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Full text of "Catalogue"

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFHCIAL PUBLICATION 



VoL 34 



MARCH, 1937 



No. 3 



Catalogue Number 



1937-1938 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



CALENDAR FOR 1937, 1938 



1937 



JULY 



sWrHWrfTFTS; 

3 



4 

11 

18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 

9 
16 
23 



10 
17 
24 
2930)31 



E 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



AUGUST 

MiTlWiT 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



8 

10 
17 
24 
81 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



::d^ 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 

28 





SEPTEMBER 


s" 


& 


T 


W 


T 


PlS" 


"5 
12 
19 
26 


1 
18 

20 
27 


1 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


8 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 



OCTOBER 

'sIMlTlWItlFT? 



8 
10 



24 
81 



4 
11 



1718 



25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



71 
14 
21 
28 



1 
8 
15 
22 
29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



NOVEMBE R 

s|Ai|t|Wlt|gT5" 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 
9 

16 
28 
30 



3 4 
1011 



17 
24 



18 
25 



5 
12 



26 



6 
13 



1920 



27 



DECEMBER 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
18 
20 



7 
14 
21 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 

9 

16 

28 



2425 
27128129 80181 



8 

10 
17 



1938 



4 
11 
18 



JANUARY 



s,tdl^|W 



2 

9 

16 



8 

10 
17 
23)24 
801811 



4 
11 
18 
25 



i 



5 
12 

19 
26 



6 
18 
20 
27 



FTS" 



7 
14 
21 
28 



Z6;» 



JULY 



"STH 



1 

8 
15 
22 

29124 
81 



8 

10 
17 



FEBRUARY 

sIMIflWIflPIS 



61 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 

21122 
28 



1 
8 
15 



2 
9 
16 
23 



8 

10 
17 



4 
11 
18 



2425 



5 
12 
19 
26 



4 

11 
18 
25 



tlWItlPIS 



51 6 
1218 



19 

26 



'—■— !»•»—> 



20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



2 
9 
15116 



1 

81 



22 
29 



28 
80 



■ffTH 



S M 



6 
13 

20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



MARCH 

W|T*|P|§ 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



AUGUST 

6 
18 
20 
27 



2 

9 

16 

28 



10 

17 
24 
80131 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



3 
10 
17 



4 
11 
18 



24125 
81 



5 
12 
19 
26 



S]M 



8 
10 

17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



i 



APRIL 



"5 



4 
11 
18 



SEPTEMBER 

MTTIW 



5 
12 
19 



25126 



6 
13 



27 



7 
14 



2021 



28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 
10 
17 
24 



5 
12 



26 



W 



6 
18 



1920 



rrrns" 



21 



L 



2728 



1 
7 8 
1415 



22 
29 



2 

9 
16 
28 
80 



OCTOBER 

■gTSfmwmT 



2 

9 

16 

23 

80 



8 

10 
17 
24 
81 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
18 
20 



7 
14 
21 



2728 



S" 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



slM 



1 

8 

15 
22 
29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

SO 



MAY 

f|W|¥|PIS 



8 
10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 



5 
12 
19 
25126 



20 

27 



6 
1814 



21 
28 



6 
18 
20 

27 



NOVEMBER 

T 



JUNE 

sIjvjItIWIt ITO" 

8 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 

18 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
26 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

81 

15 

221 

29 



W 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



5 
12 



8 

10 



24 



4 
11 



1718 



25 



19 
26 



1939 



JANUARY 



DECEMBER 



^TH 



4 

11 
18 



■U 1 25 26 



5 
12 
19 



w 



6 
13 
20 



witiPia 



7 

14 
21 



2728 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



8 

10 
17 
24 
ST 



1 

8 

15 



29 



M 



2 

9 

16 



2223 



I^IWIflPIg- 



8 
1011 



17 
24 



18 
25 



30181 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 



7 

14 

21 

27128 



1 

8 

15 

22 



21 
9 
16 
23 



29i30 



8 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



Tm 



2 
9 

16 
28 
80 



3 

10 
17 
24 



APRIL 

TIWl 



4 

11 
18 
2S 



5 

12 
19 
26 



=L 



6 
18 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



WW 



7 
14 
21 



1 

8 

16 

22 



MAY 



2 

it 

23 



17 
24 



TTF 



8 
1011 



18 



5 
12 



28I29I30I81I 



2526 



3" 



6 
13 



1920 



27 



JUNE 



'^mr 



4 
11 



25 



5 
12 



1819 



26 



6 
18 
20 
17 



WltlPIS 



71 
14 
21 



1 

8 

15 



2829 



2 

9 

16 



222824 



80 



3 
10 
17 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 
MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1937 - 1938 




Containing general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1937-1938 

and Records of 1936-1937. 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 
existing at the time of publication, March, 1937. 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



>lf> 



CALENDAR FOR 1937, 1938 



1937 



JULY 



S;M T W T F S 


1 




1 


2 


3 


4 o! *6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11112!13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19120 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 28 


29 30 

! 


31 



AUGUST 



SiM T W TIFIS 


12 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 910 


11 


12 


13 


14 


1516;17118 


19,20 


21 


22 23'24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 ...... 


— 




... . 



SEPTEMBER 

S.M|TiW|TlF|S 




1 

8 

15 



2 

9 

16 



22123 
2930 



3 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



OCTOBER 



sim:tiwit|f!s 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



12113 

19120 
26 27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T FiS 



7 
14 
21 



1 

8 
15 
22 



28129 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



DECEMBER 



SiMiT W T F S 



5 
12 

19 
26 



6 
13 

20 



7 
14 

2122 
27128129 



1 

8 
15 



3 

10 
17 
24 
30131 



2 

9 
16 
23 



4 
11 
18 
25 



1938 



JANUARY 



SiMjTiWjTIFIS 



2 3 

910 

1617 



4 
11 
18 
23 '24 25 
30131U.^| 



5 
12 
19 



6 

13 
20 



26127 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



FEBRUARY 



S|MiTiWlT|F|S 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2 
9 

16 
23 



3 

10 
17 

24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



MARCH 



SiM|TiW|T|F S 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 
22 
29 



21 3 



9 
16 
23 



10 
17 
24 



30131 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



APRIL 



SIMITIW TTFIS 



3 4 
1011 
1718 
2425 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 



I 



7 
14 

21 

27128 



15 
22 
29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



MAY 



S|M|T|WiT|F|S 



1 
8 

15 
22 



2 
9 

16 
23 



3 

10 
17 
24 



29|30|31 



4 
11 

18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



JUNE 



SiM|T|W|T|F|S 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



JULY 



SIM T 


W T F S 


l 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T W|T|F 


S 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 
9 

16 



3 

10 
17 



23 24 
30 31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



SEPTEMBER 



S|M1T|W|T|FTS 



4 
11 

18 



5 

12 
19 



25126 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 
15 
22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 
10 

17 
24 



OCTOBER 



S M TIW TIFIS 



2 
9 

16 
23 

30 



3 

10 

17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2! 3 



9 

16 
23 
30 



10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



DECEMBER 



S|M|TiW|T|F|S 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 

19 



6 

13 



7 
14 



2021 



26!27!28 



1 

8 

15 



2 
9 

16 



22! 23 



29130131 



3 

10 

17 
24 







1939 






JANUARY 


S MIT W T|F S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24125 


26 


27 


28 


29! 


30 31 

f...... 










1 










FEBRUARY 


S'MIT W T FiS 



5 
12 



6 
13 



19 20 
26127 



7 
14 

21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 

9 

16 

23 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



MARCH 



S M T W T 


F 


^ 1 









1 

8 


2 

9 


3 

10 


" 1 


5 


6 


7 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 1 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 1 


26|27 


28 


29J30 


31 


^ 1 







APRIL 






S M T|W T F 


"S 


^2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


1 

8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16117 


18 


19120 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 















MAY 



SIMITjWlTlFiS 



7 
14 
21 

28129 



1 
8 
15 
22 



3 

10 
17 
23 24 
30131 



2 
9 

16 



4 
11 
18 
25 



51 6 
12!l3 
19120 
26127 



JUNE 



S|MiT|W|T!FlS 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



13 
20 

27 



14 
21 
28 



1 
8 

15 
22 
29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



3 
10 
17 
24 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 
MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1937 - 1938 




Contitlnino uenend hifornmthn conreniwf, the Univen^Hu. 

Annouru-evunts for the Scholastic Year 19.S7-19JS 

and Records of 10!6-1937. 

Facts, comlitio„s, and versonnel herein set forth are as 

esixtin,/ at the lime of publication, March, 19.i7. 



Issued Monthly by ITie University of Maryland, CoUcce Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16. 1?94. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar 

Board of Regents ,... 

Officers of Administration 

Officers of Instruction 

Section I — General Information. 

History _ 

Administrative Organization ^ 

Princess Anne College 

Location _ _ « 



Page 

4 

7 
8 
9 
39 
39 
40 
41 
41 



Grounds and Buildings „ 41 

Admission „ 43 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 50 

Expenses -.... ^ 53 

Honors and Awards - 59 

Student Activities ~ 6 1 

Alumni _ „ „ 64 

Section II — Administrative Divisions 65 

College of Agriculture -..._ ^ 65 

Agricultural Experiment Station _ ~ 87 

Extension Service 89 

College of Arts and Sciences _ 90 

College of Education _ _ _. 114 

College of Engineering _ 133 

College of Home Economics 142 

Graduate School ~ _ 147 

Summer Session _ 156 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 157 

Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics _.... 161 

School of Dentistry _.... 162 

School of Law _ _ 171 

School of Medicine - 175 

School of Nursing _ _ 178 

School of Pharmacy - 184 

State Board of Agriculture ^. 187 

Department of Forestry _ 189 

Weather Service _ _ - 189 

Geological Survey « 190 

Section III — Description of Courses ~ :..._ 191 

(Alphabetical index of departments, p. 191) 

Section IV — Degrees, Honors, and Student Register 300 

Degrees and Certificates, 1935-1936 „ „ _ 300 

Honors, 1935-1936 _ - _ - 311 

Student Register „ „ _.... 321 

Summary of Enrollment _ > 373 

Index „ „ 375 



1937 
Sept. 16-17 
Sept. 18 

Sept. 20 

Sept. 25 

Nov. 25 

Dec. 21 

1938 
Jan. 3 
Jan. 18-26 



Jan. 10-17 
Jan. 31 



Feb. 1 
Feb. 7 

Feb. 22 
March 25 
April 14-19 

May 13-21 

May 23-June 1 
May 29 
May 30 
June 3 
June 4 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1937-1938 
COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 



Summer Term 



Thursday-Friday 
Saturday 

Monday, 8 :20 a. m. 

Saturday 

Thursday 
Tuesday, 4:10 p. m. 

Monday, 8:20 a. m. 
Tuesday- Wednesday 



Registration for freshmen. 

Upper classmen complete regis- 
tration. 

Instruction for first semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
Christmas recess begins. 

Christmas recess ends. 
First semester examinations. 



Second Semester 



Monday-Monday 
Monday 



Tuesday, 8:20 a. m. 
Monday 



Tuesday 
Friday 

Thursday, 4:10 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8 :20 a m. 

Friday-Saturday 

Monday- Wednesday 

Sunday, 11:00 a.m. 

Monday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Registration for second semester. 

Last day to complete registration 
for second semester without 
payment of late registration 
fee. 

Instruction for second semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
Observance of Maryland Day. 

Easter recess. 

Registration for first semester, 
1938-1939. 

Second semester examinations. 
Baccalaureate sermon. 
Memorial Day. Holiday. 
Class Day. 
Commencement. 



June 13-18 
June SSrji y 
Aug. •* $' 
Aug. 4-9 
Sept. 6-8 
Sept. 12-14 

Sept. 12-14 



Monday- Saturday 
Wednesday 

Thursday-Tuesday 
Tuesday-Thursday 
Monday-Wednesday 

Monday-Wednesday 



Rural Women's Short Course. 

Summer Session begins. 

Summer Session ends. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Week. 

Volunteer Firemen's Short Course. 

Sanitary Engineering Short 

Course. 
Ministers' Conference. 



BALTIMORE (PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS) 



1937 
September 13 

September 15 
September 21 



Monday 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 



September 22 Wednesday 



September 23 Thursday 



November 24 Wednesday 



November 29 

December 18 

1938 
January 3 

January 24 to 
January 29, inc. 

January 29 



Monday 
Saturday 

Monday 

Monday- 
Saturday 

Saturday 



First Semester 

♦Registration for evening students 
(LAW). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (LAW — Evening). 

♦Registration for first- and second-year 
students (DENTISTRY, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

♦Registration for all other students 
(DENTISTRY, LAW— Day, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (DENTISTRY, LAW— 
Day. MEDICINE, PHARMACY). 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the 
last scheduled period (ALL 
SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Christmas recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

♦Registration for the second semester 
(ALL SCHOOLS). 

First semester ends after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 



Second Semester 



January 31 Monday 



February 22 
April 13 

April 20 



June 4, 
11:00 a. m. 

June 15, 



Tuesday 
Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 



Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Commencement. 



Second semester ends (LAW — Even- 
ing). 



registration ^ith &Z LdedVrZ^l^r^'fL S^^^ The last day of 

instruction begins following the s^ fied ^^giSratTon neri^ ^if «^?^ week in which 
only upon the written recommendation of the d^n ) ^ ^^'^ ""^^ ""^^ ^« ^*^^^ 



Term Expires 
1945 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman _ 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary. 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 



W. Calvin Chesnut „ , 1942 

Post Office Building, Baltimore 



.1938 



William P. Cole, Jr. 



Towson, Baltimore County 



.1940 



Henry Holzapfel, Jr _ _. 

Hagerstown, Washington County 



.1943 



Harry H. Nuttle _ , 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

J. Milton Patterson „ _ 1944 

Cumberland, Allegany County 



John E. Raine. 



1939 



Towson, Baltimore County 



V^^ljl^ IVriN Lit XvlviUO _...._^.»....<...........M........._................^.....^......M..M^...>M...^ 

Catonsville, Baltimore County 



1942 



6 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station; 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Henry D. Harlax, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Law. 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
Andrew G. DuMez. Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., D.Sc, Secretary of the Baltimore Schools. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director of the 
Summer Session. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A., Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

A. J. LOMAS, M.D, D.P.H., Superintendent of the University Hospital. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 
of Nursing. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Acting Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 
W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 
Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the President. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

T. A. Hutton, A.B., Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students* Supply 
Store (College Park). 



1/ 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1936-1937 
At College Park 

PROFESSORS 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology, Dean of 

the Graduate School. 
Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
Grace Barnes, B.S., B.L.S., M.A., Librarian. 
F. W. Besley, Ph.D.', Professor of Farm Forestry, State Forester. 
L. A. Black, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist, Chairman 

of the Pre-Medical Committee. 
0. C. Bruce, M.S., Professor of Soil Technology. (On leave of absence.) 

B. E. Carmichael, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

R. W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 
H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
S. H. DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

C. G. EiCHLiN, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

W. F. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Harry Gwinner, M.E., Professor of Engineering Mathematics. 

Charles B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Malcolm Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

Homer C. House, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

K. C. IKELER, M.E., M.S., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

L. W. Ingham, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Lawrence H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng., Professor of Highway Engineering, Dean 

Emeritus of the College of Engineering. 
Morley a. Jull, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Statistics, Assistant Dean 

of the College of Agriculture. 
Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
C. L. Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Men 
T. B. Manny, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

H. B. McDonnell, M.S., M.D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
Frieda W. McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
Edna B. McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 




J. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agronomy. 

J. A. Miller, B.S., Administrative Coordinator of Practice Teaching. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management, 
^ Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

J. N. G. Nesbit, B.S., M.E., E.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Systematic Botany and Mycology. 

J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

C. J. PiERSON, A.M., Professor of Zoology. 

R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M., Professor of Animal Pathology. 

C. S. Richardson, A.M., Professor of Speech. 

A. L. Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion, Director of the Summer Session. 
J. W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, Acting Dean 
of the College of Engineering, Acting Director of Engineeiing 
Research. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro, A.B., D.Sc, Professor of Farm Management. 

C. E. Temple, M.A., Professor of Plant Pathology, State Plant Pathologist. 

A. S. Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape Gardening. 

R. V. Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquiculture. 

R. H. Waite, B.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Harry Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

S. M. Wedeberg, A.m., C.P.A., Professor of Economics and Business Admin- 
/ istration. 

Uclaribel p. Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 

LECTURERS 

0. E. Baker, Ph.D., Lecturer in Agricultural Economics. 

Richard S. Dill, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation, and Refrigeration. 
Harry R. Hall, B.S., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 
ROSCOE W. Hall, M.D., Clinical Lecturer in Psychology. 

1. A. Hyslop, M.S., Lecturer on Insect Taxonomy. 

Frank G. Kear, E.E., M.S., D.Sc, Lecturer on Electrical Communications. 

Nelson B. Lasson, LLB., PhD., Lecturer in Political Science. 

Miriam E. Oatman, PhD., Lecturer in Political Science. 

R. E. Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer on Insect Morphology. 

Charles Thom, Ph.D., Lecturer on Soil Microbiology. 

J. Franklin Yeager, Ph.C, Lecturer on Physiology of Insects. 

10 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Myron H. Berry, M.A., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

H. B. CORDNER, M.S., Associate Professor of Olericulture. 

Charles W. England, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Geary Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy, Director of Athletics. 

W. A. Frazier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture. 
\ Susan Emolyn Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

I. C. Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

L. J. HODGINS, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Carl S. Joslyn, PhD., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

C. F. Kramer, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 
w Eleanor L. Murphy, M.A., Associate Professor of Home Management. 

A. J. NiCHOL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and Business Admin- 
istration. 

N. E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Geo. D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

A. W. Richeson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (Baltimore). 

J. T. Spann, B.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Reuben Steinmeyer, PhD., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

R. P. Thomas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Technology. 

W. Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

S. W. Wentworth, B.S., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

Charles E. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

R. C. Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

R. C. Yates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Wayland S. Bailey, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Russell G. Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 
Howard Clark, 2nd, Major, Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science 

and Tactics. 
Harry G. Clowes, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Eugene B. Daniels, Ph.D., M.F.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Geo. 0. S. Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modem Languages. 
Herman G. duBuy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 
Ray Ehrensberger, A.M., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
R. T. FiTZHUGH, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
H. B. HOSHALL, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Charles H. Jones, Major, Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science and 

Tactics. 
Kate Karpeles, M.D., Physician to Women. 

11 



le 



Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Philip R. Layton, LLB., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business Administration. 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
,y^^ Jennie Lorenz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Geo. Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Chemistry. 

Monroe H. Martin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

M. a. Pyle, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

Ralph Russell, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

E. B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry (Balti- 
more) . 

Guy p. Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology (Baltimore). 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 
(Baltimore). 

Frank Ward, Capt. Inf. (D.O.L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 
^^>^Mrs. F. H. Westney, M.A., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

Arne Wikstrom, E.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Geo. F. Alrich, M.S., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 
i^^x^MARY Barton, C.D.E.F., M.A., Instructor in Education, and Critic Teacher. 

M. Thomas Bartram, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. B. Blandford, Instructor in Horticulture. 

S. 0. BURHOE, M.S., Instructor in Zoology. 

C. W. CissEL, M.A., Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. 

0. C Clark, B.S., Instructor in Physics. 
\/^ Adelaide C. Clough, M.A., Instructor in Education, and Critic Teacher. 
n^Beryl H. Dickinson, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Frank M. Dobson, Instructor in Physical Education. 
V^XAmy J. Englund, B.S., A.M., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Geo. C. Ernst. M.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

J. E. Faber, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

George W. Fogg, M.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

Gardner H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English (Baltimore). 

L. C. HuTSON, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

John E. Jacobi, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

Elizabeth Phillips James, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education for 
Women. 

Andre Liotard, B.A., B.D., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Wm. H. McManus, Warrant Officer, Instructor in Military Science and 
Tactics. 

C. D. Murphy, A.M., Instructor in English. 

C. L. NinvcoMBE, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

NiLAN Norris, Ph.D., Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. 

12 



Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modem Languages (Baltimore). 

Mblvin a. Pittman, M.S., Instructor in Physics (Baltimore). 

J, Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English (Baltimore). 

Harlan Randall, Instructor in Music. 

Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modem Languages. 

Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 

H. B. Shipley, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Arthur Silver, M.A., Instmctor in History. 

Kathleen M. Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 

W. C. SUPPLEE, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

H. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

GRANVILLE H. Triplett, A.M., Pd.M., LL.M., J.D., Instructor in Economics 

(Baltimore). 
G. J. Uhrinak, Corporal Inf., Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

F. p. Veitch, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Wm. F. Vollbrecht, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

G. S. Weiland, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Joseph C. White, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

, Helen Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Mark Woods, Ph.D., Instructor in Plant Physiology. 
Leland G. Worthington, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Education. 

ASSISTANTS 

' Elizabeth Abbiati, B.A., Assistant in Speech. 
G. J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant in Entomology. 
ROLFE L. Allen, M. A., Assistant in History. 
Cecil R. Ball, M.A., Assistant in English. 
Jean Barzhe, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Jessie Blaisdell, Assistant in Music. 
Jack Y. Bryan, M.A., Assistant in English. 
Spencer Chase, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Weston R. Clark, M.A., Assistant in Psychology. 
L. P. Ditman, Ph.D., Assistant in Entomology. 

Nathan Gammon, B.S., Assistant in Agronomy. 

Arthur M. Gibson, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry (Baltimore). 

L. B. Golden, B.S., Assistant in Agronomy. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Assistant in Agricultural Economics. 

Hugh A, Heller, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Donald Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 

Frank T. Hoadley, B.A., Assistant in English. 

Lawrence R. Holmes, B.S., Assistant in English. 

Charles D. Howell, A.B., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 

Frances Ide, M.A., Assistant in English. 

BURRIDGE Jennings, B.S., Assistant in Physics (Baltimore). 

L. J. KiLBY, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 

Audrey Killiam, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

18 



U 



I 



Hyman N. Laden, B.A., Assistant in Mathematics. 

George F. Madigan, M.S., Assistant in Agronomy. 

Mary Jane McCurdy, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

Panos Morphopoulos, Ph.D., Assistant in Modern Languages (Baltimore^ 

WILLIAM K. Morrill, Ph.D., Assistant in Mathematics ^^^'''^^re), 

^Leona S. Morris, A.B., Assistant in History. 
I^^Mabel L Morris, A.M., Assistant in Mathematics. 
^^, Carroll Nash, B.S., Assistant in Water Products 

Bernice PiERSON, A.B., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 
t^ Mabel Platz, Ph.D., Assistant in English. 

iTZl r* Qf"' ^'^'^" t^"^^^^"^ ^^ Economics and Business Administration 
ANDRE C. SiMONPiETRi, Ph.D., Assistant in Modem Languages. 
George L. Sixbey, M.A., Assistant in English. 
^//IVIiLixRED Skinner, A.B., Assistant in English. 
William D. Stull, M.S., Assistant in Zoology 
W. R. Teeter, B.S., D.V.M., Assistant in Animal Pathology. 
C. J. Wittler, M. a.. Assistant in Sociology. 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

1936-1937 

Earl Anderson „ „ Botany 

David H. Baldwin, Jr Chemistry 

Homer W. Carhart Chemistry 

Alaric a. Evangelist Modern Languages 

Henrietta Goodner „.. Modern Languages 

C. W. HiTZ „ Horticulture 

Alfred D. Hoadley > Agronomy 

William A. Horne Chemistry 

Frank L, Hov^^ard „ Chemistry 

J. R. Ives - „ Agricultural Economics 

William S. James _ Entomology 

Lewis P. MoCann _ Botany 

Michael Pelczar _ Bacteriology 

P. R. Poffenberger _ ...Agricultural Economics 

G. B. Reynard _ „ ...Botany ( Plant Pathology) 

H. G. Shirk Botany (Plant Physiology) 

Marvin L. Speck „ Bacteriology 

H. L. Stier - Horticulture 

Edwin G. Stimpson Chemistry 

Viola C. Teeter - Home Economics 

N. R. Urquhart Agricultural Economics 

Walter R. Volckhausen Mathematics 

Paschal P. Zapponi Chemistry 



14 



15 



m 



FELLOWS 

1936-1937 

John M. Bellows, Jr Botany 

Paul S. Brooks » - Chemistry 

Arthur Buddington _ Entomology 

Mary Ruth Cross Foods and Nutrition 

Henry G. Ingersoll Chemistry 

Walter C. Jacob Horticulture 

Herman F. Kraybill Chemistry 

Charles S. Lowe _ Chemistry 

Elmer L. Mayer *. „ Entomology 

Elizabeth McFarland Education 

R. A. Olson Plant Physiology 

Alfred B. Raby _ -..Agricultural Economics 

Leonard Smith _ „ Chemistry 

Elsie M. Sockrider Bacteriology 

John H. Spangler _ - Chemistry 

William A. Stanton Chemistry 

Albert H. Tillson Botany 

Edmund H. Umberger. „ Mathematics 

John K. Wolfe - Chemistry 

LIBRARY STAFF (College Park) 

Grace Barnes, B.S., B.L.S., M.A Librarian 

George W. Fogg, M.A — — Reference and Loan Librarian 

Alma Hook, B.S _ „ Head Cataloguer 

Louise W. Getchell, B.A., B.S. in L.S Cataloguer 

Kate White — „ Assistant 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

(Feeds, Fertilizer, and Lime) 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D „ _ State Chemist 

L. E. BoPST, B.S _ „ Associate State Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson, M.S Chief Inspector 

W. J. FooTEN Inspector 

E. M. Zentz ....._ Inspector 

H. R. Walls _ Assistant Chemist and Micro-analyst 

L. H. Van Wormer Assistant Chemist 

R. E. Baumgardner, B.S „ „ Assistant Chemist 

Albert Heagy, B.S „.... Assistant Chemist 

W. C. SuPPLEE, Ph.D Assistant Chemist 

16 



BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



Row- 
Dean 
Dean 
Miss 
Hale, 



THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Dean Patterson, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro Dean 
'"trd KHowell. Dean DuMez Dr. Heatwole Dean Rob™ 
Small, Dean Mount. Dean Appleman Acting Dean Sternberg 
Stamp, Colonel Patch, Dr. Lomas, Dr. Kemp, Mr. Hillegeist, 
PreSert, Miss Kellar, Professor Metzger, Dr. Broughton, Dr. 
Dr. Manny, Dr. White, Dr. Welsh, Professor Ikeler. 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY, STANDARDS, AND COORDINATION 

Dr Warfel, Chairman; Dr. DeVault, Dr. Broughton. P-f-^"^ Metzger 
Dr White, Dr. Dantzig, Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Cotterman Dr. Truit^ Dr. 
Bamford, Professor Steinberg, Dr. Gaver, Dr. Jenkms, Dr. Wyhe. 
Professor Strahorn, Professor Ikeler. 

STUDENT LIFE 



Miss Ide, Dr. Cotterman. "O.'vi ■'lo^a^d 

THE LIBRARIES 

Dr Hale Chairman; Dr. Long, Dr. Crothers, Dr. Haring Dr. Bamford, 
Mrs!' Welsh, Dr. Anderson, Dr. Spencer, Professor Strahorn. 

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Dr. Manny. Chairman; Dr. Kemp, Dr. White, Professor Quigley. Mrs. 
McFarland, Professor Eppley. 

ADMISSION, GUIDANCE, AND ADJUSTMENT 

Dr. Long. Chairman; Dr. White, Dr. »«. Professor PyleDr^^^^^^^^^ 
meyer. Dr. Crothers, Professor Ingham, Dr. Hale, Protessor ^juig y. 
Dr. Sprowls. • 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 
Professor Metzger. Chairman; Dr. Cotterman, Professor Eichlin, Dean 
Stamp. Professor Eppley. Dean Mount. 

17 



RESEAKCH 

EXTENSION EDUCATION 
Mr. OswaW Chairman; Miss Kellar, Dr. Manny, Dr. Crothers, Dr. DeVault 
WarfS ''"' """ '''''' ^^^" ^'"^"' P-f--^ Ri^hardfon dJ: 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS, NON-RESIDENT LECTURES AND 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

^'' MrBon.f^n^"r'"= ^'- ^"^^"^°"' P^«f^^«°^ Richardson, Dr Welsh 

De^n Stamn 'n V- ^t'^'^'' ""'■ S^^^^' ^r- Pollock, Dr. Be W 
i^ean btamp. Dean Mount, Dean DuMez. ^esiey, 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 



"'■ SZX: ^""" """-"' '"'-«<'■»"• '>'■ 



Cory, Professor 



UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 



COOEDINATION OF AGEICULTUEAL ACTIVITIES 

GENERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 
Oswald, Dr. Broughton, Mr Sn^deJ' ^' ^ ''"' ^'''^^"' ^^• 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



Harry J. Patterson, D.Sc. 



Director 



Agricidtural Economics : 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D Agricultural Economist 

W. Paul Walker, M.S -» Associate Agricultural Economist 

Ralph Russell, M.S _ Assistant Agricultural Economist 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S Assistant Agricultural Economist 

Roger F. Burdette, M.S , Assistant Agricultural Economist 



Agricultural Engineering : 
R. W. Cabpenter, A.B., LL.B.. 



.Agricultural Engineer 



Agronomy (Crops and Soils) : 

tJ. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A _ Agronomist 

*W. B. Kemp, Ph.D „ Geneticist 

G. Eppley, M.S „ Associate Agronomist (Crops) 

R. P. Thomas, Ph.D - - Soil Technologist 

**0. C. Bruce, M.S _ _ „.._ - Associate Soil Technologist 

R. G. Rothgeb, Ph.D Associate Geneticist (Plant Breeding) 

Geo. F. Madigan, M.S - Assistant in Soils 

E. H. Schmidt, M.S .7. ^ Assistant in Soils 

H. B. WiNANT, M.S „ _.... Assistant in Soils 

R. L. Sbllman, B.S > Assistant in Agronomy, Supt. of Station Farm 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry : 

K. C. Ikeler, M.E., M.S Animal and Dairy Husbandman 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Animal and Dairy Husbandman 

B. E. Carmichael, M.S. Animal Husbandman 

L. W. Ingham, M.S Dairy Husbandman 

M. H. Berry, M.S ^ Associate Dairy Husbandman 

Charles W. England, Ph.D. Associate Dairy Husbandman (Manufacturing) 
Geo. B. Hughes, B.S Assistant Dairy Husbandman (Manufacturing) 

C. M. Mecham, M.S Assistant Dairy Husbandman (Inspection) 

Keith G. Acker, M.S _ Assistant Animal Husbandman 

Animal Bacteriology and Pathology : 

Mark Welsh, D.V.M State Veterinarian 

R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M Animal Pathologist 

A. L. Brueckner, B.S., D.V.M - Animal Pathologist 

L. J. Poelma, D.V.M., M.S Assistant Animal Pathologist 

H. M. DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Poultry) 

C. L. Everson, D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Baltimore) 

C. R. Davis, M.S., D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Poultry) 



18 



t Assistant Director of Experiment Station. 
♦ Assistant Dean, College of Agriculture. 
** On leave of absence, State Soil Conservation (Erosion). 

19 



h, H. James, Ph.D , 

A. L. Black, Ph.D I Z~ " '*""' Bacteriologist 

M. T. Bartram, M.S. " Bacteriologist 

J. E. Faber, M.S 11... " " Assistant Bacteriologist 

I. M. MouLTHROP, D.V M A "eo;7r'~'r7 ■".* f^^^^^^^^^ Bacteriologist 

W. R. TE^HiB, B.S., DVM ""' ^^'"^^^ Pathologist (Poultry) 

^ , „ Assistant Animal Pathologist 

Botany, Pathology, Physiology: 

*C. O. Appleman, Ph.D ^ p. „. pu . 1 . 

J. B. S. Norton, M S D Sc i'liysiologist and Botanist 

C. E. Temple, M.S.....1.....1.. ^^^^^ Pathologist 

R. A. Jehle, Ph.D Plant Pathologist 

Ronald Bampord, Ph.D7~ Associate Plant Pathologist 

Russell G. Brown, Ph.D. '" Associate Botanist 

Herman G. duBuy' Ph^D ~ "* Assistant Physiologist 

Mark Woods, Ph.D ~ Assistant Physiologist 

„ ^ , ** - Assistant Pathologist 

J^ntomology: 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D._ 

H. S. McConnell, B S Entomologist 

Geo. S. Langford, Ph d"* "' "* Associate Entomologist 

L. P. DiTMAN, Ph.D Associate Entomologist 

C. Graham, M. S............ " " Assistant Entomologist 

Geo. Abrams, m! 8.11 Assistant Entomologist 

__ . " Assistant Entomologist 

Horticulture : 

A. L. SCHRADEK, Ph.D TT^^. ,^ .\ , 

T. H. White, M.S " -^Horticulturist and Pomologist 

S. W. Wentworth, "bTs ^lericulturist and Floriculturist 

F. B. Lincoln, Ph D 'nZ'^ 7'"^ T Associate Pomologist 

W. A. Frazier Ph D A ''^^ Pomologist (Plant Propagation) 

J. B. BLANDPO^. Aisi;nu^^^^^^^^ Olericulturist (Canning Crops 

I. C. HAUT, Ph.D. ""'"''^^^ ^^ Horticulture, Supt. of Horticultural Farm 

„ , '" - --Associate Pomologist 

Poultry Husbandry : 

M. A. JuLL, Ph.D. 

R. H. Waite, B.S " Poultry Husbandman 

Geo. D. Quigley B S ' " : """ ~ ^^^^^Y Husbandman 

' - Associate Poultry Husbandman 

Ridgely Sub-Station: 

Albert White, B.S 

' - -•" 

Seed Inspection: 

F. S. Holmes, B.S _ _. 

Ellen Emack ; ^^^^ Inspector 

Olive Kelk ZI " ***" Assistant Seed Analyst 

Elizabeth Shank *ZII " ^^^^^^^"^ Seed Analyst 

— - - Assistant 



Superintendent 



• Dean of Graduate SchooL 



20 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
(College Park) 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr -. Director 

E. I. Oswald, B.S County Agent Leader 

Venia M. Kellar, B.S State Home Demonstration Agent 

P. E. Nystrom, M.S., 

Assistant County Agent Leader, and Specialist in Farm Management 

E. G. Jenkins. State Boys' Club Agent 

Dorothy Emerson „ _. State Girls* Club Agent 

Florence H. Mason, B.S., 

District Home Demonstration Agent, and Specialist in Home Famishing 

K. Grace Connolly Administrative Assistant 

0. R. Carrington, B.A Assistant Editor 

SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 
(Headquarters College Park) 

W. R. Ballard, B.S. Vegetable and Landscape Gardening 

H. C. Barker, B.S Dairying (Advanced Registry Testing) 

R. W, Carpenter, A.B., LL.B ^ » Agricultural Engineering 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D. ^..Entomology and Apiculture 

Jessie D. Hinton, M.S „ > Home Management 

K. C. Ikeler, Ph.D „ „ _ Dairy and Animal Husbandry 

Xv. ^x. fi\j\A.\j5^y jrn.xJ. .~..........». ....>.........................«,. ..............................~. X lanL x atuoiogy 

E. C. Jenkins, M.S Soil Conservation 

M. A. JuLL, Ph.D - Poultry Husbandry 

A. V. Krewatch, M.S., E.E Rural Electrification 

vx. k). XjANGFORD, Jl n. ly • ».~ — ...~.... — — ............xnsec u v^ontroi 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S Nutrition 

T. B. Manny, Ph.D Rural Sociology 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D ~ Animal Husbandry 

F. W. Oldenburg, B.S - Agronomy 

W. B. Posey, B.S - Tobacco 

P. A. Raper, B.S Poultry Certification and Marketing 

21 



^. 



C. S. Richardson, A.M Educational Extension 

S. B. Shaw, B.S _ Marketing; and Chief, State Department of Markets 

Helen Shelby, M.A. _ _ Clothing 

M. M. Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D Landscape Gardening 

W. W. SiMONDS, M.F ^ .-...- Forestry 

C. E. Temple, M.A - - Plant Pathology 

J. M. Vial, B.S - Animal Husbandry 

A. F. ViERHELLER, M.S .„ Horticulture 

E. P. Walls, Ph.D Marketing and Canning Crops 

C. F. WiNSLOW, A.B., M.F -._ - Forestry 

ASSISTANT SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 

(Headquarters College Park) 

G. J. Abrams, M.S - .-.- - _ ^ Apiculture 

L. E . Downey, B.S Marketing 

H. A. Edge, M.S Farm Management and Statistics 

Castillo Graham, M.S -... Entomology 

W. E. Harrison _ > _ ».. Marketing 

H. J. TwiLLEY, B.S Marketing 

COUNTY AGENTS 
(Field) 

County Name Headqtuirters 

Allegany > _.R. F. McHenry, B.S »... - Cumberland 

Anne Arundel S. E. Day, B.S - ......Annapolis 

Baltimore H. B. DERRICK, B.S ^ Towson 

Calvert. _.... John B. Morsell, B.S Prince Frederick 

Caroline _ ._ ...G. W. Clbndaniel, B.S Denton 

Carroll X. C. Burns, B.S ^ Westminster 

Cecil „J. Z. Miller, B.S Elkton 

Charles Paul D. Brown, B.S La Plata 

Dorchester „.Wm. R. McKnight, B.S - Cambridge 

Frederick. H. R. Shoemaker, B.S., M.A —. Frederick 

Garrett. John H. Carter, B.S _ Oakland 

Harford _ H. M. Carroll, B.S _.„ JBel Air 

Howard E. K. Ramsburg, B.S ^ ^ Ellicott City 

Kent..... -. James D. McVean, B. S Chestertown 

Montgomery 0. W. Anderson, M.S Rockville 

Prince Georges P. E. Clark, B.S Upper Marlboro 

Queen Annes K. W. Baker, B.S ~ ~ Centreville 

22 



St. Marys J- J- Johnson 

Somerset C. Z. Keller, B.S 

Talbot - ^' S. brown, B.S 



Leonardtown 

Princess Anne 

Easton 



-. „ Hagerstown 

Washington M. D. MooRE, MS ^ galisburj 

Wicomico J. P- B«o^N' ^-^ " 

Worcester R. T. Gkant. B.S -- 



..Snow Hill 



Assistant County Agents 



Allegany, Garret, 
and Washington H. W. Bbxjgs, B.S. . 

Baltimore J- W. Ensor, B.S 

Harford. W. G. Myeks, B.S 



.....Cumberland 

Towson 

Bel Air 



Chestertown 
STANLEY Sutton Kockville 

A. A. ADY, B.S - 



Kent....- 

Montgomery 

Talbot, Dorchester, 

Caroline, and Easton 

Queen Annes Charles Fuller 

Local Agents— Negro Work 

Seat Pleasant 

Southern Md J. F. Armstrong -^ .Princess Anne 

Eastern Shore L. H. Martin 

COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

(Field) 

Headquarters 

County ^^^ Cumberland 

Maude A. Bean - 

Allegany --- -Mauuk. Annapolis 

Anne Arundel Mrs. G. Linthicum B.S....- ^^^^^^ 

Baltimore Anna T^entham, B.S. ^ — ^ ^^^^^^.^^ 

Calvert ---Anoela M. Feiser, B.S.. ^^^^^ 

Caroline ^^"" "^'CZ^ M A -Il^estminster 

Carroll A^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^'^^ f '^ Elkton 

Cecil GERTRUDE DENNING, B.A ^^ ^^^^^ 

Charles Mary Graham ^-^ :cambridge 

Dorchester -Hattie E. Brooks, A.B.. --- - ^^^^^^.^^ 

Frederick FLORENCE E. Williams, B.S ^^^^^^^ 

Garrett...... Mildred Barton, B.S^..^ - ^^^ ^^ 

Harford ^^^^^^^ TTIn A B .lEnicott City 

Howard ^ Martha E. Manahan, A.B 



^^^^ Helen N. Schellinger. 

23 



Chestertown 






I 



Montgomery Edythe M. Turner Rockville 

Prince Georges Ethel M. Regan Hyattsville 

Queen Annes Isabel D. Bewick, B.S Centreville 

St. Marys ..^ Ethel Joy, A.B „ Leonardtown 

Somerset Hilda Topfer, B.S ~ Princess Anne 

Talbot Margaret Smith, B.S Easton 

Washington > Ardath Martin, B.S Hagerstown 

Wicomico Gertrude M. Cookinham, B.S Salisbury 

Worcester LucY J. Walter Snow Hill 



Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 



-Cumberland 



Allegany MARGARET T. LOAR - „.„ 

Baltimore and 

Harford _ ^.Elizabeth R. Johnson, B. S Towson 

Carroll, Frederick, 

and Montgomery...JuDiTH Ault Frederick 

Local Home Demonstration Agents — Negro Work 

Somerset Justine N. Clark Princess Anne 

Charles, St. Marys, 

andPrince 

Georges Arminta J. Dixon 1117 Columbia Rd., N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



24 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1936-1937 

At Baltimore 

PROFESSORS 

r. n «2 F A C D Professor of Comparative Dental 
George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.o.u., rroie 

Anatomy and O^^^^^^*^^' Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
CHARi^sBAGi^, JR. A^.,M.D.,Pr^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ g^^^^^y 

PftRERT P Bay, M.D., F.A.C.h., rroiessor ui ,..J. 
TLntistrv) • Professor of Oral Surgery (Medicme). 
(Dentistry) , rroi professor of Clinical Medicine. 

lUEVEV VSi AI? M Dr^rofessor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
CHARLES F. Blake, a.m., m.L/., 

A.rcS.O., K.N.. Superintendent of Nurses. Director of the School of 
J F^Ki'SouCH. M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 
^.yTR CvLBKBrrH. A.M.. Ph.G.. M.D.. Professor Emeritus of Botany 

and Materia Medica. 
^ „. T T>»vi<5 M D Professor of Anatomy. 
Gael L. Davis. »1-^;' ^^"^ Professor of Anesthesia. 
S. GRIFFITH DAVIS. M.S., M.D., Professor ^^ ^ Exodontia (Den- 

BRICE M. DORSEY, D.D.S.. Professor of Anesthesia ana 

tistrv>- Professor of Exodontia (Medicme). 
L. H. SgUs. M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

of Pharmacy. , ^ Traumatic Surgery. 

Page Edmunds. M.D.. i^oiessor oi ii«i r,i„:»j,i qureerv 
Charles Reid Edwards. M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

CHILES G. EiCHLiN, A.B.. M.^, ^'-^--V^Srp'ediatrics. 

EDOAR l/^^rA^U^'frZ:^ 'Ertr:lTphthalmology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.U., ^^°J Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A^B ^.^^ ™;"^^„3 „f Gynecology. 

WILLIAM S. GABDN^. M.D., Profes^r Em ^^^^^^^^^ ,„, Physiology 

OREN H. GAVER. D;D.S r.A.C.D Fro ^^^.^.^^ ^^^ pj^y^^^^i 

Joseph E. Gichner. M.D.. froiessor 

A T^'aitLirM? Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Ikdr^w C gS. A.M.. M.D.. LL.D.. Professor of Neurology. 



I 



k 



W^l^rJ- S'*^^^"^^'^' Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Fkank W. HACHi^L, M.D., Professor of Bacteriologf 
HO.. H..^. a U.^., A.M.. LL.B., LL.D., Deaf Emeritus of the Schoo, 

F. L. W,;o^s:^^i:^roSor"^^^^^^^ ^-«-- 

C. LOEINO JosUN. M.D., Professor of Pediatrics 

JOHN C. Kkantz, jr., Ph.D., Professor of Phamac"E 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of GastrEnSolo^ 

EDWARD A. LOOM D D o'nh rf "?' *'" ''"'"^"•*^ "°^P"-'- 
Throat. ' °P''-' P^°fe«sor of Diseases of the Nose and 

FRANK S LYNN, M.D.. Professor of Clinical Surgery 
Alexius McGlannan AM Mr. t t r> '^""sefy. 
Robert L. Mitche,! Phar n m" n ^^^ T''°^^''°^ «f Surgery. 

ology "*"*''''="" P^"-^-' M. D., Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 

":nrzLZT:L''h '';r iiTr i «— ^"^-logy. 

Medicine. ' ' ^^•^•' ^^-o^essor of the History of 

Alexander H. Paterson, D.D S F a r n p,.«*„ 

and Prosthetic Dentistry ^ ^ ' ^'''^'''°'" "^ ^'■°^" ^""^ B^-i^g^. 

C. J. PiERsoN, A.M., Professor of Zoology 
Maurice C. Pinoopts. B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine 

Wadov Tiyr T> ^ ' i^i^.i5., J.b.D., Professor of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland MD^^niTT^n^ 

ths School ot Mrf"'; ■■ ■' ^'■"''•'""» ■" OI«*W«, De.„ ot 

LT.™ ?• =*■ ""'"• »•*■• '■'•^■- f '"''»" of Law. 

2e 



Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D., Professor of Law. 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.C, Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 

W. H. TOULSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S., Professor of Periodontia. 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr. P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Health. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and 

Laryngology. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
J. Carlton Wolf, B.S., Phar.D., Sc.D., Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. MoFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Thomas R. Chambexis, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Associate Professor of Economics and 

Pharmaceutical Law. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery, and Associate in 

Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
0. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Histology. 
Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

C. G. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
R. W. LOCHER, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine and Instructor 

in Pathology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
Clyde N. Marvel, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

27 



If 



'} 



Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

N. E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral 

Surgery (Medicine); Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry). 
A. W. RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Walter S. Root, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Helen E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 
Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Embryology 

and Histology. 
Marvin J. Andrews, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy. 
Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 
Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Arthur H. Bryan, V.M.D., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
A. H. Finklestein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology, and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Orville C. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and 

Bridge. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George C. Karn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Radiodontia. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Operative 

Dentistry. 
John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
MiLFORD Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

28 



H W Neweslj., M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

M. a™der Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and 

Instructor in Pathology. -o^iA^- 

WALTER L. OGGESEN, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Crown and Bradge. 
Robert H. Oster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
H R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J ' G M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
EUSSELL R. RENO, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law 
EMIL G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
FREDERICK Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
JOSEPH C. SOLOMON, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of ^^vf^^}^-^ 

EDGAR B. STARKEY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

GEORGE A. STRAUSS, JR., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

VESTA L. SWARTZ, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

GUY P THOMPSON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

JOHN H. TRABAND, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

E. G. VANDEN BOSCHE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorgamc and Physi- 

cal Chemistry. i. t> j-i. i «^r 

C GARDNER WARNER, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology, 
j' Herbert Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
R G Willse, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
THOMAS C. Wolff, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine 
LAWRENCE F. Woo'lley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychmtry. 
Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

LECTURERS 

T„ A B PVi D LL B.. Lecturer on Testamentary Law. 
ALHiED BAGBY, JR., ^•fl^^.V-'T^phD Lecturer on Carriers and Public 
J. Wallace Bryan, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., lecturer u 

Utilities, and Pleading. 
HUNTINGTON ^^--/'^^L.B. Lecturer onTaxa^^^^^ Bibliography. 
JAMES T. CARTER, A.B., LL.B. Ph.D.. Lecturer on g ^ ^^^^^ 

HON W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on reaer^i 

WALTER L. CLARK, LL.B., Lecturer on Evidence. 

vvAL,iz/iv xj. ^ AT5AHTTTPI Trf>cturer on Contracts. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, A.B., A.M., ll.b., ^^cxurei ui 

HON. ELI FRANK, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

17' T! Trpfman M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. . „ ,, , 

?,HAS S^WAU,, A.B., M.D., L«t.r.r » Ophlh.lm.c Pathology. 
CHARLK, E. GOLD8B0.0U™. M.D., U«««r m M.d.cme 

rrLr«^^":D"!Msrsi°Lr="o'"S..„»«..™d».., 

K,c„r rL2fJ.'tiT Sei on 0„, H,^.» a„. P..v»t,ve 

T0HT??McFALL, A.B., M.A., LLB., Lecturer on Insurance 

JOHN ^'J^^f^^^* TTi -R r T MA LL.B., Lecturer on Admiralty. 

Emory H. Niles, A.B., B.O.L., m.a., uu.o-, ^ 

29 






G. R^DGELY Sappington, LL.B., Lecturer on Practice; Director of Practice 

William H TRiPLErrr, M.D., Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis (Dentistry). 
Assistant m Medicine (Medicine) v dentistry), 

R. Dorset Watkins, A.B., Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

ASSOCIATES 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
H. F. BoNGARDT, M.D., Associate in Surgery 

rScf * ^"""^^ "'•''•' ^"'"^'^'^ '^ Gynecology and Assistant in Ob- 
?' Nelson cL^'m' n T"'' ^" ''''^^^"^' ""^ ^^^^-^ - Bacteriology. 

Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine ^^rgeiy. 

Francis Elus, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 
Samuel S. Guck, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 
Albert E Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
^t^^"^]^-^^^^^^^^^ A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology 
Henry F. Grapt A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology.^"^' 
L. P. GUNDRY, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

^nX.^'rr^^'^''' ^'^'^ ^•^•' Associate in Obstetrics. 

Sf T. ;x^'^^''^'^ ^•^•' Associate in Gynecology. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 

Josa>H L Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

JOHN F. LUTZ, A.B., M.D., Associate in Histology. 

'^' ?wr ^^^'^''''^' ^•^•' ^^^^^^^ ^^ diseases of the Nose and 

Waltor C. Merkle, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology 

L. J. Mn.LAN, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

and Assistant m Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 

30 



Chester L. Reynolds, B.M., M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
L 0. RiDGLEY, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
ISADORE A. SiEGEL, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery (Medicine) ; and Lec- 
turer on Oncology (Dentistry). 
William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instmctor in Pathology. 

William V. Adair, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Assistant 
in Pathology. 

John A. Askin, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Jose Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Balthis a. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

Samuel H. Bryant, A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Den- 
tistry. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. Howard Burns, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. Paul Bye2RLY, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics, and Assistant in Medicine. 

C. Jelleff Carr, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Morris E. Coberth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery. 

Thomas J. Coonan, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. A. H. Councill, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Charles C. Coward, B.S., D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

David C. Danforth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 

S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Edward €. Dobbs, D.D.S., Instructor in Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and 
Therapeutics. 

Stanley H. Dosh, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 

E, S. Edlavitch, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia and Technics. 

WiLUAM Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

William L. Fearing, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Luther W. Fetter, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

31 



I 



^. 



Gardner P. H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Joseph D. Fusco, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia. 

William R. Gekaghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and 

Pathology, and Assistant in Surgery. e, t i<x 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Georgiana S. GITTINGER, M.A., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Diagnostician. 
Karl P. Grempler, D.D.S., Instructor in Operative Technics. 
WILLIAM E Hahn, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia (Dentistry) • 

Instructor m Exodontia (Medicine). 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Anatm^'^''' ^^" ^'^' ^■^•^•' ^°^*"'*=*°'- ^^ Comparative Dental 
Samuel T. Helms. M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Sur- 

R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery 

fxVf I- ^^''''^' ^•^•^•' I^«t^^<^tor in Clinical Periodontia. 
LiLLiE R. Hoke, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

y vlM.'Tun ' ^'\^^'^^^^0T in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Z Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

o'letScs""' ^•'•' '''''" '^^^^"^*^^ '^ Histologf and Assistant in 
Frank Hurst, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics 
John M. Hyson, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Patholo^ 
Conrad L. Inman, D.D.S., Instructor in Anesthesia. 
W R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 
HAMMOND L. Johnston, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia 
M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Ernest Levi, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 
J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery 
G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 

IVANTMrnn?^'^^^^^^ ^-^-^-^ '"^'^^^^^^ ^^ ^'"-'^^ Radiodontia. 
Ivan E. McDougle, Ph.D., Instructor in Social Sciences. 

C. Paul Miller, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Dentistry 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology 

Panos P. M0RPH0P0Ui/)s, Ph.D., Instructor in Modern Languages 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

JOSEPH T. Nelson, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

Ernest B. Nuttall. D.D.S., Instructor in Ceramics 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 

32 



Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B., Instructor in Physiology. 

Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

George J. Phillips, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 

Melvin a. Pittman, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Samuel P. Platt, Instructor in Technical Drawing. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 

W. Arthur Purdum, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy. 

J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English. 

James E. Pyott, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 

Herbert E. Reifschneider, A.B., M.D., Instructor in General Anesthesia. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neural Anatomy and Pe- 
diatrics and Assistant in Pathology. 

Nathan Scherr, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

Daniel E. Shehan, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy and As- 
sistant in Surgery. 

Frank J. Slama, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Instructor in Botany. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Harry Allen Teitelbaum, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

David Tanner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Robert B. Towill, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

M. G. TuLL, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

B. Sargent Wells, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

John W. Wolf, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 

L. Edward Wojnarowski, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

ASSISTANTS 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 

Nurses and Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 
EsTELLA Baldwin, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing and 

Supervisor of Pediatric Department. 
Beatrice Bamberger, M/D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Frank A. Bellman, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
J. G. Benesuns, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 






Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology 
Dudley P. Bowe, A.B.. M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Simon H. Bracer, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Bernice Brittain, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Ruth Broadbelt, Instructor in Lettering. 

fZ'r t ^"^^'^«' D-^-S-. Assistant in Embryology and Histology. 
V,J!^'^^;:J£S;^^^-- ^" Nursing Private Patients and 

Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

Ethel Chaney, R.N., Supervisor. Out-Patients' Department 

BEVERLY C. COMPTON, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology 

Eugene Covington, M.D., Assistant in Gross Anatomy 

"^«r„t^ss,f ixirnr '" '-■"' '^ "" ^-"- °' 

JOHN M. Cross, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

Margaret Currens, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Clinical Nursing and 
Supervisor of Clinical Department. riuvsing and 

""TheSr ''''^'''^^ ^•'' '" '^'"•' ""•'•' ^""'^"' '" Pharmaceutical 

E. HoLLiSTER Davis. A.B, M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia 

W. ALLEN Deckert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics, and Gynecology 

Ameua C. DeDominicis, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Botany 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Oncology 

MELVIN F. W. Dunker, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Mary Emory, R.N., Night Supervisor. 

P^EDA FAZENBAKER, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Nursing and 
Supervisor of Surgical Wards. ^^ursmg ana 

S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Phiup D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carroll P. Foster, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Richard France, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Robert W. Garis, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

JAMES R. Gibbons, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Arthur M. Gibson, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

34 



L. Gilbert, Jr., B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

George Govatos, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Maurice Hardin, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical Nursing and Super- 
visor of Medical Wards. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Gustav Highstein, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical 

Supplies, and Supervisor of Central Supply Room. 
Ann Hoke, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, and Supervisor of Wards. 
John V. Hopkins, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Charleis D. Howell, A.B., Assistant in Zoology. 
Harry C. Hull, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 
William H. Hunt, Ph.G., M.S., Assistant in Pharmacology. 
James A. Jarvis, A.B., B.S., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
B. Jennings, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Physics and Obstetrics. 
Marius p. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology and Obstetrics. 
Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 
H. Alvan Jones, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Lauriston L. Keown, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Winifred Keyes, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology. 
Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 
Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
H. Edmund Levin, B. S., M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Nathan Levin, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
L H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Birkhead McGowan., M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat, 
and Otology. 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William N. MoFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Bernard P. MoNamara, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

35 



Julius Messina, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Howard Anthony Miller, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Sylvia Millett, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Economics. 

DwiGHT MoHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

William K. Morrill, Ph.D., Assistant in Mathematics. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics, and Gyne- 
cology. 

E. L. Mortimer, Jr., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Thomas A. Moskey, Jr., B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Bernice F. Pierson, M.S., Assistant in Zoology. 

H. Wiluam Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Ga stro- Enter ology. 

Samuel E. Proctor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

RoBB V. Rice, B.A., B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D., Assistant in Oncology. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Obstetrics. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Richard T. Shackelford, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

M. S. Shiling, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Emanuel V. Shulman, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Assistant in Botany, 

Sol Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Jerome Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

0. Walter Spurrier, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Helen M. Stedman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Obstetrical Nursing, and 

Supervisor of Obstetrical Department. 
Robert B. Taylor, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

1. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 



henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Edith Walton, Instructor in Massage. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. E. Wilson, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Charles A. Youch, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 



86 



37 



SECTION I 
General Information 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

At Baltimore 

LIBRARY 

^""talTr ?'''T ^^^^^^^> Wylie, and Love, Jr.; (Dentistry) Doctors 
Srrtun/ r ^"^T^^ """'"^^ (Pharmacy) Dean DuMez, Messrs. 
Sorn Thompson, and Slama; (Law) Messrs. Ritchie and 

The Faculty Councils of the Baltimore Schools are included in the de- 
scriptive statements of the respective schools in Section IL 

The Faculty Committees of the Baltimore Schools are given in the 
separate announcements issued by the several schools. 



*l 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The history of the present University of Maryland, before the merger in 
1920, is the history of two institutions: the old University of Maryland in 
Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) in College Park. 

The beginning of this history was in 1807, when a charter was granted 
to the College of Medicine of Maryland. The first class was graduated in 
1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of 
the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest struc- 
ture in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, 
and arts and sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or 
faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the name and 
imder the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a reg- 
ular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently there were added 
a college of dentistry, a school of pharmacy, and a school of nursing. No 
significant change in the organization of the University occurred until 1920, 
more than one hundred years after the original establishment in 1812. 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 
in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over en- 



38 



tirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the 'College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the name of the latter 
was changed to the University of Maryland. 

All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. The University is co-educational in all its 
branches. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University Senate and the Administrative Council act in an advisory 
capacity to the President. The composition of these bodies is given else- 
where. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Extension Service. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. 

Summer Session. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Law. 

School of Medicine. 

School of Nursing. 

School of Pharmacy. 

The University Hospital. 

The University faculty consists of the President, the Deans, the instruc- 
tional staffs of all the divisions of the University, and the Librarians. The 
faculty of each college or school constitutes a group which passes on all 
questions that have exclusive relationship to the division represented. The 
President is ex-officio a member of each of the faculties. 

40 



The organization and activities of the several administrative divisions are 
described in full in the appropriate chapters of Section II. 

PRINCESS ANNE COLLEGE 

Princess Anne College, located at Princess Anne, Somerset bounty, is 
maintained for the education of Negroes in agriculture, the mechanic arts, 
and home economics. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince George's 
rolntv TarS on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight m.les from 
Sfngto^^^^^^ miles from Baltimore. The campus fronts on 

are located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park <=?'«P"f 291 ^J" 
The site is healthful and attractive. The terrain is varied. A broad roll- 
l. campus is surmounted by a commanding hill which overlooks a wide 
arL Tsurrounding country and insures excellent drainage Many of the 
or ginal forest trees remain. Most of the buildings are located on this 
emfnence. The adjacent grounds are laid out attractively in lawns and 
terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. Below the brow of the 
hill on either side of the Washington-Baltimore Boulevard, he the dri 1 
g^^^^nds afd thrathletic fields. The buildings of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station adjoin the boulevard. About 100 acres a- used by the CoHj j 
of Agriculture for experimental purposes, and for orchards, vineyards, 
poultry yards, etc. Recently 270 acres additional have been Purchased 
about two miles north of the University campus, and this land is devoted 

psneciallv to research in horticulture. ttt i.- ^ 

The water supply and sewage disposal are provided by the Washington 

Suburban Sanitary Commission. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 28 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at Col- 
lege Park. 

Admmistratwn and Instncction. This group consists ^^tje following 
buildings: the Agriculture Building, which accommodates th« College o^ 
Agriculture, the College of Education, the Agricultural and Home Eco- 
noS Extension Service, and the Auditorium; the Library Building, which 

41 



houses the Library and the Executive Offices ; Morrill Hall, which accommo- 
dates in part the College of Arts and Sciences; the Old Library Building, 
in which are the offices of the Dean of Women; the Engineering Building; 
the Student Center, in which are located the offices of the student publica- 
tions, the Religious Work Council, and the Maryland Christian Association; 
the Home Economics Building; the Chemistry Building for instruction in 
Chemistry and for State work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and agricul- 
tural lime; the Dairy Building; the Horticulture Building, which adequately 
accommodates all class room and laboratory work in horticulture, and also 
work in horticultural research for both Government and State; the Plant 
Research Building; the poultry buildings; the Central Heating Plant; and 
an Arts and Sciences Building. 

Experiment Station, The offices of the Director of the Experiment Sta- 
tion are in the Agriculture Building, while other buildings house the 
laboratories for research in soils and for seed testing. Other structures 
are as follows: an agronomy building; a secondary horticulture building; 
and bams, farm machinery building, silos, and other structures required in 
agricultural research. Some of the research is being conducted in the Ross- 
bourg Inn. 

Physical Education, This group consists of The Ritchie Coliseum, which 
provides quarters for all teams, an athletic office, trophy room, rooms for 
faculty, and visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and per- 
manent seating arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium, with a 
permanent seating capacity of 8,000, also furnished with rest rooms for 
patrons, dressing rooms, and equipment for receiving and transmitting in- 
formation concerning contests in progress; a Gymnasium, used in part by 
the Military Department and generally for physical education work; and 
the Girls' Field House, for all girls* sports. Playing and practice fields and 
tennis courts are adjacent to the field houses. 

Dormitoo^es. Two dormitories, Calvert Hall and Silvester Hall, provide 
accommodations for 462 men students. Accommodations for 228 women 
students are provided by Margaret Brent Hall and the new dormitory, 
completed this year, Gerneaux Hall, formerly used as a dormitory for 
women students, is now occupied by one of the sororities. The Practice 
House, which for several years was used as a dormitory, has been turned 
over entirely to the Home Economics Department. 

Service Structures. This group includes the Central Heating Plant; the 
Infirmary, with accommodations for twenty patients, physician's office, 
operating room, and nursing quarters; Dining Hall, and Laundry. 

U, S, Bureau of Mines Building, A new research laboratoiy building for 
the United States Bureau of Mines was completed this year, and will be 
officially dedicated on October 15, 1937. In addition to the general labora- 
tories, which will be used for instruction in engineering as well as by the 
United States Government, there is a geological museum and technical li- 
brary, one of the finest of its kind in the United States. 

42 



Baltimore 

The group of buildings located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the 
University. The group comprises the original Medical School building, 
erected in 1814, the University Hospital, the Central Office building, a new 
Laboratory building for the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy, and a new 
Law School building. Full descriptions of these parts of the University 
equipment are found in the chapters devoted to the Baltimore Schools m 
Section II. 

A new University Hospital, at the corner of Greene and Redwood Struts, 
containing 400 beds and providing fine clinical facilities, was completed m 
November, 1934. 

Libraries 

Libraries are maintained at both the College Park and the Baltimore 
branches of the University. 

The Library Building at College Park houses the executive offices, post- 
office, and students^ supply store. The building is well equipped and well 
lighted The reading room on the second floor has seats for 236, and about 
4 500 reference books and periodicals on open shelves, the other books being 
kept in the stack room and three seminar rooms. The stack room is 
equipped with five tiers of metal stacks and 18 cubicles for advanced study. 
About 13,500 of the 70,000 books on the campus are shelved in the Engineer- 
ing, Chemistry, and Entomology Departments, the Graduate School, and 
other units. 

The Library facilities in Baltimore for the School of Medicine are housed 
in Davidge Hall ; those for the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy and the 
courses in Arts and Sciences are located in the Dentistry and Pharmacy 
Building; and those for the School of Law are in the new Law Building. 

The libraries, main and departmental, contain a total of 110,000 bound 
volumes, and large collections of unbound journals. In the two central 
libraries there are approximately 12,000 United States Government docu- 
ments, unbound reports, and pamphlets. 

Through the Inter-library Loan Systems of the Library of Congress, the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and other Government Libraries 
in Washington, the University Library is able to supplement its reference 
material, either by arranging for personal work in these Libraries or by 
borrowing books from them. 

ADMISSION 

All correspondence regarding admission should be addressed to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. That pertaining to the colleges of Agriculture, Arts and 
Sciences, Education, Engineering, Home Economics, the Graduate School, 

43 



Lombart and Gre.n. Stoi BalU„"" ""• ""'"'""' ■" """""I. 

b. tanrffTi""""' "'""»" '» t'* P'ofes.ion.l .chools in Baltimore wlil 

If the application, with the school record through the first semester of 

he semor year, ,s returned before graduation to the Director of Adn iSons 

ren^i f^ '^"i '^""'** "''^""^* '^' P"""P«' *<> ^end in a suppCSnteiJ 

01 tne date of graduation, and the rank of the student in the graduating 

^sf^^::^^^ '- ^'-'-^-' ^'- ^^-'^ -^"^it thefrtpS 

maid 'tf e^\' ^Lf ""'f ''^ ^"^ ""!*"""' pertaining to registration will be 
mailed to each applicant whose credentials are acceptable. The Director of 
Admissions will be pleased to advise, either in person or by corresZdeLe 
with prospective students, their parents, or other interested Arsons co^ 
^^.^:^rZ:LZ^^''^" °^"" -' -stions%hat ^el^te 

Time of Admission: Applicants for admission should plan to enter the 
Umversity at the beginning of the school year in September. It is ^oLible 

sZ7sZ. ' '""'"'' '' "'*^^" '^"^"^"'^ '' '^^ beginning 0?:^:; 

le'lndlr 1937 ITT" "'" 'f f '"^ '"^ ''^'^'■^''^^ ^"^ ^''"-y' S«Pt-'"''«r 
ber 18, 1937 """^ "*^ "^"^ ''^^'*^^ ''^ Saturday, Septem- 

tembeTltm?!'" ^' '""^^ ^" "'"'^^""'^ ''^' '"'''™"" ^"^ Wednesday, Sep- 

A special freshman program will be followed between registration and 

he beginmng of the instruction schedule, the object of which is to complete 

the organization of freshmen so that they may begin their regular work 

promptly and effectively, and familiarize themselves with their new sur- 

ronndings. 



ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate or by examination or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate : An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or 
by an accrediting agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for gradu- 
ation not less than fifteen units. A unit represents a yearns study in any 
subject in a secondary school, and constitutes approximately one-fourth of 
a full year's work. It presupposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recita- 
tion periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class 
exercises a week. A double laboratory period in any science or vocational 
study is considered equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more 
than three units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth 
course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
state certification requirements, or a graduate of an approved secondary 
school in the District of Columbia who meets the certification grade of his 
secondary school, will be admitted upon presentation of the proper certifi- 
cate from the principal. A graduate who does not meet fully these require- 
ments may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake 
college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may 
include an appropriate examination. Admission examinations will be given 
during the first week of each of the months of July, August, and September 
at College Park and other convenient places in the state. Applicants con- 
cerned will be notified as to when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 

/located in Maryland or in the District of Columbia must be recommended 

, by the principal, and must have attained the certification-to-college grade 

/ of the school. If the school does not have such a quality grade, then the 

average of the applicant's school grades must be at least ten points or 

V one letter higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school who 
is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either 
of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admis- 
sions for permission to report at the University for an examination, the 
result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary school 
record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted; or (2) he may 
be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfactorily other 
approved examinations in the subjects required for graduation from an 
accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New York City; 
the Regents of the University of the State of New York, Albany; and the 
Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 



44 



45 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 



ment of the entrance requirements below: ^ ' '''"^^" ^'"^"^^- 



Agricultural Economics and 
Farm Management— A 

Agriculture, General— A 

Agronomy- 
Farm Crops— A 
Soils— A 

Animal Husbandry A 

Bacteriology and Pathology—A 
Botany 

General Botany and 
Morphology — A 

Plant Pathology—A 

Plant Physiology— A 

Business Administration 
Accounting and Finance— A 
General — A 

Chemistry 
Agricultural — A 
Biological — A 
General — A 
Industrial — A 

Dairy Husbandry 
Dairy Manufacturing— A 
Dairy Production— A 

Economics — A 

Education 
Agricultural — A 
Arts and Sciences — A 
Commercial — E 
Home Economics — B 
Industrial — A 
Physical — A 



Engineering 

Civil— C 

Electrical — C 

Mechanical — C 
English — A 
Entomology — A 
French — A 
General Science — A 
German — A 
History — A 

Home Economics 

Extension — B 

Foods — B 

General — B 

Institution Management— B 

Textiles and Clothing— B 
Horticulture 

Floriculture — A 

Landscape Gardening— A 

Olericulture — A 

Pomology— A 

Mathematics— C 

Physics — ^C 

Political Science — A 

Poultry Husbandry— A 

Predental — A 

Prelaw — A 
Premedical — D 
Prenursing — A 
Preveterinary — A 
Sociology — A 
Spanish — A 
Zoology — A 



The requirements for admission to the foresoine- ri,rr.v,,i 
«n the following table, the requirements ^^Z^^t^^'^^ 

46 



given in the column headed by the letter which follows the name of the 
curriculum in the above list: 

A B C D E 

English - 3 3 3 3 3 

Algebra -.. 1 **2 11 

Plane Geometry...... *1 11 

Solid Geometry „ „ ** % 

Mathematics 2 

Science - 11 1 11 

Foreign Language „.... 2 

Stenography 2 

Typewriting _ 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Electives , 8 8 6y2 6 5 

Conditional Admission: An applicant who is eligible otherwise to be 
admitted to the University, but who cannot meet the specific entrance 
units required for the curriculum of his choice may register as a non- 
classified student. Classification as a regular student is automatic when 
the entrance deficiency is absolved. (See exception for a student in en- 
gineering at the foot of this page. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER FROM OTHER COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 

A candidate for admission by transfer from another college or university 
must present evidence that he has maintained a satisfactory and honorable 
record at the other institution. The applicant should file as early as pos- 
sible the formal application blank (which may be obtained from the office 
of the Director of Admissions), together with an official transcript of the 
complete college record, including a statement of honorable dismissal. 

Advanced standing is granted for courses completed elsewhere which are 
equivalent in extent and quality to those given by the University of Mary- 
land, subject to the following provisions: 

(1) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may 
secure, the baccalaureate degree will not be given under any cir- 
cumstances until a year of resident work shall have been completed. 



*In the College of Agriculture, with the exception of curricula which include trigo- 
nometry, a second unit of any mathematics may be substituted for the requirement in 
plane geometry, provided the applicant ranks in the upper three-fifths of his secondary 
school class- 

**An applicant who cannot offer the second unit in algebra and the one-half unit in 
solid geometry may be admitted to the College of Engineering, but will be obliged during 
the first semester to make up the advanced algebra and solid geometry. The regular first 
semester engineering mathematics would be taken in the second semester, and the second 
semester mathematics would be taken in the summer session. An applicant who does not have 
entrance credit for solid geometry would take this course concurrently with the regular 
first semester mathematics. Students in either of these groups would register with reg- 
ular classification. 

47 






P«sLi!!l. L^k T"" """'• ™« '»""' """> «■• "owe. 

passing giade of the college attended. 

^'^ atvTbwf -""'l ''^"''* ^" examination for advanced standing in 
uX:rst1:f MaSlTd" ^^^^' ''' ^^•^"^'^™^^ ^--ibed b/th: 

, UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

register, with the consent ofttlDiLC of A^'n,,?!'""''/ """u"" ""^ 
a degree, however, so long as he retains an unclassified status. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

to take military training for a„eri<S ^Jl '"'''*^'^ *^"*^ ^"^ '^^'^"'"'* 
graduation. ^""^ °^ ^'^^ y^^'^^' ^s a prerequisite to 

Graduation Requirements for Students Excused f«.m Military Instruction 

and Physical Education 

o^lit:.^:::!^ ^i:i:.^S^:r^^ - ^r-^ education w^h. 

in other subjects, so th^the tS Ire^^^^^^^^^ ^' -^^^ts 

lege shall not be less than 127 hours Th^nW-f? '^'"^ '^ ^"^ '^^- 

by the dean of the college conceS '""^''''^'^^^ «^ust be approved 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

s>ztz »eSa',t°?:,SLTrz'"''r; "■■' *•>■ - •*^- 

Of two years, as a prerequisiteT^a^^S ^'^"'^^^ '^^ ^ ^^^^^ 

48 



HEALTH SERVICE 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

As soon as possible after the opening of the fall semester, as a measure 
for protecting the general health, all students who enter the undergraduate 
colleges at College Park are given a physical examination. The examination 
of the men students is conducted by the University Physician in cooperation 
with the Physical Education and Military Departments. 

The examination of women students is conducted by a woman physician 
in cooperation with the office of the Dean of Women and the office of Physi- 
cal Education for Women. The woman physician has her offices in the Girls' 
Field House. She is available for consultation by all women students at 
hours to be arranged. 

INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and med- 
ical advice by reporting at the Infirmary during regular office hours estab- 
lished by the physician in charge. 

Nurses' office hours 8 to 10 A, M. and 6 to 7 P. M. 

Doctor will have office hour from 12 to 1 daily except Sundays. 

Office hours on Sunday by appointment only. 

2. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours at the Infirmary. 
Between the hours of 2 and 4 in the afternoon, quiet hour is observed. 

During this time students are requested not to report except in case of an 
emergency. 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical attention 
and who are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of the Uni- 
versity physicians. Such visits will be free of charge except in cases where 
additional visits are necessary. For such additional visits as may be 
necessary, the University physician will make his usual charge. But, if a 
student so desires, he may call a physician of his own choice and at his 
own expense. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon the order of the 
University physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the 
facilities available. Students who live off the campus will be charged a 
fee of two dollars a day. 

5. The visiting hours are 4 to 5 and 7 to 8 p. m. daily. No visitor may 
see any patient until permission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for graduate students 
and employees. Dispensary service, however, is available for graduate 
students and employees who are injured in University service or University 
activities. 

7. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 

49 



tl 



r'unltiT''?"- "^ '^'^*^'^' conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

hpL,<f*"^^f,*^ ""^"^ ™ *^ dormitories who are unable to attend classes 

to r ! ^ T" '' "^ ^'' """'''^ ^° ^^P-* to the Infirmary should 1^;' 
to their dormitory matrons, who will notify the Infirmary immediately 

ies^'anf^sh *f Z^% ^f '" '" f''' ^•"""^' ^'''''^^y ^'>^^'' "^ dormitor- 

mus^prl ^nt writtn T'"'' '"/ ^l^^T.""''^^' <^"""^ ^^^ ^'"^ -^ "'»««« 
mothers ThUr Tt ^"""^ *^^''' Physicians, parents, or house 

movers. These excuses will be approved by the University physicians or 

REGULATIONS, GRADES, DEGREES 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 
Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 

;;;; QQ°"'''/ '' ^^7'"''^ undergraduates and graduates, by numw' 
100—199; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200—299. 

The letter following the number of a course indicates the semester in 
which It IS offered; thus, course If is offered in the first semester Ts £ tJe 
second semester The letter "y» indicates a full-year course T^e ^Sr 
tlh . r • * ^Z^^"^ '"""'" ^^ '''^''^'^^ ^y the arabic numeral in p^en- 

ourt. . .-rr? *' ?''/ *^^ ^°"'^- No credit is allowed fo^ a "y" 
course until it is completed. ' 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving davs 
hours and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginE of each- 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning 8:20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a wtk 
for one semester Two or three periods of laboratory or field workTre 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory or in outside prepara 
tion for each credit hour in any course. ouxsme prepara- 

Number of Hours. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semestei 

hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are sh^Jn 

he appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several div" S 

the University. No student may carry either more or less thanX pre 

scnb^d number of hours without specific permission from thfdLn Vhi 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are rtu^^^^ 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final exam nation? a^^^^ 
in tests, when requested to do so by the instructor. ^'^^tions, and 

Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 

50 



character of the work will permit the instructor to note frequently the 
progress and proficiency of the student — in which case they may be omitted 
upon approval of the head of the department and dean of the college. 
Periodic examinations and tests are given during regularly scheduled class 
periods. Final examinations, where required, are given according to schedule 
and are of not more than three hours' duration each. 

Grading. The system of grading is uniform in the different departments 
and divisions of the University. 

The following grade symbols are used: A, B, C, D, E, F, and I. The first 
four, A, B, C, and D, are passing; E, condition; F, failure; I, incomplete. 

Grade A denotes superior scholarship; grade B, good scholarship; grade 
C, fair scholarship ; and grade D, passing scholarship. 

A student who receives the grade D in more than one-fourth of the credits 
required for graduation must take additional courses or repeat courses until 
he has the required number of credits for a degree, three-fourths of which 
carry a grade above D. A student is not permitted to repeat a course to 
raise a D grade after a lapse of two years. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this in- 
stitution. 

A student with the grade of E is conditioned in the course. The grade 
of E will be changed by a reexamination during the succeeding semester to 
D or F. The grade cannot be raised to a grade higher than D. Only one 
reexamination is permitted, and if a student does not remove the condition 
at the time scheduled for this reexamination the condition becomes a failure. 
No student is permitted to take a reexamination to remove a condition 
within four weeks after the condition has been acquired. 

The mark I (Incomplete) is exceptional, and is given only to a stu- 
dent whose work has been qualitatively satisfactory and who has a proper 
excuse for not having completed the requirements of the course. In case 
of a student whose work has been unsatisfactory and who is absent from 
the final examination, the grade will be E or F, in accordance with the 
character of the previous work. In cases where the mark I is given the 
student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of 
the first semester in which that subject is again offered, or the grade be- 
comes F. 

Work of grade D, or of any passing grade, cannot be raised to a higher 
grade except by repeating the course. This must be done within a period 
of two years after the course was originally taken. A student who repeats 
a course for which he has received credit for work done at this University 
or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, including reg- 
ular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final grade will 
be substituted for the grade already recorded, but he will not receive any 
additional credit for the course. 

51 



i^ 



REPORTS 

ELIMINATION OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

of '""'stStlTn^o? or'di^'* *^ ^"^"^^ ^* ^"^ *™« '^^ -*»'<J— . 
scholarship, or whose continLnr "t^ "Jf '"*^'" ^'^^ "^'^"'^^^ «*^"dard of 
his or her health or r^i^rTv.'^*^^ University would be detrimental to 

factory StSlori«ef of the n "' "^T' 7 "''^^^ '='^"^'^'=* ^ -* -«- 

6e o^fced *o wUMr^TZntO^ University Students 0/ tAe last class may 

wttfidraw even though no specific charge be made against them. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

or^'mirr'r t^^LnVnl* tVfi 'J™' "'. '^ ^^™'«^<^ *^ ^'^^ ^ -i- 
passed w th an aSSr'^de o? rl'"":''"'"'" ""*^' ^" °^ ^^« ^^^^^ h-« 
required for JunS ^nrgtln^L^SZTTr'^'^ 1 -tester credits 
beginning with the class enfering in Somber: SSs ) '^^*"" " '''"*'^^ 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following de^ees- Baphplnr ^-p a... r» i. , 
Of Science, Master of Arts, Master of^'S Doctor of Phn2^^^^^^^^ \ 

En^neer Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer Bache or „f t . ' 

PhfX ''^'"^' '^'''' °' ^"*^^ ^"^^-^' -d BacheTort; £en'c:Tn 
^^Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certifi- 

:=rs~-- ^^^^ '^^-^rx^^rZ 

a«y curriculum leading to a baccalau eate Teg 2 mLt bj t^^^^^^^^ '^' "' 

at the University of Maryland ° '" residence 

52 



I 



EXPENSES 

Make all checks payable to the University of Maryland for the 

EXACT amount OF THE SEMESTER CHARGES. 

In order that the cost of operation may be reduced, all fees are due and 
payable as a part of the student's registration, and all persons must come 
prepared to pay the full amount of the semester charges. No student will 
be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

EXPENSES AT COLLEGE PARK 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
costs as any occasion may make necessary. Such changes, however, in com- 
parison with the total cost to the student would be only nominal. 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Maryland 

First Semester 
Fixed Charges . _ $67.50 

♦Special Fee - 10.00 

** Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Infirmary Fee — 3.00 

Post Office Box , - -. „ 2.00 



Second Semester 


Total 


$67.50 


$135.00 — 


••...•.•••.• 


15.00 . 


.....M...** 


10.00 / 




10.00 y 




3.00 '( 




2.00 J 


$67.50 < 


''$175.00 — 



$107.50 



District of Columbia 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

General Fees listed above -.- -.- $107.50 $67.50 $175.00 

Non-Resident Fee 25.00 25.00 50.00 - 



$92.50 Q$225.0q^ 



$132.50 

Utfter States and Countries 

First Semester Second Semester Total 



^ 



General Fee „ 

Non-Resident Fee 



62.50 



$170.00 



$ 67.50 
62.50 

$130.00 



$175.00 
125.00 

$300.00 



* This fee, established by special request of the Student Government Association for a 
period of eight years, beginning Sept. 1, 1930, was for the purpose of further improving the 
University grounds and the physical training facilities. The income now being derived from 
it is used to amortize bonds issued by the Athletic Board for the purpose of constructing 
Ritchie Coliseum. 

*♦ The Student Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Associa- 
tion. Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, since 
it covers subscription to the student weekly paper, the literary magazine, and the year book ; 
class dues, including admission to class dances ; and admission to the performances of the 
musical and dramatic clubs. 




53 



^ 



M) 



Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee, payable on first entrance $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for bachelor's degree. - 10.00 

Certificate Fee for Teacher's Diploma and other certificates where 

Pre-Medical and Pre- Dental Fee — Per semester in addition to fees 
shown above: 

Maryland , $25.00 

District of Columbia 25.00 

Other States and Countries - 62.50 

Expenses of Students Living in Dormitories 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

Board -.... $135.00 $135.00 $270.00 

Lodging - 38.00 38.00 76.00 



$173.00 



$173.00 



$346.00 



Laboratory Fees 

Bacteriology 
General, Pathological Tech- 
nic, Hematology, and 

Urinalysis _ _... $5.00 

Pathogenic and Serology $8.00 

All other courses $7.00 

Botany $2.00 

Chemistry 
Industrial, Inorganic, and 

Physical Chemistry ...$7.00 

All other courses ^8.00 

Dairy 
Introductory Dairy Science 

and Dairy Mechanics. $2.00 

Dairy Manufacturing, Mar- 
ket Milk, Analysis of 
Dairy Products, Grading 
Dairy Products, and Ad- 
vanced Grading Dairy 
Products $3.00 



Per Semester Course 

Experimental Psychology $2.00 

Home Economics 

Elementary Foods, Demon- 
strations, Problems and 
Practice in Foods, Ad- 
vanced Foods, Advanced 

Experimental Foods $6.00 

Practice in Management of 

Home $3.50 

Nutrition - .$3.00 

Textiles and Clothing, Ad- 
vanced Clothing, Prob- 
lems and Practice in Tex- 
tiles, Clothing or Related 
Art, Special Clothing 

Problems, Applied Art $2.00 

Introduction to Social Sciences $2.00 
Zoology $5.00 



Miscellaneous Fees 

Late Registration Fee , $3.00-$5.00 

Fee for each change in registration after first week _ „ $1.00 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's Office during first 

54 



Absence Fee twenty-four hours before or after ^^::ZZZZZi^S>0 

Condition Examination Fee. _ $5.00 

Special Examination ^^ee. ■-.—.-•---•— ^^^ $2.00 

Fee for failure to report for ^^'^l^^^^^^ JL^^er semester 
Part-time students carrymg six semester hours^ ^^^^ 

credit hour 1""' ' $13.50 

Laundry service, when desired-per semester ---■•-■ ^^^^ 

Transcript of Record Fee 

students wm .. =-«S«'' '".UT." SS^S ^."l^bS^r 

cover the loss or damage. 



Fees For Graduate Students 

Matriculation Fee — "•• 

Fee for each semester credit hour 

Diploma Fee— Master^s Degree - 

Graduation Fee— Doctor's Degree 



$10.00 

4.00 

^.-. 10.00 

20.00 



EXPLANATIONS 
The Fi«d Char.es made to all students cover a part of the overhead ex- 
penses not provided for by the State. 

T. X • „ 5« Pphruarv. Students entermg the Univer 
Fees for Students Entermg m ^f ™"/' „ f.^owing fees for the items 

,™„,, »1.50. ..d PCS, 0«.. Box, ''-^ .„^ „„,»., „„H.. ..X 
F.« r„ f«-T'"»„ /"In'^'L I"S «s ar. charged 16.00 per 

<^^ 00 is charged at the first registration. „ ^ . ^^ 

^T.hJe Fee constitutes ^-^^---1^0^^^ 
':^;:!STstt^n;errthelthT^^ - disbursement. 

SSs fundTsaudited annually by the State Auditors. 

"^trRegistration Fee. Studen. ^^^f^-lS^Z^^'v^^^ 
and classification on --g^l-'-J^^^^f^jf;,^" ^^^^^^^^ and $5.00 thereafter, 

extra on the day followmg the ^^^^ ffff.^f °" Jf^^ periods in May and 
Students who fail to file course cards in the specitied per 
January are considered late registrants. 



56 







^ 



.i^- 



forfnrrof ctr fofa'tSion"?.^ a Period be^nnin. 24 hours be- 

the resumption of clalt a slSrwS Itt'^^^^^l't ^ ^^ ^^^ 
pay a special fee of t^i no f«^ -.o„i, > • P^^^uzed by being required to 

students will be penaS as In th! '»'«,^''- Unless properly excused, 

the first meeting of each class It /^K^'^ ''^ ^ ^''^'^^''' ^"'^ ^^^"'^^ f^"'" 
<3f„^^„* «"'ng 01 each class at the beginning of the second semester 

Except under ?hec^ndi«on^,..fi f ^'''* °"' ^''^ ^^'"'^ ^"<=h ho"day 
after'a holidarwiirbf ^anteT ' " '"'^"" '"'• "" ^*'^^"- ^^^^^ - 

In exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in the familv «r^,,r .• 
for an excuse must be made within one week aft a^tLtTieS "*"" 

DORMITORY RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Dormitory Manager wom^n Z7/ ", '^''''- *^'" ^^^^^^ ^PP^^ ^ the 

the room^eseXok card is retl?d' r'^ *1\''''" '' ^'^'^- W^- 
deposit. This fee ^^U S dLduc^ from th""'^ *' ^'=<=«'"P^"i«d »>y a $5 
the student registers- if h? f.. / -^ *'''* ^^'"^ster charges when 

Reservations by students already' a VeT"' '"^ ''' "'" ""' '°^'''^^- 
time during the'closing ll'^\C sllJ^ZT' "'^ '' "^'^ ^' ^"^ 

sTsliL^^rifis"' ^"S" --"-^^^^^^^^^^^ roTml?;2;rr 

onte Tay the^eTer' '"^ "'*^"" *''^''- ^""^ ^^^^^-^^ ^^fore 7 P. M. 

reTeZZL ''sSd"re^;rt1! tTeT T ^"^^^ "'° ^^^^ ""^^^ '^o-^^-^' 
signed. Instructions rSr^^.ZefZTrlJj'"''''' '^'' '^^^ ''^^^ - 
mation desired by the Lden? ^rbe gteX thTho'ut " V*'''" ^f °" 
Personal basffae-e s^nt vi, fi, a ^ "^^ mother on duty, 

dormitory to w2 it is to t . r.'^'* ^^^""^^ ^^^ '"^rked for the 

.age coi^ng by Sll" ^.itTel^ d It'l^'t ''^^^ '^^'^^*- ^" ^^^- 
Park, whence it can be sTcured fTl! n I ""^''"^^^ ^*^*^''" '» College 
made at the General Serc:X/L:nnf1hf uTve^r' ™"'^^"" 

sel^sTarwith^Sffietntl^rr I' ^ ''T ^*°"^^ ^^^^^ P---^^ them- ' 
a pillow, pillow cTsttoweT I ,«"^ '"""' *"'" ^""'^ °^ ^'"^'^ ^^eets. 

Women students ^JZ^^^^^^, SkeS- ^XShow. 

56 



pillow cases, towels, bureau scarf, desk blotter, laundry bag, and waste 
paper basket. 

All dormitory property assigned to the individual student will be 
charged against him, and he must assume responsibility for its possession 
without destruction other than that which may result from ordinary wear 
and tear. 

Maid service is furnished without charge for all rooms. 

All freshmen men students, except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories and board at the University dining hall. 
//Since there is not sufficient dormitory space for freshmen women, those 
Vho cannot be accommodated in the dormitories may live in approved off- 
campus houses. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NONRESIDENCE 

cJtudents who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of 
their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

Students not rooming in the dormitories may obtain board and laundry 
at the University at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunches at the University cafeteria or at nearby 
lunch rooms. 

The cost of books and supplies will vary according to the course pur- 
sued by the individual student. Books and supplies average about $35.00 
per year. 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 
student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 



• The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to such 
minor students. 

t Students in the College Park Colleges who are residents of the District of Columbia ar« 
charged two>fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 

57 



WITHDRAWALS 

Students registering for the dormitories and dining hall must continue 
for the year, as contracts for faculty and other service and for supplies are 

^ulZ"^"" r?.^^ ^^f'' ^""^ ^'^ ^'' ^'^"^ ^" *« supposition that students 
Will remain for the entire year. 

A student desiring to withdraw from the University must secure the 
written consent of the parent or guardian, to be attached to the withdrawal 
slip which must be approved by the Dean and presented to the Registrar at 
least one week m advance of withdrawal. Charges for full time will be 
continued agamst him unless this is done. The withdrawal slip must bear the 
approval of the President before being presented to the Cashier for refund 

REFUNDS 

JlZJ^^^''^^^\ 7'^'"" f""' ^^^' ^^" ^"^"^^ ^^ ^^^^ of fi^^d charges, 
athletic fee special fee, and student activities fee, with a deduction of $5 00 

So rlSd ^'^^^^^^^^^^^- ^'' '^'--^^ for board, lodging, and laundry are 

After five days, and until November 1, the first semester, or March 10 the 
second semester, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated, with a deduction 
of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. 

After November 1, or March 10, refunds are granted for board and 
laundry only, amounts to be pro-rated. 

No refunds are made without the written consent of the student's parent 
or guardian, except to students who pay their own expenses. ^ 

No student is given cash for any part of his or her refund until all 
outstanding checks have been honored by the banks on which they are drL^^^ 

EXPENSES AT BALTIMORE 

The fees and expenses for the professional schools located in Baltimore 
sThoo5: i^Blimort^ ^"^^^^ ^' '''' ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ '^ '^^ — ^ 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through emplovment 
while m attendance at the University. No student should exTecrWver 
to earn enough to pay all his expenses. The amounts vary, but somrelrn 
from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds 

A^lrTl ^^' ^""'^ ^^^^ ^' ^^^ ^^^^^^^ for those desiring employment 

Ad^ifraHn/tf \T- and a half years, through the National Youth 
Administration, the University has been enabled to offer needy students 

jT.f TT^.f ^^'^ ^^ '^^'^' ^'^^'^''^ '^^ remuneratS for wS 
averages about $15 monthly. It is not known how long the Governmenr will 
continue to extend this aid. government will 



58 



The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, maintain a bureau to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions 
is placed at the disposal of the students. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college. First honors 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second honors to the lower 
half. 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the man from Prince George's County who makes the 
highest average in his studies and who at the same time embodies the most 
manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma Fra- 
ternity offers annually a gold medal to the freshman who makes the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. The mere 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the 'College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Berman. 

Mortar Board Cup. Offered to the woman member of the senior class who 
has been in attendance at least three full years, and who has made the 
highest scholastic average. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. The sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student, of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
shall have attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the 
entire undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final 
semester. 

MILITARY AWARDS 

The Governor's Cup. Offered each year by His Excellency, the Governor 
of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

59 



IS 



ing Corps. ''"^ '""'* *°' *« ^^^^^^ Officers' Train- 

Class of '99 Gold Medal. The Cla«!<! nf 1 aoo «ff^, v. 
to the member of thP h«ttoi- u ^ ''^^^^ ^^''^ ^^^^ ^ gold medal 

member of the battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier 

fl«drh"rs'iTr rot"'""''' " "^ ^»'"» ■"«• ^•- -» 

LOANS 

on! hundrrdoflaS StZ't t""*f f ^"""^"^ ^ ^'^^ ^^^'t- loan of 
University VtaSa^'rnVfeetdX' trThoft* T^*^^^ ^" ^^« 

the University of Maryland for at least on! year. llS" Ire madATtf 
basis of scholarshiD chararf^r or..? « /^'*^- -^waras are made on the 

be made to the SchoLfhipTm^^Si ofTe'l Tv. W^^^"'^^"''"^ ^'°"'^ 

PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 

stutnttwho hf '' " ^^^^^-^^^^k' Terrapin, and Old Line work, for the 
students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout Jhe 

60 



ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. The Class of 1^05 offers 
annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics" a gold 
watch. The watch is given in honor of a former President of the Univer- 
sity, R. W. Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt to 
the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. A gold watch is presented annually by H. C. 
Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class 
who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, 
and has done most for the general advancement of the interests of the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods to the woman member of the senior class who, during her 
collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, and has done 
most for the general advancement of the interests of the University. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The description of those in the Balti- 
more divisions is included in the appropriate chapters in Section II. 

GOVERNMENT 

Regulation of Student Activities. The association of students in organ- 
ized bodies, for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student activities in 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged. All organized 
student activities are under the supervision of the Student Life Committee, 
subject to the approval of the President. Such organizations are formed 
only with the consent of the Student Life Committee and the approval of 
the President. Without such consent and approval no student organization 
which in any way represents the University before the public, or which 
purports to be a University organization or an organization of University 
students, may use the name of the University in connection with its own 
name, or in connection with its members as students. 

Student Government. The Student Government Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women's League, and the Men's League, and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officers are a President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary-Treasurer, President of Women's League and Presi- 
dent of Men's League, 

The Women's League handles all affairs concerning women students ex- 
clusively. It has the advisory cooperation of the Dean of Women. 

The Men's League handles all matters pertaining to men students. It has 
the advisory cooperation of the Assistant in Student Activities. 

61 



; » 



.?^^ 



n/UA 



The Executive Council performs the executive duties incident to manag- 
ing student affairs, and works in cooperation with the Student Life Com- 
mittee. 

The Student Life Committee, a faculty committee appointed by the Presi- 
dent, keeps m close touch with all activities and conditions, excepting class- 
room work, that affect the student, and, acting in an advisory capacity, en- 
deavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that may exist. 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and distrib- 
uted to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning student 
matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. No 
student while on probation may represent the University in such events as 
athletic contests, glee club concerts, dramatic performances, and debates. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and faculty 
rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The student 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives honor- 
ably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to maintain these 
standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct super- 
vision of the University only when on the campus, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and finan- 
cial activities m accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon sound 
business pnnciples. Where such rules and principles are observed, indi- 
vidual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and thereby 
become better fitted for their lifers work after graduation. Rules governing 
the different activities will be found in the list of Academic Regulations. 

SOCIETIES 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards in their respective fields. These are Ph jKappa P hi, a national 
honorary fraternity open to honor students, both men and women, in all 
branches of learning; Sigma Xi, scientific fraternity; Alpha Zeta, a national 
honorary agricultural fraternity recognizing scholarship and student leader- 
ship; Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary engineering fraternity; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, men's national honor society, recognizing conspicuous attain- 
ment m non-curricular activities and general leadership; K appa Phi Kappa. 
a national educational fraternity; Beta Phi Theta. an honorary French 
fraternity; SigmaJ2£ltaJl.a national honorary Spanish fraternity; Alpha 
Chi Sigma, a national honorary chemical fraternity; Scabbard and Blade 
a national military society; Pershing Rifles, a national military society for 
basic course R. O. T. C. students; P i Delta Epsil on. a national journalistic 
fraternity; Mortai^Joard^ the national senior hJ55r society for women- 



Alpha Lam bda Delta , a/national freshman women's honor society promot- 
ing IcEolarsHipT^Eetai-GfiHaH^ a local Home Economics society; Alpha Psi 
OjTl£S& (Iota Chapter), national dramatic society; and Cki AlpliR, lULdl ■• 
w,o«itn^fl jeuij'ulijlit fi'ftlyinilj^. 

Fraternities and Sororities. There are fourteen national fraternities, and 
six national sororities and one local sorority at College Park. These in the 
order of their establishment at the University are Kappa Alpha, Sigma 
Phi Sigma, Sigma Nu, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Sigma Phi, Alpha Gamma 
Rho, Theta Chi, Phi Alpha, Tau Epsilon Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, Phi 
Delta Theta, Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Lambda Tau, and Sigma Alpha 
Mu (national fraternities) ; and Alpha Omicron Pi, Kappa Delta, Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Xi Delta, and Phi Sigma Sigma 
(national sororities) ; and Alpha Sigma (local sorority). 

Clubs and Societies, Many clubs and societies, with literary, scientific, 
social, and other special objectives are maintained in the University. Some 
of these are purely student organizations; others are conducted jointly by 
students and members of the faculty. The list is as follows: Agricultural 
Council, Authorship Club, Bacteriological Society, Engineering Society, En- 
tomological Society, Horticulture Club, Latin American Club, Live Stock 
Club, New Mercer Literary Society, Poe Literary Society, Calvert Forum, 
Women's Athletic Association, Girls' "M" Club, Footlight Club, Debating 
Club, Rossbourg Club, Mathematics Society, Economics Club, Chess Club, 
Strauss Club, DeMolay Club, Psyche Club, Der Deutsche Verein, Riding 
Club, Swimming Club, Opera Club, Poetry Club, International Relations, 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, American^odety of Civil Eiy ^ 
gineers. Radio Club, and Camera Club. O^jaXn WjfWV, iUM^AA^^ >c>fH^^ 

Student Grange. The Student Grange is a chapter of the National Grange. 
With the exception of two faculty advisers, the Student Grange member- 
ship is made up entirely from the student body. New members are elected 
by ballot when they have proved their fitness for the organization. 

The general purposes of the Student Grange are to furnish a means 
through which students keep in touch with state and national problems of 
agricultural, economic, or general educational nature; to gain experience in 
putting into practice parliamentary rules; to learn the meaning of leader- 
ship, and to learn how to assume leadership that aids in the ultimate task 
of serving in one's community. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

Staff. The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the 
students not solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities 
whose development along all lines, including the moral and religious, is 
included in the educational process. Pastors representing the major denom- 
inational bodies are officially appointed by the Churches for work with the 
students of their respective faiths. Each of the Student Pastors also serves 
a local church of his denomination, which the students are urged to attend. 

68 



Committee on Religious Affairs and Social Service. A faculty committee 
on Religious Affairs and Social Service has as its principal function the 
stimulation of religious thought and activity on the campus. It brings noted 
speakers on religious subjects to the campus from time to time. The com- 
mittee cooperates with the student pastors in visiting the students, and 
assists the student denominational clubs in every way that it can. Oppor- 
tunities are provided for students to consult with pastors representing the 
denominations of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religion is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a 
denominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of Christian service. This 
year the list includes the Baptist Club, the Episcopal Club, the Lutheran 
Club, the Newman Club, and the Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet 
monthly or semi-monthly for worship and discussion, and occasionally for 
social purposes. A pastor or a member of the faculty serves as adviser. A 
local Y. W. C. A. provides a variety of activities and services on an unde- 
nominational basis. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Three student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications. 

The Diamondback, a weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is published by 
the students. This publication summarizes the University news, and pro- 
vides a medium for discussion of matters of interest to the students and 
the faculty. 

The Terrapin is the student annual published by the Junior Class. It is 
a reflection of student activities, serving to commemorate the principal 
events of the college year. 

The Old Line is a comic magazine put out quarterly by the students. 

ALUMNI 

The alumni are organized into several units, which elect representatives 
to the Alumni Council, an incorporated body which manages all general 
alumni affairs. Different alumni units represent the School of Medicine, 
the School of Pharmacy, the School of Dentistry, the School of Law, and the 
School of Nursing, while the group of colleges at College Park are repre- 
sented by one unit. This College Park unit is governed by a board made 
up of representatives of the various colleges located at College Park. 

The Alumni Council is made up of elected representatives from the several 
units, with a membership of twenty- four. Each alumni unit in Baltimore 
elects two representatives to the Council; the alumni representing the Col- 
lege Park group of colleges elect twelve representatives. 

64 



SECTION II 
Administrative Divisions 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Harry J. Patterson, Dean 

Agriculture is the primary pursuit of the human race, and P^^^^^^^^"^^ 
prosperity is in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the land. 
Land-Grant Colleges were founded to foster teaching of scientific agri- 

^^The^CoUege of Agriculture has a two-fold purpose. On the one hand, it 
^ves a liberal educational background in order that its graduates may live 
more satisfying lives, no matter what may be their eventual occupations. 
On the other hand, it trains men and women for the vanous ocaipations 
based upon those sciences which are fundamental to agriculture. With this 
training, some will find occupation as scientific specialists, others will en- 
gage in business and professional pursuits having close agricultural contacts, 
while others will take up practical farming. 

Agriculture is constantly changing; no cropping system can be worked 
out once and for all time; new as well as old pests and diseases must be 
constantly combated ; better feeding and breeding of live stock, and efficient 
marketing methods must be substituted for inefficient methods if agriculture 
is to maintain its position with the other industries. Above all, agriculture 
must be made profitable to the tiller of the soil, and must be established as 
a paying business for those who engage in it. 

The curricula of the College of Agriculture are planned to give the stu- 
dent thorough and practical instruction in agriculture and related sciences, 
and at the same time afford him an opportunity to specialize along the lines 
in which he is particularly interested. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: Agri- 
cultural Economics; Agronomy (including Crops and Soils); Animal Hus- 
bandry; Bacteriology; Botany; Dairy Husbandry; Entomology and Bee 
Culture- Farm Forestry; Farm Management; Farm Mechanics; Genetics 
and Statistics; Horticulture (including Pomology, Vegetable . Gardening, 
Landscape Gardening, and Floriculture) ; Plant Pathology; Plant Physiology 
and Bio-chemistry; Poultry Husbandry. 

Admission 

The requirements for admission are discussed under Entrance, in Sec- 
tion I. 

65 



i 



9 



Requirements for Graduation 

One hundred and twenty-eight semester hours are required for gradua- 
tion. The detailed requirements for each department are included in the 
discussion of Curricula in Agriculture. 

Farm and Labora,tory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need may 
be met by one or more summers spent on a practical farm. 

Student Organizations 

The students of the College of Agriculture maintain a Student Grange, an 
Agricultural Coimcil, a Bacteriological Society, an Entomological Society, a 
Horticulture Club, a Livestock Club, and an honor fraternity. Alpha Zeta. 

Membership and work in these is voluntary, and no college credits are 
given for work done in them; yet much of the training obtained in them is 
fully as valuable as that acquired from regularly prescribed courses. 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers' fraternity of 
the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges throughout 
the State. The Horticulture Club sponsors the Horticulture Show in the 
fall, and the Livestock Club, the Fitting and Showing Contest in the spring. 
Both of these exhibitions are creditable University functions. They give 
valuable training and inspiration to the students. 

Alpha Zeta — National Agricultural Honor Fraternity 

Membership in this fraternity is chosen from students in the College of 
Agriculture who have displayed agricultural motive and executive ability. 
This organization fosters scholarship, and to that end awards a gold medal 
to the member of the freshman class in agriculture who makes the highest 
record during the year. 

Fellowships 

A limited number of graduate fellowships, which carry remuneration of 
$400 to $800 yearly, are available to graduate students. The holders of 
these fellowships spend a portion of their time assisting in classes and 
laboratories. The rest of the time is used for original investigation or as- 
signed study. (See Graduate School.) 

Curricula in Agriculture 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes. 

(1) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal, 



State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment 
stations ; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(2) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools ; as executives, sales- 
men, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricultural 
contact and point of view. 

(3) Courses of. study may be arranged for any who desire to return 
to the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. (For details see Special Students in Agriculture, page 86.) 

To be eligible to enter tJvose courses ordirmrily carried in the junior year, 
a regular stndent enrolled in the College of Agriculture must have an 

average grade as high as C. 

Student Advisers 

Each freshman in the College of Agriculture is assigned to an adviser 
from the faculty, who is selected with due consideration for the major line 
of interest of the student. Not more than five or six students are assigned 
to any one person. With the advice and consent of his adviser and the 
Dean, any student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are 
deemed advisable to meet the requirements of his particular case. 

The suggested curricula in the catalogue include a sufficient number of 
electives to afford opportunity for those who so desire to select major 
and minor fields of study from different departments. As an illustration, a 
student may decide to have his major in entomology and yet may want to 
be well informed in pomology. In the entomology curriculum (see page 79) 
there is room for 26 semester credit hours, distributed through the last two 
years, which may be elected from courses in, or associated with pomology. 

General Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Yea/r * " 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) --. ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. 1 y) - 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 1 y) or Physical Education (Phys 

Ed. 1 y or Phys. Ed. 2 y and 4 y) ,-- 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

Elect one from each of the following groups : 

Biology (Bot. If or s and Zool. Is) ...- 

Botany (Bot. If and 2 s) - --- 

Mathematics (Math, llf and 14s) >.-.- - 1 



1 
1 



1 
1 




1 

3 

1-7 
4 
5 



:] 



Modem Language (French ly or German ly).... 

Entomology (Ent. If and 3 s) 

Agriculture (A. H. If and D. H. 2s, or A. H. 2s). 

or (Agron. If and 2 s) ~ 

or (Hort. If and lis) - 



V 3 



66 



67 



I 



■t 



I 



7 
7 
5 
5 



Sophomore Year r 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 
Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

Elect one of the following; 

Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay and 12Bf or s) ) 

Economics (A. E. If and Econ. 5 s) ZZZZITr 

Elect three or four of the following: ^ 

Mathematics (Math. 16y) ^ 3.3 

Physics (Phys. ly) .4-4...Z 

Geology and Soils (Geol. If and Soils Is) .....3-5 

Agriculture (Any freshman elective, Poultry 1 s, or 
D. H. If or s.) _....„ _ ^... 



Semester 
II 



4-3 2-3 



10-12 11-12 



0. Required of all students except those whose major is Botany. 

1. Required of students whose major is Botany. 

3. Required of students whose major is Biological Chemistry, Bacteri- 

ology, or Landscape Gardening. 

4. Required of students whose major is Entomology. 

5. Recommended for students who contemplate farming or employment in 

industries closely associated with farming. D. H. 1 required of 
all students whose major is Dairying. 

6. Required of students whose major is Agricultural Economics. 

3 and 7. Recommended for students who are interested in biological science 
and Dairy Manufacturing, and are likely to pursue graduate 
studies. 

(See special curricula for Agricultural Education, Bacteriology, Botany, 
Dairy Manufacturing, Entomology, Floriculture, Landscape Gardening,' 
Olericulture, and Pomology.) 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

The objective of the curriculum in Biological Chemistry is the fitting 
of students for work in agricultural experiment stations, and in soil, fer- 
tilizer, and food laboratories. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The objectives of the curricula in Agricultural Education are the teach- 
mg of secondary vocational agriculture, the work of county agents, and 
allied lines of the rural education service. 

(For special requirements and curricula see page 121, College of Edu- 
cation.) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

The courses in this department are designed to give students funda- 
mental training in the basic economic principles underlying the agricultural 

68 



industry. Training in both agricultural economics and farm management 
is included in the curriculum. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles underlying 
the production, distribution, and consumption of farm products. The most 
efficient and economical use of the factors of production — ^land, labor, and 
capital — are emphasized. Farm resources and tax revenues, and methods 
of financing agricultural production from both public and private points of 
view, are considered. The cost of getting products from the producer to the 
consumer through cooperative and private types of organization, the agencies 
involved and services rendered, are also included, since the farmer's work 
does not end with producing crops, animals, and animal products. Eco- 
nomical distribution and the return of a fair proportion of the selling price 
are as important factors in farming as economical production. 

The purpose of the study of farm management is to enable the individual 
farmer so to organize his business that it may produce the greatest con- 
tinuous profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is 
in accordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It 
requires not only knowledge of many factors involved in the production of 
crops and animals, but also administrative ability to coordinate them into 
the most efficient farm organization. Farming is a business, as well as 
a way of life, and as stich demands for its successful conduct the use of 
business methods. The aim of the courses in farm management is to train 
the student in the methods of keeping farm business records, analyzing the 
farm business, and organizing and operating the farm as a business en- 
terprise. This enables the student to perceive the just relationship of the 
several factors of production and distribution as applicable to local con- 
ditions, and to develop in him an executive and administrative capacity. 

Students well trained in agricultural economics and farm management 
are in demand for county agent work, farm bureau work, experiment station 
or United States Government investigation, and college or secondary school 
teaching. 



Semester 

I II 

Q 

— — 3 

-.-.. — 8 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) _ 3 3 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) -...- - 2 — 

Statistics (Gen. lllf and 112 s) - -.. 2 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

Electivpc: d. ^ 



Junior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102 s) 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107 s). 



16 



16 



69 



. Semester 

Senior Year j jj 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) 3 __ 

Transportation of Farm Products (A. E. 101s) — 3 

Seminar (A. E. 202y) 1Z""~. 1-2 l-o 

Farm Organization and Operation (A. E. 108f) 3 Z. 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) ZZZ.Z. 3 — 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104 s) „ _ \^^ZZ^I~.. 3 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 104 s) _ '~ _ 3 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) 2 — 

^^^^^^^^s IIIZZZZZZZ 4-3 ^5 

16 16 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department of Agricultural Engineering offers to students of 
agriculture training in those agricultural subjects which are based upon 
engmeermg principles. These subjects may be grouped under three heads: 
farm machmery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modem tendency in farming is to reduce production costs by the 
use of farm machinery units of efficient size and design. In many cases 
horses are bemg replaced by tractors. Trucks, automobiles, and stationary 
engmes are found on almost all farms. It is highly advisable that the student 
of any branch of agriculture have a working knowledge of the design, 
adjustments, and repair of these machines. 

More than one-fourth of the total value of Maryland farms is represented 
by the buildings. The study of the design of various buildings, from the 
standpoint of economy, sanitation, efficiency, and appearance, is, therefore, 
important. 

Studies included in the study of drainage are as follows: the principles 
of tile drainage, the laying out and construction of tile drain systems, the 
use of open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. 

AGRONOMY 

In the Department of Agronomy are grouped the courses in farm crops, 
soils, and plant breeding. 

The curriculum in farm crops aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register for sub- 
jects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular 
farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well 
fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, for em- 
ployment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State or 
Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

70 



The division of soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to 
take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The division pos- 
sesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especially 
in the pot culture laboratories, and on the experimental fields at the station 
and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves to 
teach soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment 
stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Plant Industry and the 
Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States Department of Agriculture. 

« 

Crops Division 

Senbester 
Junior Year ' I II 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) _ 2 or 3 — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) « 2 2 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) _...._ 4 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — 3 

Electives _ „ „ 1 11 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f) - - - 2 — 

Advanced Genetics (Gen. 102 s) : - -.. - — 2 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 — 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) — 2 

Selected Crop Studies (Agron. 104f and s) - 1 4 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) * -.- 3 — 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) — 2 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) - 3 . — 

Farm Forestry (For. Is) -...., — 3 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) _ - - - 4 — 

Electives .- - — - — 3 

16 16 



71 



j 



I 



I 



i 



Soils Division 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) - 2 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) ....- 4 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils If) 5 — 

Soil Management (Soils 102 s) _ — 3 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) „ 4 — 

Electives 1 8 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 — 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 — 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) — 2 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) 3 — 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) — 2 

Electives 6 12 



16 



16 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The courses in animal husbandry are designed to furnish instruction in 
the essential principles and practices that are concerned in the breeding, 
feeding, management, judging, and marketing of horses, beef cattle, sheep, 
and swine. Attention is given to meat, to wool, and to by-products of the 
meat industry. 

The curriculum in animal husbandry is so planned as to allow plenty of 
latitude in the selection of courses outside of the department, thus giving 
the student fundamental training and fitting him to become the owner or 
superintendent of general or specialized livestock farms. 

Opportunity for specialization is offered to those who may desire to 
become instructors or investigators in the field of animal husbandry. 

Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng, 5f and 6 s) „ _ 2 2 

General Bateriology (Bact. If or s) 4 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. lOlf) „ _ 3 — 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) — 3 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106 s) — 8 

Genetics ( Gen. lOlf ) 3 — 

Advanced Livestock Judging (A. H. 105f and 106 s) 2 2 

Electives ....- 2 3 



Semester 

Senior Yea/r * 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) — ^ 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) - ^ 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 109 s) — ^ 

Livestock Management (A. H. 103f) 3 

Livestock Management (A. H. 104f) 3 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) — ^ 

Electives - - - — ^ 

16 16 

BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

The present organization of this department was brought about with 
two main purposes in view. The first is to give all students of the Uni- 
versity an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of this basic sub- 
ject The second purpose is to prepare students for bacteriological positions 
(including those of dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists; and fed- 
eral, state, and municipal bacteriologists); and for public health, research, 
and industrial positions. 

Sophomore Year 
Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 3 

German or French - -•- ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - - ^ 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2 s) - -"- 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) -.• - -- - ^ 2 

Electives ~...- - 

17 15 

Junior Year 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) — ^ -- 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112 s) — — " | 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) ^^ - — 2 2 

Serology (Bact. 115f) ~ -- ^ ~" 

Hematology ( Bact. 103f ) ^ 

Advanced Methods (Bact. 122 s) ^ - -- — ^ 

Bacteriology Electives - •• ^^ 

Electives - - • ^ _ 

16 16 



16 



72 



16 



73 



< 



i 



Senior Year / 

Bacteriological Problems (Bact. 123 f and 124 s) 2 

Statistics ( Gen. 1 1 If ) 2 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) -...._ 

Research Methods (Bact. 121f ) „ _ 1 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 127f) 2 

Journal Club (Bact. 131f and 132 s) 1 

Bacteriology Electives 3-5 

Electives 5-3 



Semester 
II 



3 



— 4 



16 



2-5 
6-3 



16 



BOTANY 



The department of Botany offers three major lines of work: general 
botany and morphology, plant physiology, and plant pathology. The 
courses listed for the curricula in botany and morphology, and plant 
physiology, make a kind of skeleton of essentials, to which the student 
adds the individual requirements to make a complete four year course. 
In the junior and senior years botanical courses may be elected to fit the 
individual needs of the student and the particular line to which he is in- 
clined. Both the junior and senior years also allow considerable freedom in 
the election of non-botanical courses, in order to round out a fairly broad 
cultural education and to satisfy the educational requirements for those who 
desire to qualify for high school teaching. The curriculum as outlined lays 
a good foundation for graduate work in any field of botanical science. 

The curriculum offered in plant pathology is designed to give the student 
the fundamental principles of plant disease control and investigation. 
Trained plant pathologists find opportunities to do advisory, extension, and 
research work in the various agricultural colleges, experiment stations, and 
the United States Department of Agriculture, and also in numerous com- 
mercial concerns, such as seed companies, companies making spray ma- 
terials, farmer cooperatives, etc. For the student who elects a major in 
plant pathology, the following suggested curriculum will also lay a strong 
foundation for the type of graduate work usually required for a success- 
ful career as a professional plant pathologist. The curriculum may be 
modified to meet individual needs. 



General Botany and Morphology, Physiology, and Pathology 

Semester 
I II 



Freshman Year 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2 s) - - -....- 

General Chemistry ( Chem. ly ) 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Modern Language (French or German) — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) 



4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 

Local Flora (Bot. 4s ) — 

General Zoology (Zool. I's) ....- — - — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - _ 4 

College Algebra (Math, llf ) and Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) 3 

Modern Language - 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) -.- 2 

Electives — 

16 

General Botany and Morphology, and Plant Physiology 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - — — 4 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s).....- „ - — 

Electives - -^ - - — 8 

16 

Senior Year 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) - - - --• 3 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107f) - -.- 2 

Botanical Electives ( Maximum ) - - — 5 

Other Electives (Minimum) — 6 

16 



16 



2 

4 

8 
8 

2 
2 

16 



4 
3 
9 

16 



12 
4 

16 



74 



76 



Plant Pathology 

_ , ,, Semester 

Junior Year j »» 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) _.. 4 _ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 . 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) « 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 3 

Mycology (Bot. 102f) ~ 4 _ 

Research Methods (Pit. Path. 103s) _ 2 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107f) -. J. ' " Z.ZZT " 2 

Electives „.... « 

" " — 



Dairy Manufacturing 



Semester 



17 
Senior Year 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) 

Plant Anatomy (Bot. lOlf ) o 

Genetics ( Gen. lOlf ) 3 

Diseases of Fruits (Pit. Path. 101s) or Diseases of Garden and 

Field Crops (Pit. Path. 102s) ^ __ ___ 

iiilectives ^ _ -iQ 



15 
3 



16 



2 

11 

16 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



The department of Dairy Husbandry offers courses in two major lines: 
dairy production and dairy manufacture. The curriculum in each of these 
is 90 arranged as to give the student an intimate knowledge of the science, 
and facility in the art of dairy husbandry practice. The dairy production 
option is organized to meet the specific requirements of students who are 
especially interested in the care, feeding, breeding, management, and im- 
provement of dairy cattle and in the production and sale of market milk. 

The option in dairy manufactures is planned to meet the particular de- 
mands of those interested in the processing and distribution of milk, in dairy 
plant operation, and in the manufacture and sale of butter, cheese, ice-cream; 
and other milk products. 

The dairy herd and the dairy laboratories are available to students for 
mstruction and for research. Excellent opportunity is, therefore, afforded 
to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students for original investi- 
gation and research. Graduates in the courses in dairy husbandry should 
be well qualified to become managers of dairy farms, teachers, and investi- 
gators in the State and Federal Agricultural Experiment Stations, or to en- 
ter the field of commercial dairying. 



Sophomore Year i 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f or s) „ — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) 4 

Introductory Dairy Science (D. H. If or s) -. 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5f or s) .-. _. — 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y) ,.. 2 

Electives - -....„ , 4 

16 

Junior Year 

Geography of Dairying (D. H. lOOf) _ 2 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf and 102s) 3 

Dairy Manufacturing (D. H. 105f and 106s) -...._ „ 5 

Grading Dairy Products (D. H. 109s) _ — 

Dairy Mechanics (D. H. Illy) 1 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) , 2 

Electives 3 

16 
Senior Year 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOly) 3 

Market Milk (D. H. 107f) „ 5 

Analysis of Dairy Products (D. H. 108s) — 

Dairy Accounting (D. H. 112s) — 

Dairy Literature (D. H. 113f and D. H. 113s) _ 1 

Dairy Plant Experience (114f and 115s) 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 

Electives — 1 

16 
Dairy Production 

Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) * ~. 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) — 4 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOly) 3 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) - — 

Dairy Cattle Judging (D. H. 102 s) — 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. lOlf) 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) — 

Geography of Dairying (D. H. lOOf) - 2 

Electives 2 



76 



16 



// 

3 
4 



3 
2 
4 

16 



3 
5 
1 
1 
2 
4 

16 

3 

3 
1 
1 
1 

7 

16 

2 
8 

3 
8 
1 

2 

2 

16 



77 



• 



I 



I 

I 

I 
I 



Semester 

Senior Yea/r I II 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 109 s) — 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) - 3 — 

Market Milk (D. H. 107f) 5 — 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) „.... 3 — 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106 s).. - — 3 

Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (D. H. 104 s) — 2 

Electives 5 8 



16 



16 



ENTOMOLOGY 



This department is engaged in the teaching of entomology to all agri- 
cultural students as a basis for future work in pest control, in the prepara- 
tion of technically trained entomologists, and in furnishing courses to 
students in Arts and Sciences and Education. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in large 
measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of preventing or 
combating the pests that menace his crops. Successful methods of control 
are emphasized in the economic courses. 

The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
Extension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the office of the State 
Entomologist are in one administrative unit, enables the student in this 
department to avail himself of the many advantages accruing therefrom. 
Advanced students have special advantages in that they may be assigned to 
work on Station projects already under way. The department takes every 
advantage of the facilities offered by the Bureau of Entomology of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, the Beltsville Research Center, the 
National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, various other local laboratories, 
the libraries in Washington, and the Washington Entomological Society. 
There is an active Entomological Society composed of the students and staff 
of the department. A monthly news magazine is published, and there are 
numerous other profitable projects in which all students may participate. 
Thus students are given many opportunities of meeting authorities in the 
various fields of entomology, to observe projects under way, consult col- 
lections, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology. Following is 
the suggested curriculum in entomology. It can be modified to suit indi- 
vidual demand. Students not starting this curricoilum in their freshman 
year can with a few changes in schedule meet the requirements in the 
four years. 



Semester 

Freshman Year 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - ^ ^ 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) ^ 

General Botany (Bot. If) 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) .^ 

Insect Biology (Ent. 3s) -•- ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) --"-" -■■; •-"• 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. ^ ^ 

Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) -■-- - " 

16 16 



Sophomore Year 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) | 

College Algebra (Math, llf) - - " _ 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) - - 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) -- ^ 

French or German - - „ 

Insect Morphology and Taxonomy (Ent. 2y) -. •- ■"-"-• 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. ^ 
Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) - - 

17 



Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - • ^ 

French or German. - g 

♦Economic Entomology (Ent. lOly) - ^ 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - _ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) - ■- ^ 

Electives - -- - " " 

16 

Senior Year 

*Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. I04y) -^ •-■■ - ^ 

Seminar (Ent. 103y) -- - ' ^ 

Special Problems (Ent. llOf or s) - - "•"" ^^ 

Electives — ' _ 

16 



3 
8 
3 
3 

2 



17 



4 

3 
o 

4 
3 

16 

3 
1 
2 

10 

16 



* Ent. 10 ly and Ent. 104y Uught in alternate years. 



78 



79 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Those who do not care to specialize in any particular phase of agriculture 
will pursue the following curriculum; 

Seiruester 
Junior Year I II 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - 4 — 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) _ 4 — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and Qs) .^. 2 2 

Farm Poultry (Poultry Is) — 3 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) '6 -— 

Farm Accounting (F. M. Is) — 8 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) — 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 3 

Electives _ — 2 

17 16 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) » 3 — 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) „...- 4 — 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) - 3 — 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102 s) — 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) - „ — 2 

Farm Forestry (For. Is) _ — 3 

Electives „.. 6 8 

16 16 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Rapid accumulation of knowledge in the field of genetics has changed 
the viewpoint of those interested in plant and animal breeding and in 
eugenics. 

Teachers and investigators have increasing occasion to interpret statisti- 
cal data presented by others, as well as to gather and organize original 
material. 

The department of Genetics and Statistics offers students training in (1) 
the principles of heredity and genetics, and (2) the tools and methods em- 
ployed in statistical description and induction. 

HORTICULTURE 

There are several reasons why the State of Maryland should be pre- 
eminent in horticulture and offer excellent opportunities for horticultural 
enterprises. The more evident ones are the wide variation in soil and 
climate from the Eastern Shore to the mountains in the West, the nearness 
to many large Eastern markets, and the large number of railroads, inter- 

80 



urban lines highways, and waterways, which combine to favor the growing 
t^oM^^rl crol and to make marketing easy and comparatively cheap. 
The department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work: 
pomology, olericulture, floriculture, and landscape ^^f ^^^^^^^ , f^"^ 
Sinfto specialize in horticulture may take a general course during the 
W years, or the student may specialize in any of the four divisions. The 
courses have been so planned that upon their completion students should 
be fitted to engage in commercial work, county agent work, or teaching and 
investigational work in State and Federal institutions. 

IL tie University campus, the department has at its disposal ten acres 
of ^ound devoted to vegetable gardening, eighteen acres of orchards, small 
fruits, and vineyards, twelve greenhouses, in which research and teachmg 
are condu^^^^ and o^e building which is devoted to horticultural teaching 
and research. In addition, the department has acquired 250 acres of land 
three miles from the college, which tract is used for experimental and 
teaching purposes. MemJ)ers of the teaching staff are likewise members of 
the experiment station staff, hence students have an opportunity to 
become acquainted with the research being carried on m the department. 
Excellent opportunity for investigating new problems is afforded to ad- 
vanced undergraduates and to graduate students. 

Students who intend to specialize in Pomology, Olericulture Floriculture, 
or Landscape Gardening are required to take courses of study which it is 
felt will best equip them for their future work in Horticulture. 

The following curricula will be adjusted to the special needs of the 
student whose interests lie in the general scientific field or the one who is 
preparing for work in technical lines. The object is to fit students most 
effectively to fill positions of certain types, as noted above. 

Pomology— Olericulture— Floriculture Semester 

Freshman Year 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - — 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2s) 7;7:r'"':"7T o q 

College Algebra (Math, llf); Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) 3 6 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) .........._i^~-».. -^-- 1 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M. I. ly or 2y and 4y) or Physical Education 

(Phys. Ed. ly) - -■ - _ _ 

16 16 



SI 



I 



Semester 



Olericulture 



I 
I 



I 



Sophomore Year I 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) „ 4 

Geolo^ ( Geol. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) „ _ - _ — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 

♦Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) 3 

♦Principles of Vegetable Culture (Hort. lis) — 

♦♦General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) — 

Practical Pomology Lab. (Hort. 7f and 8s) - 2 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M.I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 

or 6y and 8y) _ _ _ _ 2 

Electives _ — 

17 

Pomology 

Junior Ye cur 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) ., — 

tSmall Fruit Culture (Hort. 4 s) _ _ — 

Fruit Judging ( Hort. 5f ) „ „ „ 2 

tSystematic Pomology (Hort. 107f) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) ™ 2 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) ., 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) — 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 3 

Electives _ „ 2 

Senior Year 

t Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. lOlf) 3 

tEconomic Fruits of the World (Hort. 102 s) — 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort, 43y) 1 

tGeneral Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31 s) — 

tGeneral Floriculture (Hort. 21f) 2 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) 2 

Electives _ _ _ 4 

16 



// 



Semester 



♦Required for students in pomolopy and olericulture. 
♦♦Required for students in floriculture. 
tCourses offered only in alternate years for juniors and seniors. 



5 
3 

3 
2 
2 

2 

0or2 

17 



3 
2 



2 

3 

6 
16 

2 
1 
2 



2 
9 

16 



Junior Year 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) - - • — ~~ 

tSmall Fruit Culture (Hort. 4 s) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) - •-- 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) ^ 

fTilack Crop Production (Hort. l2f ) - 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) 

Electives - - " " '" 



Senior Year 

Farm Management (F.'M. 2f) 

tGeneral Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) 

tGeneral Floriculture (Hort. 21f) 

tTuber and Root Crops (Hort. 103f) -- 

tSystematic Olericulture (Hort. 105f) - 

t Advanced Truck Crop Production (Hort. 104 s). 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y). 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y) - 

Electives 



16 



Floriculture 

Junior Year 

♦Greenhouse Management (Hort. 22y) - 

Floricultural Practice (Hort. 23y) - ^ 

Floricultural Trip (Hort. 27 s) .- ^ 

♦Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 24 s) - - 

♦Garden Flowers (Hort. 26f ) ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) ~ ■ ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) -'- - 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) — J^ 

Local Flora (Bot. 4 s) -- 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 32f) ^ 

Electives •■ 

17 



// 

3 
2 



3 
6 

16 



4 — 

— 2 

2 — 

2 — 

3 — 

2 
1 
2 

16 



2 
2 

1 
9 

16 



3 
2 
1 
2 

2 
3 

2 
1 

16 



*Cour<es taken by both sophomores and juniors in alternate years. 
tCour^l offered only in alternate years for juniors and seniors. 



82 



83 



I 



f 



I 
I 



Serrbester 

Senior Year I II 

♦Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 25y) - 3 3 

Plant Materials (Hort. 106y) ^ ^ ~.- 2 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 — 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y) 1 1 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) 2 2 

Electives - -....- - ~ 5 7 



16 



Landscape Gardening 

Freshman Year 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 1 s) — — 

General Botany (Bot. If) „ 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - _ - 1 

College Algebra (Math, llf); Analytic Geometry (Math. 14 s) 3 
Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 

16 

Sophomore Yea/r 

French or German , 3 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 

Geology ( Geol. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) 2 

♦General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 



17 



♦ Courses taken by both sophomores and juniors in alternate years. 



16 



4 
4 

8 
1 
8 

1 

16 



8 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 

2 
2 

17 



Junior Year 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) 

tPlant Materials (Hort. 106y) — 

tHistory of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 35f)... 

♦Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 32f) ^ 

tLandscape Design (Hort. 33 s) ^ 

t Garden Flowers (Hort. 26f ) - — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf ) — - ^ 

Local Flora (Bot. 4 s) - - ___ 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) - - ^ 

Electives - - - " " 



Semester 

i U 

3 — 

2 8 
1 — 

3 — 
— 3 



— 3 



2 
2 
3 



16 



16 



Senior Year 

tLandscape Design (Hort. 34f) - — •- 

tLandscape Construction and Maintenance (Hort. 36 s) 
tCivic Art (Hort. 37 s) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y) - 

Electives --•- - *" 



3 — 



— 


1 


— 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


8 


10 



14 



16 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 

comprehensive view of the practices of poultry raising. Students who expect 

oTecome teachers, extension workers, or investigators should choose as 

efectlvr such subj;cts as psychology, economic history, sociology, philos- 

ophy, and political science. 

Junior Year 

Poultry Production (Poultry 103 s) — - - "^ ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) - - -.- - " ^ __ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - - - -"* ^ 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact 2 s) — • ^ __ 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) - —- 4 _ 

Poultry Keeping (Poultry 102f) .^.-.-.» -- _ 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) - - '".".1 3 3 

Electives - - — 

16 16 

85 



84 



Senior Yea/r Semester 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) ^ ^^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) Z ^ "" 

Farm Accounting (F. M. ls)ZI ^ "^ 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106 s)... "" ^ 

Poultry Breeds (Poultry 104f) 1 " "~" ^ 

Poultry Management ( Poultry* 105 s) ^ "^ 

mii^tly ""^ ^^"^ Products (A. E. 102 s7zzziz::z::::::: z J 

- 5 S 



Electives 



16 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE AND VETERINARY 

MEDICINE 



16 



a combined six-year P-^L^oTr^t JhTfi^iT^^^^^^^ 
gram are taken at College Park tL U^f^l ^ "* ***'^ P'°- 

Veterinary School of thf Universitv of S. ? ^'^"' ^'" *^''"" ^* *»»« 
completion of the three years' worf at ^ ^r"''' f^; , '^"^'" ^""^^^f"' 
first year's work at the Univerrv nf p ^"'^"I'^^ty "^ Maryland and the 
B. S. degree from he'S I Jty ^/Jj^X^^^^ ^'^^ ^^^'^^^t ^-eives his 

of the last two years' woJk at til ^t -^ . ^"^"^ successful completion 
his degree in VeLinl^tedi^.^^fr^r^^^^^^^^^^^^ '^ — 

SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

of'fh?j:a::'S^^^^^^^ i^cirstrnfs^^^V''^ '^^^^ '»^^' - ~* 

not included in'any r^X tSut b"u Tr^^^ed Z'''''"l :J ^^"""^^ 
of the individual. In case surh n«,^«T i, arranged to meet the needs 

lege entrance requi ements ttev C" ' ""* ^"''^"^'^ '^' ^^^"'^^ «<>'- 

"credit") certain^/ reaSiX^Lsr^Vn '"'^' ^'° ^^^"^ -«^-* 
special students are the sLe asTels foT^X tTeS" '"^ '"'• *'^" 

in^hS: ScSiLST^HLr; s^t:foVr>--r~ 

permission to visit classes and l^r^i^.v. , k .^^ '^'*'^' granting them 
partments. This opport^^^^^^^^^ ^' '^^ ^^^erent de- 

growers, gardeners, or other erpecSvintr-S J ''*'' Poultrymen, fruit- 
get away from thei; work a^^ sX^ Sm'e '^tlTe^ ^'^ ^" '''' '' 
tl^^ll^^^^^^^ ^'' *^^-^ ^^^ ^^^^^-^^- -^ *51-00 per week for 

\'^rer/;^"^o1l^r.Lr' ^- -- — t of ...ular or intermittent attendance durin. 

86 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Harry J. Patterson, Director. 

The agricultural work of the University naturally comprises three fields: 
research, instruction, and extension. The Agricultural Experiment Station 
is the agricultural research agency of the University, which has for its 
purpose the increase of knowledge relating to agriculture, primarily for the 
direct benefit of the farmer. It is also the real source of agricultural infor- 
mation for use in the classroom and for demonstrations in the field. 

The Experiment Station work is supported by both State and Federal 
appropriations. The Hatch Act, passed by Congress in 1887, appropriates 
$15,000 annually; the Adams Act, passed in 1906, provides $15,000 annu- 
ally; the Purnell Act, passed in 1925, provides $60,000 annually, and the 
Bankhead-Jones Act, passed in 1935, provides, for 1936-1937, $14,275.24. 
The State appropriation for 1937 was $42,604. 

The objects, purposes, and work of the Experiment Station as set forth 
by these acts are as follows: 

"That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to con- 
duct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants 
and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the 
remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their 
different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative cropping 
as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new plants or 
trees for acclimation ; the analysis of soils and water ; the chemical composi- 
tion of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test 
their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation and 
value of grasses and forage plants ; the composition and digestibility of the 
different kinds of food for domestic animals; the scientific and economic 
questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such other 
researches or experiments bearing directly on the agricultural industry of 
the United States as may in each case be deemed advisable, having due 
regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective States or 
Territories." 

The Purnell Act also permits the appropriation to be used for conducting 
investigations and making experiments bearing on the manufacture, prepa- 
ration, use, distribution, and marketing of agricultural products, and for 
such economic and sociological investigations as have for their purpose the 
development and improvement of the rural home and rural life. 

The Maryland Station, in addition to the work conducted at the Univer- 
sity, operates a sub-station farm of fifty acres at Ridgely, Caroline County, 
a farm of about sixty acres at Upper Marlboro for tobacco investigation, 
and a farm of 234 acres near Ellicott City for livestock. Experiments in 
cooperation with farmers are conducted at many different points in the 

87 



The results of the Experiment Station work durino- th. „= . 
a century have develoned a <:,.,o„.„ * • ,. <^""ng the Past quarter of 

a substantial founlaS for Sulturat^'^f ""■' *^ *""'=*'' ""^ ^^^^ '^^^ 
cultural demonstrat! nT and S^nSTJoT:nT:V''^ ^l'"''^ '' ^^- 
"'sSeTtstr"^ Of the worrrre SerL^t Stirs.'^^'^ '^^ ^" 
in^SZltlTZZ::: '"^ -^''''''''''^^ ^- '^^P* ^- «=>- touch with the 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

T. B. Symons, Director, 

The Extension Service is that branch of the University of Maryland, 
established by Federal and State law, which is designed to assist farmers 
and their families in promoting the prosperity and welfare of agriculture 
and rural life. Its work is conducted in co-operation with the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

The Extension Service is represented in each county of the State by a 
county agent and a home demonstration agent. Through these agents and 
its staff of specialists, it comes into intimate contact with rural people and 
with the problems of the farm and home. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home life comes within 
the scope of the work undertaken by the Extension Service. Farmers are 
supplied with details of crop and livestock production, and with instructions 
for controlling diseases and insect pests; they are encouraged and aided in 
organized effort, helped with marketing problems, and in every way possible 
assisted in improving economic conditions on the farm. 

This service is charged with carrying out in Maryland the program of the 
Agricultural Adjustment Administration and cooperates in the programs 
of other Federal agencies. 

Rural women are likewise assisted in the problems of the home. They are 
made acquainted with time- and labor-saving devices, with simpler and 
easier methods of work, with new knowledge of foods, with new ideas about 
home furnishing, with practical methods of home sewing and millinery con- 
struction, and with such other information as tends to make rural home 
life attractive and satisfying. 

For rural boys and girls, the Extension Service provides a valuable type 
of instruction in agriculture and home economics through its 4-H Club 
work. Actual demonstrations conducted by the boys and girls themselves, 
under supervision of the county and home demonstration agents, are the 
best possible means of imparting to youthful minds valuable information in 
crop and livestock production and in the household arts. The 4-H Club 
work affords rural boys and girls a real opportunity to develop self-confi- 
dence, perseverance, and leadership. 

The Extension Service works in accord with all other branches of the 
University of Maryland and with all agencies of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. It co-operates with all farm and community organi- 
zations in the State which have as their major object the improvement of 
agriculture and rural life; and it aids in every way possible in making 
effective the regulatory work and other measures instituted by the State 
Board of Ag^culture. 

The Extension Service is gradually developing activities in the general 
adult educational field. 



88 



89 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

T. H. Taliaferro, Dean. 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal train- 
ing in biological sciences, economics and finance, history, languages 
and literatures, mathematics, philosophy, physical sciences, political sci- 
ence, psychology, and sociology. It thus affords an opportunity to ac- 
quire a general education which shall serve as a foundation for success in 
whatever profession or vocation the student may choose. In particular it 
prepares the ground and lays the foundation for the learned professions 
of law, medicine, theology, and teaching, and even the more technical profes- 
sions of engineering, public health service, and business administration. 
Through the aid which it furnishes other colleges of the University it aims 
to give the students of these colleges the outlook necessary for liberal 
culture and for public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and three Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the various de- 
partments as follows: (1) The Division of Humanities: Classical Lan- 
guages, Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Modem 
Languages, Music, Philosophy, and Speech; (2) The Division of Natural 
Sciences: Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Zoology, and associated depart- 
ments in other colleges of the University such as Bacteriology, Botany, 
Entomology, and Geology; (3) The Division of Social Sciences: Business 
Administration, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociol- 
ogy, and associated departments in other colleges. 

These Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in the College of Arts and Sciences, and designate general 
requirements, the fulfillment of which is necessary to qualify a student for 
admission to major work in each Upper Division. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the prescribed con- 
ditions for degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Graduates of this college who have completed the regular course are 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts, except that, upon request, any 
student who has met the requirements for that degree may be awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, provided the major portion of the work has 
been done in the field of science, and the application has the approval of the 
department in science in which the major work has been carried. Students 
who have elected the combined program of Arts and Medicine may be 

90 



Mpd the degree of Bachelor of Science after the completion of at 
f ^t fhrS yearTof the work of this college and the first year of the 
least tnree >ear& ui ^ ^^yyiKiriAH five-vear Academic and 

of Arts and Scifences. 

Requirements for Degrees 

Th. baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 

secured a minimum of 120 semester "^i't^^^^^fj^tfrn^n students, or 

, . ^ .i^^ af Ipa^t fiftv-eiffht semester credits, exclusive 

A «:;tudent must acquire at least nivy ei^nv^ ^^ 

oftilSry science and'physical education, ^^^^J ^ -^f^/^^t 

than C, in the Lower Division Jefore bemg ^J^^^^^ZTiesirei must 

The average grade in subjects taken m tne major u^y 

be C or better. i 4. « ^o^r^v n-nA 

, , . • f^\.^ iiiTiinr vpar each student must select a major ana 

g„dualion m«.l compUU one major .rd one »'"« '" """ ?,",'h"^,„;„- 

of work taken in the field must be at least C. 

entitled Academic Regulations. 

Requirements for Admission 

J -oc^^r. fr. fViP Collee-e of Arts and Sciences are 
in'SL^ShTs:": IrthlrSoTad^^istn^tL other colleges and schools 
of the University. See Section I, Entrance. 

For admission to the pre-medical curriculum, two years "^ ^"y;"«/;/^'^ 
language in addition to the regularly prescribed units are required. 

91 



?.*!"^'!^1u*^'"?*.°^ *''" requirements for admission to the School of Medi 
cine and the relation of these to the pre-medical curriculum S be foSd 
under the heading School of Medicine. 

Students With Advanced Standing 

Students entering the junior year of the College of Arts and ^p;»^. 

ctl gi'Ttl1st"'^"^'^^'" °^'^^ '''''^'^^' unfveStfef or^from X 
colleges of this university must meet the requirements of thf. fir«f iT 

years to the extent of their deficiencies in cr'ediTs fn L Ind Sc n ^ 
Scholarship requirements as outlined in Section I of this catalo^.P ^li 
apply to all courses offered for advanced standing. <=atalogue will 

Advisers 
During the freshman and sophomore years each student is assigned to 

inThTiL? %'r"' "'° "•" '''' '^ ^'^ P~l adviser ass s"S him 
m the selection of his courses and the arrangement of his schedule and ^ 

any other matters on which he may need assistance or aSvke StuSfnts 
are expected to report to the advisers at periodic intervals for conferences! 
For the junior and senior years the student shall consider the head of 
his major department his special adviser, and shall consult him about 
the arrangement of his schedule and any ;ther matters irwhich he may 
need advice. The Chairman of the Upper Division in which the major ^2 

SSla^SnllfrDlSi™ ''-' '''''-'' '-'' ^" — ^^^ ^^ 

Student Responsibility 

The indivM student will be held resp^mMble for the selection of the 
courses and the major in confornnty with th^ regulations of the Colleaeof 
Arts andSctences. The student will also be held responsible for a Z^l 
edge of the general Academic Regulations. ^ 

Normal Load 

sel's'terTht tin" '^\^^^^^-- y-- - -xteen credit hours each 
semester. This includes one hour of basic military science or physical edu- 

The normal load for the sophomore year is seventeen credit hours per 
semester, two hours of which are military science or physical educatTon"^ 

In no case shall the load in the freshman and sophomore years exceed 
eighteen credit hours, except for sophomore students whose av^ra^ grade 
of fh^n 'J'' '^ "'"^^'r ^^"^ ^' '""'^ ™---^y. With the app^roval 

semesteT' wl '^' ''"'"'"" ^f '"^^'" ^^^"^ ^^a" ^^ ^^'^^ hours per 

semester. With the permission of the Chairman of the Division, the load 

92 



may be increased to seventeen hours, an absolute maximum except for honor 
students. The load of honor students shall lie w^ithin the discretion of the 
Division, but in no case shall it exceed nineteen hours. 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences for work done in other colleges and schools of the 
University. 

The number of semester hours accepted from the various colleges is as 
follows : 

College of Agriculture — Fifteen.* 

College of Education — Twenty. 

College of Engineering — Fifteen. 

College of Home Economics — Fifteen. 

School of Law — In the combined program the first year of law must be 
completed. 

School of Medicine — In the combined program the first year of medicine 
must be completed. 

School of Nursing — Three years in combined program. 

THE LOWER DIVISION 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences 
is designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare 
him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

It is the student^s responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into one 
of the Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general 
scholastic ability must also be demonstrated in these two years if permission 
to pursue a major study be desired. 

Suggested courses of study for the freshman and sophomore years are 
given under certain of the Divisions. The student should follow the curricu- 
lum for which he is believed to be best fitted. It will be noted that there is 
a great deal of similarity in these outlines for the freshman and sophomore 
years, and a student need not consider himself attached to any particular 
Division until the beginning of the junior year, at which time it is necessary 
to select a major. 

The work of this Di\'ision is under the direction of the Chairman of the 
Lower Division and the Dean. 



♦students electing botany, bacteriology, or entomology as the major field are not limited 
to fifteen hours. 



93 



Typical Freshman Program 



t Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 

♦Foreign Language „.^ _ - 8 

Science (Physical or Biological) _ - ~ 3-4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly 

or 2y and 4y ) 1 

Elect five to seven credits from the following: 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) > - 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 

General European History (H. ly) 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If or s) 

History of England and Greater Britain (H. 3y) 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s, llf and 14s, 12f and 15s) 

Library Methods (L. S. If or s) 

State Grovemment (Pol. Sci. 4s) „ > 

Freshman Lectures _ 



Semester 
I 11 

3 
3 
3-4 



5-7 5-7 



Total - „ 16-17 1^17 



Typical Sophomore Program 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s)..... 

Foreign Language _ _ > 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 
or 6y and 8y ) - 

General Electives from the College of Arts and Sciences, of 
which not more than three hours per semester may be 
taken in the Humanities. - J 






8 


3 


8 


3 


2 


2 


9-10 


9-10 



Total 17-18 17-18 

Common Requirements for Graduation 

1. English and Speech — fourteen semester hours. Of these, Survey and 
Composition I and Reading and Speaking are prescribed. 

2. Foreign Lan^i^iages and Literature — ^twelve semester hours (or equiva- 
lent) in one language. In satisfaction of this requirement college credit 
of six semester credit hours is allowed for two units of credit in any one 
language offered for entrance. 



tA placement test is given during: Freshman Week to determine whether the student is 
adequately prepared for Eng. ly. Students failing this are required to take Eng. lA, 
a one-semester course, without credit. After five weeks, students may be transferred from 
lA to ly, for which they will receive full credit, or from ly to lA, according to their dem- 
onstrated ability. 

♦Students who offer two units of a foreign language for entrance, but who because of 
inadequate preparation register for the first year of the subject, will receive only one- 
half credit. 

94 



3. Social Sciences— twelve semester hours. 

4. Natural Sciences and Mathematics— twelve semester hours. Of these, 
one year must be in natural science. 

5. Military Science or Physical Education— six semester hours. 

Additional requirements of the Upper Divisions are given on pages 95-109. 

UPPER DIVISIONS 
General Regulations 

The student must satisfy the general requirements of the University on 
pages 50-52 as well as the common requirements for graduation on page 94 
and the additional requirements for graduation of each Division. 

Attention is also called to the separate pamphlet entitled Academic 
Regulations, 

THE PIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division consists of the departments of Classical Languages, Com- 
parative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Modem Languages, 
Music, Philosophy, and Speech. It has charge of students who elect major 
work in English or Modem Languages, and also may provide minors for 
students who take their major work in other Divisions or Colleges. 

Additional Requirements for Graduation 

The following additional requirements should be completed, as far as 
possible, before the beginning of the junior year, and must be completed 
before graduation. 

1. Library Science — one semester hour. 

2. English 2f and 3s— six semester hours. 

3 Modem Language-To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reasonable proficiency m at 
least one modern foreign language, and in any case he must give proof 
of this proficiency before graduation. In satisfaction of this requirement, 
the grade of C or better must be obtained in one of the general language 
examinations which are given during the first and last days of each school 
year The student must show in this examination, that he has reached 
the level of attainment to be expected after two years of a college lan- 
guage course: (1) that he can translate with reasonable accuracy; (2) 
that his pronunciation is approximately correct; (3) that he is acquainted 
with the elements of grammar. The student may elect to take this exami- 
nation whenever he wishes, and when he passes it he will have satisfied 
this requirement; but in no case will a student in the Division of 
Humanities be graduated who has not had at least 6 semester hours of 
modem language work in college. 

4. Philosophy— three semester hours. 

5. Psychology— three semester hours. 

95 



Major and Minor Requirements 

onf of'tp^'f?"?^.'^ .*^' tf'' ^'^"' '^^ ^^^^^^^ "^^^^ «-le<^t a major in 

one of the fields indicated below, and before graduation must complete one 

major and one minor. The courses constituting the major and the minor 

must conform to the requirements of the department in whkh the Zor 

work IS done. A minimum of 126 hours (including the basirreieSts 

m military science or physical education) shall be completed SSe the 

Division will recommend a student for graduation. Of these T mLf™ 

60 hours must be completed in the junior and senior yea^. STveral 

grade of work taken in the major field must be as high as C ^ 



Fields of Study 

♦♦Classical Languages 
tComparative Literature 
English 
French 
German 



**Music 
fPhilosophy 
♦♦Speech 
Spanish 



c2 f '^*=*'"^ ^. '"^JO'- «r a minor, a student must have completed twelve 

related field satisfactory to the Division, with an average of at least C 
before credit will be allowed toward the completion of mrjor or m nS 
requirements. In addition: '"-ijor or mmor 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 86 
semester credit hours in one of these fields of study. At least 16 
of these hours must be taken in courses listed for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 
semester credit hours in one of the above fields of study not selected 
for the major or m some other field of study authorized in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. At least 9 of these hours must be 
taken m courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates 

or'^mLo^'"* """'* '"''" ^' ''^'* '^ '''^^ '^""'•^ '^"^ ^"'^'"^l^d in the major 

Advisers 

.A^l'^''^T\^^f '""'"'^^'^ ^^^ ^^^ "^ ^'^ «»^j°'- department his special 
annther Lt *=°"^">*.^,''» ^^-^ *e arrangement of his schedule and 
any other matters in which he may need advice. The Chairman of the 

ti~trii'vS~ ^^^' ^^'^"^'^ ^"^^' ^" -^^^'^^ -^^^ ^^^ --^'- 

tNot available at present for a major. 
•• Not available at present for a major or a minor. 



Normal Load 

The normal load in the junior and senior years shall be 15 hours per 
semester. With the permission of the Chairman of the Division, the load 
may be increased to 17 hours, an absolute maximum except for honor 
students. The load of honor students shall lie within the discretion of the 
Division, but in no case shall it exceed nineteen hours a semester. 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Natural Sciences is composed of the departments of 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Zoology of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, and the associated departments of Bacteriology, Botany, Entomol- 
ogy, and Geology in other colleges of the University. 

Since a knowledge of natural science is deemed essential to any well- 
rounded education, all students in the University are required to pursue at 
least one year's study in one or more of its fields. In its curricula, each 
requiring four years for completion, this Division prepares students for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. Its graduates are pre- 
pared to occupy positions as bacteriologists, botanists, chemists, entomol- 
ogists, mathematicians, physicists, and zoologists, in commercial laboratories, 
as employees in various branches of the Government service, patent exam- 
iners, technical salesmen, instructors in high schools and colleges, and teach- 
ers or research assistants in universities. Students in the scientific pre-profes- 
sional curricula are prepared for entrance to colleges of dentistry, medicine, 
and nursing. 

The sciences have so grown and their applications have become so 
extensive that it is impossible to deal with all phases of any one of them 
in the four years of college study. For this reason a vital part of the work 
of the Division is in the form of graduate courses. In the work leading 
toward the Degree of Master of Science or Master of Arts the student is 
to become acquainted with the general aspects of his chosen field. In 
preparation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the student is trained 
in methods of research which should enable him to add to human knowledge, 
undertake independent investigation in his science, or take charge of indus- 
trial developments. A description of the courses for undergraduates and 
graduates in this division is given in another part of this catalogue. 

Additional Requirements for Graduation 

The following additional requirements should be completed, as far as 
possible, before the beginning of the junior year, and must be completed 
before graduation: 

1. Natural Sciences — twelve semester hours. These are in addition 
to the common requirement of twelve hours, and include a course 
in biology. 



96 



97 



Major and Minor Requirements 

At the beginning of the junior year, each student must select a major in 
one of the fields described later, and before graduation must complete a 
major and a minor. The courses constituting the major and the minor 
must conform to the requirements of the department in which the major 
work is done. A minimum of 126 hours (including the basic requirements 
in military science or physical education) shall be completed before the 
Division will recommend a student for graduation. Of these, a minimum 
of 60 semester hours must be completed in the junior and senior years. 
The average grade for work taken in the major field must be at least C. 

In selecting a major or a minor, a student must have completed twelve 
semester hours in fundamental courses, in the field chosen or in a closely 
related field satisfactory to the Division, with an average grade of at 
least C, before credit will be allowed toward completion of the major or 
minor requirements. In addition: 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 
semester credit hours in one of these fields of study. At least 8 
of these hours must be taken in courses listed for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates, 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 
semester credit hours in one of the fields of study not selected for 
the major or in some other field of study authorized in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. At least 6 of these hours must be taken in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Not more than 15 semester hours may be taken in any field of study 
other than the major or minor in addition to the specific requirements. 

Advisers 

The student must consider the head of his major department his special 
adviser, and shall consult him about the arrangement of his outline of 
courses and any other matters in which he may need advice. 

Normal Load 

The normal load in the junior and senior years shall be 15 hours per 
semester. With the permission of the Chairman of the Division, the load 
may be increased to 17 hours, an absolute maximum except for honor 
students. The load of honor students shall lie within the discretion of the 
Division, but in no case shall it exceed nineteen hours a semester. 

FIELDS OF STUDY 
Bacteriology 

Bacteriology offers training in general, pathogenic, dairy, and sanitary 
bacteriology, and prepares students for positions in federal, state, public 
health, research, and commercial bacteriological laboratories. For the four 
year outline of study in Bacteriology, see College of Agriculture, page 73. 

98 



Botany 

Botany offers students an opportunity for training for positions as 
teachers, and investigational workers in state or governmental expenment 
stations, for governmental inspection work, or for the various vocations 
involving botanical applications. For the four year outline of study m 
Botany, see College of Agriculture, page 74. • 

Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry includes Agricultural, Analytical, Industrial, 
Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, together with the State Control 

Work. , .,- • ^ 4-^ 

Courses in these branches of Chemistry are arranged with a view to 
contributing toward the liberal education of the student in Arts and Sciences; 
the laying of the scientific foundation necessary for the professions of 
medicine, dentistry, pharm^tcy, engineering, and agriculture; and the training 
of students for careers in chemistry. 

It should be noted that the chemistry curriculum hereinafter outlined is 
designed to insure adequate instruction in the fundamentals of chemistry, 
as well as to meet the specific requirements of the Division. At the same 
time, it has been considered desirable to preserve as high a degree of flexi- 
bility as possible, in order to afford the student who has a definite end 
in view as regards chemistry an opportunity to fit his course to his actual 
needs. In general it may be said that the outline proposed prepares students 
to enter the following fields: 

1 General Chemistry: Here the student is offered a liberal selection of 
subjects in the arts and sciences. Through cooperation with the College of 
Education, he may so supplement this basic outline with work in Education 
as to meet the requirements for the State high school teacher's certificate. 
To prepare for college teaching, one requires graduate study leading to a 
higher degree. 

2. Industrial Chemistry: If the student wishes to prepare himself for 
the chemical industry or, by further study, chemical engineering, he will 
elect mechanical drawing in the first year, and advanced mathematics and 
physics and industrial chemistry in the third and fourth years. 

3 Biological Chemistry (Agricultural Chemistry): The object of tWs 
curriculum is to provide training for students desiring to prepare for the 
application of chemistry in the fields of agriculture and biology. This is 
accomplished by electing zoology and botany and additional courses in 
biology and physiological chemistry. 

4. Chemical Research: Preparation for research and graduate study in 
chemistry is also based upon the suggested outline. For advanced study, it 
is advisable that election be made largely from courses in chemistry and the 
allied sciences. The graduate outline offered by the Department of Chem- 
istry is found in detail in the catalogue of the Graduate School. 

99 



The Chemistry Curriculum 
Outline Suggested 

Semester 

I U 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 8 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 8 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math, llf and 12f, 

Math. 14s and 15s) „ 3_4 3^4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) l 1 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) _ 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly 

or 2y and 4v) 1 1 

Freshman Lectures 



16-17 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

Scientific French or German (French 3y or German 3y) 3 

Calculus (Math. 16y, Math. 17y) _ , _ 3^ 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem, 2y) 3 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 



Junior Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y and 117y). 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) ~ 



Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102y)...... 

Electives (Humanities, Sciences) 



4 
3 
6 
3 

15 

5 

10 

15 



Entomology 



ie-17 

8 

8 

3-4 
8 
8 



17-18 17-18 



4 
8 
8 

3 

16 

5 
10 

15 



This department offers training in entomology for future work in pest 
control, and in the preparation of technically trained entomologists. For 
the four year outline of study in entomology see College of Agriculture, 
page 79. 



€reneral Science 

For the benefit of such students as desire a general basic knowledge of 
the natural sciences without immediate specialization in any one of them, 
a general curriculum may be arranged. 

By a proper selection of electives a student upon completion of the course 
would be eligible to pursue graduate work in any department of the Division. 

If electives be properly chosen in the educational field, a prospective 
teacher of general science or of any of the specific sciences included in the 
Division may obtain a state teacher's certificate, and in turn be prepared to 
pursue graduate work in Education. 

Mathematics 

The department of Mathematics offers a curriculum of study based on 
the recognition of four dist^ct categories of students to whom mathematics 
is taught: 

A. To students who regard mathematics as but a part of the cultural 
equipment acquired in college, who have little or no interest in the technical 
aspects of the subject, but desire to know the place which mathematics 
occupies in the general scheme of things, the department offers an orienta- 
tion course in mathematics (Math. 10s). Courses lllf and 112s have also 
been devised to meet such requirements. 

B. To students who need a rudimentary knowledge of mathematics in 
order that they may understand its application to such fields as physics, 
thermodynamics, statistics, etc., the department offers basic courses in 
algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. 

0. To prospective engineers, industrial chemists, statisticians, and others 
who have chosen professions where mathematics is an indispensable aid to 
design and research, the department, in addition to the basic work outlined 
above, offers courses in calculus, pure and applied, and elementary differen- 
tial equations. Moreover, such students, upon completion of these basic 
studies, will be equipped to enter many of the advanced special courses listed 
elsewhere in this catalogue. 

D. Finally, there are students who have chosen mathematics for a career, 
with the view either of teaching the subject or of engaging in mathematical 
mvestigation. The department has designed for such students a compre- 
hensive curriculum of study, leading towards the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science and Master of Arts or Master of Science. 
Prospective candidates for such degrees will be expected to acquire during 
their college career a well balanced education; they are, therefore, urged 
to apply as early as possible to the head of the department for a compre- 
hensive outline of study. A typical schedule of the kind is the following: 



100 



101 



The Mathematics Curriculum 

Outline Suggested Semester 

Freshman Year I U 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 3 ,3 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 3 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

llf, 12f, 14s, and 15s) 4 4 

Geometrical Drawing ^and Modeling (Math. 18y) „ 1 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Freshman Lectures ., — — 



17 



So^phow^ore Year 



Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) ^, 3 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) 3 

Calculus (Math. 16y and 17y) 4 

Advanced Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (Math. 19y) 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 

or 6y and 8y ) „.. 2 



18 



Junior Year 



Plane Curves (Math. 125f ) 2 

Advanced Topics in Calculus (Math. 127f) 2 

History of Mathematics (Math. 122s) — 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 128s) — 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) 3 

Advanced Physics (Phys. 106s or 108s) — 

Biology 3 

Electives (History, Sociology, Economics) 5 

15 
Senior Year 

Electives (Mathematics and Astronomy) 4 

Seminar and Dissertation (Math. 140y) 1 

Advanced Physics (Phys. 109y) . 3 

Education (Ed. Psych. If, and Ed. 5s and 6s) 3 

Electives (Philosophy, Logic, etc.) - 4 



15 



17 



3 
3 

4 
1 
5 



18 



2 
2 
3 
3 



15 

4 
1 
8 
3 
4 

16 



Physics 

The courses in Physics are designed (1.) to provide students of Arts 
and Sciences with a knowledge of the basic scientific principles of the 
physical world and an insight into the functioning of a quantitative science; 
(2.) to lay some of the scientific foundation for the curricula of dentistry, 
engineering, home economics, medicine, pharmacy, etc.; (3.) to prepare 
prospective teachers and instructors for high schools and colleges; (4.) to 
train students who are specifically interested in physics for positions in 
experimental and research physical laboratories (college, governmental, 
and industrial). 

The curriculum given here is intended for the student who, on entering 
the University, has chosen to do his major work in physics. On completion 
of this curriculum the student will be prepared for graduate study in 
physics, or, by a proper selection of the electives in the senior year, for 
graduate work in chemistry or mathematics. 

If the electives in the junior and senior years be properly chosen in the 
Education field, the student can meet the requirements for the state high 
school teacher's certificate, and, with additional graduate work in Educa- 
tion, be eligible for a Master's degree in Education. 

Any student who has met the minimum requirements in chemistry, mathe- 
matics, and physics and has completed calculus (Math. 16y) may, with the 
consent of the department and the completion of such additional work as 
may be deemed individually necessary, select a major in physics. 



The Physics Curriculum 
Outline Suggested 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

llf, 12f, 14s and 15s) - 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - - 

Engineering Drawing ( Dr. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y). - - 

Freshman Lectures - ;• 



Semester 
I II 



3 
3 

4 
4 
1 
1 



8 
3 

4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



17 



I 



102 



103 



Semester 



Sopkomcre Yea/r 
Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 



Scientific French or German (French 3y or German 3y). 
Calculus (Math. 16y and 17y).. 
Creneral Physics (Phys. 2y) 






Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) 



>•*••«••••••••••« ■■<■■■§■•■■ ■ ■»•>■• •••«*«••••■••< 



Junior Yea/r 

Advanced Topics in Calculus (Math. 127f ) _- 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 128s) 

Advanced Physics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 109y) 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) 

Elective in Biology 

Electives (Arts, Sciences, Education) 



«*•*••••••«•••••••••••••••••••••••«••• 



J 


// 


8 


S 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 


2 


2 


17 


17 


2 


- 


-— 


2 


6 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 


4 


4 



u 



Senior Year 



Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) ^. 8 

Advanced Physics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 109y) _ 6 

Electives - , - 6 



If 



15 

3 
3 
9 

15 



2^1ogy 



The undergraduate courses of the department provide the fundamental 
training in zoology necessary for further work in research, teaching, medi- 
cine, and related professions. 

Certain courses are designed to train students specifically for service in 
the biological bureaus of the United States Government or the biological 
departments of Maryland and other states. 

With the completion of prescribed courses in the College of Education, a 
student, while fulfilling a major in zoology, may obtain a state certificate 
which qualifies him to teach in the secondary schools of Maryland. 

The graduate program provides a complete training in teaching and re- 
search methods in general zoology with emphasis on morphology, physiology, 
and marine biology. Instruction and opportunities for original investigation 
in the latter are supplemented by the research facilities and courses of 
instruction offered at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, a description 
of which is found on page 299. 

Certain courses in the department are presented expressly for the cultural 
values which they provide in establishing, together with other work in the 
University, an appreciation of man and his place in nature. 



The Zoology Curriculum 

Outline Suggested Semester 

Freshman Yea/r I U 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 4 

General Botany (Bot. If and 28) 4 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) — 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) „ - 1 1 

French or German (French ly or German ly )..... -...- 3 8 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) -...._ - » 1 1 



16 

Sophomore Year 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f ) _ 3 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) — 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) . :. 4 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

Scientific French or German (French 3y and German 3y) 3 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

8f and 10s or Math, llf and 14s) 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

18 
Junior Year 

Mammalian Anatomy (2k>oL lOlf) 3 

Faunistic Zoology (Zool. 108f and s) 3 

Animal Genetics (Zool. 120s) _ — 

General Physics (Phys. ly) -....- _ „ _ 4 

Electives (Arts, Sciences, Education) _ _ _ 5 

Senior Year 

Journal Club (Zool. 106y) > 1 

General Animal Physiology (Zool. 103f and s) - 3 

Electives (Arts, Sciences, Education) _ ^ 11 

15 



16 



3 

4 
3 
3 

3 

2 

18 



3 
3 
4 
5 

16 

1 

3 

11 

15 



\ 



104 



Those who intend to qualify for the teacher's certificate must elect 18 
hours during the junior and senior years in courses prescribed by the College 
of Education. 

105 



THE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Premedical 

The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland is three years of academic training in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. The subjects prescribed by the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Association are covered in 
the first two years of the Premedical Curriculum. 

Preference will be given students requesting entrance to the School of 
Medicine of the University who present the credits obtained by the suc- 
cessful completion of the three-year curriculum or its equivalent of 96 
semester hours. For recommendation, a student must complete the cur- 
riculuni with an average grade of B or above, and must also satisfy the 
Committee that he is qualified by character and scholarship to enter the 
medical profession. 

Another advantage the three-year curriculum offers to students who 
successfully complete this program and enroll in the School of Medicine 

, l^'^^^'T^'}^ '' *^^* *^^y ^^y^ ^^ ^^^ recommendation of the Dean 
of the School of Medicine, be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science 
after the completion of the first year's work in the School of Medicine. 
This combined program of seven years leads to the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine upon the completion of the full course. The first three years 
are ^^^^en in residence at College Park, and the last four in Baltimore in 
the School of Medicine. At least two years of residence at College Park 
IS necessary for students transferring from other colleges and universities 
who wish to become candidates for the combined degrees. 
For requirements for admission see Section I, Entrance. 

The Curriculum Semester 

rreshman Year r jj 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) o * 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s or Math, llf and 14s) III 3 3 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) 4 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) ~ >_ 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) IZIII" 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ ~ 2 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Physr Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) , ^ ^ - 

Freshman Lrectures > 



16 



16 



106 



Semester 



Sophomore Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) — ^ -. 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and SBy) 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 

Animal Histology ( Zool. 12f ) ^ ^ 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 3f and 4s) ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and By) ....- - ^ 



/ 

4 
3 
3 
3 



Junior Year 
Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. 103y). 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f) 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) , 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) 
Electives (Social Sciences) - 



18 

3 
4 

3 
5 



// 
4 
8 
3 

3 
3 

2 

18 
3 

3 
3 
6 



15 15 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine. The student 

also may elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses offered in 

the College of Arts and Sciences. In either case the Specific Requirements 

of the Division of Natural Sciences for graduation must have been met. 

Predental 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences desiring to prepare 
themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following two-year 
outline, which meets the predental requirements of the American Associa- 
tion of Dental Colleges. This outline can also be used by the student if he 
desires to continue his college training and complete work for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ !:. 3 8 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s or Math, llf and 14s) 3 8 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) _...... 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 4 

Mjechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) _ _ 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) , 1 1 

Freshman Lectures — — — 



17 



17 



107 




Semester 



Semester 



Sophom/yre Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) - 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) 



Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 

French or German. 



'••••^•**— *••••*••■•*< « »»•***♦*—»«■••—♦<•»>•»•*»—»••—»•■— »»••*** 



■• * ■**■■•■*♦ • ••«■•«••••• 



/ 

2 

1 
4 
5 

2 
3 

17 



// 
o 

1 

4 
5 

2 
8 

17 



Five- Year Combmed Arts and Nursing Curriculum 



The first two years of this course are taken in the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park. If students enter this combined program with 
advanced standing, at least the second full year of the course must be com- 
pleted in College Park. This course is prerequisite, and cannot be taken 
after the Diploma in Nursing is granted. 

The remaining three years are taken in the School of Nursing in Balti- 
more or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. In addition 
to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor of Science may, Upon 
the recommendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be granted 
at the end of the five-year course. Full details regarding this course may 
be found in the section of the catalogue dealing with the School of Nursing. 



The Curriculum 

Freshman Yecur 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Foreign Language ~ 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly)... 1 

History (H. ly or 3y) _ 3 

State Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) — 

Library Methods (L. S. If) - - 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 

Freshman Lectures ~ — — 



16 



8 
8 

4 
1 
8 
2 



17 



Sophomore Year 

ii:xpository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. lAs) — — 

General Zoology (Zool. If) 

Foods v-*^* ^* *^"^y/ " »...«—••——"••••••••••—••"••••" 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) - ~~ — — ~< 

Child Nutrition (H. E. 136s) 



/ 
2 



// 

2 

S 
S 
2 



4 
3 
3 



Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 



17 



2 
2 

17 



THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

This Division has charge of students who elect their major work in the 
departments of Economics and Business Administration, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, and Sociology. It also provides minor courses of study 
for students who take major work in this or other Divisions or Colleges. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

There are no additional requirements; but the common requirements 
for graduation should be completed as far as possible before the beginning 
of the junior year, and must be completed before graduation. 

» 

Major and Minor Requirements 

At the beginning of the junior year, each student must select a major 
in one of the fields indicated below, and before graduation must complete 
one major and one minor. The courses constituting the major and the 
minor must conform to the requirements of the department in which the 
major work is done. A minimum of 126 hours (including the basic require- 
ments in military science or physical education) shall be completed before 
the Division will recommend a student for graduation. Of these, a minimum 
of 60 hours must be completed in the junior and senior years. The average 
grade of work taken in the major field must be as high as C. 

Fields of Study 
Accounting and Finance Political Science 

Economics *Psychology 

History Sociology 

In selecting a major or a minor, the student must have completed 12 
semester hours in fundamental courses in the field chosen or in a closely 



108 



•P8ychol<«y may be chosen for minor work, or combined with Philoeophy to form • 
major. 

109 



related field satisfactory to the Divi^tion v^Hh ov, 

C before credit will be allowTn ,17' Z ^^^""^^^ S''^'^^ °^ ^^ 'east 

requirements, iriddltion " '''' '=°'"P''"°" "' ^^^''^ ^ ™"°' 

.iTrj^ ii' r :; ^:i;-zr:nz- s ^^- 

'^ul-LTS22^- '^ -"- -- JadvLidUr 

A minor shall ,»„,ist of not fewer Ih.n 12 nor mope than 2(1 « 
mostor „.d,t hour, i„ one of fc .bov. Il.ld= of «"3„ol LSS 

conrs,. .,.W for .ava^S. .Mi^JLlt't^ Xl™" "' '" 

Advisers 

ad^sLf ^fdlhSlloZf hL*^^^^ '^'^ '"^^■- ^^''-t-nt his special 

any other mattSsTnl^crhe^'r; tld ^17^ xVe' ct •^'^'^'"•^, ^"'^ 
Division shall determine each ^tnrlw' i / ^ Chairman of the 

lations of the DiSn °'"*' '" '^""^''^ity ^ith the regu- 

Normal Load 

semester"' wL'"^*^ '" '^^ '''''''' ""'* ^^"'°^ ^^^'^ ^h-" be 15 hours per 

semester. With permission of the Chairman of the Divi<,inn th 71 

be increased to 17 hours a„ oK„„i 4. • i^ivision, the load may 

The load of honor stude;ts shalT I T'T™ T''"' '"' ^°"°'- ^^''dents 
"uiiux iituaents sJiall lie withm the discrptinn nf fv,^ n- • • 

but m no case shall it exceed 19 hours per semester ''""' 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

adL'n'isSti:! t to^aVord^Sl*''.* T '"^^^^^ '" ^''^ «^'^ «^ ^-'-ss 
a training in the "S orin L %^r •'^°''" ^"^'"^^^ ^' ^ <=-reer 
advancement mus^ Tb^ dfy^tSd :L'rreVe';rd"iller ^'° ^^f 
routine. Both curricula combine a program of cultLfn, ^ ''''''^' 
the valuable mental discipline invoLd fn a stud" «f .t'^t^^l"' "^'^ 
methods and technic Pnr fj,. J u ^ °^ *« ^est business 

curricula are tS ^me, b^t t^he t^nnC ''^''^ ^'^ ^^^ 

is intended to .eet the needs 'f\t:re:rLl ^^^^^^^^^^^ f^/^* 

training; whereas the second is designed for ^tud.ZT\ ^ ? business 
specialized work in accounting and ^ancl! " '''^ "^'"^ "^^^^^^ 



110 



Business Administration Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Zoology) _ 

Modern Language - - _ 

Algebra (Math. 8f or llf) _ „ 

Economic Greography and Industry (Econ. If) 

History of World Commerce (Econ. 2s) _.... _ 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) _ „.... 

Freshman Lectures ^ - - - -.... 



Semester 



I 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



17 



Sophomore Year 

American History ( H. 2y ) _ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) _ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f) „ 

Business English ( Eng. 4s ) _ „.... 

Principles of Accounting (A. and F. 9y) _ 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f ) 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) - 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) _ 



General Business 

Junior Year 

Experimental Psychology (Psych. 2f) 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) - 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) „ „ _ 

Banking (Econ. 102s) _ 

Inland Transportation (Econ. 112s) 

Mathematical Theory of Investment (Math. lOlf). 

Elements of Statistics (Gen. 114s) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

*Electives 



Senior Year 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103f) 2 

Investments (A. and F. 104s) 

Insurance (Econ. 105f ) _ _ - 2 

Public Utilities (Econ. 113f) 2 

Public Finance (Econ. 114s) „.... — 

Personnel Management (A. and F. 106s) _ — 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f) 1 

*Electives - - 8 



15 



// 

4 
8 



3 
3 



17 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






2 


4 


4 


2 


— 


— 


8 


2 


2 


17 


17 


3 




3 


8 


2 


— 


— 


2 


— 


3 


3 




— 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 



15 



— 3 



3 
2 



15 



♦Electives must be chosen first to fulfill the common requirements for graduation. In the 
senior year at least 3 hours each semester must be elected from Accounting and Finance or 
Economics. 

Ill 



. Accounting and Finance 

Semester 

I II 
Junior Year 

Experimental Psychology (Psych. 2f) 3 — 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) _ 3 3 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) _.... 2 — 

Advanced Accounting (A. and F. llOy) > 3 3 

Mathematical Theory of Investment (Math. lOlf) 3 — 

Elements of Statistics (Gen. 114s) _..... — 3 

Personnel Management (A. and F. 106s) „ — 2 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 1 

♦♦Elective — 1 

Senior Year ^^ ^^ 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103f) 2 — 

Investments (A. and F. 104s) .- — 8 

Cost Accounting (A. and F. 121f and 122s) 2 2 

Income Tax Accounting (A. and F. 123f) 3 — 

Public Utilities (Econ. 113f).....- 2 — 

Insurance (Econ. 105f) 2 — 

♦♦Electives _.. 4 8 

15 15 



Semester 
I II 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Science or Mathematics 

History of England and Greater Britain (H. 3y) 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 

Foreign L#anguage ~ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 

Freshman Lectures 



3 
4-3 
3 
3 
3 



Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 

American History ( H. 2y ) 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y). 



2 
3 
3 
3 



.♦.^•^••••••••-•••••••••••••••••••••••••^ 



!•••••««•••«»•••*< 



>•«•• ••«■•••• ••»»••■>•! 



••« •• ••••••••••••••«•••< 



2 
3 

17 



3 

4-3 
3 
3 
3 



16-17 16-17 



2 
3 
3 

8 
1 

2 
8 

17 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. During this f>eriod they will complete the 
prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, and must com- 
plete the common Requirements for Graduation, as indicated elsewhere. If 
students enter the combined program with advanced standing, at least the 
third full year's work must be completed in residence at College Park. Upon 
the successful completion of one year of full-time law courses in the School 
of Law in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be awarded on 
the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law. The degree oi 
Bachelor of Laws will be awarded upon the completion of the combined 
program. 



Junior Year 
Largely electives, including the completion of the Common Requirements 
for Graduation as outlined on Page 94. 



Senior Year 

First year of regular law course. 

Students who are unable to take the combined program in Arts and Law 
may fulfill the entrance requirements of the School of Law by completmg 
the first two years of prelegal studies as outlined in the above combmed 
course. 



♦Electives should be in English, history, Latin or modern languages, economics or po- 
litical science, or some of the common requirements for graduation. 



**Eleclives must be chosen first to fulfill the common requirements for graduation. 



J 



112 



113 



.:£•'?• 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

WiLLARD S. Small, Dean, 

The College of Education meets the needq nf fi.o ^ n • 

work m specialized educational and institutional fields- n\ JiZf/ 

whose major interest is in other fields b,.t ^^ a ' <^\ «*"<lents 

tion for their informational and S turaWa7ues Tfi^ T''''/" "'"*="■ 

Departments 

The instructional work of the CoIIpo-** n^? t?^„««<-- 
following functional divisions: mJo^^L^PrtSr Si *^' 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the Collee-e of Fr?„.af; 

Admission of Normal School Graduates 

114 



satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elemen- 
tary Education by attendance for two full college years; graduates of the 
three-year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year. 

Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as high 
school teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not 
uniform, but depends upon the high school subjects to be taught and the 
individual ability of the student. 

For detailed information, one should apply to the Dean of the College 
of Education. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of 128 credits in conformity with 
the requirements specified under Curricula and in conformity with the gen- 
eral requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will be con- 
ferred. 

Teacher's Special Diploma 

The Teacher's Special Diploma is not awarded to all students who satisfy 
the requirements for graduation. It is awarded, at the time of graduation, 
to students whose quality of scholarship, personal traits, successful practice 
teaching, and professional attitude indicate distinct promise of success as 
teachers. Each award is by vote of the Faculty of the College of Education. 

This diploma is not required by official certificating authorities. 

A graduate who, at the time of graduation, is not eligible for this award, 
may be awarded the Teacher's Special Diploma upon presentation of evi- 
dence of a year or more of successful teaching experience. 

Teachers' special diplomas are granted in the Biological Sciences, Chem- 
istry, English, French, General High School Science, History and Social 
Sciences, Mathematics, Mathematics-Physics, Vocational Agriculture, Vo- 
cational Home Economics, Industrial Education, Commercial Education, and 
Physical Education. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain im- 
portant supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Actual experience in teaching under competent 
supervision is of basic importance in the preparation of teachers. A 
cooperative arrangement with the Prince Georges County School author- 
ities is in effect whereby students preparing to teach get this experience 
in the Hyattsville High School. This arrangement is supplemented by 
opportunities for supervised teaching in the high schools of Montgomery 
County and Howard County and in the junior and senior high schools of 
the District of Columbia. 

115 



CurricAila 

The departments of the College of Education f^^li i«f^ *«. 
Gen«., Education and Vocational ilu^tJot -^^ '^^3 7f "u^cSTe 
offered, corresponding with these two major groupings 

which are to he placed oTa ZlCuZt^^::^^^' "^"" ^"'^""^^ 
sch^r oJ *Jf "^f/^'™™"" combinations of academic objects in the high 
SS. H- . ! ^"^ *^ ^°"°^"-" ^»e"* «nd History; EngUsh^ 

Home^t^S^Scf r^^^S^^'t^''^'''' subjects with Physical Education, 
desirable. industrial Arts, Commercial Subjects, and Music are 

sZT^^L^lZT- '^' 'T"''''^ ^ V^«»''«l Education are de- 

jctwves set up in the act and in the interpretations of the Federal Rn«rH 
of Vocational Education and the State Board of ^u^ation tS ^ 
cula lead to the degree of Bachelor of Scieni. '^'^^^^^"- ^^'^ ^'^'"- 



116 



Professional Requirements 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two years, 
by reason of temperament, health, industry, and scholastic progress, give 
promise of becoming successful teachers are encouraged to continue in the 
curricula of the College of Education; those who, by reason of health de- 
ficiencies, of weakness in oral and written English, and of unfavorable per- 
sonal traits, are unlikely to succeed as teachers are advised to transfer to 
other fields. 

Sophomore Status 

The Introduction to Teaching scheduled for the sophomore year is 
an orientation course. It is designed with the twofold purpose of giving 
students a view of the teacher's job and of testing the aptitude and fitness 
of students for teaching. Admission to this course is based upon (1) com- 
pletion of at least 30 semester hours of freshman work with an average 
grade as high as C; and (2) passing of series of tests which are designed 
to determine the student's preparation for the special demands of this 
course. 

Professional Courses 

The professional courses recognized by the State Department of Educa- 
tion for certification are given only in the junior and senior years. The 
minimum requirement for these is 16 semester hours, of which the following 
are prescribed: Educational Psychology, Technic of Teaching, Observation 
of Teaching, Special Methods and Supervised "fe^wihing, and Principles of 
Secondary Education. To be eligible to enter the professional courses in the 
junior yecur, a stuudent must have an average grade as high asC at the end of 
the sophomore year, Continwance in such courses will be contingent upon 
his maintaining an average grade as high as C; and a grade as high as C in 
each required professional course. 

From the offerings of Education the District of Columbia requirement of 
24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

The special requirements of each curriculum are shown in the tabular 
statements of the curricula for the several departments. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." 

Guidance in Registration 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean of 
the College of Education regarding possible combinations and the arrange- 
ment of their work. At the time of matriculation each student is assigned 

117 



ruida.ce of the f iulty whLh t'dSlv^IL'"*!^^^^^^^ *^^ '^°""-' -"0 
preparation. Such guidance L orovll ^T' '' ^"^ *"''' Professional 
faculty and studentsf^and by group Indindt-/T''% conferences of 
students and personal advisers ItT<f .^ • '".^f'*l"^l conferences between 
register in that college Xh in 1 ^^T'^'^^^' ^'''^^^^''' ^<»- ^ student to 
offers the majority of th^ course, r""',/"" ^''^ '^^ ^""^«« "^ Education 
ments of the curriLlum heXt! """"' '" '"^'^'^''^ *•>« ^^'l-ire- 

sha^^at'^tmiSl;' otlrr"^"- '^ '^''''' '^^'^ *° ^'^^ «*«<>-* who 
Students in othrco leges desSn^^:*^•f *^ '=''"''^"'"- ^« «'-*- 
diploma should consult 5^'h treDeanoAT 5 n"' *^' ^^"''^^^^ «P«"«1 
6e^m„i„^ ^f the sopho^e year^nZf.rT ^"""S^°f Education at the 

sequent programs. AdjustLTs^rayte mlde'LTirf ^l""^^ ^-'"^'^ ^''^^ 
the junior year. It is m-fwHrnm. -^ "^ maae as late as the beginning of 

tlu^t on aclunt of ThesTgte^HTZlf '" T^l '^mtments later Ln 
senior years. ^^9uence of professorial subjects in the junior and 

qf„H. . . .. ^^'^ ^^^ SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Students electing this curriculum may register in ih. r ^^ 
and Sciences orin the College of F^n.ot^ register m the College of Arts 
with the College of EduSn fo^thf "' J^"'*^"' *=^'" '^^^ ^'» '^^ster 
will be certified for g^uat on Z^ f^^"^^ 'P^'^' '^'Pl«'»a. Students 

of this curriculum ^"^*''"^ ""'^ "?<>« fulfillment of all the requirements 

General Requirements 

stJLttTheljn^erlS the^.o^^in"'^^''^^-' ^''"•=^*^°"' -™<' "^ «» 
all candidates for deSees in thJ "^ requirements must be fulfilled by 

sophomore year: ^ *"'" *="'-"<="l"'». preferably by the end of the 

(1) Survey and Composition I (Vno- 1„\ „ j c. 

(Eng. 2f and 3s), 12 semester hoifs "^^ ^"'""^ ""'^ Composition II 

(2) Reading and Speaking (Speech ly), 2 semester hours. 
(d) Two years of foreign lancuac'P if iv.^ o+ ^ ^ 

three years of foreign laSuagTofe'vLt -f I "* '"'"''' ^^'^ '««« «>an 
No foreign language is reaSd'of «f,!, ; ^ ^"*''' ^'^^ three years, 
years of forei^Iangti^ge!" ' '"*' ''^** ^"t^"- ^^^ ^^^^ or more 

Six tUttisSr*" '""" '^ ''^*"^ ^"^ *^^ --' ---es. Of Which 

(5) Twelve hours of natural science or nf «ot , • 
matics, including an elementary course in zoology. """ '"' .'"^*'" 

118 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

^L _V ^^ ^B Am ^W %4( a* \a^ ^k Jr ^ ■••••^■■a •■••••• ■•••••••••••••••■••■••••^•■••■a**** «••■■• ■•••••^•■s •■■•»•••••■ ■«»»■■»»■■« — »» — »»»«» #^»— — ■■■ » ■ 

Science ( Biological or Physical) _...^ _ 

From the following groups: 
History, Social Sciences, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Lan- 
guage - _ 4-3 



Semester 


I 


// 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3-4 


3-4 



Sophomore Year 

(See "Sophomore Status," p. 117) 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) ^ 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

tForeign Language 3 

Electives „ - 7-8 



16 

Senior Year 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) - 2 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) „... 3 

or 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) — 

Electives 11-13 



16 



* iSxcept students entering with four or more units of language, 
t For students entering with less than three units of language. 



4-3 



15-16 lS-16 



2 

3 

3 

7-8 



17-18 17-18 

Junior Year 

(See "Professional Courses," p. 117) 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 — 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) „ — 2 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6 s) _ ^ — 1 

Special Methods (Ed. 120 s; 122 s; 124 s; 126 s; 128 s) — 2 

Electives _ - 13 11 



16 



3 
10-12 

15 



II 



II 



II 



119 



Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
school subjects in accordance with the certification requirements of the 
State Department of Education (By-law 30 revised). These are designated 
as major and minor subjects, with a requirement of from 30 to 36 semester 
hours of credit for a major and from 20 to 24 hours for a minor. If it is 
deemed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching of three high 
school subjects, the requirement for a major may be modified at the discre- 
tion of the Dean to permit the pursuit of three subjects to the extent re- 
quired for State certification. Semester hour requirements are detailed 
below. 

No student who has not met all previous requirements unll be permitted 
to do practice teaching, 

English, For a major in English 36 semester hours are required as fol- 
lows : 

Survey and Composition I 6 semester hours 

Survey and Composition II ~ 6 semester hours 

Shakespeare (Eng. llf and 12s) 6 semester hours 

Electives _ -.... 18 semester hours 

Total > - - 36 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 18 hours 
prescribed for the major and 8 hours of electives. 

The electives must be chosen from a selected list of courses with the 
approval of the instructor in "English in the High School." 

Survey and Composition I and II must be completed by the end of the 
junior year. 

History and Social Sciences, For a major in this group 30 semester 
hours are required, as follows: 

History .~.. ~ ~ 18 semester hours 

Economics or Sociology - 6 semester hours 

Electives ~ — 6 semester hours 

For a minor, the same requirements less the electives. 

Students with a major or minor in History and Social Sciences must com- 
plete Modem European History and American History by the end of the 
junior year. 

Modem Languages, For a major in Modem Languages 30 semester hours 
are required; for a minor 24 semester hours. 

At least 18 hours of a major or minor in modem language must be com- 
pleted by the end of the junior year. 

A major or minor in French must include French 2s, 9y, lOy, and at 
least one course of the 100 group. 

120 



A major or minor in Spanish must include Spanish 2s. 5s. 6y. and at least 
TS?r *m^rin^San must include German 2s. 5s. lOy. and at least 
one course of the 100 group. .^ ^ouired for the major. 

Mathemati^. Twenty-eight ^^'/^Z^^'^r^^ St, Math. I8y. 
The following sequence is recor^^^nied: Math Uf^Math 1 ,^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

Math. 7f, and Math. 10s in the ^'^^J^^ iCilk^ 17y (optional) in the 

?X; 1:£ S^tr^rSariUrSatf 1^. Math^ -s . .e senior 

Tor the minor the following -- sequence is ^^^^^^^^^ JJ^^; 

7f, Math. lOs in the freshman J-J ^ ^^U.. l^s m the ^^P.^^ ^^^ 
16y in the junior year; Math, lllf, «*»*'V/7 j. . „eometry or trigonometry 
Students who pass an exammation m «>]»"* J^^^^j J por all majors 
„,ay be excused from Math. 7f - f^^J'^i ^^3?^'^^^^^^^^ - 

and minors in mathematics. Ed. 128s and Ed 1 mathematics 

. Matk^matics-Phy^s. ™s -a j or consists of 18 ^ 

zr.f"Sh^5r£.."rMTi- X-- "-• -- ^^- -' 

-^^LSty t^e^S If :^srniirc=1o thl major. Ed. 12Ss. 
Ed. 135t, imd Ed. 137s should >;« «^"i , , ^„„,i„„ .rith this major, 

"^ .f r^o^^T^ S ^U^fSloSd bo p.,so„Ud. 
a total o( S8 hours in t»« » j . „i.or ar« offered oonsisUns oj 

rtf.,S:^Srio5 »d W^^^^^^^ ^x 

course in chemistry, which /^"'J Vl,^?™?„^^^^ ig in biological science, 
the junior year. For studente whose mam mtere^t ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

Ed. 126s and Ed. 136f are mdicated, as are Ed 1^ 

who are interested chiefly m physics "'^^^^^^y-,, ^ ^^^^r in chemistry. 
If a major in general science ^«.,f^*^^™f ^^^^.^^ted towards both, pro- 
physics, or Wology. the same er^^sw^^^ ^ ^^^^, ^.^,, 

vided that they number not less man o^ 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

• i« i-n Acrrirultural Education are the teaching 
The objectives of the cu^a^a>^A^>cult^^^^^ ^^ ^„.^ 

of secondary vocational agriculture, tne wo 
lines of the rural education service. 

121 



II 



It 



Semester 



Curriculum A is designed for persons who have had no vocational agri- 
culture in high school or less than two years of such instruction. Cur- 
riculum B is designed for persons who have had two or more years of 
thoroughgoing instruction in secondary agriculture of the type offered in 
Maryland high schools. Curriculum B relieves the student of the necessity 
of pursuing beginning agriculture courses in the first two years of his 
college course, permits him to carry general courses in lieu of those dis- 
placed by his vocational program in high school, and offers him an oppor- 
tunity to lay a broad foundation for the advanced work in agriculture of 
the last two college years. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curricula must present evidence of having ac- 
quired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high averages upon petition may be relieved of certain re- 
quirements in these curricula, when evidence is presented showing that 
either through experience or through previous training the prescription is 
non-essential ; or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 

Students electing these curricula may register in the College of Agricul- 
ture or in the College of Education. In either case they will register with 
the College of Education for the teacher's special diploma. Students will 
be certified for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of 
this curriculum. 

Curriculum A. 

Semester 

Freshman Yea/r I II 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. If) 3 — 

Principles of Vegetable Culture (Hort. lis) — 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. lAy or IBy) . 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) _ -.... _ 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) — 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 



16 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) .^. ^ 

introductory Ejitomology (Ent. 1 s) -^^^ ^ s) 

rpreal Crop and Forage Crop Froauction v-n^e 

Geology (Geol. If) -_---.-.--■--•- 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is)...... - 

Dairy Production (D. H. 101 y) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) -■■••- " " "- 



I 

4 

3 
3 



Junior Yea/r 

Educational Psychology (Ed. y^^;:^- J^R^d''^^^ 
Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. E<1. lun a 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y). ' 



Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf)..^ /i;;" Fn^r" 102 s)" 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. lOZs). 
Farm Poultry (Poultry 1 s) 

Electives - - 



14 



0^..«:' Id * A„*s,s ot T»ch,„. for A..c«U„.> 

Students (R. Ed. 107f ) ■■ -; / p " vh "'i 05f > 

Project Organization and Cost Accounting (R. Ed. 105f 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120f or s) - " 

Farm Shop Work (Agr. Engr. 104f)...^ -^ /t, "vH 1 14 s> 

Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114 s) 

pSples of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) -3^ 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. ii.. lU^ s;.. — ^.T""" .^^^ 

S S (Eng. 120f and 121 s) or Expository Wnting (Eng. 

5f and 6 s) - --"- " 

General Floriculture (Hort. 21^)------; - -- - - -" ^ 

General Landscape Gardening P^^' ^i, '^^^^^^^^ " ^„. 

Farm Organization and Operation (A. E. 108f) 



II 

3 
3 

3 
3 



3 

3 — 

— 8 



18 17 



3 — 

1 I 

1 — 

3 — 

— 3 

— 3 

3 — 

__ 2 

3 — 

— 3 

— 4 



2 
2 

3 

16 



16 



3 — 

2 — 

3 — 

— 2 

— 2 

1 — 

— 1 

— S 

— 3 



2 
2 

15 



4 



t^ 



« 



122 



123 



II 



0«^«''""' B. Semester 

Freshman Year / // 

General Chemistry (Chem. lAy or IBy) 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. 1 s) > — 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) ~.~ 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys Ed. 



16 

Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 

General Entomology (Ent. Is) - — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 

Greneral Bacteriology (Bact. 1 A s) — 

Geology (Geol. If)^ - 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) -.. — 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y).. - 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M, I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) » 2 

Electives > 1 



Junior Yea/r 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf and 102 «)..-. 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 104 s) . 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

otudenrs (iv. iiiCi. lu 7 1 } — ..._...^....^^»^.~ — 

Project Organization and Cost Accounting (R. Ed. 105 f) 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112 s) 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f ) 

Farm Shop Wjork (Agr, Engr. 104f)... ^ ... 

Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114 s) 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120f or s) 

Electives ..^ 



15 

3 
1 
1 

12 

17 



• •••^•••••••**a««*««< 



16 



3 
2 
2 

3 
3 



15 



3 

13 

17 



3 — 

2 — 

— 2 

3 — 
1 — 

— 1 

— 2 
7 11 

16 16 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



The Home Economics Education curriculum is for^^^^^^^^ ::';;h:srTf 

teaching, home management house, and special worK a 
children in the University Nursery School. 

Students electing this curriculum may re^^ter ^^ Sy Su r^^^^^ 
Economics or in the College of f ^^f ^^^^^^^^^^ Students 

with the College of Education for the ^^^^J^T^^^^^^^ requirements 

will be cerdfied for graduation only upon fulfillment of all tne req 

of this curriculum. 



Home Economics Education 



Semester 



Freshman Year 
Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. llf ) 

Design (H. E. 2l8) — •• 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) .....-.- 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly)--.--^-;-- 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 

Electives — - — —* 



I 

S 

3 

4 
1 
1 
4 

16 



// 
3 

3 
4 
1 
1 
4 

16 



Sophom^yre Year 
Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) 

Foods (H. E. 31y) 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 12 s) ...^ ---•-" 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) -j— 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 

Electives 



2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


— 


_i_ 


8 


2 


2 


3 


8 


2 


2 


1 


1 



•••••««•••••••*•' 



16 



16 



125 



I 



124 



Junior Year Semester 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) { 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) " *"■ ' __ 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) _ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) " 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) _ , "~ 

Dietetics (H. E. 102 s) Z... " '"""^" ^ 

Management of the Home (H7Eri41f and 142 s) ~~k 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf). " - t 

Electives ^ 



// 

2 

1-2 
3 

3 
3 



3-4 
16 



8 
1 
3 
9 

16 



16 
Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f ) 

Practice in Management of the Home (171] 143f)" "'" a 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics" (i7T"El 

History of Architecture and Interior De^or^^^^^^^ 1 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106 s) "••"* 1 
Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) 

Electives „ — 

16 

Electives should include one course in each of the following groups- 
Botany, Human Physiology, Sociology, English Literature. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

rnS!:f,? *^^^' °J Vro^v^m are offered in Industrial Education: a four-vear 
curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Id^ 
cation; a program of professional courses to preparrteache^tn mif J^ 
certification requirements in vocational and pre^catiS o^^cupatn^ 
schools; a program of courses for the improvement of teachLrL iSI 

Four- Year Curriculum in Industrial Education 

« J'V' '^"'•"<="1'«» is designed to prepare both trade and industrial teachers 
and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient latitude ^f electives so 

^rxs. ""^^ ^'-'^ '""^ *=^'^*^«'=^«°" -^"^-«^ - somVrerhigh 

^^Frir^-^^^^^'^^ by en- 

126 



Students entering an Indus trial Education curriculum must register in 
the College of Educatioru 

This curriculum, with slight variations according to the needs of the two 
groups, is so administered as to provide (A) a four-year curriculum in resi- 
dence at College Park; (B) a four-year curriculum for teachers in service 
who have had some college work. 

A. Curriculum for Students in Residence 

The distribution of the curriculum requirements is approximately as 
follows : 

Military Training or Physical Education 6 semester hours 

English 1 2 semester hours 

History and the Social Sciences 20 semester hours 

Science and Mathematics - ^ 20 semester hours 

Shop Work and Drawing. ^ „ 30 semester hours 

Xi^X wxi' 1/X V ^^O ••••••••*•■•■■••••••••••«••••••••••••••••••••••«•••••■•••••••••••••••••■••.•..«•••••■••«•■■•••..••••.*•••..«•••■•■••••*•••*••• X. ^? oVSXXA%^0 vvX XX^^ w&X d 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
Iv^ ^ ^ 



/ 

3 

1 

1 

1 



Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y ) _ _ 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) >...._ - — 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) - _ - -....♦ 2 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s; or llf and 14s) 3 

From the following groups: 

History, Social Science, Science, Foreign Language, Physi- 
cal Education - 4-6 



// 

S 
1 

1 

1 
2 
1 
3 



4-6 



15-17 17-18 



Sophomx>re Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) _ 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

gy\ _ 2 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) 2 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) ♦ . 1 

From the following groups : 

English, History, Social Science, Mathematics, Science, For- 
eign Language, Physical Education + 9-10 



2 

2 



12-13 



16-17 16-17 



127 



f 



eludes courses in Foundry PracticP- Mpp1,,-«^ qi1 rf ^f? ^* ^^ ^^' 
Fa™ Machine,, .„. o/. eS'^.'S™ SrA^S^Si!"""'"" ^ 

B. Curriculum for Teachers in Service 

«•!?.? ''^1*"^"*'°" °^ curriculum requirements is the same as for r„. 

wSiS" I^tl,'""'i *"* *^' '"il't^'y-Physical trainings JreSL 3 
waaved. In the mathematics and science croun ahH iy. ♦»» A- ^'^"'''^"7'^^ ^s 

Program for Vocational and Occupational Teachers 

The completion of eight teacher-training courses, which require in een- 
eral, two years of two hundred fifty-six clock hours, entitles onTio a Tu 

!SjTr"*'r"' *r^^''^ -^^^'^^^^^ '" **>« State of Maryland anj to a 
special diploma from the College of Education of the UniveJsUy of M^^ 

Courses for Teachers in Service 

Courses are offered for teachers in service who are seeking to satisfv 
l-equirements for promotion. ^eexing ro satisfy 

A special announcement of the in-service courses in Baltimore is issued 
m August of each year. This may be obtained from the offic^ ofTS 
Registrar either in Baltimore or in College Park. 



COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

The entrance requirements for the curriculum in Commercial Education 
are as follows : English 3 units ; Algebra 1 unit ; Science 1 unit ; History 1 
unit; Stenography 2 units; Typewriting 1 unit; Bookkeeping 1 unit; 
elective 5 units. 

The Commercial Education curriculum includes a solid foundation of 
economics, social science and history, accounting and business administration 
subjects, adequate courses in methods of teaching commercial subjects, and 
supervised teaching. 

The number of electives is large enough to enable a student to prepare 
for teaching some other subject in addition to the commercial subjects. 

The curriculum does not include any college courses in shorthand and 
typewriting for the improvement of skill in these arts. Any student desir- 
ing to become a candidate for the bachelor's degree in commercial education 
must meet the speed and accuracy requirements in shorthand and type- 
writing and transcription necessary to become a teacher of commercial sub- 
jects either by work in commercial offices during the summer or by such 
other means as may be practicable for improving his skill and accuracy. 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 S 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) -.. 3 8 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Economic Geography and Industry ( Econ. If) , 3 — 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) _ — 3 

Science (Biological or Physical) 3 S 

One from the following groups : 

History, Mathematics, Literature, Foreign Language - 3 3 

SophoTHore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 S 

American xiistory ^ri. ^y/ ^....^....^.^„ .^.. « — .. „.. o 8 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) ^ _..... 2 2 

Basic R. 0. T. €. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 8 

Electives - „ 4 4 



17 



17 



128 



129 



Junior Year j 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) 2 

Principles of Accounting (A. and F. 9y) 4 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) " " o 

Banking (Econ. 102 s).._ __ 

Elements of Statistics (Gen. 114 s) L" _ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. lf)..~ZZ 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) ___ 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) -IZZZZZIZZZZ — 

Electives _„ ' " 

* ~ - - - 4 

15 
Senior Yea/r 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) _ ....„ 3 

Commercial Subjects in the High School (Ed. 150f and 151s) 2 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (Ed. 139 s) — 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) 2 



Semester 
II 



or 



Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s). 
Electives .....* 



8-10 
15 



2 
3 

2 
1 
3 

15 

3 
2 
2 



3 

5-8 

15 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curriculum is designed primarily to prepare 

iTutTf .'^T'^ ''' '^^ ^^^^ ^^^-^^- I^ -<^^-^- 31 semester 

hours of physical education courses, exclusive of methods and supervised 

teaching. It is sufficiently specialized to meet that need. At the same time 
It IS flexible enough so that certification requirements in other high school 
subjects may be met. ^ 

The curriculum includes separate courses for men and for women. Some 
of these courses are open to both men and women. (See Sec. Ill, p. 233 ) 

A combmation curriculum for Physical Education (women) and Home 
Economics satisfies the State certification requirements for both subjects. 
Flans for such combiruition should be made at the beginning of the sopho- 
more year The variations in the curriculum for men and for women are 
shown in the curriculum outlined below. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the curriculum the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred. 

Students electing this curriculum must register in the College of Educa- 

General Requirements 
The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Science Educa- 
tion (see p. 118) except that a foreign language is not required, and 13 
semester hours of biological science are required, as specified in the schedule. 

130 



Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ^ 3 S 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ - - 1 1 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) » _....*....„ „ 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) ^....- — 4 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 3 8 

From the following groups: 

History, Science, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Home 

(Women) 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 1 

Fundamentals of Rhythm and Dance (Phys. Ed. lOy) 1 1 

Music Appreciation (Mus. ly) 1 1 

(Men) 

Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. ly) 1 1 

Personal and Community Hygiene (Phys. Ed. lly) 2 2 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) ^ 2 t 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s).;. „ ^ 3 8 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) 3 S 

Human Physiology (Zool. 15f) 3 — 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2 As) — 2 

Electives -... : - — 3 1 

(Women) 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Games ( Phys. Ed. 12f ) - ^ 2 — 

Natural Gymnastics (Phys. Ed. 20 s) — — 2 

Clogs and Athletic Dances (Phys. Ed. 28f) _ - > 2 — 

Folk Dancing (Phys. Ed. 30 s) — >. — 2 

(Men) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 3y) - 2 2 

Survey of Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 21y) _ 2 2 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) - — 3 — 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) — 2 

Electives * 6 7 

131 



(Women) . 

Athletics (Phys. Ed. 18 f and s) 2 

Natural Dancing (Phys. Ed. 32 f ) t 

Physical Education Activities for High School Girls (Phys. Ed. 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) "11 ""■" _ 

(Men) 

Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 5 y) i 

Coaching High School Athletics (Phys. Ed. 13y) o 

Technics of Teaching Physical Education (Phys. Edr'^yyill 2 



Semester 

II 

2 



15 



Senior Year 
The Junior High School (Ed. llOf). 



or 



Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) 

Physical Education in the High School (Ed. 141f) 
or 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) 






(Women) 

Ekcuief ^""^ ^^^^^ti^^> Athletics for Girls (Phys. Ed. 26y) 2 

^^ ^^^^ ~ - 9-13 

(Men) 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6f) ^ 

Advanced Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 7 y) 1 

Management of Intramural Athletics (Phys. Ed. 15 y) 2 

Electives 

- -. 7-11 

15 



2 
1 

1 

2 
2 

15 



2 — 



— 3 



2 

8-13 



1 
2 

7-12 

15 



132 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. SraiNBERG, Acting Dean. 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train yoimg men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and operation. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised recently to in- 
crease the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which 
are a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and which are 
now considered essential to the proper training of engineers because of 
the practical application of these subjects in professional and business life. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient 
preparation for many callings in public and private life outside the engi- 
neering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Civil, Electrical, 
and Mechanical Engineering. In order to give the student time to choose 
the branch of engineering for which he is best adapted, the freshman year 
of the several courses is the same. Lectures and conferences are used to 
guide the student to make a proper selection. The courses differ only slightly 
in the sophomore year, but in the junior and senior years the students are 
directed more definitely along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathematics. 
See Section I, Entrance. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering witholit the unit 
of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry, provided such 
students are prepared to devote their first summer to a course in analytic 
geometry. The program for such students would be as follows: During 
the first semester, five hours a week would be devoted to making up ad- 
vanced algebra and solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics 
of the first semester would be taken, and the second semester mathematics 

133 



would be taken in the summer session. Thus, such students, if they passed 
the course, would be enabled to enter the sophomore year the next fall with 
their class without loss of time. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by students 
registered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engineering, 
which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that required 
for bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the University of Mary- 
land. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Graduate 
School, as will be found explained in the catalogue under the head of Gradu- 
ate School. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, and Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of the University who have ob- 
tained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy the 
following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years after graduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 
with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

Drafting- Rooms. The drafting-rooms are equipped for practical work. 
The engineering student must provide himself with an approved drawing 
outfit, material, and books, the cost of which during the freshman year 
amounts to $16.00 to $20.00. 

134 



Electrical Engineering Laboratory. The equipment includes many of 
the various types of direct current and alternating current generators and 
motors, rotary converter, distribution transformers, control apparatus, and 
the measuring instruments essential to practical electrical testing. For 
experimental work, electrical power is obtained from engine-dnven units 
and a turbine generator; a storage battery is used for constant voltage- 
testing. 

Instruments are available for measuring the candle power of lamps and 
for the determination of illumination intensities. The standardizing labora- 
tory apparatus includes primary and secondary standards used m calibrating 
laboratory instruments. 

The telephone laboratory is equipped with apparatus for experimental 
work on magneto and common battery systems. Radio apparatus is avail- 
able for student use as well as for experimental purposes. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The apparatus consists of plain 
slide valve engines, steam turbine set, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed 
water heaters, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, apparatus for determi- 
nation of the B. T. U. in coal, gas, and liquid fuels, pyrometers, draft 
gauges, planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and 
equipment for a mechanical laboratory. 

Materials Laboratory. Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
making standard tests on various construction materials, such as steel, con- 
crete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes two 100,000-pound universal testing machines, cement- 
testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and other special 
devices for ascertaining the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. 

The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 

Research Laboratory. Certain problems in highway research have been 
undertaken in cooperation with the State Roads Commission of Maryland 
and the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. These studies have included traffic 
surveys over the Maryland State highway system, studies of cores cut 
from the State roads by means of a special core drilling apparatus, and 
laboratory studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

It is planned to continue and extend this type of cooperative research 
with departments of the State and the federal government as well as 
with the industries of Maryland. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

135 



The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers 
milling machines, and drill presses. 

The foundry is provided with an iron cupola, a brass furnace, and a coke 
oven. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane topographic 
and geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties' 
A wide variety of instruments is provided, including domestic as well as 
foreign makes. 

Special Models and Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department main- 
tains a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering maga- 
zines. The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires that 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 

The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and Transport, founded by 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, President of the National Highways Association, is 
located m the Engineering Building. The many books, periodicals, pamphlets, 
and other items included in this library cover all phases of highway engineer- 
ing, highway transportation, and highway traffic control. 

There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans- 
portation library of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington, D. C. The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transportation problems, 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires that students 
consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies, and the courses 
of special lectures provided. The freshman engineering students are re- 
quired to attend a series of non-technical lectures, the speakers, for the 
most part, being other than engineers. The student is required to submit 
a brief written summary of each lecture. 

Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect with the 
permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 



All engineering students are urged to secure work during the summer, 
particularly in engineering fields. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



Freshman Year 
Alike for all engineering courses. 



Semester 



I 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 

*Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

College Algebra (Math, llf) - - 3 

Laboratory in Algebra (Math. 12f ) 1 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) .....: — 

Laboratory in Geometry (Math. 15s) „ — 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) 2 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) „ _.. — 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) _ — 

Introduction to Engineering (Engr. If) 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) »....- - .- 1 

Non-technical Lectures _ „ _ — 



19 



II 
3 
8 
1 



3 
1 

4 

2 

1 



19 



*With permission of the Dean, the student may substitute a course in History or Mod- 
ern Language of equal credit. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of 
highways, railroads, waterw^ays, bridges, buildings, water supply and sewer- 
age systems, harbor improvements, dams, and sur\^eying and mapping. 



136 



137 



Sophomore Year _ 

Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. j jj 

*General European History (H. ly) « ^ _ 3 3 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) a 2 -^ 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) „ „ 1 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) _ 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 3f).™ ..> 2 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 3 

Plane Surveying* (Surv. 2y) „ 2 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) - 2 2 

Engineering Lectures „ — — 



20 
Junior Year 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) _ — 

Engineering Geology (Engr. lOlf) » - 2 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf ) 5 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) - — 

Principles of Mechanical Engineering (M. E. 112f) „ + 3 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) - — 

Railroad Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) 3 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) — 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) * „ 4 

Technical Society — 

18 

Senior Year 
As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) 1 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f ) 2 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) — 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 4s) — 

Elements of Highways (C. E. 105f) - 3 

Concrete Design (C. E. 106y) 4 

Structural Design (C. E. 107y) _ 4 

Municipal Sanitation (C. E. 108y) - — 3 

Thesis (C. E. 109y) _ 1 

Soils and Foundations (€. E. 110s) _ _ „ — 

Technical Society ~ — 

18 



20 



o 
o 



4 
2 

3 

5 



18 



2 
1 

3 
3 
3 



o 
O 



18 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, and dis- 
tribution of electrical energy; electrical transportation, communication, illum- 
ination, and manufacturing; and miscellaneous electrical applications in 
industry, commerce, and home life. 



Sophomore Yea/r 
As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

*General European History (H. ly) 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) - 

Calculus (Math. 16y) —— 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 3f) — - 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If and s) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 2f ) 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. Is) 
Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) 



Semester 



I 

3 
2 
3 
1 
5 
2 
1 
1 



Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) — 

Engineering Lectures — — — — - 



20 



Junior Year 
As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) - - - 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) 4 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) -....~ - - - 

Direct Currents (E. E. 103f) - ^ 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 104s) * 

Electrical Measurements (E. E. 105f) - - - 4 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. 106s) - — 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103s) 

Technical Society 

18 



// 

3 

3 
1 
5 



3 
3 



20 



1 

8 



S 

2 



— 1 



5 
S 



18 



*With permission of the Dean, the student may substitute a course in English or 
Modern Language of equal credit. 



139 



♦With permission of the Dean, the student may substitute a course in English or 
Modern Language of equal credit. 

138 



Senior Year -, 

Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. j 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) i 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) " " o 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr 102s) __ 

Alternating Current Machinery (E. E. 107y) a 

Alternating Current Design (E. E. 108f).... " ? 

Electrical Communications (E. E. 109 v) * « 

Illumination (E. E. llOf) 

Electric Railways (E. E. lllf)!llll.'.".". " " * q 

Electric Power Transmission (E. E. 112s) 

Power Plants (M. E. 113s) " "~" 

Thesis (E. E. 113y) Z ' - "~ 

Technical Society ^ I " " " ^ 



// 

1 

2 
4 

3 



3 
3 
2 



18 



18 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design construction nnrl rv,o- f 

aTn.1nrtw7 ^'^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^eatiSg! rnSttra^d' S^^^^ 
ation, and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 

Sophomore Yea/r 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

♦General European History (H. ly) 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) " "* ™ f ^ 

Calculus (Math. 16y) " * ^ — 

Laboratory in Calculus (Matlirny) ^ ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) " """" — ^ ^ 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr 3f) """ ^ ^ 

Elenients of Plane Surveying (Sui^rif ■;:r;d"s) ^ T 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) " "~ ^ 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. ls)ZZ *""* ^ — 

Kinematics of Machinery (M E jgj'""*""* - — 3 

Engineering Lectures ~ " ^ 2 



20 



20 



*With permission of the Dean fT,o o*„ i * 
Modern Language of equal credit!' ^^^""^ "^^^ substitute a course in English or 



140 



Junior Year 
As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) ^... 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f )... 
Elements of Chemical Engineering (Chem. 120f)... 

Engineering Chemistry (Chem. Ills) 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) * 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. E. lOlf) 

Machine Design (M. E. 102f) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop lOlf) 

Foundry Practice (Shop 102s) „....«. 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104s). 

Technical Society 



Semester 

i n 



3 
3 



3 

3 
1 



1 
8 



... — 8 

.. 4 — 

.. — 8 

.. — 2 



1 
5 



18 



18 



Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) * 1 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) — 

Internal Combustion Engines (M. E. 105f) 3 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106f ) - 3 

Refrigeration ( M. E. 107s ) — 

Design of Prime Movers (M. E. 108y) ...._ 3 

Design of Power Plants (M. E. 109s) ^ — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. llOy) -.... 1 

Thesis (M. E. Illy) 1 

Technical Society -. - — 

18 



2 — 



1 

2 



3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
2 



18 



*«/«•••* «• V 



141 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Mahie Mount, Dean 

economics ^vithout specraUzfeeiT aL ^^ \ ^'""'■^' knowledge of homf 
teach home economicnrtoTiom.?^ ^ '^^^^' ^^^ *'^«*^ ^^° ^^'^ to 
(3) those who arrteterestedrrr^l r" '^'f ^"'*^ ^ '^°'»« economics; 
intention of becoming Stfa^ TI^" ''\^''/ ^•''"^ ^*'°°'^«=s ^th the 
specialists, designers buyers of doSTnT ^"' 'f'*'"^ "^^^«^«' *^-t«e 
strators for commercial fi,5S. ^''^^ '° department stores, or demon- 

I>epartments 

in^^^fDtSLl^rorSl'^d'S^^^^ ^^ organized 

and Home and Institution Management ' ^***'''"^' ^"<^ ^^^J 

Facilities 

home economics. pertaining to the various phases of 

l^'efirree 

Prescribed Curricula 

bination of curricula. A student w^^^ If ^^ f^t^ '^"^^^^^' ^^ ^ ^om- 
register in Home Economics SLltionf^^^^ P^T'^ "^'"^^ ^^^'^^^^^^ °^-y 

Home Economics Extension ^^'"*^^^' Institution Management, and 

142 



GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. 1 y) 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly )..... -.... 4 4 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 11 f) 3 — 

Design (H. E. 21s) — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech 1 y) „ 1 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4 y) 1 1 

♦Language or Electives 3 3 

Home Economics Lectures — — 

15 15 

Sophomore Year 

Costume Design (H. E. 24 f ) 3 — 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 12 s) — 3 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay and Chem. 12 B 

f ^y. o\ ^ ? 

Foods (H. E. 31 y) - 3 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3 y) 3 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) - 2 2 

**Electives -. 3 3 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f ) _ 3 — 

Dietetics ( H. E. 132s) _....* _ — 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. Ill f ).....„ 3 — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) ....„ — 3 

Electives 8 8 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) „..„ 4 — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f ) — „ 4 — 

Choice of one unit in Foods, Clothing, or Textiles 4 — 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 3 3 

**Electives -.- - ^ — 12 



15 



15 



♦ The language requirement may be waived for students entering with three or more years 
of a language. 

** In addition to the curriculum as prescribed, one course in each of the groups indicated 
below, is required: 

economics ; psychology ; sociology ; and one of the following sciences : 
zoology, botany, physiology, or genetics. 

143 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) - — 4 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) - — 

♦Nutrition (H. E. 131 f) _ „.. 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132 s) - — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) „ 3 

Institution Management (H. E. 144 y) -.. 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) - — 

Electives „ 8 



17 

Senior Year 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f ) _ 4 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) „..._ 4 

Practice in Institution Management (H. E. 145 f ) 1 

or r ^ 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135 f) J 

Advanced Institution Management (H. E. 146 s) — 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 3 

Mental Hygiene (Ed. Psych. 105 s) - _ — 

Electives ^ , — 



15 



HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f) _ 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) _ — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. Ill f ) 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) ^ ^ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) ^ 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) - — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) — 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133 f ) 2 

Electives ~ -...- ~ ....- 3 



o 

*J 



3 
3 
3 
2 
1 



19 



3 
3 
3 

6 

15 



3 
3 



— 3 



2 
1 



3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 



Semester 

I u 

Senior Year 

Child study (H. E. Ed. 102 f). ,:^:^:-^7. 4 - 

Practice in Management of the «»•"« ^^ -E. 143 f ) ...■■■• ^ _ 

Problems and Practice m Foods (H. E. 135 1) "-_;--" 3 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) ^ 
Mental Hygiene (Ed. Psych. 105 s)... - - _ 

Human Physiology (Zool. 15 f )..... •■ •;-•■——: _ 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (H. E. 151 s) ^ 

Applied Art (H. E. 122 s) IZIIII — 

Electives - ^ " — — 

15 15 

in Government and First Aid are recommended. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING CURRICULUM 

Junior Yea/r ^ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) - ^ _ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f) - •—• - 3 _ 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. Ill f ) - ___ 3 

Chemistry of Textiles (Chem. 14 s) ..^.■^-"-- ,• •:"^":r 3 8 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) ^ _ 

Advanced Textiles (H. E. 114 f)--- --- - "ZIZIZ^^ 5 8 

Electives — — — 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f ) ^ __ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f).... -^--^ irTIVrtirArt 

Problems and Practice in Textiles, Clothing, or Related Ait ^ _ 

HistS oi ^^Li::.^'^'^^^rD^o^ti^'^^^^^ ^ I 

Advanced Design (H. E. 123 s)- --""-" " __ 3 

Special Clothing Problems (H. E. 112 s) ".ZIZZI — 6 

Electives — 

15 15 



17 



17 



* In addition to Nutrition and Dietetics (H. E. 131 f and 132 s), Child Nutrition (H. 
p. 136 s) or Seminar in Nutrition (H. E. 201 f or s) is recominended. 

144 



145 



F0OI>S CURRICULUM 



Junior Year Semester 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f) " 

Dietetics (H. E. 132 s) .1" " 

Management of the Home (H. £*141 f and 142 s) " " "^ 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133 f) % 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. Zs)III~l ^ 

Electives '" "*'" 

■ - - & 

17 
Senior Yea/r 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) - 

Practice in Management of the Home (HrEri43 f) a 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135 f) ....... 4 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (h7e. 12rvT ^ 

Advanced Foods (H. E. 134 s)...... • -^^-^ y; ^ 

Electives 



// 

4 

3 
3 

3 
4 

17 



3 
3 
9 



15 



15 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean. 
The Graduate School Council 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Wm. H. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of French. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.C, Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

(Baltimore). 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 



General Information 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the General Faculty. The 
Graduate School was established in 1918, and organized graduate instruction 
leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's degree was undertaken. The 
faculty of the Graduate School includes all members of the various faculties 
who give instruction in approved graduate courses. The general adminis- 
trative functions of the Graduate Faculty are delegated to a Graduate 
Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School is chairman. 



146 



LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University library, the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset 
to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminal 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

147 



t" 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Graduates from a recognized college regarded as standard by the institu- 
tion and by regional or general accrediting agencies are admitted to the 
Graduate School. The applicant shall present an official transcript of his 
college record, which for unconditional admission shall show creditable com- 
pletion of an undergraduate major in the subject chosen for specialization 
in the Graduate School. Any deficiencies may be made up in courses without 
credit toward a graduate degree. 

Application blanks for admission to the Graduate School are obtained from 
the office of the Dean. After approval of the application, a matriculation 
card, signed by the Dean, is issued to the student. This card permits one to 
register in the Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation 
card is stamped and returned. It is the student's certificate of membership 
in the Graduate School, and may be called for at any succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Gradtuite School does not necessarily irnply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree, 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Gradu- 
ate School at the beginning of each semester. Students taking graduate 
work in the Summer Session are also required to register in the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each session. In no case will graduate credit be 
given unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. 
Registration for the first semester is held in the Gymnasium- Armory on the 
dates designated in the calendar. Students register for the second semester 
and the summer session in the office of the Dean, T-214, Agriculture Building. 

The program of work for the semester or the summer session is arranged 
with the major department and entered upon two course cards, which are 
signed first by the professor in charge of the student's major subject and 
then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One card is retained by the 
Dean. The student takes the other card, and, in case of a new student, also 
the matriculation card, to the Registrar's office, where registration is com- 
pleted. After fees have been paid, class cards are issued by the Registrar. 
Students will not be admitted to graduate courses without class cards. 
Course cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's 
office. The heads of departments usually keep a supply of these cards in 
their respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Gradriates, or 

148 



v^ Graduates and Advanced Vnder graduates. , ^^f ^^^^/^^^^^^^ 
wt courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue but S^^dufte 
: Td t wTnorbe allowed for these. Students with ^--^^f^^^^^l^ 
mS be obliged to take some of these courses as '^^^'^'^''''^^'^^^ 
c^urseJ. No credit toward graduate degrees may be obtamed by corre 
spondence or extension study. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

hours. I 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

r^St:tr^or f^-^mi S»," d upon ™b™i.«n. . ..«sfac- 

a satisfactory thesis may be completed. , . ^ j 

C LoL«.d...c« by the head o. the st.denfs major '^^^^^ 

The University publishes a special bulletin, giving fuU information con- 
cerning the sSLer Session and the graduate «<>- '^-%<'fff«^ *^!;X 
buUetin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

rr«H«ate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
Graduate '^"YttLTot Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work m 
the professional schools at Bammore o ^ ^^ g j^ , ^^d meet the 

the professional schools must register ^^J^e Graduate Schoo ^ 

same requirements and proceed in the same way as ao grauu 
other departments of the University. 

149 



t 



GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

^^i^^yT 'To/7:ZM:^ under^aduate courses in this Uni- 
the University for the rematderof th^ ^^° '"""""" *^^^ residence in 
the Graduate School andTecSe tL ! ^T ^^' ^""^"^^ *° "^i^ter ij 
though the bachelor's ^e^T^Zt^Zle^Zm''^ membership, even 

A senior of this University who ', ^"^ ""*'^ ♦'^^ <=Jo«e "f the year, 
for the undergraduate 1^2 r^^y ^XTJ'^ '''''^]''^ *he requirements 
dean and the Dean of thf SaX'te Thl^f ?^'^7^^ °^ ^' undergraduate 
college for graduate courses.^2SS fat wl'- '■"^'^*"\^» *»»« undergraduate 
an advanced degree at tht U^^rsS but tH ^ '^^"^^^"^ to-"d 
and graduate courses must not excSfiTt;.^ ^! ^i"*^' ^'^ undergraduate 
uate credits earned during the senTot vll ^^^'*' ^""^ *^" ^^^^t^r. Grad- 
residence period required il'Lvai'degrrs' "* *" ""' *'' ^^°^*- ^^^ 

Doctor's degree is maTT appSol'Sanr '''1^1 '""^ ^^^^^'^ - the 
office of the Dean of the Gradu'Jtel^hool Thl «-^^^ "^*^'"'' ^* '''^ 
and, after the required endorsementrare tbtlS T *"^? '*"* ^"^ '^"P"'^*^. 
upon by the Graduate Councir Ti offSI?^ ' ^•^PP"'=^*^'*"^ ^^« ^t^d 
undergraduate record and of any ^n^^l ^''^''^^'P* ^^ the candidate's 

tutions must be filed in the Dean'f o£ Jf ""tl '""^^^ ^* «*« i^«- 
sidered. * "^^'^ ^ <>»'<=« before the application can be con- 

metrsSfirs Taf irUm^eVaTtrr *^^ ^*"^-* ^' « '^--. b- 

sidered by his instructors sufficieXLtT.' ""T^'r^"*^ ^"'^ « «>«- 
graduate study and research as ate deSedb ^"it *"' *° P"^"« «'><=h 

x-r Lj^^ -xs ^^- -- -s;rrtt^ 

secl^S^trn^iiSrt,-^^^^^^^ stated in the 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OP MASTER OP ARTS 

AND MASTER OP SCIENCE 

date when instruction begins for ?? econd l'^"?'^"'^ "°* ^^''"^ *»>«" the 
m which the degree is sought, but not u.«f .T'^' °^ ^''^ ^"=^d«'»''= year 
hours of graduate work hfve been comp^!L T *^''^' ^'^''''' <=<'^e 
above in all major and minor su^^cSequlVed '^"'^^ ^'"^"^ ''^ « ^ 

Residence Requiremaits. Two seme9t*.r« «^ f 
satisfy the residence requirements Tor ^h. / ""^ T'"'""'' ^^««i°ns may 
Master of Science. InalquaTe preparation f^Tr. "' ^^'^^^ °* ^^ "^ 
student wishes to pursue mly maCfCr 'Z^^!::^. ^""^^^^ *'^ 

150 



G^urse Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours in 
courses approved for graduate credit is required for the Master^s degree. 
If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, 
in either the major or the minor subjects, additional courses may be required 
to supplement the undergraduate work. Not less than twelve semester 
hours and not more than fifteen semester hours in graduate courses must 
be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits of the total of twenty- 
four hours required must be outside the major subject, and they must com- 
prise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits for 
the Master^s degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 200 or above. The entire course of study must constitute a unified 
program approved by the student's major adviser and by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. No credits that are reported with a grade lower than C 
are acceptable for an advanced degree. 

At least eighteen of the twenty-four semester course credits required for 
the Master's degree must be taken at this institution. In certain cases grad- 
uate work done in other graduate schools of sufficiently high standing may 
be substituted for the remaining required credits, but any such substitu- 
tion of credits does not shorten the normal required residence at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Part time students are required to take the entire 
twenty-four semester course credits at this institution. The Graduate Coun- 
cil, upon recommendation of the head of the major department, passes upon 
all graduate work done at other institutions. The final examination will 
cover all graduate work offered in fulfillment of the requirements for the 
degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the Master's deg^ree. 
It must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work, and it 
must be acceptable in literary style and composition. It is assumed that 
the time devoted to thesis work will be not less than the equivalent of 
six semester hours earned in graduate courses. If the Master's thesis is 
based upon independent research, the student may register in research 
courses in the amount prescribed by his department, but not more than four 
semester hours in these may be included in the twenty-four semester hours 
required in graduate courses for the Master's degree. With the approval 
of the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the 
thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under direction and 
supervision of a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the. office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before Commencement. An ab- 
stract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words in length, must ac- 
company it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of 
the thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and 
should be consulted by the student before the typing of the manuscript is 

151 



begun. Individual copies of this manual may be obtained at the Dean's 
office at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts 
as chairman of the committee. The other members are persons tinder whom 
the student has taken most of his major and minor courses. The chairman 
and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the examining conmaittee 
at least one week prior to the period set for oral examinations. The chair- 
man of the committee selects the exact time and place for the examination 
and notifies the other members of the conmiittee and the candidate. The 
examination should be conducted within the dates specified, and a report 
of the committee sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. 
A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the com- 
mittee. Such a report is the basis upon which recommendation is made to 
the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree sought. The period 
for the oral examination is usually one hour. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample op- 
portunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the exami- 
nation. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the grant- 
ing of the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's 
degree must be deposited in the ofiice of the Dean not later than the first 
Wednesday in October of the academic year in which the degree is sought. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Department of Mod- 
em Languages a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be 
correspondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificate 
of residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research in 
the special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. Thirty semester hours of minor work 
are required. The remainder of the required residence is devoted to in- 
tensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 

152 



course work in the n^ajor subject will vary with the department and the 
^dividual candidate. v « ^;c 

'ds. T.e ability to do inde^ndent -^tjoTtb tfThe'^-^ 
.ertation on some ^pic '^^^^^Zl^o^Zt^s must be deposited 
typewritten copy and one clear carbon copy oi i commencement. An 

fthe office of the Dean at least t.l>'-„^.;.^f|5jto7ds1n length, must ac- 
abstract of the contents of *e ^^^^-'.^^"^^^^^^^^^^ of 

company it. A manual giving full ^^^5^*;°'^^ ^^ directs thesis work, and 
the thesis is in the hands of each P?Jf^°\^J' ^^pi^g of the manuscript 
should be consulted by the f ^^^f^^^^'^ Ty ^ obtained at the Dean's 
is begun. Individual copies »* t^^'^^XaTonSs of the thesis should be pro- 
office, at nominal <=tlfrortrexam?ning committee prior to the date of 
vided for use of members of the e™"™"^ ^ j„ g^ch form as the com- 
the final examination. The thesis is ^^^"^ P"f ^^^^^^^ „e deposited in the 
mittee and the Dean may approve, and fifty copies p" 

University librai^ ^ ^^^_^^ .^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^^. 

Final Exammation. The toai o committee is a repre- 

student's major field. ^- „ :^ annrnicimatelv three hours, and covers 

The duration of the examination ^f^^PPf "^^J'^^i" ^^^ his attainments 

the research of the candidate as. embodied m h^^^h^-^^^^^f^^^^ ^^^dures 

1. A c^didate for the Doctor's degree must ^^pi^^-^^ti:^^ 

ination that he ^?l^^^Z^:t^^tmJr^:^?ro^ brooks and articles in 
The passages to be translated wm ^^^^^ ^^^ applicant 

his specialized field. Some 500 pages oi texi ^ ^^^ of 

wishes to have his examinat on chosen «h°uld be submitted t ^^^ ^^_ 

the Department of Modern Languages at Ws^^*^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^„^, 

J • •«« +/^ iViPQP tests must be filed m tne oince oi 
2. Application for admission to these tests mu ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

the Dean of t^f Graduate Sc^^^^^^^ at e 1 1, ^^^n^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

ee!;fuf LStS ;; rSU" airat the next date set for these tests^ 

4 Eraminations are held in the S-^^-^'at 2 p m ' '' 

the first Wednesdays in February. June, and October, at 2 p. m. 

153 



GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon 
admission to the Graduate School. 

A fixed charge, each semester, at the rate of $4.00 per sem- 
ester credit hour. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduation fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. A few industrial fellowships are also available in certain depart- 
ments. The stipend for University fellows is $400 for the academic year 
and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 

Application blanks for University fellowships may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary cre- 
dentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their 
major departments. The usual amount of service required does not 
exceed twelve clock hours -per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full 
graduate program, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for 
higher degrees in the normal time. 

The selection of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow- 
ships are assigned, with the approval of the dean or director concerned, but 
all applications must first be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 
The awards of University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation for 
these assistantships is $800 a year and the remission of all graduate fees 
except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed for one year 
and they are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class devotes 
one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection with Ex- 
periment Station projects, and he is required to spend two years in resi- 
dence for the Master's Degree. If he continues in residence for the Doctor's 
degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence credit for each academic year 
at this University. The minimum residence requirement from the Bach- 
elor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic years and one 
summer, or three academic years and three summer sessions of eleven or 
twelve weeks each. 

Other Assistants. Assistants not in the regular $800 class are frequently 
allowed to take graduate courses if they are eligible for admission to the 
Graduate School. The stipend for these assistants varies with the services 
rendered, and it may or may not include the remission of graduate fees. 

154 



The question of fees is decided in each case by the dean or director c^^^^ 
t.H when the stipend is arranged. The amount of graduate work an 
rssiu Pe-^^^^^ carry is determined by the head of the ^epart^^^^^^ 
^fth the approval of the dean or director concerned. The Graduate 
r uncn guTded by the recommendation of the student's advisory committee, 
prescr^f ^^^^^ residence in each case at the time the student is 

admitted to candidacy. .^ - a ^r.r.rr> 

Further information regarding assistantships may be obtained from 
the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is con- 
fefred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean of the Graduate School 
and the President of the University. 



155 



SUMMER SESSION 

WiLLARD S. Small, Director 

A Summer Session of six weeks is conducted at College Park Th. ,., 
gram serves the needs of the following classes of stuSs fi^ wf 

Terms of Admission 

toltit^^TtZZ^^'^^T '"' *^°^^ ^^° -^^^'^^ *° ^<^-^^ candidates 
xui uegrees are the same as for any other <?p«!«!inTi nf ti,« tt--, -i. ^7 

registering, a candidate for a dee^e7 win k! ^ ■ ^^^^University. Before 

of the CoUeee or ^rh,Z • ^ ^^ " ^ required to consult the Dean 

Credits and Certificates 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be creditprl W fi,^ Qf * t^ _. 
=J' '"'""'"» "-""^^ »"-''"« ^^aSn'CJ^^lTSi 

Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards an advanced de^ee in 

ip^l. ""'' '/'''"^'' 'P'"^^^ arrangements are made supplementIS the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students woTkW^^ 
degree on the summer plan must meet the same requirementras to ad^^^^ 
sion, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do LreX^enrolled inX" 
other sessions of the University. si^uaents enrolled m the 

speZlt^l^itl^^ '^ "'^^'^ '' '^^ ^^--^^ -STesszW, consult the 
speciac bummer Session announcement, issued annually in April 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Joseph D. Patch, Lieut. Col. Infantry, U. S. Army, Professor 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Army Regu- 
lations No. 145-10, War Department. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act of 
Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 

Organization 

The unit is organized as a regiment of three battalions of three rifle 
companies each, and a band. All units are commanded by Advanced Course 
students, who have been selected for these commands on a basis of merit. 
The course of instruction is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. 

Objectives 
* Basic Course 

The object of this course is to afford to students enjoying the privileges 
of State and Federal aided education an opportunity to be trained for posi- 
tions involving leadership, within either the State or the nation. To this end 
the methods employed are designed to fit men mentally, physically, and 
morally for pursuits of peace or, if necessity requires, for national defense. 
A member of the R.O.T.C. is not in the Army of the United States, and 
membership in the unit carries no legal obligation to serve in the Army, or 
any of the armed forces. 

** Advanced Course 

The primary object of the Advanced Course is to provide military instruc- 
tion and systematic training through the agency of civil educational in- 
stitutions to selected students, to the end that they may qualify as reserve 
officers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain 
this objective during the time the students are pursuing their general or 
professional studies, thus causing minimum interference to the preparatory 
requirements of their projected civil careers. 

A student prior to enrollment in this course must have satisfactorily 
completed the basic course and must have indicated in writing his desire to 



156 



* Required of qualified students. 
** Elective for qualified students. 



157 



undertake the course. The applicant further must obtain on this document 

Military Science and Tactics, and submit same to the President of the Insti 

S^Slt thr'''"\ ^\^*"*^^"* -" be enrolled in the Advanced Co^Se 
without the approval of the President of the University. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second years, basic course, three periods a week of not lo« 

three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. ^ 

Physical Training 

is ^etoLvt"fTH ^Tr/" ^'?.P""*^"* P^'* ^'^ "^"t^y instruction, and it 
IS the pohcy of the Military Department to encourage and sunnort thl 

toSotef"^ ^^^" ^"^"^" *-*«-' thus coopTraS ^an eff^r 
to promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are reouired to hp 
examined physically at least once after entering the Univ^rsit?^ 

Uniforms 

un«o™\'t ,°n *^.^,^^T' ^'^?"''' '^"^•"'"^ ^"^^ ">"«* -PP^^r in proper 
^ M^ I ^ ^^'^ formations and at such other times as the Professor 

?re!;rt^f ru:i:rrtitr'^ "-'' ''''^^"^ -"'' *^^ approval °ofX 
Uniforms, or commutation in lieu of uniforms, for the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, are furnished by the Government. The unifoms are the 
regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain dSgJShing 
features; or if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then sucru1Sf7m^ 
as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must be kept S^^^^^^ 
condition by the students. They remain the property of the Sve^ent- 
and, though intended primarily for use in conneciTon with m^litTry SSc 

arT'Sed Te u f^' '™i? ""^T ^'^ ^^^"^^^^^^ ^overning'theS^^^^ 
are violated. The uniform will not be worn in part nor used while the 

wearer is engaged in athletic sports other than those required as I Dart of 
the course of instruction. A Basic Course uniform whiJ s f uJSshed to a 
student by the Government will be returned to the Mili ary ™epart^^^^^ 
at tie end of the year; or before, if a student severs his connection S^S^e 
nnfh T. " ''\''^^^^^^on of uniforms is furnished, the uni^onn L^ 
yrrXtl^'""" '"' """^^'^ '' '^^ ^^^^^^^ "P- --P^etion of t^o 

158 



Commutation 

Students who elect the Advanced Course and who have signed the con- 
tract with the Federal Government to continue in the Reserve Officers* 
Training Corps for the two remaining years of the Course are entitled to a 
small per aiem money allowance, for commutation of subsistence, payable 
quarterly from and including the date of contact, until they complete tne 
course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country, 
camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are 
members of the Advanced Course Reserve Officers* Training Corps. These 
camps are under the close and constant supervision of army officers, and 
are intended primarily to give a thorough and comprehensive practical course 
of instruction in the different arms of the service. 

Parents may feel assured that their sons are carefully watched and safe- 
guarded. Wholesome surroundings and associates, work and healthy recre- 
ation are the keynote to contentment. Social life is not neglected, and the 
morale branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for students who are 
taking the advanced course, which, as has been previously stated, is elective. 

Students who attend the summer camps are under no expense. The 
Government furnishes transportation from the institution to the camp and 
from the camp to the institution, or to the student's home, unless the mile- 
age is greater than that from the camp to the institution. In this case, the 
amount of mileage from the camp to the institution is allowed the student. 
Clothing, quarters, and food are furnished. The Advanced Course students, 
in addition to receiving quarters and food, are paid sixty cents for 
each day spent in camp. To obtain credit for camp a student must be in 
attendance at camp at least 85 per cent of the prescribed camp period. 

Commissions 

(a) Each year, upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm of 
the service will be determined by the War Department. 

(c) The University of Maryland has received a rating from the War De- 
partment of "Generally Excellent" for the past several years. This rating 
indicates that the work of its R. O. T. C. unit has been recognized by the 
Federal (k>vernment as being of a superior order. The "Generally Excel- 
lent" rating supersedes the former designation of "Distinguished College," 
which designation has been discontinued by the War Department for insti- 
tutions such as this University. 

159 



Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a nar wifi, r.^i.^^ 



tl 



160 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is 
broadly conceived as the development of the individual student. To accom- 
plish this purpose, physical examinations and classification tests are given 
the incoming students to determine the relative physical fitness of each. 
Upon the basis of the needs disclosed by these tests, and individual prefer- 
ences, students are assigned to the various activities of the program. 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three ac- 
tivity classes each week throughout the year. In the fall, soccer, touch 
football, and tennis are the chief activities ; in the winter, basketball, volley 
ball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore students may elect a consid- 
erable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, horse- 
shoes, ping pong, bag punching, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted, also. Touch 
football and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, base- 
ball and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, 
medals, and appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program are pro- 
vided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and ping 
pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
A large modern gymnasium, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, and an athletic 
plant provided solely for the program of physical education conducted for 
the girls, constitute the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
and tennis, which are all major sports of this program. The University is 
a member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, and other national organizations for the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and women 
students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of the 
State. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education, see College of 
Education, and Section III, Descnption of Courses. 



161 



SCHOOL OP DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean. 
Faculty Council 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 
Oren H. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 
Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S,, F.A.C.D. 
Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S. 

HISTORY 

The University of Maryland was organized December 25? isn-r „ ^v. 
College of Medicine of Maryland. On^Decelfr 29 I8i2 \ U^^S 

sitv^f pl^ that penod but four medical schools in America-the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, founded in 1765; the College of Physicians and Sur 

?oTey.'in^m7^°*' " '''"' "^"^^' ^"'^-'*' - 17827aTDSmoth 

h'^hLh'"'* '^'*k '■^l "" '*'""'*'"y '"^ America were delivered by Dr Horace 

?eafs rS? Ind iss'Th !r f ^^^'^-'' S^'^-' ^^ Medicine! betwe^rthe 
^irJl • • 1 f ; ^ lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 

dissension in the School of Medicine, but were continued in the year 1837 

tri^ei fbv m d 'aT-*'f ^!"«^*^r"*^'^ «-*- attentiL'^SL had 
^«h/o7 i ^ T T^ instruction, and he undertook to develop this sne- 
cialty as a branch of medicine. With this thought in mind he vritl til 
support of Dr. Chapin A. Harris, appealed to theVaculty of Ph'ri tt 

JLrtT/£ IS'"' '°i; *'^ •=r""'" '' ^ 'Jepartment'of d^nSry a \ 
part of the medical curriculum. The request having been refused an inl 

bv tt M '"?' 7T ^^f^'^ "P''"- A '"^^^^ ^-^ applied foV and granted 
by the Maryland Legislature Februarv 1 iR4n rpC. r^ ^ " , granted 

was held February I 1840 afwS^time Dr H H H . '"''^ T'"^' 

j^rr^fpS.*:^.--' '" '^ --■ '"- -£" — s?; £ 

Iei\rD;nJri w'Sr' ''"'^' '^'"'^'' "" "^^P^^^^ ^^ t^^ S^ltimare Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, was organized and continued instruction in dental 

162 



subjects until 1879, at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. A department of dentistry was organized at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a class each year 
from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered as a corporation and con- 
tinued as a privately owned and directed institution until 1920, when it 
became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it merged 
with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, 
School of Dentistry, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a 
distinct department of the State University under State supervision and 
control. Thus we find in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, a merging of the various efforts at dental 
education in Maryland. From these component elements have radiated de- 
velopments of the art and science of dentistry until the strength of its 
alumni is second to none either in number or degree of service to the pro- 
fession. 

« 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry now occupies its new building at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, adjoining the University 
Hospital, being so situated that it offers opportunity for abundant clinic ma- 
terial. The new building provides approximately 45,000 square feet of floor 
space, is fireproof, and is ideally lighted and ventilated. A sufficient number 
of large lecture rooms and classrooms, a library and reading room, science 
laboratories, technic laboratories, clinic rooms, locker rooms, etc., are pro- 
vided. The building is furnished with new equipment throughout with every 
accommodation necessary for satisfactory instruction under comfortable 
arrangements and pleasant surroundings. The large clinic wing accommo- 
dates one hundred and thirty-nine chairs. The following clinic departments 
have been provided: Operative, Prosthetic (including Crown and Bridge and 
Ceramics), Anesthesia and Surgery, Pathology, Orthodontia, Pedodontia, 
Radiodontia, and Photography. Modem units with electric engines have 
been installed in all clinics, while provision has been made for the use of 
electric equipment in all technic laboratories. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the 
medical sciences, the dental sciences, the ancillary sciences, and clinical 
practice. Instruction consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, 
demonstrations, conferences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral 
reading to train the student in the values and use of dental literature. 

163 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Care is observed in selecting students to begin the studv of rl.„t.-=f 

ttTotL1on1/''^""^>!r ^^"^^-^ ^""'^^ ^r.lJlrTl^t^T^:ll; 
the completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate trainino- t^ 

ArTsTdT '"' ''"'""" ^"' '""^ ^'^^^^-''^ regulations of th'^ege Of 
Arts and Sciences are strictly adhered to by the School of Dentistry 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE PREDENTAL COURSE 

sch?o! ^S™it: ttrtruaUraT" ''""' ^" ''''^''^' --'^^^ 

Mteen units. tL ZJz.^t^:;:':::-.z:i:^ r oSi?;: 

a non-graduate of a secondary school. °^ 

REQUIRED: English (I, 11, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics 1 
umt; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit Total? Sts 

drai?™^'' .^^"'^"'^'"f' astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics 
tlonl ,f,V' TT'"'' ^'"^'^' ^'""•="' «^""'^^y' ^^'^°^' ho«^e economTs, vie": 
or al' o?fef i^T' '"f^^^'"^"-' P'^J'--' geography, physics, SolTgy. 
or any other subject offered m a standard high or preparatory school f«r 
which graduation credit is granted toward college or uSSy ettrLce 
Eight umts must be submitted from this group. "'"^^''sity entrance. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

.„f.L^if' n"*'. *°'' ^'^'"'^^>°" t° the dental curriculum must have completed 

?iei ctL iT?:i7"'';? ^" r""^'*^^ "^""^^^ °^ -*^ -^ ->™ 

lish BioW f ^ U "'^^ """^ '^'' ^''^^ ^^^ ««"iester hours each in Eng- 
Sc SeSk?;.' '^'^^'"' ^"' ^"^^^^ ''""'^^ - ^'^--^ry. -eluding 0?- 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Application blanks may be obtained from the office of the Dean ' V.unh 
apphcant should fill in this blank completely and ma 1 i^ togetLr with^he 
oruZZt^^^^ Photogr h3^ to the Director of AdmissiL^UnT^'s S 
ll Std 'cS^^^^^^^ ^'^ ^^^^^ ^" ^'^ ^^^^^^^ -^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^-k should 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each qualified applicant. 



PREDENTAL CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

College Algebra (Math. 8f) or 

College Algebra and Trigonometry (Math, llf) * 

Plane Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (Math. 10s) or 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) > „ 

General Cliemistry (Chem. ly) _ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Invertebrate Morphology ( Zool. 3f ) 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) 

Mechanical Drawing ( Dr. 4y ) ., 

Basic R. O. T. C, (M. I. ly) or 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) 

Freshman Lectures _ 



Semesters 
I II 

3 3 

3 — 



4 
1 

4 

1 
1 



Total Semester Hours 17 

Sophomore Yea/r 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. SBy) 1 

General Physics (Phys. ly) *.......^.. 4 

French (French ly or French 3y) or 

German (GJerman ly or German 3y) > 3 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) 5 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

Total Semester Hours - 17 



3 
4 
1 

4 
1 



17 



2 
1 
4 

3 
5 



17 



The equivalent of the above curriculum is offered in the Baltimore branch 
of the University. 

Fees for the Predental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing application for admission) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at the time of enrollment) - 10.00 

* Tuition for the session, resident student -. 200.00 

*Tuition for the session, non-resident student 250.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) —.. 20.00 

Locker fee (each session) * 3.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (each session) 5.00 



* Definition of residence given on page 57. 



164 



165 



student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Dental Curriculum 

The curriculum is described in full in the bulletin of the School of 
Dentistry. 

Transfer Students 

Applicants desiring to transfer from another recognized dental school 
must have had creditable records at the schools previously attended. 

Applicants carrying conditions or failures in any year of their previous 
dental instruction will not be considered. All records must show an average 
grade of 5% over the passing mark of the schools in which the transfer 
credits were earned. Applicants whose records show habitual failures and 
conditions will not be considered for admission. The transferring student 
must satisfy all requirements for admission. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at 
which time lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the 
session, the dates for which are announced in the calendar of the annual 
catalogue. ' 

Regular attendance is demanded. Students with less than eighty-five per 
cent attendance in any course will be denied the privilege of final exami- 
nation in any and all such courses. In certain unavoidable circumstances 
of absence the Dean may honor excuses, but students with less than eighty- 
five per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next ^cceeding class. 

In cases of seriolis illness, as attested by a physician, students may 
register not later than the twentieth day following the advertised opening 
of the regular session. Students may register and enter not later than ten 
days after the begrinning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged 
as absences from classes. 

Promotion 

To be promoted to the next succeeding year students must have passed 
courses amounting to at least 80 per cent of the total schedule hotirs of 
the year, -and must have an average of 80 per cent on all subjects passed. 

iA grade of 75 per cent is passing. A grade between 60 per cent and 
passing is a condition. A grade below 60 per cent is a failure. A con- 
dition may be removed by a reexamination. In such eifort, failure to make 
a passing mark is recorded as a failure in the course. A failure can be re- 

166 



nvpd only by repeating the course. Students with combined conditions 
rd failure^^ amounting to 40 per cent of the schedule hours of the year wil 
nt ^ZmLd to proceed with their classes. Students carrymg conditions 
wi 1 not^r^^^^ to senior standing; students in all other classes may 

InT ^^^^^^^^ to the next succeeding year. All conditions -djai^^^^^ 

m^t be removed within twelve months from the time at which they were 
incurred. 

Equipment 
A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic 
and clS courses, and text books for lecture courses will ^^ ^^^^^f J«^ 
Se various classes. Each student will be required to prov.de himself w^h 
\ Jpver is necessary to meet the needs of his course, and present same 
; a riynsi^e clLs officer for inspection. No student will be permitted 
to go on with his class who does not meet this requirement. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School °jf »«''«^*'T^/^?^'^^ 

Jdence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of the 

^dent in relation te his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 

fe taken nte the confidence of the community as a P^ff «^««^^ ."j^"; 

inteJrSr sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority 

nd^SdSes Id honU in the transaction oiJ-^^^-^-^lJ^^; 

student will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary 

to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 
The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate 
who has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall ^-J^^'l^^^'^ 'l^'J^' '^^i'lZ 
course of study of the dental curriculum, the last year of which shall have 

been spent in this institution. 

3. He will be inquired to show a general average of at least 80 per cent 
during the full course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the va- 
rious departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness *» t^^^'^f ,^.^%P;^°'.^ ^Jfj^^^^^ 
ning of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financalobhgat.ons 
in the community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 



167 



FEES FOR THE DENTAL COURSE 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for -admis- 

Matriculation fee (paid at time of enrollment) 10.00 

* Tuition for the session, resident student 250.00 

*Tuition for the session, non-resident student - ^ „ _ 350.00 

Dissecting fee (first semester, freshman year) - 15.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) 20.00 

Locker fee — freshman and sophomore years (first semester) 3.00 

Locker fee — junior and senior years (first semester) 5.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit — fresihman and sophomore years (first 

semester) ^ 5.00 

Graduation fee (paid with second semester fees of senior year) 15.00 

Penalty fee for late registration. 5.00 

Examinations taken out of class and reexaminations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record will be issued to each student free 

of charge. Each additional copy will be issued only on payment of 1.00 

Student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from 
one professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee 
required by each professional school. 

A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or vdthin the day or 
days specified for his school, will be called upon to pay a fine of $5.00. The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins, following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only on the written recommendation of 
the Dean.) 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and pay to the Comptroller one-half of the tuition fee in 
addition to all other fees noted as payable first semester before being ad- 
mitted to class work at the opening of the session. The remainder of tuition 
and second semester fees must be in the hands of the Comptroller on the 
registration day for the second semester. 

According to the policy of the School of Dentistry no fees will be returned. 
In case the student discontinues his course, any fees paid will be credited to 
a subsequent course, but are not transferable. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 

♦ Definition of residence given on page 57. 

168 



Definition of Resident Status of Student 

Students who are minors are considered to be ^^^'•^^"V*^'^^"*'.?''/* **;! 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this State 

^^ Adllt^studentfar; considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this state for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
Qphool or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
J m unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this state by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
Tnon-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

Summer Courses 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, special courses are 
offered during the summer recess. The course in clinical instruction is 
conducted from June 1 to August 1 and from September 1 to 18 inclusive. 
The course is open only to students registered in the school. It offers op- 
portunities to students carrying conditions in the clinic from the precedmg 
session as well as those who desire to gain more extended practice durmg 
their training period. The clinics are under the direction of capable dem- 
onstrators, full credit being given for all work done. 

The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The 
society is named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental 
education, a teacher of many years experience, and during his life a great 
contributor to dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuatmg his 
name that the society adopted it. 

Students become eligible for membership at the beginning of their junior 
year if, during their preceding years of the dental course, they have at- 
tained a general average of 85 per cent or more in all of their studies. 
Meetings are held once each month, and are addressed by prominent dental 
and medical men, an effort being made to obtain speakers not connected 
with the University. The members have an opportunity, evea while stu- 
dents, to hear men associated with other educational institutions. 



students. 



169 



Omicron Kappa Upeiloii 

I^ Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental fraternity wa, 

vS;!l M*'^^?r^' "^""^^^ "' ^^"*^' S-S-y- Dental sSfuTi 
versity of Maryland, during the session of 1928-1929. Membership in the 

f ratermty is awarded to a number not exceeding twelve per cent of the 
graduating class. This honor is conferred upon students who through their 
professional course of study creditably fulfill all obligations as sfudents 
and whose conduct, earnestness, evidence of good cLacter, and SS 
scholarship recommend them to election. ^ 

Scholarship Loans 

fo.fnlT^^'' f ^^l^^'^'^'P 1°^« f«>m various organizations and educational 
foundations have been available to students in the School of Dentistry 

?If TL ^'^ f """^ °" ^^^ ^''^ ^'^ excellence in scholastic attain: 
ment and the need on the part of students for assistance in completing 
their course m dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty to recom 
mend only students in the last two years for such privileges. 

undf^ iTZ^f'Tr ^'^Tl''^^ P<^ndation-From this fund, established 

IS made to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School Uni 
versity of Maryland, for scholarship loans available for the use of young men 
and women students under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations Jor the 

r^ ^^ 1,^ students who through stress of circumstances require financial 

sWered iflw t" w''*'^^"^ ^^^ '^ ^''"'=^*'-^' P^Sres^ are con 
siaered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endmvment F««d-Under a nro- 
vision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New Haven Conn 
an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore ColleS of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds of 

elcati^n! '° ^ '''"'''' '" ^'''"^ "'''*'^^ ^""'^^ ™- '« secu'rLTdent j 

Alumni Association 

cl^^ ^""f ^^"f r^*^"^ ^^ ^^^ ^^"^^^y ^^ ^^^ Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 184^ This 
organization has continued in existence to the present, its name having been 
changed to The National Alumni Association of the Baltii^ore C^l^e 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland ^ 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean 

THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

•Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, Esq., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. The 
mstitution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper pecuni- 
ary support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and in 1870 
regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the course 
has been made more comprehensive, and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than three thousand, and 
included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence in the pro- 
fession elsewhere. 

The Law School has been recognized by the Council of the Section of Legal 
Education of the American Bar Association as meeting the standards of the 
American Bar Association, and has been placed upon its approved list. 

The Law School is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
an association composed of the leading law schools in the United States, 
member schools being required to maintain certain high standards relating 
to entrance requirements, faculty, library, and curriculum. 

The Law School is also registered as an approved school on the New York 
Regents' list. 

The Law School Building, erected in 1931, is located at Redwood 
and Greene Streets in Baltimore. In addition to classrooms and offices for 



170 



171 



the Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room, stu- 
dents' lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter containing 
a collection of carefully selected text-books, English and American reports, 
leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. No fee is 
charged for the use of the library, which is open from 9.00 A. M. to 10.30 
P. M., except on Saturday, when it closes at 5.00 P. M. 

Course of Instruction 

The School of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and the 
Evening School. The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the 
standards of work and graduation requirements are the same. 

The Day School course covers a period of three years of thirty-two weeks 
each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the day, 
chiefly in the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on Mon- 
day evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 P. M. 

The Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty-six 
weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6.30 to 9.30 P. M. This 
plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student. 

The course of instruction in the School of Law is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the Bar. 
Instruction is offered in the various branches of the common law, of equity, 
of the statute law of Maryland, and of the public law of the United States. 
The course of study embraces both the theory and practice of the law, and 
aims to give the student a broad view of the origin, development, and func- 
tion of law, together with a thorough practical knowledge of its principles 
and their application. Analytical study is made of the principles of sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and a carefully directed practice court enables 
the student to get an intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
any peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such. All of the 
subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included in the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work; that is, the completion of at least one-half the work acceptable for a 
Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study by the 
University of Maryland or other principal college or university in this State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and exclusive of 

172 



credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
Sout intellectual content of substantial value. Such pre-legal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with ^ scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation m the mstitu- 

tion attended. ^ ^ x. ^ 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
affe number of students admitted as beginning regular law students durmg 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to Justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of Baxrhelor of Arts 

and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in arts and law leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program in college and pre-legal sub- 
jects will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park. The fourth year they will register in the School of Law, and 
upon the successful completion of the work of the first year m the Day 
School, or the equivalent work in the Evening School, the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts will be awarded. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by reference to 
page 112. 

Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere in 
a law school which is either a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty Council, upon presentation of a certificate from such 
law school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the successful 
completion of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many hours 
as are required for such subjects in this school, receive credit for such 

173 



one year of resiaeVe'lZ^lt Zt^Zr '' '=°"^^"^'' ""«' ^"^ 

Fees and Expenses 
The charges for instruction are as follows: 
Registration fee to accompany aDDlication 
Matn^ulation fee, payable'on'firTStTaW ' ''Z 

Diploma fee, payable upon graduation J^^° 

. . - lo.OO 

Tuition fee, per annum: 

Day School 

Evening School $200.00 

"* 150.00 

tion for the second semester. ^^ ^^^ ^^'"^ ^^ reg^istra- 

Further information and a special catalogue of the School nf t 
be had upon application to the School of iTw tt^ . / ^^"^ ""^^ 

Redwood and Greene Streets, BLumore Md ^^^ ^^ -^ Maryland, 



174 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc. D., LL.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Magnus Gregersen, M.A., Ph.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory part 
of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) ; and 
here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of diseases of 
women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). • 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 



Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest institu- 
tion for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 

175 



Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year 22,221 
persons. 

In connection with the University Hospital, an outdoor obstetrical clinic 
is conducted. During the past year 1,608 cases were treated in the Lying 
In Hospital and outdoor clinic. 

The hospital now has about 400 beds — for medical, surgical, obstetrical, 
and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical material for 
third-year and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be 
the same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, 
Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Dermatology, 
Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work 
two hours daily for ten weeks in one of these dispensaries; all students in 
the senior year work one hour each day; 117,490 cases were treated last 
year, which fact gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical 
teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes 
are the Anatomical, Chemical, Experimental Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry, Histology and Embryology, Pathology, Bacteriology and Im- 
munology, Clinical Pathology, Pharmacology, and Operative Surgery. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Randolph Winslow Scholarship; Uni- 
versity Scholarships; Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky 
Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships; Israel 
and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarships. 

Announcement of Changes in the Requirements for Matriculation 

Beginning with the session of 1937-1938, and until further notice, the 
minimum requirements for matriculation in the School of Medicine will be : 

(a) Graduation from an approved secondary school, or the equivalent in 
entrance examinations, and 

*(b) Three years of acceptable premedical credit earned in an approved 
college of arts and sciences. The quantity and quality of this pre- 
professional course of study shall be not less than that required for 
recommendation by the institution where the premedical courses are 
being studied. 



* For admission to the Premedical Curriculum the requirements are the same as for the 
freshman class in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University with the prescribed 
addition of two years of one foreign language. (See Section I, Entrance.) 

176 



The premedical curriculum shall include one-year courses, or their equiv- 
ipnts TEnglish, biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics 
2d fcencf fnd such elective courses as will complete a balanced 

'''STe:^:^:^;' ^ a second course in English, scien^Jic 

French or GerSan (a reading knowledge of either language is desirable, 
Ilthough German is preferred), comparative vertebrate anatomy embry- 

gy^^^^^^^ technic, quantitative analysis, physical chemistry, eco 

iSs history, mathematics, political science, psychology sociology, etc. 

Thiriv semester hours in the non-science courses (i. e., exclusive of biology, 
chSry Ph^^^^^^^ and mathematics) will make a balanced curriculum in 

^IvSr;^^^^^^^^^ student should complete a four-year 

appHcants who have satisfactory high school and college records (including 
the ratio of science and non-science courses) ; acceptable scores in the Moss 
Antitude Test (which is given each fall by the Association of American 
r^af cl^^^^ in the institutions that are P-Paring^^^^^^^^^^^ ^J^^ 
erne) ' the most favorable letters of recommendation from their respectne 
preid^ca^^ - ^-^ ^- ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ '^'1 '' '^' departments 

f Sogy, chemistry, and physics; and who in all other respects give he 
most pmkise of becoming successful students and physicians of high 
standing. 

Amdications for admission to the 1938-1939 cla^s wiU he received hegin- 
n^goZber 1.1937. TUy will be considered in the order of therr recept^. 

Expenses 

The following are the fees for students in the School of Medicine: 
MatHcuMion Resident--N on-Resident La^o^^^ ^^To*'"' 

$10.00 (only once) $400.00 $600.00 $25.00 (yearly) $15.00 

Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore : 

Low Average Liberal 

Items ^ -^ ^^^. 

^ , $50 $75 $100 

^^^s - - 20 20 

College Incidenta s ^50 275 

Board, eight months ~.-.. - ^^ ^^^ 

Room rent g^ ^^q 

aothing and Laundry - - ^ ^^ ^^ 

All other expenses. — 

Total ?^ *^^« ^'^' 

-TSiT^v. tuition ^ees aPpii^We^ntU the -^^ '^ 

reserved to make changes in these tees wnenever 



177 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and SupeHntendent of Nurses 

yIr\Sr"iSZ fi !'y'^''^\^''r' "' "^"^^'"^ ^^^ established in the 
oTMaryland HrpiSf ^""^ '' '^^ *"^" ^" ''''''^^' ^^^ °' '^^ University 
prlye'rs''''"'^ '' non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning 

a^utiTZfV^ ^^"^^""^ ""^P'**^ '^ ^ ^«"«r^J hospital containing 
alwut 400 beds It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of 

To7i2.Tt:T''' ^" ^" '''-' ^' "-^"^' ^-^'^^"^ eVS: L' 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its opnortunitv 

fnZT ^^^""^=1^"' '" "^ *''''^°"S'^ curriculum taught brwefSrfid 
instructors and members of the medical staff of the University. 

Programs Oflfered 

(aI'V\nW '' '^"''^ "' '!l'.^'^""' ^' P^""'^^^ ''' '^' ^^-"P^ of students: 
(a) The three-year group; (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission to the School of Nursing must be a graduate 

musT n'r?. ; ' ""'f f^'-^' '' ^'^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ preparatory schV and 
ZuJrr T7^ '^'"'"^ '^^' '''' ^"^ ^^"^P^^^^^ satisfactorily the 
X rink TnTh P^^P\^,^.^T^ f "^y- Preference will be given to students 

P 'e;arto^;^^^^^^^^^^^ ^'^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^-^-^^^^ ^^- ^^ ^helr respective 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics 1 unit- 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, drawing, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational sub- 
jects, languages mathematics, physical geography, physics zoology? or any 
other subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory ^Lol for 

Sht un£t:.t Z^V\fT:' '^^'^^' ^^"^^^ - 'niversHy eSnce 
tourJ^T ^.«^]>"^^«ed from this group, of which not more than 

four units may pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above, students must meet certain other definite re- 
quirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness f or nursSg^ork 

20 to'.r"^ H.'^' u' ^'"^'"'^ registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. Women 

178 



of superior education and culture are given preference, provided they meet 
the requirements in other particulars. If possible, a personal interview 
with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday or Friday 
from 11:00 A. M. to 12:00 M. 

Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, all 
students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the beginning of 
their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible for examination 
and license on completion of this course. Blanks necessary for this purpose 
will be sent with application forms. A fee of $2 is charged for registration. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, or neglect of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the 
President of the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Special catalogue will be 
sent upon request.) The three-year program is designed to meet the re- 
quirements for the diploma in Nursing and comprises the work of the first, 
second, and third hospital years. 

Admission to the School 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February and those for the 
fall term in September or October, and for the five-year course in September. 

Hours of Duty '■"■ 

During the preparatory period the students are engaged in class work 
for the first four months with no general duty in the hospital, and for the 
remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight-hour duty. 
During the first, second, and third years the students are on eight-hour day 
duty and nine-hour night duty with six hours on holidays and Sundays. 
The night-duty periods are approximately two months each with one day 
at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The period of 
night duty is approximately five to six months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours, and includes courses in anatomy, physiology, 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solution, hygiene, bacteriology, chem- 
i'itry, materia medica, practical nursing, bandaging, ethics, and history 

179 



of nursing. During the last two months of the probation period the stu- 
dents are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction in bedside 
nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to them by the 
Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the students are 
required to pass both written and practical tests; failure to do so will be 
sufficient reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Sickness 

A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill, all students are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two weeks, dur- 
ing the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the school 
decide that through the time lost the theoretical work has not been suffi- 
ciently covered to permit the student to continue in that year, it will be 
necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A period of four 
weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first year and of the 
second year. 

Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student. This 
will not be returned. A student receives her board, lodging, and a reason- 
able amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her period of 
probation she provides her own uniforms, obtained through the hospital at 
a nominal cost. After being accepted as a student nurse, she wears the 
uniform supplied by the hospital. The student is also provided with text- 
books and shoes. Her personal expenses during the course of training and 
instruction will depend entirely upon her individual habits and tastes. 

THREE- YEAR PROGRAM 

First Year 

The first year is divided into two periods: the first semester, or the pre- 
paratory period (6 months), and the second semester. 

First Semester 

In the first semester, or preparatory term, the student is given practical 
instruction in the following: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies, the cost of hospital 
material, apparatus, and surgical instruments. 

II. Household economics and preparation of foods, particularly applied 
to invalid cooking and nutrition. 

180 



During this term the practical work is done under constant supervision, 
"|r.S':,f 'itTSfon and ^we^, p..n.s, „.** h.g.»,c 

^tlk""r:nkl'»l^?f1/r SVr .he student. „e r^;»d 

to isfboTwritten and oral tests, and failure to do so will be sufficient 
reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Subsequent Course 

The course of instruction, in addition to the first semester, or the prepara- 
tory per'od occupies two and one-half years, and students are not accepted 
fnr a shorter period, except in special instances. 

After entering th^ wards, the students are constantly engaged in practical 
wotk under the immediate supervision and direction of the head nurses and 

"SSut the three years, regular courses of instruction and lectures 
are given by members of the medical and nursing school faculties. 

First Year 
Second Semester 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction in massage, 
general suSry. urinalysis and laboratory methods, diet in disease, and 

'^rrSfcauSc^io^tTSived in the male and female, medical, surgical. 
and children's wards. 

Second Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes pediatrics; general 
medS nfectious diseases; obstetrics; gynecology; orthopedics; skin and 
venereal eye, ear, nose, and throat; X-ray and radium; and dental. Tlhe 
practical' Zlk provides experience in the nursing of obstetrical and gyne- 
coTglal "atien^. in the operating rooms and the out-patient department. 

Third Year 

Theoretical instruction includes psychiatry, public sanitation, profes- 
sinnal nrohlems and survey of the nursing field. 

niing tlrperLl the sludent receives short courses of lectures on sub- 
jects of special interest. These include a consideration of the work of insti- 
tutions, of public and private charities, of settlements, and of the various 
branches of professional work in nursing. Tii«trirt 

Public Health exi>erience is given in the Western Health District. 



181 



Attendance at Classes 

Attendance is required at all classes. Absences are excused by the Di- 
rector of the School only in case of illness or absence from the school. 

Examinations 

These are both written and oral, and include practical tests. The stand- 
ing of the student is based upon the general character of work throughout 
the year as well as the results of the examinations. Students must pass 
upon all subjects of each year before entering upon the work of the follow- 
ing year. 

Graduation 

The diploma of the school will be awarded to those who have completed 
satisfactorily the full term of three years and have passed the final exami- 
nations. 

Scholarships 

One scholarship has been established by the Alumnae of the Training 
School, which entitles a nurse to a six-weeks course at Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest ex- 
cellence, and who desires to pursue post-graduate study and special work. 
There are two scholarships of the value of $50.00 each, known as the Edwin 
and Leander M. Zimmerman and the Elizabeth Collins Lee prizes. An 
Alumnae Pin is presented by the Woman's Auxiliary Board to a student 
who at the completion of three years shows marked executive ability. A 
prize of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst to a student who at 
the completion of three years shows exceptional executive ability. 

Five- Year Program 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, as shown on page 108 of this catalogue, are spent in the 
College of Arts and Sciences of the University, during which period the 
student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects which are con- 
sidered fundamental in any college training. At least the latter of these 
two years must be spent in residence at College Park, in order that the 
student may have her share in the social and cultural activities of college 
life. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore 
or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, which is also affiliated with 
the School of Medicine of the University. In the fifth year of the combined 
program, certain elective courses such as public health nursing, nursing 
education, practical sociology, and educational psychology are arranged. 

182 



Degree and Diploma 

The Diploma in Nursing will be awarded to those who have completed 
satisfactorily the three-years' program. ^^^ 

The degree of Bachelor of ^^^^^^^^J^ tSTescribed combined 
awarded to students who complete successiuiiy v 

academic and nursing program. 



'I 



18S 



I 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 

Faculty Council 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D. 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.G., B.S., Ph.D 

J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 

TiXr- • .?f- '""'' r' "'■^""'^^^ ^" 1841' «"d °P--ted as an Inde 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 

professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland 
It became a department of the present University when the old UniversHy 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920 Wth 
but one short intermission, just prior to 1865, it has continuously exeiSd 
Its function as a teaching institution. exeicisea 

Loca.tion 

The School of Pharmacy is located at Lombard and Greene Streets in 
close proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and DentiJ^ ' 

AIMS 

tJ^^u^f"^} "^ Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy 
the collatera sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essS 

or 'LlSr^e^ nrtr ^?.- "^ *'^* ^"^ '^ *° ^^^-^ its m^^icuTan 
Scilites an2fnstl,f.r dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the 

laciuties and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiencv in the 
prac^ce of the other branches of the profession and in phamacSca, t- 

Combined Curriculum in Pharmacy and Medicine 

A combined curriculum has been arranged with the School of Medicine of 
the University by which students may obtain the degrees of BachelT of 
Science in Pharmacy and Doctor of Medicine, in seven years. Students who 
successfully complete the first three years of the cours^l in pharmacy Tnd 
an additional four semester hours in zoology, and show that theyTrTqual- 
fied by character and scholarship to enter the medical profession are elie 
.ble for admission into the School of Medicine of the Universfty and uion 
the successful completion of the first two years of the mXal ^ourseTn 

^i ^Ti^fcy!'^ ''""^ ^' ^^'=^^^"'- "^ ^"-- - Pharma^t bi t^Schtl 

184 



This privilege will be open only to students who maintain a uniformly 
good scholastic record during the first two years of the course in Pharmacy; 
and those who wish to avail themselves of it must so advise the School of 
Pharmacy before entering upon the work of the third year. 

Recognition 

This school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of the Association is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions holding membership must 
maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and graduation. 
Through the influence of this Association, uniform and higher standards of 
education have been adopted from time to time; and the fact that several 
States by law or by Board ruling recognize the standards of the Association 
is evidence of its influence. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized in all States. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The requirement for admission is graduation from an accredited high 
or preparatory school which requires for graduation in a four-year course 
not less than 15 units of high-school work grouped as shown below. In 
case an applicant is not a graduate of a high or preparatory school, as 
defined above, the full equivalent of such education in each individual case 
must be established and attested by the highest public educational officer 
of the State. 

UNITS FOR ENTRANCE: Required, 7; elective, 8; total, 15. 

REQUIRED: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 uniti. Total, 7 

units. 

ELECTIVE: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home economics, 
vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, 
zoology, or any other subject offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university 
entrance. Eight units must be submitted from this group. 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the office 
of the Dean. The form must be filled out in full with names of aU schools 
attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director 
of Admissions with two dollars investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or 
certificates. The Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland 
will secure all necessary credentials after the application has been received. 
Do not make application unless reasonably certain that preparation is 
sufficient, or unless intending to complete preparation if insufficient. Ample 
time should be allowed for securing credentials and investigating schools. 
If the applicant qualifies for the study of the profession, a certificate will 
be issued. 

185 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who present in addition to high-school requirements credit for 
subjects taken in schools of pharmacy holding membership in the Ameri- 
can Association of Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit for corres- 
ponding courses of equal length and content scheduled for the first three 
dfsmissfl *'''"'"'^' P'""^'^^'^ ^^"^ P"^"* ^ P^oPe'" certificate of honorable 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to students pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work equal in value to that outlined 
in this catalogue. 

Transferring students in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
tional requirements outlined under Requirements for Admission. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not care to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter as a specia 
student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be elt- 
gible for graduation, and wUl not receive a diploma. The School of Phar- 
macy reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary training 
of the applicant is sufficient. ^ 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S in 
Pharm.) must be of good moral character, and must have completed all of 
the prescribed work for that degree. 

The work of the last year must be taken in this School 

The requirements for higher degrees are stated in the Graduate School 
jDUUetin. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

The matriculation ticket must be procured from the office of the School 
of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before one enters classes. After 
matriculation all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. The last date of matriculation is Sept. 22, 1937. 

Expenses 

Laboratory 
Tuition and 

MatricvJation Re^dent^N on-Resident Breakage Graduation 

$10.00 (only once) $200.00 $250.00 $60.00 (yearly) $15.00 

Tuition for the first semester and laboratory and breakage fee shall be 
paid to the Comptroller at the time of registration; and tuition for the 
second semester and graduation fee (the latter returned in case of failure) 
on or before Jan. 31, 1937. 

A bulletin giving details of the course in Pharmacy may be obtained by 
Ma^aiS^ ""^ Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 

186 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

H. C. Byrd. „ „ Executive Officer 

F. K. Haszard _...._ _ Executive Secretary 

The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of Agriculture 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Pawers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows: 

**The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding the breeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
thereof, and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the rais- 
ing, distribution, and sale of farm, orchard, forest, and nursery products, 
generally, and plant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same; the 
preparation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection, control, and distri- 
bution of animal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds, fertilizers, 
agricultural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals, and biological 
products; and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
publish such information, statistics, and the results of such investigations 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the ef- 
ficient dissemination thereof; and except where such powers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
control of the herein recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
the agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of de- 
sirable immigration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
regulations in respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
of the State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
law, and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
punished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execution and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested with such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
on the other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

Under the above authority and by special legislation, all regulatory work 
is conducted under the general authority of the State Board. This includes 
the following services: 

187 



LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

This Service has charge of regulatory work in connection with the control 
of animal and poultry diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis, Bang's Disease 
hog cholera encephalomyolitis, rabies, anthrax, blackleg, and scabies in 
animals; and pullorum disease and blackhead in poultry. The Service co 
operates in these activities with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Well equipped laboratories for research, diagnostic work, and the examina- 
tion of specimens, are maintained at College Park, and a branch laboratory 
^f ,r\f f^T^^^^ «^ P^^s^ns residing in the Northern and Western parts 
01 tne fetate is maintained at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

^^^^^^^^^ State Veterinarian 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland. 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for the 
inspection of all nurseries and the suppression of injurious insects and dis- 
eases affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is con- 
ducted m close association with the departments of Entomology and 
Pathology of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under the 
authority of the law creating the department as well as the State Board of 
Agriculture. For administrative purposes, the department is placed under 
o?t£ w™ ""^ *^^ University on account of the close association 

^* M ^T"^^^ Director of Extension Service 

r ^'^"""^V - ^^^^ Entomologist 

C. E. Temple g^^te Pathologist 

PEED, FERTILIZER, AND UME INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

The Feed Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection Service, a branch of the Chem- 
istry Department of the University, enforces the State regulatory statutes 
controlhng the purity and truthful labeling of all feedsf^erti/zer^ and 
limes that are offered or exposed for sale in Maryland. 

L. B, Broughton „ S^^^ Chemist • 

U IL. Bopst Associate State Chemist 



SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

The Seed Inspection Service is placed by law under the general super- 
vision of the Agricultural Experiment Station. This service takes samples 
of seed offered for sale, and tests them for quality and germination. 

F. S. Holmes Seed Inspector 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Department of Forestry was created and organized to protect and 
develop the valuable forest resources of the State; to carry on a campaign 
of education; and to instruct counties, towns, corporations, and individuals 
as to the advantages and necessity of protecting from fire and other enemies 
the timber lands of the State. All correspondence and inquiries should be 
addressed to The State Forester, 1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. 

Studies have been made of the timber resources of each of the twenty- 
three counties; and the statistics and information collected are published 
for free distribution, accompanied by a valuable timber map. The Depart- 
ment also administers six state forests, comprising about 5,000 acres. The 
Roadside Tree Law directs the Department of Forestry to care for trees 
growing within the right-of-way of any public highway in the State. A 
State Forest Nursery, established in 1914, is located at College Park. 

F. W. Besley ~. -..State Forester 



STATE WEATHER SERVICE 

Edward B. Mathews - _ Director 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. 
John R. Weeks - _ Meteorologist 

U. S. Custom House, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The State Weather Service compiles local statistics regarding climatic 
conditions and disseminates information regarding the climatology of Mary- 
land under the Regents of the University of Maryland through the State 
Geologist as successor to the Maryland State Weather Service Commission. 
The State Geologist is ex-officio Director, performing all the functions of 
former officers with the exception of Meteorologist, who is commissioned by 
the Governor and serves as liaison officer with the United States Weather 
Bureau. All activities except clerical are performed voluntarily. 



188 



189 



MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Edward B. Mathews State Geologist 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Geological and Economic Survey Commission is authorized unaer the 
general jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
to conduct the work of this department. The State Geological and Eco- 
nomic Survey is authorized to make the following: 

Topographic surveys showing the relief of the land, streams, roads, rail- 
ways, houses, etc. 

Geological surveys showing the distribution of the geological formations 
and mineral deposits of the State. 

Agricultural soil surveys showing the area! extent and character of the 
different soils. 

Hydrographic surveys to determine the available waters of the State for 
potable and industrial uses. 

Magnetic surveys to determine the variation of the needle for land 
surveys. 

A permanent exhibit of the mineral wealth of the State in the old Hall 
of Delegates at the State House, to which new materials are constantly 
added to keep the collection up-to-date. 



SECTION in 

Description Of Courses 

The courses of instruction described in this section are offered at College 
Park, Those offered in the Baltinuyne Schools o/re described in the separate 
announcements issued by the several schools. 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically: 

Page 

Agricultural Economics „.... - 192 

Agricultural Engineering „ 195 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) 19G 

Animal Husbandry — 198 

Aquiculture - - — *.... -.... 298 

Art „.— 199,261 

Astronomy _ - _ - 200 

Bacteriology and Pathology 200 

Botany 205 

Chemistry 210 

Comparative Literature 217 

Dairy Husbandry „ _ 218 

Economics and Business Administration 221 

Education - 225 

Engineering ^ 237 

English Language and Literature 246 

Entomology „.... „.... ^.„ „ 252 

Farm Forestry ^ 255 

French _ 277 

Genetics and Statistics 256 

Geology - — ~ - 256 

German - - 279 

Greek - - 256 

Home Economics - • 259 

Horticulture _ ....- 263 

Italian _.... - 282 

Latin - 268 

Library Science 268 

Mathematics - - 268 

Military Science and Tactics - 275 

Modem Languages ^ 277 



190 



191 



It 



Page 
Musir 284 

Philosophy - - 285 

Physics , 286 

Political Science - 289 

Poultry Husbandry 290 

Psychology .„ - 227,291 

Sociology „ 292 

Speech. 294 

Spanish _.... 282 

Zoology 296 

Courses for undergraduates are designated by the numbers 1-99; courses 
for advanced undergraduates and graduates, 100-199 ; courses for graduates, 
200-299. 

The letter following the number of the course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered: thus, 1 f is offered the first semester; 1 s, the 
second semester; 1 y, the year. A capital S after a course number indicates 
that the course is offered in the summer session only. 

The number of hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses 
after the title of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students will obtain these schedules when they register. 

Students are advised to consult the statements of the colleges and schools 
in Section II when making out their programs of studies; also Regulation 
of Studies, Section I. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professor DeVault; Associate Professor Walker; Assistant 

Professor Russell; Mr. Hamilton. 

A. E. If. Agricultural Industry and Resources (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Open to sophomores. 

A descriptive course dealing with agriculture as an industry and its re- 
lation to climate, physiography, soils, population centers and movements, 
commercial development, transportation, etc.; the existing agricultural re- 
sources of the world and their potentialities, commercial importance, and 
geographical distribution; the chief sources of consumption; the leading 
trade routes and markets for agricultural products. The history of Ameri- 
can agriculture is briefly reviewed. Emphasis is upon the chief crop and 
livestock products of the United States. 

A. E. 2f. Agricultural Economics (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 5 f or s. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, the tariff, price movements, and marketing. 

192 



For Advanced Undergraduates ajid Graduates 

A. E. 101s. Transportation of Farm Products (3)— Two lectures; one 

laboratory. 

A study of the development of transportation in the United States, and the 
Hifferent facilities for transporting farm products, with special attention to 
such problems as tariffs, rate structure, the development of fast freight 
lines refrigerator service, truck transportation of agricultural products, 
and observation of transportation agencies in action. Not open to students 
who have taken or who are taking Econ. 112s. (Russell.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 5 f or s. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction ofeffort in 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (LVe Vault.) 

A. E. 103 f . Cooperation in Agriculture (3) —Three lectures. 
Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organi- 
zations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Kussell.) 

A. E. 104 s. Agricultural Finance (3)— Three lectures. 
AgHcultural Credit requirements ; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm orgamzations 
and industries. Farm insurance^fire, crop, livestock, and life msurance 
with special reference to mutual development^how provided, benefits, and 
11.. ixvusseii.i 

needed extension. ^ 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given m the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltim^e. 

(Staff.) 

A. E. 106 s. Prices (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. ^ 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Russell.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) —One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

193 



A. E. 108 f. Farm Organization and Operation (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 y. Resea/rch Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 110 s. Economics of Consumption (2) — Two lectures. 

Economic activity and organization viewed from the standpoint of the 
consumer. Covers among other subjects a study of consumption theory, 
including Engel's laws and demand curves, also practical information on 
standards of living, consumers' financial problems, grades of goods, brands 
and advertising, cooperative purchasing by consumers, and governmental 
consumer agencies. (Russell.) 

For Graduates 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in Agricultural Econowdcs (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. (DeVault.) 

A, E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203y. Research (8). 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under 
the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original in- 
vestigation in problems of agricultural economics, and the results will be 
presented in the form of theses. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 210 s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture: general prop- 
erty tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license taxes, in- 
heritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm tax reduc- 
tion through greater efficiency and economies in local government. 

(DeVault and Walker.) 
194 



A. E. 211 f. Taxation in Theory and Practice (^)— Two lectures; one 

laboratory period a week. ^f ^ ^f 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare of 
society; theory of taxation: the general property tax, business and license 
taxes the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, mheritance 
and estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax reforms; 
conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units; Practical * 
and current problems in taxation. (DeVault and Walker.) 

A. E. 212 f. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3)— Two 
double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation by regions of the basic physical conditions of the economic 
and social forces that have influenced agricultural settlement, and of the 
resultant utilization of the land and production of farm products; followed 
by a consideration of regional trends and interregional shifts in land utiliza- 
tion and agricultural production, and the outlook for further changes in 
each region. . ( a .; 

A. E. 213 s. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living 
(3) — Two double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation of the trends in population and migration for the Nation 
and by States, of trends in exports of farm products and their regional sig- 
nificance, of trends in diet and in per capita consumption of non-food prod- 
ucts; followed by a consideration of the factors that appear likely to influ- 
ence these trends in the future, and of the outlook for commercial as con- 
trasted with a more self-sufficing agriculture. (Baker.) 

A. E. 214 f. Advanced Cooperation (2)— Two lectures. 
Intensive study of specific phases of agricultural cooperation. (Russell.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter. 

Agr. Engr. 101 f. Farm Machinery (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse- and tractor- 
drawn machinery. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual 
machines, their calibration, adjustment, and repair. 

Agr. Engr. 102 s. Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automx>biles (3)— Two lec- 
tures: one laboratory. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the various types of in- 
ternal combustion engines used in farm practice. 

Agr. Engr. 104 f. Far7n Shop Work (1)— One laboratory. 

A study of practical farm shop exercises, offered primarily for prospective 
teachers of vocational agriculture. 

Agr. Engr. 105 f. Farm Buildings (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of all types of farm structures ; also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. 

195 



Agr. Engr. 107 s. Farm Drainage (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, and methods of 
construction. A smaller amount of time will be spent upon drainage bv 
open ditches, and the laws relating thereto. 

AGRONOMY 

Division of Crops 

Professors Metzger, Kemp; Associate Professor Eppley. 

Agron. If. Cereal Crop Production (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

History, distribution, adaptation, culture, improvement, and uses of cereal 

forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. 

Agron. 2 s. Forage Crop Production (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Continuation of Agron. 1 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. 102 f. Technology of Crop Quality (2 or 3)— Students, other than 
those specializing in agronomy, may register for either half of the course. 
^^n one (Grading Farm Crops)-^ne lecture; one laboratory. The market 
classifications and grades as recommended by the United States Bureau of 
Markets and practice in determining grades. Part two (Grain, Hay, and 
Seed Judging and Identification) -^ne laboratory. (Eppley.) 

Agron. 103 f. Crop Breeding (2)~0ne lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Gen. 101 f. ^ 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops, and methods used in 
crop improvement. .,, " 

(Kemp.) 

^tT' ^"11^"'' '• ^^^^"^^'^ ^'■"P ^*"^*'^« (l-4)-Ci*dit according to 
work done This course is intended primarily to give an opportunity for 
advanced study of crap problems or crops of special interest to students. 

(Staff.) 

AGRON. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (2)— Two lee- 
lures* 

A consideration of crop investigation methods at the various experiment 
stations, and the standardization of such methods. (Metzger.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10)— Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103 f, but will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range will be allowed in 
choice of material to suit special cases. (Kemp ) 

Agron. 203 y. Seminar (2)— One report period each week. 
The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scientific 
publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. 

196 



Agron. 209 y. Research (6-8) — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list of 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 
Professor Bruce; Associate Professor Thomas; Lecturer Thom. 

Soils If and s. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5) — Three lectures; two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Geol. 1 f, Chem. 1 y, Chem. 13 s, or 
registration in Chem. 13 s. 

A study of the principles involved in soil formation and classification. 
The influence of physical, chemical, and biological activities on plant growth, 
together with the use of fertilizers in the maintenance of soil fertility. 
Lectures may be taken without the laboratory. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 102s. Soil Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the soil fertility systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems, and the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. The practi- 
cal work includes laboratory and greenhouse practice in soil improvement. 

Soils 103 f. Soil Geography (3) — Two lectures; one discussion period. 

A study of the genealogy of soils, the principal soil regions of North 
America, and the classification of soils. Field trips will be made to empha- 
size certain important phases of the subject. 

For Graduates 

Soils 204 s. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of 
organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Thorn.) 

Soils 201 y. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 

Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. (Staff.) 

Soils 202 y. Soil Technology (7-5 f, 2 s) — ^Three lectures; two labora- 
tories first semester; two lectures second semester. Prerequisites, Geol. 1, 
Soils 1, and Chem. 1. ' 

In the first semester, chemical and physico-chemical study of soil prob- 
lems as encountered in field, greenhouse, and laboratory. In the second 
semester, physical and plant nutritional problems related to the soil, 

(Thomas.) 
197 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Ikeler, Meade, Carmichael; Mr. Vial. 

A. H. If. General Animal Husbandry (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Place of livestock in the farm organization. General principles underlying 
efficient livestock management. Brief survey of types, breeds, and market 
classes of livestock, together with an insight into our meat supply. 

(Carmichael.) 

A. H. 2 f . Breeds of Live stock (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 

The origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability of the economic 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine, with elementary judging practice. 
Students in this course will be required to fit and show an animal in the 
annual Students' Fitting and Showing Contest. (Ikeler, Carmichael.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 100 s. Classes and Grades of Live Stock (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. 

Market classes and grades of live stock, the compilation of current market 
quotations, and the evaluation of animals for the commercial market. 

(Ikeler.) 
A. H. 101 f. Feeds and Feeding' (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock. Feeding standards, the 
calculation and compounding of rations. (Meade.) 

A. H. 102s. Principles of Breeding (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

T'his course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity, variation, selection, development, systems of breeding, and ped- 
igree work. (Meade.) 

A. H. 103 f. Livestock Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Instruction will be given in the care and management of beef cattle and 
horses, with training in the judging, fitting, and showing of these two types 
of farm stock. Students in this course will be required to fit and show an 
animal in the annual Students* Fitting and Showing Contest. When con- 
flicts occur, students, with the consent of the instructor, may be allowed 
to register for the laboratory period only. (Carmichael, Vial.) 

A. H. 104f. Livestock Management (3) — Two lectures ; one laboratory. 
Same as A. H. 103 f. except that subject matter relates to swine and 
sheep. (Carmichael, Vial.) 

A. H. 105 f. Livestock Judging (2) — Two laboratories. 

Attention is given to the judging of horses, beef cattle, sheep, and swine. 
Critical study of individual animals is made, and extended practice in com- 
parative judging given. Competitive judging is stressed, and teams to rep- 

198 



resent the University in livestock judging contests will be chosen from 
students taking this course. 

A. H. 106 s. Advanced Study of Breeds of Livestock (3)— Two lectures; 
one laboratory. 

A study of the historical background and development of breeds; out- 
standing individuals, families, and more prominent blood lines ; advertising ; 
public sales, and registration procedure. (Bogue.) 

A. H. 107 f ; 108 s. Meat and Meat Packing (2)— Two laboratory periods. 
The slaughtering of meat animals; the handling of meat, and the process 
involved in the preparation, curing, and distribution of meat and its prod- 
ucts. 

A. H. 10£^ s. Anhnal Nutrition (3)— Three lectures. 
A study of digestion, assimilation, metabolism, and protein and energy 
requirements. Methods of investigation and studies in the utilization of 
feed and nutrients. ^ (Meade.) 

For Graduates 
A. H. 201 y. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (4-6). 
Problems which relate specifically to the character of work the student 
is pursuing are assigned. Credit given in proportion to the amount and 
character of work completed. (Meade, Carmichael.) 

A. H. 202y. Semttiar (2)— One lecture. 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon their research for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203 y. -Research— Credit to be determined by the amount and char- 
acter of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student pursues 
original research in some phase of animal husbandry, carries the same to 

completion, and reports the results in the form of a thesis. . ^ , , 

(Meade, Carmichael.) 

ART 

Professor Marti 
Art. 1 f. Appreciation of Art I (1)— One lecture and one hour of slide 

study. . i? 4. 

An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. 
The material used will be taken chiefly from the history of occidental art, 
from Egypt to the Renaissance. Occasional Misits to the museums m Wash- 
ington and Baltimore. No prerequisite. 

Art. 2 s. Appreciation of Art II (1)— One lecture and one hour of slide 
study. 

Similar to Art 1 f . The material wiU be mainly European art from the 
Renaissance to the present. Occasional visits to museums. No prerequisite. 

199 



ASTRONOMY 

Professor T. H. Taliaferro 

ASTR. 101 y. Astronomy (4)— Two lectures. Elective, but open only to 
juniors and seniors. 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 



(Taliaferro.) 



BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY* 

Professors James, Reed, Black; Mr. Faber, Dr. Bartram, Mr. Pelczar. 

A. Bacteriology 

Bact. 1 f or s. General Bacteriology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to 
nature; morphology; classification; metabolism; bacterial enzymes; applica- 
tion to water, milk, foods, and soils; relation to the industries and to dis- 
eases. Preparation of culture media; sterilization and disinfection; micro- 
scopic and macroscopic examination of bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and 
identification of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; effects of physical and 
chemical agents; microbiological examinations. 

Bact. 1 A f or s. General Bacteriology (2) -^T wo lectures. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 1. 

Bact. 2s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathogenic ma- 
terial; effects of pathogens and their products. 

Bact. 2 As. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2)— Two lectures. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2 s. 

Bact. 3 s. Household BacteHology (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; their relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; 
infection and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. 

Bact. 4 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (l)--One lecture. Senior year. Engi- 
neering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sewage disposal. 



* One or more of the scheduled courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates 
f^^is ch^'^ge'd ""^ evening, if a sufficient number of students register A special 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101 f. Dairy Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria in milk, sources and development; milk fermentation; sanitary 
production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation of 
milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; practice in the bacteriological control of milk 
supplies and plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 102s. Dairy BacteHology (Continued) (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 101 f or Bact. 1 and consent of 
instructor. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
starters, fermented milks, ice cream, butter, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; occa- 
sional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. Ill f. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Bacteria, yeasts, and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoil- 
age; sanitary production and handling; food regulations; food infections 
and intoxications. Microbiological examination of normal and spoiled foods ; 
factors affecting preservation. Offered alternate years, alternating with 
Bact. 125 f. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 112 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purification; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal, industrial wastes; 
disposal of garbage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Practice in stand- 
ard methods for examination of water and sewage; differentiation and 
significance of the coli-aerogenes group; other bacteriological analyses. 

(Bartram.) 

Bact. 115 f. Serology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Junior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 2 s or consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Infection and resistance ; agglutination, precipitation, lytic and complement 
fixation reactions; principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness. Prepara- 
tion of necessary reagents; general immunologic technic; factors affecting 
reactions; applications in the identification of bacteria and diagnosis of 
disease. (Faber.) 

Bact. 116 s. Epidemiology (2) — Two lectures. Junior year. Prerequi- 
site, Bact. 1. 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, including history, charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and control; per- 
iodicity; principles of investigation; public health applications. Offered al- 
ternate years, alternating with Bact. 126 s. (Faber.) 



200 



201 



Bactt. 121 f. Resea/rch Methods (1) — One lecture. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation of 
papers; research institutions, investigators; laboratory design, equipment 
and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 122 f or s. Advanced Methods (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Registration 
limited. 

Microscopy, dark field and single cell technic, photomicrography; color- 
imetric and potentiometric determinations; oxidation-reduction, electropho- 
resis; surface tension; gas analysis; special culture methods; filtration; an- 
imal care; practice in media and reagent preparation. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 123 f. Bacteriological Problems (2-3) — Laboratory. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the projects. Regis- 
tration limited. 

Subject matter suitable to the needs of the particular student or problems 
as an introduction to research will be arranged. The research is intended 
to develop the student's initiative. The problems are to be selected, out- 
lined, and investigated in consultation with and under the supervision of a 
member of the department. Results are to be presented in the form of a 
thesis. (Black.) 

Bact. 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (Continued) (2-3) — Laboratory. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the 
projects. Registration limited. (Black.) 

Bact. 126 s. Public Health (1) — One lecture. Senior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration, by 
the staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, represent- 
ing each of the bureaus and divisions. Offered alternate years, alternating 
with Bact. 116 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (James, in charge.) 

Bact. 127 f. Advanced Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

History; genetic relationships; special morphology; bacterial varia- 
tion ; growth ; chemical composition ; action of chemical and physical agents ; 
systematic bacteriology, classification, review of important genera. (Black.) 

Bact. 128 s. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1, Chem. 12 f or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

Oxygen relations; enzymes; bacterial metabolism and respiration; chem- 
ical activities of microorganisms; changes produced in inorganic and or- 
ganic compounds; industrial fermentations. Offered alternate years, alter- 
nating with Bact. 206 s. (Black.) 



BACT. 131 f. Journal Club (1). Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
at least one of the advanced courses. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticised by 
members of the class and staff. (Black.) 

BACT. 132 s. Journal Club {Continued) (1). Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and at least one of the advanced courses. (Black.) 

For Graduates 

Bact. 201 f. Advanced General Bacterwlogy (3)— One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, degree in biological sciences and consent of instruc- 
tor. Students with credit in an approved elementary course will not receive 
credit for this course. 

History; microscopy; morphology; classification; metabolism; relation to 
industries and to diseases. Media preparation; examination of bacteria; 
staining; cultivation and identification of bacteria. Minor credit will not be 
ffiven for Bact. 201 f unless Bact. 202 s is satisfactorily completed. 
^ (Faber.) 

Bact. 202 s. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (3)— -One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 or 201 f or equivalent. Registration lim- 

Infection and immunity; pathogenic microorganisms. Isolation, identifi- 
cation, and effects of pathogens. (Faber.) 

Bact. 206 s. Physiology of Bacteria (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact., 10 hours and Chem. 108 s or equivalent. 

Growth; chemical composition; physical characteristics; energy relation- 
ships; influence of environmental conditions on growth and metabolism; dis- 
infection ; physiological interrelationships ; changes occurring in media. Of- 
fered alternate years, alternating with Bact. 128 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

(James.) 

Bact. 207 f. Special Topics (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 

Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 208 s. Special Topics (Continued) (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 
hours. (^^^^^•> 

Bact. 215 f or s. Food Sanitation (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bact. 
1 f or s, Bact. 2 s, and Bact. Ill f , or their equivalent. 

Principles of sanitation in food manufacture and distribution; methods 
of control of sanitation in commercial canning, pickling, bottling, preserv- 
ing, refrigeration, dehydration, etc. (James.) 



202 



203 



Bact. 221 f. Research (1-6) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
any other courses needed for the particular projects. Credit will be de- 
termined by the amount and character of the work accomplished. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. The results ob- 
tained by a major student working towards an advanced degree are pre- 
sented as a thesis, a copy of which must be filed with the department. 

(James, Black.) 

Bact, 222 s. Research (Continued) (1-6) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the particular projects. 

(James, Black.) 

Bact. 231 f. Semina/r (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours and consent of 
instructor. 

Conferences and reports prepared by the student on current research and 
recent advances in bacteriology. (James.) 

Bact. 232 s. Seminar (Continued) (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours and 
consent of instructor. (James.) 

B. Pathology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 103 f. He^rnatology (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

Procuring blood; estimating the amount of hemoglobin; color index; 
study of red cells and leucocytes in fresh and stained preparations; 
numerical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes; differential coimt of 
leucocytes; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; 
pathological forms and counts. (Reed.) 

Bact. 104 s. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance; use of clinical meth- 
ods and interpretation of results. (Reed.) 

Bact. 105 f. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (3) — Three lectures. 
Junior year. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; the 
interrelationship between the various organs and parts as to structure and 
function. (Reed.) 

Bact. 106 s. Animal Hygiene (3) — Three lectures or demonstrations. 
Junior year. 

Care and management of domestic animals, with special reference to 
maintenance of health and resistance to disease; prevention and early recog- 
nition of disease; general hygiene; sanitation; first aid. (Reed.) 

204 



BACT. 109 f. Pathological Technic (3)— Three laboratories. Junior year. 
Bact. I desirable. 

Examination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectiomng by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin embedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. (Keed.) 

BACT. 110 s. Pathological Technic (Continued) (2-5) —Laboratory course. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 109 f or consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory P^«^!^^^^^ 
which may be applied to clinical diagnosis. (Reed.) 

Bact. 125 f. ChmcaZ Met/iocfs (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Clinical material, diagnostic features. Methods in the qualitative and 
quantitative determination of important constituents of gastric contents 
blood, urine, feces, and exudates. Offered alternate years, altematmg with 
Bact. lllf. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Bartram.) 

For Graduates 

BACT 203 f or s. Animal Disease Problems (2-6). Prerequisite, degree in 
veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or consent of 
instructor. Laboratory and field work by assignment. (Reed.) 

BACT 204 y Animul Disease Problems {Continued) (2-6). Prerequisite, 
degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or con- 
sent of instructor. ' K -) 

BOTANY 

Professors Appleman, Norton, Temple; 

Associate Professor Bamford; Assistant Professors Brown, 

duBuy; Dr. Woods, Mr. McCann, Mr. Tillson, Mr. Reynard, 

Mr. Shirk, Mr. Bellows, Mr. Olson. 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

BOT. If. General Botany (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject The chief aim in this course is to present fundamental biological 
principles rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The 
student is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods, and the value of its results. 

BoT. 2 s. General Botany (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

A study of algae, bacteria, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and seed 
plants. The development of reproduction, adjustment of plants to land, 
habit of growth, and the attendant changes in vascular and anatomical 
structures are stressed. Several field trips will be arranged. With Bot. 1, 
a cultural course intended also as foundational to a career in the plant 

sciences. 

205 



I 



I 



BoT. 3s. Introditctory Botany (3) — ^Two lectures; one demonstration 
or laboratory period. 

A course similar to Bot. 1 f , except that only one demonstration or lab- 
oratory period is required. 

Bot. 4 s. Local Flora (2) — Two laboratories. 

A study of common plants, both wild and cultivated, and the use of keys, 
floral manuals, and other methods of identifying them. Largely field work. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are required. (Bamford.) 

BoT. 102 f. Mycology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory study of the morphology, life histories, classification, 
and economics of the fungi. Methods of cultivating fungi and identification 
of plant pathogens constitute a part of the laboratory work. 

(Norton, Woods.) 

Bot. 103 f. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying 
it; the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic founda- 
tions; methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium, and 
library. Each student to work on a special problem during some of the 
laboratory time. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Norton.) 

Bot. 104 s. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two labora^ 
tories. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Each student works on an original problem dur- 
ing the laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Bot. 105 s. Economic Plants (2) — Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
By examination of plant products from markets, stores, factories, and gar- 
dens, students become familiar with the useful plants both in the natural 
form and as used by man. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Norton.) 

Bot. 106 f. History and Philosophy of Botany (1) — One lecture. 

Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Norton.) 

Bot. 107 f. Methods in Plant Histology (2) — Two laboratories. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 

(Bamford.) 

206 



BOT. 201s. Cytology (4)'-Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
^'1' iftailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 

the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity ^na 

The laboratory involves the preparation, exammation, and «-^--^^^ 

cytological material by current methods. 

BoT. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and^cytology- 

BOX 204. Keaearc;.-Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 
note: See announcement on page 299 for further botany courses given 
at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

B. Plant Pathology 

PLT. PATH. If. Diseases of Plants (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. If. , . xi, lu^^-ofnr*. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PLT. PATH. 101 s. Diseases of Fruits (2-4)-Two lectures; laboratory ac 
cording to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. If. 

fruit production, as well as those who expecx w uc i, (Woods.) 

pathology. ^v m i 

PLT. PATH. 102 s. Diseases of Garden and Field (^^OP^^^^^-^^ f "/ 
tures- laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. If. 

Th Lases It garden crops, truck crops, cereal and forage crops In- 
tended for students of vegetable culture agronomy, and plant P^tho^oey. 
and for those preparing for county agent work. V V 

PLT. PATH. 103 s. Research Methods (2) -0- inference -dfiv^ hours 
of laboratory and library work. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f or ^^^^^^^ 

Technic of plant disease investigations: sterlization, <^^^^^ ^^^'^;^^^^: 

lecnnic oi yi<xiiv ^^fi^nH^ sincle-spore methods, disinfectants, 

tion of pathogens, inoculation methods, smgie spore , 

fungicides; photography, preparation of manuscripts and the literature m 

the scientific journals and bulletins on these subjects. (Woods.) 



207 



Plt. Path. 104 f and s. Minor Investigations (1-3) — Credit according 
to work done. A laboratory course with conferences. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 
If. 

In this course only minor problems or special phases of major investiga- 
tions may be undertaken. Their solution may include a survey of the 
literature on the problem under investigation and both laboratory and 
field work. (Norton, Temple, Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 105 s. Diseases of Ornamentals (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. 

The most important diseases of plants growing in greenhouse, flower gar- 
den, and landscape, including shrubs and shade trees. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 106 y. Seminar (1). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on recent 
investigations. (Temple, Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 107 f. Plant Disease Control (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practice of plant disease 
control; the preparation of sprays and other fungicides and the testing of 
their toxicity in greenhouse and laboratory; demonstration and other ex- 
tension methods adapted to county agent work and to the teaching of agri- 
culture in high schools. (Temple.) 

For Graduates 

Plt. Path. 201 f. Virus Diseases (2) — Two lectures. 

An advanced course, including a study of the current literature on the 
subject and the working of a problem in the greenhouse. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 203 s. Non-Parasitic Diseases (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due to 
climate, soil, gases; dusts and sprays; fertilizers; improper treatment and 
other detrimental conditions. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 205 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple.) 

C. Plant Physiology 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 101 f. Plant Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f . 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim in this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. 

(Brown.) 

208 



PI.T PHYS. 102 s. Plant Ecology (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University ^^^^^^^ 

For Graduajtes 
P,T PHYS 201s. Plant Biochemistry (4) -Two lectures; two labora- 
tor^el: Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 

"l^adtltrclrse in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
arfespeSy emphasized It deals with the important substances m he 
rmp'Ttfon If the'plant body and with the important P--es m planU.^^^ 

PIT PHYS 202 Af. Plant Biophysics (2)— Two lectures 
PrlrJquS: Bot. If and Pit. Phys. 101 f or equivalent An elementary 
Sowledge of physics or physical chemistry is highly desirable. 

Tn advanced course dealing with the operation of V^y^^^J^^^^^^^^ 
life processes. 

PLT. Phys. 202 Bf. Biophysical Methods (2). 

A laboratory course to accompany Pit. Phys. 202 ^^'^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ 

PLT PHYS. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2)-0ne lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. • ^^^^-i. 

The isolation, indentiflcation, and localization .«>* «'-^-">'=,f l?";;?^? 
substances found in plant tissues ^y -^'^'^■'^tZt'l^^^^^eT 
these methods in the study of metabolism m plants is emphasized. 



(Appleman.) 



Plt. Phys. 204 f . Growth and Development (2) . 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Pit Phys. 205 f and s. Semina/r (1). 

students L required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
tu^ These're discussed in connection with the recent advance^ m ttie 

stibject. 
PLT PHYS 206 y. Keseorcft— Credit according to work done. 



209 



i 

I 

I 



CHEMISTRY 

Professors Broughton, Drake, Haring, McDonnell; 

Associate Professors White, Wiley; 

Assistant Professor Machwart; 

Dr. Supplee, Dr. Weiland, Dr. White, Mr. Brooks, Mr. Carhart, 

Mr. Heller, Mr. Horne, Mr. Howard, Mr. Ingersoll, Mr. Kraybill 

Mr. Lowe, Mr. Smith, Mr. Spangler, Mr. Stanton, 

Mr. Stimpson, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Zapponi. 

A. Gieneral Chemistry 

Chem. lAy. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures ; two laboratories. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of the 
course is to develop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. 

Course A is intended for students who have never studied chemistry, or 
have passed their high ®chool chemistry with a grade lower than B. 

Chem. IBy. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course cov<ers the same ground as Chem. 1 A y; but the subject 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade not lower than B. 

Chem. 2y. Qualitative Analysis (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory the 
first semester: and one lecture; two laboratories the second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, their 
separation and identification, and the general underlying principles. 

Chem. 3y. Introductory Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A y. This 
course is designed for students desiring a working knowledge of elementary 
chemistry, without the laboratory part. It is not accepted as a prerequisite 
for advanced chemistry courses. If one subsequently desires credit for 
Chem. 1 y, he may secure this by adding two credits in the laboratory of 
Chem. 1 y s. A demonstration fee of five dollars is required. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 104 f. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 2y. Lectures may be taken without 
laboratory. 

This course is an advanced study of the general principles of inorganic 
chemistry. Special emphasis is given to the reactions and the more unusual 

210 



properties of the common elements. Laboratory experiments are selected 
Eh involve important theoretical considerations. (White.) 

For Graduates 
CHEM. 200 A y. Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (4) -Two lectures. Pre- 

rpauisite, Chem. 2 y. „ -j „- „ 

The course is devoted to a study of the elements not usually consid^eO^n 

the elementary course. 

CHEM. 200 By. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4)-Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A laboratory study of the analyses and the compounds of elementejon- 
sidered in Chem. 200 A y. 
CHEM 201 f or s. An Introducti<m to Spectographic Aruilms (11. 
This is a laboratory course designed to give the student the fundamental 
principles of spectographic analysis. 

B. Analytical Chemistry 
CHEM. 4f or s. Qtiantitative Analysis {4)-Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Chem. ly. , i. 4. 

Quantitative analysis for premedical students, with special reference to 

volumetric methods. , 

€HEM. 6y. QwanUtatiA,e Analysis (8) -Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. , ,. 4.- ^# 

Th? principal operations of gravimetric analysis Standardization of 

^e empTasized, as well as calculations relating to common ion effect. Re- 
quired of all students whose major is chemistry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
CHEM. 101 y. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (lO)-Two lectures; three 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or its equivalent. 

A broad survey of the field of inorganic quantitative analysis. In the first 
semeS n^nera[ analysis is given. Included in this is ana^s^ of si Ka^e , 
carbonates, etc. In the second semester *e analysis of steel and iron is 
taken up. However, the student is given wide latitude as to the t^pe of 
quantitative analysis he pursues during the second semester. (Wiley.) 

C. Organic Chemistry 
CHEM. 8 Ay. Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) -Two lectures. Pre- 

requisite, Chem. 1 y. . , ^ i .* ^«„«,*/. 

This course includes an elementary study of the ^^ J^f ^Jj^-fij^ 5"^^ 
chemistry, and is designed to meet the needs of students specializing in 
chemistry, and premedical students. 

211 



Chem. 8 By. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2) -One laboratory 

methorof\v,l''„''^'*^ to familiarize the student with the fundamental 
methods of the orgamc laboratory. This course, with Chem. 8 A y. satisfie 
the premedical requirements in organic chemistry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. H6y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4)— Two lectures Pr« 
requisite, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y or their equivalent. 

This course is devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of 
carbon than is undertaken in Chem. 8 A y. Graduate students who desire 

Se^t Ch?m 118 V LT "^ "^ *° accompany it with Chem. 117 y. and to 
eieci i<nem. lis y in their semor year. /tj i^ 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Laboratory (2)— One laboratory. 

ITiis course is devoted to an elementary study of organic aualitativ^ 
analysis. The work includes the identificaLn of^LoTorSc c m^ 
pounds, and corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 20? TDraS 

Chem. 118 y. Advanced Organic LaboraUm/ (2)-0ne laboratory 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of oreanic 
compouiids. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen nitro^n 

cfem'tn :^:s« ""*• ^-^^ ^^"^^^-^ --^ ^^^^^^^ '^- ^^o^^^t 

(Drake.) 
For Graduates 

Chem. 203fors Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2-4-6)-A lec- 

sp^ializrto htln'-f'l^ *A^" ^^"^"""'^ ''''^^ °^ '"'^^'^ ^l^'<=h are too 
specialized to be considered m Chem. llfly. Topics that may be covered are 

mavleSstef fof.f f "l" ^^'"*="'^'' ^"""^ ^"^°"«^' and a student 

TrSii *'°"''' *'*'"^ semesters and acquire a total of six 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f or s. Organic Preparations (4)-A laboratory course de- 
voted to the synthesis of various organic compounds. ' 

n«Iv ' "T^l '" '^.'"'^^'^ *" ^* ^^^ "^d« "^^ «t"dents whose laboratory ex- 
perience has been msuificient for research in organic chemistry. ( Ske ) 

Chem. 206f ors. Organic Microanalysis (4)— A Iflhnra+,.,.„ „* j j. ., 
methods of Pregl for the quantitative LermiLtto^'Sfal ^n"^^^^^^^^ 
carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc.. in very small quantities of Sri^^"' 

tJiZr^'T '^ "^"^ °"'^ *° P^'^'P^^'y *>"^"fi^ students, and the consent of 
the instructor is necessary before enrollment. .T , 5 

vJJrake.) 

212 



Chem. 207 f or s. Organic Qualitative Analysis (variable credit to suit 
student, with a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 credits.) 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and of mixtures. The text used is Kamm's Qualitative Organic Ajialysis. 

This course should be taken by students seeking a higher degree, whose 
major is organic chemistry. The work is an excellent preparation for the 
problems of identification one is likely to encounter while conducting re- 
search. (Drake.) 

Chem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6). 

Students electing this course should elect CHiem. 116 y. The content of 
the course is essentially that of Chem. 117 y and 118 y, but may be varied 
within wide limits to fit the needs of the individual student. (Drake.) 

D, Physical Chemistry 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 102 A y. Physical Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y; Phys. 2 y; Math. 16 y. 

For those taking laboratory, graduate students will elect Chem. 219 f and 
s (4), and undergraduates Chem. 102 B y (4). 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws of theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solu- 
tions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chemical 
kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Haring.) 

Chem. 102 B y. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 

This course must be taken by undergraduates who desire to take labora- 
tory work in connection with Chem. 102 A y. (Haring.) 

Chem. 103 y. Elements of Physical Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Chem. ly; Phys. ly; Math. 8f and 10 s or 
11 f and 14 s. (Haring.) 

This course is designed to meet the needs of premedical students and 
others unable to pursue the subject further. Subjects discussed are gases 
and liquids, solutions, electrolytic conductance, colloidal solutions, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibria including indicators and buffers, reaction rates, elec- 
trochemistry including pH, etc. Quantitative experiments on these subjects 
are performed in the laboratory. 

For Graduates 

Note : Chem. 102 A y and 102 B y or their equivalent are prerequisites for 
all advanced courses in physical chemistry. 

Chem. 212 A f and s. Colloid Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 
This is a thorough course in the chemistry of matter associated with sur- 
face energy. First semester, theory ; second semester, practical applications. 

(Haring.) 
213 



Chem. 213 f. Phase Rule (2) -Two lectures ^'^"'"''"^ 

given in 1937-1938 ) '°"'''^^^^''' "^'^^ P'-actical applications of each. (Not 
CHEM 214 s. Structure o/ MatUr (2) -Two lectures <Haring.) 

Jf Sir:^:isr;t-^^^^^^^^ - .... 

Sf "• 215 s. Camysis (2)-Two lectures. ' ^"^'^ 

(Not iSTn mT-?938 'r*""^ **" *'^ ^''^"^^ -^ ^PP«-«o- of catalysis. 

chemistry" °^rst Se K rlT^con? ""n^^ ^^^"'=^*^°"^ «^ «'-*- 
(Not given in 1937-1938 ) semester, practical applications. 

given in 1937-19?8r ^ ^ ^^ ^^^'"- ^17 A f and s. (Not 

laws of ene" ^''' "' approaching chemical problems through the 

• /XT • \ 

(Haring.) 
E. Biological Chemistry 

Chem. 12 A y. Elements of Organic Chemistrv (4^ t, , . 
The chemistry of carbon and its comnn^Zl • ^i^—^'^o lectures. 

course is particularly designed for students 1^1/^^'^ *° ^'''^'^- '^^ 
nomics. stuaents m Agriculture and Home Eco- 

Chem. 12 B y. Elementary Organic Lahoraton, (9\ n , . 

A course designed to familiarize the student w^tT,l~?"^ laboratory, 
ods of the organic laboratory. The cour« ;!^ .^ fundamental meth- 

12 Ay. '^^- ^^^ "''"'^^ ^« <lesigned to accompany Chem. 

Chem. 14 s. Chemistry of Textile., {^\ t 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A^ aLc^^^^^^^^^^ ^-^^-^' -^ laboratory. 

A study of the principal textile 1\hrJ. \l - . 
structure. Chemical methods arf Jvef f^r id.trf "^Ti'^^ ^^^ mechanical 
for a study of dyes and mordSts. ^^^^^if ymg the various fibres and 

214 



For Advanced Under g^raduates and Graduates 

Chem. 106 f or s. Dairy Chemistry (4) — One lecture; three laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y. 

Lectures and assigned reading on the constituents of dairy products. This 
course is designed to give the student a working knowledge and laboratory 
practice in dairy chemistry and analysis. Practice is given in examining 
dairy products for confirmation under the food laws, detection of watering, 
detection of preservatives and added colors, and the detection of adulterants. 
Students showing sufficient progress may take the second semester's work, 
and elect to isolate and make complete analysis of the fat or protein of milk. 

(McDonnell.) 

Chem. 108 s. General Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y or their equiva- 
lent. 

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, 
the chemistry of foods, digestion, absorption, assimilation, tissue composition, 
and excretion. The laboratory work consists of experiments in food analysis ; 
salivary, gastric, pancreatic and intestinal digestion; and respiration. 

(Broughton.) 

Chem. 115 f or s. Organic Analysis (4) — One lecture; three laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 4 f or s or Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y. 

This course gives a connected introductory training in organic analysis, 
especially as applied to plant and animal substances and their manufactured 
products. The greater part of the course is devoted to quantitative methods 
for food materials and related substances. Standard works and the publica- 
tions of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists are used freely as 
references. (Broughton.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 208 s. Biological Analysis (2) — Two laboratories. 

A course in analytical methods of special value to students whose major 
field is the biological sciences. The work is varied to suit the needs or in- 
terests of the individual when possible. (Broughton and Supplee.) 

Chem. 221 f or s. Tissue Analysis (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y or their equivalent. 

A discussion and the application of the analytical methods used in deter- 
mining the inorganic and organic constituents of plant and animal tissue. 

(Broughton.) 

Chem. 223 A f and s. Physiological Chemistri/ (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y or their equivalent. 

An advanced course in physiological chemistry. For the first semester the 
course consists of lectures and assigned reading on the constitution and 
reactions of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and allied compounds of biological 
importance. The second semester deals with enzyme action, digestion, 
absorption, metabolism, and excretion. (Broughton.) 

215 



Chem. 223 B f. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2). Prerequisites, 
Chem. 4 f or s and Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chem. 223 A f. Qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis of foods; salivary, gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal diges- 
tion; and respiration. (Broughton and Supplee.) 

Chem. 224 f or s. Special Problems (4-8) — A total of eight credit hours 
may be obtained in this course by continuing the course for two semesters. 
Laboratory, library, and conference work amounting to a minimum of ten 
hours each week. Prerequisites, Chem. 223 A f and s, and consent of in- 
structor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates or 
amino acids, and the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a pro- 
tein. The students will choose, with the advice of the instructor, the particu- 
lar problem to be studied. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 226 f or s. Toxicology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Theory and practice of the detection and estimation of toxic substances. 
The laboratoi'y work includes alkaloids, toxic gases, and inorganic poisons. 

(McDonnell.) 

F, Industrial Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 110 y. Industrial Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y and 8 y. 

A study of the principal chemical industries; plant inspection, trips, and 
reports ; the preparation of a report on some chemical industry. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. Ill s. Engineering Cliemistry (2 or 3) — ^Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. This course may be taken with or without laboratory. 

A study of the chemistry of engineering materials. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 113 y. Advanced Industrial Chemistry (6) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 110 y. 

Unit operations typical of industrial practice; fluid flow, heat transfer, 
distillation, etc. Examination of materials. Plant design. Application of 
unit operations to a complete chemical process. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 120 f. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory, 

A theoretical discussion of heat transfer, pyrometry, liquid flow, humidity, 
air-conditioning, refrigeration, etc. (Machwart.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 222 y. Unit Operations (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

A theoretical discussion of evaporation, distillation, filtration, etc. Prob- 
lems. (Machwart) 

216 



' 7 • i^^ One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi^ 

CHEM. 226 s. Gas An^y^ (3)^0ne lectu 
site, consent of instructor ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^ater gas 

r^ or^fitative determination of comnion ga Problems. 

J'i^ttcluding calorific determinations of the latter. P ^^^^^^^^^^ 

G History of Chemistry 

the Department of Chemistry especially of the general doc- 

The development of chemical ^^o^'^^^^' f",^ g^^ived, from their earliest 
,Z of chemistry which \^;:'^^l^^^^:^r.7:S-19^S.) (Broughton.) 
beginnings up to the present day. (Not give 

H Seminar and Research 

o • r9^ Reauired of all graduate students in 
CHEM. 228 f and s. Seminar (2) -Kequ^rea 

chemistry. .^^nrts on papers in the current litera- 

'"^^''*" r, ■ Chemistry The investigation of special 

CHEM. 229fors. Research ^^ f^f^^X^^^i, an advanced degree 
problems and the preparation of a thesis towa ^g^^jf ) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

.• T Uerature is offered jointly by the faculties of 
The work in Comparative ^^.^^^^^^''^^^^rtment of Modem Languages. 

the Department of English and ^^^^^^^l j^.^^^,^,,. English 113 f and 
A minor only may be taken m <^5"P^J^;^J„^, ^.y students who have had 

- rS ^OsTaSlOe rSri2Yrmay a Jbe counted as Compara- 

"^rr'lOlf. In.oau.Uon . Com^.r.U^ UUraUre (3)_Three 

lectures. _ lUoY-o+nrp through study in English 

survey of the background of ^^^^^^'^^^JQI faid on the develop- 
translations of Greek and Latm l^^jature ^ P ^^^^^ ^^ ^^ 

ment of the epic, t^^g^^^' /""^^ era ^^re to tL ancients is discussed and 
expression. The deM of modem literature ^p^^yj 

illustrated. ^. r,-*^/ifi/-r/> C2> — ^Three 

COMP. LIT. 102 s. Intro^tion to Comparat^ve Uterature (3) 

lectures. t •. mi f • study of medieval and modem Con- 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101 f, stuuy o (Prahl.) 

tinental literature. 

217 



of e,a.s,oa, „w„,i,e.U upon E'„Smi'Srw"Si"'' K "? 

€0MP. Lit. 104 s Th^ nu t . writers. (Harman. 

For seniors J^Zt ZelT'^'''' '^ ^^^'^^ (2)-Two lectures. 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types m., . 

COMP LIT. 105 f. R^nU<nsm in France (B) Z , . * 

Introduction to the chief authnv/Jlui. <^>— Three lectures. 
Lectures on the thought curr^aLm ^°'"^"*'*= '"°"^'"^"* - ^ance. 
eenth and early nineteenth 'rturies 1^*^^ !"o^^™«nts of the late eight: 
English translations. '^^"^""^s- The reading m this course is done in 

?oTtL"aS;f :,Vn:;ST,r ^C~^ /^>-^^- .ecture^"'^' 

Heine. The reading is dLe'^fn TgL ^rsL^tior"--^ ^^^ ^7^1.1 
CoMp. Lit 107 -F TI, ry r * \rrSihl.) 

(2)-Two le'ctures ' '''^'"'^ ^'^ ^^^'^'^ "'"^ German Literature 

byVa'rlt:'in'Dr^rj2\^^^^^^^^^^ ^f « Ages and its later treatment 
1938.) ^"^'«« and by Goethe in /i'ajwt. (Not given in 1937- 

(Prahl.) 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Ikelek, Meadp Tm^^tia,, a 

, MEADE, INGHAM; ASSOCTATE PROFESSORS BeRRY 

England; Mr. Mecham, Mr. Hughes. ' 

D. H. If or s. Introductory Dairy Science rq^ t , . 
oratory. Sophomore year. PrerequStJ CheL ^1 y "' '"'*'"^' °"^ l^**- 

A general survey of the dairy industrv if! ^ 7' 
composition of milk and its phScS and cU.^,- ? "" ^"^ development, the 
and distribution of dairy products iL^ Properties, the production 

manufacturing processes The Ba^ock Ht ^7^'^'"' *"^'*^^^'' '"^ ^^^'^ 
fat and other constituents simnli^nn«Hf J I °**'^'' quantitative tests for 

servatives, and visits tHhe Un^veSy S Sn/"/'""^^^"*^ ^"^ ^^ 
oratories. ^iiiversity milk plant and manufacturing lab- 

AnVrLSZ",X:tiit itT ^'!-^"^ ^^'=*"-' °- '^^^-tory! 
of dairy breeds of catt l S aSrT' f ^'"'^^teristics, and qualitie"^, 
Students in this cou se wiuTreS!^ t \f''^!'^'^'^ i"dgin? practice. 

annua. Students' Fittingind ShoSng^onL '"' ''"" ^" ^"*?f' '" ^^^ 
n Tj or ,-.„ ^ to u (Ingham.) 

?he prin^inlf f i""^ "'^ ^'^"'"^^ <l)-One laboratory 
JLYTr ^i e1;Td£ri:d^" *^ -""^ ""^l^ ^^' -- ^^ t'^e Babcock 
dents Whose major is^AgStutlircftr"^" ""^- "^^" '^XZ 

218 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Dairy Production 

D. H. 100 f. Geographij of Dairying (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of •the development of the dairy industry in our agricultural 
system and its adaptability to the various sections and conditions of the 
nations. (Berry, Ikeler.) 

D. H. 101 y. Dairy Production (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the care, feeding, breeding, and management of the dairy 
herd; dairy farm buildings and equipment; testing and herd improvement; 
bull associations; sanitation and the production and marketing of high 
quality milk; fitting, showing, and judging of dairy cattle. Students in this 
course will be required to fit and show an animal in the annual Students' Pit- 
ting and Showing Contest. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 102 s. Dairy Cattle Judging — Juniors-Seniors (1) — One laboratory. 

Comparative judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various farms. Such dairy 
cattle judging teams as may be chosen to represent the University will be 
selected from among those taking this course. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 103 f. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging (1) — One laboratory. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, D. H. 102 s. 

Advanced work in judging dairy cattle. Credit only to students who do 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle judging teanu 

(Ingham.) 

D. H. 104 s. Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. 

A study of the historical background, characteristics, noted individuals 
and families, and the more important blood lines in the Holstein, Guernsey, 
Ayrshire, and Jersey breeds. (Ingham.) 

Dairy Manufacturing 

D. H. 105 f. Dairy Mam^ufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4 hour 
laboratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making casein, cheese, and butter, includ- 
ing a study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved. Lab- 
oratory practice will include visits to commercial factories. (England.) 

D. H. 106 s. Dairy Manufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4 hour lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making condensed milk and milk powders; 
and ice cream, including a study of the physical, chemical, and biological 
factors involved. Laboratory practice will include visits to commercial 
factories. (England.) 



219 



D. H. 107 f. Market Milk ('^\ Ti.,.«« i .. 
vPi^T Pt.^,. • x ^ ^''—^^^^^ lectures: two laborafnripe c • 

year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact 1 iaooratories. Senior 

cial buttermilk; milk laws Tutiernf ,J *'°"' '"■"^*'^ "'"'^: •='»"'««,- 
plant construct on and ope'rat^n ?1^ . '"^pectors; distribution; milk 

local dairies. (Not givVfn ToSt-IDSS ) "^ ''"*=*''=' '"'^'"'^^ "^^'*« to 

D H inSo /I r . . (England.) 

i^. -H. 108 s. Analysis of Dairy Product<i (^\ n i ^ 

pretii^rr^-^rfn^s^^^^^ 

D- H. 109 s. Grading Dairy Products ma , . (England.) 

year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. ^^"^"^^^^ (1)— One laboratory. Junior 

Market grades and the iudiHn<r nf ,v,;ii i. x^ 
the commercial field. ^^ """"' ^""^^' *=^«e««' ^"d ^ce cream in 

D H iiftf ^j . (England, Mecham.) 

n w 111 r. . ,. (England, Mecham.) 

1^ ±1. Illy. Dairy Mechanics (2)-^0ne \ahnr!^^i^nT^r T,,^- 
requisite, D. H. 1. laDoratory. Junior year. Pre- 

soldering, pipe «,u„j, kpd^l^; '"" ""= "' "'""' «!"'P™nt, repairing, 
n w 110 r. • (Hughes.) 

requi. D H. ?"' ^"'""'"^ ^'^-^"^ '^^^^*-y- Senior year. Pre- 
^^ Methods of accounting in the market milk plant and dairy manufacturing 

(Hucrhes ) 
yef;. ""preSqui't:: ^^^^1.'^'''''"''''^^ (^^-^ne lecture. Junior or senior 
Presentation and discussion of current literature in dairying. (England.) 
hoL^of DliiSutirir^^'^"''"^ (3)-Senior year. Prerequisite, 10 

Jrrunrr^?nr s^::zi:^j^^j^-^ -pie. 

turing dairy products A wluf '"'^'^'^^^ ^^^^ P^ant or factory manufac- 
K ct ly products. A written report of the work is required. 

(England.) 



220 



D. H. 115 s. Dairy Plant Experience (1) — Senior year. Prerequisite, 
D. H. 1. 

Two hundred hours practical experience in the University of Maryland 
Dairy Manufacturing Plant. The grade will be based on the dependability 
and efficiency of the student in performing work assigned. 

(England, Hughes.) 

For Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and man- 
agement. Readings and assignments. • (Ingham.) 

D. H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2)— -Two lectures. 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physio-chemical 
point of view. (England.) 

D. H. 203 s. Milk Products (2)~TVo lectures. 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of milk 
products. (England.) 

D. H. 204 f or s. Special Problems in Dairying (1-3). 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is pur- 
suing will be assigned. Credit will be given in accordance with the amount 
and character of work done. (Staff.) 

D. H. 205 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon research in progress 
or completed for presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

D. H. 206 y. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and 
quality of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of 
the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Ingham, England.) 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Wedeberg; Associate Professor Nichol; Assistant Professors 
Daniels, Layton ; Mr. Cissel, Mr. Reid, Dr. Norris. 

EcoN. If. Economic Geography and Industry (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the economic and political factors which are responsible for 
the location of industries, and which influence the production, distribution, 
and exchange of commodities throughout the world. 

_ • 

EcoN. 2 s. History of World Commerce (3) — Three lectures. 

Commercial development throughout the three major periods of history; 
viz., Ancient, Medieval, and Modern. Special emphasis is laid upon im- 
portant changes brought about by the World War. 

221 



EcoN. 3y. Principles of Economics (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
sophomore standing. 

A study of the general principles of economics: production, exchange, 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. The study is based upon a recent 
text, lectures, and student exercises. 

Ecx)N. 5fors. Fundamentals of Economics (3) — ^Three lectures. Elec- 
tive. Not open to students having credit in Econ. 3 y. This course cannot 
be substituted for the first semester of Econ 3 y. 

A study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 

* Ecx)N. 7f. Business Organization and Operation (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the growth of large business organizations. Types of organi- 
zations are studied from the viewpoints of legal status, relative efficiency, 
and social effects. 

A. AND F. 9y. Principles of Accounting (8) — Three lectures; one 
laboratory. 

This course has two aims; namely, to give the prospective business man an 
idea of accounting as a means of control, and to serve as a basic course for 
advanced and specialized accounting. A study is made of methods and pro- 
cedure of accounting in the sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

''' Econ. 101 f. Money and Credit (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y, or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the origin, nature, and functions of money, monetary systems, 
credit and credit instruments, prices, interest rates, and exchanges. 

(Nichol.) 
♦Econ. 102s. Banking (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 101 f. 

Principles and practices of banking in relation to business. Special em- 
phasis upon the Federal Reserve System. (Nichol.) 

♦Econ. 103 f. Corporation Finance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y and A. and F. 9 y. 

Principles of financing, the corporation and its status before the law, basis 
of capitalization, sources of capital funds, sinking funds, distribution of 
surplus, causes of failures, reorganizations, and receiverships. (Wedeberg.) 

* A, AND F. 104 s. Investments (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y, A. and F. 9 y, and senior standing. 

Principles of investment, analyzing reports, price determination, taxation 
of securities, corporation bonds, civil obligations, real estate securities, and 
miscellaneous investments. Lectures, library assignments, and chart 
studies. (Layton.) 



♦These courses may be used for a major or minor in the fields of Economics or Accounting 
and Finance. 

222 



*EC0N. 105 f. Insurance (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3y. 

A survey of the major principles and practices of life and property in- 
surance, with special reference to their relationship to our s°"^jj^^^^d_^^J°- 
nomic life. 

A. AND F. 106 s. Personnel Management (2)— Two lectures. (See Psy- 
chology 106 s.) 

A. AND F. 107 y. Business Law (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
junior standing. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, ^^l^ ton ) 

EOON. 109 f. Labor Problems (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 

3 y or Soc. If. , , . i 4.- 

The background of labor problems; labor organizations; labor legislation; 
unemploymSt and its remedies; wages, working conditions, and standards 
of iSigTagencies and programs for the promotion of indus toal peace. ^ 

A. AND F. 110 y. Advanced Accounting (6) - Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. and F. 9y. /w a y^ \ 
Includes special phases of corporation accounting. (WedeDerg.; 

ECON. 112 s. Inland Transportation (3) -Three lectures. Prerequis- 
ite, Econ. 3 y or Econ. 5 f or s. , tt •. j a.. * 

The development of inland means of transportation in the United States. 
Thl cot^e is devoted largely to a survey of railway ^--P-tation. Jme 
study is given to other transportation agencies. iiJanieib., 

ECON 113 f. Public UtUUies (2)-Tv>o lectvires. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

The development of public utilities in the United States, economic and 
leS characteristics, regulatory agencies, valuation, rate of "tuni -d 
public ownership. 

* EOON. 114 s. Pu6Kc Finance (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite. Econ. 

3y 

The nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, taxation, and 
budgeting. Special emphasis on the practical, social, and econonuc^rol^ 
lems involved. 

*EC0N. 116 s. Principles of F<yreign Trade (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 3 y, Econ. 1 f . and Econ. 2 s. or their equivalent. 

The basic principles of import and export trade, as influenced by the 
differences in methods of conducting domestic and foreign '^""^^J^^^^.^,^^ 

"T^ii^eourses may be used for a maior or minor in the fields of Economies or Accounting 
and Finance. 

223 






sitrE"n.1^\n?lTor!3;;^ ^'•"^^'^ <^>-'^^° '-*-- ^-<Jul- 
mist. Lectures and class discussions based on assigned readings. (Nichol ) 

Ecrii.for-cott:::;rins!r;r '''-'-'' '-'-■ '-^^^^^^^' 

is fvenloZ tilt ^''''f ' 1°^ •^"''t^^Porary economists. Special attention 
IS given to the problems of value and distribution. (Nichol ) 

A r^ (Cissel.) 

and 'p'Tzi f. '^^ •• '"■""'"<»"'*» (2)-1>« lectoM.. Prer«,„blte. A. 

Ste„d„d „„l, theory .„d p„bl.ms. (Wed.tag.) 

»^SrandtS:^p?' ""'"""'" ■" "™'"« »"- ■>' "«<■*. 

A. AND F. 125 f. Auditing (2)-Two lecture, Pr«r.. • •/ * 
9 y and consent of instructor lectures. Prerequisite, A. and F. 

^^A^AND F. 126 s. Auditing (2)_Two lectures. Prerequisite, A. and F. 

Practical auditing. 

*A "c (Wedeberg.) 

turi: 'pTer^quS: E^llt' "' ^^"^-'-'^ ^-'^-^ (3)-Three lec- 

distribution; mail order and chS Sre Itrt^ , "' ^'^"''' ^°"^* 

cies; cash and quality discounts nr^T 1°" ' ^"f ^"'^ P"'^^ P^^'' 
fi,^ ui .. 7, **^'^J^ uiiscounrs, price maintenance: and a disrii^cinn ^f 

the problem of distribution costs aiscussion of 

(Reid.) 

For Graduates 

ECON. 201 y. Research (4-6). Credit proportioned to work accomplished. 

BOON. 203 f and s. Seminar (4) -Prerequisite, consent of instructor'''' 

D,scuss.on of major problems in the field of economic theory, accounting 

or business. Presentation of reports based upon original invitS Z' 

SS "''"*' " *'^ '^P^^"^"* '' ^~'- -d Bus"rs!Tdmin: 
(Staff.) 

and'^nanr.""* ""^ '^ ""^ '°^ ^ "^^^ ^^ -^-- - the fields of Economics or Accounting 

224 



ECON. 205 y. History of Economic Thought (4). 

Development from classical antiquity with discussions of the different 
schools of economics. Extensive readings, with student reports. 

(Nichol, Norris.) 

ECX)N. 207 y. The Economics of Alfred Marshall (6) — Three lectures. 
Study of the life work of the greatest English economist of the past genera- 
tion. (Nichol.) 

EcoN. 209 y. Mathematical Economics (6) — Three lectures. 
Applications of geometry, algebra, and calculus to economic theory. (Not 
given in 1937-1938.) (Nichol.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors Small, Cottekman, Sprowls, Mackert, Long; 

Associate Professor Brechbill; Miss Smith, 

Mrs. Barton, Miss Clough. 

A. History and Principles 

Ed. 2f. Introduction to Teaching- A (2) — Required of sophomores in 
Education. 

A finding course, with the purpose of assisting students to decide whether 
they have qualities requisite to success in teaching. Study of the physical 
qualifications, personality traits, personal habits, use of English, speech, 
and habits of work; and of the nature of the teacher's work. 

Ed. 3 s. Introduction to Teaching -B (2). 
A continuation of Ed. 2 f . 

Ed. 5s. Technic of Teaching (2). Required of juniors in Education. 
Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f. 

Educational objectives and outcomes of teaching; types of lesson; prob- 
lem, project, and unit; measuring results and marking; socialization and 
directed study; classroom management. 

Ed. 6 f . Observation of Teaching (1-2). 

Observation and preliminary participation in the classes in which super- 
vised teaching is to be done. Reports, conferences, and criticism. 

For Advanced Undergra4uate8 and Graduates 

Ed. 101 f . History of Education (2) . Greco-Roman, Medieval, and Early 
Modem Education. 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of educational theory, institutions, 
and practices from the Greco-Roman era to 1750. (Long.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modem Education (2). Continuation of Ed. 101 f. 

The survey of the modern period is directed to the creators of modern 
education and the bases on which modern educational systems have been 
founded in various countries. (Long.) 

225 



Ed. 103 s. Principles of Secondary Education (3). Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Evolution of the high school; European secondary education; articulation 
of the high school with the elementary school, college, and technical school, 
and with the community and the home ; the junior high school ; high school 
pupils; programs of study and the reconstruction of curricula; teaching 
staff; student activities. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology I (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of education as social control and emergent life, with emphasis 
upon the application of the recently developed concepts in modem school 
procedures. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 107f ors. Compa/rative Education (2). 

The forces that cause different systems of education, and the character- 
istic differences in the educational policies and practices in various countries 
are studied in this course. The major emphasis is upon certain European 
systems. (Long.) 

Ed. 108 f ors. Comparative Education (2). 

This course is similar to Ed. 107, an important difference being that edu- 
cation in Latin America receives major attention. (Long.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (2). 

This course considers the functions of the junior high school in the 
American public school system. Its development, present organization, cur- 
ricula, and relation to upper and lower grades will be emphasized. (Long.) 

Ed. lllf. Lives of Scientists (2). 

A study of the major achievements and interesting incidents in the lives 
of the pioneers of science. Though designed especially to provide enrich- 
ment material for the use of high school teachers, the course is of general 
cultural value. (Brechbill.) 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). 

This course deals objectively with the organization, administration, cur- 
ricula, and present status of public education in the United States. 

(Small.) 
Ed. 201s. Educational Interpretations (3). 

In this course a study is made of the social, economic, political, and cul- 
tural environment in which American educational institutions and policies 
have developed; and of the function of education in environmental change. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 202 s. College Teaching (3). Three lectures. 

Analysis of the work of the college teacher; objectives; organization of 
subject matter; nature of learning; characteristics of college students; 
methods of college teachers; measuring results; extra course duties; prob- 
lems; investigations; reports. (Cotterman.) 

226 



Ed 204 s High School Administration and Supervision. (3). 

This course considers the principal's duties in relation to organization 
for operation, administration, and supervision of instruction, and commumty 
relationships. 

Ed. 205 s. Educational Sociology II (3)— Three lectures. 

This course deals with education as social adjustment through an analy- 
tical consideration of the objectives in the American program of educa- 
tion methods of determining educational objectives, and a brief survey of 
the 'ways in which education has been used as social adjustment m foreign 
^^^ ^ .^ (Cotterman.) 

countries. ^ 

Ed. 206 s. History of American Education to 1850 (3). 
The development of the public school in America up to 1850. (Long.) 

Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Education (2-4). 

Required of all candidates for the Master's degree whose "^^^^^^ |J"^^'^ 

the field of education. ' , ^ , ^. a 

(For additional courses see Rural Life and Agricultural Education and 

Home Economics Education.) 

B. Educational Psychology 

ED. PSYOH. 1 f. Educational Psychology (3). Required of all juniors in 
Education. Open to others only by special permission. 

The laws of learning and habit formation in their application to teaching 
in the high school; types of learning and their relation to types of subject 
matter; psychological principles involved in lesson assignments, tests, exami- 
nations; individual differences; incentives and discipline; mental hygiene 
in relation to personality problems and classroom instruction. 

For Advanced Undergra4uates and Graduates 
Ed psych. 101 s. Advwnced Educational Psychology (3). Prerequisites, 
Ed. Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. The latter may be taken concurrently with Ed. 

Psych. 101 s. ., X,. u 

Principles of genetic psychology; nature and ^^^^^^^'^^^ ^^^^^ 
orsanisni- development and control of instincts. Methods of testing intelli 
gefc^^^rp and individual differences and their relation to educational 
Sacti^e Me^^^^^ of measuring rate of learning; study of typical learning 
experiments. 
Ed. Psych. 102 f. Educati<m(d Measurements (3). Prerequisites, Ed. 

Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. , .. , i „„a 

A study of typical educational problems involving educational sea es and 

st^^dard'testrNature of tests, methods of use, --'y^! /^^ JJ^Ss^r 
practical applications in educational procedure. Emphasis is "P»!^t^^^.f«J 
high school subjects. 

227 



Ed. Psych. 105 s. Mental Hygieiie (3). Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f or 
Psych. 1 f or s or equivalent. 

Normal tendencies in the development of character and personality. Solv- 
ing problems of adjustment to school and society; obsessions, fears, com- 
pulsions, conflicts, inhibitions, and compensations. Methods of personality 
analysis. (Sprowls,) 

For Graduates 

Ed. Psych. 200 f. Systematic Educational Psychology (3). 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. It deals with 
the major contributions of psychologists from Herbart to Watson to educa- 
tional theory and practice. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. Psych. 250 y. Seminar. 

m 

C. Methods in Higli School Subjects 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the College of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection and 
organization of subject matter in terms of modem practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; 
measuring results. (Smith.) 

Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f . 

Selection and organization of subject matter in relation to the objectives 
and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson 
plans ; measuring results. (Clough.) 

Ed. 124 s. Modem Langnage in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f . 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school; selection and 
organization of subject matter in relation to modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies. Methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons ; lesson plans ; special devices ; measuring results. 

(Barton.) 

Ed. 126s. Science in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. If. 

Objectives of science teaching, their relation to the general objectives of 
secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class room situation; selection and organization of 

228 



subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and 
laboratory equipment. Technic of class room and laboratory; measurement, 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature; observation 

, .... (Brechbill.) 

and criticism. ^ 

ED. 128 s. Mathenuitics in the High School (2) . Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 

If. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature; observation and criticism. (Brechbiii.) 

Ed. 130 f. High School Course of Study-Composition (2). 

Content and organization of the materials of written and oral coniposition 
in the several high school grades. (Smith.) 

Ed. 131 s. High School Course of Study— Literature (2). 

Content and organization of the literature course in the several high 
school grades. ^ ^^ 

Ed. 135 f . High School Course of Study— Geometry (2) . 

Content and organization of intuitive and demonstrative geometry. Meth- 
ods of analysis and problem solving. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 136 f. High School Course of Study— Biology (2). 

Content and organization of biology. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 137 s. High School Course of Study— Physical Science (2). 

Content and organization of physics. Some consideration is given to con- 
tent of chemistry. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 139 f or s. Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (2). 

Observation and supervised teaching. A minimum of 20 teaching periods. 

# 
E. English (Smith.) 

S. S. Social Studies (Clough.) 
L. Modern Language (Barton.) 
Sc. Science (Brechbill.) 
M. Mathematics (Brechbill.) 
P. E. Physical Education (Mackert.) 
C. Commercial Subjects 

Ed. 140 y. Physical Education Activities for High School Girls (4) . 
Required of juniors with Physical Education major or minor. 
The principles and practices of activities appropriate for both class work 
and extra-curriculum programs in senior and junior high schools. 



229 



I 



Ed. 141 f. Physical Education in the High School (Boys) (2). Prereaui 
sites, Ed. Psych. 1 f, Ed. 5 s, Phys. Ed. 25 y. 

Objectives of physical education for high school boys; lesson planning; 
problem cases; methods of handling classes, meets, pageants, and the like- 
physical and medical examinations; care of equipment; records; grading. 

(Mackert.) 

Ed. 142 f. Physical Education in the High School (Girls) (2) . Prerequi- 
sites, Ed. Psych. 1 f, Ed. 5 s, Ed. 140 y. 

Objectives in physical education for girls in the different types of high 
schools; programs appropriate to high school girls; selection and organiza- 
tion of subject matter; lesson plans. 

Ed. 150 f; ED. 151s. Commercial Subjects in the High School (2-6) 
Prerequisites, Ed. Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Aims and methods for the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and book- 
keeping in high schools. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Proftissor McNaugihton. 

H. E. Ed. 5 s. Technic of Teaching (2) — Required of juniors in Home 
Economics Education. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f. 

Philosophy of home economics education; survey of the needs of the 
community ; analysis of the characteristics and interests of the high school 
girl ; objectives for teaching home economics in high school ; construction of 
units; use of problem, discussion, demonstration, and laboratory methods; 
selection of illustrative material; the home project. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 6 s. Observation of Teaching (1-2). Minimum of 20 class 
periods. 

Classroom management; individual differences; types of lessons; obser- 
vations and critiques; conferences. (McNaughton.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Gradluates 

H. E. Ed. 101 s. Child Psychology (3). Open to juniors. 
Study of the nervous system; the glandular system; sensory develop- 
ment; habit formation; emotional controls. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 102 f. Child Study (4). 

The study of child development in relation to the physical, mental, and 
educational phases of growth; study of textbooks and magazines; adaptation 
of material to teaching of child care in high school; observation and partici- 
pation in University Nursery School. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. lOSfors. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics: 
Methods and Practice (4). Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 5 s. 

Observation and teaching in a vocational department of a Maryland 
high school or in a junior high school in Washington. Organization of 

230 



units, lesson plans, field trips; planning and supervision of home projects. 
After completing the teaching unit the student observes in home economics 
departments other than one in which she has taught. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems in Child Study (4) — Open to sen- 
iors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102 f. 

Methods and practice in nursery school work in University Nursery 
School; making of particular studies related to the mental, emotional, or 
physical development of preschool children. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106 s. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (1). 

Analysis of the units in the State course of study; study of various 
methods for organization of class period; analysis of text-books; evalua- 
tion of illustrative material. (McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics 
(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

(McNaughton). 

« > 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in HoTtie Economics Education (2-4). (See Ed. 
250 y.) (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-4) — Credit according to work done. 

Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit 
the research to be undertaken. (McNaughton.) 

RURAL LIFE AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Professors Cotterman, Carpenter; Mr. Worthington, 

Mr. Poffbnbergbr 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 101 f. Farm, Pra^ticums and DemoTistrations (1) — One laboratory. 
Cannot be used for graduate credit. 

This course is designed to assist the student in relating the learning ac- 
quired in the several departments of the University with the problems of 
doing and demonstrating which he faces in the field and in the classroom 
as a teacher. It aims particularly to check his training in the essential 
practicums and demonstrations in vocational agriculture, and to introduce 
him to the conditions under which such activities must be carried on in the 
patronage areas and laboratories of vocational departments. Laboratory 
practice in deficiencies required. (Poffenberger.) 

R. Ed. 102 s. Farm. Practicwms and Demonstrations (1) — One laboratory. 
Cannot be used for graduate credit. 
Continuation of R. Ed. 101 f. (Poffenberger.) 

231 



I 



R. Ed. 104 s. Rural Life and Education (3) — ^Three lectures. 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural communi- 
ties, stressing an -anlysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of 
normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the con- 
ditioning effects of economic differences. The course is designed especially 
for persons who expect to be called upon to assist in shaping educational 
and other community programs for rural people. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 105 f. Project Organization and Coat Accounting (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

The development of project programs in terms of placement opportunities; 
project forecasting as a form of motivation; project estimating; systems of 
project cost accounting; practice in project accounting. (Worthington.) 

R. Ed. 107 f . Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 
Students (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. If. 
Open to juniors and seniors; required of seniors in Rural Life and Agri- 
cultural Education. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 109 f. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 105 f, 107 f; A. H. 1, 2; D. H. 1; Poultry 1; 
Soils 1; Agron. 1, 2; Hort. 1, 11; F. Mech. 101, 104; A. E. 2, 102; F. M. 2. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of voca- 
tional agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farm- 
ing programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer work, 
and objectives and methods in all-day, continuation, and adult instruction. 

(CJotterman.) 

R. Ed. 112 s. Depa/rtmental Organization and Administration (2) — Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 f, 105 f , lOd f. 

The work of this course is based upon the construction and analysis of 
administrative programs for high school departments of vocational agri- 
culture. As a project, each student prepares and analyzes in detail an admin- 
istrative program for a specific school. Investigations and reports. 

(Worthington.) 

R. Ed. 114 s. Teaching Fa/rm Shop in Secondary Schools (1) — One lecture. 

Objectives in the teaching of farm shop ; contemporary developments ; de- 
termination of projects; shop management; shop programs; methods of 
teaching; equipment; materials of instruction; special projects. 

(Carpenter.) 

R. Ed. 120 f or s. Practice Teaching (2)— -Prerequisites, R. Ed. 105 f, 107 
f , 109 f . 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student in this course is 
required to analyze and prepare special imits of subject matter, plan lessons, 



and teach in cooperation with the critic teacher, exclusive of observation, 
not less than twenty periods of vocational agriculture. 

(Cotterman, Worthington.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology I (3)— See Education. 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201 f; 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3). Prerequisite, R. Ed. 
104 s, or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of public education as compon- 
ent parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and human de- 
velopment. Discussions, assigned readings, and major term papers in the 
field of the student's special interest. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f ; 208 s. Problems in Vocational AgricultutCy Related ScieTice, 
and Shop (2-4). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. The three 
phases of the vocational teacher's program — all day, part-time, and adult 
work — receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251 y. Resea/rch (2-4). Credit hours according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 202s. College Teaching (3). (See Education.) 

Ed. 205 s. Educational Sociology II (3). (See Education.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
A. Physical Education for Men 

Professor Mackert and Student Assistants 

*Phys. Ed. 1 y. Physical Activities (2). 

An activities course for freshman boys, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities included are soccer, touch football, basket- 
ball, volleyball, baseball (soft), track, and natural gymnastics. 



232 



233 



ti 



I 

Hi 






♦Phys. Ed. 3 y. Physical Activities (4). 

An activities course for sophomore boys, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities included are soccer, touch football, basket- 
ball, volleyball, track, baseball (soft and hard), fencing, wrestling, boxing, 
ping pong, horseshoes, tennis, and natural gymnastics. 

Phys. Ed. 5y. Physical Education Practice (2). 

An activities course required of junior men, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities included are gymnastics, stunts, tumbling, 
apparatus, games, and calisthenics. 

Phys. Ed. 7y. Advanced Physical Education Practice (2). 
An activities course required of senior men, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Continuation of Phys. Ed. 5 y. 

Phys. Ed. 11 y. Personal and Community Hygiene (4). 

Freshman course required of men whose major is physical education and 
open to other freshmen and sophomores. 

This course is designed to help the incoming student live at his best and 
to realize the finest ideals of his group. 

Phys. Ed. 13 y. Coaching High School Athletics (4). 

Junior course required of men whose major is physical education; elective 
for other junior and senior students. 

Football, soccer, basketball, track, and baseball are analyzed from the 
point of view of successful team play on an interscholastic basis. The man- 
agement of athletics is studied thoroughly. 

Phys. Ed. 15 y. Management of Intramural Athletics (4). 

A senior course required of men whose major is physical education. 

Prerequisite, three years of successful participation in intramural ath- 
letics. 

Designed to give the student practice in supervising, directing, and plan- 
ning the intramural program. 

Phys. Ed. 21 y. Survey of Physical Education (4). 

Sophomore course required of men whose major is physical education; 
elective for other students. 

This course is an introduction to the study of physical education. It in- 
cludes a survey of the possibilities of the profession. 

Phys. Ed. 23 y. Technics of Teaching Physical Education (4). 

Junior course required of men whose major is physical education. 

A thorough study of the physiological and psychological aspects of in- 
struction in the performance of physical activities. 



* students who are registered in the College of Education, or in Rural Life and Agri- 
cultural Education or Arts and Science Education curricula, and whose major or minor is 
Physical Education may take both Basic Military and first and second year Physical EJduca- 
tion courses for credit. In all other curricula credit will be allowed for either Basic Military 
or first and second year Physical Education, but not for both. 

234 



Ed. 141 f. Physical Education in the High School (Boys) (3). 

Ed. 143 f or s. Supervised Teaching of Physical Education (Boys) (2). 

For Graduates 

**Phys. Ed. 201 y. Administration of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion (6). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems that 
arise in the administration of health and physical education in public 
schools. An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating the 
effectiveness of programs of health and physical education. (Mackert.) 

B. Physical Education for Women 
Miss Stamp, Mrs. Eraser, Mrs. Wade, Dr. Karpeles. 

Phys. Ed. 2y. Personal Hygiene (1). 

Freshman course required of all women. 

This course consists of instruction in hygiene one period a week through- 
out the year. The health ideal and its attainments, care of the body relative 
to diet, exercise, sleep, bathing, etc., and social hygiene. 

Phys. Ed. 4y. Physical Activities (1). 

Freshman course required of all women. 

This is an activities course, which meets two periods a week throughout 
the year. It will present the following phases of physical education: sports, 
such as hockey, soccer, basketball, baseball, speedball, archery, and volley- 
ball; natural activities, such as tumbling and stunts; and dancing, such as 
clog, folk, and athletic. 

Phys. Ed. 6y. Community Hygiene (2). 

Sophomore course required of all women. 

This course is a continuation of the freshman course. The work in 
hygiene includes the elements of physiology, the elements of home, school, 
and community hygiene, and a continuation of social hygiene. 

Phys. Ed. 8y. Physical Activities (2). 

Sophomore course required of all women. 

This course is a continuation of the work of the freshman year. In ad- 
dition to the regular work, the student is permitted to elect clog, folk, or 
natural dancing. 

tPHYS. Ed. 10 y. Fundamentals of Rhythm and Damce (2) — One lecture 
a week. Required of all freshman students planning to make physical edu- 
cation a major, and open to other freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

The fundamentals of rhythm, principles of class organization, suggested 
lesson plans for teaching various types of dancing, as well as the aims and 
objectives of creative dancing will be presented in this course. 



**Open to men and women. 
fOpen to men and women. 



235 



ft 



l» 



¥ 



I 



Phys. Ed. 12 f. Games (2). 

Required of all sophomores whose major is physical education, and open 
to other undergraduates. 

This course will aim to present games and stunts suitable for the ele< 
mentary school and recreational groups. Both theory and practice will be 
offered. 

tPHYS. Ed. 16 s. First Aid (1). 

This course is required of all juniors whose major is physical education. 

It presents the fundamentals necessary for caring for accidents and 
injuries until medical attention can be secured. Practical work will be 
required of all students. 

Phys. Ed. 18Af;18Bs. Athletics (2-2). 

Required one semester of all juniors whose major is physical education, 
and open to other juniors and seniors. 

This course includes one lecture a week, and two periods of practical work 
each semester. The practical work is organized in a series of sport units, 
four for each semester, as shown below and designated as ''practical sec- 
tions." Any three of the four may be selected. 

First semester (18 f) : hockey, soccer, fieldball, basketball. Second sem- 
ester (18 s) : volleyball and handball, speedball, archery, baseball. Instruc- 
tion will be given in the theory, practice, organization, and teaching of each 
sport. 

Phys. Ed. 20 s. Natural Gymnastics (2). 

Required of all sophomores with a major in physical education. 

This course presents stunts, games, and self -testing activities based upon 
fundamental movements which are inherent in the race. Teaching technics 
will be considered and material offered which is suitable to varying age 
groups. 

Phys. Ed. 22 s. Organization of Athletic Activities for Girls (2). 

This course is open to juniors and seniors with a major in physical edu- 
cation. 

A lecture course dealing with the organization of material and the de- 
veloping of athletic activities for girls in such situations as camp, school, 
and playground. 

Phys. Ed. 26 y. Coaching and Officiating; Athletics for Girls (4). 

This course is open to seniors with a major in physical education. It 
trains the student to coach and officiate in women's athletics. Opportunity 
is given for the student to apply practically the theory and methods which 
she has learned in this class. 



tPHYS. Ed. 28 f. Clogs and Athletic Dances (2). 

Two practical classes a week. Required of all sophomores planning to 
make physical education a major, and open to other sophomores, juniors, 

and seniors. 
This course includes suitable teaching material for both high school boys 

and girls. 

Tap shoes are required. 

tPHYS Ed. 30 s. Folk Dancing (2). Two practical classes a week. Re- 
quired of all sophomores planning to make physical education a major, and 
open to other sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

This course includes folk dances of various countries. 

tPHYS. Ed. 32 f or s. Natural Dancing (2). Two practical classes a week. 
This course is required of all juniors planning to make physical education 
a major, and is open to other juniors and seniors. 

This course consists of a type of dancing based upon free and natural 
movements, such as skipping, walking, and running. 

A special costume is required. 

tPHYS. Ed. 34 f or s. Advanced Clog (2). 

Two practical classes a week. Open to all students who have had Phys. 
Ed. 28 f or its equivalent. This course includes more advanced and difficult 
dances suitable for use with both boys and girls. Tap shoes required. 

Ed. 140 y. Physical Eduction Activities for High School Girls (4). 

Ed. 142 f. Physical Education in the High Schools (Girls) (2). 

(Not given 1937-1938.) 

ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Johnson, Creese, Nesbit; Lecturers Dill, Hall, 

Kear; Associate Professor Hodgins; Assistant Professors Hoshall, 

Pyle, Bailey, Allen, Wikstrom; Mr. Ernst, Mr. Hennick; 

Additional Instructors. 

Civil Engineering 

C. E. 101 s. Hydraulics (4)— Three lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Mech. 101 f . Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, drains, and pipes. Flow through orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, open channels, and weirs. Use of Reynold^s number. 
Measurement of water. Elementary hydrodynamics. (Given commencing 
1937-1938.) (Ernst.) 



236 



jOpen to men and women. 



237 



site' Meci"\o2 ""t''"''^^' ^^}t'^^'' l«<=t»'^es; one laboratory, mrequ.- 
nlring ' ^"" '" Electrical and Mechanical Engi- 

A shorter course than C. E. 101 s, with emphasis on water wheels ^^» 
bmes, and centrifugal pumps. (Given commencing l^-nS] (fenS.)" 

C. E. 103 f. Railroad Curves and Ea/rthivork (3)— Two lectures- n^. 
^boratory. Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in Citu Eng/ni"! 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; easement curves; vertical and horizontal parkbolic curverAnaivii 
of tonouts and computation of earthwork, including haul and mass dS 

„ _ (Allen.) 

C. E. 104s. Theory of Structures (5J-Four lectures: one laboratorv 

Taken^concurrently with Mech. 101 f. Required of junior's in S E^J 

Analytical and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 

tJe'sts TnaTvl of f^ K "" '"' ^^^'=*'°"^' ^^^^-' — Cn 
Ifllf ^"^jyf " °* l^t^^^l bracing systems. Elements of slope and 

(Allen.) 
C. E. 105f Elements of Highways (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory 

Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 
Location, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements Hi^h 

way contracts and specifications, estimates of cost, highway economics The 

course mcludes, in addition to lecture and classroom work! field T^Llil 

(Steinberg.) 
C. E. 106 y. Concrete Design (7)— Three lectures, one laboratory first 

semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. PrerequisiteTc E. 

104 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

A.tT^''"f^'T ''^ ^-f- ^^^^' "^^ ^P^^^' application to the design and 

detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures, which STclSe 

slate, columns footmgs, beam bridges, arches, retaining walls, and dams 

frames! "' ^loPe-deflection and moment distribution theori;s and ri^ 

_ ' (Allen.) 

C. E. 107 y. Structural Design (7)-Three lectures, one laboratory first 

semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prequisite, C E 

104 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design 

for roof trussses, plate girders, highway and railway bridges, buildings 
bracmg systems, and grillage foundations. (AlleS 



238 



C. E. 108 y. Municipal Sanitation (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 101 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. (Hall.) 

C. E. 109 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in civil engineering 
design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be 
needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is assigned 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is required 
to complete the thesis. (Staff.) 

G. E. 110s. Soils and Foundations (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

A study of the properties and behavior of soil as an engineering mate- 
rial. Applications to the methods of constructing foundations for highways, 
bridges, buildings, and other structures. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

(Steinberg.) 

Drawing 

Dr. 1 Af. Engineering Draunng (2) — Two laboratories. Required of 
freshmen in Engineering. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, technical sketches, 
dimensioning. Drawing from memory; drawing from description; inking, 
tracing, blueprinting, isometric and oblique projection and sections. 

Ck)urse A is intended for students who have not had mechanical drawing. 

Dr. IBf. Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. 

Advanced engineering drawing, with applications to engineering practice. 
Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school course in mechanical drawing. 

Dr. 2s. Descriptive Geometry (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 1 A f or Dr. IBf. Required of freshmen in Engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line, and plane. Intersection of planes with solids; 
development. Applications to practical problems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 3f. Descriptive Geometry (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 2 s. Required of sophomores in Engineering. 

Continuation of Dr. 2 s, including curves, plane and space, generation 
of surfaces, tangent planes, intersection and development of curved sur- 
faces. Shades, shadows, and perspective. Applications to practical prob- 
lems in engineering drafting. (Given commencing 1937-1938). 

239 



Dr. 4 y. Mechanical Drawing (2)— One laboraf^rv n„„„ + 
neering students. laDoratory. Open to non-engi- 

ve^*ot""tt?'**'''*"^' T^ "^""^^^ «*^*^"g« "f machines; including con 
ventions, tracing, isometric and cabinet projections, and blueprinting. 

Electrical Engineering 

lab^oratrt'' rTr""'" "^ ^^lf^<^l Engineering (3)-Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Taken concurrently with Math. 16 y and 17 y and Phv, 9? 
Required of sophomores in Electrical Engineering. ^ ^• 

Principles involved in flow of direct currents in conductors- cnrront «.-i 
voltage re ations in simple circuits; magnetism andTaSc drcuTs efe. 
tromagnetic induction, dielectric cirrtiits and condenser^ ' " 

lab^rato^^ «• /''•^«^pfe« of Electrical Engineering (3)_Two lectures; one 
^^rTSci^riZ:^;i'''- ''■' ^^*^- ^«y --^ ^'y- ^<>«'-d Of 

catTon tfT»*^v!' °^ *''"^'* ''"■'■^"* ^""^ alternating current machinery; appli- 
Sr„, . '"^<='^'"f«/°'- «Pe"fic duties; operating characteristics of genera- 
tors, motors, and transformers. (HodginsO 

E. E. 102 y. Principles of Electrical Enaineerinn (Si\ tu- . . 

E. E. 103 f. Direct Currents (6)— Four lecture.!- ty^rn laK„^„t • 
requisites, Phys. 2 y, Math. 16 y and 17 y and E E 1 f *L^^''°.^*^"f ; ^'^- 
in Electrical Engineering. ' ^ ^' ^^'I^^'^d of juniors 

diScrc™'.*""'^ °' °^'""*^°" ^"'^ performance characteristics of 
cr^rucJS^ chf^r ■;'' """'"/'' ^"^^ ^^^'^^ ^^P^^*"^- P^nciples of 

teSfs and c;ntrr^ /"^ "'P""*""" "^ P"""*^ *"d «««°nda^ bat- 

thr„,^ *• ] equipment. Experiments on battery characteristics and 

the operation and characteristics of direct current gLratJ^anf motors 

(Hodgfins.) 
E. E^ 105 f. Electrical Measurements (4)— Three lecture,- «„ 1 1. 

(Wikstrom.) 
240 



E. E. 106s. Alternating Current Circuits (5) — Three lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisites, E. E. 103 f and E. E. 105 f. Required of juniors 
in Electrical Engineering. • 

Introduction to the theory of alternating current circuits, both single 
phase and polyphase; methods and apparatus Used to measure alternating 
currents, voltage, and power; current and voltage relations in balanced and 
unbalanced polyphase systems. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 107 y. Alternating Current Machinery (8) — Three lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Required of seniors in Electrical 
Engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
transformers, alternators, induction motors, synchronous motors, synchro- 
nous converters, commutator type motors, and other apparatus; tests and 
experiments. (Creese.) 

E. E. 108 f. Altemajting Current Design (1) — One laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, E. E. 105 f, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 
Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Materials of construction and design of the electric and magnetic circuits 
of alternating current generators, motors, and transformers. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 109 y. Electrical Communications (6) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Principles of wire and radio communication. Theory and calculation of 
passive networks including transmission lines and coupled circuits. Theory 
and calculation of non-linear impedances including the vacuum tube. Intro- 
duction to electromagnetic wave propagation. (Kear.) 

E. E. 110 f. Illumination (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, E, E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. Required of seniors 
in Electrical Engineering. 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems, 
illumination calculations, photometric measurements. (Creese.) 

E. E. Ill f. Electric Railways (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, E .E. 
106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Mechanism of train motion. Construction of speed-time and power-time 
curves, and their use in the application of electrical equipment to transpor- 
tation. Construction, operation, and control of apparatus used in different 
fields of electrical transportation, such as urban railways, trunk line rail- 
ways, and busses. Power requirements, distribution systems, and signal 
systems. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 112 s. Electric Power Tramsmission (3) — ^Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Survey of central station and substation equipment. Calculation of line 
constants. Mechanical and economical considerations of transmission of 
power. Fundamentals of transients. (Wikstrom.) 

241 



E. E. 113 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in electrical engineer- 
ing design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may 
be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent confer- 
ences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is 
assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, 
is required to complete the thesis. (Staff.) 

General Engineering Subjects 

Engr. If. Introduction to Engineering (1) — One lecture. Required of 
freshmen in Engineering. 

A course of lectures by the faculty and by practicing engineers covering 
the engineering professional fields. The work of the engineer, its require- 
ments in training and character, and the ethics and ideals of the profession. 
The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in selecting the par- 
ticular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 

Engr. 101 f. Engineering Geology (2) — Two lectures. Required of juniors 
in Civil Engineering. 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. (Metzger.) 

Engr. 102 s. Engineering Law and Specifications (2) — Two lectures. 
Required of seniors in Engineering. 

A study is made of the fundamental principles of law relating to business 
and to engineering; including contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
corporations, and common carriers. These principles are then applied to the 
analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and 
specifications. (Steinberg.) 

Mechanics 

Mecii. Is. Statics and Dynamics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Taken concurrently with Math. 16 y and 17 y and Phys. 2 y. Required of 
sophomores in Engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solutions of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia; kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

Mech. 101 f. Strength of Materials (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Riveted joints; torsional stresses and strains; beam stresses and deflec- 
tion; combined axial and bending loads; column stresses; principal stresses 
and strains ; impact and energy loads ; statically indeterminate beams ; shear 
center; unsymmetrical bending; composite members including reinforced 
concrete beams. Instruction in the use of an approved handbook containing 
the properties of rolled steel sections. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

(Ernst.) 
242 



MECH 102 f. strength of Materials (4)-Three lectures; one laboratory 
PrSquisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in Electrical and Mechamcal 

^ A shSer'course than Mech. 101 f. Instruction in the use of an approved 
hatdS containing the properties of rolled steel sections. (G--^^" 
roencing 1937-1938.) \ ' 

MECH 103 s. Materials of Engineering (2) -One lecture; one labora- 
to^ Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f or Mech. 102 f. Required of juniors m 

^X'composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
Ir-m engineering, and of the conditions that influence their physical 
TaracLSs. The' interpretation of specifications and of stand-d tests. 
Laboratory work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, t™ber,^br,ck, 
cement, and concrete. 

Mechanical Enpneering 
ME Is. Ki«e«t«tics' 0/ Macftmerj/ (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory 
Tatn concurrently with Math. 16 y and 17 y, and Phys. 2y. Required of 
souhomores in Mechanical Engineering. .^ j •_ „„j 

L application of the principles involved in determining the J^^^^nd 
size of bolts, screws, shafting, and gears. The theory and practice of the 
size 01 °°"' > ^^ . . „_ „g applied to ropes, belts, chains, gears, and gear 
tXwhelT:tS::mTlinkwork.Vllel motions. Miscellaneous 
mechanisms and aggregate combinations. 

M E 101 f. Kinematics of Machinery (3) -Two lectures; one labora- 

to^: Prerequisite. M. E. 1 s. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

A continuation of M. E. 1 s, with special emphasis on cams, hnlo^ork 

meth^nLis. and aggregate combinations. (Given commencing 19^7-1938.) 

M E 102 f. Machine Design (3) -Two lectures; °"^l*^"^.'^**°'^y• J^f ■ 
requisite. Math. 16 y and 17 y. Phys. 2y. Required of Juniors m Mechanical 

"^ TtelppLtion of mechanics to the <letermination of stresses and^^^ 

proportioning of machine parts. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) (Hoshall.) 

M E 103 s. Thermodynmnics (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisites. 

m1 16 y and 17 y. Phys. 2 y. Required of iumors ^-^'-f^^^'^XTltZ 
The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, steam 
turbine nozzles. The properties of vapors, cycles of heat and entropy, in- 
cluding discussion of machines and their uses. 

M E 104s. Tfe6rwodj/««mics (5)-Four lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites Math. 16 y and 17 y, and Phys. 2y. Required of juniors m 

Mechanical Engineering. j „>„ Th^r^n 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors Thermo- 
dJJtics of heat cycles, air compressors, and steam engines. (Given com- 

mencing 1937-1938.) 

243 - 



M. E. 105 f. Internal Combustion Engines (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Theory, construction, and operation of gasoline and oil engines. Design 
and operation of Otto and Diesel cycle engines. (Nesbit.) 

M. E. 106 f. Heating and Ventilation (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

The study of types of heating and ventilating systems for a particular 
building; layout of piping and systems, with complete calculations and esti- 
mates of costs; fundamentals of air conditioning. (Dill.) 

M. E. 107 s. Refrigeration (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering, 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories and homes. (Dill.) 

M. E. 108 y. Design of Prime Movers (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Mech. 102 f, C. E. 102 s. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The design and proportioning of parts of essential prime movers for power 
plants, and industrial uses, (Nesbit.) 

M. E. 109 s. Design of Power Plants (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Taken concurrently with M. E. 108 y. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The design of power plants, including the layout and cost of building, 
installation of equipment, and determination of size for most economical 
operation. (Nesbit.) 

M. E. 110 y. Mechanical Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. Required 
of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and water 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam -and internal combustion 
engines, setting of vialves, tests for economy and capacity of boilers, engines, 
turbines, pumps, and other prime movers. Feed water heaters and con- 
densers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels, and power 
plant tests. (Nesbit.) 

M. E. Illy. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, 
one laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in mechanical engi- 
neering design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as 
may be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent 
conferences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student 
Is assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliog- 
raphy, is reqliired to complete the thesis. (Staff.) 



A/r E 112 f, PHndples of Mechanical Engineering (3) -Two lectures; 
onf iatory. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y and 17 y, and Phys. 2 y, . , ^. 

Flementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel, and combustion 

.„le production and use of steam for the generation of power. Includes 

H,l of fundamental types of steam boilers, fuel bummg equipment, prime 

^Srs and tSr allied'^pparatus. Supplemented by laboratory tests and 

trips to industrial plants. 

M E 113 s. Ponder Plants (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. Required 
of seni;rs in Electrical Engineering. Prerequisite, senior standing. 
A study of heat, fuel, and combustion in the production and use of 

tL?or the generation of power. Includes the theory and operation of 
steam lor i^ne jjeuciawv/x* ^^ 4.„^iv:noc and their accessories. 

by laboratory tests and trips to industrial plants. 

Shop 
SHOP is. F,yrge Praciiee (l)-One combination lecture and laboratory. 
Reauired of freshmen in Engineering. , . . ^ ♦ 

Lectures and recitations on the principles of forging and heat treatment 
of ^tS Demonstrations in acetylene and electric welding, brazing, cutting, 
andlf^ hardening. Laboratory practice in drawing, bending, upsetting, 
welding, hardening, tempering, and thread cutting. 

Shop 2f. Machim Stwp Practice (l)-One laboratory. Required of 
sophomores in Electrical Engineering. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

SHOP 3 f. Machine Shop Practice (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of sophomores in Mechanical Engineering. 

Study of the fundamental principles of machine tools such as lathe, 
planer, shaper. mUling machine, drilling machine, and grinding machmes. 
Calculation for cutting threads, spur and helical gears, and flutmg. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

SHOP 4 y. IFood Sfcoj> (2)— One laboratory. Open to non-engineering' 

students. 

Use and care of wood-working tools and exercises in ^^^^f' f ^^;^^: 
turning, furnishing, and laying out work from blueprints. (A charge will 
be made for materials actually used, approximately $2.00 a semester.) 

Shop 101 f. Machine Shop Practice (1)— One laboratory. Required of 
juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, surface grinding, fluting, and cutting spur and helical geai^. 

^ (Hoshall.) 



244 



24S 



m 



Shop 102 s. Foundry Practice (1) — One combination lecture and lab- 
oratory. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on foundry products and layout, materials and 
equipment, hand and machine moulding, cupola practice and calculating 
mixes. Core making, moulding, casting in aluminum, brass, and gray iron. 

(Hoshall.) 

Surveying 

SURV, 1 f and s. Elements of Plane Surveying (1) — 'Combined lecture and 

laboratory work. Prerequisites, Math. 11 f, 12 f , 14 s, 15 s. Required of 
sophomores in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

A brief course in the use of the tape, compass, level, transit, and stadia. 
Computations for area, coordinates, volume, and plotting. 

SuR. 2y. Plane Surveying (5) — One lecture; one laboratory first sem- 
ester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
11 f , 12 f . Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering. 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level. 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross-sec- 
tions, volume, stadia, latitude, longitude, azimuth, time. (Given commenc- 
ing 1937-1938.) 

SuRV. 101 f. Advanced Surveying (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Adjustment of instruments, triangulation, precise leveling, geodetic sur- 
veying, together with the necessary adjustments and computations. Topo- 
graphic surveys. Plane table, land surveys, and boundaries. Mine, tunnel, 
and hydrographic surveys. (Pyle.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors House, Hale, Warfel; 

Associate Professor Harman ; Assistant Professors Lemon, 

Fitzhugh; Mr. Murphy, Mr. Sixbey, Miss Ide, Mr. Bryan, 

Mr. Ball, Mr. Holmes, Dr. Platz, Mr. Hoadley, Miss Skinner. 

Eng. ly. Survey and Composition I (6) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful passing 
of the qualifying examination given by the Department, or successful com- 
pletion of English A. Required of all four-year students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the 19th Century. Written themes, book 
reviews, and exercises. Each semester of this course will be repeated in the 
following semester. 



246 



^ . Af Svecial Preparatory Course (0)->Three lectures. .Freshman 

ENG. Af. ^F^^l'^.r^^ of high school English. Required of all 

^.,,, P-reqmsite t^^^ students who show 

students who fail to Pass the J^^^/^ 1^3^ A will be transferred to 
-^rh\T'?tL:^^^^^^ Enlnsh A for one semester The 

StentCel^^^^^^^^^ right to transfer students who make unsatisfactory 

semester. .._ tt /o\ Otic general lecture given by 

SS-Sr S. 'r^Sr. U «<..«« i. «., CoU=.e 0, Arts and 

Z the i9th century. Themes, book reports, conferences. 

ENG 3 s Survey and ComposiUon U (3)-0ne lecture two quiz sec- 
E.NG. 6 s. o«' n Continuation of Eng. i t. 

tions. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and i!.ng. ^ i. 

r> • ... irynlioh f2^— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
ENG. 4 f or s. Business English (i) i wo semester. 

1 y Course complete in one semester, but may be taken m eitn 

This course develops the best methods of effective expression, both oral 
and written, used in business activities. • •. tr„,r i v 

ENG 5 f Expository Writing (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 
Sy of the Princip^s of exposition. Analysis and interpre^tion of mate- 
rial wLgu^^^^^ scieUe matter. Themes, papers, and reports 
ENG. 6 s. Expository Writing (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 5f. 
Continuation of Eng. 5 f . 
ENG. 7f. survey of An^ricoM Literature (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 

conflict. Reports and term paper. 

ENG. 8 s. Survey of Arr^Hcan Ut^ature (3)-Tliree lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. ly. the changing social forces 

Continuation of Ji.ng. < I, w"-" ^ T?Annrt<5 and term paper, 

which influenced American writers after 1865. Reports and term p P 

ENG. 9 f. Minor Victorian Po.ts (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite. Eng. 

^ Arnold, Clough, James Thompson, Swinburne, and others. 

ENG 10s Modem Poets (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite. Eng. ly. 
?ros't, Noyes Masefield, Brooke, Moody, Benet, and others. 

247 



M 



ENa 11 f. Shakespeare (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. ly. 
An intensive study of selected plays. 

Eng. 12s. Shakespeare (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng, ly. 
Continuation of Eng. 11 f. 

Eng. 13 s. Introdiiction to Narrative lAteratwre (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Not open to freshmen. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and of other narrative forms. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 100 f and s. Advanced Composition (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. Course complete in one semester, but 
may be taken a second semester for credit. Required of all students whose 
major is English. Open to others by permission of instructors. 

Theory and practice in the larger forms, the types to be varied each sem- 
ester at the election of the class. (Staff.) 

♦Eng. 101 f. College Grammar (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1 y. Required of students preparing to teach English, and an alternative 
requirement with Anglo-Saxon for others whose major is English. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of modem English. (Harman.) 

*Eng. 102 s. History of the English Ixinguage (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 101 f. Alternative requirement with Anglo-Saxon for stu- 
dents whose major is English. 

An historical survey of the English language: its nature, origin, and devel- 
opment, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in English 
speech and upon the rules which govern modem usage. (Harman.) 

*Eng. 103 y. Anglo-Saxon (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. ly. 
Alternative requirement with College Grammar and History of the English 
Language for students whose major is English. 

A sttidy of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lectures 
on the principles of phonetics and comparative philology. (House.) 

Eng. 104 y. Chaucer and Other Poetry of the lUth Century (4) — ^Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the principal poets and poems of England in the 14th Century, 
including Chaucer, Langland, Gawaine and the Green Knight, The Pea/rl, 
and early poems about Arthur. Chaucer and Langland will be read in the 
original; other works in modernized versions. (Hale.) 

Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 

(Fitzhugh.) 



*A student whose major is English is required to take Eng. 103 y, or Eng. 101 f and 
Eng. 102 s. 

243 



5^0 106 s. ^^i^5et/u.nDnma(3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 

;:r ^ Ss^tsZ'/^^i.can't Plays, outside .eaain. r.^.^^^ 

ENG. 107 s. Eli^hethan Non-Drarmtic Uterature (3)-Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Cey of the non-dramatic poetry and prose from 1^57 to 1600. mth 
e,„'S upon the sonnet cycle, the epic, and the heg.nmngs of f-t.on.^^Not 
given in 1937-1938.) 

ENG. 108 f. MUton (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites. Eng. ly and 2f 

"rs:;dy of the poetry and the chief prose worlcs. (Not .iven^J ^^7- 

1938 ) * * 

ENG 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (2) -Two 
ipptures Prerequisites. Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 
Tidy 0, Z ch.., pros. wH.=,= and «. the H.Uph>»». »d^C..^ 
traditions in poetry. _ 

ENG. UOs. Tfc. Age of Dryden (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites. Eng. 

^ ;:^s^?urse X'sites the relation of literature to the philosophical 
movements of the age. 

ENG lUf. uterature of the Eighteenth Century (2) -Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Pope. (Not given m 1937-1938.) 

ENG 112 s. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2)-Two lectures. 

Prerequisites. Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

. i.- i- ^f T?no- 111 f Dr Johnson and his Circle; the Rise or 
A continuation of Eng. ill i. yr. jo«i » f Pitzhueh.) 

Romanticism; the Letter Writers. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Mtzhugn., 

*ENG 113 f. Prose and Poetry of the Rormntic Age (3)-Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A studv of the development of the Romantic movement m England as 
exiSL by the Prose'and poetry of Wordsworth. Colendge, Lamb, De 

' tS: nrr^ltTpoetn, of the Romantic Age (3)-Three lectures. 

Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. chellev Keats, 

A study of the late Romantic writers, includmg Byron, Shelley,^ Keats, 

Moore, Scott, and others. 

~^mf and Kn. n4s »a, be^counW « Comparative Literature b, .tudent. w.o 
have had Comp. Lit. 105 f and Comp. Lit. 106 s. 

249 



an? E°ni'2 f ar,?f "Vt**^ Z'^-''^'* ''''^'''- Prerequisites, Eng. i, 
and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. No knowledge of the Scottish dialect requir^ ^ 

an^hlSi? *^' ^'""''^ Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthomden; son. 
and Bu^^ p' '''■'' ^r*' "^ *^ vernacular revival: Ramsay, Fer^f 
and Bums. Papers and reports. (Fitzlmgh.)' 

Eng^'ff "no T'*'"^""' ^^^~'^^** ^"'=*"'"^- P'^^r-q'^isites. Eng. ly and 
Wide reading of the poems, with detailed study of The Princess. (House.) 

Engf'2'f "nV's s^""^^^ ^^^~'^""' '"'*"""'• Prerequisites, Eng ly and 
Study of selections from Browning other than the dramas. (House.) 

Eng. 119 s. The Letter as a Literary Type (2)— Two lectiir*>s Pv„ 

requisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. i wo lectures. Pre- 

Beginning with the Paston letters, the course is designed as a study of 

proSttyle ^'"^"*=^" '^"^'•"' ^'^^ ^P^^^^ ^"^ntion to use and changes in 

(Lemon.) 

Eng!'2'/Sd'3 b!'" ^"""^ ^'^~'^'"* '''*""''• ^''^''^^^^^'' Eng. ly and 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class reviews 
of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. (SJI) 

Enr^/Sd's s^'^' ^"""^ i^)-'^^o lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Continuation of Eng. 120 f. 

si Jf fA^V' ^y^^ ?f Armrican Essays (2) -Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s, ^^'■^m^ 

A study of the philosophical, critical, and familiar essays of Enrfand and 
America. Bacon. Lamb, Macaulay, Emerson, Chesterton, anSolS. 

(House.) 
anfEng'Yf anfst" ''""" ^'^"'"'"^ ''"''''''■ ^^--^'^--tes, Eng. ly 

nt!T^^ **^ ^""f^^ *''^™* •'"""^ *e *^« centuries from 1660 to 1860. 

in 1937 SsTr" "^"'''"* P'"^^' '"'''"'' ^^^'^•"»' ^^P°^t«- (Not given 
'' (Pitzhugh.) 

En?i%'L%ntt3ll ""^ '"'-^'"'^ '^'^'''- Prerequisites, 
O'Ne^'^Cll'r^'^''^' ^r^P"^'' ^^ '^'"""'=^" dramatists fn,m Ibsen to 

•' (Fitzhugh.) 



250 



Eng. 125 f. Emerson and American Transcendentalism (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Study of the writings of the Concord group: Emerson, Thoreau, Haw- 
thorne, Parker, Alcott, and Margaret Fuller. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. Whitman, Twain, and the Rise of Realism (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Intensive study of the writings of Whitman, Twain, the local colorists, and 
the early realists. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — ^Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1^20. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) (Warfel.) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Research (2-4). Credit proportioned to the amount of work 
and ends accomplished. 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations looking towards 
advanced degrees. (Staff.) 

Eng. 202 y. Beoivulf (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y. 

Critical study of grammar and versification, with some account of the 
legendary lore. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Harman.) 

Eng* 203 f. Middle English (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y. 

A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference to 

etymology and syntax. (House.) 

Eng. 204 s. Gothic (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y. 

A study of the forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas Bihle. 
Correlation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (House.) 

Eng. 205 s. Brotoning*s Dramas (2) — Two lectures. 
Lu/ria, The Retwm of the Dnises, Pippa Passes, ColomJbe's Birthday, A 
Blot in the 'Scutcheon, and others. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (House.) 

Eng. 206 f. Shakespea/re Seminar (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
11 f and Eng. 12 s. 

A survey of Shakespeare's complete works, with special attention to major 
problems in Shakespeare. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Harman.) 

Eng. 207 y. Medieval Romance in England (4) — ^Two lectures. 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical romances in Medie- 
val England, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Hale.) 

Eng. 208 s. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

Intensive study of one man's work or of one important movement of the 
century. (Fitzhugh.) 

251 



Eng. 209 y. Seminar in American Literature (4)— Two lectures. 
^^Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth-century American litera- 

(Warfel.) 

Eng 210 f. SemiruM- in the Rormmtic Period (2)— Two lectures. Pre 
requisites, Eng. 115 f and Eng. 116 s or an equivalent satisfactory to the 
instructor. One discussion period of two hours. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
niovement. The subject-matter of the course will vary with the interests 
01 the class. .„ i v 

(Hale.) 

Eng. 211 s. Victorian Prose (2)— Two lectures. 

ArnStusS! ^'""" ^^'""^ ^^^^' ^^""^^ ^'^^^^ "^^"^^ ^' ^^'^^^^^ M^"' 

(House.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

PROrasSOB COKV; LECTURERS SNODGRASS, YeAGER, HYSLOP; ASSISTANT 

Professor Knight; Mr. Abrams, Dr. Ditman, Dr. Langpord. 

Mr. McConnell, Mr. Buddington. 

tn^'^V ^ "'■ •^••/"!t''"^"''**^ B«tomotoi,2/ (3) -Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Zool. 1 f or s. 

The relations of insects to the daily life and activities of the student 
General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Field work 
and the preparation of a collection of insects. 

Ent. 2 y. Insect Morphology and Taxonomy (6)— A two-semestPr rn„r.» 

"KK^THit '"*' "' ^"° '»' -<■»■'-— XT' p'„":~: 

studies of the anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of insects A funda 
mental course given in preparation for most of the advanced courses Lee" 
tures given at opportune times during laboratory periods 

Enf iVor s'"''' ^"'"^^ (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
A continuation of general entomological problems beeun in fl,» fir.f 

Zool^V* ^^^^^^'^^(2). One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 

History of beekeeping, natural history and behavior of the honeybee A 

S ttfden: :^in ''' t^- "^ ^^-^.-^--^ — -tendeS to a^^^^^^^^ 

est and to sli^ 1. J^ ^l ^"^ '^'''* "^ ^^"^"^^^^^ ^^^ cultural inter- 

est, and to serve as an introduction to the science of apiculture. 

252 



Ent. 5 s. Insecticides and Their Application (1) — One laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation, and applica- 
tion; construction, care, and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumi- 
gation; methods and apparatus in mechanical control. (Not offered in 1937- 
1938.) 

Ent. 6f. Apictdture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 1 f or s, and Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the life history, yearly cycle, behavior, and activities of the 
honeybee. The value of honeybees as pollenizers of economic plants and as 
producers of honey and wax. Designed to be of value to the student of 
agriculture, horticulture, entomology, and zoology. 

Ent. 7s. Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 6 f . 

Theory and practice of^ apiary management. Designed for the student 
who wishes to keep bees or desires a knowledge of practical apiary man- 
agement. 

Ent. 8 y. Entomological Technic and Scientific Delineation (4) — Two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

Collecting, rearing, preserving, and mounting of insects. The prepara- 
tion of exhibits, materials for instruction, entomological records. Methods 
of illustrating, including drawing, photography, lantern slide making, and 
projection. Useful for prospective teachers of biology as well as for the 
entomological student. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 101 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two lectures. 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, including life 
history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) (Cory.) 

Ent. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two laboratories. 

Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field work in economic 
entomology. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (€ory.) 

Ent. 103 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of original work, book reviews, and abstracts of the more 
important literature. (Cory, Knight.) 

Ent. 104 y. Insect Pests of Special Groups (6) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the principal insects of one or more of the following groups, 
founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course is intended to give 
the general student a comprehensive view of the insects that are of import- 
ance in his major field of interest and detailed information to the student 
specializing in entomology. 

253 



Insect Pests of 1. Fruit. 2. Vegetables. 3. Flowers, both in the open and 
under glass. 4. Ornamentals and Shade Trees. 5. Forests. 6. Field Crops. 
7. Stored Products. 8. Live Stock. 9. The Household. (Cory.) 

Ent. 105 f. Medical Entomology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Ent. 
1 f or s, and consent of instructor. 

The relation of insects to diseases of man, directly and as carriers of 
pathogenic organisms. Control of pests of man. The fundamentals of 
parasitology. (Knight.) 

Ent. 106 for s. Insect Taxonomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

An advanced course dealing with the principles and practices underlying 
modern systematic entomology. (Hyslop.) 

Ent. 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (2) — Two lectures. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, with regard to 
their chemistry, toxic action, compatability, and foliage injury. Recent 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. (Ditman.) 

Ent. 109 s. Insect Physiology (2) — Two lectures; occasional demonstra- 
tions. Enrollment subject to consent of instructor. 

The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to blood, 
circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and 
the nervous system, and metabolism. (Yeager.) 

Ent. llOf ors. Special Problems, Credit and prerequisite to be deter- 
mined by the staff. 

The intensive investigation of some entomological subject. A report of 
the results is submitted as part of the requirements for graduation. 

(Cory and Staff.) 
Ent. Ill s. Cocddology (2) — Two laboratories. 

A study of morphology, taxonomy, and biology of the higher groups of 
the scale insects. The technic of preparation and microscopy are empha- 
sized. Laboratory studies are supplemented by occasional lectures. 

(McConnell.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201 y. Advanced Entomology (1-3) — One lecture; one laboratory by 
arrangement. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy, and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 202 y. Research in Entomology. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with the approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy, or biology and control of insects. Frequently the student may 
be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. 
The student's work may fomx a part of the final report on the project and 

254 



Kp Dublished in bulletin form. A dissertation suitable for publication must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements ^f or 
an advanced degree. ^ ^^^'^ 

ENT. 203 f. Insect Morphology (2-4)— Two lectures, and laboratory work 
by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 

nreoaration for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

^^^^ (Snodgrass.) 

ENT 204 y. Economic Entomology (6)— Three lectures. Studies of the 
principles underlying applied entomology, and the most significant advances 
in all phases of entomology. (<-ory.) 

Ent. 205 s. Insect Ecology (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects 
to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic 
organism adjusted to the environment. (Langford.) 

FARM FORESTRY 

Professor Besley. 

For. Is. Farm Forestry (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Alternate 
year course. Junior and senior years. Prerequisite, Bot. 101 f . 

A study of the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of trees; forest 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest crops; 
nursery practice; and tree planting. The work is conducted by means of 
lectures and practice in the woods. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

Professor W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

F. M. Is. Farm Accounting (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Open 
to juniors and seniors. 

A concise practical course in the keeping of farm accounts and in de- 
termining the cost of farm production. 

F. M. 2f. Farm Management (4)— Four lectures. 

The business of farming from the standpoint of the individual farmer 
This course aims to connect the principles and practice which the student 
has acquired in the several technical courses and to apply them to the de- 
velopment of a successful farm business. 

See also Agricultural Economics, page 192. 



255 



GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Professor Kemp. 

Gen. 101 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of genet- 
ics, or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in the 
breeding of animals or of crops. 

Gen. 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
101 f . Alternate year course. 

A consideration of chromosome irregularities and other mutations, inter- 
species crosses, identity of the gene, genetic equilibrium, and the results of 
attempts to modify germplasm. 

Gen. lllf. Statistics (2)— Two lectures. 

The course includes a study of expressions of type, variability, correla- 
tion, regression, error, and significance of differences. 

Gen. 112 s. Advanced Statistics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
Ill f or its equivalent. 

A study of the theory of error, measures of relationship, multiple and 
partial correlation, predictive formulas, curve fitting, and analysis of vari- 
ance. 

Gen. 114 s. Elements of Statistics (3) — Three lectures. Required of 
students in Business Administration. 

A study of the fundamental principles used in statistical investigation, 
together with the making of diagrams, graphs, charts, and tables. 

Gen. 201 y. Plant Breeding. Credit according to work done. 

Gen. 209 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Bruce. 

Geol. If. Geology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A textbook, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles of 
geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is designed 
primarily for agriculture students in preparation for technical courses, it 
may also be taken as part of a liberal education. 

GREEK 

♦Professor Spence. 

Greek ly. Elementary Greek (6) — Three lectures. 
Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the acqui- 
sition of a vocabulary, with translation of simple prose. 

Greek 2y. Greek Grammar, Composition, and Translation of Selected 
Prose Work (8) — Four lectures. Prerequisite, Greek 1 y or two entrance 
units in Greek. 



♦Deceased Feb. 12, 1937. 



256 



HISTORY 

Professor Baker-Crothers ; Dr. Thatcher, Dr. Vollbrecht, 

Mr. Silver, Miss Morris. 

H. ly. General European History (6)— Two lectures and one discussion 

a week. 

A general course in European History, covering the important institutions 
of the Middle Ages and the main events and movements in Modem History. 

H. 2y. American History (6)— Two lectures and one discussion section. 
Open to sophomores. 

An introductory course in American History from the discovery of the 
New World to the present time. 

H. 3y. History of England and Greater Britain (6)— Two lectures and 
one discussion covering the lectures and assignments. 

A survey course of English History from earliest times to the World War. 

H. 5f. Ancient History (2)— Two lectures. 

A general survey course— the Near East, Greece and Rome. 

H. 6 s. Ancient History (2)— Two lectures. 

A continuation of H. 5 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
H. 101 y. AmeHcan Colonial History (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

H. 2y. 

A study of the political, economic, and social development of the Ameri- 
can people from the discovery of America through the formation of the 

o 1-4. ^- (Baker-Crothers.) 

(Constitution. \i^o- ^ 

H. 102 y. Recent American History (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. 

The history of national development from the close of the Civil War to 
the present time. (Thatcher.) 

H. 104 f. Social and Economic History of the United States (3) —Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2y. 

An advanced course, giving a synthesis of American life from 1607 to 
■^fj^Q (Baker-Crothers.) 

H. 105 s. Social and Economic History of tJie United States (3)— Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2y. 

This course is similar to H. 104 f., and covers the period from 1790 tx) 
^ggQ ( Baker-Crothers. ) 

H. 106 f. Diplomatic History of the United States (2) —Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2y. 
A study of American foreign policy. (Thatcher.) 

257 



in 



H. 107 s. Diplomatic History of the United States (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 106 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 108 f. Constitutional History of the United States (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the Con- 
stitution, and of the development of American constitutionalism in theory 
and practice thereafter. (Thatcher.) 

H. 109 s. Constitutional History of the United States (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2y. 

A continuation of H. 108 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 110 f. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

The history of national development to the end of the €ivil War. 

(Thatcher.) 

H. Ills. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 110 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 115 y. Medieval Civilization (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite H. 1 y. 

The cultural, institutional, economic, and political development of Europe 
from the decline of the Roman Empire to the opening of the Fourteenth 
Century. (Vollbrecht.) 

H. 117 f. Renaissance and Reformation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

A detailed study of movements and leaders as vital factors in the transi- 
tion from mediaeval to modem times. (Vollbrecht.) 

H. 118 s. Renaissance and Reformation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 117 f. (Vollbrecht.) 

H. 119 f. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y. 

The course deals with the French Revolution and the relations of Rev/olu- 
tionary France with the rest of Europe. (Silver.) 

H. 120 s. Revolutiono/ry and Napoleonic Europe (2) — Two lectures, Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 119 f. (Silver.) 

H. 121 f. Expansion of Europe (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Hly. 

A treatment of European History from the Crusades to the present, em- 
phasizing especially the expansion of national states. (Silver.) 

258 



H. 122 s. Expansion of Europe (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

Hly. . 

This course is a continuation of H. 121 f. (biiver.; 

H. 123 f. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. ly. 

A study of European alliances and alignments. World politics and imperi- 
alism in tke pre-World War period, and developments since the World War. 

(Vollbrecht.) 

H. 124s. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3)— Threp lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H.123 f . 

(Vollbrecht.) 

H. 125 f. Constitutional History of England (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 
This course traces the historical development of English political institu- 

( Silver.) 

tions. 

H. 126 s. Constitutional History of England (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 125 f. (Silver.) 

H. 127 f. Europe since 1815 (3)— Three lectures and assignments. Pre- 
requisite, Hly. 

An intensive course in European History from 1815 to the present time. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Vollbrecht.) 

H. 128 s. Europe since 1815 (3)— Three lectures and assignments. Pre- 
requisite, H. ly. 

This course is a continuation of H. 127 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

(Vollbrecht.) 

For Graduates 

H. 200 y. Research (2-4)— Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

(Staff.) 

H. 201 y. Semincur in American History (4)— Conferences and reports 

, , J . • (Baker-Crothers.) 

on related topics. vxj^ivci / 

H. 202 y. Bibliography and Historical Criticism (4). (SUff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors Mount, MoFarland, Welsh; Associate Professor Murphy; 
Assistant Professor Westney; Mrs. Englund. 

Textiles and Clothing 

H. E. 11 f. Textiles and Clothing (3)— Two recitations; one laboratory. 

History of textile fibers; clothing budget; care of clothing; construction 

of one garment of wool and one of silk. (Westney.) 

259 



f 



t 



5{ 



'i! 



'I' 



H. E. 12 s. Textiles and Clothing (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 

Standardization and identification of textile fibers and materials. Con- 
struction of tailored suit; application of rnnstruction methods used by the 
trade. (Westney.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ill f . Advanced Clothing (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisites, 
H. E. 11 f and H. E. 12 s or equivalent. 

The principles governing modeling and draping of garments; specific ap- 
plications in paper and materials. (Westney.) 

H. E. 112s. Special Clothing Problems (3) — One recitation; two labora 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. Ill f. 

Each student selects and develops three individual clothing problems. 

(Westney.) 

H. E. 113 f. Problems and Practice in Textiles, Clothing, or Related 
Art. (4). 

Investigations pertaining to subjects in textiles, clothing, or related art. 

(McFarland.) 

H. E. 114 f or s. Advanced Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one labora- 
tory. 

Advanced study of textiles; historic textiles; the textile industry as it 
affects the consumer; eight trips to museums and stores. (Westney.) 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

H. E. 31 y. Foods (6) — One recitation; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 y. 

Principles of food preparation; composition of foods; planning and serv- 
ing of meals. (Welsh, Englund, and Riedel.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

*H. E. 131 f or s. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 
31 y and Chem. 12 f . 

Nutritive value, digestion and assimilation of foods. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 132 s. Dietetics (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisite, H. E. 131 f. 
Selection of food to promote health; diet in disease. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 133 f. Demonstrations (2) — Two laboratories. 

Practice in demonstrations. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 134 s. Advanced Foods (3) — One recitation ; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 31 y. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food materials. (Welsh.) 



(Welsh, Englund.) 



H. E. 135 f. Problems and Practice in Foods (4), 

Experimental foods. 

H. E. 136 s. Child Nutrition (2)— Two recitations. 

Lectures and discussions relating to the principles of child nutrition. 



For Graduates 

H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (3) . 

Oral and written reports on assigned readings in the current literature 
of Nutrition. Preparation and presentation of reports on special topics. 

H. E. 202 f or s. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and 
quality of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The result may form the 
basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. 

H. E. 203 f or s. Advanced Experimental Foods (3)— One recitation; two 
laboratories. 

Experimental work with foods. 

ART 

H. E. 21s. Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 

Elements of design ; application of design principles to daily living ; prac- 
tice in designing. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 22 s. Still Life (1)— One laboratory. Prerequisite, H. E. 211 

Work in charcoal and color. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 23 s. Figure Sketching (1)— One laboratory. Alternates with 
Still Life (H. E. 22 s.) (McFarland.) 

H. E. 24 f. Costume Design (3) —One recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 21 f. 

A study of fundamentals underlying taste, fashion, and design as they 
relate to the expression of individuality in dress. (McFarland.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 121 y. History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (6)— Two 
recitations; one laboratory. Prerequisite, H. E. 21 f. 

Study of historic styles of architecture and period furniture: their adap- 
tation and use in modem architecture and furniture. 

Historic designs of rugs, tapestries, draperies, etc. : their use in interior 
decoration and influence upon modem textile design. Application of the 
principles of design, line-proportion, etc., color, harmony, balance, rhythm, 
emphasis, to interior decoration. (Murphy.) 



♦ H. E. 131 f is repeated in the second semester as H. E. 131 8, for Prenursing students. 

260 



261 



J' 



i^ 



i 



H. E. 122 s. Applied Art (1)— One laboratory. 

Application of the principles of design and color to practical problems. 

(Murphy.) 

H. E. 123 s. Advanced Design (3) —Three laboratories. Prerequisite's 
H. E. 24 s and 21 f. 

Advanced study in design, with application to particular problems. 

(McFarland.) 

Home and Institution Management 

H. E. 141 f. Management of the Home (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Study and discussion of household organization and management; time 
and money budgets; house construction and planning; selection, operation, 
and care of equipment; selection and care of household furnishings, with a 
view to providing well-being and satisfaction for the members of the family. 

H. E. 142 s. Management of the Home (3) —Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

The family, its history; discussion of questions and problems of the family 
in relation to changing social and economic conditions. 

H. E. 143 f. Practice in Management of the Home (4). 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
ber of the faculty and a small group of students for approximately one- 
third of a semester. (Murphy.) 

H. E. 144 y. Institution Management (6)— Three recitations. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service in dormi- 
tories; organization of institution laundries. 

H. E. 145 f. Practice in Institution Management (4) — Prerequisite, H. 
E. 144 y. 

Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 
room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. 

H. E. 146 s. Advanced Institution Management (3) —Prerequisite, H. E. 
144 y. One recitation weekly and individual conferences with the in- 
structor. 

Special problems in institution management. 

Home Economics Extension 

H. E. 151 s. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) — Given under 
the direction of Venia Kellar and specialists. 

H. E. 152 f. Field Practice in Horm Economics Extension (4) Given 

under the direction of Venia Kellar, State Home Demonstration Agent. 
Should be taken during the summer vacation. 

262 



Home Economics Seminar 

H. E. 161s. Semina/r (3) — Three recitations. 

Book reviews, and abstracts from scientific papers and bulletins relating 
to home economics, together with criticisms and discussions of the work 
presented. (Murphy and Staff.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Schrader, T^hurston; Associate Professors Wentworth, 

Frazier, Haut, Lincoln. 

A. Pomology 

HoRT. If. Elementary Pomology (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course in pomology. The proper location and site for an 
orchard; varieties, planting plans, pollination requirements, inter-crops, 
spraying, cultural method^, fertilizing methods, thinning, picking, spray 
residue removal, packing, and marketing are given consideration. These 
subjects are discussed for apples, peaches, pears, plums, cherries, and 
quinces. The principles of plant propagation as applied to pomology are 
also discussed. 

HoRT. 4 s. Small Fruit Culture (2) — Two lectures. Given in alternate 

years. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and their 
adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and a study 
of the experimental plots and varieties on the Station grounds. The fol- 
lowing fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, blackcap 
raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry, loganberry, and 
blueberry. (Not given in 1937-1938.) , 

HORT. 5 f. Fruit Judging (2) — Two laboratories. 

A course designed to train students for both practical judging and fruit- 
judging teams to represent the University of Maryland. Students are 
required to learn detailed characteristics of commercial varieties of fruit, 
and are given practice in judging single plates, largest and best collections, 
boxes, barrels, and commercial exhibits of fruits. Students are required 
to help set up a horticultural show each year. 

HoRT. 6f. Advanced Fruit Judging (1) — One laboratory. 

HoRT. 7 f. Practical Pomology Laboratory (2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 1 f or taken in conjunction with Hort. 1 f. Seasonal 
practical experience in carrying out orchard and small fruit operations, in- 
cluding spraying, harvesting, spray residue removal, grading, packing, 
mouse and borer control, pruning, budding, grafting, planting, pollination, 
etc. 

The course will include trips to the principal horticultural regions of 
Maryland and of neighboring states, and to nurseries or other points of 
interest. 

263 



X 

L 



HORT. 8 s. Practical Pomology Laboratory (2) — Two laboratories. Pre« 
requisite. Hort. 1 f. 

A continuation of Hort. 7 f as above outlined. 

B. Vegetable Crops 

Hort. lis. Principles of Vegetable Culture (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. 
The laboratory work is organized from the point of view of the home 
garden. Special studies are made of vegetable seed identification, methods 
of growing plants, garden planning, pest control, etc. Each student is given 
a small garden to fertilize, plant, cultivate, spray, etc. 

Hort. 12 f. Truck Crop Production (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 11 s. 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production. Each crop 
is discussed in detail. Trips are made to large commercial gardens, various 
markets, and other places of interest. Given in alternate years. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

C. Floriculture 

Hort. 21 f. General Floriculture (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

The management of greenhouses ; the production and marketing of florists' 
crops; retail methods; plants for house and garden. Given in alternate 
years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Hort. 22 y. Greenhouse Management (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A consideration of the methods employed in the management of green- 
houses, including the operations of potting, watering, ventilating, fumiga- 
tion, and methods of propagation. Given in alternate years. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 23 y. Floricultural Practice (4) — Two laboratories. 

Practical experience in the various greenhouse operations of the fall, 
winter, and spring seasons. Given only occasionally as necessary. 

Hort. 24 s. Greenhouse Construction (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

The various types of houses; their location, arrangement, construction, 
and cost; principles and methods of heating; preparation of plans and 
specifications for commercial and private ranges. Given in alternate years. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 25 y. Commercial Floriculture (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 22 y. 

Cultural methods of florists* bench crops and potted plants, the marketing 
of the cut flowers, the retail store, a study of floral decoration. Given in 
alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 



Hort. 26 f. Garden Flowers (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. (Not 
given in 1937-1938.) 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous peren- 
nials, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. Given 
in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 27 s. Floricultural Trip (1) — Prerequisite, Hort. 22 y. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principal 
floricultural sections, including Philadelphia and New York, visiting green- 
house establishments, wholesale markets, retail stores, nurseries, etc. The 
cost of this trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each 
student will be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. The 
time for taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

D. Landscape Gardening 

HoRT. 31s. General Landscape Gardening (2) — Two lectures. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their appli- 
cation to private and public areas. Special consideration is given to the 
improvement and beautification of the home grounds, farmsteads, and small 
suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to specialize in 
landscape, but who wish some theoretical and practical knowledge of the 
subject. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Hort. 32 f. Elements of Landscape Design (3) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Hort. 31 s. 

A consideration of the principles of landscape design; surveys, mapping, 
and field work. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Hort. 33 s. Landscape Design (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 32 f . 

The design of private grounds and gardens and of architectural details 
used in landscape; planting plans; analytical study of plans of practicing 
landscape architects; field observation of landscape developments. Given 
in alternate years. . (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Hort. 34 f. Landscape Design (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 33 s. 

CJontinuation of course as outlined above. Given in alternate years. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 35 f. History of Landscape Gardening (1) — One lecture. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 31 s. 

Evolution and development of landscape gardening; the different styles, 
and a particular consideration of Italian, English, and American gardens. 
Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 36 s. Landscape Construction and Maintenance (1) — One lecture 
or laboratory. Prerequisite, Hort. 31 s. 

Methods of construction and planting; estimating; park and estate main- 
tenance. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 



264 



265 



HoRT. 37 s. Civic Art (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 
improvement, including problems in design of civic center, parks, school 
grounds, and other public and semi-public areas. Given in alternate years. 
(Not given in 1938-1930.) 

E. General Horticulture Courses 

HoRT. 42 y. Horticultural Research and Thesis (4-6). 

An advanced student in any of the four divisions of horticulture may 
select a special problem for investigation. This may be either the sum- 
marizing of all the available knowledge on a particular problem or the 
investigation of some new problem. Where original investigation is carried 
on, the student should in most cases start the work during the junior year. 
The results of the research are to be presented in the form of a thesis and 
filed in the horticultural library. 

HoRT. 43 y. Horticultural Seminar (2). 

In this course papers are prepared by members of the class upon subjects 
pertaining to their research or thesis work or upon special problems as- 
signed them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to time 
by members of the departmental staff. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

HoRT. IQlf. Commercial Fruit Growing (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Hort. 1 f . 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced 
work is taken up on the subjects of culture, fertilization, pollination, prun- 
ing, thinning, spraying, spray removal, picking, packing, marketing, and 
storage of fruits. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

(Schrader.) 

Hort. 102 s. Economic Fruits of the World (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 1 f . 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological, and physiological character- 
istics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such as 
the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut-bearing trees, citrus fruits, and 
newly introduced fruits, with special reference to their cultural require- 
ments in certain parts of the United States and the insular possessions. 
All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been discussed in a 
previous course. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Haut.) 

Hort. 103 f. Tuber and Root Crops (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 11 s. 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed, varieties, 
propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, 
storing, and marketing. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

(Frazier.) 



Hort. 104s. Advanced Truck Crop Production (2)— Prerequisites, Hort. 
11 s and 12 f . 

A detailed study of some of the more important problems encountered 
in the commercial production of truck crops. A thorough study is made of 
recent literature pertaining to such problems as soil acidity, soil organic 
matter relationships, new developments in insect and disease control, plant 
production and transplanting, etc. 

Hort. 105 f. Systewxitic Olericulture (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Preresquite, Hort. 11 s. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops and the 
description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties to 
different environmental conditions and their special uses in vegetable pro- 
duction. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

HoRT. 106 y. Plant Materials (5)— One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental planting. Given in alternate years. (Thurston.) 

HORT. 107 f. Systematic Pomology (S)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

The history, botany, and classification of fruits and their adaptation to 

Marvland conditions. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

^ (Haut.) 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201 y. Experimental Pomology (6)— Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tice in pomology ; methods and difficulties in experimental work in pomology 
and results of experiments that have been or are being conducted in all 
experiment stations in this and other countries. (Schrader.) 

Hort. 202 y. Experimental Olericulture (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tice in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental work in 
vegetable production and results of experiments that have been or are being 
conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. (Frazier.) 

Hort. 204 s. Methods of Resea/rch (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Methods of conducting horticultural research are stressed, to familiarize 
the student with methods used and the technic involved. Laboratory and 
field measurements on projects are used to develop technical skill. Outlines 
of research problems and preparation of research publications are studied, 
as well as drill in methods of oral presentation of material. (Staff.) 

Hort. 205 y. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis (4, 6, or 8). 
Students will be required to select problems for original research in pomol- 
ogy, vegetable gardening, floriculture, or landscape gardening. These 
problems will be continued until completed, and final results are to be pub- 
lished in the form of theses. (Staff.) 



266 



267 



HoRT. 206 y. Advanced Horticultural Semina/r (2). 

fn^l "'"'''''! is required of all graduate students, 'students are required 
to give reports either on special topics assigned them, or on the prog^eS 
their work being done in courses. Members of the departmental s^Treport 
special research from time to time. /o!^ 

v^taiT.) 

LATIN 

Professor W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

Lat. ly. Elementa/ry Latin (6) —Three lectures. 

This course is offered to cover a substantial and accurate course in ^ram 

eTmVallt'^ '"' "f translation of simple prose. It is substantially the 
equivalent of one entrance unit in Latin. 

unit's LaL.^'^""^'"' ^"^^^"' Prerequisite, Lat. ly or one entrance 
Texts are selected from Virgil, with drill on prosody, and from Cicero. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 
Miss Barnes, Mr. Fogg. 
L. S. 1 f or s. Library Methods (1)—Ffeshman year. 
This course is intended to help students use the library with greater 
facility. Instruction is given by practical work with the varLTcLCes 

t^S:itZZT' '"^. ™^ ^^^"^ ^^^^^^-^ '^^ general cE 
tication of the library according to the Dewey system. RepresentativP 

cTtllS^?"^^^^^^^ ^'^ ^^^'^1 '^ combinationU the use oTrifbll 
catalogue. Attention is given to periodical literature, particularly that 
indexed m the Reader^s Guide and in other periodical indexe and t 
venous much-used reference books, which the student >^11 find helpM 
throughout the college course. neipiui 

MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSORS T. H. Taliaf^o, Dantzig, Gwinner; Associate Professors 

SPANN, Yates; Assistant Professor Martin; Mr. A^ic^ Mr 

UMBERCER, Mr. Volckhausen, Mr. Laden, Miss Barzhe, M^. Morris 

crSiT";; tttdent'r'of''"'*^ ^'^'''^ (0)~Three lectures. Open without 
credit to students of engineering, chemistry, and physics who lack the 
required preparation for Math. 11 f. ^ 

logSrs'et'c. '^^"''^"^' '"^^'^ ^"^ ^^^^^-tic equations; exponents and 

Math. 7 f Solid Geometry (2) ~TVo lectures. Prerequisite plane ge- 
ometry. Col ege credit given only to students in the CoUege o? EdS^^ 
Open without credit to students desiring to enter the College of ErLf^^^^^^^ 
mg who have had no opportunity to take the subject in high school 

Lines and planes; cylinders and cones; the sphere; polyhedra. 

268 



Math. 8 f. Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, one year of high 
school algebra. May be taken by business administration, biology, premedi- 
cal, and predental students who have not the prerequisites for Math. 11 f. 
Repeated in the second semester. 

Quadratic equations; elementary theory of equations; combinations; 
permutations and probabilities; the binomial theorem; progressions; 
logarithms; elementary graphs; etc. 

Math. 9 f . Introductory Trigonometry (1) — One laboratory. Prere- 
quisite to Math. 12 f . Students who have had an equivalent course in high 
school will have the privilege of entering Math. 12 f. 

Math. 10s. Plane Tngonometry and Analytic Geometry (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 8f. May be taken by biology, premedical, 
and predental students who do not take Math. 14 s. 

Trigonometric functions; trigonometric identities; equations and graphs. 
Principles of plane analytic geometry; the line and the circle; the ellipse, 
hyperbola and parabola; graphing of functions; empirical equations. 

Math. 11 f. College Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, high 
school algebra completed. Required of all students in the College of En- 
gineering; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chemistry; 
of students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major 
or minor. Repeated in the second semester. 

Foundations of algebra; binomial and multinomial expansions; progres- 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of numbers; combinatorial 
analysis and probabilities; quadratic, cubic, and quartic irrationals; com- 
plex numbers; theory of equations. Exponential functions and logarithms; 
elements of trigonometry. Repeated in the second semester. 

Math. 12 f. Laboratory in Algebra and Trigonometry (1) — One labora- 
tory. Required of students whose major is mathematics, or physics, of 
students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major; 
of all students in the College of Engineering. This course and Math. 11 f 
may be taken collaterally; if taken separately, the prerequisites are Math. 
9 f and 11 f. 

Problems and projects, with special emphasis on the applications of 
algebra and trigonometry to physics, chemistry, and engineering. 

Math. 14 s. Analytic Geometry (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 11 f. Required of all students in the College of Engineering; of 
students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chemistry; of students 
in Education who elect mathematics as their major or minor. 

Trigonometry; Cartesian and polar coordinates; line and circle; curves 
of the second order; higher algebraic and transcendental curves; periodo- 
grams; solid analytics and spherical trigonometry. 



269 



the College of EXcatirwL li ! ^f '"" '*'* ^^^^'''' ^"^ "^ ^t'^dents in 
students ?: tL cSrof EnS Lr. TV*" '' "'"'^ '"^^■''^' ^^^^ "^ -" 

Math 16 y. Co/cmZus (6) — Three lectures. Prereauisit^ Ms.fv. i. 
Required of all students in the Collec-e cf F„^-« . ®*^^1"'^'*«' Math. 14 s. 
ing in mathematics, physics or chemifrv J f ^f" ^' °* '*"*^""*^ '"^j"'" 
cation who elect m;tUmar ^f tTelfrnVor or tw " ^'^ """^^^ ^^ ^'^"- 

S; faStt^^rrs "aSrvief"^^ inCaLfS;;l tt: 

series; differential equation; S;p;ta"S:;srm:^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^'^^^"^^^'^ ^" 

Math. 17 y. ^^omtorj/ in Coicw/ws (2)— One laboratnr^ i?. • j . 
students whose maior i^ mafj,»r«of t • 'aooratory. Required of 

who ,leel m.lhe,^S" iS, 1' ■ ".' "i?"'"' "" """'* i" =<!»»«»» 
..Parallr the p„";Si"r mI'! ^ .'^A'-htT*"'- " "'" 

o.r*itr;sroS;ror£r=."--^^^^^^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

(Courses Math. 101 f. 111 f ng, n^^ i,. 
every year; all other courses a're'^v^'n in' f iteVnat ^L'rsT ^ ^" *^"^''' 

Prfi^^isi't^^Lf nr:1? Z7Ji':^-'^^^ <3>-Three lectures, 
of all students in Business LnumSjron. '"""'' ^"'^ ^^"'^'•^- ^^^^^^ 

270 



Application of mathematics to financial transactions; compound interest 
and discount; construction and use of interest tables; sinking funds; annu- 
ities; depreciation, valuation, and amortization of securities; building and 
loan associations; life insurance, etc. (Spann.) 

Math. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 
(2) — Two lectures. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers in 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathematics 
and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. Ill f or 8 f, or equivalent high school courses. 

A survey course of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and the 
calculus intended for workers in the biological sciences and for prospective 
teachers of mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 114 f. Differential Equations for Engineers (3) — Three lectures. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the College of Engineer- 
ing, and deals with aspects of mathematics which arise in engineering 
theory and practice. Among the topics treated are the following: linear 
differential equations; advanced methods in kinematics and dynamics; appli- 
cations of analysis to electrical circuits, aero-dynamics, bridge-design, etc. 

(Martin, Yates.) 

Math. 115 s. Applied Calcultis for Chemists (3) — Three lectures. 

Prerequisite, Math, 16 y. Required of students in Industrial Chemistry. 
Elective for others. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise in the theory 
and practice of chemistry. Among the topics treated are the following: 
partial and total derivatives; applications of mathematical analysis to 
thermo-dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physical 
chemistry. (Alrich.) 

Math. 121s. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 

Foundations of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and analysis. The evolu- 
tion of such concepts as number, limit, continuity, and infinity; the axioms 
of geometry; spatial forms and measurement; the concepts of space, time, 
and matter, leading up to the theory of relativity. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) (Martin.) 

Math. 122 s. History of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 
History of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, the calculus, and the theory of 
functions; from the period of classical Greece to modern times. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 123 f. Theory of Equutions (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Symmetric functions; elimination; the fundamental theorem of algebra; 
algebraic solution of equations; the Galois theory; asymptotic solutions of 
equations. (Taliaferro.) 

271 



Math. 124 s. Theory of Numbers (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math 
16 y. 

Linear congruences, continued fractions and diophantine equations; criteria 
of primality; quadratic residues; higher congruences; the Problem of 
Fermat. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 125 f. Plane Curves (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 16 y. 

Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; contact and osculation; asymp- 
otes and singular points; algebraic curves; polarity; the Plucker characters 
of a curve; cubic and quartic curves. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Alrich.) 

Math. 126 s. Analytic Geometry in Space (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 16 y. 

Point, plane, and line; line geometry; quadratic surfaces; twisted cubics; 
algebraic curves and surfaces; many-dimensional geometry. (Taliaferro.) 

Math. 127 f. Advanced Topics in Calculus (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 16 y. 

Evaluation of definite integrals; expansion into series; line and surface 
integrals; the theorems of Green and Stokes; differential equations, exist- 
ence theorems. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Martin.) 

Math. 128 s. Advanced Differential Equations (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. 

Existence theorems; integration in series; asymptotic solutions; general 
theory of linear equations; ordinary differential equations of the second 
order; singular solutions; elements of partial differential equations. (Not 
given in 1937-1938.) (Martin.) 

Math. 129 f. Non-Euclidean Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Evolution of geometrical ideas; the axioms of geometry; theory of paral- 
lels; projective approach to geometries of Lobachevsky and Riemann; the 
Cayley-Klein theory; the problem of space and the theory of relativity. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 130 f. Modern Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
16 y. 

Sets, groups, and extension of groups; poljTiomials; rings and fields; gen- 
eral theory of ideals; polynomial ideals; elements of algebraic geometry. 

(Yates.) 

Math. 131s. Analytical Mechanics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y and Math. 126 s. 

Kinematics; the djmamics of a particle; statics; the principle of D'Alem- 
bert; the dynamics of a system; the equations of Lagrange and Jacoby; 
the principle of Hamilton, (Yates.) 



272 



math. 132 f. Theory of Probabilities (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

Math. 16 y. „ ^ • i. • i 

Frequency and probability; the concept of "equally likely"; combinatorial 
^nalvsis; addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of distribution; 
Continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, to theories of errors and 
correlations, and to molecular theories. (Uantzig.) 

MATH 133 y. Fammis Mathematical Problems (2)— One lecture. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 16 y and 17 y. Open only to students with outstanding 
records in mathematical studies. 

Prime numbers; the problem of Fermat; trisection of angles; regular 
Dolvffons and kindred problems; squaring the circle; transcendentality of pi 
and e- famous integrals; maxima and minima; probability problems; the 
three-body problem. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Dantzig.) 

MATH. 134 f. Higher Algebra (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 

16 y and Math. 17 y. 

Determinants; theory of elimination; inequalities; continued fractions; 
combinatorial analysis; algebraic solution of equations; expansions and 
summations. Special emphasis will be laid on topics required ^"^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 
examinations. 

MATH. 135 s. College Geometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 
15 s and Math. 18 y. 

Geometry of the triangle; systems of circles; ruler-compass construction; 
linkages; rollers and roulettes projection; general theory of comes; prop- 
erties of plane cubics and quartics; twisted cubics. (Yates.) 

Math. 140 y. Undergraduate Seminar (2)— One session. 

Required of students who major in mathematics. This course is intended 
as a clearing house of problems which arise in th%""'l«'-gjf«'."f ^^""f^"^ 
in mathematics. (Dantzig, Yates, Alrich, Martin.) 

For Graduates 

(With the exception of the Graduate Seminar, Math. 240 y, all the courses 
listed below are taught in alternate years.) 

Math. 221 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2)— Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Math. 127 f . 

Cauchy-Riemann conditions; power series and infinite products; conformal 
mapping; the Cauchy integral theory; residues and periods; uniform func- 
tions; analytical continuation. ^^^^ ^^'' 

Math. 222 s. Theory of Functions of a Real VwrixibU (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Math. 16 y and Math. 121 s. 

Logical development of the concept of number; aggregates point-sets; 
convergence, limit; continuous and discontinuous functions; ^^^^^^^^^^J^^^ 
and generalized integration. (am.) 

273 



M^h.™23?'' ^''*'"'' ""^ ^"*'^''"' (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

Scalars, vectors, matrices, and determinants; transformations; linear de 
pendence; canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geometrt 
and quantum theory. ,t, ""letry 

' (Dantzig.) 

u^ruyZiu^ttt. ''''^'^ '''-''-'' '^^*"-^- ^-^^''^^"-- 

refidS""""™ ""''""'' "''"^"*^ "' ^'^''"'^'' '^^'^ --^ -^f--' 

^Alrich.) 

M^.t'^for.f^h S''''^'^''^'''^ ^^"^^^"^ (2)~Two lectures. Prerequisites 
Math. 125 f and Math. 126 s. i^^^^tes, 

o^'2^ r/'^rf ^\f geometry; metric and descriptive properties; the prin- 
ciple of duality; the group of collineations; projective equivalence; projee- 
glometr''''^ '''^^^' Projective differential geometry; non-Euclidean 

Math 22^ s Infinitesimal Geometry (2)~Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y. Math. 125 f, and Math. 126 s. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves and surfaces; curvature 
asymptotic lines and geodesies; triple orthogonal systems; the problem of' 
space structure. (Not given in 1937-1938.) Dantzig) 

12?f'™nd'Ma;h.'r2tf ''"""" ^'^~^"' ^"'"^^^- Prerequisites, Math. 

Criteria of convergence for series and products; continued fractions; trig- 
onometric senes; series of polynomials; orthogonal functions; functions 
defined by power series. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Martin.) 

^^Math. 228 f. ElUptic Functions (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 

The theories of Legendre and Jacoby; the Weierstrass theory; doubly 
periodic functions; elliptic integrals; applications to algebra, geometry, and 
mecnanicB. ^Yates.) 

J^t™:JJ^^'A'i^''^'^ ""^ ^^"-'^"^^^^ (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 127 f. and Math. 128 s. 

Classical problems; the conditions of Euler; the Weierstrass theory; 
strong and weak minima; case of extremals with variable endpoints; exten- 
sion to multiple integrals. (Martin.) 

Math. 230 s. Continuous Groups of Transformations (2)— Two lectures 
Prerequisites, Math. 126 s and Math. 223 s. 

Correspondence; transformation; semi-groups and groups; invariants; the 
Lie theory of groups; infinitesimal transformations; contact transforma- 
tions; applications to differential equations and to geometry. (Dantzig.) 

274 



Math. 231 s. Partial Differential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 127 f and Math. 

128 s. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Yates.) 

Math. 232 s. The Theory of Relativity (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 226 s and Math. 131 f . 

History of the problem of relativity; the Maxwell equations; special the- 
ory of relativity; elements of tensor analysis; the general theory of rela- 
tivity. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 233 s. Analytical Dynamics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 131s and Math. 221 f. 

Classical problems in celestial mechanics ; the potential ; stability of orbits ; 
the restricted problem of three bodies. Textbook: Whittaker, Analytical 
Dynamics. (Martin.) 

Math. 240 y. Graduate Seminar (2) — One session. 

Required of all graduate students. Intended as a clearing house of 
problems arising in the graduate courses. Reports on progress on disser- 
tations and a critical discussion of results achieved. 

(Dantzig, Yates, Martin.) 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph 

D. Patch, U. S. A.; Assistant Professors Major Charles H. 

Jones, Major Howard Clark, 2d, *Major Frank Ward, 

ICaptain William H. Maglin; Warrant Officer 

William H. McManus; Sergeant George J. Uhrinak. 

** BASIC COURSE 

Freshman Year — 1 lecture; 2 drill periods. 

M. I. 1 y. Basic R, 0. T, C. (2). 

The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

National Defense Act, including basic organization and the R. O.T. C; 
military courtesy, command and leadership; military hygiene and first aid; 
marksmanship. 



♦ Leaving, June, 1987. 
t Arriving, August, 1937. 
** Required of qualified students. 



275 



Second Semester 

Physical drill, command and leadership, automatic rifle; military histo.v 
and pohcy; military hygiene and first aid; citizenship; international situa 
tion. 

Sophomore Year—1 lecture; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 2y. Basic R. O. T. C. (4). 
The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

Scouting and patrolling, mapreading, military history, leadership. 

Second Semester 

Military history, musketry, combat principles of the squad and section 
leadership. * 

* ♦ADVANCED COURSE 

Junior Year—Z lectures; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 101 y. Advanced R. O, T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

Aerial photograph reading, machine guns, howitzer weapons, combat 
principles, leadership. 

Second Semester 

Combat principles of rifle, machine gun, and howitzer platoons, pistol 
marksmanship, review of rifle marksmanship, leadership. 

Senior Year— 3 lectures ; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 102 y. Advanced R. O. T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester 

Combat principles (including organization of larger combat units) com- 
mand and leadership, weapons (tanks), chemical agents and uses mecha- 
nization. * 

Second Semester 

Company administration, military history and policy, military law 
Officers' Reserve Corps regulations. ' 

•* Elective for qualified studenta. 



276 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Falls; Associate Professor Kramek; Assistant Professors 
Darby, Prahl; Miss Wilcox, Mr. Schweizer, Mr. Liotard, 
Mr. Evangelist, Mr. Simonpietri, Miss Goodner. 

All students whose major is in Modern Languages are required to take 
Introduction to Comparative Literature (Comp. Lit. 101 f and 102 s) and 
a Conference Course in Reading (French, German, Spanish 120). The fol- 
lowing courses are recommended: General European History (H. ly), In- 
troduction to Philosophy (Phil. If or Is), The Old Testament as Litera- 
ture (Comp. Lit. 104 f). Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (Eng. 113 f 
and 114 s), Romanticism in France and Germany (Comp. Lit. 105 f and 
106 s). For a major in German, Anglo-Saxon (Eng. 103 y). 

Specific requirements for the majors in the different languages are as 
follows: French — French 9 y, 10 y, 15 y, 120, and two additional year- 
courses in literature in the 100 group; German — 10 y, 15 y, 120, and 
two additional year-courses in the 100 group; Spanish — Spanish 6 y, 15 y, 
120, and two additional year-courses in the 100 group. 

A. French 

French ly. Eleinentary French (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

French 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — 'One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 1 y. Students who are 
interested in French, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of French 1 y. 

French 3y. Second-Year French (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
French 1 y or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued; composition; conversation; translation of 
narrative and technical prose. In the organization of classes, certain sec- 
tions are set aside for the reading of scientific French texts. 

French 4f. Grammar Review (2) — ^Two lectures. Designed particular- 
ly for students who enter with three or more units in French, who expect 
to do advanced work in the French language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take French 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as French 6 y, 7 y, 8 y, 15 y. 

French 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 3y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in French literature, and who have com- 

277 



pleted the first semester of French ^v wUi, fi,« j ^ . 

ta.e this course in coniunction^^jrirlrsf^:^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

in P^sriTeSr ^" ^°"^^'-^^*^°- ^^-"-^- ^» ^-^ Of sin.p!ll^3 

^^French 6y. The Develojnn.nt of the French Novel (6)-Three lec- 

(Not given in IDsSs ) "'^ important novelists. Reports. 

^^FaENCH 7y. r/^ Development of the French Drama (6)-Three lec- 

^nT:^^:VT^:^i:^' :^''-^'^ ^^^-^ of the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
(Not givlTn 193?1938 r '^^^"^'^*"'" ^^^ -"-*--! reading. Reports.' 

lectoeT" ^ ""■ ^''' ^^^^'"^^"f 0/ the Short Story in French (6)-Three 

tion TX::s::iu':izit '""^' '^*^^^*''^^'- -^^^-^ -^^ *--- 

^French 9y. French Phonetics (2)-0ne lecture. Prerequisite. French 

iuTZr::nis£X:T;J:''''^^'^^ '^-^ ^-''^-■*- («)-T'>- lec. 
(French 9 y and 10 y are required of students preparing to teach French ) 

PrSslte! F^enchty'"^''"'^ ^^ '''~''"'' ''''^'^'^^^ («)-Three lectures. 

motmtrsTn^^^eXnJei^Sf ^^^ *" «>« <=»^«^ -^^ors and 

rrencn literature. This course is given in French. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ottZT '"*^'''"'^ '""^^^ °^ '"o^^"* F^«n<=h literature is offered 
of rotating courses roughly divided by centuries. 

tufr^'m J"^''- '^"'"''^ Literature of the inh Century (4)- 
tures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) ^ ' 



^^l^^ENCH 104 y. French Literature of the 19th Century (4) 

French 105 y. French Literature of the 20th Centurv (i\ 

tures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) ceMfwrT/ (4). 

278 



by means 

—Two lec- 
( Wilcox.) 

—Two lec- 
(Falls.) 

-Two lec- 
(Wilcox.) 

-Two \ec' 
(Falls.) 



French 110 y. Advanced Composition (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
French 10 y. 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach French.) (Falls.) 

French 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 4 
semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours.) 

A two-year course open to majors and minors in French. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of such 
courses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
department take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in French for the comprehensive examination in modem French 
literature at the end of the senior year. 

' For Graduates 

French 201 y. Research (2-4) — Credits determined by work accom- 
plished. (Staff.) 

French 202 y. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (4) — Two lectures. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Falls.) 

French 203 y. Aspects and Conceptions of Nature in French Literature 
of the 18th Century (4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Falls.) 

French 204 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (4) — TWo 
lectures. (Falls.) 

French 205 y. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renais- 
sance (4) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Darby.) 

French 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. (Required of all 
graduate students in French.) 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 105 f , Romanticism in 
France, 

B. German 

German 1 y. Elementary German (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year German, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

German 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 1 y. Students who are 
interested in German, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of German 1 y. 

279 



German 3y. Second-Year German (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. In the organization of classes, certain sections are set 
aside for the reading of scientific German texts. 

German 4f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more imits in German and who 
expect to do advanced work in the German language or literature, but who 
are not prepared to take Grerman 10 y. Properly qualified students may 
elect this course at the same time as German 6 f or 8 f . 

German 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 3 y. Students who ex- 
pect to take advanced work in German literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of German 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of German 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in German of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

German 6f. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent German literature. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

German 7s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 6 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

German 8f. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. This course 
alternates with German 6 f . (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

German 9s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 8 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

German 10 y. German Grammar and Composition (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y. 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach German.) 

German 15 y. Introdtiction to German Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature; a study of 
representative authors and works. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101 f. German Literature of the 18th Century (3) 
tures. 

The earlier classical literature. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

280 



-Three lec- 
(Prahl.) 



GERMAN 102 s. German Literature of the 18th Century (3)-Three lec- 

'^The later classical literature. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Prahl.) 

German 103 f. GermAin Literature of tlie 19th Century (3)^Three lec- 

Tmanticism and Young Germany. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Prahl.) 
GERMAN 104 s. German Literature of the 19th Century (3)-Three lec- 

™ literature of the Empire. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Prahl.) 

GERMAN 105 f. Contemporary Ger^nan Literature (3)-Three lectures. 
A study of the lives, works, and influence of outstanding ^uthors^of^^the 

present. 
GEEMAN 106 s. Contemporary Gernmn Literature (3)-Three lectures- 

Continuation of Germari 105 f. 

GERMAN 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 
4 semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours). 

A two-vear course open to majors and minors in German. It proposes, 
rit t7L the atSion of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of 
Tuch courseTas he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 

VI fT^nrLd independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
CSm nr^tlTpte o? formal lectures. This --Prepares -^ors, 
and minors in German for the comprehensive examination m modem Ger 
man literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 

GERMAN 201 y. Research (2-4)-^Credits determined by -ork ac^^- 
plished. 

GERMAN 202 y. The Modem Ger^nnn Drama (4)-Two lectures. 

Study of the naturalistic, neo-romantic, and expressiomstic f^^Jf ^^/^^^^^^^ 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. (Not given^m 

1937-1938.) 

GERMAN 203 y. Schiller (4)-Two lectures. ,v. v,- . ™ of 

Study of the life and works of Schiller, with emphasis on the histo^^ of 

his dramas. 
GERMAN 210 y. Seminar (2-4) -One meeting weekly. 
(Required of all graduate students in German.) 

and German Literature. 

281 



C. Italian 

D. Spanish 

offertTJts'/s^TnSrT ^^r' ^'^-""^^ '^<=*--- students ,.ho 
uiier two units m Spanish for entrance, but whose Drenaratinn ic «/.f o^ 

quate for Becond-year Spanish, receive half crerfoJThis co"r"e 
Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

theSVXor^BrS'I ^r"'"'"''"'' ^')-^"^ l^*"r«- Prerequisite, 

interS in ll.^,, 1 f f "^']'" °^ ^P^"^^** ^ ^^ students who are 
interested m Spanish, and who have done well in the first <!.-mA«fo,. ^f ^v 
elementary year-course .shmiiH tot» tv . semester of the 

J j-cai Lourse, snouid take this course in coniunotinn witi, *v,« 
second semester of Spanish 1 y. conjunction with the 

Sp^^hTy or^; JXt''"'* ''-''''' '"'-''''- '-'--■ ^-<^--^^te. 
pr^S"'' "' "''^''^' ^"''^ ""'^ P^^y^'- ^^^^' ^«-^«w; oral and written 

Spanish 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2)— Two lecturP^ Prov.^,,.- 

course in conjunction with the second semes^r of SptnLh 3 y " 

in^^ottnd^^^^^^^^^ " conversation; discussion in Spanish of simple texts 

tufp^^'p!! ^^'' ^f^^^nced Composition and Conversation (4)--Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Spanish 3 y or equivalent. 

Introduction to phonetics; oral and written composition 
(This course is required of students preparing to teach Spanish.) 
Spanish 15 y. Introduction to Spanish Literature (6)— Three lectures 
An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements m Spanish literature. This course is given in Spanish. 

282 



(Darby.) 

(Not given 
(Darby.) 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 103 f. The Spanish Drama (3) —Three lectures. 
The drama of the Golden Age. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Spanish 104 s. The Spanish Drama (3) — Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 103 f. The drama since Calderon. 
in 1937-1938.) 

Spanish 105 y. Cervantes (6) — ^Three lectures. 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. (Not given in 
1937-1938.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 107 f. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 

Classic novels and short stories of the Golden Age and of the eighteenth 
century. (Darby.) 

Spanish 108 s. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 

CJontinuation of Spanish 107 f . A study of the development of the 
modem novel. (Darby.) 

Spanish 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 
4 semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours). 

A two-year course open to majors and minors in Spanish. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of 
such courses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
department take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in Spanish for the comprehensive examination in modern Spanish 
literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 

Spanish 201 y. Research (2-4) — Credits determined by work accom- 
plished. (Staff.) 

Spanish 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6) — Three lec- 
tures. 
Detailed study of the classical authors. (Darby.) 

Spanish 203 f. Spanish Poetry (3) — Three lectures. 

The epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyrics, poetry of the 
Golden Age. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 204 s. Spanish Poetry (3) — Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 203 f. Poetry of the 18th, 19th, and 20th cen- 
turies. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. 

(Required of all graduate students in Spanish.) 



283 



MUSIC 

Mr. Randall, Mrs. Blaisdell. 

Music ly. Music Appreciation (2) — One lecture. 

A study of all types of classical music with a view to developing the 
ability to listen and enjoy. Lecture recitals will be presented with the aid of 
performers and records. A study of the orchestra and the instruments that 
it employs. A study of musical form. The development of the opera and 
oratorio. Great singers of the past and present. Well-known musicians 
occasionally appear as gruest lecturers and performers. 

Music 2y. History of Music (2) — One lecture. 

A comprehensive course in the history of music covering the development 
of all forms of music from ancient times through the renaissance; the 
classic and the romantic schools; and the more modem composers. 

Music 3 y. University Chorus (1). 

This course is offered for those interested in part-singing. After voice 
trials, students who have ability to read and sing music of the grade of easy 
songs are admitted. Members of the Women's Chorus and the Men's Glee 
Club indicated hereafter are combined at times for mixed chorus singing. 

(a) Women's University Chorus. Study of part-singing for women's 
voices. Credit is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly 
rehearsals and participation in public performances of the chorus. 

(b) Men's Glee Club. Study of part-singing for men's voices. Credit 
is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4 y. University Orchestra (1). 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of the standard sjrmphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 
modem composers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments arc 
eligible for membership. At least one rehearsal of two hours duration is 
held each week, and all players are expected to take part in public perform- 
ances. 

Music 5y. Harmony (4) — Two lectures. 

This course includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, har- 
monic progressions, primary and secondary triads in root position and first 
and second inversions, the dominant seventh chord in its root position and 
inversions. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basis for ear training, 
dictation, melody writing, and melody harmonization. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marti. 
PHIL. 1 f or s. Introduction to Philosophy (3) -Three lectures. 

TstudT o"? fhf rSopment of philosophical thought from the early 
Greeks to the modern era. 
PHIL. lis. Modern European Philosophy (3) -Three lectures. Pre- 

rpauisite, Phil. If or s. ^ /^t .. • 

Tcontinuation of Phil. 1 f or s. Alternates with Phil. 12 s. (Not given 

in 1937-1938.) 
PHIL. 12 s. American Philosophy (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

Phil. 1 f or s. 
A continuation of Phil. 1 f or s. Alternates with Phil. 11 s. 

PHIL. 21 f. Aesthetics .(3)-Three lectures. P'^^T^^J^^^'J' ^J^'^, ^^ ^^ 
and prerequisite or, by special permission, corequisite: Art 1 f or b. or 
Music 1 y or 2 y. or a 100 course in literature. 

An historical and systematic introduction to the philosophy of art. Alter 
nates with Phil. 22 f and 23 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

PHIL. 22 f. Logic (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil If or s, and 
satisfactory preparation in mathematics or science. 

An introductory course, designed especially for science majors. Alter- 
nates with Phil. 21 f and 23 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 
PHIL 23 f. Ethics (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. If or s. 
A study of the implications of problems of the good life. Alternates with 
Phil. 21 f and 22 f . 

PHIL. 31 f. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. J J J. 

One or several relatively easy philosophical works will be read, andJUs- 
cussed in class. The topic will be changed, from semester o semester, 
although the same work may be studied again, after t^'"^^ "^Hv^f ^^Jlf" 
Not more than two credits allowed to any one student. (Not given m 1937- 

1938.) 

PHIL. 32 s. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
req^;;;e, Phil. 1 f or s. Similar to Phil. 31 f. Phil. 31 f not a prerequisite. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Phil. 33 f. Readings in PhUosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. 

Phil. 34 s. Readings in PhUosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. 



284 



285 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phil. 101 f. Systems of Philosophy (3) — Three hours of lectures, student 
reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, and the 
permission of the professor. 

The system of one philosopher, or the development of one movement, will 
be studied throughout the semester. The topic will be changed, from se- 
mester to semester, although, after three or four semesters, the same system 
may be chosen again. Not more than nine credits allowed to any one 
student. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Marti.) 

Phil. 102 s. Systems of Philosophy (3) — Three hours of lectures, 
student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, 
and the permission of the professor. 

Continuation of Phil. lOl f . (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Marti.) 

Phil. 103 f. Systems of Philosophy: F. W. J. SCHELLING (3)— Three 
hours of lectures, student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses 
in philosophy, and the permission of the professor. 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

Phil. 104 s Systems of Philosophy: CHARLES S. PEIRCE (3)-~Three 
hours of lectures, student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses 
in philosophy, and the permission of the professor. 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

PHYSICS 

Professor Eichlin; Dr. Dickinson, Mr. Clark. 

Phys. ly. GeTveral Physics (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Re 
quired of students in the Premedical curriculum. This course satisfies the 
minimum requirement for a science major. Prerequisites, Math. 11 f and 
14 s, or Math. 8 f and Math. 10 s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, 
electricity, and light. 

Phys. 2y. General Physics (10) — Four lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of all students in the Engineering curricula and of those with chem- 
istry, mathematics, and physics majors. Elective for other students. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 11 f, Math. 14 s, and Math. 16 y. The latter may be 
taken concurrently. 

A study of mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light. 

Phys. 3y. Elementary Physics (6) — Three lectures. This introductory 
course is designed to meet the need of students who desire to become ac- 
quainted with the fundamental principles of physics. Instruction will be 
given by lectures, recitations, and experimental demonstrations. This 
course, with such additional work as may be deemed necessary by the De- 
partment, will be accepted as the equivalent of Phys. 1 y. 

286 



i For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PHYS. 101 f. Precision of Measurements (3)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
•f^c Phvs 1 v or 2 y, and Math. 16 y. • - . i. i 

'1 discuss on of the principles underlying the treatment of expenmentj 
.,t as to precision of observations, errors, interpolation, curve analysis, 
etc wUh emphasis on the planning of investigations involving measure- 
:;:;;ts The course is intended as an introduction to ^'^--titaUve^e^eri- 
mental work. 

PHYS. 102 s. Qwantitative Physical Measurements (3)— Two lectures; 
nnp laboratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 101 f. , , ^ .,. • +i,^ 

TWs course, supplementing Phys. 101 f, is designed to familiarize the 
student with the manipulation of various types of apparatus used in expen 
Sition in physical problems, and the adaptation and analysis^ofjata 
SO obtained. 

PHYS. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6) - Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

^TOs^'iurse, supplementing Phys. ly, is an advanced study of physical 
phlnlena in optLs, spectroscopy, conduction of electridty through ^^es, 
protoelectricity. etc., with a comprehensive rev ew of basic P^Pj;;^; 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student m a general f^Y^^'\ 
some of the recent developments in physics. (uicKmson.; 

PHYS. 104 y. Advanced Experiments (6) -One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 103 y. , , . j .. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is intended to Pr«^d«;^.«^*"j,«>J 
with experience in experimental physics. (uicmnson.; 

PHYS. 105 f. Heat and Thermodynamics (3)-Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. . ^i„„„j 
The classical phenomena of heat and radiation phenomena are developed 
on the basis of the kinetic molecular theory and the quantum theory. The 
first and second laws of thermodynamics are applied to P^y^»'=^^jjP^;^^"^f; 

PHYS. 106 s. Theoretical Meclianics (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

^"S" a?a\ytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics ^d 
dynamics is presented, with problems and laboratory exercises to illustrate 
these principles. The use of generalized coordinates is """ffatef Jhe 
equations of La Grange are applied to selected topics m the 6^1^ of j^^am- 
ics. 
Phys. 107 f. Optics (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 

^'T'stady is made of selected topics in the refraction reflection, inter- 
ference, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed 
on a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, '"^'^"'"'^^^^^J'nsS 
scope, and interferometer. ^ 

287 



nrftn^' P ^ ^' f'.f*""^'^ ««'^ Magnetism (3)-Two lectures; One lab 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2y. 

■ (Dickinson.) 

PHYS. 109 y Electric Discliurge (6) -Two lectures; one laboratory 
Prerequisites, at least two courses of the 105 f-108 s group 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
e ec ronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process o 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics. and atomic structure 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) ,j.. , ."'-'■"'^«' 

' (Dickinson.) 

Graduates 

Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3)— Three lectures. 

Development of theories on the structure of the atom through discussion 

tJ T! r. ^"'■^^ ^P^''*''^' ^^•'""''= '""'^^'^ ^« «PP»ed to the periodic table, 
and related topics. ^^^^^^^ 

Phys-loiT^' ^'''"""'*'^ Spectroscopy (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Continuation of Phys. 201 f. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 203 f. Qtumtum Theory (3)— Three lectures. 
Discussion of the application of the principles of the quantum theory to 

black body radiation, spectroscopy, collision processes, valence, etc. 

(Eichlin.) 
Phys. 204 s. Nuclewr Physics (8)— Three lectures. 

Discussion of the constitution of the nucleus, natural radioactivity dis- 

inteSon ^ete ^''^'' "^''*'*""' ^'"'*'"°"' ""''^^^ ^"^'^ '*^*^'' ^'*^"*^ '^'- 
' * (Eichlin.) 

PHYS. 205 f. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3)--Three lee- 

thSr«7^^^''7 '""'^^ °^ *^ ^^'*°'"^ •'^ ^^y^'"'' the electromagnetic 
theory of radiation; mteraction of radiation and matter; introduction tTthe 
quantum mechanics. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Eichlin ) 

Phys. 206 s. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3)— Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Phys. 205 f. j \ > ^ nree lec 

Continuation of Phys. 205 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 207 f. Electrodynamics (3)— Three lectures. 
..ttr.^T^^''^'- ''"^/ "^ electrostatics and electromagnetics with appli- 
L ;937-193tf ' '' °"' ''''*''°- ""'^ '"^^-to-optics. (Not ^ven 

(Dickinson.) 
288 



PHYS. 208 s. Physical Optics (3) — Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light, with appli- 
cations to interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization. (Not given in 
1937-1938. ) ( Dickinson. ) 

PHYS. 209 y. Semina/r (2). 

Presentation of reports and discussion of current developments in physics 
and of original investigations on special problems. (Staff.) 

Phys. 210 y. Research. 

The investigation of special problems in physics. (Staff.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Steinmeyer; Lecture21s Oatman, Lasson. 

Pol. Sci. If or s. American National Government (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Open to freshmen; 

A study of the legislative, executive, and judicial organization and func- 
tions of the national government of the United States. This is the basic 
course for political science majors. 

Pol. Sci. 4 s. State Government (2) — Two lectures. Open to freshmen. 

A study of the legislative, executive, and judicial functions of the States, 
with emphasis given to the government of Maryland. 

Pol. Sci. 5f. Municipal Government (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of the organization and functions of the various types of city 
government in the United States. Course includes a visit to the City of Bal- 
timore, the purpose of which is to study the important departments at 
work. 

Pol. Sci. 7f. Comparative Government (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A survey of the British Empire, including a study in detail of the par- 
liamentary system of Great Britain. Course covers the governmental sys- 
tems of France and Switzerland. 

Pol. Sci. 8s. Comparative Government (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A comparative study of the governments of Germany, Russia, Italy, Japan, 
etc. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 101 f. International Lkjuw (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the principles governing international intercourse in time of 
peace as well as war, as illustrated in texts and cases. (Steinmeyer.) 

289 



Pol. Sci. 102 s. IntemationaX Relations (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the nature and importance of international relations; under- 
lying problems; agencies of control; development of international organi- 
zations. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 103 f. Current Problems in Government (2) — Two lectures. 

This course deals with the governmental problems having an international 
character, such as the causes of war, the problem of neutrality, propaganda, 
etc. Course conducted by lecture and discussion method, with students re- 
quired to report on readings from current literature. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 104 s. Current Problems in Government (2) — Two lectures. 

This course, conducted along lines similar to those of Pol. Sci. 103 f , deals 
with domestic problems of the government of the United States. (Lasson.) 

Pol. Sci. 105 f. Constitutional Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of constitutional law in the United States, as interpreted by the 
Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the American federal system, 
the amending clause, the powers of the President, Congress, and the National 
Judiciary. (Lasson.) 

Pol. Sci. 107 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

The political party as a part of the political machinery; party organiza- 
tion; party activities; campaign methods; public opinion and party leader- 
ship; the true function of parties. 

Pol. Scl 109 f. Early Political Theory (2) — Two lectures. 

A survey of the principal theorists who have influenced political thought 
and development. This course covers the various theories from Plato to the 
middle of the nineteenth century. (Oatman.) 

Pol. Sci. 110 s. Recent Political Thought (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the political schools of thought from the middle of the nine- 
teenth century to the present time. Special reference is made to such recent 
developments as Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Nazism, etc. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jull, Waite; Associate Professor Quigley. 

Poultry is. Farm Poultry (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course in poultry raising, including housing, feeding, incuba- 
tion, brooding, breeds, breeding, selection of stock, culling, general man- 
agement, and marketing. 



290 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PHTTTTRY 102 f Poultry Keeping (4) -Two lectures; two laboratories. 
^:^.nlt,.^ but iot required to take Poultry 1 s as a prerequisite 
A study of housing and yarding, practice in making poultry house plans, 
feeding, killing, and dressing. ^ 

POULTRY 103 s. Poultry Production (4)-~Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prpreauisites, Poultry 1 s and 102 f. 
W theory and practice of incubation and brooding, both natural and 
?^Ll Study of incubators and brooders, assembling, etc. Considerable 
Sis i^^ the proper growing of chicks into good laying pul- 

lets General consideration of poultry disease. Caponizmg. 

POULTRY 104 f. Poultry Breeds, (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Poultry 1 s, 102 f, and 103 s. 

A study of the breeds of poultry, the judging of Po-ltry, including culling, 
fitting for exhibition, and the methods of improvement by breeding. 

POULTRY 105 s. Poultry Management (4) -Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Poultry 1 s, 102 f , 103 s, and 104 f ^ 

A general fitting together and assembling of knowledge gamed m the 
prfvioT ot'r^i^^^^ marketing, including both -l^g o^^^^^^^^^ 
products and the buying of supplies keeping P- f ^^^^^^^^^^ 
management and operation, a study of poultry profits, how to start. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Sprowls; Lecturer Hall; Mr. Clark. 
PSYCH. If or s. Elements of Psychology /3) --Two lectures and one 
discussion. Open to sophomores. Seniors receive but 2 crechts 

An elementary course describing and explaining the Jasic facts of menta 
life and psychological terminology. It lays the foundation for a general 
understanding of psychological literature, as well as for advanced study m 
psychology. 

PSYCH. 2 f or s. Experimental Psychology (3)-Twt) lectures and one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

Theoretical discussion and experimental investigation f f^^ «";^^;°;^J 
gustatory, visual, olfactory, auditory, and kmaesthet.c »°J.^»^;;^;. "^jf P^"„. 
ence. Kymographic recording of reflexes associated with systemic emo 
tional and esthetic processes. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
PSYCH. 106 s. Mental Hygiene (3) -Two lectures and one clinic at St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f or Psych. 1 f or s. 

Designed especially for students of education, honie ^^^^l^^'J'^;^^^^ 
cal and pre-legal courses. A study of mental disorders m terms of personal 

291 



and social adaptation. Problems of adjustment in social relations- ob,« 
sions, fears, conflicts, inhibitions, and compensations. (Sprott)" 

PsycTl f or^s!" "''''"'""' P^V^hology (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite. 

»n??°''f ?•' ^'■°]''^'"' °^ '"'"^^'*" hvisin^ss. A consideration of selection 
and classification of employees, personnel guidance, employer-employee re 
lations; aspects of business leadership. (Ckrk)" 

For Graduates 

course forSr° ^' ^/''''^''''. Educational Psychology (3)-An advanced 
course for teachers and prospective teachers. Open only to graduate students 

tromH.^lV!'\T^°'' contributions of psychology to educational theory 
irom Herbert to the present time. (Sprowls ) 

SOCIOLOGY 

PRorassoR Manny; Associate Professor Joslyn; Assistant Professor 

Clowes; Dr. Jacobi, Mr. Wittler. 

di™,-^^; ^n ^f 7^«f "« ^ '^ So'^'^l Sciences (6)-0„e lecture; two 
discussions. Open to freshmen and sophomores only, 

en™' InX ZT' ^" f "^entation to advanced work in the social sci- 
ences In the first semester, the basis, nature, and evolution of societv and 

iTi^f ormoder:-r t-'"''- ^^""^ ^'^^ '^^^^^ — *- the ma ofpr^b 
lems of modem citizenship are analyzed in terms of knowledge contributed 

by economics, history, political science, psychology, and socioloS ^"*'' 

sitfsopVoror: stanS^^ "' """"''' ^'^"^^^ ^'-™-- ^-equi- 

vidtalTolwrln?"'*^' r^ f'r''^' ^'°''''''' *^ ^^'-««'" of the indi- 
vidual to the group; social products; social change. 

omte sundinr^' ^'^^'^''''^^''^^ (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, soph- 

put"osTo/SLvh *V"''"'!f "^ r^'"' P""''*^^^ ^"^ '"O''^™ ^"««««. th« 
i«f!^ f -fnT ^ *" ^^^^'^t^ the nature of culture and the processes re- 

lated to It. Museum exhibits will be utilized. processes 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

v.i?b; ien,Lf r' ^"''■'"•'^^ ^2)-'^^'' '«<=t"^««- Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

the^evo!ul?nf ^"*^ f"" u""' °^ "^'^^ communities, ancient and modem; 
the evolution of rural culture; rural institutions and their problems- the 
psychology of rural life; composition and characteristics of the ruraT popu! 

IfmLfptrni^g'"^^' "'^ *° '""^ "^^^^ -^^^^ ^-— *^^ -^^' -P-s 

(Manny.) 
292 



Soc. 102 s. Urban Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the nature and significance of urbanization; the social struc- 
ture and functions of the city; urban personalities and groups; cultural con- 
flicts arising out of the impact of urban environment. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 103 f. Criminology and Penology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. Sci. 1 y or Soc. 1 f or s. 

The nature and extent and cost of crime; causative factors; historical 
methods of dealing with criminals; apprehension of alleged criminals; 
the machinery of justice; penal institutions; other means of caring for 
convicted persons; the prevention of crime. (Jacobi.) 

Soc. 104 s. Social Psychology (3) — Three discussions. Prerequisite. Soc. 
1 f or s or Psych. 1 f or s. 

The development of human nature and personality as products of social 
experience and interaction; the behavior of public audiences, groups, crowds, 
and mobs; the development and functioning of such psycho -social forces as 
imitation, styles, fads, leadership, public opinion, propaganda, nationalism, 
etc. (Manny.) 

Soc. 105 f. Social Organization (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. If 
or s. 

Social groupings above the family in size as found among primitives and 
modem civilizations including neighborhoods, communities, special interest 
organizations, etc.; leadership and followership in organization activities; 
interorganizational conflict and cooperation. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 107 s. Social Pathology (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 
1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

Causative factors and social complications in individual and group patho- 
logical conditions; historic methods of dealing with dependent, defective, 
and delinquent classes. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 109 f. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. 107 s, or consent of instructor. 

Brief historical review of the evolution of social work. Present day types 
of social work, institutional treatment, public and private agencies; the 
theory and technic of social case work; recent developments arising out of 
the depression; visits to representative social agencies. This course is 
intended primarily for persons intending to take advanced professional 
training in this field. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 110 s. The Family (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 f or s. 

Anthropological and historical backgrounds; biological, economic, psycho- 
logical, and sociological bases of the family; the role of the family in per- 
sonality development; family and society; family disorganization; family 
adjustment and social range. (Jacobi.) 

293 



Soc. Ill f . Recent Social Thought. (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 
1 f or s, and consent of instructor; intended mainly for sociology majors and 
minors. 

Critical study of the leading schools of sociological thought in various 
countries since 1900. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 113 f. Dynamics of Bopulation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1 f or s, and Gen. Ill f, or consent of instructor. 

Causes of population growth and decline; major population migrations; 
population pressure and international problems; eugenic factors; statistical 
analyses of population trends in the United States. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

(Joslyn.) 

Soc. 115 f. The Village (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, junior stand- 
ing. An extra term paper will be required of each post-graduate student. 

The evolution of the American village; present day social structure and 
functions of the village; an analysis of village population; the relationship 
of the village to urban and open-country areas; village planning. (Manny.) 

Soc. 150 s. Field Practice in Social Work (2). Open only to sociology 
majors upon consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available 
opportunities. 

Supervised field work of various types suited to the needs of the indi- 
vidual students. (Manny.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201 f or s. Sociological Resea/rch (2-4). Credit proportional to 
work accomplished. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 
compiled data. (Staff.) 

Soc. 202 f or s. Seminar in Sociological Theories (2). 

Assigned topics for discussion, dealing primarily with major sociological 
theories and problems. Designed for major students in the department of 
Sociology. ( Staff. ) 

SPEECH 

Professor Richardson; Assistant Professors Ehrensberger, Lorenz; 

Miss Abbiati. 

Speech 1 y. Reading and Speaking (2) — One lecture. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speak- 
ing; reference readings, short reports, etc. Opportunities of Speech Clinic 
open to students. Required of all four year students. Each semester of 
this course will be repeated in the following semester. 

294 



Speech Clinic — No credit. 

Speech examinations; training in speech and voice; remedial work in 
minor speech difficulties. The work of the Clinic is conducted in individual 
conferences and in small group meetings. Hours are arranged by con- 
sultation with the respective instructors. 
SPEECH 2y. Fundamentals of Speech (4)— Two lectures. 
Studies in the bases and mechanics of speech. Emphasis on voice and 
Miction This course does not deal with public speaking exclusively; it is 
concerned with the whole speech function in private as well as public 
manifestations. It is given primarily for students who expect to do exten- 
sive work in speech. Any student electing this course may take it con- 
currently with or after completing Speech 1 y. 
SPEECH 3 f. Advanced Public Speaking (2)— Two lectures. 
Advanced work on basis of Speech 1 y, with special applications and adap- 
tations. At each session of the class a special setting is given for the 
speeches-civil, social, and political organizations, etc., and organizations m 
the fields of the prospective vocations of the different students. When a 
student has finished this course he will have prepared and delivered one or 
more speeches which would be suitable and appropriate before any and all 
bodies that he would probably have occasion to address in after-life. 
SPEECH 4 s. Advanced Public Speaking (2)— Two lectures. 
Continuation of Speech 3 f . 

SPEECH 5 f. Oral Technical English (2)— Two lectures. 
The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, etc., on both technical 
and general subjects. This course is especially adapted to the needs of 
engineering students. Required of all sophomore engineering students. 

SPEECH 6y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2)— One lecture. 

This course is a continuation of Speech 5 f. Special emphasis upon 
engineering projects that fall within the student's own experience. Class 
discussion and criticism of all speeches and reports. Required of all 
junior engineering students. 

SPEECH 7y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2)— One lecture. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 6 y. Work not confined to class 
room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies 
in the University and elsewhere. Senior seminar. For senior engineering 
students only. 

Speech 9f. Extempore Speaking (1)— One lecture. 

Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects^ 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. Training m parliamentary 
law. 

295 



Speech 10 s. Extempore Speaking (l)~One lecture. 
Continuation of Speech 9 f . 

Speech 11 f. Argumentation (2)— -Two lectures. 

This course stresses not formal debating, but forms of persuasion which 
will be useful m business and professional life. It deals, to a great extent 
with ways in which human beliefs and behavior may be influenced by logical 
discussion. J 6 ax 

Speech 12 s. Argumentation (2) —Two lectures. 
Continuation of Speech 11 f. 

Speech 13 f. Oral Reading (l)-~One lecture. 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of 
literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 
Speech 14 s. Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. 
Continuation of Speech 13 f. 

Speech 15 f. Advanced Oral Reading (l)~One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Speech 13 f or 14 s or the equivalent (if work is entirely satisfactory) 
Advanced work in oral interpretation. 

Speech 16 s. Advanced Oral Reading (l)~One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Speech 13 f or 14 s (if work is entirely satisfactory) or the equivalent. 
Continuation of Speech 15 f. 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors Pierson, Truitt; Associate Professor Phillips; Mr. Burhoe, 

Dr. Newcombe, Mr. Stull. 

ZOOL. Is. General Zoology (4) —Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory course which is cultural and practical in its aim It 
deals with the basic principles of animal development, structure, relation- 
ships, and activities, a knowledge of which is valuable in developing an 
appreciation of the biological sciences. Typical invertebrates and a mam- 
malian form are studied. 

ZooL. 2f. Elements of Zoology (3)~-Two lectures; one demonstration. 

A course for the student who desires a general knowledge of the prin- 
cipes underlying the growth, development, and behavior of certain animals, 
mcludmg man. 

ZooL. 3f. Invertebrate Morphology (4)-~Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Required of students whose major is zoology and of premedical 
students. 

This course consists in a study of the comparative morphology of selected 
invertebrate groups. 

296 



ZooL. 4s. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain classes. Required 
of students whose major is zoology and of premedical students. 

ZooL. 5 s. Economic Zoology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, one course 
in zoology and one course in botany. 

The content of this course will center around the problems of preserva- 
tion, conservation, control, and development of the economic wild life with 
special reference to Maryland. The lectures will be supplemented by 
assigned readings and reports. 

This course, combined with Zool. 6 s, should form a part of the basic 
training for professional foresters, game proctors, and conservationists. 

ZoOL. 6 s. Field Zoology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, one course in zoology and one in botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis upon insects and 
certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, environment, and economic im- 
portance. Intended for teachers of biology, and also for those who have a 
special interest in nature study and outdoor life. 

ZooL. 12 f. Animal Histology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology, 

A study of animal tissues and the technic involved in their preparation 
for microscopic examination. 

ZooL. 15 f. Human Physiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Not 
open to freshmen. 

For students who desire a knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. 
Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, circulation, respira- 
tion, and reproduction. 

ZooL. 16s. Human Physiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Not 
open to freshmen. 

Similar to Zool. 15 f. Primarily for home economics students. 

ZoOL. 20 s. Vertebrate Embryology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Limited to thirty students. Consent 
of instructor must be obtained before registration. Required of students 
whose major is zoology. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day. 

Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ZooL. 101 f or s. Mannmalian Anatomy (3) — Three laboratories. Regis- 
tration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. Recommended for 
premedical students, for those whose major is zoology, and for prospective 
teachers of science in higYi schools. (Pierson.) 

297 



ZooL. 102 s or f. Mammalian Anatomy (3)— Three laboratories. 

A continuation of Zool. 101 f or s. (Pierson 

Zool. 103 f and s. General Animal Physiology (6) -Two lectures- on,> 
laboratory. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in vert"! 
?rt ^Tk '"^;. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of instruc- 
tor must be obtained before registration for either semester. 

The first semester work deals with the principles of cellular and general 
physiology; the second semester is devoted to an application of these prin- 
ciples to the higher animals. (Pldlli s ) 

Zool. 105 y. Aguiculture (4) -One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, one course in zoology. i^ieiequi 

A comprehensive consideration of the properties of natural waters which 
render them suitable as environments for animals. (Truitt.) 

•uSs "^^' '^'"*'^' ^^"^ (2) -One session. Not open for credit to 

I^views, reports, and discussions of current literature. Required of all 
students whose major is zoology. /g^^^ ^ 

Zool. 108 f and s. Faunistic Zoology (6) -Two lectures; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, a knowledge of invertebrate and vertebrate morphology. 

Classification, distribution, and habitat studies of animals in which local 
forms are stressed for purpose of illustration. (Newcombe.) 

. ,^°?.'- ".^^.i "2 s Human Osteology (2-6) -A laboratory course. Reg- 
istration hmited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 

A descriptive study of the human skeleton. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

(Pierson.) 

Zool. 120s. Ammal Genetics (3)~Two lectures; one laboratory. Per- 
mission of the instructor must be obtained before registration. 

The fundamental principles of heredity and variation. While primarily 
of interest to students of biology, this course will be of value to those inter- 
ested m the humanities. Required of students whose major is zoology who 
do not have credit for Gen, 101 f. (Burhoe.) 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200 y. Marine Zoology (6)— One lecture; two laboratories. 
Problems in salt water animal life of the higher phyla. (Truitt.) 

Zool. 201 y. Advanced Vertebrate Morphology (6)-~0ne lecture; two 
laboratories. 

Comparative morphology of selected organ systems of the important 

vertebrate classes. /p;™^^ \ 

(Jrierson.) 

298 



Zool. 203 y. Advanced Embryology (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology and development of 
animals. Opportunity will be given for individual research. (Burhoe.) 

Zool. 204 y. Advanced Animal Physiology (6) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal 
life. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 205 y. Biology of Marine Organisms (6) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Biotic, physical, and chemical factors of the marine environment, includ- 
ing certain fundamental principles of oceanography. Special reference 
is made to the Chesapeake Bay region. (Newcombe.) 

Zool. 206 y. Research — Credit to be arranged. (Staff.) 

CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, is 
on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University in co- 
operation with the Maryland Conservation Department, Goucher College, 
Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Maryland College, 
and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to afford a center for 
wild life research and study where facts tending toward a fuller apprecia- 
tion of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The program projects 
a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake region. 

The laboratory is open from June until September, inclusive; and during 
the summer of 1937 courses will be offered in the following subjects : Algol- 
ogy, Experimental Zoology, Physiology, Diatoms, Economic Zoology, Inver- 
tebrate Zoology, Biological Problems. 

These courses, of three credit hours each, are for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates. They cover a period of six weeks. Not more 
than two courses may be taken by a student, who must meet the require- 
ments of the Department of Zoology as well as those of the Laboratory 
before matriculation. Each class is limited to five matriculants. Students 
working on special research problems may establish residence for the entire 
summer period. 

Laboratory facilities, boats of various types fully equipped (pumps, nets, 
dredges, and other apparatus), and shallow water collecting devices are 
available for the work without extra cost to the student. 

For full information consult special announcement, which may be ob- 
tained by applying to R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



299 



SECTION IV 
DEGREES, HONORS, STUDENT REGISTER 

DEGREES CONFERRED. 1935-1936 



HONORARY DEGREES 

Charles Henry Davis, Doctor of Engineering 
Fred Pierce Corson, Doctor of Letters 

HONORARY CERTIFICATES OF MERIT 

Revon Samuel Dillon t. 

r„.„r,, „ Fred Carroll Jones 

CHARLES SiEGWART 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 

William Henry Anderson Dissertation: 

M THOMAS Bartram Dissertation: 

A.R^Pennsylvania State College, "The Detection and Significance of 

M.S.University of Maryland. 1931 ^'b^:^ZTm^'''''' ^^°"" 

William Parsons Campbell Dissertation: 

A.B. St. John^s Colleere. 1931 «tv,« r\ j i.- ^ 

M.S. University of Ma^land. 1933 JritdeHn » '"" I^^^-dation of 

Reginaij, Scott Dean Dissertation : 

B.S University of Missouri, 1915 "Physicochemical Nature of Metal 
M.S. University of Missouri. 1916 lie Interfaces." 

ARTHUR P. DUNNIGAN Dissertation: 

B.S University of Maryland, 1930 "Factors Affecting the Growth and 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 Visibility of LactobacHlusTddoph 

ilus." 
H^RY Marean Duvall Dissertation : 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1932 "The Selenium Dehydrogenation of 

Ursolic Acid. (Part 1.) 
The Preparation of Methoxy Acetal- 
dehyde. (Part 2.)" 

300 



William Ellsworth Evans, Jr. Dissertation: 

B.S. George Washington Univer- "A Comparative Study of the Phar- 

sity, June, 1929 macological Properties of Isoar- 

M.S. George Washington Univer- temisin, Santoninamine, and San- 

sity, October, 1929 tonin." 

EiNAR Philip Flint Dissertation: 

B.S. University of Washington, 1930 "The Ternary System Lime-Boric 
M.A. George Washington Univer- Oxide- Silica." 

sity, 1932 

WiLLARD Theodore Haskins Dissertation: 

B.Chem. Cornell University, 1930 "The Selenium Dehydrogenation of 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 Friedelinol. (Part 1.) 

The Bromination of Friedelin. (Part 
2.)" 

Arthur Bucher Hersberger Dissertation: 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1932 "Asphaltenes in Lubricating Oils." 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 

Casimir Thaddeus Ichniowski Dissertation: 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of "The Bioassay of Digitalis with 

Maryland, 1930 Observations on the pH Factor." 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 

Joseph Raymond Kanagy Dissertation: 

B.S. Westminster College, 1928 "The Heat of Solution and Some 

A.M. Oberlin College, 1930 Partial Molal Quantities of the 

Constituents in Aqueous Solutions 
of the Decahydrate of Solium Tet- 
raborate." 

Jacob Martin Lutz Dissertation: 

B.S. Michigan State College, 1928 "Physiological Factors Influencing 

the Ripening of Kieffer Pears." 

OLE Anker Nelson Dissertation: 

B.S. North Dakota Agricultural "Calcium Arsenates — an Investiga- 
College, 1918 tion into the Three Component 

M.S. Princeton University, 1919 System: Calcium Oxide - Arsenic 

Oxide, and Water." 

William Ward Pigman ' Dissertation: 

B.S. George Washington Univer- "Some Derivatives of D-Talose." 

sity, 1932 
M.S. George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1933 

Harry Rosen Dissertation: 

B.S. in Pharmacy, George Wash- "The Pharmacology of Pyrethrum 

ington University, 1931 Flowers." 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 

301 



Clarence Emil Steinbauer 
B.S. University of Minnesota, 1930 
M.S. University of Minnesota, 1931 

Harry Allen Teitelbaum 
B,S, University of Maryland, 1929 



Ross C. Thompson 
B.S. Colorado State College, 1923 
M.S. Colorado State College,' 1925 

Mark Winton Woods 
B.S. University of Maryland, 1931 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 



Dissertation : 

"Studies on the Rest Period of 
Tubers of the Jerusalem Artichoke 
(Helianthus Tuberosus, L.)" 

Dissertation : 
"The Effect of Posterior Lobe Ex- 
tract, Adrenalin, and Pilocarpine 
on the Response of the Thyroid 
Gland to the Thyreo-Activator Hor- 
mone of the Anterior Lobe of the 
Hypophysis." 

Dissertation : 

"Genetic Relations of Some Color 
Factors in Lettuce (Lactuca Sativa 
and L. Scariola).'* 

Dissertation: 
"The Nucleolus in Tulipa." 



Evelyn Fuller Ballou 
Genevieve Spence Blew 2. 
Edward M. Custis 
William Claggett Dorsey 
Joseph Tevya Elvove 
Jean Grace Hamilton 
Mildred Ives 
Jane Wright Jack 



Master of Arts 

Olga Christina Lofgren 
Irma MoCauley 
Francis Everett Meredith 
Donoho Herbert Francis Mitchell 
Cecil Schutt 
Perry Oliver Wilkinson 
Charles W. Williams 



Master 

John Bruen Bartlett 

Frances F. Beck 

William Everett Bell 

Melvin F. W. Dunker 

John Hartshorn Eiseman 
Guy Watson Gienger 
Henry George Harns 
Elizabeth Edge Haviland 
George Lawrence Kalousek 
Herman Kessler 



of Science 

George Peter Lachar 
Alice Roosevelt Lee 
KoY William Lennartson 
George Bergin Reynard 
Erna Marta Riedel 
Harold George Shirk 
Hutton Davison Slade 
Ralph Charles Williams 
Paschal Philip Zapponi 



COLLEGE OP AGRICULTURE 
Bachelor of Science 

Howard Franklin Allard Fitz James Bartlett 

John Walker Bailey — ^ahllett 



William Francis Boarman 



Arthur Rodbird Buddington 
Bernard E. Buscher 
Harry Clifton Byrd, Jr. 
Edward Pendelton Carter 
Chester Marvin Cissel 
Harry Webstior Clark 
Charles Clayton Croft 
Walter Moulden Eiker 
John House Fales 
William Northam Garrott 
Grace-Louise Greenwood 
Wayne Brooks Hamilton 
George Elliott Harrington 
William Howard Henderson 
Thomas Jacob Hoshall 
Elizabeth Lauretta Huntington 
George Bond Hughes, Jr. 
Paul H. Imphong 
A. Wilson King 



Harry Pearce Maccubbin 
Elmer Louis Mayer 
Arnon Lewis Mehring, Jr. 
Oscar Johnathon Miller 
Paul Elsworth Mullinix 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. 
♦John Thomas Presley 
Joseph Frank Puncochar 
Garnett Dunlap Radebaugh 
Herman F. Ramsburg 
Joseph Warren Sisson, Jr. 
Elsie May Sockrider 
Clarence Grayson Stevens 
Elizabeth Lane Toole 
James Henry Vawter 
William Campbell Warfield 
James Logan Weber 
Jack Wolk 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 



Dorothy Verna Allen 
Herbert Duvall Ambrose 
June Barnsley 
Paul E. Benjamin 
Samuel Emory Bogley 
William Beall Bowie 
John Herbert Brill 
Charles Leland Callahan 
Edward Francis Cave 
Mildred Frances Chapin 
Corbin Carroll Cogswell, Jr. 
* George Leslie Crossley 
George Bernard Dantzig 
Mildred Davidson 
Dorothy Catherine Donovan 
Frank Patrick Duggan 
Ernest Risley Eaton, Jr. 
Charles Edward Edmondson 
Joseph A. Ellis 
Louis Augustus Ennis, Jr. 
Theodore Henry Erbe 
Ralph Irving Evans 



302 



'Degree conferred September, 1935. 



John Howard F arson 
Ethel Alice Fisher 
Charles Raymond Fowler 
Harold Bernard Friedman 
Raymond Jensen GtoODHART 
William John Graham, Jr. 
Marjorie Rae Grin STEAD 
IsiDOR Handler 
George Cook Hart 
James Francis Hart, Jr. 
Frederic Jennings Haskin, Jr. 
Caleb Richard Hathaway 

♦TiLGHMAN SeWELL HUBBERT 

Herbert Souder Hyatt 
William Kenneth Karow 
Katherine Eleanor Kesler 
Henry Rudolph Kozloski 
Edward John Lipin 
Robert Grant Litschert 
Richard H. Love 
Harry Joseph Lynn 
Kenneth Ross Mason 



303 



Richard Howard Maurer 

Lyman Randolph McAboy 

Sidney Payne McFerrin 

Mary Lynn McIntire 

Samuel William Hubbard Meloy 

Eleanor Lilian Meyer 

Dorothy H. Miles 

David Miller 

Jean Miller 

Rebecca Charlotte Miller 

Edward Martin Minion, Jr. 

Miriam Louise Moreland 

WiLFORD E. NeVIUS 

Nancy Lee Norment 
E. Anne Padgett 
Marion Elizabeth Parker 
Frances Kathryn Powell 
Anna Marie Laura Quirk 
Betty Claire Quirk 
Sol M. Reicher 
Robert Titus Reid 



James Lambert Rintoul, Jr. 
John MacDonald Robb 

*James Clagett Robertson, Jr. 
Thomas Elbert Robertson 
Alton Leffingwell Sanford 
Hugh Harris Saum, Jr. 
George Henry Schaffer, Jr. 
Ruth Simon 
Elwood Vincent Stark 
John Edward Starr 
Robert Walker Thomas 
L. W. Tucker, Jr. 
William Franklin Waller 
Cornelius Whalin 

♦Esther Magruder Whitacre 
Charles Gordon Whiteford 
Daniel DeWalt Willard 
George Lewis Williamson 
Meredith Richardson Wilson 
Roy Hamilton Yowell 



Bachelor of Science 



John James Abrahams, Jr. 

David Henry Baldwin, Jr. 

Edmund George Beacham 

Lester Brooks 

Charles Lamburn Cogswell 
♦John Roebling Deppish 
♦Richard Harris Flowers 

Sylvan Ellis Form an 

Nathan Gammon, Jr. 
♦Luther Chase Goldman 

George Smith Grier, III 

Lewis Henry Jannaronb 

William Reed Jones 
♦Philip Brock Keitlen 

Samuel Ager Leishear 

W11LIA.M Harvey Leitch 

Solomon Love 

Homer David Lung 

Hattie Louise Maddox 
♦Jacob Mandel 



Alvin Francis Meyer 
Guy Edward Murray 
Morris H. Reich 
Carl Eliot Rothschild 
Mortimer Ruben 
Edwin Russel Ruzicka 
Jerome Gerald Sacks 
Frederick William Sibling, Jr. 
Milton Small 
James Brady Smith 
Leonard Smith 
Walter Soltanoff 
Harman L. Spencer 
Herbert X. Spiegel 
♦Howard Stackhouse 
William Alexander Stanton 
William Wilson Williams 
John Kavanaugh Wolfe 
Harold Kenneth Young 



* Degree conferred September, 1935. 



804 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



PATRICK LOUIS ANDREORIO 

Theodore George Arends 

GEORGE J. BAYLIN 

Kenneth Earl Blanchard 

John Bonante 

LEO Brodie 

I. Norton Brotman 

Herbert Samuel Brown 

Stuart George Buppert 

Howard Allen Carrill 

H. Milton Cooper 

Lance Nathaniel Corbin 

James Leopold Corthouts 
John William Cronin 
William Frank Decesarb 
Michael Joseph DiGristine 
Eugene Joseph Dionne 
Terrence David Donohue 
Marvin Ratledge Evans 
William August Fischer 
Samuel Friedman 

ISADORE GLASER 

Solomon Goldberg 
ALVIN A. Greenberg 
Robert Edward Hampson 
Samuel Hanik 
Lawrence Harris 
Carlotta Augusta Hawley 
Ralph Warren Hodges 
Elmer Norman Hoffman 

Morris Horowitz 

Donald Scott Hunter 

Michael Impresa 

Byron Wallace Inman 

Bernard Jerome 

Samuel Burke Johnston, III 

Vernon Delbert Kaufman 

Otto Guido Klotz 

Louis Kreshtool 

William Kress 



Bruno Leon Kuta 

Henry Arthur Lacher 

Roland Paul Leahy 

Louis Levin son 

Meye» Lewis Levy 

Henry Berton McCauley, Jr. 

Joseph Francis Metz, Jr. 

Everett Nelson Meyer 

Louis Milobsky 

Harry William Mitten, 2nd 

Frank Muller 

James Richard Myers 

Norman Frederick Myers 

Gerald Maher Niebergall 

Herbert Orman 

Ray Sidna Paskell 

Wn^LiAM Charles Christopher 

Philpot, Jr. 
Ralph Raymond Racicot 
Merchline Mills Riddlesberger 
Wesley Edward Rogler 
Harold Rosen 
Herbert Sabloff 
Alexander Schoenbrun 
Daniel David Schwartz 
John Hinton Shackelford 
Abe Alvin Shapiro 
Lewis Hamilton Shipman 
Edward Silverman 
William Francis Sullivan 
John Robert Switzer, Jr. 
Leonard Joseph Tarant 
Garrison Trupp 
Edward Albert Tully 
Francis Casimir Tyburski 
James Arthur Walker 
William Thomas Walsh 
Herbert Milton Weinstein 
Robert Wien 
Alvaro Zea Hernandez 



805 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



John Joseph Asero 
♦Frances Stabler Bartram 

Lionel Burgess 

Lois Theodora Edmunds 

Velma Barr Edwards 

Mary Catherine Fisher 

Mell Ford 

Conrad George Gebelein 

Routh Virginia Hickey 

Mary Cornelia Keller 

Catherine Patricia Kenny 

Walter George Lohr 
♦John Michael Joseph McKenna 



♦Julia Waters Milliken 

Mary Evelyn Morrison 
♦Mary Elizabeth Mulligan 

Everett Hollister Northrop 

Ruth Euzabeth Parker 

Aileen Moore Rohr 

Marion Jean Rowland 
♦Joseph Shefp 

Florence Small 

Dorothy Mae Smith 

Elizabeth Blakistone Thompson 

Bernard Orr Yonkers 



William Robert Beall 
Mary Elizabeth Beitler 
Willis Alton Benner 
Margaret Doane Blake 
Edith Long Brechbill 
♦Carl Allen Carlson 
ViRGiNu Conner 
'^Jerome Denaburg 
Wilbur Irving Duvall 
Warren R. Evans 
Edith D. Forshee 
David Friedman 
* Catherine Roe Green 
Dorothy Elizabeth Hande 
Jack Masters Herbsleb 
Palmer Frey Hess 
♦Margaret Carolyn Jones 
Mary Kemp 
I. William Lustbader 
Blanche Lee Lyddane 



Bachelor of Science 



Polly Hillman Mayhew 
Laura Anita McComas 
Cathryn Elizabeth MoFarland 
William Edward Merrill 
L Earl Over 
Margaret Adele Posey 
Ida Fay Reuling 
George Henry Sachs 
Leora Lara way Sanford 
Ruth White Sessions 
RaymoxNd Karl Shank 
Robert Webster Slye 
♦Mary Emily Margaret Smith 
MiLO Wilcox Sonen 
Kathryn Marie Terhune 
Evelyn Chatham Turner 
Virginia Price Turner 
Christine Louise Wall 
John Rowley Weld 
Claire E. Zerman 



Frank Albert Ceskey 
Julius Yale Clayman 
Milton Jaye Dickman 
Bernard Glatt 
Manuel Quezon Goldstein 



Bachelor of Science 
Industrial Education 



^Degree conferred September, 1935. 



John Joseph Grimes 
William John Hucksoll 
Julia Raspe Jolly 
Erwin Clark Mahannah 
Ernest Burley Marx 



Howard Conrad Muller 

Clarence Carl Rohde 

Charles Edward Pohlman Scott 

Teachers' 

John Joseph Asero 
♦Frances Stabler Bartram 

William Robert Beall 

Willis Alton Benner 
* Stanley Dowdell Brown 
*John Joseph Cadden 

Chester Marvin Cissel 

Virginia Conner 

Wilbur I. Duvall 

Lois Theodora Edmunds 

Velma Barr Edwards 

Warren R. Evans 

Mary Catherine Fisher. 

Mell Ford 

David Friedman 

Harold Bernard Friedman 

Conrad George Gebelein 

Dorothy Elizabeth Hande 

William Howard Henderson 

Jack Masters Herbsleb 

Routh Virginia Hickey 

Ruth Allen Hunt 

Mary Cornelia Keller 

Homer David Lung 

L William Lustbader 

Blanche Lee Lyddane 

Polly Hillman Mayhew 

Laura Anita McComas 



Robert L. Smith 
George Lochard W^ebster 

Diplomas 

Cathryn Elizabeth McFarland 

Mary Lynn McIntire 

William Edward Merrill 

Dorothy H. Miles 
♦Julia Waters Milliken 

Miriam Louise Moreland 
*Mary Elizabeth Mulligan 

Paul Elsworth Mullinix 

Nancy Lee Norment 

Everett Hollister Northrop 

I. Earl Over 

Ruth Elizabeth Parker 

Margaret Adele Posey 

Florence Roberta Rea 

Ida Fay Reuling 

Aileen Moore Rohr 

Marion Jean Rowland 

George Henry Sachs 

Leora Lara way Sanford 

Raymond Karl Shank 
♦Joseph Sheff 

Dorothy Mae Smith 

Kathryn Marie Terhune 

Elizabeth Blakistone Thompson 

Evelyn Chatham Turner 

Virginia Price Turner 

John Rowley Weld 

Claire E. Zerman 



4 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineer 

Raymond Douglas Blakeslee George Edward Taylor, Jr. 

Theodore John Vandoren, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science 

Carroll Shryock Anderson Harry Veigel Bryan, Jr. 

John B. Armentrout Noel Oker Castle 

Raymond Frederick Bartelmes John Fout Christhilf 
Andrew Bennie Beveridge 
Roger Thurman Bollman 
James Gardner Brooks 
Bennard Foreman Bruns 



Leon Bixby Davis 
Brady James Dayton, Jr. 
John Monroe Firmin 
Louis Francis Flagg 



II 



306 



'Degn*ee conferred September, 1935. 



307 



Robert Barnhart Foley 
Selby McKay Frank 
Joseph H. Galliher, Jr. 
Lewis Thomson Gibbs 
Austin James Hall, Jr. 
Richard E. Hardie 
William Audley Hart 
Robert L. Hen sell 
Peter Frost Hilder 
William T'homas Johnson 
Paul Leonard King 
Henry Gerod Knoche 
Richard Louis Lutz 
John Foster Maynard 
Andrew Galbreath McConnell 
Fred H. Menke 



Philip Lawrance Mossburg, Jr. 
Bernard Andrew O'Neill 
Louis Park 

Lyle Franklin Parratt 
Jack Wendell Philups 
Charles William Poole 
William Montgomery Reading, Jr. 
James Stephen Rimmer 
Gordon Walter Robertson 
Howard Oglesby Robinson 
Edwin Leith Ruppert 
James Wilson Shipley 
Howard Melvin Steen 
Henry Christian Strobel 
Richard Edward Volland 
Walter Zuk 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Catherine Elizabeth Aitcheson 

Frances Benedict 

LUCILE Bowker 

Mildred Ev'elyn Carlton 

Mary Ruth Cross 

Nellie Rebekah Fouts 

Betty Jane Goss 



Jeanette Ruth Merritt 
Dorothy Hamilton Patterson 
Florence Roberta Rea 
Mary Virginia Taylor 
Carolyn Louise Vogt 
Ruth Eleanor Wellington 
Virginia Lamond White 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Law 



William French Blake 
fEDWARD Shoemaker Boylston 

Calvin Linwood Brinsfield 
t Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll 

Chesnut 
fERNEST Collins Clark 

Elbert Hubbard Cohen 

Frank Smith Depro 

John Maxwell Dickey 

John Dudley Digges 

Elizabeth Boys Doub 
♦Joseph Mannion Galvin 

Norman Bentley Gardiner, Jr. 

Herbert David Hamburger 

Edwin Maxwell Horchler 



t With honor. 
■Degree conferred September, 1935. 



Clarence Harlan Hurlock, Jr. 
fJosEPH O. Kaiser 
Sharpe D. Karper 
Clarence Wesley Lung 
Thomas Albert Lurz 
Samuel James Macaluso 
Bernard Manekin 
James Gordon McCabe 
James Joseph McGrath, Jr. 
IRVIN Israel Miller 
Sydney Boroh Miller 
John Joseph Moran, Jr. 
Harold Edward Naughton 
John Francis deValangin Patrick 
Carl Pergler 



308 



IWILLIAM Bernard Rafferty 
John Norris Renneburg 
Julius Christian Renninger, Jr. 
James Albert Roney, Jr. 
Randolph Schamberg Rothschild 
Joseph Crandell Russell 
fHARRY Donald Schwaab 

IFREDERICK J. SiNGLEY, JR. 

Everett Irving Smith 

William Benton Stansbury, Jr. 

w 



Daniel Stephen Sullivan, Jr. 
Henry Joseph Tarantino 

fjAMES ROYALL TiPPETT, JR. 

Bernard Monaham Verlin 

Robert Allen Waidner 
tCARL William Watchorn 

Horace Pritchard Whitworth, Jr. 
fHowARD Graham W^ood 

Thomas Gorsuch Young, Jr. 



Certificate of Proficiency 



Albert Constable 
George Hyde Engeman 



SCHOOL OF 
>» Doctor of 



Abraham Louis Batalion 
Frances Beck 
reid Lafeal Beers 
Milton Bernstein 
Roland Essig Bieren 
Harold Thomas Booth 
Harry Clay Bowie 
James Harry Bunn, Jr. 
Irving Burka 
Harold Hubert Burns 
Jerome Kermit Burton 
Joseph Edgar Bush 
Andrew Long Chesson 
Carroll Lockard Conley 
George Joseph Coplin 
Vladimir Frantisek Ctibor 
Leo Michael Curtis 
Nacham Davidson 
George Howey Davis 
Seymour Ralph Deehl 
Stuart Watt Dittmar 
Darius McClelland Dixon 
Joseph Drozd 
Jerome Feldman 
John Edward Fissel, Jr. 
Lester Mitchel Fox 
Philip Lair Franklin 
Michael Garland Frich 

tWith honor. 



Campbell Lloyd Stirling 
Vincent Alexander Tubman 

MEDICINE 

Medicine 

Marion Howard Gillis, Jr. 
Harry Solomon Gimbel 
Frank Glassner 
Jesse Walter Gordner, Jr. 
David Bernard Greengold 
Philip Orson Gregory 
William Greifinger 
Jaye Jacob Grollman 
Benjamin Herbert Isaacs 
Ceirianog Henry Jones 
Emory Ellsworth Jones, Jr. 
Walter Esselman Karfgin 
Saul Karpel 
Joseph Katz 
Norman Kleiman 
Howard Thomas Knobloch 
Louis Joseph Kolodner 
Louis Joseph Kroll 
Raymond Joseph Lipin 
Robert Morris Lowman 
Grant Lund 

William Kenneth Mansfield 
Louis Robert Maser 
Arthur Franklin McCauley 
Hector Caldwell McKnew, Jr. 
Eugene Robinson McNinch 
James Blessing Moran 
James Patrick Moran 

809 






Benjamin Bernard Moses 
Joseph Robert Myerovitz 
William Myers 
Hansford Dorsey Nester 
Thomas Agnew Nestor 
Morris John Nicholson 
SiGMUND Roman Nowak 
William Aloysius O'Brien, Jr. 
William Andrew Pars 
Richard Heber Pembroke, Jr. 
Salvador Dante Pentecoste 
Carl Pigman 
Samuel Marvin Reichel 
John Henry Reynolds, Jr. 
Gregory Narcisse Rochlin 
Ralph B. Roseman 
Victor Rosenthal 
J. Dan Royster 
George Peter Schmieler 
George Durward Selby 
Lawrence Joseph Shimanek 
William Carey Smith 



Cyril Solomon 
Matthew Sorin 
David Michael Spain 
Millard Fillmore Squires, Jr. 
Milton Stapen 
Samuel Steinberg 
Morris Harold Stern 
Stuart Dos Passos Sunday 
Isaac Terr 

Anthony Joseph Thomas 
Lawrence Matthew Tierney 
Baxter Suttles Troutman 
William Kennedy Waller 
Daniel George Wehner 
Jacob Joseph Weinstein 
Gibson Jackson Wells 
Daniel Wilfson, Jr. 
Arthur Gilbart Wilkinson 
Nathan Wolf 
Charles Sidney Yavelow 
Joseph George Zimring 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Graduate in Nursing 



Vernice Lee Bowling 
Nina Stirling Claiborne 
Frances Emily Connelly 
Margaret Teressa DeLawter 
Ruth Elizabeth Dodson 
Angela Rose Dooley 
Mary Eleanor Fowble 
Marian Elizabeth Heilman 
Norma Louise Johannes 
Mary Catherine Kefauver 
Mary Olree Knoeller 
Grace Elizabeth Lindsay 
Doris Glyspy Lloyd 



Sophie Ann Lubinski 
Annabelle Louise Magaha 
Hazel Almeda Miller 
Marguerite Odom 
Anne Jessup O'Sullivan 
Della Pauline Riley 
Margaret Bowen Rose 
Florence Beryl Smith 
Frances Tayloe 
Lucile Gordon Thomas 
Ruby Jean Thompson 
Virginia Dare Courtney Wicker 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Graduate in Pharmacy 

♦Jesse Solomon 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Daniel Jerome Abramson Melvin Irvin Berkowich 

Frank Albert Bellman Lester Leon Burtnick 



* Degree conferred September, 1935. 



BERNARD Cherry 
Samuel Herbert Cohen 
Irvin David 
Carroll Pross Foster 

ALBERT FREEDMAN 

SYLVAN CHAUNCEY GOODMAN 

William Lehman Guyton 

JOHN Henry Haase 

Ada Chamberlain Hewing 

Asher Hoffman 

Harry Jacobs 

Frank Joseph Jankiewicz 

BERTRAM KAMBER 

Leonard Elliot Kandel 
Gabriel Elliott Katz 
Thomas Carter Kleczynski 

*Lester Norman Kolman 
Benjamin Levin 
Nathan Levin 
Nathan Isaic Liss 
William Randolph Lumpkin 
Bernard Patrick McNamara 
Leonard Carl Molofsky 
Thomas Andrew Moskey, Jr. 
Edith Muskatt 
Alexander Ogurick 
Frank Ronald Paul 



William Platt 

Lawrence William Rachuba 

Sidney H. Reamer 

Harry Bernard Robinson 

Raymond Clarence Vail Robinson 

George Rodney 

Milton Philip Sause 

John Ferdinand Schaefer 

Adam John Schammel 

Charles Vincent Seivcik 

Robert Clay Sheppard 

Sidney Shochet 

Harvey Gerald Silberg 

Sylvan Leonard Silverman 

William Harry Smith, Jr. 

Morris William Steinberg 

Anthony Adolph Survil 

Adam George Swiss 

David Paul Tenberg 

Paul Howard Thompson 

Arnold Tramer 

John Wesley Vondracek 

Arthur Winakur 

Kennard Levinson Yaffe 

Morris Robert Yaffe 

Charles Anthony Youch 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES, 1935-1936 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Fraternity 



310 



Andrew Bennie Beveridge 

Genevieve Spence Blew 

Lucile Bowker 

William Parsons Campbell 

George Bernard Dantzig 

Melvin F. W. Dunker 

Velma Barr Edwards 

Louis Augustus Ennis, Jr. 

Louis Francis Flagg 

EiNAR Philip Flint 

Sylvan Ellis Forman 

Lewis Thomson Gibbs 

Marjorie Rae Grinstead 

Frederic Jennings Haskin, Jr. 

Casimer Thaddeus Ichniowski 

Mary Kemp 

Paul Leonard King 

Richard H. Lo\^ 

I. William Lustbader 



John Foster Maynard 
IRMA McCauley 

Cathryn Elizabeth McFarland 
Arnon Lewis Mehring, Jr. 
Nancy Lee Norment 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. 
Jack Wendell Phillips 
Florence Roberta Rea 
Dorothy Mae Smith 
Leonard Smith 
Elsie May Sockrider 
William Alexander Stanton 
Clarence Emil Steinbauer 
Elizabeth Blakistone Thompson 
Evelyn Chatham Turner 
Virginia Price Turner 
William Campbell Warfield 
William Wilson Williams 



•Degree conferred September, 1935. 



311 



- ! 



Ml 



^ 



Elected Members of Sigma 

Marvin J. Andrews 
M. Thomas Bartram 
John Oliver Burton 
William Parsons Campbell 
Carl L. Davis 
Reginald Scott Dean 
Arthur P. Dunnigan 
Harry Marean Duvall 
Orson N. Eaton 
EiNAR Philip Flint 
WiLLARD Theodore Haskins 



Xi, Honorary Scientific Fraternity 

Albert Bucher Hersberger 
Casimier Thaddeus Ichniowski 
Joseph Raymond Kanagy 
John C. Krantz, Jr. 
Jacob Martin Lutz 
Harold S. McConnell 
William Ward Pigman 
Harry Rosen 
Ross C. Thompson 
H. Boyd Wylie 



Citizenship Medal, offered by Dr H C Rv^^ i-i 

uy Ljr, ti, t.. Byrd, Class of 1908 

LOUIS Augustus Ennis, Jr. 
Citizenship Prize, offered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 

RouTH Virginia Hickey 

Athletic Medal, offered by the Class of 1908 
Louis Augustus Ennis, Jr. 

Maryland Ring, offered by Charles L. Linhardt 

Warren R. Evans 

Goddard Meda. offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard Jan.es 

WiLUAM Campbell Warfield 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 

Thomas Parker Wharton 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 

Shirley Florence Danforth 



Medal and Junior Membership, offered by the American Insti 

Leonard Smith 



itute of Chemists 



Dinah Herman Memorial Medal, offered by Benjamin Berman 

Robert Lee Mattingly 

Mortar Board Cup 
Florence Roberta Rea 

312 



The Diamond Back Medals 



Richard Morton Hunt 
Ruth Eleanor Wellington 
Carl Hubbard Humelsine 



Wyatt Stanley Kennon 
Thomas Elbert Robertson 
Brady James Dayton, Jr. 



The Terrapin Medals 



John Stephen Hebb, III 
Walter George Lohr 



Ruth Kreiter 
Bernice Anne Elus 



The Old Line Medals 



pYKE Johnson 
Theodore Henry Erbe 
Robert Grant Litschert 



Routh Virginia Hickey 
Samuel Acer Leishear 



Special Award for freshman or sophomore excelling in reporting. 

Lawrence Grant Hoover, Jr. 

Governor's Drill Cup 
Company F, Commanded by Cadet Captain Robert Webster Slye 

Military Faculty Award 
Cadet Colonel Louis Augustus Ennis 

Military Department Medals 

Cadet Major Noel Oker Castle Cadet Major John Monroe Firmin 

Cadet Major Andrew Bennie Beveridge 

The Military Medal, offered by the Class of 1899 

Cadet Welch Smith 

Washington Chapter Alumni Military Cup 
First Platoon, Company G, Commanded by Cadet First Lieutenant 

Lewis Thomson Gibbs 

University of Maryland Prize (Flag), to the Best Company Commander 

Cadet Captain Robert Webster Slye 

The Scabbard and Blade Cup, to the Commander of the Winning Platoon 

Cadet First Lieutenant Lewis Thomson Gibbs 

The Military Department Freshman Medals 

Cadet Robert Morton Dobres Cadet Elgin Wayne Scott, Jr. 

Cadet Antonio Charues Bonanno 



813 



i\ 



m 



I 



Gold Medals (Military Band) 
Cadet Ralph Leroy Chilcoat Cadet Presley Allen Wedding 

Squad Competition Gold Medals 

Cadet Corporal George Alfred Cadet John Alexander Krynitsky 

Bowman Cadet Warren Pruden Davis 

Cadet Herbert Scott Young Cadet Robert Halley Boyd 

Cadet Richard Shipley Brashears Cadet Robert Paul Cook 
Cadet Donald Tilghman Fugitt 

The Executive Medal 

Lieutenant Colonel Walter Brooks Bradley 

Sons of American Revolution Medals 



Cadet Thomas Parker Wharton 
Cadet Sergeant Wayne Philip 
Ellis 



Cadet Benjamin Biser Shewbridge 
Cadet Colonel Louis Augustus 

Ennis 



Inter-Collegiate Third Corps Area Silver Medal 
Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen 

Inter- Collegiate Third Corps Area Rifle Bronze Medal 

Cadet Sergeant Raymond Davis, Jr. 

Military Department Gold Medal, University of Maryland Rifle Team 

Cadet Arnon Lewis Mehring 

Military Department G^ld Medal, University of Maryland Freshman 

Rifle Team 

Capet Willard Cecillius Jensen 

WAR DEPARTMENT AWARDS OF COMMISSIONS AS 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 



The Infantry 

Howard Franlin Allard 
Raymond Frederick Bartelmes 
William Robert Beall 
Andrew Bennie Beveridge 
Walter Brooks Bradley 
John Herbert Brill 
Bennard Foreman Bruns 
Arthur Rodbird Buddington 
Hakry Clifton Byrd, Jr. 



Reserve Corps 

Charles Leland Callahan 
Noel Oker Castle 
John Fout Christhilf 
Corbin Carroll Cogswell, Jr. 
Brady James Dayton, Jr. 
Ernest Risley Eaton, Jr. 
Louis Augustus Ennis 
Theodore Henry Erbe 
Warren Rhys Evans 

314 



John Monroe Firmin 
LOUIS Francis Flagg 
William Northam Garrott 
lewis Thomson Gibbs 
Edward Harry Drake Gibbs 
George Edel Gilbert 
Austin James Hall, Jr. 
George Elliott Harrington 
George Cook Hart 
James Francis Hart, Jr. 
William Audley Hart 
Paul Leonard King 
Henry Gerod Knoche 
Melvin Courtney Lankford 
Samuel Acer Leishear 
Harry Joseph Lynn 
Kenneth Ross Mason " 
Sidney Payne McFerrin 
Clark Richardson Miller 
Edward Martin Minion, Jr. 



Joseph Hope Morgan 

Louis Park 

William Appleton Pates 

Alton Eugene Rabbitt 

Ellis Pollock Root 

George Henry Sachs 

Alton Leffingwell Sanford 

Hugh Harris Saum, Jr. 

William Randolph Schneider 

Francis Dodge Shoemaker 
Erwin Henry Shupp 
Joseph Warren Sisson, Jr. 
Robert Webster Slye 
James Brady Smith 
LEONAitD Smith 
Harmon Leake Spencer 
Henry Christian Strobel 
Robert Walker Thomas 
Albert Walter Webb 



HONORABLE MENTION 
College of Agriculture 

WILLIAM CAMPBELL WARFIELD, MICHAEL J. ^^^^^^^^ 
ARNON LEWIS MEHRING, JR., ELSIE MAY SOCKRIDER. 

^ 1 Kyss^ TnnTF Paul Elsworth Mullinix, 

second Honors-E^XH ^^-^jTv^olZ., OscAK John.thok 

MlLUK. 



First Honors — 



College of Arts and Sciences 



First Honors — 



Second Honors — 



wtiliam Wilson Williams, Leonard Smith, Sylvan 

GRINSTEAI,, FREDERIC JENNINGS HASKIN J^- J^J^^^^^ 
ALEXANDER STANTON. LOUIS AUGUSTUS E^NIS JR. 
GEORGE BERNARD DANTZIG, RICHARD H. LOVE, ALVIN 
FRANCIS MEYER, CORNELIUS WHALIN. 

SAMUEL AGER LEISHEAR, CARL ELIOT KOTHSCHILD WAUVm 
SOLTANOFF RUTH SiMON, EDMUND GEORGE BEACHAM, 
THEr^HENRY ERBE, EOWARD FRANCIS C^VE JiARV 
LYNN MCINTIRE, SOLOMON LOVE, DANIEL DeWALT 
WIlLd SOL M. REICHER, ALTON LEFFINGWELL 

Sanford. 



315 



First Honors — 



Second Honors — 



College of Education 

Cathryn Elizabeth McFarland, Velma Barr Edwards 
Virginia Price Turner, Dorothy Mae Smith, Evelyn 
Chatham Turner, Mary Kemp. 

I. William Lustbader, Elizabeth Blakistone THomp 
SON, AiLEEN Moore Rohr, Conrad George Gebelein 
David Friedman. 



Firs t Honors- 



Second Honors — 



College of Engineering 

-Andrew Bennie Beveridge, Jack Wendell Phillips 
Louis Francis Flagg, John Foster Maynard. 

Paul Leonard King, Lewis Thomson Gibbs, James 
Stephen Rimmer, John B. Armentrout, Raymond 
Frederick Bartelmes. 



College of Home Economics 

First Honors— Florence Roberta Rea, Lucile Bowker. 
Second Honors — Mary Ruth Cross. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Ralph Warren Hodges 

Certificates of Honor 

H. MILTON COOPER WILLIAM FRANK DeCESARE 

IIZTt. "^l KAUFMAN SAMUEL BURKE JOHNSTON, HI 

Henry Berton McCauley, Jr. ' 

School of Law 
Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire Course, 

Day School, 
Harry Donald Schwaab 

Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire Course, 

Evening School, 
Howard Graham Wood 

Alumni Prize of $50.00 for Best Argument in Honor Case in the 

Practice Court, 
Frederick J. Singley, Jr. 

316 



George 0. Blome Prizes to Representatives on Honor Case in 

the Practice Court, 

Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll Frederick J. Singley, Jr. 

Chesnut James Royall Tippett, Jr. 

Joseph O. Kaiser 

School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 
George Howey Davis 

Certificates of Honor 



Louis Joseph Kroll 

Harry Clay Bowie 

John Henry Reynolds, Jr. 



Howard Thomas Knobloch 
Gibson Jackson Wells 



The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the Best Work 
in Genito-Urinary Surgery During the Senior Year 

George Durward Selby 

School of Nursing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship Given by the University of Maryland 

Nurses' Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in Administration, 

Supervisory, or Public Health Work at Teachers College, Columbia 

University, to the Student Having the Highest Record in 

Scholarship, 

Grace Elizabeth Lindsay 

The Elizabeth Collins Lee Prize of $50.00 to the Student Having the 

Second Highest Average in Scholarship, 

Angela Rose Dooley 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize of $25.00 for the Highest Average 

in Executive Ability, 

Grace Elizabeth Lindsay 

The Edwin and Leander M. Zimmerman Prize of $50.00 for Practical 
Nursing and for Displaying the Greatest Interest and Sympathy 

for the Patients, 

Angela Rose Dooley 



317 



The University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association Pin and 
Membership in the Association, for Practical Nursing and' 

Executive Ability, 

Margaret Teressa DeLawter 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence 
Bertram Kamber 

The William Simon Memorial Prize for Proficiency in Practical Chemistry, 

Carroll Pross Foster 

The Simon Solomon Prize ($50.00), 
Frank Albert Bellman 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize, 
Paul Howard Thompson 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize, 

Benjamin Levin 



Nathan Levin 



Certificates of Honor 

Alexander Ogurick 
Frank Albert Bellman 



REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 

TRAINING CORPS, 1936-1937 

colonel HAROLD L. KELLY. JR., Commanding 

lieutenant colonel RAYMOND DAVIS, JR.. Second-in-Command 

MAJOR ROBERT O. HAMMERLUND, Regimental Adjutant 

MAJOR WRIGHT G. C ALDER, Regimental Plans and Training Officer 

CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. BOWER, Regimental Training and Liaison Officer 

SECOND LIEUTENANT CARLISLE H. HUMELSINE 

FIRST BATTALION 

MAJOR JOHN J. GORMLEY. Commanding 

CAPTAIN NORMAN HOBBS, Second-in-Command 

SECOND LIEUTENANT CHARLES F. ELLINGER. Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY "A" 

Captain Elmer A. Hennig 
1st Lieut. Herman W. Berger 
2nd Lieut. Norman P. Pat- 
terson 



COMPANY "B" 

Captain Eugene F. Mueller 
1st Lieut. Maurice B. Sin- 

sheimer 
2nd Lieut. M. Luther Brote- 
markle 



SECOND BATTALION 



COMPANY "C" 

Captain Irving P. Mendel- 
sohn 

1st Lieut. Justin D. Paddle- 
ford 

2nd Lieut. J. Wilmer Price, 
Jr. 



MAJOR CHARLES H. COOKE. Commanding 

CAPTAIN ROBERT J. McLEOD, Second-in-Command 

SECOND LIEUTENANT CHARLES H. BEEBE. Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY **D** 

Captain Louis R. Hueper 
1st Lieut. Walter K. Scott 
2nd Lieut. Charles H. Culp 



COMPANY "E" 

Captain Francis M. Bower 
1st Lieut. Edward J. Fletcher 
2nd Lieut. Thomas B. Harry, 
man 



THIRD BATTALION 



COMPANY 



<«i;i»» 



Captain J. Dale Patterson 
1st Lieut. Karlton W. Pierce 
2nd Lieut. John G. Hart 



MAJOR AARON W. WELCH, Commanding 

CAPTAIN JOSEPH S. LANN, Second-in-Command 

SECOND LIEUTENANT WARREN R. BONNETT. Battalion Adjutant 



♦♦ 



COMPANY "G 

Captain Willson C. Clark 
1st Lieut. George B. Kelly 
1st Lieut. R. Bernard 
Graeves 



COMPANY "H" 

Captain Paul E. Pfeiffer 
1st Lieut. Clay M. Webb 
1st Lieut. S. Gordon Wood 



FOURTH BATTALION 



COMPANY "I" 

Captain Alfred W. Ireland 
1st Lieut. Charles S. Furtney 
2nd Lieut. Herman P. Dial 



MAJOR PHILIP FIRMIN, Commanding 

CAPTAIN ALBERT P. BACKHAUS, Second-in-Command 

SECOND LIEUTENANT MAX D. ZANKEL, Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY "K" 

Captain Robert W. Jones 

1st Lieut. Clarence T. Thomason 

2nd Lieut. Charles E. Morgan 



COMPANY "L" 

Captain John S. Shinn 
1st Lieut. John E. Boothe 
1st. Lieut. Alfred B. Pettit 



CADET BAND 

CAPTAIN HARRY A. DOSCH. Commanding 
FIRST LIEUTENANT ALFRED E. SAVAGE 

Band under the direction of Master Sergeant Otto Siebeneichen, Retired, formerly with 
the Army Band, Washington Barracks, Washington, D. C. 



S18 



319 



COMPANY "A" 

Belt, Kenneth G. 



NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

FIRST BATTALION 
COMPANY "B" 



Register of Students, 1936-1937 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Baker, Robert E. 
Bishoff, Frederick M. 



Baker. Herbert W. 
Barnett, Rdbert E. 



COMPANY **D" 



Egan, John J. 



Haimovicz. Joseph P 
Heaton, Charles C. 



Long, Edwin D. 
Lynham, John C. 



COMPANY "G" 



McClesky, Benj. C. 



Keller, Joseph E. 
Mattingly, Robert L. 



Schutz, John L. 
Shaw. Clay W. 



COMPANY "K" 



Owens, Harold M. 



Sisler, Fred D. 
Walton, Robert L. 



Jacobs. John S. 
Thomas, Fred B. 



First Sergeants 
Bowman, George A. 

Platoon Sergeants 

Browning, John R. 
Converse, Henry T. 

Sergeant Guides 
Berry, James B. 
Downey, Charles L. 

SECOND BATTALION 

COMPANY "E" 

First Sergeants 
Guckeyaon, John W. 

Platoon Sergeants 
Hughes, Warren A. 
Jordan, Ralph S. 

Sergeant Guides 

McWilliams, William J. 
Mims, James R. 

THIRD BATTALION 
COMPANY "H" 

First Sergeants 
McFadden, Duncan B. 

Platoon Sergeants 

Putman, Raymond S. 
Reeves, Samuel W. 

Sergeant Guides 
Smith, Harold W. 
Wheeler, Waverly J. 

FOURTH BATTALION 

First Sergeants 

Platoon Sergeants 



Sergeant Guides 



COMPANY "C" 

Bryant, William C. 



Collins, Ralph A. 
DeArmey, Frank T. 



Hay. Perry I. 
Hughes, Fred J. 



COMPANY '*F' 



Headley. L. Coleman 



Keller, Ralph W. 
Peffer. Paul R. 



Moore, John E. 
Mullett, William B. 



COMPANY "r» 



Miller, George P. 



Richardson, Donald W. 
Shearer, Ross W. 



Yourtee, Leon 
Ravenburg, Ralph R. 



COMPANY "L" 



Shewbridge, Benj. B. 



Pierce. Charles H. 
Wolf, John F. 



Peck, Alvin B. 



SENIOR 

Armiger, Walter H., Beltsville 
Bishop, James W., Laurel, Del. 
Boekhoff, Claire L., Chevy Chase 
Bourke, Anne R., Washington. D. C. 
Butler, Henry E., Sudlerville 
Cowgill, William H., Hyattsville 
Crump, Robert T., Frostburg 
Daly, Edmond T., New Brighton, N. Y. 
Dawson, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Fletcher, Edward J., Washington. D. C. 
Fiazer, Mary W.. Washington, D. C. 
Gormley, John J., Chevy Chase 
Guckeyson, John W., Chevy Chase 
Hill. R. Travis, Laurel 
Hobbs, Lewis F., Silver Spring 
Hobson, Barbara E., College Park , 
James, William S., Hancock 
Keller, Charles E., Middletown 
Kirshbaum, Amiel, Washington, D. C. 
Leighty, Raymond V., Arlington, Va. 
Lovell, John C, New Windsor 
Marche. William T.. Hyattsville 



CLASS 

McFadden, Burton M., Hagerstown 
Mendelsohn, Irving P., Washington, D. C. 
Nellis, David C, Takoma Park 
Nezbed, Robert L., Baltimore 
Nolte, William A., Washington, D. C. 
O'Hanlon, Ardle P., Washington, D. C. 
Oitenzio, Louis F.. College Park 
Oswald, Elizabeth J., Chevy Chase 
Pettit, Alfred B.. Hyattsville 
Piquett, Price G., Catonsville 
Babbitt, Alton E., College Heights 
Rodier, John M., Lanham 
Shegogue, Edward R.. Landover 
Stevenson, Elmer C, Takoma Park 
Thomas, Virginia E., Newark, Del. 
Thornton, Eugene, Jr., Chestertown 
Voris, J. Calvin, Laurel 
Wagaman, Kenneth R., Sabillasville 
Watkins, Dayton O., University Park 
Webb. Clay M., Vienna 
Welch, Aaron W., Galena 
Willis, Victor G.. Elkton 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Bowers, Lloyd C, Oakland 
Bowie, Oden, Mitchellville 
Buchholz, James H., Catonsville 
Caplan, Raphael F., Miller Station 
Carter, Henry H., Rockville 
Carver, Ann E., Pernrville 
Clark, Ralph E., Dundalk 
Connelly, John V., Riverdale 
Converse, Henry T., Jr., Beltsville 
Downey, Charles L., Williamsport 
Fisher, Elwood G., Washington, D. C. 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington, D. C. 
Garletts, Merle A., Selby sport 
Gayhart. Harold E., Beltsville 
Gibbs, William E., Hyattsville 
Gilbertson, Warren H., Bladensburg 
Goldsmith, John S.. Allen 
Gottwals, Abram Z., Goldsboro 
Grodjesk, Bernice. Jersey City, N. J. 
Guill, John H., Takoma Park 
Harris, George J., Lonaconing 
Haynes, Anne, Trentcn. Tenn. 



Haynes, Sally, Trenton, Tenn. 

Henkin, Allen E., Washington, D. C. 

Johnston, Frederick A.. Takoma Park 

Kuhn, Albin O., Woodbine 

Lewis, Glenn W., Frederick 

Lung, Ernest H., Smithsburg 

Miller, George P., College Park 

Price, J. Wilmer, Jr., Catonsville 

Ravenburg, Ralph R., Edgewater 

Ruble, Kyle, Poolesville 

Schutz, J. Logan, Washington. D. C. 

Seabold. G. William, Jr., Glyndon 

Shaffer, Charles H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Sisler, Fred D., Washington, D. C. 

Skinner, Calvin L., Sudlersville 

Smith, Harold W., Baltimore 

Steiner, Wilmer W., Washington, D. C. 

Stoddard, David L.. Hyattsville 

Wall, Dorothy S., Catonsville 

Williams, Donald H., Washington, D. C. 

Wintermoyer. J. Paul. Hagerstown 

Yeager, S. Anita, Baltimore 



Astle, Charles C, Rising Sun 
Berkowitz, Melvin, Washington, D. C. 
Brown, Allan H., University Park 
Brownell, James F., Washington. D. C. 
Burnet. James H., Charlottesville, Va. 



820 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Cohen, Charlotte F., E. Orange, N. J. 
Crane, Julian C, College Heights 
Davis, Virginia E.. Washington, D. C. 
DeCecco, James N., Vienna 
Eck, Clarence A., Baltimore 

321 



Egan, John J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Ermold, John G., Ellicott City 
Evans, H. K., Bladensburg 
Galbreath, Paul M., Street 
Gatch, Benton R,, Jr., Baltimore 
Giloane, William, Baltimore 
Gianoly, Louis W., Lanham 
Gordon, Thomas W., Baltimore 
Hauver, Roland T„ Myersville 
Heubeck, Elmer, Jr., Baltimore 
Hite, Norbome A., Port Deposit 
Hopping, Catherine E., Washington, D. C. 
Hughes, Frank W., Washington, D. C. 
Jarrell, William E., Ridgely 
Johnson, Daniel B., Beltsville 
Johnson, Edwin R., Germantown 
Keister, H. Deborah, Hyattsville 
Kilby, Wilson M., Conowingo 
Lee, Whiting B., Hyattsville 
Mangawang, Valentin R., Riverdale 
Martin, Oscar C, Jr., Rockville 
McFarland, Frank R., Jr., Cumberland 
Michlovitz, Louis E., Baltimore 
Miller, Lee A., Hyattsville 

FRESHMAN 

Ahalt, Louis F., Middletown 

Aist, Wilmer F., Jessup 

Aycock, Joseph F., Baltimore 

Bailey, Howard M., Parkton 

Baker, Alva S., Catonsville 

Barber, Charles A., Washington, D. C. 

Beach, Howard, Wisner, La. 

Beane, Roberta A., Bennings, D. C. 

Bosley, Glenn M., Sparks 

Brosius, John W., Jr., Adamstown 

Brown, Robert B., Bethesda 

Burall, Arthur W., Sudlersville 

Butler, W. Mason, Poolesville 

Carl, Edmund O., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Clark, George E., Jr., Havre de Grace 

Cleveland, James W., Jr., Garrett Park 

Connellee, James W., Silver Spring 

Cotterman, Harold F., College Park 

Cox, Martha L., Silver Spring 

Crist, Howard G., Jr., Glenelg 

Darby, Reuben U., Baltimore 

Daugherty, Edward B., Jr., Delmar, Del. 

Dowling, Vernon L.. Annapolis 

Edmonds, Charles S., Clements 

Egnell, Edward W., New Brighton. N. Y. 

Firmin, William E., Washington, D. C. 

Flanigan, John L., Jr.. Baltimore 

Forsyth, Carroll M., Friendsville 

Foster, Vernon R., Parkton 

French, Bernard S., Jr., Baltimore 

Fullington, Page D., Washington, D. C. 

Furr, Daniel O., Middleburg, Va. 

Gray, Jean R., Washington, D. C. 



Miller, Thomas E., Washington, D. O. 
Muma, Martin H., Cumberland 
Nicholls, Robert D., Boyds 
Oakley, Ned H., Washington, D. C. 
Peaslee, Joseph K., Washington, D. C. 
Phelps, Richard N., McDonogh 
Potter, Lloyd A., Bethesda 
Remsberg, George C„ Jr., Middletown 
Schmidt, Edward H., Jr., Seat Pleasant 
Schmier, Charles N., Woodlawn 
Shaw, Clay W., Stewartstown, Pa. 
Stevenson, Frank V., Takoma Park 
Sutton, Richard S., Kennedyville 
Talcott. Ellen E., Washington, D. C. 
Tarbett, Lewis N., Takoma Park 
Tuttle, Ella M., Baltimore 
Wallace, John A., Bethesda 
Ward, Stevenson A., Havre de Grace 
Weber, Ninian B., Oakland 
Willingham, Patricia M., Hyattsville 
Winkler, Fred B., Chevy Chase 
Witt, Detlef J., Anacostia, D. C. 
Wood, Edward P., Baltimore 
Yates, William B., Cambridge 

CLASS 

Gude, John J., Hyattsville 
Hawley, Walter O., Takoma Park 
Hess, Kenneth S., Washington, D. C. 
Hoshall, George W. Parkton 
Hudgins, Charles P., Hyattsville 
James, Lynwood B., Chevy Chase 
Janes, William N., Anacostia, D. C. 
Jehle, John R., Hyattsville 
Keller, J. Hugh, Middletown 
Kelley, James R., Chevy Chase 
Kenney, Francis V., Chevy Chase 
Kerchmar, Alfred, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Kluge, Gordon L., Washington, D. C. 
Koontz, Robert K., Washington, D. C. 
Krause, Eugene F., Gambrills 
Krause, Robert M., Gambrills 
Laughead, Robert W., Bethesda 
LeRoy, Harold B„ Washington, D. C. 
Lichliter, Lawrence D., Washington, D. C. 
Lips, Robert W., Stevenson 
Mason, Joseph L., Chevy Chase 
McGregor, James A. Worton 
Merritt, Joseph S., Jr., Dundalk 
Miller, Norman A., Brookland, D. C. 
Molineu, James H., Jr., Riva 
Nevares, Oscar W., Baltimore 
Nutter, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Parker, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Pohlhaus, Joseph N., Baltimore 
Punnett, Ruth S., Leonia, N. J. 
Rea. William, Washington, D. C. 
Redding, William V., Street 
Rice, Floyd E., Takoma Park 



Ritzenberg, Albert. Washington, D, C. 
Bobbins, Maclntyre C, Washington, D. C. 
Rudy, Arthur M., Middletown 
Ryan', Hilda H., Washington, D. C. 
Sanders, William R.. Sunbury, Fa. 
Sanner. Staley V., Frederick 
Saperstein, Paul, Baltimore 
Scherer. Charles R., Towson 
Schoolfield, William H., Pocomoke 
Scoville, Raymond M., Silver Spring 
Sheibley, David F., Newport, Pa. 
Smith, Temple C Greensboro 
Stabler, Virginia N., Ashton 
Stevens, Edgar T., New Market 



Stevens, Robert L., Street 

Swann, Agnes H., Leonardtown 

Swartz, Carlyle O., Laurel 

Taylor, Frank W., Ridgely 

Valenstein, Murray A., Baltimore 

Wardman, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 

Weyrich. William H., Jr.. Washington, 

D. C. 

Winter, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 
Wood, Edgar W., Washington, D. C 
Wright, Arthur E., Washington, D. C. 
Young, James G., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, Robert E., Ellicott City 
Zipkins, Norman N., Capitol Heights 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Baynes, William C, Washington, D. C. 

Bruns, Lawrence A., Relay 

Donnally, Bessie S., Washington, D. C. 

Fitz water. Earl W., Swanton 

Hough, Louise S., Sandy Spring ^ 

Kramer, Amihud, Baltimore 

Lieber, Paul I., Baltimore 



Miles, Churchill F., Arlington, Va. 

Rogers, William I., Beltsville 

Roop, Clara I., Union Bridge 

Stabler, Nathan, Baltimore 

Wilcox, Marguerite S., Washington, D. C. 

Wise, Sarah E., Relay 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SENIOR CLASS 



Amiss, Helen C, Chevy Chase 
Athey, Thomas B., Jr., Severna Park 
Avery, John L., Washington, D. C. 
Balch, Clyde W., Hyattsville 
Beebe. Charles H., College Park 
Bell, John W., Hyattsville 
Bennett, Lucille K., Hyattsville 
Benson, Brian M., Baltimore 
Berman, David P., Hoboken, N. J. 
Billig, S. Deborah, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Bittinger, Charles Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Bonnett, Warren L., Aberdeen 

Boothe, John E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Bower, Francis M., Mt. Rainier 

Bradley, Walter B., Baltimore 

Bredekamp, Marriott W., Washington, 
D. C. 

Brian, W. P., Ellicott City 

Brown, A. Freeborn, Havre de Grace 

Burroughs, Reginald, Upper Marlboro 

Campiglio, Robert G., Milton, Pa. 

Capalbo, John L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clements, Mildred F., College Park 

Cole, Harold S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cooke. Charles H., Washington, D. C. 

Coster, William F., Jr., Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Cowie, Jean A., Perry Point 

Gulp, Charles H., Whiteford 
Cummings, Bernard A., Chevy Chase 
Cutler. Dorothy M., Silver Spring 



Daniel, Daniel R., Baltimore 

Davis, L. Voncile, College Park 

Davis, Raymond. Jr., Washington. D. C. 

DeMarco. Carmel, Washington, D. C. 

Deskin, Mark, Riverdale 

Dittmar, Gordon F., Baltimore 

Dolan, Loretta M., Sparrows Point 

Dosch, Harry A., Jr., Baltimore 

Downin, John E., Baltimore 

Drake, Harley D., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Dresher, Edward, Hackensack, N. J. 

Edwards, William W., Chevy Chase 

Ellinger, Charles F., Baltimore 

Ellis, Wayne P., Jr., College Park 

Ellison, Max M., Baltimore 

Evans, Dorothy E., Takoma Park 

Everett, Genevieve, Pasadena 

Farr, Earl W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Fischer, Isadore, Washington, D. C. 

Fosbroke, Gerald E., Elkridge 

Gaczynski, Eugenia T., Jersey City, N. J, 

Gengnagel, Rosella B., Catonsville 

Godwin, Donnie, Annapolis 

Goldstein, Ferdinand W.. Baltimore 

Graeves, R. Bernard, Silver Spring 

Gray, Ralph, Chevy Chase 

Greenfield, Ray H., Takoma Park 

Hammerlund, Robert O., Washington, 

D. C. 
Hart. John G., Hagerstown 
Hebb, John S.. III. Baltimore 



322 



323 



Helfgott. Jack L., Mitchellville 

Hendrix, Nevins B., Port Deposit 

Hennig, Elmer A., Washington, D. C. 

Hill, Florence R., Laurel 

Hobbs, Norman L., Silver Spring 

Hoenea, oopina w ., Baltimore 

Hughes, Robert L., Aberdeen 

Hunt, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 

Ireland, Alfred W., Jr., Baltimore 

Jacques, Lancelot. Jr., Smithsburg 

Jaffe, Vita R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johns, Gladys V., Beltsville 

Johnson, Pyke, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Johnston, Doris H., Takoma Park 

Jones, Marguerite E., Owings Mills 

Jordan, Francis X., Washington, D. C. 

Kelly, George B., Washington, D. C. 

Kemper, Betty J., East Orange, N. J. 

Keplinger, Anna-Lura, Washington, D. C 

Klein, Alvin S., Frederick 

Krulevitz, Keaciel, Baltimore 

Land, Robert H., Baltimore 

Lankford, Melvin C, Baltimore 

Lann, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 

Lansford. Wilson A., Bethesda 

Laukaitis, Peter E., Waterbury, Conn, 

Levy, Arthur I., Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Lewis, Mary W., Bethesda 

Lindner, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 

Lundell, Ernie D., Chevy Chase 

Lutes, Lawrence V., Silver Spring 

Maccubbin, Mary F., Laurel 

Marche, Louise C, Hyattsville 

Martinez, Josefina, San Juan, P. R. 

Matson, Ruby I., Takoma Park 

McCaffrey, Richard H., Baltimore 

Melchionna, Olin R., Rochelle Park, N. J. 

Miller. Eunice, Beltsville 

Mitchell, William A., Baltimore 

Mobus, Paul F., Ellerslie 

Morgan. Charles E., Washington, D. C. 

Nedomatsky, Ivan E., Lansdowne 

Newman. Robert A., Chevy Chase 

Nordeen, Georgia A., Mt. Rainier 



Osborn, James M,, Washington, D, C. 
Paddleford, Justin D., Washington, D. C. 
Panoff, Mortimer, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Patterson, J. Dale, Indian Head 
Pierce, Karlton W., Washington, D. C. 
Pollack, Frank L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Remington, Jesse A., Jr., Laurel 
Richmond, Marion B., Chevy Chase 
Richter, Christian F., Overlea 
Roby, Dorothy V., Riverdale 
Rosen, Janet A., Fort Salonga, N. Y. 
Savage, Dorothy, Washington, D. C. 
Schneider, William R.. Ellicott City 
Schuh, Geraldine J., Chevy Chase 
Schwartz, Stanley E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Scott, W. Kenneth, Landover 
Seidenberg, Abraham, Washington, D. C. 
Sesso, George A., Washington, D. C. 
Sinsheimer, Maurice B., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Sklar, Leo J., Far Rockaway, N. Y. 
Smith, F. Edward. Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Frank S., Pasadena 
Smith, Herbert L., Washington, D. C. 
S:)merville, Ruth E., Cumberland 
Sweeney. Thomas R., Washington, D. C. 
Talbott, Priscilla M., Bristol 
Thomason, Clarence T., Washington, D. C. 
Thompson, Kathryn E., Daytona Beach, 

Fla. 
Venemann, Virginia L., Riverdale 
Waters, Albert G., Washington. D. C. 
Watson, Stanley B., Brandywine 
Wells, Joan K. M., Washington, D. C. 
Willey, Edward J., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Iris E.. Takoma Park 
Wcod, S. Gordon, St. Michaels 
Woodell, John H., Baltimore 
Woodward, Elwyn C, Hyattsville 
Zankel, Max D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Zebelean. John F., Catonsville 
Zihlman, Frederick A., Washington, D. C. 
Zimmerman, Gordon K., Washington. D. C 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Ackerman, J. Emory, Washington, D. C. 

Alter, Irving D.. Baltimore 

Atkin, Maurice D.. Washington, D. C. 

Baevsky, William D., Penns Grove, N. J. 

Baker, Herbert W., Edgemont 

Baker, Robert E.. Washington, D. C. 

Barnett, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 

Baxley. J. W., Ellicott City 

Behm, Carl. Baltimore 

Belt, Kenneth G., College Park 

Benton, Charles L., Jr., Linthicum Heights 

Berry. James B., Jr., Bennings, D. C. 



Binswanger. Charles A., Baltimore 
Birmingham, Thomas J., Sparrows Point 
Bowen, Charles V., Centreville 
*Bowen, Joseph J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Brigham, David L., Ashton 
Brockman, E. Louise, Riverdale 
Brodsky, Alexander E., Baltimore 
Brooks, Thomas R., Hyattsville 
Brotman, Alfred, Baltimore 
Brown, Thomas C, Havre de Grace 
Buck, Marjorie M., Indian Head 



Burton, Robert J.. Cumberland 
Carleton, Harold B.. Washington. D. C. 
Carrico, Norman, Cumberland 
Cayton, Marcelle I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cayton, William I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Clark, Fitzhugh, Germantown 
Cohen, Gertrude C, Passaic, N. J. 
Cooley, Eleanor G.. Berwyn 
Corridan, Jack R.. Washington, D. C. 
Cox Philip A.. Washington, D. C. 
Crampton. William G., Washington, D. C. 
Crastnopol, Philip. Newark. N. J. 
Creamer, Robert M., Baltimore 
Culp. Richard T., Chevy Chase 
Denney, Fred H.. Bladensburg 
Donahoo, Harry C, Chester, Pa. 
Donohue. Mildred D.. Baltimore 
Dow, Mary F., Amarillo, Texas 
Duley, Oscar R., Croome Station 
Dwiggins, Roscoe D.. College Park 
Edwards, John B.. Hyattsville 
Epstein. Edwin, Centreville 
Ernest, Lois E„ Kensington 
Evans, F. Deen, Chevy Chase 
Friedman, Jack, Washington. D. C. 
Friedman. Marion, Baltimore 
Gilbertson. Kenneth G., Bladensburg 
Greer. Margaret A., Bel Air 
Gunby, Laura E., Marion 
Gunther, Francis J., Washington, D. C. 
Haimovicz, Joseph P.. Washington. D. C. 
Hamburger, Morton L., Baltimore 
Hargy. Francis R.. College Park 
Hay, Perry, Washington, D. C. 
Henderson, Joseph, Rockville 
Heringman, Leo A.. Baltimore 
Hoagland. Philip L., Washington, D. C. 
Hughes, Fred J., Chevy Chase 
Hughes, Warren A., Washington, D. C. 
Hyslop, Charles D.. Silver Spring 
Jackson, Frank H., Chevy Chase 
Jacobs, Bernice E.. Baltimore 
Jacobs, John S., Washington, D. C. 
Jacobs, Nathaniel J., Baltimore 
Jewell, Benjamin A., Grasonville 
Johnson, George A.. Baltimore 
Johnson. William R., Baltimore 
Jones, Robert W., College Heights 
Judd. Barbara, Washington, D. C. 
Keller, Joseph E., Washington, D. C 
Kelly. John F., Towson 
Kempton, Christine, Lanham 
Kennon, Wyatt S., Washington. D. C. 
Keppler, William J.. Washington, D. C. 
Lawson, J. Keith, Washington, D. C. 
Lee, Richard E., Landover 
Lehmann, Theo S., Baltimore 
Lewald. James H., Laurel 
Lewis, Barbara R.. Washington, D. C. 



324 



Liberato, Venancio Q.. Riverdale 

Lindsay. Gorton P., Baltimore 

Linn. Lois B., Hyattsville 

Littleford. Rita T., Washington, D. C. 

Long, Edwin D., Westover 

Lowe, William C, Stevensville 

Lowitz. Irving R.. Baltimore 

Maxwell, Francis T.. Towson 

McFadden, Duncan B.. New York, N. Y. 

McGoury, Thomas E., Odenton 

Mclntire, John N., Oakland 

McLaughlin, Arlene M., Towson 

McWilliams. William J., Indian Head 

Miller, Harry A.. Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Mary E., Baltimore 

Miller, Philip, Brentwood 

Molofsky, Bernice, Baltimore 

Moore. John E., Ellicott City 

Morris, Felix R., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mullett, William B.. Silver Spring 

Oliver, Elmer R., Washington. D. C. 

OstroflF, Julius J.. Baltimore 

Owens, James D., Linthicum Heights 

Pailthorp. Robert W., Takoma Park 

Park, Charles A.. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Pater son, Jean, Towson 

Pearson. H. R., St. George's Island 

Peffer. Paul R., Washington. D. C. 

Phillips. William S.. Jr.. Washington, D. C 

Potts, B. Sheba. Baltimore 

Pratt, Stanford C, Washington, D. C. 

Reeves, Samuel W.. Ill, Fort George G. 

Meade 
Richardson. Donald W., Washington, D. C. 
Richardson. Vaughn E., Willards 
Robinson, Charles H„ Cardiff 
Sachs. Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Sadie, Alexander, Washington, D. C. 
Schwartz. Harry, Baltimore 
Shaffer, Betty B.. Wilmington, Del. 
Sherrill, Elizabeth B., Sparks 
Sherwood, William T., Washington, D. C. 
Shewbridge, Benjamin B., Baltimore 
Smith, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Snyder. Roger W., Hagerstown 
Sokal. Mitchell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Spalding, Joseph P., Silver Spring 
Spruill, William T.. Brandywine 
Staire, John R., Canonsburg, Pa. 
Stambaugh. Kenneth A., Baltimore 
Stein. Martin K., Baltimore 
Stevens, Evelyn M., Laurel 
Stonebraker, John E., Hagerstown 
Thies, William N., Washington, D. C. 
Thomas, Margaret G., Riverdale 
Thompson. Robert H.. Washington, D. C. 
Tolker. Ethel B.. Silver Spring 
Townsend, Mary E., Frostburg 
Towson. William O., Baltimore 

325 



Tunis, John O., Jr., Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

Wahl, Carleton W., Silver Spring 

Waldman, Sylvia R., Hyattsville 

Watson, George B., Towson 

Weis, Helen L., Baltimore 

Wells, Robert L., Gaithersburg 

Werner, Janet, Catonsville 

White, Mary M., Dickerson 

White, Robert P., Washington, D. C. 

Whiton, Alfred C, Brentwood 

SOPHOMORE 

Aarons, Ralph, Baltimore 

Adams, George D., Washington, D. C. 

Aitcheson, William W., Berwyn 

Albert, Milton J., Waterbury, Conn. 

Aldridge, William A., Baltimore 

Allen, George D., Takoma Park 

Allen, John J., Hagerstown 

Angelico, Arthur A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Anspon, Harry D., Washington, D. C. 

Anthony, Edwin R., Chestertown 

Aring, Bernice C., Baltimore 

Armiger, Virginia G., Annapolis 

Auerbach, Lawrence W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Badenhoop, H. John, Baltimore 

Balmer, Charles B., Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Barthel, Robert A., Jr., Catonsville 

Batch, Francis E., Hyattsville 

Beers, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Benbow, Robert P., Sparrows Point 

Benjamin, Louis, Baltimore 

Bernstein, Norman N., Washington, D. C. 

Bishopp, Fred T., Silver Spring 

Blalock, Georgia, Jonesboro, Ga. 

Bloom, Morton I., Baltimore 

Bonanno, Antonio C, Washington, D. C. 

Bonnett, Howard G., Washington, D. C. 

Borlik, Ralph, Washington, D. C. 

Bowman, John D., Rockville 

Bowman, Leonard C, Lucketts, Va. 

Bow3ner, Ernestine C, Washington, D. C. 

Bradley, Robert J., Hyattsville 

Brainerd, William F., HI, Towson 

Broadwater, Norman I., Oakland 

Brockman, Carl L., Baltimore 

Brookes, Thomas R., Jr., Bel Air 

Bundick, William R.. Baltimore 

Byers, Lloyd D., Catonsville 

Callow, Charles E., Mt. Rainier 

Capossela, Thomas J,, Washington, D. C. 

Carpel, Albert J., Washington, D. C. 

Gary, Charles G., Riverdale 

Checket, Irene R., Baltimore 

Chumbris, N. Angelos, Washington. D. C. 

Chumbris, Cleom, Washington, D. C. 

Clark, John T., Greensboro 

Cleaver, William F., Washington, D. C. 

Close, Horace W., Washington, D. C. 

Clugston, Carolyn D., Chevy Chase 

Coe, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 



Wilson, Ruby E., Mt. Rainier 
Wise, Paul S., Dover, Del. 
Wohlstadter, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WojtGzuk, John A., Baltimore 
Wolf, John F., Hyattsville 
Wolfe, Elizabeth L., Stephens City, Va. 
Woll, Ephraim, Washington, D. C. 
Wood, George F., Washington, D. C. 
Young, Edmond G., Baltimore 

CLASS 

Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 

Cohen, Maxwell L., Washington, D. C. 

Cole, William H., Towson 

Collins, Roberta E., Hyattsville 

Comer, Florence R., Hyattsville 

Cooke, Alfred A., Hyattsville 

Cornnell, Ellner A., Brentwood 

Crepea, Seymour B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Crisafull, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 

Crocker, L. Eleanor, Baltimore 

Daneker, Million, Bel Air 

Dantzig, Henry P., Hyattsville 

Davidson, Oscar M., Baltimore 

Davis, Harry L., Baltimore 

Dieudonne, Erasmus L., Jr., Bladensburg 

Dippel, Francis X., Baltimore 

Dobres, Robert M., Baltimore 

Domenici, Maurice R., Hagerstown 

Edlavitch, Robert, Hyattsville 

Eierman, George H. P., Baltimore 

Evans, Lydia M., Chevy Chase 

Faul, R. Virginia, Washington, D. C. 

Feldman, Jack, Baltimore 

Ford, John H., Baltimore 

Foss, George E., Relay 

Freemire, Elmer L., Takoma Park 

Frey, Louis M., Mt. Rainier 

Fuerst, Robert G., Hyattsville 

Fulks, Moir M., Rockville 

Ganzert, Mary L., Washington, D. C. 

Gitomer, Harold A., Baltimore 

Goldberg, Alvin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Gabriel, Baltimore 

Goldman, Leon, Washington, D. C. 

Gough, James J., Chaptico 

Gram, Edith-Marie, Washington, D. C. 

Grave de Peralta, Jose I., Camaguey, Cuba 

Greenfield, Arthur, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Grodjesk. Joseph E., Jersey City, N. J. 

Groff, William. Jr., Owings Mills 

Grotlisch, Louise K., Silver Spring 

Harcum, Bettie, Salisbury 

Hardy, Jerome S., Silver Spring 

Heaton, Charles C. Baltimore 

Henderson, Adrienne M., Chevy Chase 

Henry, Frances L., Washington, D. C. 

Herbert, Joseph G., Washington, D. C. 

Hirsch, Albert, Frederick 

Hirsh, Harold L., Washington. D. C. 



Honigman, Alvin H.. Baltimore 
Hoover, Lawrence G., Takoma Park 
Hortman, William F., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 

Houck, Roland V., Vineland, N. J. 

Hunter, Frances E., Chevy Chase 

Hurley, John J., Landover 

Hurley, Walter V., Jr., Hyattsville 

Igartua, Jose E., Aguadilla, P. R. 

Ireland. Julius W., Baltimore 

Irwin, Robert C, Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Isis, Philip S., Washington, D. C. 

James, Helen M.. Chevy Chase 

Jarboe, James P., Bel Alton 

Jett, Ger^ldine V., Chevy Chase 

Johnson, Clifford E., Washington. D. C. 

Johnson, Henry C, Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Vivian H., Baltimore 

Jones, Lewis A., College Heights 

Jones, Robert M., Baltimore 

Joseph, David R., Stamford, Conm 

Kaplan, Solomon, Baltimore 

Kardash, Theodore, Baltimore 

Keefer, Ruth L., Takoma Park 

Kelly, Thomas J., Jr., Bergenfield, N. J. 

Kephart, Mary E., Taneytown 

Keppler, Millicent M., Washington, D. C. 

Kern, Richard E., Braddock Heights 
King, James F., Baltimore 

Kline, Horace F., Frederick 
Kraemer, Edwin, Hackensack, N. J. 
Kramer, Bernard, Baltimore 
Krepp, Martin W., Jr., Baltimore 
Krynitsky, John A., Chevy Chase 
Kundahl, Paul C, Germantown 
Ladson, Marcia, Rockville 
Lang, G. Margaret, Passaic, N. J. 
Lapidus, Stanley I., Baltimore 
Lavine, Isidor M., Mt. Rainier 
Lawder. Robert C. Havre de Grace 
Ledoux, Landreville, Jr.. Quantico, Va. 
Levin, Harriett A., Baltimore 
Levine, Ethel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Levine, Milton, Baltimore 
Lind, Thelma V., Washington. D. C. 
Lipsitz, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Liskey, Robert B., Hagerstown 
MacDonald, Charles R., Cumberland 
Maguire, John N., Wilmington, Del. 
Maslin, Margaret L., Port Chester, N. Y. 
Mattingly, Joseph A., Leonardtown 
Mattoon, Laura I., Takoma Park 
McCarthy, John J., Washington, D. C. 
McClay, Harriette N., Hyattsville 
McClayton, Meryl E.. Baltimore 
McFarlane, Samuel B., Jr., Lonaconing 
McGinniss, Harry, Kensington 
McGoogan. Malcolm T., Fitzgerald, Ga. 



Mears, Frank D., Pocomoke 

Mears, Thomas W., Washington, D. C. 

Mehl, Joseph M., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Mellen. Luther E., Baltimore 

Melnicove, Miriam N., Baltimore 

Meng, Ralph H., Perry Point 

Mermelstein, Daniel M., Baltimore 

Michelson, Elaine P., Baltimore 

Miller, J. William, Boonsboro 

Miller, Walter L., Washington, D. C. 

Mitchell, Alfred G., Baltimore 

Morton, Helen C, Silesia 

Nattans, Ralph A., Baltimore 

Needle, Barnett M., Washington, D. C. 

Neilson, Robert S., Jr., Baltimore 

Neiman, Robert M., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

O'Neill, Richard J., Baltimore 

Orofino, Caesar F., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Oursler, Griffith S., Clinton 

Page. John F., Baltimore 

Panciotti, Michael E., Derby. Conn. 

Parks. John A., Cumberland 

Person, Gladys M.. Chevy Chase 

Phelps, William W., Upper Marlboro 

Pickens, James L., Washington. D. C. 

Piozet, Dolores A., Hyattsville 

Pitzer, James E., Cumberland 

Pollard, Kitty L., Baltimore 

Prettyman, Dan T., Trappe 

Price, Robert S., Catonsville 

Rabinowitz, Alex, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Raisin, Herman S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Reindollar. Helen L., Baltimore 

Remsburg, Charles G., Berwyn 

Robinson, Joseph M., Cardiff 

Rochkind. Joseph M., Baltimore 

Rochlin, Martin A., Baltimore 

Rosen, Martin, Fort Salonga, N. Y. 

Rosenstein, Louis N., Baltimore 

Rouse, Edgar B., Baltimore 

Sadowsky, Wallace H., North East 

Samson, Elizabeth, Takoma Park 

Schneider, Howard, Yonkers, N Y. 

Schneyer, Herbert, Ellicott City 

Schrott, John D., Washington, D. C. 

Schwartz, Norton B., Spring Valley. N. Y. 

Schweitz, Edwin P., Washington, P. C. 

Scott, Mary J., Hyattsville 

Secrest, John P., Brentwood 

SeJtz, Charles E., Glen Rock, Pa. 

Shaw, Edward L., Chevy Chase 

Shegogue, Mac M., Landover 

Shmuner, Daniel P., Baltimore 

Simms, William G., Washington. D. C 

Simon, Fred L., Jr., Baltimore 

Sollod, Leonard, Baltimore 

Soule, Floyd A., Washington, D. C. 

Stapf, Austin M., St. Denis 



327 



326 



Stedman, Samuel P., Catonsville 
StegnnaJer, James G„ Cumberland 
Steinbach, Morton, Baltimore 
Steinberger, Janet I., Baltimore 
Stillings, Charles A., Baltimore 
Stoddard, Sara L., Hyattsville 
Stup, Charles R., Frederick 
Sturchio, Lawrence E., Newark, N. J. 
Thomas, Fied B., Wat^hington, D. C. 
Trundle, Lula S., Ashton 
Turner, Katharine L., Washington, D. C. 
Turner, Raymond E.. Takoma Park 
Updike, Edna M., Washington. Va. 
Vadala. Eugene C, Baltimore 
Waingold, George, Cumberlaiid 
Waite, Maiden D.. Odenton 



FRESHMAN 



Abbott, Betty B., Silver Spring 

Abellera, Rulloda T., Riverdale 

Abrams, David, Beckley, W. Va. 

Acree, George W., Washington, D. C. 

Adams, Donald L., Mt. Rainier 

Aiello, Catherine C, Hyattsville 

Albert, Earl A., Waterbury, Conn. 

Almony, Ruth E., White Hall 

Appelbaum, Bernard, Washington, D. C. 

Armstrong William E., Washington, D. C. 

Askin, Nathan, Baltimore 

Asper, Guy P., Jr., Castle Point, N. Y. 

Axtell, Harold A., Jr.. Takoma Park 

Baldwin, Agnes C, Berwyn 

Ballard, Emilie M., Hyattsville 

Barnes, Richard K., Jr., Sykesville 

Barre, Lola B,, Washington, D. C. 

Barthel, William F.. Catonsville 

Bautista. Moises V., E, Riverdale 

Bayuk, Robert J., Wyncote, Pa. 

Beach, E. Elizabeth, Island Creek 

Beamer, Francis X., Washington, D. C. 

Becker, Bernard E., Crisfield 

Becker, Elise I., Baltimore 

Beksinski, Joan A.. Baltimore 

Bennett, Leonard J., Baltimore 

Berlin, Walter I., Baltimore 

Bernstein. Norman R., Washington, D. C. 

Bever, John W., Berwyn 

Birmingham. Michael J., Jr., Sparrows 

Point 
Biron, Bobbie, Salisbury 
Blivess, Louis B., Baltimore 
Blondet, Luis, Guayama, P. R. 
Blum, Alice M., Baltimore 
Blumenstein, Carl R., Washington, D. C. 
Blundon, Kenneth E., Forest Glen 
Bollinger, Phyllis G., Riverdale 
Bond, Marian W.. Washington, D. C. 
Bond, William R., Halethorpe 



Waters, Robert W., Princess Anne 
Weinberg, Bernice R., Baltimore 
Weinblatt, Mayer, Baltimore 
Weiser, Theodore T., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
West, Vernon E., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Wharton, Edward M., College Park 
Williamson, Martha L., Catonsville 
Wilson, Thomas L., Havre de Grace 
Wolf, Frances, Washington, D. C. 
Woodwell, Lawrence A., Kensington 
Wyatt, Henry F., Baltimore 
Yockelson, Bernard A., Washington. D. C. 
Young, Herbert S., Washington, D. C. 
Young, Jerome L., Washington, D. C. 
Zalesak, Francis J., College Park ^ 
Zimmerman, Loy M., Baltimore 

CLASS 

Bono, Ann M., Washington, D. C. 
Bono. Vivian E., Washington. D. C. 
Borden, Burton D., Washington, D. C. 
Borden, Paul, Washington, D. C. 
Borradaile, Gilbert C, Laurel 
Bothe, Henry C, Baltimore 
Bowers, Leslie L., Washington, D. C. 
Bowling, James E., Newport 
Boyle, John B., Jr., Baltimore 
Bragaw, Josephine M., Washington, D. C. 
Branch, Hugh W., Washington, D. C. 
Branch, William R., Washington, D. C. 
Brazo, Frank A., Long Branch, N. J. 
Brelsford, Jean R., Jr., Berwyn Heights 
Brenner, Helene T., Baltimore 
Brieger, Conrad V., Baltimore 
Brinckerhofif, John S., Chevy Chase 
Britton, Rose E., Washington, D. C. 
Brooks, William R., Pikesville 
Brown, Harriet R., Havre de Grace 
Brown, John W., Bethesda 
Brown, Robert S., Hazleton, Pa. 
Brown, William E., Jr., Hampstead 
Bryan, Mary C, Berwyn 
Budmen, Bernard H., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Burk, Joseph, Linthicum Heights 
Burnham, Charles M., Owings Mills 
Burns, Robert B., Havre de Grace 
Burrage, Margaret D., Silver Spring 
Busick, Doris L., Baltimore 
Butler, Harry F., Cumberland 
Buttner, John K., Baltimore 
Caplan, Jerome E., Baltimore 
Carey, Willis C, Jr., Salisbury 
Carrico, Thomas C, Bryan town 
Carroll, Dorothy M., Washington. D. C. 
Carter, John F., Brookland, D. C. 
Case, Richard W., Berwyn 
Chaney, Jack W., Annapolis 
Chaney, Robert J., College Park 



Clapett, Samuel M., Baltimore 

Clarke, Elizabeth S.. Washington, D. C. 

dayman, Stanley, Washington, D. C. 

Clifford, James L., Jr., Baltimore 

Coale, Millard R., Baltimore 

Cohen, Kenneth M., Baltimore 

Cohen, Samuel, Washington, D. C. 

Cole, William P.. Towson 

Coleman, Albert S.. Washington, D. C. 

Collison, Margaret. Takoma Park 

Cook, H. Irvin, Hyattsville 

Coombs, Albert H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Corcoran, Martha A., Washington, D. C. 

Covey, Carlton, Easton 

Cronin, Charles T., Baltimore 

Crump, Ralph F., Frostburg 

Dahl, Arthur, Washington, D. C, 

D'Alessandro, Gene L., Newark, N. J. 

Danforth, F. Elaine, Baltimore 

Daniels, Edward W., Baltimore 

Davis, Aloyuise I., Havre de Grace 

Davis, Virginia A., Washington, D. C. 

Davis, W. Bruce, Silver Spring 

Day, Hugh A., Berwyn 

Dempsey, Harry J., Hyattsville 

Dennis, Dottie C. Woodbury, N. J. 

Dieffenbach, Albert W.. Garrett Park 

Dietle, Erwin, Silver Spring 

Dietrich, Clayton A., Baltimore 

Dillon, Harold, Baltimore 

Dorfman, Sidney A., Washington, D. C. 

Dorsey, Nathan G., Mount Airy 

Douglas. Leslie C, Washington, D. C. 

Dunie, Mack W., Baltimore 
Dunkle, H. Bothwell, Maddox 
Edmonds, William R., Baltimore 
Edmonston, William C, Washington, D. C. 
Ehrmantraut, John M., Brentwood 
Elliott, Frances A.. Washington, D. C. 
Ellis, William E., Baltimore 
Ensor, Joseph C, Cockeysville 
Epperson, John W., Winona. W. Va. 
Esmond, William G., Washinglon, D. C. 
Ettin, Pearl, W. Englewood, N. J. 
Eyler, Mervin S.. Taneytown 
Farkas, Robert W., York, Pa. 
Fawcett, Howard H., Cumberland 
Fernald, Llewellyn K., Washington, D. C. 
Fetty, John H., Takoma Park 
Finlayson, Thomas R., Bethesda 
Finney, William R.., Laurel 
Fitzpatrick. Patricia C, Silver Spring 
Flax, George L., Washington, D. C. 
Fleischman, Beatrice, Washington, D. C. 
Fradin, Melvin, Baltimore 
France, Germanus J., Baltimore 
Frazier, Lucille A.. Takoma Park, D. C. 
Freedman, Leona S., Baltimore 
Fuller, Elizabeth C, Annapolis 



Furbershaw. Olpa S., Washington. D. C. 

Gardner, William L., Jessup 

Gatchell, Howell L., Baltimore 

Gehman, Jonathan F., Brentwood 

Gifford, John F., Washington. D. C. 

Gile, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Gisriel, Austin E., Elkridge 

Glynn, Gwendolyn M., Stratford, Conn. 

Goldberg, Bernard C, Baltimore 

Goldsmith, Robert E., Baltimore 

GoTIer. Carl, Baltimore 

Goodrich. Edward E., Hyattsville 

Goodwin, Muriel G., Baltimore 

Gratz, Ezra B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Graupner, Eleanor L., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Green, Ruth E., Hyattsville 
Greenwood, Judith K., Washington. D. C. 
Grier, Jack G.. Towson 
Griffin, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Griffith, Mary L., Takoma Park 
Gross, Irving, Newark, N. J. 
Groves, Anna B., Kennedyville 
Hagan, William. Salisbury 
Hall, Norma I., Chevy Chase 
Hambleton, Harry B., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Hammond, Irvin E., Catonsville 
Hanson, William C, Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Harlan, Edwin F., Riverdale 
Harman, Bebe B., Baltimore 
Harner, Charles R., Emmitsburp 
Harrington, Mary J., Washington. D. C. 
Harris, Irving J., Washington, D. C. 
Harris, Joseph, Baltimore 
Harris. Joseph R.. Jr., Bethesda 
Harrover, M. Elizabeth, Manassas. Va. 
Hassett, Jchn G., Washington, D. C. 
Hayes, Donald A., Cumberland 
Hayman, John B., Jr., Prcomoke 
Healey, James W., Hagerstown 
Hellstem, Charlotte M., Hudson Heights, 

N. J. 
Hellweg, Vincent P., Washington. D. C. 
Hemphill, A. Leroy, Jr., Silver Spring 
Hennies, Mary L., Chester, S. C. 
Henning, John R.. Washington, D. C. 
Higbee, Lester W.. Pleasantville. N, J. 
Himelfarb, Norman H., Washington. D. C. 
Hibe, Dick, Baltimore 
Hodson. Virginia E., Baltimore 
Hohman, Gertrude E., Elkridge 
Holt, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
Holzapfel. Norman M., Hagerstown 
Houflf, Clifford G., Washington, D. C. 
Howe, Celeste M., Washington, D. C. 
Hudak, Frank A., Baltimore 
Huffer, Sarah V., Boonsboro 
Hulsfiart, Ronald G., White Hall 



328 



329 



Hunter, Mary E., Chevy Chase 

Hutchinson, Dick F., Chevy Chas« 

Hutson, Paul G., Hagerstown 

Hutton, Carroll S., Baltimore 

Irvine, Ann H., Chicago, 111. 

Jackson, Lorraine V., College Park 

Johnson, William H., Washington, D. C. 

Johnston, Margaret E., Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Rose I., College Park 

Jones, Willis R., Jr., Baltimore 

Kahn, Cyril. III. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Karlinsky, Edythe, Baltimore 

Katz, Leonard R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kaufman, Ethel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keagy, Rayburn W., Washington, D. C. 

Kefauver, Fred S., Middletown 

Kemper, James D.. Washington, D. C. 

Kempton, Hildredth, Lanham 

Kendall. Charles W., Dundalk 

Kermisch, Arthur, Baltimore 

Kessler, Jane I., Washington, D. C. 

King, Elizabeth A., Washington, D. C. 

King, Vernon J., Odenton 

Kirschner, Eleanor, Camden, S. C. 

Klinefelter, William E. B.. Baltimore 

Kling, Robert E., Jr., Riverdale 

Kloman, Winifred S., Washington, D. C. 

Koenig, Ruth E., Baltimore 

Koerner, John F., Sykesville 

Kornmann. Lucille V., Baltimore 

Kovitz, Armand, Baltimore 

Kraft, Fulton, Washington, D. C. 

Kraus, John W., Catonsville 

Kummer, Stanley T., Baltimtr-re 

Kyle, John D., Frostburg 

Lake, Jacqueline R., Glen Burnie 

Lample, Gustav C, Jr., Baltimore 

Langford, Bertha M., Washington, D. C. 

Langmaid, C. Russell, Washington, D. C. 

Larduskey, James L., Jr., Baltimore 

Lawrence, George E., Hanover, Pa. 

Lawson, Frank W., Baltimore 

Lee, Richard M., Bethesda 

LeFrak, Samuel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lehman, Milton L., Baltimore 

Leister, Dick A., Washington. D, C. 

Leonard, James D., Chevy Chase 

Linthicum, Eklgar L., Hale h rpc 

Lipman, Harold, Baltimore 

Lipsky, Irving R., Washington, D. C. 

List, Leroy H., Baltimore 

Lloyd, Edward M., Washington, D. C. 

London, Wallace, Baltimore 

Long, James W., Washington, D. C. 

Long, Ruth E., Salisbury 

Ludwig, Joseph F., Washirgtcn, D. C. 

Macdonald, Maitland, WasMrgton, D. C. 

MacLeod, Mary F., Washington, D. C. 



Maddox. Franklin E., Jr., Glen Burnie 
Magid. Meyer, Port Chester. N. Y. 
Magruder. Ruth T., Washington, D. C. 
Markley, Robert R., Baltimore 
Marriott, Natalie, Washington, D. C. 
Martin, James A., Emmitsburg 
Matthews, Edward A., Baltimore 
McCaffrey, Robert W., Baltimore 
McCauley, Hari-y R., Jr., Baltimore 
McCeney, Henry C, Silver Spring 
McClure, Charles J. R., Baltimore 
McGinn, Vivian B., Baltimore 
McManus, William H., Berwyn 
Meakin, John L., Washington, D. C. 
Meenehan, M. Frank, Washington, D. C. 
Meginniss, Stephen M., Baltimore 
Meitzler, Elizabeth V., Washington, D. C. 
Meushaw, Arthur C, Jr., Severna Park 
Meyers, Melvin H., Hagerstown 
Millar, James R., Indian Head 
Miller, Robert J., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Thomas V., Clinton 
Miller. William I., Baltimore 
Mintz, Milton D., Plainfield, N. J. 
MisKimon, Raymond M., Baltimore 
Mobley, Edward L., Hagerstown 
Mohle, Robert L., Berwyn 
Molesworth, Carlton, Jr., Frederick 
Mondorff, Pershing L., Emmitsburg 
Moore, Aurethia F., Cambridge 
Morris, Charles B., Delmar, Del. 
Morris, Henry L., Jr., Upper Marlboro 
Morris, William V., Hyattsville 
Mueller, John L., Baltimore 
Mulitz, Benjamin S., Capitol Heights 
Murphy, John R.. Washington, D. C. 
Myers, Paul F., Chevy Chase 
Nechamkin, Isadore, Baltimore 
Nelson, Andrew J., White Hall 
Newberry, John. A., Baltimore 
Newell, Robert T., Jr., Centreville 
Nichols, Lee H., Washington, D. C. 
Nigro, James, Fort George G. Meade 
Nimetz, David, Washington, D. C. 
Noble, Charles M., Fairmount 
Norman, Richard E., Hyattsville 
Oppenheimer, Beverly C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ostrow, Gertrude D., Washington, D. C. 
Oswald, William B. Catonsville 
Owens, Dorothy D., Davidson ville 
Palmer, Carroll F., Washington, D. C. 
Papanicolas, James J., Washington, D. C. 
Parks, Joseph A., Bethesda 
Parvis, Charles F., Baltimore 
Paterson, Bess L., Towson 
Payne, Frances E., Landover 
Feregoff, Arthur, Frederick 



Phillips, Jay M., Baltimore 

Pinas, Samuel R., Baltimore 

piozet, Charles F., Hyattsville 

Pollack. Ethel, Baltimore 

Popham, William F., Edgewater 

Porter, Robert L., Ellerslie 

Powell, Alwyn M., Baltimore 

Preble, Merle P., Fort Washington 

Prescott, Stedman, Jr., Rockville 

prinz, John W., Jr., Baltimore 

Pruitt, Jessie I., Takoma Park 

pyle, Mary E., Frederick 

Rabak, Richard W., Washington, D. C. 

Randall, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 

Raphel, Eugene V., Cumberland 

Ray, Enos, Fair Haven 

Reese, Elizabeth J., Washington, D. C. 

Rice, Helen F., Baltimore 

Riedel, Kathryn E., Hyattsville 

Rieg, Mary, Washington, D. C. 

Riehl, Frederick K., Baltimore 

Ringwald, Owen E., Hyattsville 

Robie, William A., Billingsley 

Roesler, Herbert S., Bayard, Va. 

Rogers, Jerome S., Jr., Bethesda 

Rogoff, Sidney, Nutley, N. J. 

Roper, Catherine B., Norfolk, Va. 

Rosen, Bernard L., Baltimore 

Rosenbaum, Joseph, Baltimore 

Rosenbloom, Harry, Washington, D. C. 

Row, Linwood P., Hagerstown 

Rowe, William B., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

St. Clair, Betty D., College Park 

Salawitch, Mildred B., Baltimore 

Saulsbury, Gove L., Riverdale 

Scarborough, Rowan L.. Silver Spring 

Scates, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 

Schaufele, Walter J.. Fullerton 

Schenker, Samuel, Annapolis 

Schlesinger, Arthur, Washington, D. C. 

Schoolfield, Nancy C, Pocomoke 

Schwarz, John T., Sparrows Point 

Scott, Tillman C, Mt. Rainier 

Seidel, David L., Takoma Park 

Sesso, Raymond F., Washington. D. C. 

Seymour, George, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Shelton, John A., Chevy Chase 

Sheriif, Roger E., Landover 
Sherman, N. M. Berlwyn, Mt. Rainier 
Shoals, Robert N., Catonsville 
Short, Katharine E., College Park 
Siegel, Leo H., Nutley, N. J. 
Silberg, I. Walter, Baltimore 
Silverman, William J., Baltimore 
Silverstein, David, Belmar, N. J. 
Simpson, Doris V., Hagerstown 
Simpson, Mary E., Trappe 
Sindler, Millard S., Baltimore 



330 



Singer, Milton E., Baltimore 
Skotnicki, Frank J., W. Hazelton, Pa. 
Slattery, Richard G., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
Smith, Edward A., Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Edward W., Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, John T., Rockville 
Smith, Tom L., Baltimore 
Snow, John W., Washington, D. C. 
. Snyder, Eleanor S., Baltimore 
Souder, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Spadola, Joseph W., Morristown, N. J. 
Speaker, Robert J., Washington, D. C. 
Springer, Earl V., Hagerstown 
Steinberg, Douglas S., College Park 
Sterling, Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Sterling, James T., Washington. D. C. 
Stern, Harry W., Washington, D. C. 
Stetson, Frank, Jr., Chevy Chase 
Stoddart, Adam T., Baltimore 
StoufTer, Frances J., Hagerstown. 
Strachan, Lincoln S., Kitzmiller 
Stringer, John T., Baltimore 
Talcott, Worthington H., Washington. 

D. C. 
Taylor, T. Guy, Baltimore 
Tenny, Morgan L., Garrett Park 
Terl, Armand, Baltimore 
Thompson, Franklin L., Washington, D. C 
Tiller, Richard E., Washington, D. C. 
Tobias, Jane E., Washington, D. C. 
Toomey, Edna P., Bladensburg 
Truman, Zelma M., College Park 
Tyser, Ralph J., Baltimore 
Usuda, Charles T., Bethesda 
Vaiden, Sara A., Baltimore 
Van Horn, John M., Glenn Dale 
Viel, Fred J., Aberdeen 
Wade, John P., Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Wailes, Dorothea A., Baltimore 
Walker, Andrew J., Washington, D. C. 
Walmsley, John S., Baltimore 
Walterman, Edward, Greenfield, N. Y. 
Warfield, Mary D., College Park 
Waters. William R., Lanham 
Watson, William W., Baltimore 
Wehmhoff. Bruce M., Washington, D. C. 
Weinman, Melvin, Baltimore 
Weinstein, David, Washington, D. C. 
West, William V., Chevy Chase 
Whedon, Paul, Washington, D. C. 
White, David G., Lanhan 
White, Jack S., Hartford, Conn. 
White, J. Gordon, Baltimore 
Williams, Don H., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Stansbury M., Baltimore 
Wise, Gabrielle D., Relay 
Witsell, Edward F., Brookline, Mass. 
Witzke, Harry H., Baltimore 

331 



Witzke, Leroy M., Baltimore 
Woollen, Elizabeth W., Lothian 
Worgan, David K., Luke 
Young, Elton F., Washington, D. C. 



Zeller, C. Doris, Baltimore 
Zilber, Morris L., Baltimore 
Zurhorst, Mary O., Washington, D. C. 
Zweig, Oscar, Washington, D. C. 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Bollinger, Gladys G., College Park 
Campbell, Gordon H., Washington, D. C. 
Choucleris, Helen E.. Winchester, Va. 
Compton, Beulah C, Arlington, Va. 
Cox, James S., Silver Spring 
Crowley, Mary C, Chicago. III. 
Dowd, Robert T., Chevy Chase 
Haynian, Harry G., Jr., Salisbury 
Hoffman, Mary J., Relay 



Holmes, Mabelle, College Park 
Lemmermann, Henry J., College Park 
Lloyd, Eugene K., Jr., Rock Point 
Mentis, Anthony P., Baltimore 
Ross, Barbara G., Washington, D. C. 
Schiff, Adelaide S.. AUentown, Pa. 
Vaught, Jeannette, Hyattsville 
Waite, Alan K., College Park. 
Williams, Arthur E., Jr., Salisbury 



EXTENSION CLASSES 
ANNAPOLIS 



Backer, A, K. 
Boteler, George W. 
Brady, Margaret E. 
Carr, Clayton 
Dimaggio, Albino M. 
Fenton, Lois V. 
Fuller, F. Peyton 
Galloway, John 
Geraci, Alvin J. 
Hoban, Charles J. 
Hopkins, M. Fawcett 
Ingersoll, Robert W. 
Jones, I. Burkley. Ill 
Kerr, Charles 



Kuchar, Helen 
Lacey, William J. 
McNew, Walter H. 
Meekins, Marjorie F. 
Mitchell, Philip E. 
Musterman, Andrew J. 
Peach, J. Compton 
Pettebone, Amy R. 
Russell, Elmer 
Saumenig, William E. 
Skoch, George H. 
Woodward, Henry 
Worthington, Robert K. 
Zerhusen, Henry, Jr. 



CAMBRIDGE 



Applegarth, Geneva 
Brooks, Hattie 
Cheezum, Lillian 
Covington, Antoinette 
Gore, Elizabeth 
Graney, Jane M. 
Hankins, Margaret 
Hirst, Elizabeth 
Hooper, Granville 
Hutchison, Stella 
Jacobson, Gertrude 
Jones, Neva 
Leonard, Clara B. 
Leonard. Katherine 



Leonard, Norma 
Lowry, Guy D, 
Lowry, Mrs. Guy 
McKnight, William 
Meekins, Scott 
Moore, Evelyn V. 
Mooi^, Medora 
Mulliken, Isabella 
Shinn, Virginia 
Taylor, Ernestine 
Travers, H. A. 
Turner, Kathleen 
Windsor, R. 
Wood, J. Arthur 



332 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



SENIOR CLASS 



Aks, Harry, Norfolk, Va. 
Barsky, Sol, Washington, D. C. 
Beetham. Curtis M., Baltimore 
Berkowitz, Bernard R., Baltimore 
Berman, Irving, New Haven, Conn. 
Burton, Wilbur D., Jr., Dover. Del. 
Byer, Joseph, Trenton, N. J. 
Caputo, Anthony V., Newark, N. J. 
Casey, William R., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Clewlow, Albert T., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Colby, Maurice R., Long Branch, N. J. 
Davis, Henry, Baltimore 
Davis, Mark O., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Downes, Kenneth F., Hartford, Conn. 
Downs, Joseph L., Jersey City, N. J. 
Eamich, Richard J., Washington, D. C. 
Edwards, Melvin F., Belford, N. J. 
Finkelstein, Louis B., Newark, N. -J. 
Fox, Isadore E., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Friedberg, Herbert, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Fulmer, James A., Fountain Inn, S. C. 
Gare, Morris R., Newark, N. J. 
Gaudreau, Raymond J., "Saylesville, R. I. 
Click, George H., Passaic, N. J. 
Greenberg, Jesse, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gregoire, Gaetan G., Moosup, Conn. 
Heck, John C, Baltimore 
Heuser, Victor L., Glen Ridge, N. J. 
Hirshorn, Abraham, Camden, N. J. 
Jacobs, Vivian M. J., Harrison, N. J. 
Jones, Donald B. B., Takoma Park 
Kanelos, Peter T., Providence. R. I. 
Kuperstein, Charles B., Philadelphia, 

Penna. 
Lavine, Harold H., Mt. Rainier 
Leonard, Melvin R., Chincoteague, Va. 
Lessow, Harold J., Hartford, Conn, 



Levin, David A., Baltimore 
Levitas, Guilford, Westwood. N. J. 
Lewis, Bernard M., Washington, D. 0. 
Lubarsky, Milton S., Philadelphia, Penna. 
Markos, Simon G., Dover, N. H. 
Miksinski, Boleslaw W.. Jr., Baltimore. 
Miller, Robert G., Catonsville 
Mirabella, Joseph, Jr., Newark, N. J. 
Moorefield, Paul B., Mt. Airy. N. C. 
Myers, Ernest L., Frederick. 
Nacrelli, Chris A., Jr., Marcus Hook, 

Penna. 
Poster, Benjamin L., Baltimore 
Pugh, Gordon S., Baltimore 
Ralph, Joseph E., Keyport, N. J. 
Reed, Robert A., Milford, Delaware 
Reilly, Bernard H., Central Aguirre, 

Puerto Rico 
Reynolds, Jotham G., Waterbury, Conn. 
Richardson, Richard E., Leaksville, N. C. 
Riggin, Harry E., Crisfield 
Roh, Frank J., Baltimore 
Rosen, Irving, Baltimore 
Salvatore, Joseph Z., Bristol, Conn. 
Seldler, Alonzo L., Towson 
Shobin, Jack, Baltimore 
Shure, Maurice D., New Haven, Conn. 
Silverstein, William H., Woodcliff, N. J. 
Simington, William B., Danville, Penna. 
Simon, Morris D., Clifton,, N. J. 
Sloan, Isaac, Dunbar. W. Va. 
Swinehart, Darwin R., Baltimore 
Sydney, Elmer L., Providence, R. I. 
Yoffe, Gilbert, Baltimore 
Zeiner, Raymond E., Torrington, Conn. 
Zerdy, Alfonce W., New Philadelphia, 
Penna, 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aaron, Alvin, Biddeford. Maine 

Asbell. Milton B., Camden, N. J, 

Bailey, Carl E., Baltimore 

Baker, Edward K., Jr., Pikesville 

Barker, John P.. Laurel 

Barnes, Bradley B., Maple wood, N. J. 

Boro, Alex L., Severn a Park 

Bozzuto, John M., Jr., Waterbury, Conn. 

Cabler, James T., Baltimore 

Cammarano, Frank P., New Haven, Conn. 

Carrigan, Harold J., Jersey City, N. J. 

Cohen, Sigmund, Baltimore 

Connell, Edward W.. Norwich, Conn. 



Cooper, David, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Cramer, Paul E., Monessen, Penna. 
Cruit, Edwin D., Poolesville 
Donofrio, Richard S., Danbury, Conn. 
DuBcff, Leonard, Hartford, Conn. 
Erlich, William, Baltimore. 
Eskow, Alexander B., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Falk, Wilbur N., Branford, Conn. 
Farrington. Charles C, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Finegold, Raymond, Belmar, N. J. 
Gemski, Henry J. New Haven, Conn. 
Giuditta, Nicholas A.. Westfield, N. J, 
Goe, Reed T., Weston, W. Va. 



Habercam, Julian W., Baltimore 

Haggerty, Jack S., Sussex, N. J. 

Hartwell, Perley B., Jr., St. Johnsbury, Vt 

Heil, Roland W., Baltimore 

Johnson, William B., Jr., Annapolis 

Johnston, Arthur J., Providence, R. I. 

Jonas, Charles S., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Joyce, Osier C, Arnold 

Kern, Louis D., Baltimore * 

Kraus, George C, Baltimore 

Lasley, Frank A., Jr., Staunton, Va. 

Lau, Irvin M., Jr., York, Penna. 

Levin, Leonard L., Norfolk, Va. 

Liberman, Sidney E., Baltimore 

Lyon, Eugene D., Baltimore 

Margulies, David B., Linden, N. J. 

Marsh, Edmond F., North Adams, Mass. 

Massucco, Lawrence P., Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Mathias, Craig P., Waynesboro, Penna. 

McCausland, Charles P., Baltimore 

McLean, Harry, Cumberland 

McMillin, Clarence V., Spartanburg, S. C. 

SOPHOMORE 

Aaronson, Fabius F., Washington, D. C. 
Allen, Joseph P., New Martinsville, 

W. Va. 
Auerbach, Bernard B., Baltimore 
Barsamian, Samuel, Providence, R. L 
Blais, Raymond, Holyoke, Mass. ' 

Blevins, George C, Centreville 
Brown, Frank A., Lansdowne. 
Cannaday, Henry L., Roanoke, Va. 
Carvalho, Antone R., New Bedford, Mass. 
Cavallaro, Ralph C, Branford, Conn. 
Chan-Pong, Bertrand O., Port-of- Spain, 

B. W. L 
Davis, James C, Silver Spring 
Dunn, Naomi A., New Britain, Conn. 
Edgar, Benjamin D., Viola, 111. 
Eichenbaum, Irving W., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Fallon, Charles H., Trenton, N. J. 
Feindt, William B., Baltimore 
Francis, Garnet P., Jr., Alexandria, Va. 
Gane, Eugene M., Hartford, Conn. 
Gilden, Paul, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Leonard N., Hartford, Conn. 
Gorsuch, Gilbert F., Sparrows Point 
Griesbach, Hans H., Naugatuck, Conn. 
Grove, Harry C, Jr.. Fairplay 
Hirschman, Leonard M., Baltimore 
Hoflfacker, Henry J., Hanover, Penna. 
Jacoby, Robert E., Halethorpe. 
Jakob, Robert, Norwalk, Conn. 
James, Verda E., Milford Del. 
Johnson, Walter E., Berlin, N. H. 
Kader, Marshall I., Baltimore 



Meadows, Stanley J., Brunswick 
Mendelsohn, Harry B., Norfolk, Va. 
Messner, Jack M., Washington, D. C. 
Morris, Hugh B., Baltimore 
Muller, Edward J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Myer, Edward H., Jr., Mahwah, N. J. 
Neal, Floyd W., Southington, Conn. 
Rich, Otto M., New Brunswick, N. J. 
Roitman, Irvin, Mercer, N. J. 
Ryan, William H., Frostburg 
Saltman, David, Holyoke, Mass. 
Silverman, Stanley G., Portsmouth, Va. 
Slavinsky, Edwin A., Baltimore 
Smyth, Lawrence C, Quincy, Mass. 
Stepan, Jerry J., Baltimore 
Stewart, Ford A., Baltimore 
Theodore, Raymond M., Baltimore 
Turok, Seymour, Passaic, N. J. 
Weigel, Sterling J., York, Penna. 
Westerberg, Carl V., Simsbury, Conn. 
Wheeler, Elias O., Lynchburg, Va. 
Williams, Ernest V., Washington, D. C. 

CLASS 

Krug, Frederick R., Baltimore 
Labasauckas, Charles F., Watertown, Conn. 
Legum, Isidore, Baltimore 
Maislen, Irving L., Hartford, Conn. 
McConnell, William L., West Union, 

W. Va. 
McCracken, Jules, Cameron, W. Va. 
Meinster, Leon H., Baltimore 
Melson, William F., Wilmington, Del. 
Miller, Max, Baltimore 
Morris, Albert W., Salisbury 
Myers, Melvin, Washington, D. C. 
Noon, William J., Jr., Providence, R. I. 
Plaster, Harold E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Rabinowitz, Seymour A., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Randolph, Kenneth V., Lost Creek, 

W. Va. 
Reed, Paul, Port Henry, N. Y. 
Robinovitz, Irving K., Fall River, Mass. 
Rogers, Everett T., Waterbury, Conn. 
Schoepke, Oscar J., Oakfield, Wis. 
Schriver, Alfred B., Bangor, Me. 
Shaudis, Leo J., Silver Creek, Penna. 
Shea, Erwin E„ Hartford, Conn. 
Sidoti, Vincent F., Winsted, Conn. 
Stinebert, Edward R., Baltimore 
Tinsley, William C, Lynchburg, Va. 
Tipton, Dorsey R., Baltimore 
Varipatis, Michael S., Baltimore 
Waldman, Bernard, New Haven, Conn. 
Weiner, Irving S., Hartford. Conn,. 
Wooden, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Wright, Dan., Greenville, N. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Belinkoff, Sidney A., Weehawken, N. J. 
Bonham, John T.. Charleston, W. Va. 
Bookstaver, Julian B., Teaneck, N. J. 
Dabrowski, Benjamin A.. Baltimore 
Diamond, Ben, Roanoke, Va. 
Goldhaber. Samuel, Flushing, N. Y. 
Ivrey, Samuel M., Annapolis 
Kasawich. Julius I.. Whitestone, N. Y. 
Litchman, Burton, Cranston, R. L 



Lowander, George A., Jr., Queens Village. 

N. Y. 
Page, John H., Larchmont, N. Y. 
Pessagno. Eugene L., Jr.. Baltimore 
Piccolo. James A., New Haven. Conn. 
Randman, Bernard, Whitestone, N. Y. 
Reposo-Ruiz, Mario L., Havana, Cuba 
Westcott, Horace L., Branford, Conn. 
Yablonski, Anthony P.. Simsbury, Conn. 



SECOND YEAR PREDENTAL CLASS 



Heaven, Sterrett P., Baltimore 
Berman. Daniel E., Baltimore 
Beits, Robert L., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Briskin, Melvin R., Springfield, Mass. 
Caldwell, Gilbert L., Baltimore 
Chmar. Phillip L., Rockville 
Cohen. Jerome S., Baltimore 
Dubansky. Paul S.. Baltimore . 
Farrell, Lawrence D.. Norwich, Conn. 
Frey, Donald T., Catonsville 
Hewitt, Earl C, Baltimore 
Klingelhofer, Herbert E.. Baltimore 



Lawrence, Ronald, Elk Mills 
Link, Etta C, Halethorpe 
Mayes. Irvin C, Jr.. Timonium 
McClees. Joseph G., Baltimore 
McDaniel, Edward P.. Jr., Jarrcttsville 
Rudo, Frederick B., Raspeburg 
Schultheis, Carl H., Baltimore 
Smith, Bernard, Hagerstown 
Storch, Murray, Passaic, N. J. 
Towson, Donald H., Dundalk 
Wohl, Milton, Baltimore 
Zuskin, Raynard F., Baltimore 



FIRST YEAR PREDENTAL CLASS 



Benfer, Vernon B., Marysville, Penna. 
Cohen, Sylvan P., Baltimore 
Coroso, Joseph T., Jr., Hartford. Conn. 
Fricke, Annamarie H., Baltimore 
Gasteazoro-Rcdriguez, Mariano, Panama 

City, Rep. of Panama 
Harber, Joseph M.. Asbury Park, N. J. 
Kahl, Gordon K„ Baltimore 
Kolman, Irvin O., Trenton, N. J. 
Lasch, Henry R., New Britain, Conn. 
Lazauskas, Algert P.. Baltimore 
Markowitz. Howard M., Baltimore 
Martinelli, Ricardo, Panama City, Rep. of 

Panama 
Munoz, Jorge E., Salinas, Puerto Rico 



Ouellette, Raymond T., Lawrence, Mass. 
Ramirez. Acosta Mario F., San German, 

Puerto Rico 
Riha, Richard K., Baltimore 
Sands, Douglas H., Baltimore 
Sanner, James H., Phoenix 
Scherr, Herman. Baltimore 
Soiled. Norman, Baltimore 
Sumner, Cleff O., Fullerton 
Tighe. Joseph M., Raspeburg 
Toomey. Lewis C, Jr., Elkridge 
Wieland, John T.. Baltimore 
Wilds, Howard F.. Baltimore 
Williamson, Riley S., Baltimore 
Yeager, John W., Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Schilling, Mary E., Baltimore 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

SENIOR CLASS 



Barnsley. Jean, Rockville 
Bayley, John S., Baltimore 
Bell, Edith U., Williamsport 
Berman, Bertrand S., Baltimore 
Bonner, Anna B., Hyattsville 
Bowen, Gertrude E., Bennings, D. C. 



Bradford, Evelyn M., Towson 
Brown, Elizabeth D., Washington, D. C. 
Buhrow. Viola M., Washington, D. C. 
Burtner, Rosemary J., Boonsboro 
Cartee, Janet L., Hagerstown 
Chatham, Jeanette F., Salisbury 



834 



335 



\\ 









'•X 



Cochran, A. Mildred, Takoma Park 
Crisp, Mary B., Baltimore. 
Curran, Betty, Washington, D. C. 
Dantzig, Anna S., Baltimore 
Davis, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 
Elmore, Edna E., Gastonia, N. C. 
Esch, Marion E., Chevy Chase 
Farrell, Albert B., Washington, D. C. 
Fatkin, Marshall W., Luke 
Forsyth, Blanche E., Friendsville 
Gretz, Harry B., Washington, D. C. 
Higgins, Marjorie A., Hurlock 
Humelsine, Carlisle H., Hagerstown 
Kreiter, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
Laws, Lucile V., Silver Spring 
Lee, Marion, Washington, D. C. 
Lightfoot, Georgiana C, Takoma Park. 
Lombardo, Michael A., Newark, N. J. 
Lugar, Charles E., Hagerstown 
Melchior, Donald F., Baltimore 
Minker, Dorothy, Washington, D. C. 
Murphy, Angela B., Cumberland 
Nordeen, Eleanor C, Mt. Rainer 
Norris, Elizabeth M., Washingrton, D. C. 
Parker, Harry E., Jr., East New Market 
Pence, Mary, Conway, Ark. 
Pfeiflfer, Paul E., Annapolis 



Phillips. Phyllis R., E. Orange, N. J. 

Polack, Samuel J., Hagerstown 

Pultz, Kathryn E., Takoma Park 

Pusey, James F., Delmar, Del. 

Resnitsky, Isabel £., Jersey City, N. J. 

Roby, Maud F., Riverdale 

Ryan, Michael J., Washington, D. C. 

Schwartz, Mortimer, New York, N. Y. 

Scop, Abraham, Catonsville 

Smith, S. Margaret, Bel Air 

Solliday, Alice J., Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 

Stalfort, Carl G., Baltimore 

Stratmann, Elsie A., Sparrows Point 

Sudler, Olive W., Baltimore 

Sugar, Beatrice, St. Pauls, N. C. 

Swanson, Harry R., Washington, D. C. 

Sween, Lorna L., Frostburg 

Talcott, Lois L., Washington, D. C. 

Tarbett, Clara M., Takoma Park 

Teal, Dorcas R., Hyattsville 

Weaver, Ella K., Ellicott City 

Williams, Margaret, Silver Spring 

Yaeger, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 

Young, Carolyn R., Clintonville, Conn. 

Zimmerman, James F., Frederick 

Zulick, Charles M., Houtzdale, Pa. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Beal, Anne A., Washington, D. C. 

Birkland, John V., Washington, D. C. 

Bond. Donald B., Reisterstown 

Boyd, Anna G., Olney 

Brode, Carl K., Frostburg 

Conway, Mary V., Washington, D. C. 

Danforth, Shirley F., Riverdale 

Dominek, Mary R., College Park 

Doub, June B., Hagerstown 

DuBrow, Rita. Newark, N. J. 

Enderle, Ethel E., Glen Burnie 

Freas, Gordon K., Wheaton 

Fuss, Lucille A., Hagerstown 

Goldsmith, Cecelia E., La Plata 

Gomborov, Minnie, Baltimore 

Hall. Thomas W., Bel Air 

Hamilton, Isabel, Hyattsville 

Hammett, James T., Leonardtown 

Harlan, Doris E., Silver Spring 

Harryman, Thomas D.. Baltimore 

Headley, L. Coleman, College Park 

Heaps, Laura F., Cardiff 

Heaps, Mary M., Cardiff 

Heffernan, Maryelene, Washington, D. C. 

Hobbs, Dorothy M., Linden 

Jack, Margaret C, Rowlandville 

Jimmyer, John K., Baltimore 

Katz, Lillian. Washington, D. C. 



Keller, Ralph W., Frederick 

Kellermann, Eileen A,, Hyattsville 

Krumpach, Mary E., Luke 

Lee, Frank D., Baltimore 

Long, Elsie G., Marion 

Lovell, Grace R., Brentwood 

Lowry, Ruth V., Baltimore 

Marriott, Margaret, Washington. D. C. 

Maxwell, Edna C, Luke 

Mazer, Robert, Baltimore 

McCleskey, Benjamin C, Washington, 

D. C. 
McNaughton, Edwina B., Washington, 

D. C. 
Miller, Aden T., Lonaconing 
Moore, Elizabeth A., Queen Anne 
Morgan, Alice S., Washington, D. C. 
O'Keefe, Bernice E.. Rockville 
Pahlman, Margaret B., Eiaston 
Polack, Bella R., Hagerstown 
Powell, Dorothy M., Dorsey 
Reuling, Leonard R., Baltimore 
Robinson, Grace E., Baltimore 
Shamberger, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Shearer, Kathleen M.. Baltimore 
Sheridan, Richard B., Jr., Salisbury 
Shipley, Cora L., Branchville 
Sinclair, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 



smith. Ruth R., Washington, D. C. 
Snyder, Faye D., Annapolis 
Sullivan, Ross H., PleasantviUe, N. J. 
Surgent, Michael G.. Eckley, Pa. 
Swanson, Margaret E.. Washington. D. C. 
Vaught, Valerie V., Riverdale 



Weisberg, Bertha, Baltimore 
Weller. Lucille B., Beallsville 
Wheeler, Elwood L., Glyndon 
Wilson, Ruth E., Washington, D. C 
Wiser, Vivian D., Branchville 
Wolfe. William C, Mt. Union, Pa. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Adams. Clifton L., Silver Spring 
Alperstein, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Anders, Anne F.. Frederick 
Aud. William E., Poolesville 
Ayers, Alice J., Barton 
Biskin. Shirley L., Takoma Park 
Bohlin, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 
Boose. Dorothy M.. Washington. D. C. 
Bowling. Thelma P., Faulkner 
Bowling, Virginia P., Wicomico 
Bowman, Anna K.. Annapolis Junction 
Bowman, Streett W., Aberdeen 
Brinckerhoff, Mary L.. Chevy Chase 
Burton, Beulah M., Washington, D. C. 
Byers. George E., Lonaconing 
Case, Sara V., Felton, Del. 
Coffey, Lillian S., Landover 
Cronin, Frank H., Joppa 
Cutting, Maude, Washington, D. C. 
Dotterer, Jacklyn S., Chev-y Chase 
DuShane, Doris A., Baltimore 
Eichlin, Doris E., Washington. D. C. 
Forker, Jessie M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Forman, Morris. Baltimore 
Fowble, Florence W., Reisterstown 
Carman, Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
Garrott, M. Virginia. Knoxville 
Goldberg, Helen E., Kingston, N. Y. 
Grove, Georgia L., Washington, D. C. 
Handler, Sylvia, Kingston, N. Y. 
Hardesty, Anna M.. Newburg 
Howard, William F., Baltimore 



Huber, Nora L., Baltimore 
lager, Helen L., Hyattsville 
Knepley. George W., Altoona, Pa. 
Kuhn, Eleanor M., Bethesda 
Lowen. Alsace L.. Hyattsville 
Males. Alexander E.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Manning. Laura, Silver Spring 
Mayes, Marian V., Phoenix 
McChesney, Douglas W., University Park 
Meade, James G., Port Deposit 
Mileto, Catherine, Annapolis 
Morris, J. Burton, Port Deposit 
Murphy, Celia E., Walkersville 
Nevy, Inez A., Cumberland 
Peterson. Olga C. Hyattsville 
Rawley, Betty E., Hyattsville 
Scharf, Thomas M., Glen Burnie 
Schutz, Patricia B.. Annapolis 
Smith, Blair H., Mt. Rainier 
Smith. Elizabeth J., Salisbury 
Smith, Mildred E., Walkersville 
Sparling, Edith R.. Washington. D. C 
Sullivan. Evelyn L., Hyattsville 
Tetlow, Robert M., Boyds 
Townsend, Frances J., Riverdale 
Trundle, Lucy W., Ashton 
Walsh. Ambrose J., Jr.. Brentwood 
Weber, June E., Washington. D. C 
Webster, Carolyn I., Pylesville 
Weidinger, Charles W., Baltimore 
Wheeler, Waverley J., Baltimore 
Williams. Dorothy E., College Park 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aitcheson, Genevieve, Laurel 
Archer. John, Bel Air 
Arnold, William D., Baltimore 
Baitz, Mildred, Washington. D. C. 
Barker. Marian E., Washington. D. C. 
Beall, Marjorie. Beltsville 
Bennett. R. Gordon. Salisbury 
Boyda, John J., Iselin. Pa. 
Brokamp. Ray W.. Glen Burnie 
Burroughs, Elizabeth E., Mechanicsville 
Cantwell, Wilma J., Marriottsville 
Carliss, John H.. Windber, Pa. 
Carpenter, Jean M., Hagerstown 
Chronister, Mason F., Baltimore 



Cline, Carl A.. Jr., Monrovia 

Collins, Hiram H.. Cnsfield 

Collins, Thomas E., Washington. D. C. 

Cook. Mary H., Washington, D. C. 

Corosh. Frances R., Annapolis 

DeVore, Clair E., Cumberland 

Dooley, Helen L., Cardiff^ 

Dubin. Charles, Baltimore 

Duncan. Laura R.. District Heights 
Dunn. Katherine C. Silver Spring 
Edwards, Blodwyn E., Washington, D. C. 
Elder, John T., Jr., Riva 
Ervin, James F., Havre de Grace 
Farr, Mary K., Wayside 



336 



337 



Forman, Sara, Washington, D. C. 

Freudenberger, John G., Baltimore 

Garonzik. Ruth, Baltimore 

Greengold, H. Ruth, Annapolis 

Griffith. Ann M., Rockville 

Groves, Helen V., Cumberland 

Hart, Richard K., Hagerstown 

Haske, Frank J., Baltimore 

Haynes, Joyce W., Silver Spring 

Hoffman, Donald R., Hyattsville 

Hottel, Betty L., College Park 

Hurley, Robert F., Hyattsville 

Jarboe, Ann E., Leonardtown 

Jones, John S., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Kahn, Estelle W., Baltimore 

Kehoe, James H., Bel Air 

Kemp, Margaret C, College Park 

Keys, Virginia A., Laurel 

King, Judith A., Washington, D. C. 

Kolius, William S., Washington, D. C. 

Legge, Martha J., Cumberland 

Leight, Rita, Teaneck, N. J. 

Leites, Israel, Baltimore 

Lewis, Edythe M., Baltimore 

Ligon, Julia C, Brinklow 

Link, Mary E., Baltimore 

Long, Virginia M., Selbyville, Del. 

Longest, Katherine A., Baltimore 

McLuckie, Virginia L„ Cumberland 



Militzer, Gustav D., Washington, D. C. 

Naughten, Edward T., Washington, D. C. 

Nordwall, Alice E., Princess Anne 

Norton, Charles A., Ogden, Utah 

Parrish, Evelyn M., Brentwood 

Poetzsch, Paul H., Baltimore 

Reed, Walter F., Dundalk 

Ross, Mary L., Cumberland 

Ryan, Winnifred A. .Washington, D. C. 

Ryon, Mary J., Waldorf 

Shea, Katherine J., Holyoke, Mass. 

Sherman, Eleanor, Baltimore 

Smith, Adria J., Baltimore 

Smith, Allen R., Baltimore 

Smith, Virginia E., Mount Airy 

Speake, Mary M., Luray, Va. 

Spicknall, Lillian S., Fair Haven 

Starlings, Cable P., Cheshire, Conn. 

Stilwell, Dorothy, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Taylor, William J., Washington, D. C. 

Teal, Lois A., Hyattsville 

Thompson, Charles L., Baltimore 

Walker, Mary A., Laurel 

Watts, William E., Laurel 

Wellinger, Phyllis M., Hagerstown 

Wilson, N. Lorraine, Fulton 

Wood, M. Virginia, Washington, D. C. 

Zecher, Lyndon B., Hagerstown 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Appier, Helen, Washington, D. C. 

Baker, Robert L., Washington, D. C. 

Beall, Susie C, Beltsville 

Blandford, Mary L., College Park 

Blondell, Mary, Washington, D. C. 

Boote, Howard S., Catonsville 

Boswell, Alice A., Brookeville 

Bowman, Emma M., Mt. Airy 

Boyd, Hollis R., Washington, D. C. 

Bray, Mairie L., College Park 

Brisker, Sarah F., Washington, D. C. 

Bunch, Edward L., Bethesda 

Burdette, Eunice E., Laurel 

Burgess, Maurine D., Washington, D. C. 

Carpenter, Virginia P., Washington, D. C. 

Casbarian, Louise W., Riverdale 

Clark, Ellen N., Silver Spring 

Close, Marion B., Washington, D. C. 

Craig, Madie E., Colmar Manor 

Davis, John H., Hyattsville 

Dawson, Wilson F., College Park 

Detweiler, Frank S., Takoma Park 

Dodd, Ocie E., Chevy Chase, D. C. 

Duncan, Peggy E., Chevy Chase 

Dunn, May A., Hyattsville 

Ehrmantraut, Doris W., Washington, D. C. 

Fennell, Dorothy, Beltsville 



AND PART TIME 

Granbery, Helen L., Washington, D. C. 
Harden, Nellie G., Washington, D. C. 
Hepting, Irene D., Baltimore 
Hess, Margaret S., Chevy Chase 
Hiatt, Pearl M., Brentwood 
Hickman, Mildred, Washington, D. C. 
Higgins, William B., Hyattsville 
Hilder, Jane F., Washington, D. C. 
Hilton, Elizabeth J., Mount Airy 
House, Theresa R., Riverdale 
Howard, Addie J., Hyattsville 
Hughes, Marion W., Upperco 
Joyce, Agnes C, Washington, D. C. 
King, Willamy S., Washington, D. C. 
Lawton, David F., Laurel 
Lynch, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Miller L., Hyattsville 
Matthews, Abigail G., La Plata 
McCall, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Dorothy A., Hyattsville 
Molyneaux, Lois G., Brookmont 
Mudd, H. Virginia, Pomfret 
Myers, W. Constance, Hyattsville 
Nichol, Wilma C, Riverdale 
Nolan, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 
Papanicolas, Gus J., Washington, D. C. 



338 



Bamsburg, Helen R.. Beltsville 
Ruark, Martha E.. Salisbury 
Ryder, Loretta A., Washington, D. C. 
Sahlin, Emilie H.. Annapolis 
Sessions. DeForest E., Takoma Park 
Smith, Francis D., Bennings, D. C. 
Smith, Mary L., Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Rosemary, Washington, D. C. 
Steigner, Elizabeth R., Silver Spring 
Stevenson, Lalla, Columbia, S. C. 
Taylor, Mary M., Washington, D. C. 
Troth, Elizabeth. Chevy Chase 



Turner, Emily B., Riverdale 
Upp, Carol L., Bethesda 
Wells, H. Gertrude, Gaithersburg 
Wetherby, Edith H., Welch, W. Va. 
White, Eleanor E., Germantown 
White, Ruth O., Brentwood 
White, Virginia W., Germantown 
Williams, Edith M., Washington, D. C. 
Wolfenbarger. Floy, Washington. D. C. 
Wyburne, Alice V., Washington, D. C. 
Young, Irene, Silver Spring 



EXTENSION TEACHERS-TRAINING COURSES 



(Industrial Education, Baltimore) 



Aaronson, Philip J. 
Albaugh, Anna E. 
Anderson, Charles 
Arnold, Charles 
Auth, Jack 
Bachman, Oswald E. 
Baer, A. Harris 
Ball, Frances H. 
Balsam, F. A. 
Bargteil, Ralph 
Barnard, E. H. 
Barnes, Marie W. 
Baughman, Elizabeth 
Belt, Robert O. 
Benesch, Esther 
Benner, Elizabeth 
Blackiston, James T. 
Boote, H. S. 
Bosley, Edgar 
Brickley, Clarence 
Bull, Carl 
Bull, Edgar M. 
BuUough, Van Ness 
Burns, Thelma W. 
Cantwell, Hammond 
Capocci, Catherine F. 
Carr, William 
Checinski, Walter 
Cohen, Sidney 
Corbett, Ruth 
Crist, Cornelia R. 
Dalinsky, Isador 
Davidson, D. 
Deitrich, Elmira 
Dewling, Evelyn 
Diver, Grant 
Doering, Ruth H. 
Donelson, Raymond 
Dubin, Charles 
Dudderar, Charles W. 
Dunwoody, Ruth 
Ebaugh, Margaret 



Ekiwards, Walter F. 
Ekas, Alice A. 
Ely, James H. 
Everhart, William C. 
Faulkner, Floyd C. 
Fisher, Gilbert 
Fisher, Joseph 
Freedman, Norman 
Friedman, Isadore 
Galley, Joseph N. 
Gardner, Harry 
Gillan, Andrew S. 
Goeller, John E. 
Griffith, Jeanette 
Griefzu, Edward G. 
Gross, Charles R. 
Grove, E. K. 
Haffner, Emanuel 
Hall, Irvin 
Hamel, W. Ramon t 
Hardy. Earl C. 
Haugh, Marian 
Hearn, Bessie V. 
Hensen, Edward C. 
Hen sen, Henry L. 
Herbert, Russell M. 
Hetrick, J. M. 
Heylmun, S. L. 
"Himmel, Mildred 
Hisley, Lillian P. 
Hoffman, Jennie Z. 
Hollander, Anna 
Horney, Paul 
Hucksoll William 
Hughes, Marion W. 
Jacob, Felice E. 
Jacobson, Sara E. 
Jirsa, Charles 
Jones, Julia 
Kacher, Russell E. 
Kalb. Merrill B. 
Karpa, Lillian 



339 



Keating:, Lyda 

Kidd, Frank 

Kinsey, Allan S., Jr. 

Kornblatt, Joseph 

Krapkat, Herbert N. 

Krause, Louise 

Kuehn, Peter 

Lambert, Hildreth 

Latham, Helen M. 

Laugerman, John B. 

Levin, Sol 

Longrford, R. C. 

Longrley, E. L. 

Lovering, Katherine A. 

Mainen, Allan 

Malach, Barbara 

Manakee, Edward Y. 

Matthaei, Lewis A. 

McCann, Harold R. 

McCarriar. Herbert G. 
McCauley, Anna C. 
McCauley, Everett S. 
McDairmant, John 
McQuade, John 
Melby, A. E. 
Mele, Virginia 
Mencke, Minnie R. 
Merkle, Clifford 
Meyer, Arthur 
Meyer. Elmer L., Jr. 
Myers, George A. 
Miller, Mayfort P. 
Munschauer, R. L. 
Murray, Eleanor D. 
Nathanson, David 
Neilson, Julia M. 
Newman, Ruth 
Nichols, J. Harvey 
Nicol, Lindsay 
Norris, Cecil 
Philips, LeRoy 
Porter, Ethel B. 
Polk, Mary L. 
Powell, George C. 
Proctor, James O. 
Purnell, Mildred I. 
Quinan, Allen J. 
Rachanow, Louis 



Armstrong. Milton S. 
Boston, Georgia 
Bradford. Alihea 
Brooks, Ellen 
Brooks, Eunice 
Brown, Alexander 
Callis. Mattie C. 
Carter, Hughes 



ftandafl. Roland E. 

Rankin, George T. 

Rassa, William J. 

Rea, Florence R. 

Rice, Bessie L. 

Rich, Bessie A. 

Richards, Ruth 

Rivkin, Leon 

Rock, Charles D. 

Rosenberg, Albert J. 

Routzahn, Evelyn R. 

Rubin. Hilda R. 

Sachs, Frank 

Saltzman, Jack 

Schubert, Florence H. 

Schwarzmann, George 
Siegel, Esther 
Silbert, Celia 
Silbert, Keel 
Silverman, Frank 
Skidmore, Carl T. 
Smith, H. D. 
Smith, Virginia E. 
Soper, Agnes P. 
Spencer, Alma F. 
Stach, James A. 
Stone, John T. 
Thomas, Eleanor L. 
Valle, Joseph A. 
Valle. Philip J. 
Vansant, Lillian H. 
Vogel, G. P. 
Waltham, W. Alan 
Waskey, Bertram H. 
Watkins, Robert S. 
Weigate, Charles 
Weikel, Stewart F. 
Weiland, Richard 
Wheeler, El wood L. 
Whipple, Stanley R. 
White, Clinton E. 
Wilkison, John W. 
Willhide, Elsa H. 
Williams, Laurence L. 
Williams, Margaret 
Wolfe, Charles 
Yoder, Merle 
Zimmerman, Ralph L. 

COLORED 

Carter, Mary H. 
DeNeal, Ola L. 
Diggs, Odessa S. 
Flanagan, LeRoy 
Fleming, Bertha R. 
Francis, Alma T. 
Glascoe, Fannie 
Grinage, Jeanette 



Gross, Clarence E. 
Gwynn, Ruby W. 
Hall. Edna 
Harding, George B. 
Harris, Zelmar A. 
Hughes, Helen G. 
Jackson, Marione 
Jones, Roberta W. 
Keyes. Alice R. 
Knox, Mamie G. 
Murray, Clifton S. 
Peck, Edward J. 



Perdue, Saul M. 
Pollard, Clara J. 
Shields, Walker A. 
Spriggs, Edith 
Stevenson, Eulalia W. 
Travers, Helen V. 
Washington, Mathilde 
Waters, Wilmore E.. 
Wilson. Hallie H. 
Wilson, Jane 
Wilson, Louis H. 
Wood, John M. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

SENIOR CLASS 



Jr. 



Bartoo, Donald G., Hyattsville 

Beckham, Robert W., Bethesda 

Berger, Herman W., Jr., Baltimore 

Brotemarkle, Martin L., Cumberland 

Calder, Wright G., Baltimore 

Clark, Willson C, Takoma Park 

Dial, Herman P., Baltimore 

Donahue, William J., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Eggers, Harold A., Washington, D. C. 
Felton, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Firmin, Philip, Washington, D. C. 
Furtney, Charles S., Cumberland 
Gall, Ralph G., Thurmont 
Gibbs, Edward H. D., Hyattsville 
Gilbert, George E., College Park 
Haspert, Mathews J., Chester 
Heiss, John W., Washington, D. C. 
Herman, Austin S., Baltimore 
Hudgins, Houlder, Washington, D. C. 
Hueper, Louis R., Berwyn 
Hynson, B. Thomas, Washington, D, C. 
Jackson, Robert A., Washington, D. C, 
Janes, Charles F., Anacostia, D. C. 



Kelly, Harold L., Jr., Forest Glen 
Leasure, William C, Silver Spring 
Lopata, Alexander A., Baltimore 
Ludlow, Francis W., Washington, D. C. 
Mann, Arthur W., Washington, D. C. 
Marans, Allen, Washington, D. C. 
McCool, William A., Hagerstown 
McCurdy, Philip C, Kensington 
McDonald, Thomas S., Ferryman 
McLean, John A., Washington, D. C. 
McLeod, Robert J., Edmonston 
Ogle, Eimerson, Catonsville 
Orcutt, Charles B., Washington, D. C. 
Patterson, Norman P., Baltimore 
Piatt, Doran S., Jr.. Washington. D. C. 
Rose, Glen W., Washington, D. C. 
Roylance, Merriwether L.. Glenn Dale 
Shinn, John S., Echo Lake. Pa. 
Shoemaker, Francis D., Bethesda 
Smith, Warner T., College Park 
Teal, Gilbert E., Pasadena 
Tibbets, William S., Chevy Chase 
Wedding, Presley A., Washington, D. C. 
Willis, Alvin H., Washington, D. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Andrews, John T., Jr., Baltimore 
Backhaus, Albert P., Baltimore 
Bennett, Joseph H., Washington, D. C. 
Bishoff, Frederick, Washington, D. C. 
Bowman, George A., Annapolis Junction 
Brookhart. George C, Jarrettsville 
Browning, John R., Washington, D. C. 
Bryant, William C. Takoma Park 
Chappelear, James A., Washington, D. C. 
Chilcoat, Ralph L., Washington, D. C. 
Cladny, Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Collins, James E., Crisfield 
Collins, Ralph A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Collison, Malcolm N., Takoma Park 
Connery. Edward F., Washington, D. C. 



Corbin, Maurice E., Woodbine 
DeArmey, Frank T., Windber, Pa. 
Diggs, Robert S., Baltimore 
Goldbeck, Page, Chevy Chase 
Goldberg, Paul, Baltimore 
Gray, Vernon H., Chevy Chase 
Harris, Fred, Washington, D. C. 
HoUister, Curtis L., Washington, D. C. 
Home, Jchn F., Chevy Chase 
Hutton, Joel W., College Park 
Kennedy, Edward J., Baltimore 
Kluckhuhn, Frederick H., Laurel 
Korab, Arnold A., Colmar Manor 
Latterner, Henry, Jr., Chevy Chase 
Lodge, Fred R., Washington, D. C. 



340 



341 



Luttrell, John C, Washingrton, D. C. 
Lynham, John C, Hyattsville 
Mattingly, Robert L., Washington, D. C. 
Maynard, William G., Baltimore 
Meinzer, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Mims, James R., Jr., College Park 
Morgan, Lee, Washington, D. C. 
Mueller, Eugene F., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Muncks, John D., Baltimore 
Odell, Robert C, Ellicott City 
Owens, Herbert M., Federalsburg 
Parce, John R., Annapolis 
Parsons, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Peck, Alvin B., Washington, D. C. 
Phillips. Adon W., Bethesda 
Phillips, Clarence W., Princess Ann 
Pierce, Charles H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

SOPHOMORE 

Ashmun, Van S., Washington, D. C. 
Bamman. Richard K., Palmers 
Bebb, Edward K., Chevy Chase 
Berg, Charles M., Baltimore 
Boyd, Robert H., Washington, D. O. 
Brashears, Richard S., Washington, D, v.. 
Budkoff, Nicholas, Lynn, Mass. 
Cook, Robert P., Washington, D. C. 
Daly, C. Robert, Baltimore 
Davis, Preston L., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Davis, William B., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
DeArmey, John J., Windber, Pa. 
Deeley, Haskin U., Baltimore 
Dorr, George W„ Washington, D. C. 
Elvove, Elies, Washington, D. C. 
Essex, H. Alfred, Washington, D. C. 
Etkind, Irving J., New Haven, Conn. 
Farrall, John A., Washington, D. C. 
Fleming, H. Edwin. Savage 
Forrester, James L., Berwyn 
Franke, Harold H., Washington, D. C. 
Gebhardt, Charles M., Silver Spring 
Gerber, Sigmund I., Baltimore 
Gessford, Richard L., Mt. Rainier 
Gottlieb, Robert, Washington, D. C. 
Greenwood, Orville W., Brentwood 
Hall. Herbert P., Washington, D. C. 
Hart, Robert L., Hagerstown 
Harvey, Cecil L., Washington, D. C. 
Hennighausen, Louis K., Baltimore 
Hewitt, Frederic M., Chevy Chase 
Holbrook, Charles C, College Park 
Janes, Henry W., Anacostia, D. 0. 
Jensen, Willard C, Washington, D. C. 
Jones. Stephen H., Leonardtown 
Jordan, Ralph S.. Washington, D. C. 
Kestler, Paul G., Baltimore 
King. Thomas O., Savage 

342 



Porter, Wade T., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Putman, Raymond S., Washington, D. C. 
Roundy, Paul V., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Savage, Alfred E., Washington, D. C. 
Schreiber, Irvin R., Washington, D. C. 
Shaffer, Thomas N., Washington, D. C. 
Shearer, Ross W., Riverdale 
Siems, John L., Baltimore 
Smith, John P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Sperry, Harold C, Baltimore 
Turnbull, James, Takoma Park 
Vernay, Howard A., Jr., Baltimore 
Walton, Robert L., Washington, D. C. 
Wettje, Robert H., Riverdale 
Willett, LeRoy G., Washington, D. C. 
Wolk, Reuben, Washington, D. C. 
Yourtee, Leon R., Jr., Brownsville 



CLASS 

Kinney, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 
Krafft, Robert E., Washington. D. C. 
Kreuzburg, Harvey W., Jr., Silver Spring 
Lapoint, George M., Catonsville 
Lass well, Philip M., Takoma Park 
Lynt, Richard K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Main, Irwin I., Seat Pleasant 
Manown, George F., Baltimore 
Mause, John D., Jr., Myersville 
McClenon, Donald, Takoma Park 
McGill, Lloyd H., Thurmont 
Mitchell, David H., Washington, D. C. 
Moran, Joseph T., Westernport 
Morris, Francis C., Washington, D. C. 
Mulitz, Milton M., Washington, D. C. 
Myers, George H., Hyattsville 
Perkins, Fred W., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Phillips, Irving, Washington, D. C. 
Poole, Lewis A., Annapolis 

Reed, Ira L., Laurel 

Roberts, Edward R., Washington, D. C. 

Robertson, Eliott B., Bethesda 

Russell, Joseph S., Maddox 

Scott, Elgin W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Scully, Walter D., Washington, D. C. 

Seeley, George E., Baltimore 

Simms, Harvey C, Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Welch, Washington, D. C. 

Stabler, Sydney S., Ednor 

Stedman. Henry T., Catonsville 

Steiner, Warren E., Washington, D. C. 

Stevens, John W., Takoma Park 

Strausbaugh, Donn P., Chevy Chase 

Talone, Edward R., Brentwood 

Thompson, T. Manning, Washington, D. C. 

Warfield, Gustavus A., College Park 

Wharton, Thomas P., College Park 

Witt. Emitt C, Washington, D. C. 



FRESHMAN 

Addleman, Louis I., Baltimore 

A^arano. Ralph J.. Lilly. Pa. 

A tschuler, Leon. WashingU,n, D. C. 

Amos, Wallace R.. Silver Spring 

Baldwin, Robert D.. Riverdale 

Beall, John, Laurel 

Bell Nathan J., Hyattsville 

Ben^oechea, Adam, Chevy Chase 

Berry. Charles R., Hagerstown 

Bcoze. William C. Baltimore 

Brand, Robert A.. Washington, D. C. 

Brauns. William P.. Jr.. Odenton 

Brockman, Roy C, Baltimore 

Brown. Elton H.. Mt. Rainier 

Buck, James W., Washington^ D. C. 

Burton, Charles J.. Takoma Park 

Camardi, Nicholas J., Washington D^ C. 

Carpenter Byron L., Washington, D. C. 

Carroll. Richard W.. Alexandria, Va. 

Cawley. Wilbert H.. Denton , 

Clarke. Joseph A., Jessup 

Cole, Albert H.. Linthicun. Heights 

Coleman, Thomas L.. Washington, D. C. 

Corkran, William H., Trappe 

Cox, Junior N., Baltimore 

Cranford. Leonard C, Washington. D. C. 

Davidson, Donald C. Washington D^ C. 

Davis. Warren P.. Washington, D. C. 

DiLeonardi. Anthony. Baltimore 

Dix Francis X., Washington, D. C. 

Downing. John A., Jr.. Edmonston 

Emrich, William S., Hebron 

Farnsworth, John K.. Washington. D. C. 

Ferrar, Charles W., Lanham 

Fletcher, Arthur W.. Linthicum Heights 

Folk, William C, Washington, D. <-. 

Foltz, Henry C, Hagerstown 

Gallagher, Harry G.. Relay 

Gore, Bertram W., Jr., Baltimore 

Graham. William M., Baltimoi-e 

Gray. Mason W.. Pbolesville 

Heil. George J.. Baltimore 

Henry, William C Fort George G. Mepde 

Herbert, Wilbur M.. Baltimore 

Herman. Harold, Washington. D. C. 

Herrmann, Edward M., Baltimore 

Jackson, Robert L.. Bethe.da 

Kammer,Charles E.. Baltimore 

Kaufman, Daniel. Washington, D. C. 

Kelley, Joseph W.. Cumberland 

Kennedy, Harry W.. Chesapeake City 

Kimball, Henry F., Washington. D, O. 

Kirby, James T. Trappe 

Lane, John E.. Washington. D. ^. 

Lanham. Paul T., Lanham 

Lanigan. James M., Washington, D. C. 

Leach, Herbert L.. Essex Junction, Vt. 

Lee, Gin H.. Washington, D. C. 

LeMat, Lee E., .Washington, D. C. 



CLASS 

Lewis. Francis A.. Woodbine 

Lewis. Harvey S.. Chevy Chase 

Lodge. Robert J.. Baltimore 

Lozupone. Frank P.. Chevy Chase 

Machen. William S.. Hyattsville 

Maidens. William A., Washington D. C. 

Males. Irwin J.. Washington. D. C. 

Maimer, Kalmon E.. Washington. D. C. 

Marzolf, Joseph M., Jr., Deales 

Mattingly, Lawrence J.. Washington, D. C 

MeeRs, George E.. Washington. D. C^ 

Mericle, John P.. Washington. D^ C. 

Miller, Alan R.. Washington D. C. 

Morrison. Norman J., Jr.. Chevy Chase 

Moynelo. Andres E.. Washington D. C. 

Nelson, Clifford L.. White Hall 

Northrop, Sanford E.. Hagerstown 

Odell. Charles N., Ellicott City 

O'Farrell. Rufus E., Washington. D. C 

Oswald. Huyette B.. College Park 

Otten. Leonard J.. Parkville 

Owings. Noble L.. Riverdale 

Page. Thad S.. Jr.. Washington D^ S. 

Pope, Llewellyn N., Washington, D. C. 

Quinn. Thomas H.. Laurel 

Randall, PhiUp A., Washington, D. C. 

Reckord, John G.. Baltimore 

Rector, Ralph L.. Washington. D. C. 

Reynolds, Austin R.. Baltimore 

Richardson, Robert R.. Washington. D. C. 

Riley Thomas W., Germantown 

Rimmer. William. University Park 

Ripple, Roland C Cheltenham 

Scott. Roy F.. Washington. D. C. 

Scribner, Kimball J.. Washington, D. C. 

Seanor, Eugene I.. Muirkirk 

Shaw, Bowen W., Silver Spring 

Shipe, John K., Washington, D. C. 

Slicer, William A., Gaithersbuig 

Sloan, James D.. Cumberland 

Speare, Almus R., Rockville 

Spicer, William A., Baltimore 

Stewart. Carl H., Jr.. Brooklyn 

Storrs, Gardner H.. Linthicum Heights 

Towson. Paul H.. Baltimore 

Vollmer, Harry F.. lH. Baltimore 

Waigand William F.. Riverdale 

Warner. Robert E.. Baltimore 

Warren. Paul W., Washington. D. C. 

Warthen. Gerald B., Kensington 

Watkins. William H., Washington. D. C. 

Wells. William F., Baltimore 

Whalen. Stanley M.. Washington. D. C. 

Wheeler. Francis W., Silver Spring 

Wilson, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 

Woodward, Ralph A.. Port Republic 

Yocum, Wilbur F., Chevy Chase 

Young. Charles M.. Washington, D. C. 

343 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Loweth, Donald C, Washington n r »,. , , 

Wash.ngton. D. C. Mitchell. Herbert F., Jr.. Hyattsville 

Von Gohren, Eugene L.. College Park 

EXTENSION CLASSES IN MINING 

BARTON 



Beeman, Walter 
Beeman, Oscar 
Brennan, George 
Broadwater, Gus 
Broadwater, Harry 
Crowe, George 
Custer, Thomas 



Ashby, Lee 

Ashby. Walter 

Bowser, Lawrence 

Cannon, John 

Cannon, Harold 

Cannon, Lewis 

Dawson, Paul 
Durst, Wendell 
Fahrety, William 
Forman, Carroll 
Forman, John H. 
Friend, Arthur 
Gilmore, Junior 
Hahn, Carroll 
Henline, Robert 

Edwards, Jack 
Edwards, Robert L., Jr. 
Griffith, John A. 
Griffith, Earl 
Hughes, Ben 



Abbott, William C. 
Casey, Addis 
Close, James H. 
Davis, Theodore 
Edwards, R. L. 
Glodfelty, Robert 
Keister, John 
Lewis, Edward 
Montana, Joseph 
Odgers, Charles 



Coddington, Ernest 
Coddington, John 
DeWitt, Robert 
Friend, Everett 
Friend, Stanley 



Hoffa, Arthur 
Jones. Thomas J. 
Metz, Samuel A. 
Miller, David 
Miller, E. L. 
Sigler, Adam 
Wilson, Jacob V. 

CRELLIN 

Henline, T. C. 
Hinebaugh, George 
Kelly. Cecil 
Lewis, Buress 
Lewis, Burl 
Lewis, Darrell 
Mersing, Lewis 
Reckert, Carlos 
Roy, Arthur 
Saurers, Ray 
Shaffer, Kenneth 
Sisler, Clyde 
Smith, Theodore 
Smith, Robert 

FROSTBURG (Elementary) 

Kidwell, Thomas 
Pryor, Clinton 
Richardson, Osborne 
Skidmore, Jonas 
Weimer, Stanley 

FROSTBURG (Advanced) 

Powers, Clarence 
Powers, Frank T. 
Rephorn, William H. 
Rankin, William 
Smouse, John 
Stevenson, John P. 
Stowell, Edward 
Taylor, George 
Thomas. Phillip 
Todd, Robert K. 

FRIENDSVILLE 

Kelly. Robert 
Kesner, Melvin 
Love, Thomas 
Mefford, Milton 
McCullough, Doyle H. 



McCullough, Ray O., Jr. 
Schroyer, Joe 
Schroyer, Wade 

Alexander, James 
Brodie, Thomas 
Buckalew, Calvin 
Clark, John R. 
Clark, Robert 
Dye, Herbert 

Butts, David 
Butts, John 
Butts, Roy 
Evans, Maynard 
Foltz, Charles 
Hughes, John T. 
Miller, W. H. 

Alexander, Guy F. 
Beachey, Elmer 
Beachey, Vernon 
Beeman, Ira 
Broadwater, Elwood 
Butler, Byard 
Butler, Harold 
Butler, Robert 



Burrell, Wilbur 
Brady, John 
Capper, John S. 
Harvey, Willis 
Hobbs, W. G. 
Kearney, Luke 
Lyons, Melvin 



Adams, Frank 
Beeman, Fred 
Bernard, Blaine 
Bernard, George 
Bowers, Meshach 
Boyce, William 
Chadderton, Wilfred 
Clark, James 
Comp, Elwood 
Cunningham, Frank 
Davis, Robert 
Dixon, Raymond 
Edwards, Harry 
Edwards, James 
Ellifritz, C. F. 
Ellifritz, Ralph 
Friend, George 
Junkins, Jack 



Sines, Glenn 
VanSickle, Harry 

GILMORE 

Jenkin, James H. 
Jenkin, Joseph A. 
Martin, Matthew, Sr. 
Martin, William H. 
Sulser, Harry 

GORMAN 

Reall, Walter 
Ridings, J. A. 
Schell, Carl 
Sisler, Clarence 
Sisler, Leo 
Williams, George 

GRANTSVILLE 

Folk, Glenn 
Miller, William F. 
Patton, Henry 
Patton, Norman 
Walls, Bernard 
Wilt, Erschel 
Wilburn, Reed 
Yommer, L. D. 

SHALLMAR 

Martin, Ray 
Mclntyre, C. D. 
Pettit, Joseph 
Rohm, James 
Shaffer, Albert 
Turner, Edward 
Warnick, W. T. 



VINDEX 



Kifer. William 
Killkenny, Earl 
Kin%er, James 
Kitzmiller, Ervin 
Knox, Russell J. 
Lipscomb, James 
Morrow, Robert C. 
McRobie, Albert 
Nelson, Dempsey 
Paugh, Harold 
Paugh, Lyie 
Pratt, Homer 
Simms, James 
Simms, Monzel 
Smith, Ocie 
Stewart, Frank 
Stewart, William 
Sweitzer, James 



344 



345 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Acker, Keith G., <:k)llege Heights 
Adams, John R., Jr., Takoma Park 
Algire, Glenn H.. Baltimore 
Allard, Howard F., Clarendon, Va. 
Allen, Rolfe L., Washington, D. C. 
Anderson, Earl J., Roy, Wash. 
Anderson, R. P., Baltimore 
Andrus, C. Fred. Washington, D. C. 
Arnold, Hubert K., Hyattsville 
Asero, John J., Washington, D. C. 
Baerwald, Frances, C, Baltimore 
Baldwin, David H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Baldwin, M'Liss A., Baltimore 
Baldwin, Willis H., Havre de Grace 
Barzhe, Jean, Washington, D. C. 
Basil, Margaret L., Baltimore 
Baughman, £}stella P., Baltimore 
Beardsell, Nellie, Baltimore 
Beck, Frances, Baltimore 
Bellman, Frank A., Baltimore 
Bellows, John M., Jr., Maynard, Mass. 
Billings, Samuel C., Takoma Park 
Birnbaum, Leon S., Flemington, N. J. 
Blue, Elmer C., Takoma Park 
Boarman, William F., Hyattsville 
Book, David R., Alexandria, Va. 
Boyles, William A., College Park 
Brechbill, Edith L., College Park 
Brenner, Abner, Washington, D. C. 
Brewer, Charles M., Hyattsville 
Bristow, Rosa L. S., Chevy Chase 
Brooks, Paul S., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Brown, James McC, Baltimore 
Buddington, Arthur R., College Park 
Burbank, Lydia M., Baltimore 

Burgess, Lionel, EUicott City 

Burton, John O., Washington, D. C. 

Byers, Alan C, Canonsburg, Pa. 

Cannon, M. H., Washington, D. C. 

Carhart, Homer W., Santiago, Chile 

Carr, C. Jelleff, Baltimore 

Carter, Edward P., College Park 

Chadwick, Louise A., Washington, D. C. 

Chandler, Frederick B., Orono, Me. 

Citrin, Estelle, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Coddington, James W., Berwyn 

Coe, Mayne R., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Bernard C, Baltimore 

Coles, Elsie R., Baltimore 

Coleman, Eugene F., Washington, D. C. 

Conley, Carroll L., Baltimore 

Cooper, Sara, Baltimore 

Cordish, Hilda, Baltimore 

Cox, Benjamin F., College Park 

Croft. Charles C, Washington. D. C. 



Crosby, Muriel E., Washington, D. C. 
Cross, John M., Little Falls, N. J. 
Cross, Mary R., Queenstown 
Grossman, Mora, Brooklandvllle 
Cabbage, Saylor C, Washington, D. C. 
Cunningham, Katherine, Washington, D. C. 
Cwalina, Gustav E., Baltimore 
D'Ambrogi, Gulius D., Baltimore 
Davis, Edward F.. Arlington, Va. 
DeDominicis, Amelia C, Baltimore 
Diehn, Karl H., Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. 
Douglass, Edgar M., Washington, D. C. 
Dozois, K. Pierre, Baltimore 
Draper, Helen M., Baltimore 
Draper, Mary E.. Baltimore 
Dudley, Horace C, Washington, D. C. 
Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 
Durrenbarger, Ruth, Orlando, Fla. 
Engel, Lea K., Washington, D. C. 
Esch, Jane H., Chevy Chase 
Evans, Warren R., Bladensburg 
Everhart, Herbert W., Kearneysville, W. 

Va. 
Faber, John E., College Heights 
Farson, John H., Showell 
Fenton, Louise E., Washington, D. C. 
Finkbinder, Roberta E., Baltimore 
Fishkin, Irwin M., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Florestano, Herbert J., Annapolis 
Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Foster, Carroll P., Baltimore 
Frack, Edward J., Arlington, Va. 
Franklin, Elizabeth C, Baltimore 
Freeman, Andrew F., Hyattsville 
Fricke, Geneva E., Hyattsville 
Friedman, Jessica, Baltimore 
Frush, Harriet L., Pella. Iowa 
Gahan, James B., Berwyn 
Gammon. Nathan, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Garrels, Harriet, Washington, D. C. 
Gersh, Edith D., Baltimore 
Gershberg, Herbert, Bronx, N. Y. 
Gilbert, Loami M., Jr., Benson, N. C. 
Glasgow, Augustus R., Jr., Hyattsville 
Golden, Lex B., Washington, D. C. 
Goodner, Henrietta, Arlington, Va. 
Goss, Warren H., Chevy Chase 
Graff, Frances B., Baltimore 
Graham. James G., Washington, D. C. 
Gray, Elizabeth K., Baltimore 
Greenwood. Grace-Louise. Brentwood 
Gregory. Florence I., Washington, D. C. 
Griffiths, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Grove, Donald C, Baltimore 
Haas, Frances S.. Takoma Park 
Haenni. Edward O., Takoma Park 



Haller, Harrison S., Baltimore 

Hammond. E. Gordon. Baltimore 

Hanzlik, Henry J., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Harden, Elmer, Washington, D. C. 

Harris, Hillman C, Washington, D. C. 

Hart, William J., Mt. Rainier 

Haszard, Frank K., Hyattsville 

Heinemann, Bernard, Bronx, N. Y. 

Heller. Hugh A., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Herzog, Helen B., Baltimore 

Herstein, Cecelia R., Baltimore 

Hesse, Claron O., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Hickey, Routh V., Pope's Creek 

Hiegins. Richard W., Washington, D. C. 

Hipolite, Carolyne P., Baltimore 

Hitz, C. W., Fortescue, Mo. 

Hoadley, Alfred D., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Hoadley, Frank T., Chevy Chase 

Hobbs, Robert B., Washington, D. C. 

Hollingsworth, Ellen K., Baltimore 

HoUis, Edgar H., Frederick , ^ 

Home, William A., Chevy Chase 

House, Bolton M., College Park 

Houston, David F., Washington, D. C. 

Howard, Frank L., Hyattsville 

Hunt, William H., Baltimore 

Ingersoll, Henry G., Chestertown 

Ives, J. Russell, Rolfe, Iowa 

Jacob, Walter C, Manchester, Mich. 

Jaeger, John R., Baltimore 

James, Artus, Baltimore 

Janson, Eugene F., Washington, D. C. 

Jarrell, Temple R., Hyattsville 

Jeffers, Walter F., Berwyn 

Jehle, Ruth A., Hyattsville 

Jessup, D. A., Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Alfaretta C, Antigo, Wis. 

Jones, Howard A., Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Merriam A., Washington. D. C. 

Kalousek, George F., Washington, D. C. 

Kauffman, Wilbur R., Washington, D. C. 

Keyes, Winifred A., Missoula, Mont. 

Kilby. Lucio J., State Mills, Va. 

Killen, John J., Baltimore 

Killingsworth, Frederic K., Columbia, S. C. 

Kirk, Ruby L., Elkton 

Klitzner, Frank, Baltimore 

Kolodner, Lee Bressler, Baltimore 

Kraemer, Leonard S., Baltimore 

Kraybill, Herman F., Mariette, Pa. 

Lachen, George P.. Detroit. Mich. 

Laden, Hyman N., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lakin. Hubert W.. Silver Spring 

Lamberton, Berenice E.. Washington. D. C 

Lanham, William B., Jr.. Silver Spring 

Lankford. Mary Lee, Jessup 

Lee, Gregory A., Baltimore 



Levenson, Leonard H., Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Levin, Irvin, Baltimore 
Levin, Nathan, Baltimore 
Linder, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 
Linzer, Jesse O., Long Beach. N. Y. 
Littleford, Robert A.. Washington. D. C. 
Lofgren, Olga C, Brentwood 
Love, Solomon, Washington, D. C. 
Lowe. Charles S., Takoma Park 
Luthey. Helen G., Baltimore 
Lyons, Alice H., Baltimore 
Maddox, Louise, Hyattsville 
Madigan, George F., Washington. D. C. 
Magruder. John W.. College Park 
Mandel. Jacob, Jersey City, N. J. 
Marth, Paul C, Beltsville 
Matheson, Harry, Washington, D. C. 
Mayer, Elmer L.. Washington, D. C. 
McCann, Lewis P., Dayton, Ohio 
McCollum, Frank L., Jonesport, Me. 
McCurley, Anne S., Baltimore 
McDermott, Edna C Midland 
McFarland, C. Elizabeth, Cumberland 
McGowan, George E., Baltimore 
McNamara, Bernard P.. Baltimore 
McVey. Warren C, Landover 
Merrill, William H., Baltimore 
Messina, Julius, Baltimore 
Miller, Fred L., Mt. Rainier 
Miller, Howard A., Rochester, N. Y. 
Miller, R. R., Washington, D. C. 
Millett, Sylvia, Pen; Mar, Pa. 
Misiek. William, Washington, D. C. 
Mohlhenrich, Gretchen, Baltimore 
Morris, Leona S., College Park 
Moskey, Thomas A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Mulholland, Elizabeth A., Baltimore 
Munsey, Virdell E., Washington. D. C. 
Murphy, Harry T., Anacostia, D. C. 
Myers, Alfred T., Riverdale 
Nash, Carroll B., College Park 
Nelson. Eleanor R.. Washington, D. C. 
Nixdorff, Helen P., Baltimore 
Nott, Perry J., Long Beach, N. Y. 
Nusinow, Samuel, Baltimore 
Oberlin, Elisabeth S., Jessup. 
Olson, Rodney A., Somerville, Mass. 
Owings, Eva M. R.. Baltimore 
Painter, Elizabeth E., New Freedom, Pa. 
Parent, Paul A., Washington. D. C. 
Parsons, Henry O., Albany, Wyo. 
Pelczar, Michael J., Jr., Stemmers Run 
Pendleton, Theodosia R., Catonsville 
Pfeffer, Armold Z., Bronx, N. Y. 
Pitts, D. Helen, Baltimore 
Poffenberger, Paul R.. Hagerstown 
Pottinger, Samuel R., Washington, D. C. 



346 



347 



Puncochar, Joseph F., College Park 
Purdum, William A., Baltimore 
Raby, Alfred B., Hickory, N. C. 
Ravitch, Irene, Baltimore 
Reioy, Kathryn, Chevy Chase 
Reynard, George B.. Hiram, Ohio 
Rice, Robb V., Missoula, Mont. 
Riley, Mary B., Hyattsville 
Rowell, Ann H., Hyattsville 
Sachs, George H., Washington, D. C. 
Sadowsky, Irving, North East 
Schechter, Milton S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Schenthal, Joseph E„ Baltimore 
Schmidt, Oswald, Baltimore 
Schnebly, Lewis A.. Jr., Clear Spring 
Schneiter, Roy, Silver Spring 
Schofield, William C, Columbus, Ohio 
Schultz, Joseph R„ Upperco 
Schwab, Frank W., Idana, Kansas 
Scott, Sue G., Baltimore 
Scribner, Bourdon F.. Washington. D. C. 
Seltzer, Sarah L., Washington, D. C. 
Sessions. Ruth W., Takoma Park 
Shank, R. Karl, Hagerstown 
Shaw, Ann B., College Park 
Shear, Cornelius B.. Arlington, Va. 
Shipley, Catherine I., Harman 
Shirk, Harold G., West Lawn. Pa. 
Sieling, Fred W., Annapolis Junction 
Simonpietri, Andre C, Novum, Va. 
Singer, Louis, Washington, D. C. 
Sixbey, George L., Laurel 
Skelton. Bessie, Hyattsville 
Skinner, Geneva K., Takoma Park 
Skinner. Mildred L., Cambridge 
Slocum, Glenn G., Washington, D. C. 
Small. Florence F., Hyattsville 
Smith, DeWitt C, Takoma Park 
Smith, Dorothy G„ Hyattsville 
Smith, Leonard. Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Margaret W., Hyattsville 
Smith. William H., Baltimore 
Snodgrass, Annie L., Takoma Park 
Sockrider, Elsie M., Washington, D. C. 
Sonen, Milo W., Washington, D. C. 
Sookne, Arnold M.. Washington. D. C. 
Spadola, John M., Washington, D. C. 
Spangler. John H., Hagerstown 
Speaker, Clare J., Washington, D. C. 
Speck, Marvin L. Middletown 
Spicer, Helen E., Takoma Park 
Stanton, William A.. Hyattsville 
Stier, Howard L., Lisbon 
Stimpson, Edwin G., College Heights 
Stimson, Jesse L., Washington, D. C. 
Stirton, Alexander J.. Washington. D. C. 
Stranahan. Leonard A., Washington, D. C. 



Strauss, Eleanor R., Baltimore 

Stuart, Leander S.. Bethesda 

Stull, William D., Madison, N. J. 

Sullivan, William N., Jr., Lawrence, Mass. 

Sylvester, Donald M., Jefferson, Me. 

Taylor, J. K., Mt. Rainier 

Teeter, Viola C, Hyattsville 

Terbush, Theron L., Washington, D. C. 

Terrell, Harriet L., Baltimore 

"ferrell, Isador, Baltimore 

Terwilliger, W. Bird, Baltimore 

Thompson, James U., Cambridge 

Thompson, Paul H., Baltimore 

Thrasher, Anne N., Washington, D. C. 

Tillett, Boone D., Athens, Ga. 

Tillson, Albert H., Arlington, Va. 

Tretter, George, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Turner, Carla S., Takoma Park 

Tuve, Richard L., Washington. D. C. 

Tymeson, Sidney W., Takoma Park 

Umberger, Edmund H., Lebanon, Pa. 

Underwood, Paul C, Takoma Park 

Urquhart, Norman R., Lincoln, 111. 

Valaer, Peter J., Baltimore 

Vawter, James H., Laurel 

Volckhausen, Walter R., New York, N. Y. 

Voris, John B., Baltimore 

Walker, Earnest A., Hyattsville 

Wallace, David, Barclay 

Walton, Mary M., Hyattsville 

Watkins, Grace O., Hyattsville 
Watkins, Robert S.. Jessup 
Watt. Lois B., Washington, D. C. 
Watt, Ralph W., Washington. D. C. 
Webster, George L., Baltimore 
Webster, Leroy G., Deal's Island 
Welsh. Llewellyn H.. Washington, D. C. 
Wenzel, Marie E., Laurel 
Weyand, Robert W.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wheeler, Donald H., Silver Spring 
Wliite, Mildred G. Baltimore 
Whiteman, Thomas M., Washington. D. C. 
Whiting, Eugenia H., Washington, D. C. 
Wilkinson, Mabel B., Washington. D. C. 
Williams, Ralph C, Silver Spring 
Williamson, Marion D., College Park 
Willingham, Charles B.. Washington, D. C. 
Wingate, Philip, Baltimore 
Wiseman, Herbert G., Washington, D. C. 
Wolfe, John K„ Washington, D. C. 
Wondrack, Arthur J., Washington, D. C. 
Yonkers, Genevieve A., Flintstone 
Young, George Y., Washington, D. C. 
Youch, Charles A., Baltimore 
Zapponi, Paschal P., Wooster, Ohio 
Zusman, Morris, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SENIOR CLASS 



' • J 



Benton, Betty L.. Silver Spring 
Pooth, Emma L., Brunswick 
Ellis, Bernice, College Park 
Garner, Mary F., Washington, D. C. 
Giles, Martha L., Washington, D. C. 
Goll, Katharine E., Washington, D. C. 
Hazard, Edith W., Takoma Park 
Hughes. Harriet E., Chevy Chase 
Jeffers, Elizabeth C, Washington, D. C. 
Leishear, Virginia E., Washington, D. C. 
Millar, Dorothy V., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Mary F., Silver Spring 



Price, Margaret A., Ridgewood. N. J. 
Rymer, Joan W., Hyattsville 
Snyder, Ruth I.. College Park 
Somers, Helen, Corozal, Canal Zone 
Spitler, Elizabeth, Luray. Va. 
Starr, Margaret E., Hyattsville 
Stearns, Lois E., Mt. Rainier 
Stolzenbach, Helen A., Baltimore 
VoUand. Katherine N., Hyattsville 
Waldman, Flora E., Washington, D, C. 
Weidemann, Janet S., Washington, D. C. 
Wulf, Vivian E., Washington, D. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Allen, Josephine R., Takoma Park 
Baines, Anna M., Lan' am ^ 

Beall, Virginia L., Bethesda 
Beggs, Mary A., Baltimore 
Broughton, Elinor C, College Park 
Burrier, Letitia S., Baltimore 
Caldwell, Katherine, Chevy Chase 
Cruikshank, Eleanor M. A., Baltimore 
Dahn, N. Eloise, Chevy Chase 
Davis, Katherine I., Washington, D. C. 
Dulin, Jean M. A., Chevy Chase 
Fisher, Ida A., Takoma Park 
Gorsuch, M. Jeannette R., New Windsor 
Gould, Irene S., Takoma Park 
Hearn, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 
Jefferson, Evelyn M., Salisbury 
Jenkins, Mary E., Suitland 



Jones, Audrey S., Washington, D. C. 
Kaylor, Helen L., Hagerstown 
Knight, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 
Krauss, Mary G., Baltimore 
Kuhn. Lois M., Bethesda 
Leane, Helen D., Washington, D. C. 
Lyons, Betty L., Sykesville 
McGinn is, Verneena, Pomonkey 
Mills, Josephine H., Cumberland 
Quirk, Eleanor K., Washington, D. C. 
Reville, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Rosin, Anne, Silver Spring 
Snyder. Paula W., Washington, D. C. 
Walker, Vera H., Ellicott City 
Weber, Ruth P., Cumberland 
Wellington, Esther R., Takoma Park 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abbott, Kathryn F., District Heights 
Adkins, Kathryn, Salisbury 
Bain, Betty B., Washington, D. C. 
Balderston, Helen G., Colora 
Beals, Jane H., Washington, D. C. 
Bloom, Betty R., Cleveland Heights, O. 
Bosley, Audrey M., Baltimore 
Byrd, Evelyn W., College Park 
Cain, Harriet G., Felton, Del. 
Cochran, Olive A., Mercer, Pa. 
DeAlba, Doris E., Glen Burnie 
Dunnington, Doris M., Chevy Chase 
George, Mary E., Mt. Rainier 
Hartig, Jean M., Washington, D. C. 
Hill, Millie L., Silver Spring 
Huff, Dorothy, Chevy Chase 
lager, Evelyn L., Annapolis 
Jaccbs, June, Flushing, N. Y. 
Johnson, Virginia M., Baltimore 



Kephart, Jane F., Takoma Park 
Law, Betty H., Washington, D. C. 
MacDonald, Margaret E., Bethesda 
MoGinniss, Bell W., Kensington 
McLean. Anne, Pennington, N. J. 
Miller, Alma V., Baltimore 
Nash, Constance M., Chevy Chase 
Neumann, Eileen C, Freeport, N. Y. 
Piatt. Helen B.. Washington. D. C. 
Samson, Catherine M., Takoma Park 
Skinner, Doris E., Port Republic 
Spehnkouch, Lucia A., Baltimore 
Stevenson, Marguerite S., Takoma Park 
Thawley, Helene E., Denton 
Tucker, Beatrice L., Abingdon 
Waldman, Fredricka I., Washington, D. C. 
Williams, Helen C, Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Ethel J., Washington, D. C. 



348 



349 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



THIRD TEAR DAT CLASS 



Abrahams, Henrietta T., E. Orange, 

N. J. 
Amadon, Virginia, Washington, D. C. 
Baylin, Helen R., Baltimore 
Bland, Mildred A., Suitland 
Bohman, Katherine H., Hagerstown 
Buckler, Mary F., Aquasco 
Bullock, Evelyn A., Baltimore 
Camalier, Elizabeth F., Washingrton, D. C. 
Cogswell, PhyllTs J., Washington, D. C. 
Conners, Marie A., Hyattsville 
Coyle, Margaret L., Upper Marlboro 
Crisp, Margaret S., Baltimore 
Cross, Gail M., Bethesda 
Curry, Tempe H., Bethesda 
Davis, Barbara J., Chevy Chase 
Dennis, Margaret A., Berlin 
Dippel, Marie D., Baltimore 
Dorsey, Sara J., Stoakley 
Downey, Milbrey A., Williamsport 
Enfield. Marjory L., Forest Hill 
Farrington, Mary C, Hyattsville 
Fennell, Beatrice M., Chevy Chase 
Foster, Virginia M., Elkton 
Fouche, Dorothy L., Adamstown 
Graham, Dorothy W., Baltimore 
Hickman, Martha V., Washington, D. C. 
Holbrook. Helen P., College Park 
Huntington. Hannah C, Baltimore 
Hussong, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 



Jones, Mary E., Hyattsville 
Kaiser, Robbin V., Annapolis 
Kraft, Jane L., Washington, D. C. 
Lang, Alice H., E. Norwalk, Conn. 
Leighty, Lena L., Washington, D. C. 
Logan, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
Lyon, Elnora L., Baltimore 
Magdeburger, Kathryn H., Washington. 

D. C. 
Mayhew, Elizabeth A., Hyattsville 
McComas, Lois C, Abingdon 
McDonough, Rita A., Baltimore 
Medbery, Dorothy A., Washington, D. C. 
Menke, Margaret C, Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Marjorie, Fort Monroe, Va. 
Monck, Margaret M., Washington, D. C. 
Mullinix, Esther L., Woodbine 
Nash, Alice M., Berwyn 
Nesbitt, Geraldine H., Baltimore 
Rice, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 
Richmond, Ruth M., Bethesda 
Robinette, Marie B., Washington, D. C. 
Rodgers, Helen, Fort Howard 
Sachs, Evelyn B., Baltimore 
Singletary, Doris L., Baltimore 
Smaltz, Margaret H., Washington, D. C. 
Soper, Ruby E., Washington, D. C. 
Steward, Isabell K., Laurel 
Ward, Maxine E., Washington, D. C. 
Zimmerman, Mary E., Ellieott City 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Burdette. Nellie L., Mt. Airy 
Finney, Elizabeth D., Laurel 
Galloway, Rhea M., Lonaconing 
Gross, Esther B., Sharpsburg 



Higgins, Ruth G., Hyattsville 

McCormac, Elizabeth M., Washington, D. C. 

Shepherd, Claire, Berwyn 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



FOURTH TEAR EVENING CLASS 



Applefeld, Irving J., Baltimore 
Athey, Charles E., Round Bay 
Becker, James S., Baltimore 
Bender, William F., Baltimore 
Bloom, Joseph G., Baltimore 
Carr, Eberle W., Baltimore 
Clarke, DeWitt F., Baltimore 
Cohen, Bernard S., Baltimore 
Coolahan, Joseph P., Baltimore 
Dixon, Earl M., Baltimore 
Graves, Clifford H,. Baltimore 
Houff, Thomas M.. Baltimore 
Jacobson, Alfred T., Baltimore 
Kaplan, Maurice A., Baltimore 



Keech, Frank B., Baltimore 

Linthicum, Sweetser, Linthicum Heights 

Mattingly, Edward W., Baltimore 

Mraz. Anton J.. Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Picario, Philip J., Baltimore 

Power, Gordon G., Baltimore 

Power, John C, Baltimore 

Reynolds, Lee B., Baltimore 

Rouse, James W., Easton 

Stissel, Carl F., Baltimore 

Tucker, William R.. Baltimore 

Walker, D. Merle, Baltimore 

Wesner, Lawrence E., Baltimore 



Buzzell, Allen E., Sparrows Point 
Carscaden, William R., Cumberland 
Cullen. Richard E., Delmar, Del. 
Ewing, Sherley, Baltimore 
Gerson, Milton, Frostburg 
James, William S., Havre de Grace 
Lipin, Edward J., Pasadena 
Maginnis, Paul T., Baltimore 
McFaul, Harry A., Baltimore 
Meyers, Amos I., Baltimore 
Moore, Charles D., Baltimore 

THIRD TEAR 

Athey, William B.. II. Severna Park 
Boyd, J. Frank, Baltimore 
Boyd, Omar K., Baltimore 
Cooper, Norman E., Baltimore 
Daneker, Clayton W., Baltimore 
Dunn, Sylvan R., Baltimore 
Dunnington, Frank P., Jr., Baltimore 
France, Ralph H., Baltimore 
Gamse, Leroy L. F., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Herman, Baltimore 
Harding, Henry J., Jr., Baltimore 
Higinbothom, Edward D., Bel Air 
Hoffman, Grace, Baltimore 
Hopkins, Samuel, Catonsville 



Morton, James C. Linthicum Heights 
Potts, Charles J., Salisbury 
Rouse. John G.. Jr., Baltimore 
Schaub, Edward A., Jr., Baltimore 
Sinskey, Henry L., Jr., Baltimore 
Struzinski, Henry P., Baltimore 
Toula, Jaroslav J., Baltimore 
Tyler, J. Edward, III, Baltimore 
Warhol, John, Jr., Mahwah, N. J. 
Welsh, John T., Cumberland 
Williams, Robert H., Jr., Baltimore 

EVENING CLASS 

Jackson, Charles E., Jr., Baltimore 
Karasik, Abe S., Baltimore 
Karow, William K., Baltimore 
Katzenstein, Alvin, Baltimore 
Kelly, Caleb, R., Baltimore 
Miller, Thomas L., Baltimore 
Motry, George O., Baltimore 
Mueller, Henry A., Baltimore 
Rothschild, Walter. Baltimore 
Sattler, Eugene J.. Baltimore 
Silverman, Arnold. Baltimore 
Storm, Edward D., Frederick 
Sybert, Edward J., Elkridge 
Thompson, Charles W., Mt. Washington 



SECOND TEAR DAT CLASS 



Archer, Robert H., Jr., Bel Air 
Barbour, John K., Jr., Catonsville 
Barclay, Frederick H., Jr., Baltimore 
Barrett, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Bartlett, Thomas R., Baltimore 
Beck, James D., Baltimore 
Beck, S. Scott, Jr., Chestertown 
Benjamin, Paul E., Baltimore 
Bernstein, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Clark, John L., Ellieott City 
Colgan, Charles W., Baltimore 
Earnshaw, Benjamin A., Baltimore 
Ellis, Joseph A., Hebron 
Filler, Edwin W., Baltimore 
Garfunkel, Sylvan A., Savannah, Ga. 
Gillis, Lee S., St. Michaels 
Goldstein, Louis L., Prince Frederick 
Handy, Francis D., Baltimore 
Harkness, David A„ Mutual 
Hecht, Isaac, Baltimore 
Jacob, John E., Jr., Baltimore 



Kirsner, Milton F., Baltimore 

Long, John W., Fruitland 

Love, Richard H., Hyattsville 

Magers, John E., Jr., Ruxton 

Malkus, Frederick C, Cambridge 

Meyer, Bernard S., Baltimore 

Miller, Amols M., Chester, Pa. 

Murray, Donald G.. Baltimore 

Prettyman, Charles W., Rockville 

Rascovar, Roy L., Baltimore 

Riehl, Louis M., Lansdowne 

Robb, John M., Cumberland 

Rubin, Jesse J., Baltimore 

Scherr, Max, Baltimore 

Sheridan, Hugh L., Baltimore 

Starr, John E., Hyattsville 

TuU, Miles T., Marion 

Wenchel, John P., II, Washington, D. C 

Whalin, Cornelius, Hyattsville 

Williams, T. Bayard. Jr., Baltimore 

Williamson, George L., Cumberland 



SECOND TEAR EVENING CLASS 



Andrew, Thomas G., Baltimore 
Banks, Talbot W., Baltimore 
Benson, Alvin L., Westminster 
Blackhurst, James W., Baltimore 



Bowles, Martin C, Baltimore 
Buppert, Doran H., Baltimore 
Clark, Louis D., Ellieott City 
Cohen, Irvin H., Baltimore 



350 



351 



Cohen, Jerome B., Baltimore 

Dyer, Harry E., Jr., Havre de Grace 

Farinholt, Leroy W., Jr., Baltimore 

Green, Thomas O., Jr., Towson 

Hopkins, John H., IV, Baltimore 

Jobson, George J., Catonsville 

Joyce, Jerome J., Baltimore 

Kirby, Raymond A., Baltimore 

Kolker. Fabian H., Baltimore 

Lassotovitch, Vladimir S., Havre de Grace 

Levinson, Irvin A., Baltimore 

Loeser, Richard A.. Baltimoi-e 

Lubinski, Edmund W., Baltimore 

Macgill, James, Slmpsonville 



McGreevy, John R., Baltimore 
MeKenrick, Stratford E., Baltimore 
Plant, Albin J., Baltimore 
Posner, Louis, Baltimore 
Rasin, Alexander P., Jr., Chestertown 
Redmond, James A., Jr., Baltimore 
Saks, Benson J., Baltimore 
Siemon, John A., Baltimore 
Slowik, Lawrence R., Baltimore 
Tiralla. Henry M., Jr., Baltimore 
Topper, Bernard C., Baltimore 
Weir, Albert E., Baltimore 
Wilson, Frank K., Jr., Baltimore 
Wisotzki, Clark T., Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



FIRST YEAR DAY CLASS 



Bloodgood, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Byrd, Charles M., Baltimore 
Clark, Leslie J., Lonaconing 
Clarke, George L., Pikesville 
Edmondson, Charles E., Cambridge 
Frailey, Carson G.. Emmitsburg 
Fuller, Frances E., Crisfield 
Getty, Gorman E., Jr., Lonaconing 
Goldberg, Harry, Baltimore 
Jones, Joseph F., Baltimore 
Jones, Lewis R., Oakland 
Kalis, Samuel D., Baltimore 
Kelly, Charles B., Jr., Hamilton 
Long. Eloise G.. Salisbury 
Lovell, Marker J., New Windsor 
Monroe, Edward G.. Baltimore 
Oken, Fred, Baltimore 
Ready, Roland C, Mt. Lake Park 



Sallow, William H., Baltimore 
Scrivener, David S., Washington, D. C. 
Shaivitz, Phyllis D.. Baltimore 
Silberg, Melvin S.. Baltimore 
Smith, John H., Cumberland 
Sullivan, John C, Jr., Baltimore 
Taylor, Alfred F., Darlington 
Tuerk, Carl E., Baltimore 
Vogel, Albert T., Baltimore 
Wasserman, Jerome, Baltimore 
Watchorn, Arthur W., Millbury. Mass. 
Waterman, Caroline H., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Welsh, Barnard T., Rockville 
Welsh. Paul E.. Baltimore 
White, George W., Baltimore 
Williams, Lawrence E., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, Richard E., Frederick 



FIRST YEAR EVENING CLASS 



Alexander, Eugene J., Laurel 
Bank, Howard M., Baltimore 
Bielinski, Leon B., Baltimore 
Bussey, Eugene, Baltimore 
Care, Harold C, Baltimore 
Cox, Charles H., Baltimore 
Douglass. Calvin A., Baltimore 
Glass, Louis J., Baltimore 
Hedrick, Thomas H., Baltimore 
Herrmann, John O., Baltimore 
Howell, George E.. Baltimore 
Howell, Joseph F., Baltimore 
Huff, James K.. Jr., Forest. Miss. 
Hunt, Richard G., Baltimore 
Johnson, Clarence L., Annapolis 



Kesmodel, Charles R., Baltimore 
McCray, Jonathan F., Towson 
Morfit, Charles C, Jr., Baltimore 
Ottenheimer, Edwin, Baltimore 
Paar, Francis W. H., Baltimore 
Paymer, Leonard, Baltimore 
Rechner, Charles F.. Jr., Baltimore 
Robertson, Emma S., Baltimore 
Scanland, Robert B., Chevy Chase 
Tobler, John O., Baltimore 
Waller, William L., Annapolis 
Waterman, Richard H., Catonsville 
Whayland, Frances E., Baltimore 
Whiteford, Charles G., Baltimore 
Yeager, Paul J., Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED EVENING 



Beck, Frances, Baltimore 
Curr. C. Jelleff, Baltimore 
Conley, Carroll L., Baltimore 
Dozois. K, Pierre, Baltimore 



Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Painter, Elizabeth E., Baltimore 
Schenthal, Joseph E., Baltimore 



SENIOR CLASS 



Coonan, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Lang, Samuel J., Catonsville 



Moran, Francis R., Baltimore 
Pyle, James H., Baltimore 



Abbott, Thomas G., Baltimore 
Bank, R. Stanley, Baltimore 
Barnett, Ernest, New York, N. Y. 
Bereston, Eugene S., Baltimore 
Brill, Leonard, Baltimore 
Burtnick, Lester L., Baltimore 
Carlson, Carl E., New Haven, Conn. 
Casanova Diaz. Jose R., Hato Rey, Puerto 

Rico 
Christensen, Roland A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Cocimano, Joseph M., Washington, D. C. 
Cooney, Robert F., Scran ton. Pa. " 
Coughlan, Stuart G., Baltimore 
Daily, Louis E., Baltimore 
D'Alessio, Charles M., Derby, Conn. 
D'Amico, Thomas V., Newark, N. J. 
Davidson, Eli, New York, N. Y. 
Deradorian, Neshon E., New Britain, Conn. 
Diggs, Everett S., Baltimore 
Eisner. William M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ellison, Emanuel S.. Baltimore 
Ensor, Helen R., Baltimore 
Feldman, Philip M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Finn, John H.. Pittsfield, Mass. 
Frenkil, James, Baltimore 
Frohman, Isaac, Baltimore 
Gehlert, Sidney R., Baltimore 
Gillespie, John L., Arlington, N. J. 
Goffin, Herbert, New York, N. Y. 
Goldberg, Sigmund. Baltimore 
Gordon. William C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gore, Robert J., Baltimore 
Gottdiener, Elvin E.. Baltimore 
Greenwald, Frank, New York, N. Y. 
Hahn, Charles S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hedrick, Grover C, Jr.. Beckley, W. Va. 
Highstiein, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Hochfeld, Leo. New York, N. Y. 
Hodgson, Eugene W., Houston, Pa. 
Hoffman, Charles W., Jr., Baltimore 
Humphries, William C, Baltimore 
Insley, James K., Jr., Baltimore 
Jackson, Samuel, New York. N. Y. 
Jacobson, Alan. Baltimore 
Johnston, Clarence F., Jr., Baltimore 
Jones, James P.. Fennsboro, W. Va. 
Kadan, J. Earl, Takoma Park 
Kagen, Gordon A., Reading. Pa. 



Kaltreider, D. Frank O., Jr.. Red Lion, Pa. 
Kaplan, Isadore, Baltimore 
Kaplan, Jack A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kaplan, Nathan, Baltimore 
Katz, Albert H., Baltimore 
Katz. Isadore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kemick, Irvin B., Baltimore 
Klemkowski, Irvin P., Baltimore 
Kolman, Lester N., Baltimore 
Kunkowski, Mitchell F., Baltimore 
Leskin, Louis W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Levine, Leonard W., Hartford, Conn. 
Levinson, Leonard J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Linhardt, Elmer G., Eastport 
Lisansky, Ephraim T., Baltimore 
Long, William B., Jr., Princess Anne 
Lubinski, Chester J., Baltimore 
Mackowiak, Stephen C, Dundalk 
Manieri, Frank V.. Baltimore 
Marino, Irene T., Allegany, N. Y. 

Matheke, Otto G., Jr., Newark. N. J. 

Meyer, Milton J., Jamaica, N. Y. 
Muller, Stephen E., Bradshaw 

Muse, Joseph E.. Baltimore 

Myers, Philip, Baltimore 

Nataro, Maurice, Newark. N. J. 

Owens, Richard S., Jr., Roanoke, Va. 

Pass. Isidore E., Baltimore 

Pavlatos, August C, Lancaster, Fa. 

Perlman, Lawrence, Ridgewood, N. Y. 

Piccolo, Pasquale A., New Haven, Conn. 

Pokrass, Frederick P., Towanda, Pa, 

Resnick, Elton, Baltimore 

Revell, Samuel T. R., Jr., Louisville, Ga. 

Rigdon, Henry L., Aberdeen 

Robins, Isadore M., Luzerne, Pa. 

Robinson, Martin H., Philadelphia, Pa, 

Rochkind, Reuben, Baltimore 

Roseman, Ephraim, Baltimore 

Rubin, Morris, New Haven, Conn. 

Rudman, Gilbert E.. Baltimore 

Safran, Sidney, Baltimore 

Sakowski, John P., Bayonne, N. J. 

Sartorius, Norman E., Jr., Pocomoke 

Scarborough, Clarence P., Jr., Delta, Pa. 

Schmidt, Jacob E., Baltimore 

Seegar, John K. B. E., Jr., Baltimore 

Seidel, Joshua, Baltimore 



352 



353 



Semoff, Milton C. F., Sea Gate, New York 

Harbor. N. Y. 
Shapiro. Abraham A., Baltimore 
Shear, Meyer R., Baltimore 
Spielman, Morton M., Baltimore 
Stapen, Mannie, Brooklyn, N, Y. 
Statman, Bernhardt J., Newark, N. J. 
Steiner, Albert, Baltimore 
Sullivan, Thomas J., New York, N. Y. 
Suwalsky, Sydney, Hartford, Conn, 
Trupp, Mason. Baltimore 

JUNIOR 

Abarbanel, Milton G., Jersey City, N. J. 

Abramson, Daniel J., Baltimore 

Applefeld, Willard, Baltimore 

Baum, Max, Baltimore 

Bonner, Robert A., Jr., Waterbury, Conn. 

Borden, Melvin N., Baltimore 

Bowers, John Z., Catonsville 

Bradley, Stanley E., Baltimore 

Brooks, Wilbur S., New York, N. Y. 

Brown, Manuel. Baltimore 

Bunting, John J., Clifton, N. J. 

Callahan, Timothy A., Jr., Bel Air 

Chance, Burton, Jr., Radnor, Pa. 

Cohen, Hilliard, Baltimore 

Colleran, Harold L., Jessup, Pa, 

Coolahan, John F., Baltimore 

Cooper, Donald D., Towson 

Costas, Jaime L., Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Crawford, Robert C, Baltimore 

Dausch, Michael J., Baltimore 

Dodd, William A., Baltimore 

Dolfman, Victor, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eichert, Arnold H., Woodlawn 

Feder, Aaron, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Fox, Lester I., Haverhill, Mass. 

Fox, Samuel L., Baltimore 

Gareis, Louis C, Baltimore 

George, Joseph M., Jr., Sudlersville 

Gertman, Samuel, Baltimore 

Gibel, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ginsberg, Milton, Baltimore 

Glassman, Edward L., Baltimore 

Goodman, Louis E., Jr., Baltimore 

Goodman, Sylvan C, Baltimore 

Gottdiener, Florence H. H., Baltimore 

Govons, Sidney R., Baltimore 

Graff, Frederick L., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Guyton, William L., Baltimore 

Haase, John H., Baltimore 

Harris, Sidney, Paterson, N. J. 

Hayleck, Mary L., Baltimore 

Horky. John R., Bel Air 

Januszeski, Francis J., Baltimore 

Katz, Milton A., Westminster 

Kelmenson, Harry, Baltimore 



Weems, George J., Baltimore 
Weiss, Henry W., Ellenville. N. Y. 
Whitworth, Frank D., Westernport 
Wilkin, Mabel G., Brenham, Texas 
Williams, Richard J., Cumberland 
Williams, Robert R., Rochester, N, Y, 
Wolff, Eldridge H., Cambridge 
Woodrow, Jack H., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Zack, Frank A., Webster, Mass. 
Zeligman. Israel, Baltimore 



CLASS 

Knox, John J., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Kotleroff, Jerome S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kump, Albert B., Bridgeton, N. J. 

Kurtz, Gerald I., Paterson, N. J. 

LaMar, David W., Middletown 

Lauve, Celeste C, Baltimore 

Layden, Milton, Baltimore 

Lenker, Luther A., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lipsitz, Morton H., Baltimore 

Lopez, Hilton L., Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Lumpkin, William R., Baltimore 

Michaelson, Ernest, Bladensburg 

Milholland, Arthur V., Baltimore 

Miller, Clarence L., Hannibal. Mo. 

Miller, Royston, Baldwin 

Miniszek, James H., Baltimore 

Molofsky, Leonard C, Baltimore 

Post, Laurence C, Buckhannon, W. Va. 

Powell, Geraldine K., Baltimore 

Rizzolo, John, Newark, N. J. 

Roman, Paul, Baltimore 

Rossello, Juan A., Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Rothkopf. Henry. Ellenville, N. Y. 

Sabatino, Bernard J., Baltimore 

Sarajian, Aram M., Ridgefield Park, N. J 

Schaefer, John F., Baltimore 

Schammel, Adam J., Baltimore 

Scherlis, Sidney, Baltimore 

Schlesinger, Robert A., Flushing, N. Y, 

Schmulovitz, Maurice J., Baltimore 

Scott, John M., Baltimore 

Sevcik, Charles V., Baltimore 

Sheppard, Robert C, Baltimore 

Siegel, Edward, Poughkeepsle. N. Y. 

Silberman, Donald J., Birmingham, Ala. 

Smith, John P., Baltimore 

Sprei, Emanuel, New Yoik, N. Y. 

Stein. Aaron, Baltimore 

Steinberg, Morris W., Baltimore 

Swiss, Adam G., Baltimore 

Thomas, Bernard O., Frederick 

Thompson, James U., Cambridge 

Thompson, Winfield L., Rehobefh 

Urlock, John P., Jr., Baltimore 

VoUmer, Frederick .!.. Baltimore 



Wagner. John A.. Baltimore 
^r^^rres, Herbert L.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Way, John E., Beaufort. N. C. 
Welfeld, Alvan, Baltimore 
White. Harry F., Jr., Baltimore 
White, Samuel C. Baltimore 



Winer, Albert S., Baltimore 
Woodward, Theodore E., Westminster 
Worthington. Richard W.. Jr., Baltimore 
Wulwick, Michael, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Yaffe. Kennard L.. Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE 



Abrahams. John J.. Jr.. Port Deposit 

Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 

Baylus, Herman, Baltimore 

Beck, Harry M.. Baltimore 

Herman, Edgar F., Baltimore 

Bernstein, Aaron, Baltimore 

Bernstein, Albion C. New York. N. Y. 

Bess, Elizabeth G., Keyser, W. Va. 

Bloom, Max R., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Brezinski, Edward J., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Briele, Henry A., Baltimore 

Brodsky, Bernard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cianos, James N.. Baltimore 

Coffman. Robert T.. Keyser. W. Va. 

Cohen, Frank S., Baltimore 

Corbitt, Richard W., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Cunningham, Raymond M., Baltimore 

Filtzer, David L., Baltimore 

Fink, Francis T., Baltimore 

Freed, Arnold U., Baltimore 

Fusting, William H., Baltimore 

Gaver, Leo J.. Myersville 

Goldberg. Raymond B., Baltimoi-e 

Goldberg, Sylvan D., Baltimore 

Grier, George S., III. Milford, Del. 

Grott, Harold A., Baltimore 

Hainowitz, Samuel I., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hartman, Oscar, Baltimore 

Hartz, Alvin S., Baltimore 

Heimoff. Leonard L., New York. N. Y. 

Hooker. Charles B., Takoma Park 

Hutchins, Thomas M., Bowens 

Isaacson, Benjamin, Hyattsville 

Jandorf, Reuben D.. Baltimore 

Jannarone, Lewis H.. Belleville, N. J. 

Jones, Charles W., Baltimore 

Kairys, David, Baltimore 

Kammer, William H., Jr.. Baltimore 

Kappelman, Melvin D., Baltimore 

Keister, Philip W., Lansdowne 

Kerr, James P., Boyd 

Kiely, James A., Cortland. N. Y. 



CLASS 

Kinnamon, Howard F., Jr.. Easton 
Kleiman. Bernard S., Baltimore 
Kurland. Albert A., Baltimore 
Kyle, Henry H.. Waterbury 
Lapinsky, Herbert, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lavenstein. Arnold F., Baltimore 
Layman, William T., Hagerstown 
Leitch, William H., Friendship 
Magness, Stephen L., Baltimore 
Magruder, John R., Baltimore 
Marks. Irving L., Baltimore 
McClafferty, William J.. Jr., West War- 
wick, R. I. 
McLaughlin. Francis J.. Towson 
Meyer, Alvin F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miller, Irving, New York, N. Y. 
Miller, William S., Baltimore 
Moran, John A., Conway, Mass. 
Nuttall, James B., Sharptown 
Palmer, David W.. Wheeling, W. Va. 
Polek, Melvin F., Baltimore 
Reimann, Dexter L., Baltimore 
Rochberg, Samuel, Passaic, N. J. 
Ruzicka, Edwin R.. Baltimore 
Sadove. Max S., Baltimore 
Scher, Isadore, Baltimore 
Sexton, Thomas S., Sisterville, W. Va. 
Siegel, Maurice, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smoak, Philip L., Tampa, Fla. 
Solarz, Sylvan D., Baltimore 
Spiegel. Herbert, McKeesport, Pa. 
Steger, William J., Wheeling. W. Va. 
Stevens. Leland B., Millington 
Tai-tikoff, George, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thomas, Ramsay B., Towson 
Wallenstein, Leonard, Baltimore 
Wanner, Jesse R., Jr., Salisbury 
Whitworth, Fuller B., Westernport 
Wilder, Milton J., Ferndale 
Wilner, Solomon, New York, N. Y. 
Zalis, Daniel L.. Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Andrews, S. Ralph, Jr., Elkton 
Baier, John C, Mt. Hays 
Bailey, Walter L., York, Pa. 
Barker, Daniel C, Niantic, Conn. 



Beacham, Edmund G., Baltimore 
Biehl, Harold P.. Frederick 
Borden. Jesse N.. Baltimore 
Brinsfield. Irving C, Vienna 



354 



355 



I 



Caplan, Lester H., Baltimore 

Clifford, Robert H., Jr., Mountain Lakes, 

N. J. 
Cole. John T., Warren, Ohio 
Correll, Paul H., Catonsville 
Daue, Edwin O., Jr., Silver Spring 
DeLuca, Joseph, Bristol, R. I. 
DonDiego, Leonard V., Brooklyn, N. Y, 
Duffy, William C. Baltimore 
Dwyer, James R., Renovo, Pa, 
Fertner, Martin L., Red Lion, Pa. 
Freeman, James A., Jr., West Union, W. 

Va. 
Gassaway, William F., Ellicott City 
Click. Irving V., New York, N. Y. 
Guzman-Lopez, Luis R., San Juan, Puerto 

Rico. 
Hecht, Morton, Jr., Baltimore 
Henning, Emil H., Jr., Baltimore 
Heyman, Albert, Baltimore 
Hooton, Elizabeth L.. Hyattsville 
Hope, Daniel, Jr., Ellicott City 
Howell, Thomas P., Ellerbe, N. C. 
Igartua-Cardona, Susana, Aguadilla, Puerto 

Rico 
Inloes, Benjamin H., Jr., Baltimore 
Johnson, Robert D., Annapolis 
Kams, James R., Baltimore 
Kirchick, Julian G., Brooklyn, N, Y. 
Kohn, Schuyler G., Baltimore 
Krieg, Edward F., Baltimore 
Lartz, Robert E., Sharon, Pa. 
Ling, William S. M., Fatshan, China 
Livingood, William C, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 
Maccubbin, Harry P., Baltimore 
Markline, Simeon V., White Hall 
Martin, Clarence W.. IL Baltimore 
Maryanov, Alfred R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mathers, Daniel H., Annapolis 
McClung, James E., Baltimore 
McClung, William D., Rich wood, W. Va. 
McDaniel, (Jeorge C, Baltimore 
McKinnon, William J., Maxton, N. C. 
Meade, Forest C, Hyattsville 
Miceli. Joseph, Baltimore 



Molz, Edward L., Baltimore 
Murphy, Frederick E., Jr., Jesup, Ga. 
Muse, William T., Baltimore 
Myers. G. Roger, Jr., Hurlock 
Odiorne, Philip W., Coopers Mills, Me. 
O'Hara, James F., Canton, Ohio 
Pasamanick, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pico, Guillermo, Hato Rey. Puerto Rico 
Pierpont, Ross Z., Woodlawn 
Flatt, William, Baltimore 
Pollock, Arthur E., Gallitzen, Pa. 
Posner, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pound, John C, Jr., Baltimore 
Quail, Thomas H., Baltimore 
Rath. Maurice M., Newark, N. J. 
Rees. David T., Jr.. Keyser, W. Va. 
Rhode, Charles M.. Baltimore 
Richter, Conrad L., Baltimore 
Robinson, Raymond C. V., Baltimore 
Roop, Donald J.. New Market 
Rothschild, Carl E., Chefoo, China 
Russell, Thomas E., Jr., Frederick 
Russillo, Philip J., Annapolis 
Sappington, Richard C, Libertytown 
Schlesinger, George G., New York, N. Y. 
Sloan, Joseph W., Bayonne, N. J. 
Smith, Benedict F., Baltimore 
Smith, James B., Baltimore 
Squillante. Orlando J., Warren, R. I. 
Stayton, Howard N., Jr., Wilmington, Del. 
Strayer, Webster M., Jr., Baltimore 
Supik, William J., Baltimore 
Tankin, Louis H., Baltimore 
Thompson, Alexander F., Troy, N. C. 
Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
Tompakov, Samuel, Baltimore 
Townshend. Wilfred H., Jr., Baltimore 
Trevor, William, Baltimore 
Triplett, W. Carryl, St. Marys, W. Va. 
Waite, Merton T., Odenton 
Wilkins, Jesse L., Pocomoke City 
Williams, Richard T., Waterbury 
Wilson, Harry T., Jr., Baltimore 
Wolff, William I., New York, N. Y. 
Zinkin, Solomon, Lakewood, N. J. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Snyder, Tillie, Baltimore 

V MEDICAL ART STUDENTS 

Ezekiel, Josephine V., San Anselmo, Cal. Miller, Frank W., Catonsville 



Krulewitz, Jeanette G., Baltimore 



Sage, Robert A., Des Moines, Iowa 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST 

Zimmerman, Grace I., Schaefferstown, Pa. 

356 



Bowling. Vernice L., Elm City. N. C. 
Dodson. Ruth E., Baltimore 
Johannes. Norma L., Pekin, 111. 
Lubinski, Sophie A.. Baltimore 
Magaha. Annabelle L.. Frederick 



Miller. Hazel A.. Fawn Grove, Pa. 
Rose, Margaret B., Atlanta, Ga. 
Thompson, Ruby J., Logan, W. Va. 
Wicker, Virginia D. C, Danville. Va. 



SENIOR CLASS 



Banes. Mary V.. Manokin 
Bo-^ley. Wanda D.. White Marsh 
Carpenter, Catherine E., Waverly, Va. 
Cornelius, Sarah, Baltimore 
Cramer, Mildred E.. Walkersville 
Dallmus, Esther M., Baltimore 
' Fadeley, Anne E.. Havre de Grace 
Hersh, Naomi G.. Manchester 
Hooe. Mina G., Charles Town, W. Va. 

Kautz. Marjorie L., Somerset, Penna. 

Kluka, Mary, Farrell, Penna. 

Knight, Sallie F.. Courtland. Va. 

Lewis, Edith E., Havre de Grace 

Mattson, Evelyn L., Baltimore 

McArthur, Muriel H., Awendaw, S. O. 

Moye, Louise M., Goldsboro, N. C. 

O'Connor, Beatrice P., Sanford, Fla. 

Parks, Willye F., Parksley. Va. 



Pennington, Rose, Bel Air 

Pilgrim, Beatrice L., Cbambersburg, Pa. 

Quarterma, Lena W.. Nicholls. Ga. 

Rayme, Carolyn R., FuUerton 

Rudisill, Mary L.. Iron Station, N. C 

Sappington, Frances V.. Hagerstown 

Scarborough, Dusetta E., Street 

Shaffer, Charlotte E.. Hampstead 

Sherrill. Evelyn F.. Sparks 

Skinner. Mary I.. Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Slick, Jane I., Hagerstown 

Stauffer, Eleanor F., Cardiff 

Strickland, Rose E.. Curwinsville. Penna. 

Sutton, Edna E., Goldsboro, N. C. 

Toom, Dorothy, Baltimore 

Turner, Margaret C, Mayodan. N. C. 

Wagner. Helen K., Barrackville, W. Va. 

Wilson, Mabyl J.. Baltimore 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Albright. Ann E., Nanticoke 
Bates. Victoria W., Greenville, S. C. 
Baughman, Anna M.. Somerset. Penna. 
Bowling. Ada G.. Elm City. N. C. 
Breedlove, Annie M.. Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Burbage, Katherine E.. Salisbury 
Coleman, Dorothy E., Livermore. Penna. 
Coleman, Myrtle A., Baltimore 
Connelly, Nancy V., Rising Sun 
Dees. Mary A., Goldsboro, N. C. 
Dixon. Dorothy L.. Wilmington. N. C. 
Eckenrode. Mary R., Manchester 
Ensor, Beatrice F., Westminster 
Finks. Ruth A.. Marshall. Va. 
Gambill, Treva L.. Bel Air 
Garrison, Alice V., Washington, D. C. 
Graham. Carola B., Hampstead 
Hanna, Lois C Mount Solon. Va. 
Haugh, Gwendolyn, Upperco 



Hedrick. Anna Lee. Beckley. W. Va. 
Kalar, Nelda. Westminster 
Kalbaugh, Mary E.. Luke 
Kroh. Louise E.. Bradshaw 
Llewellyn. Anne P.. Cockeysville 
Mays, Sara J.. Cockeysville 
McNabb. Lena. Greeneville. Tenn. 
Monath, Vivian V., Hagerstown 
Selkamaa, Ingrid E., Baltimore 
Stephens. Katherine E., Hertford, N. C. 
Stephenson. Doris V.. Baltimore 
Streett, Flora M., Street 
Terry, Virginia A., Washington, D. C. 
Tharpe, Iva L., Bel Air 
Walker, Alice J., Ellicott City 
Wert, Janice M., Sparrows Point 
Wilson. Katherine. Randallstown 
Winfield, Irma H., Rohrersville 
Yeager, Susan M., Thomas, W. Va. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Bennington. Margaret E., Delta, Penna. 
Clark, Mary S., Brunswick, Ga. 
Dorsett, Frances E., Indian Head 
Foster. Lucille E.. Beckley, W. Va. 
Hoffman, Helen M., Clarksburg, W. Va. 



HoUister, Louise M., Denton 
Magruder. Catherine B., Baltimore 
Roach, Mary J., Hagerstown 
Travers, Marion E.. Nanticoke 



357 



PROBATION CLASS 



Beall. Margaret D., Eidge water 
Bolyard. Ruth L., Grafton. W. Va. 
Brayshaw, Katherine H., Smithfield, Va. 
Calladine, Virginia J., Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
Clark, Elizabeth G., Havre de Grace 
Conley, Virginia C, Baltimore 
Conyers, Rachel M., Wilson. N. C. 
Craven, Nancy L., Asheboro, N. C. 
Culler, Margaret C, Frederick 
Danforth, Dorothy M., Baltimore 
Davis. Shirley M., Baltimore 
Doyle, Thelma C, Lonaconing 
Feeser, Grace E., Littlestown, Penna. 
Foster, Marguerite W., Sparks 
Grammer, Julia J., Waverly, Va. 
Grant, Catherine E., Live Oak, Fla. 
Grossnickle, Mildred M., Myersville 



Harris, Mary E., Tampa, Fla. 

Hayes, Mary G., Davidsonville 

Keller, Mary E., Bel Air 

Lee, Margaret M,. Glen Burnie 

Lloyd, Charlotte A., Galeton. Penna. 

Long, Audrey N.. Lynchburg, Va. 

Marshall, Lolah H., Baltimore 

Marslander, Ruth C Beaufort. N. C, 

Mullan, Mary E., Baltimore 

Remke. Pauline I., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Richardson, Virginia B.. Waverly, Va. 

Roe, Jeanette, Port Deposit 

Shaff, Dorothy E.. Jeffei-son 

Tucker, Kathleen H., Galesville 

Umphlett, Myra I., Winfall, N. C. 

Vandevoort. Susan H., Middletown, Penna. 

Wilson, Margaret F., Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Bellman, Frank A., Baltimore 

Cohen, Bernard C, Baltimore 

Cross, John M., Little Falls, N. J. 

Cwalina, Gustav E., Baltimore 

DeDominicis, Amelia C, Baltimore 

Dunker, Melvin F. W,, Baltimore 

Foster, Carroll P., Baltimore 

Gilbert, Loamie M., Jr., Benson, N. C. 

Grove, Donald C, Baltimore 

Hunt, William H., Baltimore 

Keyes, Winifred, A., W. Missoula, Mont. 

Levin, Nathan, Baltimore 



McNamara, Bernard P., Baltimore 

Messina, Julius A., Baltimore 

Miller, Howard A.. Rochester, N. Y. 

Millett, Sylvia, Pen-Mar, Pa. 

Moskey, Thomas A., Jr., Washington, D. C 

Purdum. William A., Baltimore 

Rice, Robb V., Baltimore 

Smith, William H., Jr., Baltimore 

Thompson, Paul H., Baltimore 

Tramer, Arnold, Baltimore 

Youch, Charles A., Baltimore 



SENIOR CLASS 



Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Alliker, Morris J., Baltimore 
Alperstein, Reuben R., Baltimore 
Beck, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Bliden, Abraham, Baltimore 
Brune, Richard E., Baltimore 
Cermak, Jerome J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Hershel, Baltimore 
Damico, Samuel, Baltimore 
Dawson, Leroy C, Baltimore 
Einbinder, Sylvan P., Baltimore 
Ellerin, Albert A., Baltimore 
Enten, Harry, Baltimore 
Feret, Julius W., Baltimore 
Fish, Herman J., Baltimore 
Friedman, Charles S., Grafton, W. Va. 
Glickman, Shirley M., Baltimore 
Hanna, William M., Baltimore 
Hoffman, Sylvan A., Baltimore 



Kaminski, Felix H., Baltimore 
Karpa, Jerome J., Baltimore 
Kellough, Elmer R., Jr., Cumberland 
Kobin, Benny, Baltimore 
Levy, Abraham M., Baltimore 
Levy, Frank F., Baltimore 
Libowitz, Aaron M., Baltimore 
Lieb, Frank J., Baltimore 
Mayer, Alexander M., Baltimore 
McGinity, F. Rowland, Baltimore 
Merkel, Henry, Baltimore 
Miller, Milton, Baltimore 
Miller, Solomon, Baltimore 
Mindell, Charles, Baltimore 
Morgenstern, Emma L., Woodlawn 
Mouat, Gordon A., Baltimore 
Musacchio, Leo M., Baltimore 
Myers, Irvin L.. Baltimore 
Neutze, John F.. Baltimore 



Nurkin. Bernice V., Baltimore 
purdum. Frank L., Baltimore 
Rabinowitz. Irving W.. Baltimore 
Rapoport. Leonard, Baltimore 
Raudonis. John A.. Hudson. N. H. 
Bosenfeld. Israel A.. Baltimore 
Butkowski. Edward V. P.. Baltimore 
Santoni, Daniel A.. Baltimore 
Sapperstein. Edward I.. Baltimore 
Sborofsky, Isadore. Baltimore 
Scherr, Melvin G., Baltimore 
Schumm, Frederick A., Baltimore 



Seechuk, William W.. Baltimore 
Semer. Gerald M., Baltimore 
Silverman. Irvin I.. Baltimore 
Tompakov, Sylvan, Baltimore 
Traband. Millard T., Baltimore 
Turner. Albert F.. Baltimore 
Walb. Winfield A., Baltimore 
Wasilewski. Theodore J., Baltimore 
Weiner, David, Baltimore 
Weisberg, Ruth R., Baltimore 
Winn, Solomon, Baltimore 
Zenitz, Bernard L., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aaronson. Alfred L. Baltimore 
Beam, Merlin A.. Garrison 
Bixler. Richard S.. New Windsor 
Cohen, Bernard I., Baltimore 
Colvin, Ralph, Baltimore 
Combs, Joseph L., Jr.. Baltimore 
Crane. Warren E.. Loch Arbour, N. J. 
DiGristine, Charles L.. Baltimore 
Edlavitch, Sam, Baltimore 
Floyd, Melvin L., Catonsville 
Fribush, Sidney, Baltimore 
Gakenheimer. Walter C. CatonBvUle 
Galley, Roland P., Baltimore 
Gendason, Harry B., Baltimore 
Ciller, Morris, Baltimore 
Ginaitis, Alphonsus S., Baltimore 
Gregorek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Hager, George P., Jr.. Baltimore 
Hamlin, Kenneth E.. Jr., Baltimore 
Heyman, Bernice, Baltimore 
Hopkins. Carville B.. Annapolis 
Jarowski, Charles. Baltimore 
Jones, Cyrus F., Baltimore 
Kaminkow, Joseph, Baltimore 
Katz, Emanuel O.. Baltimore 
Katz, Morton, Baltimore 
Kelley. Gordon W., Baltimore 
Kosakowski, Chester G.. Baltimore 



Levin. Benjamin S.. Baltimore 
Levin, Jacob B., Baltimore 
Levin, Norman J., Baltimore 
Levy, Bernard. Baltimore 
Loftus, Howard E., Dundalk 
Matelis. Olga P., Baltimore 
Morgenstern. William A.. Jr.. Woodlawn 
Muehlhause, Ruth V.. Baltimore 
Novak, Arthur F.. Baltimore 
Oleszczuk, Melvin J.. Baltimore 
Pearlman. Albert. Baltimore 
Pressman. Isadore, Baltimore 
Pucklis, Frank S.. Baltimore 
Rhode. John G.. Baltimore 
Richman, Jacob L.. Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Morris, Baltimore 
Schade, Joseph H.. Westemport 
Silverstein, Bernard. Baltimore 
Stoler, Myer, Baltimore 
Sussman. Bernard, Baltimore 
Thompson, Robert E.. Waubay. S. D. 
Wachsman, Irvin L., Baltimore 
Waxman, Milton M.. Baltimore 
Webster, Thomas C, Baltimore 
Wich, Joseph C Baltimore 
Young, George I., Catonsville 
Zerofsky, Harold, Baltimore 
^etlin, Henry P., Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred H., Baltimore 
Baker, Daniel S., Baltimore 
Binstock, Albert, Baltimore 
Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 
Dobropolski, Anthony J., Baltimore 
Dorsch, Joseph U.. Baltimore 
Folus, Irving H., Baltimore 
Francik, Joseph. Baltimore 
Freedman. Leonard, Baltimore 
Ginsberg, Samuel H., Baltimore 
Glaser, Louis L., Baltimore 
Golditch, Henry M.. Baltimore 
Gruz. Nathan I.. Baltimore 



Hackett. Angela R.. Baltimore 
Heneson. Irving J.. Baltimore 
Mask, Jerome. Baltimore 
Massing, David, Baltimore 
Mendelsohn. Daniel, Relay 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 

Mutchnik, Melvin, Baltin^ore 

Okrasinski, Joseph L.. Baltimore 

Parker, Katherine J.. Baltimore 

Passen. Lillian, Baltimore 

Rosenthal, Alvin, Baltimore 

Rostacher, Harry L., New York, N. Y. 

Sabatino, Louis T., Baltimore 



358 



359 



Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Sama, Mario A., Baltimore 
Sapperstein, Louis, Baltimore 
Shalowitz, Marion, Baltimore 
Ichniowski, William M., Baltimore 
Jacobs, Eugene, Baltimore 
Kamanitz, Irvin L., Baltimore 



Kline, Sidney, Baltimore 

Lieberman, La-wrence L., Front Royal, Va, 

Snyder, Nathan M., Baltimore 

Tolley, Leonard J., Brooklyn Park 

Weinstein, Daniel D., Baltimore 

Wiener, Maurice, Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Allen, Donald A., Baltimore 
Balassone, Francis S., Thomas. W. Va, 
Bemgartt, Elmar B., Baltimore 
Bertrand, Edith E., Baltimore 
Caplan, Clarice, Baltimore 
Celozzi, Matthew J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Harry I., Baltimore 
Cohen, Samuel, Baltimore 
Cooper, Madeleine C, Denton 
Councill. Wilford A. H., Jr., Baltimore 
DiGristine, Mary R., Baltimore 
Eberling, Vincent B., Baltimore 
Edyvean, John H., Towson 
Ehudin. Herbert, Baltimore 
Feinstein, Bernard S., Baltimore 
Fine, Joseph J., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Albert, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Armand M., Baltimore 
Greenberg, Joseph, Baltimore 
Gubnitsky, Albert, Baltimore 
Gumenick, Leonard, Baltimore 
Hammel, Katherine M., Baltimore 
Harris, Samuel, Baltimore 
Jaworski, Melvin J., Baltimore 
Kahn, Morton, Baltimore 
Kamenetz, Irvin, Baltimore 
Kasik, Frank T., Jr., Raspeburg 
Kessler, Edward L., Catonsville 
Kursvietis, Anthony J.. Baltimore 
Lassahn, Norbert G., Baltimore 



Lavinka, Ruth, Ellicott City 
Lerman, Philip H., Baltimore 
Levin, Leon P., Baltimore 
Levin, Melvin, Baltimore 
Levy, Irving, Annapolis 
Markowitz, Albert. Baltimore 
Mayer, Maurice V., Baltimore 
Miller, Edward, Baltimore 
Morgenroth, Victor H., Jr., Baltimore 
Phillips, Emerson C, Salisbury 
Phillips, Thaddeus T., Baltimore 
Poklis, Alphonse, Sparrows Point 
Richman, Philip F., Annapolis 
Rosen, Donald M., Baltimore 
Sachs, Norman R., Baltimore 
Sandler, Solomon, Baltimore 
Schlaen, Mildred. Baltimore 
Shear, Robert, Baltimore 
Shook, Joseph W., Baltimore 
Siegel, Harold, Baltimore 
Silberg, Edgar M., Baltimore 
Simonoff, Robert, Baltimore 
Smith, Daniel E., Catonsville 
Sowbel, Irving, Baltimore 
Spangler, Kenneth G.. Baltimore 
Sweren, Melvin R.. Baltimore 
W^ikberg, Vieno H., Dundalk 
Zerwitz, Irving F.. Baltimore 
Zukerberg, Morris, Baltimore 



Buffington, James, Catonsville 
Foster, Richard L, Baltimore 
Foxman, Norma M.. Baltimore 
Gillis. Andrew C, Jr., Baltimore 
Klaas, Emil J., Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Krivitsky, Nelson, Baltimore 
Musher, Mildred, Baltimore 
Plateau, Evelyn I., Baltimore 
Sharp, Nathaniel, Woodlawn 



BALTIMORE 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1936 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Aaron, Alvin, Biddeford, Me. 
Barnes. Bradley B., Maplewood, N. J. 
Barsamian, Samuel, Providence, R. I. 
Bozzuto, John M., Jr., Waterbury, Conn. 



Caldwell, Gilbert L.. Baltimore 
Carrigan, Harold J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Cavallaro, Ralph C, Branford. Conn. 
Centanni, Alfonse G., Newark, N. J. 



360 



Cohen, Jerome S., Baltimore 

DuBoff, Leonard, Hartford, Conn. 

Edgar, Benjamin D., Viola, 111. 

Edwards, Melvin F., Belford, N. J. 

Erlich, William, Baltimore 

Eskow, Alexander B., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Fallon, Charles H., Trenton, N. J. 

Farrington, Charles C, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Finkelstein, Louis B., Newark, N. J. 

Gilden, Paul, Baltimore 

Click, George H., Passaic, N. J. 

Griesbach, Hans H., Naugatuck, Conn. 

Hampson, Robert E., Baltimore 

Heil, Roland W., Baltimore 

Hewitt, Earl C, Baltimore 

Jakob, Robert, Norwalk, Conn. 

Johnson, William B., Jr., Annapolis. 

Joyce, Osier C, Arnold 

Lawrence, Ronald, Elk Mills 

Leonard, Melvin R., Chincoteague, Va. 

Levin, David A., Baltimore 

V 

f 

SCHOOL OF 

Aaron, James P., Jr., Baltimore 
Baile, John R., New Windsor 
Beck, Harry M., Baltimore 
Bernstein, Aaron, Baltimore 
Bernstein, Albion O.. New York, N. Y, 
Bess, Elizabeth G., Keyser, W. Va. 
Blake, John A., Baltimore 
Cianos, James N., Baltimore 
Cohen, Frank S., Baltimore 
Cowherd, William J., Long 
Evans, Virginia J., Baltimore 
Fink, Francis T., Baltimore 
Fox, Samuel L., Baltimore 
Fusting, William H., Baltimore 
Gaver, Leo J., Myersville 
Goldberg, Sylvan D., Baltimore 
Grott, Harold A., Baltimore 
Hartman, O^ar, Baltimore 
Hartz, Alvin S., Baltimore 
Hooker, Charles B., Baltimore 
Hutchins, Thomas M., Bowens 
Katz, Milton A., Westminster 



McClees, Joseph G., Baltimore 
McCracken, Jules, Cameran, W. Va. 
Melson. William F., Wilmington, Del. 
Mendelsohn, Harry B., Norfolk, Va. 
Miller, Robert G., Baltimore 
Morris, Albert W., Salisbury 
Nelson, Walter J., Providence, R. I, 
Piccolo, James A., New Haven, Conn. 
Reed, Robert A., Milford, Del. 
Riggin, Harry E., Crisfield 
Rogers, Everett T., Waterbury, Conn. 
Schoepke. Oscar J., Oakfield, Wis. 
Seyfert, Ernest G., Stratford, Conn. 
Shea. Erwin E., Hartford, Conn. 
Shobin, Jack, Baltimore 
Smyth, Lawrence C, Quincy, Mass. 
Storch, Murray, Passaic, N. J. 
Turok, Seymour, Passaic, N. J. 
Westerberg, Carl V., Simsbury, Conn. 
Zea-Hernandez, Alvaro, Columbia, S. A. 



MEDICINE 

Keister, Philip W., Lansdowne 
Kleiman, Bernard S., Baltimore 
Klinger, Mary E., Baltimore 
Kump. Albert B., Bridge ton, N. J. 
Kyle, Henry H., Waterbury 
Lavenstein, Arnold F., Baltimore 
Minor, Michael M., Kelayres, Penna. 
Moran, John A., Conway, Mass. 
Palmer, David W., Wheeling, W. Va. 
Post, Laurence C, Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Steger, William J., Wheeling, W. Va. 
Tartikoff, George, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Twardowicz, Albin H., Baltimore 
Urlock, John. P., Baltimore 
Wanner, Jesse R., Jr., Salisbury 
White, Harry F., Jr., Baltimore 
Whitworth, Fuller B., Westernport 
Wilder, Milton J., Femdale 
Williams, Herman J., Reading, Penna. 
Wilson, Harry T., Jr.. Baltimore 
Zalis, Daniel L., Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Alessi, Alfred H., Baltimore 
Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Austin, Muriel F., Norwood, R. I. 
Baker, Daniel S., Baltimore 
Beam, Merlin A., Garrison 
Blivess, Louis B., Baltimore 
Brodsky, Alexander E., Baltimore 
Dawson, Leroy O., Baltimore 
Dobropolski, Anthony J., Baltimore 
Floyd, Melvin L., Catonsville 



Francik, Joseph, Baltimore 
Freedman, Leonard, Baltimore 
Fribush, Sidney, Baltimore 
Friedman, Marion, Baltiihore 
Galley, Roland P., Baltimore 
Gillis, Andrew C, Jr., Baltimore 
Ginsberg, Samuel H., Baltimore 
Gitomer, Norman M., Baltimore 
Golditch, Henry M., Baltimore 
Grove, Donald C, Baltimore 



361 



Gruz, Nathan I., Baltimore 
Gregorek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Gude, William D., Baltimore 
Hackett, Angela R., Baltimore 
Hamburger, Morton L., Baltimore 
Heneson, Irving J., Baltimore 
Hopkins, Carville B., Annapolis 
Hopkins,* John T., Annapolis 
Hunt, William H., Baltimore 
Kardash, Theodore, Baltimore 
Karpa. Jerome J.. Baltimore 
Katz, Emanuel O., Baltimore 
Kellough, Elmer R., Jr., Cumberland 
Kosakowski, Chester G., Baltimore 
Kovitz, Armand, Baltimore 
Laken, Benjamin B., Baltimore 
Leise, Joshua M., Baltimore 
Loftus. Howard E., Dundalk 
Matelis, Olga P., Baltimore 
Mayer, Alexander M., Baltimore 
Mendelsohn, Daniel, Relay 
Miedusiewski, Francis J., Baltimore 



Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Morgenstern, Emma L., Woodlawn 
Morgenstern, William A., Woodlawn 
Muehlhause, Ruth V., Baltimore 
Odell, James E., Catonsville 
Okrasinski, Joseph L., Baltimore 
Parker, Katherine J., Baltimore 
Purdum, Frank L., Baltimore 
Rice, Robb V., Baltimore 
Richman, Jacob L., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Morris, Baltimore 
Rosenfeld, Israel A., Baltimore 
Rosenstein, Louis N., Baltimore 
Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Sama, Mario A., Baltimore 
Schwartz. Harry, Baltimore 
Seechuk, William W., Baltimore 
Silverstein, Bernard, Ferndale 
Vadala, Clarence E., Baltimore 
Walb, Winfield A.. Baltimore 
Waxman, Milton M., Baltimore 
Young, George I., Jr., Catonsville 



COLLEGE PARK 
THE SUMMER SCHOOI,— 1936 



Aaronson, Philip J.. Baltimore 

Abell. Louise B., St. Inigoes 

Abell, W. Lydia, Beachville 

Adam, George D., Washington, D. C. 

Adams, Hazel, Oldtown 

Alderton, Loretta P., College Park 

Aldridge, William A., Baltimore 

Allamong-Struckman, Hannah M., Cum- 
berland 

Allen, John J., Hagerstown 
♦Allen, Rowannetta S., Anacostia, D. C, 

Alter, Irving D., Baltimore 

Anders, Kathryn M., Westminster 

Anderson, Eleanor F., Silver Spring 
•Anderson, Earl J., Roy, Washington 

Anderson, G. Jeannette, Baltimore 

Anderson, Janet T.. Cumberland 
•Andrews, Myrtle, Crapo 
•Angel, Bonnie L., Swiss, N. C. 

Appier. Helen I., Washington, D. C. 
•Arnold. Edward J., Woodlawn P. O. 

Athearn, Robert H., Richmond, Va. 

Athey, Thomas B., Sevema Park 
♦Aud. Kathleen L., Rockville 

Auerbach, Laurence W., Brooklyn, N. Y, 

Ayers, Alice J., Barton 

Babka. Margaret, Edgewood 

Baden, Elizabeth L., Baden 

Baevsky, William D., Penns Grove, N. J. 

Bain, Betty B., Washington, D. C. 



♦Baker, Harry, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Baker, Herbert W., Edgemont 

Baker, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 
*Baker, Virginia, Mt. Rainier 
♦Baldwin, Willis H., Havre de Grace 

Balmer, Charles B., Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Banks, Elizabeth B., Rockville 

Barber, Pauline R., Charlotte Hall 
Bargteil, Ralph, Baltimore 
♦Barnes, Edwin H., Elkton 

Barnsley, Jean, Rockville 

Barnsley, Lucy H., Rockville 
♦Bartlett. Helen R., Centerville 

Batch, Francis E., Hyattsville 

Baxley, J. W.. Ellicott City 
♦Baxter, Lois, Chestertown 

Baxter. William T., Washington, D. C 

Beal, Anne A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Beall. Ada, Libertytown 
♦Beall, Beulah M., Upper Marlbiro 

Beall, Evelyn E.. Fullerton 

Beals, Jane H., Washington, D. C. 

Bebb, Edward K.. Chevy Chase 

Becraft, Mabel V., Washington Grove 

Bell, John W., Riverdale 

Belt, Kenneth G., Washington, D. C. 

Benjamin, Louis, Baltimore 

Benner, Elisabeth, Baltimore 

Bennett, Joseph H., Washington, D. C. 

Bennett, Lucille K., Hyattsville 



•Graduate Students 



362 



Bennett, Richard G.. Cambridge 
Benson, Brian M., Baltimore 
Benson, Ritchie Elizabeth, Hyattstown 
Berger, Lola W., Mechanicsville 
Bernstein, Norman, Washington, D. C. 
Bessemer, Mabel S., Washington, D. C. 
Bick, George H., New Orleans, La. 
♦Biehl, Katharine L., Frederick 
Biggs, G. Marie, Jessup 
Bilbrough, Catherine R., Greensboro 
Bird, Jane deL., Sandy Spring 
Bird, Walter M., Washington, D. C. 
Birkland, John V., Washington, D. C. 
Bittinger, Charles, Washington, D. C. 
Blacklock, Josiah A., Towson 
Blentlinger, Charles L., Frederick 
Blentlinger, Nellie E., Frederick 
Blevins, Velma F., Sharon 
Bloom, Joe Y., Paterson, N. J. 
Bonner, Anna B., East New Market 
Bonnett, Howard G., Washington, D. C. 
Boswell, Alice A., Brookeville 
Bowen, Henrietta D., Snow Hill 
Bowie, Oden, Mitchellville 
Bowser, Katherine R., Williamsport 
Boyle, John B., Baltimore 
Bradford, Ruth V., Washington, D. C. 
Bradley, Jeanette, Hyattsville 
Bradley, W. Brooks, Baltimore 
Brady, Eugenia J., Brunswick 
♦Brain, Earl F., Frostburg 
♦Brandenburg, Annie L., Lisbon 
♦Bratt, Hazel M., Oxford 
Breaden, Richard C, Berwyn 
♦Bready, Helen P., Washington, D. C. 
Brehany, Kathleen C, Cumberland 
Bricker, Kathryne M., Washington, D. C. 
Brightwell, Ralph E., Lisbon 
Brinsfield, Elizabeth, Reids Grove 
Brinsfield, Mary V., Reids Grove 
♦Bristow, Rosa L., Chevy Chase 
♦Broaddus, John P.. Mt. Rainier 
Broadbent, Janet S., Chevy Chase 
Brockman, Ethel L., Riverdale 
Brode, Carl K., Frostburg 
Broderick, Esther M., Lonaconing 
Brokamp, Ray W., Glen Burnie 
Brooka, Elsie M., Poolesville 
Brotman, Alfred, Baltimore 
Brown, Alice E., Deal's Island 
Brown, Elizabeth DeB., Washington, 

D. C. 
♦Brown, George C, Asheville, N. C. 
♦Brown, Lillian E., Chestertown 
♦Brown, Marshall G., Oakland 
♦Bruehl, John T., Jr., Centreville 



Brunson, Alice K., Florence, S. C. 
Brusowankin, Bessie, Baltimore 
Buck, Marjorie M., Indian Head 
Buckel, Ralph L., Bittinger 
Buckingham, William O., Washington, 

D. C. 

Bullen, Nellie R., Annapolis 
Bullock, Carolyn M., New Windsor 
Bullough, G. Van Ness, Baltimore 
Burdette, Eunice E., Laurel 
♦Burdette, Maxwell E., Damascus 
•Burgess, Lionel, Ellicott City 
•Burke, Edmund T., Silver Spring 
Burroughs, Henryetta B., Mechanicsville 
Burroughs, Nellie W., Mechanicsville 
•Burslem, William A., Hyattsville 
Burtner, Rosemary J., Boonsboro 
Burton, Beulah M., Washington, D. C. 
Burton, Julia, Washington, D. C. 
Bushell, Ruth T., Deals Island 
Byer, Henry L., Sparrows Point 
Byers, George E., Lonaconing 
Byers, John, Lonaconing 
•Byrer, Virginia, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Caldwell, Katherine, Chevy Chase 
•Callis, Marvin G., Accident 
Callis, Mason W., Accident 
Campbell, Marjorie H., Washington, D. C. 
•Canada, Mary E., Lynchburg, Va. 
Cantwell, Hammond D., Cambridge 
Caplan, Raphael, Miller Station 

Caples, Ruth C, Towson 
•Carney, John J., Westernport 

Carpenter, Virginia P., Washington, 

D. C. 
♦Carr, C. JellefF, Baltimore 
♦Carroll, Benjamin S., Easton 

Carter, Mary E., Marion Station 
♦Cavanaugh, John J., Cumberland 

Celia, Mildred R., Severn 

Chambers, Alsie P., Seabrook 
•Chandler, Harold H., Grayton 

Chapman, M. Josephine, Cumberland 

Chappelear, James A., Washington, D. C. 

Cherrix, Ethel G., Snow Hill 

Chrisler, Willard L., Washington. D. C. 

Christie, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 

Cissell. Beatrice S., West Friendship 

Claflin, Alison R., Chevy Chase 

Claney, Dorothy, Clark's Summit, Pa. 

Clapp, Helen, Chevy Chase 

Clark, Ellen N.. Silver Spring 

Clark, Frank, Washington, D. C. 

Clarke, Edward M.. Sabillasville 

Clarke, Mary J., Hyattsville 

Clayton, Loueila M., Mt. Rainier 



♦Graduate Students 



363 



Cleaver, William F., Washington, D. C. 

Close, Horace W.. Washington, D. C. 

Cochran, A. Mildred. Takoma Park 

Coffay, May M., Baltimore 

Coffey, Lillian S., Landover 

Coffin, Mamie C, Berlin 

Cohen, Maxwell, Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Sidney, Baltimore 

Coleman, Alvin E., Jr., Chestertown 

Coleman, Harry C, Jr., Chestertown 

Coleman, Pauline, Sudlersville 

*Colip, Louise R., Riverdale 

♦Collins, Julia E., Brazil, Ind. 
Collison, Malcolm N., Takoma Park 
Combs, Maxine, Fairmont, W. Va. 
Comer, Florence R., Hyattsville 
Connery, Edward F., Washington, D. C. 
Conrad, Maude E., Williamsport 
Cooke, Alfred A., Hyattsville 
Copes, Bessie E., Silver Spring 
Cornell, Barbara E., Silver Spring 

♦Cornell, Florence N., Chevy Chase 
Corridon, Jack R., Washington, D. C. 
Cotton, Cornelia M., Beltsville 
Coulbourne, Alice M., Crisfield 

♦Covington, Evabelle S., Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
Cowie, Jean A., Perry Point 
Craig, Evelyn M., Elk Mills 
Craig, Madie E., Brentwood 
Crampton, William G., Washington, D. C. 
Crapster, Portia H., Woodbine 
Creamer, Robert M., Baltimore 
Cressman, Kathryn, Boonsboro 
Cromer, Horace E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Cronin, Frank H., Joppa 
Cronise, A. Katherine, Frederick 
Cropper, Florence D., Charlotte Hall 

♦Cross. Chester B.. Washington, D. C. 
Cross, Janie A., Brandywine 
Cullen, Russell H., Hyattsville 

♦Cummings, Cleo, Kensington 
Cutler, Dorothy M., Silver Spring 
Cutting, Maude, Washington, D. C. 
Dalinsky, Isador J., Baltimore 
Danforth, Shirley F., Riverdale 
Daugherty, Irvin W.. Williamsport 

♦Davis. Edward F., Cherrydale, Va. 
Davis, Elsie H., Woodbine 

♦Davis, Frank R., Jarrettsville 

♦Davis, Gertrude J., Frostburg 
Davis, Margaret E., Mt. Rainier 

♦Davis, Winifred J., Frostburg 
DeArmey, Frank T., Windber, Pa. 
Delaney, Catharine A., Frostburg 

♦Delaney, Mary E., Ormond Beach, Fla. 



Dennis, Annie M,, Pittsville 
Dennis, Margaret A., Ocean City 
Densmore, Gwendolyn, Frostburg 
DeNunzio, Alfred J., Washington. D. C. 
Deskin, Mark, Riverdale 
DeVoltT Harold M., College Park 
DeWilde, Jennie D., Preston 
Dick, Virginia M., Salisbury 
Dickey. Mary, Brenham, Texas 

♦Diermier, Natalie S., Friendship Station, 
D. C. 
Dieudonne, Erasmus L., Jr., Bladensburg 

♦Diggs, Ruth E.. Catonsville 
Dillon, Mary C, Washington, D. C. 
Dodd. Ocie, Chevy Chase. D. C. 
Donahoo, Harry C, Chester, Pa. 
Donohue, Mildred D., Baltimore 
Dorsey, Agatha V.. Midland 
Dorsey, E. Elizabeth. Sykesville 
Dotterer, Jacklyn S,. Chevy Chase 

♦Douglass, Edgar M., Silver Spring 
Dowden, Elisabeth E., Washington, D. C. 
Downin, John E., Baltimore 
Downing, Anna E., Riverdale 
Downs, Glendora M., Williamsport 
Downton, Lydia M., Cumberland 

♦Doyle, Catherine M., Washington, D. C, 
Dresher, Edward, Hackensack, N. J. 

♦Drisco, Marian, Hartford. Conn. 
Dryer, Hilda Y.. Washington, D. C. 

♦DuBose, Clyde H., Pocomoke City 
Dudley, Catherine, Eckhart Mines 

♦Duley, Emily T., College Park 
Duley, Oscar R., Croome Station 
Dun woody, Ruth M., Baltimore 
Durboraw, Agnes L., Hagerstown 
Durham, Lucille R., Forest Hill 
Durner, Viola H., Severn 
Durr, Edwena, Cumberland 
DuShane, Doris A., Baltimore 

♦Duvall, Maude R., Rockville 

♦Duvall, Wilbur I., Gaithersburg 
Dyche, Mildred I., Cumberland 
Dyott, Hazel S., Easton 
Eaton, William R., Chester 
Eck. Clarence A., Raspeburg 
Edelen, Mary B., Bryantown 
Edgeton, Catherine A., Washington, D. C. 

♦Edgeworth, Clyde B., Towson 
Edmonds, William R., Baltimore 
Edmundson, Doris L., College Park 
Edson, Peggie M., Washington, D. C. 
Egan, John J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Ekas. Alice A., Baltimore 
Ellegood, Georgia G., Delmar 
Ellis, Bernice A., Washington. D. C. 



Elmore, Edna E., Wasliington, D. C. 
Emmons, Elizabeth S., Suitland 
♦Endslow, Joseph S., Street 
♦Bngel, Lea K., Washington, D. C. 
Epstein, Edwin, Centreville 
Ernest, Lois E., Kensington 
Evans, Dorothy E., Takoma Park 
Evans, Frank D., Chevy Chase 
Everett, Estella, Bel Air 
Everhart, Helen H., Frederick 
*Faber, J. E., College Park 
Farrell, Hugh G., Metuchen. N. J. 
Farwell, Florence, Takoma Park 
♦Fearnow, Genevieve A., Laytonsville 
Feddeman, Edna S., Millington 
Felton, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
*Fenton, Louise E., Washington, D. C. 
Fiery, Ruth C. Hagerstown 
Filer, Grace E., Frostburg 
Fischer, Isadore, Washington, D. C. 
Fisher, Charles B., Thomas 
Fisher, Joseph R., Baltimore 
Fitzgerald, Charlotte, Princess Anne 
Fitzwater, John L., Oakland 
Fleek, Elsie M., Anacostia, D. C. 
Fleming, Harold E., Savage 
Fletcher, Mildred J., Washington, D. C. 
Fletcher, Oscar R., Sanford, Va. 
Flook, Howard O., Myersville 
♦Foley, Julia C. Rockville 
Footen, Paul L., Barton 
♦Forshee, Edith D., Washington, D. C. 
Forsyth, Augusta, Silver Spring 
Fosbroke, Gerald E., Elkridge 
♦Fox, Eston F., Hagerstown 
♦Franklin. Mary T., Hyattsville 
Frantz, Merle D., Friends ville 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington, D. C. 
Fricker, Blanche, Washington, D. C. 
♦Friedman, David, Silver Spring 
♦Friedman, Harold B., Silver Spring 
Friedman, Jack, Washington, D. C. 
♦Frisbie, Kenneth W., Bethesda 
Fuerst, Robert G., Hyattsville 
Fulgham, Evel W., Washington, D. C. 
Fulmer, Edna M., Frederick 
♦Funk, A. Louise, Hagerstown 
Fuss, Lucille A., Hagerstown 
Gaczynski, Eugenia T., Jersey City, N. J. 
Gall, Ralph G., Thurmont 
Galloway, Rhea M., Lonaconing 
Gannon, Catherine A.. Cordova 
Gardner, Emma A., Washington, D. C. 
Garman, Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Garner, Veta B., Washington, D. C. 
Gastley, Mary C, Frederick 



Gengnagel, Rosella B., Catonsville 
George, Claire C, Washington, D. C. 
Gerstein, Lillian, Washington. D. C 
Gessford, Richard L., Mt. Rainier 
Gibson, Eloise, Huntingtown 
Gibson, Rachel F., Glen Burnie 
Gilbert, Marjorie W., Cambridge 
Gilbertson, Kenneth G., Bladensburg 
Gillespie, Fannie R., Pocomoke 
♦Gillespie, Warren Galena 
Gilmore, Gamette I., Williamson, W. Va. 
Glime, Gilbert, Frostburg 
Goforth, Alys, Riverdale 
Goldberg, Alvin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Golden, Lex B., Washington, D. C. 
Goodman, J. H., Frederick 
Goodpasture, Esther M., Washington, 
D. C. 
♦Gordon, Fortuna L.. Baltimore 
Gordon, Myrtle, Washington, D. C. 
Gordon, Thomas W., Baltimore 
Gorsuch, M. Jeannette R.. New Windsor 
Gough, Hazel O., Gaithersburg 
Graff, Marie C, Washington. D. C. 
♦Graham, James G.,Washington, D. C. 
♦Graham, Julian R., Sudlersville 
♦Graham, William C, Deal's Island 

Granbery, Helen L., Washington. D. C. 
♦Gray, Ellen H., Reisterstown 
♦Gray, Florence A., Port Tobacco 
Green, Edgar L., Jr., Catonsville 
♦Green, Mary O., Boyds 
Green, Ruth E., Hyattsville 
Greenfield, Arthur, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Greer, Margaret A., Bel Air 
♦Gregory, Florence I., Washington. D. C. 
♦Griffith, Francis D., Brandy, Va. 
Grimes, Maye E., Woodbine 
Grindle, Rhea, Cumberland 
Gross, Eleanor K., White Hall 
♦Grove, Donald C, Baltimore 
•Grove, Edith M., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
Gutschmidt, Nathan, North Bergen, N. J. 
Guy. Eleanor A.. Westernport 
♦Gwynn, Thomas S., Jr., Clinton 
Hale, Nola G., Annapolis 
Hall, Eleanor. Fairmont, W. Va. 
♦Hall, Richard W., Monie 
Hall, Thomas W., Bel Air 
Hamblin, Gertrude, Pittsville 
♦Hamilton, Evelyn E., Limestone. Me. 
Hand, George E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hanna, Mary, Westernport 
♦Hannon, Loretto, Frostburg 
Hanson, Mary E.. Frostburg 
Hanson, Ruth, Frostburg 



•Graduate Students 



♦Graduate Students 



364 



365 



Harcum, Bettie, Salisbury 

•Harden, Elmer P., Washington, D. C. 

Harden, Nellie G., Washington, D. C. 
Hardesty, Lillian M., West River 
Harris, Joseph M., Washington, D. C. 

Harshman, Edith L., Chewsville 

•Hart, William J., Madison, Wis. 

•Hartenstein, Helena. New Freedom, Pa. 

Haspert, M. J., Chester 

Hasty, Rufus B., Appalachia, Va. 
•Haszard, Frank K., Hyattsville 

•Hauke, Edna E.. Rockville 

•Hauver, Edgar R., Street 

Hawley, Walter O., Takoma Park 

Hayden, Agnes, Pope's Creek 
•Hayes, Edward E., Royersford, Pa. 

Headley, Marylois, Canton, Ohio 

Hearne, M. Elizabeth, Pittsville 

Heiss, John W., Washington, D. C. 

Helfgott, Jack L., Mitchelville 

Hellweg, Vincent P., Washington. D. C. 

Henault, Gladys M., Upper Marlboro 

Henderson, Freda M., Monkton 

Hendley, Pearl, Frostburg 

Henley, Robert C, Washington, D, C. 

Henneberger. Lawrence B,, Boonsboro 

Henry, Nellie W., Delmar 

Hepbron, Ida L., Betterton 

Heringman, Leo, Baltimore 
•Hersperger, Louise, Poolesville 
•Hesse, Claron O., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Hiatt, Pearl M., Brentwood 

Hickman, Leonora D., Parsons, W. Va. 

Hickman, Mildred M., Crisfield 

Hicks, Minnie E., Chestertown 

Higgins. Homer S., Cumberland 
•Higgins, Virginia C, Washington, D. C. 

Hill, Florence R., Laurel 

HiU, Pauline R., Woodlawn 

Hirsch, Albert. Frederick 

Hite, Norborne A., Port Deposit 
•Hitz, Chester W., Portescue, Mo. 

Hoagland, Mary A.. Washington. D. C. 

Hoagland, Philip L., Washington, D. C. 

Hobbs, Genevieve L., Laurel 

Hobbs, Lewis F., Silver Spring 

Hobbs, Marguerite W.. Washington, D, C. 

Hobson, Barbara E., Washington, D. C. 

Hoenes, Sophia W., Baltimore 

Holbrook, Helen P, College Park 
•Hollis, Edgar H., Frederick 

Hollister, Curtis L.. Washington, D. C. 
•Holmead, Frances S.. Silver Spring 

Holmes, Forrest S., Jr., College Park 

Holt. Mary E., Washington. D. C. 
♦Holter, D. Vernon, Thurmont 



Hooton, Kittie M., Hyattsville 
Hoover, Lawrence G., Takoma Park 
♦Hopkins, Eugene J., Cumberland 
Hopkins, Grace R., Easton 
Home, John F., Chevy Chase 
Home, Sally J., Easton 
Homer, Mary E., Princess Anne 
♦Horton, Sara, Miami, Fla. 
Hosken, Margaret R., Accokeek 
Howard, Addie J., Hyattsville 
Howard, Adrienne, Hyattsville 
Howard, Dorothy L., Rockville 

•Howard, Frank L., Hyattsville 

♦Howard, M. Louise, Dayton 
Howes, Grace B., Rockville 
Hoyt, Rachel E., Easton 

♦Huffington, Paul E., Trappe 
Hughes, Fred J., Chevy Chase 
Hughes, Robert L., Jr., Aberdeen 
Hughes, Virginia, Easton 
Hunt, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 

♦Hunt, William H., Baltimore 
Hutton, Joel W., College Park 
Hyde, Jennie M., Barton 
Hyslop, Charles D., Silver Spring 
lager, Helen L., Hyattsville 
Inskeep, Hazel, Barton 
Insley, F. Maurille, Cambridge 
Ireland, Veturia W., McKendrie 
Jack, Katie L., Frostburg 

♦Jackson, Martha A., Grenada. Miss. 

♦Jackson, Thomas A., Grenada, Miss. 
Jacob, John E., Baltimore 
Jacobs, John S., Washington, D. C, 
Jacques, Lancelot, Jr., Smithsburg 
Jameson, Beatrice, Hill Top 
Jarboe, Maude M., Mechanicsville 
Jeffers, Betty C, Washington, D, C. 
Jeflferson, E. Marguerite, Salisbury 
Jenkins, Margaret R., Williamsport 

♦Jenkins, Stanleigh E., Hyattsville 

♦Jewell, Edgar G., Damascus 
Jimmyer, John K., Baltimore 
Johnson, Jerome H., Washington. D. C, 
Johnson, Margaret C, Pocomoke City 

♦Johnson, Mary W., Burlington, N. C. 
Johnston, Tayloe F., Mechanicsville 
Jones, Dorothy D., Pittsville 
Jones, Emma L., Madison 
Jones, Helen J., Silver Spring 

♦Jones, Margaret, Frostburg 
Jones, Marguerite E„ Owings Mills 
Jones, Mary E., Loveville 

♦Jones, Oscar B., Shenandoah Junction, 
W. Va. 

♦Jones, Robert W., Frostburg 



♦Jones. Wilbur A., Laurel 
Jones, William P., Wingate 
Jordan, Francis X.. Washington, D. C. 
iCalb, Merrill B., Baltimore 
Kalbaugh, Virginia, Luke 
Kalis, Samuel D., Baltimore 
Kane, Eleanor B., Washington, D. C. 
Karpa, Lillian, Baltimore 
Keefer, Ruth T., Takoma Park 
Keenan, Frances J., Madison 
Keller, Joseph E., Washington, D. C. 
Kellermann, Eileen A., Hyattsville 
Kelley, Mary M., Wye Mills 
Kelly, John T., Towson 
Kelly, Nellie P., Ocean City 
Kelly, Viola H., Lonaconing 
Kennon, W. Stanley. Washington, D. C. 
*Kephart, Charlotte B., Washington, D. C. 
Kephart, Jane F., Takoma Park 
Keppler, Millicent M., Washington. D. C 
Keppler, William J., Washington, D. C. 

Kerby, Olive P., Benning, D. C. 

Kexel, Evelyn, Hampstead 

Kiernan-Vasa, Helen, Washington, D. C. 
♦Kimble, Dorothy, Port Deposit 
*King, Frances L., Frederick 

King, Laura G., Annapolis Junction 
♦King, Ora H., Clarksburg 

King, Thomas O., Savage 

Kinna, C. Robert, Chewsville 

Kinnamon, Myrtle V., Cordova 

Kinney. Robert W., Washington, D. C. 

Kirby, Marion, Takoma Park 

Kline, Margaret M., Cumberland 
♦Klinger, Mary E., Baltimore 

Klompus, Katie, Cumberland 

Kluckhuhn, Frederick H., Laurel 
♦Knight. T. H. Owen. Silver Spring 

Knotts. Dorothy E., Templeville 
♦Knox, Clarence M., Finksburg 
♦Kooken, Nellie R., Westernport 

Korab, Arnold A., Brentwood 
♦Krausse, Harry W.. Baltimore 

Kreuzburg. Harvey W., Silver Spring 

Kuhlman, Gus R., Harrisburg, Pa. 
♦Kuhnle. Mary Evelyn, Westernport 
Kunes, Geraldine L., Cumberland 
Kunes. Nina E.. Cumberland 
Ladson, Jack A., Olney 

♦Lake, Virginia S., Washington, D. C. 

♦LaMar, Austin A., Jr., Sandy Spring 

♦Lanahan,* Doris. Laurel 

♦Lane, Marian, Washington, D. C. 

♦Lane. Ruth B., Washington. D. C. 
Lang, Rachel M., Stockton 
Langford, Ruby. Blythewood, S. C. 



Langley. Theodore C Washington. D. C. 
Langschmidt. Edward G., Relay 
♦Lanham, William B.. Jr., Silver Spring 
Lankford, Melvin C, Baltimore 
Latterner, Henry, Chevy Chase 
Lauxmann, Elizabeth A., Washington, 

D. C. 
Lavine, Isidor M., Mt. Rainier 
♦Lawler, Sydney T., Olney 
Laws, Lucile W., Silver Spring 
Lee. Whiting B.. Hyattsville 
Leech, Dorothy E., Washington. D. C. 
LeFrak. Samuel J.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Lehnert, Phyllis, Washington, D. C. 
Lehr, Emily C, Bethesda 
•Lehr, H. Franklin, Bethesda 
Lemmon, Bessie B., Washington. D. C. 
Lesher, Margaret R.. Hagerstown 
♦Lesher, Robert F., Hagerstown 
Levine, Beatrice L., Washington, D. C. 
Lewald, James H.. Laurel 
Lewis, Clestelle M., Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, Frank H., Frederick 
♦Lewis, Mabel E., Wilmington, N. C. 
Liberato, Venancio Q., Riverdale 
♦Liebman, Rebekah, Norfolk, Va. 
Liggett, Carrie E., Washington, D. C. 
Linthicum. Parepa F.. Washington. D. C. 
Lisann, Tessie S.. Washington. D. C. 
Liskey, Robert B., Hagerstown 
•Littleford. Robert A.. Washington, D. C. 
Livingstone. Nannie D., Cumberland 
Loar, Margaret T., Rawlings 
Lockhart, Julia, Milledgeville, Ga. 
Long. Edwin D.. Westover 
•Longley. Edward L., Baltimore 

Lovell, Mary H., Brentwood 
♦Love, Solomon, Washington, D. C. 
Loveless, Mary G., Upper Marlboro 
♦Lowe. Cletus D., Shepherdstown. W. Va. 
♦Lucas, Philip E., Arlington, Va. 
Lundell, Ernst D.. Chevy Chase 
Lyddane, Alice M., Takoma Park 
Lynch, Elizabeth S., Washington. D. C. 
♦Lyon, Marie H., Hyattsville 
♦MacBride, John B.. Dundalk 
Maccubbin, Mary F., Laurel 
MacDonald, Margaret E.. Bethesda 
Madory. Helen E., Steubenville, Ohio 
Magaha, E. Adeline, Frederick 
Maguire, John N.. Wilmington. Del. 
Malone, Louise McC. Silver Spring 
Manakee, Edward Y., Baltimore 
Mangum, Susie A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Manley, John F., Frostburg 
Manley, Margaret R.. Midland 



•Graduate Students 



♦Graduate Students 



366 



367 



Mann, Arthur W., Washington, D. C. 
Marchant, Ruth E., Laurel 
♦Marshall. Earla B.„ Hyattsville 
Marshall, Gwendolyn A., Princess Anne 
Martin, AIic5e R., Hyattsville 
Martin, Carrie P., Baltimore 
Martin. Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Martinez, Josefina, Baltimore 
♦Mason, Clarence W., Easton 
♦Mason, Elwood B., Berlin 
Matson. Ruby I., Takoma Park 
Matthews. Abigail G., La Plata 
Mattingly, Carolyn W., Mechanicsville 
Maxson, Ruth H., Silver Spring 
Maxwell. Geneva, Washington, D. C. 
Mayerberg, Willson L., Dover, Del. 
McCaffrey, Richard H., Baltimore 
McCall, Mildred L., Washington. D. C. 
McCann, P. Harold, Glen Burnie 
McCauley, Eloise C, Bennings, D. C. 
McCauley, Irma, Washington, D. C, 
McCausland, M. L. (Mrs.). Washington, 
D. C. 
♦McClung. Frank, Rockville 
McCormack. Elizabeth H., Lonaconinfi: 
McCurdy. Philip C. Kensington 
McFadden, Duncan B., Washington, D. C. 
McGinnis, Verneena, Pomonkey 
McGoury. Thomas E.. Odenton 
Mclntire, John N., Oakland 
Mclntyre, M. Elizabeth, Cumberland 
McLeod, Katie L., Latta, S. C. 
McMahan, Elizabeth, Cambridge 
McMillan, Margaret A., Chevy Chase 
McNaughton, Edwina B., Takoma Park 
McPherson, Dorothy M., Takoma 
McPherson, Jessie F., Washington, D. C. 
♦McRae, Ruth H., Washington, D. C. 
McWilliams. William J.. Indian Head 
♦Meacham. Frank B.. Raleigh. N. C. 

Mead, Joan, Takoma Park 
♦Measell, Ira D., Upper Marlboro 
Meenehan, M. Frank, Washington, D. C. 
Mehl, Joseph M., Washington, D. C. 
Meinzer. Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Melchoir, Audrey S., Edge wood 
Merritt, Eliza C, Towson 
♦Messina, Julius, Baltimore 
♦Metcalfe, Howard E., Takoma Park 
Michael, Charles, Ferndale 
Middleton, Edward L., Wayside 
♦Middleton, Frederic A., Washington, 

D. C. 
Mileto, Catherine, Annapolis 
Miller, A. LaVerne, Leonardtown 
♦Miller, Anne, Spencerville 



♦Miller. Lula A., Bridgewater, Va. 
♦Miller, Marion E., Easton 

Miller, Nettie M., Unionville 

Miller, William I., Baltimore 
♦Mills, James B., Delmar, Del. 

Mills, Mabel D., Salisbury 

Minnick, Grace E., Washington, D. C. 

Misiek, Eleanor M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Misiek, William, Washington, D. C. 

Mitchell, Mary E., Jessups 
♦Mizell. George M., Big Pool 

Molofsky, Bernice, Baltimore 

Monred, Ravenell A., Gaithersburg 

Montgomery, Eva M., Barton 

Montgomery, Mary S„ College Park 

Moore, Edith S., Washington, D. C. 

Moore, Evelyn V., East New Market 

Moore, Helen, Frostburg 

Moore, Margaret, Washington. D. C. 

Moore, Robert R., Sandy Spring 

Moran. Joseph T., Westernport 
♦Morgan, Claudine. Lonaconing 
♦Morgan, Esthelene W., Chevy Chase 

Morris, Winfield S., Lonaconing 

Morton, Helen C, Silesia 
♦Moser, F. Irene, Washington, D. C. 

Mudd, H. Virginia, Pomfret 

Mullendore. Louise C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Mullinix, Helen E., Damascus 

Muncks, John D., Baltimore 
♦Murphy. Harry T., Ellicott City 

Murray, William P., Princess Anne 
♦Myers, Alfred T., Riverdale 
♦Nagel, Chester S., Hooversville, Pa. 
Nalley, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Nash, Carroll B., College Park 
♦Nathanson, Albert, Alexandria, Va. 
Nattans, Ralph A., Baltimore 
Needle, Barnett M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Neely, Helen F., Brookeville 
Neilson, Julia M., Baltimore 
Neilson, Robert S., Jr., Baltimore 
Nelson, Margaret L., Crisfield 
♦Newcomer, Joe C, Brunswick 
♦Nicholls, Gertrude E., Boyds 
Nichols, Dorothy V., Chevy Chase 
Nicht, Anna M., Frostburg 
Nides, Fedon G., Centreville 
♦Nides, Nicholas G., Centreville 
Niswanger, Estella L., Washington. D. C. 
Noble, Amber Y., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Nolan, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 
Nolte, William A., Washington. D. C. 
Nordwall, Nellie, Princess Anne 
Nowell. Margaret L.. Shady Side 
♦Nutter, Eva P.. Rising Sun 



Oliver, Elmer R., Washington, D. C. 

Ortenzio, Louis, College Park 

Oursler, Griffith S., Clinton 

Owen, Robert F.. Washington, D. C. 

Owens, Doris, Hanover 

Owens, James D.. Linthicum Heights 

Pagan. Katharine, Washington, D. C. 

Page. John G.. Baltimore 

palmer, E. Rebecca, Harrisburg, Pa. 
* Parent, Paul A., Washington, D. C. 

Parker, Marian D.. Pittsville 

Parker. MoUie L., Salisbury 
♦Parker, Vera. Brentwood 

Parsons, Charles R., Washington. D. C. 
♦Parsons, Henry O., Laramie, Wyo. 

Pages, William A., Chevy Chase 

Patterson, Evelyn W., Washington. D. C. 
•Paulette, Edward W., Arlington. Va. 

Peck. Alvin B., Washington. D. C. 

Peffer. Paul R.. Washington, D. C. 

Pennington. Helen D., Easton 
♦Pergler, Carl, Chevy Chase * 

Perlstein. Sam, Washington, D. C. 

Peter, Clarice. Silver Spring 
*Peterman, Walter W.. Clear Spring 

Petrides. George A., Washington, D. C. 

Phillips, Adon W., Bethesda 

Phillips, Esther V., Silver Spring 

Phillips, Irving. Washington, D. C. 
•Phillips. Watson D., Elkton 

Phillips, Wilbur M., Hagerstown 
*Phipps, William R.. Easton 

Piozet, Dolores A., Hyattsville 

Piozet, Nina C, Hyattsville 

Piatt. Doran S., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Plowden, Edna L., New Port 
♦Poole, Harry R.. Williamsport 

Potter, Charlotte P.. Emmerton, Va. 

Prichard, Helen M., Frostburg 

Probey. Frances V.. Washington, D. C. 

Pruitt, Charles E.. Frederick 

Pruitt, Dorothy M., Berlin 

Pryor, Glen M. Lantz 

Pugatch, Melvyn T., Baltimore 

Pumphrey, Elizabeth S., Upper Marlboro 

Pyles, Dorothy C, Cheltenham 

Queen, Helen H., Waldorf 

Quillen, William P.. Bishop 
*Quinn, Edward F., Jr.. Washington. D. C. 

Rabbitt. Alton E., College Heights 

Ramey, Arthur G., Cumberland 

Ramsburg, Helen B., Beltsville 

Reed, Ira L., Laurel 

Reed, Octavia E., Washington, D. C. 

Reid. Florence, Silver Spring 

Reidy, Kathryn L., Chevy Chase 



Resnitsky, Isabel, Jersey City, N. J. 
Reynolds, Brooks E., Georgetown, Del. 
♦Rhodes. Harry C. Poolesville 
♦Rhodes, Louis K., Jr.. Queenstown 
♦Rice, Robb V., Missoula, Mont. 
Richardson, Vaughn E., Willards 
Richmond, Marion, Washington, D. C. 
Richter, Christian F.. Overlea 
Ricketts, Lulu B., Brookeville 
Ridgely, Phyllis C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Riedel, Erna N., Gambrills 
Riggleman, Jessie, Frostburg 
Riggs, Katharine L., Derwood 
R gler. Hazel, Mt. Airy 
Riley, Helen M., Omaha, Neb. 
♦Riley, Mary B., Hyattsville 
Roberts, Ruby E., Salisbury 
Roberts, Ethel J., Hughesville 
♦Robertson, Roy L., Elkton 
♦Robey, Carrie E., Laurel 
Robinson, Charles H., Cardiff 

Robinson, Sara A.. Cambridge 

Roby, Ethelbert S., Kenbridge, Va. 
Rcchkind. Joseph M., Baltimore 

Rock. Dorothy A., Dundalk 
♦Rooney, Catherine M.. Washington, D. C. 

Root, Ellis P., Annapolis 

Rosen. Janet A., Long Island, N. Y. 

Rosin, Anne, Silver Spring 
♦Roth. Alfred C, Jr.. Annapolis 

Roundy. Paul V., Jr.. Chevy Chase 
♦Runyan, Elva, Hill, Va. 

Rush, Louise R.. Benning Station, D. C. 

Rymer, Joan W., Hyattsville 

Sadowsky. Ann S., North East 

Sahlin, Emilie H.. Annapolis 

Samson. Catherine M., Takoma Park 
♦Santini. Antoinette, Burtonsville 

Scates, Irene A.. Gaithersburg 

Schaefer, Edna M., Frederick 

Schaeffer, Carol J., Washington, D. C. 

Schaufele, Walter J.. Fullerton 

Scheele, Thomas J.. Washington, D. C. 

Schiff. Adelaide S., Allentown, Pa. 

Schneider, Abraham L., Glenn Dale 

Schneider. Howard, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Schneider. William R.. Ellicott City 
♦Schollenberger, George S., Laurel, Del. 

Schott. Dorothy S., Rockville 
♦Schott, Loren F., Rockville 

Schumacher, Sally, Washington. D. C. 

Schwartz, Mortimer, New York. N. Y. 

Schweitz, Edwin P., Washington, D. C. 

Scully. Walter D.. Washington, D. C. 

Sensenbaugh, Glenn H.. Smithsburg 
♦Sessions. Ruth W., Takoma Park 



♦Graduate Students 



*Graduate Students 



368 



369 



Sesso. Raymond F., Washington, D. C. 

♦Severance, Katheryne. Gaithersburg 

♦Sharitz, Rupert O., Washington, D. C, 

•Shaw, Ann B., College Park 
Shaw, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Shearer, Kathleen M., Hyattsville 
Shearer, Ross W., Hyattsville 
Shears, Kathleen, Clinton 
Shenk, Virginia, Hagerstown 
Shepherd. Ashby L.. Jr., Bristol 
Shepperd, Anna G., Upper Falls 
Shepperd, Mary F., Upper Falls 

•Sherwood, Winifred, Washington, D. C. 
Shipley, Amy E., Harman 
Shipley, Cora Lee, Branchville 
Shives, Lena M., Big Pool 
Shmuner, Anne, Baltimore 
Shockley, Mary R., Plttsville 
Shoemaker, Edna L,, Cumberland 
Shoemaker, Goldie G., Bethesda 
Shuck, Rose C, Frostburg. 

♦Shumaker, Warren Ed., Cumberland 

♦Sibley, Martha. Milledgeville, Ga. 

♦Sieling. Frederick W.. Annapolis Junction 
Silberg, I. Walter, Baltimore 
Silver. Hazel M., Washington, D. C. 
Silverman, Frank, Baltimore 
Sines, Winona W., College Park 

♦Sixbey, George L., Mayville, N. Y, 
Skelley, Mary F., Oldtown 
Skinner, Calvin L., Sudlersville 
Skinner, Doris E., Port Republic 

♦Skinner, Geneva K., Takoma Park 
Sleeman, Mary V., Frostburg 
Sleeman, Ursula C, Frostburg 
Sloan, Margaret H.. Lonaconing 
Slocomb, Lena L., Easton 

♦Slocum, Emerson P.. Cambridge 
Slote, Herbert W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

♦Small, Florence F., Hyattsville 
Smith, Ada R., Cecilton 
Smith, Arietta, Salisbury 
Smith, Belle J., Salisbury 
Smith, Eleanor L., Rockville 
Smith, Ellen L., Upper Marlboro 
Smith, F. Edward. Jr., Baltimore 

♦Smith, F, Elizabeth, Rockville 
Smith, Francis DeS., Vale Summit 

♦Smith. Helen I., Takoma Park 
Smith, Hilda H., Hebron 
Smith, John T.. Rockville 

♦Smith, Margret W., Hyattsville 
Smith. Marian, Washington, D. C. 

•Smith, Mary E. M., Frederick 
Smith, Robert E., Fishing Creek 
Smith, Ruth E.. Frederick 
Snodgrass, Annie L., Norton. Va. 



Snook, Kathyn A., Buckeystown 
Snouffer, Mary S., College Park 
Snow, Mary R., Chevy Chase 
Snyder, Charles H., Clear Spring 
Snyder, Robert L., Baltimore 
Snyder, Ruth I., College Park 

♦Soper, Agnes P., Washington. D. C. 
Soper, Kathryn E., Clarksburg 
Soper, Ruby E., Washington, D. C. 
Souder, Letty, Gaithersburg 
Soule, Floyd A., Washington, D. C. 

♦Sowers. Lowell M., Lonaconing 
Spencer, Mary H., Baltimore 

♦Spencer, Raymond R., Baltimore 

♦Spoerlein, Ernest C, Oakland 
Springer. Pauline, Westernport 
Spruill, William T., Brandywine 
Stakem, Veronica C, Midland 
Stanley, Gertrude W.. Mt. Airy 

♦Stanton, William A., Hyattsville 
Steiwer, Frederick, Washington, D. C. 
Stevens, Evelyn M., Laurel 
Stevens, Grace, Washington, D. C, 
Stevens, Margaret T., Sudlersville 
Stewart, Caroline L., Glenn Dale 
Stiles, Edith L., Rockville 

•Stimpson, Edwin G., College Park 

♦Stinnett, Lucille L., Brentwood 
Stitely, Helen E., Union Bridge 
Stone, Elizabeth Y., Ferndale 
Stone, John T., Ferndale 

♦Stone, Margaret G., White Plains 
Stoops, E. Jonelle, Frostburg 
Storm, Mildred R., Baltimore 
Stotler, Irma D., Hagerstown 
Stratmann, Marie H., Sparrows Point 
Strite, Marguerite L., Clearspring 

♦Sullivan, Helen P., Laurel 
Sullivan, Ro?s H.. Pleasantville, N. J. 
Sutherland, Jessie R.. St. Joseph, Mo. 
Swann, Melvin, Easton 
Sween, Lorna, Frostburg 

♦Sjnnon, Eva L., Hyattsville 
Symon, Gladys C, Hyattsville 
Talone, Edward R., Brentwood 
Tarbett, Clara M., Takoma Park 
Tarbutton. Ethel A., Easton 
Tate, Mary B., Washington, D. C. 

♦Taylor, Al'ce E., Perryville 
Taylor. Harriett E., Washington, D. C. 

♦Taylor, Letha E., Centreville 
Taylor, Mary W., Washington, D. C. 
Taylor, Sarah E., Conowingo 

♦Temple, Alva D., Brandywine, W. Va. 
Tennant, Anne W., Cumberland 
Tennant, Eleanor P.. Eckhart 
Terbush, Theron L.. Washington, D. C. 



Ternent, Effie, Lonaconing 
♦Terwilliger, William B., Baltimore 
*Teter, Sarah K., Bridgeport, W. Va. 
♦Thorn, Myrtle A., Washington, D. C. 
Thomas, Nellie G., Oldtown 
Thompson. Florence G., Cumberland 
Thome, Clayton T., Silver Spring 
Thornton, Eugene J., Worten 
Thorpe, Esther D., Bel Air 
Tilghman, Charles E., Salisbury 
♦Tillett, B. D., College Park 
Tillett, Elizabeth, College Park 
Todd, Wyona L., Wingate 
Tomlinson, Mary V., North East 
Tompkins, Margaret H., Rockville 
Townshend, Helen H., Baden 
Towson, Helen J., Washington, D. C. 
Towson, William O., Baltimore 
Traband, Adelaide, Upper Marlboro 
Tucker, Idabelle, Annapolis 
Tull, Miles T., Marion 
Turner, Edward C, La Plata " 

Turner, Emily B., Aquasco 
♦Twilley, Otis S.. Salisbury 
Tyler, Roberta L., Crisfield 
Tyner, Ellamay, Washington, D. C. 
Updike. Edna M., Washington, Va. 
Valle, Joseph, Baltimore 
Vandegrift, Mary C, Cumberland 

Vandervoort, Susan H., Middletown, Pa. 
♦VanMetre, Albert R., Pasadena 

Vansant, Lillian A., Catonsville 

Vasa, Vladimir, Washington, D. C. 

Vaughan, Eleanor J., Washington, D. C. 

Vaught, Valerie V.. Riverdale 

Venemann, Virginia L., Riverdale 

Vernon, Joseph B., Alderson, W. Va. 
*Vogt, Margaretta M., Chevy Chase 

Vogtman, Harry R., Cumberland 

Vogts, Leila. Aberdeen 

Wachtel, Ellen L., Myersville 

Waddey, Mary H., Princess Anne 
*Wade, Margaret E., Port Tobacco 

Waesche, Charlotte S., Mitchellville 

Waite, Maiden D., Odenton 

Waldon, Mildred E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Walker, Earnest A., Hyattsville 

Walsh, Ambrose J., Jr., Brentwood 
♦Ward, James R., Gaithersburg 

Warehime, Vallie B., Manchester 

Warfield, Harriett H., Bishopville 
*Warren, Warren, Rising Sun 
♦Waskow, Henry B., Baltimore 

Waters, Albert G., Washington, D. C. 

Watkins, Dayton 0., Hyattsville 
♦Watkins, Grace O., Hyattsville 
•Watkins, Robert S., Jessups 



♦Watkins, Wilma L., Washington Grove 
Watson, Stanley B., Brandywine 
Wayble, Margaret A., Brunswick 
♦Weagly, Robert H., Laurel 
Webb, Albert W., Vienna 
Webb, Margaret O., Hyatt.sville 
Weber, June E., Washington, D. C. 
Weidemann, Janet S., Washington, D. C. 
Weigle, Edgar F., Mt. Airy 
Weis, Helen L., Baltimore 
♦Weis, Theofield G., Takoma Park 
Weiser, Theodore T., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wells, Gertrude H., Gaithersburg 
Wells, Joan K. M., Washington, D. C. 
West, Dorothy H., Kensington 
West, Vernon E., Jr., Chevy Chase 
♦Weyman, Leo A., Washington. D. C. 
Wheatley, Rosemary, Hyattsville 
Wheatley, Victoria K., Vienna 
Wheedleton. Adeline, Seaford, Del. 
Whipple, Stanley R., Baltimore 
White, James W., Germantown 
White, Robert B.. Salisbury 
♦Whiteford, Henry S.. Baltimore 
Whitt, Marie B., Washington, D. C. 
Wiederlight, Seymour, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wilcox, Annette T.. Washington, D. C 
Wilken, Ruth R., Washington, D. C. 
Wilkinson, Eileen E., Gaithersburg 
Wilkinson, Helen V., Silver Spring 
♦Wilkinson, Mabel B., Washington, D. C. 
Willard, Helen, Poolesville 
Willey, Edward J., Washington, D. C. 
Williams, Dorothy E., College Park 
Williams, Edith M., Washington, D. C. 
Williams, James P., Pittsburgh, Pa, 
Williams, L. Leighton, Washington, D. C. 
Williamson, Helen B., Washington, D. C. 
Willingham, Patricia M., Hyattsville 
Willson, Gertrude B., Washington, D. C. 
♦Wilson, C. Merrick, Poolesville 
Wilson, Rosalie, Birmingham, Ala. 
♦Wilson, Virginia B., Plttsville 
♦Wilson, Walter S., Highland 
Windsor, Susie, Venton 
Wine, Hilda K., Washington, D. C. 
♦Wingate, Phillip J., Wingate 
Wink. Treva B.. Manchester 
Wise, Elizabeth F., Middletown 
Witman, Horace W., Rising Sun 
Witt, Emitt C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Wolfe, John K., Washington, D. C. 
WoU, Ephraim, Washington, D. C. 
Wolverton, Clara A., Baltimore 
♦Wondrack, Arthur J., Washington, D. C 
♦Wood, Bessie T., Silver Spring 
Wocd, Helen L., Washington, D. C. 



♦Graduate Students 



*Graduate Students 



370 



371 



Woodell, John H., Baltimore 
♦Woolley, Neil O., West Leyden, N. Y. 
Worsley, Gertrude C, Silver Spring 
Wright, Rcbert K., Frederick 
Wyand, William J., Sharpsburg 
♦Yearsley. Margaret E., Washington, D. 
*Yonkers, Bernard O., Emmitsburg 
Young, Alma C, Prince Frederick 
Young, Edmond G., Baltimore 



Young, Jerome L., Washington, D. C. 
Zalesak, Francis J., College Park 
*Zapponi, Paschal P.. Wooster, Ohio 
Zebelean, John, Catonsville 
Zihlman, Frederick A.. Washington, D. C. 
Zimmerman, Marian A., Washington 
D. C. 
Zulick, C. M., Hout'/dale, Pa. 



*Graduate students 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
AS OF JUNE 1, 1937 



Resident Collegiate Courses — Academic Year 

College 
Park 

College of Agriculture 252 

College of Arts and Sciences 998 

School of Dentistry _ 

College of Education _ 357 

College of Engineering 307 

Graduate School 337 

College of Home Economics...... 159 

School of Law _ „ _ _ _ 

School of Medicine - 

School of Nursing _ 

School of Pharmacy ^... ^ _ _ 



Summer School, 1936 1,077 

Extension Courses: 
Collegiate Credit: 

Annapolis (Arts and Sciences) 28 

Baltimore (Industrial Education) „ _ 220 

Cambridge (Arts and Sciences) 28 

Subcollegiate: 

Mining (Engineering) .. 178 



Grand total 
Duplications 

Net total 



3,941 
377 



•*■>■■■»■»»»*— ■*»»«^»»» w »*»«i»«*« »»>»»»>■■■•■•—»••»■••— •■ %j % \j v^^z 



Baltimore 



271 



224 

406 
126 

248 

1,275 
156 



1,431 
121 

1,310 



Total 
252 
998 
271 
357 
307 
337 
159 
224 
406 
126 
248 

3,685 
1,233 



28 

220 

28 

178 

5,372 
538 

4,834 



Enrollment in Short Courses and Conferences of from two days to one 
week: Rural Women, 717; Boys' and Girls' Club, 440; Volunteer Firemen, 136; 
Highway Engineers, 127; Operators of Water Works and Sewage Disposal 
Plants, 54; Canning Crops Conference, 134; Florists, 262; Nurserymen, 55; 
Garden School, 188. Parent Teacher Conference, 75; CCC Conference, 152. 



372 



373 



GENERAL INDEX 



Page 

Administration 

board of regents - 7 

officers of administration 8 

boards and committees — 17 

officers of instruction (College Park) 9 

officers of instruction (Baltimore) 25 

faculty committees (Baltimore) 38 

administrative organization 40 

buildings 41 

libraries 43 

43 
45 
47 
45 
45 
49 
47 
48 
22 
23 



Admission 

methods of admission- 
advanced standing 

certificate ^.... ,«.». 

examination, by 

physical examinations _. 

transfer 

unclassified students 

Agents 

assistant county 

assistant home demonstration 24 

county 22 

county home demonstration „. 23 

local „ 23 

Agricultural Education 121, 231 

Agriculture, College of 65 

admission 65 

curricula in 64 

departments 65 

farm practice 66 

fellowships 66, 154 

requirements for graduation 66 

special students in agriculture 86 

State Board of 187 

Agronomy 70, 196 

Alumni 64 

Animal husbandry 72, 198 

Aquiculture 298 

Art — 199, 261 

Arts and Sciences, College of 90 

advanced standing 92 

advisers 92 

degrees _ 91 

divisions 90 

electives in other colleges and schools 93 

normal load 92 

requirements 94, 95, 97, 109 

student responsibility 92 

Astronomy 200 

Athletics 161 

Bacteriology 73, 200 

Biochemistry, plant phsrsiology 208, 209 

Biophysics 209 

Board of Regents 7 

Botany 74, 205 

Buildings 41 

Business Administration 110. 221 

Calendar ^ 4 

Certificates, Degrees and 52 

Chemistry 99, 210 

analytical 99, 211 

biological 68, 214 

curriculum 100 

general 99, 210 

industrial 99. 216 

organic 211 

physical 213 

research 99 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 299 

Chorus „ 284 

Civil Engineering 137, 237 

Clubs, miscellaneous 63 

College of Agriculture 65 

College of Arts and Sciences 90 




Page 

College of Education ~-. — 114 

College of Engineering 133 

College of Home Economics 142 

Committees 17, 38 

Comparative Literature 217 

County agents 22 

demonstration agents 23 

Courses of study, description of 191 

Dairy Husbandry 76, 218 

Degrees and Certificatea. 
Delinquent students 

Dentistry, School of. 

advanced standing 

building 

deportment 

equipment 

expenses 

promotion 

residence 

Diamondback 64 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 90 

lower division 93 

humanities 95 

natural sciences 97 

social sciences — 109 

Dormitory rules 56 

D rawing ^- 239 

Economics 221 

agricultural - 68, 192 

Education 114. 225 

history and principles _ 225 

me^ods in arts and science subjects 

(high school) 228 

agricultural 121, 231 

arts and science 119 

curricula 116 

degrees 115 

departments _ 114 

commercial _ 129 

home economics „ 125, 230 

industrial 126 

physical 130. 161. 233 

teachers* special diploma — 115 

Educational psychology 227 

Education, College of — 114 

Electrical Engineering 139. 240 

Employment, student _ 58 

Engineering 133, 237 

agricultural 70, 195 

civil 137, 237 

drawing 239 

electrical „ 139. 240 

general subjects 242 

mechanics . ~ 242 

mechanical 140, 243 

shop 245 

surveying _ 246 

admission requirements 133 

bachelor degrees 134 

curricula 136 

equipment ^ , -~ 134 

library 1 36 

master of science in 134 

professional degrees in 134 

English Language and Literature 246 

Entomology 78, 252 

Entrance 43 

Examinations 45. 50 

Expenses 53, 154, 168, 174, 177, 180, 186 

Extension Service 89 

staff 21 

Experiment Station. Agricultural 87 

staff 19 

Faculty 9, 25 

Farm forestry 189. 255 



GENERAL INDEX 



s 

i 



Page 

Farm management. 6B, 255 

Feed, Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection 

Service - - 1^^ 

Five Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

Curriculum 108, 182 

Floriculture - 8«i. 264 

Foods and nutrition 146, 260 

Forestry, State Department of 189 

course m 255 

Fraternities and Sororities 63 

French 277 

Genetics 80. 256, 298 

Geology — - 256 

Geological Survey 190 

German 279 

Grading system - 50 

Graduate School, The 147 

admission - 148 

council 147 

courses — 148 

, fees — 154 

fellowships and assistantships 154 

registration 148 

residence requirements 150 

summer graduate work 149 

Greek - 256 

Health Service 49 

History 257 

Historical statement 39 

Home Economics 142, 259 

curricula — 142 

degree — 142 

departments 142 

facilities 142 

general 143 

H^Mne Economics Education 125, 230 

Honors and awards 59, 311 

Horticultural State Department 188 

#^ Horticulture _ 80. 263 

Sericulture 83, 264 

geheral 266 

. landscape gardening 84, 265 

olericulture 83, 266 

pomology 82. 263 

vegetable crops 264 

Hospital 49. 175, 176 

Industrial Education 126 

Infirmary rules 49 

Italian ^_ 282 

Landscape gardening 84, 265 

Latin 268 

Law, The School of 171 

advanced standing — 173 

admission 172 

combined program of study 173 

fees and expenses 174 

Libraries 43 

Library Science 268 

Livestock Sanitary Service 188 

Mathematics 101. 102. 268 

Mechanical Engineering 140. 243 

Mechanics 242 

Medals and prizes 59, 311 

Medicine, School of 175 

admission 176 

clinical facilities 175 

dispensaries and laboratories 176 

expenses 177 

prizes and scholarships 176 

Michrochemistry (plant) 209 

Military Science and Tactics 48, 157, 275 

Modern Languages, Courses in 277 

Music „ 284 

Musical organizations 284 

Nursing, School of 178 

admission 1 79 

combined program — 108, 180 

degree and diploma 1^3 

expenses 180 



Page 

hours on duty ~ 179 

programs offered 178 

OflEicers, administrative g 

of instruction 9, 25 

Old Line 64 

Olericulture 83, 266 

Pathology ._ „ 73, 75, 2U0 

Pharmacy, School of 184 

admission ~ 1^5 

expenses 186 

location 184 

Phi Kappa Phi 62, 311 

Philosophy 285 

Physical Education 130, 161, 233 

Physical examinations 49 

Physics _ »103, 286 

Plant pathology - 75, 207 

Plant physiology 75, 208 

Political Science 289 

Pomology _ ^. — 81, 263 

Poultry husbandry 85, 290 

Predental curriculum 107, 165 

Premedical curriculum 106 

Prenursing curriculum _. 108 

Princess Anne College 41 

Psychology _- _ _ 227, 291 

Publications, student 64 

R. O. T. C 48, 157, 275, 319 

Refunds _ _ 58 

Regimental Organization 819 

Register of students _ 321 

Registration, date of 4, 5 

penalty for late 54, 55, 168 

Regulations, grades, degrees 50 

degrees and certificates 52 

elimination of delinquent students 52 

examinations and grades 50 

regulation of studies _ 50 

reports _ 52 

Religious influences _ ^ 63 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 48, l57, 

275, 319 

Residence and Non-Residence 57 

Room reservation 56 

Rules and Regulations 56 

Rural Education 121, 231 

Science, General _ 101 

Seed Inspection Service 189 

Societies 62 

honorary fraternities _ _ 62 

fraternities and sororities 63 

miscellaneous clubs and societies 63 

Sociology 292 

Soils 72, 1 97 

Solomons Island research 299 

Sororities _ 63 

Spanish 2H2 

Speech 294 

State Board of Agriculture 187 

-Statistics, course in 256 

Student 

employment 58 

government „ 61 

Grange 63 

organization and activities 61 

publications 61 

Summer camps 159 

Summer session 156 

credits and certificates 156 

graduate work 149, 150 

terms of admission 156 

Surveying 2^6 

Terrapin „ ".]""" 64 

Textiles and clothing .145, 259 

Uniforms, military „ 15« 

Vegetable crops 264 

Weather Service, State _ 189 

Withdrawals 5>^ 

Zoology _ _. 104, 106, 296 



Any furtlier mfonnatum desured ooncenung dbe Uuvetsicy 
of Maiylaiid wiU be fiiniislied upon applicstioo t^ 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
College Paric, Maiyiati<L 




GENERAL INDEX 



k 



Page 

Farm management tiy, 255 

Feed, Feriihzer, and Lime Inspection 

Service ^^^ 

Five Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

Curriculum 1^'^. i82 

Floriculture ^''\' ^^4 

Foods and nutrition 14G, 260 

ForesUy, State Department of 189 

course in 2oo 

Fraternities and Sororities 63 

French _ 277 

Genetics i'", 256. 298 

Geology 256 

Geological Survey 100 

German 279 

Grading system 50 

Graduate School, The 147 

admission 148 

council 147 

courses 148 

fees - 154 

fellowships and assistantships 154 

registration 148 

residence requirements 150 

summer graduate work 149 

Greek 256 

Health Service 49 

History 257 

Historical statement 39 

Home Economics 142, 259 

curricula 142 

degree 142 

departments 142 

facilities 142 

general 143 

H*m»e Economics Education 125, 230 

Honors and awards 59. 311 

Horticul'iurai State Department 188 

*^> Horticulture 80, 263 

floriculture «3. 264 

general 266 

landscape gardening S4, 2)5 

oleiiculture K3, 266 

pomology ^2, 263 

vegetable crops 264 

Hospital 49, 175. 176 

Industrial Education 126 

Infirmary rules 49 

Italian 282 

Landscape gardening 84, 265 

Latin 268 

Law, The School of 171 

advanced standing 173 

admission 172 

combined program of study 173 

fees and expenses 174 

Libraries 43 

Library Science 268 

Livestock Sanitary Service 188 

Mathematics 101, 102. 268 

Mechanical Engineering 140. 243 

Mechanics 242 

Medals and prizes 59, 311 

Medicine, School of 175 

admission 176 

clinical facilities 175 

dispensaries and laboratories 176 

expenses 177 

prizes and scholarships 176 

Michrochemistry (plant > 2^^9 

Military Science and Tactics 48, 157, 275 

Modern Languages. Courses in 277 

Music 284 

Musical organizations 284 

Nursing. School of 178 

admission 179 

combined program 108, 180 

degree and diploma 1S3 

expenses 180 



Pa^e 

hours on duty 17i) 

programs offered 17s, 

Officers, administrative g 

of instruction 9, 25 

Old Line 04 

Olericulture ^^3. 26ii 

Pathology 73. 75, 2im) 

Pharmacy, School of 1S4 

admission L^ .) 

exi»enses - ^ IbS 

location Ib4 

Phi Kappa Phi 62. 311 

Philosophy _ 2b5 

Physical Education 130. 161, 2H:; 

Physical examinations 49 

Physics _ 103, 2>6 

Plant pathology - 75. 207 

Plant physiology 75. 20S 

Political Science 2s9 

Pomology 8 1 , 2ti3 

Poultry husbandry 85, 2f>it 

Predental curriculum 107, IG") 

Premedical curriculum li 6 

Prenursing curriculum los 

Princess Anne College 41 

I»sychology „_ _ 227, 291 

Publications, student - 64 

R. O. T. C 48, 157, 275, 319 

Kefunds 5S 

Regimental Organization 3.9 

Register of students 321 

Registration, date of 4. 5 

penalty for late 54, 55, IBS 

Regulations, grades, degrees 5ti 

degrees and certificates 52 

elimination of deliiiquent students.... fri 

exanninations and grades „, 50 

regulation of studies „ 5o 

reports 52 

Religious influences 63 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 48, IfTT. 

275, 319 

Residence and Non-Residence .^7 

Room reservation 56 

Rules and Regulations 56 

Rural Education 121. 231 

Science, General 101 

Seed Inspection Service ISO 

Societies 62 

honorary fraternities 62 

fraternities and sornrities 6^^ 

miscellaneous club^- and societies 63 

Sociology 2!'2 

Soils _...72. 1 07 

Solomons Island research 2P^' 

Sororities _ _ 6:^ 

Spanish 2^2 

Speech „ _ 29 { 

State Board of Agriculture 187 

Statistics, course in 256 

Student 

employment 58 

government 61 

Grange .'. 6o 

organization and activities 61 

publications 61 

Summer camps 159 

Summer session 15*) 

credits and certificates 15'^. 

graduate wr-rk 149, IS'^ 

terms of admission 1.' • 

Surveying 2 *'^ 

Terrapin ""' fl 

Textiles and clothing 145i 2'i^' 

Uniforms, military 15< 

V^'getable crops 26 1 

Weather Service, State IS'- 

Withdrawals Rv 

Zoology 104. 105. 29^ 



Any further information desired concerning the University 
of Maryland will be furnished upon application Id 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
College Park, Maryland. 



> ,•