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Full text of "Catalogue"

lU 



(TIMJUx—. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



VoL35 



MARCH, 1938 



No. 3 



Catalogue Number 



1938 - 1939 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



CALENDAR FOR 1938-1939 







1938 






JULY 


^|k 


T 


W 


T|F 


S 












1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


81 







.~«. 




..... 


.... 



AUGUST 



SIM 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

28 



W 



rr 



8 
10 
17 
24 
8«81 



4 

11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
18 
20 
27 



SEPTEMBER 



sTH 



4 
11 
18 



5 
12 
19 



2526 



I. 



6 
18 
20 
27 



WFTTFIS" 



7 
14 
21 

28 

J 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



J 



3 

10 
17 

28124 

80 



2 

9 

16 



OCTOBER 



2 

9 

16 

28 

30 



M 



8 
10 
17 
24 
81 



TTw 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
18 
2<M 



5 



14 
21 

27128 



ar 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



NOVEMBER 



"STsr 



6 

18 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



T 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



W 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



8 

10 



BT 



4 
11 



17118 
24 



S 



6 

12 

19 

25126 



DECEMBER 



4 
11 
18 



I 5 
12 



6 
18 



1920 



W 



25 26 27. 



1 
8 
15 
22 



7 

14 
21 
28129130 



21 

9 

16 

28 



!|29 30 



8 

10 
17 
24 
81 



1939 



JANUARY 



sTm 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2 

9 

16 

23 



29|30 



8 

10 
17 
24 
81 



WTf 



4 
11 



1819 



25 



5 

12 



26 



M 





18 



20)21 



27 



7 
14 



28 



FEBRUARY 



•gWPf 



5 
12 
19 



6 
13 
20 



7 
14 
21 



W 



1 

8 

15 



26|27|28|. 



2 

9 

16 



GT 



222824 



8 
10 
17 



4 
11 
18 
25 



MARCH 



SlMjTIWITjyTS 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 



2 
9 
16 



2228 
2980 



8 

10 
17 
24 
81 



4 
11 
18 
26 



APRIL 



S 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



M 



17 
24 



8 
1011 



W 



18 
25126 



T 



6 

12118 
1920 



27 



ET 



ff 



1 

8 
15 



7 
14 
2122 
2829 



MAY 



S 



7 
14 
21 
28 



H 



1 

8 
15 
22 



T 



2 

9 

16 

28 



W 



8 
10 

17 
24 



4 

n 

18 
26 



29I80I81L, 



6 
12 



26 



ff 



6 
18 



1920 



27 



JUNE 

s|k|t|W|!flT 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



16 
80 



5" 



8 

9110 



17 
24 



JULY 



S 



16 
28 



& 



8 

9110 



17 
24 



¥ 



801811, -I. ■ 



w 



4 
11 
18 
25126 



12 
19 



Tiyrs" 



6 

18] 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



AUGUST 



u 



6 
18 
20 
27 



s 



7 
14 
21 
28 



T 



1 

8 

15 



29 



W 



2 

9 

16 



2228 



80 



8 
10 
17 
24 
31 



18 
25 



U12 



19 
26 



SEPTEMBER 



S M 



8 

lOill 



17 
24 



18 
25 



T W 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 



7 
14 
21 
27128 



V 



a 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 
9 
16 
28 
80 



OCTOBER 



uiiikik^uy 



1 

8 

16 

22 



21 
9 



1617 



28 
2980 



8 

10 



24 
81 



4| 
11 
18 
25 



6 
12 
19 



6 
18 



2627 



7 
14 



2021 
28 



NOYSMBER 



u 



m 



6 
12 
19 
26 



20 
27 



H 



6 7 
1814 



21 
28 



W 



1 

81 
15 
22 



T 



2 

9 

16 

28 



2980 



HT 



8 
10 
17 
24 



S" 



4 
11 
18 
26 



DECEMBER 



8 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 

11 

18 



5 
12 
19 



262627 



W 



6 
18 
20 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 
8 
15 
22 
29 



S" 



2 
9 
16 
28 
SO 



1940 



JANUARY 



SIM 



14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 



TIWjTIF 



2 

9 

16 

28 



2980(81 



8 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
\2S 



5 

12 
19 
26 



s; 

6 
13 
20 
27 



FEBRUARY 



4) 
11 
18 



iiiEdbifea 



1 
8 




16 



25[26(27B8i29 



2 

9 

16 

28 



3 
10 
17 
24 



MARCH 

SIMITIWlTinT 



8 

m 

17 
24 
81 



4 
11 
18 
25 



6 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
281 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



12 

9 

16 

23 

30 



APRIL 



1 

8 
14115 



21 
28 



2 

9 
16 
23 



22 
291801 



W|T|l^|g 



8 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



6 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



MAY 



^ 



6 
12 
19 



& 



18 
20 



2627 



T 



28 



w 



1 

8 

14116 
2122 



21 

9 

16 



2980 



8 
10 
17 
28124 



81 



4 
11 
18 
25 



JUNE 




2 

9 

16 

23 

80 



8 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



6 
12 
19 
26 



6 
18 



27 



7 
14 



2021 



28 



1 
8 
16 
22 
29 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 
MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1938 - 1939 




Containing general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1938-1939 

and Records of 1937-1938. 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 
existing at the time of publication, March, 1938. 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR FOR 1938-1939 



1938 


1939 


1940 


JULY 


S 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S JM T 


W T F 


S M T|W|T|F|i> 


S M|T W T F 


S 


S M TjW T|F|S 


1 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
18 
20 

27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 

25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 7 
1314 
20 21 
27 28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 
1011 

1718 
24125 
311— 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


AUGUST 


"s 


FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S 


M T 


WIT F 


S M T W 


T F S 


S MIT W|T|F S 


S M T W T|F 


S 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
301 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


"5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 




2 
9 

16 
23 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


"6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


4 5 6 7 
11 12 13 14 
18 19 20 21 
25 26 27 28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

291 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 
17 
24 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


rs 


SEPTEMBER 


MAi:CH 


S M T W|T F S 


S|M|T 


W 


T F 


S M T W T|F S 


S 


M T W|T[F S 


1 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


17 
24 


"5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


3 

10 
17 

24 


4 

111 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


12 
9 

16 
23 
30 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M|T W|T F 


S 


S 


M T W T|F|S 


S 


M 


TjW TjFjS 


S 


M T 


W|T F S 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


"2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


1 

10 
17 

24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 

20 

27 

> 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


SiMiT W T 


FjS 


S M|T 


jW T 


FjS 


S 


M|T W 


T 


F 


S 


S M T W tIF S 




7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


7 
14 
21 
2_8] 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


5 

12 
19 
26 


1 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 


~6 
13 

20 

27 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


11 
18 
25 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


SIMIT W T 


F S 


S M 


T W 


T F S 


S" 


M 


T|W T|F S 


SIM 


TtWjTIFIS 




5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 




1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 

30 


S 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 
11 
18 
25 






7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 

24 




It 

10 
17 
24 
31 


"1 
11 
18 
25 


"5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


"2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


1 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


8 
15 
22 
29 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 

MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1938 - 1939 




Conlnlnhig general iufonnafioti concerning the University. 

Announce mentx for the Scholastic Year 1918-1919 

and Records of 19-17-1938. 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 

existing at the time of pi(blicalion, March, 19-18. 



Issued Monthly l.y Th.. Vnivprsitj- of Maryland. ColleSP Park, Md. 
Kntpri'd as Seeond Class Matter I'nder Act of Congress of July l*"'. 1894. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar 

Board op Regents 

Officers of Administtiation 

Officers of Instouction 



Page 

4 

7 
8 
9 



Boards and Committeies (College Park) „ _ ^"^ 

Section I — General Information > ^^ 

Historical Statement ^^ 

Administrative Organization «. ^^ 

Grounds and Buildings - „ ^2 

Libraries _ _ ^^ 

Admission - > '.. - 45 

Requirement in Military Instruction _ 49 

Requirements in Physical Education for Women _.... 49 



Health Service „ 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 

Honors and Awards - _ 

Student Activities _.... 

Alumni „.. 

Section II — Administrative Divisions »... 

College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Regulatory Activities 

College of Arts and Sciences. 



50 

51 
54 
60 

62 

65 
66 

66 

93 

93 

94 

96 

College of Commerce „ 122 

132 

148 

161 
166 

174 

175 

179 

181 

190 

194 

198 

............... ^Uo 



College of Engineering 

College of Home E conomics 

Graduate School - 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics 

School of Dentistry....... 

School of Medicine 

^^^^XX\^\i^A ^^ Jim ^ ^ &A ^ >J AXX ^^ ■•*■*>••••••*••••«•••••••#•■«•«••■••■■•«•■•>■■• ■•■>*»»****«^»*> ••••«••••■••■•••••■«••*•«■•••••••••■••*««•>•••.•■»•*••>■*••*•••••■• ••••••• 

ni^ ^^ A A\^\^ A \^ ak Jk A A %M> A A A AC^b X^ JT • • >> > •»•>•**•••■*••••««•••••• *■«■■«••*•«« ««••■•••••••••*••*••■■ • -— t '-•«-lrt«T IT Tr«»i»«,i»i ■■■ irTB-jr'aT-i- ■>•«*»«•■>••■••••■••••• 

State Boards and Departments 207 

Section III — Description of Courses 211 

(Alphabetical index of departments, p. 211) 

Section IV — Deckees, Honors, and Student Register 341 

Degrees and Certificates, 1936-1937 _ 341 

Honors, 1936-1937 353 

Student Register, 1937-1938 „ 362 

Summary of Enrollment, 1937-1938 „ „ 412 



1938 

Sept. 14-16 
Sept. 17 

Sept. 19 
Sept. 24 



Nov. 10 
Nov. 23 
Nov. 28 
Dec. 16 

1939 
Jan. 3 

Jan. 18-26 

Jan. 20 



Jan. 9-17 
Jan. 23-Feb. 3 

Jan. 31 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1938-1939 
COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 



Summer Term 



Wednesday-Friday 
Saturday 

Monday, 8:20 a.m. 

Saturday 



Thursday 

Wednesday, 4:10 p.m 
Monday, 8:20 a.m. 
Friday, 4:10 p. m. 



Registration for freshmen. 

Upper classmen complete regis- 
tration. 

Instruction for first semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Annual Faculty Reception. 

Thanksgiving recess begins. 

Thanksgiving recess ends. 

Christmas recess begins. 



Tuesday, 8:20 a.m. Christmas recess ends. 
Wednesday-Thursday First semester examinations. 
Friday Charter Day. Alumni Banquet. 

Second Semester 



Monday-Tuesday 
Monday-Friday 

Tuesday 



Feb. 1^ 


Wednesday, 8:20 a. 


Feb. 6 


Monday 


Feb. 22 


Wednesday 


March 25 


Saturday 


April 6-11 


Thursday, 5:10 p.m. 




Tuesday, 8:20 a.m. 


May 12-20 


Friday-Saturday 


May 22-31 


Monday- Wednesday 


May 28 


Sunday, 11:00 a.m. 


May 30 


Tuesday 


June 2 


Friday 


June 3 


Saturday 



Registration for second semester. 
Highway Engineering Short 

Course, 
Last day to complete registration 

for second semester without 

payment of late registration 

fee. 
Instruction for second semester 

begins. 
Last day to change registration 

or to file schedule card without 

penalty. 
Washington's Birthday. Holiday, 
Observance of Maryland Day. 

Easter recess. 

Registration for first semester, 

1939-1940. 
Second semester examinations. 
Baccalaureate sermon. 
Memorial Day. Holiday. 
Class Day. 
Commencement. 



June 12-17 
June 26 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 7-12 
Sept. 5-7 
Sept. 11-13 



Monday-Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday-Saturday 

Tuesday-Thursday 

Monday- Wednesday 



Sept. 11-13 Monday-Wednesday 

Sept. 18-30 Monday-Saturday 

Notice: No leaves of absence will be 
quent to the dates set for holidays. 



Rural Women's Short Course. 
Summer Session begins. 
Summer Session ends. 
Boys' and Girls' Club Week. 
Volunteer Firemen's Short Course. 
Sanitary Engineering Short 

Course. 
Ministers' Conference. 
Traffic Officers' Training School. 

granted either prior to, or subse- 



BALTIMORE (PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS) 

First Semester 



1938 

September 12 Monday 

September 14 Wednesday 

September 20 Tuesday 



September 21 Wednesday 



September 22 Thursday 



November 2o 


Wednesday 


November 28 


Monday 


December 21 


Wednesday 


1939 

January 3 


Tuesday 



January 23 to Monday- 
January 28, inc. Saturday 
January 28 Saturday 



* Registration for evening students 
(LAW). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (LAW — Evening). 
♦Registration for first- and second-year 
students (DENTISTRY, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 
♦Registration for all other students 
(DENTISTRY, LAW— Day, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (DENTISTRY, LAW— 
Day, MEDICINE, PHARMACY). 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the 
last scheduled period (ALL 
SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Christmas recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 

scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

♦Registration for the second semester 

(ALL SCHOOLS). 

First semester ends after the last 

scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 



Second Semester 



Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 



Second semester ends (LAW — Even- 
ing). 



* A stud^t who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last 
day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in 
which instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be 
waived only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

* The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a, m. to 12:30 p. m., with 
the following exceptions; Monday, September 12, 1938, until 8:00 p. m. ; Saturday, 
September 24. 1938, until 5:00 p. m.; and on Saturday, January 28, 1939, until 5:00 p. m. 
Advance registration is encouraged. 



January { 


10 


Monday 


February 


22 


Wednesday 


April 5 




Wednesday 


April 12 




Wednesday 


June 3 




Saturday, ] 


June 14 




Wednesday 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman _ _ 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary -.^ 

4101 Greemvay, Baltimore 



Tervi Expires 
1945 



1947 



J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer „ 

1015 Argonne Drive, Baltimore 

Roland Park, Baltimore 
William P. Cole, Jr — 



.1944 



1942 



1940 



1943 



Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr 

Hagerstown, Washington County 



Harry H. Nuttle. > 1941 



Denton, Caroline County 



JOHN_£-.--J^*«tWr:?-„.. 



a»^»— 



Towson, Baltimore County 



Oaluiis ' ^ ^ illc, Caltimoi'e County .^ 



%^kijL/tx-^ 



4^>jl/ 






y. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 

H. J. Patterson, D. Sc, Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service, Acting Dean 

of the College of Agriculture. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty. 
L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, N.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Dean of the College of 
Commerce. 

J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Law. 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

W". S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director of the 
Summer Session. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A., Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

A. J. LOMAS, M.D, D.P.H., Superintendent of the University Hospital. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 
of Nursing. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men and Director of Athletics. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the President. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Herbert A. Russell, Chief Engineer. 

J. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A., Acting Director of Experiment Station. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1937-1938 
At College Park 

PROFESSORS 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology, Dean of 
the Graduate School. 

Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

F. W. Besley, Ph.D., Professor of Farm Forestry, State Forester. 

L. A. Black, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Lr B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, State Chemist. 

Glen D. Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 

0. C. Bruce, M.S., Professor of Soil Technology. (On leave of absence.) 

Theodore C. Byerly, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

R. W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Kenneth A. Clark, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education, Assistant 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Myron Cree:se, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

C. G. EiCHLiN, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

W. F. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Allen S. Gruchy, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Finance. 

Charles B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Malcolm Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. ^ 

Homer C. House, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

L. V. Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

K. C. Ikeler, M.E., M.S., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

L. W. Ingham, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Lawrence H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

J. G. Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

MoRLEY A. JULL, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Statistics. 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

C. L. Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Men. 

C. H. Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor of Olericulture. 

T. B. Manny, Ph.D.. Professor of Sociology. 

Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Frieda W. McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 



8 



9 



\^ 



/ Edna B. McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

J. E. Metzge^i, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agronomy and Acting Director of 

Experiment Station. 
J. A. Miller, B.S., Administrative Coordinator of Practice Teaching. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management, 
Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

J. N. G. Nesbit, B.S., M.E., E.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. A., Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

C. S. Richardson, A.M., Professor of Speech. 

A. L. Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion, Director of the Summer Session. 

J. W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, Dean of the 
College of Engineering, Director of Engineering Research. 

W, Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Economics and 
Business Administration, Dean of the College of Commerce. 

Leonid I. Strakhovsky, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Dean of Faculty. 

C. E. Temple, M.A., Professor of Plant Pathology, State Plant Pathologist. 

ROYLE P. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Technology. 

A. S. Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape Gardening. 

R. V. Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquiculture. 

Harry Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

S. M. Wedeberg, A.m., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

XflLARiBEL p. Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 

Charles E. White, Ph.D., Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. 

LECTURERS 

0. E. Baker, Ph.D., Lecturer in Agricultural Economics. 

R. S. Dill, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation, and Refrigeration. 

H. R. Hall, B.S., Lecturer in Municipal Sanitation. 

F. G. Kear, D.Sc, Lecturer on Electrical Communication. 

Howard Larson. M.A., Lecturer in Political Science. 

Nelson B. Lasson, LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer in Political Science. 

R. E. Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer in Entomology. 

James F. Yeager, Ph.D., Lecturer in Entomology. 

10 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Myron H. Berry, M.A., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Charles W. England, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Geary Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy, Director of Ath- 
letics, Dean of Men. 

W. A. FRAZIE21, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

James Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor of Egg Marketing, Poultry 
Husbandry. 

Susan Emolyn Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

I. C. Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

L. S. Highby, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Ancient Languages and Litera- 
ture. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science, 
Librarian. 

L. J. Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Jesse William Huckert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Carl S. Joslyn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

C. F. Kramer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

Francis B. Lincoln, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Propagation. 

Alpheus R. Marshall, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

N. E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Geo, D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

A. W. RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (Baltimore). 

Reuben Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

W. Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agric\iltural Economics. 

R. C. Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

R. C. Yates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. (On leave of 
absence.) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M. Thomas Bartram, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Bacteriology. 

Russell G. Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

S. 0. BURHOE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

C. W. CissEL, M.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Howard Clark, II, Major, Inf., U. S. A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

W. R. Clark, M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

James W. Coddington, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
L Vienna Curtis, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Eugene B. Daniels, M.A., M.F.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Commerce. 

U 



George O. S. Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modem Languages. 

Linden S. Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

George C. Ernst, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

John E. Faber, M.S., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Robert T. Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Stewart D. Hervey, Major, Inf., U.S.A., B.S., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

H. B. HosHALL, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

George B. Hughes, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Charles H. Jones, Major, Inf., U. S. A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 
- Kate Karpeles, M.D., Physician to Women. 
\^ Mary E. Kirkpatrick, M.S., Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Philip R. Layton, LLB., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

F. M. Lemon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

George Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Chemistry. 

William G. Maglin, Capt., Inf., U. S. A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Monroe H. Martin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
V^DOROTHY M. MiDDLETON, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

M. A. Pyle, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

Hester Beall Provenson, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Oswald Karl Sagen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
vj Florence B. Smith, M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Management. 

E. B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry (Balti- 
more). 

W. C. Supplee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

H. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Guy p. Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology (Baltimore.) 

Edwin W. Titt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 
(Baltimore.) 

Arne Wikstrom, E.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Mark W. Woods, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

W. Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

INSTRUCTORS 

George F. Alrich, Ph.D., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 

George J. Abrams, M.S., Instructor in Apiculture. 

Cecil R. Ball. M.A., Instructor in English. 

Grace Barnes, B.S. and B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

12 



.\i 



J 



\ 



Mary Emma Barnes, M.A., Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 

Mary Barton, C.D.E.F., M.A., Instructor in Education, and Critic Teacher. 

J. D. Blandford, Instructor in Horticulture. 

Alan Edward Bogue, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

Hugh A. Bone, Jr., Ph.D., Instructor in Political Science. 

H. Glen Brown, A.M., A.M.L.S., Instructor in Library Science and Assist- 
ant Reference and Loan Librarian. 

Jack Y. Bryan, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Frances Bryant, B.S., Instructor in Home Management. 

Adelaide C. Clough, M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher. 

Beryl H. Dickinson, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Frank M. Dobson, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Donald Marquand Dozer, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

Gaylord Beale Estabrook, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics (Baltimore). 

Alaric Anthony Evangelist, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

George W. Fogg, M.A., Instructor in Library Science. 

Gardner H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English and Public Speaking (Bal- 
timore) . 

Ellen Frazer, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

John J. Gavaghan, Sgt., U. S. A., Instructor in Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Edwin E. Ghiselli, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology. 

William H. Gravely, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. — 

W. L. Hard, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

L. C. HuTSON, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

William E. Hutzell, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Frances Ide, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Egbert C. Ingalls, C.E., D.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Evelyn Iverson, M.A., Instructor in Speech, - 

John E. Jacobi, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

Polly Bell Kessinger, M.S., Instructor in Textiles and Clothing. 

Agnes I. Kinnear, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Howard M. Kline, Ph.D., Instructor in Political Science. 

Vernon Arthur Lamb, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Otis E. Lancaster, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Eric J. Lindahl, M.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Andre Liotard, B.A,, B.D., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

John Lowe, III, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

I. E. McDouGLE, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology (Baltimore). 

Wm. H. McManus, Warrant Officer, U. S. A., Instructor in Military Science 
and Tactics. 

George F. Madigan, M.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 

Fritz Maile, Instructor in Music. 

John C. Mullin, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration. 

C. D. Murphy, A.M., Instructor in English. 

C. L. Newcombe, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

IS 



P 



Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modern Lan^ages (Baltimore). 

W. D. Patton, B.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

J. Orin Powers, Ph.D., Instructor in Education. 

Gordon William Prange, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English (Baltimore). 

Harlan Randall, Instructor in Music. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Instructor in Marketing. 

Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 

George L. Sixbey, M.A., Instructor in English. 

H. B. Shipley, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Arthur Silver, M.A., Instructor in History. 

C. Mabel Smith, Instructor in Education. 

Henry Hunter Smith, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
V Kathleen M. Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 
V^XGretchen Stontemyer, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Warren L. Strausbaugh, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

William J. Svirbely, M.S., D.Sc, Instructor in Chemistry. 

Granville H. Triplett, A.M., Pd.M., LL.M., J.D., Instructor in Economics 
(Baltimore). 

G. J. Uhrinak, Corporal, Inf., U.S.A., Instructor in Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Edmund H. Umberger, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Walter R. Volckhausen, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 
\y' Bernice W. Wade, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
U-' Helen Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Charles Simpson Williams, B.S., Instructor in Poultry. 

Jonathan W. Williams, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

C. J. Wittler, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

Albert W. Woods, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 

Leland G. Worthington, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Education. 

Warren Ziegaus, B.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

ASSISTANTS 

H. L. Alderton, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education, 
Jessie Blaisdell, Assistant in Music. 
Spencer B. Chase, B.S., Assistant in Pomology. 
Edward L. Conwell, Ph.D., Assistant in English. 
L. P. DiTMAN, Ph.D., Assistant in Entomology. 
Donald Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
L. J. KiLBY, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Audrey Killiam, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics. 
Russell Hancock Lyddane, B.S., Assistant in Physics (Baltimore). 
\y Frances Hov^^e Miller, A.M., Assistant in English. 
Carroll Nash, B.S., Assistant in Water Products. 
Bernice Pierson, A.B., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 
Paul R. Poffenberger, M.S., Assistant in Agricultural Economics. 

14 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

1937-1938 

David H. Baldwin „.„._ Poultry 

Jean Barzhe. „ ^ Mathematics 

John Blackmore.. „ Agricultural Economics 

Paul S. Brooks „ Chemistry 

Donald S. Brownlee ....„ Plant Physiology 

Homer W. Carhart Chemistry 

Floyd D. Carroll Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Laurence E. Cron „ „ „ Agricultural Economics 

Nathan Gammon, Jr Agronomy 

Lex B. Golden Agronomy 

Jack D. Hartman „ Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Hugh A. Heller „ Chemistry 

Chester W, Hitz Horticulture 

Alfred D. Hoadley Agronomy 

William A. Horne _ „ Chemistry 

J. Russell Ives „ „.... Agricultural Economics 

Walter F. Jeffers Plant Pathology 

Hyman N. Laden _ Mathematics 

Charles M. Loyd Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Lewis P. McCann Bacteriology 

William A. Nolte „ Bacteriology 

James M. Osborn „ Chemistry 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr Bacteriology 

Alfred B. Pettit _ Entomology 

George B. Reynard .*. — Botany 

Harold G. Shirk „ Plant Physiology 

Hutton D. Slade. - - ™ Bacteriology 

IjEONARD oMith ~ ~ ~ — ~ ~ — — — - ~ ~~ wuemistry 

Elsie M. Sockrider „._ Bacteriology 

Marvin L. Speck..... Bacteriology 

Howard L. Stier Horticulture 

Viola C. Teeter - ~ Home Economics 

Virginia E. Thomas Entomology 

Albert H. Tillson — Botany 

La Veta Titt Genetics and Statistics 

Paschal P. Zapfoni Chemistry 

15 





n 



FELLOWS 

1937-1938 

John R. Adams > _.. Chemistry 

Ara a. Asadorian Sociology 

Clyde W. Balch Chemical Engineering 

John S. Bayley. Education 

John M. Bellows, Jr Botany 

William E. Bickley, Jr Entomology 

Francis Miles Bower. „ „ Chemistry 

John L. Bowers Horticulture 

Viola Marian Buhrow Economics 

Roy Dawson Bacteriology 

Gordon F. Dittmar _ Chemical Engineering 

Wilbur I. DuvalIx _ Physics 

Frank T. Hoadley „ English 

George K. Holmes „ Chemistry 

Frank L. Howard...... „ Chemistry 

Joseph S. Lann _....„ ...._ Chemistry 

Russell Ernest Leed _ Chemistry 

Rodney Andreen Olson Plant Physiology 

Roy L. Robertson - Zoology 

Donald E. Shay _.- „ Zoology 

Mildred E. Skinner English 

Carl B. Smith „ Agricultural Economics 

William A. Stanton Chemistry 

William D. Stull. _ Zoology 

William H. Swango Chemistry 

Flora W. Reid „ Home Economics 

Mary Elinor Webster Zoology 

John K. Wolfe..... „ > _ _.- _ „ Chemistry 



LIBRARIANS 

(College Park) 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M., A.M.L.S Librarian 

George W. Fogg, M.A Reference and Loan Librarian 

H. Glenn Brown, A.M., A.M.L.S Assistant Reference and Loan Librarian 

Alma Hook, B.S., B.S.L.S Head Cataloguer 

Louise W. Getchell, A.B., B.S.L.S. Assistant Cataloguer 

Elizabeth A. Gardner, A.M., B.S.L.S Assistant Cataloguer 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S. Assistant Cataloguer 

Warren Ziegaus, B.S., B.A. in Librarianship Order Librarian 

Kate White „ „ „ _ _ Assistant 

16 



BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Rowland, Dean Howell, 
D^n DuM;z, Dea^Robinson, Dean Small, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman 

Dean Steinberg, Dean Stamp, Dean "^I^^^^^'^^^ ^'^^^^^^ 
Cotterman, Colonel Pateh, Dr. Lomas, Dr. Huff Mr. Hille^eist M,ss 
Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Professor Metzger, Dr. Hale, Dr. Manny, Dr. 
White, Dr. Welsh, Professor Ikeler, Professor Epi^ley. 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY, STANDARDS, AND COORDINATION 

Dr Warfel Chairman; Dr. DeVault, Professor Metzger, Dr. White Dr. 
SSg Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Cotterman, Dr. Truitt, Dr. Bamford, Dean 
Sberg, Dr. Gave;, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Wylie, Professor Strahom, 
Professor Ikeler. 

STUDENT LIFE 

Professor Eppley, Chairman; Colonel Patch Dr. l^^oU^^iTJ ^^^s 
Professor Eichlin, Dr. Harman, Dean Stamp, Mr. Pollock, Mr. Williams, 

Miss Ide, Dr. Cotterman, Miss Howard. 

THE LIBRARIES 

Dr Hale, Chairman; Dr. Long, Dr. Crothers, Dr. Haring, Dr. Bamford, Mrs. 
' Welsh, Dr. Anderson, Dr. Spencer, Professor Strahom. 

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICE 
ik^'ihairman; Dr. Kemp, Dr. White, Professor Quigley, Mrs. 
McFarland, Professor Eppley. 

ADMISSION, GUIDANCE, AND ADJUSTMENT 

Dr Long, Chairman; Dr. White, Dr. Phillips, Professor Pyle, ^r. Steinmeyer, 
Dr brothers. Dr. Hale, Professor Quigley, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Hanng, 
Dean Stamp, Mr. HiUegeist, Miss Preinkert. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 
Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Cotterman, Professor Eichlin, Dean Stamp, 
Professor Eppley, Dean Mount. 

17 



KESEARCH 

Metzger, Dr. Drake, Dr. Manny, Dr. DeVault, Dr. Jul), Dr. Huff. 
EXTENSION EDUCATION 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS NON-RESIDENT LECTURES, AND 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

"""■ Mfrp'st'^Dr?^' n" A""'"^^"' ^^°^^^- Richardson, Dr. Welsh 
Mr. ijopst, Dr. Cory, Dr. Schrader, Mr. Snyder Mr Polln^w n. vveisn, 

Dean Stamp, Dean Mount, Dean DuMez. ' ^^"^^' 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 
'■"'rLpptr ''''^'™'^"' ''"'^^^"^ ^'■^^^^'^-"' ^-C->-. I^- Kemp, 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Dr. House, Dr Falls Mr 0«wai^ z> f », 

Dr. Warfel. > ^r. r aiis, air. Oswald, Professor Metzg-er, 

COORDINATION OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Symons Chairman; Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, Dr. Besley, Mr Holmes Dr 

Kemp, Mr. Shaw, Dr. Cory. Mr. Oswald, Professor Ikder ' 

GENERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 
Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Hale, Dr. Manny, Dr. Symons Dr W.rf.l 
Professor Eppley, Dr. Long, Mr. Oswald, Mr. SnyderS. StdleS 



18 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

J. E. Metzger, A.M ^ _ „ „ Acting Director 

Agricultural Economics : 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D Professor, Agricultural Economics 

A. B. Hamilton, M.S „ Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 

W. P. Walker, M.S Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 

J. W. CoDDiNGTON, M.S. _ Assistant Professor, Agricultural Economics 

R. F. BURDETTE, M.S _ Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

P. R. POFFENBERGER, M.S. Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering : 

R. W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

G. J. BuRKHARDT, M.S Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) : 

J. E. Metzger, M.A. „ Professor, Agronomy 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D „ _ Professor, Genetics and Statistics 

G. F. Eppley, M.S Associate Professor, Agronomy 

R. G. RoTHGEB, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Breeding 

W. B. Posey, B.S Associate Professor, Tobacco 

A. W. Woods, B.S. _ - Instructor, Agronomy 

R. P. Thomas, Ph.D Professor, Soil Technology 

H. B. WiNANT, M.S „ Assistant Professor, Soil Technology 

J. W. Magruder, B.S - Assistant Professor, Soil Erosion 

G. F. MadiGAN, M.S „ Instructor, Soil Technology 

S. P. Stabler, B.S „ _ Assistant, Agronomy 

Albert White, B.S - Assistant, Agronomy 

A. D. HOADLEY, M.S - Assistant, Agronomy 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry : 

K. C. IKELER, M.S Professor, Animal Husbandry 

K. A. Clark, M.S Professor, Animal Husbandry 

L. W. Ingham, M.S Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D „ Professor, Dairy and Animal Husbandry 

M. H. Berry, M.S. Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

C. W. England, Ph.D ^ Associate Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Alan Bogue, B.S Assistant, Animal Husbandry 

Animal Pathology: 

M. F. Welsh, B.S., D.V.M., 

State Veterinarian and Professor, Veterinary Medicine 

A. L. Brueckner, B.S., D.V.M Professor, Pathology 

H. M. DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M _ Associate Professor, Pathology 

L. J. POELMA, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

W. R. Teeter, B.S., D.V.M Instructor, Veterinary Science 

19 



I 

r 

WW 



Bacteriology : 

L. H. James, Ph.D _ Professor, Bacteriology 

M. T. Bartram, Ph.D „ Assistant Professor, Bacteriology 

Botany, Plant Pathology and Physiology : 

\ C. O. Appleman, Ph.D. Professor, Botany and Plant Physiology 

J. B. S. Norton, D.Sc Professor, Botany 

C. E. Temple, A.M „ „ Professor, Plant Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D „ Associate Professor, Botany 

R. A. Jehle, Ph.D. „ Associate Professor, Plant Pathology 

R. G. Brown, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

H. G. DuBUY, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

M. W. Woods, Ph.D _ Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

E. A. Walker, M.S Assistant, Plant Pathology 

Entomology : 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D. '. Professor, Entomology 

H. S. McConnell, M.S Associate Professor, Entomology 

L. P. Ditman, Ph.D _ „ Assistant Professor, Entomology 

Castillo Graham, M.S Assistant Professor, Entomology 

G. J. Abrams, M.S Instructor, Apiculture 

Horticulture : 

A. L. SCHRADER, Ph.D Professor, Horticulture 

C. H. Mahoney, Ph.D Professor, Olericulture 

I. C. Haut, Ph.D. _ Associate Professor, Pomology 

F. B. Lincoln, Ph.D. „ Associate Professor, Plant Propagation 

T. H. White, M.S _ Instructor, Vegetable Gardening and Floriculture 

S. B. Chase, B.S ....~ ~....- Assistant, Pomology 

J. B. Blandford. ^ - Assistant, Horticulture 

Poultry Husbandry: 

M. A. JuLL, Ph.D „ Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

T. C. Byerly, Ph.D - Professor, Physiology 

G. D. Quigley, B.S Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Seed Inspection: 

F. S. Holmes, M.S ~ - Seed Inspector 

Ellen P. Emack Seed Analyst 

Olive M. Kelk Seed Analyst 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
(College Park) 

THOMAS B. SVMONS. M.S., D.Agr., Acting Dean, College of Agriculture, and 
Director of Extension Service. o^rvice 

E I OSWALD B.S., Professor, and Assistant Director of Extension Service. 
vi'iA r^^LAK, B.S., Professor, and Assistant Dir^tor Home Demonstra- 

tion Work. 
A H Snyder, B.S., Professor and Editor. ^ ^ * „+ 

p! E. N™m, M.S.. Associate Professor, and Assistant County Agent 

Leader. , ^i i. x a 

E G JENKINS, Associate Professor, and Boys Club Leader. 
DOROTHV EMERSON, Associate Professor, and Girls' Club ^eadej. 
FLORENCE H. MASON, B.S., Associat. Professor Extension Home Furnuhing, 

and District Agent. 
K GRACE CONNOLLY, Administrative Assistant. 
O, R. CARRINGTON, B.A., Instructor and Illustrator. 

SUBJECT MATTER SPEQALISTS 
(Headquarters College Park) 

r T Arrams M S Instructor Extension Apiculture. , r ^ 

S. R B^lL Bi Associate Professor Extension Vegetable and Land- 

scane Gardening. „ , , 

w r Barker B S Professor Extension Dairy Husbandry. 
S; n ^f .v^ R S Assistant Professor Extension Marketing. 
W. C. Beaven, B.S., Assistant ^"^ Extension Agricultural Engineer- 

R. W. Carpenter. A.B.. LL.b., rroiessor i^j^i^ 

K. i:^f:-K, M^ p-trte"pi:s:r E^^^^^^^^^ 

E N S:Th D.!pro rl^xt'ension Entomology, and State Entomologist. 

s" H DEvluur. Ph.D., Professor Extension Agricultura Economics. 

?■ ?■ DODSON Ph D.. Assistant Professor Extension Sociology. 

w W FVANS BS Assistant Professor Extension Soil Conservation. 

Tm • S B^!'Assodate Professor Extension Egg Marketing. 

J. M. UWiN, C.O , „oci„te Professor Home Management. 

JESSIE D. HiNTON M-S. Assoc ate Fro ^^^^^_^^ ^^^^.^^ Technology. 

H. A. HUNTER, M.S., Associate jro ^^.^^j j^^^^^ry Group. 

lV'^l^vXiioI::ToiiLr Extension Plant Pathology. 

E c" JenkT^s M S., Instructor Extension Soil Conservation 

S A jS Ph.D., Professor, and Chairman Poultry Husbandry. 



20 



21 



A. V. Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor Extension Rural Electri- 
fication. 

G. S. Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor Extension Entomology. 

J. W. Magruder, B.S., Assistant Professor Extension Soil Erosion. 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor Extension Nutrition. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor Extension Dairy and Animal Husbandry. 

W. B. Posey, B.S., Associate Professor Extension Tobacco. 

Harlan Randall, Assistant Professor Extension Music. 

W. H. Rice, B.S., Associate Professor Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

C. S. Richardson, A.M., Professor Extension Speech. 

S. B. Shaw, B.S., Professor Extension Marketing, and Chief State Depart- 
ment of Markets. 

Helen Shelby, M.A., Associate Professor Extension Clothing. 

M. M. Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor Extension Landscape 
Gardening. 

C. E. Temple, M.A., Professor Extension Plant Pathology, and State Pa- 
thologist. 

J. M. Vial, B.S., Professor Extension Animal Husbandry. 

A. F. Vierheller, M.S., Associate Professor Extension Horticulture. 

E. P. Walls, Ph.D., Associate Professor Extension Canning Technology. 

C. S. Williams, B.S., Instructor Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

C. F. WiNSLOW, A.B., M.F., Assistant Professor Extension Forestry. 

ASSISTANT SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 

S. L. Crosthwait, M.S. - Entomology 

L. E. Downey, B.S ^ ^ Marketing 

H. A. Edge, M.S Farm Management and Statistics 

Castillo Graham, M.S Entomology 

W. E. Harrison..- ...„ „ .._ _ - Marketing 

H. J. TwiLLEY, B.S Marketing 

E. A. Walker, M.S Plant Pathology 

COUNTY AGENTS 
(Field) 

County Name Headquarters 

Allegany ^R. F. McHenry, B.S., Associate Professor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel S. E. Day, B.S., Assistant Professor Annapolis 

Baltimore H. B. Derrick, B.S., Associate Professor Towson 

Calvert J. B. Morsell, B.S., Assistant Professor...Prince Frederick 

Caroline G. W. Clendaniel, B.S., Assistant Professor Denton 

22 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howa 

Kent 

Mont 

Prince Georges. 



C,„on L. C. BUKNS, B.S.. Associate Professor .West.^-t.r 

^! 1 J. Z. MILX^. B.S., Assistant Professor...--. -^^EM^ 

^^"^ - „ n R„owN B S.. Associate Professor La Plata 

Charles p. D. Brown, a.J>., .,,„+ professor Cambridge 

, . w R Mcknight, B.S., Assistant Protessor 

Dorchester W. K. mi-'v i ' Associate Professor, 

Frederick H. R. Shoemaker. B.S., M.A., Associate ^^^^,^^^ 

J. H. CARTER, B.S., Assistant Professor O^land 

.„„.- H. M. CARRC. B.S Assistant Professor _ .^^ 

Howard W. G. MvERS, ^f "' J^^^^c^^,; p;:f;;;;;Z..Chestertow^ 

. ^ T D McVean, B. S., Associate nuxc 

K^"t ; O W ANOERS^N, M.S., Associate Professor RockviUe 

M""*^"""^'^ p !^- cLk B S Assistant Professor Upper Marlboro 

P-"- ""^'^'^ ^- t b'^,^ b s" Assistant Professor Centerville 

Queen Annes K. W. Baker, B.b., as Leonardtown 

T T .ToHNSON, Instructor 

St. Marys J. J. JO""» > ■„f„ Pr^fpssor Princess Anne 

<;„^„_.et C. Z. KELLER, B.S., Associate Professor 

^"'"^'^"^^ ^ S BROWN B.S., Assistant Professor Easton 

Talbot - K- S- BROWN, ^-^ - prnfp<,,or Hagerstown 

m n MnoRF M S . Assistant Protessor ^^ s 

Washington M. D. Moore, M^b., professor Salisbury 

Wicomico J. P. BROWN, B.S., Assistant Profe^sor^ ^^^ 

Worcester..: R. T. Grant, B.S., Associate Professor 

Assistant Ownty Agents 

Allegany and Cumberland 

Washington H. W. Beggs, B.S., Instru tor ^^^^^^ 

Baltimore. J- W. Ensor, B-S-, I-tructor --^^ ^^ 

„ . , w s Wilson, B.S., Instructor 

Harford - ^' o. »^ » Chestertown 

Kent. S. B. Sutton, Instructor. ^^^.^^^ 

Montgomery R- B. King, A.B., Instructor • 

Carroll, 

Frederick, ^ ^ .. 4-^,. Frederick 

and Howard. C. H. Remsberg, B.S., Instructor 

Caroline, 

Queen Annes, Easton 

and Talbot. Charles Fuli^r, Instructor - 



Local Agents— Negro Work 

Southern 
Maryland J. F. Armstrong, Instructor -.- 

Eastern Shore L. H. Martin, Instructor 



Seat Pleasant 

Princess Anne 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

(Field) 

^"'^''^y Name 

Allegany. MARpama ..^ Headquarters 

^--^^^^Zi^S^^^;:^'^'^'^: Cumberland 

Baltimore. Anka tShIm b S A ^"''Tl "''"''''''' ^^^^P^li. 

Calvert a. M Fe^s^ B s' A ^T"'^^ Professor. Towson 

Caroline B. M JpIf^'ro |"<= "f "''"" ^ Prince Frederick 

Carroll A. MBoZ^^^il^T .^''^'^f^ Denton 

Cecil w G DENNmr R A '/ "^*^ Professor. Westminster 

Charles Mary Gr^TJ'Fz ^^^^^t^"* Professor Elkton 

Dorchester ..: H E £0^! /^^^ La ?£ 

warford Catharine MAURtrp r o a . ^^®°°^- Oakland 

Howard m P m7m/„ T ;, ' Associate Professor _ Bel Air 

Kent... H N ti ''' ^■^■' ^^^'^t^nt Professor Ellicolt cttv 

Montgom;r;::z:E: M TrNEri?s;dTp^ V^^^^^^^^^ ^''-'-*-- 

Queen Annes...._ R. L Kirk RA a ./™^!fs°^- Hyattsv lie 

St. Marys Ethel Joy A b a f"-'^"''''"" Centerville 

Somerset. Hilda TopfeI R ^ a .* ^'■^'''"'■- Leonardtown 

Talbot MZ\I^rZnn%fT"'''r'r'''' ^""-^3 Anne 

Washington A. E MaLtin B q a . ."^*' ^rot^ssov Easton 

Wicomico JUDITH^LT B^" A f '?* '^•■**'^^^<'' Hagerstown 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

^"^^^"y M. T. LOAR, Instructor... 

Baltimore and " 

^^"^""'^ E. R. JOHNSON, B.S., Instructor 



Snow Hill 



Cumberland 



Towson 



Anne 



Local Home Demonstration Agents (Colored) 

cIX"^ ^ **"• '■ "• '^"'"'' '""™*" ^ ^ «-.„ 

St. Marys, and 

Prince Georges, D. R. Ransom, B.S., Instructor, 

106 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood 

Charles, ""''''''"' '^"'^'' """•* Demonstration Agent (Colored) 

St. Marys, and 

Prince Georges.c. M. Corbin, A.M., Instructor, 

^ 106 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood 



LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE AND DEPARTMENT 

OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 

(College Park) 

Mark Welsh, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science and State Veteri- 
narian. 

J. W. Hughes, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science and Asso- 
ciate State Veterinarian. 
W. R. Crawford, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 
L. J. POELMA, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
H. M. DeVolt, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

A. L. Brueckner, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Pathology in charge College 
Park Laboratory. 

C. L. EVERSON, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science in charge 
Baltimore Laboratory. 

C. R. Davis, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. 

IRVIN MouLTHROP, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science in 
charge Salisbury Laboratory. 

W. R. Teeter, B.S., D.V.M., Instructor of Veterinary Science. 

J. W. Crowl, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

H. B. Wood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

C. J. GiBBS, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

J. W. Hastings, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

J. J. Jones, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

C. R. LOCKWOOD, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

J. H. Muller, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

M. H. Trout, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

Theodore Schondau, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

H. L. Armstrong, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

F. H. Benjamin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

C. B. Bruniger, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

W. J. Cross, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

O. K. Hoffman, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

0. L. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

E. J. McLaughlin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

C. A. Turner, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

C. B. WeaGLEY, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

Charles Qmehi, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 



25 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1937-1938 
At Baltimore 

PROFESSORS 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Comparative Dental 
Anatomy and Orthodontia. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., F.A.C.S., Professor of Anatomy and Oral Surgery 
(Dentistry) ; Professor of Oral Surgery (Medicine). 

BUrvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 
^ ^ Jr.HS. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School of 
Nursing. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 
Otology. 

David M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany and 
Materia Medica. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 

Bricb M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Anesthesia and Exodontia (Den- 
tistry) ; Professor of Exodontia (Medicine). 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
^ P -^HARLES^-^rrEiOHLiN, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gynecology. 

Oren H. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Metallurgy and Physiology. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 
Therapeutics. 

2S 



^r^r riTOS AM M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology, 
r J gT-S^mX Cli^cal Professor of Genito-U^inary Surgery. 
^.NK W. Hachtel, M.D., Professo^of Bac^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 3^,,,, 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.U., i^ean 

Wx.:L'h"h^T.KO, Ph.D.. Professor of ^--^^f.S'lttYo^ Law. 
ROGER HOWELL, Ph.D., LLB., Professor of ^^^' ^^^"^^jZy. 

ir B L^XT^F.tci!p"£S^ operative Dentistry 

Tl. Jenn^gs, U.h., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

C. LORING JosoN. ^-^^^ ^'"^'^Zf^oSSrot Ophthalmology. 

tistry) ; Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
JOHK C S.ANTZ, J Jph.D., Professor of Pharm-olo^ . 
T Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
I So^L ---M.D professor ^^^^^^^^ 

tw.rr L^-? M:D!-D;o;h^^^^ of Diseases of the Nose and 

FraSTlvkk. M.D., P-f--'- "^S'rSS'of Surgery. 

Alexius MCGLANNAK, A^M.,M.a LL.D. Professor o^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

ROBERT L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D., rroiessor 

o^°sy- -, T^ r'i;«i/.ai Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

THEODORE H. MORRISON. M.D Clmical P^°J^ ^^^^^^^^^^ „f ^^, History of 
John Rathbone Ouvee, A.B., M.D., i^h.u., no 

Medicine. p a C D Professor of Crown and Bridge, 

Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.i^.JJ., rroie 

and Prosthetic Dentistry. -z^Ucrv 

M.„^^ V V Philups Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Norman E. PHiLUi-b, ra.^ , „ - ^f Medicine. 

MAinucE C. P^'^*^^' ^/-'J^lJe^sIr of Sseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
J. DAWSON FEEDER, M.D Professor of U ^^ ^^^ 

G. KENNETH f-^^^'^'^^Jf;,^;rrof orthopaedic Surgery. 
COMPTON RiELY, MD-- Chn^^^l ^^ j^^j Dermatology. 

?Tn^R«T'd^:. ?:i Sr professor of Dental Anatomy and 
'■ Operative Technics. Dean o, the Sd^ool of D^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

kL" rS b!^- LS;'prss'or of La.. 

Arthur M. Shipley, jyi.i^., ou. , ,^^^ 

W S. SMITH, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
iB^riNG J. SPEAK, M.D.. Professor of Neurology. 

27 



mpfv M f '''^' ^■^-' Professor of Pathology. 

^\^ ™''' ''•^•' ^''''''"^ °^ Clinical Medicine. 

uZrl' T'^IT' •^"•' t^' ^^■^■' S-J-^-' J-S-D- Professor of Law 

W h" To™ aT'm'?-'' M^'n ''•' '^'"^^^•'" ^^°^^^^°^ °f Pharmacology 

Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S., Professor of Periodontia 
Huntington Williams m n r.i>xi „"""*• 

Health. ''''^'^^^' ^■^■' I'P-H. Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery 
J. Carlton Wolf. B S Phar r> c- t^ tZ J' 

Throat. ' ^'"'''^' Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

J. McParland BeS™"m n 'a ^^^^ Professor of Medicine. 

HERBERT uZvlTjTkTlLTT ^""fT' "' ^^^*^*"«- 

THOMAS R. CHAMB^i A M 'm D A^ 'r. p . '''' "' '^^^• 
CARL Dame Clarke Asslci p5» ^^ Professor of Surgery. 

Paul W. Clough B S M D As?oH T/ i^'* ^' ^""^''^ *« Medicine. 
Richard G. Cob^ntz A b' M D a ^^*\^^°V' ^'^'''^'■ 

Surgery. ' ' ^•^■' ^^'^'^^^ Professor of Neurological 

'• Pha^SicrfS' '"•"•' ^^^"^^^^^ ^^^-- '>^ E— ics and 

Mr^E^r.:: t^o:,ltct:tSel-nrsulgr °'^^^^ 

Diseases of the Rectum and Colon ^''^' ^''^ ^''"""^^ « 

Fra"J'/i^*p'' M-^-Z^^o^ate Professor of Surgery. 

Mr^s-LrMAN' iTkTtt 'f r .^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^-*»-^- 

T. CAMPBELL Go™ M D rr ! "^p 'r"' **' O'^hoP-edic Surgery. 
THOMAS C Grubb Ph n Ac"' ^"f ^'^^^ ^rofessor of Pediatrics, 
n r< u.„ ^''Y ' ^^^ Associate Professor of BacterioloeT^ 
O G. HARNE, Associate Professor of Histology ^'''"°'"^- 
Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Mp^; • 
EDWARD S^ JOHNSON. M.D.. Associate Prof essor of Surget "" 

W S I ^^; ; ^' l^^«=*^te Professor of Clinical Surgery 

In PaThofS^^-"-' ''•''•' ^^^"^^*^ "^°^--^ °^ ^«^^^- --i Instructor 

28 



Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

N. E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Traumatic Sur- 
gery and Oral Surgery (Medicine) ; Assistant Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery (Dentistry). 

A. W. RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

D. Conrad Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery (Medicine) ; 
Lecturer in Oncology (Dentistry). 

Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 
Chemistry. 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Helen E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Embryology 

and Histology. 
Marvin J. Andrews, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy. 
Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 
Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Assistant in 

Bacteriology. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Physician 

in Charge of Medical Care of Students. 
C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
A. H. FiNKELSTEiN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology, and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
Orville €. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and 

Bridge. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
George C. ICarn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Radiodontia. 

29 



Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.CD., Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry. 

John E. Legoe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

MiLPORD Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy. 

George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Harry M. Murdock, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

H. W. Neweix, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

Walter L. Oggesen, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge. 

Robert H. Oster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

Russell R. Reno, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Frederick Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Edgar B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Vesta L. Swartz, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

Guy p. Thompson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physi- 
cal Chemistry. 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

J. Herbert Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

LECTURERS 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Testamentary Law. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Carriers and Public Utilities, 

and Pleading. 
Huntington Cairns, LL.B., Lecturer on Taxation. 
Jambs T. Carter, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Legal Bibliography. 
Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Federal Procedure. 
Walter L. Clark, LL.B., Lecturer on Evidence. 
Hon. Edwin T. Dickerson, A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Contracts. 
Hon. Eli Frank, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 
E. B. Freeman, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 
Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 
George Gump, A.B., LLB., Lecturer on Future Interests. 

30 



Tv;r r» n n cj n So Lecturer on Ethics and Jurisprudence. 

Denti stry 
TOHN M MCFALL, M.A.. LL.B., Lecturer on Insurance. 
JOHN 1*1. i»i»-i > ' ^ „ jT) SuDervisor, Legal Aid Work. 

GERALD MONSMAN, A.B., LL.B., 3.D., bupervisor, s 
EMOKY H. NiLES, A.B., B.A. in Jurisprudence, B.C.L., M.A., 1.... 

a. Rr^rSA^iT™: LL.B., Lecturer on Practice; Director of Practice 

WiLLxirk. TKiPi^. M.D.. Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis (Dentistry); 

Assistant in Medicine (Medicine). 
R. DORSEY Watkins, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

ASSOCIATES 

JOHN R. ABERCKOMBIE. A.B.M^D., Associate in D^nnato^^^^^ ^^^ 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases oi 

Throat, and Otology. 
TT V RoNGAKDT. M.D., Associate in Surgery. .. ,•„ n^ 

KENNe™ B^OYD, M.D.. Associate in Gynecology and Assistant in Ob- 

ste tries 
J EDMUND Bradley, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
FRANCIS ELLIS, A.B.. M.D., Associate m Dermatology, 
L K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Unnary Surgery. 
EUGENE L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
WiLUAM G. GEYER, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Samuel S. Click, M.D., Associate in Pfdiatr.cs 

ALBERT E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in P*t»»°l°fy- . . ^ 

HAEOLD M. GOODMAN, A.B., M.D., Associate m Dermatology. 

HENRY F. GRAFF, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

L. P. GUNDRY, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

E P. H. HARRISON, A.B., M.D., Associate m Obstetrics. 

JOHN T HiBBiTTS, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

JOHN F. HOGAN, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Clewell Howell. M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate m Ophthalmology. 

K D LegGB, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

JOHN F. LUTZ, A.B., M.D., Associate in Histology^ 

W. RAYMOND MCKENZIE, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose 

L j'^MilS:n, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
JOHN H. mills, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
FRANK N. OGDEN, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

81 



Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat, 

and Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
C. W. Peake, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D,, Associate in Neurology. 
Chester L. Reynolds, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
I. O, RiDGLEY, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Isadore a. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
E. H. TONOLLA, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
W. W. Walker, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Assistant 

in Pathology. 
Jose R. Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Simon H. Brager, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Balthis a. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Douglas A. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 
Arthur H. Bryan, V.M.D., B.S., M.A., Instructor in First Aid. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics, and Assistant in Medicine. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D,, Instructor in Gynecology. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery. 
Thomas J. Coonan, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
W. A. H. Councill, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Eugene E. Covington, M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy, and Assistant 

in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
Amelia C. DeDominicis, Ph.G., B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Botany. 
Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 
S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Edward C Dobbs, D.D.S., Instructor in Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and 

Therapeutics. 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 
Gaylord B. Estabrook, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 
WiLUAM Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Luther W. Fetter, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Gardner P. H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English and Public Speaking. 



losEPH D. Fusco, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia 
JOSEPH u. , T_structor in Medicine, and Assistant in Pathology. 

S'rAM rSchtv: B S M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and 
Pathology, and Assistant in Surgery. 

HAROLD GOLDSTEIN, D.D.S., Diagnostician. t^ .„=,.„ 

Instructor in Exodontia (Medicine). 
MARTIN J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

E. M. HANRAHAN. A.B., M^D '-^l-^'°\^J^Z;\ Comparative Dental 
GEORGE E. Hardy, Jr., A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in 

Anatomy. . _ 

RAYMOND F. Helfrich, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. „.;..rv Sur- 

SAMUEL T. HELMS, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Unnary Sur 

gery. 
R M Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
J 'frank HEWin, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
HUGH T HICKS, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 
LiLLiE R. HoKE, R.N., Instructor in Nursing. ' ^^ , 

F A. HOLDEN, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmologj' and Otology. 
Z VANCE Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
JAROSLAV Hulla. B.S., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
Frank Hurst, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
Jo^N M Hys<;n. D.D.S., Instructor in Embryology and Histology. 
CONRAD L. INMAN. D.D.S., Instructor in Anesthesia. 
FREDERICK W. iNVERNizzi, A.B., LL.B Instructor ^ Law >- 
w n ToHNSON M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 
HlMMONorToHNSTON, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orth^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
H ALVAN JONES, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Orthopaed.c Surgery. 
WALTER L. KiLBY, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

M <? TfoppFLMAN M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. , . . ^ x 

lURRY V LanoTlutting, A.B.. M.D., Instructor in Medicine, and Assistant 

in Pathology. . .,,..„ 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
ERNEST LEVI, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
James C. Lipsett, B.S., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Luther E Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
G. BOWERS MANSDORFER, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
H. BERTON McCAULEY, JR., D.D.S., Instructor m C mica Radiodontia. 

Marion W. McCrea, Instructor in Embryology and Histology. 

IVAN E MCDOUGLE, Ph.D., Instructor in Social Sciences. 

C PAUL MILLER, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ROBERT B. MITCHELL, JR., B.S.. M.D., Instructor in Medicme. 

J. Victor Monke, M.A., Instructor in Physiology. 

S3 



A. C. MONNINGER, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology 

Ruth Musser, A.B, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Joseph T. Nelson, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

J. W. Nei^on, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S., Instructor in Ceramics. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 

W. Arthur Purdum, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy 

J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English. 

James E. Pyott, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 

Herbert E. Reifschneider, A.B., M.D., Instructor in General Anesthesia 

Robert Reiter, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neural Anatomy and Pe- 
diatrics, and Assistant in Pathology. 

Nathan Scherr, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical F^q^v.^J.t.. 

Richard T. SH^CYvWiiFt^D, 1\1.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Daniel E. Shehan, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 

M. S. Shiung, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy, and As- 
sistant in Surgery. 

Frank J. Slama, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Instructor in Botany. 

Sol Smith, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

David TfeNNER, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Robert B. Towill, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Granville H. Triplett, D.F., Instructor in Economics. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harry Wasserman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

B. Sargent Wells, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

Hugh Whitehead, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

L. Edward Wojnarowski, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

ASSISTANTS 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 
Nurses and Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 

34 



Benjamin Frank Allen, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Frank A. Bellman, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

J. G. Benesuns, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Catherine Blumberg, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Joe M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Bernice Brittain, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

Lucy A. Brude, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing Private Patients, and 

Supervisor of Private Halls. 
Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 
A. V. BuCHNESS, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William H. Carnes, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
YOLANDE Chaney, R.N.,^ Su.^ervv5/w: , Qi'iiK-Y'hX'i^nXs' T^epartment. 
Thomas A. Christensen, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Beverly C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Marie Olga Cox, R.N., Assistant Instructor in First Aid, and Supervisor of 
Accident and Admission Department. 

Robert L. Craig, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

John M. Cross, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

DwiGHT M. CuRRiE, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. HOLLISTER Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 

W. Allen Deckert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics, and Gynecology. 

Theodore T. Dittrich, B. S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Harold C. Dix, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Oncology. 

Melvin F. W. Dunker, B. S. in Phar., M. S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry. ' 

Mary Emery, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Clinical Nursing, and Super- 
visor of Clinical Department. 

S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carroll P. Foster, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Chemistry. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

James R. Gibbons, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

Loamie M. Gilbert, Jr., B.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Shirley M. Glickman, B. S. in Phar., Assistant in Economics. 

Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

35 



Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

George Govatos, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

William H. Grenzer, M.D., As-sistant in Medicine. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

George A. Hart, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical 

Supplies, and Supervisor of Central Supply Room. 
Ann Hoke, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Nursing, and Supervisor 

of Surgical Wards. 
John V. Hopkins, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Rollin C. Hudson, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Harry C. Hull, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 
Marius p. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology and Obstetrics. 
Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Ferd. Kadan, A,B., M.D,, Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Emily J. Kemp, M.A., Assistant in Physiology. 
Lauriston L. Keown, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

H. Edmund Levin, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 

Nathan Levin, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Russell H. Lyddane, Assistant in Physics. 

Birkhead Macgowan, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Kathryn Matzen, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, and 

Supervisor of Pediatric Department. 
Maxwell L. Mazer, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William N. MoFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

F. Rowland McGinity, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Hugh B. McNally, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Bernard P. McNamara, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics, and Gyne- 
cology. 

E. L. Mortimer, Jr., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Thomas A. Moskey, Jr., B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

Bernice F. Pierson, M.A., Assistant in Zoology. 

H. Wiluam Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

36 



SAMUEL E. Proctor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

JOHN A. Raudonis, A.B., B.S. in Phar., Assistant m Pharmacy. 

E M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 

ROBERT A. Reiter, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

THOMAS E. ROACH, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D., Assistant in Oncology. 

HARRY M. ROBINSON, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

RU?H ROUSH, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, and Supervisor of 

Wards. 
JOHN G. RUNKLE, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
JOHN E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Obstetrics. 
A. ScAGNETTi, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Paul Schenkee, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

DOROTHY E. SCHMALZER, B.S. in Phar., Assistant m Biolog.cal Chemistry. 
W. J. SCHMiTZ, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
PAUL Schonfeld, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Harry S Shelley, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
SI^Iret SHERMAN, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical Nursing, and 
Supervisor of Medical Wards. 

ALBERT J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

George Silverstein, M.D., Assistant in Medicme. 

JEROME Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. . , ^, . . 

HELEN M. Stedman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Obstetrical Nursmg, and 
Supervisor of Obstetrical Department. . , ^i. • . 

WOOTEN T. Sumerford, M.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Arminta Taylor, R.N., Night Supervisor. 

T. J. TouHEY, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Edith Walton, Instructor in Massage. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J H. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Charles A. Vouch, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS 
(Baltimore) 

MARY A. Adams, M. A., Principal, School No. 44, Baltimore. 

Frank Balsam, Instructor, Boys Vocational School, Baltimore. 

Clyde B. Edgeworth, A.B., LL.B., Supervisor of Commercial Education, 

Public Schools, Baltimore. e i, ^ic. 

GEORGE M. Gaither, Supervisor of Industrial Education, Public Schools, 

PAU^B-Tri^EN, M.A., Special Assistant, School No. 70, Public Schools, 

Baltimore. 

37 



William F. Haefner, B.S., Instrucfx)r, Southern High School, Baltimore. 

Ellis O. Keller, B.S., Part-time Instructor, University of Maryland. 

P'RANCis A. LiTZ, Ph.D., Professor of English, Catholic University, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

E. L. Longley, B.S., Instructor, Sheet Metal Work, Garrison Junior High 
School, Baltimore. 

Irwin D. Medinger, B.S., LL.B., Placement Counselor, Public Schools, 
Baltimore. 

Frances E. North, M.A., Commercial Teacher, Western High School, 
Baltimore. 

Albert G. Packard, B.S., Acting Supervisor, Vocational Industrial Educa- 
tion, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Robert L. Smith, B.S., Instructor, Junior High School No. 1, Baltimore. 

John L. Stenquist, Ph.D., Director, Bureau of Research, Public Schools, 
Baltimore. 

E. H. Stevens, M.A., J.D., Extension Instructor, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore. 

Charles W. Sylvester, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Public 
Schools, Baltimore. 

Paul A. Willhide, B.S,, Principal, School No. 57, Baltimore. 

Riley S. Williamson, Ed.M., Head of Scientific Technical Department, 
Baltimore City College. 

Howard E. Ziefle, B.S., Acting Principal, School No. 294, Baltimore. 

Glen D. Brown, A.B., M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 

LIBRARIANS 
(Baltimore) 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.B., A.M.L.S „ Librarian 

Dental Library 

Beatrice Marriott Assistant Librarian 

Margaret E. Kober, A.B Assistant 

Polly Jacobson, A.B. ~ Cataloguer 

Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B. Assistant Librarian 

Medical Library 

Ruth Lee Briscoe ^ Assistant Librarian 

Julia E. Wilson, B.S. Assistant 

Pharmacy Library 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Ann Lemen Clark Cataloguer 

38 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

At Baltimore 

LIBRARY 

(Medicine) Doctors Lockard, Wylie, and Love, Jr.; (I>entistry) Doctors 
^ Gaver Aisenberg, and Hardy; (Pharmacy) Dean I^^^ez Messrs^ 

Hartung, M. R. Thompson, and Slama; (Law) Messrs. Reibhch and 

Strahorn. 

The Faculty Councils of the Baltimore Schools are included in the de- 
scriptive statements of the respective schools in Section IL 

The Faculty Committees of the Baltimore Schools are given in the 
separate announcements issued by the several schools. 



SECTION I 
General Information 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The history of the present University of Maryland, before the merger in 
1920, is the history of two institutions: the old University of Maryland in 
Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) in College Park. 

The beginning of this history was in 1807, when a charter was granted 
to the College of Medicine of Maryland. The first class was graduated in 
1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of 
the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest struc- 
ture in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, 
and arts and sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or 
faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the name and 
under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a reg- 
ular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently there were added 
a college of dentistry, a school of pharmacy, and a school of nursing. No 
significant change in the organization of the University occurred until 1920, 
more than one hundred years after the original establishment in 1812. 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 
in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over en- 

40 



tirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the name of the latter 
was changed to the University of Maryland. 

All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. The University is co-educational in all its 
branches. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University Senate and the Administrative Council act in an advisory 
capacity to the President. The composition of these bodies is given else- 
where. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 

divisions : 

College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Extension Service. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Commerce. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. 

Summer Session. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

School of Dentistry. 
School of Law. 
School of Medicine. 
School of Nursing. 
School of Pharmacy. 
The University Hospital. 

The University faculty consists of the President, the Deans, the instruc- 
tional staffs of all the divisions of the University, and the Librarians. The 
faculty of each college or school constitutes a group which passes on all 
questions that have exclusive relationship to the division represented. The 
President is ex-officio a member of each of the faculties. 

41 



The organization and activities of the several administrative divisions are 
described in full in the appropriate chapters of Section II. 



PRINCESS ANNE COLLEGE 

Princess Anne College, located at Princess Anne, Somerset County, is 
maintained for the education of Negroes in agriculture, the mechanic arts, 
and home economics. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince Georges 
County, Maryland, eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from 
Baltimore. The campus fronts on the Baltimore- Washington Boulevard. 

The Professional Schools of the University and the University Hospital 
are located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park comprise 291 acres. 
The site is healthful and attractive. The terrain is varied. A broad roll- 
ing campus is surmounted by a commanding hill which overlooks a wide 
area of surrounding country and insures excellent drainage. Many of the 
original forest trees remain. Most of the buildings are located on this 
eminence. The adjacent grounds are laid out attractively in lawns and 
terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. Below the brow of the 
hill, on either side of the Washington-Baltimore Boulevard, lie the drill 
grounds and the athletic fields. About 100 acres are used by the College 
of Agriculture for experimental purposes, and for orchards, vineyards, 
poultry yards, etc. Recently 270 acres additional have been purchased, 
about two miles north of the University campus, and this land is devoted 
especially to research in horticulture. 

The water supply and sewage disposal are provided by the Washington 
Suburban Sanitary Commission. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 28 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at Col- 
lege Park. 

Administration and Instruction, This group consists of the following 
buildings: the Agriculture Building, which accommodates the College of 
Agriculture, the College of Education, the Agricultural and Home Eco- 
nomics Extension Service, and the Auditorium; the Library Building, which 
houses the Library and the Executive Offices; Morrill Hall, which accommo- 
dates in part the College of Arts and Sciences; the Old Library Building, 

42 



in which are the offices of the Dean of Women; the Engineering Building; the 
Student Center, in which are located the offices of the student publications; 
the Home Economics Building; the Chemistry Building for instruction in 
Chemistry and for State work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and agricul- 
tural lime ; the Dairy Building ; the Horticulture Building, which adequately 
accommodates all class room and laboratory work in horticulture, and also 
work in horticultural research for both Government and State; the Plant 
Research Building; the poultry buildings; the Central Heating Plant; and 
an Arts and Sciences Building. 

Experiment Station. The offices of the Director of the Experiment Sta- 
tion are in the Agriculture Building, while other buildings house the 
laboratories for research in soils and for seed testing. Other structures 
are as follows: an agronomy building; a secondary horticulture building; 
and barns, farm machinery building, silos, and other structures required in 
agricultural research. 

Physical Education, This group consists of The Ritchie Coliseum, which 
provides quarters for all teams, an athletic office, trophy room, rooms for 
faculty, and visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and per- 
manent seating arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium, with a 
permanent seating capacity of 8,000, also furnished with rest rooms for 
patrons, dressing rooms, and equipment for receiving and transmitting in- 
formation concerning contests in progress; a Gymnasium, used in part by 
the Military Department and generally for physical education work; and 
the Girls' Field House, for all girls' sports. Playing and practice fields and 
tennis courts are adjacent to the field houses. 

Dormitories. Two dormitories, Calvert Hall and Silvester Hall, provide 
accommodations for 462 men students. Accommodations for 228 women 
students are provided by Margaret Brent Hall and the new dormitory, 
completed this year. Gerneaux Hall, formerly used as a dormitory for 
women students, is now occupied by one of the sororities. The Practice 
House, which for several years was used as a dormitory, has been turned 
over entirely to the Home Economics Department. 

Service Structures. This group includes the Central Heating Plant; the 
Infirmary, with accommodations for twenty patients, physician's office, 
operating room, and nursing quarters; Dining Hall, and Laundry. 

U. S. Bureau of Mines Building. A new research laboratory .building for 
the United States Bureau of Mines has been completed this year, and is 
known as the Eastern Experiment Station. In addition to the general 
laboratories, which are being used for instruction in engineering as well 
as by the United States Government, there is a geological museum and 
technical library, one of the finest of its kind in the United States. 

Baltimore 

The group of buildings located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the 

43 



University. The group comprises the original Medical School building, 
erected in 1814, the University Hospital, the Central Office building, a new 
Laboratory building for the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy, and a new 
Law School building. Full descriptions of these parts of the University 
equipment are found in the chapters devoted to the Baltimore Schools in 
Section 11. 

A new University Hospital, at the corner of Greene and Redwood Streets, 
containing 400 beds and providing fine clinical facilities, was completed in 
November, 1934. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Libraries are maintained at both the College Park and Baltimore 
branches of the University. 

The Library Building at College Park, completed in 1931, is an attractive, 
well equipped, and wlell lighted structure. The reading room on the second 
floor seats 236, and has about 5,000 reference books and bound periodicals 
on open shelves. The five-tier stack-room is equipped with 18 carrels for 
the use of advanced students. About 12,000 of the 70,000 volumes on the 
campus are shelved in the Chemistry and Elitomology departments, the 
Graduate School, and other units. 

Facilities in Baltimore consist of the Libraries of the School of Medi- 
cine, containing approximately 18,000 volumes; the School of Dentistry, 
6,000 volumes; the School of Pharmacy, 7,000 volumes; and the School of 
Law, 15,000 volumes. The Medical Library is housed in Davidge Hall; the 
remaining three libraries have adequate quarters in the buildings of their 
respective schools, where they are readily available for use. Facilities for 
the courses in Arts and Sciences are offered jointly by the Libraries of the 
Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The libraries of the University total in the aggregate about 116,000 bound 
volumes and large collections of unbound journals. The Library is a deposi- 
tory for publications of the United States Government, and numbers some 
12,000 documents in its collections. 

Through the Inter-Library Loan Service of the Library of Congress, 
the United States Department of Agriculture, and other libraries in Wash- 
ington, the University Library is able to supplement its reference service, 
either by arranging for personal work in these libraries or by borrowing 
material from them. 



44 



ADMISSION 

Ail correspondence regarding admission should be addressed to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. That pertaining to the colleges of Agriculture, Arts and 
Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, Home Economics, the Graduate 
School, and the Summer Session should be mailed to the University of 
Maryland, College Park; that pertaining to the schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy should be mailed to the University of 
Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

Information about admission to the professional schools in Baltimore will 
be found in their respective sections of this catalogue (see Index), and in 
the bulletins issued by the several schools. 

Age of Applicants: A student who is less than sixteen years of age must 
live with his parents or guardians. 

Admission Procedure: Candidates for admission should procure applica- 
tion blanks from the office of the Director of Admissions as early as possible. 
It would not be too soon for secondary school seniors to write for the 
blanks shortly after the beginning of their final school term. 

If the application, with the school record through the first semester of 
the senior year, is returned before graduation to the Director of Admissions, 
then the applicant should request the principal to send in a supplementary 
report after graduation— with the grades of the final term, a statement 
of the date of graduation, and the rank of the student in the graduating 
class. All other candidates for admission, also, should submit their applica- 
tions as early as possible. 

A certificate of admission and material pertaining to registration will be 
mailed to each applicant whose credentials are acceptable. The Director of 
Admissions will be pleased to advise, either in person or by correspondence, 
with prospective students, their parents, or other interested persons con- 
cerning the preparation of, the applicants, or on any questions that relate 
to admission to the University. 

Time of Admission: Applicants for admission should plan to enter the 
University at the beginning of the school year in September. It is possible, 
however, to be admitted to certain curricula at the beginnmg of either 
semester. 

Registration: English and aptitude tests will be given on Wednesday, 
September 14, 1938. Freshmen will register on Thursday and Friday, 
September 15 and 16, 1938. All other new students will register on Satur- 
day, September 17, 1938. 

A special freshman program will be follow^ed between registration and 
the beginning of the instruction schedule, the object of which is to complete 
the organization of freshmen so that they may begin their regular work 
promptly and effectively, and familiarize themselves with their new sur- 

roimdings. 

45 



ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate or by examination or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate : An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or 
by an accrediting agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for gradu- 
ation not fewer than fifteen units. A unit represents a year's study in any 
subject in a secondary school, and constitutes approximately one-fourth of 
a full year's work. It presupposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recita- 
tion periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class 
exercises a week. A double laboratory period in any science or vocational 
study is considered equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more 
than three units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth 
course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
state certification requirements, or a graduate of an approved secondary 
school in the District of Columbia who meets the certification grade of his 
secondary school, will be admitted upon presentation of the proper certificate 
from the principal. A graduate who does not meet fully these require- 
ments may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake 
college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may 
include an appropriate examination. Admission examinations will be given 
during the first week of each of the months of July, August, and September 
at College Park. Applicants concerned will be notified as to when they 
should report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland or in the District of Columbia must be recommended 
by the principal, and must have attained the certification-to-college grade 
of the school. If the school does not have such a quality grade, then the 
average of the applicant's school grades must be at least ten points or 
one letter higher than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school who 
is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either 
of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admis- 
sions for permission to report at the University for an examination, the 
result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary school 
record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted; or (2) he may 
be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfactorily other 
approved examinations in the subjects required for graduation from an 
accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New York City; 
the Regents of the University of the State of New York, Albany; and the 
Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The following curricula are available. The letters placed after the nanies 
of the curricula (see Index) refer to the columnar arrangement of the 
entrance requirements below. 

College of Arts and Sciences (cont'd) 

JPrelaw — A 
Premedical — D 
Prenursing — A 
Psychology — A 
Sociology — A ^ 
Spanish — A 
Zoology — A 

College of Commerce 

Accounting — A 
Agricultural Economics — A 
Cooperative Organization and 
Administration — A 
fEconomics — A 
Finance — A 
General Business — A 
Marketing and Sales Administra- 
tion — A 



College of Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Farm Crops — A 

Soils— A 
Animal Husbandry— A 
tBacteriology — A 

General Botany and Morphol- 
ogy—A 

Plant Pathology— A 

Plant Physiology— A 
Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Manufacturing — A 

Dairy Production — A 
§Education — A 
Entomology — A 
Farm Management — A 
General Agriculture — A 
Horticulture 

Floriculture — A 

Landscape Gardening — A 

Olericulture — A 

Pomology — A 
Poultry Husbandry — A 
Preveterinary — A 

College of Arts and Sciences 

* Bacteriology — A 
Chemistry 

Biological (Agricultural)— C 

General — C 

Industrial — C 
^Economics — A 
§Education — A 
English — A 
French — A 
General Science — A 
German — A 
History — A 
Mathematics — C 
Physics — C 
Political Science — A 
Predental — A 



fPrelaw — A 
College of Education 

* Agricultural — A 
fArts and Sciences — A 

Commercial — E 
TlHome Economics — B 

Industrial — A 

Physical — A 

College of Engineering 

Aeronautical — C 
Chemical — C 
Civil— C 
Electrical— C 
Mechanical — C 

College of Home Economics 

Applied Art — B 
§Education — B 
Extension — B 
Foods— B 
General — B 

Institution Management — B 
Textiles and Clothing— B 



♦Also College of Agriculture. JAlso College of Commerce. §Also College of Education. 
tAlso CollSe of Arts and Sciences. ^Also College of Home Economics. 

The unit requirements for admission to the foregoing curricula are indi- 
cated in the following table, the requirements for a particular curriculum 



46 



47 



being given in the column headed by the letter which follows the name of 
the curriculum in the above list: 

A B C D E 

Algebra ^ 1 **2 11 

Plane Geometry...... *1. 11 

Solid Geometry „ * * Vz 

Mathematics 2 

History 11 1 11 

Science ^. 11 111 

Foreign Language _ 2 

Stenography 2 

Typewriting 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Electives , _ 8 8 6^/2 6 5 

Conditional Admission: An applicant who is eligible otherwise to be 
admitted to the University, but who cannot meet the specific entrance 
units required for the curriculum of his choice may register as a non- 
classified student. Classification as a regular student is automatic when 
the entrance deficiency is absolved. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER FROM OTHER COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 

A candidate for admission by transfer from another college or university 
must present evidence that he has maintained a satisfactory and honorable 
record at the other institution. The applicant should file as early as pos- 
sible the formal application blank (which may be obtained from the office 
of the Director of Admissions), together with the official transcripts of the 
secondary school and college records, including a statement of honorable 
dismissal. 

Advanced standing is granted for courses completed elsewhere which are 
equivalent in extent and quality to those given by the University of Mary- 
land, subject to the following provisions: 

(1) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may 
be allowed, the baccalaureate degree will not be conferred under any 
circumstances until a year of resident work shall have been completed. 



*In the College of Agriculture, with the exception of curricula which include trigo- 
nometry, a second unit of any mathematics may be substituted for the renuirement in 
plane geometry, provided the applicant ranks in the upper three-fifths of his secondary 
school class. 

**An applicant who cannot olTer the second unit in algebra and the one-half unit in 
solid geometry may be admitted to the College of Engineering, and to the curricula in 
Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, but will be obliged during the first semester to make 
up the advanced algebra and solid geometry. The regular first semester mathematics 
would be taken in the second semester, and the second semester mathematics would 
be taken in the summer session. An applicant who does not have entrance credit for solid 
geometry would take this course concurrently with the regular first semester mathematics. 
Students in either of these groups would register with regular classification. 

48 



{2) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing allowed, the bacca- 
laureate degree will not be conferred until the student shall have 
satisfied the full requirements of the curriculum elected. 

(3) If the character of the student's work in any subject is such as to 
create doubt as to the quality of that which preceded it elsewhere, 
the University reserves the right to revoke at any time any advanced 
standing credit allowed. 

(4) Credit will not be granted for more than one-fourth of the total 
credit value of those courses which were passed with the lowest 
passing grade of the college attended. 

(5) An applicant may request an examination for advanced standing in 
any subject, in keeping with the requirements prescribed by the 
University of Maryland. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age and who have had in- 
sufficient preparation to be admitted to any of the four-year curricula may 
register, with the consent of the Director of Admissions, for such courses 
as they may appear fitted to take. The student is ineligible to matriculate 
for a degree, however, so long as he retains an unclassified status. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students, if citizens of the United States, whose bodily condition 
indicates that they are physically fit to perform military duty are required 
to take military training for a period of two years, as a prerequisite to 
graduation. 

Graduation Requirements for Students Excused from Military Instruction 

and Physical Education 

Students excused from basic military training or physical education with- 
out academic credit shall be required to take an equivalent number of credits 
in other subjects, so that the total credits required for a degree in any col- 
lege shall not be less than 127 hours. The substitution must be approved 
by the dean of the college concerned. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

All women students whose bodily condition indicates that they are phy- 
sically fit for exercise are required to take physical education for a period 
of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

49 



HEALTH SERVICE 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

As soon as possible after the opening of the fall semester, as a measure 
for protecting the general health, all students who enter the undergraduate 
colleges at College Park are given a physical examination. The examination 
of the men students is conducted by the University Physician in cooperation 
with the Physical Education and Military Departments. 

The examination of women students is conducted by a woman physician 
in cooperation with the office of the Dean of Women and the office of Physi- 
cal Education for Women. The woman physician has her offices in the Girls' 
Field House. She is available for consultation by all women students at 
hours to be arranged. 

INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and med- 
ical advice by reporting at the Infirmary during regular office hours estab- 
lished by the physician in charge. 

Nurses' office hours 8 to 10 A. M. and 6 to 7 P. M. 

Doctor will have office hour from 12 to 1 daily except Sundays. 

Office hours on Sunday by appointment only. 

2. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours at the Infirmary. 

Between the hours of 2 and 4 in the afternoon, quiet hour is observed. 

Durmg this time students are requested not to report except in case of an 
emergency. 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical attention 
and who are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of the Uni- 
versity physicians. Such visits will be free of charge except in cases where 
additional visits are necessary. For such additional visits as may be 
necessary, the University physician will make his usual charge. But, if a 
student so desires, he may call a physician of his own choice and at his 
own expense. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon the order of the 
University physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the 
facilities available. Students who live off the campus will be charged a 
fee of two dollars a day. 

5. The visiting hours are 1 to 2, 6:30 to 8 p. m. daily. No visitor may 
see any patient until permission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for graduate students 
and employees. Dispensary service, however, is available for graduate 
students and employees who are injured in University service or University 
activities. 

7. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 

50 



and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

8. Students living in the dormitories who are unable to attend classes 
because of illness or who are unable to report to the Infirmary should report 
to their dormitory matrons, who will notify the Infirmary immediately. 

9. Students who are ill in their homes, fraternity houses, or dormitor- 
ies and wish a medical excuse for classes missed during the time of illness 
must present written excuses from their physicians, parents, or house 
mothers. These excuses will be approved by the University physicians or 
nurse. 

REGULATIONS, GRADES, DEGREES 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 
1 — 99; courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates, by numbers 
100 — 199*; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200 — 299. 

The letter following the number of a course indicates the semester in 
which it is offered; thus, course If is offered in the first semester; Is, in the 
second semester. The letter "y" indicates a full-year course. The number 
of hours' credit for each course is indicated by the arabic numeral in paren- 
theses following the title of the course. No credit is allowed for a "y*' 
course until it is completed. 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning 8:20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the Imit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory or in outside prepara- 
tion for each credit hour in any course. 

Number of Hours, The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semester 
hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are shown in 
the appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several divisions of 
the University. No student may carry either more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours without specific permission from the dean of his 
college. 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are required 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final examinations; and 
in tests, when requested to do so by the instructor. 

Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 



* But not all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit. 

61 



« 

i 



I 
f 



character of the work will permit the instructor to note i-equ^ntlv th. 
progress and proficiency of the student-in which case thev mav ^H-f^ ! 
upon approval of the head of the depart.enf and dean Tth^ Sge' 
peS F^r ' '."' ''''t "'■' ^^^" ^"^'"S ^^1-riy scheduled S 

and are of no ^TZZ' """u' 'T'"'^' ^'^ «^^^" ^<='=<'^<l-g to schedule 
ana are of not more than three hours' duration each. 

fou? A'°B°c"fnf n'' ''™^^' ""^'''^= "^^ ^' ^' ^' E' F' ^"d I- The first 
r 7 : ?' ' ^'■^ P^'''"*^' ^' ''""dition; F, failure; I, incomplete. 

Urade A denotes superior scholarship; grade B, good scholarship- wade 

C, fair scholarship ; and grade D, passing scholarship. ^ ' ^ 

A student who receives the grade D in more than one-fourth of the credits 

required for graduation must take additional courses or repeat courses untH 

c:i' Vid? aboleT'r 1 7T '°^ ' '''^'^' tJ^-'fourSTwlich 

rl^aT^ltfSr a'lapsertToyea^^^^^^ '" '''^^' ^ -"^ ^^ 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 

with advanced standing, a grade of D will ^t be recogSidfL credit 

of^ ttn'f t*'' '^?J^^^' ^^ E is conditioned in the course. The grade 
of E will be changed by a reexamination during the succeeding semester t^ 
D or F. The grade cannot be raised to a grade higher than T) n^i,7 
reexamination is permitted, and if a studenf does nJt remove L conS 
at the time scheduled for this reexamination the condition becomes a f^ure 
No student is permitted to take a reexamination to remoTa condSon 
withm four weeks after the condition has been acquired 

The mark I (Incomplete) is exceptional, and is given onlv to « ,*,, 
dent whose work has been qualitatively satikctory and who ^L^ proper' 
excuse for not having completed the requirements of the course In casi 
of a student whose work has been unsatisfactory and who IsaLnt fro.^ 
the final examination, the grade will be E or F in alcordanc. ^./T 
character of the previous work. In cases wher" 'the mark iTs «>*' Se' 
student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by th^Td^f 

domes'?. """*" " "'•*=' ^'^^^ ^"'^■^'=* ^^ ^^^- °ff-^' or tL'^ade I,:' 

Work of grade D, or of any passing grade, cannot be raised to a higher 
grade except by repeating the course. This must be done withi^ a nS 
of two years after the course was originally taken. A studeTt wL re^Sats 
a course for which he has received credit for work done at this UnivSy 

Ir rifr '""f r^' '" '""^ requirements of the course, induSn™- 
ular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final grade wHl 
be substituted for the grade already recorded, but he w il nofrSve ^ 
additional credit for the course. receive any 

52 



REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guar- 
dians at the close of each semester. 

ELI^^NATION OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. Students of the last class may 
be asked to withdraw even though no specific charge he made against them. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major 
or minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have 
passed with an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number of 
semester credits required for junior standing in any curriculum. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil 
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy. 

Students in 4ihe two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certifi- 
cates. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. For full information regarding the 
requirements for graduation in the several colleges consult the appropriate 
chapters in Section II. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty credits of 
any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with grades of A, B, and C. '^ 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar before 
March 1st of the year in which he expects to graduate, a formal application 
for a degree. In general, candidates for degrees to be confeiTed at the 
annual commencement, must be present to receive the degrees. 

58 



M 






EXPENSES 

prepared to pay the full amount of t^*' t P^''^""^ '""^* '^""'^ 

EXPENSES AT COLLEGE PARK 

JsL^at;:t^:„^^^^^^^ ^^ ^ees and other 

Parison with the total Jt to the SSS^woum' etnT^^^^^^^^^^ ^" ^°'"- 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Maryland 

Fixed Charges ^^"'\f.7a"'"" ^ZZ^^.''^'''''' 

Athletic Fee 



$67.50 



$67.50 



~ ~~ —'-.'....^ .„ 1 K on 

♦Special Fee . ^^ ^^^ 

♦Student Activities Fee iq qO 

Infirmary Fee _ .J ' ' 3*00 

Post Office Box „ ....._ ZIZ. 2 00 



$107.50 



$67.50 



Total 

$185.00 

15.00 

10.00 

10.00 

3.00 

2.00 

$175.00 



District of Columbia 

General Fees listed above '^'^^^ToT^T'' ^^^^f ,f ^^^^ /^^«^ 
Non-Resident Fee .. " ' ^llfr, ^tU^ ?l^^-00 



$132.50 



$92.50 



$225.00 



General Fee 
Non-Resident Fee 



Other States and Countries 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

$107.50 $ 67.50 $175 00 

- - ^2.50 62.50 125.00 



$170.00 



$130.00 



$300.00 



.nTf^ othir ut^4Ztrr>Z^!. 'thlF^tftL^r"!^^^' ^\^- *^^ P^^-<^-I training facilities 

. ** The Student Activities FeTfs includ^\? f h. J^^^t'^^ship to student activities. ^^"'''^^' 

cmtion Its payment is not mandato^rb^t t L reaHv'f r^«ff^^ ^.'"^"'^* Government Asso- 

h^l^ '* ^''''''Z^ subscription to th« student wJeky Dane^- th^ H w °^ ^^^^^'".y ^o the student. 

nrtK^'''''^'-*^'?^^' including admission to cl^ss dances ' anH ^iZ-"*^. '"^^^^^r* ^"^ ^^^ ^^ar 
of the musical and dramatic clubs. dances, and admission to the performances 

54 



r 7 ^ 
5 



:. ^ 



4 



''^' Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee, payable on first entrance $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for bachelor ^s degree 10.00 

Certificate Fee for Teacher's Diploma and other certificates where 

required each - 5.00 

Pre Medical and Pre-Dental Fee — Per semester in addition to fees 

shown above: 



Maryland „.... 

District of Columbia 

Other States and Countries 



„........$25.00 

25.00 



Board .. 
Lodging 



Expenses of Students Living in Dormitories 

First Semester Second Semester Total 
$135.00 $135.00 $270.00 



$173.00 



$173.00 



$346.00 



Laboratory Fees 

Bacteriology 

General, Pathological Tech- 
nic, Hematology, and 
Urinalysis $5.00 

Pathogenic and Serology $8.00 

All other courses _ $7.00 

Botany 

Introductory $5.00 

All other courses $3.00 

Chemistry 

Introductory „ „ $3,00 

Industrial, Inorganic, and 
Physical Chemistry $7.00 

All other courses $8.00 

Dairy 

Introductory Dairy Science 
and Dairy Mechanics $2,00 

Dairy Manufacturing, Mar- 
ket Milk, Analysis of 
Dairy Products, Grading 
Dairy Products, and Ad- 
vanced Grading Dairy 
Products $3.00 



Per Semester Course 

Experimental Psychology $2.00 

Home Economics 

Elementary Foods, Demon- 
strations, Problems and 
Practice in Foods, Ad- 
vanced Foods, Advanced 

Experimental Foods $6.00 

Practice in Management of 

Home , $3.50 

Nutrition $3.00 

Textiles and Clothing, Ad- 
vanced Clothing, Problems 
and Practice in Textiles, 
Clothing or Related Art, 
Special Clothing Prob- 
lems, Applied Art $2.00 

Physics 

Elementary $3.00 

General _.„ $5.00 

Radio Speech .: $2.00 

Zoology 

Elements of _ _ $3.00 

All other courses - $5.00 



Miscellaneous Fees 

Late Registration Fee $3.00-$5.00 

Fee for each change in registration after first week $1,00 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's Office during first 

55 ^ 



\ 



f 






Kav^v ir-A. Vii^w 



?s 



«i 



ft 






<f>/» 



Absence Fee twenty-four hours before or after holiday , ^3.00 

V^OHCllulOIl JtiiXSlIIllIl&LlOIl x^ 60.....*....».»«^* ^..........^.M.^....*.— • ..•..^.....•.•.•^.....^•^— .^•..••....•^•^.^.— .^X«UU 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment $2.00 

Part-time students carrying six semester hours or less — per semester 

credit hour 56.00 

Laundry service, when desired — per semester $13.50 

Transcript of Record Fee ~ _ ~ $1.00 

Students will be charged for wilful damage to property. Where responsi- 
bility for the damage can be fixed, the individual student will be billed for 
it; where it cannot, the entire student body will be charged a flat fee to 
cover the loss or damage. 

Fees For Graduate Students 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Fee for each semester credit hour 4.00 

Diploma Fee — Master's Degree — — 10.00 

Graduation Fee — Doctor's Degree _ 20.00 

EXPLANATIONS 

The Fixed Charges made to all students cover a part of the overhead ex- 
penses not provided for by the State. 

The Board, Lodging, ajid Laundry charge may vary from semester to 
semester, but every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

Fees for Students Entering in February. Students entering the Univer- 
sity for the second semester are charged the following fees for the items 
indicated: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $8.00; In- 
firmary, $1.50, and Post Office Box, $1.00. 

Fees for Part-Time Students. Undergraduate students carrying six 
^ semester hours or less of regularly scheduled courses are charged $6.00 per 
semester credit and regular laboratory fees. Students carrying seven or 
more semester hours are charged the regular fees. In the case of special 
courses with special fees this rule does not apply. A matriculation fee of 
$5.00 is charged at the first registration. 

The Athletic Fee constitutes a fimd which is collected from all students 
in the University at College Park for the maintenance of athletics, and the 
entire amount is turned over to the Athletic Director for disbursement. 
This fund is audited annually by the State Auditors. 

Late Registration Fee. Students who do not complete their registration 
and classification, including payment of bill, on regular registration days 
will be required to pay $3.00 extra on the day following the last registration 
day, and $5.00 thereafter. Students who fail to file course cards in the 
specified periods in May and January are considered late registrants. 

Absence Fee. In cases of absence during a period beginning 24 hours be- 
fore the close of classes for a vacation or holiday and ending 24 hours after 
the resumption of classes, a student will be penalized by being required to 

56 



nav a special fee of $3.00 for each class missed. Unless properly excused, 
^^latrSZm be penalized, as in the case of a holiday, for absence from 
the fir t meeting of each class at the beginning of the second semester 

StudenTs desiring to be excused from classes before and after a holiday 
must make rpSion to the Dean at least one week before such hohday. 
TXTunaer^^^^^^ specified, no excuse for an absence before or 

after a holiday will be granted. 

In exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in the family apphcat.on 
for an excuse must be made within one week after a student returns. 

WITHDRAWALS FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students registering for the dormitories and ^'^^^ J^f.^'^^^X^Ze 
for the vear as contracts for faculty and other service and for supplies are 
mad 'o/an a™l basis, and fees are fixed on the supposition that students 

""rsTdtnt^'eSg t Sdraw from the University must secure the 
wrietctnLt of th'e parent or guardian, to be attached to the w^hdr^^^^^^^ 
slip, which must be approved by the Dean and presented to the Rejstrar at 
Ipast one week in advance of withdrawal. Charges for full time wUl De 
rntUed Ig^inst him unless this is done. The -f /^e „£LTt rSfVnd 
approval of the President before being presented to the Cashier for refund. 

REFUNDS 

For withdrawal within five days full refund is made of fixed charges 
athletic fee special fee. and student activities fee, with a deduction of $5.00 
Stver cost of registr;tion. All refunds for board, lodging, and laundry are 

"""Xfter five days, and until November 1, the first semester, o^ March 10. the 
second semester, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated, with a deduction 

''Sf: r::Lri,°'or^tSto, refunds are granted for board and . 

'To 7efTnI; r m'L^Hlo^rrwritten consent of the student's parent 
or guardian, except to students who pay their own expenses 

if^ student is given cash for any part of his or her refund until all 
oufsLnSnTcheck! have been honored by the banks on which they are drawn. 

DORMITORY RULES AND REGULATIONS 
Room Reservations. All new students desiring to rooni in the dormi- 
tories should request room reservation cards. Men should apply to the 
Do mitSrManager; women should apply to the Dean of Women. When 
the room reservation card is returned, it must be accompanied by a $o 
denosit Thfs fee will be deducted from the first semester charges when 
hrstden?;:gl:irs; ilhejail^t^in^e ^'oom the fee ^^^^^^ 
Reservations by students already at the University may be made at any 
time durinff the closing month of the school year. 

%WsDormIt«ries. The office of the Dormitory Manager is located m 
Aa" Section. Calvert Hall. After the student has been officially admitted 



a 



'^ 



57 



V 




lUU^ 



and has paid his bill, he will be able to receive his room key and take pos- 
session of his room. Instructions regarding rules for the dormitories will 
be given to the student at this time. 

Students are requested to obtain their room assignments before 7 P. M. 
on the day they enter. 

Room reservations not claimed by freshmen or upperclassmen on their 
respective registration days will be canceled. A room will be held until 
. after classes begin if the reservation is confirmed by September 15. 
-**-*f Mai* service is furnished without charge for all rooms. 

All freshmen students, except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories and board at the University dining hall. 

Women's Dormitories. All women students who have made dormitory 
reservations should report to the dormitory to which they have been as- 
signed. Instructions regarding rules and regulations rSJid any. other infor- 
mation desired by the student will be given by the hous^ melher on duty. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked for the 
dormitory to which it is to be sent will be delivered there direct. All bag- 
gage coming by railway will be deposited at the railway station in College 
Park, whence it can be secured for a small charge through arrangements 
made at the (General Service Department of the University. 

Since there is not sufficient dormitory space for freshmen women, those 
who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories may live in approved off- 
campus houses. 

Keys. A deposit of $1.00 is required for each key. Each student is re- 
quired to have a key for his room in the dormitory. 

Equipment. Men students assigned to dormitories should provide them- 
selves each with sufficient single blankets, at least two pairs of single sheets, 
a pillow, pillow cases, towels, a laundry bag, and a waste paper basket. 
' Women students should each bring single sheets, blankets, spread, pillow, 
pillow cases, towels, bureau scarf, desk blotter, laundry bag, and waste 
paper basket. 

All dormitory property assigned to the individual student will be 
charged against him, and he must assume responsibility for its possession 
without destruction other than that which may result from ordinary wear 
and tear. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of 
their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 



* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to such 
minor students. 

t Students in the College Park CJolleges who are residents of the District of Columbia are 
charged two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 

68 



year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 

school or college in Maryland. . . ^ ^i. 4.- -. ^-p i,ic 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of hjs 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents' move to and become lega 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. j , , , 

Students not rooming in the dormitories may obtain board and laundry 
at the University at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunches at the University cafeteria or at nearby 

lunch rooms. 

The cost of books and supplies will vary according to the course pur- 
sued by the individual student. Books and supplies average about $35.00 

per year. 4. j <. 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 

student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

EXPENSES AT BALTIMORE 
The fees and expenses for the professional schools located in Baltimore 
will be found in the section of this catalogue pertaining to the several 
schools in Baltimore. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 
A considerable number of students earn some money through employment 
while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, however, 
to earn enough to pay all his expenses. The amounts vary, but some earn 
from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. 

Generally the first year is the hardest for those desiring employment 
After one has demonstrated that one is worthy and capable, there is much 
less difficulty in finding work. , v i.i. 

During the past two and a half years, through the National Youth 
Administration, the University has been enabled to offer needy students 
a limited amount of work on special projects, the remuneration for which 
averages about $15 monthly. It is not known how long the Government will 
continue to extend this aid. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, maintain a bureau to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions 
is placed at the disposal of the students. 

.Th„ tprm "Darents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have b^:r?egally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to such 

""tltuSr^n-the College Park Colleges who -^^ l^^^^^^^^^'^l^^''' <" ^"'-"""^ "' 
charged two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other nonresidents. 

59 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors for exxellence in scholarshiD are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college Sw 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second hoLs to the lower 

required ''^' ^* ^^^^* ^^° ^^^""^ °^ ^^^''^^'^'^ ^"^'^ ^'^ 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the man from Prince George's County who makes the 
highest average in his studies and who at the same time embodies the most 
manly attributes The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma Fra- 
ternity offers annually a gold medal to the freshman who makes the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. The mere 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Herman Memorial Medal is 
awarded ^ually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Herman. . ' 

cla^c^wh^ W !^ ^"'*- .P^! '' "''"'■'^ *" '^^ ^°'»''" '"^'^ber of the senior 
class who has been m attendance at least three full years, and who has made 
the highest scholastic average. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
gil-1 who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. ^ d<jfiiu 

Class of -26 Honor Key. The Class of 1926 of the School of Business 
Administration of the University of Maryland at Baltimore offers each 
wl\^ ^i. t u^y^ *^ ^^"'°'' graduating from the College of Commerce 

nSJ . f M T""!^^ ^"'^ *^ ^"""^ ^«"'- >-«^^ '^^"'•^e taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 

'4 IT f ^""T^^^ ^ ""'^^^ ^""^ ^ ^'""^"^ membership to the graduating 
student, of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, ^who 
shall have attained the highest average grade in this major subject fo? the 
entire undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final 
semester. 

60 



MILITARY AWARDS 

The Governor's Cup. This is offered each year by His Excellency, the 
Governor of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

Military Faculty Award. The Military faculty of the University annually 
presents an award to the student who has done most for the Reserve Offi- 
cers* Training Corps. 

Oass of '99 Gold Medal. The Class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal 
to the member of the battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. 

Company Saber. The Military Department awards annually to the cap- 
tain of the best drilled company of the University a silver mounted saber. 

The Alumni Cup, The Alumni offer each year a cup to the commanding 
officer of the best drilled platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Saber. This saber is offered for the commander of 
the winning platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Medals. These medals are offered for the freshman 
students who remain longest in the individual competition, one per battalion. 

Gold Medals. These are offered by the Military Department to the two 
students who contribute the most to the success of the band. Gold Medals 
are offered also to the members of the best drilled squad. Gold Medals are 
likewise presented by the Department to the respective battalion commanders. 

A Silver Medal is presented by the Military Department to the student 
who makes the highest score in the Third Corps Area Match. 

A Bronze Medal is similarly awarded to the student making the second 
highest score in the Third Corps Area Match. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Varsity R. 0. T. C. Rifle 
Team who fired the high score of each season. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Freshman Rifle Team who 
fired the high score of each season. 

LOANS 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority offers annually a Sigma Delta loan of 
one hundred dollars, without interest, to a woman student registered in the 
University of Maryland and selected by the Scholarship Committee — the 
said Committee to be composed of the deans of all Colleges in' which girls 
are registered, including the Dean of Women and the Dean of the Graduate 
School 



lool. ^ . 1^ 

OA0- 



PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 



Medals are offered in Diamondback, Terrapin, and Old Line work, for the 
students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout the 
year. 

61 



ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. The Class of lyos offers 
annually to ^'the man who typified the best in college athletics" a gold 
watch. The watch is given in honor of a former President of the Univer- 
sity, R. W. Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt to 
the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. A gold watch is presented annually by H. C. 
Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class 
who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, 
and has done most for the general advancement of the interests of the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods to the woman member of the senior class who, during her 
collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, and has done 
most for the general advancement of the interests of the University. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The description of those in the Balti- 
more divisions is included in the appropriate chapters in Section II. 

GOVERNMENT 

Regulation of Student Activities. The association of students in organ- 
ized bodies, for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student activities in 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged. All organized 
student activities are under the supervision of the Student Life Committee, 
subject to the approval of the President. Such organizations are formed 
only with the consent of the Student Life Committee and the approval of 
the President. Without such consent and approval no student organization 
which in any way represents the University before the public, or which 
purports to be a University organization or an organization of University 
students, may use the name of the University in connection with its own 
name, or in connection with its members as students. 

Student Government. The Student Grovemment Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women's League, and the Men's League, and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officers are a President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary-Treasurer, President of Women's League and Presi- 
dent of Men's League. 

The Women's League handles all affairs concerning women students ex- 
clusively. It has the advisory cooperation of the Dean of Women. 

The Men's League handles all matters pertaining to men students. It has 
the advisory cooperation of the Assistant in Student Activities. 

62 



The Executive Council performs the executive duties incident to manag- 
ing student affairs, and works in cooperation with the Student Life Com- 

mittee. j u 4.1, r» 

The Student Life Committee, a faculty committee appomted by the Presi- 
dent, keeps in close touch with all activities and conditions, excepting class- 
room work, that affect the student, and, acting in an advisory capacity, en- 
deavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that may exist. 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and distrib- 
uted to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning student 
matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. No 
Student while on probation may represent the University m such events as 
athletic contests, glee club concerts, dramatic performances, and debates. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President^d faculty 
rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The student 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives^ honor- , 
ably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to maintain these 
standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct super- 
vision of the University only when on the campus, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. . ^. ^« 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and finan- 
cial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon sound 
business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed indi- 
vidual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and thereby 
become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules govermng 
the different activities will be found in the list of Academic Regulations. 

SOCIETIES 
Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Univer- 
sitv at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural stand- 
ards in their respective fields. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national honorary 
fraternity open to honor students, both men and women m al branches of 
learning; Sigma Xi, an honorary scientific fraternity; Alpha Zeta a national 
honorary agricultural fraternity recognizing scholarship and student leader- 
ship- Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary engineering fraternity; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, men's national honor society, recognizing conspicuous attam- 
ment in non-curricular activities and general leadership; Kappa Phi Kappa, 
a national educational fraternity; Beta Phi Theta, an honorary French 
fraternity; Sigma Delta Pi, a national honorary Spanish fraternity; Alpha 
Chi Sigma, a national honorary chemical fraternity; Scabbard and Blade, 
a national military society; Pershing Rifles, a national military society for 
basic course R. 0. T. C. students; Pi Delta Epsilon, a national journalistic 
fraternity; Mortar Board, the national senior honor society for women; 



63 



^ir- 




it;thorsht?o2rnrrni^2^^^^ wo.en/honor society pro^ot- 

Omega (Iota Wer ? SioVafrl^'t e'LSr Td Thf I=> f ^'T ''1 
women's journalistic fraternity. ^' ^*" ^^P^^' '"<=*' 

six''raSTor^"r1tferanf" ,^'7 ^-.^-'^-^ -«onal fraternities, and 

order of the restSl shmenra T^^ T"'^ "* ''""^^^ ^"^'^^ '^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 
Phi Sigma sLTa Nu Phfl ^ University are Kappa Alpha, Sigma 

Rho, S; ir Phr' A?. T^ ^^PP^' °""^ S'^^ P*»'' Alpha GaiLa 

tomologW St?, ^oriifulS^ Engineering Society, En- 

Club. New Mercer Literarv«?„.ftp' r " American Club, Live Stock 
Women's AfwetTc A focSL? S' '^'^ rfr/^^^^^^^ ^^'^^^* ^°--' 
Club, Rossbourg Club, Semat ^oly'^'S.^SlS'^'p', °^^^«"^ 

Strauss Club, DeMolay Club, Psyche Club? D^TSStWdrRfd"'.; 
Olub, Swimimnff Club Onpm rinK t> <. r.i t ^J""*-^^"® verem, Kidmg 
American Institute of E^ecSaf S'.in '^ f "^ International Relations, 
^neer^, Radio Club CamSauh aTV r.r^'^'' ^""'"^^ ^^ Civil En- 
and Trail Club. "^' A'P'^^^j^ Kappa Alpha Sigma Club. 

Student Grange. The Student Grange is a chanter nf +h^ m *• , ^ 

sris'irr-tireVTroLn^^^^^^^^^ 

by b..t whenWra^e^p^e?:^;^- r^^^ tSlr^^^ ^^^^^^ 

thr^u'gh^whS sSrklt f "J-Ve^-^e are to furnish" a means 
agricultural, economif or Jeneral e^^^^^^^^ f '*! '"' "'"°""' P'^"^""^ «>* 
putting into practice Urli?mentr?Sr^^^ Sr^rm^f'-^^^^'?"^! '" 
ship, and to learn how to assume leadershin tw^? • tu ""? °^ '^^^^'•■ 
of serving in one's community '^'"^^''^^'P **>** ^'^^ '« the ultimate task 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

studies n^'soti;t^;Ll"SStuS ^^^^^f^t'^y ^- the welfare of the 
whose development llZT^fl f^^^' .^"* ^' ^"'"^" personalities 

Included in the educat oS Zlei^' P^XT— T^'.tT' '^"^^''"^' '^ 

a local Church of hi^^iS^. ^^^f S^ J;::^:^^^ 

64 



Committee on Religious Affairs and Social Service. A faculty committee 
on Religious Affairs and Social Service has as its principal function the 
stimulation of religious thought and activity on the campus. It brings noted 
speakers on religious subjects to the campus from time to time. The com- 
mittee cooperates with the student pastors in visiting the students, and 
assists the student denominational clubs in every way that it can. Oppor- 
tunities are provided for students to consult v^rith pastors representing the 
denominations of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religion is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a 
denominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of Christian service. This 
year the list includes the Baptist Club, the Episcopal Club, the Lutheran 
Club, the Newman Club, and the Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet 
monthly or semi-monthly for worship and discussion, and occasionally for 
social purposes. A pastor or a member of the faculty serves as adviser. A 
local Y. W. C. A. provides a variety of activities and services on an unde- 
nominational basis. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Three student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Conunittee on Student Publications. 

The Diamondback, a semi-weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is pub- 
lished by the students. This publication summarizes the University news, 
and provides a medium for discussion of matters of interest to the students 
and the faculty. 

The Terrapin is the student annual published by the Junior Class. It is 
a reflection of student activities, serving to commemorate the principal 
events of the college year. 

The Old Line is a comic magazine put out quarterly by the students. 

ALUMNI 

The alumni are organized into several units, which elect representatives 
to the Alumni Council, an incorporated body which manages all general 
alumni affairs. Different alumni units represent the School of Medicine, 
the School of Pharmacy, the School of Dentistry, the School of Law, and the 
School of Nursing, while the group of colleges at College Park are repre- 
sented by one unit. The College Park unit is governed by a board made 
up of representatives of the various colleges located at College Park. 

The Alumni Council consists of elected representatives from the several 
units, with a membership of twenty- four. Each alunmi unit in Baltimore 
elects two representatives to the Council; the alumni representing the Col- 
lege Park gn'oup of colleges elect twelve representatives. 

65 



SECTION n 
Administrative Divisions 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

^^"^J^'ZSy'tot'L^.T adnnnistrative unit of the Universitv 
four principal fL'et?onsarfrs;l;^^^^^ '' *« S^^^- ^^ 

ing of young men ^M^Z^^ f^^ ■ ^^} ^.^^'^^nt Instruction, the train- 
Research, th! corducttrors^sSLSlt? T "'^'^^ --P-tions; (2) 
ance to agricultural inferests r? ExZ! ^^.^""^ "''. P""^'"*^'^ "^ ^'"P"^" 
in the solution of farm and homi ;f. w • *^t ^^^dering of assistance 

(4) Regulatory, the ircemenrofT^ . '''. '""f "^'"'■^' ^^t«"^'' ^"<' 

in agHculture ;hich ^^^1 ^J^:;r'£\^ZTor'-- 

Resident Instruction 

« Tr' agU'uSld irf" r '^^^^^^^ ^'^ P--«^« t-ned per- 
students for o^or "ire ^ Chelan Tm'" 7'^'^ °*^""^ ^™ *" ^^ 
ment to persons w^t^ special tin^,^ f^"- °^ ^*^"^*^ ^^"^^'"^ «™P'oy- 

fundamentals receiv s spS aSntio^ ^^17^'^"'"^ °' ^^^'^^^^^ ^" 
of the College are arranged w^fr.' T ^''"'^^^^ professional curricula 

associated s'ciencr^^d"':ultri ^J^l^ "7:^^^^ ^^^ -''' 
women are given a hp<5iV cror>^„«i ^""J^ci;s. Accordingly, young- men and 

in the variorbraLt: of a,r^^^^^ "'"^ *'^^ ^^^ ^^'"^ -«*-*-! 

fa^.^g^tvf sLrp::du^^^^^^^ Ss^f ; -^^^ *» -r - ^" — • 

fruit or vegetable growing flor c^t^L* ? '■^'"^' P""^*'^' husbandry, 

productio„,%r in the SrsSa^edT Wiculture, field crop 

industries. It prepares men to 'i"":' irm mlr""';' "'* '""^^ 
positions as teachers in aa-rirultn!ll n "managers, for responsible 

tional agriculture in hTgh SI s- - •^'' - ^ departments of voca- 
tions, for extension worrforSktorv.-K^^,*"'"' '" experiment sta- 
States Department of A^riculTr. 7^ '^'' ^''' '^"'''^^ '" ^^^^ United 

cems related to alScutture tr;.,^" T ^"t''"''' ^"'^ commercial con- 
mology, Genetics arSScstnSrftc'nlg^^^^^^^^ ^"*- 

to the student with a scientific bent of mn^S lead T^ °T'^"'^*''' 
many ramifications in teaching, re^arch.TttsTon, td l^S^T::! 

66 



Research 

Through research of the Experiment Station, the frontiers of knowledge 
relating to agriculture and the fundamental sciences underlying it are con- 
stantly being extended and solutions for important problems are being 
found. Research projects in many fields are in progress. Students taking 
courses in agriculture from instructors who devote part time to research 
or are closely associated with it are kept in close touch with the latest 
discoveries and developments in the investigations under way. The findings 
of the Experiment Station thus provide a real source of information for 
use in classrooms, and make possible a virility and exactness in instruction 
valuable in the extreme. The authority of scientific investigation is con- 
stantly before the student. 

Extension 

Constant contact of the Extension Service with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State through its county agents, home 
demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident in- 
struction in the College of Agriculture. This Service operates in two ways: 
Problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of research 
workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are taken to 
farmers and their families in their home communities through practical 
demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State contribute 
to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College helps them 
in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. Instruction is vitalized 
through participation in or association with extension activities. 

Regulatory 

Through their Regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are constantly dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and providing more reliable seeds for farm planting. 
These fields constitute an important part of agricultural education, as 
standardization and education go hand in hand in the development of an 
industry. Direct contact on the part of professors in their respective 
departments with the problems and methods involved makes for effective 
instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Mary- 
land lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, 
and regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the 
several departments, and in the institution as a whole. Those who give 
instruction to students are closely associated with the research, extension. 

67 



of activities. Close coordination !f ^ ! °"^ "'' '""'^ °^ *^««^ t^P^-' 
University to support a strTn^r ff u "^ ^T'" '^^^^ °^ ^"''^ ^'^^''^^ tho 
affords a higher deJrPP f/""*^^.*^ ,^«'=^ ^^ "> the College of Agriculture, and 

It insures instrictfsJnont'^'^ k^^" "°""* °**»«"^'^« l*- Po-ible 

results of reseS LTto be 1 " I JT ^ "'^T '"^"^^ °" ^^^^ ^^^est 
problems that are revea ed fn eSn^^ " i'"'" 7"'' '^"'^^"^ ^^^"^^ ^<' 
of departments hold^t^rcoirc^To Z rtThat^te "f d "f' '' 

fi"\dror.no:Lrasit*^us^^^^^^^ ^" *" '^-"^" «'^"- - 

Knowledge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

Advisory Councils 

industries in the State a^ tlat X """Z-"' *^' '''''""' ^^"'^^'t^ral 

be made most helpful' for lilt '°r'' *" '"«*"^<=t^«'^ «hall at all times 
have been constSS in the ml • ^\ '^"'"""^ *^'"' ^'^^'^^'^ Councils 
cils are composS of leaded 1^^' ""^"^*"«^°f agriculture. These Coun- 
land. and the in^r^ct onaf^t^ff *5« '"^^P^ft '^e l^es of agriculture in Marv- 
el their counsellTSvtTretJa: ^^^ ^rStZ^^T^^ 
the industries, and the students are kept abreast of deveTopments ^'' 

Facilities and Equipment 

and instruction in acrirnltn^ i?„^ , ] excellent facilities for research 
are owned and opTrateJ f^r' f.T r ',' ^^'^""^ '""'^ ^'^^^ ^^OO acres. 
One of the most crpTete anrmodernlT . . '-estigational purposes, 
work in the country'tgether ilth he^/'^^^^^^^^ ^"' animal husbandry 
cattle and livestock nroviHlMYr.- \f P^ncipal breeds of dairy 

research in these industries Exci^ T. Tt '"^"""^'^ '''' instruction and 
available in the AgrotrDep'artS ^Z:!^^':!:^^^ ^ 

i:^^ref-anr:i;rot: ?;,aTX& 

flocks of all the important b^eds of pouiry'^X Hor^Tcnf ^ ""^ 

|s housed in a separate building, andVai LpTe 'or^hSs a„d S^e^^^r 
Its various lines of work. ^'^^ii<*ras and gardens for 

DeiKirfments 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry. ^InZ I ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^P^ ^^d Soils); 
Pathology, Plant PhysX; T^h ^^^.''"™^^P' ^^^"^ (including Plant 
Bee CultiirpW r ^^P'^^^^^^' ^^ Biochemistry); Entomology (including' 
Bee Culture), Genetics and Statistics; Horticulture (including Pom^gj^ 

es 



Vegetable Gardening, Landscape Gardening, and Floriculture); Poultry 
Husbandry; Veterinary Science. 

Admission 

The requirements for admission are discussed under Entrance, in Section I. 

Requirements for Graduation 

One hundred and twenty-eight semester hours are required for gradua- 
tion. The detailed requirements for each department are included in the 
discussion of Curricula in Agriculture. 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the 
several voluntary organizations sponsored by the College. These organiza- 
tions are as follows: Student Grange, Livestock Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Bacteriological Society, Alpha Zeta, Agricultural Economics Club, 
and the Agricultural Student Council. 

Membership in these organizations is voluntary, and no college credits 
are given for work done in them; yet much of the training obtained is 
fully as valuable as that acquired from regularly prescribed courses.* 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers* fraternity 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges throughout 
the State. The Livestock Club conducts the Students' Fitting and Showing 
Contest held on the campus in the Spring. The Future Farmers of America 
foster interest in vocational education, and the Collegiate Chapter serves 
as host Chapter in connection with high school judging contests held at 
the University. The Bacteriological organization is representative of a 
national group with chapters in many institutions. The Agricultural Eco- 
nomics group conducts special studies in the field of Agricultural Economics. 
All these organizations have regular meetings, arrange special programs, 
and contribute to the extra-curricular life of students. 

Alpha Zeta — National Agricultural Honor Fraternity 

Membership in this fraternity is chosen from students in the College of 
Agriculture who have displayed agricultural motive and executive ability. 
This organization fosters scholarship, and to that end awards a gold medal 
to the member of the freshman class in agriculture who makes the highest 
record during the year. 

69 



Agricultural Student Council 

The Agricultural Student Ck)uncil is a delegate body made up of two 
representatives from each of the above organizations. Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of students in agriculture, and to promote work which 
IS beneficial to the College of Agriculture. It is the organization that is 
representative of the agricultural student body as a whole. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes: Technical, Scientific, and Special. 

(1) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools; as executives, 
salesmen, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricul- 
tural contact and point of view. 

(2) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal. 
State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment sta- 
tions; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return to 
the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. (For details see Special Students in Agriculture, page 92.) 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to an adviser from 
the faculty. Advisers are of two kinds — departmental and general. Depart- 
mental advisers consist of heads of departments or persons selected by 
them to advise students with curricula in their respective departments. 
General advisers are selected for students who have no definite choice of 
curriculum in mind, or who wish to pursue the general curriculum in agri- 
culture. 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow afford opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

Cases of students with poor records are referred to the Admission, 
Guidance, and Adjustment Committee, for review and advice. 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is 
common to all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student 

TO 



an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
i the related sciences, to articulate begimiing w^ork m coUege -t^ ^ha 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
E of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a 
student before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to 
Mother, or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum m some other 
college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice f ^u^cvd^^ 
in mind are sent immediately to departmental advisers for counsel as to 
the wisest selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their 
special interests and their probable future programs Students entering 
the freshman year with rio 'definite curriculum in mmd, or who are unde- 
^Lr^TLined to general advisers, who assist with the choice of fresb- 
nlnitivesTnd during the course of the year acquaint them with the 
ot)Dortunities in the upper curricula in the College of Agriculture and m 
iroi^XilL of the University. If by the close of the freshman year 
a Student makes no definite choice of a specialized curriculum, he continues 
under the guidance of his general adviser and at the begmnmg of the 
sophomore year enters Agriculture (General Curriculum). 

Requirements of Freshman Year 

Semester 

I U 

4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - ^ 

General Botany (Bot. If) " _ ^ 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) -■ - ~ - ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly).- — -^ "• ;"— "^^^^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly or Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y)..- " 

Elect one of the following: 

Modem Language (French ly or German ly) - -- ^ ^ 

Mathematics (Math. 21f and 22s) ^ ^ 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) -••• - :zr"~"T"^" 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) and Farm ^ ^ 

Organization (A. E. 2s) - - 



71 



AGRICULTURE 
(General Curriculum) 

enttlhe'foHowi.t''" "" .'""^"f " ^'"''■"' ^°"^^^ '" Agriculture should 
enter the following curriculum. It is designed for those seeking a general 
rather than a specialized, knowledge of the subject. 



Sophomore Year j 

Survey and Composition (Eng. 2f and 3s) o 

Geology (Geol. If) 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ 

Cereal Crop and Forage Crop Production (Agron7 If and 2s) 3 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. If and 2s) 9 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If) o 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ 57s) __ 

Ba^ U 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physic^ idu^aUon(Phys] 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) o 

"" * * JL 

16 
Junior Year 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOlf and 102s) 3 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) "" 3 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr? Engr 102s) -- 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. lOOf) o 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s)I"' _ 

General Horticulture (Hort. If and 2s) 3 

Poultry Production (Poultry If) o 

Poultry Management (Poultry Is) ZIZl __ 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f and 4s)ZIIIIIZIIII 2 

17 
Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) o 

Analysis of Farm Business (A. E. 107s) __ 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) « 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) I~II1 _ 

Electives 

10 



Semester 
I J 

3 



3 
3 
2 

3 



16 

3 

3 

3 
3 

3 
2 

17 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The objectives of the curricula in Agricultural Education are the teaching 
of secondary vocational agriculture, the work of county agents, and allied 
lines of the rural education service. 

Curriculum A is designed for persons who have had no vocational agri- 
culture in high scKool or less than two years of such instruction. Cur- 
riculum B is designed for persons who have had two or more years of 
thoroughgoing instruction in secondary agriculture of the type offered in 
Maryland high schools. Curriculum B relieves the student of the necessity 
of pursuing beginning agriculture courses in the first two years of his 
college course, permits him to carry general courses in lieu of those dis- 
placed by his vocational program in high school, and offers him an oppor- 
tunity to lay a broad foundation for the advanced work in agriculture of 
the last two college years. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curricula must present evidence of having ac- 
quired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high averages upon petition may be relieved of certain re- 
quirements in these curricula, when evidence is presented showing that 
either through experience or through previous training the prescription is 
non-essential ; or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 



Curriculum A. 



Semester 



3 

10 



Sophoirwre Year I 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) — 

Cereal Crop and Forage Crop Production (Agron. If and 2s) ... 3 

Geology (Geol. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If and 2s) 3 

General Horticulture (Hort. If)..- 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) - — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 



17 



n 

3 
3 

3 

3 

3 
2 

17 



16 



16 



72 



73 



Junior Year 
Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) ^ 

Gas Engines, Tra<;tors, and Automobiles'(Agr"'in;7Tn?;r 

Agncultural Economics (A. E lOOf) ^ ^ ~ 

Poultry Production (Poultry If) "■ ~ 

Poultry Management (Poultry Is) ^ 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H.^s) ~ 

General Horticulture (Hort. 2s) " "~ 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr 6y) ~ 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f and' is) \ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 1 .:. ? 

O 

15 

Senior Year 
Farm Management (A. E. 108f).... 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. I02f). " *" ^ 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations "(RrEdrroif and 7o9^^ ? 
Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for A^^iltur j 
Students (R. Ed. I07f) agricultural 

Principles of Secondary Education 7Ed7'l03s)'" ^ 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed" I09f)" T 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed 110s) 

Departmental Organization and Administration (r' id H2s) ~ 

Farm Shop Work (Agr. Engr. 104f) ^' ~ 

Sactice\!LT ^""^i '" ^^°"^-5^ sciu>ois^:Eri^i::: 1 

i^ractice Teachmg (R. Ed. 120 f or s) 

Electives .... " — 

3 



17 



Semester 
II 

3 

3 

3 
2 
3 



16 



3 
1 

1 
2 
3 

14 



74 



Curriculum B. 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I if 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) „ 3 — 

General Entomology (Ent. Is) — 3 

Geology ( Geol. If) _ „ 3 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 3 

General Horticulture (Hort. If and 2s) 3 3 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

=^Electives 3 3 

17 17 
Junior Year 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf ) _ 3 — 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) — 3 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) 1 — 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f and 4s) 2 2 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) _ 3 — 

Electives ._ 8 12 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) „ 3 — 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf and 102s) 1 1 
Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107f) 3 — 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) „ — 3 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f) 3 — 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) — 3 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112s) — 1 

Farm Shop Work (Agr. Engr. 104f) 1 — 

Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114s) — 1 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120f or s) — - 2 

Electives _ 3 3 

14 14 
Electives in Curriculum B to be as follows: 

Advanced Animal and Dairy Husbandry 6 hours 

Advanced Agricultural Economics, Farm Management 6 hours 

Advanced Agronomy 6 hours 

Advanced Poultry - 6 hours 

Subjects of Special Interest 8 hours 

*If Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) is not elected in the freshman year, it must be 
elected in the sophomore year. 

75 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department of Agricultural Engineering offers to students of 
agriculture training in those agricultural subjects which are based upon 
engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped under three heads: 
farm machinery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modem tendency in farming is to reduce production costs by the 
use of farm machinery units of efficient size and design. In many cases 
horses are being replaced by tractors. Trucks, automobiles, and stationary 
engines are found on almost all farms. It is highly advisable that the student 
of any branch of agriculture have a working knowledge of the design, 
adjustments, and repair of these machines. 

More than one-fourth of the total value of Maryland farms is represented 
by the btiildings. The study of the design of various buildings, from the 
standpoint of economy, sanitation, efficiency, and appearance, is, therefore, 
important. 

Studies included in the study of drainage are as follows: the principles 
of tile drainage, the laying out and construction of tile drain systems, the 
use of open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. 

AGRONOMY 

In the Department of Agronomy are grouped the courses in farm crops, 
soils, and plant breeding. 

The curriculum in farm crops aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register for sub- 
jects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular 
farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well 
fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, for em- 
ployment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State or 
Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The division of soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to 
take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The division pos- 
sesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especially 
in the pot culture laboratories, and on the experimental fields at the station 
and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves to 
teach soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment 
stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Plant Industry and the 
Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States Department of Agriculture. 

76 



Semester 

Sophomore Year 

Cereal and Forage Crops (Agron. If and 2s) ^ ^ 

Geology ( Geol. If ) • ___ ^^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) '^ 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) •^■ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y ) - - 

Select from following: 

Calculus (Math. 23y) ^ ^ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) __ 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) ^ ^ 

Agriculture (Any course under lOO) 

14-16 14-16 



Crops IMvision 

Junior Year 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) ~ ^ 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) ^.•- ^""^^ 

General Bacteriology ( Bact. If ) - - 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) ^ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) - ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) 

Electives 

16 

Senior Year 

2 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f) ^ 

Advanced Genetics (G. and S. 102 s) ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. lOOf) - ^ 

Methods of Oop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) 

Selected Crop Studies (Agron. 104f and s) 1 

Soil Geography ( Soils 103f ) ^ 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) ^ 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) ^ 

Farm Forestry (For. 1 s) ^ 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) 

Electives • 



16 



3 

11 

16 



2 

4 



2 
3 

3 

16 



77 



Soils Division 

Semester 

Junior Year I If 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) ....~ 4 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils If) 5 — 

Soil Management (Soils 102 s) — 3 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 — 

Electives 1 8 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) - 3 — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) - 4 — 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) — 2 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) 3 — 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) — 2 

Soil Conservation (Soils 120 s) — 8 

Electives » - ~ - 6 9 



16 



16 



ANIMAL AND DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Animal Husbandry 

New horse, sheep, and beef cattle bams, judging pavilion, and classroom 
have been constructed on a site adjacent to the University Campus. These 
enlarged facilities, together with the availability for use of better herds 
and flocks, have added materially to the equipment available for instruction 
and for research in all branches of animal husbandry. 

The curriculum in Animal Husbandry is so organized as to permit of 
specialization and at the same time allow plenty of latitude in the election 
of courses outside of the department, thereby giving students fundamental 
training and equipping them to become owners, managers, or superinten- 
dents of farms where livestock are maintained. Attention is given to all 
phases of the livestock industry, including care, feeding, breeding, selection, 
and management of all classes of farm livestock; to the marketing of live- 
stock and livestock products; and to other allied subjects, training in all of 
which is fundamental for those who intend to produce, buy, sell, or market 
livestock or livestock products. 

Opportunity for specialization is open to those who expect to pursue 
graduate studies or who anticipate becoming instructors, investigators, 
county agricultural agents, or specialists in State or Federal institutions. 



78 



Semester 

Sophomore Year 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. i2Ay and 12By) 3 ^ 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. If and 2s) - ^ _ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) _ 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) - -• • ^ ___ 

Geology (Geol. If) — 3 _ 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. It) - - __ ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) - "•""""■"":"* 

R O T^ C (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y ^ ^ 

or 6y and 8y ) - ~ - - " 3 

Electives " — 

17 16 

Junior Year 

Breeds of Horses and Beef Cattle (A. H. lOOf ) ^ ^ 

Breeds of Sheep and Swine (A. H. 101s) - ^ __ 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f ) - ^ ^ 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) - - ^ ___ 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf ) — • "" ^ — 

Livestock Management (A. H. 104f) ^ ^ 

Livestock Management (A. H. 105s) ^ __ 

Livestock Judging (A. H. 106f ) - •■••'• _ 2 

Livestock Judging (A. H. 107s) ~ ^ ^ 

Electives — 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Beef Cattle and Horse Production (A. H. 109f) -- ^ ^ 

Sheep and Swine Production (A. «• /^^s) -.^.^. - ^ _ 

Livestock Markets and Marketmg (A. H. lilt) ^ ^ 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 113f) " __ ^ 

Advanced Breeding (A. H. 114s) --^.^ ~ - _ ^ 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s) ^ __ 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf ) -•- "-•••' g 7 

Electives " " — 

16 16 

Dairy Husbandry 

4^ ^o.-vxr h^rrm recentlv completed at the University are 
^i™ 1: ^r:^t^uvi^^t:ZZuivr^^^ and readily accessible 
Thi dTiri he'd isTe;:.g increased in size and improved in ^luahty^^ New and 
mc^etTquipment is being placed in the dairy --'^"^-^ £*•„,/,; ff 
ThSe greatly expanded physical facilities make possible a h>gh order 
SltL and research in all phases of the dairy mdustry. 

79 



The department of Dairy Husbandry offers courses in two major lines: 
dairy production and dairy manufacture. The curriculum in each of these 
phases is arranged to give the student an intimate knowledge of the 
science, and facility in the art of dairy husbandry practice. The dairy 
I^roduction option is organized to meet the specific requirements of students 
who are especially interested in the care, feeding, breeding, management, 
and improvement of dairy cattle and in the production and sale of market 
milk. 

The option in dairy manufactures is planned to meet the particular 
demands of those interested in the processing and distribution of milk, 
in dairy plant operation, and in the manufacture and sale of butter, cheese, 
ice cream, and other milk products. 

The dairy herd and the dairy laboratories are available to students 
for instruction and for research. Excellent opportunity is, therefore, 
afforded to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students for original 
investigation and research. Graduates in the courses in dairy husbandry 
should be well qualified to become managers of dairy farms and dairy man- 
ufacturing plants, teachers, and investigators in the State and Federal 
Agricultural Experiment Stations; or to enter the field of commercial 
dairying. 



Dairy Manufacturing 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay and 12By) 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f or s) _ — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) 4 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D.H. If and D.H. 2s) 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f or s) — 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y or 

6y and 8y) _ 2 

Electives 4 



// 

3 

4 

3 
3 

2 
1 



16 

Junior Year 

History and Geography of Dairying (D. H. 118f) 2 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) 3 

Dairy Products Bacteriology (Bact. 102s) — 

Dairy Manufacturing (D. H. 108f and l()9s) 5 

Grading Dairy Products (D. H. 112s) ~ 

Dairy Mechanics (D. H. 114f) 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 

Electives 2 



1(5 



3 
5 

1 

2 
5 



16 



16 



80 



Semester 



Senior Year 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOlf) - ^ 

Market Milk (D. H. llOf) - ^ 

Analysis of Dairy Products (D. H. Ills) — 

Dairy Accounting (D. H. 115s) 

Dairy Plant Experience (D. H. 116f and D. H. 117s) 3 

Dairy Literature (D. H. 119f and D. H. 120s) 1 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. lOOf) ^ 

Electives 

16 



II 



3 
1 
1 
1 

10 

16 



i 



Dairy Production 

Sophomore Year 
Elect one of the following: 

Economics (A. E. If and Econ. 57s) 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay and 12 By) 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If and D. H. 2s) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) 

Geology and Soils (Geol. If and Soils Is) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y or 8y ) 

Electives 



-3 


2-3 


3 


3 


4 


— 


3 


5 


2 


2 





3 



16 



2 
3 
3 



Junior Year 

Expository writing (English 5f and 6s) - 

Dairy Cattle Management (D H. 106f and 107s) 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOlf and 102s) 

.Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) 

' Dairy Cattle Judging (D. H. 103s) — 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) ~ 

History and Geography of Dairying (D. H. 118f) 2 

Electives 

16 

Senior Year 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 113f) - — 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. lOOf) 3 

Market Milk (D. H. llOf) 5 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) 3 

Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (D. H. 105s) — 

Electives ^ 



16 



2 

3 
3 
3 
1 

2 

2 

16 

3 



2 

11 



16 



16 



81 



BACTERIOLOGY 

This department has been organized with two main purposes in view. 
The first is to give all students of the University an opportunity to obtain 
a general knowledge of this basic subject. The second is to prepare 
students for bacteriological positions (including those of dairy, sanitary, 
food, and soil bacteriologists; and federal, state, and municipal bacteriolo- 
gists) ; and for public health work of various types, research, and indus- 
trial positions. 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) 1 1 

German or French 3 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2s) — 4 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education 

(Phys. Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Electives - _ - 3-4 3-4 

17-18 17-18 
Junior Year 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) 4 — 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112s) — 3 

Serology (Bact. 115f) 4 — 

Advanced Methods (Bact. 122s) — 2 

General Physics ((Phys. ly) 4 4 

Electives ( Bact. ) — 2-4 

Electives (Other) 3-5 2-6 

15-17 15-17 
Senior Year 

Biological Statistics (G. and S. lllf) 2 — 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s) — 4 

Journal Club (Bact. 131f and 132s) 1 1 

Electives ( Bact. ) „ 5-6 4-2 

Electives (Other) „ 6-9 6-10 



15-17 15-17 
BOTANY 

The Department of Botany offers three major fields of work: general 
botany and morphology, plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology. 
The required courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same 
for all students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botanical 
courses to suit his particular interests in botanical science. Both the junior 
and senior years also allow considerable freedom in the election of non- 
82 



botanical courses, in order to round out a fairly broad cultural education. 
Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish to 
meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates may 
elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined lays a good foundation for students who 
wish to pursue graduate work in botanical science in preparation for col- 
lege teaching and for research in state experiment stations, in the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and in private research institutions and 
laboratories. 

The curriculum also affords students an opportunity for training for 
other vocations involving various botanical applications, such as extension 
work, and positions with seed companies, canning companies, companies 
making spray materials, and with other commercial concerns. 

General Botany and Morphology, Physiology, and Pathology 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I ^J 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) ^ 4 — 

Local Flora (Bot. 3s) - — 2 

General Botany (Bot. 2s) „ - — 4 

Greneral Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

College Algebra (Math. 21f) and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

22s) - - - - 3 8 

♦Modern Language ~ 3 S 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Electives — 2 



16 

General Botany and Morphology, and Plant Physiology 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly ) - - 4 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) „ — 

Electives - - 8 

16 

Senior Year 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) » 3 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107s) — 

Botanical Electives (Maximum) — „ „ 5 

Other Electives (Minimum) — 8 

16 



16 



4 
3 
9 

16 



2 

12 

2 

16 



* Twelve hours of modern language are required. If it is not begun until the sophomore 
year, the last six hours will be elected in the junior or senior year. 



Plant Pathology 



Semester 



Junior Year [ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf )...... _ 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 

Research Methods (Pit. Path. 103s) — 

Electives 6 

17 

Senior Year 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) — 

•iT^ianL A.natomy (i50t. xuxx^....,^.. _ « ..,..~.^.^.«.^.^....^.^......^ o 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) 3 

Diseases of Fruits (Pit. Path. 101s) or Diseases of Garden and 

Field Crops (Pit. Path. 102s) „„. — 

Electives . _...._ _ 6 



// 

4 
3 
3 
2 
3 

15 
8 



16 



2 

11 

16 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 



The objective of the curriculum in Biological Chemistry is the fitting 
of students for work in agricultural experiment stations, and in soil, fer- 
tilizer, and food laboratories. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This department is engaged in the teaching of entomology to all agri- 
cultural students as a basis for future work in pest control, in the prepara- 
tion of technically trained entomologists, and in furnishing courses to 
students in Arts and Sciences and Education. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in large 
measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of preventing or 
combating the pests that menace his crops. Successful methods of control 
are emphasized in the economic courses. 

The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
Extension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the office of the State 
Entomologist are in one administrative unit, enables the student in this 
department to avail himself of the many advantages accruing therefrom. 
Advanced students have special advantages in that they may be assigned to 
work on Station projects already under way. The department takes every 
advantage of the facilities offered by the Bureau of Entomology of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, the Beltsville Research Center, the 
National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, various other local laboratories, 



the libraries in Washington, and the Washington Entomological Society. 
There is an active Entomological Society composed of the students and staff 
of the department. A monthly news magazine is published, and there are 
numerous other profitable projects in which all students may participate. 
Thus students are given many opportunities of meeting authorities in the 
various fields of entomology, to observe projects under way, consult col- 
lections, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology. Following is 
the suggested curriculum in entomology. It can be modified to suit indi- 
vidual demand. 



Semester 



Sophomore Year 1 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) „ 3 

Insect Morphology (Ent. 2s) „ — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 3 

Modem Language (French ly or German ly) 3 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) _ — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) _ _ 2 

15 

Junior Year 

Insect Taxonomy (Ent. 3f) - 3 

Insect Biology (Ent. 5s ) — 

tEconomic Entomology (Ent. lOly) - 2 

Modem Language (French 3y or German 3y) - 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

Electives _ _ 4-5 

16-17 

Senior Year 

flnsect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 104f and s) 3 

Seminar (Ent. 103y) 1 

Special Problems (Ent. llOf and s) - » 2 

Electives - 10-11 



// 

3 
3 
3 

4 



15 



3 
2 
3 

4 
4-5 

16-17 

8 
1 

2 

10-11 



16-lT 1^17 

This curriculum is based on the option of mathematics in the freshman 
year, which subject should be elected by students wanting a major in 
entomo^logy. Students electing another course will have to make certain 
changes in the sequence of some of the required courses. 



t Ent. lOly and 104f and s taught in alternate years. 



84 



85 



FARM MANAGEMENT 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental train- 
ing in the basic economic principles underlying farming. While the cur- 
riculum is developed primarily from the viev^point of farm management, 
sufficient basic courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, finance, 
and land economics are included to give the student the foundation needed to 
meet the production and distribution problems confronting the individual 
farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farm 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and operat- 
ing the farm as a business enterprise. It requires not only knowledge of 
many factors involved in the production of crops and animals, but also 
administrative ability to coordinate them into the most efficient farm 
organization. Such knowledge enables the student to perceive the just 
relationship of the several factors of production and distribution as applic- 
able to loca'l conditions, and to develop an executive and administrative 
capacity. 

Students well trained in farm management are in demand for county 
agent work, farm bureau work, experiment station or United States Gov- 
ernment investigation, and college or secondary school teaching. 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) - 2 2 

General Mathematics for Students of Economics (Math 20y) or 
College Algebra (Math. 21f) and Analytic Geometry 

(Math. 22s ) „ _ - 3-4 3-4 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

General Horticulture (Hort. If) _ 3 — 

G^eology ( Geod. If) „ 3 — 

Soils, and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ — 3 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. If) „.... - 3 — 

Poultry Management (Poultry Is) _ -.... — 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

16-17 16-17 



Semester 

Junior Year I IJ 

Agricultural Economics (A E. lOOf) „ „ 3 — 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) — ' 3 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107s) — 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. lOlf ) 3 — 

Business Law (0. and M. lOlf and 102s) _ „ 3 3 

Money and Credit (Finance 51s) — 2 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. 10 If) 3 — 

Electives _ _ 4 5 

16 16 
Senior Year 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) _ 3 — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f ) 3 — 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104s) „ — 3 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) „ — 3 

Biological Statistics (G. and S. lllf and 112s) 2 2 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf) _ - 3 — 

Prices (A. E. 106s) - — 3 

Electives - _ _ - 5 5 



16 



16 



GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Rapid accumulation of knowledge in the field of genetics has changed 
the viewpoint of those interested in plant and animal breeding and in 
eugenics. 

Teachers and investigators have increasing occasion to interpret statisti- 
cal data presented by others, as well as to gather and organize original 
material. 

The department of Genetics and Statistics offers students training in (1) 
the principles of heredity and genetics, and (2) the tools and methods em- 
ployed in statistical description, induction, and design. 

STATISTICS 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) - 2 2 

German or French - _ 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3 y or 6 y and 8 y) _ _ 2 2 

Biology or Economic electives _ 6 6 



86 



16 



87 



16 



Semester 



Junior Year ' I 

Higher Algebra (Math. 141f) 2 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f) 2 

Theory of Probabilities (Math. 132s) _ — 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

♦Elements of Statistics (G. and S. 14f) _ 3 

*Bcononiic Statistics (G. and S. 15s) — 

♦Biological Statistics (G. and S. lllf) 2 

♦Advanced Biological Statistics (G*. and S. 112s) — 

Electives (including requirements for a minor in either a bio- 
logical science or economics) 3 

16 

Senior Year 

Advanced Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 145f) _ 2 

Theory of Equations (Math. 151f) 2 

Statistical Design (G. and S. 116s) — 

Problems (G. and S. 120) „ — 

Electives (including requirements for a minor in either a bio- 
logical science or economics) 12 



// 



2 
4 

3 

2 

5 

16 



16 



2 
4 

10 

16 



HORTICULTURE 



The State of Maryland and other States offer many excellent oppor- 
tunities in horticultural industries; large fruit enterprises, producing apples, 
peaches, strawberries, raspberries, and other fruits for domestic and foreign 
markets; extensive greenhouse establishments, growing flowers and vege- 
tables; canning and preserving factories in vegetable and fruit areas; nur- 
series, propagating trees and plants of all kinds; and concentrated farming 
areas devoted to vegetable production for market and canning. These in- 
dustries require men with a specialized knowledge of production and mar- 
keting phases of the horticultural crops which are produced. 

The Department of Horticulture offers instruction in pomology (fruits), 
olericulture (vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening 
to meet the demand for men in the several horticultural industries, and in 
related work as teachers, county agents, fruit inspectors, and scientific in- 
vestigators in private and public research laboratories, including special 
horticultural workers with fertilizer companies, seed companies, machinery 
companies, and related industries. 

Students in horticulture have considerable latitude in the selection of 
horticultural courses, but usually find it advisable to specialize by electing 
all of the courses offered in pomology, olericulture, or floriculture, accord- 
ing to the following suggested curricula. 



The department is equipped with several greenhouses and a modem 
horticultural building, with laboratories and cold storage rooms, for horti- 
cultural teaching and research. Extensive acreage near the University is 
devoted to the growing of fruit trees and vegetable crops. An arboretum 
with many ornamental plants has been started on the University grounds for 
use in teaching of horticulture and other related subjects. 

The following curricula will be adjusted to the special needs of students 
whose interests lie in the general scientific field or those who are preparing 
for work in technical lines. The object is to fit students most effectively to 
fill positions of several types. 

Pomology and Olericulture 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I If 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) -....- 4 — 

Geology (Geol. If) „ 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) 3 — 

General Botany (Bot. 2s) — 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) „ — 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ — 3-5 

General Horticulture (Hort. If and 2s) 3 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y).. - 2 2 

17 17 
Junior Year 

Fruit Production (Hort. 3f) .; 3-5 — 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 — 

♦Systematic Pomology (Hort. 103f) or ♦Systematic Olericulture 

(Hort. 104f ) 3 — 

Small Fruits (Hort. 7s) — 2-3 

Vegetable Production (Hort. 4s) — 2-4 

Diseases of Fruits (Pit. Path. 10 If) 3 — 

♦World Fruits and Nuts (Hort. 105s) — 2 

Electives 1-3 7-8 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) _ -.... 3 — 

Technology of Horticultural Plants, (Hort. lOlf and 102s) 3 2-3 

♦Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 104f and s) 3 3 

Seminar ( Hort. 14y ) - 1 1 

Electives 6 9-10 



16 



♦ Elect two. 



♦ Courses given in alternate years. 



16 



88 



89 



Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture 

Semester 

Sophomore Year / // 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) _ 4 — 

Geology (Geol. If) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) > 3 — 

General Botany (Bot. 2s) — 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) - — 3 

Local Flora (Bot, 3s) — 2 

General Horticulture (Hort. If and 2s) 3 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

17 16 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 — 

*Garden Flowers (Hort. 8f) 3 — 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) 3 — 

Vegetable Production (Hort. 4s) — 2 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 5 

* Greenhouse Management (Hort. 5f and 6s) 3 4 

Landscape Gardening (Hort. lOf) 2 — 

'^ Civic Art (Hort. 13s) — 2 

Electives 1 3 

16 16 

Senior Year 

* Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 9y) 3 8 

Landscape Design (Hort. llf and 12s) 3 2 

*Plant Materials (Hort. 106y) 3 2 

Technology of Horticultural Plants (Hort. lOlf and 102s) 1 1 

Seminar (Hort. 14y) 1 1 

Electives 5 7 

16 16 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; and poultry 
improvement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The poultry industry of Maryland ranks second to dairying in economic 
importance among the agricultural industries of the State. Nearby markets 
provide a profitable outlet for poultry products of high quality in larger 



* Courses given only in alternate years. 



volume than now produced in the State. The necessary quality can be 
attained by intelligent, trained poultry husbandmen. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. For example, most students will be expected to take 
the courses in agricultural industry and resources and farm organization 
offered in the general curriculum for the freshman year. Superior students, 
definitely anticipating preparation for a professional career in poultry hus- 
bandry, will be expected to take language instead. However, all students 
concentrating in poultry husbandry will be required to complete 24 semester 
hours in poultry husbandry. 

Seinester 



Sophomore Year I 

Poultry Production (Poultry If) 3 

Poultry Management (Poultry Is) _ — 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f and 4s) 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

Elect one of the following : 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay and 12By)) 
Economics (Econ. 57f and A. E. 102s J 

Elect two of the following: 

Calculus (Math. 23y) .'. 3-3^ 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) 3-3 

Modern language (French or German) 3-3 

Introductory Entomology and Insect Biology (Ent. If 

and 5s 3-3 

Agriculture (A. H. If and D. H. 2s or A. H. 2s 3-3 

or (Agron. If and 2s) 3-3 

or (Hort. If and 4s) 3-3 



Junior Year 

Poultry Biology (Poultry 2f) 

Poultry Genetics (Poultry 101s) 

Poultry Nutrition (Poultry 102f) 

Poultry Physiology (Poultry 106s) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104s) 

Genetics (G. and S. lOlf) 

Elect one of the following: 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s). 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2s) « 

Economics (Econ. 57f and A. E. 102s) or 

Electives - 

Farm Buildings (Agr. Engr. 105f) 



16 

2 
2 
4 
3 



t\- 



90 



3 
2 

16 



// 

3 
2 



3 



6 



16 

3 
2 
3 



16 



91 



Semester 



Senior Year 
Elect at least nine semester hours from the following: 

Poultry Products (Poultry 104y) „ 2-2 

Poultry Hygiene (V. S. 107f) 2- 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (Poultry !. 3-7 

107y) _ 2-2 

Poultry Literature (Poultry 109f and s) 1-1 

Statistics (G. and S. 11 If and 112s) _ 1 2 

Rural Sociology (Soc. lOlf ) 2 

Preservation of Poultry Products (Poultry 105s) — 

Electives 3.9 



// 



1-5 



16 



3 
5-11 

16 



SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 



Mature students who are not candidates for degrees may, on consent 
of the dean, register as special students and pursue a program of studies 
not included in any regular curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs 
of the individual. In case such persons have not fulfilled the regular col- 
lege entrance requirements, they may arrange to audit (to attend without 
"credit'*) certain of the agricultural classes. All university fees for these 
special students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrange- 
ments have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them 
permission to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different de- 
partments. This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit- 
growers, gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to 
get away from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are *$5.00 for registration and $1.00 per week for 
the time of attendance. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is the research agency of the 
University, dealing with problems related to agriculture. Support for 
research is provided by both State and Federal appropriations. The Federal 
Acts are as follows: Hatch Act, 1887; Adams Act, 1906; Pumell Act, 1925; 
and Bankhead-Jones Act, 1935. 

The Hatch Act established State Experiment Stations and defined the 
scope and type of original researches that might be undertaken. In general, 
the work done under the Hatch and Adams funds pertains to the physical 
and biological sciences and promotes a better understanding of plants and 
animals. The Purnell Act bears more directly upon investigations and 
experiments having to do with manufacture, preparation, use, distribution, 
and marketing of agriculturail products. Its funds may be used also for 
such economic and sociological investigations as have for their purpose 
the development and improvement of rural homes and rural life. Work 
under Bankhead-Jones funds must have a bearing upon new and improved 
methods of production and distribution, new and extended use and markets 
for agricultural commodities and by-products and manufactures thereof, 
and research relating to conservation, development, and use of land and 
water resources for agricultural purposes. 

In addition to work conducted at the University, the Station operates 
an experimental farm of 50 acres at Ridgely for canning crops and grain 
farming, a farm of 60 acres at Upper Marlboro for tobacco investigations, 
and a farm of 234 acres near EUicott City for livestock. Regional tests 
and experiments are conducted in cooperation with farmers at many differ- 
ent points in the State. Most of these cooperative experiments deal with 
crops, soils, fertilizers, orchards and insect and plant disease control, and 
serve as checks upon the more detailed and fundamental work done at 
the main Station. 



f 



• One ref?istration is good for any amount of regular or intermittent attendance during 
a period of four years. 

92 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

The Extension Service of the University of Maryland was established 
by State and Federal laws, and is designed to assist farmers and their 
families in promoting the prosperity and welfare of agriculture and rural 
life. Its work is conducted in cooperation with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

The Extension Service is represented in each county of the State by a 
county agent and a home demonstration agent. Through these agents 

93 



and its staff of specialists, it comes into intimate contact with rural people 
and with problems of the farm and home. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home life comes within 
the scope of extension work. Farmers are supplied with details of crop 
and livestock production, and with instructions for controlling" diseases and 
insect pests; they are encouraged and aided in organized efforts, helped 
with marketing problems and assisted in improving economic conditions 
on the farm. Rural women are assisted likewise in problems of the home 
and with such information as tends to make rural home life attractive and 
satisfying. The 4-H Club work for rural boys and girls provides a valu- 
able type of instruction in agriculture and home economics, and affords 
a real opportunity to devdop self-confidence, perseverance, and leadership. 

The Extension Service works in accord with all other branches of the 
University and with all agencies of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture. It is charged with carrying out in Maryland the program of the 
Agricultural Adjustment Administration. It cooperates with all farm and 
community organizations in the State which have as their major object 
the improvement of agriculture and rurail life; and it aids in making effec- 
tive the regulatory and other measures instituted by the State Board of 
Agriculture. 



with such problems as control and eradication of tuberculosis and Bang's 
disease of cattle, Japanese beetle, and white pine blister rust. 

By inspection and certification of seeds and farm products and through 
demonstrations of recognized grades and standards, they contribute to im- 
provement in quality and marketing conditions. 



REGULATORY ACTIVITIES 

Regulatory services carried on under the supervision of members of the 
faculty and staff of the College of Agriculture have as their general aim 
the reduction of loss caused by insect pests and diseases of animals and 
plants, protection of human health by guarding against communicable dis- 
eases of livestock and unwholesome products, improvement in quality of 
farm products, and maintenance of guaranteed quality in seeds, feeds, fer- 
tilizers, and limes. These services are carried on in accordance with laws 
and regulations under which they were established. Actual enforcement is 
involved in some activities, while in others the work is primarily or entirely 
educational. 

Agencies engaged in various forms of regulatory activities include the 
Livestock Sanitary Service, State Horticultural Department, State Depart- 
ment of Markets, State Seed Service, and State Department of Forestry. 
Operating under the State Chemist at the University, there is also the 
enforcement of regulations pertaining to fertilizers, limes, and feeds. 

These agencies are at work constantly in efforts to control and eradicate, 
when possible, any serious pests and diseases of animals, of crops of all 
kinds, of shade trees, of ornamental plants, and of forest trees. They 
are ever on the alert to prevent introduction of pests and diseases into 
the State and execute the laws and regulations with respect to shipping 
animals, jylants, and other products into and out of Maryland. They deal 

94 



P 



95 



Requirements for Admission 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

L. B. Broughton, Dean. 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal train- 
ing in biological sciences, economics, history, languages and literatures, 
mathematics, philosophy, physical sciences, political science, psychology, 
and sociology. It thus affords an opportunity to acquire a general educa- 
tion which will serve as a foundation for whatever profession or vocation 
the student may choose. In particular, it lays the foundation for the pro- 
fessions of law, medicine, theology, and teaching, and the more technical 
professions of engineering, public health service, public administration, 
and business. The College of Arts and Sciences offers to the students of 
the other colleges of the University training in fundamental subjects, both 
classical and scientific, which should permit them to acquire the perspec- 
tive necessary for liberal culture and public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and three Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the following 
departments: 

(1) The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages, Comparative 
Literature, English Literature and Philology, Modern Languages, 
Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

(2) The Division of Natural Sciences: 

A. The Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Mathe- 
matics, Physics, and Statistics. 

B. The Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, 
Genetics, and Zoology. 

(3) The Division of Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 

The work of the first and second years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences is taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student 
a basic general education, and to prepare him for specialization in the 
junior and senior years. 

The Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in the College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and 
senior years, and designate general requirements, the fulfillment of which 
is necessary to qualify a student for admission to major work in an Upper 
Division. 



The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences 
are, in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and 
schools of the University. See Section I, Admission, page 45. 

For admission to the premedical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language in addition to the regularly prescribed units are required. A 
detailed statement of the requirements for admission to the School of 
Medicine and the relation of these to the premedical curriculum will be 
found under the heading School of Medicine. See page 195. 

Students with Advanced Standing 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences with advanced stand- 
ing from other accredited universities, or from other colleges of this univer- 
sity, who fail to meet the requirements of the first two years must make 
up all deficiencies. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the requirements 
prescribed in the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. 

Graduates of this college who have completed the regular course are 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Upon request, any student who 
has met the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science may be 
awarded that degree, provided the major portion of the work has been 
done in the field of science, and the application has the approval of the 
science department in which the major w^ork has been carried. 

Students who have elected the combined program of Arts and Medicine 
may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science after the completion of 
at least three years of the work of this college and the first year of the 
School of Medicine. 

Those electing the combined five-year Academic and Nursing Course, for 
which the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing may be awarded upon 
the compile tion of the full course, must take the Prenursing curriculum at 
College Park before the Nursing Course in Baltimore. 

Those taking the combined course in Arts and Law may be awarded 
the Bachelor of Arts degree after the completion of three years of the 
work of this college and one year of the full-time law course, or its equiva- 
lent, in the School of Law. 

Residence 

The last thirty credits of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate 
degree in the Cofllege of Arts and Sciences must be taken in residence in 
this college. 



96 



97 



Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may 
be conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University Requirements. 

2. (College of Arts and Science Requirements. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements. 

1. University Requirements — See page 53. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — A minimum of 120 credits 
must be acquired, not including the six credits of basic military science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six credits of physical 
education for women and for such men as are excused from military science. 
Of these 120 credits 60 are to be acquired in the Lower Division and 60 
in one of the Upper Divisions. 

A student must acquire at least 58 credits, exclusive of military science 
and physical education, with an average grade of at least C in the Lower 
Division, before being admitted to an Upper Division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as 
possible, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed 
before graduation: 

A. English and Speech — ^fourteen credits. Of these, Survey and Compo- 
sition I (Eng. ly) and Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) are required. 

B. Foreign Languages and Literature — twelve credits. 

C. Social Sciences — twelve credits. This requirement is fulfilled by elect- 
ing courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Soci- 
ology. 

D. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — ^twelve credits. Of these one year 
must be in natural science. 

E. Military Science or Physical Education — six credits. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — At the beginning of the junior year 
each student must select a major in one of the fields of study of an 
Upper Division, and before graduation must complete a major and a 
minor. The courses constituting the major and the minor selected must 
conform to the requirements of the department in which the major work 
is done. 

Before beginning a major or a minor the student must have acquired 
twelve credits in fundamental courses in the field chosen, or in a closely 
related field satisfactory to the Division, with an average grade of at least 
C, before credit will be allowed toward completion of the major or minor 
requirements. 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 credits, 
in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits, in one of the fields of study. Of 



these advanced credits at least 8 must be acquired in courses listed lor 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 credits 
in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits, in some field of study other than 
the major. At least 6 of these must be acq^lired m courses listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Not more than 15 credits may be acquired in any field of study other 
than the major or minor during the last two years, in addition to those 
which meet the College of Arts and Sciences requirements. (See page 9«.) 

The average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields must 
be at least C. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements — 

A. Division of Humanities. See page 103. 

B. Division of Natural Sciences. See page 106. 

C. Division of Social Sciences. See page 120. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

If electives be properly chosen in educational courses, a prospective high 
school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with major electives 
in any of the Upper Divisions and minor electives in the College of Educa- 
tion. 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College 
of Arts and Sciences for work done in other colleges and schools of the 

University. 

The number of credits which may be accepted from the various colleges 

and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture— Fifteen. 

College of Education— Twenty 

College of Engineering — Fifteen. 

College of Home Economics — Fifteen. 

School of Law— In the combined program the first year of law 

must be completed. 
School of Medicine— In the combined program the first year of 

medicine must be completed. 
School of Nursing— Three years in combined program. 

Normal Load 

The normal load for the freshman in this college is sixteen credits per 
semester, including one hour of basic military science or physical education. 



96 



99 



The normal load for the sophomore year is seven^teen credits per 
semester, two of which are in military science or physical education. 

The normal load in the junior and senior years is 15 credits per 
semester. With the permission of the Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the Chairman of the Division, this load may be increased to 
17, a maximum except for honor students. The load of honor students 
shall he within the discretion of the Dean and the Chairman of the Divi- 
sion, but m no case shall it exceed 19 credits per semester. 

Advisers 

Freshmen and sophomores in this college shall consider the Dean of 
the College and the Chairman of the Lower Division their advisers. 

On entrance to the University each student of the College of Arts and 
Sciences is assigned to a member of the faculty of the College, who serves 
as his special adviser. The student should consult his adviser on all matters 
of his university life in which he may need advice. 

Juniors and seniors must consider the chairmen of their major depart- 
ments their advisers, and shall consult them about the arrangements of 
their schedules of courses and any other matters in which they may desire 
advice. 



100 



THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White, Chairman, 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare 
him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

It is the student^s responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into 
one of the Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general 
scholastic ability must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major 
study is to be obtained. 

Suggested courses of study for the freshman and sophomore years are 
given under certain of the Upper Divisions. The student should follow 
the curriculum for which he is believed to be best fitted. It will be noted 
that there is a great deal of similarity in these outlines for the first two 
years, and a student need not consider himself attached to any particular 
Upper Division until the beginning of his junior year, at which time it is 
necessary to select a major. 

The Requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for graduation 
as outlined on page 98, should be completed as far as possible in the 
Lower Division. 

TYPICAL FRESHMAN PROGRAM 

Semester 

Required: / // 

*Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish, 

Latin, Greek) - 3 3 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, Geol- 

ology. Physics, Zoology) 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly or Physical Educa- 
tion (Phys. Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) ~ 1 1 

Elect one of the following : 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) — 6 

General European History (H. ly) — 6 3 3 

History of England and Greater Britain (H. 3y) — 6 
Economic Geography and Industry (T. and T. If) 
and History of World Commerce (T. and T. 

4s) —6 

* A placement test is given during Freshman Week to determine whether the student 
is adequately prepared for Eng. ly. A student failing this test is required to take Eng. A, 
a one-semester course, without credit. After five weeks, he maj?* be transferred from Eng. A 
to Eng. ly, for which he will receive full credit, or from Eng. ly to Eng. A, according; 
to his demonstrated ability. 

101 



Elect two to four credits each semester from the 

following : 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s; 21f and 22s) —6 or 8 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If 

or Is) _ '__3 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) 2 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 2 

Ancient History (H. 129f and H. 130s) ~2or4 

Art in Ancient Civilization I and II (Art If and 

2s) - - —1 or 2 

Library Methods (L. S. If or s) „.... — i 

Music (Mus. ly and 2y, or 5y) ^ 

Women's Chorus (Mus. 3Ay) or Men's Glee Club 

(Mus. 3By) „ __1 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) 2 

Total ^ 

TYPICAL SOPHOMORE PROGRAM 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 

Foreign Language 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education 

(Phys. Ed. 3y or 6y and By) „ 

General Electives from the College of Arts and 

Sciences fulfilling, as far as possible, the 

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements 

for graduation. See page 98.... 



Semester 
I II 



2-4 



2-4 



16-17 


16-17 


3 


3 


3 


3 



9-10 9-10 



Total 



17-18 17-18 



THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Charles B. Hale, Chairman 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Lit- 
erature, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts; (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for 
those taking preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the 
departments of the Division. 

At present, the Division offers major and minor work for the Master 
of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in English Language and 
Literature, and for the Master of Arts in Modern Languages; minor work 
for the Master of Arts may be elected in Philosophy and Comparative 
Literature. Detailed requirements for these degrees are given under the 
departmental announcements and in the catalogue of the Graduate School. 

Training for the Master of Arts degree is directed especially toward 
acquainting the candidate with methods of research and the literature in 
his own fields. For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the candidate is 
required not only to be thoroughly acquainted with his major and minor 
fields and with the scholarly accomplishments therein, but also to devote 
himself intensively to a specific research problem in which he shall make 
an original contribution to human knowledge. 

Additional Requirements for Graduation 

The following requirements in addition to those required by the (Allege 
of Arts and Sciences (see page 98) should be completed, as far as possible, 
before the beginning of the junior year. 

1. Library Science — one credit. 

2. English 2/ and 3s — six credits. 

3. Modem Language — To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reasonable proficiency 
in at least one foreign language. In satisfaction of this requirement, 
he must pass one of the general language examinations, which are 
given during the first and last days of each college year, with a grade 
as high as C. Maryland students should take the examination not 
later than the close of the sophomore year or the beginning of the 
junior year. Transfer students should take the examination upon 
entrance. The student must show in this examination that he has 



102 



103 



reached the level of attainment to be expected after two years of a 
college language course: (1) that he can translate with reasonable 
accuracy; (2) that his pronunciation is approximately correct; (3) 
that he is acquainted with the elements of grammar. When the stu- 
dent has passed the general language examination, he will have satis- 
fied the language requirements; but in no case will a student in the 
Division be graduated who has not acquired at least 12 credits of a 
foreign language in college. 

4. Philosophy — three credits. 

5. Psychology— t\iTQQ credits. 

6. Major and Minor Requirements— lu selecting a major or a minor a 
student must have acquired twelve credits in fundamental courses 'in 
the field chosen, or in a closely related field satisfactory to the Divi- 
sion, with an average grade of at least C, before credit will be 
allowed toward the completion of the major or minor requirements 
In addition: 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 30 
credits m one of these fields of study. At least 16 of these credits 
must be taken in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 
credits m one of the above fields of study not selected for the 
major, or m some other field of study authorized in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. At least 9 of these credits must be taken in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

The student must acquire at least 30 credits in courses not included in 
the major or minor. 

For additional requirements for major students, see the departmental 
announcements under English (page 280) and Modern Languages (page 

MAJOR AND MINOR 
Fields of Study 

♦Classical Languages German 

^Comparative Literature "^Philosophy 

English * Speech 

^^«"ch Spanish 



♦ Not available at present for a major. 



104 



THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 



The Division of Natural Sciences is composed of the following depart- 
ments : 

A. The Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, 
Physics, and Statistics. 

B. The Biologicail' Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Cenetics, 
and Zoology. 

In its curricula, each requiring four years for completion, this division 
prepares students for the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 

Courses in the various departments are designed to meet five distinct 
needs: 

(1) To contribute toward the liberal education of students whose main 
interest does not lie in the field of Natural Sciences. 

(2) To provide the scientific foundation necessary for the professions 
of agriculture, dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, 
nursing, pharmacy, etc. 

(3) To furnish the basic knowledge for prospective teachers and instruc- 
tors in the Natural Sciences for secondary schools and colleges. 

(4) To train students for positions as bacteriologists, botanists, chemists, 
entomologists, geologists, mathematicians, physicists, statisticians, 
zoologists in experimental scientific laboratories in colleges, govern- 
ment departments, and industry. 

(5) To prepare for graduate study in the Natural Sciences. 

The Natural Sciences have grown so vast and their applications have 
become so extensive that it is impossible to deal with all phases of any 
one of them in the four years of college study. For this reason a vital 
part of the work of the Division is in the form of graduate courses. In 
the work leading toward the degree of Master of Science or Master of 
Arts the student becomes acquainted with the general aspects of • his 
chosen field. In preparation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the 
student is trained in methods of research which should enable him to add 
to human knowledge, undertake independent investigations in his field, or 
take charge of industrial developments. (A description of the courses 
for undergraduates and graduates in this Division is given in Section III 
of this catalogue, Description of Courses). 

A— THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Major and Minor 

Fields of Study 

105 



Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements — See page 53. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — See page 98. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — See page 98. 

CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry includes Agricultural, Analytical, Indus- 
trial, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, together with the State 
Control Work. The following curriculum prepares students to enter the 
fields of General Chemistry, Industrial Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and 
Agricultural Chemistry. 



Suggested Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f and 22s) 

General Chemistry ( Chem. ly ) _ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _..— _ 

Mechanical Drawing ( Dr. 4y ) ^ _ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) „ , 

Freshman Lectures _ 



Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 

French or Grerman (French 3y or German 3y) 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) _ _..... 

Qualitative Analysis ( Chem. 2y ) _ 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) „ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) - ^ 



Semester 



I 

3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



Junior Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y and 117y). 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 

Electives - -.... — 



18 

4 
3 
5 
3 



// 

3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 



18 

4 
3 
5 
3 



Semester 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102y) --- 5 5 

Electives - 

15 15 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING— CHEMISTRY 

A five-year program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry ^^dll be 
arranged between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and 
Sciences which will permit students who so desire to become candidates 
for the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Engi- 
neering. 

Mathematics 

Suggested Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly).. - ^ * 

French or German (French ly or German ly) - 3 8 

College Algebra and Analytic ^Geometry (Math. 21f and 22s) 4 4 

Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (Math. 18y) 1 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - ^ ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) -- - -■- "• 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - -••• - •- ^ 

Freshman Lectures - 

17 17 

Sophomx)re Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) — 3 3 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) _ 3 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y ) -- ^ ^ 

Advanced Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (Math. 19y) 1 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ...-.- '::Zr"""^7 ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) ^ _^ 

18 18 



i| 



15 



15 



106 



107 



Ju7iior Year ^Semester 

Higher Algebra (Math. 141f) ^ ^^ 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f) ^ ~~ 

Electives in Mathematics ^ ~~ 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) " l l 

Theoretical Mechanics (Phys. 106s) or Electricity and" Mag: 

netism (Phys. 108s) _ ^ __ 

8 5 

Senior Year 

History of Modem Mathematics (Math. 157s) _ o 

Electives (Mathematics and Astronomy) 4 f 

Undergraduate Seminar (Math. 140y) 1 f 

Electric Discharge (Phys. 109y) « 1 

Electives .... "* ^ 

7 7 



15 

Physics 

Suggested Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

French or German (French ly or Carman ly) 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f and 22s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) . 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly).... ^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Physrid 

ly or 2y and 4y) ^ 

Freshman Lectures 

17 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

French or German (flench 3y or German 3y) q 

Calculus (Math. 23y ) ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical" Education (Phy^^ 

3y or ()y and 8y) _ * 2 



17 



15 



3 
3 

4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



3 
3 
4 
5 



Semester 

Junior Year 1 II 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f and 144s) 2 2 

Advanced Phy.sics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 106s, 107f, 108s) 6 3 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) „ 3 3 

Electives „ 4 7 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) _.... 3 3 

Advanced Physics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 106s, 107f, 108s, 

109y) 6 3 

Electives _ 6 9 



15 



15 



Statistics 



The courses in Statistics are intended to provide training in the tools 
and methods employed in statistical description and induction, in the inter- 
pretation of statistical data presented by others, and in the gathering and 
organization of original data. The following four-year outline is offered 
for those who wish to specialize in this field: 



Suggested Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

French or German (French ly or German ly) _ 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f and 22s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) „ 1 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) _ 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) 3 

Biology or Economics electives 4 



3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



16 



17 

3 
4 

2 
3 

4 

16 



i 



108 



109 



Semester 



Junior Year I 

Higher Algebra (Math. 141f) 2 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f) „ 2 

Theory of Probabilities (Math. 132s) — 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ 4 

Elements of Statistics (G. and S. 14f) 3 

Economic Statistics (G. and S. 15s) — 

Biological Statistics (G. and S. lllf) 2 

Advanced Biological Statistics (G. and S. 112s) — 

Electives (including requirements for a minor in either a bio- 
logical science or economics 3 



// 



2 

4 

3 
2 

5 



16 

Senior Year 

Advanced Plane Analytic (Geometry (Math. 145f ) 2 

Theory of Equations (Math. 151f) 2 

Statistical Design (G. and S. 116s) -- 

Problems (G. and S. 120s) ~ 

Electives (including requirements for a minor in either a bio- 
logical science or economics) 12 



16 



2 

4 

10 



16 



16 



General Physical Sciences 



For the benefit of students who desire a general basic knowledge of 
the physical sciences without immediate specialization in any one of them, 
a general curriculum is arranged. The curriculum suggested should familiar- 
ize the student with the general principles and methods of each of the 
physical sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses in the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

Requirement 

A major in general physical sciences shall consist of not less than 52 
credits in the physical sciences, of which not less than 16 credits must be 
acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



110 



Suggested Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - -" ^ 

French or German (French ly or (German ly)"";"-"-"--^ " a A 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f and 22s) 4 4 

Generail Chemistry (Chem. ly) - ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ~ ^ ^ 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) - - _""- "_""" 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly or 2y and 4y) - - 

Freshman Lectures - " ^^ ^rj 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) ~ 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) - ^ ^ 

Electives ( Sciences ) - ^ g 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ■ — - ~'7^iZrvA 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) -- " __ 

17 17 

Junior Year . ^ 

Electives ( Chemistry ) - ^ - " ^ ^ 

Electives (Social Sciences) ^^ ^_^ 

Electives ( Mathematics ) ^ ^ 

Electives ( Physics ) - - " " ^ ^ 

Elective — """ 

15-16 15-16 

Senior Year ^ 

Elective ( Social Sciences ) " ^^ ^^ 

Electives - - — - 

15 15 

THE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
Five- Year Combined Arts and Nursing Curriculum 

The first two years of this curriculum are taken in the College of Art. 

The lirst ^w^ y^ ^ jf students enter this combined program 

and Sciences at College rarK. ii &tu^ , . n ,,^^^ ^f fi,;« mrriculum 

with advanced standing, at least the second full year of this curriculum 

must be completed in College Park. , , ^ xt • 4^ ^1,0 

The remaining three years are taken in the School of Nursing of ^he 

Un^vers™^^^^^ or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Bal- 

^ZTln addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor 

111 



of Science may, upon the recommendation of the Director of the School of 
lT7' ':,P^^^^^ -' ^^- -d of the five year curriculum. FuHdet^^^^^^ 
regardmg this curriculum may be found in the section of the catalog e 
dealing with the School of Nursing. See page 198 catalogue 



The Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) « 

Foreign Language ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly)....Z.Z.^^^...r 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ? 

History (H. ly or 3y) ^ 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) __ 

Library Methods (L. S. If) ' 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 

Freshman Lectures 

16 
Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) ^ 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) _ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f)IIZ'. __ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) 

Foods (H. E. Sly) ~~ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) IZIl • o 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 2 



Semester 
IJ 

3 
3 
4 
1 
3 
2 



17 



3 

3 

4 
3 



17 



17 



Premedical 



The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of 
?nn» r! f of Maryland is three years of academic training 1 the 

Snr and al :fl£ r"- '^""^^'^"™ ' ^ """'"^ --*« these'requilt- 
menK and also fulnlls the requirements prescribed by the Council on M^d 

ical Education of the American Medical Association 

Curriculum II is outlined to meet the reauirement^ nf fv,» n ■, 
Medical Education of the American MedicaTSSy^'w^^^^^ 

c= rMr.rL*oT'"^ - "" "■""■"■" --»'■"• '- "«nr: 

year'3'stTvin'tS^^^^^^^ students completing this program and the first 
>ear of study m the University of Maryland School of Medicine the oppor- 

112 



timity of securing the Bachelor of Science degree, on recommendation of 
the Dean of the School of Medicine. 

The combined program of seven years leads to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Doctor of Medicine upon the completion of the full curricu- 
lum. The first three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, and the remaining four in the School of Medicine. 

At least two years of residence are necessary for students transferring 
from other colleges and universities who wish to become candidates for the 
two degrees. 

For requirements for admission see Section I (Admission) page 45. 

Curriculum I 
For students expecting to enter the University of Maryland Medical School 

Semester 
Fr-eshmun Year I I J 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 8f or 21f and 

22s) - 3 3 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) _ 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - 4 4 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) „ „ 1 1 

18 18 
SophomA)re Year 

Survey and Ck)mposition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) „ 3 3 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) 4 4 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) „ 3 3 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f) 3 — 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) — 3 

Introduction to Philosophy (Phil. If) 3 — 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) , — 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. . 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

18 18 
Junior Year 

G'eneral Physics (Phys. ly) - - 4 4 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. 103y) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Electives (Social Sciences) _ 3 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 4 4 



15 



15 



it 



113 



Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine. The student 
also may elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses offered in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. In either case all the requirements of the 
Division of Natural Sciences for graduation must have been met. 

Curriculum II 

For students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to a Class A Medical School. 

Semester 

Freshman Year j jj 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) , _ 3 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 8f or 21f and 

22s) _ „ 3 3 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) .".IIIZZ. 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ .1.11.111 4 4 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. eZ 

ly or 2y and 4y) -j^ ^ 

Freshman Lectures „ 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 4 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 j 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f) _ 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) _ 3 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 



17 



17 



PRE DENTAL 



Students entering the Col'lege of Arts and Sciences who desire to pre- 
pare themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following two- 
year curriculum, which meets the predental requirements of the American 
Association of Dental Colleges. This curriculum can also be used by the 
student if he desires to continue his college training and complete work 
for the Bachelor of Science degree. 



The Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 8f or 21f and 

22s) 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 4 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 4 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) _ 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) _ 1 1 

Freshman Lectures _ _ — — 

17 17 
Sophomore Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) .._ 4 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 4 

French or German 3 3 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) 4 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

17 17 

B. THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University requirements — See page 53. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — See page 98. 

3. Physical Sciences and Mathematics — twenty-two credits including basic 
courses in Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. 

4. Major and Minor Requirements — See page 98. 

Major and Minor 
Fields of Study 

BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

The courses in this Department prepare students for such positions as 
dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists in federal, state, and municipal 
departments and for public health, research, and industrial positions. The 
suggested curriculum is given on page 82. 

Botany 

The Department of Botany offers three major lines of work: General 
Botany and Morphology, Plant Physiology, and Plant Pathology. In Plant 
Pathology the student is trained in plant disease control and investigation 



114 



115 



for advisory, extension, and research work in the various agricultural 
colleges, experiment stations, and the United States Department of Agri- 
culture, and in such commercial concerns as seed companies, those making 
spray materials, farmer cooperatives, etc. The suggested curriculum is 
given on page 83. 

Entomology 

The Department of Entomology is equipped to furnish general courses 
for students of biology and other subjects in the College of Arts and 
Sciences as well as to train students for careers in research, teaching, or 
control work in the field of professional Entomology. 

Two courses offered by the Department, Ent. 1 and Ent. 5s, have been 
organized particularly to meet the needs of students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Several other courses will serve to strengthen the pro- 
gram of students with a major in the biological sciences. In view of the 
fact that nearly 80% of all known species of animals in the world are 
insects, it is essential that the students of biology, particularly Zoology, 
elect some work in Entomology. 

(Jenetics 

The courses in Genetics are designed to provide training in the principles 
of heredity and genetics for those interested in plant and animal breeding 
and in eugenics. 

Zoology 

The Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
service in the biological bureaus of the United States Government and in 
the biological departments of the various states. Emphasis is placed on 
morphology, physiology, and marine biology. Instruction and opportuni- 
ties for original investigation in the latter are supplemented by the 
research facilities and courses of instruction offered at the Chesapeake 
Biological Laboratory, a description of which is found on page 239. 



Semester 



Suggested Curriculum 



Semester 



Freshman Year I 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) 4 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2s) 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 

Freshman Lectures — 



4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



Sophojnore Year 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f) >.-- ^ 

Vetebrate Embryology (Zool. 2as) ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) - ^ 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) .^. -^-^ - - 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 8f or 21t ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ 
3y or 6y and 8y) - - __ 

18 

Junior Year 

•J 

Mammalian Anatomy (Zool. lOlf) ^ 

Animal Geography (Zool. 108f) 

Animal Genetics (Zool. 120s) 

General Physics (Phys. ly ) - ^ 

Electives " 

15 

Senior Year 

Journal Qub ( Zool. 106y ) .- " ^ 

Journal Animal Physiology (Zool. 103f and s) - ^^ 

Electives - 

15 



// 

3 

4 
8 
8 

3 

2 

18 



3 

4 
8 

15 

1 

3 

11 

15 



GENERAL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

* 

A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in 
biology but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biologaca 
sciences. The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general 
principles and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years 
a student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work m that field. 

Requirements 

A major in general biological sciences shall consist of not less than 45 
credits in the biological sciences, of ^hich no fewer than 16 credits must 
be acquired in courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



I 



16 



116 



16 



117 



Suggested Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng ly) ^ 

French or German (French ly or GemianTy) I 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ 

General Botany (Bot. If) ^ 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) ^ 

16 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) , 

2ls)^! !!.!"^ ^"''^''^ ^^"'"^^^ (Mathrsf «r"2l7;nd 

French or Geman'7l^;nch'37"or"'(^ I 

Introductory Entomology (Ent If) ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) " ^ 

Electives (Sciences) — 

2 

18 
Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly)... 

Electives (Social Sciences) "" ^ 

Electives (Botany and Zoology) " " ^ 

Electives (Entomology and Bacteridog^)IZZIi;~ " J 

15 
Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) ^ 

Electives 9 

" 3 



15 



Semester 
II 

3 
3 
1 
4 



16 



3 
3 

4 
3 



18 



4 
3 

4 
4 

15 



3 
9 
3 

15 



118 



THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

T. B. Manny, Chairman, 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Modern man depends increasingly upon a vast army of people to supply 
his needs and to cater to his many desires. In return, he is expected to 
perform some useful function for others. A knowledge of how this com- 
plicated civilization has grown up; of man^s varied experiments in con- 
trolling himself through government and otherwise; of the organization 
and functioning of the business world; of the causes, extent, and attempts 
to control such conditions as poverty, crime, delinquency, unemployment, 
depressions, inter-racial conflicts, family disorganization, and the like is 
necessary for the exercise of intelligent citizenship in a democracy. More- 
over, this information, to be effectively applied, demands considerable 
knowledge of man's mental processes and the nature of human behavior. 
All students graduating from the College of Arts and Sciences are required 
to acquire at least twelve credits in this Division, including one year of 
history. Students in most of the other colleges of the University of Mary- 
land are required to take about the same minimum amount of work in 
this Division. 

As specific training for occupations, the courses of study in the division 
offer varied opportunities. For example, the Department of Economics pro- 
vides training for persons seeking careers in the business world. The 
Department of Political Science offers the first three years of a combined 
course in arts and law, and also provides training in public administration, 
a growing field of government activity. The Department of Psychology 
offers several courses intended for persons interested in personnel work. 
The Department of Sociology provides an undergraduate course of study 
preparatory to taking professional training in social work, and also pro- 
vides courses meeting the academic requirements demanded by civil service 
examinations for some of the positions known as social science analyst 
and junior social worker. All five departments offer subject matter courses 
geared in with the teacher-training program of the College of Education. 

Each department in this division offers graduate work leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science. Most of the departments 
provide sufficient graduate work for obtaining the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Increasingly, persons preparing to teach in high schools and 
colleges find it necessary to take at least one year of graduate work. Many 
academic positions now require the degree of Doctor of Philosophy as a 
prerequisite. Likewise, the more important research positions in the social 
sciences, both under governmental and private auspices, are more and 
more demanding advanced degrees on the part of candidates for such work. 

119 



The descriptions of courses listed under each department give additional 
evidence of the fields covered and the type of training provided. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements — See page 53. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — See page 98. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — See page 98. 

Major and Minor 



Economics 
Historv 
Political Science 



Fields of Study 

Psychology 
Sociology 



In selecting a major or a minor, the student must have acquired twelve 
credits in fundamental courses in the field chosen, or in a closely related 
field satisfactory to the Division, with an average grade of at least C, before 
credit will be allowed towards the completion of major or minor require- 
ments. 

With the establishment of the College of Commerce, students seeking 
primarily a vocational training in business administration will transfer to 
that college and meet the requirements specified there. Those wishing a 
major in economics as a part of a liberal education will continue to meet 
the major or minor requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. A 
student enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences may take any course 
in general or applied economics (Economics or Business Administration) 
for which he has the prerequisites as a part of a major or minor; but he 
may not take both a major and a minor in such subjects.* 



•-^^3^.— ^rr/L^= tr.?r4tr„,?.: 

combined program. 

The Curriculum 

Semester 

I II 

Freshman Year ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - ^^ ^_^ 

Science or Mathematics —-■ "- ^^ 3 3 

History of England and Greater Britam (H. 3y) ^ 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) ^ ^ 

SS^. aT? (m:t 1^) "o; p^^^ , , 

ly or 2y and 4y) " 

Freshman Lectures - : *" . 

16-17 1(>-17 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and ^^)j--" 3 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f and 5Zs) ^ ^ 

American History (H. 2y) -- - ; -" 3 __ 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. It) __ ^ 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4.s) ^ ^ 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ■^■■^■•^ -- _ t^Z^'vd 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 3 _ 

Electives 

17 17 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete 
the prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, and must 
complete the Requirements for Graduation, as indicated on page 98. If 
students enter the combined program with advanced standing, at least the 
third full year's work must be completed in residence at College Park. 
Upon the successful completion of one year of full-time law courses in 
the School of Law in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be 



*Adjiistmen.t may be made, however, for students registered for a combined major and 
minor in economics and business administration prior to June 1, 1938. 



Junior Year 1 o • «« 

Electives, including the completion of the College of Arts and Sciences 
Requirements for Graduation as outlined on page 98. 
Senior Year 
First year of regular law course. 



R 



121 



120 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, Dean. 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of economics and commerce; for downtown Washington is only 
twenty-four minutes away in one direction, while the Baltimore business 
district is less than an hour in the other, — both cities with frequent trans- 
portation services to the University gates. Special arrangements are made 
to study commercial, manufacturing, exporting, and importing facilities 
and methods in Baltimore; and every assistance is given qualified students 
who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the far-flung economic activities 
of the National Government or utilize the libraries, government depart- 
ments, and other facilities provided in Washington. 

The College of Commerce provides professional training in economics and 
business administration for those who plan to become executives, teachers, 
or investigators in commercial, industrial, agricultural, or governmental 
economic enterprises. 

While the curricula offered are technical and vocational, all require a 
thorough basic training in mathematicSj, statistics, English, and speech. The 
courses required in these fields are tool subjects needed for proper analysis, 
explanation, and interpretation of modern economic data. 

Liberal allowance in every curriculum is made for other social sciences 
or for purely cultural non-vocational subjects, in order that students may 
acquire the breadth of vision needed by a present day economist, agricul- 
tural leader, or business executive. 

The University offers a selection of courses in each of the following seven 
fields of general and applied economics: General Economics, Agricultural 
Economics, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Trade and Transportation, and 
Organization and Management. 

Subject to the group and curricula requirements described subsequently, 
a student may, with the advice of his faculty adviser, elect individual 
courses from any or all of these groups in accordance with his needs. 

Several standardized curricula are offered for the guidance of students 
in the selection of courses. Each of these is designed to provide the familiar- 
ity with essentials of the various fields of general or applied economics 
that are necessary for further study or specialization, and to provide the 
combination of courses most likely to be useful in the particular vocation 
indicated. Combinations to fit other vocational needs can be worked out 
by a different selection of courses in the junior and senior years. 



122 



CURRICULUM IN GENERAL BUSINESS 

Semester 

Freshman Year ^ « 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) ;;;"rron'"V" q ^ 

General Mathematics for Students of Economics (Math 20y)..- 6 J 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) •^- " 7: "" '7 __ 3 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and 1. 4s) - ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

^Foreign Language, Political Science, or elective - - ^^ ^^ 

* QpiPTice — ~ T-t J 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly, or 2y and 4y) - -•-- -"- "^ 

^ , , _ 17-18 17-18 

Total - 

Sophomore Year 

English: Expository Writing (Eng. 5f ) - - ^ ^ 

Business English (Eng. 4s) __ 

Statistics: Elements of Statistics (G. and S. I4f) - ^ 

Economic Statistics (G. and S. 15s) - - ^ ^ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) ^ ^ 

Money and Credit (Finance 51s) - ^ ^ 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51f, 52s) j^- - ^ 

Psychology for Students of Commerce (Psych. 4f )...^.^--^ 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y, or ^ ^ 

6y and 8y) - " 

17 17 

Total - - - •- 

Junior Year « 

Business Law (0. and M. lOlf and 102s) ^ _ 

Corporation Finance (Finance lllf ) - ___ 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) ^ ^ 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 121s) 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf and 102s) - ^ « 

Electives. (See Group Requirements.) - ;■•■ - • _ _ 

....„ 15 15 

Total •"■- 

Senior Year « 

Investments (Finance 115f) 

Financial Analysis and Control (Finance 199s) - ^^ 

Electives. (See Group Requirements) ____ _ 

. 15 15 

Total - " 

* See Group Requirements. 

123 



CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTING 

Requirements for the freshman and sophomore years are the same as 

in the General Business curriculum, except that Economic Geography 
(T. and T. If) and Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) 
are not. required, though they may be elected. 

Semester 

Junior Year / // 

Business Law (O. and M. lOlf and 102s) 3 3 

Corporation Finance (Finance lllf) 3 — 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf and 102s) 3 3 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f and 122s) 2 2 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 — 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 121s) — 3 

Speech Elective 1 1 

tElectives in Arts and Sciences — 3 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f and 172s) 2 2 

♦Income Tax Procedure (Acct. 161f) 3 — 

Specialized Accounting (Acct. 181f and 182s) 3 3 

* Advanced Business Law (0. and M. 103f) 2 — 

Investments (Finance 115f) 3 — 

Financial Analysis and Control (Finance 199s)..- — 8 

*C. P. A. Problems (Acct. 186s) — 3 

tElectives in Arts and Sciences „ 2 4 

Total 15 15 



♦ The curriculum in accountancy is intended primarily for students who plan to prepare 
for a career in public accounting. Those who do not plan to enter public practice may, 
with the consent of the professor of accounting, substitute other courses for Acct, 161f, Acct. 
1868. and O. and M. 103f. 

t All electives should be taken in liberal arts subjects. 



CURRICULUM IN FINANCE 

The freshman and sophomore years are the same 
Business curriculum. 



as m 



the General 



Semester 



Junior Year 

Business Law (O. and M. lOlf and 102s) ^ 

Corporation Finance (Finance lllf) - ^ 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf and 102s) .^. ^ 

Banking Principles and Practices (Finance 121s) ^y 

Elect twelve semester hours from the followmg: / i^ « 

Public Finance (Finance 106f ) - ^ 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. ^ 

161s) _ 

Credits and Collections (Finance 125f)... ^ ^ 

Insurance (Finance 141f).- ^ 

Real Estate (Finance 151s) ^ 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf) ^ 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104s) -- ^ 

Consumer Financing (Finance 105f) 3 

Stock and Commodity Exchanges (Finance ^ 

118f) ; ^ 3 

Investment Banking (Finance 116s) — ^ 

International Finance (Finance 129s) — ^ ^ 

Total ^^ 

Senior Year 

Investments (Finance 115f) -- •- __ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Finance 199s) 

Electives. (See Group Requirements) - ^ 

Total - " ^^ 



II 
3 

3 
3 
6 



15 



3 
12 

15 



124 



125 



CURRICULUM IN MARKETING AND SALES ADMINISTRATION 

Busi„:s?:;S:uIum ' "''"""" ^^^^-^ ^- *^« --« as in the Genera, 

Junior Year Semester 

Corporation Finance (Finance lHf) ^ ^^ 

genomics of Cooperative Organization (Econ •■1613) ^ 

Principles of Marketing (Mlct. lOlf) ^ - 3 

Sa esmanship and Salesmanagement ("St" ToSs') ^ 

Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 109f) ~ ^ 

Elect fifteen semester hours from the following- / jr l 

Insurance (Finance 141f) ^' \ " ^ 9 

Real Estate (Finance 151s).... _ ~ 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf) „ ^ 

Principles of Foreign Trade (TJand T:'l01f ) 3 

Technique^of Export and Import Trade (T. and 

Transportation (T. and Trillf) "7 ^ 

"^""Jlvi^t n9^r!^!".'"* '"' Merchandising 

Credits and CollecUons" (Finance 725f) T ^ 

Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) __ "7 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) _ , 

Consumer Financing (Finance 105f) o ^ 

^rketing of Farm Products (A. E. ^s) _ "7 

Food Products Inspection (A. E. 105s) _ , 

141sr '" ^'^^^'^'^^"^ *"^ Selling (Psych.' 

Total ^ — — — 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Business Law (0. and M. lOlf and 102s) 

M^rW \"^'y^'\^"d Control (Finance 'ms)! ^ I 

EiS£^ fZT "p ''^•'"'^* ^"""^« (M'^*- ^^■■■~~-^-~ - 

i!iiectives. (See Group Requirements ) ^ 

12 6 

Total — — 

of^d^iiursi^st^^^^^^ ~^^^^^ , J: 

students may wish to elect coupes in artTn the CnH ''". ^''"'- ^^-^^ising 
or courses in design, still life fit L ^w ^ ^^^ "^ "^"^^ ^<1 Sciences, 
the College of uT^Xon^SXr^—^ and costume design from 
marketing and installation of mechanLTr^ w, ^T '"t^^^^ted in the 
to elect a number of courses in the^X:^rES:iritr £' 

126 



ning to engage in the marketing of agricultural products may choose 
courses in the College of Agriculture — some of the nine courses in the 
department of Dairy Husbandry concerned with the processing and market- 
ing of milk, for instance. Students interested in the garment trade and in 
certain classes of retailing may find desirable some of the courses in Home 
Economics on textiles and clothing. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS* 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) „ 3 3 

General Mathematics for Students of Economics (Math. 20y)... 3 3 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) _ 3 — 

Farm Organization (A. E. 2s) — 3 

Biology (Bot. If and Zool. Is, or Zool. 2f and Bot. 3s), Geol- 
ogy (Geol. If), or Foreign Language 3-4 3-4 

GJeneral or Introductory Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) 4-3 4-3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly, or 2y and 4y) _ „ 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and Gs) 2 2 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Statistics; Elements of Statistics (G. and S. 14f) „ 3 — 

Economic Statistics (G. and S. 15s) — 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f and 52s) 3 3 

Money and Credit (Finance 51s) — 2 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 5 If and 52s)... „ 4 4 

Agriculture Elective _ » 2-3 — 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y, or 

6y and 8y) 2 2 

Total 1 7—1 R 17 

Junior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. lOOf) 3 — 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) — 3 

Business Law (0, and M. lOlf and 102s) _ 3 3 

Transportation (T. and T. lllf) _.. 3 — 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161s) _. — 3 

Corporation Finance (Finance lllf) 3 — 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104s) „ — 3 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf) 3 — 

Prices (A. E. 106s) — 3 

Total 15 15 

* Students registered in this curriculum should satisfy the Professor of Agricultural 
Economics that they have had adequate farm experience before entering the junior year. 

127 



Senior Year Semester 

Cooperation in Apiculture (A. E lOSf ) / ^^ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Finance 199s) 1 ~Z 

i^arm Management (A. E. 108f) « ^ 

Contemporary Economic Theory (Econ 191s) __ ~~ 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s)... ^ 

Electives '" ^ 

10 7 

Total ~~ — 

16 IG 

COOPERATIVE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Cooperative organizations among farmers consumpr« .r,^ k • 
are taking an increa-^ino-Kr irv,.. J ^^mer^, consumers, and busmess men 

objectives oL coope/atraredr^^^^^^^ -"^-' -<^ the 

to such a degree that training TZ ^ °^ '*^ P"^^** competitor 

1. UDtam a well-balanced e-pnpml fyaJr,;,,^ • 

.~W in ,h, GMen.1 B.7„rs 4"Zf. '"■"•^«"""'. " '""- 

149); and ^' °' ^"t^'^^'^P i" Cooperation (O. and M. 

3. Acquire a reasonably adequate technical knowledge of tT,« fi»n 
with which he plans to associate himself pv.. f ^''' 

nique (Mkt 11 >5,^. «nT ^^^'^'^-.H^s), and Purchasing Tech- 

j.t Lo^:- «^?>skou';2 eLTs\rr:t!strsr ^" ^^^ 

Of ThtrnTryT In'^ ^glttT'"^;^ °' ^''^ ^^-'^-' -P-ative.. 
students to ha^; crpe^e^Ltl^ranTotcSs?"^^^'^ ^"^''^^^ 
ments maintained with the National CoopSve ^d, "^ """'^" 

Unusual facilities for the study of cooDerativp, ^f i. ,. 

128 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN COMMERCE AND LAW 

Students who wish to combine commercial and legal studies to obtain 
both Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws degrees may do so by 
selecting their courses in such a way as to comply with all of the group 
and specific requirements of the College of Commerce in three years, and 
then completing the 126 hours required for graduation from this college by 
courses taken in the University of Maryland School of Law at Baltimore. 

Diiring the first three years, students will be registered in the College 
of Commerce. In the fourth year and thereafter, they will be registered in 
the School of Law; but they must forward copies of their study lists to the 
office of the Dean of Commerce at the beginning of each semester of the 
fourth year. At the end of the fourth year, the degree of Bachelor of 
Science may be awarded in the College of Commerce upon the recommen- 
dation of the Dean of the Law School. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will 
be awarded upon satisfactory completion of the entire program. 

GROUP REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science upon the satisfactory completion of not less 
than 120 semester hours exclusive of physical education and military instruc- 
tion. 

Of these 120 semester hours, not less than 48 must be in general or 
applied economics, and not less than 48 in subjects other than economics. 
The following non-economics subjects are required of all students: 

1. English and Speech — fourteen semester hours, 

2. Mathematics and Statistics — twelve semester hours, 

3. Military Science or Physical Education — six semester hours, 

4. Science — six to eight semester hours. Because of the importance 
of chemistry in modem industry, every student (unless registered 
in the commerce-law program) who is not specifically excused 
by the Dean, will be required to take one year-course in chem- 
istry. Students who have completed an approved high school 
chemistry course with good grades, or who can demonstrate some 
other adequate reason for doing so, may substitute other natural 
sciences. 

5. Foreign Language and Political Science. Freshmen will ordinar- 
ily take six hours of foreign language; but those who have com- 
pleted a reasonable amount of foreign language in high school 
may substitute political science or an elective. Students preparing 
for the law degree will be expected to take six semester hours 
of political science and six semester hours of English or Amer- 
ican history in place of the chemistry and foreign language 
requirement unless specifically excused by the Dean. 

129 



Except as otherwise indicated in the foregoing, ail students must com- 
plete all of the subjects shown for the freshman and sophomore years in 
either the General Business or the Agricultural Economics curriculum*. 
The following additional courses are required in the junior or senior year: 
Business Law (O. and M. lOlf and 102s), Corporation Finance (Finance 
lllf), Principles of Marketing (Mkt. 101f)t, and Financial Analysis and 
Control (Finance 199s). 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible to enter courses ordinarily carried in the junior year, a 
student enrolled in the College of Commerce must have an average grade 
as high as C. To be awarded the baccalaureate degree from this college, he 
must have (1) a grade as high as C in general or applied economics courses 
aggregating not less than 48 semester hours, and (2) a general average 
grade as high as C. 



order that the selections may be effectively adapted to the vocational or 
cultural objectives sought. 

Extra-curricular activities, military instruction, and physical education 
beyond the curriculum outlines are recommended for students of this col- 
lege whenever the physical and mental capacity of the individual student 
and available free time permit. Excellence in such activities often has a 
definite value in procuring business positions at graduation; and experience 
gained in this way is frequently invaluable in later life. 

Additional electives above the curriculum requirements in either voca- 
tional or non-economics courses are encouraged whenever a student can 
demonstrate the capacity to carry additional subjects satisfactorily. Grades 
received in previous work will be the determining factor for decision as to 
extra student load in each case. Students who do not average better than 
C will not ordinarily be permitted to carry additional courses beyond the 
curriculum requirements. 



ELECTIVES FROM OTHER COLLEGES 

Business, agricultural, and industrial leaders now require a much broader 
educational background than that provided by vocational courses in eco- 
nomics and administration alone. Group requirements have been set up 
accordingly which demand that not less than 48 semester credit hours shall 
be from non-economics courses. A considerably larger nimiber of semester 
hours than this may be elected from non-economics subjects by a student 
who is willing to forego a proportionate number of specialized courses in 
economics and business administration. 

Other social sciences, such as sociology, history, political science, and 
applied psychology are useful in furnishing the broad background in social 
sciences needed by any student of economics; and these subjects tend to 
make him a more useful citizen. Logic, ethics, and other philosophy courses 
open up a new world of intellectual pleasure to the student; and training 
provided by such subjects in abstract thinking is also useful vocationally. 
Courses in music and art may serve as a welcome diversion from vocational 
courses; and the social and extra-curricular development that music facili- 
tates is desirable for students of economics or business. 

Commerce students should diversify their non-economic selections so as 
to obtain the broadest possible general education within the time at their 
disposal. While the freedom of choice offered through electives is sufficient 
to enable a student to study whatever cultural subjects or vocational tech- 
niques he needs anywhere in the University, he who wishes to elect as much 
as a minor in any one department outside the College of Commerce must 
secure the approval of the head of that department to his study list, in 



♦ Special adjustment may be made for students with thirty or more semester hours credit 
in the University of Maryland prior to July 1, 1938. 

t Agricultural Economics students may substitute Marketini? of Agrricultural Products 
(A. E. 1028). 

130 



131 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

WiLLARD S. Small, Dean. 

The College of Education meets the needs of the following classes of 
students: (1) undergraduates preparing to teach the cultural and the 
vocational studies in high schools, preparatory schools, and vocational 
schools; (2) students who will enter higher institutions to prepare for 
work in specialized educational and institutional fields; (3) students pre- 
paring for educational work in the trades and industries; (4) students 
preparing to become home demonstrators, girls' club leaders, community 
recreation leaders, and (in cooperation with the Department of Sociology) 
social workers; (5) students whose major interest is in other fields, but 
who desire courses in education for their informational and cultural values; 
(6) graduate students preparing for teaching positions requiring the Mas- 
ter's degree and for positions as high school principals, elementary school 
principals, educational supervisors, attendance officers, and school admin- 
istrators. 

The Sxmimer Session, although organically distinct from the College of 
Education, is administered by the Dean of the College of Education, and 
is in eifect an administrative division of the College. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain 
important supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Opportunity for supervised teaching under com- 
petent critic teachers is provided by arrangement with the school authorities 
of Prince Georges, Howard, and Montgomery Counties, and of the District 
of Columbia. 

Observation. Observation of teaching is conducted in Washington and 
in nearby Maryland schools. The number, variety, and nearness of these 
schools provide ample and unusual opportimities for observation of actual 
classroom situations. 

Other Facilities in Washington. The Library of Congress, the Library 
of the U. S. Office of Education, and the special libraries of other Govern- 
ment offices are accessible. The information services of the National 
Education Association, the American Council on Education, the U. S. Office 
of Education, and of other institutions, public and private, are available 
to students. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in general 
the same as for the other colleges of the University. See Section I, 
Entrance. 

132 



Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is assigned to a member of the 
faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. Choice of subjects 
the student will prepare to teach should be made not later than the begin- 
ning of the sophomore year with the advice and approval of the appropriate 

adviser. , 

It is advisable for students who purpose to teach (except Vocational 
Agriculture) to register in the Ck.llege of Education in f ^^^ th^* ^^7 "^^^ 
have continuously the counsel and guidance of the faculty which is directly 
responsible for their professional preparation. It is permissible, however 
for a student to register in that college which in conjunction with the 
College of Education oifers the majority of the courses he -^11 pursue in 
satisfying the requirements of the curriculum he elects. 

Students in other colleges desiring to elect an education curriculum 
should consult with the Dean of the College of Education at the beg^nn^ng 
of the sophomore year in order to plan satisfactorily their ^'^^f ^"«"t P[°: 
grams. Adjustments may be made as late as the beginning of the Junior 
year It is vracticMy impossible to make adp^tmervts later thar. that <m 
account of the sequence of professional subjects in the junror and semor 
years. 

Admission of Normal School Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curricula of Maryland Normal 

Schools and other accredited normal schools whose '•--''^^^Jf^r^'ff ^^ 

of the ability and character essential to teaching will be admitted to 

aUnL sta'nding and classified provisionally in -PP-P-tejJ^J 

Graduates of the two-year normal ^<^^^f^''''r"''''''7'LZrZtne2M 
satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science i^^ El?«^«to 
Education by attendance for two full college years; graduates of the three- 
year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year. 

Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as h>gh school 
teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not i^iform, 
but depends upon the high school subjects to be taught and the individual 

ability of the student. 

Sophomore Status 
The Introduction to Teaching scheduled for the sophomore year is an 
orientetion course. It is designed with the twofold purpose of S™ ^^- 
dents a view of the teacher's job and of testing the aptitude and fitness 
of students for teaching. Admission to this course is based ^P<>» t^e foj^ 
lowing: (1) completion of at least 30 semester hours of freshman ^ork 
with an average grade as high as C; and (2) passing of --s of t-t^ 
which are designed to determine the student's preparation for the special 
demands of this course. 

183 



Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two years, 
by reason of temperament, health, industry, and scholastic progress, give 
promise of becoming successful teachers are encouraged to continue in the 
curricula of the College of Education; those who, by reason of health 
deficiencies, of weakness in oral and written English, of unfavorable per- 
sonal traits, or of scholastic deficiency, are unlikely to succeed as teachers 
are advised to transfer to other fields. 

To be eligible for junior status a student must have completed 64 semester 
hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average grade of C or better. 

Professional Courses 

The professional courses recognized by the State Department of Educa- 
tion for certification are given only in the junior and senior years. The 
minimum requirement for these is 16 semester hours, of which the follow- 
ing are prescribed: Educational Psychology, Technic of Teaching, Observa- 
tion of Teaching, Special Methods, and Supervised Teaching. 

To he eligible to enter the professional courses, a student must have 
attained junior status as defined above. Continuance in such courses will 
he contingent upon the student* s remaining in the upper four- fifths of his 
cla^s in subsequent semester revisions of class standing. 

From the offerings of Education, the District of Columbia requirement 
of 24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates w^ho "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of 128 credits in confownity with the 
requirements specified under "Curricula" and in conformity with general 
requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will be conferred. 

Curricula 

The curricula of the College of Education, described in detail in the 
following pages, are designed to prepare high school teachers of the aca- 
demic and scientific subjects, the special subjects, and the vocational sub- 
jects under the provisions of the Federal Vocational Education Acts. 

The specifications for majors and minors, under "Arts and Science 
Education", satisfy the requirements of the State Department of Education 
in regard to "the number of college credits required in any two or more 

134 



cubiects which are to be placed on a high school teachers' certificate » 
TttrriTul^^ for the special subjects cover all State r>epartment re^^^^^^ 
Ihe curnc a vocational subjects meet the objectives set up 

"''the FeSera™ an^^^ interpretations of the Office of Education 

Tnd of thf str^ of Education. (For Agricultural Education see 

't'lfA^:^^^^^^^^ curriculum one may qualify for the 

J^eTeittio^^^^^^^ of Arts or Bachelor of Science, ^iepef ng ^^ 
major subject. The other curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor of 

'thrgeneral and special requirements of each curriculum are shown in 
the following descriptions. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 
Students electing this curriculum may register in the CoU^^^^^^^ 
tion or in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students will ^e certin^ 
for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this cur 

riculum. ^ . . 

General Requirements 

In addition to Military Science or Physical Education, ^^^'^i'^^d °J f " 
stuLnts n the University, the following requirements -^st be fulfil ed 
by all candidates for degrees in this curriculum, normally by the end of 

sophomore year: ^ Composition II 

(1) Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ana survey <«m r 

(Eng. 2f and 3s), 12 semester hours. 
(i) Readintr and Speaking (Speech ly), 2 semester hours. 
3 JTo years of foreign language, if the student enters with less than 
thiee yirs of foreign laSuage; one year, if he enters with three years 
No foS language's required of students who enter with four or more 

years of foreign language. -^^^^^ 

(4) Twelve semester hours of history and the social sciences. 

(5) Twelve hours of natural science or of natural science and mathe- 
«iatics. Semester 

Freshman Year ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly). "—--—r-y^Z'T^^^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly or 2y and 4y ) ^ ^ 

♦Foreign Language - - - ^_^ 

Science (Biological or Physical) *^ 

From the following groups: x. • t „« 
History, Social Sciences, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Lan- 
guage. Music, Art, Physical Education 4^ ^^^ 

15-16 15-16 



*Except students entering with four or more units of language. 

135 



c , „ Semester 

oopfiomore Yea/r In 

(See "Sophomore Status," p. 133.) 
Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (PhyT'Ed 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 o 

tForeign Language. ^ % 

Electives „Z '^ 

* - 7-8 7-8 

17-18 17-18 
Junior Year 

(See "Professional Courses," p. 134.) 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf ) 3 _ 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) o 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6 s )..... __ 2 

Special Methods (Ed. 120 s; 122 s; 124 s; 1261712^8) — 9 

Electives ^ _ "' ^^ 

16 16 

Senior Year 

{Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) 2 or 2 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) IJIIZ".. 2 «- 

or 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) __ 3 

^^^"^^^^^ - z::::i:i2-i4 10-12 



16 



15 



Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
school subjects in accordance with the certification requiremente of the 
btate Department of Education (By-law 30 revised). These are designated 
as major and mmor subjects, with a requirement of from 28 to 36 semester 
hours of credit for a major and from 20 to 24 hours for a minor If it is 
deemed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching of three high 
school subjects, the requirement for a major may be modified at the discre- 
tion of the Dean to permit the pursuit of three subjects to the extent re- 
quired for State certification. Semester hour requirements are detailed 
below. 

No student who has not met all previous requirements wUl be permitted 
to do practice teaching, 

tFor students entering with less than three units of language. 
ISee Course description, p. 260. iKua^e. 

136 



English, A major in English requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Survey and Composition I and II 12 semester hours 

Shakespeare (Eng. llf or 12s) 3 semester hours 

American Literature - 6 semester hours 

Electives _ 15 semester hours 

Total _ 36 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 21 hours 
prescribed for the major and 5 hours of electives. 

* Electives must be chosen fom a selected list of courses with the advice 
and approval of the instructor in *' English in the High School." 

Survey and Composition I and II must be completed by the end of the 
junior year. 

History and Social Sciences, For a major in this group 30 semester 
hours are required, as follows: 

History 18 semester hours 

Economics or Sociology > _ _ 6 semester hours 

Electives ~ - 6 semester hours 

For a minor, the same requirements less the electives. 

Required courses in History are as follows: Modern European History, 
American History, and Ancient History. These must be completed by the 
end of the junior year. 

Modem Languages, For a major in Modern Languages 30 semester hours 
are required; for a minor 24 semester hours. 

At least 18 hours of a major or minor in modern language must be com- 
pleted by the end of the junior year. 

A major or minor in French must include French 2s, 9y, lOy, and at 
least one course of the 100 group. 

A major or minor in Spanish must include Spanish 2s, 5s, 6y, and at least 
one course of the 100 group. 

A major or minor in German must include German 2s, 5s, lOy, and at least 
one course of the 100 group. 

Mathematics. Twenty-eight semester hours are required for the major. 
The following sequence is recommended: Math. 21f, Math. 18y, Math. 7f, 
and Math. 10s in the freshman year; Math. 19y, Math. 22s in the sophomore 
year; Math. 23y in the junior year; Math, lllf. Math. 112s, Math. 151f, 
Math. 122s in the senior year. 

For the minor the following course sequence is advised: Math. 21f, 
Math. 7f, Math. 10s in the freshman year; Math. 22s in the sophomore 

* See paragraphs on special requirements for major in English in Section III on 
English Language and Literature, p. 282. 

137 



year; Math. 23y in the junior year; Math. 11 If, Math. 122s in the senior 
year. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry or trigonometry 
may be excused from Math. 7f or Math. 10s, respectively. For all majors 
and minors in mathematics, Ed. 128s and Ed. 135f are indicated. 

Mathematics-Physics, This major consists of 18 hours in mathematics 
and 18 hours in physics. The normal sequence of courses is Math. 21f, 
Math. 7f, Math. 10s, Math. 22s, Math. 23y, Math, lllf, Math. 122s, and 
Phys. ly, Phys. 103y. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry or trigonometry 
may be excused from Math. 7f or Math. 10s, respectively. 

Chemistry ly is required as a supporting course to this major. Ed. 128s, 
Ed. 135f, and Ed. 137s should be taken. 

If a minor in general science is offered in connection with this major, 
a total of 38 hours in the natural sciences should be presented. 

Science, In general science, a major and a minor are offered consisting of 
34 and 28 hours respectively, each including elementary courses in chem- 
istry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany). Minors of twenty semester 
hours are offered in chemistry, physics, and biological science. A minor in 
biology must include the basic courses in botany and zoology. 

A minor in chemistry must be supported by the elementary course in 
physics. Minors in physics and biology must be supported by the elementary 
course in chemistry, which should be completed before the beginning of 
the junior year. For students whose main interest is in biological science, 
Ed. 126s and Ed. 136f are indicated, as are Ed. 126s and Ed. 137s for those 
who are interested chiefly in physics or chemistry. 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be counted towards both, pro- 
vided that they number not less than 52 semester hours in natural science. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(See College of Agriculture, page 73.) 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

The entrance requirements for the curriculum in Commercial Education 
are as follows : English 3 units ; Algebra 1 unit ; Science 1 unit ; History 1 
unit; Stenography 2 units; Typewriting 1 unit; Bookkeeping 1 unit; 
elective 5 units. 

The Commercial Education curriculum includes a solid foundation of 
economics, social science and history, accounting and business administration 
subjects, adequate courses in methods of teaching commercial subjects, and 
supervised teaching. 

The number of electives is large enough to enable a student to prepare 
for teaching some other subject in addition to the commercial subjects. 

138 



The curriculum does not include any college courses in shorthand and 
typewriting for the improvement of skill in these arts. Any student desir- 
ing to become a candidate for the bachelor's degree in commercial education 
must meet the speed and accuracy requirements in shorthand and type- 
writing and transcription necessary to become a teacher of commercial sub- 
jects either by work in commercial offices during the summer or by such 
other means as may be practicable for improving his skill and accuracy. 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) - 

Science (Biological or Physical ) ^ - — 

One from the following groups : 

History, Mathematics, Literature, Foreign Language 



Semester 
I U 

3 3 

3 3 



1 
1 
3 



3 
17 



Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

American History (H. 2y) 3 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) — 2 

Basic R. O. T. C (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f and 52s) 3 

Money and Credit (Finance 51s) ~ — 

lijlectives — -..~-. — ~ — ^ 

17 

Junior Year 

Elements of Business (O. and M. 51f) 2 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51f and 52s) 4 

^Banking Principles and Practice (Finance 21s) — 

Elements of Statistics (G. and S. 14f) 3 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) - 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) — 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) — ~..- — 

Electives - ^ 

15 



1 
1 

3 
3 

3 
17 

3 
3 
2 

2 
3 
2 
2 

17 



*Note: Now a sophomore, second semester, course, preparatory to Banking, 
be taken concurrently. 

139 



4 
3 



2 
1 

5 

15 

Cannot 



ct . Tr Semester 

benior Year j 

Business Law (O. and M. f and s) 3 3 

Commercial Subjects in the High School (Ed. 150f and 151s) 2 2 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (Ed. 139 s) — 9 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) ZZ 2 ~ 

or 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) _ o 

^^^^^^^^^ IlZIir's-lO 5-8 

15 15 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is for students who are 
preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage in 
any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of teaching 
methods. It includes studies in all phases of home economics and the 
allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
li<lectives may be chosen from other colleges. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching, home management hours, and special work and observation of 
children m the University Nursery School. 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Education 
or the College of Home Economics. Students will be certified for gradua- 
tion only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this curriculum. 

Home £k!onomics Education 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 m 

Textiles (H. E. 71f) 3 _ 

Design (H. E. 21s) _ ZZZZ' "' — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 2 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 ^ 

Freshman Lecture (H. E. ly) ^ 2 

Electives ^ 2 2 



Semester 



Sophomore Year / 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) 2 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) „ _....„ 3 

Clothing (H. E. lis) „ -— 

Foods (H. E. Sly) _ 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) „ 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) » _ 3 

Introductory Botany (Bot. Is) „ — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 



18 



Junior Year 



Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5s) „ — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6s) „ — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s )...„_ - >.... „ — 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 3 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f or 142s) ^ - 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) - „ - 3 

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Zool. 15f ) _ „ 4 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133s) _ 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 



16 



15 



15 



Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) „ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f or s) 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 

103f) ......... _.... -.... 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f 

and 122s) _ ...._ 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106s) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) „ 

Electives ~ — 



4 
3 



// 
2 

S 
3 
8 
2 

3 
2 

18 



2 
1 
3 

3 
3 



2 
3 

17 



4 — 



3 
1 
3 
4 



14 
Electives should include one course each in History and English. 



15 



140 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies in Industrial Education provides: (1) a four- 
year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial 

141 



I. Foorrcar Carricnlnm in InduslrUI Ektucalion 

L-r ■ t;-r,; ^ut\:«r:sr^ .- r .s;».,I•^r 
co? w ^^r " '"'"'"'" ^''"~"°" '"™'- "•"' ">""««•• - «. 

A. Curriculum for Students in Residence 

Freshman Year Semester 

mZZT '^^^"^^^ ^^^ ^"^^^^ (^"^- Ed. If and 2s) ^2 ^2 

Elementary Woodworking (Ind. Ed 3f) ^ 

Advanced Woodworking- (Ind. Ed. 4s) ^ """ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng ly) "7 ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) f ^ 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s ) ~ "^ ^ 

History or Social Science " " ^ ^ 

" - - 3 8 

Sophom^ore Year 16 16 

Sheet Metal (Ind. Ed. 5f) 

Art Metal (Ind. Ed. 6s) Ill" " " " ^ — 

Mechanical Drawing (Ind. Ed 7y) ~~ ^ 

Electricity (Ind. Ed. 8y) '" ^ ^ 

^'%^\11.^' '• '"^^ orSi^ic^Ed^^a^i;^^^^^^ 2 2 

Mathematics (Math. 18y) ^ 2 

Survey and Composition II "vE^^^'^z^: \ I 

Chemistry (Chem. 3y or ly).. ^ 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed.lf and SsvIZ^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^~f ^~t 



Semester 



Junior Year / 

Elementary Machine Shop (Ind. Ed. 9f) 2 

Cold Metal Work (Ind. Ed. 10s) — 

Foundry (Ind. Ed. llf) _ „ 2 

Mechanical Drawing (Ind. Ed. I2y). 1 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5s) — 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) ~ - — 

Industrial Education in the High School (Ind. Ed. 162s) — 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) 3 

History or Social Science 3 

Electives 3 



// 



17 



2 

1 
2 
3 
S 
3 

17 



Senior Year 



Advanced Machine Shop (Ind. Ed. 13f) - 2 

Shop Organization and Management (Ind. Ed. 164s) — 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) 3 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects: Industrial 

Education (Ed. 139 f or s) 2 or 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) — 

Occupations, Guidance, and Placement (Ed. 163f) _ ^ 2 

Evolution of Modern Industry (Ind. Ed. 165f and 166s) 2 

Electives - 4^6 



16 



2 
3 

2 

4-8 

16 



B. Curriculum for Teachers in Service 

The requirements in this curriculum for the B. S. degree in Industrial 
Education are quantitatively the same as for Curriculum A, except that 
the military-physical training and speech requirements are waived. In 
summary the distribution is approximately as follows: 

History and the Social Sciences — 16 semester hours 

Mathematics and Science ~ - ~ — 20 semester hours 

Shop and Drawing. - — 30 semester hours 

Education - - ~ 24 semester hours 

Electives - 26 semester hours 



Total 



128 semester hours 



142 



16-17 1&-17 



In the mathematics and science group, and in the history and social 
science group, there is reasonable latitude for individual choice, but courses 
in mathematics as related to shopwork and courses in American history 
and government are required. 

143 



Program for Vocational, Occupational, and Shop Center Teachers 

This curriculum is designed for persons who have had experience in 
some trade or industry or in the teaching of shopwork. 

Applicants for admission to this curriculum must have as a minimum 
requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. The cur- 
riculum is prescribed, but is administered flexibly in order that it may be 
adjusted to the needs of students. 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher-training in Baltimore and in 
other industrial centers, extension courses are offered. The work of these 
courses deals principally with the analysis and classification of trade 
knowledge for instructional purposes, methods of teaching, observation and 
practice of teaching, psychology of trade and industrial education, and 
occupational information, guidance, and placement. 

Completion of eight teacher- training courses which require, in general, 
two years of two hundred fifty-six clock hours, entitles one to a full three- 
year vocational teacher's certificate in the State of Maryland, and to a 
special diploma from the College of Education of the University of 
Maryland. 

Courses for Teachers in Service 

Courses are offered for teachers in service who are seeking to satisfy 
requirements for promotion. 

A special announcement of the in-service courses in Baltimore is issued 
in August of each year. This may be obtained from the office of the 
Reg:istrar either in Baltimore or in College Park. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curricula are designed to prepare teachers of 
physical education for the high schools and leaders for recreational pro- 
grams. With the electives provided, it is possible to meet the certification 
requirements in other high school subjects as well as in physical education. 

These curricula include separate courses for men and for women. Some 
of the courses are open to both men and women. (See Sec. Ill, pages 265- 
269.) Variations for men and for women are shown in the curricula out- 
lined below. 

Upon satisfactory completion of either curriculum the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred. 

Students electing either of these curricula must register in the College 
of Education. 

General Requirements 

The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Science Education 
(see p. 135), except that a foreign language is not required, and twenty 
semester hours of science are required as scheduled. 



144 



Physical Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly)- - 

Elements of Zoology (Zool. 2f) - 

Introductory Botany (Bot. Is) ..■■- -■-■-" -• - - - 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly)^- - ^ ---• 

From the following groups: History, Science, Foreign Lan- 
guage, Mathematics, Home Economics -...- - 

(Women) . . . ,_, ^ , 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 4y) 

Athletics I (Phys. Ed. 18y)...---^ ■■- ^^" lo^. 

Fundamentals of Rhythm and Dance (Phys. Ed. lOy) 

(Men) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) 

Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. ly) ---■■- ■■ 

Personal and Community Hygiene (Phys. Ed. lly) 



Semester 
II 

3 
1 



3 
1 

3 



2y, 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

2 



8 
3 



1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 



16-17 16-17 



Sopho^nore Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) . 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) ^ 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) ^ : ;;.; ' 4 

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Zool. 15f ) __ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) — ~" i 

Survey of Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 21y) 

CommuiTy nTgiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y, ^ 

Phys. Ed. 8y ) - " ^ 

Modem Dance (Phys. Ed. 32y) ^ 

Athletics II (Phys. Ed. 22y) 

(Men) 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) ^-^ -^ ■— 

Physical Education Practice I (Phys. Ed. 5y) ^ 

16-17 



2 
3 
3 

4 
1 



2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

16-17 



145 



Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) ^ 3 — 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5s) — 2 

Body Mechanics (Phys. Ed. 24f) „ „ 2 — 

Physiology of Exercise (Phys. Ed. 25s) — 2 

Theory and Function of Play (Phys. Ed. 31f) 2 — 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) — 1 

Electives - - _....- 6-7 8 

(Women) 

Clogs and Athletic Dances (Phys. Ed. 28f ) 1 — 

Folk Dancing (Phys. Ed. 30s) — 1 

Games (Phys. Ed. 12f) 1 — 

Natural Gymnastics (Phys. Ed. 20s) ~ — 1 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) — 1 

(Men) 

Physical Education Practice II (Phys. Ed. 7y) 1 1 

Coaching and Officiating: Men (Phys. Ed. 13y) 1 1 

Practical Dancing (Phys. Ed. 26y) 1 1 

16 16 

Senior Year 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) 2 — 

or 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) — 3 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) 2 or 2 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) _ 3 — 

Teaching Health (Ed. l46s) - — 2 

Electives _ ~ - 3-8 5-12 

(Women) 

Coaching and Officiating: Women (Phys. Ed. 34y) „ 1 1 

Physical Education in the High School (Ed. 142f) 3 — 

(Men) 

Physical Education Practice III (Phys. Ed. 9y) 1 1 

Leadership in Recreational Activities (Phys. Ed. 35y) 2 2 

Physical Education in the High School (Ed. 141f) 2 — 



15 



15 



146 



Recreation 

Semester 

I // 

Junior Year ^ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) ^ _ 

Body Mechanics (Phys. Ed. 24f )... -----■• - •" __ j 

Physiology of Exercise (Phys. Ed. 25s) .^..- ^ _ 

Theory and Function of Play (Phys. Ed. 31f) - ^ ^ 

Playground Management (Phys. Ed. 33s) - ^ _ 

Boys and Girls Clubs (Phys. Ed. 37f ) — •^-■- ~ ^ 

From the following: Sociology, Economics, Music, Art 3-4 

(Women) i — 

Clogs and Athletic Dances (Phys. Ed. 28f) ^ ^ 

Folk Dancing (Phys. Ed. 30s) ^ _ 

Games (Phys. Ed. 12f) - _ i 

Natural Gymnastics (Phys. Ed. 20s) _ ^ 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) 

(Men) T^, rr \ 1 1 

Physical Education Practice II (Phys. Ed. 7y)-..- - ^ 

Coaching and Officiating: Men (Phys. Ed. 13y) -... ^ ^ 

Practical Dancing (Phys. Ed. 26y) _ _ 

16 16 

Senior Year 9 2 

Leadership in Recreational Activities (Phys. Ed. 35y) ^ 

Community Recreation (Phys. Ed. 39f) - _ ^ 

Teaching Health (Ed. 146s) — "-J---"-;. 3 3 

Methods and Practice in Recreation ^^d- l43y)...^-^-^---"^^- 

From the following: Sociology, Economics, Music, or Art 

(Women) , t,, o,. \ 1 1 

Coaching and Officiating: Women (Phys. Ed. 34y).. 

(Men) T1J n \ 1 1 

Physical Education Practice III (Phys. Ed. 9y) _ _ 

15 15 



U7 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean. 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and operation. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised recently to in- 
crease the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which 
are a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and which are 
now considered essential to the proper training of engineers because of 
the practical application of these subjects in professional and business life. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient 
preparation for many callings in public and private life outside the engi- 
neering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. In order to give the student time 
to choose the branch of engineering for which he is best adapted, the fresh- 
man year of the several courses is the same. Lectures and conferences are 
used to guide the student to make a proper selection. The courses differ 
only slightly in the sophomore year, but in the junior and senior years the 
students are directed more definitely along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathematics. 
See Section I, Entrance. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the unit 
of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry, provided such 
students are prepared to devote their first summer to 'a course in analytic 
geometry. The program for such students would be as follows: during 
the first semester, five hours a week would be devoted to making up ad- 
vanced algebra and solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics 
of the first semester would be scheduled, and the second semester mathe- 

148 



naatics would be taken in the summer session. Thus, such students if the^ 
paied The course, would be enabled to enter the sophomore year the next 
fall with their class without loss of time. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 
Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chem- 
icatS electrical, and mechanical engineering, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

registered m the (araauai^e ociiuui cimilar to that required 

'tandidates for the degree of Master ^IJf^^^Z^tTS:^::!^^ 
cepted in accordance with the procedure ^"^.J^^'^X iL head of Gradu- 
School, as will be found explained in the catalogue under 

ate School. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, E'ectrical Engineer, 

cant must satisfy the following conditions: 

1 He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years after graduation. , ^ „ 

2 He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of t:he ColS^ge of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Chemical, 
Civil Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3 His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve montts 

an outline of his proposed thesis. 
4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 
TV,« Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-roonis, recitation- 
rc^s. SS-rims, labo^ratories. and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

year amounts to $16.00 to $20.00. 

149 



(1) General Testin/and CoS Sfn fn ' ^"""^^"^ laboratories: 
Research, (4) Graduate ResS ' ^^ Operations, (3) Cooperative 

Plet" '^^^ZllrT!^::t?S^^^^^^ ^''^ - mailable com- 

petroleum, and their L-prSuSL Id "'"'^^ '^''^^ °' ^''''' ^^««' <=oa!, 
inorganic and organk ' ^ ^^°^''^' industrial chemicals, both 

^JJ^rheat'SHr;^^^^^^^^ ^or the study of 

and centrifuging. For Lf studT of flS Tr' ^^"P°^«»"' Sending, 
assembly is available, and this in^lnnl fr . ' * Pe'-"ianent hydraulic 

ment for the study of heat flow r^.l^"^ T''^ °^ ^^^^^ *yP«- Equip- 
centric pipe assembly for flSlnvecttn ' '?' ^''-'''■"' ^""'^'=^' -'- 
of various types, and temSmture mea ur-'^-^ '*-""'' "'"'"*'"" 

radiation, and potentiometric tvDes FW ^ ff including the optical, 

able including a vacuum ^elfSr eqC^^ w^2 ieT" f T ^^^"- 
condenser. A large mixing tank «Z T^Z^f^ ^'^'^, J^* ejector and tubular 
Sweetland filter preS Z T\ f^^"""' ^ ^^'^'Priming turbine pump, 

for studies in VatL J '"^' ^''"^ """^ '''""' ^^^^ are availabfe 

condensers, and vacuum rl veT ?£« ,tn. ™T*' '^^""^ '^^-<=^«' 
used either as a batch tvn!> T.^-'f ^^'^,.^*'" '« «« designed that it can be 

or as a vacuum sS^ Stfd Is t^vTptaT '"' ^^^' ''^^^* P°* ««» 
effect evaporator, one unit of which?, T ^^ '"^^^ ""^ a double 

bundle and the 'other ^hl :eriL %rrndlf \^^- '"^^^°'^^^' ^"''^ 
equipped with vacuum and pressure «-JJl ■ ? ■ ^'^ evaporator is 
pump, a condensate Pump, TndTXfiS Tr '"^.''""^t "^* ^^'^""'" 
crusher, a disc crusher, and an Abbrball r^ni J ! f '"^ ^^""^ ^'^ a jaw 
basket centrifuge of high vel^Jy type a 2 iS f "w ' "^"^^- ^ ^'"^^ 
suspended type, and an ordinary tube centriJfo^ , f "^rifuge of the 

study. ^'^^ '^"''^ centrifuge are available for centrifuge 

Shop facilities include a lathe, drill press ^rm^o ^ , 
types of tools necessary for unit operation Tnd SeS sTudie^ '^'^^"^^ 

The Cooperative and Graduate Research T .k . ^' 

permit the installation of such speciS equlment /Ir'' "'' ^^"^"^^ *« 
under consideration may require Ffr!^^.^ *^^ Particular problems 
With the industries of iarXJ and the "ch"^? fo n,aintain cooperation 
of the State and Federal Jovern^ents^for :S Jrf """'^^ "=*^^^- 
tages accrue because of the location „f f^ ^ » ^ ""Portant advan- 
Washington, D. C, and thr,oSorof he Ls^^^ "^"^'"^^""^ ^-^ 
the United States Bureau of Mines ^nlf UnttS f^p^ ^"' '^^"°" "^ 
Electrical Machinery Laboratories The.. - 

150 



I 



current generator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish 
direct current for testing purposes. Through the distribution switchboard, 
provision is made for distributing to the various laboratories direct current 
at 125 volts, and alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 
and 220 volts. 

The equipment includes a variety of direct and alternating-current gen- 
erators and motors, synchronous converter, distribution transformers, in- 
duction regulator, control apparatus, and the measuring instruments essen- 
tial for practical electrical testing. Most of the machines are of modem 
construction and of such size and design as to give typical performance. 
Flexibility of operation is provided in several ways: for instance, one of 
the synchronous machines has the coil terminals brought out to an external 
connection board, so that the windings may be connected for single-phase, 
two-phase, or three-phase operation; the machine is also provided with a 
phase-wound rotor and a squirrel-cage rotor, either of which may be used 
to replace the synchronous rotor. The synchronous converter is arranged 
for direct or inverted operation, either single-phase, two-phase, or three- 
phase. Metering and control boards are provided for rapid change of 
operating conditions with any machine. A single phase induction regulator 
with control panel provides voltage regulation for experimental work. 
There are several types of fractional-horsepower motors. The direct- 
current machines include several motor-generator sets and motors of vari- 
ous types and sizes for constant-speed and adjustable-speed operation. 
Storage batteries are available for low constant-voltage testing. Water- 
cooled Prony brakes are supplied for machine testing. Included in the 
general test equipment is a fairly complete assortment of ammeters, volt- 
meters, wattmeters, frequency meters, and two oscillographs. 

Illumination Laboratory. The equipment includes electric lamps, shades, 
and reflectors of various types; a bar photometer for determination of 
candle-power distribution of incandescent lamps; and four types of port- 
able photometers for the measurement of illumination intensities. 

Standardizing Laboratory. The apparatus includes a standard ammeter, 
voltmeter and watthourmeter, standards of voltage and resistance, potentio- 
meters and other equipment arranged for checking of laboratory meters. 
A five machine motor-generator set delivers power, both direct and alternat- 
ing-current, at two voltages for meter testing. 

Electrical Communication Laboratory. Telephone apparatus is available 
for experimental work on magneto and common battery systems; artificial 
lines, oscillators, vacuum tube voltmeters, cathode-ray oscillograph, and 
equipment for passive networks including transmission lines and coupled 
circuits. 

An amateur short wave radio station has been equipped for operation 
by the members of the student Radio Society under the guidance of a 
member of the faculty. The station equipment consists of a super- 
heterodyne receiver and a 500-watt transmitter. 

151 



Mechanical Engineering Laboratories. The apparatus consists of plain 
slide valve engines, steam turbine set, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed 
water heaters, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, apparatus for determi- 
nation of the B. T. U. in coal, gas, and liquid fuels, pyrometers, draft 
gauges, planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and 
equipment for a mechanical laboratory. 

Materials Laboratories. Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
making standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
gravel, steel, concrete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes a 300,000-pound hydraulic testing machine, two 
100,000-pound universal testing machines, cement-testing apparatus, ex- 
tensometer and micrometer gauges, and other special devices for ascertain- 
ing the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. 

The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 
Equipment is also available for study of models by the photo-elastic 
method. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association has, 
by arrangement with the College of Engineering, established its testing 
and research laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research 
Foundation thus organized is to make available to the Association additional 
facilities for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of 
Engineering additional facilities and opportunities for increasing the 
scope of its engineering research. 

Engineering Experiment Station. The purpose of the Engineering Exper- 
iment Station at the University, as well as of the various research labora- 
tories, is to conduct cooperative studies with departments of the State 
and Federal governments, and with the industries of Maryland. These 
studies have included traffic surveys over the Maryland State highway 
system, studies of concrete cores cut from the state roads, and laboratory 
studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

Cooperative researches now under way in the Engineering Experiment 
Station include the following projects: reinforced concrete hinge con- 
struction, dielectric constant of dry paper, smoke abatement, expansion 
joints for concrete roads, and diagonal tension reinforcement for concrete 
beams. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 
milling machines, and drill presses. 

152 



The foundry is provided with an iron cupola, a brass furnace, and a coke 

for conducting experimental and research work m engmeenng. 

surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane topography, 

foreign makes. 

special Models a^d Specimens. A number of models i"-tratmg vanous 
.,^e^f ."ghway construction ^^^Z::'^:^'-^ -- 
.athrcSS tr= irnsTrcountr. particularly from 
Maryland. Engineering Library 

.J-.- *. ti,^ o-ATiPral University Library, each department mam- 
In addition to the general ^J-^JJ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ engineering maga- 

tains a library for ^f f'^''^^^;^ J^^i i„ advanced courses, requires that 
IZJ^L:^'^;:^^^^^^-- and current technical literature 

--r Ts^ss^ ofTeTafio^^ s:crrtir 

rp^ofthfi^ ^fZ^rSSTL^r-^ 
Sir:? STe:^^, t^^ asportation, and highway 

^terrhtf also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans 
mere nab Rowland Bibbins of Washmgton, D. C. The 

S:raTdt;X n t is HbLy^L^ with urban transportation problems. 
Lctding raToads. street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

Curricula 

ThP normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
paSs sSex^Hre expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering socie les. 

The freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
The t^^^^^an eng ^ ^ ^^^^ ^f the several engmeenng pro- 

by P'-a'^f '"J. ^"SiL'l^f j;;;;;' J ^Ws course is to assist the freshman m 
r^g fhf parJcularS of engineering for which he is best ad t^. 
Tt student is^equired to submit a brief written summary of each lectu,^. 
Student branches of the following national technical .societies are estab- 
lish in the college of Engm™: Amen S-ty^o^^^^C^^^^^^^^^^^ 

rM;r cT En^gtr ihf stS ^j^::^:^^ - - 

discussion of topics dealing with the various fields of engineering. 

153 



Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect, with the 
I)ermission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 

All engineering students are urged to secure work during the summer, 
particularly in engineering fields. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



Freshman Year 
Alike for all engineering courses. 



Semester 



I 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

College Algebra (Math. 21f) „ 4 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 22s) — 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly). — 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) _ 2 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) - — 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) — 

Introduction to Engineering (Engr. If) 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Iv) 1 

*Elective 3 



19 



// 
3 
1 

4 

4 

2 
1 



1 
3 

19 



*The student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Language, or Government- 
Students who plan to enroll in Chemical Engineering are advised to take German or 
French. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information 
on chemical operations and processes of importance in modem life and 
to apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods 
for the attainment of economic objectives. Modern chemical research 
has contributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of 
the chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation 
in which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 



Sophomore Year 

Elementary German (German ly) or 

Elementary French ( French ly ) " 

Calculus (Math. 23y) - ■■■-■ "--■ "■- -"- 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is) .^ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f and 52s) 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) •■ "■-- ;" .pwT 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y) ~ - 



Semester 

I n 



3 
4 
2 
2 

3 
5 



21 



y) 



Junior Year 

Applied Mechanics ( 

Thermodynamics ( s ) " 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) ~ -■•- 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) - 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f) - - 

Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (Ch. E. 102s) .» 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. y)-^- 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch. ^; ^^^y^.T^T.^^V 
Fundamentals of Business Admimstration (O. and M. llOf ) 



3 
2 

4 

3 
3 
2 

19 



Senior Year 

Electrochemistry (Chem. 105y) - - -- 

Chemical Engineering Seminar (Ch. E. I04y) 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) --- 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) ^ 

Minor Problems (Ch. E. 106s) 

*Fuels and their Utilization (Ch. E. 107f) ^ 

*Chemical Technology (Ch. E. 108y). 

18 



3 
4 
2 
2 
1 
3 
5 



22 

2 
8 
8 
2 

4 
8 
3 

20 

2 
1 

5 

7 

2 

17 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING-CHEMISTRY 

A five-vear program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry will be 
arLged bXeen the College of Engineering and the College of Ay and 
Sees which will permit students, who so desire, to become candidates 
foT the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of 
Science in Arts. 



* student has a choice between Chemical Technology and Fuels. 



1&4 



155 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 
of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 



Sophomore Year 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) „ 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 

General Physics ( Phys. 2y ) 

Descriptive Geometry ( Dr. 3f ) _ 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) , 

Plane Surveying ( Surv. 2y ) _ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 

♦Elective 



Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 

Engineering Geology (Engr. lOlf) 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) _ 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) 

Principles of Mechanical Engineering (M. E. 112f) 
Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) 

Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f ) 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) , 

Technical Society 



Semester 
II 



2 
4 
5 
2 



Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) _ » 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf). 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) „ 

Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 4s) 

Elements of Highways (C. E. 105f) _ 

Concrete Design (C. E. 106y) „.... 

Structural Design (C. E. 107y).. - _ -.... _ 

Municipal Sanitation (C. E. 108y) 

Thesis (C. E. 109y) _ 

Soils and Foundations (C. E. 110s) _ _ 

Technical Society - ~ 



2 

3 

20 

1 

2 
5 

3 
3 

4 

18 

1 
2 



3 

4 
4 
3 
1 



4 

5 

3 
8 

2 

3 

20 

1 
3 



4 
2 

3 

5 



18 
1 

2 
1 

3 
3 
3 
2 
3 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission and dis- 
triStS electrical energy; electrical transportation, commumcation, ilium. 
t^Ton%nd manufacturing; and miscellaneous electrical applications m 
industry, commerce, and home life. 



Sophomore Year 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) .- 

Calculus (Math. 23y) - - - 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ^ 

Descriptive Geometry ( Dr. 3f ) -■■■ 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If and s) - 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 2f ) -"- •T"; 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. Is) - -- 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) -.- ~ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) — -- •- 

^Elective """ 



Semester 
II 



2 
4 
5 



1 
1 



2 

3 

20 



Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) - ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ..^^ ^•^■^^■^ 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) - - 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) -- 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) - - 

Direct Currents (E. E. 103f) - 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 104s) * ^ 

Electrical Measurements (E. E. 105f) - - ^ 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. 106s) - ^ 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103s) _ 

Technical Society 



18 



4 
5 



3 
3 

2 
3 

20 



1 
S 



3 — 

4 — 
•^ S 

— 2 

6 — 

— 1 



5 
8 



18 



Tij;r^,ent may elect a course in Social Science, History. Lan^.age. or Government. 



18 18 

*The student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Language, or Government. 

166 



157 



Senior Year 



Semester 



Semester 



Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) i 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and MrilOfV 2 

i^ngineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) _ 

Alternating Current Machinery (E. E. 107y) 4 

Alternating Current Design (E. E. 108f) _..Z.ZZ 1 

Electrical Communications (E. E. 109v^ * o 

Illumination (E. E. llOf) ^^ ? 

Electric Railways (E. E. 11U)ZZIZ~~1 " 3 

Electric Power Transmission (E. E. 112s) ^ _ 

Power Plants (M. E. 113s) " 

Thesis (E. E. 113y) 7 

Technical Society ^ 



18 



1 

2 

4 

3 



3 
3 
2 



18 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and mainten 
ance of machmery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and Ser' 
ation; and the organization and operation of industrial plantS 

Sophomore Yea/r 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) o 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 1 - • \ ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) " "" Z f 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. ^t).~ l ^ 

Elements of Plane Surveying ( Sur^rif "and 7)'"" " T 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) I "7 ^ 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) _ Z~ ~ -I "^ 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. E Is) " o 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physi;ai'¥du;at7cr^^^^^^^ ~ 

-Elective 2 2 
" - -- 3 3 



20 



20 



*The student may elect a course in Social Science. History, Lan^age. or Government. 



Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ^ 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f ). 

Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow (Ch. E. lOlf) 

Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (Ch. E. 102s) 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) * 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. E. lOlf) 

Machine Design (M. E. 102f) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop lOlf ) 

Foundry Practice (Shop 102s) _ 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104s) 

Technical Society 



1 

1 

3 
3 



Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) * 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf) 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) 

Internal Combustion Engines (M. E. 105f) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106f ) 

Refrigeration ( M. E. 107s ) 

Design of Prime Movers (M. E. 108y) 

Design of Power Plants (M. E. 109s) 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) _ 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. llOy) 

Theqi*? ^M E lllv^ 

Technical Society — - 



18 

1 
2 

3 
3 



4 
1 
1 



18 



II 
1 
3 



4 — 

- 8 
2 

3 — 

3 — 

1 — 

- 1 

- 5 



18 
1 
2 



8 
8 

2 
4 

1 
2 



18 



158 



BUREAU OF MINES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 
FELLOWSHIPS IN APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the Bureau of Mines, 
offers three fellowships for research in the field of engineering and applied 
sciences. Fellows enter upon their duties on July 1, and continue for 12 
months, including one month for vacation. Payments under a fellowship 
are made at the end of each month, and amount to $600 for the year. 
The University will remit payment of tuition fees, and will grant all 
fellowship privileges. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland, and become candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments of instruction, 

159 



but about half of the time will be spent in research, under the direction 
of the Bureau of Mines staff. 

One fellowship will be assigned for its research project in the Metal- 
lurgical Division of the Bureau of Mines. A second one likewise will be 
assigned to the Nonmetals Division, and a third to the Mining Division. 
Appropriate problems in physics, chemistry, chemical engineering, or mathe- 
matics will be chosen according to the abilities of the candidates and the 
interests of the Bureau Divisions. The faculty supervisor will be the 
Professor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland. 

The above fellowships will be known as Bureau of Mines Research Fellow- 
ships. The recipients will undertake the solution of definite problems con- 
fronting the mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 
Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 
recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require residence 
during the university year from September to June. 

All of the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities 
and technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or 
applied physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research 
work. Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of 
graduate work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications with a certified copy of college record, applicant's photo- 
graph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and letters 
from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering specifically 
the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience, will be received 
up to April 1. The application should be addressed to Fellowship Commit- 
tee, Eastern Experiment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Depart- 
ment of the Interior, College Park, Maryland. 

BUREAU OF MINES LECTURES 

Under the auspices of the University of Maryland, the Bureau of Mines 
of the United States Department of the Interior, which maintains its 
Eastern Experiment Station on the campus at College Park, will offer an 
interesting series of public lectures in the auditorium of the College of 
Engineering throughout the university year. The lectures, eight in number, 
will be given monthly, beginning in October, on the fourth Tuesday evening 
of each month at 8:15 P. M. The speakers will be outstanding members 
of the staff of the Bureau's various experiment stations throughout the 
United States, selected because of broad and varied experience in fields of 
wide technical and public interest, involving fundamental and pioneering 
research. Although the lectures are arranged in connection with the new 
work of the University in chemical engineering, they cover a broad field 
of science, technology, and economics. 

There will be no charge for admission. The general public as well as 
the faculty and student body are cordially invited. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dean 

Home economics subjects are planned to meet the needs of the following 
classes of students: (1) those who desire a general knowledge of home 
economics without speciaUzing in any one phase; (2) those who wish to 
teach home economics or to become extension specialists in home economics; 
(3) those who are interested in certain phases of home economics with the 
intention of becoming dietitians, restaurant and cafeteria managers, textile 
speciaUsts, designers, buyers of clothing in department stores, or demon- 
strators for commercial firms. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Foods and Nutrition; Textiles. Clothing, and Art. 
and Home and Institution Management. 

Facilities 

The Home Economics Building is equipped with class rooms and labora- 
tories. In addition the college maintains a home management house, m 
which students gain practical experience in home-making during their senior 

^Taltimore and Washington afford unusual opportunities for trips, addi- 
tional study, and practical experience pertaining to the various phases of 

home economics. 

Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of four years of prescribed courses, of 128 semester hours. In ac- 
cordance with the University policy, not less than three-fourths of the 
credits for graduation must be earned with grades of A, B, or C. 

Prescribed Curricula 

All students registered in the College of Home Economics follow the Gen- 
eral Home Economics Curriculum for the first two years. At the beginning 
of the junior year a student may continue with the General Home Eco- 
nomics Curriculum, or elect one of the following special curricula, or a com- 
bination of curricula. A student who wishes to teach home economics may 
register in Home Economics Education in the College of Home Economics, 
or in the College of Education (see Home Economics Education). 

Following are the outlines of the Curricula for General Home Economics, 
Textiles and Clothing, Foods and Nutrition, Institution Management, Prac- 
tical Art, and Home Economics Extension. 

161 



160 



GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Textiles (H. E. 71f) -. 3 — 

Design ( H. E. 21s ) — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ^ 1 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 1 

Home Economics Lectures (H, E. ly) 1 1 

*Electives 2-3 ^3 

15-16 15-16 
^Sophomore Year 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) .'. 3 — 

Clothing (H. E. lis) _ _ — 3 

Foods (H. E. 31y) 3 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) 3 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed, 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) — 3 

JElectives 3 3 

17 17 
Junior Year 

§Elementsof Nutrition (H. E. 32f) '] 

or I 8 _ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) J 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) _ — 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f and 142s) 3 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf or s) 3 — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 3 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and 122s) 3 3 

Electives 4-5 4r-5 

16-17 16-17 
Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f ) 4 — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f) 4 — 

Electives 7 15 



FOODS AND NUTRITION CURRICULUM 

Semester 

Junior Year \ ^ 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f) ^ _^ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) " __ 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) -■-- ---" 3 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f and 142s) ^ ^ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s)..- -- ^ ^ 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. l37s) 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and 122s) ^ ^ 

Electives ~ 

17 IT 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. io2f ) 7^"^ •:::^; 4 Z 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 14,51) ^ ^ 

Experimental Foods (H. E. 135f ) - - ^ 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133s) ^ 

Advanced Foods (H. E. 134s) ^ ^^ 

Electives - 

15 15 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f)..- ^ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) ^ 

*Nutrition (H. E. 131f) __ 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) TT"o"; ^ 

Management of the Home (H. E. I41f and 142s) ^ 

Institution Management (H. E. 144y) ^ 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5s) ^ 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6s) ^ 

Food Buying and Meal Senace (H. B. 137s) ^ 

Electives ~ 

17 



3 

3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 



18 



15 



15 



* One year or more of French is required of students majoring in art. 

t Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay and Chem. 12 By) is required of students electing the 
foods, textiles and clothing, and institution management curriculums. 

X In addition to the curriculum as prescribed one course in psychology is required and 
one course in the following sciences : zoology, botany, physiology, or genetics. 

§ Students whose major is foods and institution management will elect Nutrition (H. E. 
131f). Chem. 12 Ay is prerequisite for Nutrition (H. E. 131f). 

162 



-TlTIddition to Nutrition and Dietetics (H. E. 131f and 132s), Child Nutrition (H. E. 
1363) is recommended. 

163 



Senior Year j 

Practice in Management of the Home (H E 143f ) 4 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) .*.. * __ 

Experimental Foods (H. E. 135f) ..r...Z^^ 4 

Advanced Institution Management (H. E. 146s). __ 

Institution Cookery (H. E. 147f) ' o 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and 122s)..r. 3 

Mental Hygiene (Ed. Psych. 105s) __ 

Electives . . 

: • 1 

16 

HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 13 If) 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) __ 

Management of the Home (H. E.""l41f 'and 142s) q 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) _ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) o 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5s) __ 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6s).... __ 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133f) * 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) __ 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and 122s) o 

Electives ^ 

17 
Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) ^ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f ) 4 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135f) 4 

Mental Hygiene (Psych. 130s) * ' __ 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) 11.1. ___ 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (H. E. 15ls) __ 

Electives 

3 



15 



Semester 
U 



3 
3 
2 

15 



3 
3 



2 
1 

3 
3 



18 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



Textile and Clothing Curriculum 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) _ 3 — 

Advanced Textiles (H. E. 171f) - - 3 — 

Chemistry of Textiles (Chem. 14s) — 3 

♦Nutrition (H. E. 131f ) > 3 — 

or 

Elements of Nutrition (H. E. 32f) 3 — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f and 142s) 3 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) ,...„ — 3 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and 122s) 3 . 3 

Electives _ 2 4 

17 16 
Senior Year 

Special Clothing Problems (H. E. 112s) _ - — 3 

Special Textile Problems (H. E. 172f) 4 — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f) 4 — 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f or s) _ 4 — 

Electives 2 4 

**Practical Art 15 15 

Junior Year 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) — 3 

Art in Ancient Civilization I and II (Art. If and 2s) 2 2 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f and H. E. 122s) 3 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f ) „ 3 3 

Elements of Nutrition (H. E. 32f) „ 3 — 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. If) 3 — 

Psychology of Personnel (Psych. 161s) — 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 — 

Electives _ — 3 

17 17 
Senior Year 

Advanced Design (H. E. 123f and 124s) 3 3 

Elements of Business (O. and M. 51f) _ 2 — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f ) 4 — 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) 4 — 

Merchandise Display (H. E. 125s) : „ — 2 

Electives _ 2 10 



164 



15 



15 



* Chemistry 12 Ay is prerequisite for Nutrition H. E. 131f. 

**Student8 electing the Practical Arts curriculum may substitute Chemistry 3y for 
Chemistry ly. An elective in science may be substituted for Phys. 3y. A total of 12 
hours of science is required in this curriculum. 

165 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean, 

The Graduate School Council 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

H F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Wm. H. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of French. 

H. C. House, Ph D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

L. V. Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

L. H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

J. E. Metzger, M.A., Professor of Agronomy 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 

H J. Patterson, D.Sc. Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

^TBalfiml^er'''''''' ^^'^" ^^'^" ^'^'''''' ^roie.sor of Pharmacology 
Eduard Uhlenhutii, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 

General Information 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

coSerreVtut'r^'' 'f ^' institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 

cS^rtC'T"^'^^ ""'^^ '^^ supervision of the general faculty. The 

SalTt^bt^^^^^^^^ ^^' ^^^^^^-^ ^-^-^^ -^ 'ruction 

leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's degree was undertaken ThP 

:^%:e s:^^^^^^^ '^'^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^" --^'- ^^ ^^^ vtittcuS 

tTative Wf r "? ?. ^''^"''T^ ^^^^"'^ ^"^^^^^- T^^ ^^^^--l ^d^inis- 

Coun.n T^l 1 ^^ ^'^^"^'" ^^^"^^y ^'^ ^^l^^^^^d to a Graduate 
Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School is chairman. 

LIBRARIES 

of \he^SoLlV^%T''''''' '/ '^" University library, the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset 
to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminar 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

166 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 
ADMISSION 

Graduates from recognized colleges regarded as standard by the institu- 
tion and tby regional or general accrediting agencies are admitted to the 
Graduate School. The applicant shall present an official transcript of his 
college record, which for unconditional admission shall show creditable com- 
pletion of an undergraduate major in the subject chosen for specialization 
in the Graduate School. 

Application blanks for admission to the Graduate School are obtained from 
the office of the Dean. After approval of the application, a matriculation 
card, signed by the Dean, is issued to the student. This card permits one to 
register in the Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation 
card is stamped and returned. It is the student's certificate of membership 
in the Graduate School, and may be called for at any succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree, 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Gradu- 
ate School at the beginning of each semester. Students taking graduate 
work in the Summer Session are also required to register in the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each session. In no case will graduate credit be 
given unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. 
Registration for the first semester is held in the Gymnasium- Armory on the 
date designated in the calendar. A late registration fee will be charged to 
graduate students who register after October 5 and February 5. Students 
register for the second semester and the summer session in the office of 
the Dean, T-214, Agriculture Building. 

The program of work for the semester or the summer session is arranged 
by the student with the major department and entered upon two course cards, 
which are signed first by the professor in charge of the student's major sub- 
ject and then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One card is retained by the 
Dean. The student takes the other card, and, in case of a new student, also 
the matriculation card, to the Registrar's office, where registration is com- 
pleted. Students will not be admitted to graduate courses until the registrar 
has certified to the instructor that registration has been completed. Course 
cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. 
The heads of departments usually keep a supply of these cards in their 
respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates, or 

167 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates, Graduate students may 
elect courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate 
credit will not be allowed for these. Students with inadequate preparation 
may be obliged to take some of these courses as prerequisites for advanced 
courses. No credit toward graduate degrees may be obtained by corre- 
spondence or extension study. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the stu- 
dent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable 
minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To 
encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, grad- 
uate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of thirty 
credit hours for the year, including thesis work, which is valued at not less 
than six hours. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the summer session may be counted as residence 
toward an advanced degree. By carrying approximately six semester 
hours of graduate work for four summer sessions at this institution, a 
student may fulfill the residence requirements for the master's degree, 
provided that the greater part of the thesis work can be done under direc- 
tion during the periods between summer sessions. In some instances a 
fifth summer of residence may be required in order that a satisfactory 
thesis may be completed. 

By special arrangement, graduate work may be pursued in some depart- 
ments during the entire summer. Such students as graduate assistants, or 
others who may wish to supplement work done during the regular year, 
may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by full-time graduate 
work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory supervision and 
facilities for summer work are available in their special fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin, giving full information con- 
cerning the Summer Session and the graduate courses offered therein. This 
bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in 
the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet the 
same requirements and proceed in the same way as do graduate students in 
other departments of the University. Graduate courses in the professional 
schools are listed in the Graduate School Announcements. . 

168 



GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester, and who continue their residence m 
ZSnSl^y for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register in 
tie Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor's degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

ATei^or of this University who has nearly completed the requiremen s 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, credits for which may be transferred toward 
an advanced degree at this University; but the total of -dergrad^^^^^^ 
and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester^ Grad- 
uate credits earned during the senior year may not be used to shorten the 
residence period required for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 
Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks, which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out m duplicate 
and, after the required endorsements are obtained, the applications are acted 
upo^ by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the eandidate . 
undergraduate record and of any graduate courses comp eted at other insti- 
tutions must be filed in the Dean's office before the application can be con- 

'' Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies that he has met all the formal requirements and is con- 
sidered by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such 
graduate study and research as are demanded by the ^^^^^^^^.^^^^^^ 
degree sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship by the type 

of graduate work already completed. x x j • 4.v^ 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated m the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 

AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
reauired to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
dXwhen instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
?n wHch the degree is sought, but not until at least twelve -^ste^^^^^^^^ 
hours of graduate work have been completed. An average grade as high as 
B in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least one full academic year, or 
its equivalent, at this institution, is required. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours with 
an average grade as high as B in courses approved for graduate credit 

169 



■s 



is required for the Master's degree. If the student is inadequately pre- 
pared for the required graduate courses, either in the major or minor sub- 
jects, additional courses may be required to supplement the undergraduate 
work. Of the twenty-four hours required in graduate courses, not less than 
twelve semester hours and not more than sixteen semester hours must 
be earned in a major subject. The remaining credits must be outside 
the major subject, and must comprise a group of coherent courses intended 
to supplement and support the major work. Not less than one-half of the 
total required course credits for the Master^s degree, or a minimum of 
twelve, must be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. The entire 
course of study must constitute a unified program approved by the stu- 
dent's major adviser and by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit, not to exceed six hours, obtained at other 
recognized institutions may be transferred and applied to the course 
requirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of grad- 
uate character, and provided that acceptance of the transferred credit does 
not reduce the minimum residence period of one academic year. The can- 
didate is, however, subject to final examination by this institution in all 
work offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the Master's degree. 
It must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work, and it 
must be acceptable in literary style and composition. It is assumed that 
the time devoted to thesis work will be not less than the equivalent of 
six semester hours earned in graduate courses. With the approval of 
the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the 
thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under direction and 
supervision of a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before Commencement. An ab- 
stract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words in length, must ac- 
company it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of 
the thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and 
should be consulted by the student before the typing of the manuscript is 
begun. Students may obtain individual copies of this manual at the Dean's 
office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts 
as chairman of the committee. The other members are persons Under whom 
the student has taken most of his major and minor courses. The chairman 
and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the examining committee 
at least one week prior to the period set for oral examinations. The chair- 
man of the committee selects the exact time and place for the examination 
and notifies the other members of the committee and the candidate. The 
examination should be conducted within the dates specified, and a report 

170 



of the committee sent to tlie Dean as soon as possible after the exammation. 
A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the com- 
mittee Such a report is the basis upon which recommendation is made to 
£ fLSthat il candidate be granted the degree sought. The penod 
for the oral examination is usually one hour. ^ -^ • ^i.. .^^..1^ 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample op- 
pfrtunity fo examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the exami- 

""tTtudent will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's ^ ^^^ J^f \^ 
admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the grant- 
LTof the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor s 
decree must be deposited in the office of the Dean not later than the first 
Wednesday in October of the academic year in which the degree is sought 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Department of Mod- 
em Languages a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required^ 
ThVfirst two of the three years may be spent in other mstitutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be 
oripondTngly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificat^ 
of Sence^ a^^^ work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
atta^ments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research m 
the special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. The minor work required varies 

oitwenty-four to thirty hours, at the discretion of the ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
concerned The remainder of the required residence is devoted to in- 
LnsTve study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the 
individual candidate. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. The ongmal 
Tpewritten copy and one clear carbon copy of the thesis, together with an 
aSract of the contents, 200 to 250 words in length, must be depos^ed 
in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before commencement. One 
or two extra copies of the thesis should be provided for use of members 
of the examining committee prior to the date of the final exammation^ 
The thesis is later printed in such form as the committee and the Dean 
may approve, and fifty copies are deposited in the University library. 

171 



A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students may 
obtain copies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his attainments 
in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed procedures 
are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDI- 
DATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written exam- 
ination that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. 
The passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in 
his specialized field. Some 500 pages of text from which the applicant 
wishes to have his examination chosen should be submitted to the head of 
the Department of Modern Languages at least three days before the ex- 
amination. It is not required that the candidate recognize every word 
of the text, but it is presumed that he will know sufficient grammar to 
distinguish inflectional forms, and that he will have a large enough vo- 
cabulary to give a good translation without the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office of 
the Department of Modem Languages at least three days in advance of 
the tests. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the unsuc- 
cessful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these tests. 

4. Examinations are held in the office of the Department of Modern 
Languages, Arts and Sciences building, on the first Wednesdays in Febru- 
ary, June, and October, at 2 p. m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon 
admission to the Graduate School. 

A fixed charge, each semester, at the rate of $4.00 per sem- 
ester credit hour. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduation fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

172 



FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships A number of fellowships have been established by the Um- 
Fellowshi^. A nu j^j ^^e also available in certain depart- 

S?- Tt%en1iTr^uSlersity 'fellows is $400 for the acadenuc year 

T^h^ rpmission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 
np%~biric?for%niversity fellowships -7 be obtained from t^^^^ 
nffice of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary ere 
£Lls ifsent by the applicant directly to the Dean of t^^ ^jaf ^*J^^^^^^^^ 
Fellows are required to render mmor services prescr bed bj tn^ir 
mSr departments. The usual amount of service required does not 
Txc^ twelve clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a fi^l 
grSitrprogram. and they may satisfy the residence requirement for 

hieher degrees in the normal time. fpUow 

The sel^tion of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow 

The awards of University fellowships are on a competitive basis 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
as2Sntl%f Jrelvailable in several departments. The JPe- -^f/^ 
these assistantships is $800 a year and the remission of all ^aduate fees 
*. tv,» ^;r.lnma fee Graduate assistants are appointed for one year 
Tdterare Sble 0- reappointment. The assistant in this class devotes 
one half of his time to instruction or to research in connection with Ex- 
pSmlt Station projects, and he is required to spend two years ,n e i- 
r „1 f^v thP Master's Degree. If he continues in residence for the Doctor s 
tSe he 'sallowed S^^^^^^ ---^-^ "^'^^^ '"' each academic year 
Tms Un versity. The minimum residence requirement from the Bach- 
elor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic V^ars and. one 
summer,^r ihree academic years and three summer sessions of eleven or 

twelve weeks each. , 

other Assistants. Assistants not in the regular $800 class are frequently 
«1 lowed to take graduate courses if they are eligible for admission to the 
Suate Scho:i.^ The stipend, for these assistants varies with the servu^s 

Sr.if the .ii»d resid.M. in each .„. at fte ..n.e the .»d.n. » 

" F.Xr mS™ regarding .„i..a„..h.p, may be obtained ft.n, 
the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 
Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is con- 
feiXu^^ei the candidate is excused by the Dean of the Faculty. 

178 



SUMMER SESSION 

WiLLARD S. Smaix, Director 

and supervisors of SfsevericWrnT t'f ' °^ '*"^^"*^-- <1> ^^^^^hers 
vocational, and special ^1^1^?/'^°^''°'^-"^"™^"*^'-^' secondary. 

(3) graduate stES- U) sS S^h' / ^^° "'" •=""'^'^"*«^ ^°^ "^^Srees 

tuuems, t4) special students not candidates for degrees. 

Terms of Admission 

registering, a candidate for a deSeelmT/^^^^^ the University. Before 
of the College or School ir, Lv uf I ^ required to consult the Dean 

and special llZ^ul^ i^lM^SZT^^^Z:''; J^^ ^-<=^- 
sununer session for which thev ar« !.T,or« ^ admitted to the courses of the 

Credits and Certificates 

The semester hour is the unit of credit «c ir, ^fv, 
versity. In the summer session, a cou^^^^^^^ ^^ *^^ U"^- 

weeks and requiring the standard Z /^^f '^? ?^^ ^^^^s a week for six 
two semester Ws "^ ^^^"^* ^^ "^^^^^^ ^^^k has a value of 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited h^ fL^ o^ . T^ 

ment of Education towards satisfying certSlSn L ^^^^ ^"P^^" 
classes. ^»'ii,iying certilication requirements of all 

Summer Graduate Work 

^guiar procedurr;;a?h:;:^rdXr2:du^:e":^^^^^^^^^^^ '^^ 

degree on the summer nlan mn«,f m^f ^i, students workmg for a 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Joseph D. Patch, Lieut CoL Infantry, U. S. Army, Professor 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Army Regu- 
lations No. 145-10, War Department. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers* Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act of 
Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 

Organization 

The unit is organized as a regiment of four battalions of three rifle 
companies each, and a band. All units are commanded by Advanced Course 
students, who have been selected for these commands on a basis of merit. 
The course of instruction is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. 

Objectives 
* Basic Course 

The object of this course is to afford to students enjoying the privileges 
of State and Federal aided education an opportunity to be trained for posi- 
tions involving leadership, within either the State or the nation. To this end 
the methods employed are designed to fit men mentally, physically, and 
morally for pursuits of peace or, if necessity requires, for national defense. 
A member of the R.O.T.C. is not in the Army of the United States, and 
membership in the unit carries no legal obligation to serve in the Army, or 
any of the armed forces. 

** Advanced Course 

The primary object of the Advanced Course is to provide military instruc- 
tion and systematic training through the agency of civil educational in- 
stitutions to selected students, to the end that they may qualify as reserve 
officers in the military forces of the United States, It is intended to attain 
this objective during the time the students are pursuing their general or 
professional studies, thus causing minimum interference to the preparatory 
requirements of their projected civil careers. 

A student prior to enrollment in this course must have satisfactorily 
completed the basic course and must have indicated in writing his desire to 



174 



♦ Required of qualified students. 
** Elective for qualified students. 



175 



undertake the course. The applicant further must obtain on this document 
the recommendation of both the Dean of his College and the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, and submit same to the President of the Insti- 
tution for approval. No student will be enrolled in the Advanced Course 
without the approval of the President of the University. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second years, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour is 
utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced course, elective, five periods a week 
of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least 
three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part of military instruction, and it 
is the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the 
physical training given by civilian teachers, thus cooperating in an effort 
to promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 

Uniforms 

Members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniform at all military formations and at such other times as the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics may designate with the approval of the 
President of the University. 

Uniforms, or commutation in lieu of uniforms, for the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, are furnished by the Government. The uniforms are the 
regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain distingtiishing 
features; or, if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then such uniforms 
as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must be kept in good 
condition by the students. They remain the property of the Government; 
and, though intended primarily for use in connection with military instruc- 
tion, may be worn at other times unless the regulations governing their use 
are violated. The uniform will not be worn in part nor used while the 
wearer is engaged in athletic sports other than those required as a part of 
the course of instruction. A Basic Course uniform which is furnished to a 
student by the Government will be returned to the Military Department 
at the end of the year; or before, if a student severs his connection with the 
Department. In case commutation of uniforms is furnished, the uniform so 
purchased becomes the property of the student upon completion of two 
years' work. 

176 



Commutation 

students who elect the Advanced Course and who have «j^f the^con- 

tract with the Federal Government to <=<>"t'"^^^ ^^^^ , ^Jf ^^^i^^^^^^ a 
Training Corps for the two remammg years of the ^o^^^^^J^^^ ^le 

course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

taking the advanced course, which, as has been ^'^"^"'^^^ ^''^''l'^'"''^^ 
Students who attend the summer camps are under no expense. Ihe 

Clothing, quarters, and food are fumisneQ.ine 

.tenl'o.TLmp at L.t 86 per cent .f th. pr.scrlb.6 camp p.nd. 

Commissions 

fa^ Each year, upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 

(a) tach year, upon p-g.-™ Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
fied for commissions in the Keserve unicers ^^ i> „. , Tactics 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm of 
the service will be determined by the War Department. 

(.\ ThP TTtiiversitv of Maryland has received a rating from the War De- 
oartLIf of "Gene Sly ExceUent" for the past several years. This rating 
n^d^aLs that^he wor^ of its R O. T. C. unit has been -o^-^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 
Federal Government as being of a superior order. The Generally fcxcei^ 
lent" rating supersedes the former designation of "Distmguished College 
whLh dSation has been discontinued by the War Department for msti- 
tutions such as this University. 

177 



Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university 
work, and the requirements of this department as to proficiency the same 
as those of other departments. 

Students who have received military training at any educational insti- 
tution under the direction of an army officer detailed as professor of 
military science and tactics may receive such credit as the professor of 
military science and tactics and the President may jointly determine. 



ITS 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is 
broadly conceived as the development of the individual student. To accom- 
plish this purpose, physical examinations and classification tests are given 
the incoming students to determine the relative physical fitness of each. 
Upon the basis of the needs disclosed by these tests, and individual prefer- 
ences, students are assigned to the various activities of the program. 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three ac- 
tivity classes each week throughout the year. In the fall, soccer, touch 
football, and tennis are the chief activities ; in the winter, basketball, volley 
ball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore students may elect a consid- 
erable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, horse- 
shoes, ping pong, bag punching, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted, also. Touch 
football and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, base- 
ball and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, 
medals, and appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program are pro- 
vided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and ping 
pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
A large modern gymnasium, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute 
the major part of the eciuipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
and tennis, which are all major sports of this program. The University is 
a member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, and other national organizations for the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

A large athletic plant is provided solely for the program of physical 
education for women. The activities program assigned to freshmen and 
sophomores consists of seasonal sports, as follows: in the fall, hockey, 
tennis and soccer; in the winter, basket ball, volley ball and the various 
team games, rhythms, and tumbling; in the spring, tennis, badminton, 
indoor base ball, archery, shuffleboard, and numerous individual sports. 

179 



The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural 
tournaments throughout the year in the sport in which students at a given 
season are engaged. Ea^h women's organization on the campus is repre- 
sented m these tournaments, which provision affords opportunity for wide 
spread participation. 

Numerous extra-curricular clubs are sponsored with many opportunities 
for development of leadership. Representative student clubs are maintained 
m badmmton, riding, swimming, archery, and golf. There is also a girls' 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and 
women students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of 
the state, and to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education and Recreation see 
College of Education, and Section III, Description of Courses. 



180 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean, 

Faculty Council 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Oren H. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 

Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S. 

HISTORY 

The University of Maryland was organized December 28, 1807, as the 
College of Medicine of Maryland. On December 29, 1812, the University 
of Maryland charter was issued to the College of Medicine of Maryland. 
There were at that period but four medical schools in America — the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, founded in 1765; the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons of New York, in 1767; Harvard University, in 1782; and Dartmouth 
College, in 1797. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1821 and 1825. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 
dissension in the School of Medicine, but were continued in the year 1837. 
It was Dr. Hayden*s idea that dentistry merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medical instruction, and he undertook to develop this spe- 
cialty as a branch of medicine. With this thought in mind he, with the 
support of Dr. Chapin A. Harris, appealed to the Faculty of Physic of the 
University of Maryland for the creation of a department of dentistry as a 
part of the medical curriculum. The request having been refused, an inde- 
pendent college was decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted 
by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. The first faculty meeting 
was held February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. H. H. Hayden was elected 
President and Dr. C. A. Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was de- 
livered by Dr. Harris on November 3, 1840, to the five students matriculated 
in the first class. Thus was the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, the 
first and oldest dental school in the world, created as the foundation of the 
present dental profession. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, was organized and continued instruction in dental 

181 



subjects until 1879, at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. A department of dentistry was organized at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a class each year 
from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered as a corporation and con- 
tinued as a privately owned and directed institution until 1920, when it 
became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it merged 
with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, 
School of Dentistry, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a 
distinct department of the State University under State supervision and 
control. Thus we find in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, a merging of the various efforts at dental 
education in Maryland. From these component elements have radiated de- 
velopments of the art and science of dentistry until the strength of its 
alumni is second to none either in number or degree of service to the pro- 
fession. 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry now occupies its new building at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, adjoining the University 
Hospital, being so situated that it offers imusual opportunity for abundant 
clinic material. The new building provides approximately 45,000 square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, and is ideally lighted and ventilated. A 
sufficient number of large lecture rooms and classrooms, a library and 
reading room, science laboratories, technic laboratories, clinic rooms, locker 
rooms, etc., are provided. The building is furnished with new equipment 
throughout with every accommodation necessary for satisfactory instruc- 
tion vmder comfortable arrangements and pleasant surroundings. The large 
clinic wing accommodates one hundred and thirty-nine chairs. The follow- 
ing clinic departments have been provided: Operative, Prosthetic (including 
Crown and Bridge and Ceramics), Anesthesia and Surgery, Pathology, 
Othodontia, Pedodontia, Radiodontia, and Photography. Modem units with 
electric engines have been installed in all clinics, while provision has been , 
made for the use of electric equipment in all technic laboratories. 



BEQUIBEMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

successfully two years oi wu oemester hours each m Eng- 

ganic Chemistry. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Care is observed in selecting students to begin the study of d^^^ist^. 
through a tt "adherence to proved ability in ^<^^-f-^^^^"'j^, 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Application blanks may be obtained from the office of ^e ^ean^j^f ^d^ 

applicant should M in this ^^^^f ^-f ^^ct oTAdmisStuntisity 

TS:^'.^^^'^!^^ "tJrSerse side of the blank should 

be observed carefully. „„,.i;^-„t 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each qualified apphcant. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE PREDENTAL COURSE 

The requirement for f-issio-s graduation ^om an ac^^^^^^^^^ 

a non-graduate of a secondary school. 

REQUIRED: English (I, II, III, IV). 3 units; ^'^f^-t^^^^^^jtSts. 
unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total 7 umts. 

FLECTIVE- Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, cmcs, 
Eight units must be submitted from this group. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the 
medical sciences, the dental sciences, the ancillary sciences, and clinical 
practice. Instruction consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, 
demonstrations, conferences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral 
reading to train the student in the values and use of dental literature. 

182 



183 



PREDENTAL CURRICULUM 

Semesters 

I I J 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 8f or 21f and 22s) 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) „ 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) « 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) — 4 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) - 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) ^ 1 1 

Freshman Lectures ^ ^ — — 

Total Semester Hours 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay and 8By) 4 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly)... 4 4 

French (French ly or French 3y) or 

German (German ly or German 3y) _ 3 3 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) 4 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 2y) or 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Total Semester Hours - 17 17 

The equivalent of the above curriculum is offered in the Baltimore branch 
of the University. 

Fees for the Predental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing application for admission) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at the time of enrollment) _ 10.00 

♦Tuition for the session, resident student _ 200.00 

♦Tuition for the session, non-resident student 250.00 

Laboratory fee ( each session ) 20.00 

Locker fee (each session) -.. 3.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (each session) 5.00 



♦ Definition of residence given on page 58. 



184 



student Activity Fee— Special 

For the purpose of administering and di«"P»"l"\^^"«"; ,f ,t?lpenS 
JUe student body has voted a fee of f^^J\^:^^^^t^^:r' 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activiiy v. 

Dental Curriculum 
The curriculum is descril,ed in full in the bulletin of the School of 
Dentistry. 

Transfer Students 

Applicants desiring to transfer from another ^-^^^^'^ .^Sd''^"^ 
must have had creditable records at the schools previously attended. 

Annlicants carrying conditions or failures in any year of their previous 
dentlnrruction'^iU not be considered. All records must show an average 
Trade of 5% over the passing mark of the schools m which the transfer 
Stterrearned. Applicants whose records ^^o^J^.^^l^^^^!^, 
conditions will not be considered for admission. The transierring 
must satisfy all requirements for admission. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at 
which time lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the c ose of the 
TesSon'The dates for which are announced in the calendar of the annual 

'^S^^^ar attendance is demanded. Students with less than eighty-five per 
..^t Stendancrin any course will be denied the privilege of final exami- 
ne onT any and an such courses. In certain unavoidable circumstances 
of absence S Dean may honor excuses, but students with less than eighty- 
file per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding class. 
In cases of serious illness, as attested by a physician, students may 
regLerTot later than the twentieth day following the ^d-f ised opemng 
of the regular session. Students may register and enter not later than ten 
days after the beginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged 
as absences from classes. 

Promotion 
TO be prom^ed to^the -Succeeding year ^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^eheduirhorstf 
nZZTZX^l in ave'ragTof 80 per cent on all subjects passed^ 

A grade of 75 per cent is passing. A grade between 60 per cent and 
A graae oi f ^ jg ^ failure. A con- 

185 



Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for tP-.j,„- 
and clinic courses, and text books for lecture courses will k!! f f ' 

the various classes. Each student will Tre^uiS L pLfdeTS^^ 
whatever as necessary to meet the needs of his course, and preTen s^^^ 
to an assigned instructor for inspection No .stnrio^/ ,7-ii ^ • 

to go on With his class who does n'ofret tWs re^Unt. '^ ^""'"^ 

Deportment 

eJ^HrlrTV^ '^'"f '*u^ '^''"^"•^^' ^"*^ ^^^ School of Dentistry requires 

student will kI r" .^o^esty m the transaction of business affairs as a 

TtS'Jlll TfTdX" ^^'^"" °' ^°°' '""^^^ '^'^^'^'=*- "— ^ 

Requirements for Graduation 
wh?hafSt?e?rwin°^ c^nSon^^- ^^ ^'--^ -" ^ —- 
the'agt TStlrT' '""^ documentary evidence that he has attained 

cof;se'^of'studv'of%t''/'fr""" '^" ""^^^ ^"^"'^^'^ *»>« f»" four-year 

duLg^'tLllJlf^orsfi^t^t^ ^ ^^"^^^^ ^--^^ °^ ^* ^-* «0 P- cent 

riot d^e^aSmintr "''^'^^ ^" *^^'"'^ ^"^ •=""'<= -<^«^--"^ "^ the va- 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the collee-e nrin,. f„ ^.i, v • 
ning of final examinations, and must have adjusted Sfi^"- , ^t *'^^'"- 
in the community satisfactorily to those ^o^wCl^brSetf""^ 



186 



FEES FOR THE DENTAL COURSE 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admis- 

Matriculation fee (paid at time of enrollment) 10.00 

♦Tuition for the session, resident student 250.00 

♦Tuition for the session, non-resident student „ 350.00 

Dissecting fee (first semester, freshman year) 15.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) ^ 20.00 

Locker fee — freshman and sophomore years (first semester) 3.00 

Locker fee — junior and senior years (first semester) -.. 5.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit — fresihman and sophomore years (first 

semester) 5.00 

Graduation fee (paid with second semester fees of senior year) 15.00 

Penalty fee for late registration. - - 5.00 

Examinations taken out of class and reexaminations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record will be issued to each student free 

of charge. Each additional copy will be issued only on payment of 1.00 

Student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from 
one professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee 
required by each professional school. 

A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or 
days specified for his school, will be called upon to pay a fine of $5.00. The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins, following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only on the written recommendation of 
the Dean.) 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and pay to the Comptroller one-half of the tuition fee in 
addition to all other fees noted as payable first semester before being ad- 
mitted to class work at the opening of the session. The remainder of tuition 
and second semester fees must be in the hands of the Comptroller on the 
registration day for the second semester. 

According to the policy of the School of Dentistry no fees will be returned. 
In case the student discontinues his course, any fees paid will be credited to 
a subsequent course, but are not transferable. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 



♦ Definition of residence given on page 58. 



187 



Definition of Resident Status of Student 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this state for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this state by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

Summer Courses 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, special courses are 
offered during the summer recess. The course in clinical instruction is 
conducted from June 1 to August 1 and from September 1 to 17 inclusive. 
The course is open only to students registered in the school. It offers op- 
portunities to students carrying conditions in the clinic from the preceding 
session as well as those who desire to gain more extended practice during 
their training period. The clinics are under the direction of capable dem- 
onstrators, full credit being given for all work done. 

The €U>rgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The 
society is named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental 
education, a teacher of many years experience, and during his life a great 
contributor to dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his 
name that the society adopted it. 

Students become eligible for membership at the beginning of their junior 
year if, during their preceding years of the dental course, they have at 
tained a general average of 85 per cent or more in all of their studies. 
Meetings are held once each month, and are addressed by prominent dental 
and medical men, an effort being made to obtain speakers not connected 
with the University. The members have an opportunity, even while stu- 
dents, to hear men associated with other educational institutions. 



Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

vh\ Chanter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental ^^^^^temity w^^^^ 

scholarship recommend them to election. 

Scholarship Loans 
A number of scholar.hip loans from varloo. org«.batlom «''' «f»"»''f"°*' 

,1ZS.. haw boen avaUaW. " f J»- j, j,'^ StUltS 

rvh^^ loans are offered on the basis oi excellence m o^, . 4.. ^ 

^enTand L need on the part of students for -J J-^-^/^t^ 
their course in dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty 
meTd only students in the last two years for such prmleges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation-From this fund, establ^hed 
unS the^U of General Henry Strong, of Chicago, an annual allotment 
under the wui ° ^ p ^.^j Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 

wf of Ml'rylantfT^^^^^^^^ loans available for the use of young men 

Ind women student under the age of twenty-five. 1^^^™""'^^*'?;. ^pior 
Privileges of these loans are limited to students in the junior and senior 
veL^s Only students who through stress of circumstances require financial 
lidand^o have demonstrated excellence in educational progress are con- 
sidered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

Th^ Edward S Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund— Under a pro- 

wS .« M £ devofd to aiding worthy young men m .ecuring dental 

education. v- 

Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni f *»>« Baltimore 
Co le-c of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This 
organtatfon has continued in existence to the present f^^^^^^^^l^e^^ 
chanced to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College oi 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 



• The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the eruardians of or stand in loco parentis to such minor 
students. 



188 



189 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howeix, Dean 

THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickeeson. Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

Charles McHenry Howabd, Esq., A.B., LL.B 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, Esq., LL B 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

G Kennoth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M. 

JOHN S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

student; and ^'^^tZnllert^^^^^^^^ *° 

pronounced to be "bv far tha «,^=<- 7 1 American Review 

which has ever bLoffeVed to trnlr.^*/^!*"'^ ^'' '^' ^^^^^ of law 

of study so compXtrvt Vt ^S "r 1 1^,:^"^"'^' ^ '^"""^ 

years, no regular school of instructrn 1^ law wlropS^Stn 1823 ^Th: 

regular LtructLtherdtwafajiif be 'I T ^^^^T'' ^""^ ^" ^''' 

?estiot elJeJhte'*^*^ ^"' "^"^ "'^'^ ''^^^ ^"^^-^ P-minence in thf pTo' 

Eduttt"o?tt°Atl\'; Ba'rT::? 'f- *'' '^°''""' °' ^'^^ «^^«- ''^ Legal 
AmeHcan^Bar As^-! fnThlnSXTu^S^a;;^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ 

ReSni iTsf ^^^^ '' ''" '^^^'^^^' ^^ ^^ ^PP^-^^ -^ool on the New York 

anra^eersttet^'in^^ '"f ^' '" '''^' ^^ ^^^^^^ -t Redwood 

ana i^reene Streets m Baltimore. In addition to classrooms and offices for 

190 



the Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room, stu- 
dents* lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter containing 
a collection of carefully selected text-books, English and American reports, 
leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. No fee is 
charged for the use of the library, which is open from 9.00 A. M. to 10.30 
P. M., except on Saturday, when it closes at 5.00 P. M. 

Course of Instruction 

The School of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and the 
Evening School. The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the 
standards of work and graduation requirements are the same. 

The Day School course covers a period of three years of thirty-two weeks 
each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the day, 
chiefly in the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on Mon- 
day evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 P. M. 

The Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty-six 
weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6.30 to 9.30 P. M. This 
plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student. 

The course of instruction in the School of Law is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the Bar. 
Instruction is offered in the various branches of the common law, of equity, 
of the statute law of Maryland, and of the public law of the United States. 
The course of study embraces both the theory and practice of the law, and 
aims to give the student a broad view of the origin, development, and func- 
tion of law, together with a thorough practical knowledge of its principles 
and their application. Analytical study is made of the principles of sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and a carefully directed practice court enables 
the student to get an intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
any peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such. All of the 
subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included in the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 



Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work; that is, the completion of at least one-half the work acceptable for a 
Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study by the 
University of Maryland or other principal college or university in this State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and exclusive of 

191 



credit earned in non-theory courses m military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
without intellectual content of substantial value. Such pre-legal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with a scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation in the institu- 
tion attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
age number of students admitted as beginning regular law students during 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts 

and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in arts and law leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program in college and pre-legal sub- 
jects will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park. The fourth year they will register in the School of Law, and 
upon the successful completion of the work of the first year in the Day 
School, or the equivalent work in the Evening School, the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts will be awarded. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by reference to 
page 120. 



courses and be admitted to advanced standing. No credit will be ^Jven f or 
stX pursued in a law office, and no degree will be conferred until after 
one year of residence and study at this school. 



•$ 



2.00 
10.00 
15.00 



$200.00 

150.00 



Fees and Expenses 

The charges for instruction are as follows: 

Registration fee to accompany application....- - 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration 

Diploma fee, payable upon graduation - 

Tuition fee, per annum: 

Day School -- -- 

Evening School — ~- - 

An additional tuition fee of $50.00 per annum must be paid by students 
who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

The tuition fee is payable in two equal instalments, one-half at the t me 
of JTgiXation for tJe first semester, and one-half at the time of registra- 
tion for the second semester. 

Further information and a special catalogue of the School o^ Law may 
be haTupon application to the School of Law, University of Maryland, 
Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere in 
a law school which is either a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty Council, upon presentation of a certificate from such 
law school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the successful 
completion of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many hours 
as are required for such subjects in this school, receive credit for such 

192 



193 



i 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc, D., LL.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

MAURICE} C. PiNCOFFS, B.S., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 
Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 
William R. Amberson, Ph.D. 
Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in the United States 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory part 
of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) • and 
here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of diseases of 
women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1828 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 

ainical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest institu- 
tion for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 

194 



Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year 19,089 
persons. 

In connection with the University Hospital, an outdoor obstretrical clinic 
is conducted. During the past year 1,632 cases were delivered in the 
University Hospital and under supervision in the Outdoor Clinic. 

The hospital now has about 400 beds — for medical, surgical, obstretrical, 
and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical material for 
third-year and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be 
the same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Oncology, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, 
Oral Surgery, Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. All students in their 
junior year work two hours daily for ten weeks in one of these dispensaries; 
all students in the senior year work one hour each day; 103,143 cases were 
treated last year, which fact gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries 
for clinical teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes 
are as follows: Gross Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Physiology, 
Bacteriology and Immunology, Biological Chemistry, Pharmacology, Path- 
ology, Clinical Pathology, and Operative Surgery. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Randolph Winslow Scholarship; Uni- 
versity Scholarship; Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky 
Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships; Israel 
and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarship, and Dr. Horace Bruce Hetrick Scholar- 
ship. 

Requirements for Admission 
The minimum requirements for admission to the School of Medicine are 
as follows: 

(a) Graduation from an approved secondary school, or the equivalent in 
entrance examinations, and 
*(b) Three years of acceptable premedical credit earned in an approved 
college of arts and sciences. The quantity and quality of this pre- 
professional course of study shall be not less than that required 
for recommendation by the institution in which the premedical courses 
are being, or have been, studied. 



• For admission to the Premedical Curriculum the requirements are the same as for the 

freshman class in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University with the prescribed 

addition of two years of one foreign language. (See Section I, Entrance.) 

195 



The premedical curriculum shall include basic courses in 

English 

Biology (Invertebrate and Vertebrate Zoology are preferred to Gen- 
eral Biology) 
Inorganic Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry 
Physics 
French or German, 

and such elective courses as will complete a balanced three year schedule 
of study. 

The elective courses should be taken from the following three groups: 



Humanities 

English 

Scientific German, or 
French (A reading 
knowledge of either 
language is desirable, 
although German is 
preferred) 

Philosophy 



Natural Sciences 

Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy 

Embryology 

Physical Chemistry or 
Quantitative Analy- 
sis (Physical Chemis- 
try preferred) 

Mathematics 



Social Sciences 

Economics 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Sociology, etc. 



Histological Technic* 

Not less than 36 semester hours (or the equivalent in quarter or session 
hours, or courses) should be taken in the humanities and social sciences. 

Wherever possible, a premedical student should complete a four-year 
curriculum and earn the baccalaureate degree. 

In accepting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary school and col- 
lege; satisfactory scores in the Moss Aptitude Test (which is given each 
fall by the Association of American Medical Colleges in the institutions 
that are preparing students for medicine); the most favorable letters of 
recommendation from their respective premedical committees, or from one 
instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics; 
and who in all other respects give every promise of becoming successful 
students and physicians of high standing. 

Application blanks may be secured by addressing the Committee on 
Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Appli- 
cations for admission will be received beginnng October 1, 1938. 

Candidates for admission who are accepted will receive certificates of 
entrance from the Director of Admissions of the University. 



Expenses 

*The following are the fees for students in the School of Medicine: 
MatHculation Resident— N on-Resident Laboratory Graduation 

$10.00 (only once) $450.00 $600.00 $25.00 (yearly) $15.00 

Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore : 

jl^^ff^ Low Average Liberal 

Books •■-- ?50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals -.. 20 20 ZU 

Board, eight months - 200 250 275 

•^ *. 64 80 lOU 

Room rent - — " 

Clothing and Laundry...... 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 oU 

T^jtal -....- ^ ?409 $556 $720 

"T^ThT above tuition fees applicable until the end of the session 1937-1938 only. The 
right Is reserved to make Changes in these fees whenever the authorities deem them 
expedient. 



♦Shoojld not be taken in a three-year premedical preparation. 

196 



197 



SCHOOL OP NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and Superintendent of Nurses 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming imder the same government. The school is non-sec- 
tarian, the only religious services being morning prayers. 

The new University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital, contain- 
ing about 400 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered 

The program of study of the school is planned for two groups of students: 
(a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present record 
showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required amount of pre- 
paratory study. Preference will be given to students who rank in the 
upper third of the graduating classes in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance: required (7) 
and elective (8) units. ' 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, drawing, econom- 
ics, general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational subjects, 
languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any other 
subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory school for which 
graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Eight 
units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than four 
units can pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet certain other 
defimte requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for 
nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
Zi) to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18 
Women of superior education and culture are given preference, provided 
they meet the requirements in other particulars. If possible a personal 
mterview with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday 
or Friday from 11:00 A. M. to 12:00 M. 



Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, all 
students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the beginning 
of their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible for exami- 
nation and license on completion of this course. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, neglect, and failure to develop those qualities considered essen- 
tial in a nurse, are causes for dismissal at any time by the President of 
the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Special catalogue will be 
sent upon request.) The three-year program is designed to meet the 
requirements for the diploma in Nursing, and comprises the work of the 
first, second, and third hospital years. 

^ Admission to the School 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February, and those for 
the fall term in September or October, and the five year course in September. 

Hours of Duty 

During the preparatory period the students are engaged in class work 
for the first four months with no general duty in the hospital, and for 
the remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight-hour 
duty. During the first, second, and third years the students are on eight- 
hour day duty and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays and 
Sundays. The night-duty periods are approximately two months each, with 
one day at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The period 
of night duty is approximately five to six months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours. This instruction includes courses in anat- 
omy, physiology, cookery and nutrition, dosage and solution, hygiene, bac- 
teriology, chemistry, materia medica, practical nursing, bandaging, ethics, 
and history of nursing. During the last two months of the probation 
period the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction 
in bedside nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to 
them by the Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the 
students are required to pass satisfactorily both the written and the 



198 



199 



practical tests; failure to do so will be sufficient reason for terminating 
the course at this point. 

Sickness 

A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill all students are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two weeks 
during the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the 
school decide that through the time lost the theoretical work has not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in the current year, 
it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A period of four 
weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first year, and the 
second year. 

Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student A 
student activity fee of $5.00 is to be paid each year at the beginning of 
the first semester by each student. These will not be returned. A student 
receives her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from 
the date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides her own 
umforms, obtained through the hospital at a nominal cost. After being 
accepted as a student nurse, she wears the uniform supplied by the hospital. 
The student is also provided with text-books and shoes. Her personal 
expenses during the course of training and instruction will depend entirely 
upon her individual habits and tastes. 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years, including the 
prehmmary term of six months. The course of instruction is, in general 
as follows: * 

First Year 
First Semester 

The first semester, or preliminary term, is devoted to theoretical instruc- 
tion given in the class rooms of the Nursing School and in lecture rooms 
and laboratories of the Medical School, and to supervised practice in the 
wards of the hospital. The courses offered are anatomy, physiology, 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solutions, chemistry, bacteriology, hygiene, 
history of nursing, ethics, psychology, principles and practice of nursing, 
bandaging and surgical supplies. 

Excursions are made to the filtration plant, hygienic dairies, markets, 
and other places of interest. 

At the close of the first semester the students are reqtiired to pass 
satisfactorily both written and practical tests. Failure to do this will be 
sufficient reason to terminate the course at this period. 



Second Semester 

During this term the students receive theoretical instruction in general 
surgery, surgical technic, massage, diet therapy, materia medica, advanced 
nursing procedures and charting, and the case study method. Ward 
assignments and instruction provide experience in medical, surgical, gyneco- 
logical and urological nursing, also in the diet school and outpatients 
department. This experience is under the direction and supervision of 
the supervisors of the departments. 

Second Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes general medicine, 
clinical pathology, venereal and skin diseases, x-ray, radium, communicable 
diseases, pediatrics, obstretrics, gynecology, orthopedics, and diseases of 
eye, ear, nose, and throat. The hospital assignment here provides instruc- 
tion and experience on the public wards, on the private floors, and in the 
operating room. 

Third Year 

During the third year the theoretical instruction includes psychiatry, 
public health, professional problems, and survey of the nursing field. The 
assignments include experience in psychiatric nursing, in public health 
nursing, in obstetrics and pediatrics. 

Attendance at Classes 

Attendance is required at all classes for each course for which the student 
is registered. Absences are excused only in cases of illness or absence 
from the school. 

Examinations 

These are both written and oral, and include practical tests. Failure . 
in two or more subjects may necessitate increasing the length of the course. 

During the three years of nursing experience in the various depart- 
ments of the hospital, a monthly record of the student's nursing work is 
submitted by the nurse in charge. The student's standing is based upon 
the examinations in the theoretical subjects and these monthly records. 

Graduation 

The diploma* of the school will be awarded to those who have success- 
fully completed the required course of three years, and have maintained 
the required average in each course and phase of work. 

Five- Year Program 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or prehospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University, during which period the student has an introduction to the 



200 



201 



general cultural subjects which are considered fundamental in any college 
training. At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing 
in Baltimore. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing are 
conferred upon students who complete successfully the prescribed combined 
academic and nursing program, maintaining the required averages in both 
branches of the course. 

Scholarships 

One scholarship has been established by the Alumnae of the Training 
School, which entitles a nurse to a six week's course at Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest 
excellence, and who desires to pursue graduate study and special work. 
There are two scholarships of the value of $50.00 each: the Edwin and 
Leander M. Zimmerman prize for practical nursing and for displaying the 
greatest interest and sympathy for the patients; and the Elizabeth Collins 
Lee prize, given to the student having the second highest average in schol- 
arship. An alumnae pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board to 
a student who at the completion of three years shows marked executive 
ability. A prize of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst to a student 
who at the completion of three years shows exceptional executive ability. 



202 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 

Faculty Council 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D. Sc.D 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.G., B.S., Ph.D. 

J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy. The latter was organized in 1841, and operated as an inde- 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 
professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the present University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission, just prior to 1865, it has continuously exercised 
its function as a teaching institution. 

Locaiion 

The School of Pharmacy is located at Lombard and Greene Streets, in 
close proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry. 

AIMS 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential 
in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants 
for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the 
facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the 
practice of the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical re- 
search. 

Combined Curriculum in Pharmacy and Medicine 

The combined course in Pharmacy and Medicine leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy was discontinued in 1936. 

Students now in the University who have elected the combined course 
may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the 
first three years of the required work of the pharmacy curriculum, together 
with four semester hours in vertebrate zoology and the first three years 
of the work in medicine. 

203 



students who hereafter desire to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Science 
may do so by acquiring in summer school the additional credit in the 
arts and sciences required for a combined degree (90 semester hours). 

To become eligible to take the medical work of the combined course 
students must have completed the above work in pharmacy and the arts 
and sciences with an average grade of B or better. In addition, they 
must meet the other requirements for admission to the School of Medicine. 

Recognition 

This school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of the Association is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions holding membership must 
maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and graduation 
Through the influence of this Association, uniform and higher standards of 
education have been adopted from time to time; and the fact that several 
States by law or by Board ruling recognize the standards of the Association 
is evidence of its influence. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
Its diploma is recognized in all States. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate 

An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary school which is approved 
by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by an accredited agency 
of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation not less than 
15 umts, grouped as follows: 

Distribution Of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Required 
subjects 7 units, electives 8 units, total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, 
civics, drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home economics, 
vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography physics 
zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory school 
for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance 
Total, 8 units. 



♦The right is reserved to refuse admission even to annliranf*? wlfi, e»r««?^^4. i, i 4.' 
credit if their presence in the School would in the %dgmint of thp F«.^,Ttt r^'' ""m^k" 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. Jua&mcnt of the Faculty Council be 

204 



A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full-year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the State certification requirements will be admitted upon presentation 
of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not 
meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evidence 
of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the EHrector 
of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. Such exami- 
nation will be given during the first week of each of the months of July, 
August, and September at Baltimore and other convenient places in the 
State. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-coHege grade of the school. If the school 
does not have such a quality grade, then the average of the applicant's 
school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the 
lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination 

An applicant from a secondary school who is not eligible for admission by 
certificate may seek entrance through either of two types of examination: 
(1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for permission to report 
at the University for an examination, the result of which will be used 
in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine whether the 
applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting 
evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations in 
the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, New York City, the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, Albany, and the Department of Public Instruction 
of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy holding membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy will receive credit for the courses 
which correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the first 

205 



three years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced standing, 
provided he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper 
certificate of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic insti- 
tution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
ional requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Fresh- 
man Class from Secondary School." 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty 
Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary train- 
ing of the applicant is sufficient. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum. The work of the last 
year must have been in courses offered in this school, and must have 
been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for the last two years of not less than twice the total semester 
hours of credit scheduled for that period. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

The matriculation ticket must be procured from the office of the School 
of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before one enters classes. After 
matriculation, all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. The last date of matriculation is Sept. 22, 1938. 

Expenses 

Lraboratory 
Tuition and 

Matriculation Resident — Non-Resident Breakage Graduation 

$10.00 (only once) $200.00 $250.00 $60.00 (yearly) $15.00 

Tuition for the first semester and laboratory and breakage fee shall be 
paid to the Comptroller at the time of registration; and tuition for the 
second semester and graduation fee (the latter returned in case of failure) 
on or before Jan. 31, 1939. 

A bulletin giving details of the course in Pharmacy may be obtained by 
addressing the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

206 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

TT r Bvrd Executive Officer 

F. K. Haszard .Executive Secretary 

The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of A^i<^}t"'? 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Powers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows: 

"The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding Srbreeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
themrf and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the rais- 
S!^sition, fnd sale of farm, orchard, forest, and nursery products 
Generally, and p ant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same the 
Separation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection, control, and distri- 
Eon orantaal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds fertihzers 
aSltural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals and biological 
Sucte and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
Sfsf s'ucrinformation, statistics, and the results of such mvesti^tions 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the ef- 
ficirnfd^S^nation thereof; and except where such POwers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
co^ttlTtiie herSi recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
Z agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of de- 
!irabf iSmrgration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
reilatiorif respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
Xe State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
°aw and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
p^ished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execS and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested ^th such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
Tthe other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

Under the above authority and by special legislation, all regjilatory work 
is Conducted under the general authority of the State Board. This includes 
the following services: 

207 



LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

This Service has charge of regulatory work in connection with the control 
of animal and poultry diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis, Bang's Disease, 
hog cholera, encephalomyolitis, rabies, anthrax, blackleg, and scabies in 
animals; and pullorum disease and blackhead in poultry. The Service co- 
operates in these activities with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Well equipped laboratories for research, diagnostic work, and the examina- 
tion of specimens, are maintained at College Fark, and a branch laboratory 
for the convenience of persons residing in the Northern and Western parts 
of the State is maintained at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 



Mark Welsh 



.State Veterinarian 



STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland. 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for the 
inspection of all nurseries and the suppression of injurious insects and dis- 
eases affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is con- 
ducted in close association with the departments of Entomology and 
Pathology of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under the 
authority of the law creating the department as well as the State Board of 
Agriculture. For administrative purposes, the department is placed under 
the Extension Service of the University on account of the close association 
of the work. 

T. B. Symons Director of Extension Service 

E. N. Cory State Entomologist 

C. E. Temple _ State Pathologist 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

(Feeds, Fertilizer, and Lime) 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D State Chemist 

L. E. Bopst, B.S „ Associate State Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson, M.S _ Chief Inspector 

W. J. Footen Inspector 

E. M. Zentz „ _ Inspector 

H. R. Walls _ Asst. Chemist and Micro-Analyst 

L. H. Van Wormer „ _ Assistant Chemist 

R. E. Baumgardner, B.S Assistant Chemist 

Albert Heagy, B.S Assistant Chemist 

Robert G. Fuerst - Laboratory Helper 

208 



SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

The Seed Inspection Service is placed by law under the general super- 
vision of the A^icultural Experiment Station. This service takes samples 
of seed offered for sale, and tests them for quality and germination. 



F. S. Holmes. 



.Seed Inspector 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Department of Forestry was created and organized to protect and 
deX ^^Suable forest resources of the State; to carry on a campaign 
orpducatiL and to instruct counties, towns, corporations, and individuals 
t ttt^e^2^^ and necessity of protecting from fire and other enemies 
Setiif lands of the State. All correspondence and inquiries should be 
Iddrestr^^ The State Forester, 1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. 

Indies have been made of the timber resources of each of the twenty- 
thrt co^nS aTd the statistics and information collected are published 

ZVe:T^iUion. accompanied by a -^-^^^. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
ment also administers six state forests, comprising about 5,000 acres, ine 
W^de Tree Law directs the Department of Forestry to care for trees 
Jrowng within the right-of-way of any public highway m the State. A 
ItaTeForest Nursery, established in 1914, is located at College Park. 

F.W.Besley - State Forester 

STATE WEATHER SERVICE 

Edward B. Mathews - --;; - ^i^^^tor 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. ^ 

John R. Weeks - Meteorologist 

U. S. Custom House, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The State Weather Service compiles local statistics regarding climatic 
conditions and disseminates information regarding the climatology of Mary- 
LnHnder the Regents of the University of Maryland through the State 
GeoloSt as successor to the Maryland State Weather Service Commission 
The Ttate Geologist is ex-officio Director, performing all the functions of 
former officers with the exception of Meteorologist, who is commissioned by 
i^rZyf^orZ serves as liaison officer with the United States Weather 
Bureau. All activities except clerical are performed voluntarily. 



209 



MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Edward B. Mathews , State Geologist 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Geological and Economic Survey Commission is authorized unaer the 
general jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
to conduct the work of this department. The State Geological and Eco- 
nomic Survey is authorized to make the following: 

Topographic surveys showing the relief of the land, streams, roads, rail- 
ways, houses, etc. ' 

Geological surveys showing the distribution of the geological formations 
and mineral deposits of the State. 

Agricultural soil surveys showing the areal extent and character of the 
different soils. 

Hydrographic surveys to determine the available waters of the State for 
potable and industrial uses. 

Magnetic surveys to determine the variation of the needle for land 
surveys. 

A permanent exhibit of the mineral wealth of the State in the old Hall 

""L^ 5^^^ ^\ *^^ ^*^^^ ^^"'^' *^ ^^^^^ ^^w materials are constantly 
added to keep the collection up-to-date. 



210 



SECTION in 

Description Of Courses 

Th& courses of instruction described in this section are offered at College 
Park. Those offered in the Baltimore Schools a/re described in the separate 
announcements issued by the several schools. 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically: 

Page 

Agricultural Economics - 212 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 215 

Agricultural Engineering „ 217 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) 218 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry „ 220 

Art 227 

Astronomy _ - 227 

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Botany — 231 

Business Administration 235 

Chemistry 244 

Classical Languages _ « 251 

Comparative Literature ...._ , 252 

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Education ..- — -.... 256 

Engineering 270 

English Language and Literature 280 

Entomology -.... — 287 

Farm Forestry ^ - 290 

jf arm ivLanagemenb — .^ — .•■ — ._ .._...._ — _ .._ _.. ^x^ 



French 



309 



Genetics and Statistics 290 

Geology ; 291 

German 312 



Greek 



251 



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Home Economics ^ 294 

Horticulture 298 

^ VVwX X £^X Abaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa .•aa«>aaa«a>aaaa>asaaaaaa.a^aaa..aa.*aaaaaaaaaaaaaa.a^aaBaaaaaaBaaaaaaaaaaa..>. aa aaaa aa a Aa a a* a * a a ^ a aa a*a a aa a aaaaa aaaa^ aawaaa aa a ^J ^L ^K 

Latin „ _ 251 

Library Science 301 

Mathematics - - 301 

Military Science and Tactics „. 308 

Modern Languages 309 

Music - - .- 316 

211 



Philosophy __ ^^^^ 

Physics -. ^^'^ 

Political Science IZZIIII'I " ^"" ^^^ 

Poultry Husbandry ZZZI~ ^^^ 

Psychology. - ^^4 

Sociology _. _ "•" ^26 

Speech. „ " "■ ^28 

Spanish ^^^ 

Veterinary Science "ZZZZZI """ ^^^ 

Zoology 235 

200-9Q0 s^^uuctLCh, luu-iyy, courses for erraduates. 



which 
second 



A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester e-ivino. fh. t, 
places of meeting, and other information requiidTv fh/'-t^ ^ ^ - 

out his program Students will obtain thesT schedll eXj^n tt^^S^^^^^^^ 

of Studied SecTfon I ^ °"* *^'" P'""^'"""^ "^ ''^^'^-' «'«> Regulation 

ASS. J; izzL'r:irT:zz.2^r ^^^^"'• 

labo'ratr^'" ^^"'^""'•«' ^"^""''•^Z ««^ «-o«.ce. (3)-Two lectures; one 
lattn '^'Ir ''''. '""l"' •''"^""^ ^'* agriculture as an industry and its re- 

can agriculture is briefly reviewed Fr^!,w • ^^^ ^'^^'''^ °t Amen- 
Hvestock products of theVniS sttef! ' ''' '' "'°" *'^ '''''' "°^ ^^^ 
A. E 2s. Farm Organization (3)— Three lectures 

mcludes^^ choice of agriculture as a vocatio^? a^^p^at^^^^^^^ 

*See also related courses in Economics and in Business Administration. 

212 



particular enterprises; types of farming and factors influencing the same; 
farm returns; the use of labor, machinery, and land in production; combi- 
nation of crop and livestock enterprises as they affect the farmer's income; 
and a study of successful and unsuccessful Maryland farms. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. 100 f. Agricultural Economics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 57 f or s. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, the tariff, price movements, and marketing. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 57 f or s. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Cooperation in Agriculture (3) — Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organi- 
zations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Coddington.) 

A. E. 104 s. Agricultural Finance (3) — Three lectures. 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm organizations 
and industries. Farm insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance 
with special reference to mutual development — ^how provided, benefits, and 
needed extension. (Coddington.) 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given in the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. 

(Staff.) 

A. E. 106 s. Prices (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Ives.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

213 



A. E. 108 f. Farm Management (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 y. Research Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

A. E. lllf. Land Economics (3) — Three lectures. 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources. A 
study of major land problems and land policies including erosion and its 
control; farm tenancy; tax delinquency and tax reverted lands; land use 
planning and production control; public policies for facilitating land use 
adjustments; and directional measures for discouraging undesirable land 
uses. (Coddington.) 

For Graduates 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. (DeVault.) 

A, E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203y. Research (8). 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under 
the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original in- 
vestigation in problems of agricultural economics, and the results will be 
presented in the form of theses. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 210 s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture: general prop- 
erty tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license taxes, in- 
heritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm tax reduc- 
tion through greater efficiency and economies in local government. 

(DeVault and Walker.) 

214 



A. E. 211 f. Taxation in Theory and Practice (3)-Two lectures; one 

laboratory period a week. taxation upon the welfare of 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of ^^^fj^^^/^ j^^gg ^^^ license 
society; theory of taxation: the ^-^^\^^^^^^^ inheritance 

taxes, the income tax, f ^ ^f^^^^^ recent tax reforms; 

and estate taxes; recent ^^^^^^^^^^^^ governmental units; practical 

conflicts and duplication m taxation among g .p^Vault and Walker.) 

and current problems in taxation. „ , ,. ,ox Two 

A. E. 212 f. Land Vtilization and Agricultural Product^on (3)-Two 
double lecture periods a week^ .^.^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^., 

A presentation by regions of the basic P^^^ ^ cpttlement and of the 

and social forces that have influenced ^ ^^l^^^^^^ 

resultant utilization of the land and P^^/l^^^^^^^^ ^tiliza- 

by a consideration of regiona trends and m^^^^^^^^ ^ .^ 

tion and agricultural production, and the outlook ^^^^^^^ 

each region. Products and Standards of Living 

A. E. 213 s. Consumption of Farm froaucis ajux 

/Q^-i-Two double lecture periods a week. xTofj^r. 

(3) iwo 00 population and migration for the Nation 

A presentation of the trends ^^ PJ^ products and their regional sig- 

and by States, of trends m exports of ^ a™ P^^^^^ ^^ ^^^.,^,, p,,^- 

nificance, of trends m diet and m P^^^^^^^^^^ that appear likely to influ- 
ucts; followed by a consideration ''^^^^ ^^f'l'^^^^ as con- 

ence these trends in the future, and of the outlook ^^^^^^ 

trasted with a more self-sufficing agriculture. 

A. E. 214s. Advanced Cooperation ^'^}r^'^^ ^^"^'^^ of improving the 

An appraisal of agricultural -operation as a means of P ^ J^^.^^^ 

financial status of farmers. More ^pecificalb the cou^e - ^^^^.^^^^^ 

analysis and appraisal of specific types and classes ^Coddington.) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

PKOFESSOKS Con^KMAN, CAKPENI^R; MR. WORTHINGTON, 

Mr. Poffenbekger. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R ED. 101 f. Farm Practicums and Dew^mtrations (l)-One laboratory. 
Cannot be used for graduate credit. learning ac- 

This course is designed to assist JJ-f ^^^ j^^^-th Z prSs of 
quired in the several departments of the Unwers^ty P ^^^^^^^^ 

doing and demonstrating which he ^^^^^^ *J.f,^J"„g i„ the essential 
as a teacher. It aims particularly to check *"^ ™^^« ^ introduce 
practicunis and demonstrations m vocaW^^^^^^^ -^f^ „„ •„ ,,, 

l^ to the conditions -de' ^^1 h ^f ^ -\\wi departments. Laboratory 
patronage areas and laboratories oi vuc (Poffenberger.) 

practice in deficiencies required. 



215 



CaL?bi us:d foTZ^^rJ^ZS:' Z>-on.e.a«o«. (l)-0„e laboratory. 
Continuation of R. Ed. 101 f 
R Ed 107 4^ ni. .. ' (Poffenberger.) 

Open to juniors and s^l"-' rZill^T"''- P':^^^^"'^"«. P^^h. 10 f. 
cultural Education. ' ^ ^ °^ '^"'°'" ^" K*"-^' Life and Agri- 

IT.is course deals with an analysis of pupi, .earning in class groups. 
R Fn irvQ r /rr ,. ^ (Cotterman.) 

lectures" ZUZTnEfZt\ TlTt i'T^""'' ^^>-^^- 

tiotiTSt^r r^pi *'^ ^'^^J:-"^ ^^^^ -''-■' 'lep^rt.l of 'oca- 

ing ProSmtre o LStraTal" ^"P---<^ f-- 

and objective; and metSs in ^"l,^^"''^.'-^*"'" <>f Future Farmer work, 

methods m all-day, continuation, and adult instruction. 

R. Eo no s. Rural Life and Education (3)-Three lecturer""""' 

tiet^sTrir; :rintSs7/ror r^^^^^ ^* --^'^ - --• — - 

normal life in rural areal earlv h!- P^*''''".^«^« «^^««' the possibilities of 
culture. A. , P»J«?i'r„J^S p^^l tTatl"*" '" r"'""'' »^- 

Ob's.™ I ir^::Z"z Tz I'-'-'r '"-- ">-^'"»*- 

and leach In cooperation with tho ^i'tr, u '"* """"■• "■'«" I'""""* 
not le.s than t„iy p JodTS ^^.SL, attfC """ "' °'"'™'™' 

(Cotterman, Worthington.) 
216 



For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201 f; 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3). Prerequisite, R. Ed. 
110 s, or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of public education as compon- 
ent parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and human de- 
velopment. Discussions, assigned readings, and major term papers in the 
field of the student's special interest. (Not offered, 1938-1939.) (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f ; 208 s. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Science, 
and Shop (2-4). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. The three 
phases of the vocational teacher's program — all day, part-time, and adult 
work — receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-4). Credit hours according to work done. 
Students must fbe specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter; Associate Professor Krewatch; Assistant 

Professor Burkhardt. 

Agr. Engr. 101 f. Farm Machinery (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse- and tractor- 
drawn machinery. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual 
machines, their calibration, adjustment, and repair. 

Agr. Engr. 102 s. Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (3) — Two lec- 
tures: one laboratory. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the various types of in- 
ternal combustion engines used in farm practice. 

Agr. Engr. 104 f. Farm Shop Work (1) — One laboratory. 

A study of practical farm shop exercises, offered primarily for prospective 
teachers of vocational agriculture. 

Agr. Engr. 105 f. Farm Buildings (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. 

217 



f llTf f al'draT''^ '^''"'"'^^ (2)-0„e lecture; one laboratory 

construction. A smaHer ^amount o^time^^^^^^ ^T^' '"' ™"^*'>'^''^ "^ 

open ditches, and the laws relating thereto ^ "'"'" '^'^'"^Se by 

AGRONOMY 
Division of Crops 

PROFESSORS METZGER, KEMP; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EpPO^Y- 

Mr. a. W. Woods. ' 

Hiry/dLSuTon''ZotT"''7 ^'^-''"° '^'=*"-'- «- '-l>-atory 
forage. P^t^ cotra^tS^nr^^^^^^^^ -<^ -s of cereal. 

CoZuatitn^fXotTf!''''''""^''^ '''-''-' '-'-'-' ^ '^"-tory. 

Agrox 102 /"r "^f T""^ Undergraduates and Graduates 

t^o::ZecZLJ^::':^Z:i 'Z it-? '^ °^ ^)-Students. other than 

Part one (Gra^l Fa^ir^JjZUyf^^Te'Zefl'' f ' ''^^^^ ---- 
classifications and grades as re,^,^! TTl \? laboratory. The market 

Markets, and practice t de^S^rgrtdeJ XnT' .'^ " ^"^^^" "^ 
See<i Jud,in, and Identification)-^!, faSoratory " ^'^""' "^''' ''^ 

Agron. 103 f. Crop Breedinn (9\ r>„ i x (Eppley.) 

requisite. G. and S. ^f '^^'^^ (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 

cro^Lpt:Sr ' '"^^"^ ^^ ^^^"^^ '° ^^^'^ -P«. and methods used in 

advanced study of crop prob.rS c^Cs^2^s::cfariieTt?:^^^^^^^^ 

Agron. 121s. Methods of Crov anri <^n.i j *• • (Staff.) 

tures. ' ^ "^^ -^^^ investigations (2)— Two lee- 

(Metzger.) 
For Graduates 

compSd'"''- "^^"^ ^'•^^'^^^ (4-10)-Credits determined by work ac- 

adJp'L'rrf t:'^^5r^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^-- ^OSf. but Will be 

choice of material to suit spedalcases ^ ""^"^^ "^'^ ''" ^""^^'^ '" 

AGRON. 203 y Seminar (2)-0ne r;port period each week ^"""''^ 

pitsrdLiint^s ;Se-^x; td^:r - ™ --- 

218 



Agron. 209 y. Research (6-8) — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list of 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 

Professors Bruce, Thomas; Lecturer Thom. 

Soils If and s. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5) — Three lectures; two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Geol. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, Chem. 12 y. 

A study of the principles involved in soil formation and classification. 
The influence of physical, chemical, and biological activities on plant growth, 
together with the use of fertilizers in the maintenance of soil fertility. 
Lectures may be taken without the laboratory. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 102 s. Soil Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils I. 

A study of the soil fertility systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems, and the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. The practi- 
cal work includes laboratory and greenhouse practice in soil improvement. 

Soils 103 f. Soil Geography (3) — Two lectures; one discussion period. 

A study of the genealogy of soils, the principal soil regions of North 
America, and the classification of soils. Field trips will be made to empha- 
size certain important phases of the subject. 

Soils 112 s. Soil Conservation (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the factors relating to soil preservation, including the influence 
of cropping and soil management practices, fertilizer treatments, construc- 
tive and destructive agencies of man and nature on conservation, history of 
research in soil erosion, and field trips to soil demonstration areas. 

For Graduates 

Soils 204 s. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of 
organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. 



i 



Soils 201 y. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 
Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. 

219 



(Staff.) 



Soils 202 y. Soil Technology (7-5 f, 2 s) — Three lectures; two labora- 
tories first semester; two lectures second semester. Prerequisites, Geol. 1, 
Soils 1, and Chem. 1. 

In the first semester, chemical and physico-chemical study of soil prob- 
lems as encountered in field, greenhouse, and laboratory. In the second 
semester, physical and plant nutritional problems related to the soil, 

(Thomas.) 

ANIMAL AND DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Ikeler, Meade, Ingham, Clark, Vial, Barker; Associate 
Professors Berry, England; Assistant Professors Hughes, Bogue; 

Assistants Butljer, Loyd. 

Animal Husbandry 
A. H. If. General Animal Husbandry (2) — Two laboratories. 

General view — Animal V2, Dairy V2, First half of course is devoted to 
the place of livestock in the farm organization. General principles under- 
lying efficient livestock operations. Brief survey of the breeds and the 
market types and classes of livestock, together with an insight into our 
meat supply. Second half of course is devoted to the general topic of dairy- 
ing and milk production, and covers a brief review of the breeds of dairy 
cattle and the feeding, management, and handling of commercial dairy 
herds. (Ingham, Bogue.) 

A. H. 2s. General Animal Husbandry (2) — Two laboratories. 

Types and market classes of beef cattle, sheep, hogs, horses. An outline 
of the types and market classes of cattle, hogs, sheep, and horses, supple- 
mented by trips to large typical central livestock markets. Emphasis is 
placed on the selection and judging of the various classes of livestock. A 
review of the entire commercial livestock and meat industry. (Clark, Bogue.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. lOOf. Breeds of Horses and Beef Cattle (2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, A. H. 2s. 

A complete review of the types, characteristics, and general history of 
the various breeds of draft horses and beef cattle. This course is designed 
to familiarize students with the general use and adaptability of the breeds 
of draft horses and beef cattle that figure in Americans draft horse and 
beef cattle industry. Laboratory consists of comparing specimens of the 
various breeds with emphasis on breed characteristics of the different breeds 
involved. (Clark, Bogue ) 

A. H. 101s. Breeds of Sheep and Swine (2) — ^Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 2s. 

A complete review of the breeds of sheep and hogs, including a review 
of the history of the different breeds and the importance of the different 
breeds in our livestock farming industry. Laboratory work centers around 
the study and comparison of the breed characteristics of the various breeds 
of sheep and hogs. (Clark, Bogue.) 

220 



A. H. 102f. Feeds and Feeding (3)— One laboratory; two lectures. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Chem. ly and Chem. 12Ay. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 

various feeds to the several classes of livestock. Feeding standards, the 

calculation and compounding of rations. ^^^^ *-' 

A. H. 103s. Principles of Breeding (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Senior year. Prerequisite, G. and S. lOlf. 

This course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity, variation, selection, development, systems of breedmg, aijjj J^"^' 
gree work. 

A. H. 104f. Livestock Management, Horses, Beef Cattle (2)— Two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, A. H. 2s. 

A thorough livestock management course designed to familiarize students 
with tie practical handling and management of draft horses and beef 
Tattle under farm conditions. Students are given actual P-^^^"^*^'"- 
ing in maintaining, feeding, fitting,, and preparing animals for show sa^e, 
and work purposes; also practice in trimming feet, shoeing, dressing horns 
dehorning, and the many other things pertaimng to the handling o^f d^^ft 
horses and beef cattle. ^ ' 

A. H. 105s. Livestock Management, Sheep and Swine (2)— Two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, A. H. 2s. ,, * v 

Mostly a laboratory course, thoroughly covering the entire field of live- 
stock management as it pertains to sheep and hogs Practice is given ,n 
the fitting, grooming, trimming, and training of these animals for sale 
and show purposes. Full discussion on the management and handling 
0? practLf shLp flocks and hog herds under farm condition. Practice 
in dipping, drenching, docking, shearing, and showing. (Vial, Bogue.) 

A. H. 106f. Livestock Judging (2) -Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 

A H 2s. 

This course consists of laboratory work centered around the judging of 
hogs, sheep, beef cattle, and draft horses. Laboratory specimens are drawn 
from the college herds and flocks, and supplemental trips are occasionally 
made to outstanding state herds. (^'^rk, Bogue., 

A. H. 107s. Livestock Judging (2)— Two laboratories. Prerequisite. 

A. H. 106f. ^ ,, 

A continuation of 106f, but with a more advanced program An all- 
laboratory course in livestock judging. (ClarK, uogue.; 
A. H. 108f. Advanced Livestock Judging (2)— Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 107s. . . , 
A course for advanced training in the selection and judging of animals 
of the different breeds and market classes of sheep, hogs beef cattle, and 
draft horses. The University of Maryland livestock judging team is 

221 



selected from outstanding student judges enrolled in this course. A wide 
variety of laboratory animals are used. Practice judging includes occa- 
sional judging trips among some of the better state herds. (Bogue.) 

A. H. 109f. Beef Cattle and Horse Production (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, A. H. lOOf and A. H. 105s. 

A full review of the principles underlying the practical and economical 
production of beef cattle and draft horses, particularly treating such angles 
as the selection of breeding animals, the raising, feeding, and preparation of 
beef cattle and draft horses for breeding, market, and work purposes. 

(Clark, Bogue.) 

A. H. 110s. Sheep and Swine Production (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 101s and 104 f. 

A course for those interested in the principles and practices underlying 
economical and efficient sheep and swine production for both commercial 
and breeding purposes. Full treatment of the topics of feeding, managing, 
producing, and marketing sheep and hogs. (Clark, Bogue.) 

A. H. 11 If. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 2s. 

A comprehensive study of the marketing of sheep, beef cattle, hogs, and 
draft horses, and practices found in the vast American livestock market 
system, together with the facilities available for the marketing and mer- 
chandising of all kinds of livestock and meat products. (Clark, Bogue.) 

A. H. 112s. Geography of Livestock Production (2) — ^Two lectures. 

A course designed to familiarize students with livestock management, 
production, and marketing practices in other parts of the world. Consid- 
eration is given to the bearing of foreign livestock and meat industries 
on this country's production, including an insight into our foreign markets. 

(Clark.) 

A. H. 113f. Animal Nutrition (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Chem. 
12Ay and A. H. 102f. 

Processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients, nutri- 
tional balances, nature of nutritional requirements for growth, production, 
and reproduction. (Meade.) 

A. H. 114s. Advanced Breeding (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, G. 
and S. lOlf and A. H. 103s. 

This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity, variation, 
recombination, and mutation; selection and selection indexes; breeding sys- 
tems; specific inheritance in farm animals, and with biometry as applied 
to animal breeding. (Meade.) 

222 



For Graduates 

AH201fors. Special ProUe^^^s in Anh.ml Husbandry (2-Z) . Credit 
^iven in proportion to amount of work completed, 
given pi"i ^harsicter of work the student 

Problems which relate specifically to the character ^^^^^^ 

is pursuing will be assigned. 

A H 202 f or s. Semwar (1). . 

S;udents are required to prepare papers ^^^^^ ^j;^ ^^^^ ::Zt 
publications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research w ^^,^^ 
presentation before and discussion by the class. 

A H 203y. Kesearc/^Credit to be determined by the amount and 

^"r;:!;!!::: the head of ^^-^:-:s^:^::^^ 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D H 1 f. FundamentaU of Dairying (3)-Two lectures; one labora- 
torv Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. . . , 

"'iis coLe includes a general ^^^^l^^],^^:^^^::^^ 
try; the physical and chemical P-^^S Test ^ other quantitative tests; 
tribution of dairy products; the Babcock Test an^ o i 

simple qualitative tests for adulterants and preserva^^^^^^^^ > 

cheese, and condensed products, and judging and scoring ma ^^^^^^^^^ 

D H 2 s Fundamentals of DoArying (3)-Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. .i^^racter- 

4is coLe covers very f^^^^SJ^^S^^^^^^^' 
istics of the dairy breeds of f "l^'/Jf^^^^JJ^ Z^ farm buildings and 
breeding, and management of the ^^'l^f^'^vrovLent associations; the 
equipment; bull associations and dairy ^-d nn^roveme ^^ ^^.^^ 

production of high-quality «"lk; and the ™ ^^ ^^.^^, 

cattle. Students in this course will be required to nt (i^gi^am.) 

in the annual students' fitting and showmg contest. K 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

bred business. 

223 



D. H. 102 s. Dairy Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory; junior 
or senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 101 f. 

Essential factors in the production of high-quality milk; dairy farm inspec- 
tion ; cost of milk production ; producer's cooperative milk marketing organ- 
izations; the transportation of milk, and the fitting, showing, and judging 
of dairy cattle. Students in this course will be required to fit and show 
an animal in the annual students' fitting and showing contest. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 103 s. Dairy Cattle Judging — Juniors and Seniors (1) — One lab- 
oratory. 

Comparative judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various farms. Such 
dairy cattle judging teams as may be chosen to represent the University 
will be selected from among those taking this course. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 104 f. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging (1) — One laboratory, senior 
year. Prerequisite, D. H. 103 s. 

Advanced work in judging dairy cattle. Credit only to students who do 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle judging team. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 105 s. Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, D. H. 2 s. 

A study of the historical background, characteristics, noted individuals 
and families, and the more important blood lines in the Holstein, Coiemsey, 
Ayrshire, and Jersey breeds. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 106 f. Dairy Cattle Management and Bam Experience (3) — Junior 
or senior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 2 s and 101 f, and D. H. 102 s. 

Each student will be assigned special work under direction of an instruc- 
tor at the University of Maryland Dairy bam, and will continue such 
assignment until he is proficient. Special emphasis will be given to all 
management problems, including the fitting and showing of dairy animals. 

(Ingham.) 

D. H. 107 s. Dairy Cattle Management and Bam Experience (3) — Con- 
tinuation of D. H. 106 f. 

D. H. 108 f. Dairy Manufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4-hour lab- 
oratories; junior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making casein, cheese, and butter, includ- 
ing a study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved. Lab- 
oratory practice will include visits to commercial factories. (Not given in 
1938-1939.) . (England.) 

D. H. 109 s. Dairy Manufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4-hour lab- 
oratories; junior year. Pi'ereciuisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making condensed milk and milk powder, 
and ice cream, including a study of the physical, chemical, and biological 
factors involved. Laboratory practice will include visits to commercial 
factories. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (England.) 

224 



D. H. 110 f. Market Milk (5)-Three lectures; two laboratories; senior 
year Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

Commercial and economic phases of market milk, with ^P-^;-\ ^f^^^^^^^^ 
to its transportation, processing, and distribution; ^^"^^'^f '^}^l'^^^ 
cl butterr^lk; milk laws; duties of milk inspectors; <i^« fj^f ;^;. .f ^^^ 
pfant construction and operation. Laboratory practice -^^^^^^^/^^^^^^^^ 
local daries. 

D H. Ill s. Analysis of Dwiry Products (3)-0ne lecture; one 4-hour 
laboratory (consecutive); senior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 t, Bact. i. 
Chem. 4 f or s, Chem. 12 y. 

The application of chemical and bacteriological methods to commercial 
dairy practice; analysis by standard chemical, bacteriological, and factory 
Sod's; standardization and composition control; tests for adulterants^ and 
preservatives. 

D. H. 112 s. Grading Dairy Products (1)— One laboratory; junior year. 

Prerequisite, D. H. 1 f. 
Market grades and the judging of millc, butter, cheese and^ ice ^ream 

in the conmiercial field. ^ 

D. H. 113 f. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (l)-One laboratory; 

senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. Ill s. 

Advanced work in the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 

Open only to students who comprise the dairy vro^-<^^;^M.-- ^:;-- 

D. H. 114 f. Daim Mechanics (2)— Two laboratories; junior year. Pre- 
requisite, D. H. 1 f. , V ;„„l 

The theory and operation of the compression system of mechanical 
ref^geratln Construction, design, and care of dairy -.-P--^' X^ 
ing, soldering, pipe fitting, and wiring. ^""^ •' 

D. H. 115 s. Dairy Accounting (l)-One laboratory; senior year. Pre- 
requisite, D. H. 1 f. 

Methods of accounting in the market milk plant and dairy manufectjir- 

ing plants. • . . 

D. H. 116 f. Dairy Plant Experience (3)-Senior year. Prerequisite, 
10 hours of Dairy Husbandry. 

Twelve weeks practical experience or its equivalent (following comple- 
tio^ol uS year) in an approved market milk plant or J^ac^^^ — 
facturing dairy products. A written report of the ^^ork '^'^^'^^^j^^'^J^' 

D. H. 117 s. Dairy Plant Experience (l)-Senior year. Prerequisite, 

^Two\*undred hours practical experience in the University of Maryland 

225 



Dairy Manufacturing Plant. The grade will be based on the dependability 
and efficiency of the student in performing work assigned. ^ 

(England, Hughes.) 
D. H. 118 f. History and Geography of Dairying (2)~-Two lectures; 

A study of the history and development of dairying in the various 
ZuT" f^''\'"''f^' with special reference to the importance of the 
mdustry to breeds of dairy cattle and their development, to dairy products 
manufactured, and to the importation and exportation of dairy product 

(Berry.) 

D. H. 119 f and 120 s. Dairy Literature (1)— One lecture; junior and 
senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 f and D. H. 2 s. 

Presentation and discussion of current literature in dairying. 

(England, Berry.) 
D. H. 121 y. Methods of Dairy Research (1-3). 

This course is designed especially to meet the needs of dairy students 
who plan to pursue graduate work or enter the research or technical field 
of dairying. Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation 
of results are stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to 
the work the student is pursuing will be assigned. 

Credit will be given in accordance with the amount and character of 
work done. Elective for seniors and graduate students only. 

(England, Berry.) 

For Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and man- 
agement. Readings and assignments. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2) —Two lectures. 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physiochemical point 
of view. ,^ 1 J X 

(England.) 

D. H. 203 s. Milk Products (2) — Two lectures. 

Ail advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of milk 
products. .^ , , . 

(England.) 

D. H. 204 f or s. Special Problems in Dairying (1-3). 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. Credit will be given in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. /g^^ff ) 

D. H. 205 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon research in progress 
or completed for presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

226 



D. H. 206 y. Research. Credit to be determined by the amount and 
quality of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head 
of the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy hus- 
bandry, carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a 
thesis. (Meade, Ingham, England.) 

ART 

Professors Marti and Highby. 

Art If. Art in Ancient Civilization I (2) — Two lectures. 

A survey of the architectural remains, the sculpture and painting of 
antiquity presented with free use of the stereopticon, and with accompany- 
ing lectures calling attention to the historical stages and the cultural 
development which they represent. Due attention will be given to plan and 
design. 

Art 2s. Art in Ancient Civilization II (2) — Two lectures. 
A continuation of Art If. Roman art and archaeology. 

Art. 3f. History of Occidental Art I (2) — One lecture and one hour 
of slide study. No prerequisite. 

An introduction to the figurative art, and to the development of style. 
Art from the third century A. D. to the Renaissance. Occasional visits 
to the museums in Washington and Baltimore. 

Art 4s. History of Occidental Art II (2) — One lecture and one hour of 
slide study. No prerequisite. 

Similar to Art 3f. Art from the Renaissance to the present. Occasional 
visits to the museums. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor T. H. Taliaferro. 

ASTR. lOly. Astronomy (4) — Two lectures. Elective, but open only 
to juniors and seniors. 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 

BACTERIOLOGY* 

Professors James, Black; Assistant Professors Faber, Bartram; 
Mr. Pelczar, Miss Sockrider, Mr. Brownlee. 

Bact. 1 f and s. General Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Sophomore or higher standing. 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to 
nature; morphology; classification; metabolism; bacterial enzymes; applica- 

♦ One or more of the scheduled courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates 
may be given during the evening, if a sufficient number of students register. A special 
fee is charged. 

227 



tion to water, milk, foods, and soils; relation to the industries and to dis- 
eases. Preparation of culture media; sterilization and disinfection; micro- 
scopic and macroscopic examination of bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and 
identification of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; effects of physical and 
chemical agents ; microbiological examinations. 

Bact. 1 a f and s. General Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Sophomore 
or higher standing. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 1. 

Bact. 2s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathogenic ma- 
terial; effects of pathogens and their products. 

Bact. 2 A s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and sophomore or higher standing. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2 s. 

Bact. 3 s. Household Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; their relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; 
infection and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. 

Bact. 4 s. Elements of Sanita/ry Bacteriology (1) — One lecture. Senior 
year. Engineering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sewage disposal. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101 f. Milk Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria in milk, sources and development; milk fermentation; sanitary 
production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation of 
milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; practice in the bacteriological control of milk 
supplies and plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dairy Products Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and Bact. 101 f desirable. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
starters, fermented milks, ice cream, butter, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; occa- 
sional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. Ill f. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Bacteria, yeasts, and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoil- 
age; sanitary production and handling; food regulations; food infections 

228 



and intoxications. Microbiological examination of normal and ^P^^^^^^^^^^ 
factors affecting preservation. 

BACT 112 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purmcation; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal, industrial wastes, 
disposal of garbage and refuse; municipal sanitation ^-^^^^^^ 
ard methods for examination of water, sewage and other ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 
differentiation and significance of the coli-aerogenes group. (bartram.; 

BACT. 115 f. SeroZo^i/ (4) -Two lectures; two laboratories. Junior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 2 s. Registration limited. 

Infection and resistance; agglutination, precipitation, lytic and complement 
fixation reactions; principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness Prepara^ 
tion of necessary reagents; general immunologic technic; ^^f ^^^ affe^^^^^^^ 
reactions; applications in the identification of bacteria and ^lagnos^s^^of 

disease. 

BACT. 116 s. Epidemiology (2) -Two lectures. Junior year. Prerequi- 
site, Bact. 1 and credit or registration in Baet. 2 or 2A. 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, mcludmg history charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and <=<'nfron P^JJ" 
iodicity; principles of investigation; public health applications. Offered al- 
ternate years, alternating with Bact. 126 s. (JJaoer.; 

BACT. 118 f. Systematic Bacteriology (2)— Two lectures. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. ' 

History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; mternational 
codes of nomenclature; bacterial variation as it affects classification 

(James.; 

BACT 122 f and s. Advanced Methods (2) -One lecture; one laboratory. 
Junior "year. Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. Registration limited. 

Microscopy, dark field and single cell technic, photomicrography; color- 
imetric and potentiometric determinations; oxidation-reduction, electropho- 
resis; surface tension; gas analysis; special culture methods; filtration; an- 
imal care; practice in media and reagent preparation. (Bartram.) 

BACT 123 f Bacteriological Problems (2)— Laboratory. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and 2 and any other courses needed for the projects. 

Registration limited. 

Subject matter suitable to the needs of the particular student or problems 
as an introduction to research will be arranged. The problems are to be 
selected, outlined, and investigated in consultation with and under the 
supervision of a member of the department. Results are to be ^re^^ 
in the form of a thesis. 

BACT 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (Continued) (2)— Laboratory. 
Senior "year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and 2 and any other courses "^^ded for 
the projects. Registration limited. ^^ •' 

229 



Bact. 125 f. Clinical Methods (3)--0ne lecture; two laboratories. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Bact. 2. 

Methods of microscopic examination of the important constituents of 
blood, urine, gastric content, feces and exudates; correlation with qualita- 
tive and quantitative laboratory procedures. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 126 s. Public Health (l)--One lecture. Senior year. Prerequi- 
site, Bact. 1 and Bact. 2. 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration, by 
the staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, represent- 
ing each of the bureaus and divisions. Offered alternate years, alternating 
with Bact. 116 s. ( ja^,3^ i^ charge.) 

Bact. 128 s. ^acfcna/ ^feta6oh*sm (2) —Two lectures. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1, Chem. 12 y or equivalent. 

Growth, chemical composition; oxygen relations; enzymes; bacterial me- 
tabolism and respiration; chemical activities of microorganisms; industrial 
fermentations. Offered alternate year, alternating with Bact. 206 s. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 131 f. Journal Club (1). Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 
and 2. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticised by 
members of the class and staff. (Black.) 

Bact. 132 s. Journal Club (Continued) (1). Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and 2. (Black.) 

For Graduates 

Bact. 205 f. Research Methods (1)— One lecture. Prerequisite, Bac- 
teriology, 6 hours. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation of 
papers; research institutions, investigators; laboratory design, equipment 
and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 206 s. Physiology of Bacteria (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bacteriology, 10 hours and Chem. 108 s or equivalent. 

Growth; chemical composition; physical characteristics; energy relation- 
ships; influence of environmental conditions on growth and metabolism; dis- 
infection; physiological interrelationships; changes occurring in media. Of- 
fered alternate years, alternating with Bact. 128 s. (James.) 

Bact. 207 f. Special Topics (1). Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. 
Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 
Bact. 208 s. Special Topics (Continued) (1). Prerequisite, Bacteri- 
ology, 10 hours. (Black.) 

230 



Bact. 215 f or s. Food Sanitation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bact. 
1, Bact. 2, and Bact. Ill f, or their equivalent. 

Principles of sanitation in food manufacture and distribution; methods 
of control of sanitation in commercial canning, pickling, bottling, preserv- 
ing, refrigeration, dehydration, etc. (James.) 

Bact. 221 f. Research (1-6) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 2, 
and any other courses needed for the particular projects. Credit will be 
determined by the amount and character of the work accomplished. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. The results ob- 
tained by a major student working towards an advanced degree are pre- 
sented as a thesis, a copy of which must be filed with the department. 

(Staff.) 

Bact. 222 s. Research (Continued) (1-6) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 2 and any other courses needed for the particular projects. 

(Staff.) 

Bact. 231 f. Seminar (2). Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. 

Discussions and reports prepared by the student on current research, 
selected subjects, and recent advances in bacteriology. (James.) 

Bact. 232 s. Seminar (Continued) (2). Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 
hours. (James.) 

BOTANY 

Professors Appleman, Norton, Temple; Associate Professors Bamford, 
Jehle: Assistant Professors Brown, duBuy, Woods; Mr. Walker, 
Mr. McCann, Mr. Tillson, Mr. Reynard, Mr. Shirk, Mr. Bellows, 

Mr. Olson, Mr. Jeffers. 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

Bot. If. General Botany (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject. The chief aim in this course is to present fundamental biological 
principles rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The 
student is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods, and the value of its results. 

Bot. Is. Introductory Botany (3) — Two lectures; one demonstration 
or laboratory period. 

A course similar to Bot. 1 f, except that only one demonstration or lab- 
oratory period is required. 

231 



BoT. 2 s. General Botany (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. 

A study of algae, bacteria, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, ana seea 
plants. The development of reproduction, adjustment of plants to lanu, 
habit of growth, and the attendant changes in vascular and anatomical 
structures are stressed. Several field trips will be arranged. With Bot. 1 f , 
a cultural course intended also as foundational to a career in the plant 
sciences. 

Bot. 3 s. Local Flora (2). 

A study of common plants, both wild and cultivated, and the use of keys, 
floral manuals, and other methods of identifying them. Largely field work. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f . 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are required. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 103 f. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying 
it; the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic founda- 
tions; methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium, and 
library. Each student to work on a special problem during some of the 
laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Bot. 104 s. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two labora^ 
tories. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Each student works on an original problem dur- 
ing the laboratory time. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Norton.) 

Bot. 105 s. Economdc Plants (2) — Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
A collection of plant products from markets, stores, factories, etc., is made 
by students to illustrate the useful plants both in the natural form and as 
used by man. (Norton.) 

Bot. 106 f. History and Philosophy of Botany (I) — One lecture. 

Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. * (Norton.) 

Bot. 107 s. Methods in Plant Histology (2) — Two laboratories. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 

(Brown.) 
232 



For Graduates 

Bot. 201s. Cytology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 

Bot. 1 f. 

A detailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 
The major portion is devoted to chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and 
the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity and evolution. 
The laboratory involves the preparation, examination, and illustration of 
cytological material by current methods. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 202 s. Plant Morplwlogy (2)— Two lectures and demonstrations. 
A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to their phylogeny and development. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

(Bamford.) 

Bot. 204. Research— Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 
Note: See announcement on page 239 for further botany courses given 
at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

B. Plant Pathology and Mycology 

Plt. Path. If. Diseases of Plants (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f . 

An introductory study in the field, in the laboratory, and in the literature, 
of symptoms, causal agents, and control measures of the diseases of plants. 
The work is so arranged that a student may devote part of his time to the 
important diseases of the plants in which he is particularly interested. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Path. 101 f. Diseases of Fruits (2-4)— Two lectures; laboratory 
according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

An intensive study intended to give a rather thorough knowledge of the 
subject matter, such as is needed by those who expect to become advisers in 
fruit production, as well as those who expect to become specialists in plant 
pathology. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 102 s. Diseases of Garden and Field Crops (2-4) — Two lec- 
tures; laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

The diseases of garden crops, truck crops, cereal and forage crops. In- 
tended for students of vegetable culture, agronomy, and plant pathology, 
and for those preparing for county agent work. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 103 s. Research Methods (2)— One conference and five hours 
of laboratory work. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f, or equivalent. 

Technic of plant disease investigations; sterilization; cultural methods; 
isolation of pathogens; inoculation methods; and photography. (Woods.) 

233 



Plt. Path. 104 f and s. Minor Investigations (1-3)— Credit according 
to work done. A laboratory course with conferences. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 

In this course only minor problems or special phases of major investiga- 
tions may be undertaken. Their solution may include a survey of the 
literature on the problem under investigation and both laboratory and 
field work. (Norton, Temple, Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 105 s. Diseases of Ornamentals (2) — Two lectures. 

The most important diseases of plants grown in greenhouse, flower gar- 
den, and landscape, including shrubs and shade trees. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 106 y. Seminar (1). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on recent 
investigations. (Temple, Norton, Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 107 f. Plant Disease Control (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f . 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practice of plant disease 
control; the preparation of sprays and other fungicides and the testing of 
their toxicity in greenhouse and laboratory; demonstration and other ex- 
tension methods adapted to county agent work and to the teaching of agri- 
culture in high schools. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 108 f. Mycology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory study of the morphology, life histories, classification, 
and economics of the fungi. (Norton, Woods.) 

For Graduates 

Plt. Path. 201 s. Virus Diseases (2)— Two lectures. 

All advanced course, including a study of the current literature on the 
subject and the working of a problem in the greenhouse. (Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 203 f. Non-Parasitic Diseases (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due to 
climate, soil, gases, dusts and sprays, fertilizer, improper treatment and 
other detrimental conditions. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 205 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple, Woods.) 

C. Plant Physiology 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 101 f. Plant Physiology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f . 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim in this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. 

(Brown.) 

234 



Plt. Phys. 102 s. Plant Ecology (3) — ^Two lectures; one field trip. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 

(Brown.) 
For Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201s. Plant Biochemistry (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. It deals with the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and with the important processes in plant life. 

(Appleman, Shirk.) 

Plt. Phys. 202 Af, Plant Biophysics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1 f and Pit. Phys. 101 f or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
plant life processes. Students electing this course should elect Pit. Phys. 
202 Bf. (Appleman, Brown, duBuy.) 

Plt. Phys. 202 Bf. Biophysical Methods (2). (Shirk.) 

Plt. Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, indentification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found in plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use of 
these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized. 

(Brown.) 

Plt. Phys. 204 f. Growth and Development (2). (Appleman, duBuy.) 

Plt. Phys. 205 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 20G y. Research — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, Brown, duBuy.) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION^ 

Professors Stevens, Wedeberg, Gruchy; Associate Professor Marshall; 
Assistant Professors Layton, Daniels, Cissel; Mr. Reid, Mr. Mullin, 

Mr. Triplett, Mr. . 

Some of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 
in alternate years, whenever prospective enrollments therein do not justify 



$See also related courses in Economics; also in Agricultural Economics, especially 
A. E. 1 f, 2 s, 101 s, 104 s, 106 s, 109 y, 210 s, 211 f, 212 f, 213 s, and 214 f. 



235 



repeating annually. Such courses are so arranged, however, that students 
may include any course by election during either the junior or the senior 
year. Alternating courses are indicated as follows : 

♦Offered 1938-1939. May or may not be offered in 1939-1940. 

fOffered 1939-1940. May or may not be offered in 1938-1939. 

A. Accounting 

ACCT. 51 f and 52 s. Principles of Accounting (4) each semester — Three 
lectures; one laboratory. (Equivalent of former A. and F. 9y.) 

This course has two aims, namely, to give the prospective business man 
an idea of accounting as a means of control, and to serve as a basic course 
for advanced and specialized accounting. A study is made of methods and 
procedures of accounting in the sole proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AcCT. 101 f and 102 s. Advanced Accounting (3) each semester — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Acct. 52s. 

Advanced theory and problems in connection with the following: work- 
ing papers, statements; corporations; actuarial science; cash; accounts 
receivable; notes and acceptances; inventories, consignments; installment 
sales; tangible fixed assets; intangible assets; investments; liabilities; funds 
and reserves; correction of statements and books; comparative statements; 
the analysis of working capital; miscellaneous ratios; profit and loss 
analysis; and statement of application of funds. 

Acct. 121 f. Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Acct. 
52 s. 

The need and value of cost accounting; cost systems and cost classifica- 
tions; classification of accounts; subsidiary ledgers and cost records; outline 
of specific order cost accounting; accounting for material; material storage 
and consumption; valuation of materials; accounting for labor costs; special 
features of accounting for labor cost; accounting for manufacturing ex- 
pense; distribution of service department costs; distribution of manufac- 
turing expense to production; control of distribution cost; monthly closing 
entries. Theory, problems, and practice set. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 122 s. Advanced Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Acct. 121 f. 

Preparation of analytical statements; comparative statements; process 
cost accounting; standard costs; analysis of variances; accounting for 
standard costs; estimating cost systems; special considerations; arguments 
for and against including interest on investments; graphic charts; uniform 
methods. A discussion of advanced theory and problems. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 149. Apprenticeship in Public Accounting, No credit. Open only 
to seniors in the upper ten per cent of the class. Prerequisite, Acct. 171 
(credit or concurrent registration). 

236 



A one month's apprenticeship with nationally known firms from about 
January 15 to February 15. 

Acct. 161 f. Income Tax Procedure (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Acct. 102 s. 

Income tax in theory and practice. Selected cases and problems illus- 
tratinff the definition of taxable income of individuals, corporations, and 
estates (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 171 f and 172 s. Auditing Theory and Practice (2) each semester- 
One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, 
the preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 181 f and 182 s. Specialized Accounting (3) each semester— Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Accounting for partnerships; ventures; insurance; receiverships; 
branches; consolidations; mergers; foreign exchange; estates and trusts; 
budgets; public accounts; savings banks; commercial banks; national 
banks- building and loan associations; stock brokerage; consignments; 
department stores; real estate; extractive industries; hotels; government; 
electric utilities; and others. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 186 s. C. P. A. Problems (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of the instructor. 

This course is arranged to coordinate all previous work in accounting 
with special emphasis on the solution of practical C. P. A. problems and 
the discussion of C. P. A. theory. (Wedeberg.) 



For Graduates 

Acct. 228 f and 229 s. Accounting Systems (6). Prerequisite, Acct. 
181 f and 182 s. Students who do not have these prerequisites must attend 
all classes in Acct. 181 f and 182 s concurrently. 

A discussion of the more difficult problems in connection with the indus- 
tries covered in Acct. 181 f and 182 s. Also includes the statement of 
affairs; realization and liquidation account; parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting; and financing. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 299 f. Special Problems in Accounting (3). Prerequisite, gradu- 
ate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Investigations of specific problems, as directed by individual conferences 
with the instructor. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely 
allied with, but must not be the same as, the subject discussed in the 
student^s major thesis. (Wedeberg.) 

237 



B. Finance^ 

Finance 51 s. Money and Credit (2). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f. (Equiv- 
alent to former Econ. 101 f.) 

An analysis of the basic principles of money and credit; the history of 
money; the operations of the commercial banking system. (Gruchy.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Finance 105 f.* Consmner Financing (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f 
or 57. 

The economics of installment selling; methods of financing the consumer; 
and operations of the personal finance company. (Gruchy.) 

Finance 106 f.t Public Finance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f or 57. 
(Equivalent to former Econ. 114 s.) 

The nature of public expenditures; sources of revenue; taxation; and 
budgeting. Special emphasis on the practical, social, and economic prob- 
lems involved. (Gruchy.) 

Finance 111 f. Corporation Finance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f 
or 57, Acct. 51. (Not open to students who have credit in former Econ, 
103 f.) 

The organization and financing of a business enterprise. Types of se- 
curities and their utilization in apportioning income, risk, and control. 
Problems of capitalization, refunding, reorganization, and expansion. Pro- 
curement of capital. Public regulation of the sale of securities. 

(Stevens, MuUin.) 

Finance 115 f. Investments (3). Prerequisite, Finance 111 f. (Equiv- 
alent to former A. and F. 104 s.) 

Sources of information for the investor. Classes of investments, govern- 
ment bonds, municipals, real estate mortgages, public utilities, railroads, 
industrial securities, movement of security prices, analysis of financial 
statements, adapting the investment policy to the purpose and needs of the 
investor. (Stevens, Mullin.) 

Finance 116 s.t Investment Banking (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 52 s. 

A study of the functions and operations of investment banking institu- 
tions and their relation to the market for long-term credit, and with 
emphasis on the trends and problems of investment banking. (Gruchy.) 

Finance 118 f.t Stock and Commodity Exchanges (3). Prerequisite, 
Econ. 52 s or 57. 

An analysis of the operations of the various exchanges. Brokerage 
houses and methods of trading. Regulation of the exchanges. (Gruchy.) 

Finance 121 s.* Banking Principles and Practices (3). Prerequisite, 
Econ. 52 s or 57. 

The incorporation, organization, and operation of banks. Functions 
of departments and problems of customer relations. Bank legislation and 
governmental regulation. (Gruchy.) 

$See also related courses ia Agricultural Economics, especially A. E. 104 s 210 s 
and 211 f. 

238 



Finance 125 f.* Credits and Collections (3). Prerequisite, Acct. 52. 
Nature and function of credit and use of credit instruments. Principles 
of credit investigation and analysis. The work of the credit manager. 

(Gruchy.) 

Finance 129 s.t International Finance (S) , Prerequisite, Econ. 52 s or 57. 

Foreign exchange theory and practice. International aspects ^^ ^o^^" 
tary and banking problems. International money markets. The gold prob- 
lem and the Bank for International Settlements. (Gruchy.) 

Finance 141 f.f Insurance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f. (Similar 
subject matter to former Econ. 105 s.) 

A survey of the major principles and practices of life and property 
insurance, with special reference to their relationship to our social and 
economic life. 

Finance 149 f, s, or S. Financial Internship (1-3). Prerequisite, credit 
or concurrent registration in Finance 51 f and any specialized finance 
courses needed for proper understanding of a particular business, such as 
Finance 105, 106, 111, 115, 116, 118, 125, 129, 141 or 151. Consent of the 
instructor is necessary; this will not be given unless the position arranged 
for a given registrant in a commercial business is of such a nature that 
effective experience can be obtained. 

Practice in actual work in an approved financial institution under 
guidance. The method of individual conferences, reports, and collateral 
^ ,. (Gruchy.) 

reading. 

Finance 151 s.t Real Estate (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f or 57. 
The principles and practices involved in owning, operating, merchandis- 
ing, leasing, and appraising real estate and real estate investments. 

Finance 199 s. Financial Analysis and Control (3). Prerequisite, 
senior standing or consent of instructor, and Finance 111 f. 

Internal administration of a business from the viewpoint of the chief 
executive. Departmentalization and f unctionalization, anticipation and bud- 
getary control of sales, purchases, production, inventory, expenses, and 
assets. The coordination of financial administration. Policy determma. 
tion, analysis, and testing. (Stevens, Mulhn.) 

For Graduates 

Finance 229 f and s. Special Problems in Firuince (l-G) . Prerequisite, 
graduate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and 
permission of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major thesis 

(Stevens, Gruchy.) 

239 



C. Marketing^ 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

or W^fn^"^ ^;p.^""?^^' "^ Marfceimsr (3). Prerequisite. Econ. 52 s 
or 57 f or s. (Equivalent to former A. and F 140 s) 
A study of the fundamental principles of assembling and disnersincr 

house distribution; mail order and chain store distribution; price and price 

of thrpr?btm"'/;f 'J: '"*=°""*^'- P"'* --ntenance; Z a discus io" 
01 the problem of distribution costs. /jj^j . 

Ecfn'^^52ror^57. ^''^'''^'^'''P ""^ Salesmanagement (3). Prerequ^Jite, 

t.Xli.TY' "^ *^ fundamental principles of salesmanship and the 
technique of personal presentation of ideas, goods, and services Analysi 

and funXn of't'h^ T*""' '''''^' ^"'^ ''''' '•^^^^-"^ The structu" 
and function of the sales organization and its relation to the activities of 

SaX and" '"' °''" -departments. Building, training. equi^S s" m! 
ulating, and supervising a sales force. (Reid ) 

or^^^f'i''! ^*T^ ^"T^l^^ "f Advertising (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 52 's 
or 57 f or s. (Equivalent to former A. and F 142 s ) 

tatlT'of "me'dt T""'" ™Pjications of advertising; selection and adap- 
tation of media to various lines of business. Layouts, copy writing 

effectrnir ^ '^ '''''"^'''''' «PP-P--«°-' -^ measurements of 

TVTrrm 11C * T^ , (Mullin.) 

TZ'^ ^^'-^^o^mS' rec/m,-g«e (3). Prerequisite, junior standing 

Ascertaining sources of supply; substitutes; utilization of catalogue! 

Uons, sampling, testing, bargaining, terms, discounts, relations with sales- 

Seria?,""TrT' f"!,''"'' ""' interpretation of market and price data. 
Materials control. Interdepartmental and office organization. (Reid ) 

requSe,"Mkf lofr*' ^""'' ^"""^''"'"* """^ Merchandising (3). Pre- 

Retail store organization, location, and store policy; pricing policies 

ToTt^o'S' in^nt' ^'•^'''?"""-= ---^^ - ^ ^ide to' buying Ldg^ 
semng. trZZ ""/ '"^"'"''' P"^'^''^^'"^ methods; supervision of 
proWms ' supervision of retail sales force; administrative 

Mkt. 149 f, s, or S. Internship in Marketing (1-3) Prereoui<=itP nr.^■■^ 
or concurrent registration in Mkt. 101, and any spedah'zT ivt 

course needed for proper understanding of a nart^cXr h ""^"^^t*'"^ 

Mkt 10"; mo 11K „- nn r, """'"» "^ a particular business, such as 
Mkt. 105 109, 115, or 119. Consent of the instructor is necessarv thU 
will not be given unless the position arranged for a given Strant in a 
comme^ial business is of such a nature that effectife expSrclA: 



lofr foTsri^n'a^iTrraJa" «"it?' ^T='.. «-i- 



Psychology, especially Psych. 3 

240 



A. E. 102 s, 103 f. 
s. 140 f. and 141 s. 



Practice in actual marketing: work under guidance. The method of 
individual conferences, reports, and collateral reading. 

(Stevens, Reid, Mullin.) 

Mkt. 199 s.t Marketing Research and Market Policies (3). Prerequi- 
site, nine credit hours in marketing. 

A study of the methods and problems involved in marketing research 
in establishing or determining marketing policies. (Stevens, Reid.) 

For Graduates 

Mkt. 229 f or s. Problems in Marketing (1-6). Prerequisite, graduate 
standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and permission 
of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Marketing Staff.) 
D. Trade and Transportationi: 

T. AND T. 1 f. Economic Geography (3). (Equivalent to former Econ. 
If.) 

A study of economic and physical factors which are responsible for the 
location of industries and which influence the production, distribution, 
and exchange of commerce throughout the world. This course deals pri- 
marily with regional geography; that is, the industrial development and 
commerce of the separate regions and countries. 

Juniors receive two credits; not open to seniors. 

T. AND T. 4 s. Development of Commerce and Industry (3). (Equiva- 
lent to former Econ. 2 s.) 

Ancient and medieval economic organization. The guild, domestic, and 
mercantile systems. The industrial revolution, laissez-faire, modem indus- 
trial and commercial organizations in Europe and America. Post-war re- 
strictions on commerce. 

Juniors receive two credits; not open to seniors. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

T. AND T. 101 f. Principles of Foreign Trade (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 
51 f, T. and T. 1 f, T. and T. 4 s. (Equivalent to former Econ. 116 s.) 

The basic principles of import and export trade, as influenced by the 
differences in methods of conducting domestic and foreign commerce. 

T. AND T. Ill f.* Tr-ansportation (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f or 57 f 
or s. (Similar to former Econ. 112 s and A. E, 101 s.) 

Development of railway and truck transportation in the United States. 
Facilities for transporting agricultural and industrial products. Rate 

$See also related courses in Agricultural Economics, especially A. E. 1 f and 212 f. 

241 



structures and tariffs. Effects of changing transportation methods upon 
agricultural and business organization. ^ 

sZ'A^LI't^wA ^'''"''' ''''^ ^"^Vort TraAe Procedure (3). Prerequi- 

in ™tw1 J-'"*"' f ^"^'"^ "^'""^'- <J°<="'«ents and procedures used 
in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring goods in 
foreign countries; financing of import shipments; during throuXtte 
customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States Field 
trips are arranged to study actual import and export procedure. A nominal 
fee IS collected before each trip to cover expenses incurred. (DanTds ) 

T. AND T. 149 f, s, or S. Foreign Trade Internship (1-3). Prerequisite 

c'o^rfelST"* "^"*'''*^^" '"^ ''■ ''"' ''■ ''' ^"^ -^ ^*»>- «P3S 
course needed for proper understanding of a particular business, such as 

1. ana 1. in f, 121 s. Consent of the instructor is necessary; this will 
not be given unless the position arranged for a given registrant in a cZ 
mercial bus mess is of such a natnro ti,ot »»„„+; • 

obtained nature that effective experience can be 

Practical work under guidance in an approved exporting or importing 

reTdTng. "'*'°' "' ""'^''"^^ conferences, reports, 'and cTaS 

(Daniels.) 

For Graduates 

„ J; tf" J' ^^^ ^'v ^r^^^"^^ ^"^ ^°'-«^fl"» ^^<^e (1-8). Prerequisite, grad- 

miSil "f r '•^'. r^'^ '°""'"' ^" *^^ ^^''^ «^ specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

E. Organization and Management^ 

O. AND M. 51 f Elements of Business (2). Prerequisite, junior stand- 
ing and consent of the instructor. . J '"^ bwi.u 

A rapid survey of the elements of business and of the management of 
personal finances for students of home economics and other curricula not 

AnnW f"""""""^ ^!^\ ^"^'""'^ administration. Majors in General or 
Applied Economics will be admitted to the course only in case there are 

ISS'wk!''"''"'^ '" '*''•' ^*"'^"*^' ^""^ *'^^ ""' ""' ^^^'^'-'^ "^ ^° 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

O. AND M. 101 f and 102 s. Bumness Law (3) each semester. Pre- 
requisite, junior standing. Section II is limited to majors in Accounting, 
or those who have consent of the instructor. 

tSee also related courses in Psychology, especially Psych. 3 s. 160 f, and 161 s. 

242 



Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 
Section II is a more intensive treatment of the law^ of contracts, sales, 
negotiable instruments, agency and partnerships than is given in Section I, 
designed to prepare students for the accounting profession in Maryland. 

(Layton.) 

0. AND M. 103 f. Advanced Business Law (2). Prerequisite, 0. and M. 
101 f and 102 s, Section II. 

The principles of the law of corporations, trusts, and the administration 
of the estates of bankrupts and decedents, presented in a manner calcu- 
lated to prepare students for the accounting profession in Maryland. 

(Layton.) 

O. AND M. 110 f. Fundamentals of Business Administration (2). Pre- 
requisite, open only to senior Engineers. 

An analysis of the business structure, showing the functions of produc- 
tion, marketing, and finance, and the use of the tools of accounting and 
statistics. Designed to show the engineer his relationship as a functional 
expert to other functional experts and to give an academic opportunity to 
apply technical knowledge in business problems. 

0. AND M. 121 s. Industrial Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f 
or 57 f or s. 

A study of major problems of management in the acquisition, organ- 
ization, and control of the factors and agents of production — plant, machin- 
ery and equipment, raw materials, and personnel. Factory location and 
layout. Scheduling. Personnel organization and incentives. (Layton.) 

O. AND M. 149 f, s, or S. Cooperative Internship (1-3). Prerequisite, 
credit or concurrent registration in Econ. 161 s and any specialized courses 
needed for proper understanding of a particular cooperative enterprise. 
Consent of the instructor is necessary; this will not be given unless the 
position arranged for a given registrant is of such a nature that effective 
experience can be obtained. 

Practical work under guidance in an approved cooperative organization. 
The method of individual conferences, reports, and collateral reading. 

(Stevens.) 

For Graduates 

O. AND M. 201 f and 202 s. Research in Business Organization and Man- 
agement (1-3) — Credits each semester; credit in proportion to work ac- 
complished. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Students must be 
especially qualified by previous work to pursue effectively the research to be 
undertaken. 

Investigation or original research in problems of marketing, finance, 
accounting, trade and transportation, organization, and management, un- 
der supervision of the instructor. (Staff.) 

243 






V 



O. AND M. 291 f and s. Problems in Business Organization (1-6) Pre 
requisite, graduate standing, preliminary courses in the field of spedalizT 
tion, and permission of the instructor. specianza- 

dt^lioT' r^^'^'u-^''^''" .**' '^"''^'' ^'•""^'"^ ""^^^ 'lirection of the 
with h?f ^ ? .^'*'*^ ^^^^"^^ ^""^ investigation may be closely allied 

r» iw' (Lay ton.) 

U. AND M. 299 f and s. Problems in Cooperative Administration (1-6) 
Prerequisite, graduate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specia K 

Sork wit'h thfrr'"", "/ *^" instructor. Problems may involve practical 
work with the National Cooperative Council and other Washington (D. C ) 
or Maryland cooperative organizations. The subjects selected for investiga- 
tion may be closely allied with, but must not be the same as the s^b£ 
discussed in the student's major thesis. (StevenJ 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Broughton, Drake, Haring, White; 

Associate Professor Wiley; 

Assistant Professor Supplee; 

Dr. Lamb Dr. Svirbely, Dr. Williams, Mr. Adams, Mr. Bower Mr 

MR'L^T'n'^rr' ''"• ^^r^' ^^- «'^'^^^' ^^«- ^-'>' mr. osi 

Mr. Smith, Mr. Stanton, Mr. Swango, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Zapponi. 

A. General Chemistry 

aThv ntl' '^'"''■''' Chen,i^try (8)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
A study of th« non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of th^ 

Course A ,s intended for students who have never studied chemist.,, 

Chem. 1 B y. General ChemisU^ (8)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course covers the same ground as Chem. 1 A y; but the subiect 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theorf and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals witr f undZenTat 
pnnciples, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a svstrmatt 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high- 

Chem. 2 y. Qualitative Analysis (6)~Two lectures; one laboratorv the 

SST.:,,""'' r """"-■ "■' """>"■*»"" "" -•"" — t"^' 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, 

244 



their separation and identification, and the general underlying principles. 
Fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 3 y. Introductory Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A y. This 
course is designed for students desiring a working knowledge of elemen- 
tary chemistry, without the laboratory part. It is not accepted as a 
prerequisite for advanced chemistry courses. If one subsequently desires 
credit for Chem. 1 y, he may secure this by adding two credits in the 
laboratory of Chem. 1 y s. A demonstration fee of five dollars is required. 
Fee, $3.00 per semester. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 200 A y. Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. 

This course is devoted to a study of the elements not usually considered in 
the elementary course. (White.) 

Chem. 200 B y. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A laboratory study of the analyses and the compounds of elements con- 
sidered in Chem. 200 A y. Fee, $7.00 per semester. (White.) 

Chem. 201 f or s. An Introduction to Spectograpkic Analysis (1). 

This is a laboratory course designed to give the student the fundamental 
principles of spectographic analysis. Fee, $7.00 per semester. (White.) 

Chem. 202 y. Theory of Solutions (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 102 A y and Math. 23 y. 

A systematic study of the theories and properties of solutions. Subjects 
considered are solubility, regular solutions, dipole moments, solution 
kinetics, and modem theories of dilute and concentrated electrolytes. 

(Svirbely.) 

Chem. 230 f. Chemical Microscopy (1). 

A laboratory course designed to give the student the fundamental prin- 
ciples of microscopic analysis. Fee, $7.00 per semester. (White.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 4 f or s. Quantitative Analysis (4) — ^Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. 

Quantitative analysis for premedical students, with special reference to 
volumetric methods. Fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 6 y. Quantitative Analysis (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. 

The principal operations of gravimetric analysis. Standardization of 
weights and apparatus used in chemical analysis. The principal operations 

245 



metnc methods The calculations of volumetric and gravimetric anaivJ. 

ReUrTd o? aTl tul 7" ." ^^^^"^^*^^"^ ^^'^""^ ^'^ comnTonln effe ? 
itequired of all students whose major is chemistry. Fee, $7.00 per semesS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem 101 y. Advanced Quantitative Autolysis (10)— Two lecturp,- 
three laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or its equivalent ' 

A broad survey of the field of inorganic quantitative analysis In th« 
first semester, mineral analysis is given. Included in th^s I Tnalysl of 
silicates carbonates, etc. In the second semester, the analysis of steel and 
Toulf:V- ""r^'"' '''' ^'"^^"* ^^ ^-- -^'l- latitude L to the tSe 

(Wiley.) 
C. Organic Chemistry 

reju1™e,'chem. f^'^'^*"'-^ ^'•^-^ ^^^-^'-^^ (4)-Two lectures. Fre- 
eh^ Jt:;:iVTstsired'^rre7tf'^ °r': fundamentals of organic 
chemistry; and premeXl studeX ""'' '' ^*"'^"*^ ^^^^^'^"^^"^ - 

CHEM. 8 B y. Elementary Organic Laboratory (4)-0ne laboratory 

m^oTsTthfoSc SbfsrT^f :our withti^enSi r Tr 

the premedical requirements in o^anic c^Zi^^y^'l^^'Zo.t'sZ^S::. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Chim. 116 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4)— Two lectur*.., V.. 
requisite. Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y or their equivalent '" 

cart:S^i;j:Sen?n Ch^r s^^^^'p^r^ '^^ ^'"^ ^-P-»<^^ °^ 
an aecompanyingttStory co^s; houfd eS'chl^*"S%"'r^^^'^ 

S^Ch?m-n^: L^e-r ;-— ^^ -^ -- - ^S 
Chem. 117 y. Orflramc Laboratory (2) -One laboratory. 
This course is devoted to an elementarv «f„H,r „* 

analysis. The work includes the dSficItion of uln '^^"'' Qualitative 

Po^ds, and corresponds to the more extend To ^j'SZ "S?? T' 
$8.00 per semester. vv^ux^e, ^nem. zu/ s. Fee, 

r«„„.^ 110 >. , (Williams.) 

CHEM 118 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2)-0ne laboratory 
A Study of organic quantitative analysis and thA T„.or,„« *• ^ 

246 



For Graduates 

Chem. 203f ors. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2-4-6) — A lec- 
ture course, which will be ^iven any half-year when there is sufficient 
demand. 

The course will be devoted to an advanced study of topics which are too 
specialized to be considered in Chem. 116 y. Topics that may be covered are 
dyes, drugs, carbohydrates, plant pigments, etc. The subject matter will be 
varied to suit best the needs of the particular group enrolled, and a student 
may register for the course for three semesters and acquire a total of six 
credits. (Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f or s. Organic Preparations (4) — A laboratory course, de- 
voted to the sjmthesis of various organic compounds. 

This course is designed to fit the needs of students whose laboratory ex- 
perience has been insufficient for research in organic chemistry. Fee, $8.00 
per semester. (Williams.) 

Chem. 206 f or s. Organic Microanalysis (4) — A laboratory study of the 
methods of Pregl for the quantitative determination of halogen, nitrogen, 
carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc., in very small quantities of material. 

This course is open only to properly qualified students, and the consent of 
the instructor is necessary before enrollment. Fee, $8.00 per semester. 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 207 f or s. Organic Qualitative Analysis, (Variable credit to 
suit student, with a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 credits.) 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and of mixtures. The text used is Kamm's Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

This course should be taken by students seeking a higher degree, whose 
major is organic chemistry. The work is an excellent preparation for the 
problems of identification one is likely to encounter while conducting 
research. Fee, $8.00 per semester. (Williams.) 

Chem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6). 

Students electing this course should elect Chem. 116 y. The content of 
the course is essentially that of Chem. 117 y and 118 y, but may be varied 
within wide limits to fit the needs of the individual student. Fee, $8.00 per 
semester. (Williams.) 

D. Physical Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 102 A y. Physical Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. G y; Phys. 2 y; Math. 23 y. 

For those taking laboratory, graduate students will elect Chem. 219 f 
and s (4), and undergraduates Chem. 102 B y (4). 

247 



i!l 



This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws of theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Haring.) 

Chem. 102 B y. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 

This course must be taken by undergraduates who desire to take labora- 
tory work in connection with Chem. 102 A y. Fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

Chem. 103 y. Elements of Physical Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Chem. 1 y; Phys. 1 y; Math. 8 f and 10 s or 
21 f and 22 s. (Lamb.) 

This course is designed to meet the needs of premedical students and 
others unable to pursue the subject further. Subjects discussed are gases 
and liquids, solutions, electrolytic conductance, colloidal solutions, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibria including indicators and buffers, reaction rates, elec- 
trochemistry including pH, etc. Quantitative experiments on these subjects 
are performed in the laboratory. Fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 105 y. Electrochemistry (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Chem. 
102 A y. 

This course is intended especially for chemical engineers. The first semes- 
ter emphasizes theory and the second semester practical applications. 

(Haring.) 
For Graduates 

Note: Chem. 102 A y and 102 B y or their equivalent are prerequisites 
for all advanced courses in physical chemistry. 

Chem. 212 A f and s. Colloid Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 

This is a thorough course in the chemistry of matter associated with 
surface energy. First semester, theory; second semester, practical applica- 
tions. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Haring.) 

Chem. 212 B f and s. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two labora- 
tories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 A f and s. (Not 
given in 1938-1939.) Fee, $7.00 per semester. (Haring.) 

Chem. 213 f. Phase Rule (2) — Two lectures. 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One, two, and three 
component systems will be considered, with practical applications of each. 

(Haring.) 
Chem. 214 f and s. Structure of Matter (2) — Two lectures. 

Subjects considered are radioactivity, isotopes, the Bohr and Lewis-Lang- 
muir theories of atomic structure, and allied topics. (Not given in 1938- 
1939.) (Lamb.) 

Chem. 215 s. Catalysis (2) — ^Two lectures. 

This course consists of lectures on the theory and applications of 
catalysis. (Haring.) 

24S 



chem. 216 f and s. Reaction Kinetics (4) -Two lectures. 

A study of reaction velocity in liquid and gaseous systems, and Jh^ 
effect of heat, light, etc. on the same. 

chem. 217 A f and s. Electrochemistry (4)-Two lectures. 

A study of the principles and some of the practical applications of e ec 
trolhemSry. Firs' semester, theory; second semester, P-tical ^apph^^^^ 

tions. 

rupM 217 B f and s Electrochemistry Laboratory (4)— Two labora- 
toHr^'hS mui ::clpany or be preceded by Chem. 217 A f and^s.^Fee. 
$7.00 per semester. 
Chem 218 y. Chemical Thermodynamics (4)— Two lectures. 
A study of the methods of approaehm. chemical problems throu.hjhe 
laws of energy. (Not given m 1938-1939.) 

CHEM. 219 f and s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4 or 6)-Two lab- 
oratories and one conference. . , ^ „„ ;„ rviom 
Students talcing this course -^y J^t / <=red.s o^^^^^^^^^^^ >n^- 
102 A y to replace the conference. Fee, $7.00 per semester. \ 

E. Biological Chemistry 
CHEM 12 A y. Elements of Organic Chemistry (4)-Two lectures. 
The chemistry of carbon and its compounds in relation to biology. This 
cou^elspaSrly designed for students in Agriculture and Home Eco- 

nomics. , v x 

CHEM 12 B y. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2)-0ne laboratory, 
i course desired to familiarize the student with the fundamental meth- 

odtofTe orgaS laboratory. The course is designed to accompany Chem. 

12 A y. Fee, $8.00 per semester. 
CHEM 14 s. Chemistry of Textiles (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Ch«n. 12 A y^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ _^^„,^^, 

strtjSf Sem' alTeSsre" f^r identifying the various fibres 
and fTa study of dyes and mordants. Fee, $7.00 per semester. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

CHEM. 106 f or s. Dairy Chemistry (4)-0ne lecture; three laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y. 

249 



Fee, $8.00 per semester '=°'"P'^*^ ^"^y^is of the fat or protein of milk. 

(Broughton.) 
OHEM. 108 s. General Physiological Chemistry (4)-Two lecture,- f„ 
laboratones. Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and Ch^J A BylrTi':;,^:. 

and excretion^. Thelab^Xr^tS^oT:^^^^^^ 

(Supplee.) 

sitrchem"4 f^ "' '• nu""^ '^'""^^' (3)-Three laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, Chem. 4 f or s, or Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y Jrerequi 

a m tne tood and feed industries. Fee, ?8.00 per semester. 

(Supplee.) 
For Gradua^tes 

Chem. 208 s. Biological Analysis (3)-Three laboratories 

terests of the individual when possible Feo «s oft i^ ^ °'' '"" 

iicii possiDie. tee, ^8.00 per semester. (Supplee ) 

ch^ ^2T/L\2^?7or"r5;tS!a-i;r^ '^^-^*-^- — •-' 

minint'thfw "'^•**'' ?P"^^«°" "^ ^^^ analytical methods used in deter- 

(Broughton.) 
.o2"T ^23 A f and s. Physiological Chemistry (4) -Two lectures Pr^ 
requisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y or their equivalelt 

abr:rSmet?b:iirmrnd~:^^^^^^^^^ ^"^ ^^-^ action, diges^on 

(oupplee.) 

rh.^A*/^^ ^ ^ Z^^''''^^^^<^^^ Cliemistry Laboratory (2). Prerequisites 
Chem. 4 f or s and Chem, 12 A y and 12 B y. -^-rerequisites, 

A laboratory course to accompany Chem 22S A f OnoiUof j 

titativp nnnl^rc-e ^^ -P ^ ,. ^ -^ ^"tim. .i^^ a i. Qualitative and ouan- 

250 



hours each week. Prerequisites, Chem. 223 A f and s, and consent of 
instructor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates 
or amino acids, and the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a 
protein. The students will choose, with the advice of the instructor, the 
particular problem to be studied. Fee, $8.00 per semester. (Supplee.) 

F. History of Chemistry 

Chem. 121 y. TJie History of Chemistry (2) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 y and Chem. 8 y or their equivalent. Required of senior students in 
the Department of Chemistry. 

The development of chemical knowledge, and especially of the general doc- 
trines of chemistry which have been gradually evolved, from their earliest 
beginnings up to the present day. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Broughton.) 

G. Seminar and Research 

Chem. 228 f and s. Seminar (2) — Required of all graduate students in 
chemistry. 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Staff.) 

Chem. 229 f or s. Research in Chemistry. The investigation of special 
problems and the preparation of a thesis towards an advanced degree. 

(Staff.) 
CLASSICAL LANGUAGES* 

Professor Highby. 

Greek 

Greek 1 y. Elementary Greek (6) — ^Three lectures. 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the trans- 
lation of simple prose. 

Greek 2 y. Greek Grammar, Composition^ and Translation of Parts of 
Xenophon and Plato (8) — Four lectures. Prerequisite, Greek 1 y or two 
entrance units in Greek. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Latin 

Latin 1 y. Elementary Latin (6) — Three lectures. 

This course is intended to give a substantial and accurate knowledge 
of Latin grammar and syntax, together with practice in reading simple 
prose. 

Latin 2 y. (6) — Three lectures. Time is taken at the outset for a 
review of forms and syntax. Selections from prose writers, especially 
Cicero. Some simple work in prose composition. Translation from Vergil's 
Aeneid. Prerequisite, Latin 1 y or two entrance units in Latin. 



*See also History 129 f and 130 s and Art 1 f and 2 s. 

251 



Latin 3 y. (6) — Three lectures. Selected readings from Horace and 
other Latin poets. Prerequisites, Latin 1 y and 2 y or four entrance units 
in Latin. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The work in Comparative Literature is offered jointly by the faculties 
of the Department of English and the Department of Modern Languages. 

English 113 f and 114 s may be counted as Comparative Literature by 
students who have had Comp. Lit. 105 f and 106 s. English 124 s may also 
be counted as Comparative Literature. 

Comp. Lit. 1 y. Outlines of the World* s Literature (2) — Two lectures. 

The object of the course is to acquaint students who have an interest 
in literary history with the principal literatures of the world. The study 
will be confined to the main movements and chief representatives of Greek, 
Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and German. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

(Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 2 y. Epic Poetry in European Literature (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

The outstanding epic poems of Greek, Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, 
German, and Scandinavian literature will be studied with special emphasis 
on their interrelation, their historical and mythological background. (Prahl.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 101 f. Greek Literature in English Translations (3) — Three 
lectures. 

Emphasis is laid on the development of the epic, tragedy, comedy, and 
other typical forms of literary expression. The debt of modern literature 
to the ancient Greek literature is discussed. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 102 s. Latin Literature in English Translations (3) — ^Three 
lectures. 

The course follows the same plan as Comp. Lit. 101 f. The study will 
show the relation of Latin literature to Greek literature, and its position 
in the literature of the world. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 103 f. Types of World Literature (2) — Two lectures. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of world litera- 
ture, with special attention to the influence of classical myth and legend and 
of classical literary ideals upon English and American writers. (Harman.) 

Comp. Lit. 104 s. The Old Testament as Literature (2) — Two lectures. 
For seniors and graduate students. 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale.) 

Comp. Lit. 105 f. Romanticism in France (3) — Three lectures. 

Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau to 
Baudelaire. Texts to be read in English. (Wilcox.) 

252 



roMP lit 106 s. Romanticism in Germany (3)-Three lectures. 
COMP. LIT. lub s. German literature from Buerger to 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105 f. German iiieraL (Prahl.) 

Heine The reading is done in English translations. ^^^ > 

COMP. LIT. 107 f. The Faust Legend in English and Germxtn Literature 

by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe m Faust. 

COMP. LIT. 108 y. Medieval and Renaissance Continental Literature (2) 

"'Z: ;rse"ill deal with such movements as f ^o^-f^l^-' ^^^^^ b^ 
Humanism. The importance of the great teachers of that time pU^be 
stressed. (Not given in 1938-1939. ) 

COMP. LIT. 109 f. A Stuay of Literary ^^!'^'^^ll\'^Z^Zto 
A survey of the -ajor schools of criticism from Plato and Ar.totle^^ 

the present day. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

ECONOMICS* 
PROFESSORS STEVENS. Grbchv, DeVault, Weoeberg; associate PRO^b^^-ors 

MARSHALL, walker; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS LAYTON, DANIEI^, 

CISSEL, HAMILTON ; MR. Reid, Mr. Mullin. 
^ome Of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 

mTSde any course by election during either the junior or the senior 
year. Alternating courses are indicated as follows: 

* Offered 1938-1939. May or may not be offered m 1939-194W. 

t Offered 1939-1940. May or may not be offered in 19<{S-iad». 

ECON 51 f 52 s. Principles of Economics I (3) each semester. Pre- 
reSsUe. sophomore standing. (Econ. 51 f and 52 s are together the equiva- 
lent of former Econ-^^O .^^^ ^^^.^^^.^ 
disti?i:LrcoSsr;ionf wealth. Lecture, discussions, and student 

exercises. ^ . .. ^„i,^ 

ECON 57 f or s. Fundamentals of Economics (3). ^'^'^^'l^ff ' f Pj"" 

more sLding. Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 51 f and 52 s. 

in former Econ 3y. or in former Econ. 5 f or s. . .^ T^ • a 

A stTdv of the general principles underlying economic activity. Designed 
A ^^f y f^^^/'f ^^i^i groups, such as students in engineering, home 

groups will be set up whenever the enrollment justifies it. 

-^^^VrtrST^^^ Business ^^^-^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^i. 
especially A. Ji.. l i. ^ «»> ^"* °' 

253 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ECON. 130 f. Labor Economics (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f or 57 f or s. 
(Equivalent to former Econ. 109 f.) 

Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, substandard work- 
ers, industrial conflict; wage theories; the economics of collective bargain- 
ing; unionism in its structural and functional aspects; recent developments. 

(Marshall.) 

tEcON. 131 s. Labor and Government (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor con- 
ditions. State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, 
working conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial 
disputes, collective bargaining, and economic security. (Marshall.) 

fEcON. 133 f. Industrial Relatione (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in indus- 
try with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and 
legal analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitra- 
tion, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and 
injunctions. (Marshall.) 

*EcoN. 136 s. Economics of Consumption (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f 
or 57 f or s. 

The place of the consumer in our economic system. An analysis of 
demand for consumer goods. The need for consumer-consciousness and a 
technique of consumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for con- 
sumers. Special problems. (Marshall.) 

fEcoN. 145 s. Public Utilities (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f or 57 f or s. 

Economic and legal characteristics of the public utility status; problems 
of organization, production, marketing, and finance; public regulation and 
alternatives. (Lay ton.) 

tEcON. 151 f. Theories of Economic Reform (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f. 

An investigation of some of the more important social reform movements 
and programs of the modem era. The course begins with an examination 
and evaluation of the capitalistic system, followed by an analysis of alter- 
native types of economic control. (Marshall.) 

*EC0N. 152 s. Social Control of Business (3). Prerequisite, sophomore 
economics and O. and M. 101 f and 102 s (or concurrent registration therein). 

The reasons for and the methods of avoidance, escape, and abuse of 
competition as a regulating force in business. Social control as a substi- 
tute for, or as a modification of, preservation of competition. Law as an 
instrument of social control through administrative law and tribunals. The 
constitutional aspects of social control. (Lay ton.) 

254 



ECON. 153 f. Industrial Combination (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 51 f. 

The development of industrial combinations in the United States; the 
causes which brought about the trust movement; trade and business methods 
employed by these combinations; types of big business; anti-trust legisla- 
tion in this country and its effects. (Not offered in 1938-1939.) 

ECON. 161 s. Economics of Cooperative Organization (3). Prerequisite, 
Mkt 101 f or A. E. 102 s. Finance 111 f. For 1938-1939, concurrent regis- 
tration in the prerequisites will suffice. (See also 0. and M. 149 f, s, or S, 
A. E. 103 f, and 0. and M. 299 f and s.) 

Analysis of the principles and practice of cooperation in economic activity 
from the viewpoint of effective management and public interest. Potentaii- 
ties, limitations, and management problems of consumer, producer, market- 
ing, financial, and business men's cooperatives. (btevens.j 
ECON. 191s. Contemporary Economic Theory (3). Prerequisite, senior 
or graduate standing. 

A survey of recent trends in English, American and Continental economic 
thought, with special attention paid to the institutionalists, the welfare 
economists, and the mathematical economists. (Grucny.) 

For Graduates 

ECON. 201 f and 202 s. Research (1-3). Credits each semester; credit in 
proportion to work accomplished. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor 
Students must be especially qualified to pursue effectively the research 
to be undertaken. 

Investigation or original research in problems of economics "^^^^^^P^^" 
vision of the instructor. 

ECON. 203 y. Seminar (4). Prerequisite, concurrent graduate major in 
economics or business administration and consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory, ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
cooperation or business. 

Econ. 205 f. History of Economic Thought (3). 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories, including 
the ancients, the Greeks, the Romans, scholasticism, mercantilism, physi- 
ocrats, Adam Smith and contemporaries, Malthus, Ricardo, and ^^^^^^^^^^ 
Mill. 

Econ. 206 s. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3). 
A study of the various schools of economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, the neo-classicists, the Austrians, and the socialists. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 207 y. The Economics of Alfred Marshall (6). 

Study of the life work of the great English economist. 

(Given in 1937-1938, not offered in 1938-1939.) (Gruchy.) 

255 



F«!r''" ^^? ^ ^""i '■ ^^"^"''' ^'•"^''^'^s »■« Economic /n^es/iffahow (1-3) - 
Each semester credit in proportion to work accomplished 

Technics involved in economic research. Practice in drawing up sched 

Ss .^'^"^T" '"^'^•'^"^^ conferences and reports. (Given fniS" 
1938; not offered in 1938-1939.) v«iven in ijj/- 

' (Stevens.) 

ECON. 233 s. Problems in Industrial Relations (3). Prerequisite nrelim 
nary courses m the field of specialization, and permission S th^'ins uT 
tor. The subjects selected for study may be closely allied with but mus 
not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major tkesTs. 

PnnxT oco r, ^, (Marshall.) 

PrereauiJte tf '" «<'^^"»«»^«< ««d Business Interrelations (3) 

Son „T !f ' .P'^t '"^'•y <=''"rses in the field of specialization, and permis 
Ju f -^u^ instructor. The subjects selected for study m^y be ewTv 

(Lay ton.) 
ECON. 299 f and s. Problems in Economics of Cooperation (1-6) Pre- 
requisite, graduate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specializa 

S 'th. T k""?V' *'' '"^*"^^*"^- P^°^'«™« -^-y involve practfca work 
with the National Cooperative Council and other Washington, D C or 

Maryland cooperative organizations. The subjects selected for iLSga- 

tion may be closely allied with, but must not be the same as the St 

discussed in the student's major thesis. ' JsteveS ) 

EDUCATION 

PROFESSORS SMAU., LONG. MackERT, BROWN; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BreCH- 

bill; Dk Powers; Mrs. Barton; Miss Clough; Mrs. Fraser- 
Miss K. Smith; Miss M. Smith; Mr . 

A. History and Principles 

Educatfon^' ^''''"^'"''^'' '" Teaching-A (2)-Required of sophomores in 

theVhat^auaZ; "'''^ -"^f T^'''' "' "^"""^ ^*"^«"*« ^° ^'"^' -Aether 
they have qualities requisite to success in teaching. Study of the physical 

qualifications personality traits, personal habits, use of Engl sh speS 

and habits of work; and of the nature of the teacher's work 

Ed. 3 s. Introduction to Teaching-B (2). 
A continuation of Ed. 2 f. 

Ed. 5 f or s^ Technic of Teaching (2)-Requii^d of juniors in Education 
Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. ^uuLduoa. 

lem'^roitr' "^i""''.'' ^""^ ""''""'"' '^ ''^^^^'^ '^^'' ^^ J^^^ons; prob- 
d^LlTT', ^ ' "^^^^"^^"^ '^'^^'^ ^nd marking; socializati;^ and 

directed study; classroom management. 



-Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 
Reports, conferences, and criti- 



Ed. 6 s. Observation of Teaching (1)- 

Twenty hours of directed observation, 
cisms. 

Ed. 7 f. Observation of Teaching (1). 
Continuation of Ed. 6s. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. 101 f. History of Education (2). Greco»-Roman, Medieval, and Early 
Modem Education. 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of Educational theory, institutions, 
and practices from the Greco-Roman era to 1750. (Long.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modem Education (2). 

Continuation of Ed. 101 f. 

The survey of the modem period is directed to the creators of modem 
education and the bases on which modern educational systems have been 
founded in various countries. (Long.) 

Ed. 103 s. Principles of Secondary Education (3). Prerequisites, Psych. 
10 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Evolution of the high school; European secondary education; articula- 
tion of the high school with the elementary school, college, and technical 
school, and with the conmiunity and the home; the junior high school; 
vocational education; high school pupils; programs of study and the recon- 
struction of curricula; teaching staff; student activities. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Measurements (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Psych. 10 f or equivalent. 

A study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construction 
and use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; elementary statistical con- 
cepts, and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test results; school 
marks. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 107 f or s. Comparative Education (2). 

The forces that cause different systems of education, and the character- 
istic differences in the educational policies and practices in various coun- 
tries are studied in this course. The major emphasis is upon certain 
European systems. (Long.) 

Ed. 108 f or s. Comparative Education (2). 

This course is similar to Ed. 107, an important difference being that 
education in Latin America receives major attention. (Long.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (2). 

This course considers the functions of the junior high school in the 
American public school system. Its development, present organization, 
curricula, and relation to upper and lower grades will be emphasized. 



256 



257 



Ed. Ill f. lAves of Scientists (2). 

A study of the major achievements and interesting incidents in the 
lives of the pioneers of science. Though designed especially to provide 
enrichment material for the use of high school teachers, the course is of 
general cultural value. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 115 A f. Seminar in Course of Study Construction (2-3). 

A course for advanced students, teachers, and supervisors in the prin- 
ciples and procedures of curriculum making. Each student deals with 
some individual problem in curriculum making; e. g., units for science, the 
social studies, English, etc. 

The course is adjusted to individual needs, A\'ith class periods for the 
discussion of general principles and procedures, and separate laboratory 
periods arranged by the instructor. (M. Smith.) 

Ed. 115 B s. Senvinar in Course of Study Construction (2-3). 
Continuation of Ed. 115 A f. (M. Smith.) 

Ed. 193 f. Visual Education (2). 

Visual impressions in their relation to learning; investigations into the 
effectiveness of instruction by visual means; projection apparatus, its cost 
and operation; slides, film strips, and films; physical principles under- 
lying projection; the integration of visual materials with organized courses 
of study; means of utilizing commercial moving pictures as an aid in 
realizing the aims of the school. (Brechbill.) 

See also Agricultural Education and Rural Life, p. 215. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). 

This course deals objectively with the organization, administration, cur- 
ricula, and present status of public education in the United States. (Small.) 

Ed. 201 s. Educational Interpretations (3). 

In this course a study is made of the social, economic, political, and 
cultural environment in which American educational institutions and policies 
have developed; and of the function of education in environmental change. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 204 s. High School Administration and Supervision (3). 

This course will consider the principal's duties in relation to organiza- 
tion for operation, administration, and supervision of instruction, and com- 
munity relationships. 

Ed. 206 s. History of AmeHcan Education to 1850 (2). 

The development of the public school in America to 1850. (Long.) 

Ed. 215 y. Seminar in Secondary Education (4-6). 

(The first semester's work may receive credit whether or not the course is 
carried the second semester.) 

258 



A study of pressing problems with which secondary education is faced 
at the present time. 

Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Education (2-4). 

Required of all candidates for the Master's degree whose majors are in 
the field of education. ^ 

Note: See also Phys. Ed. 201 y, page 267. 

B. Educational Psychology 

See Psychology, page 326. 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the College of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection 
and organization of subject matter in terms of modern practice and group 
needs- evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; 1^^^^^ Plans; 

^^.^ (Miss K. Smith.) 

measuring results. ^ 

Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (2). Prerequisite, 

Psych. 10 f. , J wv 

Objectives and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliog- 
raphies; methods of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary 
materials; lesson plans; measuring results. (Clough.) 

Ed. 124 s. Modem Language in the High School (2). Prerequisite, 

Psych. 10 f. , , 1 ^. ^ 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school; selection and 
organization of subject matter in relation to modem practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring results. 
Ed 126 s. Science in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 
Objectives of science teaching, their relation to the general objectives 
of secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class-room situation; selection and organization ot 
subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and 
laboratory equipment; technic of class room and laboratory; "^f surement 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature. (Brechbill.) 
Ed 128 s. Mathematics in the High School (2). Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 
Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature. (Brechbill) 

259 



♦Ed. 130 f. High School Course of Study— Composition (2). 
Content and organization of the materials of written and oral compo- 
sition m the several high school grades. (Miss K. Smithy 

*Ed. 131 s. High School Course of Study— Literature (2). 

Content and organization of the literature course in the several high 
school grades. ^^.^^ ^ ^^.^^^ 

Ed. 135 f. High School Course of Study— Gemnetry (2). 
Content and organization of intuitive and demonstrative geometry. Meth- 
ods of analysis and problem solving. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 136 f. High School Course of Study— Biology (2). 
Content and organization of biology. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 137 s. High School Course of Study— Physical Science (2). 
Content and organization of physics. Some consideration is given to 
content of chemistry. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 138 f. High School Course of Study— Social Studies (2). 

Content and organization of the materials of the social studies in the 
several high school grades. 

Ed. 139 f or s. Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (1-2) Pre- 
requisites, Psych. 10 f , Ed. 5 s, Ed. 6 s, and the appropriate special methods. 

Five periods of observation and participation followed by 20 periods of 
actual teaching for two semester hotirs of credit and by 10 periods of 
actual teaching for one semester hour of credit. Two semester hours are 
required. The teaching may all be done in one subject or may be done 
m two subjects. 

Students desiring more than this amount must obtain special permis- 
sion from the Dean of the College of Education, and may be required 
to pay the actual cost of such additional teaching. 

Application for registration in this course must be made on the proper 
form before the beginning of the school year in which the teaching is 
to be done. Students taking this course should arrange their schedules in 
advance so as to avoid serious time conflicts with other courses. (Staff.) 

E. English. 

S. S. Social Studies. 

L. Modem Language. 

Sc. Science. 

M. Mathematics. 

P. E. Physical Education. 

C. Commercial Subjects. 

I. Industrial Education. 

♦students whose major is English should clioose one or both of these courses. 

260 



Ed, 141 f. Physical Education in the High School (Boys) (2). Pre- 
requisites, Psych. 10 f, Ed. 5 s, Phys. Ed. 25s. 

Objectives of physical education for high school boys; lesson planning; 
problem cases; methods of handling classes; physical and medical examina- 
tions; care of equipment; records; grading. (Mackert.) 

Ed. 142 f. Phymcal Education in the High School (Girls) (3). Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 10 f. 

Objectives in physical education for girls in the different types of high 
schools; programs appropriate to high school girls; selection and organi- 
zation of subject matter; lesson plans. 

Ed. 143 y. Methods and Practice in Recreation (6). 

A course required of senior men and women electing to prepare in the 
field of recreation and open to other seniors. Not given in 1938-1939. 

Methods of handling meets, pageants, play days, circuses, tournaments, 
and the like. Practice in organizing, supervising, and directing activity 
projects of the playground, club, and community. 

Ed. 146 s. Teaching Health (2). 

A course required of senior men and women in physical education and 
recreation, meeting twice a week throughout the second semester. 

This course surv^eys the materials and methods for teaching health. 

Ed. 150 f; Ed. 151 s. Coinmercial Subjects in the High School (2-6). 
Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 

Aims and methods for the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and book- 
keeping in high schools. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Professor McNaughton 

H. E. Ed. 5 s. Technic of Teaching (2). Required of juniors in Home 
Economics Education. Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. 

Philosophy of home economics education; survey of the needs of the 
commtmity; analysis of the characteristics and interests of the high school 
girl; objectives for teaching home economics in high school; construction 
of units; use of problem, discussion, demonstration, and laboratory meth- 
ods; selection of illustrative material; the home project. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 6 s. Observation of Teaching (1). Twenty hours of directed 
observations. 

Reports, conferences, and criticisms. (McNaughton.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 102 f. Child Study (4). Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

The study of child development in relation to the physical, mental, and 
emotional phases of growth; study of textbooks and magazines; adapta- 

261 



tion of material to teaching of child care in high school; observation and 
participation in University Nursery School. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 103 f or s. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics • 
Methods and Practice (4). Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 5 s. 

Ohserv^ation and teaching in a vocational department of a Maryland 
high school or in a junior high school in Washington. Organization of 
umts, lesson plans, field trips; planning and supervision of home projects 
After completing the teaching unit the student observes in home economics 
departments other than one in which she has taught. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 104 s. Nursery School Techniques (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 
10 f. Open to seniors. Designed for Nursery School teachers. 

Philosophy of preschool education; principles of learning; routines; study 
of children's interests and activities; observation and teaching in the nursery 
^^^^^^' (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems in Child Study (4). Open to 
seniors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102 f. 

Methods and practice in nursery school work in University Nursery 
School; making of particular studies related to the mental, emotional, or 
physical development of preschool children. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106 s. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (1). 

Analysis of the units in the State course of study; study of various 
methods for organization of class period; analysis of text books; evaluation 
of Illustrative material. (McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Metlwds of Teaching Home Economics 
(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

(McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2-4) (See 
Ed. 250 y.) V ;. V c 

(McNaughton.) 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For each semester hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

IND. Ed. 1 f. Elements of Drawing and Design A (2). 

The principles and technic of elementary mechanical drawing and design, 
including sketching and blue-print reading. Emphasis is upon mechanical 
drawing as a graphic language and upon the application of design to 
high school shop projects. 

Ind. Ed. 2 s. Elements of Drawing and Design B (2). 
CJontinuation of Ind. Ed. 1 f. 



Ind. Ed. 3 f. Elementary Woodworking (3). 

This course deals with the use and care of woodworking tools and mate- 
rials in bench practice involving the principles of joinery, including the 
application of woodworking finishes. 

Ind. Ed. 4 s. Advanced Woodworking (3). 

Practice in the application of design and construction of projects in 
wood involving the use of woodworking machinery suitable for the high 
school shop. It includes furniture construction and machine cabinet work, 
with some emphasis on manufacturing practices. Basic wood turning and 
a working knowledge of wood pattern making is taught, and practice given 
in coloring, finishing, and painting wood. 

Ind. Ed. 5 f. Sheet Metal Work (2). 

A general course covering effective ways of teaching the fundamental 
details of sheet metal work. Information is given on materials, tools, 
and processes. Practice is given in soldering, the laying out of patterns, 
and the making of a group of elementary graded problems which involve 
items of practical use. 

Ind. Ed. 6 s. Art Metal Work (2). 

This course follows the course in Sheet Metal. It deals with the design, 
constrtiction, and methods of teaching art metal work. Projects include 
brass, copper, silversmithing, and jewelry work. 

Ind. Ed. 7 y. Mechanical Drawing (2). 

The basic theory and practices in the teaching of mechanical drawing 
involved in the projection of objects, the making of working drawings, 
pattern lay-outs, tracing and blue-printing, and the principles in machine 
design, including the study of conventions and the sketching of machine 
parts. 

Ind. Ed. 8 y. Electricity (4). 

The essentials of electricity in industrial and other life situations. Units 
of work are complete in house and signal wiring, power wiring, auto- 
ignition, and the fundamental principles involved in direct current machin- 
ery and alternating current machinery. It provides teachers of electricity 
with sufficient material and data to cope with the problem of electrical 
projects for high school class construction. 

Note: Shop courses Ind. Ed. 9 f to 13 f inclusive will not be g^iven until 
the year 1939-1940. 

Ind. Ed. 9 f. Elementary Machine Shop (2). 

This course includes bench work, tool grinding, and elementary practice 
on the lathe, shaper, and drill press. Effective teaching methods are 
emphasized. 

Ind. Ed. 10 s. Cold Metal Work (2). 
« 

This course is concerned with the development of fundamental skills, 
teaching methods, and knowledge involved in the design and construction 
of projects from band iron and other cold metals. 



262 



263 



IND. Ed. 11 f. Foundry (2). 

Laboratory practice and instructional methods in bench and floor mould- 
ing and elementary core making. Theory and principles covering foundry 
materials, tools, and appliances are presented, including consideration of 
mixtures for casting gray iron, brass, bronze, and aluminum. 

Ind. Ed. 12 y. Mechanical Drawing (2). 

Advanced practice and teaching methods based Upon Mechanical Draw- 
ing courses of the freshman and sophomore years. 

Ind. Ed. 13 f. Advanced Machine Shop (2). 

Laboratory experiences in the fundamental operations on lathe, shaper, 
drill press, and other machine shop equipment. Special attention to effec- 
tive methods of instruction in Machine Shop Practice. 

*Ind. Ed. 162 s. Indiistrial Education in the High School (2). Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 10 f. (Brown.) 

Major functions and specific aims of industrial education; their relation 
to the general objectives of the junior and senior high schools; selection 
and organization of subject matter in terms of modem practices and 
needs; methods of instruction; expected outcomes; measuring results; pro- 
fessional standards. 

*Ind. Ed. 164 s. Shop Organization and Management (2). 

This course recapitulates methods of organization and management for 
teaching shop subjects. It includes organization and management of pupils; 
daily programs; projects; pupils' progress charts; selection, location, and 
care of tools, machines, equipment, and supplies; records and reports; and 
good school housekeeping. Opportunity is provided for visits to industrial 
plants as a basis for more practical planning of shop instruction and 
management. ( Brown. ) 

*Ind. Ed. 165 f and 166 s. Evolution of Modern Industry (4). 

The origin and development of our modern industrial system. A review 
of the industrial progress of man through the various stages of civilization 
down to modern factory organization and practice, as related to Industrial 
Education. 

First semester (165 f) is a survey of industrial development up to and 
including the Industrial Revolution. The second semester (166 s) covers 
the period from the Industrial Revolution to the present time. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 163 f. Occupations^ Guidance, and Placement (2). 

Open to juniors and seniors. 

Survey of the educational and vocational guidance movement; typical 
public school means and methods; use of occupational information; duties 
of the counselor; organization and cooperative relationships as affecting 
modem youth. (Brown.) 



Not ^ven in 1938-1939. 



264 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
A. Physical Education for Men 

MR. MACKERT, MR. FOSTER, MR. HuTZEL, and Mr. Alderton. 

♦Phys. Ed. 1 y. Physical Activities I (2). 

An activities course for male freshmen, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities taught are soccer, touch football, basket- 
ball, volley-ball, soft baseball, track, and natural gymnastics. 

*Phys. Ed. 3 y. Physical Activities II (4). 

An activities course for sophomore men, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities taught are the team sports of the freshman 
year, and fencing, wrestling, tumbling, boxing, ping pong, horseshoe pitch- 
ing, handball, tennis, and badminton. 

Phys. Ed. 5 y. Physical Education Practice I (2). 

An activities course required of sophomore men in physical education or 
recreation, meeting three periods a week throughout the year. Activities 
taught are marching, calisthenics, games, stunts, tumbling, and heavy 
apparatus. 
Phys Ed. 7 y. Physical Edu/^ation Practice II (2). 

An activities course required of junior men in physical education or 
recreation, meeting three periods a week thi^ughout the year. Continua- 
tion of Phys. Ed. 5 y. 

Phys. Ed. 9 y. Physical Education Practice III (2). 
An activities course required of senior men in physical education or rec- 
reation, meeting three times a week throughout the year. A continuation 
of Phys. Ed. 5 y and Phys. Ed. 7 y. In addition, the senior student is 
given opportunities to teach underclassmen. 

Phys. Ed. 11 y. Personal and Community Hygiene (4). 
A course required of male freshmen in physical education or recreation, 
meeting twice a week throughout the year. 

This course is designed to help the incoming student live at his best and 
realize the highest ideals of his group. Instruction in first aid to the injured 
is included in the second semester. 

Phys. Ed. 13 y. Coaching and Officiating: Men (2). 

A course required of junior men in physical education or recreation. Pre- 
requisite, two years of successful intramural participation. 

In this course students will gain actual experience in coaching and offi- 
ciating in the activities of the intramural program. The class will meet 
once a week to consider problems of coaching and officiating. 

Srfi?nit^r"rorfim anrt*con5\eiJ l{>^ticaTEdu"cation, but not for both. 

265 



*Phys. Ed. 21 y. Sm^y of Physical Education (2). 

A course required of sophomore men and women in physical education 
or recreation, meeting once a week throughout the year. 

This course is an introduction to the study of physical education. It in- 
cludes a survey of the possibilities of the profession. 

*Phys. Ed. 25 s. Physiology of Exercise (2). 

A course required of junior men and women in physical education or 
recreation, meeting twice a week during the second semester. 

A study of the physiology involved in the performance of physical activ- 
ities. 

Phys. Ed. 27 y. Practical Dancing (2). 

A course required of junior men in physical education or recreation. 

A comprehensive course in dancing. Attention will be given to rhythmic 
patterns and to the development of fundamental dance steps used in folk, 
clog, and athletic dances. Dances especially adapted for use with adolescent 
boys are stressed. 

♦Phys. Ed. 31 f. Theory and Function, of Play (2). 

A course required of junior men and women in physical education or 
recreation, meeting twice a week during the first semester. 

The psychology of action, the uses of play, organization of play activi- 
ties, management of play space, games of low organization and individual 
activities will be studied in this course. 

*Phys. Ed. 33 s. Playground Management (3). 

A course required of junior men and women electing to prepare in the 
field of recreation, and open to other juniors and seniors. 

This course is designed to study the many problems of playground 
administration. Observation of available playground situations with reports 
and criticisms will be done. Credit will be given for playground leadership. 

Phys. Ed. 35 y. Leadership in Recreational Activities (4). 

A course required of senior men in physical education or recreation. 

Prerequisites — Phys. Ed. 13 y, and three years of successful intramural 
participation or the equivalent. 

In this course the student studies the various aspects of character devel- 
opment and leadership, and gains practical experience in planning, super- 
vising, and directing programs of activities. 

♦Phys. E&. 37 f. Boys and Girls Clubs (3). 

A course required of junior men and women electing to prepare in the 
field of recreation, and open to other juniors and seniors. 

This course is designed to study the organization and administration of 
club work. Observations of available club activities with reports and criti- 
cisms will be done. Credit will be given for leadership in club work. 



*PHYS Ed. 39 f. Community Recreation (3). 

A course required of senior men and women electing to prepare in the 
field of recreation, and open to other seniors. 

This course is designed to study the planning and supervision of com- 
munity recreational projects. Observation and preliminary participation 
S reports and criticisms will be done. Credit will be given for leadersh.p 
in these projects. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

For Graduates 

♦PHYS Ed 201 y. Administration of Health and Physical Education (6). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems that 

ar^i in th" administration of health and physical education in public 

schools An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating the 

rffeSveness of programs of health and physical education. (Mackert.) 

For description of required courses in Education see page 256 and fol- 

lowing. 

B. Physical Education flor Women 

Miss Stamp, Miss Middleton, Mrs. Eraser, Dr. Karpeles, 

Mrs. Stoutemyer. 

PHYS. Ed. 2 y. Personal Hygiene (1). 
Freshman course required of all women. 

This course consists of iAstruction in hygiene one period a week through- 
out the year. The health ideal and its attainments, care of the body i da- 
tive to diet, exercise, sleep, bathing, etc., and social hygiene. 
Phys. Ed. 4 y. Physical Activities (1). 
Freshman course required of all women. 

This is an activities course, which meets two periods a week throughout 
the ylr It will present the following phases of physical education: sports 
iuchTs hockey, soccer, basketball, speedball, archery, and volleyball ; natural 
actilitls such as tumbling and stunts; and dancing, such as clog, folk, 
and athletic. 

PHYS. Ed. 6 y. Community Hygiene (2). 

Sophomore course required of all women. , , j ^, 

Continuation of the freshman course. The work in hygiene mcludes the 
element of physiology, the elements of home, school, and community hy- 
giene, and a continuation of social hygiene. 
PHYS. Ed. 8 y. Physical Activities (2). 
Sophomore course required of all women. 

Continuation of the work of the freshman year. In addition to the reg- 
ular work, the student is permitted to elect clog, folk, or natural dancing. 



'Open to men and women. 



*Open to men and women. 



266 



267 



Phys. Ed. 10 y. Fundamentals of Rhythm and Dance (2). 
One lecture a week. 

. w^lT'f .f ^" ^"""f *"'" ^'^^ ^ "'^•'■''^ ^"^ P'^y^'^^^l education. Two periods 

Tu Jl u"*"?" ^""^ P''^'"'=^^ demonstration. Fundamentals of movement 
and rhythm basic to all dance. movement 

nrWi ""d^'-fanding of the creative process, and the application of basic 
prmcples of composition to the dance. Special consideration is given to 
dance as an educational, social force, and as an art. 

*Phys. Ed. 12 f. Games (1). 

Required of all sophomore women whose major is physical education 
and open to other undergraduates. Physical eaucation, 

This course aims to present games and stunts suitable for the ele- 
mentary school and recreational groups. Theory and practice. 

Phys. Ed. 16 s. First Aid (1). 

Required of all junior women whose major is physical education 

It presents the fundamentals necessary for offering aid in accidents and 
injuries nnt. medical attention can be secured, pfaetica" ^7 wHl be 
required of all students. ^ 

Phys. Ed. 18 y. Athletics I (2). 
pertSfo^plSclltoT ^•""^" ^"""'^ '"^^■"^ '^ ^''^^'^■^' -^-^"-- '^- 

ban? Ind t^kSr ''^ "°''' -^^"^^^^^ "' ''''''''• -^-'•' «^''^''^"' -"^y- 

In the second semester the work consists of individual sports, such as 
golf, archery, tennis, and swimming. 

Phys. Ed. 20 s. Natural Gymnastics (1). 

Required of sophomore women with a major in physical education 
This course presents stunts, games, and self-testing activities based 
upon fundamental movements which are inherent in the race. TeacSg 

Phys. Ed. 22 y. Athletics II (2). 

reSthys.Td'Ty" "''"^" "^"" ^ ''''''' '^ ''''^''^' ^''"-«-- ^^ 
Two periods of practical work. 
Advanced training in major sports. 

Phys. Ed. 24 f. Body Meclianics (2). 

T^v^nT^tn"^ ""^ all juniors with a major in physical education recreation. 
l%vo lecture periods a week. a^-iun. 



A study of the principles underlying the action of the muscles, bones, 
and joints involved in physical exercise. 

The question of correct posture and divergences from the normal. Pre- 
scription of exercise from a development and corrective standpoint. 

Physical examinations. 

*Phys. Ed. 28 f. Clogs and Athletic Dances (1). 

Required of junior women with a major in physical education. Two 
practical periods a week. 

This course includes suitable teaching material for both high school boys 
and girls, and is designed to meet the need of students entering recrea- 
tional work. 

*Phys. Ed. 30 s. Folk Dancing (1). 

Required of junior women with a major in physical education. Two 
practical periods a w^eek. 

This course includes representative dances of various countries, and 
dances representing various grades of difficulty. 

♦Phys. Ed. 32 y. Modern Dance (2). 

Required of sophomore women with a major in physical education. Two 
practical periods a week. Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 10 y, or equivalent. 

A brief review of the basic materials of movement and rhythm given 
in Phys. Ed. 10 y, to be used in dance composition which will be carried 
on in groups in the regular class hour. Particular attention will be given 
to such problems as rhythm and accompaniment, movement the medium 
of the dance, design and other related arts in the production of a signifi- 
cant and educational program of dance. 

Phys. Ed. 34 y. Coaching and Officiating : Women (2), 

Required of senior women with a major in physical education. It trains 
the student to coach and officiate in women's athletics. Opportunity is given 
for the student to apply practically the theory and methods which she 
has learned in this class. 

For descriptioiis of required courses in Education see page 256 and fol- 
lowing. 



*Oi>€n to men and women. 



*Open to men and women. 



268 



269 



ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Creese, Nesbit, Huff; Lecturers Dill, Hall, 
Kear; Associate Professors Hodgins, Huckert; Assistant Professors 
HosHALL, Pyle, Allen, Wikstrom, Machwart, Ernst; Dr. Ingalls, 

Mr. Lindahl, Mr. Lowe. 

Chemical Engineering 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ch. E. 101 f. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow (3) — Two Lectures; one 
laboratory. This course is required of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

A theoretical discussion of heat transfer and fluid flow, with illustrative 
problems and related laboratory work. 

Ch. E. 102 s. Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (3 or 4) — Two lectures; one 
or two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. & A y and 8 B y; Phys. 2 y. 

The three-credit hour course is desigaed for juniors in mechanical engi- 
neering, who may take the course without the prerequisite Chem. 8 A y 
and Chem. 8 B y. 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual control methods for 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering materials. 

Ch. E. 103 y. Elements of Chemical Engineering (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y; Phys. 2 y. 

Theoretical discussion of general underlying philosophy and methods in 
chemical engineering, such as presentation of data, material balances, and 
heat balances. Illustrated by consideration of typical problems and 
processes. 

Ch. E. 104 y. Chemical Engineering Seminar (2). Required of all 
students in chemical engineering. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Ch. E. 105 y. Advanced Unit Operations (10) — ^Two lectures; three 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103 y. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of fluid flow, heat flow, evaporation, 
humidity, distillation, absorption, scrubbing, and analogous unit operations 
typical of chemical engineering. Problems and laboratory operation of 
small scale semi-commercial type equipment. 

Ch. E. 106 s. Minor Problems (7). Prerequisites, completion of third 
year chemical engineering course or permission of department of chemical 
engineering. 

Original work on a special problem assigned to each student, including 
preparation of a complete report covering the study. 

270 



aration, control, and utilization. ^ 

CH E 108 y. Chemical Technology (4)-Two lectures. Prereqms.te, 

ri, F 103 V Also open to advanced students in chemistry. 

A stX of ^principal chemical industries. Plant inspections, tnps. 

reports, and problems. 

For Graduates 
CH E 201 y. Graduate Unit Operations (10 or more). Prerequisite, 

SSTpe ^rn. ^r CpleTenC ^^J^ conferences, an. 
TrE202s Gas Ana^^sis (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Prc- 

.eSi permission of department of eHen^ica' ^me^^" 

Quantitative determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseo 
and important gaseous impurities. Problems. 

Seminar and Research 
CH E 203 f and 204 s. Graduate Seminar (2). Required of all gradu- 
ate students in chemical ^f^Zrrent problems in chemical engineering, 

Students prepare reports on current proDie 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

CH E 205 f or 206 s. Research in Chemical Engineering 
CH. E. 20& 1 o problems and the preparation of a thesis 

The investigation of special pro advanced degree, 

in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advancea 

avil Engineering 

C E 101 s Hydraulics (4)-Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
. f,' 1? ini f Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Measurement oi wat^i. j^ ^ Prp^rpoui- 

7- (^\ Two lectures; one laboratory. Frerequi 

"tlrt.r .ou„. than C. E. 101 .. with ."P"-' » -'" -"7^"!)' 

bines, and centrifugal pumps. 

271 



C. E. 103 f. Curves and Earthwork (8) —Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil en^neering. 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; easement curves; vertical and horizontal parabolic curves. Analysis 
of turnouts and computation of earthwork, including haul and mass dia- 
^^"^ (Allen.) 

C. E. 104 s. Theory of Structures (5)— Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Taken concurrently with Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in civil engi- 
neering. 

Analytical and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 
framed structures. Influence lines for reactions, shears, moments, and 
stresses. Analysis of lateral bracing systems. Elements of slope and 
deflection ; rigid frames. The design of steel, timber, and reinforced concrete 
members. (Allen.) 

C. E. 105 f. Elements of Highways (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Location, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements. High- 
way contracts and specifications, estimates of cost, highway economics. The 
course includes, in addition to lecture and classroom work, field inspection 
^^Ps- (Steinberg.) 

C. E. 106 y. Concrete Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design and 
detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures, which include 
slabs, columns, footings, beam bridges, arches, retaining walls, and dams. 
Applications of slope-deflection and moment distribution theories and rigid 
^^^^^s- (Allen.) 

C. E. 107 y. Structural Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design 
and detailing of structural steel sections, members and their connections, 
for roof trussses, plate girders, highway and railway bridges, buildings, 
bracing systems, and grillage foundations. (Allen.) 

C. E. 108 y. Municipal Sanitation (6)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 101 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. (Hall.) 

C. E. 109 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in civil engineering 
design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be 

272 



needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is assigned 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is required 
to complete the thesis. (Steinberg and Staff.) 

C. E. 110s. Soils and Foundations (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A study of the properties and behavior of soil as an engineering mate- 
rial. Applications to the methods of constructing foundations for highways, 
bridges, buildings, and other structures. (Steinberg, Lowe.) 

Drawing 

Dr. 1 a f . Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. Required of 
freshmen in engineering. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, technical sketches, 
dimensioning. Drawing from memory; drawing from description; inking, 
tracing, blueprinting, isometric and oblique projection and sections. 

Course A is intended for students who have not had mechanical drawing. 

Dr. IBf. Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. 

Advanced engineering drawing, with applications to engineering practice. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school course in mechanical drawing. 

Dr. 2 s or Dr. 4 f. Descriptive Geometry (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Dr. 1 A f or Dr. IBf. Required of freshmen in 
engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line, and plane. Intersection of planes with solids; 
development. Applications to practical problems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 3 f or Dr. 5 s. Descriptive Geometi-y (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Dr. 2 s or Dr. 4 f. Required of sophomores in civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

Continuation of Dr. 2 s, including curves, plane and space, generation 
of surfaces, tangent planes, intersection and development of curved sur- 
faces. Shades, shadows, and perspective. Applications to practical prob- 
lems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 6 y. Mechanical Drawing (2) — One laboratory. Open to non-engi- 
neering students. 

Lettering, sketching, and working drawings of machines; including con- 
ventions, tracing, isometric and cabinet projections, and blueprinting. 



273 



Electrical Engineering 

E. E. Is. Elements of Electrical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Taken concurrently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required 
of sophomores in electrical engineering. 

Principles involved in flow of direct currents in conductors; current and 
voltage relations in simple circuits; magnetism and magnetic circuits; elec- 
tromagnetic induction, dielectric circuits and condensers. 

E. E. 101 s. Principles of Electrical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y. Math. 23 y. Required of juniors in 
civil engineering. 

Fundamentals of direct current and alternating current machinery; appli- 
cation of machines for specific duties; operating characteristics of genera- 
tors, motors, and transformers. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 102 y. Principles of Electrical Engineering (8) — Three lectures; 
one laboratory. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. Prerequi- 
site, senior standing. 

Study of elementary direct current and alternating current characteristics. 
Principles of construction and operation of direct and alternating current 
machinery. Experiments on the operation and characteristics of generators, 
motors, transformers, and control equipment. (Wikstrom.) 

E. E. 103 f. Direct Currents (6) — Four lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y. Math. 23 y, and E. E. 1 s. Required of juniors 
in electrical engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
direct current generators, motors, and control apparatus. Principles of 
construction, characteristics and operation of primary and secondary bat- 
teries and control equipment. Experiments on battery characteristics, and 
the operation and characteristics of direct current generators and motors. 

(Hodgins.) 

E. E. 104 s. Direct Current Design (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 103 f. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Materials of construction and design of the electric and magnetic circuits 
of direct current generators and motors. (Wikstrom.) 

E. E. 105 f. Electrical Measurements (4)— Three lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y, Math. 23 y, and E. E. 1 s. Required 
of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Theory and application of precision instruments and methods used in 
direct current measurements of electric and magnetic quantities. 

(Wikstrom.) 

E. E. 106 s. Alternating Current Circuits (5) — Three lectures; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisites, E. E. 103 f and E. E. 105 f. Required of juniors 
in electrical engineering. 

Introduction to the theory of alternating current circuits, both single 
phase and polyphase; methods and apparatus Used to measure alternating 

274 



currents, voltage, and power; current and voltage relations in balanced and 
unbalanced polyphase systems. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 107 y. Alternating Current Machinery (8) — Three lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Required of seniors in electrical 
engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
transformers, alternators, induction motors, synchronous motors, synchro- 
nous converters, commutator type motors, and other apparatus; tests and 
experiments. (Creese.) 

E. E. 108 f. Alternating Current Design (1) — One laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, E. E. 105 f, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 
Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

Materials of construction and design of the electric and magnetic circuits 
of alternating current generators, motors, and transformers. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 109 y. Electrical Communications (6) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Principles of wire and radio communication. Theory and calculation of 
passive networks including transmission lines and coupled circuits. Theory 
and calculation of non-linear impedances including the vacuum tube. Intro- 
duction to electromagnetic wave propagation. (Kear.) 

E. E. 110 f. Illumination (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. Required of seniors 
in electrical engineering. 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems, 
illumination calculations, photometric measurements. (Creese.) 

E. E. lllf. Electric Railways (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, E .E. 
106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Mechanism of train motion. Construction of speed-time and power-time 
curves, and their use in the application of electrical equipment to transpor- 
tation. Construction, operation, and control of apparatus used in different 
fields of electrical transportation, such as urban railways, trunk line rail- 
ways, and busses. Power requirements, distribution systems, and signal 
systems. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 112 s. Electric Power Trcunsmission (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Survey of central station and substation equipment. Calculation of line 
constants. Mechanical and economical considerations of transmission of 
power. Fundamentals of transients. (Wikstrom.) 

E. E. 113 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in electrical engineer- 
ing design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may 

275 



be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent confer- 
ences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is 
assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, 
is required to complete the thesis. (Creese and Staff.) 

General Engineering Subjects 

Engr. If. Introduction to Engineering (1) — One lecture. Required of 
freshmen in engineering. 

A course of lectures by the faculty and by practicing engineers covering 
the engineering professional fields. The work of the engineer, its require- 
ments in training and character, and the ethics and ideals of the profession. 
The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in selecting the par- 
ticular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 

Engr. 101 f. Engineering Geology (2) — Two lectures. Required of juniors 
in civil engineering. 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. (Hess.) 

Engr. 102 s. Engineering Law and Specifications (2) — Two lectures. 
Required of seniors in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

A study is made of the fundamental principles of law relating to business 
and to engineering; including contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
corporations, and common carriers. These principles are then applied to the 
analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and 
specifications. (Steinberg.) 

Mechanics 

Mech. 1 s. Statics and Dynamics (3) — Three lectures. Taken concur- 
rently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores in 
civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solutions of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia; kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

Mech. 101 f. Strength of Materials (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Riveted joints; torsional stresses and strains; beam stresses and deflec- 
tion; combined axial and bending loads; column stresses; principal stresses 
and strains ; impact and energy loads ; statically indeterminate beams ; shear 
center; unsymmetrical bending; composite members including reinforced 
concrete beams. Instruction in the use of an approved handbook containing 
the properties of rolled steel sections. (Ernst.) 

Mech. 102 f. Strength of Materials (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 

A shorter course than Mech. 101 f. Instruction in the use of an approved 
handbook containing the properties of rolled steel sections. (Ernst.) 

276 



Mech. 103 s. Materials of Engineering (2)— One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f or Mech. 102 f. Required of juniors in 
civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering, and of the conditions that influence their physical 
characteristics. The interpretation of specifications and of standard tests. 
Laboratory work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, brick, 
cement, and concrete. (Pyle.) 

Mechanical Engineering 

M. E. 1 s. Kine^natics (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Taken con- 
currently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores in 
mechanical engineering. 

A course embracing the fundamentals of kinematics necessary to the 
study of kinematics of machinery. Plane motion of a particle and the gen- 
eral laws governing the transmission of plane motion are treated by vector 
and graphical methods. 

M. E. 101 f. Khhematics of Machinery (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, M. E. 1 s. Requined of juniors in mechanical engi- 
neering. 

A course applying kinematics to the study of the motions transmitted 
by cams, gears, belts, chains, links, etc. (Huckert.) 

M. E. 102 f. Machine Design (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in mechanical 
engineering. 

The application of mechanics to the determination of stresses and the 
proportioning of machine parts. (Hoshall.) 

M. E. 103 s. Thermodynamics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, steam 
turbine, nozzles. The properties of vapors, cycles of heat and entropy, in- 
cluding discussion of machines and their uses. (Lindahl.) 

M E. 104s. Thermodynamics (5)— Four lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 23 y, and Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in mechanical 
engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors. Thermo- 
dynamics of heat cycles, air compressors, and steam engines. (Huckert.) 

M. E. 105 f. Internal Combustion Engines (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Theory, construction, and operation of gasoline and oil engines. Design 
and operation of Otto and Diesel cycle engines. (Nesbit.) 

277 



tnrv* ^Vr.l^'^^'- ■^'"IT'V"^ Ventilation (3) -Two lectures; one labora- 
Sng ' '"'' '• ^""'""^ "^ ''''''"' '" mechanical engi- 

The study of types of heating and ventilating systems for a particular 
building; layout of piping and systems, with complete calculations and esti- 
mates of costs; fundamentals of air conditioning. (dh, ) 

^- -f i?*^^' ^^f'^seration (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration 
A.r conditioning for offices, buildings, factories and homes. (S) 

M. E. 108 y- Design of Prime Movers (6) -Two lectures; one laboratory 

engSing"' ' '' ''■ ^^ '"' " ^"^'^'''^ ''' ^^"'''^ '» ™-hanicS 

The design and proportioning of parts of essential prime movers for power 
plants, and industrial uses. Vxr vTf 

(Nesbit.) 

o,^:Ji\ ^"l^'\/r'^'' "f ^""'^ 'P'''"*^ (2)-Two lectures. Taken con- 
currently with M. E. 108 y. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering 

The design of power plants, including the layout and cost of building, 
installation of equipment, and determination of size for most economica 
operation. 

(Nesbit.) 

M. E. 110 y. Mechanical Laioratory (2)— One laboratory. Required 
of seniors in mechanical engineering. m" ^cu 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and water 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam and inteLl combusSn 
en^nes, setting of mlves, tests for economy and capacity of boilers, engines, 
turbines, Pumps and other prime movers. Feed water heaters and con- 
densers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels, and power 
P'^"* *^^*^- (Nesbit, Lindahl.) 

M E. Illy. Thesis (3) -One laboratory first semester; one lecture, 
one laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in mechanical engi- 
neering. ^ 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in mechanical engi- 
neering design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as 
may be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent 
conferences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student 
is assigned for advace. A written report, including an annotated bibliog- 
raphy, IS required to complete the thesis. (Nesbit and Staff ) 

M. E. 112 f. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (3)— Two lectures- 
one laboratory^ Required of juniors in civil engineering. Prerequisites', 
Math. 23 y, and Phys. 2 y. ^ » 

^ Elementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel, and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for the generation of power. Includes 

278 



study of fundamental types of steam boilers, fuel burning equipment, prime 
movers, and their allied apparatus. Supplemented by laboratory tests and 
trips to industrial plants. (Huckert.) 

M. E. 113 s. Power Plants (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Required 
of seniors in electrical engineering. Prerequisite, senior standing. 

A study of heat, fuel, and combustion in the production and use of 
steam for the generation of power. Includes the theory and operation of 
steam engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines, and their accessories. 
Practical power problems as applied to typical power plants, supplemented 
by laboratory tests and trips to industrial plants. (Huckert.) 

Shop 

Shop Is. Forge Practice (1) — One combination lecture and laboratory. 
Required of freshmen in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on the principles of forging and heat treatment 
of steel. Demonstrations in acetylene and electric welding, brazing, cutting, 
and case hardening. Laboratory practice in drawing, bending, upsetting, 
forge welding, hardening, tempering, and thread cutting. 

Shop 2f. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
sophomores in electrical engineering. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

Shop 3 f . Machine Shop Practice (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of sophomores in mechanical engineering. 

Study of the fundamental principles of machine tools, such as lathe, 
planer, shaper, milling machine, drilling machine, and grinding machines. 
Calculation for cutting threads, spur and helical gears, fluting and cutting 
speeds and coolants. The laboratory work in this course is identical with 
Shop 2 f. Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe 
threading. 

Shop 4 f. Machine Shop TJieory (1) — One lecture. Open to non- 
engineering students. 

This course consists of the lecture work only of Shop 3 f, and is sched- 
uled concurrently with Shop 3 f. 

Shop 5 s. Machine Shop Practice (2) — Two laboratories. Open to non- 
engineering students. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, pipe threading, thread 
cutting, surface grinding, and fluting and cutting spur and helical gears. 

Shop 6 y. Wood Shop (2) — One laboratory. Open to non-engineering 
students. 

Use and care of wood-working tools and exercises in sawing, planing, 
turning, finishing, and laying out work from blueprints. (A charge will 
be made for materials actually used, approximately $2.00 a semester.) 

279 



I 



Shop 101 f. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, surface grinding, fluting, cutting spur and helical gears, and jig 
work. (Hoshall.) 

Shop 102 s. Foundry Practice (1) — One combination lecture and lab- 
oratory. Required of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on foundry products and layout, materials and 
equipment, hand and machine moulding, cupola practice and calculating 
mixes. Core making, moulding, casting in aluminum, brass, and gray iron. 

(Hoshall.) 

Surveying 

SuRV. 1 f and s. Elements of Plane Surveying (1) — -Combined lecture and 
laboratory work. Prerequisites, Math. 21 f, and 22 s. Required of sopho- 
mores in chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

A brief course in the use of the tape, compass, level, transit, and stadia. 
Computations for area, coordinates, volume, and plotting. 

SURV. 2 y. Plane Surveying (5) — One lecture; one laboratory first sem- 
ester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
21 f and 22 s. Required of sophomores in civil engineering. 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level. 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross- 
sections, volume, stadia. 

SuRV. 101 f. Advanced Surveying (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Adjustment of instruments, latitude, longitude, azimuth, time, triangula- 
tion, precise leveling, geodetic surveying, together with the necessary 
adjustments and computations. Topographic surveys. Plane table, land 
surveys, and boundaries. Mine, tunnel, and hydrographic surveys. (Pyle.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Hale, House, Warfel; Associate Professor Harman; 

Assistant Professors Fitzhugh, Lemon, Zeeveld; Mr. Ball, Mr. Bryan, 

Dr. Conwell, Miss Ide, Mr. Gravely, Miss Miller, 

Mr. Murphy, Mr. Sixbey. 

Eng. 1 y. Survey and Composition I (6) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful pass- 
ing of the qualifying examination given by the Department, or successful 
completion of English A. Required of all four-year students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

280 



Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. Each semester of this course 
will be repeated in the following semester. 

Eng a f. Special Preparatory Course (0)— Three lectures. Freshman 
vear Prerequisite, three units of high school English. Required of all 
students who fail to pass the qualifying examination. Students who show 
sufficient progress after five weeks of English A will be transferred to 
English 1 y. Others will continue with English A for one semester. The 
department reserves the right to transfer students who make unsatisfactory 
progress from English 1 y to English A f. 

A course in grammatical and rhetorical principles designed to help 
students whose preparation has been insufficient for English 1 y. Exer- 
cises, conferences, precis writing. This course will be repeated in the 
second semester. 

Eng. 2 f. Survey and Composition II (3)— One general lecture given 
by various members of the department; two quiz sections. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Required of all students m the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work accomplished 
in Eng. 1 y. An historical study of English Literature from the begin- 
nings to the nineteenth century. Themes, book reports, conferences. 

Eng. 3 s. Survey and Composition II (3)— One lecture; two quiz 
sections. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f. Continuation of Eng. 2 f. 

Eng. 4 f or s. Business English (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1 y. Course complete in one semester, but may be taken in either semester. 

This, course develops the best methods of writing effective business 
letters. 

Eng. 5 f. Expository Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 

Study of the principles of exposition. Analysis and interpretation of 
material bearing upon scientific matter. Themes, papers, and reports. 

Eng. 6 s. Exposito^-y Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
5 f. Continuation of Eng. 5 f. 

Eng. 7 f. Survey of AmeHcan Literature (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1 y. 

American thought and expression from 1607 to 1865, with emphasis 
upon colonial cultural patterns, upon the rise of nationalism, and upon 
sectional conflict. Reports and term paper. 

Eng. 8 s. Survey of American Literature (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1 y. 

Continuation of Eng. 7 f , with emphasis upon the changing social forces 
which influenced American writers after 1865. Reports and term paper. 

281 



Eng. 11 f. Slmkespeare (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 

Ten significant plays, illustrating the drama as a distinct form of art. 
Dramatic criticisms; preparation of acting script. 

Eng. 12 s. Shakespeare (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y 
and Eng. 11 f. 

Eng. 13 s. Introduction to Narrative Literature (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Not open to freshmen. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and of other narrative forms. 

Eng. 14 f. College Grammar (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1 y. Required of students preparing to teach English. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

In addition to the twelve hours of basic freshman and sophomore English, 
a student taking his major work in English must pass College Grammar 
and either History of the English Language or one semester of Anglo- 
Saxon, one semester of Shakespeare, Advanced Composition, and Survey of 
American Literature. 

The Department strongly recommends, but does not require, that major 
students take a course in English History and a course in Comparative 
Literature. At least an elementary knowledge of French, German, and 
Latin is highly deesirable, especially for students who intend to do gradu- 
ate work. 

Eng. 100 f and s. Advanced Writing (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. Course complete in one semester, 
but may be taken a second semester for credit. Required of all students 
whose major is English. Open to othera by permission of instructor. 

Theory and practice in the larger forms, the types to be varied each 
semester at the election of the class. (House, Bryan.) 

Eng. 101 s. History of the English Language (3) — Three lectures. Pre^ 
requisite, Eng. 14 f. 

An historical survey of the English Language: its nature, origin, and 
development, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in 
English speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. (Harman.) 

Eng. 102 f. Anglo-Saxon (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 14 f. 

A study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lec- 
tures on the principles of phonetics and comparative philology. (House.) 

Eng. 103 s. Beowulf (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f. 

A study of the Old English epic in the original. Stress on philology, 
syntax, versification. (House.) 

282 



ENG. 104 f. ChauA^er (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y and 
Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the principal 
minor poems, with lectures and readings on the social background of 
Chaucer's time. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Hale.) 

Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports 
(Not given in 1938-1939.) (Fitzhugh.) 

ENG. 106 s. Elizabethan Drama (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the change in spirit and form of English drama from 1540 
to 1640, as seen in the works of the important dramatists other than Shake- 
speare. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading written 
dramatic criticisms. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Zeeveld.) 

ENG. 107 s. Non-Dramatic Literature of the English Renaissance (3) — 
Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3s. 

A study of the literary manifestations of humanism and the new 
national spirit in sixteenth-century England, with emphasis on the prose 
works of More, Lyly, Sidney, Hooker, Bacon, and the translators of the 
Bible, and on the poetry of Spenser. (Zeeveia.) 

Eng. 108 f. Milton (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and 
Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (2)— Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the chief prose writers and of the Metaphysical and Cavalier 
traditions in poetry. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Murphy.) 

ENG. 110 s. The Age of Dryden (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

This course emphasizes the relation of literature to the philosophical 
movements of the age. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Murphy.) 

ENG. Ill f. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2)-Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Readings in the period dominated by Defoe, Swift, Addison Steele, 
, „ (Fitzhugh). 

and Pope. 

Eng. 112 s. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A continuation of Eng. HI f. Dr. Johnson and his Circle; the Rise ^f 
Romanticism; the Letter Writers. (Fitzhugn.) 

283 



Eng. 113 f. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3)— Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the development of the Romantic movement in England as 
exemplified by the prose and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Lamb, 
De Quincey, Landor, and others. 

Eng. 114 s. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the later Romantic writers, including Byron, Shelley, Keats, 
Moore, Scott, and others. (Hale.)' 

Eng. 115 f. Scottish Poetry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y 
and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. No knowledge of the Scottish dialect required. 

Readings in the Scottish Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthornden; song 
and ballad literature; poets of the vernacular revival: Ramsay, Ferguson, 
and Burns. Papers and reports. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 116 f. Tennyson and Browning (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Wide reading of the poems with detailed study of selected pieces. 

(House.) 
Eng. 117 f. Minor Victorian Poets (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Arnold, Clough, Thompson, Swinburne, and others. (House.) 

Eng. 118 s. Modet-n and Contemporary British Poets (3) Three 

lectures. 

Hardy, Kipling, Bridges, Noyes, Masefield, and others. (House.) 

Eng. 120 f. The English Novel (2)--Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Prose fiction in England from the later seventeenth century to the 
middle of the nineteenth. Lectures on the principles of narrative themes, 
structure, and style. Class reviews of selected novels. (House.)' 

Eng. 121 s. The English Novel (2) —Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Continuation of Eng. 120 f. Discussion of later nineteenth century and 
twentieth century English fiction. (House.) 

Eng. 123 f. Modem Drama (3)-— Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A survey of English drama during the two centuries from 1660 to 1860 
Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 124 s. Contemporary Dramu (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites. 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen 
to O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 

(Fitzhugh.) 
284 



Eng. 125 f. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 7 f and 8 s. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, with 
emphasis on transcendentalism, idealism, and democracy. (Not given in 
1938-1939.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. American Fiction (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
7 f and 8 s. 

Historical and critical study of the short story and novel in the United 
States from 1789 to 1920. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 7 f and 8 s. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 128 s. American Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
7 f and 8 s. 

Historical study of representative American plays and playwrights from 
1787 to 1920. (Warfel.) 

For Graduates 

Requirements for Advanced Degrees with Major in English (in addition 
to the general requirements of the Graduate School). 

Master of Arts 

1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of 
English must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German at 
the time of admission or not later than six months before taking the degree. 

2. Before the degree is awarded, candidates must have completed English 
102 f and 103 s. 

3. At the discretion of the department, the thesis may consist of one 
long paper or an equivalent amount of original research in the form of 
shorter papers. In either case, the candidate will be expected to demon- 
strate his ability to use the ordinary methods of research in the discovery 
of knowledge and to organize and present his findings in a clear, effective 
English style. 

4. The final examination will be based in part upon the courses pursued 
and in part upon first-hand knowledge of all the literary works included in 
the departmental list of readings for the Master's degree. The examina- 
tion will test the candidate's powers of analysis and criticism. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. The courses required for all candidates for the doctorate are as 
follows : 

A. Three credit hours in Comparative Literature (101 f). 

B. Six credit hours in Anglo-Saxon (Old English), English 102 f 
and 103 s, plus four credit hours in a seminar in Old English Poetry. 

C. Four credit hours in Middle English Language (Eng. 202 f) 
and Gothic (Eng. 203 s). 

285 



2. Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination prefer 

Uon will include linguistics (morphology and phonology) and each of the 
TsTthe n"'' ^'l![ ?-'«-"y= <1) Old English, ^2 Middle English 

vLl ,? f'J^^ *^^ ^'''^"^^ ^"'^ Seventeenth Centuries, (5) the 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. 

Eng 201. Research (2-4). Credit proportioned to the amount of work 

tTL's rooS:T'"'?- i'"^'":' ^"^^^•^'^ ^"-^ ^•^^ p-p--«- «f dir/r- 

rations looking towards advanced degrees. /g^^ ^ 

En^g'"ol?and m f ^'^'''^ ^^""""^^ (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisites. 

et^:Z' :LiT.!: "' ''- ''''''' ^-^"^^ ^-^''^' -'^'^ -^7-- *« 

(House.) 
Eng. 203 s. Gothic (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f 

Correfa«on nf r!.?™' ^""u '^"*/''' ^''^ '""^'^'"^^ ^'^"^ ^''^ Ulfilas Bible. 
Correlation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (House.) 

Eng. 204 y. Medieval Romance in England (4)— Two lectures 

eval'Sn^^T'^ Ti'"^ '" ^^' '^'="'=^' ^"'^ non-cyclical romances 'in Medi- 
eval England, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. 

(Hale.) 
Eng. 205 f. Seminar in Sixteenth-Century Humanism in England (2)- 
Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 107 s. » \ i 

ism mof t?' ^^A -'"^i^o ,1" ^ ^^' cmtinuUy of early English human- 
tsm. (Not offered in 1938-1939.) (Zeeveld ) 

107 r* ^"^ ^' ^^'"*'^*' '"^ ^P"""^'' (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

In 1940-1941, the subject will be Spenser and Sixteenth-Century Puri- 
tantsm. (Not offered in 1938-1939.) (Zeeveld ) 

Eng 207 f Seminar in Shakespeare (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
H^ng. 11 f and Eng. 12 s. m > 

In 1938-1939 the subject will be The bibliographical approach to the text 
of Shakespeare's plays. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 208 s. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2)— Two lee- 
tures. 

Intensive study of one man's work or of one important movement of the 

century. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 209 y. Seminar in American Literature (4)--Two lectures. 

Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth century American Litera- 

S'^V- 7^ '"^ ^^'^ ^'''' 1938-1939 will be Charles Brockden Brown and 

^^ ^''*''^^- (Warfel.) 

286 



Eng. 210 f. Seminar in the Romantic Period (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 113 f and 114 s, or an equivalent satisfactory to the in- 
structor. One discussion period of two hours. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
movement. The subject-matter of the course will vary with the interests 
of the class. (Hale.) 

Eng. 211 s. Victorian Prose (2) — Two lectures. 

English prose from about 1830. Study devoted chiefly to Carlyle, Mill, 
Arnold, Ruskin. (House.) 

Eng. 212 s. Browning's TJie Ring and the Book (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the text, the sources, and the criticism. (Not given in 
1938-1939.) (House.) 

Eng. 213 s. Browning's Dramas (2) — Two lectures. 

Luritty The Return of the Druses, Pippa Passes, Colombe's Birthday, 
A Blot in the 'Scutcheon, and others. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (House.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Cory; Lecturers Snodgrass, Hyslop, and Yeager; Assistant 
Professor Knight; Dr. Ditman, Dr. Langford, Mr. McConnell, Mr, 

Abrams, Mr. Bickley. 

Ent. 1 f or s. Introductory Entomology (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

The relationships of insects to the activities of mankind; the general 
principles of insect morphology, classification, adaptation; elementary prin- 
ciples of economic entomology. Field work and the preparation of a collec- 
tion of representative insects of Maryland. 

Ent. 2 s. Insect Morphology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1. 

A study of the anatomy of insects, given especially in preparation for 
work in insect taxonomy and biology. 

Ent. 3 f. Insect Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 2 s. 

The general principles of taxonomy. An intensive study of the classifica- 
tion of all orders of insects and the principal families in the major groups. 
The preparation of a collection of insects is a major portion of the course. 

Ent. 4 f . Beekeeping (2). One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 1 s. 

History of beekeeping, natural history and behavior of the honeybee. A 
study of the beekeeping industry. A non-technical course intended to acquaint 
the student with the honeybee as an object of biological and cultural inter- 
est, and to serve as an introduction to the science of apiculture. 

287 



Ent. 5 s. Insect Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1, 

A continuation of some of the general aspects of entomology begun in 
Ent. 1, with emphasis upon the adaptations, behavior, inter-relationships, 
and ecology of insects. 

Ent. 6f. Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 1 f or s, and Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the life history, yearly cycle, behavior, and activities of the 
honeybee. The value of honeybees as pollenizers of economic plants and as 
producers of honey and wax. Designed to be of value to the student of 
agriculture, horticulture, entomology, and zoology. 

Ent. 7s. Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 6 f . 

Theory and practice of apiary management. Designed for the student 
who wishes to keep bees or desires a knowledge of practical apiary man- 
agement. 

Ent. 8 f , 8 s. Entomological Technic and Scientific Delineation (4) — Two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

Collecting, rearing, preserving, and mounting of insects. The prepara- 
tion of exhibits, materials for instruction, entomological records. Methods 
of illustrating, including drawing, photography, lantern slide making, and 
projection. Useful for prospective teachers of biology as well as for the 
entomological student. (Not offered in 1938-1939.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 101 y. Econoinic Entomology (4) — Two lectures. 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, including life 
history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. (Cory.) 

Ent. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two laboratories. 

Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field work in economic 
entomology. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Cory.) 

Ent. 103 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of original work, book reviews, and abstracts of the more 
important literature. (Cory, Knight.) 

Ent. 104 f, 104 s. Insect Pests of Special Groups (6) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the principal insects of one or more of the following groups, 
founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course is intended to give 
the general student a comprehensive view of the insects that are of import- 
ance in his major field of interest and detailed information to the student 
specializing in entomology. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

288 



Insect Pests of 1. Fruit. 2. Vegetables. 3. Flowers, both in the JP^^^f 
under glass. 4. Ornamentals and Shade Trees 5 Forests. 6. Field Crops 
Tstored Products. 8. Live Stock. 9. The Household. (Cory.) 

ENT. 105 f. ilfedicoZ Entomolo^l/ (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Ent. 
1 f or s, and consent of instructor. 

The relation of insects to diseases of man, directly and as carriers of 

The reiauon oi uibcv^u^ fundamentals of 

pathogenic organisms. Control of pests of man. e (knight.) 

parasitology. 

ENT. 106 s. Insect Taxonomy (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. 

An advanced course dealing with the principles and practices ""deriymg 
modem systematic entomology. 

ENT. 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (2) -Two lectures. 

The development and use of contact and sto'"^^ /f °'^^' ^'*/"^'eJent 
their chemistry, toxic action, compatability and fohage >W ^^^J 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. (Ditman., 

ENT. 109 s. Insect Physiology (2) -Two lectures; occasional demonstra- 
tions. Enrollment subject to consent of mstructor. ^ u^ a 

The functioning of the insect body with P-^'.-'^^'/tSractL and 
circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex acjon^and 

the nervous system, and metabolism. 

ENT. 110 f and s. Special Problems. Credit and prerequisite to be deter- 
mined by the staff. ^ ^f 

The intensive investigation of some^"t«">°?''g^'=^Vtir1raduation 
the results is submitted as part of the requirements ^or ^g-1-^t^on^^^ 

Ent Ills. Coccidolofiry (2)— Two laboratories. 

A .tudv of morphology, taxonomy, and biology of the higher groups of 
the scSeinfecTs! The technic of preparation and microscopy are empha- 
:td. LabTatlry studies are supplemented by occasional lectures.^^^^^^^^ 

For Graduates 
ENT 201 y Adi,ancedEntontoIopi/(l-3)-One lecture; one laboratory by 

head of the department, may 'i"°^"^'^^^^X%_-^„tly the student may 
taxonomy, or biology and control |^ ^^^^ ; J^ D^^^^^^ Projects, 

be allowed to work on Station or State f °™™; . ^ ^he project and 
The student's work may form a part of the final report on the pro] 

289 



be published in bulletin form. A dissertation suitaoie lor publication must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203 f. Insect Morphology (2-4) — Two lectures; and laboratory 
work by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 
preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

(Snodgrass.) 

Ent. 204 y. Economic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. Studies of the 
principles underlying applied entomology, and the most significant advances 
in all phases of entomology, (Cory.) 

Ent. 205 s. Insect Ecology (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects 
to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic 
organism adjusted to the environment. (Langford.) 

FARM FORESTRY 

Professor Besley. 

For. Is. Farm Forestry (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Alternate 
year course. Junior and senior years. Prerequisite, Bot. 101 f. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of trees; forest 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest crops; 
nursery practice; and tree planting. The work is conducted by means of 
lectures and practice in the woods. 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Professor W. B. Kemp; Mrs. Titt. 

G. AND S. 14 f. Elements of Statistics (3) — Three lectures. 

Organized for students in Economics and Commerce. A study of the 
fundamental principles used in statistical investigation, together with the 
making of diagrams, graphs, charts, and tables. 

G. AND S. 15 s. Economic Statistics (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
G. and S. 14 f. 

A study of error, measures of relationship, partial correlation, recti- 
linear and curvilinear multiple correlation and regression, analysis of 
variance and covariance. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

G. AND S. 101 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of 
genetics, or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in 
the breeding of animals or of plants. 

290 



G AND S 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

species crosses, identity and nature of the gene, genetic equ 
tical significance of genetic phenomena. 

r AND S 111 f Biological Statistics (2)— Two lectures. 

Srganiz'edJor' biology 'students. A study of exP-ions of^ t^^^^^^ vari- 
ability, correlation, regression, error and significance of differences. 

G. AND S. 112 s. Advanced Biological Statistics (2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

TSy^'oftfor! muitiple and partial correlation, predictive formulae, 
empirical curve fitting, analysis of variance and covariance. 

G AND S 116 s. StatisUcal Design (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

\ttuV of Se^principles of logical d^gnj^r ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

in some detail. 

a a™ S. 120. Problem. (2-«; dependent .Wtlslic.l analysis, 

and presentation of results. 

For Graduates 
G. AND S. 201 y. Plant Breeding, Credit according to work done. 
G. AND S. 209 y. Research. Credit according to work done. 

GEOLOGY 
Professor Bruce. 

GEOL. If. Geology (3)-Two lectures; ^^^ l^J^^t^'^f 'j^ ^^^ i„,ip,es of 
A textbook, lecture, and laboratory cou^^^^^^ "^Me'tS course' is designed 

may also be taken as part of a liberal education. 

HISTORY 

PKOrESSORS BAKEK-CROTHEKS. STRAKHOVSKY; ASSOCIATE Pr™rHIGHBV; 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR THATCHER; MR. SILVER, DR. DOZER, DB. FRANCE. 

H. 1 y. A Survey of Western Civilization (6)-0ne lecture and two 

'T^U T^te covering the broad movements of European history 
whthTntributed to the formation of our ^no^^^^^^^^^- J^ ^ 
the course is to make the student cognizant of the present trenos 

changing wrorld. 

291 



New rrrrp=i^^^^^^^^^ '^^"- ^--^ *^^ ^^— ^^ ^^^ 

sion'olL .^^17/ ^'^'^'^'^^ ««rf Grea« 5n7atn (6)-Lectures and discus- 

m^sion T.Hwf r^'" /"** sophomores. Upperclassmen only with per- 
mission and with reduced ci*dit (4). 

A survey course of English history from earliest times to the World War. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
^H.Wly. ^^encan Cofomai Fis^on/ (6)-Three lectures. Prei^quisite, 

ca,f ptl from thf di''' """""T: '"' ^'"'"' development of the Ameri- 

ConsSLn " ''"=**'''^ '' ^"^"'^^ ^^-"^h the formation of the 

„ (Baker-Crothers.) 

^H.W2y. ieecene AmeHcan Ms^orj/ (6) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

i^It^etZml "'"°"^' '^^^'°^'"^"* ^^'^"^ *^^ -^'-^ «^ *»>« Civil War to 
IT 1A^ 4. (Thatcher.) 

Jure! PretSi::'lf T;."" ^"'^"'^ "' *'^ ^^^'^^'^ ^*«*- (^>-Three 

I79I," ^*^''^"'''' '""''"' ^'^"^ ^ ^y"t^^^'« of American life from 1607 to 
„ (Baker-Crothers.) 

lecfiir"' 'pretS^iii::f l^Tr" "'''^'^ "' ''' '''^''' ''"''' ^'^"^^^^^ 

This course is similar to H. 104 f, and covers the period from 1790 to 1860. 

W ift« * n- , . (Baker-Crothers.) 

- Prerequfsit, H.tr'" "''"^' "^ '"' ^'^"^'^ ''^'^^ (2)_Two lectures. 

A study of American foreign policy. (Thatcher.) 

Prf;eqTsitl H.?r*" "''"^ "^ ''' '''''''' '''''' ^'^-''^^ 1-t-es. 

This course is a continuation of H. 106 f. ,rr.. , . , 

TJ ino J! ^ (Inatcher.) 

Jes'%rLZTs!:Ti:Ty"'''''^ "' ''' ^"'"'^^ ''^'- (^>-T^- lec- 

stifution'^'Lnd If'th i'^'^r' '"''' r^"'""^ •" '''' f-'"^«<'" of the Con- 
fnTStiee thteaf^r ^'"^"* "' ^'"^"^^" constitutionalism in theory 

* (Thatcher.) 

H. 109 s. CorustUutioTml History of the United States (3) -Three Ipr 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. ^^i>K^) inree lec- 

A continuation of H. 108 f. ,^, , , 

(Inatcher.) 

292 



H. 110 f. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 
The history of national development to the end of the Civil War. 

(Thatcher.) 

H. Ill s. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 110 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 112 f. History of Maryland (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 
A survey of the political, economic, and social progress of Maryland as 
colony and state. 

H. 113 s. History of Maryland (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 
This course is a continuation of H. 112 f. 

H. 115 f. Medieval History (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 
A brief survey of the medieval period, with special emphasis on the legacy 
of the Middle Ages. (Prange.) 

H. 117 s. Renaissance and Reformation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

A brief survey of the Renaissance and Reformation. (Prange.) 

H. 119 f. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Europe (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

A study of the political, economic, social, and intellectual ferment of the 
"Age of Reason." (Silver.) 

H. 120 s. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

A study of the French Revolution and the relation of Revolutionary 
France with the rest of Europe, 178^1815. (Silver.) 

H. 121 f. Expansion of Europe (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 1 y. 

A treatment of European history from the Crusades to the present, 
emphasizing especially the expansion of national states. (Silver.) 

H. 122 s. Expansion of Europe (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 121 f. (Silver.) 

H. 123 f. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of European alliances and alignments. World politics and im- 
perialism in the pre- World War period, and developments since the World 
War. (Not given in 1938-1^39.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 124 s. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3) — ^Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 123 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

293 



tut™r°'"'" *^^^" '""^ '''^^-^' ^-l«P-nt Of English political insti- 

requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. ^ngiana (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 

This course is a continuation of H 125 f 

refuisiS H. xT' ^"" '''' ^'^~'''''^ '-*-- -<i assignments'"^";! 
An intensive course in European history from 1815 to the present time. 

H. 128 s. Europe sin>^e if)f; /'>\ tu , (Strakhovsky.) 

requisite, H. 1 y. ^ (3) -Three lectures and assignments. Pre- 

This course is a continuation of H 127 f /e. , . 

H. 129 f. Ancient History (2) -Two "lectures. (S^-khovsky, 

A general survey course-the Near East, Greece, and Rome. (Highby ) 

A rZ t'"'^' "''"''-^ <2)_Two lectures. ^ ''^ 

A continuation of H 129 f 

(Dozer) 
For Graduates 
H. 200 y. Researck (2-4). Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

on'^elattd^oplcT'""'' '"^ ^"^'^"^ ^^'"'•^ (4) -Conferences and t^oS 
H. 202 y. ^.......M. an. Historical Criticism (4). '^''"''"S 

^^ HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics Lectures 

(Staff.) 
294 



Textiles and Clothing 

H. E. 11 s. Clothing (3) — Three laboratories. Use of commercial pat- 
terns; construction of 3 garments according to modern methods; study of 
clothing expenditures. (Kessinger.) 

H. E. 21 s. Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. Elements 
of design; application of design principles to daily living; practice in 
designing. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 24 f. Costume Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 21 s or equivalent. 

A study of fundamentals underlying taste, fashion, and design as they 
relate to the expression of individuality in dress. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 25 s. Crafts (2) — Two laboratories. Creative art expressed in 
clay modeling, plastic carving, metal working, paper mache modeling, etc. 
Emphasis laid upon inexpensive materials and tools and simple technic. 

(Curtiss.) 

H. E. 71 f. Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. History of 
textile fibers, their source, production, manufacture, characteristics, identi- 
fication, and use. Collection and analysis of new materials; regulations 
governing standardization; selection of men's, women's, and children's 
ready-to-wear garments; care, cleaning, and storage of clothing and furs. 

(Kessinger.) 

(bourses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H, E. Ill f. Advanced Clothing (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
H. E. 11 s and H. E. 24 f, or equivalent. 

Draping of garments in cloth on dress form, stressing style, design, 
and suitability to the individual. 

H. E. 112 s. Special Clothing Problems (3) — One recitation; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. 11 f. 

Clothing renovation, clothing for children, and an individual clothing 
project. (Kessinger.) 

H. E. 171 f. Advanced Textiles (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 71 f. 

The study of the production of textile fibers; the manufacture of fabrics 
and their relationship to the consumer; textile microscopy; reports on as- 
signed readings in current literature on textiles. (Kessinger.) 

H. E, 172 f. Special Textile Problems (4) — One recitation; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. 171 f. 

Testing and experimental work in textiles. (Kessinger.) 

Foods and Nutrition 

H. E. 31 y. Foods (6) — One recitation; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 y. 

Composition, selection, and preparation of food, with a study of the 
scientific principles involved; analysis of recipes and study of standard 
products. (Barnes and Kirkpatrick.) 

295 



H. E. 32 f. Elements of Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. 
A study of normal nutritional needs; the relation of food to health; 
planning of adequate dietetaries for adults. (Welsh.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 131 f or s. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 
31 y and Chem. 12 f. 

A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 132 s. Dietetics (3)— Three recitations. Prerequisite H. E. 131 f. 
A study of food selection for health and its adaptations in disease. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 133 f or s. DemoTistrations (2) — Two laboratories. 

Practice in demonstrations. (Welsh and Barnes.) 

H. E. 134 s. Advanced Foods (3) — One recitation ; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 31 y. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food materials, (Welsh.) 

H. E. 135 f. Experimental Foods (4) — Two recitations; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, H. E. 137 s, Chem. 12 A y. 

Study of experimental procedures and technics in jelly making, vegetable 
cookery, emulsions, and batters and doughs. (Kirkpatrick.) 

H. E. 136 s. Child Nutrition (2) — Two recitations. 
Lectures and discussions relating to the principles of child nutrition. 

(Welsh.) 

H. E. 137 s. Food Buying and Meal Service (3) — One recitation; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite H. E. 31 y. 

Study of problems in food buying; planning and service of meals for the 
family group, including simple entertaining in relation to nutritional needs 
and cost. (Barnes and Kirkpatrick.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (2). 

Oral and written reports on current literature on nutrition. 

H. E. 202 f or s. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and 
quality of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The result may form the 
basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. 

H. E. 203 f or s. Advanced Experimental Foods (3) — One recitation; two 
laboratories. 

Experimental work with foods. ^ 

H. E. 204 f. Readings in Nutrition (2) — Two recitations. 
Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and investi- 
gations. 

296 



Practical Art 

H. E. 121 f. Interior Deayration (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 21 s or equivalent. 

Study of traditional styles and design principles with f^^^lJ-^^^ 
entities in home planning and furnishing; trips to historic buildmgs, 
Z^:.::.^^^ Ltures'showing what the market provides, ^^v..^^ 
of drawing. 

H E 122 s. Interim Decoration (3)-0ne recitation, two laboratories 
PrLquisite. H. E. 121 f. Continuation of H. E. 121 f. (Curtiss.) 

H. E. 123 f. Advanced Design (3) -Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
H E 122 and H. E. Ill f , or equivalent. 

Professional aspects of costume or intorior design; contact ^'th '=«^- 
mercial establishments. Design expressed in various mediums. Students 
may choose one of the two fields listed as follows: 

(a) Advanced Costume Dest^n-Designing of costumes on PaP«>^^ ^"d i" 
cloth; a study of garment merchandising including fashion illustra- 
tion, shop display, and other phases of promotional work. 

(b) Interior Design-Designmg of rooms, including interior architecture 
^^ furniture, fabrics, accessories; arrangement of display rooms^m 

stores. Drawing to scale. 

H. E. 124 s. Advanced Design (3)— Threie laboratories. 

H E 125 s. Merchandise Display (2). 

Practice in effective display of merchandise for windows, show cases, 
and^?her parts of store interiors. Cooperation with retail estabhshments 
Prerequisite, Design H. E. 21 s or equivalent. (Curtiss.) 

Home and Institution Management 
H. E. 141 f. Manngement of the Home (3) -Two lectures; one labora- 

**^udv and discussion of household organization and management; time 
and moneTbudgets; house construction and planning; selection, operation 
and Tre of ^uipment; selection and care of household furnishings, with a 
vlt to proviSwell-being and satisfaction for the members of ttie family. 
H. E. 142 s. ManageTmnt of the Home (3)-Two lectures; one labora- 

^^e family, its history; discussion of questions and problems of the family 
in relation to changing social and economic conditions. 

H E 143 f or s. Practice in Management of the Home (4). 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
ber of the faculty and a small group of students for approximately one- 
third of a semester. 

297 



H. E. 144 y. Institution Management (6)— Three recitations. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service in dormi' 
tones; organization of institution laundries. 

H. E. 145 f. Practice in Institution Management (4) — Prerequisite, H. 
E. 144 y. 

Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 
room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. 

H. E. 146 s. Advanced Institution Management (3)— Prerequisite, H. E 
144 y. One recitation weekly and individual conferences with the in- 
structor. 

Special problems in institution management. 

H. E. 147 f. Institution Cookery (3)— One recitation; two laboratories 
Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, H. E. 137 s, H. E. 144 y. 

Application of principles of food preparation to cookery for institutions ; 
study of standard technics; menu planning and costs; use of institutional 
equipment; practice in cafeteria counter service. 

Home Economics Extension 

H. E. 151 s. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) —Given under 
the direction of Venia Kellar and specialists. 

H. E. 152 f. Field Practice in Honne Economics Extension (4) Given 

under the direction of Venia Kellar, State Home Demonstration Agent. 
Should be taken during the summer vacation. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Schrader, Mahoney, Thurston; Associate Professors Haut, 
Lincoln, Shoemaker; Assistants Chase, Stier. 

HoRT. 1 f. General Horticulture (3) —Three lectures. 

An introductory course, discussing the several phases of horticulture 
which mclude vegetable production, fruit production, flower and ornamental 
plant production, and landscape gardening. This systematic survey of the 
problems of horticulture and practical means of solution is designed for 
all students. 

HoRT. 2 s. General Horticulture (3)— Three lectures. 
A continuation of Hort. 1 f. 

HoRT. 3 f. Fruit Production (2, 3, or 5)— Two lectures and one to three 
laboratories. Some laboratories may be taken without lectures. 

Seasonal discussion and experience with orchard and packing house 
operations, including spraying, harvesting, spray residue removal, grading, 
packing, rodent control, sanitation, pruning, grafting, planting, pollination, 

298 



etc. Also identification and judging of fruit varieties, leading to a selection 
of a fruit judging team to compete in the Eastern States Fruit Judging 
League for medals and other trophies, 

Hort. 4 s. Vegetable Production (2 or 4) — Two lectures, two labora- 
tories. 

A study of the fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. 
The laboratory work is organized from the point of view of the home 
garden and commercial truck garden. Special studies are made of vegetable 
seed identification, methods of growing plants, garden planning, pest con- 
trol, etc. 

Hort. 5 f. Greenhouse Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A detailed consideration of various types of houses and their manage- 
ment; location with respect to sites and markets; arrangement, construc- 
tion, and costs of building and operation; practical methods of culture of 
all greenhouse crops under several conditions. (Given in alternate years; 
not offered in 1939-1940.) 

Hort. 6 s. Greenhouse Construction and Management (3 or 4) — A con- 
tinuation of Hort. 5 f . 

Hort. 7 s. Small Fruits (2-3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Lectures 
can be taken without laboratory. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and their 
adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and a study 
of the experimental plots and varieties on the Station grounds. The follow- 
ing fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, blackcap rasp- 
berry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry, loganberry, and blue- 
berry. 

Hort. 8 f. Garden Flowers (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous peren- 
nials, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 
(Given in alternate years; not offered in 1939-1940.) 

Hort. 9 y. Convmerdal Floriculture (6-7) — Two lectures; one or two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Hort. 5 f and 6 s. 

Methods of handling florist's bench crops and potted plants, the marketing 
of cut flowers, the retail business, and floral design and decoration. Trips 
to important commercial centers and flower shows will be made. (Given in 
alternate years; not offered in 1938-1939.) 

Hort. 10 f. Landscape Gardening (2) — Two lectures. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their appli- 
cation to private and public areas. Special consideration is given to the 
improvement and beautification of the home grounds, farmsteads, and small 
suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to specialize in 
landscape, but who wish some theoretical and practical knowledge of the 
subject. 

299 



HOBT. 11 f. Landscape Design (3)— One lecture; two laboratories 
and field work!"" "' ''' ''""""''' '' ''''^''^' ^'''^' ^"-^^^' '"^PP-^- 
^^HOBT. 12 s. Landscape Design (2)— Two laboratories. Prerequisite, Hort. 

The design of private grounds and gardens of architectural details used 
m landscape; planting plans; analytical study of plans of practicing land- 
scape architects; field observation of landscape developments. 

Hort. 13 s. Cimc Art (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 
improvement, including problems in design of civic center, parS scS 
grounds, and other public and semi-public areas. (Given in a te^aS years 
not offered in 1939-1940.) ^^"ctws years, 

Hort. 14 y. Seminar (2). 

In this course papers are prepared and presented orally by members of 
the class upon subjects pertaining to their research or thesis work or upon 

fr^ /inf '? r' r'^'i '^'"^- Discussions of special topics are givJ! 
irom time to time by members of the departmental staff. 

Hort. 15 y. Special Problems (2-4). 

An advanced student in any of the foUr divisions of horticulture may 
Wo/ TT ^''^ I? ^7 investigation. This may be either the summariz 
ing of all the available knowledge on a particular problem or the investi- 
gation of some new problem. Where original investigation is carried on 
the student should m most cases start the work during the junior year The 
results of the research are to be presented in the form of a theses aJd 
filed m the horticultural library. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101 f. Technology of Horticultural Plants (1, 3 or 4)— On^ nr 
three lectures; one laboratory. v » , r ^i; une or 

A critical analysis of detailed studies on horticultural plants in relation 
to application to practice. An interpretation of horticultural knowledge 
based on principles of physiology, chemistry, and other sciences. A study 
of underlying principles involved in growth, fruiting, storage, and quality 
of horticultural plants and products. (Haui, Mahoney.? 

Hort. 102 s. (1, 3, or 4 credits)-Two or three lectures; one laboratory 
This course is a continuation of Hort. 101 f. (Haut, Mahoney.) 

Hort. 103 f. Systematic Pomology (3)~Two lectures; one laboratory 
The history botany, and classification of fruits and their adaptation to 
Maryland conditions. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1939-1940.) 

(Haut) 
800 



Hort. 104 s. Systematic Olericulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops and 
the description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties 
to different environmental conditions and their special uses in vegetable 
production. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1939-1940.) 

(Mahoney.) 

Hort. 105 s. World Fruits and Nuts (2) — Two lectures. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological, and physiological character- 
istics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such 
as the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut-bearing trees, citrus fruits, 
and newly introduced fruits, with special reference to their cultural require- 
ments in certain parts of the United States and the insular possessions. 
All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been discussed in 
a previous course. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1938-1939.) 

(Haut.) 

Hort. 106 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A field or laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental 
planting. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1938-1939.) (Thurston.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Mr. Hintz, Mr. Fogg, Mr. Brown, Mr. Ziegaus. 

L. S. 1 f or s. Library Methods (1) — Freshman Year. 

This course is intended to help students use libraries with greater facility 
and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of lectures and practical 
work, is designed to interpret the library and its resources to the student. 
The course considers the classification of books in libraries, the card 
catalog, periodical literature and indexes, and certain essential reference 
books which will be found helpful throughout the college course and in 
later years. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors T. H. Taliaferro, Dantzig; Associate Professor Yates; 

Assistant Professors Martin, Titt, Sagen; Dr. Alrich, Dr. Lancaster; 

Mr. Volckhausen, Mr. Umberger; Mr. Laden, Miss Barzhe. 

Math. 1 A f. Introductory Algebra (0) — ^Three lectures. Open without 
credit to students of engineering, chemistry, and physics who lack the 
required preparation for Math. 21 f. 

Fundamental operations; linear and quadratic equations; exponents and 
logarithms, etc. 

Math. 7 f. Solid Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, plane 
geometry. College credit given only to students in the College of Educa- 
tion. Open without credit to students desiring to enter the College of 
Engineering who have had no opportunity to take the subject in high school. 

Lines and planes; cylinders and cones; the sphere; polyhedra. 

801 



Math. 8 f. Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, one year of high 
school algebra. Required of students of biology; premedical and predental 
students, who have not sufficient preparation to enter Math. 11 f. Repeated 
during the second semester. 

Quadratic equations; polynomials and their graphs; elementary theory 
of equations; progressions; binomial theorem; logarithms; permutations 
and combinations. 

Math. 10 s. Plane Tingonometry and Analytic Gemnetry (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 8 f or 11 f. Required of students of biology; 
premedical and predental students. 

Trigonometric identities; equations and graphs; principles of plane analytic 
geometry; line and circle; ellipse, parabola, hyperbola; other plane curves; 
graphing of empericaJ equations. 

Math. 11 f. Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, high school 
algebra completed. Required of students of biology; of premedical and pre- 
dental students. Repeated during the second semester. 

Simultaneous solution of quadratic and higher equations; properties of 
polynomials; theory of equations; binomial expansion; progressions; com- 
binatorial analysis; logarithms; empirical equations; determinants. 

Math. 18 y. Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (2) — One laboratory. 
Required of students whose major is mathematics, and of students in the 
College of Education "with mathematics as their major. 

Problems in geometrical construction, in projective geometry, in geometri- 
cal optics; mechanical generation of curves. 

Math. 19 y. Advanced Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (2) — One 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Math. 18 y. Required of students whose major 
is mathematics, and of students in the College of Education with mathe- 
matics as their major. 

Elements of descriptive geometry; projections of skew curves and sections 
of slirfaces; construction of models of space configurations. 

Math. 20 y. General Mathematics (6) — Three lectures. Primarily intended 
for students of economics and the social sciences. Required of all students 
in Business Administration. Prerequisite, one year of high school algebra. 

Principles of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry; mathematics of 
finance; quadratic and higher equations; progressions and logarithms; com- 
pound interest and annuities; permutations and combinations; probabilities; 
graphing of algebraic and trigonometric functions; construction and inter- 
pretation of graphs; interpolation and approximation methods; rudiments of 
the calculus; introduction to statistical methods. 

Math. 21 f. College Algebra (4) — Three lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, high school algebra completed. Required of all students in 
the College of Engineering; of students whose major is mathematics, phy- 
sics, or chemistry; of students in the College of Education who elect mathe- 
matics as their major or minor. Repeated in the second semester. 

302 



Foundations of algebra; binomial and multin-ial^^^^^^^^^^ 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of """T^^'^l^.^^^^en- 
analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; theory of equations, expon 
tial functions and logarithms. 

MATH 22 s Analytic Geometry (4)-Three lectures and one laboratory. 

MATH, zz s. Anmy , j jj students in the College of Engi- 

Prpreauisite, Math. 21 i. Kequirea oi an oi." ■,•„„_ /.Viomisfrv 

o;;S»"Sgr.ms; solid analytics ».d spherical tr.gon.melr,. 

MATH. 23 y. CM« (4)-Th™ l.clar.s and o„ l*»"Xe ,73- 
J.. M.th. 10 s .r 22 s R.,»ire<l ot .1 s..^."^ '", ^^Jt *mSSl 

:rs»t rrcr.-ori:«mi::; v..ua..s a, ^.. 

major or mmor. ^:ff,,p„tials- maxima and minima; curvature; 

*;"i SStt o. »..; -.as, volumes, and ™o»...si expansion ,n senes, 
differential equations with applications 10 mechanics. 

MATH 24 y El.~J.tan, MMmuttM An«l»si. (6)-Thre. tet».es. Pre- 
Tr:ern™Lrel^irl"t;..l».cn..s,,h...^^^ 

^~t tu rShLrzSe:^-:r=:tic.f=. 

pretation, etc. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

MATH. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 

(2)_Two lectures. „,athematics intended for workers in 

A survey course m high ^**'?^- '^^'"®":^-tive teachers of mathematics 

biological and social sciences, and for prospective (Dantzig.) 

llTrm s. college M^e^ies (2)_T.o lectures. Prerequisite. 
Math, in f or 8 f, <>ip^^^' :^:;,,,,^, ,„3lytic geometry, and the 

teachers of high-school mathematics and ph>sics. 

MATH 114 f DiSerenti.1 Equations for Engineers (3)-Three lectures. 
MATH. 114 1. 1^ V cooperation with the College of Engi- 

TT.is -ur- - conducted m^^^^^^ ^.^.^^ ^^.^^ ,^ ^^^j ^ng 

S^kntpttenmoCthe topics treated are the following: linear 

303 



differential equations; advanced methods in kinematics and dynamics- annl! 
cafons of analysis to electrical circuits, to aero-dynamics, briSelsi^^'^ei: 

^^l"' ii^ f- ^PP"<^ Calmlus for Chemists (3)— Three iLtur^^^pl^ 
requisite. Math. 23 y, i"ice lettures. fte- 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the Chemistry Depart 
ment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise S the the^v" 

llttiTT; tlf r^'T- ^"^""^ '""^ '^'^'^^ *-^*«^ -"^"e fo loX 
tWn A derivatives; applications of mathematical analysis to 

thermo-dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physSrchem- 

(Yates ) 

MaTS J^'ri ttiX't.''""^''"'''^^^^ (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisit;. 

Complex numbers; De Moivre, Euler and allied identities; trigonometric 
senes and infinite products; graphing of periodic functions; hypeSc trS 

onometry, with applications to geodetic survey and astronomy. (Dantzig ) 
Math. 122 s. History of Elementary Mathematics (2)— Two lectures 
History of arithmetic, algebra and geometry. (Dantzig ) 

Matt^.™' y.^' *■ '^""'^'^'^^ Mechanics (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

beS"!r'i''' *^^ ^"^.^^^ ""^ ^ P^'^''=^^= ^*^«<=^' the principles of D'Alem- 
tr^ntiplroTH^ioV""'"^ ''' ^^""^-^ ''^ ^^^-^- -^^-•'- 

Mat.™3y.''" ^'""^ "/ ^-^«^''^-«- (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

.n^Z'"ZZtn7^f'''t' f'T'r "^ "^''"^"^ '^''>'"' combinatorial 
analysis, addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of distribution- 

continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, theorL ofTrrors and 
correlations, and to molecular theories. (Tit") 

Math. 140 y. Undergraduate Seminar (2)— One Session 
Required of students whose major is mathematics. This course is intended 

S matmal '°"^^ ^' ''"'''"'' -'''' ^'^ ^" '^^ undergraduate rrts 

M ,. J (Staff.) 

^^Math. 141 f. Higher Algebra (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 

Identities; multinomial expansion; combinatorial analysis; mathematical 
mduction; undetermined coefficients; determinants; elemented Srv of 
equations; complex magnitudes. ' ^'^"^"t^'^y theory of 

n, ^ , ( lates.) 

H.To"„"^, JJt"' "'""-' '''-'" '«*"-■ "-"^""X- «'.".. 

.,otx"r i,rx4 's=nr ;r:r ' "'"•■■ ^'--tj- 

S04 



Math. 143 f. Advanced Calcidus (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, MaUi. 
23 y. 

General methods of integration; multiple integration with physical appli- 
cations; partial differentiation; geometrical and physical applications; mean 
value theorem; Jacobians; envelopes. (Martin.) 

Math. 144 s. Advanced Calculus (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
143 f or its equivalent. 

Elliptic integrals; line integrals; Green's theorem; equation of continuity; 
applications to hydrodynamics. (Martin.) 

Math. 145 f. Advanced Plane Analytic Geometry (2) — ^Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

Homogeneous coordinates; advanced theory of conic sections; Plucker 
characters of algebraic curves; cubic and quartic curves; Cremona transfor- 
mations. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 146 s. Solid Analytic Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 145 f or its equivalent. 

General theory of quadric surfaces; the twisted cubic; line geometry; 
geometry on a sphere; cubic and quartic surfaces. (Alrich.) 

Math. 151 f. Theory of Eqivations (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 142 f 
or its equivalent. 

Complex numbers; fundamental theorem of algebra; equations of the 
third and fourth degree; algebraic solution of equations; finite groups; 
numerical solution of equations; criteria of irreducivility; cyclometric equa- 
tions. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 152 s. Introduction to Modem Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 141 f and 142 s or their equivalent. 

Vectors; matrices; linear dependence; quadratic forms; infinite groups. 

(Titt.) 

Math. 153 f. Advanced Differential Equations (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 144 or its equivalent. 

Equations of the first order; linear equations with constant and variable 
coefficients; change of variables; singular solutions; solution in series; 
numerical integration; ordinary differential equations in three variables; 
partial differential equations. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 154 s. Topics in Analysis (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
153 f. 

Theory of vibrations; Fourrier series; calculus of variations; entropy; 
improper integrals. (Titt.) 

Math. 155 f. Introduction to Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 145 f or its equivalent. 

The theorems of Desargues and Pappus; cross-ratio and homography; 
projective theory of conies; projective interpretation and generalization of 
elementary geometry. (Dantzig.) 

805 



Math. 156 s. Introduction to Differential Geometry (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; transformations; orthogonal tra- 
jectories; envelopes; roulettes and glisettes; curvilinear coordinates in the 
plane. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 157 y. History of Modem Mathematics (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 23 y, or its equivalent. 

This course will begin with a comprehensive treatment of the history 
of mathematics during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; the devel- 
opment of mathematics during the nineteenth and our own centuries will 
be treated topically, with special emphasis on such topics as projective 
and non-Euclidean geometry, theory of aggregates, vector analysis, theory 
of groups, theory of numbers, etc. (Dantzig.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 221 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f and 144 s or their equivalent. 

Cauchy-Riemann equations; power series and infinite products; conformal 
mapping; the Cauchy integral theorem; residues and periods; analytic con- 
tinuation. (Martin.) 

Math. 222 f. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Math. 143 f and 144 s or their equivalent. 

Real numbers; continuous functions; implicit functions; Riemannian inte- 
gration; real analytic functions. (Martin.) 

Math. 223 s. Vector Analysis (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
152 s or its equivalent. 

Scalars, vectors, matrices and determinants; transformations; linear de- 
pendence, canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geometry 
and mechanics. (Alrich.) 

Math. 225 f. Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 155 f or its equivalent. 

Ajciomatic development of geometry; fundamental theorems; projective 
equivalence; the group of coUeneations in the plane and in space; non- 
Euclidean geometries. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 226 s. Differential Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 156 s or its equivalent. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves; kinematical applications; geom- 
etry on a surface; general theory of surfaces; curvature and space struc- 
ture; Riemannian geometries. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 227 s. Infinite Processes (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 
222 f or its equivalent. 

Convergence of infinite series and products; Fourrier series; orthogonal 
functions, asymptotic series. (Lancaster.) 

306 



Math. 228 s. Elliptic Functions (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
221 f or its equivalent. 

The theories of Legendre and Jacoby; the Weierstrass theory; doubly 
periodic functions; elliptic integrals; applications to algebra, geometry, and 
mechanics. (Martin.) 

Math. 231 s. Partial Differential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f, Math. 144 s, 
and Math. 153 f, or their equivalent. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace eqtiation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Titt.) 

Math. 235 s. Modem Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
152 s or its equivalent. 

Sets; classes; groups; isomorphism; rings; fields; Gialois theory; ordered 
and well-ordered sets; ideals; linear algebras. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 240 y. GradvxLte Seminar (2) — One session. 

Required of all graduate students. Intended as a clearing house of 
problems arising in the graduate courses. Reports on progress of disser- 
tations and a critical discussion of results achieved. 

(Staff.) 

SELECTED TOPICS COURSES 

In addition to the preceding, a number of courses will be offered from 
time to time by the various members of the staff in their respective fields 
of specialization. These courses are intended primarily for candidates for 
an advanced degree, and aim at developing materials for dissei*tations ; they 
will, however, be open to any qualified student. 

Math. 242. Selected Topics in Modem GeoTtietry, (Dantzig, Alrich.) 

Math. 243. Selected Topics in Modern Analyses. (Martin, Lancaster.) 

Math. 244. Selected Topics in Dynamics, (Martin.) 

Math. 245. Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics. (Titt.) 

Math. 246. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (Yates.) 



SOT 



Vi 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph 

D. Patch, U.S.A.; Assistant Professors Major Charles H. Jones, 

Major S. D. Hervey, Captain William H. Magun; Warrant 

Officer William H. McManus; Sergeant George J. Uhrinak. 

*BASIC COURSE 

Freshman Year—1 lecture; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 1 y. Ba^c R. 0. T. C. (2) . 
The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

National Defense Act, including basic organization and the R. 0. T. C; 
military courtesy, command and leadership ; military hygiene and first aid ; 
marksmanship. 

Second Semester 

Physical drill, command and leadership, automatic rifle; military history 
and policy; military hygiene and first aid; citizenship; international situa- 
tion. 

Sophomore Year — 1 lecture; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 2y. Basic R, 0. T. C. (4). 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester 

Scouting and patrolling, mapreading, military history, leadership. 

Second Semester 

Military history, musketry, combat principles of the squad and section, 
leadership. 

** ADVANCED COURSE 

Junior Year— 3 lectures; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 101 y. Advanced R. 0. T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

Aerial photograph reading, machine guns, howitzer weapons, combat 
principles, leadership. 



♦ Required of qualified students. 
♦♦ Elective for qualified students. 



306 



Second Semester 

Combat principles of rifle, machine gun, and howitzer platoons, pistol 
marksmanship, review of rifle marksmanship, leadership. 

Senior Year — 3 lectures; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 102 y. Advanced R. O. T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester 

Combat principles (including organization of larger combat units), com- 
mand and leadership, weapons (tanks), chemical agents and uses, mecha- 
nization. 

Second Semester 

Company administration, military history and policy, military law. 
Officers* Reserve Corps regulations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Falls; Associate Professor Kramer; Assistant Professors 
Darby, Prahl; Miss Wilcox, Mr. Schweizer, Mr. Liotard, 

Mr. Evangelist, Mr. Patton. 

All students whose major is in Modern Languages are required to take 
Greek Literature in English Translations (Comp. Lit. 101 f), Latin Litera- 
ture in English Translations (Comp. Lit. 102 s), and a Conference Course 
in Reading (French, German, Spanish 120). The following courses 
are recommended: General European History (H. 1 y), Introduction to 
Philosophy (Phil. 1 f or 1 s). The Old Testament as Literature (Comp. 
Lit. 104 s), Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (Eng. 113 f and 114 s). 
Romanticism in France and Germany (Comp. Lit. 105 f and 106 s). For a 
major in (German, Anglo-Saxon and Beowulf (Eng. 102 f and 103 s). 

Specific requirements for the majors in the different languages are as 
follows: French — French 9 y, 10 y, 15 y, 120, and two additional year- 
courses in literature in the 100 group; German — 10 y, 15 y, 120, and 
two additional year-courses in the 100 group; Spanish — Spanish 6 y, 15 y, 
120, and two additional year-courses in the 100 g^otip. 

A. French 

French ly. Elementary French (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

French 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 1 y. Students who are 
interested in French, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of French 1 y. 

309 



French 3y. Second-Year French rfi^ t»,^^« i i 
French 1 y or equivalent. (6)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

Jr^veLT^Zir''"''"^ composition; conversation; translation of 
tiom ai^ set asWe ^r rr".- " *^' ^^S^^'^^ion of classes, certain sec- 
tions are set aside for the reading of scientific French texts. 

the'^Se of'k [iTL't: JT'""*T ^'^-^^ '^'^*"^- Prerequisite, 
expeS to tL« rj ^ f '* '^'"*'*^'' °^ ^'•«"<=J» 3 y. Students who 
TZ f^ fi ! advanced work in French literature, and who have com- 
pleted the first semester of French 3 y with the gr^de of A or B shouTd 
take this course in conjunction with the second semester of Fren^k 3 y 

in p^sfa^idTeS:." " ^"'^^^^^^"-^ ^-"™ - French of .imple texts 
tuS''''''' ^^' ^^' ^^^^^P^nt of the French Novel (6)-Three lec- 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French 
Lterature; of the lives, works, and influence of impoi-tant nZusUR^^. 

turer""^" ' ^' '^''^ ^^^^loprn^nt of the French Drama (6) -Three lee- 
Introductory study of the French drama of the seventeenth eighteenth 

and nineteenth centuries. Translation and collateral rrdin^^por^^^^ 
(Not given m 1938-1939.) 'crtuing. Reports. 

lectoeT" ^ ^' "^^^ ^'^'t'^P^^^t of the Short Story in French (6)-Three 

A study of the short story in French literature: reading and tran«ln 
tion of representative examples. (Not given in 1938-1939 J 

^FRENCH 9 y. French Phonetics (2) -One lecture. Prerequisite, French 

French 10 y. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (&^ TMr-.. i 
tures. Prerequisite, French 3 y. ^'^posinon (6)— Three lec- 

(French 9 y and 10 y are required of students preparing to teach French.) 

French 15 y. Introduction to French Literature (ti\ tu i . 
Prerequisite, French 3y, J-^terature (6)— Three lectures. 

An elementary survey introducing the student to thp M^f ti, 
movements in French literature. tL couri tf^ljen L tenc^ "' 

SIO 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A more intensive survey of modem French literature is offered by means 
of rotating courses roughly divided by centuries. 



French 102 y. French Literature of tfve 17th Century (4)- 
tures. 

French 103 y. French Literature of the 18th Century (4)- 
tures. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

French 104 y. French Literature of the 19th Century (4)- 
tures. (Not given in 1938-1939.) * 

French 105 y. French Literature of the 20th Century (4)- 
tures. 

French 110 y. Advanced Composition (6) — Three lectures, 
site, French 10 y. 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach French.) 



-Two lec- 
( Wilcox.) 

-Two lec- 
( Falls.) 

-Two lec- 
(Wilcox.) 

-Two lec- 
( Falls.) 

Prerequi- 
( Falls.) 



French 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 4 
semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours.) 

A two-year course open to majors and minors in French. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student Upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of such 
courses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
department take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in French for the comprehensive examination in modem French 
literature at the end of the senior year. 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 105 f, Romanticism in 
France. 

For Graduates 

French 201 y. Research (2-4) — Credits determined by work accom- 
plished. (Staff.) 

French 202 y. Diderot a/nd the Encyclopaedists (4) — Two lectures. 
(Not given in 1938-1939.) (Falls.) 

French 203 y. Aspects and Conceptions of Nature in French Literature 
of the 18th Century (4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Falls.) 

French 204 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (4) — Two 
lectures. (Falls.) 

French 205 y. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renais- 
sance (4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Darby.) 

French 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. (Required of all 
graduate students in French.) 

311 



B. German 

<jERMAN 1 y. Elementary Gernvan (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year German, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

German 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 1 y. Students who are 
interested in German, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of German 1 y. 

German 3y. Second-Year German (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
German ly or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. In the organization of classes, certain sections are set 
aside for the reading of scientific German texts. 

German 4f. Gramw,a/r Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more units in German and who 
expect to do advanced work in the German language or literature, but who 
are not prepared to take German 10 y. Properly qualified students may 
elect this course at the same time as German 6 f or 8 f . 

German 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 3 y. Students who ex- 
pect to take advanced work in German literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of German 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of German 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in German of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

German 6f. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent German literature. 
(Not given in 1938-1939.) 

German 7 s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 6 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

German 8f. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. This course 
alternates with German 6 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

German 9 s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 8 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

German 10 y. German Grammar and Composition (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. (This course is required of students 
preparing to teach German.) 

312 



German 15 y. Introduction to German Literature (6)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Gennan 3 y or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature; a study of 
representative authors and works. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101 f. German Literature of the 18th Century (3)— Three lee 

*^^®^- rPrahl > 

The earlier classical literature. ^^ ^'^ '' 

German 102 s. Germnn Literature of the 18th Century (3) —Three lec- 

The later classical literature. ^^^^ '^ 

German 103 f. GerTwan Literature of the 19th Century (3)~Three lee- 

tures 
Romanticism and Young Germany. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Prahl.) 

GERMAN 104 s. German Literature of the 19th Century (3)— Three lee- 
iniires 
The literature of the Empire. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Prahl.) 

German 105 f. Contempora/ry Genrum Literature (3)— Three lectures. 
A study of the lives, works, and influence of outstanding authors of the 
present. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Prahl.) 

German 106 s. Contemporary German Literature (3)— Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 105 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Prahl.) 

German 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 
4 semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours). 

A two-year course open to majors and minors in German. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of 
such courses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
department take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in German for the comprehensive examination m modem Ger- 
man literature at the end of the senior year. 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 106 s, Romanticism in 
Germany, and Comparative Literature 107 f , The Faust Legend m English 
and German Literature. 

For Graduates 
German 201 y. Research (2-4)-Credits determined by ^^^^ ^g^^" 

plished. 

German 202 y. The Modem German Dramxi (4)— Two lectures. 

Study of the naturalistic, neo-romantic, and expressionistic drama against 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. (Not given ^n 
1938-1939.) (Fram.) 

313 



German 203 y. Schiller (4) — Two lectures. 

Study of the life and works of Schiller, with emphasis on the history of 
his dramas. (Prahl.) 

German 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. 
(Required of all graduate students in German.) 

C. Italian 

Italian ly. Elementary Italian (6) — Three lectures. Recommended 
particularly for advanced students in French and Spanish. Not open to 
freshmen and sophomores. (Not to be counted in fulfillment of the general 
language requirements.) 

Drill in pronunciation and in the elements of the language. Reading of 
short stories from modern authors. 

D. Spanish 

Spanish ly. Elementary Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

Spanish 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 1 y. Students who are 
interested in Spanish, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of Spanish 1 y. 

Spanish 3y. Second-Year Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 1 y or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative works and plays; grammar review; oral and written 
practice. 

Spanish 4f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who expect 
to do advanced work in the Spanish language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take Spanish 6 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as Spanish 15 y. 

Spanish 5s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 3 y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in Spanish literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of Spanish 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of Spanish 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in Spanish of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

Spanish 6y. Advanced Composition and Conversation (4) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Spanish 3 y or equivalent. 

Introduction to phonetics; oral and written composition. 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach Spanish.) 

314 



Spanish 15 y. Introduction to Spanish Literature (6)— Three lectures. 
An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in Spanish literature. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 103 f. The Spanish Drama (3)— Three lectures. 

The drama of the Golden Age. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 104 s. The Spanish Drama (3)— Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 103 f . The drama since Calderon. (Not given 
in 1938-1939.) • (Darby.) 

Spanish 105 y. Cervantes (6)— Three lectures. 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. (Darby.) 

Spanish 107 f. The Spanish Novel (3)— Three lectures. 

Classic novels and short stories of the Golden Age and of the eighteenth 
century. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 108 s. The Spanish Novel (3)— Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 107 f. A study of the development of the 
modem novel. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 
4 semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours). 

A two-year course open to majors and minors in Spanish. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of 
such courses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop in the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
department take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in Spanish for the comprehensive examination in modern Spanish 
literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 

Spanish 201 y. Research (2-4)— Credits determined by work accom- 
pUshed. (Staff.) 

Spanish 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6)— Three lec- 
tures. 

Detailed study of the classical authors. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 203 f. Spanish Poetry (3)— Three lectures. 

The epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyrics, poetry of the 
Gk>lden Age. (Darby.) 

Spanish 204 s. Spanish Poetry (3)— Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 203 f . Poetry of the 18th, 19th, and 20th cen- 
turies. (Darby.) 

Spanish 210 y. Semiwar (2-4)— One meeting weekly. 

(Required of all graduate students in Spanish.) 

315 



MUSIC 

Mr. Randall, Mrs. Blaisdell. 

Music ly. Mtcsic Appreciation (2) — One lecture. 

A study of all types of classical music with a view to developing the 
ability to listen and enjoy. Lecture recitals will be presented with the aid of 
performers and records. A study of the orchestra and the instruments that 
it employs. A study of musical form. The development of the opera and 
oratorio. Great singers of the past and present. Well-known musicians 
occasionally appear as guest lecturers and performers. 

Music 2y. History of Music (2) — One lecture. 

A comprehensive course in the history of music covering the development 
of all forms of music from ancient times through the renaissance; the 
classic and the romantic schools; and the more modern composers. 

Music 3 y. Chorus (1). 

This course is offered for those interested in part-singing. After voice 
trials, students who have ability to read and sing music of the grade of easy 
songs are admitted. Members of the Women's Chorus and the Men's Glee 
Club indicated hereafter are combined at times for mixed chorus singing. 

(A) Women's Chorus. Study of part-singing for women's voices. Credit 
is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public performances of the chorus. 

(B) Men's Glee Club. Study of part-singing for men's voices. Credit 
is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4 y. Orchestra (1). 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of the standard symphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 
modern composers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments are 
eligible for membership. At least one rehearsal of two hours duration is 
held each week, and all players are expected to take part in public perform- 
ances. 

Music 5y. Harmony (4) — Two lectures. 

This course includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, har- 
monic progressions, primary and secondary triads in root position and first 
and second inversions, the dominant seventh chord in its root position and 
inversions. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basis for ear training, 
dictation, melody writing, and melody harmonization. 



816 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marti. 
Phil. 1 f or s. Introduction to Philosophy (3)— Three lectures. 

Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the development of philosophical thought from the early 

Greeks to the modem era. 

Phil. lis. Modern European Philosophy (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or s. Alternates with Phil. 12 s. 

Phil. 12 s. American Philosophy (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phil. 1 f or s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or s. Alternates with Phil. 11 s. (Not given 
in 1938-1939.) 

Phil. 21 f. Aesthetics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or s, 
and prerequisite or, by special permission, corequisite: Art 1 f or s, or 
Music 1 y or 2 y, or a 100 course in literature. 

An historical and systematic introduction to the philosophy of art. Alter- 
nates with Phil. 22 f and 23 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Phil. 22 f. Logic (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or s, and 
satisfactory preparation in mathematics or science. 

An introductory course, designed especially for science majors. Alter- 
nates with Phil. 21 f and 23 f . 

Phil. 23 f. Ethics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. If or s. 
A study of the implications of problems of the good life. Alternates with 
Phil. 21 f and 22 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Phil. 31 f. Readings in Philosophy (1)— One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. 

One or several relatively easy philosophical works will be read, and dis- 
cussed in class. The topic will be changed, from semester to semester, 
although the same work may be studied again, after three or four semesters. 
Not more than two credits allowed to any one student. 

Phil. 32 s. Readings in Philosophy (1)— One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. Similar to Phil. 31 f . Phil. 31 f not a prerequisite. 

Phil. 33 f. Readings in Philosophy (1)— One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

Phil. 34 s. Readings in Philosophy (1)— -One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 



317 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phil. 101 f. Systems of Philosophy: KANT (3)— Three hours of lectures, 
student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, 
and the permission of the professor. 

The system of one philosopher, or the development of one movement, will 
be studied throughout the semester. The topic will be changed, from se- 
mester to semester, although, after three or four semesters, the same system 
may be chosen again. (Marti.) 

Phil. 102 s. Systems of Philosophy: FICHTE (3) —Three hours of lec- 
tures, student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in phil- 
osophy, and the permission of the professor. 

Continuation of Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

Phil. 103 f. Systems of Philosophy (3)— Three hours of lectures, student 
reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, and the 
permission of the professor. 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Marti.) 

Phiu 104 s. Systems of Philosophy (3)— Three hours of lectures, student 
reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, and the 
permission of the professor. 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Marti.) 



PHYSICS 

Professor Eichlin; Dr. Dickinson, Mr. Smith. 

PHYts. 1 y. General Physics (8) —Three lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
cjuired of students in the premedical and predental curricula. This course 
satisfies the minimum requirement for a science major. Prerequisites, Math. 
8 f or 11 f and Math. 10 s, or Math. 21 f and 22 s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, 
electricity, and light. Fee, $5.00 per semester. 

Phys. 2y. General Physics (10)— Four lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of all students in the engineering curricula, and of those with chem- 
istry, mathematics, and physics majors. Elective for other students. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 21 f. Math. 22 s, and Math. 23 y. The last may be taken 
concurrently. Fee, $5.00 per semester. 

A study of mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light. 

Phys. 3y. Elementa/ry Physics (6)— Three lectures. This introductory 
course is designed to meet the need of students who desire to become ac- 
quainted with the fundamental principles of physics. Instruction will be 
given by lectures, recitations, and experimental demonstrations. This 
course, with such additional work as may be deemed necessary by the De- 
partment, will be accepted as the equivalent of Phys. 1 y. Fee, $3.00 per 
semester. 

318 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. 101 f. Precision of Measurements (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 1 y or 2 y, and Math. 23 y. 

A discussion of the principles underlying the treatment of experimental 
data, as to precision of observations, errors, interpolation, curve analysis, 
etc., with emphasis on the planning of investigations involving measure- 
ments. The course is intended as an introduction to quantitative experi- 
mental work. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 102s. Qiumtitative Physical Measurements (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 101 f. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 101 f, is designed to familiarize the 
student with the manipulation of various types of apparatus used in experi- 
mentation in physical problems, and the adaptation and analysis of data 
so obtained. Fee, $5.00. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. ly. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is an advanced study of physical 
phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, conduction of electricity through gases, 
photoelectricity, etc., with a comprehensive review of basic principles in- 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student in a general survey with 
some of the recent developments in physics. (Smith.) 

Phys. 104 y. Advanced Experiments (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 103 y. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is intended to provide the student 
with experience in experimental physics. (Not given in 1938-1939.) Fee, 
$5.00 per semester. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 105 f. Heat and Thermodynamics (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

The classical phenomena of heat and radiation phenomena are developed 
on the basis of the kinetic molecular theory and the quantum theory. The 
first and second laws of thermodynamics are applied to physical processes. 
Fee, $5.00. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 106 s. Theoretical Mechanics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y. 

An analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented, with problems and laboratory exercises to illustrate 
these principles. The use of generalized coordinates is illustrated. The 
equations of La Grange are applied to selected topics in the field of dynam- 
ics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 107 f. Optics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, inter- 
ference, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed 

319 



on a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectro- 
scope, and interferometer. Fee, $5.00. * (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 108s. Electricity and Magnetism (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2y. 

A study is made of elementary and mathematical theory of electrostatics, 
magnetostatics, magnetism, electrical currents, etc. 

An experimental study of electrical instruments and their use in physical 
measurements is included. Fee, $5.00. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 109 y. Electric Discharge (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, at least two courses of the 105 f-108 s group. 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics, and atomic structure. 
Pee, $5.00 per semester. (Dickinson.) 

Graduates 

Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3) — Three lectures. 

Development of theories on the structure of the atom through discussion 
of optical and X-ray spectra, atomic models as applied to the periodic table, 
and related topics. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 202 s. Advanced Spectroscopy (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201 f. 

Continuation of Phys. 201 f. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 203 f. Qv/mtum Theory (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the application of the principles of the quantum theory to 
black body radiation, spectroscopy, collision processes, valence, etc. 

(Eichlin.) 

Phys. 204 s. Nuclear Physics (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the constitution of the nucleus, natural radioactivity dis- 
integration processes, neutron, positron, nuclear energy states, artificial dis- 
integration, etc. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 205 f. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Comprehensive survey of the history of physics; the electromagnetic 
theory of radiation; interaction of radiation and matter; introduction to the 
quantum mechanics. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 206 s. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Phys. 205 f. 

Continuation of Phys. 205 f. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Eichlin.) 

820 



Phys. 207 f. Electrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of electrostatics and electromagnetics with appli- 
cations to diffraction, dispersion, electro- and magneto-optics. (Not given 
in 1938-1939.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 208 s. Physical Optics (3)— Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light, with appli- 
cations to interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization. (Not given m 
1938-1939.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 209 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of reports and discussion of current developments in physics 
and of original investigations on special problems. (Staff.) 

Phys. 210 y. Research, 

The investigation of special problems in physics. (Staff.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Howard; Associate Professor Steinmeyer; Lecturers 

Lasson, Larson ; Dr. Bone, Dr. Kline. 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. American National Government (3)— Three lectures. 
Open to freshmen. 

A study of the organization and functions of the national government 

of the United States. 

Pol. Sci. 4 f or s. State and Local Government (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. If or s. 

A study of the organization and functions of state and local government 
in the United States, with special emphasis upon the Government of Mary- 
land. 

Pol. Sci. 7 f. Comparative Government (2)— Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A comparative study of the governments of Great Britain, France and 

Switzerland. 

Pol. Sci. 8 s. Comparative Government (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A comparative study of the dictatorial governments of Europe, with 
special emphasis upon Italy, Germany, and the U. S. S. R. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Pol. Sci. 101 f. International Relatio^is (3)— Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with the major factors underlying international rela- 
tions; the influence of geography, climate, nationalism, imperialism, etc. 
(Not given in 1938-1939.) (Steinmeyer.) 

321 



Pol. Sci. 102 s. International Law (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. ^ > 

A study of the principles governing international intercourse in time of 
peace and war, as illustrated in texts and cases. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Scl 103 f. International Organization (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with the forms and functions of the various cooperative 
international organizations, with special reference to the League of Nations 
and the Permanent Court of International Justice. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 104 s. Recent Far Eastern Polities (3)— Three lectures Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far 
East and their influence on world politics. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Scl 105 f. Problems of World Politics (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with governmental problems of an international char- 
acter, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, propaganda, etc. 
Students are required to report on readings from current literature. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Scl 106 s. British Empire (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Pol. 
oCi. 7 I. 

A survey of the constitutional development of the British Dominions 
with particular attention to the present inter-imperial relationship. (Not 
given m 1938-1939.) - (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. Ill f. Principles of Public Administration (3)— Three lectures 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 f or s. 

A functional study of public administration in the United States with 
special emphasis upon organization and the relation of administration to 
the other branches of government. (Howard ) 

Pol. Sci. 112 s. Problems of Public Administration (3)— Three lectures 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 f or s. 

A detailed study of selected current problems in the field of national 
and state government, with particular emphasis upon their administrative 
^'^^''- (Howard.) 

Pol. Scl 113 f. Public Personnel Administration (3) — Three lectures 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. Ill f, or consent of instructor. 

TT \ ^^""^J ""^ ^''^^''' personnel practices in the various jurisdictions of the 
United States and their comparison with practices in certain European 
countries. (Not given in 1938-1939.) (Howard.) 

322 



Pol. Scl 114 s. Municipal Government and Administration (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 f or s. 

A detailed study of selected problems of municipal government, such as 
housing, health, zoning, fire and police, recreation, and planning. Course 
includes a visit to Baltimore to observe the agencies of city government 
at work. (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 121 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A descriptive and critical examination of the party process in govern- 
ment: nominations and elections, party expenditures, political leadership, 
the management and conditioning of public opinion. (Bone.) 

Pol. Scl 123 f. Government and Biisiness (3) — Three lectures. Prereq- 
uisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A general survey of governmental activities affecting business, with spe- 
cial emphasis upon recent developments; federal and state assistance to, 
and regulation of business in their historical and legal aspects ; government 
ownership and operation. (Bone.) 

Pol. Scl 124 s. Legislatures and Legislation (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 4 f or s. 

A comprehensive study of the legislative process, bicameralism, the com- 
mittee system and the lobby, with special emphasis upon the legislature of 
Maryland. The course includes a visit to Washington to observe Congress 
at work. (Bone.) 

Pol. Scl 125 f. Constitutional Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of constitutional law in the United States as interpreted by the 
Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the American federal system, 
the amending clause, and the powers of President, Congress, and courts. 

(Lasson.) 

Pol. Scl 128 s. Administrative Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of the powers and procedure of administrative bodies; the validity 
of administrative regulations and the conclusiveness of administrative 
decisions. (Howard.) 

Pol. Scl 131 f. History of Political Theory (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 132 s. Recent Political Theory (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories 
of democracy, socialism, communism, fascism, etc. (Larson.) 



328 



For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201 f or s. Jtesearch in Political Science (2-4) — Credit appor- 
tioned according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Pol. Sci. 203 y. Se^ninar in Federal-State Relations (4) — Reports on 
topics assigned for individual research in the field of recent federal-state 
relations. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 205 y. Seminar in Public Opinion (4) — Reports on topics 
assigned for individual research in both the national and international 
aspects of public opinion and propaganda. (Staff.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jull, Byerly; Associate Professors Gwin, Quigley. 

Poultry 1 f. Poultry Production (3) — Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory. 

This is a general course designed to acquaint the student with modem 
methods of poultry husbandry. Principles of incubation, brooding, egg 
production, marketing, and breed improvement are discussed. 

Poultry 1 s. Poultry Management (3) — Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory. 

Material will be presented in this course to acquaint the student with 
modem methods of feeding, housing, sanitation, and organization neces- 
sary to the profitable operation of a poultry establishment. 

Poultry 2 f. Poultry Biology (1 or 2) — One lecture and one two-hour 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Poultry 1 f and s or equivalent. 

The elementary anatomy of the fowl, selection for egg production and for 
breed standards are studied. Judging team for intercollegiate competitions 
are selected from members of this class. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Poultry 101 s. Poultry Genetics (2) — Three one-hour lectures, demon- 
stration, quizz periods. Prereqtiisites, Poultry 2 f and G. and S. 101 f. 

The inheritance of morphological and physiological characters of poultry 
are presented. Inheritance of factors related to egg and meat production and 
quality are stressed. 

Poultry 102 f. Poultry Nutrition (2) — One two-hour laboratory; one 
one-hour lecture, demonstration, quizz. Prerequisite, Poultry 1 f and 1 s. 

The nutritive requirements of poultry and the nutrients which meet those 
requirements are presented. Feed cost of poultry production is emphasized. 

Poultry 103 s. Poultry Disease Prevention (3). 
(See Veterinary Science V. S. 107 s.) 



Poultry 104 y. Poultry Products (4)— Two one-hour lecture, demonstra- 
tion, quizz periods, weekly. Prerequisite, Poultry 1 f and 1 s. 

This course includes material on egg and meat quality, commercial 
grades, relation of transportation and distribution to quality and methods 
of marketing, especially as related to quality. 

Poultry 105 s. Preservation of Poultry Products (3). 

(See Bacteriology, Bact. Ill f.) 

Poultry 106 f. Poultry Physiology (1 or 2)— One two-hour laboratory; 
one lecture. Prerequisite, Poultry 101 s. 

The physiology of development and incubation of the embryo, especially 
physiological pathology of the embryo in relation to hatchability, is pre- 
sented. Physiology of growth and the influence of environmental factors 
on growth and development are considered. 

Poultry 107 y. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (4) — Two 
lectures weekly. 

This course presents the relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole 
and its economic importance. Consumer prejudices and preferences, pro- 
duction, transportation, storage, and distribution problems are discussed. 
Trends in the industry, surpluses and their utilization, poultry by-products, 
and disease problems, are presented. 

Poultry 109 f and s. Poultry Literature (2-8). 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Oral and written reports 
required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are 
taught. Seniors are limited to one semester hour of such work each semester. 

For Graduates 

Poultry 201 f. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Poultry 102 s or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. Link- 
age, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in develop- 
ment, inheritance of resistance to disease and the influence of the environ- 
ment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 

Poultry 202 f. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3)— Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Poultry 102 f or equivalent. 

Deficiency diseases of poultry are considered intensively. Vitamin, min- 
eral, and protein deficiencies are given special consideration. Synthetic 
diets, metabolism, and the physiology of digestion, growth curves and their 
significance, and feed efficiency in growth and egg production are studied. 

Poultry 203 s. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3) — One two- 
hour laboratory; two one-hour lectures. 

The role of the endocrines in reproduction, especially with respect to egg 
production, is considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, molting, 
egg formation, ovulation, deposition of egg envelopes and the physiology 
of oviposition are studied. 



324 



825 



Poultry 204 y. Seminar (2). 

Reports of current researches by staff members, graduate students, and 
guest speakers are presented. 

Poultry 205 y. Research in Poultry. 

Practical and fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under 
the supervision of staff members toward the requirements for the degrees 
M. S. and Ph. D. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Jenkins, Sprowls; Assistant Professors Clark, ; 

Lecturer Hall; Dr. Ghiselli. 

Psychological Testing Bureau 

The staff of the Department of Psychology will maintain a bureau for 
vocational and educational guidance on the basis of adequately standardized 
psychological tests. The services of the bureau will be available without 
charge to students. 

Psych. 1 f or s. Introdwction to Psychology (3) — Two lectures and one 
discussion. Open to sophomores. Seniors receive but two credits. 

A general introduction to typical fields in which psychologists are at 
work, including experimental psychology, differential psychology, social 
psychology, and mental hygiene. 

Psych. 2 f. Applied Psychology I (3) — Two lectures and one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in methods of studying, in vocational orientation, and in the professions. 

PsYCH. 3 s. Applied Psychology II (3) — Two lectures and one discus- 
sion. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in business and industry, including industrial selection, methods of produc- 
tion, advertising, selling, and market research. 

Psych. 4 f. Psychology for Students of Commerce (3) — Two lectures 
and one discussion. Open only to students in economics or business 
administration. 

Topics in applied psychology which relate to practical problems in busi- 
ness and industry, viewed from the standpoint of controlled observation. 

(Jenkins.) 

Psych. 10 f or s. Educational Psychology (3) — Two lectures and one 
discussion. Open to jimiors and seniors only. Required of students in 
Education. 

Experimental studies of basic psychological problems encountered in 
education; individual differences, learning, motivation, transfer of train- 
ing, etc. 

326 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PSYCH. 110 f or s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3)— Two lectures 
and one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f or s. 

More advanced treatment of the solution of basic psychological problems 
in education by methods of controlled observation. (bprowis.j 

PSYCH. 120 f. Psychology of Individual Differences (3)— Two lectures 
and one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

The occurrence, nature, and causes of psychological differences between 
individuals; methods of measuring these differences. ^L^iarK.; 

PSYCH. 121 s. Experimental Social Psychology (3) -Two lectures and 
one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

Results of researches on behavior in social settings; experimental studies 
of the effects of group membership, of the family, and of current social 

(Jenkins.) 

PSYCH. 125 f. ChUd Psychology (3) -Two lectures and one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 

Experimental and statistical analyses of child behavior and of the earl y 
stages of human development. ^ 

PSYCH. 130 f or s. Mental Hygiene (3)— Two lectures and one clinic. 

Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. Repeated in second term. 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of adjust- 

(Sprowls, Hall.) 
ment. 

PSYCH. 131 s. Abnormal Psychology (3)— Two lectures and one clinic. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 130 f or s. 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of psychological abnorma ity with 
emphasis on the clinical rather than theoretical aspects. (Sprowls, Hall.) 

Psych 140 f Psycliological Problems in Market Research (3)— Two lec- 
tures and one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of mstructor. 

Use of methods of controlled observation in determining public reactions 
to merchandise, and in measuring the psychological influences ^^ ^^^ m 
particular markets. 

Psych 141 s. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3)— Two lectures 
and one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of instructor. 

Experimental and statistical studies of psychological aspects of adver- 
tising, including attention, memory, comprehension, and """^'''^^'JJj^g^jj; ^ 

Psych 150 s Psychological Tests and Measurements (3)— Two lectures 
and one 'laboratory period. Prerequisite, Psych. 120 f or permission of 
instructor. 

Survey of typical psychological tests used in vocational orien tation an d 
in industry; actual practice in administering such tests. ( •) 

327 



Psych. 160 f. Psychological Aspects of Ind^istrial Production (3)— Two 
lectures and one discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of 
instructor. 

Controlled observation applied to psychological problems in industrial 
production, including psychological effects of conditions and methods of 
^^^^' (Ghiselli.) 

Psych. 161 s. Psychology of Personnel (3)— Two lectures and one dis- 
cussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of instructor. 

Typical problems and methods of approach to psychological problems 
mvolved in vocational orientation, employee morale, and employee moti- 
^^^^^"- (Qark.) 

Psych. 190 y. Technics of Investigation in Psychology (3) Three 

periods of practice and discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 150 s. 

Actual practice in various methods of obtaining data and in treating 
these results for interpretations. Required of all majors. (G'hiselli.) 

For Graduates 

Psych. 200 y. Research in Psychotechnology (4-6)— Credit apportioned 
to work accomplished. CSf ff^ 

Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6) —An advanced 
course for tea<:hers and prospective teachers. Open only to graduates 

Systematic approach to advanced problems in educational psychology 
based upon specific experimental contributions. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 240 y. Seminar in Current Psyclw technological Prohlems (6) — 
An advanced course for students pursuing major graduate studies. 
icat Ss '^^^''^ analysis of recent contributions in selected psychotechnolog- 

( Jenkins, Clark.) 

Psych. 250 y. Participation in Testing Clinic (4-6)— Credit apportioned 
to work accomplished. 

Actual practice in the administration and interpretation of psychological 
tests m the course of the routine operation of the testing clinic. 

( , Ghiselli.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Manny; Associate Professor Joslyn; Assistant Professors 
DODSON and Clowes; Dr. Jacobi, Dr. Wittler, Mr. Asadorian. 

Soc. Sci. ly. Introduction to the Social Sciences (6)— One lecture; two 
discussions. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

This course serves as an orientation to advanced work in the social sci- 
ences. In the first semester, the basis, nature, and evolution of society and 
social institutions are studied. During the second semester the major prob- 
lems of modem citizenship are analyzed in terms of knowledge contributed 
by economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. 

828 



Soc. 1 f or s. Principles of Sociology (3) — Three discussions. Prerequi- 
site, sophomore standing. 

An analysis of society and the social processes; the relation of the indi- 
vidual to the group; social products; social change. 

Soc. 2 f or s. Cultural Anthropology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
sophomore standing. 

An analysis of the cultures of several primitive and modern societies, the 
purpose of which is to ascertain the nature of culture and the processes re- 
lated to it. Museum exhibits will be utilized. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101 f. Rural Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The structure and functions of rural communities, ancient and modem; 
the evolution of rural culture; rural institutions and their problems; the 
psychology of rural life; composition and characteristics of the rural popu- 
lation; relation of rural life to the major social processes; the social aspects 
of rural planning. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 102 s. Urban Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the nature and significance of urbanization; the social struc- 
ture and functions of the city; urban personalities and groups; cultural con- 
flicts arising out of the impact of urban environment. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 103 f. Criminology and Penology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. Sci. 1 y or Soc. 1 f or s. 

The nature and extent and cost of crime; causative factors; historical 
methods of dealing with criminals; apprehension of alleged criminals; 
the machinery of justice; penal institutions; other means of caring for 
convicted persons; the prevention of crime. (Jacobi.) 

Soc. 104 s. Social Interaction (3) — Three discussions. Prerequisite. Soc. 
1 f or s or Psych. 1 f or s. 

The development of human nature and personality as products of social 
experience and interaction; the behavior of public audiences, groups, crowds, 
and mobs; the development and functioning of such psycho-social forces as 
imitation, styles, fads, leadership, public opinion, propaganda, nationalism, 
etc. (Manny.) 

Soc. 105 f. Social Organization (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. If 
or s. 

Social groupings above the family in size as found among primitive and 
modem civilizations including neighborhoods, communities, special interest 
organizations, etc.; leadership and followership in organization activities; 
interorganizational conflict and cooperation. (Joslyn.) 

329 



Soc. 107 s. Social Pathology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 
1 f or s, or consent of instructor. 

Causative factors and social complications in individual and group patho- 
logical conditions; historic methods of dealing with dependent, defective, 
and delinquent classes. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 109 f. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. 107 s, or consent of instructor. 

Brief historical review of the evolution of social work. Present day types 
of social work, institutional treatment, public and private agencies; the 
theory and technic of social case work; recent developments arising out of 
the depression; visits to representative social agencies. This course is 
intended primarily for persons intending to take advanced professional 
training in this field. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 110 s. The Family (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 f or s. 

Anthropological and historical backgrounds; biological, economic, psycho- 
logical, and sociological bases of the family; the role of the family in per- 
sonality development; family and society; family disorganization; family 
adjustment and social change. (Jacobi.) 

Soc. Ill f. Recent Social Thought (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Soc. 1 f or s, and consent of instructor. Intended mainly for sociology 
majors and minors. 

Critical study of the leading schools of sociological thought in various 
countries since 1800. (Not offered in 1938-1939.) (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 113 f. Dynamics of Population (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1 f or s, and G. and S. Ill f, or consent of instructor. 

Causes of population growth and decline; major population migrations; 
population pressure and international problems; eugenic factors; statistical 
analyses of population trends in the United States. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 115 f. The Village (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student will 
be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The evolution of the American village; present day social structure and 
functions of the village; an analysis of village population; the relationship 
of the village to urban and open-country areas; village planning. (Not 
offered in 1938-1939.) (Manny.) 

Soc. 117 f. The Sociology of Leisure (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1 f or s. Each graduate student will be required to prepare an extra 
term paper. 

This course deals with the sociological implications of leisure time and 
its uses, particularly in contemporary American life. The group aspects 
of recreation, including both commercialized and voluntary forms, com- 
munity organization and planning for leisure-time activities, and related 
subjects are included. (Manny.) 

380 



Soc. 150 s. Field Practice in Social Work (2)— Open only to sociology 
majors upon consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available oppor- 
tunities. 

Supervised field work of various types imdertaken during the summer 
months and suited to the needs of the individual students. (Manny.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201 f or s. Sociological Research (2-4)— Credit proportional to 
work accomplished. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 
compiled data. (Staff.) 

Soc. 202 f or s. Seminar in Sociological Theories (2). 

Assigned topics for discussion, dealing primarily with major sociological 
theories and problems. Designed for major students in the department 
of sociology. (Staff.) 

SOCIAL WORK 

Note: The following courses are offered in Baltimore under the joint 
auspices of the University of Maryland and the Baltimore Council of 
Social Agencies. Until further notice, enrollment in these courses is 
restricted to currently employed personnel of Maryland social agencies, 
and constitutes part of the **in-service" training program of these agencies. 
To obtain graduate credit from the University of Maryland, students must 
meet all requirements for admission to the Graduate School of the Univer- 
sity. For further details, see special circular. 

Social Work 201 f or s. Introduction to Social Casework I (2)— Two 
lectures. 

A discussion of case material, to give the student a general introduction 
to the basic processes of social casework, with special emphasis on the 
individual and his social situation. 

Social Work 202 s. Social Casework II (2)— Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Social Work 201 or a similar introductory casework course. 
A further analytical study of casework methods. 

Social Work 205 f or s. Diagnosis as a Part of Casework Treatment 
(2)_Two lectures. Prerequisite, completion of one year's work in a gradu- 
ate school of social work, or its equivalent. 

Case material illustrating various types of treatment will be used. Em- 
phasis will be placed on a study of the early period in treatment, so that 
the student may develop an ability to establish and to understand the 
relationship with the client, to bring out and evaluate material important 
for diagnosis, and to meet the real and psychological needs of the client 
which must be met prior to diagnosis. 

331 



reSe S W t o^.^'^'^' ^'^'^'- <2)-Two discussions. Pre- 
3er! ^"'■'^ '"' ""^ '^^ ^^"^^^'^'^^ -"d -Perience as a case 

bettitdrn'^aS ""'J" ""T*? ""^ ''^^ understanding of the relationship 
Between cl ent and worlcer and its significance in treatment Illustrative 
material will be selected from the participants' active cases '""'*'^*'^^ 

b!Z^ 72)-Two Llr^es. ^ ^^^'^'""'"^ ^'"'-''' '" ^^^^^^ <>/ ^~ 

in JthavW 't"ht"?' T^ 'Tf "' ''''^^''*'^' "« '""tivation, factors modify- 
ing behavior the structure of the personality and of the psyche the modi 
fication of the personality in various developmental phases the evirnce 
of maladjus ment, and an effort to relate maladjustments io experiences 
and personality patterns. Special reference will be made to the iSka 
tions of the foregoing for social work in its theory and practice 

SOCIAL WORK 221 f. SocM Psychiatric TreaUn^nt I (2) -Two lectures 
Prerequisite. Social Work 220 or its equivalent, and permiUon of in^r^;::! 

inSlTa^itkl'^'^ °' '"" ^'°"'"^ '""^ ^^P"'^^"- o^ P^y-^hiatry 

SOCIAL WORK 222 s. Sooml Psychiatric Treat^nent II (2) -Two lectures 
or discussions. Prerequisites. Social Work 220 or its equSenr and 

SXr^aTnSrpT* iln. ^-"^" -"^ '^ ^^^ V^^^^J^l 
in term^of'lin!L'^'''■"'*l7^*^ *^" philosophy of psychiatric treatment 

by the clients; the difficulties arising from the workers' own attitudes- 
he therapeutics of talking; the problems of transference, the mLnlg of 

Sn to lecH, '^'"; *' ^ '°"''"''°" °^ treatment. Sixteen hours are 
given to lectures, discussions, and illustrative case material, and 14 hours 
to study of cases supplied by the students from their curr;'* case loads 

SOCIAL WORK 230 f and 231 s. Medical Problems in Social Work I and 
11 (2 per semester)— Two lectures. 

of ^h'e'v^lT' ^"r^* '" tr '*'" ''"'^^ ^°'-'^«' ^ ^^"^'•-' understanding 

with whkh he wm ^""""'' '"'^'"""^ ^""'^^"''"^ chronic diseases 

with which he will come m contact, such as malnutrition, tuberculosis 
heart disease, syphilis, etc. Different conditions are taken up Uch semester 
hence students may enter in either semester. semester, 

SOCIAL WORK 250 s. Public Welfare Administration (2) -T^^ lectures 

SaiirSg irsrr ^°^^' ^"' ™"^^^ ^^-'^ "^^^ ^^'^ -- 

anrLeiSTublLTSraT^^^^^^^ ^"'^ ^^^^-^-^^ o^ 'oeal. state. 

832 




Social Work 260 s. Principles of Social Group Work (2) — Two lectures. 

In this course, the principles of pro^essive education and the implica- 
tions from sociology, educational and clinical psychology are related to 
the task of group leadership. Aims and methods of group work are 
analyzed and evaluated in terms of actual field situations, and consideration 
is given to the relation of experiences in organized groups to the personality 
development and social adjustment of the participants. 

Social Work 270 f and 271 s. Labor Problems I and II (2 per semester) 
— Two lectures. Either semester may be taken separately. 

These courses deal with the rise and development of the American labor 
movement. Treatment is given to the development of trade unionism in 
this country, with a brief comparison of the problems and objectives of 
American organized labor with those of labor groups in certain European 
countries. Special attention is given to wage rates, hours of labor, condi- 
tions of work, collective bargaining, and labor disputes. Legislation en- 
acted to meet the problems of insecurity affecting labor, as w^ell as to 
develop collective bargaining, will be treated in some detail. In this latter 
connection, consideration will be given to relief legislation, public works 
programs, the Social Security Act, the National Labor Relations Act, and 
proposed wages and hours legislation. 

SPEECH 

Professor Richardson; Assistant Professors Ehrensberger, Provensen; 

Mr. Strausbaugh, Miss Iverson. 

Speech ly. Reading and Speaking (2) — One lecture. 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speak- 
ing; reference readings, short reports, etc. Opportunities of speech clinic 
open to students. Required of all four year students. Each semester of 
this course will be repeated in the following semester. 

Speech Clinic — No credit. 

Speech examinations; training in speech and voice; remedial work in 
minor speech difficulties. The work of the clinic is conducted in individual 
conferences and in small group meetings. Hours are arranged by con- 
sultation with the respective instructors. 

Speech 2y. Fundamentals of Speech (4) — Two lectures. 

Studies in the bases and mechanics of speech. Emphasis on voice and 
diction. This course does not deal with public speaking exclusively; it is 
concerned with the whole speech function in private as well as public 
manifestations. It is given primarily for students who expect to do exten- 
sive work in speech. Any student electing this course may take it con- 
currently with or after completing Speech 1 y. 

838 



Speech 3 f. Advanced Public Speaking (2) — Two lectures. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1 y, with special applications and adap- 
tations. At each session of the class a special setting is given for the 
speeches — civil, social, and political organizations, etc., and organizations in 
the fields of the prospective vocations of the different students. When a 
student has finished this course he will have prepared and delivered one or 
more speeches which would be suitable and appropriate before any and all 
bodies that he would probably have occasion to address in after-life. 

Speech 4 s. Advanced Public Speaking (2) — Two lectures. 
Continuation of Speech 3 f . 

Speech 5 f. Oral Technical English (2) — Two lectures. 

The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, etc., on both technical 
and general subjects. This course is especially adapted to the needs of 
engineering students. Required of all sophomore engineering students. 

Speech 6y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. 

This course is a continuation of Speech 5 f. Special emphasis upon 
engineering projects that fall within the student's own experience. Class 
discussion and criticism of all speeches and reports. Required of all 
junior engineering students. 

Speech 7 y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 6 y. Work not confined to class 
room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies 
in the University and elsewhere. Senior seminar. For senior engineering 
students only. 

Speech 9 f. Extempore Speaking (1) — One lecture. 

Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects. 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. Training in parliamentary 
law. 

Speech 10 s. Extempore Speaking (1) — One lecture. 
Continuation of Speech 9 f . 

Speech 11 f. Argumentation (2) — Two lectures. 

This course stresses not formal debating, but forms of persuasion which 
will be useful in business and professional life. It deals, to a great extent, 
with ways in which human beliefs and behavior may be influenced by logical 
discussion. 

Speech 12 s. Argumentation (2) — Two lectures. 
Continuation of Speech 11 f. 

Speech 13 f. Oral Reading (1) — One lecture. 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of 
literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 

834 



Speech 14 s. Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. 

Continuation of Speech 13 f . 

Speech 15 f. Advanced Oral Reading (l)-One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Speech 13 f or 14s or the equivalent (if work is entirely satisfactory). 

Advanced work in oral interpretation. 

speech 16 s. Advanced Oral Reading (l)--One lecture. Prerequisite 
Speech 13 f or 14 s (if work is entirely satisfactory) or the equivalent. 

Continuation of Speech 15 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

SPEECH 101 y. Radio Speaking (2)-Two lectures. 

'Ll^Tsys^r: ZZ speech ^^f-rn^^^^^Z'' ^"'"^" 
or consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

PROFESSORS WELSH, BRUECKNER; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DeVOLT; 

Assistant Professor Davis. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

V S 101 f Comparative Anatcmy and Physiology (3)-Three lectures. 
oJ \ If thP animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; 

intStSnsWp ttw^nL vt^i^^^^^ organs and parts as to structure and 
iSonTclparative study of herbivora, carnivora, and ommvora. 

V S 102 s. Animal Hygiene (3)— Three lectures. 

Care' and management of domestic animals, with special "fe^ence to 
Oare ^'^^ '"f' ^ . , ^ resistance to disease; prevention and early 

3g"SVlbrm'al itfons; gene^l hygiene; sanita^on; infections; 

eSz^tics; enzootics; internal and external parasites; first aid. 

V S 103 f. HeTnatology (2)— Two laboratories. 
P.,,«e P«.o|o.,. »^^^^^ 

SJ,'t.i«"tf »urr. rXp.«.'«. the <.™.d e.e™». .< Mood; 

pathological forms and counts. 

335 



deLbie"' " ''"'"'"''" ^'^-^"*' laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
Balt'l Jesiible'^"'''"'''"'^' "'"'"''^ ^'^"^^^^ l^hor.U,ries. Junior year. 
Jior"yrr.%re:tuit:irnl^^^^^^^^ (2-5) -Laboratory course. 

astsrctLirSosTs:^^' '"^^^"^^"--^ ^-'^ ^^^'---^ --^"- 

uisTtef ■ B^y 'l /'""'"^ 51'"'''*' (2)-Two lectures. Senior year. Prereq- 
uisites, Bact. 1 f or s, and Poultry Physiology (Poultry 106 s) ^ 

&tudy of causes, symptoms, dissemination, life cvcle «flP=„„ i 
ance, methods of pnntrni «^a j- ^. "' '"^ cycle, seasonal appear- 

(DeVolt and Davis.) 
For Graduates 

V. S. 201 f or s. Animal Disease Prohlerm (2-6) Prereoui^ifp Aa^ 

n vetennary medicine from an approved veter narv ro) w!^ ' f I 

.nstructor. Laboratory and field work by assignment. ^ '""''"* '' 

vet'^rinVy"L^dicbfll''tr; """T" ^'■'^- ^-'•-'"-te, degree in 
instructor! " ^^^'^^"^ veterinary college or consent of 

ZOOLOGY 

Mr. Stull, Miss Webster. 
ZOOL. 1 s Ge^emZ Zoology (4)-Two lectures ;' two laboratories 

deal: ':s:tTzrx^^ -"^T? r ^^^^^^^^^ - ^^^ --• ^t 

ships, and acti^-:: ^,^^^3 ^wt^il^l^^^^^^^ ^^3^*^^^ 

appreciation of the biolo^ic^l Jenc^s xtniJ^^^^ 

mammalian form are studied, kejs?^^ ^""^''^^ invertebrates and a 

ZOOL. 2 f. Elen^nts of Zoology ;3)-Two lectures; one demonstration 

untrS%h:%twt\"'^ ". ''"T' '^^-^^^^ ^^ ^^e principles 

man. FeJ, $3!oO ' ^^^^^P^^^^t, and behavior of animals, incIuLg 

336 




ZooL. 3 f. Invertebrate Morphology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Required of students whose major is zoology, and of premedical students. 

This course consists in a study of the structure and relationships of 
selected invertebrate groups. Fee, $5.00. 

ZooL. 4 s. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. Required of students whose major is zoology, and of premedical 
students. Fee, $5.00. 

ZooL. 5 s. Economic Zoology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisfte, one course 
in zoology. 

The content of this course centers around the problems of preservation, 
conservation, control, and development of economic wild life, with special 
reference to Maryland. The lectures are supplemented by assigned read- 
ings and reports. 

Combined with Zool. 6s, this course should form a part of the basic 
training for professional foresters, game proctors, and conservationists. 

Zool. 6 s. Field Zoology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, one course in zoology and one in botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis on the higher 
invertebrates and certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, environment, 
and modes of living. Intended for teachers of biology, and also for those 
who have a special interest in nature study and outdoor life. Fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 12 f. Animal Histology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology, 

A study of animal tissues and the technic involved in their preparation 
for microscopic examination. Fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 15 f. Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy and 
physiology. Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, circula- 
tion, respiration, and reproduction. Required of students whose major is 
physical education, and of those preparing to teach general science or 
biology. Fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 16 s. Human Physiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Not 
open to freshmen. 

Similar to Zool. 15 f. Primarily for home economics students. Fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 20 s. Vertebrate Embryology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Consent of instructor must be ob- 
tained before registration. Required of students whose major is zoology. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and early 
mammalian embryology. Fee, $5.00. 

337 



Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ZOOL. 101 f and s. Mammalian Anatomy (6) — Three laboratories. Regis- 
tration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. Recommended 
for premedical students, and those whose major is zoology. Fee, $5.00 
per semester. (Hard.) 

ZoOL. 103 f and s. General Animal Physiology (6) — ^Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in verte- 
brate anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of in- 
structor must be obtained before registration. 

The first semester work deals with the fundamentals of cellular and 
general physiology; the second semester is devoted to an application of 
these principles to the higher animals. Fee, $5.00 per semester. 

(Phillips.) 

ZoOL. 105 y. Aquiculture (4) — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, one course in zoology. 

Course deals with the practices employed in rearing aquatic animals 
and the properties of natural waters which render them suitable for environ- 
mental purposes. Fee, $5.00 per semester. (Truitt.) 

ZooL, 106y, Journal Club (2) — One session. Not open for credit to 
juniors. 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. Required of all 
students whose major is zoology. (Staff.) 

ZoOL. 108 f. Animal Geography (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

This course deals with the distribution, classification, and environmental 
relations of animals. Several field trips are scheduled. Fee, $5.00. 

(Newcombe.) 

ZooL. 120 s. Animal Genetics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Per- 
mission of the instructor must be obtained before registration. 

The fundamental principles of heredity and variation. While primarily 
of interest to students of biology, this course is of value to those inter- 
ested in the humanities. Required of students whose major is zoology 
who do not have credit for G. and S. 101 f. Fee, $5.00. (Burhoe.) 

ZooL. 121 s. Animal Ecology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. 

Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Certain 
environmental factors affecting growths, behavior, and distribution are 
analyzed by observations and experiments conducted in the field, and also 
in the laboratory under controlled conditions. Special field excursions are 
made to the mountains and seashore. Fee, $5.00. (Newcombe.) 

838 



For Graduates 

ZOOL. 200 y. Mamne Zoology (6)— One lecture; two laboratories. 

Problems in salt water animal life of the higher Phyla. Fee, $5^00 per 

I 1 ruitt. ; 
semester. 

ZOOL. 201 y. Microscopical Anatomy of Vertebrates (6)— One lecture; 
two laboratories. 

A detailed study of the morphology and activity of cells composing verte- 
brate tissues. Recent advances in the field of cytology are covered in 
lectures, assigned readings, and reports. Opportunity is given for indi- 
vidual research. Fee, $5.00 per semester. tnara.j 
ZOOL 203 y. Advanced Embryology {6)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. 
Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology and d«^e>°P"'^"t^! 
animals. Opportunity is given for individual research. Fee, ?|-00j^^J 
semester. 

ZOOL. 204 y. Advanced Aninuil Physiology (6) -One lecture; two lab- 

oratories. . .- 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in ™al.life 

Fee, $5.00 per semester. ' '^ 

ZOOL. 205 y. Biology of Aquatic Organisms (6)-0ne lecture; two lab- 

nrfitories 

Biotic physical, and chemical factors of the aquatic environment, includ- 
ing certain fundamental principles of oceanography. Special reference is 
made to the Chesapeake Bay region. Fee, $5.00 per semester. (Newcombe.) 

ZooL. 206 y. Kesearcfe— Credit to be arranged. 

Pee, $5.00 per semester. 

CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country 
is on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored cooperatively by the 
Maryland Conservation Department, Goucher College, Washington College 
Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland, Western Mary^a^d 
College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to afford 
a center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward a 
fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The 
program projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake 

region. , . j j • 

The laboratory is open from June until September, inclusive; and dunng 
the summer of 1938 courses will be offered in the following subjects: 
Algae, Economic Zoology, Diatoms, Protozoology, Ichthyology, and Inverte- 
brate Zoology. 

339 



I 



Laboratory facilities, boats of various types fully eauiDoed fn„rr,n<: r.»f= 

wol^Sth"Vr "^''^'"*"^^' ^"^ ^""-^"^ deviL:™1a?arSr £ 
work without extra cost to the student. 

For full information consult special announcement, which may be ob 
tamed by applying to R. V. Truitt, Director, College P;rk, Maryland. 



SECTION IV 
DEGREES, HONORS, STUDENT REGISTER 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1936-1937 



HONORARY CERTIFICATES OF MERIT 

Edwin Warfield, Jr. Paul Lewis Gunby, Sr. 

Jesse Peyton King 



RoLFE Lyman Allen 

A. B. University of Maryland, 1934 
M. A. University of Maryland, 1935 

George Frederick Alrich 
E.E. Lafayette College, 1910 
M.S. Lehigh University, 1912 

Earl Jennings Anderson 

B.S. Washington State College, 1932 
M.S. Washington State College, 1934 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Dissertation : 



John Ouver Burton 

B.S. Hamline University, 1927 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 



Charles Jelleff Carr 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1933 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1934 

GusTAV Edward Cwauna 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1931 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 



"The legislation for the confiscation 
of British and loyalist property 
during the Revolutionary War." 

"Hyperconformal transformations." 



"The association of certain chemical 
and histological characters with 
susceptibility in strawberry roots 
to black root rot as influenced by 
soil treatment." 

"The secondary ionization constant 
of malonic acid from to 60° C. 
and the heat of ionization of the 
acid malonate ion." 

"The metabolism of the sugar alco- 
hols and their anhydrides." 



"A phytochemical study of Ipomoea 
Pes-Caprae (L) sweet." 



H 



340 



841 



Chester Arthur Davis 

B.A. North Texas State Teachers 

College, 1924 
M.A. University of Wisconsin, 1926 

K. Pierre Dozois 
B.S. University of Montana, 1927 
M.S. Pennsylvania State College, 
1930 

John E. Faber, Jr. 
B.S. University of Maryland, 1926 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1927 

Castillo Graham 

B.S. Mississippi A. & M. College, 

1927 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1930 



Donald Cooper Grove 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1930 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 



Dissertation : 

*'The opposition to early federal- 
ism." 



"Studies of the electrophoretic mi- 
gration velocity of various micro- 
organisms." 



"Measurement, production and pres- 
ervation of the hemolytic activity 
of guinea pig complement." 



"Biology and control of the plum 
curculio (Conotrachelus numphar 
Herbst) with special reference to 
certain phenological data." 



"A phytochemical investigation of 
trillium erectum." 



William Howard Hunt 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of "A pharmacological study of Usti- 

of Maryland, 1932 lago." 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1934 



Marion Lee Jacobs 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

of Nebraska, 1925 
M.S. University of Nebraska, 1926 

ViRDELL EVERARD MUNSEY 

B.S. University of Maine, 1924 
M.S. George Washington University, 
1931 



"A study of new solvents in alka- 
loidal assaying." 



"An investigation of the application 
of the neutral wedge photometer 
to the measurement of carotenoid 
pigments in flour and macaroni 
products." 



Paul Andrew Parent 

B.S. Catholic University, 1931 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1935 



"The separation of aluminum from 
beryllium with the aid of sodium 
hexametaphosphate." 



342 



ROBB Vernon Rice 

A.B. State University of Montana, 

B.S. in Pharmacy, State University 

of Montana, 1933 
M.S. in Pharmacy, State University 
of Montana, 1934 
Edwin Greenwood Stimpson 

A.B. University of Maryland, 1930 



Dissertation: 

'*The preparation and properties of 
some 2, 2, 2-trialkyl ethanols." 



"A nutritive study of Vigna Sinen- 
sis (black-eyed pea variety)." 



Master of Arts 



Edwin Harry Barnes 
ROSA Leah St. Clair Bristow 
Crystal Elliott 
Lea Kathryn Engel 
Henrietta Goodner 
Virginia Cooke Higgins 

Margaret Louise Howard 

Wilbur Arters Jones 

Michael Joseph Kelley 

Alma Essex Marshall 

CATHRYN Elizabeth McFarland 

Leona Sara Morris 

Laura Nevius 



Mary Esther Smith 
Lowell Martin Sowers 
LUCILLE La Toure Stinnett 
Alice Elizabeth Taylor 
John Charles Thompson 
Edmund Henry Umberger 
Walter R. Volckhausen 
Mabel Barnes Wilkinson 
Gertrude A. C. Williams 
May-Louise Wood 
Genevieve Asenath Yonkers 
Verna Margarite Zimmerman 



Master of Science 



Howard Franklin Allard 
Willis Harford Baldwin 
John Morton Bellows, Jr. 
Dorothy Frances Burch 
Spencer Bliss Chase 
CHARLES Clayton Croft 
Mary Ruth Cross 
Katherine Cunningham 
GiULio D. D^Ambrogi 
Herbert Joseph Florestano 
Sylvan Ellis Forman 
Herbert Gershberg 
Bernard Heinemann 
Edgar Harrison Hollis 
Henry Gilbert Ingersoll 



Walter Fulton Jeffers 
William Bradford Lanham, Jr. 
CHARLES Samuel Lowe 
Jacob Barry Mandel 
Howard Anthony Miller 
Carroll Blue Nash 
Rodney Andreen Olson 
Arnold Zachary Pfeffer 

PAUL ROUTZAHN POFFENBERGER 

Alfred Benjamin Raby 
Elsie May Sockrider 
Marvin Luther Speck 
Howard Livingston Stier 
Norman Richard Urquhart 
David H. Wallace 



343 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Bachelor of Science 



Walter Hamilton Armiger 

Claire Louise Boekhoff 

Anne Rosaleen Bourke 

Henry Edward Butler 

Robert Taylor Crump 

Edmond Thomas Daly 

Roy Carlton Dawson 
* Harold Moon DeVolt 

Edward James Fletcher 
Mary Washington Frazer 
John Joseph Gormley 
John William Guckeyson 
Rodney Travis Hill 
Lewis Franklin Hobbs, Jr. 
William Scott Comerer James \ 
Amiel Kirshbaum 
John Cornell Lovell 
Burton Marven McFadden 
Irving Philip Mendelsohn 



David Charles Nellis 
Robert Louis Nezbed 
William Anthony Nolte 
Ardle Patrick O'Hanlon 
Louis Francis Ortenzio 
Elizabeth Janet Oswald 
Alfred Buhr Pettit 
Price Godman Piquett 
Alton Eugene Babbitt 
Edward R. Shbgogue 

Elmer Clark Stevenson 
*Theron Lee Roy Terbush 

Virginia Eleanor Thomas 

J. Calvin Voris 

Kenneth Robert Wagaman 

Dayton 0»Lander Watkins 

Clay M. Webb, Jr. 

Aaron Waddington Welch 

Victor Gassaway Willis, Jr. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 



Helen Courtney Amiss 
Thomas Burch Athey, Jr. 
John Weldon Bell 
Brian Miller Benson 
Sophia Deborah Billig 
Charles Bittinger, Jr. 
Warren Lee Bonnett 

John Edward Boothe, Jr. 
Walter Brooks Bradley 

A. Freeborn Brown, III 
♦William Oscar Buckingham 

Reginald Burroughs, Jr. 

Mildred Frances Clements 

Bernard Aloysius Cummings 

Dorothy May Cutler 

Daniel Ries Daniel 

LuLA VoNciLE Davis 

Carmel DeMarco 

♦ Degree conferred September. 1936. 



Mark William Deskin 
LoRETTA Marie Dolan 
Harry Albert Dosch, Jr. 
John Ernest Downin 
Harley Daniel Drake, Jr. 
Edward Dresher 
William Williams Edwards 
Charles F. Ellinger 
Dorothy Elizabeth Evans 
Genevieve Everett 
Earl Weech Farr, Jr 
Hugh G. Farrell 
Isadore Fischer 
Gerald Elton Fosbroke 

ROSELLA BOWEN GengNAGEL 

DoNNiE Godwin 
Ferdinand W. Goldstein 



344 



Raymond Bernard Graeves, Jr. 
William Ralph Gray 
Robert Otto Hammerlund 
John George Hart 
John Stephen Hebb, III 
Elmer Albert Hennig 
Florence Raymond Hill 
Robert Leslie Hughes, Jr. 
Richard Morton Hunt 
Alfred Warfield Ireland, Jr. 
Gladys Virginia Johns 
Pyke Johnson, Jr. 
Doris Havens Johnston 
Marguerite Elizabeth Jones 
Francis X. Jordan 
Betty Jane Kemper 
Anna Lura Keplinger 
Alvin S. Klein 
*Theodore Clark Langley 
Melvin Courtney Lankford 
Mary Ward Lewis 
Dorothy Evelyn Lindner 
Richard A. Loeser 
Ernst Drake Lundell 
Lawrence Vincent Lutes 
Mary Frances Maccubbin 
Richard Henderson McCaffrey 
Eunice Miller 
Paul Franklin Mobus 
Charles Everett Morgan 



Robert Andrews Newman 
Georgia Anne Nordeen 
Jesse Dale Patterson 
Dorothy V. Roby 
Janet Arden Rosen 
Dorothy Esther Savage 
William Randolph Schneider 
Geraldine Jane Schuh 
Walter Kenneth Scott 
Abraham Seidenberg 
Melvin Stanley Silberg 
Maurice Benjamin Sinsheimer, Jr. 
Francis Edward Smith, Jr. 
Frank S. Smith 
Herbert Lee Smith, Jr. 
Ruth Eutelka Somerville 
Clarence Temple Thomason 
Kathryn Ellen Thompson 
Carl Edward Tuerk 
♦Miles Tawes Tull 
Virginia Lockwood Venemann 
Jerome Wasserman 
Albert Gregory Waters 
Stanley Boykin Watson 
George Wendell White, Jr. 
Iris Elizabeth Wilson 
Gordon Wood 

Elwyn Chappel Woodward 
John P. Zebelean, Jr. 
Richard Edward Zimmerman 



Bachelor of Science 



John Lawrence Avery 
Clyde Wilkinson Balch 
Lucille Kathryn Bennett 
David Peter Berman 
Francis Miles Bower 
Walter Phiup Brian 
John Louis Capalbo 
Harold S. Cole 
Edwin 0. Daue, Jr. 
Raymond Davis, Jr. 
Gordon Freiderick Dittmar 
Wayne Philip Ellis, Jr. 



Eugenia Teresa Gaczynski 
*Lex Bailey Golden 

Ray Herbert Greenfield 

Jay Leon Helfgott 

Norman Lester Hobbs 
♦Charles Bullard Hookesi 

Elizabeth Louise Hooton 

Vita R. Jaffe 

George Bernard Kelly, Jr. 

Schuyler George Kohn 

Keaciel Krulevitz 

Joseph Sidney Lann 



* Degree conferred September, 1936. 



345 



Arthur Irving Levy 
Frank Ford Loker 
Louise Catherine Marche 

JOSEFINA MARTInEZ CORTEZ 

Olin Richard Melchionna 
James McClain Osborn 
Justin Davis Paddleford 
Mortimer Pan off 
Karlton Wayne Pierce 
Frank Leo Pollack 
Leonard Posner 
Marion Ballard Richmond 
Christian F. Richter, Jr. 



T. Edgie Russell, Jr. 
♦Thomas Frederick Scheele 

Stanley Eugene Schwartz 

George Aloysius Sesso 

Leo J. Sklar 

Thomas Richard Sweeney 

Raymond Kief Thompson 
♦Albert Walter Webb 
♦Seymour Wiederught 

Jesse Lee Wilkins 

Max David Zankel 

Frederick Albert Zihlman 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



Harry Aks 
Sol Barsky 
Curtis Muse Beetham 
Bernard Robert Berkowitz 
Irving Berman 
Wilbur Darwin Burton, Jr. 
Joseph Byer 
Anthony Victor Caputo 
WiLUAM Raymond Casey 
♦Alfonse Centanni 
Albert Thomas Clewlow 
M. Rubin Colby 
Henry Davis 
Mark Orsamus Davis, Jr. 
Kenneth Forsythe Downes 
Joseph Lawrence Downs 
Richard James Eamich 
Frederick Melvin Edwards 
Louis Benjamin Finkelstein 
ISADORE Edward Fox 
Herbert Friedberg 
James Ambrose Fulmer, Jr. 
Morris Ralph Gare 
Raymond Joseph Gaudreau 
George Harold Guck 
Jesse Jerome Greenberg 
Gaetan Georges Gregoire 
John Conrad Heck 



Victor Lemoine Heuser 
Abraham Hirshorn 
Vivian Meyer Jehiel Jacobs 
Donald Beebe Booth Jones 
Peter Theodore Kanelos 
Charles Ben Kupers 
Harold Harry Lavine 
Melvin Ralph Leonard 
Harold Jack Lessow 
David Aaron Levin 
Guilford Levitas 
Bernard Melvin Lewis 
Milton Seth Lubarsky 
Simon George Markos 
BoLESLAW Walter Miksinski 
Robert Greer Miller 
Joseph Anthony Mirabella, Jr. 
Paul Boyd Moorefield 
Ernest Linwood Myers, Jr. 
Chris Anthony Nacrelli 
♦Walter Josef Nelson 
Benjamin Leonard Poster 
Gordon Scott Pugh 
Joseph Emile Ralph 
Robert Alton Reed 
Bernard Henry Reilly 
JOTHAM Gay Reynolds 
Richard Edgeworth Richardson 



Harry Ewell Riggin 
Franklin John Roh 
Irving Harvard Rosen 
Joseph Zeoli Salvatore 

Alonzo LePage Seidler 
♦Ernest Gustave Seyfert 

jack Shobin 

Maurice David Shure 

William Herman Silverstein 



William Bower Simington 
Morris David Simon 
Isaac Walter Sloan 
Darwin Robert Swinehart 
Elmer Louis Sydney 
Gilbert Yoffe 
Raymond Edward Zeiner 
Alfonce Walter Zerdy 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



Janet Trouton Anderson 
Evelyn Marguerite Bradford 
Elizabeth DeBell Brown 
Janet Louise Cartee 
Amy Mildred Cochran 
Mary Elizabeth Curran 
Anne Shmuner Dantzig 
♦Margaret Glendora Downs 
William Marshall Fatkin 
♦Leonard Sharp Griffiths 
Addie James Howard 
Ruth Kreiter 



DONALD Foster Melchior 
Dorothy Minker 
♦Anna Mary Nicht 
Edna Penman Nolan 
Eleanor Carolyn Nordeen 
Samuel J. Polack 
Isabel E. Resnitsky 
Sarah Margaret Smith 
♦Edith Louise Stiles 
Lois Lenora Talcott 
Dorcas Rosalia Teal 
Margaret Williams 



Bachelor of Science 



• Degree conferred September, 1936. 



Jean Barnsley 
John Sharpley Bayley 
Edith Ursula Bell 
Bertrand Samuel Berman 
* Helen Doty Bickmorb 
Anna Baker Bonner 
Viola Marian Buhrow 

ROSEMARY JACOB BURTNBR 
*J0HN G. Byers 

Virginia Pendleton Carpenter 

Jeanette Frances Chatham 

Sidney S. Cohen 

Mary Brandon Crisp 

Robert Edward Davis 

♦Elizabeth S. Downing 
Blanche Elizabeth Forsyth 
Helens Luve Granbery 
Harry B. Gretz 

""^Degree conferred September, 1936. 



♦Robert Creecy Henley 
Marjorie Adele Higgins 
LuciLE Virginia Laws 
Marion Lee 
Michael Lombardo 
Charles Edward Lugar 

LOIS G. MOLYNEAUX 

Angela Birmingham Murphy 
Elizabeth Margaret Norris 
♦Margaret Leona Nowell 
Harry E. Parker, Jr. 
Mary Pence 
PAUL Emil Pfeiffer 
JAMES Franklin Pusey 
Helen Bryan Ramsburg 
♦Kathryn G. Reidy 

Michael Joseph Ryan, Jr. 

Alice Jeanne Solliday 



347 



346 



Carl Gerhakd Stalfort 
John Theadore Stone 
Elsie Anne Stratmann 
OuvE Wright Sudler 
Beatrice Sugar 
Harry Roy Swanson 
LoRNA Lee Sween 



Clara Mae Tarbett 
Ella Katherine Weaver 
Edith M. Williams 
Charles Frederick Yaeger, Jr. 
Carolyn Roberta Young 
James Franklin Zimmerman 
•Charles Martin Zulick 



Bachelor of Science 
Industrial Education 



James Thomas Blackiston 
Alice Anna Ekas 
Charles Raymond Gross 
E. Kenneth Grove 



Lillian Karpa 
Julia Marguerite Neilson 
Frank Silverman 
George Philip Vogel 



John Sharpley Bayley 
Edith Ursula Bell 
Sophia Deborah Billig 
Anna Baker Bonner 
Evelyn Marguerite Bradford 
Elizabeth DbBell Brown 
Viola Marian Buhrow 

♦John G. Byers 
Jeanette Frances Chatham 
Mary Brandon Crisp 
Mary Elizabeth Curran 
Anne Shmuner Dantzig 
Dorothy Elizabeth Evans 
William Marshall Fatkin 
Martha Louise Giles 
Harry B. Gretz 

♦Robert Creecy Henley 
Marjorie Adele Higgins 

Marion W. Hughes 

Walter Fulton Jeffers 

Gladys Virginia Johns 

Ruth Kreiter 

Marion Lee 

Virginia Euzabeth Leishear 

Michael Lombardo 

Charles Edward Lugar 



Teachers' Diplomas 



Mary Frances Maccubbin 
Donald Foster Melchior 
Dorothy Minker 
Lois G. Molyneaux 
♦Anna Mary Nicht 
Elizabeth Margaret Norris 
Mary Pence 
Paul Emil Pfeiffer 
Samuel J. Polack 
James Franklin Pusey 
Isabel E. Resnitsky 
♦Edith Louise Stiles 
Elsie Anne Stratmann 
OuvE Wright Sudler 
LoRNA Lee Sween 
Lois Leonora Talcott 
Clara Mae Tarbett 
Dorcas Rosalia Teal 
Virginia Eleanor Thomas 
Virginia Lockwood Venemann 
Ella Katherine Weaver 
Margaret Wiluams 
Carolyn Roberta Young 
James Franklin Zimmerman 
Charles Martin Zulick 



• Degree conferred September, 1936. 



348 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Civil Engineer 

Ulpiano Coronel Zevallos Milton Allender Pyle 

Electrical Engineer 
Harry Warren Wells 

Bachelor of Science 



Robert Woodbury Beckham 
Herman William Berger, Jr, 
Martin Luther Brotemarkle 
Wright Gaddess Calder 
WiLLSON Carpenter Clark 
Herman Ponsford Dial 
William John Donahue, Jr. 
Harold A. Eggers 
Charles Wheeler Felton, Jr. 
Philip Firman 
Charles Shirley Furtney 
Ralph Glenn Gall 
Edward Harry Drake Gibbs 
George Edel Gilbert 
♦Joseph Montgomery Harris 
John Welden Heiss 
Houlder Hudgins 
Louis R. Hueper 
Benjamin Thomas Hynson 
Robert Austin Jackson 
Charles Francis Janes 
Harold Leon Kelly, Jr. 
William Carlton Lbasure 



Alexander Andrew Lopata 
Francis W. Ludlow 
Arthur Wilbur Mann 
Allen Marans 
William Augustus McCool 
Phiup Charlton McCurdy 
Thomas S. McDonald 
John A. McLean, Jr. 
Robert John McLeod 
Emerson D. F. Ogle 
Charles Bernard Orcutt 

♦William Appleton Pates 
Norman Parks Patterson 
Doran Stone Platt, Jr. 

♦Ellis Pollock Root 
Glen Willard Rose 
John Semple Shinn 
Francis Dodge Shoemaker 
Gilbert Earle Teal 
Wiluam S. Tibbets 
Presley Allen Wedding 
Alvin Hurd Willis 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Elizabeth Louise Benton 
Emma Louise Booth 
♦Barbara Elinor Cornell 
Bernice Anne Elus 
Mary Frances Garner 
Martha Louise Giles 
Katharine Eleanor Goll 
Edith Wagstaff Hazard 
Elizabeth Chester Jeffers 



Virginia Elizabeth Leishear 
Mary Florence Miller 
Margaret Aileen Price 
Joan Warren Rymer 
Ruth Irene Snyder 
Helen Somers 
Euzabeth Spitler 
Margaret Eleanor Starr 
Lois Elaine Stearns 



♦ Degree conferred September, 1936. 



349 



Helen Anna Stolzenbach 
Katherine Craig Volland 
Flora Edith Waldman 



Janet Stewart Weidemann 
Vivian Edith Wulf 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



tiRVING J. AppLEFELD 

Charles Edwards Athey 
James Stephen Becker 
William Francis Bender 
Joseph Gerald Bloom 
tALLEN Eugene Buzzell 
tEBERLE William Carr 

WiLUAM R. CARSCADEN 

DeWitt Forman Clarke 
Bernard Solomon Cohen 
Joseph Paul Coolahan 

tRicHARD Edmund Cullen 

tEARL Martin Dixon 
Sherley Ewing 
Milton Gerson 

tCuFFORD Holmes Graves 
Thomas Meredith Houfp 
Alfred Theodore Jacobson 

tWiLLiAM Smith James 

Maurice A, Kaplan 

Frank Bartholomew Keech 

Edward John Lipin 

Paul Tobin Maginnis 

Edward Wiegand Mattingly 

Harry Algire McFaul 



Bachelor of Laws 



Amos I. Meyers 
Charles Davis Moorb 
Francis Robert Moran 
James Cooke Morton, Jr. 
Philip John Picario 
Charles Joseph Potts 
t Gordon Gilbert Power 
John Carroll Pow^r 
James Harford Pylb 
Lee Bishop Reynolds 
tJAMEs Wilson Rouse 
John Gould Rouse, Jr. 
Edward Anthony Schaub, Jr. 
Henry Lyon Sinskey, Jr. 
Carl Frederick Stissel 
Henry Paul Struzinski 
tWiLLiAM Randolph Tucker 
J. Edward Tyler, m 
D. Merle Walker 
♦Robert Warren Warfel 
John Warhol, Jr. 
John Thomas Welsh 
Lawrence E. Wesner 
Robert Hope Williams, Jr. 



Thomas Gilbert Abbott 
R. Stanley Bank 
Ernest Barnett 
Eugene Sydney Bereston 
Leonard Brill 
Lester Leon Burtnick 



Certificate of Proficiency 

Anthony Joseph Mraz 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
I>octor of Medicine 



tW^h^honor!''''^ September. 1936. 



Carl Edwin Carlson 
J. R. Casanova Diaz 
Roland Arnold Christensen 
Joseph Michael Cocimano 
Stuart Gray Coughlan 
Louis Eugene Daily 



850 



Charles Magno D'Alessio 

Thomas Vincent D*Amico 

Eli Davidson 

Neshon Edward Deradorian 

Everett Schnepfe Diggs 

William Monroe Eisner 

Emanuel Simon Eluson 

Helen Robinson Ensor 

Philip Michael Feldman 

John Hannon Finn 

Isaac Phillips Frohman 

Sidney Richard Gehlert, Jr. 

John Lawrence Gillespie 

Herbert Goffin 

Sigmund Goldberg 

WiLUAM Cecil Gordon 

Robert Joseph Gore 

Elvin Edward Gottdiener 

Frank Greenwald 

Charles Solomon Hahn 

Grover Cleveland Hedrick, Jr. 

Benjamin Highstein 

Leo Hochfeld 

Eugene Welch Hodgson 

Charles Wilbur Hoffman, Jr. 

William Coolidge Humphries 

Samuel Jackson 

Alan Jacobson 

Clarence Frederick Johnston, 

James Porter Jones 

James Earl Kadan 

Gordon Arthur Kagen 

D. Frank Olewiler Kaltreider, 

ISADORE Kaplan 

Jack Allen Kaplan 

Nathan Kaplan 

Albert Herbert Katz 

Isadore Katz 

Irvin Bernard Kemick 

Irvin Philip Klemkowski 

Lester Norman Kolman 

Mitchell Frank Kunkowski 

Louis Woron Leskin 

Leonard Warren Levine 

Leonard Jules Levinson 



Elmer George Linhardt 

Ephraim Theodore Lisansky 

William Broughton Long, Jr. 

Chester James Lubinski 

Stephen Casimir Mackowiak 

Frank Vincent Manieri 

Irene Thelma Marino 

Otto George Matheke, Jr. 

Milton Joseph Meyer 

Edwin Stephen Muller 

Joseph Ennalls Muse 

Philip Myers 

Maurice Nataro 

Richard Spurgeon Owens, Jr. 

Isidore Earl Pass 

August Constantine Pavlatos 

Lawrence Perlman 

Pasquale Humbert Piccolo 

Frederick Phillip Pokrass 

Elton Resnick 

Samuel Thompson Redgrave 
Revell, Jr. 

Henry Lewis Rigdon 

Isadore Morris Robins 

Martin Herman Robinson 

Reuben Rochkind 

Ephraim Roseman 

Morris Rubin 
Jr. Gilbert Elmore Rudman 

John Paul Sakowski 

Norman Ellis Sartorius, Jr. 

Clarence Parke Scarborough, Jr. 
Jr. Jacob Edward Schmidt 

John King Beck Emory Seegar, Jr. 

Joshua Seidel 

Milton C. F. Semoff 

Sydney Sewall 

Abraham Albert Shapiro 

Meyer Robert Shear 

Morton Marvin Spielman 

Manuel Stapen 

Bernhardt Joseph Statman 
♦Joseph Louis Stecher 

Albert Steiner 

Thomas John Sullivan 



* Degree conferred September, 1936. 



351 



Mason Trupp 
♦George Louis Vieweg, Jr. 
George Jones Weems 
Henry Wolfe Weiss 
Frank Dixon Whitworth 
Mabel Giddings Wilkin 



Richard Jones Wiluams 
Robert Roderic Williams 
Eldridge Henry Wolff 
Jack Henry Woodrow 
Frank Anthony Zack 
Israel Zeligman 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Graduate 

Mary Virginia Banes 

Wanda Delphine Bosley 

Catherine Elizabeth Carpenter 

Sarah Cornelius 

Mildred Elisbeth Cramer 

Esther Mary Dallmus 

Naomi Grace Hersh 

Mina Geraldine Hooe 

Marjorie Lucile Kautz 

Mary Kluka 

Sallie Frances Knight 

Edith Evelyn Lewis 

Evelyn Lucille Mattson 

Muriel Hill McArthur 

Louise Manning Move 

Beatrice Patricia O'Connor 

Willye Frances Parks 

Rose Pennington 



in Nursing 

Beatrice Lorraine Pilgrim 
Lena Winifred Quarterman 
Carolyn Roberta Rayme 
Mary Laurie Rudisill 
Frances Virginia Sappington 
Dusetta Elizabeth Scarborough 
Charlotte Eileen Shaffer 
Evelyn Freelove Sherrill 
Mary Imogene Skinner 
Jane Isabelle Suck 
Eleanor Frances Stauffer 
Rose Elizabeth Strickland 
Edna Earl Sutton 
Dorothy Merle Toom 
Margaret Catherine Turner 
Helen Kathryn Wagner 
Mabyl Jane Wilson 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Benjamin Frank Allen 
Morris Joshua Alliker 
Reuben Robert Alperstein 
Sylvan E. Beck 
Abraham Bliden 
Richard C. Brune 
Jerome Jerry Cermak 
Hershel Cohen 
Samuel Damico 
Leroy Oldham Dawson 

♦William Anthony Dodd 

♦Arnold H. Eichert 
Sylvan Philip Einbinder 
Albert Abraham Ellerin 



Harry Enten 

Julius Walter Feret 

Herman Jesse Fish 
♦Samuel Louis Fox 

Charles Steele Friedman 

Shirley M. Glickman 

William Melvin Hanna 

Sylvan Allan Hoffman 
♦Francis Joseph Januszeski 

Feux H. Kaminski 

Jerome Jay Karpa 

Elmer Robert Kellough, Jr. 
♦Benjamin Bernard Laken 

Abraham Maurice Levy 



♦ Degree conferred September, 1936. 



352 



Frank Ferdinand Levy 

A. M. Libowitz 

Frank Joseph Lieb 

Alexander M. Mayer 

Francis Rowland McGinity 

Henry Merkel 

Milton Miller 
Solomon Miller 
Charles Mindell 
Emma Louise Morgenstern 
Gordon Anthony Mouat 
Leo Milton Musacchio 
IRVIN Louis Myers 
John Frederick Neutze 
Frank Lewis Purdum 
Irving Wolf Rabinowitz 
Leonard Rapoport 
John Anthony Raudonis 
Israel Aaron Rosenfeld 



Edward Vincent Rutkowski 
Daniel Anthony Santoni 
Edward I. Sapperstein 

ISADORE SBOROFSKY 

Melvin Gerald Scherr 
Frederick Albert Schumm 
William Walter Seechuk 
Gerald Melvin Semer 
Irvin Israel Silverman 
Sylvan Tompakov 
Millard Tolson Traband, Jr. 
Albert Frankun Turner, Jr. 
♦John Peter Urlock, Jr. 
WiNFiELD Alexander Walb 

Theodore John Wasilewski 

David Weiner 

Ruth R. Weisberg 

Solomon Winn 

Bernard Leon Zenitz 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES, 1936-37 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 



Janet Trouton Anderson 
John Weldon Bell 
Elizabeth Louise Benton 
Francis Miles Bower 
Viola Marian Buhrow 
WiLLSON Carpenter Clark 
Chester Arthur Davis 
LULA Voncile Davis 

Lea Kathryn Engel 

Genevieve Everett 

Gerald Elton Fosbroke 

DoNNiE Godwin 

John George Hart 

Robert Austin Jackson 

Vita R. Jaffe 

Charles Francis Janes 

Alexander Andrew Lopata 

Allen Marans 



William Augustus McCool 
Robert John McLeod 
Donald Foster Melchior 
Robert Andrews Newman 
Isabel E. Resnitsky 
RoBB Vernon Rice 
Janet Arden Rosen 

Geraldine Jane Schuh 

Stanley Eugene Schwartz 

Abraham Seidenberg 

Elizabeth Spitler 

Edwin Greenwood Stimpson 

LORNA Lee Sween 

Clara Mae Tarbett 

Katherine Craig Volland 

Flora Edith Waldman 

Alvin Hurd Willis 

Richard Edward Zimmerman 



Elected Members of Sigma Xi, Honorary Scientific Fraternity 

EARL Jennings Anderson John Edgar Faber, Jr. 

CHARLES JELLEFF CARR ^^'"'^'^.^''TrROVP 

GUSTAV EDWARD CWALINA D0NAU> COOPER GROVE 



* Degree conferred September, 1936. 



353 



Oliver Glenn Harne 
William James Hart 
David Fairchild Houston 
Frank Lee Howard 
William Howard Hunt 
Robert Anthony Littleford 



George Francis Madigan 

ViRDELL EVERARD MuNSEY 

Paul Andrew Parent 
RoBB Vernon Rice 
Edgar Bennett Starkey 
Edwin Greenwood Stimpson 



The Terrapin Medals 



Paul Smith Wise 



Dorothy Merriam Hobbs 



Citizenship Medal, Offered by Dr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

John William Guckeyson 

Citizenship Prize, Offered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 

Flora Edith Waldman 

Athletic Medal, Offered by the Class of 1908 

John Joseph Gormley 

Maryland Ring, Offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
John William Guckeyson 

Goddard Medal, Offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

Charles Francis Janes 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 

Mary Elizabeth Harrover 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 
Lydia MacMullen Evans 

Medal and Junior Membership, Offered bp the American Institute 

of Chemists 

Francis Miles Bower 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal, Offered by Benjamin Berman 

Thomas Parker Wharton 

Mortar Board Cup 
Lula Voncile Davis 

The Diamond Back Medals 

Carlisle Hubbard Humelsine janet Stewart Weideman 

Jesse Dale Patterson Robert Elwood Baker 

Christine Kempton 



Pyke Johnson, Jr. 



William Jameson McWilliams 



The Old Line Medals 



Norman Parks Patterson 



Helen Somers 



Governor's Drill Cup 

Company C, Commanded by Cadet Captain Irving Philip Mendelsohn 

Reserve Officers* Association Award 

Cadet Captain Irving Philip Mendelsohn 

Military Medal, Offered by the Class of 1899 

Cadet Francis Zalesak 

Alumni Military Cup 

Second Platoon, Company A, Commanded by 
Cadet First Lieutenant Norman Parks Patterson 

The Scabbard and Blade Award, to the Commander of the Winning Platoon 

Cadet First Lieutenant Norman Parks Patterson 

Squad Competition Gold Medals 

Cadet Corporal Harvey Wilson Kreuzberg, Jr. 

Cadet William Bryan Rowe, Jr. 

Cadet Robert Wiluam Farkas 

Cadet Robert August Brand, Jr. 

Cadet Thomas Ludlow Coleman 

Cadet Lawrence John Mattingly 

Cadet Richard Westley Carroll 

Cadet George Carlton Remsberg, Jr. 

William Randolph Hearst Rifle Match Medals 

Cadet Raymond Davis, Jr. Cadet Warren Pruden Davis 

Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen Cadet Robert Lee Mattingly 

Cadet Aaron Waddington Welch 

National Society of Pershing Rifles Medals 

Cadet Thomas Wise Riley, Gold Medal 

Cadet John Gekler Reckord, Silver Medal 

Cadet William Henry McManus, Jr., Bronze Medal 



a54 



355 



WAR DEPARTMENT AWARDS OF COMMISSIONS 
AS SECOND UEUTENANTS 

The Infantry Reserve Corps 



Albert Paul Backhaus 
Herman Wiluam Berger, Jr. 
John Edward Boothe, Jr. 
Francis Miles Bower 
Martin Luther Brotemarkle 
Wright Gaddess Calder 
WiLLSON Carpenter Clark 
Charles Harvey Cooke 
Charles Hersey Culp 
Raymond Davis, Jr. 
Herman Ponsford Dial 
Harry Albert Dosch, Jr. 
Philip Firmin 
Edward James Fletcher 
Charles Shirley Furtney 
John Joseph Gormley 
Raymond Bernard Graeves, Jr. 
Robert Otto Hammerlund 
Thomas Daniel Harryman 
John George Hart 
Elmer Albert Hen nig 
Norman Lester Hobbs 
Carusle Hubbard Humelsine 
Alfred Warfield Ireland, Jr. 



Robert Wellington Jones 

George Bernard Kelly, Jr. 

Harold Leon Kelly, Jr. 

Joseph Sidney Lann 

Robert John McLeod 

Irving Philip Mendelsohn 

Charles Everett Morgan 

Eugene Frederick Mueller, Jr. 

Justin Davis Paddleford 

Jesse Dale Patterson 

Norman Parks Patterson 

Alfred Buhr Pettit 

Paul Emil Pfeiffer 

Karlton Wayne Pierce 

James Wilmer Price, Jr. 

Alfred Everett Savage 

Walter Kenneth Scott 

John Semple Shinn 

Maurice Benjamin Sinsheimer, Jr. 

Clarence Temple Thomason 

Clay M. Webb, Jr. 

Aaron Waddington Welch 

Samuel Gordon Wood 

Max David Zankel 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors — Henry Edward Butler, Aaron Waddington Welch, 

Clay M. Webb, Jr., Alfred Buhr Pettit. 

Second Honors — J. Calvin Voris, Anne Rosaleen Bourke, David Charles 

Nellis. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

First Honors — Lula Voncile Davis, Abraham Seidenberg, Geraldine 

Jane Schuh, Genevieve Everett, John Weldon Bell, 
Francis Miles Bower, Donnie Godwin, Vita R. Jaffe, 
Richard Edward Zimmerman, Stanley Eugene 
Schwartz, John George Hart, Janet Arden Rosen, 
Gerald Elton Fosbroke, Mortimer Panoff. 



356 



Second Honors— Robert Andrews Newman, Pyke Johnson, Jr., Joseph 

Sidney Lann, David Peter Berman, Richard A. Loeser, 
Harold S. Cole, Jesse Dale Patterson, William Ralph 
Gray, Elmer Albert Hennig, Charles Everett Morgan, 
Jerome Wasserman, Schuyler George Kohn, Isadore 
Fischer, Mildred Frances Clements. 



First Honors- 



Second Honors- 



College of Education 

-Janet Trouton Anderson, Clara Mae Tarbett, Donald 
Foster Melchior, Isabel E. Resnitsky, Viola Marian 
BuHROw, Lorna Lee Sween. 

-Lois G. Molyneaux, Samuel J. Polack, Margaret 
Williams, Edith M. Williams, Elsie Anne Stratmann, 
Evelyn Marguerite Bradford, Angela Birmingham 
Murphy. 

College of Engineering 

First Honors — Robert Austin Jackson, William Augustus McCool, 

Axjexander Andrew Lopata, Allen Marans. 

Second Honors — Charles Francis Janes, Robert John McLeod, Alvin 

HuRD Willis, Willson Carpenter Clark. 



First Honors- 
Second Honors- 



College of Home Economics 

-Elizabeth Spitler, Flora Edith Waldman. 
-Katherine Craig Volland, Elizabeth Louise Benton. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Darwin Robert Swinehart 



Certificates of Honor 



Albert Thomas Clewlow 
Richard Edgeworth Richardson 



Henry Davis 
Alfonce Walter Zerdy 



Alonzo LePage Seidler 

School of Law 

Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire Course, 

Day School 
Allen Eugene Buzzell 

Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire Course, 

Evening School 
Clifford Holmes Graves 

357 



Alumni Prize of $50.00 for Best Argument in Honor Case in 

the Practice Court 

James Cooke Morton, Jr. 

» 

Greorge O. Blome Prizes to Representatives on Honor Case in 

the Practice Court 



Eberle William Carr 
Earl Martin Dixon 



Clifford Holmes Graves 
James Cooke Morton, Jr. 



School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 
William Broughton Long, Jr. 



Certificates of Honor 



Morris Rubin 

Morton Marvin Spielman 



R. Stanley Bank 
Mabel Giddings Wilkin 



Jacob Edward Schmidt 



The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the Best Work 
in Genito-Urinary Surgery during the Senior Year 

Mason Trupp 

School of Nursing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship, Given by the University of Maryland 

Nurses' Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in Administration, 

Supervisory, or Public Health Work at Teachers College, 

Columbia University, to the Student Having 

the Highest Average in Scholarship 

Jane Isabelle Slick 

The Elizabeth Collins Lee Prize to the Student Having 
the Second Highest Average in Scholarship 

Mina Geraldine Hooe 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize for the 
Highest Average in Executive Ability 

Naomi Grace Hersh 

The Edwin and Leander M. Zimmerman Prize for Practical Nursing and for 
Displaying the Greatest Interest and Sympathy for the Patients 

Mina Geraldine Hooe 



358 



The University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association Pin, and Member- 
ship in the Association, for Practical Nursing and Executive Ability 

Eleanor Frances Stauffer 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence 
Bernard Leon Zenitz 

The William Simon Memorial Prize for Proficiency in Practical Chemistry 

Leonard Rapoport 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

Frank Joseph Lieb 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

Bernard Leon Zenitz 



Leonard Rapoport 



Certificates of Honor 
Frank Joseph Lieb 



Sylvan E. Beck 



859 



REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 

TRAINING CORPS, 1937-1938 

COLONEL BENJAMIN C. McCLESKEY, Commanding 
LIEUTENANT COLONEL ROBERT L. WALTON, Second-in-Command 
CAPTAIN JOSEPH P. HAIMOVICZ, Regimental Training and Liaison Officer 
CAPTAIN ROBERT E. BAKER, Regimental Adjutant 

FIRST BATTALION 

MAJOR GEORGE A. BOWMAN, Commanding 

SECOND LIEUTENANT ALVIN B. PECK, Battalion Adjutant 



NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 



COMPANY "A" 

Captain Ralph A. Collins 
Ist Lieut. John R. Browning 
2nd Lieut. Ralph R. 
Ravenberg 



COMPANY "B" 

Captain Samuel W. Reeves, 

III. 
2nd Lieut. John C. Lynham 
2nd Lieut. Herbert W. Baker 



««r«»» 



COMPANY "C 

Captain Charles L. Downey 
2nd Lieut. Frank T. DeArmey 
2nd Lieut. John J. Egan 



SECOND BATTALION 

MAJOR BENJAMIN B. SHEWBRIDGE. Commanding 
SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN E. MOORE, Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY **D" 

Captain Raymond S. Put- 
man 
1st Lieut. Harold W. Smith 
2nd Lieut. Henry T. Con- 
verse 



COMPANY "E" 

Captain Frederick M. 

Bishoff 
2nd Lieut. Paul R. PeflFer 
2nd Lieut. Perry I. Hay 



THIRD BATTALION 



COMPANY "F" 

Captain Robert L, Mattingly 
2nd Lieut. Ross W. Shearer 
2nd Lieut. John S. Jacobs 



MAJOR D. BRUCE McFADDEN, Commanding 
♦FIRST SERGEANT WARREN P. DAVIS, Acting Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY "G" 

Captain John L. Schutz 
2nd Lieut. James B. Berry 
2nd Lieut. Joseph E. Keller 



COMPANY "H" 

Captain William C. Bryant 
2nd Lieut. Charles C. 

Heaton 
2nd Lieut. Robert B. Barnett 



FOURTH BATTALION 



««¥»♦ 



COMPANY "I 

Captain Ralph W. Keller 
2nd Lieut. Fred D. Sisler 
2nd Lieut. Donald R. Rich- 
ardson 



MAJOR KENNETH G. BELT, Commanding 
♦FIRST SERGEANT JAMES M. LANIGAN, Acting Battalion Adjutant 



COMPANY "K" 

Captain William J. Mc- 

Williams 
1st Lieut. Warren D. Hughes 
2nd Lieut. Edwin D. Long 



COMPANY "L" 

Captain H. Malcolm Owens 
1st Lieut. Charles H. Pierce 
2nd Lieut. John F. Wolf 



COMPANY "M" 

Captain William B. Mullett 
1st Lieut. Clay W. Shaw 
2nd Lieut. Leon R. Yourtee 



CADET BAND 

♦FIRST SERGEANT WALTER L. MILLER 



COMPANY "A' 



John A. Farrall 



Ned H. Oakley 
Lewis N. Tarbett 



Sigmund Gerber 



COMPANY "D" 

Harvey W. Kreuzberg 



Elies Elvove 
Fred T. Bishopp 



«tr"* 



COMPANY "G 

John W. Stevens 
William F. Howard 

John J. Gude 



««if f» 



COMPANY "K 



Francis J. Zalesak 



William B. Davis 
Robert J. O'Neill 



Richard E. Kern 



FIRST BATTALION 
COMPANY "B** 

First Sergeants 
John G. Freudenberger 

Platoon Sergeants 

John J. DeArmey 
Fred A. Soule 

Sergeant Guides 

Robert E. Krafft 
James W. Ireland 
Robert L. Hart 

SECOND BATTALION 

COMPANY "E" 

First Sergeants 

Robert Gottlieb 

Platoon Sergeants 

Harold H. Essex 
Fred H. Denney 

Sergeant Guides 
Frank H. Cronin 

THIRD BATTALION 
COMPANY "H" 

First Sergeants 

Don P. Strausbaugh 

Platoon Sergeants 

Fred W. Perkins 
Chas. W. Weidinger 

Sergeant Guides 



FOURTH BATTALION 

COMPANY "L" 

First Sergeants 
Benjamin Alperstein 

Platoon Sergeants 

Eliott B. Robertson 
Thomas J. Capossela 

Sergeant Guides 

Luther E. Mellen 



«tr«»» 



COMPANY "C 



Byron L. Carpenter 



John H. Beers 
Van S. Ashmun 



COMPANY "F" 

Lewis A. Jones 



Herman P. Hall 
Cecil L. Harvey 



Thomas L. Wilson 
COMPANY "I" 

Elgin W. Scott 
George D. Allen 

Sidney S. Stabler 

COMPANY "M" 

Frederic M. Hewitt 



George E. Secley 
William B. Yates 



Band under the direction of Master Sergeant Otto Siebenelchen, Retired, formerly with 
the Army Band. Washington Barracks. Washington, D. C. 



♦Non-Commissioned Officers. 



360 



861 



Register of Students, 1937-1938 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SENIOR 

Baynes, William C, Washington, D. C. 

Bialek, Lillian, Washington, D. C. 

Bowie, Oden, Mitchellville 

Buchholz, James H., Catonsville 

Caplan, Raphael F., Millers 

Carter, Henry H., Rockville 

Carver, Ann E., Perryville 

Clark, Ralph E., Dundalk 

Connelly, John V., Hartford, Conn. 

Converse, Henry T., Jr., Beltsville 

Devakul, Debriddhi, Baugkok, Siam 
Downey, Charles L., Williamsport 
Fisher, Elwood G., Washington, D. C. 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington, D. C. 

Garletts, Merle A., Selbysport 
Gayhart, Harold E., Beltsville 
Gibbs, William E., Hyattsville 
Gilbertson, Warren H., Bladensburg 
Goldsmith, John S., Allen 
Gottwals, Abram Z., Goldsboro 
Grodjesk, Bern ice, Jersey City, N. J. 
Guill, John H., Jr., Takoma Park 
Haynes, Anne M., Trenton, Tenn. 
Haynes, Sally T., Trenton, Tenn. 
Henkin, Allen E., Washington, D. C. 



CLASS 

Johnston. Fred A., Takoma Park 

Keller, Charles E.. Middletown 

Kuhn. Albin O., Woodbine 

Leighty, Raymond V., Arlington, Va. 

Lewis, Glen W., Lantz 

Lung, Ernest H., Smithsbure 

Marche, William T.. Hyattsville 

Price, James W., Jr., Catonsville 

Ravenburg, Ralph R.. Edgewater 

Ruble, Kyle, Poolesville 

Schutz, J. Logan, Washington. D. C. 

Seabold, G. William, Jr., Glyndon 

Shaffer, Charles H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Shaw, Clay W., Stewartstown, Pa. 

Sisler, Fred D.. Washington, D. C. 

Skinner, Calvin L., Sudlersville 

Smith, Harold W., Baltimore 

Steiner, Wilmer W., Washington, D. C. 

Stoddard, David L.. Hyattsville 

Wall, Dorothy S., Catonsville 

Williams, Donald H., Washington, D. C. 

Wintermoyer, J. Paul. Hagerstown 

Wise, S. Betty, Relay 

Yeager, Sara A., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Astle, Charles C, Rising Sun 

Brown, Allan H., University Park 

Brownell, James F., Washington, D. C. 

Burnet, James H., Charlottesville, Va. 

Cohen, Charlotte F., E. Orange, N. J. 

Crane, Julian C, College Heights 

DeCecco, James N., Vienna 

Eck, Clarence A., Overlea 

Faith, Lawrence S., Hancock 

Galbreath, Paul M., Street 

Gupton, Ewing L., Berwyn 

Harris, George J., Lonaconing 

Hepburn, Edward W., Worton 

Heubeck, Elmer, Jr., Baltimore 
Hite, Norbome A., Port Deposit 
Jarrell, William E., Ridgely 
Johnson, Edwin R., Germantown 
Jones, Kenneth F., Newport, Del. 
Kramer, Amihud, Baltimore 
Lapidus, Stanley I., Baltimore 
Lowe, Laban R., Pylesville 
Lynt, Richard K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Oscar C, Jr., Rockville 
Matthews, Harry B., Jr., Salisbury 
McFarland, Frank R., Jr., Cumberland 
Miller, Lee A., Hyattsville 



Miller, Thomas E., Washington, D. C. 
Muma. Martin H., Cumberland 
Nicholls, Robert D.. Boyds 
Pailthorp, Robert W., Takoma Park 
Peaslee, Joseph K.. Washington, D. C. 
Phillips, Clarence W., Princess Anne 
Potter, Lloyd A.. Bethesda 
Remsberg, George C, Jr.. Middletown 
Schmier, Charles N.. Woodlawn 
Secrest, John P., Brentwood 
Shearer, Ross W., College Park 
Shoemaker, Robert A., Woodbine 
Steinberger. Janet I., Baltimore 
Stevenson, Frank V., Takoma Park 
Sutton, Richard S., Kennedyville 
Talcott, Ellen E., Washington, D. C. 
Ward, Stevenson A., Havre de Grace 
Weber, N. Bond, Oakland 
Wheatley, Marion L., Vienna 
Willingham, Patricia M., Hyattsville . 
Winkler, Fred B., Chevy Chase 
Witt, Detlef J.. Anacostia, D. C. 
Wood, E. Wade. Washington, D. C. 
Wood, Edward P., College Park 
Yates, William B., Cambridge 



362 



SOPHOMORE 

Ahalt, Louis F., Middletown 

Aist, Wilmer F., Jessup 

Baker, Alva S., Catonsville 

Beneze, George C, Annapolis 

Biron, Bobbie, Salisbury 

Bothe, Henry C, Baltimore 

Brinckerhoff, Mary L., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Brosius, John W., Jr., Adamstown 

Butler, Walter M., Jr., Poolesville 

Cotterman, Harold F., College Park 

Crist, Howard G., Jr., Glenelg 

Daugherty, Eklward B., Jr., Delmar 

Davis, George H., Berlin 

Davis, Virginia E., Washington, D. C. 

Edmonds, Charles S., Clements 

Ermold, John G., Ellicott City 

Fitzwater, E. Wayne, Swanton 

Forsyth, Carroll M., Friendsville 

Foster, Vernon R., Parkton 

Fullington, Page D., Washington, D. C. 

Gatch, Benton R., Baltimore 

Gude, John J., Hyattsville 

Hauver, Roland T., Myersville 

Hess, Kenneth S., Washington, D. C. 

Huffer, Sarah V., Boonsboro 

James, Lynwood B., Chevy Chase 

Jajies, William N., Oxon Hill 

Jehle, John R., Hyattsville 

Kefauver, Fred S., Middletown 

Keller, J. Hugh, Middletown 

Kilby, Wilson W., Conowingo 

Kluge, Gordon L., Washington, D. C. 

Koontz, Robert K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Ladson, Marcia, Rockville 

Lee, Whiting B., Hyattsville 

Leise, Joshua M., Washington, D. C. 



CLASS 

Lichliter, Lawrence D., Washington, D. C. 

Lips, Robert W., Baltimore 

Lipsitz, Benjamin, Baltimore 

MacLeod, Mary F., Washington, D. C. 

McGregor, James A. Worton 

Meade, DeVoe K., Hyattsville 

Menke, Margaret C, Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Alan R., Washington, D. C. 

Morris, Joseph B., Port Deposit 

Nevares, Oscar W., Baltimore 

Oakley, Ned H., Washington, D. C. 

Phelps, R. Nelson, McDonogh 

Pohlhaus, Joseph N., Baltimore 

Punnett, Ruth S., Leonia, N. J. 

Redding, William V., Street 

Rice, Floyd E., Takoma Park 

Robbins, Maclntyre C, Washington, D. C. 

Rudy, Arthur M., Middletown 

Ryan, Hilda H., Washington, D. C. 

Saperstein, Paul, Baltimore 

Sheibley, David F., Newport, Pa. 

Stabler, Virginia N., Ashton 

Stevens, Robert L., Street 

Stouffer, Frances J., Berwyn 

Sturchio, Lawrence E., Newark, N. J. 

Swann, A. Hope, Leonardtown 

Talbott, Dorothy E., Clarksville 

Tarbett, Lewis N., Takoma Park 

Taylor, Frank W., Ridgely 

Waite, Maiden D., Odenton 

Wallace, John A., Bethesda 

Wardman, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 

Whitall, Sarah O. M., Crownsville 

Winter, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 

Zimmerman, Robert E., Ellicott Cfty 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Anderson, Harry W., Washington, D. C. 

Astle, Norris C, Rising Sun 

Bailey, Howard M., Parkton 

Barber, Charles A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Bast, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 

Beattie, James M., Beltsville 

Bierer, Donald S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bollinger, Nevin C, Hyattsville 

Bosley, Glenn M., Sparks 

Boyle, James F., Washington, D. C. 

Brooks, Philip M., Chestertown 

Burall, Jesse E., Baltimore 

Burkom, Philip, Baltimore 

Burton, Ralph V., Baltimore 

Cabrera, Rafael L., Washington, D. C. 

Calhoun, John K., Westminster 

Calver, Georgianna E., North Beach 

Carl, Edmund O., Washington, D. C. 

Cawley, Wilbert H., Denton 

Chance. Charles M., Grasonville 



Clark, George E., Jr., Havre de Grace 
Clendaniel, Charles E., Jr., Stewartstown, 

Pa. 
Cohen, Abraham, Washington, D. C. 
Crist, I.,ee S., Glenelg 
Ciniikshank, Thomas C, Galena 
Custis, John K., Washington, D. C. 
deAlba, Jorge, Washington, D. C. 
Detorie, Francis J., Washington, D. C. 
DiGuilian, Charles A., Hillside 
Dodge, Harry P., Takoma Park 
Donn, Marian S., Hollywood 
Dowling, Vernon L., Annapolis 
Doying, Will B., Washington, D. C. 
Elkins, William S., Silver Spring 
Ernst, Chester G., Clear Spring 
Eyler, Laura H., Baltimore 
Firmin, William E., Washington, D. C. 
Forbes, Ian, Washington, D. C. 



363 



Garrett, John G., Baltimore 

Gladfelter, Armand L.. Seven Valleys. Pa. 

Gordon, Jack L„ Riverdale 

Gunnell, John F., Takoma Park 

Hall, Bruce M., College Park 

Harbaugh, Mildred B., Bagley 

Harcum, Eduard W., Mardela 

Harwood, Elliott B., Baltimore 

Hastings, Joseph W., Cambridge 

Hoflfman, Frank H., Edmonston 

Hollis, Marvin F., Denton 

Hoshall, George W.. Parkton 

Husted, James V., Silver Spring 

Jackson, Harry H., Brentwood 

Jacques. Samuel A., Smithsburg 

Jerome, Wayne B., Hancock 

Johnson, David O., Takoma Park 

Jones, Bradley H., Sharon 

Keeler, John. Washington. D. C. 

Kelly, David C. Fort Meade 

Kenney. Francis V.. Chevy Chase 

Kolb. Robert W., Baltimore 

Krause. Eugene F., Gambrills 

Krause, Robert M., Gambrills 

Leister. Richard A., Washington, D. C. 

Levy, Stanley, Baltimore 

Libeau, Clayton P., Manassas, Va. 

Linsley, Herbert C, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Marshall, Donald P., Berlin 

Marshall, Earla B., HyattsviUe 

Martin, Calvin S., Rockville 

Mason, Joseph L., Chevy Chase 

McCann, David R., Silver Spring 

Merritt, Joseph S., Jr., Dundalk 

Meyer. Robert C, Baltimore 

Miller, Harry G., Anacostia. D. C. 

Miller, Norman A., Jr.. HyattsviUe 

Miller Robert J., Baltimore 

Miller, Vernon H., Laurel 

Miller. William R., Washington. D. C. 

Moore. Stanley W.. Sandy Spring 

Mullady. John T.. Washington. D. C. 

Myers. John W. H., Baltimore 
Nicholson, Clark O.. Dickerson 
Nordeen, Carl E., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Oursler, Charles G.. Spencersville 



Pelczar. Henry W., Stemmers Run 
Pinkerton, William F., Halethorpe 
Porter, Bettie V., Silver Spring 
Rappleye. Robert D., Washington. D. C. 

Rea, William, Washington, D. C. 

Read. William A., Silver Spring 

Reed, Walter F., Dundalk 

Rehberger. Edward A,. Jr., Baltimore 

Reiblich, Karl F., Woodlawn 

Reid. John T., Siebert 

Reid, Richard S., Kensington 

Rice. Dorothy T., Baltimore 

Ritzenberg, Albert, Washington. D. C. 

Roby, Thomas O., Silver Spring 

Ryan, John J., Ednor 

Sanner, Staley V.. Frederick 

Schaffer, Joseph D.. Laurel 

Scherer. Charles R., Towson 

Schilling. John M., Baltimore 

Scoville. Raymond M.. Silver Spring 

Shelton. Emma, Chevy Chase 
Simonds, Warren O., Riverdale 
Skinner, James H., Barclay 
Smith, Donald F., Chevy Chase 
Smith, Wilson L.. Jr., Stevenson 
Stalcup. Robert E.. Brentwood 
Stiles, Frank C., Rockville 
Suit, William J., Washington, D. C. 
Treakle, Hugh C, Street 
Vogt, George B., Catonsville 
Waite, Alan K.. College Park 
Wannan. Charies W.. Jr.. Washington. 
D. C. 

Warfield. Bernard D.. Jr.. Woodbine 
Waters, Perrie W., Rockville 
Watkins. Charles B.. Baltimore 
Watson, William W., Catonsville 
Weber, Jack E., Oakland 
Wehrle, John S., Altoona, Pa. 
Weiss, Boyd F., Jr.. Stroudsburg, Pa 
Weyrich. William H.. Jr.. Washington. 
D. C. 

Whiteford, William G., Baltimore 
Wyvell, Janet E., Washington. D. C. 
Zentz. Monroe H., University Park 



Bigoness. Laura M., Landover 

Brandt. Karl W.. College Park 

Brown, James S., Grand Harbour, N. B.. 

Canada 
Camie, Elinore W.. Alexandria, Va. 
Cohill. Benjamin M.. Hancock 
Conrad. Jean L.. Annapolis 
Cunningham. Ruth J.. Cambridge 
Fugitt. Donald J.. Washington. D. C. 
Gleckler, Norman L.. Riverdale 



PART TIME 



Gordon, Thomas W.. Baltimore 

Ingalls, Boyd, Washington, D. C. 

Lewald. Ella M. T.. Laurel 

Posey, Walter B., Upper Mariboro 

Reed, James M., Silver Spring 

Selby, Rosemary B., Bethesda 

Wells, Julian W., Beltsville 

Wilcox, Marguerite S., Washington. D. C. 

Zabel, John F.. Washington, D. C. 



364 



Bruns, Lawrence A., Relay 
Katsura, Saburo, Washington, D. C. 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Newman. Ernest H., Beaver Heights 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



SENIOR CLASS 



Ackerman, Julius E., Baltimore 
Atkin, Maurice D.. Washington, D. C. 
Baker. Herbert W.. Edgemont 
Baker. Robert E.. Washington. D. C. 
Barnett, Robert E., Washington. D. C. 
Beebe, Charles H.. College Park 
Behm. Carl, Baltimore 
Belt. Kenneth G., Washington, D. C. 
Benton. Charles L.. Jr., Linthicum Heights 
Berry. James B., Jr., Bennings. D. C. 
Binswanger, Charles A., Baltimore 
Boyer, Roswell R., College Park 
Brigham. David L.. Ashton 
Bredekamp, Marriott W.. Washington, 

D. C. 
Brodsky, Alex E., Baltimore 
Brown. Thomas C, Havre de Grace 
Burton, Robert J., Cumberland 
Carrico, Norman. Cumberland 
Cayton, William I.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cohen, Gertrude C, Passaic, N. J. 
Cooke, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 
Cooley, Eleanor G., Berwyn 
Corridon, Jack R., Washington, D. C. 
Coster, William F.. Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Crastnopol, Philip, Newark, N. J. 
Creamer, Robert M., Baltimore 
Donohue, Mildred D., Baltimore 
Dow, Mary F., Amarillo, Texas 
Epstein. Edwin. Centreville 
Ernest. Lois E.. Kensington 
Evans, Frank D., Chevy Chase 
Friedman, Marion. Baltimore 
Greer. Margaret A., Bel Air 
Gunther, Francis J., Washington. D. C. 
Haimovicz. Joseph P., Washington. D. C. 
Hamburger, Morton L., Baltimore 
Harcum, Bettie, Salisbury 
Hay, Peri-y I., Washington, D. C. 
Henderson, Joseph, Rockville 
Hoagland, Philip L., Washington. D. C. 
Hoenes. Sophia W., Baltimore 
Hoffman, Mary J., Relay 
Hughes, Warren A., Washington, D. C. 
Jackson, Frank H., Chevy Chase 
Jacobs, Bernice E., Baltimore 
Jacobs, Nathaniel J., Baltimore 
Johns, Malcolm L., Washington, D. C. 
Johnson, William R.. Baltimore 
Jones. Robert W., College Park 



Kardash, Theodore, Baltimore 
Keller, Joseph E., Washington, D. C. 
Kempton, Christine, Lanham 
Lansford, Wilson A., Bethesda 
Kramer. Bernard. Baltimore 
Lawson, J. Keith, Washington. D. C. 
Lehmann. Theodore. Baltimore 
Lewis, Barbara R.. Washington. D. C. 
Liberate. Venancio Q., Riverdale 
Lindsay, Gorton P., Baltimore 
Linn, Lois B., University Park 
Littleford, Rita T.. Washington. D. C. 
Long, Edwin D., Westover 
Lowitz, Irving R., Baltimore 
Marriott, Margaret, Washington, D. C. 
McCleskey. Benjamin C, College Park 
McGoury, Thomas E., Odenton 
McLaughlin, Arlene M., Baltimore 
McWilliams. William J.. Indian Head 
Miller, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 
Miller. Mary E., Baltimore 
Molofsky, Bernice, Baltimore 
Moore, John E., Ellicott City 
Mullett. William B.. Silver Spring 
Owens. James D., Linthicum Heights 
Park, C. A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Paterson, Jean, Towson 
Peffer, Paul R., Washington, D. C. 
Phillips. William S., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Potts. B. Sheba, Baltimore 
Pratt. Stanford C, Washington. D. C. 
Richardson, Donald W.. Washington, D. C. 
Richardson. Vaughn E.. Willards 
Sachs. Harold, Washington. D. C. 
Sadie. Alexander. Washington. D. C. 
Schiff, Adelaide S., Allentown, Pa. 
Schwartz, Harry. Baltimore 
Shaflfer, Betty B., Wilmington. Del. 
Shewbridge, Benjamin B., Baltimore 
Snyder, Roger W., Hagerstown 
Sokal. Mitchell. Brooklyn, N. Y, 
Spruill, William T., Brandywine 
Sta.ire, John S., College Park 
Stein, Martin K., Baltimore 
Stevens, Eveljm M., Laurel 
Thies. William N.. Washington, D. C. 
Thomas, Margaret G., Riverdale 
Thompson, Robert H.. Washington, D. C. 



365 



Tolker, Ethel B., Silver Spring 

Townsend, Mary E., Frostburg 

Tunis, John O., Jr., Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

Wahl, Carleton W., Silver Spring 

Waldman. Sylvia R., Hyattsville 

Watson, George B., Towson 

Wells, Robert L., Gaithersbiirg 

Werner, Janet, Baltimore 

White, M. Maxine, Dickerson 



White, Robert P., College Park 
Whiton, Alfred C, Brentwood 
Wilson, Ruby E.. Mt. Rainier 
Wojtczuk, John A., Baltimore 
Wolf, John F., Hyattsville 
Wolfe, Elizabeth L., Stephens City, Va. 
Wood. George F., Washington, D. C. 
Woodell, John H., Baltimore 
Young, Edmond G.. Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aarons, Ralph, Baltimore 

Allen, George D., Takoma Park 

Anspon, Harry D., Washington. D. C. 

Anthony, E. Rumsey. Jr., Chestertown 

Aring, Bernice C, Baltimore 

Auerbach, Lawrence W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Barber, Elizabeth C, Gaithersburg 

Barthel, Robert A., Catonsville 

Beers, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Benbow, Robert P., Sparrows Point 

Bishopp, Fred T., Silver Spring 

Blalock. Georgia, Jonesboro, Ga. 

Blanek, Katherine V., Washington. D. C. 

Borlik, Ralph, Washington, D. C. 

Bowen, Charles V., Centi^ville 

Bowman, John D., Rockville 

Bowyer, Ernestine C, Washington. D. C. 

Bradley, Robert J., Hyattsville 

Broadwater, Norman I., Oakland 

Campbell, Gordon H., Washington, D. C. 

Cannon, Robert P., Salisbury 

Capossela, Thomas J., Washington, D. C. 

Carleton, Harold B., Washington, D. C. 

Carson, Mary K., Chevy Chase 

Checket. Irene R., Baltimore 

Clark, John T., Greensboro 

Clugston, Carolyn D., University Park 

Cohen, Hari-y, Baltimore 

Cole, William H., Towson 

Collins, Roberta E.. Berwyn 

Comer, Florence R., Hyattsville 

Cooke. Alfred A.. Hyattsville 

Cornnell, Ellner A., Brentwood 

Crane, Warren E., Loch Arbour, N. J. 

Crocker, L. Eleanor, Baltimore 

Cronin, Mary E., Aberdeen 

Dantzig, Henry P.. Hyattsville 

Davies, Thomas E., Blossburg. Pa. 

Davis, Gajle M.. St. John. N. B.. Canada 

Denney, Fred H., Bladensburg 

Domenici. Maurice R., Hagerstown 

Duley. Oscar R., Croome Station 

Dwiggins, Roscoe D.. College Park 

Edlavitch. Robert, Hyattsville 

Edwards, John B., Hyattsville 

Eierman. George H. P., Baltimore 

Evans, Lydia M., Chevy Chase 



Faul, R. Virginia, Washington, D. C. 

Frey, Louis M., Mt. Rainier 

Pulks, Moir M., Rockville 

Ganzert, Mary-Louise, Washington, D. C. 

Gilbertson, Kenneth G., Bladensburg 

Goldberg. Alvin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Leon, Washington. D. C. 

Gough, James J., Chaptico 

Grave de Peralta, Jose I., Camaguey, Cuba 

Greenfield, Arthur, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Groff, William D., Jr., Owings Mills 

Grotlisch, Louise K., Silver Spring 

Hall, N. Irene, College Park 

Hardy. Jerome S.. Silver Spring 

Hart. Margaret F.. Baltimore 

Heaton. Charles C. Baltimore 

Henry. Frances L., Washington, D. C. 

Hirsh, Harold L., Washington, D. C. 

Honigman, Alvin H., Baltimore 

Hoover, Lawrence G.. Takoma Park 

Hortman, William F., Jr., Washington. 

D. C. 
Hunter, Frances E., Chevy Chase 
Ireland. Julius W., Baltimore 
Irwin. Robert C. Lyndhurst. N. J. 
Jacobs, John S., Washington, D. C. 
James, Helen M., Chevy Chase 
Jarboe, James P.. Bel Alton 
Jewell, Benjamin A., Grasonville 
Johnson, Clifford E., Washington. D. C. 
Johnson, Vivian H., Baltimore 
Jones, Lewis A., College Park 
Keefer, Ruth L., Takoma Park 
Kern, Richard E., Braddock Heights 
Kraemer, Edwin, Hackensack, N. J. 
Krynitsky, John A., Chevy Chase 
Kundahl, Paul C, Germantown 
Laws, Victor H., Parsonsburg 
Leard, Mary D., Norfolk, Va. 
Lee, Richard E., Landover 
Levine, Ethel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lewald, James H.. Laurel 
Link. Etta C. Halethorpe 
Luddecke. Hugh F.. Montclair, N. J. 
MacDonald, Charles R., Cumberland 
Maslin, Margaret L., Port Chester, N. Y. 



366 



Maxwell, Francis T., Towson 
McCarthy, John J., Washington, D. C. 
McClayton, M. Elaine, Baltimore 
McFadden, Duncan B., College Park 
McFarlane, Samuel B., Lonaconing 
McGoogan, Malcolm T., Fitzgerald, Ga. 
Mears, Thomas W., Washington, D. C. 
Mehl, Joseph M., Washington. D. C. 
Mellen, Luther E., Baltimore 
Meng, Ralph H., Perry Point 
Mermelstein, Daniel M., Baltimore 
Miller, J. William, Boonsboro 
Miller, Walter L., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, William I., Baltimore 
Neiman, Robert M., New York, N. Y. 
O'Neill, Richard J., Woodlawn 
Oppenheimer, Beverly C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Orofino, Caesar F., North Felham. N. Y. 
Parks, John A., Jr., Cumberland 
Perdue, Herman E., Parsonsburg 
Person, Gladys M., Chevy Chase 
Fitzer, James E., Cumberland 
Pollard, Kitty L., Baltimore 
Prettyman, Dan T., Trappe 
Price, Robert, Catonsville 
Raisin, Herman S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Reeves, Samuel W., Ft. George G. Meade 
Reindollar. Helen L., Baltimore 
Rochkind, Joseph M., Baltimore 
Rosenstein, Louis N., Baltimore 
Sadowsky, Wallace H., North East 



Samson, Elizabeth, Takoma Park 
Schneider, Howard, Yonkers, N Y. 
Scott, Mary Jane, Hyattsville 
Seitz, Charles E., Glen Rock, Pa. 
Shelton, John A., Chevy Chase 
Sherwood, William T.. Washington, D. C. 
Shmuner, Daniel P., Baltimore 
Silberg, I. Walter, Baltimore 
Simon, Fred L., Jr., Baltimore 
Spalding, Joseph P., Silver Spring 
Staken, Richard J., Jr., Midland 
Stedman, Samuel F., Catonsville 
Stegmaier, James G., Cumberland 
Stoddard, Sara L., Hyattsville 
Stup, Charles R., Frederick 
Survil, Anthony A., Baltimore 
Todd, Ira T., Crisfield 
Towson, William O., Baltimore 
Trundle, Lula S., Ashton 
Turner, Katherine L., Washington, D. C. 
Warfield, Gustavus A., College Park 
Weinblatt, Mayer, Baltimore 
Wharton, Edward M., College Park 
White, William M.. Washington. D. C. 
Williams, Arthur E., Jr.. Salisbury 
Winn, Solomon, Baltimore 
Wolf, Frances, Washington, D. C. 
Woodwell. Lawrence A.. Kensington 
Young, Jerome L., Washington. D. C. 
Zalesak. Francis J., College Park 
Zimmerman, Loy M.. Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abellera, Thomas R.. Riverdale 
Abrams, Alan D., Beckley, W. Va. 
Acree, George W., Washington, D. C. 
Aiello, Catherine C, Hya*.-sviile 
Aitcheson, William W., Berwyn 
Albert, Earl A., Waterbury, Conn. 
Allen, John J., Hagerstown 
Almony, Ruth E., White Hall 
Askin, Nathan, Baltimore 
Axtell, Harold A., Jr., Takoma Park 
Badenhoop, H. John, Baltimore 
Baldwin, Agnes C, Berwyn 
Ballard, Emilie M., Hyattsville 
Balmer, C. Blum, Lyndhurst, N. J. 
Barnes, Richard K., Sykesville 
Barre, L. Bernice, Washington, D. C. 
Barthel, William F., Catonsville 
Bastian, Charles W., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Beamer, Francis X., Washington, D. C. 
Benson, Susan E., Relay 
Bernstein, Norman R., Washington, D. C. 



Birmingham, Michael J., Jr., Sparrows 

Point 
Bloom, Morton I., Baltimore 
Blum, Alice M., Baltimore 
Blumenstein, Carl R., Washington, D. C. 
Blundon, Kenneth E., Forest Glen 
Bollinger, Phyllis G., College Park 
Bond, Marian W., Washington, D. C. 
Bond, William R., Relay 
Bonnett, Howard G., Washington, D. C. 
Booth, Muriel M., Baltimore 
Borden, Burton D., Washington, D. C. 
Bowers, Leslie L., Washington, D. C. 
Bowman, Leonard C, Leesburg, Va. 
Bragaw, Josephine M., Augusta, Ga. 
Brainerd, William F., TIL Dundalk 
Brenner, Helen T., Baltimore 
Britton, Rose E.. Washington, D. C. 
Brooks, William R., Pikesville 
Brown, Harriet R., Havre de Grace 
Brown, John W.. Jr.. Bethesda 
Brown, Robert B„ Bethesda 



367 



Brown, Robert S., W. Hazleton, Pa. 
Brown, William E., Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Burk, Joseph, Linthicum Heights 
Burns, Robert B., Havre de Grace 
Burrage, Margaret D., Silver Spring 
Carrico, Thomas C, Bryantown 
Caxy, Charles G., Riverdale 
Case, Richard W., Berwyn 
Chaney, Jack W., Annapolis 
Chaney, Robert J., College Park 
Chumbris, Angelos N., Washington, D. C. 
Chumbris, Cleom G., Washington, D. C. 
Clark, Caroline C, Washington, D. C. 
Clarke, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C. 
dayman, Stanley, Washington, D. C. 
Cleaver, William F., Washington, D. C. 
Clifford, James L., Jr., Baltimore 
Close, Horace W., Washington, D. C. 
Coe, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 
Cole. William P., Towson 
Coleman, Albert S., Washington, D. C. 
Collison, Margaret, Takoma Park 
Cook, H. Irvin, Hyattsville 
Coombs, Albert H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Councill, Wilford A. H., Jr., Baltimore 
Coyle, Margaret L., Upper Marlboro 
Crisafull, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Daneker, Million, Bel Air 
Danforth, F. Elaine. Baltimore 
Daudt, Louis R., Wilmington, Del. 
Davidson, Oscar M., Baltimore 
Davis, Aloyuise I., Havre de Grace 
Davis, W. Bruce, Silver Spring 
Deeley, Haskin U., Baltimore 
Dennis, Dorothy C, Woodbury, N. J. 
Dieffenbach, Albert W., Garrett Park 
Dietrich, Clayton A., Baltimore 
Dieudonne, Erasmus L., Jr., Bladensburg 
Dillon, Harold, Baltimore 
Dippel, Francis X., Baltimore 
Dorfman, Sidney A., Washington, D. C. 
Doi-sey, Charlotte T., Hyattsville 
Dunie, Mack W., Baltimore 
Edmonds, William R., Baltimore 
Edyvean, John H.. Baltimore 
Epperson, John W. W., Baltimore 
Esmond, William G., Washington, D. C. 
Ettin, Pearl, W. Englewood, N. J. 
Farkas, Robert W., York. Pa. 
Fawcett, Howard H., Cumberland 
Fernald, Llewellyn K., Washington, D. C. 
Fetty, John H., Takoma Park 
Finlayson, Thomas R., Bethesda 
Fitzgerald, Marie M., Washington, D. C. 
Flax, George L., Washington, D. C. 
Freedman, Leona S.. Baltimore 
Freemire, Elmer L., Takoma Park 
Gardner, William L., Jessup 
Gay, Martha E., Washington, D. C. 



Gebhardt, Charles M., Silver Spring 

Gifford, John F., Washington, D. C. 

Gile, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Goldstein, Armand M., Baltimore 

GoITer, Carl, Baltimore 

Goodrich, Edward E., Hyattsville 

Gratz, Ezra B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Greenwood, Judith K., Washington, D. C. 

Griffith, Mary L., College Park 

Gubnitsky, Albert, Baltimore 

Hagan, William B., Allen 

Hall, Marjorie E., Washington, D, C. 

Hambleton, Harry B., Washington, D. C. 

Harlan, Edwin F., Riverdale 

Harrington, Mary J., Washington, D. C. 

Harris, Joseph, Baltimore 

Harris, Joseph R., Jr., Bethesda 

Harris, Samuel, Baltimore 

Harrover, M. Elizabeth, Manassas, Va. 

Hayman, Harry G., Jr., Salisbury 

Hayman, John B., Focomoke 

Haynes, Joyce W., Silver Spring 

Healey, James W., Hagerstown 

Hellstern, Charlotte M., Hudson Heights, 

N. J. 
Henderson, Adrienne M., Chevy Chase 
Himelfarb, Norman H., Washington, D. C. 
Hirsch, Albert, Frederick 
Hodson, Virginia E., Baltimore 
Hoffman, Jean A., Hagerstown 
Holt, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
Holzapfel, Norman M., Hagerstown 
Houck, Roland V., Vineland, N. J. 
Houff, Clifford G., Washington, D. C. 
Hunter, Mary E., Chevy Chase 
Hurley, John J., Landover 
Hurley, Walter V., Hyattsville 
Hutson, Paul G., Hagerstown 
Hutton, Carroll S., Baltimore 
Irvine, Ann H., Chicago, 111. 
Jackson, Lorraine V., College Park 
Jett, Geraldine V., Chevy Chase 
Johnson, Henry C, Washington, D. C. 
Johnston, Margaret E., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Charles M., Cumberland 
Jones, Rose I., College Park 
Joseph, David R., Stamford, Conn. 
Kammer, Charles E., Baltimore 
Katz, Leonard R., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Kaufman, Daniel, Washington, D. C. 
Kaufman, Ethel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Keagy, Raybern W., Washington, D. C. 
Kemper, James D., Washington, D. C. 
Keppler, Millicent M., Washington. D. C. 
King, Elizabeth A., Washington, D. C. 
King, James F., Baltimore 
King. Vernon J., Lansdowne 
Klinefelter, William E., Baltimore 



368 



Koenig, Ruth E., Baltimore 

Kovitz, Armand, Baltimore 

Kraft, Fulton, Washington, D. C. 

Kraus, John W.. Baltimore 

Krepp, Martin W., Jr.. Baltimore 

Kummer, Stanley T., Baltimore 

Langford, Bertha M., Washington, D. C. 

Lawder, Robert C, Havre de Grace 

Lawrence, George E., Hanover, Pa. 

Lee, Richard M. C, Bethesda 

LeFrak, Samuel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lehman, Milton L., Baltimore 

Leonard, James D., Chevy Chase 

Levin, Harriett A., Baltimore 

List, Leroy H., Baltimore 

Lloyd, Edward M., Washington, D. C. 

Lloyd, Eugene K., Jr., Rock Point 

London, Wallace, Baltimore 

Long, James W.. Washington, D. C. 

Long, Ruth E., Salisbury 

Macdonald, Maitland, Washington, D. C. 

Maddox, Franklin E.. Jr.. Glen Burnie 

Magruder, Ruth T., Washington, D. C. 

Marriott, Natalie, Washington, D. C 

Matthews, Edward A., Baltimore 

McCauley, Hari-y R.. Jr., Baltimore 

McGinniss, Harry, Kensington 

McManus, William H., Jr., Berwyn 

Meakin, J. Leonard. Washington. D. C. 

Mears, Frank D., Pocomoke 

Meginniss, Stephen M., Baltimore 

Meitzler, Elizabeth V., Frederick 

Miller, Robert J., Washington, D. C. 

Mintz, Milton D.. Plainfield, N. J. 

Mitchell, Alfred G., Baltimore 

Molesworth, Carlton, Frederick 

Mueller, J. Leo, Baltimore 

Mulitz, Ben S.. Capitol Heights 

Neilson, Robert S., Baltimore 

Nesbitt, Geraldine H., Baltimore 

Newell, Robert T., Jr., Centreville 

Nigro, James, Fort George G. Meade 

Norman, Richard E., Hyattsville 

Ostrow, Gertrude D., Washington, D. C. 

Oswald, William B.. Catonsville 

Owens, Anna B., McDonogh 

Owings, Noble L., Riverdale 

Palmer. Carroll F., Washington, D. C. 

Panciotti, Michael E., Sparrows Point 

Papanicolas, James J., Washington. D. C 

Parks, Joseph A.. Washington, D. C. 

Parvis, Charles F., Baltimore 

Paterson, Bess L., Towson 

Payne, Frances E., Landover 

Pearsall, Dorothy M., Washington. D. C. 

Pearson, H. Ralph, St. Georges Island 

Peregoff, Arthur, Frederick 

Phillips. Jay M., Baltimore 



Pickens. James L., Washington, D. C. 

Pinas. Samuel R., Baltimore 

Pollack, Ethel, Baltimore 

Porter, Robert L., Ellerslie 

Powell, Alwyn M., Baltimore 

Frescott, Stedman, Rockville 

Pyle, Mary E.. Frederick 

Rabak, Richard W.. Washington, D. C. 

Rangle, Raymond V.. Baltimore 

Raphel, Eugene V.. Cumberland 

Ray, Enos, Fair Haven 

Reckord, John G., Baltimore 

Remsburg. Charles G.. Berwyn 

Rice, Bernard, Baltimore 

Rice, Helen F.. Baltimore 

Rieg, Mary, Washington, D. C. 

Ringwald, Owen E., Hyattsville 

Robie, William A., Billingsley 

Rochlin, Martin, Baltimore 

Rogers, Jerome S.. Jr.. Bethesda 

Rogoff. Sidney, Nutley. N. J. 

Rosen, Bernard L., Baltimore 

Rosen, Martin. Fort Salonga, N. Y. 

St. Clair, Betty D., College Park 

Scates, Charles E., Washington. D. C. 

Schenker, Samuel, Annapolis 

Schoolfield. Nancy C. Pocomoke 

Schwartz. Norton B.. Spring Valley. N. Y. 

Schwarz. John T.. Sparrows Point 

Seidel, David L., Takoma Park 

Shaw, Edward L., Chevy Chase 

Short, Katharine E., College Park 

Siegel, Leo H., Nutley, N. J. 

Silk, Claudia L.. New Rochelle. N. Y. 

Silverstein, David. Belmar, N. J. 

Sindler, Millard S.. Baltimore 

Singer, Milton E., Baltimore 

Skotnicki. Frank J.. W. Hazleton, Pa. 

Snyder, Eleanor S., Baltimore 

Souder, William H., Washington. D. C. 

Soule, Floyd A., Washington, D. C. 

Springer, Earl V., Hagerstown 

Steinbach, Morton, Baltimore 

Steinberg, Douglas S., College Park 

Sterling, Harold, Washington. D. C. 

Stern, Harry W., Washington. D. C. 

Stiefelmaier, Charles A., Clarksburg. 

W. Va. 

Stillings. Charles A., Baltimore 
Stoddart. Adam T.. Baltimore 
Talcott, Worthington H.. Washington. 

D. C. 

Tenny. Morgan L.. Garrett Park 
Terl. Armand. Baltimore 
Thompson, Charles L.. Baltimore 
Thompson. Franklin L.. Washington. D. C 
Tiller. Richard E.. Washington, D. C. 
Toomey, Edna P.. Bladensburg 

369 



Tyser, Ralph J., Baltimore 
Usuda. Charles T., Bethesda 
Vaiden, Sara A., Baltimore 
Valenstein, Murray A., Baltimore 
Vollmer. Harry F., Ill, Baltimore 
Wade, John P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Wailes, Dorothea A., Baltimore 
Waingold, George, Cumberland 
Walterman. Edward, Greenfield Park, N. Y. 
Warfield, Mary D.. College Park 
Waters, Robert W., Princess Anne 
Welsh, Helen O., Hyattsville 



West, William V., Chevy Chase 

White, J. Gordon, Baltimore 

Williams, Don H., Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, Thomas L., Havre de Grace 

Wise, Gabrielle D., Relay 

Worgan, David K., Luke 

Wyatt, Henry F., Baltimore 

Yockelson, Bernard A., Washington, D. C. 

Young, Herbert S.. Washington, D. C. 

Zeller, C. Doris, Baltimore 

Zurhorst, Mary O., Washington. D. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



A bell, Joseph D., Leonardtown 
Abelman, Rita, Atlanta, Ga. 
Abrams, Amanda A.. Hyattsville 
Abramson, Nathan, Flushing, N. Y. 
Aburn, Herbert O., Baltimore 
Adams, Donald L., Mt. Rainier 
Aiken, Bernard S., Cockeysville 
Albright, Erving E., Coxsackie. N. Y. 
Albright, Frank H.. Coxsackie, N. Y. 
Allen, Charles B., Towson 
Altman. Andrew T., Washington, D. C. 
Altschuler, Leon, Washington, D. C. 
Amsterdam, Ben, Newark, N. J. 
Anchell, Melvin, Baltimore 
Angleberger, Grace E., Frederick 
Anspon. Bert W., Washington. D. C. 
Appelbaum, Bernard. Washington. D. C. 
Arnold, Bessie L.. Takoma Park 
Ashman, Robert E., Baltimore 
Atwood, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 
Augustine, Frances M., Seat Pleasant 
Aymold, Bernard L., Baltimore 
Back, Dolores M., Baltimore 
Bageant, Audry G., Washington. D. C. 
Baker. Jane C, Chester, N. S., Canada 
Baldwin, Janet K., Berwyn 
Barnes, Wilbur J., Takoma Park 
Ball, William M., Berwyn 
Barr, Charles M., Easton 
Barthel, Carl C, Catonsville 
Beach, Dorothy M., Washington, D. C. 
Bedell, Helen I., Washington, D. C. 
Benton, Thomas R., Ammendale 
Berkowich. Betty B., Thurmont 
Berlin, Walter I.. Baltimore 
Bierly, Jack S., Sabillasville 
Bindes, Louis L., Washington, D. C. 
B Jorge, Margaret, New London, Conn. 
Blake, Frank E., Washington, D. C. 
Blum, N. Frances, York, Pa. 
BonDurant, Edgar H., Mt. Rainier 
Borenstein. Frank C, Baltimore 
Bosley, Dorothy A., Baltimore 



Bowers, Cecil D., Baltimore 
Bowling, James E., Newport 
Bradley, Eleanor J., Chevy Chase 
Brandes, Herbert G., Washington. D. C. 
Brandt. Frederick B., Washington, D. C. 
Brandt, John M., Jr., Baltimore 
Breitschwerdt, Lloyd C, Baltimore 
Brendle, William K., Baltimore 
Brice, Mary E. Millburn, N. J. 
Briggs, Gilbert P.. Washington. D. C. 
Brill, Warren D.. North Beach 
Brinckerhoff, John G., Lansdowne, Pa. 
Brooks, Eva B., Baltimore 
Brown, Kimbrough S., Washington, D. C. 
Buch. Eloise A. A.. Baltimore 
Bugos, Paul E., Riverdale 
Bunevich. Milton. Washington, D. C. 
Burges, Sam H., Takoma Park 
Burgess, Betty R., Hyattsville 
Burke, Francis V., Silver Spring 

Burke, Robert, Hyattsville 

Burnside, James B., Washington, D. C. 

Burton, Jean E., Cheverly 

Butler, Harry F., Cumberland 

Byers, Shirley, Baltimore 

Cahn, Shirelyn, Upper Marlboro 

Campbell. Dorothy M.. Riverdale 

Cann, Alice V., Baltimore 

Caplan, Jerome E., Baltimore 

Carey, Frank W., Jr., Dundalk 

Carlton, Jean F., Fair Haven 

Carson, Betsy J., Chevy Chase 

Cartee, Robert S., Hagerstown 

Casgel, Douglass W., Baltimore 

Chandler, Edmond T., Takoma Park 

Chapline, George M., Frederick 

Cherry, Jack F., Washington, D. C. 

Chertkof, Helen R., Baltimore 

Childress, Miriam R., Washington, D. C. 

Cissel, Elizabeth M.. Washington, D. C. 

Clark, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 
Clark, Clara M., Takoma Park 
Clark, Kenneth J., Baltimore 



370 



Clark, Richard A., Fort Belvoir, Va. 

Clarke, Daniel E., Washington. D. C. 

Cohen, Helyn E., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Cohen, Morton G., Baltimore 

Cole, Milton S., Laurel 

Collins, Lyman I., Linthicum Heights 

Conway, Earl V., Oxon Hill 

Cook, Elmer E., Jr., Brooklyn 

Corridon, Donald C, Washington, D. C. 

Covey, Carlton, Easton 

Criner, Ploomie E., Washington, D. C. 

Crone, John L., Mt. Rainier 

Curtis, Elizabeth J., Ellicott City 

Custer, John D., Washington, D. C. 

Daiker, John A., Washington, D. C. 

Dammeyer, Robert E., Annapolis 

Daniels, Edward L., Baltimore 

Danilson, Harry T., Chevy Chase 

Dann, Clayton S., Chevy Chase 

Davies, Thomas A., Jr., Baltimore 

Davis, Frank I., Jr., Poolesville 

Davis, Joseph G., Pittsville 

Davis, Ralph F., Baltimore 

Day, Margaret W., Chevy Chase 

Day, Richard S., Baltimore 

DeChemiss, Billy P., Washington, D. C. 

Delaney, Atlee M., Charleston, W. Va. 

Dempsey, Harry J., Hyattsville 

Derrick, Daniel M., Washington, D. C. 

DeWitt, George A., Jr., Bethesda 

DeYoung, Joseph. Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Diggs, William B., Jr., Baltimore 

Dinowitzer, Wilma, Washington, D. C. 

Dix, Gloria R., New York, N. Y. 

Dodson, Charles M., Mount Airy 

Dorr, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 

Dowd, James F., Baltimore 

Downey, Hugh P., Washington, D. C. 

Drawbaugh, David G., Hagerstown 

Dunkle, H. Bothwell, Maddox 

Durm, William B., Baltimore 

Dwyer, Frank A., Baltimore 

Ehudin, Herman, Baltimore 

Elder, Jack T., Riva 

Elliott, Frances A., Washington, D. C. 

England, William H., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Epstein, Bernard, Baltimore 
Eschner, Paul F., Jr., Billingsley 
Esterson, Milton M., Baltimore 
Etzler, Doris M., Frederick 
Evans, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 
Evans. Ruth E., Baltimore 
Evering, George C, Baltimore 
Ewing, Lydia F.. Takoma Park 
Farina. Yolanda L.. Hyattsville 
Faris, James B., Washington, D. C. 
Feldman, Milton J., South Fajlsburg, N. Y. 



Fink, Morie. Beckley, W. Va. 

Fisch, Leahadele, South Orange, N. J. 

Fisher, Allan C, Cumberland 

Flanagan, Elizabeth L., Fort Meade 

Flippin, Ruth L., Baltimore 

Foote, Ellen C, Chevy Chase 

Forsberg. Robert A., Rockville 

Fox, Harvey E., Seat Pleasant 

Frenkil, Bernard L., Baltimore 

Frey, Ralph W., Jr., Mt. Rainier 

Frothingham, James R.. Jr., Hyattsville 

Frye, Donald H., Laurel 

Fugitt, Howard D., Seat Pleasant 

Fuhrman, Marion J., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Furbershaw, Olga S., Washington, D. C. 

Gantz, Guy G., Jr., Hagerstown 

Garrett, Esther B., Annapolis 

Garrett, Marshall J., Washington, D. C. 

Gehman, Jonathan F., Brentwood 

Gillett. Donald M., Washington, D. C. 

Gilley, Virginia R., Washington, D. C. 

Glaze, Francis W., Jr., Hyattsville 

Goldbeck, Clara G., Chevy Chase 

Goldblatt, Hyman, Washington, D. C. 

Graves, Glen W., Baltimore 

Greenip, John F., Washington, D. C. 

Grier, Jack G., Towson 

Grover, Oscar D., Washington, D. C. 

Gude, Adolph E., Jr., Rockville 

Guerrant, William S., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Gurkin, Mildred I., Newark, N. J. 
Guyther, Joseph R., Mechanicsville 
Haase, Thomas N., Baltimore 
Haines, William S., Westfield, N. J. 
Hamill, James E., Bethesda 
Handler, Chester J., Washington, D. C. 
Harbig, James T., New Holland, Ga. 
Hardy, James W., Washington. D. C 
Harn, John N.. Baltimore 
Hamer, Charles R., Emmitsburg 
Harris, Herbert R., Washington, D. C. 
Hartman, James H., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Hasley, John R., Washington, D. C. 
Hayes, Edson A., Washington, D. C, 
Hazard, Alfred S., Takoma Park 
Hazatsky, Martin, Asbury Park, N. J. 
Heaster, Joy L., Salisbury 
Hebgen, Mildred A., Washington, D. C. 
Heider, Edward M.. Washington, D. C. 
Henderson. Frances W.. Washington, D. C. 
Henderson, Hugh M., Baltimore 
Henderson, Mary D., Rockville 
Hei-man, Robert, Baltimore 
Heyer, Anna K., Baltimore 
Heyer, Frank N., Baltimore 
Heygster, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Hicks, Clarence M., Washington, D. C. 



371 



Higbee, Lester W., Pleasantville, N. J. 

Hitch, Robert N., Queenstown 

Hodges, Julia L., Catonsville 

Hodson, Annesley E., Ill, Baltimore 

Hogan, James E., Baltimore 

Hohouser, Henry S., Washington, D. C. 

Hollander, Leah J., Baltimore 

Hollingsworth, Treva F., Washington, D. C. 

Horn, Arthur W. M., Hyattsville 

Horowitz, Daniel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Howard, Eugene, Baltimore 

Hudson, Marion C, Delmar, Del. 

Hudson, Vann D., Baltimore 

Hughes, Thomas D., Washington, D. C. 

Hurwitz, Hyman, Annapolis 

Hutchinson, Richard F., Chevy Chase 

Hutson, Harry M., Cumberland 

Ingraham, Wilson G., Washington, D. C. 

Irvin, Mary E., Baltimore 

Jachowski, Leo A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Jansson, George A. W., Baltimore 

Jarboe, Paul E., Mechanicsville 

Jeflferys, Wilbur T., Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Robert W., Jr., Baltimore 

Johnson, Thomas L., Waishington, D. C. 

Johnson, William P., Glen Burnie 

Jones, Bobby L., Relay 

Joy, Bernard P., Washington, D. C. 

Joyce, Charles V., Hyattsville 

Judd. Mary D., Takoma Park 

Kane, James L., Hyattsville 

Kane, Mary E., Silver Spring 

Kaplan, Harry E., Washington, D. C. 

Kassan, Robert S., Baltimore 

Kassel, Victor. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keeney, Dan F., Walkersville 

Kemp, Lois V., Baltimore 

Kempton, Hildreth, Lanham 

Kendall, Charles W., Dundalk 

Kercher, Frances L., Paoli, Pa. 

Kidd, Franklin F., Washington. D. C. 

Kiernan, Harry D., New Haven, Conn. 

King, Laura F., Sa.vage 

Kirkman, Harriet V., Catonsville 

Kitchin, William M., Washington, D. C. 

Kittel, Patricia I., Chevy Chase 

Klawans, Bernard B., Annapolis 

Kleiman, Albert, Baltimore 

Klein, Charles F., Baltimore 

Kneessi, Robert W., Riverdale 

Kress, Bernice E., Baltimore 

Kritzer, Katryna L., Hagerstown 

Krogmann, Carl F., Washington, D. C. 

Krouse, William E., Bethesda 

Krugman, Leonard, Newark, N. J. 

Ksanda, Charles F., Washington, D. C. 

Kuhn, Helene L., Baltimore 

Kyttle, Stuart F., Washington, D. C. 



Labovitz, Henry P., Baltimore 

Landy, William C, Clifton, N. J. 

Lank, Murrell C, Washington, D. C. 

Lansdale, Miriam E., Washington, D. C. 

Lansdale, Richard H., Jr., Sandy Spring 

Larduskey, James L., Jr., Baltimore 

Larson, John D., Jr., Bowie 

Leatherman, Robert B., Hyattsville 

Lee, Mary M., Bethesda 

Lee, Mildred V., Baltimore 

Lempke, Charles T„ Washington, D. C. 

lyevin, Allan F., Akron, Ohio 

Levine. Lawrence B., South Fallsburg, 

N. y. 

Levine, Stuart C, Baltimore 
Levy, Bernice F., Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, Addison L., Havre de Grace 
Lewis, Eula G., Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, George W., Chevy Chase 
Lewis, Howard I., Washington, D, C. 
Lewis, John E., Silver Spring 
Lewis, Thomas H., Bethesda 
Lipsky, Irving R„ Washington, D. C. 
Longfield, Aaron N., Lampasas, Texas 
Lowenthal, Jean E., New York, N. Y. 
Luber, Laura E., Washington, D. C. 
Lucas, Frances N., Berwyn 
Luntz, John G., Go vans 
Madorsky, Irving, Washington, D. C. 
MaJirer, Mary E., Wilmington, Del. 
Makover, Jeanne A., Baltimore 
Mandell, Marvin, Baltimore 
Mangum, Lola M., Silver Spring 
Marlow, Alice M., Bethesda 
Martin, James A., Emmitsburg 
Matheke, Joan B., Newark, "N. J. 
Mazur, Alexander, Shelton, Conn. 
McCardell, Ethel C, Hagerstown 
McCoy, Horace L., Jr., Chevy Chase 
McDevitt, Richard C, Baltimore 
McDonald, Francis J., Washington, D. C. 
McGill, Cai'oline F., Thurmont 
Mclnturff, George F., Washington, D. C. 
McLaughlin, Lillian P., Baltimore 
McMahon, William E., II, Washington, 

D. C. 
McNiel, John R., Washington, D. C. 
Mead, James M., Washington, D. C. 
Meanley, Bi-ooke, Jr., Baltimore 
Mehl, Chai'lson I., Washington, D. C. 
Mendelson, Robert, Baltimore 
Meriam, Martha P., Kensington 
Meyerson, Norman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Michaelson, Helen G., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Middleton, Frederic E., Jr., Bethesda 
Miller, Ervin, Baltimore 
Miller, Joshua I., Berwyn 
Miller, King B., Jr., Princess Anne 



Miller, Robert A., Branchville 
Miller, Sonia V., Annapolis 
Milloff, Bernard. Silver Spring 
Minion, Allen V., Newark, N. J. 
Mintzer. Jack M., Ocean City, N. J. 
Mintzer, Lynwood F., Ocean City, N. J. 
Mohle, Robert L., Berwyn 
Moon, Arthur P., Takoma Park 

Moore, George C, Jr., Queen Anne 

Moore, Henry W., Washington. D. C. 

Morris, Charles B., Delmar 

Morris, Daniel L.. Washington. D. C. 

Morton, John, II. Mt. Airy 

Mudd, Patrick C, Bryantown 

Mueller, John L., Baltimore 

Muniz, Jose A., Ponce, P. R. 

Murphy, Julian G.. Silver Spring 

Neale, Robert R.. Baltimore 

Nichols, Irene, Washington, D. C. 

Nichter, Harry R.. Takoma Park 

Nimetz, David, Washington, D. C. 

Norcross, Theodore W., Jr.. Chevy Chase 
Nowell, Ellsworth B., Linthicum Heights 
Ochsenreiter, Eugene C, Jr., Asheville. 

N. C. 
O'Donnell, John C, Oakland 
Offutt, Haj-ry D., Edgewood Arsenal 
Osso, Philomena, Annapolis 
Page, Thad S., Washington, D. C. 
Palese, John M., Baltimore 
Panitz, Leon J., Baltimore 
Pappas, George H., Baltimore 
Parker, Frances J., Catonsville 
Peacock, Franklin K.. Takoma Park 
Pennella, Michael, Washington, D. C 
Peters, Emily R., Beltsville 
Pfeil, Edgar T., Baltimore 
Pierpont, William M., Baltimore 
Pitcher, David L., Washington, D. C. 
Pohlman. Thelma V., Landover 
Pope, Joseph A., Washington, D. C 
Popham, William F., Edgewater 
Powers, Lillian, Jersey City, N. J. 
Preble, Merle R.. College Park 
Prinz. John W., Jr., Baltimore 
Prostic, Abraham, Baltimore 
Pulliam, James W.. Washington, D. C. 
Rawlings, David E., Kensington 
Rawls, Estelle H., Kensington 
Raymond, Betty T., Washington, D. C 
Reese, Elizabeth J., Washington, D. C. 
Reynolds, Hope, Rising Sun 
Rice, Alvin B., Greenwich, Conn. 
Rice, Edward J.. Brentwood 
Rice, George W.. Jr., Catonsville 
Rice, Robert C Jefferson 
Richardson, Robert R.. Washington, D. C 
Richmond, Naomi M., Cottage City 



372 



Riedel, Kathryn E., Hyattsville 

Ritter, Ira M., Hagerstown 

Ritter, Marshall H., Takoma Park 

Ritter, Rhea M., Baltimore 

Robertson, Alice C, Washington, D. C. 

Robertson, Sherrard A., Washington. D. C. 

Robinson, Geneva M., Bennings, D. C. 

Rogers, John D.. Richmond, Va. 

Rolfes, Harry F., Brentwood 

Roop, Dorothy M., Baltimore 

Root, Elizabeth A., Ben Avon Heights, Pa. 

Roper, Catherine B., Washington, D. C. 

Rosenberg, Gus B., Baltimore 

Rosenberg, Robert, Baltimore 

Rosenfield, Ethel M., Baltimore 

Rosenstock, LeRoy G„ Westminster 

Ross, Elizabeth. Washington, D. C. 

Rowe, Dora M., Brentwood 

Royster, Patsy A., Bethesda 

Rozelle, Albert L., Washington, D. C. 

Rubin, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 

Rundell, Barbara J.. Baltimore 

Ruppersberger, Marjorie E., Baltimore 

Sachs, Moses B., Baltimore 

Sack, Margaret E., Baltimore ^ 

Salganik, Alvin C, Baltimore 

Samler, Emily, Baltimore 

Sanchiz, Jose C, Panama City. Panama 

Sasser, William G.. Takoma Park 

Saum, Robert W., Lanham 

Sawyer, Arthur W., Baltimore 

Scarborough, Rowan L., Jr., Silver Spring 

Schindel, Katherine, Catonsville 

Schlesinger, Arthur, Washington, D. C 

Schmidt, June C, Randall stown 

Schmitt, Edwin M.. Chevy Chase 

Schuler, Walter H., Washington. D. C. 

Schultz, Selma, Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Scopi. John D., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Scott. Donald C, Washington,- D. C. 

Seal, William A., Jr., Baltimore 

Sedlak, Emery P., Riverdale 

Seeger, William H., Jr., Silver Spring 

Seitz, William N., Washington, D. C. 

Senge, George W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Senseman, Rodney L., Silver Spring 

Seymore, George, Washington, D. C. 

Sherline, David M., Garrett Park 

Sherman, Andrew N., Baltimore 

Shields, Leonard J.. Atlantic City. N. J. 

Shorb, Alfred F., Silver Spring 

Silver, Betty J., Washington, D. C. 

Silverman, Norman H., Washington. D. C. 

Silverman, William J., Baltimore 

Simpson, Doris V., Hagerstown 

Simpson, Frances, Washington. D. C. 

Skeen, Richard T., Baltimore 

Skill, Elizabeth P., Homestead, Fla. 

373 



Skipton, Roy K., Mt. Rainier 
Slattery. Richard G., Washington, D. C. 
Sleig^ht, Mildred A., Glen Burnie 
Smith, Francis A., North East 
Smith, Gregg C, Bethesda 
Smith, Kenneth A., Cumberland 
Smith, Warrington G., Phoenix 
Snyder, Peter F., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Spelsberg. Walter K., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Stapf, Shirley A., Baltimore 
Sterling, James T., Washington, D. C. 
Sterling, Raymond A., Washington, D. C. 
Stetson, Frank, Jr., Chevy Chase 
Stotler, Frances I., Baltimore 
Strachan, Lincoln S., Kitzmiller 
Stuart, LaRhett L., Washington, D. C. 
Stuver, Richard L., Washington, D. C. 
Swank, Lawrence E., Washington, D. C. 
Taliaferro, Thomas B., Heathsville, Va. 
Talmadge, Richard H., Nutley, N. J. 
Teubner, Raymond C, Ellicott City 
Thompson, Talmadge S., Silver Spring 
Thurston, Margaret J., Riverdale 
Thurston, William B., Relay 
Tilles, Norman D., Baltimore 
Todd, Gary T., Baltimore 
Tooma, Frederick A., Baltimore 
Tregellis, John S., Baltimore 
Trimble, Ernest C, Mt. Savage 
Truman, Zelma M., College Park 
Tucker, Rebecca A., Forest Hill 
Tulin, Molly B., Hartford. Conn. 
Turner, Alan C, Jr., Lusby 
Turner, Roy B., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Turner, William F., Washington, D. C. 
Tuttle, Samuel D., Baltimore 
Ubides, Pedro F., Ponce, P. R. 
Valenti, Gino, Washington, D. C. 
Vance, Edwin S., Jr., Baltimore 
Voris, Anna M., Laurel 
Waesche, Harry L., Chevy Chase 
Wagner, Ernest G., Hyattsville 
Wallace, James C, Washington, D. C. 



Wallace, Mary C, Barclay 
Wallenstein, Walter A., Washington, D. C. 
Walmsley, John S., Baltimore 
Warthen, Gerald B., Kensington 
Waters, Mary E., Laurel 
Waters, William R., Lanham 
Watson, Betty J., Forest Glen 
Watson, Mary E., Bradbury Park 
Weathersbee, David R., Washington, D. C. 
Webb, Mary J., Federalsburg 
Wehmhoflf, Bruce M., Chevy Chase 
Wehr, Everett T., Malverne, N. Y. 
Weinberg, Harold H., Baltimore 
Weinman, Melvin, Baltimore 
Wellslager, John A., Baltimore 
Wessberg, Olof H., Colmar Manor 
Wette, Mary Anne M., Baltimore 
White, Rollie H., Washington, D. C. 
Whitten, John M., Annapolis 
Wiessner, Gilbert W., Baltimore 
Wightman, Joseph W., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Wilcox, Stanley, Rockville 
Wiley, William W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Williams, Owen W., Granite 
Willis, Daniel P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Howard D., College Heights 
Wilson, Irene L., Mt. Rainier 
Wilson, Stansbury M., Baltimore 
Wiseman, Leon R., Washington, D. C. 
Witlin, Louise F., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Witsell, Edward F., Washington. D. C. 
Woodring, Judy W., Chevy Chase 
Woodward, Charles W., Jr., Rockville 
Worthington, Leland G., Jr., Berwyn 
Worthington, Raymond L., New Milford, 

Conn. 
Yaffe, Stanley N., Baltimore 
Yagendorf, June L., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Young, Elton F., Washington, D. C. 
Zaino, Rocco M., Westbury, N. Y. 
Zedd. Ruth A., Norfolk. Va. 
Ziegler, Paul R., Baltimore 
Zilber, Morris L., Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED 



PART TIME 



Adams, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 
Blackman, Maulsby N., Woodside Park 
Bowmar, Hartley, Baltimore 
Donovan, Mary M., Washington, D. C. 
French, Samuel L.. Rumbley 
Hanson, William C, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Harris. Jean W., College Park 
Kiernan, Paul C, Washington, D. C. 
Lemmermann, Henry J., College Park 
Maris, Helen B., Riverdale 
MeClay, Harriette N., Hyattsville 
Motyka, Agnes L., Washington, D. C. 



Oxley, John E., Washington, D. C. 
Ready, Frank T., Landover 
Riddell, Jean M., Washington, D. C. 
Ross, Barbara G., Riverdale 
Saylor, Zella P., Hyattsville 
Seligson, David. Washington, D. C. 
Shulman, Samuel, Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Stelzer, Frederick C. Jr., Derwood 
Walker. Ernest C. Takoma Park 
White. Kenneth S., College Park 
Willey, Edward J., Washington. D. C. 



Andrews, C. A., Jr., Tampa, Fla. 
Arnold. Ann G.. Mt. Washington 
Ehrlich, Raphael H.. Washington, D. C. 
Hammer, Ralph C Cumberland 
Hornstein, Audrey A., Baltimore 
Hunt, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 



Hyman, Harold, Meriden, Conn. 
Kellough, Elmer R., Jr., Cumberland 
Land, Robert H., Baltimore 
Plumer, Gertrude E.. Huntingtown 
Race, Thornton C. Hagerstown 
Walten, Max, Washington, D. C. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

SENIOR CLASS 



Aaron, Alvin, Biddeford, Maine 

Asbell, Milton B., Camden. N. J. 

Bailey, Carl E.. Baltimore 

Baker. Edward K.. Jr.. PikesviUe 

Barker. John P., Laurel 

Barnes. Bradley B., Maplewood. N. J. 

Boro. Alex L.. Severna Park 

Cabler, James T.. Baltimore 

■c^or^v P New Haven, Conn. 
Cammarano, Frank P., xsew x* , 

Carrigan. Harold J., Jersey City. N. J. 

Cohen. Sigmund. Baltimore 

Cooper. David, Atlantic City. N. J. 

Cramer. Paul E., Monessen. Penna. 

emit. Edwin D.. PoolesviUe 

Donofrio. Richard S.. Danbury. Conn. 

DuBoff. Leonard. West Hartford, Conn. 

Erlich, William, Baltimore 

Eskow, Alexander B.. Perth Amboy. N. J. 

Falk Wilbur N.. Branford, Conn. 

Farr'ington, Charles C. Chelmsford Mass. 

Finegold. Raymond, Belmar, N. J. 

Gemski, Henry J.. New Haven, Conn. 

Giuditta, Nicholas A., Westfield. N. J. 

Goe, Reed T.. Weston, W. Va. 

Habercam. Julian W., Baltimore 

Haggerty. Jack S.. Sussex. N. J. 

Hartwell, Perley B., St. Johnsbury. Vt. 

Heil, Roland W.. Baltimore 

Johnson, William B., Jr.. Annapolis 

Johnston. Arthur J.. Providence. R. I. 
Jonas. Charles S., Atlantic City. N. J. 
Kern, Louis D.. Baltimore 
Kraus, George C. Baltimore 



Lasley. Frank A.. Jr.. Staunton, Va. 
Lau. Irvin M.. Jr.. York. Penna. 
Levin, Leonard L.. Norfolk, Va. 
Liberman, Sidney E.. Baltimore 
Lyon, Eugene D.. Baltimore 
Margulies, David B., Linden, N. J. 
Marsh. Edmond F.. North Adams, Mass 
Massucco. Lawrence P.. Bellows Falls, Vt. 
Mathias, Craig P., Waynesboro, Pa. 
McCausland, Charles P., Baltimore 
McMillin, Clarence V., Landrum, S. C. 
Meadows. Stanley J., Brunswick 
Mendelsohn. Harry B., Norfolk, Va. 
Messner, Jack M.. Washington, D. C. 
Morris, Hugh B., Baltimore 
Muller, Edward J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Myer, Edward H., Jr.. Mahwah, N. J. 
Neal, Floyd W., Southington. Conn. 
Rich! Otto M.. New Brunswick, N. J. 
Roitman, Irvin, Trenton, N. J. 
Ryan, William H.. Frostburg 
Saltman, David. Holyoke. Mass. 
Silverman, Stanley G.. Portsmouth, Va. 
Slavinsky. Edwin A.. Baltimore 
Smyth, Lawrence C Quincy. Mass. 
Stepan. Jerry J., Baltimore 
Stewart, Ford A.. Baltimore 
Theodore. Raymond M., Baltimore 
Turok, Seymour, North Bergen. N. J. 
Weigel, Sterling J.. York, Pa. 
Westerberg. Carl V., Simsbury, Conn. 
Wheeler, Elias O., Lynchburg, Va. 
Williams, Ernest V., Chevy Chase. D. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aaronson, Fabius F., Washington. D. C. 
Allen. Joseph P.. New Martinsville. 

W Va. 
Auerbach. Bernard B.. Baltimore 
Barsamian. Samuel, Providence, R. I. 
Blais. Raymond. Holyoke. Mass. 
Blevins. George C. Centreville 
Bozzuto, John M., Jr., Waterbury. Conn. 
Brown, Frank A., Lansdowne. 
Cannaday. Henry L.. Roanoke. Va. 



Carvalho, Antone R., New Bedford, Mass. 
Cavallaro, Ralph C Branford. Conn. 
Chan-Pong. Bertrand O.. Port-of-Spain. 

B. W. L 
Davis, James C, Silver Spring 
Dunn, Naomi A., New Britain, Conn. 
Edgar, Benjamin D., Viola. III. 
Eichenbaum. Irving W., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Fallon, Charles H., Trenton. N. J. 



374 



375 



Feindt, William B., Baltimore 
Francis, Garnet P., Jr., Alexandria, Va. 
Gane, Eugene M., Hartford, Conn. 
Gilden, Paul, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Leonard N., Hartford, Conn. 
Gorsuch, Gilbert F., Dundalk 
Griesbach, Hans H., Naugatuck, Conn. 
Grove, Harry C, Jr., Fairplay 
Hirschman, Leonard M., Baltimore 
Hoff acker, Henry J., Hanover, Pa- 
Jacoby, Robert E., Halethorpe. 
Jakob, Robert, Norwalk, Conn. 
James, Verda E., Milford. Del. 
Johnson, Walter E., Berlin, N. H. 
Joyce, Osier C, Arnold 
Kader, Marshall L, Baltimore 
Krug, Frederick R., Baltimore 
Labasauckas, Charles F., Watertown, Conn. 
Legum, Isidore, Baltimore 
Maislen, Irving L., Hartford, Conn. 
McConnell, William L., West Union, 

W. Va. 
McCracken, Jules, Cameron, W. Va. 
Meinster, Leon H., Baltimore 
Melson, William F., Wilmington, DeL 
Miller. Max, Baltimore 



Morris, Albert W., Salisbury 
Myers, Melvln, Washington. D. C. 
Noon, William J., Jr., Providence, R. I. 
Plaster, Harold E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Rabinowitz, Seymour A., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Randolph, Kenneth V.. Lost Creek, 

W. Va. 
Reed, Paul, Port Henry, N. Y. 
Robinovitz, Irving K., Fall River, Mass. 
Rogers, Elverett T., Waterbury, Conn. 
Rosen, Joseph G., New York, N. Y. 
Schoepke, Oscar J., Oakfield, Wis. 
Schriver, Alfred B., Bangor, Me. 
Shaudis, Leo J., Silver Creek, Penna. 
Shea, Erwin E., Hartford, Conn. 
Sidoti, Vincent F., Winsted, Conn. 
Stinebert, Edward R., Baltimore 
Tinsley, William C, Lynchburg, Va. 
Tipton. Dorsey R., Baltimore 
Varipatis, Michael S., Baltimore 
Waldman, Bernard, New Haven, Conn 
Weiner, Irving S., Hartford, Conn. 
Wooden, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Wright, Dan, Greenville, N. C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Belinkoflf, Sidney A., Weehawken, N. J. 
Bonham, John T., Charleston, W. Va. 
Bookstaver, Julian B., Teaneck, N. J. 
Dabrowski, Benjamin A., Baltimore 
Diamond, Ben, Roanoke, Va. 
Goldhaber, Samuel, Flushing, N. Y. 
Kasawich, Julius I., Whitestone, N. Y. 



Litchman, Burton, Cranston, R. I. 
Lowander, George A., Queens Village, N. Y. 
Pessagno, Eugene L., Jr., Baltimore 
Piccolo, James A., New Haven, Conn. 
Randman, Bernard, Whitestone, N. Y. 
Westcott, Horace L., Branford, Conn. 
Yablonski, Anthony P., New Britain, Conn. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aurbach, Frederick, Idabel, Okla. 
Baevsky, William D., Penns Grove, N. J. 
Baker, Robert N.. Kings Mountain, N. C. 
Beaven, Sterrett P., Baltimore 
Berman, Daniel E., Baltimore 
Betts, Robert L., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Birschtein, Benjamin, Atla,ntic City, N. J. 
Bohne, Edmund L., Bergenfield, N. J. 
Bressman, Edward, Newark, N. J. 
Briskin, Melvin R., Springfield, Mass. 
Brotman, Alfred, Baltimore 
Burch, Joseph P., Clifton, N. J. 
Caldwell, Gilbert L., Baltimore 
Callaway, John S., Beckley, W. Va. 
Capone, Nicholas J., Baltimore 
Castelle, Paul B,, Baltimore 
Chernow, Abraham, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chmar, Phillip L., Rockville 
Cohen, Jerome S., Baltimore 
Collins. William M.. Bellows Falls, Vt. 



Corbitt, Don C, Waverly, W. Va. 
DePasquale, Frank L., East Northport, 

N. Y. 
DeScherer, Morton, Englewood, N. J. 
Dubansky, Paul S., Baltimore 
Easton, James F., Romney, W. Va. 
Farrell, Daniel L., Norwich, Conn. 
Frey, Donald T., Ca.ton»ville 
Friedmann, Michael, Whitestone, N. Y. 
Golden, Maxwell S., South River, N. J. 
Gudwin, Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Haggerty, Warren D., Jr., Hackensack, 

N. J. 
Hawkins, Virgil R., Union, S. C. 
Heller, Stanley, New York, N. Y. 
Hewitt, Earl C, Baltimore 
Hoffman, Barnet. Newark, N. J. 
Hyman, Harold, New York, N. Y. 
Hymanson, Nathan W., Somerville, N. J. 
Kapiloff, Bernard, New York, N. Y. 



Kapiloff, Leonard, New York, N. Y. 
Karow, Seymour M., EllenviUe, N. Y. 

Kellar, Sidney, EllenviUe, N. Y. 

Klingelhofer. Herbert E., Baltimore 

Koenig. Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kornreich, Kenneth D., Waterbury, Conn. 

Lauro, Mario A.. Waterbury, Conn. 

Lawrence, Ronald, Elk Mills 

Levine. Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levy, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Marano, Frank A., Newark, N. J. 
McClees, Joseph G.. Baltimore 
McDaniel, Edward P., Jarrettsville 
Mishkin. Edward A.. New York, N. Y. 
Oilman, Abraham, New York. N. Y. 
Parker, Malcolm M., Freehold, N. J. 
Policow, Myron A., Metuchen, N. J. 
Reposo Ruiz, Mario L.. Havana. Cuba 
Reusch. George, Cranford. N. J. 
Rosenberg, Edward G.. Jamaica, N. Y. 



Rudo. Frederick B.. Raspeburg 
Santeramo, John R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Schiller, LeRoy E.. Newark, N. J. 
Schultheis, Carl H.. Baltimore 
Singer, Max. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Sloan, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smith, Bernard, Hagerstown 
Smith, Joseph H.. Hancock 
Spina, Russell, Jamaica. N. Y. 
Storch, Murray. Passaic, N. J. 
Taub, Charles, Newark. N. J. 
Toffic, John W., Bergenfield. N. J. 
Tolley. Leonard J.. Brooklyn Park 
Upham. Louis J., Baltimore 
Vitolo, Erminio, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weinger, Irving, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Wohl. Milton. Baltimore 
Zeger. Jack I.. Port Jervis. N. Y. 
Zuskin. Raynard F.. Baltimore 



SECOND YEAR PREDENTAL CLASS 



Aldridge. William A.. Baltimore 
Chicques. Elsa L.. Caguas. Puerto Rico 
Cohen. Sylvan P., Baltimore 
Coroso, Joseph T.. Hartford, Conn. 
Gasteaaoro, Mariano, Panama City, 

Panama « i vr t 

Harber. Joseph M.. Asbury Park. N. J. 
Kahl, Gordon K.. Baltimore 
Kennedy. Walter E.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Kolman, Irvin O.. Trenton, N. J. 
Lasch. Henry R.. New Britain. Conn. 



Lazauskas. Algert P., Baltimore 
Martinelli. Ricardo. Panama City. Panama 
Munoz, Jorge E., Salinas. Puerto Rico 
Ouellette. Raymond T., Lawrence, Mass. 
Ramirez, Mario F.. San German. Puerto 

Rico 
Tighe. Joseph M., Raspeburg 
Toomey, Lewis C Elkridge 
Wieland. John T., Baltimore 
Williamson. Riley S.. Baltimore 
Yeager, John W.. Baltimore 



FIRST YEAR PREDENTAL CLASS 



Beaulieu. Jerome E.. Gome, N. H. 

Carrasquillo. Ralph J.. New York. N. Y. 

Cierler. Irving J., Baltimore 

Cooper. Bertram. Baltimore 

DiPaula. Vincent J., Elkton 

Ditrolio, James V., Kearny. N. J. 

Edwards. John J.. Dundalk 

Greene, WiUard T., Baltimore 

Jacobs, Robert I.. Baltimore 

Kramer, Mervin. Baltimore 
Krieger, Leon, Baltimore 
Lancaster. DeWitt B.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Landes. Isaac J.. Baltimore 
Leatherbury, George P.. Towson 
Leiphart, Mahlon P., York, Pa. 
Levin. Naomi H., Baltimore 
Levy, Herbert S.. Baltimore 
Libauer. Robert S., Baltimore 
Liloia. Michael P., Nutley, N. J. 
Moffett, Virginia M., Catonsville 



Montesinos, Miguel J.. Governors Island. 

N. Y. ^ 

O'Meara, John O.. Torrington, Conn. 
Reilly, James T.. Central Aguirre, 

Puerto Rico 
Rising. Richard B.. Catonsville 
Rothenberg, Joffi^e M.. Baltimore 
Sauerman, Edward E. K., Jr.. Linthicum 

Heights 
Schmidt. John H.. Baltimore 
Schmidt, Robert F.. Baltimore 
Shochet, Melvin W.. Baltimore 
Stern, Martin. Passaic, N. J. 
Sucoll, Sidney, Hartford. Conn. 
Tongue. Raymond K.. Baltimore 
Wilds, Howard F.. Jr., Baltimore 
Wilkinson. Milton S.. North Arlington. 

N. J. ., 

Yalovitz, Marvin S.. Anniston. Ala. 
Zimmerman. John B., Schaefferstown. Pa. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

T 1 ^A. Proutt. Leah M., Hagerstown 

Erana, Nieva B.. Pasay. Philippine Islands Proutt. Le 

377 



376 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

SENIOR CLASS 



Bailey, Douglas A., Takoma Fajk 

Beal, Anne A., Washington, D. C. 

Birkland, John V., Washington, D. C. 

Brode, Carl K., Frostburg 

Burton, Beulah M., Berwyn 

Clopper, Richard R., Clear Spring 

Conway, Mary V., Washington, D. C. 

Danforth, Shirley F., Riverdale 

Enderle, Ethel E.. Glen Burnie 

Esch, Marion E., Chevy Chase 

Glime, Gilbert, Frostburg 

Goldsmith, Cecelia E., Faulkner 

Hall, Thomas W., Bel Air 

Hamilton, Isabel, Hyattsville 

Harlan, Doris E., Silver Spring 

Harryman, Thomas D., Baltimore 

Headley, Lawrence C, College Park 

Heaps, Laura F., Cardiff 

Heaps, Mary M., Cardiff 

Heffernan, Maryelene, Washington, D. C. 

Heintze, Ruth W., Takoma Park 

Hilton, E. Jane, Ml. Airy 

Hobbs, Dorothy M., Linden 

Katz, Lillian, Washington, D. C. 

Keller, Ralph W., Frederick 

Kellermann, Eileen A., Hyattsville 

Krumpach, Mary E., Luke 

Lee, Frank D., Baltimore 

Lightfoot, Georgiana C, Takoma Park 



Long, E. Genevieve, Marion 
Lovell, Grace R., Brentwood 
Lowry, Ruth V., Baltimore 
Maxwell, Edna C, Luke 
Mazer, Robert, Baltimore 
Miller, Aden T., Lonaconing 
Moore, Elizabeth A., Queen Anne 
Morgan, Alice S., Washington, D. C. 
O'Keefe, Bernice E., Rockville 
Polack, Bella R., Hagerstown 
Robinson, Grace E., Baltimore 
Shamberger, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Shaw, Roberta F., Stewartstown, Pa. 
Shearer, Kathleen M., College Park 
Sheridan, Richard B., Salisbury 
Shipley, Cora L., Branchville 
Sinclair, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Ruth R., Washington, D. C. 
Snyder, Faye D., Annapolis 
Sullivan, Ross H., Pleasantville, N. J. 
Surgent, Michael G., Eckley, Pa. 
Swanson, Margaret E., Washington, D. C. 
Weisberg, Bertha, Baltimore 
Weller, Lucille B., Beallsville 
Wetherby, Edith H., Welch, W. Va. 
Wheeler, Elwood L., Glyndon 
Wiser, Vivian D., Branchville 
Wolfe, William C, Mt. Union. Pa. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Adams, Clifton L., Jr., Silver Spring 
Alperstein, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Anders, Anne F., Frederick 
Armiger, Virginia G., Pindell 
Aud, William E., Poolesville 
Bailey, Donald, Takoma Park 
Biskin, Shirley L., Takoma Park 
Bohlin, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 
Boose, D. Matilda, Washington, D. C. 
Bowling, Virginia P., Wicomico 
Bowman, Anne K., Annapolis Junction 
Bride, Crescent J., Rockville 
Burke, Myrtle G., McCoole 
Byers, G. Ellsworth, Lonaconing 
Cronin, F. Harford, Joppa 
DuShane, Doris A., Baltimore 
Eichlin, Doris E., Washington, D. C. 
Forman, Morris, Baltimore 
Fowble, Florence W., Reisterstown 
Freas, Karl G., Wheaton 
Freudenberger, John G., Baltimore 
Gordy, Eugene M., Snow Hill 
Guyther, Mary A., Mechanicsville 



Haas, Alice C, Jenkintown, Pa. 
Handler, Sylvia, Kingston, N. Y. 
Hardesty, A. Marie, Newburg 
Howard, William F., Baltimore 
Huber, Nora L., Baltimore 
Hutzell, William E., Washington, D. C. 
Jack, Margaret C Port Deposit 
Kalbaugh, Hazel L., Luke 
Kephart, Mary E., Taneytown 
Linn, Ruth L., State College, Pa. 
Manning, Laura, Silver Spring 
Matthews, Margaret E., Cambridge 
Mayes, Irvin C, Jr., Timonium 
Michelson, Elaine, Baltimore 
Mileto, Catherine, Annapolis 
Murphy, Celia E., Walkersville 
Nevy, Inez A., Cumberland 
Powell, Dorothy M., Dorsey 
Rabinowitz, Alex, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rawley, Betty E., Hyattsville 
Schutz, Patricia B., Annapolis 
Smith, Blair H.. Mt. Rainier 
Smith, Elizabeth J., Salisbury 



378 



Smith. Mildred E., Walkersville 
Sollod, Leonard. Baltimore 
Sparling, Edith R., Washington, D. C. 
Speake, Mai-y M., Luray, Va. 
Stevan, Diana, Baltimore 
Sullivan, Evelyn L., Hyattsville 



Summers, Mary E.. Pulaski. Va. 
Trundle, Lucy W., Ashton 
Webster. Carolyn I., Pylesville 
Wheeler. Waverley J., Baltimore 
Williams, Dorothy E.. College Park 
Yochelson, Aaron, Anacostia 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Aitcheson. Genevieve. Laurel 

Ames,, Ann C, Westmoreland Hills 

Baitz, Mildred, Washington, D. C. 

Barker. Marian E.. Washington, D. C. 

Bono, Ann M., Washington, D. C. 

Bono. Vivian E., Washington, D. C 

Bowling, Thelma P., Faulkner 

Brokamp. Raymond W.. Linthieum Heights 

Burroughs, E. Elizabeth, Mechanicsville 

Case, Sara V., Felton. Del. 

Chronister, Mason, Baltimore 

Cline, Carl A., Jr.. Monrovia 

Collins. Hiram H., Crisfield 

DeVore, Clair E., Cumberland 

Dorsey. Margaret F., Baltimore 

Duncan, Laura R., District Heights 

Dunn, Katherine C, Silver Spring 

Egan, John J., Waterbury. Conn. 

Evans, Hal K.. Bladensburg 

Fricke, Annamarie H., Baltimore 

Garonzik, Ruth, Baltimore 

Gisriel, Austin E., Elkridge 

Goldberg, Helen E., Kingston, N. Y. 

Greengold, H. Ruth, Annapolis 

Griffin, Margaret E.. Baltimore 

Griffith, Ann M., Rockville 

Grindel, Jane H., Frostburg 

Groves, Helen V., Cumberland 

Hart, Richard K., Hagerstown 

Hottel, Betty L., College Park 

lager. Helen E.. Hyattsville 

Jarboe. Ann E.. Leonardtown 

Jones. John S., Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Kehoe, James H., Bel Air 

Kemp. Margaret C. College Park 



Keys. Virginia A.. Laurel 

King. Judith A.. Washington, D. C. 

Knepley, George W., Altoona, Pa. 

Kornmann, Lucille V., Baltimore 

Kuhn, Eleanor M., Bethesda 

Legge. Jane M., Cumberland 

Leites, Israel. Baltimore 

Lewis, Francis A., Sykesville 

Link, Mary E., Baltimore 

Long, Virginia M., Selby%'ille. Del. 

Longest, Katherine A., Baltimore 

Mayes, Marian V.. Phoenix 

McChesney, Douglas W., University Park 

Meade. James G.. Fort Deposit 

Mondorff. Pershing L.. Emmitsburg 

Naughten. Edward T., Washington, D. C. 

Nordwall, Alice E., Princess Anne 

Norton, Charles A., Ogden. Utah 

O'Hara, William J.. Gambrills 

Petersen, Olga C, Hyattsville 

Provenza. Dominic V., Baltimore 

Roesler, Herbert S.. Bayard, Va. 

Ross. Mary L., Cumberland 

Ryon, Mary J., Waldorf 

Scharf. Thomas M., Glen Burnie 

Smith, Adria J.. Baltimore 

Smith, Virginia E., Mount Airy 

Teal, Lois A., Hyattsville 

Tetlow, Robert M., Boyds 

Walsh, Ambrose J., Jr., Brentwood 

Weber, June E., Washington, D. C. 

Weidinger, Charles W.. Baltimore 

Wellinger, Phyllis M., Hagerstown 

Wilson, N. Lorraine, Fulton 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Adams, Ellen C, Aberdeen 
Applegarth, Vivian E.. Honga 
Arnold, William D., Baltimore 
Bell. Judson H., Aberdeen 
Bishopp. Hazel E., Silver Spring 
Blattman. Margaret M.. Riverdale 
Bodine, Mildred V., Silver Spring 
Bollinger, G. Gladys, College Park 
Boose, Barbara E., Takoma Park. D. C. 
Boyda. John J., Iselin. Pa., 
Bright, Elmer F., Baltimore 
Butler, Isabel R.. Edmonston 



Gary, Clara F., Washington, D. C. 
Chaires, Helen V., Queen Anne 
Cissel, Jean L., Sandy Spring 
Clark, Mary E.. Takoma Park 
dayman. Henry, Mt. Rainier 

Coffman, Maidee E., Washington, D. C. 

Cook, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 

Corcoran, Martha A., Washington. D. C. 

Cournyn, Rena L., Washington, D. C. 

Culver, Burton E.. College Park 

Davis. Florence V.. Grantsville 

Deitz. Alice E.. Baltimore 



379 



Everly. Mai-fha E.. Lisbon 
Fields. Thomas M., Hyattsville 
Flynn. E. Patricia, Washington. D C. 
Forman, Saxa. Washington. D. C 
Gilleland. Catherine E.. Chevy Chase 
Gray. Carolyn B.. Poolesville 
Groesbeck, Philip F.. Coxsackie. N. Y. 
Hall, Marguerite G.. Baltimore 
Hurley, Robert F., Hyattsville 
Hyatt. Hilda M., Damascus 
Kahn, Estelle W., Baltimore 
Katz. Bertha. Washington. D. C. 
Kraft. Dorothy A.. Washington. D. C. 
Lanahan, Reita M., Washington, D. C 
Lancaster. Truman O.. Washington, D. C. 
Main, Robert L.. Seat Pleasant 
Maisel. Frederick C. Jr., Catonsville 
Maynard. Eurith L.. Baltimore 
McFadden, Janet M.. Mt. Rainier 
McLuckie, Virginia L.. Cumberland 
McNeil, John P.. Baltimore 
Melvin. Robert H., Washington, D C 
Moskey, Frances E.. Washington. D. C. 
Murphy. Joseph M.. Carney's Point, N J 
Murray, Norma L., Princess Anne 
Nelson, Clifford L.. White Hall 
Nordwall. Frances L., Princess Anne 
Owings, Jane C., Riverdale 
Papanicolas. Gus J.. Washington. D. C. 



Poetzsch, Paul H., Baltimore 
Ramer. Evelyn J.. Chevy Chase 
Resnick, Minnie M., Mt. Airy 
Rockstroh, Henry J., Ellicott City 
Ross. Betsy L.. Takoma Park 
Rudo, Charles, Baltimore 
Sargeant, Lida E., Silver Spring 
Scharpf, Louise. Baltimore 
Schroeder, Leonard T., Annapolis 
Schwartz, Rosalind. New York, N. Y. 
Seligson, Mildred. Baltimore 
Shea, Katherine J.. Holyoke, Mass. 
Smith, Paul H., Westmoreland Hills 
Smith, Robert H., Woodlynne, N. J. 
Stark, Mary E., Aberdeen 
Steele, H^nry G., Washington, D. C. 
Stewart. Frank S., Arlington, Va. 
Stubbs, Mildred V.. Mt. Rainier 
Tapper, Herman A., Baltimore 
Taylor, Morton F., Perry vi lie 
Thomas, Elaine M., Mt. Rainier 
Thomas, Lester G., Mt. Rainier 
Trout, Maxine E., Walkersville 
Turner, Alice V., Washington, D. C. 
Waxier, Mary. Cambridge 
Wolfinger, Margaret E., Hagerstown 
Wood. M. Virginia. Washington. D. C. 
Zimmerman. Margaret C. Frederick 
Zinberg, Norma E.. Richmond. Va. 



PART TIME 



Abbott, Kathryn K.. Bennings, D. C 

Alder. Betty L., Bethesda 

Alder. Grace L.. Rockville 

Ashmun, Jean R., Washington, D. C. 

Baker. Robert L.. Washington, D C 

Becraft. Mabel V.. Washington Grove 

Benbow. Gene T.. Clinton 

Benner. Willis A., Washington. D. C. 

Biggins, Gertrude L., Washington. D C 

Bomberger. Hulda B., College Park 
Boswell, Alice A., Brookeville 
Bowie, Andrew K.. Hyattsville 
Brashears, Helen H., Hyattsville 
Burch, Elizabeth B.. Charlotte Hall 
Burgess. Maurine D., Washington. D. C 
Campbell. Marjorie H.. Washington. D. C. 
Cantwell. Hammond D., Cambridge 
Casbarian, Louise W., Riverdale 
Chatham, Elizabeth E., La Plata 
Clapp. Alice R., Washington, D. C. 
Clark. Ellen N., Silver Spring 
Close, Marion B., Frostburg 
Coffey, Lillian S.. Landover 
Collins. Thomas E.. Brentwood 
Copes. Bessie E., Silver Spring 
Copes, Grace R.. Silver Spring 



Craig, Madic E., Brentwood 
Cross, Mary G.. Rockville 
Dawson. Catherine B., Washington. D. C 
Dommek. Mary R.. College Park 
Dunn. May A., Hyattsville 
Durrant. Charlotte F.. College Park 
Earle. Mary I.. Washington, D. C. 
Faber. Anna P., College Heights 
Fedak. Marjorie B., Rockville 
Feddeman, Edna S.. Washington. D. C 
Grove, Edith M.. Washington. D. C. 
Grubbs, Birdie A., Washington, D. C 

Hardesty. Mae L., West River 

Hearne, Ethel G., La Plata 

Henderson, Esther L., Washington. D. C 

Hiatt, Pearl M., Chevy Chase 

Hobbs, Thelma E., Mt. Airy 

Horton. Helen E., Cleveland. Tenn. 

Joyce. Agnes C, Frostburg 

Kaufman. Gee L.. Washington. D C 

Kekenes. Athena. Mt. Rainier 

Kirby, Marion. Takoma Park 

Klink. May. Mt. Rainier 

Knotts, Dorothy E. Templeville 

Lambrides, John G.. Laurel 
Lesser, Claire. Washington. D. C. 



380 



Lynch, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Matthews, Abigail G., La Plata 
McCall, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 
McKeever, Alice A., Silver Spring 
Meany, Elizabeth, Rockville 
Miller, Dorothy A., Hyattsville 
Monred, Ravenell A., Gaithersburg 
Moore, Nell M., Washington, D. C. 
Mudd, H. Virginia, Pomfret 
Myers, W. Constance, Hyattsville 
Nichols. Dorothy V., Chevy Chase 
Regan. Ethel M., Mt. Rainier 
Reich, Elinor G. J.. La Plata 
Richmond. Nadine, Washington, D. C. 
Ricketts, Lulu B., Brookeville 
Rose, Anna P., Kensington 
Scates. Irene. Gaithersburg 
Schaeffer, Carol J.. Washington. D. C. 
Schwarzmann. Ethel M., Washington, D. C. 
Scop, Abraham, Catonsville 



Smith, Gladys H., Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Miriam O., Bethesda 

Sothoron, Julia H., Charlotte Hall 

Stanley, A. Jeanne, Silver Spring 

Turner, Edward C, La Plata 

Turner, Emily B., Aquasco 

Uhrinak, George J.. Riverdale 

Walker. Louise S., Washington, D. C. 

Webb, Margaret O., Hyattsville 

Weld. Ruth, Sandy Spring 

West, Dorothy H., Sligo Park Hills 

Wheeler, Elsie L., Silver Spring 

White. Ruth O., Mt. Rainier 

Willard, Helen L.. Poolesville 

Wilson, Elinor G., Washington, D. C. 

Wine. Hilda K., Washington, D. C. 

Wisner, Jackson W., Rockville 

Yeager, Mildred F.. Laurel 

Young, Irene, Silver Spring 

Zimmerman, Marian A.. Washing<<>n, D. < 

Zulick, Charles M., Houtzdale, Pa. 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Sullivan Mary S., Frostburg 



EXTENSION TEACHERS-TRAINING COURSES 

(Industrial Edacation, Baltimore) 



Aaronson, Philip J. 
Adkinson, Olney 
Anderson, Charles R. 
Annan. Clara 
Askew. Howard D. 
Auth. Jack W. 
Bachmann, Oswald E. 
Baer, A. Harris 
Ball, Frances H. 
Bargteil, Ralph 
Barnard, Ednah H. 
Barnes, Marie W. 
Barnes, May S. 
Baron. Herman L. 
Barrett, Mary E. 
Baughman, E. Elizabeth 
Baumgardner, Ralph W. 
Beall, Dallas I. 
Bell, Raymond E. 
Benner, Elisabeth 
Benson, Ida B. 
Bloomberg, Nance 
Borenstein, Olga 
Bosley, Edgar B. A. 
Bowen, Louise MacW. 
Britton, Margaret 



Brooks, Helen 
Brusowankin, Bessie 
Buettner, John A., Jr. 
Bull, Carl E. 

Bullough, George Van Ness 
Bunce, Edward W. 
Burns. Thelma W. 
Cantwell, Hammond D. 
Capocci, Catherine F. 
Childs, William M. 
Colbert, Cecile 
Corbett. Ruth 
Crane, Amy Hicks 
Crist, Cornelia R. 
Davidson, David K. 
Dogen, LeRoy G. 
Deitrich, Elmira H. 
Denowitch, Freda G. 
Dewling, Evelyn E. 
Doering, Ruth 
Dorsey, Catherine 
Dudderar, Charles W. 
Dun woody, Ruth M. 
Edwards, Walter F. 
Ely, James H., Jr. 
Engle, Viva R. 



381 



English, Edith M. 
Etzkorn, Kathryn H. 
Everhart, William C. 
Ewingr, Margaret T. 
Falk, Miriam 
Farrow, Blanche S. 
Farson, Eleanor M. 
Fisher, Gilbert C. 
Fisher, Joseph G. 
Frank, Paul S. 
Freedman, Norman N. 
Freeze, Frank L., Jr. 
Friedman, Isadore 
Galley, Joseph N. 
Gambrill, H. Nelson 
Garmer, William McK., Jr. 
Gilbert, Loren G. 
Gilbert, Roland A. 
Gill, Francis 
Gillan, Andrew S. 
Goden. Alan A. 
Gomborov, Minnie 
Graham, Margaret C. 
Grove, Elmer K. 
Gugliuzza. Joseph M. 
Haley, Lillian L. 
Hall, Elmer E. 
Hamel, W. Ramont 
Hansen, Cyril 
Hardy, Earl C. 
Harker, Mildred C. 
Haugh, Marian 
Hausmann, Ida M. 
Hawkins, Nannie M. 
Healey, William G. 
Healey, William G.. Jr. 
Heathcote, Louis W. 
Hedrick, Lillian S. 
Hedrick, Melvin 
Heimiller, Wm. J. C. 
Heinz, Kathryn 
Hennick, Donald C. 
Hensen, Edward C. 
Hensen, Henry 
Herbert, Russell M. 
Heylmun, Stanley L. 
Himmel, Mildred 
Hisley, Lillian P. 
Hocheder, Harry P. 
Hoffman, Jennie Z. 
Hogan, Margaret M. 
Holden, Delma Mae 
Hollander, Anna 
Hollander, Eleanor 
Hollander, Margaret 
Horn, Robert H. 
Horvath. G. Kenneth 
Hunt. Richard G. 



Isabelle, Jos. O. 
Jacob, Felice E. 
Jennings, Margaret 
Jeschke, Cury A. H. 
Jirsa, Charles 
Johnson, Eldred D. 
Johnston, Ruth E. 
Jones, Julia E. 
Keating, Lyda 
Kidd, Frank 
Kleiman, Bernice 
Knorr, Helen E. 
Knotts, Dorothy E. 
Krapkat, Herbert M. 
Krause, Louise 
Krieger, Mildred B. 
Kuehn, Peter 
Kummel, Lillian 
Lantz, Naomi M, 
Latham, Helen H. 
Leonhart, Gail A. 
Levin, Sol 
Lewis, Dorothy E. 
Lodenkemper. Harvey C. 
Longford, Robert C. 
Lovering, Katherine A. 
McCann, Robert H. 
McCarriar, Herbert G. 
McCauIey, Everett S. 
McDairmant, John 
McQuade, John F. 
Mahannah, Erwin 
Mainen, Allan 
MaJtese, Stephen L. 
Manakee, Edward Y. 
Marshall, M. Ellen 
Matthaei, Lewis A. 
Matthews, Elizabeth P. 
Mattingly, Nellie B. 
Mele, Virginia M. 
Merkle, Clifford C. 
Meyer, Elmer Lee. Jr. 
Miller, Mayfort P. 
Miller, Ruth C. 
Morsberger, Mary B. 
Nachlas, Bernard 
Nathanson, David 
Nicol, Lindsay 
Norris, Cecil 
Odin, Hans P. 
O'Keeffe, Violet E. 
Oursler, Anna B. 
Peterson, Harold D. 
Pettit, Burnett A. 
Phillips, J. LeRoy 
Poetzsch, Paul H. 
Powell, George C. 
Proctor, James O. 



382 



Provenza, Anna M. 
Quinan, Allen J. 
Quinan, Charles R. 
Rachanow, Louis 
Randall, Roland E. 
Rankin, George T. 
Reynolds, Joseph R. 
Rich, Bessie A. 
Richards, Ruth 
Rivkin, Leon 
Rock, Charles V. 
Rummel, Edward F. 
Ruppel, Alvin G. 
Russell, Helen A. 
Sachs, Frank N. 
Sahlin, Emilie H. 
Sappington, Esther 
Saunders, Leslie M. 
Schorr, George W. 
Schubert, Florence H. 
Schwarzmann, George A. 
Selsky, S. Samuel 
Shepherd, Clarence M. 
Sheppard. Ethel C. 
Siegel, Esther F. 
Silbert, Keel I. 
Slade, Margaret E. 
Smith, Harold D. 
Spiegel, Anna 
Stauffer, Arden K. 



Steigner, E. Paul 
Sweat, Algie Elizabeth 
Sweetland, Theodore R. 
Thomas, Eleanor L. 
Thompson, Madeleine M. 
Tustin, Howard D. 
Valle, Joseph 
Valle, Philip J. 
Vansant, Lillian H. 
Wachsman, Celia 
Wahab, Charlotte E. 
WaJker, J. Annabel 
Waltham. Wm. Alan 
Weigate, Charles 
Weiland, Richard Wm. 
Weisbei-g, Maurice M. 
West, Elmer P. 
Whipple, Stanley R, 
White, Clinton E. W. 
White, Walter S. 
Wilkison, John Wm. 
Willhide. Elsa H. 
Williams, L. Leighton 
Williams, Margaret G. 
Wilson, Hugh 
Wolfe, Charles 
Woolf, Samuel 
Wrot€n, Arthur A. 
Yoder, Minnie Merle 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

SENIOR CLASS 



Andrews, John T., Baltimore 
Backhaus, Albert P., Baltimore 
Bennett, Joseph H., Washington, D. C. 
Bishoff, Frederick M., Washington, D. C. 
Bowman, George A., Annapolis Junction 
Brookhart, George C, Jarrettsville 
Browning, John R., Washington, D. C, 
Cladny, Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Collins, Ralph A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
CoUison, Malcolm N., Takoma Park 
DeArmey. F. T., Windber, Pa. 
Diggs, Robert S., Baltimore 
Goldbeck, Page, Chevy Chase 
Goldberg, Paul, Baltimore 
Gray, Vernon H., Chevy Chase 
Harris, Frederick, Washington, D. C. 
Hollister, Curtis L., Washington. D. C. 
Horman, Austin S., Baltimore 
Kennedy, Edward J., Baltimore 
Kluckhuhn, Frederick H., Laurel 
Korab. Arnold A., Colmar Manor 



Latterner, Henry, Jr., Chevy Chase 
Mattingly, Robert L., Washington, D. C. 
Maynard, William G., Baltimore 
Meinzer, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Morgan, Lee, Washington, D. C. 
Owens, Herbert M., Federalsburg 
Parce, John R., Annapolis 
Phillips, Adon W., Bethesda 
Pierce, Charles H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Putman, Raymond S.. Washington, D. C. 
Roundy, Paul V., Chevy Chase 
Savage, Alfred E., Washington, D. C. 
Schreiber. Irvin R., Washington. D. C. 
Shaffer, Thomas N., Washington, D. C. 
Siems, John L., Baltimore 
Smith, Warner T.. College Park 
Sperry, Harold C, Baltimore 
Turnbull, James, Takoma Park 
Vernay, Howard A., Baltimore 
Walton. Robert L., Washington, D. C. 
Wolk, Reuben, Washington, D. C. 



383 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Ashmun. Van S.. Washington, D. C. 
Bartoo, Donald G., Hyattsville 
Bryant, William C, Takoma Park 
Budkoff, Nicholas A.. Lynn, Mass. 
Collins, James E.. Crisfield 
Corbin. Maurice E., Baltimore 
Davis. William B., Jr.. Washington, D. C. 
DeArmey, John J., Windber, Pa. 
Elvove, Elies, Washington, D. C. 
Essex. H. Alfred, Washington. D. C. 
Etkind, Irving J., New Haven, Conn. 
Forrester, James L., Berwyn 
Franke. Harold H.. Washington. D. C. 
Gerber, Sigmund I.. Baltimore 
Gottlieb, Robert. Washington. D. C. 
Hall, Herbert P., Washington. D. C. 
Harvey, Cecil L.. Washington. D. C. 
Hennighausen, Louis K., Baltimore 
Hewitt. Frederic M.. Baltimore 
Holbrook, Charles C, College Park 
Home. John F.. Chevy Chase 
Hutton, Joel W.. College Park 
Janes. Henry W.. Anacostia, D. C. 
Jones, Stephen H., Leonardtown 
Krafft. Robert E., Washington, D. C. 
Lass well. Philip M., Takoma Park 



Lynham, John C, Hyattsville 

McClenon, Donald, Takoma Park 

McGill. Lloyd H. R., Baltimore 

Mitchell, David H., Washington, D. C. 

Morris. Francis C. Washington, D. C. 

Mueller, Eugene F., Jr.. Washington. D. C. 

Muncks, John D., Baltimore 

Peck. Alvin, Washington, D. C. 

Perkins, Fred W.. Jr.. Chevy Chase 

Phillips. Irving, Washington. D. C. 

Porter. Wade T.. Washington. D. C. 
Robertson, Eliott B., Bethesda 
Scott, Elgin W.. Washington, D. C. 
Seeley, George E., Baltimore 
Simms, Harvey C. Washington, D. C. 
Smith. John P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Welch, Washington, D. C. 
Stabler, Sydney S.. Hyattsville 
Stedman, Henry T.. Catonsville 
Stevens, John W.. Takoma Park 
Thompson, T. Manning. Washington. D. C. 
Wettje. Robert H., Riverdale 
Wharton. Thomas P., College Park 
Willett, LeRoy G.. Washington. D. C. 
Witt. Emitt C, Washington, D. C. 
Yourtee, Leon R., Brownsville 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Albarano. Ralph J., Willow, Pa. 

Amos, Wallace R.. Silver Spring 

Baldwin. Robert D.. Riverdale 

Bamman, Richard K.. Coltons Point 

Bebb, Edwaid K.. Chevy Chase 

Berg, Charles M.. Baltimore 

Booze. William C, Mt. Washington 

Brand. Robert A.. Washington. D. C. 

Brashears. Richard S.. Washington, D. C. 

Brauns, William P., Jr., Odenton 

Brockman, Roy C, Baltimore 

Brookes, Thomas R., Bel Air 

Camardi, Nicholas J., Washington. D. C. 

Carpenter Byron L.. Washington, D. C. 
Carroll, Richard W.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Chilcoat. Ralph L.. Washington D. C. 
Clarke, Joseph A., Jessup 
Cole. Albert H., Linthicum Heights 
Coleman, Thomas L., Washington. D. C. 
Corkran, William H., Trappe 
Cox. Junior N.. Baltimore 
Cranford, Leonard C, Washington, D. C. 
Davidson. Donald C. Washington, D. C. 
Davis. Warren P., Washington. D. C. 
Dorr, George W., Washington. D. C. 
Emrich. William S.. Hebron 
Farnsworth. John K., Washington. D. C. 
Farrall, John A.. Washington. D. C. 



Fletcher. Arthur W., Linthicum Heights 
Folk. William C. Washington, D. C. 
Gallagher, Harry G.. Relay 
Gessford. Richard L.. Mt. Rainier 
Graham. William M., Baltimore 
Greenwood, Orville W., Brentwood 
Hart, Robert L.. Hagerstown 
Heghinian. Garabed, Baltimore 
Herbert. Wilbur M., Baltimore 
Herman. Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Herrmann. Edward M.. Baltimore 
Jackson. Robert L., Bethesda 
Kaminski. Joseph. Baltimore 
Kestler. Paul G., Baltimore 
Kimball. Henry F., Washington, D. C. 
King. Thomas O., Savage 
Kinney. Robert W., Washington, D. C. 
Kirby, James T., Trappe 
Knust, Herman R., Jessup 
Kreuzberg. Harvey W., Silver Spring 
Lane, John E., Washington. D. C. 
Lanham. Paul T.. Lanham 
Lanigan, James M.. Washington. D. C. 
Lapoint. George M.. Catonsville 
Lee, Gin H.. Washington. D. C. 
LeMat, Lee E., Washington. D. C. 
Lodge. Robert J.. Baltimore 
Lozupone, Frank P., Chevy Chase 



384 



Males, Irwin I.. Washington. D. C. 

Marzolf, Joseph M., Jr., Deale 

Meeks. George E., Washington, D. C. 

Meyer, Carl W., Baltimore 

Moran, Joseph T., Westernport 

Mulitz. Milton M., Washington, D. C. 

Northrop, Sanford E., Hagerstown 

Odell, Charles N.. Ellicott City 

O'Farrell, Rufus E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Oswald, Huyette B.. College Park 

Otten. Leonard J.. Parkville 

Parsons, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 

Purdum, William D., Glyndon 

Rector, Ralph L.. Washington, D. C. 

Riley, Thomas W., Germantown 

Ripple, Roland C. Cheltenham 

Roberts, E. Richard, Washington, D. C. 

Russell, Joseph S., Maddox 

Schwartz. Charles H.. Branchville 



Scott. Roy F.. Washington, D. C. 
Shaw, Bowen W.. Silver Spring 
Shipe, John K.. Washington, D. C. 
Slicer, William A.. Gaithersburg 
Speare, Almus R., Jr., Rockville 
Steiner, Warren E., Washington. D. C. 
Stewart, Carl H., Jr., Baltimore 
Storrs, Gardner H., Linthicum Heights 
Strausbaugh, Donn P., Chevy Chase 
Talone. Edward R., Brentwood 
Warner. Robert E.. Baltimore 
Watkins. William H.. Washington. D. C. 
Weeks, Loraine H., Mt. Lake Park 
Whalen, Stanley M., Mt. Rainier 
Wheeler. Francis W., Silver Spring 
Wilson, J. Gibson, Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 
Yocum, Wilbur F., Chevy Chase 
Young, Charles M., Washington, D. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Abarca, Jose F., San Juan, P. R, 
Abbe, Gilbert. College Park 
Altman, Edwai-d R., Wa3hington, D. C. 
Anderson. Philip R.. Bay Ridge 
Bauernschmidt, John N., Baltimore 
Bengoechea, Adam. Chevy Chase 
Betts, Allen W.. Chevy Chase 
Bittinger, Francis G., Washington, D. C. 
Blazek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Boice, John E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Bollinger, George W., Elkton 
Bradley, Alan T., Baltimore 
Bralove, William. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 
Bridge, Herbert S., Takoma Park 
Brinson. John R., Brentwood 
Brown, Sewell A., Jr.. Baltimore 
Brucker, Fredric L., Jr.. Sparrows Point 
Caldwell, Carl D.. Washington. D. C. 
Callahan. William H., Baltimore 
Capps. Overton B., Jr., Baltimore 
Carter. John M., Baltimore 
Cavey, Daniel J.. Baltimore 
Clark, John W., Jr., Hancock 
Clark. Thomas C. Hanover 
Cochrane. Robert B., Jr.. Baltimore 
Condon, Robert D., Baltimore 
Crockett, David T., Jr., Hagerstown 
Cromwell, Howard L., Washington, D. C. 
Crum, Bernard G., Baltimore 
Crump. Ralph F.. Frostburg 
Damuth. Donald R., Baltimore 
Darling, William M., Washington, D. C. 
Day, Rodney R., Bethesda 
Devlin. Joseph J.. Catonsville 
Dix. Francis, Washington, D. C. 
Dougherty, Stanley S., Washington, D. C 
Dove, Jack E., Washington, D. C. 



Downs, Hugh G., Jr.. Hagerstown 
Duey. Homer G., New Brighton, Pa. 
Edgerton. James F., Washington, D. C.> 
Emmerich, George M.. Silver Spring 
Evans, Kenneth J., Takoma Park 
Eyler. John D.. Jr., Baltimore 
Farley, Belmont G., Washington. D. C. 
Finton, James R., Washington, D. C. 
Fisher. David, Baltimore 
Fishkin, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Flanagan, Francis, Jr., Fort Meade 
Ford, Harry S., Silver Spring 
Fox, Gabriel. Washington. D. C. 
Freeze, Paul D., Thurmont 
Frye, William M.. Mt. Rainier 
Gannon, William F., Westernport 
Garlitz. Vincent L.. Cumberland 
Gienger, George H., "Scottsville, Va. 
Gore, Bertram W., Baltimore 
Greene, Joseph G.. Fort George G. Meade 
Groves. Robert A., Woodlawn 
Haddaway, Vaden J., Woodlawn 
Hall, Lacy. Bennings, D. C. 
Hall. Thomas A.. Washington, D. C. 
Hancock, Charles W., Baltimore 
Harmon, Robert B., Takoma Park 
Haskin, Lawrence H., Takoma Park 
Hatchett, Samuel E., Washington, D. C. 
Hawkins, Edward C. Catonsville 
Heil. George J.. Baltimore 
Heitz. Albert W.. Washington. D. C. 
Hink, Henry M„ Annapolis Junction 
Hitch, Thomas E., Washington, D. C. 
Hodges, Raymond L., St. Inigoes 
Hodgins, Lawrence J., College Park 
Hollomon, James E., Catonsville 
Holloway, John" J.. Jr.. Silver Spring 



385 



Hopkins, George C, Ck>llege Park 
Hopkins, Page F., Silver Spring 
Hughes, Thomas A., Washington, D. C. 
Imus, Alden E., Mt. Rainier 
Jones, Nelson R., Washington, D. C. 
Joyce, Joseph M., Hyattsville 
Kaiser, Herman F., Washington, D. C. 
Keller, Holly M., Bethesda 
Kinder, Gilbert E., Millersville 
Klug, Howard J., Washington, D. C. 
Laughead, Robert W., Bethesda 
Leaf, Albert L., Williamsport 
Leland, Charles R., Baltimore 
Lumsden, Milton G., Baltimore 
Maidens, William A., Washington, D. C. 
Maloney, William F., Baltimore 
Markline, Donald D., White Hall 
Marzolf, John C, Deale 
Mattingly, Robert D., Riverdale 
McCusker, Richai'd W., Pikesville 
McGee, John K., Silver Spring 
Mehring, Arthur C, Bennings, D. C. 
Mericle, John P., Washington, D. C. 
Mitchell, Walter G., Takoma Park 
Money, Qarence L., Washington, D. C. 
Moore, Harry H., Washington, D. C. 
Mulligan, Walter F., Jr., Berwyn 
Murphy, Donald F., Baltimore 
Nauss, Allen H., Baltimore 
Norris, John H., Baltimore 
Oberle, William F., Dundalk 
Onnen, Donald S., Baltimore 
Parker, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Peters, Roy F., Washington, D. C. 
Pfeiffer, Arthur M., Jr., Baltimore 
Piozet, Charles F., Hyattsville 
Plant, Edward F., Lanham 
Poole, Lewis A,, Annapolis 
Pope, Llewellyn N., Washington, D. C. 
Powell, John M., Dorsey 
Pyles, George V., Anacostia, D. C. 
Randall, Joseph H., Boyds 
Randall, Philip A., Washington, D. C. 
Rausch, Charles A., Baltimore 
Rawley, Weldon N., Jr., Hyattsville 
Reckner, Jack V., Severna Park 



Reynolds, Austin R., Baltimore 

Rife, John W., Baltimore 

Rimmer, William, University Park 

Royall, Wilbur M., Silver Spring 

Roylance, Donald C, Glenn Dale 

Saltzman, Ernest C, Washington, D. C. 

Saum, Irving, East Riverdale 

Schlenoff, Maurice, Baltimore 

Schlieder, Loren R., Baltimore 

Schmidt, Earl W., Catonsville 

Schultz, Charles P., Elkridge 

Scribner, Kimball J., Washington, D. C. 

Sesso, Raymond F., Washington, D. C. 

Sexton, Martin J., Baltimore 

Shaffer, Richard W., Denton 

Shaw, Thomas C, Baltimore 

Shivoder, Charles A., Ferguson 

Showacre, Harold G., Baltimore 

Siebeneichen, Paul O., Washington, D. C. 

Simmons, Dennis M,, Bethesda 

Sloan, James D., Cumberland 

Smith, Stanley H., Jr., Takoma Park 

Staines, Powell R., Jr., Severna Park 

Stevens, John F., Ill, Annapolis 

Stevenson, John W., Baltimore 

Streep, Samuel, Cheverly 

Suter, Walter H., Jr., Baltimore 

Thompson, Jack H., Chevy Chase 

Timberlake, Turner G., Magnolia 

Tool, Arthur Q., Jr., Takoma Park 

Tyson, Clifford W., Takoma Park 

Walker, John S., Silver Spring 

Watkins, Frank G., Baltimore 

Watson, Thomas E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Weathersbee, Frank B., Washington, D. C. 

Webster, Edward, Washington, D. C. 

Weikel, Stewart F., Baltimore 

Westfall, Robert R., Snow Hill 

Widener, Fredy D., Baltimore 

Wier, John B., Sparks 

Williams, Floyd D., Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, Henry D., Takoma Park 

Witherspoon, Fred L., Silver Spring 

Woodward, Ralph A., Port Republic 

Worden, John F., Berwyn 

Wynn, Harry T., Brentwood 



PART TIME 



Chappelear, James A., Washington, D. C. 
Leyba, Joseph M., New York, N. Y. 



O'Connell, Daniel T.. Washington, D. C. 
Utecht, Alfred M., College Park 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Wyche, Crosby, Charlotte Hall 



386 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Adams, John R., Jr., Takoma Park 
Aiken, Leonora, Chevy Chase 
Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 
Allard, Howard F., Arlington, Va. 
Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Allison, Herbert. M., Hyattsville 
Alperstein, Reuben R., Baltimore 
Anderson, Richard P., Baltimore 
Andrus, C. Fred, Washington, D. C 
Appier, Helen I., Washington, D. C. 
Archer, Louise V., Washington, D. C. 
Asadorian, Ara A., Providence, R. I. 
Backus. Lucile M., Silver Spring 
Baerwald, Frances C, Baltimore 
Balch, Clyde W., Hyattsville 
Baldwin, David H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Baldwin, Willis H., Havre de Grace 
Bartholdi, Wendell L., Salisbury 
Barzhe, Jean, Riverdale 
Bates. Tilly S., Baltimore 
Bayley, John S., Baltimore 
Beck, Frances F., Baltimore 
Beck, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Bellman, Frank A., Baltimore 
Bellows, John M., Jr., Maynard, Mass. 
Bennett, Elizabeth L., Frostbuig 
Bertschy, Harry A., Gaithersburg 
Bickley, William E., Jr., Martel, Tenn. 
Billings, Samuel C, Silver Spring 
Blackmore, John, Pullman, Wash. 
Booth, Frances S., Baltimore 
Bower, Francis M., Mt. Rainier 
Bowers, John L., Troy, Texas 
Boyles, William A., Hyattsville 
Bready, Helen P., Silver Spring 
Brechbill, Edith L., College Park 
Brenner, Abner, Washington, D. C. 
Brewer, Charles M., Hyattsville 
Brooks, Paul S., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Brown, Ruth L., Frederick 
Brownlee, Donald S., Alva, Okla. 
Bryan, Jack Y., Washington, D. C. 
Bryan, Samuel, Washington, D. C. 
Buddington, Arthur R., College Park 
Buhrow, Viola M., Washington. D. C. 
Burdette, Roger F., College Park 
Burslem, William A., Hyattsville 
Byrer, M. Virginia, Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Carhart, Homer W., Santiago, Chile 
Carl, Howard F., Washington, D. C. 
Carroll, Floyd D., Bostwick, Neb. 
Carter, Edward P., College Park 
Carver, Lynda M., Washington, D. C. 
Chadwick, Louise A., Washington, D. C. 
Chandler, Frederick B., Orono, Me. 
Citrin, Estelle, Washington, D. C. 



Coles, Elsie R., Elkton 
Colip, Louise R., Riverdale 

Conrad, Monima R., Takoma Park 

Cordish, Hilda, Baltimore 

Cox, B. Frank, College Park 

Creitz, E. Carroll, Beloit, Kaji. 

Cron, Lawrence E., Alamo, Texas 

Crosby, Muriel E., Washington, D. C. 

Cross, John M., Passaic, N. J. 

Grossman, Mora, Rowlandville 

Crow, Jane H., Mocksville, N. C 

Cullen, James G., Glen Burnie 

Custis, William K., Riverdale 

Dahn, Eloise, Chevy Chase 

Dantzig, Anne S., Hyattsville 

Davidson, Nellie M., Silver Spring 

Davis, Edward F.. Arlington, Va. 

Dawson. Roy C, Washington, D. C. 

Dedinsky, Joe S., Smock, Pa. 

DeDominicis. Amelia C, Baltimore 
Deemer. Ralph B., Takoma Park 
Dittmar, Gordon F., Baltimore 
Dittrich. Theodore T., Baltimore 
Donnally, Bessie S., Washington. D. C. 
Douglass, Edgar M., Washington, D. C. 
Draper, Mary E., Baltimore 
Dugan, Raymond, Poolesville 
Duncan, Sven S.. Silver Spring 
Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 
Duvall, Maude R.. Rockville 
Duvall, Wilbur I., Gaithersburg 
Edwards, William W., Silver Spring 
Eiseman, John H., Chevy Chase 
Elmore, Edna E., Washington, D. C. 
Emshwiller, Susie B., Washington, D. C 
Endler, Abraham S., New York, N. Y. 
Enten, Harry, Baltimore 
Ervin, Guy, Jr., Falls Church. Va. 
Evans, Dorothy E., Takoma Park 
Everhart, Herbert W., Kearneysville, 

W. Va. 
Fand, Isidore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Finkbinder, Roberta E., Baltimore 
Fisher, Ralph C, Hyattsville 
Florestano, Herbert J., Annapolis 
Fogelgren, Helen D., Mansfield. Ohio 
Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Fosbroke, Gerald E.. Elkridge 
Foster, Carroll P., Baltimore 
Fraas, Foster C, College Park 
Frazer, Mary W., Bethesda 
Freeman, Andrew F., Hyattsville 
Friedberg, Minna C Baltimore 
Friedman, David, Silver Spring 
Friedman, Harold B., Silver Spring 
Friedman. Jessica E., Baltimore 



387 



Frush, Harriet L., Pella, Iowa 
Fulton, George P., Carlisle, Pa. 
Gaddis, Adam M., Brown 
Gammon, Nathan, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Gereh, Edith D., Baltimore 
Gibson, Margaret H., Washington, D. C. 
Gilbert, Loamie M,, Jr., Benson, N. C. 
Glasgow, Augustus R., Jr., Hyattsville 
Glickman, Shirley M., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Charles, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Goldberg, Joseph L., Chester, Pa. 
Golden, Lex B., Washington, D. C. 
Graff, Frances B., Baltimore 
Graham, James G., Washington, D. C 
Gray, Elizabeth K., Baltimore 
Greenwood, Grace-L/ouise, Brentwood 
Griffith, Francis D., Brandy, Va. 
Gwynn, Thomas S., Jr., Clinton 
Haas, Frances S., Takoma Park 
Haenni, Edward O., Takoma Park 
Haller, Harrison S., Washington, D. C. 
Hanzlik, Henry J., Swarthmore, Pa. 
Harden, Nellie G.. Washington. D. C. 
Harman, William E., Accident 
Harris, Kenton L., College Park 
Hartman, Jack D., Columbia, S. D. 
Haszard, Frank K., Hyattsville 
Heagy, Albert B., College Heights 
Heller, Hugh A., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Herring, Charles E., Jr., Baltimore 
Herstein, Frederick E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Herzog, Helen M., Baltimore 
Hiatt, Edwin P., Wilmington, Ohio 
Hickman, Mildred M., Washington, D. C. 
Hipp, Norbert J., Washington, D, C. 
Hirshfeld, Martin A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hitz, Chester W., Fortescue, Mo. 
.Hoadley, Alfred D., Swarthmore, Pa. 
Hoadley, PYank T., Chevy Chase 
Hobbs, Robert B., Washington, D. C. 
Hodges, Leslie C, Rockville 
Hoene, Mary A., Baltimore 
Hollis, Edgaj H., Frederick 
Holmes, George K., Washington, D. C. 
Home, William A., Chevy Chase 
Hoseh, Mordecai, Hyattsville 
Hoshall, Edward M., Baltimore 
House, Bolton M„ College Park 
Howard, Addie J., Hyattsville 
Howard, Frank L., Hyattsville 
Humelsine, Carlisle H., Hagerstown 
Hunt, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 
Ide, Frances A., College Heights 
Ives, J. Russell, College Park 
Jansen, Eugene F., Takoma Park 
Jarrell, Temple R., Bervsryn 
Jeffers, Walter F., Berwyn 
Jehle, Ruth A., Hyattsville 



Jewell, Eldgar, Damascus 
Jones, Elinor I., Prince Frederick 
Jones, Elsie C, Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 
Jones, Howard A., Washington, D. C. 
Jump, Margaret D., Queen Anne 
Kalousek, George L., Washington, D. C. 
Kauffman, Wilbur R., Washington, D. C. 
Kelsey, Harry E., Laurel 
Keppel, James E., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kensinger, Pauline, Baltimore 
Killingsworth, Fredric K., Pikesville 
Klitzner, Frank, Baltimore 
Knowlton, John W., Bethesda 
Kolodner, Lee B., Baltimore 
Kraemer, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Kraybill, Herman F., Marietta, Pa. 
Lachar, George P., Detroit, Mich. 
Laden, Hyman N., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lahey, Mary A., Wichita, Kan. 
Lakin, Hubert W., Silver Spring 
LaMar, Austin A., Sandy Spring 
Lamberton, Berenice G., Washington, D. C. 
Lang, Theodore H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lanham, William B., Jr., Silver Spring 
Lann, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 
Lee, Charles F., Brentwood 
Leed, Russell E., Denver, Pa. 
Leendertse, Pete H., Wichita, Kan. 
Lentz, Joe W., Washington, D. C. 
Levin, Irvin, Baltimore 
Levin, Nathan, Baltimore 
Levinsky, Daniel J., Washington, D. C. 
Levy, Frank F., Baltimore 
Lewandowski, Thaddeus, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Love, Solomon, Washington, D. C. 
Lowe, Charles S., Takoma Park 
Loyd, Charles M., Valley Center, Kan. 
Luthy, Helen G., Baltimore 
Maddox, Louise, Hyattsville 
Magill, Gwendolyn, Wa,shington, D. C. 
Marks, William B., Silver Spring 
Marshall, Ruth T., Bristol, Tenn. 
Marth, Paul C, Takoma Park 
Masure, Mortimer P., Chicago, 111. 
Matheson, Harry, Washington, D. C. 
Matson, Ruby I., Takoma Park 
Mayer, Elmer L., Hyattsville 
McCann, Lewis P., Dayton, Ohio 
McCollum, Frank L., Jonesport, Me. 
McGinity, Francis R., Baltimore 
McNamara, Bernard P., Baltimore 
McVey, Warren C, Brentwood 
Miller, Fred L., Mt. Rainier 
Miller, Roman R., Washington, D. C. 
Mohlhenrich, Gretchen E., Baltimore 
Monke, J. Victor, Baltimore 
Moore, Robert R., Sandy Spring 
Morgan, Esthelene W., Chevy Chase 



388 



Mulholland. Elizabeth A., Baltimore 
Moskey, Thomas A., Arlington, Va. 
Munson, Sam C, Kosciusko, Miss. 
Murphy, Harry T., Ellicott City 
Nash, Carroll B., College Park 
Nellis, David C, Takoma Park 
Nixdorff. Helen P., Baltimore 
Nixon, Ruth A., Des Moines, Iowa 
Noble, Wesley M., Washington, D. C. 
Nolan, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 
Nolte, William A., Washington, D. C. 
Nordby, Aagot F., Washington, D. C. 
Olson, Rodney A., Somerville, Mass. 
Ortenzio, Louis F., College Park 
Osborn, James M., Washington, D. C. 
Ost, Walter M., Takoma Park 
Ostrolenk, Morris, Washington, D. C. 
Owings, Eva M. R., Baltimore 
Pahlman, Margaret B., Easton 
Pelczar, Michael J., Jr., Stemmers Run 
Perlmutter, Frank, Newark, N. J. 
Peterson, Robert F., Washington, D. C. 
Pettit. Alfred B., Hyattsville 
Pezzuti, John E., Homer City. Pa- 
Pitts, Dorothy H., Baltimore 
Pottinger, Samuel R., Washington, D. C. 
Pryor, Robert L., Lantz 
Puncochar, Joseph F., Takoma Park 
Purdum, William A., Baltimore 
Fyles, William G., Hancock 
Raudonis, John A., Baltimore 
Ravitch, Irene, Baltimore 
Reinhart, Frank W., Takoma Park 
Remington, Jesse A., Jr., Laurel 
Reynard. George B., Hiram, Ohio 
Rhodes, Harry C, Poolesville 
Rice, John E., Washington, D, C. 
Riley, Virginia L., Snow Hill 
Roberts, Grace C, Baltimore 
Robertson, Roy L., Elkton 
Rose, Frank W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Schechter, Milton S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Schmidt, Oswald, Baltimore 
Schneiter, Roy, Silver Spring 
Schwab, Frank W., Washington, D. C. 
Scott, Donald H., Washington, D. C. 
Scott, Sue G., Baltimore 
Scribner, Bourdon F., Washington, D. C. 
Seller, Frances J., Baltimore 
Sessions, Ruth W., Bethesda 
Shay, Donald E., Lebanon, Pa. 
Shear, Cornelius B., Arlington, Va. 
Shepherd, Boland B., Orrum, N. C. 
Shepley, D. Carroll, Myersville 
Shirk, Harold G.. West Lawn, Pa. 
Simpson, Vernon R., Ashton 
Singer, Louis, Washington, D. C. 
Sixbey, George L., Mayville. N. Y. 



Skelton. Bessie W., Hyattsville 

Skinner, Mildred L.. Cambridge 

Sklar, Louise, Manhattan, Kan. 

Slade, Hutton, Baltimore 

Slavin, Morris, College Park 

Small, Florence F., Hyattsville 

Smith, Carl B.. Delta, Utah 

Smith. Leonard, Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Margret W., Hyattsville 

Snyder, Ethel, Laurel 

Sockrider, Elsie M., Washington, D. C. 

Sookne, Arnold M., Washington, D. C. 

Speaker, Clare J., Washington, D. C. 

Speck, Marvin L., Middletown 

Spicer, Helen E., Takoma Park 

Spicknall, Florence L., Hyattsville 

Spiers, Robert D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stanton, William A., University Park 

Steigner, Elizabeth R.. Silver Spring 

Stephens, William A., Charlotte Hall 

Stewart, John R., Stevens, Fa. 

Stier, Howard L., Lisbon 

Stimson, Jesse L., Washington, D. C. 

Stirton, Alexander J., Washington, D. C. 

Stokes, Charles S., Baltimore 

Studz, Helen, Baltimore 

Stull, William D., Madison, N. J. 

Sullivan, William N., Washington, D. C. 

Sumerford, Wooten T., Athens, Ga. 

Swango, William H., Omar, W. Va. 

Sweeney, Thomas R., Washington, D. C. 

Swern, Daniel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Swift, Elizabeth C. Hyattsville 

Sylvester, Donald M., Brooklyn 

Taylor, Myra C, Frostburg 

Taylor, John K.. Mt. Rainier 

Teal. Dorcas R., Hyattsville 

Teeter, Viola C, Hyattsville 

Terrell, Harriet L., Baltimore 

Terrell, Isador B., Baltimore 

Terwilliger, W. Bird, Baltimore 

Thomas, Virginia E., Newark, Del. 

Thompson, Paul H., Baltimore 

Thrasher, Edward J., Washington, D. C. 

Tillson, Albert H., Arlington, Va. 

Titt, LaVeta G., Hyattsville 

Tomlinson, Mary V., North East 

Tompakov, Sylvan. Baltimore 

Trundle, David, Ashton 

Turner, Carla S., Takoma Park 

Tuve, Richard L.. Washington, D. C 

Twersky, Aaron N., Washington, D. C. 

Volckhausen, Walter R.. New York, N. Y. 

Waldman, Flora E., Washington, D. C. 

Walker, Earnest A., Hyattsville 

Wallace, David H.. Barclay 

Walton, William W.. Hyattsville 

Webster, Mary E.. Atlantic City, N. J- 



389 



.1 



■i 



Weis, Theo G., Takoma Park 
Wellman, Thelma M., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Welsh, Llewellyn H., Washington, D. C, 
Werkenthin, Theo. A., Washington, D. C. 
Wester, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 
Wheatley, Rosemary, Hyattsville 
Wheeler, Donald H., Takoma. Park 
White, Cesarine B., College Park 
White. Richard O.. College Park 
Whiteman, Thomas M., Forest Glen 
Williams, Edith M., Washington, D. C. 
Willingham, Charles B., Washington, D. C. 
Willman, Clara, Annapolis 



Wilson, C. Merrick, Foolesville 
Wingate, Phillip J., Wingate 
Wiseman, Herbert G., Washington, D. G 
Wolfe, John K., Washington, D. C. 
Wolfe, Winthrop C, Washington, D. C. 
Wolk, Jack, Washington, D. C. 
Woodbury, Ethel L., Baltimore 
Woods, Albert W., College Park 
Youch, Charles A., Baltimore 
Zapponi, Paschal P., Wooster, Ohio 
Zenitz, Bernard L., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, S. Edwin, Glen Burnie 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SENIOR CLASS 



Allen, Josephine R., Takoma Park 
Beall, Virginia L., Bethesda 
Beggs, Mary A., Baltimore 
Broughton, Elinor C, College Park 
Brown, Miriam, Centreville 
Burdette, N. Laura, Mt. Airy 
Burrier, Letitia S., Baltimore 
Caldwell, Katherine, Chevy Chase 
Cruikshank, Eleanor M. A., Baltimore 
Davis, Katherine I., Washington, D. C. 
Dulin, Jean M. A., Chevy Chase 
Fisher, Ida A., Takoma Park 
Good, Josephine M., Cumberland 
Gorsuch, M. Jeannette R., New Windsor 
Gould, Irene S., Takoma Park 
Hearn, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 



Hughes, Harriet E., Chevy Chase 

Hutton, Vera W., Ellicott City 

Jefferson, E. Marguerite, Salisbury 

Jenkins, Mary E., Suitland 

Jones, Audrey S., Washington, D. C. 

Kaylor, Helen L., Hagerstown 

Knight, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 

Krauss, Mary G., Baltimore 

Kuhn, Lois M., Bethesda 

Lyons, Betty L., Sykesville 

McCormac, Elizabeth M., Washington, D. C. 

Quirk, Eleanor K., Washington, D. C. 

Reville, Ruth C, Baltimore 

Rosin, Anne, Silver Spring 

Weber, Ruth P., Cumberland 

Wellington, Esther R., Takoma Park 



Abbott, Kathryn F., District Heights 
Adkins, Kathryn, Salisbury 
Bain, Betty B., Washington, D. C. 
Balderston, Helen G., Colora 
Beals, Jane H., Washington, D. C. 
Bloom, Betty R., Cleveland Heights, O. 
Bosley, Audrey M., Baltimore 
Byrd, Evelyn W., College Park 
Cain, Harriet G., Felton, Del. 
DeAlba, Doris E., Glen Burnie 
Dunnington, Doris M., Chevy Chase 
George, Mary E., Mt. Rainier 
Gross, Esther B., Sharpsburg 
Hartig, Jean M., Washington, D. C. 
Hill, Millie L., Silver Spring 



JUNIOR CLASS 

lager, Evelyn L., Annapolis 
Kephart, Jane F., Takoma Park 
Law, Betty H., Washington, D. C. 
McGinnis, Verneena, Pomonkey 
McGinniss, Bell W., Kensington 
Miller, Alma V., Baltimore 
Neumann, Eileen C, Freeport, N. Y. 
Nusbaum, Ruth A. N., New Windsor 
Piatt, Helen B., Washington, D. C. 
Soper, Ruby E., Washington, D. C. 
Spehnkouch, Lucia A., Baltimore 
Stevenson, Marguerite S., Takoma Park 
Tucker, Beatrice L., Abingdon 
Waldman, Fredricka I., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, E. Jane, Washington, D. C. 



Huff, Dorothy A., Chevy Chase 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Abrahams, Henrietta T., E. Orange, Crisp, Margaret S., Baltimore 

N. J. Curry, Tempe H., Bethesda 

Amadon, Virginia, Washington, D. C. Davis, Barbara J., Chevy Chase 

Bohman, Katherine W., Hagerstown Dippel, Marie D., Baltimore 

Bullock, Evelyn A., Baltimore Dotterer, Jacklyn S., Chevy Chase 

Cochran, Olive A., Mercer, Pa. Farrington, Mary C, University Park 

Conners, Marie A., Hyattsville Fennell, Beatrice M., Chevy Chase 

Cornelius, Elida A., Chevy Chase Fuchs, Sister Mary Ann, Maryknoll, N. Y. 

390 



Head, Julia E., College Heights 
Hickman, Martha V., Washington, D. C. 
Hussong, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 
Kraft, Jane L., Washington, D. C. 
Lang, Alice H., S. Norwalk, Conn. 
Leighty, Lena L., Washington, D. C. 
Logan, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
Lyon, Elnora L., Baltimore 
MacDonald, Margaret E., Bethesda 
Mayhew, Elizabeth A., Hyattsville 
McComas, Lois C, Abingdon 

FRESHMAN 

Allan, Lorraine E., Washington, D. C. 
Anderson, Muriel E., Washington, D. C. 
Bland, Mildred A., Suitland 
Bolden, Mary V., Oakland 
Bondareff, Helen E., Washington, D. C. 
Boss, Emma L., Washington, D. C. 
Briscoe, Jacqueline B., Washington, D. C. 
Brookens, Lillian E., Hyattsville 
Brown, Virginia L., Washington, D. C. 
Buckler, Mary F., Aquasco 
Burkins, Alice K., Castleton 
Burrill, Roxane A., Pleasantville, N. Y. 
Callander, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 
Christensen, Edith A„ Hyattsville 
Christensen, Hilde M., Hyattsville 
Coe, Adelaide E., Washington, D. C. 
Cornnell, Norma L., Cottage City 
Cramblitt, Maxine T., Cumberland 
Davis, Dorothy M., Washington, D. C. 
Dicus, Frances A., Arlington, Va. 
Downey, Milbrey A., Williamsport 
Elliott, Margaret J., Kensington 
Enfield, Marjory L., Forest Hill 
Fleming, Elizabeth K., Baltimore 
Foster, Emma G., Parkton 
Gardiner, Dorothy G., Arlington, Va. 
Graeves, Helen F., Silver Spring 
Green, Dorothy M., Silver Spring 
Haskell, Mary J., Youngstown, N. Y. 
Hess, Marguerite R., Washington, D. C. 
Holbrook. Helen P., College Park 
Hubel, Shirley C, Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Bernice, Takoma Park 
Kellond, Ruth S., Baltimore 
Kohnstamm, Gene L., Moscow, Pa. 
Lambertson, Edwina, Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, Lydia I., Lantz 



Medbery, Dorothy A., Washington, D. C. 

Mullinix, Esther L., Woodbine 

Rice, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 

Richmond, Ruth, Bethesda 

Robinette, Bonnie M., Washington, D. C. 

Rodg^ers, Helen, Fort Howard 

Sachs, Evelyn B., Baltimore 

Sheild, Harriet E., Chevy Chase 

Simpson, Mary E., Trappe 

Skinner, Doris E., Port Republic 

Smaltz, Margaret H., Washington, D. C. 

CLASS 

Lung, Mary E., Smithsburg 

Madigan, Helen M., Dunkirk, N. Y. 

McCurdy, Jean E., Kensington 

McDowell, Sarah M., Nottingham, Pa. 

Mike, Emma M., Flemington, N. J. 

Miller, Marjorie L., Elizabeth City, Va- 

Miser, Catherine E., Washington, D. C. 

Nellis, Dorothy A., Takoma Park 

Nichols, Helen E,, Baltimore 

Owens, Elizabeth W., Linthicum Heights 

Phelps, Baibara M., Berwyn 

Pierce, Patricia M., Washington, D. C. 

Pinner, Doris J., Washington, D. C. 

Powers, Mai-y E., Hyattsville 

Pyle, Shirley D., College Park 

Ridgely, Nancy L., Glenwood 

Rosenbusch, Frances S., Washington, D. C. 

Schopmeyer, Grace E., Washington, D. C. 

Schutrumpf, Doris E., Washington, D. C. 

Seiter, Margaret E., Baltimore 

Simons, Barbara E., Washington, D. C. 

Snow, Claudia, Chevy Chase 

Stevenson, Bernice, Takoma Park 

Stick, Rebecca R., Hampstead 

Taylor, Mary C, Chevy Chase 

Tobias, Jane E., Washington, D. C. 

Tomberlin, Isabelle I., Hyattsville 

Trundle, Catharine M., Frederick 

Upson, Eileen C, Baltimore 

Vorkoeper, Marcia M., Washington, D. C. 

Warthen, Laura M., Kensington 

Watson, Evelyn N., Brandywine 

Webb, Mary E., Mt. Airy 

Wheater, Frances A., Washington, D. C. 

Whitney, Margaret E., Takoma Park 

Zimmerman, Mary E., Ellicott City 



PART TIME 

Skinner, Barbara B., Silver Spring 

UNCLASSIFIED 



Aylesworth, Mary L., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Cashin, Sister Mary Helen, Maryknoll, 

N. Y. 
Ford, Margaret E., Millingfon 



Gaston, Virginia M.. Buckhannon. W, 
Grogan, Mariana, Washington, D. C. 
Harris, Elma E., Washington, D. C. 



Va. 



391 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



FOURTH YEAR EVENING CLASS 



Athey, William B., Severna Park 
Boyd, J. Frank. Bar stow 
Boyd, Omar K., Larchmont 
Cooper, Norman E., Baltimore 
Daneker, Clayton W., Baltimore 
Dunn, Sylvan R., Baltimore 
France, Ralph H., Baltimore 
Gamse, Leroy L. F., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Herman, Baltimore 
Harding, Henry J., Baltimore 
Higinbothom, Edward D., Bel Air 
Hoflfman, Grace, Baltimore 



Hopkins, Samuel, Catonsville 
Karasik, Abe S., Baltimore 
Katzenstein, Alvin, Baltimore 
Kelly, Caleb R., Jr., Baltimore 
Motry, George O., Baltimore 
Mueller, Henry A., Baltimore 
Rothschild, Walter, Baltimore 
Sattler, Eugene J., Baltimore 
Silverman, Arnold, Baltimore 
Storm, Edward D., Frederick 
Thompson, Charles W., Baltimore 



THIRD YEAR DAY CLASS 



Archer, Robert H., Jr., Bel Air 
Barbour, John K., Jr., Catonsville 
Barclay, Frederick H., Baltimore 
Barrett, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Bartlett, Thomas R., Baltimore 
Beck, S. Scott, Jr., Chestertown 
Benjamin, Paul E., Baltimore 
Bernstein, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Clark, John L., Ellicott City 
Colgan, Charles W., Baltimore 
Earnshaw, Benjamin A., Baltimore 
Ellis, Joseph A., Hebron 
Filler, Edwin W., Baltimore 
Garfunkel, Sylvan A., Savannah, Ga. 
Gillis, Lee S., St. Michaels 
Goldstein, Louis L., Prince Frederick 
Handy, Francis D., Baltimore 
Harkness, David A., Mutual 
Hecht, Isaac, Baltimore 
Jacob, John E., Salisbury 



Kirsner, Milton F., Baltimore 
Long, John W., Fruitland 
Love, Richard H., Hyattsville 
Magers, John E., Jr., Ruxton 
Malkus, Frederick C, Jr., Cambridge 
Meyer, Bernard S., Baltimore 
Miller, A. Milton, Chester, Pa. 
Murray, Donald G., Baltimore 
Rascovar, Roy L., Baltimore 
Riehl, Louis M., Lansdowne 
Robb, John M., Cumberland 
Rubin, Jesse J., Baltimore 
Scherr, Max, Baltimore 
Starr, John E., Hyattsville 
Toula, Jaroslav J., Baltimore 
Tull, Miles T., Marion 
Whalin, Cornelius, Hyattsville 
Williams, Thomas B., Jr., Baltimore 
Williamson, George L., Cumberland 



THIRD YEAR EVENING CLASS 



Andrew, Thomas G., Baltimore 
Banks, Talbot W., Baltimore 
Benson, Alvin L., Baltimore 
Bowles, Martin C, Baltimore 
Buppert, Doran H., Baltimore 
Cohen, Irvin H., Baltimore 
Dyer, Harry E., Jr., Havre de Grace 
Gentry, Everyn A., Baltimore 
Hopkins, John H.. IV, Baltimore 
Jackson, Charles E., Jr., Baltimore 
Jobson, George J., Catonsville 
Joyce, Jerome J., Baltimore 
Kirby, Raymond A., Baltimore 
Kolker, Fabian H., Baltimore 



Lassotovitch, Vladimir S., Havre de Grace 
Levinson, Irvin A., Baltimore 
Lubinski, Edmund W., Baltimore 
Macgill, James, Simpsonville 
McKenrick, Stratford E., Baltimore 
Patterson, James T., New Haven, Conn. 
Plant, Albin J., Baltimore 
Rasin, Alexander P., Chestertown 
Redmond, James A., Jr., Baltimore 
Saks, Jay B., Baltimore 
Sybert, Edward J., Elkridge 
Tiralla, Henry M., Jr., Baltimore 
Topper, Bernard C, Baltimore 
Wilson, Frank K., Jr., Baltimore 



392 



SECOND YEAR DAY CLASS 



Beck, James D.. Baltimore 
Blackhurst, James W., Baltimore 
Clark, Leslie J., Lonaconing 
Clarke, George L.. Pikesville 
Edmondson, Charles E., Cambridge 
Frailey, Carson G., Frederick 
Getty, Gorman E., Lonaconing 
Goldberg, Harry, Baltimore 
Jones, Lewis R., Oakland 
Kalis, Samuel D., Baltimore 
Kelly, Charles B., Jr., Baltimore 
Long, Eloise G., Salisbury 
Lovell, Marker J., New Windsor 
Monroe, Edward G., Baltimore 
Oken, Fred, Baltimore 



Prettyroan, Charles W., Rockville 
Ready, Roland C, Mt. Lake Park 
Sallow. William H., Baltimore 
Shaivitz, Phyllis D., Baltimore 
Silberg, Melvin S., Baltimore 
Smith, John H., Cumberland 
Sullivan, John C, Jr., Baltimore 
Taylor, Alfred F., Darlington 
Tuerk, Carl E., Baltimore 
Vogel, Albert T., Baltimore 
Wasserman, Jerome, Baltimore 
Waterman, Caroline H., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Welsh, Barnard T., Rockville 
White, George W., Jr., Baltimore 
Williams, Lawrence E., Baltimore 



SECOND YEAR EVENING CLASS 



Bank, Howard M., Baltimore 
Bussey, Eugene, Baltimore 
Care, Harold C, Baltimore 
Chancellor, Arthur B., Jr., Baltimore 
Ciesielski, Stanley, Baltimore 
Cox, Charles H., Baltimore 
Douglass, Calvin A., Baltimore 
Glass, Louis J., Baltimore 
Green, Thomas O., Jr., Towson 
Hedrick, Thomas H., Baltimore 
Herrmann, John O., Baltimore 
Howell, George E., Baltimore 
Howell, Joseph F., Baltimore 
Johnson, Clarence L., Annapolis 



McCray, Jonathan F.. Towson 
Ottenheimer, Edwin, Baltimore 
Paymer, Leonard, Baltimore 
Rechner, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 
Robertson, Emma S., Baltimore 
Rosinoff, Samuel, Washington, D. C. 
Scanland, Robert B., Baltimore 
Scrivener, David S., Washington, D. C. 
Thompson. Charles A., Hurlock 
Watchorn, Arthur W., Milbury, Mass. 
Welsh, Paul E.. Baltimore 
Yeager, Paul J., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, Richard E., Frederick 



FIRST YEAR DAY CLASS 



Armstrong, Alexander, Jr., Towson 
Bailey, Warren L., Baltimore 
Benjamin, Louis, Baltimore 
Bloodgood, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Brennan, John J., Baltimore 
Brockman, Ethel L., Riverdale 
Brown, Augustus F., Havre de Grace 
Caplan, David L., Baltimore 
Connor, John S., Catonsville 
Digges, Edward S., LaPlata 
Everhart, Nannie M., Frederick 
Fey, John T., Cumberland 
Finan, Thomas B., Jr., Cumberland 
Fowler, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Heringman, Leo A., Baltimore 
Holmes, Jesse W., Jr., Cumberland 
Jones, Joseph F., Baltimore 
Kaplan, Solomon, Baltimore 



Keppler, Kurt, Baltimore 
Lankford, Richard E., Baltimore 
Maguire, John N., Wilmington, Del. 
Maier, George, Jr., Bridgeton, N. J. 
Mclntire, John N., Oakland 
Murphy, John L. V., Jr., Baltimore 
Nattans, Ralph A., Baltimore 
Olds, Mark N., Honolulu, Hawaii 
Ostroff, Julius J., Baltimore 
Polack, Samuel J., Hagerstown 
Ricciuti, Hugo A., Baltimore 
Shiling, Reuben. Baltimore 
Taylor, Beverly C, Jr., Baltimore 
Tillman, David F., Riderwood 
Treacy, James J., Oakland 
Umbarger, Paul, Bel Air 
Virts, Charles C, Jefferson 
White, Robert B., Salisbury 



393 



FIRST YEAR EVENING CLASS 



4< 



Alter, Irving D., Baltimore 
Atwater, Charles C, Chestertown 
Barnard, John D., Baltimore 
Bennett, Robert S., Baltimore 
Bichy. Charles E., Jr., Baltimore 
Carlin, Elizabeth M., Baltimore 
Coburn, Paul H., Easton 
Coonan, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Cory, Ernest N., Jr., College Park 
Daum, John A., Baltimore 
Dolan, Frank J., Baltimore 
Dougherty, J. Minton, Baltimore 
Fahy, Ambrose J., Baltimore 
Franklin, John M., Oakland 
Garrott, William N., Knoxville 
Click. Louis, Baltimore 
Glickman, Max, Annapolis 
Gulbransen, William, Baltimore 
Hebb, John Stephen, III, Baltimore 
Hendrickson, Charles J., Halethorpe 
Huff, James K., Jr., Forest, Miss. 
Kelly, Charles E., Overlea 
Knight, Ellsworth C, Jr., Baltimore 
Lang, Samuel J., Baltimore 
Mahoney, Elmer J., Baltimore 



Martin, Darwin B., Mountain Lake Park 
Mason, Everett P., Jr., Baltimore 
McClure, Kenneth F., Baltimore 
McColgan, James E., Catonsville 
McComas, Charles H., Bel Air 
Mclntyre, Katherine A., Baltimore 
Meidling, George A., Baltimore 
Mohlhenrich, William W., Catonsville 
O'Donnell, William J., Baltimore 
Paar, Francis W. H., Baltimore 
Pearson, Craven P., Jr., Elkridge 
Purrington, Sara G., Baltimore 
Rasin, George B., Jr., Worton 
Rhodes, Fred B., Jr., Baltimore 
Russell, Archibald L., Baltimore 
Shapiro, Donald B., Baltimore 
Skeen, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Marvin H., Federalsburg 
Smith, Reginald C, Baltimore 
Smith, William A., Baltimore 
Sody, Herman S., Baltimore 
Vincenti, Bernard C, Baltimore 
Williams, George H.. Baltimore 
Wise, Paul S., Dover, Del. 
Wright, William A. S., Denton 



UNCLASSIFIED EVENING 



Evans, Matthew S., Severna Park 
Russell, Turner R., Baltimore 



Smith, Benton P., Baltimore 
Wisotzki, Clark T., Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED DAY 

Ayre, Josephine, Washington. D. C. Hartman, Carl S., Pikesville 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 
Beck, Frances F., Baltimore 
Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 



Hiatt, Edwin P., Wilmington, Ohio 
Monke, J. Victor, Litchfield, 111. 



SENIOR CLASS 



Abarbanel, Milton G., Jersey City, N. J. 

Abramson, Daniel J., Baltimore 

Applefeld, Willard, Baltimore 

Baum, Max, Baltimore 

Bonner, Robert A., Jr., Waterbury, Conn. 

Borden, Melvin M., Baltimore 

Bowers, John Z., Catonsville 

Bradley, Stanley E., Baltimore 

Brooks, Wilbur S., New York, N. Y. 

Brown, Manuel, Baltimore 

Bunting, John J., Clifton, N. J. 



Callahan, Timothy A., Bel Air 
Chance, Burton, Jr., Radnor, Pa. 
Cohen, Hilliard, Baltimore 
Colleran, Harold L., Jessup, Pa. 
Coolahan, John F., Baltimore 
Cooper, Donald D., Towson 
Costas, Jaime L., Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Crawford, Robert C, Baltimore 
Dausch, Michael J., Baltimore 
Dodd, William A., Baltimore 
Dolfman, Victor, Philadelphia, Fa. 



Eichert, Arnold H., Woodlawn 

Feder, Aaron, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Fox, Lester I., Haverhill, Mass. 

Fox, Samuel L., Baltimore 

Gareis, Louis C, Baltimore 

George, Joseph M., Jr., Sudlersville 

Gertman, Samuel, Baltimore 

Gibel, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ginsberg, Milton, Baltimore 

Glassman, Edward L., Baltimore 

Goodman, Louis E., Jr., Baltimore 

Goodman, Sylvan C, Baltimore 

Gottdiener, Florence H., Baltimore 

Govons, Sidney R., Baltimore 

Graff, Frederick L., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Guyton, William L., Baltimore 

Haase, John H., Baltimore 

Harris, Sidney, Roselle, N. J. 

Hayleck, Mary L., Baltimore 

Horky, John R., Bel Air 

Januszeski, Francis J., Baltimore 

Katz, Milton A., Westminster 

Kelmenson, Harry, Baltimore 

Knox, John J., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Kotleroff, Jerome, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kump, Albert B., Bridgeton, N. J. 

Kurtz, Gerald I., Paterson, N. J. 

Lauve, Celeste C, Baltimore 

Layden, Milton, Baltimore 

Lenker, Luther A., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lipsitz, Morton H., Baltimore 

Lopez, Hilton L., Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Lumpkin, William R., Baltimore 

Michaelson, Ernest, Bladensburg 

Milholland, Arthur V., Baltimore 

Miller, Clarence L., Hannibal, Mo. 

Miller, Royston, Baldwin 

Miniszek, James H., Baltimore 

Molofsky, Leonard C, Baltimore 

Novey, Samuel, Baltimore 



Post, Laurence C, Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Powell. Geraldine K., Baltimore 
Rizzolo. John, Newark, N. J. 
Roman, Paul, Baltimore 
Rossello, Juan Antonio, Ponce, Puerto 

Rico 
Rothkopf, Henry, Ellenville, N. Y. 
Sabatino, Bernard J.. Parkville 
Sarajian, Aram M., Ridgefield Park, N. J 
Schaefer, John F., Baltimore 
Schammel, Adam J., Overlea 
Scherlis, Sidney, Baltimore 
Schlesinger, Robert A., Flushing, N. Y. 
Schmulovitz, Maurice J., Baltimore 
Scott, John M., Baltimore 
Sevcik, Charles V., Baltimore 
Sheppard, Robert C, Baltimore 
Siegel, Edward, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Silberman, Donald J., Birmingham, Ala. 
Smith, John P., Baltimore 
Sprei, Emanuel, New York. N. Y. 
Stein, Aaron, Baltimore 
Steinberg, Morris W., Baltimore 
Swiss, Adam G., Baltimore 
Thomas, Bernard O., Frederick 
Thompson, James U., Cambridge 
Thompson, Winfield L., Rehobelh 
VoUmer, Frederick .T.. Baltimore 
Wagner, John A., Baltimore 
Warres, Herbert L., New York, N. Y. 
Way, John E., Beaufort, N. C. 
Welfeld, Alvan A., Baltimore 
White, Harry F., Jr., Baltimore 
White, S. Cottrell, Baltimore 
Winer, Albert S., Baltimore 
Woodward, Theodore E., Westminster 
Worthington, Jlichard W., Baltimore 
Wulwick, Michael, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Yaffe, Kennard L., Baltimore 



394 



Baylus, Herman, Baltimore 

Beck, Harry M., Baltimore 

Berman, Edgar F., Baltimore 

Bernstein, Aaron, Baltimore 

Bernstein, Albion O., New York, N. Y. 

Bess, Elizabeth G., Keyser, W. Va. 

Bloom, Max R., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Brezinski, Edward J., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Briele, Henry A., Baltimore 

Brodsky, Bernard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cannon, Lawrence S., Salt Lake City, 

Utah 
Cianos, James N., Baltimore 
Coffman, Robert T., Keyser, W. Va. 
Cohen, Frank S., Baltimore 
Corbitt, Richard W., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Cunningham, Raymond M., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Filtzer, David L., Baltimore 
Freed, Arnold U., Baltimore 
Fusting, William H., Baltimore 
Gaver, Leo J., Myersville 
Goldberg, Sylvan D., Baltimore 
Gray, Thomas B., Cherokee, N. C. 
Grier, George S., Ill, Milford, Del. 
Grott, Harold A., Baltimore 
Haimowitz, Samuel I., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harris, Charles I., Jr., Rome, Ga. 
Harrison, Charles S., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Hartman, Oscar, Baltimore 
Hartz, Alvin S., Baltimore 
Heimoff, Leonard L., New York, N. Y. 
Hooker, Charles B., Takoma Park 
Hutchins, Thomas M., Bowens 
Isaacson, Benjamin, Baltimore 

895 



Jamison, William P., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Jandorf, R. Donald, Baltimore 

Jannarone, Lewis H., Belleville, N. J. 

Jones, Charles W., Baltimore 

Jorgensen, Louis C, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Kairys, David, Baltimore 

Kammer, William H., Jr.. Baltimore 

Kappelman, Melvin D., Baltimore 

Keister, Philip W., Baltimore 

Kerr, James P., Boyd 

Kiely, James A^ Cortland, N. Y. 

Kinnamon, Howard F., Jr., Easton 

Kleiman. Bernard S., Baltimore 

Kurland, Albert A., Baltimore 
Kyle, Henry H., Crownsville 

Lapinsky. Herbert. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lavenstein, Arnold F., Baltimore 

Layman, William T., Hagerstown 

Leitch, William H., Friendship 
Magness, Stephen L., Catonsville 
Magruder, John R., Baltimore 
Marks, Irving L., Baltimore 
McClafferty, William J., Jr., West War- 
wick, R. I. 
McLaughlin, Francis J., Baltimore 
Meyer, Alvin F.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miller, Irvin J., New York. N. Y. 
Miller, William S.. Baltimore 
Moran, John A., Conway, Mass. 
Moricle, Charles H.. Reidsville, N. C. 
Nutall. James B., Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE 



Andrews. S. Ralph, Jr., Elkton 

Baier, John C, Mt. Hays 

Bailey, Walter L., York, Pa. 

Barker, Daniel C Niantic. Conn. 

Beacham, Edmund G., Baltimore 

Biehl, Harold P., Frederick 

Borden, Jesse N., Baltimore 

Brinsfield, Irving C Vienna 

Caplan, Lester H., Baltimore 

Clifford, Robert H., Jr., Mountain Lakes, 

N. J. 
Cole, John T., Warren, Ohio 
Correll, Paul H., Catonsville 
Daue, Edwin O., Jr., Silver Spring 
DeLuca, Joseph, Bristol, R. I. 
Don Diego, Leonard V., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Duffy, William C, Baltimore 
Dwyer, James R., Renovo, Pa. 
Freeman. James A.. West Union. W. Va. 
Gassaway, William F., Ellicott City 
Click. Irving V., New York, N. Y. 
Graham. Walter R.. Charlotte, N. C. 
Guzman-Lopez, Luis R., San Juan, 

Puerto Rico 
Hecht, Morton, Jr., Baltimore 



Palmer, David W., Wheeling, W. Va. 
Parks, Seigle W., Fairmont, W. Va. 
Pijanowski, Walter J., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Pillar, Samuel, Baltimore 
Polek, Melvin F., Baltimore 
Reimann, Dexter L., Baltimore 
Rochberg, Samuel, Passaic, N. J. 
Ruzicka, Edwin R., Baltimore 
Sadove, Max S., Baltimore 
Schenthal, Joseph E., Baltimore 
Scher, Isadore, Baltimore 
Sexton. Thomas S.. Sistersville, W. Va. 
Sherman, Claude P., Fuquay Springs, N. C. 
Siegel, Maurice, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smoak, Philip L., Tampa. Fla. 
Solarz, Sylvan D., Baltimore 
Spiegel, Herbert, McKeesport. Pa. 
Steger. William J.. Wheeling, W. Va. 
Stevens, Leland B., Millington 
Tartikoff, George, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thomas, Ramsay B., Towson 
Thomas, Wilbur C, Lansdowne 
Urlock, John P., Baltimore 
Wallenstein, Leonard, Baltimore 
Wanner, Jesse R., Jr., Salisbury 
Whitworth, Fuller B., Westernport 
Wilder, Milton J., Ferndale 
Wilner. Sol, New York. N. Y. 
Worsley, Thomas L., Jr., Rocky Mount, 

N. C. 
Zalis, Daniel L., Baltimore 

CLASS 

Henning, Emil H., Jr., Baltimore 
Heyman, Albert, Baltimore 
Hooton, Elizabeth L., Hyattsville 
Hope, Daniel, Jr., Ellicott City 

Igartua-Cardona, Susana, Aguadilla. Puerto 

Rico 
Inloes, Benjamin H., Jr., Baltimore 
Johnson, Robert D., Annapolis 
Karns, James R., Baltimore 
Kirchick. Julian G., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kohn, Schuyler G., Baltimore 
Krleg, Edward F., Baltimore 
Lartz, Robert E.. Sharon, Pa. 
Ling, William S. M., Fatshan, China 
Livingood, William C, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 
Maccubbin, Harry P., Baltimore 
Markline, Simeon V., White Hall 
Martin, Clarence W., Baltimore 
Maryanov. Alfred R., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Mathers, Daniel H., Annapolis 
McClung. James E.. Richwood. W. Va. 
McClung, William D., Richwood, W. Va. 
McDaniel. George C, Baltimore 
McKinnon. William J., Maxton, N. C. 



396 



Meade, Forest C, Hyattsville 
Miceli, Joseph, Baltimore 
Molz, Edward L., Baltimore 
Murphy, Fred E., Jr., Jesup. Ga. 
Muse, William T., Baltimore 
Myers, George R.. Hurlock 
O'Hara, James F., Canton, Ohio 
Pico, Guillermo, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 
Pierpont, Ross Z., Woodlawn 
Pigford, Robert T., Wilmington, N. C. 
Piatt, William, Baltimore 
Pollock, Arthur E., Gallitzin. Pa. 
Posner, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pound, John C. Baltimore 
Rath, Maurice M.. Newark, N. J. 
Rhode, Charles M., Baltimore 
Richter, Conrad L., Baltimore 
Robinson, Raymond V., Baltimore 
Roop, Donald J., New Market 
Rothschild, Carl E., Chefoo, China 
Russell, Thomas E., Jr., Frederick 



Russillo, Philip J., Annapolis 
Schlesinger, George G., New York, N. Y. 
Sloan, Joseph W., Bayonne, N. J. 
Smith, James B.. Baltimore 
Squillante. Orlando J., Warren, R. I. 
Stayton, Howard N., Jr., Wilmington, Del. 
Supik, William J., Baltimore 
Tankin, Louis H., Baltimore 
Thompson, Alexander F., Troy, N. C. 
Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
Tompakov, Samuel, Baltimore 
Townshend, Wilfred H., Jr., Baltimore 
Trevor, William, Baltimore 
Triplett, William C. St. Mary's, W. Va. 
Waite, Merton T., Odentoa 
Wilkins, Jesse L., Pocomoke City 
Williams, Herman J., Reading, Pa. 
Williams, Richard T.. Crownsville 
Wilson, Harry T., Jr., Baltimore 
Wolff. William L, New York, N. Y. 
Zinkin, Sol, Lakewood, N. J. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Albert! , Aurora F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Alexander, Fred, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Barnett, Charles P., Baltimore 
Baxley, Joshua W., Ellicott City 
Bowen, Joseph J., Wateibury, Conn. 
Brooks, J. Culpepper, Jr., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 
Bundick, William R.. Baltimore 
Checket, Pierson M., Baltimore 
Chiques. Carlos M., Caguas, Puerto Rico 
Cooper, LeRoy G., Glen Lyon, Pa. 
Crecca, Joseph V., Newark, N. J. 
Croce, Gene A.. Providence. R. I. 
Cruikshank, Dwight P., Jr.. Lumberport, 

W. Va. 
Culler, John M., Frederick 
de Vincentis, Michael L., Baltimore 
Diez-Gutierrez, Emilio, Orocovis, Puerto 

Rico 
DiPaula, Anthony F.. Baltimor? 
Esnard, John E., Los Angeles. Calif. 
Evola, Camille M., Flushing, N. Y. 
Figge, Frank H. J., Baltimore 
Trey, Edward L., Jr., Catonsville 
Garci'a-Blanco, Jose, Ponce. Puerto Rico 
Gelber, Julius, New York, N. Y. 
Goodman, William, Baltimore 
Graziano, Theodore J.. Baltimore 
Hedrick, Thomas A., Beckley, W. Va. 
Hershner, Newton W., Jr., Mechanicsburg, 

Pa. 

Hollander, Asher, Baltimore 
Hunter. James S., Jr.. Frostburg 
Jaffe, Vita R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Jordan, Gordon T., Hurricane, W. Va. 
Kemp, Norval F., Relay 
Kiefer, Robert A., Catonsville 
Krulevitz, Keaciel K., Baltimore 
Lach, Frank E.. Perth Amboy. N. J. 
Leslie, Franklin E., Towson 
Levinson, Lorman L., Baltimore 
Licha, Jose S., Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Lowe, William C, Stevensville 
Lusby, Thomas F., Prince Frederick 
Mandel, Jacob B., Jersey City, N. J. 

Martinez, Josefina, Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Matthews, Henry S., Rose Hill. N. C. 

McBrayer, John A., Jr., Lattimore, N. C. 

Mitchell, William A., Baltimore 

Molinari, Jose G., Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Montgomery, Mark R., Fairchance, Pa. 

Morris, Felix R., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Morrison, William H., Baltimore 

Nolan, James J., Catonsville 

Novoa-Caballero, Miguel, Rio Pledras, 
Puerto Rico 

Ortiz, Idalia O., Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Palmer, Margaret V., Easton 

Pasamanick, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pearcy, Thompson, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Perman, Joshua M., Baltimore 

Pruitt, Charles E., Frederick 

Renna, Francis S., Montclair, N. J. 

Revell, Walter J., Louisville, Ga. 

Richardson, Charles. Jr., Bel Air 
Richmond, Marion B., Chevy Chase 
Richter, Christian F., Jr., Overlea 
Rosenberg, Jonas S.. New York, N. Y. 



397 



Rossberg, Clyde A., Baltimore 
Sasscer, Robert B., Upper Marlboro 
Sawyer, William H., Raleigh, N. C. 
Schwartz, Stanley E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
S«igman, Edwin L., Jr., Baltimore 
Shannon, Bklward P., Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sheehan, Joseph C, Baltimore 
Sherrill, Elizabeth B., Sparks 
Spencer, Tracy N., Jr., Concord, N. C. 
Spinnler, Henry R., Butler, N. J. 
Stevens, John S., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Strayer, Webster M., Baltimore 
Trevaskis, Richard W., Jr., Cumberland 
Traynor, Francis W., Cumberland 



Trumper, Eleanor J., Montgomery, Ala. 
Ulrich, George J., Baltimore 
Vest, William J., laeger. W. Va. 
Virusky, Edmund J., Freeland, Fa. 
Walker, James H., Charleston, W. Va. 
Wall, Lester A., Jr., Baltimore 
Ward, Charles M., Beckley, W. Va. 
Watkins, Dayton O., Hyattsville 
Wells, John B., Jr., Baltimore 
Wilder, Thomas C, Rochester, Minn. 
Wilson. Edwin F., New York, N. Y. 
Yanagisawa, Kazuo, Berkeley, Calif. 
Young, John D., Jr., Westminster 
Zierler, Kenneth L.., Baltimore 



Bialek, Ruth, Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Wassell, Anna R., Baltimore 

MEDICAL ART STUDENTS 

Krulevitz, Jeanett« G., Baltimore 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Carpenter, Catherine E., Waverly, Va. 

Hersh, Naomi G., Manchester 

Kautz, Marjorie L., Cumberland 

Pennington, Rose, Bel Air 

Pilgrim, Beatrice L., Chambersburg, Pa. 



Quarterman, Lena W., Nicholls, Ga. 
Rayme, Carolyn R., Fullerton 
Rudisill, Mary L., Iron Station, N. C. 
Sappington, Frances V., Hagerstown 
Sherrill, Evelyn F., Sparks 



SENIOR CLASS 



Bates, Victoria W., Greenville, S. C. 
Baughman, Anna M., Somerset, Pa. 
Bowling, Ada G., Elm City, N. C. 
Burgage, Katharine E., Salisbury 
Coleman, Dorothy E., Livermore, Penna. 
Coleman, Myrtle A., Baltimore 
Connelly, Nancy V., Rising Sun 
Dees, Mary A., Goldsboro, N. C. 
Dixon, Dorothy L., Wilmington, N. C. 
Eckenrode, Mary R., Manchester 
Gambill, Treva L., Bel Air 
Garrison, Alice V., Washington, D. C. 
Graham, Carola B., Hampstead 
Hanna. Lois C, Mount Solon, Va. 
Hough, Gwendolyn, Parkton 
Hedrick, Anna Lee, Beckley, W. Va. 
Kalar, Nelda, Baltimore 



Kalbaugh, Mary E., Luke 
Kroh, Louise E., Kingsville 
Llewellyn, Anne P., Cockeysville 
Mays, Sara J., Cockeysville 
McNabb, Lena, Greenville, Tenn. 
Monath, Vivian V., Hagerstown 
Selkamaa, Ingrid E., Baltimore 
Stephens, Katherine E., Hertford, N. C. 
Stephenson, Doris V., Baltimore 
Streett, Flora M., Street 
Terry, Virginia A., Washington, D. C. 
Tharpe, Iva L., Bel Air 
Walker, Alice J., Ellicott City 
Wert, Janice M., Sparrows Point 
Wilson, Kathryn, Randallstown 
Winfield, Irma H., Rohrersville 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Beall. Margaret D., Edgewater 
Bennington, Margaret E., Delta, Pa. 
Calladine, Virginia J., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Clark, Mary S., Screven, Ga. 
Craven, Nancy L., Asheboro, N. C. 



Culler, Margaret O., Frederick 
Danforth, Dorothy M., Baltimore 
Dorsett, Frances E., Indian Head 
Doyle, Thelma C, Lonaconing 
Foster, Lucille E., Beckley, W. Va. 



Foster, Marguerite W., Spaxks 
Grammer, Julia J., Waverly, Va. 
Hollister, Louise M., Denton 
Lee, Margaret M., Glen Burnie 
Magruder, Catharine B., Baltimore 
Marshall, Lolah H., Baltimore 
Richardson, Virginia B., Waverly, Va. 



Roaxjh, Mary J., Hagerstown 
Shaff, Dorothy E., Jefferson 
Travers, Marian E„ Nanticoke 
Vandervoort, Susan H., Columbus, Ohio 
Wilson, Margaret F., Baltimore 
Yeager, Susan M., Thomas, W. Va. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Albright, Pearl E., Granite 
Conley, Virginia C, Baltimore 
Horn, Beatrice C, Point of Rocks 
Mcintosh, Annie M.. Cheraw, S. C. 
Nester, Edna C, Auburn, N. J. 
Provance, Dorothy J., Greensboro, Pa. 
Remke, Pauline I., Elm Grove, W. Va. 



Rothhaupt, Ruth A., Gettysburg, Fa. 

Sherwood, Alida, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Sinnott, Mary L., Baltimore 

Starford, Marianna K., Grafton, W. Va. 

Thompson, Ruby E., Hurlock 

Vivod, Marion H., Luke 

Woerner, Ruth C, Baltimore 



PROBATION CLASS 



Adkins, Elizabeth M., Pittsville 

Akers, Evelyn G., Baltimore 

Baer, Martha L.. Delta, Pa. 

Barnes, Edith L., Baltimore 

Brenisholtz, Esther R., Lewistown, Pa. 

Broadnax, Clarie P., Rock Hill, S. C. 

Bussard, Mary M., Jefferson 

Caldwell, Ruth D., Cordova 

Cook, Kathryn H., Frostburg 

Duffee, Ava V., Norfolk, Va. 

Evans. Flora E., Linthicum Heights 

Gardner, Nellie F., Lynchburg, Va. 

Gillespie, Sallie A., Parksley, Va. 

Granofsky, Elizabeth C Baltimore 

Joneckis, Mary, Patapsco 

Killmon, Mabel V., Parksley, Va. 

Liles, Judy, Clayton, N. C. 

Linthicum, Laura E., Linthicum Heights 

Mathais, Phyllis Y., Littlestown, Pa. 



McCullough, Martha E.. Glen Rock. Pa. 
Parks, Bessie M., Parksley, Va. 
Pember, Laura G., New Bern, N. C. 
Porterfield, Virginia L.. Bluefield, W. Va. 
Scharf, Nellie M., Glen Burnie 
Shaver, Etta M., Westminster 
Simmons, Edna V., Bridgewater, Va. 
Simmons, Iva L., Bridgewater, Va. 
Skaggs, Mary A., Hinton, W. Va. 
Skinner, Edna M., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
Smithson, Ethel B., Easton 
Storey, Ethel M.. Chestertown 
Teeple, Laura E., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Tracey, Sara A., Parkton 
Ward, Dorcas V., Baltimore 
Watson, Ada M., Dilliner. Pa. 
Wilkins, Amy L., Rock Hall 
Wilkins, Laura A.. Pocomoke City 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



398 



Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Alperstein, Reuben R., Baltimore 
Bellman, Frank A., Baltimore 
Cross, John M., Little Falls, N. J. 
DeDominicis, Amelia C, Baltimore 
Dittrich, Theodore T., Baltimore 
Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 
Enten, Harry, Baltimore 
Foster, Carroll P., Baltimore 
Gilbert, Loamie M., Jr., Benson, N. C. 
Glickman, Shirley M., Baltimore 
Hanna, William M., Baltimore 



Levin, Nathan, Baltimore 
McGinity, F. Rowland, Baltimore 
McNamara. Bernard P., Baltimore 
Moskey. Thomas A., Jr., Arlington, Va. 
Furdum, William A.. Baltimore 
Raudonis, John A., Hudson, N. H. 
Sumerford. Wooten T., Athens. Ga. 
Thompson, Paul H., Waubay, S. Dak. 
Tompakov, Sylvan, Baltimore 
Youch, Charles A., Baltimore 
Zenitz, Bernard L., Baltimore 



399 



l! 



SENIOR CLASS 



Aaronson. Alfred I., Baltimore 
Beam, Merlin A., Garrison 
Bixler. Richard S., New Windsor 
Cohen, Bernard I., Baltimore 
Colvin, Ralph, Baltimore 
Combs, Joseph L., Jr., Baltimore 
Edlavitch. Sam, Baltimore 
Floyd, Melvin L., Catonsville 
Fribush, Sidney, Baltimore 
Gakenheimer, Walter C. Catonsville 
Galley, Roland P., Baltimore 
Gendason, Harry B., Baltimore 
Ginaitis, Alphonsus S., Baltimore 
Gregrorek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Hager, George P., Baltimore 
Hamlin, Kenneth E., Jr., Baltimore 
Heyman, Bemice, Baltimore 
Hopkins, Carville B., Annapolis 
Jarowski, Charles, Baltimore 
Kaminkow, Joseph, Baltimore 
Katz, Morton, Baltimore 
Kelley, Gordon W., Baltimore 
Kobin. Ben. Baltimore 
Levin, Benjamin S., Baltimore 



Levin, Jacob B., Baltimore 
Levin, Norman J., Baltimore 
Levy, Bernard, Baltimore 
Loftus, Howard E., Dundalk 
Matelis, Olga P., Baltimore 
Morganstem, William A., Woodlawn 
Muehlhause, Ruth V.. Baltimore 
Nurkin, Bemice V., Baltimore 
Oleszczuk, Melvin J., Baltimore 
Pearlman, Albert, Baltimore 
Pressman, Isadore, Baltimore 
Pucklis. Frank S., Baltimore 
Rhode, John <3., Baltimore 
Richman, Jacob L., Baltimore 
Stoler, Myer, Baltimore 
Sussman, Bernard, Baltimore 
Thompson, Robert E., Waubay, S. D. 
Wachsman, Irvin L., Baltimore 
Waxman. Milton M., Baltimore 
Webster, Thomas C, Baltimore 
Wich, Joseph C. Baltimore 
Zerofsky. Harold, Baltimore 
Zetlin, Henry P.. Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred H., Baltimore 

Baker, Daniel S., Baltimore 

Binstock, Albert, Baltimore 

Dobropolski, Anthony J., Baltimore 

Dorsch. Joseph U., Baltimore 

Feldman, Jack, Baltimore 

Folus, Irving H., Baltimore 

Francik, Joseph, Baltimore 

Freedman, Leonard, Baltimore 

Glaser, Louis L., Baltimore 

Golditch, Henry M., Baltimore 

Gruz, Nathan I., Baltimore 

Hackett. Angela R., Baltimore 
Heneson, Irving J., Baltimore 
Ichniowski, William M., Baltimore 
Jacobs, Eugene, Baltimore 
Jones. Cyrus F., Baltimore 
Kamanitz. Irvin L., Baltimore 
Lieberman, Lawrence L., Front Royal, Va 
Mask. Jerome. Baltimore 
Massing, David, Baltimore 



Mendelsohn, Daniel, Arbutus 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Morgenroth, Victor H.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Mutchnik, Melvin, Baltimore 
Okrasinski, Joseph L., Baltimore 
Parker, Katherine J., Baltimore 
Passen, Lillian. Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Alvin, Baltimore 
Rostacher, Harry L., New York, N. Y. 
Sabatino, Louis T., Parkville 
Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Sama, Mario A., Baltimore 
Sapper stein, Louis, Baltimore 
Schneyer, Herbert, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shalowitz, Marion. Baltimore 
Silverstein. Bernard. Baltimore 
Snyder, Nathan M., Baltimore 
Stone. Harry, Baltimore 
Wiener. Maurice, Baltimore 
Young, George I., Catonsville 



Bemgartt, Elmar B., Baltimore 
Bloom, Morris, Baltimore 
Caplan, Clarice, Baltimore 
Celozzi, Matthew J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Harry I., Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



400 



Cohen. Samuel, Baltimore 
DiGristine, Mary R.. Baltimore 
Ehudin. Herbert, Baltimore 
Feinstein. Bernard S., Baltimore 
Ginsberg. Samuel H., Baltimore 



Goldberg. Albert, Baltimore 
Greenberg, Joseph. Baltimore 
Gumenick, Leonard. Baltimore 
Jaworski. Melvin J.. Baltimore 
Kahn, Morton. Baltimore 
Kamenetz, Irvin. Baltimore 
Kasik, Frank T., Raspeburg 
Kline, Sidney, Baltimore 
Kursvietis, Anthony J., Baltimore 
Lassahn, Norbert G.. Baltimore 
Lerman. Philip H., Baltimore 
Levin. Leon P., Baltimore 
Levy, Irving, Annapolis 
Mayer, Maurice V., Baltimore 
Miller, Edward, Baltimore 



Poklis, Alphonse, Sparrows Point 
Richman, Philip F., Annapolis 
Rosen, Donald M., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Morris, Baltimore 
Sachs, Norman R., Baltimore 
Sandler, Solomon, Baltimore 
Schlaen, Mildred, Baltimore 
Shook, Joseph W., Baltimore 
Siegel, Harold, Baltimore 
Silberg, Edgar M., Baltimore 
Simonoflf, Robert, Baltimore 
Smith, Daniel E., Catonsville 
Sowbel, Irving, Baltimore 
Spangler, Kenneth G.. Baltimore 
Zukerberg, Morris, Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Balassone, Francis S., Thomas, W. Va. 
Blankman, Albert J., Baltimore 
Buchwald, Eva D., Baltimore 
Buffington, James E., Catonsville 
Cerny, Henry F., Chase 
Cohen, Rose, Baltimore 
Collins, Thomas F., Cambridge 
DeGele, George O., Baltimore 
Fainberg, Alvin J., Baltimore 
Friedman, Arnold M., Baltimore 
Gassaway, Franklyn D., Clarkdale, Ariz. 
Glaser, Abraham E., Baltimore 
Goodman, Leon, Baltimore 
Hendin, Walter, Baltimore 
Kahn, Reuben, Baltimore 
Knode, Frances L., Baltimore 



Kreis, George J., Baltimore 
Lindenbaum, Albert, Baltimore 
Martin, William R., Baltimore 
Moser, John T., Baltimore 
Norris, Muriel E., Baltimore 
Noveck, Irvin, Baltimore 
Oken, Jack, Baltimore 
Phillips, Emerson C. Salisbury 
Rosenthal, Bernard, Baltimore 
RudoflP, Oscar, Baltimore 
Sarubin, Milton, Ellicott City 
Schkloven, Judah, Baltimore 
Steel, Irvin, Baltimore 
Wienner, Herman D., Baltimore 
Wlodkowski, Edward M.. Baltimore 
Zerwitz, Irving F., Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Dobbs, Edward C, Baltimore 



BALTIMORE 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1937 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Betts. Robert L., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Cadden, John J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Sigmund, Baltimore 
Cohen, Sylvan P., Baltimore 
Cooper. David. Atlantic City. N. J. 
Eskow, Alexander B., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Gasteazoro, Mariano, Panama City, 

Panama 
Legum, Isidor, Baltimore 
Joyce, Osier C, Arnold 



Kahl, Gordon K.. Baltimore 
Lazauskas. Algert P., Baltimore 
McCracken, Jules, Cameron, W. Va. 
Ouellette, Raymond T., Lawrence, Mass. 
Ramirez, Mario F., San Gei-man, Puerto 

Rico 
Robinovitz. Irving K., Fall River, Mass. 
Weigel, Sterling J.. York, Pa. 
Yeager, John W., Baltimore 



401 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



M 



II 



Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 
Arthur, William E., Cardiff 
Baier, John C, Mt. Hays 
Cannon, Martin L., Baltimore 
Caplan, Lester H., Baltimore 
Carozza, Anthony F., Baltimore 
Freeman, James A., Jr., West Union, 

W. Va. 
Click, Irving V., New York, N. Y. 
Hecht, Morton, Jr., Baltimore 
Henning, Emil H., Jr.. Baltimore 
Jacobson, Samuel M., Cumberland 
Kirchick, Julian G., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Krieg, Edward F.. Baltimore 
Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 
Maccubbin, Harry P., Baltimore 
Markline, Simeon V., White Hall 
Mathers, Daniel H., Annapolis 
McClung, James E., Richwood, W. Va. 
McClung, William D., Richwood, W. Va. 



Meade, Forest C, Hyattsville 

Molz, Edward L., Baltimore 

Muse, William T., Baltimore 

Painter, Elizabeth E., Baltimore 

Piatt, William, Baltimore 

Pollock, Arthur E., Gallitzin, Pa. 

Pound, John C, Baltimore 

Rhode, Charles M., Baltimore 

Roop, Donald J., New Market 

Russillo, Philip J., Annapolis 

Schenthal, Joseph E., Baltimore 

Schlesinger, George G., New York, N. Y. 

Stayton, Howard N., Jr., Wilmington, Del. 

Supik, William J., Baltimore 

Tankin, Louis H., Baltimore 

Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 

Tompakov, Samuel, Baltimore 

Trevor, William, Baltimore 

Wixted, John F., Chesaning, Mich. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Alessi, Alfred H., Baltimore 
Berngartt, Elmar B., Baltimore 
Binstock, Albert, Baltimore 
Celozzi, Matthew J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Samuel, Baltimore 
Councill, Wilford A. H., Jr., Baltimore 
DiGristine, Mary R., Baltimore 
Dobropolski, Anthony J., Baltimore 
Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 
Ehudin, Herbert, Baltimore 
Floyd, Melvin L., Catonsville 
Francik, Joseph, Baltimore 
Freedman, Leonard, Baltimore 
Goldberg, Albert, Baltimore 
Golditch, Henry M.. Baltimore 
Goldstein, Armand M., Baltimore 
Heneson. Irving J., Baltimore 
Hiss. Priscilla F., Washington, D. C. 
Jaworski, Melvin J., Baltimore 



Kahn, Morton, Baltimore 
Kasik, Frank T., Jr., Raspeburg 
Kosakowski, Chester G., Baltimore 
Levy, Irving, Annapolis 
Loftus, Howard E., Dundalk 
Lutz, Harry H., Baltimore 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Novak, Arthur F., Baltimore 
Okrasinski, Joseph L., Baltimore 
Proutt, Leah M., Hagerstown 
Richman, Jacob L., Baltimore 
Rosen, Donald M.. Baltimore 
Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Siegel, Harold, Baltimore 
Smith, Daniel E., Catonsville 
Sowbel, Irvin, Baltimore 
Spangler, Kenneth G., Baltimore 
Zukerberg, Morris, Baltimore 



COLLEGE PARK 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1937 

Aaronson, Philip J., Baltimore 

Abbott, Kathryn K., Bennings, D. C. 

Acheson, Elizabeth N., Washington, D. C. 

Albert, Earl A., Waterbury, Conn 
♦Albright, M. Louise, Washington, D. C. 

Alder, Betty L., Rockville 
*Alderton, Harold L., College Park 

Alderton, Loretta, College Park 

Alexander, Lavinia M., Salisbury 



♦Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 
♦Allard. Howard F., Clarendon. Va. 

Allen, John J., Hagerstown 
♦Allen, Louis P., Washington, D. C. 

Angelico, Arthur A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Anspon, Harry D., Washington, D. C. 

Anthony, Elizabeth C, Centerville 
♦Archer, Louise V., Washington, D. C. 

Arnold, Charles M., Woodlawn 






♦Gradua.te students. 



•Asero, John J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Austin, Frances, Eiast New Market 

Ayers, Alice J., Barton 
♦Babylon, William H., Hancock 

Baer, A. Harris, Baltimore 

Bailey, Catherine V., Fruitland 

Bailey, Howard M., Parkton 

Bailey, Reginald T., Highfield 

Bair, Thelma E., Hancock 

Baker, Alva S., Catonsville 
♦Baker, Kenneth W., Centerville 

Baldwin, Robert D., Riverdale 

Banks, Elizabeth B., Rockville 

Barbee, Susan G., Washington, D. C. 

Barber, Tena B., Vale Summit 
♦Barcus, James W., Centerville 

Barnes, Ruth E., Bennings, D. C. 
♦Barnhart, C. Paul, Williamsport 
♦Baroniak, Katherine B., St. Mary's City 

Barthel, Robert A,, Catonsville 

Barthel, William F., Catonsville 
♦Bartlett, Helen R., Centerville 

Barton, Rose, Brunswick 
♦Baugh, Ellie M., Eatonton, Ga. 

Baumann, Martin N., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Baxley, Katherine W., Ellicott City 

Baxter, Ruth M., Washington, D. C. 

Beals, Jane H., Washington, D. C. 

Beane, Bessie A., Bennings, D. C, 

Beauchamp, William F., Snow Hill 

Beck, Alma K., Davidsonville 

Beckwith, John C, Petersburg, Va. 

Becraft, Mabel V., Washington Grove 

Bedsworth, Margaret C, Princess Anne 
♦Bellows, John M., Jr., Maynard, Mass. 

Benjamin, Bernioe, Salisbury 

Bennett, Edith C, Mechanicsville 

Benson, Ritchie E., Hyattstown 
♦Berchtold, Louise E., Washington, D. C. 

Berlin, Walter I., Baltimore 

Bernstein, Norman N., Washington, D. C. 
♦Bickley, William E., Martel, Tenn. 
♦Bickmore, Helen D., Washington, D. C. 
♦Biehl, Katharine L., Frederick 

Birch, Marian, Hyattsville 

Birkland, John V., College Park 

Birmingham, Michael J., Baltimore 

Biron, Bobbie, Salisbury 
♦Bischoff, Anthony, Lothian 
♦Bischoff, Lillian S., Lothian 
♦Bishop, Catherine A., Queenstown 

Bishop, James W., Laurel, Delaware 
♦Black, Charles T., Chicago, Illinois 

Blacklock, Josiah A., Towson 

Blake, Frank E., Washington, D. C. 

Bloom, Morton I., Baltimore 



Bollinger, Garcia G., College Park 

Bonnett, Howard G., Washington, D. C. 

Boone, Athol B., Crisfield 

Borlik, Ralph, Washington, D. C. 
♦Boston, William T., Cambridge 

Boswell, Alice, Brookeville 

Bowen, C. Vernon, Centerville 
♦Bower, Francis M., Mt. Rainier 

Bowie, Frances W., Berwyn 

Bowie, Oden, Mitchellville 

Bowling, James E., Newport 

Bowling, Thelma P., Faulkner 
♦Bowman, Helen B,, Union Bridge 

Boyd, Ann G., Olney 

Boyd, Hollis R., Washington, D. C. 
♦Brain, Earl F., Frostburg 

Branson, Lindsay B., Washington, D. C. 

Bray, Nona D., Hyattsville 
♦Brechbill, Edith L., College Park 

Bredekamp, Marriott W., Washington, 
D. C. 

Brice, Eleanor V., Annapolis 

Bride, Crescent J., Rockville 

Brigham, David L., Ashton 

Britton, Rose, Washington, D. C. 

Brode, Carl K., Frostburg 

Brooks, William R., Pikesville 

Brown, Clara E., Annapolis 
♦Brown, George C Asheville, N. C. 
♦Brown, Marshall G., Oakland 

Brown, Mary B., Upper Marlboro 

Brown, Ruth D., Woodstock 
♦Bruehl, John T., Centerville 

Brusowankin, Bessie, Baltimore 
♦Bryson, Beth, Baltimore 

Buck, Marjorie M., Indian Head 

Buckler, Mary F., Aquasco 

Buckworth, Mary S., Middletown, Del. 
♦Buddington, Arthur R., College Park 

Bullock, Elizabeth B., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Bullock, Evelyn A., Baltimore 

Bullough, G. Van Ness, Baltimore 

Burch, Elizabeth B., Charlotte Hall 

Burdette, Dorothy S., Mt. Airy 

Burdette, Eunice E., Laurel 

Burdette, Nellie L., Mt. Airy 

Burgee, Ralph M., Ijamsville 

Bunk, Joseph, Waterloo, Iowa 
♦Burke, Edmund T., Silver Spring 

Burke, Francis V., Silver Spring 

Bums, Harriet D., Denton 
♦Burr, Clifton W., Lewisburg, W. Va. 

Burroughs, Viola J., Aquasco 
♦Burruss, Martha B., Front Royal, Va. 

Burton, Beulah M., Washington, D. C. 

Burton. Julia, Baltimore 



♦Graduate students. 



402 



403 



II 



♦Butterfield, George P., IronwoDd, Mich. 
♦Butz, Mary M., Rockville 
Byer, Henry L., Sparrows Point 
Byers, G. Ellsworth, Lonaconing 
Campbell, Gordon H., Washingrton, D. C. 
Campbell, Marjorie H., Washington, D. C. 
Campiglio, Robert G., Baltimore 
Cantwell, Hammond D., Cambridge 
Caplan, Florence M., Baltimore 
Caplan, Jerome. Baltimore 
Carrico, Norman, Cumberland 

♦Carroll. Floyd D., Mt. Clare. Nebraska 

•Carter, Adrienne, Oakland 

♦Carter, John H., Oakland 
Case, Sara V., Felton, Del. 
Cassel, Jane C, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Casson, Margaret H., Easton 
Castle, Florence A., Williamspart 
Catterton, Elizabeth N., Bristol 
Chambers, Pauline P., Centerville 
Chandlei", Miriam T., Grayton 
Checket, Irene R., Baltimore 
Cherbonnier, Dorothy H., Royal Oak 

♦Chesley. H. Elizabeth. Baltimore 
Cheyney, Elizabeth B., Arlington. Va. 
Chiswell, Marjorie W., Gaithersburg 
Christie, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
Cissel, Beatrice S,. West Friendship 
Claggett, Jennie D., Preston 
Clark, A. D.. Washington, D. C. 
Clark, Charles T., Laurel 

♦Clark, Percy E., Upper Marlboro 
Clarke, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C. 
Claytor, Margaret A., Riverdale 
Cleaver, William F., Washington, D. C. 

♦Clevenger, Helen E., Everett, Pa. 

Close, Marion B., Frostburg 
♦Coblentz. Manville E., Vienna 

Coflfman, Naomi H., Fairplay 

Cogswell, Phyllis J., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Maxwell L., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 

Cole, William H., Towson 

Cole. William P., Glenarm 
♦Colip, Louise R., Riverdale 

Collins, Hiram H,. Crisfield 

Collison. Malcolm N., Takoma Park 

Combs, Edna E., Mt. Rainier 

Combs, Maxine, Fairmont, W. Va. 

Comegys, Estella K., Chestertown 
♦Compton, Calvin L.. Pisgah 

Conlon. Margaret R., Frostburg 

CDnningham, Barbara J.. Washington, 
D. C. 

Conrad, Maude E., Williamsport 

Cook. Laurel D.. Bethesda 



Cook, Mildred L., College Park 
Cooke, Alfred A., Hyattsville 
Cooke, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 
Coombs, Albert H., Washington, D. C. 
Copes, Bessie E., Silver Spring 
Copes, Grace R., Silver Spring 
Corbett, Ruth, Baltimore 
Corbett, Violet E., Hancock 
Corey, Ellen B., Littleton, N. H. 
Corkran, Clarence H., Anacostia 
♦Cornelius. Alberta S., Lynch 
♦Cornell, Florence N., Chevy Chase 
Cornnell, Ellner A., Brentwood 
Corosh, Frances R., Annapolis 
Corridon, Jack R., Washington, D. C. 
Coulbourne, Alice M., Crisfield 
Coulby, Mary C„ Easton 
Cowie, Jean A., Havre de Grace 
Cox, Clara V., Parkton 
Craig, Evelyn M., Elk Mills 
Craig, Madie E., Brentwood 
♦Cramer, Bessie W., Washington, D. C. 
Cressman, Kathryn, Boonsboro 
Cronise, A. Katherine, Frederick City 
Crosby, Virginia E., Friendship 
Crowder, Adelaide M., Wajshington, D. C. 
Cullen, M. Elizabeth, Marion Station 
Culler, W. Walter, Jr., Walkersville 
Gulp, Charles H., Whiteford 
Curfman, Joseph E., Sabillasville 
Curley, Kathryn L., Cumberland 
Dahlgren, Clyde R., Oakland 
Dahlgren, Ruby A., Frostburg 
Dahn, Nona E., Chevy Chase 
Daisey, Jessie D., Glenn Dale 
Dalinsky, Isador J., Baltimore 
Danforth, Shirley F., Riverdale 
Daniels, Catherine L., Lusby 
♦Dantzig, Anne S., Baltimore 
Darby, Eleanor N., Washington, D. C. 
Daugherty, Irvin W., Williamsport 
Davidson, Lida M., Chevy Chase 
♦Davidson, Nellie M., Silver Spring 
Davis, Barbara J., Chevy Chase 
♦Davis, Edward F., Arlington, Va- 
♦Davis, Gertrude J., Frostburg 

Davis, Katherine I., Washington, D. C. 
♦Dawson, Catharine I.. Richmond, Va. 
♦Dawson, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Day, Muriel E., Oxford 
Dean, Gladys M., Middletown, Del. 
DeNeen, Rhea V., Hancock 
Derr, L. Hubert, Monrovia 
Derr, Naomi, Hampstead 
Detwiler, Frank J., Takoma Park 
DeWilde, Cornelia, Preston 



Dick, Alice S., Cumberland 

Dick, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 

Dillon, Mary C, Washington, D. C. 

Dippel, Francis X., Patterson Park 

Dodd, Ocie E., Chevy Chase 

Donohoe, Mildred D., Baltimore 

Dorsey, Agatha V., Midland 

Dotterer, Jacklyn S., Chevy Chase 
♦Doub, Charles A., Leonardtown 
♦Douglass, Edgar M., Washington, D. C. 

Dowden, Elizabeth E., Washington, D. C. 

Dowling, Vernon T., Annapolis 
♦Downey, Mylo S., College Park 
♦Dugan, Raymond F., Towson 

Dulin, Blanche S., Washington, D. C. 

Dungan, Nevis. Baltimore 
♦Dunker, Melvin F., Baltimore 

Dun woody, Ruth M., Baltimore 

Durrant, Charlotte F., College Park 
♦Duvall. Maude R., Rockville 
♦Duvall. Wilbur I., Gaithersburg 
♦Dyer, Harry E., Havre de Grace 

Dyson, Edna M.. Charlotte Hall 

Earle, Mary I., Washington, D. C. 
♦Edgeworth, Clyde B., Towson 

Edlavitch, Robert, Hyattsville 

Edwards, John B., Washington, D. C. 
♦Eiler, Charles M., Union Bridge 

Ellegood, Georgia G., Delmar 

EUery, Rosina, Nanticoke, Pa, 

Elliott. E. v., Baltimore 

Ellison, Max M., Baltimore 

Elmore, Edna E., Washington, D. C. 

Epperson, John W., Winona, W. Va. 

Ermold, John G., Ellicott City 

Ernest, Lois E., Kensington 

Etchison, Katherine, Gaithersburg 

Evans, Hal K., Bladensburg 
♦Everett, Genevieve, Pasadena 
♦Eyler, Marian. Cumberland 

Faiella, John D., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Falcone, Thelma E., Washington, D. C. 

Farlow, Margaret S., Baltimore 

Farrell, Albert B., Washington, D. C. 

Farrington, Mary C, Hyattsville 

Faust, Bernard B., Washington, D. C. 

Fawcett, Howard H., Cumberland 

Fenwick, Lucy I., Aquasco 

Fey, Alice V., Bethesda 

♦Filler, W. Arthur, Baltimore 

Filmer, Catharine P., Laurel 

Fisher, Joseph G., Baltimore 

♦Flanagan, Inez E., Walkersville 

♦Fleetwood, Robert T., Denton 
Fletcher, Lucille W., Rockville 
Flinn, Nannie R., Kensington 



Foehl, Marie E., Washington. D. C. 
♦Foley, Julia C, Rockville 
Fooks, Annie E., Bethesda 
Footer, Thomas, Barton 
Ford, Alleine K., Boonsboro 
Forman, Morris, Baltimore 
Fowble, Florence W., Reisterstown 
Fox, Hamilton P., Salisbury 
Fox, William W.. Washington. D. C. 
Foxwell, Gertrude E., Leonardtown 
France, Germanus J., Baltimore 
Francis, Harold E., Washington. D. C. 
Frantz, Merle D., Friendsville 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington. D. C. 
Freeman, L. Louise, Boonsboro 
Freeman. Mary J., Charlotte Hall 
Freeman, Willye B., Washington, D. C. 
Freudenberger, John G., Carroll Station 
♦Frey, Elizabeth C, Millersville, Pa. 
♦Friedman, Harold B., Silver Spring 
♦Frisbie, Kenneth W., Bethesda 
Frushour, Harry V., Myersville 
Fuchser, Marie M., Emerson, Nebraska 
Fugitt, Elizabeth S., Washington. D. C. 
Fulgham, Evel W., Washington. D. C. 
Fulmer, Edna M., Frederick 
♦Funk, Merle R.. Boonsboro 
Furbershaw. Olga S., Washington, D. C. 
Fumiss, Thelma A., Princess Anne 

Gale, Mary V., Hagerstown 
Galloway, Rhea M., Lonaconing 
♦Gardner. Eva M.. Jessups 

Gary, Ruth E., University Park 

Gehman, Jonathan F., Brentwood 

Gibbes, Ella H., Savannah. Ga. 

Gilchrist, Flora I., Laurinburg, N. C. 

Giles, Martha R., Annapolis 
♦Gillespie, Warren, Galena 
♦Glading. Rebekah F., Lanham 

Glime, Gilbert, Frostburg 

Goldsmith, John S., Allen 

Goller, Carl, Baltimore 

Gomborov, Minnie. Baltimore 
♦Gordon, Fortuna L., Fayette, Mo. 

Gordon, Jack L., Riverdale 

Gordy. Martha. Rhodesdale 

Gosnell, Grace V., Laurel 

Gough, James J.. Chaptico 
♦Grace, Meta E., Clanton, Ala. 
♦Graham, James G.. Washington. D. C. 
♦Graham, Julian R., Sudlersville 
♦Gray, Ellen H., Reisterstown 

Gray, Jane E., Port Tobacco 
♦Green, Janice H., Gaithersburg 
♦Green, Mary O.. Boyds 

Greenwell, Hope, Leonardtown 



♦Graduate students. 



♦Graduate students. 



404 



405 



♦Gregory, Florence I., Washington, D. C. 

Griffith, Ann M., Rockville 
♦GriflSth, Francis D., Brandy, Va. 

Griffith, Saxah S., Rockville 

Gross, Esther B., Sharpsburg 

Gross, Irving, Newark, N. J. 

Grove, Edith M., Chevy Chase, D. C. 

Gue, Ruth S., Rockville 
♦Gwynn, Thomas S., Clinton 
♦Haas, Frances S., Takoma Park 

Hall, Eleanor, Fairmont, W. Va. 
♦Hall, Elizabeth G., Silver Spring 

Hall, N. Iren«, College Park 
♦Hanune, Wilson S., Seven Valleys, Pa.. 

Hammer, Ralph C, Cumberland 
♦Hammond, Rachel A., Mt. Airy 
♦Hand, George E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Handy, Effie B., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hanna, Mary G., Westernport 
♦Hanna, Otis D., Port Deposit 
♦Hanna, W. Miles, White Hall 

Harcum, Bettie, Salisbury 
♦Hardcastle, Aaron B., Richmond, Va. 
♦Harden, Elmer P., Washington, D. C. 

Harden, Nellie G., Washington. D. C. 

Harding, Elaine M., Highland 

Harmon, June, Silver Spring 

Harmon, Katharyn E., Salisbury 

Harris, Eleanor, Aldie, Va. 

Harrison, Bernard A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Harrison, George K., Upper Marlboro 

Hart, Pearl M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hartenstein, Helena J., New Freedom, Pa. 

Harvey, Carolyn H., Olney 

Haslbeck, Theresa M., Cumberland 

Haspert, Mathews J., Chester 

Hazard, Rosemary, Chevy Chase 

Heaps, Laura F., Cardiff 

H^hinian, Garabed W., Baltimore 

Hellstem, Charlotte M., Hudson Heights, 
N. J. 

Helmers, Carolyn, Washington, D. C. 

Henderson, Esther L., Washington, D. C. 

Hendricks, Lucy T., Hyattsville 

Hendrix, Nevins B., Port Deposit 
♦Henley, Robert C, Washington, D. C. 

Hepbron, Louise, Betterton 

Herbert, Wilbur M., Morrell 

Hewitt, Frederic M., Chevy Chase 

Heylmun, Stanley L., Baltimore 

Hickman, Mildred M., Crisfield 
♦Higgins, William B., Hyattsville 
♦High, Louis F., Abingdon 

Hilton, Elizabeth J., Mt. Airy 

Hirsch, Albert, Frederick 
♦Hitchcock, George R., Silver Spring 



Hite, Norborne A., Port Deposit 
♦Hitz, C. W., Fortescue, Mo. 
♦Hoadley, Alfred D., Swarthmore, Fa. 

Hobbs, Eva E., Washington, D. C. 

Hobbs, Marguerite W., Washington, D. C. 

Hobson, Barbara E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hodges, Leslie C, Warsaw, Va. 

Hohman, Gertrude E., Elkridge 

Holbrook, Helen P., College Park 
♦Holland, Rebecca P., Walkersville 
♦Holley, Julia W., Damascus 

Hollingsworth, Mary L., Hyattsville 
♦Hollis, Edgar H., Frederick 
♦Holmead, Francis S., Silver Spring 
♦Hoover, Jacob H., Fruitland 

Hoover, Lawrence G., Takoma Park 

Hopkins, Anne C, Cordova 

Hopkinsi, Grace R., Easton 

Hopkins, Martha T., Catonsville 

Horine, Frances V., Jefferson 
♦Horn, Walter E., Arlington, Va. 

Horsey, Maude B., Mardela Springs 

Hosken, Margaret R., Accokeek 
♦Houchen, Grace, Washington, D. C. 
♦House, B. M., College Park 

House, Dorothy M., Flintstone 

House, Mildred L., Flintstone 

House, Theresa R., College Park 

Houser, Emilie T., Laurel 
♦Hovermill, Harry A., Rising Sun 

Howard, Adrienne R., Hyattsville 
♦Howland, Lionel B., Laurel 
♦Hudson, Yola V., Cumberland 

Humelsine, Carlisle H., Hagerstown 

Hurley, Robert F., Hyattsville 

Hutchison, Frances E., Chevy Chase 

Hutchison, Stella B., Queen Anne 
♦Hutton, A. Claire, Brinklow 

Hyde, Jennie M., Barton 
♦Ide, Frances A., BaJtimore 

Ingrick, Helen S., Washington, D. C. 

Ireland, Julius W., Baltimore 

Ison, Patricia, Hyattsville 

Jackson, Lorraine V., College Park 

Jacobs, Mary H., Gaithersburg 

Jacobs, Nathaniel J., Baltimore 

Jacobs, Norman B., Jr., Gaithersburg 

Jacques, Jane, Smithsburg 

Jacques, Lancelot, Jr., Smithsburg 

Jacques, Mary L., Smithsburg 

James, Jennie P., Mt. Rainier 
♦James, Lillie H., Hyaltsville 

Jarrell, Evelyn R., Hyattsville 

Jefferson, Evelyn M., Salisbury 

Jehle, John R., Hyattsville 
♦Jewell, Edgar G., Damascus 



Johns, Malcolm L., Washington, D. C 
Johnson. Clifford E., Washington, D. C. 
Johnson, Vivian H., Baltimore 
Johnson, William R.. Baltimore 
Johnston, Frederick A., Takoma Park 
♦Johnston, John W.. Webster Mills, Pa. 
Jones, Anna B., Snow HiU 
Jones, Carrie R., Church Creek 
♦Jones, Helen H., Germantown 
Jones, Leonore G., Faulkner 
Jones, Lewis A., College Park 
Jones, Mary E., Loveville 
♦Jones, Omar J.. Jr., Faulkner 
Jones, Robert W., College Park 
♦Jones, Robert W., Frostburg 
♦Jones. William B.. Ellicott City 
Joseph. David R.. Stamford. Conn. 
♦Joy, Mary E., Leonardtown 
Judy, Gladys L., Cumberland 
♦Jump, Margaret D., Queen Anne 
♦Jump, Raymond, Saint Michaels 
Kalb, MerrUl B., Baltimore 
♦Kanatzar, Charles L., St. Elmo, III. 
♦Kapiloff, Leonard, New York, N. Y. 
Katz, Lillian, Morganton, N. C. 
Katz, Lillian. Washington, D. C 
♦Katz, Mildred R., Baltimore 
Kaufmaji, Daniel, Washington, D. C. 
Kaufman. Josephine, Washington, D. C 
Keefer, Ruth L., Takoma Park 
♦Keller, Clarence Z., Princess Anne 
Keller, Joseph E., Washington, D. C. 
Keller, Thelma I., Hagerstown 
Kennedy, Edward J., Baltimore 
Kepler. Russell L., Hagerstown 
Keppler, MHlicent M.. Washington, D. C. 
Kilby, Wilson W.. Conowingo 
King, Irene H., Huntingtown 
♦King, Ruth S., Washington. D. C. 
King, Vernon J., Lansdowne 
King, Williamy S., Washington, D. C. 
Kingdon, Hattie C, Rockville 
Kinna, C. Robert, Chewsville 
Kirby, James T., Trappe 
Kirby, Marion, Takoma Park 
♦Kirk, Ruby L., Elkton 
Knotts. Dorothy E., Templeville 
Koppelman, Mary, Cornwall on the Hud- 

son, N. Y. 

Kraemer. Edwin, Hackensack, N. J. 

Kramer, Amihud, Baltimore 

Krause, Louise E.. Towson 

Krausse. Dorothy E., Baltimore 
♦Krausse, Harry W., Baltimore 
♦Kreider, David, Lanham 
♦Kroh, Cornelia C, Westminster 



♦Graduate students. 



♦Graduate students. 



1 ,i 



406 



Ladson, Jack A., Olney 
♦Lamberton, Berenice E.. Washington. 

DC. ^ ^ 

Lambros, Theodora S., Washington. D. C. 

♦Lanahan, Doris, Laurel 
Land, Robert H., Baltimore 
♦Landrum, Lonny I., Rock Hill, S. C. 
♦Lanford, Charles B.. Bowling Green, Va.. 
♦Lannon, Mildred W., Cumberland 
Larrimer, Frances E., Hanover 
Larsen, Dorothy M., Brigham, Utah 
♦Lawyer, Mary L., Westminster 
♦Lee, Marion, Washington, D. C. 
Legge. Jane M.. Cumberland 
Lehman, Milton L., Baltimore 
♦Leidy, Katherine, Westminster 
Lentz, Roberta H., Washington, D. C. 
Leonard, Norma L.. Trappe 
Leonard, Norman H.. Jr.. Trappe 
Levin, Sol, Baltimore 
Lewald, James H., Laurel 
Lewis. Frank H., Frederick 
Lewis, Geraldine L., Brunswick 
♦Liebman. Rebekah R., Norfolk 
Lindsay, Margaret L., Washington. D. C. 
Littleford. Rita T., Washington, D. C. 
Littleton, Alberta M.. Snow Hill 
Livingstone, Eva M., Capitol Heights 
♦Loeffler, Ernestine M., Laurel 
Loper, Albert K.. Cumberland 
Lowery. Norma L.. Cumberland 
♦Lucas. Philip E.. Arlington, Va. 
Lufburrow. Miriam A.. Cambridge 
Luyster, Madge C Washington, D. C. 
Lynch, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C 
♦Lyon, Marie H.. HyattsvUle 
Lynt, Richard K.. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
♦MacCanum, Annie P., Silver Spring 
MacDonald, Charles R.. Cumberland 
MacDonald, Margaret E., Bethesda 
Magaha, Dora M., Frederick 
Magaha, E. Adeline, Frederick 
Magaha. Evelyn M.. Burkittsville 
♦Magruder, John W.. College Park 
Males. Alex. East Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Mangum, Susie A., Washington, D. C. 
Manley, Catherine E.. Midland 
Marlow. Dorothy E.. Washington. D. C. 
Marshall. Gwendolyn H.. Princess Anne 
Marshall. P. W.. Washington. D. C. 
Martin, Alta G., Hagerstown 
♦Martin, Ardath E., Hagerstown 
Martin, Carrie P.. Baltimore 
Martin. Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Mason. Amy E.. Washington, D. C 
♦Massey, James B.. Hampden Sydney, Va. 



407 



Massey Mabel, WilliajTisburg, Va. 

Matson, Ruby I., Takoma Park 

Matthews, Abigail G., La Plata 

Matthews, Edward A., Baltimore 

Maxson, Ruth H., Silver Spring 

Mayhew, Elizabeth A., Hyattsville 

McCall, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 

McCann, R. Harold, Glen Burnie 

McCarriar, Herbert G., Baltimore 

McClean, William C, Dundalk 
♦McDermott, Edna C, Midland 
*MeGinniss, Arria G., Kensington 

McGinnis, Verneena, Pomonkey 

McGlaughlin, Doris M., Highfield 

McGoogan, Malcolm T., Fitzgerald, Ga. 

McGregor, Bessie E., Washington, D. C, 

Mclntyre, Myrtle E., Cumberland 

McKeever, Alice A., Boyds 

McLuckie, Donald, Frostburg 

McMahan, Catherine E., Cambridge 
♦Meacham, Frank B., Raleigh, N. C. 

Mead, Joan, Takoma Park 

Medbery, Dorothy A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Meekins, Elizabeth G., Lenoir, N. C. 

Meeks, George E., Washington, D. C. 

Mees, Theo. H., Washington, D. C. 

Meese, Louise, Barton 

Meese, Mae, Barton 

Melick, Amanda D., Salisbury 

Melroy, Ruth M., Washington, D. C. 

Meng, Ralph H., Perry Point 
♦Merritt, Helen C, Forest Glen 

Metcalf, Owen E., Crystal Lake, III. 

Meyer, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 

Meyer, Ruth S., Arlington, Va. 

Meyers, Mary E., Lonaconing 

Micari, Fred S., Bristol, Conn. 
♦Middleton, Frederic A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Miles, Ivan E., State College, Miss. 

Millar, Dorothy V., Washington, D. C, 

Miller, Elna M., Silver Spring 
♦Miller, Frances B., Manchester 
♦Miller, J. Z., Elkton 

Miller, Marjorie L., Fort Monroe, Va. 

Miller, Mary E., Baltimore 

Miller, Ruth C, Baltimore 

Miller, William I., Baltimore 

Mills, Wyona T., Toddville 

Minnick, Grace V., Washington, D. C. 

Mitchell, Alfred G., Baltimore 

Mitchell, Mai*y, Jessups 
♦Mitchell, Orrel J., Washington, D. C. 

Mohle, Robert L., Berwyn 

Monroe, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 

Moore, Beryl L., Elgin, 111. 

Moore, Evelyn W., Washington, D. C. 



♦Moore, Florence J., Port Deposit 

Moore, Grace E., White Hall 
♦Morgan, Estheline W., Chevy Chase 

Morgan, Joseph H., Port Tobacco 

Morgan, Mary, Frostburg 

Morningstar, Mary A., Bamesville 

Moser, Marion, Frederick 

Motyka, Agnes L., Washington, D. C. 

Mudd. H. Virginia, Pomfret 

Mulitz, Milton M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Mulligan, Mary E., Berwyn 
♦Mumma, Samuel C, Sharpsburg 

Murphy, Bernice L., Fishing Creek 
♦Murphy, Harry T., Ellicott City 
♦Myers, Gibbs, Washington, D. C. 

Myers, Mabel E., Frostburg 

Myers, Paul F., Chevy Chase 
♦Nathanson, Albert E., Arlington, Va. 

Nattans, Ralph A., Baltimore 

Nedomatsky, Ivan, Lansdowne 

Needle, Barnett M., Washington, D. C. 

Needy, Glendora E., Boonsboro 

Neff, Virginia K., Frostburg 

Nefflen, Myra M., Keyser, W. Va. 

Neilson, Robert S., Baltimore 

Nesbitt, Geraldine H., Baltimore 

Niemeyer, Gei;^rude E., Washington, D. C. 

Norris, Cecil, Baltimore 

O'Brien, Kitty, Luke 

O'Keefe, Bernice E., Rockville 

Oland. Gladys P., Olney 

O'Neill, Richard J.. Woodlawn 

Osborn, Mary J., Flintstone 

Oster, Leota, Flintstone 

Oswald, Huyette B., College Park 
♦Otto, Thomas W., Towson 

Owens, Frances J., Washington, D. C. 

Owens, James D., Linthicum Heights 

Owens, Lenora, Greenock 

Owings, Helen B., Owings 

Pahlman, Margaret B., Easton 
♦Painter, Elizabeth E., New Freedom, Pa. 

Palmer, Charlotte A., Chewsville 

Parker, Mildred I., Berwyn 

Parks, John A., Cumberland 
♦Parmenter, Miriam F., Keene, N. H. 

Parvis, Charles F., Baltimore 

Pasma, Henry K., Mrs., Rockville 
♦Patterson, Walter G., New Galilee, Pa. 
♦Paulett, Edward W., Arlington, Va. 

Peiter, Doris S., Washington, D. C. 

Perdew, Elma C, Cumberland 

Perlstein, Sam, Washington, D. C. 

Petersen, Olga C, Hyattsville 

Phillips, Esther V., Silver Spring 
♦Phillips, Watson D., Elkton 



♦Graduate students. 



408 



Philpott. Lucile, Cadiz, Ohio 
Plowden, Edna W., Newport 
Poland, Evelyn B.. Cumberland 
♦Poole, Harry R., Hagerstown 
Poole, Helen N., Hagerstown 
Poole, Virginia L., Foolesville 
Porter Aline C, Washington, D. C. 
Posey. Walter B., College Park 
♦Poston, Margaret C, Washington, D. C 
Powell, Alice, Berwyn 
Powell, Dorothy M., Dorsey 
Powell. Veanetta M., Frostburg 
♦Powers, Mary I., Frostburg 

Preble, Merle R., Fort Washington 
♦Priest, Hazel, Washington, D. C. 
♦Pritchard, Orpha B., Cumberland 
♦Pritchard, Virginia G., Cumberland 
Pritchett, Lillian A., Bishop's Head 
Prout, Rebecca S., Friendship 
Pryor, Glen M., Lantz 
Pryor, Leone L., Washington, D. C. 
Pultz. Kathryn E., Takoma Park 
Funnett, Ruth S.. Leonia, N. J. 
Pyle, Helen D., Bethesda 
Pyle, Patience H., Chestertown 
♦Pyle, Thomas W., Bethesda 
Pyles, Helen W., Rockville 
♦Pyne. Iva E., South Beloit, III. 
Quijano. Gregorio R.. Riverdale 
♦Quinn, Edward F., Washington D. C. 
Raisin, Herman S., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
♦Ramsburg, Herman F., Freilerict 
Reed, Catherine T., Riverdale 
*Reed, Edward D., Alexandria, Va. 
♦Reed, Harriet A., Chevy Chase 
Reed, Octavia E., Washington, D. C. 
Reeder, Harriet. Morganza 
Regan, Ethel M., Mt. Rainier 
♦Reidy. Kathryn, Silver Spring 
Remington, Jesse A., Laurel 
♦Remley, Estelle W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Remsberg, J. Homer, Middletown 
Reynolds, Mary F., Mt. Savage 
♦Rhodes, Harry C, Poolesville 
♦Rhodes, Louis K., Jr., Queenstown 
Richardson, Mildred M., Willards 
Richardson, Minnie J., Willards 
Richardson, Myra H., Whiteford 
Richmond, Nadine N.. Washington. D. C. 
Riedel. Kathryn E., Hyattsville 
Rieg, Mary, Washington, D. C. 
Riehl, Frederick K., Baltimore 
Ringler, Margaret K., Flintstone 
♦Robertson, Roy L., Elkton 
Roby, Maud F.. Riverdale 
Rochlitz, Ethel E., Arnold 



♦Graduate students. 



Rockwood, Marion, Silver Spring 
Rodier, John M., Lanham 
Rogers. Jerome S., Bethesda 
♦Roland, Elsie H., Flintstone 
♦Rolston, Frank, Washington. D. C. 
Rose, Lael T., Washington, D. C. 
♦Roth, Alfred C, Annapolis 
Roylance, Merriwether L., Glenn Dale 
Rucker, Clara M., Garrett Park 
Rudolph, Elsie, Hillsdale. N. Y. 
♦Rusk, Gertrude P., Kensington 
Russell, Joseph S., Maddox 
Saltzman. Michael, Baltimore 
Samson, Elizabeth, Takoma Park 
Sangster, Ruth H., Washington, D. C. 
Saperstein, Paul, Baltimore 
♦Sasscer, Cora D., Chevy Chase 
Saunders, Elizabeth H.. Washington, D. C. 
Scally, Mary I., Lutherville 
Scates, Irene, Gaithersburg 
SchaeflEer, Carol J., Washington, D. C. 
Schellinger, Helen N.. Kent 
♦Schenthal. Joseph E.. Baltimore 

Schlesinger. Arthur. Washington. D. C. 
♦Schnebly. Lewis A.. Clearspring 
Schultz. Dorothy J.. Rockville 
Schwartz. Charles H.. Branchville 
Schwartz. Mortimer. New York. N. Y. 
Schwartz. Norton B.. Spring Valley 

N. Y. 

Scoggin. Josephine C. Beatrice. Nebr. 

Scott, Roy F., Washington, D. C. 

Secrest. John P.. Brentwood 

Seitz. Charies E.. Glen Rock, Pa. 

Sensenbaugh, Glenn H., Smithsburg 

Sergent, Edith M., Fairmont, W. Va. 
♦Severance, KatheiTne, Gaithersburg 

Sharp, Emily L., Washington, D. C. 

Shaw, Clay W., Stewartstown, Pa. 

Shearer, Kathleen M., Baltimore 

♦Sheff, Joseph, Annapolis 

Shenk, Virginia, Hagerstown 
* ♦Shepherd. Boland B., Orrum, N. C. 
Shepperd. Anna G.. Upper Falls 
Shepperd. Regina B.. Upper Falls 
Sheridan, Richard B.. Salisbury 

♦Shipley, Ruth J.. Washington, D. C. 
Shires. Dorothy W., Cumberiand 

♦Shirk, Harold G., Hyattsville 
Shmuner, Daniel P.. Baltimore 
Shockley, Edith B., Parsonsburg 
Shrewsbury. William J.. Upper Marlboro 
Shue, Elise D., Hagerstown 
Shulman. Samuel. Washington. D. C. 
Shupp. Virginia W.. Clearspring 
♦Sibley, Martha, Milledgeville. Ga. 



409 



•Sieling, Frederick W., Annapolis Junction 

Silberg, I. Walter, Baltimore 
♦Silverman, PVank, Baltimore 
♦Simonds, Gardner W., Silver Spring 

Simpson, Doris V., Hagerstown 
♦Sipple, Margaret, Frostburg 
♦Skelton, Bessie W., Hyattsville 
♦Skinner, Geneva K., Takoma Park 

Skirven, Emilie N., Chestertown 
♦Slade, Hutton D., Baltimore 

Sloan, James D., Cumberland 

Slocum, Dorothy J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Small. John R., Elkridge 

Smith, Blair H., Mt. Rainier 

Smith, Dorothy G., Hyattsville 

Smith, Ellen L., Upper Marlboro 
♦Smith, Helen I., Takoma Paxk 

Smith, Helen K., Big Spring 

Smith, Irvin, Denton 

Smith, Marian, Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Martha E., Goldsboro 
♦Smith, Mary E., Frederick 

Smith, Ruth E., Frederick 
♦Smith, Ruth P., Silver Spring 

Smith, Wilson L., Stevenson 

Smithers, Ann S., Germantown 

Snow, Mary R., Chevy Chase 
♦Snyder, Ethel, Laurel 
♦Snyder, Ruth I., University Park 

Sollod, Leonard, Baltimore 

Soper, Ruby, Washington, D. C. 

Sothoron, Julia H., Charlotte Hall 

Souder, Letty H., Gaithersburg 

Soule, Floyd A., Washington, D. C. 

Speake, Mary M., Luray, Va. 
♦Speaker, Clare J., Washington, D. C. 

Speare, Almus R., Jr., Rockville 
♦Speck, Marvin L., Middletown 
♦Speicher, John P., Accident 
♦Speir, Hugh B., Westminster 
♦Spicknall, Florence L., Hyattsville 

Stanley, Anna J., Silver Spring < 

Stanley, Gertrude W., Mt. Airy 
♦Steffey, Phoebe, Williamsport 

Steiner, Wilmer W., Washington, D. C. 

Sterling, Burnice H., Crisfield 

Stevens, Eileen, Riderwood 

Stevens, Margaret T., Sudlersville 
♦Stewart, Laura C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Stier, Howard L., College Park 

Stillings, Charles A., Baltimore 

Stone, Marguerite M., Takoma Park 

Stonebraker, John E., Hagerstown 
♦Straub, Eleanor H., Cumberland 
♦Strauss, Samuel, Washington, D. C. 

Streett, John H., Bradshaw 



♦Stull, Robert B., Frederick 
Stumbaugh, Marian G., Hagerstown 
{Sullivan, Rosalyn C, Chevy Chase 
Sullivan, Ross H., Pleasantville, N. J. 

♦Sutton, Carrie O., Washington, D. C. 
Swan, Augusta M., Washington, D. C. 
Swann, Alice O., Dentsville 
Swink, Janis E., Hagerstown 
Taschenberg, Emil F., Cumberland 
Tawes, Elizabeth, Crisfield 
Taylor, Mary W., Washington, D. C. 

♦Teal, Dorcas R., Hyattsville 
Tennant, Anne W., Cumberland 

♦Terbush, Theron L., Washington, D. C. 
Terhune, Kathryn M., Washington, D. C. 

♦Terwilliger, W. Bird, Baltimore 
Teter, Naomi R., Cumberland 
Thies, William N., Washington, D. C. 
Thomas, Bertha A., Frostburg 

♦Thomas, Catherine B., Takoma. Park 
Thomas, George E., Washington, D. C. 

♦Thomas, Margaret R., Gaither^urg 
Thompson, T. Manning, Washington, D. C. 
Thornton, Eugene, Worton 
Tilghman, Margaret V., Salisbury 

♦Todd. Wilton R.. Wingate 

♦Tomlinson, Mary V., North East 
Tompkins, Margaret H.. Rockville 
Toomey, Edna P., Bladensburg 

♦Topfer, Hilda, Princess Anne 
Toulson, Myra W., Chestertown 
Townsend. Lawrence R., Parkville 
Trader, Mary F., Kensington 

♦Trice, Evelyn B., Hurlock 
Truman, Zelma M., College Park 

♦Tucker, Margaret E., Washington, D. C. 
Valle, Philip J., Baltimore 
Vansant, Anna T., Chestertown 
Vansant, Lillian H., Catonsville 
Vaughan, Alice M., Chesapeake City 
Vaught, Jeannette, Hyattsville 
Vogtman, Harry R., Cumberland 

♦Wadleigh, Clarence B.. Durham. N. H. 
Waesche, Harry L., Chevy Chase 
Waite, Maiden D.. Odenton 
Waldman, Sylvia R., Hyattsville 
Walker, Marian W., Gaithersburg 
Waller, Julia L., Salisbury 
Walmsley, John S., Jr., Baltimore 
Walsh, Ambrose J., Jr., Brentwood 
Walters, Mozelle C, Hagei-stown 
Ward, Mary B., Gaithersburg 
Warehime, Vallie B., Manchester 
Waring, Elizabeth A., Annapolis 
Warner, Grenfell, Washington, D. C. 
Warthen, Albert E., Monrovia 



♦Watkins, Dayton O., Hyattsville 
♦Watkins, Mary L., Chevy Chase 
Watkins, Mildred R.. Davidsonville 
♦Watkins. Wilma L., Washington Grove 
Watson, George B.. Towson 
♦Watt, Lois B., Washington, D. C. 
Webb, James L., Chevy Chase 
Webb, Margaret O., Hyattsville 
Webster, Sarah P.. Pylesville 
Weinman. Melvin. Baltimore 
♦Weis, Theo. G., Takoma Park 
Weisberg, Maurice M., Baltimore 
Wells, Elinor H.. College Park 
Wells, Joan K., Washington, D. C. 
Welsh, Eleanor R., Westernport 
♦Wentz, Clark H.. Manchester 
♦Wenzel. Marie E., Laurel 
Werner, Janet T., Catonsville 
West, William V., Chevy Chase 
Wetherby, Edith H., Welch, W. Va. 
Wheeler. Elwood L.. Glyndon 
Whipple, Stanley R., Baltimore 
White, Mary G., Dickerson 
White, Ruth O., Mt. Rainier 
Whiton, Alfred C, Brentwood 
Wilcox, Annette T., Washington, D. C. 
Will, Fern F.. Rockville 
Williams, Don H., Washington, D. C. 
♦Williams, Edith M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Williams, Helen V., Washington, D. C. 
♦Williams. Loris E.. Takoma Park, D. C. 
Williams, Reynold D.. Sharpsburg 
♦Williamson, Eleanor S.. Lancaster, N. H. 
Williamson, Helen B., Washington, D. C. 
Williamson, Robert G., Washington, D. C. 
Willing, Ruth A., Bivalve 
Willingham. Patricia M., Hyattsville 
Willoughby, Lola M., Denton 
Wilson, Elinor G., Denton 



♦Graduate students. 



Wilson, Ethel J.. Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, Gladys, Cumberland 

Wilson, N. Loraine, Fulton 

Wine, Hilda K., Washington. D. C. 
♦Winebrener, Miriam F., Walkersville 
♦Wingate, Phillip J., Wingate 

Wink, Treva B.. Manchester 
♦Winnemore, Augustine E., Washington, 

D. C. 

Wintermoyer, J. Paul, Hagerstown 
Wisner. Jackson W., Rockville 
Wolf, Frances, Washington, D. C. 
Wolfe, William C Mt. Union, Pa. 
Wolford, John L., Washington. D. C. 
Wolford, Ruth R., Cumberland 
Wonn. Virginia G., Hampstead 
Wood, Rebecca I.. Rock Hall 
Woodell. John H., Baltimore 
♦Worsley. Gertrude C Silver Spring 
Wright, Philip A., Federalsburg 
Wright. Robert K., Knoxville 
Yeager, Mildred F., Laurel 
Yocum, Wilbur F.. Chevy Chase 
Voder, Elizaheth, Long Green 
Yoder, M. Merle, Towson 
♦Yonkers, Bernard O., Emmitsburg 
Yonkers. Saranna W., Emmitsburg 
♦Young, Dorothy O., Bethesda 
Young, Edmond G.. Baltimore 
Young, Herbert S.. Washington. D. C. 
Young, Irene. Silver Spring 
Young, Jerome L., Washington. D. C. 
Young, Mabel C, Hyattsville 
Zalesak, Francis J., College Park 
♦Zapponi, Paschal P., Wooster. Ohio 
Zimmerman. Marian A.. Washington, 

D. C. 

Zittel, Blanche A., Centreville 
Zulick, Charles M.. Houtzdale, Pa. 



♦Graduate students. 



l^i 



410 



411 



11 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
AS OF APRIL 1, 1938 
Resident Collegiate Course^Academic Year: 

College 

College of Agriculture ^^^^ 

College of Arts and Sciences . ul 

School of Dentistry ""'■ ' 

College of Education ' " o^„' 

College of Engineering.... " ^^^ 

Graduate School Z>1 

College of Home Economic^ icn 

School of Law '" ^" 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing ~ " 

School of Pharmacy " 



Total 



Summer School, 1937........... ^'H^ 

Extension Courses : 

Collegiate Credit: 

Baltimore (Industrial Education) 907 

Subcollegiate : ^"^^ 



Mining (Engineering) 

Industrial Education (Baltimore)^ 



198 

48 



Grand Total _ ^ ^^^ 

Duplications '„o,. 



337 



Net Total 



3,822 



Baltimore 


Total 




319 


- 


1,114 


280 


280 


•"•"■"•■•••• 


362 




359 


••••■«■••■•• 


368 




180 


239 


239 


381 


381 


117 


117 


184 


184 


1,201 


3,903 


92 


1,076 



1,293 

77 

1,216 



227 

198 
48 



5,452 
450 

5,002 



nee. 136? TVaffln nflR«^^» rn_-- _• « , . ^ v/illcxchcc, ik)6, \^{ji^ 



Con- 



^.rence, «, T„«e Offlce„. T„,„,^ ih^UsrSS 'Sll^^^^X 



412 



GENERAL INDEX 



Page 

Administration 

board of regents 7 

officers of administration 8 

boards and committees (College Park) 17 
officers of instruction (CJollege Park) 9 
officers of instruction (Baltimore).... 26 

faculty committees (Baltimore) 39 

administrative organization 41 

buildings 4 1 

libraries 43 

Admission 45 

methods of admission 46 

undergraduate curricula 47 

advanced standing 48 

certificate, by 46 

examination, by 46 

physical examinations 49 

transfer, by 48 

unclassified students 49 

Agents 23 

assistant county 23 

assistant home demonstration 24 

county 23 

county home demonstration 24 

Agricultural Economics 212 

Agricultural Engineering 76, 217 

Agricultural Education 73, 215 

Agriculture, College of ^ 65 

advisory councils 68 

curricula in _ 70 

departments 68 

farm practice 69 

equipment 68 

requirements for graduation 69 

special students in agriculture 92 

regulatory activities 94 

State Board of 207 

Agronomy 76, 218 

Alumni „ 65 

Animal husbandry 78, 220 

Applied mathematics, fellowship in 160 

Aquiculture 838 

Art 165, 227, 297 

Arts and Sciences, (College of 96 

advanced standing 97 

advisers „ 100 

degrees 97 

divisions 96 

electives in other colleges and schools 99 

normal load 99 

requirements, 

97, 98, 104, 110, 115, 117, 120 

Astronomy 227 

Athletics „...42, 179 

Bacteriology 82, 227 

Biochemistry, plant physiology 234 

Biophysics, plant _ 235 



Page 

Board of Regents 7 

Botany 82, 231 

Buildings 42 

Bureau of Mines 43 

research fellowships in 159 

lectures 160 

Business Administration 235 

Calendar _ 4 

Certificates, Degrees and 53 

Chemical engineering 107, 154 

research fellowships in 159 

Chemistry 107, 244 

analytical 99, 211, 245 

biological ^ 84, 249 

curriculum 106 

general 244 

organic '. 246 

physical - 247 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 339 

Chorus „ 316 

Civil Engineering 137, 271 

Clubs, miscellaneous 64 

College of Agriculture 66 

College of Arts and Sciences 96 

College of Commerce 122 

College of Education 132 

College of Engineering 145 

College of Home Economics 161 

CJommerce, College of 122 

curriculum in General Business 123 

curriculum in Accounting 124 

curriculum . in Finance 125 

curriculum in Marketing and Sales 

Administration 126 

curriculum in Agricultural Economics 127 
cooperative Organization and Admin- 
istration 128 

combined program in Commerce and 

Law 129 

scholarship requirements 130 

electives from other colleges 130 

Committees 17, 39 

Comparative Literature 252 

County agents 23 

demonstration agents 24 

Courses of study, description of 211 

Dairy Husbandry 79, 220 

Degrees and Certificates 53 

Delinquent students 53 

Dentistry, School of 181 

advanced standing „... 185 

building 182 

deportment 186 

equipment _ 186 

expenses „ 187 

promotion _ _ 185 

residence _ „ 188 



I 



GENERAL INDEX (Continued) 



GENERAL INDEX (Continued) 



I 



^. "Page 

Diamondback g5 

Divisions. College of Arts and Sciences 90 

lower division jqj 

humanities jqo 

natural sciences 105 

social sciences „ Hg 

Dormitory rules 57 

Drawing 273 

Economics _ 953 

agricultural _ 212 

Education 132, 256 

history and principles 256 

methods in arts and science subjects 

(high school) 259 

agricultural 73, 215 

arts and science I35 

curricula I34 

degrees _ 134 

commercial I3g 

home economics 140 261 

industrial 262 

physical 144, 179, 265 

Educational psychology „... 326 

Education, College of 132 

Electrical Engineering 157^ £74 

Employment, student 59 

Engineering 14g, 270 

chemical ^ I54, 270 

chemical engineering chemistry 155 

<^»^il 156, 271 

drawing 273 

electrical 157, 274 

general subjects 276 

mechanics 276 

mechanical 158 277 

shop ' 279 

surveying _ 280 

admission requirements 143 

bachelor degrees 149 

curricula „ 153 

equipment ^ I49 

^^hrary " 153 

master of science in 149 

professional degrees in 149 

English Language and Literature 280 

Entomology 84. 116, 287 

Entrance _ 45 

Examinations 51 

Expenses 54. 172. 187, 193. 197. 206 

Extension Service 93 

staff ~~'". 21 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 93 

staff jg 

Experiment Station, Engineering 152 

F*c"»ty ;9 26 

Farm forestry _ 209. 290 



Page 
Farm management §6 212 

Feed. Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection 

Service _ 2O8 

Fellowships 173, jgQ 

Five Year (Combined Arts and Nursing 

Curriculum m, 201 

Floriculture 299 

Foods and nutrition 153, 295 

Forestry, State Department of 209 

course in 290 

Fraternities and Sororities 62 

^*'«nch 3Qg 

Genetics and Statistics 87, 116, 290 

Geology 291 

Geological Survey 2IO 



German 



312 



courses 
fees 



Grading system 52 

Graduate School, The 166 

admission -t^n 

council 166 

1 67 

172 

fellowships and assistantships 173 

registration 167 

residence requirements 169, 171 

requirements for degreesL 169, 171 

summer graduate work 168 

G^^^k ;;"";" 251 

Health Service 50 

High school teachers, certification of, 

99, 134 
History 291 

Historical statement 49 

Home Economics 16I 294 

curricula igi 



degree 



161 



departments igi 

facilities igj 

general 2^2 

Home Economics Education 140, 261 

Honors and awards 60, 341 

Horticultural State Department .' 208 

Horticulture gg, 298 

floriculture 299 

general 293 

landscape gardening 299 

olericulture gg" 391 

pomology gg^ 298 

vegetable production 299 

^^^^^^ - ..ZZIisO, 194 

Humanities, division of 193 

Industrial Education 126 

Infirmary rules 59 

Inspection and regulatory service 208 

Italian _ 314 

Landscape gardening 299 

^^^^ - ZZZZ 251 



Page 

Law, The School of 190 

advanced standing 192 

admission 191 

combined program of study 192 

fees and expenses 193 

Librarians (College Park) 16 

Librarians (Baltimore) 38 

Libraries 44 

Library Science 301 

Livestock Sanitary Service 208 

Location of the University 42 

Lower division 101 

Mathematics 301 

Mechanical Engineering 158, 277 

Mechanics 276 

Medals and prizes 60, 354 

Medicine, School of 194 

admission 195 

clinical facilities 194 

dispensaries and laboratories 195 

expenses 197 

prizes and scholarships 195 

Metallurgical division. Bureau of Mines, 

fellowships in 160 

Michrochemistry (plant) 235 

Military Science and Tactics 49, 175, 308 

Modern Languages, (bourses in 309 

Music 316 

Musical Organizations 316 

Natural Sciences, division of 105 

Non-metals division, Bureau of Mines, 

fellowships in 160 

Nursing, School of „ 198 

admission 199 

combined program Ill, 201 

expenses 200 

hours on duty _ 199 

programs offered 198 

Officers, administrative 8 

of instruction 9, 26 

Old Line 65 

Olericulture 89 

Pharmacy, School of 203 

admission „ 204 

expenses „ 206 

location 203 

Phi Kappa Phi 63. 353 

Philosophy 317 

Physical Education 42, 49, 144, 179. 265 

Physical examinations 50 

Physical sciences, division of 105 

Physics 108. 3 1 8 

Plant pathology 115. 233 

Plant physiology 115. 234 

Political Science 321 

Pomology „ 89 

Poultry husbandry 90, 324 

Predental curriculum 114 



Page 

Premedical curriculum 112 

Prenursing curriculum Ill 

Princess Anne College 42 

Psychology 326 

Publications, student 65 

R. O. T. C 49, 175. 308. 355. 356 

Refunds 57 

Regimental Organization 360 

Register of students 362 

Registration, date of 4, 5 

penalty for late 56. 187 

Regulations, grades, degrees 51 

degrees and certificates 53 

elimination of delinquent students.... 53 

examinations and grades 51 

regulation of studies. 51 

reports 53 

junior standing 53 

Religious influences 64 

Reserve Officers' Training Ck)rps, 

49, 175, 308. 355. 356 

Residence and Non-Residence 58 

Room reservation 57 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories 57 

Rural Life _ 73. 215 

Seed Inspection Service 209 

Social Sciences, division of 110 

Societies 63 

honorary fraternities 63 

fraternities and sororities 64 

miscellaneous clubs and societies 64 

Sociology 328 

Soils 78, 218 

Solomons Island research. 339 

Sororities 64 

Spanish _ 314 

Speech 333 

State Board of Agriculture 207 

Statistics, courses in 290 

Student 

employment 59 

government ~ 62 

Grange _ 64 

organization and activities 62 

publications 65 

Summer camps 177 

Summer session 174 

credits and certificates 174 

graduate work 168, 174 

terms of admission 174 

Surveying „ 280 

Terrapin 65 

Textiles and clothing 165, 294 

Uniforms, military 176 

Vegetable production 299 

Weather Service, State 209 

Withdrawals 57 

Zoology „1 16, 336 



Any further information desired concerning the University 
of Maryland will be furnished upon application to 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
College Park, Maryland.