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Full text of "Catalogue"

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAN 



OFHCIAL PUBLICATION 



I 



Vol. 37 



JUNE, 1940 



No. 7 



Catalogue Number 



1940 - 1941 




/ 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



^ 



CALENDAR FOR 1940-1941 




NOYEMBER 




1011 
17 



s 



5 
12 



1819 
26 



1 
8 



6 71 
18 14 IS 
20212228 
27282880 



;L=I 



2 

9 

16 



BIAY 



S|M|T 



5 
121 




tiiuk^ki 



1 

8i 

16 
22 
29 



2 8 



9 



1617 
28 24 



1011 



18 



80|81L 



go 

1218 



2520 



192021 



7 
14 



12728 

fc- 



uu 



4t 
11 
18 
251861 



WTTryfS' 



1814 



1912021 

la 



2 
9 



li 

8 
15 
11128 

a 



8 

lOJ 



1617 
24 
81 



JUNE 




1 

8 

15 

22 



9|mi 

16 17 18 



23 
291801 



19 

24125126 



12 18 14 



20 



n 



27ZH 



NOvaiBeR 



slH 



2 

9 

16 

28 

80 



8 



17 



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1011 



« 5 



aa 



**i 



181920 



^2B2»2128 



6 
18 



7 



S" 



1 

718 
1415 
2122 
29 



DECEMBER 



TIH 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

81 



22 
29 



I'lwifjyis 



8 

9110 



1516 



28 



.1- 



17 
24 



8081 



4 

11 



25 



1819 



12118 
20 



2627 



HAT 




JUN» 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1940 . 1941 




Containing general information concerning the University, 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1940-1941 

and Records of 1939-1940 

FactSy conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 

existing at the time of publication, June, 1940, 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park. Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of CJongress of July 16. 1894. 



CALENDAR FOR 1940-1941 



\ 



1940 



JULY 


S M T|W|T|F S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


_ 


_ 


_ 


AUGUST 


S|M|T|W!T F S 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 



SEPTEMBER 



SIMIT 


W 


t|f 


fs" 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 









OCTOBER 



S M T W T|F|S 


"6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 

12 
19 
26 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W 


T F S 




4 
11 
18 
25 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 


3 
10 
17 
24 


5 
12 
19 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


9 
16 
23 
30 



DECEMBER 



S M TiWlTTFTS 

12 3 4 

8 91011 



15 
22 
29 



2 

9 
lo 
2S 
30 



17 
24 
31 



18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1941 



JANUARY 



S |M T W T F S 






7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


11 
18 
25 


FEBRUARY 


SIM T|W T|F|S 



2 

9 

16 

23 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 



7 
14 
21 



27 28 



1 

8 
15 
22 



MARCH 



S M 



2 
9 

16 
23 

30 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



T|W|T|F 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



APRIL 



S|M|TiW|T|F|S 



6 
13 
20 



7 
14 
21 



27128 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2; 8 

9\lJ0 

1617 



23 

29130 



24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



MAY 



SiMITIWVTTFTS 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9!10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


2!> 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29130 


31 


1 l~l 1 M 


JUNE 


SIM T|W|T|F 


Is 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



8 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6! 7 



13 

20 
27 



14 
21 

2;S 



JULY 



S|M|T|W|T|F|S 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



AUGUST 



SlMlTTWrTIFTS 




5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



SEPTEMBER 



S |M T Wl T I F S 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



OCTOBER 



S MITjW T FiS 



rrr 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



1 

7 8 
1415 
21122 
28129 



2 

9 

16 
23 
80 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



NOVEMBER 



S MIT WIT F S 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 

10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



DECEMBER 



SIMITIWITIFjS 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 
27 



_T 



1942 



JANUARY 



SIMlTTWrT FlS 



41 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 

26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 

14 
21 



1 

8 

15 

22 



28129 



2 

9 

16 

23 



3 
10 
17 
24 



30131 



FEBRUARY 



T 


M|T|W|T|FiS 


1 

8 
15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 
17 

24 


4 5 
1112 
1819 

25 26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 

!21 

28 




_~. 




....^ 



MARCH 



SiMlTlWiT f^S 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 



APRIL 



S|MiT;W!T|FiS 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 



1 

8 
15 



21 22 
28|29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



MAY 



s 


M 


FtI 


WITjFIS 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


"4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 







JUNE 






SlMITiW T F S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5! 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12113 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19120 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26;27 


28 


29 


30 


— 


— 


— 


— 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1940 . 1941 




Coutalrung general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 19JtO-19'tl 

and Records of 1939-19',0 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 

existing at the time of publication, June, 19/^0, 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park. Md. 
Entered as Second Clasa Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Table of Contents 

Page 

University Calendar _ _ _....- * _ 4 

Officers of Administration ....._ ....„ _ 8 

Officers of Instruction ^ ,...._ _....„ _ 9, 30 

Boards and Committees (College Park) „ 20 

Section I — General Information _ „ _ 45 

Historical Statement 45 

Administrative Organization _ 46 

Location _ > _ 47 

Grounds and Buildings 47 

Princess Anne College _ 4S 

Libraries - 19, 49 

Admission _ „ 50 

Requirement in Military Instruction 54 

Requirements in Physical Education for Women _ 54 

Health Service „ 55 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 56 

Expenses - - 59 

Honors and Awards 65 

Student Activities 68 

Alumni _ 71 

Section II — Administrative Divisions - 72 

College of Agriculture „ 72 

Agricultural Experiment Station _ 103 

Extension Service „ 103 

Regulatory Activities - 104 

College of Arts and Sciences _ 105 

College of Commerce 132 

College of Education _ 147 

College of Engineering 163 

College of Home Economics 180 

Graduate School _ : 186 

Summer Session _ , 196 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 1 197 

Physical Education, Reecreation, and Athletics. 201 

School of Dentistry _ „._ 203 

School of Law „ 214 

School of Medicine 218 

School of Nursing 222 

School of Pharmacy - 227 

State Boards and Departments _ 231 

Section III — Description of Courses _ _ 235 

(Alphabetical index of departments, p. 235) 

Section IV — Degrees, Honors, and Student Register - 381 

Degrees and Certificates, 1938-1939 381 

Honors, 1938-1939 „ 393 

Student Register, 1939-1940 - 402 

Summary of Enrollment, 1939-1940 „ 466 

Index _ - - 469 



1940 

Sept. 18-21 
Sept. 23 

Sept. 28 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1940-1941 
^ COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 



Wednesday-Saturday 
Monday, 8:20 a. m. 

Saturday 



semester 



Registration. 
Instruction for first 

begins. 
Last day to change registration 

or to file schedule card without 

penalty. 
Homecoming Day. 
Annual Faculty Reception. 
Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins. 



Christmas recess ends. 

Charter Day. Alumni and Faculty 

Banquet. 
First semester examinations. 



Registration for the second se- 
mester. 

Instruction for second semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Maryland Day. 

Easter Recess. 

Second semester examinations. 

Memorial Day. Holiday. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Class Day. 

Commencement. 



Summer Session begins. 
Summer Session ends. 
Summer Convocation for confer- 
ring of degrees. 

Notice: No leaves of absence will be granted for a period of twenty-four 
hours immediately preceding or following the time set for a holiday. 



Oct. 12 


Saturday 


Nov. 14 


Thursday 


Nov. 20 


Wednesday, 5:10 p. m. 


Nov. 25 


Monday, 8:20 a. m. 


Dec. 14 


Saturday, 1:10 p.m. 


1941 




Jan. 2 


Thursday, 8:20 a.m. 


Jan. 20 


Monday 


Jan. 22-30 


Wednesday-Thursday 




Second Sen 


Feb. 3-5 


Monday-Wednesday 


Feb. 6 


Thursday, 8:20 a.m. 


Feb. 12 


Wednesday 


Feb. 22 


Saturday 


March 25 


Tuesday 


April 10-16 


Thursday, 5 :10 p. m. 




Wednesday, 8:20 a. m 


May 26-June 4 


Monday- Wednesday 


May 30 


Friday 


June 1 


Sunday, 11:00 a.m. 


June 6 


Friday 


June 7 


Saturday 




Summer S( 


June 23 


Monday 


Aug. 1 


Friday 


Aug. 2 


Saturday 



1940 

Sept. 3-5 
Sept. 3-5 
Sept. 11-14 
December 

1941 

January 

Jan. 13-17 

Jan. 27-Feb. 1 

February 

March 

April 

Spring 

June 16-21 

July 

August 

Aug. 11-16 

August 

August 



Short Courses and Conferences, 19/iO-lO^l 

Volunteer Firemen's Short Course. 
Sanitary Engineering Short Course. 
Poultry Produces Marketing School. 
Canning Crops Conference. 



Greenkeepers' School. 

Highway Engineering Short Course. 

Milk Testers* Short Course. 

Nurserymen's Short Course. 

Florists' Short Course. 

Garden School. 

Traffic Officers' Training School. 

Rural Women's Short Course. 

Conference of Educational Advisers of C. C. C. 

Poultry Breeding and Improvement School. 

Boys' and Girls' Club W^eek. 

Conference of Fertilizer Salesmen. 

Conference of Tree Wardens. 



BALTIMORE (PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS) 



1940 

September 16 



Monday 



September 18 Wednesday 
September 24 Tuesday 



September 25 Wednesday 



September 26 Thursday 



November 20 Wednesday 



First Semester 

♦Registration for evening students 
(LAW). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (LAW — Evening). 

♦Registration for first- and second-year 
students (DENTISTRY, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

♦Registration for all other students 
(DENTISTRY, LAW— Day, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 
Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (DENTISTRY, LAW— 
Day. MEDICINE, PHARMACY). 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the 
last scheduled period (ALL 
SCHOOLS). 



November 25 Monday 

December 21 Saturday 



1941 

January 6 

January 27 to 
February 1, inc. 

February 1 



February 22 
April 9 

April 16 

June 7 
June 18 



Monday 

Monday- 
Saturday 

Saturday 



February 3 Monday 



Saturday 
Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Saturday 
Wednesday 



Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Christmas recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

* Registration for the second semester 
(ALL SCHOOLS). 

First semester ends after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Second Semester 

Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Commencement. 

Second semester ends (LAW — Even- 
ing). 



*A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). 
The last day of registration with fee added to regular charges is Saturday at noon of the 
week in which instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule 
may be waived only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

*The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9.00 a. m. to 5.00 p. m., and on Saturday from 9.00 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 16, 1940, until 8:00 p. m. Advanced registration 
is encouraged. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman - 1^^^ 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Vice-Chairman 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 1947 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 1944 

1015 Argonne Drive, Baltimore 

William P. Cole, Jr - — 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Harry H. Nuttlr _ 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

Wr!ATVT'Ni Pttttqimttt 1942 

%, ^ ^^.M-t T M X^ ^t .1^ XXCit^ X^ \J A 1 ■ ■»■■■■>■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■>■■■*■■>> i TTTT-T — T 1 — —-—.-.-.. -■.-. — — -^. -.-— -■-■ .. .-»—--,- ^ %^ ^^mm 

Roland Park, Baltimore 



100 W. University Parkway, Baltimore 



1942 



Rowland K. Adams — — 1948 

1808 Fairbank Road, Baltimore 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service, Dean of 

the College of Agriculture, Acting Director of the Experiment Station. 
H. J. Patterson, D. Sc, Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty. 
H. BOYB Wylie, M.D., Acting Dean of the School of Medicine. 
J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of 

Medicine. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 
of Nursing. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 
Andrew G. DuMez. Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Law. 
C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director of 
the Summer Session. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Advisory Dean of the College of Education, Advisory 
Director of the Summer Session. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering. 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Dean of the College of 
Commerce. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A., Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men, Director of Athletics. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

Thomas D. Finley, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the President. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 
T. A. Hutton, Purchasing Agent. 

8 



For the Year 1940-1941 

At College Park 

PROFESSORS 

Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physi- 
ology, Dean of the Graduate School. 
Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director 

of Summer School. 
Fred Wilson Besley, Ph.D., Professor of Farm Forestry, State Forester. 
Luther Allen Black, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
Levin Bowland Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences, Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist. 
Glen David Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 
Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Animal Pathology. 
Theodore Carroll Byerly, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering, State Drainage Engineer. 
Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 
Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education, Assist- 
ant Dean of the College of Agriculture, State Supervisor of Vocational 
Agriculture. 
Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and 

Farm Management. 
Nathan Lincoln Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
Alice Gwendolyn Drew, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Women. 
Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Professor of Speech. 
Charles Garfield Eichlin, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 
Charles Walter England, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 
William Franklin Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 
Thomas Deiweies Finley, Lieutenant Colonel, Inf., U.S.A., Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics. 
Allen Garfield Gruchy, Ph.D., Professor of Finance and Economics. 
Charles Brockway Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
Malcolm Morrison Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 
Lawrence Vaughan Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 
Wilbert James Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Kenneth Cole Ikeler, M.E., M.S., Professor of Animal and Dairy Hus- 
bandry. 
Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
John Gamewell Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

9 






Carl Smith Joslyn, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Statistics. 
Frederick Harold Leinbach, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
Edgar Fauver Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Charles Leroy Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Men. 
Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor of Olericulture. 
Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 
\y Frieda Wiegand McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
\^ Edna Belle McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 
Joshua Albert Miller, B.S., Administrative Coordinator of Practice 

Teaching. 
y^MYRL Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management, 

Dean of the College of Home Economics. 
John Bitting Smith Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Botany. 
J. Orin Powers, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 
WiLLARD Stanton Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Advisory Dean 

of the College of Education, Advisory Director of the Summer Session. 
Jesse William Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
//^Adele Hagner Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

Samuel Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, Dean 

of the College of Engineering, Director of Engineering Research. 
Wayne Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Economics 

and Business Administration, Dean of the College of Commerce. 
Leonid Ivanovich Strakhovsky, D. Hist. Sc, Professor of European 

History. 
Thomas Hardy Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Dean 

of Faculty. 
Charles Edward Temple, M.A., Professor of Plant Pathology, State Plant 

Pathologist. 
ROYLE Price Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Technology. 
Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape 

Gardening. 
Reginald Van Trump Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquiculture. 
Kenneth Leroy Turk, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D., Professor of Canning Crops. 
Harry Redcay Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
SiVERT Matthew Wedeberg, A.M., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 
Claribel Pratt Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 
Mark Frederick Welsh, M.S., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science, 

State Veterinarian. 
Charles Edward White, Ph.D., Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. 
John Elliott Younger, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Adolf Edward Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 



LECTURERS 

Oliver Edwin Baker, Ph.D., Lecturer on Agricultural Economics. 

Richard Samuel Dill, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation, and Refrig- 
eration. 

Harry Rutledge Hall, B.S., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 

Frank L. Hess, B.S., Lecturer on Geology. 

Frank Gregg Kear, D.Sc, Lecturer on Electrical Communications. 

William Martin Nevins, Ph.D., Lecturer on Economics (Baltimore). 

John Randolph Riggleman, Ph.D., Lecturer on Marketing and Business 
Statistics. 

Robert Evans Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer on Entomology. 

Stanton Walker, B. S., Lecturer on Engineering Materials. 

James Franklin Yeager, Ph.D., Lecturer on Entomology. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Roger Marion Bellows, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Victor Wilson Bennett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing. 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.A., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Nutrition. 

Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

James William Coddington, B.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

William Rush Crawford, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 

Geary Francis Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy, Director of 
Athletics, Dean of Men. 

James Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Production and 
Marketing. 

Susan Emolyn Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Irvin Charle§ Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

Leo Ingeman Highby, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Ancient Languages 
and Literature. 

Carl William Edmund Hintz, A.M.L.S., Associate Professor of Library 
Science, Librarian. 

Lawrence Judson Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Jesse William Huckert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Mary Juhn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Charles Frederick Kramer, Jr., M.A., Associate Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

Francis Busy Lincoln, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Propagation. 

Alpheus Royall Marshall, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 






10 



11 



Monroe Harnish Martin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Norman Ethelbert Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

George DeWitte Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Allie W. Richeson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (Balti- 
more) . 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor of Land- 
scape Gardening. 

Reuben George Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

William Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Raymond Clifford Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chem- 
istry. 

Logan Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Vertrees Judson Wycoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture. 

Arthur Montraveille Ah alt, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Russell Bennett Allen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Cecil Ravenscroft Ball,* M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Hugh Alvin Bone, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

Jack Yeaman Bryan, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Sumner Othniel Burhoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Cornelius Wilbur Cissel, M.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Weston Robinson Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Frankun DeLaney Cooley, B.S., Assistant Professor of English. 
'^^ Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

"-^ Eugene B. Daniels,* M.A., M.F.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eccnomics 
and Commerce. 

George Odell Switzer Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

Beryl He^ibert Dickinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Linden Seymour Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Herman Gerard DuBuy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

George Campbell Ernst, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Gaylord Beale Estabrook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics (Balti- 
more) . 

John Edgar Faber, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Allen Jerry Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Administra- 
tion. 

Robert Tyson Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 



/ 



*On leave. 



12 



Ralph Galungton, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education. 

Merrill Cochrane Gay, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Wilson Payne Green, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

H.\RLAND Clayton Griswold, Major, Inf., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science, and Tactics. 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Walter Leon Hard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Benton Hoshall, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. 
^Alice La Rue Howard, M.A., Assistant Dean of Women. 

George Bond Hughes, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Frances Aurelia Ide, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Charles Hudson Jones, Major, Inf., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

Kate Breckinridge Bogle Karpeles, A.B., M.D., Physician to Women. 

Charles Atkinson Kirkpatrick, A.M., D.C.S., Assistant Professor of 
Marketing and Business Administration. 

MARy E. Kirkpatrick, M.S., Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Howard Martin Kline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Otis Ewing Lancaster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Willard Arthur Laning, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical 
Engineering. ^ 

^^ -Grace Lee, B.A., Assistant Dean of Women. 

Frank Martin Lemon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

George Maurice Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical 

Engineering. 
^.Dorothy Mae Middleton, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
PpLLY Kessinger Moore, M.S., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
Charles Driscoll Murphy, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
Curtis Lakeman Newcombe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Arthur Charles Parsons, AvM., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

(Baltimore). 
Augustus John- Prahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 
Gordon William Prange, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 
--- Hester Beall Provenson, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Milton Allender Pyle, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering. 
Joseph Thomas Pyles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English (Baltimore). 
Harold George Shirk, B.S., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 
Arthur Silver, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 
Edgar Bennett Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

(Baltimore). 
Warren Laverne Strausbaugh, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
William Carleton Suppi^e, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

13 



^ 




V 



WiLUAM Julius Svirbley, M.S., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Harold Wesley Thatcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
GUY Paul Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology (Baltimore) 
EDWIN Warren Titt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics ^'"'"°'^^- 
E. Gaston VANDEN Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chera- 
istry (Baltimore). 

CHESTER Carlton Westfall, Major, Inf., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

P^J" ^i^'''"'''' ^*''"'^' ^^•^•' Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 
ROBERT EDW^ WYSOR, Jr., Major, Inf., U.S.A., Assistant ProfSr of 

Military Science and Tactics. 
William Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

INSTRUCTORS 

George Frederick Alrich, Ph.D., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 

ESTELLA Coates BALDWIN, R.N., Instructor in Hygiene 

Mary Walsh Barton, C.D.E.F., M.A., Instructor in Education, and Critic 

Howard Lynn Bodily, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology 
Hazel Burnette, B.S., Instructor in Foods 

E;ESrmv:t''^A?''"T'"; ''•'^•' I^^t^'^tor in Education and Critic Teacher. 
Evelyn Davis, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education 

Donald Marquand Dozer, Ph.D., Instructor in History 

H.4RRY Cole English, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education 

Eleanor Enright, A.M., Instructor in Home and Institution Management 

ALARic ANTHONY EVANGELIST. M.A.. Instructor in Modem Languages 

George Wilus Fogg, M.A., Instructor in Library Science 

^^(sTltiWO ^''''''''' ^'^" ^"'*'*"'*''' '" ^"^"^'^ ^"'l P»Wi<= Speaking 

Leon Webster Frayer. B.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

William Henry Gravely, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English 

Frances Bryant Hintz, B.S., Instructor in Home Management. 

Clarence Lewis Hodge, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology 

Richard Russell Hutcheson, M.A,, Instructor in Speech 

Lewis Cass Hutson, Instructor in Mining Extension 

John Edward Jacobi, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology 

Vernon Arthur Lamb, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

Andre Frank Liotard,* B.A., B.D., Instructor in Modern Languages 

John Lowe, in, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering ' 

Frederick Stewart McCaw, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education 

IVAN Eugene McDougle, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology (BaSmore)' 

JOHN ANGUS McLaughlin, Jr., C.E., Instructor in Ci^l Engineering 

John Walker Macmillan, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology 

George Francis Madigan, M.S., Instructor in Soil Technoloev 

EDWARD Mars, Sergeant, D.E.M.L., Instructor in Military Science and 



*On leave. 



U 



Edmund Erskine Miller, Ph.D., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Frances Howe Miller, A.M., Instructor in English. 

Lillian Gertrude Moore, A.M., Special Methods Instructor and Critic 
Teacher. 

Norman Harned Moore, M.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Ralph V. Mozingo, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

John Church Mullin, B.S., M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 
Administration. 

John George Mutziger, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Ralph Duane Myers, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Fay Joseph Norris, Sergeant, Inf., U.S.A., Instructor in Military Science 
and Tactics. 

James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

William Harwood Peden, M.S., Instructor in English. 

Paul Rontzahn Poffenberger, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 

Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Instructor in Music. 

James Henry Reid, M.A., Instructor in Marketing. 

Durant Waite Robertson, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Orlando De Leone Scoppettone, A.B., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Aaron Wiley Sherwood, M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Robert Vernon Shirley, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 
Statistics. 

Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 

George Lawton Sixbey,* M.A., Instructor in English. 

Howard Burton Shipley, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Henry Hunter Smith, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 

Kathleen Marie Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 

Paul Edward Smith, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Howard Livingston Stier, Ph.D., Instructor in Horticulture. 

Lynn LeRoy Swearingen, M.A., Instructor in English. 

George James Uhrinak, Sergeant, Inf., U.S.A., Instructor in Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

William Jacob Van Stockum, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Evelyn Iverson Vernon, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

George Edward Walther, A.B., Instructor in Political Science. 

John Cook Ward, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Donald Chester Weeks, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Mark Wheeler Westgate, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Fritz Joachim Weyl, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Milton Joel Wiksell, M.A., Instructor in Speech, 
t Helen Barkley Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Ralph Irwin Williams, A.B., Assistant Dean of Men. 

Albert Westle Woods, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 

Leland Griffith Worthington, M.A., Instructor in History. 

Warren Ziegaus, B.S., Instructor in Library Science. 



> 



14 



*0n leave. 



15 



> 

l/>; 



V 



\^' 



ASSISTANTS 

Frank Graham Banta, B.A., Assistant in Modem Languages. 
Lewis P. Ditman, Ph.D., Assistant in Entomology. 
Minor Cecil Donnell, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Cattle Farm. 
James Robert Douglas, M.S., Assistant in Physical Education for Men. 
George William Eastment, Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Herbert Joseph Florestano, M.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
George L. Gadea, Assistant in Physical Education for Men. 
liLDRED COE Gavin, B.Mus., Assistant in Music. 
Neil Addison Gilbert, M.A., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Donald Cummins Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
Chester Wood Hitz, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Assistant in Plant Pathology. 
Anne Carver Lundell, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Richard King Lynt, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Martha Hathaway Plass, M.S., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Jesse Arthur Remington, Jr., M.A., Assistant in History. 
S. Herman Todd, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Walter Robert Volckhausen, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Kathryn Marguerite Painter Ward, A.M., Assistant in English. 

Robert Newton Woodworth, A.M., Assistant in Sociology. 



Celia Estelle Murphy, B.S. _ Physical Education for Women 

William Anthony Nolte, B.S Bacteriology 

Norman Gerard Paulhaus, B.S Poultry Husbandry 

Mary Elizabeth Rawley, B.S Physical Education for Women 

Max Rubin, B.S - - Poultry Husbandry 

John Parrish Secrest, B.S Entomology 

Vladimir Gregory Shutak, M.S - Horticulture 

Alston Wesley Specht, B.S _ „ -..- Soils 

Richard Carley Tollefson, M.A _ - ...Chemistry 

Thomas Charles Gordon Wagner, B.S , - Mathematics 

Arthur Paul Wiedemer, B.S - _ - > Dairy Manufacturing 

Phillip Jerome Wingate, M.S - Chemistry 

Edmund Grove Young, B.S - - Chemistry 

Raymond Milton Young, B.S - _ Bacteriology 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

193^-1940 



Ross Elwood Backenstross, Jr., M.A - - Modem Languages 

John Morton Bellows, Jr., M.S — Botany 

Charles Lee Benton, Jr., B.A _ ...Business Administration 

Floyd Dale Carroll, B.S „ _ Animal Husbandry 

Aurelius Franklin Chapman, M.S ^ Chemistry 

John Paul Cheney, B.A _ „ „ Political Science 

Julian Coburn Crane, B.S „ _ - Horticulture 

Thomas Grover Culton, B.S _ Poultry Husbandry 

Carl Kester Dorsey, M.S - _...., * Entomology 

Paul McConkey Galbreath, B.S _ Agronomy 

Lex Bailey Golden, B.S Agronomy 

John Salisbury Goldsmith, B.S. „.... Bacteriology 

William Holland Griggs, M.A „ „....„ Horticulture 

Peter Herman Heinze, M.A _ _ Plant Physiology and Botany 

Carl William Hess, B.S Poultry Husbandry 

Robert Edwin Jones, A.B _ _ Botany 

Albin Owings Kuhn, B.S Agronomy 

Russell Ernest Leed, B.S Chemistry 

Robert Eugene Mather, B.S -....- -. ..~ -.— Dairy Husbandry 

Earl Edward Miller, B.S Agricultural Economics and Farm Management 



16 



17 



FELLOWS 

1939-1940 

Ralph Aarons, B.S -....- - ^ — .'. _ ....- Chemistry 

Harry Davis Anspon, B.S - „....* Chemistry 

William Howard Beiamer, B.A. „ - Chemistry 

William Elbert Bickley, Jr., M.S _ Entomology 

Francis Miles Bower, M.S _...- -..- Chemical Engineering 

John Lowry Bowers, B.S _ - „...- Horticulture 

Robert Johnston Bradley, B.S _ Commerce 

Robert McCoy Bruce, B.A _ „....- „..Chemistrv 

Dieter Cunz, Ph.D. _ Modem Languages (Research) 

Gordon Frederick Dittmar, M.S _ Chemistry 

Robert Lloyd Eccles, B.S Mathematics 

William Humbert Form, M.A „ Sociology 

MiLO Vivian Gibbons, B.S. _ , „ -Mathematics 

Lester Phillip Guest, M.A _ „ Psychology 

Walter Judson Haney, B.S - Botany 

Robert Willmott Harrison, B.S Agricultural Economics 

Phiup Classon Harvey, B.S. _ Bacteriology 

Albert Franklin Herbst, B.S Mathematics 

Lester Fuller Keene, B.S - _ „ Physics 

Alan Mottar Kershner, M.A _....„ - _ Psychology 

Diana Stevan Kramer, B.S _ _ Education 

John Joseph Lander, B.S - „ Chemistry 

Joseph Sidney Lann, B.S -....- >.... _ ...._ ^..Chemistry 

Frederick John Linnig, A.B _ >..... Chemistry 

Raymond Irving Longley, Jr., M.S „ ..« Chemistry 

Richard Harding McBee, M.S _ _ Bacteriology 

Frederick Richmond McBrien, A.B „ „ _ Sociology 

Selmer Wilfred Peterson, M.A _ _ , Chemistry 

Elwood Clifton Pierce, M.S _ Botany 

David Ouver Schecter, B.A „ „ _ Mathematics 

Charles Henry Seufferle, B.S „ _ Agricultural Economics 

Donald Emerson Shay, B.S -....- Zoology 

BOLAND BiCKETT SHEPHERD, M.S j..~ - ., Zoology 

Leonard Smith, B.S — ~ - -.... Chemistry 

Roger William Snyder, B.S — Bacteriology 

William Alexander Stanton, B.S „ -..Chemistry 

Richard Battell Stephenson, B.S - Botany 

William DeMott Stull, M.S _ Zoology- 

Thomas Richard Sweeney, B.S _ _ Chemistry 

Mary Virginia Tomlinson, M.S „ Zoology 

Edward Martin Wharton, B.S ..- _ > Chemistry 

Alfred Case Whiton, B.S „..Chemistry 

Daniel DeWalt Willard, A.B _ - English 

18 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.B., A.M.L.S - University Librarian 

COLLEGE PARK 

George W. Fogg, M.A. - Reference and Loan Librarian 

Julia M. Holzapfel, A.B., B.S.L.S.. Assistant Reference and Loan Librarian 

Alma Hook, B.S., B.S.L.S Head Cataloguer 

Louise W. Getchell, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Cataloguer 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Cataloguer 

Elizabeth A. Gardner, A.M., B.S.L.S - General Service Assistant 

Warren Ziegaus, B.S., B.A. in Librarianship Order Librarian 

Kate White - - Assistant 

BALTIMORE 

Dental Library 

Beatrice Marriott - Librarian 

Margaret Kober Young, A.B „ Assistant 



Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B., Certificate in Library Science. 



Librarian 



Medical Library 



Ruth Lee Briscoe 

Julia E. Wilson, B.S.. 



Librarian 

Assistant 



Pharmacy Library 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Librarian 

Ann Lemen Clark „ Assistant 



19 



BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, 
Dean Robinson, Dean Small, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean Stein- 
berg, Dean Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean Stevens, Dean Eppley, Dean 
Benjamin, Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Finley, Dr. Huff, Mr. Hillegeist, 
Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Dr. Zucker, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. White, 
Dr. Welsh, Dr. Wylie, Professor Ikeler. 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY, STANDARDS, AND COORDINATION 

Dr. Zucker, Chairman; Dr. DeVault, Dr. Warfel, Dr. Haring, Dr. Martin, 
Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Truitt, Miss McNaughton, Dr. Bamford, Dr. Younger, 
Dr. Dorsey, Dr. Hartung, Dr. Wylie, Professor Strahorn, Dr. Jull. 

STUDENT LIFE AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. White, Chairman; Professor Eppley, Colonel Finley, Dr. Faber, Pro- 
fessor Mackert, Professor Eichlin, Dr. Harman, Miss Stamp, Mr. 
Pollock, Mr. Williams, Miss Ide, Miss Howard, Miss Drew, Professor 
Allen, Dr. Phillips, Dr. Joslyn, Dr. James, Dr. Lancaster, Professor 
Kramer. 

THE LIBRARIES 

Dr. Hale, Chairman; Professor Hintz, Dr. Long, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Younger, 
Dr. Howard, Dr. Haring, Dr. Bamford, Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Ande?rson, 
Dr. Spencer, Professor Strahorn. 

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Dr. Kemp, Chairman; Dr. White, Professor Quigley, Dr. Woods, Miss Lee, 
Professor Eppley. 

ADMISSION, GUIDANCE, AND ADJUSTMENT 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Dr. White, Dr. Phillips, Professor Pyle, Professor 
Wedeberg, Dr. Prange, Dr. Hale, Professor Quigley, Dr. Bellows, Dr. 
Gruchy, Miss Stamp, Mr. Hillegeist, Miss Preinkert, Professor Eppley, 
Mr. Williams. , 



RESEARCH 

Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Amberson, Dr. Uhlenhuth, Dr. James, Dr. 
Drake. Dr. Jenkins, Dr. DeVault, Dr. Jull, Dr. Huff, Dr. Zucker. 

EXTENSION AND ADULT EDUCATION 

Dr. Benjamin, Chairman; Miss Kellar, Dr. Dodson, Dr. Crothers, Dr. 
DeVault, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Steinmeyer, Dr. Small, Dr. Ehrensberger, Miss 
Curtiss. 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Robinson, Dr. DuMez, Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, 
Dr. Cory, Dr. Schrader, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Pollock, Dr. Besley, Miss 
Stamp, Miss Mount, Mr. Randall. 

RESIDENT AND NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Warfel, Miss Ide, Dr. Benjamin, Dr. Younger, 
Dr. Stevens, Dr. Jull. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Professor Eppley, Chairman; Dr. Broughton, Dr. Cory, Dr. Kemp, Dr. 
Supplee. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Dr. Hale, Dr. Zucker, Mr. Oswald. 

COORDINATION OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, Dr. Besley, Mr. Holmes, 
Dr. Kemp, Mr. Shaw, Dr. Cory, Mr. Oswald, Professor Ikeler, Dr. 
Cotterman, Dr. Schrader, Dr. Jull. 

GENERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Zucker, Dr. Hale, Dr. Kemp, Dr. Symons, 
Professor Eppley, Dr. Long, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Snyder, Dr. Steinmeyer. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Cotterman, Professor Eichlin, Miss Stamp, 
Professor Eppley, Miss Mount, Mr. Cobey. 



20 



21 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

Thomas Baddeley Symons, M.S., D.Agr _ Acting Dirictor 

Agricultural Economics: 

Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D Professor, Agricultural Economics 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
William Paul Walker, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
Arthur Montreville Ahalt, M.S., 

Assistant Professor, Agricultural Education 

Roger Franklin Burdette, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Paul Routzahn Poffenberger, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Lawrence Everett Cron, M.S - Assistant, Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering : 

Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LLB., 

Professor, Agricultural Engineering, State Drainage Engineer 
George John Burkhardt, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 
Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy: 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D Professor, Genetics and Statistics 

Russell Grove Rothgeb, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Breeding 

Royle Price Thomas, Ph.D Professor, Soil Technology 

Howard Barr Winant, M.S Assistant Professor, Soil Technology 

Albert Westle Woods, B.S Instructor, Agronomy 

George Francis Madigan, Ph.D Instructor, Soil Technology 

Stanley Phillips Stabler, B.S Assistant, Agronomy 

Albert White, B.S Assistant, Agronomy 

Alfred Damon Hoadley, M.S Assistant, Agronomy 

Anim^al and Dairy Husbandry: 

Kenneth Cole Ikeler, M.S Professor, Animal Husbandry 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.S Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Charles Walter England, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, M.S Professor, Animal Husbandry 

Kenneth LeRoy Turk, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Henry Butler, B.S Assistant Dairy Inspector 

Animal Pathology : 

Mark Frederick Welsh, B.S., D.V.M., 

State Veterinarian and Professor, Veterinary Medicine 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D. Professor, Pathology 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Leo Joseph Poelma, M.S., D.V.M _ Associate Professor, Pathology 

Morton Moses Rabstein, V.M.D....Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science 

22 



Bacteriology: 

Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D Professor, Bacteriology 

Howard Lynn Bodily, Ph.D Instructor, Bacteriology 

George William Eastment _ - Assistant, Bacteriology 

Botany, Plant Physiology and Pathology: 
Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., 

Professor, Botany and Plant Physiology 

John Bitting Smith Morton, D.Sc - Professor, Botany 

Charles Edward Temple, A.M Professor, Plant Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D -- Professor, Botany 

ROBERT Andrew Jehle, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Pathology 

RUSSELL Guy Brown, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Herman Gerard DuBuy, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Mark Winton Woods, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

ERNEST Artman Walker, M.S Assistant, Plant Pathology 

HAROLD GEORGE SHIRK, Ph.D Assistant, Plant Physiology 

Entomology : 
Ernest Neale Cory, Ph.D., 

State Entomologist and Professor, Entomology 

HAROLD Sloan McConnell, M.S Associate Professor, Entomology 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

CASTILLO GRAHAM, M.S Assistant Professor, Entomology 

GEORGE Jenvey Abrams, M.S Instructor, Apiculture 

Horticulture: 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D ~ Professor, Horticulture 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D - Professor, Olericulture 

Francis Busy Lincoln, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Propagation 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D Associate Professor, Canning Crops 

IRVIN Charles Haut, Ph.D Associate Professor, Pomology 

Jack Amatt, B.S - Instructor, Horticulture 

Chester Wood Hitz, M.S - Assistant, Horticulture 

Herman Todd, B.S Assistant, Horticulture 

Howard Livingstown Stier, Ph.D ...Instructor, Horticulture 

Poultry : 

Morley Allan Jull, Ph.D - - Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

THEODORE Carroll Byerly, Ph.D Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

George DeWitt Quigley, B.S .....Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D Associate Professor, Nutrition 

James Martin Gwin, B.S., 

Associate Professor, Poultry Production and Marketing 
Charles Simpson Williams, B.S Instructor, Poultry Husbandry 

Seed Inspection: 

Forrest Shepperson Holmes, M.S Seed Inspector 

Ellen Phelps Emack Seed Analyst 

Olive Marian Kelk ..- - — Seed Analyst 

23 






EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
College Park 

Thomas Baddeley Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Dean, College of Agriculture, 
Director of Extension Service. 

Edward Ingram Oswald, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director of Exten- 
sion Service. 

Venia Merie Keller, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director. 
Addison Hogan Snyder, B.S., Professor, Editor. 

Paul Edwin Nystrom, M.S., Associate Professor, Assistant County Agent 
Leader. 

Edward Garfield Jenkins, Associate Professor, Boys' Club Leader. 

Dorothy Emerson, Associate Professor, Girls' Club Leader. 

Florence Harriett Mason, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Home 

Furnishing and District Agent. 
Katherine Grace Connolly, Administrative Assistant. 
Omer Raymond Carrington, B.A., Assistant Professor, Illustrator. 

SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Apiculture. 

Arthur Montreville Ahalt, M.S., Assistant Professor, Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Walter Raymond Ballard, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Vegetable 
and Landscape Gardening. >^ 

Howard Cunton Barker, B.S., Professor, Extension Dairy Husbandry. 

Walter Crothers Beaven, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry 
Nutrition. 

Theodore Carrol Byerly, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Poultry Physiology. 

Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor, Extension Agricultural 
Engineering, State Drainage Engineer. 

John Alfred Conover, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Dairy Hus- 
bandry. 

Ernest Neale Cory, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Entomology, State Ento- 
mologist. 

John Cotton, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Soil Erosion. 

Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Linden Seymour Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension Sociology. 

Lawrence Elden Downey, B.S., Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Mylo Snavely Downey, B.S., Assistant, Extension Boys' Club Work. 

Castillo Graham, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Entomology. 

James Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Egg Marketing. 

W. Edgar Harrison, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Jessie Delcina Hinton, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Home Man- 
agement. 

24 



Herman Aull Hunter, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Canning Tech- 
nology. 

Kenneth Cole Ikeler, M.E., M.S. A., Professor, Animal Industry. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension 
Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Plant Path- 
ology. 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor, Chairman Poultry Husbandry. 

Albin Owingskuhn, M.S., Graduate Assistant, Extension Agronomy. 

Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Extension Rural 
Electrification. 

George Shealy Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Ento- 
mology. 

John Winfield Magruder, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Nutrition. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Dairy, Animal Husbandry. 

Charles Percival Merrick, B.S., Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Instructor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Walter Benjamin Posey, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Tobacco. 

Harlan Randall, Assistant Professor, Extension Music. 

Wade Hampton Rice, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor, Horticulture. 

Stewart Baker Shaw, B.S., Professor, Extension Marketing, Chief State 
Department of Markets. 

Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Clothing. 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor, Extension 
Landscape Gardening. 

Carl B. Smith, M.S., Instructor, Extension Agricultural Economics. 

Charles Edward Temple, M.A., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology, and 
State Pathologist. 

Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor, Extension Landscape Garden- 
ing. 

Joseph McNaughton Vial, B.S., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Albert Frank Vierheller, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Horti- 
culture. 

RuFUS Henry Vincent, B.S., Graduate Assistant, Extension Entomology. 

Earnest Artman Walker, M.S., Assistant, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Canning 
Technology. 

Forrest Brookes Whittington, M.S., Instructor, Extension Entomology. 

Charles Simpson Williams, B.S., Instructor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

Callender Fayssoux Winslow, A.B., M.F., Assistant Professor, Extension 
Forestry. 

Leland Griffith Worthington, B.S., Assistant, Extension (General Educa- 
tion. 

25 



COUNTY AGENTS 
(Field) 

County Name Headquarters 

^"^^^^y Ralph Frank McHenry, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Cumberland 
Anne Arundel Stanley Everett Day, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

o ,,. Annapolis 

Baltimore .....Horace Bennett Derrick, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Towson 
^^^^®^*- John Boome Morsell, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Prince Frederick 
^^^0""® - -..George Watson Clendaniel, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Denton 
^^^^o" Landon Crawford Burns, B.S., Associate Professor, 

^Westminster 
^^^^^ - JAMES Zenus Miller, B.S., Assistant Professor Elkton 

^^^^^^s Paul Dennis Brown, B.S., Associate Professor La Plata 

Dorchester „. William Russell McKnight, B.S., Associate Professor, 

17 J • 1 TT X, Cambridge 

Frederick Henry Reese Shoemaker, B.S, M.A., Associate Professor, 

Frederick 
Garrett John Hurley Carter, B.S., Assistant Professor Oakland 

Harford Henry Morrison Carroll, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Bel Air 

Howard Warren Graham Myers, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Ellicott City 
Kent James Dunham McVean, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 
Montgomery _Otto Watson Anderson, M.S., Associate Professor, 

_ . ^ Rockville 

Prince Georges Percy Ellsworth Clark, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Upper Marlboro 
Queen Annes ..Mark Kermit Miller, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Centerville 
St. Marys Joseph Julius Johnson, Assistant Professor, 

Leonardtown 
Somerset. Clarence Zeigler Keller, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Princess Anne 
Talbot Rudolph Stocksdale Brown, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

TTT , Easton 

Washington .....Milton Donaldson Moore, M.S., Associate Professor, 

Hagerstown 
Wicomico James Paul Brown, B.S., Assistant Professor Salisbury 

Worcester ....„ Robert Thornton Grant, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Snow Hill 
26 



Assistant County Agents 

Allegany and 

Washington Harry Wesley Beggs, B.S., Instructor Cumberland 

Baltimore. „...John Wheeler Ensor, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Harford Walter Sherard Wilson, B.S., Instructor - Bel Air 

Kent Stanley Burr Sutton, Instructor _ Chestertown 

Montgomery Rufus Backer King, A.B., Instructor Rockville 

Carroll and 
Frederick Charles Harmon Remsberg, B.S., Instructor Frederick 

Caroline, 

Dorchester 

and Talbot Charles Fuller, Instructor Easton 

Queen Anne's ^Chester Marvin Cissell, B.A., Instructor „ Centreville 

Local Agents — Negro Work 

Southern 

Maryland Martin Green Bailey, B.S., Instructor Seat Pleasant 

Eastern Shore Louis Henderson Martin, Instructor Princess Anne 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

(Field) 

County Name Headquarters 

Allegany Maude Alberta Bean, Associate Professor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel (Mrs.) Georgiana Linthicum, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Annapolis 

Baltimore Anna Trentham, B.S., Associate Professor Towson 

Calvert. Angela Mae Feiser, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Prince Frederick 

Caroline Bessie Marguerite Spafford, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Denton 

Carroll ^..Adeline Mildred Hoffman, M.A., Assistant Professor, 

Westminster 

Cecil Helen Irene Smith, B.A., Assistant Professor Elkton 

Charles Mary Graham, Assistant Professor _ La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie Estella Brooks, A.B., Associate Professor, 

Cambridge 

Frederick .....Florence Elizabeth Williams, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Frederick 

Garrett Mildred Eva Barton, B.S., Assistant Professor Oakland 

Harford ^Catharine Maurice, B.S., Associate Professor Bel Air 

Howard Kathryn Elizabeth Newton, M.S., Assistant Professor, 

Ellicott City 

Kent Helen Nickerson Schellinger, Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 
Montgomery .Edythe Margaret Turner, Associate Professor...Rockville 

27 



Prince George's Ethel Mary Regan, Associate Professor Hyattsville 

Queen Anne's .....Helen Marie Harner, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Centreville 

St. Mary's „ Ethel Joy, A.B., Assistant Professor Leonardtown 

Somerset .....Hilda Topfer, B.S., Assistant Professor. Princess Anne 

Talbot — Margaret Smith, B.S., Associate Professor Easton 

Washington Ardath Ellen Martin, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico Judith Ault, B.S., Assistant Professor Salisbury 

Worcester Lucy Jane Walter, Associate Professor Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

Allegany Margaret Thomson Loar, Instructor Cumberland 

Baltimore and 
Harford ^.Elizabeth Rozelle Johnson, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Local Home Demonstration Agents (Colored) 
Charles, 

St. Mary's, 
Prince George's 
and Montgom- 
ery ....(Mrs.) Arminta Johns Dixon, Instructor, 

106 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood 
Somerset. (Mrs.) Justine Nahala Clark, Instructor..Princess Anne 

Assistant Local Home Demonstration Agent (Colored) 

Charles, 
St. Mary's, 
Prince George's 
and Montgom- 
ery Dorothy Ruth Ransom, B.S., Instructor, 

106 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood 

LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE AND DEPARTMENT 

OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 
(College Park) 

Mark Frederick Welsh, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Science, 
State Veterinarian. 

James W. Hughes, D.V.M., LL.B., Associate Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, Associate State Veterinarian. 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D.,, Professor of Animal Pathology, 
in Charge of College Park Laboratory. 

Leo Joseph Poelma, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 

William Rush Crawford, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

Harold Moon DeVolt, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 

28 



Clyde LoRayne Everson, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, in Charge of Baltimore Laboratory. 

Charles Robert Davis, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

Irvin M. Moulthrop, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, in 
Charge of Salisbury Laboratory. 

George Edwin Daniel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Parasitol- 
ogy. 

Charles Henry Cunningham, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Vet- 
erinary Science, in Charge of Centreville Laboratory. 

Melvin Moses Rabstein, V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, 
U. S. Cooperative Agent. 

Louise Sklar, M.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Science, CoMcge Park. 

James W. Crowl, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Centreville. 

H. B. Wood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, Hagers- 
town. 

Clarence J. Gibes, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Upper Marlboro. 

J. Walter Hastings, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Cambridge. 

J. J. JONE^s, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, LaPlata. 

Chas. R. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Towson. 

Mahlon H. Trout, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Salisbury. 

W. B. Coughlin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Union Stock Yards. 

H. L. Armstrong, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Bel Air. 

F. H. Benjamin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
North East. 

Chas. B. Breininger, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Easton. 

Ora K. Hoffman, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Hagerstown. 

Owen L. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Baltimore. 

Ed. J. McLaughlin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Salisbury. 

Chas. A. Turner, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Chestertown. 

Chas. B. Weagley, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Middletown. 

Chas. Omer, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, West- 
minster. 

29 



/ 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTTION 

For the Year 1939-40 

At Baltimore 

PROFESSORS 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Orthodontics. • 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 

Clifford W. Chapman, M.S., Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 
of Nursing. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 
Otology. 

David M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany and 
Materia Medica. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Anesthesia and Exodontia (Dentis- 
try), Professor of Exodontia (Medicine). 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., D.H.L., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 
Ophthalmology. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gynecology. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 
Therapeutics. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 



Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School 

of Law. 
Walter H. Hartung, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
Roger Howell, Ph.D., LL.B., Professor of Law, Dean of the School of Law. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
C. LORiNG JosLiN, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.S.C., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (Den- 
tistry) , Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 
Throat. 

Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 
ology. ' 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Crown and Bridge 
and Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, Ph.D., J.D., LL.M., Professor of Law. 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Dental Anatomy and Oper- 
ative Technics, Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of 

Medicine. 
Edwin G. W. Ruge, B.A., LL.B., Professor of Law. 
Abram S. Samuels, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. • 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Thomas R. Sprunt, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D., Professor of Law (Law), 

Lecturer in Jurisprudence (Dentistry). 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary. Surgery. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S., Professor of Periodontia. 



30 



31 



Huntington Williams, M.D., D.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Health. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., B.S., Sc.D., Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry, Acting Dean of 

the School of Medicine. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Nose 

and Throat and Otology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Physician in 

Charge of Medical Care of the Students. 

C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Richard G. Coblentz, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurological 

Surgery. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Associate Professor of Economics and 
Pharmaceutical Law. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery, Associate in 
Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Frank H. J. Figge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, Instructor in 
Pathology. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

T. Campbell Goodwin, M.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

Thomas C. Grubb, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

O. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Histology. 

Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Instructor 
in Pathology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence, Asso- 
ciate in Pathology. 

N. Clyde Marvel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

James G. McAlpine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Sydney R. Miller, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Emil Novak, A.B., M.D., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

D. J. Pessagno, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

32 



H R Peters, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. ,. ^ ^ 

CHAKLES A. kEiFSCHNEiDER, M.D., Associate Professor of Traumatic Sur- 
gery and Oral Surgery (Medicine), Assistant Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery (Dentistry). 
A W RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
HARRY L. ROGERS, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
EMiL G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 
G. M. SETTLE, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clmical 

Medicine. 
D Conrad Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. ^ 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RALPH P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery (Medicine), 

Lecturer in Oncology (Dentistry). ^ , * i 4.- i 

HENRY E. WiCH, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 
LAWRENCE F. Woolley, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
HELEN E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

and Pathology. 
Marvin J. Andrews, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy. 
Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
J. Edmund Bradley, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
H. M. Hubert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
William E. Evans, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Prosthetic 

Dentistry. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

William E. Hahn, M.S., D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Anatomy (Dentis- 
try), Instructor in Exodontia (Medicine). 

ORVILLE C. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and Bridge. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

George C. Karn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Operative 

Dentistry. 
John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
James C. Lipsett, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Histology. 

3& 



Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Dental 
Anatomy. 

Marion W. McCrea, D.D.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Embryology and 

Histology. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Harry M. Murdock, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter L. Oggesen, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge. 
Robert H. Oster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
Russell R. Reno, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 
ISADORE A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
Frank J. Slama, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany and 

Pharmacognosy. 
Frederick B. Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Edgar B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology 
A. Allen Sussman, A.B., D.D.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
Vesta L. Swartz, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Guy p. Thompson, A.M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry. 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology 

J. Herbert Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy (Dentistry), 

Assistant in Surgery (Medicine). 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Thomas C. Wolff, Litt.B., M.D., CM., Assistant Professor of Medicine 
Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

LECTURERS 

W. N. Bispham, Col., M.C., U.S.A. (Retired), Lecturer in Medicine. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Pleading. 

Huntington Cairns, LL.B., Lecturer on Taxation. 

James T. Carter, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Contracts and Legal 

Bibliography. 
Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Federal Procedure. 
Walter L. Clark, LL.B., Lecturer on Evidence. 
Hon. Edwin T. Dickerson, A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Contracts. 
Hon. Eli Frank, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 
E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 
Jonas Friedenwald, M.A., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 

34 



Charles R. Goldsborough, M.A., M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 

George Gump, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Future Interests and Taxation. 

Richard C. Leonard, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Lecturer in Oral Hygiene and Pre- 
ventive Dentistry. 

John M. McFall, M.A., LL.B., Lecturer on Insurance. 

Gerald Monsman, A.B., LL.B., J.D., Supervisor of Legal Aid Work. 

William M. Nevins, Ph.D., Lecturer in Economics. 

Hon. Emory H. Niles, A.B., B.A. in Jurisprudence, B.C.L., M.A., LL.B., 
Lecturer on Admiralty. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, LL.B., Lecturer on Practice, Director of Practice 

Court. 
WiLUAM H. Triplett, M.D., Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis (Dentistry), 

Assistant in Medicine (Medicine). 
R. Dorsey Watkins, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts, Suretyship and 

Mortgages. 

ASSOCIATES 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Associate in Gynecology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 

W. A. H. COUNCILL, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

J. S. Eastland, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Frank J. Geraghty, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Albekt E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Harold M. Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

L. P. GuNDRY, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Clewell Howell, B.S., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

H. Alvan Jones, M.D., Associate in Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Frank B. Kindell, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 
L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Thomas R. O^Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

and Otology, Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
C. W. Peake, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

35 



Benjamin S. Rich, A.B., M.D., Associate in Otology. 

I. O. RiDGLEY, M.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics, Assistant in Path- 
ology, Acting Superintendent of Hospital. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Edw. p. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

William J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

E. H. TONOLLA, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Sc.D., Associate in Surgery. Orthopaedic Surgery. 

William H. F. Warthen, A.B., M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public 
Health. 

R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, Assistant in Path- 
ology (Medicine), Lecturer in Principles of Medicine (Dentistry). 
A. Russell Anderson, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 
Bernhard Badt, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
Jose R. Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia 
Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Simon H. Brager, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Otto C. Brantigan, B.S.. M.D., Instructor in Anatomy, Assistant in 
Surgery. 

Douglas A. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry and 
Physiology. 

Samuel H. Bryant, A.B., D.D.S., Diagnostician. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Thomas A. Christensen, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 

Albert T. Clewlow, D.D.S., Instructor in Anatomy 

Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery 

Thomas J. Coonan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Eugene E. Covington, M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy, Assistant in 

Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
B. Matthew Debuskey, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 
Amelia C. DeDominicis, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Botany. 
Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 
S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., Instructor in Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and 
Therapeutics. 

Ernest S. Edlow, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

36 



Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

Gaylord B. Estabrook, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

William L. Fearing, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Jerome Fineman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

PHIUP D. Flynn, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Gardner P. H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English and Speech. 

Robert W. Garis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and 

Pathology, Assistant in Surgery. 
Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Instructor in Genito Urinary Surgery. 
Georgiana S. Gittinger, M.A., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Diagnostician. 

D. James Greiner, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Karl F. Grempler, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Raymond F. Helfrich, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Samuel T. Helms, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
W. Grafton Hersperger, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Hugh T. Hicks, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 
Lillie R. Hoke, R.N., Instructor in Nursing. 

F. A. HoLDEN, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Assistant in Pathology. 

Frank Hurst, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

John M. Hyson, D.D.S., Instructor in Embryology and Histology. 

Conrad L. Inman, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Instructor in Anesthesia. 

Frederick W. Invernizzi, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Law. 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

William R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Hammond L. Johnston, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

Joseph O. Kaiser, A.B., LL.B., Instructor -in Law. 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
Wiluam Kress, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 
Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
Ernest Levi, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

H. Edmund Levin, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Medicine. 
Sidney Liberman, D.D.S., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 
Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

H. Berton McCauley, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Roentgenology. 
Ivan E. McDougle, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

37 



I 



C. Paul Miller, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Robert B. Mitchell, Jr., B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. Assistant in 
Gynecology. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S., Instructor in Ceramics. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

ARTHUR C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 

Gordon S. Pugh, B.S., D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics* 

J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Ph.D., Instructor in English 

James E. Pyott, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics 

^n^^^W^'^'^^'^fT''''''' ^'^'' ^•^•' Instructor in General Anesthesia. 
Robert A. Reiter, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., B.S., M.D., Instructor in Dermatology, Assist- 
ant m Medicine. ' 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology 

Francis A. Sauer, D.D.S., Diagnostician 

Nathan B. Scherr, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

Richard T. Shackelford, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery 

Daniel E. Shehan, D.D.S, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery and 
Gross Anatomy. 

M. S. Shiling, A.B., M.D., Sc.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Albert J. Shochat, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Sol Smith, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

David Tenner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Instructor in Surgery 

MYRON G. TULL, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

B. Sargent Wells, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics 

Hugh G. Whitehead, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

L. Edward Wojnarowski, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 

ASSISTANTS 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 

Nurses. Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 
J. Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics 
Benjamin Frank Allen, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy 
Leon Ashman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Charles E. Balfour, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Richard H. Barry, B.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

38 



Nathaniel M. Beck, A.B., M.L)., Assistant in Medicine and Gastro Enter- 
ology. 

Frank A. Bellman. B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Roland E. Bieren, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. ^ 

Catherine Blumberg, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Joseph M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Medicine. 

Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

A. V. Buchness, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul E. Carliner, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Yolande Chaney, R.N., Supervisor of Out-Patients' Department. 

Robert F. Chenowith, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Beverly C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Nevis E. Cook, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Edward F. Cotter, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Marie Olga Cox, R.N., Assistant Instructor in First Aid, and Supervisor 
of Accident and Admission Department. 

John M. Cross, M.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Dwight M. Currie, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 

W. Allen Deckert, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics, and 
Gynecology. 

Theodore T. Dittrich, B. S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Joseph U. Dorsch, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Mary Emery, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Clinical Nursing, Supervisor 
of Clinical Department. 

Mildred Epler, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, Super- 
visor of Pediatric Department. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Guy M. Everitt, B.A., Assistant in Zoology. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carroll P. Foster, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Herbert M. Foster, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Walter C. Gakenheimer, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Shirley M. Guckman, B. S. in Phar., Assistant in Economics. 

George Govatos, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. L. Granoff, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

William Greenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

William H. Grenzer, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert F. Healy, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Jeannette R. Heghinian, B.S. in Phar., M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical 
Supplies, Supervisor of Central Supply Room. 

Rollin C. Hudson, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

39 



JAROSLAV HULLA, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Abraham Hurwitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Charles Jarowski, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Jacob R. Jensen, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Joseph V. Jerardi, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Marius p. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology and Obstetric^ 

Ferd. E. Kadan, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Edward S. Kallins, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Clyde F. Karns, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Lawrence Katzenstein, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Vernon D. Kaufman, D.D.S., Graduate Assistant in Clinical Exodontia 

Lauriston L. Keown, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Milton C. Lan<;, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Nathan Levin, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Kurt Levy, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Grace Lindsay, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor of the Surgical Wards. 

Maxwell L. Mazer, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

P. Rowland McGinity, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Hugh B. McNally, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Bernard P. McNamara, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Pharmacology 

Israel P. Meranski, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

S. Edwin Muller, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

JOHN A. Myers, B.E.E., M.E.E., M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Gastro- 

Enterology. 
J. Edw. Norris, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
WiLUAM A. Parr, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
Samuel E. Proctor, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Kenneth V. Randolph, D.D.S., Graduate Assistant in Clinical Operative 
Dentistry. 

John A. Raudonis, A.B., B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Thomas E. Roach, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Daniel R. Robinson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Israel Rosen, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Roush, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor of Wards. 
Arlo W. Ruddy, M.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 
W. J. SCHMiTZ, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Margaret Sherman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical Nursing, Super- 
visor of Medical Wards. 
George Silverton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Jerome Snyder, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 



Samuel Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Elsie Sperber, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Virginia Stack, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing Private Patients, 
Supervisor of Private Halls. 

Helen M. Stedman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Obstetrical Nursing, 
Supervisor of Obstetrical Department. 

Cleo D. Stiles, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

Arminta Taylor, R.N., Night Supervisor. 

Robert E. Thompson, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

James K. Thornton, Assistant in Physics. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Edith Walton, Instructor in Massage. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Bernard L. Zenitz, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 



FELLOWS 

1939-40 

John Atkins, A.B., M.D. „ Pathology 

Frances F. Beck, Ph.D Pharmacology 

Frederick K. Bell, Ph.D U. S. Pharmacopoeia 

Edward G. Boettiger, Ph.D. _ „ Gynecology 

Otto C. Brantigan, M.D. „ _ Surgery 

Mildred Donohue, B.S _ - „„ Histology 

Melvin F. W. Dunker, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Ph.D. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Fred W. Ellis, M.S _ Pharmacology 

Sylvan Forman, M.S Pharmacology 

George P. Hager, Jr., B.S. in Phar _ Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Kenneth E. Hamlin, B.S. in Phar Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

J. Victor Monke, M.S - Physiology 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D Medicine 

Gordon M. Stephens, A.B., M.D _ Psychiatry 

Bernard Sussman, B.S. in Phar Food and Drug Chemistry 

William K. Waller, A.B. „ _ -... Medicine 

Mabel G. Wilkin, M.A., M.D _ Pediatrics 



40 



41 



I 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION STAFF 

For the Year 1939-40 

At Baltimore 

Mary Alice Adams, M.A., Principal, School No. 44, Baltimore. 

Glen David Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education, University of 
Maryland. 

Clyde Baltzer Edgeworth, M.A., Supervisor of Commercial Education, 
Baltimore Public Schools. 

Gaylord Beale Estabrook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Gardner P. H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English and Speech, University of 
Maryland. 

George Morrison Gaither, Supervisor of Industrial Education, Baltimore 
Public Schools. 

Ralph Gallington, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education, 
University of Maryland. 

Paul Bates Gillen, M.S., Special Assistant, Patterson Park Senior High 
School, Baltimore. 

John Joseph Grimes, B.S., Director, Day Camp, Baltimore. 
William Frederick Haefner, B.S., Instructor, Woodworking, Southern 
High School, Baltimore. 

Millard Crane Kent, M.A., Principal, Boys' Vocational School No. 293, 
Baltimore. 

Edward Leroy Longley, B.S., Shop Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic In- 
stitute, Baltimore. 

Gerald Louis Lund, B.S., Instructor, Ottmar Mergenthaler School of Print- 
ing, Baltimore. 

Irwin Dwinelle Medinger, B.S. in Economics, LL.B., Placement Counselor, 
Baltimore Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Melvin LeRoy Moritz, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice and Cold Iron 
Work, Clifton Park Junior High School, Baltimore. 

Frances Doub North, M.A., Instructor in Commercial Education, Western 
High School, Baltimore. 

Albert Gibson Packard, M.A., Supervisor of Industrial Education, Balti- 
more Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Thomas Pyles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English, University of 
Maryland. 

Robert Lincoln Smith, B.S., Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 

Baltimore. 
John Langdon Stenquist, Ph.D., Director, Bureau of Research, Baltimore 

Public Schools, Baltimore. 
Edwin Holt Stevens, M.A., J.D., Extension Instructor, University of 

Maryland. 

42 



Charles Wesley Sylvester, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Balti- 
more Public Schools, Baltimore. 

E. Gaston Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and 
Physical Chemistry, University of Maryland. 

Paul Alexander Willhide,^ B.S., Principal, General Vocational School 
No. 57, Baltimore. 

Riley Seth Williamson, M.S., Head of Scientific Technical Department, 

Baltimore City College, Baltimore. 
Karl H. Young, Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education, Baltimore 

Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Howard Edward Ziefle, B.S., Principal, General Vocational School No. 294, 
Baltimore. 



43 



SECTION I 
General Information 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

At Baltimore 

LIBRARY 

(Medicine) Doctors Lockard, Wylie, and Love, Jr.; (Dentistry) Doctors 
Anderson Aisenberg, and McCrea; (Pharmacy) Dean DuMez, Messrs. 
Hartung, Chapman, and Slama; (Law) Messrs. Reiblich and Strahom. 

The Faculty Councils of the Baltimore Schools are included in the de- 
scriptive statements of the respective schools in Section IL 

The Faculty Committees of the Baltimore Schools are given in the 
separate announcements issued by the several schools. 



44 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The history of the present University of Maryland, before the merger in 
1920, is the history of two institutions: the old University of Maryland in 
Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. 

This history began in 1807 when the College of Medicine of Maryland 
was organized, the fifth medical school in the United States. The first 
class was graduated in 1810. A pennanent home was established in 
1814-1815 by the erection of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets 
in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries (and the first medical 
school library) in the United States. In 1812 the General Assembly of 
Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or 
constitute faculties of divinity, law, and arts and sciences," and by the 
same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus united should be 
constituted an university by the name and under the title of the University 
of Maryland." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to 
establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction in 
law was opened. Subsequently there were added in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a 
School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 

45 



y 



in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over en- 
tirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the name of the latter 
was changed to the University of Maryland. 

All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. The University is co-educational in all its 
branches. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
There is a General Administrative Board which acts in an advisory capacity 
to the President. 

The University administrative organization comprises the following 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Extension Service. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Commerce. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. 

Summer Session. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Law. 

School of Medicine. 

School of Nursing. 

School of Pharmacy. 

University Hospital. 

The University faculties are composed of the Deans and the instructional 
staffs of each college and school, including the librarian and two assistant 
librarians. The President and the Dean of the Faculty are ex-officio members 
of each of the faculties. 

The organization and activities of the several administrative divisions are 
described in full in the appropriate chapters of Section II. 

46 



LOCATION 

The University of Maryland, located at College Park, Prince George's 
County, is eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from Balti- 
more. The campus fronts on the Baltimore-Washington boulevard 

The Professional Schools of the University and the University Hospital 
are located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College P^'-'S.'=°'"P!?f\JJ;/*=;"'- 
A broad rolling campus is surmounted by a commandmg h^" which over- 
looks a wide area and insures excellent dramage. Most of the b»^dmgs 
are located on this eminence, and the adjacent grounds are laid out attrac- 
UvelyTn lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds 
Mow the brow of the hill, on either side of the Washington-Baltimore 
Boulevard, lie the drill grounds and the athletic fields. 

Approximately 300 acres are used for research and tf^<=Wng;n *';rt>c«l- 
ture agriculture, dairying, livestock, and poultry; ^"^ ^" ^^Z'^'^""', ^^^ 
hundred and eight acres for plant research work are located on a farm 
five miles northwest of the campus. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 30 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at College 

Park 

AAministration and Instruction. This group consists of the following 
buildings: Administration Building, which accommodates the Office of the 
President, Dean of Faculty, Dean of Men, Comptroller, Registrar, Director 
of Admissions, and Alumni Secretary; Agrtcidture Building, whid^ houses 
the College of Agriculture, Agricultural and Home Economics Extension 
Service and Auditorium; Arts and Sciences Building; Engineering Bmld- 
ing ■ Morrill Hall, which houses a portion of the work in t^e Sciences; 
Poultry Research Building; Horticulture Building; Dairy Budding ; Old 
Library Building, in which are the Offices of the Dean of Women and her 
staff; Music Budding, which provides for the Department of Music, the 
student band, and Glee Club; Home Economics Budding; Chemistry Bmld- 
ing in which are located, in addition to space for instruction in chemistry 
la^ratories for State work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and lime; and 
College of Education Building, 

Experiment Station. The headquarters for the Station are in the Agri- 
culture Building. The various laboratories and green houses for this work 
are located in many of the other buildings on the Campus. 

Physical Education. This group consists of The Ritchie Coliseum, which 
provTdi quarters for all teams, an athletic office, trophy room, rooms for 
?Lulty and visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and per- 

47 



H 



manent seating arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium^ with a 
permanent seating capacity of 8,000, also furnished with rest rooms for 
patrons, dressing rooms, and equipment for receiving and transmitting in- 
formation concerning contests in progress; Gyinnasium, used in part by 
the Military Department and generally for physical education work; and 
the Girls' Field Houses for all girls' sports. Playing and practice fields and 
tennis courts are adjacent to the field houses. 

Dormitories, The Men's Dormitory group, consisting of six structures, 
provides accommodations for 460 men students. Accommodations for 228 
women students are provided in Margaret Brent and Anne Arundel Halls. 

Rossborough Inn, This historic Inn, built in 1798, is the oldest building 
on the campus and for many years housed the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. It has been restored with the aid of a WPA grant, and present 
plans call for its use as a museum, and a faculty-alumni center. 

Service Structures, This group includes the Central Heating Plants Gen- 
eral Service Building; Infirmary, with accommodations for forty patients, 
physician's office, operating room, and nurses' quarters; Dining Hall; and 
Laundry, 

United States Bureau of Mines. The Eastern Experiment Station of 
the United States Bureau of Mines is located on the University grounds. 
The general laboratories are used for instiniction purposes in Engineering 
as well as by the United States Government for experimental work. The 
building contains a geological museum, and a technical library. 

Baltimore 

The group of buildings, located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets, provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the Uni- 
versity. The group comprises the original Medical School Building, erected 
in 1814; the Old Hospital, now used as a dispensary; the New University 
Hospital with approximately 450 beds; the Frank C, Bressler Research 
Laboratory; the Dental and Pharmacy Building; the Nurses' Home; the 
Law School Building and the Administration Building, 

PRINCESS ANNE COLLEGE 

Princess Anne College, located at Princess Anne, Somerset County, is 
maintained for the education of negroes in agriculture, the mechanic arts, 
and home economics. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

libraries are maintained at both the College Park and Baltimore branches 
of the University. 

The Library at College Park,, completed in 1931, is an attractive, well 
equipped, and well lighted structure. The reading room on the second floor 
seats 236, and has about 5,000 reference books and bound periodicals on 



open shelves. The five-tier stack room is equipped with 18 carrels for the 
use of advanced students. About 12,000 of the 90,000 volumes on the campus 
are shelved in the Chemistry and Entomology departments, the Graduate 
School, and other units. Over 700 periodicals are currently received. 

Facilities in Baltimore consist of the Libraries of the School of Dentistry, 
containing some 7,500 volumes; the School of Law, 17,000 volumes; the 
School of Medicine, 20,000 volumes; and the School of Pharmacy, 8,000 
volumes. The Medical Library is housed in Davidge Hall; the remaining 
three libraries have adequate quarters in the buildings of their respective 
schools, where they are readily available for use. Facilities for the courses 
in Arts and Sciences are offered jointly by the Libraries of the Schools of 
Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The libraries of the University total in the aggregate about 142,500 
bound volumes and large collections of unbound journals. The Library is a 
depository for publications of the United States Government, and numbers 
some 13,000 documents in its collections. 

The University Library is able to supplement its reference service by 
borrowing material from other libraries through Inter-Library Loan and 
Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library of 
Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, and other 
agencies in Washington. 



48 



49 



* 



ADMISSION 

All correspondence regarding admission should be addressed to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. That pertaining to the colleges of Agriculture, Arts and 
Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, Home Economics, the Graduate 
School, and the Summer Session should be mailed to the University of 
Maryland, College Park; that pertaining to the schools of Dentistry, Law, 
Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy should be mailed to the University of 
Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

Information about admission to the professional schools in Baltimore will 
be found in their respective sections of this catalogue (see Index), and in 
the bulletins issued by the several schools. 

Age of Applicants: A student who is less than sixteen years of age must 
live with his parents or guardians. 

Admission Procedure: Candidates for admission should procure applica- 
tion blanks from the office of the Director of Admissions as early as possible. 
It would not be too soon for secondary school seniors to write for the 
blanks shortly after the beginning of their final school term. 

If the application, with the school record through the first semester of 
the senior year, is returned before graduation to the Director of Admissions, 
then the applicant should request the principal to send in a supplementary 
report after graduation— with the grades for the final term, a statement 
with date of graduation, the rank of the student in the graduating class, 
and whether the applicant is recommended for admission. All other can- 
didates for admission, also, should submit their applications as early as 
possible. 

A certificate of admission and material pertaining to registration will be 
mailed to each applicant whose credentials are acceptable. The Director of 
Admissions will be pleased to advise, either in person or by correspondence, 
with prospective students, their parents, or other interested persons con- 
cerning the preparation of the applicants, or on any questions that relate 
to admission to the University. ^ 

Time of Admission: Applicants for admission should plan to enter the 
University at the beginning of the school year in September. It is possible, 
however, to be admitted to certain curricula at the beginning of either 
semester. 

Registration: New students will register on Wednesday and Thursday, 
September 18 and 19, 1940. The English placement and psychological and 
other required tests are a part of the registration procedure. 

A special freshman program will be followed between registration and 
the beginning of the instruction schedule, the object of which is to complete 
the organization of freshmen so that they may begin their regular work 
promptly and effectively, and familiarize themselves with their new sur- 
roundings. 

50 



ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate or by examination or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate : An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or 
by an accrediting agency of at least equal rank, and which requires for gradu- 
ation not fewer than fifteen units. A unit represents a yearns study in any 
subject in a secondary school, and constitutes approximately one-fourth of 
a full year's work. It presupposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recita- 
tion periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class 
exercises a week. A double laboratory period in any science or vocational 
study is considered equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more 
than three units are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth 
course has been taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
certification requirement of the State Department of Education, or the 
Department of Education of Baltimore City; or a graduate of an approved 
secondary school in the District of Columbia who meets the certification 
grade of his school, will be admitted upon presentation of the proper certifi- 
cate from the principal. A graduate who does not meet fully these require- 
ments may be required to present further evidence of ability to undertake 
college work. At the discretion of the Director of Admissions, this may 
include an appropriate examination. Admission examinations will be given 
during the first week of each of the months of July, August, and September 
at College Park. Applicants concerned will be notified as to when they 
should report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland or in the District of Columbia must be recommended 
by the principal, and should have attained the certification-to-college grade 
of the school. If the school does not have such a quality grade, then the 
applicant's school grades should be at least ten points or one letter higher 
than the lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school who 
is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either 
of two types of examination: (1) he may appeal to the Director of Admis- 
sions for permission to report at the University for an examination, the 
result of which will be used in conjunction with the secondary school 
record to determine whether the applicant should be admitted; or (2) he may 
be admitted on presenting evidence of having passed satisfactorily other 
approved examinations in the subjects required for graduation from an 
accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New York City; 
the Regents of the University of the State of New York, Albany; and the 
Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

51 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The following curricula are available. The letters placed after the names 
of the curricula (see Index) refer to the columnar arrangement of the 
entrance requirements below. 



i; 



ti 



College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry — C 

Agricultural Education and Rural 
Life— B 

Agriculture-Engineering — C 
Agriculture, General — B 
Agronomy 

Farm Crops — A 

Soils— A 
Animal Husbandry — B 

fBacteriology — A 
tBotany 

General Botany and Morphol- 
ogy—A 
Plant Pathology — A 
Plant Physiology and Ecology — A 
Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Manufacturing — B 
Dairy Production — B 
tEntomology — A 
Farm Management — B 
Food Technology — A 
Horticulture 

Floriculture and Ornamental 

Horticulture — B 
Pomology and Olericulture — B 
Poultry Husbandry — B 
Preforestry — A 
Preveterinary — A 
Statistics — C 

College of Arts and Sciences 

* Bacteriology — A 

* Botany — A 
II Chemical Engineering — C 

Chemistry 
General — C 
Industrial — C 
JEconomics — A 
§Education — A 
English — A 

* Entomology — A 
French — A 

General Biological Sciences — A 
General Physical Sciences— C 
German — A 
History — A 



College of Arts and Sciences (con'd) 

Mathematics — C 
Physics — C 
Political Science — A 
Predental — A 
JPrelaw — A 
Premedical — D 
Prenursing — A 
Psychology — A 
Sociology — A 
Spanish — A 
Statistics — C 
Zoology — A 

College of Commerce 

Accounting — A 

Agricultural Economics — A 

Cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration — A 
fEconomics — A 

Finance — A 

General Business — A 

Marketing and Sales Administra- 
tion — A 
tPrelaw — A 



College of Education 

fArts and Sciences — A 

Commercial — E 
TfHome Economics — B 

Industrial— A (also in Baltimore) 

Physical — A 

College of Engineering 

tChemical— C 
Civil— C 
Electrical — C 
Mechanical — C 

Mechanical with Aeronautical op- 
tion — C 

College of Home Economics 

§Education — B 
Extension — B 
Foods and Nutrition — B 
General Home Economics — B 
Institution Management — B 
Practical Art — B 
Textiles and Clothing— B 



*Also College of Agriculture. fAlso College of Arts and Sciences. jAlso College of 
Commerce. §Also College of Education. ||Also College of Engineering. Ulso College 
of Home Economics. 

52 



The unit requirements tor admission to the foregoing curricula are indi- 
cated in the following table, the requirements for a particular curriculum 
being given in the column headed by the letter which follows the name of 

the curriculum in the above list: . « ^ ^ ^ 

A B C D E 

English _.... « 3 3 8 8 3 

Algebra 1 *2 X 1 

Plane Geometry. I 11 

Solid Geometry. ».. * V^ 

Mathematics - 2 

History „ 111 11 

Foreign Language ^ 2 

Stenography * *2 

Tvnewritincf **1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Electives _. 8 8 6y2 6 5 

Total 15 15 15 15 15 

(Not more than four vocational units may be offered.) 
Conditional Admission: An applicant who is eligible otherwise to be 
admitted to the University, but who cannot meet the specific entrance 
units required for the curriculum of his choice may register as a non- 
classified student. Classification as a regular student is automatic when 
the entrance deficiency is absolved. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER FROM OTHER COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 

A candidate for admission by transfer from another college or university 
must present evidence that he has maintained a satisfactory and honorable 
record at the other institution. The applicant should file as early as pos- 
sible the formal application blank (which may be obtained from the office 
of the Director of Admissions), together with the official transcripts of the 
secondary school and college records, including a statement of honorable 
dismissal. 

Advanced standing is granted for courses completed elsewhere which are 
equivalent in extent and quality to those given by the University of Mary- 
land, subject to the following provisions: 

(1) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may 
be allowed, the baccalaureate degree will not be conferred under any 
circumstances until a year of resident work shall have been completed. 

*An applicant who cannot offer the second unit in algebra and the one-half unit in 
solid geometry may be admitted to the College of Engineering, and to the curricula in 
Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, but will be obliged during the first semester to make- 
up the advanced algebra and solid geometry. The regular first semester mathematics 
would be taken in the second semester, and the second semester mathematics would 
be taken in the summer session. An applicant who does not have entrance credit for solid 
geometry would take this course concurrently with the regular first semester mathematics. 
Students in either of these groups would register with regular classification. 

** Students preparing to teach in the field of Business Practice may substitute electives 
for stenography and typewriting. 

53 



i 



ii 



' ( 

I 

H 



(2) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing allowed, the bacca- 
laureate degree will not be conferred until the student shall have 
satisfied the full requirements of the curriculum elected. 

(3) If the character of the student's work in any subject is such as to 
create doubt as to the quality of that which preceded it elsewhere, 
the University reserves the right to revoke at any time any advanced 
standing credit allowed. 

(4) Credit will not be granted for more than one-fourth of the total 
credit value of those courses which were passed with the lowest 
passing grade of the college attended. 

(5) An applicant may request an examination for advanced standing in 
any subject, in keeping with the requirements prescribed by the 
University of Maryland. 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age and who have had in- 
sufficient preparation to be admitted to any of the four-year curricula may 
register, with the consent of the Director of Admissions, for such courses 
as they may appear fitted to take. A student is ineligible to matriculate 
for a degree, however, so long as he retains an unclassified status. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students classified academically as freshmen or sophomores, 
who are citizens of the United States, who are physically fit to perform 
military duty and who are not less than 14 or more than 2G years of 
age, are required to take basic military training for a period of two years 
as a prerequisite to graduation. 

Graduation Requirements for Students Excused from Military Instruction 

and Physical Education 

Students excused from basic military training or physical education with- 
out academic credit shall be required to take an equivalent number of credits 
in other subjects, so that the total credits required for a degree in any col- 
lege shall not be less than 126 hours. The substitution must be approved 
by the dean of the college concerned. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

All women students whose bodily condition indicates that they are phy- 
sically fit for exercise are required to take physical education for a period 
of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

54 



HEALTH SERVICE 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

As soon as possible after the opening of the fall semester, as a measure 
for protecting the general health, all students who enter the undergraduate 
colleges at College Park are given a physical examination. The exammation 
of the men students is conducted by the University Physician in cooperation 
with the Physical Education and Military Departments. 

The examination of women students is conducted by a woman physician 
in cooperation with the office of Physical Education for Women. The 
woman physician has her offices in the Infirmary. She is available for 
consultation by all women students at hours to be arranged. 

INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and med- 
ical advice by reporting at the Infirmary during regular office hours estab- 
lished by the physician in charge. 

Nurses' office hours, 8 to 10 A.M.— 1 to 2 P. M.— 6 to 8 P. M., daily except 
Sunday; 10 A. M. to 12 Noon— 6 to 7 P.M. Sunday. 

Doctor's office hour 12 Noon to 1 P. M. daily except Sunday. Office hour 
on Sunday by appointment only. 

2. A regristered nurse is on duty at all hours in the Infirmary. Between 
the hours of 2 and 4 in the afternoon, quiet hour is observed. During this 
time sj:udents are requested not to report except in case of an emergency. 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical attention 
and who are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of the Uni- 
versity physicians. Such visits will be free of charge except in cases where 
additional visits are necessary. For such additional visits as may be 
necessary, the University physician will make his usual charge. But, if a 
student so desires, he may call a physician of his own choice and at his 
own expense. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon the order of the 
University physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the 
facilities available. Students who live off the campus will be charged a 
fee of one dollar and a quarter a day. 

5. The visiting hours are 10 to 11 A.M. and 6 to 7:30 P.M. daily. 
Each patient is allowed only three visitors at one time. No visitor may 
see any patient until permission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6 Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for graduate students 
and employees. Dispensary service, however, is available for graduate 
students and employees who are injured in University service or University 
activities. 

7 Students living in the dormitories, who are ill and unable to attend 
classes must report to the Infirmary, between 8:00 and 9:00 A. M. If they 
are to<^ ill to go to the Infirmary, they must notify the house mother so 
that the physician can be called to the dormitory. When possible this 

55 



41 

fi 



should be done before 8:30 A. M. If a student is taken sick at any other 
time he must report to the Infirmary, before going to his room. 

Medical excuses for classes missed during illness will be issued by the 
Infirmary physician, only when this procedure is followed. 

8. Students who are ill in their homes, fraternity houses, sorority 
houses, or dormitories and wish a medical excuse for classes missed during 
the time of illness must present written excuses from their physicians, 
parents, or house mothers. 

9. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 
and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

REGULATIONS, GRADES, DEGREES 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 
1 — 99; courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates, by numbers 
100 — 199*; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200 — 299. 

The letter following the number of a course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered; thus, course If is offered in the first semester; 
Is, in the second semester. The letter "y" indicates a full-year course. 
The number of semester hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in 
parentheses after the title of the course. No credit is allowed for a "y" 
course until it is completed. 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning 8:20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory or in outside prepara- 
tion for each credit hour in any course. 

Number of Hours. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semester 
hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are shown in 
the appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several divisions of 
the University. No student may carry either more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours without specific permission from the dean of his 
college. 

EXAMINATION AND MARKS 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are required 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final examinations; and, 
also, when requested to do so by the instructor, in tests. 

*But not all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit. 

56 



Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 
character of the work will permit the instructor to note frequently the 
progress and proficiency of the student— in which case they may be omitted 
upon approval of the head of the department and dean of the college. 
Periodic examinations and tests are given during regularly scheduled class 
periods. Final examinations, where required, are given according to schedule 
and are of not more than three hours' duration each. 

Marking. The system of marking is uniform in the different departments 
and divisions of the University. 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, D, F, and 7. The 
first four. A, B, C, and Z), are passing; F, failure; /, incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, 
fair scholarship and mark D, passing scholarship. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with marks of A, B, and C. A student who receives the mark of D 
in more than one-fourth of his credits must take additional courses or re- 
peat courses until he has met these requirements. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a mark of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 

institution. 

A student with a mark of F has failed in the course and must repeat the 
entire course in order to receive credit for it. In case of a failure in a 
required course a student must enroll in that subject again the first time 
it is offered unless excused by the dean. 

The mark of / (Incomplete) is exceptional, and is to be given only to a 
student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his control, he has been 
unable to complete the requirement. In each case where the instructor 
gives an 7, he shall enter on the class card a reason of the nature stated 
above, with an estimate of the quality of the student's work. In cases 
where this mark is given the student must complete the work assigned by 
the instructor by the end of the first semester in which that subject is 
again offered or the mark becomes F. 

Work of mark D, or of any passing mark, cannot be raised to a higher 
mark except by repeating the course. A student who repeats a course which 
he failed or for which he has received credit for work done at the Univer- 
sity, or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, including 
regular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final mark 
will be substituted for the mark already recorded, but he will not receive 
any additional credit for the course. 

A mark of D received in the first semester of a course cannot be raised 
by virtue of a higher mark earned in the second semester of that course. 

REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guar- 
dians at the close of each semester. 

57 



ELIMINATION OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing marks in fifty per cent of the semester 
hours for which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped from 
the University. The registrar notifies the student, his parent or guardian, 
and the student's dean of this action. A student who has been dropped 
for scholastic reasons may appeal in writing to the Committee on 
Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment for reinstatement. The Committee 
is empowered to grant relief for just cause. A student who has been 
dropped from the University for scholastic reasons, and whose petition for 
reinstatement is denied, may again petition after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. Stvdents of the last class may 
be asked to withdraw even though no specific charge he made against them. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major 
or minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have 
passed with an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number of 
semester credits required for junior standing in any curriculum. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil 
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy. 

Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certifi- 
cates. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. For full information regarding the 
requirements for graduation in the several colleges consult the appropriate 
chapters in Section II. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty credits of 
any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with grades of A, B, and C. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar before 
March 1st of the year in which he expects to graduate, a formal application 
for a degree. In general, candidates for degrees to be conferred at the 
annual commencement, must be present to receive the degrees. 

58 



EXPENSES 

Make all checks payable to the University of Maryland for thb 
exact amount of the semester charges. 

In order that the cost of operation may be reduced, all fees are due and 
payable as a part of the student's registration, and all persons must come 
prepared to pay the full amount of the semester charges. No student will 
be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

EXPENSES AT COLLEGE PARK 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
costs as any occasion may make necessary. Such changes, however, in com- 
parison with the total cost to the student would be only nominal. 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Maryland 

First Semester 

Fixed Charges $ 67.50 

Athletic Fee 15.00 

* Special Fee 10.00 

** Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Infirmary Fee ~ 5.00 

Post Office Box 2.00 



$109.50 



Second Semester 


Total 


$ 77.50 


$145.00 


•—••••...^ 


15.00 




10.00 





10.00 


«•....*...»• 


5.00 




2.00 



$ 77.50 



$187.00 



District of Columbia 

First Semester 

General Fees listed above $109.50 

Non-Resident Fee 25.00 



Second Semester Total 
$ 77.50 $187.00 

25.00 50.00 



$134.50 



$102.50 



$237.00 



Other States and Countries 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

General Fee $109.50 $ 77.50 $187.00 

Non-Resident Fee 62.50 62.50 125.00 



$172.00 



$140.00 



$312.00 



♦This fee is used for improving the University grounds, and the physical training facilities, 
and for other University projects that have direct relationship to student activities. 

♦♦ The Student Activities Fee la included at the request of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. Its pajrment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, 
since it covers subscription to the student weekly paper, the literary magazine, and the year 
book; class dues, including admission to class dances; and admission to the performances 
of the musical and dramatic clubs. 

59 



Advisory 



Expenses of Students Living in Dormitories 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

Board — _ $135.00 $135.00 $270.00 

Lodging $38.00-55.00 $38.00-55.00 $76.00-110.00 



$173.00-190.00 $173.00-190.00 $346.00-380.00 

Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee, payable on first entrance _ $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for bachelor's degree 10.00 

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Fee — Per semester in addition to fees 
shown above: 

Maryland „ „ $25.00 

District of Columbia 9^^ nn 

Other States and Countries.. fi9 FtO 

Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

For the fee in a given course see 

Section III, Description of Courses 

Bacteriology $5.00-$8.00 Entomology $2.00-$3.00 

Botany $3.00-$5.00 Home Economics $1.00-$7.00 

Chemistry $3.00-$8.00 Industrial Education $2.00-$4.00 

^^iry - $1.00-$3.00 Physics $3.00-$5.00 

Engineering, All Students $2.50 Radio Speech $2.00 

Engineering, Chemical $7.00-$8.00 Zoology $3.00-$5.00 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Late Registration Fee $3.00-$5.00 

Fee for each change in registration after first week ._ $1.00 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's Office during first 

week of semester „ $1.00 

Absence Fee twenty-four hours before or after holiday (for each class)...$3.00 

Special Examination Fee ....._ ^ _....$5.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment $2.00 

Part-time students carrying six semester hours or less — per semester 

credit hour „.... ^ $g 00 

Laundry service, when desired— per semester. $13.50 

Transcript of Record Fee <II1 (\(\ 

Students will be charged for wilful damage to property. Where responsi- 
bility for the damage can be fixed, the individual student will be billed for 
it; where it cannot, the entire student body will be charged a flat fee to 
cover the loss or damage. 

Fees For Graduate Students 

Matriculation Fee . _ $10.00 

Fee for each semester credit hour 6.00* 

Diploma Fee — Master's Degree _.... 10.00 

Graduation Fee — Doctor's Degree 20.00 



*For students carrying eight hours or less; for students carrying more than eight hours, 
$50.00 for the semester. 

60 



EXPLANATIONS 

The Fixied Charges made to all students cover a part of the overhead ex- 
penses not provided for by the State. 

The Board, Lodging, and Laundry charge may vary from semester to 
semester, but every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

Fees for Students Entering in February. Students entering the Univer- 
sity for the second semester are charged the following fees for the items 
indicated: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $8.00; In- 
firmary, $2.50, and Post Office Box, $1.00. 

Fees for Part-Time Students. Undergraduate students carrying six 
semester hours or less of regularly scheduled courses are charged $6.00 per 
semester credit and regular laboratory fees. Students carrying seven or 
more semester hours are charged the regular fees. In the case of special 
courses with special fees this rule does not apply. A matriculation fee of 
$5.00 is charged at the first registration. 

The Athletic Fee constitutes a fund which is collected from all students 
in the University at College Park for the maintenance of athletics, and the 
entire amount is turned over to the Athletic Director for disbursement. 
This fund is audited annually by the State Auditors. 

Late Registration Fee. Students who do not complete their registration 
and classification, including payment of bill, on regular registration days 
will be required to pay $3.00 extra on the day following the last registration 
day, and $5.00 thereafter. 

Absence Fee. In cases of absence during a period beginning 24 hours be- 
fore the close of classes for a vacation or holiday and ending 24 hours after 
the resumption of classes, a student will be penalized by being required to 
pay a special fee of $3.00 for each class missed. Unless properly excused, 
students will be penalized, as in the case of a holiday, for absence from 
the first meeting of each class at the beginning of the second semester. 

Students desiring to be excused from classes before and after a holiday 
must make application to the Dean at least one week before such holiday. 
Except under the conditions specified, no excuse for an absence before or 
after a holiday will be granted. 

In exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in the family, application 
for an excuse must be made within one week after a student returns. 

WITHDRAWALS FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students registering for the dormitories and dining hall must continue 
for the year, as contracts for service and for supplies are made on an 
annual basis, and fees are fixed on the supposition that students will remain 
for the entire year. 

A student desiring to withdraw from the University must secure the 
written consent of the parent or guardian, to be attached to the withdrawal 

61 



slip, which must be approved by the Dean and presented to the Registrar at 
least one week in advance of withdrawal. Charges for full time will be 
continued against him unless this is done. The withdrawal slip must bear the 
approval of the Dean of Men before being presented to the Cashier for 
refund. 

All women students who are withdrawing from the University are 
requested to report to the Office of the Dean of Women. 

REFUNDS 

For withdrawal from the University within five days full refund is made 
of fixed charges, athletic fee, special fee, and student activities fee, with 
a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. All refunds for board 
lodging, and laundry are pro-rated. 

After five days, and until November 1, the first semester, or March 10, the 
second semester, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated, with a deduction 
of 55.00 to cover cost of registration. 

After November 1, or March 10, refunds are granted for board and 
laundry only, amounts to be pro-rated. 

No refunds are made without the written consent of the student's parent 
or guardian, except to students who pay their own expenses. 

No refunds of laboratory fees are made in the first semester after 
October 12, 1940 and in the second semester after February 27, 1941. 

« 

HOUSING RULES AND REGULATIONS 
Dormitory Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the 
dormitories should request room application cards. Men should apply to 
the Director of Admissions, and women to the Office of the Dean of 
Women. When the room application card is returned, it must be accom- 
panied by a $15 deposit. This fee will be deducted from the first semester 
charges when the student registers. Rooms reserved and not claimed bv 
freshmen or upperclassmen on their respective registration days will be 
cancelled. A room will be held by special request until after classes begin 
providing the dormitory office is notified by September 18th. Room reserva- 
tion fees will not be refunded after August 15th. Reservations by students 
in attendance at the University should be made during the closing month 
of the school year. 

Men's Dormitories. All men students who have made dormitory reserva- 
tions should report to the dormitory office in "A" section, Calvert Hall. 

All freshmen students, except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories. 

Women's Dormitories. All women students who have made dormitory 
reservations should report to the dormitory to which they have been 

62 



assigned. Instructions regarding rules and regulations and any other 
information desired by the student will be given by head resident on duty. 

Off-Campus Housing. All housing arrangements for women students 
must be approved by the Office of the Dean of Women. Those women 
students who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories may live in 
private homes which have been approved for student occupancy. Informa- 
tion regarding these off-campus houses may be secured through the Office 
of the Dean of Women. 

Equipment. Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves 
with sufficient single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow 
cases, towels, a laundry bag, a shoe bag, and a waste paper basket. 

The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormitory 
property assigned to him. Any damage done to the property other than 
that which would result from ordinary wear and tear will be charged 
to the student concerned. 

General Information. It is necessary that each student have a key for 
his room for which a deposit of $1.00 is required. 

All students who live in the dormitories must board at the University 
dining hall. 

Cleaning service is furnished for all rooms. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked for the 
dormitory to which it is to be sent will be delivered when you notify the 
College Park Express office of your arrival. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of 
their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 



*The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or otiier unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to 
such minor students. 

fStudents in the College Park Colleges who are residents of the District of Columbia 
are charged two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 

m 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

^t^Sf*^ not rooming in the dormitories may obtain board and laundry 
at the University at the same rates as those living in the dormitories, 
lunclfrooms^" ""^^ ^^* '""'^^' ^* *^^ University cafeteria or at nearby 

.J^V7^ °* ^■'^^' f ""^ '"PP""' *"^ ^^""y ac'^ording to the course pur- 
ner V.L '"^'^'''"^' ^t"''^*- ^ooks and supplies average about $35.00 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 
student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

EXPENSES AT BALTIMORE 

The fees and expenses for the professional schools located in Baltimore 
will be found in the section of this catalogue pertaining to the several 
schools in Baltimore. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University of Maryland offers a limited number of scholarships 
covermg fixed charges to residents of the State of Maryland who are 
graduates of high schools or preparatory schools. 

Since the University of Maryland is interested in encouraging students 
who show promise, these scholarships are awarded on the basis of a stu- 
dent s contribution to his high school, preparatory school, or University; 
his scholastic average; special talents; and evidence of leadership 

A scholarship, known as the Victor E. Albright Scholarship, is awarded 
to a boy or girl of good character, born and reared in Garrett County 
and graduated from a high school in Garrett County during the year in 
which the scholarship is awarded. This scholarship is worth $200.00 a year 
Ihe names of prospective scholars are forwarded to the Scholarship Com- 
mittee by the high school principals of Garrett County and the selection 
IS made by lot. The recipient of this award must maintain a B average for 
each semester in order to keep the scholarship. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employment 
while m attendance at the University. No student should expect, however 
to earn enough to pay all of his expenses. The amounts vary, but some 
earn from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. 

Generally the first year is the hardest for those desiring employment 
After one has demonstrated that he is worthy and capable, there is much 
less difiiculty in finding work. 

Under the provisions of the National Youth Administration the Uni- 
versity has been enabled to offer needy students a limited amount of work 
on special projects, the remuneration for which averages about $13 monthly 
It is not known how long the Government will continue to extend this aid. 

64 



Applications for N. Y. A. employment should be made to the Chairman of 
the Student Life Committee. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, maintain a bureau to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions is 
placed at the disposal of the students. Applications should be made for 
this work to the Employment Service. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college. First honors 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second honors to the lower 
half. To be eligible for honors, at least two years of resident work are 
required. 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the man from Prince George^s County who makes the 
highest average in his studies and who at the same time embodies the most 
manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma Fra- 
ternity offers annually a gold medal to the freshman who makes the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. The mere 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Herman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Herman. 

Mortar Board Award. This is offered to the woman member of the senior 
class who has been in attendance at least three full years, and who has made 
the highest scholastic average. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

Class of '26 Honor Key. The Class of 1926 of the School of Business 
Administration of the University of Maryland at Baltimore offers each 
year a gold key to the senior graduating from the College of Commerce 
with the highest average for the entire four year course taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

65 



American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student, of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
shall have attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the 
entire undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final 
semester. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl who attains the highest scholastic average during the 
first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 
to the senior Alpha Lambda Delta girl who has had the highest average 
for the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Elngineers to the senior in the 
Department of Civil Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty of the 
Department, is the outstanding student in his class. 

Tau Beta Pi Award. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi awards 
annually an engineers' handbook to the junior in the College of Engineering 
who, during his sophomore year, has made the greatest improvement in 
scholarship over that of his freshman year. 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi awards annually a certificate of merit to the initiate of the Chapter 
who, in the opinion of the members, has presented the best thesis during 
the year. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. An award is presented annually by Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class 
who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, 
and has done most for the general advancement of the interests of the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods, wife of a former president of the University of Maryland, 
to the woman member of the senior class who, during her collegiate career, 
has most nearly typified the model citizen, and has done most for the 
general advancement of the interests of the University. 

66 



MILITARY AWARDS 

Mahlon N. Haines '94 Trophy. This is offered to the major of the win- 

""t^fZ^ri^ent Award. Gold second lieutenant^s insignia to the 

maior of the winning battalion. ^«n^„^v \hp 

'Z Governor's Cup. This is offered each year by His Excellency, the 

Governor of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

^mpany Awarf. T^e Reserve Officers' Association, Montgomery County 

Ch?p™r? awards annually to the captain of the best drilled company of the 

University, gold second lieutenant's msignia. 
The Alumni Cup. The Alumni offer each year a cup to the commandmg 

officer of the best drilled platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Cup. This cup is offered for the commander of the 

"Ss'o?9rGold Medal. The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal 

to^the mtmler o'f the battalion who proves ^^-f V'^.^^-^ ^^^ J^'^fl, 
A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Varsity R. O. T. C. Rifle 

Team who fired the high score of each season. pja. Tpam who 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Freshman Rifle Team who 

fired the high score of each season. , . . , ;„ .1,- s„„ad 

Pershing Rifle Medals to each member of the winning squad in the squad 

drill competition. ^ a • „ ii,„ 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition Gold Medal to the student firing the 
highest™core in this competition; A Silver Medal to the student showing 
greatest improvement during the year in this competition . „ , . 

Pershing Rifle Medals to the three best drilled students in Pershing 
Rifles. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 
Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold watch is offered 
annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics The 
wa"ch" is given in honor of a former President of the University, R. W. 

Silvester 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. linhardt to 
the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 

Mndals are offered in Duimondback, Terrapin, and Old Line work, for the 
stutnts who £ given most efficient and faithful service throughout the 

year. 

LOANS 

The Kappa I&ppa Gamma Sorority offers annually a Sigma Delta loan of 
onrhundre'd dollars, without interest, to a wo-n sjude^t -^^If*^^ 
University of Maryland and selected by the Scholarship Committee-the 

67 



said Committee to be composed of the deans of all Colleses in which Jr. 
are^^^g^stered. including the Dean of Women and the DeTof "thltadTat 

A. A. U. W. Loan. The College Park Branch of the ^American Associa 
tion of University Women maintains a fund from which loans are m Je t^ 
women students of junior or senior standing who have been in a« 'ndafce a 
the University of Maryland for at least one year. Awards in varying 
amounts are made on the basis of scholarship, character, and financilfneed 
Apphcahons should be made to the Scholarship Committee of the T A U 
W.^on^ blanks which may be obtained through the office of the Dean of 

n,Jll^*^'*i'*M*V^^ ^^"''^ '"^"^ ^^^""^ ^'•^ f^<"" t™e to time others that are 
made available by various women's organizations in the State of Marvland 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers tho<=P nf fi,o , a 
graduate divisions of College Park. The descJptTon of Ssefn ^e BaW 
more dms.ons is included in the appropriate cLpters in SL n. 

GOVERNMENT 

• ^f"!.'"""/^ ^""'^''* Activities. The association of students in orean- 
ized bodies for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student actrvitiefrn 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged AroJ^niJS 

onW t>l%?' approval of the President. Such organizations are fTr^ed 
l^J^Vt rr* °^ *' ^*'"^""* ^^^ Committee and the approJJof 

whicrtn °"' '"'^ '=°"''"* ^*^ ^PP^°^^' ""^ «t"dent organi^a ion 

which m any way represents the University before the public or whid^ 
purports to be a University organization or an organization oiuSv^saJ 
students, may use the name of the University in connection withT oS 
name, or m connection with its members as students. 

Student Government. The Student Government Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women's League, and the Men's Lea^e and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officei^ are a PresidentTvS 

^2::=': iiTaiieL" p:srtorme?st^dtr^ *" ^-" ^^ 

The Merits League, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Men 
handles all matters pertaining to men students ' 

in J^.^. ^''^1''^^. ^"^^^1 P^^^™« the executive duties incident to mana^- 
mg^student affairs, and works in cooperation with the Student LifrCom- 

68 



The Student Life Committee, a faculty committee appointed by the Presi- 
dent, keeps in close touch with all activities and conditions, excepting class- 
room work, that affect the student, and, acting in an advisory capacity, en- 
deavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that may exist. 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and distrib- 
uted to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning student 
matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. In 
addition, various student organizations have established certain other re- 
quirements. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass at least 
twenty-four hours of work during a preceding year. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and faculty 
rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The student 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives honor- 
ably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to maintain these 
standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct super- 
vision of the University only when on the campus, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and finan- 
cial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon sound 
business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed, indi- 
vidual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and thereby 
become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules governing 
the different activities will be found in the list of Academic Regulations. 

FRATERNITIES, SOCIETIES, AND CLUBS 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards in their respective fields. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national 
honorary fraternity open to honor students, both men and women, in all 
branches of learning; Sigma Xi, an honorary scientific fraternity; Alpha 
Zeta, a national honorary agriculture fraternity recognizing scholarship 
and student leadership; Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary engineering 
fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa, men's national honor society, recognizing 
conspicuous attainment in non-curricular activities and general leadership; 
Mortar Board, the national senior honor society for women recognizing 
service, leadership, and scholarship; Alpha Chi Sigma, a national honorary 
chemical fraternity; Scabbard and Blade, a national military society; Persh- 
ing Rifles, a national military society for basic course R. 0. T. C. students; 
Pi Delta Epsilon, a national journalistic fraternity; Alpha Lambda Delta, a 
national freshman women's scholastic society; Omicron Nu, a national home 
economics society; Alpha Psi Omega, a national dramatic society; and 

69 



Beta Alpha Psi, national accounting honorary fratpmitv ^r.A t>- c- 
Alpha, honorary political science fraternity ^'^^^^^'t^' ^"^ Pi S.g,na 

nafionarioi.^'f'"' ^"T"'*^- Th^-'e are fourteen national fraternities six 

Phi Sma S g^a Nu ?hi T* "'^'^^ ^"'^^"^ ^^^ ^^PP^ ^'P'^^' Signia 
Rho Sa rh^ PI, ;, ,, rl^""^ ^^PP^' ^^'*^ S'S'"^ Phi, Alpha Gamma 

Theia imbda CM aH"; a^ ?'1'°" .''.''' ^'^"^ ^^" °'"^^^' ^^i Delta 
r,of ,^^"^^^^ ^^1 Alpha, Alpha Lambda Tau, and Siffma Alnha Mn 

sororities ^ ^^' ^^^^^ ^""^' ^"^ ^^PP* ^Ipha Sigma, local 

Qubs and Societies. Many clubs and societies, with literary scientific 

E.l.«on. Club, Op,„ ^aTiS o,»" C^^^^^^ 

Student GtBnge, Asrkuilur.l Economic; Club Future r.m,^„, I 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

.tuSs n^'.'istsrssis ^TrK-i "■• ""•" ■" "• 

whose deyelopment alon^ «li i^T- f°7^'^' °"* ^s human personalities 

f£ churcWrT''"' ''"^'- "^^^ °^ *^ Student Pastors also erJe 
local church of hzs denomination, which the students are urged to attS 

on^dSot IffSrs'tn"/ f ^'f %-«•. So-l Service. A faculty committee 
While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious belief, 

s: zrs "' '■^"^°" ^^ '"^'^''^^^^'^ "'"^'^"^ -^ reiiSrictS 



Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a 
denominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of Christian service. This 
year the list includes the Baptist Student Union, the Episcopal Club, the 
Lutheran Club, the Newman Club, the Hillel Foundation, the Methodist Club, 
and the Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet monthly or semi-monthly for 
worship and discussion, and occasionally for social purposes. A pastor or 
a member of the faculty serves as adviser. Evensong is held every Sunday 
evening under the auspices of the various denominational clubs. A local 
Y. W. C. A. provides a variety of activities and services on a non-denomi- 
national basis. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Four student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications. 

The Diamondback, a semi-weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is pub- 
lished by the students. This publication summarizes the University news, 
and provides a medium of expression for the discussion of matters of 
interest to the students and the faculty. 

The Terrapin is the student annual published by the Junior Class. It is 
a reflection of student activities, serving to commemorate the principal 
events of the college year. 

The Old Line is a monthly magazine issued by the students containing 
short stories, cartoons, humorous material, poetry, and features of gen- 
eral interest. 

The "M" Book is a handbook issued each September by the Student Gov- 
ernment Association for the benefit of incoming students to acquaint them 
with general University life. 

ALUMNI 

The alumni are organized into several units, which elect representatives 
to the Alumni Council, an incorporated body which manages all general 
alumni affairs. Different alumni units represent the School of Medicine, 
the School of Pharmacy, the School of Dentistry, the School of Law, and the 
School of Nursing, while the group of colleges at College Park are repre- 
sented by one unit. The College Park unit is governed by a board made 
up of representatives of the various colleges located at College Park. 

The Alunmi Coimcil consists of elected representatives from the several 
units, with a membership of twenty-four. Each alumni unit in Baltimore 
elects two representatives to the Council; the alumni representing the Col- 
lege Park group of colleges elect twelve representatives. 



70 



71 



SECTION II 
Administrative Divisions 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

T. B. Symons, Dean, Director of Extension, and Acting 

Director, Experiment Station. 
H. F. COTTERMAN, Assistant Dean. 

The Agricultural College is the administrative unit of the University 
devoted especially to the agricultural industries and life of the State. Its 
four principal functions are as follows: (1) Resident Instruction, the train- 
ing of young men and women for agricultural and related occupations; (2) 
Research, the conducting of systematic investigations on projects of import- 
ance to agricultural interests; (3) Extension, the rendering of assistance 
in the solution of farm and home problems in their natural setting; and 
(4) Regulatory, the enforcement of those standards and control measures 
in agriculture which are deemed necessary for the common good. 

Resident Instruction 

The courses in resident instruction are designed to provide trained per- 
sonnel for agricultural and allied industries. These offerings aim to fit 
students for one or more of the many fields of activity affording employ- 
ment to persons with special kinds of training. Education of students in 
fundamentals receives special attention. The twenty-four professional cur- 
ricula of the College are arranged with a view to correlating technical work 
with associated sciences and cultural subjects. Accordingly, young men and 
women are given a basic general education while they are being instructed 
in the various branches of agriculture. 

The College provides education for those who wish to engage in general 
farming, live stock production, some type of dairying, poultry husbandry, 
fruit or vegetable growing, floriculture or ornamental horticulture, field crop 
production, or in the highly specialized activities connected with these 
industries. It prepares men to serve as farm managers, for responsible 
positions as teachers in agricultural colleges or in departments of voca- 
tional agriculture in high schools, or as investigators in experiment sta- 
tions, for extension work, for regulatory activities, for service in the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and for positions with commercial con- 
cerns related to agriculture. Its curricula in Bacteriology, Botany, Ento- 
mology, Food Technology, Genetics, Statistics, and Soil Technology offer rich 
opportunities to the student with a scientific bent of mind, and lead to 
positions with many ramifications in teaching, research, extension, and 
regulatory work. 

72 



Research 

Through research of the &cperiment Station, the frontiers of taowledge 

J^inAo agriculture and the fundamenUl sciences underlying at are con- 

tttW beinf extended and solutions for important problems are bemg 

flund Research projls in many fields are in progress. Students takmg 

ou^esraSculture from instructors who devote I-^ ^^VV^^.^;; 

r T- closely associated with it are kept in close touch -^^ the Jat^t 

d scoveries and developments in the investigations under ^^y. The findings 

of the Experiment Station thus provide a real source of information for 

use in eSsrooms, and make possible a virility and exactness m instruction 

vile in the extreme. The authority of scientific investigation is con- 

stantly before the student. 

Extension 

Constant contact of the Extension Service with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State through its county agents, home 
demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident in- 
st^ction in the College of Agriculture. This Service operates in two ways: 
Cblems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of research 
workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are taken to 
fanners and their families in their home communities through practical 

eronTtrations. Hence the problems of the people of ^he State con r.bute 
to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College helps them 
in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. Instruction is vitalized 
through participation in or association with extension activities. 

Regulatory 

Through their Regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are constantly dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and providing more reliable seeds for farni plantmg. 
These fields constitute an important part of agricultural education, as 
standardization and education go hand in hand in the development of an 
industry. Direct contact on the part of professors in their respec ive 
departments with the problems and methods involved makes for effective 
instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 
The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Mary- 
land lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, 
and regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the 
several departments, and in the institution as a whole. Those who give 
instruction to students are closely associated with the research, extension. 

73 



and regulatory work being carried on in their respective lines, and, in 
many cases, devote a portion of their time to one or more of th;se t;pes 

UnivS'tvl- ^^"^^^^^-'J'"^*-" of these four types of work enables fh 
University to support a stronger faculty in the College of Agi-iculture, and 
affords a higher degree of specialization than would otherwife be pos iWe 
It insures instructors an opportunity to be always informed on the latest 
results of research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends 2 
problems tha are revealed in extension and regulator>- activities He2 
of departments hold staff conferences to this end, so ttiat the ient a 

fieldrf." 'f f"'' '" '^' developments in the frontiers of tfe severa 
fields of knowledge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

Advisory Councils 

intte"s"ndraJr 7'' f ,''' ''""^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^P°-'- *'> a^icultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several a^riclt,,..! 

industries in the State, and that the courses of instruction shaU af a 1 W 

be made most helpful for students who pursue tS Adv^so^ rL!'? 

have been constituted in the major industries of aSltte T^ese Coun' 

Facilities and Equipment 

In addition to the building-s, laboratories lihr5,r.,-^o ^ 
effective instruction in the relft;d ba^L sciences an^^^^^^^ equipment for 

the University of Maryland is provided Xexcellenflcfli '^^'''''' 

and instruction in a^riculturP P^rrv. lo ^ ^^fe e^t facilities for research 

are owned and oZZZ inSc otf 1^ in^veXti/'"'^ '''''■ 
One of the most complete and modem nln„r= /a ""'^^^'^ational purposes. 

work in the country' together with herfs of t^^^^^ Tr^' '^"'"^"'"^ 

cattle and livestock, pro^vides faiiHtfes and in' er^sX in'T'' ^^ '"'I 
research in these industries. Excellent laboratory Jnd field f^r^"" ""^ 
available in the Agronomy Department for breed^L and ,1 ?'*"'. ^'^ 
crops and for soils research Tb« P«„if "^^^amg and selection m farm 

laboratories and classrooms, I plant clpSTtTl^' ' '""^'"^^ '"' 

flocks of all the important b;eeds of pouTvXVt'^''u^^^ ^'''^'' ^"^ 

is housed in a separate building anVhas a^p^^^^Cs a";? '"''T"'?' 
Its various lines of work. orcnards and gardens for 

Departments 

B« C„„„„,; G»e.i=s and S«.ia.ic.; Hor..„llVe (Si'S Smotgy 

74 



and Olericulture, Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture); Poultry 
Husbandry; Veterinary Science- 
Admission 
The requirements for admission are discussed under Entrance, in Section I. 

Junior Standing 

To attain junior standing in the College of Agriculture, a student must 
have an average grade of C in not less than 62 semester hours. 

Requirements for Graduation 

A minimum of one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours is required 
for graduation. The detailed requirements for each department are included 
in the discussion of Curricula in Agriculture. 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the 
several voluntary organizations sponsored by the College. These organiza- 
tions are as follows: Student Grange, Livestock Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Bacteriological Society, Alpha Zeta, Agricultural Economics Club, 
and the Agricultural Student Council. 

Membership in these organizations is voluntary, and no college credits 
are given for work done in them; yet much of the training- obtained is 
fully as valuable as that acquired from regularly prescribed courses. 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers' fraternity 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges throughout 
the State. The Livestock Club conducts the Students' Fitting and Showing 
Contest held on the campus in the Spring. The Future Farmers of America 
foster interest in vocational education, and the Collegiate Chapter serves 
as host Chapter in connection wdth high school judging contests held at 
the University. The Bacteriological organization is representative of a 
national group with chapters in many institutions. The Agricultural Eco- 
nomics group conducts special studies in the field of Agricultural Economics. 
All these organizations have regular meetings, arrange special programs, 
and contribute to the extra-curricular life of students. 

Alpha Zeta — National Agricultural Honor Fraternity 

Membership in this fraternity is chosen from students in the College of 
Agriculture who have displayed agricultural motive and executive ability. 
This organization fosters scholarship, and to that end awards a gold medal 
to the member of the freshman class in agriculture who makes the highest 
record during the year. 

75 



Agricultural Student Council 

The A^icultural Student Council is a delegate body made up of two 
representatives from each of the above organizations. Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of students in agriculture, and to promote work which 
is beneficial to the College of Agriculture. It is the organization that is 
representative of the agricultural student body as a whole. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes: Technical, Scientific, and Special. 

(1) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools; as executives, 
salesmen, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricul- 
tural contact and point of view. 

(2) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal, 
State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment sta- 
tions; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return to 
the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. (For details see Special Students in Agriculture, page 102.) 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to an adviser from 
the faculty. Advisers are of two kinds — departmental and general. Depart- 
mental advisers consist of heads of departments or persons selected by 
them to advise students with curricula in their respective departments. 
Greneral advisers are selected for students who have no definite choice of 
curriculum in mind, or who wish to pursue the general curriculum in agri- 
culture. 

Cases of students with poor records are referred to the Admission, 
Guidance, and Adjustment Committee, for review and advice. 

/ Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow afford opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

Students wishing to take Advanced R. 0. T. C. may, upon consultation 
with the Department Head and with the consent of the Dean, substitute this 
subject either as an elective or for certain requirements in junior and 
senior years. 

76 



Freshman Year 

common to all curricula of t^« ^oUege. lis purp agriculture 

an opportunity to lay a ^^1^:^X1^^^^ ^ToUege with that 
and the related sciences, to articulate ^^""'"^ . onportunity for wise 

^r^z ^^^^^^^^. ^rs:ir t: 

Xe 'of the university with little or - - o^ cr^^t 

Students entering the fresl^man year ^^^^^^ff ,^^^"3^^";;" counsel as to 
in mind are ^rl}-^-^f^^:J^:^Ttt^rst^^Volnt of their 
the wisest selection of * '^«^^^^, ,7"\^^^^^^ programs. Students entering 
special interests and their Probable ^^^^^ P^°f ^j^^ ^^ who are unde- 
tL freshman year ^t::^^^^^:^^^ SVe choice of fresh- 
cided, are assigned to general ^^^^i^^^' j"" acquaint them with the 

man electives and during the <=°"f« "^.^^^^Xge ,f Agriculture and in 
opportunit^s in the upper -rncu J m the College^of^ ^g^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ . 

the other divisions of ^le University ^^^J curriculum, he continues 

a student makes no definite choice of * SP«<='^ , beginning of the 

under the guidance of his general adviser and at the begmmng 
LphLore ^ar enters Agriculture (General Curriculum). 

Curriculum for Freshman Year 

Semester 

I II 

4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - - 3 3 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ^ ^ ^ ___ 

General Botany (Bot. If) - " _ 4 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) -^.-■^^- - " ^ i 

ly.or Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) ^ ___ _ 

Freshman Lectures "" 

Elect one of the following: ^ ^ 

Modem Language (French or ^eri^) - -- -^ — 3 3 

-Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) ^ ^ 

Elementary Physics (Phys 3y) - _; "- 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. ^^\^J^^^^^^^^^^ 3 3 

Organization (A. E. 2s) - 

■ , • i„ ;„ qtntistics and Agricultural Chemistry 

«4. ♦/> TKnr^mp the curricula in mhiistk s imw » 
^Students who expect t\J>y^""^/, ^^^ . oo^ 
must be prepared to elect Math. 21f and -s. 



77 



AGRICULTURE 
(General Curriculum) 

rather than a speSauStLel: o/r rulj";*""^^ "^"^^"^ ^ ^--^>- 

« 

Sophomore Year Semester 

Survey and Composition (Eng. 2f 3s) 

Geology (Geol. If) ' ^ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils ls)ZZlZZZ ^ "" 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If). Z "T ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s )Z. __ "~ 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2s) ^ 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. if) ~~ ^ 

Physical or Biological Science* Sequence f T 

S "^ ""• '^ ""• i"^- '• '^^ ^^ Physic^ll^du^ation (Ph^s: ' 

ii.a. 3y or 6y and 8y) ^ 

- -• ~ 2 2 

Junior Year 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. 2s) 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) "" ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ^ ~~ 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s*) T ^ 

Poultry Production (P. H. If) [ ^ 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) ^ ~~ 

Advanced Public Speaking ( Speech "sfTis) "7 f 

Electives . " -^ 2 

: 5 3 

Senior Year 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agrr Engr" 102^^^^ ^ "T 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) ^ ~~ ^ 

Analysis of Farm Business (A. E. 107s) " ^ "" 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f)..... "~ * 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed 110s) ^ "~" 

Electives — 3 

' 6 6 



15 



15 



78 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

In the field of Chemistry there is an opportunity for one properly trained 
in the biological sciences and appreciative of the chemical aspects of agri- 
culture. The following curriculum is intended primarily to insure adequate 
instruction in the fundamentals of both the physical and biological sciences. 
It may be adjusted through the selection of electives to fit the student for 
work in agriculture experiment stations, soil bureaus, geological surveys, 
food laboratories, industries engaged in the process of handling food 
products and the fertilizer industries. 

The outline calls for five years of study. The completion of four years 
of this outline leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. By the proper 
use of electives in the fourth year and the continuation of this course of 
study for the fifth year and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, the 
student may qualify for the Master's degree. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Survey and Composition (Eng. 2f, 3s) „ 3 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) _ 4 4 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) 3 — 

Farm Organization (A. E. 2s)... — 3 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) „ 3 3 

Electives ( Biology) _ - _ „ 4 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „ „ 2 2 

19 19 

Junior Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) „ 2 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 2 2 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) _ 4 • 4 

Modem Language - 3 3 

Geology (Geol. If): 3 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 3 

Electives ( Biology ) _ 3 3 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y) 3 3 

Modem Language 3 3 

Electives ( Biology ) .- - 3 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) ~ - 4 4 

Electives - ^ 3 



16 



79 



16 



Fifth Year 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) o 

l^rganic Laboratory (Chem. 117y) " " 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (ChemrilSy) \ 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) I 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) I 

Electives (Chemistry) ^ 

Electives (Biology) "^ "~Z ^ 

o 



Semester 



2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFe'' '" 

ihe objectives of the curricula in Agricultural F.ii,/.of; .i . 

of secondary vocational agriculture tS worrit ^''' ^^' *'^'^^"^ 

lines of the rural educatiof ^rvTce ''"'''^ ^^""''' ^"^ ^"^^^ 

riculum B is LstTd f.r ^"^ T ^"^"^ "^ ^"^^ instruction. C^r- 

Maryland high schools CnrnV,,!., ^ ^picuiture of the type offered in 

of pursuin/beitTng aScuSrc™ T t tt"/ "' ^'^ "^"^^^^^^^ 
college course Dermit, v,L f„ courses n the first two years of his 

tunity to lay a broacT founSn f .f '^ °°'' ^"^ °*^^''^ ''^ ^^ «>PPor- 
the last two college years ' ^''""''*^ "°^^ '" agriculture of 

quired adequate farm exDerifmpI !ff ? , ^^<J«n<=e o^ having ac- 

Students with S averages unn^ k!^'^'"^ '^^ ^^" °* ^""^^t^^" y«^«- 
quirements in thesT curricuL w^ ^ T "^^^ ^" "^^'"^"** »^ ^^^^t^^" ^e- 
either through experience or thJ^n^^ '''"''' "' P''^^^"*^^ «1>°^"& that 
non-es.ntiaf. or t^Ty ^e ^S ^^J^^^g^^r"''-- ^ 

Curriculum A o 

Sophomore Year * bemester 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) _ ^ ^^ 

Introductory Entomology (Eht. Is) ^ — 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) Z". "" ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) ^ "~ 

Geology (Geol. If)... ~~ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) ..I....1I ^ "" 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If, 2s) ~~ ^ 

General Horticulture (Hort. lf)..l [ " I ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ 57s) ^ "~ 

"'?: o; ?ylnd-8i?- ' "'' """ ^y^<^^'^^^^oniV^s:^ ~ . ' 

2 2 



Junior Year / 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 3 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) 3 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) — 

Poultry Production (P. H. If) 3 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) — 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2s) _ — 

General Horticulture (Hort. 2s) — 

General Shop (Ind. Ed. 167y) 1 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) 2 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f ) „ „ 3 

Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107s) _ — 

15 
Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) .....> 3 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) — 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf, 102s) 1 

The High School (Ed. 103s) — 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f) 3 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) — 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112s) — 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) 1 

Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114s) — 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120y) _ 2 

Electives - 2 

15 
Curriculum B. 

Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) , 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) - — 

Geology (Geol. If) ~ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) ^ - — 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s) _ 3 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If) 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) „ — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - -...- 2 

♦Electives ~ '.. - 3 



17 



// 



3 
2 
3 
1 
2 



17 



3 
1 
3 

3 
1 

1 
3 



15 



3 
3 



2 
3 

17 



80 



17 



17 



*If Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) is not elected in the freshman year, it mnst be 
elected in the sophomore year. 

81 



Semester 
Junior Year / // 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 3 — 

General Shop (Ind. Ed. 167y) _ 1 l 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) 2 2 

Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107s) — 3 

Electives 11 li 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) 3 — 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf, 102s) _ 1 1 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) — 3 

The High School (Ed. 103s) _ — 3 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f ) 3 — 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) — 3 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112s) — 1 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) 1 — 

Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114s) — 1 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120y) „ 2 3 

13 15 

Electives in Curriculum B to be as follows : 

Advanced Animal and Dairy Husbandry 6 hours 

Advanced Agricultural Economics, Farm Management 6 hours 

Advanced Agronomy ^ 6 hours 

Advanced Poultry 6 hours 

Subjects of Special Interest _ - 4 hours 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department of Agricultural Engineering offers to students of 
agriculture training in those agricultural subjects which are based upon 
engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped under three heads: 
farm machinery and motors, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modem tendency in farming is to reduce production costs by the 
use of farm machinery units of efficient size and design. In many cases 
horses are being replaced by tractors. Trucks, automobiles, stationary 
engines and electrical equipment are found on almost all farms. It is 
highly advisable that the student of any branch of agriculture have a 
working knowledge of the design, adjustments, and repair of these machines. 

More than one-fourth of the total value of Maryland farms is represented 
by the buildings. The study of the design of various buildings, from the 
standpoint of economy, sanitation, efficiency, and appearance, is, therefore, 
important. 

82 



Subjects included in the study of drainage are as follows: the principles 
of land drainage, the design and construction of tile drain systems and 
open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE— ENGINEERING 

For those students who wish to specialize in the application of engineering 
principles to the physical and biological problems of agriculture there is 
offered a combined program, extending over a five-year period, arranged 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineermg, and 
leading to a degree from each of these Colleges. 

Graduates from such a program should be prepared to enter State, Fed- 
eral or commercial fields of activity in such work as soil and water con- 
servation, rural electrification, design and sales of farm machinery and 
structures, and in the development of new uses for farm products and the 
profitable utilization of farm wastes and by-products. 

To be properly trained in these fields a student should have a broader 
knowledge of basic and applied engineering principles than could be pro- 
vided in a four-year course in agriculture. He would also need a broader 
training in the fundamentals of agriculture than a standard four-year 
course in engineering could furnish. 

All students electing the five-year combined program follow the same 
curriculum for the first year. At the end of the first year they decide 
whether their final objective is a degree in Qvil, Electrical, Mechanical, or 

Chemical Engineering. ^ t> i. i 

Upon completion of the required course of study the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Agriculture is granted at the end of the fourth year. For the 
fifth year the student registers in the College of Engineering, and at the 
end of that year receives his degree in Civil, Electrical, Mechamcal or 
Chemical Engineering from that College. 

Curriculum 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - ^ 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math 21f, 22s) -- 4 

General Chemistry ( Chem. ly ) ^ 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If ) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) - ~~ 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) •- - ~~ 

Introduction to Engineering (Etigr. If) - 1 

Introductory Zoology (Zool. 2f) - ^ 

Introductory Botany (Bot. 2s) - ^ 

Agriculture Freshman Lectures -• •"""- --■ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) - - - 



// 
8 
1 

4 
4 

2 
1 



19 



19 



83 



The remainder of this curriculum is for the student whose objective at 
the end of the fifth year, is a degree in Civil Engineering. Similar curricula 
will be arranged for options in Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical Engi- 
neering. 



Sophomore Year — Civil Engineering Option / 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) _ _ 2 

Calculus (Math. 23y) " 4 

General Physics ( Phy s. 2y ) 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. M) _ _ _ 2 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) > 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) 2 

Geology (Geol. If) _ _ ZZIZ 3 

Elective in Agriculture 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „ _ 2 



20 
Junior Year — Civil Engineering Option 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) l 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) 5 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) — 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) _ 4 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) _ _ i 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ „ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 

Electives in Agriculture ^ _ 3 



17 



// 

4 
5 

3 
3 



20 



3 

3 

5-6 

16-17 



84 



Semester 
Fourth Year — Civil Eyigineering Option I II 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) _ — 4 

Principles of Mechanical Engineering (M. E. 112f) 3 — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) — 3 

Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) 3 — 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) _...._ — 5 

Biological Statistics (Stat, lllf) 2 — 

Advanced Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) „ — 2 

Farm Buildings (Agr. Engr. 105f) 2 — 

Gasoline Engines and Tractors (Agr. Engr. 102s) — 3 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) - 3 — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) 3 — 

Technical Society - „ ~ — — 

16 17 

Fifth Year — Civil Engineering Option 

The curriculum for the fifth year is the senior year curriculum in civil 
engineering, without change, as shown under College of Engineering. 

AGRONOMY 

In the Department of Agronomy are grouped the courses in farm crops, 
soils, and plant breeding. 

The curriculum in farm crops aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register for sub- 
jects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular 
farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well 
fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, for em- 
ployment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State or 
Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The division of soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to 
take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The division pos- 
sesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especially 
in the pot culture laboratories, and on the experimental fields at the station 
and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves to 
teach soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment 

85 



I 



stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Plant Industrv anH fh^ 
Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States DeparlSnt of IgriSlture 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year Semester 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) _ { ^^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) ~ "I 

Geology (Geol. If) "~ ^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) II. ^ "^ 

-Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem! 12Ay) T ^"o 

*E]ements of Organic Laboratory (Chem 12By) i 7 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys" Ed 
t5y or 6y and 8y) 

Select from following: 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 

Agriculture (Any course under 100) 2-4 2-4 

13-15 13-17 

_ Crops IHvision 

Junior Year 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 

Technology of Crop Quality ( Agronll02f ) o ^r ^ '" 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) T ~~ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s)...II t T 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 _ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) __ 

• 1 11 

Senior Year ^^ ^^ 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f) 2 __ 

Advanced Genetics (Gen. 102s) __ 9 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) IIII^^^^^^ 3 _ 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) — . 2 

Selected Crop Studies (Agron. 104f, 105s) I.. i_2 i_2 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) 3 __ 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) III.III. 3 — 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) _ 9 

Farm Forestry (For. 101s) _ ~ " __ ^ 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) „ ^ -..ZIIIIII 3 _ 

Electives „.... ^ 

1 6 



16-17 15-16 

*Under certain conditions a sequence in biology may be sub.stituted for Organic Chemistry. 

86 



Soils Division 



Semester 



Junior Year I 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 

Soil Management (Soils 102 s) -.... — 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 

Electives - 6 



// 

2 
3 

3 

8 



16 
Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) - 3 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) » — 

Soil Geography ( Soils 103f ) „ 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) ~ — 

Soil Conservation (Soils 112s) — 

Electives 10 



16 



2 
3 
9 



16 16 

ANIMAL AND DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Modem dairy cattle, horse, beef cattle, and sheep bams have been com- 
pleted on a site adjacent to the University campus. These up-to-date 
facilities, with choice herds and flocks, together with improvements that 
have been made in the dairy manufacturing plant, add materially to the 
equipment for instruction and research in animal and dairj- husbandr>\ 

The Department of Animal and Dairy Husbandry offers thorough instruc- 
tion in the selection, breeding, feeding, management, and marketing of dairy 
cattle, horses, beef cattle, sheep, and swine, and in the processing and sale 
of milk and milk products, meat, and wool. 

The curriculum in animal and dairy husbandry permits specialization and 
allows considerable latitude in the election of courses in other departments. 
Courses in accounting, soil fertility and crops, agricultural economics and 
marketing, bacteriology, botany, agricultural education, entomology, ge- 
netics and statistics, farm buildings and drainage, horticulture, physiological 
chemistry, physics, poultry, and veterinary medicine are among the support- 
ing courses most strongly recommended for majors in animal and dairy 
husbandry. 

Students satisfactorily majoring in animal and dairy husbandry are well 
equipped for general livestock and dairy cattle farming, to become County 
Agricultural Agents, for employment by commercial concerns, and for 
instructional and investigational work in colleges and experiment stations. 

Students who wish to enter teaching or research work in agricultural 
colleges or the U. S. Department of Agriculture are urged to continue their 
studies as graduate students in some specific phase of research work in the 
Experiment Station, supported by the proper courses. 

87 



Animal Husbandry 

The curriculum for the sophomore, junior, and senior years is sue 
S Et:-^^^ for students wishing to major in the animThusbandf; 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year Semester 

J ' // 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12 By) 1 f 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2s) 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. 2s) I".. H \ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) [ ZI~1 4 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) __ "T 

Geology (Geol. If) _ ^ 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) 3 ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) " __ 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys.Ed73y or 

6y and 8y) 90 

Electives '■ ^ ^ 

^ — 

17 16 

Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 2 

Breeds of Horses and Beef Cattle (A. H. lOOf) " 2 — 

Breeds of Sheep and Swine (A. H. 101s) __ o 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) « __ 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) _ T 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) " „ 

Livestock Markets and Marketing (A. H. lllf )^. 2 ~ 

Livestock Management (A. H. 105s) 1 " __ 

Livestock Judging (A. H. 107s) "" _ 

Electives 

" 4 5 

16 16 

Senior Yea/r 

Beef Cattle and Horse Production (A. H. 109f) 3 

Sheep and Swine Production (A. H. 110s) 3 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 113f) ~ 3 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) ~ 3 

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (V. S. lOlf) 3 

Animal Hygiene (V. S. 102s) , L.Z.I.. __ 3 

Electives 4 2^ 



16 



88 



16 



Dairy Husbandry 

The Department of Dairy Husbandry oifers two major lines of work; 
dairy production and dairy manufacturing. The dairy production option 
is organized to meet the requirements of students wishing to major in 
dairy cattle farming and in the production and sale of market milk. 

Dairy Production 

The curriculum for the sophomore, junior, and senior years is sug- 
gested as a guide for students majoring in dairy production. Some 
electives from dairy manufacturing, animal husbandry, and veterinary 
science will be helpful. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Sophomore Year / // 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12 By) „ 1 1 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If, 2s) _ _ 3 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

(ieology (Geol. If) ^ 3 ' — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 6 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) „ — 8 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education (3y or 

6y and 8y ) „ 2 2 



15 

Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 3 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) — 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) 3 

Dairy Cattle Management (D. H. 106f, 107s) _ 3 

Dairy Cattle Judging (D. H. 103s) -- 

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (V. S. lOlf) 3 

Animal Hygiene (V. S. 102s) — 

History and Geography of Dairying (D. H. 108f) 2 

16 

Senior Year 

Dairy Cattle Feeding and Herd Management (D. H. lOlf ) 3 

Dairy Breeds and Breeding (D. H. 105s) ^ — 

Market Milk (D. H. 113f) „....- 5 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f ) 3 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 113f) 3 

Electives 3 



16 

2 
3 

3 

8 
2 



16 



14 



17 



16 



89 



Dairy Manufacturing 

nerds\T*twi"t''^.'"/"'^^*"""^ ^" ^^''^^^ to 'neet the particular 
needs of those interested in the processing and distribution of milk in 

JX^wr"'"" ""' management, and in the manufacture and s^ o? 
butter, cheese, ice cream, and other milk products. The cu^iculum fnr 

"mrrt r"^' '"'.""^^.^ ''''' '^ ^"^^-t«^ forl'denTwt wSh 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year Semester 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) i "o 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12 By) i T 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4s) " ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) ~ ^ 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. If72s)" t ~l 

Elementary Physics (Physics 3y) ^ "* 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys Ed" ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) ^ ^* „ 

Electives 2 2 

■■" 1 1 

Junior Yea/r ^^ 
History and Geography of Dairying (D. H. 108f ) o 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) ^ "" 

Dairy Products Bacteriology (Bact. 102s) ~ __ ~ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) " __ 

Grading Dairy Products (D. H. 115s).. ^ 

Dairy Mechanics (D. H. 116s) "" ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) " „ ^ 

Cheese Making (D. H. 109f) ^ ^ 

Butter Making (D. H. llOf) Z ~~ 

Concentrated Milks (D. H. Ills) ~" 

Ice Cream Making (D. H. 112s) 3 ^ 

Electives ... ^ 

Senior Year ^^ 1^ 

Market Milk (D. H. 113f) 

Analysis of Dairy Products (D. H. 114s) _ "7 

Dairy Accounting (D. H. 117s) ___ ^ 

Dairy Plant Experience (D. H. 121f, 122s) o ! 

Dairy Literature (D. H. 119f, 120s) " f ] 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) ^ 

■' 5 10 



90 



16 



16 



BACTERIOLOGY 

This department has been organized with two main purposes in view. 
The first is to give all students of the University an opportunity to obtain 
a general knowledge of this basic subject. The second is to prepare 
students for bacteriological positions (including those of dairy, sanitary, 
food, and soil bacteriologists; and federal, state, and municipal bacteriolo- 
gists) ; and for public health work of various types, research, and indus- 
trial positions. Freshmen planning to major in Bacteriology should elect 
Mathematics in the first year. 

General Bacteriology 

Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) _ 1 1 

German or French -....- 3 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) _ 4 — 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2s) — 4 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) - 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 2 2 

Electives ~ — - — 3-4 3—4 

17-18 17-18 
Junior Year 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) - _ 4 — 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112s) — 3 

Serology (Bact. 115f) - 4 — 

Advanced Methods (Bact. 113s) - — 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 4 

Electives ( Bacteriology ) „ — 2-4 

Electives (Other) „ -....„ 3-5 2-6 

15-17 15-17 
Senior Year 

Biological Statistics (Stat, lllf) „ 2 — 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s) — 4 

Journal Club (Bact. 131f, 132s) 1 1 

Electives ( Bacteriology ) 5-6 4-2 

Electives (Other) > „ - 6-9 6-10 



15-17 15-17 

Food Technology 

This curriculum offers combinations of courses that will equip the student 
with an unusually broad knowledge of the many aspects involved in food 
manufacture. In the curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals 

91 



of biology, chemistry, and engineering which, when supported by the 
proper electives and by practical experience, will serve as an excellent 
background for supervisory work in food factory operation, salesmanship, 
research in the food industries, etc. 

The freshmen will enroll for the common curriculum of the Freshman 
Year as shown for the College of Agriculture, and will elect Elements of 
College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s). The course in Reading and Speaking 
(Speech ly) may be postponed until the junior or senior years. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Sovhoinore Year I II 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) 2 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (diem. 8By) 2 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - _ - 4 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) 2 — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) - — 4 

Electives „ 5 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ay or 6y and By) _ _ 2 2 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Quantitative Chemistry (Chem. 4f) 4 — 

Refrigeration (M. E. 106s) _ _ — 3 

Food Bacteriology (Bact. lllf) „ 3 — 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112s) — 3 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. 103Ay) 2 2 

Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 103By) 1 1 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch. E. 103y) 3 3 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. Is) _ — 3 

Electives 3-4 1-2 



16-17 

Senior Year 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) 3 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 121s) — 

Food Analysis (Chem. 115y) _ „ 2 

Technology Ck)nference (F. Tech. 130y) _ _ 1 

Regulatory Control (F. Tech. llOf) 1 

Food Sanitation (F. Tech. 120s) _ — 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) _ 5 

Electives 4-5 



16-17 



3 
2 
1 

2 

5 

3-4 



ie-17 16-17 



92 



BOTANY 

The Department of Botany offers three major fields of work: general 
boSiy arrSology, plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology^ 
^hrreau^reTcourses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same 

Through cooperation with the College of Education, f "^^''^^j]'" .^'^*° 
S the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates may 

^^?hf :ur=^ rrtSn^rCa good foundation for students who 
wilh to pursue graduate work in botanical science - jreP^a^^-n fo. o^" 
leee teaching and for research in state experiment stations in the Uniteo 
sTa'erDepaftment of Agriculture, and in private research institutions and 

'"xJf "curriculum also affords students an opportunity for training for 
other vocaSons involving various botanical applications, such as extension 
work and positions with seed companies, canning companies, companies 
making spray materials, and with other commercial concerns. 

Curricula 

General Botany and Morphology, Physiology, and Pathology 

Semester 

I II 
Sophomore Year , 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) _ ^ 

Local Flora (Bot. 4s) — " ^ 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) • :•; •:"■•" " „ « 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) -■.. ^ ^ 

* Modern Language £ 

BS''KO.'T.Cr(M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) _ _ 

16 16 
General Botany and Morphology, and Plant Physiology 

Junior Year ^ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) -•■- ^ ^ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) _ g 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) _ ^ 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107s) ^ ^ 

Electives 

16 16 

_.,!-„.! T* it U not bceun until the sophomore 

•Twelve hours of modern language are required. H it is not Degu 

rear, the last six hours will be elected in the junior or senior year. 

93 



I 



Semester 
Senior Year I II 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 3 — 

Botanical Electives (Maximum) 7 10 

Other Electives (Minimum) _ _ 6 6 



16 

Plant Pathology 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf ) 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) 1 

Research Methods (Pit. Path. 104s) _ — 

Electives 6 

17 

Senior Year 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) — 

Mycology (Pit. Path. 108f) _ _ 4 

Plant Anatomy (Bot. lOlf) 3 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) _ 3 

Diseases of Fruits (Pit. Path. lOlf) or Diseases of Garden 

and Field Crops (Pit. Path. 102s) _ 2 

Electives _ 4-6 



16 



ENTOMOLOGY 



16 



4 
3 
2 
1 
2 
3 

15 



or 2 
11-13 

16 



This department is engaged in the teaching of entomology to all agri- 
cultural students as a basis for future work in pest control, in the prepara- 
tion of technically trained entomologists, and in offering courses to students 
in Arts and Sciences and Education. 

The success of the farmer, particularly the fruit and vegetable grower, 
is in large measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of pre- 
venting or combating pests. Successful methods of control are emphasized 
in the economic courses. 

The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
Extension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the State Entomologist 
are in one administrative unit enables the student to avail himself of the 
many advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students may be assigned 

94 



various fields of entomology, to ^^^^f^^ J^^^'^^^^^^ Following is the 

tions, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology, ro b 

suggested curriculum in entomology: 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) - 

Insect Morphology (Ent. 2s) •-- •;•"*;■: 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) - 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. liKy) 

Modem Language (French or German) 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) -••-•-"r "-• "i '.'iZZ'Z^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Ph>s. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - - - 



Semester 



I 

3 

2 
1 
3 

4 



2 
15 



// 

S 
2 
1 
3 



2 
15 



Junior Year 

Insect Taxonomy (Ent. 3f ) - _ 

Insect Biology (Ent. 5s) - ^ 

tEconomic Entomology (Ent. lOly) - - - ^ 

Modern Language (French or German) ^ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) " " ^_^ 

Electives — *" 



3 — 

3 

2 2 

3 

4 

4-5 



16-17 16-17 



Senior Yea/r ^r.» ^ % 

Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 103f, 104s) 3 

Seminar (Ent. 112y) - - — " - g 

Special Problems (Ent. llOf and s) - - -^^^ 

Electives - 



3 
1 
2 

10-11 



16-17 16-17 



This curriculum is based on the option of mathematics in the freshman 
yel^ whl^riect should be elected by ^^udents el^tm^^^^^^ 
entomology. Students electing another course will have to make certain 
changes in the sequenx^e of some of the required courses. 



tCourses taken in alternate years by both iuniors and seniors. 

95 



FARM MANAGEMENT* 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental train- 
ing in the basic economic principles underlying farming. While the cur- 
riculum is developed primarily from the viewpoint of farm management, 
sufficient basic courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, finance, 
and land economics are included to give the student the foundation needed to 
meet the production and distribution problems confronting the individual 
farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of fann 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and operat- 
ing the farm as a business enterprise. It requires not only knowledge of 
many factors involved in the production of crops and animals, but also 
administrative ability to coordinate them into the most efficient farm 
organization. Such knowledge enables the student to perceive the just 
relationship of the several factors of production and distribution as applic- 
able to local conditions, and to develop an executive and administrative 
capacity. 

Students well trained in farm management are in demand for county 
agent work, farm bureau work, positions with farm organizations and 
private business concerns, experiment station or United States Government 
investigation, and college teaching. 



Curriculum 



Semester 



Sophomore Year / 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) _ 2 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 

General Horticulture (Hort. If) » 3 

Geology ( Geol. If) _ _ 3 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2s) ^ — 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „ _ 2 



16 



// 
2 
3 
3 



3 

2 
3 



18 



♦students electing the Farm Management curriculum must present evitlence of having 
acquired at least one year of practical farm experience. 



96 



Semester 

I II 
Junior Year ^ 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) ^ 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) - ^ ^ 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107s) - ^ __ 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. I02f) ^ 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) ^ 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) ^ ^ 

Electives - - - " 

15 15 

Senior Year ^ 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) ^ __ 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f ) - ^ ^ 

Farm Finance (A. E. 104s) - __ g 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) - - ^ __ 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) __ ^ 

Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) - - ^ _ 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf ) ^ 

Prices of Farm Products (A. E. 106s) - ^ ^ 

Electives 

16 16 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 
Rapid accumulation of knowledge in the field of genetks has changed 
the viewpoint of those interested in plant and animal breedmg and m 

'"E Department of Genetics offers students training in the principles of 
heredity and presents results of the application of these prmciples m plant 

and animal improvement. 

Statistics 

Teachers and investigators have increasing occasion to interpret statis- 
tical data presented by others, as well as to gather and organize origmal 

'''xhe' D^epartment of Statistics offers students training in the tools and 
methods employed in statistical description, induction, and design. 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - 

Calculus (Math. 23y ) -••- - ^ ^ 

German or French - - ^ 

Electives - ~ "" 

Basic R. o7 T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. ^ 

Ed. 3 y or 6 y and 8 y) -"- ^ __^ 

16 16 

97 



Semester 

Junior Year 1 // 

Higher Algebra (Math. 141f) 2 -- 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f) _ 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) _ 4 4 

♦Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 — 

♦Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) — 3 

♦Biological Statistics (Stat, lllf) 2 — 

♦Advanced Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) — 2 

Electives 3 7 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Advanced Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 145f) 2 — 

Theory of Equations (Math. 151f) 2 ^ 

Statistical Design (Stat. 116s) — 2 

Problems (Stat. 120) — 4 

Electives - - - 12 10 



16 



16 



HORTICULTURE 

The State of Maryland and other States offer many excellent oppor- 
tunities in horticultural industries; large fruit enterprises, producing apples, 
peaches, strawberries, raspberries, and other fruits for domestic and foreign 
markets; extensive greenhouse establishments, growing flowers and vege- 
tables; canning and preserving factories in vegetable and fruit areas; nur- 
series, propagating trees and plants of all kinds; and concentrated farming 
areas devoted to vegetable production for market and canning. These in- 
dustries require men with a specialized knowledge of production and mar- 
keting phases of the horticultural crops which are produced. 

The Department of Horticulture offers instruction in pomology (fruits), 
olericulture (vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening 
to meet the demand for men in the several horticultural industries, and in 
related work as teachers, county agents, fruit inspectors, and scientific in- 
vestigators in private and public research laboratories, including special 
horticultural workers with fertilizer companies, seed companies, machinery- 
companies, and related industries. 

Students in horticulture have considerable latitude in the selection of 
horticultural courses, but usually find it advisable to specialize by electing 
all of the courses offered in pomology, olericulture, or floriculture, accord- 
ing to the suggested curricula. Students who wish to specialize in land- 
scape architecture will be given an opportunity to secure certain basic 
courses in the cumculum for ornamental horticulture, but must plan to 
spend additional time at another institution where a complete landscape 
curriculum is offered. 



• Elect two. 



98 



ThP department is equipped with several greenhouses and a modeni 

,^LSST^L,, JthTaboratories and cold storage rooms f^^^^^^^^^^^ 

nltural teaching and research. Extensive acreage near the University is 

!. nt^ to the Growing of fruit trees and vegetable crops. An arboretum 

S maiy —Tafplants has been started on the University grounds for 

hose Crests liT the general scientific field or those who are preparing 
t worirt-lln^^^^^ lines' The object is to fit students most effectively to 
fill positions of several types. 

Curricula 
Pomology and Olericulture Semester^ 

Sophomore Year ^ — 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) ^ __ 

Geology (Geol. If) -■-■ ■- — 3 __ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. bit) ^ ^ 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) - 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) - ^ ^^^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) - ^ ^ 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s) ^ 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) - -- ■■• ~ "■; — "" 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. ^ ^ 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y)-- _ ___ 

17 17-19 

Junior Year ^ 

Fruit Production (Hort. 3f, 4s) __ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) __ 2,3 

Small Fruits ( Hort. 8s ) * ___ 2_4 

Vegetable Production (Hort. 5s) -^ 77^' "S"'" 

Diseases of Fruits (Pit. Path. lOlf) or Diseases of Garden ^^ ^ 

and Field Crops (Pit. Path. 102s) - __ ^ 

*World Fruits and Nuts (Hort. 106s) - ^^^ ^^ 

Electives - - " " 

16-17 16-18 

Senior Year ^ 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) -" " ~. "nor. in^f 

Technology of Horticultural Plants (Hort. lOlf, 102s; 103f, ^ ^ 

nnsect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 103f, 104s) 3 3 

Seminar (Hort. Illy) "" -"■ ";: Z^Z^";'":."Z, 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 109f ) or Systematic Olericulture 

(Hort. llOf), or Farm Management (A. E. 10«t) o ^ 

Electives - - 

15 16 

♦Courses given in alternate years. 

d9 



It 



♦' 



Sophomore Fea/'""'"""'* '"•* Ornamental Horticulture Semester 

Geologry (Geol. If) ^ U 

Local Flora (Bot. 4s) Z~'Z ^ — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) ~" ^ 

General Horticulture (Hort 'if) " ^ 2 

Elect from the following courses: ^ ^ 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) 

Landscape Gardening (Hort. llf) " ~" 4 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y).... ^ — 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) " " " ^ 3 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path If) ^ —' 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ 57s) ^ ~~ 

Introductory Entomology (Ent Is) ~~ ^ 

- - — 3 

Junior Year ~Z 

(warden Flowers (Hort. 9f) 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) ^ — 

*Plant Materials (Hort. 107y).. "~" ^ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 10lf)~.' ** ^ 2 

Elect from the following courses: " ^ "~ 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 

Vegetable Production (Hoi^tr'ss) " ^ ^ 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 6f, 7s") ~ ^ 

■'Civic Art (Hort. 14s) _ 3 3-4 

Landscape Design (Hort!T2fri"3s) "" ~~ 2 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 10y)....I..I ^ ^ 

Senior Year 16 16 

Seminar (Hort. Illy) 

Special Problems (Hort 112y)- " ^ ^ 

T^ogy of Horticultural F^^r(HorCio5ti:::::z:::: \ i 

H 13 

Botany, Economics, Genetics, StaStks X^^ Agricultural Engineering, 
Plant Pathology, Speech, kglLh BusSS ^>fj'^^^^f ' Bacteriology, 
Languages, Fine Arts, or Education Administration, Modern 

^Courses given only in alternate years. 

tSuch electives are advised for all students in Horticulture. 

100 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry 
improvement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The poultry industry of Maryland ranks second to dairying in economic 
importance among the agricultural industries of the State. Nearby markets 
provide a profitable outlet for poultry products of high quality in larger 
volume than now produced in the State. The necessary quality can be 
attained by intelligent, trained poultry husbandmen. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. For example, most students will be expected to take 
the courses in Agricultural Industry and Resources and Farm Organization 
offered in the general curriculum for the freshman year. Superior students, 
definitely anticipating preparation for a professional career in poultry hus- 
bandry, will be expected to take language instead. However, all students 
concentrating in poultry husbandry will be required to complete 24 semester 
hours in poultry husbandry. 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Poultry Production (P. H. If) 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 
Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 



Semester 

1 II 
3 — 

— 3 

2 2 

2 2 



Elect one of the following: 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay and 12By)) 
Economics (Econ. 57f and A. E. 102s) J 

Elect two of the following: 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) _ , 3-3' 

Modem Language (French or German) 3-3 

Introductory Entomology and Insect Biology (Ent. If, 



5s) 



3-3 



Agriculture (D. H. If or A. H. 2s) 3-2 

or (Agron. If, 2s) 3-3 

or (Hort. If and 5s) 3^3 



6 



6 



16 



16 



101 



f! 



I 



Junior Year 

Poultry Biology (P. H. 3f) 

Poultry Genetics (P. H. 101s) 

Poultry Nutrition (P. H. 102s).. 

Poultry Physiology (P. H. 106f) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 

Farm Finance (A. E. 104s) 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 

Elect one of the following: 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s). 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2s) 

Economics (Econ. 57f and A. E. 102s) or 

Electives 

Farm Buildings (Agr. Engr. 105f) 



Semester 



I 

2 



2 

4 



// 

3 
2 



3 — 



= :!- 



3 
2 



4 

3-4 



16 15-16 



Senior Year 

Poultry Products (P. H. 104f, 105s) „ 2-2 

Poultry Hygiene (V. S. 107s) _ —2 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (P. H. 107f) 2 — 

Commercial Poultry Management (P. H. 108s) — 2 

Biological Statistics ( Stat, lllf ) 

Advanced Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) 

Rural Sociology ( Soc. 102f ) „ _ : 

Preservation of Poultry Products (Bact. 108s) 

Electives 



2 
3 

7 
16 



2 
6 

16 



SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students who are not candidates for degrees may, with consent 
of the dean, register as special students and pursue a program of studies 
not included in any regular curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs 
of the individual. In case such persons have not fulfilled the regular col- 
lege entrance requirements, they may arrange to audit (to attend without 
"credit") certain of the agricultural classes. All university fees for these 
special students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrange- 
ments have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them 
permission to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different de- 
partments. This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit- 
growers, gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to 
get away from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are *$5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour 
per month for the time of attendance. 



*One registration is good for any anioiint of regular or intennittent attendance during 
a period of four years. 

102 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is tj^e -eart a.ency of the 
university, dealing -^l^^^^^i:^;':^^ ^^^^ns. Th'e'pederal 
Sratl^St'^t^^TlSSTt Mams aS 1906; Pumell Act. 1925; 

and Bankhead-Jones Act, 1935. , , c a tx.^ 

The Hatch Act established State Experiment Stations and defined the 
^P and tvne of original researches that might be undertaken. In general 

Twork ion undTr'the Hatch and Adams funds pertains to *« PhysKal 

H hioloffical sciences and promotes a better understandmg of plants and 
and '''"l^S'cal sciences J ^^ investigations and 

'TrltntrhavS^Tto do with manufacture, preparation, use, distribution. 

and research relating to conservation, development, and use of land and 
water resources for agricultural purposes. 

In addition to ^vork conducted at the University, the Station operates 
an exnerimental farm of 50 acres at Ridgely for camiing crops and gram 
«g Tf arm of^O acres at Upper Marlboro for tobacco investigations 
and a trm of 234 acres near Ellicott City for livestock. Reg'^n^l f^f; 
and experiments are conducted in cooperation with farmers at many differ- 
ent nofntsTn the State. Most of these cooperative experiments deal with 

rops sons fertilizers, orchards and insect and plant disease control, and 
serve as checks upon the more detailed and fundamental work done at 
the main Station. 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

ThP Extension Service of the University of Maryland was established 
>, ^Lfe and Federal laws, and is designed to assist farmers and their 
by State ^^d t ederai ' ^ j^^^e of agriculture and rural 

families m promoting tne prospenty o. ^^^r,\t^A states Denart- 

life. Its work is conducted in cooperation with the United btates iJepan 

TL^Et'elTonTervice is represented in each county of the State by a 
coLtv agent and a h:„,e demonstration agent. Through these agens 
and ii st'aff of specialists, it comes into intimate contact with rural people 

and with problems of the farm and home. 

ana witn P agriculture and rural home life comes within 

Practically every phase oi agri supplied vrfth details of crop 

SfmSting problems and assisted in improving economic conditions 

103 



/ 



•f 



satisfying. The 4Taub ZTf ""ft """^^ ^"'"^ "^" ^''^''^''^ and 
able tyne of in<=wr • ^'"'^.^°'' ™'*al ^oys and girls provides a valu 
auic type 01 instruction m aericulturp urtA ^n/^,v,« « • , 

culture It is Ph»rL»H ^.^t""®^ °.^ ^^^ United States Department of Agn- 
AgrSturll AdtuXn^^^^^ in Maryland the program of "tie 

community orga^nizaTns 1n the St^^^^r J* '^T^''^*"' ''''^ ^" ^^^"^ a"" 

the improvement of agricu L^and ru jS ^^^-.''-i^"'' '"^^'''^ ""^'^^^ 
tive the resulatorv .7.T !C ''^^' ^"^ '* ^<*s in making effec- 

Agriilture "^ °*"" "'""'"'""^ '"^*""t«d by the State Board of 

REGULATORY ACTIVITIES 

fac?if;';i7st:75lhr5tr :^T .^^ -^--- o^ -mbers of the 
the reduction of ,1 caused r insetf Testf '/ h'T " *'"^ ^^"^^^' ^™ 
plants, protection of human health by rardintl T" °' ^"'""^'^ ^"-^ 
eases of livestoelc and r.n.,ot^o2' S^t'^' ZTe::r::r'^^^^^^^^^ 

:rerratiirs^ rsfs:;rs^?e7aS ^-^"^^ " -'^' ^^ 

and regulations under which they we^: esSshTd " aX?" f' ""' ^""'^ 

Liv^e!:rssrs:^rs?:te%^^^^^^^^^^ 

enforcement of regulations pertaining to fe^STL^.M ftl ''^ 

with such problems as control and eradication of tuSSs' an^ BanS 
disease of cattle, Japanese beetle, and white pine blister rusT ^ 

demLlTradot^r'' '''''''' f^^ f ««eds and fann products and through 
demonstrations of recognized grades and standards, they contribute to it 
provement in quality and marketing conditions. contribute to im- 



/' 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

L. B. Broughton, Dean, 



104 



The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal training 
in the biological sciences, in economics, history, languages and literatures, 
mathematics, philosophy, the physical sciences, political science, psychology, 
and sociology. It thus affords an opportunity to acquire a general educa- 
tion which will serve as a foundation for whatever profession or vocation 
the student may choose. In particular, it lays the foundation for the pro- 
fessions of dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, teaching, and theology, and 
the more technical professions of engineering, public health service, public 
administration, and business. The College of Arts and Sciences offers to 
the students of the other colleges of the University training in fundamental 
subjects, both classical and scientific, which should permit them to acquire 
the perspective necessary for liberal culture and public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and four Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the following 
departments: 

A. The Division of Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entom- 
ology, Genetics, and Zoology. 

B. The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages and Litera- 
tures, Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Mod- 
ern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

C. The Division of Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics. 

D. The Division of Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 

The work of the first and second years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences is taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student 
a basic general education, and to prepare him for specialization in the 
junior and senior years. 

The Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in the College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and 
senior years, and designate general requirements, the fulfillment of which 
is necessary to qualify a student for admission to major work in an Upper 
Division. 

105 



II 



Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Art.! «nH cj.i„„ 

of r Tf'' *^^""^ '' *°^« ^"^ admission to the It col^es and sTho"," 
of the University. See Section I, Admissions, page 50 '' 

For admission to the premedical curriculum, two years of anv one fnr.i 
language are required. A detailed statem;nt of the requLments f 
admission to the School of Medicine and the relation of SsTto the nr. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the requirements nrp 
loTof Si;':.'^""^^^ "' ^^' ^"'^ ^"^"- -« ^-•^^'^ o^ Art'sTdta^h:: 

thf DtTsiL^'of^H '""T "^° ^.^^" '^"'"P'"*"'^ tJ^^ ^«^"'«r course in either 
the Division of Humanities or the Division of Social Sciences are awardpH 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Any student who has met th? requirement 

major portion of the work has been done in the field of science and the 

vr trbetr^^^eT^^^' '' ''' -'-- ^-« ^" whic"h th:"iro: 

JdXlT- "^^^ ^^? ''''*'*^ *' '=°'"'''"^** P"^^^*" of Arts and Sciences 
compfe ?on of TtTeast fr'^' '"' '/^""^^ ^' ^^^'^^'''^ ^' «-»- ^t *" 
ThtSoo. o^Medfcine"' '''" "' "°^' '" ^"^'^ ^""^^^ ^"'' ^^^ «-* ^-^ 
Those electing the combined five-year Academic and Nursing curriculum 
for which the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing X be awarded 

aT Col geXtbef" "'.f i"" ^""^^' """^^ ^^'^^ '"^^ PreLSgtrrruum 
at College Park before the Nursing Course in Baltimore. 

BalLfoVol' Arts d'e^'r'^'f.'' ?."" '" ^^' ^"^ ^^^ ^^^ ''^ ^-^ed the 
aacftelor of Arts degree after the completion of three years of the work of 

Residence 

The last thirty credits of anv curriculum l^pHi'r,^ f u 

Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and S.;«n. 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied fhe L^ing re^qrem^sf '' 

1. University Requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements. 



1. University Requirements — See page 56. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — A minimum of 120 credits 
must be acquired, not including the six credits of basic military science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six credits of physical edu- 
cation for women and for such men as are excused from military science. 

A student must acquire at least 58 credits, exclusive of military science 
and physical education, with an average grade of at least C in the Lower 
Division, before being admitted to an Upper Division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as possi- 
ble, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before 
graduation : 

I. English and Speech — fourteen credits. Of these, Survey and Compo- 
sition I (Eng. ly) and Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) are required. 

II. Foreign Languages and Literatures — twelve credits of one language. 

III. Social Sciences — twelve credits. This requirement is fulfilled by elect- 
ing courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

IV. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — twelve credits. Of these one year 
must be in natural science. 

V. Military Science or Physical Education — six credits. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — At the beginning of the junior year 
each student must select a major in one of the fields of study of an Upper 
Division, and before graduation must complete a major and a minor. The' 
courses constituting the major and the minor selected must conform to the 
requirements of the department in which the major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or a minor the student should have acquired 
twelve credits in fundamental courses in the field chosen, or in a closely 
related field satisfactory to the Division, with an average grade of at least 
C, before credit will be allowed toward completion of the major or minor 
requirements. 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 credits, 
in addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Division, in one of the 
fields of study. Of these credits at least 8 must be acquired in courses listed 
for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 credits, in 
addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Division, in some field of 
study other than the major. At least 6 of these must be acquired in courses 
listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Not more than 15 credits may be acquired in any field of study other than 
the major or minor during the last two years, in addition to those which 
meet the College of Arts and Sciences requirements. 



106 



107 






■*' 



The average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields must 
be at least C. A general average of at least C is required for graduation. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements — 

A. Division of Biological Sciences. See page 112. 

B. Division of Humanities. See page 117. 

C. Division of Physical Sciences. See page 119. 

D. Division of Social Sciences. See page 126. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

If courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective 
high school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with major and 
minor in any of the Upper Divisions of this College. 

The College of Education requires that at least twenty credits must be 
acquired in educational subjects before one can be certified for high school 
teaching. 

Elect Ives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences for work done in other colleges and schools of the 
University. 

The number of credits which may be accepted from the various colleges 
and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture — Fifteen. 

College of Commerce — Fifteen. 

College of Education — Twenty. 

College of Engineering — Fifteen. 

College of Home Economics — Fifteen. 

School of Law — In the combined program the first year of law must be 
completed. 

School of Medicine — In the combined program the first year of medicine 
must be completed. 

School of Nursing — In the combined program the three years of nursing 
must be completed. 

Normal Load 

The normal load for the freshman in this college is sixteen credits per 
semester, including one hour of basic military science or physical education. 

The normal load for the sophomore year is seventeen credits per semester, 
two of which are in military science or physical education. 

The normal load in the junior and senior years is 15 credits per semester. 
With the permission of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 

108 



S'tt-o'Te rrrn7S.'Sl.™.„ », the Dlvi,.o„, « in no e,„ 

shall it exceed 19 credits per semester. 

Advisers 

Freshmen and sophomores in this college .shall --j^^^^^^^^ ^ean of the 
roUese and the Chairman of the Lower Division their advisers. 

% v,ic nniversitv life in which he may need advice, 
sire advice. 



109 







il 






THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White, Chairman. 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare 
him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into 
one of the Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general 
scholastic ability must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major 
study is to be obtained. 

Suggested courses of study for the freshman and sophomore years are 
given under certain of the Upper Divisions. The student should follow 
the curriculum for which he is believed to be best fitted. It will be noted 
that there is a great deal of similarity in these outlines for the first two 
years, and a student need not consider himself attached to any particular 
Upper Division until the beginning of his junior year, at which time it is 
necessary to select a major. 

The Requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for graduation 
as outlined on page 106, should be completed as far as possible in the 
Lower Division. 

TYPICAL FRESHMAN PROGRAM 

Semester 

Required: / I^ 

^Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin, Greek, 

Italian) - - 3 3 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology) 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 1 

Elect from the following so that the total credits each semes- 
ter are 16 or 17: 

A Survey of Western Civilization (H. ly) 3 3 

History of England and Great Britain (H. 3y) 3 3 

Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s; 21f, 22s) 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) 3 — 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) — 8 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If and s) 3 or 3 

*A placement test is given during Registration Week to determine whether the student 
is adequately prepared for Eng. ly. A student failing this test is required to take Eng. A, 
a one-semester course, without credit. After live weeks, he may be transferred from 
Eng. A to Eng. ly, for which he will receive full credit, or from Eng. ly to Eng. A, 
according to his demonstrated ability. 

110 



Semester 

I il 

State and Local Governn^nUPc^ScL^J^) 2:::Z:i:i: Z 2 

Comparative Government (Pol. Sci. »s, ^ i 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 2 - 

SSSiS^^" (co^-^-^ :::::::: 1 or i 

Library Methods (L. S. if and s) ■■■■•■■•-•■;;; ^ ! 

Art (Art If, 3f, 2s, 4s) -^ ■^■■- i/^ to 2 V. to 2 

Music (Mus. ly, 2y, 3y. 4y. 5y) ■•;;■;;; _ i i 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) _ — 

16-17 16-17 



TYPICAL SOPHOMORE PROGRAM 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3— ::::::::i 3 

Foreign Language • ■:Z^cMe^e^ Arts and Sciences ful- 

or 6y and 8y) " — 

17-18 



3 
3 



9-10 
2 
17-18 



111 



A— DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

L. H. James, Chairman, 
The Division of Biological Sciences is organized to stimulate close co- 
duZ tT n "r ^"/^"^'"^^ i" the field of biology. The Division in- 
and Zoology ^^"' °* Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Genetics, 

riculf T^T'^.T*/'*'". *^' °^^^^'"" ^^^ «"« «^ ™«'r« established cur- 
,Tn .^ the demands for technically trained workers in the biological 

al V th?f «1 f *r^ ^'"'■' °^ '=°"^^" ^°^'^- T*^^y P^°^''J«. more specifi- 
cally, the basic knowledge and experience required for (1) teaching in 

secondary schools; (2) research and regulatory work in federal, state an3 

ZarattnT'^^n"*' 7' ''"'•^^"^= ^'^ ^'^™'^^-" *^ ^-^-t- study!; th 
preparation for college teaching and advanced research; and (4) entrance 

to the professional schools of medicine, dentistry, and nursing. 

Instruction 

suR ' of"r w!./''' ^'^^""Tf '''""'"' P*""'""*^ ^" opportunity for the pur- 
suit of a well coordinated program of study. Completion of a suggested 
undergraduate curriculum under any one of the departments fSs the 
requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science Advanced " a so 

sci^rr i^crof'pit^r " "^--^ "^ "^ ^--- ^^ ^"-" 

graduate instruction and experience and the attainment of an advanced 
degree are desirable m preparation for the larger opportunities that arise !n 

h,s rapidly expanding field. The need for workers in the fields of agr" 
culture home economics, industry, public health, etc., presents almost 
unlimited opportunities for specialization and has made it necessarT to 
correlate closely the undergraduate courses in this DMs^^n S tho : 
offered in the Graduate School in order to equip the advanced stuS 
adequately m his own work and in related fields 

A special curriculum in General Biological Science is presented primarily 
for those interested in teaching biological science or general sd^cen 
elementary and high schools. Students in the pre-prffeLfona school" 
who expect to complete their work for the degree of Bachelor of Science 

I'-'\ T""^ '^^ pre-professional curriculum, complete a mSr in 

inTt^/n"*-""'^"* P''°^««^'°"^ ^"d "nes of work for which each department 
the description of each department. 

112 



Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements. See page 56. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. See page 107. 

3. Physical Sciences — Ten semester hours in addition to the twelve re- 
quired by the College of Arts and Sciences, the total to include basic 
courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. 

Fields of Study 

The curriculum outlined in each field of study represents the courses 
which, in the judgment of the Department and Division, are necessary for 
an adequate training in the particular subject. In most curricula enough elec- 
tives are included to give the student ample opportunity to study subjects 
outside his major or minor departments in which he may have become in- 
terested or in which further training is desired. 

Bacteriology 

• 

The courses in this Department prepare students for such positions as 
dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists in federal, state, and municipal 
departments and for public health, research, and industrial positions. The 
suggested curriculum is given on page 91. 

^ Botany 

The Department of Botany offers three major fields of work: General 
Botany and Morphology, Plant Pathology, and Plant Physiology and 
f]cology. For further information and the suggested curricula see page 93. 

Entomology 

« 

The Department of Entomology is equipped to furnish general courses 
for students of biology and other subjects in the College of Arts and 
Sciences as well as to train students for careers in research, teaching, or 
control work in the field of professional Entomology. 

Two courses offered by the Department, Ent. 1 and Ent. 5s, have been 
organized particularly to meet the needs of students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Several other courses will serve to strengthen the pro- 
gram of students with a major in the biological sciences. In view of the 
fact that nearly 80% of all known species of animals in the world are in- 
sects, it is essential that the students of biology elect some work in entomol- 
ogy. The suggested curriculum is given on page 94. 



113 



II 

II 

ii 



Genetics 

The courses in Genetics are designed to provide training in the principles 
of heredity and genetics for those interested in plant and animal breeding 
and in eugenics. The suggested curriculum is given on page 97. 

2k)ology 

The Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
teaching and for service in the biological bureaus of the United States 
Government and in the biological departments of the various states. 
Emphasis is placed on morphology, physiology, and marine biology. Instruc- 
tion and opportunities for original investigation in the latter are supple- 
mented by the research facilities and courses of instruction offered at 
the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, a description of which is found on 
page 379. 



Curriculum 



Semester 






Freshman Year / 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 3y) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _..' ^ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) „ 1 

Modem Language (French or German) „ 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) ^ ^ 1 

16 
Sophomore Year 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f) 3 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 208) „ __ 

General Botany (Bot. If) or General Bacteriology (Bact. If)... 4 
General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) or Pathogenic Bacteriology 

(Bact. 2s) _ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) _ , 2 



18 



// 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



16 



3 



4 
3 
3 
3 



Semester 

Junior Year . I II 

Animal Ecology (Zool. 121f) 3 — 

Animal Genetics (Zool. 120s) - — 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 4 

Electives (Zoology) _.... _ 3 3 

Electives - 5 5 

15 16 

Senior Year 

Journal Club (Zool. 106y) 1 1 

General Animal Physiology (Zool. 103y) 3 3 

Electives 11 11 



15 



15 



General Biological Sciences 



18 



A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in 
biology but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biological 
sciences. The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general 
principles and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. Also by a 
proper selection of electives, the educational requirements of the State, 
Department of Education for certification can be met. 

Requirements 

A major in general biological sciences shall consist of not fewer than 
40 credits in the biological sciences, of which no fawer than 14 credits 
must be acquired in courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 • 3 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) „ :.._ 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) -.... _ 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) „ _ — 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) _ 1 1 



16 



16 



114 



115 



Semester 



Sophomore Year / 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) — 

Electives 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

18 

Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 6 

Electives _ 3 

16 

Senior Year 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) :. 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 6 

Electives _ ^ _ _ 6 



15 



// 

3 

3 
3 

4 
3 



18 

4 
3 
6 
3 

16 

3 

7 
5 

15 



B— THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Adolf E. Zucker, Chairman 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Lit- 
erature, Modem Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts; (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for 
those taking preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the 
departments of the Division. 

At present, the Division offers major and minor work for the Master 
of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in English Language and 
Literature and in Modern Languages and Literatures; major work for the 
Master of Arts may be elected in Comparative Literature and General 
Linguistics, and minor work in Philosophy. Detailed requirements for 
these degrees are given under the departmental announcements and in the 
catalogue of the Graduate School. 

Training for the Master of Arts degree is directed especially toward 
acquainting the candidate with methods of research and the literature in 
his own fields. For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the candidate is 
required not only to be thoroughly acquainted with his major and minor 
fields and with the scholarly accomplishments therein, but also to devote 
himself intensively to a specific research problem in which he shall make 
an original contribution to human knowledge. 



116 



Division Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

The following requirements in addition to those of the College of Arts 
and Sciences (including a general average of C — see page 107) should be 
completed, as far as possible, before the beginning cff the jimior year. 

1. Library Science — one credit. 

2. English 2/, 3s — six credits. 

3. Modern Language — To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language. In satisfaction of this requirement, he 
must pass one of the general language examinations, which are g^iven 
during the first and last days of each semester, with a grade as 
high as C. Maryland students should take the examination not later 
than the close of the sophomore year or the beginning of the junior 
year. Transfer students should take the examination upon entrance. 
The student must show in this examination that he has attained the 

117 






y 



I 



reading ability to be expected after two years of a college language 
course. When the student has passed the general language examina- 
tion, he will have satisfied the language requirements; but in no case 
will a student in the Division be graduated who has not acquired 
at least 12 credits of one foreign language in college. 

4. Philosophy — three credits. 

5. Psychology — three credits. 

G. Major and Minor Requirements— In selecting a major or a minor a 
student must have acquired twelve credits in fundamental courses' in 
the field chosen, or in a closely related field satisfactory to the Divi- 
sion, with an average grade of at least C, before credit will be 
allowed toward the completion of the major or minor requirements 
In addition: 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 
credits, m addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Divi- 
sion, in one of these fields of study. At least 16 of these credits 
must be taken in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 
credits, m addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Divi- 
sion, in one of the above fields of study not selected for the 
major, or in some other field of study authorized in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. At least 9 of these credits must be taken in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates 

The student must acquire at least 30 credits in courses not included in 
the major or minor. 

For additional requirements for major students, see the departmental 
announcements under English (page 314) and Modern Languages (pagS). 

MAJOR AND MINOR 

Fields of Study 

Comparative Literature *Greek 



English 
French 

**General Linguistics 
German 



Latin 
*Philosophy 
*Speech 

Spanish 



*Not available at present for a major. 
**Major only for Master of Arts Degree. 



118 



THE DIVISION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Chairman 

The Division of Physical Sciences is composed of the department of 
Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics. On 
the following pages the division outlines a number of curricula, each 
requiring four years for completion, leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science or Bachelor of Arts together with five year programs in Chem- 
istry-Chemical Engineering and Applied Physics. The departments of 
study have developed courses to contribute to the liberal education of 
students not primarily interested in science; to provide the basic knowledge 
of the physical sciences necessary for so many professions such as agricul- 
ture, dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, pharmacy, and 
others; to equip teachers of the Physical Sciences for secondary schools 
and colleges; and to train students for professional service as chemists, 
chemical engineers, geologists, mathematicians, physicists, and statisticians, 
and to prepare for graduate study and research in the Physical Sciences. 

The fields of knowledge represented by the Physical Sciences are so vast 
and their applications are so important that it is impossible to deal ade- 
quately with any one in a four-year undergraduate curriculum. Students 
who aspire to proficiency are therefore encouraged to continue their studies 
in the graduate years. In the work leading to a Master's degree, the 
student becomes acquainted with the general aspects of the field. In partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy*, 
the student must demonstrate a command of his chosen field sufficiently 
great to permit him to make independent investigations and creative 
contributions. 

No degree will be granted to a student in any department of Physical 
Sciences whose general average in all courses offered for the degree is 
below C. To enroll in the Division of Physical Sciences, at the beginning 
of the junior year a student must select a major in one of the departments 
and before graduation must complete a major and a cognate minor selected 
to conform to the requirements of the department in w^hich the major 
work is done. 

The candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will be governed by the requirements for that degree established 
by the University and the College, including the major and minor require- 
ments, except the candidate who offers the curriculum in General Physical 
Science, for whom special requirements are stated below. 

For the University requirements see page 56. 

For the College of Arts requirements and major and minor requirements 
see page 107. 

Detailed description of the undergraduate and graduate courses offered 
in this Division is given in Section III of this catalogue. Description of 
Courses. 

119 



Semester 
II 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 

1 



Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry includes Agricultural, Analytical, Inorganic, 
Organic, and Physical Chemistry, together with the State Control Work. The 
following curriculum prepares students to enter the fields of General 
Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Agricultural Chemistry. For Indus- 
trial Chemistry, it is recommended that the student elect the combined 
Chemical Engineering-Chemistry curriculum as outlined on page 171. 

Curriculum 

Freshman Year j 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ „ 1 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) j 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) „ ^ 2 

17 
Sophom^ore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) „..„„ ...'I...! 4 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) ^ 3 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and By) ^ 2 

18 
Junior Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) 4 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) 2 

Organic Laboratory (Chem. 117y) _ 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) _„..„ 5 

Electives (Social Sciences) 3 

15 
Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) _ 3 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (Chem. 118y) 1 

English Language or Literature „... „ 2 

Electives (Six must be in Social Science) 7 

15 
120 



17 

2 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 



18 

4 
2 
1 
5 
3 

15 

3 
2 
1 

9 

15 



Chemical Ekigineering — Chemistry 

A five-year program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry has been 
arranged between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and 
Sciences which permits students who so desire to become candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 
This curriculum is outlined on page 171. 

MATHEMATICS 

The Mathematics curriculum is designed for students who desire a thor- 
ough training in the fundamentals of Mathematics in preparation for 
teaching, research, or graduate work in Mathematics. Outstanding students 
in Mathematics may be awarded the honors degree in Mathematics. For 
further details see page 336 of this catalogue. 

Curriculum 

Seines ter 

Freshman Year i U 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 2 If, 22s) 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) -. 1 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) — 4 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 1 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y ) 4 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) _...._ 5 5 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) _....„ „ - 2 2 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Higher Algebra (Math. 14 If, 142s) 2 2 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) 3 3 

Mathematical Physics (Phys. lllf, 112s) 3 3 

Pictorial Geometry (Math. 18y) „ _ _ 2 2 

Elective (Social Sciences) - ^ 3 3 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 153f) _ 2 — 

Topics in Analysis (Math. 154s) — 2 



15 



15 



121 



Semester 

Senior Year * I II 

Analytic Mechanics (Math. 130f, 131s) „ 2 2 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f, 144s) - 2 2 

Theory of Equations (Math. 151f ) 2 — 

Undergraduate Seminar (Math. 140y) - 2 2 

Electron Physics (Phys. 109y) 3 3 

Electives (Including 6 credits in Social Sciences) 4 6 



15 



15 



Physics 



Two curricula are offered in Physics, (1) the General Physics curriculum 
for students who desire a thorough training in the fundamentals of Physics 
in preparation for graduate work, research, and the teaching of Physics, 
(2) the Applied Physics curriculum for students who desire to train for 
industrial and applied physical research. The latter is intended to prepare 
students for positions in governmental laboratories and in the laboratories 
established by many industries for testing, research, and development 
through the application of physical principles and tools. 

The completion of the first four years of the latter curriculum leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics; the completion of the five 
years with a satisfactory thesis to that of Master of Science in Physics. 



Curriculum I — General Physics 



Semester 



Freshman Year I 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 

Generall Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) „ 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) _ _ 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) „ 5 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) _ 2 



// 

3 
3 
4 
4. 
1 
1 



17 

3 
3 
4 
5 



17 



17 



122 



Semester 

Junior Year * 

Advanced Mathematics ^ 2 

Advanced Physics - ^ ^ 

Elective (Chemistry) 3 3 

Electives - ^ 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) 3 3 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 2 

Advanced Physics - ^ ^ 

4 4 

Electives - " 

15 15 

Curriculum II— Applied Physics 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 ^ 

Elementary German (German ly) ^ 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ * , 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 3 

Second Year German (German 3y) ^ 3 3 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) -- ^ ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ^ ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) - 2 2 



17 



17 



123 



Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Electi ves ( Social Sciences ) 3 3 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 3 

Thermodynamics (M. E. lOlf) 3 — 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) _ 1 — 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) 3 — 

Electricity (Phys. 108y) 3 3 

Optics (Phys. 107s) _ — 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4s) — 4 



16 

Senior Year 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) 4 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) — 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) _ .._ 3 

Heat (Phys. 105f) 3 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) — 

Elective ( Physics ) _ 3 

16 
Fifth Year 

Electives (Engineering) 3 

Electives ( Physics ) 6 

Electives _ 3 



16 



12 



3 
3 

3 
3 

15 

3 
6 
3 

12 



Statistics 



The courses in Statistics are intended to provide training in the tools 
and methods employed in statistical description and induction, in the 
interpretation of statistical data presented by others, and in the gathering 
and organization of original data. The suggested curriculum is given 
on page 97. 

General Physical Sciences 

For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the physical sciences 
without immediate specialization in any one, a general curriculum is offered. 
By proper selection of courses in the junior and senior year a student may 
concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of study to be 
able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

A major in the Physical Sciences shall consist of not less than 52 
credits in the departments comprising the Division, of which at least 6 

124 



shall be acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates in one particular field. At least two courses of not less than 
three credit hours each in a field cognate to the just-mentioned particular 
field will be required, and one of these shall be among those listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Curriculum 

Se7nester 

^ ' ■ I u 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) - ^ 

Modem Language (French or German) .....^.™..»^-.----^^^^^^ 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 * 

Generall Chemistry (Chem. ly) — ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - ^ ^ 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6y) - - - ; -";" - - , 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly or 2y and 4y) - 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - 

Modem Language (French or German) ^ ^ 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) ^ • 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) •• ■■■-■- -• -— -, 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) -.... 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Electives (Chem. 2y; 8Ay and 8By) - ^-4 ^ 

Electives (Social Sciences) - - • " 

Electives (Math.. Stst., Hist., Philos., Physics, Logic) 2-3 ^ ^ 

Electives (Biological Sciences) - ^^ . ^_^ 

Electives ~ " 

.15 15 

Senior Year q 3 

Electives (Social Sciences) --^ ^^ ^^ 

Electives 

15 15 



125 



I 

I 



D— THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

J. G. Jenkins, Chairman 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions 
and other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of 
Social Sciences offer opportunities for advanced training in the several 
fields represented. A major in Economics is available for students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. During the freshman and sophomore years, 
in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences requirements, Principles of 
Economics (Econ. 51y) should be completed and as many other lower 
division social science courses taken as practicable. The Department of 
Political Science offers the first three years of a combined Arts-Law course 
and also oflTers training in the field of public administration. The Depart- 
ment of Psychology is identified vdth the development of applied psychology 
and is in position to supply training in the industrial and clinical phases 
of the subject. The Department of Sociology provides a course of study 
preparatory to professional training in social work and offers the courses 
demanded by civil service examinations for certain positions. All five 
departments present courses aligned with the teacher-training program 
represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. These advanced degrees are 
increasingly required for secondary school teaching and for professional 
positions in the several fields represented. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University requirements ^ see page 56. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements^ see page 107. 

3. Major and Minor requirements, see page 107. 

Major and Minor Fields of Study 

Economics Psychology 

History Sociology 

Political Science 

Combined Program in Arts and Law 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University also offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete 
the prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, and they 
must complete the Requirements for Graduation, as indicated on page 107. 
If students enter the combined program with advanced standing, at least 

126 



the third full year's work must be completed in residence at College Park. 
Upon the successful completion of one year of full-time law courses in the 
School of Law in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be awarded 
on the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law. The degree of 
Bachelor of Laws will be awarded upon the completion of the combmed 

program. 

Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year ' 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Science or Mathematics - - 3 3 

History of England and Great Britain (H. 3y) -- 3 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 3 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) « 

Foreign Language ~ 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) -. - 1 ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) •• - - - ^ ^ 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

English I I 

Science or Mathematics "^ ^ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y) 3 3 ^ 

American History (H. 2y) ~ - 3 3 

Foreign Language - 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) ^ ^ 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. If) 3 — 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sci. I31f) „ 3 -- 

Administrative Law (Pol. Sci. 134s) — 3 

Constitutional History of the United States (H. 11 5y) or Con- 
stitutional History of England (H. 125f, 126s) 3 3 

Legislatures and Legislation (Pol. Sci. 124s) — 3 

Electives 

15 15 

Senior Year 

The student may elect either the curriculum for the first year of the 
School of Law or a fourth year's work from advanced courses offered in 
Political Science. In either case all of the requirements of the Division 
of Social Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences for graduation must 
have been met. 

127 



THE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
Five- Year Combined Arts and Nursing Curriculum 

The first two years of this curriculum are taken in the College of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. If students enter this combined program 
with advanced standing, at least the second full year of this curriculum 
must be completed in College Park. 

The remaining three years are taken in the School of Nursing of the 
University in Baltimore or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore. In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing may, upon the recommendation of the Director of 
the School of Nursing, be granted at the end of the five year curriculum. 
Full details regarding this curriculum may be found in the section of the 
catalogue dealing with the School of Nursing. See page 222. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) :. 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

History (H. ly or 3y) „ 3 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) — 3 

Library Methods (L. S. If) 1 — 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 1 



16 

Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) - 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) - — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) — 

Foreign Language ~ ~ ....- 3 

Electives - - 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 2 



18 



17 



3 
3 

4 
3 

2 

17 



Premedical 

The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland is three years of academic training in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Curriculum I as outlined meets these require- 
ments, and also fulfills the requirements prescribed by the Council on Med- 
ical Education of the American Medical Association. 

Curriculum II is outlined to meet the requirements of the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Society, which prescribes two 
years of academic training as the minimum prerequisite for entering a 
Class A Medical School. 

Curriculum I offers to students a combined seven-year* program leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first 
three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park, and the last four years in the School of Medicine in Balti- 
more. (See University catalogue for details of quantitative and qualitative 
premedical course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medi- 
cine, and upon the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Medicine, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College of Arts 
and Sciences, at the Commencement following the second year of profes- 
sional training. 

At least two years of residence are necessary for students transferring ' 
from other colleges and universities who wish to become candidates for the 
two degrees. 
For requirements for admission see Section I, Admission, page 50. 

Curriculum I 

For students expecting to enter the University of Maryland Medical School 

Sem,ester 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) - 3 3 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 3y) ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - - ^ ' * 

Modern Language (French or German) -^^ - _^-- 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed, 
ly or 2y and 4y) - 

18 18 



129 



128 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) _ 2 

Modem Language (French or German) „ 3 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f ) 3 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) _ — 

Introduction to Philosophy (Phil. If) > 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) _ — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 2 

18 

Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ 4 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. lOSAy) 2 

Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 103By) 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Electives ( Social Sciences) ^ „ _ „ 3 

Electi ves (Biological Sciences ) 4 



// 

3 
2 
2 
3 



18 



4 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 



15 15 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine is accepted. 
The student also may elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses 
offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Curriculum II 

For students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to a Class A Medical School. 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) > 3 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) _ 3 3 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 3y) 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 4 

Modem Language (French or German) _ _ 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) ....> 1 1 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - -• 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) ^ 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f ) - ^ 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) - - ^ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) "-■■-• "-j 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ld. ^ 
3y or 6y and 8y) — 



Semester 
II 

4 
2 
2 
1 



8 
3 



17 



17 



Predental 



c^fndent^ entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to prepare 
the'^sS tTe%\^^^ of 'dentistry are offered the foll^^^^^^^^^^ 
curriculum, which meets the predental requirements of the American Asso 
cSn o^Dental Colleges. This curriculum may also ^e ^-^^-^^^^^^^ 
sludent if he desires to continue his college trammg and complete work 
for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) — - - 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) - 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) -- - -- 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 3y) - • " 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 6 y) -- --"■" — - 7ov.T;"' t^h 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) — 



3 
1 
3 
4 

4 
1 



3 
1 

3 

4 
4 
1 



Sophomore Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) - - 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) - 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - - - 

Modem Language (French or German) - 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences)..^-.. ...- - , ■"; "" ".ZT 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) ~ 



17 



2 
2 

4 
3 
4 



17 



2 
2 
4 
3 

4 



17 



17 



130 



131 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, Dean. 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of economics and commerce; for downtown Washington is only 
tw^enty-four minutes away in one direction, while the Baltimore business 
district is less than an hour in the other — both cities with frequent trans- 
portation services to the University gates. Special arrangements are made 
to study commercial, manufacturing, exporting, and importing facilities 
and methods in Baltimore; and every assistance is given qualified students 
who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the far-flung economic activities 
of the National Government or utilize the libraries, government depart- 
ments, and other facilities provided in Washington. 

The College of Commerce provides professional training in economics and 
business administration for those who plan to become executives, teachers, 
or investigators in commercial, industrial, agricultural, or governmental 
economic enterprises. 

While the curricula offered are technical and vocational, all require a 
thorough basic training in mathematics, statistics, English, and speech. The 
courses required in these fields are tool subjects needed for proper analysis, 
explanation, and interpretation of modem economic data. 

liberal allowance in every curriculum is made for other social sciences 
or for purely cultural non-vocational subjects, in order that students may 
acquire the breadth of vision needed by a present day economist, agricul- 
tural leader, or business executive. 

The College of Commerce offers a selection of courses in each of the 
following seven fields of general and applied economics: General Eco- 
nomics, Agricultural Economics, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Trade 
and Transportation, and Organization and Management. 

Subject to the group and curricula requirements described subsequently, 
a student may, with the advice of his faculty adviser, elect individual 
courses from any or all of these groups in accordance with his needs. 

Several standardized curricula are offered for the guidance of students 
in the selection of courses, namely: General Business, Accounting, Finance, 
Marketing and Sales Administration, Cooperative Organization and Admin- 
istration, Agricultural Economics, and Commerce-Law. Unless a student 
wishes to take the combination Commerce-Law or the Agricultural Eco- 
nomics curriculum, he registers for the Lower Division General Business 
Curriculum for the freshman and sophomore years and decides at the 
beginning of his junior year whether he wishes to specialize in Accounting, 
Finance, Marketing, or Cooperation, or continue with a General Business 
training. Combinations to fit other vocational needs can be worked out 
by a different selection of courses in the junior and senior years. 

132 



Advisory Councils 

In order to facilitate the prompt and continuous adjustment of courses, 
curricula, and instructional methods to provide the training most m demand 
bv industry and commerce, and in order constantly to maintam mstruction 
abreast of the best current practice, the advice and suggestions of busmess 
nien are constantly sought and received through Advisory Councils com- 
nosed of outstanding leaders in each major field of business activity. Each 
Council has its own particular interest to ser^^e, such as advertismg, 
marketing, or finance; and the viewpoint and suggestions of these business 
men are proving to be invaluable in developing the instructional and 
research program of the College. 

Group Requirements For Graduation 
A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
decree of Bachelor of Science upon the satisfactory completion of not fewer 
than 120 semester hours, not including the six hours of basic Military Science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six hours of physical 
education for women and for such men as are excused from Military Science. 
Of these 120 credits, not fewer than 48 must be in general or applied 
economics, that is, in courses offered in the departments of Economics, 
Business Administration, or Agricultural Economics, and not fewer than 
48 in subjects not offered by these departments; provided that courses m 
principles of economics may be considered to be in either category. 

The following minimum requirements in each of the groups specified 
must be completed before graduation, except as indicated in a particular 
curriculum. 

1. English and Speech— fourteen credits. 

2. Mathematics and Natural Science— twelve credits. 

3. Military Science or Physical Education— six credits. 

4. Social Science and Foreign Languages— not fewer than twelve hours 
are required in psychology, sociology, political science, and history, 
and considerably more than these are recommended; provided that 
electives in foreign languages or other humanities may be substituted 
for six hours of this requirement. 

5. Economics — twelve credits. 

6. Organization and Management, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, 
Trade and Transportation, and additional requirements as specified 
in each curriculum. 

Scholarship Requirements 

To be eligible to enter courses ordinarily carried in the junior year, a 
student enrolled in the College of Commerce must have an average grade as 
high as C in not fewer than 58 credit hours, not including the six hours of 
basic Military Science required of all able-bodied men students, or the six 
hours of physical education for women and for such men as are excused 



X 



133 



courses a.gregatin^'Lri;tTaf 48^^^^^^ 

average grade as high as C. semester hours, and (2) a general 

Electives And Extra-CurricuIar Activities 

edSS rSS' tTaVtf "^' rn ""- ^^•'"^'^ ^ ""-^ ''-^'•^ 
nomics and admfnXation «l T''''^''^ ^^ vocational courses in eco- 

accordingly wSh demand tha^"; . /"'' requirements have been set up 
<!han hcTf aemand that not fewer than 48 semester credit hour. 

sem stt WsTayTdSedT"" ^ ^°"^^*^^^^'"^ '^^^ "-»'- 
who is wiltoJtrfLego L p oVornr""T"n^"'^'^*^^^ "^ ^ ^'"^«"t 
economics and%usiness'admSralT^ """'^'' "' ^^^"^"^^^ *=°-- - 

apSrpsTcho\og?r ^sS i^f^^^^^^^^^ ^°"*-^ ---' -d 

sciences needed bv anv studL. ^"'^'^'''»^. t^e broad background in social 

make him a more useful cSzen T^ ^'=°"°"?'-' ^"^ these subjects tend to 

open up a new Lrld of Swt^r', "' ^"^ ''*'^"'' Philosophy courses 

provided by such sheets tab^^^^^^^^^^ ''^ ^'"'^'J'; ^""^ ^'^'^"^ 

Courses in music and art ml v t!l t^mkmg is also useful vocationally. 

courses; and the solfLT.x ^^ ^' ^ ,""'?'"" ^'""^^'^"^ *^'>'" ^°<=^tional 
tates is desirablVfTL^dltroTrnTmt^t;^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ --^<= ^-"■ 

disposal. While the freedom of ^^""^^^ f^'^^^^on within the time at their 

to enable a stude': t'tdy whlt^rcSral'^T^'. ^'""^" ^^ ^"«-"* 
niques he needs anywhere in the TW ! I ^f^^^^ °'' ^^^"onal tech- 

as a minor in ^ny^nriZnlToZZ' ^etul^^^^ 1''^'' '^ "''''' 
secure the approval of the head nf fh.^A ^""^^^^^ ^f Commerce must 
order that the selectLs Lv be i!l. f ^^^^^^^^ *<> ^^ study list, in 
cultural objectives sought effectively adapted to the vocational or 

le^wL^^^^^^^^^ pTS^nTmrr^^^^^^ ^^ ^^"^^^^ ^' ^^^^ -^- 
and available free time permit F n '^"^^'^'^ "^ '^" ^^^^^^^^^ ^^udent 
definite value in prorrinrZLS'' 'f^ '"^ '"'^ ^''^''''' ^^^^^ ^^^ ^ 

tiotaTrnl!^^^^^^^ ^^--^- requirements in either voca- 

demonstrate the capacity to carrv'addir'r^^ "'^'^^"^^ ^ ^^"^-^ -" 
received in previous work Xb^^^ '""^''''f satisfactorily. Grades 

extra student load in each case 4'. S'"^^^^^ '^''"" ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^« ^^ 
C will not be perm/tted to carr; Z! ' 7^^ ^' ^"^ ^^^^^^^ better than 
requirements ^'™'"'^ '" ^^^^^ additional courses beyond the curriculum 



134 



Collegiate Chamber of Commerce 

The Collegiate Chamber of Commerce provides students of business 
administration with an organization in which they may learn to work 
effectively with others in conferences and committees, and through which 
they may be brought into close contact with business men and trade associa- 
tions in the types of business in which they are most interested. The 
Collegiate Chamber of Commerce maintains close relations with the Junior 
and Senior Chambers of Commerce in the various cities of Maryland and 
with the United States Chamber of Commerce in Washington. It is con- 
trolled by a board of directors elected by students of the College, two from 
each class and one from each student organization in the College. Member- 
ship is voluntary, but all students of business are urged to take part in its 
activities, for much of the training obtained is as valuable as that obtained 
in regular courses. 

While general and social meetings are held periodically, most of the activi- 
ties are centered in the following committees, each of which fosters study, 
business contacts, association with corresponding committees in city, state, 
and national chambers of commerce, discussion, field trips, and advancement 
of students interested in each field: Marketing, Public Relations, Civic 
Affairs, Community Affairs, Finance, Foreign Trade, Agricultural Affairs, 
and Industrial Affairs. A member of the faculty who is qualified in the 
special field in which a given committee is working serves as adviser. 
Additional committees are formed whenever a sufficient number of students 
desire them. 

Beta Gamma Alpha 

Beta Gamma Alpha is a local scholastic fraternity. Students in the 
College of Commerce who have maintained high scholastic averages are 
eligible to membership. Election each year is limited to two per cent 
of the junior class, to ten per cent of the senior class, and to not more 
than one graduate student. 

Beta Alpha Psi 

Beta Alpha Psi is a national accounting fraternity which is made up of 
students majoring in Accounting who have maintained a high scholastic 
record. 

Class of 1926 Award 

The Class of 1926 of the School of Business Administration of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore offers each year a gold key to the senior 
graduating from the College of Commerce with the highest average for the 
entire four-year course taken at the University of Maryland. . 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Commerce is assigned to a faculty adviser 
who, so far as practicable, is a specialist in the student's field of interest. 
A student who plans to become an accountant, for instance, has a professor 
of accounting as his adviser; one who is interested in banking as a career, 
a professor of finance; and those interested in marketing, advertising, for- 
eign trade, industrial management, agricultural economics, and other sub- 
jects, specialists in these fields. Students are expected to see their advisers 

135 



regnilarly about registration, curricular requirements, scholarship require 
ments. and such personal or university matters as m^y be desiraWe 

Freshman Year ^"""''' Curriculum* Semester 

Survey and Composition (English ly) 1 ^^ 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y), (for"rtudents"of ' Com: ^ 

merce) ..._ 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If )" """ I ^ 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T.'and"?: 4s) __ "T 

Readmg and Speaking (Speech ly) -, f 

tForeign Language, Political Science, or elective q I 

Science (preferably Chemistry).... ^J , , 

Sophomore Year ^^~^^ ^'^"^^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f) 2 _ 

Business English (Eng. 4s) __ 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) o 

Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) 1.Z....Z. __ ~~ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y)....ZZZZZZ. "3 o 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. Sly) " ~ 4 . 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) __ 

Psychology for Students of Commerce (Psychr4f ) or ~ 

{Elective (See suggested courses below) o __ 
Basic R. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Educati^nTprysZE^^^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) 

/ 17 17 

Suggested Elective Courses: 

Government: American National (Pol. Sci. If and s)— 3. 

State and Local (Pol. Sci. 4f and s)— 3. 
Comparative (Pol. Sci. 7f, 8s)— 2, 2. 

History: A Survey of Western Civilization (H. ly)— 6. 
American (H. 2y) — 6. 
England and Great Britain (H. 3y)— 6. 

Social Sciences: Introduction (Soc. Sci. ly)-6.' (Elect in Freshman year 
only.) -^ 

Sociology: Principles (Soc. If and s)— 3. 

136 



Psychology: For Students of Commerce (Psych. 4f) — 3; or Applied (Psych. 

3s)— 3. 
Introduction (Psych. If and s) — 3. 
Philosophy: Introduction (Phil. If and s) — 3. 
Logic (Phil. 22f)— 3. 
Ethics (Phil. 23f)— 3. 
Speech: Advanced (3f, 4s) — 2, 2. 

Extempore (9f, IQs) — 1, 1. 
English: Survey of American Literature (Eng. 7f, 8s) — 3, 3. 
Expository Writing continued (Eng. 6s) — 2. 
College Grammar (Eng. 14f ) — 3. 
Science: Introductory courses in Chemistry, Botany, Geology, Physics, or 

Zoology— 3, 4, 6, 8. 
Language: French, German, Spanish, or Italian — 6. 
Drawing: Mechanical (Dr. 6y) — 2. 

General Business Curriculum 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) , 3 — 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf ) - 3 — 

Industrial Management (O. and M. 121s) _ — 3 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) _ — 3 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) „ 3 3 

*Electives (See suggested courses below) 6 6 

15 15 
Senior Year 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) 3 — 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) „ — 3 

*Electives (See suggested courses below) 12 12 



15 



15 



Suggested Elective Courses 

Economics of Cooperative Organ- 
ization (Econ. 161f) — 3. 

Insurance (Fin. 141f) — 3. 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf)— 3. 

Principles of Foreign Trade (T. 
and T. lOlf )— 3. 

Principles of Transportation (T. 
and T. lllf)— 3. 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 

—3. 
Public Finance (Fin. 106f)— 3. 



Investments (Fin. 115f) — 3. 
Labor Economics (Econ. 130f)— 3. 
Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 

109f)— 3. 
Social and Economic History of the 

U. S. (H. lllf, 112s)— 6. 
Principles of Public Administration 

(Pol. Sci. lllf)— 3. 
Speech electives are recommended 
for either semester. 



*Electives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

137 



Economics of Consumption (Econ. 

136s)--3. 
Banking Principles and Practices 

(Fin. 121s)— 3. 
Salesmanship and Salesmanagement 

(Mkt. 105s)— 3. 
Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 
Social Control of Business (Econ. 

152s)— 3. 



Psychology in Advertising and Sell- 
ing (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Industrial Psychology (Psych. 
160f)— 3. 

Personnel (O. and M. 125s)— 3. 

Legislatures and Legislation (Pol 
Sci. 124s)— 3. 

Real Estate (Fin. I51s)— 3. 



Accounting Curriculum 

Junior Year Semester 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) „ 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) 3 ~Z 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f, 122s) 2 ? 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) __ 

tElectives (See suggested courses he[ow)IIIIIZZ~IIZl 7 - 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) ^ 3 __ 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s)ZZ" 2 2 

Specialized Accounting (Acct. 181f, 182s) 3 o 

Fmancial Anaylsis and Control (Fin. 199s) __ 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) 7 ^ 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

♦Income Tax Procedure (Acct. 161f ) 

Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 

T. lOlf)— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. lllf)— 3. 

Industrial Combination (Econ 

153f)— 3. 
Investments (Fin. llof)— 3. 

Principles of Mf.rketing (Mkt. lOlf ) 
—3. 



15 



15 



Advanced Economic Principles 
(Econ. 190f)— 3. 
* Advanced Business Law (O. and M. 

103s)— 2. 
*C. P. A. Problems (Acct. I86s)— 3. 
Industrial Management (0. and M. 
121s)— 3. 

Banking Principles and Practices 
(Fin. 121s)— 3. 

Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 
Accounting Apprenticeship (Acct. 
149)— 0. 

an^'^irnio'Vetr'^ '"''"'^ "^' '''' '""^^ ''^ ^-^'^ «^ ^^vanced econonues during iunior 
^Essential for students who plan to prepare for a career in public accounting. 

138 



Marketing and Sales Administration Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) 3 — 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) _ - — 3 — 

Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 109f ) „ 3 — 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) 3 — 

Salesmanship and Salesmanagement (Mkt. 105s) — 3 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) „ — 3 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) 3 9 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) „ „ 3 — 

Marketing Research and Market Policies (Mkt. 199s) — 3 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) _ — 3 

'Electives (See suggested courses below) - ~ 12 9 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 
—S. 

Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 
T. lOlf)— 3. 

Principles of Transportation (T. 
and T. lllf)— 3. 

Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) 
—3. 

Psychological Problems in Market 
Research (Psych. 140f)— 3. 

Insurance (Fin. 141f) — 3. 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf)— 5. 

Labor Economics (Econ. 130f) — 3. 

Supervised Practice in Marketing 
(Mkt. 149)— 2. 

Retail Store Management and Mer- 
chandising (Mkt. 119s) — 3. 



15 



15 



Export and Import Trade Pro- 
cedure (T. and T. 121s)— 3. 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 
102s)— 3. 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 
136s)— 3. 

Psychology in Advertising and Sell- 
ing (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) 
—3. 

Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 

Food Products Inspection (A. E. 
105s)— 2. 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 
121s)— 3. 



The list of potential electives for students interested in special phases 
of advertising and marketing is too great for inclusion here. A student 
who is training for some position in the garment trade, department store 
work, or other classes of retailing, might wish to substitute, for instance. 
Textiles (H. E. 71f), Advanced Textiles (H. E. 171f), or Merchandise Dis- 
play (H. E. 125s). Advertising students may wish to elect courses in Art 
or English in the College of Arts and Sciences. Those interested in the 
marketing and installation of mechanical or electrical equipment will wish 
to elect a number of courses in the College of Engineering. Persons plan- 



tElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

139 



I 

J 

ning to engage in marketing of agricultural products may choose courses 
in the College of Agriculture. 

Finance Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year I // 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) , 3 — 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) 3 3 

Advanced Banking Principles and Practices (Fin. 121s) — 3 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) „ — 3 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) - 9 6 

15 15 
Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) 3 — 

Investments (Fin. 116f) 3 — 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) _ — 3 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) 9 12 

Suggested Elective Courses: 

Public Finance (Fin. 106f)— 3. Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) Farm Finance (A. E. 104s) — 3. 

— 3. Supervised Practice in Finance 
Insurance (Fin. 141f)— 3. (Fin. 149)— 2. 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf )-^. Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 

Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f ) Investment Banking (Fin. 116s) — 3. 

— 3. International Finance (Fin. 129s) 
Stock and Commodity Exchanges — 3. 

(Fin. 118f) — 3. Social Control of Business (Econ. 
Economics of Cooperative Organi- 152s) — 3. 

pation (Econ. 161f) — 3. 

Agricultural Economics Curriculum* Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) — 3 3 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y), (for students of Com- 
merce) - 3 3 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) 3 — 

Farm Organization (A. E. 2s) — 3 

Biology (Bot. If and Zool. Is, or Zool. 2f and Bot. 2s), Geology 

(Geol. If), or Foreign Language — 3-4 3-4 

General or Introductory Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) ^ 4-3 4r-S 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y _ 1 1 

17-18 17-18 



* Students registered in this curriculum should satisfy the Professor of Agricultural 
Economics that they have had adequate farm experience before entering the junior year. 

jElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

140 



Semester 

I n 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s). -^ ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) " - ^ __ 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) __ ^ 

Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) - - ^ 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y) - - __ ^ 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) -- ^ ^ 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) -•- - " ^^ __ 

Agriculture Elective - -• -•-■■■■■—• '"^'"^'T^i^^'^A 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) 

17-18 18 



Junior Year ^ 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) g 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) ^ ^ 

Business Law I (O. and M. lOls) ^ _ 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) • ••-"• •-—- __ 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) ^ _ 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) __ ^ 

tFarm Finance (A. E. 104s) - ^ 

fLand Economics (A. E. 11 If) g 

Prices of Farm Products (A. E. 106s) ^ ^ , 

fElectives - 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) ^ __ 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) .^.■^-^. - " __ ^ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fm. 19i^s)... - ^ 

Contemporary Economic Thought (Econ. 191s) ^ ^ 

{Research Problems (A. E. 109y) "-"■-" -• __ . g 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) - ^ __ 

Rural Sociology (Soc. 102f) " ^ ^ 

fElectives ; ' 

15-16 15-16 

' ^ ^ *• «.„«f hP taken during the sophomore, junior, or senior 

jr\n:\nra:rA't7o.7ir.rrstpone/,.nm U. sen., .ea. . U,. .„. 

,'acTlitattth^- selection of useful electives during the last two years. 
^Elective for honor students only. 



141 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN COMMERCE AND LAW 

bofrBlir^orS'^/r^^^^^^^^^^^ -'^ ^^' ^'^^- to Obtain 

selecting their courTesfn su^h ^Z ! ^^' ^^^^^^' ""^^ <1° «° by 

and specific ir^nj rtt^'oS/e^? crZlcI^* S "' *'^ ^^^^^ 
then completing the 126 hours r^onirl/? Commerce m three years, and 
courses taken in the UniverSv of M? f°7f ^uataon from this college by 

During the first threlveas stuS'"'n^i>°°^ °' "^^^ ^* ^^'''^^'-■ 
Of commerce. In the ^SM"': Thre^ftrtrs ^^f """^^^ 
alternative program is taken, they will be re^ZZ^ •"!<.? 5«»r-year 
but they must forward copies of th^^r «?,!/ f . ? V" ^^^ ^"^'"'^ °^ L^*' 

of Commerce at the begLirof eth^'em/steToVt'h f' "T '' *'^ ^^^" 
end of the fourth year the L^l^Tlf r i, , f ^ ^°'"'*'' y^^""" ^^ t^^e 
in the College of Commerce upon th.r^' 'l ^"""'^^ "^"^ ^"^ ^^^''ded 
Law School The degree of SJt ;7'"'"«"^f ««" of the Dean of the 
factory completion ofX ent.^rprtgral^"^ "" '' '^''"''^ "P°" ^^t"^- 

Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester 

Survey and Composition (Eng- ly) ^^ 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T: and' T. 4s) ^ "; 

Keadmg and Speaking (Speech ly) "T ^ 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) o ' ^ 

State and Local Government (Pol Sci 4s) "" 

Hi^ry of England and Great Britain (E'^)::::: ^ l 

2y and Z " "^"'""'^ ^'^'^'"'^ ^^'^" ^^- "^"^ - 

" ■ -■• - 1 1 

Sophomore Year ^'^ 17 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f) 

Business English (Eng. 4s) ZZZ..I ^ "" 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y)ZI "7 ^ 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) ' ^ ^ 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f).. ^ ^ 

Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) ZZ ^ "~ 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) Z" "~ ^ 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f)"ZZI ' T ^ 

Comparative Government (Pol Sci 7f) " 

K. O. T. C. (M I. 2y) or Physical' Educ^ti;;' (Physrid: 3^ ^ 

or 6y and 8y) ^ 

- 2 2 



18 



17 



Junior students may elect either the accounting or the economics group 
of courses: 

Semester 

Junior Year — Accounting Concentration / // 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) _ 3 — 

*Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 3 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 — 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 121s) — 3 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) 3 3 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f, 122s) „ 2 2 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s) 2 2 

Argumentation (Speech llf, 12s) 2 2 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) „ 1 1 



16 

Junior Year — Economics Concentration 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) 3 

♦Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) ^ — 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 

Public Finance (Fin. 106f) _....„ _ 3 

Labor Economics (Econ. 130f) 3 

*Social Control of Business (Econ. 152s) _ — 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) — 

Public Utilities (Econ. 145s) ,.... „ _ — 

Argumentation (Speech llf, 12s) 2 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) „ 1 

Electives - _ _ 1 



16 



3 
3 

3 
2 
1 
1 



16 16 

Senior Year 

First year of regular Law School; or, preferably, graduation from the 
four-year curriculum in Commerce-Law before entering Law School. In 
the latter case, Business Law I is substituted for Financial Analysis and 
Control, and an approved elective for Social Control of Business in the 
junior year, the replaced courses being taken in the senior year. The addi- 
tional requirements are shown below: 

♦Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 8 

♦Social Control of Business (Econ. 152s) > _... _ — 3 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) „ 3 — 

Electives (See suggested courses below) 12 .9 



15 



16 



142 



*Preferably taken in senior year if the four-year curriculum is followed. 

143 



Suggested Elective Courses: 



Advanced Economic Principles 

(Econ. I9af)— 3. 
Comparative Economic Systems 

(Econ. lolf)— 3. 
Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 



-3. 



Contemporary Economic Thought 

(Econ. 191s)-^. 
Labor and Government (Econ 

131s)— 3. 
Advanced Banking Principles and 

Practices (Fin. 121s)— 3. 
International Finance (Fin. 129s) 

Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 
Personnel (0. and M. 125s)— 3. 
Recent Political Theory (Pol Sci 

142s)— 3. 
Constitutional History of the 

United States (H. Il5y)— 6. 
Psychology in Advertising and 

Selling (Psych. 141s)— 3. 
Legislatures and Legislation (Pol 

Sci. 124s)— 3. 
Farm Finance (A. E. 104s)— 3. 
tC. P. A. Problems (Acct. 186s)— 3. 
tAdvanced Business Law (0. and M 
lOSs)— 2. 



Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 
and T. lOlf)— 3. 

Insurance (Fin. 141f) 3. 

Principles of Public Administra- 
tion (Pol. Sci. lllf)— 3. 

History of Political Theory (Pol 
Sci. 141f)— 3. 

Investments (Fin. 115f)— 3. 

Economics of Cooperative Organ- 
ization (Econ. 161f)— 3. 

Principles of Transportation (T. 
and T. lllf)— 3. 

Industrial Combination (Econ 

153f)— 3. 
fSpecialized Accounting (Acct. 181f 

182s)— 3, 3. 
tincome tax Procedure (Acct 

161f)— 3. 

COOPERATIVE AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 

are tS"a' sTeS "'""' '""^ '"'"^^^^ consumers, and business men 
are takmg a steadily more important part in modem economic lifp Al 
hough agricultural, consumers^ and credit cooperatives are well t^wn" 
ufU' Z^'^'^'^^^y '^^^'^-^ that cooperative principles are being TncreLinX 
utihzed by merchants, manufacturers, investors, and others in fr"^^^^^^^ 
tions mutua s, voluntary groups, and other types of democrlucaUv con 
trolled orgamzations that may or may not call thLselves co^pera^^^^^^ xTe" 
problems of organization and administration of a cooperative are much IL 
same whether the enterprise is a farmers' marketing assocLT. o. 1 
merchants' cooperative, a wholesalers' voluntary c£ a gr^^^^^^ 
facturers who set up an association to carry their own insurance prXe" 
join y, or advertise and sell cooperatively, a group of farmers or urban 
dwellers who establish an association to purchase or produce the goods 

or theXsTnes^mr ^ -^\-^-, a building and loan^sLdftion 

or tne business men of a community or of a given type of business who 
jointly carry on any continuous business enterprise business who 

The form of ownership and control and the objectives of a cooperative 
are_different from those of its centrally controlled competitor to such a 

tEssential for students who wish to prepare for C. P. A. examinations. 

144 



degree that training and experience suitable for executive responsibility in 
the latter type of enterprise is not adequate for cooperative leadership; 
because the managerial problems of a cooperative or business association 
include not only most of those arising from the nature of the business but 
also additional problems brought about by these differences in ownership 
relations, obj'ectives, and control. 

A student intending to prepare himself for positions with cooperative 
enterprises has two alternatives: (a) To register in one of the specialized 
curricula such as Finance, Marketing, Accounting, or Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, in accordance with the type of work he wishes to do with coopera- 
tives, and then use electives to obtain as much cooperative theory and 
practice as practicable, or (b) To register for the curriculum in Cooperative 
Organization and Administration that follows, and then elect courses that 
will give him a reasonably adequate technical knowledge of the type of 
activity with which he plans to associate himself. For instance, a person 
intending to work vdth farmer cooperatives should have at least one course 
in agriculture during each of his eight semesters; a student of consumer 
cooperation should elect Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s), Retail 
Store Management and Merchandising (Mkt. 119s), and Purchasing 
Technique (Mkt. 115s); a person intending to specialize in the credit union 
or savings and loan field should elect several courses in finance; and a 
student of trade or business association work should elect courses that fit 
in most closely with the kind of business with which he expects to be 
associated. 

Since every student interested in cooperation as a career should have the 
basic training provided in the lower division general business curriculum 
in any case, he need not make a definite decision until the beginning of his 
j'unior year, though students are urged to use the electives provided during 
the first two years to obtain so far as possible the background subjects 
likely to be needed. 

Practical experience is exceedingly important. Students intending to 
work with agricultural cooperatives, should have farm experience, for 
example, and all students who plan to make cooperative organization and 
management a career should arrange for practical work with cooperatives 
as early as may be practicable. The course entitled "Supervised Practice 
in Cooperation," which involves experience with cooperatives, should be 
taken during the summer between the junior and senior years unless a 
different period is arranged. 

Washington is the national headquarters of the agricultural cooperatives 
of this country, and arrangements have been made for properly equipped 
students to have cooperative experience by means of close working arrange- 
ments maintained with the National Cooperative Council. 

Unusual facilities for the study of cooperatives of all types are also 
available in the government agencies and libraries of Washington, and 
special arrangements will be made for properly qualified students to make 
the most of the opportunity for special study .thus offered. Most trade and 
business associations have headquarters or representation in Washington. 

The courses below are suggested for the junior and senior years, though 

145 



substitutions will be permitted whenever the student's adviser believes this 
will improve the training for a particular type of cooperative work. 

Cooperative Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year / // 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) _ „ ^ — 3 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) 3 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) „ _ 3 _ 

Industrial Management (O. and M. 121s) _ — 3 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) _ 3 3 

*Principles of Transportation (T. and T. lllf ) „ 3 — 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) 3 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) - _ — 3 

Elective „ 3 



15 

tSupervised Practice in Cooperation (0. and M. 149) (Summer) 2 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) _...._ _ 3 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) 3 

* Retail Store Management and Merchandising (Mkt. 119s), or 
♦Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) — 

* Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) „ _ 3 

* Contemporary Economic Thought (Econ. 191s) — 

♦Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s) 2 

Problems in Cooperative Administration (O. and M. 161s) — 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) 1 

Elective _ , 3 



15 



3 
2 
3 
1 



SPECIAL CURRICULA ^^ ^^ 

Suggestions for a selection of courses in Management, Personnel Admin- 
istration and Industrial Relations to constitute a curriculum are available 
upon request to the Dean. Other organized programs of study will be 
developed whenever the needs of business and industry or the demands of 
students for training in other fields of business administration or economics 
warrant it. 

A student who has completed the basic first two years of Commerce with 
an average grade of B may, with the approval of his adviser, petition for a 
special curriculum if he can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Dean 
that the courses needed for his intended vocation are different from those 
offered in any of the foregoing standardized curricula. If the petition be 
granted, a special curriculum designed to fit the specific needs of such a 
student may be set up and made a part of his permanent record. There- 
after, the requirements for graduation of this student will be as set forth 
in his special curriculum. All such special curricula are subject to the 
scholarship, group, and specific course requirements of the College. 

* Suggested electives for students who wish general training and do not have a particular 
type of cooperation or cooperative activity in mind. 

t Application for this course must be made not later than March 1. 

146 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Harold Benjamin, Dean. 



-t 



The College of Education meets the needs of the following classes of 
students: (1) undergraduates preparing to teach the cultural and the 
vocational studies in high schools, preparatory schools, and vocational 
schools; (2) students who will enter higher institutions to prepare for 
work in specialized educational and institutional fields; (3) students pre- 
paring for educational work in the trades and industries; (4) students 
preparing to become home demonstrators, girls* club leaders, community 
recreation leaders, and (in cooperation with the Department of Sociology) 
social workers; (5) students whose major interest is in other fields, but 
who desire courses in education for their informational and cultural values; 
(6) graduate students preparing for teaching positions requiring an 
advanced degree and for positions as high school principals, elementary 
school principals, educational supervisors, attendance officers, and school 
administrators. 

The Summer Session, although organically distinct from the College of 
Education, is administered by the Dean of the College of Education, and 
is in effect an administrative division of the College. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain 
important supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Opportunity for supervised teaching under com- 
petent critic teachers is provided by arrangement with the school authorities 
of Prince Georges, Howard, and Montgomery Counties, and of the District 
of Columbia. 

Observation. Observation of teaching is conducted in Washington and 
in nearby Maryland schools. The nimiber, variety, and nearness of these 
schools provide ample and unusual opportunities for observation of actual 
classroom situations. 

Other Facilities in Washington. The Library of Congress, the Library 
of the U. S. Office of Education, and the special libraries of other Govern- 
ment offices are accessible. The information services of the National 
Education Association, the American Council on Education, the U. S. Office 
of Education, and of other institutions, public and private, are available 
to students. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in general 
the same as for the other colleges of the University. See Section I, 
Admission. 

Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

147 



Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is assigned to a member of the 
faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. Choice of subjects 
the student will prepare to teach should be made not later than the begin- 
ning of the sophomore year with the advice and approval of the appropriate 
adviser. 

It is advisable for students who purpose to teach (except Vocational 
Agriculture) to register in the College of Education, in order that they may 
have continuously the counsel and guidance of the faculty which is directly 
responsible for their professional preparation. It is permissible, however, 
for a student to register in that college which in conjunction with the 
College of Education offers the majority of the courses he will pursue in 
satisfying the requirements of the curriculum he elects. 

Students in other colleges desiring to elect an education curriculum 
should consult with the Dean of the College of Education at the beginning 
of the sophomore year in order to plan satisfactorily their subsequent pro- 
grams. Adjustments may be made as late as the beginning of the junior 
year. It is practically impossible to make adjustments later than that on 
account of the sequence of professional subjects in the junior and senior 
years. 

Admission of Teacher College Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curricula of Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges and other accredited teacher education institutions whose records 
give evidence of the ability and character essential to teaching will be 
admitted to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate 
classes. Graduates of the two-year teacher-training curriculum, in most 
cases, may satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Elementary Education by attendance for two full college years; gradu- 
ates of the three-year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year. 

Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as high school 
teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not uniform, 
but depends upon the high school subjects to be taught and the individual 
ability of the student. 

Sophomore Status 

The "Introduction to Teaching" scheduled for the sophomore year is an 
orientation course. It is designed with the twofold purpose of giving stu- 
dents a view of the teacher's job and of testing the aptitude and fitness 
of students for teaching. Admission to this course is based upon the fol- 
lowing: (1) completion of at least 30 semester hours of freshman work 
with an average grade as high as C; and (2) passing of series of tests 
which are designed to determine the student's preparation for the special 
demands of this course. 

Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two years, 

148 



by reason of temperament, health, industry, and scholastic progress, give 
promise of becoming successful teachers are encouraged to continue in the 
curricula of the College of Education; those who are unlikely to succeed 
as teachers by reason of health deficiencies, of weakness in oral and 
written English, of unfavorable personal traits, or of scholastic deficiency, 
are advised to transfer to other fields. 

To be eligible for junior status a student must have completed 64 semester 
hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average grade of C or better. 

Professional Courses 

The professional courses recognized by the State Department of Educa- 
tion for certification are given only in the junior and senior years. The 
minimum requirement for these is 16 semester hours, of which the follow- 
ing are prescribed: Educational Psychology, Technic of Teaching, Observa- 
tion of Teaching, Special Methods, and Supervised Teaching. 

To be eligible to enter the professional courses^ a student must have 
attained junior status as defined above. Continuance in such courses will 
be contingent upon the student's remaining in the upper four-fifths of his 
class in subsequent semester revisions of class standing. 

From the offerings of Education, the District of Columbia requirement 
of 24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe-, 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of 128 credits in conformity with the 
requirements specified under "Curricula" and in conformity with general 
requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will be conferred. 

Curricula 

The curricula of the College of Education, described in detail in the 
following pages, are designed to prepare high school teachers of the aca- 
demic and scientific subjects, the special subjects, and the vocational sub- 
jects under the provisions of the Federal Vocational Education Acts. 

The specifications for majors and minors, under "Arts and Science 
Education", satisfy the requirements of the State Department of Education 
in regard to "the number of college credits required in any two or more 
subjects which are to be placed on a high school teacher's certificate." 
The curricula for the special subjects cover all State Department require- 
ments. The curricula for the vocational subjects meet the objectives set up 

149 



in the Federal Acts and in the interpretations of the Office of Education 
and of the State Board of Education. (For Agricultural Education see 
College of Agriculture, page 80.) 

In the Arts and Science Education curriculum one may qualify for the 
degree either of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, depending upon the 
major subject. The other curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. 

The general and special requirements of each curriculum are shown in 
the following descriptions. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Educa- 
tion or in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students will be certified 
for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this cur- 
riculum. 

General Requirements 

In addition to Military Science or Physical Education, required of all 
students in the University, the following requirements must be fulfilled 
by all candidates for degrees in this curriculum, normally by the end of the 
sophomore year: 

(1) Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) and Survey and Composition II 
(Eng. 2f and 3s), 12 semester hours. 

(2) Reading and Speaking (Speech ly), 2 semester hours. 

(3) Two years of foreign language, if the student enters with less than 
three years of foreign language; one year, if he enters with three years. 
No foreign language is required of students who enter with four or more 
years of foreign language. "Foreign language" includes both Ancient and 
Modem languages. 

(4) Twelve semester hours of history and the social sciences. 

(5) Twelve hours of natural science or of natural science and mathe- 
matics. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

*Foreign Language 3 3 

Science (Biological or Physical) — „ 3-4 3-4 

From the following groups: 

History, Social Sciences, Mathematics, Science, Foreign 

Language, Music, Art, Physical Education 4-3 4-3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 1 



15-16 15-16 



* Except students entering with four or more units of language. 

150 



Semester 
Sophomore Year— {See ^'Sophomore Status," p. 148.) / ^^ 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f, 3s) ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) ^ ^ 

tForeign Language - ^ ^ 

Electives - """ 7; """77' ^. 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) - __ 

17 17 

Junior Year— (See ^Professional Courses," p. 149.) ^ ^ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) •-- __ ^ 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5s) ■• __ ^ 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) - - - ^ __ 

History of American Education (Ed. lOOf ) - - ^ 

Special Methods (Ed. 120s; 122s; 124s; 126s; 128s) ..- ^^ ^^ 

Electives " 

16 16 

Senior Year 2 or 2 

{Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) __ ^ 

The High School (Ed. 103s) 

or 3 

The Junior High School (Ed. UOf) -^_^^ ^^_^^- 

Electives - - ■ 

16 16 

Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
schc^l subjects in accordance with the certification requirement* of the 
Sta" Department of Education (By-law 30 revised) ^hese are des^ated 
as major and minor subjects, with a requirement of from 28 to 36 semester 
houTof credit for a major and from 20 to 24 hours for a minor. If it is 
SLmed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching o ttiree high 

school subjects, the requirement for a major may ^«. y«°f,^*^^\^Vcxtent rt 
tion of the Dean to permit the pursuit of three subjects to the «^nt re 
quired for State certification. Semester hour requirements are detailed 

below. . , 

No student who tos not met all previous reqmrements wdl be permitted 

to do practice teaching, 

tFor students entering with less than three units of language. 
$See Course description, p. 289. 



151 



English, A major in English requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Survey and Composition I and II 12 semester hours 

Shakespeare (Eng. llf or 12s) 3 semester hours 

American Literature ^ 6 semester hours 

36 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 21 hours 
prescribed for the major and 5 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen from a selected list of courses with the advice 
and approval of the instructor in "English in the High School." The stand- 
ards governing selection are those suggested by the National Council of 
Teachers of English. 

Survey and Composition I and II must be completed by the end of the 
junior year. 

Social Sciences. For a major in this group, 30 semester hours are 
required, of which at least 18 hours must be history including 6 hours in 
American history and 6 in European history. Six of the 18 hours must 
be in advanced courses. For a minor in the group, 24 hours are required, 
of which 18 are the same as specified above, and 6 of which must be in 
advanced courses. In every case the selection of courses must be approved 
by the head of the department in which the largest portion of the work is 
to be elected. 

History - 18 semester hours 

Economics or Sociology... _ 6 semester hours 

Electives _ - 6 semester hours 

For a minor, the same requirements less the electives. 

Required courses in History are as follows: A Survey of Western Civi- 
lization and American History. These must be completed by the end of 
the junior year. 

Modem Languages, For a major in Modern Languages 30 semester hours 
are required; for a minor 24 semester hours (exclusive of the introductory 
course). 

At least 18 hours of a major or minor in modern language must be com- 
pleted by the end of the junior year. 

A major or minor in French must include French 5s, 9y, lOy, and two 
courses of the 100 group. 

A major or minor in Spanish must include Spanish 5s, 6y, and two courses 
of the 100 group. 

A major or minor in German must include German 5s, lOy, and two 
courses of the 100 group. 

• See paragraphs on special requirements for major in English in Section III on 
English Language and Literature, p. 314. 

152 



Mathematics. Twenty-ei^ht semester hours are required for the major. 
The following sequence is recommended: Math. 7f, 21f, and 22s m the 
freshman year; Math. 18y and 23y in the sophomore year; Math, lilt, 
I12s and 141f in the junior and senior years. 

Twenty semester hours are required for the minor. The following course 
sequence is advised: Math. 7f, 21f and 22s in the freshman year; Math 
23y in the sophomore year; and Math. 18y and lllf m the jumor and 

senior years. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused 

from Math. It. 

Mathematics-Physics. This major consists of 18 hours in mathematics 
and 18 hours in physics. The courses selected must include Math, .f, ^U, 
and 22s; Phys. ly and 103y. ' 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused 

from Math. 7f. 

Chemistry ly is required as a supporting course to this major. 

If a minor in general science is offered in connection with this major, 
a total of 40 hours in the natural sciences should be presented. 

Science. In general science a major and minor are offered, consisting of 
40 and 30 hours respectively, each including elementary cou'ses^ ^ 
chemistry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany). The major must 
include one of the following course sequences. 

Sequences I and II, emphasizing chemistry or physics: 

Freshman year: *Math. 8f (3) or 21f (4); 10s (3) or 22s (4); Chem. 

ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Bot. If (4); Phys. ly (8). 

Junior and senior years: Phys. 103y (6) or Chem. 12y (6), and 103y 
(6); Zool. 3y (8); Bact. lA (2). 

Sequence III, emphasizing zoology: 

Freshman year: Zool. 3y (8); Chem. ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Zool. 12f (3) and 6s (3) ; Bot If (4). 

Junior and senior years: Zool. 103y (6); Phys. 3y (6) or ly (8); Bact. 

lA (2). 

Sequence IV, emphasizing botany: 

Freshman year: Zool. 3y (8); Chem. ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Bot. If (4) and 3s (4); Phys. 3y (6) or ly (8) 

Junior and senior years: Pit. Phys. lOlf (4) and I02s (3); Bact. lA (2) 

Minors of twenty semester hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and 

in Magical scScef A minor in biology must include the basic courses xn 

.Mathematics credits are r.ot counted in the total number of hours required for the 
science major. 

153 



zoology and botany and be supported by a course in chemistry (Chem. ly 

. ; J^ """°'' '" P^^^'*=^ ™"^* ^ supported by a basic course in chem- 
istry (Chem. ly or 3y) and a minor in chemistry by a basic course in 
physics (Phys. ly or 3y). 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry 
physics or biology, the same credits may be counted towards both provided 
that they number not fewer than 52 semester hours in natural sciences. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(See College of Agriculture, page 80.) 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

The entrance requirements for the curriculum in Commercial Education 
are as follows: English 3 units; Algebra 1 unit; Science 1 unit; History 1 
unit; Stenography 2 units; Typewriting 1 unit; Bookkeeping 1 uidt- 
elective 5 units. ' 

The Commercial Education curriculum includes a solid foundation of 
economics social science and history, accounting and business administration 
subjects, adequate courses in methods of teaching commercial subjects, and 
supervised teaching. 

The number of electives is large enough to enable a student to prepare 
for teaching some other subject in addition to the commercial subjects. 

The curriculum does not include any college courses in shorthand and 
typewriting for the improvement of skill in these arts. Any student desir- 
ing to become a candidate for the bachelor's degree in commercial education 
must meet the speed and accuracy requirements in shorthand and type- 
writing and transcription necessary to become a teacher of commercial sub- 
jects either by work in commercial offices during the summer or by such 
other means as may be practicable for improving his skill and accuracy. 

Curriculum 



Freshman Year Semester 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ o 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly^ZZT " 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) , ^ 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) Z'lZIZZZ 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is).. 

Science (Biological or Physical) .ZZI.^ 3 

One from the following groups : 

History, Mathematics, Literature, Foreign Language 3 
Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed" 

ly or 2y and 4y) ^ * - 



// 

3 
3 
1 

3 
3 



17 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - 3 

American History (H. 2y) „.... 3 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f, 3s) „ 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y) 3 

Money and Banking (Finance 53s) — 

Electives ..- — 4 

Basic R. O. T. €. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

17 

Junior Year 

Elements of Business (0. and M. 51f) „ 2 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. Sly) - 4 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) — 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 

History of American Education (Ed. lOOf ) _ 2 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) _ 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) — 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) — - — 

Business Law (0. and M. 101s) - — 

Electives ^ 2 

16 

Senior Year 

Business Law (0. and M. 102f) - 3 

Commercial Subjects in the High School (Ed. 150f, 151s) 2 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (Ed. 139 s) _ — 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf ) - 3 

or 

The High School (Ed. 103s) -. — 

Electives „ - 7-10 



15 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



// 

3 
8 
2 
3 
2 
2 



17 



4 
3 



2 
1 
8 
2 

15 



2 
2 



3 

8-11 

15 



17 



154 



The Home Economics Education curriculum is for students who are 
preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage in 
any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of teaching 
methods. It includes studies in all phases of home economics and the 
allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
Electives may be chosen from other colleges. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching, home management, house, and special work and observation of 
children in the University Nursery School. 



155 



students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Education 
or the College of Home Economics. Students will be certified for gradua- 
tion only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this curriculum. 



Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ 

Textiles (H. E. 71f) 

Design (H. E. 21s) „ „ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 

Freshman Lecture (H. E. ly) ~ 

Electives 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 2y 
and Phys. Ed. 4y) 



Semester 
II 

3 
4 



3 
4 
3 

1 
1 
2 



Sophomore Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f, 3s) 

Costimie Design (H. E. 24f) „ 

Clothing ( H. E. lis) „ 

Foods (H. E. 31y) _.... 

Elementary Physics ( Phys. 3y ) ..- - ~ 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) — ^ „ 

Introductory Botany ( Bot. 2s) 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) 

Community Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y 
and Phys. Ed. 8y ) _ _ 



15 

2 

3 

3 
3 
3 

2 

2 

18 



Junior Year 



Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5s) — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6s) — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 3 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) „ 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Zool. 15f ) 4 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133s) — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 



3 
1 
1 
2 



15 

2 

3 
3 
8 

3 
2 



18 



2 
1 
3 

a 

8 



2 
8 



Semester 

1 II 

Senior Year __ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f ) :-"Z:T,^: _ 3 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. l^ds).-..™-.——- 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H. E. Ed. ^ ^ 

103f) ■ 3 3 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) "-"—:^".'^-;^^ . i 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106f, 107s) ^ ^ 

The High School (Ed. 103s) ^ g 

Electives " 



14 



15 



Electives should include one course each in History and English. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies in Industrial Education provides: (1) a four- 
yelf cuSum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science m Industrial 
FH^Lnon. (2) 2L nroeram of professional courses to prepare teachers to 
Strr ;ei?L:^^^^^^ in vocational -d o^^^^^^^^^^^ 

(3) a program of courses for the improvement of teachers m service. 

I Four-year Curriculum in Industrial Education. 

' The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. (See page 53.) Experience in some trade or industrial 
activity will benefit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. 

This curriculum is designed to prepare both trade and industrial shop 
and related teachers, and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient 
latitude of electives so that a student may also meet certification require- 
ments in some other high school subject. 

Students entering an Industrial Education curriculum must register in the 
College of Education. 

This curriculum, with limited variations according to the needs of the 
two groups, is so administered as to provide: (A) a four-year pre-service 
curriculum for students in residence; (B) a four-year curriculum for 
teachers in service. 



16 



17 



156 



157 



A. Curriculum for Students in Residence 



Semester 



Freshman Year I 

Mechanical Drawing (Ind. Ed. If, 2s) 2 

Elementary Woodworking (Ind. Ed. 3f) 3 

Advanced Woodworking (Ind. Ed. 4s) — 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) „ ....._ 3 

History or Social Science. - 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ly) 1 

16 

« 

Sophomore Year 

Sheet Metal Work (Ind. Ed. 5f) 2 

Art Metal Work (Ind. Ed. 6s) _ — 

Architectural Drawing (Ind. Ed. 7y) „ 1 

Electricity (Ind. Ed. 8y) 2 

Pictorial Geometry (Math. 18y) _ _ 2 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f, 3s) _ 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y) 2 



17-18 



Junior Year 



Elementary Machine Shop (Ind. Ed. 9s) — 

Cold Metal Work (Ind. Ed. lOf ) 2 

Foundry (Ind. Ed. llf) „ - 1 

Forge Practice (Ind. Ed. 12f) > 1 

Essentials of Design (Ind. Ed. 160y) - ^ 1 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5s) ~. — 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) ~ — 

Industrial Education in the High School (Ind. Ed. 162s) — 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) - 3 

History or Social Science _ 3 

Electives — - - - 3 



17 



// 
2 

3 
3 
1 
3 
3 



16 



2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3-4 
2 

2 

17-18 



2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 

17 



Semester 

I n 

Senior Year « 

Advanced Machine Shop (Ind. Ed. 13f) -- .- - ^ ^ 

Shop Organization and Management (Ind. Ed. 164s) ^ 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) ........™™ 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects: Industrial Edu- ^^ ^ 

cation (Ed. 139f or s) --- ^ __ 

History of American Education (Ed. lOOf ) .-...- — • __ 

Occupations, Guidance, and Placement (Ind. Ed. 163f) - ^ 

Evolution of Modem Industry (Ind. Ed. 165f, 166s) ^^ ^^_^^ 

Electives 

16 16 

B. Curriculum for Teachers in Service 

The requirements in this curriculum for the B. S. degree in Industrial 
Education are quantitatively the same as for Curriculum A, except that 
the military-physical training and speech requirements are waived. In 
summary the distribution is approximately as follows: 

,. , 12 semester hours 

nSory ai^d^SieSoci^fs^ien^^^^^ 16 semester hours 

r/ .,- 4-- A ^n\^r.n^ - .- 20 semester hours 
Mathematics and Science - 

J T^ . 30 semester hours 

Shop and Drawing. " ^ . i. 

z;,^ ,. .24 semester hours 

Education - ^ . , i, ^„ ^o 

„, ,. 26 semester hours 

Electives ~ 

128 semester hours 

In the mathematics and science group, and in the history and social 
science group, there is reasonable latitude for individual choice, but courses 
in mathematics as related to shopwork and courses in American history 
and government are required. 

Program for Vocational, Occupational, and Shop Center Teachers 

This curriculum is designed for persons who have had experience in 
some trade or industry or in the teaching of shopwork. ^ 

Applicants for admission to this curriculum must have as a minimum 
requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. The cur- 
riculum is prescribed, but is administered flexibly in order that it may be 

adjusted to the needs of students. . ^ , . j . 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher-training m Baltimore and m 
other industrial centers, in-service courses are offered. The work of these 
courses deals principally with the analysis and classification of trade 
knowledge for instructional purposes, methods of teaching, observation and 
practice of teaching, psychology of trade and industrial education, and 
occupational information, guidance, and placement. 

Completion of eight teacher-training courses which require, in general, 
two years of two hundred forty clock hours, entitles one to a full three- 

159 



158 



year vocational teacher's certificate in the State of Maryland, and to a 
special diploma from the College of Education of the University of 
Maryland. 

Courses for Teachers in Service 

Courses are offered for teachers in service who are seeking to satisfy 
requirements for promotion. 

A special announcement of the in-service courses in Baltimore is issued 
in August of each year. This may be obtained from the office of the 
Registrar either in Baltimore or in College Park. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curricula are designed to prepare teachers of 
physical education for the high schools and leaders for recreational pro- 
grams. With the electives provided, it is possible to meet the certification 
requirements in other high school subjects as well as in physical education. 

These curricula include separate courses for men and for women. Some 
of the courses are open to both men and women. (See Sec. Ill, page 294.) 
Variations for men and for women are shown in the curricula outlined 
below. 

A standard uniform costing between five and ten dollars must be pur- 
chased by students electing the curricula. 

Upon satisfactory completion of either curriculum the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred. 

Students electing either of these curricula must register in the College 
of Education. 

General Requirements 

The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Science Education 
(see page 150), except that a foreign language is not required, and twenty 
semester hours of science are required as scheduled. 

Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I JI 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) , 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly).. 1 1 

Introductory Zoology (Zool. 2f) _ 3 — 

Introductory Botany (Bot. 2s) _ „ — 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 3 3 

From the following: History, Foreign Language, Mathematics, 

Home Economics, Industrial Education 3 3 

Wow,en 

Dance I (Phys. Ed. lOy) - 1 1 

Athletics I: W (Phys. Ed. 12y) _ _ 2 2 

Men 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) '. „ 1 1 

Athletics I: M (Phys. Ed. 5y) 2 2 

16 16 

160 



Semester 

Sophomore Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f, 3s) 2 2 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) ^ 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) ^ - ^ ^ 

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Zool. 15f ) 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) - - "~ 

Hygiene (Phys. Ed. llf) - • • ^ — 

Physical Education I (Phys. Ed. 20s) — ^ 

Women 

Dance II (Phys. Ed. 14y) J ^ 

Athletics II: W (Phys. Ed. 22y) ^ 

Men 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) - - — ^ 2 

Gymnastics I (Phys. Ed. 15y) ^ ^ 

17 17 

Junior Year— General Option 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) ^ "^ 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5s) ^ ^ 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6s) ~ ^ 

Physiology of Exercise (Phys. Ed. 125f ) - ^ 

Nature of Play (Phys. Ed. 132s )...... - __ 

Accident Prevention (Phys. Ed. 13f) - ^ ^ 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) ^ 

Dance III (Phys. Ed. 26y) ^ 

Physical Activities III (Phys. Ed. 52y) ^ ^ 

Electives 

Women 

Dance IV (Phys. Ed. 28f) ' J- "" 

Dance V (Phys. Ed. 30s) 

Men 
Athletics III: M (Phys. Ed. 113y) ~ J- J- 

16 16 



161 



o • T^ ^ , ^ Semester 

benwr Year — General Option / /, 

The Junior High School (Ed. llOf) or 3 _ 

The High School (Ed. 103s) __ 3 

Educational Measurements (Ed. lOof) 3 _^ 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) 2 or 2 

Teaching Health (Ed. 145s) „ _ 2 

Recreation IV (Phys. Ed. 137f) 2 -. 

Physical Education IV (Phys. Ed. 144s) 2 

Physical Education in the High School (Ed. 142f) 2 -, 

Electives 2-7 5-lo 

Women 

Athletics IV: W (Phys. Ed. 114y) 1 j 

Men 

Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 119y) 1 1 

Junior Year — Recreation Option ^^ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 — 

Physiology of Exercise (Phys. Ed. 125f) 2 — 

Nature of Play (Phys. Ed. 132s) __ 2 

Recreation I (Phys. Ed. 131f) 3 _ 

Recreation II (Phys. Ed. 133s) 3 

Accident Prevention (Phys. Ed. 13f) l _ 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) „......._ — 1 

Dance III (Phys. Ed. 26y) 1 1 

Physical Activities III (Phys. Ed. 52y) 1 1 

From the following: History, Sociology, Economics, Music, 

Art, Industrial Education, Home Economics, or Education... 4 7 
Women 

Dance IV (Phys. Ed. 28f ) 1 _ 

Dance V (Phys. Ed. 30s) IZZZZZZ — 1 

Men 

Athletics III: M (Phys. Ed. 113y) 1 1 

Senior Year— Recreation Option ^^ ^^ 

Recreation III (Phys. Ed. 135f) 3 _ 

Recreation IV (Phys. Ed. 137f) Z.Z^^ 2 — 

Physical Education IV (Phys. Ed. 144s) __ 2 

Teaching Health (Ed. 145s) Z _ 2 

Methods in Recreation (Ed. 143f) „ L'~. 2 — 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) 2 or 2 

From the following: History, Sociology, Economics, Music, 

Art, Industrial Education, or Education 5.7 g-lO 

Women 

Athletics IV: W (Phys. Ed. 114y) 1 1 

Men 

Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 119y) 1 1 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean. 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and operation. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised recently to in- 
crease the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which 
are a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and which are 
now considered essential to the proper training of engineers because of 
the practical application of these subjects in professional and business life. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient 
preparation for many callings in public and private life outside the engi- 
neering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. In the Mechanical Engineering 
Department an aeronautical option is offered in the junior and senior years. 
In order to give the student time to choose the branch of engineering for 
which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several courses is the 
same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the student to make a 
proper selection. The courses differ only slightly in the sophomore year, 
but in the junior and senior years the students are directed more definitely 
along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathematics. 
See Section I, Admission. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the unit 
of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry, provided such 
students are prepared to devote their first summer to a course in analytic 
geometry. The program for such students would be as follows: during 
the first semester, five hours a week would be devoted to making up ad- 
vanced algebra and solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics 
of the first semester would be scheduled, and the second semester mathe- 

163 



162 



15 



15 



matics would be taken in the summer session. Thus, such students, if thev 
passed the course, would be enabled to enter the sophomore year the next 
fall with their class without loss of time. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chem- 
ical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by students 
registered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engineering, 
which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that required 
for bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the University of Mary- 
land. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Graduate 
School, as will be found explained in the catalogue under the head of Gradu- 
ate School. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to graduates of the Uni- 
versity who have obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The appli- 
cant must satisfy the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years after grraduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Chemical, 
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 
with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

Drafting-Rooms. The drafting rooms are fully equipped for practical 
work. The engineering student must provide himself with an approved 
drawing outfit, material, and books, the cost of which during the freshman 
year amounts to $16 to $20. 

164 



Chemical Engineering Laboratories. For instruction and research, the 
Chemical Engineering Department maintains laboratories for (1) General 
Testing and Control; (2) Unit Operations; (3) Cooperative Research; (4) 
Graduate Research. 

General Testing and Control Laboratory. In this laboratory there is 
available complete equipment for the chemical and physical testing of 
water, gases, coal, petroleum, and their by-products; and for general 
industrial chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

Unit Operations Laboratory. This laboratory contains equipment for the 
study of fluid flow, heat flow, drying filtration, distillation, evaporation, 
crushing, grinding, and centrifuging. Organic process equipment includes 
an autoclave, nitrator, reducer, and mixing kettle. For the study of fluid 
flow a permanent hydraulic assembly is available, and this includes flow 
meters of most types. 

In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity of 
100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed type, 
direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evaporation 
can be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is equipped 
with a horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube bundle. 
This evaporator is equipped with vacuum and pressure gauges, stirrer, wet 
vacuum pump, a condensate pump, and a salt filter with different types of 
packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may be made. 
The organic process equipment is all self-driven and designed to afford 
flexibility in use. Filtration studies may be made either on a large plate 
and frame press or on the ordinary Sweetland type press. Shop facilities 
include a lathe, drill press, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools 
necessary for unit operation and research studies. For grinding there is a 
jaw crusher, a disc crusher, and a ball mill. A mechanical shaker and 
standard sieve are available for particle size separation. 

Cooperative and Graduate Research Laboratories. These laboratories are 
arranged to permit the installation of such special equipment as the par- 
ticular problems under consideration may require. Effort is made to 
maintain cooperation with the industries of Maryland and the Chemical 
Engineering activities of the State and Federal governments; for such work 
important advantages accrue because of the location of the Eastern 
Experiment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines on the University 
campus. 

Electrical Machinery Laboratories. There is provided a 20 kw. motor- 
generator set, consisting of a synchronous motor and a compound direct- 
current generator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish 
direct current for testing purposes. Through the distribution switchboard, 
provision is made for distributing to the various laboratories direct current 
at 125 volts, and alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 
and 220 volts. 

165 



/ 



The equipment includes a variety of direct and alternating-current gen- 
erators and motors, synchronous converter, distribution transformers, in- 
duction regulator, control apparatus, and the measuring instruments essen- 
tial for practical electrical testing. Most of the machines are of modem 
construction and of such size and design as to give typical performance. 
Flexibility of operation is provided in several ways: for instance, one of 
the synchronous machines has the coil terminals brought out to an external 
connection board, so that the windings may be connected for single-phase, 
two-phase, or three-phase operation; the machine is also provided with a 
phase-wound rotor and a squirrel-cage rotor, either of which may be used 
to replace the synchronous rotor. The synchronous converter is arranged 
for direct or inverted operation, either single-phase, two-phase, or three- 
phase. Metering and control boards are provided for rapid change of 
operating conditions with any machine. A single phase induction regulator 
with control panel provides voltage regulation for experimental work. 
There are several types of fractional-horsepower motors. The direct- 
current machines include several motor-generator sets and motors of vari- 
ous types and sizes for constant-speed and adjustable-speed operation. 
Storage batteries are available for low constant-voltage testing. Water- 
cooled Prony brakes are supplied for machine testing. Included in the 
general test equipment is a fairly complete assortment of ammeters, volt- 
meters, wattmeters, frequency meters, and two oscillographs. 

Illamination Laboratory. The equipment includes electric lamps, shades, 
and reflectors of various types; a bar photometer for determination of 
candle-power distribution of incandescent lamps; and four types of port- 
able photometers for the measurement of illumination intensities. 

Electrical Measurements and Electronics Laboratory. The equipment of 
this laboratory consists of secondary standards of potential, resistance, 
inductance, capacity and time for the comparison measurement of these 
values. Auxiliary equipment such as batteries, oscillators, amplifiers, 
bridges and both galvanometers and phone detecting devices is available. 
Equipment is also available for the experimental study of electric and 
magnetic fields, non-linear circuit elements and other topics in advanced 
electricity and magnetism. 

The equipment for calibration of meters includes a standard ammeter, 
voltmeter and watthourmeter which are used in conjunction with the stand- 
ards of potential and resistance, potentiometers and other apparatus. A 
five-machine motor-generator set delivers voltage and currents, both alter- 
nating and direct, for meter testing. 

For work in electronics high-vacuum, gas and vapor filled tubes and 
photo-tubes are available for the testing of their characteristics, and for 
the study of their applications in research and industrial circuits. Power 
supplies for tube operation are provided. 

Electrical Communications Laboratory. This laboratory is equipped with 
artificial lines, oscillators, amplifiers, vacuum-tube voltmeters, a transmission 

166 



loss or gain set and miscellaneous circuit elements for the study of the 
response of passive networks, transmission lines and coupled circuit. 

The University maintains an amateur short-wave radio station, under 
faculty supervision, for members of the Student Radio Society. This station 
is equipped with a multi-band superheterodyne amateur commumcations 
receiver and a 500-watt transmitter adjustable to amateur frequencies. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories. The apparatus consists of slide 
valve automatic steam engines equipped with Prony brakes, steam turbme- 
generator set, Waukesha Diesel engine research unit with electric dynamom- 
eter and other accessories, two-stage steam-driver air compressor, gas 
engines, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed water heaters, steam con- 
densers, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, pyrometers, draft gauges 
planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and equipment 
for a mechanical engineering laboratory. A refrigeration unit and a heating 
and ventilation unit have been installed. 

Aeronautical Laboratory. This laboratory is being equipped for practice 
and research in engines, metal construction, structural tests, vibration and 
noise, and aerodynamics. 

Hydraulics Laboratory. The equipment consists of electrically driven 
centrifugal pumps, measuring tanks, various types of weirs, venturi meters, 
nozzles, Pelton water wheel with Prony brake built especially for laboratory 
use, hook gauges, dial gauges, tachometers, stop watches, and other appa- 
ratus necessary for the study of the flow characteristics of water. 

Materials Laboratories. Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
making standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
gravel, steel, concrete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes a 300,000-pound hydraulic testing machine, two 
100,000-pound universal testing machines, torsion testing machine, hardness 
tester, abrasion testing machine, rattler, constant temperature chamber, 
cement-testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and other 
special devices for ascertaining the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. 

The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 
Equipment is also available for study of models by the photo-elastic 
method. 

Engineering Soils Laboratory. Equipment is available for performing 
the usual tests on engineering soils. This includes apparatus for grain size 
analysis, Atterberg limits, permeability, optimum moisture content for 
compaction, Proctor penetration, and consolidation. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association has, 
by arrangement with the College of Engineering, established its testing 

167 



and research laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research 
Foundation thus organized is to make available to the Association additional 
facilities for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of 
Engineering additional facilities and opportunities for increasing the 
scope of its engineering research. 

Engineering Experiment Station. The purpose of the Engineering Exper- 
iment Station at the University, as well as of the various research labora- 
tories, is to conduct cooperative studies with ^departments of the State 
and Federal governments, and with the industries of Maryland. These 
studies have included traffic surveys over the Maryland State highway 
system, studies of concrete cores cut from the state roads, and laboratory 
studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

Cooperative researches now under way in the Engineering Experiment 
Station include the following projects: reinforced concrete hinge construc- 
tion, expansion joints for concrete roads, diagonal tension reinforcement 
for concrete beams, operating effect of size of motor in single phase rural 
electric lines, electrical wave shaper recorder, and several studies in the 
design of airplanes. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 
milling machines, drill presses, shaper, midget mill, and precision boring 
head. Equipment is available for gas and electric arc welding. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane topographic, 
and geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties. 
A wide variety of surveying instruments is provided, including domestic as 
well as foreign makes. 

Spiecial Models a^d Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department main- 
tains a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering maga- 
zines. The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires that 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 



The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and Ti-ansport, founded by 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, President of the National Highways Association, 
is .'part of the Library of the College of Engineering. The many books, 
periodicals, pamphlets, and other items included in this library cover all 
phases of highway engineering, highway transportation, and highway 
traffic control. 

There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans- 
portation library of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington, D. C. The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transportation problems, 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is otitlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies. 

The freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
by practicing engineers covering the work of the several engineering pro- 
fessional fields. The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in 
selecting the particular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 
The student is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecture. 
A series of engineering lectures for upper classmen is also provided. These 
are given weekly by prominent practicing engineers in the various branches 
of the profession. 

Student branches of the following national technical societies are estab- 
lished in the College of Engineering: American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers. The student branches meet regularly for the 
discussion of topics dealing with the various fields of engineering. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior when 
he shall have passed at least 68 semester credit hours with an average 
grade of C or higher. 

Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect, with the 
permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 

All engineering students are urged to secure work during the summer, 
particularly in engineering fields. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



168 



169 



Semester 



Freshman Curriculum 



Semester 
Freshman Year — Alike for all engineering courses. / // 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

"College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) 2 — 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) — ^ 2 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) ^ — 1 

Introduction to Engineering (Engr. If) 1 — 

tElective 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Phvsical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) . 1 1 

19 19 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information 
on chemical operations and processes of importance in modem life and 
to apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods, 
for the attainment of economic objectives. Modem chemical research 
has contributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of 
the chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation 
in which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f) 4 

Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (Ch. E. 10s) 4 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 4 4 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) 2 2 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is) — 1 

Modem Language (French or German) _ 3 3 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 5 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) „ 2 2 



20 



21 



*A qualifying test is given at the close of the first two weeks to determine whether the 
student is adequately prepared for Math. 21f. A student failing this test is required to take 
Math. If, a one-semester course without credit. 

fThe student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Language, or Government. 
Students who plan to enroll in Chemical Engineering are advised to take German or French. 



170 



Junior Year ^ 

Applied Mechanics (Phys. 117y) 2 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) _ 3 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. Sly) 3 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch. E. 103y) 3 

*Fuels and their Utilization (Ch. E. 107y)..: ) 

'Chemical Technology (Ch. E. 108y) - ~..™ \ 

19 

Senior Year 

Elements of Thermodynamics (Chem. 105y) 2 

Chemical Engineering Seminar (Ch. E. 104y) - 1 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) - 3 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) 5 

Minor Problems (Ch. E. 106y) 5 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf ) 2 



// 

2 

3 
2 
3 
4 
3 



19 

2 
1 

5 

8 



18 16 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING-CHEMISTRY 

A five-year program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, arranged 
between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and Sciences, 
permits students, who so desire, to become candidates for the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Arts upon 
completion of the program outlined below: 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) 4 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) - ~ 5 5 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) 2 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 2 2 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) - - ^- 3 3 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is) * — 1 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y) 2 2 

21 22 

♦Student has a choice between Chemical Technology and Fuels. 



171 



X 



r . ^r Semester 

Junior Year r jj 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 2 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) ' 4 4 

Water Fuels and Lubricants (Ch. E. 10s) _ 4 

Applied Mechanics (Phys. 117y) Zl 2 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51y) 3 3 

Chemical Technology (Ch. E. 108y) 2 2 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) _ 3 



16 

Fourth Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) 3 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) 2 

Organic Laboratory ( Chem. 117y) 1 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch. E. lOSy) 3 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (0. and M. llOf) 2 

Public Utilities ( Econ. 145s ) _ 

17 

Fifth Year 

Elements of Thermodynamics (Chem. 105y) 2 

Chemical Engineering Seminar (Ch. E. 104y) 1 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) 5 

Minor Problems (Ch. E. 106y) ZIZ 5 

Elective — Social Sciences 3 

Elective — English 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (Chem. 118y) _ 1 



17 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



17 



3 
2 
4 
2 
1 
3 



18 



2 

1 
5 

8 

2 
1 

19 



Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 
of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) _ 

Calculus (Math. 23y) _ 

General Physics ( Phys. 2y ) 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) 

Plane Surveying ( Surv. 2y ) „ 

*Elective - „ „ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y) 



Semester 
II 



2 

4 
5 
2 

2 
3 



20 



Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 

Engineering Geology (Engr. lOlf) „ „. 2 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) 5 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) - — 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) — 

Principles of Mechanical Engineering (M. E. 112f) — 3 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) ^ — 

Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) 3 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) — 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) ^ „ 4 

Technical Society — 



Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf). 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) _ 

Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 4s) 

Elements of Highways (C. E. 105f) _ _ 

Concrete Design (C. E. 106y) 

Structural Design (C. E. 107y) 

Municipal Sanitation (C. E. 108y) - 

^ A A^^ l3X l3 ^ ^^^ • n T • JL ^^ ^^ J m a* ■•■*«a*as^aa* ■.**•■•••*■■*•••«•••••••■••■ ■ a a • >••«• •••*> a «•* >• a ■ ■ a • a •••••*• aa a ••>»«••••• a a a a a *••••• >•••»••• 

Soils and Foundations (C E. 110s) _ ..^ 

Technical Society - 



18 

1 
2 



3 
4 
4 
3 
1 



4 
6 

3 
3 
3 



20 

1 
3 

4 
2 

3 

5 



18 



2 
1 

3 
3 
3 
2 

i 



18 



18 



172 



*The student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Lan^age, or Government. 

173 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, and dis- 
tribution of electrical energy; electrical transportation, communication, illum- 
ination, and manufacturing; and miscellaneous electrical applications in 
industry, commerce, and home life. 



Semester 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) » 

Calculus (Math. 23y) „ 

1 )escriptive Geometry ( Dr. 3f ) ^ 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 2f ) 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. Is) 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) 

*Elective „ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y) - - 



Semester 

1 II 

2 — 

4 4 

5 5 

2 — 
1 — 
1 — 

— 8 

— 3 

3 3 



20 20 

Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) _ 4 — 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) — 3 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) - — 2 

Direct Currents (E. E. 103f ) 5 — 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 104f ) 1 — 

Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 105y) 4 4 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. 106s) — 5 

^L \^\^X&XAi^^^CvX tk^^^^^X^^ ^ JF ^ -■ >-..--»..-^»^ ^ TTTT--T tT--TTTlTtlWir ■¥■■■■■■■■■< ■!■ — 

18 18 



/ 

1 
2 



Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf) 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) — 

Alternating Current Machinery (E. E. 107y) 4 

Alternating Current Design (E. E. 108f) ^ 

Electrical Communications (E. E. 109y) 

^Illumination (E. E. llOf) - - 

♦Electric Railways (E. E. lllf) 

♦Electric Power Transmission (E. E. 112s) 

♦Engineering Electronics (E. E. 113s) 

Thermodynamics (M. E. lOlf) 

Power Plants (M. E. 113s) 

Thesis' (E. E. 114y) 

Technical Society -• 



// 
1 

2 

4 



3 
3 



18- 



3 
3 

3 
Z 



18 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and mainten- 
ance of machinery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and refriger- 
ation ; and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 

General Physics (Phys. 2y).....~ ^...- - 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 3f) 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is)... 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. 2s)' - 



4'J]|g(»^iYg „ - ~ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 



3y) ~ 



2 — 

4 4 

5 5 
2 — 

— 1 

2 — 
3 
2 
20 



5 
3 

2 

20 



*The student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Lan^iage, or Government 

174 



tThlTtudent may elect a course in Social Science, History. Language, or Government. 

175 



I! 



ti 



Semester 

Junior Year — General I // 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 i 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) 5 ^ 

Hydraulics ( C. E. 102s ) — 3 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) — 2 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 4 

Mechanics of Machinery (M. E. 102y) 2 2 

Foundry Practice (Shop lOlf) 1 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 102s) — 1 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103y) 2 2 

Technical Society „ — — 



Semester 



18 

Junior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) 5 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) ^..... — 

Foundry Practice ( Shop lOlf ) „ _ 1 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 102s) — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 

Mechanics of Machinery (M. E. 102y) 2 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103y) 2 

Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics (M. E. 104s) _ — 

Technical Society — 

18 

Senior Year — General 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) „ 1 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf) 2 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) — 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 105f) 3 

Refrigeration ( M. E. 106s ) — 

Prime Movers (M. E. 108y) 4 

Mechanical Engineering Design (M. E. 109y) 4 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. llOy) 3 

Thesis (M. E. 107y) - - 1 

Technical Society. - — 



18 



18 



3 



2 

1 
4 
2 
2 
3 



18 



3 
4 
3 
3 
2 



18 



r 

Senior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) ;;■•;""••:; 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOt) 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) 

Airplane Structure (M. E. Illy) 

Prime Movers (M. E. 108y) - 

Mechanical Engineering Design (M. E. 109y) 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. llOy) 

Thesis (M. E. 107y) 

Technical Society - - "■' 



/ 

1 
2 

3 

4 
4 
3 



18 



// 
1 

2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 



18 



176 



AGRICULTURE ENGINEERING 

A five-year combined program in Agriculture and Engineering, arranged 
. f 1 hJ thl College of Agriculture and the College of Engmeermg, per- 
S stulents to Sme candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
rigricSre at the end of four years and for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science i^^^^^ Electrical, Mechanical, or Chemical Engmeermg at the 

^^Lfails^f tM^^^^^^^^ will be found listed in this catalogue under 

College of Agriculture, page 83'. 

RiTRFAIT OF MINES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 
FELLOWSmPS IN APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING . 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 
off!rr f^nowrwps for research in the field of engineering and applied 
sSnces Fdlows enter upon their duties on July 1. ^"<i/*'"tmue for 2 
Tnths" including one month for vacation. Paynients -d- ^ ^e^^owsh^p 
are made at the end of each month, and amount to $600 for the year 
The TnTversity will remit payment of tuition fees, and will grant all 
fellowship privileges. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 

mIv and anT become candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Sass wo^k wfll be directed by the heads of the -departments of -sruct.n. 

but about half of the time will be spent in research, under the direction 

of the Bureau of Mines staff. 

Appropriate problems in physics, <=h«-^^t'3v.'''''"'rtL'LSS'knd 
mathematics will be chosen according to the abilities of the candidates and 
Thet'erLts of the Bureau Divisions. The faculty superv^orw^^^^ the 
Professor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland. 

The above fellowships will be known as Bureau of Mines Research Fellow- 
shS ^Irecpients will undertake the solution of definite problems con- 
frrtinfL mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 

177 



Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 
recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require residence 
during the university year from September to June. i 

All the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities 
and technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or 
applied physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research 
work. Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of 
graduate work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications with a certified copy of college record, applicant's photo- 
graph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and letters 
from three i>ersons, such as instructors or employers, covering specifically 
the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience, will be received 
up to April 1. "nie application should be addressed to Fellowship Commit- 
tee, Eastern Experiment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Depart- 
ment of the Interior, College Park, Maryland. 



BUREAU OF MINES LECTURES 

4^ fV,o TTniversitv of Maryland, the Bureau of Mines 
Under the auspices of the University ^^'\J' ^^^^ maintains its 

of the United States Department of the ^f ™ Tp^^^ ^ni offer an 
Eastern Experiment Station - the campus ^^rtmoti^e College of 
interesting series of public lee ures m the ~J^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^er. 
Engineering throughout ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I^eLt month, beginning in 
.ill be given monthly, -J^^^^/^^ ^^^^^^^ W 8:15 P. M. 

October and ending in April, except ^^^"^^^^/ ^^ ^ ^he Bureau's 
The speakers will be outstanding /^^^\^^^;^^.,2%t^^^^ llec^d because 
various experiment stations ^1^-)^^^-^^^^^^^ inter- 

of broad and varied experience in fields of wide t^^*'^^^' ^ , ^^^ ^^ctures 

There will be no charge for admission. The general public 
the faculty and student body are cordially invited. 



STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 

NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate problems 
related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their duties 
on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vacation. 
Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month and 
amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 

This fellowship is open to graduates in Engineering, from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications with a certified 
copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, statement of technical 
and practical experience (if any), and letters from three persons, such as 
instructors or employers, covering specifically the applicant's character, 
ability, education, and experience, will be received up to May 1, 1940. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean, College of Engineering, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

178 



179 



A 



II 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dean 

To give a young woman the best personal development and a preparation 
for home making is the chief aim of home economics education. The second 
aim is professional — a preparation for earning a livelihood. For the ma- 
jority of women who must earn a living home economics offers many 
opportunities as teachers or extension specialists in home economics; direc- 
tors of food service in restaurants, cafeterias and hospitals; as textile 
specialists or clothing specialists in department stores; as home economists 
with commercial firms, radio stations or magazines and newspapers. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Foods and Nutrition; Textiles, Clothing, and Art; 
and Home and Institution Management. 

Facilities 

The new home economics building increases greatly the classroom and 
laboratory facilities. These increased facilities will permit expansion of 
work now being offered and the addition of new lines of work. The college 
maintains a home management house, in which students gain practical 
experience in home-making during their senior year. 

Baltimore and Washington afford xmusual opportunities for trips, addi- 
tional study, and practical experience pertaining to the various phases of 
home economics. 

Professional Organizations v 

The Home Economics Club, to which all home economics students are 
eligible, is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association. 

Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, established Alpha 
Zeta chapter at the University of Maryland, November, 1937. Students of 
high scholarship may be elected to membership. 

Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of four years of prescribed courses, of 128 semester hours. In ac- 
cordance with the University policy, not less than three-fourths of the 
credits for graduation must be earned with grades of A, B, or C. 

180 



Curricula 

When a student has attained junior standing* she "^^^ /^""^'^^J^^^ ^e 
^.professional general home -"---^^^^"^f "^^^S foods and 
Slowing professional curricula or a '^^^^J^^Zfj^^:;,e.tnes and 
nutrition, institution ^^^^^^^J^^XkT:^^^^^^^^^^^ home economics 
tv SisTer fnTorU^nomts^SSirn in the College of Home Economics, 

rSfcollege of Education (see home economics education). 

Following are the outlines of all curricula. 

Curriculum-General Home Economics 

Semester 

I 11 

freshman Year ^ 3 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly)-^- - ■•"---" 3.4 

IGeneral or Introductory Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) ^ _ 

Textiles (H. E. 71f) _ 3 

Design (H. E. 21s) .....^-^ -•■ - ^ 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly)-^ " ^ ^ 

Home Economics Lectures (H. E. ly) — 2.3 2-3 

'?S2 i^^^nraM Physical Aiti;^«es;]p^^ ^ , 

and 4y ) . 

15-16 15-16 

%Sopho'more Year ^ 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f ) - " ___ 3 

Clothing (H. E. lis) - ~^' 3 3 

Foods (H. E. 31y) - - " 3 S 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y)-^.^ ■■ "" 3 _ 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) ■••••• ___ 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ^ ^ 

'S^ity Hygi^r;;;d"Sys^^^^ ^ 2 

and 8y ) — — 

17 17 



;clr'i;'irr:,:ireVfo'^ futrrr^ith the exception of general ho..e eco„o:„ics and 
ll?rLf;ne .ear of French --'>^^^^:^:t^ iSf etun. the foods 

TrXion to the courses as P-Hhed one eo„r. ^^'^J::r^^X^. 
eulncula except P-«-' "* ^,7^2 hou": of scLce is Quired in the practiea. art 
tlt^^/AnXrscienee"::^. he substituted for ph.ics in this curriculum. 

181 



It 



Junior Year 

Elements of Nutrition (H. E. 32f). 



Semester 
U 



or 



r 



Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) „ 3 

Advanced Qothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) 3 

Electives ..„ : 4-5 

16-17 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f ) 3 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143s) — 

Electives _ 12 

15 

Curriculum — Foods and Nutrition 

Junior Year 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f) 4 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) : — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) _ 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) 3 

Electives - 4 

17 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) 3 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143s) — 

Experimental Foods (H. E. 135f) _ 4 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133s) — 

Advanced Foods (H. E. 134s) — 

Electives 8 



3 

3 

3 
3 

4-5 

16-17 



3 
12 

15 



8 

8 
3 
3 
8 
2 

17 



2 
3 
7 



♦Curriculum-Institution Management ^Semester^ 

Junior Year ,r^^^ ^ a(\^^\ 4 — 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f) _ ^ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) ^ _ 

Nutrition (H. E. I31f) - _ 8 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) ;- ••■-•:::; iT,:; 1 3 8 

Management of the Home (H. E Ulf. 142s) - ^ ^ 

Institution Management (H. E. 144y) _ g 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. Ssj..^ -^ _ j 

Observation of Teaching (H. E- Ed. 6s) .^.^. _ ^ 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. Id7s) ^ _ 

Electives ~ "' — — 

17 18 

Senior Year - , ,, tu v M-it\ 3 — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 14rft) _ ^ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) ..^^.^ ^ _ 

Experimental Foods (H. E. l^Sf)^ •—"-—- _ 3 

Advanced Institution Management (H. E. 14bs) ^ _ 

Institution Cookery (H. E. IfJ^) ;„• ; 3 3 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) - _ 3 

Mental Hygiene (Psych. 130s) ■■•■■-;■ _ S 

Diet in Disease (H. E. 138s) - "^ 2 — 

Electives — — — 

15 15 

Curriculum-Home Economics Extension 

Junior Year 3 — 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) _ 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) ;-" •:;;,:,„;; 3 8 

Management of the Home (H. E Ulf, 142s) ^ _ 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf). -^ _ 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) _ ^ _ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) _ ^ 

Technic of Teaching (H. E Ed. 5s).. .^. - _ ^ 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. bs) ^ _ 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133f) -^■^■■- _-_•- _ 3 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E 137s) ^ 

Interior Decoration (H. E. I21f, 122s) __ _ 

17 18 



15 



182 



15 



A student planning to do '-''t"*--^/";^'' Ob ervation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6s) 
to take Technic of Teaching (H. E. t.<i. 58). w 
and Diet in Disease (H. E. 138s). 



Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) ^ 

Rental Hygiene (Psych. 130s) 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) ■■" " 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (Hi ■is'is) ~ 

12 

15 

Curriculum-Textiles and Clothing 
Junior Year 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. 11 if) 

Advanced Textiles (H. E 17ls) ^ 

Chemistry of Textiles (Chem. 14s)" " "" 

tNutrition (H. E. 131f) — 

or 1 

Elements of Nutrition (H E 32f ) ( ^ 

Management of the Home* (H. E. uif ;r4"2s) ^ « 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) ^ ^ 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) T 

ii<lectives . 3 

- - 5 



Semester 
II 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



Curriculum — Practical Art 



Semester 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
2 



Junior Year I 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) > — 

Art in Ancient Civilization (Art. If, 2s) 2 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) - 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) 3 

Elements of Nutrition (H. E. 32f ) _ 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. If) 3 

Personnel ( Psych. 161s ) - — 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) „ 3 

17 

Senior Year 

Advanced Design (H. E. 123f, 124s) 3 

Elements of Business (O. and M. 51f) 2 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f) 3 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) — 

Merchandise Display (H. E. 125s) — 

Electives ~ 7 

15 



// 

3 
2 
3 
S 



3 



17 



3 
2 

7 

15 



17 
Senior Year 
Problems in Clothing (H. E. 112s) 

Problems in Textiles (H. E. 172f) "~~ 

Practice in Management of the Home 7h E 143f ) " t 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) .....' ^ ^ 

Electives .... " 

" 8 



17 



3 
9 



15 



15 



*Electives should include a course in Poultry and in Dairying 
.Chemistry 12 Ay and 12 By is prereQuisite for Nutrition h|; i3if. 



184 



185 



» 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean. 

The Graduate School Council 

II. C. B vuD, LL.D.. President of the University. 

r ir' Tr • •• Professor of English. 

L H UM^'..?;? •' ^'"'^^^•'^ «>^ P°"«'=-l Science. 
K H JAMES. Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

H. J. PATTEriDst'Sa?Z'..tTr''. '"'*""*'"" M^^^^ 
W <? <3m*tt du rT'^" . Emeritus of Agriculture. 
W. S. Small. Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

r E Zuc^Kr^'n • !• f^''- P^°'^^^°^ °^ Mathematics. 

timore) ' " ^"'^''"'' '^ Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Bal- 

EDUAKD Uhlenhuth. Ph.D.. Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 

General Information 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

c^^^c^^^ *;; ;;f Sa?e%f rr^ '''-- -- ^-^--"^ 

departments concerned under ft™ •• f*' ""^^ '" "^^'^e of the 
Graduate School of^'u^vershv oXTTf '^' ^""^' ^^'"'^'y- ^h^ 
organized graduate instruSLn Sd^i to wl! .^1''*"''"'^"^ '" '^''' ^"<^ 
degree was undertaken. The flcu t! * , ,t *^M^«t«'■'« ^^d the Doctor's 

members of the various facuHiefwt'g^Vfn^tSoT^ ''"'''' T'"'^^ ^" 
courses. The general administrative functions^f h ^^^'■'''''*^ ^'"^^"^*" 
delegated to a Graduate Council of whkh h^ n *^!f <l»«t« fa<="lty are 
is chairman. ' ^'*''' ^''^ ^e^" "^ the Graduate School 

LIBRARIES 

the p^xlmily of thes, Ubrari« J^ ™f ' ?' ,"'"""• "* Because of 

186 



THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The graduate students maintain an active Graduate Club. Several meet- 
ings for professional and social purposes are held during the year. Students 
working in different departments have an opportunity to become acquainted 
with one another and thus profit by the broad cultural values derived from 
contacts with fellow students working in different fields. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Graduates from recognized colleges regarded as standard by the institu- 
tion and by regional or general accrediting agencies are admitted to the 
Graduate School. The applicant shall present an official transcript of his 
collegiate record which for unconditional admission shall show creditable 
completion of an undergraduate major in the subject chosen for specializa- 
tion in the Graduate School. 

Application blanks for admission to the Graduate School are obtained from 
the office of the JDean, T-214, Agriculture Building. After approval of the 
application, a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, is issued to the 
student. This card permits one to register in the Graduate School. After 
payment of the fee, the matriculation card is stamped and returned. It is 
the student's certificate of membership in the Graduate School, and may be 
called for at any succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Gradwate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree, 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each semester. Students taking grad- 
uate work in the summer session are also required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each session. In no case will grad- 
uate credit be given unless the student matriculates and registers in the 
Graduate School. 

The program of work for the semester or the summer session is arranged 
by the student with the major department and entered upon two course 
cards, which are signed first by the professor in charge of the student's 
major subject and then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One card is 
retained by the Dean. The student takes the other card, and in case of a 
new student, also the matriculation card, to the Registrar's office, where 
the registration is completed. Students will not be admitted to graduate 
courses until the Registrar has certified to the instructor that registration 
has been completed. Course cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office 
or at the Dean's office. The heads of departments usually keep a supply 
of these cards in their respective offices. 

187 



GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates, 
or For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Graduate students may 
elect courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue but graduate 
credit will not be allowed for these. Students with inadequate preparation 
may be required to take some of these courses. No credit toward graduate 
degrees may be obtained by correspondence or extension study. Courses that 
are audited are registered for in the same way and at the same fees as other 
courses. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including 
suitable minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of thirty 
credit hours for the year, including thesis work, which is valued at not less 
than six hours. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the summer session may be counted as residence 
toward an advanced deg/'ee. 

By special arrangement, graduate work may be pursued during the entire 
summer in some departments. Such students as graduate assistants, or 
others who may wish to supplement work done during the regular year, 
may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by full-time graduate 
work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory supervision and 
facilities for summer work are available in their special fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin giving full information con- 
cerning the summer session and the graduate courses offered therein. The 
bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work 
in the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet 
the same requirements and proceed in the same way as do graduate students 
in other departments of the University. 

The graduate courses in the professional schools are listed in the 
Graduate School Announcements. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester, and who continue their residence 
in the University for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register in 
the Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor's degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

188 



. • . of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
A senior of this university w ^nnrnval of his undergraduate 

for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of h s J^^^^^^^ 
Dean and the Dean of the Graduate S<=h<^l' register m ^^^^^^^ 

college for graduate courses, wh:ch may ^-^-^J.^^J^^^^^^^ of under- 

credit toward an advanced degree ^^^^'^t exceed ^f teen credits for the 

for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to -didacy for ^^^^^aster s J^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Doctor's degree is made on -P/--%°" "f"^^jf f,e Med out in dupli- 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. Jh^^e are ^cations 

eate and after the required endorsement -^/^^^^^^^'J^^.^Xt of the 
are acted upon by the Graduate CounciL J^^^^'^^^l^^ , Jpieted at 

candidate's undergraduate '^^^f ^^^" J, ^"^J'^^^ee before the applica- 
other institutions must be filed in the Dean s office 

tion can be considered. cfnHpnt of a degree, but 

Adn,l»l.n .0 candidacy » J ,;f J^r,%t„tr.nd '. considered 

rs iSo^ ^^^^^^^^ ^:-=. r.rdrc 

graduate work already completed. ^ j^ 

Ad..«c.n,«,. .. Cdidacy Each ^--^^f'^^^^'^X^'tSTiZ 
„,„lred t. n,ake awlic.ti.n for »«~» " ^"tf rf ftc academic year 

grade of "B" in all major and mmor subjects is requi 

Minimum Residence. A residence o^ ^^^' ^^^^^^S"^:.^^:.:; 

its equivalent, at this institution -J^^^^^ J^r^ersessTons at this 
six semester h°urs of gr^uate work f or to ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

institution, a student may fulfill th^ ^^^'^^^^'^j^ J ,^^^ the greater part of 
of Master or Arts or Master of Science pro between 

the thesis work can be d-%^"t'/a fifth^^^^^ of residence may be 
summer sessions. In some instances a fifth s™*'^ , .^ 
required in order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

189 



Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
sive of research, with an average **B" grade in courses approved for grad- 
uate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science. If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate 
courses, either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses may be 
required to supplement the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four hours 
required in graduate courses, not less than twelve semester hours and not 
more than sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major subject. 
The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must com- 
prise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits 
for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 200 or above. The entire course of study must constitute a 
unified program approved by the student^s major adviser and by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit, not to exceed six hours, obtained at other 
recognized institutions may be transferred and applied to the course re- 
quirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of graduate 
character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the student's 
graduate program at the University of Maryland. This transfer of credit is 
approved by the Graduate Council when the student is admitted to can- 
didacy for the degree. Acceptance of the transferred credit does not reduce 
the minimum residence requirements. The candidate is subject to final 
examination by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate 
courses a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Master of Science. It must demonstrate the stu- 
dent's ability to do independent work and it must be acceptable in literary 
style and composition. It is assumed that the time devoted to thesis work 
will be not less than the equivalent of six semester hours earned in graduate 
courses. With the approval of the student's major professor and the Dean 
of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared in 
absentia under direction and supervision of a member of the faculty of this 
institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before commencement. An ab- 
stract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words in length, must accom- 
pany it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the 
thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should 
be consulted by the student before the typing of the manuscript is begun. 
Individual copies of this manual may be obtained by the student at the 
Dean's office at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's ad- 
viser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the 

190 



committee are persons under whom the student has taken -?f ?^^^^^^^^ 
\a minor courses The chairman and the candidate are notified of the per 
LnnSTtre e"L^^ committee at least one week prior to the period se 

or oral examinations. The chairman of the committee -elects ^^^^/^.^^ 
time and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the 

ommhtee and the candidate. The examination should be cond^-^-^ J^JJ^J 
thHates specified and a report of the committee sent to the Dean as soon 
fs poSe'^^^^^^^ the examination. A special form ^or this purpose .^ ^ 
nlied to the chairman of the committee. Such a report is the basis upon 
wSh recom^^^^^ is made to the faculty that the candidate be grant^^^^ 
the degree sought. The period for the oral exammation is usually one 

'The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the --^^.^^^^^^^ 
portunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examma 

'"a student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Course Requirements. Thirty hours of course work are required, which 
n,ay Sude courses in departments other than Education not to exceed be- 
half of the total thirty hours, such courses to ^e selected ly^^fo^^ty 
with the student's special needs as agreed upon by the student and ms 
TdLr Of the thirfy hours, not less than one-half must be on the 200 

'^"fl" I ocf fnnr of the thirty hours must be seminar work, which shall 
inctud one or more tm^nlfpapers in the student's m^Jor field of concen- 
"aUon in the Department of Education. (A thesis may be substituted for 

^\:Z7^t ;^rot\rrrb°erurSin education, statistics and in 

procedure of educational research. 

A comprehensive wriUen e-^in^^n .^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^ _^^^ 

sefsirind^r/ m^rfthr 'si'x hours may be transferred from another 

'" TlTlZuirements in regard to advancement to can^dacy transfer of 
credits, and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's deg'e« ™"«* 

be ad'tted to candidacy not later than one academic jea^ P-r J the 

^f fV^o AocrvPf^ AoDlications for admission to candidacy lor me 

SSdtle areTlW X the student and submitted to his major de- 

191 



partment for further action and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate 
School not later than the first Wednesday in October of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Modem Language 
Department a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be cor- 
respondingly increased. All work at other institutions that is transferred 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree is approved 
by the Graduate Council, upon recommendation of the department con- 
cerned, when the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree. The 
Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and work, 
but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in scholar- 
ship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special field in 
which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. The minor work required varies from 
twenty-four to thirty hours at the discretion of the department concerned. 
The remainder of the required residence is devoted to intensive study and 
research in the major field. The amount of required course work in the 
major subject will vary with the department and the individual candidate. 
The candidate must register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of 
research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. The original type- 
written copy and one clear carbon copy of the thesis, together with an 
abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited 
in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before commencement. One 
or two extra copies of the thesis should be provided for use of members 
of the examining committee prior to the date of the final examination. The 
thesis is later printed in such form as the committee and the Dean may 
approve, and fifty copies are deposited in the University library. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students may 
obtain copies of this manual at the Dean*s office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 



The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 

~ -^ rhf«erj? hTS: ::/ si:f iSect t:^^£^ 

l^StL^f thf :tfaf t\l^tated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDIDATES 
BULi!^ u ^^^ ^^^ DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

have nis exammation cnu before the examination. 

partment of f <!-- ^a^^ab h^^ '^ ^ 

The exammation aims to test at>inty ^ ^„„aidate will know sufficient 

'T'Lplication for admission to these tests must be filed in the office 
of the DCrtment of Modern Languages at least three days m advance of 

Vto penalty is attached to failure in f ;~S^:t"'fofth:;; 
successful candidate is free to try agam at the next date set 

T Examinations are held near the office of the f P-f f jJ^JJ^,^:™ 
Unguages, on the last Wednesday in September and the first Wednesdays 
in February and June, at 2 P. M. 

GRADUATE FEES 
The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

Tmat" uttion fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon admission to 

the Graduate School. , .^Aft 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 
A graduate fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

''TlTZr.e each semester, of $6.00 per semester credit hour for 
students carrying eight hours or less; for students carrymg more than 

^'tb^y^r rt^gffrrSo to $S.OO per course per semester. 
"''^Torjf M^iicine: A fixed charge each semester of JS-O^ per se-ter 

ter'telt" h?ur Ss ft is re.uifed of all graduate students except 

193 



192 



assistants, who will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit 
hour. 

Summer Sessions, College Park: 

Students in the Summer Session pay the regular matriculation and diploma 
fees. The hour credit fee is as follows: 
A full load of six semester hours, $25.00. 
A load of less than six semester hours, $6.00 per semester credit hour. 

Living Expenses: 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park 
and vicinity. The cost of board and room ranges from about $35.00 to 
$45.00 a month, depending on the desires of the individual. A list of 
accommodations is maintained in the office of Miss Grace Lee, Director of 
Personnel, College Park. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the 
University. The stipend for the University fellows is $400 for the academic 
year and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. Sev- 
eral industrial fellowships with varying stipends are also available in 
certain departments. 

Application blanks for University fellowships may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary creden- 
tials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
departments. The usual amount of service required does not exceed twelve 
clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate pro- 
gram, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in 
the normal time. 

The selection of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow- 
ships are assigned, with the approval of the dean or director concerned, 
but all applications must first be approved by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The awards of University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation 
for these assistantships is $800 a year and the remission of all graduate 
fees except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed for one 
year and are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class 
devotes one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection 
with Experiment Station projects, and he is required to spend two years 
in residence for the Master's degree. If he continues in residence for 
the Doctor's degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence credit for each 
academic year at this University. The minimum residence requirement 
from the Bachelor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic 
years and one summer, or three academic years and three summer 
sessions of eleven or twelve weeks each. 

194 



other Assistants. Assistants not in he -/"^^^J^b e for admis- 

,„ently a"o-<i;° /-^\^f "^^ Xend or these asstsLts varies with 
,ion to the Graduate School '^if'^'^^J;^^, j^.i^de the remission of 
the services rendered, and it may or jay individual case 

graduate fees. The question of fees is ^f laea ged. The 

by the dean or director concerned when the ^^^^^"^ ^^"J'^^ry is deter- 
aUnt of graduate work these assistants are permitted to^^^ ^^^^ 

„ined by the ^^^i, °%t%rTdulrSur.S^id by the recommenda- 
or director concerned. The ^''^''"^^f.,^"'*"" 'Jibes the required residence 

%:«!,„ i.f.™.U.n regarding as.isU>„ttMps m., b. obu„ned from fte 
department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 



195 



SUMMER SESSION 
Harold Benjamin, Director 

A Summer Session of six weeks is conducted at College Park. The pro 
gram serves the needs of the following classes of students: (1) teachers 
and supervisors of the several classes of school work — elementary, secondary, 
vocational, and special; (2) regular students who are candidates for degrees; 
(3) graduate students; (4) special students not candidates for degrees. 

Terms of Admission 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. Before 
registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean 
of the College or School in which he wishes to secure the degree. Teachers 
and special students not seeking a degree are admitted to the courses of the 
summer session for which they are qualified. All such selection of courses 
must be approved by the Director of the Summer Session. 

Credits and Certificates 

The semester hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the Uni- 
versity. In the summer session, a course meeting five times a week for six 
weeks and requiring the standard amount of outside work has a value of 
two semester hours. 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State Depart- 
ment of Education towards satisfying certification requirements of all 
classes. 

Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards an advanced degree in 
the summer sessions, special arrangements are made supplementing the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students working for a 
degree on the summer plan must meet the same requirements as to admis- 
sion, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do students enrolled in the 
other sessions of the University. 

For detailed information in regard to the Summer Session, consult the 
special Summer Session announcement, issued annually in April. 



196 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

THOMAS D. FiNLEY, Licut. Col Infantry, V. S. Army, Professor 
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 
The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Army Regu- 
lations No. 145-10, War Department. 

Authorization 
An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act ot 
Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 

Organization 
The unit is organized as a regiment of four battalions of three rifle 
companies each, and a band. All units are commanded by Advanced Course 
students who have been selected for these commands on a basis of merit 
The cou^sl of instruction is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. 

Objectives 
* Basic Course 

The object of this course is to afford to students enjoying the privileges 
of State and Federal aided education an opportunity to be trained for posi- 
tions involving leadership, within either the State or the nation. To this end 
the methods employed are designed to fit men mentally, physically and 
morally for pursuits of peace or, if necessity requires, for national defense. 
A member of the R. O. T. C. is not in the Army of the United States, and 
membership in the unit carries no legll obligation to serve in the Army, or 
any of the armed forces. 

** Advanced Course 
The primary object of the Advanced Course is to provide military instruc- 
tion and systematic training through the agency of civil educational in- 
t!tut?ons to selected students, to the end that they may qualify as reserve 
officers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain 
th objective in accordance with the terms of the contract during the time 
thL students are pursuing as undergraduates their general or professional 
studies, thus" causing minimum interference with the preparatory require- 
ments of their projected civil careers. f„„t„„-i„ 
A student prior to enrollment in this course must have satisfactorily 
completed the\asic course and must have indicated in writing his desire to 

^i^ti^ aualitd undeTgradua.es in accordance with the contract. 

197 



undertake the course. The applicant further must obtain on this document 
the recommendation of both the Dean of his College and the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, and submit same to the President of the Insti- 
tution for approval. No student will be enrolled in the Advanced Course 
without the approval of the President of the University. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second years, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour is 
utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced course, elective, five periods a week 
of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least 
three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part of military instruction, and it 
is the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the 
physical training given by civilian teachers, thus cooperating in an effort to 
promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 

Uniforms* 

Members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniform at all military formations and at such other times as the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics may designate with the approval of the 
President of the University. 

Uniforms, or commutation in lieu ^ of uniforms, for the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, are furnished by the Government. The uniforms are the 
regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain distinguishing 
features; or, if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then such uniforms 
as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must be kept in good 
condition by the students. They remain the property of the Government; 
and, though intended primarily for use in connection with military instruc- 
tion, may be worn at other times unless the regulations governing their use 
are violated. The uniform will not be worn in part nor used while the 
wearer is engaged in athletic sports other than those required as a part of 
the course of instruction. A Basic Course uniform which is furnished to a 
student by the Government will be returned to the Military Department 
at the end of the year; or before, if a student severs his connection with the 



♦Each new student entering the R. O. T. C is required to purchase a pair of shoes 
approved by the Military Department, at the approximate cost of $3.90. These shoes are on 
sale at the Armory and will be fitted and paid for at the time uniforms are issued. 

198 



Department. In case commutation of uniforms is furnished, the uniform^o 
purchased becomes the property of the student upon completion of two 
years' work. 

Commutation 

students who elect the Advanced Course and who haje J-d the con; 
tract with the Federal Government to continue in the ^^^^"^^^ "r^;" 
Training Corps for the two remaining years of the Course are e^t'^led to a 
ImaU per diem money allowance, for commutation of subsistence, payable 
quarterly from and including the date of contract, until they complete the 
course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Cor^s is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country, 
camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are 
members of the Advanced Course Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These 
ITps are under the close and constant supervision of army .officers and 
ar^intended primarily to give a thorough and comprehensive practical 
course of instruction in the different arms of the service. 

Parents may feel assured that their sons are carefully watched and safe- 
guarS Wholesome surroundings and associates, work and healthy recre- 
adon are the keynote to contentment. Social life is not neglected, and the 
morale branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for students who are 
taking the advanced course, which, as has been previously stated, is elective 
Students who attend the summer camps are under no expense, ine 
Govetment furnishes transportation from the institution to the carnp and 
from the camp to the institution, or to the student's ^lon^e, unless the mle 
ase is greater than that from the camp to the institution In this case the 
amoint of mTleage from the camp to the institution is allowed the student. 
crtWng quarters, and food are furnished. The Advanced Course students 
L addiSon to receiving quarters and food, are paid sixty cents for each 
day spent in camp. To obtain credit for camp a student must be in attend- 
ance at camp at least 85 per cent of the prescribed camp period. 

Commissions 

(a) Each year, upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied or 'ImTss'ions in the Reserve Officers' Corps wil be -^-ted ^ f « 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm of 
the service will be determined by the War Department. ^ 

(c) The University of Maryland has received a rating from the War De- 
par^Lnt of "Generally Excellent" for the past several years. This rating 
Etes that the work of its R. 0. T. C. unit has been recognized by the 

199 



Federal Government as being of a superior order. The "Generally Excel 
lent rating supersedes the former designation of "Distinguished Collet" 
which designation has been discontinued by the War Department for insti- 
tutions such as this University. 

Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university 
work, and the requirements of this department as to proficiency the same 
as those of other departments. 

Students who have received military training at any educational insti- 
tution under the direction of an army officer detailed as professor of 
military science and tactics may receive such credit as the professor of 
military science and tactics and the President mav jointlv determine 



200 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is 
broadly conceived as the development of the individual student. To accom- 
plish this purpose, physical examinations and classification tests are given 
the incoming students to determine the relative physical fitness of each. 
Upon the basis of the needs disclosed by these tests, and individual prefer- 
ences, students are assigned to the various activities of the program. 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three ac- 
tivity classes each week throughout the year. In the fall, soccer, touch 
football, and tennis are the chief activities ; in the winter, basketball, volley 
ball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore students may elect a consid- 
erable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, horse- 
shoes, ping pong, bag punching, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted, also. Touch 
football and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, base- 
ball and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, 
medals, and appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program are pro- 
vided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and ping 
pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
A large modern gymnasium, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute 
the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. ' Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
and tennis, which are all major sports of this program. The University is 
a member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, and other national organizations for the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities 
for conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including 
hockey, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball; individual sports, 
consisting of tennis, badminton, fencing, golf, archery, deck tennis, table 
tennis, and the like are offered. Opportunity is given for various types 
of dancing including, modern, tap, folk, and ballroom. The proximity of the 

201 



1 



4 

4 



University to Washington and Baltimore provides excellent opportunity for 
groups to attend professional concerts in dance, as well as to participate in 
dance symposia. 

The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural tour- 
naments m the seasonal sports, sports days with neighboring colleges and 
mtercollegiate competition in rifle shooting. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and 
women students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of 
the state, and to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education and Recreation see 
LoUege of Education, and Section III, Description of Courses, 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dearu 
Faculty Council 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 
Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S. 

HISTORY 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery occupies an important and 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular 
session, 1939-40, it will have completed its one hundredth year of service 
to dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents 
the first effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those 
anticipating the practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between 
the years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 
dissensions in the School of Medicine and were discontinued. It was Dr. 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of 
dental teaching then in vogue. It was also his opinion that dental educa- 
tion should be developed as a special branch of medical teaching. The 
unfortunate circumstances of internal strife in the Medical School defeated 
the purpose of Dr. Hayden to engraft dental education upon medical edu- 
cation. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 
1800. From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation 
for a scientific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris 
came to Baltimore to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of 
unusual ability and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing 
and promoting formal dental education. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had 
been interrupted at the University of Maryland and there was an apparent 
insurmountable difficulty confronting the creation of dental departments 
in medical schools, an independent college was decided upon. A charter 
was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. 



202 



203 



The first Faculty meeting was held February 3 1840 at which f 

Den.., s„,„,. .,. Lrrr„?Caers:„t r= ^°"- °' 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of fh^ Hpnf.i ^' • 

Dental Science was founded with Chan-" ^" ^^"'^°"™^^ 

i-ciaiuie lo me time of his death. The fil«i» nf fv.„ „ij 
American Journal of Dental Science testifv +„ n, fi / -t *® °'*^ 

by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the Zerican tc Sty of D^^^^^^^^^^ ""'''' 

founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its PresMent aS Dr^hTlT 
Harris as its Corresponding- Secretarv TViio ,,.o ^-i, u • . ^napin A. 
«..a„,»„o. i„ A,„„"iea. aLtnT„™S„: ".h.T.Sa:' S:,' 

on professional ideals and politics. exercised 

lei" o?S;ntl ^^''"^"'^ '''"'^' ^""'^"' ^" °^^P""^ °f the Baltimore Col- 
it whL. r^"'"'' ^'^^ «^^^"i^ed. It continued instruction untillS^Q 
at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore r^ii ""'^" ^"^y- 

Surgery. A department of dentistry was organ^ed at SI n." ^.'"'^ 

foftrt '" T r^ ''''' ^^^^"^'-^ ^ cSr eth year' f'^rS t1 
1923. This school was chartered as a corporation =,L L . i 

privately owned and directed institution untiuS when tt ZZ:l sLl 
T£^^Z ^'t«of *'' ^^P-t--t of the Baltim'ore MedicafcX'e la 
established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it mereed with ^r n Z , 
Department of the University of Maryland. ^ ^"*^' 

effS:dTun:T5'"lSlv''tt '"''", ''"'='"°"^' '"*^'-^^*^ °^- B^'t^-e was 
errectea June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodip.. nf ,h. 

' ?t 77 rf ""'^' °' ^^"*"' ^"^^^'•^ ^"d the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoSi^ a 
distinct department of the University under State supervision and cont^or 
Thus we find in the Baltimore College of Dental Siirp-^rv n. f i o J ' 
University of Marjdand, a merging ol the v^a'^us ^ffSt dS ttca ' 
tion m Maryland. From these component elements have radiated deteZ 
ments of the art and science of dentistry until the strength ofL a uZi 
IS second to none, either in number or degree of service to^e protsSoT 

The University of Maryland Medical School was oreani/eH n.. i, oo 
1807, as the College of Medicine of Maryland. Sn Dfcerber 28 l"?." the' 
University of Maryland charter was issued to the College nfM^' I 
Maryland. There were at that period but fou other i^alsloof 
America-the University of Pennsylvania, founded in n'sTthl Conege S 

204 



Physicians and Surgeons of New York, in 1767; Harvard University, in 1782; 
and Dartmouth College, in 1797. 

It is of interest to note that the University of Maryland as it now exists 
is the youngest State University in America, but that its various schools 
rank among the oldest in existence. The School of Medicine at its begin- 
ning was the fifth oldest existent medical school in America; the Law 
School was organized in 1823; the Dental School, 1840, is the oldest dental 
school in the world; the Pharmacy School was founded in 1841; the College 
of Agriculture, 1856, is the second oldest land grant college in America. 
While the present form of the University of Maryland is young, its sub- 
stance and character date back to the earliest period in education in the 
various professions. 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occu- 
pied by the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is 
ideally arranged for efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large 
lecture rooms, classrooms, a library and reading room, science laboratories, 
technic laboratories, clinic rooms, and locker rooms. It is funished with 
new equipment throughout and provides every accommodation necessary 
for satisfactory instruction under comfortable arrangements and pleasant 
surroundings. 

Special attention has been given to the facilities in clinic instruction. 
The large clinic wing contains 145 operating spaces; each space contains a 
chair, operating table and unit equipped with an electric engine, compressed 
air, gas, running water, etc. Clinic instruction is segregated, and the fol- 
lowing departments have been arranged for effective teaching: Operative, 
Prosthetic (including Crown and Bridge and Ceramics), Anesthesia and 
Surgery, Orthodontia, Diagnosis, Pathology, Pedodontia, Radiodontia, and 
Photography. All technic laboratories are equipped with every modern 
facility to promote efficiency in instruction. 

LIBRARY 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the best equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. It is 
located in the main building and consists of a stack room, collateral offices 
and a reading room that will accommodate ninety-six students. It contains 
over eight thousand bound volumes of dental textbooks and files of dental 
magazines, numerous pamphlets, reprints, etc.; while over 140 current 
dental magazines reach its reading tables. The two full-time librarians 
promote the growth of the Library and serve the student body in its use 
of library material. The Library is financed by direct appropriations from 
the State, by the income from an endowment established by the Maryland 
State Dental Association and by the proceeds of the sale of books to 

205 



students. One of the most important factors of the dental student's educa- 
tion is to teach him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal 
education and in promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during 
practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to 
take care of this phase of dental study. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in 
the medical sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction 
consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, confer- 
ences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train 
the student in the value and use of dental literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

(a) Applicants for admission must present evidence of having success- 
fully completed two years of work in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high-school course. No 
applicant will be considered who has not completed all requirements for 
advancement to the junior year in the arts and sciences college from 
which he applies. His scholastic attainments shall be of such quality as 
to ensure a high quality of achievement in the dental course. 

(b) The minimum as a basis for admission is two years* credit toward 
a baccalaureate degree in an accredited college of arts and sciences. The 
following minimum quantitative requirements are prescribed: 

Biology 6 semester hours 

Inorganic Chemistry „ 8 semester hours 

Organic Chemistry 4 semester hours 

Physics 6 semester hours 

English - 6 semester hours 

Electives 30 semester hours 

Deviation from these minimum requirements is allowed in all of the 

required subjects except chemistry, and is dependent upon the length of 

college training and the level of achievement attained by the student in 
his college work. 

Semester Hours Deviation 

60 semester hours none 

90 semester hours 6 hours 

Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts Degree 9 hours 

Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy Degree 12 hours 

(c) Applicants who have been dropped for poor scholarship, or who have 
failed at other institutions or other colleges of the University of Maryland 
last attended, will not be considered for admission, 

206 



EEQUIEEMENTS FOB MATRICULATION AND ENROLLMENT 

. • ^ rr\.^ T-onnirpments for admission and tne acaaemic xcg 
rthrCcSe oTirani sciences, University of Maryland, are stnctly 
arlhered to by the School of Dentistry. o i, i f 

insure registration in the class. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Application blanks may be obtained from the office .f ^^;^^^^^^^^ 
,. i. V. ^A fill in this blank completely and mail it, together witn tne 

be observed carefully. i:^o«f 

A certificate of entrance will be issued t^;-^.X cLss'L' whth 
which will permit him to matriculate and to register m the class to whicn 

he has applied. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE PREDENTAL 
^ CURRICULUM 

The secondary school requirements observed Jy t^^^ f;^;:dltt\Tm 

Trs no lessTan 15 units.* The e.uivalent in entrance examinations 
may be offered by nongraduates of a secondary school. 

. . ^ 1- V, n TT TTT IV) 3 units; algebra to <iuadratics, i 

!,,w;,ZSt offered in a standard Wsk " POT™"'?' '*~' '" 
;h.r^«.5in »d.t" .ranted ..ward .c.lege or university entrance. 
Eight units most be anbmitted from IM. group. 



I 



*Required seven (7), and elective e 



ight (8) units for entrance. Total fifteen (15) \inits. 

207 



Predental Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester. 

Survey and Composition (Eng*. ly) 3 ^ 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math 8f, 10s) 3 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ^ 1 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 3y) 4 \ 

Technical Drawing (Dr. ly) ^ 

bophomore Year 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 2y) 2 2 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 3y) 2 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) * 4 ^ 

French (French ly or French 3y) or German (German ly 

or German 3y) o 

English Survey (Eng. 2y) IZZZZZ 2 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) 3 ____ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 57s) ZZZZ... _ 3 



16 



16 



The equivalent of the above curriculum is offered in the Baltimore branch 
of the University. 



Fees for the Predental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing application for admission) 

Matriculation fee (paid at the time of enrollment) 

*Tuition for the session, resident student 

*Tuition for the session, non-resident student 

Laboratory fee (each session) 

Locker fee (each session) 

Laboratory breakage deposit (each session) L'..ZIIIIZ^ 

Penalty for late registration 

Examination taken out of class and re-examinations 



$2.00 

10.00 

220.00 

270.00 

50.00 

3.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Student Activity Fee— Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Academic Regulations 

^ The academic regulations of the College of Arts and Sciences are applied 
m the predental curriculum. 

♦Definition of resident status of student given on page 212. 

208 



A student must attain marks higher than F in fifty per cent of the 
semester hours for which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped 
from the curriculum. 

No student will be certified for admission to the School of Dentistry until 
he shall have completed the predental curriculum with a minimum average 
mark of C— 2.0 (A, 4; B, 3; C, 2; D, 1.). / 

DENTAL CURRICULUM 

The curriculum is described in full in the bulletin of the School of 
Dentistry. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) The School of Dentistry will not accept toward advanced standing 
credits earned in dental schools not members of the American Association 
of Dental Schools. 

(b) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed 
two or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the 
School of Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced stand- 
ing to the Sophomore year jn^ovided the applicant shall complete under 
competent regular instruction the courses in dental technology regularly 
scheduled in the first year. 

(c) Applicant for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for 
admission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promo- 
tion to the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; 
(3) show an average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the 
school where transfer credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic 
attainments, character and personality; (5) present letter of honorable 
dismissal and recommendation from the dean of the school from which he 
transfers. 

(d) No transfer application will be considered after August 15. All 
applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an interview 
before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at 
which time lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the 
session, the dates for which are announced in the calendar of the annual 
catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. Students with less than eighty-five per 
cent attendance in any course will be denied the privilege of final exami- 
nation in any and all such courses. In certain unavoidable circumstances 
of absence the Dean may honor excuses, but students with less than eighty- 
five per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding class. 

Promotion 

1. Students who shall have passed satisfactorily all subjects in the year 
in which they are enrolled and w^ho shall have achieved an average of 

209 



five per cent above the passing mark shall be promoted to the next suc- 
ceeding year. 

2. Students who are deficient in courses amounting to not more than 
20% of the scheduled hours of their course will be permitted to proceed 
with their class w^ith the understanding that such deficiency shall be re- 
moved before the beginning of the next regular school year. Students with 
conditions will not be admitted to Senior standing. 

3. A grade of 75 per cent is passing. A grade between 60 per cent and 
passing is a condition. A grade below 60 per cent is a failure. A condition 
may be removed by a re-examination. In such effort, failure to make a 
passing mark is recorded as a failure in the course. A failure can be 
removed only by repeating the course. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and 
clinic courses and textbooks for lecture courses will be announced for the 
various classes. Each student will be required to provide himself with 
whatever is necessary to meet the needs of his course and present same 
to an assigned instructor for inspection. No student who does not meet 
this requirement will be permitted to go on with his class. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students, evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 
to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. 
Integrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority 
and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a 
student will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary 
to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate 
who has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full four-year 
course of study of the dental curriculum, the last year of which shall have 
been spent in this institution. 

3. He will be required to show a general average of at least 80 per cent 
during the full course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the va- 
rious departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the begin- 
ning of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations 
in the community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

210 



Fees for the Dental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for ad- 
mission) _ $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at time of enrollment) 10.00 

*Tuition for the session, resident student 275.00 

*Tuition for the session, nonresident student _ 375.00 

Dissecting fee (first semester. Freshman year) 15.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) 20.00 

Locker fee — Freshman and Sophomore years (first semester) 3.00 

Locker fee — Junior and Senior years (first semester) 5.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit — Freshman and Sophomore years 

( first semester ) - _ 5.00 

Graduation fee (paid with second semester fees of Senior year) 15.00 

Penalty fee for late registration _ 5.00 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record will be issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy will be issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Refunds — According to the policy of the University no fees will be re- 
turned. In case the student discontinues his course, any fees paid will be 
credited to a subsequent course, but are not transferable. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from 
one professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee 
required by each professional school. 

A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or 
days specified for his school, will be called upon to pay a fine of $5.00. The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins, following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only on the written recommendation of 
the Dean.) 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and pay to the Comptroller one-half of the tuition fee in 
addition to all other fees noted as payable first semester before being ad- 
mitted to class work at the opening of the session. The remainder of tuition 
and second semester fees must be in the hands of the Comptroller on the 
registration day for the second semester. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 

*Definition of resident status of student given on page 212. 

211 



/ 

Definition of Resident Status of Student 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this state for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this state by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. . 

Summer Courses 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, special courses are 
offered during the summer recess. The course in clinical instruction is 
conducted from June 1 to August 1 and from September 1 to 16 inclusive. 
The course is open only to students registered in the school. It offers op- 
portunities to students carrying conditions in the clinic from the preceding 
session as well as those who desire to gain more extended practice during 
their training period. The clinics are under the direction of capable dem- 
onstrators, full credit being given for all work done. 

The (xorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The 
society is named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental 
education, a teacher of many years experience, and during his life a great 
contributor to dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his 
name that the society adopted it. 

Students become eligible for membership at the beginning of their junior 
year if, during their preceding years of the dental course, they have at- 
tained a general average of 85 per cent or more in all of their studies. 
Meetings are held once each month, and are addressed by prominent dental 
and medical men, an effort being made to obtain speakers not connected 
with the University. The members have an opportunity, even while stu- 
dents, to hear men associated with other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental fraternity was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 

*The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand ill lOCO parentis to such 
minor students. 

212 



versity of Maryland, during the session of 1928-1929. Membership in the 
fraternity is awarded to a number not exceeding twelve per cent of the 
graduating class. This honor is conferred upon students who through their 
professional course of study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, 
and whose conduct, earnestness, evidence of good character, and high 
scholarship recommend them to election. 

Scholarship Loans 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educa- 
tional foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. 
These loans are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment 
and the need on the part of students for assistance in completing their 
course in dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend 
only students in the last two years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation — From this fund, established 
under the will of General Henry Strong, of Chicago, an annual allotment 
is made to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, for scholarship loans available for the use of young men 
and women students under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations for the 
privileges of these loans are limited to students in the junior and senior 
years. Only students who through stress of circumstances require financial 
aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational progress are con- 
sidered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S, Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund — Under a pro- 
vision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New Haven, Conn., 
an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds of 
which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This 
organization has continued in existence to the present, its name having been 
changed to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 



213 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean 

THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 
Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B. 
Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 
Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 
' Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M. 
Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 
G. RiDGELY Sappington, ESQ., LL.B. 
Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 
John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. The 
institution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper pecuni- 
ary support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and in 1870 
regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the course 
has been made more comprehensive, and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than three thousand, and 
included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence in the pro- 
fession elsewhere. 

The Law School has been recognized by the Council of the Section of Legal 
Education of the American Bar Association as meeting the standards of the 
American Bar Association, and has been placed upon its approved list. 

The Law School is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
an association composed of the leading law schools in the United States, 
member schools being required to maintain certain high standards relating 
to entrance requirements, faculty, library, and curriculum. 

The Law School is also registered as an approved school on the New York 
Regents* list. 

The Law School BuildiAg, erected in 1931, is located at Redwood 
and Greene Streets in Baltimore. In addition to classrooms and offices for 

214 



the Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room, stu- 
dents^ lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter contaming 
a collection of carefully selected text-books, English and American reports, 
leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. No fee i^ 
charged for the use of the library, which is open from 9.00 A. M. to 10.30 
P. M., except on Saturday, when it closes at 5.00 P. M. 

Course of Instruction 

The School of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and the 
Evening School. The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the 
standards of work and graduation requirements are the same. 

The Day School course covers a period of three years of thirty-two weeks 
each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the day, 
chiefly in the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on Mon- 
day evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 P. M. . 

The Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty-six 
weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on Monday 
Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6.30 to 9.30 F. M. Ihis 
plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student. 

The course of instruction in the School of Law is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the Bar. 
Instruction is offered in the various branches of the common law, of equity, 
of the statute law of Maryland, and of the public law of the United States 
The course of study embraces both the theory and practice of the law, and 
aims to give the student a broad view of the origin, development, and func- 
tion of law, together with a thorough practical knowledge of its principles 
and their application. Analytical study is made of the principles of sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and a carefully directed practice court enables 
the student to get an intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
any peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such. All of the 
subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included in the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work- that is, the completion of at least one-half the work acceptable for a 
Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study by the 
University of Maryland or other principal college or university in this State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and .jxclusive of 

215 



credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
without intellectual content of substantial value. Such pre-legal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with a scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation in the institu- 
tion attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
age number of students admitted as beginning regular law students during 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of Bajchelor of Arts 

and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in arts and law leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Ajrts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program in college and pre-legal sub- 
jects will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park. The fourth year they will register in the School of Law, and 
upon the successful completion of the work of the first year in the Day 
School, or the equivalent work in the Evening School, the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts will be awarded. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by reference to 
page 126. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws 

The University also offers a combined program in commerce and law 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program will spend the first three years 
in the College of Commerce at College Park. In the fourth year they will 
register in the School of Law, and upon the successful completion of the 
work of the first year in the Day School, or the equivalent thereof in the 
Evening School, will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. The 
degree of Bachelor of Laws will be awarded upon the completion of the 
work prescribed for graduation in the School of Law. 

216 



Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by reference 
to page 142. 

Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere m 
a law school which is either a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty Council, upon presentation of a certificate from such 
law school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the successful 
completion of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many hours 
as are required for such subjects in this school, receive credit for such 
courses and be admitted to advanced standing. No credit will be given for 
study pursued in a law office, and no degree will be conferred until after 
one year of residence and study at this school. 

Fees and Expenses 

The charges for instruction are as follows: 

Registration fee to accompany application. -..- - $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration - ... 10.00 

• Diploma fee, payable upon graduation -- lo-^O 

Tuition fee, per annum: 

Day School - •■-■.; 150.OO 

Evening School * — 

An additional tuition fee of $50.00 per annum must be paid by students 
who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

The tuition fee is payable in two equal instalments, one-half at the time 
of registration for the first semester, and one-half at the time of registra- 
tion for the second semester. 

Further information and a special catalogue of the School of Law may 
be had upon application to the School of Law, University of Maryland, 
Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



217 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

f 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

H. Boyd Wylie, Acting Dean, 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wyue, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Maurice? C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D. 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

At this Medical School for the first time in America, dissection was 
made a compulsory part of the curriculum, and independent chairs for the 
teachmg of gynecology and pediatrics (1867), and of ophthalmology and 
otology (1873), were installed. 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 

Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest institu- 
tion for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in September, 

218 



1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 

Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the 
clinical facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year 
6,682 persons. 

In connection with the University Hospital, an outdoor obstetrical clmlc 
is conducted. During the past year 2,108 cases were delivered in the 
University Hospital and under supervision in this Outdoor Clinic. 

The hospital now has 435 beds and 50 bassinets — for medical, surgical, 
obstetrical, and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical 
material for third- year and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy Hos- 
pital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be the 
same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Oncology, Ophthalmology and Otology, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro- 
Enterology, Oral Surgery, Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Ortho- 
pedics, Proctology, Psychiatry, Dermatology, Laryngology and Rhinology, 
and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work each day during 
one-third of the year in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery of the 
dispensaries. In their senior year, all students work one hour each day 
in the special departments, where 126,663 cases were treated last year. 
This gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching. 

Student laboratories conducted by the School of Medicine purely for 
medical instruction are as follows: Gross Anatomy, Histology and Embry- 
ology, Physiology, Bacteriology and Immunology, Biological Chemistry, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Operative Surgery and Sur- 
gical Anatomy. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Samuel M. Shoemaker 
Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Ran- 
dolph Winslow Scholarship; University Scholarship; Frederica Gehrmann 
Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Grenevra 
Warfield Scholarships; Israel and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarship, and Dr. 
Horace Bruce Hetrick Scholarship. The Medical Alumni Association Schol- 
arship is assigned for four years. This scholarship is now occupied and 
will not be assigned again until September, 1944. 

Requirements for Admission 

The minimum requirements for admission to the School of Medicine are 
as follows: 

(a) GTaduation from an approved secondary school, or the equivalent in 
entrance examinations, and 

219 



/ 



*(b) Three calendar years of acceptable premedical credit earned in an 
approved college of arts and sciences. The quantity and quality of 
this pre-professional course of study shall be not less than that 
required for recommendation by the institution in which the pre- 
medical courses are being, or have been, studied. 

The premedical curriculum shall include basic courses in 

English 

Biology 

Inorganic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Physics 

French or German 

and such elective courses as will complete a balanced three-year or four- 
year schedule of study. 

The elective courses should be taken from the following three groups: 
Humanities Natural Sciences Social Sciences 



English 

Scientific Grerman, or 
French (A reading 
knowledge of either 
language is desirable, 
although German is 
preferred) 

Philosophy 



Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy 

Embryology 

Physical Chemistry or 
Quantitative Analy- 
sis (Physical Chemis- 
try preferred) 

Mathematics 



Economics 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology (Basic 

course should be 

taken) 
Sociology, etc. 



Not less than 36 semester hours (or the equivalent in quarter or session 
hours, or courses) should be taken in the humanities and social sciences. 

Wherever possible, a premedical student should complete a four-year 
curriculum and earn the baccalaureate degree. 

In accepting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary school and 
college; satisfactory scores in the Medical Aptitude Test (which is given 
each year by the Association of American Medical Colleges in the institu- 
tions that are preparing students for medicine); the most favorable letters 
of recommendation from their respective premedical committees, or from 
one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics ; 
and who in all other respects give every promise of becoming successful 
students and physicians of high standing. 

Application blanks may be secured by addressing the Committee on 
Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Appli- 



*Por admission to the Premedical Curriculum the requirements are the same as for the 
freshman class in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University with the prescribed 
addition of two years of one foreign language. (See Section I, Entrance.) 

220 



cations for admission will be received beginning October 1 for the ensuing 
September classes. 

Candidates for admission who are accepted will receive certificates of 
entrance from the Director of Admissions of the University. 

Expenses 

*The following are the fees for students in the School of Medicine: 

^ Tuition 

MatHculation Resident Non-Resident Laboratory Graduation 

$10.00 (only once) $450.00 $600.00 $25.00 (yearly) $15.00 

Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore : 

jlems ^^^ Average Liberal 

Books ?50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals - 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

aothing and Laundry. - 50 80 i^u 

All other expenses - -• 25 50 lb 

Total ?409 $556 $720 

Advice to Premedical Students 

It is suggested that students registered in the Premedical Curriculum 
secure a copy of the latest bulletin of the school of medicine in which they 
are interested, early in their freshman year in college, in order to acquamt 
themselves with the latest requirements for admission. 

Copies of the Bulletin of our School of Medicine may be secured by 
writing to the Committee on Admissions, School of Medicine, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore. 



• *The above tuition fees applicable until the end of the session 1939-1940 only The 
righT is reserved lo make changes in these fees whenever the authorities deem it expedient. 

221 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and Superintendent of Nurses 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. The school is non-sec- 
tarian, the only religious services being morning prayers. 

The new University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital, contain- 
ing 435 beds and 50 bassinets. It is equipped to give young women a 
thorough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered 

The program of study of the school is planned for two groups of students: 
(a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present record 
showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required amount of pre- 
paratory study. Preference will be given to students who rank in the 
upper third of the graduating classes in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance: required (7), 
and elective (8) units. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective; Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, drawing, econom- 
ics, general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational subjects, 
languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any other 
subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory school for which 
graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Eight 
imits must be submitted from this group, of which not more than four 
units can pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet certain other 
definite requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for 
nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. 
Women of superior education and culture are given preference, provided 
they meet the requirements in other particulars. If possible a personal 
interview with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday 
or Friday from 11:00 A. M. to 12:00 M. 

222 



Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, all 
students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the beginning 
of their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible for exami- 
nation and license on completion of this course. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, neglect, and failure to develop those qualities considered essen- 
tial in a nurse, are causes for dismissal at any time by the President of 
the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year combined program of the 
School of Nursing are the same as for the other schools and colleges. 
(Special catalogue will be sent upon request.) The three-year program is 
designed to meet the requirements for the diploma in Nursing, and com- 
prises the work of the first, second, and third hospital years. 

Admission to the School 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February, for the fall term 
in September or October, and for the five year course in September. 

Hours of Duty 

During the preparatory period the students are engaged in class work 
for the first four months with no general duty in the hospital, and for 
the remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight-hour 
duty. During the first, second, and third years the students are on eight- 
hour day duty and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays and 
Sundays. The night-duty periods are approximately two months each, with 
one day at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The period 
of night duty is approximately five to six months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours. This instruction includes courses in anat- 
omy, physiology, cookery and nutrition, dosage and solution, hygiene, bac- 
teriology, chemistry, materia medica, practical nursing, bandaging, ethics, ^ 
and history of nursing. During the last two months of the prebation 
period the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction 
in bedside nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to 
them by the Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the 

223 



students are required to pass satisfactorily both the written and the 
practical tests; failure to do so will be sufficient reason for terminatin« 
the course at this point. 

Sickness 

A physician is in attendance each day, and all students, when ill, are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two weeks 
during the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the 
school decide that, because of time lost, the theoretical work has not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in the current year 
It will be necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A period of four 
weeks IS allowed the student at the completion of the first year and of the 
second year. ' 

Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student A 
student activity fee of $5.00 is to be paid each year at the beginning of 
the first semester by each student. These will not be returned. A student 
receives her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from 
the date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides her own 
uniforms, obtained through the hospital at a nominal cost. After being 
accepted as a student nurse, she wears the uniform supplied by the hospital. 
ITie student is also provided with text-books and shoes. Her personal 
expenses during the course of training and instruction will depend enUrelv 
upon her individual habits and tastes. 

GENERAL PLAN OP INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years, including the 
preliminary term of six months. The course of instruction is, in general 
as follows: ' 

First Year 
First Semester 

The first semester, or preliminary term, is devoted to theoretical instruc- 
tion pven m the class rooms of the Nursing School and in lecture rooms 
and laboratories of the Medical School, and to supervised practice in the 
wards of the hospital. The courses offered are anatomy, physiology 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solutions, chemistry, bacteriology, hygiene' 
history of nursing, ethics, psychology, principles and practice of nursing 
bandaging and surgical supplies. 

Excursions are made to the filtration plant, hygienic dairies, markets, 
and other places of interest. 

At the close of the first semester the students are required to pass 
satisfactorily both written and practical tests. Failure to do this will be 
sufficient reason to terminate the course at this period. 

224 



Second Semester 

During this term the students receive theoretical instruction in general 
I surgery, surgical technic, massage, diet therapy, materia medica, advanced 
I nursing procedures and charting, and the case study method. Ward 
[assignments and instruction provide experience in medical, surgical, gyneco- 
logical and urological nursing, also in the diet school and outpatients 
department. This experience is under the direction and supervision of 
the supervisors of the departments. 

Second Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes general medicine, 
clinical pathology, venereal and skin diseases, x-ray, radium, communicable 
diseases, pediatrics, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedics, and diseases of 
eye, ear, nose, and throat. The hospital assignment here provides instruc- 
tion and experience on the public wards, on the private floors, and in the 
operating room. 

Third Year 

During the third year the theoretical instruction includes psychiatry, 
public health, professional problems, and survey of the nursing field. The 
assignments include experience in psychiatric nursing, in public health 
nursing, in obstetrics and pediatrics. 

Attendance at Classes 

Attendance is required at all classes for each course for which the student 
is registered. Absences are excused only in cases of illness or of absence 
from the school. 

Examinations 

These are both written and oral, and include practical tests. Failure 
in two or more subjects may necessitate increasing the length of the course. 

During the three years of nursing experience in the various depart- 
ments of the hospital, a monthly record of the student's nursing work is 
submitted by the nurse in charge. The student's standing is based upon 
the examinations in the theoretical subjects and these monthly records. 

Graduation 

The diploma of the school will be awarded to those who have success- 
fully completed the required course of three years, and have maintained 
the required average in each course and phase of work. 

Five- Year Program 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or prehospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University, during which period the student has an introduction to the 

225 



general cultural subjects which are considered fundamental in any college 
training. At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursin? 
in Baltimore. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing will be 
conferred upon students who complete successfully the prescribed combined 
academic and nursing program, maintaining the required averages in each 
branch of the course. 

Scholarships 

One scholarship has been established by the Alumnae of the Training 
School, which entitles a nurse to a six-weeks' course at Teachers College 
Columbia University, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest 
excellence, and who desires to pursue graduate study and special work 
There are two scholarships of the value of $50.00 each: the Edwin and 
Leander M. Zimmerman prize for practical nursing and for displaying the 
greatest interest and sympathy for the patients; and the Elizabeth Collins 
Lee prize, given to the student having the second highest average in schol- 
arship. An alumnae pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board to 
a student who at the completion of three years shows marked executive 
ability. A prize of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst to a student 
who at the completion of three years shows exceptional executive ability. 



\ 



226 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 
Faculty Council 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
E. F. Kelly, Phar.D. Sc.D 

Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 
Clifford W. Chapman, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D. 
J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 
Thomas C. Grubb, A.B., Ph.D. 

A. W. Richeson, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy. The latter was organized in 1841, and operated as an mde- 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 
professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the present University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission, just prior to 1865, it has continuously exercised 
its function as a teaching institution. 

LOCATION 

The School of Pharmacy is located at Lombard and Greene Streets, in 
close proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry. 

AIMS 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential 
in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants 
for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the 
facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the 
practice of the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical re- 
search. 

RECOGNITION 

This school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by the Council or 
holding membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum 
requirements for entrance and graduation. Through the influence of the 

227 ^ 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. ^<*"cation and the Amencan Associa- 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Admission by Certificate 

byteTtarBo:rTof\Z±^*%°'^^ ^T"'^^ ^<=^°°^ ^'^''^^ - ^PP-ed 
of at least equal ra^anTSchrf"'^'"^ "'^ '^ "'* ^'='«^"^<^ ^^^'^'^^ 
15 units, grouped as Sw '''""' ''*'" ^'"^*'«" »«* ^^^ than 

suSri?^sis:e?s":n^^^^^^^^^ -^--^ — 

ra?rriir5Se ^e^oS:^:^! IJ^hS;/ ^t^;.^'-^- ^ ^^ 
Total, 7 units. ' nistory, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 

for which graduation credit if^J^foH standard high or preparatory school 
Total, 8 uSs. ^^"*"* ^"^^""^ ^*"^e« *»• university entrance. 

supposes a school year oTSf "" f °^ ^ full-year's work. It pre- 

60 minutes, and LeihsSfflr?' 'T"'""'^ ^^"'^'^ "^ ^'"^ ^'^ '<> 
laboratory periods in a^v,.fo ^^ ^''^^^ exercises a week. Double 

ecnivaleS toTne dass e,ercT,r M ''"'n'"""' '^'^'^^ ^^« '^^^'^^'^^ ^^ 

detrimental to the best interests of the sihool. '^^"'"' '' '^' "'"^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ 

228 



of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not 
meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evidence 
of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the Director 
of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. Such exami- 
nation will be given during the first week of each of the months of July, 
August, and September at Baltimore and at other convenient places in the 
State. Applicants concerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school 
does not have such a quality grade, then the average of the applicant's 
school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the 
lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination 

An applicant from a secondary school who is not eligible for admission by 
certificate may seek entrance through either of two types of examination: 
(1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for permission to report 
at the University for an examination, the result of which will be used 
in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine whether the 
applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting 
evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations in 
the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, New York City; the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, Albany; and the Department of Public Instruction 
of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Ck)uncil of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education will receive credit for the courses which 
correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the first three 
years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced standing, provided 
he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper certificate 
of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic insti- 
tution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
ional requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Fresh- 
man Class from Secondary School." 

229 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty 
Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary train- 
ing of the applicant is sufficient. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Phar.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum. The work of the last 
year must have been in courses offered in this school, and must have 
been done m residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the total 
semester hours of credit scheduled for these years. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

The matriculation ticket must be procured from the office of the School 
of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before one enters classes. After 
matriculation, all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. The last date of matriculation is Sept. 28, 1940. 

EXPENSES 

Laboratory 
Tuition and 

Resident Non-Resident Breakage 
$220.00 $270.00 $60.00 (yearly) 



Matricttlation 
$10.00 (only once) 



Graduation 
$15.00 



Tuition for the first semester and laboratory and breakage fee shall be 
paid to the Comptroller at the time of registration; and tuition for the 
second semester and graduation fee (the latter returned in case of failure) 
on or before Feb. 1, 1941. 

A bulletin giving details of the course in Pharmacy may be obtained by 
addressing the School of Pharmacy. University of Maryland, Baltimore. 
Marylana. 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. Maryland. 

^^ • \^ .^J J X *1 1 !■■■■ 1-1- r r-T r -*— »---—-.--- - ....- — «-»»^»»*. »»»»---. 



F. K. Haszard. 



Executive Officer 

Executive Secretary 



The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of Agriculture 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Powers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows: 

"The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding the breeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
thereof, and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the rais- 
ing, distribution, and sale of farm, orchard, forest, and nursery products, 
generally, and plant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same; the 
preparation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection, control, and distri- 
bution of animal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds, fertilizers, 
agricultural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals, and biological 
products; and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
publish such information, statistics, and the results of such investigations 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the ef- 
ficient dissemination thereof; and except where such powers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
control of the herein recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
the agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of de- 
sirable immigration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
regulations in respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
of the State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
law, and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
punished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execution and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested with such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
on the other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

Under the above authority and by special legislation, all regulatory work 
is conducted under the general authority of the State Board. This includes 
the following services: ^ 



230 



231 



LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mark Welsh 

g^^^g Veterinarian 

hog cholera, encepSomSi ' k ^' ^"''l"" tuberculosis. Bang's Disease, 
animals; ar;d S^fea e\nd hi'. T.*'?"' "''=''^^' "°^ ^^'''^^ » 
operates in these acU^ties wTh 2t U ? n'' '1 ^""'*'^- ^'^^ ^^^^''^^ <="- 

Well eauinnpH ],.>,„ V • i ^^ ^- department of Agriculture. 

110^0" sSens are IT^^ for research, diagnostic work. aJd the exa^ina- 
for the conSence of per^^^^^^^^^^ %.'"''''^' l^''^' ^^^ '^^^^'^^ laboratories 
maintained atiombard IZcJ t^ f ''''''' ^"'^"^"^ °^ ^^e State are 
treviUe. ^'"""^ ^*''"^*"' Baltimore; Salisbury; and Cen- 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland. 

E.' N. c"^"' ^'"^'^'"^ °* Extension Service 

C. E. Temple" " Z ^^*® Entomologist 



inspection of all nurserip«5 anri fi,^ o, • . ^ provides for the 

eases affecting pLntsTf aHk^^^^^^ '"^'"'^^^^ ^"^^^*« ^^^ dis 

ducted in close aSLation S J^". '^''} '^ '^' department is con- 
Pathology of the UnS^^^^ Th^ the departments of Entomology and 
authority of t^law creatS^^ tL H "'^;^'"7 ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ucted under the 
Agriculture ForTdSrfr ^"P^^^"^^'^* ^' ^^" ^^ the State Board of 
the ExtensLSr4eTt^^^^^^^^^^^ '^' department is placed under 

of the work. Umversity on account of the close association 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

T p p t!^^^"*' Fertilizer, Lime, Insecticide and Fungicide) 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D ^ ^ J 

L. E. Bopst, B.S. "* — ^tate Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson, M.'s! Associate State Chemist 

W. J. Pooten I~" - - Chief Inspector 

E. M. Zentz. '" " " Inspector 

H. R. Walls "* " 7"":"':;;" inspector 

L. H. Van Wormerllll ^^"^^^^ ^^ Micro-Analyst 

R. E. Baumgardner, B.S. ~ ' " Assistant Chemist 

Albert Heagy, B.S..! Assistant Chemist 

J. E. Schueler, Jr., M.S. " ' " -Assistant Chemist 

R. H. Flowers, B.S _. " Assistant Chemist 

Robert G. Fuerst.....*.....". Assistant Chemist 

- - Laboratory Helper 

232 



This Service, which is a branch of the Department of Chemistry, is 
charged with the enforcement of the Feed Law of this State, the Fertilizer 
Act, the Agricultural lime Statute, and the Insecticide and F\ingicide Law 
which became effective January 1, 1940. Briefly, this involves the registra- 
tion and sampling of all products sold, the chemical and physical examina- 
tion of samples collected, the publication of results obtained, and the 
prosecution of violators of the four statutes. 

The people of Maryland last year spent at least twenty million dollars 
for their purchases of commodities covered by the above mentioned laws. 
The protection of our users of these products to the extent of insuring 
them value received for this amount of money spent is of very great 
importance. This protection benefits not only the farm owner who must 
buy fertilizer for his fields, feed for his livestock, and insecticides for his 
orchards, but also the city home owTier who must fertilize his lawn and 
flowers and protect his shrubbery. 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 



F. S. Holmes. 



Seed Inspector 



The Seed Inspection Service is placed by law under the general super- 
vision of the Agricultural Experiment Station. This service takes samples 
of seed offered for sale, and tests them for quality and germination. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 



^ « WW • J.^\^dX^^V •»••••••••••••••••••••• 



— State Forester 



The Department of Forestry was created and organized to protect and 
develop the valuable forest resources of the State; to carry on a campaign 
of education; and to instruct counties, towns, corporations, and individuals 
as to the advantages and necessity of protecting from fire and other enemies 
the timber lands of the State. All correspondence and inquiries should be 
addressed to The State Forester, 1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. . 

Studies have been made of the timber resources of each of the twenty- 
three counties; and the statistics and information collected are published 
for free distribution, accompanied by a valuable timber map. The Depart- 
ment also administers six state forests, comprising about 6,000 acres. The 
Roadside Tree Law directs the Department of Forestry to care for trees 
growing within the right-of-way of any public highway in the State. ' A 
State Forest Nursery, established in 1914, is located at College Park. 



233 



STATE WEATHER SERVICE 

Edward B. Mathews 

John r! Wee?r'*"^ ^^^^^^r^B^l^^^ru^.i^^''"' 

TT o r^ Meteorologist 

U. S. Custom House, Baltimore, Maryland. 

land under the Regents of he Unt° .'f^^ i!?*' *^' climatology of Mary- 
Geologist as succesL to the Ma^anTS te W ''l''"t ^'^'"''"^ *h^ State 
The State Geologist is ex-officio n,Wf Weather Service Commission, 

former officers with the except'! of mJ' ^f ^°T'"^ ^" *^« ^""'^"""^ of 
the Governor and serves as Hanson „^°'°t^'l*' "^^^ '' commissioned by 
-reau. .„ activities :^:J^'S.:f- ;:^^,!^^^ Weathel^ 

MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Edward B. Mathews 

to conduct the work of this deDartmP^f t^ o! ^"^^^^^ity of Maryland 
nomic Survey is authorized ^S^thT^^^^^^ ^^^^^-^ -ci Eco- 

JyTSZr^'' ^'^^^^^ '^^ -^^^^ of the land, streams, roads, rail- 
an?S;atrpS% '''''''^'^^^ ^' '^^ ^-lo^cal f orations 

diffefenTS^ "^^ ^'^^^'^ ^'^"^"^ ^^^ ^^^ -tent and character of the 

PofaSeTdtLS^^^^^^ '^^^^"^^^^ ^^^ -^^^^^^^ -ters of the State for 
sur';:yr'^ surveys to detennine the variation of the needle for land 

added to keep the collection up to date ''""' '""''^^^^ ^'^ ^^^^-tly 



SECTION III 
Description Of Courses 

The courses of instruction described in this section are offered at College 
Park. Those offered in the Baltimore Schools are described in the separate 
announcements issued by the several schools. 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically : 

V Page 

Agricultural Economics _ _ - 236 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life - 240 

Agricultural Engineering 241 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) 242 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry 244 

Aquiculture - _ — 378 



Art 



251 



Astronomy - _ 253 

Bacterioloerv 9*^^ 

Botany — 257 

Business Administration..... 261 

Chemistry 271 

Classical Languages _.... _ 279 

Comparative Literature 280 

Economics _ „ 282 

Education 285 

Engineering 299 

English Language and Literature .^ : 312 

Entomology 320 

Farm Forestry „ 323 

Farm Management -.„ _ 236 

French _ „ 344 

Genetics _ : •... 323 

Geology ..- — - „ 324 

German _ 346 

Greek 1 279 

History , „... „ _ 324 

Home Economics _.... - 327 

Horticulture „ „.. 332 

Italian. :.... _ _ _._ „ _ _L 349 

Latin 279 

Library Science - 336 



234 



235 



I 



Mathematics 

Military Science and TacticsZ^^^^^^ 

Modem Laiiffuasres 

••yr • e>»*«'6c* — 

Music -• 

Philosophy — 

Physics™ 

Political Science 

Poultry Husbandry 

Psychology. -- 

Sociology 

Speech...... " - 

Spanish •* 

Statistics IT - — 

Veterinary Science *" 

ry -I •- 

Zool oerv 

o«' -. ........ 



Page 

. 336 

343 

. 344 

. 351 

-" 352 

- — 353 

—.. 357 

— 361 

- ~ 364 

367 

332 

"■" - 3 74 

- - 3 75 

376 



JXance'ruXtfldl^ttrr ^'1^^'^' ""' '"^^ numbers'i^g; courses 
200-299. "^^'•graduates and graduates, 100-199 ; courses for g^aZates! 

-'^^t^z':^ToiZT:r^^^ ^^^ — ter i„' 

second semester; 1 y, the year i f Lf T ^''' ''""'''''• ^ '' ^^e 
repeated in the second semester; 1 f or s thS the" '"'* *'^ ^""^^^ ^^ 
m either the first or the second sLtltL f *^^ .^^""^'''^^ may be given 
number indicates that the course is ofSredt tt '"' ' ^ "'''' ' ^°"^^^ 

The number of hours' credit i7ci!> I J summer session only, 

after the title of the course " ^ " "'"''" ""'"^^"' '" parentheses 

platrrmtetSrlnd olSo^iJr ^^*fr*-. giving the hours, 
out his program Students ^mTtarfr''"''^ .^^. '''' ^*'''^^»* '" ""^king 
Students are advised to colult th!. ^'' I "^"'"^ ^'^"'^ '^'^ ^^^^t^'^ 
in Section II when makL out tl^^t '*"*^'"^"t^ "^ *!>« <=olleges and schools 
Of Studies, Section I ^ **'^'" ^'""^''^'"^ °^ «t"dies; also Regulation 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS ANn padx^ ., ■ 

labtat^/- ^^"•="""^^' ^"'^-*- -<^ Resources (3)-^o lectures; 'one 

lattn^rSCXsitSy^onf ^^^^^^^ - - ^"^-*ry and its re- 
commercial development, ^aLpVtat^f etc .^L" r"?^^ ^"^ movements, 
sources of the world and their potenttlH-;;; *'"^ agricultural re- 

236 



trade routes and markets for agricultural products. The history of Ameri- 
can agriculture is briefly reviewed. Emphasis is upon the chief crop and 
livestock products of the United States. 

A. E. 2 s. Farm Organization (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of farm organization consisting of an introduction to the com- 
plex problems of the agricultural industry as these problems affect the 
life and welfare of the individual farmer. More specifically, the course 
includes the choice of agricultiire as a vocation; adaptation of farms to 
particular enterprises; types of farming and factors influencing the same; 
farm returns; the use of labor, machinery, and land in production; combi- 
nation of crop and livestock enterprises as they affect the farmer's income; 
and a study of successful and unsuccessful Maryland farms. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
A. E, 100 f. Farm Economics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
51y or 57. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, the tariff, price movements, and marketing. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. Sly or 57. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Cooperation in Agriculture (3) — Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers* cooperative organi- 
zations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 104 s. Farm Finance (3) — Three lectures. 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm organizations 
and industries. Farm insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance, 
with special reference to mutual development — ^how provided, benefits, and 
needed extension. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given in the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore, 

(Staff.) 
237 



A. E. 106 s. Prices of Farm Products (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 

emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 108 f. Farm Management (3) — ^Three lectures. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 y. Research Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

A. E. Ill f. Land Economics (3) — Three lectures. 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources. A 
study of major land problems and land policies including erosion and its 
control; farm tenancy; tax delinquency and tax reverted lands; land use 
planning and production control; public policies for facilitating land use 
adjustments; and directional measures for discouraging undesirable land 
uses. (Coddington.) 

For Graduates 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in Farm Economics (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. (Staff.) 

A. E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203. Research (8). 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under 
the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original in- 
vestigation in problems of agricultural economics, and the results will be 
presented in the form of theses. (DeVault.) 

238 



Sation, taxation in relation to ability ^f^^^Hure: general prop- 
: iparisok of the following taxes -they a^^^^^^^^^ ^.^^^^^ ,^. 

erty tax. income tax, sales tax. S^f.'J^^J^^f possibilities of farm tax reduc- 

Sitance tax, and special commodity taxes Po g^nment. 

S trough greater efficiency and economies m g ^^^^^^^^ peVault.) 

, . m f. AgrieuUura, Taxation in Theory and Practice (3)-Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory period a week_ ^^^ ^^^^ ^f 

Ideals in taxation; economic eff^ts of t ^^^^ ^^^.^^^^ 
society; theory of taxation: the genera' PP ^^^j ^^^^s. inheritance 
taxes, the income tax, he f^^f J^J^j^^^'^^ethods and recent tax reforms 
and estate taxes; recent shifts I'^.ta^"'^ ni ^^ ^j^jts; practical 

icts and duplication in taxation among govermn ^^^^^^^^ DeVault.) 
and current problems in taxation. 

, K .12 f. 213 s. Land Utilization and Agricultural ProducUon (3. 2) 
Two double lecture periods a week conditions of the economic 

A presentation by regions of the ^^-^^fcuW settlement, and of the 
and social forces that have ^^J^^^^f ^^^tion of farm products; followed 
resultant utilization of the land and P^^^^^ion • .^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^. 

by a consideration of regional trends ^n^f^^ ^^^^^^ ,^,„ges in 

tfon and agricultural production, and the outio ^^^^^^^ 

each region. _ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^.^^ ^,, 

A E 214 s. Consumption of Farm i roau 
-Two double lecture periods a week. migration for the Nation 

A presenUtion of the trends - P^f^^JpXrand their regional sig- ^ 
and by States; of trends in exports of f^™ P^^^^^„,p,i„„ of non-food prod- 
nificance; of trends m diet and m P^^^^P ,^^^ appear likely to mflu- 

ucts; followed by a <=— a^^^^^^^^^^^ outlook for commercial as ^on 

Sr^trato^etlfSWng agriculture. 

A. E. 215 s. Advanced Agricultural -Pe-ion^--^^^^^^ ^^^ 

An appraisal of agriculture^ -^/^^SCthe ^^ ,„,, ^es a critical 
financial status of farmery. More specihca^^ ^^ cooperatives, 

analysis and appraisal of specific types ana (Poffenberger.) 



239 



i 



I 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RUKAL LIFE 

PKOFESSORS COTTHn^MAK, CAKPENTER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AhaLT 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

doing and demonstrating St faces in Z'fi:^^ "' ? .*''\P'°l"«"« of 
as a teacher. It aims particularly rheekhist^^^^^^^^^ *?.' ''""'•°^'" 
practicunis and demonstratinT,« ,•„„„*•, "'^/'^aining m the essential 

him to the conditior„ndTwhich such r^^^^ ^^ *« ^'^t^'xJ^'^e 

patronage areas and "boratories of vocatiTi? T'^'J^ T"'' °" '" *^« 
practice in deficiencies require? ^"*=**'°"^' departments. Laboratory 

Stu'^de^fs S^Tw^Su^;^:" :„"e' lah ^f '"^"' ^^^'^"'"^ ^"^ ^'^"-''-a! 
re^^^d Of ,uniors inTuS Li": rd^^uHurEru^r^ ^" '-'-■ 
This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in cLss groups. 

R VA ino f T ... (Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 109 f. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) ThrJ 

lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s- A H 9. n ti i ^ rt ^^^~^^^^ 

R i?j tiA n . . (Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

R. Ed 110 s. Rural Life and Education (3)_Three lectures 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work iL ^ral communl 

Sm Sl^rralTrifefrl'h'''"' ^•^*^°"^^^ ^^^^^' ^^^e ^2"" of" 

and other community programs for rural people. CCotSaT) 

K. td. 112 s. Departmental Organization and Administration m t 

lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s 109 f ^"""""stration (l)-Two 

adl^ritivf^Joyamrfor hth' T^ T ""^*"'=«''" -"^ ^^'^^ "^ 
culture. Asa pr^XeT^tt^dX^lar^S^^^^^ r^^^^^ ^^'- 
istrative program for a specific scU. Tv^t^ ^ ^^0^.^ ''"^"■ 

leLf • "' ^- "^^^-'- '-- ^-''-'- *" S-ndary Schools (If-One 

CiS^n2:s^:Lixs--^-r^- 

240 



grams; methods of teaching; equipment; materials of construction; special 
projects. (Carpenter.) 

R. Ed. 120 y. Practice Teaching (5 to 6)— Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s, 

109 f. First semester, 2 credits. Second semester, 3 to 4 credits. 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student in this course is 
required to analyze and prepare special units of subject matter, plan lessons, 
and teach in cooperation with the critic teacher, exclusive of observation, 
not less than 125 clock hours of day class vocational agriculture and related 
subjects. A sixth semester hour may be earned by supervising home 
projects in the field not less than twenty-five clock hours, or teaching the 
equivalent time in part-time or evening classes, or any combination of these 
three types of work. (Cotterman.) 

For Graduates 
R. Ed. 201 f, 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3, 3)— Prerequisite, R. Ed. 

110 s, or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of public education as compon- 
ent parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and human de- 
velopment. Discussions, assigned readings, and major term papers in the 
field of the student's special interest. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f, 208 s. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Science, 
and Shop (2, 2). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. The three 
phases of the vocational teacher's program — all day, part-time, and adult 
work — receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251. Research (2-4) — Credit hours according to work done. Stu- 
dents must be especially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit 
the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter; Associate Professor Krewatch; Assistant 

Professor Burkhardt. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 101 f. Farm Machinery (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design and adjustments of modem horse- and tractor- 
drawn machinery. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual 
machines, their calibration, adjustment, and repair. (Carpenter.) 

241 



Agr. Engr. 102 s. Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (3)— Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the various types of in- 
ternal combustion engines used in farm practice. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 104 f. Farm Mechanics (1)— One laboratory. 

This course consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm shop and 
farm equipment repair and construction projects. It is offered primarily 
for prospective teachers of vocational agriculture. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 105 f. Farm Buildings (2)— Two lectures. 
A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 107 s. Farm Drainage (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain- 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, methods of 
construction and the use of engineering instruments. A smaller amount 
of time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the laws relating 
thereto. (Carpenter.) 

AGRONOMY 
Division of Crops 

Professor Kemp; Associate Professor Eppley; Mr. A. W. Woods. 

Agron. 1 f. Cereal Crop Production (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
History, distribution, adaptation, culture, improvement, and uses of cereal, 
forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. 

Agron. 2 s. Forage Crop Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Continuation of Agron. 1 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Agron. 102 f. Technology of Crop Quality (2 or 3)— Students, other than 
those specializing in agronomy, may register for either portion of the course. 
Part one (Grading Farm Crops) — one lecture; one laboratory. The market 
classifications and grades as recommended by the United States Bureau of 
Markets, and practice in determining grades. Part two (Grain, Hay, and 
Seed Judging and Identification) — one laboratory. (Eppley.) 

Agron. 103 f. Crop Breeding (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Gen. 101 f. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops, and methods used in 
crop improvement. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 104 f, 105 s. Selected Crop Studies (1-2, 1-2)— Credit according to 
work done. This course is intended primarily to give an opportunity for 
advanced study of crop problems or crops of special interest to students. 

(Staff.) 

242 



Agron. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

A consideration of agricultural investigation methods at the various 
experiment stations, and the standardization of such methods. ^ (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10) — Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103 f , but will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range will be allowed in 
choice of material to suit special cases. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 203 y. Seminar (2) — One report period each week. 
The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scientific 
publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. (Staff.) 

Agron. 209. Research (6-8) — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list of 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 

, Professor Thomas; Dr. Madigan, Dr. Bodily. 

Soils 1 f and s. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5) — ^Three lectures; two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Geol. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, Chem. 12 y. 

A study of the principles involved in soil formation and classification. 
The influence of physical, chemical, and biological activities on plant growth, 
together with the use of fertilizers in the maintenance of soil fertility. 
Lectures may be taken without the laboratory. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 102 s. Soil Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the soil fertility systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems, and the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. The practi- 
cal work includes laboratory and greenhouse practice in soil improvement. 

(Thomas.) 

Soils 103 f. Soil Geography (3) — Two lectures; one discussion period. 

A study of the genealogy of soils, the principal soil regions of North 
America, and the classification of soils. Field trips will be, made to empha- 
size certain important phases of the subject. - - (Thomas.) 

Soils 112 s. Soil Conservation (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the factors relating to soil preservation, including the infinence 
of cropping and soil management practices, fertilizer treatments, construc- 
tive and destructive agencies of man and nature on conservation, history of 
research in soil erosion, and field trips to soil demonstration areas. 

(Thomas.) 
243 * i 



For Graduates 
Soils 201. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 
Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. 



(Staif.) 



Soils 202 y. Soil Science (3-5 f, 2 s) — Three lectures and two laboratories 
first semester; two lectures the second semester. Prerequisites, geology, 
soils, and organic and quantitative chemistry. The lectures and laboratory 
may be taken separately. 

A discussion of the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved 
in the development of soils with special emphasis on soil water, organic 
matter, structure colloids, base exchange, and plant food deficiencies and 
their relation to soil fertility. The laboratory involves a study of the 
methods used in soil investigation. (Thomas.) 

Soils 204 s. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of 
organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Bodily.) 

ANIMAL AND DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Ikeler, Meade, Turk, Leinbach, England; Associate Profes- 
sor Berry; Assistant Professor Hughes; Mr. Outhouse; Mr. Wiedemer. 

Animal Husbandry 

A. H. 2 s. General Animal Husbandry (2) — Two laboratories. 

Types and market classes of beef cattle, sheep, hogs, horses. An outline 
of the types and market classes of cattle, hogs, sheep, and horses, supple- 
mented by trips to large typical central livestock markets. Emphasis is 
placed on the selection and judging of the various classes of livestock. A re- 
view of the entire commercial livestock and meat industry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 100 f. Breeds of Horses and Beef Cattle (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, A. H. 2 s. 

A complete review of the types, characteristics, and general history of the 
various breeds of draft horses and beef cattle. This course is designed to 
familiarize students with the general use and adaptability of the breeds of 
draft horses and beef cattle that are important in America. Laboratory 
consists of comparing specimens of the various breeds, with emphasis on 
breed characteristics of each. ' (Leinbach.) 

244 



A. H. 101 s. Breeds of Sheep and Swine (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 

Prerequisite, A. H. 2 s. ^ . i,- i, 

A complete review and history of the breeds of sheep and hogs which 
are important in our livestock industry. Laboratory work consists of the 
study and comparison of the breed characteristics of each. (Not given 
1940-41.) (Leinbach.) 

A. H. 102 f. Feeds and Feeding (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Junior year. Prerequisites, Chem. 1 y and 12 Ay. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock. Feeding standards, the 
calculation and compounding of rations. (Ikeler, Meade.) 

A. H. 103 s. Principles of Breeding (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Gen. 101 f. 

This course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 

heredity, variation, selection, development, systems of breeding, and pedi- 

, (Meade.) 

gree work. • ^ 

A. H. 105 s. Livestock Management (2)— Two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, A. H. 2 s. 

A thorough livestock management course designed to familiarize students 
with the practical handling and management of livestock. Students are 
given actual practice and training in the maintaining, feeding, fitting, and 
preparation of animals for show and work purposes. (Outhouse.) 

A. H. 106 f. Meat and Meat Products (1)— One laboratory. Prerequisite, 

A. H. 2 s. 

A course designed to give the student information on the processing and 
handling of our meat supply. Included is a study of the physical and struc- 
tural differences which affect the value of meat and its products. Numerous 
trips will be made to packing houses and meat distributing centers during 
the course. (Leinbach, Carroll.) 

A. H. 107 s. Livestock Judging (2)— Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 2 s. 

A laboratory course in the judging of hogs, sheep, beef cattle, and draft 
horses. Laboratory specimens are drawn from the college herds and flocks, 
with occasional supplemental trips to outstanding State herds. 

(Outhouse, Leinbach.) 

A. H. 108 f. Advanced Livestock Judging (2)— Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 107 s. . 1 i? 

A course for advanced training in the selection and judging of animals of 
the different breeds and market classes of sheep, hogs, beef cattle, and draft 
horses. The University of Maryland livestock judging team is selected from 
the best student judges enrolled in this course. A wide variety of labora- 
tory animals are used. Practice judging includes occasional judging trips 
among some of the outstanding State herds. (Outhouse, Leinbach.) 

245 



A. H. 109 f. Beef Cattle and Horse Production (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, A. H. 105 s. 

A full review of the principles underlying the practical and economical 
production of beef cattle and draft horses, particularly treating such angles 
as the selection of breeding animals, the raising, feeding, and preparation of 
beef cattle and draft horses for breeding, market, and work purposes. 

(Leinbach, Outhouse.) 

A. H. 110 s. Sheep and Swine Production (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 105 s. 

A course for those interested in the principles and practices underlying 
economical and efficient sheep and swine production for both commercial 
and breeding purposes. Full treatment of the topics of feeding, managing, 
producing, and marketing sheep and hogs. (Outhouse, Leinbach.) 

A. H. Ill f. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 2 s. 

A comprehensive study of the marketing of sheep, beef cattle, hogs and 
draft horses, and practices found in the American livestock market system 
together with the facilities available for the marketing and merchandising 
of all kinds of livestock and meat products. * (Leinbach, Ikeler.) 

A. H. 112 s. Geography of Livestock Production (2) — Two lectures. 

A course designed to familiarize students with livestock management, 
production, and marketing practices in other parts of the world. Considera- 
tion is given to the bearing of foreign livestock and meat industries on this 
country's production, including an insight into our foreign markets. (Not 
given in 1940-41.) (Leinbach, Outhouse.) 

A. H. 113 f. Animal Nutrition (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Chem. 
12 Ay and A. H. 102 f. 

Processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients, nutri- 
tional balances, nature of nutritional requirements for growth, production, 
and reproduction. (Meade.) 

Light Horse Section 

With the cooperation of Dr. A. L. Brueckner of the Veterinary Science 
Section of the University, and Mr. Humphrey Finney of the Maryland Horse 
Breeders' Association and Editor of The Maryland Horsey two courses are 
scheduled in light horse production. 

A. H. 115 f. Light Horse Production (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 2 s. 

A study of the light horse breeds with emphasis on the types and useful- 
ness of each. A full discussion of principles of selection and breeding of 
light horses is included in this course. (Bi*ueckner, Finney, Ikeler.) 

246 



A. H. 116 s. Advanced Light Horse Production (1)— One lecture. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 115 f. 

This course is a continuation of A. H. 115 f. Included is a study of 
the organization of the light horse farm, proper methods of feeding and 
training; control of disease; treatment and care of injuries; sale of surplus 
gl-ock. (Brueckner, Finney, Ikeler.) 

For Graduates 

A. H. 201 f or s. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (2-3) — Credit 
given in proportion to amount of work completed. 

Problems which relate specifically to the character of work the student 
is pursuing will be assigned. (Staff.) 

A. H. 202 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research work for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203. Research.— Credit to be determined by the amount and 
character of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be re- 
quired to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade and Staff.) 

A. H. 204 s. Advanced Breeding (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Gen. 
101 f and A. H. 103 s. 

This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity, variation 
recombination, and mutation; selection and selection indices; breeding 
systems; specific inheritance in farm animals, and with biometry as applied 
to animal breeding. (Meade.) 

A. H. 205 s. Advanced Livestock Marketing (2)— Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite A. H. Ill f. 

An advanced study of central, terminal and other systems of livestock 
marketing and the relationship of certain transportation and market priv- 
ileges. Students will be required to make original and comparative studies 
from Government reports and its Market News Service. (Ikeler.) 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 
Dairy Production 

D. H. 1 f. Fundamentals of Dairying (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. 

This course includes a general survey of the dairy manufacturing indus- 
try; the physical and chemical properties of milk; the production and dis- 
tribution of dairy products; the Babcock Test and other quantitative tests; 
simple qualitative tests for adulterants and preservatives; ice cream, butter, 

247 



I 



I 



cheese, and condensed products, and judging and scoring market milk. Lab- 
oratory fee $2.00. 

D. H. 2 s. Fundamentals of Dairying (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 f. 

This is a general course covering very briefly the origin, development, 
and characteristics of the dairy breeds of cattle; feeding, breeding, and 
management of the dairy herd; calf raising, dairy farm buildings and equip- 
ment; bull associations and dairy herd improvement associations; the pro- 
duction of high-quality milk; elementary judging practice; and the fitting 
and showing of dairy cattle. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 101 f. Dairy Cattle Feeding and Herd Management (3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. Junior or senior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 2 s, and 
A. H. 102 f. 

A comprehensive course in dairy cattle feeding and herd management 
designed for advanced students in dairy husbandry. It covers the efficient 
feeding of the dairy herd, including milking cows, dairy heifers, ' calves, 
and dairy bulls; common diseases of dairy cattle and their treatment; dairy 
farm sanitation; problems of herd management; dairy bams and equip- 
ment; and the factors essential for success in the dairy farm business. 

(Turk.) 

D. H. 103 s. Dairy Cattle Judging (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. 
Prerequisite, D. H. 2 s. 

This course is designed to give instruction in the comparative judging 
of dairy cattle. Trips to various farms for judging practice will be made. 
Such dairy cattle judging teams as may be chosen to represent the Uni- 
versity will be selected from among those taking this course. (Turk.) 

D. H. 104 f. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging (1) — One laboratory. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, D. H. 103 s. 

Advanced work in judging dairy cattle. Credit only to students who do 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle judging team. (Turk.) 

D. H. 105 s. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, D. H. 2 s. Gen. 101 f, A. H. 103 s. 

A study of the historical background; characteristics; prominent blood 
lines; noted families and individuals of the major dairy breeds. A survey 
of breeding systems; genetic and environmental factors as applied to dairy 
cattle. The use of the pedigree, various indices, herd and production 
records in selection and formulating breeding programs. (Berry.) 

D. H. 106 f, 107 s. Dairy Cattle Management and Barn Experience (3, 3) 

— Junior or senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 2s. 

Each student will be assigned special work under direction of an instructor 
at the University of Maryland Dairy bam, and will continue such assign- 

248 



\ 



ment until he is proficient. Special emphasis ..ill be given to all manage- 
ment problems. 

D. H. 108 f. History and Geography of Dairying (2)-Two lectures. 

Junior year. 

A study of the history and development of dairying in the various coun- 
tries of the world, with special reference to the importance of the mdustry, 
nreeds of dairl. cattle and their development, to dairy products manu- 
factured, and to the importation and exportation of dairy products. ^^^^ 

Dairy Manufacturing 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
D. H. 109 f. Cheese Making (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Junior 
year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making casein and cheese, including a 
study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved. Laboratory 
practice will include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory /««> $2.00 
(Not given 1940-41.) (England.) 

D. H. 110 f. Butter Making (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Junior 
year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making butter, including a study of the 
physical, chemical, and biological factors involved Laboratory practice 
will include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory fee, $1.00. ^^(N^ot 
given 1940-41.) 

D. H, 111 s. Concentrated Milks (2)— One lecture; one laboratory. 
Junior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making condensed milk, evaporated milk, 
and milk powder, including a study of the physical, chemical, and biologica 
factors involved. Laboratory practice will include visits to commercial 
factories. Laboratory fee, $1.00. (Not given 1940-41.) (England.) 

D. H. 112 s. Ice Cream Making (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making ice cream, sherbets, and ices, 
including a study of the physical, chemical, and biological ^ctors^involved 
Laboratory practice will include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. (Not given 1940-41.) (England.) 

D. H. 113 f. Market Milk (5)— Three lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1 f and Bact. 1. 

Commercial and economic phases of market milk, with special reference 
to its transportation, processing, and distribution; certified milk; commerc.a 
buttermilk; milk laws; duties of milk inspectors; distribution; milk plant 
construction and operation. Laboratory practice includes visits to local 
dairies. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (England.) 

249 



; 



I 



D. H. 114 s. Analysis of Dairy Produrt« r^\ n i x 

laboratory Prerequisites. D. h:^/.:1S^ TcIe^ritrAT "'^'■'"'^' 
dafr/pSrXL'w?/ ^;^''-*-°'o^-aI methods to ;ommercial 
methods; tanM^^onlJT'^^^^^^^^ bacteriological, and factory 

preservative" iX/eeJs'or" ""*"'= '"*^ ''' ^^"'*-^»*^ -^« 
n R iir; r. ' • • (England.) 

Pre;eq;is?te.'D hIT °"'"" ''"'"^'^ ^'^"^^ '^^-^^-J'- J-ior year. 

Pre;eq^;si"'D"H.''f;' *""''"'" ^'^-^^^ laboratories. Junior year. 

friSatt;° VollstSo'fr' *'' T^""^^" ^^^*^™ °f --^^--l re- 
sole.. i.e ^S^^^^^ 

requ'isl D H. if' """""" ^'^"^"^ ^^^'^-*-^- Senior year. Pre- 
^^ Methods of accounting in the market milk plant and dairy manufacturing 

Selr°;ear. "prer^.S D^t^L^/s^^^''^ ^'"""^^^ ^^^"^"^ '^^^-'-^• 

Oprr^olSe^ l^VrmtrLlhe-'^'pS f^f'.- ^^e cream, 
oratory fee, $3.00. ^ products judging team. Lab- 

D H liqf i9n r. • r. (England, Wiedemer.) 

D. H.TV and D H. 2 s. ' '^^'''"'"''^ ^'^ ^>-^- ^-^-- Prerequisite, 
Presentation and discussion of current literature in dairying. 

D. H. 121 f. Dairy Plant Experience C2) .. • ^"""^t"'' ^'""^'^ 

10 hours of Dairy Husbandry ^""^"^""^ (2)-Senior year. Prerequisite, 

dairy products. A written r^ort of th^wor?^ "" "'T^ manufacturing 
D H 122 c n- y^P^^ ^^ *^e work IS required. (England.) 

D. H. I'f!'' " ''"'•^ ^^^'^^ ^^^--- a)-Senior year. Prerequisite, 
Da^y^^titut^^^ '\^ ^'^^-sity of Maryland 

D. H. 123 y. Methods of Dairy Research CI 3. r^^^f ' """"^""'^ 
with the amount and character of wSc done ^''^^~^''^'' ^^ accordance 

stu^dtVX ptn^?^^^^^ ^\--^ ^^^ -eds of those dairy 

Plan to enter the research or technical field of dairying. 

250 



Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation of results are 
stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to the work the 
student is pursuing will be assigned. (England, Berry.) 

For Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and man- 
agement. Readings and assignments. (Turk.) 

D. H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2)— Two lectures. 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physiochemical point 
of view. (England.) 

D. H. 203 s. Milk Products (2)— Two lectures. 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of milk 
products. ^ (England.) 

D. H. 204 f or s. Special Problems in Dairying (1-3) — Credit in accord- 
ance with the amount and character of work done. 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. (Staff.) 

D. H. 205 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare papers, based upon research in progress 
or completed, for presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

D. H. 206. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and quality 
of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of 
the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Turk, Berry, England.) 

*ART 

Professor Marti; Associate Professor Highby. 

Art 1 f. Art in Ancient Civilization (2) — Two lectures. Egypt and the 
Ancient Near East up to 1000 B. C. 

A survey of the architectural remains, sculpture, painting, and minor 
arts of Egypt, Sumeria, Babylonia, and Palestine. Attention is given to 
the stages of human history and cultural development reflected in the 
archaeological and artistic remains. Lectures are freely illustrated by 
slides. 

Art 2 s. Art in Ancient Civilization (2) — Two lectures. The Near East 
after 1000 B. C. and the Pre-Greek Civilization of the Eastern Mediterranean. 

• 

Hittite, Assyrian, and Persian art are chiefly considered in the first half of 
the course. The important archaeological discoveries of Heinrich Schlie- 



'For other courses in Art see page 328. 



251 



mann and Sir Arthur Evans at Troy, the Greek mainland, and in Crete are 
then treated in detail. Conducted with the use of slides. (Not given in 
1940-41.) 

Art 3 f. Art in Classical Civilizatian (2) — Two lectures. Greek art. 

Architecture, sculpture, and vase-painting. The course covers the 
archaeic period, treats in detail the highly developed art-forms of the 
Golden Age, and shows the main trends in the late Greek or Hellenistic era. 
Emphasis is placed on the interrelation between motifs as they appear on 
art objects and in Greek literature. Lectures illustrated by slides. (Not 
given in 1940-41.) 

Art 4 s. Art in Classical Civilization (2) — Two lectures. Monuments of 
Ancient Rome. 

A survey of the architectural remains and decorative art of the Romans. 
The related Etruscan art development will also be briefly considered, as 
well as the remains of Pompeii and important outlying sites in the Roman 
world. The study of the monuments in Rome itself will be carried to the 
early Christian period. Illustrated with slides. 

Art 11 s. Medieval Art (2) — Two lectures. 

An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. 
European architecture, sculpture, and painting, from the third century 
A. D. to the Renaissance, studied by means of slides. 

Art 12 s. Modern Art (2) — Two lectures. 

Similar to Art 11 s. European art from the Renaissance to the present. 
Illustrated lectures. Occasional visits to the museums in Washington. 
(Not given in 1940-41.) 

Art 21 f. German Art (2)— Two lectures. 

A survey of the development of German architecture, sculpture, painting, 
and graphic art, from the time of Charlemagne to the early twentieth cen- 
tury. Similar developments in German literature vdll be considered. A 
knowledge of German is desirable, though not a prerequisite. (Not given 
in 1940-41.) 

Art 22 f. French Art (2) — Two lectures. 

Similar to Art 21 f. French art from Charlemagne to the present. Simi- 
lar developments in French literature will be considered. A knowledge of 
French is desirable, though not a prerequisite. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

Art 23 f. Italian Art (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the development of Italian art since the third century A. D., 
with special emphasis on the Renaissance and the Baroque. Reference will 
be made to Italian history and literature. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

252 



Art 51 f. Principles of Art Appreciation (2)^Two lectures. Open to 
upper classmen and by special permission to sophomores. 

A course designed to help those who seek ^^^rrj^ZTl'l^^^^ 
nrt and the best enjoyment of it. Lectures illustrated with slides showing 
sfmpTe w^^^^^^ the fields of architecture, sculpture, painting and 

^rapMc Irt. Qass discussion of principles. Occasional visits to the mu- 

"S! TnZT^l^n\ct^.it^ in our schools confront teachers with the 

this course. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor T. H. Taliaferro. 

Astr. 101 y. Astronomy (4)-Two lectures. Elective, but open only to 

juniors and seniors. /Taliafprro ^ 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. (Taliaterro.; 

BACTERIOLOGY* 

PROFESSORS JAMES, BLACK; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FABER; DR. BODILY; MR. 

^NoLii MR. SNYDER, MR. McBee, Mr. Harvey, Mr. Lynt, Mr. 

GOLDSMITH, Mr. young, Mr. Florestano. 

A. Bacteriology 
Bact. 1 f and s. General Bacteriology (4)-Two lectures; two labora- 
tones. Sophomore standing. .^ i.- . 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; r'-P^t'f' iTndtils 
melabolism; bacterial enzymes; application to water, ""^^^'/.^^^^^^f j£'. 
relationship to disease and to the industries. Preparation of culture media, 
SS^n and disinfection; -ro-opic and macroscopu^^^^^^^^ o 

bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and identification of bacteria, effects 
physical and chemical agents. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 1 A f and s. General Bacteriology (2)-Two lectures. ^ Sophomore 

standing. . t» 4. n 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 1. 

Bact 2 s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite. Bact. 1. Registration limited 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of P^t^°f '^l^'"^^'"- 
orSms Isolation and identification of bacteria from Pathological ma- 
teria" Xts of pathogens and their products. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

charged. ^53 



Bact. 2 A s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and sophomore standing. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2 s. 

Bact. 3 s. Household Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; their relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; 
infection and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 4 s. Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology (1) — One lecture. Senior 
year. Engineering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sewage disposal. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101 f. Milk Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. • 

The sources and development of bacteria in milk; milk fermentation; sani- 
tary production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation 
of milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; the bacteriological control of milk supplies and 
plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dairy Products Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Bact. 101 f desirable. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
fermented milks, starters, butter, ice cream, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; occa- 
sional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Black.) 

Bact. Ill f. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria, yeasts, and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoil- 
age; sanitary production and handling; food infections and intoxications. 
Microbiological examination of normal and spoiled foods; factors affecting 
preservation. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (James.) 

Bact. 112 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purification; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal; disposal of gar- 
bage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Standard methods for examination 
of water, sewage and other sanitary analyses; differentiation and signifi- 
cance of the coli-aerogenes group. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Black.) 

254 



« .f 11^ f and s Advanced Methods (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. 

resis; surface tension; gas analjsis, ^P^"* ^rj^Q (Bodily.) 

advanced study in reagent preparation. Laboratory tee, if /.uu. 

Bact. 115 f. Serology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. Junior year. 

reactions; applications in the identmcauon (Faber.) 

disease. Laboratory fee, $8.00. ^ p^^r^nui- 

ternate years. (Not offered in 1940-41.) 

Bact. 117 s. Public Health (l)-One lecture. Junior or senior year. 

Tstr^f^i^lectuL on public ^^^^tS^^^:^ 
the staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, represent 
Ing il "f the bureaus and divisions. Offered alternate years, alt.^r.atmg 
with Bact. 116 s. 
Bact 118 s. Systematic Bacteriology (2)-Two lectures. Junior or senior 

^'^J^TS^'^^^^^rTZe^^ relationships; international 
coSn? nImLlature; bacterial variat^" ^ it affects classi cat^r^, 
Offered alternate years. (Not offered in 1940-41.) v 

Bact 123 f 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (2. 2)-Two laboratories 
Se^or year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and 2 s and any other courses needed for 

^hrttseT^geVafa^^^^^^^^^^ to research. Subject matter 

.^hl.rthe needs of the particular student or problem will be arranged. 

S piobTems arelo be selected, outlined, and investigated in consultation 

:^^:^'=er the sup^ision o, ^^^-^^^^^ ^^^ 
are to be presented in the form of a thesis in o g 

majoring in Bacteriology. Laboratory fee, $/.00. 

Bact 125 f. Clinical Methods (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequisite. Bact. 

' lllTsZl «;;lc";xamination of blood; bacteriological examina 
tionftutum, feces and spinal fluids; -i-scopic a.d routine chemic^ 
methods for examination of urine. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (l-aDe, 

255 • 



\ 



Bact. 131 f, 132 s. Journal Club (1, 1) — Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and 2 s. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticised by 
members of the class and staff. No graduate credit for students majoring 
in Bacteriology. (Black.) 

For Graduates 

Bact. 205 f. Research Methods (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, Bac- 
teriology, 6 hours. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation of 
papers; research institutions, investigators; laboratory design, equipment 
and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 207 f, 208 s. Special Topics (1, 1) —Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 

10 hours. 

Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 211 f. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bact. 
1, Chem. 12 y or equivalent. • 

Growth, nutrition, physiological inter- relationships; bacterial enzymes; 
respiration; fermentations; chemical activities of micro-organisms; indus- 
trial fermentations. (Black.) 

Bact. 221. Research (2-12) — Laboratory. Credit will be determined by 
the amount and character of the work accomplished. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 
and 2 s, and any other courses needed for the particular projects. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00 per credit hour. (Staff.) 

Bact. 231 f, 232 s. Seminar (2, 2) — Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. 

Discussions and reports prepared by the student on current research, 

selected subjects, and recent advances in bacteriology. (James.) 

B. Food Technology* 
F. Tech. 1 s. Introduction to Food Technology (1) — One lecture. 
Discussions of the general phases of study comprising food technology. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

F. Tech. 100 f. Food Microscopy (2) — Two laboratories. 

Microscopical analysis of foods following the methods used in the Federal 

Government and other agencies. Studies of the structural composition of 

agricultural and manufactured foods. Use of microscopic tests in factory 

control and analyses. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (James.) 



*One or more of the scheduled courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates may 
be given during the evening, if a sufficient number of students register. For further in- 
formation, address The Department of Bacteriology. A special fee is charged. 

256 



P Tech. 108 s. Preservation of Poultry Products (2)_Two laboratories. 
Junior or senior year, i^^^^jf ' ^f^^'^ ',,^, and during storage; micro- 
Studies of the '«i<='f^*'!'*^y°^during storage; microbiology of frozen and 
biology of shell eggs '^^^^;i'^;^;,ZJ with department of poultry 
dried eggs. This is taught in coup (James, Gwin.) 

husbandry. Laboratory fee, $7.00. demonstration. 

F. Tech. 110 f. Regulatory Control (l)-One lecture an ^^^^^t^ 

1 refrigeration. 6**aU.., "-■ ^^^^^^ Ir^l^^.^J. Senior 
P. Tech. 130 y. Technology Conference k^^j 

standing. _ . j„„„i„nnif>nt<? in the field of food 

Reports and discussions of current developments in (james.) 

technology. . BOTANY 

^ ,.M.N NORTON TEMPLE, BAMFORD; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
PROFESSORS A^P^N.^^^^^^^^^ shirk; Wr. bellows, MR. JONES, 

MR. Haney, Mr. Pierce. 
A General Botany and Morphology 

- i^i :^i?e.T.»"J^r=,££.^^^^^^^^^^ 

student is also acquainted with the true nature ana aim o 

or laboratory period ^^^ demonstration or lab- 

A course similar to Bot. 1 t, excepi, v j 

oratory period is required. Laboratory fee, $3.00. , ^ , . p,„ 

Born General Botany (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. emphasis upon the evolutionary 

A ,-«„T"jLn^^^^^^^^^^^^ the morphological changes correlated 

development of the P'f "* ^S"*"^ . liverworts, mosses, ferns, and their 

Suii, L"sf.%:L*;s=. s»,u ,;^ «... b. ..™.ed. ^a.. 

oratory fee, $3.00. 
B... 4 .. U.... ""•,<«,-^° St.TrulUv.«<i. and U.e «» of keys, 

257 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are required. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Bamford.) 

Bot. 103 f. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying 
it; the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic founda- 
tions; methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium, and 
library. Each student to work on a special problem during some of the 
laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Bot. 104 s. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Bot. 103 f. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Each student works on an original problem dur- 
ing the laboratory time. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Norton.) 

Bot. 105 s. Economic Plants (2) — Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
A collection of plant products from markets, stores, factories, etc., is made 
by students to illustrate the useful plants both in the natural form and as 
used by man. (Norton.) 

Bot. 106 f. History and Philosophy of Botany (1) — One lecture. 
Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Norton.) 

Bot. 107 s. Methods in Plant Histology (2) — Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Brown.) 

Bot. 108 y. Undergraduate Seminar (2). 

Discussion of current literature, problems, and progress in Botany. For 
undergraduate majors and minors; no graduate credit given. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201 s. Cytology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1 f, Gen. 101 f, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 
The major portion is devoted to chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and 
the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity and evolution. 
The laboratory involves the preparation, examination, and illustration of 
cytological material by current methods. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Bamford.) 

258 



Bot. 202 s. Plant Morphology (2)-Two lectures and demonstrations. 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f , 3 s, and 101 f. 

A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
.pedal re'ference to their phylogeny and development, ^abora^^^^^^^^^ 
$3.00. 

Bot. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, -"^dg^^y;^;"^^; 

Bot. 204. Research.-Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 
Note: See announcement on page 379 for further botany courses given 
at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

B. Plant Pathology and Mycology 
Pit. Path. 1 f. Diseases of Plants (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Prerequisite, Bot. If. v + 

An introductory study in the field, in the laboratory and in the htemture 
of symptoms, causal agents, and control measures of th^/j.^J^.f/^^^'^^', 
The work is so arranged that a student may devote part of his time to the 
SortaLt dilses o? the plants in which he is particularly mtevested. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pit. Path. 101 f. Diseases of Fruits (2-4)— Two lectures; laboratory 
according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

An intensive study intended to give a rather thorough knowledge of the 
subject matter, such as is needed by those who expect to become advisers in 
fruit production, as well as those who expect t^^ecome spee.ahsts in plan 
pathology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not given m 1940-1941.) (Temple.) 

Pit. Path. 102 s. Diseases of Garden and Field Crops (2-4)-Two lec- 
tures; laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

The diseases of garden crops, truck crops, cereal and forage crops In- 
tended for students of vegetable culture, agronomy, and plant Pathology, 
and for those preparing for county agent work. Laboratory fee, ^JOO.^^^^ 

Pit. Path. 103 f, 104 s. Research Methods (2-3, 2-3)-One conference and 
five or seven hours of laboratory work. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f, or 
equivalent. 

Certain technics of plant disease ' investigations including P'o'^^dures in 
sterilization; cultural methods; isolation of pathogens; microscopy and 
to^S^Z in some instances the student may undertake an investigation 
of special phases of a research problem. Laboratory fee, $3.00. ^^^^^^^ 

259 



sitr^ m^Vf. ""•'""' "' Ornamentals (2)-Two lectures. Prerequi- 

der'LTlaVi?^"* diseases of plants grown in greenhouse, flower gar- 
den, and landscape, including shrubs and shade trees. (Temple ) 

Pit. Path. 106 y. Seminar (2). 

inv?st5aTon; '"' "'"'"^ *"" ^'^"* Pathological Hterature and on recent 

(Temple, Norton, Woods.) 

Pit. Path. 107 f. Plant Disease Control (3)-Two lecture.- „«. i.>, 
tory. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. lectures, one labora- 

coiftrot^r'nlnTt' '■'"^i"^ ^^*^ *^" '^'°'^ ^"-l P^a«t-« of plant disease 
control, the preparation of sprays and other fungicides and the testinTnf 

ten L?SLT«rT57" '"' laboratory; demonstration and oth^fex 

cX: ZTJt:tT *° ""^"^^ ^^^"* -^•^'^ ^"-^ *° ^''^ *-<^^'"^ 0^ ^S- 

(Temple.) 
req''u!;ite!B;t"i%'- '''"'*'^^ ^'^-^^^ ''''^'''■' '^° 'aboratories. Pro- 

an^ecoromttfTh'f"'''-"'/'.' '"'"•P'^'"°^y' 1^^^ ''i^tories, cl'assification, 
and economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Norton, Woods.) 

For Graduates 
Pit. Path. 201 s. Virus Diseases (2)_Two lectures 

..b^tlr tt =-ra-^4rn^ht ^;;n= "^ 7^^ 
orf^'ry''''"'- '"' '• ^-P--"<= Diseases (3)-Two lectures; one lab- 
dim!"" Tasf "duT °'. "'"^^ '" *'"' environment; injuries due to 
iiidue, soil, gases, dusts and sprays, fertilizer, improper treatrDPnf nnri 
other detrimental conditions. (Not given in 1940-41 )' Tn^Lu J 

Pit. Path. 205. Research.-Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple, Woods.) 
C Plant Physiology 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PrerequS, Bit.'-lf^'''"' "'^^''""^^ ^*^-^- '-*"-'• *- '-"oratories. 
A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants The 

:;atoryt^,So! ^^ " "^^^^ '''-'''- -'^^ ^''^ ^--' ^etaS" '^- 

(Brown.) 

reTutit^:''^^^^^^^^^ ^''''' ^^^'^^^ <^>-^-^ ^-^--^ one field trip. Pre- 

anrructssions ?^ var " "'"iT" l' '^''' environments. Plant formations 
ana successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 

260 



of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 
Students pay cost of field trips. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 201 s. Plant Biochemistry (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. It deals with the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and with the important processes in plant life. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Appleman, Shirk.) 

Pit. Phys. 202 A f. Plant Biophysics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1 f and Pit. Phys. 101 f or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
plant life processes. Students electing this course should elect Pit. Phys. 
202 Bf. (Not given in 1940-1941.) (Appleman, Shirk, Brown.) 

Pit. Phys. 202 Bf. Biophysical Methods (2)— Two laboratories. Labora- 
tory fee, $3. (Not given in 1940-1941.) (Shirk.) 

Pit. Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, identification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found in plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use of 
these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. (Brown.) 

Pit. Phys. 204 f. Growth and Development (2). 

(Appleman, Brown, duBuy.) 

Pit. Phys. 20.5 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
slibject. (Appleman.) 

Pit. Phys. 206. Research. — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Staff.) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONS 

Professors Stevens, Wedeberg, Gruchy; Lecturer Riggleman; Associate 

Professors Marshall, Bennett, Wyckoff; Assistant Professors 

Daniels,* Gay, Cissel, Fisher, Kirkpatrick; Mr. Reid, Mr. 

MuLLiN, Mr. Shirley, Mr. Benton. 

Some of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 
in alternate years, whenever prospective enrollments therein do not justify 
repeating annually. Such courses are indicated by an asterisk. 



$See also related courses in Economics, in Agriciiltiiral Economics, especially A. E. 1 f, 
2 s, 102 s. 104 s, 106 s, 109 y, 210 s, 211 f, 212 f, 213 s, 214 s, and 215 s; and in 
Psychology, especially Psych. 4 f, 141 s, and 160 f. 

*0n leave. 

261 



A. Accounting 
oraX '' "' ''""''"" "' ^"•""'""^ ^«>-Th-e lectures; one lab- 

an?diTre:oX"astrarf^:;^ *^^ P-pective business .an 
for advanced and spfcialiLrac^ountinf A ? H • '''■^!. ^' ^ ^^''' '^""'^^ 
procedures of accounting in thrd "^ '^ '"^''^ °* '"^t''<><Js «•") 

corporation. ^'='°""*'"^ '" ^^^ ^^^^ proprietorship, partnership, and 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Acct. 101 f, 102 s. Advanced Accountine (S 3> Ti,,. 7 * 
requisite, Acct. 51 y. *^"unung a, d>— Three lectures. Pre- 

Advanced theory and problems in connection with fho *„u • 
mg papers, statements; corporations acTuari«,' ^ ^''"o^'"^: ^ork- 
receivable; notes and accent«^.L " actuarial science; cash; accounts 
sales; tangible ?xed asseL ^-S ^•l/"'''"*^""'' «°nsignn,ents; installment 
and .^serves correetir.^; intangible assets; investments; liabilities; funds 
the anal7s ' of «; ea^itT"^-"n '°"'^' --P-^"- statements 
analysis; and stateltV?;Scatror?=. ^"'°^'' ^^^^ ^ij; 
^^Acct. 121 f. Cost Accounting (2)_Two lectures. Prerequisite, Acct. 

tiois.^i^'i£io;^o7a:co:nis^rbsS;ir ^^^*t ^-'^ ''^' '^'^-•^'- 

of specific order cost acconnW f-^ /^""^ ^""^ •="'* "•=<'^'J«; «"t''ne 

and consumptioi; valuTor "Lt^r.^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

features of accounlin,, f™ i.t.. . ' "=™»»""S '»r labor co.ls; special 

Pense- dkirltafi™ 1. '">'»' ""'^ accounting for manutacturlnj e,- 
turlng .tens" rpr,d.':.7''f ■^"'"'"fl'^^": Jl.trlbutlon ., „.„^„,. . 

eatrll U;," p^^ranrr . °'e tt' '""°" "°"^ """'''^S? 
=ltt; AccfiaT ,."'"'""' '^' ''""""""» ">-Two l^^nres. Prere,.!- 

««bo.. \ -is^ss^'"rni:rz":-r'rSr^-*'S.T 

Acct. 149. Apprenticeship in Public Acmnnfin^r /-/»■> r. 
seniors in the upper ten ner rpnt \.f l^ Recounting. (0)— Open only to 

172 s, (credit or^ron^Tre^rftioS;. '^'^"- '^'•^^^'^"^^^*^' ^«*- ^^^ '' 

JanuaT; iTt^ Febr'na'^y^'r '' "^'' "^"°"^"^ ^""^^ «-^ ^-- ^^-o"* 

262 



Acct. 161 f. Income Tax Procedure (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

Acct. 102 s. 

Income tax in theory and practice. Selected cases and problems illus- 
trating the definition of taxable income of individuals, corporations, and 
estates. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 171 f, 172 s. Auditing Theory and Practice (2, 2)— One lecture; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, 
the preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 181 f, 182 s. Specialized Accounting (3, 3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Accounting for partnerships; ventures; insurance; receiverships; 
branches; consolidations; mergers; foreign exchange; estates and trusts; 
budgets; public accounts; savings banks; commercial banks; national 
banks; building and loan associations; stock brokerage; consignments; 
department stores; real estate; extractive industries; hotels; government; 
electric utilities; and others. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 186 s. C. P. A. Problems (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of the instructor. 

This course is arranged to coordinate all previous work in accounting 
with special emphasis on the solution of practical C. P. A. problems and 
the discussion of C. P. A. theory. (Wedeberg.) 

For Graduates 

Acct. 228 f, 229 s. Accounting Systems (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Acct. 
181 f, 182 s. Students who do not have these prerequisites must attend 
all classes in Acct. 181 f, 182 s concurrently. 

A discussion of the more difficult problems in connection with the indus- 
tries covered in Acct. 181 f, 182 s. Also includes the statement of 
affairs; realization and liquidation account; parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting; and financing. ^ (Wedeberg.) 

Acct, 299 f. Special Problems in Accounting (3) — Prerequisite, gradu- 
ate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Investigations of specific problems, as directed by individual conferences 
with the instructor. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely 
allied with, but must not be the same as, the subject discussed in the 
student's major thesis. (Wedeberg.) 

263 



B. Finance$ 

Fin. 53 s. Money and Banking (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 
An analysis of the basic principles of money and credit; the history of 
money; the operations of the commercial banking system. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Fin. 105 f.* Consumer Financing (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 y or 57 
and Fin. 53 s. 

The economics of installment selling; methods of financing the consumer; 
and operations of the personal finance company. (Gruchy.) 

Fin. 106 f. Public Finance (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

The nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, taxation, and 
budgeting. Special emphasis on the practical, social, and economic prob- 
lems involved. (Gruchy.) 

Fin. Ill f. Corporation Finance (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 y or 57 and 
Acct. 51 y. 

The organization and financing of a business enterprise. Types of se- 
curities and their utilization in apportioning income, risk, and control. 
Problems of capitalization, refunding, reorganization, and expansion. Pro- 
curement of capital. Public regulation of the sale of securities. 

(Stevens, Mullin.) 

Fin. 115 f. Investments (3) — Prerequisite, Fin. Ill f. 

Sources of information for the investor. Classes of investments, govern- 
ment bonds, municipals, real estate mortgages, public utilities, railroads, 
industrial securities, movement of security prices, analysis of financial 
statements, adapting the investment policy to the purpose and needs of the 
investor. (Stevens, Mullin.) 

Fin. 116 s.* Investment Banking (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

A study of the functions and operations of investment banking institu- 
tions and their relation to the market for long-term credit, and with 
emphasis on the trends and problems of investment banking. (Not offered 
in 1940-41.) (Gruchy.) 

Fin. 118 f.* Stock and Commodity Exchanges (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 
51 y or 57. 

An analysis of the operations of the various exchanges. Brokerage 
houses and methods of trading. Regulation of the exchanges. (Gruchy.) 

Fin. 121 s.* Advanced Banking Principles and Practices (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 51 y or 57, and Fin. 53 s. 

The incorporation, organization, and operation of banks. Functions 
of departments and problems of customer relations. Bank legislation and 
governmental regulation. (Gruchy.) 



$See also related courses in Agricultural Economics, especially A. E, 104 s, 210 s, 
and 211 f. 



Fin 125 f." Credits and Collections (3) -Prerequisite, Acct. 51 y. 
Nature and function of credit and use of credit instrunients. Prmcples 
„f^er3itinvestigation and analysis. The work of the cred.t -anager.^^^^ 

Fin 129 s.* International Finance (3)-Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

For'eign exchange theory and practice I-t«™-«'>f^,%^^'; "ob" 
tary ani banking problems. International money markets. The gold prob 
lem and the Bank for International Settlements. ^^^y., 

Fin 141 f. Insurance (3)— Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

A lurvev of the major principles and practices of life and property 
Jur^ , wil 'pecial^ef e'rence to their relationship to our soaal^and 

economic life. „ ■ -^ 

r- lia f , or S Supervised Practice in Finance (2)-Prerequis.te, 

effective experience can be obtamed. .,.,.. .;^„ „^Hpr 

This practice in actual work in an approved financ.a -t' "t.n -de 

guidance may be arranged for any P^^^.^f .'nli^-at ;ead?ng 
fndividual conferences, reports, and supervised collateral reading. ^^^^^^^^ 

Fin 151 s.* Real Estate (3)-Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 
The principles and practices involved in owning, operating merchand.s- 
ing'taS! 'and apprLing real estate and real estate -vestments.^^^^^^ 

Fin 199 s. Financial Analysis and Control (3)-Prerequisite, senior 
standing or consent of instructor, and Finance 111 f. 

.rr c^^-- .'=.s,^- fsi.^/L^ 

executive, u^y r^urchases, production, inventory, expenses, and 

tion, analysis, and testing. 

For Graduates 
P!„ 99A f or s Special Problems in Finance (l-3)-Prerequisite, grad- 
uar;tanding P-linLary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 

"f I'M^'rstudvTspecific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
Individual study of ^P^^'J? P ^e closely allied with, but must 

"^^r th^ Tame as tLsufiect discussed in the student's major thesis 
not be the same as, tne suojei. (Stevens, Gruchy.) 



264 



265 



C. Marketing^ 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Mkt. 101 f. Principles of Marketing (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

A study of the fundamental principles of assembling and dispersing 
manufactured goods; functions of wholesale and retail middlemen; branch 
house distribution; mail order and chain store distribution; price and price 
policies; cash and quality discounts; price maintenance; and a discussion 
of the problem of distribution costs. (Bennett.) 

Mkt. 105 s. Salesmanship and Salesmanagement (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 
51 y or 57, and Mkt. 101 f or consent of the instructor. 

An analysis of the fundamental principles of salesmanship and the 
technique of personal presentation of ideas, goods, and services. Analysis 
of customer buying motives, habits, and sales reactions. The structure 
and function of the sales organization and its relation to the activities of 
the production and other departments. Building, training, equipping, stim- 
ulating, and supervising a sales force. , (Reid.) 

Mkt. 109 f. Principles of Advertising (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

Functions and economic implications of advertising; selection and adap 
tation of media to various lines of business. Layouts, copy writing, 
and campaign planning. Objectives, appropriations, and measurements of 
effectiveness. (Mullin.) 

Mkt. 115 s.* Purchasing Technique (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

Ascertaining sources of supply; substitutes; utilization of catalogues, 
files, pooled information, and cooperative purchasing; buying on specifica- 
tions, sampling, testing, bargaining, terms, discounts, relations with sales- 
men. Procurement, analysis, and interpretation of market and price data. 
Materials control. Interdepartmental and office organization. 

(Kirkpatrick.) 

Mkt. 119 s.* Retail Store Management and Merchandising (3) — Pre- 
requisite, Mkt. 101 f. 

Retail store organization, location, and store policy; pricing policies, 
price lines, brands, credit policies; records as a guide to buying; budgetary 
control of inventory and expenses; purchasing methods; supervision of 
selling; training and supervision of retail sales force; administrative 
problems. (Kirkpatrick). 

Mkt. 149 f, s, or S. Supervised Practice in Marketing (2) — Prerequisite, 
credit or concurrent registration in Mkt. 101, and any specialized marketing 
course needed for proper understanding of a particular business, such as 
Mkt. 105, 109, 115, or 119. Consent of the instructor is necessary; this 
will not be given unless the position assigned for a given registrant in a 



JSee also related courses in Agricultural Economics, especially A. E. 102 s, 103 f, 
105 s, 106 s, and 215 s; and in Psychology, especially Psych. 4 f, 140 f, and 141 s. 

266 



commercial business is of such a nature that effective experience can be 
obtained. This internship may be arranged for any period of the year. 

Practice in actual marketing work under guidance The method of 
individual conferences, reports, and supervised -Hate^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

Mkt. 199 s. Marketing Research and Market Policies (3)-Prerequisite, 
nine credit hours in marketing. 
A study of the methods and problems involved in m^a^rlceting res^eard.. 

For Graduates 

Mkt 229 f or s. Problems in Marketing (l-3)-Prere<,uisites, g'-^duate 
standing preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and permission 
of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, .but must 
:X the same as. the subj.t discussed in the -den^. m.or thej. 

D. Trade and Transportation^ 
T. and T. 1 f. Economic Geography (3)-For freshmen. Sophomores 
admitted with consent of instructor. 

commerce of the separate regions and countries with especial reference to 
the U. S. 

T and T 4 s. Development of Commerce and Industry (3)-For fresh- 
men. Sophomores admitted with consent of instructor. 

Ancient and medieval economic organization. The guild, domestic, and 
metaSe "stems. The industrial revolution, laissez-faire -de- -du ; 
Trial and commercial organizations in Europe and America. Post-war re 
strictions on commerce. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

T and T. 101 f. Principles of Foreign Trade •(3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 
51 y T and T. 1 f , 4 s, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the basic principles and practices of foreign trade, its develop- 
ment and steiificance in relation to domestic commerce and national develop- 
":;;. MoTm commercial policies, the tariif controversy, and the growth 
of economic nationalism. 



tSee also' r'elated courses in Agricultural Econo„,ies. .specially A. E. 1 f. 212 f, and 213 s. 

267 



T. and T. Ill f. Principles of Transportation (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 
51 y or 57. 

A study of the development of transportation facilities in the United 
States, and the regulatory measures that have accompanied this develop- 
ment. The principles of railway rates and tariffs and their effects on 
agricultural and business organization. Changing transportation methods; 
the modem "railroad problem." (Gay.) 

T. and T. 121 s.* Export and Import Trade Procedure (3) — Prerequi- 
site, T. and T. 101 f. 

Functions of various exporting agencies; documents and procedures used 
in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring goods in 
foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through the 
customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. Field 
trips are arranged to study actual import and export procedure. A nominal 
fee is collected before each trip to cover expenses incurred. (Gay.) 

T. and T. 148 f, s, of S. Supervised Practice in Transportation (2) — 

Prerequisites, credit or concurrent registration in T. and T. Ill f, and any 
other specialized course needed for proper understanding of a particular 
type of transportation enterprise. Consent of the instructor is necessary; 
this will not be given unless the position arranged for a given registrant in 
a commercial business is of such a nature that effective experience can be 
obtained. 

This practical work under guidance in an approved transportation agency 
may be arranged for any period during the year. The method of individual 
conferenices, reports, and supervised collateral reading. (Gay.) 

T. and T. 149 f, s, or S. Supervised Practice in Foreign Trade (2) — Pre- 

reciuisites, credit or concurrent registration in T. and T. 101 f and any other 
specialized course needed for proper understanding of a particular business, 
such as T. and T, 111 f, and 121 s. Consent of the instructor is necessary; 
this will not be given unless the position arranged for a given registrant in a 
commercial business is of such a nature that effective experience can be 
obtained. 

This practical work under guidance in an approved exporting or import- 
ing house, may be arranged for any period during the year. The method of 
individual conferences, reports, and supervised collateral reading. (Gay.) 

For Graduates 

T. and T. 229 s. Problems in Foreign Trade (1-3)— Prerequisites, grad- 
uate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Gay.) 

268 



E. Organization and Management* 
O. and M. 51 f. Elements of Business (2)-Prerequisite, junior stand- 
•«^*QTiH consent of the instructor. ^ 

additional work. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
n ,nH M 101 s 102 f. Business Law (3. 3)-Prerequisite, junior stand- 
i„?' tctl A is Lted to majors in Accounting, or those who have 

TXltfrburness relationship, contracts, negotiable instruments. 
Legal aspects oi u , ^ personal property, and sales, 

agency, partnerships, corporations, "^^^l ^"° ^ ^ contracts, sales. 

Section A is a more intensive t^/^*'";"* ?f. *"J^\ I've^^ in Section B, 
negotiable instruments, agency and ^^^-^'f'^''^^^;j^^\,,iession in 
and is designed to prepare students for the account ^g_^P^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ 

Maryland. . r\ a K/f 

O. and M. 103 s. Adva«^ Business Law (2)-Prerequisite, O. and M. 

'"ThL 'principles of the law of corporations, trusts, and the ad^trat^^^^^^ 

of the estates of ^-^^P^tetc: ^n^I^g ;^S^^^^^^ Mary^""^. 
lated to prepare students for the accounting p (Shirley.) 

O and M 110 f. Fundamentals of Business Administration (2)-Pre- 

Tr:z: :- :r« rp. -.;;j - :".T»"i^i 

expert to other functional experts and to gi^^ ^" (Reid.) 

apply technical knowledge m business problems. 

O. and M. 121 s. Industrial Management (3)-Pr^^^^^^^^^^^^ Econ. 51 y 

or 57 Fin 111 f, Mkt. 101 f, or consent of the instructor, 
or 57, i' »"• ^ ' analvsis of actual business cases concerned with 

The course IS H^^^^^l^^^ZoLm of production, including particu- 
various aspects of "^anagenieni, p equipment, and labor; simpli- 

n ^'%SS^atirnrt:SrtL1TxprsiL; contraction; Integra- 
fication, standardization purchasing; plant location; plant layout; labor 
tion; raw f^^er.als supply .purchagPj ^^^^,u^^^, planning and 
supply; job standards and wage paymen.., v (Mullin.) 

scheduling; organization and control. 

-^Z::^, .elated courses in Psyeholo^. especially Psych. 3 s, 160 f, a.d 161 s. 

269 



O. and M. 25 s Psych ifii = t> 

or 57 and Psych. 3 s or I'/ " permtr""''/'^-^'^'^'^"'^"^^' Econ. 51 y 
A study of the proble.slv^ve^tr f "^.*™^*''^- 

personnel in „,odern business t^istrvT''*'"^ '"' '"^"^^^'"^'^^ ot 
selection, measures of ability methorkn/^' ^ <=°nsideration of employee 

. ''T' '^'"''"'y- Supplement *reain. t? Tf ''^** ""-"t-ning per! 
will conform to the individual's Dar«.l^ . "^^ ^•"' Commerce students 
direction of Dr. Wycko/f and Dr Marshal, "sl f '"'. ""' "^ ""^^^ ^^e 
133 f, Industrial Relations. ^'^^'^shall. See also related course, Econ. 

O. and M. 149 f s or <={ « • (Clark.) 

requisites, credit o; c;ncurr;nt rTgTslSrrp"' - Cooperation (2)-Pre. 
courses needed for proper understand^ 7 f I ' ' ^"*^ ^"^ specialized 

Pnse. Consent of the instruSoTl „e~v' fh— If ^-P--«ve enter- 
■ the position aranged for a given re^stmr.. ^' ^^'^ T" ""* ^^ ^^^^^ ""'ess 
experience can be obtained '^^'^^'^^''^ '^ of such a nature that effective 

This practical work under e-nirJan • 
tion niay be arranged for any perlordurin" T'"''^^ cooperative organiza- 
v-dua, conferences, reports, ^JZe^T/^lZri J^^^^^^^ ^' ^"^^- 

O. and M. 161 « * p-^ki^ • ^ (Stevens.) 

sites, si.. semesVe-r horSrecTuntTnnhrr ^'T''''^'^^'' C3)-Prere,ui- 
three in statistics, three in organ zaiion!,' !," '"'"' ''^''' '" «<=o"o'«ics, 
cooperative theory. Oraduate S^Z^t/^^S^ ^^J^^J^ 

thai irrnSer;:- ,tat: p^rS mragTri f ^"^^^^^^ — - 
of travel is required, for which a nominal ?f T''^'' ^ ""^"^d amount 

field trip to cover the expenses incurS. " ""''*'' "* '^^ ^ime of each 

(Stevens.) 
For Graduates 
0. and M. 201. Research (2~Q) r..^-^ • 
Plished. Student must be especiall7 o^.H^ ^T J^'^P^^^^^^ to work accom- 
effectively the research to be undSken ' ^ '"'""^ "^^^ '^ P"^«"- 

Investigation or original research ir, 1 ui 
and operation under sutrvisio^f thelsTuctT "' '"T."^ organization 
O. and M 2n« i . . (Commerce Staff.) 

"• and M. 208 s. Legal Aspects of Business Pr„ki 

O. and M. 291 f or s PrnKi^ • t. (Shirley.) 

270 



hours in organization and management, eight in accounting, nine in eco- 
nomics, and three in statistics. 

Individual investigation of specific problems, under direction of the 
instructor. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied 
with, but must not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's 
major thesis. (Business Administration Staff.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Broughton, Drake, Haring, White; Associate Professor 
Wiley; Assistant Professor Sufplee; Dr. Lamb, Dr. Mozingo, Dr. 
SviRBELY, Mr. Westgate, Mr. Aarons, Mr. Anspon, Mr. Beamer, Mr. 
Bruce, Mr. Chapman, Mr. Lander, Mr. Lann, Mr. Leed, Mr. Linnig, Mr. 
LoNGLEY, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Sweeney, Mr. Tollefson, Mr. Wharton, 
Mr. Whiton, Mr. Wingate, Mr. Woodrow, Mr. Young. 

A. Inorganic Chemistry 

Chem. 1 A y. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of the 
course is to develop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. 

Course A is intended for students who have not had high school chem- 
istry, or have passed their high school chemistry with a grade lower than 
B. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 1 B y. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course covers the same ground as Chem. 1 A y; but the subject 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade not lower than B. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 2 y. Qualitative Analysis (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory the 
first semester: and one lecture; two laboratories the second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, 
their separation and identification, and the general underlying principles. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 3 y. Introductory Chemistry (6) — ^Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A y. This 
course is designed for students desiring a working knowledge of elemen- 
tary chemistry, without the laboratory part. It is not accepted as a 
prerequisite for advanced chemistry courses. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per 
semester. 



271 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 130 y. Chemical Microscopy (4)-0ne lecture; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, special permission of instructor. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of micro 
scopic analysis. Latter part of the course devoted to a study of textile 
fibers. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Svirbely.) 

For Graduates 
PrSlTulsS* L'ri.. 2"^'""''''' "' ""^ ^^^^^ ^'^"-^^ ^^>-'^° '-t-es. 

(White.) 

Chem 200 B y. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4)_Two laboratories; 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. J' v .» i o laooratories. 

90(? l^^^'T? '!""'' f *^ compounds of elements considered in Chem. 
-I'W A y. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. - (White.) 

Chem. 201 f or s. An Introduction to Spectographic Analysis (1), 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamen- 
tals of spectographic analysis. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (White.) 

Chem""l02^ A y.' '^^'"''' "' ^"'""""^ ^*^-^"'' '^^*"''^^- Prerequisite, 

A systematic study of the theories and properties of solutions. Subjects 
considered are solubility, regular solutions, dipole moments soluHon 

o'rr in " 94otr ''"''" °' '"-^^ ^-^ '=°"^^"'^^*^^ electroUs^'S: 

' (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 240 f. Chemical Microscopy (2)_0ne lecture; one laboratory. 

stulrwitr'th''? "'"'•«%*an Chem. 130 y designed to acquaint the 
So fundamentals of microscopic analysis. Laboratory fee, 

(Svirbely.) 

PreSisife.' Chem't"' t' ""'""'^"''^ ^'^"""^ >-^"-= ^^ '^"---y. 

Latrir; ftSo.*'' ^'^ ^'"'^ °' ''^ °^"<^^' P-^-^- Of crystals. 

(Svirbely.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 4 f or s. Quantitative Analysis (4)-Two lectures- twn T.i. 
tones. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y lectures, two labora- 

272 



Chem. 6 y. Quantitative Analysis (8) — ^Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. 

The principal operations of gravimetric analysis. Standardization of 
weights and apparatus used in chemical analysis. The principal operations 
of volumetric analysis, a study of indicators, typical volumetric and color- 
metric methods. The calculations of volumetric and gravimetric analysis 
are emphasized. Required of all students whose major is chemistry. Lab- 
oratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 101 y. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (8) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y, or its equivalent. 

A broad survey of the field of inorganic quantitative analysis. The first 
semester is devoted to mineral analysis, including the analysis of silicates 
and carbonates. The second semester is devoted to a study of the analysis 
of iron, steel, and such other materials as best fit the needs of the indivi- 
dual student. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Svirbely.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 243 y. Special Problems in Quantitative Analysis (4) — Two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y. Laboratory work and conferences. 

A complete treatment of some special problem or problems, chosen to 
meet the needs and interest of the individual student. Laboratory fee, $7.00 
per semester. (Svirbely.) 

C. Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 8 A y. Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. 

This course includes an elementary study of the fundamentals of organic 
chemistry, and is designed to meet the needs of students specializing in 
chemistry, and of premedical students. 

Chem. 8 B y. Elementary Organic Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 

A course designed to familiarize the students with the fundamental 
methods of the organic laboratory. This course, with Chem. 8 A y, satisfies 
the premedical requirements in organic chemistry. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 116 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y, or their equivalent. 

A course devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of carbon 
than is undertaken in Chem. 8 A y. Graduate students who desire an 
accompanying laboratory course should elect Chem. 210 y. (Drake.) 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 
A course devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative analysis. 
The work includes the identification of unknown organic compounds, and 

273 



\ 



corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 207. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. (Mozingo.) 

Chem. 118 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, 
and halogen are carried out, and representative synthesis, more difficult than 
those of Chem. 8 B y are studied. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

(Mozingo.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 203 A f. Stereochemistry (2) — Two lectures. 

A comprehensive study of stereoisomerism. (Not offered in 1940-41.) 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 203 B f. The Polyene Pigments, and Certain Vitamins (2)— Two 
lectures. 

A study of the structure and reactions of the more important polyene 
pigments and those vitamins whose structure is known. (Drake.) 

Chem. 203 C f. Sterols and Sex Hormones (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the structure and reactions of the more important sterols, and 
the sex hormones. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f or s. Organic Preparations (2-4) — Two or four laboratories. 

A laboratory course, devoted to the synthesis of various organic com- 
pounds, and designed to fit the needs of students whose laboratory exper- 
ience has been insufficient to enable them to pursue research in organic 
chemistry. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Mozingo.) 

Chem. 206 f or s. Organic Microanalysis (4) — Prerequisite, consent of 
the instructor. 

A laboratory study of the methods of Pregl for the quantitative deter- 
mination of halogen, nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen, and methoxyl. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Drake.) 

Chem. 207 f or s. Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6). 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and of mixtures. This course serves as an intensive preparation for the 
problems of identification encountered in organic research, and should be 
taken by all students planning to do research in organic chemistry. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Mozingo.) 

diem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6) — Two or three lab- 
oratories. Students electing this course should elect Chem. 116 y. 

The content of the course is essentially that of Chem. 117 y and 118 y, 
but may be varied within wide limits to fit the needs of the individual 
student. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Mozingo.) 

274 



Chem. 235 A s. Chemistry of Certain Natural Organic Bases (2) — Two 

lectures. 

A review of the chemistry of the simple amines and a study of the alka- 
loids, and related compounds. (Not offered 1940-41.) (Mozingo.) 

Chem. 235 B s. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2) — Two lectures. 

The practical applications of modem theories of physics and physical 
chemistry to the problems of structure and reactions of organic substances. 
(Not offered 1940-41.) (Mozingo.) 

Chem. 235 C s. The Heterocyclics (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of some of the heterocyclic compounds with special reference to 
those related to natural products. (Mozingo.) 

D. Physical Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 102 A y. Physical Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y; Phys. 2 y; Math. 23 y. 

For those taking laboratory, graduate students will elect Chem. 218 f, 
219 s, and undergraduates Chem. 102 B y. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Raring.) 

Chem. 102 B y. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 
For undergraduates taking Chem. 102 A y. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demonstrate 
physico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and acquaint 
the student with precision apparatus. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

Chem. 103 A y. Elements of Physical Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 1 y; Phys. 1 y; Math. 8 f, 10 s; or 21 f, 22 s. Under- 
graduates taking this course must also register for Chem. 103 B y. 

The course is designed to meet the needs of premedical students and 
others unable to pursue the subject farther. Accordingly such topics as 
solution theory, colloid chemistry, reaction rates, equilibrium, the methods 
for determining pH, etc., are stressed. (Lamb.) 

Chem. 103 B y. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) — One 

laboratory. This course must be taken by undergraduates enrolled in Chem. 
103 A y. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

Numerous quantitative experiments illustrating the principles discussed 
in Chem. 103 A y are performed. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

• (Lamb.) 

275 



Chenu 105 y. Elements of Chemical Thermodynamics (4)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 102 Ay. 

This course is designed for Chemical Engineering majors and is less 
extensive than Chem. 218 y but with suitable emphasis on all pertinent 
^^P^^s- (Haring.) 

For Graduates 

Note: All courses in this group have, as prerequisites, Chem. 102 A y 
for lecture courses and Chem. 102 B y for laboratory courses, or their 
equivalents. 

Chem. 212 A f, 213 A s. Colloid Chemistry (2, 2)— Two lectures. 
A discussion of the effects of surface on chemical reactions with numerous 
practical applications. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Haring.) 

Chem. 212 B f, 213 B s. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)— Two lab- 
oratories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 A f, 213 A s 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Not given in 1940-41.) ^ (Haring.) 

Chem. 214 f, 215 s. Structure of Matter (2, 2)— Two lectures. 
A study of the structure of atoms, molecules, solids and liquids. Molecular 
structure and related topics will be studied from the standpoints of dipole 
moments, Raman spectra, and infra-red spectra. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Lamb.) 
Chem. 216 f. Phase Rule (2)— Two lectures. 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One, two, and three com- 
ponent systems will be considered, with practical applications of each. 

(Haring.) 
Chem. 217 s. Catalysis (2)— Two lectures. 

This course consists of lectures on the theory and applications of catalysis. 

( Haring. ) 
Chem. 218 f, 219 s. Reaction Kinetics (2, 2)— Two lectures. 
A study of reaction velocity and mechanisms of reactions in gaseous and 
liquid systems, dnd the effect of temperature, radiation, etc., on the same. 

(Lamb.) 
Chem. 220 A f, 221 A s. Electrochemistry (2, 2) — Two lectures. 
A theoretical discussion coupled with practical applications. (Haring.) 

Chem. 220 B f, 221 B s. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2, 2) Two labora- 
tories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 220 A f 221 A s. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Haring*.) 

Chem. 226 y. Chemical Thermodynamics (4) — Two lectures. 
A study of the methods of approaching chemical problems through the 
laws of energy. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Haring.) 

276 



Chem. 231 f, 232 s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2 or 3, 2 or 3)— Two 

laboratories and one conference. 

Students taking this course may elect six credits of lectures in Chem. 
102 A y to replace the conference. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

E. Biological Chemistry 

Chem. 12 A y. Elements of Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 

The chemistry of carbon and its compounds in relation to biology. This 
course is particularly designed for students in Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Chem. 12 B y. Elements of Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental meth- 
ods of the organic laboratory. The course is designed to accompany Chem. 
12 A y. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Chem. 14 s. Chemistry of Textiles (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y. 

A study of the principal textile fibres, their chemical and mechanical 
structure. Chemical methods are given for identifying the various fibres 
and for a study of dyes and mordants. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 108 f or s. General Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; 
two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y or their 
equivalent. 

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, 
the chemistry of foods, digestion, absorption, assimilation, metabolism, 
tissue composition, and excretion. The laboratory work consists of experi- 
ments in food analysis, salivary, gastric, pancreatic and intestinal digestion, 
and identification of components of blood and urine. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. (Supplee.) 

Chem. 115 y. Food Analysis (4) — Two laboratories. (By special arrange- 
ment a student may take this course one semester for two hours credit) 
Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y or their equivalent. 

This course is designed to give the student experience in analytical pro- 
cedures of particular benefit to workers in the food industries. Particular 
attention is given to the problems presented in sampling, and in applying 
standard methods to different types of products. Analytical determinations 
of value in detecting and estimating various types of decomposition are 
also stressed. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Wiley.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 208 f or s. Biological Analysis (2) — Two laboratories. 
A course in analytical methods of value to the student whose major 
field is in the biological sciences. The work is varied somewhat to fit the 

277 



needs or interest of the individual student. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. (Wiley.) 

Chem. 222 A f, 223 A s. Physiological Chemistry (2, 2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y or their equivalent. 

An advanced course in physiological chemistry. For the first semester 
the course consists of lectures and assigned reading on the chemistry of 
the carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and enzymes. The second semester deals 
with digestion, absorption, metabolism, excretion, hormones, and nutrition. 

(Supplee.) 

Chem. 222 B f, 223 B s. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)— 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 4 and Chem 12 A y and 12 B y or 
their equivalent. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chem. 222 A f, 223 A s. Qualitative 
and quantitative food analysis; digestion, nutrition, metabolism, and respira- 
tion experiments; and quantitative analysis of the blood and urine. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Supplee.) 

Chem. 224 f, 225 s. Special Prablems (2-4, 2-4)— Two to Tour labora- 
tories. Laboratory, library, and conference work amounting to a minimum 
of 10 hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 222 A f, 223 A s and consent of 
the instructor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates or 
amino acids, the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a protein, 
or the detailed analysis of some specific type of tissue. The student will 
choose the particular problem to be studied with the advice of the instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Wiley.) 

F. History of Chemistry 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 121 y. The History of Chemistry (2) — One lecture. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 1 y and 8 y or their equivalent. 

The development of chemical knowledge, and especially of the general 
doctrines of chemistry, from their earliest beginnings up to the present day. 

(Broughton.) 

G. Seminar and Research 
For Graduates 

Chem. 227 f, 228 s. Seminar (1, 1) — Required of all graduate students in 
chemistry. 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Staff.) 

Chem. 229. Research in Chemistry. — The investigation of special prob- 
lems and the preparation of a thesis towards an advanced degree. 

(Staff.) 

278 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

Associate Professor Highby. 

Greek 

Greek 1 y. Elementary Greek (6)— Three lectures. 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the trans- 
lation of simple prose. 

Greek 2 y. Greek authors (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Greek 1 y 
or equivalent. 

Translation of parts of Xenophon and Plato. 

Latin 

Both a major and a minor are offered in Latin. The minor requires the 
successful completion of twelve semester hours in language courses higher 
than Latin 2 y. Four entrance units will also be regarded as fulfilling the 
regular requirement of twelve credit hours prerequisite to the minor. To 
make possible the fulfillment of major requirements, further courses will 
be added in the next issue of the catalogue. 

Latin 1 y. Elementary Latin (6)— Three lectures. 

This course is intended to give a substantial and accurate knowledge of 
Latin grammar and syntax, together with practice in reading simple prose. 

Latin 2 y. Intermediate Latin (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Latin 
1 y or two entrance units in Latin. 

Review of forms and syntax. Readings from Caesar and Cicero, Ovid 
and Virgil. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Latin 101 f. Review of Latin Literature (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Latin 2 y or four entrance units in Latin; three units will admit well quali- 
fied students. 

Review of Latin literature by selected readings from the origins down 
to the time of the Late Republic. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Highby.) 

Latin 102 s. Review of Latin Literature (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Latin 101 f or special permission of the teacher. 

Review of Latin Literature continued; the Age of Augustus and the Early 
Empire. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Highby.) 

Latin 111 f. Livy's History of Rome (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
I^tin 2 y or four entrance units in Latin; three units in the case of well 
qualified students. (Highby.) 

Latin 112 s Horace's Odes (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Latin 111 f 
or equivalent.' (Highby.) 

279 



T ^"""o ^^^ /• ^''"'^'' ^''''^^ y^rhers (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite 
L»atin 2 y or four entrance units in Latin. 

Essays of Cicero and Seneca. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Highby.) 

Latin 122 s. Roman Poetry (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Latin 
121 f or equivalent. ^ , i 

Satires of Horace and Juvenal. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Highby.) 

Latin 131 f. Tacitus, Germania and Histories (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 

requisite, 12 hours beyond Latin 2 y. (Highby.) 

Latin 132 s. Martial, selected Epigrams (3)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, as for Latin 131 f. 

If students for this advanced course have read Martial, other Latin poets 
may be substituted. (Hiffhbv ) 

Courses Given in English 

Classics 3 f. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (2)— Two lec- 
tures. No prerequisite. 

This course aims to show how Latin roots are used in English and to 
make for a more accurate use of English vocabulary. It also supplies the 
basic knowledge involved in the comprehension or creation of scientific 
nomenclature. (Highby.) 

Classics 4 s. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (2)— Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Classics 3 f. 

A continuation of the course outlined above. The study of Latin roots 
IS continued and that of the Greek language elements added. (Highby.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Dr. Prahl, Dr. Darby, Dr. Falls, Dr. Fitzhugh, Dr. Hale, Mr. Murphy 
Mr. Robertson, Dr. Warfel, Miss Wilcox, Dr. Zeeveld, Dr. Zucker. 
A general prerequisite for all courses in Comparative Literature is 
English 1 y and English 2 f , 3 s. Requirements for major include Compara- 
tive Literature 101 f, 102 s. 

Comp. Lit. 1 f. Greek Poetry (2)— Two lectures. 

Greek Poetry. Homer's Ilmd and Odyssey will be studied. Special em- 
phasis is laid on the literary form, the historical and mythological back- 
ground. 

Comp. Lit. 2 s. Later European Epic Poetry (2)— Two lectures. 

VirgiPs Aeneid, Dante's Divine Comedy; Nihelungenlied, Song of Roland 
and other European Epics will be studied. Special emphasis is laid on 
their relationship to and comparison with the Greek epic. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 101 f. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3)— 

Three lectures. 

Survey of the background of European literature through study in English 

280 



translations of Greek and Latin literature. Special emphasis is laid on 
Greek drama, along with the development of the epic, tragedy, comedy, and 
other typical forms of literary expression. The debt of modem literature 
to the ancients is discussed and illustrated. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 102 s. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) — 

Three lectures. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101 f; study of medieval and modern Conti- 
nental literature. (Zucker.) 



Comp. Lit. 103 f. Chaucer (3) — Three lectures. 
Same as English 104 f, cf. p. 315. 



(Hale.) 



Comp. Lit. 104 s. The Old Testament as Literature (2) — Two lectures. 
A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale.) 

Comp. Lit. 105 f. Romanticism in France (2) — Two lectures. 

Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau to 
Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. (Wilcox.) 

Comp. Lit. 106 s. Romanticism in Germany (2) — Two lectures. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105 f. German literature from Buerger to 
Heine. The reading is done in English translations. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 107 f. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature 

(2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the Faust Legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment 
by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust (Prahl.) 



(Murphy.) 



Comp. Lit. 108 f. Milton (2)— Two lectures. 
Same as English 108 f, cf. p. 315. 

Comp. Lit. 109 y. Cervantes (6) — Three lectures. 

Same as Spanish 105 y, cf. p. 350. (Darby.) 

Comp. Lit. 110 s. Introduction to Folklore (2) — Two lectures. 

Origin, evolution, and bibliography of types. Literary significance, as 
seen in the development of prose fiction. Collections, such as the Pancha- 
tantra, Seven Sages, Arabian Nights, etc., and the continuation of these 
tales through medieval and modem literature. (Robertson.) 

Comp. Lit. 112 f. Ibsen (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the life and chief works of Ibsen with special emphasis on his 
influence on the modern drama. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 113 f, 114 s. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3, 3) — 

Three lectures. 

Same as English 113 f, 114 s, cf. p. 316. (Hale.) 

281 



t 



]f 



.1 



Comp. Ut. 124 s. Contemporary Drama (3)— Three lectures. 
Same as English 124 s. cf. p. 317. (Fitzhugh.) 

Comp. Lit 125 f. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3)-Three lectures 
Same as English 125 f, cf. p. 317. (Warfel.) 

For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 200 s. The History of the Theatre (2)_Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite a wide acquaintance with modern drama and some knowledge of 
the Greek drama. ^ 

A detailed study of the history of the European theatre. Individual 
research problems will be assigned for term papers. (Not given in 1940- 

" „ (Hale.) 
Comp. Lit. 201 y. Medieval Romance in England (4)— Two lectures 

Same as English 204 y, of. p. 319. S.) 
Comp. Lit. 203 y. Schiller (4)— Two lectures. 

Same as German 203 y, cf. p. 348. (Prahl.) 
Comp. Lit. 204 y. Goethe (4)— Two lectures 

Same as German 204 f, 205 s, cf. p. 348. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 205 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (4)— Two 
lectures. 

Same as French 204 y, cf. p. 346. (Falls.) 

Comp. Lit. 206 s. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (2)— Two 
lectures. v , .« 

Same as English 205 s, cf. p. 319. (Zeeveld.) 

Comp. Lit. 207 f. Seminar in Shakespeare (2)-Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, English 11 f, 12 s. 

Same as English 207 f, cf. p. 319. (Zeeveld.) 

ECONOMICS* 

Professor Stevens, Gruchy, DeVault; Lecturer Nevins; Associate 
Professors Marshall, Wyckoff, Bennett; Assistant Professors Gay 
Fisher, Kirkfatrick, Daniels*; Mr. Reid, Mr. Mullin, Mr. Shirley.' 
Some of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 
in alternate years, whenever prospective enrollments therein do not justify 
repeating annually. Such courses are indicated by an asterisk. 

sta^d"ing ^^ ^' ^"""P'*^ ''^ Economics (6)-Prerequisite, sophomore 

A study of the general principles of economics; production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of wealth. Lectures, discussions, and student 
exercises. "v^'^m- 



lofs T InfT^^^^^^^ -P^-^"^ Fin. 106 f. Ill f. and 

I . I'nl' in« \no ' ^^^ ^' *"^ '^ Agricultural Economics, especially A E 1 f 

*bn leave. '' ""' ''' ""' "''' '' ''' '' ''' '' ''' ^' "'^ ^' ^'^^ ^15 s ' 

282 



Econ. 57 f or s. Fundamentals of Economics (3) — Prerequisite, sopho- 
more standing. Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 51 y. 

A brief study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups, such as students 
of engineering, home economics, agriculture, and others who are unable 
to take the more complete course provided in Economics 51 y. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Econ. 130 f. Labor Economics (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

Insecurity, wages and income, hours, substandard workers, industrial con- 
flict; wage theories; the economics of collective bargaining; unionism in its 
structural and functional aspects; recent developments. (Marshall.) 

Ek;on. 131 s.* Labor and Government (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor con- 
ditions. State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, 
working conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial 
disputes, collective bargaining, and economic security. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 133 f.* Industrial Relations (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in indus- 
try with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and 
legal analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitra- 
tion, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and 
injunctions. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 136 s. Economics of Consumption (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y 
or 57. 

The place of the consumer in our economic system. An analysis of 
demand for consumer goods. The need for consumer-consciousness and a 
technique of consumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for con- 
sumers. Special problems. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 145 s.* Public Utilities (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y or 57. 

Economic and legal characteristics of the public utility status; problems 
of organization, production, marketing, and finance; public regulation and 
alternatives. (Wyckoff.) 

Econ. 151 f.* Comparative Economic Systems (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 
51 y. 

An investigation of some of the more important social reform movements 
and programs of the modem era. The course begins with an examination 
and evaluation of the capitalistic system, followed by an analysis of alter- 
native types of economic control such as socialism, communism, nazism, 
fascism, and the cooperative movement. (Wyckoff.) 

283 



Econ. 152 s.* Social Central of Business (3) — Prerequisite, Economics 
51 y or 57. 

The reasons for and the methods of avoidance, escape, and abuse of 
competition as a regulating force in business. Social control as a substi- 
tute for, or as a modification of, preservation of competition. Law as an 
instrument of social control through administrative law and tribunals. The 
constitutional aspects of social control. (Shirley.) 

Econ. 153 f.* Industrial Combination (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

The development of industrial combinations in the United States; the 
causes which brought about tlie trust movement; trade and business methods 
employed by these combinations; types of big business; anti-trust legisla- 
tion in this country and its effects. (Wyckoif.) 

Econ. 161 f. Economics of Cooperative Organization (3) — Prerequisite, 
Econ. 51 y or 57. (See also 0. and M. 149 f, s, or S, A. E. 103 f, and 0. 
and M. 161.) 

Analysis of the principles and practice of cooperation in economic activity 
from the viewpoint of effective management and public interest. Potentiali- 
ties, limitations, and management problems of consumer, producer, market- 
ing, financial, and business men's cooperatives. (Stevens.) 

Econ. 190 f. Advanced Economic Principles (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 
y or 57 and senior standing or consent of the instructor. 

An analysis of advanced economic principles with special attention to 
recent developments in value and distribution theory. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 191 s. Contemporary Economic Thought (3) — Prerequisite, senior 
or graduate standing. 

A survey of recent trends in English, American and Continental economic 
thought, with special attention paid to the institutionalists, the welfare 
economists, and the mathematical economists. (Gruchy.) 

For Graduates 

Econ. 201. Research (2-6) — Credit in proportion to work accomplished. 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Student must be especially quali- 
fied to pursue effectively the research to be undertaken. 

Investigation or original research in problems of economics under super- 
vision of the instructor. (Staff.) 

f^con. 203 y. Seminar (4) — Prerequisites, concurrent graduate major in 
economicsi or business administration and consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory, accounting, 
cooperation, or business. (Staff.) 

Econ. 205 f. History of Economic Thought (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 51 y. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories, including 
the ancients, the Greeks, the Romans, scholasticism, mercantilism, physi- 

284 



ocrats. Adam Smith and contemporaries, Malthus, Ricardo, and John Stuart 
Mill. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 206 s. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3)— Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 205 f. 

A study of the various schools of economic thought, particularly the 
:lassicists, the neo-classicists, the Austrians, and the socialists. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 210 f, 211 s. Special Problems in Economic Investigation (1-3, 1-3) 
—Each semester credit in proportion to work accomplished. 

Technique involved in economic research. Practice in drawing up sched- 
ules and programs. Individual conferences and reports. (Stevens.) 

Econ. 233 s. Problems in Industrial Relations (3)— Prerequisite, prelim- 
inary courses in the field of specialization, and permission of the instruc- 

The subjects selected for study may be closely allied with, but must not 
be the same, as the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Marshall.) 

Econ. 252 s. Problems in Government and Business Interrelations (3)-- 

Prerequisite, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and permis- 
sion of the instructor. . , ^ . 4. 
The subjects selected for study may be closely allied with, but must not 
be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

Econ. 298 f, 299 s. Problems in Economics of Cooperation (1-3, 1-3)— 

Prerequisite, six semester hours in accounting, three in finance, three in 
statistics, eight in economics, and three in cooperative theory. 

Problems may involve practical work with the National Cooperative 
Council and other Washin^on (D. C.) or Maryland cooperative organiza- 
tions. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, 
but must not be the same as, the subject discussed in the student's major 
thesis. (Stevens.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors Benjamin, Small, Brown, Drew, Powers, Long, Mackert, 
McNaughton, Joyal, Hand; Associate Professor Brechbill; Assist- 
ant Professor Gallington; Miss Clough; Miss Smith. 

A. History and Principles 

Ed. 2 f, 3 s. Introduction to Teaching (2, 2)— Required of sophomores in 

Education. 

A finding course, with the purpose of assisting students to decide whether 
they have qualities requisite to success in teaching. Study of the physical 
qualifications, personality traits, personal habits, use of English, speech, 
and habits of work; and of the nature of the teacher's work. 

285 



11 



Ed. 5 f or s Technic of Teaching (2)-Required of juniors in Education 
Prerequisite, Psych. 10 f. uui^duon. 

Educational objectives and outcomes of teaching; types of lessons; prob- 

ir;.t^.rTV ,""'*' measuring results and marking; socialization and 
directed study; classroom management. 

Ed. 6 s, 7 f. Observation of Teaching (1, 1)-Prerequisite, Psych 10 f 
o.-«*!!I^"*^ ''°"''' "^ '"'■^'*^'' observation. Reports, conferences, and criti- 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ed. 100 f. History of American Education (2)— Two lectures 
The course traces the origins and development of the concepts'and prac- 
tices which now characterize contemporary American education. The ele- 
mentary and secondary schools, teacher training, and higher education will 
be considered, as well as the emergence of the junior high school and the 
junior college. 

(Long.) 

MotriXaSir" "' '^''"""" (2)-Greco-Roman, Medieval, and Early 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of Educational theory, institutions 
and practices from the Greco-Roman era to 1750. (Long ) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modern Education (2)-Continuation of Ed 101 f 

.^'^!fi?'^Z t *l^ "^"^^"^ P^"°*^ '^ ^''^''^^^ t° the creators of modern 

tuZT- ^^"'^ °" ^^'"^ """"^^^ educational systems have been 

tounded m various countries. /t 

(Long.) 

Ed. 103 s. The High School (3)-Prerequisite, senior standing 

in'^r^JZT^f'^ '''!°°' P°P»l^«°n' "s nature and needs; the school as an 
instrument of society; relation of the secondary school to other schools- 
aims of secondary education; curriculum and methods in relation to aims 
extra-curricular activities; guidance and placement; the school's oppor- 
tunities for service to its community; teacher certification and employment 
m Maryland and the District of Columbia. (Brechbill ) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Measurements (3)— Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, consent of instructor. 

A study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construction 
and use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; elementary statistical con- 
cepts, and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test results; school 
^''^'- (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 107 f. Comparative Education (2) — ^Two lectures. 

, P'l^^''^^^ ^^"^ '^^"se different systems of education, and the character- 
istic differences in the educational policies and practices in various coun- 
tries are studied in this course. The major emphasis is upon certain 
li-uropean systems. ,t 

(Long.) 

286 



Ed. 108 s. Comparative Education (2). 

This course is similar to Ed. 107, an important difference being that 
education in Latin America receives major attention. (Benjamin.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (3) — Prerequisite, senior standing. 

Definition and history of the junior high school; physical, mental, and 
social traits of the junior high school pupil; purposes, functions, and 
limitations; types of reorganized schools; articulation with lower and higher 
schools; duties and responsibilities of the administrative and teaching staff; 
the program of studies; exploratory courses; departmentalization; pro- 
visions for individual differences; the guidance program; significant prob- 
lems and challenges implied in present trends. (Joyal.) 

Ed. 112 f. Educational Sociology-Introductory (3). 

Discussion of the social-economic background of the school population, 
its history, setting, and subsequent adjustments. (Hand.) 

M. 114 s. Guidance in the Schools (3). 

Objectives, problems, and organization of the guidance service; assem- 
bling and using information concerning students; counseling procedures. 

(Hand.) 
See also Agricultural Education and Rural Life, p. 240. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

This course deals with the organization, administration, curricula, and 
present status of public education in the United States. (Joyal.) 

Ed. 202 s. The Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools 

(2) — Two lectures. 

This course will consider the principal's duties in relation to organization 
of secondary school units; selecting and assigning the staff; schedule mak- 
ing; school records and accounting systems; organization of guidance and 
extra-curricular activities; testing and the marking system; public relations 
and publicity; professional improvement. (Joyal.) 

Ed. 203 s. High School Supervision (2) — Two lectures. 

This course will deal with the nature and functions of supervision in a 
modern school program; recent trends in supervisory theory and practice; 
teacher participation in the determination of policies; planning of super- 
visory programs; appraisal of teaching methods; curriculum reorganiza- 
tion and other direct and indirect means for the improvement of instruction. 

(Joyal.) 

Ed. 212 s. Educational Sociology -Advanced (2). 

A study of materials bearing upon the problem of civic education with 
particular attention to the behavior of the electorate and political leadership. 

(Hand.) 
287 



li 



Ed. 216 s. School Finance and Business Administration (2) 

School revenue and taxation; State and Federal aid; budgets and bud^^f 
making; internal school finance. ouugets and budget 

reauivt"'/ ''"^"^^^"^ f^'" '^^ degree of Master of Education will e!ecrtle 

Zinat ?Ed. i:S% rLrusitTTher '''"^ ^^ ^^"^^^"^ '^^^ "^ 
v»,r o„ *u , ' inclusive). Ihese courses are ooen for plprtinn 

by any other ^aduate student in Education. election 



Ed. 220 f. Seminar in Secondary Education (2). 

Ed. 222 f. Seminar in Adult Education (2). 

Ed. 224 s. Seminar in History of Education (2). 

Ed. 226 f. Seminar in Administration (2). 

Ed. 228 s. Seminar in Supervision (2). 

Ed. 230 f. Seminar in Science Education (2). 

Ed. 232 s. Seminar in Guidance (2). 

Ed. 234 s. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). 



(Hand.) 
(Benjamin.) 
(Long.) 
(Joyal.) 
(Joyal.) 
(Brechbill.) 
(Hand.) 
(Benjamin.) 



bets .f »x.hi.° s,sr„V" """■"■''"'" """"■"" '«> »•»>' "- 

Note: See also Phys. Ed. 201 y, page 299. 

B. Educational Psychology 
(For full descriptions of these courses, see "Psychology", p. 3C4.) 
Ed. Psych. 10 f or s. Educational Psychology (3). 
Ed. Psych. 110 f or s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) 
Ed. Psych. 125 f. Child Psychology (3). 
Ed. Psych. 130 f or s. Mental Hygiene (3). 
Ed. Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6). 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (3). Prerequisite, Psych 10 

needs; evaluation of tex^a^ refe L^^^^ ^^"^^^1^ T^ ^-"P 

cedure and types of lessons- the u.Pnf ^^.^.^^^^"^P^^^^' "^^^hods of pro- 
measuring results ' ' "^ ^"'^^^^'^ materials; lesson plans; 

(Smith.) 
288 



Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (3). Prerequisite, 
Psych. 10. 

Objectives and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliog- 
raphies; methods of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary 
materials; lesson plans; measuring results. (Clough.) 

Ed. 124 s. Modern Language in the High School (3). Prerequisite, 
Psych. 10. 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school; selection and 
organization of subject matter in relation to modem practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring results. 

Ed. 126 s. Science in the High School (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Objectives of science teaching, their relation to the general objectives 
of secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class-room situation; selection and organization of 
subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and 
laboratory equipment; technic of class room and laboratory; measurement, 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 128 s. Mathematics in the High School (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 138 f. Visual Education (2). 

Visual impressions in their relation to learning; investigations into the 
effectiveness of institiction by visual means; projection apparatus, its cost 
and operation; slides, film strips, and films; physical principles under- 
lying projection; the integration of visual materials with organized courses 
of study; means of utilizing conmiercial moving pictures as an aid in 
realizing the aims of the school. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 139 f or s. Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (1-2). Pre- 
requisites, Psych. 10, Ed. 5 and 6 s, and the appropriate special methods. 

Five periods of observation and participation followed by 20 periods of 
actual teaching for two semester hotirs of credit and by 10 periods of 
actual teaching for one semester hour of credit. Two semester hours are 
required. The teaching may all be done in one subject or may be done 
in two subjects. 

Students desiring more than this amount must obtain special permis- 
sion from the Dean of the College of Education, and may be required 
to pay the actual cost of such additional teaching. 

Application for registration in this course must be made on the proper 
form before the beginning of the school year in which the teaching is 

289 



E. English. (Brechbill and Staff.) 

S. S. Social Studies. 

L. Modem Language. ' 

Sc. Science. 

M. Mathematics. 

P. E. Physical Education. 

C. Commercial Subjects. 

I. Industrial Education. 

R. Recreation. 

ft 

pZ: Jo'aL Ed't^' ^'"^^"''" •" '»•« "'^"^ S'--' (2).-Prere,uisites. 

nations, discipHne, recoS^ZdiSZtaran^^^^^^^^^ ^''^^^^^ --^■ 
S'or W*"'*'? '" ''^'•^*"*'" <2)._Two lectures. 

projects for worthwhi.e\lEl";„,f:rf; elSS ^"' ^"^^^^^"^ 
•Ed. 145 s. Teaching Health (2)._Two lectures 

whth~s?S"a:LfforoLrs" ^^^'f education and recreation, 
13 f. and 16 s. °"' '"""''""• Prerequisites. Phys. Ed. 11 /, 

for'^SS'^Sh.' "'^■"""^' ^^°''^"^' '"^*^"^'«- -et'^o'^^ and procedures 
PrfrtquStf: Psych'. iJ!""'"^""' ^"''^'^^ '" '"^^ ^^^^ School (1-3. 1-3).- 
^etZl in'hShthLt *^ *^^^'^"^ °' ^'^°''*'^-<^' *^P-ritin.. and book- 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Professor McNaughton 
H. E. Ed. 5 s. Technic of Teachinp- r9^ p^ • ^ ^ . 
Economics Education. PrerequSe Psych i7 '""'"''' "' """"" 

commSfan^ly'Hf TeTar^ ;'n^^^^^^ ^' *^« "-''^ «f the 

girl; objectives for telwtr''' -^"^ '"'""^^'^ «^ **>« high school 
of units; use of problem disL.^ ""?"""" '" '''^^ ^'^''°^' construction 
ods^tion Of m^rtiv^rafeS^th^^^^^^^^^^^^^ '^^— -th- 

*C)pen to men and women. 



H. E. Ed'. 6 s. Observation of Teaching (1) — Twenty hours of directed 

observations. 

Reports, conferences, and criticisms. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 102 f or s. Child Study (3)— Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

The study of child development in relation to the physical, mental, and 
emotional phases of growth; study of textbooks and magazines; adapta- 
tion of material to teaching of child care in high school; observation and 
participation in University Nursery School. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 103 f or s. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics: 
Methods and Practice (3). — Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 5 s. 

Observ^ation and teaching in a vocational department of a Maryland 
high school or in a junior high school in Washington. Organization of 
units, lesson plans, field trips; planning and supervision of home projects. 
After completing the teaching unit the student observes in home economics 
departments other than one in which she has taught. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 104 s. Nursery School Techniques (2-3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 
10. Open to seniors. Designed for Nursery School teachers. 

Philosophy of preschool education; principles of learning; routines; study 
of children's interests and activities; observation and teaching in the nursery 
school. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems in Child Study (3).— Open to 

seniors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102. 

Methods and practice in nursery school work in University Nursery 
School; making of particular studies related to the mental, emotional, or 
physical development of preschool children. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106 f, 107 s. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (1, 1). 

Reports of units taught; analysis of the units in the State course of 
study; study of various methods for organization of class period; analysis 
of text books; evaluation of illustrative material. (McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home H/Conomics 
(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home econonucs. 

(McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2-4). 

(McNalighton.) 



290 



291 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



I 



li 



t^:: ziTTiZttT.:^ '^^^ «^°p -^ ^^-i-^ coupes two o^ 

specific needs of the course ^'' ^"^"''^'''^ "P""^ *^« 

Ind. Ed. 1 f, 2 s. Mechanical Drawing (2, 2) 

inf/rrnrprr^Zrut?^^^^^^ °J <^'^-^^. ^^^ -kin, of wor.- 

in machine design includ^nrthe^tTd'^ f blue-pnnting, and the principles 
machine parts. "'"''"'^'"S ^^^^ «*"dy of conventions and the sketching of 

Ind. Ed. 3 f. Elementary Woodworking (3) 

e,!,M,M. * '■ '*'"""'' «'<»<'~*"S (3).-Prere,u,si,e, I.d. Ed. 3 f o, 

w<SlS:ivrng'L°™ "f ° 1 ";"" "•" ~"«™«ion .f Projecte i„ 
«hooi shop f, i„d„d' ''ZT'"'""" «ia«l.l„ery .ulfbl. for the high 

wHh ,o„,'e4Si^txs;„TS::snrr dt'"" "* 

a working knowledge of wood natt^r/Zl • \ , '^°°*^ *"™"^8: and 

m eo,.rt„,, „„,..hi„i a.rpic"rs'„s;f L"i5r" ^"" 

Ind. Ed. 5 f. Sheet Metal Work (2). 

in'^oZ-S'^h: t," :^roT^^ ^-^ P^— ^- ^-«ce is given 

elementaryVaded Prirs^tier nXl'nif^f"^^ f ' ^'''"' "^ 
tory fee, $2.50. mvoUe items of practical use. Labora- 

Ind. Ed. 6 s. Art Metal Work (2). 

pro™i;Sdingtete of 'h '"'""'"^ ^""^ ^""^^^"•^«- «^ ^^t metal 
other alioys^T^borltrL $2^^^^^^^^ "'''''''' ^"^-'' -'-"-". P-ter, and 

Ind. Ed. 7 y. Architectural Drawing (2) 

buSrDSgT:pedfit'tio"'""/Kf ^'^"""'^ "^ '^--^ -<» <'th- 

conventions anTSilTSltSt^d""^-^'''"*^ ^"^'"'^^"^ ^'^^ «'"^^ ^^ 
Ind. Ed. 8 y. Electricity (4) 

i^ition, and the Ldamental p^^^^^^^^^^ ^"^^^ -*- 

ery and alternating current macWrv ^7^^"^^.?^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^rent machin- 
with sufficient mLZr^r^^^ t ^''•''^'^^^ *^^'^^''" ^^ electricity 

projects for Lr scTool ctf \"Z" ^^'^ '^" ^^"^^^^ «^ ^^^^trical 
semester. ^ '^'' construction. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per 

292 



Ind. Ed. 9 s. Elementary Machine Shop (2). 

This course includes bench work, tool grinding, and elementary practice 
in the fundamentals of operating machine tools. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 10 f. Cold Metal Work (2). 

This course is concerned with the development of fundamental skills, and 
knowledges involved in the design and construction of projects from band 
iron and other forms of mild steel. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 11 f. Foundry (1). 

Laboratory practice in bench and floor moulding and elementary core 
making. Theory and principles covering foundry materials, tools, and appli- 
ances are presented, including consideration of mixtures for casting gray 
iron, brass, bronze, and aluminum. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ind. Ed, 12 f. Forge Practice (1). 

Laboratory practice in forging and heat treating of metals. Theory and 
principles of handling tools and materials in the drawing out, upsetting, 
cutting, bending, twisting, welding, annealing, hardening, tempering and 
grinding of steel. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ind. Ed. 13 f. Advanced Machine Shop (2). — Prerequisite Ind. Ed. 9 s 

or equivalent. 

Laboratory experiences in the fundamental operations on lathe, shaper, 
drill press, and other machine shop equipment. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 14 s. Shop Maintenance (1). 

Skill developing practice in the up-keep and care of school shop tools 
and equipment. Saw filing, the sharpening of edged power tools, the design 
and construction of tool racks, and the adjusting and oiling of power 
machinery are among the major units offered. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 160 y. Essentials of Design (2) — Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. 1 f, 
2 s, or equivalent. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application 
to the construction of high school shop projjects. It presents knowledge and 
develops abilities in the art elements of line, mass, color, and design, and 
employs laboratory activities in freehand and mechanical drawing, tracing, 
and blue-printing. (Gallington.) 

Ind. Ed. 162 s. Industrial Education in the High School (2)— Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 10. 

Major functions and specific aims of industrial education; their relation 
to the general objectives of the junior and senior high schools; selection 
and organization of subject matter in terms of modem practices and 
needs; methods of instruction; expected outcomes; measuring results; pro- 
fessional standards. (Brown.) 

293 



Ind. Ed. 163 f. Occupations, Guidance, and Placement (2) — Open to 
juniors and seniors. 

Survey of the educational and vocational guidance movement; typical 
public school means and methods; use of occupational information; duties 
of the counselor; organization and cooperative relationships as affecting 
modem youth. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 164 s. Shop Organization and Management (2). 

This course recapitulates methods of organization and management for 
teaching shop subjects. It includes organization and management of pupils; 
daily programs; projects; pupils' progress charts; selection, location, and 
care of tools, machines, equipment, and supplies; records and reports; and 
good school housekeeping. Opportunity is provided for visits to industrial 
plants as a basis for more practical planning of shop instruction and 
management. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 165 f, 166 s. Evolution of Modern Industry (2, 2). 

The origin and development of our modem industrial system. A review 
of the industrial progress of man through the various stages of civilization 
down to modem factory organization and practice, as related to Industrial 
Education. 

First semester (165 f) is a survey of industrial development up to and 
including the Industrial Revolution. The second semester (166 s) covers 
the period from the Industrial Revolution to the present time. (Brown.) 

Ind. Eld. 167 y. General Shop (4). — Elective for juniors and seniors. 

A general survey course designed to meet teacher training needs in 
organizing and administering a high school General Shop course. Special 
teaching methods are emphasized as students are rotated through skill and 
knowledge developing activities in mechanical drawing, electricity, wood- 
working, and general metal working. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per semester. 

(Gallington.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education and Recreation for Men and Women 

A. Professor Mackert; Mr. McCaw, Mr. Engush. 
B. Professor Drew; Assistant Professor Middleton; Dr. Karpeles. 

Note: A special uniform is required of all those enrolled in any physical 
activities course. 

Phys. Ed. 1 y. Physical Activities I: M (2) — ^An activities course for 
male freshmen, which meets three periods a week throughout the year. 

The activities taught are soccer, touch football, basketball, volleyball, soft 
baseball, track, and natural gymnastics. 

294 



^ T>u • oi A^ivities- W (D— Freshman course for women. 

Phys Ed. 4 y. Physical Activities, w ^.u 

Meets twice each week throughout the year ..^sidered-** Tennis, 

. week througkoul the S»r. ^^^ ,^,j„. 

nys. Ed. « Jt. Con-miinity Hygiene w V ,^^ 

C.„,i„»a,..n ...he freshman .»™. The -k .n^^. ^^ ^^_^„„,„ 

S:~ .nd fSSJfof t°:. hygiene. 

Z:^. 8 y. Phy.i»' A..iv....»-. W <«-Soph,„.re .o»™e for won,en. 

Meets twice each week. Dermission of 

continuation of the -k of the^-h^^^^^^^^^ the^P ^^^^ ^^^^.^^^ 

the head of the department, a student may oe p 
courses offered in the major curriculum. 

•r. T r9\ Ppouired of freshmen women whose major 

,/X;i»i '^--r IV o'p:r.r::her. ...h ^e pe™is.ion of .h. 

basic principles of ti"™^, force ana sp ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

is eiven for creating short dances in rcav 

. ^^ 11 f Hv«ene (2)-A course required of all sophomores m 

e„^r^' re"SS'«rd'"S, . .he e^nd .ha. .. individua, 

*Open to men and women. arranged upon the recommendation 
-An individual activity program suited to need 
. .. _i „:^:<>n 



of the University physician. 



295 



N 



N 



<•! 



sU.de^nt may increase his ability to adapt himself to conditions of fi„er 

ma^t'^is^h'^sLl^ESucI^Ln VetT^'"'''^ V'^'''-'^ -«'"- -'^-e 
arranged in which thr^tuH.n?; f ^l"^ ^"^ ^^^^ P'"^ ^^^ hours 

Th/f .. ' ^' assistant in a section of Phys. Ed 4 , 

bar££n:^"Lrti:\^:^^^^^^^^^^^^ ---. hocw. soce:; 

temiis, golf, and soft ball. '^''"^^^^"' '" ^'^^ ««^°nd semester, bowling, 
Phys. Ed. 13 f. Accident Prevpntinn n^ a ^^ . , 

Phys. Ed. 14 y. Dance II (2)— PrereauisitP Pfi^rc tt^ ia 
Required of sophomore women whose XrS ^hy icff Edufar' ''"T'""*- 
to others with the permission of the instmctor Education and open 

for group or individLIn Ves^rfr LfcTntrnt!^^^*^ '^"^^ ^^*^^™^ 

sojlmorfmen in pSvsTaT e1 ' .^'^-""".^^''^^^^^ '^""-^ -^"-ed of 
peSods a wS trro^St the year " " '^"^'*'''"' "'^^'^'^ ""^^^^ *'^- 

eaSh -ril^- - -? b-^r ^Jre-S 1^= ^-^' 

wbpaSJ il^pUirLtl^^^^^^^^^ = Se eth-r 

deS\;7^;yrreruLtifi's^^^^^^ "^"^^"^'^ '^^ ^^-"^ -<^ - -«- 

is required TaT studentf *'"*"" *='" "^ ^^"'•^- P^^<=«<=^1 ^"^k 

seriorJ'^k'Ve'ets^Trr"'''] ^'^-''" ^"^"^'"^^ <=°»^^« ^^ i-^-s and 
site. Phy?ElTi;\X%S:nt "^^' ^''•''"^'^°"* ^^^ ^^^^ P--'^"'" 

tuSLrapp^aituVaTjTy:!^^ ^^- ^ - — d wor. in 

*Phys. Ed. 20 s. Physical Education I (2)-Required of .onl, 

the possibilities of the professlol ^ ''''^"^^' ^ ^"^^^^ «^ 



If 



'Open to men and women. 



Phys. Ed. 22 y. Athletics II: W (4) — Required of sophomore women 
whose major is Physical Education. 

This course is a continuation of Phys. Ed. 12 y. 

*Phys. E]d. 26 y. Dance III (2) — Required of junior men and women 
whose major is Physical Education or Recreation and open to others with 
the permission of the instructor. Meets twice each week. 

The course offers opportunity for the learning of the fundamental ball- 
room dance steps as well as the more modem routines. Attention is given 
to ballroom etiquette and the planning of dance parties. 

*Phys. Ed. 28 f. Dance IV (1) — Required of junior women w^hose major 
is Physical Education or Recreation and open to others with the permis- 
sion of the instructor. Meets twice each week for one semester. 

This course includes suitable teaching material in tap dancing for school 
or recreation groups. 

*Phys. Eld. 30 s. Dance V (1) — Required of junior women whose major 
is Physical Education or Recreation and open to others with the permission 
of the instructor. Meets twice each week for one semester. 

The course includes historical and contemporary folk dances, festivals, 
and customs of various countries as well as the costume appropriate for 
each. 

*Phys. Ed. 52 y. Physical Activities III (2) — Required of junior men and 
women whose major is Physical Education or Recreation and open to others 
with the permission of the instructor. Meets twice each week. 

The course presents co-educational and co-recreational activities suitable 
for school, club, and recreation groups. Games and stunts for contests, 
picnics, school parties, and other social gatherings are considered. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. Ed. 113 y. Athletics III: M (2) — Required of junior men in Phys- 
ical Education or Recreation, which meets once a week throughout the 
year. Prerequisite, two years of successful intramural participation. 

Problems of coaching and officiating in intramural play and high school 
athletics. Participation in the intramural program at the University, or 
in nearby schools, is a requirement of the course. (Mackert.) 

Phys. Ed. 114 y. Athletics IV: W (2) — Required of senior women whose 
major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week. Prerequisites, Phys. 
Ed. 12 y and 16 y. 

The student is given the opportunity to coach and officiate under super- 
vision in the intramural program on the campus as well as to officiate in 
the schools in Washington, D. C, and Maryland. With the cooperation of 
the teachers in nearby schools the students plan and administer invitational 
sports days in the respective schools. (Drew.) 



296 



*Open to men and women. 



297 



II 



v\ 



hi 



Phys. Ed. 119 y. Physical Education Practice (2)— A practical course 
for senior men in Physical Education or Recreation. Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 
113 y or the equivalent. 

The aim of this course is to provide students with opportunities to assist 
in teaching, coaching, and officiating in the schools of Maryland, and the 
athletic tournaments conducted by these schools through the State Depart- 
ment of Education. The equivalent of two hours of practice is required 
each school week throughout the year. Individual conferences will be ar- 
ranged in order that students may discuss with the instructor the problems 
that arise for them, and the class will meet occasionally to pool experiences. 

(Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 125 f. Physiology of Exercise (2) — A course required of all 
juniors in Physical Education or Recreation, which meets twice a week for 
one semester. 

This course presents the background of science for the workings of the 
human body from the standpoint of power-building and acquisition of skills. 

(Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 131 f. Recreation I (3) — A course required of juniors elect- 
ing the curriculum in Recreation, which meets twice a week for one semester. 
Twenty directed observations are a requirement of the course. 

Sponsoring organizations of boys* and girls' clubs; how clubs are organ- 
ized; support of clubs; program planning and administration will be con- 
sidered. (Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 132 s. Nature of Play (2) — Required of junior men and 
women whose major is Physical Education or Recreation. Meets twice each 
week for one semester. 

The psychology of action, the uses of play, the types and organization of 
play activities and the management of play space are considered in the 
course. (Drew.) 

*Phys. Ed. 133 s. Recreation II (3) — A course required of juniors elect- 
ing the curriculum in Recreation, which meets twice a week for one 
semester. Twenty directed observations are a requirement of the course. 

The playground as a laboratory for the classroom; programs and problems 
of the playground; materials, methods, and supervision will be discussed. 

(Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 135 f. Recreation III (3) — A course required of seniors elect- 
ing the curriculum in Recreation, which meets twice a week for one 
semester. Twenty directed participations are required. 

A comprehensive study of various types of socialized communities in 
terms of recreational projects. The church, the home, and the school as 
factors in community recreation will be studied. (Mackert.) 



*Open to men and women. 



298 



♦Phys. Ed. 137 f. Recreation IV (2)-— A course required of all seniors 
in Physical Education or Recreation, which meets twice a week for one 
semester. Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 113 y or 114 y, and three years of 
successful participation in intramural athletics or the equivalent. 

The purpose of this course is to study the various aspects of character 
cruidance through leadership in physical activities. Participation in plan- 
ning, supervising, and directing the University program of intramural activ- 
ities or an equivalent situation, is a requirement of the course. 

' (Mackert.) 

Phys. Ed. 144 s. Physical Education IV (2)— A course required of all 
seniors in Physical Education or Recreation, which meets twice a week for 
one semester. Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 113 y or 114 y, and three years 
of 'successful participation in intramural athletics or the equivalent. 

The organization and administration of programs of Physical Education 
in high school situations. (Drew.) 

For Graduates 
*Phys. Ed. 201 f or s. Problems of Health and Physical Education (3). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems that 
arise in the administration of health and physical education in public 
schools. An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating the 
effectiveness of programs of health and physical education. (Mackert.) 

ENGINEERING 

PROFESSORS Steinberg, Creese, Huff, Younger; Lecturers Dill, Hall, 

Kear, Walker; Associate Professors Hodgins, Huckert; Assistant 

Professors Hoshall, Pyle, Allen, Machwart, Ernst, Laning, Green; 

Mr. Lowe, Mr. Moore, Mr. McLaughlin, Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Frayer. 

Chemical Engineering 

Ch. E. 10 s. Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (4)— Two lectures; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 8 A y and 4 f ; Phys. 2 y. 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual control methods for 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering materials. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. B. 103 y. Elements of Chemical Engineering (6)— Three lectures. 

Prerequisites, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y; Phys. 2 y.* 

Theoretical discussion of general underlying philosophy and methods 

in chemical engineering, such as presentation of data, material balances. 



*Open to men and worn 



299 



1 ' 



"L'^i '"""^- "'"='""«' "' ~»»*"«»n Of Wc>I pr.bl™, aM 

vXpment o^ , .^ ?^5«'-«to'-y operations is included to illustrate the de- 

ordinarily t reqSS ^™""— registration in Ch. E. 105 y will 

Original work on a special problem assigned to earh ct.,^. <. ■ , ^■ 
preparation of a complete report eov9.rinTtlT:, a ^^."^^^tudent, mcludmg 
per semester. covermg the study. Laboratory fee, $8.00 

engineeSng ' ''^ ^ '*'" P«"«'««>«n of department of chemlal 

reSratf L Ch. E^Tof; olt^^Son'^f-f^l, '''''''''■ '''^-^^'^^^^' 
neering. ^ permission of department of chemical engi- 

A study of the principal chemical industnVs Pio^*^ • 
reports, and problems. maustries. Plant inspections, trips, 

(Machwart.) 
For Graduates 

Ch E. 201 y. Graduate Unit Operations (10 or more> Pr«. • •. 
permission of department of chemical engineering. """*>— ^''^'-eq^'site, 

Advanced theoretical treatment of tvnical unit «t,-.,»*- • , 
engineering. Problems. Laboratorr opeSn oJ sS J'l '" ''*'"''"' 
mercial type equipment with supplemeS" read 2 .f '*™'"'**'"- 
reports. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per sem"ste=^ ^' *=°'''^'^"«^«' ^^<^ 

* Students in Food Technology m.j meet this prerequisite by offering Phys. ly. 

300 



Ch. E. 202 s. Gas Analysis (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, permission of department of chemical engineering. 

Quantitative determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseous vapors, 
and important gaseous impurities. Problems. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Ch. E. 203 f, 204 s. Graduate Seminar (2)— Required of all gradu- 
ate students in chemical engineering. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering, 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 205. Research in Chemical Engineering. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 207 A f, 208 A s. Plant Design Studies (3, 3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, permission of department of chemical engineering. 

An examination of the fundamentals entering into the selection of pro- 
cesses, the specifications for and choice and location of equipment and 
plant sites. Problems. ' (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 207 B f, 208 B s. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (2, 2)— Six 

hours of laboratory work which may be elected to accompany or be pre- 
ceded by Ch. E. 207 A f, 208 A s. Prerequisite, permission of department 
of chemical engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Machwart.) 

Ch. E. 209 y. Gaseous Fuels (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of department of chemical engineering. 

An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles in- 
volved in the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. 
Problem in the design and selection of equipment. (Huff.) 

Civil Engineering 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

C. E. 101 s. Hydraulics (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, dams, and pipes. Flow through orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, open channels, and weirs. Use of Reynold's number. 
Measurement of water. Elementary hydrodynamics. (Ernst.) 

C. E. 102 s. Hydraulics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, Mech. 101 f or 102 f. Required of juniors in electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 

A shorter course than C. E. 101 s, with emphasf on water wheels, tur- 
bines, and centrifugal pumps. (Lowe, Sherwood.) 

301 



C. E. 103 f. Curves and Earthwork (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil en^neering. 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; transition curves; vertical and horizontal parabolic curves. Analysis 
of turnouts and computation of earthwork, including haul and mass dia- 
gram. Preliminary and final location survey; cross sectioning; and compu- 
tation of earthwork, including haul and mass diagram. (Allen.) 

C. E. 104 s. Theory of Structures (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Analytical and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 
framed structures. Influence lines for reactions, shears, moments, and 
stresses. Analysis of lateral bracing systems. Elements of slope and 
deflection; rigid frames. (Allen.) 

C. E. 105 f- Elements of Highways (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Location, design, construction, and maintenance of road^ and pavements. 
Field inspection trips. (Steinberg.) 

C. E. 106 y. Concrete Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design and 
detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures, which include 
slabs, columns, footings, beam bridges, arches, retaining walls, and dams. 
Applications of slope-deflection and moment distribution theories and rigid 
frames. (Allen.) 

C. E. 107 y. Structural Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design 
and detailing of structural steel sections, members and their connections, 
for roof trussses, plate girders, highway and railway bridges, buildings, 
bracing systems, and grillage foundations. (Alien.) 

C. E. 108 y. Municipal Sanitation (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 101 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. (Hall.) 

C. E. 109 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in civil engineering 
design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be 
needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is assigned 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is required 
to complete the thesis. (Steinberg and Staff.) 

302 



r F 110 s Soils and Foundations (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Pre'r JSuis i, C. K 104 s. Required of seniors in civil engmeenng. 
' TnTuWuctory study of the properties and behavior of soil as an eng. 
netring material Applications to engineering construction. (Lowe.) 

For Graduates 
C. E. 201 f. Advanced Properties of Materials (3)-Three credits. Pre- 
reouisite, Mech. 103 s or equivalent. 

A cri ical study of elastic and plastic properties, flow of materials 
Jstir t U're by fracture. ^rr^^U^^ro^on. the theon^^ o 
failure. Assigned reading from current literature. 

C. E. 202 f. Advanced Strength of Materials (3)-Three credits. Pre- 
roniiidite Mech. 101 f or equivalent. 

C. E. 203 s. Applied Elasticity (3)-Three credits. Prerequisite, Math. 

114 f or equivalent. . , • • i-u^^^ 

.. • 1 locHV T^roblems general stress-stram analysis m three 

Two dimensional elastic problems, g^^er (Ernst.) 

dimensions, stability of beams, columns, and thm plates. I 

C E 204 f. Soil Mechanics (3)-Three credits. Prerequisite, C. E. 

ing from current literature. 

C. E. 205 s. Advanced Foundations (3)-Three credits. Prerequisite 

C E 106 y or equivalent. , ^ *• i.« 

A detailed study of types of foundations. Design and construcUonJo 

meet varying soil conditions. .. „ ■ -f^ 

C E 206 s. Highway Engineering (3)-Three credits. Prerequisite, 

'■I llL-rrr t the ication, design and construction of .g^^^ays. 

C. E. 207 y. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (6)-Three credits. Pre- 

rpniiisite Mech. 103 s or equivalent. , 

A horough review of the methods for the design of concrete mixtures 

of excrete, concrete aggregates, or reinforced concrete. ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

C E 208 Research (2-6)-Credit in accordance with work outlined. 
The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thes. in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. (SUff.) 

303 ' 



Drawing 

Dr. 1 f. Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. Required of 
freshmen in engineering. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, technical sketches, 
dimensioning. Drawing from memory; drawing from description; inking, 
tracing, blueprinting, isometric and oblique projection and sections. 

Dr. 2 f or s. Descriptive Geometry (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Dr. 1 f. Required of freshmen in engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line, and plane. Intersection of planes with solids; 
development. Applications to practical problems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 3 f or s. Descriptive Geometry (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Dr. 2. Required of sophomores in civil, electrical, and mechanical engi- 
neering. 

Continuation of Dr. 2, including curves, plane and space, generation 
of surfaces, tangent planes, intersection and developmeni; of curved sur- 
faces. Shades, shadows, and perspective. Applications to practical prob- 
lems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 6 y. Mechanical Drawing (2) — One laboratory. Open to non-engi- 
neering students. 

Lettering, sketching, and working drawings of machines; including con- 
ventions, tracing, isometric and cabinet projections, and blueprinting. 

Electrical Engineering 

E. E. 1 s. Elements of Electrical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Taken concurrently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required 
of sophomores in electrical engineering. 

Principles involved in flow of direct currents in conductors; current and 
voltage relations in simple circuits; magnetism and magnetic circuits; elec- 
tromagnetic induction, dielectric circuits and condensers. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 101 s. Principles of Electrical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y. Math. 23 y. Required of juniors in 
civil engineering. 

Fundamentals of direct current and alternating current machinery ; appli- 
cation of machines for specific duties; operating characteristics of genera- 
tors, motors, and transformers. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 102 y. Principles of Electrical Engineering (8) — Three lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, junior standing. Required of juniors in chem- 
ical and mechanical engineering. 

Study of elementary direct current and alternating current circuit char- 
acteristics. Principles of construction and operation of direct and alter- 

304 



nating current machinery. Experiments on the operation and character- 
Sicfof generators, motors, transformers, and control e.^-P^^^^^^^^ 

F E 103 f. Direct Currents (5)-Three lectures; two laboratories Pre- 
requiSti! Phys. 2 y, Math. 23 y, and E. E. 1 s. Required of jumors 
in electrical engineering. ^ 

Construction, theory of operation and performance charac^f^^^f f 
direct current generators, motors, and control apparatus P^^ciples of 
instruction, characteristics and operation of primary and secondary bat- 

eSes and control equipment. Experiments on battery characteristics, and 
Se opltioTand cLacteristics of direct current generators and inotors. 

E E 104 f. Direct Current Design (l)-One laboratory. Prerequisite 
taL Concurrently with E. E. 103 f. Required of juniors m electrical 
engineering. . . 

The purpose of this course is to help the student in electrical engineering 
to acquire a thorough knowledge of the basic principles upon which any 
desS Tpends A s^udy is made of design formulas and materials, suit-. 
Sor dTrect current machinery, and the reasons for the various stand- 
Sis of practice. The student is required to make all '^-^'^-^^'^^^^^ 
direct current generator or motor. 

E E 105 y Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (8)-Two lectures, two 
labtSorfel^first semester; three l-tures, one laboratoij^ secon^semej^^^^ 
Prerequisites, concurrent registration m E. E. 103 f, 106 s. Required 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

A study of electric and magnetic fields; of electric and "^^^f P^J!^^; 
ties of materials; of solid, liquid and gaseous conduction; and of e^c^trical 
circuits and measurements. 

E. E. 106 s. Alternating Current Circuits (5)-Three lectures; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisites, E. E. 103 f and concurrent registration in E. E. 
105 y Required of juniors in electrical engmeering. 

Introduction to the theory of alternating current circuits, both smgle 
phase and polyphase; methods and apparatus used |o .me^ure aHernaU^^ 
currents, voltage, and power; current and voltage relations m ^al^ced and 
unbalanced polyphase systems. 

E E 107 y. Alternating Current Machinery (8)-Three lectures; one 

laboratory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Required of seniors m electrical 

engineering. , . ^. * 

Construction theory of operation and performance characteristics of 

trfrfor^rraltemaLs, induction motors. ^TrZ^^S^-tS:::^^ 
nous converters, commutator type motors, and other apparatus. tests_a.^ 

experiments. 

305 



sitt ^E *? L'i"*^""^ *^''"*'" ^"'^" ^*>-0"« laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, E E. 104 f and concurrent registration in E. E, 107 y. Required of 
seniors in electrical engineering. ^equirea of 

v'^i'\nTr^ *f ^ continuation of the course in Direct Current Design, 

t^^l /' ^^^^'^^ ^^^ '^"^ principles to the design of an alternator 

and transformer. /tt j • 

(Hodgins.) 

tn^' ^P.^"' ^' ■F'^^^^^'^"^ Communications (6)-Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Principles of wire and radio communication. Theory and calculation of 
passive networks including transmission lines and coupled circuits. Theory 
and calculation of non-linear impedances including the vacuum tube. Intro- 
duction to electromagnetic wave propagation. (Kear.) 

sitf E f"?oL "TJ"^"*'" ^'^~''^° ^'•='"'""^' °"« laboratory. Prerequi- 
sue, Hj. £>. lOb s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems 
Illumination calculations, photometric measurements , (CreS 

,nf ^'r^\^ '■ ^'*''"'' R^^a^i^ys (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, E. E. 
106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E 107 y 

noJStIr'' r °'r^'r- """''T ^PP"'^^^"" «f electrical equipment to trans- 
fieS „f 1 ^'^'^^f '"'^ ^"d operation of control apparatus used in different 
fields of electrical transportation such as urban railways, trunk line rail- 
ways, trolley busses and elevators. Power requirements, distribution sys- 
tems and signal systems. (Hodgins.) 

E E. 112 s. Electric Power Transmission (3)— Three lectures Pr^ 
requisite. E. E. 106 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y 

A study of the electrical, mechanical, and economic consideration of 
power transmission; a survey of central station and substation equtment- 
and a consideration of the fundamentals of transients. (liS 

E. E. 113 8. Engineering Electronics (3)-Two lectures, one laboratory 
Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s and concurrent registration in E. E. 107 y ^'^'^^• 

A review of the properties, emission and utilization of electrons in 
vacuum, gases, and vapors; a study of the application of electron tubes and 

problems "''"''' '' *' ""'"' ''""""'^ '"'l"^^"-! -"d researS 

(Laning*.) 

E. E 114 y. Thesis (3)-0ne laboratory first semester: one lecture onp 
laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in electrical Seeding 
^ The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in electrical engineer- 
ing desigri or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies armav 
be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and fr^u^t coS 
ences -e ^eid -.^ the member of the faculty to whom tTstudenT^ 
assigned for advice A written report, including an amiotated bibliography 
IS required to complete the thesis. (Creese andS / 

306 



General Engineering Subjects 

Engr. 1 f. Introduction to Engineering (1) — One lecture. Required of 
freshmen in engineering. 

A course of lectures by the faculty and by practicing engineers covering 
the engineering professional fields. The work of the engineer, its require- 
ments in training and character, and the ethics and ideals of the profession. 
The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in selecting the par- 
ticular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Engr. 101 f. Engineering Geology (2) — Two lectures. Required of juniors 
in civil engineering. 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. (Hess.) 

Engr. 102 s. Engineering Law and Specifications (2) — Two lectures. 
Required of seniors in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

A study is made of the fundamental principles of law relating to business 
and to engineering; including contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
corporations, and common carriers. These principles are then applied to the 
analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and 
specifications. (Steinberg.) 

Mechanics 

Mech. 1 s. Statics and Dynamics (3) — Three lectures. Taken concur- 
rently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores in 
civil and electrical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solutions of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia; kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

Mech. 2 s. Statics and Dynamics (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Taken concurrently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores 
in mechanical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solution of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia, kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

The course also embraces the fundamentals of kinematics necessary to 
the study of kinematics of machinery. Plane motion of a particle and the 
general laws governing the transmission of plane motion are treated by 
vector and graphical methods. 



307 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

M."h"''l's'°„r2'/Rr*'\°', "*""■'• <«-'^™ '»""»■ Pr.'eflui^te. 
Mecl,. 1 s or 2 s. Re,„,red „f j^,,,, ;„ ^|,„ ^^^ „„hanic.] mglneeilng 

Riveted joints; torsional stresses and strains; beam stresses and deii„ 
n";,rrs'°tpat'.nT """T T'^^ c«W Wsses 'Sprstr s.." 

p^C-iS'MeeiiTfi ?s"5;sL<S7:rirr: irsxsreS 

Mech, 103 s. Materials of Engineerinp (2) n«» i * 

toiy. Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f or Mech 102 7 R ^^T' ''"^ ^^^°^^- 
civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering '''"''■'*^ "^ ^""'"^^ ^" 

The composition, manufacture, and proDertie<! nf ti,^ ,,>• • , 
used in engineering, and of the condiHlfl . • ^ P"""Pal materials 

characteristics. The interpretation offnlfi ^^ '"^"!"'" ^'^"'^ ^^^^''^^^ 
Laboratory work in the tesUnrn/ ??*'°"l ^"^ "^ '^^"'l^^d tests. 

cement, and concrete ^ *"''' ^""^'^* '"°"' *''"»'«'. brick, 

(Pyle.) 

Mechanical Engineering 
For Advanced Undergraduates 

tuSe'Zr S'rrlpX'rr^-tr otKS- d'"T' '""" 
eluding diseussion of maehlnes and therusi " "'T?."'' "■; 

(Czreen.) 

M. E. 102 y. Mechanics of Machinerv (±\ n^.^ i 4^ 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f or rfgistratTon theVe^.' *""'' °"' '^'°^^*°'-^- 

A course treating mechanics of machinprv ^r,A ti,„ j • 
members and mechanisms. machinery and the design of machine 

(Huckert.) 

M. E. 103 y. Thermodynamics (4)— Two I^rturAo t>,.o • •. 
23 y and Phys. 2 y Reouired of iLL '^^'"'^S- Prerequisites, Math. 

y. i. y. iiequirea ot juniors in mechanical engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and v«n«r= tu 
dynamics of heat cycles, air compressors, and s!S engines' ™" 

(Huckert, Sherwood.) 
308 



I 

M. E. 104 s. Aeroaynamics and Hydrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. 
Frerequisites, Math. 23 y, Phys. 2. Required of juniors in mechanical 
engineering, aeronautical option. 

A study of the fundamental principles of the flow of air and of w^ater. 
Applications with special reference to the airplane; airfoil and propeller 
theory; theory of model testing in wind tunnels; design performance cal- 
culations of airplanes. (Younger.) 

M. E. 105 f. Heating and Ventilation (3) — Tw^o lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, M. E. 103 y. Required of seniors in mechanical engi- 
neering. 

The study of types of heating and ventilating systems for a particular 
building; layout of piping and systems, with complete calculations and esti- 
mates of costs; fundamentals of air conditioning. (Dill.) 

M. E. 106 s. Refrigeration (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 103 y. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories and homes. (Dill.) 

M. E. 107 y. Thesis (3) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, 
one laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in mechanical engi- 
neering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in mechanical engi- 
neering design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as 
may be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent 
conferences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student 
is assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliog- 
raphy, is required to complete the thesis. (Younger and Staff.) 

M. E. 108 y. Prime Movers (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 101 f, C. E. 102 s. Required of seniors in mechanical 
engineering. 

A course covering the use of prime movers to convert heat into power. It 
includes a study of heat, fuels and combustion processes followed by the 
theory, construction and operation of internal combustion engines, steam 
engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines and their auxiliary equipment. 
Theory is supplemented by practical problems and by laboratory tests. The 
entire course is closely integrated with the Mechanical Laboratory course. 

(Green.) 

M. E. 109 y. Mechanical Engineering Design (7)— Two lectures; two 
laboratories, first semester; one lecture, two laboratories, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f and M. E. 102 y. Required of seniors in mechani- 
cal engineering. 

A course embracing the kinematics and dynamics of machinery and the 
design of machine members and mechanisms. Special problems on the 
balancing, vibration, and critical speeds of machine members are treated. 

(Huckert.) 
309 



M. E. 110 y. Mechanical Laboratory (6) — Three laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, senior standing. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and water 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam and internal combustion 
engines, setting of valves, tests for economy and capacity of boilers, engines, 
turbines, pumps, and other prime movers. Feed water heaters and con- 
densers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels, and power 
plant tests. (Younger and Staff.) 

M. E. Ill y. Airplane Structures (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
M. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering, aeronautics 
option. 

The fundamental principles of structural analysis and design of airplanes. 
The air worthiness requirements of the Civil Aeronautics Authority and 
the design requirements of the government service branches are given 
special consideration. (Younger.) 

M. E. 112 f. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (b) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Required of juniors in civil engineering. Prerequisites, 
Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. 

Elementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel, and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for the generation of power. Includes 
study of fundamental types of steam boilers, fuel burning equipment, prime 
movers, and their allied apparatus. Supplemented by laboratory tests and 
trips to industrial plants. (Sherwood.) 

M. E. 113 s. Power Plants (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Required 
of seniors in electrical engineering. Prerequisite, senior standing. 

A study of heat, fuel, and combustion in the production and use of 
steam for the generation of power. Includes the theory and operation of 
steam engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines, and their accessories. 
Practical power problems as applied to typical power plants, supplemented 
by laboratory tests and trips to industrial plants. (Green.) 

Shop 

Shop 1 s. Forge Practice (1) — One combination lecture and laboratory. 
Required of freshmen in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on the principles of forging and heat treatment 
of steel. Demonstrations in acetylene and electric welding, brazing, cutting, 
and case hardening. Laboratory practice in drawing, bending, upsetting, 
forge welding, hardening, tempering, and thread cutting. 

Shop 2 f. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
sophomores in electrical engineering. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

310 



Shop 3 f. Machine Shop Practice (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. Re- 
auired of sophomores in mechanical engineermg. 

'study .f «.= <»d™.„... P'«f -' — Lri'lnmS ~cS-. 

planer, shaper, mUling machme, drilling «^^^?^^^^^^ f^^s and cutting 
Llculation ^or cutting tH^^^^^^^^^^^ with 

S^t Pt:£ ilV:T^^Z turning, planing, drilling, and pipe 
threading. 
Shop 4 f. M.chl„e Shop Thw <l)-0~. lecture. Open t. no„. 

'tTeL?::^.. o, t. l.«u„ wot. o„„ p. Shpp 3 . ». U se.ed- 
uled concurrently with Shop 3 f . 

Shop 5 s. Machine Shop Practice (2)-Two laboratories. Open to non- 

Shop 6 y. Wood Shop (2)-0ne laboratory. Open to non-engineenng 

students. exercises in sawing, planing, 

Use and care of ^""d-working tools and exerc ^.^^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Shop 101 t. Foundry Pr..tu:. (l)-0«. c.rr,bl»«.n lec.ur. »d l.b- 
oitZ. Required «t juniors in mechmlcal engrnoenng. 

iTure. a^d recitations on '<>" ^^.".^"^2^ inTSlt"' 
Zrt^:!^ rS. 3':S.Tli.. (Hos..i,.> 

^. w ^i,«n Practice (D— One laboratory. Required of 
Shop 102 s. Machine Shop Praciice k.lj yj 

juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Advanced vr^'^^<^^ ^^l^^^t^^^^^r M hS^Srs. and Jig 

cutting, surface grinding, fluting, cutting bp (Hoshall.) 

work. 

Surveying 

^ 4. f Pi^na Survevinc (1)— Combined lecture and 

Surv.lfands. Elements of Plane Surv^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^_ 

A brief course in the use of the tape, compass, level, *--*• -^ ^^*^- 
Cotputetions for area, coordinates, volume, and plottmg. 

311 



Surv. 2 y. Plane Surveying (5) — One lecture; one laboratory first se- 
mester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
21 f, 22 s. Required of sophomores in civil engineering. 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level. 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross- 
sections, volume, stadia. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Surv. 101 f. Advanced Surveying (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Adjustment of instruments, latitude, longitude, azimuth, time, triangula- 
tion, precise leveling, geodetic surveying, together with the necessary 
adjustments and computations. Topographic surveys. Plane table, land 
surveys, and boundaries. Mine, tunnel, and hydrographic surveys. (Pyle.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Hale, Warfel; Associate Professor Harman; Assistant 
Professors Lemon, Fitzhugh, Zeeveld, Bryan, Cooley; Mr. Murphy, 
Mr. Ball,* Miss Ide, Mr. Sixbey,* Mr. Gravely, Miss Miller, Mr. Peden, 
Mr. Robertson, Mr. Swe.\ringen, Mrs. Ward, Mr. Ward, Mr. Smith, 

Dr. Weeks. 

Eng. 1 y. Survey and Composition I (6) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful pass- 
ing of the qualifying examination given by the Department, or successful 
completion of English A. Required of all four-year students. . 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. Each semester of this course 
will be repeated in the following semester. 

Eng. A f. Special Preparatory Course (0) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English. Required of all 
students who fail to pass the qualifying examination. Students who show 
sufficient progress after five weeks of English A will be transferred to 
English 1 y. Others will continue with English A for one semester. The 
department reserves the right to transfer students who make unsatisfactory 
progress from English 1 y to English A f . 

A course in grammatical and rhetorical principles designed to help 
students whose preparation has been insufficient for English 1 y. Exer- 
cises, conferences, precis writing. This course will be repeated in the 
second semester. 



*Absent on leave. 



312 



of Arts and Sciences. , , 

"ngs ?o thrnineteenth century. Themes, book reports, conferences. 

Eng. 3 8. Survey and Composition II (3)-0ne lecture; two quiz 
sections. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f. 

Continuation of Eng 2 f. 

Eng 4 f or s. Business English (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng 
1 y "^bourse complete in one semester, but may be taken m either semester. 

This course develops the best methods of writing effective business 

letters. 

Eng^ 5 f. Expository Writing (2)-Two lectures. Prere<,uisite, Eng. 

' Study of the principles of exposition. Analysis and i'^terpretation of 

material bearing upon scientific matter. Themes, papers, and reports. 

Eng. 6 s. Expository Writing (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

5f. 

Continuation of Eng. 5 f . 

Eng. 7 f, 8 s. Survey of American Literature (3, 3)-Three lectures. Pre- 

requisite, Eng. 1 y. . ^nr^rj f„ 1865, 

.rmp=ru^on-=e=*i^^^^ 

-L= :::XTmZru:: r mi. forces w^ch in^. 

enS AmSn .^iters' after 1865. Reports and term paper. 

Eng. 11 f, 12 s. Shakespeare (3. 3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

^ Fir,t semester eleven significant early plays, illustrating the drama as 
a SctTo™ of art. Drfmatic criticisms; preparation of acting script; 
experimental production. 

Second semester, ten significant late plays. 

Eng 13 s. Introduction to Narrative Literature (2)-Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Not open to freshmen. 

An intensive study of representative series, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and of other narrative forms. 

Eng 14 f. College Grammar (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1 y Required of students preparing to teach English. 
Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. 

313 



i! 



Drama 1 f. Amateur Play Production (3) — Three lectures. 

A basic course for little theatre workers and secondary school teachers 

« 

of dramatics. Brief survey of the mechanics used in the theatre from early 
Greek tragedy to contemporary times. Plays of each major period studied 
with attention to the method of creating theatrical effectiveness. Admission 
by the permission of the instructor. 

Drama 2 s. Amateur Play Production (3) — Three lectures and one lab- 
oratory. 

Fundamental principles of acting, staging, lighting, and direction of 
amateur production. Each student will make a production book of one or 
more plays and engage in practical laboratory work. Admission by the 
permission of the instructor. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Qualified major students who wish to read for honors h\ English should 
apply to the chairman of the department. The reading may be done in the 
last two years, but should, if possible, be begun earlier. 

In addition to the twelve hours of basic freshman and sophomore English, 
a student taking his major work in this department must pass one semester 
of Advanced Writing, one semester of College Grammar, and one semester 
of either History of the English Language or Old English. In addition, he 
must complete one of the schedules below. 

a. Major work in general literature (recommended for those preparing 
to teach English in secondary schools) : Introduction to American Litera- 
ture, Shakespeare, and at least six hours from the following: Milton; 
Literature of the 18th Century; Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age; 
Victorian Literature; Modem and Contemporary British Poets; Emerson, 
Thoreau, and Whitman; American Fiction; Contemporary American Poetry 
and Prose. 

b. Major work in American literature: Survey of American Literature; 
Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman; American Fiction; Contemporary Ameri- 
can Poetry and Prose; American Drama. 

c. Major work in drama: Shakespeare, and twelve hours from the fol- 
lowing: Medieval Drama, Elizabethan Drama, Modern Drama, Contempo- 
rary Drama, American Drama, Amateur Play Production, Introduction to 
Comparative Literature (first semester). The Spanish Drama, The Faust 
Legend, Ibsen. 

d. Major work in English literature: Shakespeare, and at least twelve 
hours in the department in advanced courses other than American litera- 
ture. 

Minor work may also be elected in these fields, but no major and minor 
combination of a. and b. or of a. and d. will be permitted. 



Eng. 101 s. History of the English Language (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 14 f. 

An historical survey of the English Language: its nature, origin and 
development, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in 
English speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. (Harman.) 

Eng. 102 f. Old English (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 14 f. 
A study of Old English grammar and literature. Lectures on the prin- 
ciples of phonetics and comparative philology. ^ 

Eng. 103 s. Beowulf (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f. 

A study of the Old English epic in the original. (Ball-) 

Eng. 104 f. Chaucer (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, TroUus and Crkeyde and the Principal 
minor p<ims, with lectures and readings on the social background^ of 
Chaucer's time. (Not given m 1940-41.) 



Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside '^^^'^^"f: J^P°jJ'- 
(Not given in 1940-41.) ^ 

Eng. 106 s. Elizabethan Drama (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, 

Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the change in spirit and form of English drama from 1540 
to 1640 as seen in the works of the important dramatists other than Shake- 

dramatic criticisms. (Not given in 1940-41.) v 

Eng. 107 s. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A <;tndv of the literary manifestations of humanism and the new 
nat: r s'pirit if sixteenth'-century En^and, with -Pb-is on^^e pr^e 
works of More, Lyly, Sidney, Hooker, Bacon, and the translators^of^the 
Bible, and on the poetry of Spenser. 

Eng. 108 f. Milton (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (2)-Two 

lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the chief prose writers and of the Metaphysical ^^^ Cava^aer 
traditions in poetry. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Mu.phj.) 



314 



315 



- 1 fX'VfJ^lt'' "' ^'^'•^" ^^>-^- •-'"-• Prerequisites, En,. 

m^eLTTf S'agf ^" *'^ "'^"°" "' "*^^^"^^ "" ^^« Philosophical 

^ • X (Murphy.) 

lect^.' PreV^ulsL ^EnTrf alts.^^'"^'"*'* ^"'"^^ ''' ^>-'^« 

soI'stlTeH^Xt"'' " *'^ '"^°' '°'"'"^*^'^ '^ °^^°^' «-'^*' ^'^^^- 

thTZtrT£l: ''f^"'"''"^"" ^"d ''•^ Circle; the Rise of Romanticism; 
ine letter Writers. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 113 f, 114 s. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3, 3)-Thre«. 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f, 3 s. ^ ^^' ^^ ^^^^ 

in ErlnTff" "' ^ ri"^A-"* *^ development of the Romantic movement 

anJT«="J\ ^''"."i"'* ^"^*'^ (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f 
and 3 s. No knowledge of the Scottish dialect required 

anfbfSlit *f ^'""•'•^ Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthornden; song 
and Burnt ^;*"''^*"'^^' P°«t« of *e vernacular revival: Ramsay. Ferguson 
and Burns. Papers and reporrts. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Fitzhugh ) 

rrtUiLJ; En;.^2 f^nd ti ^"" ^""^ ^'^''^ ''' ^>-^'>- ^-tures. 

■ (Cooley.) 

Eng. 118 s. Modem and Contemporary British Popta r<i\ ti. 

Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. (3)— Three lectures. 

A study of the chief English and Irish poets of the Twentieth Century. 

,o^f !S ^' ^f\^' '^^^ History and Development of the Novel H^Zl^Inl 
(3, 3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s England 

A study of the origin and development of the novel as a form in England. 

2f"and?l'- ^"'•-" Drama (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, ^ Eng. 
A survey of English drama during the two centuries from 1660 to ISfin 

in r94oti~ '"^''^'"' '''''' ""*^^^^ ^^^-^' -Ports.''(No?gfv?n 

(Fitzhugh.) 

316 



Eng. 124 s. Contemporary Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen 
to O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 
(Not given in 1940-41.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 125 f. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 7 f , 8 s. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, with 
emphasis on transcendentalism, idealism, and democracy. (Not given in 
1940-1941.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. American Fiction (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 

7 f, 8 s. 

Historical and critical study of the short story and novel in the United 
States from 1789 to 1920. (Not given in 1940-1941.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 7 f , 8 s. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 128 s. American Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
7 f, 8 s. 

Historical study of representative American plays and playwrights from 
1787 to 1920. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 135 f. Introduction to Creative Writing (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Theory and practice in the short story and lyric, ^vith some study of the 
novelette and play at the election of the class. Major students in English 
must elect either this course or Eng. 136 s. (Bryan.) 

Eng. 136 s. Magazine Writing (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
2 f and 3 s. 

The production and marketing of such literary forms as the magazine 
article, the personal essay, the biographical essay, and the book review. 

(Bryan.) 

Eng. 137 s. Advanced Creative Writing (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Eng. 135 f or 136 s; open to other advanced students by permission of the 
instructor after submission of an original composition. 

Study and exercise in original literary expression as an interpretative 
art. (Bryan.) 

For Graduates 

Requirements for Advanced Degrees with Major in English (in addition 
to the general requirements of the Graduate School): 

317 



Master of Arts 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of English 
must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German at the time 
of admission or not later than six months before taking the degree 

tn^,?J^tt ***"!,"' *^^ ^^"•^■•late will be expected to demonstrate his ability 
to use the ordinary methods of research in the discovery of knowledge and 
to organize and present his findings in a clear, effective English style 

The final examination will be based in part upon the courses pursued 
■n "Ir/^V^"? first-hand knowledge of all the literary works included 
in the departmental list of readings for the Master's degree. The examina- 
tion will test the candidate's powers of analysis and criticism. 

Major work in the department may be elected in any of the following 
fields, the requirements of which are listed below. 

a. Major work in English literature: Old English, and at least six hours 

rZf '"Tr" T'^tJ'' ^''^'"^^' ^°'"^"'=^' '^^ Elizabethan period, the 
Eighteenth Century, The Romantic period, the Victorian period. 

tnr; ^^J°'-7,«'-k in. American literature: the seminar in American litera- 
Ame'riTal IraTurr '""" ''''"' ''' ^'^^"'^^'^ undergraduate courses in 

fromfhifnir'^ in drama: History of the Theatre, and at least six hours 
Selval Drr/^ S wf °" to Comparative Literature (first semester), 
Dr«l A 't. '^''^*^^" ^'■^'"^' ^°''^''» I'^^'na. Contemporary 

span^:h Dr:: ibJer" ''^ ^^"^* '^^^"'^' '^'^ ^°^-" «--" ^--• 

P \ ^^j°!\7>-k in philology: Old English, Beowulf, Seminar in Old English 
Poetry, Middle English, Gothic, and either Medieval Romance or Chaucer 

nu^^Tt^ ""T"" (<^^«i^ned chiefly for teachers in secondary schools)- 

S lma"t an^Ehvl'T "" '""" '^^ *^ ^"""^'"^ ^-"P- Elizabethan 
Drama, or an Elizabethan seminar; Milton; the Eighteenth Century, either 

SeSr :^' r "":■"'.'' ''''"' ^"*^ P°^'^y °f tl^« Romantic Age or 
Seminar ,n the Romantic Period, Contemporary American Prose and Poetry 

Doctor of Philosophy 

musVhfvfthVf:iL':i„7ctrer °' *'^ ^'•^'"^^^ '-'''''• ^^-^^^ -"^^'^^*^ 

a. Three credit hours in Comparative Literature. 

b. Six credit hours in Old English, English 102 f, 103 s, and 212 s 

Go't^??Eng.1o3^sr " '"' ""''''" ''"^'"' """^'^^ ^'^"^- ''' '^ ^^' 

318 



Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination, preferably 
one year before they expect to be awarded degrees. This examination 
will include linguistics (morphology and phonology) and each of the major 
literary fields, from which the candidate may select two for particularly 
detailed examination, specifically: Old English, Middle English, the Drama, 
the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, the Eighteenth Century, the Nine- 
teenth Century, American Literature. 

Eng. 200 f or s. Seminar in Special Studies (1-3). Credit proportioned 
to the importance of the problems assigned. Work under personal guidance 
in some problem of especial interest to the graduate student, but not con- 
nected with the thesis. ^ (Staff.) 

Eng. 201. Research (2-4) — Credit proportioned to the amount of work 
and ends accomplished. Original research and the preparation of disserta- 
tions for the doctor's degree. (Staff.) 

Eng. 202 f. Middle English Language (2-3) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 102 f and 103 s. 

A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference to 
etymology and syntax. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203 s. Gothic (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f. 

A study of the forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas Bible. 
Correlation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (Harman.) 

Eng. 204 y. Medieval Romance in England (4) — Two lectures. 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical romances in Medi- 
eval England, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. 
(Not given in 1939-40.) (Hale.) 

Eng. 205 s. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (2-3) — Two lec- 
tures. 

Studies and problems in sixteenth-century literature other than Shake- 
speare. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 207 f. Seminar in Shakespeare (2-3) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 11 f, 12 s, or equivalents. 

Studies and problems in Shakespeare. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 208 s. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2-3) — Two lec- 
tures. 

Intensive study of one man's work or of one important movement of the 
century. ( Fitzhugh. ) 

Eng. 209 y. Seminar in American Literature (4-6) — Two lectures. 

Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth century American Litera- 
ture. The subject for 1940-41 will be the major writings of Emerson and 
Whitman. • (Warfel.) 

319 



Eng. 210 f. Seminar in the Romantic Period (2-3) — Two or three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 113 f and 114 s, or an equivalent satisfactory to 
the instructor. One discussion period of two hours. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
movement. The subject-matter of the course will vary with the interests 
of the class. (Hale.) 

Eng. 211 y. Seminar in the Victorian Period (4-6) — Two or three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 116 f and 117 s, or the permission of the 
instructor. 

Special studies of problems or persons in the Victorian Age. The subject- 
matter of the course will vary with the interests of the class. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 212 s. Old English Poetry (2-3) — Two or three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 102 f or equivalent. 

A study of Old English poetic masterpieces other than the Beowulf. 

(Ball.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Cory; Lecturers Snodgrass, Yeager; Assistant Professor 
Knight; Dr. Ditman, Dr. Langford, Mr. McConnell, Mr. Abrams, 

Mr. Bickley. 

Ent. 1 f and s. Introductory Entomology (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, 1 year college biology. 

The relationships of Insects to the activities of mankind; the general 
principles of insect morphology, classification, adaptation; elementary prin- 
ciples of economic entomology. Field work and the preparation of a collec- 
tion of representative insects of Maryland. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ent. 2 s. Insect Morphology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1. ^ 

A study of the anatomy of insects, given especially in preparation for 
work in insect taxonomy and biology. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ent. 3 f. Insect Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 2 s. 

The general principles of taxonomy. An intensive study of the classifica- 
tion of all orders of insects and the principal families in the major groups. 
The preparation of a collection of insects is a major portion of the course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ent. 4 f. Beekeeping (2). — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 1. 

History of beekeeping, natural history and behavior of the honeybee. A 
study of the beekeeping industry. A non-technical course intended to acquaint 
the student with the honeybee as an object of biological and cultural inter- 
est, and to serve as an introduction to the science of apiculture. 

320 



^t. 5 s. Insect Biology (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 

^"** ^' . ^ r.f +V.O a.PTiPral aspects of entomology begun In 

and ecology of insects. 
E„t. 6 f.-ApicuUure (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 

'a ;;udy of the life histo^ yearly ^y J. beh^^^^^^^^^^^^ of^^^^^ 

X- S'l^:^^'^^:^^^^^ to tL stuaent Of 
Agriculture, horticulture, entomology, and zoology. 
Ent 7 s. Apiculture (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite. 

'^eTs f, 9 s. Entomological Technic and Scientific Delineation (2, 2)- 

-IV'o laboratories. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. . , . . t^,,^ nrenara- 

offered in 1940-41.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent 101 y. Economic Entomology (4)-Two lectures. 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, mcludmghf 
histr; ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. (Cory.) 

Ent 102 y. Economic Entomology (4)-Two laboratories. 

Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field worlc m economic 
entomology. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

Ent. 103 f, 104 s. Insect Pests of Special Groups (3, 3)-Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. , .,. . „ •„„ „rn„n.5 

A study of the principal insects of one or :^^\^^f,^^:Zl7e 
founded upon food preferences and habitat '^}^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ j^p^ort- 

IteTS l:^:^^!::^'^^^^^ ^^S^ation to the student 

snecializing in entomology. 

speciaiiz g Vegetables. 3. Flowers, both in the open and 

Insect Pests of 1. Fruit. Z. jegeia porests. 6. Field Crops, 

under glass^ 4 OrnamenUls and Shade Tr^es. 5.^1^^^^^ Laboratory fee. 
7. Stored Products. 8. Live Stock 9. me . 

$2.00 per semester. (Not offered in 1940-41.) 

321 



parasitology. ^ ^ ^^^' ^^® fundamentals of 

En. .0. .. ,..„. T.„„„„, ,„_^^__ ,^^^_^^^ ^^ ,.W J.""'*"' 

Ent 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (3)_Three lectures 

thel chSrTt"' T- °' '=°"*^'=* ^""^ ^*°™-h P---. -ith regard to 
work wSSSic de^wm hT' '^"^'"Pf"''"'*^^' ^^^ ^o'-ge injury. Recen 
in insecticides will be especially emphasized. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

F'nf ina T (Ditman.) 

tions.'- z^j:ri^:rsr!LS::^:^:r' — ^e^onstra. 

cirL'ratt^^Sof ItoiSi '"'^ :"' ^^^^^"'^^ -^— to '>'ood. 
the nervou's sy'^ZV^Z^^Sisr^'"''''' "^P^"-^*'^"' ^^^ ^;^°n -^ 

mil^d-byth'etuff!- '•'^*='»' P-*"-- Credit and prerequisite to beX! 

suomitted as part of the requirements for graduation. 
Ent 111 s Coccidology (2)-Two laboratories. ^"'"''■^ 

sized. Laboratory studies are LplleZtH 7 ""^ >"i<=roscopy are empha- 
tory fee, $2.00. supplemented by occasional lectures. Labora- 

Vni 110 cj ■ , (McConnell.) 

Jint. 112 y. Seminar (2). 

imSn^memurr™' ""'"' '^^'^ '•^^'^-' -'^ ^^^^racts of the more 

(Cory, Knight.) 

For Graduates 
.rSllgeltt'- "''"""'' ^'""•"'"l" O-^-One lecture; I.b.^,,,, fc, 

Ent. 202. Research in Entomology. ^^°'y'> 

The student's work ZTfoZ^Jn^^^^^^ Department projects. 

^> lorm a part of the final report on the project and 

322 



be published in bulletin form. A dissertation suitable for publication must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Cbry.) 

Ent. 203 f. Insect Morphology (2-4) — Two lectures; laboratory work 
bv special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 
preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

(Snodgrass.) 

Ent. 204 y. Economic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. 
Studies of the principles underlying applied entomology, and the most 
significant advances in all phases of entomology. (Cory.) 

Ent. 205 s. Insect Ecology (2). — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects 
to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic 
organism adjusted to the environment. (Langford.) 

FARM FORESTRY 

Professor Besley. 

For. 1 s. Introduction to Forestry (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f and 3 s. 

A general survey of the field of forestry. Principles of forestry applied 
to the establishment care, and protection of stands of timber. Identifica- 
tion and distribution of commercially important trees. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

For. 101 s. Farm Forestry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of trees; forest 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest crops; 
nursery practice; and tree planting. (Besley.) 

GENETICS 

Professor Kemp. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Gen. 101 f. Genetics (3)— Three lectures. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of 
genetics, or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in 
the breeding of animals or of plants. (Kemp.) 

Gen. 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
101 f. 

A consideration of chromosome irregularities and other mutations, inter- 
species crosses, identity and nature of the gene, genetic equilibrium, statis- 
tical significance of genetic phenomena. (Kemp.) 

For Graduates 

Gen. 201 f and s. Plant Breeding. Credit according to work done. (Kemp.) 



323 



GEOLOGY 

Professor 



Geol. 1 f. Geology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 y. 

A textbook, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles 
of geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is 
designed primarily for agriculture students in preparation for technical 
courses, it may also be taken as part of a liberal education. 

HISTORY 

Professors Baker-Crothers, Strakhovsky; Associate Professor Highby; 
Assistant Professor Thatcher; Mr. Silver, Dr. Prange, 

Dr. Dozer, Mr. Worthington. 

H. 1 y. A Survey of Western Civilization (6) — One lecture and two 
recitations. This course is for freshmen and sophomores; it is open to 
juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor but with reduced 
credit. 

A general course covering the broad movements of European History 
which contributed to the formation of modem institutions. The aim of 
the course is to make the student cognizant of the present trends in this 
changing world. 

H. 2 y. American History (6) — One lecture and two recitations. This 
course is open to sophomores and upper classmen. 

This course treats American History from the discovery of the New 
World to the present time. 

H. 3 y. History of England and Great Britain (6) — One lecture and two 
recitations. This course is open to freshmen and sophomores and to upper 
classmen only with the permission of the instructor, but with reduced 
credit. 

The course is a survey of the evolution of England and Great Britain 
from earliest times to the World War. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

In addition to the requirements of the University and the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the History Department requires that all credits for 
a major and at least 12 credits for a minor be acquired in courses offered 
for advanced undergraduates or graduates. History majors must also 
take two of the three fundamental courses (H. 1 y, H. 2 y, H. 3 y). 

H. 101 y. American Colonial History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. 

A study of the political, economic, and social development of the Ameri- 
can people from the discovery of America through the formation of the 
constitution. (Baker-Crothers.) 

324 



„. 105 f, 106 s. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2. 2)-Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 
The history of national development to the end of the ^i ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

H 107 f. The united States from the Civil War to 1900 (3)-Three 

,ect;res. Prerequisite, H. 2 y, or "s ;quwalent. 

Selected topics intended to provide a historical basis ^^^^^^^^ ^ 

ctanding of problems of the present century. 

stantting oi. y rpnturv (3)— Three lectures. 

H 108 s. The United States in the 20th Century (^) 

Prerequisite, H. 2 y, or its equivalent 
A historical study of the more important problems ^^^ J^^^^^ ^ 

Tm f 112 s. social and Economic History of the United States 
,3"3)"Thr'ee lectures. Prerequisite. H. 2 y or - --^^ _^_ ,,,. 
First semester, an advanced course giving a synthesis oi a 
Second semester, the period from 1790 to 1860 is covered^^^_^^^^^^^^^ 

„ 115 y. Constitutional History of the United States (6)-Three lee- 

and practice thereafter. 

H 119 f. 120 s. Diplomatic History of the United States (2, 2)_Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2y. (Dozer.) 

A study of American foreign policy. 

H. 123 f, 124 s. History of Maryland (2, 2)-Two lectures. Prerequi- 

site, H. 2 y. economic progress of Maryland 

A survey of the political, sotidi, a (Dozer.) 

as colony and state. , ^ , ^ /q q>i Three 

H 125 f 126 s. The Constitutional History of England (3, 3)-Three 

tutions since the Germanic invasion. (Not given m 1940 41 ) 

H 127 f. 128 s. Latin American History (2, 2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

'T^^tei: s'rvly'of the history of Latin American states through 
thP colonial period to the wars of independence. 

United States. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

325 



H. 131 f, 132 s. Ancient History (3, 3) — Three lectures. 

A general survey course — the Near East, Greece and Rome. (Highby.) 

H. 135 f. Medieval History (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A general survey of the Medieval period with special emphasis on the 
legacy of the Middle Ages. (Prange.) 

H. 136 s. Renaissance and Reformation (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

A general survey of the Renaissance and Reformation. (Prange.) 

H. 137 f. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Europe (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of the political, economic, social and intellectual ferment of the 
"Age of Reason.'* (Silver.) 

H. 138 s. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of the French Revolution and the relation of Revolutionary 
France with the rest of Europe, 1789-1815. (Silver.) 

H. 139 f. Europe Since 1815 (2) — Two lectures and assignments. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of the political, economic, social and cultural development of 
Europe up to the World War. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 140 s. Present Day Europe (2) — Two lectures and assignments. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 139 f. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Strakhovsky.) 

H. 145 f, 146 s. Expansion of Europe (3, 3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

A treatment of European History from the Crusades to the present, 
emphasizing especially the expansion of national states. (Not given in 
1940-41.) (Silver.) 

H. 151 f, 152 s. Diplomatic History of Europe Since 1871 (2, 2)— Two 
lectures and assignments. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of European alliances and alignments, power politics and 
imperialism up to the present. (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 155 f, 156 s. History of Central Europe (3, 3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y. 

A history of Central Europe from the Reformation to the present. 
Special emphasis will be placed on Germany, Austria and France. (Not 
given in 1940-41.) n (Prange.) 

326 



For Graduates 

(See Graduate School Catalogue for special departmental requirements.) 
H. 200. Research (2-4)-Credit proportioned to the amount of woric. 

„. ,01 y. seminar in American Co.onia, Histor. ^^^-^^-^^1^^ 
T^rf't'rarHistorical BihHo.raph. and Criticise (2)_^Not 

given in 1940-41.) ^ ... • ,o\ iTint 

H. 203 s. European Historical Bibliography and Cnt.c.sm (2)-(Not 

given in 1940-41.) R^und-table discussions 

H. 204 y. Seminar in European History (4)-R'>"f *^^st-„khovsky.) 

and reports on specified topics. (Not given m 1940-41.) (f™""^''^;^ 

D • TT S S R (4)_Lectures, round-table discussions 
H. 205 y. Russia— U. S. b. K. W i-ecv (Strakhovsky.) 

and reports. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

PROFESSORS MOUNT. McFARLAND, WELSH; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS CURTISS, 
"^ kSkPATRICK, MOORE; miss ENRIGHT, miss BURNETTE. MRS. HINTZ, 

Mrs. Hamilton. 
Home Economics Lectures 
H. E. 1 y. Home Economics Lectures (2)-0ne recitation. Required of 
Home Economics freshmen. 

Lectures, demonstrations, group and individual discussions »" f-«' 
perSnality development, personal adjustments, health, and social usage. 

Textiles, Qothing, and Art 
H E 11 s. Clothing (3)-Three laboratories. Prerequisite, H. E. 24 f 

fee, $2.50. 

H E. 21 f and s. Design (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 

Elements of design; application of design principles to daily hving. 
practice in designing. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

H. E. 24 f. Costume design (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

A study of fundamentals underlying taste, fashion and design as they 
reltte to the expression of individuality in dress. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

H E. 25 9. Crafts (2)— Two laboratories. 

L^^ive art expressed in clay modeling, plastic carving. -^^ ^f ^^^• 
paper mache modeling, etc. Emphasis laid upon inexpensive materials and 
tools and simple technic. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

327 



H. E. 71 f and s. Textiles (3)_Two recitations; one laboratory 

cT.-rreaT=artrrni^^^^^ 

and furs. Laboratory f err2 00 ^e^ seme'sTer"' ^"' ^^"^^^^ "' ^'°*^'"^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

h."e. n "::, .4T:;?„,^r„r "'-'""^ '"""""-■ ^"-""""'. 

(McFarland, Curtiss.) 
sites, H. e' n" and niT '" "^'"''"^ ^'^"^^^'^^ laboratories. Prerequi- 

prSet^Lrrrry V mT '•''' ^'"'-^"' ^"'^ ^" ^"^-"^-^ <='°^'»-« 

(Moore.) 

PrfiiL", S. e"* nT" ■"""'■ "'-°"« ""'"'»• '"» ■"borate^. 

(Moore.) 
Prt J;itHVH.''ri;rf.'" ''''^'"" ^'^-^"^ ^«<="^*-"' t^'-- laboratories. 
Testing and experimental work in textiles. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Moore.) 
*Art 

soSritfesln^Tot'"'/ ''"'' '"f ^'''^ P"""P^^« ^'th relation to per- 
nrst semes ter, $2.00; second semester, $1.00. (Curt ) 

*For other courses in Art see page 251. 



328 



H. E. 123 f, 124 s. Advanced Design (3, 3) — Three laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, H. E. 122 s and 111 f, or equivalent. 

Professional aspects of costume or interior design; contact with com- 
mercial establishments. Design expressed in various mediums. Students 
may choose one of the two fields listed. 

(a) Advanced Costume Design — Designing of costumes on paper and in 
cloth; a study of garment merchandising including fashion illustra- 
tion, shop display, and other phases of promotional work. 

(b) Interior Design — Designing of rooms, including interior architecture, 
furniture, fabrics, accessories; arrangement of display rooms in 
stores. Elevation and perspective drawing to scale. Laboratory 
ifee, $3.00 per semester. (Curtiss.) 

H. E. 125 s. Merchandise Display (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Design H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

Practice in effective display of merchandise for windows, show cases, 
and other parts of store interiors. Cooperation with retail establishments. 
Five large display windows in the home economics building provide 
practical demonstration space for this course. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Curtiss.) 

Foods and Nutrition 

H. E. 31 y. Foods (6) — One recitation; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 y. 

Composition, selection, and preparation of food, with a study of the 
scientific principles involved; analysis of recipes and study of standard 
products. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Kirkpatrick, Enright, Bumette.) 

H. E. 32 f. Elements of Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. 

A studv of normal nutritional needs; the relation of food to health; 
planning of adequate dietaries for adults. (Welsh.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. 131 f. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, 
Chem. 12 A y. 

A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 132 s. Dietetics (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, H. E. 131 f. 

A study of food selection for health; planning and calculating dietaries 
for adults and children. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 133 f and s. Demonstrations (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisites, 
H. E. 11 s, 31 y and 71 f. 

Practice in demonstrations. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Welsh, Enright.) 

329 



Advaneed study of manipulation of food materials. (^elsh.) 

tori.. ■S^rl-^.L, STSrri^rS J^", rr-^.- two law. 

prttSt tis. zziz rie^iZ. ''""^ ^^^^^^™^tK- rr "^• 

re"uil; H. E. S^fofSff"" '''-'"'' "'^^^"""^^ ^^ lablrltt^te! 

chSt:? tc.:L\TxpeSt'°witr'i:t*" ^^^^'^ ^"^ ^^-^'^p-n* of 

children's hospitals a Jchnies. '" '" ^'^^ """-^^^^ ^^^'^ i" 

H F 1Q7 ^ J ». (Welsh.) 

rt. ri. 138 s. Diet in Disea«itf> r^\ n«^ vl x- 

rwisite, H. E. 131 f. <3)-0ne retrtation; two l.boratorira. Pre- 

(Enrig-ht.) 
For Graduates 
H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (2) 

Oral and written reports on current literature on nutrition. (Welsh ) 
of work donl ^^^^^'*^*^-^-^^t to be detennined by amount and quality 

With the approval of the head of the denartm^nt ti, ^ j . 
an original investigation in some phase of ffods^J^ u"* ""^^ ^"^^"^ 

basis of a thesis for an advanced degree "" "^^^ ^°'''" *^' 

H F 9nQ #^ « A J * (Welsh.) 

labtatries. " ^'''"^^•' Experimental Foods (3)_0ne recitation; two 

prSf lrrrt!::;rS,Ti^"^- '^^^^'^^ ^'-P^^^- - «- -^ Maryland 
H F onj f D J- .' ' (Kirkpatrick.) 

H. E. 204 f. Readings in Nutrition (2)_Two recitatinn<= 
Reports and discussions of outstanHin,. '^.^^^^^t^t'^ns- 

gations. outstanding nutntional research and investi- 

H. E. 205 f or s. Nutrition d) n«^ •. .• (Welsh.) 

ment. nutrition (3)-0ne recitation; laboratory by arrange- 

Feeding experiments are conduptpH nr. uk^ ,. 
Of diets of varying composiS ^^^^^^^^ry animals to show effects 

(Welsh.) 
330 



Home and Institution Management 
For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 141 f, 142 s. Management of the Home (3, 3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Junior standing, College of Home Economics. 

The family and human relations; household organization and manage- 
ment; budgeting of time and money. Housing as a social problem; federal 
and civic housing projects; housing standards for the family; building and 
financing a home. Selection and care of household equipment and furnish- 
ings. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 143 f or s. Practice in Management of the Home (3) — Prerequi- 
sites, H. E. 141 f and 142 s. 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
ber of the faculty and a small group of students for approximately one- 
third of a semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. (Enright.) 

H. E. 144 y. Institution Management (6) — Three recitations. Prerequi- 
sites, H. E. 31 y, 141 f, 142 s and 131 f. The last three may be taken 
concurrently. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service in dormi- 
tories; organization of institution laundries. Institutional accounting and 
purchasing of supplies, furnishings and equipment. (Mount.) 

H. E. 145 f. Practice in Institution Management (3) — Prerequisite, H. E. 
144 y. 

Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 
room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. This must be done under direction for 
not less than six weeks full time. (Staff.) 

H. E. 146 s. Advanced Institution Management (3) — Prerequisite, H. E. 
144 y. One recitation weekly and individual conferences with the instructor. 

Special problems in institution management. (Hamilton.) 

H. E. 147 f. Institution Cookery (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, 137 s and 144 y. 

Application of principles of food preparation to large quantity cookery; 
study of standard technics; menu planning and costs; standardization of 
recipes; use of institutional equipment; practice in cafeteria counter service. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Hamilton.) 

Home Economics Extension 

H. E. 151 f and s. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) — Given 
under the direction of Venia M. Kellar and specialists. (Specialists.) 

331 



HORTICULTURE 

Professors Schradeir, Mahoney, Thurston, Walls; Associate Professors 
Haut, Lincoln, Shoemaker; Mr. Stier, Mr. Hitz, Mr. Shutak. 

Hort. 1 f, 2 s. General Horticulture (3, 3) — Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory. Designed for all students in Agriculture and Home Economics. 

An introductory course, discussing the several phases of horticulture in 
a systematic survey of the problems of horticulture and practical means of 
solution. 

First semester. Fruits and vegetables. 

Second semester. Flowers, ornamental plants, propagation, and land- 
scape gardening. First semester not a prerequisite. 

H«rt. 3 f, 4 s. Fruit Production (2-3, 2) — One or two lectures and one or 
two laboratories. 

The practical application of the principles of fruit growing as related 
to climatic conditions, soil and water requirements, selection of sites, 
systems of planting, varieties, pruning, pollination, harvesting, washing, 
grading, and other pertinent problems. 

One laboratory in the first semester is devoted to apple variety identifi- 
cation and judging. A fruit judging team is selected to compete in the 
Eastern States Intercollegiate Fruit Judging League. 

A laboratory must be taken with a lecture, or two laboratories with one 
lecture. 

Hort. 5 s. Vegetable Producti'on (2-4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. 
The laboratory work is organized from the point of view of the home 
garden and commercial truck garden. Special studies are made of vegetable 
seed identification, methods of growing plants, garden planning, pest con- 
trol, etc. Lectures may be taken without laboratory. 

Hort. 6 f. Greenhouse Construction and Management (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. 

A detailed consideration of various types of houses and their manage- 
ment; location with respect to sites and markets; arrangement, construc- 
tion, and costs of building and operation; practical methods of handling 
greenhouses under various conditions. 

Hort. 7 s. — Greenhouse Management (3-4) — Two or three lectures; one 
laboratory. No prerequisite. 

A continuation of Hort. 5 f. 

Hort. 8 s. Small Fruits (2-3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Lectures 
can be taken without laboratory. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of the 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, black- 
berries, cranberries, etc. Plant characteristics, varieties, propagation, site 

332 



„a soils planting, soil managen^ent. fruiting habits, prumn., fert.h.ers. 
;: V Sg'and marketing receive consideration. 

„ t 9 f Garden Flowers (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Hort. 9 t. uaraeii x ^Tinnals herbaceous peren- 

Plants for garden use; the -Xo^ar th^ -Itu-l requirements, 
nials. bulbs, bedding plants, and roses ana 

trt 10 . commercial Floriculture (6-7)_Two lectures; one or two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Hort. 6 f and 7 s ^^^^^^.^^ 

Methods of handling florist's ^ench c-PS a^d P^^^ ^^ .^^^^.^^ ^.^.^^ 
of cut flowers, the retail busmess, and floral de^ig^^ ^.^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^, 
to important commercial centers and flower 
given in 1940-41.) 

„.... u ,. u.„a«.P. «"-";- ^»-r.;i:,"™.n. »a .h.i, .pp..- 

Th. theory aod gen.r.! P™"f '» "' '"™, TJider.tto i, gi.o. to th. 
cation to private and pobhc "" ; /'"'f ~"d,, tarmslead,, M.d »»•« 

ita^/b^X..* »~ Seoreticai and pra*.. kno»W.= o, th. 

"It U f. Landscape D.si.n <3,-0n, iectur., two ■;'»»'°*^_ 

• • i.c nf greneral landscape design and prac 

„„^ rd;St^"X'::.'Sr*'arp"p.r..ion o. «.. ..nd.e.P. 

^^^"^" T. •„„ d) Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 

Hort. 13 s. Landscape Design (3)-lhree 

"'''^- ^^ ^" A. .nd wardens and of architectural details 

The design of private ^^""^^^^^^^^/^/Xns , analytical study of plans 
used in landscape <^'>'»P<>^'t'°"t' ^ "S^W oEserv^tion of landscape develop- 
of practicing landscape architects, field 

ments. 

-rdri«'i» P- and ..-pub. a«^^ . ^ 

Hort. 16 f or s. Methods of Commercial Processing 

(4)_Three lectures; one laboratory jt^.^i erops: maturity 

The fundamentals of canning ^«f ff JJ^^^j ^f peas and lima beans; 

studies; harvesting -^f^^^^'^^^ X^^- *- P-^^^^'"^ ""' '^^^'^ 
grades and grading of raw Prod^fS' ^^ . ^^ processing and 

,„„ such - -ashing, .^ng^^a^^^^^^^^^ ,„ ,,„iors and seniors 

;rigrU"rmVEclmics. and Bacteriology. 

333 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101 f, 102 s. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Fruits) (2, 2)— 

Two lectures. 

A critical analysis of detailed studies on horticultural plants in relation 
to application to practice. An interpretation of horticultural knowledge, 
based on principles of physiology, chemistry, and other sciences. A study 
of underlying principles involved in growth, fruiting, storage, and quality 
of horticultural plants and products. (Haut.) 



Hort. 103 f, 104 s. 
(2, 2)— Two lectures. 
102 s. 



Technology of Horticultural Plants (Vegetables) 

These courses are described under Hort. 101 f, 

(Mahoney.) 



Hort. 105 f or s. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Oramentals) (2) — 

Two lectures. This course is described under Hort. 101 f, 102 s. (Haut.) 

Hort. 106 s. World Fruits and Nuts (2) — Two lectures. Designed for 
students in Commerce, Agricultural Economics, and Home Economics. 

A study of the tropical and subtropical fruits and nuts of economic import- 
ance. The orange, lemon, grapefruit, pineapple, banana, date, fig, olive, 
avocado, papaya, mango, walnut, pecan, almond, filbert, tung nut, Brazil 
nut, cashew, and cocoanut receive consideration. Special emphasis is placed 
upon the botanical relationships, composition, varieties, climatic and cul- 
tural requirements, methods and problems of production, and the develop- 
ment and present commercial status of those grown in the United States 
and its possessions. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Haut.) 

Hort. 107 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A field or laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental 
planting. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Thurston.) 

Hort. 108 f or s. Canning Crops Technology (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, senior standing, Hort. 16 and Pit. Phys. 101. 

A course dealing with the more technical physico-chemical methods used 
in the study of the fundamentals of factors influencing the quality of raw 
products, physiological processes prior to and after blanching, grade of 
processed product. In addition, studies will be made of new types of equip- 
ment and recent research on methods of processing. Visits to canning 
plants and commercial laboratories will be required. (Mahoney, Walls.) 

Hort. 109 f or s. Systematic Pomology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, description, 
pomological classification and identification of tree and small fruits. (Haut.) 

Hort. 110 f or s. Systematic Olericulture (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops and 
the description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties 

334 



„ aifr.«n. «vi,o„™nU. ..ndUion. and .heir special o.es in v.^e.ab,. 

production. 

Hart, my seminar (2) ..^„,,t,tion. condensation, and oral 

'^SZ:l^^: -^tT..^^^^ phases of horuculture. (Staff.) 

H«rt. 112 y. Special ^-'"•^'"^/^f ^.^.^.„„, ^, horticulture n^ay select 

An advanced «t-/-VLThis mS bte her the summarizing of all the 
a special problem for study. This ^^yj'^ f ^^^ investigation of some 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201 y. Experimental ^^^^^^^^ ''''^l^^ZZ^^r. as to prac 

A systematic study of the -;«- ,ts 1 1^^^^^^^^ ^ P°-°^^^f, 

tices in pomology; methods and d«^^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^^,^ , all 

:fpeSn; sts:r:s r oS counties. <«---.> 

Hort. 202 y. Experimental 0^^r^^^^^^-^<;^X: '^^^^^^^n as to prac- 

A systematic study ^^ the sources of ^^^^^^^^^^ .^ experimental workin 

tices in vegetable growing, '"^*°? ^^V^^nts that have been or are being 

:rtedrrSrmtrSol?:his and other countries. (Mahoney.) 

Hort. 203 s. Experimental Pomology (2)-Two lectures. ^^^^^^^^^^ 

A continuation of Hort. 201 y. 

Hort. 203 f. Experimental Olericulture (2)-Two lectures. ^^^^^^^^^ 
A continuation of Hort. 202 y. ^^^^^^^. 

Hort. 204 f or s. Methods of Horticultural Research 

one laboratory. research v^orkers in the U. S. and 

Methods in use by _^l'«^-t»'=""'^fjS critically evaluating such meth- 
foreign countries are discussed m det^ 1, c J^ ^^ photographic tech- 

ods for use in solving present ProWems^ measurements, plot 

nicue, application of f''^^^l/J:^TmLL^s will be emphasized, 
designs, survey methods, and experimen ox Credit given 

.J -1 HnrticuUural Research (4, 6, or »)— ^^reu.w s 

Hort. 205. Advanced Horticuiiura 

™.=rn.ir.^»1;-f ar-"eal »i» ^ i. - ..™.«' -^ 

335 



Hort. 206 f, 207 s. Advanced Horticultural Seminar (1 n 

staff n^embers durtrZ Lfter eS '^ ?"'"''^''" '^ *^^ ^^^^^'^t^ -"d 
seminar. The aim of thi.rr.,,. T. ""T""^ '^ ^" ^"^^"«^1 P^^t of the 
sent research relus o Jl r^s'^dl ^,'7'°^ .^''■'■*^ *" -^'^^ and to pre- 
culture. ^ ^^ "^^^ ^^ *° ^e^'ew i-ecent advances in horti- 

(Staff.) 
LIBRARY SCIENCE 
Associate Professor Hintz ; Mr. Fogg, Mr. Ziegaus. 
U S. 1 f and s. Library Methods (1). 

and™LX"Jl'nnsttrn^'!.:r^'^*r^V^'^ "^'"^ ^^^^^ ^-"% 

work, is designed toTnte'tt'tfe Th '" *' 5°™ "^ '"'^'"^^^ ^"^^ Pra<=«<=al 

The course Snsider thH L 'm^^^^^^^^ '" *^^ ^*"^^"*- 

catalog, periodical literature and Sexes and" /" ''^''"''' '''' '^"^ 
books which will be found helnfnltif' u . ^l'^^''' essential reference 
later years. ^^"' throughout the college course and in 

MATHEMATICS 

S"r/pj;iiTm™- £t:c7s r°?™ "•^'^^ ««'"■"'•■ 

t^ccLEs, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Herbst, Mr. Schechter 

ing, chemistry and physics who IppV fi, • T students of engineer- 

exponentials and logarithms. Progressions, binomial theorem, 

etrrSpL^o ^uL^::ZZZl-^:[:^^^^^^ P'- .eom. 

offer the entrance credit of 'one-halT^r^fTfi^";:!^? J'" "''' '° ""' 
Lines and planes, cylinders and cones, the sphere, polyhedra 

etrThL^;ouris^S:7d fo^;;ira"rsSenrrr*h'- ^'^^ -- 
in high school and is open to studLt^ i;%UcoC of '^Zr'^'"'^ 

on^^hTsptrer'Sa^Sr ^"' ''"'''' ''' ^''^^^^ ^'^'y^^^' ^-metry 

336 



Math. 8 f, 10 s. Elements of College Mathematics (3, 3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, at least one year of high school algebra. Required of biological, 
premedical and predental students. 

This course acquaints the student with the elementary ideas in the fol- 
lowing branches of mathematics: algebra, trigonometry, analytic geom- 
etry and calculus. Math. 8 f, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for Math. 
10 s. 

First semester. Algebra: Quadratic equations, theory of equations, ex- 
ponentials, logarithms, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations. 
Trigonometry : trigonometric functions, solution of triangles, trigonometric 
equations and identities. 

Second semester. Analytic geometry: Cartesian coordinates, the straight 
line, the circle, the ellipse, graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential 
and logarithmic functions. Calculus: elementary theory of differentiation 
and integration. 

Math. 18 y. Pictorial Geometry (4) — Two lectures. Required of students 
whose major is mathematics, and of students in the College of Education 
with mathematics as their major or minor. 

The story of geometry, classical and modem, synthetic and analytic, pre- 
sented by means of drawings and models made by the students themselves. 

Math. 20 y. General Mathematics (6) — Three lectures. Primarily intended 
for students of economics and the social sciences. Required of all students 
in Business Administration. Prerequisite, one year of high school algebra. 

Principles of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry; mathematics of 
finance; quadratic and higher equations; progressions and logarithms; com- 
pound interest and annuities; permutations and combinations; probabilities; 
graphing of algebraic and trigonometric functions; construction and inter- 
pretation of graphs; interpolation and approximation methods; rudiments of 
the calculus; introduction to statistical methods. 

Math. 21 f and s. College Algebra (4) — Three lectures and one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and satisfactory passing 
of a qualifying test. Required of all students in the College of Engineer- 
ing; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chemistry; of 
students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major 
or minor. 

Foundations of algebra; binomial and multinomial expansions; progres- 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of numbers; combinatorial 
analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; theory of equations; exponen- 
tial functions and logarithms; principles of trigonometry. 

Math. 22 s and f. Analytic Geometry (4) — Three lectures and one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Math. 21 f. Required of all students in the College 
of Engineering; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chem- 

337 



istry; of students in Education who elect mathematics as their major or 
minor. 

Cartesian and polar coordinates; line and circle; curves of the second 
order; higher algebraic and transcendental curves; periodograms; solid 
analytic geometry. 

Math. 23 y. Calculus (8) — Three lectures and one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 8 f, 10 s; or 21 f, 22 s. Required of all students in the College 
of Engineering; of students with a major in mathematics, physics or chem- 
istry; of students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 
their major or minor. 

Limits, derivatives, and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
evolutes; envelopes; elements of curve theory; elementary theory of func- 
tions; partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; multiple inte- 
grals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes, and moments; expansion in series. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Students majoring in mathematics who have completed Freshman and 
Sophomore courses in mathematics with distinction in the honors sections 
are eligible to try for honors in mathematics. To receive the honors degree 
in mathematics, a student must: (1) complete the curriculum in mathe- 
matics found on page 121 of the catalogue with an average grade of B 
in all subjects; (2) pass honors examinations in mathematics at the end 
of the Junior and Senior years; (3) write a satisfactory thesis on an 
assigned topic in mathematics in the latter half of the Senior year. Students 
who wish to try for honors in mathematics should consult the executive 
officer of the department at the conclusion of their Sophomore year. 

Math. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 
(2) — Two lectures. 

V 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers in 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathematics 
and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill f, or its equivalent. 

A survey course of analytic geometry, and the calculus, intended for 
workers in the biological sciences and for prospective teachers of high- 
school mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 114 f. Diflferential Ekiuations for Engineers (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the College of Engi- 
neering, and deals with aspects of mathematics which arise in engineering 
theory and practice. Among the topics tireated are the following: linear 

338 



differential equations; advanced methods in kinematics and dynamics; appli- 
cations of analysis to electrical circuits, to aero-dynamics, bridge-design, etc. 

(Martin, Lancaster.) 

Math. 115 s. Applied Calculus for Chemists (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 23 y. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise in the theory 
and practice of chemistry. Among the topics treated are the follovdng: 
partial and total derivatives; applications of mathematical analysis to 
thermo-dynamics, to molectilar and atomic phenomena, and to physical chem- 
istry. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 116 f. Advanced Trigonometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 23 y or its equivalent. 

Complex numbers; De Moivre, Euler and allied identities; trigonometric 
series and infinite products; graphing of periodic functions; hyperbolic trig- 
onometry; trigonometric solution of equations; principles of spherical trig- 
onometry. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 122 s. History of Elementary Mathematics (2)— Two lectures. 
History of arithmetic, algebra and geometry. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 123 s. Vector Analysis (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
142 s or its equivalent. 

Scalars, vectors, matrices and determinants; transformations; linear 
dependence; canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geometry 
and mechanics. (Alrich.) 

Math. 130 f. Analytical Mechanics (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

Math. 23 y. 

Statics, equilibrium of a point and of flexible cords, virtual work, kme- 
matics dynamics of a particle, elementary celestial mechanics. (Not given 
in 1940-41.) (Martin.) 

Math. 131 s. Analytical Mechanics (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 130 f or its equivalent. 

Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, two and three 
degrees of freedom. Hamilton's principle. The Hamilton-Jacobi partial 
differential equation. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Martin.) 

Math. 140 y. Mathematical Seminar (4)— Two sessions. Open to juniors 
and seniors majoring in mathematics and graduate students. 

This course is devoted to special topics not taken up in the regularly 
scheduled courses. (Staff.) 

Math. 141 f. Higher Algebra (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 

23 y. 

Identities; multinomial expansion; combinatorial analysis; mathematical 
induction; undetermined coefficients; determinants; elementary theory of 
equations; complex magnitudes. (Weyl.) 

339 



mTo; if eiivfiS" ^''*''" '''-'^° '^^^"'■«^- ^--'»--*^' Math- 

Inequalities; continued fractions; summation of series; difference eaua 
tions; theory of numbers; diophantine equations. ( v^y, )" 

^^Math. 143 f. Advanced Calculus (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 

General methods of integration; multiple integration with physical annli 
caaons; partial differentiation; geometrical and physicalTpbVaS- mean' 
value theorem; Jacobians; envelopes. (Not given fn 1940 410 (Stt? 

uTftlts IqufvSt!"' '^'''''"" ^''-''^° ^^'=^"-- ^--^"=^^t«. '^ath- 

apSon'^1f'h?dr"r ^"^^^'^^'^/ «--'« theorem; equation of continuity; 
applications to hydrodynamics. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Titt ) 

Prteq'uisltt Math^tsT """^ ^"''''" ^"""'^''^ ^'^"'^"'^ ^^*=*"-- 

cha"rrteSTal.ew"'*''' ''T'"' ^'^^'^^^ °^ '^""''^ ^^^^^O"^: PlA-^ker 

matrons! "''^^''' ''''"' ^""^ ^"^'"*= '=""^^' C'«'"»''* t^ansfor- 

' (van Stockum.) 

M.'S.'l.r? o'; ^J^' "-"""" <«-^» '""■'»■ ■>«-^"'*. 

Math. 151 f. Theory of Equations (2)— Two leotnrpc p. 
Math. 23 y or its equivalent. lectures. Prerequisite, 

third"2rfouT^T' """'^^r'".'"' *^'°^^'" "^ a'^^hra; equations of the 

(Lancaster.) 
Math. 152 s. Introduction to Modem Algebra (9-\ t,„ i . 
requisite, Math. 151 f or its equivalent <2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

Vectors; matrices; linear dependence; quadratic forms; infinite groups. 

ivr fu iro r A (Lancaster.) 

^^itXi.. 2iT"t'"*':r.' ^""■^ '^>-^" '«'"- p- 

nrnnemal tatograUon; ordinary dillStS ™^ ? ' ■ S'"" '" "«■'•*■ 
partial differential eqUtions. ™'""'"" '""•"»"» » tl>'M variable., 

(Titt ) 

i.ff*^ ^.^^ '• .^""P'"^ ^" Analysis (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite M^th 
153 f or Its equivalent. ^^^erequisite, Math. 

Theory of vibrations; Fourier series; calculus of variations- entronv 
improper integrals. ^-^latiunb, entropy, 

(Titt.) 
340 



Math. 155 f. Introduction to Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

The theorems of Desargues and Pappus; cross-ratio and homography; 
projective theory of conies; projective interpretation and generalization of 
elementary geometry. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 156 s. Introduction to Differential Geometry (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; transformations; orthogonal 
trajectories; envelopes; roulettes and glissettes; curvilinear coordinates in 
the plane. (Not given in 1940-41.) (van Stockum.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 220 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f and 144 s, or their equivalent. 

Complex numbers, power series, integration of analytic functions, Cauchy 
integral formula, Cauchy theory of analytic functions; special analytic 
functions. (Weyl.) 

Math. 221 s. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Two 

lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 220 f or its equivalent. 

Meromorphic functions, Weierstrass theory of analytic functions, analytic 
continuation and Riemann surfaces, conformal representation. (Weyl.) 

Math. 222 f. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Math. 143 f and 144 s, or their equivalent. 

Real numbers, continuous functions, differentiable functions, uniform con- 
vergence, implicit functions, Jacobians, the Riemann integral, infinite series, 
dominant functions, real analytic functions. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Martin.) 

Math. 224 s. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 222 f or its equivalent. 

Point sets, Heine-Borel theorem, content and measure of point sets, the 
Lebesque integral. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Martin.) 

Math. 225 f. Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
155 f or its equivalent. 

Axiomatic development of geometry; fundamental theorems; projective 
equivalence; the group of collineations in the plane and in space; non- 
Euclidean geometries. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 226 s. Diflferential Geometry (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 156 s or its equivalent. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves; kinematical applications; geom- 
etry on a surface; general theory of surfaces; curvature and space struc- 
ture; Riemannian geometries. (van Stockum.) 

341 



Math. 227 s. Infinite Processes (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
222 f or its equivalent. 

Convergence of infinite series and products; Fourier series; orthogonal 
functions, asymptotic series. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 231 s. Partial Diflferential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f, 144 s, and 
153 f or their equivalent. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Titt.) 

Math. 232 s. Theory of Probabilities and Least Squares (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Math. 23 y. 

Frequency and probability; the concept of **equally likely"; combinatorial 
analysis; addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of distribution; 
continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, to theories of errors 
and correlations, and to molecular theories. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Titt.) 

Math. 235 s. Modern Algebra (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
152 s or its equivalent. 

Sets; classes; groups; isomorphism; rings; fields; Galois theory; ordered 
and well-ordered sets; ideals; linear algebras. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Weyl.) 
Math. 240 y. Graduate Colloquium. 

A forum for the presentation and critical discussion of mathematical 
research conducted by the faculty and advanced students. (Staff.) 

Math. 250 y. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y or its equivalent. 

Celebrated Problems of Mathematics from antiquity to our own days. 
History of individual mathematical disciplines such as the theory of num- 
bers, non-Euclidean geometry, vector and matrix analysis, theory of func- 
tions, theory of groups, theory of aggregates. Special emphasis will be 
laid on the evolution of mathematical concepts and principles. (Dantzig.) 



SELECTED TOPICS COURSES 

In addition to the preceding, a number of courses will be offered from 
time to time by the various members of the staff in their respective fields 
of specialization. These courses are intended primarily for candidates for 
an advanced degree, and aim at developing materials for dissertations; they 
will, however, be open to any qualified student. 



Math. 242. 



Selected Topics in Modem Geometry. 

(Dantzig, van Stockum.) 

342 



Math. 243. Selected Topics in Modern Analysis. . w i ^ 

(Martin, Lancaster, Weyl.) 

Math. 244. Selected Topics in Dynamics. (Martm.) 

Math. 245. Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics 

(van Stockum, Titt.) 

Math. 246. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (Dantzig, Alrich.) 

Math. 247. Selected Topics in Differential and Difference Equations. 

( xjancast/d . / 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

PROFESSOR OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS, LIEUTENANT COLONEL FiNIXY; 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS, MAJOR JONES, MAJOR WYSOR, MAJOR WESTFALL, 

MAJOR Griswold, Major Ellis; Sergeant Mars, Sergeant Norris, 

Sergeant Uhrinak 

tBasic Course 

M. I. 1 y. Basic R. O. T. C. (2)-0ne lecture; two drill periods. Fresh- 
man year. . 

First Semester: National Defense Act, including 'basic «^g^\f '^" ^^ 
the R. 0. T. C; military courtesy; command and leadership; rifle marks- 
manship. . .» M-i V 

Second Semester: Command and leadership; automatic rifle; military his- 
to? and policy; military hygiene and first aid; citizenship; military organ- 
ization. 

M. I. 2 y. Basic R. O. T. C. (4)-0ne lecture; two drill periods. Sopho- 
more year. 

First Semester: Scouting and patrolling; musketry; military history; 

command and leadership. 

Second Semester: Military history; combat principles of the squad; com- 
mand and leadership; map reading. 

JtAdvanced Course 

M. 1. 101 y. Advanced R. O. T. C. (6)— Three lectures; two drill periods. 
Junior year. 

First Semester: Aerial photograph reading; machine guns; heavy 
weapons; combat principles; command and leadership; admmistration. 

Second Semester: Combat principles of rifle, machine gun, and weapons 
platoons; pistol marksmanship; review of rifle marksmanship; command 
and leadership. 



IRequired of qualified students. ..»..* 

ttElective for qualified undergraduates in accordance with contract. 

343 



SelrVllr.'"' ^"""'^ ^' ^^ '"• ""' («>-Th-e lectures; two drill periods. 

First Semester: Combat principles (including organization of larger com- 
bat umts); command and leadership; weapons (tanks). 

Second Semester: Company Administration; military history and policv 
^^ents^a^Jser^'^' ^^^^^^ ""'^^ ^^-•^"""- meThanizaXnTchrmSl 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

PROFESSORS ZUCKER, FALLS; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR KRAMER; ASSISTANT 
E^rrS mH' ''^"'' "^''^ '^'"^«'^' ^'^ SOHWEIZER, DR. MILLER MR 

EVANGELIST, Mr. Scoppettone, Mr. Mutziger, Mr. Backenstoss, Mr. bInta. 

AH students whose major is in Modern Languages are reoniro^ +„ t=t„ 
Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature Tcoml Ut Wlf T H 
102s) and they are strongly advised to take the revLw ' cole ("'reS 

sLfvTfVste'Jr? r'^-Z""' '°"""'"^ •'""^^- -^ recommended: 

1) rlnUT 7 ^'^^''^"f^ow (H. ly). Introduction to Philosophy (Phil 

^l' The Old Testament as Literature (Comp. Lit. 104s), Prose an! Poetrv 

Irt' T^'" ^^.«'-..(Eng. 113f and 114s), Romanti^m in France Z 

fn^dTZSTClO^f^ \T^:t '- ^ -•- ^" — Old .nZ 

Specific requirements for the majors in the different languages are as 

follows: French-French 9y. lOy. 15y. and three additional yearSurses L 

Sr rrse" t th e" T^T''' ^™"-«f™- ^O^' ^^y, and three addZnal 

Jit^alTeircouV^ '^' 1^^. -^ three addi- 

A. French 

twoZtVin'^'Fr^lTcrf ''■'' T""^'* (6)-Three lectures. Students who offer 
two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not adenn«tP 
for second-year French, receive half credit for this course ^ 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

the^grat of A „^';".«"t"y Conversation (l)-One lecture. Prerequisite, 

nterested In FreLh H Arst semester of French 1 y. Students who are 

interested in French, and who have done well in the first semester of the 

Study of grammar continued; composition: conver^afmn. fr-o i 4.- 
narrative and technical prose. In the^rganiUt^ oT ra^'ef c^^^^^^^ 
tions are set aside for the reading of scientific French texts 

344 



French 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particularly 
for students who enter with three or more units in French, who expect to 
do advanced work in the French language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take French 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as French 6 y, 7 y, 8 y, 15 y. 

French 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 3 y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in French literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of French 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of French 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation, based on material dealing with French 
history, art, and music. 

French 6 y. The Development of the French Novel (6) — Three lectures. 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French litera- 
ture; of the lives, works, and influences of important novelists. Reports. 
(Not given in 1940-41.) 

French 7 y. The Development of the French Drama (6) — Three lectures. 

Introductory .study of the French drama of the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
and nineteenth centuries. Translation and collateral reading. Reports. (Not 
given in 1940-41.) 

French 8 y. The Development of the Short Story in French (6) — Three 
lectures. 

A study of the short story in French literature; reading and translation 
of representative examples. 

French 9 y. French Phonetics (2) — One lecture. Prerequisite, French 1 y. 

French 10 y. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (6) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, French 3 y. 

(French 9 y and 10 y are required of students preparing to teach French.) 

French 15 y. Introduction to French Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, French 3 y. 

An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in French literature. This course is given in French. 

French 99 f. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (1) — One 

lecture. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French litera- 
ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
means of a brief survey of the entire field. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A more intensive survey of modem French literature is offered by means 
of rotating courses roughly divided by centuries. 



French 102 y. 



French Literature of the 17th Century (4) — Two lectures. 

(Wilcox.) 

345 



iZVLZ'mZT '"^^^""^ "' ''^ '''' ^-'"^ <^>-^o lectures. 

(Falls ) 

Jr:LntJ'J^r^ '"-»'-- «' "•« ^^'^ Centur, (4)-Two lectures. 

(Wilcox ) 
French 105 y. French Literature of the 20th Century (4)_Two lecture. 

i:' u ^.^ (Falls.) 

sit! French lo'^; TWr"' ^"'"P"^''-" (6)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
French "^^ ^ ' '°"'"'" '" '^''"''■^^ "^ ^^"dents preparing to teach 

f'rt^e""" •' ''" *^''"^' *° Comparative Literature 105 f, Romannl^Tl 

For Graduates 
French 201. Re^arch (2.4)-Credits determined by work accomplished. 

1? I. nnn (Staff.) 

givenTn'mO-'mL;''"' '"' '"^ Encyclopaedists (4)-Two lectures. (Not 
^^^Fre^h 204 y. Georges Duhame,. Poet. Dramatist, Novelist (4;-T:o 

(Falls ) 
(4f-:To'?ect'ures^'^''''' ""'''^'"- "^ '"^ ^^«'«"*^ ^ges and the Renaissan. 

teemrcenfur/'cl"!;- /'^ T'"" '"''''' '" '"^^ ^^^ ««'f "^ ^^e nI^! 
leentn century (2. 2)-Two lectures. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Falls ) 

P, , „^^ (Falls.) 

I^rench 210 y. Seminar (2.4)-One meeting weekly Rennirpd f i. 
graduate students in French weekly. Kequired of all 

i;^ u o.« ' (Staff.) 

French 212 s. Introduction to Old French (2)-Two lectures. 

French 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2)--0ne conference. ^'''''''*^ 
Designed to give graduate students the backeronnH nf ^ 

(Falls.) 
B. German 
German 1 y. Elementary German (6)--Three lecturer ^fn^.^f i. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation 

J™oV4 o^bT'^ f^r"'"'" ^'^-^"^ ^^^^^-- ^-requisite, 
tne grade of A or B m the first semester of German 1 y. Students who 

346 



are interested in German, and who have done well in the first semester 
of the elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with 
the second semester of German 1 y. 

German 3 y. Second- Year German (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
German 1 y or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review, and oral 
and written practice. In the organization of classes, certain sections are 
set aside for the reading of scientific German texts. 

German 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particularly 
for students who enter with three or more units in German and who expect 
to do advanced work in the German language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take German 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as German 6 f or 8 f . 

German 5 s. Intermediate CJonversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 3 y. Students 
who expect to take advanced work in German literature, and who have 
completed the first semester of German 3 y with the grade of A or B, should 
take this course in conjunction with the second semester of German 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; based on material dealing with 
German history, art, and music. 

German 6 f, 7 s. Advanced Grcrman (3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, German 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent Grerman literature. 
(Not given in 1940-41.) 

German 8 f, 9 s. Advanced German (3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, German 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. (Not given in 
1940-41.) 

German 10 y. German Grammar and Composition (4)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of Grerman grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. This course is required of students 
preparing to teach German. 

German 15 y. Introduction to Grerman Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature; a study of 
representative authors and works. 

German 99 f. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1) — 

One lecture. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of German litera- 
ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
means of a brief survey of the entire field. 

347 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101 f, 102 s. German Literature of the 18th Century (3, 3)^ 
Three lectures. j \ * j 

First semester, the earlier classical literature. 

Second semester, the later classical literature. (Prahl.) 

German 103 f, 104 s. German Literature of the 19th Century (3. 3)— 
Three lectures. ^ \ » y 

First semester, Romanticism and Young Germany 

Second semester, the Literature of the Empire. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Prahl.) 
lecti!™^'' ^^^ ^' ^^^ ^' Contemporary German Literature (3, 3)— Three 

A study of the lives, works, and influence of outstanding authors of the 
present. ,p , 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 106s, RomantiJsm in 
Gerrmny, and Comparative Literature 107f, The Faust Legend in English 
ana German Literature. 

For Graduates 
German 201. Research (2-4)_Credits determined by work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 
German 202 y. The Modem German Drama (4)-Two lectures, 
fhf K V *^^"^t"'^f''«t'<=' necromantic, and expressionistic drama against 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. (Prahl.) 

German 203 y. Schiller (4)— Two lectures. 

Study of the life and works of Schiller, with emphasis on the history 
of his dramas. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Prahl ) 

^German 204 f. Goethe's Faust (2)-Two lectures. (Not given in 1940- 

(Zucker.) 

•^'"'"'la^ilf f; . ^"^""^'^ '^'''^^ ^"'^•'•*' "f Faust (2)-Two lectures. (Not 
given m 1940-41.) ^^ucker.) 

German 206 y. The Romantic Movement (4)— Two lectures. 

(Prahl.) 
German 210 y. Seminar (2-4)— Two meetings weekly 
Subject for 1940-41: Lessing. Required of all graduate students in 
^^™*"- (Staff.) 

German 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2)_0ne conference 
Designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of German 
literature. Extensive outside reading with reports and connecting lectures. 

(Prahl.) 

lectu™*"* ^^" ^' ^"*'""'^"*""» *" Indo-European Linguistics (3)-Three 

(Mutziger.) 
German 231 s. Middle High German (3)-Three lectures. (Mutziger.) 

S48 



C. Italian 

Italian 1 y. Elementary Italian (6) — Three lectures. Open to freshmen. 
Also recommended for advanced students in French and Spanish. 

Drill in pronunciation and in the elements of the language. Reading of 
short stories from modern authors. 

Italian 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, the 
grade of A or B in the first semester of Italian 1 y. Students who are 
interested in Italian, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of Italian 1 y. 

D. Spanish 

Spanish 1 y. Elementary Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

Spanish 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 1 y. Students who 
are interested in Spanish, and who have done well in the first semester of 
the elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with 
the second semester of Spanish 1 y. 

Spanish 3 y. Second- Year Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 1 y or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative works and plays; grammar review; oral and 
written practice. 

Spanish 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who 
expect to do advanced work in the Spanish language or literature, but who 
are not prepared to take Spanish 6 y. Properly qualified students may 
elect this course at the same time as Spanish 15 y. 

Spanish 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 3 y. Students 
who expect to take advanced work in Spanish literature, and who have 
completed the first semester of Spanish 3 y with the grade of A or B, 
should take this course in conjunction with the second semester of 
Spanish 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; based on material dealing with 
Spanish history, art, and music. 

Spanish 6 y. Advanced Composition and Conversation (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 3 y or equivalent. 

Introduction to phonetics; oral and written composition. This course is 
required of students preparing to teach Spanish. 

349 



Spanish 15 y. Introduction to Spanish Literature (6)— Three lectures. 
An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in Spanish literature. 

Spanish 99 f. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature CD- 
One lecture. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of Span' 
literature, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majV 
by means of a brief survey of the entire field. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 103 f, 104 s. The Spanish Drama (3, 3)-Three lectures. 

First semester, the drama of the Golden Age. 

Second semester, the drama since Calderon. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Darby.) 
Spanish 105 y. Cervantes (6)— Three lectures. 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. (Not ffiven in 
1940-41.) fL 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 107 f, 108 s. The Spanish Novel (3, 3)-Three lectures. 

First semester, classic novels and short stories of the Golden Age and 
of the eighteenth century. 

Second semester, a study of the development of the modem novel. 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 151 f. La tin -American Literature: The Colonial Period (3)— 

Three lectures. /ta / ^ 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 152 s. Latin- American Literature: The Modern Period (3)— 

Three lectures. /T^ i. x 

(Darby.) 

For Graduates 
Spanish 201. Research (2-4)-Credits determined by work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

Spanish 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6)— Three 
lectures. 

Detailed study of the classical authors. (Not given in 1940-1941.) 

(Darby.) 
Spanish 203 f, 204 s. Spanish Poetry (3, 3)-Three lectures. 

First semester, the epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early Ivrics 
poetry of the Golden Age. 

Second semester, poetry of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth 

centuries. ,tx t x 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 210 y. Seminar (2-4)— One meeting weekly. Required of all 
graduate students in Spanish. (Darbv ) 

350 



Spanish 212 f. Introduction to Old Spanish (2) — Two lectures. 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2) — One conference. 

-designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of Span- 
literature. Extensive outside reading with reports and connection 
iotures. (Darby.) 



MUSIC 

Mr. Randall, Mrs. Gavin. 

Music 1 y. Music Appreciation (2) — One lecture. 

A study of all types of classical music with a view to developing the 
ability to listen and enjoy. Lecture recitals will be presented with the aid 
of performers and records. A study of the orchestra and the instruments 
that it employs. A study of musical form. The development of the opera 
and oratorio. Great singers of the past and present. Well-known musicians 
occasionally appear as guest lecturers and performers. 

Music 2 y. History of Music (2) — One lecture. 

A comprehensive course in the history of music covering the development 
of all forms of music from ancient times through the renaissance ; the classic 
and the romantic schools; and the more modem composers. 

Music 3 y. Chorus (1). 

This course is offered for those interested in part-singing. After voice 
trials, students who have ability to read and sing music of the grade of 
easy songs are admitted. Members of the Women's Chorus and the Men's 
Glee Club indicated hereafter are combined at times for mixed chorus 
singing. 

(A) Women*s Cfwrus. Study of part-singing for women's voices. Credit 
is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public performances of the chorus. 

(B) Men's Glee Club, Study of part-singing for men's voices. Credit is 
awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and par- 
ticipation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4 y. Orchestra (1). 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of the standard symphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 
modern composers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments are 
eligible for membership. At least one rehearsal of two hours* duration is 
held each week, and all players are expected to take part in public per- 
formances. 

351 



Music 5 y. Harmony (4) — Two lectures. 

This course includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, hai 
monic progressions, primary and secondary triads in root position ani 
first and second inversions, the dominant seventh chord in its root position' 
and inversions, altered and mixed chords and modulation. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basis for ear training, 
dictation, melody writing, and melody harmonization. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marti. 

Phil. 1 f. Introduction to Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. Not open 
to freshmen. 

A study of Greek and Roman thought and its connection with present ways 
of thinking. This course or Phil. 2 s may be chosen in fulfillment of the 
philosophy requirement. 

Phil. 2 s. Introduction to Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. Not open 
to freshmen. 

A study of the development of modem thought since the Renaissance. 
This course or Phil. 1 f may be chosen in fulfillment of the philosophy 
requirement. 

Phil. 11 s. Modern European Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or 2 s. Alternates with Phil. 12 s. (Not 
given in 1940-41.) 

Phil. 12 s. American Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 

1 f or 2 s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or 2 s. Alternates with Phil. 11 s. 

Phil. 21 f. Aesthetics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or 

2 s, and prerequisite or, by special permission, corequisite, a course in Art, 
Music 1 y or 2 y or a 100 course in literature. 

An historical and systematic introduction to the philosophy of art. Alter- 
nates with Phil. 22 f and 23 f. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

Phil. 22 f. Logic (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s, and 
satisfactory preparation in mathematics or science. 

An introductory course, designed especially for science majors. Alter- 
nates with Phil. 21 f and 23 f. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

Phil. 23 f. Ethics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. 

A study of the implications of problems of the good life. Alternates 
with Phil. 21 f and 22 f . 

352 



Phil 31 f. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 

cussed in ciasb. xue i."f ^ j- . „„:„ aff^r tVirpe or four semesters, 

although the same work may be studied again, ^^er three 
S more than two credits allowed to any one student. 

PhU. 32 s. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. 

requisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. (Not given m 1940-41.) 

'pMl. 34 s. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One ^"^ "^ '-^^-^^ ^'' 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
r>y.i ifti f Systems of Philosophy (3)-Three hours of lectures, stu- 
dent tepoi.and'dtcuLion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, and 
the permission of the professor. development of one movement. 

The system of one P^' -^f ^^^^^^^f Thr opHiU be changed, from 
will be studied throughout the semester ine P ^^^ ^^^^ 

semester to semester, although, after three or lour ^^^^,^ 

svstem may be chosen again. +„Jonf ' 

r nui „„!,„ <^^^_Three hours of lectures, student 

permission of the professor. (Marti.) 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. 

permission of the professor. _ -.o.n 4i ^ (Marti.) 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Not given in 1940-41.) v 

permission of the prof essor. . myin 11 ^ (Marti.) 

Similar to Phil. 101 f . (Not given m 1940-41.) 

PHYSICS 
PHOPESSoa E,C„U», DH. mcKmsON. DR. MVBKS, MR. SMITH. Mh. K^^NR. 

magnetism, and electricity. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

353 



che„.istry, mitE:S;L 'p^sT Ss T^^^^^^^^^^ f 1 *«^^ -"" 
Pr^^e.u.Ues. Math. . , 22 ran?2rrT.e"T.\rjSr^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

LatorSS tTof pi sr.tr'' '^'*' '"^^"^"^'"' ^"'^ «'-*^^<=">-- 
Phys. 3 y. Elementary Physics (6)-Three lectures. 

des^ ;%;"teS;7aeruSed' XT ? T' '""^ "^^^^ ''^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^o 
Instruction wTL glen bTielt^res:^^^^^^^ ^"""P'^^ ''^ P^^-^^- 

strations. Laboratory Tee%T;:;'sZe£r' ^"' ^^-^'^^•"-*^' <^--»- 

Tstudv of 'tV' r''"'"f^"P''y <2, 2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. 

application of photographic n,etU in thTlXrafor^ P er^SeX' 
1 y or 2 y. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. '^requisite, Phys. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

sitel"'phir2^ P^'^'"" of Measurements (3)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
siies, I'hys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y ^ciequi 

dafa,tT;Tecfsi:n^rS^L""'^^'^'^^ *'-^ '^^^^'"^"^ "^ -P^-"^^' 
etc.,Vith especi^ emphLt^n r- 7°"' ">*«'T<>1^«0". <="rve analysis, 

mea'surements. ?he TurTis Leted """"^ -1 'r'^^-*-- --Iving 

experimental work ^' ""^ introduction to quantitative 

PI, ,„„ (Eichlin.) 

PreisftlW^s' ml.'''"""'"'"'^ ^'^-'"^^ '-*--: o- 'aboratory. 

stu™VwTL7a'n3al"^f '" '"'/' ^^ ''''^'' *° ^«-"-"- ^^e 
mentation in phylcarnrobtZ 711 ^^^^^ "^ "PP^'""*"^ "«^*» ^» ^-P^i- 

30 obtained. ^SorTfer 5.oS.' ^'^ ^'^^*^^^"" ^"'^ ^^'^^^^^^^f.^^t 

r»u ^/.« (Eichlin.) 

^ Phys. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6)_Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. 

nh^r""""^' ""PPl«'"«°«"8f Phys. 1 y, is an advanced study of physical 
phenonienam optics, spectroscopy, conduction of electricity through JaJ^s 

some of the recent developmentsTn physics " ' ^^"^'■^' ^"7/Jj^J 

PrrrtuisTe, Phyt'loT;.' ^'""'"'"'' '''-''"^ '^'=*"^^' ^^ '^"^t-- 

This course, supplementing Phys 1 v is intpnHpH f^ • i .. 

with experience in experimental' ph'^s s llto^^^^^^^ 'll ot'^^' 

semester. (Not given in 1940-41 ) ^ooratory tee, $5.00 per 

(Myers.) 
354 



Phys. 105 f. Heat (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

The classical phenomena of heat and radiation are developed on the basis 
of the kinetic molecular theory • and the quantum theory. The first and 
second laws of thermodynamics are applied to physical processes. Labora- 
tory fee, $5. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Myers.) 

Phys. 106 s. Theoretical Mechanics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

An analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented with problems to illustrate these principles. The 
use of generalized coordinates is illustrated. The equations of Lagrange 
are applied to selected topics in the field of dynamics. (Not given in 
1940-41.) (Myers.) 

Phys. 107 s. Optics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, interfer- 
ence, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed 
in a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectroscope, 
and interferometer. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 108 y. Electricity (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

A study of electrical properties of matter and space with applications 
to common electrical instruments and apparatus. Laboratory fee, $5.00 
per semester. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 109 y. Electron Physics (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics, and atomic structure. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. (Myers.) 

Phys. 110 f. Sound (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

A study is made of vibrating systems, the propagation and scattering of 
sound waves, standing sound waves, sound wave energy, etc. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Myers.) 

Phys. Ill f, 112 s. Mathematical Physics (3, 3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 2 y or 1 y and Math. 23 y. 

Selected topics in physics will be treated to illustrate certain mathe- 
matical methods, particularly the use of derivatives and differentials, 

355 



Pnys. 113 f, 114 s. Properties of Mattpr rq Q^ -m, i ^ 
reauisitp Phirc 9 ,r i 1 ,^ inauer (d, 3)— Three lectures. Prp 

requisite, rJiys. 2 y or 1 y and Math 23 y 

nuias at rest and m motion, wave propagation. 

Pl,^ itrr 4. ^^ (Eichlin.) 

i-nys. 115 f, 116 s. High Frequency Phenomena r^ q^ T,.r^ i * 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Phys '2 y or 1 yZTulki^y'"' '"*""'' ""^ 

frequeTcf gelr^trs' filtef'f V ^^^'•-*^"^«- "^ electron tubes, high 
in wire/r^ r I ' ^'«<=t'-«n'agnetic waves, propagation of waves 

' (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 117 y. Applied Mechanics (4)-Two lectures Pr».o , • •. t,u 

r: H^'t-f ^- ^^^"'^^^ °^ ^""^'- in ci:SaTengErrr"' '^' 
of botes'in trtn'sSra^^^^^^^^^^^^ Principles of the kinetics and kinematics 

regard to th'rSrrfnVa^^^^^^^^^^ '' ''''''''^ "' -"^^' ^f.-^^^' 

(Jiiichlin.) 

For Graduates 
Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3)— Three lectures. 
A development of atomic theorv bv a d\<^rM^<^nr. ..f ^i, 

(Myers ) 
Phys. 202 f. 203 s. Spectra I and II (3, 3 )-Three lectures 

structure TnP^'^nf^'-r'"*''^f*^""" ^^ '^^'''^^ «^"««. «»« «nd hyperfine 

:sri ^zrif'i^'^'^r-' - e.^ei of 

specific heats, entropy, and related phenomena. (Not Svent 1940 41 ) 

(Myers ) 
Phys. 204 f, 205 s. Quantum Mechanics (3, 3)-Three lectures 

tion.^trJr^'Jt ""^ ^^^^""^'^^ "^^thods of quantum mechanics with applica- 

rproces'ses I^Vthe^^^^^^ •'"' T'^'^' ^^^"^^"^^' ^^^ ^^-^^ o'^oZ 
sion processes, and the theories of radiation and electrodynamics. 

(Myers.) 
Phys. 206 s. Nuclear Structure (3)_Three lectures. 
The theory of the nucleus is developed bv a di^rn«=«i«r, ^^ 

magnetic moments, radioactivity, nucLa/ reac S scatf ""'^""""' f"'^"'' 
action with radiation fields. reactions, scattenng, and inter- 

( Myers.) 

356 



Phys. 207 f, 208 s. Modem Physics (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

A comprehensive survey of developments in physics leading to recent 
concepts of atomic structure, theory of radiation, interaction of radiation 
and matter, quantum theory, relativistic mechanics, cosmology. 

(Dickinson.) 

Phys. 209 f, 210 s. Dynamics I and II (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

I. A treatment of dynamical systems in generalized coordinates by the 
equations of Lagrange, of Hamilton, and of Hamilton-Jacobi, by the 
Hamiltonian Principle, and by the use of canonical transformations. 

II. Derivation of the equations of motion of a fluid, a study of irrota- 
tional motion, vortex motion, motion of solids through liquids, waves 
through liquids, viscosity. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Myers.) 

Phys. 211 f. Electrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. 

The electric and magnetic fields; properties of dielectrics; properties of 
electric conductors; electromagnetic induction; electromagnetic radiation; 
dispersion theory; electro- and magneto-optics. (Not given in 1940-41.) 

(Dickinson.) 

Phys. 212 s. Physical Optics (3)— Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light, with appli- 
cations to interference, diffraction, dispersion, and polarization. (Not given 
in 1940-41.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 213 f, 214 s. Theory of Elasticity (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

A comprehensive discussion of the development of theoretical concepts of 
elasticity with particular attention to torsion, stresses in beams, curved 
bars, thin plates, stresses produced by dynamical causes, propagation of 
waves in solid media. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 215 f, 216 s. X-Ray and Crystal Structure (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

A discussion of the production and measurement of X-rays with the appli- 
cation of X-ray methods to the study of the physical properties of crystals. 
(Not given in 1940-41.) ( .) 

Phys. 217 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of reports and discussion of current developments in physics 
and of original investigations on special problems. (Staff.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Howard; Associate Professor Steinmeyer; Assistant 
Profeissor Bone; Dr. Kline, Mr. Walther. 

Pol. Sci. 1 f and s. American National Government (3) — Three lectures. 
Open to freshmen. 

A study of the organization and functions of the national government of 
the United States. 

357 



Prlr 'JS;e%'oL t,%. ''''•^ ""'' "^^^ «"-"••»-' C3)-Three lectures. 

metttl^LtdXttuhtl 'r"T "' ^*^*^ ^"^ '-^^ ^o--- 
Maryland. ' * "P^"*' emphasis upon the government of 

req'lriitt Pd'scVi. "^""P^'^''^^ Government (2, 2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

Frl^Tce. rndlS^XT""^^ ^*"'^ ^' *^« ^°^^~*« '>^ Great Britain. 

E^rwr;r;ie=eoV;^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 102 s. International Law rii ti,^=„ i 4. x. 

Pol. Sci. 1. (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

p , G . F^iitn^a. (Steinmeyer.) 

requTs'it? Porsci l'''""""' *^ Y"'"'* ^"""'^ (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, rol. faci. 1 or consent of instructor 

actS'sur?/'^'' ""f governmental problems of an international char- 
ts are renuirrd T ""; ^'""''^'"^ '' "^"*^^"*y' propaganda, etc Stu- 
dents are required to report on readings from current literatur^. 

p , (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. Ill f. Principles of Public Administration ^3) Thro. 1. . 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 or consent of instructor ^^^-^^ree lectures. 

A functional study of public administration in the United St«f« -.t, 

special emphasis upon organization and the relation of S" • ! !'• ^'^^ 

the other branches of government relation of administration to 

p . o . ,,„ „ * (Howard.) 

roi. feci. 112 s. Public Personnel Administratinn r'»^ tu 

Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. Ill f or consent ofrstructor ^^~^"'' '''=*"'"^" 

(Howard.) 
358 



Pol. Sci. 113 f. Municipal Government and Administration (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A detailed study of selected problems of municipal government, such as 
housing, health, zoning, fire and police, recreation and planning. Course 
includes a visit to Baltimore to observe the agencies of city government 
at work. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 117 f, 118 s. Government at Work (3, 3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Pol. Sci. 1 and consent of instructor. 

This course consists of visits to various administrative agencies of the 
national government, supplemented by reading assignments on the work 
of the agencies visited. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 121 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A descriptive and critical examination of the party process in govern- 
ment: nominations and elections, party expenditures, political leadership, 
the management and conditioning of public opinion. (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 123 f. Government and Business (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A general survey of governmental activities affecting business, with 
special emphasis upon recent developments; federal and state assistance 
to and regulation of business in their historical and legal aspects; gov- 
ernment ownership and operation. (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci, 124 s. Legislatures and Legislation (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A comprehensive study of the legislative process, bicameralism, the com- 
mittee system and the lobby, with special emphasis upon the legislature of 
Maryland. The course includes a visit to Washington to observe Congress 
at work. (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 131 f. Constitutional Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American consti- 
tutional system, with special reference to the role of the judiciary in the 
interpretation and enforcement of the Constitution, the position of the 
states in the federal system, state and federal powers over interstate and 
foreign commerce, and the rights of citizens and of accused persons. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 134 s. Administrative Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the principles involved in the expansion of the discretion of 
administrative boards and commissions, including an analysis of their func- 
tions, their powers over private rights, their procedure in making findings, 
the enforcement of their rules and orders and judicial control of their 
actions. (Kline.) 

359 



\ 



Pol. Sci. 136 s. Elements of Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1. 

Development of law and legal systems; comparison of methods and pro- 
cedure in making and enforcing law in Roman and common law systems; 
consideration of fundamental legal concepts; contribution and influence of 
modern schools of legal philosophy in relation to law and government. 

(Walther.) 

Pol. Sci. 138 s. Law Enforcement (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A survey of the organization and operation of the agencies involved in 
the administration of criminal justice, with special reference to the organ- 
ization and methods of police departments, problems of organized crime 
and its suppression, the role of the prosecutor and the courts, and the 
interrelations between these agencies. (Not given in 1940-41.) (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 141 f. History of Political Theory (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1 or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. (Walther.) 

Pol. Sci. 142 s. Recent Political Theory (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 1 or consent of instructor. 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories of 
democracy, socialism, communism, fascism, etc. (Walther.) 

For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201 f. Seminar in International Organization (2), 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organiza- 
tions. Special attention is given to the work of the World Court. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 202 s. British Empire (3). 

A study of the constitutional development of the British Dominions, with 
particular attention to the present inter-imperial relationship. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 205 y. Seminar in American Imperialism (4). 

Individual reports on selected topics, with special reference to the causes 
and methods of recent American imperialistic policy. (Not offered in 1940- 
41.) (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 211 f. Federal-State Relations (3). 

A study of the American federal system as affected by recent develop- 
ments in such fields as agriculture, education, social security, public works, 
transportation, etc. (Howard.) 

360 



Pol Sci. 214 s. Problems in Public Administration (2). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of^nat.onal 
and state administration. 
Pol Sci. 216 s. Problems of Government in Metropolitan Regions (2). 

Lllvsis of some metropolitan areas and some of the most pressing 

Analysis ot some m r p . , ^f ^^^^e populations spread over a 

problems arising out^o the e^s^^^^^^^^^^ J.P _^^^^^^ .^^^^^^^^ 

^l^LTdlLmtieTtl^orwith the problems involved; discussion ^of^pos- 

sible solutions. 

T>«1 ^i 221 f Seminar in Public Opinion (2). , , ^ ut 

KepoS'on topics assigned for individual research in the field of^ public 

opinion. . , n rr» i 

Pol Sci. 222 s. Psych. 280 s. Analysis of Propaganda (3)-Two lec- 
tnrVs'and one discussion. Prerequisite, consent of instructors 

ALlytlcaTapproach to modern propaganda, including study of organiza- 
tions whS employ propaganda, of techniques in actual use m disseminat- 
ng propaganS and of attempts at measuring the effects of Propag-da 
ReUnsMity for instruction is shared by the department of Poh .a 
Science and the Department of Psychology. (Bone, Jenkins.) 

Pol Sci. 2S5 f. Problems in Public Law (2). , ■, f 

due process and equal protection. 

Pol Sci. 251 f. Bibliography of Political Science (2). _ 

T^ ; bourse is intended to acquaint the student with the literature of the 
va^ouVfiXS P^^cal scienc'L and to instruct him in the use of govej.- 
ment documents. ,.4. 

Pol. sci. 261. Research in Political Science (2-4)-Credit according^to 

work accomplished. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

PROFESSORS JULL, BYERLY; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS GWIN, BIRD, QUIGLEY. 

P. H. 1 f. Poultry Production (3)-Two lectures and one two-hour 

'' Thi?a general course designed to acquaint the student with modern 
method of poultry husbandry. Principles of incubation, broodmg, egg 
production m'arketing, and breed improvement are discussed. 

P H 2 s Poultry Management (3)-Two lectures and one laboratory. 
Material' will be presented in this course to acquaint the student with 
mo^Sn methods of feeding, housing, sanitation, and organization neces- 
sary ^ the .profitable operation of a poultry establishment. 

361 



req^uislte P H°?7 y:*^' <l-2)-0ne lecture and one laboratory. P« 
requisites, P. H. 1 f and 2 s or equivalent. "' 

The elementary anatomy of the fowl, selection for esss and m^^t n, 
duction and for breed standards are studied. JudgingSms L Ltr. T 
legiate competitions are selected from members of thfs dasT 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

arfpristiS?"? k' morphological and physiological characters of poultry 

(Staff.) 

p. H. 102 s. Poultry Nutrition (2)-0ne laboratory; one lecture demo„ 
stration and quiz period. Prerequisites, P. H. 1 f and 2 s 

« , (Bird.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107 s. 

P. H. 104 f, 105 s. Poultry Products Marketing Problems (2 2^ T, 

one-hour lecture, demonstration and quiz periods. PrerequSef P '^"Jl 

This course includes material on egg and meat quality commercial ^r«H»<= 
relation of transportation and distrihntmn f„ ""'y. commercial grades, 

marketing, especially as relatS to quality ' ' "' ""''^'r''- ''' 

^' (Gwm.) 

Preservation of Poultry Products, see Bacteriology. P. Tech. 108 s. 
refuiSie "p.'k. m'^ '''"'^'*''"^^ ^^"'^-^^ ^-*"-' »- laboratory. Pre- 
r.Z^L^^^^'f^^lr."^ development and incubation of the embryo especiallv 

sented. Physiology of growth and the influence of environmental' f!i 
on growth and development are considered. (Byerfy') 

P. H. 107 f. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2)-Two lectures 
This course presents the relation of poultry to affricltn-^ „ 
and Its economic importance. Consume? Pre/udlcesTr pXenc:s"pr ' 
duction, transportation, storage, and distribution problems IZT ^ °,' 
Trends in the industry, surpluses and their utilization noultr^K *^'*="^^^'^- 
and disease problems, are presented. "'"'^«*'«»' Poultry by-products, 

(Staff.) 

362 



P. H. 108 s. Commercial Poultry Management (2) — Two one-hour lec- 
ture, discussion, demonstration, and quiz periods weekly. Prerequisites, Ten 
hours of Poultry Husbandry, including 1 f and 2 s. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, purchase 
of supplies, management problems in baby chick, eggy broiler, and turkey 
production, foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, production and 
financial records. Prior to this course the student should have practical 
experience with poultry at home, on a commercial poultry farm, or under 
the supervision of the poultry department. (Quigley.) 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201 s. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, P. H. 101 s or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. 
Linkage, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in de- 
velopment, inheritance of resistance to disease, and the influence of the 
environment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 

(Jull.) 

P. H. 202 f. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, P. H. 102 f or equivalent. 

Deficiency diseases of poultry are considered intensively. Vitamin, min- 
eral, and protein deficiencies are given special consideration. Synthetic 
diets, metabolism, and the physiology of digestion, growth curves and 
their significance, and feed efficiency in growth and egg production are 
studied. (Bird.) 

P. H. 203 s. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3) — One laboratory; 
two lectures. 

The role of the endocrines in reproduction, especially with respect to egg 
production, is considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, molting, 
egg formation, ovulation, deposition of egg envelopes, and the physiology 
of oviposition are studied. (Byerly.) 

P. H. 204 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Reports of current researches by staff members, graduate students, and 
guest speakers are presented. (Staff.) 

P. H. 205 f and s. Poultry Literature (1-4). 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Oral and written reports 
required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are 
taught. . (Staff.) 

P. H. 206. Research in Poultry — Credit in accordance with work done. 

Practical and fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under 
the supervision of staff members toward the requirements for the degrees 
M. S. and Ph. D. (Staff.) 

363 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Jenkins, Sprowls; Associate Professor Bellows; Assistant 

Professor Clark; Dr. Macmillan. 

Psychological Testing Bureau 

The staff of the Department of Psychology maintains a bureau for voca- 
tional and educational guidance on the basis of adequately standardized 
psychological tests. The services of the bureau are available without charge 
to students. 

Psych. 1 f and s. Introduction to Psychology (3) — Two lectures and one 
discussion. Open to sophomores. 

A general introduction to typical problems upon which psychologists 
are at work. Review of experimental investigations of the more funda- 
mental phases of human behavior. 

Psych. 2 f. Applied Psychology I (3) — Two lectures and one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in methods of studying, in vocational orientation, in highway safety, and 
in the professions. 

Psych. 3 s. Applied Psychology II (3) — Two lectures and one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in business and industry, including industrial selection, methods of produc- 
tion, advertising, selling, and market research. 

Psych. 4 f. Psychology for Students of Commerce (3) — Two lectures 
and one discussion. Open only to students in economics or business ad- 
ministration. 

Topics in applied psychology which relate to practical problems in busi- 
ness and industry viewed from the standpoint of controlled observation. 

Psych. 10 f and s. Educational Psychology (3) — Two lectures and one 
discussion. Open to juniors and seniors only. Required of students in 
Education. 

Experimental studies of basic psychological problems encountered in 
education; measurement and significance of individual differences, learning, 
motivation, transfer of training, etc. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Psych. 110 f or s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, 
Psych. 10. 

More advanced treatment of the solution of basic psychological prob- 
lems in education by methods of controlled observation. (Not given in 
1940-41.) (Sprowls.) 

364 



Psych. 120 f. Psychology of Individual Differences (3)-Prerequisite, 

Pqvch. 1 or 10. 

Tk, occurrence nature, and causes of psychological difference, between 
..SLXmSds of measuring these differences, and "■- »J»-- 
in education, business and industry. 

Psych 121 s. Social Psychology (3)-Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Results of researches on behavior in social -^"^^; J^r^ttS 
of the effects of group membership, of the family, and ''"'"^^^^^^^^ 

forces. 

Psych 125 f. Child Psychology (3)-Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or 10. 

FKDerimental analysis of child behavior; motor and intellectual develop- 
nieTemotions, soci'al behavior, parent-child relationships, and proWems 
of the growing personality. 

Psych. 130 £ and s. Mental Hygiene (3)-Two lectures and one clinic. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or 10. . , . j- ^ 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of^jdjust- 

ment. 
Psych. 131 s. Abnormal Psychology (3)-Two lectures and one clinic. 

Prerequisite, Psych. 130. , , ,-. -^v. 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of psychological ahnormal.ty with 
emphasis on the clinical rather than theoretical aspects. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 140 f. Psychological Problems in Market Research (3)-Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 3 s or permission of instructor. 

Use of methods of controlled observation in determining public reactions 
to r^Ltndte and in measuring the psychological influences at^work m 
particular markets. 

Psych. 141 .. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3)-Pre,.,«i.ite, 

S^Lrrat a.t=:. nfe.ory. helief, etc.; probie.s associated «h 
specific advertising media. 

o .. ircn = Psvcholocical Tests and Measurements (3)— Two lectures 
Z"ot S.». JrirS. Prercuisite. Psych. « , or permission o, 

instructor. „v,„,„<,i»ai tests used in vocational orientation and 

in'^iSL'sC^'I^^tCrlrir:; which >- tests are validated, 
Tracuretathe .sc of test, and the interprct.t.on of test data. ^^^^^^^^ 

365 



Psych. 155 s. Psychological Problems in Vocational Orientation (3) — 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150 s or equivalent. 

Experimental development and use of the vocational counseling interview, 
aptitude tests, and related techniques for the occupational orientation of 
youth. (Bellows.) 

Psych. 160 f. Industrial Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or 
permission of instructor. 

Controlled observation applied to psychological problems in industrial 
production, including psychological effects of conditions and methods of 
work. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 161 s. Personnel (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of 
instructor. 

Psychological problems involved in the management of personnel in 
modern business and industry. A consideration of employee selection, 
measures of ability, methods of developing and maintaining personal effi- 
ciency and morale. (Clark.) 

Psych. 162 f. Advanced Personnel Psychology (3) — Lectures and field 
periods. Prerequisite, Psych. 161 f. 

Actual participation in industrial and governmental personnel programs, 
together with periodic discussions of the principles involved. Intended pri- 
marily for students planning to enter personnel administration. (Clark.) 

Psych. 170 f. Legal Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 121 s or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Interpretation of researches pertaining to accuracy of observation ana 
of testimony, psychological aids in determination of guilt, and treatment 
of the oifender. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 190 y. Techniques of Investigation in Psychology (6) — Three 
periods of practice and discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s. 

A consideration of quantitative methods in psychology, the design of 
experiments, and actual practice in various methods of obtaining data and 
in treating these results for interpretation. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 195 f or s. Minor Problems in Psychotechnology (2-3) — Credit 
apportioned to work accomplished. Prerequisite, Major senior standing and 
consent of department head. (May not be offered for credit toward graduate 
degrees.) 

Conduct of original research under the supervision of some member of 
the staff. Satisfactory completion of this project may lead to publication 
in one of the standard psychological journals. (Staff.) 

366 



For Graduates 
rsych. 200. Research in Psychoteclmology (4-6)-Credit apportioned^to 

,-ork accomplished ^^^^,,,,i Psychology (6)-An advanced 

Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Hiducaiionai rsj 

course for teachers and P^^^f ^^^/^^^Ls in educational psychology 
Systematic approach to advanced ProWems m (gprowls.) 

hasS upon specific experimental contributions. ^ 

based upo 1 ^ . . p„,,e„t Psychotechnological Problems (6)- 

Psych. 240 y. Semmar m ^^^ent rsjc^ ^^^^.^ 

Graduate study of the specialized P'-^J^^'^^^^^^ ^n attempt to combine 

the psychologist in -^''^t^uTprttirirde^^^^^ with these research 
systematic theory with actual practice & (Jenkins.) 

problems. (4.6)— Credit apportioned 

Psych. 250 y. Participation in Testmg Om.c ^4 x,) 

to work accomplished. ^ ^^^^s of aptitude, interest, and 

Actual practice m t^e admmistration o ^^ ^^^^.^^ ^^^^. 

achievement and interpretation of test data m tne (Bellows.) 

tion of the testing bureau. . . . , rr^*„ r^->_ 

Psych. 251 s. Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150 s. „,. f^^ the analysis and combination of 

Methods for evaluating criteria and for the an y (Bellows.) 

test and P^^-*-;;^-^; „, p,„p,,anda (3)-Two lectures 

Psyeh. 280 ^Pol. ^'J^J;^^%,Z,,, of instructors. 

and one discussion. ^-J«*l^^ propaganda, including study of organ- 
Analytical approach to modern P^°P ^ J ■ ^^t^al use in dissemina- 

izations which employ propaganda «f t^^^^^f^^i^^ effects of propaganda. 

tion of propaganda, and '>f-"empts at measuring t^^^^^^ ^^ ^ 

Responsibility for instruction ^y^^J^^ ^^ (Bone, Jenkins.) 

Science and the Department of Psychology. 

SOCIOLOGY 

A=«nr./.TE PROFESSOR WiLSON ; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
PKOFKSSOR J«--^^j/jrrC0BI DR. HODGE, MR. WOODWOKTH. 

^^ Sci 1 y introduction to the Social Sciences (6)-Two lectures, one 

Soc. bci. 1 y. "I r^p^h^pn and sophomores only, 
discussion. Open to '^''"'^'l^ 'I i^e student an understanding of the 

The purpose of this ^^'^'^^^'^^".f ^^, ^'eiety and the maladjustments re- 
processes of change '^^'^^^^^ Emphasis will be placed upon an 
suiting from some of these cnang 

367 



analysis of present day social problems: their causes, social implications, 
and suggested approaches to their solution. 

Soc. 1 f and s. Principles of Sociology (3) — Two lectures, one discussion. 
Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 

An analysis of society and the basic social processes; characteristics of 
collective behavior; typical social organizations; the development of person- 
ality; the relation of the individual to the group; social products; social 
interaction; social change. 

Soc. 2 s. Comparative Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, sopho- 
more standing. 

A comparative analysis of primitive and civilized societies; resemblances 
and differences in their social life and cultures; factors underlying these 
resemblances and differences; significance of findings with reference to 
fundamental principles of sociology. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101 f. Social Organization (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. 
Required of all sociology majors. 

A systematic analysis of the forms of organization common to basic social 
institutions; variations of these forms in time and space; classification of 
forms of organization; conditioning factors of organizational forms; appli- 
cation of findings to contemporary problems. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 102 f. Rural Sociology (3) — Two lectures, one discussion. Each 
graduate student will be required to prepare a term paper. 

The structure and functions of rural communities, ancient and modern; 
the evolution of rural culture; rural institutions and their problems; the 
psychology of rural life; composition and characteristics of the rural 
population; relation of rural life to the major social processes; the social 
aspects of rural planning. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 103 s. Rural Community Organization (3) — Two lectures, one dis- 
cussion. Prerequisite, Soc. 102 f. 

An analysis of the rural community and its component social groups; 
ecological foundations of the rural community; determining the boundaries 
of community areas; the structure and functions of special interest groups; 
leadership and followership in community activities. (Dodson.) 

Soc 104 s. Urban Sociology (3) — Two lectures, one discussion. Each 
graduate student will be required to prepare a term paper. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the social ecology of the city; social relationships and group- 
ings in the city; the organization of urban activities; social problems of 
the city; the planning and control of urban development. (Joslyn.) 

368 



Soc. 105 f. Population Problems (3)~Two lectures, one discussion. Pre- 

''Ctlltitr growth in the United States; contemporary trends in fertility 
?mortamy differential fertility and mortality; changes m the compo- 
irToS^ovulMon and their significance; population migration in 

Srn tirs;'S^^^^^ problems of population; theories of popul^^^^^^ 

growth and decline. 
Soc 106 s. B.Bion.1 Sociology (3)-Two lectures, one discassion. Pre- 

T'^S oi A.e™ -ie.yjj,--/^xrj srco-r-it 

^Z. t^fi, of reeions in the United States; problems peculiar to these 
S;nsf met^ropoS rural, cultural, and administrative -g.onahsm;^reg- 
ional planning and development. 

Soc 107 f. Ethnic Minority Groups (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
^or 1 or consent of instructor. 

Theoretical aspects of ethnic group relations; -Uural backgrounds and 
characteristics of immigrant groups in America; ^'^/^^s of ciltural 
concerning minority peoples; relevant social processes; effects of oiUura^^ 
contacts upon personality and social structure. 

Soc. 108 s. The Family (3)-Two lectures, one discussion. Prerequisite, 

'"nlhropological and historical backgrounds; biological economi^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
logical, and sociological bases "f the^^y; the role o^^^^^^^ - P,^ 

sonality development; family and society, family aiso g ^^jj^^n.) 

adjustment and social change. 

Soc. 120 f. Social Pathology (3)-Two lectures, one discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1 or consent of instructor. 

A study of social maladjustments which represent deviations from gen- 
erSlf tcep Lrnonns. Problems to be covered will include: poverty, un- 
:2ymeTfamily disorganization, crime and delinquency, sui.de.^and 
the misuse of leisure time. 

Soc. 121 f. Criminology and Penology (3)-Two lectures, one discussion. 

Prerequisite, Soc. 120 f. , , • ^ ■ i 

The nature and extent and cost of crime; causative factors; historica 
methods of dealing with criminals; apprehension of alleged criminals; penal 
InsSins; othe? means of caring for convicted persons; the pre^^ntion 

of crime. 

Soc. 122 s. Juvenile Delinquency (3)-Two lectures, one discussion. 

Prerequisite, Soc. 121 f. „^;^„. 

The nature of delinquency; the relations between delinquency and crime 
thrdelCent child as a social problem; causative factors m delinquency; 

369 



the juvenile court movement; disposition and treatment of delinquent cases 
as a form of social work; evaluation of contemporary programs of crime 
prevention. (Not offered in 1940-41.) (Wilson.) 

Soc. 123 f. The Sociology of Leisure (3) — Two lectures, one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 120 f or consent of instructor. 

This course deals primarily with the sociological implications of leisure 
time and its uses. Topics to be considered will include: the meaning and 
significance of leisure; the conditioning factors of leisure time and its 
uses; the changing uses of leisure; leisure and personality; theories of play 
and recreation; commercial, public, and voluntary forms of recreation; 
planning of leisure time activities. (Hodge.) 

Soc. 124 s. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Two lectures, one discus- 
sion. Prerequisite, Soc. 120 f . 

The theory of social work; social case work, generic and specific; proce- 
dure and techniques in social case work; principles of social diagnosis; 
present day types of social work; administration of public and private 
welfare agencies. Field trips will be made to representative social agencies. 

(Joslyn.) 

Soc. 130 f. Recent Social Thought (3) — Three discussions. Prerequi- 
sites, Soc. 1 and 101 f. Intended mainly for sociology majors and minors. 

A critical study of the leading schools of sociological thought since 1800. 
(Not offered in 1940-41.) (Wilson.) 

Soc. 150 s. Field Practice in Social Work (2) — Open only to sociology 
majors upon consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available 
opportunities. 

Supervised field work of various types undertaken during the summer 
months and suited to the needs of the individual students. (Joslyn.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 200 f. Seminar in Methodology (3) — Two lectures, one discussion. 
Required of all graduate students in sociology. 

A study of fundamental methodological problems in sociology. Reference 
will be made to the works of Rickert, Windelband, Pareto, Max Weber, W. I. 
Thomas, and others. (Joslyn, Wilson.) 

Soc. 201 y. Systematic Sociology (6) — Two lectures, one discussion. 

A study of the works of the following systematic thinkers in sociology: 
Pareto, Simmel, Vierkandt, Von Wiese, Max Weber, Tonnies, Durkheim, 
Sorokin. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 202 s. Comparative Sociology (3) — ^Two lectures, one discussion. 

An intensive study of selected problems bearing on the significance of 
resemblances and differences shown in the social life and cultures of 
primitive as compared with civilized peoples. (Wilson.) 

370 



Soc. 203 s. Community Organization (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

Special problems in the field of rural, village, suburban, and urban com- 
munity organization. Studies will be made of the composition, structure, 
and functioning of particular communities. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 204 f. Rural-Urban Sociology (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

A study of the differences between rural and urban societies with refer- 
ence to composition of population, social mobility, social relationships, dif- 
ferentiation of social groups, standards of living, mores and attitudes, and 
various pathological conditions. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 205 s. Regional Sociology (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

A comparative analysis of regional trends in the United States and various 
foreign countries. Topics to be covered will include: the meanmgs and 
implications of regionalism; historical origins of regionalism; demarcation 
of regions in the United States on the basis of geographic, economic, 
demographic, political, and cultural criteria; characteristics and problems 
peculiar to each region; the role of local, state, and national administrative 
units in regional planning and development. (Hodge.) 

Soc. 206 f. Population Problems (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 
An intensive study of selected problems in the fields of population growth, 
fertility and mortality, population composition, and population migration. 

^ (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 207 s. Occupational Sociology (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

Structural and functional significance of the division of labor in society; 
typologies and special problems of occupational organization; sociological 
differentiation of major occupations; criteria of a profession; the role of 
professionalism in social organization; methodology for the study of pro- 
fessions; detailed analysis of several leading professions. (Wilson.) 

Soc. 208 s. Social Stratification (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

A study of differences of status in basic institutions and organizations of 
contemporary society; factors underlying these differences; forms and 
criteria of social selection; trends in vertical mobility and stratification; 
theories of social stratification. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 221 f. Criminology and Penology (3)— Two lectures, one discussion. 

A study of some of the principal theoretical problems of criminology with 
maior emphasis upon a methodological analysis of leading contemporary 

'' , (Wilson.) 

approaches. 

Soc. 250. Sociological Research (2-4)— Credit proportioned to work ac- 
complished. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 

compiled data. 

371 



SPEECH 

PROFESSOR Ehrensberger; Assistant Professor Provensen; Mr 
Strausbaugh, Mrs. Vernon, Mr. Williams, Mr. Hutcheson, 

Mr. Wiksell. 

Speech 1 y. Reading and Speaking (2)— One lecture. 
The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible- 
he preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speak' 

Speech Ginic— No credit. 

Speech 2 y. Fundamentals of Speech (4)— Two lectures. 
Studies in the bases and mechanic*? nf cr^c^^ni. rrw 

f or Ch '". ""? ' ^' ^'" ^' P"''"'= manifestations. It is givrn primari J 
for students who expect to do extensive work in speech A nvT/. 
elec^ing^this course may take it concurrently wk'oTafter^XS 

Speech 3 f. 4 s. Advanced Public Speaking (2, 2)-Two lectures 
_ Advanced work on basis of Speech 1 y, with special applications and adan 

IZT ' f^"^ 'T'''' °^ '^' '^^'' ^ ^P^«-l netting irgrverfor th^ 
speeches-civil social, and political organizations, etc., and orSStions t 
the fields of the prospective vocations of the different student w^ 
student has finished this course he will have preDared L^h!? T ^ 
more speeches which would be suitable ^^ :^:::^:^it^:7:^ Z :;, 
bodies that he would probably have occasion to address in after-hfe. 

Speech 5 f. Oral Technical English (2)-Two lectures. Required of all 
sophomore engmeering students. ^«quirea ot an 

anrgeS'subLTs' Th"'" "' '''"''"' ''^''''' ^^^ ^ "^^'^ t-^^"-! 
engineering sTudent """' " "^"'^"^' ^^^^'^ '^ '""^ ^^^^^ «^ 

Speech 6 y. Advanced Oral Technical En-lish (2>^ Or.. ^ , 
quired of all junior engineering students. ^^"^""^ '^^"""- ^^- 

This course is a continuation of Speech 5 f Qino.ioi i. • 

engineering projects that fall within th'e tudent. oZt:e7^T:' ZTs 
discussion and criticism of all speeches and reports. ^'^P^^^^"^^- Class 

372 



Speech 7 y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. Senior 
seminar. For senior engineering students only. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 6 y. Work not confined to class 
room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies 
in the University and elsewhere. 

Speech 9 f, 10 s. Extempore Speaking (1, 1) — One lecture. 

Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects. 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. Training in parliamentary 
law. 

Speech 11 f, 12 s. Argumentation (2, 2) — Two lectures. 

This course stresses not formal debating, but forms of persuasion which 
will be useful in business and professional life. It deals, to a great extent, 
with ways in which human beliefs and behavior may be influenced by logical 
discussion. 

Speech 13 f and s. Oral Reading (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of 
literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Speech 101 y. Radio Speaking (4) — Two lectures. 

A laboratory course dealing with the various aspects of modem broad- 
casting. Practice in program planning, continuity writing, announcing, 
news reporting, etc. Actual participation in broadcasting at station WJSV 
in Washington. This course is under the supervision of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System and the speech department. Admission by audition 
or consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. 

(Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 102 f. Voice and Diction (3) — Three lectures. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to 
improve his articulation and phonation. Study and demonstration of speech 
sound production, physics of sound, attributes of voice, the breathing mech- 
anism, the larynx and the ear are combined with intensive drills in articu- 
lation and voice production. (Hutcheson.) 

Speech 103 s. Speech Pathology (3) — Three lectures. 

The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with causes, nature, 
symptoms, and treati-^ient of common types of speech disorders. Emphasis 
is placed upon the remedial measures employed in the treatment of minor 
speech disorders. (Hutcheson.) 

373 



STATISTICS 

PROFESSOR Kemp; Lectukek Riggleman; Mr. Shirley. Mr. Mullin. 
Stat 14 f. Elements of Statistics (3)_Lectures, recitations and labora 
tory^ Orgramzed for students in Economics and Business AdmlnSation 

n,.ThnH^'^'"^, .*'''' """'''^ *" *» ^'^« ^^^ «t"<lent a knowledge of the 
rmertal data f r;>,'""'rr.' ""'^ ^^^^^"""^ ^-'"^^ and^economi 

use of such iods S"^'' '^'^'^'''' '"''''' *° P'''^^*^^ Pr^<=«ce in the 
use 01 such methods. The course covers collection of data; hand and ma 

chine tabulation; graphic charting; statistical distributions; kverages; index 
coTelaJL 'n^'^r^' skewness; the normal curve; sampling; L'slmpTe 
correlation. The practical application of these methods as aids in solving 
business problems is emphasized throughout the course. 
Stat 15 s. Economic Statistics (3)-Lectures, recitations, and laboratory 
In this course, time series, secular trends, seasonal variations, business 
cycles error, partial correlation, rectilinear and curvilinear multiple corrX 
tion and regression, analysis of variance and covariance are studied and 
applied in business forecasting, budgeting, population and purchasing power 

SeS^'ar; "k"" '"'i'^'"'' ^"^^y^' *™« and motion ^udies 
Taltses b»l- ^<^^"'^*'^'"S ^^^^y'^^' '•^^' estate investigation, investmen 
analyses, banking operations, management, and executive control. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates " 
Stat. Ill f. Biological Statistics (2)— Two lectures. 
Organized for students in biology. A study of expressions of type 
variability, correlation, regression, error and significance of differences 

(Kemp.) 
ui!itT:slll Til f """' ^""'''"' ^'*"^"^« ^^^--r- l-tures. Prereq- 

A study of error, multiple and partial correlation, predictive formulae 
empirical curves, analyses of variance and covariance. (Sp )' 

isli'or /i^"' ^*^"""'** ^""'^ (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Stat. 

A study of the principles of logical design for investigations when the 
resulting data are to be subjected to statistical analysfs. Methods and 
uses of randomization, factorial design, and confounding are considered 
m some detail. (v \ 

Stat. 120. Problems (2.4)_Credit in accordance with work done 
To acquire training and experience in independent statistical analysis 
each student will select an approved problem for organization, analysis and 

presentation of results. /d A^ 

(btaff.) 

For Graduates 

Stat. 208. Special Problems (1-4)— Credit in accordance with work done 

Each student registered in this course will choose a relatively complex 

problem for organization, analysis, and presentation of results. (Staff.) 

374 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 

PROFESSORS Welsh, Brueckner; Associate Professors Crawford, DeVolt; 

Assistant Professor Davis. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

V. S. 101 f. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (3) — Three lectures. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; 
interrelationship between the various organs and parts as to structure and 
function; comparative study of herbivora, carnivora, and omnivora. 

(Crawford.) 

V. S. 102 s. Animal Hygiene (3) — Three lectures. 

Care and management of domestic animals, with special reference to 
maintenance of health and resistance to disease; prevention and early 
recognition of abnormal conditions; general hygiene; sanitation; infections; 
epizootics; enzootics; internal and external parasites; first aid. 

(Crawford.) 

V. S. 103 f. Hematology (2)— Two laboratories. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance of changes in blood; 
taking samples; estimating the amount of hemoglobin; color index; numer- 
ical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes; study of red cells, and leucocytes 
in fresh and fixed stained preparations; differential count of leucocytes; 
vital staining; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; 
pathological forms and counts. (Welsh.) 

V. S. 104 s. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance of kidney excretions, 
use of clinical methods including microscopic examination for casts, cells, 
blood, parasites, bacteria, and interpretation of results. (Brueckner.) 

V, S. 105 f. Pathological Technic (3) — Three laboratories. Junior year. 
Bact. 1 desirable. 

Examination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectioning by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin embedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 106 s. Pathological Technic (continued) (2-5) — Laboratory course. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory procedures 
as applied to clinical diagnosis. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 107 s. Poultry Hygiene (2) — Two lectures. Senior year. Prerequi- 
sites, Bact. 1, P. H. 106 f. 

Study of causes, symptoms, dissemination, life cycle, seasonal appear- 
ance, methods of control and eradication of various bacterial, protozoan 
and virus diseases of poultry, including internal and external parasites. 

(DeVolt, Davis.) 

375 



V. S. 108 f. Avian Anatomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 1 s. Open only to majors in Poultry Husbandry. 

A study of the gross and microscopic structure of the body of the 
domestic fowl. The lectures include frequent references to physiological 
processes. The laboratory provides for a study of systematic anatomy by 
dissection work combined with demonstrations. The course is designed to 
meet the needs of the student in poultry husbandry. (DeVolt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 201 f or s. Animal Disease Problems (2-6). — Prerequisite, degree 
in veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or consent of 
instructor. Laboratory and field work by assignment. (Welsh.) 

V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research (2-6) — Prerequisite, degree in 
veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or consent of 
instructor. • (Staff.) 

ZOOLOGY 

Professor Truitt; Associate Professor Phillips; Assistant Professor 

Burhoe; Dr. Newcombe, Dr. Hard, Mr. Stull, Mr. Shay, Miss Tomlinson, 

Mr. Shepherd, Mr. Tornetta, Mr. Greenfield. 

Zool. 1 s. General Zoology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory course, which is cultural and practical in its aim. It 
deals with the basic principles of animal development, structural relation- 
ships, and activities, a knowledge of which is valuable in developing an 
appreciation of the biological sciences. Typical invertebrates and a mam- 
malian form are studied. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 2 f. Introductory Zoology (3) — Two lectures; one demonstration. 

A course for students desiring a general knowledge of the principles 
underlying the growth, development, and behavior of animals, including 
man. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Zool. 3 y. Fundamentals of Zoology (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classification and life history of rep- 
resentative invertebrate and vertebrate forms. This course satisfies the 
freshman pre-medical requirements in biology. Freshmen who intend to 
choose zoology as a major should register for this course. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 per semester. 

Zool. 4 f. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. Required of students whose major is zoology, and of premedical 
students. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

376 



Zool. 5 s. Economic Zoology (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, one course 

'"^eTntent of this course centers around the P-blems of P---^^^^^ 

conservation, control, and development of ^'^"^^^'^ ^f h^L^^^^^ 
reference to Maryland. The lectures are supplemented by assigned reaa 

ings and reports. ^ ^t. v. • 

Combined with Zool. 6 s, this course should form a part of the basic 
traiSg f or professional foresters, game proctors, and conservationists. 

Zool. 6 s. Field Zoology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, one course in zoology and one in botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis on the higher 
nTrteSaSs and certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, envi-nment 
and modes of living. Intended for teachers of biology, and also for those 
who have a special interest in nature study and outdoor life. 

Zool. 8 f. Invertebrate Morphology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Required of students whose major is zoology. 

This course consists in a study of the structure and relationships of 
selected invertebrate groups. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 12 f. Animal Histology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. 

A study of animal tissues and the technic involved in their preparation for 
microscopic examination. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool 15 f. Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)-Two lectures; two lab- 
oratories Prerequisite, one course in zooolgy. Required of students whose 
mSorL physical education, and of those preparing to teach general science 

or biology. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy and 
phyLS Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, c.rcula- 
tion, respiration, and reproduction. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool 16 s. Human Physiology (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Not 
open to freshmen. Primarily for home economics students. 
Similar to Zool. 15 f. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool 20 s. Vertebrate Embryology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. 
PrerequisL one course in zoology. Required of students whose major :s 
zoology and of premedical students. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and early 
mammalian embryology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

377 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Zool. 101 s. Mammalian Anatomy (3)-Three laboratories. Registration 
limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before StS on 
Recommended for premedical students, and those whose maiovTz^^' 

,io1^ T?vf '" ^^^ <lif action of the cat or other mammal. By special permis- 
sion of the instructor a vertebrate other than the cat may be used for 
study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. ^ (Slips ) 

Zool. 102 s. Histological Technique (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories 

tS h r '' '•'"/*''*• ""^ *^^ permission of the instrLctor must be ob 
tained before registration. 

The preparation of animal tissues for microscopical examination The 
course is designed to qualify the student in the preparation of tissues and 
blood for normal and pathological study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Hard.) 

t„5r''p^"^ ^- . ^""^"^ ^™'»^' Physiology (6)-Two lectures; one labora- 

anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of instructor 
must be obtained before registration. instructor 

The first semester work deals with the fundamentals of cellular and 
general physiology. The second semester is devoted to an appl catL of 
these principles to the higher animals. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. 

(Phillips.) 

Zool. 105 f. Aquiculture (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, one course in zoology. ^cichiu 

The course deals with the practices employed in rearing aquatic animals 
and the properties of natural waters which render them suitable for envir- 
onmental purposes. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Truitt.) 

Zool. 106 y. Journal Club (2)— One session. 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature 
students whose major is zoology. 



Required of all 
(Staff.) 



Zool 108 s. Animal Geography (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. 

This course deals with the distribution, classification, and environmental 
relations of animals. Several field trips are scheduled. Laboratory fee, 

(Newcombe.) 

au^^\V\ !; ^'T^ ^'''^^'' ^^^-'^^ ^^^^"^^^' ^'^^ laboratory. Re- 
quired of students whose major is zoology who do not have credit for Gen. 

The fundamental principles of heredity and variation. A consideration 
of the factors determmmg the formation and development of the charac- 
teristics of an individual and their manner of transmission through suc- 
cessive generations. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Burhoe.) 

378 



Zool. 121 f. Animal EJcology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. 

Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Certain 
environmental factors affecting growth, behavior, and distribution are ana- 
lyzed by observations and experiments conducted in the field and also in 
the laboratory under controlled conditions. Special field excursions are made 
to the mountains and sea shore. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Newcombe.) 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200 f. Marine Zoology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Problems in salt water animal life of the higher phyla. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Truitt.) 

Zool. 201 s. Microscopical Anatomy (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A detailed study of the morphology and activity of cells composing 
animal tissues. Recent advances in the field of cytology are covered in 
lectures, assigned readings, and reports. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Hard.) 

Zool. 203 f. Advanced Embryology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology and development of ani- 
mals, including a consideration of tissue culture and transplantation. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. (Burhoe.) 

Zool. 204 f. Advanced Animal Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 205 s. Hydrobiology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Biotic, physical, and chemical factors of the aquatic environment, includ- 
ing certain fundamental principles of oceanography. Special reference is 
made to the Chesapeake Bay region. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Newcombe.) 

Zool. 206. Research — Credit to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each 
semester. (Staff.) 



Zool. 207 y. Zoological Seminar (2). 



CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 



(Staff.) 



This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, 
is on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University of 
Maryland in cooperation with the Maryland Conservation Department, 
Goucher College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western 
Maryland College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to 
afford a center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward 

379 



a fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The 
program projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake 
region. 

The laboratory is open throughout the year. Courses are offered for 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students, during a six-week summer 
session, in the following subjects: Economic Zoology, Invertebrates, Inverte- 
brate Embryology, Experimental Zoology, Algae, and Diatoms. Not more 
than two courses may be taken by a student, who must meet the require- 
ments of the Department of Zoology as well as those of the laboratory 
before matriculation. Classes are limited to eight matriculants. Student's 
pursuing special research may establish residence for the summer, or for 
the entire year. 

Laboratory facilities; boats of various types fully equipped with pumps 
nets, dredges and other apparatus; and shallow water collecting devices are 
available for the work without cost to the students. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Lab- 
oratory, apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



SECTION IV 
DEGREES, HONORS, STUDENT REGISTER 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1938-1939 



Melvin C. Hazen 



HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Laws 

Herbert Romulus O'Conor 

Doctor of Engineering 

Glenn L. Martin 

Doctor of Agriculture 

Cecil Willis Creel 

Doctor of Science 

Fred Wharton Rankin 

Honorary Certificates in Agriculture 

William Alan McGregor Frank Marion Shook 

Philip Calder Turner 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Helen R. Bartlett 

A.B. Western Maryland, 1919 
M.A. George Washington Univ., 1922 

Frances Ford Beck 
B.S. Smith College, 1933 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1936 

Abner Brenner 

A.B. University of Missouri, 1929 
M.S. University of Wisconsin, 1930 

Homer Walter Carhart 

B.S. Dakota Wesleyan Univ., 1934 
M.A. Univ. of South Dakota, 1935 

Frederick Barker Chandler 
B.S. University of Maine, 1928 



Arthur Russell Taylor Denues 
B.E.Johns Hopkins University, 1935 
M.G.E. Johns Hopkins Univ., 1937 



Dissertation : 
"Eighteenth century Georgia wo- 



» 



men. 

"Glycolysis studies on Walker Sar- 
coma 319." 

"The electrodeposition of copper- 
bismuth alloys from a perchlorate 
bath." 

"The structure and synthesis of 
phellonic acid." 

"Mineral nutrition of the genus 
Brassica with particular reference 
to boron." 

"Some aspects of the slow propaga- 
tion of flame in gases with partic- 
ular reference to the displacements 
of the mixtures giving maximum 
flame velocities in the combustion 
of methane." 



380 



381 



Melvin F. W. Dunker 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1934 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1936 

Walter Fulton Jeffers 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1935 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1937 

Charles Samuel Lowe 

B.S. George Washington Univ., 1933 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1937 



Carroll Blue Nash 

B.S. G^eorge Washington Univ., 1934 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1937 

Rodney Andreen Olson 
B.S. Tufts College, 1936 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1937 

Glenn Gerald Slocum 

B.A. Simpson College, 1928 
M.S. Iowa State College, 1930 

Howard Livingston Stier 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1932 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1937 



WooTEN Taylor Sumerford 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Georgia, 193*0 
M.S. University of Georgia, 1933 

Earnest Artman Walker 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1926 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1927 

John Kavanaugh Wolfe 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1936 



Dissertation : 
Some aromatic fluorine compounds 
of therapeutic interest." 



Master of Arts 



"Studies on Caryospora putaminum 
(Schw.) De Not." 

"Fluorescence in inorganic analysis 
with special reference to (A) Pho- 
tometric estimation of aluminum; 
(B) Detection of thorium, zinc, 
silver and copper." 

"Effects of starvation and thirst on 
the chemical composition of rats of 
various ages." 



<( 



n 



The relation of protoplasmic 
streaming in the Avena coleoptile 
to respiration and auxin transport." 

Studies on food-poisoning staphy- 
lococci." 



"A physiological study of growth 
and fruiting of the tomato (Lyco- 
persicum esculentum) with refer- 
ence to the effect of certain cli- 
matic and edaphic conditions." 

"A study of nitrosothymol and ami- 
nothymol with particular reference 
to Schiff's bases of aminothymol." 



n 



Development of storage scab on* 
apples." 



"I. Surface films of cerin, friedelin, 
and their derivatives. II. The struc- 
ture of friedonic acid." 



Samuel Preston Caltrider 
Alma Evelyn Davis 
Paul J. Dixon 
Charles Abner Doub 
Clyde Baltzer Edgeworth 
Francis Dickerson Griffith 
David Chauncey Holly 
Frances Strickland Holmead 
Temple Rolph Jarrell 
Louis P. Knox, Jr. 



Esthelene Williamson Morgan 

Aagot Francine Nordby 

Margaret Barbara Phillips 

Watson Delaha Phillips 

Gussie Randall 

Kathleen McCollum Shearer 

LaVeta Titt 

Edward Harold Frederick West 

Vivian Doris Wiser 



Master of Science 



John Paterson Bewley 
Samuel Clark Billings 
John Lowry Bowers 
Marriott Warfield Bredekamp 
Arthur R. Buddington 
Caroline Frances Burpeau 
Floyd Dale Carroll 
Edward Pendleton Carter 
Ann Elizabeth Carver 
Lawrence Everett Cron 
John Milton Cross 
Rex F. Daly 
Roy Carlton Dawson 
Mary Washington Frazer 
Nathan Gammon, Jr. 
Augustus Rossell Glasgow, Jr. 
Charles Goldberg 
James Glenn Graham 
Elsie Catherine Hanson 
Jack D. Hartman 
Mildred Louise Hearn 
Roy Elwood Huffman 



Charles David Hyson 

Amihud Kramer 

Albin Owings Kuhn 

William Clarence Leavenworth 

Thaddeus Lewandowski 

Charles Morris Loyd 

Harry Matheson 

Bernard Patrick McNamara 

William Anthony Nolte 

Perry Jacob Nott 

James McClain Osborn 

Frank Perlm utter 

Bourdon Francis Scribner 

BOLAND BiCKETT SHEPHERD 

John Raymond Stewart 
Virginia Eleanor Thomas 
Virginia Trullinger 
Earle B. Wagner 
Mary Elinor Webster 
Charles Baynard Willingham 
Phillip Jerome Wingate 
WiNTHROP Charles Wolfe 



382 



383 



COLLEGE OF 
Bachelor 



Charles Chandlee Astle 
Alva Sayrs Baker, Jr. 
*Oden Bowie 
Allan Harvey Brown 
James Franklin Brownell 
Lawrence Anthony Bruns 
James Hazen Burnet 
Charlotte Frances Cohen 
Julian Coburn Crane 
Clarence Akehurst Eck 
Lawrence Sherwood Faith 
Earl Wayne Fitzwater 
Paul McConkey Galbreath 
W. Eric Gibes 
EwiNG L. GuPTON, Jr. 
Edward Wroth Hepburn 
Elmer Heubeck, Jr. 
Norborne Archeart Hite 
William Edward Jarrell, Jr. 
Edwin Roberts Johnson 
Saburo Katsura 
Wilson Wiley Kilby 
Stanley L Lapidus 



AGRICULTURE 
of Science 

Laban Robert Lowe 
Richard King Lynt, Jr. 
William T. March^ 
O. Clifton Martin, Jr. 
Frank Russell McFarland, Jr. 
Thomas Edwin Miller, Jr. 
Martin Hammond Muma 
Robert Darby Nicholls 
Joseph Kemp Peaslee 
Clarence Wilson Phillips, Jr. 

♦Walter Benjamin Posey 
Lloyd Alden Potter 
James Wilmer Price, Jr. 
George C. Remsberg, Jr. 
John Parrish Secrest 
Robert Andrew Shoemaker 

♦William Lawrence Sippel 
Janet Irma Steinberger 
Richard S. Sutton 
Ellen Elizabeth Talcott 
Marion Linwood Wheatley 
Fred Bern hard Winkler 
Detlef Jacob Witt 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 



Bernicb Carmen Aring 
William Eugene Aud 
Charles Blum Balmer 
Elizabeth Clark Barber 
John Henry Beers 
Georgia Blalock 
John Darby Bowman, Jr. 
Ernestine Carr Bowyer 
Robert Ennalls Powell Cannon 
Mary Katherine Carson 
♦William Irwin Cayton 
Irene Ruth Checket 
John Thomas Clark 
Carolyn Dennette Clugston 
William Hutchins Cole 



Roberta E. Collins 
Florence Ruth Comer 
Mary Elizabeth Cronin 
Maurice Richard Domenici 
Ralph Milo Edmonds 
Lydia MacMullan Evans 
Rita Virginia Faul 
Moir M. Fulks 
Arthur Greenfield 
William Den mead Groff, Jr. 
Norma Irene Hall 
Sylvia Handler 
Margaret Florence Hart 
♦NfcviNS Byford Hendrix, Jr. 
Leo Arthur Heringman 



*Degree conferred September, 1938. 



384 



Mary Elizabeth Holt 
Lawrence Grant Hoover, Jr. 
Vivian H. Johnson 
David Robert Joseph 
ruth Lesue Keefer 
James Forrest King 
Victor Hartwell Laws 
Mary Douglas Leard 

Richard Everett Lee 

Harriett Ann Levin 

Ethel S. Levine 

Gorton Parker Lindsay 

Margaret Leslie Maslin 

Elaine McClayton 

Harry Wilkeson McGinniss, III 

Joseph Martin Mehl, Jr. 

Luther Edgar Mellen, Jr. 

Beverly C. Oppenheimer 
*JuLius Joseph Ostroff 



Herman Elwood Perdue 
Katherine Lee Pollard 
Daniel Travers Prettyman 
Elizabeth Samson 
Patricia Barbara Lee Schutz 
Mary Jane Scott 
Fred Lester Simon, Jr. 

*JOHN ROSMAN STAIRE, JR. 

Samuel Fort Stedman 
Martin Kirk Stein 
Frank Vernon Stevenson 
Sara Louise Stoddard 
Lula Spates Trundle 
Muriel James Wahl 
GusTAVUS Warfield 
Paul Smith Wise 
Frances Waggoner Wolf 
Leonard Wohlstadter 



Bachelor 

Ralph Aarons 

Harry Davis Anspon 

Edwin Rumsey Anthony, Jr. 

Robert Amthor Barthel, Jr. 

Fred Thomas Bishopp 

Ralph Borlik 

Charles Vernon Bowen, Jr. 

Gordon Howard Campbell 

Charles G. Gary 

Harry Cohen 

Dorothy Margaret Danforth 

Henry Poincar^ Dantzig 

Francis Xavier Dippel 

Frances Elizabeth Dorsett 

Alvin Goldberg 

Leon Goldman 

Josfi Grave De Peralta IbarzAbal 

Frances Lucille Henry 

Alvin H. Honigman 

Frances Elizabeth Hunter 

Robert Clark Irwin 

John Stark Jacobs 

Joseph Jaffe 

William Richard Johnson 

Edwin Kraemer 

John Alexander Krynitsky 



of Science 
Etta Carolyn Link 
Samuel B. McFarlane, Jr. 
Thomas Wood Mears 
Ralph Harvey Meng 
Daniel M. Mermelstein 
Walter Leroy Miller, Jr. 
Caesar Francis Orofino 
James Elwood Pitzer 
Herman Saul Raisin 
Samuel Winchester Reeves, III 
Joseph Max Rochkind 
Louis Nathan Rosenstein 
Wallace Hyman Sadowsky 
Howard Schneider 
Elizabeth Brown Sherrill 
Daniel Shmuner 
Isaac Walter Silberg 
Joseph Priestly Spalding 
James G. Stegmaier 
*Ethel B. Tolker 
Susan Hays Vandervoort 
Mayer Weinblatt 
Edward Martin Wharton 
Margaret Fentress Wilson 
Jerome Louis Young 
LoY Miller Zimmerman 



♦Degree conferred September, 1938. 



385 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 
Bachelor of Science 



Robert Paul Benbow 
Robert Johnston Bradley 
Thomas James Capossela 
Ellner Annette Cornnell 
Lillian Eleanor Crocker 
Robert Edlavitch 
George Henri Pearson Eierman 
Sidney J. Fenster 
Louis Mohler Frey 
Mary- Louise Ganzert 
Jerome Spilman Hardy 
William Franklin Hortman, Jr. 
Clifford Edward Johnson 



Henry Clay Johnson 
Lewis Arthur Jones 
Richard Eugene Kern 
John William Miller 
William Irving Miller 
Robert Morton Neiman 
Richard James O'Neill 
John Arthur Parks, Jr. 
Helen Lucille Reindollar 
Charles Robert Stup 
Ira Thompson Todd, Jr. 
Lawrence Archer Woodwell 
Bernard Alvin Yockelson 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Doctor of 

Fabius Fox Aaronson 
Joseph Paul Allen 
Bernard Berry Auerbach 
Samuel Barsamian 
Raymond Blais 
George Coffman Blevins 
John Michael Bozzuto, Jr. 
Frank Anderson Brown 
Henry Lee Cannaday 
Antone Richard Carvalho 
Ralph Carmine Cavallaro 
Bertrand Oswald Chan-Pong 
James Clarke Davis 
Naomi Ada Dunn 
Benjamin Delbert Edgar 
Irving William Eichenbaum 
Charles Huff Fallon, Jr. 
William Becker Feindt 
Garnet Paul Francis, Jr. 
Eugene Michael Gane 
Paul Gilden 

Leonard Nathan Goldstein 
Hans Henry Griesbach 
Harry Clyde Grove, Jr. 
Leonard Marvin Hirschman 
Henry Jacob Hoffacker, II 
Robert Ellsworth Jacoby 



Dental Surgery 

Robert Jakob 

Verda Elizabeth James 

Walter Edgar Johnson 

OSLER COLLINSON JOYCE 

Marshall Irvin Kader 

Frederick Robert Krug 

Charles Frank Labasauckas 

Irving Lawrence Maislen 

William Lewis McConnell 

Jules McCracken 

Leon Meinster 

William Franklin Melson 

Max Miller 

Albert William Morris 

Melvin Myers 

William Joseph Noon, Jr. 

Harold Edwin Plaster 

Seymour Albert Rabinowitz 

Kenneth Vincent Randolph 

Paul Reed 

Irving Kay Robinovitz 

Everett Tryon Rogers 

Joseph Gerald Rosen 

Oscar John Schoepke 

Alfred Bradbury Schriver 

Leo Joseph Shaudis 

Erwin Edward Shea 

386 



Vincent Francis Sidoti 
Edward Rennert Stinebert 
William Carter Tinsley 
Dorsey Robert Tipton 
Michael Stephen Varipatis 



Bernard Waldman 
Irving Solwin Weiner 
John Hoffman Wooden, Jr. 
Dan Wright 



COLLEGE OF 
Bachelor 

Benjamin Alperstein 

Anne Fitzhugh Anders 

Virginia Gertrude Armiger 

Donald E. Bailey 

Douglas A. Bailey, Jr. 

Marian Elizabeth Barker 

Shirley Lee Biskin 

Anna Kathryn Bowman 

Myrtle Grove Burke 

George Ellsworth Byers 

* Agatha Veronica Dorsey 

*Rita Loretta DuBrow 
Doris Ebert Eichlin 
John George Freudenberger 
Jane Hartje Grindel 



EDUCATION 

of Arts 

Mary Anne Guyther 
Doris Ruth Harrison 
William Franklin Howard 
Nora Louise Huber 
Hazel Louise Kalbaugh 
Mary Eleanor Kephart 
Marian Virginia Mayes 

Elaine P. Michelson 

Inez Angeune Nevy 

Dorothy May Powell 
*Elinor Grahame Johnson Reich 

Elizabeth Jane Smith 

Leonard Sollod 

Richard Joseph Stakem, Jr. 

Evelyn Lilian Sullivan 



Philip Joseph Aaronson 
Clifton Adams 
Oswald Egon Bachmann 
Mary-Hedda Bohlin 
Dorothy Matilda Boose 
Virginia Pearle Bowling 
Carl Krause Brode 
Carl Edgar Bull 
Julia Howison Burton 
James Gerard Carroll 

* Ellen Nesbitt Clark 
Elva Maude Conrad 
Bessie Ella Copes 
Ruth Corbett 

*Madie Elizabeth Craig 
*Ruby Anne Dahlgren 

* Lloyd Hubert Derr 

* Charles Wesley Dudderar 
*RuTH Mary Dun woody 

* Georgia Guthrie Ellegood 



Bachelor of Science 

James Henry Ely, Jr. 
Charlotte Maria Ericson 
Margaret Turnbull Ewing 
Florence Wilson Fowble 
Karl Gordon Freas 
IsADORE E. Friedman 
Alice Carlotta Haas 
Elizabeth Wise Hamilton 
Anna Marie Hardesty 
Nannie Mowell Hawkins 
Henry Leonard Hensen 
Merrill Bond Kalb 
♦Elizabeth Louise Krause 
Laura Manning 
Alta Grace Martin 
Grace Weber Martin 

* Robert Harold McCann 
*M. Elizabeth McIntyrb 

* Marion Ogle Moser 



♦Degree conferred September, 1938. 



387 



Il 



»l 



Hester Virginia Mudd 
Celia Estella Murphy 
James O. Proctor 
Alex Rabinowitz 
Roland Emerson Randall 
George Thomas Rankin 
Mary Elizabeth Rawley 

♦Bessie Arterburn Rich 
Ethel Mae Schwarzmann 
Regina Bernardine Shepperd 
Blair Hanna Smith 
Mildred Elizabeth Smith 

*RUTH Elizabeth Smith * 



Edith Ray Sparling 
Mary Miller Speake 
Diana Stevan 
Lucy Waite Trundle 

* Lillian Heiser Vansant 
June Elizabeth Weber 
Carolyn Isabelle Webster 
Ruth E. Westerblad 
Stanley R. Whipple 

*Elsa Haefner Willhide 
Hilda Kathreen Wine 

*M. Merle Yoder 
Marian Adele Zimmerman 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Civil Engineer 

CHARLES AtWELL CHANEY GeRALD BuRKE COE 

Bachelor of Science 



Van Sanford Ashmun 
Donald Glenn Bartoo 
William Cullen Bryant 
James Albert Chappelear, Jr. 
Maurice E. Corbin, Jr. 
William Bates Davis, Jr. 
Elies Elvove 
Henry Alfred Essex 
Irving Julius Etkind 
James Louis Forrester 
Harold Hugo Franke 
Robert Gottlieb 
Herbert Prescott Hall 
Cecil Lee Harvey 
Charles Chilton Holbrook 
John Frank Horne 
Henry White Janes 
Stephen Harris Jones 
Robert Edgar Krafft 
Philip Morton Lasswell 



John Cameron Lynham, Jr. 
Donald McClenon 
Lloyd Howard Reisler McGill 
David Harper Mitchell 
Eugene Frederick Mueller, Jr. 
John Dana Muncks 
Frederick Wallace Perkins, Jr. 
Irving Phillips 
Eliott Brightwood Robertson 
Elgin Wayne Scott, Jr. 
George Edward Seeley 
John Philip Smith, Jr. 
Sydney Snowden Stabler, Jr. 
John Walter Stevens, li 
Thomas Manning Thompson 
Robert Henry Wettje 
Thomas Parker Wharton 
LeRoy Giddings Willett 
Emitt Cleveland Witt, Jr. 
Leon Ryno Yourtee, Jr! 



^Degree conferred September, 1938. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Kathryn Frances Abbott 
Kathryn Adkins 
Virginia Amadon 
Mary Lee Aylesworth 
Betty Burdette Bain 
Helen Griest Balderston 
Virginia Lee Beall 
Jane Hedrick Beals 
Audrey M. Bosley 
Evelyn Westover Byrd 
Harriet Goslee Cain 
Doris Elizabeth De Alba 
Doris Mildred Dunnington 
Virginia May Gaston 
Mary Edith George 
Esther Brent Gross 
Elm A Harris 
Jean Merie Hartig 
Millie Locke Hill 
Dorothy Ashley Huff 



Evelyn Louise Iager 
Margaret Caldwell Jack 
Jane Frazer Kephart 
Alice Hudson Lang 
Betty Hall Law 

Margaret Elizabeth MacDonald 
Elizabeth Mary McCormac 
Bell Weir McGinniss 
Alma Viola Miller 
Paula Snyder N alley 
Eileen Catherine Neumann 
Ruth Ann Naill Nusbaum 
Helen Barr Platt 
Dorothy Elizabeth Skinner 
Anna Lucia Spehnkouch 
Marguerite Susan Stevenson 
Beatrice Louise Tucker 
Fredricka Isabelle Waldman 
*Ruth p. Weber 
Ethel Jane Wilson 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Laws 



tTALBOT Winchester Banks 

James Dudley Beck 

Alvin LaMar Benson 

James Watts Blackhurst 

Martin Clint Bovn:.ES 

Leslie Jerome Clark 
t George Levy Clarke 
flRviN Henry Cohen 

Harry E. Dyer, Jr. 

Charles Edward Edmondson 

Thomas Bernard Finan, Jr. 

Carson Gray Frailey 

Harry August Centner 

Gorman Eugene Getty, Jr. 

Harry Goldberg 
IFrancis Davis Handy 

George Jarvis Jobson 



Lewis Ray Jones 
Jerome Joseph Joyce 
Samuel Dale Kalis 
Charles Bernard Kelly, Jr. 
Raymond Aloysius Kirby 
Fabian Homer Kolker 
Vladimir Stephen Lassotovitch 
Marker Jacob Lovell 
Edmund William Lubinski 
James Macgill 
Stratford Eyre McKenrick 
Edward George Monroe 
Fred Oken 

Charles Wesley Prettyman 
Alexander Parks Rasin, Jr. 
t Roland Custer Ready 
James Albert Redmond, Jr. 



388 



*Deg:ree conferred September, 1938. 
tWith honor. 



389 



Phyllis D. Shaivitz 
Melvin Stanley Silberg 
John Hodge Smith 
John Carroll Sullivan, Jr. 
Edward James Sybert 
Alfred Frederick Taylor 
Henry Merryman Tiralla, Jr. 



Jaroslav Jerry Toula 
Carl Edward Tuerk 
Albert Theodore Vogel, Jr. 
Jerome Wasserman 
Barnard Talbott Welsh 
George Wendell White, Jr. 
Frank Kennedy Wilson* Jr. 



Certificates of Proficiency 

THOMAS GORDON ANDREW BERNARD CaRROLL ToPPER 



SCHOOL 

Doctor 

Hkriman Herbert Baylus 

Harry McBrine Beck 

Edgar Frank Berman 

Aaron Bernstein 

Albion Older Bernstein 

Elizabeth Grant Bess 

Max Ralph Bloom 

Edward Joseph Brezinski 

Henry Alison Briele 

Bernard Brodsky 

Lawrence Saville Cannon 
James Nicholas Cianos 
Robert Thornhill Coffman 
Frank Samuel Cohen 
Richard Wylie Corbitt 
Raymond Murray Cunningham 
David Leonard Filtzer 
Arnold Ulysses Freed 
Leo Junior Gaver 
Sylvan David Goldberg 
George Smith Grier, III 
Harold Allan Grott 
Samuel Isaac Haimowitz 
Charles Isaac Harris, Jr. 
Charles Samuel Harrison 
Oscar Hartman 
Alvin Sidney Hartz 
Leonard Lincoln Heimoff 
Charles Bullard Hooker 
Thomas Manning Hutchins 
Benjamin Isaacson 
R. Donald Jandorf 



OF MEDICINE 
of Medicine 

Lewis Henry Jannarone 

Charles Wilson Jones 

David Kairys 

William Henry Kammer, Jr. 

Melvin Daniel Kappelman 

Philip Weyforth Keister 

James Patterson Kerr, Jr. 

James Arthur Kiely 

Howard Franklin Kinnamon, Jr. 

Bernard Stanley Kleiman 

Herbert Lapinsky 

Arnold Fabian Lavenstein 

William Templeton Layman 

William Harvey Leitch 

Stephen Lee Magness 

John Robinson Magruder 

Irving Lowell Marks 

William James McClafferty, Jr. 

Francis McLaughlin 

Alvin Francis Meyer 

Irving Miller 

William Shepherd Miller 

John Anthony Moran 

Charles Hunter Moricle 

James Baker Nuttall 

David Waugh Palmer 

Seigle Wilson Parks 

Walter Joseph Pijanowski 

Samuel Pillar 

Melvin Frank Polek 

Dexter LeRoy Reimann 

Samuel Rochberg 



Edwin Russell Ruzicka 
Max Samuel Sadove 
*Aram Martyr Sarajian 
Joseph Edwin Schenthal 
Isadore Scher 
Thomas Scott Sexton 
Claude Porter Sherman 
Maurice Siegel 
Philip Laurens Smoak 
Sylvan D. Solarz 
Herbert Spiegel 
William Joseph Steger 



Leland Bates Stevens 
George Tartikoff 
Ramsay Berry Thomas 
Wilbur Clyde Thomas ^ 

John Peter Urlock, Jr. 
Leonard Wallen stein 
Jesse R. Wanner, Jr. 
Fuller Barnard Whitworth 
Milton Jay Wilder 
Sol Wilner 

Thomas Luther Worsley, Jr. 
Daniel Leonard Zalis 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Graduate in Nursing 



Margaret Davidson Beall 
Margaret Eleanor Bennington 
Mary Sunshine Clark 
Nancy Lou Craven 
Margaret Odelle Culler 
Dorothy Margaret Danforth 
Frances Elizabeth Dorsett 
T helm a Catherine Doyle 
Lucille Elizabeth Foster 
Marguerite Wilson Foster 
Julia Juanita Grammer 



Louise Margaret Hollister 
Margaret Maddox Lee 
Catherine Boon Magruder 
LoLAH Harrington Marshall 
Virginia Belle Richardson 
Mary Jane Roach 
Dorothy Elizabeth Shaff 
Marian Estelle Travers 
Susan Hays Vandervoort 
Margaret Fentress Wilson 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Daniel S. Baker 
Herman Herbert Baylus 
*Aaron Bernstein . 
Albert Bin stock 
Frank Samuel Cohen 
Anthony Joseph Dobropolski 
Joseph Urban Dorsch 
Jack Feldman 
Irving Herbert Folus 

* Arnold Ulysse:s Freed 
*Leo Junior Gaver 

Morris Giller 

* Sylvan David Goldberg 
Henry Mervin Golditch 



Nathan L Gruz 

Angela Rose Hackett 
*OscAR Hartman 

William Marion Ichniowski 

Eugene Jacobs 

Cyrus Francis Jones 

Irvin Leonard Kamanitz 
* Melvin Daniel Kappelman 

Lawrence Lipman Lieberman 

Irving Lowell Marks 

Jerome Mask 

David Massing 

Daniel Mendelsohn 

Victor Hugo Morgenroth, Jr. 



'Degree conferred September, 1938. 



390 



391 



«■ 



Melvin Mutchnik 
*James Baker Nuttall 
Joseph Leon Okrasinski 
Katherine Justina Parker 
Lillian Passen 
* Dexter LeRoy Reimann 
Harry Louis Rochester 
Morris Rosenberg 
Alvin Rosenthal 
Louis Thomas Sabatino 



Mi 



*Max Samuel Sadove 
Mario Sama 
Louis Sapperstein 
Herbert David Sch never 
Marion Shalowitz 
Bernard Silverstein 
Nathan Morton Snyder 
Maurice Wiener 
Milton Jay Wiij)er 
George Ira Young, Jr. 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES, 1938-39. 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 



Ralph Aarons 

Kathryn Frances Abbott 

Kathryn Adkins 

Harry Davis Anspon 

Edwin Rumsey Anthony, Jr. 

Mary Lee Aylesworth 

Helen R. Bartlett 

Phyllis Geraldine Bollinger 

Anna Kathryn Bowman 

Robert Johnston Bradley 

Allan Harvey Brown 

Myrtle Grove Burke 

Florence Ruth Comer 

George Henri Pearson Eierman 

Elies Elvove 

Lydia MacMullan Evans 

Earl Wayne Fitzwater 

Harold Hugo Franks 

Paul McConkey Galbreath 

Robert Gottlieb 



Mary Anne Guyther 

Jack D. Hartman 

Frances Strickland Holmead 

Hazel Louise Kalbaugh 

Jane Frazer Kephart 

John Alexander Krynitsky 

Marcia Ladson 

Philip Morton Lasswell 

Richard Everett Lee 

Etta Carolyn Link 

Bell Weir McGinniss 

James Elwood Pitzer 

Milton Seymour Schecter 

Diana Stevan 

Ellen Elizabeth Talcott 

Ira Thompson Todd, Jr. 

Edward Martin Wharton 

Thomas Parker Wharton 

Carolyn Isabelle Webster 



*Degree conferred September, 1938. 



Citizenship Medal, Oflfered by Dr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

Joseph Kemp Peaslee 

Citizenship Prize, Offered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 

Helen Lucille Reindollar 

Athletic Medal, Offered by the Class of 1908 
Edwin Roberts Johnson 

Maryland Ring, Offered by Charles L. Linhardt 

James Gordon Meade, Jr. 

Goddard Medal, Offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

Richard Everett Lee 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 

Cecil Roscoe Martin 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 

Lois Virginia Kemp 

Medal and Junior Membership, Offered by the American Institute 

of Chemists 

John Alexander Krynitsky 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal, Offered by Benjamin Berman 

John Chesley Marzolf 



392 



393 



Mortar Board Cup 

Lydia MacMullan Evans 

Honor Key, OflFered by the Class of 1926 of the School 

of Business Administration 

George Henri Pearson Eierman 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal 

Doris Helen McFarland 

Service Award 

Helen Griest Balderston 

Bernard L. Crozier Award 

Robert Edgar Krafft 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award 
Thomas Parker Wharton 

Tau Beta Pi Award 

Bowen Wood Shaw 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit 

Robert Gottlieb 

Alpha Lambda Delta Sorority Award 

Lydia MacMullan Evans 

Edward Powell Lacrosse Trophy 

James Gordon Meade, Jr. 

Louis W. Berger Baseball Trophy 
George William Knepley 

The Diamond Back Medals 

Lawrence Grant Hoover, Jr. Gporcv ttttxtot t>^*,, 

MAHCARET LESLIE Masuk john Geokoe FnZ!ZnZ 

The Terrapin Medals 

William Edward Brown, Jr. mary Lee Ross 

William Bruce Davis 

The Old Line Medals 

Jerome Spilman Hardy irving Phillips 

Margaret Elizabeth MacDonald 

Battalion Trophy, Offered by Mahlon N. Haines (1894) 

First Battalion, Commanded by Cadet Major Charles W. Weidinger 

394 



Governor's Drill Cup 

Company G, Commanded by Cadet Captain Elgin Wayne Scott, Jr. 

Reserve Officers* Association Award 
Cadet Captain Elgin Wayne Scott, Jr. 

Alumni Military Cup 

First Platoon, Company D, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant Julius Wirth Ireland 

Scabbard and Blade Cup 

First Platoon, Company D, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant Julius Wirth Ireland 

Military Medal, Offered by the Class of 1899 
Cadet Thomas Eugene Watson, Jr. 

Pershing Rifles Medal to Each Member of Winning Squad 

Cadet Corporal Joseph Michael Cadet Gordon Fisk Blood 

Joyce Cadet Bernard Milloff 

Cadet James Warren Pulliam Cadet J. Aldrich Hambleton 

Cadet Page Boyd Pratt Cadet Frank Cooper Borenstein 

Cadet John Leonard Meakin 

William Randolph Hearst Rifle Match Medals 

Cadet Warren Pruden Davis Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen 

Cadet George Everett Meeks Cadet Thomas Wise Riley 

Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead 



Third Corps Area Intercollegiate 

Cadet Warren Pruden Davis 
Cadet Thomas Wise Riley 
Cadet George Everett Meeks 
Cadet Raymond Louis Hodges 
Cadet Floyd Allison Soul^ 



Rifle Match Championship Medals 

Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead 
Cadet Fletcher Hudson Jones, Jr. 
Cadet John Chesley Marzolf 
Cadet Enos Ray 
Cadet John Francis Greenip 



National Intercollegiate Rifle Match Championship Medals 
for Third Place in Shoulder Match 

Cadet Warren Pruden Davis Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead 

Cadet Frank Deen Evans Cadet George Everett Meeks 

Cadet Alden Elon Imus, Jr. Cadet Thomas Wise Riley 

Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen 

National Rifle Association Intercollegiate Postal Match Medals 

First Place 

Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead Cadet Thomas Wise Riley 
Cadet George Everett Meeks Cadet Frank Deen Evans 

Cadet Warren Pruden Davis 

395 



Fifth Place 

Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen 

Camp Perry National R. O. T. C. and C. M. T. C. Rifle Competition, 

Mmuteman Trophy Gold Medals 
Cadet Thomas L. Coleman PAnpT w n t 

Military Department GoM Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Varsity Rifle Team 

Cadet Thomas Wise Riley 

Military Department Gold Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Freshman Team 

Cadet Fletcher Hudson Jones, Jr. 

National Rifle Association All-American Rifle Team Gold Bullet 

Cadet George Everett Meeks 

A. L. Mehring All-American Gold Medal for Rifle Competition 

Cadet George Everett Meeks 

A. L. Mehring All-American Silver Medal for Rifle Competition 

Cadet Alden Elok Imus, Jr. 

National Society of Pershing Rifles Medals 

Cadet John Chesley Marzoip o.t,™ r.„ 

r.x iviARzoLF Cadet Robert Lee Mattingly 

Cadet John William Mitchell 

District of Columbia Championship Medals, First Place 

Cadet Warren Pruden Davis Cadet Prank Been Fv.m« 

Cadet George Everett Mppko r^ ^kaink. i^een ji^vans 

KOt I!.VERETT MEEKS CaDET ROBERT WyNNE LaUGHEAD 

Cadet Thomas Wise Riley "J^hi-ad 

District of Columbia Championship, Individual High Score 

Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead 

District of Columbia Championship, Individual High Score, Class "B" 

Cadet Ends Ray 

District of Columbia Freshman Rifle Championship 
Junior Medals for First Place 
Cadet Fletcher Hudson Jones Jr CAnrr r.Tv u^ 

CADET JAMES BERNARD WATERS ' clZ ARTHUR C "'"T^''' '''■ 

CADET WILLIAM Wyl^HoIx™! JR '^'''""'^' 

396 



WAR DEPARTMENT AWARDS OF COMMISSIONS 
AS SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

Chemical Warfare 

Walter Leroy Miller, Jr. 



The Infantry 

Robert Waring Adams 
Benjamin Alperstein 
Van Sanford Ashmun 
John Henry Beers 
Fred Thomas Bishopp 
Thomas James Capossela 
Frank Harford Cronin 
Warren Pruden Davis 
William Bates Davis, Jr. 
Elies Elvove 
Henry Alfred Essex 

SiGMUND IRVIN GeRBER 

Robert Gottlieb 
John Judson Gude 
Herbert Prescott Hall 
Cecil Lee Harvey 
Frederic Maxcy Hewitt 
William Franklin Howard 
Julius Wirth Ireland 
Lewis Arthur Jones 



Reserve Corps 

Richard Eugene Kern 
Robert Edgar Krafft 
Harvey Wilson Kreuzburg, Jr. 
James Michael Lanigan, Jr. 
Luther Edgar Mellen, Jr. 
Ned Herman Oakley 
Richard James O^Neill 
Frederick Wallace Perkins, Jr. 
Eliott Brightwood Robertson 
George Edward Seeley 
Floyd Allison Soule 
Sydney Snowden Stabler, Jr. 
John Walter Stevens, II 
DoNN Pere Strausbaugh 
Lewis Newton Tarbett 
Charles William Weidinger 
Em MITT Cleveland Witt, Jr. 
Thomas Leslie Wilson 
Francis Joseph Zalesak 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors — Allan Harvey Brown, Earl Wayne Fitzwater, Ellen 

Elizabeth Talcott, Paul McConkey Galbreath 

Second Honors — Robert Andrew Shoemaker, Fred Bern hard Winkler, 

Lawrence Sherwood Faith, Frank Russell McFar- 
land, Jr. 



First Honors- 



College of Arts and Sciences 

-Lydia MacMullan Evans, Etta Carolyn Link, Flor- 
ence Ruth Comer, Harry Davis Anspon, Edward 
Martin Wharton, James Elwood Pitzer, £dwin Rumsey 
Anthony, Jr., Ralph Aarons, John Alexander Krynit- 
SKY, Victor Hartwell Laws, Elizabeth Brown Sher- 

RILL 



397 



Second Honors-R.™ ^^^ ^ p^, ,„,„^^ 

WALTER SlLBERG, EuZABETH ClaRK BaRBER Harrv 

COHEN Daniel Travers Prettyman, Gustavus W.? 

FIEI-D. ETHEL S. LeVINE, ALVIN H. HoniGMAN 1r™;' 
GREENFIELD, CaROLYN DENNETTE ClUGSTON 

College of Commerce 
I- . r s t Honors-IRA Thompson Todd, Jr.. George Henri Pearson E.pp 

MAN, Robert Johnston Bradley ''^''■ 

Second Honors-JEROME Spilman Hardy, Louis Mohler Frey 

_, . College of Education 

F.rstHonors-MYRTLE Grove Burke, Mary Anne Guyther Diav. 

Stevan, Carolyn Isabelle Webster ' '^^ 

Second Honors-ANNA Kathryn Bowman, William Franklin Howard 

Hazel Louise Kalbaugh. Doris Ebert Eichlin ' 

College of Engineering 
F . r s t Honors-PHiLiP Morton Lasswell. Elies Elvove, Thomas Parkeh 

Wharton, Harold Hugo Franke " 

Second Honors— Wiluam Bates nivio t„ d 

i^^m cAii^ JJAVis, Jr., Robert Gottlieb Irvim/> 
Phillips, Henry Alfred Essex ' "ttlieb, Irving 

. ^ College of Home Economics 

First Honors-MARY Lee Aylesworth, Jane Frazer Kephart Kathryn 

Frances Abbott, Kathryn Adkins ^^athryn 

Second Honors-BELL Weir McGinniss, Elizabeth Mary McCormap 

EVELYN WESTOVER ByRD, Betty BURDETTE BaIN ' 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
George Copfman Blevins 

Certificate of Honor 
Harold Edwin Plastpr tjt 

John Hoffman Wooden, Jr. ' * 

School of Law 

Elected to the Order of the Coif 

Talbot Winchester Banks Prakptq fiavto tj 

George Levy Clarke Rm.Mn p ^^'''''' 

KOLAND Custer Ready 
iRViN Henry Cohen 

Alun,„i PHze for the Best Argument in the Honor Case in the Practice Court 

lALBOT Winchester Banks 
398 



George O. Blome Prizes to Representatives on the Honor Case 

in the Practice Court 
Talbot Winchester Banks Charles Bernard Kelly, Jr. 

THOMAS Bernard Finan, Jr. Melvin Stanley Silberg 

School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 
James Baker Nuttall 

Certificate of Honor 
Francis McLaughlin Thomas Scott Sexton 

Raymond Murray Cunningham Leland Bates Stevens 
William Harvey Leitch Ramsay Berry Thomas 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the Best Work in 

Genito-Urinary Surgery during the Senior Year 
Leonard Wallenstein 

School of Nursing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship, given by the University of Maryland 
Nurses* Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in Administra- 
tion, Supervisory, or Public Health Work at Teachers 
College, Columbia University, to the Student Hav- 
ing the Highest Average in Scholarship 
Nancy Lou Craven 

The Elizabeth Collins Lee Prize to the Student Having 

the Second Highest Average in Scholarship 

Virginia Belle Richardson 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize for the Highest Average 

in Executive Ability 
Nancy Lou Craven 

The Edwin and Leander M. Zimmerman Prize for Practical Nursing and for 
Displaying the Greatest Interest and Sympathy for the Patients 

Marguerite Wilson Foster 

The University of Maryland Nurses* Alumnae Association Pin, and Member- 
ship in the Association, for Practical Nursing and Executive Ability 

Louise Margaret Hollister 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence 
Maurice Wiener 

The William Simon Memorial Prize for Proficiency in Practical Chemistry 

Melvin Mutchnik 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 
Victor Hugo Morgenroth, Jr. 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

Louis Thomas Sabatino 

Certificate of Honor 
Eugene Jacobs 



399 






REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 

TRAINING CORPS, 1939-1940 

COLONEL MERLE REED PREBLE. Commajiding: 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL THOMAS L. COLEMAN, Regimental Executive Officer 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL THOMAS W. RILEY, Adjutant 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOSEPH M. MARZOLF, Plans and Training Officer 

FIRST BATTALION 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL ROBERT W. LAUGHEAD, Commanding 
MAJOR WILLARD C. JENSEN, Executive Officer 
FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE L. FLAX, Adjutant 



NON- 



COMPANY "A" 

Captain Joseph A. Parks 

1st Lieut. Ralph Albarano 

1st Lieut. Morgan Tenny 

2nd Lieut. Herman J. Baden- 
hoop 



COMPANY *'B" 

Captain Francis X. Beamer 
1st Lieut, Elmer Freemire 
2nd Lieut. Richard K. Barnes 
2nd Lieut. H. B. Hambleton 



COMPANY "C* 

Captain Frank J. Skotnicki 
1st Lieut. William G. Esmond 
2nd Lieut. Carl Blumenstein 
2nd Lieut. William F. Yocum 



SECOND BATTALION 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL ENOS RAY. Commanding 
MAJOR CHARLES C. HOLBROOK, Executive Officer 
FIRST LIEUTENANT P'RED J. HUGHES, Adjutant 



COMPANY "D" 

Captain William G. Souder 
1st Lieut. John Grier 
1st Lieut. Chas. W. Bastian 
2nd Lieut. William E. Brown 



COMPANY "E" 

Captain Robert S. Brown 
1st Lieut. Huyette B. Oswald 
2nd Lieut. Nicholas Budkoff 
2nd Lieut. H. F. Kimball 



COMPANY*'F'* 

Captain Warren E. Steiner 
1st Lieut. R. J. Lodge 
2nd Lieut. J. Newton Cox 
2nd Lieut. Vernon R. Foster 



THIRD BATTALION 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL WILLIAM H. McMANUS, JR., Commanding 
MAJOR LOUIS HENNIGHAUSEN, Executive Officer 
SECOND LIEUTENANT HAROLD DILLON, Adjutant 



COMPANY "G" 

Captain George Heil 
1st Lieut. James A. McGregor 
2nd Lieut. Donald Davidson 
2nd Lieut. S. M. Meginniss 



COMPANY "H" 

Captain Burton D. Borden 
1st Lieut. Adam T. Stoddart 
2nd Lieut. W. B. Davis 
2nd Lieut. Oscar Nevares 

FOURTH BATTALION 



««¥'♦ 



COMPANY *'I 

Captain Carl H. Stewart 
1st Lieut. Mason Chronister 
2nd Lieut. C. A. Dietrich 
2nd Lieut. Ralph J. Tyser 



LIEUTENANT COLONEL RICHARD LEE. Commanding 

MAJOR ALAN R. MILLER. Executive Officer 

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEORGE D. ALLEN, Adjutant 



<(ir'> 



COMPANY "K 

Captain Edward T. Naughten 
1st Lieut. John K. Shipe 
2nd Lieut. C. M. Forsyth 
2nd Lieut. G. H. Storrs 



COMPANY *'L*» 

Captain H. F. Cotterman, 
Jr. 

1st Lieut. G. E. Lawrence 

2nd Lieut. Paul Lanham 

2nd Lieut. R. E. O'Farrell 

BAND 

CAPTAIN L. J. OTTEN 

400 



COMPANY "M' 



Captain Wm. H. Watkins 
1st Lieut. Arthur M. Rudy 
2nd Lieut. H. G. Gallagher 
2nd Lieut. E. F. Harlan 



COMPANY "A* 



W. F. Gannan 



J. M. Beattie 
R. D. Mattingly 
R. A. Groves 



B. M. Hall 

H. A. Tapper 

J. N. Bauernschmidt 



"r»'» 



COMPANY "D 



D. C. Kelly 



D. Custer 

D. G. Drawbaugh 

B. L. Jones 



J. F. Cherry 
G. Valenti 



««r?»» 



COMPANY "G 



A. B. Rice 



J. F. Greenip 
S. C. Streep 
T. Hitch 



E. C. Saltzman 
H. M. Hink 
D. P. Marshall 



«»«•♦♦ 



COMPANY "K 



R. Hodges 

T. A. Hughes 
C. W. Wannan 
R. W. Saum 

J. C. McDevitt 
J. H. Randall 
E. F. Bright 



COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

FIRST BATTALION 

COMPANY "B" 
First Sergreants 
L. J. Hodgins 

Platoon Sersreants 



J. M. Carter 
J. L. Meakin 
R. A. Clark 

Guide Sergeants 
V. J. Haddaway 
W. K. Brendle 
E. M. Lloyd 

SECOND BATTALION 
COMPANY "E** 

First Sergeants 
J. C. Marzolf 

Platoon Sergeants 
E. L. Daniels 
R. D. Rappleye 
J. F. Edgerton 

Guide Sergeants 
W. E. McMahon 
R. F. Crump 
D. A. Onnen 

THIRD BATTALION 
COMPANY "H" 

First Sergeants 

T. E. Watson 

Platoon Sergeants 

Lacy Hall 
F. C. Maisel 
D. J. Harwood 

Guide Sergeants 
N. H. Silverman 
A. V. Minion 
M. Pennella 

FOURTH BATTALION 

COMPANY "L" 

First Sergeants 
S. M. Whalen 

Platoon Sergeants 
H. M. Hutson 
J. E. Weber 
W. J. Suit 

Guide Sergeants 
E. B. Harwood 
R. T. Skeen 

BAND 

First Sergeant 
F. O. Siebeneichen 

401 



COMPANY *'C*' 



N. R. Jones 



J. L. Crone 
N. A. Miller 
R. F. Davis 

G. M. Chapline 
F. A. Dwyer 



COMPANY "F" 

R. C. Rice 

F. W. Glaze 
R. L. Reid 
J. R. Finton 

J. H. Rochstroh 
W. C. Downs 
W. P. Johnson 



COMPANY 

R. R. Westfall 

L. H. Haskin 
E. C. Wagner 
J. J. Ryan 

T. G. Timberlake 
J. M. Powell 

COMPANY 

J. G. Reckord 



A. E. Imus 
J. B. Burnside 
A. M. Horn 

J. E. Hamill 
W. H. Talcott 
L. T. Schroeder 



«•»•♦ 



"M" 



Register of Students, 1939-40 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Sophomore Class 



l< 



Senior 

Ahalt, Louis F., Middletown 
Aist, Wilmer F., Jessup 
Beneze, George C, Annapolis 
Brinckerhoff, Mary L., Lansdowne, Pa. 
Brosius, J. William, Jr., Adamstown 
Butler, Walter M., Dickerson 
Cole, Albert H., Linthicum Heights 
C-^tterman, Harold F., Jr., College Park 
Crist, Howard G., Jr., Glenelg 
Danforth, F. Elaine, Baltimore 
Daugherty, Edward B., Jr., Delmar, Del. 
Davis, Virginia E., Washington, D. C. 
Dougherty, Edward J., Baltimore 
Farrington, Edith, Chevy Chase 
Faulkner, Edgar F., Lansdowne 
Forsyth, Carroll M., Friendsville 
Foster, Vernon R., Parkton 
Fullington, Page DeF., Washington, D. C. 
Gatch, Benton R., Baltimore 
Gude, John J., Hyattsville 
Hansel, William, Vale Summit 
Harris, George J., Lonaconing 
Harrison, Venton R., Washington, D. C. 
Hess, Kenneth S., Washington, D. C. 
Hodson, Virginia E., Baltimore 
Howard, Park P., Havre de Grace 
Huffer, Sarah V., Boonsboro 
Jones, Kenneth F., Newport, Del. 



Class 

Kefauver, Fred S., Middletown 
Keller, J. Hugh, Middletown 
Kemp, Margaret C, College Park 
Leise, Joshua M., Washington, D. C. 
MacLeod, Mary F., Washington, D. C, 
McGregor, James A., Worton 
Meade, DeVoe K., Takoma Park 
Menke, Margaret C, Washington, D. C. 
Merritt, Joseph S., Dundalk 
Miller, Lee A., Hyattsville 
Morris, J. Burton, College Park 
Nevares, Oscar W., Baltimore 
Oakley, Ned H., Washington, D. C. 
Pohlhaus, Joseph N., Baltimore 
Redding, William V., Street 
Rudy, Arthur M., Middletown 
Schmier, Charles N., Woodlawn 
Sheibley, David F., Newport, P;i. 
Smith, Wilson L., Jr., Stevenson 
Stevens, Robert LeR., Street 
Stouflfer, Frances J., Berwyn 
Swann, Agnes H., Helen 
Talbott, Dorothy E., Clarksville 
Taylor, Frank W., Ridgely 
Ward, Stevenson A., Havre de Grace 
Winter, Joseph S., Silver Spring 
Wisner, Gaylord H., Washington, D. C. 



Janior Class 



Bailey, Howard M., Parkton 

Beattie, James M., Beltsville 

Bierer, Donald S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bothe, Henry C, Baltimore 

Brown, Virginia L., Washington. D. C. 

Chance, Charles M., Easton 

Christensen, Hilde M., Hyattsville 

Cox, Daniel T., La.wrence, N. Y. 

Cragin, Lexey J., Greenbelt 

Crist, Lee S., Glenelg 

Donn, Maryan S., Hollywood 

Eyler, Laura H., Baltimore 

Forbes, Ian, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Gordon, Jack L., Riverdale 

Hoflfman, Frank H., Edmonston 

Hoshall. George W., Parkton 

Jehle, John R., Hyattsville 

Johnson, David O., Takoma Park 

Kelly, David C. Jr.. Fort Meade 

Kluge. Gordon L., Washington, D. C. 

T.ange. PTiyllis S., Washington, D. C. 

Lichliter, Lawrence D., Washington, D. C. 



Mahrer, Mary E., Wilmington, Del. 

Meyer, Robert C, Baltimore 

Milkie, Frederick E., Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Alan R., Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Norman A., Jr., Hyattsville 

Mulladay, John T., Washington, D. C, 

Polan, Alvin F., Baltimore 

Punnett, Ruth S., Leonia, N. J. 

Rappleye, Robert DuB., Washington, D. C. 

Rea, William, Takoma Park 

Reid, John T., Siebert 

Rice. Floyd E., Takoma Park 

Ryan, Hilda H., Washington, D. C. 

Ryaji, John J., Rockville 

Scoville, Raymond M., Silver Spring 

Shelton, Emma, Chevy Chase 

Suit, William J., Washington, D. C. 

Thurston, Margaret J., Riverdale 

Treakle, Hugh C. Street 

Vogt, George B., Catonsville 

Weber, Jack E., Oakland s 

Yochelson, Aaron, Anacostia 



Adkin Lee W., Snow Hill 
Anderson, Harry W., Washington, D. C. 
Astle, Norris C, Rising Sun 
Bernstein, Alfred, Washington, D. C. 
Bosley, Glenn M., Sparks 
Boyce, William W., Jr., Lutherville 
Boyer, William W. Ferryman 
Brauner, Donald J., Hyattsville 
Briggs, Gilbert P., Bethesda 
Buddington, Philip N., College Park 
Cabrera, Rafael L., Washington, D. C. 
Calver, Georgianna E., North Beach 
Clark, George E., Jr., Havre de Grace 
Clendaniel, Charles E., Stewartstown, Pa, 
Cooley, John D., Jr., Aberdeen 
Cooley, Stuart J., Berwyn 
Cruikshank, Thomas C, Galena 
Day, William W., Street 
deAlba, Jorge, Washington, D. C. 
Degen, Rudolph G., Chevy Chase 
DiGiulian, Charles A., Hillside 
Downes, Marshall H., Centreville 
Duguid, George C, Riverdale 
Dunster, Harold P., Jr., Baltimore 
Durm, William B., Baltimore 
Edwards, Robert H., Baltimore 
Eisenberger, James D., Cumberland 
Elliott, Howard E., Baltimore 

Ernst, Chester G., Clear Spring 

Galbreath, Thomas C, Rocks 

Garrett, Harry A., Rockville 

Garrett, John D., Baltimore 

Goodman, Guy H., Jr., Takoma Park 

Gross, Howard M., Raspeburg 

Gude, Joseph L., Hyattsville 

Harcum, Edward W., Mardela 

Harwood, Elliott B., Baltimore 

Hawley, Walter O., Takoma Park 

Hughes, Frank W., Washington, D. C. 

Hunt, Max VanK., Wysox, Pa. 

Husted, James V., Silver Spring 

Jacques, Samuel A., Smithsburg 

Jarrell, Joseph B., Jr., Ridgely 

Jenkins. Richard L., Suitland 

Jones, H. Bradley, Sharon 

Jones, Joseph W., Sharon 

Jubb, Charles R., Millersville 

Keller, Elmer C, Middletown 

King, Roland E., Reisterstown 

Klahold, Harold P., Baltimore 

Kolb, Robert W., Baltimore 

Leighton, Irene, Spring Lake. N. J. 

Leister, Richard A., Washington, D. C. 
Levy, Stanley, Baltimore 
Libeau, Clayton P., College Park 



Liden, Conrad H., Federalsburg 
Linsley, Herbert C, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Marshall, Donald P., Berlin 
Martin, Calvin S., Rockville 
Mayne, Mehrl F., Rockville 
McDonald, Leib, Maryland Line 
McGregor, William A., Worton 
McKay, Robert H., Rocky Ridge 
Meredith, George G., Centreville 
Michaels, Sheldon, New York, N. Y. 
Miles, William W., Gaithersburg 
Miller, Vernon H., Laurel 
Nicholson, Clark O., Dickerson 
Nordeen, Carl E., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Northam, David E., Snow Hill 
Osborn, James G., Aberdeen 
Porter, Carlton H., Greensboro 
Porter, Robert C, Washington, D. C. 
Radebaugh, Carroll M., Towson 
Rehberger, Edward A., Jr., Baltimore 
Reiblich, Karl F., Woodlawn 
Reid, Frank S., Siebert 
Rose, Donald B., Baltimore 
Ryon, Mary F., Springfield, Mo. 
Sachs, Carl A., Washington, D. C. 
Scarborough, Rowan L., Silver Spring 
Schaffer, J. David, Laurel 
Schilling, John M.. Baltimore 

Sesso, Raymond F., Washington, D. C. 

Siegrist, Jacob C, Baltimore 
Sigrist, Paul E., Westover 

Skinner, James H., Barclay 

Slack, Samuel T., Sykesville 

Smelser, Charles H., Jr., Uniontown 

Smith, Ernest E., Brooklyn 

Smith, Verlin W., Hayesville, N. C. 

Smoot, John J., Catonsville 

Smyth, Randall B., Hagerstown 

Solomon, Marvin B., Baltimore 

Stalcup, Robert E., Berwyn Heights 

Talbott, Edward B.. Clarksville 

Taliaferro, T. Boyd, Jr., Baltimore 

Waite, Alan K., College Park 

Walton, Hugh McK., Washington, D. C. 

Wannan, Charles W., Jr.. Washington. 
D. C. 

Waters, Perrie W., Rockville 

Wehrle, John S., Altoona, Pa. 

Welling, Mordecai G., Sykesville 

Whipp, Roscoe N., Frederick 

Whiteford. Winfield S.. Whiteford 

Whittaker, Burton E., Laurel 

Widener, Frederick D.. Baltimore 

Wilcox. Stanley, Rockville 

Zalph. Isidor S., New York. N. Y. 



402 



403 



Freshman Class 



Anderson, Julian B., Laurel 
Archer, Norman D., Landover 
Baity, Earl C. Jr., Street 
Baker, Nevin S., New Windsor 
Baker, Ralph V., Mountain Lake Park 
Barger, Blair B., Upper Marlboro 
Barnes, Norman R., Port Deposit 
Baumann, Joseph C, Mt. Rainier 
Benson, Henry F., Berwyn 
Benson, Robert H., Clarksville 
Biondi, Harry J., Jr., Riverdale 
Biser, Lloyd C, Hagerstown 
Black, Benjamin F., Reisterstown 
Bialove, Daniel C, Washington, D. C. 
Brennan, Joseph M., New York, N. Y. 
Brice, Julian T., Baltimore 
Brill, Harold W., Mt. Rainier 
Briscuso, Amleto J., Washington, D. C. 
Bryan, James E., Jr., Queenstown 
Brylawski, Alan W., Washingotn, D. C. 
Burlin, Amos M., Port Deposit 
Calhoun, John K., Westminster 
Carr, Richard D., Baltimore 
Cartagena, Nicholas M., Caguas, P. R. 
Carter, John McC, Rockville 
Chilson, LeMar M., Riverdale 
Clark, John E., Rockville 
Clarke, Margaret E. O., Annapolis 
Cleveland, Richard A., Garrett Paik 
Comstock, Robert O., Bethesda 
Corey, Arthur T., Pasadena 
Costa, Avelino M., Chevy Chase 
Crist, Hartley D., Glenelg 
Dameron, L. Yates, Hyattsville 
Davis, Russell C, Rockville 
Davis, William McN.. Whiteford 
Dillon, John A., Hyattsville 
Donaldson, William S., Catonsville 
Dunlap, Lohr E., Winchester, Va. 
Durst, Harry P., Silver Spring 
Durst, John, Silver Spring 
Eyster, Glenn R., York New Salem. Pa. 
Gales, Richard E., Laurel 
Gibson, Harry Jr., White Hall 
Gies, Donald G., Crownsville 
Gordy, Irving McK., Linkwood 
Grafton, Merrell L., Forest Hill 
Gray, Francis A., Jr., Chaptico 
Green, V. Edwin, Washington, D. C. 
Griswold, Richard M., Silver Spring 
Gritzan, Robert F., Silver Spring 
Groome, William B., Mechaiiicsville 
Hahn, Madison N„ Annapolis Junction 
Hance, Benjamin L., Wilson 
Handen, Sylvan L., Baltimore 
Harrison, John T., Tilghman 



Harrison, Walter VanA., Jr., Baltimore 

Heckrotte, Walter B., Jr., Baltimore 

Henesy, Russell E., Chewsville 

Hoopengardner, Joseph L., Hagerstown 

Hopkins, Samuell E., Brinklow 

Horn, Norman L., Baltimore 

Hudson, Marion C, Delmar 

Jacques, Edgar G., Smithsburg 

Johns, Wilford E.. Hyattsville 

Johnson, Robert W., Germantown 

Kahoe, Stephen M., Jr., Joppa 

Kautz, Paul H., Baltimore 

Kemp, William B., Baltimore 

Kendall, Donald J., Jr., Alexandria, Va. 

Klein, Victor P., Baltimore 

Knox, Philander C, Towson 

Korab, Harry E., Brentwood 

Kott, Thaddeus J., Jamaica, N. Y. 

Kubler, Warren H., Federalsburg 

Lane, William E., Stevensville 

Lane, William L., Bozman 

Lankford, Stanley E., Pocomoke City 

Leizman, Theodore, Baltimore 

Lewis, Ralph H., Hyattsville 

Lowe, William B., Pylesville 

MacDonald, Thomas A., Washington, D. C. 

Manuel, Glenn H., Chevy Chase 

Markley, William K., Washington, D. C. 

Matthews, Lewis J., Takoma Park 

Mattingly, John P., Riverdale 

Mause, James P., Myers ville 

Mitchell, Charles W., Ill, Baltimore 

Mitchell, George G., Bloomfield. N. J. 

Mizell, Russell F., Jr., Kensington 

Montgomery, William T., Charlestown 

Moore, John E., Upper Marlboro 

Moore, Robert C, Anacostia, D. C. 

Mueller, Raymond G., Ccdova 

Myers, Merl D., Baltimore 

Neuman, Harry I., Washington, D. C. 

Novick, Shulamith, Washington, D. C. 

Oltman, John W., Berlin 

Pappas, George A., Washington, D. C. 

Parkman, Theodore G., Jr., Silver Spring 

Peak, Frank L., Washington, D. C. 

Perry, Gilbert W., Annapolis 

Phillips, Arthur G., Lonaconing 

Pitcher, Charles W., Jr., Trenton, N. J. 

Plummer, DonaJd B., Hagerstown 

Prigel, James M., Gittings 

Quinn, Patrick J., Towson 

Ralston, Norvell S., Bowie 

Ramey, David S., Towson 

Rassier, Henry J., Washington. D. C. 

Reisinger, Robert C, Miami. Fla. 

Reith. William A., College Park 



Reynolds, Kenton C, Washington, D. C. 

Kosenstadt, Aaron A. S., Baltimore 

Rubenstein, Daniel, Baltimore 

St. Clair, Charles W., Rocks 

Salisbury, Bernard F., East Hampton, N. Y. 

Samper, Armando, Washington, D. C. 

Sandler, Robert, Baltimore 

Schaeflfer, Edgar A., Westminster 

Schlosnagle, Eugene S., Accident 

Schloss, Irvin P., Baltimore 

Schlup, Lester A., Washington, D. C. 

Scott, Henry I., Friendship Heights 

Seifert, August A., Jr., Baltimore 

Seitz, Frank L., Bowie 

Seltzer, Charles P., Silver Spring 

Simpkins, Lloyd L., Princess Anne 

Skemp, Glenn S., Washington, D. C. 

Smith, James W., Knoxville 

Smith, Warren C, Woodsboro 

Smith, Willis A., Forest Hill 

Snesil, Jerome A., Baltimore 

Sprott, George F., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Squeri, Frank J., Blairstown, N. J. 

Steger, Joseph M., Hyattsville 



Stephens, Clyde W., Lansdowne 
Stevens, James T., Barclay 
Stevens, William C, Takoma Park 
Stewart, Charles N., Washington, D. C. 
Stringer, George F., Washington, D. C. 
Sykes, Alexander R., Jessups 
Talmadge, Daniel W., Cheshire, Conn. 
Tessier, James L., Hyattsville 
Thompson, Phillip St. C, Ellicott City 
Todd, Alexander M., Jr., Dundalk 
Tolson, Greydon S., Bethesda 
Vanaman. John W., Gloucester, N. J. 
Vicino, Dominic J., Washington, D. C. 
Volbers, William A., Erie, Pa. 
Ward, Maurice C, Germantown 
Waugh, Christopher J., Gloucester, N. J. 
Weston, Phillip H., Vienna, Va. 
White, Frank F., Jr., Lanham 
Whitman, Julian R., Wellesley Hills. Mass. 
Williams, John R., University Park 
Williams, Tilghman H., Goldsboro 
Wilson, Jacqueline S., Annapolis 
Wimert, Paul M., Jr., Westminster 
Worthington, John D., Ill, Bel Air 



Part Time 



Arnold, Sophia B. (Mrs.), Windsor, 

Vermont 
Barber, Charles A., Washington, D. C. 
Cotter, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 
Crawford, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Dickey, Ernest G., Baltimore 
Earle, Imogene P. (Mrs.), Laurel 
Eberle, Allan R., College Park 
Jenkins, Eben C, Hyattsville 
Lipchin, Leonard, Eastport 
Matthews, Harry B., Jr., Salisbury 



Mitchell, William O., Parma, Idaho 

Morris, Harry R., Jr., Baldwin 

Muth, Mary-Lee (Mrs.). Ellicott City 

Perkins, John J., Greenbelt 

Phelps, R. Nelson, New Windsor 

Riggs, Francis H., Brookeville 

Schleis, Joseph J., Beltsville 

Spawn, William, Washington, D. C. 

VanEtten, Cecil H., Beltsville 

Wilcox, Marguerite S., Washington, D. C. 



Unclassified 



Alt, Theodore W., Washington, D. C. 

Bartlett, William K., Trappe 

Brown, Lewis A., Bagley 

Campbell, George A., College Park 

Fogle, Charles E., New Windsor 

Furst, Walter A., Jr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 



Goss, Lelia M., Lanham 
Harman, William E., Accident 
Hinkle, Peyton L., Washington. D. C. 
Nevitt, Anna M., Washington, D. C. 
Nitsch, Norbert C. Jr., Baltimore 
Webb, Clay McA., Jr., Vienna 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Senior Class 



Abrams, David A., Beckley, W. Va. 
Aiello, Catherine C, Hyattsville 
Auerbach, Lawrence W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Axtell, Harold A., Jr., Takoma P:nk 
Baldwin, Agnes C, Berwyn 
Barre, L. Bernice, Washington, D. C. 
Benavent, Belen N., San German. P. R. 
Blum, Alice M., Baltimore 



Blumenstein, Carl R., Washington. D. C. 

Bond, Marian W., Washington, D. C. 

Bond, William R.. Relay 

Bonnett, Howard G., Washington, D. C 

Booth, Muriel M., Baltimore 

Bowers, Leslie L., Washington, D. C. 

Bragaw, Josephine M., Augusta, Ga. 

Britton, Rose E., Washington, D. C. 



404 



405 



\ 



Buch, Eloise A. A., Baltimore 

Burk, Joseph, Woodlawn 

Clark, Camille C, College Park 

Cole, William P. Towson 

Davis, Gayle M., St. John, N. B., Canada 

Dennis, Dorothy C, Woodbury, N. J. 

Dieudonne, Erasmus L., Jr., Bladensburg 

Dillon, Harold, Baltimore 

Dwiggins, Roscoe D., College Park 

Edyvean, John H., Baltimore 

Esmond, William G., Washington, D. C. 

Ettin, Pearl, Teaneck, N. J. 

Fawcett, Howard H., Cumberland 

Fisch, Lee A., S. Orange, N. J. 

Freedman, Leona S., Baltimore 

Furbershaw, Olga S.. Edgemoor 

Gardiner, Louise St. C, Washington. D. C. 

Gile, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Goller, Carl, Baltimore 

Greenwood, Judith K., Washington, D. C. 

Griffith, Mary L., College Park 

Hampshire, Evelyn L., Towson 

Harrington, Mary J.. Washington, D. C. 

Harris, Pauline C. Elkton 

Harrover, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 

Head. Julia E., College Park 

Henderson, Adrienne M., Chevy Chase 

Hornstein, Audrey A., Baltimore 

Hunter, Mary E., Chevy Chase 

Hurley, Walter V., Hyattsville 

Irvine, Ann H., Chicago, 111. 

Jett, Geraldine V., Chevy Chase 

Johnston, Margaret E., Washington 

Kaufman, Daniel, Washington, D. C. 

King. Vernon J.. Baltimore 

Koenig, Ruth E., Baltimore 

Kraus, John W., Catonsville 

Langford. Bertha M., Washington, D. C. 

Lee, Richard M.. Bethesda 

Legge, Martha J., Cumberland 

Lehman, Milton L., Baltimore 

Junior 

Adams, Adelaide C, Washington, D. C. 

Anchell, Melvin, Baltimore 

Arnold, Bessie L., Takoma Park 

Ashman, Robert E., Baltimore 

Augustine, Frances M., Seat Pleasant 

Baldwin, Janet K., Berwyn 

Baldwin, Ruth E. W. (Mrs.), Washington. 

D. C. 
Beattie, Edna P., Bladensburg 
Benson, Susan E., Relay 
Blackman, Maulsby N., Woodside Park 
BonDurant, Edgar H., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Bradley, Eleanor J.. Upper Darby. Pa. 
Brandt, Frederick B., Washington, D. C. 
Brice, Mary E., Baltimore 



Leonard, James D., Chevy Chase 
Long, Ruth E., Salisbury 
McClay, Harriette N., Hyattsville 
Mclndoe, Margaret R., Lonaconing 
McManus, William H., Berwyn 
Mintz, Milton D., Plainfield, N. J. 
Palmer, Carroll F., Washington, D. C. 
Parks, Joseph A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Paterson, Bess L., Towson 
Pearson, Henry R., St. George's Island 
Pinas, Samuel R., Baltimore 
Pyle, Mary E., Frederick 

Ray, Enos, Fair Haven 

Remsburg, Charles G., Berwyn 

Rice, Bernard, Baltimore 

Ringwald, Oweri E., Hyattsville 

Rochlin, Martin, Baltimore 

Rubin, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 

Sachs, M. Bertram, Baltimore 

St. Clair, Betty D., College Park 

Scheffler, Rita A., Bethesda 

Seidel. David L., Takoma Park 

Seligson, David. Berwyn 

Sempeles, George, Baltimore 

Simpson, Mary E., Trappe 

Smith, Adria J., Baltimore 

Souder, William H., Jr., Washington. D. C. 

Soule, Floyd A., Washington, D. C. 

Sterling. Harold, Washington, D. C. 

Stern, Harry W., Washington, D. C. 

Terl, Armand, Baltimore 

Thompson, Franklin L.. Washington. D. C 

Turner, Katherine L., Washington, D. C. 

Ubides, Pedro F.. Ponce, P. R. 

Vaiden. Sara A.. Baltimore 

Wade, John P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Waters, Robert W., Princess Anne 
Welsh, Helen O.. Hyattsville 
West, William V., Chevy Chase 

White. Joseph G., Baltimore 
Wilson, Naomi L., Fulton 



Class 



Bridge, Herbert S., TaJcoma Park 
Brill, Warren D., North Beach 
Brooks, Eva, Baltimore 
Campbell, Dorothy M., Riverdale 
Cann, Alice V., Baltimore 
Carson, Betsy J., Chevy Chase 
Chaney, Jack W., Annapolis 
Christensen, Edith A., Hyattsville 
Cissel, Elizabeth M., Washington. D. C. 
Clark, Kenneth J., Baltimore 
Clark. Richard A., Alexandria, Va. 
Coe, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 
Coleman, Albert S., Washington, D. C. 
Cook, Elmer E., Jr., Brooklyn 
Curtis, Elizabeth J., Ellicott City 



406 



Dammeyer, Robert E., Annapolis 

Davis, Frank I., Poolesville 

Davis, Ralph F.. Camp Holabird 

Davy, Charles D., Washington, D. C. 

Day, Margaret W., Chevy Chase 

Dicus, Frances A., Arlington, Va.. 

Diggs, William B., Jr., Baltimore 

Dorr. Charles R., Washington, D. C. 

Dozier, Douglas B.. Silver Spring 

Drawbaugh, David G., Jr., Hagerstown 

Evans, Ruth E., Baltimore 

Evering, George C, Baltimore 

Ewing, Lydia F.. Takoma Park 

Farkas, Robert W., York, Pa. 

Farley, Belmont G., Washington, D. C. 

Foote, Ellen C, Chevy Chase 

Fox, Harvey E.. Seat Pleasant 

Frye. Donald H., Laurel 

Genovesi, Joseph, Baltimore 

Goldbeck, Clara G., Chevy Chase 

Gooch, Dennie, Jr.. Pulaski, Ky. 

Gubnitsky, Albert, Baltimore 

Guyther, J. Roy, Mechanicsville 

Hamill, James E., Bethesda 

Harris, Joseph, Baltimore 

Harvey, Marian W., College Park 

Harwood, Daniel J., Baltimore 

Hellstern, Charlotte M., Teaneck, N. J. 

Henderson, Mary D.. Rockville 

Hollingsworth, Treva F., Washington. D. C. 

Hutson, Harry M.. Cumberland 

Ingraham, Wilson G.. Washington, D. C. 

Jaworski, Melvin J., Baltimore 

Johnson, William P., Glen Burnie 

Jones, Bobby L., Relay 

Kassel, Victor, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Katz, Bertha, Washington, D. C. 

Keeney, Dan F., Walkersville 

Kemp, Lois V., Baltimore 

Kempton, Hildreth, La^iham 

Kirkman, Harriet V., Catonsville 

Kress, Bernice E., Baltimore 

Ksanda, Charles F., Washington, D. C. 

Kuhn, Helene L., Baltimore 

Lane, David, Baltimore 

Ijanza, Francisco M. Aguirre, P. R. 

Lesley, Vernon M., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Levin, Naomi H., Baltimore 

Tjevine, Stuart C, Baltimore 

T^ewis, Thomas H., Maplewood, N. J. 

Long. Mary V., Muncie, Ind. 

Lowenthal, Jean E., New York, N. Y. 

Luber, Laura E., Washington, D. C. 

Madorsky, Irving, Washington, D. C. 

Makover, Jeanne A., Baltimore 

Mangum, Lola M., Silver Spring 

Mazur. Alexander, Shelton. Conn. 

Mclnturff, George F.. Washington, D. C. 



McMahon, William E., II, Washington. 

D. C. 
Meakin, J. Leonard, Washington, D. C. 
Meriam, Martha P.. Kensington 
Miller, Robert A.. Branchville 
Milloff, Bernard, Silver Spring 
Moore, George C, Jr., Queen Anne 
Nichols, Irene M., Washington, D. C. 
Nichols, Kathryn L., Hurlock 
Nielsen, Anna M., Stamford, Conn. 
Norcross, Theodore W.. Chevy Chase 
Nowell, Ellsworth B., Linthicum Heights 
Palese, John M., Baltimore 
Pfeil, Edgar T., Jr., Baltimore 
Pohlman, Thelma V. L., Landover 
Powell, Alwyn M., Baltimore 
Preble, Merle R., College Park 
Raymond, Betty H., Washington. D. C. 
Reid, Richard S., Chevy Chase 
Rice, Alvin B., Greenwich, Conn. 
Richmond, Barbara A., Chevy Chase 
Richmond, Naomi M., Cottage City 
Riedel, Kathryn E., Hyattsville 
Robertson, Alice C, Washington, D. C. 
Rogers, Jerome S., Jr., Bethesda 
Royster, Patsy A., Bethesda 
Ruppersberger, Marjorie E., Baltimore 
Sagle, Quay J., Hagerstown 
Sauerman, Edward E. K., Jr., Linthicum 

Heights 
Schmidt, June C, Randallstown 
Schuler, Walter H., Washington, D. C. 
Silver, Betty J.. Atlanta, Ga. 
Spelsberg. Walter K., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Stapf, Shirley A., Baltimore 
Sterling, James T., Washington, D. C. 
Stultz, Miriam E., Braddock Heights 
Talbott, Amelia M., Louisville, Ky. 
Talcott, Worthington H., Washington. D. C. 
Tenny, Morgan L., Garrett Park 
Thompson. Talmadge S.. Silver Spring 
Tiller. Richard E., Washington, D. C. 
Tool, Arthur Q., Jr., Talcoma Park 
Tulin, Molly B., Hartford, Conn. 
Turner, Alice V., Washington, D. C. 
Wallace, Florence M., Bethesda 
Waters, Mary E., Odenton 
Watson, William W.. Catonsville 
White, Kenneth S., Hyattsville 
Whitten, John M., Annapolis 
Wills, Charlie C, Jackson, Miss. 
Wilson, Irene L.. Mt. Rainier 
Woodring, Judy W., Chevy Chase 
Woodward, Charles W., Jr., Rockville 
Yaffe, Stanley M., Baltimore 
Yagendorf, June L., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Ziegler, Paul R., Baltimore 



407 



Sophomore Class 



Abell, Joseph D., Leonardtown 
Abelman, Rita, Atlanta. Ga. 
Aiello. Dorothy A., Hyattsville 
Allen, Charles B., Towson 
Amsterdam, Benjamin, Newark, N. J. 
Andrews, Richard L., Kresgeville, Pa. 
Ardinger, Joseph S., Jr., Catonsville 
Arias, Rogelio E., Panama City, R. p 
Armstrong. Robert H., Jr., Washington. 
D. C 

Bacas, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 

Bacharach. Carl W.. Baltimore 

Badenhoop. William H., Baltimore 

Bailey, Read T., LaPlata 

BaJton, Esther E., Baltimore 

Barker, Katherine E., Washington, D. C. 

Barthel, Carl C, Catonsville 

Baugher. Harry G., Catonsville 

Beener, Randa E., Washington, D. C. 

Bell, David F., Jr., Dundalk 

Bell, Houston L., Williamsport 

Benavent, Arturo, Jr.. San German, P. R. 

Bentz. Frank L., Boonsboro 

Bierly, Robert F., University Park 

Bindes, Louis L., Washington, D. C. 

Black. William P., Charleston, W. Va. 

Boggs, Mary L., Chevy Chase 

Booth. William T.. Salisbury 

Borenstein. Frank C, Baltimore 

Boston, Arnold, North Bergen, N. J. 

Bowen, Gilbert C, Washington, D. c! 

Bowers. Cecil D., Woodlawn 

Bowling. James E.. Newport 

Boyd. Foster L.. Washington. D. C. 

Boyer. Elroy G.. Rock Hall 

Bradley. Robert B.. Washington. D. C. 

Brandes. Herbert G.. Washington, D. C. 

Brandt. John M., Jr.. Baltimore 

Brendle. William K.. Baltimore 

Brinckerhoff, John G.. Lansdowne. Pa. 

Brooks. Helen M.. Rockville 

Brooks. Sylvia. Annapolis 

Brosius. Dorothy G.. Baltimore 

Brown. Norma D.. Landover 

Bruns. Helen A.. Baltimore 

Buckingham. Ritchie. Washington. D. C. 

Bnrbage, Jean E.. Berlin 

Burke. Francis V.. Silver Spring 

Burklin. Mary W.. Washington. D. C. 

Burr. Marguerite E., Leonia. N. J. 

Butler. Harry F.. Cumberland 

Byrn. Rosemary, Cambridge 

Carlton. Jean F.. Fair Haven 

Carr. John R., Takoma Park 

Cassel. Douglass W., Baltimore 

Chapline, George M.. Jr.. Braddock Heights 



Clancy. Georgia K., Takoma Park 
Clark, Clara M.. Takoma Park 
Clark, Dorothy V., Silver Spring 
Cohen, Samuel, Baltimore 
Cole, Milton S., Laurel 
Cook, George R., Silver Spring 
Councill, Wilford A. H., Jr.. Baltimore 
Cragoe. John H., Washington, D. C. 
Craig. Raymond E., Edmonston 
Crilley, Francis J., Washington. D. C. 
Criner, Ploomie E.. Takoma Park 
Culver. Ralph J., Washington. D. C. 
Cunningham. Richard E., Washington, 

D. C. 
Dann, Clayton S., Chevy Chase 
Dantoni. Joseph L.. Baltimore 
Delaney. Atlee M.. Charleston. W. Va. 
Dennis. Elizabeth J.. Ocean City 
Derrick. Daniel M., Washington, D. C. 
DeWitt. George A.. Jr.. Bethesda 
Dodd, Patricia, Savannjih, Ga. 
Dodson. Charles M.. Mt. Airy 
Doukas. Harry M.. Washington. D. C. 
Dowd, James F., Washington, D. C. 
Downey. Hugh P., Washington. D. C. 
Dunbar, Leslie W., Baltimore 
Duty, Mary C, Baltimore 
Easter, Donald P., Washington, D. C. 
Edson, Donald C, Billings. Montana 
Ehman, Shirley A.. Flushing, N. Y. 
Eichhorn. Henry C, Jr., Baltimore 
Einbinder, S. Anita. Hagerstown 
Eisele. Charlotte. Bethesda 
Eleder. Dorothea. Baltimore 
England. Collin B., Washington. D. C. 
England. Helen T., Rockville 
England. William H.. Washington, D. C. 
Fairbanks. Garland ,W., Baltimore 
Farina, Yolanda L., Schenectady 
Feldman. E. Harriet. Salisbury 
Filgate. George E. D.. Washington. D. C. 
Fisher. Allan C, Cumberland 
Frothingham. James R., Jr., Hyattsville 
Fulford. Robert F.. Baltimore 
Gait, Dwight B.. Jr.. Hyattsville 
Garrett, Marshall J., Washington. D. C. 
Gassaway. Franklin D.. Clarksdale, 

Arizona 
Gay-Lord. Henry L.. Baltimore 
Gehman. Jonathan F., Brentwood 
Gendason. Daniel L.. Washington. D. C. 
Gerwig. Doris L.. Ellicott City 
Glenn. Carmela A.. Washington. D. C. 
Goff. Russell H.. Washington. D. C. 
Goldblatt, Hyman. Washington. D. C. 
Goode. Eloise J.. Maddox 



Goodgal, Sol H., Baltimore 
Gordner, Louise E., Jerseytown, Pa. 
Greenip, John F., Washington, D. C. 
Grigg, Walter K., Albany, N. Y. 
Grollman, Jerome, Baltimore 
Groves, Doris E., Waldorf 
Hall, Bruce M., College Park 
Hampshire, Doris L., Towson 
Hance, John C, Washington, N. J. 
Handler, Chester J., Washington, D. C. 
Hanlon, Lucile A., Baltimore 
Hardey, James W., Chevy Chase 
Ham, John N., Baltimore 
Harris, Dorothy M., Washington, D. C. 
Harris, LeRoy S., Damascus 
Hartman, James H., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Harzenstein, Maxine, Washington, D. C. 
Harzenstein, Phyllis, Washington,, D. C. 
Havens, Phyllis L., Kensington 
Hayden, Richard C, Chevy Chase 
Hayman, John B., Jr., Pocomoke 
Hazard, Alfred S., Takoma Park 
Hein, Charles LeR., Glen Burnie 
Hendrickson, Lillian D., Valley Stream, 

N. Y. 
Henry, Robert C, College Park 
Hermann, Adelheid M., Lansdowne 
Herrmann, Albert C, Baltimore 
Heslop, Robert W., Mt. Rainier 
Hevener, K. Hope, Gambrills 
Hewitt, Barton G., Baltimore 
Hill, Harry E., Baltimore 
Hisaw, Lois L., Belmont, Mass. 
Hoen, Anne G., Glyndon 
Hohouser, Henry S., Washington, D. C. 
Holbrook, William A., College Park 
Howard, Jane C, University Park 
Hughes, Doris, Chevy Chase 
Hughes, Erma K., Chevy Chase 
Hughes, Mary K., Quincy, Illinois 
Hurwitz, Hyman, Annapolis 
Hutchins, Miriam E., Barstow 
Huyck, Marjorie E., Baltimore 
Hyde, Myra K., Washington, D. C. 
Hyman, Gilmore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Inches, Robert W.. Laytonsville 
Insler, Robert S., Baltimore 
Isaacs, William H,, Washington. D. C. 
Jacobs, Irving, Port Chester. N. Y. 
Jacques, Julia M., Smithsburg 
James, Helen A., Silver Spring 
Jefferys, Wilbur T., Washington. D. C. 
Johnson, Robert W., Baltimore 
Johnston. Corinne C. Washington. D. C. 
Jones. Charles M., Cumberland 
Jones, James E.. Baltimore 
Jones. John W.. Jr., Baltimore 
Jope, Clifford H., Washington, D. C. 



Kagle, Helen J., Owings Mills 

Kaiser, Julius A., Kensington 

Kaplan, Harry E., Washington. D. C 

Katzenberger, William L.. Catonsville 

Keeny. Roy E.. Mt. Rainier 

Keller, Vivian E., Riverdale 

Kennard, Katherine E., Washington, D. C. 

Kennedy, Marie L., Baltimore 

Kerwin, Walter J., Bennings Station, D. C. 

Kiefer, Alice V., Catonsville 

Kiernan, Harry D., Jr., East Haven, Conn. 

Kindler, Daniel, Passaic. N. J. 

King, Nancy R., Annapolis 

Kluge, Doris V., Washington. D. C. 

Knight. Anza P., Baltimore 

Koehler, Walter O., Washington, D. C. 

Kurzenknabe, Catherine E., Harrisburg. 

Pa. 
Kuslovitz, Irene E., Baltimore 
Kypta, Harold A., Washington, D. C. 
Landy, William C, Clifton, N. J. 
Lank, Murrell C, Washington. D. C. 
Lansdale, Thomas F., Sandy Spring 
Lawrie, David R., Silver Spring 
Lebeck, Clara G., Cumberland 
Leith, Lahoma, Hyattsville 
Lempke. Charles T., Cottage City 
Lewis, John H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Lieberman, Gladys R.. Jersey City, N. J. 
Livingston, Paul S., Washington, D. C. 
Lynch, Betty S., Baltimore 
Lyon, Rosalie T., Hyattsville 
Machen. Valentine. Washington. D. C. 
Martin, Cecil R.. Smithsburg 
Martin. James A.. Emmitsburg 
Matheke. Joan B.. Newark. N. J. 
Maxwell, George A., Severna Park 
Maxwell, Ula V., Salem, W. Va. . 
McCardell, Ethel C, Hagerstown 
McCarty, Barbara I., Washington, D. C. 
McCauley, Harry R., Jr., Baltimore 
McDevitt, Richard C, Baltimore 
McHale, Richard F.. Washington, D. C. 
McKeever, Robert L., Silver Spring 
McKinley. Anne C, Washington. D. C- 
McLaughlin, John L., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Mead. James M., Washington, D. C. 
Meade, Arthur C. Baltimore 
Meanley, Brooke, Baltimore 
Meginniss. Stephen M.. II. Baltimore 
Mehl, Charlson I., Washington. D. C 
Mercer. L. Louise. Landover 
Millikan, Mary, Washington, D. C. 
Mintzer, Donald W., Ocean City, N. J. 
Mitchell, John W., Baltimore 
Moon, Arthur P.. Silver Spring 
Moon. Joan M.. Silver Spring 
Moriarty. Eugene H.. Chicago. 111. 



408 



409 



I 



Morris, Charles B., Delmar 

Morton, John, Mt. Airy 

Mosberg, William H.. Jr., Baltimore 

Neal, Walter L., Frostburg 

Nichols. Helen E., Baltimore 

Nichols, William J., Ck)llege Park 

Nichter, Harry F.. Jr., Takoma Pa. k 

Norment. Richard B., Hagerstown 

Norton, Alfred S.. Washington. D. C 

Ochek. George Z.. New Brunswick. N J 

Ochsenreiter. Eugene C, Chevy Chase 

Olmstead. Merlin E.. Anacostia 

O'Neil, Eileen D.. Washington. D C 

Oursler. Mildred E., Jessup 

Patrick, Mary R., Westernport 

Patton. Jack D.. Edgewood 

Pearson. Elmire. Chevy Chase 

Pennella. Michael. Washington. D. C. 

Perkins. Katharine, Baltimore 

Pierpont, Edwin L., Woodlawn 

Pinkerton, William F., Halethorpe 

Podolsky. William G.. Baltimore 

Polikoff. Marvin. Baltimore 

Poole. Victor H.. Baltimore 

Porter. Bettie V.. Silver Spring 

Prentice. Gerald E.. Hyattsville 

Price. Edward H.. Frostburg 

Prince. Jessie C. Washington. D C 

Prinz. John W.. Jr.. Baltimore 

Prostic. Abraham. Baltimore 

Punte. Charles L.. Baltimore 

Rabenhorst. Daniel C. Washington. D. C 

Ramsey. Roy S.. Jr.. Hyattsville 

Rau. Hammond, Brunswick 

Rawls, Estelle H., Kensington 

Reed. Nancy S.. Schenectady. N. Y. 

Reinstedt. Beverly J.. Valley Stream. N. Y 

Reynolds. Orr E.. Washington, D. C. 

Rice. Imogene L., Edgewood Arsenal 

Ricketts, Sarah A., Catonsville 

Riley, Eugene J., Sparrows Point 

Ritzenberg. Albert. Friendship. D. C. 

Roberts. Floyd B., Baltimore 

Roberts, Frances A.. Washington. D. C. 

Roelke. Margaret E.. Brunswick 

Rolfes. Harry F.. Mt. Rainier 

Roseman, Morris, Baltimore 

Rowe. Abner T.. Washington. D. C. 

Rowe. Dora M., Brentwocd 

Rowe, William B.. Washington. D. C. 

Royal. Doyle P.. Washington. D. C. 

Rubin. Lillian R.. Washington, D. C. 

Ryon, Ann E., Springfield, Mo. 

Sachs. Harris H.. Bladensburg 

Sack. Margaret E., Baltimore 

Sandman, Harriet M.. Rockville Center 

N. y. 

Santaniello, Nick J., College Park 



Schindel. Katherine M.. Catonsville 
Schmidt, Earl W.. Catonsville 
Schultz, Lenora, Lynbrook. N. Y. 
Scott, John L., Jr., Catonsville 
Seymore, George. Washington, D. C. 
Shaw, Charles E., Jr., Cumberland 
Shaw, David. College Park 
Shay. Clarence M.. Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 
Shelton. Martha H.. Chevy Chase. D. C. 
Shepsle. Philip L., Washington. D. C. 
Sheridan. David L.. New York, N. Y. 
Shirey, Orville C. Cumberland 
Shuman. Beatrice. Scotland 
Simms. Charles F.. Bel Alton 
Simonds, Warren O.. Hyattsville 
Simons, George M.. Cumberland 
Skill. Elizabeth P.. Homestead, Fla. 
Skipton, Roy K.. Mt. Rainier 
Slee. Helen W.. Bethesda 
Sleeth. Annarose C. University Park 
Smith, Frank B., Chevy Chase 
Sparhawk, Martha L.. Washington. D C 
Sparrow. Clifford V.. Washington. D. C. 
Staggers. Delores, Laurel 
Stavitsky, Edward J., Newark. N. J. 
Steele, Robert B., Baltimore 
Steinbach, Harvey B., Baltimore 
Steinberg, Stanley H., Washington, D. C. 
Stell. Theodore J., Washington. D. C. 
Stevan. Mitchell S., College Park 
Stichel. Frederick L.. Jr., Catonsville 
Stone. Bette R., Baltimore 
Stone. John H.. Waldorf 
Stotler. Frances I., Baltimore 
Stowell. Ruth E.. Friendship. D. C. 
Stuart, LaRhett L.. Washington. D. C 
Sullivan, Richard C. Baltimore 
Teller, Leslie W., Chevy Chase 
Teubner, Ray C, EUicott City 
Trimble, Ernest C. Mt. Savage 
Trussell. Howard M.. New York, N. Y. 
Tryon. Max, Washington, D. C. 
Turner, Roy B., Washington. D. C. 
Tuttle, Samuel D., Baltimore 
Vandegrift, Edward W., Greensboro 
Van Horn, Robert L.. Baltimore ' 
Van Huizen. Adrian H., Mt. Rainier 
Vial, Theodore M.. Riverdale 
Waldo. Willis H.. Silver Spring 
Walton. Edward. Washington. D. C. 
Watson, Betty J.. Forest Glenn 
Weare. Josephine W., Washington, D. C 
Webster, Harvey O., Linthicum 
Weintraub. Joseph. Baltimore 
Wiggins. Robert A., Washington, D. C. 
Wilberger. Yvonne M.. Indian Head 
Wilcox. lasca J., College Park 
Wilds, Howard F., Jr.. Baltimore 



William*. Frances D., Cumberland 
Williams. William O., Woodstock 
Winter, Franklin R., Baltimore 
Wlodkowski. EJdward M.. Baltimore 
Woodward, Arthur F., Rockville 
Wright, Robert H., Greensboro 
Wyche, Crosby, Charlotte Hall 
Wyvell. Janet E., Highland 



Yates, Sarah J., Alexandria, Va. 
Yesbek, William R., Washington, D. C. 
Yowell, William B.. Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Ziegler, Mary T., Washington, D. C. 
Zinberg, Norman E., Baltimore 
Zitreen, Zelda, Freeport, N. Y. 



Freshman Class 



410 



Abbadessa, Joan B., Mt. Rainier 
Acker, Ellsworth G.. Baltimore 
Adams. John F., Washington, D. C 
Adlcsberger, Elsie L., Emmitsburg 
Allan. Selma J., Woodbury. N. J. 
Alvord, Dorothy M., Silver Spring 
Andrews, Rodney D.. Washington, D. C. 
Angelakos, John G.. Somerville, N. J. 
Anthony. Louis E. B.. Chestertown 
Apuzzio. John L., Elizabeth. N. J. 
Arabia.n, Mary. Baltimore 
Ardis, Barbara M., Snow Hill 
Auslund, Anna V., Takoma Park 
Bach, Frederick L., Washington, D. C. 
Bachrach, Stanley M., Washington, D. C. 
Bageant, A. Granville. Washington. D. C. 
Baker. Muriel L., Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Banfill. Margaret M., Washington, D. C. 
Barker. David H., Washington, D. C. 
Barsky, Ruth P., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Baylin. Cynthia, Baltimore 
Beale. Lorraine E., Washington. D. C. 
Bechtold, Charles A., laurel 
Bell, Helen. Hyattsville 
Benecke. John F.. Baltimore 
Bennett, Edith M.. California 
Benson, Richard V., Silver Spring 
Berman, Alvin M., Baltimore 
Berman, Shirley M., Baltimore 
Bickford, Frederick H. C, Jr.. Clinton 
Bierbusch, Marcella M.. Takoma Park 
Blamire. William B.. Washington, D. C. 
Bloede, Victor G.. Catonsville 
Bonham, Mary C. Greenbelt 
Bonifant. Alfred D., Silver Spring 
Booher, Phyllis J., Marion. Ind. 
Bowers, William T.. Riverdale 
Bowman, David J.. Washingt'^n. D. C. 
Bowman. Doris W., BaJtimorc 
Bowman, Valera M., Baltimore 
Bradshaw, Raymond, Riverdale 
Brigham. Majorie A.. Rockville 
Brigham, Ruth M.. Landover 
Brooks, Lionel. Annapolis 
Brown. David C, Milford, Conn. 
Brown, Irene M., Fort Meade 
Brown. Margaret H., Baltimore 
Brown, Warren F., Mt. Rainier 



Bryant, Thomas E., Franklin. Pa. 
Buckner, Louise P., Takoma Park 
BuUard, Perry C, Washington, D. C. 
Bullard, Robert E., Takoma Park 
Bumann, Theodore J., Washington, D. C. 
Burall. Lois M., Myersville 
Byrne, Robert F., Silver Spring 
Byrnes. Edward J., Baltimore 
Callender. George Jl.. Jr.. Washington, 

D. C. 
Cameron, Lorna L., Harpers Ferry. W. Va. 
Cano. Harold V.. Elizabeth, N. J. 
Carhart, Herbert G.. Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Carroll, Vivian M.. Long Branch, N. J. 
Carson. Thomas E., Towson 
Carter. Harry G., Baltimore 
Carter, Sara E., Annapolis 
Chambers, Berniece B., Washington. D. C. 
Chambers. David H., Catonsville 
Chandler, Earl N. Chevy Chase 
Chmar, Paul. Rockville 
Clark, Elizabeth J., Takoma Park 
Clark, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
Clarke. A. Slater, Washington, D. C. 
Clarke, Margaret S., Brentwood 
Clinite, Caroline E., Silver Spring 
Cochrane, William K.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Cohn, Richard H.. Newark. N. J. 
Collins, John M.. Bennings. D. C. 
Colvin. Walter H., Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Compton. Vera J., Cumberland. 
Connor, Berenice E., Margate City, N. J. 
Cook. Coleman B., Jr., Baltimore 
Cooper, Jane M.. Baltimore 
Copenhaver, Cleo V., Street 
C'^rkran, Davis H., Glen Burnie 
Cosimano. Stephen J., Washington, D. C. 
Coyle, Bernard J., Jr., Upper Marlboro 
Crawford. William K.. Laurel 
Criswell. Ann E., Hyattsville 
Criswell, Robert B., Hyattsville 
CuUen, Gilbert H., Baltimore 
Dalton, Ruth O., New Haven, Conn. 
Davidson. Frances A., Baltimore 
Divis, Clifford H., Takoma Park 
Davis, Dorothy L.. Silver Spring 
DeLadrier, Andre R., Annapolis 



411 



Dennis, John M., Willards 

Dickinson, Barbara W., Chevy Chase 

Diehl, John F., Hagerstown 

Diener, Margaret M., Washington, D. C. 

Dixon, William E., Edgewater 

Donahue, Douglas M., Baltimore 

Draper, Doris L., Hyattsville 

DuBois, William F., Jr., Woodside Park 

Dudrow, Ralph C. Jr., Hyattsville 

Duncan, Eunice C, Washington, D. C. 

Dunham, John N., Northville, N. Y. 

Eanes, Frances E.. Richmond, Va. 

Eareckson, William M., Baltimore 

Eastwood, Vincent F., Baltimore 

Eaton, Jay W., Bethesda 

Ekkam, Marietta C, Island Creek 

Edsall, Marjorie M., East Orange, N. J. 
. Elgin, Joseph F., Hagerstown 

Engel, Richard A., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Eno, Evelyn B., Washington, D. C. 

Ettin, Elaine N., Harlan, Ky. 

Evert, Jacqueline L., University Park 

Fanning. Wallace R., University Park 
Fardwell, Charles L., Baltimore 
Fazzalari. Paul V., Oakland 

Ferry, Charles H.. Washington, D. C. 
Fertig, Natalie, New York, N. Y. 
Finkelstein, Hortense E., Wilmington, 

N. C. 
FlaJcs, Rosadean, Baltimore 
Fletcher, Adelaide S., Hyattsville 
Flom, Elsie M., Baltimore 
Formhals, Christian A., Baltimore 
France, Bruce A., Hyattsville 
Franklin, Ann, Chevy Chase 
Freedman, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Frey. Rita C, Catonsville 
Friedrich, Charles. Jr., Kensington 
Frisbie, Margaret E., Chevy Chase 
Fugitt, Howard D., Bennings, D. C. 
Garrett, Mary M., Rockville 
Gaston, Janet D., Baltimore 
Gelof, Sara S., Wilmington, Del. 
Gershenson, Betty, Baltimore 
Gervasio. Joseph P., Washington. D. C. 
Getty, Sara L., Wayne, Pa. 
Gilfix, Roy H., Chevy Chase 
Glaser, Seena S., Washington, D. C. 
Goldman. Daniel W., Washington, D. C. 
Goldstein, Albert E., Jr., Baltimore 
Goodman, Muriel H., Washington, D. C. 
Gordon. Janet G.. Summit, N. J. 
Gray, Ellen F., Chevy Chase 
Green, Larry Q., Riverdale 
Guild, Aria G., Baltimore 
Gumnick, Karl F., Baltimore 
Gundlach, Lucy J., New York, N. Y. 
Guy, Ernest C, Washington, D. C. 



Guy, Jean F., Washington, D. C. 
Guyther. Robert O., Mechanicsville 
Hadder, John C, East Hampton, N. Y. 
Hall, Gene L., Washington, D. C. 
Hall, Jeanne F., Brentwood 
Hallett, Charles B., Cynwyd, Pa. 
Hancock, John C, Washington, D. C. 
Hand, Leon M., Washington, D. C. 
Ha.nna, Burton E., Baltimore 
Hansson, Barbro D., Baltimore 
Hardie, Dorothy P., Harrisburg. Pa. 
Harris, Carl A., Washington, D. C. 
Harwitz, Norman P., Baltimore 
Hastings, Charles R., Baltimore 
Herson, Ruth M., College Heights 
Hettinger, Ora L., Baltimore 
Hidnert, Frances E., Washington, D. C. 
Hines. Constance N., Elkridge 
Hoagland, Ralph, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Hoffmaster, Betty E., Brunswick 
Hoffmaster, Margaret L.. Funkstown 
Holland, Nancy B., Cumberland 

House, Norman M., Riverdale 

Hyder, Martin S. W., Seat Pleasant 
Ireland, Robert W.. Washington. D. C. 

Jack, William G., Port Deposit 

Jacobs, Irwin S., Washington, D. C. 

Jacobs, Robert P., Washington, D. C. 

Jacoby, Betty C, Washington, D. C. 

Janof, Marie M., Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Frederick M., Takoma Park 

Johnson, Gwendolyn, Washington. D. C. 

Johnston, Virginia T., Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Charles I., Jr., Snow Hill 

Jones, Henry E., Washington, D. C. 

Joyce, Margaret A., Hyattsville 

Karr, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 

Karro, Jeannette, Washington, D. C. 

Kauch, Robert, Bethesda 

Kavanaugh, Emmett P., Jr., ElUcott City 

Keith, Deane E., Greenbelt 

Kelley, George G., Bozman 

Kellman, Miriam D., Baltimore 

Kelly. Alexander P., Jr., Edgewood 
Arsenal 

Kelly. Tom S., Salisbury 

Kelso, Arthur D., Linthicum Heights 

Kempton, Margaret J.. Lanham 

Kennedy, Frances J., Takoma Park 

Kenney, Kathryn C, Chevy Chase 

Kerpen, Julian, New York. N. Y. 

Kerr, Alice, Washington, D. C. 

Kiefer, Lester, Baltimore 

Klebold, Mabel. Washington. D. C. 

Klein, Judah B., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Kuenstle, George F.. Washington, D. C. 

Lacey, Donald E., Chevy Chase 
Lakeman, William, Edgewater 



Lambert, Henry D., Washington, D. C. 
Langford, Taylor M., Jr., Greenbelt 
Lawrence, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Lemen, Daniel B., Williamsport 
hevy, Audrey B., Washington, D. C. 
Liebman, Leonard, Washington, D. C. 
Lincoln, Judson D., Takoma Park 
Lindamood, Joseph G., Jr., Laurel 
Linthicum, Charles M., Linthicum Heights 
Litman, Arnold D., Baltimore 
Logsdon, John W., Balboa, Canal Zone 
Loker, William M., Leonardtown 
Loomis, Malcolm L., Washington, D. C. 
Ludwig, Margaret M., Sparrows Point 
Lynch, James, Takoma Park 
Macnemar, Dunbar B., Millersville 
Macpherson, Alaji C, Washington, D. C. 
Marbury, Mildred R., Chevy Chase 
Margolis, Isadore E., Baltimore 
Martin, Mary K., Washington, D. C. 
Massce, Doris J.. Woodmere, N. Y. 
Masters, Nancy, Glen Burnie 
Mattingley, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Maxson, Frank T., Jr., Cranford, N. J. 
Maxwell, Anne L., Frederick 
Maxwell, Jerome L., Washington, D. C. 
Mazur, George J., Bridgeport, Conn. 
McCann, Majorie E., Rutland Heights, 

Mass. 
McCathran, Margaret E., Washington, 

D. C. 
McCauley, Elizabeth J., Maugansville 
McCeney, Thomas S., Silver Spring 
Mclntyre, Kenneth H., Hampton, Va. 

McKinley, Harry C, Hancock 

Meade, John P., College Park 

Meenehan, John F.. Washington, D. C. 

Melton, Gene H., Washington, D. C. 

Merican, Alma R., Baltimore 

Merriken, William S., Denton 

Mezzanotte, Matthew N., Washington, 
D. C. 

Miller, Muriel E., Baltimore 

Miller, Robert J., Severna Park 

Milstead, Valgene M.. Indian Head 

Mintzer, Joseph H., €atskill, N. Y. 

Mitchell, Jacqueline L., Washington. D. C. 

Montuori, Carl F., Washington, D. C. 

Mullen, Richard F., Chevy Chase 

Mundy, Elizabeth A., Baltimore 

Murray, John E., Washington, D. C. 

Naron, Mildred D., Baltimore 

Nelson, Dorothy J., East Riverdale 
Heights 

Neumann, John W., Silver Spring 

Newgarden, Paul W., Washington. D. C. 

Newton, Edward G., Princess Anne 

Nicoll, Betty B., Laurel 



Nixon, Robert L., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Noel, Lloyd S., Hagerstown 

Nordby, Robert C, Washington, D. C. 

Novak, Andrew J., Annapolis 

Ogden, Ellen A., Baltimore 

Orr, Martha J., Fort Meade 

Orwitz, Morton H., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Ovitt, Harry C, Chevy Chase 

Paganelli, Vitale X., Orange, N. J. 

Park, William F., Rutland, Mass. 

Parry, Francis A., Washington, D. C. 

Paterson, Bertha A., Towson 

Patterson, Shirley A., Washington, D. C. 

Pavesich, Frances E., Baltimore 

Payne, Thomas A., Washington, D. C. 

Pearce, William H., Hyattsville 

Peck, Richard M., Damascus 

Petzold, Robert W., Silver Spring 

Pickering, Arada E.. Hagerstown 

Pickett, Betty R., Woodbine 

Fittle, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 

Podolsky, Dolly, Baltimore 

Port, William L., Baltimore 

Ports, Kenneth L., Walkerville 

Powell, Arlys J., Sarasota, Fla. 

Preisser, Warren G., Washington, D. C. 

Price, John R., Timonium 

Primm, Florence, Washington, D. C. 

Pringle, Audrey L., College Park 

Radin, Mildred, New York, N. Y. 

Ramirez, Dixon, Cabo Rojo, P. R. 

Rands, Robert D., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Rice, Daniel G., Anacostia, D. C. 

Riley, Margaret E., Silver Spring 

Roark, Bruce A., Cabin John 

Robinson, Martha J., Baltimore 

Rosengluth, Arlene, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Rothenbach, Emma M., Teaneck, N. J. 

Rothstein, Jack, Baltimore 

Royal, Nancy T., Worcester, Mass. 

Rubey, Susie L., Friendship, D. C. 

Rubin, Charlotte, Columbia, S. C. 

Ruff, Mary E., Randallstown 

Rutledge, Herbert W., Takoma Park 

Ryon, John F., Riverdale 

Sachs, Shirley, Washington, D. C. 

Sagner, Alan L., Baltimore 

Sands, Dorothy M., Baltimore 

Savoy, Joycelyn L., Mamou, La. 

Schauman, Clarence A., II, Baltimore 

Schreiner, Raymond L., Washington, D. C. 

Seidman, Harold L., Baltimore 

Shansey, George T., Washington, D. C. 

Shapiro, David, Washington, D. C. 

Shaver, Olen L., Silver Spring 

Sheely, Kathryn G., Baltimore 

Sherman, Shirley C, Flushing, N. Y. 

Sherwood, Ralph H., Washington, D. C. 



412 



413 



\ 



iStiifler, Hubert I., Jr., Hagerstown 

Shoemaker, Henry R., Frederick 

Shook, Yvonne E., Baltimore 

Shorser, Natalie I., West New York, N. J. 

Showacre, Jane L., Cumberland 

Sislen, Arthur A., Washington, D. C. 

Skladowsky, Mary L.. Baltimore 

Small, James G., University Park 

Smith, Beverly J., Nutley, N. J. 

Smith, Cuddy S., Baltimore 

Smith, DeWitt C, Jr., Bethesda 

Smith, Evelyn, North East 

Smith, Florence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snitzer, Beverly A., Baltimore 

Some, Seymour J., Newark, N. J. 

Spangler, William A., Washington, D. C. 

Starr. Shirley M.. Washington, D. C. 

Stedman, William P., Catonsville 

Stellhorn, William H., Jr., Baltimore 

Sterling, Ernest A., Silver Spring 

Sterling, Wilfred R.. Washington, D. C. 

Stevens, Gene C, Washington, D. C. 

Stevens, Wilbert, Catonsville 

Stewart, William S.. Washington, D. C. 

Stribling, Alice L.. Washington, D. C. 

Suit, Lois G., College Park 
Tabor, John A., Winchester, Ky. 
Teel, George R., White Hall 
Tennant, Irma A., Washington, D. C. 
Thompson, Mary F., Rockville 
Torvestad, Robert J., Colmar Manor 
Touchet, Mary L., Silver Spring 
Treder. Jean A., Scotia, N. Y. 
Trinkel, Florence E.. Providenc". R. I. 
Tiomba, Francis, Ozone Park, N. V. 
Tupy, Joseph L., Washington, D. C. 
Uhland, Homer E., Washington, D. C. 



Uzzell, Vernon R., Woodlawn 
Vandenberg, Milton H., Towson 
Vecere, Richard E., Trenton, N. J. 
Voorhees, Robert DeH.. Manasquan, N. J. 
Walker, John S., Silver Spring 
Ward, Elizabeth F., Darlington 
Warder, Frederic B., Chevy Chase 
Waring, Edward J., Jr., Leonardtown 
Waters, James B., Washington, D. C. 
Weakley, Emma J., Annapolis 
Webb, Claude A., Jr., Hyattsville 
Weber, Harriet W., Washington, D. C. 
Weisberg, Sonia, Baltimore 
Wells, Martha J., Washington, D. C. 
Werner, Gunther A., Towson 
Weston, Glen E., College Park 
Wheeler. William F., Hampstead 

White, Ira, Hyattsville 

Whitman, Claire S.. Laurel 

Wienecke, Edward L., Jr., Baltimore 

Wilkins, Bernard, Mt. Airy 

Williams, Emma K., Washington, D. C. 

Williams, Louis S., Daysboro, Del. 

Wills. Jacque L., Baltimore 

Wix, George B., New York, N. Y. 

Wolfe, Charles R., Washington .D. C. 

Wolfe, Clarence E., Smithsburg 

Worgan, John M., Luke 

Workman, Selma J.. Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

Yeager, Mary A., Hagerstown 

Yost, Charles M., Woodlawn 

Young, Eliot R., Chevy Chase 

Young, Harry H., Bethesda 

Young. Robbie V.. Washington, D. C. 

Ziegler. Harry A., Easton 

Zimmer. David J.. Takoma Park 

Zimmerman. Beverly D., Providence, R. I. 



Part Time 



Alden, William H., Silver Spring 
Barthel, William F., College Park 
Bates, Virginia B. (Mrs.). Bethesda 
Birmingham, Alfred N., Washington, D. C. 
Carnig, Paul T.. Takoma Park 
Casbarian, Louise W. (Mrs.), RiverdaJe 
Cohen, Milton J., Washington, D. C. 
Dudas, Michael, Landover 
Ferguson, Don S., Washington, D. C. 
Fuerst, Robert G., Riverdale 
Garrett. Clyde W. G.. Eastland. Texas 
Gotsis, Helen D., Washington, D. C. 
Green, Maryan A., Hyattsville 
Hajisen, Harold. Takoma Park 



Jinkins, May R. (Mrs.), Arlington, Va. 
Lane, Martha W. (Mrs.), Takoma Park 
Larner, Charles D.. Silver Spring 
Michaelson. Ernest, Bladensburg 
Murphy. Julian G.. Forest Glen 
Murray. Banks A., Silver Spring 
Nicolet. Kathryn, Riverdale 
Rollow. Douglas Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Schmidt, Norman B.. College Park 
Villa. Marguerite M. (Mrs.). Port au 
Prince. Haiti 

Wiseman, Leon R.. Washington, D. C. 
Witt, Franklyn, Washington, D. C. 



Baido. James, Baltimore 
Bagby, William W., Annapolis 
Bailey, Marguerite P.. Silver Spring 
Bartlett. Baxbara L., Washington, D. C. 
Butler, James H., Jr., Baltimore 
Calomiris, Catherine, Washington, D. C. 
Carlson, Adele S. (Mrs.), Annapolis 
Hager, William D.. Frostburg 
Hammer, Ralph C, Cumberland 



Unclassifled 

Martin. Gerard J., Annapolis 
McAuliffe, William I., Great Neck, N. Y. 
Miller, Margaret E., Princess Anne 
Ricketts, Matilda J., Catonsville 
Ryan, James H., Long Beach, N. Y. 
Simpson, Edgar A., Baltimore 
Sutherland, David L., Franklin, Pa. 
Turk, Irma L., Riderwood 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Senior Class 



Allen, George D.. Takoma Park 
Askin. Nathan, Baltimore 
Badenhoop, Herman J., Baltimore 
Beamer, Francis X.. Washington. D. C. 
Borden, Burton D., Washington. D. C. 
Brown. Robert S.. Hazleton, Pa. 
Brown, William E., Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Burns, Robert B.. Havre de Grace 
Chaney, Robert J., College Park 
Cook, Harry I., Hyattsville 
Coyle, Margaret L., Upper Marlboro 
Crisafull, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Davis, Aloyuise I., Havre de Grace 
Davis, W. Bruce, Silver Spring 
Dieffenbach. Albert W., Garrett Park 
Disharoon, Charles R.. Salisbury 
Dorfman. Sidney A.. Washington, D. C. 
Duflf. Edward H., Tall Timbers 
Flax. George L.. Washington, D. C. 
Hambleton. Harry B., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Harlan. Edwin F., Riverdale 
Harris, Sam, Baltimore 
Hcaley, James W., Hagerstown 



Hughes, Fred J., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Hutton, Carroll S., Baltimore 
Ireland, Julius W., Baltimore 
Kemper, James D., Washington, D. C, 
Kendall. Charles W., Dundalk 
Kummer. Stanley T.. Baltimore 
Lawrence, George E., Hanover, Pa. 
LeFrak, Samuel J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Magruder. Ruth T.. Washington. D. C. 
Peregoff, Arthur. Fi-ederick 
Phillips, Jay M.. Baltimore 
Race. Thornton C, Chevy Chase 
Rittase, Billie J., Cumberland 
Skotnicki, Frank J., Hazleton, Pa. 
Springer, Earl V., Hagerstown 
Steinberg, Douglas S., College Park 
Thompson, Charles L., Baltimore 
Tyser, Ralph J., Baltimore 
Valenstein, Murray A., Baltimore 
Vollmer, Harry F., Ill, Baltimore 
Weber, N. Bond, Oakland 
Wyatt, Henry F., Baltimore 
Young, Herbert S., Washington, D. C. 



Junior Class 



Altschuler, Leon. Washington, D. C. 

Anspon. Bert W.. Jr., Washington. D. C. 

Aymold. Bernard L.. Jr.. Baltimore 

Barr. Charles M.. Easton 

Bastian, Charles W.. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Boice, John E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Burke, Robert. Hyattsville 

Carey, Frank W., Jr., Dundalk 

Chandler. Edmond T., Westmoreland Hills 

Clunk, John J., Hyattsville 

Corridon, Donald C„ Washington, D. C. 

Daiker, John A., Washington. D. C. 

Detorie. Francis J., Washington, D. C. 

Dwyer, Frank A.. Baltimore 

Ehrlich. Raphael H.. Washington, D. C. 

Ehudin, Herman. Baltimore 



Frey. Ralph W., Jr., Mt. Rainier 

Gantz. Guy G.. Hagerstown 

Grier, Jack G.. Towson 

Gunter, John B„ Jr., Johnstown, Pa. 

Heyer, Frank N., Baltimore 

Himelfarb, Norman H.. Washington. D. C. 

Hodges, Raymond L., St. Inigoes 

Holzapfel, Norman McC, Hagerstown 

Hopps, William J., Baltimore 

Howard, Eugene, Baltimore 

Hutchinson, Richard^., Ghevy Chase 

Jansson, George A. W., Jr., Baltimore 

Jarboe, Paul E., Mechanicsville 

Joyce, Joseph M., Hyattsville 

Katz, Leonard R., New York, N. Y. 

Kephart, George O., Takoma Park 



414 



415 



King, Laura F., Savage 
Lewis, John E., Silver Spring 
Lloyd, Edward M., Washington, D. C. 
Mears, Frank D., Pocomoke 
Mueller, John L., Baltimore 
Mulitz. Ben S., Capitol Heights 
Oswald, Huyette B., College Park 
Peacock, Franklin K., Takoma Park 
Reckord, John G., Baltimore 
Rice, Robert C, Jefferson 
Salganik, Alvin C, Baltimore 
Sanchiz, Jose C, Panama City, R. P. 



Saum, Robert W., Lanham 
Senseman, Rodney LaV., Silver Spring 
Shields, Leonard J., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Silverma.n, Norman H., Washington, D. C. 
Skeen, Richard T., Baltimore 
Stuver, Richard L., Washington, D. C. 
Tilles, Norman D., Baltimore 
Valenti, Gino, Washington, D. C. 
Wagner, Ernest G., Hyattsville 
Weathersbee, David R., Washington, D. C. 
Worthington, Raymond L., New Milfoid, 
Conn. 



Sophomore Class 



Aitcheson, William W., Berwyn 

Allnutt, Richard C, Germantown 

Altmann, Andrew T., Baltimore 

Ander, Marvin H., Baltimore 

Arospmena, Conrado A., Panama City, R. P. 

Ayres, Robert R., Jr., Baltimore 

Baker. Rudell B., Damascus 

Bennett, John M., Baltimore 

Berlin, Joseph G., Washington, D. C. 

Berman, Sidney M., Baltimore 

Boswell, Harry A., Hyattsville 

Bradley, Alan T., Baltimore 

Bugos, Paul E., Greenbelt 

Burges, Sam H., Takoma Park 

Burnside, James B., Washington, D. C. 

Carry, Albert J., Washington, D. C. 

Cartee, Robert S., Jr., Hagerstown 

Chamberlin, Garwood, Chevy Chase 

Cherry, Jack F., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Morton G., Baltimore 

Condon, Robert D., Baltimore 

Cooper, William I., Colonial Beach, Va. 

Custis, John K., Washington, D. C. 

Damuth, Donald R., Baltimore 

Diamond, William C, Gaithersburg 

DiBlasi, Francis P., Bethesda 

Dorn, Robert L., Riverdale 

Dunn, Charles W., Riverdale 

Dunn, James E., Washington, D. C. 

DuVall, Jacque B., Bethesda 

Emrey, Jay C, Colora 

Engel, Mary L., Washington, D. C 

Eyler, John D., Jr., Baltimore 

Fanning, James A., College Park 

Filbry, H. William, Annapolis 

Forsberg, Robert A., Rockville 

Garlitz, Vincent LeR., Cumberland 

Gillett, Donald M., Washington, D. C. 

Ginsburg, Abraham, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gransee, Vern H., Linthicum Heights 

Grover, Dunreath O., Washington, D. C. 

Hales, L. Roman, Pasadena 

Hall, Kenneth D., Washington, D. C. 



Hambleton, James A., Washington, D. C. 
Hancock, Charles W., Baltimore 
Hathaway, Neal L., University Park 
Hodson, Annesley E., Ill, Baltimore 
Holloman, J. Edward, Catonsville 
Hopkins, W. Wylie, Bel Air 
Horn, Arthur W. M., Hyattsville 
Hutson, Paul B., Cumbeiland 
Joy, Bernard F., Washington, D. C. 
Keagy, Lowell T., Washington, D. C. 
Kelly, C. Markland, Jr., Baltimore 
King, Robert P., Baltimore 
Klein, Louis E., Baltimore 
Krouse, William E., Bethesda, 
Kyttle, Stuart F., Washington, D. C. 
Lafer, Harry N., Passaic, N. J. 
Lautenberger, George F., Baltimore 
Layton, William R., Hurlock 
Lee, Robert S. W., New York, N. Y. 
Luntz, John G., Govans 
MacKenzie, Lawrence, Silver Spring 
Mann, Stanley R., Norristown, Pa. 
McAuliffe, Richard G., Great Neck, N. Y. 
McCloskey, Paul D., Cumberland 
Meacham, Richaxd H., Catonsville 
Mendelson, Robert I., Baltimore 
Miller, Cai-y H., Branchville 
Miller, William T., Winchester, Indiana 
Minion, Allen V., Newark, N. J. 
Mishtowt, Basil I., Chevy Chase 
Molofsky, Albert L., Baltimore 
Montgomery, Robert J., Washington, D. C. 
Moog, Robert L., Summit, N. J. 
Moore, Samuel V., Washington, D. C. 
Moran, Robert T., Chevy Chase 
Morris, William VanN., Hyattsville 
Moseley, Robert M., Beltsville 
Mueller, J. Leo, Baltimore 
Mulligan, Walter F., Jr., Berwyn 
Murphy, Donald F„ Mt. Washington 
Myers, Harold E., College Park 
Nylen, Edward W., W. Hartford, Conn. 
Parker, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 



Pendleton, George C, Washington, D. C. 
pfefferkorn, Samuel L., Jr., West Friend- 
ship 
Pickett, Harry K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Pratt, Page B., Washington, D. C. 
Pulliam, James W., Washington, D. C. 
Rausch, Charles A., Jr., Baltimore 
Reese, Elmer L., Baltimore 
Reside, Marjorie S., Silver Spring 
Rimmer, Harry, University Park 
Roach. William O.. Baltimore 
Rogers, John D., Richmond, Va. 
Roth, Clayton F., Cumberland 
Rumpf, Russell M., Beltsville 
Samuelson, Morton S., Baltimore 
Schaefer. Charles F. H., Hamilton 
Schmitt, Edwin M., Chevy Chase 
Schultz, Selma, Lynbrook, N. Y. 
Seigel, Martin P., Washington, D. C. 
Seippel, John H., Baltimore 
Seitz, William N., Washington, D. C. 
Seviour, Carolyn E., Silver Spring 



Shaw, E. Leslie, Chevy Chase 
Slesinger, Albert D., Baltimore 
Smith, Francis A., North East 
Smith, Harry L., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Smith, Warrington G., Phoenix 
Snyder, Peter F., Silver Spring 
Spicer, Hiram H., Ill, Baltimore 
Tate, John K., Middletown 
Thurston, William B., Ill, Relay 
Ulman, Bernard, Jr., Baltimore 
Vaile, Charles L., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Vannais, Leon S„ Leonia, N. J. 
Vogel, Albert E., Hyattsville 
Walker, Frederick B., Beltsville 
Ward, George B., Jr., Washington, D. C, 
White, Joseph H., Maplewood, N. J. 
White, William P., Oxon Hill 
Williams, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 
Worthington, Leland G., Jr., Berwyn 
Wrightson, Wilson T., Easton 
Young, Elton F., Washington, D. C. 



Freshman Class 



Aldinger, George W., Dayton, Ohio 

Baker, Jack A., Chevy Chase 

Barker, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 

Barnett, William M., Washington, D. C. 

Bates, William C, New York, N. Y. 

Bergman, Arthur J., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Berman, Stanley, Annapolis 

Berry, Harold P., Washington. D. C. 

Bourne, Thomas E., Hyattsville 

Bransdorf, Kenneth H., Washington, D. C. 

Brock, Marjorie J., Baltimore 

Brown, Francis W., Ashton 

Campbell, Bruce S., Lutherville 

Christmas. Walter E., Washington. D. C. 

Christopher, William W., Newtonville, 

Mass. 
Coffman, James R., Catonsville 
CoUings, Neil B., Bethesda 
Conrad, Alison M., Annapolis 
Cook, George A., Takoma Park 
Crockett, James E., University Park 
Crockett, Joseph McL., University Park 
Crom, Theodore R., Jajckson Heights, N. Y. 
Crouch, Charles T., Church Hill 
Cutler, Abraham B., Haddonfield, N. J. 
Darroch, Dan M., Baltimore 
Davis, Burton F., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Davis, Floyd E., Jr., Rockville 
Degges, James E., Brentwood 
Dobler, John J., Baltimore 
Draper, William G., Silver Spring 
Duke, Benedict D., Leonardtown 
Dunbar, Paul M., Greenbelt 



Dunnington, Donald W., Chevy Chase 
Durkin, Charles A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Edwards, Neal J., Silver Spring 
Embrey, Chester T., Washington, D. C. 
Evans, Robert P., Crisfield 
Fisher, Eugene S., Baltimore 
Fletcher, Theodore G., Jr., Preston 
Fontaine, Guy E., Washington, D. C. 
Forbes, Eleanor M., Aquasco 
Frederick, John R., Baltimore 
Frye, Ellis F., Baltimore 
Fulton, William J.. Roselle Park, N. J. 
Gaines, Clemens W., Edgewood 
Galliher, David, Washington, D. C. 
Gay, Charles P., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Gilmore, John D., Washington, D. C. 
Glasgow, Norman M., Hyattsville 
Goldenzweig, William M., Washington, 

D. C. 
Gordon, Harry R., Chevy Chase 
Gorfine, Lewis W., Baltimore 
Gossage, Howard S., Washington, D. C. 
Green, Thornton F., Riverdale 
Greenberg, David H., Baltimore 
Gross, Benton H., Bel Air 
Hammond, Robert B., Keedysville 
Hare, Ray M., Chevy Chase 
Hargreaves, Jack A., Randallstown 
Harry, Joseph C, Pylesville 
Heathcote, William C, Baltimore 
Hepburn, John W., Brentwood 
Herring, Paul L., Hyattsville 
Hesse, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 



416 



417 



Hicks, Fred C, Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Higgins, William T., Hurlock 
Holland, Sorin N., Salisbury 
Howell, Walter R., Washington. D. C. 
Jenkins, George M., Baltimore 
Jenkins. Thomas C. Jr., Indian Head 
Jewell, Alvin W.. College Park 
Jones, Fletcher H., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Leonard K.. Baltimore 
Katz, Sylvan L., Washington. D. C. 
Keller. Robert S., Washington. D. C. 
Kidd. Franklin F.. Washington, D. C. 
Kimbel, Milton. Washington, D. C. 
Kinsel, James N.. Washington, D. C. 
Koehnlein. William F., Raspeburg 
Krehnbrink, William H., Baltimore 
Kreiter, Emory B., Washington. D. C. 
Lanahan, Thomas J., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
LaPorte, Frank B., Lanham 
Lavinsky. Elaine L.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Levenson. William I.. Baltimore 

Lewis, Paul A.. Baltimore 

Little. Roy L.. Riverdale 

Logan. Alice C, Riverdale 

Longanecker, Walter R., Branchville 

Mandjuris, Andrew A., Riverdale 

Mann. John W., Jr., Bethesda 

McDonald. Mary L., Washington, D. C. 

McKinney, Swift. Washington, D, C. 

Meltz. Harry R., College Park 

Mennen. Dorothy V., Washington. D. C. 

Mericle, Harold I., Washington, D. C. 

Meyer. Gratian J.. Washington, D. C. 

Meyer. William J.. Washington. D. C. 

Miller, John F.. Baltimore 

Miller, John P., Washington. D. C. 

Moore. Warren H.. Chevy Chase. D. C. 

Morris, Daniel L., Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Morrow. Mary E., Washington, D. C. 

Moss, Seymour L., Boonsboro 

Murphy. John J., Jr., Washington. D. C. 



Newell, Donald E., Centreville 
Oakes, Robert R.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Odell, Marshall D., Ellicott City 
Orpwood, Wilmer T.. Baltimore 
Rabai. John F., Baltimore 
Ray, Robert N.. Fair Haven 
Rigby. Elmer C. Baltimore 
Ritzel. James A.. Westover 
Roberson. Ann K.. Rising Sun 
Robinowitz, Shirley B., Washington, D. C. 
Robinson, Edward C. Jr., Bethesda 
Rosenfield. Norman P., So. Norwalk, Conn. 
Rothenhoefer. Robert S., Frederick 
Ruppersberger, Charles A., Jr., Baltimore 
Sattler, Eugene A., Monkton 
Schendel, Walter G., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Schwab, James E., Washington, D. C. 
Sewell, Reamer E., Cumberland 
Shea, John H., Washington, D. C. 
Shields. James C, Jr., Abington, Pa. 
Sinclair, Norman S.. Washington. D. C. 
Smith, Herbert D.. Riverdale 
Sneeringer. James G., Gettysburg, Pa. 
Spalding, E. Allan, Washington. D. C. 
Sperling. Alvin B., Washington, D. C. 
Steinberg, Edward H., College Park 
Sullivan. William S.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Tepper. Lawrence, Washington, D. C. 
Triplett, Daniel C, Washington, D. C. 
Tufft, Robert A., Hurlock 
Twigg, Carl C, Westminster 
Vannais, Phil C, Leonia. N. J. 
Vincent. Reginald C, Eatontown, N. J. 
Walker. Jonathan T., Mitchellville 
Wallop. John D., III. Washington, D. C. 
Warfield, Allen, Jr., Baltimore 
Wells, John D., Washington, D. C. 
Whipple, Daniel S., Catonsville 
Winn, Percy E., Silver Spring 
Wood, James M., Coltons Point 
Wurzbacher. Frederick E.. Jr., Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Senior Class 



Part Time 



Carey. Helen F. (Mrs.). Greenbelt 
Lemmermann, Henry J., University Paxk 



Miller, Joshua I., Berwyn 



Unclassified 



Baker. Archie K., Keedysville 

Barry, Caroline L.. Washington, D. C. 

Bunevich, Milton, Washington, D. C. 



Kennedy, Henry A., Mason City, Iowa 
Marcus, Clarence, Indiana, Pa. 
Smith, Hateva V., Greensboro 



Belinkoflf, Sidney A., Weehawken, N. J. 
Bonham, John T., Charleston, W. Va. 
Bookstaver, Julian B., Teaneck, N. J. 
Czaplinski, Theodore F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dabrowski, Benjamin A., Baltimore 
Diamond, Ben, Roanoke, Va. 
Goldhaber, Samuel, Flushing, N. Y. 
Kasawich, Julius I., Whitestone, N. Y. 



Litchman, Burton. Edge wood, R. I. 
Lowander, George A., Jr., Queens Village, 

N. Y. 
Fessagno, Eugene L., Jr., Baltimore 
Piccolo, James A., New Haven, Conn. 
Randman, Bernard, Whitestone, N. Y. 
Westcott, Horace L., New London, Conn. 



Junior Class 



418 



Aurbach. Frederick. Idabel. Okla. 
Baker, Robert N., Kings Mountain. N. C. 
Beaven, Sterrett P., Baltimore 
Berman, Daniel E., Baltimore 
Betts, Robert L., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Birschtein. Benjamin. Atlantic City. N. J. 
Bohne, Edmund L., Bergenfield. N. J. 
Bressman, Edward. Newark, N. J. 
Briskin. Melvin R., Springfield, Mass. 
Brotman. Alfred. Baltimore 
Burch, Joseph P.. Clifton, N. J. 
Caldwell, Gilbert L., Baltimore 
Callaway, John S.. Beckley, W. Va. 
Capone, Nicholas J., Baltimore 
Castelle, Paul B., Baltimore 
Chernow. Abraham, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chmar. Phillip L., Rockville 
Collins, William M., Bellows Falls, Vt. 
Corbitt, Donald C, Waverly, W. Va. 
Cullen, Jerome S., Baltimore 
Dembo, Joseph C, Norwich, Conn. 
DePasquale, Frank L., East Northport, 

N. Y. 
DeScherer, Morton, Englewood. N. J. 
Dubansky, Paul S.. Baltimore 
Easton, James F., Romney, W. Va. 
Farrell, Daniel L., Norwich, Conn. 
Frey, Donald T., Ca.tonsville 
Friedmann, Michael, Whitestone, N. Y. 
Golden, Maxwell S., South River, N. J. 
Gudwin, Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Haggerty, Warren D., Jr., Ridgewood, 

N. J. 
Hawkins, Virgil R., Jr., Union, S. C. 
Heller, Stanley, New York, N. Y. 
Hewitt, Earl C, Baltimore 
Hoffman. Barnet, Newark. N. J. 
Hyman. Harold, New Yoi-k. N. Y. 
Hymanson, Nathan W., Richmond Hill, 

N. Y. 

Sophomore 

Aldridge. William A.. Baltimore 
Amatrudo. Andrew J., New Haven. Conn. 
Askins, Clifford F., New York. N. Y. 

419 



Kapiloff, Bernard, New York. N. Y, 
Kapiloff, Leonard, New York, N. Y. 
Karow, Seymour M., Ellen ville, N. Y. 
Kellar, Sidney, Ellenville, N. Y. 
Klingelhofer. Herbert E., Baltimore 
Koenig, Leonard, New York, N. Y. 
Kornreich, Kenneth D., Waterbury. Conn. 
Lauro, Mario A., Waterbury, Conn. 
Lawrence, Ronald. Elk Mills 
Levy, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marano, Frank A., Newark, N. J. 
Matisi, Anthony F., Endicott, N. Y. 
McClees, Joseph G.. Baltimore 
McDaniel. Edward P.. Jr., Jarrettsville 
Mishkin. Edward A., New York, N. Y. 
Oilman, Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Parker, Malcolm M., Freehold, N. J. 
Policow, Myron A., Roxbury, Mass. 
Reusch. George. Cranford, N. J. 
Rosenberg, Edward, Jamaica. N. Y. 
Rudo, Frederick B., Raspeburg 
Santeramo. John R.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Schiller. LeRoy E.. Newark, N. J. 
Schultheis, Carl H., Baltimore 
Singer, Max, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Sloan, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smith, Bernard, Hagerstown 
Smith. Joseph H., Hancock 
Spina, Russell, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Storch, Murray, Passaic, N. J. 
Taub, Charles, Newark, N. J. 
Toffic, John W., Bergenfield, N. J. 
Tolley. Leonard J., Brooklyn Park 
Vitolo, Erminio R., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Weinger, Irving I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Zeger, Jack I., Port Jervis, N. Y. 
Zuskin, Raynard F., Baltimore 



Class 

Berman, Alexander N., Spring Valley, 

N. Y. 
Biega, Stanley G., Wallingford, Conn. 



/ 



Bixby, Daniel, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Chiques, Elsa L., Caguas, Puerto Rico 
Coccaro, Peter J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Cohen, Sylvan P., Baltimore 
Corder, Woodrow W., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Coroso, Joseph T., Hartford, Conn. 
Criss, James T., Fairmont, W. Va. 
Deneroff, Paul, New York, N. Y. 
Edwards, Paul M., Dundalk 
Eilenberg, Morris, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Emburgia, Joseph A., Vineland, N. J. 
Entelis, Stanley, New York, N. Y. 
Everson, Stewart, Washington, D. C. 
Gibel, Charles, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Goldstein, Richard H., Huntington, W. Va. 
Gratz, Ezra B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Helitzer, Bernard, Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Herman, Alan H., East Orange, N. J. 
Herschaft, Arthur, New York, N. Y. 
Hyman, Seymour G., Vineland, N. J. 
Katz, Isador G., Ellenville, N. Y. 
King, Samuel L., Mount Nebo, W. Va.. 
Kolman, Irvin O., Trenton, N. J. 
Koppelman, Seymour, New York, N. Y. 
Lasch, Henry R., Jr., New Britain, Conn. 
Lazauskas, Algert P., Baltimore 
Lichtenstein, Lawrence, New York, N. Y. 
Martinelli, Ricardo, Panama City, Panama 
Mintz, Victor W., Newark, N. J. 
Munoz, Jorge E., Salinas, Puerto Rico 



Murzin, Louis L., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Nathanson, Norman R., Millis, Mass. 
Nussbaum, Murray, New York, N. Y. 
Ouellette, Raymond T., Lawrence, Mass. 
Pecoraro, Arthur A., New York, N. Y. 
Powell, Julius B., Clinton, N. C. 
Rakosky, David S., New London, Conn. 
Ralph, Chester B., Keyport, N. J. 
Ramirez, Mario F., San German, Puerto 

Rico 
Reynolds, Joseph R., Providence, R. I. 
Rogoff, Sidney, Nutley, N. J. 
Salutsky, David M., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Savage, Alvin H., Baltimore 
Schwartz, Harold, Belle Harbor, N. Y. 
Steele, Glenn D., Dagsboro, Del. 
Stoopack, Chester J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tighe, Joseph M., Raspeburg 
Toomey, Lewis C, Elkridge 
Toubman, Rosalind I., Hartford, Conn. 
Towson, Donald H., Dundalk 
Waltma.n, Edwin B., Steubenville, O. 
Watsky, Howard F., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Watson, Earle H., Henderson, N. C. 
Weise, Hans E., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Weiss, Howard G., Glendale, N. Y. 
Wieland, John T., Baltimore 
Williams, Roger E., Norfolk, Va. 
Williamson, Riley S., Baltimore 



Freshman Class 



Binder, Herbert, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Birghenthal, Murray, Flushing, N. Y. 
Blevins, John P., Centreville 
Book, David R., Baltimore 
Bryce, Frank J., Florence, S. C. 
Bytovetzski, David L., Providence, R. I. 
Carey, Asher B., Frankford, Del. 
Carter, William P., Jr., Nutley, N. J. 
Carvalho, John C, Fall River, Mass. 
Cerny, Henry F., Baltimore 
Check, Oscar, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chereskin, Frank M., Longmeadow, Mass. 
Cierler, Irving J., Baltimore 
Cirrito, William J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Colaluca, Anthony C, Providence, R. I. 
Cook, George P., Ticonderoga, N. Y. 
Cooper, Bertram, Baltimore 
Cooper, Harry W., Baltimore 
Czachorowski, Leo J., Jr., Jersey City, 

N. J. 
DeYoung, George M., Paterson, N. J. 
DiGristine, Charles L., Baltimore 
Ditrolio, James V., Kearney, N. J. 
DuBoff, Mortimer, West Hartford, Conn. 
Dulberg, Sidney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Eff, Leo, Hartford, Conn. 
Feigenbaum, Irving, New York, N. Y. 
Feldman, Milton J., South Fallsburg, N. Y. 
"Fishman, Leo, Flushing, N. Y. 
Fox, Joseph, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Foxman, Paul B., Newburgh, N. Y. 
Gardner, Mont M., Fairview, W. Va. 
Goodman, Harold H., Manchester, N. H. 
Greene, Willard T., Baltimore 
Greifer. Albert B., New York, N. Y. 
Hauss, Howard J., New London, Conn. 
Heller, Stanley H„ Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Herman, Paul A., Hartford, Conn. 
Hirsch, Albert, Frederick 
Hyman, Harold, Meriden, Conn. 
Jailer, Robert W., Maywood, N. J. 
Kaufman, Morton, New York, N. Y. 
Klein, Joseph, New York, N. Y. 
Klinger, Seymour S., New York, N. Y. 
Koggan, David, Fa.terson, N. J. 
Kraman, Hyman, New York, N. Y. 
Krieger, Leon I., Baltimore 
Krugman, Leonard, Newark, N. J. 
Kushner, Jack, New York, N. Y. 
Langel, Lester, New York, N. Y. 



Leatherbury, George P., Towson 
Lee, William G., Willow Springs, N. C 
Leibowitz, Bernard B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lepine, Arthur J., Holyoke, Mass. 
Levine, Lawrence B., South Fallsburg, 

N. Y. 
Levy, Herbert S., Baltimore 
Lewis, Edward, Camden, N. J. 
Libby, Lewis S., Jr., Milford, Maine 
Liloia, Michael P., Nutley, N. J. 
Martin, William R., Baltimore 
Martino, Alfred A., Hartford, Conn. 
Mass, Calvin N., Hartford, Conn. 
Masserman, Joseph, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McAtee, Kenneth S., Berryville, Va. 
Mohring, Richard S., Taneytown 
Menius, John W., Jr., Monroe, N. C. 
Nussbaum, Philip, New York, N. Y. 
O'Meara, John O., Torrington, Conn. 

Onesti, Vincent R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pedinoff, Philip R., Newark, N. J. 

Ffeflfer, Harry G., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pollak, Robert M., New York. N. Y. 

P'jstilnik, Jack, Maplewood, N. J. 

Reilly, James T., Central Aguirre, Puerto 
Rico 

Robinson, Maurice C, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Rosenberg, Morris K., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rosenfeld, Mortimer, New York, N. Y. 

Second Year 

Aserinsky, Eugene, New York, N. Y. 
Bernert, Robert H., West Hartford, Conn. 
Bruckner, Rcbert J., Union City, N. J. 
Capone. Celeste E., Baltimore 
Carliner, Louis E., Baltimore 
Davitz, Leonard, Baltimore 
Ebeling, W. Carl, III, Baltimore 
Feit, Sylvan O., Baltimore 
Haimovitz, Herman, Baltimore 
Hollander, Morton H., Baltimore 
Karesh, Stanley H., Charleston, S. C. 
Kirshen, Sanford W., New York, N. Y. 
Kramer, Donald, Baltimore 



.Roulier, Albert P., Laconia, N. H. 
Rubin, Norman H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rubin, William, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Russell, Donald G., Basking Ridge, N. J. 
Safro. Abraham I., West New York, N. J. 
Scanlon, John H., Westerly, R. I. 
Schechter, Alexander, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Scheinberg, Emil M., New Brighton, N. Y. 
Schwartz, Norton B., Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Seides, Justin M., New York. N. Y. 
Shane, Sylvan M. E., Baltimore 
Shilkret, Robert T., New York, N. Y. 
Shmuner, Daniel, Baltimore 
Simpson, Thomas R., Dillon, S. C. 
Skowronek, Marvin, Somerville, N. J. 
Smith, Russell P.. Jr., Cambridge 

Spanier, Eugene, New York, N. Y. 

Spoon, Riley E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Stern, Martin, Sacramento, Calif. 

SucoU, Sidney, Hartford, Conn. 

Tongue, Raymond K., Jr., Baltimore 

Tunstall. William M., Jr., Lovingston, Va. 

Walsh, Albert J., Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Watson, Ben M., Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 
South America 

Wilkinson, Milton S.. N. Arlington, N. J. 

Yalovitz, Marvin S., Anniston, Ala. 

Zahn, Julius. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Zimmerman, John B., Schaeflferstown, Pa. 



Predental Class 

Krasner, Herbert A., Newark, N. J. 
Lavine, Bernard S., Trenton, N. J. 
Leiphart, Mahlon P.. York. Pa. 
Machen, August R., Baltimore 
Richman, George Y., New Britain, Conn. 
Smith, Robert H., Harrington, Del. 
Steinberg, Leon, Baltimore 
Stillwell, Walter B., Jr., Baltimore 
Trommer, Felix T., Norwich, Conn. 
Vine, Leon, Baltimore 
Whaley, Wilson M., Jr., Baltimore 
Witman, Harold I.. Newark, N. J. 
Zeender, Philip J., New Haven, Conn. 



First Year Predental Class 



Bosworth, John F., Bristol, Vt. 
Bove, Charles J., Jr., Eastport 
Byars, James R., Baltimore 
Clement. Hugh M.. Baltimore 
Conner, Eugene H., Baltimore 
Danker, Bertram, Baltimore 
Donohue, James C, Baltimore 
Dosh, David H., Baltimore 
Fales, Donald G., Baltimore 
Feldman, Henry E., Baltimore 
Flitton, Herbert H., Baltimore 



Gare, Louis I., Newark, N. J. 
Gaver, Oren H., Linthicum Heights 
Goldberg, Harold, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Goldman, Edgar H., Baltimore 
Gordon, Bernard, Phoenicia, N. Y. 
Hennesey, Charles W.. Jersey City, N. J. 
Hoffman, Edward J.. Baltimore 
Levickas, Herbert J., Baltimore 
Long, Henry L., Jr., Ellicott City 
O'Hearn, James W., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Pfeifer, William E., Halethorpe 



420 



421 



Pitruzzella. Joseph A., Baltimore 
Quillin, George O., Laurel. Del. 
Radler, Herbert A., Newark, N. J. 



Smith, Norval F., Baltimore 
Walker, Owen, Catonsville 
Zemel, Hyman W., Baltimore 



Special Student 
Gratzon, Peter, North Catasauqua, Pa. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Senior Class 



Aitcheson, Genevieve, Laurel 
Albarano, Ralph J., Lilly, Pa. 
Ames, Ann C, Westmoreland Hills 
Baitz, Mildred, Washington, D. C. 
Barnes, Richard K., Jr., Sykesville 
Bollinger, Gladys G. (Mrs.). College Park 
Bono, Ann M., Washington, D. C. 
Bono, Vivian E., Washington, D. C. 
Brenner, Helene T., Baltimore 
Burroughs, Eva E., Mechanicsville 
Chronister, Mason F., Baltimore 
Cronin, Frank H., Joppa 
Dietrich, Clayton A., Baltimore 
Dorsey, Nathan G., Jr., Mt. Airy 
Duncan, Laura R., District Heights 
Dunn. Katherine C, Silver Spring 
Evans, Halbert K., Bladensburg 
Ferrell, Sara F., Matoaka, W. Va. 

Fout, Murray H., Frederick 

Fricke, Annamarie H., Baltimore 

Gisriel, Austin E.. Elkridge 

Green, Mildred E., Lonaconing 

Griffith, Ann M., Rockville 

Groves, Helen V.. Cumberland 

Hackett, Eunice M. L., Secretary 

Hart, Richard K., Hagerstown 

Hottel, Betty L., College Park 



Jackson, Lorraine V., College Park 
Jarboe, Anne E., Leonardtown 
Jones, Rose I., College Park 
Kehoe, James H., Bel Air 
Keys, Virginia A., Laurel 
King, Judith A., Washington, D. C. 
Knepley, George W., College Park 
Kornmann, Lucille V., Baltimore 
Kreuzburg, Harvey W., Silver Spring 
Leites, Israel. Baltimore 
Longest, Katherine A., Baltimore 
Meade, James G., Port Deposit 
Nordwall, Alice E., College Park 
Owens, Anna B. (Mrs.), McDonogh 
Plumer, Gertrude E., Huntingtown 
Pollack, Ethel, Baltimore 
Price, Frances, Chattaroy, W. Va. 
Reynolds, Margaret S., Relay 
Rinehart, Mary S., Relay 
Roesler, Herbert S., Bayard, Va. 
Short, Katharine E., Calvert Hills 
Smith, Virginia E., Mt. Airy 
Stoddart, Adam T., Baltimore 
Sullivan, Mary S., Frostburg 
Teal, Lois, Hyattsville 
Weidinger, Charles W., Baltimore 
Zurhorst, Mary O., Silver Spring 



Junior Class' 



Adams. Ellen C. Aberdeen 

Applegarth, Vivian E., Honga 

Bell, Judson H., Aberdeen 

Bengoechea, Adam, Chevy Chase 

Bierly, Jack S., Sabillasville 

Bodine, Mildred V., Silver Spring 

Bolden, Mary V., Oakland 

Boose, Barbara E., Washington, D. C. 

Boyda, John J., Iselin, Pa. 

Broome, Ethel M., Washington, D. C. 

Burkom, Philip, Baltimore 

Butler. Isabel R., Edmonston 

Cline, Carl A., Monrovia 

Corcoran, Martha A., Washington, D. C. 

Gumming, William K., Port Deposit 

Farlow, Hester A., Salisbury 

Gienger, George H., Brentwood 

Gilleland, Catherine E., Chevy Chase 



Gray, Carolyn B., Poolesville 
Haase, Thomas N., Baltimore 
Hall, Marguerite G., Baltimore 
Hurley, Robert F., Hyattsville 
Hyatt, Hilda M., Damascus 
Kalbaugh, Helen B., Luke 
Lanahan, Reita M., Washington, D. C. 
Lane, John E., Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, Francis A., Sykesville 
Lucas, Frances N., Berwyn 
Maisel, Frederick C, Catonsville 
Maynard, Eurith L., Baltimore 
McClure, Charles J. R., Baltimore 
McFadden, Janet M., Mt. Rainier 
McGuigan, Hilda C, Halethorpe 
Mohle, Robert L., Berwyn 
Mondorff, Pershing L., Emmitsburg 
Morse, Suzanne F., Washington, D. C. 



422 



Murphy, Joseph M., Carney's Point, N. J. 

Naughten, Edward T., Washington, D. C. 

Nordwall, Frances L., College Park 

Osso, Philomena, Annapolis 

Owings, Jane C, Riverdale 

Powers, Lillian, Jersey City, N. J. 

Ramer, Jean E., Bethesda 

Reese, Elizabeth J., Washington, D. C. 

Reynolds, Hope, Rising Sun 

Ross, Betsy, Takoma Park 



Ryon, Mary J., Waldorf 
Sargeant, Lida E., Silver Spring 
Schwartz, Rosalind, New York, N. Y. 
Shaffer, Richard W., Johnstown, Pa. 
Stubbs, Mildred V., Mt. Rainier 
Tapper, Herman A., Baltimore 
Trout, Maxine E., Frederick 
Vaught, Jeannette, Hyattsville 
Zimmerman, Margaret C, Frederick 



Adkins, Isobel, Parsonsburg 
Alperstein, Isadore H., Baltimore 
Arnold, William D., Baltimore 
Beard, Melva F., Annapolis Junction 
Bertrand, Lorraine K., Baltimore 
Betts, Allen W., Chevy Chase 
Bjorge, Margaret, New London, Conn. 
Bowling, Martha E., Hughesville 
Bright, Elmer F., Baltimore 
Burton, Jean E., Cheverly 
Carnin, Helen J., Baltimore 
Catling, Ruth E., Catonsville 
Chaires, Helen V., Queen Anne 
Cissel, Jean L., Sandy Spring 
Coffman, Maidee E., Washington, D. C. 
Cohen, Elias, Baltimore 
Conner, Shirley N., Washington, D. C. 
Crane, Helen L., College Heights 
Culver, Burton E., Hyattsville 
Deitz, Alice E., Baltimore 
Dubin, Charles T., Baltimore 
Duvall, Hiltrude A., Savage 
Duvall, Mearle D., Baltimore 
Fields, Thomas McC., Hyattsville 
Foerster, Dorothy H., Washington, D 
Fraley, Harry H., Derwood 
Garlitz, Dorothy M., Cumberland 
Giles, Nathan L., Washington, D. C. 
Gordon, Ian, Arbutus 
Griffin, Helen C, Baltimore 
Hall, Betty D., Washington, D. C. 
Hamilton, Mildred E., Oakland 
Handler, Esther, Kingston, N. Y. 
Harman, Jessie M., Hyattsville 
Heath, Phillip C, College Park 
Holt, Bette E., Takoma Park 
Huff, Catherine P., Chevy Chase 
Jacobs, Sylvan W., Red Lion, Pa. 
Jost, Marjorie E., Bethesda 
Jullien, Elizabeth J., Chevy Chase 
Kahl, Mary C, Hagerstown 
Kane, Mary E., Silver Spring 
Kardash, John, Baltimore 
Kerchner, Janet L., Walkersville 
Kibler, Margaret J., Hyattsville 
Kinlock. William H., III. Bellevue 



Sophomore Class 

Knauer, Helena M. A., Berwyn 
Kreider, Geraldine, Riverdale 
Kuehle, Marie P., Baltimore 
Lamm, Vivian C, Hyattsville 
Latimer, Mary B., Silver Spring 
Lennon, Mary R., Baltimore 
Lumsden, Milton G., Baltimore 
Luskin, Joseph, Baltimore 
Main, Robert L., Seat Pleasant 
McGill, Caroline, Thurmont 
McLuckie, Virginia L., Cumberland 
McNeil, John P., Baltimore 
Meiser, Margaj*et R., Baltimore 
Melvin, Robert H., Washington, D. C. 
Mercer, M. Virginia, Baltimore 
Mermelstein, Arnold, Baltimore 
Mullin, Beryl H., Aberdeen 
Murray, Norma L., Princess Anne 
Oberle, William F., Jr., Dundalk 
Parlett, Mary D., Ellicott City 
Pfeiffer, H. Shirley, Teaneck, N. J. 
Powell, Mary V., Hagerstown 
Purnell, Jane L., Laurel, Del. 
Riley, William T., Baltimore 
C. Rockstroh, Henry J., Ellicott City 

Sansone, Marie J., Baltimore 
Saperstein, Paul, Baltimore 
Savitz, Melvin M., Baltimore 
Schmidt, Wilhelmina V., Seat Pleasant 
Schoenhaar, William H., Baltimore 
Schroeder, Leonard T., North Linthicum 
Scott, Janet L., Brentwood 
Sexton, M. Jordan, Baltimore 
Shanahan, Kathleen E., Riverdale 
Shea, Katherine, Holyoke, Mass. 
Shipley, Florence L., Cumberland 
Showacre, Harold G., Baltimore 
Smith, Robert H., Woodlynne, N. J. 
Stealey, Jean E., Baltimore 
Stiles, Catherine E., Rockville 
Stubbs, Charlotte M., Mt. "Rainier 
Surosky, Ruth F., Baltimore 
Taylor, Morton F., Perryville 
Thompson, Norma L., Fenwick 
Urquhart, Ann M., Riverdale 
Valle, Michalena M., Baltimore 



423 



Wharton, James H., Baltimore 
White, Chajlotte B., Dickerson 
White, Florence J., Poolesville 
Wilkins, Laura A., Pocomoke City 



Williams, Aileen M., Hyattsville 
Wolf, Ann O., Baltimore 
Wolfinger, Margaret E., Hagerstown 
Woodburn, Dale B., Mt. Rainier 



Freshman Class 



Ashby, Loretta J., Crellin 
Baker, Halford H., Winchester, Va. 
Beall, G. Marie, Damascus 
Benjamin, Harold H., Hyattsville 
Bradburn, Eleanor M., Upper Marlboro 
Bramble, Harrison L., Cambridge 
Brelsford, Richard E., Berwyn 
Brockman, Muriel F„ Riverdale 
Brown, Edwin L., Lovettsville, Va. 
Burnett, Pelham R., Baltimore 
Chacos, Louis G., Washington, D. C. 
Conrad, Luther B., Hollidaysburg, Pa. 
Coursey, Carolyn M., Centreville 
Davis, Frances M., Glenside, Pa. 
Decker, Dorothy J., Washington, D. C. 
DePrimo, Joseph G., Dunmore, Pa. 
Devlin, Thomas H., Baltimore 
Dunn, Mary, Hyattsville 
Durst, Laura R., Lonaconing 
Eckman, William D., Canton, Pa. 
Errera, Irven, Washington, D. G. 
Evans, Ruth V., Washington, D. C. 
Fenton, Elizabeth L., Washington, D. C. 
Ferree, Dolores J., Frostburg 
Ferrell, Mary J., Richmond, Va. 
Fradin, Harry H., Baltimore 
Frye, William M., Mt. Rainier 
Gannon, Joseph A., Hyattsville 
Goldman, Allan P., Baltimore 
Gottlieb, Gloria I., Oceanside, N. Y. 
Greenberg, Beatrice, Baltimore 
Greer, Richard S., Baltimore 
Grelecki, Ramon, Baltimore 
Gunther, Herbert J., Baltimore 
Hamacher, John S., Washington, D. C. 
Harrison, Betty Lou, Hyattsville 
Henderson, James M., Washington, D. C. 
Hess, Mary M. E., Point Pleasant, N. J. 
House, Norris M., Washington, D. C. 
Humphreys, Margaret L., Baltimore 
Jones, Marjorie K., Wheeling, W. Va. 



Kihn, Stanley J., Baltimore 
Krafft, Catharine E., Washington, D. C. 
Kramer, Bernard I. H., Baltimore 
Kuster, Walter B., Blossburg, Pa. 
Loveless, Ernest A., Clinton 
Maisel, Robert L., Catonsville 
Markowitz, Carroll, Baltimore 
Masincupp, Gordon, Chevy Chase 
Mathieson, Elwood F., Washington, D. C. 
McGlaughlin, Charles C, Highfield 
Munson, Louise, Southbury, Conn. 
Murray, Kenneth M., Lydia 
Novick, Corrine C, Baltimore 
O'Neil, Warren K., Alexandria, Va. 
Ott, Willa L., Mt. Rainier 
Passen, Alex, Baltimore 
Prettyman, Virginia A., Tilghman 
Rawlings, Emma W., Westwood 
Reibetanz, Jeanette M., Baltimore 
Reynolds, Charles J., Baltimore 
Richards, Patricia E., Takoma Park 
Romm, Pearl J., Takoma Park 
Sansone, John A., Baltimore 
Seward, Mark H., Baltimore 
Shaw, Winthrop S., Chevy Chase 
Sheer, Daniel E., Baltimore 
Shockey, Donald J., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Smink, Betty W., Aberdeen 
Sterling, Samuel C, Baltimore 
Stevenson, Lottie E., Takoma Park 
Stratmann, Elizabeth L., Dundalk 
Taylor, Mary L., Baltimore 
Thayer, Mary A., High Point, N. C. 
Thomas, Jean C, Washington, D. C. 
Thompson, Frances A., College Park 
Townsend, James G., Frostburg 
Trice, Paul C, Hurlock 
Umali, Loiiise-Marie, Hyatsville 
Wagner, Barbara J., Riverdale 
Wilmer, Cynthia Q., Popes Creek 
Zepp, Ethel G., Westminster 



Part Time 



Alder, Guy D., Greenbelt 
Angel, Ralph L., Dundalk 
Bargas, Joseph E., Greenbelt 
Becraft, Mabel V., Washington Grove 
Bedsworth. Margaret C. (Mrs.), Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Benbow, Gene T,, Clinton 



Bennett, Frances, Annapolis 
Bentley, George E., Washington, D. C. 
Biret, Elsie, Washington, D. C. 
Blackmore, Esther M. (Mrs.), College Park 
Blanchard, William St. J., Jr., Greenbelt 
Blentlinger, Charles L., Frederick 
Blentlinger, Nellie E., Frederick 



/ 

Blundon, E^arl A., Silver Spring 
Bowie, Blanche L., La Plata 
Bowling, Ellen H., Upper Marlboro 
Bowlus, Sara E., Jefferson 
Bowman, Emma M., Berwyn 
Brice, Eleanor V., Annapolis 
Brookbank, Annie V.. Charlotte Hall 
Brown, Mary W. (Mrs.), Greenbelt 
Bryant, Slater W., Jr.. Glen Burnie 
Burgess, Maurine D. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Burroughs, Henryetta B. (Mrs.). Mechan- 

icsville 
Cantwell, Hammond D.. Annapolis 
Chatham, Elizabeth E., Salisbury 
Chew. Virginia. Annapolis 
Childs, Minnie, Annapolis 

Clark, Orpha A., Frostburg 
Claytor, Margaret A., Riverdale 

Copes, Grace R., Silver Spring 

Cross, Janie A., Brandy wine 

CuUen, Emily M., Edgewater 

Culver, Lynn J., Greenbelt 

Cunningham. Hilda S. (Mrs.). Washington, 

D. C. 

Curley. Kathryn L. (Mrs.). Washington. 

D. C. 

Dawson, Helen M., Edgewater 

Dematatis, Ernest E., Greenbelt 

DeSalvo, Marks X., Greenbelt 

Dickey, Mabel S., Indian Head 

Dillon, Mary C. (Mrs.), Washington. D. C. 

Dodd, Ocie E., Chevy Chase, D. C 

Dominek, Mary R., Washington, D. C. 

Dowden, Elisabeth E., Washington, D. C. 

Dyson, Edna M., Charlotte Hall 

Earle. Mary I., Washington, D. C. 

Ehrmantraut, Doris W., Washington, D. C. 

Elliott, Marcia A., Annapolis 

Emmerich, Sophie N.. West River 

Erickson. Janet A.. Annapolis 

Evans. William B., Jr., Ewell 

Faber. Anna P. (Mrs.). College Heights 

Fleming, Amy M. (Mrs.), Washington. 

D. C. 

Folkman, Albert J., Greenbelt 
Forsyth. Augusta McC. (Mrs.). Washing- 
ton, D. C 
Fowler, Lavinia L. (Mrs.), Annapolis 
Freeman, L. Louise, Frederick 
Frothingham. James R., Sr., Hyattsville 
Garner, Adelaide G. (Mrs.). Spring Hill 
Gaver, Mabel B. (Mrs.), Linthicum Heights 
Gibson, H. Madeline. Glen Burnie 
Gibson, Rachel F., Glen Burnie 
Giles, Martha R.. Annapolis 
Goodhand, Elizabeth A.. Upper Marlboro 
Goodpasture, Esther M., Washington, D. C. 



424 



Gough. Katharine L. (Mrs.), Laurel 
Gray, Jane E., Port Tobacco 
Green. Helen F.. College Park 
Grove. Edith M., Washington, D. C. 
Gue. Ruth S. (Mrs.). Rockville 
Hagenbuch. Ola K. (Mrs.). Hyattsville 
Harbold, Charlotte R. (Mrs.), Annapolis 
Hardesty, Leila V., Port Republic 
Harrington. Irene N., Annapolis 
Harris. Elizabeth M. (Mrs.). College Park 
Haverty, Bernadine H. (Mrs.). Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Hayden, Agnes, Popes Creek 
Healy, Roberta F.. Annapolis 
Hearne, Ethel G. (Mrs.). La Plata 
Henault. Gladys M. (Mrs.). Upper Marlboro 
Henderson, William D., Mercer, W. Va. 
Hennick, Donald C, College Park 
Holmes. Miriam McD. (Mrs.), College Park 
Holt, Nadine R. (Mrs.), Washington, D. C. 
Ivins, May E., Lansdowne 
Jameson, Anna B. (Mrs.), Rock Point 
Johnson, Lucille E.. Johnson City. Tenn. 
Jones, Leonora G. (Mrs.), Faulknor 
Kaufman, Gee L. (Mrs.), Washington. D. C. 
Kenney. Katherine J., Frostburg 
King. Olive E. (Mrs.). Clinton 
King, Willamy S.. Washington, D. C. 
Kingdon, Mary R.. Rockville 
Knobla.uch, Juliet J. (Mrs.), White Hall 
Knotts, Dorothy E.. Annapolis 
Kyle. May T. (Mrs.), Washington. D. C. 
Lederhos. Virginia L., Arnold 
Linthicum, Eleanor E., Washington, D. C. 
Long. Hannah E.. Selbyville. Del. 
Luckenbach, Everett A.. Washington, D. C. 
Magaha, Dora M.. Frederick 
Mangum, Susie A.. Washington, D. C. 
Margell. Lawrence C, Greenbelt 
Marshall. Alma E. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 

Martin, Sister Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Rae G. (Mrs.), Hughesville. 
Matthews. Abigail G. (Mrs.). La Plata 
Maw, Harold L.. Greenbelt 
McCall. Mildred L. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 

McGuire, Margaret F., Lonaconing 
McKeever, Antoinette D. (Mrs.). Silver 

Spring 
McNeely. John H.. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 
Michael. Edna M.,^ Frederick 
Miller, Dorothy A. Hyattsville 
Mills, Christene (Mrs.), Washington. D. C 
Miner, Ernest H., Greenbelt 
Miner, Hazel T. (Mrs.), Greenbelt 
Mitchell, Alfred G., Baltimore 
Mitchell, Nellie. Cambridge 

425 



Morris, Alta M., Normal, 111. 

Mudd, Anna L., Berwyn 

Mudd, Dorothy, Bryantown 

Mullendore, Louise C. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Mumford, Addie M. (Mrs.), Hyattsville 
Murphy, Joseph L., Greenbelt 
Myers, Wilma C, Hyattsville 
Nagle, Elmer S., Greenbelt 
Needy, Glendora E., Boonsboro 
Newman, Jeanette R. (Mrs.). Washington, 

D. C. 
Nielsen, Gladys G. (Mrs.), Greenbelt 
Norris, George W., Annapolis 
O'Connor, Mai-y C, Roanoke, Va. 
Owens, Doris E. C, Hanover 
Parker, Mabel H. (Mrs.), Glen Burnie 
Parrish, Marie M. (Mrs.), Upper Marlboro 
Phillips, Esther V., Silver Spring 
Plowden, Edna L. W. (Mrs.), Newport 
Powell, Alice, Berwyn 
Price, L. Irene, Frederick 
Proctor, Irvin M., Greenbelt 
Pumphrey, Elizabeth E. (Mrs.), Upper 

Marlboro 
Riggin, Albia E., Princess Anne 
Schaff. Boyd F., Greenbelt 
Schoonmaker, Katherine, La Plata 
Sheaffer, George E., Jr., Greenbelt 
Sims, Olivia K, (Mrs.), Rockville 
Smoot, Mildred D. (Mrs.), Kensington 
Somers, Milton M., La Plata 
Soper, Jessie G. (Mrs.), Piscataway 
Sothoron, Julia H., Charlotte Hall 
Souder, Letty H., Gaithersburg 
Speicher, Nelle I., Accident 



Stack, Margaret T. S. (Mrs.), Silver Spring 
Stainback, Little B., Jr., Greenbelt 
Staley, Ruth H. (Mrs.), Frederick 
Starr, Margaret E., Hyattsville 
Swann, Alice O., Dentsville 
Tarleton, Laura B. (Mrs.), Annapolis 
Taylor, L. Raymond, Greenbelt 
Testerman, Lida M., Princess Anne 
Teunis, Audrey S. (Mrs.), Upper Marlboro 
Todd, Hilda M., Crisfield 
Tretter, George, Greenbelt 
Turner, Edward C, La Plata 
Turner, Naomi E., Malcolm 
Twardowicz, Albin H., Baltimore 
Updograff, Edward R., Berwyn 
Vaughan, Eleanor J. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Wackwitz, Mary B. (Mrs.), College Park 
Waring, Elizabeth A., Annapolis 
Weld, Ruth, Sandy Spring 
Weller, Clara G. B. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
West, Dorothy H., Silver Spring 
West, Margery H. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
White, Ruth O., Mt. Rainier 
Wilkerson, Roberta T. (Mrs.), Malcolm 
Wilkinson, Helen V., Silver Spring 
Willard, Helen L., Pbolesville 
Wilson, Josephine E.. Charlotte Hall 
Woodward, Emily C, Annapolis 
Worthington, Lilian, Annapolis 
Yhnell, Berndt P., Greenbelt 
Young, Alice I., Silver Spring 
Young, Herschel, Greenbelt 
Zeller, Grace R. (Mrs.), Rockville 



Unclassified 



Anderson, Marian, Hyattsville 
Fluharty, Zelma L., Washington. D. C. 
Glotfelty, Mary L., Oakland 
Herbert, William L., Clearspring 
Jones, Mildred B. (Mrs.), Annapolis 
Larison, Oliver K., Chevy Chase 



Mackie, Eleanore W., Elkton 
Monocrusos, Marguerite S., Baltimore 
Schiff, Charles, Annapolis 
Sgrignoli, Mary, Garwood, N. J. 
Smith, A. Grayson, Greensboro 



VOCATIONAL TEACHER TRAINING COURSES, BALTIMORE 

Department of Industrial Education 



Amass. Jack R.. Baltimore ^ 

Amoss, Elsie F., Baltimore 
Anderson. Charles R., Baltimore 
Annan. Clara L., Baltimore 
Askew, Howard D., Baltimore 
Aspel. Sister Mary Catherine, Baltimore 
Baer, Bankard F., Baltimore 
Baker. Allena R., Baltimore 



Barnes, Marie, Baltimore 
Barnes, May S., Baltimore 
Baumgardner, Ralph W., Westminster 
Beall, Irl H., Baltimore 
Beam, Earl E., Baltimore 
Becker, Dorothea A., Baltimore 
Bell, Raymond K., Baltimore 
Bem, Alma, Aberdeen 



Benner, Elisabeth, Baltimore 
Bentley, George, Washington, D. C 
IJlacklock, Josiah A., Towson 
Bochau, Marian H., Baltimore 
Bomhardt, Norine L., Baltimore 
Boone, Arrah B., Baltimore 
Boone, Katherine O., Baltimore 
Borchers, Charles M., Finksburg 
Bordley, Madison B., Jr., Baltimore 
Bosley, Edgar B. A., Baltimore 
Bowen, Louise M., Pikesville 
Boylan, Edward M., Baltimore 
Bradford, Genevieve M., Baltimore 
Braecklein, Howard W., Baltimore 
Brandenburg, Emily J., Baltimore 
Brooks, Mary M., Hampstead 
Brown, Frances L., Woodstock 
Brown, Ruth D., Woodstock 
Bryant, Slater W., Jr., Glen Burnie 
Buchman, Thomas W., Stevenson 
Buettner, John A., Jr., Baltimore 
Bullough, G. Van Ness, Baltimore 
Burke, Miriam, Baltimore 
Burns, Thelma W., Catonsville • 
Burton, Basil M., Monkton 
Byer, Henry L., Dundalk 
Cann, Charles S., Baltimore 
Carey, F. Emmart, Baltimore 
Carroll, Genevieve A., Baltimore 
Cissel, Beatrice S., West Friendship 
Clark, Emily L., Baltimore 
dayman, Henry, Baltimore 
Clubb, Evelyn M., Baltimore 
Conlin, Anne D., Baltimore 
Crane, Amy H., Towson 
Creery, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Criminale, Emanuel E., Baltimore 
Ciomwell, Mildred V., Baltimore 
Cronin, Catherine E., Baltimore 
Davidson, David K., Baltimore 
Degen, LeRoy G., Baltimore 
Denaburg, Gertrude, Baltimore 
Dennis, Evelyn G., Baltimore 
Diehl, George C Baltimore 
Dobbs, Edward C, Baltimore 
Dorfman, Julius, Washington, D. C. 
Downs, Emma, Baltimore 
Drechsler, Clotilde C, Westminster 
Duncan, Lida Lee, Baltimore 
Dunwoody, Ruth M., Baltimore 
Edwards, Paul C, Baltimore 
Elchenko, Alice V.. Catonsville 
Elliott, Helen O.. Baltimore 
Elliott, Robert V., Catonsville 
Emig, Chaxles L., Towson 
Enders, Grace H., Baltimore 
Ercole, Henry A., Baltimore 
Evans, William B., Jr., Ewell 



Farrell, Alice C, Baltimore 

Farrow, Blanche S., Baltimore 

Faulkner, Floyd C Baltimore 

Forrester, Bernadette E., Baltimore 

Foster, Sister Mary de Sales, Towson 

Forster, Jack E., Baltimore 

Francey, James, Baltimore 

Freeze, Frank L., Baltimore 

Fristoe, Virginia R., Linthicum Heights 

Furness, Gordon W.. Catonsville 

Gerkens, Carl A., Baltimore 

Gilbert, Loren G., Baltimore 

Gilbert, Roland A., Laurel 

Giles, Marie L., Baltimore 

Gillen, Bertha C Baltimore 

Goden, Alan, Baltimore 

Goldstein, Harold I., Baltimore 

Goldstein, Mildred H., Baltimore 

Gontrum, Charles H., Baltimore 

Goode, Rubye M., Baltimore 

Granek, Abraham, Baltimore 

Greenfield, Albett N., Baltimore 

Grief zu, George E., Baltimore 

Grimsley, L. Beatrice, Baltimore 

Grove, Elmer K., Baltimore 

Gunderloy, Frank C, Pasadena 

Haile, Margaret E., Towson 

Hamilton, D. Kathleen B., Baltimore 

Hare, Ruth C Baltimore 

Hardy, Earl C, Baltimore 

Hay, Donald B., Catonsville 

Hearn, Bessie V., Baltimore 

ICedrick, Melvin D., Baltimore 

Heghinian, Garabed W., Baltimore 

Hennick, Donald C, College Park 

Herwig, Edward H., Baltimore 

Hibbitts, Jane D.. Baltimore 

Hilgartner, Robert W., Baltimore 

Hill, Mary, Conowingo 

Himmel, Mildred, Baltimore 

Hisley, Lillian P., Baltimore 

Hofher, Sister Mary Margaret J)olores, Bal- 

timore 
Holden, Delma, Baltimore 
Holland, Mary T., Baltimore 
Hollander, Margaret, Baltimore 
Holter, Mary M., Fullerton 
Hooks, A. D., Baltimore 
Horn, George F., Baltimore 
Horn. Robert H., Baltimore 
Homey, Paul O., Annapolis 
Hottes, William. Baltimore 
Huflfman, Julia K.', Baltimore 
Irnler, Katharine B., Baltimore 
Isabelle, J. Ovide, Baltimore 
Jacobson, Sara, Baltimore 
Jeschke, Curt A. H., Baltimore 
Jirsa, Charles, Baltimore 



426 



427 



Johnson, Eldred D., Upper Falls 
Jones, George G., Baltimore 
Jones, Julia E., Overlea 
Jones, Ruth, Towson 
Joyce, Brother Paul. Baltimore 
Kaufman, Fred W., Baltimore 
Keating, Lyda, Baltimore 
Kehm, Marguerite C, Baltimore 
Keller, Melvin J., Baltimore 
Kinsey, Allan S., Jr., Baltimore 
Kommalan, Marie A. E., Bait more 
Koontz, Paul M., Baltimore 
Kornblatt, Joseph, Baltimore 
Krieger, Mildred B., Baltimore 
Kruse, Lillian, Baltimore 
Kuehn, Peter, Baltimore 
Kummell, Lillian M., Baltimore 
Kypta, James F., Baltimore 
Lambert, Arthur G., Baltimore 
Lambert, Hildreth, Baltimore 
Lassahn, John H. C.. Baltimore 
Laugerman, John B., Baltimore 
Lawlis, Tilden T., Overlea 
Levin, Sol, Baltimore 
Lewis, Dorothy E., Baltimore 
Little, Edward T., Baltimore 
Lokstein, Henry, Baltimore 
Magness, Harriet E., Baltimore 
Malloy. Reginald D., Baltimore 
Manakee, Edward Y., Baltimore 
Mainen, Allan, Baltimore 
Marriott, Beatrice, Baltimore 
Marshall, Mary E., Baltimore 
Martin, Arthur L., Baltimore 
Martin, Carrie P., BaJtimore 
Mason, Sarah A., Baltimore 
Matthaei, Lewis A., Baltimore 
Mattingly, Nellie B., Baltimore 
McCarriar, Herbert G.. Baltimore 
McCarthy, Mary L., Baltimore 
McCarty, George W., Middle River 
McCauley, Annie C, Baltimore 
McConnachie, John A., Baltimore 
McDairmant, John, Baltimore 
McDonald, Gertrude, Baltimore 
McGarvey, Maybelle P., Baltimore 
McGuigan, Mary J., Halethorpe 
McKeon, Brother Alvin, Baltimore 
McLain, Elizabeth M., Baltimore 
Medinger, Helen A., Baltimore 
Medinger, John L., Baltimore 
Mele, Virginia M., Baltimore 
Mencke, Minnie R., Baltimore 
Merkle, Cliflford C, Baltimore 
Meyer, E. Lee, Jr., Baltimore 
Miller, Gladys G., Baltimore 
Moler, Margaret V., Baltimore 
Moles, William G., College Park 



I 



Montgomery, Marie L., Baltimore 
Muhlenfeld, Louise F., Baltimore 
Mohrlein, Julia S., Baltimore 
Muller, Marion B., Bradshaw 
Murphy, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Nathanson, Jerome L., Baltimore 
Nelson, Clifford L., White Hall 
Nichols, John H., Baltimore 
Ningard, Paul S., Baltimore 
Norris, Cecil, Baltimore 
Ochstein, Sophia J., Baltimore 
Oder, Alice M., Baltimore 
O'Keefe, William D., Baltimore 
Owens, Doris E. C, Hanover 
Parker, Mabel, Glen Burnie 
Paul, Felix H., Baltimore 
Peterson, Harold D., Baltimore 
Phillips, J. LeRoy, Baltimore 
Pieper, Eleanor C, Baltimore 
Piersol, Charles D., Baltimore 
Powell, George C, Baltimore 
Provenza, Anna M„ Baltimore 
Pund, Ruth L., Baltimore 
Rachanow, Louis, Baltimore 
Rawlins, Lillian E., Baltimore 
Reiter, Charles L., Baltimore 
Reynolds, Joseph R., Baltimore 
Rice, Dorothy, Baltimore 
Rittenhouse, Harold F., Baltimore 
Robinson, Harry L., Baltimore 
Robinson, Helen S., Baltimore 
Rock, Charles V., Baltimore 
Rost, Florence B., Baltimore 
Ruppel, Alvin G., Baltimore 
Sachs, Frank N., Baltimore 
Sadowski, Frank, Laurel 
Schacht, Harriet M., Catonsville 
Schmidt, Grace M., Baltimore 
Schmidt, Robert F.. Baltimore 
Schneider, Ethel G., Baltimore 
Schraiber, Maurice H., Baltimore 
Schultz, Melvin J., Baltimore 
Schwarzmann, George A., Baltimore 
Scott, Roy R., Baltimore 
Sellers, Robert M., Baltimore 
Sendelbach, John F., BaJtimore 
Senft, Charlotte R., Baltimore 
Shalowitz, Annette, Baltimore 
Sheppard, Ethel C, Baltimore 
Shepperd, Anna G., Upper Falls 
Shepperd, Mary F., Upper Falls 
Sherwood, Alice E., Baltimore 
Shinault, Sarah R.. Baltimore 
Silbert. Celia S., Baltimore 
Silbert. Keel, Baltimore 
Slade, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Smith. Harold D., Baltimore 
Sokolsky, Henry, Baltimore 



428 



Spence, Albin W., Baltimore 
Spencer, Alma Foster, Baltimore 
Spencer, Ethel B., Baltimore 
Sperry, Helen K., Baltimore 
such, James A., Baltimore 
Stein, Isadore L., Baltimore 
Stewart, Margaret L., Baltimore 
Stinnett, Bernard J., Baltimore 
Streett, Georgie A., Bradshaw 
Streett, V. Heuisler, Bradshaw 
Stubbs, Ethel H., Baltimore 
Stull, Robert B., Baltimore 
Sweetland, Theodore R., Baltimore 
Swisher, Elizabeth B., Baltimore 
Taylor, Sylvanus E., Westminster 
Temple, John F., Jr., Baltimore 
Thomas, Eloise, Baltimore 
Townsend. Lawrence R., Baltimore 
Tustin, Howard D., Jr.. Baltimore 
Updegraff, Edward R., Berwyn 
Valle, Joseph A., Baltimore 
Valle, Philip J.. Baltimore 
Vaught, Joseph D., Baltimore 
Vogel, B. Frank, Baltimore 



Walker, Dunaway, Baltimore 
Walker, Julia A., Reisterstown 
Ward, Fred J., Baltimore 
Ware, Margaret C, Baltimore 
Washburn, Mary A., Baltimore 
Weigate, Charles, Baltimore 
Weiland, Richard, Baltimore 
Weisheit, Teresa M., Baltimore 
West, Elmer P., Baltimore 
White, Walter. Baltimore 
Wilenzick, Jerome, BaJtimore 
Willett, Grace A., Baltimore 
Williams, Bessie S., Glen Arm 
Williams, Clara E., Baltimore 
Williams, L. Leighton, Baltimore 
Williamson, Riley S., Baltimore 
Willis, William N., Jr., Baltimore 
Wonn, Gertrude V., Hampstead 
Wroten, Arthur A., Baltimore 
Yaffe, Paul, Baltimore 
Yoder, Elizabeth M., Long Green 
Young, Karl H., Baltimore 
Zafren, Miriam, Baltimore 
Zerbola, Alice R., Baltimore 



(SubcoUegiate) 



Ahman, Bernard L., Jr., Baltimore 
Alban, Alma C, Baltimore 
Andrew, Virginia S., Baltimore 
Auer, Edna M., Baltimore 
Behm, Rosemary McN.. Baltimore 
Benser, Ethel M., BaJtimore 
Benson, Mark T., Baltimore 
Biddison, Robin S., Baltimore 
Bochau, Carl T., Baltimore 
Bonadio, Michael F., Baltimore 
Bouchelle, Robert B., Baltimore 
Brady, Eleanor M., Baltimore 
Brower, Edmund D., Towson 
Burgan, Louella H.. Baltimore 
Campbell, John P., Catonsville 
Cassard, Winifred B., BaJtimore 
Cummins, Thomas J., Baltimore 
Davies, John F., Catonsville 
Deems, Margaret Z., Baltimore 
DeWitt, Charles P., Ill, Baltimore 
Dorsey, James H., Baltimore 
Downin, Russel A.. Baltimore 
Driscoll, Catherine B., BaJtimore 
Duhan, Stephenson, Baltimore 
Duckworth, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Eckert, Dorothy H., Baltimore 
Forsyth, Irvin J., Baltimore 
Endres, Harry J.. Baltimore 
Gerlach. Paul E., Baltimore 
Gile, Miriam B., Baltimore 
Heller, Tressa S., Middle River 



Helm, Betty C, Baltimore 
Herring, Vernon, Baltimore 
Hurlock, Francis G., Baltimore 
Insley, R. Leland, Baltimore 
Jones. Eva T., Baltimore 
Kaufman, Lillian M., .Halethorpe 
Litsinger, William C Towson 
McBride, Carroll W. J., Baltimore 
McDaniel, Frances D., Baltimore 
McDonnell, John A., Baltimore 
McGinley, Edward, Baltimore 
Merrill, Virginia M., Baltimore 
Mezzullo, Frank A., Baltimore 
Miller, Thomas L., Baltimore 
Minderlein, Margaret M., Baltimore 
Moores, William M., Baltimore 
Mullin, Mary E., Baltimore 
Mumford, Thomas, Baltimore 
O'Connor, John J.. Jr., Baltimore 
Owens, Ann, Baltimore 
Penn, Jane S., Baltimore 
Powers, Margaret L., Baltimore 
Redmond, Ann L., Baltimore 
Robinson, Carroll, Baltimore 
Rockwell, Merle G., Baltimore 
Rouse, John G., Baltimore 
Sandberg, John H.. Fullerton 
Schaff, Rose, Baltimore 
Shank, Hazel R., Baltimore 
Silverman, Alexander M„ Baltimore 
Sneeringer, William J., Jr., Baltimore 



429 



Stewart, Granvel F., Baltimore 
Stonestreet, Guy W., Baltimore 
Swanson, Blanche E., Baltimore 
Trapp, Frederick S., Baltimore 
Warner, Richard G., Larchmont 
Weaver, William K., Jr., Towson 
Weller, Joanna I., Baltimore 



White, Helen F., Baltimore 
Whitehouse, Alton, Baltimore 
Whitmore, John McC, Reisterstown 
Widman, George J., Baltimore 
Wilson, C. Roland, Baltimore 
Woodyear, William E., Baltimore 
Zielski, Rose L., Baltimore 



VOCATIONAL TEACHER TRAINING COURSES, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Department of Industrial Education 



Anderson, Joseph A., Washington, D. C. 
Baker, Russell A., Washington, D. C. 
Barnfather, Matthew M., Washington, D. C. 
Bland, Annie E., Washington, D. C. 
Bolt, John B., Washington, D. C. 
Bowden, Bernice S., Arlington, Va. 
Clarke Delia L., Washington, D. C. 
Cleary, Hubert H., Washington, D. C. 
Cleaveland, Herbert, Takoma Park 
Combs, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Cook, Edgar I., Washington, D. C. 
Cook, Gertrude, Washington, D. C. 
Cooney, Edward L., Washington, D. C. 
Cowden, Cornelia G., Washington, D. C. 
Crankshaw, Harold G., Washington, D. C. 
Duncan, John M., Washington, D. C. 
Elson, Hulda M., Washington, D. C. 
Ferguson, Jonathan D., Silver Spring 
Fleming, Euclid S., Washington, D. C. 
Foster, Charles F., Washington, D. C. 
Gilbert, Roland, Laurel 
Ginberg, Ethel, Washington, D. C. 
Gottwals, Gene A., Silver Spring 
Griest, Walter S., Washington, D. C. 
Hartley, Edgar R. C, Washington, D. C. 
Hasbach, Michael F., Washington, D. C. 
Heironimus, Clark, Washington, D. C. 



Holzer, Emma A. F.. Washington, D. C. 
Horstkamp, Francis A., Washington, D. C. 
House, Matthew J., Washington, D. C. 
Keirn, Etta L., Washington, D. C. 
Kirk, Harold H., Washington, D. C. 
Knox, Howai'd L., College Park 
Knox, Lloyd T., College Park 
Lee, John P., Bethesda 
Leesnitzer, Brownley, Washington, D. C. 
Magee, John E., Washington, D. C. 
Maust, Edwin E., Washington, D. C. 
Mitchell, Helen N., Washington, D. C. 
Moore, Alice M., Hyattsville 
Murray, Lucile W., Washington, D. C. 
Olle, Arlyn F., Washington, D. C. 
Reily, James R., College Park 
Remmlein, Cyril D., Washington, D. C. 
Stevens, Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
Washburn, Carleton T., Washington, D. C. 
Weeks, Paul D., Washington, D. C. 
White, Robert A., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Joseph H., Washington, D. C. 
Woddell, J. Howard, Washington, D. C. 
Wondrack, Arthur J., Washington, D. C. 
Wondrack, Walter J., Washington, D. C. 
Wood, Louis L., Washington, D. C. 
Zcarfoss, John E., Alexandria, Va. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Senior 

Bamman, Richard K., Coltons Point P. O. 

Bebb, Edward K., Chevy Chase 

Brashears, Richard S., Washington, D. C. 

Budkoff, Nicholas A., Lynn, Mass. 

Carpenter, Byron L., Washington, D. C. 

Carroll, Richard W., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Clarke, Joseph A., Jessup 

Coleman, Thomas L., Washington, D. C. 

Collins, James E., Crisfield 

Cooke, Alfred A., Hyattsville 

Corkran, William H., Trappe 

Cox, Junior N., Baltimore 

Cranford, Leonard C, Washington, D. C. 

DeArmey, John J., Windber, Pa. 

Fletcher, Arthur W., Linthicum Heights 



Class 

Gallagher, Harry G., Relay 
Gerber, Sigmund I., Washington, D. C. 
Greenwood, Orville W., Cottage City 
Grogan, Leslie S., Washington, D. C. 
Hennighausen, Louis K., Jr., Baltimore 
Herbert, Wilbur M., Baltimore 
Herman, Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Kaminski, Joseph, Baltimore 
Kestler, Paul G., Baltimore 
Kinney, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 
Knust, Herman R., Jessup 
Lanham, Paul T., Lanham 
Lapoint, George M., Baltimore 
LeMat, Lee E., Washington, D. C. 
Lodge, Robert J., Baltimore 



Lozupone. Frank P.. Chevy Chase 
Marzolf, Joseph M., Deale 
Moran. Joseph T., Westernport 
Morris, Francis C, Washington, D. C. 
Mulitz, Milton M., Washington, D. C. 
Northrop, Sanford E., Hagerstown 
Odell. Charles N., ElUcott City 
Otten, Leonard J., Parkville 
Parsons, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Poole, Lewis A., Annapolis 
Purdum, William D., Glyndon 
Rector, Ralph L., Washington, D. C 
Russell, Joseph S.. Jr., Maddox 



Shaw, Bowen W., Silver Spring 
Shipe, J. Kelso, Washington, D. C. 
Simms, Harvey C, Silver Spring 
Slicer, William A., Gaithersburg 
Stedman, Henry T., Catonsville 
Steiner, Warren E., Washington. D. C. 

Storrs, Gardner H., Linthicum Heights 

Warner, Robert E., Baltimore 

Watkins, William H., Washington, D. C. 

Weeks, Loraine H., Mt. Lake Park 

Wilson, J. Gibson, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 

Yocum, Wilbur F., Chevy Chase 



Junior Class 



Bauernschmidt, John N., Baltimore 

Blazek, Frank J., Baltimore 

Bollinger, George W., Elkton 

Booze, William C, Baltimore 

Bralove, William, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Brockman, Roy C Baltimore 

Buhl, Victor C. Baltimore 

Carter, John M., Baltimore 

Clark, John W., Jr., Hancock 

Cromwell, Howard L., Washington, D. C. 

Crump, Ralph F., Frostburg 

Custer, John D., Washington, D. C. 

Darling, William M., Washington, D. C. 
Daudt, Louis R.. Wilmington, Del. 
Davidson, Donald C, Washington, D. C. 
Dorr, George W., Washington, D. C. 
Downs, Hugh G., Jr., Hagerstown 
Filbert, Howard C, Jr., Baltimore 
Finton. James R., Washington, D. C 
Gannon, William F., Westernport 
Glaze, Francis W., Jr., Hyattsville 
Haddaway, Vaden J., Woodlawn 
Hall, Thomas A., Washington, D. C. 
Harmon, Robert B., Takoma Park 
Haskin, Lawrence H., Takoma Park 
Hatchett, Samuel E., Washington, D. C. 
Hawkins, Edward C, Catonsville 
Heil. George J.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Hitch, Thomas E., Washington, D. C. 
Hodgins. Lawrence J., Jr., College Park 
Hughes, Thomas A., Washington. D. C. 
Hutton, Junius O., Chevy Chase 
Imus, Alden E., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Jackson, Robert L., Bethesda 
Jensen. Willard C Washington, D. C 



Keller, Holly M.. Bethesda 

Kimball, Henry F., Washington, D. C. 

Kinder, Gilbert E., Millersville 

Klawans, Bernard, Annapolis 

Lanigan, James M.. Washington, D. C. 

Laughead, Robert W., Bethesda 

Lee, Gin H., Washington. D. C. 

Marzolf, John C, Deale 

Mattingly. Robert D., Riverdale 

McCusker. Richard W.. Pikesville 

Mehring, Arthur C, Capitol Heights 

Meyer, Carl W., Baltimore 

O'Connell, Daniel T., Washington, D. C. 

O'Farrell, Rufus E.. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Onnen, Donald S., Baltimore 

Powell, John M., Dorsey 

Riley, Thomas W.. College Park 

Rimmer, William, University Park 

Saltzman, Ernest C Washington, D. C. 

Shivoder, Charles A., Jr., Fullerton 

Siebeneichen, Paul O., Washington, D. C. 

Sloan, James DeW., Cumberland 

Smith. Stanley H., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Stevens, John F., IIL Annapolis 

Stewart, Carl H., Jr., Baltimore 

Streep, Samuel C, Silver Spring 

Suter, Walter H., Jr., Baltimore 

Thompson, Jack H., Chevy Chase 

Timberlake, Turner G.. Magnolia 

Watson, Thomas E., Jr., St. Inigoes 

Whalen. Stanley M.. Washington. D. C. 

Wilson, Lawrence L., Baltimore 

Witherspoon, Fred L., Jr., Silver Spring 

Worden, John F., Berwyn 

Young, Charles M.. Washington, D. C. 



Sophomore Class 



Ackerman, John H., Baltimore 

Agress, Joseph, Cumberland 

Aiken, Albert S., Cheverly 

Altman, Edward R., Washington, D. C. 

Anderson, Bruce S., Hyattsville 



Augustine, Francis W., Cheverly 
Baker, Thomas, San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Beaumont, Charles R., Jr., Silver Spring 
Becker, Clarence E., Baltimore 
Berg, Hyman A., Baltimore 



450 



431 ' 



Biggs. Anson W., Washington, D. C. 
Bilbrey, Joseph H., Takoma Park 
Blondheim, Leonard, Baltimore 
Boyer, Rodney L., Highland. 
Bransdorf, Richard R., Washington, D. C. 
Bridge, Richard, Takoma Park 
Bridges, J. Ralph. Baltimore 
Brinson, John R., Brentwood 
Carpenter, Frank G., Chevy Chase 
Chirieleison, Joseph P., Washington, D. C. 
Clark, Fitzhugh T., Germantown 
Cochrane, Robert B., Jr.. Baltimore 
Cordyack, John E., Baltimore 
Crockett, David T., Jr., University Park 
Cronin, Randall C, Joppa 
Curtin, John F., Laurel 
Davis, Donald D., Hyattsville 
DeMarr, Creighton O., Berwyn 
Deming, Andrew S., Washington, D. C. 
Douglas, Bruce A., Baltimore 
Dow, Neal, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Earp, Harold E.. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Eberhart. Jack M.. Baltimore 
Edgerton, James F.. Washington. D. C. 
Edwards, Paul M., Washington. D. C. 
Ellsworth. William M.. Washington, D. C. 
Emrich, Howard F., Baltimore 
Evans, Kenneth J., Takoma Park 
Falck, David A., Baltimore 
Farnsworth, John K., Washington, D. C. 
Finlayson, Thomas R., Bethesda 
Fishkin, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Forsythe, Dixon L., Baltimore 
Foss, Kenneth E., Relay 
Freemire. Elmer L., Takoma Park 
Freeze, Paul D., Thurmont 
Fusfeld, Robert D., Washington. D. C. 
Gearhart. Robert A., Alexandria. Va. 
Gillett, Thornton R., Washington, D. C. 
Glasgow. Raymond J., Hyattsville 
Godwin, Gurney L., Baltimore 
Graham, William McL.. Baltimore 
Greene, Robert E., Jr., Mt. Rainier 
Griggs, Louis C, Cumberland 
Groves, Robert A., Woodlawn 
Hall. Lacy. Seat Pleasant 
Hathaway. Norman E.. University Park 
Haywood, Stuart T.. Westernport 
Hege. Jeremiah C, Washington, D. C. 
Hessler, Bernard P., Washington, D. C. 
Hink, Henry M., Annapolis Junction 
Hoddinott, Reginald K., Jr., Baltimore 
Hopkins, Page F., Silver Spring 
Hoskinson, Jack W., Washington, D. C. 
Huggins, Lloyd G., Fort Meade 
Hughes, Vincen J., Jr., Baltimore 
Hutchinson, John LeR., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Nelson R., Washington, D. C. 



Kaiser, Herman F., Washington, D. C. 
Karr, Roger W., Bethesda 
King, Arthur R., Silver Spring 
Klein, Charles F., Baltimore 
Klug, Howard J., Washington. D. C. 
Kursch. Robert F.. Washington, D. C. 
Kurz, Philip E., Takoma Park 
Lambert, John L., Baltimore 
Lewis, Bernard M., Washington, D. C. 
Lewis, George W.. Jr., Chevy Chase 
Lopata, John, Baltimore 
Malcolm, James E.. Silver Spring 
Males, Irwin J., Washington, D. C. 
Maloney, William F., Jr., Govans 
Maslin, William R., Port Chester, N. Y. 
Maxcy, Donald C. Washington, D. C. 
McFall, Russell W., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, James H., University Park 
Mitchell. John T., Washington, D. C. 
Moore, Henry W., Washington. D. C. 
Morin, Herbert L., Baltimore 
Morris, Robert L., Baltimore 
Moss, Howard M.. Tokyo, Japan 
Nitzel, Henry D.. Baltimore 
Owens. Benjamin M.. Landover 
Patch, Richard L., Washington. D. C. 
Peters, Roy F.. Washington. D. C. 
Peterson, Ernest H., Billingsley 
Pfeiffer, Arthur M.. Jr., Baltimore 
Piozet, Charles F., College Heights 
Pittiglio, Clayton L., Washington, D. C. 
Platshon, Alvin, Washington, D. C. 
Pyles. George V., Anacostia. D. C. 
Randall, Joseph H., Boyds 
Rawley. Weldon N., Jr., Hyattsville 
Reckner, Jack V., Severna Park 
Redd, William M., Jr.. Baltimore 
Reynolds. George E.. Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Rinehart, Elijah, Relay 
Rives. Thomas McD., Jr.. Washington. 

D. C. 

Robertson. Samuel T.. Jr.. Bethesda 
Rodgers, Kelly, Washington, D. C. 
Rosenberg, Norman H., Baltimore 
Russell, Robert W., Frederick 
Schlenoflf, Maurice, Baltimore 
Schmidt, Francis R., Washington. D. C. 
Schumacher, Irwin J., Washington* D. C. 
Searls, Robert W., Baltimore 
Shulman, Fred, Washington, D. C. 
Sirkis, Joseph A., Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Earl W., Baltimore 
Smith, Paul J., Silver Spring 
Staines, P. Raymond, Severna Park 
Steed, Leon S., Bethesda 
Sunier, Emile H., Washington, D. C. 
Tierney. Louis M., Bennings, D. C. 



432 



Tilley. William R., Bel Air 
Turner, Norris H., Hyattsville 
Underwood, Vahl E., Washington. D. C. 
Valaer, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Valentine, Arthur H., Dundalk 
Walker, Hoba.rt T., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Wannall, George L., North Beach 
Warehime, Norwood R., Baltimore 
Watkins, Frank G., Baltimore 
Waxman, Meyer, Baltimore 



Webster, Edward. Washington. D. C. 

Westfall, Robert R., Hyattsville 

White, Roland G., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Wick, Donald H., Hyattsville 

Williams. John W., Salisbury 

Wilson, Henry D., Takoma Park 

Witkowski, Thomas T., Baltimore 

Wolf, Seymour D., South Fallsburg, N. Y. 

Young, Willis H., Jr., Riverdale 



Freshman Class 



Allen, Redfield W., Silver Spring 
Altimont, Orlando W., Chevy Chase 
Anderson, Benjamin E.. University Park 
Appleby. William A., Washington, D. C. 
Archibald, John H., Washington, D. C. 
Arentson, Robert M., Silver Spring 
Armstrong, Richard W., Cabin John 
Atkinson, Harold B., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Avery, John B., Washington. D. C. 
Avey, Ray J., Washington, D. C. 
Bailey, Leslie E., Hyattsville 
Baker, Frank G., Jr., Annapolis 
Barlow, Nathan B., West Cedar City, Utah 
Barrett, Jack R., Catonsville 
Barrett, James H., Jr., Annapolis 
Barrett, Thomas F., Washington, D. C. 
Bates, Elwood, Annapolis 
Batson, David R., Washington, D. C. 
Bean, Tarleton S., Jr., Silver Spring 
Beardsley, Thomas D.. Berwyn 
Beasley. Jack P.. Burtonsville 
Bell. Forrest H., College Park 
Bemis. Robert K.. Washington. D. C. 
Beveridge. John, Chevy Chase 
Blood, Gordon F., Washington, D. C. 
Blumenstein, Otto J., Washington, D. C. 
Boothe, Daniel U.. Washington, D. C. 
Bosley, William H., Ruxton 
Bowser, Richard B.. Silver Spring 
Boyer, Edward L., Alexandria, Va. 
Brown, Charles E., Washington. D. C. 
Brown, David T., Millersville 
Brumback. Thomas B., Bethesda 
Bryan, John W., Berwyn 
Buck. Sidney E., Kensington 
Burlin, Ralph M.. Port Deposit 
Burton. M. Durant. Washington, D. C. 
Butler, Harry M., Edmonston 
Caldwell, Albert T., Conowingo 
Campbell, William R., Brentwood 
Chapin, Giles L., Washington, D. C. 
Chapman, Richard G.. Baltimore 
Chapman, William B.. Chevy Chase 
Chessler, Marvin L., Baltimore 
Clancy, William J., Washington, D. C. 



Clark, George L., Silver Spring 

Clark, James A., Takoma Park 

Clark, Robert W., Silver Spring 

Collison, Frederic E., Takoma Park 

Cook, Fraise A., Kensington 

Cook. William T., Washington. D. C. 

Coster, Joseph B., Jr., Baltimore 

Covell, Donald E., Fort Meade 

Cowgill, Frank A., Oaklyn, N. J. 

Crammond, James D., Washington, D. C. 

Crampton, Erwin E., Washington, D. C. 

Crone, John L., Mt. Rainier 

Crone, Norman A., Mt. Rainier 

Crouthamel, Harry R.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cumberland, John I., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Cunningham, Norman J.. Washington. D. C. 

Cunningham. William J., Silver Spring 

Daniels. Edward L., Fort Monmouth. N. J. 

Davis. James R.. Chevy Chase 

Delcher. Howard C. Baltimore 

DePue, Leland A., Takoma Park 

Dickinson, John F., Bethesda 

Dietz, Charles R., Mt. Hayes 

Drew, Howard R., Chevy Chase 

Drysdale, William B., Washington. D. C. 

Eastment, Norton D., Silver Spring 

Ebner, Holland A.. Washington. D. C. 

Egloff, Julius, Washington, D. C. 

Eicker, Carl W., Gk>vans 

Ellett, William C, Washington. D. C. 

Evans, Eugene M., Takoma Park 

Farnham, Arthur C, Washington, D. C. 

Fearnow, Dwight O., Williamsport 

Fetters, David R., Baltimore 

Fiedler, Lionel M., Washington, D. C. 

Fisher, Evan D., Takoma Park 

Flax, Louis, Washington, D. C. 

Floyd, Richard I., Baltimore 

Forbes, James E., Baltimore 

m 

Forrester, Robert J., Berwyn 
Fradin, Samuel, Baltimore 
Frazier, Donald L., Baltimore 
Fuchs, Richard G., Baltimore 
Gassinger, Henry A., Baltimore 
Gast, William R., Cheverly 



433 



Geller, Ulrich A., Chevy Chase 

Ginder, William M., Baltimore 

Gingell, Vernon R., Washington, D. C. 

Golomb, Jerome W., Baltimore 

Goode, Adrian F., Westbury, N. Y. 

Gore, Oliver R. C, Cambridge 

Goss, David A., Baltimore 

Goss. Milton E., Mt. Rainier 

Gough, Eugene A., Washington, D. C. 

Grable, William H., Hyattsviile 

Grace, George M., Easton 

Graham, Grantham T., Washington, D. C. 

Gransee, Charles L., Linthicum Heights 

Grant, Herbert J., Washington, D. C. 

Grant, William R., Washington, D. C. 

Green, Morris W., Washington, D. C. 

Hale. F. Joseph, Washington, D. C. 

Hall, Philip G., Govans 

Harmon, George W., Silver Spring 

Harrigan, Richard K., Chevy Chase 

Harrison, David L., Baltimore 

Haselbarth, John E., Riverdale 

Hatfield, Robert V., Washington, D. C. 

Hayleck, Charles R., Jr., Baltimore 

Head, Bayard M., Hyattsviile 

Heintz, Charles E„ Baltimore 

Hill, Frederick L., Washington, D. C. 

Hilliard, Eleanor B., Baltimore 

Hobbs, Edward V., Washington, D. C. 

Hochgesang, Charles F., Washington, D. C. 

Hoffman, Edward L., Lansdowne 

Hoffman, Jacob L., Hagerstown 

Hoffman, James L., Relay 

Hoffman, Leon D., Jr., Cranford, N. J. 

Hollingsworth, Roy J., Washington. D. C. 

Holmes, Gail R., Washington, D. C. 

Hopkins, Charles P., Silver Spring 

Horn, James E., Bethesda 

Horst, Joseph J., Baltimore 

Howland, Lionel B., Jr., Laurel 

Hurlock, Ellsworth A.. Jr., Baltimore 

Iddings, Lloyd A., Baltimore 

Ireland, Thornton E., Lansdowne 

Kabik, Irving, Washington, D. C. 

Keat, William G., Washington, D. C. 

Keller, Howard L., Baltimore 

Kelley, Raymond M., Silver Spring 

Kennedy, James L., Jr., Baltimore 

Kessinger, Jackson A., Silver Spring 

Keys. Whitney, Washington, D. C. 

Kidwell, Guy S., Hagerstown 

Kimmel, Robert E., Jr., Piedmont. W. Va. 

King, William R., Takoma Park 

Kirk, Millard F., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Klinefelter, John W., Washington. D. C. 

Kohloss, Frederick H., Bethesda 

Konigsberg, Tolbert H.. Washington, D. C. 

Lasher, Arthur E., Silver Spring 



Latimer, Roberts E., Jr., Silver Spring 
Leasure, Harry S., Jr., Hagerstown 
Lee, Harrison, Washington, D. C. 
Leonberger, Melvin F., Washington, D. C. 
Love, Charles C, Hollywood 
Lozupone, Louis A., Chevy Chase 
Luber, Joseph L., Washington, D. C. 
Lusby, Edward W., Arlington, Va. 
Magruder, Donald R., Washington, D. C. 
Mariner, Joseph V., Baltimore 
Marsden, James N., Chevy Chase 
Marshall, Byron T., Taylors Island 
Martin, George E., Baltimore 
Mathias. John R., Mt. Rainier 
Mattix, Paul R., Silver Spring 
Maxwell, Robert W., Arlington, Va. 
May, John O., Bethesda 
McCarty, John E., Cumberland 
McGogney, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 
Mclntyre, John T., Washington, D. C. 
McKee, Robert C, Chevy Chase 
McKinstry, Vernon LeR., Hyattsviile 
Meredith, Henry J., Bethesda 
Merriken, Lyal N., Federalsburg 
Merritt, William T., Easton 
Meyer, Edward M.. Washington. D. C. 
Miller, Robert W., Silver Spring 
Miller, William B., Washington, D. C. 
Montgomery, Henry T., Lanham 

Moore, Springs R., Bethesda 
Moriarty, Ernest C. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Mortimer, Samuel H. J., Baltimore 
Moulden, Owen, Washington, D. C. 

Murphy, Arthur A., Washington. D. C. 
Nairn. Geoffrey MacD.. Jr., Silver Spring 

Naylor, Arthur E., Jr., Oakland 

Newell, Richard B., Govans 

Newgarden, George J., Ill, Washington, 
D. C. 

Niedemair, William I., Washington, D. C. 

Niederstrasser, Robert E., Washington, 
D. C. 

O'Dea, Stephen F.. E. Riverdale 

O'Malley, John F., Manokin 

Otto, Ernest A., Eastport 

Overstreet, William B., Washington, D. C. 

Owens, Elmer H., Jr., Hanover 

Owens, Emmet D., Washington, D. C. 

Pavesich, James A., Baltimore 

Phillips, Bertram W., Catonsville 

Pindell, William H., Washington, D. C. 

Porter, Leonard W.. Catonsville 

Powell, Ernest G., Mt. Rainier 

Preston, Robert E., Cottage City 

Provost, J. Stanley, Greenbelt 

Queen, Galen K., Washington. D. C. 

Rakestraw. Dale L., Baltimore 

Raum, Mark. Washington, D. C. 



Rawlingr, Arnold G., Luke 
Rawls, Fletcher H., Jr., Kensington 
Raymond, Charles B., Bethesda 
Reckner, Richard G., Severna Park 
Reynolds, Nowland E., Relay 
Rice, Harold D., Jr., Silver Spring 
Rice, Leonard M., Baltimore 
Richer, Kenneth A., Lansdowne 
Ridout, Orlando IV, Annapolis 
Riley, John B., Germantown 
Rivello, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 
Roudabush, Robert, Washington, D. C. 
Rowny, Carroll L., Dundalk 
Runkle, George W., Washington, D. C. 
Saha, Sidney G., Washington, D. C. 
Schack. William R., Washington, D. C. 
Schwarz, Howard F., Baltimore 
Seidel, William F., Catonsville 
Senser, Lisle H., Mt. Rainier 
Seymour, Gilbert B., Washington, D. C. 
Shank, James W., Keedysville 
Sheridan, Hugo G., Washington, D. C. 
Sherwood, John H., Jr., Baltimore 
Shields, James R., Washington, D. C. 
Shipp, Loy M., Mt. Rainier 
Simmons, Don E., Washington, D. C, 
Singleton, Carey B., Jr., Hollywood 
Skinner, Harold B., Silver Spring 
Smith, Robert H., Silver Spring 
Smith, Thomas W. E., Millersville 
Sohn, Edward D., Millersville 
Solomon, Burton, Washington. D. C. 
Sparhawk, William N., Jr., Washington. 

D. C. 
Spessard, Lawson W., Colesville 
Spicer, James R.. Towson 
Spielman. John R.. Washington. D. C. 
Stafford, Willis R., Easton 
Stevenson, Robert K., Baltimore 



Barr, Paul C, Washington, D. C. 
Farrall, John A., Washington, D. C. 
Fox, Gabriel, Washington, D. C. 
Hewitt, Frederic M., Baltimore 



Stewart", John H., Silver Spring 

Strauss, Henry M., Woodlawn 

Stuntz, George R., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Swann, William H., Faulkner 

Tawes, Philip W., Crisfield 

Thompson, Henry G., Baltimore 

Thumm, C. Ashton, Baltimore 

Tibbals, Edward A., Jr., Bethesda 

Todd, Norman W., Preston 

Trexler, Jay E., Baltimore 

Trott, Clarence W., Hyattsviile 

Uglow, Kenneth MacM., Jr., Wellington, 

Va. 
Uilman, Guy N., Washington, D. C. 
Updegraff, James E., Berwyn 
Vinton, Kenneth W., Silver Spring 
Walker, Elmer E., Hyattsviile 
Walker, John H., Greenbelt 
Wannan, Jere C, Washington, D. C. 
Warthen, Willard A., Jr., Kensington 
Waters, Roger K., Jr., Germantown 
Webster, George C, Washington, D. C. 
Wegman, Ernest C, Baltimore 
Weller, Edward F., Baltimore 
Whinerey, Donald F., Washington, D. C. 
Whitcomb, Martin F., Baltimore 
Whittemore, Donald P., Greenbelt 
Widman, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 
Willett, John W., Jr., Relay 
Williams, Leonard F., Takoma Park 
Wiseman, Ralph F., Washington, D. C. 
Wode, William, Baltimore 
Wolman, Sidney S., Washington, D. C. 
Wood, Robert E., Catonsville 
Yeatman, Robert H., Hyattsviile 
York, Warren M., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Ziarko, Casimir C, Washington, D. C. 
Zimmer, Howard. C, Jr., Towson 



Part Time 

Holbrook, Charles C, College Park 
Leyba, Joseph M., Jr., New York. N. Y. 
Mattingly, Lawrence J., Washington, D. C. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Professional Schools, Baltimore 



Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Barry, Richard H., Brownsville, Pa. 
Bellman, Frank A., Baltimore 
Bolth, Franklin A., Church Hill 
Cone, Nellie M., Dundalk 
Cook, Nevis E., Waleska, Ga. 
Cross, John M., Little Falls, N. J. 
DeDominicis, Amelia C, Baltimore 



Dittrich, Theodore T., Baltimore 
Dorsch, Joseph U., Baltimore 
Ellis, Fred W., Heath Springs, S. C. 
Everett, Guy M., Missouri Valley, Iowa 
Foster, Carroll P., Baltimore 
Friedman, David, Dundalk 
Gakenheimer, Walter C, Catonsville 
Glickman, Shirley M., Baltimore 



434 



435 



Hager, George P., Baltimore 
Hamlin, Kenneth E., Jr., Baltimore 
Hewing, Ada C, Baltimore 
Heyman, Bernice, Baltimore 
Jarowski, Charles, Baltimore 
Karel, Leonard, Baltimore 
Levin, Nathan, Baltimore 
Liss, Nathan I., Baltimore 
Loftus, Howard E., DundaJk 

Vocational Teacher 

Brode, CarK K., Catonsville 
Acree, Samuel. Baltimore 
Brooks, Helen G., Baltimore 
Crosby, Fred D., Baltimore 
Denaburg, Jerome, Baltimore 
Dudderar, Charles W., Baltimore 
Edwards, William L., Catonsville 
Ekas, Alice A., Baltimore 
Grimes, John J., Catonsville 
Gross, Charles R., Stemmers Run 
Haefner, William F., Baltimore 
Hoffacker, George W., Baltimore 
Horvath, Kenneth, Baltimore 
Hubbard, Arthur M., Baltimore 
Hucksoll, William J., Baltimore 
Knight, Frances L., Baltimore 
Lindley, L. Lee, Baltimore 
Longley, Edward L., Baltimore 
Lund, Gerald L. V., Baltimore 



McGinity, F. Rowland, Baltimore 
McNamara, Bernard P., Baltimore 
Merdinyan, Edward F., Pawtucket, R. 1. 
Monke, J. Victor, Litchfield, 111. 
Raudonis, John A., Hudson, N. H. 
Ruddy, A. Wayne, Auburn, Neb. 
Sussman, Bernard, Baltimore 
Thompson, Robert E., Waubay, S. Dak. 
Zenitz, Bernard, Baltimore 

Training Courses, Baltimore 

Mahar, John D., Catonsville 

Marx, Ernest B., Baltimore 

Messick, Carter D., Annajwlis 

Meyer, Arthur A., Baltimore 

Meyer, Frederick, Owings Mills 

Myrick, Floyd A., Timonium 

Nachlas, Bernard, Baltimore 

Ossenmacher, Sister Philomena. Baltimore 

Proctor, James O., Baltimore 

Randall, Roland E., Baltimore 

Rose, Joan K. M., Baltimore 

Selsky, S. Samuel, Baltimore 

Silverman, Frank, Baltimore 

Smith, Robert L., Baltimore 

Solomon, Christine R., Dundalk 

Storms, Sister Barbaj-a, Baltimore 

Whipple, Stanley R., Baltimore 

Ziefle, Howard E., Baltimore 



College Park 



Aarons, Ralph, Baltimore 
Allard, Howard F., Arlington, Va. 
Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Allen, Rowannetta S., Anacostia, D. C. 
Anspon, Harry D., Washington, D. C. 
Archer, Louise V., Berwyn 
Armstrong, Herbert E.. McDonogh 
Arthur, Irvin L., Cumberland 
Atkins, Eileen N., Halethorpe 
Axelrod, Bernard, Greenbelt 
Bachman, Irvin, Baltimore 
Backenstoss, Ross E., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Bailey Donald E., Takoma Park 
Bailey, Douglas A., Jr., Takoma Park . 
Bailey, Wallace K., College Park 
Balch, Clyde W., Hyattsville 
Bandel. David, Lanham 
Banta, Frank G., Franklin, Ind. 
Barnett, Robert E., Annapolis 
Bartilson, Thomas H.. University Park 
Barto, Edward E., Leonardtown 
Beamer, William H., Youngstown. Ohio 
Beck, Ethel, Baltimore 
Beck, Sylvan E., Baltimore 



Bellows, John M., Jr., Maynard, Mass. 
Benton, Charles L., Jr., Laurel 
Berman, David Z., Rochester, N. Y. 
Berry, Henrietta T., Chevy Chase 
Bertschy, Harry A., Gaithersburg 
Besley, Arthur K., Hyattsville 
Bickley, William E., Jr., Martel, Tenn. 
Biskin. Shirley L., Takoma Park 
Blond, Bernard, Washington, D. C. 
Bolth, Franklin A., Church Hill 
Boote, Howard S.. Greenbelt 
Bower. Francis M., Mt. Rainier 
Bowers, John L., Troy, Texas 
Boyd, Lola E., Panama City, R. P. 
Bradley, Robert J., Hyattsville 
Branca, James L., Washington, D. C. 
Braungart. Dale C, Washington, D. C. 
Bredekamp, Marriott W., Silver Spring 
Brewer, Charles M., Hyattsville 
Brittingham, William H., Portsmouth, Va. 
Brooks, Vernon L., Washington, D. C. 
Brownell, James F., Washington, D. C. 
Browning, Laura B. (Mrs.), Mt. Airy 
Bruce, Robert McC, Wooster, Ohio 
Bruening, Charles F., Overlea 



Brune, Richard C, Overlea 
Buddington, Arthur R., College Park 
Campbell, Marjorie H. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Carroll, Floyd D., Bostwick, Nebr. 
Carter, Edward P., College Park 
Carter, Harold E., Chevy Chase 
Chadwick, Louise A. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Chapman, Aurelius F., Marietta, Ga. 
Cheney, John P., Oswego, N. Y. 
Chesley, Henrietta E., Baltimore 
Christie, Mary E. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Clarke, Frank E., Westminster 
Colip, Louise R. (Mrs.), Mt. Rainier 
Collings. Helen T., Washington, D. C. 
Comer, Florence R., Hyattsville 
Conti, Joseph G., Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Converse, Henry T., Jr., Beltsville 
Cotton, Cornelia M., Bethesda 
Cotton, John, Takoma Park 
Cowgill, William H., Hyattsville 
Crane, Julian C, College Heights 
Creitz, Elmer C, Washington, D. C. 
Culton, Thomas G., Parksville, Ky. 
Curtis, Arthur H., Hyattsville 
Custis, William K., Riverdale 
Dantzig, Henry P., Hyattsville 
Davidson, Nellie M. (Mrs.), Silver Spring 
Dawson, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Dittmar, Gordon F., Baltimore 
Dobres, Robert M., Baltimore 
Donahay, Katharine, Washington, D. C. 
Donnally, Bessie S. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Dorsey, Carl K., Fulton, Mo. 
Douglas, James R., Lafayette, Ind. 
Downey, Mylo S., CJollege Park 
Druz, William, Baltimore 
Duvall, Wilbur I., Gaithersburg 
Eccles, Robert L., Hansford, W. Va. 
Emshwiller, Susie B. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Ensor, Samuel S., New Windsor 
Evangelist, Alaric A., Jenkintown, Pa. 
Everson, Emma M. (Mrs.), College Park 
Ezell, Boyce DeW., Takoma Park 
Fairbank, Thomas P., Baltimore 
Fisher, Bertha G., Greenbelt 
Fisher, Herbert H., Greenbelt 
Florestano, Herbert J., Annapolis 
Fontaine, Jesse T., Jr., Richmond, Va. 
Form, William H., Rochester, N. Y. 
Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Fosdick, Clara B. (Mrs.), Riva 
Fox, Frances C. (Mrs.), Silver Spring 
Friedman, Emanuel. New York, N. Y. 



Frush, Harriet L., Pella, Iowa 
Fulboam, Elsie G., Andover, N. J. 
Fulton, George P., Washington, D. C. 
Gakenheimer, Walter C, Catonsville 
Galbreath, Paul McC, Street 
Gay, John R., Washington, D. C. 
Gibbons, Milo V., Ocean Grove, N. J. 
Gibson, Margaret H., Washington, D. C. 
Gilbert, Howard W., Yellow Springs, Ohio 
Gilbert, Neil A., Centerburg, Ohio 
Glasgow, Dorcas T., (Mrs.), Hyattsville 
Godfrey, Albert B., Berwyn 
Goebel, Wallace B., Baltimore 
Golden, Lex B., Berwyn 
Goldman, Leon, Washington, D. C. 
Goldsborough, George H.. Denton 
Goldsmith, John S., College Paik 
Goldsmith, Margaret T. (Mrs.), College 

Park 
Grand, Joseph A., Washington, D. C. 
Greenfield, Ray H., Detroit, Mich. 
Griffin, Lucille H. (Mrs.). Washington, 

D. C. 
Griggs, William H., Adair. Mo. 
Grober, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Groschke, Albert C, Erie, Pa. 
Grover, Leslie S.. Washington. D. C. 
Guest, Lester P., Medford. Mass. 
Haenni, Edward O., Takoma Park 
Hale, Joseph F., Big Clifty, Ky. 
Hall, Ruth B. (Mrs.), College Heights 
Hall Wallace LeR., Hyattsville 
Hamlin, Kenneth E., Jr., Baltimore 
Hammond, John C, Silver Spring 
Hand, George E., Washington. D. C. 
Haney. Walter J., Oregon, 111. 
Haidell. Nellie G. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Harkins, Charles. Annapolis 
Harrington. George E., Washington, D. C. 
Harris, Elizabeth W.. Lonaconing 
Harrison, George K., Upper Marlboro 
Harrison, Robert W., Wilmore, Ky. 
Harvey, Philip C. Nashua, N. H. 
Hayes, Earl T., Mullan, Idaho 
Heim, John W., Upper Marlboro 
Heinze, Peter H., Kahoka, Mo. 
Henderson, Perlie deF., Takoma Park 
Henry, Frances L., Washington, D. C. 
Henson, Paul R., University Park 
Herbst. Albert F., Westminster 
Herring, Charles E^ Pasadena P. O. 
Hess, Carl W., Amana, lo'wa 
Heyman, Bernice, Baltimore 
Highby, William I., University Park 
Hill, Carl R., Washington. D. C. 
Hipp, Norbert J., Washington, D. C. 
Hitz, Chester W., Fortescue, Mo. 



436 



437 



Hoadley, Alfred D., Hyattsville 
Hodges, Leslie C, Warsaw, Va. 
Hohing, Richard E., Frostburp 
Holdstock, Henry B., Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia 
Hoover, John I., Altoona, Pa. 
Hormats, Saul, Baltimore 
Hoshall, Edward M., Baltimore 
Howard, Addie J. (Mrs.). Hyattsville 
Izsak, John A., Halethorpe 
Jansen, Eugene F., Takoma Park 
Jarowski, Charles, Baltimore 
Jenkins, Eloise T. (Mrs.). Washington, 

D. C. 
Jernigan, Grace, Washington, D. C. 
Johns. B. Kathryn, Hyattsville 
Johnson, Walter H., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Robert E., Springfield, Ohio 
Kaminsky, Daniel, New York, N. Y. 
Kane, Catherine M., Washington, D. C. 
Kapiloff, Leonard, Baltimore 
Katsura, Saburo, Washington, D. C. 
Keene, Lester F., St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Kelley, Carl W., Durham, N. C. 
Kephart, Mary E„ Taneytown 
Kershner, Alan M.. Emmitsburg 
Kesler, Katherine E., Silver Spring 
Ketcham, Harry L., Santa Rosa, Texas 
Knowlton, John W., Bethesda 
Kosar, William F., College Park 
Kraemer, Leonard S., Baltimore 
Kramer, Amihud, Baltimore 
Kramer, Diana S. (Mrs.), Baltimore 
Krasauskas, John W., Washington, D. C. 
Kraybill, Herman F., Marietta, Pa. 
Kremen, Simon, Annapolis 
Kuhn, Albin O., Hyattsville 
Kurtz, Floyd E., Washington, D. C. 
Lakin, Hubert W., Silver Spring 
Lander, John J., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Lann, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 
Leed, Russell E., Denver, Pa. 
Lehr, H. Franklin, Bethesda 
Leinbach, Frederick H., College Park 
Levin, Irvin, Baltimore 
Libber, Theodore, Washington, D. C. 
Linnig, Frederic J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Littman, Louis, Clarendon, Va. 
Livingston, Mabel S. (Mrs.), Takoma Park, 

D. C. 
Longley, Raymond I., Jr., Storrs, Conn. 
Love, Solomon, Washington, D. C. 
Lundell, Ann C. (Mrs.), Washington, D. C. 
Lynt, Richard K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
MacConomy, Edward N., Jr., St. Mary's 

City 
Martin, Grace W. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 



Massey, James B., Hampden-Sydney, Va. 
Mather, Robert E., W. Lafayette, Ind. 
Mayes, Irvin C, Timonium 
McBee, Richard H., Eugene, Oreg. 
McBrien, Frederick R., Toronto, Ont. ~ 
McCollum, Frank L., Jonesport, Me. 
McNally, Edmund H., Washington, D. C. 
Mehl, Joseph M., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Mehring, Arnon L., Jr., Greenbelt 
Melchior, Donald F., Upper Marlboro 
Metcalf, Helen B. (Mrs.), Forest Glen 
Metcalf, Stephen E., Forest Glen 
Miller, Earl E., Sublette, Kans. 
Miller, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Mary E., Baltimore 
Miller, Roman R., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Thomas E., Washington, D. C. 
Milliken, Julia W., (Mrs.), Silver Spring 
Moore, Oscar K., Gainesville, Fla. 
Mudd, Hester V., Pomfret 
Muma, Martin H., Cumberland 
Murphy, Celia E., Walkersville 
Mye;s, Alfred T., Hyattsville 
Nelson, Thorman A., Washington, D. C. 
Neustadt, Morris H., Arlington, Va. 
Newman, Marian A. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Nolan, Edna P. (Mrs.), Mt. Rainier 
Nolte, William A., Washington, D. C. 
O'Dea, Katherine T.. Honolulu, T. H. 
O'Keefe, Bernice E., Rockville 
Olsen, Marlow W., Beltsville 
OpperiAan, Nancy R., Washington, D. C. 
O'Rourke, Francis L., Glenn Dale 
Outhouse, James B., Canandaigua. N. Y. 
Parmele, Leslie P., Washington, D. C. 
Paulhus, Norman G., Willimantic, Conn. 
Peaslee, Joseph K., Washington, D. C. 
Peers, Ada F. (Mrs.), Washington, D. C. 
Perlmutter, Frank, Newark, N. J. 
Peterson, Robert F., Washington, D, C. 
Peterson, Selmer W., Blooming Prairie, 

Minn. 
Pfeiffer, Paul E., Annapolis 
Pierce, Elwood C, Warren, Ohio 
Poole, Helen N. (Mrs.), Hagerstown 
Posey, Walter B., Upper Marlboro 
Potts, B. Sheba, Baltimore 
Power, Wilson H., Lancaster, Pa. 
Prickett, Hilda M. (Mrs.), Berwyn 
Provenza, Dominic V., Catonsville 
Pyles, William G., Gaithersburg 
Quinn, Joseph P., Washington, D. C. 
Radcliffe, William E., Upper Marlboro 
Rairigh, William N., Ridgely 
Ramsburg, Morris M., Beltsville 
Raspet, August, Riverdale 
Rauehschwalbe, Otto E., Silver Spring 



Ravenburg, Ralph R., Edgewater 

Rawley, Mary E., Hyattsville 

Reid, James L., Catonsville 

Reidy, Kathryn (Mrs.), Silver Spring 

Reinhart, Frank W., Takoma Park 

Reinhart, Frederick M., Takoma Park 

Remington, Jesse A., Jr., Laurel 

Rhodes, Harry C, Poolesville 

Rich, Edith M., St. Louis, Mo. 

Riggs, Lisette, Washington, D. C. 

Robertson, Roy, Elkton 

Robey, Carrie E., Laurel 

Robey, Louise E., Washington, D. C. 

Robinson, Harold B., Takoma Park 

Roby, Maud F. (Mrs.), Riverdale 

Rose, Frank W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Rosen, Milton J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Routson, Urith A., Uniontown 

Rubin, Max, Woodcliff, N. J. 

Sadie, Alexander, Washington, D. C. 

Saylor, Zella P. (Mrs.), Hyattsville 

Schechter, David O., Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Schechter, Milton S., Brooklyn, N. V. 

Scholl, Walter, Washington, D. C. 

Schutz, John L., Baton Rouge, La. 

Schwab, Frank W., Washington, D. C. 

Schweizer, Mark, Riverdale 

Scott, Donald H„ Washington, D. C. 

Scott, Mary J., Hyattsville 

Scribner, Bourdon F., Washington, D. C. 

Secrest, John P., Brentwood 

Seufferle, Charles H., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Shapiro, Irving M., North Westchester, 

Conn. 
Shay, Donald E., Lebanon, Pa. 
Shear, Cornelius B., Vienna, Va. 
Sheff, Joseph A., Annapolis 
Shepherd, Boland B., Orrum, N. C. 
Shewbridge, James T., Baltimore 
Shupe, Irwin S., Baltimore 
Shutak, Vladimir G., San Francisco. Calif. 
Simpson, Vernon R., Baltimore 
Singer, Louis, Washington, D. C 
Sisler, Fred D., Washington, D. C. 
Skelton, Bessie K. W. (Mrs.), Hyattsville 
Slavin, Morris, College Park 
Smith, Frances E., Ashton 
Smith, Gaylon B. (Mrs.). Berwyn 
Smith, Harold W., Baltimore 
Smith, Leonard, Washington, D. C. 
Smith, Ruth P., (Mrs.), Silver Spring 
Smithson, John R., Annapolis 
Snyder, Roger W., Hagerstown 
Speaker, Clare J. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 

Specht. Alston W.. Martinsburg, W. Va. 
S!)rague, Norman G., College Park 
Stanton. William A., Hyattsville 



Starkey, James H., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Stephens, William A., Charlotte Hall 

Stephenson, Richard B., Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Stevenson, Frank V., Takoma Park 

Stoddard, Carl K., Reno, Nev. 

Stone, Marguerite M., Takoma Park 

Streiff, Anton J., Washington, D. C. 

Struble, John B., Washington, D. C. 

Stuart, Leander S., Bethesda 

Stull, William DeM., Madison, N. J. 

Sussman, Bernard, Baltimore 

Sweeney, Thomas R., Washington, D. C. 

Swern, Daniel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Swift, Harold M., Hyattsville 

Temin, Samuel C, Washington, D. C. 

Tepper, Albert E., Durham, N. H. 

Terwilliger, William B., Baltimore 

Thatcher, John S., Ithaca, New York 

Tollefson, Richard. Aberdeen, S. Dak. 

Tomlinson, Mary V., North East 

Tornetta, Frank J., Norristown, Pa. 

Tredick, Wendell S., Jr., Kensington 

Turer, Jack, Arlington, Va. 

Tuve, Richard L., Washington, D. C. 

Valaer, Peter J., Washington, D. C. 

VanMetre, Albert R., Pasadena 

Voris, John B., Baltimore 

Wagner, Thomas C. G., Washington. D. C. 

Walker, Laurence H., Charlotte Hall 

Walton, William W., Hyattsville 

Waltz, George F., Washington, D. C. 

Ward, Archibald F., Jr., Towson 

Ward, James R., Gaithersburg 

Warren, Minnie, Snow Hill 

Watkins, Grace O. (Mrs.), University Park 

Waugh, John G., Denver, Colo. 

Wayne, Dorothy (Mrs.), Washington, D. C. 

Webster, Carolyn I., Pylesville 

Weinblatt, Mayer, Baltimore 

Welsh, Llewellyn H., Washington, D. C. 

Wester, Robert E., Berwyn 

Wharton, Edward M., Mt. Rainier 

Wheatley, Rosemai-y P.. Hyattsville 

White, Dorothy E., Bedford, Va. 

Whiton, Alfred C. Brentwood 

Wiedemer, Arthur P., Darien, Wis. 

Willard, Daniel DeW., Cumbeiland 

Williams, Charles S., Hyattsville 

Williams, Edgar J.. Chai-lotte Hall 

Willingham, Patricia M., Hyattsville 

Wilson, C. Merrick, Poolesville 

Wilson, Robert H., Baltimore 

Wingate, Phillip J., Wingate 

Winkler, Fred B., Chevy Chase 

Wintermoyer, John P., Hagerstown 

Wise, Sarah E., Relay 

Wiseman, Herbert G., Washington. D. C 

Wojtczuk, John A., Baltimore 



438 



439 



Woodard, Geoffrey D. LeR., Hyattsville 
Woodrow, Carroll C, Leonardtown 
Woodworth, Robert N., Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Wright, Margery W., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Wright, Rex E., Galesville 
Wynn, Ruth A.. Washington, D. C. 
Yost, Henry E., Grantsville 



Young, Edmond G., Baltimore 
Young, Raymond M., Moosup, Conn. 
Zenitz, Bernard L., Baltimore 
Ziegaus, Warren, Hyattsville 
Zimmerman, Marian A., Washington, 

D. C. 
Zimmerman, Sterling E., Glen Burnie 



X Sophomore Class 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Senior Class 



Abrahams, Henrietta T., East Orange, 

N. J. 
Bernstein, Edith R. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Bland, Mildred A., Washington, D. C. 
Bohman, Katherine H., Hagerstown 
Bullock, Evelyn A., Baltimore 
Collison, Margaret, Takoma Park 
Cramblitt, Mary Lee R., Cumberland 
Curry, Tempe H., Bethesda. 
Davis, Barbara J., Chevy Chase 
Dippel, Marie D., Baltimore 
Dorsey, Margaret F., Baltimore 
Enfield, Marjory L., Forest Hill 
Fennell, Beatrice M., Chevy Chase 
Ford, Margaret E., Millington 
Fuchs, Sister Mary Ann, Maryknoll, N. Y. 
Garonzik, Ruth, Baltimore 
Grogan, Mariana, Washington, D. C. 
Hickman, Martha V., Washington, D. C. 
Hussong, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 
Kraft, Jane L., Washington, D. C. 
Kuhn, Eleanor M., Bethesda 



Iy=ighty, Lena L., Washington, D. C. 
Logan, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
McComas, Lois C, Abingdon 
McGinnis, Verneena, Indian Head 
McRae, Gertrude E., Chevy Chase 
Mullinix, Esther LaR., Woodbine 
Repp, Florence J., Westernport 
Richards, Bonnie M. (Mrs.), Mt. Rainier 
Richmond, Ruth M., Bethesda 
Rodgers, Helen, New Rochelle 
Ross, Mary Lee, Cumberland 
Sachs, Evelyn B., Baltimore 
Samson, Catherine, Takoma Park 
Schopmeyer, Grace E., Washington, D. C. 
Sheild, Harriet E., Chevy Chase 
Skinner, Barbara B,, Silver Spring 
Smaltz, Margarette H., Washington, D. C. 
Soper, Ruby E., Washington, D. C. 
Turner, Marie A. (Mrs.), Washington, 

D. C. 
Wailes, Dorothea A., Baltimore 
Wood, Margaret V., Washington, D. C. 
Zimmerman, Mary E., Catonsville 



Junior Class 



Anderson, Muriel E., Washington, D. C. 
Atkins, Sue S. (Mrs.), University Park 
Bondareff, Helen E., Washington, D. C. 
Boss, Emma L., Washington, D. C. 
Brookens, Lillian E., Hyattsville 
Buckler, Mary F., Aquasco 
Burkins, Alice K., Castleton 
Cook, M. Helen, Washington, D. C. 
Davis, Dorothy M., Washington, D. C. 
Downey, Milbrey A., Williamsport 
Dunlap, Marguerite C, Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Bernice, Takoma Park 
Jones, Helen J. (Mrs.), Greenbelt 
Lewis, L. Inez, Lantz 
Lung, Mary E., Smithsburg 
Lyon, Elnora L., Baltimore 
McCarron, Catherine H., Washington, 

D. C. 
Medbery, Dorothy A., Washington, D. C. 
Mike, Emma M., Washington, D. C. 



Miller, Marjorie L., Ft. Monroe, Va. 
Nellis, Dorothy A., Takoma Park 
Owens, Elizabeth W., Linthicum Heights 
Pierce, Patricia M., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Powers, M. Elizabeth, Hyattsville 
Reynolds, Daphne, Washington, D. C. 
Santamarie, Jeanne M., Rosemont, Pa. 
Schutrumpf, Doris E., Washington, D. C. 
Seiter, Margaret E., Govans 
Skidmore, Mary A., College Park 
Stephenson, Elizabeth, Mt. Lake Park 
Stevenson, Bernice, Takoma Park 
Tomberlin, Isabelle I., Hyattsville 
Upson, Eileen, Towson 

Vorkoeper, Marcia M., Washington, D. C. 
Wegman, Ruth R., Baltimore 
Weil, Margaret, Alexandria, Va. 
Williams, Helen E., Randallstown 
Wright, Helen L., Clovis, N. Mex. 



Allen, Marjorie L., Ritchie 
Aronson, Esther M., Cumberland 
Bedell, Helen I., Washington, D. C. 
Bryan. Helen M., Chevy Chase 
Callander, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 
Gary, Clara F., Washington, D. C. 
Clements, Doris M., Washington, D. C. 
Coe, Adelaide E., Washington. D. C. 
Cole, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
Cornnell, Norma L., Washington, D. C. 
Cramblitt, Maxine T., Cumberland 
Dashiell, Rebecca R., Cambridge 
Davidson, Mary J., Washington, D. C. 
Doisey, Alberta R., Crisfield 
Dunbar, Ruth M., Little Valley, New York 
Ellis, Erin, Washington, D. C. 
Fisk, Alice K., Washington, D. C. 
Fulton, Elizabeth C, Bowie 
Funk, M. Elizabeth, Hagerstown 
Gordon, Muriel, Washington, D. C. 
Graves, Mary L., Kensington 
Griffith, Mary A., Silver Spring 
Gurney, I. Elaine, Silver Spring 
Gusack, Sue G., Washington, D. C 
Halstead, Jessie W., Washington, D. C. 
Hambleton, Edwina, Washington, D. C. 
Hastings, Laura F.. Kensington 
Hess, Marguerite R.. Washington, D. C. 
Holbrook, Helen P., College Park 
Hubel. Shirley C, College Park 
Jenkins, Eleanor E., Stewartstown, Pa. 
Jones, Claudia H.. Washington, D. C. 
Ladd, Louise B., Chevy Chase 
Likely, Dorothy E., Savage 



Lillie, Margaret A., Bethesda 

Loar, Margaret T., Rawlings 

Loomis, Marian, Washington, D. C. 

Lutzer, Ellen, Floral Park. N. Y. 

Marks. Agnes L., Lansdowne 

Marshall, Earla B., Hyattsville 

McFarland. Doris H., Cumberland 

Melton, Mildred M., S. Norfolk, Va. 

Moore, Maryan G., Washington, D. C 

Mumma, Elizabeth M., Hagerstown 

Myrick, Betsy A., Silver Spring 

Newmaker, Phyllis J., Brentwood 

Page, Jane E., Accokeek 

Park, Mary L., Wayne, Pa. 

Patterson, Ellen F., Elkridge 

Rainalter, Martha L., Cumberland 

Remsburg. Carol, Middletowu 

Rosenbusch. Frances S., Washington, D. C. 

Ruoff, Ethel L.. Washington. D. C. 

Simpson, L. Mable, Frederick 

Staley, Elma L., Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Sullivan, Betty L., Washington, D. C. 

Teller, M. Louise, Chevy Chase 

Thomas, Elaine M., Mt. Rainier 

Thompson, Ruth L., Cumberland 

Todd, Frances M., Laurel 

Trundle. Catharine M., Frederick 

Tydings, Elizabeth L., Washington, D. C 

Vaiden, Mary V., Baltimore 

Watson, Evelyn N., Brandywine 

Webb, Mary E., Mt. Airy 

Werth, Dorothy, Washington, D. C. 

WestfaJl, Jean E., Hyattsville 

White, Helen G., Washington, D. C. 



Freshman Class 



Albers, Catherine M., Jessup 
Anderson, Dorthy V., Catonsville 
Anderson, Jane P., Bay Ridge 
Atwood, Margaret C, Ft. Leavenworth, 

Kans. 
Bateman, Eleanor M., Baltimore 
Beck, Marian L., Washington, D. C. 
Bell, Mary J., Hyattsville 
Bennett, Shirley L., Laurel 
Bentz, Alice R., Boonsboro 
Bohanan, Mary M., Catonsville 
Briggs, Ruth L., Gaithersburg 
Brinson, Dorothy M., Brentwood 
Burke, Elizabeth M., Hyattsville 
Burner, Betty, Washington, D. C. 
Caflferty, Joyce A., Washington, D. C. 
Carlson, Frances A., North East 
Carr, Eileen B., Jessups 
Carter, Eileen W.. Washington. D. C. 
Chapin, Jane A.. Washington, D. C. 



Cissel, Anne E., Sandy Spring 
Clayton. Thelma J., Bethesda 
Ceilings, Janice, Bethesda 
Cook, Marjorie L., University Park 
Coulliette, Ralston, Washington, D. C. 
Gushing, Susan B., Chevy Chase 
Davis, Lois R., Washington, D. C. 
Dawson, Mary J., Washington, D. C. 
Demaree, Frances E., College Park 
Dietzman, Carol H., Riverdale 
Ditzel, Virginia H., Halethorpe 
Donahue, Elizabeth J., Washington. D. C. 
Dubb, Ruth. Baltimore 

Duff, Avis D., Chevy Chase 

Dunberg, Frances J., Passaic, N. J. 

Edelblut, Grace V., Silver Spring 

Enfield. Mary V., Forest Hill 

England, Barbara R., Arlington, Va. 

Erickson, Audrey L., Washington, D. C. 

Fike, Betty L., Richmond, Va. 



440 



441 



/ 



Foerster, Evelyn M., Washington, D. C. 
Freeman, Anna R., Galena 
Friedman, Blanche, Washington, D. C. 
Frothingham, Jean T., Hyattsville 
Garlock, Sue M., Chevy Chase 
Gilbert, Betty L., Washington, D. C. 
Gisriel, Beulah M., Elkridge 
Graham, Betty M., Baltimore 
Gulick, Esther M., Chevy Chase 
Haase, Elizabeth S., Baltimore 
Haislip, Dorothy H., Washington, D. C. 
Harris, Mary D., Bel Air 
Hart, Doris J., Washington, D. C. 
Holland, Lois H., Silver Spring 
HufT. Eleanor G., Chevy Chase 
Hutchinson, Virginia J„ Takcma Park 
Jaggers, Miriam E., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, Bettie M., Washington, D. C 
Jones, Louise A., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Jope, Nellie M., Washington, D. C. 
Julia, Nancy P., Bethesda 
Kahn, Elaine J., Washington, D. C. 
Kellermann, Mary J., College Park 
Kepner, Velma J., Chevy Chase 
Kline, Evelyn E., Columbia, S. C. 
Lamb, Nellie, Chevy Chase 
Landbeck, Shirley J., Baltimore 
Lane, Mary E., College Park 
Lawrence, Edythe M., Edge water 
Lee, Mary C, Landover 
Lehmann, Ruth I., Baltimore 
Lowe, Carlyn B., Stewartstown, Pa. 
MacKay, Shirley, Washington, D. C. 
Magruder, Margaret J.. Silver Spring 
Maier, Marie K., University Park 
Martin, Mary C, Hagerstown 
Mason, Marilyn G., Queen Anne 
McDaniel, Helen L., Jarrettsville 
Mednick, Miriam R., Norfolk, Va. 
Meng. Caroline T., Washington, D. C. 



Miskelly, Dorothy J., Washington, D. C. 
Mitchell, Betty B., Chevy Chase 
Mitchell, Mary V., Bethesda. 
Notz, Ellen C, Washington, D. C. 
Owen, Jeannette, Chevy Chase 
Peabody, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 
Perlstein, Sylvia, Washington, D. C. 
Persons, Jean M., Washington, D. C. 
Phillips, Nancy J., Hyattsville 
Pifer, Rosaleen B., Silver Spring 
Pitts, Dorris E., Chevy Chase 
Rawlings, Martha E., Westwood 
Rian, Louisa A., Brentwood 
Richmond, Frances A., Bethesda 
Ritchie, Catherine M., Washington, D. C. 
Rolph, Katherine L., Greenbelt 
Romero, Betty R., Crownsville 
Rundles^ Dorothy A., Washington, D. C. 
Sargent, Marion F., Batavia, N. Y. 
Scher, Irene J., Washington, D, C. 
Shapiro, Beverly S., Washington, D. C. 
Shpritz, Geraldine R., Baltimore 
Skipton, Lisbeth J., Mt. Rainier 
Snyder, Lillian H., Laurel 
Stauber, Lora M., Hyattsville 
Steely, Betty G., College Park 
Stevenson, Mary H., University Park 
Thompson, Doris M., Catonsville 
Tiffany, Tommie S., Edgewood Arsenal 
Volland, Jean B., Washington, D. C. 
Volland, Ruth M., Hyattsville 
Warmack, Marion L., Washington, D. C. 
Warthen, Charlotte E., Washington, D. C. 
Wathen, Roberta M., Hyattsville 
Way, Miriam L., Havre de Grace 
Wilbor, Florence E., Williamson, N. Y. 
Wood, Doris A., Washington, D. C. 
Wood. Elizabeth J., Washington, D. C. 
Wright, Millicent E., Laurel 
Young, Anne L., Washington Grove 



Part Time 

Bafford. Mena E. (Mrs.), College Park Regan, Ethel M., Mt. Rainier 

Mowatt, Nancy M., College Park Turner, Edythe M., Rockville 

Unclassified 

Cashin, Sister Mary Helen. Maryknoll, Dixon, Margaret A., Brunswick 

N. Y. Maxson, Jane, Cranford, N. J. 
Codier, Ruth G. (Mrs.), Takoma Park 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Fourth Year Evening Class 

Hedrick, Thomas H., Baltimore 



Bussey, Eugene, Baltimore 
Care, Harold C, Baltimore 
Cox, Charles H., Baltimore 
Douglass, Calvin A., Baltimore 



Herrmann, John O., Baltimore 
Hordes, Sanford, Washington, D. 
Howell, George E., Baltimore 



Howell, Joseph F.. Baltimore 
Johnson, Clarence L., Annapolis 
Ottenheimer, Edwin, Baltimore 
Paymer, Leonard, Baltimore 
Pl&nt, Albin J., Baltimore 
Rechner, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 
Robertson, Emma S., Baltimore 



Saks, Jay B., Baltimore 
Sallow, William H., Baltimore 
Thompson, Chaxles A., Hurlock 
Watchorn, Arthur W., Millbury, Mass. 
Woods, Alfred, Plant City, Fla. 
Yeager, Paul J., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, Richard E.. Frederick 



Third Year Day Class 



Bailey, Warren L., Baltimore 
Berry, Thomas N., Cumberland 
Bichy, Charles E., Jr., Baltimore 
Bogdanow, Morris, Jersey City, N. J. 
Brennan, John J., Baltimore 
Brockman, E. Louise, Takoma Park 
Brown, Forrest W., Charlestown, W. Va. 
Bruce, Robert M., Cumberland 
Caplan, David L., Baltimore 
Connor, John S., Jr., Catonsville 
Farinholt, Leroy W., Baltimore 
Fey, John T., Cumberland 
Fowler, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Holmes, Jesse W., Jr., Cumberland 



Kaplan, Solomon, Baltimore 
Lankford, Richard E.. Baltimore 
Maguire, John N., Pennsgrove, N. J. 
Mason, Everett P., Jr., Baltimore 
Polack, Samuel J., Hagerstown 
Ricciuti, Hugo A., Baltimore 
Scrivener, David S., Washington, D. C. 
Shiling, Reuben, Baltimore 
Sweeny, James B., Jr., Baltimore 
Taylor, B. Conway, Jr., Baltimore 
Thomas, Calvert, Baltimore 
Treacy, James J., Oakland 
Virts, Charles C, Frederick 



Third Year Evening Class 



Alter, Irving D., Baltimore 

Atwater, Charles C. W., Chestertown 

Barbour, Robert T., Rock Point 

Barnard, John D., Baltimore 

Brown, Augustus F., 3rd, Havre de Grace 

Cory, Ernest N., Jr., College Park 

Evans, Matthew S., Severna Park 

Glickman, Max, Annapolis 

Hebb, John S., 3rd, Baltimore 

Hendrickson. Charles J., Halethorpe 

Huff, James K., Jr., Baltimore 

Kelly, Charles E.. Forest Hill 

Light, Abraham, Baltimore 

Mahoney, Elmer J., Greenbelt 



Martin, Darwin B.. Mt. Lake Park 
McClure, Kenneth F.. Baltimore 
McComas, Charles H., Bel Air 
Mohlhenrich, William W., Catonsville 
O'Donnell, William J.. Baltimore 
Posner, Louis, Baltimore 
Purrington, Sara, Baltimore 
Rasin, George B., Jr., Worton 
Rhodes, Fred B., Jr.. Baltimore 
Skeen, John Henry, Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Marvin H., Federalsburg 
Umbarger, Paul, Bel Air 
Wenchel, John P., 2nd. Washington, D. C. 
Wilkinson, Herbert A., Baltimore 



Second Year Day Class 



Bast, George C, Baltimore 
Bowman, John D., Rockville 
Brenner. Richard B.. Baltimore 
Broadwater, Norman I., Oakland 
Clark, Edward T., Jr.. Ellicott City 
Cole. William H.. Towson 
Duvall. Charles O.. Annapolis 
Fales. Merton S.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Fox, John Brockenborough. Baltimore 
Ghingher. John J.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Goldman. Robert M., Baltimore 
Insley, Thomas I.. Jr.. North East 
Kassirer, Earle L.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Kempton, William B., Baltimore 
Kraus, Anthony W.. Jr., Baltimore 



Laws, Victor H.. Parsonsburg 
Maginnis, James B., Baltimore 
Martin. Richard, Baltimore 
Maulsby, William E. H., Baltimore 
Monk, Carl, Baltimore 
Perdue. Herman E.. Parsonsburg 
Peters, F. Leroy, Baltimore 
Raine, John E., Jr., Towson 
Rosenberg, Morton P., Baltimore 
Russell, B. Royce, Baltimore 
Schenker, Samuel, Annapolis 
Timanus, Hall E., Baltimore 
Vincenti, Bernard C, Baltimore 
Waingold, George, Cumberland 
Wright, W. A. Stewart, Denton 



442 



443 



Second Year 
Bishop, John O., Pasadena 
Bratton, William W., Perryville 
Brumbaugh, Chalmers S.. Jr., Baltimore 
Close, Albert P., Bel Air 
Cohen, Daniel, Baltimore 
Cohen, Herbert L., Baltimore 
Coonan, Margaret E., Baltimore 
Fisher, Charles O., Westminster 
Frisco, William P., Dundalk 
Gehring. Edwin A„ Baltimore 
Grady, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Grubbs, Harry L., Jr., Baltimore 
Hammond, Frank L.. Baltimore 
Harris. Frances N., Baltimore 
Ivrey, Samuel M., Annapolis 
Kahl, Gordon K., Baltimore 



Evening: Class 

Kolker, Marvin D., Baltimore 
Lanahan, William J., Baltimore 
Little, William J., Baltimore 
Mahoney, William W.. Baltimore 
McGreevy, Philip A., Baltimore 
Miller, Homer L., Baltimore 
Niemoeller, Joseph V., Baltimore 
Page, Maurice J., Derby. Vt. 
Reddy, Edward B., Baltimore 
Richardson, Vaughn E., Willards 
Russell, Archibald L., Baltimore 
Saul, Milton H. F., Baltimore 
Scarborough, J. Gifford, Elkton 
Skeen, William A., Baltimore 
Whaley, Mary H., Baltimore 
Wilson, Meredith M., White Hall 



First Year Day Class 



Barroll. Lewin W.. Jr., Baltimore 
Benjamin, Albert E., Baltimore 
Bierman. John F., Baltimore 
Blucher, John H.. Baltimore 
Bowen, Ralph C, Jr., Cumberland 
Brown, John H., Jr., San Juan. Puerto 
Rico 

Brown, John W.. Jr.. Bethesda 
Bushong, Jacquelin H., Breathedsville 
Cannon, Robert E. P., Salisbury 
Carrico, Thomas C, Bryantown 
Carter. Clayton C, Centreville 
Case, Richard W., Berwyn 
Clark. John T., Jr.. Greensboro 
Feld, Benjamin N., Baltimore 
Flanigan. William P.. Baltimore 
Gerardino. Alberto J., Ponce. Puerto Rico 
Goldstein. Morton S., Baltimore 
Gorman, William H.. II. Baltimore 
Gray. Thomas C, Jr., Chase 
Hicks, Harry J., Jr., Towson 



Ichniowski, William M., Baltimore 

LaNeve, Evelyn M.. Cumberland 

List, Leroy H., Baltimore 

Macmillan, William D., Jr., Baltimore 

Mandell, Marvin. Baltimore 

McSherry, William C, Frederick 

Murphy, William H.. Baltimore 

Oswald. William B.. Relay 
Owings, Noble L., Riverdale 

Prescott, Stedman, Jr., Rockville 

Prettyman, Dan T., Trappe 
Rosen, Bernard L., Baltimore 
Royster, John R., Evansville, Ind. 
Simmons, Peter T., Newport, R. I. 
Sindler, Millard S.. Baltimore 
Smith, John L., Jr., Baltimore 
Solomon, Harold, Baltimore 
Somerville, William B., Cumberland 
Tarantino. Arthur E.. Hyattsville 
Toula, Wilson R., Baltimore 



First Year Evening Class 



Alperstein. Reuben R.. Baltimore 
Applefeld. LeRoy S., Baltimore 
Baldwin, John S., Hydes 
Bortner, William A., Baltimore 
Brown, Charles A.. Severna Park 
Brown. Sara A., Baltimore 
Buck. Frederick R., Baltimore 
Butschky. Wilfred W.. Baltimore 
Clifford, J. Lawrence. Baltimore 
Connor, Charles M., Catonsville 
Cronie, Evelyn L., Baltimore 
Dawbarn, Waring L., Baltimore 
Disney, Peter W. L.. Baltimore 
Eckhardt, Earl S., Baltimore 
Eierman, George H. P., Baltimore 



Gallop, Millard, Halethorpe 
Gardner, William L., Jessups 
Himmelfarb, Anna, Baltimore 
Holtzner, Francis J., Fullerton 
Kerger, Francis P., Catonsville 
Lally, Edward B.. Baltimore 
Mackie. Osborne S., Elkton 
Martin. Eugene P., Jr., EUicott City 
Matricciani, Albert J., Baltimore 
McClees, J. Sheridan, Jr., Baltimore 
McLeod, George R., Pasadena 
Muller, Augustine J.. Kingsville 
Murphy, Cyril R., Jr.. Baltimore 
Norris, Louis G., Sykesville 
Raphel, Eugene V., Cumberland 



Reed, Charles H., Jr., Bel Air 
Rugemer, Francis E.. Baltimore 
Sfekas, James S., Baltimore 
Silber, Samuel L., Baltimore 
Stevens, George R., Baltimore 
Stone, John T., Ferndale 
Taymans, Bernard, Baltimore 



Teague, Thomas S., Baltimore 
Thompson, Martin A., Baltimore 
Watson, George B., Towson 
White, Frederick W., Towson 
Wildman, Lewis M., Mt. Lake Park 
Zebelean, John P., Jr., Catonsville 



Unclassified Evening 

Buppert, Doran H., Baltimore Sproat, Mary E., Rochester, N. Y. 

Hopkins. John H., IV, Baltimore Tillman, David F., Baltimore 

Killingsworth, Frederic K., Pikesville Weir. Albert E., Baltimore 



Bloodgood. Joseph H., Baltimore 
Hall, Eunice Mae, Baltimore 
Heringman, Leo A., Baltimore 



Unclassified Day 

Mattingly, Joseph A., Leonardtown 
McColgan, James E., Catonsville 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Senior Class 



Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 

Andrews, S. Ralph, Jr., Elkton 

Arney, William C, Morganton, N. C. 

Baier, John C, Baltimore 

Bailey, Walter L., York, Pa. 

Barker, Daniel C, Niantic, Conn. 

Beacham, Edmund G., Baltimore 

Biehl, Harold P., Frederick 

Borden, Jesse N., Baltimore 

Brinsfield, Irving C, Vienna 

Caplan, Lester H., Baltimore 

Chandler, Weldon P., Asheville, N. C. 

Clifford. Robert H., Jr., Mountain Lakes, 

N. J. 
Cole, John T., Warren. Ohio 
Correll, Paul H.. Catonsville 
Daniel, Louie S., Oxford, N. C. 
Daue. Edwin O., Jr., Silver Spring 
Deluca, Joseph, Bristol, R. 1. 
Dent, Charles F., Morgantown. W. Va. 
DonDiego. Leonard V., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Duffy, William C, Perryman 
Dwyer, James R., Renovo, Pa. 
Freeman, James A., Jr., West Union,W.Va. 
Fusting, William H., Baltimore 
Gassaway, William F., Ellicott City 
Gibbs, Robert L., Hickory, N. C. 
Click, Irving J., New York, N. Y. 
Graham, Walter R., Charlotte, N. C. 
Guzman-Lopez, Luis R., San Juan, Puerto 

Hico 
Hecht. Morton, Jr., Baltimore 
Henning, Emil H.. Baltimore 
Heyman, Albert, Baltimore 
Hooton, Elizabeth L., University Park 
Hope, Daniel, Jr., Ellicott City 



Igartua-Cardona, Susana, Aguadilla, Puerto 

Rico 
Inloes, Benjamin H., Jr., Baltimore 
Jamison, William P., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Jorgensen, Cecil L., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Karns, James R., Baltimore 
Kirchick, Julian G., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kohn, Schuyler G., Baltimore 
Krieg, Edward F., Baltimore 
Kurland, Albert A., Baltimore 
Lartz, Robert E., Sharon, Pa. 
Ling, William S. M.. New York. N. Y. 
Livingood, William C, Waynesburg, Pa. 
Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 
Maccubbin, Harry P., Baltimore 
Markline, Simeon V., White Hall 
Martin, Clarence W., Baltimore 
Maryanov, Alfred R., New York, N. Y. 
Mathers, Daniel H., Annapolis 
McCann, Harold F., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
McClung, James E., Richwood, W. Va, 
McClung, William D., Richwood. W. Va. 
McDaniel, George C, Baltimore 
McKinnon, William J., Maxton, N. C. 
Meade, Forest C, Hyattsville 
Miceli, Joseph, Baltimore 
Molz, Edward L.. Baltimore 
Murphy. Fred E., Jesup, Ga. 
Muse, William T., Baltimore 
Myers, George R., Hurlock 
O'Hara, James F., tJanton, Ohio 
Pico, Guillermo. Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Pierpont, Ross Z., Woodlawn 
Pigford, Robert T., Wilmington. N. C. 
Piatt, William, Baltimore 
Pollock, Arthur E., Gallitzin, Pa. 



444 



445 



Posner, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pound, John C, Baltimore 
Rhode, Charles M., Baltimore 
Richter, Conrad L., Baltimore 
Robinson, Raymond C. V., Baltimore 
Roop, Donald J., New Market 
Rothschild, Carl E., Chefoo, China 
Russell, Thomas E., Jr., Frederick 
Russillo, Philip J., Norwich, Conn. 
Schlesinger, George G., New York, N. Y. 
Sloan, Joseph W., Bayonne, N. J. 
Smith, James B., Glen Burnie 
Smith, Ruby A., Princeton, W. Va. 
Squillante, Orlando J., Waxren, R. I. 
Stayton, Howard N., Jr., Wilmington, Del. 
Supik. William J., Baltimore 

Junior 

Alberti, Aurora F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Alexander, Fred, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Arnett, Jerome C, Eglon, W. Va. 
Barnett, Charles P., Baltimore 
Baxley, Joshua W., 3rd, Ellicott City 
Bowen, Joseph J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Brooks, Julius C, Jr., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Bundick, William R., Baltimore 
Carter, John M., Mt. Hope, W. Va. 
Checket, Pierson M., Baltimore 
Chiques, Carlos M., Caguas, Puerto Rico 
Cloninger, Charles E., Claremont, N. C. 
Conlen, Richard A., Audubon, N. J. 
Cooper, LeRoy G., Glen Lyon, Fa. 
Crecca, Joseph V., Newark, N. J. 
Croce, (Jene A., Providence, R. I. 
Cruikshank, Dwight P., 4th, Lumberport, 

W. Va. 
Culler, John M., Frederick 
DeVincentis, Michael L., Baltimore 
Diez-Gutierrez, Emilio, Orocovis, Puerto 

Rico 
DiPaula, Anthony F., Baltimore 
Esnard, John E., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Evola, Camille M., Flushing, L. I., New 

York 
Frey, Edward L., Jr., Catonsville 
Garcia-Blanco, Jose P., Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Gelber, Julius, New York, N. Y. 
Goodman, William, Baltimore 
Graziano, Theodore J., Baltimore 
Hedrick, Thomas A., Beckley, W. Va. 
Hershner, Newton W., Jr., Mechanicsburg, 

Pa. 
Hollander, Asher, Baltimore 
Huffman, Pearl T., Morganton, N. C. 
Hunter, James S., Jr., Frostburg 
JaflFe, Vita R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kemp, Norval F., Relay 
Krulevitz, Keaciel K., Baltimore 



Tankin, Louis H., Baltimore 
Thompson, Alexander F., Troy, N. C. 
Tompakov, Samuel, Baltimore 
Townshend, Wilfred H., Jr., Baltimore 
Trevor, William, Baltimore 
Triplett, William C, St. Marys, W. Va. 
Waite, Merton T., Odenton 
Weeks, William E., Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Wilkins, Jesse L., Pocomoke City 
Williams, Herman J., Reading, Pa. 
Williams, Richard T., Crownsville 
Wilson, Harry T., Jr., Baltimore 
Wolff, William I., New York, N. Y. 
Wright, James R., Raleigh, N. C. 
Zinkin, Solomon B., Lakewood, N. J. 

Class 

Lach, Frank E., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Leslie, Franklin E., Towson 
Levinson, Lorman L., Baltimore 
Licha, Jose S., Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Lowe, William C, Stevensville 
Lusby, Thomas F., II, Prince Frederick 
Malouf, Raymond N., Richfield, Utah 
Mandel, Jacob B., Jersey City, N. J. 
Mitchell, William A., Baltimore 
Molinari, Jose G., Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Morgan, Margaret, Austin, Ind. 
Morris, Felix R., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Morrison, William H., Baltimore 
Nolan, James J., Catonsville 
Novoa-Caballero, Miguel, Rio Piedras, P. R. 
Ortiz, Idalia O., Santurce, P. R^ 
Palmer, M. Virginia, Easton 
Pasamanick, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Fearcy, Thompson, Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Perman, Joshua M., Baltimore 
Phrydas, Irene, Greensboro, N. C. 
Pruitt, Charles E., Frederick 
Renna, Francis S., Montclair, N. J. 
Revell, Walter J., Louisville, Ga. 
Richardson, Charles, Jr., Bel Air 
Richmond, Marion B., Chevy Chase 
Richter, Christian F., Jr., Overlea 
Rosenberg, Jonas S., New York, N. Y. 
Rossberg, Clyde A., Baltimore 
Sasscer, Robert B.. Upper Marlboro 
Sawyer, William H., Raleigh, N. C. 
Scholl, John A., Wheeling, W. Va. 
Schwartz, Stanley E,, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Seigman, Edwin L., Jr., Baltimore 
Shannon, Edward P., Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sheehan, Joseph C, Baltimore 
Sherrill, Elizabeth B., Sparks 
Sims, Thomas C, Fayetteville, W. Va. 
Skitarelic, Benedict, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Spencer, Tracy N., Jr., Concord, N. C. 



Spinnler, Henry R., Butler, N. J. 
Stevens, John S., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Strayer, Webster M.. Jr., Baltimore 
Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
Trevaskis, Richard W.. Jr., Cumberland 
Ulrich, George J., Baltimore 
Virusky, Edmund J., Freeland, Pa. 
Walker, James H., Charleston, W. Va. 

Sophoinnre 

Adam. Alberto L., San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Ahroon, William A., Baltimore 
Bacharach, David N., Jr., Baltimore 
Barthel, Robert A., Jr., Catonsville 
Bassan, Morton E., Baltimore 
Bennett, Van Boring, Burnsville, N. C. 
Bird. Joseph G., Baltimore 
Bowen, Francis D. T., Cumberland 
Brodsky, Alexander E., Baltimore 
Byerly, William L.. Hartsville, S. C. 
Carey, Richard A., Baltimore 
Coffman, Harry F., II., Keyser, W. Va. 
Concilus, Frank, Uniontown, Pa. 
Cox, Matthew M., Sparrows Point 
Crane, Warren E., Loch Arbour, N. J. 
Davies, Thomas E., Blossburg, Pa. 
Davila-Lopez, Jose G., Guaynabo, P. R. 
Davis, John R., Jr., Weston, W. Va. 
Day, Newland E., Baltimore 
Dillinger, Karl A., Weston, W. Va. 
Fallin, Herbert K., Linthicum Heights 
File, Richard C, Decatur, 111. 
Franz, John H., Baltimore 
Friedman, Marion, Baltimore 
Fuertes, Jose R., Santurce, P. R. 
Furnari, Joseph C, Johnstown, Pa. 
Goldsmith, Jewett, Baltimore 

Gramse, Arthur E., Holyoke, Mass. 

Greer, Margaret A., Bel Air 

Gregoi-y. Exie M., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Hamburger, Morton L., Baltimore 

Hubbard, Prevost, Jr., White Plains, N. Y. 

Ingram, Albert L., Jr., Wilmington, Del. 

Irwin, Robert C, Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Jones. Everett D., Westminster 

Kardash, Theodore, Baltimore 

Keeley, Joseph F., Jr., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Kenyon, Haxold A., East Falmouth, Mass. 

Kiefer, Robert A., Catonsville 

Klijanowicz, Stanley B., Baltimore 

Koleshko, Lawrence J., Waterbury, Conn. 

Krepp, Martin W., Jr., Baltimore 



Wall. Lester A., Jr., Baltimore 
Watkins, Dayton O., Hyattsville 
Wells, John B., Jr., Baltimore 
Wilder, Thomas C, Rochester, Minn. 
Wilson, Edwin F., New York, N. Y. 
Yanagisawa, Kazuo, Berkeley, Calif. 
Young, John D., Jr., Westminster 
Zierler, Kenneth, Baltimore 

Class 

KroU. John G., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Kundahl. Paul C, Germantown 
Link, Etta C, Halethorpe 
Longwell, Robert H., Tyrone, Pa. 
Lowitz, Irving R., Baltimore 
Lyons, Mary L., Steubenville, Ohio 
Manganiello, Louis O., Waterbury, Conn. 
Marino, Frank S., Middletown, Conn. 
Matthews, Henry S., Rose Hill, N. C. 
Mazer, Robert, Baltimore 
McCosh, James N., Jr., Ruxton 
McGoogan, Malcolm T., Fitzgerald, Ga. 
Meli, John J.. Charleroi, Pa. 
Miller, Edgar A., Jr., Gettysburg, Pa. 
Moses, Robert A.. Baltimore 
Mullins, George R., Logan, W. Va. 
Orafino, Caesar F., North Pelham, N. Y. 
Osborne, John C, Baltimore 
Phelan, Patrick C, Jr., Baltimore 
Phillips, Otto C, Baltimore 
Posey, Dale M., Christiana, Pa. 
Ritchings, Edward P., Annapolis 
Rosin, John D., Silver Spring 
Rousos, Anthony P., Rochester, N. Y. 
Sadler, Henry H., Jr., Annapolis 
Sadowsky, Wallace H., North East 
Sborofsky, Isadore, Baltimore 
Scott, Joseph W.,,Live Oak, Fla. 
Shipley, Edgar R., Baltimore 
Shub, Maurice I., Baltimore 
Shuman, Louis H., Scotland 
Stegmaier, James G., Cumberland 
Summa, Andrew J., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Townsend, Francis J., Ocean City 
Traynor, Francis W., Cumberland 
Van Lill, Stephen J., Ill, Catonsville 
Wallace, Joseph, Jr., Stroudsburg, Pa. 
Ward, Charles M., Beckley, W. Va. 
Williams, Charles H.. Owings Mills 
Williamson, Edgar P., Jr., Catonsville 
Zimmerman, Loy M., Baltimore . 



Freshman Class 

Allsopp, Richard C, Houston. Pa. Barnes, John D.. New Bedford Mass. 

Almodovar, Ramon I., San German, Puerto Beall, William L., Grafton. W. Va. 

j^j^^ Bowen, Charles V., Jr., CentreviUe 

Baker, Emory F., Spokane, Wash. Brennan. Thomas J., Baltimore 



446 



447 



Brooks, Ralph K., Moorefield, W. Va. 
Brooks, Ross C, Baltimore 
Bryson, William J., Baltimore 
Chenowith, Ralph S., Baltimore 
Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 
Coughlin, John B., Athens, Pa. 
Courtney, Donald L., The Dalles, Oregon 
Crastnopol, Philip, Newark, N. J. 
Cusani, Benedict A., Miami, Fla. 
Dalmau, Miguel S., Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Davis, William J. G., Washington, D. C. 
Deegan, Robert T., Massillon, Ohio 
DeRosa, Hugo A., Tenafly, N. J. 
Diorio, John D., Waterbury, Conn. 
Dippel, Francis X., Baltimore 
Dunne, Thomas B., Stapleton, N. Y. 
Epperson, John W. W., Baltimore 
Fowler, Richard L#., Greensboro, N. C. 
French, Samuel L., Rumbler 
Friedman, Paul N., Baltimore 
Garrison, Alfred S., Monkton 
Giglia, Tony R., Jr., Glen Jean, W. Va. 
Grave de Peralta, Jose I., Camaguey, Cuba 
Gray,* David B., Rainelle, W. Va. 
Hagan, William B., Allen 
Hassler, Frank S., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Haydu, Joseph F., Omar, W. Va. 
Honigman, Alvin H., Baltimore 
Hutson, Paul G., Baltimore 
Koleshko, William N., Irvington, N. J, 
Lacher, George M., Baltimore 
LaMar, Robert C, Hagerstown 
Lewis, Richard Q., Annapolis 
Livingstone, Robert C, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Lukats, Paul G., Barberton, Ohio 
MacDonald, Charles R., Cumberland 
Mace, Carville V., Jr., Stemmers Run 
Matchar, Joseph C, Baltimore 
McMillan, Marcy E., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Mele, Vincent J., Jr., South Orange, N. J. 
Mendez, Nestor H., Santurce. Puerto Rico 
Miller, James D., Columbus, Ohio 
Minervini, Robert V., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Musnick, Henry, Baltimore 
Myers, Joseph C, Woodlawn 



Nash, Kenneth P., Glendale, Calif. 

Neflf, Charles A., Chicago, 111. 

Fares, Maria A., Manati, Puerto Rico 

Perez, Enrigue, Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Peterson, Preston H., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Queen, J. Emmett, Baltimore 

Rangle, Raymond V., Baltimore 

Renshaw, Josephine E., Baltimore 

Richards, Granville H., Port Deposit 

Robbins, Martin A., Baltimore 

Rosenstein, Louis N., Baltimore 

Royer, Earl L., Woodlawn 

Rude, Richard S., Rutherford. N. J. 

Sacks, Seymour, Baltimore 

Samuels, Irving L., Baltimore 

Sharp, Nathaniel, Woodlawn 

Sigler, John W., Chillicothe, Ohio 

Soler, Marta E., Yauco, Puerto Rico 

Spier, Andrew A., Cumberland 

Stafford, Harold, Detroit, Mich. 

Stewart, Edwin H., Jr., Baltimore 

Stier, Howard W., Passaic, N. J. 

Stoner, James E., Jr., Woodsboro 

Taylor, Irvin J., Ellicott City 

Tilt, LeRoy W., Baltimore 

Torres, Jose M., San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Trader, Charles W., Crisfield 

Trent, Letcher E., Lexington, Ky. 

Tunney, Robert B., Baltimore 

Varhol, Joseph G., Jr., Passaic, N. J. 

Wachsman, Irvin L., Baltimore 

Walker, Samuel H., Mt. Gilead, N. C. 

Warren, Frank O., Jr., Manchester, N. H. 

Webster, Thomas C, Baltimore 

Weiss, Maurice R., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wich, Joseph C, Baltimore 

Wilson, Thomas L., Havre de Grace 

Wise, Robert E., Swissvale, Pa. 

Wishbow, Eleanor M., Jersey City, N. J. 

Wooddy, Arthur O., Baltimore 

Worgan, David K., Luke 

Wysong, William S., Jr., Clarksburg, 

W. Va, 
Yurko, Leonard E., Holidays Cove, W. Va. 



Medical Art Students 



Blades, Alice P., Baltimore 

Cone, Elizabeth S., Baltimore 

Stringer, John T., Jr., Portsmouth, N. H. 



Towson, Caroline H., Baltimore 
Woodland, Virginia, Baltimore 



Special Student 
Sister Francis Helen, Baltimore 



448 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Graduate Students 
Craven. Nancy Lou, Ramseur, N. C. Marshall. Lolah H Baltimore 

cXr. Margaret O.. Frederick Richardson. Virginia B.. Waverly. Va. 

Foster. Marguerite W., Sparks Shaft. Dorothy E.. ^eSer^on 

ut Margaret M.. Glen Burnie Vandervoort. Susan H., Rantoul. 111. 

Senior Class 

Provance, Forothy J., Greensboro, Pa. 

Remke, Pauline I., Elm Grove. W. Va. 

Rothaupt, Ruth A., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Scharf, Nellie M., Glen Burnie 

Sherwood, Alida, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Skaggs, Mary A., Hinton, W. Va. 

Smithson, Ethel B., Easton 
Starford. Marianna, Wendel, W. Va. 

Teeple, Laura E., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Thompson, Ruby E., Hurlock 
Vivod, Marion H., Luke 
Ward. Dorcas V., Baltimore 
Watson, Ada M., Dilliner, Pa. 
Wilkins, Amy L., Chestertown 
Woerner. Ruth C Baltimore 



Akers, Evelyn G., Baltimore 
Albright, Pearl E., Granite 
Baer. Martha L., Delta, Pa. 
Broadnax, Clarie P., Rock Hill, S. C. 
Bussard, Mary M., Jefferson 
Conley, Virginia C, Baltimore 
Duffee, Ava V., Norfolk, Va. 
Gardner, Nellie F., Lynchburg, Va. 
Granofsky, Elizabeth C Baltimore 
Horn, Beatrice C, Point of Rocks 
Linthicum, Laura E., Linthicum Heights 
Mcintosh, Annie M., Cheraw, S. C. 
Nester, Edna C, Auburn, N. J. 
Parks, Bessie M., Farksley, Va. 
Pember, Laura. G., New Bern, N. C. 



Intermediate Class 



Almony, Ruth E., White Hall 
Barkdoll, Charlotte S., Hagerstown 
Chesson, Ruth F., Waverly, Va. 
Clarke, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C 
Edmundson, Margaret B., Mount Olive, 

N. C. 
Evans, Flora E., Linthicum Heights 
Foster, Mildred E.. Bel Air 
Hammer, Nell U., Cumberland 
Heintz, Phyllis J., Aldon, Pa. 
Higgins, Mary E., Sanford, Fla. 
Jones, Thelma M., Grayson, Va. 
Lightbourne, Rebekah S., Burlington, N. C. 
Liles, Judy, Clayton, N. C. 
Long, Sara N., Duncansville, Pa. 
Matthews, Charlotte L., Parksley, Va. 
Neel, Catherine L., Mount Airy 



Parker, Ann Janet, Salisbury 

Reynolds, Margaret L., Bluefield, Va. 

Rice, Helen, Baltimore 

Sample, Myra M., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

SchoH, Mary C Wilmington, Del. 

Shaver, Etta M., Westminster 

Simmons, Edna V., Bridgewater, Va. 

Sinnott. Mary L., Baltimore 
Skinner, Edna M., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
Snyder, Peggy J., Windber, Pa- 
Stanley, Frances J., Blue Ridge Summit, 

Pa. 
Wilson. Martha C, Kingwood. W. Va. 
Wilson, Philena S., Kingwood, W. Va. 
Wolfe, Elizabeth L., Stephens City, Va. 
Yates, Mary G., Grafton, W. Va. 
Zeller, Carolyn D., Baltimore 



Albaugh, Ivy M., Hampstead 

Alt, Anna D., Baltimore 

Baker, Doris C, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Baldwin, Beatrice A., Keyser, W. Va. 

Beach, Emmett E., Island Creek 

Conrad, Jean L., Annapolis 

Coard, Louise M., Leemont, Va. 



Angleberger, Grace E., Frederick 
Ballard, Emilie M., Hyattsville 
Black, Nancy M., Baltimore 
Byers, Shirley, Baltimore 



Junior Class 

Goodman, Lelia B., Mooresville, N. C. 
Hance, Sarah C. Island Creek 
Hubbard, Florence, Hurlock 
Leonard. Gladys M., Streett 
Loock, Peggy E., Baltimore 
Skiles, Rachel L., Dundalk 
Thumel, Alma D., Baltimore 

Probation Class 

Coffman, Mary E., Keyser, W. Va. 
Cope, Helen P., Davidson, N. C. 
Cranford, Elizabeth V., Washington, D. C. 
Deaver, Evelyn L., Delta, Pa. 

449 



Etzler, Doris M., Frederick 
Ford. Nina M., Rock Hall 
Foster, Emma G., Parkton 
Frames, Mary O., Bethesda 
Frederick, Grace C,, Hampstead 
Frye, Dorothy M., Baltimore 
Garrett, Esther B., Annapolis 
Hansen, Ruth A., Washington, D. C. 
Hodges, Julia L., Catonsville 
Hollister, Sara F., Denton 
Jones, Nancy L., Baltimore 
Logan, Margaret M., Millington 
Magruder, Louise D., Baltimore 
Michael, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
Parker, Frances J., Catonsville 



Petry, Mary R., Baltimore 

Phillippi, Betty A., Cumberland 

Repp, Martha V., Westernport 

Schroeder, Mary L., Ferry Point 

Schulze, Margaret E., Baltimore 

Shaffer, Karolyn G.. Hampstead 

Sharp, Mary M., Ladoga, Ind. 

Shipley, Helen L., Westminster 

Small, Rosalind J., Baltimore 

Strider, Emma J., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Thornton, Grace M., Assawoman, Va. 

Tucker, Anna P., Hertford, N. C. 

Tucker, Rebecca A., Forest Hill 

Whitney, Margaret E., Takoma Park 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Senior Class 



Alessi, Alfred H., Baltimore 
Balassone, Francis S., Thomas, W. Va. 
Caplan, Clarice. Baltimore 
Celozzi, Matthew J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 
Cohen, Samuel, Baltimore 
Feinstein, Bernard S., BaJtimore 
Glaser, Louis L., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Albert, Baltimore 
Greenberg, Joseph, Baltimore 
Gumenick. Leonard, Baltimore 
Kamenetz, Irvin, Baltimore 
Kasik, Frank T., Jr., Baltimore 
Kline, Sidney, Baltimore 
Klotzman, Robert H.. Baltimore 
Kramer, Bernard, Baltimore 
Kursvietis, Anthony J., Baltimore 



Buchwald, Eva D., Baltimore 
Codd, Francis I., Severna Park 
Cohen, Rose P., Baltimore 
DeGele, George O., Baltimore 
DiGristine, Mary R., Baltimore 
Fainberg, Alvin J., Baltimore 
Ginsberg, Samuel H., Baltimore 
Glaser, Abraham E., Baltimore 
Goodman, Leon, Baltimore 
Hendin, Walter, Baltimore 
Jernigan, John M., Baltimore 
Kahn, Reuben, Baltimore 



Berngartt, Elmar B., Baltimore 
Blankman, Albert J., Baltimore 
. Clyman, Sidney G., Baltimore 
DeBoy, John M., Halethorpe 
Eckes, Charles F.,' Baltimore 



Lassahn, Norbert G., Baltimore 
Lerman, Philip H., Baltimore 
Levin, Leon P., Baltimore 
Levy, Irving, Annapolis 
Miller, Edward, Baltimore 
Poklis, Alphonse, Sparrows Point 
Richman, Philip F., Annapolis 
Rosen, Donald M., Baltimore 
Sachs, Norman R., Baltimore 
Sandler, Solomon, Baltimore 
Schlaen, Mildred, Baltimore 
Shook, Joseph W., Baltimore 
Silberg, Edgar M., Baltimore 
Simonoff, Robert, Baltimore 
Smith, Daniel E., Catonsville 
Sowbel, Irving, Baltimore 
Zukerberg, Morris A.. Baltimore 



Junior Class 



Kreis, George J., Jr., Baltimore 
Lindenbaum, Albert, Baltimore 
Mayer, Maurice V., Baltimore 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Moser, John T., Baltimore 
Noveck, Irvin, Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Bernard, Baltimore 
Rudoff, Oscar, Baltimore 
Sarubin, Milton, EUicott City 
Siegel, Harold, Baltimore 
Spangler, Kenneth G., Baltimore 
Zerwitz, Irving F., Baltimore 



Sophomore Class 



Ehudin, Herbert, Baltimore 
Feit, Abraham, Baltimore 
Friedman, Jerome S., Baltimore 
Getka, Milton S., Baltimore 
Gitomer, Marie, Glen Burnie 



Goldberg, Milton, Baltimore 
Harrison, Alice E., Baltimore 
Heyman, Shirley, Baltimore 
Jankiewicz, Alfred M., Baltimore 
Klavens, Sidney R., Baltimore 
Levin, Evelyn S., Baltimore 
Myers, Morton, Baltimore 
Nollau, Elmer W., Woodla.wn 
Oken, Jack, Baltimore 
Panamarow, Stephen, Baltimore 
Pritzker, Sherman, Baltimore 
Ramsey, Wilbur O., Lutherville 



Reisch, Milton, Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Robert, Baltimore 
Sacks, Sidney, Baltimore 
Shochet, Melvin, Baltimore 
Simon. Alder, Baltimore 
Smulovitz, Sidney, Baltimore 
Sober. Norman. Baltimore 
Weaver, Warren E., Dundalk 
Weinbach, Eugene C, Baltimore 
Whaley, Wilson M., Jr., Baltimore 
Wylie. H. Boyd, Jr.. Baltimore 



Freshman Class 



Applebaum, Leonard, Ahoskie, N. C. 
Caldwell, John R., Baltimore 
Carlisle, Elbert B., Berryville, Va. 
Carouge, Gilbert M., Baltimore 
Cragg, James P., Baltimore 
Finkelstein, Sidney, Baltimore 
Gordon, Max, Baltimore 
Grave de Peralta, Raoul A., Camaguey, 

Cuba 
Haase. Frederick R., Baltimore 
Hutchinson, William J., Baltimore 
Hyman, Nathan B., Baltimore 
Katz, Doris A., Baltimore 
Klotzman, Alfred. Baltimore 
Kremer, Beryle P., Baltimore 
Lathroum, Leo B., Jr., Baltimore 
Levin, Harold P., Baltimore 
Lockard, John E., Reisterstown 



Minor. Frances. Baltimore 
Poulase, Guss N.. Baltimore 
Rice. Leonard M.. Baltimore 
Rodman, Leonard, Baltimore 
Scheinin, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Schwartz, Nathan, Baltimore 
Schwartz, Theodore H.. Baltimore 
Siegel, Alvin M.. Baltimore 
Sindler, Melvyn, Baltimore 
Smith, Morton, Baltimore 
Steinberg, Sherman, Baltimore 
Stockton, Walter W., Silver Spring 
Sussman. Raymond A., Baltimore 
Totz, Bernard, Baltimore 
Weiner, Earl R., Baltimore 
Yarmosky, Jack J., Baltimore 
Yevzeroflf, Benjamin, Baltimore 



Special Students 

Burton. Harold F., Monkton Moffett. Virginia M., Catonsville 

Dansereau. Harry K.. Claremont, N. H. Rosenblatt, Hilda K.. Baltimore 

Fisher, David, Baltimore Tuckerman. Louis. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hamilton. Kathleen B., Baltimore Wilson. Julia E., Baltimore 

BALTIMORE 

THE SUMMER SCHOOLS— 1939 

School of Dentistry 



Amatrudo. Felix F., New Haven, Conn. 
Anderson. Helen L., Sudlersville 
Aycock, Robert E.. Baltimore 
Badenhoop. William H., Baltimore 
Capone, Celeste E., Baltimore 
Cierler, Irving J., Baltimore 
Feit, Sylvan O., Baltimore 
Haimovitz. Herman, Baltimore 
Karesh, Stanley H., Charleston, S. C. 
Kramer, Donald, Baltimore 
Kramer, Mervin. Baltimore 
Landes. Isaac, Baltimore 



Predental Students 

Lavine. Bernard S., Trenton, N. J. 
Levin, Florence S., Baltimore 
Robinson, Earl B.. Balboa, Canal Zone 
Sa.uerman, Edward E. K., Jr., Linthicni 

Heights 
Scanlon, John H., Westerly, R. I. 
Tongue. Raymond K.. Baltimore 
Trommer, Felix T., Norwich, Conn. 
Vine, Leon, Baltimore 
Witman. Harold I., Newark, N. J. 
Zeender, Philip J., Annapolis 



450 



451 



Dental Students 



Bixby, Daniel, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Coccaro, Peter J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Corder, Woodrow W., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Coroso, Joseph T., Hartford, Conn. 
Diamond, Ben, Roanoke, Va. 
Gorsuch, Gilbert F.. Dundalk 
Hyman, Harold, New York, N. Y. 
Koenig, Leonai-d, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Legum, Isidore, Baltimore 

Martinelli, Ricardo. Panama City, Panama 

Morris, Albert W., Salisbury 

Ouellette, Raymond T., Lawrence. Mass. 

Pecoraro, Arthur A., New York, N. Y. 

Powell, Julius B., Clinton, N. C. 

Smith, Bernard, Hagerstown 

Wieland. John T., Baltimore 



COLLEGE PARK 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1939 



School of Medicine 

Bacharach, David N., Jr., Baltimore 
Courtney, Donald L., The Dalles. Oregon 
Day, Newland E., Baltimore 
Eaton, William R.. Chester 
Eckles, Eleanor. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Gregory, Exie M., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Kenyon, Harold A., East Falmouth. Mass. 
Krepp, Martin W., Jr., Baltimore 
Kundahl, Paul C. Germantown 
Lusby, Thomas F., Prince Frederick 
Marino, Frank S., Middletown, Conn. 



Matthews, Henry S., Rose Hill, N. C. 
Mitchell, William A., Baltimore 
Ortiz, Idalia O., Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Posey, Dale M., Christiana, Pa. 
Rossberg, Clyde A., Baltimore 
Sharp, James H., Fairchance, Pa. 
Smith, Benedict F., Baltimore 
Townsend, Frajicis J., Ocean City 
Traynor. Francis W., Cumberland 
Van Lill, Stephen J., Ill, Catonsville 
Young, John D., Jr., Westminster 



School of Pharmacy 



Blankman, Albert J., Baltimore 
Burton, Harold F., Monkton 
DeBoy, John M., Halethorpe 
DeGele. George O., Baltimore 
DiGristine. Mary R., Baltimore 
Dziatkowski. Alice R., Baltimore 
Eckes, Charles, Baltimore 
Feit. Abraham. Baltimore 
Freedman, Leonard, Baltimore 
Friedman, Jerome S., Baltimore 
Getka, Milton S., Baltimore 
Gitomer, Marie, Glen Burnie 
Glaser, Louis L., Baltimore 
Goodman, Leon, Baltimore 
Heneson, Irving J., Baltimore 
Jernigan, John M., Jr., Baltimore 
Kreis, George J., Baltimore 
Kursvietis, Anthony J., Baltimore 



Mayer, Maurice V., Baltimore 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Noveck, Irvin, Baltimore 
Panamarow, Stephen, Baltimore 
Pascual, Juan A., Baltimore 
Pritzker, Sherman, Baltimore 
Ramsey, Wilbur O., Towson 
Rosen, Donald M., Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Bernard, Baltimore 
Rudoff, Oscar, Baltimore 
Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Sarubin, Milton, Ellicott City 
Simon, Alder, Baltimore 
Sober, Norman, Baltimore 
Sowbel, Irving, Baltimore 
Stone, Harry, Baltimore 
Thumm, C. Ashton, Jr., Baltimore 
Zerwitz, Irving F., Baltimore 



Graduate School 



Professional Schools, Baltimore 



Algire, Glenn H., Baltimore 
Allen, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Cook, Nevis E., Waleska, Ga. 
Cross, John M., Little Falls, N. J. 
Dittrich, Theodore T., Baltimore 
Gakenheimer, Walter C. Catonsville 
Hager, George P., Jr.. Baltimore 
Hamlin, Kenneth E., Jr., Baltimore 



Heyman, Bemice, Baltimore 
Jarowski, Charles, Baltimore 
Karel, Leonard, Baltimore 
Kunkel, Anne, Baltimore 
Levin, Nathan. Baltimore 
Ruddy. A. Wayne, Auburn. Neb. 
Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
Zenitz, Bernard L., Baltimore 



Abbott, Kathryn K., Bennings, D. C. 

Abell, Joseph D., Leonardtown 

Abell, Louise B., St. Inigoes 

Ackerman, John H., Baltimore 

Acree, Samuel, Brooklyn 

Adams, Ellen C, Aberdeen 

Adams, Hazel M., Oldtown 

Adams, Thomas E.. Oakton, Va. 

Adkins, Aline V., Annapolis 

Adkins, Charles S., Ellendale, Del. 

Ady. Katherine G.. Sharon 

Ahalt, Arthur M., Frederick 

Aiello, Catherine C Hyattsville 

Aiken, Leonara, Bethesda 

Akins, Lillian M., Washington, D. C. 

Albin, William D., Rohrersville 

Alder, Betty L., Princess Anne 

Alexander, Nelle M., Accident 

Alexander, Taylor R., Hope, Ark. 

Allen, Charles B., Towson 

Allen, Louis P., Washington, D. C. 

Allen, Rowannetta S., Anacostia, D. C. 

Alt, Theodore W., Washington, D. C. 

Altmann, Andrew T., Baltimore 

Altschuler, Leon, Washington, D. C. 

Amass, Jack R., Baltimore 

Anderson, Bernhard T., Takoma Park 

Anderson, Charles F. W., Baltimore 

Anderson, Dorothy N., Linthicum Heights 

Anderson, G. Jeannette, Baltimore 

Anderson, Howard H., Princess Anne 

Anderson, Minnie E., Salisbury 

Anderson, Muriel E., Washington, D. C. 

Andrews, Myrtle, Crapo 

Angel, Ralph L., Dundalk 

Appel, John C, Paradise. Pa. 

Appier, Helen I., Washington, D. C. 

Archer, Louise V., Berwyn 

Ardinger, Ellen B., Williamsport 

Ardis, Barbara M., Snow Hill 

Arnold, Jesse H., Washington, D. C. 

Arnold, Thelma H., Brunswick 

Arnold. William D., Baltimore 

Arosemena, Conrado A., Republic of Panama 

Asplen, Emily B., Glen Burnie 

Atkins, Sue E., Aberdeen 

Augustine, Frances M., Seat Pleasant 

Ayers, Alice J., Barton 

Babka, Margaret K., Edgewood 

Backenstoss, Ross E., Jr., Washington,D.C. 

Bailey, Alice H.. Federalsburg 

Bailey, Howard M., Parkton 

Bailey. Reginald T., Highfield 

Baity, Earl C, Street 



Ball, Herman, Cumberland 

Banks, Elizabeth B., Rockville 

Bant, William P., Ocean View, Del. 

Barber, F. Leone, Hyattsville 

Barnard, Charlotte P., Bloomington 

Barnes, Edwin H., Elkton 

Barnhart, C Paul, Williamsport 

Baron, Herman L., Baltimore 

Baroniak, Katherine B.. St. Mary's City 

Bassford, Elizabeth W., Harwood 

Bates, Virginia B., Washington, D. C. 

Batt, Helen K., Baltimore 

Baum, M. Justin, Washington, D. C. 

Baumgardner. Ralph W., Westminster 

Beale, Hilda, Upper Marlboro 

Beall, Ada M., Libertytown 

Beall. Susie C, Beltsville 

Beard, Melva F., Annapolis Junction 

Beauchamp, Aileen F., Westover 

Beavers, A