(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue"










I't 



I \- 






/ fc-' 



T-~\ 



1-;::.©^ 



IU^^i--W--^-.^ 



;-i 



X 



IJ 



^>— n. i^C*""ill 





^rrrf' 






t '^4 



■-m^nm^-;^^fjl^ 



i»finpS 



■»tV>»''^«'-M."-- ..v.,. 





i. 



f —g ■■* >Al 




&*«^ 



:^ ! ^JFV^^;»br^^^=gJ^fe^^ 



^ -«k; A«^j.J » y,>.,!fci.,M^ jiw . 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




GENERAL 

CATALOGUE 

NUMBER 



VOL 38 



No. 3 




1941-42 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



1941 



JULY 



S|M|T|W|TfFr5 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 
9 

16 
23 



3 

10 

17 

24 

30131 



J- 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



AUGUST 



s|m|T|w[tTfT5 



3 
10 

17 



4 5 
1112113 



7 

14 

20121 



18119 

24!25J26|27|28 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 

9 

16 
23 
29J30 



SEPTEMBER 

S!M|T|W|T|F|S 



1 

7| 8 
14115 
21122 



2 

9 
16 
23 



3 

10 
17 
24 



28|29|30|.-. 



4 5 
11112 13 
18ll9l20 
25126 27 



OCTOBER 

S!M|TtW|T|P|S 



1 

51 61 7 8 
12|13!14 15 
19120121 122 

26|27|28|29 



2! 3 

9110 

16ll7 



23 
30 



24 
31 



4 
11 

18 
25 



NOVEMBER 



S1M|T|W|T|P|S 



2 31 41 51 6 

9 10)11 12 13 

16(17|18|19|20 

23124125126127 

801 



7 

14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



DECEMBER 



STMITIW 



7 
14 



1 

8 
15116 



2 
9 



2122(23 



3 
10 

17 
24 



28I29I30I31 



TTFTS 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 

20 
27 



CALENDAR FOR 1941-1942 



1942 



JANUARY 



SIMITIWITfFT^ 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



L 



2 
9 

16 
23 
30 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



FEBRUARY 



S!M|T|W[TTfTS 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2 

9 

16 



3 
10 
17 



23 24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 






6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



MARCH 

SIMITIWITIFfS 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2 
9 

16 



31 4 



10 
17 
23124 



11 
18 



51 6 7 



12113 
1920 



25|26!27 



29130!31|....X.~.|. 



14 
21 
28 



APRIL 



S!M|T|W|T|FTg 



5! 6 
12113 



19 
26 



20 
27 



.-. 1 
7 8 
1415 
2122 
28129 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30i 



3 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



MAY 



S|M|T|W|T|P1S 



3 4 



10 

17 
24 



5 
12 



3lL 



11 
18 
25126 



6 

13 



19120 
27 



1 
71 8 
1415 
2122 
28 29 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



JUNE 



S|M|T|WlTfFT5 



7 
14 

21 
28129 



1 

8 
15 
22 



2 
9 

16 
23 
30 



3 
10 

17 
24 



4 
11 

18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



JULY 

S|M|T|W|T|F|S 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
1516 



22 
29 



23 
30 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



AUGUST 



SIMlTIWITfy 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 

19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 

29 



SEPTEMBER 

SIMITIWITTFpg 



6 
13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 

9 

16 
23 



3 
10 

17 
24 



28f29J30l^..| 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



OCTOBER 



S M T WTIPIS 


1[ 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 7 
1314 
20 21 
27 28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W|T|PIS 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 

18 

25 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


DECEMBER 


SIM 


TW|T|F!S 



6 

13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 
9 



16 

23.., 

30131 



3 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 

25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



1943 



JANUARY 

S|M|T|W|T|F|S 



8 

10 
17 



— . 24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



1314 



20 

27 



21 

28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



FEBRUARY 

s|M|T|w|tfFr5 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 



2 
9 

16 
23 



31 4 
1011 



17 
24 



18 
25 



5 6 
12113 



19 
26 



20 
27 



MARCH 



S|M|T|W|TTfTS 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



2 
9 

16 
23 



3 

10 
17 

30I3I 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 
13 
20 
27 



APRIL 



S|M|T|W|TTfT^ 



4 

11 

18 
25 



6 

12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 

28 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 
9 

16 
28 
30 



3 

10 
17 
24 



MAY 



SIM|T|W|T|F|S 



2 

9 

16 
23 



3 

10 
17 



4 
11 
18 



2425 



3031 



6 

12 



6 
13 



1920 
2627 



7 
14 



1 

15 



21122 



JUNE 

S|M|T|W|T|F|^ 



J 1 
6[ 7 8 
1311415 
2021122 
27128129 



2 
9\ 

16 
23 
30 



81 4 



10 
17 
24 



11 

18 
25 

1^ 



I 
15 
1* 
2« 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1941 - 1942 




Containing general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for tJie Scholastic Year 1941-1942 

and Records of 1940-1941. 

FactSy conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 

existing at the time of publication, March, 1941, 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR FOR 1941-1942 



1941 


1942 


1943 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


SIM T|W|T 


F|S 


S M|T W|T|F|S 


S M TW|T|F|S 


SIM T|WT F|S 


... 1 


.^.i. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


3 








1 


2 


3 


4 








1 


2 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 4 


5 


6 7 


8 


9 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13il4ll5 


16 


20121 


22 


23 ,'24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22I23 


27 28 


29 


3031 


y 


— 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


— 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 29130 
1 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M 


rTfWiTTFTS 


S!M|T|W|T|F|S 


S M|TW|T|F|S 


SIM 


T WjTIFIS 


_| 




1 2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5| 6 7 








1 1. 


1 


— 


1 


2 


3 4 


5 6 


31 4 5 


6 7 


8 9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12113 14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 11 


1213 


10 


1112 


13 14115116 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


1314 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19120 


17 


18 19 


20l2lt22'23 


22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20i21 


22 


2l!22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


24!25 26 27 28 29J30 

81 -- LLUL 










— 


— 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M|T|W1T|F|S 


S|M TIWTIFfS 


SI 


M TV/|T!F|S 


SIM T|W|T FjS 




1 2 


3 


41 5 6 


1 


2 


31 4 


51 6 


7 




1 


2 


3 4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


1111213 


8 


9 


1011 


12 


13 


14 


6 7 


8 


9 


1011 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10111112 13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18119 20 


15 


16 


1718 


19 


20 


21 


13 14 


15 


16 


1718 


19 


14115 


16 


1718119 20 


21'22!23l24l25 


26 27 


22 


23124125126 


27 


28 


20121 


22123 24 25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28|29!30 . ....U. 


1 


29130131 L...I. .„. 


•«•••• 


27 28 29I30L...UI 




28 


29130131 





^... 


— 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S!M|TW!T|P|S 


SIM T|W!T F|S 


S1 


M T|WiT|F!S 


S|M T|WT|F|S 




-j 


1 
8 


21 31 4 






1 
8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


1 


"5 


6 7 


1 

8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


1 


5 


6 


7 


1 2 
8 9 


3 


5 6 


9 10 


11 


5 6 


7 


10 


12|13 


14 


15 


1617 


18 


12113 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


11 


12 


1314 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


19120121122 


23 24 


25 


19 20 


21 


22123 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 


26 27128 29 


30 31 


••••■* 


26|27l28I29|30 






25f26 


27 


28 29130 31 


25| 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 


.... 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


¥TS 


S|M T|WIT|P|S 


S|M|T WTIFIS 


SIM T|W|T F|S 


S M TIWjTI 


1 






1 


I 






1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 61 


7 




1 








1 


21 3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 


3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


131 


14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


? 


9110 11 


1213 


14 


15 


1011 


1213 


14 


15 


16 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20] 


21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16I17I18I 


19 20 


21! 


22 


1718 


19 20 211 


22 


23 


22 


23124125 


26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


21 


23124 25I26J27 28l 


29 


24 25 26)27)28129 


30 


29 


30 






1 1 




231 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


oU| — 1 .^..]^^ 


31| --- 1 1 










■..~. 


.....L.-.I 




30) 


31UI 


-~.. 


.^^ 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNB 


S!M T1W|T!P|S 


SIM T!WIT|F|S 


Si 


M T WT F|S 


S|M T|W|T|F|S 


-^ 


1 


2 


8 4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


81 4 


i 


7 


8 


9 


1011 


12 


13 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


r. 


14 


15! 


16 


1718 


19 


20 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 161 


17 


18 


19 


13ll4 


15 


16 


17 


18 


V 


21 22'23'24l25 


26 


27 


21122! 


23 


24 


25 


26127 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


2021 


22 23 


24 


25 


2f 


28 29 30 31J - 


1 


28129 


30 


...^. 


~..M 


4^ 


27 28f29l30(3l| 


^ 


^«~ 


27128 


29130 


~~.. 


. 


..<' 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1941 - 1942 




Coiitaming general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 19.U-1942 

and Records of 19^0-19^1. 

FactSy conditions^ and personnel herein set forth are as 

existing at the time of publication y March y 1941, 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Table of Contents 



\ 



Page 

University Calendar _ _....* _ 4 

Officers of Administration 8 

Officers of Instruction * > .._ _..... 9 

Boards and Committees (College Park) _ _ 21 

Section I — General Information „ 47 

Historical Statement - - 47 

Administrative Organization _ _ 48 

Location - - 49 

Grounds and Buildings _ „ 49 

Princess Anne College _ „ _ _ 50 

Libraries - - 51 

Admission _ _ _ 51 

Requirement in Military Instruction _ „ 55 

Requirements in Physical Education for Women - „ 55 

Health Service - » 56 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees _ _ _ 57 

Expenses - - 59 

Honors and Awards 65 

Student Activities - 68 

Alumni - _ „ _ 72 

Section II — Administrative Divisions - 73 

College of Agriculture - _ 73 

Agricultural Experiment Station „ 104 

Extension Service 104 

Regulatory Activities - 105 

College of Arts and Sciences 106 

College of Commerce 135 

College of Education 153 

College of Engineering _ _ 168 

Engineering Experiment Station 173 

College of Home Economics _._ 185 

Graduate School ^ :. 191 

Summer Session _ 201 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 202 

Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics 206 

School of Dentistry _ 208 

School of Law „.... 219 

School of Medicine „ _.. 223 

School of Nursing _ _ 228 

School of Pharmacy 233 

State Boards and Departments „ _ _ 237 

Section III — Description of Courses „ 241 

(Alphabetical index of departments, p. 241) 

Section IV — Degrees, Honors, and Summary of Enrollment 391 

Degrees and Certificates, 1939-1940 _ „.. 391 

Honors, 1939-1940 _...... 403 

Summary of Enrollment, 1940-1941 „ 414 

Index _ „....„ 415 



1941 

Sept. 17-20 
Sept. 22 

Sept. 27 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1941-1942 
COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 

Wednesday- Saturday Registration. 

Monday, 8:20 a. m. Instruction for first semester be- 

gins. 

Saturday Last day to change registration 

or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 



1941 

September 15 Monday 

September 16 Tuesday 

September 17 Wednesday 



Oct. 14 


Tuesday 


Reception to the Faculty. H 


September 17 


Wednesday 


Nov. 15 


Saturday 


Homecoming Day. ^R 






Nov. 19 


Wednesday, 5 :10 p. m. 


Thanksgiving recess begins. Hj 


September 23 


Tuesday 


Nov. 24 


Monday, 8:20 a. m. 


Thanksgiving recess ends. H 


K-/ ^^ I 




Dec. 19 
1942 


Friday, 5:10 p. m. 


Christmas recess begins. Bf 


September 24 


Wednesday 


Jan. 5 


Monday, 8:20 a.m. 


Christmas recess ends. ^M 






Jan. 17 


Saturday 


Alumni and Faculty Charter Day ^M 


September 24-27 Wednesday- 






Banquet. ^H 




ISaturaay 


Jan. 22-29 


Thursday-Thursday 


First semester examinations. ^B 


September 25 


Thursday 




Second Semester |g 






Feb. 2-4 


Monday- Wednesday 


Registration for the second se- H| 










mester. ^m 


September 29 


Monday 


Feb. 6 


Thursday, 8 :20 a. m. 


Instruction for second semester H| 


• 








begins. ^M 


November 19 


Wednesday 


Feb. 11 


Wednesday 


Last day to change registration ^M 
or to file schedule card without H 










penalty. H 


November 24 


Monday 


Feu. 23 


Monday 


Washington's Birthday. Holiday. ^m 






March 25 


Wednesday 


Maryland Day. ^h 


December 20 


Saturday 


April 2-8 


Thursday, 5 :10 p. m. 


H 








Wednesday, 8 :20 a. m. 


Easter recess. ^T 


1942 




May 26-June 3 


Tuesday- Wednesday 


Second semester examinations. 1 




May 30 


Saturday 


Memorial Day. Holiday ■ 


January 5 


Monday 


May 31 


Sunday, 11 :00 a. m. 


Baccalaureate sermon. ■ 






June 5 


Friday 


Class Day. ■ 


January 26-31 


Monday — 


June 6 


Saturday 


Commencement. H 




Saturday 




Summer Session | 


January 31 


Saturday 


June 22 


Monday 


Summer Session begins. I 






July 31 


Friday 


Summer Session ends. ■ 


I. 




July 31 


Friday, p. m. 


Summer Convocation for confer- B 







ring of degrees. 
Notice : No leaves of absence w^ill be granted for a period of tv^enty-four 
hours immediately preceding or following the time set for a holiday. 



February 2 
February 23 



Monday 
Monday 



BALTIMORE 

First Semester 

Registration for evening students in 
Law School. 

Registration for first and second year 
students in Dentistry. 

Registration for other students in Den- 
tistry. 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period in evening Law School. 

Registration for first and second year 
students in Medicine and Pharmacy. 

Registration for all other students in 
Law (Day), Medicine and Pharmacy. 

- Registration for all Education students. 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period for Law (Day), Medicine 
and Pharmacy. 

Instruction begins for Education stu- 
dents. 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the last 
scheduled period for all schools. 

Instruction resumed with the first sched- 
uled period for all schools. 

Christmas recess begins after the last 
scheduled period for all schools. 

Instruction resumed with the first sched- 
uled period for all schools. 

Registration for the second semester for 
all schools. 

First semester ends after the last sched- 
uled period in all schools. 

Second Semester 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period for all schools. 
Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 



April 1 

April 8 

May 29 

June 6 
June 17 



Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Saturday 
Wednesday 



Easter recess begins after the last sched- 
uled period for all schools. 

Instruction resumed with the first sched- 
uled period for all schools. 

Second semester ends for Education stu- 
dents. 

Commencement. 

Second semester ends for evening Law 
School. 



*A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the dav or davs snprifl a 

A^ off^ %>,^%'' r^°°^ T"^ ^« ^*"^^ ^P°^ t° P»y" a late registration L^of five ^d^^^^^^^^^^^ 
($5 00). The last day of registration with fee added to regular charge is Saturday at i^i.n 

i4le rnr^'b. wJvpf n^r*'^'*^^'V»?"^^'^? following the spefTfied re|L^tration Sd. \tMs 
*T^Toffi. Mi ^^l^^.^PO'^ the written recommendation of the deans). ^ ' 

IfZor^.llT''"'- *'"'""'''• September 15. I9I1. until 8 :00 p"in!\'d\a\°ce^d regSmi;; 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman 

Kensing:ton, Montgomery County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Vice-Chairman 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore' 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 

1015 Argonne Drive, Baltimore 



Term Expires 
1945 



••••••••••••«..•••...... X«7^0 



.1947 



.....1944 



William P. Cole, Jr 1949 



Towson, Baltimore County 



*Harry H. Nuttle. 



.....1941 



Denton, Caroline County 



W. Calvin Chesnut. 



1942 



Roland Park, Baltimore 

*J UUN £i. oBMMES -.........._ _.„ — -... ..... _.».... 

100 W. University Parkway, Baltimore 



1942 



Rowland K. Adams. 



<••••••••*•«••••• ••■•■*•••••••■ ^L %^ ^S ^^ 



1808 Fairbank Road, Baltimore 



** Philip C. Turner... 



.1930 



Parkton, Baltimore County 



6 



^*Term expires first Monday in June, 1941. 
Term begins first Monday in June, 1941. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 
T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service Dean n* 
the College of Agriculture. ' ^^ 

H. J. Patterson, D. Sc, Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Acting Dean of the School of Medicine. 

J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of 
Medicine. . ""^ 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 
of Nursing. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of the School of Dentistry 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director of 
the Summer Session. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering. 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Dean of the College of 
Commerce. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A., Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men, Director of Athletics. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

Roger B. Corbett, Ph.D., Director of Agricultureal Experiment Station. 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Acting Director of Engineering Experiment 
Station. 

Thomas D. Finley*, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Robert Edward Wysor, Jr., Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Acting Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

Edgar Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the President. 
Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 
T. A. Hutton, Purchasing Agent. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1940-1941 

At College Park 

PROFESSORS 

CHARLES Orville Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physi- 
ology, Dean of the Graduate School. 

Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Director 
of Summer School. 

Fred Wilson Besley, Ph.D., Professor of Farm Forestry, State Forester. 

Luther Allen Black, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Levin Bowland Broughton, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry, Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, State Chemist. 

Glen David Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Animal Pathology. 

Theodore Carroll Byerly, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering, State Drainage Engineer. 

Roger Bailey Corbett, Ph.D., Director of Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist, 
Assistant Director of Extension. 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education, Assist- 
ant Dean of the College of Agriculture, State Supervisor of Vocational 
Agriculture. 

Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Farm Management. 

Nathan Lincoln Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Alice Gwendolyn Drew, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Women. 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Professor of Speech. 

Charles Garfield Eichlin, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

Charles Walter England, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

William Franklin Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Thomas Dewees Finley*, Lieutenant Colonel, Inf., U. S. Army, Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

Wesley Marsh Gewehr, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Allen Garfield Gruchy, Ph.D., Professor of Finance and Economics. 

Charles Brockway Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Harold Curtis Hand, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Malcolm Morrison Haring, Ph.D., Professor pf Physical Chemistry. 

Lawrence Vaughan Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 



On leave. 



*0n leave. 



9 



8 



. I 



I 



WiLBERT James Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
Acting Director of Engineering Experiment Station. 

Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor of Pathology, State Pathologist. 

John Gamewell Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Carl Smith Joslyn, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Arnold Edward Joyal, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Administration. 

Morley Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy. 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Edgar Fauver Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Acting Director of 
Admissions. 

Charles Leroy Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Men 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor of Olericulture. 

Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Frieda Wiegand McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles, Clothing, and 
Art. 

Edna Belle McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Joshua Albert Miller, B.S., Administrative Coordinator of Practice 

Teaching. 
Myrl Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management, 

Dean of the College of Home Economics. 
John Bitting Smith Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 
Jesse William Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Adele Hagner Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 
Samuel Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, Dean 

of the College of Engineering. 
Wayne Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Economics 

and Business Administration, Dean of the College of Commerce. 
Leonid Ivanovich Strakhovsky, D. Hist. Sc, Professor of European 

History. 
Thomas Hardy Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Dean 

of Faculty. 
RoYLE Price Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soils. 
Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape 

Gardening. 
Reginald Van Trump Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquiculture. 
Kenneth Leroy Turk, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D., Professor of Canning Crops. 
Harry Redcay Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
SiVERT Matthew Wedeberg, A.M., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 
Claribel Pratt Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 



10 



M^K Fbb:oerick Welsh. M.S.. D.V.M.. Professor of Veterinary Science. 
State Veterinarian p j ^^ of Inorganic Chemistry. 

ZlS!SJlc.t^^>'D.. P,«fe.^r of Mod.™ L»g«8... 

LECTURERS 

P..„. REKCE ACHENBACH. B.S.,>ecturer on Heating, Ventilation, and Re- 
frigeration Lecturer on Agricultural Economics. 

OLIVER EDWIN B^'fJ^-^-'g"^ Lecturer on Soils and Foundations. 
rvfiRfiE Edwakd Bertram, b.o., i-eciurei uu 

ASHBV BUELL GURNEY, Ph.D., Lecturer onJ^-»"«7_ .. ,. 
Sy Rutledge hall. B.S., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 
T? r.r T TTvQ<? B S Lecturer on Geology. 

^ ARTHUR D. WILLARD, JR., B.A., Lecturer on Speech. 
James Franklin Yeager, Ph.D.. Lecturer on Entomology. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



^ ,o DV, r> A<!i?ociate Professor of Psychology. 

ROGER MARION BELLOWS Ph^D Ass^mteJ ^^ Marketing. 

VICTOR WILSON ^^^^J''^l-''^,toZe%ofe.sor of Dairy Husbandry. 
MYRON HERBERT BERRY, M_A.,Asso«at^ Professor of Poultry Nutrition. 
HERBERT RODERICK Bii^, ^^^^.^^^I'^^sov of Education. 
HENRY BRECHBiLLPh.D., Associate f^o Professor of Agricultural 

James Wiluam Coddington, B.S., Associate 

Economics. r>vM Associate Professor of Veterinary 

WiLUAM RUSH Crawford, D.V.M., Associate 

Science. „ ^^^ Associate Professor of Animal Path- 

Harou) Moon DeVolt, M.b., u.v.m., •"•=>=> 

GEA^Y Irancis Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy, Director of 
jAMrMriN^Gri.:;*^^ Associate professor of Poultry Production and 

S.s.^tMOLYN HARMAN, Ph.D., Associate Professorof^En^ish. 

TT . xTm T»v> n A c;«;ociate Professor of Pomology. 
iRViN Charles Haut, Pn.u., Associate jta^ 

11 



Leo Ingeman Highby, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Ancient Langua.. 
and Literature. •"'? Jages 

Carl Wiluam Edmund Hintz. A.M.L.S., Associate Professor of Liuran 
Science, Librarian. ^'orarj 

Lawrence Judson Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical E„.i 
neering. '^"Si 

John Bradshaw Holt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 
Jesse William Huckert*, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical En.i 
neering. "8i- 

Mary Juhn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

FRANCIS BUSY Lincoln, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Propaeatinn 
ALPHEUS ROYALL MARSHALL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Econo„ ' 
MONROE HARNISH MARTIN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of MathematTcs 
Norman Ethelbert Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology" 
George DEWiTTE Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandrv 
Allie W Richeson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (Balti- 
more). ^ 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor of Land- 
scape Gardening. 

Reuben George Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science 
William Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Eco' 
nomics. 

Raymond Clifford Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chen,- 
istry. 

Alexander Cox Williams, Jr., Ph.D., Research Associate in Psychology. 

Logan Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

Vertrees Judson Wycoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture 
ARTHUR Montraville Ahalt, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Russell Bennett Allen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
Cecil Ravenscroft Ball, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Hugh Alvin Bone, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political* Science 
Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology 
Jack Yeaman Bryan, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Sumner Othniel Burhoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
Cornelius Wilbur Cissel, M.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 
Lincoln Harold Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Weston Robinson Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Arnold Colvin Cobb, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical EngineeWng. 
Franklin DeLaney Cooley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 






Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

George Odell Switzer Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

Charles Robert Davis, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

Beryl Herbert Dickinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Linden Seymour Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Paul Murray Ellis, Major, Inf. (Retired), U.S. Army, Assistant Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

George Campbell Ernst, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Gaylord Beale Estabrook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics (Balti- 
more) . 

John Edgar Faber, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Allen Jerry Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Administra- 
tion. 

Robert Tyson Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Gardner Henry Foley, M.A., Assistant Professor of English and Speech 
(Baltimore). 

Ralph Galungton, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education. 

Merrill Cochrane Gay, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Wilson Payne Green, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Walter Leon Hard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Benton Hoshall, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

George Bond Hughes, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Frances Aurelia Ide, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Mary Ann Johnson, M.A., Assistant Dean of Women. 

Robert Wellington Jones, First Lieutenant, Inf. Reserve, U.S. Army, 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Gordon Louis Judd, First Lieutenant, Inf. Reserve, U.S. Army, Assistant 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Harold Leon Kelly, Jr., First Lieutenant, Inf. Reserve, U.S. Army, 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Charles Atkinson Kirkpatrick, A.M., D.C.S., Assistant Professor of 
Marketing and Business Administration. 

Mary E. Kirkpatrick, M.S., Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Howard Martin Kline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Otis Ewing Lancaster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

WiLLARD Arthur Laning, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical 
Engineering. 



*Oii leave. 



13 



12 



Grace Lee, B.A., Assistant Dean of Women. 

Frank Martin Lemon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Naomi Therese Lucius, M.D., Physician to Women. 

George Maurice Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Roberta Mack, B.S., Assistant Professor of Institution Management. 

George Francis Madigan, M.S., Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Polly Kessinger Moore, M.S., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

Charles Driscoll Murphy, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Arthur Charles Parsons, A.M., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 
(Baltimore). 

Joseph Warren Phillips, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Aeronautics. 

Augustus John Prahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

Gordon William Prange, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Hester Beall Proyenson, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Milton Allender Pyle, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Joseph Thomas Pyle^s, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English (Baltimore). 

Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Harold George Shirk, B.S., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

Arthur Silver, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

Edgar Bennett Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

(Baltimore). 
Warren Laverne Strausbaugh, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

WiLUAM Carleton Supplee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

William Julius Svirbley, M.S., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Harold Wesley Thatcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Guy Paul Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology (Baltimore). 

Edwin Warren Titt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Willis Lattanner Tressler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

E. Gaston Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chem- 
istry (Baltimore). 

George Clarence Vedova, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Earnest Artman Walker, M.S., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Chester Carlton Westfall, Lieutenant Colonel, Inf., U.S. Army, Assis- 
tant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Robert Owen Wickersham, B.S., M.E., M.S.E., Assistant Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Ralph Irwin Williams, A.B., First Lieutenant, Inf. Reserve, U.S. Army, 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Assistant Dean 
of Men. 

Howard Barr Win ant, M.S., Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Mark Winton Woods, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

William (Gordon Zeeveij), Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 



14 



y 



\ i 



INSTRUCTORS 

rPORGE FREDERICK Alrich, Ph.D., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 

GEORGE J^K BALDWIN, R.N., Instructor in Hygiene. 

^^:rWALSH b!rton, C.D.E.F., M.A., Instructor in Education, Cnt.c 

n JjoneTbaumann. M.A., Instructor in Clothing and Art. 
DALE J" RoniL Y Ph D Instructor in Bacteriology. 

„.» BORN."., BS, in-ttuoto- » Fo<«i.^ 

^r; B^-rrB. T„s"i' in"sw. -<.»»- - w.™. 

HARRY oou. Instructor in Home Management. 

S AS:7'EtK0EUS., M.A ins^-or in -^^^^ Languages. 

NEIL !«" GiiiERT M.A., Instructor in Mathematics^ 
wTllum HENRY GRAVELY. JR.. M.A., Instructor m English. 
? V cTrter Hackman, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology. 
rLlRENCE LEWIS HODGE. Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology 
R CHARD RUSSELL HuTCHESON, M.A., Instructor m Speech. 
LEWIS CASS HUTSON, Instructor in Mining Extension. 
SHTE'DWARDjACOBi,Ph.D instruct^^^^^^^^ 

I:rZ:^:^£^oi^:-i'^T---' M.D.. instructor in Health 

Education. TTi=;tructor in Chemistry. 

VERNON ARTHUR ^AMB.Ph^D. Instructor ^.^^^^ 

JAMES MILTON LEATH, M.A ^^^'^f^^^^J^^ j„ ^odem Languages. 

Andre FRANK Liotard, B.A., B.D., mstrucior 

JOHN LOWE, III, B.S., M.S., Instructor m Cml En^^'^eerin^- 

JOHN WALKER MCMILLAN, PhJX,InstrUCtO^^^^^^^^ ^^.^^^^ ^^^ 

Edward Mars, Sergeant, D.E.M.L., Instructor in 

GeorSdward martin, sergeant, D.E.M.L., Instructor in Military Science 

WiluaII™ McCollomb. M.A ^-^-f ^V"p,f^,^it,i„^. 
WILBU. I^wiOHT MCC.^..AN B.s^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 'socil^Xltimore) . 
Ivan Eugene McDougle, Ph^u., ^™nstructor in Civil Engineering. 
JOHN ANGUS McLaughun, JR. C^J^^^^^f^^f °^^^^^^^^ Languages. 
Edmund Erskine Miller, Ph.D., instrucxor m i 

FRANCES HOWE MILLER, A^M., '^:^^X^^ and Clothing. 

THYRA FAYE Mitchell, M.A Instructor in ^^^^^^^^ ^^.^.^ 

Lillian Gertrude Moore, A.M., instructor mi. 
Norm!n hIkned MOORE, M.S.. Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

15 



John Church Mullin, B.S., M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 

Administration. 
John George Mutziger, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Ralph Duane Myers, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Homer Edward Newell, Jr., A.M.T., Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Fay Joseph Norris, Sergeant, Inf., U.S. Army, Instructor in Milituy 

Science and Tactics. 
James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 
William Harwood Peden, M.S., Instructor in English. 
Paul Rontzahn Poffenberger, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics 
Edward Wilkins Reeve, Ph.D., Instructor in Organic Chemistry. 
James Henry Reid, M.A., Instructor in Marketing. 
Robert Charles Rigal, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Durant Waite Robertson, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 
Howard Rovelstad, A.M., B.S.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 
Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Orlando De Leone Scoppettone, A.B., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Aaron Wiley Sherwood, M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Robert Vernon Shirley, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 

Statistics. 
Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 
Howard Burton Shipley, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Carl B. Smith, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 
Henry Hunter Smith, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
Kathleen Marie Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 
Paul Edward Smith, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Marvin Luther Speck, Ph.D., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 
Howard Livingston Stier, Ph.D., Instructor in Horticulture. 
Lynn LeRoy Swearingen, M.A., Instructor in English. 
William How.ard Taft, III, B.A., Instructor in English. 
Kathryn Marie Terhune, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for 

Women. 
Wayne Louis Tyler, M.A., Instructor in English. 
George James Uhrinak, Sergeant, Inf., U.S. Army, Instructor in Military 

Science and Tactics. 
William Jacob Van Stockum, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Evelyn Iverson Vernon,* M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
George Edward Walther, A.B., Instructor in Political Science. 
John Cook Ward, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Floyd Warner, Instructor in Physical Education for Men. 
Virginia Lee Watts, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 
Donald Chester Weeks, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 
Mark Wheeler Westgate, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Gladys Anna Wiggin, M.A., Instructor in Education. 
Milton Joel Wiksell, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Helen Barkley Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Albert Westle Woods, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 
Leland Griffith AVorthington, M.A., Instructor in History. 



ASSISTANTS 

FRANK Graham Banta, B.A., Assistant in Modern Languages. 
AD V Missouri Beall, A.B., Assistant in English. 

DTFTER Cunz, Ph.D., Assistant in Modern Languages. . 

J ;'L ROBERT DOUGLAS, M.S., Assistant in Physical Education for Men. 
Emmert Parker Dupler, A.B., Assistant in Speech. 
TFORGE William Eastment, Assistant in Bacteriology. 
JESSE TURNER FONTAINE, Jr., B.A., Assistant in Psychology Research. 
Mildred Coe Gavin, B.Mus., Assistant in Music. 
Donvld cummins Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
Chester Wood Hitz, B.S., Assistant in Pomology. 
Cvrl William Kelley, B.S., Assistant in Agronomy. 
VERNON EDWARD Krahl, M.S., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 
HXRRY ANDREW MiLLER, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry Research. 
NMHAN GRIER PARKE, III, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
PATRICIA WILLINGHAM Stier, B.S., Assistant in Botany Laboratory. 
^ JOHN SHERMAN THATCHER, A.B., Assistant in Psychology Research. 
d J.MES KENDALL THORNTON, B.S., Assistant in Physics (Baltimore). 
S HERMAN TODD, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 

FRVNCES EVELYN TUTTLE, B.S., Assistant in Institution Management. 
WALTER ROBERT VoLCKHAUSEN, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
THOMAS CHARLES GORDON Wagner, B.S., Assistant in Mathematics. 
ROBERT NEWTON WooDWORTH, A.M., Assistant in Sociology. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

_ ^ Chemistry 

Harry Davis Anspon, B.b 

^^^^ Tt, M A Modern Languages 

Ross Elwood Backenstoss, Jr., M.a chemistry 

William Howard Beamer, B.S " " 

^ Tr, Tvr <2 r P A ...Business Administration 

Charles Lee Benton, Jr., M.b., c.r.A 

, Tvyr Q Chemistry 

Aurelius Franklin Chapman, M.b 

. ^ Modern Languages 

Albert Neil Cole, A.B 

.„ CI Horticulture 

Julian Coburn Crane, B.b " 

,/f c Poultry Husbandry 

Thomas Grover Culton, M.b 

,_ c. Entomology 

Carl Kester Dorsey, M.b . 

,- c? Chemistry 

Felix Frederick Ehrich, M.b 

. T5 Zoology 

Michael John Fillippi, A.B ^^ . ^ 

, , c Poultry Husbandry 

C.\RL Frischknecht, M.b 

17 



*0n leave. 



16 



John Church Mullin, B.S., M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 

Administration. 
John George Mutziger, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Ralph Duane Myers, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

Homer Edward Newell, Jr., A.M.T., Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Fay Joseph Norris, Sergeant, Inf., U.S. Army, Instructor in Military 

Science and Tactics. 
James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 
William Harwood Peden, M.S., Instructor in English. 
Paul Rontzahn Poffenberger, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics 
Edward Wilkins Reeve, Ph.D., Instructor in Organic Chemistry. 
James Henry Reid, M.A., Instructor in Marketing. 
Robert Charles Rigal, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Durant Waite Robertson, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 
Howard Rovelstad, A.M., B.S.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 
Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Orlando De Leone Scoppettone, A.B., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Aaron Wiley Sherwood, M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Robert Vernon Shirley, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics and Business 

Statistics. 
Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 
Howard Burton Shipley, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Carl B. Smith, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 
Henry Hunter Smith, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
Kathleen Marie Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 
Paul Edward Smith, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Marvin Luther Speck, Ph.D., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 
Howard Livingston Stier, Ph.D., Instructor in Horticulture. 
Lynn LeRoy Swearingen, M.A., Instructor in English. 
William Howard Taft, III, B.A., Instructor in English. 
Kathryn Marie Terhune, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for 

Women. 
Wayne Louis Tyler, M.A., Instructor in English. 
George James Uhrinak, Sergeant, Inf., U.S. Army, Instructor in Military 

Science and Tactics. 
William Jacob Van Stockum, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Evelyn Iverson Vernon,* M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
George Edward Walther, A.B., Instructor in Political Science. 
John Cook Ward, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Floyd Warner, Instructor in Physical Education for Men. 
Virginia Lee Watts, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 
Donald Chester Weeks, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 
Mark Wheeler Westgate, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Gladys Anna Wiggin, M.A., Instructor in Education. 
Milton Joel Wiksell, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Helen Barkley Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Albert Westle Woods, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 
LEI.AND Griffith AVorthington, M.A., Instructor in History. 



*0n leave. 



ASSISTANTS 

vK Graham Banta, B.A., Assistant in Modern Languages. 
^DA Missouri Beall, A.B., Assistant in English. 
DIETER Cunz, Ph.D., Assistant in Modern Languages. 
JAMES ROBERT DoUGLAS, M.S., Assistant in Physical Education for Men. 
Emmert Parker Dupler, A.B., Assistant in Speech. 
GEORGE William Eastment, Assistant in Bacteriology. 
JESSE TURNER FONTAINE, JR., B.A., Assistant in Psychology Research. 
Mildred Coe Gavin, B.Mus., Assistant in Music. 
Donald Cummins Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
CHESTER Wood Hitz, B.S., Assistant in Pomology. 
C\RL William Kelley, B.S., Assistant in Agronomy. 
Vernon Edward Krahl, M.S., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 
Harry Andrew Miller, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry Research. 
Nathan Grier Parke, III, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Patricia Willingham Stier, B.S., Assistant in Botany Laboratory. 
JOHN SHERMAN THATCHER, A.B., Assistant in Psychology Research. 
James Kendall Thornton, B.S., Assistant in Physics (Baltimore). 
S. Herman Todd, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Frances Evelyn Tuttle, B.S., Assistant in Institution Management. 
Walter Robert Volckhausen, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Thomas Charles Gordon Wagner, B.S., Assistant in Mathematics. 
Robert Newton Woodworth, A.M., Assistant in Sociology. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Harry Davis Anspon, B.S Chemistry 

Ross ELWOOD Backenstoss, Jr., M.A Modern Languages 

William Howard Beamer, B.S Chemistry 

Charles Lee Benton, Jr., M.S., C.P.A - Business Administration 

Aurelius Franklin Chapman, M.S Chemistry 

Albert Neil Cole, A.B Modern Languages 

T ^ i-.« . ^T,:. 15 Q Horticulture 

Julian Coburn Crane, B.b 

Thomas Grover Culton, M.S Po^^^ry Husbandry 

Carl KESTER DORSEY, M.S - Entomology 

Felix Frederick Ehrich, M.S Chemistry 

Michael John Fillippi, A.B ~ Zoology 

Carl FRiscHKNECHT, M.S Poultry Husbandry 

17 



16 



A 

Lex Bailey Golden, M.S Agronomy 

William Holland Griggs, M.A Horticulture 

Samuel Grober, M.S Botany 

Albert Carl Groschke, M.S Poultry Husbandry 

Harold Ernest Hensel, B.S. _ Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Carl William Hess, M.S Poultry Husbandry 

Henry Robert Hushebeck, B.S: - Agronomy 

Robert Edwin Jones, M.S Botany 

xCUSSELL HiRNEST IjEED, JVl.»b. ~.............^.......~... ~ V-/Jl6niistrv 

Raymond Irving Longley, M.S Chemistry 

Robert Eugene Mather, B.S Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Richard Harding McBee, M.S Bacteriology 

Earl Edward Miller, B.S Agricultural Economics 

Oscar Keeling Moore, M.S Poultry Husbandry 

William Anthony Nolte, M.S „ ~ _ Bacteriology 

Norman Gerard Paulhaus, M.S Poultry Husbandry 

Selmer Wilfred Peterson, B.S. Chemistry 

Clifton Elwood Pierce, M.S » - Botany 

Robert Collon Rand, M.A Mathematics 

Mary Elizabeth Rawley, B.S Physical Education 

Max Rubin, M.S _ Poultry Husbandry 

Vladimir Shutak, M.S Horticulture 

Alston Wesley Specht, B.S Physical Education 

Robert Nielson Stewart, B.S • Botany 

David Lee Stoddard, M.S ~ ^ Botany 

Albert Edward Tepper, M.S. Poultry Service 

Richard Carter Tollefson, M.A Chemistry 

Alfred Case Whiton, B.S Chemistry 

Arthur Paul Wiedemer, B.S Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Philip Jerome Wingate, M.S Chemistry 

John Paul Wintermoyer, M.S Agronomy 

Carroll Christian Woodrow, B.S Chemistry 

Edmund Grove Young, B.S Chemistry 

John Ashby Yourtee, B.S Chemistry 

FELLOWS 

Richard Warren Akeley, B.S Agricultural Economics 

Paul Aurile Albert, B.S Fish and Wild Life 

Fred Frank Bartel, B.S Civil Engineering 

NoRBERT Lea Behrendt, A.B „ Education 

18 



OUN HENRY BORUM, B.S - - Chemistry 

vvxscis Miles Bower, M.S .- „ Chemical Engmeermg 

Marriott Warfield Bredekamp, M.S Chemical Engineermg 

n WILLIAM HENRY Brittingham, M.A Genetics 

'^ Lov^ELL THOMAS Crews, M.S Chemistry 

^ T EWis EUGENE Cronin, A.B - - Zoology 

' roRDON FREDERICK DiTTMAR, M.S Chemistry Research 

ROBERT LLOYD ECCLES, B.S Mathematic^ 

LYDuMcMuLLiN Evans, A.B ~ ~ English 

WILLIVM HUMBERT FORM, M.A ~ Sociology 

MiLO Vivian Gibbons, B.S - Mathematics 

LEON GOLDMAN, B.S -.^ Xhemistry 

Margaret Towell Goldsmith, B.S - - Bacteriology 

LESTER Philip Guest, M.A Psychology 

R.^PH CURTIS Hammer, B.S Fish and Wild Life 

Walter Judson Haney, B.S ~ Botany 

PHILIP Classon Harvey, B.S - Bacteriology 

James Grant Hayden, Jr., B.S ^ Chemical Engineering 

Carl Adam Hechmer, Jr., B.S - - Chemistry 

Albert Franklin Herbst, B.S Mathematics 

Robert Isaac Jaffee, M.S Chemical Engineering 

Martin Bernard Kalkstein, M.S ~ Mathematics 

Marg.aret Cobey Kemp, B.S Botany 

'^ Alan Mottar Kershner, M.A - Psychology 

Herman Fink Kraybill, M.S - ~ Fish and Wild Life 

l^ John Joseph Lander, B.S - Chemistry 

Joseph Sidney Lann, B.S ~ Chemistry Research 

Frederick John Linnig, A.B - Chemistry 

William James Lodman, B.S ~ Agricultural Economics 

Frederick Richmond McBrien, M.A Sociology 

John Udell Michaelis, M.A Education 

Martin Hammond Muma, B.S - ~ - - Entomology 

John Edward Nutting, M.A - - - Education 

Lloyd Elwin Parks, M.S - - Fish and Wild Life 

Arthur Peregoff, B.S Business Administration 

James Lloyd Poland, M.S. Zoology 

William Huntley Power, M.S Chemistry 

William Nelson Rairigh, M.A ~ Political Science 

Roger William Snyder, B.S _ Bacteriology 

Norman Gilbert Sprague, B.S Fish and Wild Life 

Francis C. Stark, Jr., B.S ~ Horticulture 

Lois Teal, B.S - - Zoology 

.\RTHUR Woodward Warner, Jr., B.A Physics 

Conrad Sch atte Yocum, B.S Botany 



19 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



Carl W. E. Hintz, A.B., A.M.L.S University Librar 



arian 



COLLEGE PARK 



George W. Fogg, M.A Reference and Loan Librarian 

Julia H. Carhart, A.B., B.S.L.S.... Assistant Reference and Loan Librarian 

Alma Hook, B.S., B.S.L.S. Head Cataloguer 

Louise W. Getchell, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Cataloguer 

Ruth V. Hewlett, A.B., A.M.L.S Assistant Cataloguer 

Elizabeth A. Gardner, A.M., B.S.L.S General Service Assistant 

Howard Rovelstad, A.M., B.S.L.S Order Librarian 

Kate White :. Assistant 

BALTIMORE 

Dental — Pharmacy Library 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S. Librarian 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott Assistant Librarian 

Ann Lemen Clark Cataloguer 

^ Assistant Cataloguer 



THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, 
Dean Robinson, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Dean Steinberg, Dean 
Stamp, Dean Broughton, Dean Stevens, Dean Eppley, Dean Benjamin, 
Dr. Cotterman, Colonel Wysor, Dr. Huff, Miss Preinkert, Miss Kellar, 
Dr. Zucker, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. White, Dr. Welsh, Dr. Wylie, Dr. Corbett, 
Mr. Casbarian, Dr. Long. 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY, STANDARDS, AND COORDINATION 

Dr. Zucker, Chairman; Dr. DeVault, Dr. Warfel, Dr. Haring, Dr. Martin, 
Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Truitt, Miss McNaughton, Dr. Bamford, Dr. Younger, 
Dr. Dorsey, Dr. Hartung, Dr. Wylie, Professor Strahorn, Dr. Jull. 

STUDENT LIFE AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. White, Chairman; Professor Eppley, Colonel Wysor, Dr. Faber, Pro- 
fessor Mackert, Professor Eichlin, Dr. Harman, Miss Stamp, Mr. 
Pollock, Lieutenant Williams, Miss Ide, Miss Johnson, Miss Drew, 
Professor Allen, Dr. Phillips, Dr. Joslyn, Dr. James, Dr. Lancaster, 
Professor Kramer, Miss Preinkert, Dr. Griffith, Mr. Humelsine. 



Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B., Certificate in Library Science. 



.Librarian 



Medical Library 



Ruth Lee Briscoe 

Julia E. Wilson, B.S.. 



.Librarian 
..Assistant 



*To be filled later. 



20 



?>!-; 



THE LIBRARIES 

Dr. Hale, Chairman; Professor Hintz, Dr. Long, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Younger, 
Dr. Howard, Dr. Haring, Dr. Bamford, IMrs. Welsh, Dr. Anderson, 
Dr. Spencer, Professor Strahorn. 

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Dr. Gewehr, Chairman; Dr. White, Professor Quigley, Miss Lee, Professor 
Eppley, Dr. Haring, Dr. Dozer. 

ADMISSION, GUIDANCE, AND ADJUSTMENT 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Dr. White, Dr. Phillips, Professor Pyle, Professor 
Wedeberg, Dr. Prange, Dr. Hale, Professor Quigley, Dr. Bellows, Dr. 
Gruchy, Miss Stamp, Miss Preinkert, Professor Eppley, Lieutenant 
Williams. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Cotterman, Professor Eichlin, Miss Stamp, 
Professor Eppley, Miss Mount, Mr. Cobey. 

21 



RESEARCH 

Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Amberson, Dr. Uhlenhuth, Dr. James n. 
Drake. Dr. Jenkins, Dr. DeVault, Dr. Jull, Dr. Huff, Dr. Zucker. ' 

EXTENSION AND ADULT EDUCATION 

Dr. Benjamin, Chairman; Miss Kellar, Dr. Dodson, Dr. Crothers Dr 
DeVault, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Steinmeyer, Dr. Ehrensberger, Miss CuVtiss! 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Robinson, Dr. DuMez, Dr. Welsh, Mr Bopst 
Dr. Cory, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Pollock, Dr. Besley, Miss Stamp, Miss 
Mount, Mr. Randall, Dr. Gewehr. 

RESIDENT AND NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Warfel, Miss Ide, Dr. Benjamin, Dr. Younger 
Dr. Stevens, Dr. Jull. ^ ' 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Professor Eppley, Chairman; Dr. Broughton, Dr. Cory, Dr Kemp Dr 
Supplee. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Dr. Hale, Dr. Zucker, Mr. Oswald. 

COORDINATION OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, Dr. Besley, Mr Holmes 
Dr. Kemp, Mr. Shaw, Dr. Cory, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Cotterman Dr' 
Mahoney, Dr. Jull, Dr. Corbett, Dr. Leinbach, Dr. Turk. 

GENERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Zucker, Dr. Hale, Dr. Gewehr, Dr Symons 
Professor Eppley, Dr. Long, Dr. Benjamin, Dr. White, Mr. Snyder,' 
Dr. Steinmeyer. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

Roger Bailey Corbett, Ph.D > ^^ Director 

/Agricultural Economics: 

Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D Professor, Agricultural Economics 

ARTHUR Bryan Hamilton, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
William Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
Arthur Montraville Ahalt, M.S., 

Assistant Professor, Agricultural Education 

ROGER Franklin Burdette, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Paul Routzahn Poffenberger, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Carl B. Smith, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Lawrence Everett Cron, M.S Assistant, Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering: 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LLB., 

Professor, Agricultural Engineering, State Drainage Engineer 
George John Burkhardt, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 
Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy: 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D Professor, Agronomy 

Russell Grove Rothgeb, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Breeding 

Royle Price Thomas, Ph.D .Professor, Soils 

Howard Barr Win ant, M.S Assistant Professor, Soils 

George Francis Madigan, Ph.D „ Assistant Professor, Soils 

Albert Westle Woods, B.S — Instructor, Agronomy 

Stanley Phillips Stabler, B.S.. Assistant, Agronomy 

Albert White, B.S ~ Assistant, Agronomy 

Alfred Damon Hoadley, M.S ~.. Assistant, Agronomy 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry : 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D „ Professor, Animal Husbandry 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D _ Professor, Animal Husbandry 

Kenneth LeRoy Turk, Ph.D._ „ Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Charles Walter England, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.S Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Henry Butler, B.S Assistant Dairy Inspector 

Animal Pathology : 
Mark Frederick Welsh, B.S., D.V.M., 

Professor, Veterinary Medicine, State Veterinarian 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D — Professor, Pathology 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Leo Joseph Poelma, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Morton Moses Rabstein, V.M.D... Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science 



22 



23 



Bacteriology : 

LA.WRENCE Henry James, Ph.D Professor, Bacteriology 

Howard Lynn Bodily, Ph.D Instructor, Bacteriology 

George • William Eastment ;. Assistant, Bacteriology 

Botany, Plant Physiology and Pathology : 
Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., 

. Professor, Botany and Plant Physiology 

John Bitting Smith Norton, D.Sc Professor, Plant Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D Professor, Botany 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., 

Professor, Plant Pathology, State Pathologist 

Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Herman Gerard DuBuy, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Mark Winton Woods, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Harold George Shirk, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Harold Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Carroll Eastburn Cox, M.S. Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Wilbur D wight McClellan, B.S Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Entomology : 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D Professor, Entomology, State Entomologist 

Harold Sloan McConnell, M.S Associate Professor, Entomology 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

Castillo Graham, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S Assistant Professor, Apiculture 

Horticulture: 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D Professor, Olericulture 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D Professor, Pomology 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D Professor, Canning Crops 

Francis Busy Lincoln, Ph.D Associate Professor, Plant Propagation 

Irvin Charles Haut, Ph.D Associate Professor, Pomology 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S Associate Professor, Canning Crops 

Jack Amatt, B.S - Instructor, Horticulture 

Howard Livingstown Stier, Ph.D _ „ ...Instructor, Horticulture 

Chester Wood Hitz, M.S _ Assistant, Horticulture 

Herman Todd, B.S - Assistant, Horticulture 

Pqultry : 

Morley Allan Jull, Ph.D - Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Theodore Carroll Byerly, Ph.D _ Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

George DeWitt Quigley, B.S Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D Associate Professor, Nutrition 

James Martin Gwin, B.S., 

Associate Professor, Poultry Production and Marketing 
Charles Simpson Williams, B.S Instructor, Poultry Husbandry 

Seed Inspection: 

Forrest Shepperson Holmes, M.S Seed Inspector 

Ellen Phelps Emack Seed Analyst 

Olive Marian Kelk _ _ Seed Analyst 

24 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
College Park 

THOMAS BADDELEY Symons, M.S., D.Agr.. Dean, College of Agriculture, 

Director. 

Edward Ingram Oswald, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director. 

VENiA MERiE Kellar, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director. ^ ^ ^' 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Entomology, State Ento- 
mologist, Assistant Director. 

Addison Hogan Snyder. B.S., Professor, Editor. 

Paul Edwin Nystrom, M.S., Associate Professor, County Agent Leader. 

Edward Garfield Jenkins, Associate Professor, Boys' Club Leader. 

Oorothy Emerson, Associate Professor, Girls' Club Leader. 

FLORENCE Harriett Mason, B.S.. Associate Professor, Extension Home 
Furnishing, District Agent. 

Kathfrine Grace Connolly, Administrative Assistant. 

OMER PvAYMOND Carrington, B.A., Assistant Professor, Illustrator. 

SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Apiculture. 
Arthur Montraville Aiialt, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Agricul- 
tural Education. . , 
Walter Raymond Ballard. B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Vegetable 

and Landscape Gardening. „ u j 

Howard Clinton Barker, B.S., Professor, Extension Dairy Husbandry. 
Walter Crothers Beaven, Ph.B., Assistant Professor, Extension Market- 

WiLLUM Elbert Bickley, Jr., Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Entomology. 
Herbert Roderick Bird, Pli.D., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry 

Nutrition. _ . . • i,. _„i 

Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B.. LL.B., Professor, Extension Agricultural 

Engineering, State Drainage Engineer. 
John Alfred Conover, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Dairy Hus- 
bandry. , r.x i. -c 4. 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Entomology, State Ento- 

mologist. . o -1 T7< • 

JOHN Cotton, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Soil Erosion 
Carroll Eastburn Cox, M.S., Instructor, Extensio:. Plant Pathology 
SAMUEL Henry DeVault. Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agricultural Eco- 

LiNn^TsEYMOUR DODSON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Extension Sociology. 
Lawrence Elden Downey, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing 
Mylo Snavely Downey, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Boys Club 

Work 
Castillo Graham, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension Entomology. 
James Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Egg Marketing. 
William Edg.ar Harrison, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 
Jessie Delcina Hinton. M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Home Man- 

agement. 

25 



Herman Aull Hunter, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Canning Crops. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology, State 
Pathologist. 

Morley Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Albin Owings Kuhn, M.S., Assistant, Extension Agronomy. 

Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Extension Rural 
Electrification. 

George Shealy Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Ento- 
mology. 

John Winfield Magruder,* B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Wilbur Dwight McClellan, B.S., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Nutrition. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Charles Percival Merrick, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Drainage 
Engineering. 

James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Instructor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Calvin Platt Poppell, Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Walter Benjamin Posey, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Tobacco. 

Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Assistant Professor, Extension Music. 

Wade Hampton Rice, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Franklin Kirk Sampson, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Pomology. 

Stewart Baker Shaw, B.S., Professor, Extension Marketing, Chief State 
Department of Markets. 

Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Clothing. 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor, Extension 
Landscape Gardening. 

Carl B. Smith, M.S., Instructor, Extension Agricultural Economics. 

Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor, Extension Landscape Garden- 
ing. 

Joseph McNaughton Vial, B.S., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Albert Frank Vierheller, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Horti- 
culture. 

RuFUS Henry Vincent, B.S., Instructor, Extension Entomology. 

Earnest Artman Walker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension Plant 
Pathology. 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Canning Crops. 

Forrest Brookes Whittington, M.S., Instructor, Extension Entomology. 

Charles Simpson Wiluams, B.S., Instructor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

Callender Fayssoux Winslow, A.B., M.F., Assistant Professor, Extension 
Forestry. 

Leland Griffith Worthington, B.S., Instructor, Extension General Edu- 
cation. 



COUNTY AGENTS 

(Field) 

Name Headquarters 

County ^^^^^ . „ . 

• RALPH frank Mchenry, B.S., Associate Professor, 
Allegany ^^ Cumberland 

Anne Arundel Stanley Everett Day, B.S., Assistant ^^^^^^^^^^^^p^^.; 

o uimnre HORACE BENNETT DERRICK, B.S., Associate Professor, 

BaltimorB Towson 

r„,„prt —JOHN BOOME MORSELL, B.S., Assistant Professor, 
Calvert. " Prince Frederick 

r rniiTie GEORGE WATSON Clendaniel, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Caroline " Denton 

Carroll Landon Crawford Burns. B.S., Associate P^^^^^^J;^^^ 

(j^^il JAMES ZENUS MILLER, B.S., Assistant Professor Elkton 

Charts . I... Paul Dennis Brown, B.S., Associate Professor La Plata 

nnrchester William Russell McKnight, B.S., Associate Professor 

Uorcnesier. Cambridge 

Frederick. Henry Reese Shoemaker, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor, 

treaericK. Frederick 

g^rrett JOHN Hurley Carter, B.S., Assistant Professor Oakland 

Harford Henry Morrison Carroll, B.S., Associate Professw^, ^_^ 

Howard Warren Graham Myers, B.S., Assistant Prof^ssor^ ^_^^ 

K-™t James Dunham McVean, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Kent -J Chestertown 

Montgomery Otto Watson Anderson, M.S., Associate P'^^^^^^^JJj^^^.j,^ 

Prince Georges Percy Ellsworth Clark, B.S., Assistant Professor 
rnnce ueorges Upper Marlboro 

Queen Annes Mark Kermit Miller, B.S., Assistant P"""^^"^^^;^^^,,^ 

Sh Marvs JOSEPH JuLius JOHNSON, Assistant Professor, 

ij u 1 X ai J. o Leonardtown 

Somerset .Clarence Zeigler Keller, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Princess Anne 

Talbot RUDOLPH Stocksdale Brown, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Easton 

Washington MiLTON DONALDSON MOORE, M.S., Associate Professor, 

^ Hagerstown 

AVicomico JAMES PAUL BROWN, B.S., Assistant Professor Salisbury 

Worcester ..Robert Thornton Grant, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Snow Hill 

27 



*On leave. 



26 



€ 



Assistant County Agents 
Allegany and 

Washington Harry Wesley Beggs, B.S., Instructor Cumberland 

Baltimore. John Wheeler Ensor, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Harford „ Walter Sherard Wilson, B.S., Instructor , Bel Air 

Kent Stanley Burr Sutton, Instructor „ Chesteitown 

Montgomery Rufus Backer King, A.B., Instructor Rockville 

Carroll and 
Frederick Chester Marvin Cissell, B.A., Instructor Frederick 

Caroline, 

Dorchester 

and Talbot ^Charles Fuller, Instructor Easton 

Queen Annes James Walter Eby, B.S., Instructor Centreville 



Southern 

Maryland _. 

Eastern Shore. 



Local Agents — Negro Work 

.Martin Green Bailey, B.S., Instructor Seat Pleasant 

.Louis Henderson Martin, Instructor Princess Anne 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

(Field) 

County Name Headquarten 

Allegany Maude Alberta Bean, Associate Professor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel Anna Trentham, B.S., Associate Professor Towson 

Baltimore Frances E. Beegle, B.S., Assistant Professor Annapolis 

Calvert Angela Mae Feiser, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Prince Frederick 

Caroline Bessie Marguerite Spafford, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Denton 

Carroll Adeline Mildred Hoffman, M.A., Assistant Professor, 

Westminster 

Cecil Helen Irene Smith, B.A., Associate Professor Elkton 

Charles Mary Graham, Assistant Professor La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie Estella Brooks, A.B., Associate Professor, 

Cambridge 

Frederick Florence Elizabeth Williams, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Frederick 

Garrett Mildred Eva Barton, B.S., Associate Professor Oakland 

Harford Catharine Maurice, B.S., Associate Professor Bel Air 

Howard Kathryn Elizabeth Newton, M.S., Associate Professor, 

Ellicott City 

Kent Helen Nickerson Schellinger, Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 
Montgomery. Edythe Margaret Turner, Associate Professor Rockville 



rpnr^es Ethel Mary Regan, Associate Professor Hyattsville 

P^^^^' Annes HELEN MARIE Harner, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Queen Annes j^^ Centreville 

,,,,^s ...ETHEL joy, A.B., Assistant Professor Leonardtown 

^t-^^^'f HILDA TOPFER, B.S., Assistant Professor Princess Anne 

^^r? MARGARET SMITH, B.S., Associate Professor „ Easton 

Tal^f -r;;"" ard^th Ellen martin, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Washington ...i^KUAin x. Hagerstown 

Esther Weightman Bower, M.S., Assistant Professor, 
Wicomico t^smt^K Salisbury 

.Vorcester -Lucy Jane Walter, Associate Professor Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

,^^,g,ny -..-Thelma RYAN, Instructor Cumberland 

I Local Home Demonstration Agents (Colored) 

Charles, 
St. Marys, 
I Prince Georges 

: and Montgom- ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ instructor Seat Pleasant 

: S(L^rseLlZI.(MRS.) Justine Nahala Clark, Instructor...Princess Anne 

Assistant Local Home Demonstration Agent (Colored) 

Charles, 
St. Marys, 
Prince Georges 

ery ^^!"!1""!1ethel Laurence Branch, B.S., Instructor...Seat Pleasant 

LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE AND DEPARTMENT 

OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 
(College Park) 

Mark Frederick Welsh, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Science, 

State Veterinarian. j, tt i. • „ o«i 

JAMES W. Hughes, D.V.M.. LL.B., Associate Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, Associate State Veterinarian. tv,„i«n.,r 
.Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Animal Pathology, 

in Charge of College Park Laboratory. 
Leo Joseph Poelma, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Fath- 

William^'rush CRAWFORD, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary 

HauolTmoon DeVolt, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 



28 



29 



Clyde LoRayne Everson, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci. 
ence, in Charge of Baltimore Laboratory. 

Charles Robert Davis, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

IRVIN M. MouLTHROP, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, in 

Charge of Salisbury Laboratory. 
George Edwin Daniel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Parasitol 

ogy. 
Charles Henry Cunningham, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Vet- 
erinary Science, in Charge of Centreville Laboratory. 
Melvin Moses Rabstein, V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, 

U. S. Cooperative Agent. 
James W. Crowl, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Centreville. 
H. B. Wood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, Hagers- 

town. 
Clarence J. Gibbs, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Upper Marlboro. 
J. Walter Hastings, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Cambridge. 
J. J. Jones, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, LaPlata. 
Chas. R. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Injector, 

Towson. 
Mahlon H. Trout, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Salisbury. 
William B. Coughlin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary 

Inspector, Union Stock Yards. 
H. L. Armstrong, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Bel Air. 
F. H. Benjamin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

North East. 
Chas. B. Breininger, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Easton. 
Ora K. Hoffman, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Hagerstown. 
Owen L. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Baltimore. 
Ed. J. McLaughlin, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Salisbury. 
Chas. A. Turner, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Chestertown. 
Chas. B. Weagley, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 

Middletown. 
Chas. Omer, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, West- 
minster. 

30 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Year 1940-41 

At Baltimore 

PROFESSORS 

MOTION S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Dental Pathology. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

CEORGE M. ANDERSON, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Orthodontics. 

rridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

THOMAS B. AYCOCK, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

CHARLES BAGLEY, JR., M.A., M.D.,Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CHARLES F. BLAKE, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

CLIFFORD^. CHAPMAN, M.S., Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 
ROSS McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
CLYDE A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

ALBERTUS Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. * I. o v 1 

ANNIE Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 

of Nursing. , , , a 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 

Otology. ^ „ ^ J 

David M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany and 

Materia Medica. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Oral Surgery. 
Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the 

School of Pharmacy. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., D.H.L., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 

Ophthalmology. 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gynecology. 

Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Clinical Prosthetic 

Dentistry. 
Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 

Therapeutics. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito- Urinary Surgery. 

31 



Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
Hon. Henry D. Harlan AMTTRTTr>i~. V, 

of Law. ' ' ^^■' ^^^" Ementus of the School 

7^ri^- "^^^U'^^' Ph.D.. Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
ROGER Howell. Ph.D., LL.B., Professor of Law, Dean of the ScTool n"f r 
J. Mason Hundley Jr MA M n p,.^*.. * ^ , "°°' °^ W 

FFT,r>.n^ tr ti '*'"•' ^"•■*-' ^•^•> Professor of Gynecology. 

Eluott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgerv 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Operative DentSy 

F. L. JENNINGS, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery "^''^'^^^^• 
C. LORING Joslin, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

E ■ FBATrKPrf ^"p,: ^-J?-' ''"'"'="' P^^^^^^°^ °f Ophthalmology. 

t^strv> I^ ' n""- ''■^■''■' ''"''''''' ^'"^"t"^ 0' Chemistry (De„ 
tistry), Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. * "" 

JOHN C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

™oat. '^'"'^^' ''■''■' ''•''^'•' ^''''''''" '' ^'^^^«««' °f the Nose and 

"'TenLfy!''"'"''' ''■''•'•' ^■''■''■^■' '''°''''''- "^ ^1'"'-' ^P^^tive 
ROBERT^. MITCHELL, Phar.D., M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 

THEODORE H. MORRISON, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 
Alexander H. Paterson*, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Crown and Brid« 

and Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, Ph.D., J.D., LL.M., Professor of Law 
Russell R. Reno, A.B., LL.B., LL.M., Professor of Law 
COMPTON Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Dermatology 
J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Dental Anatomy and Oper- 

ative Technics, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
J. M H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics, Dean 

Emeritus of the School of Medicine. 
Edwin G. W. Ruge, B.A., LL.B., Professor of Law 

Abram S. Samuels, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology 

Thomas P. Sprunt, A.B., M.D., Professor of ciinical Medicine 

John S. Strahorn, Jr, A.B., LL.B., S.J.D.. J.S.D., Professor of Law (Law). 
Lecturer in Jurisprudence (Dentistry) 

W. H. TOULSON, A.B., M.Sc., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgeiv 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy 

ALLEN FiSKE VosHELL, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology 



*Deceased. 



32 



Huntington Williams, M.D., D.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Health. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

J Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., B.S., Sc.D., Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy. 
H Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry, Acting Dean of 

the School of Medicine. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Nose 

and Throat and Otology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Physician in 

Charge of Medical Care of the Students. 
C. JELLEFF Carr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Richard G. Coblentz, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurological 

Surgery. 
B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Associate Professor of Economics and 

Pharmaceutical Law. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery, Associate in 

Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
Frank H. J. Figge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Moses Gellman, B.3., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
T. Campbell Goodwin, M.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
Thomas C. Grubb, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 
0. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Histology. 
Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Kenneth D. Legge, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Wm. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Instructor 

in Pathology. -j 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence, Asso- 
ciate in Pathology. 
N. Clyde Marvel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
James G. McAlpine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 
Sydney R. Miller, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Emil Novak, A.B., M.D., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
^' J. PE!5SAGN0, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

33 



H. R. Peters, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Traumatic Sur- 
gery (Medicine), Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry). 

A. W. RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

D. Conrad Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery (Medicine), 
Instructor in Oncology (Dentistry). 

Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 
Chemistry. 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Helen E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marvin J. Andrews, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy. 

H. F. BONGARDT, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

J. Edmund Bradley, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

H. M. BUBERT, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Oral Pathology. 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

Gaylord B. Estabrook, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

William E. Evans, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Gardner H. Foley, A.M., Assistant Professor of English and Public Speak- 
ing. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

William E. Hahn, M.S., D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Hugh T. Hicks, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Periodontia. 

Orville C. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and Bridge. 

Frederick W. Invernizzi, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

George C. Karn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Oral Roentgenology. 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry. 

John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 



T^ T TTT7 A B M.D., Assistant Professor of Histology. 
Son W Mcci D.D.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Embryology and 

^i^MrfLN M D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
GEOEGE MCLEAN M. ^^^_^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ Pathology. 

TcZi^n Moi, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Sl MORRISON. k.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
wi M MURDOCK, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
„ W NEWELL, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
M Lx!nder Novey, A.B., M.D.. Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, 
wi™ L OGGESEN. b.D.S., Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge. 
PHRERT H ■ OSTER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
fKTHmC. PARSONS, A.M., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 
Sjamin PUSHKIN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology 
rSoMAS PYLES, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
T a M REESE, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

r aTr.^pi A R M D Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
?;S% sS'b^ in^ht.frS..'ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Botany 

and Pharmacognosy. 
FREDERICK B. SMITH, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
e" Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
tSe A STRAUSS, JR., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
A aSenSussman, A.B., D.D.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
VESTA L Swartz, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
GUY P THOMPSON, A.M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
JOHN H TRABAND, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. ^ _ . , 

E G VANDEN BOSCHE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 

C GA^NErWARNER, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
WILLIAM H. F. WARTHEN, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Hygiene and 

Public Speaking. , » t /n^^fio+i-ir'* 

J.HERBERT WiLKERSON, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy (Dentistry), 

Assistant in Surgery (Medicine) .- 
R G WiLLSE, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. , ,^ ,. . 

THOMAS C. WOLFF, Litt.B., M.D., CM., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
ROBERT B. WRIGHT, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

LECTURERS 

W. N. BISFHAM, Col., M.C., U.S.A. (Retired), Lecturer in Medicine. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Pleading. 

James T. Carter, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Contracts. 

Walter L. Clark, LL.B., Lecturer on Evidence. 

Hon. Edwin T. Dickerson, A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Contracts. 

Hon. Eli Frank, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. . . „ ,^ , 

Jonas Friedenwald, M.A., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 

35 



34 



H. R. Peters, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Traumatic Sur. 

gery (Medicine), Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry). 
A. W. Richeson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
D. Conrad Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery (Medicine), 

Instructor in Oncology (Dentistry). 
Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 
Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Helen E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marvin J. Andrews, Ph.C, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

J. Edmund Bradley, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Oral Pathology. 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

Gaylord B. Estabrook, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

William E. Evans, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

A. H. FiNKELSTEiN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Gardner H. Foley, A.M., Assistant Professor of English and Public Speak- 
ing. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

William E. Hahn, M.S., D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Hugh T. Hicks, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Periodontia. 

Orville C. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and Bridge. 

Frederick W. Invernizzi, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

George C. Karn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Oral Roentgenology. 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry. 

John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 



A 13 Tvrn A<;«^i^tant Professor of Histology. 

»r.To" ^rb1>t S;.a*« Professor Of C„™ »d Brid^. 

WALTER 1.. " Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

ROBERT H^ OOT Ph.D AS ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^ Languages. 

ARTHUR C. P^SONS, A.ivi , p^ofessor of Neurology. 

Edgar B. Starkey, ^n-^- ^ Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
: GEORGE A. STRAUSS, JR. M J) ^ss^st^nt P o ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ 

i A Allen Sussman, A.B., D.D.b., m.u., as^ ^ Nurses 

William H. F. Warthen, A.B., M.D., Assistanx; r 

, „r^ wTSo., M.D, As.i...n. profess., o, An.U.™, (Den«.«), 

Assistant in Surgery (Medicine). 

« R. G. WiixsK, M.D. Assistant P-^^-^ ^nTSssor of Medicine. 
.A THOMAS C. WOLFF, Litt.B., M.D., C.M., Assisiani p„.^-,o™ 

" ROBERT B. WRIGHT, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
GEORGE H. YEAGER, B.S.. M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

LECTURERS 

^1 i>i /- TT Q A r Retired) Lecturer in Medicine. 
W. N. BisPHAM, Col., M.C., U.S.A (Ketirea;, ^ 

J. WALLACE BRYAN, Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer °« /^f J"'^,^^^^^ 
James T. Caeter, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Contracts. 

WALTER L. CLARK, LL.B., ^ef «7{; f ^^er on Contracts. 
Hon. Edwin T. Dickerson, A.M., LL.B., lecturer on 
Hon. Eli Frank, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

E. B. FREEMAN, B.S., M.D., Lec^-^i^^fr^^^^^ Pathology. 

Jonas Friedenwald, M.A., M.U., L.ecturer m v^f 

35 



34 



U; 



Charles R. Goldsborough M A m n t^ ^ • ,. 
George Gump ABIT r t V " ' Lecturer m Medicine. 

GERALD MONSMAN. Ab" Hf ^n ." "" '"'"'■""•=^- 

WiLUAM M. Nbvins Ph n T ■' ; ' ^"Pe'-^'sor of Legal Aid Work 
HON. Emory H nSes a B r a''' '"t E^^'^'''^'^^- 

Lecturer on Z^L^" ^•^^ " J--P™dence. B.C.L., M.A., Ll, 

G. R^^o^^v SAPP..CXO., LL.B., Lecturer on Practice, Director of Praet, 
R. DORSEV WATKXKS, Ph.D.. LL.B., Lecturer on Torts and Mortgages. 

ASSOCIATES 

JOHN R. AbeRCROMBIE. A B M n Aco^^- + • T^ 

Surgery ' ''•''•' ^'^°^'^*« '" ^ross Anatomy, Instructor 

Ross RwiES, M.D., M.P.H., Associate in Hygiene and Public U uu 

Samuel S Guck M da' '1 ^.^^""^^^ i" Medicine. 
ALBERT p' rn^nf' ^•^•' ^^sociate in Pediatrics. 

h^l; m.%'i^:'^-s-'£tt ^" r*'"'"^- 

Henry P. Grafp A R iw n k ' ^''""^^e m Dermatology. 

L. P Gundr?^T'r M ,f ;' ^''""''^^ in Ophthalmology 
. r. ^UNDKY. A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

JOHN ?• Hx^iTsVif -f •^•'. ^^^°*=^^*^ ^" «^^*«*^-- 
T^„ i* ;tiiBBiTTS, M.D., Associate in Gynecoloo^ 

w r». ^^^"^LL, A.B., M.D., Associate in Patholoe-v 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

36 



BENJAMIN S. Rich, A.B., M.D., Associate in Otology. 

T 0. Ridgley, M.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Associate in Medicine, Instructor in Pathol- 
ogy. 

joHxN E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics, Assistant in Path- 
ology, Acting Superintendent of Hospital. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Edw. p. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

William J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

E. H. TONOLLA, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Sc.D., Associate in Surgery and Orthopaedic 
^ Surgery. 

R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
* Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 



I 



INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, Assistant in Path- 
ology. 

A. Russell Anderson, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 
Bernhard Badt, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Carl E. Bailey, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

Jose R. Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 

Thomas S. Bowyer, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Simon H. Brager, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Otto C. Brantigan, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy, Assistant in 

Surgery. 
Douglas A. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Samuel H. Bryant, A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Diagnosis. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Thomas A. Christensen, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Albert T. Clewlow, D.D.S., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Morris E. Coberth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery. 
Murray M. Copeland, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

B. Matthew Debuskey, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. Allen Deckert, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, Assistant in 

Surgery and Obstetrics. 
Amelia C. DeDominicis, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Botany. 
S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

37 



Stanley H. Dosh, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Ernest S. Edlow, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. I 

Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

Houston Everett, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

William L. Fearing, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Jerome Fineman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Phiup D. Flynn, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Irving Freeman, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Robert W. Garis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Georgiana S. Gittinger, M.A., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 

Harold Golton, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Instructor in Diagnosis. 

D. James Greiner, B S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Karl F. Grempler, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Raymond F. Helfrich, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Samuel T. Helms, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
W. Grafton Hersperger, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Lillie R. Hoke, R.N., Instructor in Nursing. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology- 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, Assistant in Pathology. 

Frank Hurst, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

John M. Hyson, D.D.S., Instructor in Embryology and Histology. 

B. Wallace Inman, D.D.S., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Conrad L. Inman, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Instructor in Anesthesia. 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

William R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Hammond L. Johnston, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

Edward S. Kallins, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Vernon D. Kaufman, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Oral Surgery. 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
WiLUAM Kress, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 
Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Richard C. Leonard, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Instructor in Oral Hygiene and 

Preventive Dentistry. 
Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology.' 
Ernest Levi, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
H. Edmund Levin, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Medicine. 
Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

H. Berton McCauley, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Roentgenology. 
Ivan E. McDougle, Ph.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

38 



, o n D <^ Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Dentistry, 
p,,. MILLER D^D.SI^^^^^^^^^^ Bacteriology and Pathology. 

'^" T^m^ni: Tr., B.S., M.D., instructor in Medicine. 

SS MUSSER, A.B., M.S., instructor in Pharmacology. 
fw nelson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery ^ 

1 F PmFFER. Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Bactenology. 
its C PLAGGE, Ph.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy. 

u PnKORNEY M D., Instructor in Histology. 
™ rP^s i) D.S instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

r7s. POOH. B.S., D.D.S.. ^r^^^-<^X^:J^^^^f ''''''■ 
^-•^'^ "• rR;r^H' rr^^sl^^o'taSr operative Dentislry. 
rrE^^-HErriEK^ A.B.. M.D.. instructor in General Anesthes.a. 
SrA. H-EH. A.B.. M.D instructor in Med-ne. 

HAKRV M. ROBtNSON, M.D. Instructor -O-J/jff dermatology. Assist- 
lURRY M. ROBINSON, JR., B.S., M.D., Instructor 

PB^K J:^r"d.S., instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
FRANCIS A. SAUER. D.D.S.. Instructor in I^'^?""^!' „ , , .5^ 
NATHAN B. SCHEBR, D.D.S., Instructor mClm.calPedodontia. 
RICHARD T. SHACKELFORD. A.B., M.D., I^^^ructor m S^^. 

DAKiE. E. SHEH... ^f\'^^'^£-Z^T£Z'^^^^ and 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., insuuctui vz 

Gross Anatomy. . ^r i- :„^ 

M. S. SHILING. A.B.. M.D., ScD.. Instructor - f ^^--^^^^^^ 
AiBERT J. SHOCHAT, B.S.. M.D.. Instructor m Gastro-Enterology. 
SOL SMITH. A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicme. 

KAKL J. STEXNMt;EU.K, A.B.. ^-D-. In^tr-tor - Sur^^^^^ orthodontics. 
D. Robert Swinehart, B.A.. D.U.b.. instructor 
David T^nnee, M.D.. Instructor in Medicine. .^^tomv 

JAMES U. THOMPSON, A.B.. M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy. 
James E. P. Toman. Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
I. RiDGEWAY TRIMBLE, M.D., Instructor m Surgery. 
IIYRON G. TULL. A.B.. M.D.. Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

PHILIP S. WAGNER. M.D l-%^'^\Zt^^i;^Tvi.ysic.l Diagnosis Prin- 
W. KENNEDY Waller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in my 

L. E:;Arw™tS.D.S., instructor in Clinical Prophetic Dentistry. 
B. Sargent Wells. D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
Hugh G. Whitehead, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

89 



ASSISTANTS 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 

Nurses, Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 
J. Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Benjamin Frank Allen, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Leon Ashman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
John L. Atkins, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Charles E. Balfour, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Richard H. Barry, B.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
Nathaniel M. Beck, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Gastro-Enter- 

ology. 
Frank A. Bellman. B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Joseph M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Obstetrics. 
Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
A. V. Buchness, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Paul E. Carliner, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

YOLANDE Chaney, R.N., Supervisor of Out-Patients' Department. 
Robert F; Chenowith, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 
Edward F. Cotter, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Marie Olga Cox, R.N., Assistant in First Aid, Supervisor of Accident and 

Admission Department. 
John M. Cross, M.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Dwight M. Currie, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 
Francis G. Dickey, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Theodore T. Dittrich, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Angela Dooley, R.N., Assistant in Nursing Private Patients, Supervisor 

of Private Halls. 
Joseph U. Dorsch, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Alexander M. Duff, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 
Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Carroll P. Foster, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Herbert M. Foster, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Marguerite Foster, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor of 

Surgical Wards. 
Walter C. Gakenheimer, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Shirley M. Glickman, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Economics. 
George Govatos, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
H. L. Granoff, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 



, „ uM GKEENFELD, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
V . u PRENZER M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Clinical Department. 

p TTealy M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBEKT F. HEALY, , Assistant in Dermatology. 

visor of Central Supply Room. 
LTv HOPKINS, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
'Roam C. HUDSON, M.D., Assistant in Derxnatology. 
jLsLAV HULLA, M.D., Assistant in Obstetncs. 
, Uham HuEwm, M.D., Assistant in Ped.atncs. 
: loYE E J^OBS, A.B., Assistant in Physiology. 
'' CHABLES JAKOWSKI, B.S., Assistant in ^^^-^^J, 
UcoB R. JENSEN, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
H V JERAEDI, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
JOSEPH A distant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

HUGH JEWETT, M.D., Assistant in u pharmacology and Obstetrics. 

MARius P. JOHNSON, A.B., M.D., Assistant m Pharmacology 
FERD E KADAN, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
CLYDE F. KARNS. B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
LAWRENCE KATZENSTEIN, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
LEROV C. KEAGLE, B.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
L.URISTON L. KEOWN, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
LESTER N. KOLMAN, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
VERNON E. KKAHL, M.S., Assistant in Zoology. 
LOUIS J. KROLL, A.B., M.D.. Assistant in Medicine. 
MILTON C. LANG, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
NORBERT G. LASSAHN, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy 
NATHAN LEVIN, B.S. in Phar.. M.S., Assistant m Chemistry. 
Kurt LEVY, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. «„nervisor of Wards. 

GRACE LiNDSEY, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor of War 
JOHN W. MACHEN, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Lrinary Surgery. 
MAXWELL L. Mazer, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
F. ROWLAND MCGINITV, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Bacteriology, 
i SAMUEL McLANAHAN, JR., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
\ Hugh B. McNally, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

41 



40 



BERNARD P. MCNAMABA. B.S. in Phar., M.S.. Assistant' in Phamacok, 
ISRAEL p. MERANSKi, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics ''• 

'" EntlT ^•^•^•' ''•'^•^- ^•°-' ^^^^^*^"* ^" ^^^^^^- -ci Cast.. 

J. Edw. Norris, M.D, Assistant in Obstetrics 

WiLUAM A. Parr, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

Arnold L. Peter, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Samuel E. Proctor, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel T. R. Rev-ell, Jr., B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology 
Thomas E. Roach, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Dermatology 

Eldred Roberts, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

Daniel R. Robinson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

Israel Rosen, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology 

DOROTHV E. SCHMALZER, B.S., Assistant in BiologL Chemistry 

W. J. SCHMiTZ. M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics 

GEORGE SiLVERTON, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

nrtS™'ep!-^n;er ^-- ^" ^^^^^^^^^ ^--' «-rvisor of 

'^T^Z f ™"'' f ^•' ''■''■• ^''''''^' '" Ophthalmology. 
Samuel Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Medicine 

ELSIE SPERBEB, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Virginia Stack, R.N., Assistant in Nursing Private Pati^nfc « 

of Private Halls. private Patients, Supervisor 

CLEO D. Sth^, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
Abminta Taylor, R.N., Night Supervisor. ^*- 

pn^'' ^" !f="^^^"M, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Neurology 

flZKT;:T''''?f ^" ^'^^•' ^^^^^*-* - Pharmacology. 
JAMES K. Thornton, B.S., Assistant in Physics. 

Richard N. Tillman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

T J TOUHEY, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine 

Margaret Turner, R.N., Assistant in Medical Ni,r«in„ q 

Medical Wards. ^leaicai Nursing, Supervisor of 

Frederick J. Vollmer, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine 
Edith Walton, Assistant in Massage ^^dicine. 

Gibson J. Wells, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics 

Albert R. Wh^kerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery 

r™T L Wollenweber, M.D., Assistant in Pathology 

BERNARD L. ZENm, B.S.. Assistant in Pharmaceutic^ Chemistry. 

' . . 42 



FELLOWS 

1940-41 

Frederick K. Bell, Ph.D U. S. Phannacopoeia 

Edward G. Boettiger, Ph.D Gynecology 

Otto C. Brantigan, M.D Surgery 

Ann V. Brown, A.B Cranberry Canners Assistant 

Nellie Cone, A.B „ Pharmacology 

Edward F. Cotter, M.D Neuro- Surgery 

Benjamin A. Dabrowski, A.B., D.D.S Oral Roentgenology 

Alexander M. Duff, M.D. „ National Cancer Institute 

Fred W. Ellis, M.S » _ Pharmacology 

Guy M. Everett, B.A Physiology and Physiological Chemistry 

Sylvan Forman, M.S Pharmacology 

Wilson C. Grant, M.S. „ Pharmacology 

George P. Hager, Jr., M.S _ Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Kenneth E. Hamlin, Jr., B.S Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

LeRoy C. Keagle, B.S Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Ephraim T. Lisansky, A.B., M.D _ „ Pathology 

Howard B. Mays, M.D „ Urology and Biological Chemistry 

Edward Merdinyan, M.S Phai-macology 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D National Cancer Institute 

Gordon M. Stephens, A.B., M.D „ Psychiatry 

LeRoy W. Tilt, Jr., A.B Histology 

Dorsey R. Tipton, D.D.S _ Oral Surgery 

William K. Waller, A.B „ Medicine 

John W. Wooden, Jr., D.D.S Clinical Operative Dentistry 



43 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION STAFF 

For the Year 1940-41 
At Baltimore 

Mary Alice Adams, M.A., Principal, School No. 44, Baltimore. 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education, Director of the 
Summer Session, University of Maryland. 

Glen David Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education, University of 
Maryland. 

Charles Norman Cramer, M.A., Special Assistant, Garrison Junior High 
School, Baltimore. 

Leah Kathryn Dice, B.S., Assistant in Aptitude Testing and Curriculum 
Adjustment, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Clyde Baltzer Edgeworth, M.A., Supervisor of Commercial Education, 
Baltimore Public Schools. 

Edna Marie Engle, M.A., Principal, Girls Vocational School, Baltimore. 

Gaylord Beale Estabrook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Gardner Henry Foley, M.A., Assistant Professor of English and Speech, 
University of Maryland. 

George Morrison Gaither, Supervisor of Industrial Education, Baltimore 
Public Schools. 

Ralph Gallington, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education, 
University of Maryland. 

Paul Bates Gillen, M.Ed., Special Assistant, Patterson Park Senior High 
School, Baltimore. 

John Joseph Grimes, B.S., Director, Day Camp, Baltimore. 

William Frederick Haefner, B.S., Instructor, Woodworking, Southern 
High School, Baltimore. 

Harold C. Hand, Ph.D., Professor of Education, University of Maryland. 
Arnold E. Joyal, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Administration, Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 
Eugene Bowers Link, E. Eng., Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 

Edward Leroy Longley, B.S., Shop Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic In- 
stitute. 

Gerald Louis Lund, B.S., Instructor, Ottmar Mergenthaler School of Print- 
ing, Baltimore. 

William M. Nevins, Ph.D., Supervisor of Training, Social Security Board, 
Baltimore. 

Frances Doub North, M.A., Instructor in Commercial Education, Western 
High School, Baltimore. 

Albert Gibson Packard, M.A., Supervisor of Industrial Education, Balti- 
more Public Schools. 

44 



THOMAS Pvi^s, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of English, University of 

T™n smith, B.S., instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 
Zl^ZZs^^^^^^^^, PH.D., Director, Bureau of Research. Baltimore 

,SuoTC^^^, M.A., J.D.. Extension Instructor. University of 

CnrK^wtEV SV.V.ST.K, B.S., Director of Vocational Education. Balti- 

more Public Schools. • „„^ 

E g" N VANDBN BOSCHE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and 

Phvsical Chemistry, University of Maryland. 
rMHiBEL PK.TT WELSH, M.A., Professor of Foods, University of Maryland, 
a'vs ANNA WiGGiN, M.A., Instructor in Education. University of Mary- 

P.„rALKXANDER Wh.lhide. B.S., Principal, General Vocational School 
R. J°SETH WILLIAMSON, B.A., M.Ed., Head of Technical Department. Bal- 

jr^v ?or.Tupervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education, Balti- 

more Public Schools. 

\. ry^r.,^ T^^ PrinciDal General Vocational School No. 294, 

Howard Edward Ziefle, B.b., Fnncipai, ^entjia 

Baltimore. 



45 



SECTION I 
General Information 



y 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

At Baltimore 

LIBRARY 
(Medicine) Doctors Lockarri w^ri;^ « j t 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The history of the present University of Maryland, before the merger in 
1920, is the history of two institutions: the old University of Maryland in 
Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. 

This history began in 1807 when the' College of Medicine of Maryland 
was organized, the fifth medical school in the United States. The first 
class was graduated in 1810. A pennanent home was established in 
1814-1815 by the erection of the building at Lombard and Greene Streets 
in Baltimore, the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries (and the first medical 
school library) in the United States. In 1812 the General Assembly of 
Maryland authorized the College of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or 
constitute faculties of divinity, law, and arts and sciences," and by the 
same act declared that the "colleges or faculties thus united should be 
constituted an university by the name and under the title of the University 
of Maryland." By authority of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to 
establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a regular school of instruction in 
law was opened. Subsequently there were added : in 1882 a Department of 
Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a 
School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded 
in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 

47 



46 



in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over en- 
tirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution 
was given the name, University of Maryland. 

All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. The University is co-educational in all its 
branches. 

ADMINISTRAllVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regent:?, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
There is a General Administrative Board which acts in an advisory capacity 
to the President. 

The University administrative organization comprises the following 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture. * 

Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Extension Service. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Commerce. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

Engineering Experiment Station. 

College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. 

Summer Session. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Law. 

School of Medicine. 

School of Nursing. 

School of Pharmacy. 

University Hospital. 

The University faculties are composed of the Deans and the instructional 
staffs of each college and school, including the librarian and two assistant 
librarians. The President and the Dean of the Faculty are ex-ofRcio members 
of each of the faculties. 

The organization and activities of the several administrative divisions are 
described in full in the appropriate chapters of Section II. 

48 



LOCATION 

The University of Maryland, located at College Park, .f™ ^^f^^^ 
/tv is etght miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from Balti- 
' t The campus fronts on the Baltimore-Washington boulevard. 
%Te P^f ssional Schools of the University and the ^n^-s^^^^^^^^^ 
J located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
College Park 

A. The University grounds at College Park comprise 600 acres. 

Boulevard, lie the drill grounds and the athletic fields. 

Approximately 300 acres are used for research and tf^-^^ing in hor icul^ 
J^:SZ^tnrl, dairying. Hvestoc. and P0"^7J^ -J^^-^f^^ ^ 
acres for plant research work are located on a larm nve 
of the campus. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 30 individual «t^<=tures which 
provide facilities for the several activities and sei-vices earned on at College 

Park 

Adrnmistration and Instruction. This group consists of the following 
buildings- Administration Building, which accommodates the Office of the 
President: Dean of Faculty. Dean of Men, ^o-f roller. Reglst^r^ Director 
of Admissions and Alumni Secretary; Agriculture ButZdmfl-, which houses 
L Si ge of Agriculture, Agricultural and Home Economics Extension 
ServSe. fnd Audftorium; Arts and Sciences Riming; f .^--"'l^ .f^'^f; 
ina- Morrill Hall which houses a portion of the work m the Sciences, 
Zury Research Building; Horticulture Building; ^«7^^«f ^/^^ Jf, 
Librani Building, in which are the Offices of the Dean of Wo^^n and her 
staff; Music Building, which provides for the department of Musi^^ 
student band, and glee club; Home Econom^cs Bu^ld^ng,Chem^stryB^ 
ina in which are located, in addition to space for instiuction in chemistry, 
itatols for State work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and lime; and 
College of Education Building. 

Experiment Station. The headquarters for the StaWon are in the Agri^ 
culture Building. The various laboratories and green houses for ths WDik 
are located in many of the other buildings on the campus. 

Physical Education. This group consists ot The RitcMe Co«-«''^ -h.cji 
provides quarters for all teams, an athletic office, trophy room rooms for 
faculty, and visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and per- 

49 



N. 



manent seating arrangements for 4,262 Derson«?- R,w <?/^^- 

zzri "^'^"^ ''''''''' °^ '•'''' - aisrc^fd^^witf s:;o:f, * 

patrons, dressing rooms, and equipment for receiving and transmitt^ "' 
formation concerning contests in Droo-r^«= . ,- • 'transmitting ,„. 

tho MJUfo,^ r> ^ Lujiujsis in progress Gymnasium, used in nart k 

i%i:s^^w?rrfLrgirsafr^^^^^^ f ^^*^°" ^°"= - 

tennis courts are adja;ent to t'e Lirh^Lf "^^^ '"' ^'"^^"'^^ '^"^^ -^ 

prfvr-t^mis:t='f^^^^^^^^^^ 

Margaret Brent Hall fnd AnneTrundTHaH." ' ' '"'^"^*^'^ ^^ 

ftoss6orottj7/i Inn. This historic Inn, built in 1798 is the oldest h„;i r 

Stattn '7T r' ''*'■ "^"^ ^^^^^ '^--'^ *^^ AgrieuH:r:txpeS:f 
Station. It has been restored with the aid of a WPA ^rant a^/n. 
Plans call for its use as a museum, and a faculty-rif Ser ' '"""' 

P/Snr • ?'■"'*"'■"'• '^'^'^ ^'■°"P ^"'^'^'l^^ *e Central Heating Plant- 
t^ns frfortvTat""t ""T"'?""^ ^"^■'*"^'- ^"^^--^' -^h acclm! : 

the^'Si^StaL^rra "^'S""- ^"l' ^^^*^™ Experiment Station of 
Hie united Mates Bureau of Mines is located on the University grounds 
The general laboratories are used for instruction purposes in ELfneerin. 
as well as by the United States Government for experimental wSkTh! 
building contains a geological museum, and a technical library 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service Laboratory. The technological 
research laboratory of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is located on^th^^ 
University campus. It contains laboratories for conduct of research Z th 
tionl?"and t-T ""'^ "^'l""^^' *='^^'"''=^' -^'--ing, bacteriologS, nut J 
LeUniversitv f " y^^'f' '''''°''^'' ^ cooperative arrangement with 

to pursue stu'^L'^"'"?' ^'l '*"'^'"*^' "^° '^^^^ undergraduate degrees, 
tioned above ^ ^^""^^ '" ^"^ °^ *^" subjects men- 

Baltimore 

StJetts^nrovide?""*^i"^f' 1?"^*"^ '" *" '''''''''^ °' Lombard and Greene 
versS' ThJ ^''^ ' ^°"r^ ^^'^ ^'^^ Baltimore division of the Uni- 
m iS- Ih! ^"^"P ^°"?P"^«« the original Medical School Building, erected 
Sosfit/ wL "^^ ^': f°^ """^ ^' ^ dispensary; the iVe«; C;nit,er.«j/ 

LnhoZ ^'th approximately 450 beds; the Frank C. Bressler Research 

La^tn ^J"^.,^.""'^^ r" ^'^"'^^ ^'**^*'^^' the Nurses' Home; the 
I^fflM; Sc/fooi Building; and the Administration Building. 

Princess Anne 

ma^niXd tr"th "^"I,''^';- '""l"' "* '''''"'''' ^""^' ^^--^^t County, is 
aTdhoreeonUicr '""*"" "' "^""" ^" ^^^'="'*"'-^' *^« ^-^anic Iks, 

50 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Libraries are located at both the College Park and Baltimore branches 
of the University. 

The Library at College Park, completed in 1931, is an attractive, well 
equipped and well lighted structure. The main reading room on the second 
floor seats 236, and has about 5,000 reference books and bound periodicals 
on open shelves. The five-tier stack room is equipped with carrels and desks 
for the use of advanced students. About 12,000 of the 95,000 volumes on the 
campus are shelved in the Chemistry and Entomology departments, the 
Graduate School, and other units. Over 750 periodicals are currently 
received. 

Facilities in Baltimore consist of the Libraries of the School of Dentistry, 
containing some 8,000 volumes; the School of Law, 18,000 volumes; the 
School of Medicine, 21,000 volumes; and the School of Pharmacy, 8,000 
volumes. The Medical Library is housed in Davidge Hall; the remaining 
three libraries have adequate quarters in the buildings of their respective 
schools, where they are readily available for use. Facilities for the courses 
in Arts and Sciences are offered jointly by the Libraries of the Schools of 
Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The libraries of the University total in the aggregate about 150,000 bound 
volumes with large collections of unbound journals. The Library is a deposi- 
tory for publications of the United States Government, and numbers some 
14,000 documents in its collections. 

The University Library is able to supplement its reference service by 
borrowing material from other libraries through Inter-Library Loan and 
Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library of Con- 
gress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, and other 
agencies in Washington. 

ADMISSION 

Information may be had from the Director of Admissions, either in person 
or by correspondence, concerning planning secondary school courses to meet 
entrance requirements or problems relating to admission. 

College Park 

Undergraduate Schools : Applicants for admission to the colleges of Agri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics should communicate with the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park. 

Graduate School: Those seeking admission to the Graduate School should 
address the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Maryland, College 
Park. 

Baltimore 

Information about admission to the professional schools in Baltimore may 
be found in this catalogue (see Index), and in the bulletins issued by the 
several schools. 

51 



Age of Applicants: A student who is less than sixteen years of age must 
live with his parents or guardian. 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail the 
blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
August 1 for the first semester, and January 1 for the second semester. 
Applications from students completing their last semester of secondary 
work are encouraged. If acceptable, supplementary records may be sent 
upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and 
ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the Regis- 
trar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions, College Park. 

Time of Admission: Applicants for admission should plan to enter the 
University at the beginning of the school year in September. It is possible, 
however, to be admitted to certain curricula at the beginning of either 
semester. 

Registration: New students will register on Wednesday and Thursday, 
September 17 and 18, 1941. The English placement, psychological, and other 
required tests are a part of the registration procedure. 

The Freshman Week program includes registration, placement and apti- 
tude tests, physical examinations, assemblies, and the President's reception. 

ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates of secondary schools accredited by 
regional associations or the State Department of Education will be admitted 
by certificate upon the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out- 
of-state schools should have attained college certification marks, such marks 
to be not less than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Graduates who fail to obtain the principaFs recommendation will be con- 
sidered by the Committee on Admissions. Supplementary information, includ- 
ing aptitude tests, will determine whether they are eligible for admission. 

Admission by Examination: Applicants, who have passed the examina- 
tions set by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, 
New York City; the Regents of the University of the State of New York, 

52 



fhP Denartment of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsyl- 
vI^rH^rrW ^ upon presentation of the proper ere- 

dentials. 

ADMISSION FROM OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

. J fc i„ o-nnH standing as to scholarship and conduct are eligible 
, rnsS'TdlnceTstSl'assigned to transfer students from accred- 
ited institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 30 

hours is necessary for a degree. 
2 The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



the particular requirements are given. 



A B 

3 3 

English H 

Algebra "~ ^ 

Plane Geometry — 

Solid Geometry g 

Mathematics ^ ^ 

History ^ -^ 

Science — 

Foreign Language 

Stenography - 

Typewriting — — 

Bookkeeping - g 

Electives -- • 

Total .. - 15 1' 



c 


D 


E 


3 


8 


3 


*2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




*V2 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
2 


1 

**2 

1 


6% 


6 


5 


— 


— 


— 


15 


15 


15 



•* i« aicrphra and solid geometry may be admitted 
*An applicant deficient a second nmt ^^^^'^:,,,,,,^ u.tl.em.tics, and Physics, 
to the College of Engineering, and to the <^^^^"^!^^^ ^ ^^^ .^e solid geometry before 

hut win be obliged to make up the second unit of algebra a 

the beginning of the second semester of the freshman year^ ,„u,Htute electives 

, . XV- ^ir.^A «f Tin«iinpss Practice may substitute eiecuves 
** Students preparing to teach in the field of Business ir-raci 

for stenography and typewriting. 



53 



College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry— C 
Agricultural Education and Rural 
Life — B 

Agriculture-Engineering C 

Agriculture. General— B 
Agronomy 

Farm Crops — A 

Soils— A 
Animal Husbandry — B 

tBacteriology — A 
fBotany 

General Botany and Morphol- 
ogy—A 
Plant Pathology — A 
Plant Physiology and Ecology— A 
Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Manufacturing— B 
Dairy Production— B 
tEntomology — A 

Farm Management — B 
fFood Technology— A 
Horticulture 

Floriculture and Ornamenta 
Horticulture— B 

Pomology and Olericulture— B 
Poultry Husbandry— B 
Preforestry — A 
Preveterinary — A 



College of Arts and Sciences (con'd) 

Mathematics — C 
Physics — C 
Political Science — A 
Predental — A 
^Prelaw — A 
Premedical — D 
Prenursing — A 

Psychology— A 
Sociology — A 
Speech — A 
Spanish — A 
Zoology — A 

College of Commerce 

Accounting — A 
Agricultural Economics— A 

Cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration— A 
fEconomics — A 
Finance — A 
General Business — A 

Marketing and Sales Administra- 
tion — A 
tPrelaw — A 

College of Education 

tArts and Sciences — A 
Commercial — E 
IfHome Economics — B 

College of Engineering 

tChemical — C 
Civil— C 
Electrical — C 
Mechanical — C 

Mechanical with Aeronautical op- 
tion — C 

College of Home Economics 

§Education — B 
Extension — B 
Foods and Nutrition— B 
General Home Economics— B 
institution Management— B 
Practical Art— B 
Textiles and Clothing— B 

JAlso College of Agriculture fAl r ii 
Commerce. §Also College of Educajrii "^ ^AlL'^rnt''^^ and Sciences. JAlso College of 
of Home Economics. ''^^'° ^°"^^« «^ Engineering. Ulso College 

Special students: Applicants who are at least tw^nf.. 

54 



College of Arts and Sciences 

*i3acteriology — A 
if Botany — A 

II Chemical Engineering C 

Chemistry — C 

JEconomics — ^A 
§Education — A 
^English — A 
^E ntomology — A 

French — A 

General Biological Sciences— A 

General Physical Sciences— C 

German — A 

History — A 

Latin — A 



Unclassified Students: Applicants who meet entrance requirements but 
who do not wish to pursue a program of study leading to a degree are 
eligible for admission to pursue courses for which they have met pre- 
requisites. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of 
their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students classified academically as freshmen or sophomores, 
who are citizens of the United States, who are physically fit to perform 
military duty and who are not less than 14 or more than 26 years of 
age, are required to take basic military training for a period of two years 
as a prerequisite to graduation. If any student be excused from taking basic 
military instruction because of physical disability, he must take physical 
education. 

Graduation Requirements for Students Excused from Military Instruction 

and Physical Education 

Students excused from basic military training and physical education with- 
out academic credit shall be required to take an equivalent number of credits 
in other subjects, so that the total credits required for a degree in any col- 
lege shall not be less thaYi 126 hours. The substitution must be approved 
by the dean of the college concerned. 

REQUIREMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

All women students whose bodily condition indicates that they are phy- 
sically fit for exercise are required to take physical education for a period 
of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or otlier unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to 
such minor students. 

tStudents in the College Park Colleges who are residents of the District of Columbia 
are charged two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 

55 



I 



HEALTH SERVICE 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

As soon as possible after the openinff of th.» fall <!o,v,»ot„ 
for protecting the general health ,11 ef ^ I 1 semester, as a measure 
colleges at College Park are^^..' ^"f "^"f ^ ^^« ^"t^^ the undergraduate 
Of the men studfn^tf SoS Jby t' U^IvS^^^ ^^^-^-«- 

"The trm'^T' "^'r"""^ '^' MilitrrySirarSenS^""" " ^°°^^'-^«- 

in?o:pTr:rn":rtrTffieerf^"^h;:ie:r^^^^^^^^ 

woman physician has her offices in the Lrmarv'sh" "^T" '''' 
consultation by all women students at hourf to b^arrtyd. '^"'^"^ ^°' 

INFIRMARY RULES 

lished by the physician in charge. ® '"'"'"^ ^^tab- 

Nurses' office hours, 8 to 10 A ivr 1 + o r. », . 

daily except Sunday; I'o I M to i^NoU-' rT^M^^Su T~' '' ' ^■^•' 
Doctor's office hour 12 Noon to 1 P M S ^ **^^- 

on Sunday by appointment only "'^ '"'^'P* ^"'^'^^y- Office hour 

arLetrsSrtrre;rt^;inIet'Ir^" TV^ ^'^ ^"«™->^- ^^-^^-ts 
emergency. ■ ^^ *^"""^ ''«'<=« f^^^rs unless the case is an 

anLl:t:ral";Te;o"rt*t'VeTr'"^^ t" "^^^ ^''^-^ ^"-«- 
versity physicians. Such Sits will Lf™^''\'''°"'*^ *=^" °"^ °^ the Uni- 
additional visits are nec^s arv For .'^ t^'?' "^*="P* ^° *=«««« ^^ere 
necessary, the UniversUy pTsLn ;y m^^^ ^' ^^^ be 

student so desires, he mav caH a^r • '^^^^}]^. «S"al charge. But, if a 
own expense. ^ '^" ^ Physician of his own choice and at his 

UnteX'XsTcLr 'Har^dtr i7;heT«^ "^'^ '^^^'^ *^« -'^^ »^ «>« 
facilities available. Students who Ive off .1, ^^''^ *° *' "''*"°* "^ the 
fee of one dollar and a quarter a Say ^" '^"''"'' ^" ''^ *=h«^«<^ « 

Each St'ie^rf Slow^ronS t'hV'' 'V'''- ^' ' *» ^^^^ ^-M- daily, 
see a a „„,, pt.-l^rgredrthnuiSl. ^^^ - 

anJ eSSSrSinSr^l^^e Itv^etTs^ ^^ r^ "— 
st^n. and employees who^re ^A^^^:.^^^ X^^ 

7. Students living in the dormitories who fiv^^ in ^^a ^.^ 

56 



should be done before 8:30 A. M. If a student is taken sick at any other 
time he must report to the Infirmary, before going to his room. 

Medical excuses for classes missed during illness will be issued by the 
Infirmary physician, only when this procedure is followed. 

8. Students who are ill in their homes, fraternity houses, sorority 
houses, or dormitories and wish a medical excuse for classes missed during 
the time of illness must present written excuses from their physicians, 
parents, or house mothers to the Infirmary. 

9. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 
and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

REGULATIONS, GRADES, DEGREES 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 
I — 99; courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates, by numbers 
100 — 199*; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200 — 299. 

The letter following the number of a course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered; thus, course If is offered in the first semester; 
Is, in the second semester. The letter "y" indicates a full-year course. 
The number of semester hours* credit is shown by the arable numeral in 
parentheses after the title of the course. No credit is allowed for a "y** 
course until it is completed. 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning 8:20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory, including outside 
preparation, for each credit hour in any course. 

Number of Uours. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semestei 
hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are shown in 
the appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several divisions of 
the University. No student may carry either more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours without specific permission from the dean of his 
college. 

EXAMINATION AND MARKS 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are required 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final examinations; and, 
also, when requested to do so by the instructor, in tests given during the 
semester. 

But not all courses numberod 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit, 

57 



Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 
character of the work will permit the instructor to note frequently the 
progress and proficiency of the student — in which case they may be omitted 
upon approval of the head of the department and dean of the college. 
Periodic examinations and tests are given during regularly scheduled class 
periods. Final examinations, where required, are given according to schedule 
and are of not more than two hours' duration. 

Marking. The system of marking is uniform in the different departments 
and divisions of the University. 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, D, F, and /. The 
first four, A, B, C, and I>, are passing; F, failure; /, incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship ; mark B, good scholarship ; mark C, 
fair scholarship and mark D, passing scholarship. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with marks of A, B, and C. A student who receives the mark of B 
in more than one-fourth of his credits must take additional courses or re- 
peat courses until he has met these requirements. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a mark of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 

REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guar- 
dians at the close of each semester. 

ELIMINATION OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing marks in fifty per cent of the semester 
hours for which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped fiom 
the University. The registrar notifies the student, his parent or guardian, 
and the student^s dean of this action. A student who has been dropped 
for scholastic reasons may appeal in writing to the Committee on 
Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment for reinstatement. The Committee 
is empowered to grant relief for just cause. A student who has been 
dropped from the University for scholastic reasons, and whose petition for 
reinstatement is denied, may again petition after a lapse of at least one 
semester. 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. Students of the last class may 
be asked to withdraw even though no specific charge he made against them. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major 
or minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have 

.58 



. with an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number of 
'ZiZtS'^^^^^^ i-ior standing in any curnculum. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

.,^<'«".•^'-'»■^^^^;^^"Z^^ E.g\.e», E.ecl,i..l Mn^'. 
!'„' rSlnSrerSrii L.w., D~.or of Mediae, Doc... of Den... 

* ~°, »dVhe,o, of scene. '" ^^•™«„^,,„,. .„ .„^^ „,„»- 
Students in the two-year and three-year curricula 

earned with grades of A, B, and C. transfer student 

in the case of a candidate for a ^if^^^^^Xf^l^^ for credit 

^artrdetee^rre SJn^lfourth of the credits earned at this 

^ir candidate for a de.ree .ust .e in ^^^^^^^'^ 
March 1st for the June Convocation and J J^ /"^^^^j.^t^^ ,,, degrees 
Convocation, a ^orma appl ca^on for a ^ej e ^^^ ^.^^^^^^ ^^^ 

must attend a convocation at ^»»ch degrees a ^^ ti^^ai cases, 

awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia only in 

EXPENSES • 

„ ,-,T,^ ttmtvfr'?tty of Maryland for the 
Make all checks payable to the University of 

he admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

EXPENSES AT COLLEGE PARK 

The University reserves the right to make such changes -^l^^H-^l^^^^ 
costs as any occasion may make necessary. Such changes however, 
parison with the total cost to the student would be only nominal. 

59 



FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Maryland 

First Semester Second Semester 

Fixed Charges $ 67.50 $ 77.50 

Athletic Fee - 15.00 

*Special Fee 10.00 

** Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Infirmary Fee 5.00 

Post Office Box 2.00 

Advisory and Testing Service 50 .50 



$110.00 



$ 78.00 



Total 

$145.00 
lo.OO 
10.00 

lO.OO 
5.00 
2.00 
1.00 

$188.00 



District of Columbia 

First Semester 

General Fees.. _ $ 42.50 

Tuition 92.50 



Second Semester Total 

$ .50 $ 43.00 

102.50 195.00 



$135.00 



$103.00 



$238.00 



Other States and Countries 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

General Fees „.... $ 42.50 $ -50 $ 43.00 

Tuition 130.00 140.00 270.00 



$172.50 



$140.50 



$313.00 



*This fee is used for improving the University grounds and the physical training facili- 
ties and for other Univei-sity projects that have direct relationship to student activities. 

** The Student Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, 
since it covers subscription to the student weekly paper, the literary magazine, and the year 
book; class dues, including admission to class dances; and admission to the performances 
of the musical and dramatic clubs. 

Expenses of Students Living in Dormitories 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

Board -..$135.00 $135.00 $270.00 

Lodging .$38.00 to 55.00 $38.00 to 55.00 $76.00 to llO.OO 



$173.00 to 190.00 $173.00 to 190.00 $346.00 to 380.00 

Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee, payable on first entrance $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for bachelor^s degree _.... lO.OO 

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Fee — Per semester in addition to fees 
shown above: 

Maryland „... .._ $25.00 

District of Columbia 25.00 

Other States and Countries 62.50 

60 



Bacteriology $5.00-$8.00 

l^f\ $3.00-$5.00 

cStrr'I"-- $3.00-$8.00 

Daly $1.00-$3.00 

Engineering, All Students $2.50 

Engineering, Chemical $7.00-$8.00 



Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

For the fee in a given course see 

Section III, Description of Courses 

Entomology - $2.UU-$d.ou 

Home Economics $1.00-$7.00 

Industrial Education $2.00-$4.00 

Physics $3.00-$5.00 

Radio Speech - f 2.00 

Zoology $3.00-$5.00 



Miscellaneous Fees 

_ ..$3.00-$5.00 
Late Registration Fee ..^....-^ 7Z7Z7'^^^ "'"' $1.00 

. j;:V:'. ^:^^^i^iiSirp;;:i^i^l'o. each c,.», g 0. 

Special Examination Fee per semester credit hour ■- ^ 

Ferfor failure to report for medical examination appointment ----^^.OO 

Srt-time students carrying six semester hours or ^''^^^^^^,_,, 

credit hour - " $13.50 

Laundry service, when desired-per semester -•• *^^ ^^ 

bimy fTr thellge c!n be fixed, the individual student will be billed for 
a! where it cannot the entire student body will be charged a flat fee to 
cover the loss or damage. 

Fees For Graduate Students 

Matriculation Fee - ^ ^^^^ 

Fee for each semester credit hour --• • 

Diploma Fee-Master's Degree -.-.. ^^-^^ 

Graduation Fee— Doctor's Degree ^"-"^ 

EXPLANATIONS 

The Fixed Charges made to all students cover a part of the overhead ex- 
penses not provided for by the State. 

The Board. Lodging, and Laundry charge may vary f ^^JJ^^J^/ji, J 
semester, but every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

Fees for Students Entering in February. Students ^^^f^"! t^^^^mver- 
sity for the second semester are charged the ^f 7»"/ ^^f^f ^f.^Q ^'J^' 
indicated: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities $8.00 In 
firmary, $2.50; Advisory and Testing Service, 50c; and Post Office Box, $1.00. 

Fees for Part-Time Students. Undergraduate students carrying six 
semester hours or less of regularly scheduled courses are charged $6.00 per 

•For students carrying eight hours or less; lor students carrying more than eight hours, 
$50.00 for the semester. 

61 



mTfr "f\^''^ "^^eular laboratory fees. Students carrying sev.n 
more semester hours are charged the regular fee., Tn tht T. * " "' 

.mount .. i„„rf „„, to ,k, ^,^1,,.^ tor S„™.„! T? 

fimd IS audited annually by the stale Auditora »"'>""'!">««. Tt 

forftrrrof cir fo^^tStL'Th^ou^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^-- ^^ 

the resumption of classes, a sludentwiU rpeJaUzed'bv'b!- '' '""'"^ ^''^^ 
pay a special fee of $3.00 for each class mi.C n i ^ ^"^ ^^"^""^^^ ^ 
students will be penalized, as In the caseTf a hnV^ ' T^^v ^^ "^^"^^'^• 
the first meeting of each class at tt%:£4%?r Jeco^^d i^V'^ 

before such holiday. W^uX'^ ciders JpTcififd 'T^ T 
an absence before or after a holiday will be granted "' ^'' 

In exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in th^ #„ -i 
for an excuse must be made within one^JL'Til" t dtTi^rs!'^^'" 

WITHDRAWALS FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

rs tSe^^if ^ -^ «- - -^ suppis^nr 're;r;;;rr:L- 

wrttte?ctntnfof ^e ^° ^!'"^'-^- 'j.^ ^he University must secure the 
Ilin wl- t Vv ^ ^"* "'■ guardian, to be attached to the withdrawal 
shp which must be approved by the Dean and presented to the R^SraTa 
least one week m advance of withdrawal Charges for fnii . *^ t. T 

Tptr ofTe^D^n Tm *''h ? ^T ^^^ ^'^^"^^^^^^^^^ 

refund '" '"^°'"" ''"'"«^ P'-^^^"*^^ *« the Registrar for 

All women students who are withdrawing from th« TT„i„„ -,. 
requested to report to the Office of the Dean o? Women *^ "' 

REFUNDS 

I dliutt"^^^^^^ '''' 'T^^^ '^^' ^"^ ^^"^^-^ ^^tivities fee, with 

a deduction of $5 00 to cover cost of registration. All refunds for hoard 
lodging, and laundry are pro-rated. reiunas lor boara, 

62 



After five days, and until November 1, the first semester, or March 10, the 
second semester, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated, with a deduction 
of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. 

After November 1, or March 10, refunds are granted for board and 
laundry only, amounts to be pro-rated. 

No refunds are made without the written consent of the student's parent 
or guardian, except to students who pay their own expenses. 

No refunds of laboratory fees are made in the first semester after 
October 11, 1941, and in the second semester after February 28, 1942. 

HOUSING 

Dormitory Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the 
dormitories should request room application cards. Men should apply to 
the Director of Admissions, and women to the Office of the Dean of 
Women. When the room application card is returned, it must be accom- 
panied by a $15 deposit. This fee will be deducted from the first semester 
charges when the student registers. Room reservations, not claimed by 
freshmen or upperclassmen on their respective registration days, will be 
cancelled. A room will be held by special request until after classes begin 
providing the dormitory office is notified by September 18th. Room reserva- 
tion fees will not be refunded after August 15th. Reservations by students 
in attendance at the University should be made during the closing month 
of the school year. New students are urged to attend to their housing 
arrangements well in advance of registration. 

Men's Dormitories. All men students who have made dormitory reserva- 
tions should report to the dormitory office in "A" section, Calvert Hall. 

All freshmen students, except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories. 

Women's Dormitories. All >vomen students who have made dormitory 
reservations should report to the dormitory to which they have been 
assigned. There is a head resident living in each building who supervises 
the enforcement of University rules and regulations. 

Dormitory rooms — single, double, and a few triple — are tastefully fur- 
nished and have running hot and cold water. 

Equipment. Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves 
w*:th sufficient single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow 
cases, towels, a laundry bag, a shoe bag, and a waste paper basket. 

The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormitory 
property assigned to him. Any damage done to the property other than 
that which would result from ordinary wear and tear will be charged 
to the student concerned. 

Off-Campus Housing. Men: Only upper classmen are allowed to live in 
off -campus houses. Inquiries about these should be addressed to the Office 
of the Assistant Dean of Men. 



66 



Women: Those undergraduate women students who cannot be accommo- 
dated in the dormitories may live in private homes which have been approved 
for student occupancy and are registered in the Office of the Dean of 
Women. No woman student should enter into an agreement with a house 
holder without first ascertaining at the Office of the Dean of Women that 
the house is on the approved list. 

General Information. It is understood that all housing arrangements are 
made for the year. All students who live in the dormitories must board at 
the University dining hall. It is necessary that each student have a key for 
his room, for which a deposit of $1.00 is required. 

Cleaning service is furnished for all rooms. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked for the 
dormitory to which it is to be sent will be delivered when you notify the 
College Park Express office of your arrival. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

Students not rooming in the dormitories may obtain board and laundry 
at the University at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunches at the University cafeteria or at nearby 
lunch rooms. 

The cost of books and supplies will vary according to the course pur- 
sued by the individual student. Books and supplies average about $35.00 
per year. 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 
student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

EXPENSES AT BALTIMORE 

The fees and expenses for the professional schools located in Baltimore 
will be found in the section of this catalogue pertaining to the several 
schools in Baltimore. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University of Maryland offers a limited number of scholarships 
covering fixed charges to residents of the State of Maryland who are 
graduates of high schools or preparatory schools. 

Since the University of Maryland is interested in encouraging students 
who show promise, these scholarships are awarded on the basis of a stu- 
dent's contribution to his high school, preparatory school, or University; 
his scholastic average; special talents; and evidence of leadership. 

A scholarship, known as the Victor E. Albright Scholarship, is awarded 
to a boy or girl of good character, born and reared in Garrett County 
and graduated from a high school in Garrett County during the year in 
which the scholarship is awarded. This scholarship is worth $200.00 a year. 



r„"ht».i'i» order « keep .he scho.„ship. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 



.ro» U' drnsSd" h*t h.t"U and c.p.Me, .here is »uch 

,„.i,y h.s been enabled tt """"^J/^ith Averages ab... J13 -onMs. 
„ special proiectt. .he «7"'»"°" '°;„t ;„,' „„,lL ». .mnd thi= aid 

'i;jir..or.:rr ri'-.;="u be ..-e . .e :>.-.., ., 

nt utSi"r.s=d..s no -P— '-ii^'rrSer '^iTX 
n d»is, however, main.am a '»"=»•» "J "'"f „, „,iuble posi.ions is 

Sd"' s: res^. *v=- 1^-- — ^ "■"' '" 

this work to the Employment Service. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors f-^/^lXo^SSo-- 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduatmg c^a-n -'^^^^^^^^ ^ ^, ,,^er 
are awarded to the upper half ot this group , resident work are 

half. To be eligible for honors, at least two years ot resiaen 

require . Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 

The Goddard Medal, ^he James JJoug ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

awarded annually to the resident "^ f ""^^ J^^^ at the same time 

who makes the highest average m ^is studies and w ^^^^ ^ 

embodies the most manly attributes. The medal i» given y 
Goddard James, of Washington, D. C. 

Si.™a Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Cha^r^fSig- P^^^^^^^^^ 
temity offers annually a gold medal to the freshman wno 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Af cultural Fraternity o^^A^^^^^^ ZeU 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural ^^^^e"* J the f^eshm 
who attains the highest average record in acadeni^ T fraternity, but 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fratern y, 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

65 



64 



Dinah Berman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Berman. 

Mortar Board Scholarship Cup. This is awarded to the senior girl who 
has been at the University for four years, and who has made the highest 
scholastic average for three and one-half years. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

Class of '26 Honor Key. The Class of 1926 of the School of Business 
Administration of the University of Maryland at Baltimore offers each 
year a gold key to the senior graduating from the College of Commerce 
with the highest average for the entire four year course taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
has attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the entire 
undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final semester. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl in the College of Home Economics ^vho attains the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 
to the senior member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
for the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Engineers to the senior in the 
Department of Civil Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty of the 
Department, is the outstanding student in his class. 

Tau Beta Pi Award. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi awards 
annually an engineers' handbook to the junior in the College of Engineering 
who, during his sophomore year, has made the greatest improvement in 
scholarship over that of his freshman year. 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi awards annually a certificate of merit to the initiate of the Chapter 
who, in the opinion of the members, has presented the best thesis during 
the year. 

66 



CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

CU.ens.P Pr.e .r Men. An award j ^^^^:^::::Sl^S^^^ 
^'i Bvrd, a graduate of the ^ass of 1908 to the ^^^ ^^^^^ 

^S^iip prize for Wo.en. The C^^VSZ^^^^' 
X;F. woods, .dfe of a^;™f-nU Si-^ her collegiate care- 
ts the woman member of the senior c ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ f,, the 

has most nearly tyP'«/f.;"£ of the University, 
general advancement of the interests oi 

MILITARY AWARDS 

,^ u -n,;. U offered to the major of the win 
Mahlon N. Haines '94 Trophy. This is offeree 

ning battalion. ^ lieutenant's insignia to the 

Military Department Award. Gold secona 
„>ajor of the winning battalion ^^ ^^ Excellency, the 

The Governor's Cup. ^^h's is offere 
Governor of Mary^and^t" the ^fo ^ ,^^ ^^^^^.^^.^^^ Montgomery County 

Company Award. The R^^e^^^^ ^ ^^^ ^est drilled company of the 

PhaDter awards annually to the captain oi 

'Z::::^::^'^ - is offered to the commander of the 

^'=^T9toia Medal - c.ss of .99 -^^^^ ^bSt d^lS^s^^- 
to the member of the ba"alion who prjes h m ^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ R,fl, 

A Gold Medal is awarded to ^^jn^J^^ 
Team who fired the high score of each f^^ason. ^.^^ ^^^^ ^ho 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the 
fired the high score of each season. ^g^^ber of the winning squad 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to each memoe 
in the squad drill competition. ^^^^^^^ students in 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to the tnree 

Pershing Rifles. a rnW Medal is awarded to the 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition. A Gold Meda^ .^ 

student firing highest score in this -""^P^^^^f ." .^„ ^^^ year in this com- 
to the student showing greatest improvement during y 

petition. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

•« AtiilMirs A gold watch is offered 
Silvester Watch for Excellence in AtWetics. iv g ^^^^^tics". The 

annually to "the man who ^yf^^J"^^^^^^^ R. W. 

watch is given in honor of a former President oi 

Silvester. 

67 



J! 



Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt to 
the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

Edward Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the class of 1913 ^^ 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the outstanding 
senior baseball player. 

PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 

Medals are offered in Diamondhack, Terrapiriy and Old Line work, for the 
students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout the 
year. 

LOANS 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority offers annually a Sigma Delta loan of 
one hundred dollars, without interest, to a woman student registered in the 
University of Maryland and selected by a Scholarship Committee— the 
said Committee to be composed of the deans of all Colleges in which girls 
are registered, including the Dean of Women and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

A. A. U. W. Loan. The College Park Branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women maintains a fund from which loans are made to 
women students of junior or senior standing who have been in attendance at 
the University of Maryland for at least one year. Awards in varying 
amounts are made on the basis of scholarship, character, and financial need. 
Applications should be made to the Scholarship Committee of the A. A. U. 
W. on blanks which may be obtained through the office of the Dean of 
Women. 

Catherine Moore Brinkley Loan Fund. Under the provisions of the will 
of Catherine Moore Brinkley a loan fund has been established, available 
for worthy students who are natives and residents of the State of Mary- 
land, studying mechanical engineering or agriculture at the University of 
Maryland. 

This loan fund is administered by the Scholarship and Student Aid Com- 
mittee. Details concerning loans and application for loans should be made 
to the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee. 

Home Economics Loan Fund. A small loan fund, established by the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Home Economics Society, is available for students major- 
ing in Home Economics. It is administered by the Scholarship and Student 
Aid Committee. 

In addition to the above loans there are from time to time others that are 
made available by various women's organizations in the State of Maryland. 
Information regarding these may be secured upon request from the Office 
of the Dean of Women. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The description of those in the Balti- 
more divisions is included in the appropriate chapters in Section II. 

68 



I 



GOVERNMENT 

.eHation of Student --^^^^ -Z:^;^^^:^^:^ 
i,ed bodies for f ^e'Cs is recSzed and encouraged. All organized 
orderly and Pjf ^^Hn^f (^^ su'e^ision of the Student Life and Reps- 
student activities are "nder tne s P President. Such organiza- 
tration Committee, subject %^^^^^^J^-^l student Life and Registration 
tions are formed only with *e consent of the b ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Committee and the approval of *« f^^*;^^";-^ represents the Univer- 
approval no student orgamzation which '" ^f ^university organization or 
:; before t^^-frv^rSfstErmay use%h^^^^^^^^ tJe University 
t; SSr ^^th'X-rname, or in connection with its members as 

Students. Qf„dent Government Association consists of 

dent of Men's League. . ^ ^j^ pgan of 

The Women's League, m cooperation with the ^"'^e o 

Women, handles all matters P«'^"-|,i?^^jroffice of tL Dean of Men, 

The Men's League, in cooperation with the Oftice ol tne 
handles all matters Pertaining to men students^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^_ 

.riurt^SiS-^^i wotn: tap^rSn With the Student Life and 
^rsrirrra Registration Co..Utee a -^ye—e; ap- 
pointed by the President, ^-PS^^^-J::^^^^^^^^^^ in an 

tions, e-ePt-^/'---«:,jt^i^^pl^^^^^^ conditions that 

advisory capacity, endeavors to improve <tiiy 

matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in ^-^ s anding 
arf eligible to represent the University in ^^/^^^ ^^^ ott; re- 
addition, various student organizations have ^^t^JJ^^Jf^^'^f^^J^ 
quiremeks. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass 
twenty-four hours of work during a preceding year. 

Discipline. In the govermnent of the University th. President and fj^ulty 
rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students The stadent 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes '^g^^^'^ly' 'i^^/. ^°"°J, 
ably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility ^^^^^^^ 
of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to «^^ "t^^" t^^^/* 
standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct super 
vision of the University only when on the campus, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

69 



I 



• 



»Ial activities In ^md,mM^ .i. , to conduct th«, soci.l .„d «„ 
business prlncipleT Whe" s„A Z^Z ^"^ r'"" '"" ">«•» "'« 

FRATERNITIES, SOCIETIES, AND CLUBS 

vefsrTc!llfrp't ''""'"■^'■^ fraternities and societies in the U„i 

to honor students, both men and w^men , n\ T'^"^ ^"^^'^'^y "P^" 
Xi, an honorary scientirf-ra^^fnSrScr:" S^^^^^^^^^ 

t^n^S^rSSXtXr^^ ^" no^'^JurJar tS 

for women recognizing ser;ice Lade^h^n T, IT^ t""'"" '^°"°'" ^°"«t>- 
Belta. a nation^r ^ re!hmrn ^^n^ sl.Ts ic" ote^.'^k^ 
national freshman honor societv for nn^r. a ^^^^^y^ ^^m Eta Sigma, 

encourage development in":Safi;d"Letr"^^^^^^^^ 

Alpha Chi Sigma a natLr'T, "^*'«"^' honorary engineering fraternity; 
Bla'de, a na^Snal' rnSTlo::^},^^^^^ -d 

society for basic course R n T r' f ^f '"^ J^'A^s, a national militarj- 

joumalistic f rate^^^f Omi^ron ' Nu a n'at ' "^1 ^'"'^ "^P^"""' " "^*'''"^' 
Alpha Psi Omega, a^n^tlnrdLl^^c^o^erBerilprp"^^^ 
accounting honorary fratemitv Pi <?,VmT a'i V , ' ^ "^*'°"^' 

AVpha' eZ,1 p?' 'i!*'; ,*'?* .'^■""' f "»• Sigma Alpha Mu. ..J 

ssSTn/SaT "'• r ", ■'-- " 'Smr/hi^BUtii. ; 

aororities, and Alpha Sigma, a local sorority. 

Clubs and Societies. Many clubs and societies, with literary scientific 
social and other special objectives, are maintained in the uJJeSity Some 

studentirH'""^ student organizations; others are conducted oLlyb 
Students and members of the famlfv Ti,^ Hc^- • jf ^^ j^^^^^^ ^j 

r^ MA, lacuity. Ihe list is as follows- Ap-nVnlfnra 

Council, Authorship Club, Bacteriology Society, Engineering ctu^S 

70 



ticulture Club, Block and Bridle Club, Calvert Debate Club, Women's 
Athletic Association, Footlight Club, Rossbourg Club, American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers, Chess Club, Swimming Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Clef and Key, Radio Club, Camera Club, Terrapin 
Trail Club, Student Grange, Farm Economics Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Riding Club, Collegiate Chamber of Commerce, Der Deutsche 
Verein, Spanish Club, Le Cercle Francaise, Chemical Engineering Club, 
Freshman Chemical Society, American Chemical Society, and Daydodgers 
Club. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

Staflf. The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the 
students, not solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities 
whose development along all lines, including the moral and religious, is 
included in the educational process. Pastors representing the major denom- 
inational bodies are officially appointed by the Churches for work vdth the 
students of their respective faiths. Each of the Student Pastors also serves 
a local church of his denomination, which the students are urged to attend. 

Committee on Religious Afifairs and Social Service. A faculty committee 
on Religious Affairs and Social Service has as its principal function the 
stimulation of religious thought and activity on the campus. It brings noted 
speakers on religious subjects to the campus from time to time. The com- 
mittee cooperates with the student pastors in visiting the students, and 
assists the student denominational clubs in every way that it can. Oppor- 
tunities are provided for students to consult with pastors representing the 
denominations of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religion is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a 
denominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of service. This year 
the list includes the Baptist Student Union, the Episcopal Club, the 
Lutheran Club, the Newman Qub, the Hillel Foundation, the Methodist Club, 
and the Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet monthly or semi-monthly for 
worship and discussion, and occasionally for social purposes. A pastor or 
a member of the faculty serves as adviser. Evensong is held every Sunday 
evening under the auspices of the various denominational clubs. A local 
Y. W. C. A. also provides a variety of activities and services on a non- 
denominational basis. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Four student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications. 

71 



The Diamondback, a semi-weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is pub- 
lished by the students. This publication summarizes the University news 
and provides a medium of expression for the discussion of matters of 
interest to the students and the faculty. 

The Terrapin is the student annual published by the Junior Class. It is 
a reflection of student activities, serving to commemorate the principal 
events of the college year. 

The Old Line is a monthly magazine issued by the students containing 
short stories, cartoons, humorous material, poetry, and features of gen- 
eral interest. 

The "M" Book is a handbook issued each September by the Student Gov- 
ernment Association for the benefit of incoming students to acquaint them 
with general University life. 

ALUMNI 

The Alimini Council, which is composed of representatives of each school 
and college in the University, coordinates all general Alumni interest. 
Alumni activities are further unified in two ways. There are organized 
alumni associations in the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, 
and Nursing located in Baltimore. The alumni of the Colleges of Agricul- 
ture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics, located at College Park, constitute a general Association, each 
group haiving its own Board of Representatives. Each school and college 
Alumni organization exerts an active interest in the welfare of its respective 
graduates. 



72 



SECTION II 
Administrative Divisions 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

T B. SYMONS, Dean. Director of Extension. 
r! B. Corbett, Director, Experiment Station, 
H F COTTERMAN, Assistant Dean, 

ing of young »««"*" J. "^''"nvsteScinv^^^^^^ on projects of impor- 

Research, the conducting of ^^^^^^^f ^\ ^„^i„„^ the rendering of assistance, 
tance to agricultural interests <3) Exte.^ion ^^^^.^^. ^^^ 

in the solution of farm and ^^^'J^^^^ll^.^i, and control measures 
!:iStr;h;;h :rr=?nir; L the common good. . 

Resident Instruction 

The courses in resident f^^^Z^^^^^ Xt^s^fm to^M 
sonnel for agricultural and -"^^ mdustnes. ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^_ 

students for one or more of the many hems ^^ ^^^^^^ts in 

ment to persons with special '^'"f .^^^ The t^'enty-two professional cur- 
fundamentals receives special ^"jn^ioru The twenty J ^^^^,^^, 
ricula of the College are arranged ^Mth a view ^j ^ ^^^g 

work with associated -^-fJJ^^^t^ JuSn wM^ the/ai^e being 
men and women are given a basic Sfneiai ea 

instructed in the vanous branches o Jg-;Uure. ^^ ^ ^^^^^^ .^ ^^^^^^^ 
The College provides education foi those husbandry, 

farming, liv. stock P-duction, some t^^^^^^^^ fl,,d 

fruit or vegetable gro™.flo^^^^^^^^ ^^^ivities connected 

crop production, or in the t^ignjy ^ ^s farm managers, for 

with these industries. It prepares men to serve responsible 

positions with commercial '^onc^ns rela ed to a^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^. 

positions as teachers in agricultural <=oll«^^^^ JXc;:". ^^^periment stations, 
tional agriculture in high schools or -y'}llfl^'l^^^^^^Z the United 
for extension work, f- regulatory -*- -- and ^o-erv.^^ ^^^^^^_ 

r/rJmSir i^ t^Snt rarri^n, and regulatory work. 

73 



Research 

Through research of the Experiment Station, the frontiers of knowledge 
relating to agriculture and the fundamental sciences underlying it are con- 
stantly being extended and solutions for important problems are being 
found. Research projects in many fields are in progress. Students taking 
courses in agriculture from instructors who devote part time to research 
or are closely associated with it are kept in close touch with the latest 
discoveries and developments in the investigations under way. The findings 
of the Experiment Station thus provide a real source of information for 
use in classrooms, and make possible a virility and exactness in instruction 
valuable in the extreme. The authority of scientific investigation is con- 
stantly before the student. 

Extension 

Constant contact of the Extension Service with the problems of fanners 
and their families in all parts of the State through its county agents, home 
demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident in- 
struction in the College of Agriculture. This Service operates in two ways: 
problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of research 
workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are taken to 
farmers and their families in their home communities through practical 
demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State contribute 
to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College helps them 
in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. Instruction is vitalized 
through participation in or association with extension activities. 

Regulatory , 

Through their Regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are constantly dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and providing more reliable seeds for farm planting. 
These fields constitute an important part of agricultural education, as 
standardization and education go hand in hand in the development of an 
industry. Direct contact on the part of professors in their respective 
departments with the problems and methods involved makes for effective 
instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Mary- 
land lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, 
and regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the 
several departments, and in the institution as a whole. Those who give 
instruction to students are closely associated with the research, extension 

74 



iy cases, devote a portion of ^ei^^^e ^ one^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 
Tactivities. Close coordination of these lour yv Apiculture, and 

t;tU to support a ^f ^^^^Jf^'jf/, ^Sil^^^^^^^ be possible- 

^ords a higher degree of ^P^^^^^^^"^ '^IxZays informed on the latest 
tt insures instructors an "PP"'^""'^^ J? ".^ ^.J, ^^h current trends and 
suits of research, and ^o ^^^^^^^^^^ activities. Heads 

blems which are revealed m extension a g ^^^^^^ ^^ 

S departments hold ^^^a^ J^Xmentst tte frontiers of the several 
trX^eirasIt tpSSr organization to put him. 

Advisory Councils 

1 * fi,a rnllee-e shall be responsive to agricultural 
In order that the ^ '^^li^'^eet Te nSds of the several agricultural 
interests and shaU f^'^'^'^^^^'^ZsTot instruction shall at all times 
industries in the State and ^^^^^^^ pursue them, Advisory Councils 
be made >--* j?2!;\Hhe*^t^:? iXstSes of agriculture. These Coun- 
have been constituted ^^/'^f .""X _esnective lines of agriculture in Mary- 
cils are composed of eaders m th« respective ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^,, 

land, and the ^"^2=*-^^ /^^^e^^^^^ S Ss. By this means the College, 
t^H.^^TATZSn^^r. .ept abreast of developments. 

Facilities and Equipment 

effective instruction in the relatea oasic ^ ^ facilities for research 

*e university of M^W is P--;^ed -^^ --^S more than 1200 acres, 
and instruction m agn^re. *^^ ^^ investigational purposes, 

are owned and operated for inftf^<=*r^*^ ^^. ^^^ animal husbandry 
One of the most complete and '"°*!^™^^'V/thT principal breeds of dairy 
work in the country, together -JitS^Jnd mateSs f'or instruction and 
cattle and livestock, provides f^^jties ^na m faciUties are 

research in these industries Excellent ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^,,,^^^ in farm 
available in the Agronomy Departmex^ ^ or breetog ^^^ ^ ^^^^.^^ ^^^ 
crops and for soils research, ^he Poultry Ueparx ^^^ 

laboratories and classrooms, a P^f * ^."^P^^^^^HoSlture Department 
flocks of all the important breeds »^ P^f ^ J^^ J,° J^ and gardens for 
is housed in a separate building, and has ample o 

its various lines of work. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes ^^'^^ZIuTaX^S^ 
cultural Chemistry; Agricultural Educat on a^^^^^^^^ ^,,^.n6ry; 

Engineering; Agronomy (indudm^^^^^^^^^^ ; Botany; Dairy Husbandry ('in- 
Bacteriology (mcluding Food T«^*^"™ ^ (including Bee Culture) ; 

76 



Pomology, Olericulture, Floriculture, and Ornamental Horticulture) • P , 
try Husbandry; Veterinary Science. xzorucuiture) , Pom. 

^ Admission 

tion l! ''^"'~"*^ ^- ^^'-on are discussed under Admission, in Sec- 

Junior Standing 

To attain junior standing in the College of Agriculture a stud^r,f „ 
have an average grade of C in not less thfn 62 semester houi. '"^' 

. . Requirements for Graduation 

f orVadTtrn "^'^"^T^^'f ""'^. *^-ty--ght semester hours is required 

in'rssn s^cttt rrgSSrt ''-' ''''-'--' -' '-^^'^ 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

for praSllTt •?^P^'»«"* ^"^ ^^IP *» "^ke available opportunities 
itude^t tl ""'^ experience along his major line of study for each 

iperSnc" For'^tr " " ''f department and who is in need of su 
mav hfr^V K "^^P^"^n<=ed students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in th. 
several voluntary organizations sponsored by the College SsT organi a 
tions are as follows: Student Grange, Livestock Club, Future Farmerrof 

i::^'.^^:ss^t^^^^ --' --— -nom-rc,; 

fully as valuable as that acquired from regularly prescribed coursed 
/T !,t'«lent Grange represents the Great National Farmers' fratemitv 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes traiZg^Tr ™ al 
eadershap. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges^roLhou 

^JTy; ,?' J^^'^''''' ^'"^ '=°'^'"^*^ *^^ Students' S^n? Shot 1 
Contest held on the campus in the Spring. The Future Farmers of AmS 
foster mterest m vocational education, and the Collegiate ChapterTerve 

the Umversity. The Bacteriological organization is representative of a 
national group with chapters in many institutions. The AgSTtural Eco 
nomics group conducts special studies in the field of Agricultural Sonom^^s 
All these organizations have regular meetings, arrange special pro™ 
and contribute to the extra-curricular life of students. Programs. 

Alpha Zeta— National Agricultural Honor Fraternity 

Membership in this fraternity is chosen from students in the College of 
Agriculture who have displayed agricultural motive and executive abmtv 
This organization fosters scholarship, and to that end awa^ra g^ W m d , 

JLSd rtg^thl t/'^^^'"^'^ ''-' ^" ^^^^"'^"^^ -^'^ -'^^ «- ^Shes^ 

76 



Agricultural Student Council 

The Agricultural Student Council is a delegate body made up of two 
representatives from each of the above organizations. Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of students in agriculture, and to promote work which 
IS beneficial to the College of Agriculture. It is the organization that is 
representative of the agricultural student body as a whole. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes: Technical, Scientific, and Special. i 

(1) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools; as executives, 
salesmen, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricul- 
tural contact and point of view. 

(2) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal, 
State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment sta- 
tions; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return to 
the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. (For details see Special Students in Agriculture, page 103.) 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to an adviser from 
the faculty. Advisers are of two kinds — departmental and general. Depart- 
mental advisers consist of heads of departments or persons selected by 
them to advise students with curricula in their respective departments. 
General advisers are selected for students who have no definite choice of 
curriculum in mind, or who wish to pursue the general curriculum in agri- 
culture. 

Cases of students with poor records are referred to the Admission, 
Guidance, and Adjustment Committee, for review and advice. 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow afford opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

Students wishing to take Advanced R. O. T. C. may, upon consultation 
with the Department Head and with the consent of the Dean, substitute this 
subject either as an elective or for certain requirements in junior and 
senior years. 

77 



Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is 
common to all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to aiford the student 
an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
and the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a 
student before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to 
another, or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in some other 
college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent immediately to departmental advisers for coimsel as to 
the wisest selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their 
special interests and their probable future programs. Students entering 
the freshman year with no definite curriculum in mind, or who are unde- 
cided, are assigned to general advisers, who assist with the choice of fresh- 
man electives and during the course of the year acquaint them with the 
opportunities in the upper curricula in the College of Agriculture and in 
the other divisions of the University. If by the close of the freshman year 
a student makes no definite choice of a specialized curriculum, he continues 
under the g-uidance of his general adviser and at the beginning of the 
sophomore year enters Agriculture (General Curriculum). 



Curriculum 



Semester 



Freshman Year ' / 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly).._ 3 

General Botany (Bot. If) ~ ~ ~.... 4 

(General Zoology (Zool. Is) - - — 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ~ 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - 1 

Elect one of the following: 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

♦Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) _.... 3 

Introductory Physics (Phys. 3y) _ ~- 3 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) and Farm 

Organization (A. E. 2s) 3 



// 

4 
3 

4 
1 



3 
3 
3 

3 



* Students who expect to pursue the curriculum in Agricultural Chemistry must be 
prepared to elect Math. 21f and 22s. 



AGRICULTURE— GENERAL 

This curriculum is designed for persons wishing to return to the farm, 

Tprtino- to enter business allied to fanning, others seekmg a general 

'Ter than aCTaUzed knowledge of the field of agriculture, and those 

•,,«. -fnr rountv and other agricultural agents. 
'TTroper use of the electives allowed in this course a student may 
eJose Xd o" concentration in agriculture and at the same t.me elect 
courses to enhance his liberal culture. 

Curriculum 

Seinester 

J ^^ 

Sophomore Year ^ 

English Sequence ^ _ 

Geology (Geol. If) _ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) ^ ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) -- __ 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A.H. 2f) ^ ^ 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D.H. Is) ^ 

Physical or Biological Science Sequence - ■..^.-■- _-^- 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M.I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y ) - " _ 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) - __ ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ^ 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s) ^ ^ 

Poultry Production (P.H. If) - - ^ 

Poultry Management (P.H. 2s) ^ 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) ^ ^ 

Electives 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) - — - "" 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) -- ^ 

Farm Management (A. E. lOSf).... - - - ^ 

Analysis of Farm Business (A. E. 107s) -• ^ 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) -•-- " __ ^ 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) -■■■- ^ 

Electives - - - " " 

15 15 



78 



79 



/ 

I 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

work m agriculture exnerimpnf ofof eiectives to ht the student for 

food labor^ories indus~enfa^^^^^^^ '""""^' ^'f'^'^' ^-^ys 

products and the fertilizer TndusS ' ^'"'''^ °' '^^"^''"^ food 

The outline calls for five years of <!HiH,r Th^ „„ w 
of this outline leads to the decree of bIh.i? 5"^?'"*'°" "^ ^""r years 
use of electives in the fourth vear IJ^t . ^l^"'^" ^^ *^« P^-^P^r 
study for the fifth vZ.r7^ J ^ continuation of this course of 

student .ay'^uSif/for' tt MaL^r^Xtr "' ^ ^"^^^"^"^^ ^•'-'^- ^^ 

Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ^ Semester 

Survey and Composition (Eng 2f 3s) ^^ 

Calculus (Math. 23y) _ „' ^ 3 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A E If ) t ^ 

Farm Organization (A. E. 2s).._ "^ - 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) ' ' " ~Z ^ 

Electives (Biology) " ^ 2 

- 4 4 

Junior Year 

Elementar>^ Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Av) 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By): " I I 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y) " ^ " 

Modem Language " '^ ^ 

Geology (Geol. If) '^Z " " ^ ^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) " ^ ~ 

Electives ( Biology) — 3 

O 

Senior Year ^'^ ^' 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) 

Modem Language * ^ ^ 

Electives (Biology) 3 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) Z ' ^ ^ 

Electives ~ ~ 4 4 

" 3 3 



R 



80 



16 



16 



Semester 

Fifth Year I II 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) 2 2 

Organic Laboratory (Chem. 117y) _ 2 2 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (Chem. 118y) 1 1 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) 3 3 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 2 

Electives (Chemistry) 2 2 

Electives ( Biology ) -..- 3 3 

15 15 

AGRICULTURE EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The primary objective of the curricula is the teaching of secondary vo- 
cational agriculture, the work of county agents, and allied lines of the rural 
education service. Graduates from these curricula are in demand in rural 
business, particularly of the cooperative type. A number have entered the 
Federal service. Others are engaged in teaching and research in agricul- 
tural colleges. Quite a few have returned to the farm as owner managers. 

Curriculum A is designed for persons who have had no vocational agri- 
culture in high school or less than two years of such instruction. Cur- 
riculum B is designed for persons who have had two or more years of 
thoroughgoing instruction in secondary agriculture of the type offered in 
Maryland high schools. Curriculum B relieves the student of the necessity 
of pursuing beginning agriculture courses in the first two years of his 
college course, permits him to carry general courses in lieu of those dis- 
placed by his vocational program in high school, and offers him an oppor- 
tunity to lay a broad foundation for the advanced work in agriculture of 
the last two college years. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curricula must present evidence of having ac- 
quired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high averages may upon petition be relieved of certain re- 
quirements in these curricula, when evidence is presented showing that 
either through experience or through previous training the prescription is 
non-essential; or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 

Curriculum A. Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 3 — 

Introductory Entomology (Etit. Is) _ — 3 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) _ - — 3 — 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) _ — 3 

Geology (Geol. If).. 3 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) „ — 3 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A.H. 2f) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D.H. Is) _ — 3 

General Horticulture (Hort. If) - 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3v or 6v and 8v> 2 9 

81 17 17 



Junior Year 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr, lOlf) ~ 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) _ „ 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) _ 

Poultry Production (P. H. If) 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) ...„ „ 

Greneral Horticulture ( Hort. 2s ) _ 

General Shop (Ind. Ed. 167y) 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) - „.. 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f ) 

Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107s) _ 

Dairy Production (D.H. lOlf ) 



Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) _..... 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) ~ 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf, 102s) 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f) 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) _ 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112s) 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) „ 

Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools. (R. Ed. 114s) 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120y) 

Electives ~ 



Semester 


I 


// 


3 




3 


-^ 


— 


3 


3 


-^ 


— 


3 


— 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 





— 3 



18 

3 
3 

1 
3 



15 

Curriculum B. 

Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) — 

Geology (Geol. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) „ — 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s) - 3 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A.H. 2f) 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _ — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - — - 2 

♦Electives - 3 



17 



15 



3 
1 

3 
1 



— 1 

2 
2 



o 




14 



3 

3 



2 
3 

17 



*If Introductory Physics (Phys. 3y) is not elected in the freshman year, it must be 
elected in the sophomore year. 

82 



*fw Y ear 
fS Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 

SttSon -d'rAnilU of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107s) ZIII'—--- 

Electives 



Educational Psychology (Psych lOf) •-•■- 

Farm Management (A. E. lOSf).-... 7"-"T'7n.f .qos) 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf, 1"^^) -... 

GaTEngines, Tractors, and Automobiles (Agr. Engr 102s) 

?ScS Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f ) -... 

Pnral Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) •- T:r"""T ,io_^ 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112s) 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) "T"T:"7p Vd 114s) 

TeSing Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114s) 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120y) - ■^^^"^^'"""'ZIL 

Electives. 



Semester 

I n 

3 — 

1 1 

2 2 



11 

17 

3 
3 
1 



3 

11 

17 



1 
3 



Electives in Curriculum B: 

Animal Husbandry - 

Agronomy 

Dairy Husbandry 

Farm Management 



3 — 

_- 3 

- 1 

1 — 

__ 1 

3 
2 

14 

3 hours 
6 hours 
6 hours 

6 hours 
3 hours 

7 hours 



2 
1 

14 



Poultry - -•- ■" 

Liberal or Subjects of Special Interest 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department offers to students of agriculture training in those^^^^^^ 

buildings, and farm drainage production costs by the 

The modem tendency m farming is to ™^'*''^/ " , ^^g 

use of farm machinery -its "f ^^^^ ^^^^ tZ^iJ^sTZ^iy 

horses -^-}>-^\''t^:^^^^^rio^^\\rao.t all farms. It is 

.X sr s: ^^HS ~ Eff br, 

standpoint of economy, sanitation, etticiency, cinu app 
important. 

83 



of ?.Th ^"^ [" '^^ '*"*^^ "^ •^'•^"^g« are as follows: the princin, 

of land drainage, the design and consti-uction of tile drain svster^'' 
open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. ^ ' ^"^ 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE-ENGINEERING 

For those students who wish to specialize in the application of en^ine^,- 
pnnciples to the physical and biological problems of agScultureTe •' 
offered a combined program, extending over a five-yeafDerioi «? '' 
jointly by the College of Agriculture Ld the College of Strine'T 
leadmg to a degree from each of these Colleges J^ngmeenng, and 

Graduates from such a program should be prepared to enter State v^ 
eral or commercial fields of a<=tivity in such work as soif anj Zerlt 

structures, and m the development of new uses for farm products and X 
profitable utilization of farm wastes and by-products ^' 

To be properly trained in these fields a student should have a bro.rf«, 
knowledge of basic and applied engineering principles than" uld b ^ 
vided m a four-year course in agriculture. He would also need a bro^l 
training m the fundamentals of agriculture than a standard four ^^ 
course m engineering could furnish ^ 

eu^iufumTr t^'t^'""" ^^^f-r -mbined program follow the same 
curriculum for the first year. At the end of the first year they decide 

Upon completion of the required course of study the degree of Bachelor 

StwT' :^ ''T?'''''' " ^^^'^^ ^' ^^^ -^ «^ '^e fo-rt^ yLr Fort 
fifth year the student registers in the College of Engineering and at h 
end of hat year receives his degree in avil, Electrical, M;chanical 
Chemical Engmeering from that College. lecnanicai or 

Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) "l ^i 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ZZZI i i 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math 2 If 22s) a a 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) „ _ ' " 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) ZZ..Z. t 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) " 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) Z^ZZZIZ.. " ~~ ^ 

Introduction to Engineering (Eligr. If) " ~T ^ 

Introductory Zoology (Zool. 3f) ZZIZ7Z " 3 _ 

Introductory Botany (Bot. 2s) „ _ " __ 

Agriculture Freshman Lectures _ ~ " ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or PhysicafEducation Z^ys"^ M "~ 
ly or 2y and 4y) „ _ _ ^ ' ^ 



-1 



The remainder of this curriculum is for the student whose objective, at 
the end of the fifth year, is a degree in Civil Engineering. Similar curricula 
will be arranged for options in Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical Engi- 
neering. 

Semester 

Sophomore Year — Civil Engineering Option I II 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) - - — 2 — 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) -... 4 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) -....„ „ 5 5 

Advanced Engineering Drawing (Dr. 3f) .^ 2 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) > _ _ — 3 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) _ - 2 3 

Geology (Geol. If) -...._ _ _ 3 — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - - 2 2 

Elective in Agriculture .„ _ — 8 



20 

Junior Year — Civil Engineering Option 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6s) — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf ) 5 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) _ ^^ _ — 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) _ _ - _ _ 4 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) - _ 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) „ — 

Farm Mechanics (Agr. Engr. 104f) _ _ „ 1 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) _ „ ^ — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _ .•. — 

Electives in Agriculture 4 



Fourth Year — Civil Eyigineering Option 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) _ . 

Principles of Mechanical Enineering (M. E. lOlf) „. 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) _ 

Cun^es and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) _ _ 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s )..„ ...._ ^._ 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 

Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) 

Farm Buildings (Agr. Engr. 105f) 

Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles (Agr. Engr. 102s) 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) - 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) _...._ _ 

Technical Society _ _ - „ 



3 

3 

3 

2 

3 
3 



20 

2 
2 



8 
8 

4-5 



17 16-17 



4 
3 
4 
3 
3 



84 



19 



19 



17 



85 



17 






Fifth Year — Civil Engineering Option 

The curriculum for the fifth year is the senior year curriculum in ci i 
engineering, without change, as shown under College of Engineering. 

AGRONOMY 

The curricula in the department are designed to prepare students for th 
following occupations or positions: specialized crop farming; genera' farm^ 
ing; technical workers in private and public concerns; scientists in soil and 
crop technology; and agricultural representatives with commercial and 
industrial organizations. 

The curriculum in crop production aims to give the student the funda- 
mental principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the 
work to the young man who wishes to apply the scientific principles of field 
crop culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough free- 
dom is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register 
for subjects which might go along with the growing of crops on his par- 
ticular farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should 
be well fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, 
for employment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State 
or Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The curriculum in plant breeding aims to prepare students for work in 
this field, with commercial seed companies, in the Federal Government, and 
in State Agricultural Experiment Stations. In this curriculum, founda- 
tions are also laid in fundamental sciences for the graduate work which 
many will want to pursue in further preparation for advancement in the 
work of plant breeding. 

The curriculum in soils gives instructions in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future fanner 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to take 
up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The department 
possesses the necessary equipment and facilities for instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especial- 
ly in the pot culture laboratories, and on the experimental fields at the 
station and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
research as technical workers or as representatives of commercial or in- 
dustrial organizations, to conduct research in experiment stations, to teach 
in agricultural colleges, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Plant 
Industry and the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States Department 
of Agriculture. 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) _..... 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) _ 

Geology (Geol. If) -^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) „ „ 

^Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) _...._ 

♦Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

J% ^f (jX \3 V wIaIX^L ^J _y m ■■■■■■•••••••■••••■••B«^**B***«a***>** ■•■•»■■••••■•■•*••••■>••••••>■>>■••••■*■ ■■■■••^•■•••■•■^■•■^•••■■••■■■■a* aM 

Select from following: 

(Jeneral Physics (Phys. ly) _ 4 

Agriculture (Any course under 100) 2-4 

fCalculus (Math. 23y) ....._ ^ - 4 



Semester 

I n 

3 — 

— 3 
3 — 

— 3-5 
2 2 
1 1 



Crop Production 

Junior Year 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) 3 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f ) 1-3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) _ 2 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) _ „ _ 4 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _ — 

Electives „ ^ 5 

15-17 
Senior Year 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f ) _ _...._ „ ._ „ 2 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf ) - 3 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) — 

Selected Crop Studies (Agron. 104f, 105s) 1-2 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) ....„ _.... 3 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) _ _ 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107 s) _ — 

Farm Forestry (For. 101s) _ — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) 3 

Electives 1 



4 

2^ 

4 



13-15 13-17 



4 
2 

3 

7 

16 



2 

1-2 



2 
2 



8 



lift 



16-17 15-16 

Under certain conditions a sequence in biology may be substituted for Organic Chemistry. 
TKequired of students majoring in Plant Breeding. 



86 



87 



Crop Breeding 

Junior Year ^^mster 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) IIIII -_ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) __ 

General Physics (Phy. ly) Z~ " 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) ^ZZZZ. 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) JZZZZZZ 2 

Electives „ 

" ~ ~ ~ 

16 
Senior Year 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) _ 3 

Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) ZZZIZZI — - 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f) ZZ"" 2 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) „.... ,ZZZ -- 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) „1...ZZZ.... 3 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) — 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 

Soil Geography ( Soils 103f ) "IIZZZIII 3 

Electives ., 



// 

2 
3 

4 
4 



3 



16 



16 



9 
16 



Soils 



T . xr Semester 
Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 

General Bacteriology .(Bact. If) 4 

Soil Management (Soils 102 s) _ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) Z.Z.Z.ZZ.Z... 4 

Electives ^ 

*• D 

Senior Year 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) ....„ _....„ 3 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121 s) — 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) " 3 

Farm Drainage (Agr. Engr. 107s) "IZ.Z.I"'Z"I — 

Soil Conservation (Soils 112s) _ " 

El ecti ves _ ^ ^ 



// 

2 
3 



8 
16 



16 



88 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in animal husbandry is designed to prepare students for 
three distinct professional fields: livestock farming, technical workers and 
dvisors in private and public concerns, and scientists in the livestock indus- 
tries. 

Bv proper use of the electives allowed in this curriculum, the student may 
equip himself to become an owner or operator of a general or specialized 
livestock farm ; to become a county agricultural agent ; to meet the require- 
ments of positions with certain types of private and cooperative business 
concerns; or, with more technical and specialized training, to become quali- 
fied for instructional work in colleges, for investigational work in State 
and Federal experiment stations or in commercial research laboratories. 

Students who desire to enter the field of teaching or highly specialized 
research should elect the more scientific courses offered by this and by other 
departments and should further qualify themselves by continuing graduate 
studies in some specific phase of animal science. 

Modern beef cattle, horse, and sheep barns are located on the campus; a 
livestock farm within a short distance of the University and the possession 
of choice herds and flocks provide the department with the equipment and 
facilities so essential for instruction and for research in animal husbandry. 

Through the courtesy of Maryland breeders and the Bureau of Animal 
Industry, Beltsville Research Center, additional facilities, including herds 
and flocks, are available for instructional purposes. The headquarters of 
the Bureau of Animal Industry in Washington are approximately eight miles 
from the University campus. 

The curriculum for the sophomore, junior, and senior years is sug- 
gested as a guide for students wishing to major in the animal husbandry 
field. 

Curriculum 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) _...._ „ 2 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12 By) _..- „...._ 1 1 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A.H. 2f) > , 3 — 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D.H. Is) - — 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _.... — 3 

Geology (Geol. If) ..„._ _ 3 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils If) -.... -...._ — 3 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) _ — 3 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y or 

6y and 8y ) _ ....._ „ „...„ 2 2 

Electives 1 

16 17 

89 



Junior Year / .. 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) _ 2 9 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) 3 J^ 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) _ „....„ — . 

Livestock Markets and Marketing (A. H. 112f ) 2 _ 

Livestock Management (A. H. 105s) _.... ...._ — 2 

Livestock Judging (A. H. 51s) — 2 

*Sheep Production (A. H. 104f) 2 

*Pork Production (A. H. 107s) — '^ 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) 3 J! 

Electives - _ 4 5 

16 16 

Senior Yea/r 

♦Beef Cattle Production (A. H. llOf) 2 

*Draft Horse Production (A. H. 109s) — 2 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 114f) _ 3 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) 3 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107s) — 3 

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (V. S. lOlf ) _.... 3 — 

Animal Hygiene (V. S. 102s) „..._ — 3 

Electives ' _ _ 5 8 

16 16 

BACTERIOLOGY 

This department has been organized with two main purposes in view. 
The first is to give all students of the University an opportunity to obtain 
a general knowledge of this basic subject. The second is to prepare 
students for bacteriological positions (including those of dairy, sanitary, 
food, and soil bacteriologists; and federal, state, and municipal bacteriolo- 
gists) ; and for public health work of various types, research, and indus- 
trial positions. 

A. Bacteriology 

The curriculum in Bacteriology is arranged to provide an unusually thor- 
ough training in the principle phases of the science, namely, the cause and 
prevention of disease, sanitation, water purification, the microbiology of 
foods including milk and other agricultural products and bacterial meta- 
bolism, with further work in soil microbiology, research methods, and bac- 
terial classification. A knowledge of Organic and Biochemistry is also 
required. 

Freshmen planning to major in Bacteriology should elect Mathematics in 
the first year. 



*Oiily two production courses are required for graduation, 
two of these four courses to fulfill this requirement. 



90 



The student may choose any 



Curriculum 

If^tZTof Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) 

Senls of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) - 

German or French -..-- -•• 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - - - __ 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2s) - 

TTvnnsitorv Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) -"• 

BaS R. 0. T. G. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) -- - - - 

Electives - " 



Semester 


I 


// 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


— 


^.^ 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3-4 


,V4 



17-18 17-18 



Junior Year 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) - - ^ 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112s) -.-. - 

Serology (Bact. 115f) - - - ~ ^ 

Advanced Methods (Bact. 113s) - - - 

General Physics (Phys. ly) ~ - - 

Electives ( Bacteriology ) - - 

Electives (Other) - - - -: -- 



3-5 



Senior Year 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s) 

Journal Club (Bact. 131f, 132s) 

Electives ( Bacteriology ) - 

Electives ( Other) 



B. Food Technology 



2 

4 

2-4 

2-6 



15-17 15-17 



3 — 

— 4 

1 1 

5-6 4-2 

6-8 6-10 



15-17 15-17 



This curriculum offers combinations of courses that will equip the student 
with an unusually broad knowledge of the many aspects involved m tood 
manufacture. In the curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals 
of biology, chemistry, and engineering which, when supported by the 
proper electives and by practical experience, will serve as an excellent 
background for supervisory work in food factory operation, salesmanship, 

research in the food industries, etc. ^ xx. r i. 

The freshmen will enroll for the common curriculum of the freshman 
year as shown for the College of Agriculture, and will elect Elements of 
College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s). 



91 



/ 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year r ^^^ 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) _ _.... 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) ^ 2 ^ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) , _ 4 ^ 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) 2 ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) _ _ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. \ 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) _ „ „ _ „...„ 2 9 

Electives _ r; 

*" ■■' - ^ V\ 

Junior Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f) 4 

Refrigeration (M. E. 107s) ,._ __ ^ 

Food Bacteriology (Bact. lllf) _ 3 ^ 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112s) _ _ „ __ ^ 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. 103Ay) „.._ 2 2 

Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. lOSBy) 1 1 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) _ 2 2 

Electives "IIIZ 4-5 5^ 

„ . 16-17 1&-1m 
Senior Year 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) '. 3 2 

Industrial Management (O. and M. 121s) _ _ 3 

Food Analysis (Chem. 115y) _ „.._ 2 2 

Technology Conference (F. Tech. 130y) 1 1 

Regulatory Control (F. Tech. llOf) _ l 

Food Sanitation (F. Tech. 120s) „ _ _ 2 

Electives _ 9_10 ^4 



16-17 I6-I: 



BOTANY 



The department offers three major fields of work: general botaiiv and 
morphology; plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology. The 
required courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same 
for all students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botanical 
courses to suit his particular interests in botanical science. Both the junior 
and senior years also allow considerable freedom in the election of non- 
botanical courses, in order to round out a fairly broad cultural education, 
Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish to 
meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates may 
elect the necessary work in education. 

92 



The curriculum as outlined lays a good foundation for students who 
wish to pursue graduate work in botanical science in preparation for col- 
lege teaching and for research in state experiment stations, in the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and in private research institutions and 
laboratories. 

The curriculum also affords students an opportunity for training for 
other vocations involving various botanical applications, such as extension 
work, and positions with seed companies, canning companies, companies 
making spray materials, and other commercial concerns. 

Curriculum 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I Jl 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) _ 4 — 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) — 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) „ 3 3 

^Modern Language _ 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Electives — — 4 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf ) 4 -— 

General Physics ("Phys. ly) „ 4 4 

Plant Taxonomy (Bot. 103s) _ , — 3 

Plant Microtechnique (Bot. 107s) _ — 2 

Electives 8 7 

Senior Year 

Genetics (Zool. 104f ) _ 3 — 

Seminar (Bot. 108 f and s, or Pit. Path. 106 f and s) 1 1 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) _ — 3 

Botanical Electives (Maximum) 6 6 

Other Electives (Minimum) _ _ „ 6 6 

16 16 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The department offers instruction in two major lines of work: dairy pro- 
duction and dairy manufacturing. The curricula are designed to prepare 
students for practical work in dairy farming and dairy manufacturing in- 
dustries, for scientific w^ork in the dairy industry, and for technical workers 
with milk cooperatives, dairy breed associations, and private and public 
concerns. 



Twelve hours of modern language are required. If it is not begun until the sophomore 
J^ai', the last six hours will be elected in the junior or senior year. 

93 



In the dairy production curriculum, students are given technical and prac 
tical training in the breeding, feeding, management, and selection of dairi' 
cattle and in the handling and marketing of milk and milk products. With 
additional courses in the physical, biological and social sciences, student^ 
are qualified to become owners or operators of dairy farms, for breed pro. 
motion and sales work, for employment with private and cooperative busi- 
ness organizations, and for county agent work. By careful election of 
courses the student may lay a foundation for instructional work in colleges 
and for investigational work in experiment stations and commercial research 
laboratories. 

For those students interested in dairy manufacturing, the curriculum is 
designed to prepare students for practical and scientific work concerned 
with the processing and distribution of milk, manufacture and handling of 
butter, cheese, ice cream, and other milk products, and in dairy plant opera- 
tion and management. Students satisfactorily majoring in dairy manufac- 
turing are qualified for the many technical and applied positions in the 
various branches of the dairy industry. 

These curricula permit specialization in the respective fields, but allo\r 
considerable latitude in the election of courses in other departments. When 
desirable, changes may be made to meet the special needs of some students. 
For example, those students who desire to enter the field of teaching and 
research should elect more of the scientific courses offered in this and the 
other departments. In most cases these students will be advised to pursue 
graduate work in some particular phase of dairy science. 

The dairy industry of Maryland ranks first in economic importance among 
the agricultural industries of the State. Such an industry needs and de- 
pends upon intelligent, well trained men for work in dairying. The depart- 
ment is equipped with modem dairy barns, dairy herds, dairy manufactur- 
ing plant and salesroom, and laboratories and other facilities for instruc- 
tional and research work in dairy husbandry. 

Dairy Production 

The following curriculum for the sophomore, junior, and senior years is 

suggested as a guide for students majoring in dairy production. Some elec- 

tives from dairy manufacturing, animal husbandry, agronomy, and veteri- 
nary science will be helpful. 

Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I /^ 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 2 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2f) _ 3 — 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. Is) — ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) _ 4 — 

Geology (Geol. If) „ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — ^ 

Forage Crop Production (Agron. 2s) — ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (3y or 6y 

and 8y) 2 2 

Electives _ 2 ^ 

94 16 1^ 



Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) - ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 

fenetics (Zool. 104f ) - 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103s) ~ - - 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f ) - - 3 

Dairy Cattle Management (D. H. 106f) 2 

Dairy Cattle Judging (D. H. 50s) ~ -- 

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (V. S. lOlf) 3 

Animal Hygiene (V. S. 102s) — 

Electives — • - - 

16 



Semester 
II 

2 
3 



3 



3 

3 

16 



Senior Year 

Dairv Production (D. H. lOlf) - *^ 

Dairy Breeds and Breeding (D. H. 105s) — 2 

Market Milk (D. H. 113f ) - - ^ — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f ) -- - ^ 

Animal Nutrition (A. H. 114f ) - --- 3 — 

Dairy Literature (D. H. 119f, 120s) 1 ^ 

Electives - - - 

16 16 

Dairy Manufacturing 

The following curriculum for sophomore, junior, and senior years is sug- 
gested for students who wish to major in dairy manufacturing. Electives 
in dairy production, chemistry, and bacteriology will be helpful. 



Curriculum 



Semester 



Sophomore Year * 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) 1 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4s) — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - ^ 

Fundamentals of Dairying (D. H. Is) - - — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) — 3 

Introductory Physics (Phys. 3y) - 3 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 

or 6y and 8y) - 2 

Electives - > ~ - - 1 



// 

2 

1 
4 



16 



3 

2 

1 

16 



95 






Junior Year / 

Milk Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) 4 

Dairy Products Bacteriology (Bact. 102s) — 

Grading Dairy Products (D: H. 51s) — 

Dairy Mechanics (T). H. 116s) 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Cheese Making (D. H. 109f) 3 

Butter Making (D. H. llOf ) 2 

Concentrated Milks (D. H. Ills) — 

Ice Cream Making (D. H. 112s) „ — 

Electives 3 



Semester 
11 



16 



Senior Year 



Market Milk (D. H. 113f) „ „ 5 

Analysis of Dairy Products (D. H. 114s) 

Dairy Accounting (D. H. 117s) - 

Dairy Plant Experience (D. H. 121f, I22s) - 2 

Dairy Literature (D. H. 119f, 120s) 1 

Electives _ ^ „ 8 

16 
Suggested Elective Courses: ♦ 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 

Salesmanship (Mkt. 106s) — 

Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 109f) _ 3 

Elements of Business (0. and M. 51f) 2 

Business Law (O. and M. 101s) _ — 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f or s) 4 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 

Food Bacteriology (Bact. lllf) 3 

Sanitary Bacteriology ( Bact. 112s) - 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) ^ 1 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) - 3 



If, 



— 4 

— 1 



16 



3 
or 4 



— 3 



ENTOMOLOGY 

This department trains entomologists for work in state and federal ento- 
mological bureaus, in preparation for commercial pest control operations 
and finally, but not least, for actual insect control on their own farms. Iii 
addition, entomology is taught as a cultural subject because of its wide 
field of application, its varied subject matter, and the general interest of 
the public in the small creatures about it. 

The success of the farmer, particularly the fruit and vegetable grower, 
is in large measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of pre; 
venting or combating pests. Successful methods of control are emphasized 
in the economic courses. 

96 



3 



The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
F tension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the State Entomologist 
;n nne administrative unit enables the student to avail himself of the 
nv advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students may be assigned 
'"^vvork on Experiment Station projects already under way. The depart- 
^^ nt takes every advantage of the facilities offered by the Bureau of 
Entomology of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the Beltsville Research 
Center the National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, various other local 
laboratories, the libraries in Washington, and the Washington Entomological 
Society. Thus students are given many opportunities of meeting authorities 
in the various fields of entomology, to observe projects under way, consult 
collections, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology. Following is 
the suggested curriculum in entomology: 

Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) ~. 

Insect Morphology (Ent. 2s) — ~ 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay) 2 

Elements of Organic Laboratory (Chem. 12By) - 1 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If)... ■••■-- ^ 

Greneral Bacteriology (Bact. Is) — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) ~ — ^ 

15 

Junior Yea/r 

Insect Taxonomy (Ent. 3f ) - - — 3 

Insect Biology (Ent. 5s) — - - — 

t Economic Entomology (Ent. lOly) 2 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) - ^ 

Electives - --- - -- 4-5 

16-17 

Senior Yea/r 
'Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 103f, 104s) — 3 

Seminar (Ent. 112y) - -- - 1 

Special Problems (Ent. llOf, Ills) - 2 

Electives -... lO-H 



// 

3 
2 
1 
8 



15 



3 
2 

8 

4 

4-5 

16-17 

3 
1 
2 

10-11 



i 



16-17 16-17 

i This curriculum is based on the option of mathematics in the freshman 
I year, which subject should be elected by students electing a major in 
^entomoilogy. Students electing another course will have to make certain 
'^hanges in the sequence of some of the reqmred courses. 



tCk)urses taken in alternate years by both juniors and seniors. 

97 



FARM MANAGEMENT* 

The curriculum in farm management is designed to prepare students for 
the following types of positions: on the farm as farm operators and farm 
managers ; with farm organizations, such as the Farm Bureau and farmers' 
co-operatives; with private and corporate business concerns; and with 
State and Federal agencies, such as college teachers, extension and investi- 
gational workers. 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental train- 
ing in the basic economic principles underlying farming. While the cur- 
riculum is developed primarily from the viewpoint of farm management 
sufficient basic courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, finance. 
and land economics are included to give the student the foundation needed to 
meet the production and distribution problems confronting the individual 
farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farni 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and operat- 
ing the farm as a business enterprise. It requires not only knowledge of 
many factors involved in the production of crops and animals, but also 
administrative ability to coordinate them into the most efficient farm 
organization. Such knowledge enables the student to perceive the just 
relationship of the several factors of production and distribution as applic- 
able to local conditions, and to develop an executive and administrative 
capacity. 



Semester 



Curriculum 



Sophomore Year j 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) „ _ 2 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _... 

Greneral Horticulture (Hort. If) 3 

G*eology ( Geol. If) _ _ „ 3 

Cereal Crop Production (Agron. If) „ 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) _ _„_ _ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 



16 



Semester 



11 

2 
3 
3 



_ 3 



16 



♦students electing the Farm Management curriculum must present evidence of having 
acquired at least one year of practical farm experience. 



98 



Junior Year I 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) — — - 3 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) — 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107s) — 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102f) — — - 3 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) „ — 

Farm Machinery (Agr. Engr. lOlf) 3 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (A. H. 2f) , — 3 

Electives - 4 

16 
Senior Year 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) — 3 

Farm Management (A, E. 108f ) - ~ - 3 

Farm Finance (A. E. 104s) -... — 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) — 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) _ 3 

Economic Statistics (Stat. 15s) _ — 

Land Economics (A. E. lllf ) „ _ 3 

Prices of Farm Products (A. E. 106s) „ - - — 

Electives -- ~ — 4 



// 

3 
3 



16 



3 
3 



3 

4 



' 16 16 

HORTICULTURE 

The department offers instruction in pomology (fruits), olericulture 
(vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening. These 
courses prepare students to enter the field of commercial production and 
to meet the demand for men in the -horticultural industries. Students are 
likewise prepared to enter the allied industries as horticultural workers 
with fertilizer companies, seed companies, equipment manufacturers, and 
others. Students who wish to enter specialized fields of research and teach- 
ing may take advanced work in the department. 

The State of Maryland and other states offer many excellent opportu- 
nities in horticultural industries: large fruit enterprises, producing apples, 
peaches, strawberries, raspberries, and other fruits for domestic and foreign 
markets; extensive greenhouse establishments, growing flowers and vege- 
tables; canning and preserving factories in vegetable and fruit areas; nur- 
series, propagating trees and plants of all kinds; and concentrated farming 
areas devoted to vegetable production for market and canning. These in- 
dustries require men with a specialized knowledge of production and mar- 
keting phases of the horticultural crops which are produced. 

Students in horticulture have considerable latitude in the selection of 
horticultural courses, but usually find it advisable to specialize by electing 
all of the courses offered in pomology, olericulture, or floriculture, accord- 
ing to the suggested curricula. Students who wish to specialize in land- 
scape architecture will be given an opportunity to secure certain basic 

99 



courses in the curriculum for ornamental horticulture, but must plan to 
spend additional time at another institution where a complete landscape 
curriculum is offered. 

The department is equipped with several greenhouses and a modern 
horticultural building, with laboratories and cold storage rooms, for horti- 
cultural teaching and research. Extensive acreage near the University is 
devoted to the growing of fruit trees and vegetable crops. An arboretum 
with many ornamental plants has been started on the University grounds for 
use in teaching of horticulture and other related subjects. 

The suggested curricula will be adjusted to the special needs of students 
whose interests lie in the general scientific field or those who are preparing 
for work in technical lines. The object is to fit students most effectively to 
fill positions of several types. 

Curricula 

Pomology and Olericulture Semester 

Sophomore Year / // 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) „.... 4 

Geology ( Geol. If) _ _ 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f) 3 - 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) , _ _ _ „ — 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) ~ ^ — 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) - — 3-5 

General Horticulture (Hort. If, 2s) 3 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

r . ^ ' 17 17-19 

Junior Yea/r 

• Fruit Production (Hort. 3f, 4s) 2-3 2 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 

Small Fruits ( Hort. 8s ) _ — 2-3 

Vegetable Production (Hort. 5s) - _ - — 3 

Diseases -of Special Crops (Pit. Path. lOlf, 102s) 3 or 3 

World Fruits and Nuts (Hort. 106s) — 2 

Electives - - -....- 6-10 3-8 

Senior Year 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) 3 

Technology of Horticultural Plants (Hort. lOlf, 102s; 103f, 

104s) - „ 4 4 

Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. l<)3f, 104s) 3 3 

Seminar (Hort. Illy) _ 1 1 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 109f) or Systematic Olericulture 

(Hort. llOf), or Farm Management (A. E. lOSf) 3 - 

Electives ~ 1 J 

100 15 15 



Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Semester 

I 11 

Sophomore Year 

Geology (Geol. If) -- ■■•■--- "7 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) -• • ^ J 

General Horticulture (Hort. If) - - - ^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) 

Elect from the following courses: 

General Botany (Bot. 3s) -- -•- * 

Landscape Gardening (Hort. llf) — 2 — 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) - - - • 2 ^ 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) — 2 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - — - -* — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) - — - ® 

16 14-17 



Junior Year 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 107y) — ^ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) - 4 

Elect from the following courses: 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) - - ^ 

Vegetable Production (Hort. 5s) 

Civic Art ( Hort. 14s ) - - — 

Landscape Design (Hort. I2f, 13s) 3 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. lOy) - ^ 

16 

Senior Year % 

Seminar ( Hort. Illy) - ^ 

Special Problems (Hort. 112y) - 2 

Technology of Horticultural Plants (Hort. 105f ) 2 

Electives » _ - ^^ 

16 



6 
2 



8 
2 
3 

4 

14-17 

1 
2 

13 

16 



Elect from courses listed for the Sophomore and Junior Years and from 
other coursesf offered in Entomology, Agronomy, Agricultural Engineering, 
Botany, Economics, Genetics, Statistics, Plant Physiology, Bacteriology, 
Plant Pathology, Speech, English, Business Administration, Modern 
Languages, Fine Arts, or Education. 



tSuch electives are advised for all students in Horticulture. 



101 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raisin^ ,' 
marketmg, distribution, and processing of poultry products; po;^. 
improvement work; and as a basis for graduate training for tea^chZt 
research m poultry husbandry. ^ ^^ 

The poultry industry of Maryland ranks second to dairying in economic 
importance among the agricultural industries of the State. Nearby ma2 
provide a profitable outlet for poultry products of high quality in larl 
vo ume than now produced in the State. The necessary quality can 
attained by intelligent, trained poultry husbandmen. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. For example, most students will be expected to take 
the courses m Agricultural Industry and Resources and Farm Organization 
offered m the general curriculum for the freshman year. Superior students 
definitely anticipating preparation for a professional career in poultry hus' 
bandry, will be expected to take language instead. However, all students 
concentrating in poultry husbandry will be required to complete 24 semester 
hours in poultry husbandry. 

Curriculum 

ci J ,, Semester 

Sophomore Year In 

Poultry Production (P. H. If) 3 _ 

Poultry Management (P. H. 2s) ^ ZZZ — 3 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f, 4s) Z 2 "> 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys! 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Elect one of the following: 

* 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay, 12By) ) 

Economics (Econ. 57f, A. E. 102s) f- ^ ^ 

Other Electives: These will be chosen from the physical sci- 
ences, modern languages, and elementary courses in agri- 
culture _ _ g g 



16 



16 



If 
■ff 



I 



Semester 



Junior Year 

Poultry Biology (P. H. 3f) 

Poultry Genetics (P. H. 101s) „ _ _ 

Poultry Nutrition (P. H. 102s) „...._ — 

Poultry Physiology (P. H. 106f ) _ _ ....„ „ 

General Bacteriology ( Bact . If ) _ _ „....- — 

Farm Finance (A. E. 104s) _.... — 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) _ 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108s) or Pathogenic 

Bacteriology ( Bact. 2s ) _ 

Economics (Econ. 57f, A. E. 102s) or Electives 

Farm Buildings (Agr. Engr. 105f) ^ 



/ 

2 



2 

4 



// 

3 
2 



3 
2 



4 
3-4 



16 15-16 



Senior Year 

Poultry Products Marketing Problems (P. H. 104f, 105s) 2 

Poultry Hygiene (V. S. 107s) _ — 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (P. H. 107f ) 2 

Commercial Poultry Management (P. H. 108s) — 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 

Biological Statistics (Stat. 112s) — 

Rural Sociology ( Soc. 103f ) „ 3 

Preservation of Poultry Products (F. Tech. 108s) » ^ — 

Electives „ > - 6 



16 



2 
3 

2 

3 

2 
5 

17 



SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students (see Special Students, page 54) may, with consent 
of the Dean, register as special students and pursue a program of studies 
not included in any regular curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs 
of the individual. All university fees for these special students are the 
same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrange- 
ments have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them 
permission to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different de- 
partments. This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit- 
growers, gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to 
get away from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are *$5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour 
per month for the time of attendance. 



102 



One registration is good for any amount of regular or intermittent attendance during 
a period of four years. 

103 



i 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is the research agency of the 
University, dealing with problems related to agriculture. Support for 
research is provided by both State and Federal appropriations. The Federal 
Acts are as follows: Hatch Act, 1887; Adams Act, 1906; Pumell Act, 1925- 
and Bankhead-Jones Act, 1935. 

The Hatch Act established State Experiment Stations and defined the 
scope and type of original researches that might be undertaken. In general, 
the work done under the Hatch and Adams funds pertains to the physical 
and biological sciences and promotes a better understanding of plants and 
animals. The Pumell Act bears more directly upon investigations and 
experiments having to do with manufacture, preparation, use, distribution, 
and marketing of agricultural products. Its funds may be used also for 
such economic and sociological investigations as have for their purpose 
the development and improvement of rural homes and rural life. Work 
under Bankhead-Jones funds must have a bearing upon new and improved 
methods of production and distribution, new and extended use and markets 
for agricultural commodities and by-products and manufactures thereof, 
and research relating to conservation, development, and use of land and 
water resources for agricultural purposes. 

In addition to work conducted at the University, the Station operates 
an experimental farm of 50 acres at Ridgely for canning crops and grain 
farming, a farm of 60 acres at Upper Marlboro for tobacco investigations, 
and a farm of 234 acres near Ellicott City for livestock. Regional tests 
and experiments are conducted in cooperation with farmers at many differ- 
ent points in the State. Most of these cooperative experiments deal with 
crops, soils, fertilizers, orchards and insect and plant disease control, and 
serve as checks upon the more detailed and fundamental work done at 
the main Station. 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

The Extension Service of the University of Maryland was established 
by State and Federal laws, and is designed to assist farmers and their 
families in promoting the prosperity and wdfare of agriculture and rural 
life. Its work is conducted in cooperation with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

The Extension Service is represented in each county of the State by a 
county agent and a home demonstration agent. Through these agents 
and its staff of specialists, it comes into intimate contact with rural people 
and with problems of the farm and home. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home life comes within 
the scope of extension work. Farmers are supplied with details of crop 
and livestock production, and with instructions for controlling diseases and 
insect pests; they are encouraged and aided in organized efforts, helped 
with marketing problems and assisted in improving economic conditions 

104 



n the farm. Rural women are assisted likewise in problems of the home 
and with such information as tends to make rural home life attractive and 
satisfying- The 4-'H Club work for rural boys and girls provides a valu- 
able type of instruction in agriculture and home economics, and affords 
a real opportunity to deveilop self-confidence, perseverance, and leadership. 

The Extension Service works in accord with all other branches of the 
University and with all agencies of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture. It is charged with carrying out in Maryland the program of the 
Agricultural Adjustment Administration. It cooperates with all farm and 
community organizations in the State which have as their major object 
the improvement of agriculture and rural life; and it aids in making effec- 
tive the regulatory and other measures instituted by the State Board of 
Agriculture. 

REGULATORY ACTIVITIES 

Regulatory services carried on under the supervision of members of the 
faculty and staff of the College of Agriculture have as their general aim 
the reduction of loss caused by insect pests and diseases of animals and 
plants, protection of human health by guarding against communicable dis- 
eases of livestock and unwholesome products, improvement in quality of 
farm products, and maintenance of guaranteed quality in seeds, feeds, fer- 
tilizers, and limes. These services are carried on in accordance with laws 
and regulations under which they were established. Actual enforcement is 
involved in some activities, while in others the work is primarily or entirely 
educational. 

Agencies engaged in various forms of regulatory activities include the 
Livestock Sanitary Service, State Horticultural Department, State Depart- 
ment of Markets, State Seed Service, and State Department of Forestry. 
Operating under the State Chemist at the University, there is also the 
enforcement of regulations pertaining to fertilizers, limes, and feeds. 

These agencies are at work constantly in efforts to control and eradicate, 
when possible, any serious pests and diseases of animals, of crops of all 
kinds, of shade trees, of ornamental plants, and of forest trees. They 
are ever on the alert to prevent introduction of pests and diseases into 
the State and execute the laws and regulations with respect to shipping 
animals, plants, and other products into and out of Maryland. They deal 
with such problems as control and eradication of tuberculosis and Bang's 
disease of cattle, Japanese beetle, and white pine blister rust. 

By inspection and certification of seeds and farm products and through 
demonstrations of recognized grades and standards, they contribute to im- 
provement in quality and marketing conditions. 



105 



Requirements for Admission 



CX)LLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

L. B. Broughton, Dean, 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal training 
m the biological sciences, economics, history, languages and literatures 
mathematics, philosophy, the physical sciences, political science, psychology' 
and sociology. It thus affords an opportunity to acquire a general educa- 
tion which will serve as a foundation for whatever profession or vocation 
the student may choose. In particular, it lays the foundation for the pro- 
fessions of dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, teaching, and theology, and 
the more technical professions of engineering, public health service, 'public 
administration, and business. The College of Arts and Sciences offers to 
the students of the other colleges of the University training in fundamental 
subjects, both classical and scientific, which should permit them to acquire 
the perspective necessary for liberal culture and public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and four Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the following 
departments: 

A. The Division of Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entom- 
ology, Genetics, and Zoology. 

B. The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages and Litera- 
tures, Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Mod- 
ern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

C. The Division of Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 

Mathematics, and Physics. 

D. The Division of Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 

The work of the first and second years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences is taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student 
a basic general education, and to prepare him for specialization in the 
junior and senior years. 

The Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in the College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and 
senior years, and designate general requirements, the fulfillment of which 
is necessary to qualify a student for admission to major work in an Upper 
Division. 

106 



I 



1 



The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
• rreneral, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. See Section I, Admission, page 51. 

For admission to the premedical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language are required. A detailed statement of the requirements for 
admission to the School of Medicine and the relation of these to the pre- 
medical curriculum will be found under the heading School of Medicine. 
See page 225. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the requirements pre- 
scribed in the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of Arts and Bache- 
lor of Science. 

Students of this college who have completed the regular course in either 
the Division of Humanities or the Division of Social Sciences are awarded 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Any student who has met the requirements 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science is awarded that degree, provided the 
major portion of the work has been done in the field of science, and the 
application has the approval of the science department in which the major 
work has been carried. 

Students who have elected the combined program of Arts and Sciences 
and Medicine may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science after the 
completion of at least three years of work in this college and the first year 
of the School of Medicine. 

Those electing the combined five-year Academic and Nursing curriculum, 
for which the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing may be awarded 
upon the completion of the full course, must take the prenursing curriculum 
at College Park before the Nursing Course in Baltimore. 

Those taking the combined course in Arts and Law may be awarded the 
Bachelor of Arts degree after the completion of three years of the work of 
this college and one year of the full-time law course, or its equivalent, in 
the School of Law. 

Residence 

The last thirty credits of any curriculimi leading to a baccalaureate de- 
gree in the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in residence in this 
University. 

Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University Requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements. 

107 



1. University Requirements — See page 57. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements — A minimum of 120 credits 
must be acquired, not including the six credits of basic military science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six credits of physical edu- 
cation for women and for such men as are excused from military science. 

A student must acquire at least 58 credits, exclusive of military science 
and physical education, with an average grade of at least C in the Lower 
Division, before being admitted to an Upper Division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as possi- 
ble, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before 
graduation: 

I. English and Speech — fourteen credits. Of these, Survey and Compo- 
sition I (Eng. ly) and Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) are required. 

II. Foreign Languages and Literatures — twelve credits of one language. 

III. Social Sciences — twelve credits. This requirement is fulfilled by elect- 
ing courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

IV. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — twelve credits. Of these one year 
must be in natural science. 

V. Military Science or Physical Education — six credits. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — At the beginning of the junior year 
each student must select a major in one of the fields of study of an Upper 
Division, and before graduation must complete a major and a minor. The 
courses constituting the major and the minor selected must conform to the 
requirements of the department in which the major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or a minor the student should have acquired 
12 prerequisite credits in fundamental courses in the field chosen, or in a 
closely related field satisfactory to the department and the Division, with 
an average grade of at least C before credit will be allowed towards com- 
pletion of the major or minor requirements. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits required 
in the Lower Division, of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 credits in 
one of the fields of study. Of these credits at least 8 must be acquired in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist, in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits required 
in the Lower Division, of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 credits in 
some field of study other than the major. At least 6 of these must be 
acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Not more than 15 credits may be acquired in any field of study other 
than the major or minor during the last two years, in addition to those 
which meet the College of Aits and Sciences requirements. 

108 



T1.P average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields must 
be at least C. A general average of at least C is required for graduation. 

4 Special Upper Divi^on Requirements— 

A. Division of Biological Sciences. See page 113. 

B. Division of Himianities. See page 118. 

C. Division of Physical Sciences. See page 120. 

D. Division of Social Sciences. See page 127. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

Tf courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective 
M^h school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with major and 
mhior in one. of the Upper Divisions of this College. 

The College of Education requires that at least twenty credits must be 
acquired in educational subjects before one can be certified for high school 
teaching. 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences for work done in other colleges and schools of the 

University. . 

The number of credits which may be accepted from the various colleges 

and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture— Fifteen. 

College of Commerce — Fifteen. 

College of Education— Twenty. 

College of Engineering— Fifteen. 

College of Home Economics— Fifteen. 

School of Law-In the combined program the first year of law must be 
{ completed. 

I School of Medicine-In the combined program the first year of medicine 

'i must be completed. • 

School of Nursing— In the combined program the three years of nursing 
must be completed. 

Normal Load 

The normal load for the freshman in this college is sixteen credits per 
semester, including one hour of basic military science or physical education. 

The normal load for the sophomore year is seventeen credits per semester, 
two of which are in military science or physical education. 

The normal load in the junior and senior years is 15 credits per semester 
With the permission of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 

109 



N 



the Chairman of the Division, this load may be increased to 17, a maxin,, 
except for honor students. The load of honor students shall 1 eS.*? 
discrebon of the Dean and the Chairman of the Division but i^ no V^ 
shall It exceed 19 credits per semester. '^^« 

Advisers 

Freshmen and sophomores in this college shall consider the Dean of ,^. 
College and the Chairman of the Lower Division their advisers *' 

On entrance to the Upiversity each student of the College of Arts .r,H 
Sciences is assigned to a member of the faculty of the CoIWp llf 
as his special adviser. The student should consult LadSfrTn Tu matir 
of his university life in which he may need advice. "" 

Juniors and seniors must consider the chairmen of their mn,v,. ^ . 
ments their advisers, and shall consult them aZtt^ZrT—S't 

itTadtr^^ "' *=""^^" ^"' ^"^ ^^''^^ -^"^ - whichTerCd:! 



110 



THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White, Chairman, 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare 
him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into 
one of the Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general 
scholastic ability must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major 
study is to be obtained. 

Suggested courses of study for the freshman and sophomore years are 
given under certain of the Upper Divisions. The student should follow 
the curriculum for which he is believed to be best fitted. It will be noted 
that there is a great deal of similarity in these outlines for the first two 
years, and a student need not consider himself attached to any particular 
Upper Division until the beginning of his junior year, at which time it is 
necessary to select a major. 

The minimum requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, as out- 
lined on page 108, should be completed as far as possible in the Low^er 
Division. 

Curriculum 
Freshman Year 
Required : / 

♦Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ^ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 

Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin, Greek, 

Italian) ^ _ - ~ - — - 3 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology) 3 or 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) ^ - 1 

Elect from the following so that the total credits each semes- 
ter are 16 or 17: 

A Survey of Western Civilization (H. ly) — 3 

History of England and Great Britain (H. 3y) _ 3 

American History (H. 5f, 6s) _ 3 

Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s; 21f, 22s) 3 or 4 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) 3 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) — 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If and s) 3 



Semester 
II 

3 



3 
3 or 4 



3 
3 
3 

3 or 4 



or 



3 

3 



*A placement test is given during Registration Week to determine whether the student 
18 adequately prepared for Eng. ly. A student failing this test is required to take Eng. A, 
a one-semester course, without credit. After five weeks, he may be transferred from 
E"g. A to Eng. ly, for which he will receive full credit, or from Eng. ly to Eng. A, 
according to his demonstrated ability. 

Ill 



State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4f and s) o ^^ 

Comparative Government (Pol. Sci 7f 8s) """" "*""' 9 ^^ ^ 

Latin and Greek in Current English uWe( Classics Sf; 4^^^^^^^^^^ 2 

Library Methods (L. S. If and s) 2 

Art (Art If, 2f, 3s, 4s) ** " ^ ^^ 1 

Music (Mus. ly, 2y, 3y, 4y, 5y)..I " *i7 ^ f 2 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) ** — /2 to ^ 3oto2 

- 1 1 



16-17 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 

Foreign Language ' ~ " ^ 

General Electives from the Colleg^^;;^ A;t7ai^^^ ^ 

Sr/' Vll^ ^T'""''^ *^^ ^P^^^fi^ requirements of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 9-lo 

^'orl; Sd^^) '• '"^ " '^''^"''' Educatbn (Pi;^ eI^ " 



16-1 



3 
3 



9-10 
2 



17-18 17-18 



112 



A— DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

L. H. James, Chairman. 

The Division of Biological Sciences is organized to stimulate close co- 
ordination between all activities in the field of biology. The Division in- 
cludes the Departments of Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, and Zoology. 

Each department within the Division has one or more established cur- 
ricula. To meet the demands for technically trained workers in the biological 
sciences these curricula are designed to give specialized training, particu- 
larly during the last two years of college work. They provide, more specifi- 
cally, the basic knowledge and experience required for (1) teaching in 
secondary schools; (2) research and regulatory w^ork in federal, state, and 
municipal departments and bureaus; (3) admission to graduate study in the 
preparation for college teaching and advanced research; and (4) entrance 
to the professional schools of medicine, dentistry, and nursing. 

Instruction 

Alliance of the biological sciences presents an opportunity for the pur- 
suit of a well coordinated program of study. Completion of a suggested 
undergraduate curriculum under any one of the departments fulfills the 
requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science. Advanced work also 
is presented in each of the biological sciences for the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Although the undergraduate training in any Department of the Division is 
both thorough and well-balanced, nevertheless, one or more years of post- 
graduate instruction and experience and the attainment of an advanced 
degree are desirable in preparation for the larger opportunities that arise in 
this rapidly expanding field. The need for workers in the fields of agri- 
culture, home economics, industry, public health, etc., presents almost 
unlimited opportunities for specialization and has made it necessary to 
correlate closely the undergraduate courses in this Division with those 
offered in the Graduate School in order to equip the advanced student 
adequately in his own work and in related fields. 

A special curriculum in General Biological Science is presented primarily 
for those interested in teaching biological science or general science in 
elementary and high schools. Students in the preprofessional schools 
who expect to complete their work for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
inay, in following the preprofessional curriculum, complete a major in 
certain departments of the Division of Biological Sciences by the proper 
selection of courses. 

The particular professions and lines of work for which each department 
m this Division prepares its students are outlined in greater detail under 
the description of each department. 

113 



J 



Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements. See page 57. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. See page 108. 

3. Physical Sciences — Ten semester hours in addition to the twelve re- 
quired by the College of Arts and Sciences, the total to include basic 
courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. 

Fields of Study 

The curriculum outlined in each field of study represents the courses 
which, in the judgment of the Department and Division, are necessary for 
an adequate training in the particular subject. In most curricula enough elec- 
tives are included to give the student ample opportunity to study subjects 
outside his major or minor departments in which he may have become in- 
terested or in which further training is desired. 

Bacteriology 

The courses in this Department prepare students for such positions as 
dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists in federal, state, and municipal 
departments and for public health, research, and industrial positions. The 
suggested curricula are given on pages 91 and 92. 

Botany 

The Department of Botany offers three major fields of work: General 
Botany and Morphology, Plant Pathology, and Plant Physiology and 
Ecology. For further information and the suggested curriculum see page 93. 

Entomology 

The Department of Entomology is equipped to furnish general courses 
for students of biology and other subjects in the College of Arts and 
Sciences as well as to train students for careers in research, teaching, or 
control work in the field of professional Entomology. 

Two courses offered by the Department, Ent. 1 and Ent. 5s, have been 
organized particularly to meet the needs of students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Several other courses will serve to strengthen the pro- 
gram of students with a major in the biological sciences. In view of the 
fact that nearly 80 per cent of all known species of animals in the world 
are insects, it is essential that the students of biology elect some work in 
entomology. The suggested curriculum is given on page 97. 



Zk)ology 

TV^P Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
ll^aLd for service in the biological bureaus of the United States 
rinme^t and in the biological departments of the various states. 
SlhS placed on morphology, physiology, and marine biology. Instruc 
rranTop^^^^^ for original investigation in the latter are supple- 

^ tpd bv the research facilities and courses of instruction offered at 
rChesapea^^^^ Biological Laboratory, a description of which is found on 
page 390. 



Curriculum 



Semester 



freshman Year 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 2y) - 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ~ - 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - - ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

Modern Language (French or German) -....^. ^^^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 
Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) --• --• - 

16 

Sophomore Year 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f) 3 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) - - 

General Botany (Bot. If) or General Bacteriology (Bact. If)... 4 
General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) or Pathogenic Bacteriology 

(Bact. 2s) - - -•■ "" 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - — ^ 

Modem Language (French or German) - 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) - ^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) -.-. - ~ — ^ 

18 



// 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



16 



4 
3 
8 
3 

2 

18 



114 



115 



Semester 

Junior Year I ^ 

Histological Technique (Zool. 102s) — o 

Genetics (Zool. 104f) 3 ^ 

General Physics (Phys. ly) _.... - 4 ^ 

Electives (Zoology) _ 3 -3 

Electives fi 



15 

Senior Year 

Journal Club ( Zool. 106y ) 1 

General Animal Physiology (Zool. 103y) 3 

Electives 11 



15 



15 



9 

y 

11 



15 



General Biological Sciences 



A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in 
biology but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biological 
sciences. The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general 
principles and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. Also by a 
proper selection of electives, the educational requirements of the State 
Department of Education for certification can be met. 



Sopfiomore Year 

Qinrvev and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) .-- ••■■■• 

Snts of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 

Modem Language (French or German) 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is).....- -..-»...--...--.- — •-•"- ~ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 

Electives ~ - 



Semester 


I 


// 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 




4 


2 


2 


4 


8 



18 



Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) -. - 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) - ^ 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) - 

Electives __ 

16 

Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) 

Electives - 

16 



18 

4 
3 
6 
3 

16 

3 

7 
5 

15 



Requirements 

A major in general biological sciences shall consist of not fewer than 
40 credits in the biological sciences, of which no fewer than 14 credits 
must be acquired in courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 

Modem Language (French or German) _ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ _.„.. 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) _ 4 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) _ _.... „ — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ly or 2y and 4y) 1 



16 



3 
3 
1 
4 

4 

1 
16 



116 



117 



B— THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Adolf E. Zucker, Chairman 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Lit- 
erature, Modem Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts; (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for 
those taking preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the 
departments of the Division. 

At present, the Division offers major and minor work for the Master 
of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in English Language and 
Literature and in Modem Languages and Literatures; major work for the 
Master of Arts may be elected in Comparative Literature and General 
Linguistics, and minor work in Philosophy. Detailed requirements for 
these degrees are given under the departmental announcements and in the 
catalogue of the Graduate School. 

Training for the Master of Arts degree is directed especially toward 
acquainting the candidate with methods of research and the literature in 
his own fields. For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the candidate is 
required not only to be thoroughly acquainted with his major and minor 
fields and with the scholarly accomplishments therein, but also to devote 
himself intensively to a specific research problem in which he shall make 
an original contribution to human knowledge. 

Division Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

The following requirements in addition to those of the College of Arts 
and Sciences (including a general average of C, see page 108) should be 
completed, as far as possible, before the beginning of the junior year. 

1. Library Science — one credit. 

2. English 2/, 3s — six credits. . 

3. Modem Language — To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language. In satisfaction of this requirement, he 
must pass one of the general language examinations, which are given 
during the first and last days of each semester, with a grade as 
high as C. Maryland students should take the examination not later 
than the close of the sophomore year or the beginning of the junior 
year. Transfer students should take the examination upon entrance. 
The student must show in this examination that he has attained the 

118 



-r lizs^i^^ t^^ rSHS 

It least 1^^^^^^^ of one foreign language in college. 
4. Philosophy— three credits. 
5 Psychology— three credits. 

, Ma^or ana Minor ^^<^^^^':^ ^JZLL^^:^ ^ 
student must have acquired t^^^^.^.^Xl. satisfactory to the depart- 
the field chosen or in a ^l^-^yj'^^^.'.^fg;:^^^^^^^ C, before 

ment and the Division, ^1*^/" ^^^'^^^^^J^!, „. the major or minor 
credit will be allowed toward the completion of the major 

reauirements. In addition: . 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 -r more than 36 

eri'dits, In addition to the 12 cre^^ts -^--^16 of t^r^crXs 

1Z^i:Z^ rclrl^:ro^aa^Sunder.raduates and 

sSn in one of the above fields of study not elected - t^^^^ 
maior or in some other field of study authorized m the College oi 
Lt's^nd Sciences. At least 9 of these credits must ^e t,,en xn 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates 
The student must acquire at least 30 credits in courses not included m 
the major or minor. j^r^onf marital 

353). 

MAJOR AND MINOR 



Fields of Study 



Comparative Literature 
English 
French 
♦♦General Linguistics 
German 



♦Greek 
Latin 

♦Philosophy 
Speech 
Spanish 



Not available at present for a major. 
Major only for Master of Arts Degree. 



*XT 



** 



119 



C— THE DIVISION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Chairman 

The Division of Physical Sciences is composed of the departments of 
Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Physics. On the fol. 
lowing pages the division outlines a number of curricula, each requir- 
ing four years for completion, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts together with five year programs in Chem- 
istry-Chemical Engineering and Applied Physics. The departments of 
study have developed courses to contribute to the liberal education of 
students not primarily interested in science; to provide the basic knowledge 
of the physical sciences necessary in so many professions such as agricul- 
ture, dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, pharmacy, and 
others; to equip teachers of the Physical Sciences for secondary schools 
and colleges; and to train students for professional service as chemists, 
chemical engineers, geologists, mathematicians, physicists, and statisticians; 
and to prepare for graduate study and research in the Physical Sciences. 

The fields of knowledge represented by the Physical Sciences are so vast 
and their applications are so important that it is impossible to deal ade- 
quately with any one in a four-year undergraduate curriculum. Students 
who aspire to proficiency are therefore encouraged to continue their studies 
in the graduate years. In the work leading to a Master's degree, the 
student becomes acquainted with the general aspects of the field. In partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
the student must demonstrate a command of his chosen field sufficiently 
great to permit him to make independent investigations and creative 
contributions. 

No degree will be granted to a student in any department of Physical 
Sciences whose general average in all courses offered for the degree is 
below C. To enroll in the Division of Physical Sciences, at the beginning 
of the junior year a student must select a major in one of the departments 
and before graduation must complete a major and a cognate minor selected 
to conform to the requirements of the department in which the major 
work is done. 

The candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will be governed by the requirements for that degree established 
by the University and the College. A student will be considered a major 
in one of the Departments of the Division of Physical Sciencies only when 
he has completed a program approved by the department concerned. The 
following suggested curricula outline the general requirements of these 
departments. 

For the University requirements see page 57. 

For the College of Arts and Sciences requirements and major and minor 
requirements see page 108. 

Detailed description of the undergraduate and graduate courses offered 
in this Division is given in Section III of this catalogue, Description of 
Courses. 

120 



Chemistry 

f «f rhpmiqtrv includes agricultural and biological, ana- 
The Department "fCh^^^^^^^^ J ^^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^ ^^ate 

•>'^'^'';/rSThffonoJing curriculum provides students with a wel 
iTedlralning in chemistry Lt is adequate preparation for the pursmt 
of graduate work. 

Curriculum ^ . 

Semester 

I II 

preshman Year . ^ ,^ . ^ 3 8 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly)-.^ ^ 3 

Modem Language (French or German)... .^^--.^^■•.■■•^"•^^ • 

CoS Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 J 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) -■- - - ^ ^ 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) — - ••; — • 

BasTc R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

ly or 2y and 4y) ___ __ 

17 17 

Sophomore Year _ 2 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) .-..-.-•• ^ 3 

Modem Language (French or German) ^ ^ 

Calculus (Math. 23y ) 3 3 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) - --•"--•- ~- ^ 2 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay)...^- ^ ^ 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Cheni. 8By) "-, "7 "T 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) - _ 

18 18 

Junior Year 4 4 

Quantitative Analysis (CJhem. 6y) •• ^ 2 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) - ^ ^ 

Organic Laboratory (Chem. 117y) ^ g 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) --- - 2 2 

Electives (Social Sciences) -.-- - 

15 15 

Senior Year o 3 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) ^ 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) - ^ ^ 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (Chem. 118y) ^ 

English Language or Literature - - ^ 

Electives (Six must be in Social Sciences) ^ ^ 

15 15 

121 



Chemical Engineering—Chemistry 

A five-year pi-ogram in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry ha. h. 
arranged between the College of Engineering and the College 7f Arts . !! 
Sciences which permits students who so desire to become candidates f 
the degree of Bachelor of Science and of Bachelor of Science in Engine^ ! 
This curriculum is outlined on page 176. ^' 

Mathematics 

The Mathematics curriculum is designed for students who desire a thor 
ough traming in the fundamentals of Mathematics in preparation t; 
teaching, research, or graduate work in Mathematics. Outstanding studen 
m Mathematics may be awarded the honors degree in Mathematics. F 
further details see page 345. 



16 



Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Modem Language (French or German) 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math721f, 2^^^^^^^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _/ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or PhysicarEducation (^^^^^^^^ 
ly or 2y and 4y) 



Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) „.... 

Modem Language (French or German).. 

Calculus (Math. 23y) ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ZZ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education "(S^^^ 
3y or 6y and 8y) v j^ . 



Junior Year 

Higher Algebra (Math. 141f, 142s) _ 2 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. lD2Ay) ZZZZ'Z'. 3 

Mathematical Physics (Phys. lllf, 112s) ZZ 3 

Pictorial Geometry (Math. 18y) ....._ ZZZ 2 

Elective (Social Sciences) ZZIZ^ZI. 3 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 153f)... 2 

Topics in Analysis (Math. 154s) ZZ. — 



15 



122 



SmnesUr 



I 


// 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


1 


1 


4 


4 



16 



3 





3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 



2 

17 

2 
3 
3 
2 
3 

2 

15 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

Analytic Mechanics (Math. 130f, 131s) 2 2 

Advanced Calculus (Math. 143f, 144s) _..... , „ 2 2 

Theory of Equations (Math. 151f) 2 — 

Mathematical Seminar (Math. 140y) „ 2 2 

Electron Physics (Phys. 109y) ' 3 3 

Electives (Including 6 credits in Social Sciences) _ _ 4 6 

15 15 

Physics 

Two curricula are offered in Physics, (1) the General Physics curriculum 
for students who desire a thorough training in the fundamentals of Physics 
in preparation for graduate work, research, and the teaching of Physics, 
(2) the Applied Physics curriculum for students who desire to train for 
industrial and applied physical research. The latter is intended to prepare 
students for positions in governmental laboratories and in the laboratories 
established by many industries for testing, research, and development 
through the application of physical principles and tools. 

The completion of the first four years of the latter curriculum leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics; the completion of the five 
years with a satisfactory thesis to that of Master of Science in Physics. 



Curriculum I — General Physics 



Semester 



Freshman Year I 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) > 3 

Modem Language (French or German) „ _ 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 

Generail Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) „ 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Iv or 2v and 4v^ 1 

17 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) '. 3 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) „...._ 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y ) 5 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 



// 

3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 



17 



3 
4 
5 



17 



17 



123 



Junior Year 

Advanced Mathematics 

Advanced Physics 

Elective (Chemistry) 
Electives 



fi^emesfer 


/ 


// 


2 


2 


6 


6 


3 


3 


4 


4 



15 



Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) o 

Advanced Physics _ ■""" ^ 

Electives """ -• ^ 

— ^ 

15 

Curriculum II— Applied Physics 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng ly) _ o 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) „. " . 

Elementary German (German ly) " " g 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Mathr21f722s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _.„ . ^ "" ' I 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) "" Z 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Ph^i^aF Ed^^ic^n ' (S^^^ 

ly or 2y and 4y) \ ^ ; ^ 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) ' 3 

Second Year German (German 3y)....' ~ o 

Calculus (Math. 23y) " 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) c 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physkaf Educa^^^^^^ 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) v >^- 

.....^...^ — — .... — .......... — ........... ^ 



17 



15 



3 
2 
6 
4 

15 



3 
J 
3 
4 
4 
1 



17 

3 
3 
4 
5 

2 

17 



Semester 

Junior Year ^ I^ 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 3 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — ... — 3 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 102f) — 3 — 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) _ 1 — 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf ) _ 3 — 

Electricity (Phys. 108y) 3 3 

Optics (Phys. 107s) _ -. — 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4s) ~.. — 4 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) — 3 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) ...._ 4 — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) — 3 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) „ 3 3 

Heat (Phys. 105f) _.... _....- _ 3 — 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) — 3 



16 

Fifth Year 

Electives ( Engineering ) _ 3 

Electives ( Physics ) 6 

Electives 3 



12 



General Physical Sciences 



15 

3 
6 
3 

12 



For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the physical sciences 
without immediate specialization in any one, a general curriculum is offered. 
By proper selection of courses in the junior and senior year a student may 
concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of study to be 
able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

A major in the Physical Sciences shall consist of not less than 52 
credits in the departments comprising the Division, of which at least 6 
shall be acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates in one particular field. At least two courses of not less than 
three credit hours each in a field cognate to the just-mentioned particular 
field will be required, and one of these shall be among those listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



124 



125 



Junior Year 

Advanced Mathematics 

Advanced Physics _..... 

Elective (Chemistry) 
Electives 



Sem 



ester 



I 


// 


2 


2 


6 


6 


3 


3 


4 


4 



16 



Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) o 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) " " 9 

Advanced Physics 

Electives _.. ^ 

" - •• — — 4 

15 

Curriculum II— Applied Physics 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly)...... « 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) IZZZ i 

Elementary German (German ly) 3 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Mathr21fr22s7^™ * 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) __ . ^ "'"" 2 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) . 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Educ^^^^^^^^ 
ly or 2y and 4y) 

17 
Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Second Year German (German 3y) ' 3 

Calculus (Math. 23y) ZZZir 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) c 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical" Education (P^^^^^^ 

Ed. 3y or 6y and 8y) * 2 



17 



15 



3 
2 
6 
4 

15 



3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 



17 



3 
3 
4 
5 



17 



Junior Year I 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) ....~ 3 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 102f) - 3 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) 1 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf ) _ _ ~..... 3 

Electricity (Phys. 108y) -.- 3 

Optics ( Phys. 107s ) _ -.... — 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4s) - - ~.. — 

16 

Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) -....- 4 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) _ _ — 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) „ 3 

Heat (Phys. 105f) „ 3 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) „ „...._ _...._ — 

16 
Fifth Year 

Electives (Engineering ) 3 

Electives ( Physics ) 6 

Electives ^ 3 



12 



Semester 
II 
3 



3 
3 
4 

16 



S 

3 
3 

3 
3 

15 

« 

3 

12 



? 



General Physical Sciences 

For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the physical sciences 
without immediate specialization in any one, a general curriculum is offered. 
By proper selection of courses in the junior and senior year a student may 
concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of study to be 
able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

A major in the Physical Sciences shall consist of not less than 52 
credits in the departments comprising the Division, of which at least 6 
shall be acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates in one particular field. At least two courses of not less than 
three credit hours each in a field cognate to the just-mentioned particular 
field will be required, and one of these shall be among those listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



124 



125 



Curriculum 



Freshman Year ' > . ^^ 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) __ 

Modem Language (French or German)...^ o 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Mathf^lZ 22s) 4 

General. Chemistry (Chem. ly) J 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly)ZZZZZZ. i 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) ^ 

Basic R. T. C (M. I. ly) or Ph^^icai Edu^al^ "(Ph^s:^^^^^ 

ly or 2y and 4y) ^ ^ J^^ ^ 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) o 

Modem Language (French or German) o 

Calculus (Math. 23y) ^ 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Educat^^^^^^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) ^ 2 

17 

Junior Year 

Electives (Chem. 2y; 8Ay and 8By) 3_4 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Electives (Math., Stat., Hist, Philos., Physics, Logic) 2-3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) . 

Electives ^_^ 



15 



Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences). 
Electives 



3 

12 

15 



blester 
II 

3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 

1 

17 



3 

3 

4 
5 



17 



3-4 

3 

2-3 

4 
1-3 

15 



3 

12 

15 



126 



D— THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

J. G. Jenkins, Chairman 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions 
and other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of 
Social Sciences offer opportunities for advanced training in the several 
fields represented. A major in Economics is available for students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. During the freshman and sophomore years, 
in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences requirements, Principles of 
Economics (Econ. 5 If, 52s) should be completed and as many other! lower 
division social science courses taken as practicable. The Department of 
Political Science offers the first three years of a combined Arts-Law course 
and also offers training in the field of public administration. The Depart- 
ment of Psychology is identified with the development of applied psychology 
and is in position to supply training in the industrial and clinical phases 
of the subject. The Department of Sociology provides a course of study 
preparatory to professional training in social work and offers the courses 
demanded by civil service examinations for certain positions. All five 
departments present courses aligned with the teacher-training program 
represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. These advanced degrees are 
increasingly required for secondary school teaching and for professional 
positions in the several fields represented. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University requirements, see page 57. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements^ see page 108. 

3. Major and Minor requirements, see page 108. 

' Major and Minor Fields of Study 

Economics Psychology 

History Sociology 

Political Science 

Combined Program in Arts and Law 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University also offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete 
the prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, and they 
must complete the Requirements for Graduation, as indicated on page 108. 
If students enter the combined program with advanced standing, at least 

127 



the third full year's work must be completed in residence at College Park 
Upon the successful completion of one year of full-time law courses in the 
School of Law in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be awarded 
on the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law. The degree of 
Bachelor of Laws may be awarded upon the completion of the combined 
program. 

Curriculum 



Semester 



Freshman Year J 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 3 

Science or Mathematics. - _. 3 

History of England and Great Britain (H. 3y) ~ 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 3 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) ....~ — 

Foreign Language _ - 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) — 1 

17 

Sophomore Year 

English „....- 3 

Science or Mathematics _ 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) >._ - 3 

American History (H. 5f, 6s) _ 3 

Foreign Language _ 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

17 
Junior Year 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) - ~..... — 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sci. I31f) 3 

Administrative Law (Pol. Sci. 134s) — 

Constitutional History of the United States (H. 115y) 3 

Legislatures and Legislation (Pol. Sci. 124s) — 

Electives - 6 



15 



// 

3 
3 
3 



3 
1 



17 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



17 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



Senior Year 

The student may elect either the curriculum for the first year of the 
School of Law or a fourth year's work from advanced courses offered in 
Political Science. In either case all of the requirements of the Division 
of Social Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences for graduation must 
have been met. 

128 



Public Administration 

The following suggested curriculum, consisting of a major in Political 

Science and a minor in Economics, is offered for the benefit of those students 

^ho are looking forward to an administrative career in the public service. 

Curriculum 

Semester 

freshman Year ' ^^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History (H. 5f, 6s) 3 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 3 — 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) — 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M.I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - 1 ^ 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

English 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 5 If, 52s) - 3 3 

Comparative Government (Pol. Sci. 7f, 8s) 2 2 

Foreign Language - 3 3 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M.I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - 2 2 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. If) _-. 3 — 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) _ - — 3 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) - - 3 — 

Business Statistics (Stat. 15s) _ — 3 

Labor and Government (Econ. 131s) or Public Utilities (Econ. 

145s) „ -•- — 3 

Principles of Public Administration (Pol. Sci. 11 If) 3 — 

Public Personnel Administration (Pol. Sci. 112s) — 3 

Municipal Government and Administration (Pol. Sci. 113f) 3 — 

Electives _ - - - - - 3 3 



15 



15 



129 



Senior Year 

Advanced Economic Principles (Econ. I90f) _ 

Contemporary Economic Thought (Econ. 191s) _ 

Public Finance (Fin. IQGf) 

Government and Business (Pol. Sci. 123f ) or Government and 

Social Security (Pol. Sci. 125f) 

Public Budgeting (Pol. Sci. 114s) _ 

Legislatures and Legislation (Pol. Sci. 124s) 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sci. 131f) ^ 

Administrative Law (Pol. Sci. 134s) „ 

E lectives _ 



Semester 


I 


// 


3 


. 


— 


3 


3 


- 


3 




— 


3 


— 


3 


3 


— . 




3 


3 


3 



15 



15 



THE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
Five- Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

The first two years of this curriculum are taken in the Collegia of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. If students enter this combined program 
with advanced standing, at least the second full year of this curriculum 
must be completed in College Park. 

The remaining three years are taken in the School of Nursing of the 
University in Baltimore or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore. In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing may, upon the recommendation of the Director of 
the School of Nursing, be granted at the end of the five year curriculum. 
Full details regarding this curriculum may be found in the section of the 
catalogue dealing wuth the School of Nursing. See page 228. 



Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ „ 3 3 

Foreign Language - - 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) — _..... 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 1 

History (H. ly or 3y) „ 3 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) — 3 

Library Methods (L. S. If) - _ 1 — 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) _ 1 1 

16 18 
Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) - 2 2 

Contemporary Social Problems (Soc. If, 2s) 3 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) _ _ — 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) _ — 4 

Foreign Language -^ 3 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) „....„ 2 2 



17 



17 



Premedical 



The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland is three years of academic training in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Curriculum I as outlined meets these require- 



130 



131 



merits, and also fulfills the requirements prescribed by the Council on Med- 
ical Education of the American Medical Association. 

Curriculum II is outlined to meet the requirements of the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Society, which prescribes two 
years of academic training as the minimum prerequisite for entering a 
Class A Medical School. 

Curriculum I offers to students a combined seven-year program leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first 
three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park, and the last four years in the School of Medicine in Balti- 
more. (See University catalogue for details of quantitative and qualitative 
premedical course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medi- 
cine, and upon the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Medicine, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College of Arts 
and Sciences at the Commencement following the second year of profes- 
sional training. 

At least two years of residence are necessary for students transferring 
from other colleges and universities who wish to become candidates for the 
two degrees. 

For requirements for admission see Section I, Admission, page 51. 

Curriculum I 

For students expecting to enter the University of Maryland Medical School 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _. 3 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 3 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 2y) 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 4 

Modern Language (French or German) _ 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Iv or 2v and 4v) 1 1 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) ~ - ^ 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. BBy) 2 

Modern Language (French or German) - 3 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f ) - 3 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) — 

Introduction to Philosophy (Phil. If) 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and By) 2 

18 

Junior Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly ) -- - 4 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Chem. 103Ay) 2 

Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 103By) 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) - - - 3 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) - 4 



Semester 
II 

3 
2 
2 
3 



18 



4 

2 
1 
1 
3 

4 



15 15 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine is accepted. 
The student also may elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses 
offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Curriculum II 

For students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to a Class A Medical School. 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - 3 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 3 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 2y) 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - 4 4 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) — 1 ^ 

18 18 



132 



133 



Semester 

Sophomore Year j 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) 2 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4f) 3 

Introduction to Psychology (Psych. Is) 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 



2 



17 17 

Predental 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to prepare 
themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following two-year 
curriculum, which meets the predental requirements of the American Asso- 
ciation of Dental Colleges. This curriculum may also be followed by the 
student if he desires to continue his college training and complete work 
for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) ! 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 1 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) _ 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Fundamentals of Zoology (Zool. 2y) „ ^ 4 4 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 4y) ^ 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) 1 1 



17 

Sophomore Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) _ „ „ 2 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) _ 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ 4 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) _ 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „„... 2 

17 



17 

2 

2 
4 
3 
4 



17 



134 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, Dean, 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of economics, commerce, and business administration; for downtown 
Washington is only twenty-four minutes away in one direction, while the 
Baltimore business district is less than an hour in the other — both cities with 
frequent transportation services to the University gates. Special arrange- 
ments are made to study commercial, manufacturing, exporting, and import- 
ing facilities and methods in Baltimore; and every assistance is given quali- 
fied students who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the far-flung eco- 
nomic activities of the National Government or to utilize the libraries, gov- 
ernment departments, and other facilities provided in Washington. 

The College of Commerce provides professional training in economics and 
business administration for those who plan to become executives, teachers, 
or investigators in commercial, industrial, agricultural, or governmental 
econoniic enterprises. 

While the curricula offered are technical and vocational, all require a 
thorough basic training in mathematics,, statistics, English, and speech. The 
courses required in these fields are tool subjects needed for proper analysis, 
explanation, and interpretation of modern economic data. 

Liberal allowance in every curriculum is made for other social sciences 
or for purely cultural non-vocational subjects, in order that students may 
acquire the breadth of vision needed by a present day economist or business 
executive. 

The College of Commerce offers a selection of courses in each of the 
following seven fields of general and applied economics: General Eco- 
nomics, Agricultural Economics, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Trade 
and Transportation, and Organization and Management. 

Subject to the group and curricula requirements described subsequently, 
a student may, with the advice of his faculty adviser, elect individual 
courses from any or all of these groups in accordance with his needs. 

Advisory Councils 

In order to facilitate the prompt and continuous adjustment of courses, 
curricula, and instructional methods to provide the training most in demand 
by industry and commerce; and in order constantly to maintain instruction 
abreast of the best current practice, the advice and suggestions of business 
men are constantly sought and received through Advisory Councils com- 
posed of outstanding leaders in each major field of business activity. Each 
Council has its own particular interest to serve, such as advertising, 
marketing, or finance; and the viewpoint and suggestions of these business 
men are proving to be invaluable in developing the instructional and 
research program of the College. 

135 



Standards of Work 

The College of Commerce was admitted to membership in the Anierican 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1940. This is an organiza- 
tion established in 1916 to promote thorough and scientific training for the 
business profession. It maintains high standards of membership based on 
the number and training of the faculty, the thoroughness of the work, the 
length and breadth of the curriculum, the number of students, the financial 
backing of the college, and the facilities for carrying on the work. 

In addition to all general university scholarship requirements, grad- 
uates of the College of Commerce must have successfully completed all 
specific curriculum requirements and must have passed at least forty-eight 
semester hours of economic and business subjects with grades of A, B, or C. 

Group Requirements For Graduation 

A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science upon the satisfactory completion of not fewer 
than 120 semester hours, not including the six hours of basic Military Science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six hours of physical 
education for women and for such men as are excused from Military Science. 

Of these 120 credits, not fewer than 48 must be in economics or business 
subjects, that is, in courses offered in the departments of Economics, 
Business Administration, or Agricultural Economics, and not fewer than 
48 in subjects not offered by these departments; provided that courses in 
principles of economics may be considered to be in either category. 

The following minimum requirements in each of the groups specified 
must be completed before graduation, except as indicated in a particular 
curriculum. 

1. English and Speech — fourteen credits. 

2. Mathematics, Statistics, and Natural Science — twelve credits. 

3. Military Science or Physical Education — six credits. 

4. Social Sciences and Foreign Languages — not fewer than twelve hours 
are required in psychology, sociology, political science, and history, 
and considerably more than these are recommended; provided that 
electives in foreign languages or other humanities may be substituted 
for six hours of this requirement. 

5. Economics — twelve credits. 

6. Organization and Management, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, 
Trade and Transportation, and additional requirements as specified 
in each curriculum. 

Electives And Extra-Curricular Activities 

Business, agricultural, and industrial leaders now require a much broader 
educational background than that provided by vocational courses in eco- 
nomics and administration alone. Group requirements have been set up 
accordingly which demand that not fewer than 48 semester credit hours 

136 



hall be from non-economics courses. A considerably larger number of 
emester hours may be elected from non-economics subjects by a student 
veho is willing to forego a proportionate number of specialized courses in 
economics and business administration. 

Other social sciences, such as sociology, history, political science, and 
applied psychology are useful in furnishing the broad background in social 
sciences needed by any student of economics; and these subjects tend to 
make him a more useful citizen. Logic, ethics, and other philosophy courses 
open up a new world of intellectual pleasure to the student; and training 
in abstract thinking provided by such subjects is also useful vocationally. 
Courses in music and art may serve as a welcome diversion from vocational 
courses; and the social and extra-curricular development that music facili- 
tates is desirable for students of economics or business. 

Students of business administration are urged to learn stenography, typ- 
ing, and other office techniques because this multiplies their opportunities for 
original appointment to positions in general administrative offices and facili- 
tates their promotion to positions where their training in business adminis- 
tration has an opportunity to demonstrate its value. 

Commerce students should diversify their non-economic selections so as 
to obtain the broadest possible general education within the time at their 
disposal. While the freedom of choice offered through electives is sufficient 
to enable a student to study whatever cultural subjects or vocational tech- 
niques he needs anywhere in the University, he who wishes to elect as much 
as a minor in any one department outside the College of Commerce must 
secure the approval of the head of that department to his study list, in 
order that the selections may be effectively adapted to the vocational or 
cultural objectives sought. 

Extra-curricular activities are recommended to students of this col- 
lege whenever the physical and mental capacity of the individual student 
and available free time permit. Excellence in such activities often has a 
definite value in procuring business positions at graduation; and experience 
gained in this way is frequently invaluable in later life. 

Additional electives above the curriculum requirements in either voca- 
tional or non-economics courses are encouraged whenever a student can 
demonstrate the capacity to carry additional subjects satisfactorily. Grades 
received in previous work will be the determining factor for decision as to 
extra student load in each case. Students who do not average better than 
C will not be permitted to carry additional courses beyond the curriculum 

requirements. 

Student Organizations 

There are three student societies in the College of Commerce that are 
designed to develop scholarship, professional attitudes, ability to carry 
responsibility, and comradeship among students of similar interests, namely: 
Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholarship fraternity in the field of busi- 
ness. Beta Alpha Psi, the professional accounting fraternity, and the Colle- 
giate Chamber of Commerce, a general student organization open to all 
students of the College. 

137 



Beta Gamma Sigma 

Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholarship fraternity in commerce and 
business administration recognized by the American Association of Colle- 
giate Schools of Business, has established a chapter, Alpha of Maryland, at 
the University. Membership is limited to senior students ranking scholas- 
tically in the highest tenth of the senior class and junior students in the 
highest two percent of the junior class. 

Beta Alpha Psi 

Students whose major interest is accounting and who have a high scholas. 
tic record are eligible for invitation to membership in Beta Alpha Psi, the 
national professional accounting fraternity. Beta Alpha Psi sponsors a 
professional program of outside lecturers and study in Accountancy during 
the school year. 

Collegiate Chamber of Commerce 

The Collegiate Chamber of Commerce provides students of business 
administration with an organization in which they may learn to ^vo^k 
effectively with others in conferences and committees, and through which 
they may be brought into close contact with business men and trade associa- 
tions in the types of business in which they are most interested. The 
Collegiate Chamber of Commerce maintains close relations with the Junior 
and Senior Chambers of Commerce in the various cities of Maryland and 
with the United States Chamber of Commerce in Washington. It is con- 
trolled by a board of directors elected by students of the College, two from 
each class and one from each student organization in the College. Member- 
ship is voluntary, but all students of business are urged to take part in its 
activities, for much of the training obtained is as valuable as that obtained 
in regular courses. 

While general and social meetings are held periodically, most of the activi- 
ties are centered in the following committees, each of which fosters study, 
business contacts, association with corresponding committees in city, state, 
and national chambers of commerce, discussion, field trips, and advancement 
of students interested in each field: Marketing, Public Relations, Civic 
Affairs, Community Affairs, Finance, Foreign Trade, Agricultural Affairs, 
and Industrial Affairs. A member of the faculty who is qualified in the 
special field in which a given committee is working serves as adviser. 
Additional committees are formed whenever a sufficient number of students 
desire them. 

Class of 1926 Award 

The Class of 1926 of the School of Business Administration of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore offers each year a gold key to the senior 
graduating from the College of Commerce with the highest average for the 
entire four-year course taken at the University of Maryland. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Commerce is assigned to a faculty adviser 
who, so far as practicable, is a specialist in the student's field of interest. 

138 



A student who plans to become an accountant, for instance, has a professor 
f accounting as his adviser; onv* who is interested in banking as a career, 
a professor of finance; and those interested in marketing, advertising, for- 
eign trade, industrial management, agricultural economics, and other sub- 
jects, specialists in these fields. Students are expected to see their advisers 
regularly about registration, curricular requirements, scholarship require- 
ments, and such personal or university matters as may be desirable. 

ORGANIZED CURRICULA 

Several standardized curricula are offered for the guidance of students in 
the selection of courses, namely: General Business, Accounting, Finance, 
Marketing and Sales Administration, Merchandising, Cooperative Organiza- 
tion and Administration, Agricultural Economics, and Commerce-Law. 

Lower Division 

Unless a student wishes to take the combination Commerce-Law, the 
Retail Merchandising, or the Agricultural Economics curriculum, he regis- 
ters for the Business Curriculum immediately following for the freshman 
and sophomore years and decides at the beginning of his junior year whether 
he wishes to specialize in Accounting, Finance, Marketing, or Cooperation, 
or continue with a General Business training. Combinations to fit other 
vocational needs can be worked out by a different selection of courses in the 
junior and senior years. 

Business Curriculum* Semester 

Freshman Year I Ji 

Survey and Composition (English ly) _ 3 3 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y) 3 3 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) _ ....„ 3 — 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ~ - - 1 1 

tForeign Language, Political Science or other social science. 

Mechanical Drawing or elective - - 3 3 

Science (preferably Chemistry) - 3-4 3-4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - 1 1 

17-18 17-18 



*See also Commerce-Law and Agricultural Economics curricula which are described on 

subsequent pages. 

tit is important that students take foreign language if the^ expect to pursue graduate 
work later or enter foreign trade work. 

139 



Semester 
Sophomore Year I // 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f) 2 «^ 

Business English (Eng. 4s) _ — 2 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 -^ 

Business Statistics (Stat. 15s) _ — 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 5 If, 52s) 3 3 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) 4 4 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) — 3 

Psychology (Psych. 4f), Sociology, Government, Philosophy, 

or Psychology 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „ _ 2 2 

JElective (See suggested courses below) 3 — 

17 17 

Suggested Elective Courses: 

Government: American National (Pol. Sci. If and s) — 3. 

State and Local (Pol. Sci. 4f and s) — 3. 
Comparative (Pol. Sci. 7f, 8s)— 2, 2. 
History: A Survey of Western Civilization (H. ly) — 6. 
American (H. 5f, 6s) — 3, 3. 
England and Great Britain (H. 3y) — 6. 

Sociology. Introduction (Soc. 3f, 4s) — 3, 3. 

Psychology: For Students of Commerce (Psych. 4f) — 3; or Applied (Psych. 

3s)— 3. 
Introduction (Psych. If or s) — 3. 
Philosophy: Introduction (Phil. If and s) — 3. 
Logic (Phil. 22f)— 3. 
Ethics (Phil. 23f)— 3. 
Speech: Advanced (3f, 4s) — 2, 2. 

Extempore (9f, 10s) — 1, 1. 
Library Science. Sources of Business Information (L. S. 2s) — 1. 
English: Survey of American Literature (Eng. 7f, 8s) — 3, 3. 
Expository Writing, continued (Eng. 6s) — 2. 
College Grammar (Eng. 14f ) — 3. 
Science: Introductory courses in Chemistry, Botany, Geology, Physics, or 

Zoology— 3, 4, 6, 8. 
Language: French, German, Spanish, or Italian — 6. 

Classics: Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (Classics 3f, 4s) — 2, 2. 
Drawing: Mechanical (Dr. 4y) — 2. 



General Business Curriculum 



Junior Year 

Corporation Finance (Fm. lllf) - ^ 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf ) ^ 

Industrial Management (O. and M. 121s) --- -.-- — 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) _ — — 

Trade and Commercial Organizations (O. and M. 172s) or Eco- 
nomics electives 

*Electives (See suggested courses below) 6 

15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) _ - - 3 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

*Electives (See suggested courses below) 12 



Semester 
II 



15 



3 
3 

3 
6 

15 



S 

12 

15 



Suggested Elective Courses 

Economics of Cooperative Organ- 
ization (Econ. 161f)— 3. 
Property, Casualty, and Liability 

Insurance (Fin. I43f) — 2. 
Life, Group, and Social Insurance 

(Fin. 144f)^2. 
Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) — 3. 
Principles of Foreign Trade (T. 

and T. lOlf )— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. lllf )— 3. 
Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 

—3. 
Public Finance (Fin. 106f)— 3. 
Investments (Fin. 115f) — 3. 
Labor Economics (Econ. 130f ) — 3. 
Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 

109f)— 3. 
Social and Economic History of the 

U. S. (H. lllf, 112s)— 3, 3. 
Principles of Public Administration 

(Pol. Sci. lllf)— 3. 



Trade and Commercial Organiza- 
tions (0. and M. 172s)— 3. 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 
136s)— 3. 

Banking Principles and Practices 
(Fin. 121s)— 3. 

Salesmanship (Mkt. 106s)— 2. 

Salesmanagement (Mkt. 108s)— 2. 

Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 

Social Control of Business (Econ. 
152s)— 3. 

Psychology in Advertising and Sell- 
ing (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Industrial Psychology (Psych. 
160f)— 3. 

Personnel (O. and M. 125s)— 3. 

Legislatures and Legislation (Pol. 
Sci. 124s)— 3. 

Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 

Speech electives are recommended 
for either semester. 



JSpecial attention is called^o the elective in Advanced Speech (2), which must be talcen 
in sophomore, junior, or senior year. 

140 



*Electives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

141 



Accounting Curriculum 

Semester 

Junior Year I // 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) 3 ^ 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) 3 3 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f, 122s) _ 2 2 

Business Law I (0. and M. IQls) — 3 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) 7 7 



Sales Administration Curriculum 



Semester 



15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) 3 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s) 2 

Specialized Accounting (Acct. 181f, 182s) - 3 

Financial Anaylsis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) _ 7 



15 



15 



2 
3 
3 

7 

15 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

*Income Tax Procedure (Acct. 161f ) 

—3. 
Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 

T. lOlf)— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. lllf)— 3. 
Industrial Combination (Econ. 

153f)— 3. 
Investments (Fin. 115f) — 3. 
Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf ) 

—3. 



Advanced Economic Principles 

(Econ. 190f)— 3. 
* Advanced Business Law (0. and M. 

103s)— 2. 
*C. P. A. Problems (Acct. 186s)— 3. 
Industrial Management (O. and M. 

121s)— 3. 
Banking Principles and Practices 

(Fin. 121s)— 3. 
Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 
Accounting Apprenticeship (Acct. 



149)— 0. 

Marketing, Sales Administration, and Merchandising 

Two programs of study are available for students of marketing, mer- 
chandising, and sales administration, of which the first is primarily intended 
for students interested in sales administration, and the second for men and 
women who wish to go into the garment trade, department store work, or 
other types of retail or wholesale distribution. The second involves certain 
changes in the basic lower division curriculum in order to provide for 
technical courses needed. 



*Essential for students who plan to prepare for a career in public accounting. 
fElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 



/ /i 

junior Year _ 3 _ 

Corporation Finaiice (Fin. lllf) _ 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf)....: ■. - - _ 

P i"ciples of Advertising (Mkt. 109f) .-. -^-^^^^ I 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) _3 ^ 

Salesmanship (Mkt. 106s) -...- _ g 

Salesmanagement (Mkt. I08s) _ g 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) -■-■■^^r^ Ti^i.. _ 3 

Trade and Commercial Organizations (O. and M. 172s) ^ ^_^ 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) ^ _ 

15 15-16 

Senior Year « 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f ) ;-":;-■; 3 

Marketing Research and Market Policies (Mkt. 199s) - .. -- ^ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fm. 199s) - ^^ ^ 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) ^ __ 

15 15 



142 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 

—3. , 

Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 

T. lOlf)— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. lllf )— 3. 
Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) 

—5. 

Psychological Problems in Market 

Research (Psych. 140f)— 3. 
Property, Casualty, and Liability 

Insurance (Fin. 143f) — 2. 
Life, Group, and Social Insurance 

(Fin, 144f )— 2. 
Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) — 3. 
Labor Economics (Econ. 130f)— 3. 
Supervised Practice in Marketing 

(Mkt. 149)— 2. 
The list of potential electives for ^^tudent%interested in sp^^^^^^^ 
of advertising, sales administration, and marketmg is too ^[^f /;5,^^^^^^^^ 
here. Advertising students may wish to elect courses - ^/^JJ ,^^^^^^ 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Those interested m the marketmg and 

tElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during Junior 
and senior years. ^ ^o 



Retail Store Management and Mer- 
chandising (Mkt. 119s)— 3. 

Export and Import Trade Pro- 
cedure (T. and T. 121s)— 3. 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 
102s)— 3. 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 

136s)— 3. 

Psychology in Advertising and Sell- 
ing (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Purchasing Technique (Mkt. Il5s) 

—3. 
Real Estate (Fin. I51s)— 3. 
Food Products Inspection (A. E. 

105s)— 2. 
Industrial Management (O. and M. 

121s)— 3. 



I 

I 



Accounting Curriculum 

Semester 

Junior Year I jj 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) 3 _. 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) 3 3 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f, 122s) _ 2 2 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) „ — 3 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) - 7 7 



Sales Administration Curriculum 



Semester 



15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) _..... 3 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s) 2 

Specialized Accounting (Acct. 181f, 182s) 3 

Financial Anaylsis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) _ ^ 7 



15 



15 



2 
3 

3 

7 

15 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

*Income Tax Procedure (Acct. 161f ) 

—3. 
Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 

T. lOlf)— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. 11 If)— 3. 
Industrial Combination (Econ. 

153f)— 3. 
Investments (Fin. 115f) — 3. 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf ) 
—3. 



Advanced Economic Principles 
(Econ. 190f)— 3. 
* Advanced Business Law (0. and M. 

103s)— 2. 
*C. P. A. Problems (Acct. 186s)— 3. 
Industrial Management (O. and M. 

121s)— 3. 
Banking Principles and Practices 

(Fin. 121s)— 3. 
Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 
Accounting Apprenticeship (Acct. 



149)— 0. 

Marketing, Sales Administration, and Merchandising 

Two programs of study are available for students of marketing, mer- 
chandising, and sales administration, of which the first is primarily intended 
for students interested in sales administration, and the second for men and 
women who wish to go into the garment trade, department store work^ or 
other types of retail or wholesale distribution. The second involves certain 
changes in the basic lower division curriculum in order to provide for 
technical courses needed. 



*Essential for students who plan to prepare for a career in public accounting. 
tElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 



Junior Year , . 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) - ^ ^ 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf)..-: , - 3 

Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 109f ) -^ 3 -- 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) ^ ^ 

Salesmanship (Mkt. 106s) - - _ ^ 

Salesmanagement ( Mkt. I08s ) - -• 

Business Law I (0. and M. 101s) , ;; ;;o ', " t 

Trade and Commercial Organizations (O. and M. 172s) — J 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) - ^ ^"^ 

15 15-16 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) - ^ -" 

Marketing Research and Market Policies (Mkt. 199s) - — ^ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) -•- — ^ 

tElectives (See suggested courses below) ^ ^ 

15 15 



142 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) 

—3. 

Principles of Foreign Trade (T. and 

T. lOlf)— 3. 
Principles of Transportation (T. 

and T. lllf)— 3. 
Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) 

—3. 

Psychological Problems in Market 

Research (Psych. 140f)— 3. 
Property, Casualty, and Liability 

Insurance (Fin. 143f) — 2. 
Life, Group, and Social Insurance 

(Fin, 144f )— 2. 
Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) — 3. 
Labor Economics (Econ. 130f) — 3. 
Supervised Practice in Marketing 

(Mkt. 149)— 2. 

The list of potential electives for students interested in special phases 
of advertising, sales administration, and marketing is too great for mclusion 
here. Advertising students may wish to elect courses in Art or English m 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Those interested in the marketing and 

tElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

143 



Retail Store Management and Mer- 
chandising (Mkt. 119s)— 3. 

Export and Import Trade Pro- 
cedure (T. and T. 121s)— 3. 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 
102s)— 3. 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 
136s)— 3. 

Psychology in Advertising and Sell- 
ing (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) 

—3. 
Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 
Food Products Inspection (A. E. 

105s)— 2. 
Industrial Management (0. and M. 

121s)— 3. 



installation of mechanical or electrical equipment will wish to elect a num- 
ber of courses in the College of Engineering. Persons planning to en;;age 
in marketing of agricultural products may choose courses in the College of 
Agriculture. 

Merchandising and Retail Distribution Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year I jj 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) 3 3 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y) 3 3 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) 3 ^ 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) „ — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Chemistry (Chem. 3y or ly) 3-4 3-4 

Textiles ( H. E. 71f ) 3 _ 

Design (H. E. 21s) - — 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) „ 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f) _ 2 — 

Business English (Eng. 4s) — 2 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 — 

Business Statistics (Stat. 15s) — 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) 3 3 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. Sly) 4 4 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) — 3 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f ) or an elective 3 — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Junior Year 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) _ 3 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 — 

Principles of Advertising (Mkt. 109f ) 3 — 

Economics of Trade and Cooperative Organization (Econ. 

161f) ^ 3 

Salesmanship (Mkt. 106s) _...._ „ — 2 

Sales Management (Mkt. 108s) _ „ — 2 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) _ — 3 

Interior Decoration (H. E. 121f, 122s) 3 3 

Merchandise Display (H. E. 125s) — 2 

Advanced Textiles (H. E. 171s) „ _ 3 

Crafts (H. E. 25s) or elective — 2-3 



Semester 



I 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f ) .- - •• • ^ 

Marketing Research and Market Policies (Mkt. 199s) — — 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — -— 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) - - ^ 

Retail Store Management (Mkt. 119s) — 

Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) -■ -- 

/Advanced Design (H. E. I23f, I24s) - - --• j 

Problems in Textiles (H. E. 172f) - 4 

Supervised Practice in Retail Marketing (Mkt. 149f) ^ 

15 



// 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



15 



Finance Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) — ^ 

\dvanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) or Economic electives 3 

Advanced Banking Principles and Practices (Fin. 121s) — 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) --. - — 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) - ^ 



// 

3 
3 
3 
6 



15 

Senior Year 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) -.- 3 

Investments (Fin. 115f) - ^ 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

fElectives (See suggested courses below) • 9 



15 



15 



3 
12 

15 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

Public Finance (Fin. 106f)— 3. 
Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f ) 

—3. 
Property, Casualty, and Liability 

Insurance (Fin. 143f) — 2. 
Life, Group, and Social Insurance 

(Fin. 144f)— 2. 
Land Economics (A. E. lllf) — 3. 
Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) 

—3. 
Stock and Commodity Exchanges 

(Fin. 118f)— 3. 
Economics of Cooperative Organi- 
zation (Econ. 161f)— 3. 



Trade and Commercial Organiza- 
tions (O. and M. 172s)— 3. 
Public Utilities (Econ. 145s)— 3. 
Farm Finance (A. E. 104s)— 3. 
Supervised Practice in Finance 

(Fin. 149)— 2. 
Real Estate (Fin. 151s)— 3. 
Investment Banking (Fin. 116s) — 3. 
International Finance (Fin. 129s) 

—3. 
Social Control of Business (Econ. 
152s)— 3. 



15 17-18 



144 



fElectives should include not less than six hours of advanced economics during junior 
and senior years. 

145 



Agricultural Economics Curriculum* Semester 

Freshman Year I n 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) „ 3 3 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y) 3 3 

Agricultural Industry and Resources (A. E. If) „ 3 ^ 

Farm Organization (A. E. 2s) - — 3 

Biology (Bot. If and Zool, Is, or Zool. 3f and Bot. 2s), Geology 

(Geol. If), or Foreign Language 3-4 3,4 

General or Introductory Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) 4-3 4-3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y). - 1 i 



Semester 



17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 

Business Statistics (Stat. 15s) — 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 5 If, 52s) - 3 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) _ _ — 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) _ „ 4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 

Agriculture Elective - - .- - ~ 2-3 

17-18 
Junior Year 

Farm Economics (A. E. lOOf) 3 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102s) — 

Business Law I (O. and M. 101s) — 

Farm Management (A. E. 108f) - _..... 3 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) 3 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) _ _ 3 

fFarm Finance (A. E. 104s) _ — 

fLand Economics (A. E. 11 If) 3 

Prices of Farm Products (A. E. 106s) » — 

fElectives ~ - - 1 



16 



17-18 



2 

1 








3 
3 
4 



18 



3 
3 



3 
4 

16 



♦Students registered in this curriculum should satisfy the Professor of AgricuHnral 
Economics that they have had adequate farm experience before entering the junior year. 

fTwo hours of speech elective must be taken during the sophomore, junior, or senior 
years. A. E. lllf and 104s may be postponed until the senior year if this will facilitate 
the selection of useful electives during the last two years. 

146 



Senior Year 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f ) - - - • 3 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f ) ~ 3 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) — 

Contemporary Economic Thought (Econ. 191s) _.... — 

jResearch Problems (A. E. 109f, 110s) _ 1 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) 

Rural Sociology ( Soc. 103f ) - 3 

fElectives •• - - 

16 



// 



3 
3 
1 
3 



16 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN COMMERCE AND LAW 

Students who wish to combine commercial and legal studies to obtain 
both Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws degrees may do so by 
selecting their courses in such a way as to comply with all of the group 
and specific requirements of the College of Commerce in three years, and 
then completing the 126 hours required for graduation from this college by 
courses taken in the University of Maryland School of Law at Baltimore. 

During the first three years, students will be registered in the College 
of Commerce. In the fourth year and thereafter, unless the four-year 
alternative program is taken, they will be registered in the School of Law; 
but they must forward copies of their study lists to the office of the Dean 
of the College of Commerce at the beginning of each semester of the fourth 
year. At the end of the fourth year, the degree of Bachelor of Science may 
be awarded in the College of Commerce upon the recommendation of the 
Dean of the Law School. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be awarded 
upon satisfactory completion of the entire program. 

Curriculum Semester 

Freshmun Year I II 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) — 3 8 

General Mathematics (Math. 20y) 3 8 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) — 3 — 

Development of Commerce and Industry (T. and T. 4s) — ...... — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - • 1 1 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 3 — 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) -- — 3 

History of England and Great Britain (H. 3y) 3 8 

R. 0. T. C. (M I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly or 

2y and 4y) _ ,.... -.... 1 1 

— 17 17 

tElective for honor students only. 

fTwo hours of speech elective must be taken during the sophomore, junior, or senior 
years. A. E. lllf and 104s may be postponed until the senior year if tliis will facilitate 
t!ie selection of useful electives during the last two years. 

147 



Semester 

Sophomore Year I // 

Expo-sitory Writing (Eng. 5f) 2 ^ 

Business English (Eng. 4s) — 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) 3 3 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) 4 4 

Elements of Statistics (Stat. 14f) 3 

Business Statistics (Stat. 15s) - , — 3 

Money and Banking (Fin. 53s) — 3 

Advanced Public Speaking (Speech 3f) 2 -« 

Comparative Government (Pol. Sci. 7f) 2 -. 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 

or 6y and 8y) ~ 2 2 

18 17 

Junior students may elect either the accounting or the economics group 
of courses: 

Junior Year — Accounting Concentration 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) » -.... 3 — 

♦Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) „ _ — 3 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) ,.- - 3 - 

Industrial Management (0. and M. 121s) „ — 3 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, lQ2s) 3 3 

Cost Accounting (Acct. 121f, 122s) 2 2 

Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 171f, 172s) 2 2 

Argumentation (Speech llf, 12s) „ 2 2 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) 1 1 



16 
Junior Year— Economics Concentration 

Corporation Finance (Fin. lllf) ^ 3 

♦Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) ,. 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) 3 

Public Finance (Fin. 106f) _...... _ 3 

Labor Economics (Econ. 130f) _ 3 

♦Social Control of Business (Econ. 152s) _ , — 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) ^ „..„. — 

Public Utilities (Econ. 145s) ...._ > -.... — 

Argumentation (Speech llf, 12s) „ _ 2 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) _ „ _ 1 



16 



16 



— 3 



3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 

16 



♦Preferably taken in senior year if the four-year curriculum is followed. 

148 



Lst year of regular Law School; or, preferably, graduation from the 

, !r vear curriculum m Commerce-Law before entering Law School. In 

r Matter case. Business Law I is substituted for Financial Analysis and 

r trnl and an approved elective for Social Control of Busmess m the 

ior year the replaced courses being taken in the senior year. The addi- 

£al requirements are shown below: ^^^^^^^ 

I - ' " 

1 ^Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) - - J 

' *Social Control of Business (Econ. 152s) - 

Business Law II (O. and M. 102f) - ^ - 

Electives (See suggested courses below) -i^ ^ 

15 15 

i Suggested Elective Courses: 

Selections from the economics or accounting concentrations previously 
I shown additional speech or English courses, and the following: 

Advanced Economic Principles tincome Tax Procedure (Acct. 

.^ iQfVf^ 3 161f) — 3. 

Comparative Economic Systems Contemporary Economic Thought 

(E n 151f)— 3 (Econ. 191s) — 3. 

Credits and Collections (Fin. 125f) Labor and Government (Econ. 

n 131s) O. 

Prii^iples of Foreign Trade (T. and Advanced Banking Principles and 

T 101 f)— 3 Practices (Fm. 121s)— 3. 

Property, Casualty, and Liability International Finance (Fin. 129s) 

Insurance (Fin. 143f)— 2. T?: . . .-n.- i,.i x o 

Life, Group, and Social Insurance Real Estate (Fm 151s)-3. 

(Fin 144f)— 2 Personnel (O. and M. 125s)— 3. 

Principles of Public Administra- Recent Political Theory (Pol. Sci. 

tion (Pol. Sci. lllf)— 3. 142s)— 3. 

\ T. v^' 1 TV,o..rv rPnl Constitutional History of the 

^1^•^!f.^ f United States (H. 115y)-6. 

bci. 1411)— d. Psychology in Advertising and 

Investments (Fin. 115f)— 3. Selling (Psych. 141s)— 3. 

Economics of Cooperative Organ- Legislatures and Legislation (Pol. 

ization (Econ. 161f)— 3. Sci. 124s)— 3. 

Principles of Transportation (T. Farm Finance (A. E. 104s)— 3 

and T. lllf)— 3. tC. P. A. Problems (Acct. 186s)— 3. 

Industrial Combination (Econ. fAdvanced Business Law (O. and M. 

153f)— 3. 103s)— 2. 

tSpecialized Accounting (Acct. 181f, Trade and Commercial Organiza- 

182s)— 3, 3. tions (0. and M. 172s)— 3. 

^Essential for students who wish to prepare for C. P. A. examinations. 
* Preferably taken in senior year if the four-year curriculum is followed. 

149 



COOPERATIVE AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 

are teS'r Z^/""""' """"^ '"■'"^'^' «=— ^^^s, and business men 
thonS, Tl u 1 ^ """^^ important part in modem economic life 1, 
though agricultural, consumers', and credit cooperatives are well tnn 

Vv Z'r''"""''! "^^''^'^ '^^' cooperative principles are beinl rncreasTn7' 
utilized by merchants, manufacturers investors and r>th!r«1l ? increasingly 

tions mutuals, voluntary groups, a^d Ith trCs of dem^crStircf 
trolled orgamzations that may or may not call themselves c^rperSe Th: 
problems of organization and administration of a cooperative I^e much Tl 
same whe her the enterprise is a farmers' marketing assocLTon a reta-l 
merchants' cooperative, a wholesalers' voluntary chafn a ^roun of J! 
facturers who set up an association to carry tS^ir ow insurance nrl 
join y, or advertise and sell cooperatively.'a groupTf faTe^'or urbl' 
dwelers who establish an association to purchase or prolce the gfod 

:rnh:Tu7nerm:rora%Lmu^LT^^^^ 

Jointly carry on any contin^^ bTr/ss'Interprifr ''"' °' '"^'"^^^ ^'^ 

^r^lT-ff''^.''^ °^"T^'P ^"d <=°nt'-ol and the objectives of a cooperative 
dUfZf. " '''°!f "' "^ ^^"'^^"^ <=°"*^«»«d competitor to S 

?hT latir tv^n?^ T '"'''"'"'' '"^'""'^ ''' ^"^'^""^^ responsibility i 
h«!, /., ^^ enterprise is not adequate for cooperative leadershio 

.nZr .' ^'^^^"-l problems of a cooperative or Easiness aTsocS 
l?!l !l V °" "^ "" uf "^ *^°^" ""^'"^ ^'•""^ the nature of the business but 

riL:rSctiC':nd ctt^ "^" ^^ ^^-^ ^^^~ ^'^ — -p 
entrSst^hirr rrt::r inrreS^tr: oftLr-fi 

curricula such as Finance, Marketing, AccountTni? IT A^Z^TZl 
nomics, in accordance with the type of work he wifhes to dTw" h coopS- 
tives and then use electives to obtain as much cooperath^rtheorJ and 
practice as practicable, or (b) to register for the curriculum In Cooperative 
Organization and Administration that follows, and then ekct courses tha 
will give him a reasonably adequate technical knowledge of the t^e o 
activity with which he plans to associate himself. For fnstaiice a Sson 
ntendmg to work with farmer cooperatives should have at feastle cours 
m agriculture during each of his eight semesters; a student of consum 
cooperation should elect Economics of Consumption (Econ 136s) ReTai 
Store Management and Meivrhandising (Mkt!^ 119s) and SchasS^ 
Technique (Mkt 115s); a person intending to specialize n the crSt union 

sTudeTo? tSe :'"b ''" ''°"'' ''''' ''''''' ^°™ in finan:^ and 
student of trade or business association work should elect course, t),«f fit 

Since every student interested in cooperation as a career should have the 

^^LcZZ^^^ ?' lower division general business cuSl^lu': 

m any case, he need not make a definite decision until the beginning of his 

150 



junior year, though students are urged to use the electives provided during 
the first two years to obtain so far as possible the background subjects 
likely to be needed. 

Practical experience is exceedingly important. Students intending to 
work with agricultural cooperatives, should have farm experience, for 
example, and all students who plan to make cooperative organization and 
management a career should arrange for practical work with cooi>eratives 
as early as may be practicable. The course entitled "Supervised Practice 
in Cooperation", which involves experience with cooperatives, should be 
taken during the summer between the junior and senior years unless a 
different period is arranged. 

Washington is the national headquarters of the agricultural cooperatives 
of this country, and arrangements have been made for properly equipped 
students to have cooperative experience by means of close working arrange- 
ments maintained with the National Cooperative Council. 

Unusual facilities for the study of cooperatives of all types are also 
available in the government agencies and libraries of Washington, and 
special arrangements will be made for properly qualified students to make 
the most of the opportunity for special study thus offered. Most trade and 
business associations have headquarters or representation in Washington. 

The courses below are suggested for the junior and senior years, though 
substitutions will be permitted whenever the student's adviser believes this 
will improve the training for a particular type of cooperative work. 

Cooperative Curriculum 

Semester 
j2inior Year I II 

Business Law I (0. and M. 101s) ^ — 3 

Corporation Finance (Fin. 11 If) — 3 — 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) _ _ 3 — 

Industrial Management (O. and M. 121s) _ — 3 

Advanced Accounting (Acct. lOlf, 102s) „ 3 8 

* Principles of Transportation (T. and T. lllf ) 3 — 

Economics of Cooperative Organization (Econ. 161f) 3 — 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 136s) _ — 3 

Elective — 3 



t Supervised Practice in Cooperation (0. and M. 149) (Summer) 



15 
2 



15 



* Suggested electives for students who wish general training and do not have a particular 
tM)e of cooperation or cooperative activity in mind. 

tApplication for this course must be made not later than March 1. 



151 



Semester 






Senior Year 

Business Law II (0. and M. 102f) -- 

Financial Analysis and Control (Fin. 199s) 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) 

*Retail Store Management and Merchandising (Mkt. 119s), or 

♦Purchasing Technique (Mkt. 115s) _ 

♦Consumer Financing (Fin. 105f) _ 

♦Contemporary Economic Thought (Econ. 191s) 

♦Auditing Theory and Practice (Acct. 17 If, 172s) 

Problems in Cooperative Administration (O. and M. 161s) 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 9f, 10s) ~ — 

Elective 



/ 

3 



// 

3 



3 

2 

1 
3 

15 



3 
2 
3 
1 



15 



SPECIAL CURRICULA 

Suggestions for a selection of courses in Management, Personnel Admin- 
istration and Industrial Relations to constitute a curriculum are available 
upon request to the Dean. Other organized programs of study will be 
developed whenever the needs of business and industry or the demands of 
students for training in other fields of business administration or economics 
warrant it: 

A student who has completed the basic first two years of Commerce with 
an average grade of B may, with the approval of his adviser, petition for a 
special curriculum if he can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Dean 
that the courses needed for his intended vocation are different from those 
offered in any of the foregoing standardized curricula. If the petition be 
granted, a special curriculum designed to fit the specific needs of such a 
student may be set up and made a part of his permanent record. There- 
after, the requirements for graduation of this student will be as set forth 
in his special curriculum. All such special curricula are subject to the 
scholarship, group, and specific course requirements of the College. 



* Suggested electives for students who wish general training and do not have a particular 
type of cooperation or cooperative activity in mind. 



152 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Harold Benjamin, Dean. 
The College of Education meets the needs of the following classes of 
students: (1) undergraduates preparing to tea^ih the cultural and the 
vocational studies in high schools, preparatory schools, and vocational 
schools; (2) students who will enter higher institutions to prepare for 
work in specialized educational and institutional fields; (3) students pre- 
paring for educational work in the trades and industries; (4) students 
preparing to become home demonstrators, girls' club leaders, community 
recreation leaders, and (in cooperation with the Department of Sociology) 
social workers; (5) students whose major interest is in other fields, but 
who desire courses in education for their informational and cultural values; 
(6) graduate students preparing for teaching positions requiring an 
advanced degree and for positions as high school principals, elementary 
school principals, educational supervisors, attendance officers, and school 

administrators. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain 
important supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Opportunity for supervised teaching under com- 
petent critic teachers is provided by arrangement with the school authorities 
of Prince Georges, Howard, and Montgomery Counties, and of the District 
of Columbia. 

Observation. Observation of teaching is conducted in Washington and 
in nearby Maryland schools. The number, variety, and nearness of these 
schools provide ample and unusual opportunities for observation of actual 
classroom situations. 

Other Facilities in Washington. The Library of Congress, the Library 
of the U. S. Office of Education, and the special libraries of other Govern- 
ment offices are accessible. The information services of the National 
Education Association, the American Council on Education, the U. S. Office 
of Education, and of other institutions, public and private, are available 

to students. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in general 
the same as for the other colleges of the University. See Section I, 
Admission. 

Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is tentatively assigned to a 
member of the faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. The 

153 



choice of subject areas within which the student will prepare to teach and 
the selection of his professional courses will be made under faculty guid- 
ance during the first year in connection with the Introduction to Education 
course, which is required of all freshmen. Students from other colleges in 
the university who plan to take an education curriculum should also take 
this course. However, the course is open to sophomores or upper classmen 
who transfer to the College of Education from other colleges within the 
university or from other institutions. Although in particularly fortunate 
cases, it is possible to make satisfactory adjustments as late as the junior 
year for students from other colleges who have not already entered upon 
the sequence of professional courses, it is usually imperative that this work 
in the College of Education be begun not later than the sophomore year. 
It is practically impossible to make the necessary adjustm^ents for studenU 
of advanced upper class standing on account of the sequence of prepro- 
fessional and professional subjects. 

It is advisable for students who purpose to teach (except Vocational 
Agriculture) to register in the College of Education, in order that they may 
have continuously the coimsel and guidance of the faculty which is directly 
responsible for their professional preparation. It is permissible, however, 
for a student to register in that college which in conjunction with the 
College of Education offers the majority of the courses he will pursue in 
satisfying the requirements of the curriculum he elects. 

Preprofessional and Professional Courses 

The courses required of all students in the College of Education, and of 
all students in other colleges desiring to elect an education curriculum, are 
classified into two categories (1) preprofessional and (2) professional. 
The professional courses are all recognized for certification ;purposes by 
the Maryland State Department of Education, provided they are taken in 
the junior and senior years. 

Preprofessional courses: Introduction to Education; Educational Forum. 

Professional courses: Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; 
The High School or The Junior High School; Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Observation (in field of teaching major); Educational Measurements; Meth- 
ods and Practice of Teaching. 

Recommendations Beyond Bare Required Minimum. Students who wish 
to enrich their professional preparation will do well to take the Curriculum, 
Instruction, and Observation course in their minor as well as their major 
teaching field, and to elect 6 instead of 3 units in the Methods and Practice 
of Teaching course. The first-level offering in guidance and the course in 
Visual Education are also centered around the day-by-day demands made 
upon the classroom teacher. Many students, and particularly those who plan 
to do graduate work in Education, may wish to strengthen their grasp of 
the foundations of education through second-level courses in Educational 
Psychology and Educational Sociology, or to deepen their insights by taking 
courses in History of Education or Comparative Education. 

154 



Eligibility. To be eligible to enter the professional courses, a student 
must have attained junior status as defined below. Continuance in such 
courses will be contingent upon the student's remaining in the upper four- 
fifths of his class in subsequent semester revisions of class standing. 

Admission of Teacher College Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curricula of Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges and other accredited teacher-education institutions whose records 
dve evidence of the ability and character essential to teaching will be 
admitted to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate 
classes. Graduates of the two-year teacher-training curriculum, m most 
cases may satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Elementary Education by attendance for two full college years; gradu- 
ates of the three-year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year. 
Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as high school 
teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not uniform, 
but depends upon the high school subjects to be taught and the mdividual 
ability of the student. 

Junior Status 
The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two years. 
by reason of temperament, health, industry, and scholastic progress, give 
promise of becoming successful teachers are encouraged to continue m the 
curricula of the College of Education; those who are unlikely to succeed 
as teachers by reason of health deficiencies, of weakness m oral and 
written English, of unfavorable personal traits, or of scholastic deficiency 
are advised to transfer to other fields. Data bearing on all these aspects of 
the student's personality are secured through the selective admissions test- 
ing program administered in connection with the Introduction to Education 
course, through the cooperation of the Department of Speech, and through 

direct observation by the faculty. , , ,». 4. 

To be eligible for junior status a student must have completed 64 semester 
hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average grade of C or better. 

Student Teaching 

Two courses are offered in student teaching— Principles and Practice of 
Teaching (Ed. 139f or s, Ed. 140f or s), carrying respectively 3 and 6 semes- 
ter hours of credit. u xr 

Students who expect to register for the 6-hour credit course should offer 
130 credits for graduation and, because of the large amount of time devoted 
to this course in the senior year, will ordinarily need to include at least one 
summer session in their college programs. Students who elect the 3-hour 
credit course need present only 128 credits for graduation. 

Certification of Secondary School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved high 
schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have satisfac- 

155 



4 



torily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Specifically it 
limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the upper four- 
fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in practice teachin^r " 
From the offerings of Education, the District of Columbia requirement of 
24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of a minimum of 128 credits in con- 
formity with the requirements specified under "Curricula" and in conformity 
with general requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will 
be conferred. 

Curricula 

The curricula of the College of Education, described in detail in the 
following pages, are designed to prepare high school teachers of the aca- 
demic and scientific subjects, the special subjects, and the vocational sub- 
jects under the provisions of the Federal Vocational Education Acts. 

The specifications for majors and minors, under "Arts and Sciences 
Education," satisfy the requirements of the State Department of Education 
in regard to "the number of college credits required in any two or more 
subjects which are to be placed on a high school teacher's certificate." 
The curricula for the special subjects cover all State Department require- 
ments. The curricula for the vocational subjects meet the objectives set up 
in the Federal Acts and in the interpretations of the Oflfice of Education 
and of the State Board of Education. (For Agricultural Education see 
College of Agriculture, page 81.) 

In the Arts and Sciences Education curriculum one may qualify for the 
degree either of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, depending upon the 
major subject. The other curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. 

The general and special requirements of each curriculum are shown in 
the following descriptions. 

Curriculum in Agricultural Education 

See College of Agriculture, page 81. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES EDUCATION 

General Requirements 

In addition to Military Science or Physical Education, required of all 
students in the University, the following requirements must be fulfilled by 
all candidates for degrees in this curriculum, normally by the end of the 
sophomore year: 

(1) Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) and Survey and Composition II 
(Eng. 2f, 3s), 12 semester hours. 

(2) Two years of foreign language are required of candidates for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree if the student enters with less than three years of 

156 



,,reiffn language; one year, if he enters with three years. No foreign 
«e is required of any student who enters with four or more years of 
Sn lawe nor of candidates for the bachelor of science degree. 
"Foreign language" includes both ancient and modem languages. 

(3) Twelve semester hours of the social sciences (history, economics, 

sociology, political science). . . i • „^ 

(4) Twelve semester hours of natural science or of natural science and 

mathematics. 

(5) Twenty semester hours of education. 

The program of each student shall include all of the general requirements 
listed above, and all requirements for his major and minor, stated below. 

Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year 

Introduction to Education (Ed. 2f or s) l """^ I 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - " 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) -•" "- " 

General Requirements (as indicated under 2, 3, and 4 above) 6-7 b-7 

Major and minor requirements and electives - - 3-5 3^ 

15-17 15-17 

Sophomore Year 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f or s) - q ^^ 3 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - - - _l 

General Requirements (as indicated above) - ^ J ^^ 

Major and minor requirements and electives -..-•- - 4 5 4-5 

15-17 15-17 

Junior Yea/r 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) -. ~ 3 •— 

Educational Sociology— Introductory (Ed. 112f ) 2 

The High School (Ed. 103s) or The Junior High School 

Ed. 110s) - """ "~ 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (Ed. 120s; 122s; 

124s; 126s; or 128s) - -- •; "" 

General requirements, major and minor requirements, and 

, .. „ 10-12 12-14 

electives 

15-17 15-17 



167 



Senior Year Semester 

I n 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) 2 ^ 

Methods and Practice of Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) or (Ed. 

140f or s) - ....._ 3-6 or 3~6 

Major and minor requirements and electives „ 10-12 12-14 

15-17 15-17 
Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
school subjects in accordance with the certification requirements of the 
State Department of Education (By-law 30 revised). These are designated 
as major and minor subjects, with a requirement of from 28 to 40 semester 
hours of credit for a major and from 20 to 30 semester hours for a minor. 
If it is deemed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching of three 
high school subjects, the requirement for a major may be modified at the 
discretion of the faculty of the College of Education to permit the pursuit 
of three subjects to the extent required for State certification. Semester 
hour requirements are detailed below. 

No student will he permitted to do practice teaching until he has m,et all 
previous requirem^ents, 

English. (For the degree of bachelor of arts.) A major in English 
requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Survey and Composition I and II 12 semester hours 

Shakespeare (Eng. llf or 12s) 3 semester hours 

American Literature 6 semester hours 

Electives 15 semester hours 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 21 hours 
prescribed for the major and 5 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen from a selected list of courses with the approval 
of the adviser. The standards governing selection are those suggested by 
the National Council of Teachers of English. 

Social Sciences, (For the degree of bachelor of arts.) For a major in 
this group, 36 semester hours are required, of which at least 18 hours 
must be in history including 6 hours in American history and 6 hours in 
European history. Six of the 18 hours must be in advanced courses. For a 
minor in the group, 24 hours are required, of which 18 are the same as 
specified above, and 6 of which must be in advanced courses. 

History 18 semester hours 

Economics or Sociology 6 semester hours 

Electives 12 semester hours 

For a minor, the requirements are the same less the electives. 
Required courses in History are as follows: A Survey of Western 
Civilization and American History. 

158 



Modern Languages. (For the degree of bachelor of arts ) For a major 
„ Modirn Languages 30 semester hours are required; for a mmor, 24 
"Jester hours. Thfs is exclusive of the introductory course m each case. 
'The courses are chosen with the advice of the Department of Modern 

Languages. 

Classical Languages. (For the degree of bachelor of arts). Both a major 
.„d m nor are offered in Latin consisting of 30 and 20 semester hours 
respSely. The courses are chosen with the advice of the Department of 

Classical Languages. ^ - v,f 

Mathematics. (For the degree of bachelor of science.) Twenty-eight 

semesterTours are required for the major. The following sequence is 

semester nou m freshman year; Math. 18y 

rrytthetthom'o;e';ear; Math. lllf. n2s. and Ulf in the junior 

"^'semester hours are required for the minor. The following course 
sequence is advised; Math. 7f. 21f, and 22s in the freshman year; Math. 
23y In the sophomore year; and Math. 18y and lllf m the junior and 

'ttudente'who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused 

from Math. 7f. , . v m,-„ 

Mathematics-Physics. (For the degree of bachelor of science.) This 

major consists of 18 hours in mathematics and 18 hours in Physics^ The 

Zses selected must include Math. If, 21f, and 22s; Phys. ly and 103y. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused from 

^Chemfstry ly is required as a supporting course to tWs major 

If a minor in general science is offered m connection with thas major, a 
total of 40 hours in the natural sciences should be presented. 

Science (For the degree of bachelor of science.) In general science a 
major and minor are offered, consisting of 40 and 30 semester houi^ resp^- 
tively, each including elementary courses in chemistry. Pl^V--' ^J j*-^^^ 
(zooiogy and botany). The major should include one of the following 

course sequences. 
Sequences I and II, emphasizing chemistry or Physics: 
Freshman year: *Math. 8f (3) or 21f (4); 10s (3) or 22s (4); Chem. 

ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Bot. If (4); Phys. ly (8). 

Junior and Senior years: Phys. 103y (6) or Chem. 12y (6), and 103y (6) , 

Zool. 2y (8); Bact. lA (2). 

Sequence III, emphasizing zoology: 

Freshman year: Zool. 2y (8); Chem. ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Zool. 15y (8); Bot. If (4). 

Junior and Senior years: Zool. 121f (3) or 120f (3) ; 102s (3). 

■ mathematics credits are not counted in the total number ol hours required for the 
science major. 

159 



Sequence IV, emphasizing botany: 

Freshman year: Zool. 2y (8); Chem. ly (8). 

Sophomore year: Bot. If (4) and 3s (4); Phys. 3y (6) or ly (8). 

Junior and Senior years: Pit. Phys. lOlf (4) and 102s (3); Bact. lA (2). 

Minors of twenty semester hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and 
in biological sciences. A minor in biology must include the basic courses in 
zoology and botany and be supported by a course in chemistry (Chem. ly 
or 3y). A minor in physics must be supported by a basic course in chemis- 
try (Chem. ly or 3y) and a minor in chemistry by a basic course in physics 
(Phys. ly or 3y). 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be counted towards both provided 
that they number not fewer than 52 semester hours in natural sciences. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

(*For the degree of bachelor of science) 

The entrance requirements for the curriculum in Commercial Education 
are as follows: English 3 units; Algebra 1 unit; Science 1 unit; History 
1 unit; Stenography 2 units; Typewriting 1 unit; Bookkeeping 1 unit; 
elective 5 units. • 

The Commercial Education curriculum includes a solid foundation of 
economics, social science and history, accounting and business administra- 
tion subjects, adequate courses in methods of teaching commercial subjects, 
and supervised teaching. 

The number of electives is large enough to enable a student to prepare 
for teaching some other subject in addition to the commercial subjects. 

The curriculum does not include any college courses in shorthand and 
typewriting for the improvement of skill in these arts. Any student desir- 
ing to become a candidate for the bachelor*s degree in commercial education 
must meet the speed and accuracy requirements in shorthand and type- 
writing and transcription necessary to become a teacher of commercial 
subjects by such means as may be practicable for improving his skill and 
accuracy. 

Curriculum Semester 

I II 

Freshman Year 

Introduction to Education (Ed. 2f or s) 2 or 2 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 3f, 4s) 3 3 

Economic Geography (T. and T. If) , 3 -— 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) — 3 

Science (Biological or PhysicaJ) - 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) _ 1 1 

Electives 1-4 1-4 



Semester 

Sophomore Year . , 1 or 1 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f or s) ^ ^ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) - --- ^ 

American History (H. 5f, 6s).. - 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) j^ 

Money and Banking (Finance 53s) --- "■•--- ~ — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ^ 

3y or 6y and 8y) - - - ^_^ ^^ 

Electives " - 

15-17 15-17 

Junior Year tt- i. o i. i 

The High School (Ed. 103s) or The Junior High School 

(Ed. UOf) ■•- I ^' _2 

Educational Sociology— Introductory (Ed. 112f) - ^ ^ 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf ) - ^ 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observ^ation (Ed. 150f, 151s) ^ 

Elements of Business (O. and M. 51f ) - ^ — 

Principles of Accounting (Acct. 51y) - ^ 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. I36s) - 

Business Law (O. and M. 101s) - ""; 

^, ,. ^ 3-4 3-4 

Electives 

16-17 16-17 

Senior Year 

Educational Measurements (Ed. I05f ) - - - 

Methods and Practice of Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) or (Ed. 

,.^- „>, „ 3-6 or 3-6 

140f or s ) - - 

Business Law (O. and M. 102f ) - _^ ^^_^ 

Electives - 

16-17 15-17 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is for students who are 
preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage m 
any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of teaching 
methods. It includes studies of all phases of home economics and the 
allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
Electives may be chosen from other colleges. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching and experience in the home management house. 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Education 
or the College of Home Economics. Students will be certified for gradua- 
tion only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this curriculum. 

161 



160 



16-17 16-17 



Curriculum 



Freshman Year J 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Textiles ( H. E. 71f ) 3 

Design (H. E. 21s) _ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Freshman Lecture (H. E. ly) 1 

Introduction to Education ('Ed. 2f ) 2 

Introductory Botany (Bot. 2s) — 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 2y 

and 4y) 1 

15 
Sophomore Year 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) 3 

Clothing (H. E. lis) — 

Foods (H. E. Sly) 3 

Introductory Physics (Phys. 3y) 3 

Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 3f) 3 

Elements of Organic Chemistry ('Chem. 12Ay) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) ^ — 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f) 1 

Community Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y 

and 8y) 2 

17 
Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (H. E. Ed. 101s) — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Nutrition ('H. E. 131f ) 3 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) — 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133f ) 2 

The High School (Ed. 103s) — 

Electives 3 

17 



Semester 



II 

3 
4 

3 
1 
1 



16 



3 
3 
3 

2 
3 



16 



3 

3 



o 
O 



o 
O 



Semester 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) - — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143s) 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H. E. Ed. ^ 

103f ) I , 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) ^ ^ 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106f, 107s) 1 1 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) ~~ 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) ~ ^ 

♦Electives " 

15 16 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies provides: (1) a four-year curriculum leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education; (2) a program 
of professional courses to prepare teachers to meet the certification re- 
quirements in vocational and occupational schools; (S) a program of 
courses for the improvement of teachers in service. 

I. Four-ye;ar Curriculum. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. (See page 51.) Experience in some trade or industrial 
activity will benefit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. 

This curriculum is designed to prepare both trade and industrial shop 
and related teachers, and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient 
latitude of electives so that a student may also meet certification require- 
ments in some other high school subject. 

Students entering an Industrial Education curriculum must register in the 
College of Education. 

This curriculum, v^rith limited variations according to the needs of the 
two groups, is so administered as to provide: (A) a four-year pre-service 
curriculum for students in residence; (B) a four-year curriculum for 
teachers in service. 

* Electives should include one course each in History and English. 



17 



162 



163 



Curriculum 

Freshman Year , 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly).. 4 

Textiles ( H. E. 71f ) ZZZI ' " 3 

Design (H. E. 21s) IIZIIZZ'ZI — 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ^ 

Freshman Lecture (H. E. ly) -1^ 

Introduction to Education ('Ed. 2f) 2 

Introductoi-y Botany (Bot. 2s) 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed7 2y 

and 4y) ^ 

15 
Sophomore Year 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) 3 

Clothing (H. E. lis) „ IZZZZZZZ " _ 

Foods (H. E. Sly) IZZIZZ. 3 

Introductory Physics ( Phys. 3y ) 3 

Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 3f) 3 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f) 1 

Community Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y 

and 8y ) 2 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (H. E. Ed. 101s) — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) 

Nutrition ('H. E. 131f ) ZZZZZIZ 3 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Human Physiology (Zool. 16s) 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133f) 2 

The High School (Ed. 103s) ..ZZZ — 

Electives 3 

17 



Semester 



II 

3 

4 

3 
1 
1 



9 

o 



16 



3 
3 
3 

2 
3 



16 



3 
3 

3 
3 

3 

2 

17 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) _ „... — 3 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143s) — 3 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 

103f) 3 — 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) 3 3 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106f, 107s) 1 1 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) 2 — 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) — 1 

♦Electives ~ 6 4 

15 15 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies provides: (1) a four-year curriculum leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education; (2) a program 
of professional courses to prepare teachers to meet the certification re- 
quirements in vocational and occupational schools; ("3) a program of 
courses for the improvement of teachers in service. 

I. Four-ye;ar Curriculum. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. (See page 51.) Experience in some trade or industrial 
activity will benefit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. 

This curriculum is designed to prepare both trade and industrial shop 
and related teachers, and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient 
latitude of electives so that a student may also meet certification require- 
ments in some other high school subject. 

Students entering an Industrial Education curriculum must register in the 
College of Education, 

This curriculum, with limited variations according to the needs of the 
two groups, is so administered as to provide: (A) a four-year pre-service 
curriculum for students in residence; (B) a four-year curriculum for 
teachers in service. 



* Electives should include one coui-se each in History and English. 



162 



163 






A. Curriculum—Students in Residence 

E, . ,. Semester 

Freshman Year j 

Mechanical Drawing (Ind. Ed. If, 2s) _..... ..... 2 

Elementary Woodworking (Ind. Ed. 3f) 3 

Advance Woodworking (Ind. Ed. 4s) _.. ._ 

Introduction to Education (Ed. 2f or s) „.... _.... 2 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 

Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

History or Social Science 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) 1 



15^17 

Junior Year 

Cold Metal Work (Ind. Ed. lOf ) 2 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 4s) 

Foundry Practice (Shop lOlf) _.... ....._ 1 

Essentials of Design (Ind. Ed. 160y) _ _....., _....II" 1 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (Ind. Ed. 162s) — 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Educational Sociology— Introductory (Ed. 112f) _ 2 

The High School (Ed. 103s) or The Junior High School (Ed. 

110s) ;.. ^ _ 

Physics (Phys. 3y or ly) j. „ _ _ 3.4 

History or Social Science _.... 3 

Electives — ^ 1 



or 



// 

2 

3 
2 
3 
3 
3 



1 



15-17 15-17 

Sophomore Year 

Sheet Metal Work (Ind. Ed. 5f ) „... 2 - 

Art Metal Work (Ind. Ed. 6s) .1"Z.Z.......Z... — 2 

Architectural Drawing (Ind. Ed. 7y) 1 ^ 

Electricity (Ind. Ed. 8y) _ „ _ _. ' 2 2 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) _ "ZIZIZZ. — 1 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f or s) .....1.... 1 or 1 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) _ 3 3 

Solid Geometry (Math. 7f) „...._ „ ZZZl 2 - 

Chemistry (Chem. 3y or ly) ZIZZ 3-4 3^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) - 2 2 

Elective „ ._ ^ 



15-17 



— 2 



1 
3 



9 

3-4 

3 

2 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 103s) _ — 2 

Shop Organization and Management (Ind. Ed. 164f) 2 — 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) _ 2 — 

Guidance in the Schools (Ed. 114s) _ — 3 

Methods and Practice of Teaching (Ed. 139f or s or Ed. 140f 

or s ) - 3-6 or 3-6 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57f or s) 3 or 3 

Electives - -....„ -..3-12 2-11 



16 



16 



16-17 16-17 



B. Curriculum — Teachers in Service 

The requirements in this curriculum for the B. S. degree in Industrial 
Education are quantitatively the same as for Curriculum A, except that 
the military-physical training requirements are waived. In summary the 
distribution is approximately as follows: 

English _ - 1 2 semester hours 

History and the Social Sciences „ _ 16 semester hours 

Mathematics and Science — 20 semester hours 

Shop and Drawing „ „ 30 semester hours 

Education - - 24 semester hours 

Electives - 26 semester hours 

128 semester hours 

In the mathematics and science group, and in the history and social 
science group, there is reasonable latitude for individual choice, but courses 
in mathematics as related to shopwork and courses in American history 
and government are required. 

Program for Vocational, Occupational, and Shop Center Teachers 

This curriculum is designed for persons who have had experience in 
some trade or industry or in the teaching of shopwork. 

Applicants for admission to this curriculum must have as a minimum 
requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. The cur- 
riculum is prescribed, but is administered flexibly in order that it may be 
adjusted to the needs of students. 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher-training in Baltimore and in 
other industrial centers, in-service courses are offered. The work of these 
courses deals principally with the analysis and classification of trade 
knowledge for instructional purposes, methods of teaching, observation and 
practice of teaching, psychology of trade and industrial education, and 
occupational information, guidance, and placement. 



164 



165 



Courses for Teachers in Service 

Courses are offered for teachers in service who are seeking to satisfy 
requirements for promotion. 

A special announcement of the in-service courses in Baltimore is issued 
in August of each year. This may be obtained from the Baltimore office 
of the College of Education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Sciences Educa- 
tion (see page 156), except that 22 semester hours of science are i-equired 
as scheduled. 

Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year / // 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) „ _ - — 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) 4 — 

Introductory Hygiene (Phys. Ed. 18f) » 2 — 

Introduction to Education (Ed. 2s) - _ - — 2 

Electives: History, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Home 

Economics, Industrial Education, Physics 5 5 

Women 

Dance I (Phys. Ed. lOy) 1 1 

Athletics I (Phys. Ed. 12y) 2 2 

Men 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) 1 1 

Athletics I (Phys. Ed. 5y) :.... 2 2 

17 17 
Sophomore Year 

Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 3f) 3 — 

Surv^ey and Composition II (Eng. 2f, 3s) 3 3 

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Zool. I5y) — 4 4 

Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) - 3-4 3-1 

Educational Forum (Ed. 3f or s) „ 1 or 1 

Physical Education I (Phys. Ed. 20s) — 3 

Wom,en 

Dance II (Phys. Ed. 14y) _ - : 1 1 

Athletics II (Phys. Ed. 22y) _ -...- 2 2 

Men 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) _...- 2 2 

Gymnastics I (Phys. Ed. 15y) - 1 1 

16-18 16-18 
166 



Semester 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) - - •• 3 — 

Educational Sociology— Introductory (Ed. 112f) - 2 — 

Physiology of Exercise (Phys. Ed. 121f) - — 2 

Nature of Play (Phys. Ed. 133s) -■■■ — ^ 

Accident Prevention (Phys. Ed. 13f) - ~ - 1 — 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16s) _ - - - — ^ 

Dance III (Phys. Ed. 26y) - ^ J 

Physical Activities III (Phys. Ed. 52y) -■- 1 1 

Maturation of the Human Organism (Phys. Ed. 123s) — 2 

Analysis of Activities (Phys. Ed. 127y) - 2 , 2 

The Junior High School (Ed. 110s) or The High School 

(Ed. 103s) — ^ 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (Ed. 142s) ^ — 3 

Electives 

Wom.en 

Dance IV (Phys. Ed. 28f) - - 1 — 

Dance V (Phys. Ed. 30s) - — 1 

Men 
Athletics III (Phys. Ed. 113y) - 1 1 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Educational Measurements (Ed. 105f) 2 — 

Methods and Practice of Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) or 

(Ed. 140f or s) - 3-6 or 3-6 

Teaching Health (Phys. Ed. 146s) — 2 

Recreation IV (Phys. Ed. 137f) 2 — 

Physical Education IV (Phys. Ed. 144f) 2 — 

Electives - - - 2-8 6-12 

Women 
Athletics IV (Phys. Ed. 114y) - 1 1 

Men 
Athletics V (Phys. Ed. 119y) - 1 1 

15 15 



167 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean. 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and operation. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised recently to in- 
crease the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which 
are a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and which are 
now considered essential to the proper training of engineers because of 
the practical application of these subjects in professional and business life. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an eiFicient 
preparation for many callings in public and private life outside the engi- 
neering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. In the Mechanical Engineering 
Department an aeronautical option is offered in the junior and senior years. 
In order to give the student time to choose the branch of engineering for 
which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several courses is the 
same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the student to make a 
proper selection. The courses differ only slightly in the sophomore year, 
but in the junior and senior years the students are directed more definitely 
along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathematics. 
See Section I, Admission. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the unit 
of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry, provided such 
students are prepared to devote their first summer to a course in analytic 
geometry. The program for such students would be as follows: during 
the first semester, five hours a week would be devoted to making up ad- 
vanced algebra and solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics 
of the first semester would be scheduled, and the second semester mathe- 

168 



atics would be taken in the summer session. Thus, such students, if they 
"Issed the course, would be enabled to enter the sophomore year the next 
fall with their class without loss of time. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chem- 
ical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by students 
registered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engineering, 
which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that required 
for bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the University of Mary- 
land- . ^ . 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science m Engmeermg are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Graduate 
School, as will be found explained in the catalogue under the head of Gradu- 
ate School. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to graduates of the Uni- 
versity who have obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The appli- 
cant must satisfy the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years after graduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Chemical, 
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 
with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

Drafting-Rooms. The drafting rooms are fully equipped for practical 
work. The engineering student must provide himself with an approved 
drawing outfit, material, and books, the cost of which during the freshman 
year varies between $16 and $20. 

Chemical BMgineering Laboratories. For instruction and research, the 
Chemical Engineering Department maintains laboratories for (1) General 
Testing and Control; (2) Unit Operations; (3) Cooperative Research; (4) 

Graduate Research. 

169 



General Testing and Control Laboratory. In this laboratory there is 
available complete equipment for the chemical and physical testing of 
water, gases, coal, petroleum, and their by-products; and for general 
industrial chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

Unit Operations Laborafory. This laboratory contains equipment for the 
study of fluid flow, heat flow, drying filtration, distillation, evaporation, 
crushing, grinding, combustion, gas absorption, and centrifuging. Organic 
process equipment includes an autoclave, nitrator, reducer, and mixing ket- 
tle. For the study of fluid flow a permanent hydraulic assembly is available, 
and this includes flow meters of most types. 

In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity of 
100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed type, 
direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evaporation 
can be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is equipped 
with a horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube bundle. 
This evaporator is equipped with vacuum and pressure gauges, stirrer, wet 
vacuum pump, a condensate pump, and a salt filter with different types of 
packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may be made. 
The organic process equipment is all self-driven and designed to afford 
flexibility in use. Filtration studies may be made either on a large plate 
and frame press or on the ordinary Sweetland type press. Gas absorption 
equipment includes a blower and a stoneware packed column. Combustion 
equipment available consists of an industrial carburetor, pot furnace, pre- 
mix gas fired furnace and the usual gas analysis equipment. Shop facilities 
include a lathe, drill press, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools nec- 
essary for unit operation and research studies. For grinding there is a 
jaw crusher, a disc crusher, and a ball mill. A mechanical shaker and 
standard sieve are available for particle size separation. 

Cooperative and Graduate Research Laboratories. These laboratories are 
arranged to permit the installation of such special equipment as the par- 
ticular problems under consideration may require. Effort is made to 
maintain cooperation with the industries of Maryland and the Chemical 
Engineering activities of the State and Federal governments; for such work 
important advantages accrue because of the location of the Eastern 
Experiment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines on the University 
campus. 

Electrical Machinery Laboratories. There is provided a 20 kw. motor- 
generator set, consisting of a synchronous motor and a compound direct- 
current generator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish 
direct current for testing purposes. Through the distribution switchboard, 
provision is made for distributing to the various laboratories direct current 
at 125 volts, and alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 
and 220 volts. 



The equipment includes a variety of direct and alternating-current gen- 
erators and motors, synchronous converter, distribution transformers, in- 
duction regulator, control apparatus, and the measuring instruments essen- 
tial for practical electrical testing. Most of the machines are of modem 
construction and of such size and design as to give typical performance. 
Flexibility of operation is provided in several ways: for instance, one of 
the synchronous machines has the coil terminals brought out to an external 
connection board, so that the windings may be connected for single-phase, 
two-phase, or three-phase operation; the machine is also provided with a 
phase-wound rotor and a squirrel-cage rotor, either of which may be used 
to replace the synchronous rotor. The synchronous converter is arranged 
for direct or inverted operation, either single-phase, two-phase, or three- 
phase. Metering and control boards are provided for rapid change of 
operating conditions with any machine. A single phase induction regulator 
with control panel provides voltage regulation for experimental work. 
There are several types of fractional-horsepower motors. The direct- 
current machines include several motor-generator sets and motors of vari- 
ous types and sizes for constant-speed and adjustable-speed operation. 
Storage batteries are available for low constant-voltage testing. Water- 
cooled Prony brakes are supplied for machine testing. Included in the 
general test equipment is a fairly complete assortment of ammeters, volt- 
meters, wattmeters, frequency meters, and two oscillographs. 

Illumination Laboratory. The equipment includes electric lamps, shades, 
and reflectors of various types; a bar photometer for determination of 
candle-power distribution of incandescent lamps; and four types of port- 
able photometers for the measurement of illumination intensities. 

Electrical Measurements and Electronics Laboratory. The equipment of 
this laboratory consists of secondary standards of potential, resistance, 
inductance, capacity and time for the comparison measurement of these 
values. Auxiliary equipment such as batteries, oscillators, amplifiers, 
bridges and both galvanometers and phone detecting devices is available. 
Equipment is also available for the experimental study of electric and 
magnetic fields, non-linear circuit elements and other topics in advanced 
electricity and magnetism. 

The equipment for calibration of meters includes a standard ammeter, 
voltmeter and watthourmeter which are used in conjunction with the stand- 
ards of potential and resistance, potentiometers and other apparatus. A 
five-machine motor-generator set delivers voltage and currents, both alter- 
nating and direct, for meter testing. 

For work in electronics, high-vacuum, gas and vapor filled tubes and 
photo-tubes are available for the testing of their characteristics, and for 
the study of their applications in research and industrial circuits. Power 
supplies for tube operation are provided. 

Electrical Communications Laboratory. This laboratory is equipped with 
artificial lines, oscillators, amplifiers, vacuum-tube voltmeters, a transmission 



170 



171 



loss or gain set and miscellaneous circuit elements for the study of the 
response of passive networks, transmission lines and coupled circuit. 

The University maintains an amateur short-wave radio station, under 
faculty supervision, for members of the Student Radio Society. This station 
is equipped with a multi-band superheterodyne amateur communications 
receiver and a 500-watt transmitter adjustable to amateur frequencies. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories. The apparatus consists of slide 
valve automatic steam engines equipped with Prony brakes, steam turbine- 
generator set, Waukesha Diesel engine research unit with electric dynamoni- 
eter and other accessories, two-stage steam-driver air compressor, gas 
engines, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed water heaters, steam con- 
densers, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, pyrometers, draft gauges 
planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and equipment 
for a mechanical engineering laboratory. A refrigeration unit and a heating 
and ventilation unit have been installed. 

Aeronautical Laboratory. The laboratory is equipped for practice and 
research in engines, metal aircraft construction, structural tests, vibra- 
tion and noise, and aerodynamics. A three-foot return type wind tunnel, 
fully equipped with balances and other instruments and electrically oper- 
ated, has been constructed for standard experiments in aerodynamics and 
for student thesis research. 

A sheet metal shop equipped to construct components of aircraft struc- 
tures in aluminum alloy and steel is available. This shop includes such 
equipment as automatic air riveting hammer, planishing machines, squaring 
shears, rolls, brake, heat treating furnace, etc. A small machine shop is 
also available for students in constructing research apparatus. Variable 
speed motors are available for experiments in vibration and noise. 

The laboratory also includes a research spot welding machine, a sixty 
thousand-pound Baldwin-Southwark aircraft universal testing machine, 
Tuckerman gauges, oscillographs with accessories, and a Timby hydraulic 
jack system for static testing. 

Hydraulics Laboratory. The equipment consists of electrically driven 
centrifugal pumps, measuring tanks, various types of weirs, venturi meters, 
nozzles, Pelton water wheel with Prony brake built especially for laboratory 
use, hook gauges, dial gauges, tachometers, stop watches, and other appa- 
ratus necessary for the study of the flow characteristics of water. 

Materials Laboratories. Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
making standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
gravel, steel, concrete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes a 300,000-pound hydraulic testing machine, two 
100,000-pound universal testing machines, torsion testing machine, hardness 
tester, abrasion testing machine, rattler, constant temperature chamber, 
cement-testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and other 
special devices for ascertaining the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. 

172 



The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 
Equipment is also available for study of models by the photo-elastic 

niethod. 

Engineering Soils Laboratory. Equipment is available for performing 
the usual tests on engineering soils. This includes apparatus for grain size 
analysis, Atterberg limits, permeability, optimum moisture content for 
compaction. Proctor penetration, and consolidation. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association has, 
by arrangement with the College of Engineering, established its testing 
and research laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research 
Foundation thus organized is to make available to the Association additional 
facilities for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of 
Engineering additional facilities and opportunities for increasing the 
scope of its engineering research. 

Engineering Experiment Station. The purpose of the Engineering Exper- 
iment Station at the University, as well as of the various research labora- 
tories, is to conduct cooperative studies with departments of the State 
and Federal governments, and with the industries of Maryland. These 
studies have included traffic surveys over the Maryland State highway 
system, studies of concrete cores cut from the state roads, and laboratory 
studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

Cooperative researches now under way in the Engineering Experiment 
Station include the following projects: reinforced concrete hinge construc- 
tion, expansion joints for concrete roads, diagonal tension reinforcement 
for concrete beams, operating effect of size of motor in single phase rural 
electric lines, electrical wave shaper recorder, studies on airplane design, 
on petroleum and lubricating oils, and on gases. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 
milling machines, drill presses, shaper, midget mill, and precision boring 
head. Equipment is available for gas and electric arc welding. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

Surveying Ekiuipment. Surveying equipment for plane topographic, 
and geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties. 
A wide variety of surveying instruments is provided, including domestic as 
well as foreign makes. 

Special Models and Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

173 



Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department main 
tains a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering mJ, 
zines. The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires thai 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature 

The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and Transport, founded bv 

S^.^^n?'.!, T?^''''' ^n^^""' ""^ *^^ ^^*'°'^^' Highways Association 
IS part of the Library of the College of Engineering. The many books 
periodicals, pamphlets, and other items included in this library cover a i 
phases of highway engineering, highway transportation, and highwav 
traffic control. ^ & ^ay 

There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans 
portation hbrary of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington DC The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transporStion problems 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 

!^!Z-, fTV fr*"^ *° ^"^°*^ ^"'^ t^'^^ P«rt in the meeUngTo 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies 

ITie freshman engineering students are given a special bourse of lectures 
by Prac icmg engineers covering the work of the several engineering po 
fessional fields. The purpose of this course is to assist the fresTman n 

Sr r^ ^ """^'"^^ ""''^ '' engineering for which he is best adapted 
The student is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecC' 
A series of engineering lectures for upper classmen is also provided These 

oTtr^roTss'lo^n'^ ""•"^"^"^ ''^'''' -^^"^^ ^" '^^ ^^^ ^-^2 

hshed in the College of Engineering: American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers The studen 
branches meet regularly for the discussion of topics dealing with the various 
fields of engmeenng. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior when 
he shall have passed at least 68 semester credit hours with an average 
grade of C or higher. 

Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect with the 
permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 

All engineering students are urged to secure work during the summer, 
particularly m engineering fields. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportumty for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 

174 



Curriculum 



Semester 



freshman Year — Alike for all engineering courses. / 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) _ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

*College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math. 21f, 22s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) 2 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) _ « — 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) _ — 

Introduction to Engineering (Engr. If) 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) 1 

fElective - - - 3 



19 



II 

3 
1 
4 
4 

2 

1 



1 
3 

19 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information 
on chemical operations and processes of importance in modem life and 
to apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods, 
for the attainment of economic objectives. Modern chemical research 
has contributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of 
the chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation 
in which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 



Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f) 4 

Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (Ch. E. 10s) — 

Calculus (Math. 23y).... : 4 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) 2 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is) — 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) ~ - 2 

20 



4 
4 
2 
1 
3 
5 

2 

21 



*A qualifying test is given at the close of the first two weeks to determine whether the 
student is adequately prepared for Math. 21f. A student failing this test is required to take 
Math, if, a one-semester course without credit. 

tThe student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Language, or Government. 
Students who plan to enroll in Chemical Engineering are advised to take German or French. 



175 



Semester 



Junior Year I 

Applied Mechanics (Phys. 117y) _ 2 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) 3 

_ Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 102By) 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) _ 3 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch. E. 103y) 3 

Chemical Technology (Ch. E. 108y) „ _ 2 

19 

Senior Year 

♦Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Ch. E. l()9y) 2 

Chemical Engineering Seminar (Ch. E. 104y) _ 1 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) 3 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) 5 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (0. and M. 11 Of) 2 

Fuels and Their Utilization (Ch. E. 107y) 2 

Chemical Engineering Calculations (Ch. E. llOy) 3 



// 

2 
3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 

1!) 
2 



18 



2 

e 

16 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING-CHEMISTRY 



A five-year program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, arranged 
between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and Sciences, 
permits students, who so desire, to become candidates for the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
upon completion of the program outlined below: 



Curriculum 

fSophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f, 6s) 2 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 

Calculus ( Math. 23y ) „ -..„ 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) _ - 5 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) - 3 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. Is) — 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y) 2 

19 



2 
3 
4 
5 
3 
1 
2 

20 



Semester 

I u 

Junior Year ^ g 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay) ^ 

Elementary Organic Laboratory (Chem. 8By) ^ ^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 6y )..-.»-. ^ - __ ^ 

Water, Fuels, and Lubricants (Ch. E. 10s) ^ ^ 

Applied Mechanics (Phys 117y)^^^--^^^^ : •-■ 3 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 51f, 52s) ^ ^ 

Chemical Technology (Ch. E. 108y) . __ 

Precision of Measurements (Phys. lOlf) - ^ _ 

18 19 

Fourth Year ^ 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) - 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (^1^^"^; ^^^^^ -"- 4 4 

Principles of Electrical Engmeermg (E. E. lO^y) - 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y) ^ ^ 

Organic Laboratory (Chem. 117y) - ^ 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Ch E. l^^y>- ;■---- o — 

Fundamentals of Business Administration (0. and M. llOf) ^ ^ 

Public Utilities (Econ. 145s) - __ __ 

18 19 

Fifth Year 

*Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Ch. E. 109y) ^ ^ 

Chemical Engineering Seminar (Ch. E. 104y) - - ^ 

Advanced Unit Operations (Ch. E. 105y) ~ ^ ^ 

Elective — Social Sciences - " ^ ^ 

Elective— English -•"" - j 

Advanced Organic Laboratory (Chem. 118y) 

Fuels and their Utilization (Ch. E. 107y) -^- ^ ^ 

Chemical Engineering Calculations (Ch. E. llOy) ^ ^ 

17 19 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, constniction, and ^^i^^^^^^^^ 
of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildmgs, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mappmg. 



*Note: A week's inspection trip will be required. 

fChemistry majors who wish to transfer to the five year combined program should take. 
if possible, Chemistry or Econ. 51f, 52s, in the summer school preceding the sophomore 
year. 



^Note: A week's inspection trip will be required. 



176 



177 



/ 



Curriculum 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) 2 

Calculus (Math. 23y) 4 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 

Advanced Engineering Drawing (Dr. 3f) 2 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) 2 

Engineering Geology (Engr. 2f) - 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) - — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 2 

19 

Junior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6s) — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) 5 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) - — 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) - — 

Principles of Mechanical Engineering (M. E. lOlf) 3 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 101s) — 

Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f ) 3 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) — 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) 4 

*Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Technical Society — 

18 

Senior Year 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) 1 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s) — 

Elements of Highways (C. E. 105f ) 3 

Concrete Design (C. E. 106y) „ 4 

Structural Design (C. E. 107y) 4 

Municipal Sanitation (C. E. 108y) _ 3 

Soils and Foundations (C. E. 109s) - — 

fElective 3 

Technical Society — 



// 

4 
5 

3 
3 

3 

2 

20 



4 
2 

3 

4 

3 

18 



1 
2 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

in industry, commerce, and home life. 

C"'"'"!"" Semester 

I n 

Sophomore Year ^ _ 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) ■■■—■■■■■ 4 4 

Calculus (Math. 23y) _ 5 5 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) -■■■•-- 1 - 

Elements of Plane Surveymg (Surv. If) - ^ _ 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 2f ^ 3 

Direct Current Theory (E. E. ly) _ 3 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) .^--^ _ 3 

3y) V ._ 3 — 

Non-Engineering Elective _ __ 

20 20 

Junior Year __ 2 

Advanced Oral Technical English (^Peech Gs).^.^^^-^- ■■ 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) ^ 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 102f) - __ 3 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) ^^^ -^ — - " ' ^ 2 - 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. I03f ^ _ 

Direct Current Machinery (E. L. lUdi) __ ^ 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 104s) "---^^^ "■;; 3 4 

Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (E.E. 105y) ___ ^ 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. lObs) ^ 3 

* Non-Engineering Elective — — 

Technical Society " — — 

18 18 



Advanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or 



other approved non-engineering course. 



18 



18 



♦Advanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or other approved non-engineering course. 

fElective may be Advanced R. O. T. C. ; Thesis (C. E. llOy), with approval of hfa<l 
of department; a course in Fundamentals of Business Administration (O. and M. llOf), 
Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 4s), or other approved courses. 

178 



\ 



179 



n 



Senior Year Semester 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) / 

Alternating Current Machinery (E. E. 107y) ■* ] 

Alternating Current Design (E. E. 108f) ' f 

i^lectrical Communications (E. E. 109y) " 

tlllumination (E. E. llOf) ~ ^ 

tElectric Railways (E. E. lllf) ^ 

tElectric Power Transmission (£1:. 112s) " " " ^ 

tEngmeering Electronics (E. E. 113s) ~~ 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 102f) * ~~ 

Power Plants (M. E. 103s) ^ 

^Elective " — 

Technical Society ^. " ^ 



// 

1 
5 

3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



18 



18 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Curriculum 



Semester 



Sophomore Year ^ 

Oral Technical English (Speech 5f) 

Calculus (Math. 23y) " 2 

General Physics (Phys. 2y )........ ^ 

Advanced Engineering Drawing 7Dr3f) o 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv Is) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) "" 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. 2s) ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ 57f ) " ~" 

^S ^:.lll!^' '• '"^ " "^'""^^ Education (Phys! Ed: ' 

Non-Engineering Elective ........I. "" *" ^ 



// 



4 
5 

1 
5 



2 

3 



20 



20 



fAlternates. 

^Elective may be R. O. T. C • Thesis (F v ^1A \ 
rnent; a course in Fundamentals W Busines^ A^m/nifr^V-'^'^^^^^PP^^^*! of head of depart- 
Law and Specifications (Engr. 102s)^S?'SApTove5'^^^^^^^^ '"' ^- ''"'' EngineTing 



Semester 

Junior Year — General I 11 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6s) _ — 2 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f ) 3 — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) ~ 5 — 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) _ - — 3 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) — 2 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 4 

Foundry Practice (Shop lOlf) 1 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 102s) — 1 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104y) 2 3 

*Non-Engineering Elective - 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

18 18 
Junior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6s) — 2 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) „ 3 — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf ) 5 — 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 103s) _ — 2 

Foundry Practice (Shop lOlf) _ 1 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 102s) ^ „ — 1 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E. E. 102y) 4 4 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104y) 2 3 

Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics (M. E. 105s) „ — 3 

*Non-Engineering Elective - 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

18 18 
Senior Year — General 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) 1 1 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106f ) .,. _ 3 — 

Refrigeration (M. E. 107s) — 3 

Thesis (M. E. 108y) _ 1 2 

Prime Movers (M. E. 109y) 4 4 

Mechanical Engineering Design (M. E. llOy) _ 4 3 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. Illy) _ 2 2 

tElective - 3 3 

Technical Society „ - _ — — 



18 



18 



* .Advanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or other approved non-engineering course 
tElective may be Advanced R. O. T. C, or other approved courses. 



180 



181 



,r-^ 



Senior Year— Aeronautical Option Semester 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y). , " 

Thesis (M. E. 108y) ^ 1 

Prime Movers (M. E. 109y) ^ 2 

Mechanical Engineering Design '(M7E'rnOy) t ^ 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. Illy) 2 

Airplane Structures (M. E 112v^ " ^ 2 

tElective ' 3 3 

Technical Society IIIIZZIZI.... ^ ^ 

r 

18 18 

AGRICULTURE— ENGINEERING 

• -^f'T^tf <=°'"*''"ed program in Agriculture and Engineering arran.»i 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Eng"ne;rfnT nf 
mits students to become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of f'-^ 

SdtrrcXif gr-' r'rj'"' '-'' "elegrt ofVaLSn 
enTorth: fifth 'year '' "'' °'' '''''"'^^' Engineering at the 

cS^yijs^z:^ '^ '"""' ''-'-' ''' '''' -*^'«^- ""^« 

BUREAU OF MINES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RFSFAPr.i 
FELLOWSHIPS IN APPLIED SCIENCE AND SgINEERiNG 

offli^ f^ltwThS tr'^r^eS I'^'TT /'"^ ''' ""^^" ^' ''^-^' 
sciences. Fellows enter upoTtheTr duties on JuwT'f ^ f"' ^^""'^ 

aTirJt tfeT; oTV 4"--^-^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

tZ nl •. n ^^'^ "'^''^^' ^"^ ^^^"'^t to $600 for the year 

o^nh:tuletu^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^\^^ — ^' -^- the direction 

matLTa^'wiHe'T' " ''^^!!"' ^^^"^^'^^' ^^^^^^^ engineering, or 
matnematics will be chosen according to the abilities of the candidates and 

PrVeTsroJ ?he''L lT'- ''^^^^^^^^- ^'^ '^'^''^ supervir^rb ! 
l-r^essor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland 

shS' '47rfc1iTt'^''-if ^ '/ ^?"" "^ ^"^^^" ^^ ^^-« ^--^ch Fellow- 

ftSnf the Ze^S "^ ""^^^^^^t'^' '^'"'^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ problems con- 
fronting the mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 

tElective may be Advanced R. O. T. C, or other approved courses. 

182 



Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 
recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require residence 
during the university year from September to June. 

All the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities 
and technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or 
applied physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research 
work. Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of 
graduate work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications should include a certified copy of college record, applicant's 
photograph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and 
letters from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering spe- 
cifically the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. The 
application should be addressed to Fellowship Committee, Eastern Experi- 
ment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, 
College Park, Maryland. 

STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 

NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate problems 
related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their duties 
on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vacation. 
Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month and 
amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 

This fellowship is open to graduates in Engineering from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications with a certified 
copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, statement of technical 
and practical experience (if any), and letters from three persons, such as 
instructors or employers, covering specifically the applicant's character, 
ability, education, and experience. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean, College of Engineering, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

183 t 



Senior Year-~ Aeronautical Option Semester 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 7y) i ^' 

Thesis (M. E. 108y) ^ 1 

Prime Movers (M. E. 109y) ~~Z ] ^ 

Mechanical Engineering Design (M. E. llOy) a ^ 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. Illy). 9 ^ 

Airplane Structures (M. E. 112v) " t ^ 

tElective ^ 3 

Technical Society IIZZZZZIZ ^ ^ 

18 18 

AGRICULTURE— ENGINEERING 

• •^i^'^r^tf "^"?,^^^^^ program in Agriculture and Engineering, arranged 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engine;rW pj 
mits students to become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Agriculture at the end of four years and for the degree of Bachelor 

TJ7.Z s'vfr""'- """"'"• " <"'™"" -^^""'"^ «•>. 

Corgf :flgrtl^^^^^^^^^^^^ '^ ^^^"^ ''''^' '- ^^^^ -^^^-ue under 

BUREAU OF MINES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEAPru 
FELLOWSHIPS IN APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEER^^^^^^ 

.J^^ Umvef .ty of Maryland, in cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 
Itr ''"7f P^ ''' ^^^-^^h in the field of engineering and apS 
monr.'*- ^^" "''' "^? '^"^ '"'^^^ ^^ '"^'y 1' -<^ continue 'or 
are n^ade at the end of each month, and amount to $600 for the year 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland and become candidates for the degree of Doctor of PMosophv 
burab^ut h"; .%'rf ' '^'"^ '^^^^ ^^ ^^^ departments of instruction, 

m.'^W?."^'^ -n'u^^T' ^" P^^'^'"' chemistry, chemical engineering, or 
the t^re^^^^^ if X" ?'"" "^ ^'^"^ '^ '^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^' ^^^ candidates and 

Professor of rL TT""' '''''•''''''' ^^^ '^^^^'^ supervisor will be the 
Professor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland 

.hi!^/ S""^ fellowships will be known as Bureau of Mines Research Fellow- 
f rn^ti. X "^'^?^^^'^ !^" undertake the solution of definite problems con- 
fronting the mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 

tElective may be Advanced R. O. T. C. or other approved courses. 

182 



Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 
recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require residence 
during the university year from September to June. 

All the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities 
and technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or 
applied physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research 
work. Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of 
graduate work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications should include a certified copy of college record, applicant's 
photograph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and 
letters from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering spe- 
cifically the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. The 
application should be addressed to Fellowship Committee, Eastern Experi- 
ment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, 
College Park, Maryland. 

STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 

NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate problems 
related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their duties 
on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vacation. 
Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month and 
amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 

This fellowship is open to graduates in Engineering from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications with a certified 
copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, statement of technical 
and practical experience (if any), and letters from three persons, such as 
instructors or employers, covering specifically the applicant's character, 
ability, education, and experience. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean, College of Engineering, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

183 



BUREAU OF MINES LECTURES 

Eastern Experiment ^^Ji li ^ Interior, which maintains it 

interesting IIZZ pu e" it^t t ^'^ f d'f ^-^^ ^^'^' ^^^ ^^^ - 
Engineering throughou't the Un versit^ ylar tlT^ "' f ' •'^""^^^ "^ 
will be given monthly, on the fo«^h t, ! . l««=tures, five in number 
October and ending in Ipnl I^^lS^ n f" "^ ^^"^ '"°"*'^' ''^^"nin*? in 
The speakers will be outstanT.^ December and January, at 8:15 P m 

selected becausl of broad and t ^ ' "' '^" ""^^ "' *" ^""'^^^ 

and public interest, Lvol^ng Zdam^rnSTd " '^•'^- "' "^'^ ^^^''"^ 
though the lectures are arr^mTn ^ pioneering research. Al- 

University in chem caT eng neS ' theT"''*"" l'''' '""^ "^^'^ "^ ^^ 
technology, and economics '^' "^ '°^''' ^ '"'^^^ ««"* "^ science, 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dean 

To give a young woman the best personal development and a preparation 
for home making is the chief aim of home economics education. The second 
aim is professional — a preparation for earning a livelihood. For the ma- 
jority of women who must earn a living, home economics offers many 
opportunities as teachers or extension specialists in home economics; direc- 
tors of food service in restaurants, cafeterias and hospitals; designers of 
room interiors and wearing apparel; textile specialists or clothing special- 
ists in department stores; home economists with commercial firms, radio 
stations or magazines and newspapers. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Foods and Nutrition; Textiles, Clothing, and Art; 
and Home and Institution Management. 

Facilities 

The new home economics building increases greatly the classroom and 
laboratory facilities. These increased facilities will permit expansion of 
work now being offered and the addition of new lines of work. The college 
maintains a home management house, in which students gain practical 
experience in home-making during their senior year. 

Baltimore and Washington afford unusual opportunities for trips, addi- 
tional study, and practical experience pertaining to the various phases of 
home economics. 

Professional Organizations 

The Home Economics Club, to which ail home economics students are 
eligible, is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association. 

Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, established Alpha 
Zeta chapter at the University of Maryland, November, 1937. Students of 
high scholarship may be elected to membership. 

Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory com 
pletion of four years of prescribed courses, of 128 semester hours. In ac- 
cordance with the University policy, not less than three-fourths of the 
credits for graduation must be earned with grades of A, B, or C. 



184 



185 



Curricula 

When a student has attained junior standing* she may continue with the 
nonprofessional general home economics curriculum, or elect one of the 
following professional curricula or a combination of curricula: foods and 
nutrition, institution management, home economics extension, textiles and 
clothing and practical art. A student who wishes to teach home economics 
may register in home economics education in the College of Home Economics, 
or in the College of Education (see home economics education). 

Following are the outlines of all curricula. 

Curriculum « 

c>emester 

Freshman Year — Alike for all home economics courses. / // 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

fGeneral or Introductory Chemistry (Chem. ly or 3y) „ 4-3 4-3 

Textiles (H. E. 71f) 3 

Design ( H. E. 21s ) „ „ — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 1 

Home Economics Lectures (H. E. ly) 1 l 

Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 2y 

and 4y ) 1 1 

JElectives -..- 2-3 2-3 

15-16 15-16 
^Sophomore Year — Alike for all home economics courses. 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f ) 3 - 

Clothing (H. E. lis) — 3 

Foods (H. E. 31y) 3 3 

Introductory Physics (Phys. 3y) _ 3 3 

Psychology ( Psych. If ) „ 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 3 

Community Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y 

and 8y) : 2 2 

IIElectives 3 3 



17 



17 



♦64 credit hours with a C grade average. 

tChem. ly is required for all curricula with the exception of general home economics and 
practical art. 

$At least one year of foreign language is required of students majoring in practical art. 

SOrganic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay, 12By) is required of students electing the foods 
and nutrition, textiles and clothing, institution management, or home economics extension 
curriculum. 

II In all curricula, in addition to the courses prescribed, one course in sociology is 
required and a course in one of the following sciences : zoology, botany, physiology, or 
genetics. In practical art, Elements of Nutrition is required in the sophomore y*'*'". 
Another science may be substituted for Introductory Physics. 



Curriculum-General Home Economics ^^^^^^^^ 

X'nlLTf Nutrition (H. E,32f) or Nutrition (H. E. ISlf) _3 - 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H- ^ 3 ) -^-^^---^ ^ 3 

Management of the Home (HE 141f, 142s) - ^ 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. Ulf).^ _ 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) - 3 

fZior Design (H. E. i2if, 122s) :::: z:::!!!:: J 4-5 

Electives — — 

16-17 16-17 

Senior Year ^ — 

Child study (H. E. Ed. 102f )^ ^ ^ f' 143s) - ^ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143s) --— 12 12 

Electives - " — — 

15 15 



Curriculum— Foods and Nutrition 

Junior Year ^ 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f) - ^ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) " __ 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) 7:";7:7 ;"^o' V 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) - __ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s)- ■^_- - __ 

Food Buving and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) ^ ^ 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) - ZZZI 4 

Electives — " " " 

17 

Senior Year ^ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) ~'Z"':'a^": — 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 14ds) ^ 

Experimental Foods (H. E. 135f) - __ 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133s) - 

Advanced Foods (H. E. 134s) - " 

Electives .- _ 

15 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

17 



3 

2 

3 
7 

15 



186 



187 



\ 



*Curriculum — Institution Management 



Set) 



Junior Year I 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108f)..„ 4 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) 3 

Institution Management (H. E. 144y) _ 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (H. E. Ed. 101s) — 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Electives _ _ ~ _ 4 

17 

Senior Year 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f) 3 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) 

Experimental Foods (H. E. 135f) „ 4 

Advanced Institution Management (H. E. 146s) — 

Institution Cookery (H. E. 147f) 3 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) _ 3 

Mental Hygiene (Psych. 130s) _ _ ....„ — 

Diet in Disease (H. E. 138s) — 

Electives -...._ „ 2 

Curriculum — Home Economics Extension 
Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) „ „ „ 3 

Dietetics (H. E. 132s) — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) ^.... 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3s) — 

Educational Psychology (Psych. lOf) 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (H. E. Ed. 101s) — 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133f) _ 2 

Food Buying and Meal Service (H. E. 137s) — 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) _ 3 



// 



18 



— 3 



3 

3 
3 



15 



3 

3 

3 



Senior Year 

Mental Hygiene (Psych. 130s) .--...-. 

Human Physiology (Zool 16s). - -•-•-•"-;: 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (H. E. 151s) 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 110s) 

♦Electives --- ~ — ~ 



Semester 

I U 

3 — 

— 3 

— 8 

— S 

— S 

— 8 
12 — 



15 



Curriculum— Textiles and Clothing 

Junior Year 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) - - - __ 

Advanced Textiles (H. E. 171s) " - __ 

Chemistry of Textiles (Chem. 14s).. ....™. "-■--.•"" 3 

tNutrition (H. E. 131f ) or Elements of Nutrition (H. E. 32f ) 6 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) - " ^ 

Household Bacteriology ( Bact. 3s ) - 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) - -- ^ 

Electives 

17 



Senior Year 

Problems in Clothing (H. E. 112s) 

Problems in Textiles (H. E. 172f ) - --—"7 „ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f ) ^ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102s) - j 

Electives 



8 



16 



15 



3 

3 
3 
3 
2 

17 



8 

4 — 



3 

9 

15 



^Electives in Gardening. Poultry, and Dairjdng aro ^«^«.7"^;'^^^^- .^. ^ .„ « ^g^^v 
tOrganic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay. 12 By) is prerequisite for Nutrition (H. E. 131f). 



17 



18 



*Training for a hospital dietitian requires one year of graduate study in a hospital 
offering a course approved by the American Dietetic Association. The institution manage- 
ment curriculum meets the academic requirements for entrance to such a course. 

A student planning to do institutional work other than hospital dietetics is not required 
to take Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (H. Ed. 101s) and Diet in Disease 
(H. E. 1388). 

188 



189 






I 



— 3 

— 3 

~ 5 



Curriculum— Practical Art 

Junior Year ^^^ 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f, 142s) o 

Interior Design (H. E. 121f, 122s) [ **"" t 

Principles of Marketing (Mkt. lOlf) ~ t 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) ^ 

Advertising Layout and Store Coordination "(H.E.i20f) 9 

Elective in Speech ^ " ^ 

Retail Store Management and Merchandising (Mkt" n 9s) 

Applied Psychology II (Psych. 3s) ...L ^ " Z 

Electives - 

Senior Year ^^^'^ 

Practice in Management .of the Home (H. E 143f) o 
Advanced Interior Design (H. E. 123f, 124s) or Advanced 

Costume Design (H. E. 127f, 128s) ^ 

Consumer Problems in Textiles (H. E. 170f) t 

Merchandise Display (H. E. 125f) _... t 

Store Experience (H. E. 126f) ^ 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) "ZZ~ZZ ~ __ 

Electives .. 

^ " - - 2 



15 



letter 

U 
3 

3 



3 
10 

15 



s 



190 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean. 
The Graduate School Council ' 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 
C 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 
Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Roger B. Corbett, Ph.D., Director of Experiment Station. 
E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 
H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 
N. L. Drake, Ph.D.,Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
C. B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
L. V. Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 
WiLBERT J. Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
L. H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
J. G. Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 
H. J. Patterson, D.Sc. Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 
W. M. Stevens, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Business Administration. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
A. E. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Walter H. Hartung, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Bal- 
timore). 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the general faculty. The 
Graduate School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918, and 
organized graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's 
degree was undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School includes all 
members of the various faculties who give instruction in approved graduate 
courses. The general administrative functions of the graduate faculty are 
delegated to a Graduate Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School 
is chairman. 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University libraries, the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset 
to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminar 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

191 



THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The graduate students maintain an active Graduate Club. Several meet- 
ings for professional and social purposes are held during the year. Students 
working in different departments have an opportunity to become acquainted 
with one another and thus profit by the broad cultural values derived from 
contacts with fellow students working in different fields. 

ADMISSION 

Graduates from recognized colleges, regarded as standard by the institu- 
tion and by regional or general accrediting agencies, are admitted to the 
Graduate School. Application for admission to the Graduate School should 
be made prior to dates of registration, on blanks obtained from the office of 
the Dean. The applicant must furnish an official transcript of his collegiate 
record which for unconditional admission must show an adequate amount 
of undergraduate preparation, including advanced preparation in the major 
field 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the 
Dean, is issued to the student. This card permits one to register in the 
Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation card is 
stamped and returned to the student. It is his certificate of membership in 
the Graduate School and should be retained by the student to present at 
each succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each semester. Students taking grad- 
uate work in the summer session are also required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each session. In no case will grad- 
uate credit be given unless the student matriculates and registers in the 
Gradunte School, 

The program of work for the semester or the summer session is arranged 
by the student with the major department and entered upon two course 
cards, which are signed first by the professor in charge of the student's 
major subject and then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One card is 
retained by the Dean. The student takes the other card, and in case of a 
new student, also the matriculation card, to the Registrar's office, where 
the registration is completed. Students will not be admitted to graduate 
courses until the Registrar has certified to the instructor that registration 
has been completed. Course cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office 
or at the Dean's office. The heads of departments usually keep a supply 
of these cards in their respective offices. 

192 



GRADUATE COURSES 

rr.duate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 

Ints for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates. 

""""'Tr Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates, Graduate students may 

'i Vrourses numbered from 1 to 99 but graduate credit will not be allowed 

f. these Students with inadequate preparation may be required to take 

L of t^hese courses. No credit toward graduate degrees may be obtamed 
Tcoriespondence or extension study. Courses that are audited are regis- 
tered for in the same way and at the same fees as other courses. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
.indent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, mcludmg 
nitable minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the mstructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of thirty 
credit hours for the year, including thesis work, which is valued at not less 

than six hours. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the summer session may be counted as residence 

toward an advanced degree. , , . ^i, 4-;^.. 

By special arrangement, graduate work may be pursued during the entire 
summer in some departments. Such students as graduate assistants, or 
others who may wish to supplement work done during the regular year, 
may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by full-time graduate 
work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory supervision and 
facilities for summer work are available in their special fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin giving full information con- 
cerning the summer session and the graduate courses offered therein. The 
bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work 
in the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet 
the same requirements and proceed in the same way as do graduate students 
in other departments of the University. 

The graduate courses in the professional schools are listed in the 

Graduate School Announcements. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester, and who continue their residence 
in the University for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register in 
the Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor's degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

193 



A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
Dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the total of under. 
graduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be transferred 
unless such prearrangement has been made. Graduate credits earned dur- 
ing the senior year may not be used to shorten the residence period required 
for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in dupli- 
cate and after the required endorsements are obtained, the applications 
are acted upon by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the 
candidate's undergraduate record and any graduate courses completed at 
other institutions must be on file in the Dean's office before the application 
can be considered. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered 
by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate 
study and research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree 
sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship by the type of 
graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in 
the sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 

AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
date when instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought (or in case of a summer school student at 
the end of the third summer's residence), but not until at least twelve 
semester course hours of graduate work have been completed. An average 
grade of B in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least one full academic year, or 
its equivalent, at this institution, is required. By carrying approximately 
six semester hours of graduate work for four summer sessions at this 
institution, a student may fulfill the residence requirements for the degree 
of Master or Arts or Master of Science, provided that the greater part of 
the thesis work can be done under direction during the periods between 
summer sessions. In some instances a fifth summer of residence may be 
required in order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

194 



Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
• of research, with an average B grade in courses approved for grad- 
^^? credit is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
q ience If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate 
irses' either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses may be 
'Quired to supplement the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four hours 
Tauired in graduate courses, not less than twelve semester hours and not 
more than sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major subject. 
The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must com- 
r^rise a ffroup of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
maior work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits 
for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 200 or above. The entire course of study must constitute a 
unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 
Transfer of Credit. Credit, not to exceed six hours, obtained at other 
I recognized institutions may be transferred and applied to the course re- 
quirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of graduate 
character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the student's 
graduate program at the University of Maryland. This transfer of credit is 
approved by the Graduate Council when the student is admitted to can- 
didacy for the degree. Acceptance of the transferred credit does not reduce 
the minimum residence requirements. The candidate is subject to final 
examination by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate 
courses a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Master of Science. It must demonstrate the stu- 
dent's ability to do independent work and it must be acceptable in literary 
style and composition. It is assumed that the time devoted to thesis work 
will be not less than the equivalent of six semester hours earned in graduate 
courses. With the approval of the student's major professor and the Dean 
of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared in 
absentia under direction and supervision of a member of the faculty of this 

institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before commencement. An ab- 
stract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words in length, must accom- 
pany it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the 
thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should 
be consulted by the student before the typing of the manuscript is begun. 
Individual copies of this manual may be obtained by the student at the 
Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's ad- 
viser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the 
committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of his major 

195 



and mmor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified of the t,., 
sonnel of the examining committee at least one week prior to the period Li 
for oral examinations. The chairman of the committee selects the exa 
time and place for the examination and notifies the other members of th 
committee and the candidate. The examination should be conducted witht 
the dates specified and a report of the committee sent to the Dean as sol 
as possible after the examination. A special form for this purpose is su^ 
plied to the chairman of the committee. Such a report is the basis nZ 
which recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted 
the degree sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about on 
hour, but the time should be long enough to ensure an adequate examination 
The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi 
date s obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample on 
portunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examina- 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination 
a comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Course Requirements. Thirty hours of course work are required, which 
may include courses in departments other than Education not to exceed one- 
half of the total thirty hours, such courses to be selected in conformity 
with the student's special needs as agreed upon by the student and his 
adviser. Of the thirty hours, not less than one-half must be on the 200 
level. 

At least four of the thirty hours must be seminar work, which shall 
include one or more seminar papers in the student's major field of concen- 
tration in the Department of Education. 

Included in the program must be courses in educational statistics and in 
procedure of educational research. 

A maximum of six hours of graduate credit may be earned in a summer 
session, and not more than six hours may be transferred from another 
institution. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of 
credits, and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must 
be admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the 
granting of the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the 

196 



Doctor's degree are filled out by the student and submitted to his major de- 
nartment for further action, and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate 
School not later than the first Wednesday in October of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Modern Language 
Department a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be cor- 
respondingly increased. All work at other institutions offered for transfer 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree is approved 
by the Graduate Council, upon recommendation of the department con- 
cerned, when the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree. The 
Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and work, 
but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in scholar- 
ship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special field in 
which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. The minor work required varies from 
twenty-four to thirty hours at the discretion of the department concerned. 
The remainder of the required residence is devoted to intensive study and 
research in the major field. The amount of required course work in the 
major subject will vary with the department and the individual candidate. 
The candidate must register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of 
research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original type- 
written copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together with 
an abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited 
in the office of the Deaii at least three weeks before commmencement. It is 
the responsibility of the student also to provide copies of the thesis for the 
use of the members of the examining committee prior to the date of the final 
examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the University 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general University library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be 
obtained at the students' supply store; one is later sent to the University 
library and one to the Library of Congress. The abstracts are published by 
the University in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
IS m the hands of each professor who directs thesis work and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students may 
obtain copies, of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

197 



i 



i 



Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his at- 
tainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed 
procedures are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDIDATES 
FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written exami- 
nation that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. The 
passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in his spe- 
cialized field. Some 300 pages of text from which the applicant wishes to 
have his examination chosen should be submitted to the head of the De- 
partment of Modern Languages at least three days before the examination. 
The examination aims to test ability to use the foreign language for re- 
search purposes. It is presumed that the candidate will know sufficient 
grammar to distinguish inflectional forms and that he will be able to trans- 
late readily in two hours about 500 words of text, with the aid of a dic- 
tionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office 
of the Department of Modern Languages at least three days in advance of 
the tests. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the un> 
successful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these 
tests. 

4. Examinations are held near the office of the Department of Modem 
Languages, on the last Wednesday in September and the first Wednesdays 
in February and June, at 2 p. m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

All Students: 

A matriculation fee of. $10.00. This is paid once only, upon admission to 
the Graduate School. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduate fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

College Park: 

A fixed charge, each semester, of $6.00 per semester credit hour for 
students carrying eight hours or less; for students carrying more than 
eight hours, $50.00 for the semester. 

Laboratory fees range from $2.00 to $8.00 per course per semester. 

198 



n 



BaUimore: 

School of Medicine: A fixed charge, each semester, of $8.00 per semester 

redit hour. Laboratory fees range from $10.00 to $20.00 per course. 

^ School of Pharmacy: A fixed charge, each semester, of $6.00 per semes- 

fpr credit hour. This fee is required of all graduate students except 

assistants, who will pay only a laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester credit 

hour. 

Summer Sessions, College Park: 

" Students in the Summer Session pay the regular matriculation and diploma 
fees. The hour credit fee is as follows: 

A full load of six semester hours, $25.00. 

A load of less than six semester hours, $6.00 per semester credit hour. • 

Living Expenses: 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park and 
vicinity. The cost of board and room ranges from about $35.00 to $45.00 a 
month, depending on the desires of the individual. A list of accommodations 
is maintained in the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity The stipend for the University fellows is from $400 to $500 for the 
academic year and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 
Several industrial fellowships, with varying stipends, are also available in 
certain departments. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
departments. The usual amount of service required does not exceed twelve 
clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate 
program, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees 
in the normal time. 

Scholarships. A limited number of scholarships are available, carrying 
a stipend of from $150 to $200, without remission of fees. Scholarships are 
awarded pn the basis of ability and of financial need. Scholars carry full 
time work and only minor services are required by the departments. 

Applications for fellowships and scholarships are made on blanks which 
may be obtained from the office of the Graduate School. The application, 
with the necessary credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean 
of the Graduate School. Applications which are approved by the Dean are 
forwarded to the departments, where final selection of fellows and scholars 
is made. The awards of University fellowships and scholarships are on a 
competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation for 
these assistantships is from $600 to $1000 a year and the remission of al? 

199 



graduate fees except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed 
for one year and are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class 
devotes one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection with 
Experiment Station projects, and he is required to spend two years in resi- 
dence for the Master's degree. If he continues in residence for the Doctor's 
degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence credit for each academic year at 
this University. The minimum residence requirement following the Bach- 
elor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic years and one 
summer, or three academic years and three summer sessions of eleven or 
twelve weeks each. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned, and appointments are made through the regular channels 
for staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships 
may be obtained from the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is 
conferred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean of the Faculty. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the office of the Registrar before 
April 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to obtain a degree. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement. Candi- 
dates who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Students' 
Supply Store. Order must be filed before April 1, but may be cancelled 
later if the student finds himself unable to complete his work for the degree. 



iff 



SUMMER SESSION 

Harold Benjamin, Director 

A Summer Session of six weeks is conducted at College Park. The pro- 
gram serves the needs of the following classes of students: (1) teachers 
and supervisors of the several classes of school work — elementary, secondary, 
vocational, and special; (2) regular students who are candidates for degrees; 
(3) graduate students; (4) special students not candidates for degrees. 

Terms of Admission 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. Before 
registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean 
of the College or School in which he wishes to secure the degree. Teachers 
and special students not seeking a degree are admitted to the courses of the 
summer session for which they are qualified. All such selection of courses 
must be approved by the Director of the Summer Session. 

Credits and Certificates 

The semester hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the Uni- 
versity. In the summer session, a course meeting five times a week for six 
weeks and requiring the standard amount of outside work has a value of 
two semester hours. 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State Depart- 
ment of Education towards satisfying certification requirements of all 
classes. 



Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards an advanced degree in 
the summer sessions, special arrangements are made supplementing the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students working for a 
degree on the summer plan must meet the same requirements as to admis- 
sion, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do students enrolled in the 
other sessions of the University. 

For detailed information in regard to the Summer Session, consult the 
special Summer Session announcemeyity issued annually in April. 



200 



201 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Thomas D. Finley,! Lieut. Col., Infantry, U, S. Army Professor 
Robert E. Wysor, Jr., Lieut, Col, Infantry, U, S. Army, Acting Professor 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Army Regu- 
lations No. 145-10, War Department. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers* Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act of 
Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 

Organization 

The unit is organized as a regiment of four battalions of three rifle 
companies each, and a band. All units are commanded by Advanced Course 
students, who have been selected for these commands on a basis of merit. 
The course of instruction is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. 

Objectives 
* Basic Course 

The object of this course is to afford to students enjoying the privileges 
of State and Federal aided education an opportunity to be trained for posi- 
tions involving leadership, within either the State or the nation. To this end 
the methods employed are designed to fit men mentally, physically, and 
morally for pursuits of peace or, if necessity requires, for national defense. 
A member of the R. 0. T. C. is not in the Army of the United States, and 
membership in the unit carries no legal obligation to serve in the Army, or 
any of the armed forces. 

JAdvanced Course 

The primary object of the Advanced Course is to provide military instruc- 
tion and systematic training through the agency of civil educational in- 
stitutions to selected students, to the end that they may qualify as reserve 
officers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain 
this objective in accordance with the terms of the contract during the time 
the students are pursuing as undergraduates their general or professional 
studies, thus causing minimum interference with the preparatory require- 
ments of their projected civil careers. 

A student prior to enrollment in this course must have satisfactorily 
completed the basic course and must have indicated in writing his desire to 



undertake the course. The applicant further must obtain on this document 
the recommendation of both the Dean of his College and the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, and submit same to the President of the Insti- 
tution for approval. No student will be enrolled in the Advanced Course 
without the approval of the President of the University. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second years, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour is 
utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced 'course, elective, five periods a week 
of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least 
three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part of military instruction, and it 
is the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the 
physical training given by civilian teachers, thus cooperating in an eifort to 
promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 



Uniforms* 



V 



Members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniform at all military formations and at such other times as the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics may designate with the approval of the 
President of the University. 

Uniforms, or commutation in lieu of uniforms, for the Reserve Officers* 
Training Corps, are furnished by the Government. The uniforms are the 
regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain distinguishing 
features; or, if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then such uniforms 
as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must be kept in good 
condition by the students. They remain the property of the Government; 
and, though intended primarily for use in connection with military instruc- 
tion, may be worn at other times unless the regulations governing their use 
are violated. The uniform will not be worn in part nor used while the 
wearer is engaged in athletic sports other than those required as a part of 
the course of instruction. A Basic Course uniform which is furnished to a 
student by the Government will be returned to the Military Department 
at the end of the year; or before, if a student severs his connection with the 



tOn leave. 

*Required of qualified students. 

^Elective for qualified undergraduates in accordance witli the contract. 

202 



*Each new student entering the R. O. T. C is required to purchase a pair of shoes 
approved by the Military Department, at the approximate cost of $3.90. These shoes are on 
sale at the Armory and will be fitted and paid for at the time uniforms are issued. 

203 



Department. In case commutation of uniforms is furnished, the uniform so 
purchased becomes the property of the student upon completion of two 
years* work. 

Commutation 

Students who elect the Advanced Course and who have signed the con- 
tract with the Federal Government to continue in the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps for the two remaining years of the Course are entitled to a 
small per diem money allowance, for commutation of subsistence, payable 
quarterly from and including the date of contract, until they complete the 
course at the institution. An allowance of approximately twenty-nine dollars 
is allowed for uniform. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country, 
camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are 
members of the Advanced Course Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These 
camps are under the close and constant supervision of army officers, and 
are intended primarily to give a thorough and comprehensive practical 
course of instruction in the different arms of the service. 

Parents may feel assured that their sons are carefully watched and safe- 
guarded. Wholesome surroundings and associates, work and healthy recre- 
ation are th« keynote to contentment. Social life is not neglected, and the 
morale branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for students who are 
taking the advanced course, which, as has been previously stated, is elective. 

Students who attend the summer camps are under no expense. The 
Government furnishes transportation from the institution to the camp and 
from the camp to the institution, or to the student's home, unless the mile- 
age is greater than that from the camp to the institution. In this case, the 
amount of mileage from the camp to the institution is allowed the student. 
Clothing, quarters, and food are furnished. The Advanced Course students. 
in addition to receiving quarters and food, are paid seventy cents for each 
day spent in camp. To obtain credit for camp a student must be in attend- 
ance at camp at least 85 per cent of the prescribed camp period. 



Federal Government as being of a superior order. The "Generally Excel-- 
,lt" rating supersedes the former designation of "Distmguished College, 
which designation has been discontinued by the War Department for mst.- 
tutions such as this University. 

Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university 
work, and the requirements of this department as to proficiency the same 
as those of other departments. 

Students who have received military training at any educational insti- 
tution under the direction of an army officer detailed as professor of 
military science and tactics may receive such credit as the professor of 
military science and tactics and the President may jointly determme. 



Commissions 

(a) Each year, upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm of 
the service will be determined by the War Department. 

(c) The University of Maryland has received a rating from the War De- 
partment of "Generally Excellent" for the past several years. This rating 
indicates that the work of its R. 0. T. C. unit has been recognized by the 

204 



205 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is 
broadly conceived as the development of the individual student. To accom- 
plish this purpose, physical examinations and classification tests are given 
the incoming students to determine the relative physical fitness of each. 
Upon the basis of the needs disclosed by these tests, and individual prefer- 
ences, students are assigned to the various activities of the program. 

For Men 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three 
activity classes each week throughout the year. In the fall, soccer, touch 
football, and tennis are the chief activities; in the winter, basketball, volley- 
ball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore students may elect a con- 
siderable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, 
horseshoes, ping pong, bag punching, badminton, shuffleboard, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted also. Touch foot- 
ball and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, baseball 
and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, 
medals, and other appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program 
are provided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Educa- 
tion Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and 
ping pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
Two large modern gymnasia, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute 
the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
soccer, wrestling, golf, and tennis. The University is a member of the 
Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and 
cooperates with other national organizations in the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

For Women 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities 
for conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including 
hockey, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball; individual sports, 
consisting of riding, tennis, badminton, fencing, golf, archery, deck tennis, 

206 



.ohlP tennis, and the like, are offered. Opportunity is given for various types 
f dancing including, modern, square, folk, and ballroom. The proximity 
f the University to Washington and Baltimore provides excellent oppor- 
tunity for groups to attend professional programs in dance. 

The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural 
tournaments in the seasonal sports, sports days with neighboring colleges, 
and intercollegiate competition in rifle shooting. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and women 
students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of the 
state, and to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education, see College of 
Education, and Section III, Description of Courses. 



207 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean. 
Faculty Council 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Harry B. McC.^thy, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S.. F.A.C.D. 

HISTORY 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery occupies an important and 
mterestmg place in the history of dentistry. At the end of thP rl i 
session, 1939-40, it completed its one hundrV^r of Lvice^t^^^^^^^^^^ 
educatjon^ The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents th^^^^^^^^^ 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr Horace 

the ySs'ls'a'i' Y^r^t^^^ ^-^^-^^ School of MediJine, 'bftr: 
the years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 
dissensions in the School of Medicine and were discontinued It was Dr 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention thTn had 
been given it by medicme or could be given it by the preceptorial pL of 

ttr houTd be^ d'^'l " 7^" '' "^^ ^^^^ ^^^ opinion^hat'dentil'lcf 
tion should be developed as a special branch of medical teaching TTie 

tTe ™! ZTT'T'f ^'^^^^^^^ ^'^'^^ '^ the Medical School defeated 
cation "^ ^""^"^^^ ^^""^^^ education upon medical edu- 

18?o'' ^ITf^.l f-^'^'^T ^'^? ^^" P"^'*^"" "^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^ Baltimore in 
1800. From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation 

for a scientific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris 

came to Baltimore to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of 

unusual ability and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing 

and promoting formal dental education. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had 

been interrup ed at the University of Maryland and there was an apparent 

msurmountable difficulty confronting the creation of dental departments 

m medical schools, an independent college was decided upon A charter 

was apphed for and granted by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. 

208 



m 



The first faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, at which time 
Horace H. Hayden was elected president and Chapin A. Harris, dean. The 
introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Harris on November 3, 1840, 
to the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was created as 
the foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, the first and oldest dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of the dental profession, con- 
tributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities 
for professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of 
Dental Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. 
Harris continued fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into peri- 
odic dental literature to the time of his death. The files of the old 
American Journal of Dental Science testify to the fine contributions made 
by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society of Dental Surgeons was 
founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its president and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris as its corresponding secretary. This was the beginning of dental 
organization in America, and was the forerunner of the American Dental 
Association, which now numbers approximately forty-five thousand in its 
present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual influence Balti- 
more dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have exercised 
on professional ideals and policies. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1879, 
at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. A department of dentistry was organized at the University of 
Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 
1923. This school was chartered as a corporation and continued as a 
privately owned and directed institution until 1920, when it became a State 
institution. The Dental Department of the Baltimore Medical College was 
established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it merged with the Dental 
Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, 
School of Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a 
distinct department of the University under State supervision and control. 
Thus, in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, is found a merging of the various efforts at dental educa- 
tion in Maryland. From these component elements have radiated develop- 
ments of the art and science of dentistry until the strength of its alumni 
is second to none, either in number or degree of service to the profession. 

The University of Maryland Medical School was organized December 28, 
1807, as the College of Medicine of Maryland. On December 28, 1812, the 
University of Maryland charter was issued to the College of Medicine of 
^laryland. There were at that period but four other medical schools in 
America — the University of Pennsylvania, founded in 1765; the College of 

209 



1 



Physicians and Surgeons of New York, in 1767; Harvard University, in 17S2- 
and Dartmouth College, in 1797. 

It is of interest to note that the University of Maryland as it now exists 
is the youngest State University in America, but that its various schools 
rank among the oldest in existence. The School of Medicine at its begin- 
ning was the fifth oldest existent medical school in America; the Law 
School was organized in 1823; the Dental School, 1840, is the oldest dental 
school in the world; the Pharmacy School was founded in 1841; the College 
of Agriculture, 1856, is the second oldest land grant college in America. 
While the present form of the University of Maryland is young, its sub- 
stance and character date back to the earliest period in education in the 
various professions. 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest comer of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occu- 
pied by the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is 
ideally arranged for efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large 
lecture rooms, classrooms, a library and reading room, science laboratories, 
technic laboratories, clinic rooms, and locker rooms. It is furnished with 
new equipment throughout and provides every accommodation necessary 
for satisfactory instruction under comfortable arrangements and pleasant 
surroundings. 

Special attention has been given to the facilities in clinic instruction. 
The large clinic wing contains 145 operating spaces; each space contains a 
chair, operating table and unit equipped with an electric engine, compressed 
air» gas, running water, etc. Clinic instruction is segregated, and the fol- 
lowing departments have been arranged for effective teaching: Operative, 
Prosthetic (including Crown and Bridge and Ceramics), Anesthesia and 
Surgery, Orthodontics, Diagnosis, Pathology, Pedodontia, Radiodontia, and 
Photography. All technic laboratories are equipped with every modern 
facility to promote efficiency in instruction. 

LIBRARY 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the best equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. It is 
located in the main building and consists of a stack room, collateral offices 
and a reading room that will accommodate ninety-six students. It contains 
over eight thousand bound volumes of dental textbooks and files of dental 
magazines, numerous pamphlets, reprints, etc.; while over 140 current 
dental magazines reach its reading tables. The two full-time librarians 
promote the growth of the Library and serve the student body in its use 
of library material. The Library is financed by direct appropriations from 
the State, by the income ffom an endowment established by the Maryland 
State Dental Association and by the proceeds of the sale of books to 

210 



students. One of the most important factors of the dental student s educa- 
on is to teach him the value and the use of dental literature m his formal 
education and in promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during 
practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to 
take care of this phase of dental study. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in 
the medical sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction 
consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, confer- 
ences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to tram 
the student in the value and use of dental literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

(a) Applicants for admission must present evidence of having success- 
fully completed two years of work in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high-school course. No 
applicant will be considered who has not completed all requirements for 
advancement to the junior year in the arts and sciences college from 
which he applies. His scholastic attainments shall be of such quality as 
to ensure a high quality of achievement in the dental course. 

(b) The minimum as a basis for admission is two years^ credit toward 
a baccalaureate degree in an accredited college of arts and sciences. The 
following minimum quantitative requirements are prescribed: 

Biology - ^ semester hours 

Inorganic Chemistry - 8 semester hours 

Organic Chemistry ^ semester hours 

Physics -^ semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

Electives - ^^ semester hours 

Deviation from these minimum requirements is allowed in all of the 
required subjects except chemistry, and is dependent upon the length of 
college training and the level of achievement attained by the student in 
his college work. 

Semester Hours Deviation 

60 semester hours - — ^^"® 

90 semester hours - ^ ^^"^^ 

Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts Degree „ 9 hours 

Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy Degree 12 hours 

(c) Applicants who have been dropped for poor scholarship, or who have 
failed at other institutions or other colleges of the University of Maryland 
last attended, will not be considered for admission. 

211 



I 



REQUIEEMENTS FOR MATRICULATION AND ENROLLMENT 
? r^ ,?^ "quiremente for admission and the Jad.mic ro„E* 

i*^ry tS'o i-iLr- £S5 ™"'*^ •' ---. --; 

$10.00, and IS not enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of S-iOnn . 
insure registration in the class. « P lu a aeposit of $50.00 to 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Application blanks may be obtained from the office of the D^=.„ • r . 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE PREDENTAL 

CURRICULUM 

q.J!^! ^^^^'I^^ .f hool requirements observed by the College of Arts and 
Sciences^ University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to-^aduatton fit 
an accredited secondary school which requires for ffraduatiof t o ^ 
cour<!P not- loco tVio., -Id -i * rm 'i"^^^" ^"'^ srdauation m a four-vcar 
course not less than 15 urnts.* The equivalent in entrance examination, 
may be offered by nongraduates of a secondary school. ^^*'«">^t.ons 

Required: English (I. II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics 1 

unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Stal 7 units 

Elective: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry civics 

t1rS:rTar^r"'' -lence, geology, history, h;me econo^U :^:: 
Clonal subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics zooIoct 

eS S musthf i "'J'.^T^ '"^^'^ '^^"^^^ °^ '''^^«-«ity entrance, 
i^ignt units must be submitted from this group. 



Predental Curriculum 



Semesters 



-Required seven (7). and elective eight (8) units for entrance. Total fifteen (15) units. 



freshman Year I 

Survey and Composition (Eng. ly) 3 

♦Elements of College Mathematics (Math. 8f, 10s) 3 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

General Zoology (Zool. 25f) _ 4 

Vertebrate Zoology (Zool. 26s) — 

Technical Drawing (Dr. ly) 1 

16 
Sophomore Year 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 2y). 2 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 3y) 2 

General Physics (Phys. ly) ~ 4 

French (French ly or French 3y) or German (German ly 

or German 3y) „ 3 

English Survey ( Eng. 2y ) „ _ 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) „ 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 57s) — 



// 

3 
3 
4 
1 

4 
1 

16 

2 

2 
4 

3 
2 



212 



16 16 

The above curriculum is offered in the Baltimore branch of the University, 
and its equivalent at College Park. 

Fees for the Predental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing application for admission) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at the time of enrollment) 10.00 

fTuition for the session, resident student 220.00 

fTuition for the session, non-resident student 270.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) 50.00 

Locker fee (each session) -.. 3.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (each session) 5.00 

Penalty foi late registration , 5.00 

Examination taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

Student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Academic Regulations 

The academic regulations of the College of Arts and Sciences are applied 
in the predental curriculum. 

*Stu(ients whose preparation permits will take College Algebra (Math. 21f) and Analy- 
tic Geometry (Math. 22s). 

tDefinition of resident status of student given on page 217. 

213 



A student must attain marks higher than P ir. fi^^f,. 

mark of C-2.0 (A, 4; B. 3; P^^^^^jJ^^^'^^'^^'^"!"'" with a minimum average 

DENTAL CURRICULUM 

DeS::t;""^"^"" ^^ •^^^^^'^^^^^ ^^ ^"" - ^^e bunetin of the Schooi , 
r«^ TV. c . '^*''"'^«'«>n '^'th Advanced Standing 

of Dental Schools. members of the American Association 

twl'l^morTreaS Tnt^redic^arsSl ^"a "t hT^ ^'^ '^^^^ <=-^>-^^ 
School of Medicine, UniverStyof M^rvitd !,? , '^ '''^"''''' '" ''' 
ing to the Sophomore ye./p^LT/lTf'.ZL^:,'^!^^^^^^^ 
competent regular instruction the courses ^n denf",l .^i T^ *' ™'^" 
scheduled in the first year. technology regularly 

(c) Applicant for transfer iniKsf n\ «,„^i. * i. x, 
admission to the first year S tTedenta c^ e- 'j"; bellS'T"'^ '" 
ion to the next higher class in the school f;om;iiehLsTe£%o^^ 'T" 
(3) show an average grade of five per cent ahlvl If * tr&nsier; 

school where transfer credits wer! eaLed U^t ^T''^ ""^'^ '" *>>« 
attainments, character and plrsonS 'r.?^ '7*^'"'" '^ '*=''°'^«' 

dismissal and recommendSon from t£'dean ofTh". T. °' ^°"°"'"' 
transfers. " °^ ^'^^ ^'^^'^^^ from which he 

apSlan^s S^rtVef mSfp'^erent tt •="? '^^-"^ ^''^' ^^^'' ''■ ^" 
before qualifying certTficarcaTbe issued" " "'"''" '"'■• ^^ ^"*™' 

Attendance Requirements 
which ttei. lecture, lo .11 cl.LTl,..1„ j P'" ='*^»" "P"* " 

..,,. .he a,.. ,c, w.cf.r.j=r jTisi- r i: 

.ve pe, cen. .nen^ance^riT- --«* re^^ S^X^E 

Promotion 

214 



five per ^^^^ above the passing mark shall be promoted to the next suc- 
ceeding year. 

2. Students who are deficient in courses amounting to not more than 
20 per cent of the scheduled hours of their course will be permitted to 
proceed with their class with the understanding that such deficiency shall 
be removed before the beginning of the next regular school year. Students 
with conditions will not be admitted to senior standing. 

3. A grade of 75 per cent is passing. A grade between 60 per cent and 
passing is a condition. A grade below 60 per cent is a failure. A condition 
may be removed by a re-examination. In such effort, failure to make a 
passing mark is recorded as a failure in the course. A failure can be 
removed only by repeating the course. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and 
clinic courses and textbooks for lecture courses will be announced for the 
various classes. Each student will be required to provide himself with 
whatever is necessary to meet the needs of his course and present same 
to an assigned instructor for inspection. No student who does not meet 
this requirement will be permitted to go on with his class. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students, evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 
to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. 
Integrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority 
and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a 
student will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary 
to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate 
who has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full four-year 
course of study of the dental curriculum, the last year of which shall have 
been spent in this institution. 

3. He will be required to show a general average of at least 80 per cent 
during the full course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the va- 
rious departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the begin- 
"ii'.g of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations 
m the community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

215 



Fees for the Dental Course 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for ad- 
mission) _ „ $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at time of enrollment) lO.Oo 

♦Tuition for the session, resident student - 275.00 

♦Tuition for the session, nonresident student - 375.00 

Dissecting fee (first semester. Freshman year) 15.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) — 20.00 

Locker fee — Freshman and Sophomore years (first semester) 3.00 

Locker fee — Junior and Senior years (first semester) 5.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit — Freshman and Sophomore years 

(first semester) _.... - » _ — 5.00 

Graduation fee (paid with second semester fees of Senior year) 15.00 

Penalty fee for late registration _ 5.00 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record will be issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy will be issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Student Activity Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activi- 
ties the student body has voted a fee of $10.00 to be paid at the opening 
of the school year to the treasurer of the Student Activity Committee. 

Refunds 

According to the policy of the Universtiy no fees will be returned. In 
case the student discontinues his course, any fees paid will be credited to a 
subsequent course, but are not transferable. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from 
one professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee 
required by each professional school. 

A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or 
days specified for his school, will be called upon to pay a fine of $5.00. The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins, following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only on the written recommendation of 
the Dean.) 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and pay to the Comptroller one-half of the tuition fee in 
addition to all other fees noted as payable first semester before being ad- 
mitted to class work at the opening of the session. The remainder of tuition 
and second semester fees must be paid to the Comptroller during registra- 
tion period for the second semester. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 

*Definition of resident status of student given on page 217. 

216 



Definition of Resident Status of Student 

Students who are minors are considered to be '■^^^'^^"^/^"'^^"J^i,^/* *' 
ti^e of Seir registration, their parents* have been residents of this State 

^^ ";* .r^Uentfar; considered to be resident students if, at the time of 

first registration m tne univerb y, ^^_^ts* move to and become legal 

^'•"rlr^f^strby ^nSn"^ sS^^^ at least one full 

residents f}^''^l^°J ^l .j ^t of the student (minor) to change from 
rSn r'esS to T rTidlnJ stLs must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

Summer Courses 
Aside ,ro„ »d Wpenden. ^ ^r/l'JrTt^lfnTcd t^'Sn'" 

conducted ^^""^ . ^g^^^ in the school. It offers opportunities to 

ILT fc.^nfrdSfln .h. .li„U from ^^'-^^ -^'int 

as those who desire to gain more extended practice during their training 
perSd^he clinics are under the direction of capable demonstrators, full 
credit being given for all work done. 

The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 

student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission The 

00 S is'Sied aS Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas a pioneer in denta 

^duration a teacher of many years experience, and durmg his life a great 

coSSrtrd^ntal literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his 

name that the society adopted it. , ,. ■ • * ^.i,!;,. ;„r„-nr 

Students become eligible for membership at the beginning of t^^ir jun^r 
year if, during their preceding years of the dental course, they have at 
aTned a general average which places them in the -PP;%4Xv 'nromteS 
class. Meetings are held once each month, and are ^f ?^^^^«^^^y P^^"/"* 
dental and medical men, an effort being made to °^t^>"JP^f "^^ "f J°" 
nected with the University. The members have an opportunity even while 
students, to hear men associated with other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary Cental fraternity was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Um- 

"^^^ilT;;;; .-parents- includes persons who. by reason of f^^'^^^^^^^^-Zm t^s^h 
.tancos, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand m loco parentis 

minor students. 

217 



versity of Maryland, during the session of 1928-1929. Membership in the 
fraternity is awarded to a number not exceeding twelve per cent of the 
graduating class. This honor is conferred upon students who through their 
professional course of study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, 
and whose conduct, earnestness, evidence of good character, and high 
scholarship recommend them to election. 

Scholarship Loans 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educa- 
tional foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry-. 
These loans are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment 
and the need on the part of students for assistance in completing their 
course in dentistry. It has been the policy of the faculty to recommend 
only students in the last two years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation — From this fund, established 
under the will of General Henry Strong, of Chicago, an annual allotment 
is made to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, for scholarship loans available for the use of young men 
and women students under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations for the 
privileges of these loans are limited to students in the junior and senior 
years. Only students who through stress of circumstances require financial 
aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational progress are con- 
sidered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund — Under a pro- 
vision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New Haven, Conn., 
an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds of 
which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This 
organization has continued in existence to the present, its name having been 
changed to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 



218 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean 

The Faculty Council 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

G. RiDGELY Sappington, Esq., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the s^dy of law ^ 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. ine 
institution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of P^^Pf P^^^™" 
ary support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and m 1870 
regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the course 
has been made more comprehensive, and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than three thousand, and 
included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence m the pro- 
fession elsewhere. 

The Law School has been recognized by the Council of the Section of Legal 
Education of the American Bar Association as meeting the standards of the 
American Bar Association, and has been placed upon its approved list. 

The Law School is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
an association composed of the leading law schools in the United States, 
member schools being required to maintain certain high standards relating 
to entrance requirements, faculty, library, and curriculum. 

The Law School is also registered as an approved school on the New York 
Regents' list. 

The Law School Building, erected in 1931, is located at Redwood 
and Greene Streets in Baltimore. In addition to classrooms and offices for 

219 



the Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room .it 
dents' lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter contain!?" 
a collection of carefully selected text-books, English and American renorh 
leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. No fee i 
charged for the use of the library, which is open from 9.00 a. m to mil 
p. m. •*^" 

Course of Instruction 

The School of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and thf 
Evenmg School. The same curriculum is offered in each school, and th* 
standards of work and graduation requirements are the same. 

The Day School course covers a period of three years of thirty-two weeks 
each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the dav 
chieily m the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on Mon 
day evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 p. m. 

The Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty-six 
weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on Mondav 
Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6.30 to 9.30 p m This 
plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student 

The course of instruction in the School of Law is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the Bar 
Instruction is offered in the various branches of the common law, of equity' 
of the statute law of Maryland, and of the public law of the United States' 
1 he course of study embraces both the theory and practice of the law, and 
aims to give the student a broad view of the origin, development, and func- 
tion of law, together with a thorough practical knowledge of its principles 
and their application. Analytical study is made of the principles of sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and a carefully directed practice court enables 
the student to get an intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
any peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such. All of the 
subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included m the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work ; that is, the completion of at least one-half the work acceptable for a 
Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study by the 
University of Maryland or other principal college or university in this State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and exclusive of 

220 



credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
without intellectual content of substantial value. Such prelegal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with a scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation in the institu- 
tion attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
age number of students admitted as beginning regular law students during 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts 

and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in arts and law leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program in college and prelegal sub- 
jects will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park. The fourth year they will register in the School of Law, and 
upon the successful completion of the work of the first year in the Day 
School, or the equivalent work in the Evening School, the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts may be awarded. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by 
reference to page 127. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws 

The University also offers a combined program in commerce and law 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program will spend the first three years 
in the College of Commerce at College Park. In the fourth year they will 
register in the School of Law, and upon the successful completion of the 
work of the first year in the Day School, or the equivalent thereof in the 
Evening School, may be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. The 
degree of Bachelor of Laws will be awarded upon the completion of the 
work prescribed for graduation in the School of Law. 

221 



Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or bv 
reference to page 147. 

Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere in 
a law school which is either a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty Council, upon presentation of a certificate from such 
law school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the successful 
completion of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many hours 
as are required for such subjects in this school, receive credit for such 
courses and be admitted to advanced standing. No student transferring from 
another law school will be admitted unless eligible to return to the school 
from which he transfers. No degree will be conferred until after one year 
of residence and study at this school. 

Fees and Expenses 

The charges for instruction are as follows: 

Registration fee to accompany application. j 2.OO 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration JO.OO 

Diploma fee, payable upon graduation „ ^ ^ 15.00 

Tuition fee, per annum: 

Day School _ $200.00 

Evening School _ 150.00 

An additional tuition fee of $50.00 per annum must be paid by students 
who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

The tuition fee is payable in two equal instalments, one-half at the time 
of registration for the first semester, and one-half at the time of registra- 
tion for the second semester. 

Further information and a special catalogue of the School of Law may 
be had upon application to the School of Law, University of Maryland 
Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

H. Boyd Wylie, Acting Dean. 

Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wyue, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D. 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

At this Medical School for the first time in America, dissection was 
made a compulsory part of the curriculum, and independent chairs for the 
teaching of gynecology and pediatrics (1867), and of ophthalmology and 
otology (1873), were installed. 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 



222 



Qinical Facilities 

The original University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest 
institution for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in Septem- 
ber, 1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was re- 
served for eye patients. 

223 



Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the 
clinical facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year 
6,682 persons. 

In connection with the University Hospital, an outdoor obstetrical clmic 
is conducted. During the past year 2,108 cases were delivered in the 
University Hospital and under supervision in this Outdoor Clinic. 

The hospital now has 435 beds and 50 bassinets — ^for medical, surgical 
obstetrical, and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical 
material for third-year and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy Hos- 
pital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be the 
same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Oncology, Ophthalmology and Otology, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro- 
Enterology, Oral Surgery, Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Ortho- 
pedics, Proctology, Psychiatry, Dermatology, Larjmgology and Rhinology, 
and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work each day during 
one-third of the year in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery of the 
dispensaries. In their senior year, all students work one hour each day 
in the special departments, where 141,142 cases were treated last year. 
This gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching. 

Student laboratories conducted by the School of Medicine purely for 
medical instruction are as follows: Gross Anatomy, Histology and Embry- 
ology, Physiology, Bacteriology and Immunology, Biological Chemistry, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Operative Surgery and Sur- 
gical Anatomy. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Randolph Winslow Scholarship; Uni- 
versity Scholarship; Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky 
Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships; Israel 
and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarship; Dr. Horace Bruce Hetrick Scholarship, 
and the Medical Alumni Association Scholarship. 

Method of Making Application for Admission 

Application forms may be filed beginning October 1 for the following 
September classes. These forms may be secured from the Committee on 
Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. 

Application for Admission to the First Year 

Application for admission is made by filing the required form and by 
having all pertinent data sent directly to the Committee on Admissions, 
in accordance with the instructions accompanying the application. 

224 



i 



Application for Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to file 
applications for admission to the second- and third-year classes. These 
applicants must be prepared to meet the current first-year entrance require- 
ments in addition to presenting acceptable medical school credentials, and a 
medical school record based on courses which are quantitatively and quali- 
tatively equivalent to similar courses in this school. 

Application for advanced standing is made in accordance with the instruc- 
tions accompanying the application form. 

Minimum Requirements for Admission 

The minimum requirements for admission to the School of Medicine are: 

(a) Graduation from an approved secondary school, or the equivalent in 
entrance examinations, and 

• 

*(b) Three calendar years of acceptable premedical credit earned in an 
approved college of arts and sciences. The quantity and quality of 
this preprofessional course of study shall be not less than that re- 
quired for recommendation by the institution where the premedical 
courses are being, or have been, studied. 

The premedical curriculum shall include basic courses in 

English 

Biology 

Inorganic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Physics 

French or German 

and such elective courses as will complete a balaiiced three-year schedule 
of study. 

The elective courses should be selected from the following three groups: 



Natural Sciences 

Comparative V e r t e - 
brate Anatomy 

Embryology 

Physical Chemistry or 
Quantitative Analy- 
sis 

Mathematics 



Social Sciences 
Economics 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology (a basic 

course should be 

taken) 
Sociology, etc. 



Humanities 
I English (an advanced 

course in English 

composition should be 

taken, if possible) 
I Scientific German or 

French (a reading 

knowledge of either 

language is desirable, 

although German is 

preferred) 
[Philosophy 

„ 1*°^ admission to the Premedical Curriculum the requirements are the same as for the 
ladd r^^'^ class in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University with the prescribed 
I ^^"on of two years of one foreign language. (See Section I, Admission.) 

225 



Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses in 
the natural sciences. Accordingly, it is suggested that the elective list 
given above be a guide in this connection and that the remainder of the 
college credits be accumulated from courses designed to promote a broad 
cultural development. Students should avoid the inclusion of college courses 
in subjects that occur in the medical curriculum, for example, histology 
histological technique, human anatomy, bacteriology, physiology, neurology 
physiological chemistry. 

It is not intended that these suggestions be interpreted to restrict the 
education of students who exhibit an aptitude for the natural sciences or 
to limit the development of students who plan to follow research work in 
the field of medicine. 

In accepting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have acceptable scholastic records in secondary school and 
college, satisfactory scores in the Medical Aptitude Test, favorable letters 
of recommendation from their premedical committees, or from one instruc- 
tor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics, and who 
in all other respects give every promise of becoming successful students 
and physicians of high standing. 

Those candidates for admission who are accepted will receive certificates 
of entrance from the Director of Admissions of the University. 



xperience. In addition to these the student must bear in mind the expen- 
diture for a microscope. 

Low 

„ , $ 50 

Books ■- *^ 

College Incidentals - - - J^^ 

Board, eight months ^^^ 

Room rent — ^ 

Clothing and laundry. »" 

All other expenses 25 

Total - - -- ?409 

Advice to Premedical Students 



Average 


Liberal 


$ 75 


$100 


20 


20 


250 


275 


80 


100 


80 


150 


50 


"fh 



$556 



$720 



It is suggested that students registered in the Premedical 
secure a copy of the latest bulletin of the School of Medicine in 
are interested, early in their freshman year in college, in order 
themselves with the latest requirements for admission. 

Copies of the Bulletin of this School of Medicine may be 
writing to the Committee on Admissions, School of Medicine, 
of Maryland, Baltimore. 



Curriculum 
which they 
to acquaint 

secured by 
University 



Fees* 

Matriculation fee (paid once) - _ $ lO.OO 

Tuition fee (each year) — Residents of Maryland 450.00 

Tuition fee (each year) — Non-Residents _ 600.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) _ 25.00 

Conditioned examination fee (each subject) 5.00 

Student health service fee (each year) _ 10.00 

Student activities fee (each year) .^..._ 5.00 

Maintenance and service fee (each year) : 

First year 6.00 

Second year _ 3.00 

Third year _ 2.30 

Fourth year — '^-^^^ 

Graduation fee - ~ 15.00 

Transcript fee to graduates. First copy gratis, thereafter, each 

copy „ - 1'^^ 

Personal Expenses 

The following estimates of personal expenses for the academic year of 
eight months have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual 

*The above tuition fees applicable until the end of the session 1940-1941 only. /^^ 

right is reserved to make changes in these fees whenever the authorities deem it expedient 

226 



227 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and Superintendent of Nurses 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. The school is non-sec- 
tarian, the only religious services being morning prayers. 

The new University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital, contain- 
ing 435 beds and 50 bassinets. It is equipped to give young women a 
thorough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Oflfered 

The program of study of the school is planned for two groups of students: 
(a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present record 
showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required amount of pre- 
paratory study. Preference will be given to students who rank in the 
upper third of the graduating classes in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance: required (7), 
and elective (8) .units. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; chemistry, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: astronomy, biology, botany, civics, drawing, economics, 
general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational subjects, 
languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any other 
subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory school for which 
graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Eight 
units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than four 
units can pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet certain other 
definite requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for 
nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. 
Women of superior education and culture are given preference, pro\aded 
they meet the requirements in other particulars. If possible a personal 
interview with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday 
or Friday from 11:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 

228 



Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, all 
students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the beginning 
of their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible for exami- 
nation and license on completion of this course. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, neglect, and failure to develop those qualities considered essen- 
tial in a nurse, are causes for dismissal at any time by the President of 
the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year combined program of the 
School of Nursing are the same as for the other schools and colleges. 
(Special catalogue will be sent upon request.) The three-year program is 
designed to meet the requirements for the diploma in Nursing, and com- 
prises the work of the first, second, and third hospital years. 

Admission to the School 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February, for the fall term 
in September or October, and for the five year course in September. 

Hours of Duty 

During the preparatory period the students are engaged in class work 
for the first four months with no general duty in the hospital, and for 
the remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight-hour 
duty. During the first, second, and third years the students are on eight- 
hour day duty and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays and 
Sundays. The night-duty periods are approximately two months each, with 
one day at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The period 
of night duty is approximately five to six months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours. This instruction includes courses in anat- 
omy, physiology, cookery and nutrition, dosage and solution, hygiene, bac- 
teriology, chemistry, materia medica, practical nursing, bandaging, ethics, 
and history of nursing. During the last two months of the probation 
period the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction 
in bedside nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to 
them by the Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the 

229 



I, 



students are required to pass satisfactorily both the written and the 
practical tests; failure to do so will be sufficient reason for terminating 
the course at this point. 

Sickness 
A physician is in attendance each day, and all students, when ill, are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two weeks, 
during the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the 
school decide that, because of time lost, the theoretical work has not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in the current year, 
it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A period of four 
weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first year, and of the 
second year. 

Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student. A 
student activity fee of $5.00 is to be paid each year at the beginning of 
the first semester by each student. These will not be returned. A student 
receives her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from 
the date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides her own 
uniforms, obtained through the hospital at a nominal cost. After being 
accepted as a student nurse, she wears the uniform supplied by the hospital. 
The student is also provided with text-books and shoes. In her senior year 
she is required to be prepared to meet an expense of $30.00 for affiliations. 
Her personal expenses during the course of training and instruction will 
depend entirely upon her individual habits and tastes. 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years, including the 
preliminary term of six months. The course of instruction is, in general, 
as follows: 

First Year 

First Semester 

The first semester, or preliminary term, is devoted to theoretical instruc- 
tion given in the class rooms of the Nursing School and in lecture rooms 
and laboratories of the Medical School, and to supervised practice in the 
wards of the hospital. The courses offered are anatomy, physiology, 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solutions, chemistry, bacteriology, hygiene, 
history of nursing, ethics, psychology, principles and practice of nursing, 
bandaging and surgical supplies. 

Excursions are made to the filtration plant, hygienic dairies, markets, 
and other places of interest. 

At the close of the first semester the students are reqtiired to pass 
satisfactorily both written and practical tests. Failure to do this will be 
sufficient reason to terminate the course at this period. 

230 



Second Semester 

During this term the students receive theoretical instruction in general 
surgery, surgical technic, massage, diet therapy, materia medica, advanced 
nursing procedures and charting, and the case study method. Ward 
assignments and instruction provide experience in medical, surgical, gyneco- 
logical and urological nursing, also in the diet school and outpatients 
department. This experience is under the direction and supervision of 
the supervisors of the departments. 

Second Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes general medicine, 
clinical pathology, venereal and skin diseases, x-ray, radium, commimicable 
diseases, pediatrics, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedics, and diseases of 
eye, ear, nose, and throat. The hospital assignment here provides instruc- 
tion and experience on the public wards, on the private floors, and in the 
operating room. 

Third Year 

During the third year the theoretical instruction includes psychiatry, 
public health, professional problems, and survey of the nursing field. The 
assignments include experience in psychiatric nursing, in public health 
nursing, in obstetrics and pediatrics. 

Attendance at Classes 

Attendance is required at all classes for each course for which the student 
is registered. Absences are excused only in cases of illness or of absence 
from the school. 

Examinations 

These are both written and oral, and include practical tests. Failure 
in two or more subjects may necessitate increasing the length of the course. 

During the three years of nursing experience in the various depart- 
ments of the hospital, a monthly record of the student's nursing work is 
submitted by the nurse in charge. The student's standing is based upon 
the examinations in the theoretical subjects and these monthly records. 

Graduation 

The diploma of the school will be awarded to those who have success- 
fully completed the required course of three years, and have maintained 
the required average in each course and phase of work. 

Five- Year Program 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or prehospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University, during which period the student has an introduction to the 

231 



general cultural subjects which are considered fundamental in any college 
training. At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing 
in Baltimore. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing may be 
conferred upon students who complete successfully the prescribed combined 
academic and nursing program, maintaining the required averages in each 
branch of the course. 

Scholarships 

One scholarship has been established by the alumnae of the Training 
School, which entitles a nurse to a six-weeks' course at Teachers College 
Columbia University, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest 
excellence, and who desires to pursue graduate study and special work. 
There are two scholarships of the value of $50.00 each: the Edwin and 
Leander M. Zimmerman prize for practical nursing and for displaying the 
greatest interest and sympathy for the patients; and the Elizabeth Collins 
Lee prize, given to the student having the second highest average in schol- 
arship. An alumnae pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board to 
a student who at the completion of three years shows marked executive 
ability. A prize of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst to a student 
who at the completion of three years of work shows exceptional executive 
ability. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 

Faculty Council 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D. 
Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 
Clifford W. Chapman, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D. 
J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 
Thomas C. Grubb, A.B., Ph.D. 

A. W. RiCHESON, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy. The latter was organized in 1841, and operated as an inde- 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 
professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the present University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission, just prior to 1865, it has continuously exercised 
its function as a teaching institution. 

LOCATION 

The School of Pharmacy is located at 32 South Greene Street, in close 
proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry. 

AIMS 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential 
in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants 
for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the 
facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the 
practice of the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical re- 
search. 

RECOGNITION 

This school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of these agencies is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions accredited by the Coimcil or 
holding membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum 
requirements for entrance and graduation. Through the influence of the 



232 



233 



Council, uniform and higher standards of education have been adopted* 
and the fact that several states by law or by Board ruling recognize the 
standards of the Association is evidence of its influence. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized in all states. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN CLASS FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate 

An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary school which is approved 
by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by an accrediting agency 
of at least equal rank, and which requires for graduation not less than 
15 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution Of Units Between Required and Elective Subjects: Required 
subjects, 7 units; electives, 8 units. Total, 15 units. 

Required Subjects: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. 
Total, 7 units. 

Elective Subjects: agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, 
civics, drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home economics, 
vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, 
zoology, or any subject offered in a standard high or preparatory school 
for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 
Total, 8 units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full-year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education or the 



*The right is reserved to refuse admission even to applicants with sufficient scholastic 
credit if their presence in the School would, in the judgment of the Faculty Council, be 
detrimental to the best interests of the School. 

234 



Department of Education of Baltimore City will be admited upon the pre- 
sentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does 
not meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evi- 
dence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the Director 
of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. Such exami- 
naiions will be given during the first week of July, August, and September 
at Baltimore and at other convenient places in the state. Applicants con- 
cerned will be notified when and w^here to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school 
does not have such a quality grade, then the average of the applicant's 
school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the 
lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination 

An applicant from a secondary school who is not eligible for admission by 
certificate may seek entrance through either of two types of examination: 
(1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for permission to report 
at the University for an examination, the result of which will be used 
in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine whether the 
applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting 
evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations in 
the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, New York City; the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, Albany; and the Department of Public Instruction 
of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education will receive credit for the courses which 
correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the first three 
years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced standing, provided 
he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper certificate 
of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic insti- 
tution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
ional requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Fresh- 
man Class from Secondary School." 

235 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter as a 
special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will 
not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty 
Council reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary train- 
ing of the applicant is sufficient. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Phar.) will 
be conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum. The work of the last 
year must have been in courses offered in this school, and must have 
been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester hour credit of not less than 140, with a grade point 
count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the total 
semester hours of credit scheduled for these years. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

The matriculation ticket must be procured from the office of the School 
of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before one enters classes. After 
matriculation,, all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. The last date of matriculation is Sept. 25, 1941. 

EXPENSES 

Laboratory 
Tuition and 

Resident Non-Resident Breakage 

$220.00 $270.00 $60.00 (yearly) 



Matriculation 
$10.00 (only once) 



Graduation 
$15.00 



Tuition for the first semester and laboratory and breakage fee shall be 
paid to the Comptroller at the time of registration; and tuition for the 
second semester and graduation fee (the latter returned in case of failure) 
on or before Jan. 31, 1942. 

A bulletin giving details of the course in Pharmacy may be obtained by 
addressing the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 



236 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

H. C. Byrd Executive Officer 

F. K. Haszard „ Executive Secretary 

Mark Welsh State Veterinarian 

The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of Agriculture 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Powers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows: 

''The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding the breeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
thereof, and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the rais- 
ing, distribution, and sale of farm, orchard, forest, and nursery products, 
generally, and plant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same; the 
preparation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection, control, and distri- 
bution of animal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds, fertilizers, 
agricultural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals, and biological 
products; and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
publish such information, statistics, and the results of such investigations 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the ef- 
ficient dissemination thereof; and except where such powers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
control of the herein recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
the agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of de- 
sirable immigration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
regulations in respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
of the State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
law, and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
punished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execution and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested with such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
on the other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

Under the above authority and by special legislation, all regulatory work 
is conducted under the general authority of the Board. This includes the 
following services: 

237 



i 



LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 
Mark Welsh .: State Veterinarian 

This Service has charge of regulatory work in connection with the control 
of animal and poultry diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis, Bang's disease, 
hog cholera, encephalomyelitis, rabies, anthrax, blackleg, and scabies in 
animals; and pullorum disease and blackhead in poultry. The Service co- 
operates in these activities with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Well equipped laboratories for research, diagnostic work, and the examina- 
tion of specimens, are maintained at College Park, and branch laboratories 
for the convenience of persons residing in other sections of the State are 
maintained at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore; Salisbury; and Cen- 
treville. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland. 

T. B. Symons Director of Extension Service 

E. N. Cory „ „ „.... State Entomologist 

R. A. Jehle ^ « „ State Pathologist 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for the 
inspection of all nurseries and the suppression of injurious insects and dis- 
eases affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is con- 
ducted in close association with the departments of Entomology and 
Pathology of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under the 
authority of the law creating the department as well as the State Board of 
Agriculture. For administrative purposes, the department is placed under 
the Extension Service of the University on account of the close association 
of the work. 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

(Feed Stuffs, Fertilizers, Agricultural Liming Materials, Insecticides 

and Fungicides.) 

L. B. Broughton State Chemist 

L. E. Bopst Associate State Chemist 

W. C. Supplee Biological Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson Chief Inspector 

W. J. Footen Inspector 

E. M. Zentz Inspector 

H. R. Walls „ - Assistant Chemist and Microscopist 

L. H. Van Wormer. Assistant Chemist 

238 



Assistant Chemist 
R. E. Baumgardner Assistant Chemist 

A. B. Heagy -^- - - Assistant Chemist 

J. E. Schueler, Jr ; Assistant Chemist 

R.H. Flowers Laboratory Assistant 

R. G. Fuerst ~ - -■•- -"• 

The Inspection and Regulatory Service is ^^'^^'''^^ 'l.^'f^^^^^^^ 
fr iv T 5.W Feed Stuff Law, Agricultural Lime Law, and the Insecticide 
^ fC.^^^^^^ apply to agricultural products. This involves 

and ^'''^^'''l^^^^^ all materials sold, securing samples for 

the --^fl^'^;^^^^^ checking labeling requirements, publi- 

:a:rof th?reS^ and the prosecution of violators of these 

statutes. 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

Seed Inspector 

F. S. Holmes - 

, X 4.- Qi^r^n^ \^ T^laced by law under the general super- 

•"'^ o?tt Tg^tlLa^xy;^^^^^^^ This service takes samples 

IS 2r:d f or s^ltand tesl them for quality and germination. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

F. W. Besley State Forester 

Karl E. Pfeiffer. Assistant State Forester 

Walter J. Quick, Jr .Assistant Forester 

This department is responsible under State laws for certain administra- 
tive functions including: 

1. A State-wide forest protection system to protect the 2.225,000 acres 
of forest land against fires. , . ^ 4. 

2. A system of nine state forests, comprising 105,000 acres, and six state 

parks of 4,000 acres. ^ 

3. The operation of a State Nursery for growing and distributing small 
seedlings for forest and windbreak planting. 

, . . i. 4.- r.^ fVio Pnadside Tree Law involving the protec- 

State. 

The department also renders a service to 7°^1-/ "^^^^"f^t'stTnd 
agement of their woodlands and the preparation of plans for 

roadside planting. 

239 



STATE WEATHER SERVICE 

Edward B. Mathews _ Director 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. 
John R. Weeks Meteorologist 

U. S. Custom House, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The State Weather Service compiles local statistics regarding climatic 
conditions and disseminates information regarding the climatology of Marv 
land under the Regents of the University of Maryland through the Stale 
Geologist as successor to the Maryland State Weather Service Commission 
Ihe State Geologist is ex-officio Director, performing all the functions of 
former officers with the exception of Meteorologist, who is commissioned bv 
tfie Governor and serves as liaison officer with the United States Weather 
liureau. All activities except clerical are performed voluntarily. 

MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Edward B. Mathews State Geologist 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Geological and Economic Survey Commission is authorized under the 
genera jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
to conduct the work of this department. The State Geological and Eco- 
nomic Survey is authorized to make the following: 

Topographic surveys showing the relief of the land, streams, roads, rail- 
ways, houses, etc. 

Geological surveys showing the distribution of the geological formations 
and mineral deposits of the State. 

Agricultural soil surveys showing the areal extent and character of the 
different soils. 

Hydrographic surveys to determine the available waters of the State for 
potable and industrial uses. 

Magnetic surveys to determine the variation of the needle for land 
surveys. 

A permanent exhibit of the mineral wealth of the State in the old Hall 
of Delegates at the State House, to which new materials are constantly 
added to keep the collection up-to-date. 



240 



SECTION in 
Description Of Courses 

The courses of instruction described in this section are offered at College 
Park. Those offered in the Baltimore Schools are described in the separate 
announcements issued by the several schools. 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically : 

Page 

Agricultural Economics - 242 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life „ 246 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) ^ 248 

Animal Husbandry - 250 

Art - - - -- •..: 253 

Astronomy - - 254 

Botany - 258 

Business Administration 263 

Chemistry „ 273 

Classical Languages and Archaeology 281 

Comparative Literature 283 

Dairy Husbandry 285 

Education 292 

Engineering 305 

English Language and Literature. - 318 

Entomology 326 

Farm Forestry 329 

French _ 353 

Geology 330 

German 356 

Greek 281 

History „.„ _ _ .„ 330 

Home Economics 334 

Horticulture _ - 339 

Latin 281 

Library Science 345 

241 



. 



Page 
Mathematics _ > 345 

Military Science and Tactics _ 352 

Modem Languages -... 353 

Philosophy _... .„ 361 

Political Science 367 

Poultry Husbandry „... _ > 371 

Psychology _ „... 373 

Socioloe^ Q77 

Speech. „ „ 382 

Statistics - - - _ 384 

Veterinary Science „ 385 

Zoology ^ 386 

Courses for undergraduates are designated by the numbers 1-99; courses 
for advanced undergraduates and graduates, 100-199 ; courses for graduates, 
200-299. 

The letter following the number of the course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered: thus, 1 f is offered the first semester; 1 s, the 
second semester; 1 y, the year; 1 f and s indicates that the course is 
repeated in the second semester; 1 f or s that the course may be given 
in either the first or the second semester. A capital S after a course 
number indicates that the course is offered in the summer session only. 

The number of hours' credit is shown by the arabic numeral in parentheses 
after the title of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students will obtain these schedules when they register. 

Students are advised to consult the statements of the colleges and schools 
in Section II when making out their programs of studies; also Regulation 
of Studies, Section I. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT* 

Professor DeVault; Lecturer Baker; Associate Professors Walker, 
Coddington; Assistant Professor Hamilton; Mr. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 1 f. Agricultural Industry and Resources (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. 

A descriptive course dealing with agriculture as an industry and its re- 
lation to climate, physiography, soils, population centers and movements, 
conmiercial development, transportation, etc.; the existing agricultural re- 
sources of the world and their potentialities, commercial importance, and 
geographical distribution; the chief sources of consumption; the leading 

*See also related courses in Economics and in Business Administration. 

242 



trade routes and markets for agricultural products. The history of Ameri- 
can agriculture is briefly reviewed. Emphasis is upon the chief crop and 
livestock products of the United States. 

A. E. 2 s. Farm Organization (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of farm organization consisting of an introduction to the com- 
plex problems of the agricultural industry as these problems affect the 
life and welfare of the individual farmer. More specifically, the course 
includes the choice of agriculture as a vocation; adaptation of farms to 
particular enterprises; types of farming and factors influencing the same; 
farm returns; the use of labor, machinery, and land in production; combi- 
nation of crop and livestock enterprises as they affect the farmer's income; 
and a study of successful and unsuccessful Maryland farms. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
A. E. 100 f. Farm Economics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
51f, 52s, or 57. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, the tariff, price movements, and marketing. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 5 If, 52s, or 57. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Cooperation in Agriculture (3) — Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organi- 
zations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 104 s. Farm Finance (3) — Three lectures. 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm organizations 
and industries. Farm insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance, 
with special reference to mutual development — ^how provided, benefits, and 
needed extension. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given in the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. 

(Staff.) 
243 



A. E. 106 s. Prices of Farm Products (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 

emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 108 f. Farm Management (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 f, 110 s. Research Problems (1-2, 1-2). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

A. E. Ill f. Land Economics (3) — Three lectures. 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources. A 
study of major land problems and land policies including erosion and its 
control; farm tenancy; tax delinquency and tax reverted lands; land use 
planning and production control; public policies for facilitating land use 
adjustments; and directional measures for discouraging undesirable land 
uses. (Coddington.) 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200 f, 201 s. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2, 2). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. (Staff.) 

A. E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion^ and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203. Research (8). 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics imder 
the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original in- 
vestigation in problems of agricultural economics, and the results will be 
presented in the form of theses. (DeVault.) 

244 



A. E. 210 s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture: general prop- 
erty tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license taxes, in- 
heritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm tax reduc- 
tion through greater efficiency and economies in local government. 

(Walker, DeVault.) 

A. E. 211 f. Agricultural Taxation in Theory and Practice (3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare of 
society; theory of taxation: the general property tax, business and license 
taxes, the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, inheritance 
and estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax reforms: 
conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units; practical 
and current problems in taxation. (Walker, DeVault.) 

A. E. 212 f, 213 s. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3, 2)— 

Two double lectures. 

A presentation, by regions, of the basic physical conditions of the economic 
and social forces that have influenced agricultural settlement, and of the 
resultant utilization of the land and production of farm products; followed 
by a consideration of regional trends and interregional shifts in land utiliza- 
tion and agricultural production, and the outlook for further changes in 
each region. (Baker.) 

A. E. 214 s. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living (3) 

—Two double lectures. 

A presentation of the trends in population and migration for the nation 
and by states; of trends in exports of farm products and their regional sig- 
nificance; of trends in diet and in per capita consumption of non-food prod- 
ucts; followed by a consideration of the factors that appear likely to influ- 
ence these trends in the future; and of the outlook for commercial as con- 
trasted with a more self-sufficing agriculture. (Baker.) 

A. E. 215 s. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (2) — Tw^o lectures. 

An appraisal of agricultural cooperation as a means of improving the 
financial status of farmers. More specifically, the course includes a critical 
analysis and appraisal of specific types and classes of cooperatives. 

(Poffenberger.) 



245 



I 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Professors Cotterman, Carpenter; Assistant Professor Ahalt. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 101 f, 102 s. Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (1, 1) — One 

laboratory. Cannot be used for graduate credit. 

This course is designed to assist the student in relating the learning ac- 
quired in the several departments of the University with the problems of 
doing and demonstrating which he faces in the field and in the classroom 
as a teacher. It aims particularly to check his training in the essential 
practicunis and demonstrations in vocational agriculture, and to introduce 
him to the conditions under which such activities must be carried on in the 
patronage areas and laboratories of vocational departments. Laboratory 
practice in deficiencies required. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 107 s. Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 
Students (3) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. Required of juniors in Rural 
Life and Agricultural Education. Elective for others. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

(Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 109 f. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s; A. H. 2 f ; D. H. 1 s; P. H. 1; Soils 1; 
Agron. 1, 2; Hort. 1, 11; Agr. Engr. 101, 104; A. E. 2, 102, 10i8 f. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of voca- 
tional agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farm- 
ing programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer work, 
and objectives and methods in all-day, continuation, and adult instruction. 

(Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 110 s. Rural Life and Education (3) — Three lectures. 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural communi- 
ties, stressing an analysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of 
normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the con- 
ditioning effects of economic differences. The course is designed especially 
for persons who expect to be called upon to assist in shaping educational 
and other community programs for rural people. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 112 s. Departmental Organization and Administration (1) — One 

lecture. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s, 109 f. 

The work of this course is based upon the construction and analysis of 
administrative programs for high school departments of vocational agri- 
culture. As a project, each student prepares and analyzes in detail an admin- 
istrative program for a specific school. Investigations and reports. 

(Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 114 s. Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools (1) — One 
lecture. 

Objectives in the teaching of farm shop and farm mechanics; contempo- 
rary developments; determination of projects; shop management; shop pro- 

246 



crrams; methods of teaching; equipment; materials of construction; special 
projects. (Carpenter.) 

R. Ed. 120 y. Practice Teaching (5 to 6)— First semester, 2 credits. 
Second semester, 3 to 4 credits. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 s, 109 f. 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student in this course is 
required to analyze and prepare special units of subject matter, plan lessons, 
and teach in cooperation with the critic teacher, exclusive of observation, 
not less than 125 clock hours of day class vocational agriculture and related 
subjects. A sixth semester hour may be earned by supervising home 
projects in the field not less than twenty-five clock hours, or teaching the 
equivalent time in part-time or evening classes, or any combination of these 
three types of work. (Cotterman.) 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201 f, 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3, 3)— Prerequisite, R. Ed. 
110 s or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of public education as compon- 
ent parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and human de- 
velopment. Discussions, assigned readings, and major term papers in the 
field of the student's special interest. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f, 208 s. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Science, 

and Shop (2, 2). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. The three 
phases of the vocational teacher's program— all day, part-time, and adult 
work— receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251. Research — Credit hours according to work done. Students 
must be especially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit the 
research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter; Associate Professor Krewatch; Assistant 

Professor Burkhardt. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 101 f. Farm Machinery (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse- and tractor- 
drawn machinery. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual 
machines, their calibration, adjustment, and repair. (Carpenter.) 

247 



Agr. Engr. 102 s. Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the various types of in- 
ternal combustion engines used in farm practice. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 104 f. Farm Mechanics (1) — One laboratory. 

This course consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm shop and 
farm equipment repair and construction projects. It is offered primarily 
for prospective teachers of vocational agriculture. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 105 f. Farm Buildings (2) — Two lectures. 
A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 107 s. Farm Drainage (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain- 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, methods of 
construction, and the use of engineering instruments. A smaller amount 
of time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the laws relating 
thereto. (Carpenter.) 

AGRONOMY 
Division of Crops 

Professor- Kemp; Associate Professor Eppley; Mr. A. W. Woods. 

Agron. 1 f. Cereal Crop Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
History, distribution, adaptation, culture, improvement, and uses of cereal, 
forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. 

Agron. 2 s. Forage Crop Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Continuation of Agron. 1 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. 102 f. Technology of Crop Quality (1-3) — Students, other than 
those specializing in agronomy, may register for either portion of the course. 
Part one (Grading Farm Crops) — one lecture; one laboratory. The market 
classifications and grades as recommended by the United States Bureau of 
Markets, and practice in determining grades. Part two (Grain, Hay, and 
Seed Judging and Identification) — one laboratory. (Eppley.) 

Agron. 103 f. Crop Breeding (2) — Prerequisite, Zool. 104 f. 
The principles of breeding as applied to field crops, and methods used in 
crop improvement. (Kemp) 

Agron. 104 f, 105 s. Selected Crop Studies (1-2, 1-2) — Credit according to 
work done. 

This course is intended primarily to give an opportunity for advanced 
study of crop problems or crops of special interest to students. (Staff,) 

248 



Agron. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (2)-Two lee- 

tures. , 

^ consideration of agricultural investigation methods at the variou 
experiment stations, and the standardization of such methods. (Staff.) 

For Graduates ' 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10)— Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. „ - , . -11 i„ 
The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103 f . bu will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range wUl be allowed m 
choice of material to suit special cases. ^ 
Aeron. 203 y. Seminar (2)— One report period each week. 
t£ seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scientific 
publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. ^ftan.; 
Agron. 209. Research (6-8)-Credit determined by work accomplished^ 
With the approval of the head of the department, .f "dent will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list ol 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. it'^an., 

Division of Soils 
Professor Thomas; Dr. Madigan, Dr. Bodily. 
Soils 1 f and s. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5)-Three lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Geol. 1 f, Chem. 1 y, 12 Ay. Lectures may be taken 
without the laboratory. 

A study of the principles involved in soil formation and classification. 
The influence of physical, chemical, and biological activities on plant growth, 
together with the use of fertilizers in the maintenance of soil fertility. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Soils 102 s. Soil Management (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the soil fertiUty systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems^nd the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. (Thomas.) 
Soils 103 f. Soil Geography (3)— Two lectures; one discussion period. 
A study of the genealogy of soils, the principal soil regions of North 
America, and the classification of soils. Field trips will be made to empha- 
size certain important phases of the subject. (i nomas.) 
Soils 112 s. Soil Conservation (3)— Three lectures. 

A study of the factors relating to soil preservation, including the influence 
of cropping and soil management practices, fertilizer treatments, construc- 
tive and destructive agencies of man and nature on conservation, history of 

research in soil erosion, and field trips to soil demonstration areas. 

(Thomas.) 

249 



For Graduates 
Soils 201. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 
Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. (Staff.) 

Soils 202 y. Soil Science (3-5i f, 2 s) — Three lectures, two laboratories 
first semester; two lectures, second semester. Prerequisites, geology, soils 
and organic and quantitative chemistry. The lectures and laboratory may 
be taken separately. 

A discussion of the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved 
in the development of soils with special emphasis on soil water, organic 
matter, structure colloids, base exchange, and plant food deficiencies in 
their relation to soil fertility. The laboratory involves a study of the 
methods used in soil investigation. (Thomas.) 

Soils 204 s. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of 
organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Bodily.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Leinbach, Meade; Lecturer Finney; Mr. Outhouse, 

Mr. Hensel. 

A. H. 2 f. Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (3) — Three laboratories. 

The relation of livestock to agriculture and the nation's welfare. A study 
of the types, breeds and market classes of beef cattle, sheep, hogs, and 
horses; systems of livestock farming; functions of shows, sales, breed and 
livestock associations; general problems in breeding, feeding, and manage- 
ment. Practice will be given in the selection, fitting, showing of livestock; 
and livestock farm analysis. 

A. H. 51 s. Livestock Judging (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 2 f. 

Training in the judgfing of beef cattle, sheep, hogs and draft horses. 
Occasional judging trips are made to farms where outstanding herds and 
flocks are Maintained. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 102 f. Feeds and Feeding (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Chem. ly, 12 Ay. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock; feeding standards; the 
calculation and compounding of rations. (Meade.) 

250 



A. H. 103 s. Principles of Breeding (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Prerequisite, Zool. 104 f. . , . ,. ^ Viprpditv variation, selection. 

The practical aspects of -^-^^' ^^1'^^^'^:':^^'^^, consid;red. 
development, systems of breeding, and pedigree wor (Meade.) 

, „ 104 f Sheep Production (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, A H. 2 f . 

piples 'underlying the practical and ^'^^^^'^^X:^^, 
including a study of the breeds and their -^aptab 1 ty Breeding ^^^^^ 
Ind management of purebred and commercial flocks, the ^^^^^^^^^ ^ 

Th. 105 s. Livestock Management (2)-T.-o laboratories. Prerequisite. 

'Ti'ugh livestock management course ^^^-^-JJ^^^cf ^^ie^^^^^^ 

with the practical handling and -^^^ll^^J^.X^teAin^, fitting, and 
given actual practice and traming in ^^^^ ™^'"^™^' (Outhouse.) 

preparation of animals for show and work purposes. 
A. H. 106 f. Meat and Meat Products (l)-One laboratory. Prerequisite, 

' A^Irse designed to give the student information on t, P~g^^^^^ 

handling of the nation's meat supply f J^-f;^*^;;4:rll\';%Uucts. 
and structural differences -^-h affect the ^alue of m ^^^^^ 

Numerous trips are made to packmg houses ana ^Leinbach, Hensel.) 

A H 107 s. Pork Production ' (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, A. H 2 f. 
PHnJiples underlying the practical ^d econo^^^^^^^^^ 

breeding, feeding, and management of purebred ana ^Leinbach.) 

breeds of swine and their adaptability. 
A H 108 f Advanced Livestock Judging (2)-Two laboratories. Pre- 

course are chosen to represent the University ^^""^ ^^^^^^^^^ Leinbach.) 
livestock judging contests. 
A. H. 109 s. Draft Horse Production (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

^ Prindpies underlying the practical and economical f "^'^^"^JJ/';^^^^^^^^^^ 
draft horses, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability. (Meade.) 

A. H. 110 f. Beef Cattle Production (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

"^Prindples underlying the practical and economical production of bee^^ 
cattle, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability, breedmg, feed 

251 



L^VettaUr^^'"^"* °' ^""-^'^^^ ^"-^ -—^^1 •'erds; the feedi„, ,, 

A H 119 4^ f • . , , (Leinbach.) 

A. «. 112 f. Livestock Markets and Marketinor r9^ t,,. i .. 
reqursite, A. H. 2 f. inarKeimg (2)— Two lectures. Pre. 

tm^'hT °' ''*•"'"'"• ^tsorpllon, .„d metabolism of nutTOnte- „,„ ■ 

tional balances: naturp nf nnfY-if,-^^ ^ • iiutnenrs, nutn- 

and reproduction '^"t"taonal requirements for growth, production, 

A. H. 116 f. Light Horse Production (l)_One lecture. '^"^''^ 

nefs 'of each A Sn^n'^"'' '''''' "'* ^"P'^^^'^ '^'^ ^he types and useful- 

..™?z::°r„,\vSh."rot",:™ ■ "■ "" '• ■"■»" » • =">' «' »• 

in. co„.„, o, ..a.f4re.fS LT/fS^S SL'^f-^:;^ ^, 

(Brueckner, Finney, Outhouse.) 
For Graduates 
A. H. 201 f or s. Special Problems in Animal Husbandrv t9 1^ n a: 
given m proportion to amount of work completed "^ (2-3)-Credit 

A TT « « * (Staff.) 

A. H. 202 f or s. Seminar (1) 

presentation hefore^aS ^J::X1^Z:'''' ''''' ^^^^^^ ^ip, 
actt of work dtT"'"''"''' '"^ ""' '^^^^^^^'^ ^^ ^^^ — t and char- 

reSdt%rsr:ri:j,a^'L'"\"' ^'^ '^^^'^'"^"*' ^^^^^-^^ -» "« 

carry the sa^e to L^^irS^ ^ ^ L^-^nr o^/fS 

104^f"A.H'l03s^''""' ^"'^'""^ ^'^-^^-^ '-*--• P-equisiterzfol! 

rec^mbi^S tntmtaW TrV'^'T' ^'^^^^ ''' ^-«^^^>^. ™t- 
.en..eci.^ntr--far;:t^^^^^ 

252 ^^^^^'-^ 



A. H. 206 f, 207 s. Advanced Livestock Management (3, 3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

An intensive study of the newer developments in animal breeding, animal 
physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology and other closely allied fields 
as these apply to the management and commercial production of livestock. 

(Leinbach.) 

*ART 

Professor Marti; Associate Professor Highby. 

Art 1 f. Art in Ancient Civilization (2) — Two lectures. 

Egypt and the Ancient Near East up to 1000 B. C. A survey of the 
architectural remains, sculpture, painting, and minor arts of Egypt, 
Sumeria, Babylonia, and Palestine. Attention is given to the stages of 
human history and cultural development reflected in the archaeological and 
artistic remains. Lectures are freely illustrated by slides. (Not given in 
1941-42.) 

Art 2 f. Art in Ancient Civilization (2) — Two lectures. 

The Near East after 1000 B. C. and the Pre-Greek Civilization of the 
Eastern Mediterranean. Hittite, Assyrian, and Persian art are chiefly con- 
sidered in the first half of the course. The important archaeological dis- 
coveries of Heinrich Schliemann and Sir Arthur Evans at Troy, the Greek 
mainland, and in Crete are then treated in detail. Conducted with the use 
of slides. 

Art 3 s. Art in Classical Civilization (2) — Two lectures. 

Greek art: Architecture, sculpture, and vase-painting. The course covers 
the archaeic period, treats in detail the highly developed art-forms of 
the Golden Age, and shows the main trends in the late Greek or Hellenistic 
era. Emphasis is placed on the interrelation between motifs as they appear 
on art objects and in Greek literature. Lectures illustrated by slides. 

Art 4 s. Art in Classical Civilization (2) — Two lectures. 

Monuments of Ancient Rome : A survey of the architectural remains and 
decorative art of the Romans. The related Etruscan art development will 
also be briefly considered, as well as the remains of Pompeii and important 
outlying sites in the Roman world. The study of the monuments in Rome 
itself will be carried to the early Christian period. Illustrated with slides. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 

Art 11 s. Medieval Art (2) — Two lectures. 

An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. 
European architecture, sculpture, and painting, from the third century 
A. D. to the Renaissance, studied by means of slides. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

Art 12 s. Modem Art (2) — Two lectures. 

Similar to Art 11 s. European art from the Renaissance to the present. 
Illustrated lectures. Occasional visits to the museums in Washington. 



* For other conrses in Art see page 335. 



253 



Art 21 f. German Art (2)— Two lectures. 

A survey of the development of German architecture, sculpture, painting 
and graphic art, from the time of Charlemagne to the early twentieth cen 
tury Similar developments in German literature will be considered A 
knowledge of German is desirable, though not a prerequisite. 

Art 22 f. French Art (2)— Two lectures. 

Similar to Art 21 f. French art from Charlemagne to the present. Simi- 
lar developments in French literature will be considered. A knowledge of 
French is desirable, though not a prerequisite. 

Art 23 f. Italian Art (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the development of Italian art since the third century A D 
with special emphasis on the Renaissance and the Baroque. Reference will 
be made to Italian history and literature. Occasional visits to the Mellon 
Gallery. 

Art 51 f. Principles of Art Appreciation (2)-Two lectures. Open to 
upper classmen and by special permission to sophomores. 

A course designed to help those who seek the proper approach to figurative 
art, and the best enjoyment of it. Lectures illustrated with slides showing 
sample works from the fields of architecture, sculpture, painting and 
graphic art. Class discussion of principles. Occasional visits to the mu- 
seums in Washington. 

The increasing art activities in our schools confront teachers with the 
task of guiding their pupils to an intelligent appreciation of contemporary 
creations as well as of older works of art. A reasonable amount of time 
will be given to the pedagogical application of the principles studied in 
this course. ("Not given in 1941-42.) 

ASTRONOMY 

Mr. N. a. Gilbert. 

Astr. 101 y. Astronomy (4)-Two lectures. Elective, but open only to 
juniors and seniors. 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. (Gilbert.) 

BACTERIOLOGY* 

Professors James, Black; Assistant Professor Faber; Dr. Bodily 
Dr. Speck, Mr. Nolte, Mr. Snyder, Mr. McBee, Mr. Harvey, 

Mrs. Goldsmith. 

A. Bacteriology 

Bact. 1 f and s. General Bacteriology (4)-Two lectures; two labora- 
tones. Sophomore standing. 

mpthnrf ^'T7 ^^1 bacteriology; microscopy; morphology; classification; 
metabolism ; bacterial enzymes; application to water, milk, foods, and soils; 

be^gwL'duXe tl^e^enin'/'f ""Z""' ''' ''''°'^' under^aduates and graduates may 
charged * ^ ""' ''^^"" ^' "'^^''^'" "^^«^«^- ^ «P«"*1 '«« " 

254 



relationship to disease and to the industries. Preparation of culture media; 
sterilization and disinfection; microscopic and macroscopic examination of 
bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and identification of bacteria; effects of 
physical and chemical agents. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 1 A f and s. General Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Sophomore 
standing. 
This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 1. 

Bact. 2 s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — ^Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore standing. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathological ma- 
terial; effects of pathogens and their products. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 2 A s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and sophomore standing. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2 s. 

Bact. 3 s. Household Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; their relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; 
infection and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 4 s. Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology (1) — One lecture. Senior 
year. Engineering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sewage disposal. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101 f. Milk Bacteriology (4) — T\\^o lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

The sources and development of bacteria in milk; milk fermentation; sani- 
tary production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation 
of milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; the bacteriological control of milk supplies and 
plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dairy Products Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Bact. 101 f desirable. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
fermented milks, starters, butter, ice cream, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; occa- 
sional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Black.) 

255 



Bact. in f. Food Bacteriology (3)— One leptnr^. +«,^ i u 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registratiof limited ' *^" laboratories. 

Bacteria, yeasts, and molds in foods; relation to nreservatio,, =.„ , . 
age; sanitary production and handling- foodTnfe.tfo.fII?. "P""' 
Microbiological examination of normaf knd spot/Ci 2ctl°^ 
preservation. Laboratory fee, $7.00. lactors affecting 

bage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Standfrd tethS's fo^eximlr 
significance of the coli-aerogenes group. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Black ) 

tension; gas analysis; special culture methods- fi ItrS.- ^t '- ^'' 

niques and preparation of dye solutions; Advanced stdT i'™!?/""^ *"'■ 

tion. Laboratory fee $7 00 ^ reagent prepara- 

R , . . (Bodily) 

disease. Laboratory fee, $8.00. "actena and diagnosis of 

Bact. H6 s. Epidemiology (2)-Two lectures. Prereauisite^ R«,.f ^ !L 
credit or registration in Bact. 2 s or 2 As. ^'^erequisites, Bact. 1 and 

Epidemiology of important infectious disease.^ inri.,^.-^ v.- . 

u X -.-- (Faber.) 

:rBtf .'j^^ ^sr. :;tr;s^. -r""™^' -- «=s^ 

P (James.) 

Bact. 118 s. Systematic Bacteriology (2)--Two Ippfnvoc t> 
Bacteriology, 10 hours. lectures. Prerequisite, 

coS^'^oY nle^'ltre-^'rf '*r' ^^"^^''^ relationships; international 

OffeL alte~years ' ""'*"" ^' '' ^''^'=*^ classification. 

(James.) 
256 



Bact. 123 f, 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (2, 2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 2 s and any other courses needed for the projects. 
Registration limited. 

This course is arranged as an introduction to research. Subject matter 
suitable to the needs of the particular student or problem will be arranged. 
The problems are to be selected, outlined, and investigated in consultation 
with and under the supervision of a member of the department. Results 
are to be presented in the form of a thesis. No graduate credit for students 
majoring in Bacteriology. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Staff.) 

Bact. 125 f. Clinical Methods (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 
2 s or consent of instructor. 

Methods for microscopic examination of blood; bacteriological examina- 
tion of sputum, feces and spinal fluids; microscopic and routine chemical 
methods for examination of urine. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Faber.) 

Bact. 131 f, 132 s. Journal Club (1, 1) — Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 2 s. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticised by 
members of the class and staff. No graduate credit for students majoring 
in Bacteriology. (Black.) 

For Graduates 

Bact. 205 f. Research Methods (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, Bac- 
teriology, 6 hours. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation of 
papers; research institutions, laboratory design, equipment and supplies; 
academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 207 f, 208 s. Special Topics (1, 1) — Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 

10 hours. 

Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 211 f. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Bact. 
1, Chem. 12 y, or equivalent. 

Growth, nutrition, physiological inter- relationships; bacterial enzymes; 
T'espiration; fermentations; chemical activities of micro-organisms; indus- 
trial fermentations. (Black.) 

Bact. 221. Research (1-6) — Credit will be determined by the amount and 
character of the work accomplished. Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 2 s and any 
other courses needed for the particular project. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. I^aboratory 
fee, $3.00 per credit hour. (Staff.) 

Bact. 231 f, 232 s. Seminar (2, 2)— Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 10 hours. 

Discussions and reports prepared by the student on current research, 

selected subjects, and recent advances in bacteriology. (James.) 

267 



B. Food Technology* 
F. Tech. 1 s. Introduction to Food Technology (1) — One lecture. 
Discussions of the general phases of study comprising food technology. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
F. Tech. 100 f. Food Microscopy (2) — Two laboratories. 

Microscopical analysis of foods following the methods used in the Federal 
Government and other agencies. Studies of the structural composition of 
agricultural and manufactured foods. Use of microscopic tests in factory 
control and analyses. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (James.) 

F. Tech. 108 s. Preservation of Poultry Products (2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Studies of the microbiology of poultry, alive and during storage; micro- 
biology of shell eggs, fresh and during storage; microbiology of frozen and 
dried eggs. This is taught in cooperation with department of Poultry 
Husbandry. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (James, Gwin.) 

F. Tech. 110 f. Regulatory Control (1) — One lecture and demonstration. 

Methods followed in the control of foods in interstate and intrastate 

commerce. Consideration of laboratory basis of standards of control. 

(James.) 

F. Tech. 120 s* Food Sanitation (2) — Lecture, laboratory, and field work. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 111 f or equivalent. Enrollment limited, with prefer- 
ence given to students majoring in this field. 

Principles of sanitation in food manufacture and distribution; methods 
of control of sanitation in commercial canning, pickling, bottling, preserv- 
ing, refrigeration, dehydration, etc. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (James.) 

F. Tech. 130 y. Technology Conference (2) — One lecture. 
Reports and discussions of current developments in the field of food 
technology. (James.) 

BOTANY ' 

Professors Appleman, Norton, Jehle, Bamford; Assistant Professors 
Brown, Woods, Shirk; Mr. Jones, Miss Kemp, Mr. Haney, 

Mr. Pierce, Mr. Stewart. 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

Hot. 1 f. General Botany (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject. The chief aim in this course is to present fundamental biological 
principles rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The 
student is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods, and the value of its results. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

*One or more of the scheduled courses for advanced undergraduates and ^aduates may 
be given during the evening, if a sufficient number of students register. For further ;«• 
formation, address the Department of Bacteriology. A special fee is charged. 

258 



Bot. 2 s. Introductory Botany (3)-Two lectures; one demonstration 

''rcour^^'^imilar to Bot. 1 f, except that only one demonstration or lab- 
oratory period is required. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Bot. 3 s. General Botany (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f or 2 s. 

A continuation of Bot. 1 f. A brief study of algae, fungi, liverworts 
mosses, ferns and their relatives, and the seed plants. The evolutiona 
relationships of these groups is emphasized. The identification of loca 
plants by use of manuals and keys is introduced. Several field trips will 
be arranged. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 

requisite, Bot. If. • xu 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are required. Laboratory fee, $3m 

Bot. 103 f or s. Plant Taxonomy (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. 

Prerequisite, Bot. 3 s. , , . . , „,v.;«v. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles on which 
classification is based; methods of taxonomic research in Aeld. garden, 
herbarium, and library. The identification of plants is continued Each stu- 
dent works on a special problem during some of the laboratory time. 

(Brown, Norton.) 

Bot. 104 f. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3)— One lecture; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Bot. 103. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Emphasis on the identification and recognition 
of the Compositae and other species blooming in the fall. Each student 
works on a special problem during the laboratory time. (Norton.; 

Bot. 105 s. Economic Plants (2)— Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
A collection of plant products from markets, stores, factories, etc., is made 
by students to illustrate the useful plants both in the natural forni and as 
, , (Norton.) 

used by man. 

Bot. 106 f. History and Philosophy of Botany (1)— One lecture. 

Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Norton.) 

Bot. 107 f or s. Plant Microtechnique (2)— Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. If. . 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent micro- 

259 



scope slides of plant materials. Practice with the most generally used 
techniques on a variety of tissues. An opportunity for the student to 
make a private collection of several hundred slides. Laboratory fee, $3.00 

(Brown.) 
Bot. 108 f and s. Undergraduate Seminar (1). 

Discussion of current literature, problems, and progress in botany. For 
undergraduate majors and minors; no graduate credit given. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201 s. Cytology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1 f, Zool. 104 f, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 
The major portion is devoted to chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and 
the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity and evolution. 
The laboratory involves the preparation, examination, and illustration of 
cytological material by current methods. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Bamford.) 

Bot. 202 s. Plant Morphology (2) — Two lectures and demonstrations. 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f, 3 s, 101 f. 

A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to their phylogeny and development. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

(Bamford.) 

Bot. 204. Research. — Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 

Note: See announcement on page 390 for further botany courses given 
at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

B. Plant Pathology 

Pit. Path. 1 f. Diseases of Plants (3-4) — Two lectures; one or two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f or equivalent. 

An introductory study in the field, in the laboratory, and in the litera- 
ture, of symptoms, causal agents, and control measures of plants. The 
work is so arranged that a student may devote part of his time to the 
important diseases of the plants in which he is particularly interested. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pit. Path. 101 f, 102 s. Diseases of Special Crops (3, 3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f or equivalent. 

First semester, diseases of fruits and ornamentals; second semester, 
diseases of garden and field crops. (With consent of department, student 
may register and receive credit for one semester only.) Intended for 
students of plant pathology, horticulture, agronomy, entomology, who wish 

260 



fo obtain more detailed information on diseases of special crops than is 
vaiSe in Pit. Path. 1 f. Lectures are given by different members of the 

^aff who are specialists in the fields covered. 

staff wno are y (Woods, Jehle, McClellan, Cox, Jeffers.) 

Pit Path. 103 f, 104 8. Research Methods. (1, l-2)-0ne conference; 
laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f or 
equivalent. Graduate credit not given. 

Students who are interested in obtaining advanced training m basic 
technics such as preparation of phytopathological culture media, cultural 
ShTds, isolation of pathogens, and other essential procedures, should 
Agister for two credits in 104 s. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per ^emester^^^^ 

Pit. Path. 106 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological ^^^^^^^^^^ j^^^^^^/^^^ 
investigations. ' 

Pit. Path. 108 f. Mycology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. If. . , ./5 i-'^^o 

An introductory study of the morphology, life histories classifications 
and economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Norton, Woods.) 

For Graduates 
Pit. Path. 201 s. Virus Diseases (2-3)— Two lectures; or two lectures, 
one laboratory. 

Consideration of the physical, chemical, and physiological aspects of 
plant viruses and plant virus diseases. The laboratory credit 's earned by 
partially independent work. The instructor should be consulted before 
registering for laboratory credit. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Woods.) 

Pit. Path. 203 f. Non-Parasitic Diseases (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due 
to climate, soil, gases, dust, sprays, fertilizers, improper treatment, and 
other detrimental conditions. (Not given in 1941-1942.) 

Pit. Path. 205. Research— Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

Pit. Path. 206 f. Plant Disease Control (3)— Three lectures. 
An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant dis- 
ease control. A good general knowledge of elementary plant Pathology 
is presupposed. (Jeffers, Jehle, McClellan, Cox, Woods.) 

Pit. Path. 209 f. Advanced Seminar (1)— One two-hour meeting, bi- 
weekly. 
Attention is given to the advanced technical literature of P^J't^P^^^Jj/- 

261 



C. Plant Physiology 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 101 f. Plant Physiology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories 
Prerequisite, Bot. If. ^^' 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim m this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. ,p^^ ^\ 

(Brown.) 

Pit. Phys. 102 s. Plant Ecology (3)— Two lectures; one field trip. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f. ^ ^ 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected 
Students pay cost of field trips. (Brown ^" 

For Gradua.tes 

Pit. Phys. 201 s. Plant Biochemistry (4)— Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. It deals with the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and with the important processes in plant life 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not given in 1941-1942.) (Appleman, Shirk.)' 

Ro^^'; 7vn 'p^ ^ in/J""* Biophysics (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1 f. Pit. Phys. 101 f, or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
209^^ f P^oc^sses. Students electing this course should elect Pit. Phys. 

(Appleman, Shirk.) 

Pit Phys. 202 B f. Biophysical Methods (2)-Two laboratories. Labora- 
tory fee, $3. ^gj^.^^^ 

Pit Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2)-0ne lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f, Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, identification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found m plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use of 
these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. .^ . 
' ^ (Brown.) 

1942^' ^^^^' ^^^ ^' ^'''''^^^ ^""^ Development (2)— (Not given in 1941- 

( Appleman.) 
Pit. Phys. 205 f or s. Mineral Nutrition Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 

subject. /A 1 ^ 

(Appleman.) 

262 



Pit. Phys. 206. Research. — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Staff.) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONt 

PROFESSORS Stevens, Wedeberg, Gruchy; Lecturer Riggleman; Associate 
Professors Marshall, Bennett, Wyckoff; Assistant Professors 
Gay, Cissel, Fisher, Kirkpatrick, Clark; Mr. Reid, Mr. Mullin, - 
Mr. Shirley, Mr. Benton, Mr. Peregoff. 

Some of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 
in alternate years, whenever prospective enrollments therein do not justify 
repeating annually. Such courses are indicated by an asterisk. 

A. Accounting 
Acct. 51 y. Principles of Accounting (8) — Three lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

This course has two aims, namely, to give the prospective business man 
an idea of accounting as a means of control, and to serve as a basic course 
for advanced and specialized accounting. A study is made of methods and 
procedures of accounting in the sole proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Acct. 101 f, 102 s. Advanced Accounting (3, 3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Acct. 51 y. 

Advanced theory and problems in connection with the following: work- 
ing papers; statements; corporations; actuarial science; cash; accounts 
receivable; notes and acceptances; inventories; consignments; installment 
sales; tangible fixed assets; intangible assets; investments; liabilities; funds 
and reserves; correction of statements and books; comparative statements; 
the analysis of working capital; miscellaneous ratios; profit and loss 
analysis; and statement of application of funds. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 121 f. Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Acct. 
51 y. 

The need and value of cost accounting; cost systems and cost classifica- 
tions; classification of accounts; subsidiary ledgers and cost records; outline 
of specific order cost accounting; accounting for material; material storage 
and consumption; valuation of materials; accounting for labor costs; special 
features of accounting for labor cost; accounting for manufacturing ex- 
pense; distribution of service department costs; distribution of manufac- 
turing expense to production; control of distribution cost; monthly closing 
entries. Theory, problems, and practice set. (Cissel.) 

tSee also related courses in Economics, in Agricultural Economics, especially A. E. 1 f, 
2 s, 102 s. 104 s, 106 s, 109 y, 210 s, 211 f, 212 f, 213 s, 214 s, and 215 s; and in 
Psychology, especially Psych. 4 f, 141 s, and 160 f. 

263 



Acct. 122 s. Advanced Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Acct. 121 f. 

Preparation of analytical statements; comparative statements; process 
cost accounting; standard costs; analysis of variances; accounting for 
standard costs; estimating cost systems; special considerations; arguments 
for and against including interest on investments; graphic charts; uniform 
methods. A discussion of advanced theory and problems. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 14d. Apprenticeship in Public Accounting. (0) — Open only to 
seniors in the upper ten per cent of the class. Prerequisites, Acct. 171 f, 
172 s, (credit or concurrent registration). 

A one month's apprenticeship with nationally known firms from about 
January 15 to February 15. 

Acct. 161 f. Income Tax Procedure (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Acct. 102 s. 

Income tax in theory and practice. Selected cases and problems illus- 
trating the definition of taxable income of individuals, corporations, and 
estates. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 171 f, 172 s. Auditing Theory and Practice (2, 2) — One lecture; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, 
the preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 181 f, 182 s. Specialized Accounting (3, 3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Acct. 102 s. 

Accounting for partnerships; ventures; insurance; receiverships; 
branches; consolidations; mergers; foreign exchange; estates and trusts; 
budgets; public accounts; savings banks; commercial banks; national 
banks; building and loan associations; stock brokerage; consignments; 
department stores; real estate; extractive industries; hotels; government; 
electric utilities; and others. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 186 s. C. P. A. Problems (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of the instructor. 

This course is arranged to coordinate all previous work in accounting 
with special emphasis on the solution of practical C. P. A. problems and 
the discussion of C. P. A. theory. (Wedeberg.) 

For Graduates ^ 

Acct. 228 f, 229 s. Accounting Systems (3, 3) — Prerequisites, Acct. 
181 f, 182 s. Students who do not have these prerequisites must attend 
all classes in Acct. 181 f, 182 s concurrently. 

A discussion of the more difficult problems in connection with the indus- 
tries covered in Acct. 181 f, 182 s. Also includes the statement of 
affairs; realization and liquidation account; parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting; and financing. (Wedeberg.) 

264 ^ 



. . 2^8 f 299 s Special Problems in Accounting (3) -Prerequisites, 
pXnS courses in t'he field of specialization, and permission of the 

'"tvettTgations of specific problems, aJ directed by individual conf^^^^^ 
. whpS^^^^ The subjects selected for investigation may be closely 
:i'';ir« ™.. n:t b.\he subi,.. discus,^, in the --.^^ -^«; 
thesis. 

B. Finance^ 

Fin 53 s. Money and Banking (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s. 
An analysis of the basic principles of money and credit; the history of 
money; the operations of the commercial banking system. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Fin. 105 f.* Consumer Financing (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, 

or 57, Fin. 53 s. 

The economics of installment selling; methods of financing the '="«'•' 
and operations of the personal finance company. 

Fin 106 f. Public Finance (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, or 57. 

Thfi nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, taxation, and 
bu'dStinrSpelia? emphasi's on the practical, social, and econo«ob- 

lems involved. c-i ^ f;9 

Fin. Ill f. Corporation Finance (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, 

or 57, Acct. 51 y. . • ^ t-.xt.o* nf se- 

The organization and financing of -J^-^^^^^^'J^'^^ IScontrd. 
curities and their utilization in apportionmg ™<=°'"^' "^J' ^f^„ p^o- 
Problems of capitalization, refunding, ^^fl^^ZT^'^nrSL 
curement of capital. Public regulation of the sale of -<=-'g*;^^-^^^^ ^^^^.^^ 

Fin 115 f. Investments (3)— Prerequisite, Fin. Ill f. 

nn. 11& in> Classes of investments, govern- 

Sources of information for the investor Classes oti ^^Uroads, 

ment bonds, municipals, real estate "'"rtgag^, public utiM , ^^^.^^ 

industrial securities, movement of security P^-^^^^ ^"f ^^^^ „,,ds of the 

statements, adapting the investment policy to the V^'^^'^^^^^^^^ j^^uin.) 

investor. „ ri .r ro - 

Fin 116 s * Investment Banking (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 61 f, 52 . 
Hn. lib s. in „nprations of investment banking institu- 

A study of the ^"'J^tions and op^^rations of ^^^.^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

tions and their "l^^^'^^J-'Ji^r.f Lestment banking. (Not offered 
emphasis on the trends and problems oi (Gruchy.) 

in 1941-42.) 

. . in Agricultural Economicg, especially A. E. 104 8, 210 ». 

tSee also related courses in Agricultural 

and 211 1. 265 



m 1941-42.) ^ «egulation of the exchanges. (Not offered 

(Gruchy.) 

sit2:Eeltl tsTTor ^Z' S^r'"'" ^"^^ ^'•-"^ (3)-Prere,u, 

The incorporation, orsamyafim. „ ^ 

of departn^ents and probfe^ o^ e^sti TeC""" t •'^"'^^- ^"^^o- 
governmental regulation. customer relations. Bank legislation and 

V ,n (Gruchy.) 

*'"• ^25 f-* Credits and Collections rs^ P 

Nature and function of credit aT ^'^-'^'■^'•^•'"'^'*^' ^-t- 51 y. 

of credit investigation and aSys" ^e 1 w* r*'™'"^"*^- Principles 

aiysis. The work of the credit manager. 

Fin. 129 <! * Tn»«- *• . „ (Bennett.) 

Fin. 53? " I"t-„at.o„a. Finance (3)_Prere.uisites, Econ. 51 f. 52 s, 

i^y':^.:;Z7roti:::i rtej-^ti '"*^™^*^'^"^' -^-^^ ^^ -e. 

lem and the Bank for InternatiorSe'iTtr '"''■''*^- ''''' ^'"'^ P-"" 

Fin 143 f p (Gay.) 

sites. Econ. 51 f, 52T ' '''"'"^ ^"^ ^•^''^^^ I"«"rance (2)-Prerequi. 

rists -7cUl.tl:^cov^^"esTt;^^^^^^^^^^ --ance; liability 

insurance, coverages. Analys s of the inl "^ *'°"^"' ^"'^ miscellaneous 

Fin 144 f T -r r^ (Fisher.) 

p. (Fisher.) 

credl^r lLu^r:nt';eS2r1n'Sf 53 T ^7"^ (2)-Prere.uisites, 
courses needed for proper understanding S ^" .-^"^ specialized finance 
Fin. 105 f. 106 f, 111 f, 115 f, lis s "ml "J.'T^o"'' '"^'"^^«' ^-^ as 

151 s. Consent of the instructor^'necessarr'this w ifn^ l'' '■' ''' '' "^ 

^'iry, tms will not be given unless 

266 



the position arranged for a given registrant in a commercial business is of 
such a nature that effective experience can be obtained. 

This practice in actual work in an approved financial institution under 
guidance may be arranged for any period of the year. The method of 
individual conferences reports, and supervised collateral reading is utilized. 

(Gruchy.) 

Fin. 151 s.* Real Estate (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, or 57. 

The principles and practices involved in owning, operating, merchandis- 
ing, leasing, and appraising real estate and real estate investments. 

(Bennett.) 

Fin. 199 s. Financial Analysis and Control (3) — Prerequisites, senior 
standing or consent of instructor, and Fin. Ill f . 

Internal administration of a business from the viewpoint of the chief 
executive. Departmentalization and functionalization, anticipation and bud- 
getary control of sales, purchases, production, inventory, expenses, and 
assets. The coordination of financial administration. Policy determina- 
tion, analysis, and testing. (Stevens, Fisher.) 

For Graduates 

Fin. 229 f or s. Special Problems in Finance (1-3) — Prerequisites, grad- 
uate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Stevens, Gruchy.) 

C. Marketing, Merchandising, and Sales Administration:]: 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Mkt. 101 f. Principles of Marketing (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, 
or 57. 

A study of the fundamental principles of assembling and dispersing 
manufactured goods; functions of wholesale and retail middlemen; branch 
house distribution; mail order and chain store distribution; price and price 
policies; cash and quality discounts; price maintenance; and a discussion 
of the problem of distribution costs. (Bennett.) 

Mkt. 106 s. Salesmanship (2) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s or 57, 
Mkt. 101 f or consent of the instructor. 

An analysis of the fundamental principles of salesmanship and the 
technique of personal presentation of ideas, goods, and services. Analysis 
of customer buying motives, habits, and sales reactions. (Kirkpatrick, Reid.) 



tSee also related courses in Agricultural Economics, especially A. E. 102 s, 103 f, 
105 8, 106 s, and 215 s; and in Psychology, especially Psych. 4 f, 140 f, and 141 s. 

267 



Mkt. 108 s. Salesmanagement (2)— PrereauUitA ^r-^Au 
registration in Mkt. 106 s. ^-rerequisite, credit or concurrent 

JttSr. r ^d^SL^artSTrizr ^ r- ^ 

equipping, stimulating, and supervising a sa'esTorce ''"^' ^^^f/; 

52To*r 5*? '* ^"""^'"^ "' Advertising (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 5l f, 

tatioTormedt T""" ^'"Pj!-"-^ of advertising; selection and adap. 

In^Jaiir UV^TieX IpprZSons'^'d"' ^"^^ -^^"^ 
effectiveness ^ojecuves, appropriations, and measurements of 

(MuUin.) 
orl?' "^ '•* ^"""^^'"8 Technique (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, 

Ascertaining sources of supply; substitutes; utilization of catalogues 
tion; P^^d '»f°™-«on, and cooperative purchasing; buyLg on specffica 
t^ons, sampling, testing, bargaining, terms, discounts relations with sales' 

Sat;ri«?"''"Tf*'r"""'^"'' ""'^ '"^rpretation of market and pr ce di I" 
Materials control. Interdepartmental and office organization. 

(Kirkpatrick.) 

(Kirkpatrick). 

Mkt. 149 f, 8, or S. Supervised Practice in Marketing (2^ p 

credit or concurrent registration in Mkt 101 flZT <2)-Prerequisites, 

ing course needed for proper underlnding of a paXurb "'' "'""'^t 
as Mkt. 106 s, 108 s 109 f 115 ., nr iio f / Particular business, such 

necessary; thi; will ^ott^en ^slh ' po'sS^^U^^^^ ^^ 

registrant in a commercial business is of such a nat^rJhft effe^T 

experience can be obtained. This internship may be arranged f 

penod of the year. ^ arranged for any 

Practice in actual marketing work under euidancf^ TJ,^ ^ ^i. j r 
individual conferences, reports, and supervised coirat"ar;eaJl:rg Tstnized 

(Stevens, Reid, Mullin.) 

Mkt. 199 s. Marketing Research and Market Policies (3)-Prereauisite 
nine credit hours in marketing. prerequisite, 

A study of the methods and problems involved in marketing research. 

(Stevens, Bennett.) 
268 



For Graduates 

Mkt. 229 f or s. Problems in Marketing (1-3) — Prerequisites, graduate 
standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and permission 
of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. (Staff.) 



D. Trade and Transportationt 

T. and T, 1 f. Economic Geography (3) — For freshmen, 
admitted with consent of instructor. 



Sophomores 



A study of economic and physical factors which are responsible for the 
location of industries and which influence the production, distribution, 
and exchange of goods throughout the world. This course deals pri- 
marily with regional geography; that is, the industrial development and 
commerce of the separate regions and countries with especial reference to 
the U. S. 

T. and T. 4 s. Development of Commerce and Industry (3) — For fresh- 
men. Sophomores admitted with consent of instructor. 

Ancient and medieval economic organization. The guild, domestic, and 
mercantile systems. The industrial revolution, laissez-faire, modem indus- 
trial and commercial organizations in Europe and America. Post-war re- 
strictions on commerce. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

T. and T. 101 f. Principles of Foreign Trade (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 
51 f, 52 s, T. and T. 1 f, 4 s, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the basic principles and practices of foreign trade, its develop- 
ment and significance in relation to domestic commerce and national develop- 
ment. Modem commercial policies, the tariff controversy, and the growth 
of economic nationalism. (Gay.) 

T. and T. 102 s. World Resources and Industries (3). 

Economic, political and geographic factors affecting the distribution of 
industries. Problems of industrial migration, land utilization, and regional 
planning. Effects of resource patterns upon current world economic and 
political developments. (Gay.) 

T. and T. Ill f. Principles of Transportation (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 
51 f, 52 s, or 57. 

A study of the development of transportation facilities in the United 
States, and the regulatory measures that have accompanied this develop- 



tSee also related courses in Agrricultural Economics, especially A. E. 1 f, 212 f, and 213 s. 

269 



ment. The principles of railway rates and tariffs and their effects on 
agricultural and business organization. Changing transportation methods; 
the modem "railroad problem." (Gay.) 

T. and T. 121 s.* Export and Import Trade Procedure (3)— Prerequi- 
site, T. and T. 101 f. 

Functions of various exporting agencies; documents and procedures used 
in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring goods in 
foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through the 
customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. Field 
trips are arranged to study actual import and export procedure. A nominal 
fee is collected before each trip to cover expenses incurred. (Not offered 
in 1941-42.) (Gay.) 

T. and T. 148 f, s, or S. Supervised Practice in Transportation (2) — 

Prerequisites, credit or concurrent registration in T. and T. Ill f and any- 
other ' specialized course needed for proper understanding of a particular 
type of transportation enterprise. Consent of the instructor is necessary; 
this will not be given unless the position arranged for a given registrant in 
a commercial business is of such a nature that effective experience can be 
obtained. 

This practical work under guidance in an approved transportation agency 
may be arranged for any period during the year. The method of individual 
conferences, reports, and supervised collateral reading is utilized. (Gay.) 

T. and T. 149 f, s, or S. Supervised Practice in Foreign Trade (2) — Pre- 
requisites, credit or concurrent registration in T. and T. 101 f and any other 
specialized course needed for proper understanding of a particular business, 
such as T. and T. Ill f, and 121 s. Consent of the instructor is necessary; 
this will not be given unless the position arranged for a given registrant in a 
commercial business is of such a nature that effective experience can be 
obtained. 

This practical work under guidance in an approved exporting or import- 
ing house may be arranged for any period during the year. The method of 
individual conferences, reports, and supervised collateral reading is utilized. 

(Gay.) 

For Graduates 

^, and T. 229 s. Problems in Foreign Trade (1-3) — Prerequisites, grad- 
uate standing, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. The, 
subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, but must 
not be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. (Gay.) 

270 



Organization and Management $ 
0. and M. 51 f. Elements of Business (2)-Prerequisites, junior stand- 
ino- and consent of instructor. 

A rapid survey of the elements of business and of the management of 
personal finances for non-Commerce students. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
n and M 101 s, 102 f. Business Law (3, 3)-Section A is limited to 
„.a^;; fn Accolu^g. or those who have consent of the instructor. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable in^t-ments, 
..pncv partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sa es. 
Son rta mor; intensive treatment of the law of contrac J -Je^, 
'egotTable instruments, agency and partnerships than is given m Sec ion b 
S is designed to prepare students for the -ounti^ofes.^^^ 
Maryland. 

O. and M. 103 s. Advanced Business Law (2)-Prerequisites, O. and M. 

101 S, 102 f. , . . 4. „4.:^, 

The principles of the law of corporations, trusts, and the admmistratio , 
of the 'estate's of bankrupts and decedents, presented ma -a-e^ di- 
lated to prepare students for the accounting profession in Maryland.^^^^^ 

n and M 105 f Business Cycles and Business Indexes (3)-Prerequi- 

siti Stat 14 f, E;on. 51 f, 52 s, consent of the instructor. 

business cycle analysis. 

0. and M. 11* f. Fundamentals of Business Administration (2)-Open 

only to senior Engineers. , ^ ^. r r^rnHnr 

An analysis of the business structure, showing f^^^^l^^^:^:^, 
tion, marketing, and finance, and the use of the tools of as a functional 
statistics. Designed to show the engmeer his ^f ^'^"/^^P/^^p^/rt^^^^^ to 
expert to other functional experts and to give an academic "PP^-^" J 
apply technical knowledge in business problems. ^t ; 

O and M 121 s. Industrial Management (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 61 f, 
52 s, or 57,' Fin. Ill f, Mkt. 101 f, or consent of the instructor. 

ThP course is based upon analysis of actual business cases concerned with 
va^oLTsp" t: of managements, problem of production, inelud-gPar^^^^^^^ 
larlv the following: specialization of plant, equipment, and 'fl^or, simpii 
ficaLn standardfzation; diversification; expansion; -n -cti-^^^^^^^ 
tion; raw materials supply; purchasing; plant lo-tion; plant la>°; - '""^J 
supply; job standards and wage payment; personnel relations, P'annmg and 
scheduling; organization and control. 

Psychology, especially Psych. 3 s. 160 f. 161 s. 

271 












$See also related courses in 



52^.' nrtl^'^^'-T^"'"'^- '" "• P^'-^"'"'^' (3)-Prerequisites, Econ 5] f 
52 s or 57. Psych. 3 s or 4 f, or permission of instructor. ^■ 

npinf '^f °^ *''^P'"°'''^'"s '"solved in the organization and management of 
personnel m modern business and industry. A consideration of empToyee 

sotne rffil"""^"' f ""^' '"'''''"'' °' ^^^^••'P-^ --^ maintaining per 
sonnel efficiency. Supplementary reading material for Commerce studrnK 

will confonn to the individual's particular interests and wiirbrunder th! 
direction of Dr. Wyckoff and Dr Marshall Qo i i Vl "* 

133 f. Industrial Relat^ns ""'' '"'' '"'"'"•^ '?"f U^<=''"- 

(W. Clark.) 

r.?:,-.^ ^ ^i® ^' ^' "■■ ^- ^"P^'-vised Practice in Cooperation (2)_Pre 
requisites, credit or concurrent registration in Econ. 161 s and any speciali/ed 
courses needed for proper understanding of a particular cooperative en , 
prise. Consent of the instructor is necessary; this will not be given unless 
the position arranged for a given registrant is of such a nature that effecv 
experience can be obtained. euecnve 

This practical work under guidance in an approved cooperative orirani.a- 
t.on may be arranged for any period during the year. The method of nd! 
vidual conferences, reports, and supervised collateral read^g is utilized. 

(L. Clark.) 

^it?;*"^ t' ^" ^-l ''™'"«™« '" Cooperative Administration (3)-I-rerequ:- 
sites, eight semester, hours in accounting, three in finance, egh Tneeo- 

Tn ro;;S«vV';hr"''r ' T^ " -gamzation and managemenf. and th re 
m cooperative theory. Graduate students will be required to do additional 

thai ir=de- -rg^^: -s ra^iirsr ^ii^rr "^-^ 

of travel is required, for which a nominal fee oSed at the t'imi T"1 
field trip to cover the expenses incurred. '^^"ected at the time of each 

{L. Clark.) 

Ec^^^'^Jf sfs.^- ''"'^ ^"^ '^"'"'"^^^•^' Organizations (3)-Prerequisites. 

niem£hir:u'i,r; Tot:r:zLrT''''T '^^"^^"^^' «--^"^' 

and program builZ^ In f organization and procedure, conventions 
responsSL ^' ''*'"" '"^ dissemination of information. Public 

(Stevens, Clark.) 

(l.^'o-Prtquiit's'ln •'"""' ''^""'^'"•^ '" «"^'-- Administration 

.e £. Of ZiSd^drs^^ s:s -.— - 1 
Of rdSr^rrLt^—pr ^^^^^^^ - .rr 

resourcefulness, maturity, and high scholas fc sfand£' it tish tfdo 
extensive organized reading in a special field of businfss adnSStrSion 

(Staff.) 
272 



For Graduates 

0. and M. 201. Research (2-6) — Credit in proportion to work accom- 
plished. Student must be especially qualified by previous work to pursue 
efTectively the research to be undertaken. 

Investigation or original research in problems of business organization 
and operation under supervision of the instructor. (Staff.) 

0. and M. 208 s. Legal Aspects of Business Problems (2) — Prerequisites, 
six semester hours in commercial law, twelve in accounting, nine in eco- 
nomics, and six in political science. 

Law as an institution conditioning economic behavior. The law applicable 
to problems in management and production, marketing, and finance. 

(Shirley.) 

0. and M. 291 f or s. Problems in Business Organization (1-3) — Pre- 
requisites, preliminary courses in the field of specialization, six semester 
hours in organization and management, eight in accounting, nine in eco- 
nomics, and three in statistics. 

Individual investigation of specific problems, under direction of the 
instructor. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely alliet^ 
with, but must not be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Staff.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Drake, Broughton, Haring, White; Associate Professor 
Wiley; Assistant Professors Supplee, Svirbely; Dr. Lamb, Dr. Reeve, 
Dr. Westgate, Mr. Anspon, Mr. Beamer, Mr. Borum, Mr. Chapman, Mr. 
Ehrich, Mr. GolDxMan, Mr. Hechmer, Mr. Lander, Mr. Leed, Mr. Linnig, 
Mr. Longley, Mr. Love, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Power, Mr. Tollefson, Mr. 
Whiton, Mr. Wingate, Mr. Woodrow, Mr. Young, Mr. Yourtee. 

A. Inorganic Cliemistry 

Chem. 1 A y. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of the 
course is to develop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. 

Course A is intended for students who have not had high school chem- 
istry, or have passed their high school chemistry with a grade lower than 
B. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 1 B y. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course covers the same ground as Chem. 1 A y, but the subject 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade not lower than B. Laboratory fee, 
?7.00 per semester. 

273 



Chem. 2 y. Qualitative Analysis (6) — ^Two lectures and one laboratory 
during the first semester; one lecture and two laboratories during the sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, 
their separation and identification. The physical and chemical principles 
are stressed. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem. 3 y. Introductory Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A y. This 
course is designed for students desiring some knowledge of elementary 
chemistry. It is not accepted as a prerequisite for advanced chemistry 
courses. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 200 A y. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (4)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. 

A course devoted to the study of the elements not usually considered in 
the elementary course. (White.) 

Chem. 200 B y. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A laboratory study of the compounds of elements considered in Chem. 
200 A y. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (White.) 

Chem. 201 f or s. An Introduction to Spectographic Analysis (1). 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamen- 
tals of spectographic analysis. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (White.) 

Chem. 233 s. Inorganic Microanalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 2 y, 6 y, or equivalent. 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint students with the qualitative 
and quantitative techniques available for the analysis of milligram samples. 

The qualitative procedures are carried out on the microscope slide, in the 
microcentrifuge cone, in the capillary, and in the fibre. The quantitative 
procedures include residue determinations, the use of the filter stick, etc. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Westgate.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 4 f or s. Quantitative Analysis (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. 

Quantitative analysis for premedical students, with special reference to 
volumetric methods. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Chem. 6 y. Quantitative Analysis (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. 

This course includes a study of the principal operations of gravimetric 
and volumetric analysis, the standardization of weights and apparatus used 

274 



.ivtical work and a study of indicators and typical colorimetric 
^' raf tI riculalJons of volumetric and gravimetric analyses are em- 
5:Sd. i:cXefT^^^ students whose major is^chemistry. Laboratory 
fee, $7-00 per semester. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Chem 101 y Advanced Quantitative Analysis (8)-Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or equivalent. 

The first semester is devoted to mineral and gas analysis, ^unng the 
second semester the emphasis is on instrumental analysis. Labora^o^^^^ 
fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Chem 130 y. Chemical Microscopy (4)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, special permission of instructor. 

A course designed to acquaint the student -i^^^^;!^^^^';^^^ % 3e 
scopic analysis. The latter part of the course is devoted to a ^^udy o^t ^^^ ^ 
fibers. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

For Graduates 

rh^m 24^ V Special Problems in Quantitative Analysis (4)-Two lab- 
oratorfe-s iLc^^l Chem. 6 y. Laboratory work and conferences. 

A complete treatment of some special problem or problems, chosen to 
meet trneeds and interest of the individual student. Laboratory^ fe^^$7^00 
per semester. 

rh.m 240 f Chemical Microscopy (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. 

Tmo're extensive course than Chem. 130 y designed to acquam, , 
student with the fundamentals of microscopic analysis. Labora^^^^J, j^' 
$7.00. 

Chem. 241 s. Chemical Microscopy (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. 

'T^ d?v:SdTo 'the study of the optical properties of ^c^.tal. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

C. Organic Chemistry 
Chem. 8 A y. Elementary Organic Chemistry (4)-^^vo lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. ' , ^ , . 

This course includes an elementary study of the fundamentals of organic 
chlmLry and is designed to meet the needs of students speciahzmg in 
chemistry, and of premedical students. 
Chem 8 B y. Elementary Organic Laboratory (4)-Two laboratories 
A course designed to familiarize the students with the f-damenta 
methods of the organic laboratory. This course, with Chem. 8 A V. satisfies 
the premedical requirements in organic chemistry. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. 

275 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

sites*"chem'8 A fl'T'' "''^^"'^ Chemistry (4)_Two lectures. Prerequi. 
sues, «^nem. 8 A y, 8 B y, or equivalent. ^ 

A course devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of carbon 
than IS undertaken in Chem. 8 A y. Graduate students who desfre 1 
accompanymg laboratory course should elect Chem. 205 andTor 207 '" 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Laboratory (4)-0ne lecture; one laboratorr*"^ 

A course devoted to a study of organic qualitative analysis The wort 

ncludes the identification of unknown organic compounds, and coSlspIn^s 

„. , (Reeve.) 

Chem 118 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2)-0ne laboratory 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of oreani. 

compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen ni^ro^^n 

and halogen are carried out, and representative syntheses mor'eScui; 

than those of Chem. 8 B y, are studied. Laboratory^, So per se^S' 

(Reeve.) 
For Graduates 
Chem. 203 A f. Stereochemistry (2)— Two lectures. 
A comprehensive study of stereoisomerism. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 
„, ' (Drake.) 

lec^Ire": ' ^ '" '"'' ''"'"'"' '*'"'"^"'^' '"'' ^*'^'''" V"-'- (2)_Two 

A study of the structure and reactions of the more important polvene 

pigments and those vitamins whose structure is known. (Se J 

Chem. 203 C f. Sterols and Sex Hormones (2)— Two lectures 

A study of the stnicture and reactions of the more important sterols and 

the sex hormones. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Drake ) 

Chem. 205 f or s. Organic Preparations (2-4)_Two or four laboratories. 

thtaul^fH.T ''"'!^ 1 th; synthesis of various organic compounds and of 
the quantitative methods of determining carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen and 
halogen in organic compounds. Laboratory fee, $8.00. fZevf) 

the'^SnfctL.' " " ^'■''"'" *«"-->y- (4)-Prerequisite, consent of 

mitit°'^of 'L'w/ °' '^^ "'''''°^' u°' P'"'^^ ^'"- *« quantitative deter- 

SrX fee'^S' "'"'^"' "''''"' ^"'^ ''^^'•°^^"' -^*^-^>' «^«- 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 207 f or s. Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6). 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and of. mixtures. This course serves as an intensive preparation for the 

276 



problems of identification encountered in organic research, and should be 
taken by all students planning to do research in organic chemistry. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 209 f. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Certain Enzymes and 
Polysaccharides (2) — Two lectures. (Not offered 1941-42.) (Pigman.) 

Chem. 210 f or s. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2-3) — Two or three lab- 
oratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 205, 207, or equivalent. 

A laboratory course designed to fit the needs of a student about to begin 
research in organic chemistry. The course consists of work on the identifi- 
cation of mixtures of organic compounds, difficult syntheses and ultimate 
analyses for carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, and halogen but can be varied 
to fit the needs of the individual student. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 235 A s. Chemistry of Certain Nitrogen Compounds (2) — Two 

lectures. 

A study of the chemistry of open chain nitrogen compounds and of 
alkaloids. ( Reeve. ) 

Chem. 235 B s. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2) — Two lectures. 

The practical applications of modem theories of physics and physical 
chemistry to the problems of structure and reactions of organic substances. 
(Not offered 1941-42.) (Reeve.) 

Chem. 235 C s. The Heterocyclics (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of some of the heterocyclic compounds with special reference to 
those related to natural products. (Not offered 1941-42.) (Reeve.) 

D. Physical Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 102 A y. Physical Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y; Phys. 2 y; Math. 23 y. 

Graduate students taking laboratory will elect Chem. 218 f, 219 s; under- 
graduates will elect Chem. 102 B y. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Haring.) 

Chem. 102 B y. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 
For undergraduates taking Chem. 102 A y. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demonstrate 
physico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and acquaint 
the student with precision apparatus. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

277 



Chem. 103 A y. Elements of Physical Chemistry (4)-Two lecturo. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 1 y; Phys. 1 y; Math. 8 f. 10 s; or 21 f 2^1 Under 
graduates taking this course must also register for Chem. 103 By. 

The course is designed to meet the needs of premedical students and 
others unable to pursue the subject farther. Accordingly such topks as 

for determining pH, etc., are stressed. (Lamb ) 

Chem. 103 B y. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)-0ne 
aboratory. This course must be taken by undergraduates enrolled in Chem 
103 A y. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

in ChZTn^T^""'^"''^ experiments illustrating the principles discussed 
in Chem. 103 A y are performed. Laboratory fee. $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

For Graduates 

Note: All courses in this group have, as prerequisites, Chem 102 A v 
for lecture courses and Chem. 102 B y for laboratory courses, or their 
equivalents. ' 

Chem.^102^ A /' '^"^"'^ "^ ^"'""""' ^^^''^^'^ ^''=*"'"^- Prerequisite, 

A systematic study of the theories and properties of solutions. Subjects 
considered are solubility, regular solutions, dipole moments, solution 
kinetics, and modem theories of dilute and concentrated electrolytes. 

(Svirbely.) 

Chem. 212 A f, 213 A s. Colloid Chemistry (2, 2)-Two lectures 

„™.K 'T''T °J *' ^^^'*' "^ '"^^'^ *"» "'^emical reactions; numerous 
practical applications. /tt • 

(Hanng.) 

Chem. 212 B f, 213 B s. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)-Two lab- 
oratories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 A f 213 A s 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Haring ) 

Chem. 214 f, 215 s. Structure of Matter (2, 2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the structure of atoms, molecules, solids and liquids'. Molecular 
structure and related topics will be studied from the standpoints of Se 
moments, Raman spectra, and infra-red spectra. (Lamb!) 

Chem. 216 f. Phase Rule (2)— Two lectures. 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One. two. and three com- 

(Nr;ivrr;94tk)^ '"'''''''''' ^^*" '''''"''' applications of each 

'' (Hanng.) 

Chem. 217 s. Catalysis (2)— Two lectures. 

This course consists of lectures on the theory and applications of catalysis. 
(Not given m 1941-42.) (Haring.) 

278 



Chem, 218 f, 219 s. Reaction Kinetics (2, 2)— Two lectures. 

A study of reaction velocity and mechanisms of reactions in gaseous and 
liquid systems, and the effect of temperature, radiation, etc., on the same. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) (Lamb.) 

Chem. 220 A f, 221 A s. Electrochemistry (2, 2) — Two lectures. 
A theoretical discussion coupled with practical applications. (Not given 
in 1941-42.) (Haring.) 

Chem. 220 B f, 221 B s. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2, 2) — Two labora- 
tories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 220 A f, 221 A s. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Haring.) 

Chem. 226 y. Chemical Thermodynamics (4) — ^Two lectures. 
A study of the methods of approaching chemical problems through the 
laws of energy. (Haring.) 

Chem. 231 f, 232 s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2 or 3, 2 or 3)— Two 

laboratories and one conference. 

Students taking this course may elect six credits of lectures in Chem. 
102 A y to replace the conference. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

(Lamb.) 

E. Biological Chemistry 

CTiem. 12 A y. Elements of Organic C!hemistry (4)— Two lectures. 

The chemistry of carbon and its compounds in relation to biology. This 
course is particularly designed for students in Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Chem. 12 B y. Elements of Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental meth- 
ods of the organic laboratory. The course is designed to accompany Chem. 
12 A y. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Chem. 14 s. Chemistry of Textiles (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A y, 12 B y. 

A study of the principal textile fibres, their chemical and mechanical 
structure. Chemical methods are given for identifying the various fibres 
and for a study of dyes and mordants. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates^ and Graduates 

Chem. 108 f or s. General Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; 
two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A y, 12 B y, or equivalent. 

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, 
the chemistry of foods, digestion, absorption, assimilation, metabolism, 
tissue composition, and excretion. The laboratory work consists of experi- 
ments in food analysis, salivary, gastric, pancreatic and intestinal digestion, 
and identification of components of blood and urine. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

(Supplee.) 
279 



be attended by all studLr Lk fg 1h^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^T*^' "'"'' '""^^ 

..res...,. L.b<,„.o^ «» TsS. i'r .i^.'"* '""'"■""'" "^J^ 

For Graduates 
Chen. 208 f or ,. Blologic.l An.l„fe (2)_Two labonKori.s 

An advanced course in physiological chemistry. For the first semester 
the course consists of lectures and assigned reading on the chemTsTrv o 
the carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and enzymes. The second semester deal 
wUh digestion, absorption, metabolism, excretion, hormones, aTdnSritt 

r^r. ««« ^ (Supplee.) 

Chem 222 B f, 223 B s. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 4, Chem. 12 A y, 12 B "'or'^quiv;: 

and oiTtlwr'r *", ^'=.'='''"P^"y Chem. 222 A f, 223 A s. Qualitative 
and quantitative food analysis; digestion, nutrition, metabolism and resoira- 

oratory lee, $8.00 per semester. zo , x 

(Supplee.) 

tor^es""'liforato?' TH ^''"'''. '^'"'"^'"^ ^'■'' 2-4)-Two to four labora- 
of hoifs ° wlT' p'^''^' '"'' '^'^'^^'-^"'^e ^ork amounting to a minimum 
the Ltructor. P^^'^^'l^'-tes, Chem. 222 A f, 223 A s and consent of 

of^he fauv'! T'?*' °^ '*",^'"' "' 'P""^' "^^*°*1^' ^"<=h as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates or 

or'S: dSled^ determination of the distribution of nitrogen in'a pttein 

TL? 1 5 ,^''' °^ '"'"^ 'P^"«^ type of tissue. The student will 

LaboTator?fi"t no'"^ *^ 'f ^*"*^'^ "'^^ *^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ *- - "™c7o r. 
i^aDoratory fee, $8.00 per semester. /«^.| x 

Chem. 250 s. Toxicology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories 

bvVrion^ .n J^r T'^'^Tu ''''''^"'' '^^'' '^''^' ^"^ detection. Lectures 
by various specialists will be arranged. /^H^ ^ 

280 



F. History of Chemistry 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 121 y. The History of Chemistry (2)— One lecture. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 1 y, 8 y, or equivalent. 

The development of chemical knowledge, and especially of the general 
doctrines of chemistry, from their earliest beginnings up to the present day. 

(Broughton.) 
G. Seminar and Research 

For Graduates 

Chem. 227 f, 228 s. Seminar (1, 1) — Required of all graduate students in 
chemistry. 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Staff.) 

Chem. 229. Research in Chemistry. — The investigation of special prob- 
lems and the preparation of a thesis towards an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

Associate Professor Highby; Mr. Banta. 

Greek 

Greek 1 y. Elementary Greek (6) — Three lectures. 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the trans- 
lation of simple prose. 

Greek 2 y. Greek Authors (6) — Prerequisite, Greek 1 y or equivalent. 
Translation of parts of Xenophon and Plato. 

Latin 

Both a major and a minor are offered in Latin. The minor requires the 
successful completion of at least 12 semester hours in Latin language 
courses higher than Latin 2 y. Four entrance units will also be regarded 
as fulfilling the regular requirement of 12 credit hours prerequisite to 
the minor. 

Latin 1 y. Elementary Latin (6) — Three lectures. 

This course is intended to give a substantial and accurate knowledge of 
Latin grammar and syntax, together with practice in reading simple prose. 

Latin 2 y. Intermediate Latin (6) — Prerequisite, Latin 1 y or two 
entrance units in Latin. 

Review of forms and syntax. Readings from Caesar, Cicero, Ovid and 
Virgil. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Latin 101 f. Review of Latin Literature (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Latin 2 y or 4 entrance units; three units will admit well qualified 
students. 

A review of Latin literature by selected readings in the Latin from the 
origins down to the time of the late Republic. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

281 



Latin 102 s. Review of Latin Literature (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Latin 101 f or special permission of the instructor. 

Review continued; the Age of Augustus and the Early Empire. (Not 
offered in 1941-42.) 

Latin 111 f. Livy's History of Rome (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Latin 2 y or 4 entrance units in Latin; three units acceptable in the case 
of well qualified students. (Highby.) 

Latin 112 s. Horace's Odes (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Latin 
111 f or equivalent. (Highby.) 

Latin 121 f. Roman Prose Writers (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
6 credit hours beyond Latin 2 y. 

Essays of Cicero and Seneca. (Highby.) 

Latin 122 s. Roman Satire (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Latin 121 f 
or equivalent. 

Satires of Horace and Juvenal. (Highby.) 

Latin 131 f. The Historian Tacitus (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
12 credit hours beyond Latin 2 y. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

Latin 132 s. Martial, Selected Epigrams (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, same as for Latin 131 f. (Highby.) 

Latin 141 f. Lucretius' I>e Natura Rerum (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, 12 credit hours beyond Latin 2 y. (Highby.) 

Latin 151 s. Advanced Latin Prose Composition (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, 6 credit hours beyond Latin 2 y. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

Courses Given in English 

Classics 3 f. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

This course aims to show how Latin roots are used in English and to 
make for a more accurate use of English vocabulary. It also supplies the 
basic knowledge involved in the comprehension or creation of scientific 
nomenclature. 

Classics 4 s. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Classics 3 f. 

A continuation of the course outlined above. The study of the Latin 
language elements is continued and that of the Greek added. 

Note: Attention is here called to the courses in "Art in Ancient Civiliza- 
tion" which deal with Egypt, the Near East, and the Minoan and Mycenaean 
civilization (Art 1 f and 2 f) and most especially to those in "Art in 
Classical Civilization" which treat of Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology 
(Art 3 f and 4 s). Also the courses in Ancient History, which present the 
Near East and Greece (History 131 f) and Rome (History 132 s). 

282 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

101 f, 102 s. 

^ ¥ ;* 1 f rirppk Poetrv (2) — Two lectures. 

ground. 
r„mn I it 2 s Later European Epic Poetry (2)— Two lectures. 

their relationship to and comparison with the Greek epic. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Comp Lit. 101 f. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3)- 

"B ssri s^r -r sr set ;: ^t 

translations of GreeK ana i.^tiii , . .. ^ ^^,v trao-edv comedy, and 

to the ancients is discussed and illustrated. 
Comp. Lit. 102 s. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3)- 

Three lectures. .„ ^i f. study of medieval and modem Conti- 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101 t, stuay oi me (Zucker.) 

nental literature. 

Comp. Lit. 103 f. Chaucer (3)-Three lectures. ^^^^^^ 

Same as Eng. 104 f , cf. p. 321. 

Comp. Lit. 104 s. The Old Testament as Literature (2)_Two lectures 
A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale., 

Comp Lit 105 f. Romanticism in France (2)-Two lectures. 
Lectu;es and readings in the F-ch ~t^^^^^^^^^ from Rousseaujo 
Baudelaire. Texts are read m English translations. V 

Comp. Lit. 106 s. Romanticism in Germany (2)-Two '-*--• 
Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105 f German literature from Buerger t 
Heine The reading is done in English translations. (^^^'^ 

Comp. Lit. 107 f. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature 

'^-^rdVoTrraust Legend of the Middle A^es and its later tr.tment 
by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe m Faust. (f ra 

283 






(Murphy.) 
(Barby.) 



Comp. Lit. 108 f. Milton (2)_Two lectures. 
Same as Eng. 108 f, cf. p. 321. 

• SZ'^V^J:- Cervantes (6)-Three lectures. 
t>ame as Spanish 105 y, cf. p. 359. 

Comp. Lit. 110 s. Introduction to Folklore (2)-Two lectures 
Origin, evolution, and bibliography of tvDes I ittrIL c « 

Comp «. 1,2,. lb.„ (2)_Two l„t„„. """"'"'•' 

Same as Eng. II3 f, 114 s, cf. p. 322. .^ , 

(Warfel.) 

For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 200 s. The History of the TheatrP r2^ t i . 

trs::ic^,r::^: -^-^"^-- -- -er?ri^it^i- -z: j-; 

reLS^bi^i^l^-iSS --e. lnc;..ua, 

Sra"Lr20^4V,rra25."'"^"'^ '" "-'^^ <^>--- '-ureV' 

Comp. Lit 203 y. Schiller (4)-Two lectures ^^^'"'^ 

bame as German 203 y. cf. p. 357 

Comp. Lit 204 y. Goethe (4)-Two lectures. ^''"^^''^ 

bame as German 204 f, 205 s, cf. p. 357 fZ k ) 

^ Jomp. Lit. 205 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist. Novelist (4)-^:o 
Same as French 204 y, cf. p. 355. 

lectuTes.- '^"- '"' " '^'"^"^•- '" «"^*-""' C-»-y ^terature (2)-T^. 
Same as Eng. 205 s, cf. p. 325. 

Comp. Lit. 207 f. Seminar in Shakesoeare r2^ T. i . ^^^^""^^^'^ 
requisites, Eng. 11 f, 12 s. ^"^^^espeare (2)— Two lectures. Pre- 

Same as Eng. 207 f, cf. p. 326. 

(Zeeveld.) 
284 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Turk, England; Associate Professor Berry; 

Assistant Professor Hughes. 

Dairy Production 

D. H. 1 s. Fundamentals of Dairying (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. Not open to freshmen. 

This course is designed to cover the entire field of dairy husbandry. A 
study is made of the development and characteristics of the important 
breeds of dairy cattle; feeding, breeding and management of the dairy herd; 
calf raising; dairy organizations; production of high quality in milk; ele- 
mentary judging of dairy cattle and dairy products; fitting and showing of 
cattle; important dairy manufacturing industries; physical and chemical 
properties of milk; distribution and marketing of dairy products; and the 
Babcock Test and other quantitative tests. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

D. H. 50 s. Dairy Cattle Judging (2) — Two laboratories. Not open to 
freshmen. 

This course offers complete instruction in the selection and comparative 
judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various dairy farms for judging practice 
will be made. 

D. H. 51 s. Grading Dairy Products (1) — One laboratory. Not open to 
freshmen. 

Market grades and the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream in 
the commercial field. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 101 f. Dairy Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1 s, A. H. 102 f. 

A comprehensive course in dairy cattle feeding and herd management, 
designed for advanced students in dairy husbandry. It covers the efficient 
feeding of the dairy herd, including milking cows, dairy heifers, calves, and 
dairy bulls; common diseases of dairy cattle and their treatment; dairy 
farm sanitation; problems of herd management; dairy barns and equipment; 
and the factors essential for success in the dairy farm business. (Turk.) 

D. H. 104 f. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging (1) — One laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, D. H. 50 s. 

Advanced work in judging dairy cattle. Credit only to students who do 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle judging team. (Turk.) 

D. H. 105 s. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, D. H. 1 s, Zool. 104 f, A. H. 103 s. 

A study of the historical background; characteristics; prominent blood 
lines; noted families and individuals of the major dairy breeds. A survey 

285 



cf ttle Th. ZTTtl ^'":*'' ""*^ env-onmental factors as applied to dairy 
cattle. The use of the pedigree, various indices, herd and production reco!7 
m selection and formulating breeding programs. (BeSy J 

site:5'H"'/s. ''"'■'' ^'*"' Management (2)_Two laboratories. Prerequi- 

j,.li?"*"^^T^"* '"""^^ ^^"^^^"^ *° familiarize students with the practio^i 
handling and management of dairy cattle. Students are given actuaTt.? 
tice and training in the University dairy bams. (T^rk Be^rj:'.'; 

Dairy Manufacturing 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 109 f. Cheese Making (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories Pr. 
requisites, D. H. 1 s, Bact. 1. "dooratones. Pre- 

^t^^jl^'K^^ ■^'"^ r^'*'"^ "^ '"^'^'"^ ''^^^^ «nd cheese, including a 

See w-S delude' ''rr'' ^"'^ ''°'°^^^^ '^"^'^ --'-'1 LabotTor 
practice will include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory fee, $2.00 

r» n (Hughes.) 

site;, D. H- ;-s,^c:r''"' '''-^^"^ '"*""' '"•^ '^''-^*-^- ^--^i- 

The principles and practice of making butter, including a studv of th. 
physical, chemical, and biological factors involved Laboral.^ praeticf,^! 
include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory fee, $1 (S^ 'rEngland ) 

re^uistl"D^H.TsXc?i;^ """'' ^'^"^"^ '^*=*"-= -^ >«^-^t-^- P- 
.J^^-n"""^!^" and' practice of making condensed milk, evaporated milk 

(England.) 
re^Mlef^: n'\ ^Tct'^f"'^ ^'^"^"^ '^^*"-= *- '^^-atories. Pre- 

(England.) 

D. H. 113 f. Market Milk (5)— Three lecture^:, twn iaKn,.of • 
requisites, D. H. 1 s, Bact. 1. lectures, two laboratones. Pre- 

to^'iri^'^^^^^^^^ ^'^^^^ ^'."!^^^^ -^^^^ -^h special reference 

Its transportation, processing, and distribution; certified milk, mm 
mercial buttermilk; milk laws; duties of milk inspectors dKiw'' Z 
Plant cons^^^^^^^^ and operation. Laborato^Ti^^^^^^^^ inlt^^^^^^ 
local dames. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not given in 1941-42.) (E^^Zd) 

286 



D. H. 114 s. Analysis of Dairy Products (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, D. H. 1 s, Bact. 1, Chem. 4, 12 A y, 12 B y. 

^ The application of chemical and bacteriological methods to commercial 
dairy practice; analysis by standard chemical, bacteriological, and factory 
methods; standardization and composition control; tests for adulterants and 
preservatives. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not given in 1941-42.) (England.) 

D. H. 116 s. Dairy Mechanics (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
D. H. 1 s. 

The theory and operation of the compression system of mechanical re- 
frigeration. Construction, design, and care of dairy equipment; repairing, 
soldering, pipe fitting, and wiring. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Not given 
in 1941-42.) (Hughes.) 

D. H. 117 s. Dairy Accounting (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite, 
D. H. 1 s. 

Methods of accounting in the market milk plant and dairy manufacturing 
plants. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

D. H. 118 f. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (1) — One laboratory. 
Prerequisite, D. H. 51 s. 

Advanced work in the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 
Open only to students who comprise the dairy products judging team. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (England.) 

D. H. 119 f, 120 s. Dairy Literature (1, 1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
D. H. 1 s. 

Presentation and discussion of current literature in dairying. 

(England, Berry, Turk.) 

D. H. 121 f. Dairy Plant Experience (2) — Prerequisite, 10 hours of dairy 
husbandry. 

Ten weeks' practical experience or its equivalent (following completion 
of junior year) in an approved market milk plant or factory manufacturing 
dairy products. A written report of the work is required. (England.) 

D. H. 122 s. Dairy Plant Experience (1) — Prerequisite, D. H. 1 s. 

Two hundred hours' practical experience in the University of Maryland 
Dairy Manufacturing Plant. The grade will be based on the dependability 
and efficiency of the student in performing work assigned. 

(England, Hughes.) 

D. H. 123 f, 124 s. Methods of Dairy Research (1-3)— Credit in accord- 
ance with the amount and character of work done. 

This course is designed especially to meet the needs of those dairy stu- 
dents who plan to enter the research or technical field of dairying. 

Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation of results are 
stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to the work the 
student is pursuing will be assigned. (England, Berry, Turk.) 

287 



For Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and man- 
agement. Headings and assignments. (Tyrk ) 

D. H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2)— Two lectures. 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physiochemical point 
^^ ^^^- . (England.) 

1>. H. 203 s. Milk Products (2)— Two lectures. 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of milk 
P^^^"^^^- (England.) 

D. H. 204 f or s. Special Problems in Dairying (1-3)— Credit in accord- 
ance with the amount and character of work done. 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is pur- 
suing will be assigned. (Staff ) 

D. H. 205 f or s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on current literature in dairy 
husbandry and allied fields. These reports are presented and discussed in 
the class. (S^^^^ 

D. H. 206. Research— Credit to be determined by the amount and quality 
of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of 
the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a thesis. 

(Staff.) 
ECONOMICS^: 

Professor Stevens, Gruchy, DeVault; Lecturer Nevins; Associate 

Professors Marshall, Wyckoff, Bennett; Assistant Professors Gay, 

Fisher, Kirkpatrick ; Mr. Reid, Mr. Mullin, Mr. Shirley. 

Some of the specialized courses in the following lists may be offered only 
in alternate years, whenever prospective enrollments therein do not justify 
repeating annually. Such courses are indicated by an asterisk. 

Econ. 51 f, 52 s. Principles of Economics (6)— Econ. 51 f is prerequisite 
to Econ. 52 s. Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the general principles of economics; production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of wealth. Lectures, discussions, and student 
exercises. 



12rr T^'and''^T^'\m°7'711'^^'''T?^ Administration, especially Fin. 106 f , 1 11 f. 
o ^\a ™ • ^^^ ^' ^^^ ^' ^^^ in Agricultural Economics esDeciallv A F If 
2 s. 104 s. 106 s. 109 y. Ill y. 210 s, 211 f. 212 f. 213 s. 214 s.' and 215 1 



288 



Econ. 57 f or s. Fundamentals of Economics (3)— Not open to students 
who have credit in Econ. 51 f, 52 s. Not open to freshmen. 

A brief study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups, such as students 
of engineering, home economics, agriculture, and others who are unable 
to take the more complete course provided in Economics 51 f , 52 s. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Economics, 129 s (Fin. 129 s), International Finance (3)— Prerequisites, 
Econ. 51 f , 52 s or 57. Open to Commerce students only as Fin. 129 s. Credit 
may not be received for both Econ. 129 s and Fin. 129 s. 

Class sessions with Finance 129 s but readings and reports stress the 
economic, as contrasted with the managerial and business man's viewpoint. 
Assumed previous knowledge of finance is less than in Fin. 129 s. (Gay.) 

Econ. 130 f. Labor Economics (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s or 57. 

Insecurity, wages and income, hours, substandard workers, industrial con- 
flict; wage theories; the economics of collective bargaining; unionism in its 
structural and functional aspects; recent developments. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 131 s.* Labor and Government (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor con- 
ditions. State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, 
working conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial 
disputes, collective bargaining, and economic security. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 133 f.* Industrial Relations (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in indus- 
try with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and 
legal analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitra- 
tion, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and 
injunctions. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 136 s. Economics of Consumption (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 
52 s or 57. 

The place of the consumer in our economic system. An analysis of 
demand for consumer goods. The need for consumer-consciousness and a 
technique of consumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for con- 
sumers. Special problems. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 145 s.* Public Utilities (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s, or 57. 

Economic and legal characteristics of the public utility status; problems 
of organization, production, marketing, and finance; public regulation and 
alternatives. (Wyckoflf.) 

289 



Econ« 151 f.* Comparative Economic Systems (3) — Prerequisites, Econ 

51 f, 52 s. 

An investigation of some of the more important social reform movements 
and programs of the modern era. The course begins with an examination 
and evaluation of the capitalistic system, followed by an analysis of alter- 
native types of economic control such as socialism, communism, nazisni, 
fascism, and the cooperative movement. (Wyckoff.) 

Econ. 152 s.* Social Control of Business (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 

52 s or 57. 

The reasons for and the methods of avoidance, escape, and abuse of 
competition as a regulating force in business. Social control as a substi- 
tute for, or as a modification of, preservation of competition. Law as an 
instrument of social control through administrative law and tribunals. The 
constitutional aspects of social control. (Shirley.) 

EJcon. 153 f.* Industrial Combination (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 51 f, 52 s. 

The development of industrial combinations in the United States; the 
causes which brought about the trust movement; trade and business methods 
employed by these combinations; types of big business; anti-trust legisla- 
tion in this country and its effects. (Wyckoff.) 

Econ. 161 f. Economics of Cooperative Organization (3) — Prerequisites, 
Econ. 51 f, 52 s or 57. (See also O. and M. 116, 149 A. E., 103 f.) 

Analysis of the principles and practice of cooperation in economic activity 
from the viewpoint of effective management and public interest. Potentiali- 
ties, limitations, and management problems of consumer, producer, market- 
ing, financial, and business men's cooperatives. (Stevens, Bennett.) 

Econ. 190 f. Advanced Economic Principles (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 
51 f , 52 s or 57, and consent of the instructor. 

An analysis of advanced economic principles with special attention to 
recent developments in value and distribution theory. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 191 s. Contemporary Bkonomic Thought (3). 

A survey of recent trends in English, American and Continental economic 
thought, with special attention paid to the institutionalists, the welfare 
economists, and the mathematical economists. (Gruchy.) 

Ek^on. 195 f, 196 s. Special Problems in Economics (1, 1) — Prerequisites, 
preliminary courses in Economics and in the field of specialized study, high 
scholastic standing, and consent of the instructor. 

Independent study of economic problems in a specialized field. The 
methods of individual conferences and reports is utilized. For students of 
initiative, resourcefulness, maturity, and high scholastic standing who wish 
to do extensive organized reading in a special field of economics. (Staff.) 

290 



For Graduates 

Econ. 201. Research (2-6)-Credit in proportion to work accomplished. 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Student must be especially quali- 
fied to pursue effectively the research to be undertaken. 

Investigation or original research in problems of economics under super- 
vision of the instructor. - (Staff.) 

Econ. 203 y. Seminar (4-6)— Prerequisites, concurrent graduate major in 
economics or business administration and consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory, account^ing, 
cooperation, or business. 

Econ. 205 f. History of Economic Thought (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 
51 f , 52 s. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories, including 
the ancients, the Greeks, the Romans, scholasticism, mercantilism, physi- 
ocrats, Adam Smith and contemporaries, Malthus, Ricardo, and John Stuart 
Mill. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 206 s. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3)— Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 205 f. 

A study of the various schools of economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, the neo-classicists, the Austrians, and the socialists. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 210 f, 211 s. Special Problems in Economic Investigation (1-3, 1-3) 

—Credit in proportion to work accomplished. 

Technique involved in economic research. Practice in drawing up sched- 
ules and programs. Individual conferences and reports. (Stevens.) 

Econ. 233 s. Problems in Industrial Relations (3)— Prerequisite, prelim- 
inary courses in the field of specialization and permission of the instructor. 

The subjects selected for study may be closely allied with, but must not 
be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 252 s. Problems in Government and Business Interrelations (3)— 

Prerequisites, preliminary courses in the field of specialization and permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

The subjects selected for study may be closely allied with, but must not 
be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

Econ. 298 f, 299 s. Problems in Economics of Cooperation (1-3. 1-3)-— 

Prerequisites, eight semester hours in accounting, three in finance, three in 
statistics, eight in economics, and three in cooperative theory. 

Problems may involve practical work with the National Cooperative 
Council and other Washington (D. C.) or Maryland cooperative organiza- 
tions. The subjects selected for investigation may be closely allied with, 
but must not be the subject discussed in the student's major thesis. 

(Stevens, Bennet.) 

291 



EDUCATION 

Professors Benjamin, Brown, Drew, Hand, Joyal, Long, Mackert, 
McNaughton; Associate Professor Brechbill; Assistant Professor 

Gallington; Miss Smith, Miss Wiggin. 

Ed. 2 f or s. Introduction to Education (2)— Required of freshmen in 
education and of students in other colleges desiring to elect a curriculum 
in education. 

An exploratory and finding course designed to afford students a better 
basis for deciding whether to enter the field of education. Types of work, 
supply and demand, salaries, tenure, prestige, avenues of advancement! 
ethics, limitations on personal freedoms, types of personal and professional 
competence required, requirements for teaching certificate, and bases of 
selection and rejection in the College of Education are among the topics 
included. 

The selective admission testing and observational program of the College 
of Education is begun in this course. 

Ed. 3 f or s. Educational Forum (1)— Required of all sophomores in 
the College of Education. 

In this course the prospective teacher is introduced in a variety of ways 
to the various problems and processes of education around which much of 
the work in his later professional courses will be centered. 

The selective admission testing and observation program begun in the 
freshman year is continued in this course, as are the organized but informal 
faculty guidance helps. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ed. 100 f. History of Education in the United States (2)— Two lectures. 
A study of the origins and development of the chief features of the 
present system of education in the United States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modern Education (2) — Two lectures. 

A survey of the history of education with emphasis upon the modern 
period in Europe. (L^^^^ j 

Ed. 103 s. The High School (2)— Two lectures. 

The secondary school population, its nature and needs; the school as an 
instrument of society; relation of the secondary school to other schools; 
aims of secondary education; curriculum and methods in relation to aims; 
extra-curricular activities; guidance and placement; the school's opportu- 
nities for service to its community; teacher certification and employment 
in Maryland and the District of Columbia. (Brechbill) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Measurements (2)— Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

A study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construction 
and use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; elementary statistical con- 
cepts, and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test results; school 
'"a^^s. (Brechbill.) 

292 



Ed. 107 f. Comparative Education (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of national systems of education with the primary purpose of 
discovering their characteristic differences and formulating criteria for 
judging their worth. Emphasis upon European systems. (Long.) 

Ed. 108 s. Comparative Education (2) — Two lectures. 

This course is a continuation of Ed. 107 f, with emphasis upon the national 
educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. (Benjamin.) 

Ed. 110 s. The Junior High School (2)— Two lectures. 

This course is designed to give a general overview of education in the 
junior high school. It includes material on the purposes, functions, and 
characteristics of this school unit; a study of its population, organization, 
program of studies, methods, staff; and other similar topics, together with 
their implication for prospective teachers. (Joyal.) 

Ed. 112 f. Educational Sociology-Introductory (2). 

This course deals with certain considerations as derived from the data of 
the social sciences which are germane to the work of teachers and school 
administrators. Prominent among those treated are the following: demo- 
cratic ideology as the value benchmark for all educational endeavor; educa- 
tional tasks imposed by population and technological trends; the distribu- 
tion of welfare and its educational consequences; the welfare status of the 
school population and the consequent demands made upon the school; the 
selective character of the school in welfare terms and the educational impli- 
cations of this class structuring; the socio-economic composition and atti- 
tudes of school board members, school administrators, and teachers and the 
limiting conditions which these impose upon the work of the school; the 
problem of securing academic freedom in the schools; the community 
approach to education. (Hand.) 

Ed. 114 s. Guidance in the Schools (3). 

This course is primarily designed for the classroom teacher in terms of 
the day-by-day demands made upon him as a teacher in the guidance of the 
youth in his classes and in the extra-class activities which he sponsors. 
The stress throughout will be upon practical common-sense guidance proce- 
dures of demonstrated workability. A variety of practical use-materials 
helpful in the guidance of youth will be examined (Hand.) 

See also Agricultural Education and Rural Life, page 246. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

This course deals with so-called "external" phases of school administra- 
tion. It includes study of the present status of public school administration ; 
organization of local, state, and federal educational authorities; and the 
administrative relationships involved therein. (Joyal.) 

293 



Ed. 202 s. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Sec- 
ondary Schools (2). 

This course is designed as a continuation of Ed. 200 f , but may be taken 
independently. It includes what is called "internal" administration; the 
organization of units within a school system; the personnel problems 
mvolved; and such topics as schedule making, teacher selection, public 
relations, and school supervision. CJoyal.) 

Ed. 203 s. High School Supervision (2). 

This course will deal with the nature and functions of supervision in a 
modern school program; recent trends in supervisory theory and practice; 
teacher participation in the determination of policies; planning of super- 
visory programs; appraisal of teaching methods; curriculum reorganization 
and other direct and indirect means for the improvement of instruction. 

(Joyal.) 

Ed. 212 s. Educational Sociology- Advanced (2). 

This course is essentially a continuation of Ed. 112 f in that it is designed 
further to round out the study of various considerations derived from the 
data of the social sciences which are pertinent to the work of all public 
school educators. However, Ed. 112 f is not required as a prerequisite. 

The educational implications of such topics as the following are studied: 
role of an ideology, national defense crisis, status of civil liberties, deple- 
tion status of natural resources, folklore of education, interest and pressure 
groups, press, radio, pictures, economic myths, behavior of electorate, youth 
problems, consumer behavior, recreational trends, occupational trends, 
safety, teachers* organizations, and follow-up studies. (Hand.) 

Ed. 216 s. School Finance and Business Administration (2). 

This course deals principally with these topics: school revenue and taxa- 
tion; federal and state aid and equalization; purchase of supplies and 
equipment; internal school accounting; and other selected problems of local 
school finance. (Joyal.) 

Students qualifying for the degree of Master of Education will elect the 
required four semester hours of seminar work from the following list of 
seminars (Ed. 220-234, inclusive). These courses are open for election 
by any other graduate student in Education. 



Ed. 220 f. 
Ed. 222 f. 
Ed. 224 s. 
Ed. 226 f. 
Ed. 228 s. 
Ed. 230 f. 
Ed. 232 s. 



Seminar in Secondary Education (2). 
Seminar in Adult Education (2). 
Seminar in History of Education (2). 
Seminar in Administration (2). 
Seminar in Special Education (2). 
Seminar in Science Education (2). 
Seminar in Guidance (2). 

294 



(Hand.) 

(Benjamin.) 

(Long.) 

(Joyal.) 

(Cain.) 

(Brechbill.) 

(Hand.) 



Ed. 234 s. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). (Benjamm.) 

Note- Ed B 236 f or s. Seminar in Vocational Education (2), com- 
monly given in the summer session and in the Baltimore division, may be 
used to satisfy this requirement. 

Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6) may also be used 
to satisfy this requirement. 

Note: See also Phys. Ed. 201 f or s, page 305. 

B. Educational Psychology 
(For full descriptions of these courses, see "Psychology," p. 373.) 
Psych. 10 f and s. Educational Psychology (3). 
Psych. 110 f or s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3). 
Psych. 125 f. Child Psychology (3). 
Psych. 130 f and s. Mental Hygiene (3). 
Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6). 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the College of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-English (3)— Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 10. • - . 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection 
and organization of subject matter in terms of modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references, bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; 
measuring results. Twenty periods of observation. (bmitn.; 

Ed. 122 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- Social Studies (3)— 
Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Objectives and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliogra- 
phies; methods of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary 
materials; lesson plans; measuring results. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 124 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Foreign Language 
(3)_Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Objectives of foreign language teaching in the high school; selection and 
organization of subject matter in relation to modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring 
results. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 126 8. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- Science (3)— Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 10. , , . i.. 

Objectives of science teaching; their relation to the general objectives 

296 



of secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class-room situation; selection and organization of 
subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works 
and laboratory equipment; technic of class room and laboratory; measure- 
ment, standardized tests; professional organizations and literature. Twenty 
periods of observation. (Brechbill ) 

Ed. 128 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Mathematics (3)-. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content 
and construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; 
methods of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional 
organizations and literature. Twenty periods of observation. CBrechbill.) 

Note: See also H. E. Ed. 103 f or s. Teaching Secondary Vocational 
Home Economics, page 297; Ind. Ed. 162 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Observation, page 300; Ed. 142 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- 
Physical Education, page 297. 

Ed. 138 f. Visual Education (2). 

Visual impressions in their relation to learning; investigations into the 
effectiveness of instruction by visual means; projection apparatus, its cost 
and operation; slides, film strips, and films; physical principles underlying 
projection; the integration of visual materials with organized courses of 
study; means of utilizing commercial moving pictures as an aid in realiz- 
ing the aims of the school. ' (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 139 f or s. Methods and Practice of Teaching I (3)— Prerequisite, 
approval of faculty committee. 

Thirty periods of observation, participation, and teaching in a high school 
class under the direction of the regular teacher of the class and the uni- 
versity supervisor. The student carries major responsibility for the instruc- 
tion of the high school pupils for approximately 25 periods. 

Two hours weekly of class sessions are included, in which study is made 
of the principles and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for this course must be obtained and submitted, prop- 
erly filled in, at the time of registration. Students taking this course should 
arrange their schedules so as to avoid serious conflicts with other courses. 



E. English 

L. Language 

M. Mathematics 

C. Commercial Subjects 



SS. Social Studies 

Sc. Science 

P. E. Physical Education 

I. Industrial Education 

(Brechbill and Staff.) 

Ed. 140 f or s. Methods and Practice of Teaching II (6) — Prerequisite, 
approval of faculty committee. 

Students who register in this course serve as apprentice teachers in the 
high schools to which they are assigned. One-half of each school day 

296 



throughout the semester is devoted to this work, which is carried on under 
the direction of a university supervisor. Opportunity is afforded for expe- 
rience in connection with school activities, guidance, records and reports, 
and other phases of school life, as well as classroom teaching. 

Two hours weekly of class sessions are included in which study is made 
of the principles and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for this course must be obtained and submitted, prop- 
erly filled in, not less than thirty days before registration. 



E. English 

L. Language 

M. Mathematics 

C. Commercial Subjects 



SS. Social Studies 

Sc. Science 

P. E. Physical Education 

I. Industrial Education 

(Brechbill and Staff.) 

*Ed. 142 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observati^jn-Piiysical Education 

(3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Materials and procedures in relation to program planning, physical exam- 
inations, records, grading, directed observation, reports, conferences and 
criticisms. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 150 f, 151 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Commercial 
Subjects (2, 2) — Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Aims and methods for the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and book- 
keeping in high schools. Twenty periods of observation. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Professor McNaughton. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 101 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3) — Required 
of juniors in Home Economics Education. Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

Philosophy of homemaking education; community survey; analysis of 
characteristics, interests, and needs of the high school girl; construction 
of a course of study; directed observations; use of various technics; selec- 
tion of illustrative material; the home project. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 102 f or s. Child Study (3)— Prerequisite, Psych. 10. 

The study of child development in relation to the physical, mental, and 
emotional phases of growth; adaptation of material to teaching of child 
care in high school; observation and participation in a nursery school. 

(McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 103 f or s. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics: 
Methods and Practice (3)— Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 101 s. 

Observation and teaching in a vocational department of a Maryland 
high school or in a junior high school in Washington. Organization of 



Open to men and women. 



297 



units, lesson plans, field trips; planning and supervision of home projects. 
After completing the teaching unit the student observes in home economics 
departments other than the one in which she has taught. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 104 s. Nursery School Techniques (2-3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 
10. Not open to juniors. Designed for nursery school teachers. 

Philosophy of preschool education; principles of learning; routines; study 
of children's interests and activities; observation and teaching in the 
nursery school. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems in Child Study (3) — Not open to 
juniors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102. 

Methods and practice in nursery school; making of particular studies 
related to the mental, emotional, or physical development of preschool 
children. % CMcNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106 f, 107 s. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (1, 1). 

Reports of units taught; construction of units for high school course of 
study; study of various methods for organization of class period; analysis 
of text books; evaluation of illustrative material. (McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 
H. Em Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics 
(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

(McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2-4). 

(McNaughton.) 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Professor Brown; Assistant Professor Gallington. 

For each semester hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

Ind. Ed. 1 f, 2 s. Mechanical Drawing (2, 2) — Ind. Ed. 1 f or its equiva- 
lent is prerequisite to Ind. Ed. 2 s. 

Fundamental practices in the projection of objects, the making of work- 
ing drawings, pattern layouts, tracing and blue-printing, and the principles 
in machine design including the study of conventions and the sketching of 
machine parts. 

Ind. Ed. 3 f. Elementary Woodworking (3). 

This course deals with the use and care of woodworking tools and mate- 
rials in bench practice involving the principles of joinery, including the 
application of woodworking finishes. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

Ind. Ed. 4 s. Advanced Woodworking (3) — Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 3 f or 
equivalent. 

Practice in the application of design and construction of projects in 
wood involving the use of woodworking machinery suitable for the high 

298 



school shop. It includes furniture construction and machine cabinet work, 
with some emphasis on manufacturing practices. Basic wood turning and 
a working knowledge of wood pattern making is taught, and practice given 
in coloring, finishing, and painting wood. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

Ind. Ed. 5 f. Sheet Metal Work (2). 

Information is given on materials, tools, and processes. Practice is given 
in soldering, the laying out of patterns, and the making of a group of 
elementary graded problems which involve items of practical use. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 6 s. Art Metal Work (2). 

This course deals with the designing and construction of art metal 
projects, including the use of brass, copper, silver, aluminum, pewter, and 
other alloys. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 7 y. Architectural Drawing (2)— Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1 f or 

equivalent. ^ 

Practical experience in the design and planning of homes and other 
buildings. Drawings, specifications, and blue-prints including the study of 
conventions and detail parts are featured. 

Ind. Ed. 8 y. Electricity (4). 

The essentials of electricity in industrial and other life situations. Units 
of work are completed in house and signal wiring, power wiring, auto- 
ignition, and the fundamental principles involved in direct current machin- 
ery and alternating current machinery. It provides teachers of electricity 
with sufficient material and data to cope with the problem of electrical 
projects for high school class construction. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per 
semester. 

Ind. Ed. 9 s. Elementary Machine Shop (2)— Alternate, Shop 4 s. 
Includes bench work, tool grinding, and elementary practice in the fun- 
damentals of operating machine tools. Laboratory fee, $2.50. (Not offered 
in 1941-42.) 

Ind. Ed. 10 f. Cold Metal Work (2). 

This course is concerned with the development of fundamental skills and 
knowledges involved in the design and construction of projects from band 
iron and other forms of mild steel. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
Ind. Ed. 11 f. Foundry (1)— Alternate, Shop 101 f. 

Laboratory practice in bench and floor moulding and elementary core 
making. Theory and principles covering foundry materials, tools, and ap- 
pliances are presented, including consideration of mixtures for casting gray 
iron, brass, bronze, and aluminum. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Not offered in 
1941-42.) 
Ind. Ed. 12 s. Forge Practice (1)— Alternate, Shop 1 s. 
Laboratory practice in forging and heat treating of metals. Theory and 
principles of handling tools and materials in the drawing out, upsetting, cut- 
ting, bending, twisting, welding, annealing, hardening, tempering and grind- 
ing of steel. Laboratory fee $2.00. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

299 



Ind. Ed. 13 s. Advanced Machine Shop (2) — Alternate, Shop 103 s. Pre- 
requisite, Ind. Ed. 9 s or equivalent. 

Laboratory experiences in the fundamental operations on lathe, shaper, 
drill press, and other machine shop equipment. Laboratory fee, $2.'50. (Not 
offered in 1941-42.) 

Ind. Ed. 14 s. Shop Maintenance (1) — Prerequisite, 8 semester hours of 
Shop credit or equivalent. 

Skill developing practice in the up-keep and care of school shop tools and 
equipment. Saw filing, the sharpening of edged power tools, the design 
and construction of tool racks, and the adjusting and oiling of power ma- 
chinery are among the major units offered. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 160 y. Essentials of Design (2) — Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. 1 f, 
2 s or equivalent. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application 
to the construction of high school shop projects. It presents knowledge and 
develops abilities in the art elements of line, mass, color, and design, and 
employs laboratory activities in freehand and mechanical drawing, tracing, 
and blue-printing. (Gallington.) 

Ind. Ed. 162 s. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 10^ 

Major functions and specific aims of industrial education; their relation 
to the general objectives of the junior and senior high schools; selection and 
organization of subject matter in terms of modem practices and needs; 
methods of instruction; expected outcomes; measuring results; professional 
standards. Twenty periods of observation. (Brown, Gallington.) 

Ind. Ed. 164 f. Shop Organization and Management (2). 

This course recapitulates methods of organization and management for 
teaching shop subjects. It includes organization and management of pupils; 
daily programs; projects; pupils' progress charts; selection, location, and 
care of tools, machines, equipment, and supplies; records and reports; and 
good school housekeeping. Opportunity is provided for visits to industrial 
plants as a basis for more practical planning of shop instruction and 
management. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 167 y. General Shop (2-4)— Elective. 

A general survey course designed to meet teacher training needs in organ- 
izing and administering a high school General Shop course. Special teach- 
ing methods are emphasized as students are rotated through skill and 
knowledge developing activities in mechanical drawing, electricity, wood- 
working, and general metal working. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per semester. 

(Gallington.) 

300 



B. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Physical Education for Men and Women 

A. Professor Mackert; Mr. English, Mr. Warner. 
PROFESSOR drew; Miss Davis, Miss Terhune, Miss Watts. 



Phys. Ed. 1 y. Physical Activities I: (2)-An activities course for male 
freshmen which meets three periods a week. 

The activities taught are soccer, touch football, basketball, volleyball, soft 
baseball, track and natural gymnastics. 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled m this course. 

Phys Ed. 2 y. Personal Hygiene (l)-Freshman course for women. 

This course consists of instruction in hygiene. The ^e^^^^^.^^^^^^^^^^^' 
attainments, care of the body by diet, exercise, sleep, bathmg, etc., and 

social hygiene. 

Phys. Ed. 3 y. Physical Activities II: (4)-An activities course for sopho- 
more men which meets three periods a week. 

The activities taught are the team sports of the freshman year and mdi- 
viJual :;orts which include fencing, wrestling, tumbling, boxing, ping pong, 
horseshoe pitching, handball, golf, tennis, and badmmton 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled m this course. 

**Phys Ed 4 y. Physical Activities (1)— Freshman course for women. 
Meets twice each week, with the exception of riding which meets one two- 
hour period each week. 

Students may elect from a wide range of activities, including archery, 
bowling, dance, equitation, golf, hockey, tennis, etc. 

The cost to the student varies in accordance with the activity chosen, and 
ranges from approximately $0.00 to $17.25 per semester. 

Phys. Ed. 5 y. Athletics I: (4)-Required of male freshmen in physical 
education. Meets five times a week. 

Two periods are devoted to training in activities for squad leadership 
and three periods to participation in the activities of the general physical 

education program. . „„„^„^ 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled m this course. 

Phys Ed. 6 y. Community Hygiene (2)-Sophomore course for women. 

Continuation of the freshman course. The work in hygiene includes the 
elements of physiology; the element, of home school, and commumty 
hygiene; and a continuation of social hygiene. 

*.An activity program suited to need is arranged upon the recommendation of the 
University physician. 

301 



**Phys. Ed. 8 y. Physical Activities (2)— Sophomore course for women. 
Meets twice each week. 

A continuation of Phys. Ed. 4 y. With the permission of the head of the 
department, a student may substitute activity courses offered in the major 
curriculum. 

Phys. Ed. 10 y. Dance I: (2)— Required of freshmen women whose major 
is Physical Education; open to others with the permission of the instructor. 

This course includes practice in elementary techniques and considers the 
basic principles of time, force, and space underlying all dance. Opportunity 
IS given for creating short dances in respect to form and content. 

Phys. Ed. 12 y. Athletics I: (4)— Required of freshmen women^ whose 
major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week plus two hours ar- 
ranged in which the student acts as assistant in a section of Phys. Ed. 4 y. 

The following sports are considered: in the first semester, hockey, soccer, 
basketball, badminton, and volleyball; in the second semester, bowling, 
tennis, golf, and soft ball. 

*Phys. Ed. 13 f. Accident Prevention (1)— Required of all juniors in 
Physical Education. Meets twice a week. 

This course is designed to help the professional student detect accident 
hazards in physical activities and to train him in safety precautions. 

Phys. Ed. 14 y. Dance II: (2)— Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 10 y or equiva- 
lent. Required of sophomore women whose major is Physical Education. 
Open to others with the permission of the instructor. 

This course includes practice in techniques of modem dance and a study 
of the contemporary field. Opportunity is given to create dance patterns 
for group or individual in respect to form and content. 

Phys. Ed. 15 y. Gymnastics I (2)— An activities course required of 
sophomore men in Physical Education which meets three periods a week. 

The activities taught are light and heavy gymnastics, including marching, 
calisthenics, tumbling, pyramid building, and exercise on apparatus. 

*Phys. Ed. 16 s. First Aid (1)— Required of junior men and women 
whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week. 

The course presents the fundamentals necessary for offering aid in ac- 
cidents and injuries until medical attention can be secured. Practical work 
is required of all students. 

Phys. Ed. 17 y. Gymnastics II (2)— Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 15 y or 
equivalent. An activities course for juniors and seniors, which meets three 
periods a week. 

This course is a continuation of Phys. Ed. 15 y. Advanced work in tumb- 
ling, apparatus and pyramid building. 



Unive^rsitrphJScian'?^'^"' '""'^^^ ^"^ ""^^^ '" arranged upon the recommendation of the 
*Open to men and women. 

302 



♦Phys. Ed. 18 f. Introductory Hygiene (2) — Required of all freshmen in 
Physical Education. Meets twice a week. 

This course surveys the health practices of college students and their 

community in the light of standard criteria, to the end that the individual 

student may increase his ability to adapt himself to conditions of finer 
living. 

*Phys. Ed. 20 s. Physical Education I: (3) — Required of sophomore men 
and women whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week. 

This course considers interpretations and objectives of physical education. 

Phys. Ed. 22 y. Athletics II: (4) — Required of sophomore women whose 
major is Physical Education. 

^ This course is a continuation of Phys. Ed. 12 y. 

*Phys. Ed. 26 y. Danoe III: (2) — Required of junior men and women 
whose major is Physical Education; open to others with the permission of 
the instructor. Meets twice each week. 

The course offers opportunity for the learning of the fundamental ball- 
room dance steps as well as the more modern routines. Attention is given 
to ballroom etiquette and the planning of dance parties. 

*Phys. Ed. 28 f. Dance IV: (1) — Required of junior women whose major 
is Physical Education; open to others with the permission of the instructor. 
Meets twice each week. 

This course includes suitable teaching material in tap dancing for school 
or recreation groups. 

*Phys. Ed. 30 s. Dance V: (1) — Required of junior women whose major is 
Physical Education; open to others with the permission of the instructor. 
Meets twice each week. 

The course includes historical and contemporary folk dances, festivals, and 
customs of various countries as well as the costume appropriate for each. 

*Phys. Ed. 52 y. Physical Activities III: (2) — Required of junior men and 
women whose major is Physical Education; open to others with the permis- 
sion of the instructor. Meets twice each week. 

The course presents co-educational and co-recreational activities suitable 
for school, club, and recreation groups. Games and stunts for contests, 
picnics, school parties, and other social gatherings are considered. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. Ed. 113 y. Athletics III: (2) — Prerequisite, two years of successful 
intramural participation. Required of junior men in Physical Education. 
Meets once a week. 

Problems of coaching and officiating in intramural play and high school 
athletics. Participation in the intramural program at the University, or in 
nearby schools, is a requirement of the course. (Mackert.) 



*Open to men and women. 



303 



Phys. Ed. 114 y. Athletics IV: (2)— Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 12 y, 22 y. 

Required of senior women whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice 
each week. 

The student is given the opportunity to coach and officiate under super- 
vision in the intramural program on the campus as well as to officiate in the 
schools of Washington, D. C, and Maryland. With the cooperation of the 
teachers in nearby schools the students plan and administer invitational 
sports days in the respective schools. (Drew.) 

Phys. Ed. 119 y. Athletics V: (2)— Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 113 y oi 
equivalent. A practical course for senior men in Physical Education. 

The aim of this course is to provide students with opportunities to assist 
in teaching, coaching, and officiating in the schools of Maryland and in the 
athletic tournaments conducted by these schools through the State Depart- 
ment of Education. The equivalent of two hours of practice is required 
each week. Individual conferences will be arranged in order that students 
may discuss with the instructor the problems that arise for them, and 
the class will meet occasionally to pool experiences. (Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 121 f. Physiology of Exercise (2) — Required of all juniors in 
Physical Education. Meets twice a week. 

A detailed consideration of the mechanism of muscular contraction; the 
metabolic, circulatory, and respiratory responses in exercise; and their 
integration by means of the nervous system. (Mackert.) 

*Phys. Ed. 123 s. Maturation of the Human Organism (2). 
A study of the main factors affecting the growth and development of 
the child with especial emphasis on normal development. 

Phys. Ed. 127 y. Analysis of Activities (4). 

An analysis of activities from the mechanical, anatomical, physiological, 
and psychological standpoint. Discussions, lectures, field study, and reports. 

*Phys. Ed. 133 s. Nature of Play (2) — Required of junior men and 
women whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week. 

The psychology of action, the uses of play, the types and organization 
of play activities and the management of play space are considered in 
the course. (T)rew.) 

*Phys. Ed. 137 f. Recreation IV: (2)— Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 113 y 
or 114 y, and three years of successful participation in intramural athletics 
or equivalent. Required of all majors in Physical Education. Meets twice 
a week. 

The purpose of this course is to study the various aspects of character 
guidance through leadership in physical activities. Participation in plan- 
ning, supervising, and directing the University program of intramural 
activities, or an equivalent situation, is a requirement of the course. 

(Mackert.) 



.Phys Ed. 144 f. Physical Education IV: (2)-Prerequisites Phys. Ed. 
,13 y or 114 y, and three years of successful participation in intramural 
llhletics or equivalent. Required of all seniors in Physical Education. 

Meets twice a week. . , x^j .• 

' The organization and administration of programs of Physical Educ^abon 

in high school situations. 

*Phys Ed. 146 s. Teaching Health (2)-Two lectures Prerequisites. 
Phys Ed. 18 f, 13 f, 16 s. A course required of seniors in Physical Educa- 
tion. Meets twice a week. 

Philosophy, aims, objectives, problems, materials, methods, and J>ro^e- 

dures for teaching health. 

For Graduates 
*Phys Ed. 201 f or s. Problems of Health and Physi«^al Education (3). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems 
that arise in the administration of health and physical education in public 
chor An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating th 
effectiveness of programs of health and physical education. (Mackert.) 

ENGINEERING 

PROFESSORS STEINBERG. CREESE. HUFF. YOUNGER; LECTURERS ACHENBACH. 
DiLLt HXLL, REAR, WALKER, BERTRAM; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS HODGINS. 
HUCKERTt; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS HOSHALL. PYLE, ALLEN, MaCHWART, 
ERNST, LANING, GREEN, WICKERSHAM, CoBB; MR. LOWEf, MR. MOORE, MR. 

McLaughlin. Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Frayer, Mr. Boyles. 

Chemical Engineering 

Ch E 10 s. Water. Fuels, and Lubricants (4)-Two lectures; two lab- 
oratfe's. Prerequisite Chem. 8 A y. 4 f, Phys. 2 y. or permission of 

instructor. , . 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual -"J;"! -^*°^^^^^^^^^^ 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering materials. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ch. B. 103 y. Elements of Chemical Engineering (6)-Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 8 A y. 8 B y. Phys. 2 y. . . .u ^= 

Theoretical discussion of general underlying philosophy and methods 
in chemLl engineering, such as presentation of ^-'l'^^'^^^^^^'::;^ 
and heat balances. Illustrated by consideration of typical problems and 

processes. 



'Open to men and women. 



♦Open to men and women. 
tOn leave. 



304 



305 



Ch, E. 104 y. Chemical Engrineering Seminar (2) — Required of all under- 
graduate students in chemical engineering. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Ch. E. 105 y. Advanced Unit Operations (10) — Two lectures; three lab- 
oratories. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103 y, Chem. 102 A y. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of fluid flow, heat flow, evaporation, 
humidity, distillation, absorption, scrubbing, and analogous unit operations 
typical of chemical engineering. Problems and laboratory operation of 
small scale semi-commercial type of equipment. A comprehensive problem 
involving theory and laboratory operations is included to illustrate the de- 
velopment of a plant design problem that requires the utilization of a 
number of the fundamental topics. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Ch. R 106 y. Minor Problems (13) — Prerequisite, completion of third 
year chemical engineering course or permission of department of chemical 
engineering. Completion of or simultaneous registration in Ch. E. 105 y will 
ordinarily be required. 

Original work on a special problem assigned to each student, including 
preparation of a complete report covering the study. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. (Not offered in 1941-1942.) 

Ch. E. 107 y.. Fuels and Their Utilization (4) — ^Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Ch. E. 103 y or permission of department of chemical engineering. 

A study of the sources of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, their economic 
conversion, distribution, and utilization. Problems. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 108 y. Chemical Technology (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
registration in Ch. E. 103 y or permission of department of chemical engi- 
neering. 

A study of the principal chemical industries. Plant inspections, trips, 
reports, and problems. (Machwart.) 

Ch. E. 109 y. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 102 A y, Ch. E. 103 y. 

A study of the application of the principles of engineering and chemical 
thermodynamics to some industrial problems encountered in the practice 
of chemical engineering. 

Ch. E. 110 y. Chemical Engineering Calculations (9) — Three lectures, 
first semester; six lectures, second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 23 y, 
Ch. E. 103 y. 

A study of methods for analyzing chemical engineering problems along 
quantitative and mathematical lines, with the calculus and other mathe- 
matical aids such as infinite series and Bessel's functions. Emphasis is 
placed on graphical presentations and the engineering utility of the results. 

306 



For Graduates 
Ch. E. 201 y. Graduate Unit Operations (10 or more).— Prerequisite, 
permission of department of chemical engineering. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of typical unit operations in chemical 
engineering. Problems. Laboratory operation of small scale semi-com- 
micial type equipment with supplementary reading, conferences, and 
reports. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Ch. E. 202 s. Gas Analysis (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, permission of department of chemical engineering. 

Quantitative determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseous vapors, 
and important gaseous impurities. Problems. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Ch. E. 203 f, 204 s. Graduate Seminar (2)— Required of all gradu- 
ate students in chemical engineering. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering, 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 205. Research in Chemical Engineering. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis 

in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. -L^a^^^- 

tory fee, $8.00 per semester. ^^^^ '' 

Ch. E. 207 A f, 208 A s. Plant Design Studies (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

Prer^uisite, permission of department of chemical engineering. 

An examination of the fundamentals entering into the selection of pro- 
cesses, the specifications for and choice and location of equipmen^^d 
plant sites. Problems. ^ 

Ch E. 207 B f 208 B s. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (2, 2)— Six 
hours of laboratory work which may be elected to accompany or be pre- 
ceded by Ch. E. 207 A f, 208 A s. Prerequisite, permission of department 
of chemical engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Machwart.) 
Ch. E. 209 y. Gaseous Fuels (4)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of department of chemical engineering. 

An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles in- 
volved in the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. 
Problem in the design and selection of equipment. (Hutt.J 

Civil Engineering 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
C. E. 101 s. Hydraulics (4)— Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site' Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, dams, and pipes. Flow through orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, open channels, and weirs. Use of Reynolds number 
Measurement of water. Elementary hydrodynamics. (B^mst.) 

307 



C. E. 102 s. Hydraulics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, Mech. 101 f or 102 f. Required of juniors in electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 

A shorter course than C. E. 101 s, with emphasis on water wheels, tur- 
bines, and centrifugal pumps. (Sherwood, McLaughlin.) 

C. E. 103 f. Curves and Earthwork (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; transition curves; vertical and horizontal parabolic curves; rail- 
way turnouts, track layout, and string lining of curves. (Allen.) 

C. E. 104 s. Theory of Structures (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Analytical and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 
framed structures. Influence lines for reactions, shears, moments, and 
stresses. Analysis of lateral bracing systems. Elements of slope and 
deflections. (Allen.) 

C. E. 105 f. Elements of Highways (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Location, design, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements. 
Field inspection trips. ^ (Steinberg.) 

C. E. 106 y. Concrete Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design and 
detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures, which include 
slabs, columns, footings, beam bridges, arches, retaining walls, and dams. 
Applications of slope-deflection and moment distribution theories and rigid 
frames. . (Allen.) 

C. E. 107 y. Structural Design (7) — Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design 
and detailing of structural steel sections, members and their connections, 
for roof trusses, plate girders, highway and railway bridges, buildings, 
bracing systems, and grillage foundations. (Allen.) 

C. E. 108 y. Municipal Sanitation (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 101 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. (Hall.) 

C. E. 109 s. Soils and Foundations (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104 s. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

An introductory study of the properties and behavior of soil as an engi- 
neering material. Applications to engineering construction. (Lowe.) 

308 



C E 110 y. Thesis (3)— One laboratory, first semester; one lecture, one 
laboratory second semester. Elective for seniors in civil engmeermg. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in civil engineering 
design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be 
needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is assigned 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is reqmred 
to complete the thesis. 

For Graduates 
C. E. 201 f. Advanced Properties of Materials (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Mech. 103 or equivalent. 

A critical study of elastic and plastic properties, flow of materials, 
resistance to failure by fracture, impact, and corrosion, the theories of 
failure. Assigned reading from current literature. vi^xn^^u/ 

C. E. 202 f. Advanced Strength of Materials (3)— Three credits. Pre- 
requisite, Mech. 101 f or equivalent. 

Special problems in engineering stress analysis. Limitations of flexure 

and torsion formulas, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, combined 

stresses, thin tubes, thick-walled cylinders, and flat plates. (Ernst.) 

C. E. 203 s. Applied Elasticity (3)— Three credits. Prerequisite, Math. 

114 f or equivalent. 

Two dimensional elastic problems, general stress-strain analysis in three 
dimensions, stability of beams, columns, and thin plates. (Ernst.) 

C. E. 204 f. Soil Mechanics (3)— Three credits. Prerequisite, C. E. 
109 s or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the properties of engineering soils. Assigned read- 
ing from current literature. (Lowe.) 
C. E. 205 s. Advanced Foundations (3)— Three credits. Prerequisite 
C. E. 106 y or equivalent. 

A detailed study of types of foundations. Design and ^^^s^^^^^j^^j'^^^^ 
meet varying soil conditions. ^ ^^'' 

C. E. 206 s. Highway Engineering (3)— Three credits. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 105 f or equivalent. 

An intensive course in the location, design and construction of highways. 

(Steinberg.) 

C. E. 207 y. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (6)— Three credits. Pre 
requisite, Mech. 103 or equivalent. 

A thorough review of the methods for the design of concrete mixtures, 
followed by a study of factors affecting the properties of the Resulting 
concrete This course is intended as a background for work m the field 
of concrete, concrete aggregates, or reinforced concrete. ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

309 



a E. 208 Research (2-6)-Credit in accordance with work outlined. 

Drawing 

fien i e^gSS? """^ '''''^^ •^»'°'^*--- ^^^^^-^ of 

di^Sl'ln/'nrfi^'^T*"*'' "'^o^^Phi'^ projection, technical sketches, 
Sr hW I ^""^ *^°'" ™^™°^' "^"^^^"S f^^"! description; inkinj 
tracing, bluepnntmg, isometric and oblique projection and sections. 

Dr^i' f p*"* ^^ P*f ''P"^« Geometry (2)_Two laboratories. Prerequisite 
Dr. 1 f. Required of freshmen in engineering prerequisite. 

reSgT'tii%!Lt iSr a?d ?.?"' V ."'^ "'"*^^" "' ^P-« P-^-^ 
developLnt. /ppLlS's t p^- al "^^S^Vl^^^^ 

r:rprotsrfi:j° '"'=*^'=^' ^-^^"^^'•^"^ ^-^^-^ - *'« stude^^; 

nee'S^g'sLe^:."'"'"' ^'^^^"^ ^^^"^"^ '^^-«*«^^- ^P- to non-engi- 

v^nttt"?' ^^^^^''^' ^"d working drawings of machines; including con- 
ventions, tracing, isometric and cabinet projections, and bl^eprintfng 

Electrical Engineering 

lectrt 'one l^bi^^It^""'"' ''^""'^ ^'^"^^ '^*=*"^^^' «^«t ^^^^^^r; two 
23 yS Phvs It Zrr /'T*'""- ''"^^" concurrently with Math. 
I Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores in electrical engineering 

Principles involved in the flow of direct currents in conductors- current 
and voltage relations in simple circuits; magnetism and magnetic circuS- 
electromagnetic induction, simple dielectric circuits and dynSSs ExS 
ments on direct current circuits and machines. ^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
E. E. 101 s Principles of Electrical Engineering (3)— Two lecturer- nnp 

rators, motors, and transformers. ^ cnaracteristics of gene- 

(Hodgins.) 

310 



E. E. 102 y. Principles of Electrical Engineering (8) — Three lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y, Math. 23 y. Required of juniors 
in chemical and in mechanical engineering. 

Study of elementary direct current and alternating current circuit char- 
acteristics. Principles of construction and operation of direct and alter- 
nating current machinery. Experiments on the operation and characteristics 
of generators, motors, transformers, and control equipment. 

(Creese, Laning.) 

E. E. 103 f. Direct Current Machinery (4) — Three lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y. Math. 23 y, and E. E. 1 y. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
direct current generators, motors, and control apparatus. Experiments on 
the operation and characteristics of direct current generators and motors. 

(Hodgins.) 

E. E. 104 s. Direct Current Design (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 103 f. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

The purpose of this course is to help the student in electrical engineering 
to acquire a thorough knowledge of the basic principles upon which any 
design depends. A study is made of design formulas and materials, suit- 
able for direct current machinery, and the reasons for the various standards 
of practice. The student is required to make all calculations for a direct 
current generator or motor. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 105 y. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (7) — Two lectures, one 
laboratory first semester; three lectures, one laboratory second semester. 
Prerequisites, concurrent registration in E, E. 103 f, 106 s. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

A study of electric and magnetic fields; of electric and magnetic proper- 
ties of materials; of solid, liquid and gaseous conduction; and of electrical 
circuits and measurements. (Laning.) 

E. E. 106 s. Alternating Current Circuits (5) — Three lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, E. E. 103 f. Required of juniors in electrical 
engineering. 

Introduction to the theory of alternating current circuits, both single 
phase and polyphase; methods and apparatus used to measure alternating 
currents, voltage, and power; current and voltage relations in balanced and 
unbalanced polyphase systems. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 107 y. Alternating Current Machinery (9) — Three lectures, one 
laboratory first semester; four lectures, one laboratory second semester. 
I'rerequisite, E. E. 106 s. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
transformers, alternators, induction motors, synchronous motors, syn- 
chronous converters, commutator type motors, and other apparatus; tests 
and experiments. (Creese, Hodgins.) 

811 



req^uisL^E E iT"'^^ """"""' ''"''^" ^'>-°"^ laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, E. E. 104 s and concurrent registration in E. E. 107 y. Required 
of seniors m electrical engineering. required 

cinTe^'tn'TV'-^ continuation of E. E. 104 s, and applies the same prin- 
ciple, to the design of an alternator and transformer. (HodgE ) 

tJt ^P ^"^ ^' .,^'*''"*^''' Communications (6)-Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. ituora- 

Principles of wire and radio communication. Theory and calculation o' 

a'nTraruLZ'f "^'"r"^ transmission lines and coupled circuits. Th:or; 
and calculaton of non-lvnear impedances including the vacuum tube Intro 
duction to electromagnetic wave propagation. (Rear ) 

site,' E. "^106 ,"'""''•''""" (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems 
Illumination calculations, photometric measurements (CreesT)' 

E. E. Ill f. Electric Railways (.3)_Three lectures. Prerequisite takpr, 
concurrently with E. E. 107 y. ^ icrequisite, taken 

Mechanism of train motion. Application of electrical equipment to trans 
portation. Construction and operation of control apparatus used in diffe 
en fields of electrical transportation such as urban railways trunk w" 
rai ways trolley busses and diesel-electric equipment. Power r^qurements 
distribution systems and signal systems. (HodS) 

E. E 112 s. Electric Power Transmission (3)_Three lectures Pre- 
requisite, taken concurrently with E. E. 107 y. 'ectures. fre- 

A study of the electrical, mechanical, and economic consideration of 
power transmission; a survey of central station and substation equipment 
and a consideration of the fundamentals of transients. (Sng )' 

E. E. 113 s. Engineering Electronics (3)— Two lecturer- «„» i»i, * 
Prerequisite, E. E. 106 s. ^^^o 'ectures, one laboratory. 

A review of the properties, emission and utilization of electron^ in 
vacuum gases, and vapors; a study of the application of electJortube^ 

To^eZ. ^"""^^^' ^^^^""^ '"^ ''^ '"''- --"- industrilltnlTese'^S 

(Laning.) 

tricalt^L^Hn^^^^^ '''""''"^ ''''''''''''' ^^^^^^^^ '^' ^^^^^ ^^ e^- 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a special problem in elec 

S /T;Ii"^- "' "''" ^"^' '^^' ^^ ^^^-^'->^ studies a" LX 
arP h 1 ,t\l """"^"T ''^'''' ^'' ^^^^^^^^' ^^d frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student S assTJ^ed 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibllgraX is 
required to complete the thesis. "lonography, is 

(Staff.) 
312 



General Engineering Subjects 

Engr. 1 f. Introduction to Engineering (1) — One lecturo. Required of 
freshmen in engineering. 

A course of lectures by the faculty and by practicing engineers covering 
the engineering professional fields. The work of the engineer, its require- 
ments in training and character, and the ethics and ideals of the profession. 
The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in selecting the par- 
ticular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 

Engr. 2 f. Engineering Geology (2) — Two lectures. Required of sopho- 
mores in civil engineering. 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Engr. 102 s. Engineering Law and Specifications (2) — Two lectures. 
Required of seniors in civil engineering; elective for seniors in electrical 
and in mechanical engineering. 

A study is made of the fundamental principles of law relating to business 
and to engineering; including contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
corporations, and common carriers. These principles are then applied to the 
analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and 
specifications. ( Steinberg. ) 

Mechanics 

Mech. 1 s. Statics and Dynamics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Dr. 
3, and to be taken concurrently with Math. 23 y and Phys. 2 y. Required 
of sophomores in civil and in electrical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solutions of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia; kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

Mech. 2 s. Statics and Dynamics (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Dr. 3, and to be taken concurrently with Math. 23 y and 
Phys. 2 y. Required of sophomores in mechanical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solution of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, friction, centroids 
and moments of inertia, kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

The course also embraces the fundamentals of kinematics necessary to 
the study of kinematics of machinery. Plane motion of a particle and the 
general laws governing the transmission of plane motion are treated by 
vector and graphical methods. 

313 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

Mech. 101 f. Strength of Materials (5) — Five lectures. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 1 s or 2 s. Required of juniors in civil and in mechanical engineering. 

Riveted joints; torsional stresses and strains; beam stresses and detlec- 
tion; combined axial and bending loads; column stresses; principal stresses 
and strains ; impact and energy loads ; statically indeterminate beams ; shear 
center; unsymmetrical bending; composite members including reinforced 
concrete beams. Instruction in the use of an approved handbook containing 
the properties of rolled steel sections. (Younger, Ernst.) 

Mech. 102 f. Strength of Materials (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 1 s or 2 s. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

A shorter course than Mech. 101 f . Instruction in the use of an approved 
handbook containing the properties of rolled steel sections. (Ernst.) 

Mech. 103 f and s. Materials of Engineering (2) — One lecture; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Mech. 101 f or 102 f. Required of juniors in civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering, and of the conditions that influence their physical 
characteristics. The interpretation of specifications and of standard tests. 
Laboratory work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, brick, 
cement, and concrete. (Pyle.) 

Mechanical Engineering 
For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 101 f. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisites, Math. 23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors 
in civil engineering. 

Elementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel, and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for the generation of power. Includes 
study of fundamental types of steam boilers, fuel burning equipment, prime 
movers, and their allied apparatus. Supplemented by laboratory tests and 
trips to industrial plants. (Sherwood.) 

M. E. 102 f. Thermodynamics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 
23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, 
steam turbine, nozzles. The properties of vapors, cycles of heat and entropy, 
including discussion of machines and their uses. (Green.) 

M. E. 103 s. Power Plants (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, senior standing. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

A study of heat, fuel, and combustion in the production and use of steam 
for the generation of power. Includes the theory and operation of steam 

314 



engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines, and their accessories. Practical 
power problems as applied to typical power plants, supplemented by lab- 
oratory tests and trips to industrial plants. (Careen.) 

M E. 104 y. Thermodynamics (5)— Two lectures, first semester; three 
lectures, second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required 
of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors. Thermo- 
dynamics of heat cycles, air compressors, and steam engines. 
■^ (Huckert, Sherwood.) 

M E. 105 s. Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics (3)-Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Math. 23 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in mechamcal 
engineering, aeronautical option. 

A study of the fundamental principles of the flow of air and of water. 
Applications with special reference to the airplane; airfoil and propeller 
theory; theory of model testing in wind tunnels; design perfonnance cal- 

. . » • 1 (Younger.) 

eulations of airplanes. 

M. E. 106 f. Heating and Ventilation (3)-Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, M. E. 104 y. Required of seniors in mechanical engi- 
neering. 

The study of types of heating and ventilating systems for a particular 
building; layout of piping and systems, with complete calculations and esti- 
mates of costs; fundamentals of air conditioning. (um.) 

M E 107 s. Refrigeration (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 104 y. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refngeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories and homes. (i^m.) 

M E 108 y. Thesis (3)-0ne laboratory, first semester; one lecture, 
one laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in mechanical engi- 

"'Srstudent selects, with faculty approval, a object in mechanic^ engi- 
neering desTgn or res'earch. He makes such field or '-^^/^J^^/^J 
may be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent 
coSerences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the gudent 
Is assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bAhog- 
raphy, is required to complete the thesis. *^ 

M E. 109 y. Prime Movers (8)-Three lectures; one laboratory Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 101 f, C. E. 102 s. Required of seniors m mechanical 

engineering. , . ^ t* 

A course covering the use of prime movers to convert heat into power. It 
includes a study of heat, fuels and combustion processes followed by the 
theory, construction and operation of internal combustion engines, steam 
engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines and their auxiliary equipment. 

316 



Theory is supplemented by practical problems and by laboratory tests IT, 
entire course is closely integrated with the mechanical laborTtor; couSe. 

M. E. 110 y Mechanical Engineering Design (7)-Two lectures'^^'wl 
iaboratones first semester; one lecture, two laboratories second sem;ster 
Prereqmsite, Mech. 101 f. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering 
deiriT embracing the kinematics and dynamics of machinery and the 
design of machme members and mechanisms. Special problems on 't 
balancmg, vibration, and critical speeds of machine members a^ treated 

( Huckfirt ) 

M. E. Ill y. Mechanical Laboratory (4)-0ne lecture; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of seniors in meckanical engS 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and wat.r 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam and in emal cTmh.^t 
engines, setting of valves, tests for economy and cap^ "f Srs eSl" 
detr- TT^'"' f '^'' P"-?. -— Feed'watlr heaters 'and^eo;.' 
plant tests.' "''"' "^ '"''^' ^"''°"'' ""^ "^"'<* ^"^^^^ ^"^ power 

m'^E 1o."<f ''; ^""^''''t S*'-"*^*"'-^^ (6)-Three lectures. Prerequtue 
option. ""' °' "'"'"'■^ ^" '"^^'^^"'^^l engineering, aeroLtics' 

The fundamental principles of structural analysis and design of airplanes 
The air worthiness requirements of the Civil Aeronautics ^uthS and 

fpLitrSsiSror ^ -' ''- ~* --- branched aryv^; 

(Younger.) 
For Graduates 

M. E. 201 y. Advanced Statics and Dynamics of Machinery f6)-Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, Mech. 101 f, Math. 114 f, or equivalent 

dat^S'r NiZ"''r" ^f ''"'^'. '" "'^''^'''''- Vibrations, and vibration 

(Younger.) 

reauisft'e 'm F .ff ""*="'^ ^'''r^' Structures (6)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, M. h, 112 y or equivalent. 

rep?rSs t\f. ^""f/f '"l ""^^^^'"^ ^'"^^'^^^ "^ designing. Study of research 
reports m aircraft structures. (Wickersham, Younger.) 

M. E. 203 y. Advanced Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics (6)--Three 

lectures. Prerequisite, M. E. 105 s or equivalent. 
Theoretical and experimental study of the flow of fluids. (Wickersham.) 

M. E. 204 y. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer (6)-Three 

lectures. Prerequisites, M. E. 104 y, 109 y, or equivalent ^ 

Entl'i'?'''''. 'V^".^^""' '^ thermodynamics to industrial processes. 
Energy transfer by radiation, conduction, and convection. (Green.) 

316 



M. E. 205 y. Seminar (2-6) — Credit in accordance with work outlined. 
Seminars may be organized in any field of mechanical engineering for the 
study of general theory or specific problems. (Staff.) 

M. E. 206. Research (2-8) — Credit in accordance with work done. (Staff.) 

Shop 

Shop 1 s. Forge Practice (1) — One combination lecture and laboratory. 
Required of freshmen in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on the principles of forging and heat treatment 
of steel. Demonstrations in acetylene and electric welding, brazing, cutting, 
and case hardening. Laboratory practice in drawing, bending, upsetting, 
forge welding, hardening, tenipering, and thread cutting. 

Shop 2 f. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
sophomores in electrical engineering. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, tapping, knurling, and 
tool sharpening. 

Shop 3 f. Machine Shop Practice (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of sophomores in mechanical engineering. 

Study of the fundamental principles of machine tools, such as lathe, 
planer, shaper, milling machine, drilling machine, and grinding machines. 
Calculation for cutting threads, spur and helical gears, fluting and cutting 
speeds. The laboratory work in this course is identical with Shop 2 f. 

Shop 4 s. Machine Shop Practice (2) — Two laboratories. Required of 
juniors in Industrial Education. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, pipe threading, thread 
cutting, surface grinding, and fluting and cutting spur and helical gears. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Shop 101 f. Foundry Practice (1) — One combination lecture and lab- 
oratory. Required of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on foundry products and layouts, materials and 
equipment, hand and machine moulding, cupola practice and calculating 
mixes. Core making, moulding, and casting in aluminum. (Hoshall.) 

Shop 102 s. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, fluting, cutting spur and helical gears, jig work, and cutter and 
surface grinding. (Hoshall.) 

Shop 103 s. Machine Shop Practice (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Shop 4 s. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. 

Boring, reaming, broaching, fluting, milling, jig work, gear cutting, and 
sharpening milling cutters. (Hoshall.) 

317 



Surveying 

Surv. 1 f and s. Elements of Plane Surveying (1) — Combined lecture and 
laboratory work. Prerequisites, Math. 21 f, 22 s. Required of sopho- 
mores in chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

A brief course in the use of the tape, compass, level, transit, and stadia. 
Computations for area, coordinates, volume, and plotting. 

Surv. 2 y. Plane Surveying (5) — One lecture, one laboratory first se- 
mester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
21 f, 22 s. Required of sophomores in civil engineering. 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level. 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross- 
sections, volume, stadia. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Surv. 101 f. Advanced Surveying (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 2 y. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Adjustment of instruments, latitude, longitude, azimuth, time, triangula- 
tion, precise leveling, geodetic surveying, together with the necessary 
adjustments and computations. Topographic surveys. Plane table, land 
surveys, and boundaries. Mine, tunnel, and hydrographic surveys. (Pyle.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Hale, Warfel; Lecturer McManaway; Associate Professor 
Harman; Assistant Professors Lemon, Fitzhugh*, Zeeveld, Bryan, 
Cooley, Murphy, Ball, Ide; Mr. Gravely, Miss Miller, Mr. Peden, Mr. 
Robertson, Mr. Sv^aringen, Mr. Ward, Mr. Smith, Dr. Weeks, Mr. 

Taft, Mr. McCollom, Mr. Tyler, Miss Beall. 

Eng. 1 y. Survey and Composition I (6) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful pass- 
ing of the qualifying examination given by the department, or successful 
completion of Eng. A f. Required of all four-year students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. Each 
semester of this course will be repeated in the following semester. 

Eng. A f. Special Preparatory Course (0) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English. Required of all 
students who fail to pass the qualifying examination. Students who show 
sufficient progress after five weeks of Eng. A f will be transferred to 
Eng. 1 y. Others will continue with Eng. A f for one semester. The 
department reserves the right to transfer students who make unsatisfactory 
progress from Eng. 1 y to Eng. A f. 

A course in grammatical and rhetorical principles designed to help 
students whose preparation has been insufficient for Eng. 1 y. Exer- 
cises, conferences, precis writing. This course will be repeated in the 
second semester. 



* Absent on leave. 



318 



Eng 2 f. Survey and Composition II (3)— One general lecture given 
bv various members of the department; two quiz sections. Prerequisite, 
Eng. 1 y- Required of all students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work accomplished 
in Eng 1 y. An historical study of English Literature from the begin- 
nings through the Romantic Age. Themes, book reports, conferences. 

Eng. 3 s. Survey and Composition II (3)— One lecture; two quiz 
sections. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 f. 

Continuation of Eng 2 f . 

Eng. 4 s. Business English (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y, 5 f. Limited to students in commerce. 

This course develops the best methods of writing effective business 
letters. 

Eng. 5 f. Expository Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

Study of the principles of exposition. Analysis and interpretation of 
material bearing upon scientific matter. Themes, papers, and reports. 
Eng. 6 s. Expository Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

5 f . ' , 

Continuation of Eng. 5 f . 
% Eng. 7 f, 8 s. Survey of American Literature (3, 3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1 y. . - ^nt\n \ 1QCC 
I First semester, American thought and expression from 1607 to 18b&, 
with emphasis upon colonial cultural patterns, upon the rise of nationalism, 
and upon sectional conflict. Reports and term paper. 

Second semester, emphasis upon the changing social forces which influ- 
enced American wTnters after 1865. Reports and term paper. 
Eng. 11 f, 12 s. Shakespeare (3, 3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

First semester, eleven significant early plays, illustrating the drama as 
a distinct form of art. Dramatic criticisms; preparation of acting script; 
experimental production. 

Second semester, ten significant late plays. 

Eng. 13 s. Introduction to Narrative Literature (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Not open to freshmen. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and of other narrative forms. 

Eng. 14 f and s. College Grammar (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Eng. 1 y. Required of students preparing to teach English. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. 

Eng. 15 s. The contemporary Novel (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y. 

A study of the contemporary novel in Britain, America, and on the 

Continent. (Not given in 1941-1942.) 

319 



Drama 1 f. Amateur Play Production (3) — Three lectures. Admissioh 
by the permission of the instructor. 

A basic course for little theatre workers and secondary school teachers 
of dramatics. Brief survey of the mechanics used in the theatre from early 
Greek tragedy to contemporary times. Plays of each major period studied 
with attention to the method of creating theatrical effectiveness. 

Drama 2 s. Amateur Play Production (3) — Three lectures; one labora- 
tory. Admission by the permission of the instructor. 

Fundamental principles of acting and of direction of amateur produc- 
tion. Each student will make a production book of one or more plays and 
engage in practical laboratory work. 

Journ. 1 y. Introduction to Journalism (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 1 y. Registration only by permission of the instructor. 

A study of the elementary principles of journalism. 

Journ. 15 y. Graphic Design (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 
A study of typography and its application. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Qualified major students who wish to read for honors in English should 
apply to the chairman of the department. The reading may be done in the 
last two years, but should, if possible, be begun earlier. 

In addition to the twelve hours of basic freshman and sophomore English, 
a student taking his major work in this department must pass one semester 
of Advanced Writing, one semester of College Grammar, and one semester 
of either History of the English Language or Old English. In addition, he 
must complete one of the schedules below. 

a. Major work in general literature (recommended for those preparing 
to teach English in secondary schools) : Introduction to American Litera- 
ture, Shakespeare, and at least six hours from the following: Milton; 
Literature of the 18th Century; Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age; 
Victorian Literature; Modern and Contemporary British Poets; Emerson, 
Thoreau, and Whitman; American Fiction; Contemporary American Poetry 
and Prose; the English Novel; Elizabethan Drama. 

b. Major work in American literature: Survey of American Literature; 
Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman; American Fiction; Contemporary Ameri- 
can Poetry and Prose; American Drama. 

c. Major work in drama: Shakespeare, and twelve hours from the fol- 
lowing: Medieval Drama, Elizabethan Drama, Modern Drama, Contempo- 
rary Drama, American Drama, Amateur Play Production, Introduction to 
Comparative Literature (first semester), The Spanish Drama, The Faust 
Legend, Ibsen. 

320 



A Major work in English literature: Shakespeare, and at least twelve 
hours in the department in advanced courses other than American litera- 

^"ninor work may also be elected in these fields, but no major and minor 
combination of a. and b. or of a. and d. will be permitted. 

Eng. 101 s. History of the English Language (3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 14 f. ' 

An historical survey of the English Language: its nature, origin, and 
development, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in 
English speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. (Harman.) 

Eng. 102 f. Old English (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 14. 

A study of Old English grammar and literature. Lectures on the prin- 
ciples of phonetics and comparative philology. (Ball.), 

Eng. 103 s. Beowulf (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f. 

A study of the Old English epic in the original. (Ball.) 

Eng 104 f. Chaucer (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f , 3 s. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and CHseyde, and the principal 
minor poems, with lectures and readings on the social ^^^^^^J^^^^^^J 
Chaucer's time. 

Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. . 1 • • 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside ''^^^'"l^.^^^^^'J^^- 

Eng. 106 s. Elizabethan Drama (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 

Eng. 2 f , 3 s. 

A study of the change in spirit and form of English drama from 1540 
to 1640, as seen in the works of the important dramatists other than Shake- 
speare. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, written 
dramatic criticisms. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 107 s. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f , 3 s. 

A study of the literary manifestations of humanism and the new 

national spirit in sixteenth-century England, with emphasis on the prose 

works of More, Lyly, Sidney, Hooker, Bacon, and the translators of the 

Bible, and on the poetry of Spenser. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 108 f. Milton (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (2)— Two 

lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

A study of the chief prose writers and of the Metaphysical and Cavalier 
traditions in poetry. (Murphy.) 

321 



Eng. 110 f. The Age of Dryden (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

This course emphasizes the relation of literature to the philosophical 
movements of the age. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Murphy.) 

Eng. Ill f, 112 s. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2, 2)--Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

First semester, readings in the period dominated by Defoe, Swift, Addi- 
son, Steele, and Pope. 

Second semester. Dr. Johnson and his Circle; the Rise of Romanticism; 
the Letter Writers. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 113 f, 114 s. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3, 3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

First semester, a study of the development of the Romantic movement 
in England as exemplified by the prose and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Lamb, De Quincy, and others. 

Second semester, a study of the later Romantic writers, including Byron, 
Shelley, Keats, and others. (Hale.) 

Eng. 115 f. Scottish Poetry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 
3 s. No knowledge of the Scottish dialect required. 

Readings in the Scottish Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthornden; song 
and ballad literature; poets of the vernacular revival: Ramsay, Ferguson, 
and Burns. Papers and reports. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 116 f, 117 s. Victorian Prose and Poetry (3, 3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

A study of the chief English authors of the Nineteenth Century from 
the close of the Romantic Period. (Cooley.) 

* 

Eng. 118 s. Modern and Contemporary British Poets (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

A study of the chief English and Irish poets of the Twentieth Century. 

(Murphy.) 

Eng. 120 f, 121 s. The History and Development of the Novel in England 
(3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

A study of the origin and development of the novel as a form in England. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) (Ide.) 

Eng. 123 f. Modern Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
2 f, 3 s. 

A survey of English drama during the two centuries from 1660 to I860. 
Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Fitzhugh.) 

322 



Eng. 124 s. Contemporary Drama (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 2 f , 3 s. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen 
fn O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 
^" ^ (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 125 f. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 7 f , 8 s. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, with 
emphasis on transcendentalism, idealism, and democracy. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. American Fiction (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 

7 f , 8 s. 

Historical and critical study of the short story and novel in the United 
States from 1789 to 1920. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3)— Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 7 f , 8 s. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. (Not given 
in 1941-42.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 128 s. American Drama (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
7 f , 8 s. 

Historical study of representative American plays and playwrights from 
1787 to 1920. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 129 f. Types of English Literature (3)— Three lectures. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of English litera- 
ture, with especial attention to the influence of classical myth and legand 
and of classical literary ideals upon English and American writers. 

(Harman.) 

Eng. 135 f. Introduction to Creative Writing (2)— Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f , 3 s. 

Theory and practice in the short story and lyric, with some study of the 
novelette and play at the election of the class. Major students in English 
must elect either this course or Eng. 136 s. (Bryan.) 

Eng. 136 s. Magazine Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
2 f, 3 s. 

The production and marketing of such literary forms as the magazine 
article, the personal essay, the biographical essay, and the book review. 

(Bryan.) 

Eng. 137 s. Advanced Creative Writing (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Eng. 135 f or 136 s; open to other advanced students by permission of the 
instructor after submission of an original composition. 

Study and exercise in original literary expression as an interpretative 
art. (Bryan.) 

323 



Eng. 140 f. Major American Poets (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites 
Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

Intensive study of the poetry and poetic theories of the major American 
poets since Bryant. 

Eng. 141 s. Major American Prose Writers (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 2 f, 3 s. 

Intensive study of the major non-fiction prose writers of nineteenth- 
century United States. 

For Graduates 

Requirements for Advanced Degrees with major in English (in addition 
to the general requirements of the Graduate School): 

Master of Arts 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of English 
must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German at the time 
of admission or not later than six months before taking the degree. 

In the thesis, the candidate will be expected to demonstrate his ability 
to use the ordinary methods of research in the discovery of knowledge and 
to organize and present his findings in a clear, effective English style. 

The final examination will be based in part upon the courses pursued 
and in part upon first-hand knowledge of all the literary works included 
in the departmental list of readings for the Master's degree. The examina- 
tion will test the candidate's powers of analysis and criticism. 

Major work in the department may be elected in any of the following 
fields, the requirements of which are listed below. 

a. Major work in English literature: Old English, and at least six hours 
from seminar courses in Medieval Romance, the Elizabethan period, the 
Eighteenth Century, The Romantic period, the Victorian period. 

b. Major work in American literature: the seminar in American litera- 
ture, and at least six hours from the advanced undergraduate courses in 
American literature. 

c. Major work in drama: History of the Theatre, and at least six hours 
from the following : Introduction to Comparative Literature (first semester), 
Medieval Drama, Elizabethan Drama, Modern Drama, Contemporary 
Drama, American Drama, The Faust Legend, The Modem German Drama, 
Spanish Drama, Ibsen. 

d. Major work in philology: Old English, Beowulf, Seminar in Old English 
Poetry, Middle English, Gothic, and either Medieval Romance or Chaucer. 

e. General major (designed chiefly for teachers in secondary schools): 
Old English, and at least six hours from the following groups: Elizabethan 
Drama, or an Elizabethan seminar; Milton; the Eighteenth Century, either 
undergraduate or seminar; Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age or 

324 



Seminar in the Romantic Period, Contemporary American Prose and Poetry 
or the American seminar; Victorian Prose and Poetry or Seminar in the 
Victorian Period; The English Novel; Advanced Writing. 

Minor work may also be elected in these fields, but no major and minor 
combination of a. and e. will be permitted. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, each candidate 
must have the following courses : 

a. Three credit hours in Comparative Literature. 

b. Six credit hours in Old English, English 102 f, 103 s, and 212 s. 

c. Four credit hours in the Middle English Language (Eng. 202 f) and 
Gothic (Eng. 203 s). 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination one year 
before they expect to be awarded degrees. This examination will mclude 
linguistics (morphology and phonology) and each of the major literary 
fields from which the candidate may select two for particularly detailed 
examination, specifically: Old English, Middle English, the Drama the 
Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, the Eighteenth Century, the Nine- 
teenth Century, American Literature. 

Eng. 200 f or s. Seminar in Special Studies (1-3)— Credit proportioned 
to the importance of the problems assigned. 

Work under personal guidance in some problem of especial interest to 
the graduate student, but not connected with the thesis. (Staff.) 

Eng. 201. Research (2-4)— Credit proportioned to the amount of work 
and ends accomplished. ^ 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations for the doctor s 

, . ( Staff. ) 

degree. 

Eng. 202 f. Middle English Language (2-3)— Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 102 f, 103 s. 

A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference J:o 
etymology and syntax. ' arman.) 

Eng. 203 s. Gothic (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 102 f. 

A study of the forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas Bible. 
Correlation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (Harman.) 

Eng. 204 y. Medieval Romance in England (4)— Two lectures. 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical romances in Medi- 
eval England, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) (Hale.) 

Eng. 205 s. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (2-3)— Two lec- 
tures. 

Studies and problems in sixteenth-century literature other than Shake- 
speare. (Zeeveld.) 

325 



Eng. 206 y. Seminar in Elizabethan Literature (2)— Two lectures Pro 
requisite, Eng. 107 s or equivalent. lectures. Pre- 

Subject for 1941-42: A survey of the works of Edmund Spenser, with 
special attention to The Faerie Queene. (McManaw^ ) 

^n^\^^^y^9 ^^'"'»" .ta Shakespeare (2.3)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Ji-ng". 11 f, 12 s, or equivalent. 

Studies and problems in Shakespeare. (Zeeveld ) 

Eng. 208 s. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2-3)--Two lee- 
tures. 

centuS''''^ '^""^^ °^ °"^ ™^"'' "^""■'^ "'■ "* ''"^ important movement of the 

(Fitzhugh.) 

^•f- ^?^ ^: S^"'"*"- '" American Literature (4-6)-Two lectures. 
Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth century American Litera 
ture^ The subject for 1941-42, first semester, will be th^major^tingl^^ 

Twa?; and H^wSr "'' '"' ^"'^ ^^'^^^^ ''^'''^'' ^^^^^ '>^ ^-^^' 

(Warfel.) 

ty^^'altl' ^""" •".'''*' Romantic Period (2-3)-Two or three lec- 
tures. One discussion period of two hours. Prerequisites, Eng. 113 f 114 . 
or equivalent satisfactory to the instructor. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
nh^dis ^"Wect-matter of the course will vary with the interests 

(Hale.) 

Eng. 211 y. Seminar in the Victorian Period r4.fi^ T\,r^ ^u 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 116 f, 117 s, or the per^llstL"^^^^^^^ 

Special studies of problems or persons in the Victorian Age. The su'wt^^^ 
matter of the course will vary with the interests of the clasf. (Cooley ) 

A study of Old English poetic masterpieces other than the Beowulf. 

ENTOMOLOGY ^^^"'^ 

Professor Cory; Lecturers Snodgrass, Yeager; Assistant Professors 
KNIGHT, DiTMAN, Abrams; Dr. Langford, Mr. McConnelJ M^ Muma! 

Ent. 1 f and s. Introductory Entomology (3)^Two lectures- onp T,.!. 
oratory. Prerequisite, 1 year college biology lectures, one lab- 

JJ^lUf^f^'^V '^ 'f '"'" ^ ^^^ ^'^^''^'^ ^^ ^^^kind; the general 
principles of insect morphology, classification, adaptation; elementary nrin 
ciples of economic entomology. Field work and the preparS^n ofTcolS" 
tion of representative insects of Maryland. Laboratory fee $3 00 

re^:!^illntr' """''^'^^^ ^'^-^"^ ^^^^"^^^ '^^ laboratories. Pre- 

A study of the anatomy of insects, given especially in preparation for 
work m insect taxonomy and biology. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

326 



Ent. 3 f. Insect Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 2 s. 

The general principles of taxonomy. An intensive study of the classifica- 
tion of all orders of insects and the principal families in the major groups. 
The preparation of a collection of insects is a major portion of the course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ent. 4 f. Beekeeping (2). — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 1. 

History of beekeeping, natural history and behavior of the honeybee. A 
study of the beekeeping industry. A non-technical course intended to acquaint 
the student with the honeybee as an object of biological and cultural inter- 
est, and to serve as an introduction to the science of apiculture. 

Ent. 5 s. Insect Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1. 

A continuation of some of the general aspects of entomology begun in 
Ent. 1, with emphasis upon the adaptations, behavior, inter-relationships, 
and ecology of insects. 

Ent. 6 f. Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1. 

A study of the life history, yearly cycle, behavior, and activities of the 
honeybee. The value of honeybees as pollenizers of economic plants and as 
producers of honey and wax. Designed to be of value to the student of 
agriculture, horticulture, entomology, and zoology. 

Ent. 7 s. Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 6 f . 

Theory and practice of apiary management. Designed for the student 
who wishes to keep bees or desires a knowledge of practical apiary man- 
agement. 

Ent. 8 f, 9 s. Entomological Technic and Scientific Delineation (2, 2) — 

Two laboratories. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. 

Collecting, rearing, preserving, and mounting of insects. The prepara- 
tion of exhibits, materials for instruction, entomological records and pub- 
lications. Methods of illustrating, including drawing, photography, lantern 
slide making, and projection. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. (Not 
offered in 1941-42.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ent. 101 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two lectures. 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, including life 
history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. (Cory.) 

Ent. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two laboratories. 
Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field work in economic 
entomology. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Cory.) 

327 



n.f?!^^"^' ^"1^- ^""^"^ ^*^'« "^ Special Groups (3, 3)-Two lecture 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. f v . 7 x wo lectures, 

A study of the principal insects of one or more of the following eroun, 
founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course is inteTded ^If 
the general student a comprehensive view of the inLcts tha Se of impTrT 

:z:^^i:z^^:'''-'' -' ^-"^^ ^"^— «- - ^he zz 

Insect Pests of 1. Fruit. 2. Vegetables. 3. Flowers, both in the open and 
under glass^ 4 Ornamentals and Shade Trees. 5. Forests. 6. F^ld Crop 

koT;:' sf^et? • '■ "'^^ '''"'''■ '• ^^^^ «--'^°'^- I-boratory'?::; 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 105 f Medical Entomology (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites Fnf 
1 and consent of instructor. ^'erequisites, Knt. 

nJv!!r '^•^*'°" °'. '""""*" *° ^''^^'^' °f «»an. directly and as carriers of 
JalaSy"""^"'^"^- ^°"*^°' °^ P-*^ "^ -"• The fundamSj :[ 

Ent. 106 s. Insect Taxonomy (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

n.otrnnXmVtL-^n^otl-.^y-^*'' ^^^ -"-'^ -'^ --«- -^erlyin, 

(Gurney.) 

Ent. 107 8. Theory of Insecticides (3)-Three lectures. 

The deve bpment and use of contact and stomach poisons, with regard to 
their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, and foliage iSvR.int 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. SraZy 'fee, JS 

ir»f inn T ^, (Ditman.) 

the nervous system, and metabolism. /v ? 

„ (x eager.) 

niine"db"?he' stiff.'- '"""' '''"'"^"•^- "^^'^* ^"'^ ^--^''^^"^ ^'> »>« <^eter- 
The intensive investigation of some entomological subject. A report of 
the results is submitted as part of the requirements for graduaS 

Ent. 112 y. Seminar (2). ^^*^^'^ 

ini^mnTmeralr^"^' "°''^' ^^"'^ '•^^^^-' -'^ ^^^^-ts of the .ore 

(Cory, Knight.) 

For Graduates 

arriement'- '''''""'' "^"""""'"^^ ^^"^^-^^ ^-^"-^ l^^o-tory by 
Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy, and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to preparation for individual research 

328 ^^^'-y-^ 



Ent. 202. Research in Entomology. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with the approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy, or biology and control of insects. Frequently the student may 
be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. 
The student's work may form a part of the final report on the project and 
be published in bulletin form. A dissertation suitable for publication must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203 f. Insect Morphology (2-4) — Two lectures; laboratory work 
by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 
preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

(Snodgrass.) 

Ent. 204 y. Economic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. 

Studies of the principles underlying applied entomology, and the most 
significant advances in all phases of entomology. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

(Cory.) 
Ent. 205 s. Insect Ecology (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects 
to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic 
organism adjusted to the environment. (Langford.) 

Ent. 206 s. Coccidology (2) — Two laboratories. 

A study of morphology, taxonomy, and biology of the higher groups of 
the scale insects. The technic of preparation and microscopy are empha- 
sized. Laboratory studies are supplemented by occasional lectures. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. (McCk)nnell.) 

FARM FORESTRY 

Professor Besley. 

For. 1 s. Introduction to Forestry (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f , 3 s. 

A general survey of the field of forestry. Principles of forestry applied 
to the establishment, care, and protection of stands of timber. Identifica- 
tion and distribution of commercially important trees. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
For. 101 s. Farm Forestry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of trees; forest 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest crops; 
nursery practice; and tree planting. (Besley.) 

329 



GEOLOGY 

Professor Hess. 

Ch!"Vy/' """'"^^ ^'^-''"° •^^*"^^^'- ^- '-''°-t«ry. Prerequisite. 

A textbook, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the nrin^;,,] 
of geology and their application to agriculture WhTle tWs cour? 
designed primarily for agriculture stude^s in prepara L for tech!!,;' 
courses, it may also be taken as part of a liberal educatTon '" 

HISTORY 

Professors Gewehr, Baker-Crothers, Strakhovsky; Associate Professor 
Highby; Assistant Professors Thatcher, Silver, Prange; Dr D™ 

Mr. Worthington. 

tion" Vh"i,^ S-'-^^y of Western Civilization (6)-Two lectures; one recita- 

sen-;rs ^th rV' "'."? ""' sophomores; it is open to juniorsld 

seniors with the permission of the instructor, hut with reduced credit 

whth'^^SributeTto tTT"^ ?' '?"' movements of European history 
wnich contributed to the formation of modern institutions. The aim of thp 

?ng Torid "^ ' *'^ ^*"'^"' '=°^"'^^"* °^ '""^ P--"* *-"d^ in trcha^; 

rec^teLns "tSTo"' ''""'"' ''"' ^•■*''' ^"'^•" ^«>-0"- "ecture; two 
recitations. This course is open to freshmen and sophomores- it i« „„1 7 

upper Classmen with the permission of the instruLTbuT wU^ Zlll 

froreaXTtLrtrtlTpl^nr^"'"""" °^ "^'^^ ^^ «-* ^r"- 

Pr!I;;«w/' S "' ^'"*"*=*" History (3, 3)-Three lecture-discussion meetings 
Primarily for sophomores but open to freshmen. meetings. 

A survey of American history from colonial times to the present 
First semester, to the Civil War. present. 

Second semester, since the Civil War. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H 101 y. American Colonial History (6)-Three lectures PrereaukitP. 
H. 5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. ^"-"les. prerequisites, 

A study of the political, economic and social development of the American 

330 



people from the discovery of America through the formation of the consti- 
tution. CBaker-Crothers.) 

H. 107 f or s. The United States from the Civil War to 1900 (3)— Three 

lectures. Prerequisite, H. 6 s or equivalent. 

Selected topics intended to provide a historical basis for an understanding 
of problems of the present century. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

( Baker-Crothers. ) 

H. 108 f or s. The United States in the 20th Century (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 6 s or equivalent. 

A study of the outstanding economic and political problems and of the 
cultural changes of the last fifty years, with the purpose of understanding 
our own day. ^ (Gewehr.) 

H. Ill f, 112 s. Social and Economic History of the United States to 
1860 (3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, H. 5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. 

First semester, an advanced course giving a synthesis of American life 
in the colonial period. 
Second semester, the period from 1790 to 1860 is studied. 

( Baker-Crothers. ) 

H. 115 y. Constitutional History of the United States (6) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, H. 5 f, 6 s. 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the consti- 
tution, and of the development of American constitutionalism in theory 
and practice thereafter. (Thatcher.) 

H. lift f, 120 s. Diplomatic History of the United States (2, 2)— Two 

lectures. Prerequisites, H. 5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. 

An historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations 
of the United States from the American Revolution to the present. (Dozer.) 

H. 121 f, 122 s. History of the American Frontier (3, 3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, H. 5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. 

A study of the influence of the westward movement in shaping Ameri- 
can institutional development. 

First semester, the trans-Allegheny West. 

Second semester, the trans-Mississippi West. (Gewehr.) 

H. 123 f. The Old South and the Civil War (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, H. .5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. 

A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South 
with particular reference to the development of sectionalism and the back- 
ground of the Civil War. (Gewehr.) 

331 



H. 124 s. Reconstruction and the Recent South (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, H. 5 f, 6 s, or equivalent. 

Economic, social and political changes in the South after the Civil War. 
Factors and influences shaping the present South and some of the con- 
comitant problems. (Gewehr.) 

H. 125 f, 126 s. History of Maryland (2, 2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
H. 5 f , 6 s, or equivalent. 

First semester, a survey of the political, social and economic history of 
colonial Maryland. 

Second semester, Maryland's historical development and role as a state 
in the American Union. (Dozer.) 

H. 127 f, 128 s. Latin American History (2, 2)— Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, 6 hours of fundamental courses. 

First semester, a survey of the colonial history of Latin America 
through the wars of independence. 

Second semester, history of the Latin American states from the wars 
of independence to the present, with special attention to Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico, and their relations to the United States. (Dozer.) 

H. 131 f, 132 s. Ancient History (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

First semester, the Near East and Greece. 

Second semester, History of Rome. (Highby.) 

H. 133 y. Medieval History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y or 
equivalent. 

A study of the Medieval period with special emphasis on the legacy of 
the Middle Ages. (Prange.) 

H. 135 f, 136 s. Renaissance and Reformation (3, 3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. 

First semester, the Renaissance. Second semester, the Reformation. 
(Not offered in 1941-42.) (Prange.) 

H. 137 f, 138 s. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2, 2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. 

First semester. Revolutionary France and its influence on Europe. 

Second semester, the Napoleonic regime and the balance of power. ("Not 
offered in 1941-42.) (Silver.) 

H. 13ft f, 140 s. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914 (3, 3)— 

Three lectures and assignments. Prerequisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. 

A study of the political, economic, social and cultural development of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the World War. (Strakhovsky.) 

332 



^ a- ^« 1Q1A r2 2^— Two lectures and assignments. 

H 143 f> 144 s. Buroi>e Since 1914 C^> ^) ^^" '*" 

prerequisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. development of 

A study of the political, economic -^^^^^^^^^^ World Wars. 

Europe with special emphasis towards understanding (g^^^i^^vsky.) 
(Not offered in 1941-42.) 

the Franco-Prussian War. (Not offered in 1941 4^) ^ 

H. 155 f, 156 s. History of Central Europe (3, 3)-Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. ^ j 

H 157 f. 158 s. Central Europe in the World Today (2. 2)-Two lectures. 

Prerequisite, H. 1 y or equivalent. ^^^ ^^^ ^^,,,,, „f 

An analysis of the ongin the P^^^^^Pj^^^^' J. ^j^ ^ placed upon the 
National Socialism and Hitler. Special emphasis will be p ^ ^ 

problems involved in the present world conflict. ^ ^ 

^ , .u x:»„.. T?a«* (2 2)— Two lectures and 

H 161 f 162 s. History of the Near East CA i) 

of Berlin of 1878. ^^^ ^^^^^^ f,„„ i878 to 

Second semester, a study ot tne edi«. (Strakhovsky.) 

'';T7iTi72 s. History of the British Empire (3, 3)-TTiree lectures. 

Pre;equisite, HI ^J J^/; ;/ ^^ orMercantilist Empire in the east and 
First semester, the rise oi rne v . • Revolution. 

west and its decline in the period of ^^^^ Amen- ^ ^^^_ 

Second semester, the evolution of Greater uriia (Silver.) 

monwealth of Nations. 

For Graduates 
Special Departmental Requirements for Advanced Degrees. 

Master of Arts. 

1. c ^-f flip total maior course requirement of all 

thesis, i. e., European History or American History. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

must be acquired in the general field of the thesis, 
or European History. 



2. At least ten semester hours of the thirty required for a minor in 
History must have been taken at the University of Maryland. 

3. Candidates must pass a preliminary oral examination covering the 
major and minor fields before admission to candidacy, preferably one year 
before they expect to be awarded degrees. 

4. The final oral examination will be confined to a defense of the thesis 
and the testing of the candidate's knowledge of the bibliography of his 
major field. 

H. 200. Research (2-4) — Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

(Staff.) 

H. 201, y. Seminar in American Colonial History (4) — Conferences and 
reports in related topics. (Baker-Crothers.) 

H. 202 f. Historical Criticism and American Bibliography (2). 

(Thatcher.) 

H. 203 s. Historical Criticism and European Bibliography (2). 

(Strakhovsky.) 

H. 204 y. Seminar in European History (4) — Round table discussions and 
reports on specified topics. (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 205 y. Russia-U. S. S. R. (4) — Lectures, round table discussions and 
reports. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 206 y. Seminar in Central European History (4). 

Topics pertaining mainly to recent Germany. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

(Prange.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors Mount, McFarland, Welsh; Assistant Professors Curtiss, 
KiRKPATRicK, Moore; Miss Enright, Miss Burnette, Mrs. Baumann, 

Miss Mitchell. 

Home Economics Lectures 

H. E. 1 y. Home Economics Lectures (2) — One recitation. Required of 
Home Economics freshmen. 

Lectures, demonstrations, group and individual discussions on grooming 
and clothing budget for the college girl, personality development, personal 

adjustments, health, and social usage. 

Textiles, Clothing and Art 
Textiles 

H. E. 71 f and s. Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. 

History of textile fibers; their source, production, manufacture, charac- 
teristics, identification, and use. Collection and analysis of new materials; 
regulations governing standardization. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

334 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
H F 170 f or s Consumer Problems in Textiles (3)-Tw(* recitations; 
onf lat Itory P^ereVite, H. E. 71 or consent of the instructor. 

Laundering and dry cleaning of clothing and household /-nishrngs ; 
3to'rge r^^^^^^ and furs; comparison and evaluation of fabrjc^.^La^ 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

H E 171 f or s. Advanced Textiles (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 71, Chem. 12 A y, 12 B y. 

A studv of recent research and commercial development m textiles, 
JtnTX:L:Z physical and chemical analysis of textile ^abncs^^^^; 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

H. E. 172 f or s. Problems in Textiles (4)-0ne recitation; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. 171. nwoore) 
Experimental work in textiles. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Moore.) 

Clothing 
H E. lit and »■ Clothing <3)-Thre. l.bo»lori». Prereq.l.it., H. E. 24 

°""'oT::Ler.l., pa.,™.; co«n.e.i.n o, three ,a™.nts .ccordln. « 
modern methods. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
H. E. HI f and s. Advanced Clothing (3)-Three laboratories. Prerequi- 

cites H E 11. 24. or equivalent. . 

sites, H. SL. 11, ^t, H stressing style, design 

Draping of garments in cloth on a dress ™' (McFarland.) 

and suitability to the individual. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mctar 

H. E. 112 f or 8. Problems in Clothing (3)-Three laboratories, Pre- 

TAniiitsite H. E. Ill or equivalent. 

requisite, n. r.. , ., • „ f-„ children and individual clothing proj- 

Clothing renovation, clothing foi children, ana (Mitchell.) 

ects. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

H. E. 113 f or s. Pattern Designing (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 

"a^' comparative study of commercial patterns; the development of a 
foundation patU and^ts adaptation in the designing of .armen^J^^^Lab- 

oratory fee, $3.00. 

Art* 

H E 21 f and s. Design (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratori^es 
Elements of design; application of design principles to da.ly hvmg 
practice in designing. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



* For other courses in Art, sec page 253. 



335 



^i 



H. E. 24 f and s. Costume Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

A study of fundamentals underlying taste, fashion, and design as they 
relate to the expression of individuality in dress. Survey of the fashion 
industry. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

H. E. 25 f or s. Crafts (2) — Two laboratories. 

Creative art expressed in clay modeling, plastic carving, metal working, 
paper mache, modeling, etc. Emphasis is laid upon inexpensive materials 
and tools and simple techniques. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. 120 f. Advertising Layout and Store Coordination (2) — Two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

Lettering, elementary figure sketching, and freehand perspective draw- 
ing applied to graphic advertising in the field of each student's major 
interest. Discussion of department and specialty store organization; lec- 
tures by retail executives from Baltimore and Washington. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. (Baumann.) 

H. E. 121 f, 122 s. N Interior Design (3, 3) — First semester, two recita- 
tions, one laboratory; second semester, three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

Study of traditional styles and design principles with relation to per- 
sonalities in home planning and furnishing; trips to historic buildings; 
special merchandise lectures showing what the market provides. In second 
semester floor plans and wall elevations are drawn to scale and rendered 
in color. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Curtiss.) 

H. E. 123 f, 124 s. Advanced Interior Design (2, 2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 121 f, 122 s, or equivalent. 

Designing of rooms, including interior architecture, furniture, fabrics, 
accessories; scale drawing and color rendering in plan, elevation and 
perspective. A study of furniture manufacture and merchandising. Plan- 
ning of exhibition rooms or houses when possible. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

( Curtiss. ) 

H. E. 125 f and s. Merchandise Display (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, H. E. 21 or equivalent. 

Practice in effective display of merchandise windows, show cases, and 
other parts of store interiors. Cooperation with retail establishment. Five 
large display windows in the home economics building provide demonstration 
space for the courses. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Curtiss.) 

H. E. 126 f or s. Store Experience (3) — (160 clock hours or 20 eight-hour 
days). 

Selling, buying, advertising, or executive work done under supervision 
in a specified department store. (Curtiss.) 

336 



H. E. 127 f, 128 s. Advanced Costume Design (2)-Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. Ill or equivalent. * . 

Falion i lustration and design. Special emphasis is placed on origmaMy 
an! tr adaptability of designs to fabrics and Pe-naht.s. ^LaWatory 

fee, $2.00. 

Foods and Nutrition 

H. E. 30 y. Introductory Foods Study (6)-0ne recitation; two labora- 

'tle'mentary food selection and preparation for students not majoring in 
home economics. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 
H. E. 31 y. Foods (6)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 

Tmpos'don, selection, and preparation of food, f ^J./^f,,l*; 
scientific principles involved; analysis of recipes and study of standard 
products. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

H E 32 f or s. Elements of Nutrition (3)-Three recitations. 

a' study of normal nutritional needs; the relation of food to health; 
planning of adequate dietaries for adults. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. 131 f or s. Nutrition (3)-Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 
31 y, Chem. 12 A y. 

A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. (Weisn.; 

H. E. 132 s. Dietetics (3)-Two recitations; one laboratory. Prerequi- 

" A fJy offood selection for health; planning and calculating dietaries 

for adults and children. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Weisn.^ 

H. E. 133 f and s. Demonstrations (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequisites, 

"practL^L^demonstrations. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Welsh, Enright.) 
H E. 134 f and s. Advanced Foods (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 31 y. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 
Advanced study of manipulation of food materials. (Weisn.) 

H. E. 135 f and s. Experimental Foods (4)-Two recitations; two labora- 
tories Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, 137, Chem. 12 A y. 

A study o? food 'preparation processes from experimenta^^ew^int 
Practice in technics. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Kirkpatnck.) 

H. E. 136 s. Child Nutrition (3)-Two recitations; one laboratory. Pre- 

Trinct^les !f 'humafnutrition applied to growth and development of 
chMrenf experience with children in the nursery school, in children's hos- 

pitals and clinics. 

337 



/ 



I 



H. E. 137 f and s. Food Buying and Meal Service (3)— One recitation, 
two laboratories. Prerequisite, H. E. 31 y. recitation, 

Study of problems in food buying; planning and serving meals for the 
family group m relation to nutritional needs and cost. Includes simple enter 
taming. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Kirkpatrick, Enright, Burnette ) 

requiL!'H.\. m." """''" ^'^-°"^ '■^'^''^"^"= '^' laboratories. Pre- 

Modification of the principles of human nutrition to meet dietary needs 
of certain diseases. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Enright ) 

For Graduates 
H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (2). 

Oral and written reports on current literature of nutrition. (Welsh.) 

of woS Tne ^^^'■'^''"-^^^^^^ ^ b^ determined by amount and quality 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The result may form the 
Dasis of a thesis for an advanced degree. (Wejsh.) 

lab^r^ories ^ """^ ^' ^^''^''''^^ Experimental Foods (3)-0ne recitation; two 

Individual experimental problems. Special emphasis on use of Maryland 
products. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Kirkpatrick.) 

H. E. 204 f. Readings in Nutrition (2)— Two recitations. 

Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and investi- 
^"'^^^- . (Welsh.) 

ment ^ ^^^ ^ """" ^' Nutrition (3)-0ne recitation; laboratory by arrange- 

n/nfo^fi'' V''^^''^'^^''*' ^""^ conducted on laboratory animals to show effects 
of diets of varying compositions. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Welsh.) 

Home and Institution Management 
For Advanced Undergraduates 

laSrSor^^ ^' ^^^ ^' ^^"''^^"*^''* ^^ ^^^ ^ome (3, 3)-Two lectures; one 

The family and human relations; household organization and manage- 
ment; budgeting of time and money. Housing as a social problem; federal 
and civic housing projecrs; housing standards for the family; building and 
financing a home. Selection and care of household equipment and fumish- 

'''^' (Welsh.) 

338 



H. E. 143 f or s. Practice in Management of the Home (3) — Prerequi- 
sites, H. E. 141 f, 142 s. 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
ber of the faculty and a small group of students for approximately one- 
third of a semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. (Enright.) 

H. E. 144 y. Institution Management (6) — Three recitations. Prerequi- 
sites, H. E. 31 y, 141 f, 142 s, 131. The last three may be taken concurrently. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service in dormi- 
tories; organization of institution laundries. Institutional accounting and 
purchasing of supplies, furnishings and equipment. (Mack.) 

H. E. 145 f or s. Practice in Institution Management (3) — Prerequisite, 
H. E. 144 y. 

Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 
room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. This must be done under direction for 
not less than six weeks full time. (Staff.) 

H. E. 146 s. Advanced Institution Management (3) — One recitation 
weekly and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite, H. E. 
144 y. 

Special problems in institution management. (Mack.) 

H, E. 147 f or s. Institution Cookery (3) — One recitation; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y, 137, 144 y. 

Application of principles of food preparation to large quantity cookery; 
study of standard technics; menu planning and costs; standardization of 
recipes; use of institutional equipment; practice in cafeteria counter service. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Mack.) 

Home Economics Extension 

H. E. 151 f or s. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) — Given 
under the direction of Venia M. Kellar and specialists. (Specialists.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Mahoney, Schrader, Thurston, Walls; Associate Professors 
Haut, Lincoln, Shoemaker; Dr. Stier, Mr. Hitz, Mr. Shutak. 

Hort. 1 f. General Horticulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, sophomore standing. 

A foundation course planned to give the student a background of methods 
used in the commercial production of fruits and vegetables. The production 
problems of the commercial growers are presented to acquaint the student 
with a general outlook on the future of the industry in the state and in the 
country as a whole. The laboratory work consists of actual practice by the 
student on the various procedures used by successful producers of fruits and 
vegetables. 

339 



Hort. 2 s. General Horticulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, sophomore standing. 

One-half of semester is devoted to a consideration of the landscape de- 
velopment of the suburban home and farmstead, so as to increase the use- 
fulness, efficiency and attractiveness of such areas. Simple and practical 
information is given covering the proper arrangement of trees, shrubs, 
and flowers; the location and construction of walks and drives; planting 
methods; lawn building and care; and such maintenance problems as prun- 
ing, plant feeding and insect and disease controls. Illustrated lectures, field 
work and plan making. 

The second half of the semester will be devoted to a study of home flori- 
culture, greenhouse practices, and plant propagation. The work will cover 
design and planting of annual and perennial borders, flower boxes, and pot 
culture in soil and nutrient solutions. 

Hort. 3 f. Fruit Production (2-3) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A study of commercial varieties and the harvesting, grading, and storage 
principles and practices in tree fruit production. One laboratory is devoted 
to the actual operations involved in these orchard practices, and includes 
field trips to commercial packing and storage houses. The second laboratory 
is devoted to apple variety identification and judging. A fruit judging team 
is selected to compete in the Eastern States Intercollegiate Fruit Judging 
League, of which Maryland is a member. 

Hort. 4 s. Fruit Production (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Bot. 1 f , Chem. 1 y. 

A continuation of Hort. 3 s, devoted to the practical application of the 
principles involved in tree fruit production. Establishment of the orchard, 
soils, sites, fertilizers, cultural practices, fruiting habits, pollination, and 
pruning receive consideration. The laboratory is especially designed to 
provide actual practice in the application of the various orchard operations. 

Hort. 5 s. Vegetable Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 1 y, Bot. 1 f. 

A study of the underlying principles of vegetable production. This course 
deals with proper soil types and maintenance of soil fertility, seedage, plant 
production and plant growing structures, methods in cultivation, harvesting 
and storage, the selection of proper types and varieties to suit various 
market requirements; and discussion of the more important diseases and 
insect pests and their control, incident to vegetable production for home 
use, as well as on a commercial scale. 

Laboratory work will cover practical exercises in the above phases of 
vegetable growing. Working out of detailed plans of a farm garden, to 
insure an adequate food supply for the family will be required, as well as 
the maintenance of a demonstration garden. 

Hort. 6 f. Greenhouse Construction and Management (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. 

A detailed consideration of various types of houses and their manage- 

340 



^pnf location with respect to sites and markets; arrangement construc- 
Sn i cTs^ of builcEng and operation; practical me^^^^^^^^ of handhng 
greenhouses under various conditions. (Not given m 1941-42.) 

Hort. 7 s. Greenhouse Management (3-4)-Two or three lectures; one 
laboratory. No prerequisite. 

A continuation of Hort. 6 f . (Not given in 1941-42.) 

Hort. 8 s. Small Fruits (2-3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Lectures 
may be taken without laboratory. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of the 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, black- 
brries cranberries, etc. Plant characteristics, varieties, propagation, site 
and X planting, soil management, fruiting habits, pruning, fertilizers, 
harvesting, and marketing receive consideration. 

Hort. 9 f. Garden Flowers (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous peren- 
nials, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 

Hort. 10 y. Commercial Floriculture (6-7)— Two lectures; one or two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Hort. 6 f , 7 s. 

Methods of handling florists* bench crops and potted plants the market- 
ing of cut flowers, the retail business, and floral design and decoration. 
Trips to important commercial centers and flower shows will be made. 

Hort. 11 f. Landscape Gardening (2)— Two lectures. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their ap- 
plication to private and public areas. Special consideration is given to the 
improvement and beautiflcation of the home grounds, farmsteads, and small 
suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to specialize m 
landscape, but who wnsh some theoretical and practical knowledge of the 
subject. 

Hort. 12 f. Landscape Design (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 11 f. 

A consideration of the principles of general landscape design supple- 
mented by direct application in the drafting room. Attention is given to 
the reading of plans, practice in lettering, and the technique of landscape 
drafting. Practice in obtaining field data by various expedient methods is 
given and field trips to observe local examples, illustrating the principles of 
landscape design, will be taken. Simple landscape sketch plans will be pre- 
pared applying the principles of walk and drive locations, the arrangement 
of trees, shrubs and flowers and other items incident to the landscape de- 
velopment of small home-grounds. 

341 



Hort. 13 s. Landscape Design (3)— Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 

A continuation of Hort. 12 f with more advanced application. The solu- 
tion of original landscape problems in the development of home-grounds 
and small country places where topography, natural features, and the out- 
line of the property provide factors influencing the development. Consider- 
ation will be given to the principles of planting design and simple planting 
plans will be prepared. The design of flower gardens and architectural de- 
tails used in landscape compositions will be part of the work, and simple 
grading plans and constructive drawings will be made. Field trips to in- 
spect and study actual landscape developments will be made. 

Note; The courses offered in landscape design are not sufficiently ade- 
quate in scope, to prepare a student for the professional practice of land- 
scape architecture, but are designed to be helpful to those who may find 
some training in landscape design desirable, incident to following other 
related occupations. Included would be nurserymen, florists, landscape gar- 
deners, park, estate, and cemetery superintendents; landscape contractors 
and students of home economics. Students found to have particular aptitude 
for landscape design and who wish to follow the work professionally may 
complete the course elsewhere. 

Hort. 14 s. Civic Art (2)— Two lectures. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural im- 
provements, including problems in design of civic centers, parks, school 
grounds, and other public and semi-public areas. 

Hort. 16 f or s. Methods of Commercial Processing of Horticultural 
Crops (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 

The fundamentals of canning and freezing horticultural crops; maturity 
studies; harvesting methods, including threshing of peas and lima beans; 
grades and grading of raw products; preparation for processing or freez- 
ing, such as washing, sizing, and blanching; methods of processing and 
freezing and storage of frosted foods. Open only to juniors and seniors 
majoring in agriculture, home) economics, or bacteriology. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101 f, 102 s. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Fruits) (2, 2)— 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101 f. 

A critical analysis is made of research work in horticulture and allied 
work in plant physiology, chemistry, and botany, the results of which are 
interpreted with respect to their application in commercial production. 
Fundamental principles involved in growth, fruiting, storage, and quality 
of horticultural plants and products are stressed. (Haut.) 

Hort. 103 f, 104 s. Technology of Horticultural Plants. (Vegetables) 
(2, 2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101 f. 
These courses are described under Hort. 101 f, 102 s. 

342 



Hort. 105 f or s. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Ornamentals) (2) 

-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101 f. 

A study of the physiological plant processes as related to the growth, 
flowering, storage, etc., of floricultural and ornamental plants. A critical 
analysis and interpretation of the result of research studies dealing with 
water relations, temperature relations, photoperiodism, rest period, soils, 
fertilizers, and mineral deficiencies on ornamental crops. The applications 
pertaining to commercial production receive special consideration. 

Hort. 106 s. World Fruits and Nuts (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the tropical and subtropical fruits and nuts of economic im- 
portance. The orange, lemon, grapefruit, pineapple, banana, date, fig, olive, 
avocado, papaya, mango, walnut, pecan, almond, filbert, tung nut, Brazil 
nut, cashew, and cocoanut receive consideration. Special emphasis is placed 
upon the botanical relationships, composition, varieties, climatic and cultural 
requirements, methods and problems of production, and the development 
and present commercial status of those grown in the United States and its 
possessions. (Haut.) 

Hort. 107 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A field or laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental 

plantings. (Thurston.) 

Hort. 108 f or s. Canning Crops Technology (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Hort. 16, Pit. Phys. 101 f. 

A course dealing with the more technical physico-chemical methods used 
in the study of the fundamentals or factors influencing the quality of raw 
products; physiological processes prior to and after blanching; and grade 
of processed product. In addition, studies will be made of new types of 
equipment and recent research on methods of processing. Visits to canning 
plants and commercial laboratories will be required. (Not offered in 
1941-42.) (Mahoney, Walls.) 

Hort. 109 f or s. Systematic Pomology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, description, pomo- 
logical classification and identification of tree and small fruits. (Not offered 
in 1941-42.) (Haut.) 

Hort. 110 f or s. Systematic Olericulture (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops, and 
the description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties 
to different environmental conditions and their special uses in vegetable 
production. (Walls). 

Hort. Ill y. Seminar (2). 

Designed to give training in the interpretation, condensation, and oral 
presentation of the results of investigational work by reviewing recent 
scientific literature in the various phases of horticulture. (Staff.) 

343 



rrV" '; ^'f" '^'"'"' «-«-C'«iit according to work d.n. 

For Graduates 

4ii'p,t s' ',„fr'"""" '"•""*'" <^ ^>-''-» '-'"- p- 

A .ystematic .My of the source, of knowledge and oninlon <u to or.. 

^per.„e.t st.tJr '7^ ^ o.t e^n'IrS. "^ ^'"= ""'"tiLi'; 
re,""^! P,[' S,;."; „t;.'"""»'"' »'<■*""«'. «. 2)-Two leeu,res. Pr.- 

do« t*ti,rff?trei:ti'tr,^?r.s"thf ^r" •"''™"" -"■ 

rest period and dormanrv «nH o .'"J'^l ^'^^^ ^^^ temperature relations, 

mayLappHed^tTeTe^r4raZ:topr^^^^^^^^^ r- -^^^'^ 

in research are discussed. Methods and techniques used 

(Mahoney.) 
Hort. 205 f or s, Experimental Pomology (2)~Two lectures 
A continuation of Hort. 201 f. 202 s 

(ochrader.) 

Hort. 206 f or s. Experimental Olericulture r9\ t,,.^ i 4. 
requisites, Zool. 120 s, P,t. Phys. 101 Tofe^i.^^^ "*""'• "^'^ 
^^ A course dealing with the field of cyto-genetics in ;elation to horticul- 

(Mahoney.) 
onMlSLy" "• '""^' " «<""'«"»»' «»..roh (2)-o„e ,e«„,., 

anf Sit'-Ju^tSs're'llSedTttl"*-? 'l *' """^ ''''" 
methods for use in solving nr«f. m detail, cntically evaluating such 

technique, app.ic^irofTStLrarpreduTes phrcir °' ^'^"'^'"^'^ 
designs, survey methods, and e.Ji:^rr;.:^Ss\luT'^.£t 

(Staff.) 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research C4 6 or «>^ r ^-^ • 

according to work done ^ ' ' »)— Credit given 

w,n be co„t.„„.d ,„H, completed and ,£, re.u,.. S"E:- J^^for 'oT: 

344 'S'"''' 



Hort. 209 f, 210 s. Advanced Horticultural Seminar (1, 1). 

Oral reports with illustrative material are required on special topics or 
recent research publications in horticulture. Discussion by the students and 
staff members during and after each report is an essential part of the 
seminar. The aim of this course is to develop ability to analyze and to pre- 
sent research results orally as well as to review recent advances in horti- 
culture. (Staff.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Hintz; Mr. Fogg, Mr. Rovelstad. 

L. S. 1 f and s. Library Methods (1). 

This course is intended to help students use libraries with greater facility 
and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of lectures and practical 
work, is designed to interpret the library and its resources to the student. 
The course considers the classification of books in libraries, the card 
catalogue, periodical literature and indexes, and certain essential reference 
books which will be found helpful throughout the college course and in 
later years. 

L. S. 2 s. Sources of Business Information (1). 

This course deals with the techniques and practices necessary to the 
efficient location of business information and the intelligent evaluation of 
sources of commercial data. Primarily intended for students in the College 
of Commerce but open to others. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors T. H. Taliafe^iro, Dantzig; Associate Professor Martin; 
Assistant Professors Titt, Lancaster, Vedova; Dr. Alrich, Dr. Van 
Stockum, Dr. Newell, Mr. Volckhausen, Mr. Gilbert, Mr. Wagner, Mr. 
Parke, Mr. Eccles, Mr. Rand, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Herbst, Mr. Kalkstein. 

Students taking Mathematics 21 f, 22 s and 23 y who excel in mathe- 
matical ability are eligible for enrollment in an honors section. 

Math. 1 f. Introductory Algebra (0) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, one 
year of high school algebra. Open without credit to students of engineer- 
ing, chemistry and physics who lack the required preparation for Math. 21 f, 
or have failed the qualifying examination in Mathematics. 

Fundamental operations, quadratic equations, simultaneous quadratic 
equations, polynomials and their graphs, progressions, binomial theorem, 
exponentials and logarithms. 

Math. 2 f. Solid Geometry (0) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, plane geom- 
etry. Open to students in engineering, mathematics and physics who do not 
offer the entrance credit of one-half unit of solid geometry. 

Lines and planes, cylinders and cones, the sphere, polyhedra. 

345 



1 



MatK. 7 f. Solid Geometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, plane ffeom 
etry. This course is designed to prepare a student for teaching geometn" 
in high school and is open to students in the College of Education. 

lines and planes, cylinders and cones, the sphere, polyhedra, geometry 
on the sphere, regular solids. '^ 

Math. 8 f, 10 s. Elements of College Mathematics (3, 3)— Three lectures 
Prerequisite, at least one year of high school algebra. Required of biological* 
premedical and predental students. ' 

This course acquaints the student with the elementary ideas in the fol- 
lowing branches of mathematics: algebra, trigonometry, analytic geom- 
etry and calculus. Math. 8 f, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for Math 
10 s. 

First semester. Algebra: Quadratic equations, theory of equations, ex- 
ponentials, logarithms, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations 
Trigonometry: trigonometric functions, solution of triangles, trigonometric 
equations and identities. 

Second semester. Analytic geometry: Cartesian coordinates, the straight 
line, the circle, the ellipse, graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential 
and logarithmic functions. Calculus: elementary theory of differentiation 
and integration. 

Math. 18 y. Pictorial Geometry (4)-Two lectures. Required of students 
whose major is mathematics, and of students in the College of Education 
with mathematics as their major or minor. 

The story of geometry, classical and modem, synthetic and analytic, pre- 
sented by means of drawings and models made by the students themselves. 

Math 20 y. General Mathematics (6)-Three lectures. Primarily intended 
for students of economics and the social sciences. Required of all students 
m College of Commerce. Prerequisite, one year of high school algebra. 

Principles of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry; mathematics of 
finance; quadratic and higher equations; progressions and logarithms; com- 
pound interest and annuities; permutations and combinations; probabilities; 
graphmg of algebraic and trigonometric functions; construction and inter- 
pretation of graphs; interpolation and approximation methods; rudiments of 
the calculus; introduction to statistical methods. 

Math. 21 f and s. College Algebra (4)-Three lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and satisfactory passing of a 
qualifying examination. Required of all students in the College of Engineer- 
mg; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chemistry; of 
students m the College of Education who elect mathematics as their maior 
or minor. ** 

Foundations of algebra; binomial and multinomial expansions; progres- 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of numbers; combinatorial 
analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; theory of equations; exponen- 
tial functions and logarithms; principles of trigonometry. 

346 



Math. 22 s and f. Analytic Geometry (4) — Three lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Math 21. Required of all students in the College 
of Engineering; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chem- 
istry; of students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 
their major or minor. 

Cartesian and polar coordinates; line and circle; curves of the second 
order; higher algebraic and transcendental curves; periodograms; solid 
analytic geometry. 

Math. 23 y. Calculus (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 8 f, 10 s or 21, 22. Required of all students in the College 
of Engineering; of students with a major in mathematics, physics or chem- 
istry; of students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 
their major or minor. 

Limits, derivatives, and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
evolutes; envelopes; elements of curve theory; elementary theory of func- 
tions; partial derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; multiple inte- 
grals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes, and moments; expansion in series. 

Math. 71 f. Applied Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
either Math. 8 f, 10 s or 21, 22, or equivalent. 

Spherical trigonometry with applications to navigation; also topics in 
aeronautics, ballistics, surveying, map reading, charts, signals, and codes. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Students majoring in mathematics who have completed freshman and 
sophomore courses in mathematics with distinction in the honors sections 
are eligible to try for honors in mathematics. To receive the honors degree 
in mathematics, a student must: (1) complete the curriculum in mathe- 
matics found on page 122 of the catalogue with an average grade of B 
in all subjects; (2) pass honors examinations in mathematics at the end 
of the junior and senior years; (3) write a satisfactory thesis on an 
assigned topic in mathematics in the latter half of the senior year. Students 
who wish to try for honors in mathematics should consult the executive 
officer of the department at the conclusion of their sophomore year. 

Math. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 
(2) — Two lectures. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers in 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathematics 
and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill f or equivalent. 

A survey course of analytic geometry, and the calculus, intended for 
Workers in the biological sciences and for prospective teachers of high- 
school mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

347 



i 



Math. 7 f. Solid Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, plane geom- 
etry. This course is designed to prepare a student for teaching geometry 
in high school and is open to students in the College of Education. 

Lines and planes, cylinders and cones, the sphere, polyhedra, geometry 
on the sphere, regular solids. 

Math. 8 f, 10 s. Elements of College Mathematics (3, 3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, at least one year of high school algebra. Reqmred of biological, 
premedical and predental students. 

This course acquaints the student with the elementary ideas in the fol- 
lowing branches of mathematics: algebra, trigonometry, analytic geom- 
etry and calculus. Math. 8 f, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for Math. 
10 s. 

First semester. Algebra: Quadratic equations, theory of equations, ex- 
ponentials, logarithms, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations. 
Trigonometry : trigonometric functions, solution of triangles, trigonometric 
equations and identities. 

Second semester. Analytic geometry: Cartesian coordinates, the straight 
line, the circle, the ellipse, graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential 
and logarithmic functions. Calculus: elementary theory of differentiation 
and integration. 

Math. 18 y. Pictorial Geometry (4) — Two lectures. Required of students 
whose major is mathematics, and of students in the College of Education 
with mathematics as their major or minor. 

The story of geometry, classical and modem, synthetic and analytic, pre- 
sented by means of drawings and models made by the students themselves. 

Math. 20 y. General Mathematics (6) — Three lectures. Primarily intended 
for students of economics and the social sciences. Reqmred of all students 
in College of Commerce. Prerequisite, one year of high school algebra. 

Principles of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry; mathematics of 
finance; quadratic and higher equations; progressions and logarithms; com- 
pound interest and annuities; permutations and combinations; probabilities; 
graphing of algebraic and trigonometric functions; construction and inter- 
pretation of graphs; interpolation and approximation methods; rudiments of 
the calculus; introduction to statistical methods. 

Math. 21 f and s. College Algebra (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and satisfactory passing of a 
qualifying examination. Required of all students in the College of Engineer- 
ing; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chemistry; of 
students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major 
or minor. 

Foundations of algebra; binomial and multinomial expansions; progres- 
sions; determinants; elements of the theory of numbers; combinatorial 
analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; theory of equations; exponen- 
tial functions and logarithms; principles of trigonometry. 

346 



Math 22 s and f. Analytic Geometry (4)-Three lectures; one lab- 

rftorv' Prerequisite, Math 21. Required of all students m the College 

T^ndneering; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, or chem- 

LtryTof students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 

their' major or minor. 

Cartesian and polar coordinates; line and circle; curves of the second 
order; higher algebraic and transcendental curves; penodograms; solid 
analytic geometry. 

Math 23 y. Calculus (8)-Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites Math. 8 f, 10 s or 21, 22. Required of all students in the College 
of En^neering; of students with a major in mathematics, physics or chem- 
istiyrof students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 
their major or minor. 

Limits, derivatives, and differentials; maxima and minima; curvature; 
pvolutes- envelopes; elements of curve theory; elementary theory of func- 
ZTv.S.l derivatives. Indefinite and definite integrals; multiple inte- 
grals; calculation of arcs, areas, volumes, and moments; expansion m series. 
Math 71 f. Applied Mathematics (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
either Math. 8 f, 10 s or 21, 22, or equivalent. ^ _ 

Spherical trigonometry with applications to navigation; also topics m 
aeronautics, ballistics, sur^-eying, map reading, charts, signals, and codes. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Students majoring in mathematics who have completed freshman and 
sophomore courses in mathematics with distinction in the honors sections 
are eligible to try for honors in mathematics. To receive the honors degree 
in mathematics, a student must: (1) complete the curriculum m mathe^ 
matics found on page 122 of the catalogue with an average grade of B 
in all subjects; (2) pass honors examinations in mathematics at^ the end 
of the junior and senior years; (3) write a satisfactory thesis on an 
assigned topic in mathematics in the latter half of the semor year. Students 
who wish to try for honors in mathematics should consult the executive 
officer of the department at the conclusion of their sophomore year. 

Math. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 

(2) — Two lectures. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers in 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathematics 

J T_ . (Dantzig.) 

and physics. 

Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill f or equivalent. 

A survey course of analytic geometry, and the calculus, intended for 
workers in the biological sciences and for prospective teachers of high- 
school mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

347 



Math. 114 f. Differential Equations for Eneineers d) Th~^ i .. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y or equivalent. *"•«"***" (3)-Three lectures. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the ColWe of Fr, • 
neenng, a«d deals with aspects of mathematics which arise ten^neerif" 
theory and practice. Among the topics treated are the tolTo^nTu^^^ 
Afferentzal equations; advanced methods in kinematics aifd dyScs- L'r' 
cations of analysis to electrical circuits, to aero-dynamics. briSelsi^n^'et 

Mafh lie A ,- . ^ (Martin, Lancaster.) 

reSL Ma't^ 9?^"^ '''''^"'"f '"■■ ^^''^•"^^'^ (3)-niree lectures, pj 
requisite. Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

n.P^'' ''^T ,'" *=°"/^"'=t«*J '" <=lose cooperation with the Chemistry Depart 
ment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise in tt^e 2 

theli H . derivatives; applications of mathematical analys^te 

the^io-dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physicaf chem- 

(Lancaster.) 
MaT23To'equSer ^'•^-""-*^'^ <2>-^- ^-tures. Prerequisite, 

seSeTand'in"finf ''J'\''°'^'' ^"'^^ ^*^ ^'"^^^ ^d«'>««e«; trigonometric 
™.r . P^<^"<=ts; graphing of periodic functions; hyperbolic tS 

onometT '"^°"°'"^*"^ ^°^"*^- «^ ^^-«-' P-ciples of sTheS Sj" 
^ , (Dantzig.) 

ffistorv „f " -.f ''7 "' Elementary Mathematics (2)_Two lectures. 
History of arithmetic, algebra and geometry. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

M fk io (Dantzig.) 

142 *t S™|„T""" ''"•"'■" «>-^'"' '«•»»'■ Pre„,„,s,«,, M.th. 

Ti)T *L ^o/^ ^ (Alrich.) 

MiS, 23 r ^""""' *""'"'" ''^-''"° '^*=*--- Prerequisite, 

Statics, equilibrium of a point and of flexible cord<! vJrf,,,! i . • 

rnatics. dynamics of a particle, elementary celeltiaTihlt:.' ^Mardr; 

Ma"!S''l3o'?'o;;qu1SS'' ''"''''•" ^'^-^^'^ ^-*-- P-equisite, 

Lagran^an equations for dynamical systems of one two and three 
degrees of freedom. Hamilton's principle Th» «=»»,«?' t l- , 

diflTerential equation. Pnncipie. The Hamilton-Jacobi part.al 

(Martin.) 

(Staff.) 
348 



Math. 141 f. Higher Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
23 y or equivalent. 

Identities; multinomial expansion; combinatorial analysis; mathematical 
induction; undetermined coefficients; determinants; elementary theory of 
equations; complex magnitudes. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 142 s. Higher Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
141 f or equivalent. 

Inequalities; continued fractions; summation of series; difference equa- 
tions; theory of numbers; diophantine equations. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 143 f. Advanced Calculus (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
23 y or equivalent. 

General methods of integration; multiple integration with physical appli- 
cations; partial differentiation; geometrical and physical applications; mean 
value theorem; Jacobians; envelopes. (Titt.) 

Math. 144 s. Advanced Calculus (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
143 f or equivalent. 

Elliptic integrals; line integrals; Green's theorem; equation of continuity; 
applications to hydrodynamics. (Titt.) 

Math. 145 f. Advanced Plane Analytic Geometry (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

Homogeneous coordinates; advanced theory of conic sections; Pliicker 
characters of algebraic curves; cubic and quartic curves; Cremona transfor- 
mations. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Van Stockum.) 

Math. 146 s. Solid Analytic Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 145 f or equivalent. 

General theory of quadric surfaces; the twisted cubic; line geometry; 
geometry on a sphere; cubic and quartic surfaces. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

(Alrich.) 

Math. 151 f. Theory of Equations (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

Complex numbers; fundamental theorem of algebra; equations of the 
third and fourth degree; algebraic solution of equations; finite groups; 
numerical solution of equations; criteria of irreducibility; cyclotomic equa- 
tions. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 152 s. Introduction to Modem Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 151 f or equivalent. 

Vectors; matrices; linear dependence; quadratic forms; infinite groups. 

(Lancaster.) 

Math. 153 f. Advanced Differential Equations (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

Equations of the first order; linear equations with constant and variable 

349 






rrfi?",*'? ."^^"^.^ °^ variables; singular solutions; solution in series- 

ZiaTd ffel T^"' "J""""'^ ii^erenm equations in three varfaWes.' 
partial differential equations. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Titt j 

isf ft Stivalent"'" " ^"'''^" ^'^-"^^ '"=*"'^^- ^-requisite. Math. 

pSisS U'^rXuiv'x"^^ ^""^^^^ ^^^-^'^ '-^-- 

The theorems of Desargues and Pappus; cross-ratio and homographv 

lZ£Z;':Z:l;''''''-' ^-^^"^^^^^^ ^"*-P-^«- -^ .eneraHza^n'^f 

' (Dantzig.) 

IWquisit!, Ma;h."2l"f "or rqufv^r"^' "^-"'^ '''-'^^ ^-^--• 
Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; transformations- orthogonal 

tSpf '"''^"^^^' '•"''•^"^^ ^"'^ ^"-^«es; curvilinear :;ord?natri,! 

(Van Stockum.) 

veq'^LVLh.^lT^^eSlaS^^^^ ^"^'"'^ ^^^""^^ '^^^'^^^ ^- 
in^*matl ^''"..^'^^^"f «^. ""^ergraduate and graduate students in engineer- 

Ls t^il h! rfr"' ^'^^^''^^ ''^''''' <='-yPto?raphy, and communica^ 
lions will be included among the subjects discussed. (Titt ) 

For Graduates 
Math. 220 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variahip (9^ t,„ i 

tures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f. 144 s, or equivalent ^ ^~^^" ^''■ 

Complex numbers, power series, integration of analytic functions Oanrbv 

(Newell.) 
Math. 221 s. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2)-Two 

lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 220 f or equivalent 

coSuaZ^'indT"""'' Weierstrass theory of analytic functions, analytic 
nZfl) '"'™ '"''"'""' •=""'°'"'"^' representation. (Not given 

(Newell.) 

Real numbers continuous functions, differentiable functions uniform con 

360 '«■""»■' 



Math. 225 f. Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
155 f or equivalent. 

Axiomatic development of geometry; fundamental theorems; projective 
equivalence; the group of collineations in the plane and in space; non- 
Euclidean geometries. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 226 s. Differential Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 156 s or equivalent. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves; kinematical applications; geom- 
etry on a surface; general theory of surfaces; curvature and space struc- 
ture; Riemannian geometries. (Van Stockum.) 

Math. 227 s. Infinite Processes (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
222 f or equivalent. 

Convergence of infinite series and products; Fourier series; orthogonal 
functions; asymptotic series. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 231 s. Partial Differential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 143 f, 144 s, 153 f, 
or equivalent. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Titt.) 

Math. 232 s. Theory of Probabilities and Least Squares (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

Frequency and probability; the concept of "equally likely"; combinatorial 
analysis; addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of distribution; 
continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, to theories of errors 
and correlations, and to molecular theories. (Titt.) 

Math. 235 s. Modem Algebra (2) — ^Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
152 s or equivalent. 

Sets; classes; groups; isomorphism; rings; fields; Gtalois theory; ordered 
and w^ell-ordered sets; ideals; linear algebras. (Newell.) 

Math. 240 y. Graduate Colloquium. 

A forum for the presentation and critical discussion of mathematical 
research conducted by the faculty and advanced students. (Staff.) 

Math. 250 y. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 23 y or equivalent. 

Celebrated Problems of Mathematics from antiquity to present day. 
History of individual mathematical disciplines such as the theory of num- 
bers, non-Euclidean geometry, vector and matrix analysis, theory of func- 
tions, theory of groups, theory of aggregates. Special emphasis will be 
laid on the evolution of mathematical concepts and principles. (Dantzig.) 

351 



Math. 243. 

Math. 244. 
Math. 245. 

Math. 246. 
Math. 247. 

Math. 260. 



Selected Topics Courses 

In addition to the preceding, a number of courses will be offered from 
time to time by the various members of the staff in their respective fields 
of specialization. These courses are intended primarily for candidates for 
an advanced degree, and aim at developing materials for dissertations; they 
will, however, be open to any qualified student. 

Math. 242. Selected Topics in Modem Geometry. 

(Dantzig, Van Stockum.) 

Selected Topics in Modem Analysis. 

(Martin, Lancaster, Newell.) 
Selected Topics in Dynamics. (Martin.) 

Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics. 

(Van Stockum, Titt.) 

Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (Dantzig, Alrich.) 

Selected Topics in Differential and Difference Equations. 

(Lancaster.) 
Research. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis to- 
wards an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant Colonel Fin- 
ley*; Acting Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant 
Colonel Wysor; Assistant Professors, Lieutenant Colonel Westfall, 
Major Ellis, Lieutenant Judd, Lieutenant Jones, Lieutenant Williams, 
Lieutenant Kelly; Sergeant Mars, Sergeant Norris, Sergeant Uhrinak, 

Sergeant Martin. 

fBasic Course 

M. I. 1 y. Basic R. O. T. C. (2) — One lecture; two drill periods. Fresh- 
man year. 

First Semester: National Defense Act, including basic organization and 
the R. 0. T. C; military courtesy; command and leadership; rifle marks- 
manship. 

Second Semester: Command and leadership; automatic rifle; military his- 
tory and policy; military hygiene and first aid; citizenship; military organ- 
ization. 

M. I. 2 y. Basic R. O. T. C. (4) — One lecture; two drill periods. Sopho- 
more year. 

First Semester: Scouting and patrolling; musketry; military history; 
command and leadership. 

Second Semester: Military history; combat principles of the squad; com- 
mand and leadership; map reading. 



*Oti leave. 

fRequired of qualified students. 



352 



* Advanced Course 
M. I. 101 y. Advanced R. O. T. C. (6)-Three lectures; two drill periods. 

'TZ^SLster: Aerial photograph reading and ^^^^^.Z!^ 

Second Semester: Tactical principles and methods ^° ^"^'f ^ ^^"^^f^! 
platoon and platoons of the ^eay weapons company p.st^m^^^^^ 
ship; rifle range procedure to include preparation of schedules, 
and leadership. , .,1 • ^c 

M. I. 102 y. Advanced R. O. T. C. (6)-Three lectures; two dnll penods. 

Senior year. i-„«f;^oi T^rmrittles and methods 

First Semester: Command and leadership; ^^^f ^^J P^^^^tganization of 
to Include the rifle company and heavy weapons company, organiza 

larger combat units; tank tactics. ^nitarv law company ad- 

Second Semester: Military history and ^<^'^^l'J^^Z'Z' rTcomp..y 
ministration; mechanization; tactical exercise to include 
and heavy weapons company; command and leadership. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 
T ^x.™ WATK5- ASSOCIATE Professor Kramer; Assistant 
SEsrs D^rv PrLT Mist rJcox, M. Schweizer, Mk- Liot- D- 

EeR MR EVANGELIST, MR. SCOPPETTO.E, MK^ MUTZIGER, MR. BACKEN- 

stoss, MR. Banta, Mr. Cole, Dr. Cunz. 

All students whose major is in Modern Languages are required to take 
Mroductory Survey of Comparative Literature (Comp. L^t- 101 « , 102 sh 
-r,H thf>v are strongly advised to take the review course (l-rencn 
99 f German 99 f Spanish 99 f). The following courses are recommended: 
iJvey 7 Western Civilization (H. ly). Introduction to PMosophy iPhil 
xT The Old Testament as Literature (Comp. Lit. 104 s), Prose and Poetry 
l\' 2 Romantic Age. (^ng. 113 f, 114 s), Romanti.^sm ^n prance an^ 
Germany (Comp. Lit. 105 f, 106 s). For a major in German, Old English 

't":^:rSlZ Ll: majors in the different languages are as 
fofC PVench-French 9 y, 10 y, 15 y, and three additional year^cou^^^^^^ 
in literature in the 100 group; German-German 10 y, ^^ J'^f !^^Zdlt 
ditional year-courses in the 100 group; Spanish-Spanish 6 y, 15 y, and at 
least 16 hours in the 100 group. 

A. French 

French 1 y. Elementary French (6)-Three lectures. Students who offer 
tw!i in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate 
for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

♦Elective for qualified undergraduates in accordance with contract. 

353 



French 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 1 y. Students who are 
interested in French, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of French 1 y. 

French 3 y. Second- Year French (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
French 1 y or equivalent. 

Study of grammar continued; composition; conversation; translation of 
narrative and technical prose. In the organization of classes, certain sec- 
tions are set aside for the reading of scientific French texts. 

French 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particularly 
for students who enter with three or more units in French, who expect to 
do advanced work in the French language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take French 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as French 6 y, 7 y, 8 y, 15 y. 

French 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 3 y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in French literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of French 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of French 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation, based on material dealing with French 
history, art, and music. 

French 6 y. The Development of the French Novel (6) — Three lectures. 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French litera- 
ture; of the lives, works, and influences of important novelists. Reports. 

French 7 y. The Development of the French Drama (6) — Three lectures. 
Introductory study of the French drama of the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
and nineteenth centuries. Translation and collateral reading. Reports. 

French 8 y. The Development of the Short Story in French (6) — Three 
lectures. 

* 

A study of the short story in French literature; reading and translation 
of representative examples. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

French 9 y. French Phonetics (2) — One lecture. Prerequisite, French 1 y. 

French 10 y. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (6) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, French 3 y. 

(French 9 y and 10 y are required of students preparing to teach French.) 

French 15 y. Introduction to French Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, French 3 y. 

An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in French literature. This course is given in French. 

354 



French 99 f. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (l)-One 

''weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French » 
ture, art! and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
mea^s of a brief survey of the entire field. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
A more intensive survey of modem French literature is offered by means 
of rotating courses roughly divided by centuries. 

French 102 y. French Literature of the 17th Century C^^-'^YwUcox!) 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 
French 103 y. French Literature of the 18th Century (4)-1V'0 lec^tures. 

French 104 y. French Literature of the 19th Century (4)-Two^lectur^^ 

French 105 y. French Literature of the 20th Century (4)-Two lectoes. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 

French 110 y. Advanced Composition (6)-Three lectures Prerequr- 
sitrFrench 10 y. This course is required of students prepanng to^teach 

^TtS^tion is also called to Comp. Lit. 105 f, Romanticism in France. 

For Graduates 
French 201. Research (2-4)-Credits determined by work accompUshed. 

French 202 y. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (4)-Two lectures 

(Falls.) 

French 204 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (4)--Jwo 

lectures. (Not given in 1941-42.) ^ 

French 205 y. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 
" , 1 (Darby.) 

(4) — Two lectures. 

French 206 f, 207 s. The French Novel in the Fii^t Half of the Nine- 
teenth Century (2, 2)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Falls.) 

French 208 f, 209 s. The French Novel in the Second Half of th« N™*" 
teenth Century (2, 2)— Two lectures. (l^aiis.) 

French 210 y. Seminar (2-4)-One meeting weekly. ^^"''^^^J^" 
graduate students in French. 

French 212 s. Introduction to Old French (2)-Two lectures. 

(Daroy.; 

French 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2)-One conference. 
Designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of 
FrenJh^iterature. Extensive outside reading with reports and conn^ecfang 

lectures. 

355 



n 



B. German 

German 1 y. Elementary German (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year German, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

German 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 1 y. Students who 
are interested in German, and who have done well in the first semester 
of the elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with 
the second semester of German 1 y. 

German 3 y. Second- Year German (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
German 1 y or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review, and oral 
and written practice. In the organization of classes, certain sections are 
set aside for the reading of scientific German texts. 

German 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particularly 
for students who enter with three or more imits in German and who expect 
to do advanced work in the German language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take German 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as German 6 f or 8 f . 

German 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A. or B in the first semester of German 3 y. Students 
who expect to take advanced work in German literature, and who have 
completed the first semester of German 3 y with the grade of A or B, should 
take this course in conjunction with the second semester of German 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; based on material dealing with 
German history, art, and music. 

German 6 f, 7 s. Advanced German (3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, German 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent G^erman literature. 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 

German 8 f, 9 s. Advanced German (3, 3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, German 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. (Not given in 
1941-42.) 

German 10 y. (Jerman Grammar and Composition (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 3 y. This course is required of students preparing 
to teach German. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. 

356 



German 15 y. Introduction to German Literature (6)-Three lectures, 
prerequisite, German 3 y or^^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^, 

An elementary survey of the history oi uennd 
representative authors and works. 

German 99 f. Rapid Review of the History of German Uterature («- 

One lecture. • ^ • 4.1,^ i^iQtnrv of German litera- 

weekly lectures stressing the h.gh pomts m the Instory of Ge ^^ 

ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review 

means of a brief survey of the entire field. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
German 101 f. 102 s. German Literature of the 18th Century (3. 3)- 

Three lectures. 

First semester, the earlier ^^^f ^i«^\"*7^f """, (Not given in 1941-42.) 
Second semester, the later classical literature. (Not g ^^^^^^^ 

German 103 f. 104 s. German Literature of the 19th Century (3, 3)_ 

Three lectures. 

First semester. Romanticism and Young Germany. ^^^^^^ 

Second semester, the Literature of the Empire. 

German 105 f, 106 s. Contemporary German Literature (3. 3)-Three 

Ts^dy of the lives, works, and influence of outstanding author^of ^he 

"Mention is also called to Comp. ^ .^^^.^TZt^^ I^:^- 
and Comp. Lit. 107 f. The Faust Legend t« English and Ue 
German 107 y. Goethe's Faust (4)-Two lectures. (Zucker.) 

For Graduates 
German 201. Research (2-4)-Credits determined by work accompUJjd. 

German 202 y. The Modern German Drama (4)-Two lectures. 

S™ tie naturalistic, neo-romantic. and expressionistic drama agams 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. (Prahl.) 

n -« on^i V Schiller (4) — ^Two lectures. 

r; ofi^irriL o, s^me,, «... ^ph... »„ .h. m*.., 

of his dramas. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

German 204 f. Goethe's Faust (2)_Two lectures. (Not given^»|^mi- 
42.) 

German 205 s. Goethe's Works Outside of Faust (2)_Two ^-tures^^^^ 

357 



Grerman 206 y. The Romantic Movement (4) — Two lectures. 

(Prahl.) 
German 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — Two meetings weekly. 
Subject for 1941-42: Grillparzer. Required of all graduate students in 
German. (Staff.) 

German 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2) — One conference. 

Designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of German 
literature. Extensive outside reading vdth reports and connecting lectures. 

(Prahl.) 

German 230 f. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics (3) — Three 

lectures. (Mutziger.) 

German 231 s. Middle High German (3) — Three lectures. (Mutziger.) 

C. Italian 

Italian 1 y. Elementary Italian (6) — Three lectures. Open to freshmen. 
Also recommended for advanced students in French and Spanish. 

Drill in pronunciation and in the elements of the language. Reading of 
short stories from modem authors. 

Italian 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, the 
grade of A or B in the first semester of Italian 1 y. Students who are 
interested in Italian, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of Italian 1 y. 

D. Spanish 

Spanish 1 y. Elementary Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

Spanish 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 1 y. Students who 
are interested in Spanish, and who have done well in the first semester of 
the elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with 
the second semester of Spanish 1 y. 

Spanish 3 y. Second- Year Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 1 y or equivalent. 

Reading of narrative works and plays; grammar review; oral and 
written practice. 

Spanish 4 f. Grammar Review (3) — Three lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who 
are not prepared to take Spanish 6 y or 15 y. 

358 



,i«. th. gr«l= ot A or B »;''' «;'*„"rS. Ulmtui., and who h.v. 
.to «P~t lo fko "^'"'f r°* 2h 3 T «lth the sr.do of A or B 

^■?Si.V-„e»=os » ..„v.,.«.o.; h».d o„ n,.«H^ deall.g w.th 
Sp»i,h history, art, mi ».u»=. „.,„„,. p^ 

,^ sU.hTrr:;,:irsn:Li i ^^r. .. «^^^ 

■"tScL'^'ph-tt- ,™. .nd written co„po.tlo„^ 

-:r:rc::r. .h. «... . ..... ...™..™ <.>- 

One lecture. . .i, v^io-h noints in the history of Spanish 

by means of k brief survey of the entire field. 

For Advanced Under.rad«at^ and Gdua^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Spanish 101 f. Spanish Literature of the 20th Century (. 

tures. 
Novels, the drama, essays and poetry. 

Spanish 103 f. 104 s. The Spanish Drama (3, 3)_Three lectures. 
First semester, the drama of *e Golden Age. ^^^ 

Second semester, the drama smce Calderon. INot g (parby.) 

Spanish 105 y. Cervantes ^^^''^^^.■[f^'^'^ ^^^ks (Darby.) 

The life and times of Cervantes; pnncipal prose works. 

e • 1, in7 f 108 s The Spanish Novel (3, 3)-Three lectures. 
l?rserstf;,'clas:ic nove Jand short stories of the Golden Age and 

°^£rnfsSUtSy of the development of the modem novel. JNot 

given in 1941-42.) lectures Prerequisite, 

Spanish 110 s. Advanced Composition (3)-Three lectures, r 

Spanish 6 y or the consent of the ™*=^J- for students who are 

eoSSX?i?i?==rinTp= CO— m .^^^^^^^ 

Spanish 151 f. Latin-American Literature : The Colon.al Per.od^^S)- 
Three lectures. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

Spanish 152 s. Latin- Ameri«in Literature: The Modem ^^r.o.^^^' 
Three lectures. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

359 



\ 



For Graduates 



Spanish 201. Research (2-4) — Credits determined by work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

Spanish 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6) — Three 

lectures. 

Detailed study of the classical authors. (Darby.) 

Spanish 203 f, 204 s. Spanish Poetry (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

First semester, the epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyrics, 
poetry of the Golden Age. 

Second semester, poetry of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth 
centuries. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. Required of all 
graduate students in Spanish. (Darby.) 

Spanish 212 f. Introduction to Old Spanish (2) — Two lectures. 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 220 f, 221 s. Reading Course (2, 2) — One conference. 

Designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of Span- 
ish literature. Extensive outside reading with reports and connection 
lectures. (Darby) 

MUSIC 

Assistant Professor Randall; Mrs. Gavin. 

Music 1 y. Music Appreciation (2) — One lecture. 

A study of all types of classical music with a view to developing the 
ability to listen and enjoy. Lecture recitals will be presented with the aid 
of performers and records. A study of the orchestra and the instruments 
that it employs. A study of musical form. The development of the opera 
and oratorio. Great singers of the past and present. Well-known musicians 
occasionally appear as guest lecturers and performers. 

Music 2 y. History of Music (2) — One lecture. 

A comprehensive course in the history of music covering the development 
of all forms of music from ancient times through the renaissance ; the classic 
and the romantic schools; and the more modern composers. 

Music 3 y. Chorus (1). 

This course is offered for those interested in part-singing. After voice 
trials, students who have ability to read and sing music of the grade of 
easy songs are admitted. Members of the Women's Chorus and the Men's 
Glee Club indicated hereafter are combined at times for mixed chorus 
singing. 

360 



.A) Women^s Chorus. Study of part-singing for women s voices. C^^^^^^ 
., awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
Participation in public performances of the chorus. 

m) MerCs Glee Club. Study of part-singing for men's voices Credit is 
awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and par- 
ticipation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4 y. Orchestra (1). 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of tt staXd symphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 

I.^ comnosers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments are 
T h^ fTmeXrship At least one rehearsal of two hours' duration is 
Xach wXt^^^^^^^ players are expected to take part in public per- 
formances. 

Music 5 y. Harmony (4)-Two lectures. 

™s course include— t^^^^^^^^ ^-^ ™ if- r::S£; t'd 

S inversions, altered and mixed chords and modulabon. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basas for ear trammg, 
dictation, melody writing, -and melody harmonization. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marti. 
Phil. 1 f. Introduction to Philosophy (3)-Three lectures. Not open 

to freshmen. . , ^ ,.„ 

A study of Greek and Roman thought and its connection ^th present ways 
Astuayoi vjiect^. cwi^ chosen in fulfillment of the 

of thinking. This course or Phil. 2 s may be cnosen m 

philosophy requirement. 

Phil. 2 s. Introduction to Philosophy (3)-Three lectures. Not open 
to freshmen. , _ . _^^ 

requirement. 

Phil. 11 s. Modern European Philosophy (3)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Phil. 1 f or 2 s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or 2 s. Alternates with Phil. 12 s. 

Phil. 12 s. American Philosophy (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 

' A continuation of Phil. 1 f or 2 s. Alternates with Phil. 11 s. (Not given 

in 1941-42.) 

361 



Phil. 21 f. Aesthetics (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites Phil i f . 

nate^s wHh"pTn.^^' Sll. "'"'"'^""'^ *° ^^^ ^^""^^^^ '>' ^^- Alter- 

Phil. 22 f. Logic (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 f or 2 s and 
satisfactory preparation in mathematics or science. »• 1 t or J s, and 

nate"s S Pht'Il rand'2?r^' ^^"^^"^ '"^ ^^^^"^^ '"^^•°- ^.te. 

Phil. 23 f. EtWcs (3)_Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f or 2 s 

wifhPM'2ff*L'"fr*;Nr' "'"'''"cf '' *^ ^°^*^ "^- Alternates 
^x I ana ^^ f. (Not given m 1941-42.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
sion'"p"req';isitl^hif f f"S '" ^^'"-""''^ <'' l>-One hour of discus- 

disc;:se°;in"c7aTs Ttf^onfc -f,^ P^'osophical works will be read and 
although the same wirkmavhr 5^^'^^"^''' ^rom semester to semester, 
Not mL thanT::^.ratr r ^J'lf 2^ ^ '^^ T^tS 

Phil 113 f, 114 s. Readings in Philosophy (1, 1)— OnP hnnr .f ^• 
sion. Prerequisite, Phil. 1 f, or 2 s. i>>— t>ne hour of discus- 

Similar to Phil ]llfii9o /XT^ 

x-nii. ill 1, 112 s. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Marti.) 

Phil. 151 f. Proseminar in Aesthetics (3)--Two hm.ve p 

zj^:ls^''^ -'■ ^---^^^-. - c'oiL'sTpikztn^ 

o/of ItlV^y^J/jr ^^^^^^ - -,— o^' aesthetics, 

testing study of the Drincinfernf ih ^ . ^""^ historical period, or a 

will be chan'ged, ftm y af i^yea^S ^Sh f "^^ "'^i"^'"" ^'^^ ^''^'^ 
needs of the group partLpating " ""'''"'"" '" ""« ^'* ^he 

*■ (Marti, Weeks.) 

pleminfr, ^one'^ZTT tl!^^^^^^ ^^ "^^^^^^ ^^>-^- ^ours of 
philosophy.' No graduate credit ^^^^^-tes, two courses in 

oph; Stilt;^:^^^ - P^- of, the philo. 

history, or of the philosonhi..^ ^ .''^^ implications of some period of 

or theories. The toSwn^be T ^f '' ^^^-^ sociological trends 

chosen in line wTth the n^eds S thp"^ ' '"" ^'^' '^ ^'^'^ ^^^ -^^ ^^ 

the needs of the group participating. (Marti, Thatcher.) 

362 



Phil. 191 f, 192 s. Systems of Philosophy (3, 3)— Three lectures, student 
reports, and discussion. Prerequisites, two courses in philosophy and the 
permission of the professor. 

The system of one philosopher, or the development of one movement, 
will be studied throughout each semester. The topic will be changed, from 
semester to semester, in line with the needs of the students enrolled. 

(Marti.) 

Phil. 193 f, 194 s. Systems of Philosophy (3)— Three lectures, student 
reports, and discussion. Prerequisites, two courses in philosophy and the 
permission of the professor. 

Similar to Phil. 191 f, 192 s. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Marti.) 

PHYSICS 

Professor Eichlin; Assistant Professor Dickinson; Dr. Myers, 

Mr. Smith, Mr. Warner. 

Phys. 1 y. General Physics (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of students in the premedical and predental curricula. This course 
satisfies the minimum requirement for a science major. Prerequisites, 
Math. 8 f, 10 s; or 21 f, 22 s. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, soimd, light, 
magnetism, and electricity. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

Phys. 2 y. General Physics (10) — Four lectures; one laboratory. Ke- 
quired of all students in the engineering curricula, and of those with 
chemistry, mathematics, and physics majors. Elective for other students. 
Prerequisites, Math. 21 f, 22 s, 23 y. The last may be taken concurrently. 

A study of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, and electricity. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

Phys. 3 y. Introductory Physics (6) — Three lectures. 

This introductory course is designed to meet the needs of students who 
desire to become acquainted with the fundamental principles of physics. 
Instruction will be given by lectures, recitations, and experimental demon- 
strations. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. 

Phys. 51 f, 52 s. Photography (2, 2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 1 y, 2 y, or 3 y. 

A study of the physical principles of the camera, enlarger, exposure 
meter, filter, and other photographic devices. Special emphasis on the 
application of photographic methods in the laboratory. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 per semester. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. 101 f. Precision of Measurements (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y, Math. 23 y. 

A discussion of the principles underlying the treatment of experimental 
data, as to precision of observations, errors, interpolation, curve analysis, 

363 



etc., with especial emphasis on the planning of investigations involving 
measurements. The course is intended as an introduction to quantitative 
experimental work. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 102 s. Physical Measurements (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, Phys. 101 f. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 101 f, is designed to familiarize the 
student with the manipulation of various types of apparatus used in experi- 
mentation in physical problems, and the adaptation and analysis of data 
so obtained. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. 

ly. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is an advanced study of physical 
phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, conduction of electricity through gases, 
photoelectricity, etc., with a comprehensive review of basic principles in- 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student in a general survey with 
some of the recent developments in physics. (Smith.) 

Phys. 104 y. Advanced Experiments (6)— One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 103 y. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is intended to provide the student 
with experience in experimental physics. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per 
semester. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Myers.) 

Phys. 105 f. Heat (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. n , 

The classical phenomena of heat and radiation are developed on the basis 
of the kinetic molecular theory and the quantum theory. The first and 
second laws of thermodynamics are applied to physical processes. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. (Myers.) 

Phys. 106 s. Theoretical Mechanics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisites 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

An analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented with problems to illustrate these principles. The 
use of generalized coordinates is illustrated. The equations of Lagrange 
are applied to selected topics in the field of dynamics. (Myers.) 

Phys. 107 s. Optics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, interfer- 
ence, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed 
in a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectroscope, 
and interferometer. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 108 y. Electricity (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

A study of electrical properties of matter and space with applications 
to common electrical instruments and apparatus. Laboratory fee $5.00 
per semester. (Dickinson.) 

864 



Phys. 109 y. Electron Physics (6)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics, and atomic structure. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. (Myers.) 

Phys. 110 f. Sound (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 2 y or 1 y, Math. 23 y. 

A study is made of vibrating systems, the propagation and scattering of 
sound waves, standing sound waves, sound wave energy, etc. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Myers.) 

Phys. Ill f, 112 s. Mathematical Physics (3, 3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

Selected topics in physics will be treated to illustrate certain mathe- 
matical methods, particularly the use of derivatives and differentials, 
methods of integration, infinite series, vectors, ordinary and partial differen- 
tial equations, orthonormal sets of functions. (Myers.) 

Phys. 113 f, 114 s. Properties of Matter (3, 3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

A study of the constituent particles of matter and such properties of 
matter as gravitation, molecular attraction, elasticity, special properties 
of solids and of fluids at rest and in motion, wave propagation. (Not 
given in 1941-42.) (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 115 f, 116 s. High Frequency Phenomena (3, 3)— Two lectures, one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Phys. 2 y or 1 y. Math. 23 y. 

A study of resonant circuits, characteristics of electron tubes, high 
frequency generators, filters, electromagnetic waves, propagation of waves 
in wires and through a conducting medium. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per 
semester. (Not given in 1941-42.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 117 y. Applied Mechanics (4)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Phys. 
2 y. Math. 23 y. Required of juniors in chemical engineering. 

A study of the fundamentals and principles of the kinetics and kinematics 
of bodies in translation and rotation, and of elasticity of solids, with special 
regard to their engineering application. (Eichlin.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3)— Three lectures. 

A development of atomic theory by a discussion of the various atomic 
properties, particularly those of emission of spectra, scattermg of jc-rays 
and electrons, and valency. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

365 



(Myers.) 



Phys. 202 f. Atomic Spectra (3)— Three lectures. 

Interpretation of spectral series, fine and hyperfine structure, line inten- 
sities and polarization, line contours, and effects of external fields in light 
of modern atomic theory. (Myers.) 

Phys. 203 s. Molecular Spectra (3) — Three lectures. 

A discussion of molecular spectra with particular reference to the infor- 
mation that is given about molecular structure, specific heats, entropy, 
and related phenomena. (Myers.) 

Phys. 204 f, 205 s. Quantum Mechanics (3, 3) — ^Three lectures. 

A treatment of the general methods of quantum mechanics with applica- 
tions to the theory of atomic and molecular structure, the theory of colli- 
sion processes, and the theories of radiation and electrodynamics. 

(Myers.) 

Phys. 206 s. Nuclear Structure (3) — Three lectures. 

The theory of the nucleus is developed by a discussion of masses, charges, 
magnetic moments, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, scattering, and inter- 
action with radiation fields. (Myers.) 

Phys. 207 f, 208 s. Modern Physics (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

A comprehensive survey of developments in physics leading to recent 
concepts of atomic structure, theory of radiation, interaction of radiation 
and matter, quantum theory, relativistic mechanics, cosmology. 

(Dickinson.) 

Phys. 209 f. Dynamics I (3)— Three lectures. 

A treatment of dynamical systems in generalized coordinates by the 
equations of Lagrange, of Hamilton, and of Hamilton-Jacobi, by the 
Hamiltonian Principle, and by the use of canonical transformations. (Not 
given in 1941-42.) (Myers.) 

Phys. 210 s. Dynamics II (3) — Three lectures. 

Derivation of the equations of motion of a fluid, a study of irrotational 
motion, vortex motion, motion of solids through liquids, waves through 
liquids, viscosity. (Not given in 1941-42.) ^ (Myers.) 

Phys. 211 f. Electrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. 

The electric and magnetic fields; properties of dielectrics; properties of 
electric conductors; electromagnetic induction; electromagnetic radiation; 
dispersion theory; electro- and magneto-optics. (Not given in 1941-42.) 

(Dickinson.) 

Phys. 212 s. Physical Optics (3)— Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light, with appli- 
cations to interference, diffraction, dispersion, and polarization. (Not given 
in 1941-42.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 213 f, 214 s. Theory of Elasticity (3, 3)— Three lectures. 

A comprehensive discussion of the development of theoretical concepts of 



elasticity with particular atten^on to to^on^ stre^^^^^ 

bars, thin plates, stresses produced by dynamical f ^g.^j^j;^ j 

waves in solid media. 

Phv« 215 f 216 s X-Ray and Crystal Structure (3, 3)-Three lectures. 

Phys. 215 I, Zl^> S. A rvaj ^ ^^, 

A discussion of the production and --~" ^^ "^^Z^^esoi crystals, 
cation of X-ray methods to the study of the physical p P 
(Not given in 1941-42.) 

and of original investigations on special problems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

.» wnwARD- Associate Professor Steinmeyer; Assistant 

^''"^^^Ssrs BO^e! KUNE; MR. WA.THER, MR. LEATH. 

PC Sei 1 f and s. American National Government (3)-0ne lecture 
.„d two discussions. Open *« J-^-- ^^^.^,„^,„, 

A study of the organization and functions oi 
of the United States. 

Pol. Sci. 4 f and s. State and Local Government (3)_0ne lecture and 
fwo discussions. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

Maryland. 

Pol sci 7 f 8 s. Comparative Government (2, 2)-Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1. Not open to freshmen. 

First semester, a comparative study of the governments of Great 
T^ritain France, and Switzerland. 

tZ^ semes;er, a comparative study of the dictatorial govemmentj of 
Europe ^^Jth special emphasis upon Italy, Germany, and the U. S. S. R. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Pol. Sci. 101 f. International Relations (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 or 
consent of instructor. underiying international rela- 

and the development of international organization.. 

Pol Sci 102 s. International Law (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

Tst!:; of the principles governing international intercourse in time 
peace and war, as illustrated in texts and cases. ( 

367 



366 



Pol. Sci. 104 s. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 
1 or consent of instructor. 

The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far 
East and their influence on world politics. ( Steinmeyer. ) 

Pol. Sci. 105 f. Problems of World Politics (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 
1 or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with governmental problems of an international char- 
acter, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, propaganda, etc. Stu- 
dents are required to report on readings from current literature. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. Ill f. Principles of Public Administration (3) — Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 4 or consent of instructor. 

A functional study of public administration in the United States, with 
special emphasis upon organization and the relation of administration to 
the other branches of government. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 112 s. Public Personnel Administration (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. 
Sci. Ill f or consent of instructor. 

A study of civil service practices in the United States with particular 
reference to the organization of the personnel agency, the classification 
and compensation plans, the selection of employees and the management of 
personnel. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 113 f. Municipal Government and Administration (3) — Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A detailed study of selected problems of municipal government, such as 
housing, health, zoning, fire and police, recreation and planning. Course 
includes a visit to Baltimore to observe the agencies of city government at 
work. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 114 s. Public Budgeting (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. Ill f or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of budgetary administration in the United States, including 
systems of financial control and accountability, the settlement of claims, 
centralized purchasing and the reporting of financial operations. (Not 
offered in 1941-42.) - (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 117 f, 118 s. Government at Work (3, 3) — One lecture and two 
field trips. Prerequisites, Pol. Sci. 1 and consent of instructor. 

This course consists of visits to various administrative agencies of the 
national government, supplemented by reading assignments on the work 
of the agencies visited. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 121 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (3) — Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1. 

A descriptive and critical examination of the party process in govern- 
ment; nominations and elections, party expenditures, political leadership, 
the management and conditioning of public opinion. (Bone.) 

368 



Pol Sci. 123 f. Government and Business (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A general survey of governmental activities affecting business, with spe- 
cial emphasis upon recent developments; federal and state assistance to, 
and regulation of, business in their historical and legal aspects; goveni- 
ment ownership and operation. 

Pol. Sci. 124 s. Legislatures and Legislation (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. 

A comprehensive study of the legislative process, bicanieralism the 
committee system and the lobby, with special emphasis upon the legislature 
of Maryland The course includes a visit to Washington to observe Congress 
at work. 

Pol. Sci. 126 s. Government and Social Security (2)— Prerequisite, Pol. 

Sci. 4. . , V • 

An analysis of the Federal Social Security Act with special emphasis 
upon its background, purposes, administration, and deficiencies. Attention 
will be given also to employment assurance and relief policies, and to the 
efforts of European countries and the 48 states to provide a greater measure 
. (Bone.) 

of security. 

Pol. Sci. 131 f. Constitutional Law (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American consti- 
tutional system, with special reference to the role of the judiciary in the 
interpretation and enforcement of the Constitution; the position of the 
states in the federal system; state and federal powers over interstate and 
foreign commerce; and the rights of citizens and of accused Pef^^n^-^j.^^ ^ 

Pol. Sci. 134 s. Administrative Law (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the principles involved in the expansion of the discretion of 
administrative boards and commissions, including an analysis of their func- 
tions; their powers over private rights; their procedure in making findings; 
the enforcement of their rules and orders; and judicial control of th^'^ 

(Kline.) 
actions. 

Pol. Sci. 136 s. Elements of Law (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

Development of law and legal systems; comparison of methods and 
procedure in making and enforcing law in Roman and common law sys- 
tems; consideration of fundamental legal concepts; contribution and influ- 
ence of modern schools of legal philosophy in relation to law ^nd^goveni- 
ment. 

Pol. Sci. 138 s. Law Enforcement (2)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A survey of the organization and operation of the agencies involved in 
the administration of criminal justice, with special reference to the organ- 
ization and methods of police departments; problems of organized crime 
and its suppression; the role of the prosecutor and the courts; and the 
interrelations between these agencies. ( '" •■' 

369 



Pol. Sci. 141 f. History of Political Theory (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 
1 or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. (Walther.) 

Pol. Sci. 142 s. Recent Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 
or consent of instructor. 

4 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories 
of socialism, communism, fascism, etc. (Walther.) 

Pol. Sci. 144 s. American Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 
1 or consent of instructor. 

A study of the writings of the principal American political theorists 
from the colonial period to the present. (Not offered in 1941-42.) 

(Walther.) 

For Graduates 
Pol. Sci. 201 f. Seminar in International Organization (2). 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organiza- 



tions. 



(Steinmeyer.) 



Pol. Sci. 202 s. British Empire (3). 

A study of the constitutional development of the British Dominions, 
with particular attention to recent inter-imperial relationships. (Not offered 
in 1941-42.) , ' (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 211 y. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (4). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of recent 
federal-state relations. (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 213 f. Problems of Public Administration (2). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of national 
and state administration. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 214 s. Problems of Personnel Administration (2). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of public 
personnel administration. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 216 s. Problems of Government in Metropolitan Regions (2). 

Analysis of some metropolitan areas and some of the most pressing 
problems arising out of the existence of dense populations spread over a 
large number of small governmental units having similarly inadequate 
powers and facilities to cope with the problems involved; discussion of 
possible solutions. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 221 f. Seminar in Public Opinion (2). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of public 
opinion. (Bone.) 

370 



Pol. Sci. 222 s^Psych. 280 s. Analysis of Propaganda (3)— Two lec- 
tures; one discussion. Prerequisite, consent of instructors. 

Analytical approach to modern propaganda, including study of organ- 
izations which employ propaganda, of techniques in actual use m dissem- 
inating propaganda, and of attempts at measuring the effects of propa- 
ganda. Responsibility for instruction is shared by the Department of 
Political Science and the Department of Psychology. (Bone, Jenkins.) 

Pol. Sci. 235 f. Problems in Public Law (2). 

Readings and reports on topics selected with reference to the needs of 
the individual student; special attention will be given to methods of 
research in legal materials and to problems in interstate commerce, police 
power, due process and equal protection. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 251 f. Bibliography of Political Science (2). 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the literature of the 
various fields of political science and to instruct him in the use of govern- 
ment documents. 

Pol. Sci. 261. Research in Political Science (2-4)-Credit accordrng^to 
work accomplished. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jull, Byerly; Associate Professors Gwin, Bird, Quigley. 

P. H. 1 f. Poultry Production (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

This is a general course designed to acquaint the student with modem 
methods of poultry husbandry. Principles of incubation, brooding, egg 
production, marketing, and breed improvement are discussed. 

P. H. 2 s. Poultry Management (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Material will be presented in this course to acquaint the student with 
modern methods of feeding, housing, sanitation, and organization neces- 
sary to the profitable operation of a poultry establishment. 

P. H. 3 f. Poultry Biology (1-2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, P. H. 1 f, 2 s, or equivalent. 

The elementary anatomy of the fowl, selection for eggs and meat pro- 
duction, and for breed standards are studied. Judging teams for intercol- 
legiate competitions are selected from members of this class. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
P. H. 101 s. Poultry Genetics (3)— Three lectures, demonstration, and 
quiz periods. Prerequisites, P. H. 3 f, Zool. 104 f. 

The inheritance of morphological and physiological characters of poultry 
are presented. Inheritance of factors related to egg and meat production 
and quality are stressed. (Jull.) 

371 



i 



\ 



p. H. 102 s. Poultry Nutrition (2)— One laboratory; one lecture, demon- 
stration and quiz period. Prerequisites, P. H. 1 f, 2 s. 

The nutritive requirements of poultry and the nutrients which meet those 
requirements are presented. Feed cost of poultry production is emphasized. 

^ , (Bird.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107 s. 

P. H. 104 f, 105 s. Poultry Products Marketing Problems (2, 2)— Two 

lecture, demonstration and quiz periods. Prerequisites, P. H. 1 f, 2 s. 

This course includes material on egg and meat quality, commercial grades, 
relation of transportation and distribution to quality and methods of 
marketing, especially as related to quality. (Gwin.) 

Preservation of Poultry Products, see Bacteriology, F. Tech. 108 s. 

P. H. 106 f. Poultry Physiology (1-2)— One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, P. H. 101 s. 

The physiology of development and incubation of the embryo, especially 
physiological pathology of the embryo in relation to hatchability, is pre- 
sented. Physiology of growth and the influence of environmental factors 
on growth and development are considered. (Byerly.) 

P. H. 107 f. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2) Two lectures. 

This course presents the relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole 
and its economic importance. Consumer prejudices and preferences, pro- 
duction, transportation, storage, and distribution problems are discussed. 
Trends in the industry, surpluses and their utilization, poultry by-products, 
and disease problems, are presented. (Staff.) 

P. H. 108 s. Commercial Poultry Management (2) — Two lectures, dis- 
cussion, demonstration, and quiz periods. Prerequisites, ten hours of poul- 
try husbandry, including P. H. 1 f, 2 s. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, purchase 
of supplies, management problems in baby chick, egg, broiler, and turkey 
production, foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, production and 
financial records. Prior to this course the student should have practical 
experience with poultry at home, on a commercial poultry farm, or under 
the supervision of the poultry department. (Quigley.) 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201 s. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3)— Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, P. H. 101 s or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. 
Linkage, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in de- 
velopment, inheritance of resistance to disease, and the influence of the 
environment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 

(Jull.) 
372 



P. H. 202 f. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, P. H. 102 s or equivalent. 

Deficiency diseases of poultry are considered intensively. Vitamin, min- 
eral, and protein deficiencies are given special consideration. Synthetic 
diets, metabolism, and the physiology of digestion, growth curves and 
their significance, and feed efficiency in growth and egg production are 
studied. (Bird.) 

P. H. 203 s. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. 

The role of the endocrines in reproduction, especially with respect to egg 
production, is considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, molting, 
egg formation, ovulation, deposition of egg envelopes, and the physiology 
of oviposition are studied. (Byerly.) 

P. H. 204 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Reports of current researches by staff members, graduate students, and 
guest speakers are presented. (Staif.) 

P. H. 205 f and s. Poultry Literature (1-4). 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Oral and written reports 
required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are 
taught. (Staff.) 

P. H. 206. Research in Poultry — Credit in accordance with work done. 

Practical and fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under 
the supervision of staff members toward the requirements for the degrees 
of M. S. and Ph. D. ^ (Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Jenkins, Sprowls; Associate Professor Bellows; Assistant 
Professor Clark; Dr. Macmillan, Dr. Hackman. 

Psychological Testing Bureau. The staff of the Department of Psy- 
chology maintains a bureau of vocational and educational guidance on the 
basis of adequately standardized psychological tests. The services of the 
bureau are available without charge to students. 

Psych. 1 f and s. Introduction to Psychology (3) — Two lectures; one 
discussion. Open to sophomores. 

A general introduction to typical problems upon which psychologists are 
at work. Review of experimental investigations of the more fundamental 
phases of human behavior. 

Psych. 2 f. Applied Psychology I (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in methods of studying, in vocational orientation, in highway safety, and 
in the professions. 

373 



Psych. 3 s. Applied Psychology II (3) — -Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in business and industry, including industrial selection, methods of produc- 
tion, advertising, selling, and market research. 

Psych. 4 f. Psychology for Students of Commerce (3) — Two lectures; 
one discussion. Open only to students in economics or business administra- 
tion. 

Topics in applied psychology which relate to practical problems in busi- 
ness and industry viewed from the standpoint of controlled observation. 

Psych. 10 f and s. Educational Psychology (3) — Two lectures; one dis- 
cussion. Open to juniors and seniors only. Required of students in College 
of Education. 

Experimental studies of basic psychological problems encountered in edu- 
cation; measurement and significance of individual differences, learning, 
motivation, transfer of training, etc. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Psych. 110 f or s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, 
Psych. 10. 

More advanced treatment of the solution of basic psychological problems 
in education by methods of controlled observation. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 115 f. Detection and Treatment of Defects in Reading (3) — Pre- 
requisites, Psych. 1 and permission of the instructor. 

A survey of the psychological problems involved in the discovery and 
treatment of reading defects at the college level. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 120 f. Psychology of Individual Differences (3) — Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1 or 10. 

The occurrence, nature, and causes of psychological differences between 
individuals; methods of measuring these differences; and their importance 
in education, business and industry. (Hackman.) 

Psych. 121 s. Social Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Results of researches on behavior in social settings; experimental studies 
of the effects of group membership, of the family, and of current social 
forces. ( Jenkins. ) 

Psych. 125 f. Child Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or 10. 

Experimental analysis of child behavior; motor and intellectual develop- 
ment, emotions, social behavior, parent-child relationships, and problems of 
the growing personality. (Clark.) 

Psych. 130 f and s. Mental Hygiene (3) — Two lectures; one clinic. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1 or 10. 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of adjust- 
ment. (Sprowls.) 

374 



Psych. 131 s. Abnormal Psychology (3)— Two lectures; one clinic. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 130. 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of psychological abnormality with 
emphasis on the clinical rather than theoretical aspects. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 140 f. Psychological Problems in Market Research (3)— Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 3 s or permission of instructor. 

Use of methods of controlled observation in determining public reactions 
to merchandise, and in measuring the psychological influences ^J J^«^^^'^ 
particular markets. 

Psych. 141 s. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3)-Prerequisite, 

Psvch 3 s. 

Experimental and statistical studies of psychological aspects of advertis- 
ing; methods of measuring the effectiveness of advertising; the role of 
such factors as attention, memory, belief, etc.; problems associated vath 
, . . J- (Hackman.) 

specific advertismg media. ^ 

Psych 150 s. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3)— Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Psych. 120 f or permission of instructor. 

Critical survey of psychological tests used in vocational orientation and 
in industry with emphasis on methods by which such tests are validated; 
practice in the use of tests and the interpretation of test data. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 155 s. Vocational Orientation (3)— Prerequisite, Psych. 150 s or 
equivalent. 

Psychological methods and results for occupational classification, and for 
worker selection, classification, and individual orientation. (Bellows.) 

Psych. 160 f. Industrial Psychology (3)— Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Controlled observation applied to psychological problems in industrial 
production, including psychological effects of conditions and niethods of 
, (xiacKman./ 

work. 

Psych. 161 s. Personnel (3)— Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s or permission of 
instructor. 

Psychological problems involved in the management of personnel in 
modem business and industry. A consideration of employee selection, 
measures of ability, methods of developing and maintaining P^^^^J^^J^^^" 
ciency and morale. 

Psych. 162 f. Advanced Personnel Psychology (3)— Lectures; field 
periods. Prerequisite, Psych. 161 s. 

Actual participation in industrial and governmental personnel programs, 
together with periodic discussions of the principles involved. Intended pri- 
marily for students planning to enter personnel administration. (Clark.) 

376 



. i 



Psych. 165 s. Psychobiological Problems in Aviation (3) — Prerequisite, 
Psych. 120 f or permission of instructor. 

Study of researches dealing with human response to conditions met dur- 
ing flight. Selection and classification of flight personnel. Eff'ects of high 
altitudes and accelerations. Effects of noise, fatigue and other conditions. 
Problems of tension and emotion. (Jenkins.) 

Psych. 170 f. Legal Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 121 s or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Interpretation of researches pertaining to accuracy of observation and of 
testimony, psychological aids in determination of guilt, and treatment of 
the offender. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 190 y. Techniques of Investigation in Psychology (6) — Three 
periods of practice and discussion. Prerequisite, Psych. 3 s. 

A consideration of quantitative methods in psychology, the design of 
experiments, and actual practice in various methods of obtaining data and 
in treating these results for interpretation. (Hackman.) 

Psych. 195 f or s. Minor Problems in Psychotechnology (2-3) — Credit 
apportioned to work accomplished. Prerequisite, major senior standing and 
consent of department head. (May not be offered for credit toward graduate 
degrees.) 

Conduct of original research under the supervision of some member of 
the staff. Satisfactory completion of this project may lead to publication 
in one of the standard psychological journals. (Staff.) 



For Graduates 

Psych. 200. Research in Psychotechnology (4-6) — Credit apportioned to 
work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Psych. 210 y. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6) — An advanced 
course for teachers and prospective teachers. 

Systematic approach to advanced problems in educational psychology 
based upon specific experimental contributions. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 240 y. Seminar in Current Psy-chotechnological Problems (6) — An 

advanced course for students pursuing major graduate studies. 

A systematic analysis of recent contributions in selected psychotechno- 
logical fields. (Jenkins.) 

Psych. 245 f. Advanced Psychological Problems in Market Research (3). 

Graduate study of the specialized problems and techniques employed by 
the psychologist in market research. The course will attempt to combine 
systematic theory with actual practice in dealing with these research 
problems. (Jenkins.) 

376 



Psych. 250 y. Participation in Testing Clinic (4-6)— Credit apportioned 
to work accomplished. 

Actual practice in the administration of tests of aptitude, interest, and 
achievement and interpretation of test data in the course of routine opera- 
tion of the testing bureau. (Bellows.) 

Psych. 251 s. Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3)— 
Prerequisite, Psych. 150 s. 

Methods for evaluating criteria and for the analysis and combination of 
test and predictor items. (Bellows.) 

Psych. 255 s. Occupational Psychology (3)— Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

Experimental development and use of the vocational counseling interview, 
aptitude tests, and related techniques for the occupational orientation of 
youth. (Bellows.) 

Psych. 280 s.— Pol. Sci. 222 s. Analysis of Propaganda (3)— Two lec- 
tures; one discussion. Prerequisite, consent of instructors. 

Analytical approach to modern propaganda, including study of organiza- 
tions which employ propaganda, of techniques in actual use in dissemination 
of propaganda, and of attempts at measuring the effects of propaganda. 
Responsibility for instruction is shared by the Department of Political 
Science and the Department of Psychology. (Bone, Jenkins.) 

Psych. 290 f. Problems of Experimental Design in Psychology (3)— 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Application of advanced research techniques to specific fields in psycho- 
technology with actual practice in their use. (Hackman.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Joslyn; Associate Professors Wilson, Holt; Assistant 
Professor Dodson; Dr. Hodge, Mr. Form, Mr. McBrien. 

Soc. 1 f, 2 s. Contemporary Social Problems (3, 3) — Two lectures; one 
discussion. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student an understanding of 
the processes of change taking place in our society and the maladjustments 
resulting from some of thebe changes. Emphasis will be placed upon an 
analysis of present day social problems: their causes, social implications, 
and suggested approaches to their solution. 

Soc. 3 f, 4 s. Introduction to Sociology (3, 3)— Two lectures; one dis- 
cussion. Prerequisite for Soc. 4 s, Soc. 3 f or consent of instructor. Not 
open to freshmen. 

An analysis of society and of basic social processes; characteristics of 
collective behavior; typical social organizations; the role of culture in 
the development of personality; social products; social interaction; social 

change. 

377 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101 f. Social Organization (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, Soc. 
3 f, 4 s. • 

A systematic analysis of the forms of organization common to basic 
social mstitutions; variations of these forms in time and space; classifica- 
tion of forms of organization; conditioning factors of organizational forms; 
application of findings to contemporary problems. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 102 s. Community Organization (3)— Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisites, Soc. 3 f , 4 s. 

An analysis of the community and its component social groups; ecolog- 
ical basis of the community; determination of the boundaries of communi- 
ties and neighborhoods; characteristics of rural and urban communities; 
social institutions of the community; social change and the community; 
the structure and functions of special interest groups; the community 

council. .j^ , . 

(Dodson.) 

Soc. 103 f. Rural Sociology (3)— Two lectures; one discussion. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 3 f , 4 s. 

The structure and functions of rural communities; the evolution of rural 
culture; rural institutions and their problems; the psychology of rural 
life; composition and characteristics of the rural population; relation of 
rural life to the major social processes; the social aspects of rural planning. 

^ (Holt.) 

Soc. 104 s. Urban Sociology (3)— Two lectures; one discussion. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 3 f, 4 s. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the social ecology of the city; social relationships and group- 
ings in the city; the organization of urban activities; social problems of 
the city; the planning and control of urban development. (Holt.) 

Soc. 105 f. Population Problems (3)_Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisites, Soc. 3 f, 4 s. 

Population growth in the United States; contemporary trends in fertility 
and mortality; differential fertility and mortality; changes in the composi- 
tion of our population and their significance; population migration in 
modern times; qualitative problems of population; theories of population 
growth and decline. (Not offered in 1941-42.) (Holt.) 

Soc. 106 s. Regional Sociology (3)— Two lectures; one discussion. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 3 f, 4 s. Each student will be required to prepare a term 
paper. 

^ An analysis of American society in terms of regional factors and their 
impact upon social institutions. Problems to be covered will include- the 
meanings and implications of regionalism; criteria of regional differentia- 
tion; types of regions in the United States; problems peculiar to these 
regions; metropolitan, rural, cultural, and administrative regionalism- 
regional planning and development. (Hodge.) 

378 



Soc. 107 f. Ethnic Minority Groups (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Soc. 3 f , 4 s, or consent of instructor. 

Theoretical aspects of ethnic group relations; cultural backgrounds of 
immigrant groups in America; social processes and class structure with 
reference to certain minority peoples; effects of cultural contacts upon 
personality. (Wilson.) 

Soc. 108 s. Marriage and the Family (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 3 f or consent of instructor. 

The family as an institution; variations of the family in time and space; 
family interaction: courtship and mating behavior, marital behavior, parent- 
child behavior, member roles and personality; family tensions and malad- 
justments: structural and functional factors, conflict patterns, divorce and 
desertion; family and society; family adjustment and social change. 

(Wilson.) 

Soc. 109 s. Comparative Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Soc. 3 f , 4 s. 

A comparative analysis of the basic institutions of primitive and civi- 
lized societies; resemblances and differences in patterns of material and 
non-material culture; contrasting types of social organization and member 
roles; the origin, diffusion, and change of traits and complexes; significance 
of findings for sociological generalization. (Wilson.) 

Soc. 120 f. Social Pathology (3) — ^Two lectures; one field trip. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 3 f, 4 s, or consent of instructor. 

A study of social maladjustments which represent deviations from gen- 
erally accepted norms. Problems to be covered will include poverty, unem- 
ployment, family disorganization, crime and delinquency, suicide, and the 
misuse of leisure time. (Hodge.) 

Soc. 121 f. Criminology (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. Prerequi- 
sites, Soc. 3 f, 4 s, or consent of instructor. 

The social significance of crime; causative factors; forms and processes 
of criminal behavior; detection, apprehension, and prosecution methods; 
penology and treatment; public policy and crime prevention. (Wilson.) 

Soc. 123 f. The Sociology of Leisure (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 120 f or consent of instructor. 

This course deals primarily with the sociological implications of leisure 
time and its uses. Topics to be considered will include the meaning and 
significance of leisure; the conditioning factors of leisure time and its 
uses; the changing uses of leisure; leisure and personality; theories of 
play and recreation; commercial, public, and voluntary forms of recreation; 
planning of leisure time activities. (Hodge.) 

Soc. 124 s. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Two lectures and one field 
trip. Prerequisite, Soc. 120 f. 

The theory of social work; social case work, generic and specific; pro- 

379 



Ik 



cedure and techniques in social case work; princioles of ^nripi H4o' • 

(Joslyn.) 

PrSquL'ftel' SocT f ^4"?' J'""":,' S'^"^"'' '^'=*"'-^^' ^^ ^^---o"- 
rerequisites, hoc. 3 f, 4 s. Required of all sociology majors. 

A general survey and critical study of the leading =,.i,„„i. * • , • , 
thought since 1800 leading schools of sociological 

(Wilson.) 

Soc. 131 f. Techniques of Investigation in Sociology (3)_Three period., 

sliSrLToi'"^"^^^''"- ''''^'''-' '-■ ' ^." s. ^equSdTftn 

variou?method'T"i:"" "'^'^f' '" ^"""'"^^ ^"^ ^<=t-l P-<=tice in 
various method, of obtaining, analyzing, and interpreting data. (Holt.) 

Soc. 150 s. Field Practice in Social Work (3)_Prerequisite Soc 124 
s or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to avaSrop^'ort^^itfes 

Supervised field work of various types undertaken during the summer 
months and suited to the needs of the individual student. (jZ^) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 200 y. Seminar in Methodoloffv (6)— ThrPP n^nnHe r.f a- 
Required of all graduate students in sociology ^ "' discussion. 

th^^/K-'^^"!^?'*^'"^"*^' •"et'^odological problems in sociology Amone 

cour e '" K '', '*'""'"'"' ""' ^^ '^"^"^^« P-blems in s Jentific Sis 
course; operational concepts in sociology; the postulates, procedures and 
methods of science; the uses and limitations of quantitat^ive methods' the 

inTsStiol '"''^'^'^" ^^"*^"^^-^^' ^-- ^" -^»'--- tecti's^of 

(Staff.) 

Soc 201 f. Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3)-Three periods of 
discussion. Required of all graduate students in sociology 

A study of social systems and the processes by which these systems 
maintain an equilibrium between external and internal forces (JoslyT J 

Soc. 202 s Sociological Theory (3)-Two lectures; one discussion 
Required of all graduate students in sociology. aiscu.sion. 

An analysis and evaluation of the works of outstanding theorists in 
Europe and America. Special attention will be given to Simmel Sa^^^^^^ 
Von Wiese, Tonnies, Weber, Durkheim, Paretof Thomas, anTLroWn. ^ 

(Wilson.) 

Soc. 203 s. Comparative Sociology (3)-Two lectures; one discussion 

A study of certain aspects of the process of personality organization 

and disorganization in the framework of selected primitive ZStal 

compared with contemporary American society. (Wilson ) 

380 



Soc. 204 s. Community Organi2;ation (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

Criteria of community organization and disorganization; variables in 
community organization and their conditioning factors; special problems 
in the organization of rural, village, suburban, and urban communities; 
community stability and instability; the lay and professional leader in the 
community. Classroom and field studies will be made of the composition, 
structure, and functioning of selected communities. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 205 f. Rural- Urban Sociology (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

A study of the differences between rural and urban societies with ref- 
erence to composition of population, social mobility, social relationships, 
differentiation of social groups, standards of living, mores and attitudes, 
and various pathological conditions. (Holt.) 

Soc. 206 s. Regional Sociology (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

A comparative analysis of regional trends in the United States and vari- 
ous foreign countries. Topics to be covered will include the meanings and 
implications of regionalism; historical origins of regionalism; demarcation 
of regions in the United States on the basis of geographic, economic, 
demographic, political, and cultural criteria; characteristics and problems 
peculiar to each region; the role of local, state, and national administrative 
units in regional planning and development. (Hodge.) 

Soc. 207 s. Population Problems (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

An intensive study of selected problems in the fields of population growth, 
fertility and mortality, population composition, and population migration. 

(Holt.) 

Soc. 208 s. Occupational Sociology (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

Structure and function of the social division of labor; typologies of 
occupational organization; major bases of differentiation; criteria of a 
profession; the role of professionalism in social organization; a methodology 
for analyzing the professions; sociological study of selected professions. 

(Wilson.) 

Soc. 209 f. Social Organization (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

A study of the forms of organization common to basic social institutions; 
classification of these forms; variations of forms of organization in time 
and space; conditioning factors of organizational forms; application of 
findings to contemporary problems. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 210 f. Sociological Problems of Leadership (2) — One lecture; one 
discussion. 

An analysis of the leader-follower relationship; leadership defined; 
factors conditioning the leadership situation; leadership as a function of 
the group; the leader as an instrument of social control; methods of devel- 
oping group support; the professional and lay leader; functions of the 
leader; types of leaders; morale as a function of leadership. (Dodson.) 

381 



Soc. 221 f. Criminology (3) — Two lectures; one discussion. 

A study of the principal theoretical problems of criminological investiga- 
tion, with emphasis upon a methodological analysis of selected monographs. 

(Wilson.) 

Soc. 250. Research in Sociology — Credit apportioned to work accom- 
plished. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 
compiled data. (Staff.) 

SPEECH 

Professor Ehrensberger; Assistant Professors Provensen, Straus- 
BAUGH; Mrs. Vernon*, Mr. Hutcheson, Mr. Wiksell, Mr. Rigal, 

Mr. Dupler. 

Speech 1 y. Reading and Speaking (2) — One lecture. Required of all 
four year students. Prerequisite for Advanced Speech Courses, 

The principles and techniques of oral expression, visible and audible; 
the preparation and delivery of short original speeches; impromptu speak- 
ing; reference readings; short reports; etc. Opportunities of speech clinic 
open to students. 

Speech Clinic — No credit. » 

Speech examinations; training in speech and voice; remedial work in 
minor speech difficulties. The work of the clinic is conducted in individual 
conferences and in small group meetings. Hours are arranged by con- 
sultation with the respective speech instructors. 

Speech 2 f. Fundamentals of Speech (3) — Three lectures. 

Studies in the bases and mechanics of speech. This course does not 
deal with public speaking exclusively; it is concerned with the whole speech 
function in private as well as public manifestations. It is given primarily 
for students who expect to do extensive work in speech. Any student 
electing this course may take it concurrently with or after completing 
Speech 1 y. 

Speech 2 s. Voice and Diction (3) — Three lectures. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to 
improve his articulation and phonation. Study and demonstration of speech 
sound production, physics of sound, attributes of voice, the breathing mech- 
anism, the larynx and the ear are combined with intensive drills in articu- 
lation and voice production. 

Speech 3 f, 4 s. Advanced Public Speaking (2, 2) — Two lectures. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1 y, with special applications and adap- 
tations. At each session of the class a special setting is g^ven for the 
speeches — civil, social, and political organizations, etc., and organizations in 



*0n leave. 



382 



the fields of the prospective vocations of the different students. When a 
student has finished this course he will have prepared and delivered one or 
more speeches which would be suitable and appropriate before any and all 
bodies that he would probably have occasion to address m after-life. 

Speech 5 f. Oral Technical English (2)— Two lectures. Required of all 
sophomore engineering students. Limited to engineering students. 

The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, etc., on both technical 
and general subjects. 

Speech 6 s. Advanced Oral Technical English (2)— Two lectures. Re- 
quired of all junior engineering students. Limited to engineering students. 
This course is a continuation of Speech 5 f. Special emphasis upon 
engineering projects that fall within the student's own experience. Class 
discussion and criticism of all speeches and reports. 

Speech 7 y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2)— Oiie lecture. Senior 
seminar. For senior engineering students only. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 6 s. Work not confined to class 
room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies 
in the University and elsewhere. 

Speech 9 f, 10 s. Extempore Speaking (1, 1)— One lecture. 
Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects. 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. Training in parliamentary 
law and discussion groups. 

Speech 11 f, 12 s. Argumentation (2, 2)— Two lectures. 
This course stresses not formal debating, but forms of persuasion which 
will be useful in business and professional life. It deals, to a great extent, 
with ways in which human beliefs and behavior may be influenced by logical 
discussion. 

Speech 13 f and s. Oral Reading (3)— Three lectures. 
A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of 
literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 

Speech 14 f. Stagecraft (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Open to sophomores. 

Planning and construction of stage settings, costumes, properties. Prac- 
tice in the stagecraft shop and on stage in performance. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Speech 101 y. Radio Speaking (4)— Two lectures. Admission by audi- 
tion or consent of instructor. 

A laboratory course dealing with the various aspects of modem broad- 
casting. Practice in program planning, continuity writing, announcing, 

383 



news reporting, etc. Actual participation in broadcasting at station WJSV 
in Washington. This course is under the supervision of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System and the speech department. Laboratory fee, $2.00 
per semester. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 102 f, 103 s. Speech Composition (3, 3) — Three lectures. Not 
allowed for graduate credit except in English and Education. 

A study of rhetorical principles and models of speech composition in 
conjunction with the preparation and presentation of both general and 
specific forms of public address. This course is offered to meet the needs 
of speech majors and students who expect to enter public life. Students 
electing this course cannot receive credit for Speech 3 f , 4 s. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 104 f. Speech Pathology (3) — Three lectures. 
The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with causes, nature, 
symptoms, and treatment of common types of speech disorders. 

(Hutcheson.) 

Speech 105 s. Speech Clinic (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 104 f . 

A course dealing with the various methods in correction. Actual work 
in clinic with cases. Library research and detailed reports required. 

(Hutcheson.) 

Speech 106 s. Advanced Oral Reading (3) — Three lectures. 
Emphasis upon the longer reading and a more critical and detailed study 
of literature suitable for oral interpretation. Program planning. 

(Provensen.) 

STATISTICS 

The courses in Statistics are intended to provide training in the tools 

and methods employed in statistical description and induction, in the 

interpretation of statistical data presented by others, and in the gathering 

and organization of original data. 

Stat. 14 f. Elements of Statistics (3) — Lectures, recitations, and labora- 
tory. Not open to freshmen. 

A. Open to students in the College of Commerce. 

B. Open to students other than those in A. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a knowledge of the 
fundamentals necessary in the further study of statistics and its applica- 
tions. 

Stat. 15 s. Business Statistics (3) — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Stat. 14 f-A, or consent of the instructor. 

In this course, time series, secular trends, etc., are studied and applied to 
matters concerning business. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Stat. 112 s. Biological Statistics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Stat. 
14 f-B, or consent of instructor. 

A study of statistics pertaining to biology and its applications. 

384 



Stat. 116 s. Statistical Design (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Stat. 

^^^' , • • i^e ^f in^ical design for investigations when the 

A study of the prmciples of ^^f ^^^ ^f ^^ analysis. Methods and uses 

resulting data are to be subjected ^«jf ^^^^^^^^^^ considered in some 

of randomization, factorial design, and confoundmg ^^^^^^ 

detail. ^ ^ _ , 

Stat 117 f 118 s. Advanced Business Statistics (3. 3)-Lectures and 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Stat. 15 s or consent of instructor. 

Stat. 131 f. 132 s. Mathematics of Statistics (2. 2)-Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Stat. 14 f-B, Math. 23 y. ^,^„^ the study of statistics 
A course dealing with the mathematics underlying the ^^^''^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

and its applications. 

cw 1 ^n Problems (2-4)— Credit in accordance with work done. 

Stat. IdO. Problems (j ' . -^ independent statistical analysis, 

To acquire training and experience in y ore-anization analysis, 

each student will select an approved problem for organization, ^^^y^^ 

and presentation of results. 

For Graduates 

Stat 208 Special Problems (l-4)-Credit in accordance with work done. 
Stat. 208. «pe relatively complex 

Each student registered in this course wm ^^sults (Staff.) 

problem for organization, analysis, and presentation of results. (b 

VETTERINARY SCIENCE 

W,.,«„ RRIIECKNER- ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS CRAWFORD, DeVOLT ; 

Professors Welsh, KRUECK.M!-K, abo t%..„c. 

Assistant Professor Uavis. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

V S 101 f. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (3)-Three lectures. 
S'trtture of the animal body; abnormal as contracted ^^^^^^^^ 

V S 102 s. Animal Hygiene (3)-Three lectures. 

Le' and management of ^o-^^rdt a^ pr^Tt In" a^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
maintenance of health -^ -^f "^„V° ^^^teZ\ sanitation; infections; 
recognition of abnormal conditions, f "^'^f' ^^f . ^ aid. (Crawford.) 

epizootics; enzootics; internal and external parasites, first 

V S 103 f. Hematology (2)-Two laboratories. .u,„„a. 

pilogic, pathologic, and ^^^-^l/^^^:^{^^ 
taking samples; estimating the amount «* '^^"^"gj""'"' '^^ ^^^ leucocytes 
ical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes ^^^^J^ «^^^^^^^^^ „f leucocytes; 

in fresh and fixed stained preparations; ff^^JT^!^ J elements of blood; 
vital staining; sources and development of the foimed ^^^^^^^ 

pathological forms and counts. 

OoO 



V. S. 104 s. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance of kidney excretions, 
use of clinical methods including microscopic examination for casts, cells, 
blood, parasites, bacteria, and interpretation of results. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 105 f. Pathological Technic (3) — Three laboratories. Bact. 1 desir- 
able. 

Elxamination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectioning by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin embedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 106 s. Pathological Technic (continued) (2-5) — Laboratory course. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory procedures 
as applied to clinical diagnosis. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 107 s. Poultry Hygiene (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory period. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 1, P. H. 106 f. 

Study of causes, symptoms, dissemination, life cycle, seasonal appearance, 
methods of control and eradication of various virus, bacterial and protozoan 
diseases of poultry including internal and external parasites. The lectures 
are supplemented by laboratory demonstrations. (DeVolt.) 

V. S. 108 f. Avian Anatomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 1 s. 

A study of the gross and microscopic structure of the body of the 
domestic fowl. The lectures include references to physiological processes. 
The laboratory provides for a study of systematic anatomy by dissection 
work combined with demonstrations. The course is designed to meet the 
needs of the student in poultry husbandry. (DeVolt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 201 f or s. Animal Disease Problems (2-6) — Credit according to 
work done. Prerequisite, degree in veterinary medicine from an approved 
veterinary college or consent of instructor. Laboratory and field work by 
assignment (Welsh.) 

V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research (2-6)— Credit according to work 
done. Prerequisite, degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veter- 
inary college or consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

ZOOLOGY 

Professor Truitt; Associate Professor Phillips; Assistant Professors 
BuRHOE, Hard, Tressler; Mr. Cronin, Mr. Fiuppi, 

Mr. Poland, Miss Teal. 

Zool. 1 s. General Zoology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory course, which is cultural and practical in its aim. It 
deals with the basic principles of animal development, structural relation- 

386 



malian form are studied. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool 2 y. Fundamentals of Zoology (8)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classification and ^^^^^JZ 
resentative invertebrate and vertebrate forms. Jhis cou ^ 

freshman premedical requirements '"biology. Freshmen 
choose zoology as a major should register for this course. Lab 
$5.00 per semester. 

Zool. 3 f. introductory Zoology (3)-Two lectures; one «-^^^^^^^^ 

A course for students desiring Y^-^J^t^:Z^'^ ^^^SZ 
underlying the growth, development, and behavior of anima 

man. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Zool 4 f. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (3)-0ne lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. ^..tebrate 

A comparative study of selected organ systems m cert^n vertoljat^e 
groups. Required of students whose major is zoology, and p 
students. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 5 s. Economic Zoology (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisito. one course 

^"^e Intent of this course centers ^^^uM^jroU^^^ ^--tion, 
^:^Z^tt'^i^^ :=:r bl assigned .ead- 

TomMnl^li zool. 6 s, this course should form a P-^-- -- 
training for professional foresters, game proctors, and conserva 

Zool 6 s. Field Zoology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites one course in zoology and one m botany. 

forms of nearby woods fields and streams ^ j^j environment, 

who have a special interest in nature study and outdoor life. 

Zool 8 f. Invertebrate Morphology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Reauired of students whose major is zoology. 

Kequirea oi *. , , j ^^^ structure and relationships of 

This course consists in a study oi me 
selected invertebrate groups. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 12 f. Animal Histology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
T'^r.niaitp one course in zoology. ^ 

T^dy of animal tissues and the technic involved in their preparation for 
microscopic examination. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

387 



Zool. 15 y. Human Anatomy and Physiology (8) — Two lectures; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Required of students whose 
major is physical education, and of those preparing to teach general science 
or biology. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy and 
physiology. Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, circula- 
tion, respiration, and reproduction. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

Zool. 16 s. Human Physiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Not 
open to freshmen. 

An elementary course in physiology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 20 s. Vertebrate Embryology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Required of students whose major is 
zoology and of premedical students. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and early 
mammalian embryology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Zool. 101 s. Mammalian Anatomy (3) — Three laboratories. Registration 
limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before registration. 
Recommended for premedical students, and those whose major is zoology. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. By special permis- 
sion of the instructor a vertebrate other than the cat may be used for 
study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 102 s. Histological Technique (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Registration is limited and the permission of the instructor must be ob- 
tained before registration. 

The preparation of animal tissues for microscopical examination. The 
course is designed to qualify the student in the preparation of tissues and 
blood for normal and pathological study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Hard.) 

Zool. 103 y. General Animal Physiology (6) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in vertebrate 
anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of instructor 
must be obtained before registration. ^ 

The first semester work deals with the fundamentals of cellular and 
general physiology. The second semester is devoted to an application of 
these principles to the higher animals. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. 

(Phillips.) 

Zool. 104 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. Required of students intend- 
ing to take advanced courses in plant and animal breeding, and also of 
zoology majors. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of 
genetics or of heredity; a consideration of the factors instrumental in 

388 



. • 4^ .v.«r«Pters through successive generations; and also 
the transmission of characters ^^Y.^^the breeding of animals and plants, 
to prepare students for later courses m the breeding (Burhoe.) 

zool. 105 f. Aquiculture (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 

site, one course in zoology. ,pa,.inff aauatic animals 

The course deals with the practices employ.d n --"^ ^^^^^^ ,„,i,. 
and the properties of natural waters which render them ^^^.^^^ 

onmental purposes. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 106 y. Journal Club (2)-0ne session 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. Required ^^^^^ 
students whose major is zoology. 

, ^ *• /^•^^ Onp lecture; two laboratories, rre- 
Zool. 120 s. Advanced Genetics (3)— One lecture, 

requisite, Zool. 104 f. „atiir<> of the gene, chro- 

A consideration of salivary '^^^^"^^^^^t^^ Br^il^ experiments 

mosome irregularities, polyploidy, ^"^^ J^^f "^^-^^.ted. Laboratory fee, 

with Drosophila and small mammals will be conouc (Burhoe.) 

$5.00. 

Zool 121 f. Principles of Animal Ecology (3)-Two lectures; one lab- 

physical and chemical f^f °f Pj /''^ limaXs are stressed in lecture and 

behavior, habits and distribution »* ^""^^'" \ ^^^^^ ;„ the laboratory 
laboratory. The use of ecological instu^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ .^ 

and on field excursions to local areas oi p ^^ ^^^^ ^ 

designed to give a broad survey «* *^ J^^^^^^j^^ ^l^ecial problem in 
background for students who wish to continue with som (Tressler.) 

the field. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

For Graduates 

7^1 9nn f Marine Zoology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Zool. 200 f. Marine aou s» Laboratory 

Problems in salt water animal life of the higher pny ^^.^^^ 

fee, $5.00. 

Zool 201 s. Microscopical Anatomy (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories 
Itetailed study of the morphology and -ivity jfc „ omposing 

SUTsSnedTa^Ura^rre^Ul^ L^iSorTLfU (Hard.) 
zool. 203 s. Advanced Embryol^y (4) TWO ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

mals, including a consideration of tissue culture ana p (Burhoe.) 

oratory fee, $5.00. 

389 



Zool. 204 f. Advanced Animal Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. 

"The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 205 s. Hydrobiology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical factors which determine 
the growth, distribution, and productivity of microscopic and near micro- 
scopic organisms in marine and freshwater environments with special 
reference to the Chesapeake Bay region. Microscopic examination and iden- 
tification of plankton, and experience with hydrobiological equipment and 
methods is provided for in the laboratory and field. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Tressler.) 

Zool. 206. Research — Credit to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each 
semester. (Staff.) 



Zool. 207 y. Zoological Seminar (2). 



(Staff.) 



CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, 
is on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University of 
Maryland in cooperation with the Maryland Conservation Department, 
Groucher College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western 
Maryland College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to 
afford a center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward 
a fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The 
program projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake 
region. 

The laboratory is open throughout the year. Courses are offered for 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students, during a six-week summer 
session, in the following subjects: Protozoology, Economic Zoology, Inver- 
tebrates, Ichthyology, Algae, and Diatoms. Not more than two courses 
may be taken by a student, who must meet the requirements of the 
Department of Zoology as well as those of the laboratory before matricu- 
lation. Classes are limited to eight matriculants. Students pursuing special 
research may establish residence for the summer, or for the entire year. 

Laboratory facilities; boats of various types fully equipped with pumps, 
nets, dredges and other apparatus; and shallow water collecting devices are 
available for the work without cost to the students. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Lab- 
oratory, apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



390 



SECTION IV 

DEGREES, HONORS, 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

. DEGREES CONFERRED, 1939-1940 



HONORARY DEGREES 
Doctor of Engineering 

HERSCHEL HEATHCOTE ALLEN 

Doctor of Laws 

Raymond Asa Kent 

Doctor of Science 
Harvey J. Burkhart 
William John Gies 
Arthur Hastings Merritt 
Thomas Parran, Jr. 

Honorary Certificates in A.rKuUure ^ ^^^^^ 

Chester F. Hockley Tobias Zimmerman 

Harry Rieck 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 



John Morton Bellows, Jk. 

B S. University of Vermont 1936 
M. S. University of Maryland, 1937 



Dissertation: 
"Embryo-sac Development 
Triploid Tulip." 



in a 



William Elbert Bickley, Jr. comparative Study of the Sto- 

B. S. university of Tenne-e 934 A^^^ J ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ,, ,,. 
M. S. University of Tennessee, ^^^^^ „ 



CHARLES MACFARLANE BREWER 

B. S. University of Maryland, 1923 
M S University of Maryland, 1924 



"A study of Certain Factors which 
influence the Resistance of Staphy- 
lococcus Aureus when Grown in 
Beef Extract." 



391 



Paul Sherwood Brooks 
B.S. West Virginia Wesleyan 

University, 1935 
M. S. University of Maryland, 1938 

Arthur r. Buddington 
B. S. University of Maryland, 1936 
M. b. University of Maryland, 1939 



Dissertation: 
"The Use of the Glass Electrode as 
a Keference Electrode." 



Herbert Joseph Florestano 
A. B. St. Johns College, 1934 
M. S. University of Maryland, 1937 



Sylvan Ellis Forman 

B. S. University of Maryland, 1936 
M. b. University of Maryland, 1937 

Edward Otto Haenni 
A. B. Washington University, 1929 
M. 55. Washington University, 1931 



Earl Thomas Hatos 
B. S. University of Idaho, 1935 
ra- 1>. University of Idaho, 1936 

Peter Herman Heinze 
B. S. Northeast Missouri State 

Teachers College, 1935 
M. A. University of Missouri, 1938 

Edwin Peelle Hiatt 
A. B. Wilmington College, 1933 
M.A. Haverford College, 1934 



"Some Studies in the Nutrition and 
Metabolism of the Yellow Fever 
Mosquito, Aedes aegypti L., and 
the Common House Mosquito, 
Culex pipiens L." 

"Studies on Oral Health as Reflect- 
ed m the Saliva, with Special Ref- 
erence to the Local and Systemic 
Use of Citrus Fruits, Oral Acid- 
unc Micro-organisms, Diastatic 
Activity and pH." 

"SheS"" °' '"''^' Cyclopropyl 

"A New Method for the Determi- 
nation of Cholesterol and Its Ap- 
plication to the Estimation of the 
Egg^^^Content of Alimentary 



"The Ferromagnetic Properties of 
Hematite." 



"A Physiological and Biochemical 
Study of the Curing Processes in 
Sweet Potatoes." 

"Extreme Hypochloremia in Does 
Induced by Nitrate Administra- 
tion." 



George Kirby Holmes, Jr. 

B. S. University of Maryland 192fi «Qf»^- 

M. S. University of Maryland' llso f.H f T.'""^ ^*""^*"^^ ^^ ^erin 

yiana, wso and its Relation to Friedelin." 

392 



Edmund Houston McNally 

B. S. George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1930 
M. A. George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1934 



Dissertation : 
"The Physiology of Yolk Forma- 
tion, Especially the Vitelline Mem- 
brane and the Mechanism of Ovu- 
lation in the Fowl." 



Jesse Arthur Remington, Jr. 

A. B. University of Maryland, 1937 "States-Rights in Maryland, 1789- 
M. A. University of Maryland, 1938 1832." 



Arlo Wayne Ruddy 

B. S. in Pharmacy, U. of Nebraska, 

1936 
M. S. University of Nebraska, 1938 

William DeMott Stull 
B. S. Middleburg College, 1934 
M. S. Middleburg College, 1936 

Daniel Swern 

B. S. College of the City of New 

York, 1935 
M. A. Columbia University, 1936 



"The Synthesis and Properties of 
Fluorinated Organic Arsenicals." 



"Some Physiological Differences be- 
tween the Blood of Frogs at High 
and Low Temperatures." 

"The Action of Lead Tetraacetate 
Upon Hydroxylated Fatty Acids, 
Esters, and Related Compounds. 



» 



Donald Hyde Wheeler 

B. A. Oberlin College, 1927 "Triolein and Trilinolein." 

M. S. University of Maryland, 1931 



393 



Herbert Monroe Allison 
Herbert Eustace Armstrong 
Katharine Lucille Biehl 
Edith Long Brechbill 
George Carl Brown 
Virginia Byrer 
Marjorie Haines Campbell 
Helen Elmira Clevenger 
Bessie Wood Cramer 
Muriel Crosby 
Arthur a. Dick 
Mylo Snavely Downey 
Fortuna Lucille Gordon 



Master of Arts 



Florence Isabel Gregory 
Frances Smith Haas 
Alta Lucille Hurlbut 
Blanche Le Ora Jenkins 
Diana Stevan Kramer 
William Conroy Marth 
Frederick Richmond McBrien 

LiSETTE RiGGS 

Thomas Charles Gordon Wagner 
Minnie Warren 
Lois Belfield Watt 
Daniel De Walt Willard 
Margery Walker Wright 



Sylvan E. Beck 

Charles Lee Benton, Jr. 

Thomas Grover Culton 

Raymond Davis, Jr. 

Bessie A. Stearnes Donnally 

JiiMANUEL Friedman 

Paul McConkey Galbreath 

Shirley Madelyn Glickman 

LEX B.AiLEY Golden 

George Hall Goldsborough 

John Salisbury Goldsmith 

Samuel Grober 

Albert Carl Groschke 

George Philip Hager 

Robert Willmott Harrison 

Carl Wiluam Hess 

Bernice Heyman 

Kathryn Johns 

Robert Edwin Jones 

Daniel Kaminsky 

Anne Mary Kunkel 

Russell Ernest Leed 



Master of Science 



Raymond Vandermark Leighty 
iRViN Levin 
Melvin Lewis Levine 
Louis Littman 
Oscar Keeling Moore 
Martin Hammond Muma 
Norman Gerard Paulhus 
Walter Benjamin Posey 
August Raspet 

Otto E. Rauchschwalbe 
Max Rubin 
Alexander Sadle 
John Logan Schutz 
Charles Henry Seufferle 
Fred David Sisler 
Richard Battell Stephenson 
Bernard Sussman 
Robert Edward Thompson 
Clifton Wilson Van Horn 
John Paul Wintermoyer 
Raymond Milton Young 



394 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Bachelor of Science 



Louis Franklin Ahalt 
Wilmer Francis Aist 
John Alfred Baden 
George Charles Beneze 
Mary Louise Brinckerhoff 
John William Brosius, Jr. 
Walter Mason Butler, Jr. 
Albert Harman Cole 
Harold F. Cotterman, Jr. 
Howard Grafton Crist, Jr. 
Elaine Danforth 
Edward Bloxom Daugherty, Jr. 
Virginia Elizabeth Davis 
Edward Joseph Dougherty 
Edith Farrington 
Carroll Milton Forsyth 
Vernon Royston Foster 
Page DeForrest Fullington 
Benton Ray Gatch, Jr. 
William Hansel 
George Joseph Harris 
Venton Rufus Harrison 
Kenneth Samuel Hess 
Virginia Eyre Hodson 
Park Painter Howard 
Sarah Virginia Huffer 
Kenneth Forthenbaker Jones 



Fred Stone Kefauver 

Joseph Hugh Keller 

Margaret Cobey Kemp 
*Marcia Ladson 

Joshua Melvin Leise 

Mary Frances MacLeod 

Harry Byrd Matthews, Jr. 

James Alan McGregor 

DeVoe Kepler Meade 

Margaret Charlotte Menke 

Joseph Samuel Merritt, Jr. 

Joseph Burton Morris 

Oscar William Nevares, Jr. 

Robert Wescott Pailthorp 

Richard Nelson Phelps 

Joseph Norbert Pohlhaus 

William Vaughn Redding 

Arthur Millard Rudy 

David Gabriel Freeland Sheibley 

Wilson L. Smith, Jr. 

Frances Jane Stouffer 

Agnes Hope Swann 

Dorothy Elizabeth Talbott 

S. Ady Ward 
♦Patricia Margaret Willingham 

Joseph Smith Winter 

Gaylord H. Wisner 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 



Catherine Carmela Aiello 
Lola Bernice Barre 
Alice Marie Blum 

♦Phyllis Geraldine Bollinger 
William Ross Bond 
Muriel Mabelle Booth^ 
Leslie Lorentz Bowers 

*Thelma Penn Bowling 
Rose Emlyn Britton 

♦Harold Browne Carleton 
Thomas Carlyle Carrico 
Gayle Montgomery Davis 



Dorothy Coulbourn Dennis 
John Herbert Edyvean 
Pearl Ettin 
Lee Adele Fisch 
Leona Shirley Freedman 
Olga Selma Furbershaw 
Louise Saint Clair Gardiner 
Carl Goller 

Judith Kathryn Greenwood 
Mary Louise Griffith 
Evelyn Lee Hampshire 
Mary Jane Harrington 



* Degree conferred September, 1939. 



395 



Pauline Clayton Harris 
May Elizabeth Harrover 
Julia Elizabeth Head 
Adrienne Marye Henderson 
Audrey Annette Hornstein 
Geraldine Viola Jett 
Ruth Elizabeth Koenig 
John William Kraus 
Bertha Mary Langford 
Richard McGowan Lee 
Martha Jane Legge 
James David Leonard 
Leroy Henry List 
Ruth Elaine Long 
Harriette N. McClay 
Margaret Rebecca McIndoe 
William Henry McManus, Jr. 
William Bruce Oswald 
Noble Luther Owings 



♦Gladys Marion Person 
Merle Reed Preble 
Stedman Prescott, Jr. 
Mary Ellen Pyle 
Bernard Rice 
Bernard Leon Rosen 
Ruth Rubin 

♦Harold Sachs 
M. Bertram Sachs 
Betty Dirks St. Clair 
George Sempeles 
Edgar Alan Simpson 
Adria Jean Smith 

♦Eleanor Shirley Snyder 
Katherine Love Turner 
Sara Anne Vaiden 
Helen Owen Welsh 
Joseph Gordon White 
Naomi Lorraine Wilson 



Bachelor of Science 



David Alan Abrams 
Lawrence Warren Auerbach 
Agnes Crawford Baldwin 
Virginia Blanck Bates 
Belen Noemi Benavent 
Carl Richard Blumenstein 
Marian Webster Bond 
Eloise Ameua Anne Buch 
Camille Caroline Clark 
Virginia' Carolyn Conley 
Alfred Arthur Cooke 
Harold Dillon 
RoscoE Daniel Dwiggins 
♦Mary Rachel Eckenrode 
William George Esmond 
Howard Hoy Fawcett 
John Hercles Gile 
Ralph Curtis Hammer 
Mary Ellen Hunter 
Walter Vincent Hurley 
Ann Heath Irvine 
Melvin Stephen Joseph Jaworski 
Margaret Elizabeth Johnston 
Daniel Kaufman 



Paul Charles Kundahl 
♦Francis Thomas Maxwell 

Malcolm Thomas McGoogan, Jr. 

Ernest A. Michaelson 

Milton D. Mintz 

Carroll Funk Palmer 

Joseph Algernon Parks, Jr. 

Samuel Ronald Pinas 

Enos Ray 

Charles Gordon Remsburg 

Martin Rochlin 
♦Martin Rosen 

Rita Abigail Scheffler 

David Louis Seidel 

David Seligson 
♦Benjamin Biser Shewbridge 

Mary Elizabeth Simpson 

William Howard Souder, Jr. 

Harold Sterling 

Harry William Stern 
♦Virginia Annette Terry 

Pedro F. Ubides Aponte 
♦Frances Joseph Zalesak 



*Degree conferred September, 1939. 



396 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 
Bachelor of Science 



George Damon Allen 
Nathan Askin 
Herman John Badenhoop 
Francis Xavier Beamer 
Burton David Borden 
Robert S. Brown 
William Edward Brown, Jr. 
Robert James Chaney 
Margaret Lorraine Coyle 
Joseph Crisafulli 
Aloyuise Ivor Davis 
William Bruce Davis 
Albert W. Dieffenbach 
Charles Robbins Disharoon, II 

Sidney Abraham Dorfman 

Edward Hoover Duff 

George L. Flax 

Edwin Freeland Harlan 

Sam Harris 

James Wendell Healey 

Fred John Hughes, Jr. 

Carroll Summers Hutton 



Julius Wirth Ireland 
James Danforth Kemper 
Charles Walter Kendall, Jr. 
Henry Arthur Kennedy 
Stanley Trudman Kummer 
George Edward Lawrence 
Samuel Jayson LeFrak 
Ruth Thornton Magruder 
♦Michael E. Panciotti 
Arthur Peregoff 
Jay Morton Phillips 
Thornton C. Race 
Billie Jane Rittase 
Frank Joseph Skotnicki 
Hateva Vivring Smith 
Douglas Sidney Steinberg 
Charles Linwood Thompson 
Ralph Jay Tyser 
Murray Alvin Valenstein 
Harry Frederick Vollmer, III 
Henry F. Wyatt 
Herbert Scott Young 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



Sidney Alfred Belinkoff 
John Tandy Bonham 

JULIAN BARNET BOOKSTAVER 

Theodore Francis Czaplinski 

BENJAMIN ANTHONY DABROWSKI 

Benjamin Diamond 
Samuel Goldhaber 
♦Gilbert Franklin Gorsuch 



Julius Irving Kasawich 
♦Isidore Legum 
Burton Litchman 
George Arthur Lowander, Jr. 
Eugene Leo Pessagno, Jr. 
Bernard Randman 
Horace Lloyd Westcott 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



Mildred Baitz 

Richard Kenneth Barnes, Jr. 
Gladys King Bollinger 
Helene Toba Brenner 
♦Elizabeth Summers Clopper 
Clayton A. Dietrich 

♦Degree'conferred September. 1939. 



Nathan Gustavus Dorsey, Jr. 
Katherine Cornelia Dunn 
Doris W. Ehrmantraut 
Annamarie Helene Fricke 
Helen Virginia Groves 
Richard Kenneth Hart 



a97 



Betty Leland Hottel ^ 

* Helen Lucille Iager 
Lorraine Valentine Jackson 
Anne Elizabeth Jarboe 
Rose Irene Jones 
Virginia Anderson Keys 
George William Knepley 
Bess Louise Paterson 

Bachelor 

*Kathryn Kalbfus Abbott 

Genevieve Aitcheson 

Ralph Joseph Albarano 
♦Betty Lanier Alder 

Ann Calhoun Ames 

Bankard Frederick Baer 

Allena Weiler Baker 

Marie Wollenberg Barnes 

* Herman L. Baron 
Ann Marie Bono 
Vivian Eulalia Bono 

♦Crescent J. Bride 

Slater Warner Bryant, Jr. 

Thelma Wollenberg Burns 

Eva Elizabeth Burroughs 
♦Mary Ellen Christie 

Mason F. Chronister 
♦Jennie De Wilde Clagett 
♦Marion Brown Close 
♦Alice Mae Coulbourn 
♦Alice Katherine Cronise 
♦Lydia M. Downton 

Laura Roberta Duncan 

Halbert Knapp Evans 

William Benjamin Evans, Jr. 

Blanche Summers Farrow 

Sara Frances Ferrell 
^Paul Leo Footen 

Murray Holmes Fout 
♦EvEL Walker Fulgham 

Austin Eugene Gisriel 

Charles Henry Gontrum 
♦E. Marvel Gordy 

Edith Marie Grove 

Frank Charles Gunderloy 

Eunice Marjorie Lee Hackett 



Gertrude Ethel Plumer 

Ethel Pollack 

Margaret Stafford Reynolds 

Mary Susan Rinehart 

Katharine Elizabeth Short 

Ruth Weld 

Mary Ovelton Zurhorst 



of Science 

♦Katharyn Elizabeth Harmon 

Delma Mae Holden 
♦Jennie M. Hyde 

Eldred DeWitt Johnson 

Lyda Keating 

James Henry Kehoe, Jr. 

Katherine Jane Kenney 

Judith A. King 

Allan Stacy Kinsey, Jr. 
♦Marion Kirby 

Joseph Kornblatt 

Lucille Viola Kornmann 

Harvey Wilson Kreuzburg, Jr. 

John Bennett Laugerman 

Israel Leites 

Katherine Ann Longest 
♦Elizabeth S. Lynch 
♦William Houston Mahaney 

Lewis Arnold Matthaei 
♦Irvin Curtis Mayes, Jr. 

Mildred Lois McCall 

Antoinette Darby McKeever 

James Gordon Meade 
♦Minnie Mae Meese 

Clifford Clarence Merkle 

Mabel Evitt Myers 
♦Bernard Nachlas 
♦David Nathanson 

Virginia Kathryn Neff 

Alice Elinor Nordwall 

Cecil Norris 

Sophia Jean Ochstein 

Anna Belle Owens 
♦Dominic Vincent Provenza 

Louis Rachanow 
♦Leon Rivkin 



*Degree conferred September, 1939. 



398 



Herbert Stewart Roesler 

Edna May Schaefer 
*Glenn Hugh Sensenbaugh 

Anna Gertrude Shepperd 
♦Mary Veronica Sleeman 

James Anthony Stach 

A. Terris Stoddart 

Lois Teal 

*Anne Watson Tennant 



♦Naomi Rita Teter 
♦Margaret Hardy Tompkins 

Charles William Weidinger 

Margery Hurd West 

Laurence Leighton Williams 
♦Margaret Grothey Williams 

Helen Louise Wood 

♦Saranna White Yonkers 

Alice Irene Young 



* 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Civil Engineer 

Ezekiel John Merrick, Jr. 

Electrical Engineer 
Richard Louis Lloyd 



Bachelor 
Richard Kenneth Bamman 
Edward Kent Bebb 
Richard S. Brashears 
Nicholas Alexander Budkoff 
Byron Lawrence Carpenter 
Richard Westley Carroll 
Joseph Anderson Clarke 
Thomas Ludlow Coleman 
James Edward Collins 
Alfred Arthur Cooke 
William Hambleton Corkran 
Junior Newton Cox 
Leonard Carter Cranford 
John Joseph DeArmey 
Arthur Whitney Fletcher, Jr. 
Harry Gorsuch Gallagher 
Sigmund Irvin Gerber 
Orville Wallin Greenwood 
Leslie Stewart Grogan 
Louis Kemp Hennighausen, Jr. 
Wilbur Meade Herbert 
Harold Herman 
Joseph Kaminski 
Paul Gloss Kestler 
Robert William Kinney 
Herman Russell Knust 
Paul Trueman Lanham 
George Malcolm Lapoint 



of Science 
Lee E. LeMat 
Robert Joseph Lodge 
Frank Paul Lozupone 
Joseph Mossler Marzolf, Jr. 
Joseph T. Moran 
Francis Clyde Morris 
Milton Morton Mulitz 
Sanford Edsall Northrop 
Charles Neepier Odell 
Leonard John Otten, Jr. 
Charles Richard Parsons 
Lewis Albert Poole 
William Dixon Purdum 
Ralph Louis Rector 
Joseph Solomon Russell, Jr. 
BowEN Wood Shaw 
John Kelso Shipe 
Harvey Clarence Simms 
William Alexander Slicer 
Henry Taylor Stedman, II 
Warren Eugene Steiner 
Gardner Hollister Storrs 
Robert E-\rl Warner 
William Henry Watkins 
Loraine Hubert Weeks 
John Gibson Wilson, Jr. 
Robert Murray Wilson 
Wilbur Fisk Yocum 



*Degree conferred September, 1939. 



399 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Bachelor of Science 



Henrietta T. Abrahams 
Edith Ripnitz Bernstein 
Mildred Alice Bland 
Katherine Hinwood Bohman 
Evelyn Adair Bullock 
Sister Helen Agnes Cashin 
Margaret R. Collison 
Mary Lee Rebecca Cramblitt 
Tempe Haile Curry 
Marie Dorothy Dippel 
Margaret Frances Dorsey 
Beatrice Fennell 
Margaret Ellen Bishop Ford 
Sister Mary Louise Fuchs 
Ruth Garonzik 
Mariana Grogan 
Martha Virginia Hickman 
Dorothy Lura Hussong 
Jane Louise Kraft 
Eleanor Margaret Kuhn 
Lena Lucile Leighty 



Mary Adan Logan 
Elnora Louise Lyon 
Jane Maxson 
Lois Charlotte McComas 
Gertrude Evelyn McRae 
Esther La Rue Mulunix 
Florence Jane Repp 
B. Marie Robinette Richards 
Ruth Mae Richmond 
Helen Rodgers 
Mary Lee Ross 
Evelyn B. Sachs 
Catherine Samson 
Grace Elaine Schopmeyer 
Harriet Elizabeth Sheild 
Barbara Belle Skinner 
Margaret Hunt Smaltz 
Marie Conners Turner 
Dorothea Annette Wailes 
Margaret Virginia Wood 
Mary Elizabeth Zimmerman 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Laws 



Warren Lee Bailey 
Thomas Newan Berry 

fCHARLES Edward Bichy, Jr. 
Morris Bogdanow 
John Joseph Brennan 
Ethel Louise Brockman 
Robert MacDonald Bruce 
Doran Henry Buppert 
Michael Eugene Bussey 
David Lesser Caplan 
Harold Claudius Care 
John Stephen Connor, Jr. 
Calvin Albert Douglass 

fLEROY Whiting Farinholt, Jr. 

tJOHN T. Fey 

fTHOMAs Humphries Hedrick 

tJoHN Oliver Herrmann 
Jesse Walter Holmes, Jr. 



John Henry Hopkins, IV 

Sanford Hordes 

George E. Howell 

Joseph Franklin Howell 

Clarence Leatherbury Johnson 
t Solomon Kaplan 

Richard Estep Lankford 

Everett Paul Mason, Jr. 

Edwin Ottenheimer 

Leonard Paymer 

Albin Joseph Plant 

Samuel Joseph Polack 

Charles Frederick Rechner, Jr. 

Hugo Anthony Ricciuti 
fEMMA Sadtler Robertson 
fJAY Benson Saks 

David Stevenson Scrivener 

Reuben Shilling 



fWith honor. 



400 



James Blaine Sweeney, Jr. 
B. Conway Taylor, Jr. 
Calvert Thomas 

tCHARLES AWDRY THOMPSON 

Charles Clifton Virts 



Arthur Walter Watchorn 
^Lawrence Emerson Williams 
Alfred Woods 
P\ul Jacob Yeager 
Richard Edward Zimmerman 



Certificate of Proficiency 

Charles Hurley Cox 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Doctor of Medicine 



Glenn Horner Algire 
Stephen Ralph Andrews, Jr. 
William Charles Arney 
John Cletus Baier 
Walter Levi Bailey 
Daniel Cleveland Barker 
Edmund George Beacham 
Harold Paul Biehl 

Jesse Nachlas Borden 

Irving Carlton Brinsfield 

Lester Harold Caplan 

WELDON Porter Chandler 

ROBERT Henry Clifford, 3rd 

John Totterdale Cole 

Paul Harvey Correll 

Louie Samuel Daniel 

Edwin Oliver Daue, Jr. 

Joseph DeLuca 

Charles Frederic Dent 

LEONARD VINCENT DON DiEGO, JR. 

William Carroll Duffy 
JAMES Richard Dwyer 
James Albert Freeman, JR. 
William Hammond Fusting 
William Farrow Gassaway 
Robert Louis Gibbs 
IRVING Van der Veere Click 
Walter Raleigh Graham 
LUIS Roberto Guzman Lopez 
Morton Hecht, Jr. 

EMIL HELLER HENNING, JR. 

Albert Heyman 
Elizabeth Louise Hooton 

"^^^Snferrea September. 1939. 



Daniel Hope, Jr. 
Susana Igartua Cardona 
benjamin Harrison Inloes, JR. 
William Parks Jamison 
Louis Cecil Jorgensen 
James Roscoe Karns 
JULIAN Gilbert Kirchick 
Schuyler George Kohn 
Edward Louis Joseph Krieg 

ALBERT ALEXANDER KURLAND 
ROBERT ESHELMAN LARTZ 

William Soy Ming Ling 
William Cook Livingood 
Frank Ford Loker 
Harry Pearce Maccubbin 
Simeon Van Trump Markline 
Clarence Wilbur Martin, U 
ALFRED Richard Maryanov 
Daniel Hutchinson Mathers 
Harold Francis McCann 
James Edward McClung 
William Dennis McClung 
George Croxton McDaniel 
William James McKinnon 
Forest Chauncey Meade 
Joseph Miceli 
Edward Louis Molz 
FREDERICK Elbert Murphy, Jr. 
William Travers Muse 
George Roger Myers, Jr. 
James Francis O'Hara, Jr. 

GUILLERMO PICO SANTIAGO 

Ross Zimmerman Pierpont 



401 



N 



Robert Toms Pigpord 

William Platt 
Arthur Edgar Pollock 
Leonakd Posner 
John Costello Pound 

co^'^% ^A«"N Rhode 
Conrad Louis Richter 
Raymond c. Vail Robinson 
Donald James Roop 

Jtnt^"'''' Rothschild 
Thomas Edgie Russell Jr 
Philip Joseph Russillo 

Joseph' w?'"'' ^^hlesinger 
JOSEPH Wright Sloan 

James Brady Smith 

Ruby Arden Smith 

Orlando John Squillante 



Srp v"^""^"^'^'^ A«E«s 
™^ Elaine Albright 

Martha Louisa Baer 
Clarie Patria Broadnax 
Mary Madora Buss.ard 

Virginia CAfioLYNCoNLEY 
AVA Virginia Duffee 
J;fELLiE Perrell Gardner 

^CA^HrNrH^N^-- 

Edna r?^*'^"^" McIntosh 
^DNA Cecelia Nester 

Bessie Marie Parks 
Laura Grace Pember 
Dorothy Jane Provance 



SCHOOL OP NURSING 
Graduate in Nursing 



Howard Nehemlah Stayton Tp 
William Joseph Supik 
Louis Haberer Tankin 

ALEXANDER FraNK Thompsov 

Samuel Tompakov ^^^^"^ 
Wilfred Henrv t,^,„. 
William CZ "^"^^^^^^^^ J«. 
William Carryl Triplett 
Merton Theodore Waite 
William Earl Weeks 
Jesse Lee Wilkins 
Herman Joseph Williams 

hIrr^JJo^^^"^ ^'^"-' 
«ARRY Thomas Wilson Jr 

William Irwin Wolff 
James Rhodes Wright 
Solomon Bernard Zinkin 



PAtLINE IS.ABEL Remke 

Ruth Anna Rothhaupt 
Nellie May Scharf 
ALiDA Sherwood 
Mary Louise Sinnott 
Mary Alyce Skaggs 
Ethel Buffett Smithsom 

Dorcas Viola Ward 
ADA Margaret Watson 
Amy Lee Wilkins 
Ruth Carey Woerner 



SCHOOL 
Bachelor of 

Alfred Henry Alessi 

i-RANClS SaLVATORP R,r ■„ 
Cl-ARICE CaPLaT ^-'"-^^^O^E 

Matthew Joseph Celozzi 
Harry I. cohen 

•Degree conferred September. 1939. 



OF PHARMACY 
Science in Pharmacy 

Samuel Cohen 

Louis Lester Glaser 
Albert Goldberg 

402 



Joseph Greenberg 

Leonard Gumenick 
♦Irving Jerome Heneson 
♦Albert Heyman 
-^Daniel Hope, Jr. 
*Benjamin Harrison Inloes, Jr. 

Irvin Kamenetz 
*James Roscoe Karns 

Sidney Kline 

Robert Harold Klotzman 

Bernard Kramer 
* Albert Alexander Kurland 

Anthony J. Kursvietis 

NoRBERT Gordon Lassahn 

Philip H. Lerman 

Leon Phillip Levin 

Irving Levy 

Edward Miller 



*Ross Zimmerman Pierpont 
Alphonse Poklis 
Philip Frederick Richman 

* Conrad Louis Richter 
Donald Merle Rosen 

*Albert Sachs 
Norman Robert Sachs 
Solomon Sandler 
Mildred Schlaen 
Joseph William Shook 
Edgar Mano Silberg 
Robert Simonoff 
Daniel E. Smith 
Irving Sowbel 

* Harry Stone 

* William Joseph Supik 
Morris Zukerberg 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES, 1939-40 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 



Agnes Crawford Baldwin 
Sylvan E. Beck 
Charles Lee Benton, Jr. 
Gladys King Bollinger 
Marian Webster Bond 
Burton David Borden 
John William Brosius, Jr. 
Arthur R. Buddington 
Eva Elizabeth Burroughs 
Walter Mason Butler, Jr. 
Richard Westley Carroll 
Muriel Crosby 

Nathan Gustavus Dorsey, Jr. 
Edward Hoo\^r Duff 
George L. Flax 
Vernon Royston Foster 
Murray Holmes Fout 
Sister Mary Louise Fuchs 
John Hercles Gile 
Lex Bailey Golden 
Mariana Grogan 
Helen Virginia Groves 
Mary Jane Harrington 
May Elizabeth H.vrrover 



Martha Virginia Hickman 
Betty Leland Hottel 
Margaret Cobey Kemp 
Jane Louise Kraft 
George Malcolm Lapoint 
Richard McGowan Lee 
Russell Ernest Leed 
Joshua Melvin Leise 
Joseph Mossler Marzolf, Jr. 
Ralph Louis Rector 
Margaret Stafford Reynolds 
Mary Susan Rinehart 
BiLLiE Jane Rittase 
Mary Lee Ross 
M. Bertram Sachs 
Betty Dirks St. Clair 
David Seligson 
BowEN Wood Shaw 
Mary Elizabeth Simpson 
Walter Marion Sparks 
Frances Jane Stouffer 
Agnes Hope Swann 
LoRAiNE Hubert Weeks 
Daniel DeWalt Willard 



*Deg:ree conferred September, 1939. 



403 



Citizenship Medal, Offered by Dr H C r . 

Richard McGowan Le^ ' ^''''" ''^ ^'»« 
Citizenship Prize, Offered by Mr. Aiu r. 

Athletic Medal, Offered by the n , 

Maryland Ring. Offered by Charles L Li . . 
James Heney Kehoe jr "^"'^^ 
(«oddard Medal. Offered k ^ 

' ""ered by Mrs. Annie K r j^ 

Lee Amos mV^r ^'*^^"^ James 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 
David Hargis Barker ^' 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Med,i 

Medal and Junior Memhership, Offered by the An.e • . 

^ of Chemists ^ ^^ ^"'«"«^an institute 
^^"""^i- Funk Palmer 
•>«ah Berman Memorial Medal. Offered bv R • 

Stuart Tro^ Hai^^ood """'" ^«'™«'' 
Mortar Board Cup 
• Gi^vs King BoLUNGER 
Honor Key. Offered by the Class of lo,« , . 

BURTON David Borden 

^JeITm^" ^"'""^'y Medal 

JEAN MURDAY Persons 

Service Award 
Bess Louise Paterson 

^1?!^ ^- ^'^^**'- Award 

ALFRED Arthur Cooke 

American Society of Civil P„ • 

EowIko KeS Br "" ^'^^^^ 
Timx '^*" »eta Pi Award 
TINNER Grafton Timberlake 
Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit 
Joseph Kaminski 
Alpha Lambda Delfa <a,., -. 

Margarh.'^<;'o;b?S ^'^'^•' 
404 



Edward Powell Lacrosse Trophy 

Oscar William Nevares, Jr. 
J. Leo Mueller, III 

Louis W. Berger Baseball Trophy 

Earl Victor Springer 

Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards 

David Louis Seidel 
Judith Kathryn Greenwood 

The Diamondback Medals 
Allan Carroll Fisher Ralph Jay Tyser 

Douglas Sidney Steinberg Betty Leland Hottel 

Bess Louise Paterson Morgan Ledyard Tenny 

Murray Alvin Valenstein Charles Branson Morris 

Bertha Mary Langford 



Robert Culler Rice 
George L. Flax 



Betty Dirks St. Clair 
John Kelso Shipe 



The Terrapin Medals 

May Elizabeth Harrover 
Charles Branson Morris 
Mary Jane Harrington 

The Old Line Medals 

Charles Fernand Ksanda 
Mary Ovelton Zurhorst 
Walter Joseph Kerwin 



Battalion Trophy, Offered by Mahlon N. Haines (1894) 
First Battalion, Commanded by Cadet Major Enos Ray 

Governor's Drill Cup 
Company F, Commanded by Cadet Captain Warren Eugene Steiner 

Reserve Officers' Association Award 

Cadet Captain Warren Eugene Steiner 

Alumni Cup 

Second Platoon, Company D, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant Charles Wiluam Bastian 

Scabbard and Blade Cup 

Second Platoon, Company D, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant Charles William Bastian 

Military Medal, Offered by the Class of 1899 
Cadet Clifford Haines Davis 

Pershing Rifles Medal to Each Member of Winning Squad, 1st Squad, 

2nd Platoon, Company I 



Cadet Robert Hobart Edwards 
Cadet Victor Philip Klein 
Cadet John Franklyn Adams 
Cadet William Allen Spangler 



Cadet Herbert Carl Linsley 
Cadet Robert Francis Byrne 
Cadet Ramon Grelecki 
Cadet Sidney Eugene Buck 



405 



CAD.T ROBEKT WVNN. Lauch/a" S""" T""^'^^ WxsE R,.ev 

C.U)ET Wiu!nn''i^r '"'*'''^»"egiate Rifle Match ru ■ 

Cadet Alden Elon ImusTr ^^''^^ ^"o^as Wise Rilpv 

National Rifle Association National r . """ Newgarden 

CA.E. ROB.H, wv^rLt^r "^"" "'^-^^ 

Military Department Gold MeH.. . t 

. on Va^^tR^J?J:L'-' "^'^-^ «-" «eore 

Cadet Willard Ceciluus Jense. 
M.'.^ary Department Gold Meda. to Individual F • „ 

on Freshman Team "^ "'■^'' ^'^""' 

• '^^ ''^'"■'"^ All-American Gold Medal for Rifl r 

CADET WX..AHD CEOI.U.S Je^SE^^ """"*'"""'' 

• '''""■'■"^ ^"-American Silver Meda, for Rifle r 

Cadet Howard Dean FvlV '^""*^''"«" 

CADET J.n.u..ntoZ!tZ "' ''T'"^ ^'''^^ ^'^-^'^ 

CADET OlEN LSlLtr'' "'^'"'^ ^^'^^"^ 

D'«trict of Columbia Marine Corps Rifl r, k 

CA... ROBERT WV..E ^r ^^ ^^ ^'^ ^ ''^"^•■"-^- 
C-. A.DE. E.O. ^S^Tr"- C-t RAVMO.D Lo.. Hodces 

CADET JOSEPH Moss'ErMA^.IrjR'?"'^ ^^^'" 

406 



District of Columbia Marine Corps Rifle Club Freshman Rifle Championship, 

Junior. Medals for First Place 

Cadet George Joseph Newgarden Cadet William Robert Schack 
Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 

WAR DEPARTMENT AWARDS OF COMMISSIONS 

AS SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

The Officers Reserve Corps 



Ralph Joseph Albarano 
George Damon Allen 
Herman John Badenhoop 
Richard Kenneth Barnes, Jr. 
Charles William Bastian, Jr. 
Francis Xavier Beamer 
Carl Richard Blumenstein 
DuRTON David Borden 
Robert S. Brown 
William Edward Brown, Jr. 
Nicholas Alexander Budkoff 
Mason F. Chronister 
Thomas Ludlow Coleman 
Harold F. Cotterman, Jr. 
Junior Newton Cox 
Donald Chatterson Davidson 
William Bruce Davis 
Clayton A. Dietrich 
Harold Dillon 
William George Esmond 
George L. Flax 
Carroll Milton Forsyth 
Vernon Royston Foster 
Elmer Leroy Freemire 
Harry Gorsuch Gallagher, Jr. 
John Gordon Grier 
Harry Bulkley Hambleton, Jr. 
Edwin Freeland Harlan 
George James Heil, Jr. 
Louis Kemp Hennighausen, Jr. 



Charles Chilton Holbrook 

WiLLARD CECILLIUS JENSEN 

Henry Frankland Kimball, Jr. 
Robert Wynne Laughead 
George Edward Lawrence 
Richard McGowan Lee 
Robert Joseph Lodge 
Joseph Mossler Marzolf, Jr. 
Edward Thomas Naughten, Jr. 
William Henry McManus, Jr. 
Stephen Mason Meginniss 
Alan Randolph Miller 
Oscar William Nevares, Jr. 
Leonard John Otten, Jr. 
Joseph Algernon Parks, Jr. 
Merle Reed Preble 
Enos Ray 

Thomas Wise Riley, Jr. 
John Kelso Shipe 
Frank Joseph Skotnicki 
William How\\rd Souder, Jr. 
Warren Eugene Steiner 
Carl Hoak Stewart, Jr. 
A. Terris Stoddart 
Gardner Hollister Storrs 
Morgan Ledyard Tenny 
John Sherman Thatcher 
Ralph Jay Tyser 
William Henry Watkins 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors — John William Brosius, Jr., Margaret Cobey Kemp, 

Walter Mason Butler, Jr., Agnes Hope Swann, Frances 
Jane Stouffer. 

Second Honors — Vernon Royston Foster, Joshua Melvin Leise, David 

Gabriel Freeland Sheibley, Sarah Virginia Huffer, 
Margaret Charlotte Menke. 



407 



College of Arts and Sciences 

First Honors — M. Bertram Sachs, May Elizabeth Harrover, Richard 

McGowAN Lee, John Hercles Gile, Mary Elizabeth 
Simpson, Betty Dirks St. Clair, Mary Jane Harrington, 
Marian Webster Bond, Agnes Crawford Baldwin, David 
Seligson. 

Second Honors — Camille Caroline Clark, Olga Selma Furbershaw, 

Bertha Mary Langford, Eloise Amelia Anne Buch, 
David Alan Abrams, Carl Richard Blumenstein, Noble 
Luther Owings, Margaret Elizabeth Johnston, Carroll 
Funk Palmer, Samuel Ronald Pinas. 

College of Commerce 
Fi rst Honors — Burton David Borden, George L. Flax, Henry Arthur 

Kennedy, Billie Jane Rittase. 

Second Honors — Edward Hoo\^r Duff, Arthur Peregoff, Ralph Jay 

Tyser, William Edw^ard Brown, Jr. 

C4>llege of Education 

First Honors — Gladys King Bollinger, Eva Elizabeth Burroughs, 

Betty Leland Hottel, Helen Virginia Groves, Nathan 
GusTAVUs DoRSEY, JR., Mary Susan Rinehart, Margaret 
Stafford Reynolds. 

Second Honors — Mildred Baitz, Katharine Elizabeth Short, Judith A. 

King, Murray Holmes Fout, Richard Kenneth Hart, 
Rose Irene Jones. 

College of Engineering 

First Honors — Joseph Mossler Marzolf, Jr., Richard Westley Carroll, 

BowEN Wood Shaw, George Malcolm Lapoint, Ralph 
Louis Rector. 

Second Honors — Joseph Kaminski, Sanford Edsall Northrop, Wilbur 

Meade Herbert, Loraine Hubert Weeks, William Dixon 
PuRDUM, Byron Lawrence Carpenter. 

College of Home Economics 

First Honors — Jane Louise Kraft, Mary Lee Ross, Sister Mary Louise 

FucHS, Mariana Grogan, Martha Virginia Hickman. 

Second Honors — Sister Helen Agnes Cashin, B. Marie Robinette Rich- 
ards, Barbara Belle Skinner, Lena Lucile Leighty. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 

Benjamin Anthony Dabrowski 



Bernard Randman 



Certificates of Honor 

John Tandy Bonham 

408 



School of Law 

Elected to the Order of the Coif 

Solomon Kaplan 
John T. Fey j^y Benson Saks 

JOHN OLIVER HE^^^^^^r^^^s AWDKV THOMPSON 

. • th. Honor Case in the Practice Court 

B. CONWAY TAYLOK, JK- 
JOHN OLIVER HERRMAN RjCHARD EdWARD ZIMMERMAN 

Jay BENSON Saks 

School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 

William Irwin Wolff 

JAMES ROSCOE KARNS 

Certificates of Honor 

LESTER Harold Caplan 

JOSEPH WRIGHT SLOAN SAMUEL TOMPAKOV 

CARL ELIOT ROTHSCHILD^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 

,, ..i.l Prize Of ?25.00 for the Best Worlc an 

CHARLES MARTIN RHODE 

,, 5«l Prize of $25.00 for the Best Essay 

Edward Louis Molz 

TT'kI TX the university of Maryland 
The Janet Hale Memorial ^^^""'^'ZZel Course in Administra- 
Nurses' Alumnae Association Jo f^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^, teachers 
tion, Supervisory, or f^°' ^^ t^^ student Hav- 

AVA Virginia Duffee 

Pauline Isabel Remke 

T y. L Whitehurst Prize for the Highest Average 
The Mrs. John L. ^^^'f^^^^,^^ Ability 

AVA Virginia Duffee 
409 



The Edwin and Leander M 7- 

The u • ^^ "^^^'^'^'^"^ W^^SON ^'*''"*' 

^^'^"'^" -"«^^^^^^^ Pin an. Me..er- 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence 
Mildred Schlaen 
■i'lie William Simon Memorial Prize for P « • 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pf,. 

xdcticai Pharmacy Prize 

Alphonse Poklis 
The Conrad L WifVi p^^ 



REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 

TRAINING CORPS, 1940-1941 

CADET COLONEL JOHN (JEKLEK RECKORD. Commanding 

CADET LIEUTENANT COLONEL THOMAS EUGENE WATSON, Executive Officer 

CADET MAJOR GINO VALENTL Regimental Adjutant 

FIRST BATTALION 

CADET LIEUTENANT COLONEL ROBERT WARFIELD SAUM. Commanding 
CADET MAJOR STANLEY MORRIS WHALEN, Executive Officer 
CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT FRANK ARTHUR DWYER, Adjutant 



COMPANY "B" 



COMPANY "AV 

Captain Lawrence Judson 

Hodgins 

1st Lieut. Joseph Howard 
Randall 

2nd Lieut. Raymond Louis 

Hodges 2nd Lieut. Donald Spoerer 

2nd Lieut. Samuel Coke Streep Onnen 

2nd Lieut. Ralph Fletcher Davis 



COMPANY "C** 



Captain Ernest Gunther Wagner Captain Robert Ramsey 

1st Lieut. Richard Savage Reid Westfall 

2nd Lieut. Michael Pennella 1st Lieut. Lacy Hall 



2rid Lieut. Vaden Jones 
Haddaway 



2nd Lieut. John Francis 
Greenip 

2nd Lieut. Alden Elon Imus 



SECOND BATTALION 

CADET LIEUTENANT COLONEL WILLIAM FRANCIS GANNON. Commanding 
CADET MAJOR EDWARD MELVIN LLOYD. Executive Officer 
CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT ELMER FRANCIS BRIGHT, Adjutant 



- COMPANY "D" 

Captain Arthur Warren Max 
Horn 

1st Lieut. David George 
Drawbaugh 

2nd Lieut. Warren Purnell 
Johnson 

2nd Lieut. Leonard Treherne 
Schroeder 

2nd Lieut Robert Ashby Groves 



COMPANY "E" 

Captain John Douj^las Custer 

1st Lieut. Jack Foster Cherry 

2nd Lieut. William Edwin 
McMahon 

2nd Lieut. Herman Alexander 
Tapper 

2nd Lieut. John Lynwood 
Crone 



COMPANY"F*' 

Captain Norman Albert 
Miller 

1st Lieut. Worthington 
Heaton Talcott 

2nd Lieut. Norman 
Silverman 

2nd Lieut. Richard Alvan 
Clark 

2nd Lieut. Charles Wilson 
Wannan 



THIRD BATTALION 

CADET LIEUTENANT COLONEL LAWRENCE HOWARD HASKIN, Commanding 
CADET MAJOR THOMAS ELDON HITCH, Executive Officer 
CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT JAMES MONROE BEATTIE, Adjutant 



COMPANY *'G*' 

Captain Nelson Reide Jones 

1st Lieut. Allen Vogel Minion 

2nd Lieut. James Robert 
Finton 

2nd Lieut. Henry Jacob 
Rockstroh 

2nd Lieut. John Leonard 
Meakin 



COMPANY "H" 

Captain Robert DuBois 
Rappleye 

1st Lieut. William Jack Suit 

2nd Lieut. Jack Edward Weber 

2nd Lieut. Ernest Clifford 
Saltzman 

2nd Lieut. Elliott Brooke 
Harwood 



COMPANY "I" 

Captain John Jerome Ryan 

1st Lieut. Daniel Julius 
Harwood 

2nd Lieut Richard Tinney 
Skeen 

2nd Lieut. James Edward 
Hamill 

2nd Lieut. Francis Warner 
Glaze 



410 



FOURTH BATTALION 

CADET LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOHN CHESLEY MARZOLF, Commanding 

CADET MAJOR HUGH GIFFORD DOWNS. Executive Officer 

CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT DOUGLAS MATTINGLY, Adjutant 



411 



COMPANY "K" 

Captain Robert Culler Rice 

Ist Lieut. James Bradford 
Bumside 

2nd Lieut. John Marvin Powell 

2nd Lieut. Donald Powell 
Marshall 



COMPANY "L" 

Captain David Cleveland Kelly 

1st Lieut. Carl Albert Cline 

2nd Lieut. Richard Charles 
McDevitt 

2nd Lieut. John Norman 
Bauernschmidt 

2nd Lieut. Ralph Frost Crump 



COMPANY '*M" 

Captain Paul Otto 
Siebeneichen 

1st Lieut. William Kendig 
Brendle 

2nd Lieut. Turner Grafton 
Timberlake 

2nd Lieut. Frederick 
Charles Maisel 

2nd Lieut. Bobby Lee Jones 



«««•»♦ 



COMPANY "A* 



Frank Gilbert Carpenter 



Isadore H. Alperstein 
Robert Randolph Ayres 
Harry Arthur Boswell 



Tarleton Smith Bean 
Frank Lawrence Bentz 
Rodney Leonard Boyer 



BAND 

CAPTAIN ALVIN BLAIR RICE 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

FIRST BATTALION 

COMPANY "B" 

First Sergreants 

Andrew Stilley Deming 

Platoon Sersreants 



COMPANY "K 

John Francis Curtin 

Robert Edward Stalcup 
William Reeves TiUey 
Arthur Howard Valentine 

Fred Carlisle Hic>8 
Walter Joseph Kirwm 
Robert Herman SmitH 



FOURTH BATTALION 
COMPANY "V 

First Sergeants 

Louis Martin Tierney 

Platoon Sergeants 

Theodore Merriam Vial 
James Henry Wharton 

Thomas T. Witkowski 
Guide Sergeants 

William Allen McGr^^or 
Charles August Rauscn 

Hiram Henry Spicer 

BAND 

First Sergeant 

Charles R. Beaumont 



COMPANY "M" 

Howard Marshall Trussell 



Robert Charles Henry 
Robert Welsh Russell 
Phillip C. Heath 

Roy Kenneth Skipton 
Robert Dale Hall 



George Robert Cook 
Randall Courtney Cronin 
Neal Dow 

Guide Sergeants 

Robert Driscoll Condon 
Clayton Sherwood Dann 
James Aldrich Hambleton 



COMPANY "C" 



Bruce Allen Douglas 



James Edward Dunn 
Harold E. Earp 
John Dechert Eyler 



Paul B. Hutson 

Donald Richard Magruder 

James Horace Miller 



COMPANY "D' 



Mearle Daniel DuVall 



Jeremiah Collins Hege 
Vincen J. Hughes 
Lloyd Gordon Huggins 



Richard Craig Sullivan 
Hugh McKeldon Walton 
George Lawrence Wannall 



COMPANY "G" 



William Addison Holbrook 



Samuel L. Pfefferkom 
Gerald Eugene Prentice 
Edward Hector Price 



Charles B. Raymond 
Robert Settle Insley 
Robert Lee Dorn 



SECOND BATTALION 
COMPANY "E" 

First Sergeants 

Theodore Eiswald Fletcher 

Platoon Sergeants 

Lawrence Mackenzie 
James Edwin Malcolm 
William Rowland Maslin 

Guide Sergeants 

Mordecai Gist Welling 
Thomas McCoy Fields 

THIRD BATTALION 
COMPANY "H" 

First Sergeants 

William Harvey Schoenhaar 

Platoon Sergeants 

Frank Sam Reid 
William Thomas Riley 
Harry Rimmer 

Guide Sergeants 

Harry Michael Doukas 
Thomas Crawford Galbreath 

412 



COMPANY "F" 



Walter Kingsley Grigg 



Vernon LeRoy McKinstry 
Samuel Varick Moore 
George Pendleton 



John Paul McNeil 
Jack P. Beasley 



COMPANY "I" 



Theodore John Stell 



John Lester Scott 
Orville Cresap Shirey 
Joseph Alvin Sirkis 



Daniel Leonard Gendason 
Joseph Lane Gude 
Charles Richard Jubb 



413 



SUMMARY OF THE STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1940-1941 
AS OF MARCH, 1941 
Resident Collegiate Courses-Academic Year: 



FOR 



College 
Park 

434 
1,094 

417 



Baltimore 



566 



College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and SciencesIZZ 

College of Commerce 

College of Dentistry. 1 

College of Education I 

College of Engineering.. " ^07 

Graduate School " " f 4^^ 

College of Home Economics!.. S06 

School of Law..... 

School of Medicine ZZZ 

School of Nursing. .3 

School of Pharmacy. '.Z.Z 



376 
255 

104 

218 
374 
142 
124 



Total 

434 
1,094 
417 
376 
821 
597 
574 
306 
218 
374 
142 
124 



Total. 



Summer School, 1940 ^ 1 453 



Grand Total 

Duplications 49^^ 



3,884 



5,337 



94 



76 



1,593 



1,687 



1,547 



678 



Total Less Duplications 4 846 

Vocational Teacher Training, Subcollegiate' 
Mmmg Courses, Western Maryland 

Engmeering, Defense Extension Z~ 

Short Courses and Conferences: 

Boys' and Girls' Club Week 

Canning Crops Conference 1. 

Cooperative Institute 

Educational Advisers, C C C. 

Greenkeepers' School „.. 

Highway Engineering Short Course 

Milk Testing 

Nurserymen's Short Course" 

Parent-Teachers Association Conference -" 

Poultry Products Marketing School "■ 

Rural Women 

Sanitary Engineering Short Course 

Volunteer Firemen . 



1,611 



5,477 



7,024 



6,346 

134 
236 
637 



630 
201 
246 
108 
51 
188 
12 
99 
128 
134 
759 
45 
162 



Total Short Courses. 



"™i.T*'-4Lr~!- """"'"• "" ««■'- 



2,763 



GENERAL INDEX 



414 



10,116 



Page 

Administration 8 

board of regents 7 

officers of administration 8 

boards and committees ( College Park ) 21 
officers of instruction (College Park) 9 
officers of instruction (Baltimore) _ 31 

faculty committees (Baltimore) 46 

administrative organization 48 

buildings, grounds and 49 

libraries 5 1 

Admission 5 1 

methods of admission 52 

undergraduate curricula 54 

advanced standing 53 

certificate, by 52 

examination, by 52 

physical examinations 56 

transfer, by 53 

unclassified students 55 

Agents 27 

assistant county 28 

assistant home demonstration 29 

county 2 7 

county home demonstration 28 

Agricultural Economics ...^ 242 

Agricultural Engineering 82, 247 

Agricultural Education 81, 246 

Agriculture. College of 73 

advisory councils 75 

chemistry 80 

curricula in 77 

departments 75 

farm practice 76 

equipment 75 

requirements for graduation 76 

special students in agriculture 103 

. regulatory activities 74, 105 

State Board of 237 

Agronomy 86, 243 

Alumni 72 

Animal Husbandry 89, 250 

Applied Science, fellowship in 182 

Aquiculture 389 

Art 190, 253, 334 

Arts and Sciences, College of 106 

advisers 110 

degrees 107 

divisions 106 

electives in other college and schools 109 

normal load 109 

requirements 107 

Astronomy 254 

Athletics 49, 206 



Page 

Bacteriology 90, 254 

Biochemistry, plant physiology 93, 262 

Biological Sciences, Division of 113 

Board of Regents 7 

Botany 93. 258 

Buildings 49 

Bureau of Mines 50 

research fellowships in 182 

lectures 184 

Business Administration 263 

Calendar 4 

Certificates, Degrees and 59 

Chemical engineering 122, 175 

chemistry 122, 176 

research fellowships in 182 

Chemistry 121, 273 

analytical „ 274 

biological 279 

general 121, 273 

organic 275 

physical 277 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 390 

Chorus 360 

Civil Engineering 178,307 

Classical Languages 281 

Clubs, miscellaneous 70 

College of Agriculture 73 

College of Arts and Sciences 106 

College of Commerce 13.5 

College of Education 153, 292 

College of Engineering 168, 305 

College of Home Economics 185, 334 

Commerce, College of 135 

curriculum in General Business..l38, 141 

curriculum in Accounting 142 

curriculum in Finance 145 

curriculum in ^larketing and Sales 

Administration 142 

curriculum in Agricultural Economics 146 
cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration 150 

combined program in Commerce and 

Law 147 

scholarslii]) requirements 136 

electives from other colleges 136 

Committees 2 1 . 46 

Comparative Literature 283 

County agents 27 

demonstration agents 28 

Courses of study, description of 241 

Dairy Husbandry 93, 285 

Dairy Manufacturing 95, 286 

Degrees and Certificates 59 



GENERAL INDEX (Continued) 



Page 

Delinquent students 58 

Dentistry, School of 208 

building 210 

curriculum 213, 214 

expenses 213, 216 

Diamondback 77 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 

lower division Ill 

biological sciences 113 

humanities 118 

physical sciences 120 

social sciences 127 

Drawing 310 

Economics 288 

agricultural 242 

Education 153, 292 

methods in arts and science sub- 
jects (high school) 295 

agricultural 81, 156, 246 

arts and science 156 

curricula ~ 156 

degrees 156 

commercial 160 

home economics 161, 297 

industrial 163, 298 

physical 166, 206, 301 

Educational psychology 295 

Education, College of 153 

Electrical Engineering 170, 179 

Employment, student - 65 

Engineering 168, 305 

chemical 169, 175, 305 

chemical engineering — chemistry 122, 176 

civil 177, 307 

drawing 310 

electrical 170, 179, 310 

general subjects 313 

mechanics 313 

mechanical 172, 180, 314 

shop 317 

surveying 173, 318 

admission requirements 168 

bachelor degrees 169 

curricula ~ 174 

equipment 169 

library ^ _ 1 74 

master of science in 169 

professional degrees in 169 

English Language and Literature 318 

Entomology 96, 114, 326 

Entrance 51 

Examinations 57 

Expense8..-59, 64, 198, 213, 216, 222, 227 

230, 236 

Extension Service 74, 104 

staff _ _ 24 



Page 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 104 

staff 2 3 

Experiment Station, Engineering 173 

Faculty 9, 3 1 

Farm forestry 239, 329 

Farm management '. 98 

Feed, Fertilizer, Lime, etc., Service — 238 

Fellowships 182, 199 

Five Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

Curriculum 130, 230 

Floriculture 101, 341 

Food Technology 92, 258 

Foods and nutrition 187, 337 

Footlight Club 71 

Forestry, State Department of 239 

course in 329 

Fraternities and Sororities 70 

French 353 

Genetics 388 

Geology 330 

Geological Survey 240 

German _ 356 

Grading system 57 

Graduate School, The 191 

admission 192 

council 191 

courses 193 

fees 198 

fellowships and assistantships 199 

registration _ 192 

residence requirements 194 

requirements for degrees 194, 196 

summer graduate work.... 193, 199 

Greek ^ 281 

Health Service 56 

High school teachers, certification of, 

109, 155 

History 330 

Historical statement 47 

Home Economics 185, 334 

curricula 186 

degree 185 

departments 185 

facilities 185 

general 187 

Home Economics Education 161, 297 

Honors and awards 65, 403 

Horticultural State Department 238 

Horticulture 99, 339 

Hospital 56, 223 

Housing rules 63 

Humanities, division of 118 

Industrial Education ~ 163 

Infirmary rules 56 

Inspection and regulatory service 238 

Italian 3 58 

Landscax>e gardening 341 



GENERAL INDEX (Continued) 



Page 

281 

Latin -" 219 

Law, The School of - 222 

advanced standing " ^20 

admission 1' J"Z" 221 

combined program of stud> ^^^ 

fees and expenses — - ^o 

Librarians (College Park) ——2 48 

Libraries " 345 

Library Science ---- ; 238 

Livestock, Sanitary Service ——^ gg 

Loans ; ;"' 49 

Location of the University """"^^i 

Lower division ^,j 

Marks 345 

Mathematics - '172 180. 314 

Mechanical Engineering 1-?^ ^^^ 

Mechanics gg^ 493 

Medals and prizes ' ^33 

Medicine, School of --•-••■• ^24 

admission " 223 

clinical facilities --"—-■ ^ 

dispensaries and laboratories...^--^-- 22^ 

expenses --; 224 

prizes and scholarships "r:"";: 

Metallurgical division. Bureau of Mines. ^^^ 

fellowships m -"—--- _""' ^^ 352 

Military Science and Tact.cs 55. 20-, 35^ 
Modern Languages, Courses '" •-— ^^^ 

Music 360 

Musical Organizations ^^g 

Nursing, School of *"..228. 229 

admission ^^^ 23 1 

combined program ' ^30 

expenses 229 

hours of duty 228 

programs offered g 

Officers, administrative •■"^ ^^ 

of instruction ' ,^2 

Old Line ".....-.-- 100 

Olericulture - 233 

Pharmacy, School of •--•"• 234 

admission 236 

expenses - 233 

location - ^^^ 403 

• Phi Kappa Phi - •"" ' ^^^ 

Philosophy '"'"c c i aa "^06 301 

Ph>-«ical Education..-.49, 55. 166. 206, .^u^ 

Physical examinations - ^20 

Physical sciences, division ^^"■■■--- 3^3 

Physics ' 260 

Plant patfiology 262 

Plant physiology ~ - 3^,^ 

Political Science ■" •"" ^qo 

Pomology " .["q2, 371 

Poultry husbandry 213 

Predental curriculum ♦ ^^^ 

Premedical curriculum 



Page 
130 



Prenursing curriculum -- 50 

Princess Anne College ^^^ 

Psychology " "* 373 

Psychological Testing Bureau - ^^^ 

Publications, student --" ^2 

Refunds ; " 411 

Regimental Organization ^ ^ 

Registration, date of -" ^^^ 

penalty for late ' ^^ 

Regulations, grades, degrees ^^ 

deerees and certificates ""7'" r;« 

tuminltion of delinquent students.. 58 

examinations and marks ^^ 

regulation of studies - ^^ 

reports - 53 

junior standing ^^ 

Religious influences -- 

Reserve Officers' Tr^aining^ Corps ^^^ ^^^^ 

Residence and Non-Residence --- 55 

Room reservation --- ""T'' 53 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories.^, ^b^ 

Rural Life 54 

Scholarships 230 

Seed Inspection Service .- ^^^ 

Social Sciences, division of .-^--— ^^ 

Societies - - 70 

honorary fraternities ..- ^^ 

fraternities and sororities....-----^-- 

n^iscellaneous clubs and societieB.... ^70 

Sociology ..„-.88, 249 

Soils "* 390 

Solomons Island research -— ^^ 

Sororities 35g 

Spanish - "'"' 3 g2 

Speech - -; '* 237 

State Board of Agriculture ---------- ^^^ 

Statistics 

Student §5 

employment gg 

government ;— " gg 

organization and activities -- ^^ 

SummTrroTtheSt^den^^ Enrollment-^ 414 

Summer camps 201 

Summer session ~ 201 

credits and certificates -— ^^^ 

graduate work ' ^^^ 

terms of admission - " ^^^ 

Surveying 72 

Terrapin - " gg 334 

Textiles and clothing ^ ♦ ^^^ 

Uniforms, military 3^^ 

Veterinary Science 240 

Weather Service, State -- -•■" ^^ 

Withdrawals .- "IZZZZlis. 386 

Zoology ' ' ~~ 



Any further information desired concerning the University 
of Maryland will be furnished upon application to 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 
College Park, Maryland