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A 




Mimm\ OF NIRYLilND 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



'^EKERAl CATALOG 

19421943 




^ke foundation of C^veru S^taU 
id the Education of its Lyoutk" 



DIOGENES 



9- 



AGRICULTURE 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



COMMERCE 



EDUCATION 
ENGINEERING 



HOME ECONOMICS 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



GRADUATE STUDIES 
DENTISTRY 



LAW 



MEDICINE 



NURSING 



PHARMACY 



EXTENSION 



RESEARCH 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University, The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw for cause 
at any time. 



MAP 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY CAMPUS 

COLLEGE PARK 






MAP 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw for cause 
at any time. 



OF THE 

UNIVERSITY CAMPUS 

COLLEGE PARK 



Official Publication of the University of Maryland 



Vol. 39, No. 4 



March, 1942 



CATALOG 



1942 



1943 




Containing general information concerning the University, 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1942-1943, and rec- 
ords of 1941-1942. 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as exist- 
ing at the time of publication, March, 1942. 



Issued Semi Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR FOR 1942-1943 



1942 


1943 


1944 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S M 


T WjTiFjS 


S M 


T W T 


F S 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 

iZ 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

•••••• 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 














1 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
1? 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


8 
15 
22 
29 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S|M T W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T WTjFIS 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 


2 3 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


"6 
13 
20 
27 


....„ 

14 

21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 

17 

24 

f31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 

21 
28 


9 
16 
23 


10 
17 
24 


12 
19 
26 


30' 






























SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S MiT'iWIT F S 


S|M T W|T|F|S 


S M 


T W 


T 


FjS 


"Si 


M 


T W|T 


F| 


IS 




....„ 

14 

21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


....„ 

14 
21 
28" 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 

27 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 


6 
13 
20 

27 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


11 
18 
25 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M 


T 


WiT 


F|S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S M 


T 


W T 


F S 


S M|T W T|F S 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 














1 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 

27 


7 
14 
^1 

28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


8 
15 
22 

29 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T 


WT F S 


SI 


M 


T 


W T F S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


Si 


M 


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IT 


F 


S 


1 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 

X7 

24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


14 

21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

'22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 

27 


....„ 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 


8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
'24 
31 


11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


13 
20 

27 




























DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


SI 


M 


T 


W T|F S 


S M T W|T|F S 


SI 


M T W 


T 


F S 


S M 


T 


W 


T F 


S 




14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 SI 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


"6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 

SI 


4 

11 
18 

25 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 


6 

13 
20 
27 


9 
16 
23 
30 


10 
17 
24 
31 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


10 
17 
24 



1942 

June 19-20 

June 22 
June 27 



July 4 
Aug. 12 

September 7 
October 2 

October 8, 9, 10 
October 12 
October 17 



October 20 
October 31 
November 26 
December 21-27 
(inc.) 

1943 

January 1 
January 20 

February 4 

February 8, 9 
February 10 
February 16 



February 22 

March 25 

April 23-26 (inc.) 

May 23 

May 28 

May 29 

June 14-19 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1942-43 
COLLEGE PARK 



Summer 
Friday, Saturday 

Monday 
Saturday 



Saturday 
Wednesday 



Monday 
Friday 



Semester 

Registration for Summer Semes- 
ter and Short Summer Session. 

Instruction begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Holiday. 

Closing date, Short Summer Ses- 
sion. 

Labor Day, Holiday. 

Closing date, Summer Semester. 



Monday 
Saturday 



Fall Semester 
Thursday-Saturday Registration for Fall Semester. 

Instruction begins. 
Last day to change registration 

or to file schedule card without 

penalty. 
Reception to the Faculty. 
Homecoming Day. 
Thanksgiving, Holiday. 
Christmas Recess. 



Tuesday 
Saturday 
Thursday 
Monday-Sunday 



Friday 
Wednesday 

Thursday 

Spring 
Monday-Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Tuesday 



Monday 

Thursday 

Friday-Monday 

Sunday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Monday-Saturday 



New Year's Day, Holiday. 
Alumni and Faculty Charter Day 

Banquet. 
Closing date, Fall Semester. 

Semester 

Registration for Spring Semester. 

Instruction begins. 

Last day to change registration 

or to file schedule card without 

penalty. 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday. 
Maryland Day. 
Easter Recess. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Closing date, Spring Semester. 
Commencement. 
Rural Women's Short Course. 



Note: The academic calendars of the professional schools in Baltimore 
will be found in the separate catalogues published by these schools. 



Table of Contents 



FOREWORD 

In view of the urgent need of the military services and the country 
generally for trained men and women, the University of Maryland has 
adopted an accelerated educational program designed to meet this need. 
Under the new plan, the University's academic year, which formerly con- 
sisted of two semesters of eighteen weeks each, running from mid- Septem- 
ber to early June, with a long summer vacation, has been changed to a 
three semester, all-year basis. The first semester under the new plan — the 
summer semester of 1942— will begin on June 19, 1942, and run until 
October 2, 1942. The fall semester will begin on October 12, 1942, and run 
until February 4, 1943. The spring semester will begin on February 8, 
1943 and end on May 29, 1943. 

Students following the accelerated program, except those in Engineering, 
who will need three years, should be able to graduate in two and two-thirds 
years from the date of entrance. New students will be admitted at the 
beginning of any of the three semesters. 

It is of special importance that men students matriculate at the begin- 
ning of the summer semester, because, by doing so, they will, in most cases, 
be able to complete their university training before they become of draft 
age. Another important consideration is that the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics has adopted a regulation that only students who take 
the full all-year round schedule will be admitted to the Advanced Course, 
which leads to a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps of the United States Army. 

For the convenience of school teachers and others who may wish to 
spend a part of their summer vacation in study, the summer semester has 
been divided into two equal parts of approximately seven and one-half 
weeks each, and the usual Summer Session will run concurrently with the 
first of these seven and one-half week periods. 

The attention of men students is especially directed to the unusual oppor- 
tunities which exist for training in specialized curricula which lead to com- 
missions in the United States Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard 
and Merchant Marine, and of receiving expert instruction in piloting of 
aircraft. Also, there is an unusual demand at this time, which demand will 
doubtless continue for the duration of the war emergency, for trained men 
in Meteorology, Electronics, Chemistry, Physics, Radio, and other scientific 
lines, both in the military services and in the United States Civil Service. 

While the University recommends that students enroll for the all-year 
round program, it will still be possible for those who desire to do so, to 
pursue their college careers more leisurely. In other words, students who 
register for the first time in the fall semester will be able to have their 
summers free and complete their college course in the normal four year 
period. 



Page 

Calendars for 1942, 1943 ^ 2 

University Calendar ~ 3 

Foreword ~ • 4 

Board of Regents 6 

Officers of Administration, and Instructional Staff at College 

Park - ~ 8 

SECTION I— GENERAL 20 

Preliminary Information 20 

History and Organization 21 

Academic Regulations and Procedure 26 

Admission 26 

Regulation of Studies 30 

Fees and Expenses - 32 

Student Health and Welfare 36 

Student Health Service 36 

Living Arrangements -- 38 

Scholarships and Fellowships 40 

Honors and Awards 42 

Student Activities and Organizations 46 

SECTION II— RESIDENT INSTRUCTION— College Park Division... 52 

College of Agriculture -- 52 

College of Arts and Sciences 86 

College of Commerce 124 

College of Education „ 142 

College of Engineering 160 

College of Home Economics 182 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 194 

Department of Physical Education and Intercollegiate Athletics 197 

Department of Physical Education for Women 198 

Graduate School 200 

Summer Session _ 210 

Evening Courses ^ _ _ 211 

Courses of Instruction 212 

SECTION III— RESIDENT INSTRUCTION— Baltimore Division 371 

Officers of Instruction — Baltimore 371 

School of Dentistry 388 

School of Law 392 

School of Medicine „ 398 

School of Nursing „ ^ 404 

School of Pharmacy „ _ _ >..„ 410 

University Hospital „ 413 

College of Education (Baltimore Division) 414 

SECTION IV— RECORDS AND STATISTICS 415 

Degrees, Conferred ; Certificates and Honors Awarded, 1940-1941... 415 

Summary of Enrollment for Ac.\demic Year 1941-1942 435 

SECTION V— AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND 

REGULATORY AGENCIES „ 438 

SECTION VI— FEDERAL, STATE AND PRIVATE AGENCIES 459 

SECTION VII— GENERAL INDEX 469 

5 



BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

W. Calvin Chesnut Baltimore 1942 

John E. Semmes Ealtimore 1942 

Henry Holzapfei., Jr^ Hagerstown 1943 

J. Milton Patterson - Baltimore 1944 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Baltimore 1947 

Rowland K. Adams ^ Baltimore 1948 

William P. Cole, Jr Towson 1949 

Phillip C. Turner Parkton 1950 

Officers of the Board 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr Chairman 

Rowland K. Adams Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst.... Secretary 

J. Milton Patterson - Treasurer 

H. C. Byrd Executive Officer 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the 1st Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the third Friday of each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



President Byrd, Chairman, 
Miss Preinkert, Secretary. 



Representing The 
College Park Division 



Dean Appleman 
Dean Benjamin 
Dean Broughton 
President Byrd 
Mr. Casbarian 
Director Corbett 
Dean Cotterman 
Dr. Huff 



Dr. James 
Dr. Jenkins 
Miss Kellar 
Dr. Long 
Dean Mount 
Miss Preinkert 
Dean Reid 



Dean Stamp 
Dean Steinberg 
Dean Stevens 
Dean Symons 
Dr. Welsh 
Dr. White 
Colonel Wysor 
Dr. Zucker 



Representing The 
Baltimore Division 

Dean DuMez 
Dean Howell 
Dean Robinson 
Dean Wylie 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance and Adjustment 

Dr Long, Chairman; Dr. Gruchy, Dr. Hale, Dr. Macmillan, Dr. 
Phillips, Dr. Prange, Miss Preinkert, Professor Pyle, Professor Quig- 
LEY, Dean Reid, Dean Stamp, Professor Wedeberg, Dr. White. 

Athletics and Physical Education 

Professor Shaughnessy, Chairman; Dr. Broughton, Dr. Cory, Miss 
Drew, Dr. Kemp, Dean Stamp, Dr. Supplee, Col. Wysor. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Mr. Bopst, Dr. Corbett, Dr. Cory, Dr. Cotter- 
man, Mr. Holmes, Dr. Jull, Dr. Kemp, Dr. Leinbach, Dr. Mahoney, Mr. 
Oswald, Mr. Shaw, Dr. Turk, Dr. Welsh. 

Educational Policy, Standards, and Coordination 

Dr. Zucker, Chairman; Dr. Bamford, Dr. DeVault, Dr. Haring, Dr. 
Hartung, Dr. Jull, Dr. Martin, Miss McNaughton, Professor Strahorn, 
Dr. Truitt, Dr. Warfel, Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Wylie, Dr. Younger. 

Extension and Adult Education 

Dr. Benjamin, Chairman; Dr. Crothers, Miss Curtiss, Dr. DeVault, 
Dr. Dodson, Dr. Ehrensberger, Miss Kellar, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Stein- 

MEYER. 

Libraries 

Dr. Hale, Chairman; Dr. Anderson, Dr. Bamford, Dr. Haring, Pro- 
fessor HiNTZ, Dr. Howard, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Long, Dr. Spencer, Pro- 
fessor Strahorn, Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Younger. 

Publications 

Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Dr. Corbett, Miss E. Frothingham, Mr. Has- 
ZARD, Mr. Oswald, Miss Preinkert, Capt. Williams, Dr. Zucker. 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Mr. Bopst, Dr. Cory, Dr. DuMez, Dr. Gewehr, 
Dean Mount, Miss Preinkert, Mr. Randall, Dean Reid, Dr. Robinson, 
Mr. Snyder, Dean Stamp, Dr. Welsh, Col. Wysor. 

Religious Affairs and Social Service 

Dr. Gewehr, Chairman; Dr. Haring, Miss Lee, Professor Quigley, 
Dean Reid, Dr. White. 

Resident and Non-Resident Lecturers 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Dr. Benjamin, Dr. Jull, Miss Ide, Dr. 
Warfel, Dr. Younger. 

Scholarship and Student Aid 

Dr. Steinmeyer, Chairman; Mr. Cobey, Dr. Cotterman, Professor 
EiCHLiN, Dean Mount, Dean Reid, Dean Stamp. 

Student Life 

Dr. White, Chairman; Professor Allen, Miss Drew, Professor Eich- 
LiN, Dr. Faber, Dr. Griffith, Dr. Harman, Miss Ide, Dr. James, Dr. 
JosLYN, Professor Kramer, Dr. Lancaster, Dr. Phillips, Miss Preinkert, 
Dean Reid, Professor Shaughnessy, Dean Stamp, Capt. Williams, Col. 
Wysor. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D. SC. 

President of the University and Executive Officer of the Board of Regents 

and the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



DEANS AND DIRECTORS 
College Park 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Dean Emeritus of Agriculture 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr. 

Dean of the College of Agriculture, Director of the Extension Service 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Roger B. Corbett, Ph.D Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., 

Dean of the College of Education, Director of the Summer Session 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E Dean of the College of Engineering 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A Dean of the College of Home Economics 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., 

Dean of the College of Commerce 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Adele H. Stamp, A.B., M.A Dean of Women 

Mark F. Welsh, M.S., D.V.M State Veterinarian 

Robert E. Wysor, Jr., Col. Inf., U.S.A., 

Commandant of the Military Department 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 

Clark Shaughnessy, A.B., 

Director of Athletics, Head of Department of Physical Education 

Geary Eppley, M.S Dean of Men (on military leave 1941 — ) 

James H. Reid, M.A Acting Dean of Men 

Baltimore 

J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., 

Dean Emeritus of the School of Medicine 
Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., 

Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, 

Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Acting Dean of the School of Medicine 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D Dean of the School of Law 

Annie Crighton, R.N., 

Director of the School of Nursing, Superintendent of Nurses, 

University Hospital 
John E. Savage, M.D Acting Superintendent of the University Hospital 

8 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Office of the President 

FRANK K. HASZARD, B.S Secretary to the President 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

EDGAR F. LONG, Ph.D Acting Director of Admiss^ns 

Mary Burke I" charge, Baltimore Division Office 

OflSce of the Registrar 

AlmaH. Preinkert, M.A ...Registrar 

Sarv G.BAUER Assistant to Registrar 

LisETTE F. THOMPSON Assistant, Records 

MARY SFENCE, A.B Assistant, Student Contacts 

FLORENCE STAFFORD In charge. Baltimore Division Office 

Dean of Men's Office „ ^ ^4.1, t^„„ 

LUCILE LAWS, A.B Secretary to the Dean 

Dean of Women's Office 

GRACE LEE. M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

Office of Business Management 

H. T. Casbarian. B.C.S., C.P.A Comptroller 

w. w. coBEY. A.B ;;v.; •; v-^^^'^y 

LEO J. PARR. C.P.A Chief Accountant 

T. A. Hutton, M.A Purchasing Agent 

Herbert E. RUSSELL - Chief Engineer 

Edith M. Frothingham Personnel Officer 

German V. Rice Military Property Custodian 

ERNEST Gelinas University Postmaster 

Herman P. Stewart In charge, University Press 

W V Maconachy Assistant Comptroller (Baltimore) 

J H Tucker Chief Clerk (Baltimore) 

Dining Hall 

ROBERTA MACK, B.S •■ •.• Manager 

Frances E. Tuttle, B.S Assistant Manager 

Evelyn L. Thomas. B.S Dietitian 

Dormitories 

Mrs. MARY Beaumont, Matron of Silvester Hall and Calvert Hall (for Men) 

Miss Mary Corse Matron, Margaret Brent Hall (for Women) 

Miss Lenna Gross Matron, Anne Arundel Hall (for Women) 

Student Health Service ^, . . ^ ,. . 

Dr W Allen Griffith Physician Consultant 

Dr. Leonard L. Hays University Physician 

Dr Mary M. Richardson Women's Physician 

Miss Estella C. Baldwin, R.N Supervisor of Nurses 

Publicity 

Joseph M. Mathias Acting Head, Information Service 

9 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.B., A.M.L.S University Librarian 

College Park 

George W. Fogg, M.A Reference and Loan Librarian 

Elizabeth A. Gardner, A.M., B.S.L.S., 

Assistant Reference and Loan Librarian 

Louise W. Getchell, A.B., B.S.L.S Acting Head Cataloger 

Ruth V. Hewlett, A.B., A.M.L.S Assistant Cataloger 

Adele G. Skinner, A.B., A.B.L.S General Service Assistant 

Helen T. Armstrong, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Cataloger 

Howard Rovelstad, A.M., B.S.L.S Order Librarian 

Kate White Assistant 

Baltimore 

Dental — Pharmacy Library 

Thelma R. Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S..... Librarian 

Kathleen B. Hamilton Assistant Librarian 

Beatrice Marriott Assistant Librarian 

Ann Lemen Clark ^...Cataloger 

Angela O'Hanley Assistant to the Cataloger 

Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B., B.L.S Librarian 

Medical Library 

Ruth Lee Briscoe. ^. Librarian 

Julia E. Wilson, B.S Assistant 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture. 

Paul Reece Achenbach, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation, and 

Refrigeration. 
Arthur Montraville Ahalt, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Russell Bennett Allen, B.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Gex)rge Frederick Alrich, Ph.D., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant 

Physiology. 
Dean Mauter Bailey, M.S., Instructor in Olericulture. 
Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
Oliver Edwin Baker, Ph.D., Lecturer on Agricultural Economics. 
Cecil Ravenscroft Ball, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 
Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Frank Graham Banta, M.A., Assistant in Modern Languages. 
Catherine Barr, M.A., Acting Head of Physical Education for Women. 
Millard Vernon Barton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. 
William Robert Beall, 1st Lt., Inf. Reserve, U. S. A., Assistant Professor 

of Military Science and Tactics. 
* Roger M. Bellows, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 
Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Victor Wilson Bennett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing. 
C. L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Instructor of Accounting. 
Myron Herbert Berry, M.S., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
Fred W. Besley, D.Sc, State Forester. 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Nutrition. 
Mary Holme Bitting, M.S., Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 
Myrl H. Bolds, B.S.I. E., Instructor, Mechanical Engineering. 
Hugh Alvin Bone, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 
Donald Theodore Bonney, Ph.D., Lecturer on Thermodynamics. 
Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 
Levin Bowland Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Allison Travis Brown, Instructor in Interior Decorating. 
Glen David Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 
Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 
Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Animal Pathology. 
Jack Yeaman Bryan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
Marie D. Bryan, A.B., Assistant in English. 
SuMNEHi Othniel Burhoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Leo Francis Cain, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education. 
Margaret Cain, D.Ed., Supervisor of Student Teaching. 
Curry Nourse Caples, B.S., M.A., Instructor iii Home Economics. 
Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 



*On leave 1941-42 



10 



11 



V 



12 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



13 



*C. Wilbur Cissel, M.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 
Lincoln Harold Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Admin- 
istration. 

Weston Robinson Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
James William Coddington, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

Franklin Delaney Cooley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

George Francis Corcoran, M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Gesualdo a. Costanzo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Carroll Eastburn Cox, M.S., Instructor in Plant Pathology. 
William Rush Crawford, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science. 
Hugh John Creech, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Dieter Cunz, Ph.D., Assistant in Modem Languages. 
Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Professor of Art. 
George E. Daniel, Sc.D., Assistant Professor of Parasitology. 
Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

George Odell Stitzer Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

Gomer Lewis Davies, B.S., Lecturer on Electrical Communications. 
Evelyn Davis, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 
Robert W. Dayton, M.S., Instructor in Engineering Drawing. 
Samuel H. DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Farm Management. 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Animal 
Pathology. 

Linden Seymour Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Nathan Lincoln Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
♦Alice Gwendolyn Drew, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for 
Women. 

H. G. DuBuY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Emmert Parker Dupler, M.A., Assistant in Speech. 

Florence Irma Edwards, A.B., Instructor in Art. 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Professor of Speech. 

Charles Garfield Eichlin, M.S., Professor of Physics. 

Paul Murray Ellis, Major, Inf., (Retired) U.S.A., Assistant Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics. 
Charles Walter England, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Manufacturing 
Harry Cole English, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
♦Geary Francis Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
Alaric Anthony Evangelist, M.A., Instructor in Modem Languages 
John Edgar Faber, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 
William Franklin Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modem Languages.' 
H. S. Finney, Lecturer in Animal Husbandry. 

*On leuve 1941-42 



Robert Tyson Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

George Willis Fogg, M.A., Instructor in Library Science. 

Mennick Truman Fossom, M.S., Instructor in Commercial Floriculture. 

Eugene S. Foster, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

Mary T. Franklin, M.A., Assistant in English. 

Leon Webster Frayer, B.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Ralph Gallington, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education. 

Catharine A. Gardiner; M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Merrill Cochrane Gay, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Wesley Marsh Gewehr,^ Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Carl William Gohr, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

William Henry Gravely, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Wilson Payne Green, M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Harland C. Griswold, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

Allen Garfield Gruchy, Ph.D., Professor of Finance and Economics. 
*James Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Production and 
Marketing. 

Ray Carter Hackman, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology. 

Charles Brockway Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Harry Rutledge Hall, B.S., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

Harold Curtis Hand, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

PouL Arne Hansen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Walter L. Hard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Malcolm Morrison Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

Susan Emolyn Harm an, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Irvin Charles Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

Donald Cummins Hennick, B.S., Instructor in Shop Practice. 

Frank L. Hess, B.S., Lecturer on Zoology. 

Leo Ingeman Highby, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Ancient Languages 
and Literature. 

Carl William Edmund Hintz, A.M.L.S., Associate Professor of Library 
Science. 

Chetser Wood Hitz, Ph.D., Assistant in Pomology. 

Lawrence Judson Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical 
Engineering. 

Chester A. Hogentolger, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Bernard J. Holm, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

John Bradshaw Holt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Harry Benton Hoshall, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Lawrence Vaughn Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 
♦Jesse William Huckert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

*0n leave 1941-42 



V 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



WiLBERT James Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

George Bond Hughes, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Richard Russell Hutcheson, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

Leroy Charles Hutchinson, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
* Frances Aurelia Ide, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Lorraine V. Jackson, B.A., Assistant in Speech. 

Stanley Bartlett Jackson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Robert Isaac Jaffee, B.S., S.M., Lecturer on Chemical Engineering. 

Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Instructor in Plant Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor of Pathology. 
*JoHN Gamewell Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Robert Wellington Jones, 1st Lt., Inf. Reserve, U.S.A., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Carl Smith Joslyn, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Ida S. Joslyn, M.A., Assistant in English. 

Arnold Edward Joyal, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Administration. 

Gordon Louis Judd, 1st Lt., Inf. Reserve, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

James W. Just, Director of Fire Service Extension. 

George Jule Kabat, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Harold Leon Kelly, Jr., 1st Lt., Inf. Reserve, U.S.A., Assistant Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy. 

R. T. Kerlin, Ph.D., Instructor in English (Extension). 

Charles Atkinson Kirkpatrick, A.M., D.C.S., Assistant Professor of 
Marketing and Business Administration. 

Mary E. Kirkpatrick, M. S., Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Joseph Armstrong Kitchin, M.A., Instructor in Political Science. 
♦Howard Martin Kline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Charles Frederick Kramer, Jr., M.A., Associate Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

Arthur Columbus Kurzweil, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Otis Ewing Lancaster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

George S. Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Willard Arthur Laning, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical 
Engineering. 

James Milton Leath, M.A., Instructor in Political Science. 

FIiederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Peter P. Lejins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Frank Martin Lemon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Andre Frank Liotard, B.A., B.D., Instructor in Modem Languages. 

Edgar Fauver Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Gerald Louis Lund, B.S., Assistant in English. 

*0n leave 1941-42 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



15 



Stuart Alexander MacCorkle, Ph.D., Lecturer in Political Science 
George Maurice Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical En- 
gineering. . ^^ i. 
Roberta Mack, B.S., Assistant Professor of Institution Management. 
CHARLES LeRoy Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education 

(deceased). 
John Walker Macmillan, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology. 
George Francis Madigan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soils. 
Charles Howard Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor of Olericulture. . 

Alpheus Royall MARSHALL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 
Leon C. Marshall, Ph.D., Instructor in Education (Extension). 
Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. , . ^^ 

Monroe Harnish Martin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
William Gilham McCollom, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Joseph Clark McDaniel, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education 
Frieda Wiegand McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
James Gilmer McManaway, Ph.D., lecturer on Elizabethan Drama. 
Edna Belle McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
John U. Michaelis, M.A., Instructor in Education. 
Edmund Erskine Miller, Ph.D., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
Frances Howe Miller, A.M., Instructor in English. ^ -^ 4.- 

JOSHUA Albert Miller, M.A., Administrative Coordinator of Practice 

Teachinsr. 
Charles Wright Mills, M.A., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Thyra Faye Mitchell, M.A., Instructor in Textiles and Clothing. 
LANE A. MOORE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
POLLY KBSSINGER MooRE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Textiles and 

Clothing. ...•., I 

Myrl MARIE MOUNT, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 
Charles Driscoll Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
Hazel B. Murray, B.S., Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 
John George Mutziger, M.A., Instructor in Modem Languages. 
Ralph Duane Myers, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 
HOMER Edward Newell, Jr., A.M.T., Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Edwin N. Nilson, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
John Bitting Smith Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Plant Pathology. 
PETER Oesper, Ph.D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry. „ ^ , 

James Burton Outhouse, B.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
William Harwood Peden, M.S., Instructor in English. 
MICHAEL Joseph Pelczar, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Norman Ethelbert Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Robert Emmett Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Physi- 

olofiry 
ROMAN N. PiEO, B.A., Assistant in Physical Education for Men 
PAUL ROUTZAHN PoFFENBERGER, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Eco- 

AucHsTOrJoHN PRAHL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 



16 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



17 



Gordon Wiluam Prange, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
Hester Beall Pkovensen, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech 

Milton Allender Pyle, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

Fnw.^pn^^^A"'' ^""t^"^^' ^•^•' ^'"^'^'^ Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
EDWARD F. QuiNN, JR., Captain, Inf., U. S. A., Assistant Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics. 
Robert C. Rand, M.A., Assistant in Mathematics. 
BENJAMIN Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music. 
Edward WiLKiNs Reeve, Ph.D., Instructor in Organic Chemistry. 
James Henry Reid, M.A., Instructor in Marketing. 
DURANT Waite Robertson, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 
Howard Rovelstad, A.M., B.S.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 
Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology 
Mark Schweizer, Ph.D., Instructor in Modem Languages 
Aaron Wiley Sherwood, M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
Howard BURTON Shipley, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Harold George Shirk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 
Robert Vernon Shirley, M.B.A., Instructor in Business Law and Busi- 
ness Statistics. 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor of Land- 
scape Gardening. 

CHARLES Alfred Shreeve, Jr., B.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

iingineering. 
Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music 
Arthur Silver, M.A., Assistant Professor of History 

J. Marvin Sipe, A.M., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Henry Hunter Smith, M.S., Instructor in Physics 

Kathi^n Marie Smith, A.B., Ed.D., Instructor in Education. 

Paul Edward Smith, M.A., Instructor in English 

Wilson Levering Smith, Jr., B.S., Assistant in Plant Pathology 

Robert Evans Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer on Entomology 

Charles McC. Snyder, M.A., Instructor in History (Extension) 

Alston W. Specht, M.S., Instructor in Agronomy 

Jcssn William Spp.owls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

Samuel Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering 

Rr^UDEN^ George Steinme^-er, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Sci- 

'"^:nZ.S^ "^•"•' ^•^•^•' ^-^-r "^ — ^cs and 

""^ Wome^"^'' ^™''^"'' ''•''•' '"'*^"'=*°^ •" P^y^-^l Ed-««on for 
Leonid^Ivanovich Strakhovsky, D.Hist.Sc., Professor of European His- 

Warren Laverne Strausbaugh, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech 
William Julius Svirbely, M.S., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Chemt'frv 
LYNN LeRoy Swearingen, M.A., Instructor in English Chemistry. 



Kathryn Marie Terhune, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for 
Women. 

Harold Wesley Thatcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Evelyn Louise Thomas, B.S., Assistant in Institution Management. 

Royal Price Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soils. 

Alice Janet Thurston, A.M., Instructor in Psychology. 

Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. 

Willis Lattanner Tressler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Reginald Van Trump Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquicul- 
ture. 

Kenneth Leroy Turk, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

George Clarence Veidova, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

T. C. G. Wagner, B.S., Assistant in Mathematics. 

William Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D., Professor of Canning Crops. 

Lucy C. Wang, M.A., Instructor in Home Economics Education. 

Kathryn M. Ward, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Harry Redcay Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Floyd H. Warner, M.Ed., Instructor in Physical Education for Men. 

Virginia Lee Watts, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 

Sivert Matthew Wedeberg, A.M., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

Donald Chester Weeks, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Claribel Pratt Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 

Chester C. Westfall, Lt. Col., Infantry, U. S. A., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, 

Mae a. Westgate, Instructor in Art. 

Mark Wheeler Westgate, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Charles Edward White, Ph.D., Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. 

Gladys Anna Wiggin, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Milton Joel Wiksell, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

Helen Barkley Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

John D. Wildman, M.A., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Raymond Clifford Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chem- 
istry. 

Martha Hathaway Williams, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Ralph Irwin Williams, Captain, Inf., U. S. A., Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

Sarah Elizabeth Wise, M.S., Assistant in Plant Pathology. 

John K. Wolfe, Ph.D., Lecturer in Chemistry. 

Albert Westle Woods, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy. 

Mark Winton Woods, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Vertrees Judson Wyckoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

James Franklin Yeager, Ph.D., Lecturer on Entomology. 

John Elliott Younger, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

William Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Adolf Edward Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 



18 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF. COLLEGE PARK 



19 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AND FELLOWS 

1941-42 

Graduate Assistants 

Name Department 

Genevieve Aitcheson Poultry Husbandry 

John H. Axley Agronomy 

R. E. Backenstoss Modern Languages 

Dorothy M. Campbell. _... Chemistry 

Donald W. Cate Chemistry 

Charles Marion Chance „ Dairy Husbandry 

AuRELius F. Chapman Chemistry 

Harvey J. Cheston, Jr Mathematics 

Johnnie Coe ^ English 

Albert Neill Cole. Modem Languages 

Joseph W. Cotter Dairy Husbandry 

Julian C. Crane Horticulture 

Lowell T. Crews Chemistry 

Thomas J. Davies Agricultural Economics 

John D. Draper Chemistry 

David George Drawbaugh, Jr Chemistry 

Charles M. Eaker Chemistry 

Felix Frederick Ehrich „ Chemistry 

Michael J. Fillipi Zoology 

Lex B. Golden „ Soils 

William P. Gottlieb „ Business Administration 

Albert Greenfield Business Administration 

William H. Griggs Horticulture 

Samuel Grober „ ~ — — Botany 

Albert C. Groschke _ Poultry Husbandry 

HiLLMAN C. Harris Chemistry 

Harold E. Hensel. Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

Carl W. Hess Poultry Husbandry 

Robert E. Jones Botany 

Daniel Kaufman Chemistry 

John J. Lander Chemistry 

Frederic John Linnig Chemistry 

Raymond L Longley Chemistry 

James A. Marvel Poultry Husbandry 

Martin H. Muma Entomology 

Robert Murdick - Mathematics 

William A. Nolte Bacteriology 

John S. Nowotarski „ Poultry 

Edward Orban Chemistry 

Selmer Peterson Chemistry 

Vladimir Shutak Horticulture 

Francis C. Stark Horticulture 

Robert N. Stewart ~ Botany 



Botany 

David L. Stoddard "" Horticulture 

A. H. Thompson "ZZ Chemistry 

John Van Hook ■■' Entomology 

George B. Vogt. "^ZI. Chemistry 

Alfred Whiton - "^ Chemistry 

Phillip J. Wingate Agronomy 

John Paul Wintermoyer. " '^ Chemistry 

Carroll C. Woodrow ZZZ Chemistry 

Edmond Grove Young ^ Chemistry 

John A. Yourtee - " 

Fellows Agricultural Economics 

George S. Abshier Bacteriology 

Paul A. Albert - ZZZZI Chemistry 

Harry Anspon ' ^.^.j Engineering 

Fred Frank Bartel. Education 

Jack S. Bierly ■*" Botany 

HiLDE M. Christensen ZZZZII. Zoology 

Berner K. Clarke Bacteriology 

Lexey J. Cragin Zoology 

Lewis E. Cronin ZIZZZ English 

Lydia Evans ~ — "■"■ Sociology 

William H. Form - ""2 chemistry 

Clara Gale Goldbeck...... Chemistry 

Leon Goldman Bacteriology 

Margaret T. Goldsmith ZZZZ.... Botany 

Walter J. Haney - Sociology 

Carl J. Kujawski ZZZl Bacteriology 

Joshua M. Leise " Mathematics 

Rita Catherine Marron Poultry Husbandry 

Marvin R. McClung.... " Zoology 

Essie J. McCutcheon ZZZ English 

Dorothy Mintz - Agricultural Economics 

Earl Landson Park - - - chemistry 

Lloyd E. Parks Psychology 

Howard Geisler Phillips - """"'^^Zl. Zoology 

Sidney G. Piness " chemistry 

Wilson H. Power " _^ Entomology 

D. Vincent Provenza ZZZZ Bacteriology 

Edward L. Reed - ^ Zoology 

Orr E. Reynolds — " Home Economics 

Elizabeth Runner ~ Z.Political Science 

Walter Henry Schuler " ZZ.Z Bacteriology 

Roger Snyder '^ Zoology 

Richard E. Tiller Chemistry 

Richard Tollefson IZZZI Zoology 

Martin M. Winbury ~ -^ Botany 

Conrad Yocum - - 



SECTION I-General 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



21 



PREUMINARY INFORMATION 



in all of its branches. JMaryland. The University is co-educational 

College Park 

land, on a beautiful fr^.f ^f "^^n^Se I'ark, Prmce George's County, Mary- 

the hear? ':iT'^':^: cCS Talh nS '? ^c'Th'"'* ""^^ '^"^ 
Washington natural! v ic ^.^^'^^^' Washington, D. C. This nearness to 

almost without e?ort an «ST^*iT'' *^" "PPortunity of obtaining 

automobile trkvll University easily accessible by private 

find desirable living accommodations at reasoSaS rates ^"' '"^'' 

Baltimore 

The professional schools of the Universitv n*.7.f;cf t 
Nursing, and Pharmacy-the University TospiTa? S^^^^^^ r^T' ^'^'^r^' 
sion of the College of Education, are locatd Tl'^^otp :f s'^^^^^^^^^ 
ings, most of them erected in recent years, at or nflr tL L . ''^" 

Baltimore, a thriving, modern industrial city of 1 OOn nnn ;„i, vx . 
_tutions. libraries, museums, parks, public buildings, and placL orhTsS 

Baltimore is justly proud of its well earned rpnnf5,fi..r, « 
high,« type of prote.i„„aI e<l«»li.„. L .1 S^Tl.ion'lMf H "" 

20 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

While its advancement in recent years, both in the matter of physical 
plant facilities and educational standards has been especially rapid, the 
University has behind it a long and honorable history. 

The history of the present University is the history of two institutions; 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 
1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of 
the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest Btruc- 
ture in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, 
and arts and sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or 
faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the name and 
under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law,*' and in 1823 a 
regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently there were 
added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental 
school in the world) ; in 1889 a School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy 
college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 
in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over 
entirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution 
was given the name. University of Maryland. 



22 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



23 



All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. 

THE UNIVERSITY YEAR— NEW THREE SEMESTER PLAN 

The University of Maryland operates on a three semester basis. By 
attending all semesters a student may, in most curricula, complete his 
university training in two and two-thirds years. The Engineering curricula 
require three years. 

Under the new plan, the academic year is divided into three terms of 
approximately fifteen weeks each. The summer semester is further divided 
into two equal parts of approximately seven and one-half weeks each, for 
the convenience of school teachers and others who may desire to spend a 
part of their summer vacation in study. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

In connection with the accelerated program, the following time schedule 
of classes will be observed: 

1st period 8:00- 8:50 A.M. 

2nd period „ 9:00- 9:50 A.M. 

3rd period 10:00-10:50 A.M. 

4th period 11:00-11:50 A.M. 

Lunch Hour 11:50 A. M.-12:50 P. M. 

5th period 12:50- 1:40 P. M. 

6th period 1:50- 2:40 P. M. 

7th period 2:50- 3:40 P. M. 

8th period 3:50- 5:00 P. M. 

Military Drill is held on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6th and 7th periods. 
Physical Education program — 8th period. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The government of the University is, by law, vested in a Board of 
Regents, consisting of eleven members, appointed by the Governor of the 
State, each for a term of nine years. 

The administration of the University is vested in the President. 

The Deans, Directors and other principal officers of the University form 
the General Administrative Board. This group serves in an advisory 
capacity to the President. 

The University faculties are composed of the Deans and the instructional 
staffs of each college and school, including the University Librarian, and 
any assistant librarians who perform teaching duties. 



Ponowin. is a Hst o. t.e administrative divisions o^^- --sit. 

At ^''l^Zf School of Dentistry 

College of Agriculture ^^ ^^^ 

College of Arts and Sciences ^^ Medicine 

College of Commerce ^^ ^^^^^^^ 

College of Education Pharmacy 

College of Engineering University Hospital 

College of Home Economics Umve y^ ^^^^^^j^^ (Baltimore ■ 

Graduate School ^.^.^^^^ 

SpaXenTT Military Science Maryland State Board of Agncul- 

and Tactics ^""^ 

Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agricultural and Home Economics 

Extension Service 

State-Wide Activities 

T. -^ TT^fATmion Service maintains local 

The Agricultural and Home Economics Extension be^r^^^ ..preventatives, 
representatives in every county of tne * • ^^ ^^^5^^^^^^. 

County Agents and Home Demonstration Agen^^^^^ ^^,j ^^,, 

to farmers and farm families in th«' ^^^^ ^^ ^^e Extension Service 
the large staff of specialists at the headquarters 

at College Park. . charged with responsibility for 

The Live Stock ^f tary S^B^^-^f/^^f ^^ poultry, maintains 

the control and eradication of diseases 01 ^ specialists 

local veterinary inspectors ^^f ^"^^ tlorSoxV at College Park and the 
and laboratory techmcians f^the mam labor ry^^^^^ 
branch laboratories in Salisbury, CentrevUle „«,t,pmfnT 

PHYSICAL FACILITIES-GROUNDS. BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

College Park r^iioo-p Park comprise 600 acres. 

Grounds. The University S«''^^'^^j\^°f f^^^^^^^^^^ which over- 

A broad rolling campus is ^^'^"^"""^f .^^^ ^X'" Mo"? of the buildings 

looks a wide area and insures ^--"^^iace^t grounds are laid out attrac- 

^Z^, tlfJ^:^^ r::ratneaching in hortieul- 
Approximately 300. acres are ued for jsea^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^.^.^^^^ 

T:sTt^'r^^^^oTrt:.e. In a farm five miles northwest 

''ZZr^^ buildings eompnse^ about fjn^^^^^^^^^^ 
provide facilities for the several activities and services 

Park. . T^hj -roup consists of the following 

Admmistration and /nstrwctton. ^^^ ^"^P^^^dates the Office of the 
buildings: Administration Building, which accommoa 



I'M 



'I 



24 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



25 



houses the Collegrfo^'A^icutuTA u '^', ^^""'""'•^ -^^^Wm^; which 

sion Service, an^ A^^TZ 'JT'^'Tf- ^""^ '^"'"^ ^^""'''"^'^^ ^xten- 
fiue7<K«,; Morrill /atlTAoie^a Lrt£Tt/"''t^'- ^'^^^--^^ 
PoMZtry BMiWtW; HoniculturrZTr,- ^ n • £ *^^ '^°'"'' '" **>« Sciences; 

Music Building t}^h pro^der^.t ' ^T °' '^°'"^" ^""^ ^^^ ''^^' 
Music, tlie stuLrband I^^ , ^<','=7'n^dat»ons for the Department of 

tion in chem? try, a^Td laboirorie ' f T'-^"'' *='^'^^"°'"^ ^''^ ^"^t^uc- 
lime; and ColleglofEaucaZTBZ! t" ''^ o."^ ^^''^^' fertilizers, and 
Work Experience Proiam of T t^.- ^ ?'^ ^''"^ ^"'■''^*«^' *<> h«"se the 
has for ite oSveTeTrainin^of T' ""r* ^^^^i-^tration, which 
been completed. "^ ''^ ^"""''"''^ ^"-^ ^^>- industries, has just 

for this work are loLed trr^sTuHd^n^s^t^^^^^^^ ^^^ •>-- 

prrXurr:t:-a„™Lr?eart?al^^^^^ ^^S.-. wbicH 
Visiting team rooms, together l^h a playinTSj fd";*'""'" ^''°™' ""'^ 
arrangements for 4,262 persons; ByrdsladlmZifTt P"™^"^"* ««^ting 
capacity of 8,000, is furnished with rest rolTforff Pemanent seating 
and equipment for receiving and transmit W J ^ T' '^'"^'''"^ ^««'"«' 

tests in progress; GyrnnJu^^^tZTrrulZ^f^Ti'V^ZT"^^ *=""- 
partment, and for phvsir-al pH„„o+- f ^ ^^^^ ^^^ the Military De- 

House, for all Sris' sport ^Z ""7^ '"^ *"""' ^"<^ ^^e GzVfe' kw 
are adjacent to S.e fieKuses ' ^ "' ''"'=*"^ '^^''^^ ^"^^ *-»- --ts 

of''bTS;tr:pro?f%rtruetT^r r-^' •=°"^'^*'"^ »^ ^^- ''""'^■•n^s. 

students. The wlenrr^Tdence Jor^' -TT °''«»"« ^^^ 460 men 
of Colonial archit.ture"rc:rmTtU72?UL rsSe?^ 'T''"^'' 
designated as Margaret Brent Hall and Anne Ar'ndel HaU '' "" 

Rossborough Inn. This historic Inn built in 17qs f= ft ,.. . 

on the campus and for many years housed the A^u^u'ral eI';"'"! 
Station. It recently was rp^fnra^ or,^ ;« ^g^ricuitural Experiment 

interesting buildings on the campus "" °"' °' *'' '"''^* "^^'^^^''^ -"^ 

STervice Structures. This group includes flip r.,^/ 7 rr 
Plant Maintenance and OperLnl B^m:i.tfi^TJ^^T' '''T 
tions for forty patients, physician's office operlwrno^ accommoda- 
quarters; and Dining Hall. operatmg room, and nurses' 

United States Bureau of Mines Tho Tro»«.„„ it. 
the United States Bureau If Mne's iJlocatd o^th 1?""'"* ^*"«°» "^ 
The general laboratories are used f o " iSSioT pu^olT^E^n ?'''""'^- 
as well as by the United States Government for Sment^l -^'^"^^ 
bu^drng^contains a geological museum, and a technSlCy.X s"^! 



United States Fish and Wildlife Service Laboratory, The technological 
research laboratory of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is located on the 
Uniyersity campus. It contains laboratories for conduct of research in the 
fisheries dealing with chemical, chemical engineering, bacteriological, nutri- 
tional, and biological subjects. Through a cooperative arrangement with 
the University it is possible for students, who have undergraduate degrees, 
to pursue studies toward graduate degrees in any of the subjects men- 
tioned above. (See Section VI.) 

Baltimore 

The group of buildings, located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets, provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the Uni- 
versity. The group comprises the original Medical School Building, erected 
in 1814; the Old Hospital, now used as a dispensary; the New University 
Hospital with approximately 450 beds; the Frank C. Bressler Research 
Laboratory; the Dental and Pharmacy Building; the Nurses* Home; the 
Law School Building; Davidge Hall, which houses the Medical library; and 
the Administration Building, 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

Libraries are located at both the College Park and Baltimore divisions 
of the University. 

The General Library at College Park, completed in 1931, is an attractive, 
well equipped and well lighted structure. The main reading room on the 
second floor seats 236, and has about 5,000 reference books and bound 
periodicals on open shelves. The five-tier stack room is equipped with 
carrels and desks for the use of advanced students. About 12,000 of the 
100,000 volumes on the campus are shelved in the Chemistry and Ento- 
mology departments, the Graduate School, and other units. Over 900 
periodicals are currently received. 

Facilities in Baltimore consist of the Libraries of the School of Dentistry, 
containing some 9,000 volumes; the School of Law, 18,500 volumes; the 
School of Medicine, 22,000 volumes; and the School of Pharmacy, 9,000 
volumes. The Medical Library is housed in Davidge Hall; the remaining 
three libraries have adequate quarters in the buildings of their respective 
schools, where they are readily available for use. Facilities for the courses 
in Arts and Sciences are offered jointly by the Libraries of the Schools of 
Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The libraries of the University total in the aggregate about 158,500 
bound volumes with large collections of unbound journals. The General 
Library is a depository for publications of the United States Government, 
and numbers some 15,000 documents in its collections. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its reference 
service by borrowing material from other libraries through Inter-Library 
Loan or Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the 
Library of Congress, The United States Department of Agriculture Library, 
and other agencies in Washington. 



ill 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



27 



26 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURE 



ADMISSION 

METHOD OF APPLICATION 

Information may be had from the Director of Admissions, either in person 
or by correspondence, concerning planning secondary school courses to meet 
entrance requirements or problems relating to admission. 

Undergraduate Schools : Applicants for admission to the colleges of Agri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics should communicate with the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park. 

Graduate School : Those seeking admission to the Graduate School should 
address the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Maryland, College 
Park. 

Professional Schools: Information about admission to the professional 
schools in Baltimore may be found in Section III. 

Age of Applicants : A student who is less than sixteen years of age must 
live with his parents or guardian. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail the 
blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
June 1 for the Summer semester, August 1 for the Fall semester, and 
January 1 for the Spring semester. Applications from students completing 
their last semester of secondary work are encouraged. If acceptable, 
supplementary records may be sent upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and 
ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the Regis- 
trar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions, College Park. 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to enter the University 
at the beginning of the summer semester, in June, if possible. Students 
will, however, be admitted at the beginning of any semester. 

Registration: New students will register for the summer semester on 
Friday, June 19, and for the fall semester on Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day, October 8, 9 and 10. The English placement, psychological, and other 
required tests are a part of the registration procedure. 

The Freshman Week program includes registration, placement and apti- 
tude tests, physical examinations, assemblies, and the President's reception. 



ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN _ondary schools accredited by 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates ^fs^^^^^^ 
regional associations or the State SfTthe principal. Graduates of out- 
by certificate upon the '^«<=<''«";^?*i**V^ °^e ce^ marks, such marks 

S-state schools should have -t*^^";^;°£y^2r than the passing mark. 
to be not less than one ^^^^^^ ^ ^"^ ^ZZaVs recommendation will be con- 
Graduates who fail to obtam the ?"""|^^^',;^e„tary information, includ- 
sidered by the Committee on Admissions Supplementay ^^^i^sion. 

ng aptitude tests, will determine whether they ^-jl S ^^^ ^^^^^,. 

Admission by Examination: Appb*=ants who have P ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

tiots set by the College Entrance ^x— J-^^^^^^^^ of New York, 

New York City; the J^^^f /p^Ue Tstr^etion of the State of Pennsyl- 

dentials. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING ^^ ^^.^^^ 

hours is necessary for a degree. advanced 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ^^mission to the various under- 

Below are shown (1) -^^f^^^^^^^^^^ £5 in the different colleges, 
graduate curricula, and (2) ^^f ;™^^^^^^ ^^e column in the table where 
The letter following the curriculum mdicates tne 
the particular requirements are given. 

^- ABODE 

4 4 4 4 4 

English 1 *2 1 1 

Algebra — i 1 1 

Plane Geometry * i^ 

Solid Geometry 2 

Mathematics ....- 111 1 1 

History - 111 1 1 

Science 2 

Foreign Language ♦♦2 

Stenography **1 

Typewriting ^' 1 

Bookkeeping 8 8 6% 6 5 

Electives - __ — 



Total 



16 16 



16 



16 16 



Total ^^^^ 

to the College of Engineenng and to th* ^Brn^'s^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^ ,„i,4 geometrj^ 

but will be obliged to make up the secona 

the beginning of the second seme, er of the fresh J^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^.^„^, 

"Students preparing to teach in the neia o 
for stenography and typewriting. M 



28 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



29 



College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry — C 
Agricultural Education and Rural 

Life— B 
Agriculture-Engineering — C 
Agriculture, General — B 
Agronomy 

Farm Crops — A 

Soils— A 
Animal Husbandry — B 

tBotany 

General Botany and Morphol 

ogy — A 
Plant Pathology — A 
Plant Physiology and Ecology — A 
Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Manufacturing — B 
Dairy Production — B 
tEntomology — A 
Farm Management — B 
Horticulture 

Floriculture and Ornamenta 
Horticulture — B 

Pomology and Olericulture — B 
Poultry Husbandry — B 
Preforestry — A 
Preveterinary — A 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bacteriology — A 
JfBotany — A 
II Chemical Engineering — C 

Chemistry — C 

tEconomics — ^A 
§Education — A 

English — A 
JfEntomology — A 

Food Technology — A 

French — A 

General Biological Sciences — A 

General Physical Sciences — C 

German — A 

History — A 

Latin — A 



College of Arts and Sciences (con'd) 

Mathematics — C 
Physics — C 
Political Science — A 
Predental — A 
{Prelaw — ^A 
Premedical — D 
Prenursing — ^A 
Psychology — A 
Sociology — A 
Speech — A 
Spanish — A 
- Zoology — A 

College of Commerce 

Accounting — A 

Agricultural Economics — A 

Cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration — A 
t Economics — A 

Finance — A 

General Business — A 

Marketing and Sales Administra- 
1 tion — A 

fPrelaw — A 

College of £>lucation 

tArts and Sciences — A 

Commercial — E 
IfHome Economics — B 

Industrial — ^A (also in Baltimore) 

Physical — A 

College of Engineering 

fChemical — C 
Civil— C 
Electrical — C 
Mechanical — C 

Mechanical with Aeronautical op- 
tion — C 

College of Home Economics 

§ Education — B 
Extension — B 
Foods and Nutrition — B 
General Home Economics — B 
Institution Management — B 
Practical Art — B 
Textiles and Clothing — S 



Special Students: Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age, 
and who have not completed the usual preparatory course, may be admitted 
to such courses as they seem fitted to take. Special students are ineligible 
to matriculate for a degree until entrance requirements have been satisfied. 



$Also College of Agriculture. fAlso College of Arts and Sciences. $AIso College of 
imerce. fAIso College of Education. ||Also College of Engineering. ^Also College 
:me Economics. 



requisites. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY ^f ^«UC"ON ^^^^^^^^ 

AU male students clasf ed -ad^m.cany a /reshme ^^ ^ 
who are citizens of the United States who are py^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ 

irrr=-n trrrS S^tS^^ ta. pKVsieai 

education. ^^^^ ^^^^^^ instruction 

Graduation Reau.rements ^for Students E ^^^^.^^ 

Students excused fro. basic ^^iXSlTtJ^r^XZ 
without academic credit ^re /eqmr^^^^ ^ t^kj jn J_^,^ ,,, ^ degree in 

::ftS:'Z^^^ resf InVri^urs. The substitution must he 
approved by the dean of the college concerned. 

of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

OEFINITION OF RESIDENCE ^^J> ^^^^J-^^^:^Z....s, if at the 

^" Aj:i"S^;:sC%onsidered to ^^^^^^^S^^ aUelTofe 

their registration they have ^^^/^^f J 1 J^red^^^^^^^ attending any 
year; provided such residence has not been acq 

school or college in Maryland. determined at the time of his 

The status of the residence of a student is ae ^^ ^^^^^^ ^y 

first registration in the University. ^^^^^J^^^^^^ ^ and become legal 
him unless, in the case of a '"!"^^: ^^^/^XresiJence for at least one full 
residents of this Statet, by '"*"!\^^"^",|,'Xde^^^^^ to change from a 

rsr^reSt"- ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ - -- - -^^- 

,^^r a semester in any ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ „^ „,,^, „_, 

""^^^^^ "'t7:XT'Z^^rcZlZ^^^ L^eTuaraians o. and stand ^ loco 
circumstances, have been legaiiy • . , , 

parentis to such minor students residents of the District of 

CoCrL"ch?4e?ir«rofrern-resident fee charged to other non-resi- 

dents. 



30 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



31 



REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 

Group I numbered 1 to 49 — courses primarily for freshmen, and 
sophomores. 

Group II numbered 50 to 99 — courses for juniors and seniors. 

Group III numbered 100 to 199 — courses for advanced undergraduates 
(well-qualified juniors and seniors) and graduates. 

Group IV numbered 200 to 299 — courses for graduates only. 

Courses designated by the letters "f" and "s'' following the numbers, 
are unit courses, and both the "f" (first) and the "s" (second) parts must 
be completed before credit is allowed for the course. 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of 
each semester. Classes are scheduled beginning at 8.00 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory, including outside 
preparation, for each credit hour in any course. 

Normal Student Load. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semes- 
ter hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are shown in 
the appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several divisions of 
the University. No student may carry either more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours without specific permission from the dean of his 
college. 

Examinations. During the war emergency, the examination period at 
the close of the semester has been discontinued and periodic examinations 
and tests will be given during regularly scheduled instructional periods. 
Students are required to use the prescribed type of examination book in 
these tests. 

Marking System. The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, 
and D, Passing; F, Failure; 7, Incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, 
fair scholarship and mark Z), passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical values are assigned as 
follows: A^; B— 3; C— 2; D— 1; F— 0. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with marks of A, B, and C. A student who receives the mark of D 
in more than one-fourth of his credits must take additional courses or 
repeat courses until he has met these requirements. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a mark of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 



REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guar- 
dians at the close of each semester. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing marks in fifty per cent of the semester 
hours for which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped from 
ir University. The registrar notifies the student, his parent or guardian, 
S thrstudlnt^s dean of this action. A student who has been dropped 
or scholastic reasons may appeal in writing to the Committee on 
AdmSon, Guidance, and Adjustment for reinstatement. The Committee 
fs ~;red to grknt relief for just cause. A student who has been 
dropped from the University for scholastic reasons, and whose pe ition for 
reinstatement is denied, may again petition after a lapse of at least one 

''tS University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. Stvdents of the last class rmy 
he asked to withdraw even though no specific charge he made against them. 
According to University regulations, excessive absence from any course 
is penalized by failure in that course. Students who are guilty of persistent 
absence from any course will be reported to the President or to hio 
appointed representative for final disciplinary action. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major 
or minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have 
passed with an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number o^ 
semester credits required for junior standing in any curriculum. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master 
of Business Administration, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil Engineer, Mechan- 
ical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in 

Pharmacy. 
Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certifi- 

''xhe requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. For full information regarding the 
requirements for graduation in the several colleges consult the appropriate 
chapters in Section II. 



32 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



33 



No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty credits of 
any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with grades of A, B, and C. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar, before 
March 1st, a formal application for a degree. Candidates for degrees must 
attend a convocation at which degrees are conferred and diplomas are 
awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia only in exceptional cases. 

EXPENSES AND FEES 

General 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount of the semester charges. 

In cases where students have been awarded Legislative Scholarships or 
University Grants, the amount of such scholarship or grant will be deducted 
from the bill for semester charges. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, and students 
should come prepared to pay the full amount of the semester charges. No 
student will be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and 
other charges as may be found necessary. For example, board and lodging 
may vary from semester to semester, although every effort will be made 
to keep the costs to the student as low as possible. 

No degree will be conferred upon, nor any diploma or certificate awarded 
to, a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

Fees for Summer Session. See Section II. 

Fees for Professional Schools in Baltimore. See Section III. 

Fees for Evening Courses. See Section II. 



FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
Maryland Residents ^^^^^^ 

Semester 

Fixed Charges ? ^2.50 

Athletic^ee ■■■■■■■^■■■■^■^ 5.00 

5.00 
2.50 



Special Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Infirmary Fee ^'"J' 

Post Office Fee ^'"Z 

Advisory and Testing Fee ^ 

$91.50 

District of Columbia Residents 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from District of Columbia m ^ 

addition to fees shown above ^^oAJU 

$116.50 

Residents of Other States and Countries 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from other states and countries 
in addition to fees shown above...$ b^ 

$154.00 



Fall 

Semester 

$ 67.50 

15.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

2.00 

.50 

$110.00 




$ 62.50 



$172.50 



Spring 
Semester 

$ 77.50 



.50 



*$ 78.00 



$ 25.00 
*$103.00 



$ 62.50 
=$140.50 



Board and Lodging ^.^^ qq 

$135 00 $135.00 $it5D.uu 

^^^^^ -"- c^^Ro'oto 55 00 $38.00 to 55.00 $38.00 to 55.00 

Dormitory Room $38.UU to od.kjkj ^ 

$173.00 to moo $173.00 to 190.00 $173.00 to 190.00 

. . • ir.^ thA University grounds and the physical training 

The Special Fee is used for }^^'^''];j'\l^,^^^^^^^ relationship to student welfare. 

fa.ilities and for other University projects ^J^^* ^^;;J ^^ ^^ ^^^ g^udent Government Asso- 
The Students Activities Fee is -eluded at t^^ ^^^^^f ^^^^^^^^ ,, ,,,,o^y to the student, 
ciation. Its payment is not mandatory, but it ^^J^^J magazine and the year 

since it covers subscription to ^^^^^" -^^,;;;~;:: l.V diXsion to the performances 
book; class dues, including admission to class dances, ana 
of the musical and dramatic clubs. ^ 



Post Oflfice Box, $1.00. 



34 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OTHER FEES AND CHARGES 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at time of first reg- 
istration in the University $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to graduation $10.00 
Special Fee for students enrolled in Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental 
course 

For Residents of Maryland $25.00 

For Residents of the District of Columbia $25.00 

For Residents of other states or countries $62.50 

Fee for part time students per credit hour $ 6.00 

(The term "part time students'' is interpreted to mean stu- 
dents taking 6 semester credit hours or less. Students carrying 
more than 6 semester hours pay the regular fees.) 

Late Registration Fee $3.00 to $5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, in- 
cluding the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the 
regular registration days. Those who complete their registration 
one day late are charged a fee of $3.00, and those who are more 
than one day late will be charged $5.00.) 

Fee for change in registration after first week of instruction $1.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment $2.00 

Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per semester 

hour $2.00 

Makeup Examination Fee — (For students who are absent during any 

class period when tests or examinations are given) $1.00 

Transcript of Record Fee - $1.00 

Laboratory Fees — The laboratory fee for each course is shown under 
"Description of Courses," Section II. These fees range in amount 
from $1.00 to $8.00 $1.00 to $8.00 

Property Damage Charge — Students will be charged for damage to 
property or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can 
be fixed, the individual student will be billed for it; where re- 
sponsibility can not be fixed, the cost of repairing the damage or 
replacing equipment will be prorated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from general library before ex- 

I>^ration r^. loan period 05 per day 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before expira- 
tion of loan period: 

First hour overdue 25 

Each additional hour overdue .05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution 
must be made. 



GENERAL INFORMATION ^5 

Text books and classroom supplie^These costs vary with the course ^^^^ 
pursued, but will average per semester..... 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition charge for students carrying more than 8 ^^^^ 

semester credit hours * 

Tuition charge for students carrying 8 semester ^ ^^ ^^^_^ ^^^^ 

credit hours, or less - ■" 

Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of ^^ ^^ 

first registration 

Diploma Fee (For Master's degree) I"-"" 

Graduation Fee (For Doctor's degree) '="•"" 

Votes • Fees, in the Graduate School are the same for all students, whether 
residents of the State of Maryland or not. 
Allfeerexcept Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee, are payable at 

thP time of registration for each semester. 
DiSoma Fee anf Graduation Fee must be paid prior to graduation. 

FEES FOR EVENING COURSES 

Matriculation Fee (payable once, at ^-;.;[Xr'^^^ 

dents-full time and part time; candidates for degrees, ana non 

For Undergraduates ^ ^'"^ 

For Graduates 

Tuition Charge-(same for all students) (Limit ^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

six hours) . , 

,,,„,,„., Pees-A small laboratory J- ^ ^^V^^rtl Thfrurse" Ind 
is charged in laboratory courses These fees vary ^ tn^ 
can be ascertained in any case by inquiry of the Director oi j^ 
Courses, or the instructor in charge of the course. 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING WITHDRAWAL FROM THE 
UNIVERSITY AND REFUND OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw *-- ^f J"?^^^^^^^^^^ 
any time during the academic year, he should Al^ .^ j°"«al J^f ^^^""^j; 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures as »"f •'=^*^f °" f " ^"^ J'^ 
the Registrar's Office. A copy of this withdrawal *?Pl^^^°" J^^^^^^S ^ 
obtained from the office of the Dean of the College m which the student 
registered, or from the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 



36 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



37 



A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be 
entitled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund! 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the University within five days after the 
beginning of instruction for the semester are granted a full refund of all' 
charges except board and lodging, with a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost 
of registration. Board and lodging are refunded on a pro rata basis. 

Students withdrawing from the University after five days and before 
the end of four weeks from the beginning of instruction in any semester 
will receive a pro rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $5.00 to 
cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the four week period 
referred to, refunds will be made only for board and lodging. The refund 
for these items will be on a pro rata basis. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic record 
from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so furnished, but 
for each additional copy, there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcripts of records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 

alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal, which are for- 

warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 
agencies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at 
the University and his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

Persons desiring transcripts of records should, if possible, make request 
of the Registrar for same at least one week in advance of the date when 
the records are actually needed. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have not 
been satisfied. 

STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health 
of its student body and takes every reasonable precaution towards this end. 
In addition to the physical examinations which are given all students on 
entrance to the University, health instruction is given to all freshman and 
sophomore students, and a modem, well equipped infirmary is available for 
the care of sick or injured students. A small fee is charged undergraduate 
students for this infirmary service. 



Physical Examinations 

I" JaTpC^iarL't *fflc:' .r'S .n«™„,. She Is avall.bU for 
riTut'on to .11 women s.ud.nts .. hour, .. b, .™„g.d. 

Infirmary Service and Regulations 

1 All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and med- 
ical' advL at the Infirmary during regular office hours established by the 
physician in charge. 

Nurses' office hours, 8 to 10 A.M.-l to 2 P.M.-4 to 5 P.M.-6 to 8 P.M.. 
daily except Sui^day; 10 A.M. to 12 Noon-6 to 7 P.M. Sunday. 

Doctor's office hour 12 Noon to 1 P. M. daily except Sunday. Office hour 
on Sunday by appointment only. 

2 A registered nurse is on duty at all hours in the Infirmary. Students 
are revested "report illnesses during office hours unless the case is an 
emergency. 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical atten^^on 
and who are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of J^e Urn 
versity physicians. Such visits will be free of charge ^^^^F*;" ^--^-^^^^ 
additional visits are necessary. For such additional visits as may 
necessary, the University physician will make his usual charge. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may. ^vo^^^^^'^^^ °J *^ 
University physician, be cared for in the ^f^'^J^ Jf. "f ^ged a 
facilities available. Students who live off the campus will be charged a 
fee of one dollar and a quarter a day. 

5. The visiting hours are 10 to U A. M. and 7 to 7:30 l^-J^^^^ 
Each patient is allowed only three vis tors at one tirne No v^'^^^ ^^^ 
see an^patient until permission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary forgraduate students 
activities. 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



39 



7. Students living in the dormitories, who are ill and unable to attend 
classes, must report to the Infirmary, between 8:00 and 9:00 A. M. If they 
are too ill to go to the Infirmary, they must notify the house mother so 
that the physician can be called to the dormitory. When possible this 
should be done before 8 : 30 A. M. If a student is taken sick at any other 
time he must report to the Infirmary, before going to his room. 

8. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 
and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories: 

Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormi- 
tories should request room application cards. Men should apply to the 
Director of Admissions, and women to the Office of the Dean of Women. 
When the room application card is returned, it must be accompanied by a 
$15 deposit. This fee will be deducted from the first semester charges when 
the student registers. Room reservations not claimed by freshmen or upper- 
classmen on their respective registration days will be cancelled. A room will 
be held by special request until after classes begin providing the dormitory 
office is notified by the first day of registration. Room reservation fees will 
not be refunded if the request is received later than one month before the 
first day of registration for the semester for which arrangements were 
made. 

Reservations by students in attendance at the University should be made 
at least two weeks before the close of the preceding semester. New students 
are urged to attend to their housing arrangements well in advance of 
registration. 

Men, All men students who have made dormitory reservations should 
report to the dormitory office in "A*' section, Calvert Hall. 

All freshmen students, except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories. 

Women. There are two attractive dormitories of colonial architecture 
for women, each under the supervision of a matron and the Office of Dean 
of Women. The buildings are fire resistant; the rooms, single, double, and 
a few triple, have hot and cold running water and are tastefully furnished. 

Applications for rooms are considered only when a student has been fully 
admitted academically to the University. A student for whom a reservation 



has been made should report at registration time to the dormitory to which 
she has been assigned. 

All housing arrangements for women students must be approved by the 
Office of the Dean of Women. 
r^ ■ ^.r,t Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves 

.SSdl't S blanS at least two pairs of sheets a pillow, p.llow 

^"tt ::Z^ that all housing arrangements which are made for the 
fall semester are binding for the spring semester also. 

at the end of the year. 



Cleaning service is furnished by the University. 



Laundry The University does not provide laundry service and each stu- 

laundry home. Women students may, if they wish, do tneir own 
the laundry room in each dormitory. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and '"^f «<1 rj* ^ 
domTo" address will be delivered when the student concerned notifies the 
College Park express office of his arrival. 

Oflf-Campus Houses. 

Women- Undergraduate women students who cannot be accommodated 
Si Wo».n." Th. household.™ '»«"» J^^^™ S'^S IS^s 

No woman student should enter m^^^^^^^ 

without first ascertaining at the Office of the Dean oi 

is on the approved list. 



40 



Meals 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



41 



Meals. All students who live in University dormitories must board at 
the University Dining Hall. 

Students not living in the dormitories may make arrangements to board 
by the semester at the dining hall, get their meals in the University Cafe 
teria, or at eating establishments in College Park. A few "ofF-campus 
houses'' provide board as well as room. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN 

The Office of the Dean of Men exists for the purpose of furnishing 
friendly counsel and helpful guidance to male students in connection with 
any of their personal problems, especially those relating to financial need 
employment, housing, etc. ' 

This office also handles for male students matters of student discipline 
and infringement of University regulations. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 

The Office of the Dean of Women sei-ves in the same capacity for women 
students as does the Office of the Dean of Men for men students. In addi- 
tion, it coordinates the interests of women students, handles matters of 
chaperonage at social functions, regulation of sorority rushing, etc. It has 
supervision over all housing accommodations for women students, whether 
on or off campus. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

Legislative Scholarships 

By Act of the Maryland Legislature in 1941, members of the Legislature 
were given the privilege of awarding scholarships to worthy students from 
their respective districts. Members of the House of Delegates may award 
one four-year scholarship. Members of the Senate may award three four- 
year scholarships, only one to be appointed in any given year. 

Students desiring these scholarships are requested to contact either a 
State Senator or a member of the House of Delegates in their respective 
districts. 



University Grants 

The University of Maryland offers 
covering fixed charges to graduates of 

Since the University of Maryland is 
who show promise, these scholarships 
dent's contribution to his high school, 
his scholastic average; special talents; 



a limited number of scholarships 
high schools or preparatory schools. 

interested in encouraging students 
are awarded on the basis of a stu- 
preparatory school, or University; 
and evidence of leadership. 



Albright Scholarship 

A scholarship, known as the Victor E. Albright Scholarship, is awarded 
to a boy or girl of good character, born and reared in Garrett County 
and graduated from a high school in Garrett County during the year in 
which the scholarship is awarded. This scholarship is worth $200.00 a year. 
The names of prospective scholars are forwarded to the Scholarship Com- 
mittee by the high school principals of Garrett County and the selection 
is made by lot. The recipient of this award must maintain a B average for 
each semester in order to keep the scholarship. 

Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation Grants 

A limited number of scholarships have been made available by the Sears 
Roebuck Agricultural Foundation for young men who have been reared 
on farms in the State of Maryland and who enroll as freshmen in the 
College of Agriculture. These grants apply only in the freshman year. 

Applications may be obtained from the Committee on Scholarships at 
the University. 

Graduate Fellowships 

For information concerning Graduate Fellowships, see Graduate School, 
Section II. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employment 
while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, however, 
to earn enough to pay all of his expenses. The amounts vary, but some 
earn from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. 

Generally the first year is the hardest for those desiring employment. 
After one has demonstrated that he is worthy and capable, there is much 
less difficulty in finding work. 

Under the provisions of the National Youth Administration, the Uni- 
v^ersity has been enabled to offer needy students a limited amount of work 
on special projects, the remuneration for which averages about $13 monthly. 
It is not known how long the Government will continue to extend this aid. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, make every effort to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions is 
placed at the disposal of students. Applications for N. Y. A., or other 
employment should be made to the Dean of Men. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority offers annually a Sigma Delta loan 
of one hundred dollars, without interest, to a woman student registered in 
the University of Maryland and selected by a Scholarship Committee — the 



42 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



43 



said Committee to be composed of the deans of all Colleges in which girls 
are registered, including the Dean of Women and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

A. A. U. W. Loan. The College Park Branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women maintains a fund from which loans are made to 
women students of junior or senior standing who have been in attendance 
at the University of Maryland for at least one year. Awards in varying 
amounts are made on the basis of scholarship, character, and financial need. 
Applications should be made to the Scholarship Committee of the A. A. U. 
W. on blanks which may be obtained through the office of the Dean of 
Women. 

Catherine Moore Brinkley Loan Fund. Under the provisions of the will 
of Catherine Moore Brinkley a loan fund has been established, available 
for worthy students who are natives and residents of the State of Mary- 
land, studying mechanical engineering or agriculture at the University of 
Maryland. 

This loan fund is administered by the Scholarship and Student Aid Com- 
mittee. Details concerning loans and application for loans should be made 
to the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee. 

Home Economics Loan Fund. A small loan fund, established by the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Home Economics Society, is available for students major- 
ing in Home Economics. It is administered by the Scholarship and Student 
Aid Committee. 

In addition to the above loans there are from time to time others that are 
made available by various women's organizations in the State of Maryland. 
Information regarding these may be secured upon request from the Office 
of the Dean of Women. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLASTIC AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors* Final honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college. First honors 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second honors to the lower 
half. To be eligible for honors, at least two years of resident work are 
required. 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the resident of Prince Georges County, born therein, 
who makes the highest average in his studies and who at the same time 
embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. 
Goddard James, of Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma 
Fraternity offers annually a gold medal to the man in the freshman class 
who makes the highest scholastic average during the first semester. 



Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. The mere 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Berman. 

Mortar Board Scholarship Gup. This is awarded to the senior girl who 
has been at the University for four years, and who has made the highest 
scholastic average for three and one-half years. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

Class of '26 Honor Key. The Class of 1926 of the School of Business 
Administration of the University of Maryland at Baltimore offers each 
year a gold key to the senior graduating from the College of Commerce 
with the highest average for the entire four year course taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
has attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the entire 
undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final semester. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl in the College of Home Economics who attains the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 
to the senior member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
^or the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Gvil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Engineers to the senior in the 
I^epartment of Civil Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty of the 
department, is the outstanding student in his class. 



44 



I 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



45 



RpL Pi . ^* Certificate of Merit. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi awards annually a certificate of merit to the initiate of the Chapter 
who, m the opinion of the members, has presented the best thesis during 
the year. ^ 

« J''^^^Y'*' ^' "^'^ Dramatic Awards. The Footlight Club recognizes 
annually the man and woman members of the senior class who have done 
most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This is awarded to the senior student 
majonng m Bacteriology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

Hillegeist Memorial Award. This is oflFered annually by Mrs. W M 
Hillegeist in memory of her husband for excellence in English. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. An award is presented annually by President 
H C. Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class 
who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, 
Unlve^ltf"^ '"°^* *^^ ^^"^'^^ advancement of the interests of the 

^^?!!^Tt^ ^"'*.!"' ?"*•"*"• The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods, wife of a former president of the University of Maryland 
to the woman member of the senior class who, during her collegiate career 
has most nearly typified the model citizen, 'and has done Sst for the 
general advancement of the interests of the University. 

MILITARY AWARDS 

Mahlon N. Haines *94 Trophy. 
ning battalion. 

Military Department Award. Gold second lieutenant's insignia to the 
major of the winning battalion. e «. lo 

The Governor's Cup. This is offered each year by His Excellency, the 
Governor of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

Company Award. The Reserve Officers' Association, Montgomery County 

uS:st;,is Tor Li°t2:ri''ir '-' ^^"^^ — - - 

offi^: oiretst"^drili?d;fa=: ""^^ '''' ^^" ^ ^^ *° *^^ — ''^"^ 

Scabbard and Blade Cup. This cup is offered to the commander of the 
winning platoon. 

Class of '99 Gold Medal. The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal 
to the member of the battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. 



This is offered to the major of the win- 



A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Varsity R. 0. T. C. Rifle 
I Team who fired the high score of each season. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Freshman Rifle Team who 
I fired the high score of each season. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to each member of the winning squad 
iin the squad drill competition. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to the three best drilled students in 
Pershing Rifles. 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition. A Gold Medal is awarded to the 
student firing highest score in this competition. A Silver Medal is given 
to the student showing greatest improvement during the year in this com- 
petition. 

4 ATHLETIC AWARDS 

I 

"" Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold watch is offered 
annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics.*' The 
watch is given in honor of a former President of the University, R. W. 

Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

Edward Powell Trophy, This trophy is offered by the class of 1913 to 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the outstanding 
senior baseball player. 

PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 

Medals are offered in Diamondback, Terrapin, and Old Line work, for the 
students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout the 
year. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the stu- 
dents, not solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities 
whose development along all lines, including the moral and religious, is 
included in the educational process. Pastors representing the major denom- 
inational bodies are officially appointed by the Churches for work with the 
students of their respective faiths. Each of the Student Pastors also serves 
a local church of his denomination, which the students are urged to attend. 

Committee on Religious Aflfairs and Social Service. A faculty committee 
on Religious Affairs and Social Service has as its principal function the 
stimulation of religious thought and activity on the campus. It brings noted 
speakers on religious subjects to the campus from time to time. The com- 
mittee cooperates with the student pastors in visiting the students, and 



46 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



47 



assists the student denominational clubs in every way that it can. Oppor- 
tunities are provided for students to consult with pastors representing the 
denominations of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religion is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a 
denominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of service. This year 
the list includes the Baptist Student Union, the Episcopal Club, the 
Lutheran Club, the Newman Club, the Hillel Foundation, the Methodist Club, 
and the Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet monthly or semi-monthly for 
worship and discussion, and occasionally for social purposes. A pastor or 
a member of the faculty serves as adviser. Evensong is held every Sunday 
evening under the auspices of the various denominational clubs. A local 
Y. W. C. A. also provides a variety of activities and services on a non- 
denominational basis. 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The description of those in the Balti- 
more divisions is included in the appropriate chapters in Section III. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Regulation of Student Activities. The association of students in organ- 
ized bodies for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student activities in 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged. All organized 
student activities are under the supervision of the Student Life and Regis- 
tration Committee, subject to the approval of the President. Such organiza- 
tions are formed only with the consent of the Student Life and Registration 
Committee and the approval of the President. Without such consent and 
approval no student organization which in any way represents the Univer- 
sity before the public, or which purports to be a University organization or 
an organization of University students, may use the name of the University 
in connection with its own name, or in connection with its members as 
students. 

Student Government. The Student Government Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women's League, and the Men's League, and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officers are a President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary-Treasurer, President of Women's League, and Presi- 
dent of Men's League. 

The Women's League, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of 
Women, handles all matters pertaining to women students. 



v^ 



^ 

'^- 

•i 



The Men's League, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Men, 
handles all matters pertaining to men students. 

The Executive Council performs the executive duties incident to manag- 
ing stddent affairs, and works in cooperation with the Student Life and 
Registration Committee. 

The Student Life and Registration Committee, a faculty committee ap- 
Dointed by the President, keeps in close touch with all activities and condi- 
tions, excepting classroom work, that affect the student, and, acting in an 
advisory capacity, endeavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that 

may exist. . j- * k 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and distrib- 
uted to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning student 
matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. In 
addition, various student organizations have established certain other 
requirements. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass at least 
twenty-four hours of work during a preceding year. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and fac- 
ulty rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. Ihe 
student who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives 
honorably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the 
interest of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to maintain 
these standards are asked to withdraw. Students are ""der the direct 
supervision of the University only when on the campus, but they are 
responsible to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

General Statement 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and finan- 
cial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon sound 
business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed, indivi- 
dual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and thereby 
become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules governing 
the different activities will be found in the list of Academic Regulations. 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national honorary fraternity open 
to honor students, both men and women, in all branches of learning; Sigma 
Xi an honorary scientific fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa, men's national 
honor society, recognizing conspicuous attainment in non-cumcular activi- 
ties and general leadership ; Mortar Board, the national senior honor society 
for women recognizing service, leadership, and scholarship; Alpha Lambda 



48 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



49 



Delta, a national freshmen women's scholastic society; Phi Eta Sigma, 
national freshman honor society for men. A group of honorary fraternities 
encourage development in specialized endeavor. These are Alpha Zeta, a 
national honorary agriculture fraternity recognizing scholarship and stu- 
dent leadership; Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary engineering fraternity; 
Alpha Chi Sigma, a national honorary chemical fraternity; Scabbard and 
Blade, a national military society; Pershing Rifles, a national military 
society for basic course R. O. T. C. students; Pi Delta Epsilon, a national 
journalistic fraternity; Omicron Nu, a national home economics society; 
Alpha Psi Omega, a national dramatic society; Beta Alpha Psi, a national 
accounting honorary fraternity; Pi Sigma Alpha, an honorary political 
science fraternity; and Beta Gamma Sigma, a national honorary commerce 
fraternity. 

Fraternities and Sororities. There are fourteen national fraternities, 
one local fraternity, nine national sororities, and one local sorority at 
College Park. These in the order of their establishment at the University 
are Kappa Alpha, Sigma Nu, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Sigma Phi, Alpha 
Gamma Rho, Theta Chi, Phi Alpha, Tau Epsilon Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, 
Phi Delta Theta, Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Lambda Tau, Sigma Alpha 
Mu, and Alpha Epsilon Pi, national fraternities; Iota Sigma, a local fra- 
ternity; and Alpha Omicron Pi, Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Delta 
Delta Delta, Alpha Xi Delta, Phi Sigma Sigma, Alpha Delta Pi, Sigma 
Kappa and Gamma Phi Beta, national sororities; and Alpha Sigma, a local 
sorority. 

Clubs and Societies. Many clubs and societies, with literary, scientific, 
social and other special objectives, are maintained in the University. Some 
of these are purely student organizations; others are conducted jointly by 
students and members of the faculty. The list is as follows: Agricultural 
Council, Authorship Club, Bacteriology Society, Engineering Council, Hor- 
ticulture Club, Block and Bridle Club, Calvert Debate Club, Women's 
Athletic Association, Footlight Club, Rossbourg Club, American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers, Chess Club, Swimming Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Clef and Key, Radio Club, Camera Club, Terrapin 
Trail Club, Student Grange, Farm Economics Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Riding Club, Collegiate Chamber of Commerce, Der Deutsche 
Verein, Spanish Club, Le Cercle Francaise, Chemical Engineering Club, 
Freshman Chemical Society, American Chemical Society, and Daydodgers 
Club. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Four student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications. 

The Diamondback, a semi-weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is pub- 
lished by the students. This publication summarizes the University news. 



,„d provides a medium of expression for the discussion of matters of 
Juterest to the students and the faculty. 

events of the college year. 

o.;«o u i«;^iied bv the students containing 
The Old Line, a monthly -"^S^^^'"^' ;^^^7;';etry and features of gen- 
short stories, cartoons, humorous matenal, poetry, .* 

eral interest. 

for the benefit of incoming students, is designea w 
general University life. 



UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 



The University operates an office for the reception, dispatch and delivery 

ties are available for sending or ^«<=^7^"^ P° jj ^^ received and 

stamps, however, may be purchased. United States man 

dispatched several times daily. 

Fach student in the University is assigned a post office box at the time 
Of r^^strattn! for which a small fee is charged. Also, boxes are provided 
for the various University offices. 

f fi,o ,«<.ior reasons for the operation of the Post Office is to pro- 
vid^'e": llenirnrmethrS which DeLs. teachers and University officias 
may communicate with students, and students are expected to call for their 
mdl d™ if possible, in order that such communications may come to 
their attention promptly. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' 
c y Qfir located in the basement of the Administration Building, 
Si%?utnts'mt^oSain at reasonable prices text books, stationery, 
classroom materials and equipment, confectionery, etc. 

This store is operated on a basis of furnishing students needed books 
and supplies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any are turned 
fnto the general University treasury to be used for promoting general 
student welfare. 



50 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Students are advised not to purchase any text books until they have been 
informed by their instructors of the exact texts to be used in the various 
courses, as texts vary from year to year. 

The bookstore is operated on a cash basis and credit is not extended to 
students. 



COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE 



ALUMNI 

The Alumni Council, which is composed of representatives of each school 
and college in the University, coordinates all general Alumni interests, 
Alumni activities are further unified in two ways. There are organized 
alumni associations in the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, 
and Nursing located in Baltimore. The alumni of the Colleges of Agricul- 
ture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics, located at College Park, constitute a general Association, each 
group having its own Board of Representatives. Each school and college 
Alumni organization exerts an active interest in the welfare of its respective 
graduates. 

An Alumni Office, with a full time Alumni Secretary in charge, is main- 
tained at College Park, in the Administration Building, to direct the work 
of the association and to form a point of contact between the University and 
its graduates. 




"When tillage begins, other 
arts follow- The farmers, there- 
fore, are the founders of civili- 



zation. 



ft 



—Daniel Webster. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



53 



SECTION II 
Resident Instruction 

COLLEGE PARK 



COLLEGE OP AGRICULTURE 

T. B. Symons, Dean. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Assistant Dean. 

JANE K. FARREL., Secretary to the Assistant Dean. 

of agricultural endeavor. S Sent pro^fr"' "''^^ '" '"^^ ^-ad fieW 
correlating technical work with r Jafed ' i. ^""^T*^ ^'^'^ ^ ^'^«^ *« 
Education in fundamentals receives sleil I.?'!- ^"'' *="'*"'-^' «"''i^<=ts- 
men and women are given a bask ' S .H "J*'""- ^"^''din^ly, young 
instructed in the various branches of rllr^*'^" ^''"^ ^''^^ ^^e being 
th,s opportunity for thorough frounl^i*"'"- ^" *'''''*'°n ^^ offering 
social sciences, it is an ob^^ve of Tht r^n" .' '"'"*''' ''"«''= "^^^^al anf 
for agricultural and alli'ed ndustrfes Thif *° "''"''^ ^''^'^^'^ P-«-"el 
rural and urban areas. Farm-reareH ll J f P^^^"""^! ^s recruited from 

cialized curricula; city-rearS ^^^eJstTtoTn ''T ^^"^^^' «'• «P- 
grams. ""^""^^ tend to follow the specialized pro- 

General 

table growing, floriculture or ornaC/J i. ^^ husbandry, fruit or vege- 
t'on. or in the highly speciaLrSffic acr '?"'"'' ""''' '''^ P^-^^uc- 
mdustries. It prepares men to serve affar^t' '°""'*=*"'^ ""^'^ these 
commercial concerns related to agriJulturT f^""^^^''' ^°^ Positions with 
teachers in agricultural colleges and in hI . ^''P''"^''"^ Positions as 
ture in high schools or as inSLatorr- ^^P^^*"^"*^ «f vocational agricul- 
work, for regulatory activitil ,1S t s"erSeTr T^ •°"^' ^°^ -*--- 
ment of Agriculture. Its curricula Yn Animal ^?' ^"'l"^ ^*^*^^ ^^P^^t- 
Plant Physiology and Plant Pathology) olTrv |"^"*=^' botany (including 
cultural Science, Poultry Science 3 L^, 7 f 'T'^' Entomology, Horti 
nities to students with a^cienS bent of mL f;^^ f'' ^-^ opportu- 
-ny ramiflcations in teaching, research! e^eti^ 2 ^^S^^^ 

62 



Through research the frontiers of knowledge relating to agriculture and 
the fundamental sciences underlying it are constantly being extended and 
solutions for important problems are being found. Kesearch projects in 
many fields are in progress. Students taking courses in agriculture from 
instructors who devote part time to research, or are closely associated with 
it. are kept in close touch with the latest discoveries and developments in 
the investigations under way. The findings of these research scientists 
provide valuable information for use in classrooms, and make instruction 
virile and authentic. The results of the most recent scientific investigations 
are constantly before the student. 

Close contact of workers in the College with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State, through the county agents, 
iiome demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident 
instruction in the College of Agriculture. These contacts operate in two 
ways: problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of 
research workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are 
taken to farmers and their families in their home communities through 
practical demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State 
contribute to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College 
helps them in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. 

Through their regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are continually dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and analyzing and testing germination quality of 
seeds to insure better seeds for farm planting. 

These fields contribute largely to agricultural education, as standardiza- 
tion and education go hand in hand in the development of an industry. Direct 
contact on the part of professors in their respective departments with the 
problems and methods involved makes for effective instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Mary- 
land lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, 
and regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the 
several departments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the 
several departments are closely associated with the research, extension and 
regulatory work being carried on in their respective fields, and, in many 
cases, devote a portion of their time to one or more of these types of 
activities. Close coordination of these four types of w^ork enables the Uni- 
versity to provide a stronger faculty in the College of Agriculture, and 
affords a higher degree of specialization than would otherwise be possible. 
It insures instructors an opportunity to keep informed on the latest results 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



55 



of research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends and problems 
which are revealed in extension and regulatory activities. Heads of depart- 
ments hold staff conferences to this end, so that the student at all times is 
as close to the developments in the frontiers of the several fields of knowl- 
edge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

In order that the work of the College shall be responsive to agricultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several agricultural 
industries in the State, and that the courses of instruction shall at all times 
be made most helpful for students who pursue them, Advisory Councils 
have been constituted in the major industries of agriculture. These Councils 
are composed of leaders in the respective lines of agriculture in Maryland, 
and the instructional staff of the College of Agriculture has the benefit of 
their counsel and advice. By this means the College, the industries, and the 
students are kept abreast of developments. 

Facilities and Equipment 

In addition to buildings, laboratories, libraries, and equipment for effec- 
tive instruction in the related basic sciences and in the cultural subjects, 
the University of Maryland is provided with excellent facilities for research 
and instruction in agriculture. University farms, totaling more than 1200 
acres, are operated for instructional and investigational purposes. One of 
the most complete and modern plants for dairy and animal husbandry work 
in the country, together with herds of the principal breeds of dairy and 
beef cattle, and other livestock, provides facilities and materials for instruc- 
tion and research in these industries. Excellent laboratory and field facili- 
ties are available in the Agronomy Department for breeding and selection 
in farm crops, and for soils research. The Poultry Department has a build- 
ing for laboratories and classrooms, a plant comprising thirty-four acres, 
and flocks of all the important breeds of poultry. The Horticulture Depart- 
ment is housed in a separate building, and has ample orchards and gardens 
for its various lines of work. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: Agricul- 
tural Chemistry; Agricultural Education and Rural Life; Agricultural 
Engineering; Agronomy (including Crops and Soils); Animal Husbandry; 
Botany (including Morphology, Plant Physiology and Plant Pathology) ; 
Dairy Husbandry (including Dairy Manufacturing); Entomology (includ- 
ing Bee Culture) ; Farm Management and Agricultural Economics; Horti- 
culture (including Pomology, Olericulture, Floriculture, and Ornamental 
Horticulture) ; Poultry Husbandry; Veterinary Science. 

Admission 

The requirements for admission are discussed under Admission, in Sec- 
tion I. 



Junior standing .v,. Colleee of Agriculture, a student must 

Requirements for Graduation ,i,v,t semester hours is required 

- -rtrn^-e^S^retire-JillSt^^^^^ -e included 

rtSrruron^^Cu^rricula in Agriculture. 

Farni and Laboratory Practice _ .^^^^^ opportunities 

The head of each department will help to maK ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

foJ^rSal or technical -P;/^! f^^^^^en^ a"?"ho is in need of such 

iLt whose -t:cSitd\ Xrt many departments th. need 

-irst hTo- ^-- — --^ "^ ^ ^^• 

Student Organizations expression and growth in the 

Student Council. ^nhintarv and no college credits 

of the Order of Patrons «* Husbandry and emp ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ,,,, 

leadership. It sponsors ,«^^f . ^^^P^^^^L the Students' Fitting and Showmg 
the State. The Livestock Club «°f "^*f ^^'^he Future Farmers of America 

Contest held on the <=^'"P^^ '" ^^J^S? and '^^ C°"^^^**^ '^''"^''7^ 
foster interest in ^°<=^t^°"^}.„f '""jHWh school judging contests held at 

ricular life of students. 

Alpha Zeta-National Agricultural Ho- Fraternity ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^ 

Membership in AlP^V^^ vlSayed afr^^^Hural motive and execu- 
College of Agriculture who ^^^ f^^fXlarJhip, and awards a gold medal 
tive ability. This organization fosters scho ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ j^^g^est 
to the member of the freshman class m ag 
record during the year. 



56 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



57 



Agricultural Student Council 

thJtLforSrntSStS-^ "^ "^ representatives fron, 

is to coordinate activitTefof these studentf'^nf Agriculture. Its purpose 
beneficial to the College. students and to promote work which is 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

™i:fTettl^^rg?C^ prepare students for farming .. 

tural agents, or teachers of agrkulture' fn^^^ T f '^^^'^^^ ^^^^"J" 
salesmen, or other employees in comm.r.-7 ^^ ''^°°'"' ^« executives, 
tural contact and point of view """'""'^^'*' busmesses with close agricui: 

tecScLt^treSTi^^trgSL' t^PrePare students for positions as 
various scientific and educationrdepartments T h""' ''' "'"^"^ ''^ '"^^ 
State, or Municipal govermnents; in t^e various ,.h?^"' "^ ^''^ ^^^^^«'' 
t^ons; or in the laboratories of private corporations °" "''""^"* ^*^- 

thi'krarer'onlt mr^rrtr?^-^"^.-''^ ^^^^^ ^ — - 
subjects. ^"""^ y^^"^^ °f tram2ng m practical agricultural 

Student Advisers 

adS2. S^-^pUtntalt^^Lf™^^^^^ ^^ ^^ *° ^ ^^^^ 
heads of departments or persons seWfL ^^^^5*'"^"^' advisers consist of 
curricula in their respective departments / T *." "'^'^^ ^^udents with 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow .ff a 
for those who so desire to supplement m=.I I • ^"""^ opportunity 
to add to their general training ^""' ^"*^ ""'""^ ««lds of study or 

advisable to meet the re^uire^nTsr Lrpa'«cui™r ^ ''' '-'"^ 

students wishing to take Advanced R n T n 
with the Department Head and with the consent of ' t^J^n "^''" .consultation 
Object either as an elective or for cpT»i? ^^"' ^"^•stitute this 

senior years. "'^ '^^'^^"^ requirements in junior and 



r-* 



Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is 
the same for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student 
an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
and the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a 
student before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to 
another, or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in some other 
college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisers for counsel as to the wisest 
selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests 
and their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year 
with no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to general advisers, who 
assist with the choice of freshman electives and during the course of the 
year acquaint the students with the opportunities in the upper curricula 
in the College of Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. 
If by the close of the freshman year a student makes no definite choice of 
a specialized curriculum, he continues under the guidance of his general 
adviser and at the beginning of the sophomore year enters Agriculture 
(General Curriculum). 

Agriculture Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition....: 3 8 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 — 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology — 4 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking „ 1 1 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) V2—'^^l 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) % — ^ 

Freshman Lectures .... 

Elect one of the following: 

Modem Language — French or German 3 3 

*Math. 8, 9— Elements of College Mathematics 3 3 

Phys. 3fs — Introductory Physics 3 3 

A. E. 1 — Agricultural Industry and Resources — 3 

A. E. 2 — Farm Organization 3 — 



16 



16 



* Students who expect to pursue the curriculum in Agricultural Chemistry must be pre- 
pared to elect Math. 21 and 22. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURE-GENERAL 

rather than a specialized rowedgl/:^^^^^^^ if '"^ ^ ^^'^-^l 

preparing to be county and other agricultural agents "^ "' '"' *'"^ 

oho^r«:M:;ern:rS:r^\^Sui: ^ rr ^ ^^"^-* •-- 

courses to enhance his liberal cuHure ^ '*™^ ^'"^ ^'^^^t 

General Agriculture Curriculum 

Sopliomore Year Semester 

Eng. 4, 6— Expository Writing ^ ^^ 

Geol. 1— Geology 2 2 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers ^ ~ 

Agron. 1-Cereal Crop Production ~ ^ 

Agron. 2-Forage Crop Production ~ 

n H f-Z"'^"5^'nentals of Animal Husbandry o ^ 

1^. H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying ~ 

Physical or Biological Science Sequence..' ~ l 

S 2fs-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) , „V ^ ^ 

?t ?J L''~Sr"""^*>^ Hygiene (Women): tS[ 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs-Physical Activities (Women).... ...::.:.:: ^ 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

Econ. 37-Fundamentals of Economics ^ ~ 

Hort. 1, 2— General Horticulture ~ ^ 

P. H. 1— Poultry Production ^ ^ 

P. H. 2— Poultry Management ^ ~ 

6 6 

17 17 

Senior Year 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

A. E 107~Analysis of Farm Business ^ "" 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery ~~ ^ 

R. Ed. llO-Rural Life and Education ^ - 

Electives . — 3 

9 9 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



59 



15 



15 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

In the field of chemistry there is an opportunity for one properly trained 
in the biological sciences and appreciative of the chemical aspects of agri- 
culture. The following curriculum is intended primarily to insure adequate 
instruction in the fundamentals of both the physical and biological sciences. 
It may be adjusted through the selection of electives to fit the student for 
work in agricultural experiment stations, soil bureaus, geological surveys, 
food laboratories, industries engaged in the process of handling food 
products and the fertilizer industries. 

The outline calls for five years of study. The completion of four years 
of this outline leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. By the proper 
use of electives in the fourth year and the continuation of this course of 
study for the fifth year and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, the 
student may qualify for the Master's degree. 

Agricultural Chemistry Curriculum ^^ . 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

A. E. 1 — Agricultural Industry and Resources 3 — 

A. E. 2 — Farm Organization — 3 

Chem. 2fs — Qualitative Analysis 3 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2] 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

Electives — Biology 4 4 

19 19 

Junior Year 

Chem. SAfs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. SBfs — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 6fs — Quantitative Analysis « 4 4 

Modern Language 3 3 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 — 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers — 3 

Electives — Biology 3 3 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics _.. 3 3 

Modern Language 3 3 

Electives — Biology _ _ 3 3 

Phys. If s— General Physics _ 4 4 

Electives _ 3 3 

16 16 



60 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



61 



Fifth Year 

rh '""• //,f ^-^d-^-ced Organic Chemistry '^ [ 

Chem. 117fs-0rganic Laboratory l 

Electives— Biology 2 



15 



Semester 
II 



2 

9 

1 

3 
2 
2 
3 

15 






AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

education ^service 6 aduIJes frorthir"*'' ?' """-^ ""^^ °^ *»»- ^-a' 
business, particularly of thrcoopTraSv? ^'"V" "'""^^^ '^ ^^ral 

Federal service. Others are eTald Tn iTv """?''"'■ ^^^" ""*^^^«^ ^^^ 
tural colleges. Quite a few h^rr^tLned to the^' '"'""*='* '" "^"'="'- 
Curriculum A is designed for ner^nr t u T ^' ""^"^^ managers, 
culture in high school Jr less th'^ "^ "° vocational agri- 

riculum B is desiS for npr,l ? T^"' °^ '"'='' instruction. Cur- 
thoroughgoing instruction yTerdaTy^Slttt ST t"""" T^^ "^ 
Maryland high schools. Curriculum R%.»r I^ ^''^ *5^P^ "^^^ed in 

of pursuing beginning aStoe cLs sTn th'e tT^ °' *'^ "^'^^^"^ 
college course, permits hfm to carry geSracour^i ^° ^f" ^* '"'^ 
placed by his vocational program i^hf^r^^i ? . '" ''^" ''^ ^''^^^ «*'«■ 
tunity to lay a broad foundSon f or th!^ .? ' !"^ *''^''"' ^™ ^" ^^P^^- 
the last two college years advanced work in agriculture of 

volvVg SaSoi'LTa'lrdl;?^^^^^^^ "^ ^''^ ^-v-Hy, in- 

the agricultural educain currlSa iT^reslS "'f' ^*"'^"*^ ^'^*=«"S 
quired adequate farm exDer,V,;.T,ff ?^ "* evidence of having ac- 

Students'with S aZT^^rn^^Zr .'"l^ *1^ ^^^ °^ ^""^t^^" years, 
quirements in these curricula Th.^ ^f *'''" *" "■"""^"'^ "^ <=«rtain re- 
either through experi™ ^r thrlugh pSu^: traiS^r ^'''^^"^ ^'^^^ 
non-essential; or they may be allowc^d to%™;^:Sfon,no'r"'*"^ " 



Agricultural Education Curriculum A, Semester 

^ Sophomore Year I II 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 3 — 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology — 3 

Agron. 1 — Cereal Crop Production 3 — 

Agron. 2 — Forage Crop Production _ ~ — 3 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 — 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers — 3 

A. H. 2 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 3 — 

D. H. 1 — Fundamentals of Dairying — 3 

Hort. 2 — General Horticulture .-. 3 — 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2^ 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 — 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 — 

A. E. 102 — Marketing of Farm Products — 3 

P. H. 1— Poultry Production 3 — 

P. H. 2 — Poultry Management — 3 

Hort. 1 — General Horticulture — 3 

Ind. Ed. 167fs— General Shop 1 1 

Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking 2 2 

A. H. 52 — Feeds and Feeding 3 — 

R. Ed. 107 — Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for 

Agricultural Students — 3 

D. H. 101— Dairy Production 3 — 

18 15 
Senior Year 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management — 3 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology 3 — 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles — 

R. Ed. 51, 52 — Farm Practicums and Demonstrations 1 

R. Ed. 109 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

R. Ed. 110 — Rural Life and Education ^ — 

R. Ed. 112 — Departmental Organization and Administration... — 

Agr. Engr. 54 — Farm Mechanics 1 

R. Ed. 114 — Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools — 

R. Ed. 90fs— Practice Teaching 2 

Electives 5 



3 
1 

3 

1 

1 
2 



15 



14 



62 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



63 



Agricultural Education Curriculum B. Semester 

Sophomore Year I U 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants ^ ^ 3 — 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology. ^ ^ — 3 

Geol. 1— Geology 3 — 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers ^ ^ — 3 

Hort. 1, 2 — General Horticulture ^ 3 3 

A. H. 2 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry ^ 3 — 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 J- 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

*Electives 3 3 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 — 

Ind. Ed. 167— General Shop 1 1 

Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking 2 2 

R. Ed. 107 — Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for 

Agricultural Students * — 3 

Electives 11 11 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology 3 — 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management — 3 

R. Ed. 51, 52 — Farm Practicums and Demonstrations 1 1 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles — 3 

R. Ed. 109 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 — 

R. Ed. 110 — Rural Life and Education — 3 

R. Ed. 112 — Departmental Organization and Administration — 1 

Agr. Engr. 54 — Farm Mechanics 1 — 

R. Ed. 114 — Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools — 1 

R. Ed. 90fs— Practice Teaching 2 2 

Electives 4 — 

14 14 
Electives in Curriculum B: 

Animal Husbandry „ 3 hours 

Agronomy ^ 6 hours 

Dairy Husbandry ^ 6 hours 

Farm Management 6 hours 

Poultry ^ ^ 3 hours 

Liberal or Subjects of Special Interest 7 hours 

*If Phys. 3fs ( IntrodTictory Physics) is not elected in the freshman year, it must be 
elected in the sophomore year. 



T.rr: or nil o, „H„,.™ .»..n. .n ^^^^ 

^'' iThSf replaced by tractors. Trucks, automobiles, stationary 

^Ln'S;':. Xn.^y, »nL;L%c,i,, and .pp.ar.nc, is, .he^fc., 

open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE-ENGINEERING 

Tr lose students .ho wish to. ec.^^^^^^^^^ 

principles to the physical and ^ "^X^^P^'^^e.yea? period, arranged 
S ^^^tl!:^^^^!^ Collegl o. Engineering, and 
eading to a degree from each of these Colleges. 

iobepropeny ti ^^ .„_ .^^ Drinciples than could be provided in a 
of basic and ^P^ f J^S He aTso needs a broader training in the 
SaTe^tS^f ^griS^re Xn a standard f our-year course in engineer- 

lt:d"ntfe'^S;g the «ve-year ^of^^i^-^-^ZTl^^:^^^ 
S fnll^^t^a dr/-i.t SLSfafMecScal, or Chemical 

Xnllpletion of the normal four year course ^^f^l'^l^Ts^- 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture is granted, ^^r the fifth year the stu 
dent registers in the College of Engineering, and f^ ^^^ !"f °^ *f Jf^^J 
upon satisfactory completion of the required -urse of study 
a degree in Civil, Electrical, Mechanical or Chemical Engineering. 



64 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum ^^ . 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking _ 1 l 

Math. 21, 22 — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry; Ana- 
lytic Geometry 4 4 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Dr. 1 — Engineering Drawing 2 — 

Dr. 2 — Descriptive Geometry — 2 

Shop 1 — Forge Practice — 1 

Engr. 1 — Introduction to Engineering 1 — 

Zool* 3 — Introductory Zoology 3 — 

Bot. 1 — General Botany — 4 

Freshman Lectures — — 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1—1" 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ¥2—% VI 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) :V2 — V2 



19 



20 



The remainder of this curriculum is for the student whose objective, at 
the end of the fifth year, is a degree in Civil Engineering. Similar curricula 
will be arranged for options in Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical 
Engineering. 



Sophomore Year — Civil Engineering Option 

Speech 5 — Oral Technical English. 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics 

Surv. 2fs — Plane Surveying 

Geol. 2 — Engineering Geology 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1—1 



2 

4 
5 
2 

2 
2 



19 



4 
5 

3 
3 

3 

2 

20 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 65 

Semester 

Junior Year— Civil Engiyieering Option ^ ^^ 

Speech 6— Advanced Oral Technical English -■ — ^ 

Mech. 50— Strength of Materials __ ^ 

Mech 52— Materials of Engineering __ 

Surv. 101— Advanced Surveying __ 

Agr.' Engr. 101— Farm Machinery ^ ^ 

\gr. Engr. 107— Farm Drainage __ 

Agr. Engr. 54— Farm Mechanics ^ ^ 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers ^ ^ 

Electives in Agriculture • __ __ 

17 17 

Fourth Year— Civil Engineering Option 

C. E. 50— Hydraulics ; __ 

M. E. 50— Principles of Mechanical Engmeering ^ 

E. E.* 50— Principles of Electrical Engineering ^ 

C. E. 52— Curves and Earthwork ^ 

C. E. 104— Theory of Structures "" ___ 

Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings -• • 

Agr. Engr. 102— Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles -- ^ 

A. E. 100— Farm Economics _ 

A. E. 108— Farm Management ^ 

Approved Electives - 

Technical Society •• _ 

17 17 

Fifth Year— Civil Engineering Option 

The curriculum for the fifth year is the senior year curriculum m cml 
engineering, without change, as shown under College of Engmeenng. 

AGRONOMY 

The curricula in this department are designed to prepare ^^udent^^^^^^^^ 
following occupations or positions: specialized crop ^^™!^^;. f ^."J^^^^^ 
ing; technical workers in private and public concerns; scientists ms^^ and 
cro; technology; and agricultural representatives with commercial and 
industrial organizations. 

The curriculum in crop production aims to give the student the funda- 
mental principles of crop production. Special effort is made *<> adapt the 
work to the young man who wishes to apply the scientific prmciples of field 
crop culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough free- 
dom is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register 
for subjects which might go along with the growing of crops on his par- 



66 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ticular farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should 
be well fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, 
for employment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State 
or Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The curriculum in plant breeding aims to prepare students for work in 
this field, with commercial seed companies, in the Federal Government, and 
in State Agricultural Experiment Stations. In this curriculum, founda- 
tions are also laid in fundamental sciences for the graduate work which 
many will want to pursue in further preparation for advancement in the 
work of plant breeding. 

The curriculum in soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to take 
up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The departAient 
possesses the necessary equipment and facilities for instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especial- 
ly in the pot culture laboratories, and in the experimental fields at the 
station and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
research as technical workers or as representatives of commercial or in- 
dustrial organizations, to conduct research in experiment stations, to teach 
in agricultural colleges, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Plant 
Industry and the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

Agronomy Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year • I II 

Agron. 1 — Cereal Crop Production 3 — 

Agron. 2 — Forage Crop Production — 3 

Geol. 1— Geology 3 — 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers. — 3-5 

*Chem. 12Afs — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

*Chem. 12Bfs — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 (►2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 

Select from following: 

Phys. Ifs — General Physics 4 4 

Any course under 50 — Agriculture 2-4 2-4 

tMath. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

13-15 13-17 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ^7 

« J -♦;«« Semester 

Crop Production ^^ 

Junior Year ... 3 — 

Zool * 104 — Genetics ^_^ 

Agron. 51— Technology of Crop Quality _ ^ 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology ^ g 

Eng. 4, 5— Expository Writing ^ _ 

Pit Phys. 101— Plant Physiology ~ __ 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics ^ ^ 

Electives — — 

15-17 16 

Senior Year - ^ 

Agron. 103— Crop Breeding ^ __ 

A E. 100— Farm Economics - "•; __ 

Jgron. 121-Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations ^J ^_^ 

Agron. 54— Selected Crop Studies ^ __ 

Soils 53— Soil Geography ^ _ 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery ^ ^ 

Agr. Engr. 107— Farm Drainage ^ _ 

A. E. 108— Farm Management ^ ^^ 

Electives "* — 

17-18 14-15 



Crop Breeding 

Junior Year 

Eng. 4, 5— Expository Writing - __ 

Econ. 37- -Fundamentals of Economics ^ 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology ^ 

Phys. Ifs— General Physics ^ 

Zool. 104— Genetics o 

Agron. 51— Technology of Crop Quality ^ 

Electives ** 

16 



2 

3 
4 
4 



16 



*Under certain conditions a sequence in biology may be substitnted for Organic Chem- 

istrv 

tRequired of students majoring in Plant Breeding. 



68 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



69 



Semester 

Senior Year I // 

Stat. 14 — Elements of Statistics 3 ^ 

Stat. 112 — Biological Statistics — 3 

Agron. 103 — Crop Breeding 2 — 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage — 2 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 — 

Agron. 121 — Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations 2 — 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology 4 — 

Soils 53 — Soil Geography 3 — 

Electives — 11 



17 

Soils 

Junior Year 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 

Soil s 102 — Soil Management — 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Electives 6 

16 

Senior Year 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 3 

Agron. 121 — Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations 2 

Soils 53 — Soil Geography 3 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage — 

Soils 112 — Soil Conservation — 

Electives 8 



16 



16 



3 



3 

8 
16 



2 

3 

11 

16 



Socf LtusSs! Snical workers and advisors in private and pubUc 

^^BvTJoper u. of the electives allowed in tM-™!^^^^^^^^^^^ 
equip himself to become an owner or operator f^ ^enera^ or P 
Sock farm; to become a county agricultural agent to -ee^the J_^^^^ 
ments of positions with certam types «« P^^^**f .^^f^j^g ^to become quali- 
concems; or, with more technical -"^ ^P^"f f^^^^^^^^^^^^^ work in State 
fled for instructional work m <=«"«?«^' *°" '"™^e7rch laboratories. 

studies in some specific phase of animal science. 

Modern beef cattle, horse, and sheep barns are located on the campus; a 
livSck f arm within a short distance of the University and the possession 
of cho ce h^^^^^^ flocks provide the department with the equipment and 

»es so essential for instruction and for research in animal husbandry 

Through the courtesy of Maryland breeders, the Bureau of Animal 
InLtry' and BeltsviUe Research Center, additional '^^^^^^^^^^^ 
herds and flocks, are available for instructional purposes. The .^^^^^^^J^^^^ 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry in Washington are approximately eight 
miles from the University campus. 

The curriculum for the sophomore, junior, and senior years is suggested 
as a guide for students wishing to major in the animal husbandry field. 

Animal Husbandry Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year ^ « 

Chem. 12Afs— Elements of Organic Chemistry ^ 

Chem. 12Bfs— Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 ^ 

A. H. 2— Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry ^ 

D. H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying "~ ^ 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology -• ^ ^ 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics ^ 

Geol. 1— Geology ^ 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers ^ ^ 

Agron. 2— Forage Crop Production - -■ 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) 1—1 V ^ 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1— IJ ^ 

Electives - — — 

16 17 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



71 



Semester 

Junior Year I // 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 2 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding 3 — 

A. H. 53 — Principles of Breeding — 3 

A. H. 112 — Livestock Markets and Marketing 2 — 

A. H. 55 — Livestock Management _ — 2 

A. H. 31 — Livestock Judging — 2 

*A. H. 64— Sheep Production 2 — 

*A. H. 67— Pork Production — 2 

Zool. 104— Genetics - 3 — 

Electives 4 5 

16 16 



Senior Year 

*A. H. 60— Beef Cattle Production ! 2 

*A. H. 69— Draft Horse Production — 

A. H. 114 — Animal Nutrition 3 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management — 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

V. S. 101 — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 3 

V. S. 102— Animal Hygiene — 

Electives 5 



16 



2 
3 



3 
8 

16 



BOTANY 

The department offers three major fields of work: general botany and 
morphology; plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology. The 
required courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same 
for all students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botanical 
courses to suit his particular interests in botanical science. Both the junior 
and senior years also allow considerable freedom in the election of non- 
botanical courses, in order to provide a fairly broad cultural education. 
Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish to 
meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates may 
elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined lays a good foundation for students who 
wish to pursue graduate work in botanical science in preparation for col- 



1 cr. teaching and for research in state experiment stations, in the United 
states Department of Agriculture, and in private research institutions and 
laboratories. . . f 

The curriculum also affords students an opportunity for traimng for 
other vocations involving various botanical applications, such as extension 
work and positions with seed companies, canning compames, compames 
making spray materials, and other commercial concerns. 

Botany Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

got, 20— Diseases of Plants • 

got. 2— General Botany 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology 

Math. 8, 9— Elements of College Mathematics 

*Modern Language 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 

Electives 



.2—2 
1—1 
.1—1 



Junior Year 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology. 

Phys. Ifs— General Physics 

got. 50— Plant Taxonomy 

got. 51— Plant Microtechnique 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

Bot. 52 — Seminar 

Pit. Phys. 102— Plant Ecology 

Botanical Electives (Maximum). 
Other Electives (Minimum) 



Semester 


I 


// 


4 


— 


— 


4 


4 




3 


3 


3 


3 

• 


2 


2 




4 


16 


16 


/ 


// 


4 




4 


4 




3 




2 


8 


7 




— 


16 


16 


3 


— . 


1 


1 




3 


6 


6 


6 


6 



16 



16 



*Only two production courses are required for graduation. The student may choose 
any two of these four courses to fulfill this requirement. 



*Twelve hours of modern language are required. If it is not begun until the sophomore 
year, the last six hours will be elected in the junior or senior year. 



72 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



73 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The department offers instruction in two major lines of work: dairy pro- 
duction and dairy manufacturing. The curricula are designed to prepare 
students for practical work in dairy farming and dairy manufacturing in- 
dustries, for scientific work in the dairy industry, and for technical workers 
with milk cooperatives, dairy breed associations, and private and public 
concerns. 

In the dairy production curriculum, students are given technical and 
practical training in the breeding, feeding, management, and selection of 
dairy cattle and in the handling and marketing of milk and milk products. 
With additional courses in the physical, biological and social sciences, stu- 
dents are qualified to become owners or operators of dairy farms, for breed 
promotion and sales work, for employment with private and cooperative 
business organizations, and for county agent work. By careful election of 
courses the student may lay a foundation for instructional work in colleges, 
and for investigational work in experiment stations and commercial research 
laboratories. 

For those students interested in dairy manufacturing, the curriculum is 
designed to prepare students for practical and scientific work concerned 
with the processing and distribution of milk, manufacture and handling of 
butter, cheese, ice cream, and other milk products, and in dairy plant opera- 
tion and management. Students who major in dairy manufacturing are 
qualified for the many technical and applied positions in the various 
branches of the dairy industry. 

These curricula permit specialization in the respective fields, but allow 
considerable latitude in the election of courses in other departments. When 
desirable, changes may be made to meet the special needs of some students. 
For example, those students who desire to enter the field of teaching and 
research should elect more of the scientific courses offered in this, and 
other, departments. In most cases these students will be advised to pursue 
graduate work in some particular phase of dairy science. 

The dairy industry of Maryland ranks first in economic importance among 
the agricultural industries of the State. Such an industry needs and de- 
pends upon intelligent, well trained men for work in dairying. The depart- 
ment is equipped with modern dairy barns, dairy herds, dairy manufactur- 
ing plant and salesroom, and laboratories and other facilities for instruc- 
tional and research work in dairy husbandry. 



Dairy Production Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 12Afs— Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 ^ 2 

Chem. 12Bfs— Elements of Organic Laboratory .- 1 

^ H, 2— Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 3 — 

D. H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology ^ ~ 

Geol. 1— Geology - ^ 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers 

Agron. 2— Forage Crop Production 

jyi I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) 1—1 V 2 Z 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1—1 J 

Electives » 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Eng. 4, 5— Expository Writing 2 2 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics — « 

Zool. 104— Genetics ^ "~ 

A. H. 53— Principles of Breeding — ^ 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding ^ 

D. H. 50— Dairy Cattle Management 2 

D. H. 30— Dairy Cattle Judging — 2 

V. S. 101— Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 3 — 

V. S. 102— Animal Hygiene — ^ 

*Electives 

16 16 

Senior Year 

D. H. 101— Dairy Production 3 — 

D. H. 105— Dairy Breeds and Breeding — 2 

D. H. 113— Market Milk - ^ ~" 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management ^ ~ 

A. H. 114— Animal Nutrition 3 — 

D. H. 119, 120— Dairy Literature 1 ^ 

*Electives ^ ^^ 

16 16 



*Electives from dairy manufacturing, animal husbandry, agronomy, and veterinary 
science are recommended. 



74 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



75 



Dairy Manufacturing Curriculum ^ t 

Sophomore Year I /; 

Chem. 12Afs — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 12Bfs — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Chem. 4 — Quantitative Analysis — 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 3 — 

Bact. 5 — Bacteriological Technique 2 — 

D. H. 1 — Fundamentals of Dairying _ — 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 — 

Phys. 3fs — Introductory Physics 3 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2] 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 1 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — IJ 

piectives — 1 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Bact. 101 — Milk Bacteriology 4 — 

Bact. 102 — Dairy Products Bacteriology „.. — 3 

D. H. 40 — Grading Dairy Products — 1 

D. H. 64 — Dairy Mechanics , 2 — 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 2 

D. H. 109— Cheese Making 3 — 

D. H. 110— Butter Making 2 — 

D. H. Ill— Concentrated Milks — 2 

D. H. 112— Ice Cream Making — 3 

*Electives _ 3 5 

16 16 
Senior Year 

D. H. 113— Market Milk 5 — 

D. H. 114 — Analysis of Dairy Products - — 4 

D. H. 68 — Dairy Accounting 1 — 

D. H. 72 — Dairy Plant Experience 2 — 

D. H. 70 — Dairy Plant Management — 1 

D. H. 119, 120— Dairy Literature 1 1 

*Electives 7 10 



Suggested Elective Courses: Semester 

I II 

Mkt. 101 — Principles of Marketing 3 — 

Mkt. 106 — Salesmanship — 2 

Mkt. 109 — Principles of Advertising 3 — 

Bus. 164 — Business Law — 3 

Chem. 50A, B — General Physiological Chemistry 4 or 4 

Stat. 14 — Elements of Statistics 3 — 

Bact. Ill — Food Bacteriology 3 — 

Bact. 112 — Sanitary Bacteriology — 3 

Dr. 4fs — Mechanical Drawing 1 1 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 — 

Bus. 71 — Fundamentals of Business Administration 2 — 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This department trains entomologists for work in state and federal ento- 
mological bureaus, in preparation for commercial pest control operations 
and finally, but not least, for actual insect control on their own farms. In 
addition, entomology is taught as a cultural subject because of its wide 
field of application, its varied subject matter, and the general interest of 
the public in the small creatures about it. 

The success of the farmer, particularly the fruit and vegetable grower, 
is in large measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of pre- 
venting or combating pests. Successful methods of control are emphasized 
in the economic courses. 

The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
Extension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the State Entomologist 
is in one administrative unit enables the student to avail himself of the 
many advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students may be assigned 
to work on Experiment Station projects already under way. The depart- 
ment takes every advantage of the facilities offered by the Bureau of 
Entomology of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the Beltsville Research 
Center, the National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, various other local 
laboratories, the libraries in Washington, and the Washington Entomological 
Society. Thus students are given many opportunities of meeting authorities 
in the various fields of entomology, to observe projects under way, consult 
collections, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology. Following is 
the suggested curriculum in entomology: 



16 



16 



*Electives in dairy production, chemistry, and bacteriology are recommended. 



7G 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Entomology Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 12Afs — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 12Bfs — Elements of Organic Laboratory 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 

Ent. 2 — Insect Morphology 

Modern Language 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



Semester 



I 

2 
1 
4 



15 



Junior Year 

E nt. 50 — Insect Taxonomy 3 

Ent. 51 — Advanced Taxonomy. — 

Ent. 101 — Economic Entomology. 4 

Phys. 3fs — Introductory Physics 3 

Modern Language 3 

Electives 3-4 

16-17 
Senior Year 

*Ent. 103, 104— Insect Pests 3 

Ent. 112fs— Seminar 1 

tEnt. 110, 111— Special Problems 2 

Electives 10-11 



// 

2 
1 



3 
3 



15 



3 

3 

7-8 

16-17 

3 

1 

2 

10-11 



16-17 16-17 
The curriculum in entomology is based upon the option of elementary 
mathematics in the freshman year and the selection of another elective may 
interfere severely with the taking of remaining required courses in subse- 
quent years. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 77 

FARM MANAGEMENT* 

The curriculum in farm management is designed to prepare students for 
the following types of positions: on the farm as farm operators and farm 
managers; with farm organizations, such as the Farm Bureau and farmers' 
co-operatives; with private and corporate business concerns; and with 
State and Federal agencies, such as college teachers, extension and investi- 
gational workers. 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental train- 
ing in the basic economic principles underlying farming. While the cur- 
riculum is developed primarily from the viewpoint of farm management, 
sufficient basic courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, finance, 
and land economics are included to give the student the foundation needed to 
meet the production and distribution problems confronting the individual 
farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farm 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and operat- 
ing the farm as a business enterprise. It requires not only knowledge of 
many factors involved in the production of crops and animals, but also 
administrative ability to coordinate them into the most efficient farm 
organization. Such knowledge enables the student to perceive the rela- 
tionship of several factors of production and distribution as applic- 
able to local conditions, and to develop an executive and administrative 
capacity. 

Farm Management Curriculum ' Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 2 

Math. 8, 9 — Elements of College Mathematics 3 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 3 

Hort. 1 — General Horticulture 3 — 

Geol . 1 — Geology ~ 3 — 

Agron. 1 — Cereal Crop Production 3 — 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers — 3 

P. H. 2 — Poultry Management — 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2] 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) 1— 1 !► 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1— IJ 

16 16 



♦During some years a part af this requirement will have to be taken during the junior 
year. 

tFlexible credit hours make it possible for the student to satisfy all the requirements 
in this course during a single semester if his schedule permits. 



* Students electing the Farm Management curriculum must present evidence of having 
acquired at least one year of practical farm experience. 



78 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Semester 

Junior Year I // 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 -> 

A. E. 102 — Marketing of Farm Products — 3 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 3 — 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding. 3 ^ 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking — 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 -~ 

A. H. 2 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry — 3 

Electives 4 7 

16 IC 
Senior Year 

A. E. 103 — Cooperation in Agriculture 3 — 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 3 — 

A. E. 104— Farm Finance — 3 

R. Ed. 110— Rural Life and Education — 3 

Stat. 15fs — Business Statistics 3 3 

A. E. Ill — Land Economics 3 — 

A. E. 106 — Prices of Farm Products — 3 

Electives ^ 4 4 



16 



16 



HORTICULTURE 



The department offers instruction in pomology (fruits), olericulture 
(vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening. These 
courses prepare students to enter the field of commercial production and 
to meet the demand for men in the horticultural industries. Students are 
likewise prepared to enter the allied industries as horticultural workers 
with fertilizer companies, seed companies, equipment manufacturers, and 
others. Students who wish to enter specialized fields of research and teach- 
ing may take advanced work in the department. • 

The State of Maryland and other states offer many excellent opportu- 
nities in horticultural industries: large fruit enterprises, producing apples, 
peaches, strawberries, raspberries, and other fruits for domestic and foreign 
markets; extensive greenhouse establishments, growing flowers and vege- 
tables; canning and preserving factories in vegetable and fruit areas; nur- 
series, propagating trees and plants of all kinds; and concentrated farming 
areas devoted to vegetable production for market and canning. These in- 
dustries require men with a specialized knowledge of production and mar- 
keting phases of the horticultural crops which are produced. 

Students in horticulture have considerable latitude in the selection of 
horticultural courses, but usually find it advisable to specialize by electing 
all of the courses offered in pomology, olericulture, or floriculture, accord- 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 79 

in? to the suggested curricula. Students who wish to specialize in land- 
scape architecture will be given an opportunity to secure certain basic 
courses in the curriculum for ornamental horticulture, but must plan to 
spend additional time at another institution where a complete landscape 
curriculum is offered. 

The department is equipped with several greenhouses and a modern 
horticultural building, with laboratories and cold storage rooms, for horti- 
cultural teaching and research. Extensive acreage near the University is 
devoted to the growing of fruit trees and vegetable crops. An arboretum 
with many ornamental plants has been started on the University grounds 
for use in teaching of horticulture and other related subjects. 

The suggested curricula will be adjusted to the special needs of students 
whose interests lie in the general scientific field or those who are preparing 
for work in technical lines. The object is to fit students most effectively to 
fill positions of several types. 

Pomology and Olericulture Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants ^ 

Geol. 1— Geology ^ 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics ~ 3 

Bot. 2— General Botany - "" ^ 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology — ^ 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers — ^-5 

Hort. 1, 2 — General Horticulture 3 3 

Eng. 4, 5— Expository Writing ~ 2 2 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) ^—^\ 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1—1 J 

17 17-19 

Junior Year 

Hort. 3, 4— Fruit Production 2-3 2 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology ^ — 

Hort. 8— Small Fruits — 2-3 

Hort. 5— Vegetable Production - — ^ 

Pit. Path. 101— Diseases of Special Crops ~ ~ 3 — 

Hort. 106— World Fruits and Nuts — — 2 

Electives - ^"'^ ^^ 

15-17 15-18 



80 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



81 



Senior Year Semester 

Zool. 104— Genetics ^^ 

Hort. 101, 102-Technology of Horticultural Plan^^^^ 2 1 

Hort. 103, 104— Technology of Horticultural Plants (Vese- 
tables) ^ 

Ent. 103, 104— Insect PestsZZ ' ? ^ 

Hort. lllfs— Seminar ' ^ ^ 

Hort. 109— Systematic Pomology ~Z o ^ 

or "~~ 

Hort. 110— Systematic Olericulture 3 

or 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management o 

Electives "^ 

1 7 



Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Curriculum 
Sophomore Year 

Geol. 1 — Geology 

Eng. 4, 5— Expository Writing "~IZ 9 

Hort. 1— General Horticultural 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) IIZIZZZIl2^" 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women)... 1—1 1 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) .....Z.l— 1 

Elect From the Following Courses: 

Bot. 2— General Botany 

Hort. 11 — Landscape Gardening 

Surv. 2fs— Plane Surveying ZZ.Z.Z 2 

Dr. 1 — Engineering Drawing o 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants . 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology. 

Junior Year 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers. 

Hort. lOTfs— Plant Materials "ZZ ." o 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology ..Z~~"~. 4 

Elect From the Following Courses: 

Zool. 104— Genetics « 

Hort. 5— Vegetable Production ___ 

Hort. 14— Civic Art ZZZZ""~ __ 

Hort. 12, 13 — Landscape Design o 

Hoi-t. lOfs — Commercial Floriculture o 



15 



4 
3 





o 



14-17 

5 
2 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

Hort. 1 1 If s — Seminar 1 1 

Hort. 112fs— Special Problems 1-2 1-2 

Hort. 105 — Technology of Horticultural Plants (Ornamen- 

Isiis) 2 — 

Electives 11-12 13-14 

16 16 

Elect from courses listed for the Sophomore and Junior Years and from 
other courses* offered in Entomology, Agronomy, Agricultural Engineering, 
Botany, Economics, Genetics, Statistics, Plant Physiology, Bacteriology, 
Plant Pathology, Speech, English, Business Administration, Modern Lan- 
guages, Fine Arts, or Education. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry 
improvement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The poultry industry of Maryland ranks second to dairying in economic 
importance among the agricultural industries of the State. Nearby markets 
provide a profitable outlet for poultry products of high quality in larger 
volume than now produced in the State. The necessary quality can be 
attained by intelligent, trained poultry husbandmen. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. For example, most students will be expected to take 
the courses in Agricultural Industry and Resources and Farm Organization 
offered in the general curriculum for the freshman year. Superior students, 
definitely anticipating preparation for a professional career in poultry hus- 
bandry, will be expected to take language instead. However, all students 
majoring in poultry husbandry will be required to complete 24 semester 
hours in poultry husbandry. 



3 
2 
3 
4 



16 14-17 



*Such electives are advised for all students in Horticulture. 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
Poultry Husbandry Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

p ^' ^— Po"'try Production 

F. H 2— Poultry Management 

Speech 4fs--Advanced Public Speaking::: 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C (Men^ 

'"ES.tr,?^,;^:;;^'-^ <*— ' ^i-^. 

of Farm Products ""^n^^cs, A. E. 102— Marketing 

Other Electives : Thes^ win k^ Z ." 

sciences, modern langua's a'nd"! T ''' P*^^^'^^' 
agriculture "suages, and elementary courses in 



Semester 

^ II 

3 



3 
3 



16 



Junior Year 

P. H. 50— Poultry Biology 

P. H. 51— Poultry Genetics .. ^ 

P. H. 52— Poultry Nutrition — 

P. H. 56— Poultry Physiology 2 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology ~~" 

A. E. 104-Farm Finance 4 

Zool. 104— Genetics — 

Choose from the following- ^ 

Chem. 50 A, B-General Physiological Chemistry 



or 



Bact. 2— Pathogenic Bacteriology 

Econ. 37-Fundamentals of Economics ' ■)' ~ 

^actives ""I!''""" "' ^^™ ^'°^-*«l ' 



3 
9 



3 
3 



16 



3 
2 
3 



16 



1-5 



16 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



83 



Semester 

Senior Year ' I II 

P. H. 104 — Poultry Marketing Problems 2 — 

P. H. 105 — Egg Marketing Problems — 2 

V. S. 57, 107— Poultry Hygiene — 3 

V. S. 108 — Avian Anatomy 3 — 

P. H. 107 — Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems 2 — 

P. H. 58 — Commercial Poultry Management — 2 

Stat. 14 — Elements of Statistics 3 — 

Stat. 112 — Biological Statistics — 3 

Bus. 102 — Organization and Management 3 — 

F. Tech. 108 — Preservation of Poultry Products — 2 

Electives '. ' 3 4 



16 



16 



SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students (see Special Students, Sect. I) may, with consent of 
the Dean, register as special students and pursue a program of studies 
not included in any regular curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs of 
the individual. All university fees for these special students are the same 
as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrangements 
have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission 
to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different departments. 
This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit-growers, 
gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to get away 
from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are $5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour 
per month for the time of attendance. One registration is good for any 
amount of regular or intermittent attendance during a period of four years. 



COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SaENCES 




I 



''The object of a liberal train- 
in^ is not learning, but discipline 
and the enlightenment of the 
mind. It is citizenship of the 
world of knowledge, hut not 



ownership of it. 



• . 99 



— Woodrow Wilson, 
in "The Spirit of Learning." 



86 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



87 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

L. B. Broughton, Dean. 

Reba a. Turner, Secretary to Dean, 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides liberal training in the biolog- 
ical sciences, economics, history, languages and literatures, mathematics, 
philosophy, the physical sciences, political science, psychology, and sociology. 
It thus affords an opportunity to acquire a general education as a founda- 
tion for whatever profession or vocation the student may choose. In 
particular, it lays the foundation for the professions of dentistry, law, 
medicine, nursing, teaching, and theology, and the more technical profes- 
sions of engineering, public health service, public administration, and 
business. The College of Arts and Sciences offers to the students of the 
other colleges of the University training in fundamental subjects, both 
classical and scientific, which should permit them to acquire the perspective 
necessary for liberal culture and public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and four Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the following 
departments: 

A. The Division of Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entom- 
ology, Genetics, and Zoology. 

B. The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages and Litera- 
tures, Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Mod- 
ern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

C. The Division of Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 

Mathematics, and Physics. 

D. The Division of Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 

The work of the first and second years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences is taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student 
a basic general education, and to prepare him for specialization in the 
junior and senior years. 

The Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in the College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and 
senior years, and designate general requirements, the fulfillment of which 
is necessary to qualify a student for admission to major work in an Upper 
Division. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. 



Section III- 

- Sn- Tu^ *™" " - -* '" *'= "*^ '" *" " 

of the School of Medicine Academic and Nursing curriculum. 

Those electing the combined f ^'^f ' jl' -^ Nursing may be awarded 
for which ^^^ ^^^^^l;l^^fZLZ^l^.e the prenursing curriculum 
upon the completion of the *^" ^ ' j^ Baltimore, 
af College Park before the N^^^^Jg f J^^^^^ ,„d Law may be awarded the 
Those taking the combined <=r^' omnktion of three years of the work of 
Bachelor of Arts degree ^tf*^;,^ toe law course, or its equivalent, m 
this college and one year of the full time 
the School of Law. 
Residence . , ipadine to a baccalaureate de- 

University. 

Requirements for Degrees ..p College of Arts and Sciences may be 

; The baccalaureate degree from *heCoii g requirements: 

i conferred upon a student who has satisfied the 

* 1. University Requirements. . 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements. 

4. Special Upper Division Requirements. 

1. Urdversity Require .^ents-See Section L ^^^ ^^^^^ 

2. College of Arts anaS^nences ^f^-^:;^;-^rZs^c military science 
must be acquired, not includmg the six creo 



88 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



89 



required of all able-bodied men students, or the six credits of physical edu- 
cation for women and for such men as are excused from military science. 

A student must acquire at least 58 credits, exclusive of military science 
and physical education, with an average grade of at least C in the Lower 
Division, before being admitted to an Upper Division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as possi- 
ble, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before 
graduation : 

I. English and Speech — fourteen credits. Of these. Survey and Compo- 
sition I (Eng. ly) and Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) are required. 

II. Foreign Languages and Literatures — twelve credits of one language. 

III. Social Sciences — twelve credits. This requirement is fulfilled by elect- 
ing courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

IV. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — twelve credits. Of these one year 
must be in natural science. 

V. Military Science or Physical Education — six credits. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — At the beginning of the junior year 
each student must select a major in one of the fields of study of an Upper 
Division, and before graduation must complete a major and a minor. The 
courses constituting the major and the minor selected must conform to the 
requirements of the department in which the major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or a minor the student should have acquired 
12 prerequisite credits in fundamental courses in the field chosen, or in a 
closely related field satisfactory to the department and the Division, with 
an average grade of at least C before credit will be allowed towards com- 
pletion of the major or minor requirements. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits required 
in the Lower Division, of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 credits in 
one of the fields of study. Of these credits at least 10 must be acquired in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist, in addition to the 12 prerequisite credits required 
in the Lower Division, of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 credits in 
some field of study other than the major. At least 8 of these must be 
acquired in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Not more than 15 credits may be acquired in any field of study other 
than the major or minor during the last two years, in addition to those 
which meet the College of Arts and Sciences requirements. 



be at least C. A general average of at least O is 4 
4 Special Upper Division Requi^-ements- 
A Division of Biological Sciences. See page 92. 
b' Division of Humanities. See page 100. 
C Division of Physical Sciences. See page 103. 
D. Division of Social Sciences. See page HI. 

Certification of High School Teachers ^ ^^^^^^^.^.^ 

If courses are properly ^^^osen m the fieW of e ^_^^ ^^.^^ ^^^ 
,i,h school teacher can Prepare^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

minor in one of the Upper Uivis ^^^.^^ ^^^^ ^ 

teaching. 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools ^^ 

" trr^b-r of c^t. Which ™, 1» .cc.p« .»» .>» -"«- "■"^'» 
and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture— Fifteen. 

College of Commercfr— Fifteen. 

College of Education— Twenty. 

College of Engineering— Fifteen, 

College of Home Economics-Fifteen. . ^^ 

School of Law-In the combined program the first year 

SchoTlt tline-ln the combined program the first year of medicine 

Schorf Nu:rg-;'the combined program the three years of nursing 
must be completed. 

Normal Load ^^^^j^^ pe. 

The normal load for the f'^f J^^^^^^.^^Se or physical education, 
semester, including one hour of basic "^^J"^^'; JJ^^ ^^mester, 

The normal load for the sophomore year is seventeen cr^^ P 
two of which are in military science or physical education 

The normal load in the Junior -^ sen or V-. is l^credi^^^ ^^^ 

With the permission of the Dean of the C°llese ot maximum 

the Chairman of the Division, this load may be increased 



90 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



shall it exceed 19 credits ^tseJster" ^ °""""' '"* ''^ "» '^^^^ 
Advisers 

Ji" r^,?..!,'': """"f" '"'' """»' " "» Co.l.g. of Art. .„, 

miTTif •^"**/^"*°^' '""^t *=°"«'der the chairmen of their major depart 
ments their advisors, and shall consult them about the arrangeLents „; 

JeSreidir '' ''''''''' ^"' ^"^ "^^^ -"- ^" whicTr;!;' 

THE LOWER DIVISION 

study is to be obtained ''^'"on^trated, if permission to pursue a major 

.iven^Sfr ^S f. T^f^^^^ ^^77 f/" ^^ 

years, and a stuf::^ n£ l::^^^' ZTeuV^'T/.'"''' '""^ «'^* ^^^ 
Upper Division until the beSn^Z^u^T ^ ^"^''^''^ **» ^"^ particular 
necessary to select a m^jor ^ ^""""' y^^""' ^* ^''''='> ^'"e it is 

The minimum requirements of the College of Art<, ar,^ Q.- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Arts and Science Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Required: 

*Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking _ 

Foreign Language 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology) 3 or 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men)..... 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — ^ 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — % 

Elect from the following so that the total credits each semes- 
ter are 16 or 17: 

H. Ifs — A Survey of Western Civilization 

H. 3fs — History of England and Great Britain 

H. 5, 6 — American History 

Math. 8, 9; 21, 22— Mathematics 3 or 

Bus. 1 — Economic Geography 

Bus. 4 — Development of Commerce and Industry - 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 

Pol. Sci. 4 — State and Local Government \. - 

Latin or Greek „ 

L. S. 1 — Library Methods 

Art 1, 2, 3, 4— Art 

Mus. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5— Music _ .V2 to 

Dr. 4fs — Mechanical Drawing 



91 



Semester 


I 


// 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


3 or 4 



3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



3 
1 
2 

2 
1 



16-17 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition _ 3 

Foreign Language _ 3 

General Electives from the College of Arts and Sciences ful- 
filling, as far as possible, the specific requirements of the 

College of Arts and Sciences 9-10 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2' 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 j. 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1—1 



3 
3 
3 

3 or 4 



or 



or 



3 
3 
3 
3 

1 
2 

y2 to2 

1 

16-17 

3 
3 



9-10 
2 



17-18 17-18 



*A placement test in English is given during Registration Week to assist in determining 
^vhether a student is adequately prepared for Eng. Ifs. After this the student is given five 
^^eeks trial in Eng. If. If he has failed the original examination and is also unsuccessful 
in an examination at the end of the five weeks period, he is transferred to Eng. A, a 
preparatory course without credit. He may also be placed in Eng. A if he passes the 
original examination, but fails the second. 



92 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



93 



A— DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Biological Sciences is organized to stimulate clo,. 
coordination between all activities in the field of biology. The Divisio 
includes the Departments of Bacteriology and Zoology. 

Each department within the Division has one or more established cur 
ncula. To meet the demands for technically trained workers in the biological 
sciences these curricula are designed to give specialized training, particu- 
lar y durmg the last two years of college work. They provide, more specifi- 
cally, the basic knowledge and experience required for (1) teaching in 
secondary schools; (2) research and regulatory work in federal, state, and 
municipal departments and bureaus; (3) admission to graduate study in the 
preparation for college teaching and advanced research; and (4) entrance 
to the professional schools of medicine, dentistry, and nursing. 

Instruction 

Alliance of the biological sciences presents an opportunity for the pur- 
suit of a well coordinated program of study. Completion of a suggested 
undergraduate curriculum under any one of the departments fulfilfs th 

"itZr""?/ *!!" J^'f'" "^ ^^'^'^°' «^ S"«"^«- Advanced work also 
is presented m each of the biological sciences for the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. e => ^ mdsier or 

Although the undergraduate training in any Department of the Division is 
both thorough and well-balanced, nevertheless, one or more years of post- 
graduate instruction and experience and the attainment of an advanced 
degree are desirable in preparation for the larger opportunities that arise in 
this rapidly expandmg field. The need for workers in the fields of agri- 

coi-^Lt "^PPf *""'t'^^ ^°'- specialization and has made it necessary to 
correlate closely the undergraduate courses in this Division with Sose 
offered in the Graduate School in order to equip the advanced student 
adequately m his own work and in related fields. 

for'^t'wf • r'"!"!,"'" '" ^'""'■^^ ^'°'*'^''=^' S""^"<^« ^« presented primarily 
for those interested m teaching biological science or general science in 
elementary and high schools. Students in the prepr^fessional schoJs 

mav irfJ^ """^"It^^ *"''" T'^ ^°'' *^ ^'^^^ °f Bachelor of Science 
may, in following the preprofessional curriculum, complete a major in 

certain departments of the Division of Biological Sciences by the proper 
selection of courses. ^ 

The particular professions and lines of work for which each department 
n this Division prepares its students are outlined in greater detail under 
tne description of each department. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements, See Section I. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 



3. Physical Sciences — Ten semester hours in addition to the twelve re- 
quired by the College of Arts and Sciences, the total to include basic 
courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. 

Fields of Study 

The curriculum outlined in each field of study represents the courses 
which, in the judgment of the Department and Division, are necessary for 
an adequate training in the particular subject. In most curricula enough elec- 
tives are included to give the student ample opportunity to study subjects 
outside his major or minor departments in which he may have become in- 
terested or in which further training is desired. 

The courses in Bacteriology prepare students for such positions as 
dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists in federal, state, and municipal 
departments and for public health, research, and industrial positions. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

The Department has been organized with two purposes in view. The first 
is to provide a high degree of training for positions as bacteriologists in 
federal, state and municipal laboratories; as well as trained technicians in 
hospital, clinic or private laboratories; and as control or research bacteri- 
ologists in sanitary, dairy, food or soil science. 

The second is to make available to all students of the University a 
general knowledge of bacteriology and its applications. A variety of courses 
make it possible for every student to go as extensively into the many 
phases of public health, food and sanitary bacteriology as may be desired. 

Bacteriology 

The curriculum in Bacteriology is arranged to provide training in all 
the principle phases of the science, namely, (1) the cause and prevention 
of disease, including the identification of the causative bacteria,' (2) the 
phenomena of immunity, including its application in disease, (3) the lab- 
oratory diagnostic procedures for medical technicians, (4) the microbiology 
of foods and milk, soil, sanitation and water purification and (5) bacterial 
metabolism and classification. College graduation is becoming a prerequi- 
site for entrance into all branches of public health and bacteriological work. 

The basic course in General Bacteriology is designed to present the funda- 
mental nature of microorganisms and their importance and function in the 
lives of man, plants and animals. For major students, it is required that 
they follow the course in General Bacteriology with the course designated 
Bacteriological Technique. This course is a prerequisite to all other 
bacteriology laboratory courses. One then proceeds with other courses as 
outlined in the suggested curriculum. 

All of the subjects listed are required for graduation and should be 
adhered to closely if one plans a four-year program. However, because of 
the unprecedented demand for bacteriologists in both the Armed Services 



94 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



95 



and Civilian Life, a student may plan an accelerated or a three-year pro- 
gram. Such a student will find it necessary to deviate from the sequence 
presented in the curriculum and except for certain basic requirements he 
will be permitted considerable leeway. 

In addition to the basic training represented in the curriculum the work 
of each student is correlated with his or her particular interests. 

Post graduate study is especially encouraged, primarily for those men 
and women who prefer to go into research, industrial work or the teaching 
profession. Facilities are available for investigations in the fields of 
general, medical, food and sanitary bacteriology, as well as in various 
aspects of bacterial physiology. 

University and Experiment Station Fellowships are available to graduate 
students of high standing. Students receiving Fellowships will carry on 
research along specified lines, and usually assist with laboratory instruction 
in the beginning classes. Experience in teaching bacteriology is desirable 
for all graduate students, and opportunities will be made available in so 
far as the facilities of the Department permit. Fellowships sponsored by 
commercial concerns also are frequently available, and offer opportunities 
for research in problems important to industry, with frequent opportunities 
for business contacts. 

Freshmen planning to major in Bacteriology should elect Mathematics 
and may substitute General Bacteriology (Bact. 1) for either Botany or 
Zoology in the first year. All students planning to major in Bacteriology 
should consult the Department before registration. 

Bacteriology Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 3 — 

Bact. 5 — Bacteriological Technique — 2 

Math. 8, 9 — Elements of College Mathematics 3 3 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

Biology (Botany or Zoology) _.~ — 3-4 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 I 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) .V2 — % 



Sophomore Year 

Bact. 60— Public Health _ 

Bact. 2— Pathogenic Bacteriology ~ 

Chem. 12Afs— Elements of Organic Chemistry ^ 

Chem. 12Bfs— Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 

Language - 

Eng. 4, 5-Expository Writmg - - - 

M I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ^— ^ 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) 

Phys. Ed. Sfs— Physical Activities (Women) 

Electives 



Semester 
I II 



1 — 
4 

2 

1 

3 3 

2 2 



.1—1 
.1—1 



5-7 



Junior Year 

Bact. 101— Milk Bacteriology ,. 

Bact. 112— Sanitary Bacteriology. 

Bact. 115— Serology 

Bact. 116— Epidemiology 



or 



Bact. 60— Public Health 

Physics Ifs— General Physics. 

Electives : 

Social Science 

Other 



3 

2-3 



Senior Year 

Bact. Ill— Food Bacteriology 

Bact. 90, 9 1— Journal Club 

Chem. 50A— General Physiological Chemistry 

Chem. 50B— General Physiological Chemistry Laboratory. 

Electives : 

Social Sciences - 

Bacteriology 

Other - 



3 
1 



2-4 



16-18 16-18 



4 — 

_ 3 

2 



4 — 



3 
2-3 

5-7 



1 

4 



3 
4-6 



17-18 16-17 



1 
2 
2 

3 

4-6 
1-4 



15-16 15-16 



15 17-18 



Medical Technology 

The Department of Bacteriology offers under its direction two years of 
training for those students desiring to become Medical Technicians, but 
who are not in a position to complete the four year curriculum in Bac 
teriology. 



^^ THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

t Jl!!/""^"™ ^ w"'^ ^^ '"^'^'""^ ^^^"'^^^ ^^^ ^id °f the laboratory and 
trained personnel for this service. The clinical laboratory technician is a 
person who by education and training is capable of performing the var out 
routine microscopic, chemical, and bacteriological tests used in the Silgno^ 
and treatment of disease. •as'iosis 

The curriculum in medical technology gives the student training in Biol 
ogy, Bacteriology, Chemistry and Physics. These basic sciences are requhel 
before the student undertakes practical hospital training. 

The curriculum is essentially that required in the first two years of a 

itsTr.? "* r Bacteriology. The Bacteriology Department offers unde 

nl f A T^I *^'' *'^''" *"^'"'"^- ^^^"'•^ qualifying as a Medical Tech- 
nologist the student must spend at least twelve months in a hospital labora- 

S^rn'lli Fl^^'l supervision in order to obtain practical experience in 
the routine laboratory procedures. 

terl^w"^ information may be obtained from the Department of Bac 

Food Technology 

This curriculum offers combinations of courses that will equip the student 

w2^ ^ ? curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals of 
biolop, chemistry, and engineering which, when supported by the proper 
ekctives and by practical experience, will serve as an excellent backgrou.d 

IZ SSsTriretc." '°°' ''''''' °^^^^*^""' ''''"'^'- — *> ^" 

Food Technology Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition « 

Chem. Ifs— General Chemistry. 4 ^ 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology Zl.Zl...... t 

Bact. 5— Bacteriological Technique __ T 

Math. 8, 9— Elements of College Mathematics q q 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking ^ 

Biology (Botany or Zoology) _ J 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men)ZZZIII"Z iZ' r ' 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Personal Hygiene (Women).. Vo—Ui 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs-Physical Activities (Women) 'IZ}^—^ 



15 



17-18 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Sophomore Year 

Chem. SAfs — Elementary Organic Chemistry ^ 

Chem. SBfs — Elementary Organic Laboratory « 

Physics Ifs — General Physics _ - 

Dr. 1 — Engineering Drawing 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. Sfs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 

Electives - 



Juyiior Year 

M. E. 102— Refrigeration 

Bact. Ill — Food Bacteriology ^ 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 

Bact. 112 — Sanitary Bacteriology „ 

Chem. 103Afs — Elements of Physical Chemistry 

Chem. 103Bfs — Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory... 

Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking 

Electives ^ 



97 

Semester 

1 II 

2 2 
2 2 
4 4 
2 — 



2 

5 

17 



3 

3 

2 

1 
2 

5-6 



2 
6 

16 



16-17 
Senior Year 

Bus. 137s — Industrial Management — 

Chem. 115fs — Food Analysis 2 

Food Tech. 130fs — Technology Conference 1 

Food Tech. 110— Regulatory Control _ 1 

Food Tech. 120— Food Sanitation „ — 

Electives „ 12-13 



3 
3 
2 
1 
2. 
2-3 

16-17 

3 
2 
1 

2 

8-9 



16-17 16-17 
ZOOLOGY 

The Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
teaching and for service in the biological bureaus of the United States 
Government and in the biological departments of the various states. 
Emphasis is placed on morphology, physiology, and marine biology. Instruc- 
tion and opportunities for original investigation in the latter are supple- 
mented by the research facilities and courses of instruction offered at 
the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, is 
on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University of Mary- 
land in cooperation with the Maryland Conservation Department, Goucher 
College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Mary- 



98 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



land College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to afford 
a center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward a 
fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The pro- 
gram projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake 
region. 

The laboratory is open throughout the year. Courses are offered for 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students, during a six-week summer 
session, in the following subjects: Protozoology, Economic Zoology, Inverte- 
brates, Ichthyology, Algae, and Diatoms. Not more than two courses may 
be taken by a student, who must meet the requirements of the Department 
of Zoology as well as those of the laboratory before matriculation. Classes 
are limited to eight matriculants. Students pursuing a special research may 
establish residence for the summer, or for the entire year. 

Laboratory facilities; boats of various types fully equipped with pumps, 
nets, dredges, and other apparatus; and shallow water collecting devices 
are available for the work without cost to the students. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Labora- 
tory, apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



Zoology Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Zool. 2fs — Fundamentals of Zoology. 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 

Modern Language (French or German) 

M. I. Ifs.— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1— 1 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — V2 



Semester 



I 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



16 



// 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 

1 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Zool. 4 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — 

Zool. 20 — Vertebrate Embryology. 3 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 

Biological Electives 4 

Math. 8, 9 — Elements of College Mathematics 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) >. 1 — 1 J. 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1—1 J 

18 



3 
3 
4 
3 



18 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 

Semester 

I II 

Junior Year __ 

Zool. 108— Animal Histology ^ _ 

Zool. 104— Genetics ^ ^ 

Phys. Ifs— General Physics ^ ^ 

Zoology, Electives - ~ - "~ ^ g 

Electives " — — 

15 15 

Senior Year ^ 

Zool. 75fs— Journal Club g 

Zool. 103fs— General Animal Physiology ^ ^^ 

Electives -- — — 

15 15 

GENERAL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

A curriculum has been prepared for students who are ^terested m 
biology but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biologica 
sciences. The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general 
principles and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in ^^y^^^^/f/^^^ ,^^^t' o 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that ^eld. Also by a 
proper selection of electives, the educational requirements of the btate 
Department of Education for certification can be met. . 

Requirements 

A major and a minor, comprising together not fewer than 52 credits, 
shall be completed in the Departments included in the Division of Biological 
Sciences, with at least 18 of these credits in the courses for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates in the Division. 

Curriculum for General Biological Sciences Semester 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition • ^ 

Modem Language (French or German) - 3 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking ^ 

Chem. Ifs— General Chemistry ^ ^ 

Bot. 1— General Botany ^ 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology -- "■ 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1—1] 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) V2— ¥2 V 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) ¥2- ^/^J ^ __ 

16 16 



100 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



101 



Sophomore Year ' Semester 

I Ji 

Kng. 2, 3— Survey and Composition 3 

Math. 8, 9— Elements of College Mathematics...ZZ... 3 ^ 

Modem Language (French or German) 3 , 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 3 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology "^ 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men).."lZZIZIZIIIIl2~21 ' 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) i__i I 9 9 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) i— 1 1 

Electives (Biological Sciences) ^ 4 

Junior Year 

Phys. Ifs— General Physics 4 

Electives (Social Sciences) 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) g 

Electives 

3 3 

Z. . 16 16 

Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) 3 ^ 

Electives (Biological Sciences) ZZZZZl 9 9 

Electives 

• • " o 3 

15 15 

B— THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Lit- 
erature, Modem Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts; (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for 
those takmg preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the 
departments of the Division. 

At present, the Division offers major and minor work for the Master 

iLt'f" ^""^ 1^^ ^f^^"" ^^ Philosophy degrees in English Language and 
Literature and in Modem Languages and Literatures; major work for the 
Linguistics, and minor work in Philosophy. Detailed requirements for 
these degrees are given under the departmental announcements and in the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 

Training for the Master of Arts degree is directed especially toward 
acquainting the candidate with methods of research and the literature in 



his own fields. For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the candidate is 
required not only to be thoroughly acquainted with his major and minor 
fields and with the scholarly accomplishments therein, but also to devote 
himself intensively to a specific research problem in which he shall make 
an original contribution to human knowledge. 

Division Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

The following requirements in addition to those of the College of Arts 
and Sciences (including a general average of C, see page 88) should be 
completed, as far as possible, before the beginning of the junior year. 

1. Library Science — one credit. 

2. English 2, 3 — six credits. 

3. Foreign Language — To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language, either ancient or modern. In satisfaction 
of this requirement, he must pass one of the general language exami- 
nations, which are given during the first and last days of each semes- 
ter, with a grade as high as C. Maryland students should take the 
examination not later than the close of the sophomore year or the 
beginning of the junior year. Transfer students should take the exam- 
ination upon entrance. The student must show in this examination that 
he has attained the reading ability to be expected after two years of 
a college language course. When the student has passed the general 
language examination, he will have satisfied the language require- 
ments; but in no case will a student in the Division be graduated who 
has not acquired at least 12 credits of one foreign language in college. 

4. Philosophy — ^three credits. 

5. Psychology — three credits. 

6. Major and Minor Requirements — In selecting a major or a minor, a 
student must have acquired twelve credits in fundamental courses in 
the field chosen, or in a closely related field satisfactory to the depart- 
ment and the Division, with an average grade of at least C, before 
credit will be allowed toward the completion of the major or minor 
requirements. In addition: 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 36 
credits, in addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Divi- 
sion in one of these fields of study. At least 15 of these credits 
must be taken in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 20 
credits, in addition to the 12 credits required in the Lower Divi- 



102 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



103 



sion, in one of the above fields of study not selected for the 
major, or in some other field of study authorized in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. At least 9 of these credits must be taken in 
courses listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

The student must acquire at least 30 credits in courses not included in 
the major or minor. 



MAJOR AND MINOR 
Fields of Study 

Comparative Literature 

English 

French 

** General Linguistics 
German 



*Greek 

Latin 
♦Philosophy 

Speech 

Spanish 



Additional Requirements in English 

In addition to the twelve hours of basic freshman and sophomore English, 
a student taking his major work in this department must pass one semester 
of Advanced Writing or Magazine Writing, one semester of College Gram- 
mar, and one semester of either History of the English Language or Old 
English. In addition, he must complete one of the schedules below : 

a. Major work in general literature (recommended for those preparing 
to teach English in secondary schools) : Introduction to American Litera- 
ture, Shakespeare, and at least six hours from the following: Milton; 
Literature of the 18th Century; Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age; 
Victorian Literature; Modern and Contemporary British Poets; Emerson, 
Thoreau, and Whitman; American Fiction; Contemporary American 
Poetry and Prose; the English Novel; Elizabethan Drama; Major Ameri- 
can Poets. 

b. Major work in American Literature; Survey of American Literature, 
and twelve hours of upperclass courses in American Literature. 

c. Major work in drama: Shakespeare, and twelve hours from the fol- 
lowing: Medieval Drama, Elizabethan Drama, Modern Drama, Contem- 
porary Drama, American Drama, Play Production, Introduction to Com- 
parative Literature (first semester). The Spanish Drama, The Faust 
Legend, Ibsen. 

d. Major work in English Literature: Shakespeare, and at least twelve 
hours in the department in advanced courses other than American Litera- 
ture. 

Minor work may also be elected in these fields, but no major and minor 
combination of a. and b. or of a. and d. will be permitted. 



*Not available at present for a major. 
** Major only for Master of Arts Degree. 



Additional Requirements in Modern Languages 

All students whose major is in Modern Languages are required to take 
Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (Comp. Lit. 101, 102), and 
they are strongly advised to take the review course (French 99, German 99, 
Spanish 99). The following courses are recommended: Survey of Western 
Civilization (H. Ifs), Introduction to Philosophy (Phil. 1), The Old Testa- 
ment as Literature (Comp. Lit. 104), Prose and Poetry of the Romantic 
Xge (Eng. 113, 114), Romanticism in France and Germany (Comp. Lit. 
105, 106). For a major in German, Old English and Beowulf (Eng. 102, 

103). 

Specific requirements for the majors in the different languages are as 
follows: French — French 59fs, 60fs, 75, 76, and three additional year-courses 
in literature in the 100 group; German — German 60fs, 75, 76, and three addi- 
tional year-courses in the 100 group; Spanish — Spanish 60fs, 75, 76, and 
at least 16 hours in the 100 group. 

Donors in English 

Qualified major students who wish to read for honors in English should 
apply to the chairman of the department. The reading may be done in the 
last two years, but should, if possible, be begun earlier. 

C-THE DIVISION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Physical Sciences is composed of the departments of 
Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Physics. On the fol- 
lowing pages the division outlines a number of curricula, each requir- 
ing four years for completion, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts together with five year programs in Chem- 
istry-Chemical Engineering and Applied Physics. The departments of 
study have developed courses to contribute to the liberal education of 
students not primarily interested in science; to provide the basic knowledge 
of the physical sciences necessary in so many professions such as agricul- 
ture, dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, pharmacy, and 
others; to equip teachers of the Physical Sciences for secondary schools 
and colleges; and to train students for professional service as chemists, 
chemical engineers, geologists, mathematicians, physicists, and statisticians; 
and to prepare for graduate study and research in the Physical Sciences. 

The fields of knowledge represented by the Physical Sciences are so vast 
and their applications are so important that it is impossible to deal ade- 
quately with any one in a four-year undergraduate curriculum. Students 
who aspire to proficiency are therefore encouraged to continue their studies 
m the graduate years. In the work leading to a Master's degree, the 
student becomes acquainted with the general aspects of the field. In partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
^he student must demonstrate a command of his chosen field sufficiently 
great to permit him to make independent investigations and creative 
contributions. 



104 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



105 



No degree will be granted to a student in any department of Physical 
Sciences whose general average in all courses offered for the degree is 
below C. To enroll in the Division of Physical Sciences, at the beginning 
of the junior year a student must select a major in one of the departments 
and before graduation must complete a major and a cognate minor selected 
to conform to the requirements of the department in which the major 
work is done. 

The candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will be governed by the requirements for that degree established 
by the University and the College. A student will be considered a major 
in one of the Departments of the Division of Physical Sciencies only when 
he has completed a program approved by the department concerned. The 
following suggested curricula outline the general requirements of these 
departments. 

For the University requirements see Section I. 

For the College of Arts and Sciences requirements and major and minor 
requirements see page 88. 

MATHEMATICS 

The Mathematics curriculum is designed for students who desire a thor- 
ough training in the fundamentals of Mathematics in preparation for 
teaching, research, or graduate work in Mathematics. 

Students majoring in mathematics who have completed freshman and 
sophomore courses in mathematics with distinction in the honors sections 
are eligible to try for honors in mathematics. To receive the honors degree 
in mathematics, a student must: (1) complete the curriculum in mathe- 
matics with an average grade of B in all subjects; (2) pass on honors 
examination in mathematics at the end of the senior year; (3) write a 
satisfactory thesis on an assigned topic in mathematics in the latter half 
of the senior year. Students who wish to try for honors in mathematics 
should consult the chairman of the department at the conclusion of their 
sophomore year. 

The curriculum suggested below offers the student a minor in Physics. 
It is possible, however, for the student to minor in other fields, such as 
statistics or chemistry. 



Mathematics Curriculum 

freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 

Modern Language (French or German) 

j^a^;h. 21— College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 

Math. 22 — Analytic Geometry 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 

^^ I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1— H 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — V2 



Semester 



I 

3 
3 
4 

1 
4 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 

Modern Language (French or German) 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 

Phys. 2fs— General Physics 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



16 

3 
3 
4 
5 



17 



Junior Year 

Math. 141, 142— Higher Algebra 2 

Phys. 101 — Precision of Measurements 3 

Phys. 106 — Theoretical Mechanics — 

Phys. Ill, 112— Mathematical Physics 3 

Math. 18fs — Pictorial Geometry 2 

Elective ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Math. 153 — Advanced Differential Equations 2 

Math. 154 — Topics in Analysis — 

15 

Senior Year 

Math. 130, 131 — Analytic Mechanics 2 

Math. 143, 144— Advanced Calculus 2 

Math. 151— Theory of Equations 2 

Math. 140 — Mathematical Seminar 2 

Phys. 109fs— Electron Physics. ^ 3 

Electives (Including 6 credits in Social Sciences) 4 



// 

3 
3 

4 
1 
4 



16 

3 
3 

4 
5 



17 



3 
3 
2 
3 



15 

2 
2 

2 
3 

6 



15 



15 



106 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



107 



CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry includes agricultural and biological, ana- 
lytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The following curricu- 
lum provides students with a well rounded training in chemistry that is 
adequate preparation for the pursuit of graduate work. 

Chemistry Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I // 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Math. 21 — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 4 — 

Math. 22 — Analytic Geometry — 4 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

Dr. 4f s — Mechanical Drawing 1 1 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ^^— % I 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — % 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 

Modern Language (French or German) _ 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 

Chem. 2fs — Qualitative Analysis 

Chem. 8Afs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 8Bf s — Elementary Organic Laboratory 

M. L 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



17 



2 

3 
4 
3 
2 
2 



18 



Junior Year 

Chem. 6fs — Quantitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 116fs — Advanced Organic Chemistry 2 

Chem. 117fs — Organic Laboratory 2 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 5 

Electives ( Social Sciences) 2 



17 



2 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 



18 

4 
2 
2 
5 
2 



Semester 

Senior Year 7 // 

Chem. 102Afs — Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Chem. 102Bfs — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 118fs — Advanced Organic Laboratory 1 1 

English Language or Literature 2 — 

Electives (Six must be in Social Sciences) 7 9 



15 



15 



PHYSICS 



Two curricula are offered in Physics, (1) the General Physics curriculum 
for students who desire a thorough training in the fundamentals of Physics 
in preparation for graduate work, research, and the teaching of Physics, 
(2) the Applied Physics curriculum for students who desire to train for 
industrial and applied physical research. The latter is intended to prepare 
students for positions in governmental laboratories and in the laboratories 
established by many industries for testing, research, and development 
through the application of physical principles and tools. 

The completion of the first four years of the latter curriculum leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics; the completion of the five 
years with a satisfactory thesis to that of Master of Science in Physics. 

General Physics Curriculum „ 

Semester 

Freshman Year I ' II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Math. 21 — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 4 — 

UsLth, 22 — Analytic Geometry — 4 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry „ 4 4 

Dr. 4f s — Mechanical Drawing 1 l 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

M. L Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ¥2—^ V 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) .¥2—% 



17 



17 



15 



15 



108 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



109 



Semester 

Sophomore Year I // 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 2f s — General Physics 5 5 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2] 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 > 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

17 17 
Junior Year 

Advanced Mathematics 2 2 

Advanced Physics 6 6 

Elective (Chemistry) - 3 3 

Electives 4 4 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Chem. 102Afs— Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Chem. 102Bfs — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 2 

Advanced Physics _ 6 6 

Electives 4 4 



15 
Applied Physics Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs — Surv^ey and Composition 3 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 

German Ifs — Elementary German 3 

Math. 21 — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 4 

Math. 22 — Analytic Chemistry — 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 

Dr. 4f s — Mechanical Drawing 1 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — ^ !► 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — % 



15 



3 
1 
3 

4 
4 
1 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition ^ 

German 5fs — Intermediate Scientific German 

Math. 23fs — Calculus 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 

M. L 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

phys. Ed. Sfs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



17 
Junior Year 

Electives ( Social Sciences) 3 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 3 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics — 

M. E. 51 — Thermodynamics 3 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying 1 

Phys. 101 — Precision of Measurements 3 

Phys. lOSfs— Electricity 3 

Phys. 107— Optics — 

Chem. 4 — Quantitative Analysis _ — 

16 
Senior Yea/r 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials 3 

E. E. 50 — Principles of Electrical Engineering — 

Chem. 102Afs— Physical Chemistry _ 3 

Phys. 105— Heat 3 

C. E. 51 — Hydraulics... ~ — 

Elective ( Physics ) 4 

16 
Fifth Year 

Electives ( Engineering ) „.. ~ 3 

Electives ( Physics ) ~.. 6 

Electives 3 



12 



Semester 
I II 

3 3 

3 3 

4 4 

5 5 



17 

3 
3 



3 
3 
4 

16 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 

15 

3 
6 
3 

12 



17 



17 



110 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the physical 
sciences without immediate specialization in any one of them, a general cur- 
riculum is offered. By proper selection of courses in the junior and senior 
years a student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the 
fields of study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

A major and a minor comprising together not fewer than 62 credits shall 
be completed in the Departments included in the Division of Physical 
Sciences with at least 18 of the credits in courses of the Division listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



Curriculum for General Physical Sciences 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 

Modern Language (French or German) 

Math. 21 — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 

Math. 22 — Analytic Geometry 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 

Dr. 4fs — Mechanical Drawing 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) % — ^A 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) ^ — •V2 



Semester 



I 

3 
3 
4 

4 
1 
1 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 

Modem Language (French or German) _ 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2' 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



17 

3 
3 
4 
5 



17 



Junior Year 

Electives (Chemistry) 3 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) 3 

Electives ( Mathematics ) „ 2 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) _ 4 

Electives 3 



II 

3 
3 

4 
4 
1 
1 



17 

3 
3 
4 
5 



17 

3 
3 
2 
4 
3 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES HI 

Semester 

Senior Year 

Electives ( Social Sciences ) ^ 

Electives ( Physics ) ^ 

Electives (Physical Sciences) ^ ^ 

Electives ~ 

15 15 

I>-THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions 
and other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of 
Social Sciences offer opportunities for advanced training in the several 
fields represented. A major in Economics is available for students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. During the freshman and sophomore years, 
in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences requirements, Principles of 
Economics (Econ. 5 If, 52s) should be completed and as many otheil lower 
division social science courses taken as practicable. The Department of 
Political Science offers the first three years of a combined Arts-Law course 
and also offers training in the field of public administration. The Depart- 
ment of Psychology is identified with the development of applied psychology 
and is in position to supply training in the industrial and clinical phases 
of the subject. The Department of Sociology provides a course of study 
preparatory to professional training in social work and offers the courses 
demanded by civil service examinations for certain positions. All tive 
departments present courses aligned with the teacher-traming program 
represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. These advanced degrees are 
increasingly required for secondary school teaching and for professional 
positions in the several fields represented. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University requirements, see page 31. 

1. College of Arts and Sciences requirements, see page 87. 

3. Major and Minor requirements, see page 88. 



Major and Minor Fields of Study 

Economics 
History 
Political Science 



Psychology 
Sociology 



15 



15 



112 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Additional Requirements in History 

In addition to the general requirements of the University and of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the History Department requires that all 
credits for a major and at least 12 credits for a minor be acquired in courses 
offered for advanced undergraduates and graduates. No work below a grade 
of C will be accepted towards a major. History majors must also take 
twelve hours of the three fundamental courses (H. Ifs; H. 3fs; H. 5, 6). 

Combined Program in Arts and Law 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University also offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete 
the prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, or a total of 
98 credit hours, and they must complete the Requirements for Graduation, 
as indicated on page 87. If students enter the combined program with 
advanced standing, at least the third full yearns work must be completed in 
residence at College Park. Upon the successful completion of one year of 
full-time law courses in the School of Law in Baltimore, the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts may be awarded on the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Law. The degree of Bachelor of Laws may be awarded upon the 
completion of the combined program. 

Arts-Law Curriculum ct i 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

H. 3fs — History of England and Great Britain 3 3 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 3 — 

Pol. Sci. 4 — State and Local Government — 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1— 1] 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 V 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — ^/^J 



17 



17 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 113 

Semester 

Sophomore Year ^ 

English " " - " 3 3 

Science or Mathematics ^ 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics -.. - -■ ^ ^ 

^ 5^ 6 — American History ^ 

Foreign Language - "• "T 

M. I. 2fs-Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) -^ ^-^ 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) - 1— 1 V ^ 

Phys Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1— l 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology ^ — 

Pol. Sci. 131— Constitutional Law ^ ^ 

Pol. Sci. 134— Administrative Law • -■•-•-"•" 

H. 115fs— Constitutional History of the United States ^ ^ 

Pol Sci. 124— Legislatures and Legislation ~ -- • 

6 o 

Electives " _ — 

15 15 

Senior Year 

The student may elect either the curriculum for the first year of the 
School of Law or a fourth year's work from advanced courees offered m 
Politi al Science. In either case all of the requirements of the D.v.sion 
of Social Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences for graduation must 
have been met. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The following suggested curriculum, consisting of a major in Political 
Science and a minor in Economics, is offered for the benefit of those students 
who are looking forward to an administrative career in the public service. 

Public Administration Curriculum Semester 

,r I II 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition ^ 

Science or Mathematics 

H. 5, 6— American History ^ _ 

Pol. Sci. 1— American National Government ^ 

Pol. Sci. 4— State and Local Government — ^ 

Foreign Language 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking - - 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C (Men) ,, ., . 1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ¥2-/2 V 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) ¥2-/2 J _^ _ 

17 17 



114 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Semester 



Sophomore Year 

English 

Science or Mathematics 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 

Pol. Sci. 7, 8 — Comparative Government 

Foreign Language 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—11 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



Junior Year 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology. 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking. 

Stat. 14 — Elements of Statistics 

Econ. 131 — Labor and Government 



/ 

3 
3 
3 
2 
3 



16 

3 
3 



or ^ 

Econ. 145— Public Utilities |^ 

Pol. Sci. Ill — Principles of Public Administration 

Pol. Sci. 112 — Public Personnel Administration 

Pol. Sci. 64 — Municipal Government and Administration 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Econ. 190 — Advanced Economic Principles 

Econ. 191 — Contemporary Economic Thought 

Fin. 106— Public Finance 

Pol. Sci. 123 — Government and Business f 



3 
3 

15 



or 

Pol. Sci. 126 — Government and Social Security. 

Pol. Sci. 114— Public Budgeting 

Pol. Sci. 124 — Legislatures and Legislation...^ 

Pol. Sci. 131 — Constitutional Law 

Pol. Sci. 134 — Administrative Law 

Electives 



1 



3 
3 
3 

3 
6 



// 

3 
8 
3 
2 
3 



16 



3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
15 

3 
3 



3 
3 



15 15 

ECONOMICS 

A major in Economics is available to students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. During the freshman and sophomore years, in addition to the 
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, Econ. 31, 32, Principles 
of Economics, and 12 other credits in the social sciences should be com- 
pleted. Acct. 31fs, Principles of Accounting, is strongly recommended as 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES "5 

intend to enter Government work. 

Economics Curriculum Semester^^ 

freshman Year ^ 3 

gj^g^ Ifs— Survey and Composition ^ ^ 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking •■— 3 3 

Foreign Language ■' 3,4 3.4 

Science or Mathematics q ^ 

*Electives "" """" " i__ i~ 

M I Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) -^ ^ i/A i 1 

Phvs Ed. 2fs-Personal Hygiene (Women).^ '^-/^^ ^ 

Phys'. Ed. 4fs-Physical Activities (Women) -/2-/2 

17-18 17-18 

^Elect from the following so that the total credits each 
semester are 17 or 18: 

Pol Sci. 1— American National Government 
Pol* Sci. 4— State and Local Government 
H. 3fs— History of England and Great Britam 
Econ 1— Economic Geography 
Econ. 4— Development of Commerce and Industry 

Sophomore Year 3 3 

Eng. 2, 3— Survey and Composition - - ^ ^ 

Foreign Language - •• 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32-Principles of Economics -•— ^_^ ^_^ 

■Electives 9 0^ 

M. I. 2fs-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) .^. ^ 1 

Phys. Ed. 6fs-Community Hygiene (Women) l-i ^ 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) l— ij ^ _ 

17-18 17-18 

*Elect from the following so that the total credits each 
semester are 17 or 18 : 
Completion of required 12 credits in Science and Mathe- 

matics. 
Acct. 31fs. Principles of Accountmg 
Stat. 14— Elementary Statistics 
Stat. 15fs— Business Statistics 
Soc. 1— Contemporary Social Problems 
Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology 
H. 5, 6 — American History 



116 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Year Semester 

Econ. 43~-Money and Banking ^ ^ 

ii.conomic Electives "* - 3 or 3 

Minor Electives J"" " 3-6 3^ 

General Electives 3 3 

Speech or English Eleiiti^ 3-4 3^ 

2-3 2--3 

Eco^M.' rtf ^ ^""^ '^^ f'''''^'^' Economics courses • '' '' 

i^con. 145, Public Utilities- Fmn iqa t u x. ^"^^^^^s- 

161, Fundamentals of 'cS;:;i';;^^^^! ^^.•'-•"J^: Econ. 

Economics of Consumptr Econ lo?" p'-'^'T" '''' 

Marketing- Econ ir>9 p. • , ^^' Pnn«Ples of 

g, i^con. 102, Pnnciples of International Trade. 

Senior Year 

Econ. 190-Advanced Economic Principles 
♦Economic Electives "ncipies g __ 

Minor Electives ~~ ' 3 6 

General Electives 3 3 

6 6 

*To be selected from the follor^ing Economics courses ■ '' '' 

c'nS ofiss^EtT nr r^"":^ "^°"- '''' «-^^> 

163, Economics of iooperat"^^^^^^^^^ T^' '=^°" 

Economic Thought- Econ 1I2 P , ' ^""temporary 

tion; Econ. lOB.^ublliRnaic;. ""'''' °' Transporta- 

THE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
FIVE-YEAR COMBINED ARTS AND NURSING 

and Scfe'SeraVcXgt J>ai^"nul T ^^ ^ *^^ ^""^ "^ Arts 
with advanced standing, at least th./^*^' *'" '^•""^'"ed program 
must be completed in SoHegl Park ' '"'""^ ^"" ^^^'^ '^^ ^^^ curriculum 

ults^tBaltimrr: n^hTT::^^^^^^^^ ''^ ^-^"^ of the 

more. In addition to the DiplL ""^rslf;!: f "^ ««^P^*^'' «-'«- 
Science in Nursing may, upon thp rl-f f' ''^^''^^ "f Bachelor of 

School of Nursing%e ^aS at the eX'teT "' *'^ ^''•^^*°^ ''^ '^^ 
details regarding this curriculum mav h! f . .^""^ ^^^"^ <="rriculum. Full 
lo.ue dealing with the SchoorXSg^ SrSeJ^n nf""" °' *'^ ''''■ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Arts-Nursing Curriculum 

freshman Year 

Eng. If s — Survey and Composition 

Foreign Language 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 

H. Ifs — A Survey of Western Civilization 

or 

H. 3fs — History of England and Great Britain 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 

L. S. 1 — Library Methods „ „ 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities „ 



117 



Semester 



I 

3 
3 
4 
1 
3 



1 
16 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 

Soc. 1 — ContemiDorary Social Problems 3 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology _ 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology — 

Foreign Language - 3 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities 1 

Elective — 



// 

3 
3 

4 
1 
3 

3 
3 

% 
18 



2 



16 



4 
3 

1 
1 
3 

17 



PREMEDICAL 



The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland is three years of academic training in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Curriculum I as outlined meets these requirements, 
and also fulfills the requirements prescribed by the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association. 

Curriculum II is outlined to meet the requirements of the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Society, which prescribes two 
years of academic training as the minimum prerequisite for entering a 
Class A Medical School. 

Curriculum I offers to students a combined seven-year program leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first 
three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park, and the last four years in the School of Medicine in Balti- 



118 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

the degree of Bachelor of Science mil h! T . *^^ ^*=''*'*'' "^ Medicine 
and Sciences at the Comme"cemerf„n T^ ^^ *^" C°"^^« "^ Arts' 
sional training. mencement following the second year of profes 

At least two VGar«? nf >./%c.;^^ 

from other colleges and uTiv "sTtieTwI'""^/*';^'"'^"*^ *--f-™g 
the two degrees. diversities who wish to become candidates for 

For requirements for admission see Admission, Section I. 
Premedical Three Year Curriculum 

For students -P-ting to enter the University of Maryland 

. School of Medicine 

Freshman Yewr Semester 

Eng If s-Survey and Composition ' " 

^001. 2fs— Fundamentals of Zoologv ^ 8 

Chem. Ifs-General Chemistry. ■■■■"■ "" - * 4 

Sophomore Year 18 18 

nu^' 2' 3-Survey and Composition 

Phil l^Introduction to Philosophy. ^ - 

Psych l-Introduction to Psychology ^ 

M. I. 2fs~-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) - ^ 

Phys. Ed. 8fs--Physical Activities (Women).... JIZliZi '^ ^ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



18 



18 



119 



Semester 



Junior Year I 

Phys. If s — General Physics ~.« 4 

Chem. 103 Afs — Elements of Physical Chemistry 2 

Chem. 103Bfs — Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking ^ 1 

Electives ( Social Sciences) „ 3 

Electives ( Biological Sciences ) 4 



// 

4 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 



15 15 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine is accepted. 

The student also may elect the fourth year from advanced courses offered 
in the College of Arts and Sciences, fulfilling the requirements for major 
and minor, or transfer to the General Science Curriculum and complete the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree, as outlined on page 87. 

Premedical Two- Year Curriculum 

For students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to a Class A Medical School (2 year requirement). 

Semester 
Freshman Year I H 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 . 3 

Math. 8, 9 — Elements of College Mathematics 3 3 

Zool. 2fs — Fundamentals of Zoology „ _. _ 4 4 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

M. L Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 1—1] 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ¥2— % I 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) .V2 — ^J 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

Phys. Ifs — General Physics 4 4 

Chem. 8Afs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 8Bfs — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

Zool. 4 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology „ „ — 3 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology » „ ^ 3 — 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—2] 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 J- 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) 1— IJ 

17 17 



120 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PREDENTAL 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to prepare 
themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following two-year 
curriculum, which meets the predental requirements of the American Asso- 
ciation of Dental Colleges. This curriculum may also be followed by the 
student if he desires to continue his college training and complete work 
for the Bachelor of Science degree. 



Predental Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 

Math. 8, 9 — Elements of College Mathematics 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry. 

Zool. 2fs — Fundamentals of Zoology 

Dr. 4fs — Mechanical Drawing 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1— 1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — V2 



Sophomore Year 

Chem. 8Afs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Chem. SBfs — Elementary Organic Laboratory 

Phys. Ifs — General Physics 

Modem Language (French or German) 

Electives (Humanities, Social Sciences) 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — ^Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. Sfs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — 1 



Semester 



I 

3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 



17 

2 
2 

4 
3 
4 



// 

3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 

1 



17 

2 
2 
4 
3 
4 



17 



17 



GENERAL SCIENCE 

For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the physical and 
biological sciences without immediate specialization in any one, a general 
curriculum is offered. By proper selection of courses in the junior and 
senior year a student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of 
the fields of study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

A major and a minor, comprising together no fewer than 72 credits, 
shall be completed in the Departments included in the Divisions of Biologi- 
cal and Physical Sciences with at least 18 credits in the courses for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates in these Divisions. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

General Science Curriculum 

freshman Year 

^ Ifs— Survey and Composition 

Modern Language (French or German) - 

Speech Ifs— Public Speakmg 

Chem. Ifs— General Chemistry "- 

gQ^ 1— General Botany " ' 

7qo1, i__General Zoology ■— 

M L Ifs-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ^- "; 

Phvs Ed. 2fs-Personal Hygiene (Women) - /^-^ 

Phys'. Ed. 4fs-Physical Activities (Women) - V2-V., 



121 



Semester 
I 



3 
3 
1 
4 
4 



16 



Sophomore Year 



2, 3— Survey and Composition. 



4 
3 



Math. 8, 9-Elements of College Mathematics ^ 

Math. 21, 22-College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry; 

Analytic Geometry •• 

Modern Language (French or German) ^^ 

Electives (Biological Sciences) ^_^ 

Electives (Physical Sciences) — •■ 

M I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) - 

Phys. Ed. 6fs-Community Hygiene (Women) i ^ 

Phys Ed. Sfs— Physical Activities (Women) 



18 



4-5 



Junior Year 

Phys. Ifs or 2fs— General Physics - "^"^ 

Electives ( Social Sciences) ^ 

Electives (Biological Sciences) ^ 

Electives ( Physical Sciences) - ^ 

Electives ** 



Senior Year 



Electives ( Social Sciences) ^ 

Electives ( Biological Sciences) ^ 

Electives ( Physical Sciences) - 

Electives (Biological or Physical Sciences) - - • ^ 

Electives " 



15 



// 

3 
3 
1 

4 



16 

3 

3 



4 

3 

3-4 

4-3 



18 

4-5 
3 
3 
3 
3 



16-17 16-17 



8 
8 
8 
3 

3 

15 



COLLEGE OF 
COMMERCE 




It is the interest of the com- 
mercial world that wealth should 



he found everywhere. 



99 



— Edmund Burke. 



124 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



125 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, Dean. 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of economics, commerce, and business administration; for downtown 
Washington is only twenty-four minutes away in one direction, while the 
Baltimore business district is less than an hour in the other — both cities with 
frequent transportation services to the University gates. Special arrange- 
ments are made to study commercial, manufacturing, exporting, and import- 
ing facilities and methods in Baltimore; and every assistance is given quali- 
fied students who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the far-flung eco- 
nomic activities of the National Government or to utilize the libraries, gov- 
ernment departments, and other facilities provided in Washington. 

The College of Commerce provides professional training in economics 
and business administration for those who plan to become executives, 
teachers, or investigators in commercial, industrial, agricultural, or gov- 
ernmental economic enterprises. 

While the curricula oifered are technical and vocational, all require a 
thorough basic training in mathematics, statistics, English and speech. The 
courses required in these fields are necessary for proper analysis, explana- 
tion, and interpretation of modern economic data. 

Liberal allowance in every curriculum is made for other social sciences 
or for purely cultural non-vocational subjects, in order that students may 
acquire the breadth of vision needed by a present day economist or business 
executive. 

Subject to the group and curricula requirements described subsequently, 
a student may, with the advice of his faculty adviser, elect individual 
courses from any offered by the University in accordance with his needs. 

Advisory Councils 

In order to facilitate the prompt and continuous adjustment of courses, 
curricula, and instructional methods to provide the training most in demand 
by industry and commerce; and in order constantly to maintain instruction 
abreast of the best current practice, the advice and suggestions of business 
men are constantly sought and received through Advisory Councils com- 
posed of outstanding leaders in each major field of business activity. Each 
Council has its own particular interest to serve, such as advertising, market- 
ing, or finance; and the viewpoint and suggestions of these business men 
are proving to be invaluable in developing the instructional and research 
program of the College. 

Standards of Work 

The College of Commerce was admitted to membership in the American 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1940. This is an organiza- 
tion established in 1916 to promote thorough and scientific training for the 



business profession. It maintains high standards of membership based on 
the number and training of the faculty, the thoroughness of the work, the 
length and breadth of the curriculum, the number of students, the financial 
backing of the college, and the facilities for carrying on the work. 

In addition to all general university scholarship requirements, grad- 
uates of the College of Commerce must have successfully completed all 
specific curriculum requirements and must have passed at least forty-eight 
semester hours of Commerce subjects including economics with grades of 
A, B, or C. 

Group Requirements For Graduation 

A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science upon the satisfactory completion of not fewer 
than 120 semester hours, not including the six hours of basic MiUtary Science 
required of all able-bodied men students, or the six hours of physical 
education for women and for such men as are excused from Military Science. 

Of these 120 credits, not fewer than 48 must be in Commerce courses 
(including economics) and not fewer than 48 in other subjects; provided 
that courses in principles of economics may be considered to be in either 
category. 

The following minimum requirements in each of the groups specified 
must be completed before graduation, except as indicated in a particular 
curriculum. 

1. English and Speech— fourteen credits. 

2 Mathematics, Statistics, and Natural Science— twelve credits— except 
in Secretarial Administration. 

3. Military Science or Physical Education— six credits. 

4. Social Sciences and Foreign Languages— not fewer than twelve hours 
are required in psychology, sociology, political science, or history, 
and considerably more than these are recommended; provided that 
electives in foreign languages or other humanities may be substituted 
for six hours of this requirement. 

Electives And Extra-Curricular Activities 

Business and industrial leaders now require a much broader educational 
background than that provided by vocational courses in economics, and busi- 
ness administration alone. Group requirements have been set up accordingly 
which demand that not fewer than 48 semester credit hours shall be from 
courses other than commerce; and a considerably larger number of semes- 
ter hours may be elected from other subjects by a student who is willing 
to forego a proportionate number of specialized courses in economics and 
business administration. 

Other social sciences, such as sociology, history, political science, and 
applied psychology are useful in furnishing the broad background in social 



126 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



127 



sciences needed by any commerce student; and these subjects tend to 
make him a more useful citizen. Logic, ethics, and other philosophy courses 
open up a new world of intellectual pleasure to the student; and training 
in abstract thinking provided by such subjects is also useful vocationally. 
Courses in music and art may serve as a welcome diversion from vocational 
courses; and the social and extra-curricular development that music facili- 
tates is desirable for students of economics or business. 

Students of business administration are urged to learn stenography, typ. 
ing, and other office techniques because this multiplies their opportunities for 
appointment to positions in general administrative offices and facilitates 
their promotion to positions where their training in business administration 
has an opportunity to demonstrate its value. 

Commerce students should diversify their non-economic selections so as 
to obtain the broadest possible general education within the time at their 
disposal. While the freedom of choice offered through electives is sufficient 
to enable a student to study whatever cultural subjects or vocational tech- 
niques he needs anywhere in the University, he who wishes to elect as much 
as a minor in any one department outside the College of Commerce must 
secure the approval of the head of that department to his study list, in 
order that the selections may be effectively adapted to the vocational' or 
cultural objectives sought. 

Extra-curricular activities are recommended to students of this college 
whenever the physical and mental capacity of the individual student and 
available time permit. Excellence in such activities often has a definite 
value in procuring business positions at graduation, and experience gained 
in this way is frequently invaluable in later life. 

Additional electives above the curriculum requirements in either voca- 
tional or non-economics courses are encouraged whenever a student can 
demonstrate the capacity to carry additional subjects satisfactorily. Grades 
received in previous work will be the determining factor for decision as to 
extra student load in each case. Students who do not average better than 
C will not be permitted to carry additional courses beyond the curriculum 
requirements. 

Student Organizations 

There are three student societies in the College of Commerce that are 
designed to develop scholarship, professional attitudes, ability to carry 
responsibility, and comradeship among students of similar interests, namely: 
Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholarship fraternity in the field of busi- 
ness. Beta Alpha Psi, the professional accounting fraternity, and the Colle- 
giate Chamber of Commerce, a general student organization open to all 
students of the College. 

Beta Gamma Sigma 

Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholarship fraternity in commerce and 
business administration recognized by the American Association of Colle- 



giate Schools of Business, has established a chapter, Alpha of Maryland, at 
the University. Membership is limited to senior students ranking scholas- 
tically in the highest tenth of the senior class and junior students in the 
highest two percent of the junior class. 

Beta Alpha Psi 

Students whose major interest is accounting and who have a high scholas- 
tic record are eligible for invitation to membership in Beta Alpha Psi, the 
national professional accounting fraternity. Beta Alpha Psi sponsors a 
professional program of outside lecturers and study in Accountancy during 
the school year. 

Collegiate Chamber of Commerce 

The Collegiate Chamber of Commerce provides students of business 
administration with an organization in which they may learn to work 
effectively with others in conferences and committees, and through which 
they may be brought into close contact with business men and trade associa- 
tions in the types of business in which they are most interested. The 
Collegiate Chamber of Commerce maintains close relations with the Junior 
and Senior Chambers of Commerce in the various cities of Maryland and 
with the United States Chamber of Commerce in Washington. It is con- 
trolled by a board of directors elected by students of the College, two from 
each class and one from each student organization in the College. Member- 
ship is voluntary, but all students of business are urged to take part in its 
activities, for much of the training obtained is as valuable as that obtained 
in regular courses. 

While general and social meetings are held periodically, most of the activi- 
ties are centered in the following committees, each of which fosters study, 
business contacts, association with corresponding committees in city, state, 
and national chambers of commerce, discussion, field trips, and advancement 
of students interested in each field: Marketing, Public Relations, Civic 
Affairs, Community Affairs, Finance, Foreign Trade, Agricultural Affairs, 
and Industrial Affairs. A member of the faculty who is qualified in the 
special field in which a given committee is working serves as adviser. 
Additional committees are formed whenever a sufficient number of students 
desire them. 

Class of 1926 Award 

The Class of 1926 of the School of Business Administration of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore offers each year a gold key to the senior 
graduating from the College of Commerce with the highest average for the 
entire four-year course taken at the University of Maryland. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Commerce is assigned to a faculty adviser 
^ho, so far as practicable, is a specialist in the student's field of interest. 
A student who plans to become an accountant, for instance, has a professor 



128 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



129 



of accounting as his adviser; one who is interested in banking as a career 
a professor of finance; and those interested in marketing, advertising, for- 
eign trade, industrial management, agricultural economics, and other sub- 
jects, specialists in these fields. Students are expected to see their advisers 
regularly about registration, curricular requirements, scholarship require- 
ments, and such personal or university matters as may be desirable. 

Fields of Special Study 

By a proper selection of courses, organized programs of study or cur- 
ricula are available as follows: 

General Business Management including 

Industrial Management 

Business Statistics 

Industry, Trade, and Transportation 
Accounting including C. P. A. Concentration 
Finance 
Marketing including 

Sales Management 

Retail Merchandising 
Cooperative Administration, Marketing, and Economics 
Secretarial Administration 
Economics and Agricultural Economics 
Combined Program in Commerce and Law 

If a student plans to take the Combination Commerce-Law, the Retail 
Merchandising, the Agricultural Economics, or the Secretarial Administra- 
tion curriculum, he may register in the curriculum of his choice in the Fresh- 
man or Sophomore year. Otherwise, he should register for the General 
Business Curriculum immediately following and then decide at the begin- 
ning of the Junior year the extent to which he wishes to specialize. 

General Business Curriculum 
Freshman Year 



Semester 



Semester 



Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 

Math. 5, 6— General Mathematics ~I"~I. 3 

Bus. 4— Development of Commerce and Industry 3 

Bus. 5 — Business Organization 

Speech ifs— Public Speaking. I'lZIlII 1 

Foreign Language, Political Science or other social science, 

Mechanical Drawing, or elective ' 3 

Science— (preferably Chemistry or Physics) 3.4 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) IIIZZ 1— iV 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) ZZ/o— 1/2 l 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) Z^i— 4| 



;/ 

8 

3 

3 

1 

3 
3-4 

1 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4 — Expository Writing 

Eng. 6 — Business English 

Stat. 15fs — Business Statistics 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 

Acct. 31fs — Principles of Accounting 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking 

Psychology, Sociology, Government, Philosophy, or other elec- 
tive - ~ 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—2 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) _ 1 — 1 



/ 

2 

3 

3 

4 



// 

2 
3 
3 
4 
3 



3 — 

2 2 



17 17 

Suggested Elective Courses: 

Government: Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government — 3. Pol. Sci. 4 — 
State and Local Government — 3. Pol. Sci. 7, 8 — Comparative Govern- 
ment — 2, 2. 

History: H. Ifs — A Survey of Western Civilization — 6. H. 5, 6 — American 
History — 3, 3. H. 3fs — History of England and Great Britain — 6. 

Sociology: Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology — 3. Soc. 1 — Contemporary 
Social Problems — 3. Soc. 5 — Comparative Sociology — 3. 

Psychology: Psych. 4 — Psychology for Students of Commerce — 3. Psych. 1 
— Introduction to Psychology — 3. Psych. 2-3 — Applied Psychology — 3-3. 

Philsophy: Phil. 1 — Fundamentals of Philosophy — 3. Phil. 2 — Ethics — 3. 
Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking— 4. 
L. S. 2 — Sources of Business Information — 1. 

English : Eng. 7, 8 — Survey of American Literature — 3, 3. Eng. 5 — Exposi- 
tory Writing, continued — 2. Eng. 14 — College Grammar — 3. 

Science: Introductory courses in Chemistry, Chem. 3fs; Geology, Geol. 1; 

Physics, Phys. 3fs; or Zoology, Zool. 3; and General Botany, Bot. 1. 
Language: French, German, Spanish, or Italian — 6. 

Classics: Classics 3, 4 — Latin and Greek in Current English Usage — 2, 2. 
Drawing: Dr. 4fs — Mechanical Drawing — 2, 
Secretarial Administration: Sec. Ifs — Elementary Office Techniques — 2, 2. 

Sec. 3fs — Intermediate Office Techniques — 3, 3. 



17-18 17-18 



130 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



131 



General Business Management Curriculum Semester 

Junior Yea/r I // 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance „ 3 ^ 

Mkt. 101 — Principles of Marketing. 3 ^ 

Bus. 137 — Industrial Management — 3 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law 3 3 

Economics electives 3 3 

Electives (See suggested concentrations following) 3 g 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Fin. 199 — Financial Analysis and Control — 3 

Electives (See suggested concentrations following) 15 12 

15 15 

CONCENTRATION IN INDUSTRIAL MANAGExMENT 

Students interested in the management aspects of industry and business 
may specialize in the field of industrial administration by taking the fol- 
lowing courses: Bus. 137 — Industrial Management; Bus. 130 — Labor Eco- 
nomics; Bus. 131 — Labor and Government; Acct. 121 — Cost Accounting; 
Acct. 122 — Advanced Cost Accounting; Bus. 133 — Industrial Relations; 
Bus. 138 — Personal Management; Psych. 162 — Advanced Personnel Psy- 
chology; and Bus. 141 — World Resources and Industries. 

CONCENTRATION IN BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Students interested in applied business and economic statistics beyond 
the year of study provided in Statistics 15fs, should take Statistics 117, 118, 
Advanced Business Statistics and Bus. 168, Business Cycles and Indexes, 
in the junior year. 

The student's advisor and the Dean should be consulted on the program 
of courses in mathematical statistics and mathematics. Mathematics 8, 9, 
21, 22 and 23fs are desirable courses if professional competence is the 
objective in the general field of statistics. 

CONCENTRATION IN INDUSTRY, TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 

For students wishing to concentrate in this field, it is recommended that 
a substantial number of the following courses be taken: Bus. 102 — Inter- 
national Trade; Fin. 129 — International Finance; Mkt. 122 — Export and 
Import Trade Procedure; Bus. 92 — Supervised Practice in Transportation; 
Bus. 94 — Supervised Practice in Foreign Trade; Mkt. 106 — Salesmanship; 
Mkt. 108 — Salesmanagement; Pol. Sci. 102 — International Law; Pol. Sci. 
51 — International Relations; Bus. 112 — Principles of Transportation; Bus. 
137 — Industrial Management; and Bus. 141 — World Resources and Indus- 
tries. It is strongly recommended that students interested in foreign trade 
equip themselves adequately with a knowledge of Spanish and/or French. 



Accounting Curriculum Semester 

^ / // 

Junior Year 

\cct. 101, 102— Advanced Accounting ^ ^ 

^^^^ 121 — Cost Accounting ^ 

^^^|. 122— Advanced Cost Accounting — 

Bus. 164, 165— Business Law ^ 

Speech 4fs— Advanced Public Speaking ^ 

♦Electives 

15 15 

Senior Year 

pijj 111 — Corporation Finance ^ ~" 

Acct. 171, 172— Auditing Theory and Practice 2 2 

Acct. 181, 182— Specialized Accounting 3 3 

Pin. 199— Financial Analysis and Control ^ 

*Electives 

15 15 

C. P. A. CONCENTRATION 

Students interested in public accounting should elect Acct. 186— C. P. A. 
Problems- Acct. 161— Income Tax Procedure; Bus. 166— Advanced Busmess 
Law; Acct. 91— Accounting Apprenticeship; and Econ. 190— Advanced 
Economic Principles. 

Finance Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year 

Fin. Ill— Corporation Finance ^ ~" 

Acct. 101, 102— Advanced Accounting ■- 3 3 

Fin. 121— Advanced Banking Principles and Practices — 3 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law - - ^ 

Speech 4fs— Advanced Public Speaking 2 — 

Electives (See suggested courses below) ^ 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Q 

Fin. 115 — Investments 

Fin. 199— Financial Analysis and Control -•• — | 

Electives (See suggested courses below) - 12 

15 15 



*For additional suggestions for business administration and economics courses see 
course descriptions. 



132 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



133 



Suggested Elective Courses: 

A. E. 101 — Land Economics — 3. 

A. E. 104— Farm Finance— 3. 

Econ. 145— Public Utilities— 3. 

Econ. 161 — Fundamentals of Cooperative Enterprise — 3. 

Econ. 152 — Social Control of Business — 3. 

Fin. 93 — Supervised Practice in Finance — 2. 

Fin. 105 — Consumer Financing — 3. 

Fin. 106— Public Finance— 3. 

Fin. 116 — Investment Banking — 3. 

Fin. 118 — Stock and Commodity Exchanges — 3. 

Fin. 125 — Credits and Collections — 3. 

Fin. 129 — International Finance — 3. 

Fin. 143 — Property, Casualty and Liability Insurance — 3. 

Fin. 144 — Life, Group and Social Insurance — 3. 

Fin. 151— Real Estate— 3. 

MARKETING, SALES MANAGEMENT, AND MERCHANDISING 

Two specialized programs of study are available for students of market- 
ing, of which the first is primarily intended for students interested in sales 
management and the second for men and women who wish to go into the 
garment trade, department store work, or other types of retail or wholesale 
distribution. The second involves certain changes in the basic lower division 
curriculum in order to provide for technical courses needed. 

Marketing Curriculum Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance 3 — 

Mkt. 101 — Principles of Marketing 3 — 

Mkt. 106— Salesmanship — 2 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law 3 3 

Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking 2 2 

Electives (See suggested courses below) 4 8 

16 15 

Senior Year 

Mkt. 109 — Principles of Advertising ^ 3 — 

Mkt. 199 — Marketing Research _ — 3 

Fin. 199 — Financial Analysis and Control — 3 

Mkt. 108 — Salesmanagement _ 2 — 

Electives (See suggested courses below) 10 9 

15 15 

NOTE: For a description of Business Administration and Economics 
courses. 



CONCENTRATION IN SALES MANAGEMENT 

The following are some of the additional courses recommended for those 
students who wish special training in Sales Management: Mkt. 106— Sales- 
manship- Mkt 108— Sales Management; Fin. 125— Credits and Collections; 
Mkt 136-Economics of Consumption; Bus. 141-World Resources and 
Industries; Bus. 112— Principles of Transportation; Mkt. 115— Purchasmg 
Technique'; and Mkt. 91— Supervised Practice in Marketing. 

PROGRAM IN RETAIL MERCHANDISING 

This program is planned to appeal to those students of business and 
administration who are interested particularly in department store and 
specialty store positions such as Buyer, Advertising Manager, Merchandise 
Manager, Superintendent, Credit Manager, Comptroller, or other retail 
store functions where specialized training in retail storage management is 
required. This concentration should appeal to both men and women who 
are interested in making retail merchandising their vocation. 

This program can be entered in the junior year, but it is recommended 
that students register their choice earlier in their college courses whenever 
practicable. 



Retail Merchandising Curriculum 

Freshman Year * 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 

Math. 5, 6— General Mathematics, or Modem Language 3 

Bus. 5 — Business Organization 3 

Bus. 4 — Development of Commerce and Industry — 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 

Chem. Ifs— General Chemistry or Social Science 3-4 

H. E. 15— Textiles 3 

H. E. 21— Design — 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ...1—11 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) .¥2-^ V 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) -..¥2-^^ 



Semester 
II 

3 



3 
1 

3-4 



3 



17-18 17-18 



134 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



135 



/ 

2 

3 
3 

4 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4 — Expository Writing 

Eng". 6 — Business English 

Stat. 15fs-— Business Statistics I~ 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 

Acct. 31fs— Principles of Accounting 

Fin. 43— Money and Banking 1"..."I"I1. 

H. E. 24— Costume Design or an elective 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) '.ZlZZ^Zi 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene (Women) l_i 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities (Women) Ill— 1 



Junior Year 

Fin. 1 1 1 — Corporation Finance 3 

Mkt. 101— Principles of Marketing 3 

Mkt. 109 — Principles of Advertising 3 

Mkt. 106— Salesmanship IIZZZZI — 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law o 

_ .^ o 

H. E. 121, 122 — Interior Design or electives 3 

H. E. 125 — Merchandise Display 

H. E. 25 — Crafts or elective 



Senior Year 

Mkt. 199— Marketing Research _ 

Fin. 199— Financial Analysis and Control 

Fin. 125— Credits and Collections 3 

Mkt. 119— Retail Store Management and Merchandising — 

Mkt. 115— Purchasing '" — 

H. E. 123, 124 — Advanced Interior Design 2 

H. E. 172— Problems in Textiles ..ZZZZ. 3 

Mkt. 91 — Supervised Practice in Marketing 2 

Econ. 161— Fundamentals of Cooperative Enterprise 3 

H. E. 171— Advanced Textiles 3 



16 



Semester 
II 

2 
3 
3 
4 
3 



2 



17 



2 
3 
3 
2 

5 

15 

3 
3 

3 
3 
2 



14 



PROGRAM IN COOPERATIVE ADMINISTRATION 

The program in cooperative administration is designed to meet the needs 
of the following classes of students: (1) Students who aspire to executive 
positions in cooperative organizations; (2) Students who plan careers in 
governmental agencies that handle cooperative problems; (3) Students 



wrhose major interest may be in other fields, but who wish to study the 
contrasting methods and objectives of corporate, public, and cooperative 
enterprise. 

Cooperative organizations are playing an increasingly important role in 
our free enterprise system. They provide a democratic way for individuals 
voluntarily to improve their own situations, both economic and social. Much 
of the appropriate training for engaging in or understanding cooperative 
enterprise is the same as that needed for private business. The form of 
owTiership, the method of procedure, and the objectives of cooperative enter- 
prise, however, are sufficiently different from those of corporate enterprise 
to call for a special program. 

The University of Maryland offers unusual opportunities for the study 
of all types of cooperative enterprise. In addition to the opportunities on 
the campus itself, several important cooperative organizations are located 
nearby, and the governmental agencies and libraries of Washington are 
only twenty minutes away. 

Since every student interested in cooperatives should have the basic 
training provided in the Lower Division Business Administration cur- 
riculum, it is not necessary to make a definite decision until the beginning 
of the junior year. Students are urged, however, to consult with their 
adviser concerning electives to be taken during the first two years in order 
to obtain the most suitable background. Provision has been made for 
transfer students with two-year college standing to complete the program 
in the junior and senior years. Graduates of other universities and colleges 
can attain a master's degree in the field in one or two years depending on 
their previous background and training. 

The student interested in this program may take the cooperative courses 
as electives regardless of the college of the University or curriculum in 
the College of Commerce in which he is registered, or he may register for 
the Business Management curriculum with cooperatives as his field of 
concentration. The several aspects of cooperative enterprise require course 
schedules fitted to the particular needs and interests of the student and 
are worked out in consultation with his adviser. Class-room work and trips 
are needed for well-rounded training but cannot take the place of actual 
experience. Consequently, students who plan to make a career in coopera- 
tives should arrange for practical work with a cooperative as early as 
possible. Students intending to work with agricultural cooperatives, should 
have considerable farm experience. The course entitled "Supervised Prac- 
tice in Cooperation," involves actual experience and should preferably be 
taken during the summer between the junior and senior years. 

CONCENTRATION IN COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS 

Students specializing in the field of cooperative economics are advised 
to take the following courses: Bus. 161 — Fundamentals of Cooperative 
Enterprise; Bus. 163 — Economics of Cooperatives; Fin. 105 — Consumer 



136 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



137 



Financing; Mkt. 136— Economics of Consumption; A. E. 103--Cooperatin. 
in Agriculture; and Econ. 151-Comparative Economic Systems. It is also 
highly desirable for .students in this field to take several accounting courses 

CONCENTRATION IN COOPERATIVE MARKETING 

The following are some of the additional courses recommended for those 
students who wish special training in Cooperative Marketing: Mkt 101->- 
Principles of Marketing; Mkt. 108-Sales Management; Mkt. 109-Principles 
^if If ^'o""^' ^^^- 104-Salesmanship; Fin. 125-Credits and Collections- 
Mkt. 91-Supervised Practice in Marketing; Bus. 161-Fundamentals of 
Cooperative Enterprise; Bus. 163— Economics of Cooperatives- A E 103^ 
Cooperation in Agriculture; Mkt. 136-Economics of Consumption; and 
Bus. 91— Supervised Practice in Cooperation. 

SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The combination of a thorough training in secretarial work with a well- 
rounded knowledge of business administration is much sought by prospec- 
tive employers of both men and women. The graduate of a college of com- 
merce with this training frequently has unusually promising chances of 
rapid promotion because of the practical knowledge of administration 
gained in assisting an important administrator and the opportunities avail- 
able to know at first hand the leading executives of the organization with 
which he is associated. 

These opportunities are available only to men and women of hi^h 
capacity, however, (1) because important executives will not allow them- 
selves to be served by mediocre assistants or secretaries, and (2) because 
mediocre persons do not obtain from superiors the confidence necessary to 
encourage the delegation of important responsibilities. 

For this reason, only students who have demonstrated high scholarship 
m their high school or previous college work will be permitted to enroll 
this curriculum. 

Secretarial Administration Curriculum 

r, , „ Semester 

treshman Year j 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition „ „ 3 

Bus. 5 — Business Organization ~ 

Bus. 4— Development of Commerce and Industry 3 

Sec. Ifs — Elementary Office Techniques 2 

Math. 5, 6— General Mathematics or Social Sciences 3 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking. ~^ 2 

Elective ^ 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ZIIIZZZ'l^T 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) Va— 1/2 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) ^i— V2 



m 



16 



// 

3 
3 

2 
3 
1 
3 

1 

16 



Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 4 — Expository Writing 2 — 

Eng. 6 — Business English — 2 

Stat. 15fs — Business Statistics, or electives .* 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics. 3 3 

Acct. 31fs — Principles of Accounting. 4 4 

Sec. 3fs — Intermediate Office Techniques 3 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

17 17 
Junior Year 

L. S. 2 — Sources of Business Information ^ — 1 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking — 3 

Mkt. 101 — Principles of Marketing. 3 — 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law. 3 3 

Sec. 5fs — Secretarial Work 3 3 

*Electives 6 5 

15 15 
Senior Year 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance 3 — 

Mkt. 136 — Economics of Consumption or elective „ — 3 

Sec. 117 — Office Procedure and Equipment 3 — 

Sec. 119 — Office Supervision and Management — 3 

Bus. 138 — Personnel Management _ 3 — 

♦Electives 6 9 

15 15 

ECONOMICS 

A student who wishes to specialize in the field of economics in the College 
of Commerce may elect either (a) General Economics, or (b) Agricultural 
Economics. 

CONCENTRATION IN GENERAL ECONOMICS 

Students with a special interest in economic theory and in the general 
field of economics are advised to meet the requirements of the General 
Business Management Curriculum and take the following courses: Econ. 
190 — Advanced Economic Principles; Econ. 130 — Labor Economics; Econ. 
136 — Economics of Consumption; Econ. 145 — Public Utilities; Econ. 151 — 
Comparative Economic Systems; Econ. 191 — Contemporary Economic 
Thought; Econ. 152 — Social Control of Business; etc. 

Other courses suggested for consideration are shown in the list of courses 
under the heading of "Economics." 

*Electives as convenient provided that the total credit hours obtained during the four 
years shall not be less than 126, and that ^oup requirements for graduation are com- 
pleted. Fourteen hours of speech and English are required with grades of A, B, or C 



138 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



139 



Agricultural Economics Curriculum* 

Freshman Year 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition ^ 

Math. 5, 6 — General Mathematics 3 

A. E. 1 — Agricultural Industry and Resources ^ — 

Bus. 4 — Development of Commerce and Industry. 3 

Biology or Foreign Language 3-4 

Chem. Ifs or 3fs — General or Introductory Chemistry 4-3 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — V2 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) „ V2 — V2 

17-18 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 

Stat. 15fs — Business Statistics 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking — 

Acct. 31fs — Principles of Accounting 4 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll. 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

Agriculture Elective 2-3 

17-18 
Junior Year 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 

A. E. 102 — Marketing of Farm Products — 

Bus. 164, 165 — Business Law 3 

Econ. 161 — Fundamentals of Cooperative Enterprise 3 

fA. E. 104 — Farm Finance — 

A. E. 106 — Prices of Farm Products — 

fElectives 7 

16 



Semester 
I 

3 



// 

3 
3 
3 

3-4 

4-3 

1 



17-18 

2 

1 
3 
3 
3 
4 

2 



17-18 



3 
3 

3 
3 

4 

16 



* Students registered in this curriculum should satisfy the Professor of Agrricultural 
Economics that they have had adequate farm experience before entering the junior year. 

tTwo hours of speech elective must be taken during" the sophomore, junior or senior 
years. A. E, 104 may be postponed until the senior year if this will facilitate the selection 
of useful electives during the last two years. 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

A. E. 103 — Cooperation in Agriculture 3 — 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance 3 — 

A. E. 109, 110 — Research Problems 1 1 

Econ. 136 — Economics of Consumption — 3 

See. 103 — Rural Sociology — 3 

Electives 9 9 



16 



16 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN COMMERCE AND LAW 

Students who wish to combine commercial and legal studies to obtain 
both Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws degrees may do so by 
selecting their courses in such a way as to comply with all of the group 
and specific requirements of the College of Commerce in six semesters, and 
then completing the 126 hours required for graduation from this college by 
courses taken in the University of Maryland School of Law at Baltimore. 

During the first three years, students will be registered in the College 
of Commerce. In the fourth year and thereafter, unless the four-year 
alternative program is taken, they will be registered in the School of Law; 
but they must forward copies of their study lists to the office of the Dean 
of the College of Commerce at the beginning of each semester of the fourth 
year. At the end of the fourth year, the degree of Bachelor of Science may 
be awarded in the College of Commerce upon the recommendation of the 
Dean of the Law School. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be awarded 
upon satisfactory completion of the entire program. 

Commerce- Law Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Math. 20fs— General Mathematics 3 3 

Bus. 5 — Business Organization — 3 

Bus. 4 — Development of Commerce and Industry 3 — 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 3 — 

Pol. Sci. 4 — State and Local Government ~ — 3 

H. 3fs — History of England and Great Britain 3 3 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1—1 

Phys. Ed. 2fs — Personal Hygiene (Women) V2 — ¥2 !► 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs — Physical Activities (Women) V2 — V2 



17 



17 



140 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CX3LLEGE OF 
EDUCATION 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Eng. 4 — Expository Writing 2 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics ^ 3 

Acct. 31fs — Principles of Accounting 4 

Stat. 1 5f s — Business Statistics 3 

Fin. 43 — Money and Banking — 

Speech 4fs — Advanced Public Speaking 2 

Pol. Sci. 7 — Comparative Government 2 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

18 
Junior Year 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance 3 

*Fin. 199 — Financial Analysis and Control — 

Mkt. 101 — Principles of Marketing 3 

Acct. 101, 102 — Advanced Accounting or Econ. Electives 3 

Speech 9fs — Debate 2 

Eng. 6 — Business English — 

Fin. 106— Public Finance — 

*Econ. 152 — Social Control of Business 3 

Econ. 145— Public Utilities 3 

Electives „ „ — 

17 

IfSenior Year 

*Fin. 199 — Financial Analysis and Control — 

*Econ. 152 — Social Control of Business 3 

Electives (A student may concentrate on Econ. or Acct. in the 

senior year) 12 



15 



// 

3 
4 
3 
3 
2 



17 



3 

3 
2 
2 
3 



15 



3 



12 



15 



SPECIAL CURRICULA OR CONCENTRATIONS 

Organized programs of study in fields not covered by the foregoing ones 
will be developed whenever the needs of business and industry or the 
demands of students for training in other branches of business administra- 
tion or economics warrant it. 



*To be taken in senior year if the four-year curriculum is followed. 
tThe first year of regular Law School may be substituted for the fourth year in 
Commerce. 




''What the best and wisest 
parent wants for his own child, 
that must the community want 



for all its children. 



V 



— John Dewey. 



142 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



143 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Harold Benjamin, Dean, 

Alma Frothingham, Secretary to Dean. 

The College of Education meets the needs of the following classes of 
students: (1) undergraduates preparing to teach in high schools, prepara- 
tory schools, and vocational schools; (2) students who will enter higher 
institutions to prepare for work in specialized educational and institutional 
fields; (3) students preparing for educational work in the trades and indus- 
tries; (4) students preparing to become home demonstrators, club or com- 
munity recreation leaders, and (in cooperation with the Department of 
Sociology) social workers; (5) students whose major interest is in other 
fields, but who desire courses in education; (6) graduate students preparing 
for teaching positions requiring an advanced degree and for positions as 
high school principals, elementary school principals, educational supervisors, 
attendance officers, school administrators, counselors, and other positions. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain 
important supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Opportunity for supervised teaching under com- 
petent critic teachers is provided by arrangement with the school authori- 
ties of Prince Georges, Howard, and Montgomery Counties, the District of 
Columbia, and Baltimore. 

Observation. Observation of teaching is conducted in Washington and 
in nearby Maryland schools. The number, variety, and nearness of these 
schools provide ample and unusual opportunities for observation of actual 
classroom situations. 

Other Facilities in Washington. The Library of Congress, the Library 
of the U. S. Office of Education, and special libraries of other Government 
offices are accessible. The information services of the National Education 
Association, American Council on Education, U. S. Office of Education, and 
other institutions, public and private, are available to students. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in general 
the same as for the other colleges of the University. 

Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is tentatively assigned to a 
member of the faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. The 
choice of subject areas within which the student will prepare to teach and 
the selection of his professional courses will be made under faculty guid- 



n.^ during the first year in the Introduction to Education course, required 
'rill freshmen. Students from other colleges in the university who p an 
t take an education curriculum should also take this course. However the 
Irse is open to sophomores who transfer to the College of Education 
1 m other colleges within the university or from other institutions. Al- 
hough in particularly fortunate cases, it is possible to make satisfactory 
Stments as late as the junior year for students from other colleges who 
have not already entered upon the sequence of professional courses it is 
desirable that this work in the College of Education be begun in the fresh- 
man year. It is practically impossible to make the necessary adjustments 
^or students of advanced upper class standing on account of the sequence 
of preprofessional and professional subjects. 

It is advisable for students who purpose to teach (except Vocational 
AKriculture) to register in the College of Education, in order that they may 
have continuously the counsel and guidance of the facu'.ty which is directly 
responsible for their professional preparation. It is permissib.e, however, 
for a student to register in that college which in conjunction with the 
College of Education offers the majority of the courses he will pursue in 
satisfying the requirements of the curriculum he elects. Such students, 
however, must meet all the requirements of the College of Education. 

Preprofessional and Professional Courses 

The courses required of all students who elect an education curriculum, 
are classified into two categories (1) preprofessional and (2) professional. 
The professional courses are all recognized for certification purposes by 
the Maryland State Department of Education, provided they are taken in 
the junior and senior years. 

Preprofessional courses: Introduction to Education; Educational Forum, 

Voice and Diction. 

Professional courses: Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; 
The High School or The Junior High School; Curriculum, Instruction and 
Observation (in field of teaching major); Educational Measurements; Meth- 
ods and Practice of Teaching. 

Recommendations Beyond Bare Required Minimum. Students who wish 
to enrich their professional preparation will do well to take the Curnculum, 
Instruction, and Observation course in their minor as well as their major 
teaching field, and to elect 6 instead of 3 units in Methods and Practice of 
Teaching. The first-level offering in guidance and the course in Visual 
Education are also centered around the day-by-day dernands "^^de upon the 
classroom teacher. Many students, and particularly those who plan to do 
graduate work in Education, may wish to strengthen their grasp of the 
foundations of education through second-level courses m Educational 
Psychology and Educational Sociology, or to deepen their insights by taking 
courses in History of Education or Comparative Education. 



144 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



145 



I 



Eligibility To be eligible to enter the professional courses, a student 
must have attained junior status as defined below. Continuance in suet 

fiT'^T ^f '^''i^'''^^"* "PO" the student's remaining in the upper fou, 
fifths of his class m subsequent semester revisions of class standing. 

Admission of Teacher College Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curricula of Maryland State 
Teachers Colleges and other accredited teacher-education institutions who 
records give evidence of the ability and character essential to teaching wl 
be admitted to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate 
classes. Graduates of the two-year teacher-training curriculum in moS 
cases, may satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Elementary Education by attendance for two full college years; graT 
ates of the three-year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year 

Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as high school 
teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not unfform 

«Mnf'TS ""T. ." ^'^^ ^"^"""^ ^"''J"*=*^ to be taught and the individual 
ability of the student. 

Education Courses in Baltimore 

Po Jrtr^^'""* V^ *^^ professional courses and some of the arts and science 
courses required for undergraduate preparation in Education are offered in 
Baltimore m late afternoon and evening courses primarily for employed 
people On a part time basis a student may complete some or all of his 

7ZcZl ; t'/' f- ^- l^r^ ^" ^'*"^^*'"" ^" the Baltimore Division of 
the College of Education. Through special arrangement with the Graduate 

Sdif^ ? '°"''^' f ^ ^^^ ^^^"^^'^ *<"• students working on master's 
and doctor's degrees in education. 

™^ ^%T^^ announcement of these courses is issued in the spring of each 

V^LZY^ fT""rT"T ""^^ ^^ "^^^^^ ^'"™= College of Education. 
University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Sts., Baltimore, Md. 

Junior Status , 

wo'rw'ttTuniorV' ""''^' ""'■'' "■■' preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two vears 
by reason of temperament, health, industry, and s;holast1c 74^- 5- 

currTcuL of thtTon '""TSI *''''^" ^^^ '^'^'^'^'^^ *° contfnue V he 
curricula of the College of Education; those who are unlikely to succeed 

"ittTn English T"f °' ^r'* '^'"^""^^' "^ weakness in*°orra„d 
written English, of unfavorable personal traits, or of scholastic deficiency 
are advised to transfer to other fields. Data bearing on all these aspens of 
the student's personality are secured through the selective admissions t^st 

ZlrirtZu:iZ:T'' in connection with the Introduction tfEducayon 
course, through the cooperation of the Department of Speech and through 
direct observation by the faculty. Special attention is Jlled to The rS 



course in (Speech 2) Voice and Diction which must be taken in either the 
freshman or sophomore year. 

To be eligible for junior status a student must have completed 64^ semes- 
ter hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average grade of C or 

better. 

Student Teaching 

Two courses are offered in student teaching — Ed. 139, Ed. 140 — Methods 
and Practice of Teaching, carrying respectively 3 and 6 semester hours 
of credit. 

Certification of Secondary School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved high 
schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have satisfac- 
torily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Specifically it 
limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the upper four- 
fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in practice teaching." 

From the offerings of Education, the District of Columbia requirement of 
24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of a minimum of 128 credits in con- 
formity with the requirements specified under "Curricula" and in conformity 
with general requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will 
be conferred. 

Curricula 

The curricula of the College of Education, described in detail in the 
following pages, are designed to prepare high school teachers of the aca- 
demic and scientific subjects, the special subjects, and the vocational 
subjects under the provisions of the Federal Vocational Education Acts. 

The specifications for majors and minors, under "Arts and Sciences 
Education," satisfy the requirements of the State Department of Education 
in regard to "the number of college credits required in any two or more 
subjects which are to be placed on a high school teacher's certificate." 
The curricula for the special subjects cover all State Department require- 
ments. The curricula for the vocational subjects meet the objectives set up 
in the Federal Acts and in the interpretations of the Office of Education 
and of the State Board of Education. 

In the Arts and Sciences Education curriculum one may qualify for the 
degree of either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, depending upon 
the major subject. All of the other curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. 



146 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



147 



Curriculum in Agricultural Education 

See College of Agriculture. 

The general and special requirements of the several curricula are .. 
follows: *** 

ARTS AND SCIENCES EDUCATION 
General Requirements 

In addition to Military Science or Physical Education, required of all 
students in the University, the following requirements must be fulfilled bv 
all candidates for degrees in this curriculum, normally by the end of thp 
sophomore year: ^ 

(1) Eng. Ifs^Survey and Composition I and Eng. 2, 3-Survey and 
Composition II, 12 semester hours. 

(2) Two years of foreign language are required of candidates for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree if the student enters with less than three years of 
foreign language; one year, if he enters with three years. No foreiffn 
language is required of any student who enters with four or more years of 
foreign language nor of candidates for the bachelor of science degree 
The term foreign language" is interpreted to include both ancient and 
modem languages. 

(3) Twelve semester hours of the social sciences (history, economics, 
sociology, political science). 

(4) Twelve semester hours of natural science or of natural science and 
mathematics. 

(5) Twenty semester hours of education. 

The program of each student shall include all of the general requirements 
listed above, and all requirements for his major and minor, stated below. 

Arts and Science Education Curriculum 

r, . Tr Semester 

treshman Year j jj 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 or 2 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

* Speech 2— Voice and Diction __ 3 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ..ZZZIIZZl—U 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene (Women) Zvs---^ I 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities (Women) ¥2—^ | 

General Requirements (as indicated under 2, 3, and 4 above. . 6-7 6-7 

Major and minor requirements and electives 3.5 2 

0^ _ 

15-17 15-18 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

g(j 3 — Educational Forum 1 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition - 3 

^ I, 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 2—21 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene (Women) 1 — ll 2 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities (Women) 1 — ij 

(Jeneral Requirements (as indicated above) 5-7 

Major and minor requirements and electives 4-5 



or 



// 
1 
3 



5-7 
4-5 



15-17 15-17 

Junior Year 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology 3 — 

Ed. 112 — Educational Sociology — Introductory 2 — 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School f — 2 

or 

Ed. 110— The Junior High School — 2 

Ed. 120; 122; 124; 126; or 128— Curriculum, Instruction, and 

Observation — 3 

General Requirements, major and minor requirements, and 

electives 10-12 10-12 

15-17 15-17 

Senior Year 

Ed. 105 — Educational Measurements 2 — 

Ed. 139 or Ed. 140— Methods and Practice of Teaching 3-6 

Major and minor requirements and electives 10-12 



3-6 
12-14 



♦students who take Ed. 2 in the second semester should take Speech 2 in the first 
semester of the sophomore year. 



15-17 15-17 

Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
school subjects in accordance with the certification requirements of the 
State Department of Education (By-law 30 revised). These are designated 
as major and minor subjects, with a requirement of from 28 to 40 semester 
hours of credit for a major and from 20 to 30 semester hours for a minor. 
If it is deemed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching of three 
high school subjects, the requirement for a major may be modified at the 
discretion of the faculty of the College of Education to permit the pursuit 
of three subjects to the extent required for State certification. Semester 
hour requirements are detailed below. 

No stitdent will be permitted to do practice teaching until he has met all 
previous requirements. 



^^ THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

English. (For the degree of bachelor of arts.) A maior in Fn i u 
requires 36 semester hours as follows: ^'"'" 

Survey and Composition. _ 10 ^ , 

Survey of American Literature I f™^"*"'" ^""-^ 

Electives ^ semester hours 

■ 18 semester hours 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the IS ),n, 
prescribed for the major and 8 hours of electives. °"'"' 

thf r*]""^! ""f ^ ''^^'^" '^"*' *^^ ^PP^^^^l °f tJ'e adviser who will guide 
S^th?Srh S«!""^ '' ^''^'"^"" ^^^^^'^^ -^ recommendaS; 

berijre hltd'or'are."^"^"-^' ''' ' "^'^^ '"-* "^ ^" — -" 
Social Sciences. (For the degree of bachelor of arts.) For a maior in 

^LK"""^' ^^ .^""f '^""'■^ ^^^ '^^'^^' °* ^hi<=h at least 18 hou 

must be in history including 6 hours in American history and 6 hours L 

European history. Six of the 18 hours must be in advanced courses PoVa 

minor in the group. 24 hours are required, of which 18 are the same as 

specified above, and 6 of which must be in advanced courses. 

History 

EconomicITrl^doTo;;: " "•• ^f ^^'"ester hours 

Electives . ,^ semester hours 

J2 semester hours 

For a minor, the requirements are the same less the electives 

Required courses in History are as follows: A Survey of Western 
Civilization; American History. webiern 

Modern languages. All students whose major is in Modern Languages 
are required to take Comp. Lit. 101-Introductory Survey of CompaS 
Literature, and they are strongly advised to take the review course (Fr 99 
Ger. 99, Span. 99). The following courses are recommended- H If s— Survey 

1 xt'oMT^f ""V"''";-'-^™'^^"^^"*^'^ "^ Philosophy; comp S 
If^Ji Old Testament as Literature; Eng. 113, 114-Prose and Poetry 
of the Romantic Age; Comp. Lit. 105, 106-Romanticism in France and Ger- 

fiTwulf ^ "'^^°'' "" ™*"' ^"^' ^^^' ^^^-^^^ E»g"sh and Eng. 103. 

Specific requirements for the major in the different languages are as 
follows: French-Fr. 59fs, Fr. 60fs, Fr. 75, Fr. 76, and three additional 
year courses m literature in the 100 group; German-Ger. 60fs, Ger. 75, 
Ger 76, and three additional year courses in the 100 group; Spanish-Span. 
60fs, Span. 75, Span. 76, and at least sixteen hours in the 100 group. 

Classical Languages. (Forthe degree of bachelor of arts) . Both a major 
and minor are offered in Latin consisting of 30 and 20 semester hours 
respectively. The courses are chosen with the advice of the Department of 
Classical Languages. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



149 



^Mathematics, (For the degree of bachelor of science.) Twenty-eight 
semester hours are required for the major. The following sequence is 
recommended: Math. 7, 21, and 22 in the freshman year; Math. 18fs and 
23fs in the sophomore year; Math. Ill, 112, and 141 in the junior and 
senior years. 

Twenty semester hours are required for the minor. The following course 
sequence is advised: Math. 7, 21, and 22 in the freshman year; Math. 23fs 
in the sophomore year; and Math. 18fs and 61 in the junior and senior 

years. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused 
from Math. 7. 

Science. (For the degree of bachelor of science.) In general science a 
major and minor are offered, consisting of 40 and 30 semester hours respec- 
tively, each including elementary courses in chemistry, physics, and biology 
(zoology and botany). The major should include one of the following 
course sequences. 

Sequences I and II, emphasizing chemistry or physics : 

Freshman year: *Math. 8 (3) or 21 (4) ; 9 (3) or 22 (4) ; Chem. Ifs (8). 
Sophomore year: Bot. 1 (4); Phys. Ifs (8). 

Junior and Senior years: Phys. 103fs (6) or Chem. 12fs (6), and 103fs 
(6); Zool. 2fs (8); Bact. lA (2). 
Sequence III, emphasizing zoology: 
Freshman year: Zool. 2fs (8); Chem. Ifs (8). 
Sophomore year: Zool. 15fs (8) ; Bot. 1 (4). 
Junior and Senior years: Zool. 121 (3) or 120 (3); 102 (3). 
Sequence IV, emphasizing botany: 
Freshman year: Zool. 2fs (8) ; Chem. Ifs (8). 
Sophomore year: Bot. 1 (4) and 3 (4); Phys. 3fs (6) or Ifs (8). 
Junior and Senior years: Pit. Phys. 101 (4) and 102 (3); Bact. lA (2). 

Minors of twenty semester hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and 
in biological sciences. A minor in biology must include the basic courses in 
zoology and botany and be supported by a course in chemistry (Chem. Ifs 
or 3fs) . A minor in physics must be supported by a basic course in chemis- 
try (Chem. Ifs or 3fs) and a minor in chemistry by a basic course in 
physics (Phys. Ifs or 3fs). 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be counted towards both provided 
that they number not fewer than 52 semester hours in natural sciences. 



*Mathematics credits are not counted in the total number of hours required for the 
science major. 



150 



for 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

(•For the degree of bachelor of science) 

tion subje;ts, iuTcourses rmT^hT"^ T' "^^'"^^^ ^'''"'"-t- 
and supervised teaching! °^ '"^''^'"^ commercial subjects, 

'tLrr/ome ^:ZcU^::S^^-^^ ^ -^- to prepa. 

^uujeci; in aadition to the commercial subjects. 

Commercial Education Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 

*Speech 2— Voice and Diction ^ 

Eng-. Ifs—Survey and Composition "T 

Sec. Ifs— Elementary Office Technique t 

Econ. 1— Economic Geography 

Pol Sci. 1-American National Government ^ 

ri, 5, 6 — American History 

Science (Biological or Physical) ^ ^ 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) -, '" 

P?'- li' ^5^-P^rsonal Hygiene (Women)::: ^ 

Phys. Ed. 4fs-Physical Activities (Women) ' 



Semester 



3-4 



y2- 



72 



■V2 



Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum : 

Eng. 4— Expository Writing ^ 

Eng. 6 — Business English ^ 

Sec. 3fs— Intermediate Office Techniques "7 

Econ. 31, 32-Principles of Economics I 

Acct. 31fs— Principles of Accounting T 

L. S. 2— Sources of Business Information 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C. (Men) 

11^^' It' ff^-^^^^^^'^ity Hygiene (Women). ,__, , 

El^eSves ^^"""^^^"^"^^ Activities (Women)... .„::::: I 



17 



.2—2 
1—1 



// 

3 
3 
2 

3 

3 

3-4 

1 



17-18 18-19 



. 2 
3 
3 
4 
1 

2 

2 

17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Junior Year 

Ed. 112 — Educational Sociology — Introductory 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School 

or 

Ed. 110— The Junior High School 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology 

Ed. 150, 151 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- 
Commercial Subjects 

Sec. 5fs — Secretarial Work 

Fin. 1 1 1 — Corporation Finance 

fEcon. 136 — Economics of Consumption 

fStat. 14 — Elements of Statistics 

Bus. 164 — Business Law 

Econ. 43 — Money and Banking 

Electives 



151 

Semester 

1 II 

2 * — 

2 

3 — 



2 


2 


3 


3 


3 




3 




— 


3 


— 


3 


— 


3 


2 


2 



18 18 

Senior Year 

Ed. 105 — Educational Measurement „ 2 — 

Ed. 139 or Ed. 140— Methods and Practice of Teaching 3 or 3 or 6 

Bus. 165 — Business Law - 3 — 

Electives 7 6-12 



15 12-15 



HOxME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed for students who 
are preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage 
in any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of 
teaching methods. It includes studies of all phases of home economics and 
the allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
Electives may be chosen from other colleges. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching and through experience in the home management house. 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Education 
or the College of Home Economics. Students will be certified for gradua- 
tion only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this curriculum. 



.e:er;:rth?:„;:o:.o'e-,ea..:" '"^ "^""^ ^^-^"^^ ^•■°""' -"« «»-ech , >„ ,,, «,, 



tHistory may be substituted for these courses by students who wish to build a teaching 
field in the social studies. 



3 

V2 



16 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Home Economics Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition 3 

Chem. Ifs—General Chemistry . 

H. E. 15— Textiles ZZZZZZ 3 

H. E. 21 — Design 

Speech Ifs— Public Speaking ~~IZ ~i 

H. E. Ifs — Freshman Lecture -. 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education ~~~Z 2 

Bot. 2 — Introductory Botany 

Phys. Ed. 2fs— Personal Hygiene ZI 1/ 

Phys. Ed. 4fs— Physical Activities 1/ 

Sophomore Year 

H. E. 24 — Costume Design 

H. E. 1 1— Clothing I ^ 

H. E. 31fs— Foods ZZZZ ~~ 

Phys. 3fs— Introductory Physics ZZZZZZZ 3 

Soc. 3— Introduction to Sociology. 

Chem. 12Afs— Elements of Organic Chemistry o 

Econ. 57— Fundamentals of Economics __ 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene 

Phys. Ed. 8fs— Physical Activities ZZZZZZZZZ 1 

Junior Year 

Psych. 55— Educational Psychology 

?: f f ^•J^^--^"f i^^l"^. Instruction, "and Observation _ 

tJact. 3— Household Bacteriology 

H. E. 131 — Nutrition 

H. E. 137— Food Buying and Meal Service.Z ] _^ 

H. E. 141, 142— Management of the Home ' o 

H. E. Ill— Advanced Clothing ^ 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 

H. E. 133 — Demonstrations 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School ^ 

or 

Ed. 110— The Junior High School 

Electives . 

■ ' 3 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



153 



// 

3 

4 

3 
1 
1 



3 
3 
3 

2 

3 

1 
1 

16 



3 
3 

3 
3 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study - — 8 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home - — 3 

H. E. Ed. 103 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Eco- 
nomics 3-6 — 

H. E. 121, 122— Interior Design 3 3 

H. E. Ed. 106fs — Problems in Teaching Home Economics 1 1 

Ed. 105 — Educational Measurements _.. 2 — 

Phys. Ed. 66— First Aid — 1 

^Electives 6 4 



15-18 



15 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



The program of studies provides: (1) a four- year curriculum leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts and Vocational 
Education; (2) a program of professional courses to prepare teachers to 
meet the certification requirements in vocational and occupational schools; 
(3) a program of courses for the improvement of teachers in service. 

I. Four-year Curriculum. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. Experience in some trade or industrial activity will bene- 
fit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. 

This curriculum is designed to prepare teachers of trade and industrial 
shop and related subjects, and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient 
latitude of electives so that a student may also meet certification require- 
ments in some other high school subject. 

Students entering an Industrial Education curriculum mu^t register in the 
College of Edv^cation, 

This curriculum, with limited variations according to the needs of the 
two groups, is so administered as to provide: (A) a four-year Industrial 
Arts curriculum for students in residence; (B) a four-year curriculum for 
in-service teachers of Industrial Arts and Occupational and Vocational 

subjects. 



17 



17 



'Electives should include one course each in History and English. 



154 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Industrial Educational Curriculum for Students in Residence ^ 

Freshman Year Semester 

Ind. Ed. 1— Mechanical Drawing i ^^ 

Ind. Ed. 21— Mechanical Drawing ...1... __ "^ 

Ind. Ed. 2— Elementary Woodworking ......" o ^ 

Ind. Ed. 22— Machine Woodworking __ "^^ 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 ^ 

Speech 2— Voice and Diction Z~. __ """ 

Eng. Ifs— Survey and Composition o ^ 

Math. 8, 9-EIements of College Mathematics 3 I 

History or Social Science Z "^ 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C ZZZZIIZ 1 ^ 

SophoTTiore Year 

Ind. Ed. 24— Sheet Metal Work __ 

Ind. Ed. 26— Art Metal Work ZZIZZZZZI 2 1 

Ind. Ed. 41 — Architectural Drawing ~Z 

Ind. Ed. 28— Electricity .ZZZZ. 2 

Ind. Ed. 48— Advanced Electricity . __ "^ 

Ind. Ed. 23— Forge Practice ZZZZZZ __ \ 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 

Eng. 2, 3— Survey and Composition q ^^ q 

Math. 7— Solid Geometry _ 2 _ 

Chem. 3fs or Ifs-General Chemistry "or "introductory Chem- 
istry 

M. I. 2fs-Basic R. oZtZcZ" "f ^~t 

Elective ^ ^ 

1 — 

Junior Year 

Ind. Ed. 67— Cold Metal Work 2 — 

Ind. Ed. 69— Elementary Machine Shop Practice _ 2 

Ind. Ed. 110— Foundry - _ 

Ind. Ed. 160— Essentials of Design ZZZZZZZZ _ 2 

Ind. Ed. 162— Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation _ 3 

Psych. 55— Educational Psychology 3 _ 

Ed. 112— Educational Sociology— Introductory 2 — 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School V 

or I _ 2 

Ed. 110— The Junior High School [ 

Phys. 3fs or Ifs— Introductory Physics or General "physics 3-4 3-4 

History or Social Science o 3 

Electives - 

16-17 16-17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



155 



Semester 
Senior Year I II 

Ind. Ed. 89 — Advanced Machine Shop — 2 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management 2 — 

Ed. 105 — Educational Measurements » 2 — 

Ed. 114 — Guidance in the Schools — 3 

Ed. 139 or Ed. 140— Methods and Practice of Teaching 3-6 3-6 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 or 3 

Electives 3-12 2-11 

• ___ ^__ 

16 16 

Curriculum for Teachers in Service 

The requirements in this curriculum for the B. S. degree in Industrial 
Arts and Vocational Education are quantitatively the same as for Curricu- 
lum A, except that the military science-physical training requirements are 
waived. The distribution is approximately as follows: 

English 12 semester hours 

History and the Social Sciences _ _ _ 16 semester hours 

Mathematics and Science 20 semester hours 

Shop and Drawing _ „ - 30 semester hours 

Education ^ ....- 24 semester hours 

Electives _ 26 semester hours 

128 semester hours 

In the mathematics and science group, and in the history and social 
science group, there is reasonable latitude for individual choice, but courses 
in mathematics as related to shopwork, and courses in American history 
and government are required. 

Program for Vocational, Occupational, and Shop Center Teachers 

This curriculum is designed for persons who have had experience in 
some trade or industry or in the teaching of shopwork. 

Applicants for admission to this curriculum must have as a minimum 
requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. The cur- 
riculum is prescribed, but is administered flexibly in order that it may be 
adjusted to the needs of students. 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher-training in Baltimore and in 
other industrial centers, in-service courses are offered. The work of these 
courses deals principally with the analysis and classification of trade 
knowledge for instructional purposes, methods of teaching, observation and 
practice of teaching, psychology of trade and industrial education, and 
occupational information, guidance, and placement. 



156 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Sciences Educa- 
tion (see page 146), except that 22 semester hours of science are required 
as scheduled. , 

Physical Education Curriculum .« 

oemester 

Freshman Year I // 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology — 4 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 * — 

Phys. Ed. 18 — Introductory Hygiene 2 — 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 ~ 

Speech 2 — Voice and Diction ^ — 3 

Electives: History, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Home 

Economics, Industrial Education, Physics 3 4 

Women 

Phys. Ed. lOfs— Dance 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 12fs— Athletics 2 2 

Men 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. O. T. C 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 5fs— Athletics 2 2 

17 17 
Sophomore Year 

Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology „ 3 ' — 

Eng. 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Zool. 15fs — Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

Chem. Ifs or 3fs — General Chemistry or Introductory Chem- 
istry 4-3 4-3 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 1 or 1 

Phys. Ed. 20— Physical Education — 3 

Women 

Phys. Ed. 14fs— Dance 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 22fs— Athletics 2 2 

Men 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C „ 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 15fs — Gymnastics 1 ^ 

16-18 16-18 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 157 

Semester 

I II 

Junior Year __ 

Psych. 55— Educational Psychology ^ __ 

Ed 112— Educational Sociology-Introductory ^ ^ 

Phys. Ed. 121— Physiology of Exercise ^ ^ 

Phys. Ed. 133— Nature of Play ^ 

Phys. Ed. 63— Accident Prevention J- ^ 

Phys. Ed. 66— First Aid -- -- "" ^ 

Phys. Ed. 76fs— Dance ~ — 

Phys. Ed. 52fs— Physical Activities ^ 

Phys. Ed. 123— Maturation of the Human Organism — ^ 

Phys. Ed. 127fs— Analysis of Activities „ ^ 2 

Ed 103— Theory of the Senior High School 1 ^ ^ 

or I 

Ed. 110— The Junior High School • J 

Ed. 142— Curriculum, Instruction and Observation ~ — ^ 

Electives -""* 

Women 

Phys. Ed. 78— Dance - 

Phys. Ed. 90— Dance - " ~" 

Men - 

Phys. Ed. 113fs— Athletics - ^ ___ 

16 16 

Senior Yea/r 

Ed. 105— Educational Measurements -^ -■•• o ^ ^^ qIa 

Ed. 139 or Ed. 140-Methods and Practice of Teaching 3-6 or 6-^ 

Phys. Ed. 146— Teaching Health ^ __ 

Phys. Ed. 137— Recreation ■ " _ 

Phys. Ed. 144— Physical Education ^_^ ^^^ 

Electives 

Women - 

Phys. Ed. 114fs— Athletics - - 

Men ^ < 

Phys. Ed. 119fs— Athletics __ ___ 

15 15 



COLLEGE OF 
ENGINEERING 




''Engineering— The art of 
directing the ^reat sources of 
power in nature for the use and 



convenience of man. 



9f 



—Thomas Tredgold, 1828. 



I 



160 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



161 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean. 

Margaret G. Engle, Secretary to Dean. 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and operation. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised recently to 
increase the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, 
which are a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and 
which are now considered essential to the proper training of engineers 
because of the practical application of these subjects in professional and 
business life. It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an 
efficient preparation for many callings in public and private life outside 
the engineering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. In the Mechanical Engineering 
Department Aeronautical Engineering is offered as an option in the junior 
and senior years. In order to give the student time to choose the branch of 
engineering for which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several 
courses is the same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the student 
to make a proper selection. The courses differ only slightly in the sophomore 
year, but in the junior and senior years the students are directed definitely 
along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathe- 
matics. See Admission, Section I. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the 
unit of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry. The 
program for such students would be as follows: during the first semester, 
five hours a week would be devoted to making up advanced algebra and 
solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics of the first semester 
would be scheduled, and the second semester mathematics would be taken 
in the third semester. 



Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chem- 
ical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, and mechanical engmeer- 
ing'with aeronautical option, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by stu- 
dents registered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engi- 
neering, which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that 
required for bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are 
accepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Gradu- 
ate School. See Graduate School, Section II. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to graduates of the Uni- 
versity who have obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The appli- 
cant must satisfy the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years aJter graduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Chemical, 
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 
with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

Drafting-Rooms. The drafting rooms are fully equipped for practical 
work. The engineering student must provide himself with an approved 
drawing outfit, material, and books. 

Chemical Engineering Laboratories. For instruction and research, the 
Chemical Engineering Department maintains laboratories for (1) General 
Testing and Control; (2) Unit Operations; (3) Cooperative Research; (4) 
Graduate Research. 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



163 



General Testing and Control Laboratory. In this laboratory there is 
available complete equipment for the chemical and physical testing of 
water, gases, coal, petroleum, and their by-products; and for general 
industrial chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

Unit Operations Laboratory. This laboratory contains equipment for the 
study of fluid flow, heat flow, drying filtration, distillation, evaporation, 
crushing, grinding, combustion, gas absorption, extraction, and centrifug- 
ing. Organic process equipment includes an autoclave, nitrator, reducer, and 
mixing kettle. For the study of fluid flow a permanent hydraulic assembly 
is available, and this includes flow meters of most types.. 

In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity of 
100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed type, 
direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evaporation 
can be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is equipped 
with a horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube bundle 
This evaporator is equipped with vacuum and pressure gauges, stirrer, wet 
vacuum pump, a condensate pump, and a salt filter with different types of 
packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may be made. 
The organic process equipment is all self -driven and designed to afford 
flexibility in use. Filtration studies may be made either on a large plate 
and frame press or on the ordinary Sweetland type press. Gas absorption 
equipment includes a blower and a stoneware packed column. Combustion 
equipment available consists of an industrial carburetor, pot furnace, pre- 
mix gas fired furnace and the usual gas analysis equipment. Shop facilities 
include a lathe, drill press, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools nec- 
essary for unit operation and research studies. For grinding there is a 
jaw crusher, a disc crusher, and a ball mill. A mechanical shaker and 
standard sieve are available for particle size separation. 

Cooperative and Graduate Research Laboratories. These laboratories are 
arranged to permit the installation of such special equipment as the par- 
ticular problems under consideration may require. Effort is made to 
maintain cooperation with the industries of Maryland and the Chemical 
Engineering activities of the State and Federal governments; for such work 
important advantages accrue because of the location of the Eastern 
Experiment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines on the University 
campus. 

Electrical Machinery Laboratories. There is provided a motor-generator 
set, consisting of a synchronous motor and a compound direct-current gen- 
erator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish direct current 
for testing purposes. Through a distribution switchboard, provision is made 
for distributing to the various laboratories direct current at 125 volts, and 
alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 and 220 volts. 



High-current potential dividers and auto-transformers are available at 
^)ie testing stations for individual voltage control. A single-phase induction 
regulator with control panel is also available for voltage regulation of 
experimental circuits. At the individual testing stations, use is made of 
specially constructed instrument tables which are designed to facilitate 
measurements in fundamental, direct-current machinery, and alternating- 
current machinery experiments. 

The test equipment includes a variety of direct-and alternating-current 
generators and motors, distribution transformers, a synchronous converter, 
an induction regulator, and modern control apparatus. Most of the machines 
are of modern construction and of such size and design as to give typical 
performance characteristics. Flexibility of operation is provided in several 
ways: for example, direct-current machines and alternating-current ma- 
chines are mounted on common bases with provisions for easy mechanical 
coupling and any machine may be readily connected electrically to any other 
machine through a common distribution panel. Metering and control boards 
are provided for rapid change of operating conditions with any machine. 
Water-cooled prony brakes are available for machine testing. 

Included in the test equipment are the measuring instruments essential 
for practical electrical testing, namely, ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, 
watthourmeters, frequency meters, tachometers, stroboscopes, Wheatstone 
bridges, impedance bridges, and oscillographs. 

Illumination Laboratory. The equipment includes electric lamps, shades, 
and reflectors of various type^; bar photometers for determination of 
candle-power distribution of incandescent lamps; and four types of porta- 
ble photometers for the measurement of illumination intensities. Several 
rather large fluorescent light installations are available for study in nearby 
rooms. 

Electrical Measurements Laboratory. The calibrating equipment consists 
of standards of potential and resistance which are used in conjunction 
with modern potentiometers to maintain calibration of a standard ammeter, 
voltmeter, and watthourmeter. Secondary standards of potential, resistance, 
inductance, capacitance, and frequency are available. Auxiliary devices 
such as oscillators, amplifiers, rectifiers, wavemeters, bridges, and galva- 
nometers are also available. 

A five-machine motor-generator set delivers voltages and currents, both 
alternating and direct, to test tables for meter testing. Equipment is also 
available for the experimental study of electric and magnetic fields, non- 
linear circuit elements and other topics in the field of electricity and 
Magnetism. 

Electronics Laboratory. This laboratory is housed in the same room as 
the measurements laboratory thereby permitting direct use of the measure- 
wients equipment. A wide variety of vacuum tubes, gas-filled tubes, and 



164 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



165 



photo-tubes is provided for studying tube characteristics. Associated equip- 
ment is also provided for making quantitative studies of emission, rectifi- 
cation, amplification, and oscillation. This equipment includes cathode-ray 
oscillographs, vacuum-tube voltmeters, microvoltmeters, and driving oscil- 
lators. 

Electrical Communications Laboratory. Equipment for studying both 
wire and wireless communication is provided. Transmission circuits, includ- 
ing artificial lines, filter sections, attenuation sections, and coupling devices 
are provided. A transmission loss or gain set is available. 

Rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators, and a demonstration radio set are pro- 
vided for making radio communication studies. 

The University maintains an amateur short-wave station, under faculty 
supervision, for members of the Student Radio Society. This station is 
equipped with a multi-band superheterodyne amateur communications 
receiver and a 500-watt transmitter adjustable to amateur frequencies. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories. The apparatus consists of slide 
valve automatic steam engines equipped with Prony brakes, steam turbine- 
generator set, Waukesha Diesel engine research unit with electric dynamom- 
eter and other accessories, two-stage steam-driver air compressor, gas 
engines, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed water heaters, steam con- 
densers, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, pyrometers, draft gauges, 
planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and equipment 
for a mechanical engineering laboratory. A refrigeration unit and a heating 
and ventilation unit have been installed. 

Aeronautical Laboratory. The laboratory is equipped for practice and 
research in engines, metal aircraft construction, structural tests, vibra- 
tion and noise, and aerodynamics. A three-foot return type wind tunnel, 
fully equipped with balances and other instruments and electrically oper- 
ated, has been constructed for standard experiments in aerodynamics and 
for student thesis research. 

A sheet metal shop equipped to construct components of aircraft struc- 
tures in aluminum alloy and steel is available. This shop includes such 
equipment as automatic air riveting hammer, planishing machines, squaring 
shears, rolls, brake, heat treating furnace, etc. A small machine shop is 
also available for students in constructing research apparatus. Variable 
speed motors are available for experiments in vibration and noise. 

The laboratory also includes a research spot welding machine, a sixty 
thousand-pound Baldwin-Southwark aircraft universal testing machine, 
Tuckerman gauges, oscillographs with accessories, and a Timby hydraulic 
jack system for static testing. 

Hydraulics Laboratory. The equipment consists of electrically driven 
centrifugal pumps, measuring tanks, various types of weirs, venturi meters, 
nozzles, Pelton water wheel with Prony brake built especially for laboratory 



,„e hook gauges, dial gauges, tachometers, stop watches, and other appa- 
ratus necessary for the study of the flow characteristics of water. 

Materials Laboratories. Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
nig standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
sravel, steel, concrete, timber, and brick. 

Eouipment includes a 300,000-pound hydraulic testing machine, two 
,00 000 pound universal testing machines, torsion testing machme, hardness 
Sr abrasion testing machine, rattler, constant temperature chamber 
!ment-testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and o her 
spS devices f or ascert;ining the elastic properties of different materials. 
Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. ^ f ^ ^u^ 

Zl College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
..eAan?ci solution If stresses in structures by use of celluloid models 
EquU.ment is also available for study of models by the photo-elastic 
method. 

Engineering Soils Laboratory. Equipment is available for performing 
the usual tests on engineering soils. This includes apparatus for grain size 
analysis, Atterberg limits, permeability, optimum moisture content for 
compaction. Proctor penetration, and consolidation. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association has, 
by arrangement with the College of Engineering, established its testmg 
and research laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research 
Foundation thus organized is to make available to the Association additional 
facilities for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of 
Engineering additional facilities and opportunities for mcreasmg the 
scope of its engineering research. 

Engineering Experiment Station. The purpose of the Engineering Exper- 
iment Station at the University, as well as of the various research labora- 
tories, is to conduct cooperative studies with departments of the State 
and Federal governments, and with the industries of Maryland. These 
studies have included traffic surveys over the Maryland State highway 
system, studies of concrete cores cut from the state roads, and laboratory 
studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

Cooperative researches now under way in the Engineering Experiment 
Station include the following projects: reinforced concrete hinge construc- 
tion, expansion joints for concrete roads, diagonal tension reinforcement 
for concrete beams, operating effect of size of motor in single phase rural 
electric lines, electrical wave shaper recorder, studies on airplane design, 
on petroleum and lubricating oils, and on gases. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 



166 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



167 



The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery 
The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers 
milling machines, drill presses, shaper, midget mill, and precision boring 
head. Equipment is available for gas and electric arc welding. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane topographic, 
and geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties. 
A wide variety of surveying instruments is provided, including domestic as 
well as foreign makes. 

Special Models and Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department' main- 
tains a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering maga- 
zines. The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires that 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 

The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and T'ransport, founded by 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, President of the National Highways Association, 
is part of the Library of the College of Engineering. The many books, 
periodicals, pamphlets, and other items included in this library cover all 
phases of highway engineering, highway transportation, and highway 
traffic control. 

There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans- 
portation library of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington, D. C. The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transportation problems, 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies. 

Freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
by practicing engineers covering the work of the several engineering pro- 
fessional fields. The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in 
selecting the particular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 
The student is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecture. 
A series of engineering lectures for upper classmen is also provided. These 



are given weekly by prominent practicing engineers in the various branches 
of the profession. 

Student branches of the following national technical societies are estab- 
lished in the College of Engineering: American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The student 
branches meet regularly for the discussion of topics dealing with the various 
fields of engineering. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior when 
he shall have passed at least 68 semester credit hours with an average 
grade of C or higher. 

Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect, with the 
permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to obsers'^e what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 

BASIC CURRICULUM FOR ALL FRESHMAN STUDENTS IN THE 
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

All Freshman students are required to take the following curriculum 
during their first year: 

Semester 

Freshman Year » I II 

Eng. Ifs — Survey and Composition 8 3 

Speech Ifs — Public Speaking 1 1 

*Math. 21. — College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 4 — 

Math. 22 — Analytic Geometry — 4 

Chem. Ifs — General Chemistry 4 4 

Dr. 1 — Engineering Drawing _ 2 — 

Dr. 2 — Descriptive Geometry — 2 

Shop 1 — Forge Practice — 1 

Engr. 1 — Introduction to Engineering 1 — 

M. I. Ifs— Basic R. 0. T. C 1 1 

'Elective : 3 3 



19 



19 



*A qualifying test is given at the close of the first two weeks to determine whether the 
student is adequately prepared for Math. 21. A student failing this test is required to take 
^lath. 1, a one-semester course without credit. 

tThe student may elect a course in Social Science, History, Language, or Government. 
•Mudents who plan to enroll in Chemical Engineering are advised to take G-erman or French. 



168 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



169 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information 
on chemical operations and processes of importance in modern life and 
to apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods 
for the attainment of economic objectives. Modern chemical research has 
contributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of the 
chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation in 
which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum ^ 

Sophomore Year I // 

Chem. 4 — Quantitative Analysis 4 — 

Ch. E. 10 — Water, Fuels, and Lubricants „ — 4 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

Chem. 8Afs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying — 1 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 5 5 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C :. 2 2 

20 21 

Junior Year 

Phys. 117fs — Applied Mechanics 2 2 

Chem. 102Afs— Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Chem. 102Bfs — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 2 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economic^ 3 3 

E. E. 51fs — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

Ch. E. 103fs — Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 3 

*Non-Engineering Elective 3 3 

20 20 
Senior Year 

Ch. E. lOSfs— Chemical Technology 2 2 

Ch. E. 109fs — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 2 2 

Ch. E. 105fs — Advanced Unit Operations 5 5 

Ch. E. llOfs — Chemical Engineering Calculations 3 3 

Ch. E. lllfs — Explosives and Toxic Gases 2 2 

Ch. E. 104fs — Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 1 

Bus. 71 — Fundamentals of Business Administration 2 -' 

C. E. 107 — Elements of Structure — 3 

* Non-Engineering Elective 3 ^ 

20 21 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING-CHEMISTRY 

A five-year program in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, arranged 
between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and Sciences, 
permits students, who so desire, to become candidates for the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
upon completion of the program outlined below: 

Chemical Engineering-Chemistry Curriculum Semester 

*Sophomore Year I -i^ 

Eng. 4, 5 — Expository Writing 2 2 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 2f s — General Physics 5 6 

Chem. 2fs — Qualitative Analysis 3 3 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying — 1 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C - 2 2 

19 20 
Third Year 

Chem. 8Afs — Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 8Bfs — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 6fs — Quantitative Analysis 4 4 

Ch. E. 10 — Water, Fuels and Lubricants — 4 

Phys. 117fs — Applied Mechanics 2 2 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

Phys. 101 — Precision of Measurements 3 — 

{Non-Engineering Elective ~.... — 3 3 

19 20 

Fourth Year 

Chem. 102Afs— Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Chem. 102Bfs— Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 2 

E. E. 51fs — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

Chem. 116fs — Advanced Organic Chemistry _ 2 2 

Chem. 117fs — Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Ch. E. 103fs — Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 3 

tNon-Engineering Elective 3 3 



19 



19 



*Advanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or other approved non-eng^ineering course- 



*Chemistry majors not taking an accelerated program who wish to transfer to the five- 
J^^ar combined program should take, if possible. Chemistry or Economics 31, 32 in the 
''Uminer semester preceding the sophomore year. 

lAdvanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or oth6r approved non-engineering course. 

tThree hours must be chosen from Social Science. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



171 



170 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Semester 

Fifth Year ' ^ ^^ 

Ch. E. 109fs— Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 2 2 

Ch. E. 104fs— Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 1 

Ch. E. 105fs— Advanced Unit Operations 5 5 

Bus. 71— Fundamentals of Business Administration 2 — 

Elective-English 2 

Chem. 118fs— Advanced Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Ch. E. lllfs — Explosives and Toxic Gases - 2 2 

Q^ E. 107 — Elements of Structures 3 

Ch. E. llOfs— Chemical Engineering Calculations 3 3 

Ch. E. lOSfs— Chemical Technology _2 ^ 

18 21 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 
of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 

Civil Engineering Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Speech 5— Oral Technical English 2 — 

Math. 23fs— Calculus ^ ^ 

Phys. 2fs— General Physics ^ ^ 

Dr. 3— Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 — 

Mech. 1— Statics and Dynamics — ^ 

Surv. 2fs— Plane Surveying 2 3 

Geol. 2— Engineering Geology - 2 — 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics — ^ 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C __2 J 

19 20 

Junior Year 

Speech 6— Advanced Oral Technical English — ^ 

Mech. 50— Strength of Materials 5 — 

C. E. 50— Hydraulics — ^ 

Mech. 52— Materials of Engineering — 

M. E. 50 — Principles of Mechanical Engineering 3 — 

E. E. 50— Principles of Electrical Engineering — 3 

C. E. 52 — Curves and Earthwork 3 — 

C. E. 100— Theory of Structures — 

Surv. 100— Advanced Surveying ~ ~ — 4 -- 

*Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Technical Society ^ _ 

18 18 

♦Advanced R. O, T. C for qualified students, or other approved non-engineering course. 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

Speech 7fs — Advanced Oral Technical English 1 1 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Law and Specifications — 2 

C. E. 101— Elements of Highways 3 — 

C. E. 102fs— Concrete Design 4 3 

C. E. 103fs — Structural Design „.„ 4 3 

C. E. 104fs — Municipal Sanitation 3 3 

C. E. 105 — Soils and Foundations — 3 

fElective _ 3 3 

18 18 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, and dis- 
tribution of electrical energy; electrical transportation, communication, 
illumination, and manufacturing; and miscellaneous electrical applications 
in industry, commerce, and home life. 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Speech 5 — Oral Technical English 2 — 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 2fs — General Physics 5 5 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying 1 — 

Shop 2 — Machine Shop Practice 1 — 

E. E. Ifs— Direct-Current Theory 2 3 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics — 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — 3 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. 0. T. C 2 2 

Non-Engineering Elective 3 — 

20 20 
Junior Year 

Speech 6 — Advanced Oral Technical English — 2 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 3 — 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials 3 — 

C. E. 51— Hydraulics — 3 

Mech. 52 — Materials of Engineering 2 — 

E. E. 52 — Direct Current Machinery 3 — 

E. E. 53 — Electricity and Magnetism 4 — 

E. E. 100 — Engineering Electronics — 4 

E. E. 101 — Alternating Current Circuits — 6 

■Non-Engineering Elective 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

18 18 

tElective may be Advanced R. O. T. C, C. E. 106fs Thesis, with approval of head 
of department; a course in Bus. 71, Fundamentals of Business Administration, Bact. 70, 
Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology, or other approved courses. 

*Advanced R. O. T. C, for qualified students, or other approved non-engineering course. 



172 



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173 



Semester 

Senior Year I jj 

Speech 7fs — Advanced Oral Technical English 1 i 

E. E. 102fs — Alternating-Current Machinery 5 5 

E. E. 103fs — Radio Communications 3 3 

tE. E. 104— Illumination 3 -- 

fE. E. 105— Electric Railways 3 — 

fE. E. 107 — Transmission Lines 3 — 

tE. E. 108— Electric Transients — 3 

fE. E. 109 — Advanced Alternating-Current Theory — 3 

M. E. 51 — Thermodynamics 3 — 

M. E. 52— Power Plants — 3 

^Elective _ 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

18 18 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and mainte- 
nance of machinery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and refrigera- 
tion; and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum « 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Speech 5 — Oral Technical English 2 — 

Math. 23fs— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 2f s — General Physics 5 5 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 — 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying — 1 

Shop 3 — Machine Shop Practice 2 — 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics — 5 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 — 

M. I. 2fs— Basic R. O. T. C 2 2 

Non-Engineering Elective „ 3 



20 



20 



Semester 

Junior Year — General I II 

Speech 6 — Advanced Oral Technical English — 2 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 3 — 

Mech. 50 — Strength of Materials 5 — 

C. E. 51— Hydraulics — 3 

Mech. 52 — Materials of Engineering — 2 

E. E. 51fs — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

Shop 50 — Foundry Practice 1 — 

Shop 51 — Machine Shop Practice — 1 

M. E. lOOfs— Thermodynamics 2 3 

♦Non-Engineering Elective 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

18 . 18 

Junior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Speech 6 — Advanced Oral Technical English — 2 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 3 — 

Mech. 50 — Strength of Materials 5 — 

Mech. 52 — Materials of Engineering „ — 2 

Shop 50 — Foundry Practice 1 — 

Shop 51 — Machine Shop Practice ~ — 1 

E. E. 51fs — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

M. E. lOOfs— Thermodynamics 2 3 

M. E. 53 — Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics — 3 

*Non-Engineering Elective 3 3 

Technical Society — — 

• 18 18 
Senior Year — General 

Speech 7fs — Advanced Oral Technical English 1 1 

M. E. 101— Heating and Ventilation 3 — 

M. E. 102— Refrigeration „ — 3 

M. E. 103fs— Thesis „ 1 2 

M. E. 104fs — Prime Movers 4 4 

M. E. 105fs — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 3 

M. E. 106fs — Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 

tElective 3 3 

Technical Society — — 



18 



18 



t Alternates. 

{Elective may be R. O. T. C. ; E. E. 106fs Thesis, with approval of head of department; 
a course in O. and M. 110, Fundamentals of Business Administration* Engr. 100, Engi- 
neering Law and Specifications, or other approved course. 



*Advanced R. O. T. C. for qualified students, or other approved non-engineering course. 
tElective may be Advanced R. 0. T. C, or other approved courses. 



174 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



175 



ct . Tr ^ Semester 

benior Year— Aeronautical Option j jr 

Speech 7fs— Advanced Oral Technical English i i 

M. E. 103fs— Thesis 1 2 

M. E. 104fs— Prime Movers IIIZZZIZZZ 4 4 

M. E. 105fs — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 3 

M. E. 106fs— Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 

M. E. 107fs— Airplane Structures .ZIIIIIIZ. 3 3 

Elective (Advanced R. O. T. C. or other approved course) 3 3 

Technical Society __ 

18 18 

AGRICULTURE— ENGINEERING 

^ A five-year combined program in Agriculture and Engineering, arranged 
jomtly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineering per- 
mits students to become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
m Agriculture at the end of four years and for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, or Chemical Engineering at the 
end of the fifth year. 

Details of this program will be found listed in this catalog under College 
of Agriculture. 

BUREAU OF MINES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 

FELLOWSHIPS IN APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 
offers fellowships for research in the field of engineering and applied 
sciences. Fellows enter upon their duties on July 1, and continue for 12 
months, including one month for vacation. Payments under a fellowship 
are made at the end of each month, and amount to $600 for the year 
The University will remit payment of tuition fees, and will grant all 
fellowship privileges. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 

Maryland, and become candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments of instruction, 

but about half of the time will be spent in research, under the direction 

of the Bureau of Mines staff. 

Appropriate problems in physics, chemistry, chemical engineering, or 
niathematics will be chosen according to the abilities of the candidates and 
the interests of the Bureau Divisions. The faculty supervisor will be the 
Professor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland 

The above fellowships will be known as Bureau of Mines Research Fellow- 
ships. The recipients will undertake the solution of definite problems con- 
fronting the mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 
Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 



recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require resi- 
dence during the university year from September to June. 

All the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities 
and technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or 
applied physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research 
work. Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of 
graduate work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications should include a certified copy of college record, applicant's 
photograph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and 
letters from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering spe- 
cifically the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. The 
application should be addressed to Fellowship Committee, Eastern Experi- 
ment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, 
College Park, Maryland. 

STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 
NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate problems 
related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their duties 
on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vacation. 
Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month and 
amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 

This fellowship is open to graduates in Engineering from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications with a certified 
copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, statement of technical 
and practical experience (if any), and letters from three persons, such as 
instructors or employers, covering specifically the applicant's character, 
ability, education, and experience. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean, College of Engineering, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 



176 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



177 



BUREAU OF MINES LECTURES 

Under the auspices of the University of Maryland, the Bureau of Mines 
of the United States Department of the Interior, which maintains its 
Eastern Experiment Station on the campus at College Park, offers public 
lectures from time to time during the University year. The speakers are 
outstanding members of the staff of the Bureau, selected because of broad 
and varied experience in fields of wide technical and public interest, involv- 
ing fundamental and pioneering research. Although the lectures are ar- 
ranged in connection with the work of the University in chemical engineer- 
ing, they cover a broad field of science, technology, and economics. 

There is no charge for admission. The general public as well as the 
faculty and student body are cordially invited. 

CIVILIAN PILOT TRAINING PROGRAM 

In cooperation with the Civil Aeronautics Authority, the College of 
Engineering offers to qualified male students airplane pilot training 
courses, both elementary and secondary. 

Elementary Course, 4 credits. — Prerequisites (subject to change each 
semester as specified by the C. A. A.): (a) Age limits, 18 to 25; (b) scho- 
lastic attainment, 15 or more college credit hours completed, if registered 
for 15 additional credit hours; (c) must be an American citizen; (d) must 
pass a physical examination as required by the U. S. Army Air Corps, or 
by Naval Aviation. 

Undergraduates at the University registering for this course must have 
the approval of their Dean, who also determines whether C. A. A. credit 
will be accepted for electives in the student's course. 

This course is open without credit to qualified students not registered at 
the University. 

The student is required to sign an affidavit that he will continue his flight 
training in the Army or the Navy. 

Expenses for the course are: physical examination, $12; insurance, $7; 
and enrollment fee, $10. According to present regulations, the medical fee 
and the insurance fee are refunded to the student before the completion 
of the course. 

The course consists of 72 hours of ground school work and 35 to 50 
hours of flight training. Upon completion of the course, a private pilot's 
license is awarded the student. 

Secondary Course, 6 credits. — Prerequisites (subject to change each 
semester as specified by the C. A. A.): (a) age limits, 18 to 25; (b) scho- 
lastic attainment, 45 or more credit hours completed, if registered for 15 
additional credit hours; (c) must be an American citizen; (d) must pass 
physical examination as required by U. S. Army Air Corps, or by Naval 
Aviation; (e) must have successfully completed the elementary course. 



Undergraduates at the University registering for this course must have 
the app^val of their Dean, who also determines whether C. A. A. credit 
vviU be accepted for electives in the student's course. ^. «. ,,. 

The student is required to sign an affidavit that he will continue his flight 
training in the Army or the Navy. 

Expenses for the course are: physical examination $12; insurance $9; 
J enrollment fee, $10. According to present regulations, the medical fee 
and t^e insurance fee are refunded to the student before the completion 

of the course. , ^„ v * 

The course consists of 108 hours of ground school work and 50 hours of 
flight training. Upon completion of the course, a restricted-commercial 
nilot's license is awarded the student. 

Additional information may be obtained from Dr. J. E. Younger, Coordi- 
nator, Civilian Pilot Training Program. 

PROGRAM LEADING TO A COMMISSION IN THE U. S. NAVAL 

RESERVE 

Under the provisions of the Naval Reserve Act of 1938, a class of en- 
listed men in the Naval Reserve, designated as V-7, has been estab ished 
leading to a Commission in the U. S. Naval Reserve. Students selected 
wm remain in college until they receive their degrees. The foUowmg are 
the special requirements under this program. 

Engineering students. Seniors and juniors in the College of Engineering 
who meet the physical and other special requirements, ^^^ff^^^' 
appointment to probationary commissions. They will be permitted to com- 
plete their college course before being sent to active duty in their own 
specialized fields. No courses other than the regular engineering courses 
are required, though it is recommended that the courses listed in the follow- 
ing paragraphs be taken as electives where possible. 

Other students. Seniors and juniors in other than the College of Engi- 
neering who meet the physical and other requirements, must before gradu- 
ation have received credit in at least two one-semester courses m mathe- 
matics of college grade and submit college credit for a course in plane trig- 
onometry. The following courses meet these requirements in mathematics: 

Math. 3— Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, 1, 2 or 3 credits. 

Math. 21— College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry, 4 credits. 

The following courses are also recommended for those planning to enter 
the U. S. Naval Reserve: 

Math. 4— Spherical Trigonometry and Navigation, 3 credits. 

Hist. 129— American Naval History, pro-seminar, 2 credits. 

Additional information may be obtained from Dean S. S. Steinberg, 
College of Engineering. 



178 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



179 



ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT DEFENSE TRAINING 

The College of Engineering is offering, in cooperation with the U. S. 
Office of Education, specialized training in engineering, science and man- 
agement courses essential to the national defense. These courses are de- 
signed to train men and women now employed in defense industries for 
more responsible positions, and to train others who desire to enter defense 
work. This training is also available for personnel of the Army and the 
Navy. 

The courses under this program are chiefly part-time evening courses in 
the fields of aeronautics, radio, drawing, mapping, metallurgy, testing, and 
industrial safety. Additional courses may be organized as the demands of 
industry or the armed forces require. 

The instruction is given by members of the faculty of the College of 
Engineering and by specialists from industry. 

Qualifications for Admission. Since all courses under this program are 
of college grade, the minimum requisite for admission is high school gradu- 
ation. In certain courses additional qualifications may be required to carry 
on successfully the work outlined. 

Cost. There is no charge to the students for tuition for these courses; 
but each student is required to bear his own living expenses and to furnish 
his own text books, drawing instruments and such other supplies as may 
be required. 

Training Centers. To meet the need of the defense industries in Mary- 
land and vicinity, training centers have been established at College Park, 
Baltimore, Hagerstown, and Washington, D. C. Additional centers may be 
established as the need arises. 

Certificate. Since the primary purpose of this training is specialized 
preparation for national defense, no college credit will be given for these 
courses. However, a certificate will be awarded each student who success- 
fully completes a full course. 

Employment. The College of Engineering cannot guarantee positions to 
those completing the courses, but every effort is made to place the men so 
trained. 

Additional information may be obtained from Dean S. S. Steinberg, 
College of Engineering. 

ENGINEERING SHORT COURSES 

Through short courses, the College of Engineering carries the benefits of 
engineering teaching to persons and industries in various parts of the State. 
These courses offer, in addition to regular instruction, an opportunity for 
the discussion of problems of interest to those engaged in public works, 
in public health and in public safety. 



Minm. Extension Classes ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ TX^^"^^^^ 
Jls and the State Departments ^f^'^^f J^^^^^hout the year in several 
SUs, night mining ^'^^J^^^^^tl^S::^^^ subjects studied are 

coal mme gases, coai "* pooneration with the Maryland 

volunteer Firemen's Short Course m cooP^ratum ^^ ^^^^^^^ 

LSs!rirarr::tr=rinspe arson investigation 

iraT^ r^i'rr:; service extension courses may he found under 

»i7i,» Service Extension Department. 

"Fire Service ii> ^.,t Course In cooperation with the Maryland 

Highway Engineering ^hort Course 1 p .^ ^^^^ ^^^^, 

State Roads Commission a highway «"f "^^""J 'J^tors of the Commission. 
!,ly at college Park for the engineers a^d -Pectors ^^^.^ developments 

The purpose of this <=°«'^^«;^«.*"^/Xl an opportunity for conference and 

throughout the State. biennially at 

sanitary Engineering Short Course^ J^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^,^, 

College Park in coopera ion ^f J^^^ f^^^ Association and the American 
Maryland-Delaware Water and Sewerage ^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ 

tr O^l Training Scho. This c_ is ^ ^^^ - 
joint cooperation of the I'»t«'^"*tional Assocmtion o ^^ Maryland. 

American Automobile Association a"d the jtom .^^^,,,^^tion of 

It deals with the best ^^'^^^ :^J^:r;^^::S^^rirn.nly for the traffic 
highway traffic accidents. J^^ ^^VoeparLent and the police depart- 
offlcers of the Maryland State ^^''^ J"^^ 
„.ents of the cities and counties of ^a^^^^^; ^^^^ ,,,,,,, „ay be 

Additional information regarding ^^^^^^l^^,^^,,,,^, 
obtained from Dean S. S. btemoerg, 

FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Service Extension ^^^^Z'li:T:;::t^of'vo2S:^^ 
of Engineering in <=°«P«'^^*!^\'^;%Seral and State funds. The Depart- 
Education, and operates with both Federal and ^^^^^ conducted 

ment provides in-service ^-^^Ji ^^etors and about 50 local 

SJSS. S:sic"ainSg i ^5 Sk hours is given in the fundamentals 



»» 



180 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of firemanship, as well as an advanced course of 69 clock hours, covering 
the technical field of fire prevention, control and extinguishment. A training 
course of 45 clock hours for industrial plant fire brigades is also available. 
Firemen who have completed the prescribed training courses have been 
given preferential rating in positions in the military and naval fire fighting 
forces. 

To meet the demands of the national emergency, the Department has 
expanded its activities to the training of auxiliary fire forces and rescue 
units in defense duties. There is also available a comprehensive training 
course of 24 clock hours in connection with incendiaries, war gases, infernal 
machines, sabotage and fire fighting as applied to military explosives and 
ammunition, that is available for all civilian defense groups. 

The Department also serves in an advisory capacity to the State Fire 
Marshal and municipal authorities in matters of fire prevention, fire protec- 
tion engineering, and fire safety regulations. 

Additional information may be obtained from Chief J. W. Just, Director, 
Fire Service Extension Department, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Director. 

The Engineering Experiment Station carries on cooperative investiga- 
tions with industries of Maryland and Departments of the State and Fed- 
eral Governments. A diversity of engineering training, experience, and 
equipment represented by the staff and laboratories of the College of Engi- 
neering is thus made available for the problems under inquiry. 

Among the researches at present being carried on are studies on (1) 
streamlined steel tubes under loading conditions; (2) high speed wings for 
airplanes; (3) eccentric rivet groups; (4) D tube sections under various load- 
ing conditions; (5) expansion joints for concrete roads; (6) the design of 
concrete culverts; (7) the conversion of petroleum products to aromatic 
hydrocarbons; (8) sabotage by explosives; (9) magnetic properties of special 
alloys. Recently completed reports have involved topics such as (a) the 
action of manufactured gas on ceramic ware, (b) the fluid characteristics 
of bentonite suspensions, (c) the ferro-magnetic properties of hematite, 
(d) the separation and estimation of the four general classes of hydrocar- 
bons occurring in the gasoline range of petroleum. 



COLLEGE OF 
HOME ECONOMICS 




<' 



IS I 



The strength of a nation . . 
n the intelligent and well- 
dered homes of the people.'' 



— Lyda Sigoumey. 



w 



182 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dean. 

The College of Home Economics serves Maryland and the surrounding 
area with its educational program for young women. This program com- 
bines good personal development with education for homemaking and for 
a livelihood. Information on better health principles, good study habits, 
efficient use of time, good grooming, becoming dress and proper adjust- 
ment to new situations constitute the student's program for self-develop- 
ment. 

In the professional phases of her program, the student advises with mem- 
bers of the faculty and with women well-known in home economics who 
aid her in choosing the particular curriculimi in which she expects to 
specialize. 

The student is urged to acquire practical experience during vacations. 
This might begin with the actual management of her family's home for a 
period of time. Students preparing to teach gain experience on playgrounds 
in caring for children and in executing home projects. Commercial firms 
and institutions provide opportunities for other types of experience. 

Organization 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Textiles and Clothing, Practical Art, Home and 
Institution Management, and Foods and Nutrition. 

Facilities 

The home of the College of Home Economics, following campus tradition, 
is a new colonial brick building planned and built to present the best 
equipment and facilities for education in home economics. A home manage- 
ment house is maintained on the campus for experience in homemaking. 

Located, as the campus is, between two large cities, unusual opportunities 
are afforded for both faculty and students. In addition to the University's 
excellent general and specialized libraries, Baltimore and Washington fur- 
nish the added library facilities so essential to scientific research and 
creative work in the arts. The art galleries and museums with their price- 
less exhibits, the government bureaus and city institutions, stimulate study 
and provide practical experience for the home economics student. 

Professional Organizations 

The Home Economics Club, in which membership is open to all home 
economics students, is affiliated with the American Home Economics 
Association. 

Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, established Alpha 
Zeta chapter at the University of Maryland, November, 1937. Students of 
high scholarship may be elected to membership. 



183 
COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Oegree „ . . „„_fprred for the satisfactory com- 

'Ihe degree of Bachelor of sconce sc^^^^^^^^^^^ .^ ,„y ,f the 

pletion of 128 semester hours ot cour 
following curricula. 

Curricula ^ ^ «t„Hent may elect the curriculum 

' At the close of the * "^^^-J J^^f^oS^^ or one of the follow- 
in general home economics ^h'-^l^'^Ji^" ^f curricula: home economics 
^/professional curricula, or a '"'^^'"f ^^^^ ^ome economics extension, 
tation, textiles and clot]^-^; J^^^f^^^^^^^ A student who wishes to 

institution management and J^^J^^^/J^^, economics education m the 
teach home economics may ^^g f ^J^^cJlege of Education (see home eco- 
CoUege of Home Economics, or in tne v.o s 

nomics education) . ,.,..„ =nprialize at the close of the freshman 

The student who has not dec;ded ^o JJ^^^^^^^^ ^^,^ ,^, ^akes 

year may follow the general ^""^^ ^~i of any curriculum, the 

grade average. 

^ . 1 ^ Semester 

Home Economics Curriculum . • i. I II 

V «. AiiVP for all home economics curricula 
Freshman Year— Alike lor an uu 3 3 

istry „ " 

TT E 15 — Textiles - ^ 3 

ri' ^' ^"^ . - 

jj E 21 — ^Design ' 1 1 

Sneech Ifs— Public Speaking .• ^ i 

HE If s-Home Economics Lectures ^^ ^ 

Phys* Ed. 2f s-Personal Hygiene- ,^ y, 

Phvs Ed 4fs-Physical Activities ■■ ^---^ _^ 3.2 

t?h5cr3fs-Introductory Physics, or elective _^ __ 

15-16 15-16 

•^o niirriculum is non-professional. It is 
The General Home Economics ^™^^^ . ^^, ^est personal develop- 

Sri"-f-V=.".l?t !> provides .o.a .„,»,„. ,0, .» 
as a future home maker. 



and Practical Art. ^^^ i.^shman or sophomore year. 

tPhysics 3fs may be taKen oun b 



184 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



General Home Economics Curriculum 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

H. E. 24 — Costume Design 3 

H. E. 11— Clothing — 

H. E. 31fs— Foods 3 

Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology — 

JPsych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities 1 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology — 

Electives 3 

• ^"^ 

17 
Junior Year 

H. E. 32 — Elements of Nutrition 

or 

H. E. 131— Nutrition 

H. E. 137 — Food Buying and Meal Service 

H. E. 141, 142 — Management of the Home 3 

H. E. Ill— Advanced Clothing 3 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology — 

H. E. 121, 122— Interior Design 3 

Electives _ -.. ~ 4-5 

16-17 

Senior Year 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study 3 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home — 

Electives 12 



15 



II 

3 
3 

3 



1 
1 
3 
3 

17 



3 
3 

3 
3 

4-5 

16-17 



3 
12 

15 



Home Economics EMucation Curriculum 

(See College of Education Page 154) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

This curriculum is planned for the young woman who wants more than a 
general knowledge of textiles and clothing for her personal use, or as a 
potential home maker. Its principal purpose is professional: to prepare 
young women as teachers of textiles and clothing, as research workers or 
as specialists in textile testing with government agencies or commercial 
firms. The student electing this curriculum has an opportunity for much 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 1^5 

• .U in textiles and clothing, design, and for many contacts with 

creative work i« ™" ^ ^^^ j^ these lines of work, 
nrofessional persons interesieu 

^ • 1.,™ Semester 

Textiles and Clothing Curriculum I II 

Sophomore Year ^ g — 

H. E. 24— Costume Design ZZZ — ^ 

jl' E. 11— Clothing 3 3 

h! E. 31fs— Foods --" 2 2 

S: S«==oS" ^::SSi^^=^ ;:; \ 1 

Psvch 1-Introduction to Psychology 3 _ 

Econ.'37-Fundamentals of Economics _ 3 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology - 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 6f s-Community Hygiene ^ 1 

Phys Ed. 8fs-Physical Activities __ 3 

goc 3— Introduction to Sociology __ — 

17 yj 

Junior Yea/r — 3 

H E 111— Advanced Clothing __ 3 

h! E, 171-Advanced ^extil^ ^- -— — ^ _ 3 

Chem. 14— Chemistry of Textiles v^very ^ __ 

H E 131 — Nutrition *""* 3 3 

H. E. 141, 142— Management of the Home ^ __ 

H E* 121— Interior Design - •• •; r ___ 3 

H E 137-Food Buying and Meal Service I 

or .....[ - 8 

H E 122— Interior Design 3 __ 

Stat. 14— Elements of Statistics , 3 3 

Phys, —Advanced Physics I 

or . , 1 — ^ 

Bact. 50— Household Bacteriology ■ ••• ^ ^_q _ 

Electives — "^ 

18 18 

Senior Year 2 

H. E. 113— Pattern Design _ 3 

h' E 112— Problems in Clothing 3 __ 

tt' tt' 172— Problems in Textiles - - " __ 3 

H I 143-Practice in Management of the Home • ^ 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study ■^.. 3 — 

Speech lOl-Introduction to Radio ^""II 4 » 

Electives .••- — 

15 15 



lEducational Psychology, Psych. 55, may be substituted for Psych. 1, in the junior year. 



186 THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

PRACTICAL ART 

^ des?.; ZIZ'ZJ:Z:1^.^ tZ:' ^^^ '-''- ^^ concentration: interior 
furnishings and w eart7applef S "la^ '^ '"' "^"^'^^ ^^ ^^^^ 
available to graduates LS wHh" eL. H "i P'^^^"^^^*^' ^^^itions 
textile analysis, and radio worT; the" d^^^^^^^^^^ con^parison shopping, 

these fields or in denartniPr^f.,! k J^^^^lop into advanced positions in 

nation, personality cons"^^^ buying, department managing, style coordi 
personnel work. '"^'^^'^"^^ designing, advertising, and training and 

Practical Art Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' Semester 

H. E. 24--Costume Design ^ ^^ 

H. E. 11— Clothing 3 _ 

H. E. 31fs— Foods ZZ ~~ ^ 

Soc. 3— Introduction to Sociology "■■"■"■" " " ^ ^ 

Econ. 37-FundamentaIs of Economics! "I ^ 

Phys. Ed. 6fs— Community Hygiene ^ - 

Phys. Ed. 8fs-Physical Activities ? ^ 

Psych. 3— Applied Psychology II ZZ ^ 

H. E. 32— Elements of Nutrition ~~" ^ 

Modern Language ^ — 

" --• 3 3 

Junior Year ^'^ ^'^ 
H. E. 121, 122— Interior Design 

Jour. 15— Graphic Design ^ 3 

Jour. 1-Introduction to Joumalism " ^ ^ 

Mkt. 101— Principles of Marketing ^ ^ 

HE 'nr^!'f ^^-^M-agement "an^Al^^^a^^ii;^^^ 1 " 

w. iL. Ill— Advanced Clothing ^ ^ 

3 — 

Senior Year 17 17 

of1?ome 1"::^:^^^^^^^ — - the College 

department store. ^''''*^ ^^ experience in a specified 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



187 



Semester 

For majors in interior design j jj 

H. E. 123, 124 — Advanced Interior Design ^ 2 2 

H. E. 120 — Advertising Layout and Store Coordination 2 — 

H. E. 125 — Merchandise Display ~ 2 — 

H. E. 126 — Store Experience -. 3 — 

H. E. 129— Radio in Retailing ^ — 3 

H. E. 170 — Consumer Problems in Textiles 3 — 

H. E. 137 — Food Buying and Meal Service — 8 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home 3 — 

H. E. Ed. 102s— Child Study — 8 

Elective ~ — 4 



15 

For majors in costume design 

H. E. 127, 128— Advanced Costume Design 2 

H. E. 120 — Advertising Layout and Store Coordination 2 

H. E. 125 — Merchandise Display 2 

H. E. 126— Store Experience „.. 3 

H. E. 129— Radio in Retailing — 

H. E. 170 — Consumer Problems in Textiles 3 

H. E. 113— Pattern Design 2 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home 3 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study — 

Elective — 

17 

For majors in both interior and costume design 

H. E. 123, 124 — Advanced Interior Design 2 

H. E. 127, 128 — ^Advanced Costume Design 2 

H. E. 120 — Advertising Layout and Store Coordination 2 

H. E. 125 — Merchandise Display 2 

H. E. 126— Store Experience 3 

H. E. 129— Radio in Retailing — 

H. E. 170 — Consumer Problems in Textiles 3 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home 3 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study „ — 

Elective — 



15 



2 



8 



3 
5 

13 



2 
2 



3 

3 



17 



13 



I 



188 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION 

This curriculum outlines the training necessarv fnr tl,. 

Home Economics Extension Curriculum 

Sophomore Year Semester 

H. E. 24— Costume Design ^ ^^ 

H. E. 11— Clothing * 3 _ 

H. E. 31fs— Foods ZZ. ~" 

Soc. 3— Introduction to Sociology ^ 

Econ. 37-FundamentaIs of Economics...' "7 

Phys. Ed. 6fs-Community Hygiene .... ^ 

Phys. Ed. 8fs-Physical Activities ^ 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology ^ 

E 1 ec ti ves - — 

• 6 



Junior Year "^^ 

H. E. 131— Nutrition 

H. E. 132— Dietetics 3 

H F nJ' ^^--^^^^^^"^^t of tj^e HomeZ "7 

n, tj. 111— Advanced Clothing ^ 

Bact. 50— Household Bacteriology ^ 

Psych. 55-EducationaI Psychology ^ 



-Interior Design. 



17 



Senior Year 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study 

R FH ?iir^''^?^r' ^" ^""^^ Economics" Extension "~ 

*meMyli ^""^ Education !! ZZZ Z 



15 



3 
3 
3 

1 

1 
3 
3 



17 



3 
3 

3 

3 

3 
3 

18 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



189 



IXSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

The Institution Management Curriculum provides training for those stu- 
dents interested in the housing and the food service administration for large 
groups of persons. This work divides generally into two types: food sersdce 
or housekeeping in such institutions as hospitals and schools and in com- 
mercial organizations such as restaurants, cafeterias, inns and hotels. 
Training for a hospital dietitian requires one year of graduate study in a 
hospital offering a course approved by the American Dietetic Association. 
The Institution Management Curriculum meets the academic requirements 
for entrance to such a course. A student planning to do institutional work 
other than hospital dietetics is not required to take Curriculum, Instruction, 
and Observation (H. E. Ed. 101s) and Diet in Disease (H. E. 138s.) 

Institution Management Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I 11 

H. E. 24— Costume Design 3 — 

H. E. 11— Clothing — 3 

Chem. 12Afs — Organic Chemistry _.. 2 2 

Chem. 12Bfs — Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 1 

H. E. 31fs— Foods 3 3 

Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology — 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 — 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology — 3 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 3 — 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Chem. 50A — General Physiological Chemistry 2 — 

Chem. 50B — General Physiological Chemistry Laboratory 2 — 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology — 3 

H. E. 131— Nutrition 3 — 

H. E. 132— Dietetics — 3 

H. E. 141, 142 — Management of the Home 3 3 

H. E. 144fs — Institution Management „ 3 * 3 

H. E. Ed. 101 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — 3 

H. E. 137 — Food Buying and Meal Service — 3 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology 3 — 



Electives in Government, Gard 



16 



18 



niended. 



ening, Poultry HusbandrT- a»,/i o • i 

^ nusoanary, and Sociology are recom- 



190 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Semester 

Senior Year I // 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home — 3 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study 3 _ 

H. E. 135 — Experimental Foods 4 — . 

H. E. 146 — Advanced Institution Management ~.~ — 3 

H. E. 147— Institution Cookery. 3 ^ 

H. E. 121, 122— Interior Design 3 3 

Psych. 130 — Mental Hygiene — 3 

H. E. 138— Diet in Disease — 3 

Electives 2 — 

15 15 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

If our country is to meet, successfully, the demands made by war, our 
people must be strong. This means that the great amount of mal-nutrition 
now existing must be decreased to a minimum. To do this, many of our food 
habits must be changed; and better use made of scientific knowledge in the 
planning, purchasing, preparing and serving of food. 

The first purpose of the Foods and Nutrition Curriculum is to teach 
each young woman the daily use of scientific information in the choice of 
food, now for herself, and in the future for her family. The second purpose 
is professional; there are many positions in foods and nutrition research 
with government and state agencies and with commercial organizations. 
As the National Nutrition Program gets under way, the number of such 
positions is increasing. Newspapers, magazines for home makers, and radio 
stations employ home economists with special training in foods and nutri- 
tion. 

Foods and Nutritijon Curriculum Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

H. E. 24 — Costume Design 3 — 

H. E. 11— Clothing _ 3 

Chem. 12Afs — Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 12Bfs — Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 1 

H. E. 31fs— Foods 3 3 

* Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 — 

Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology „ — 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 — 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology — 3 

Phys. Ed. 6fs — Community Hygiene 1 1 

Phys. Ed. 8fs — Physical Activities 1 1 

17 n 

*Ed. Psych. 10 may be substituted for Psych. 1, in junior year. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Junior Year 

^, _jn 50A— General Physiological Chemistry.. -^ 

Chem.' 50B-General Physiological Chemistry Laboratory. 

H. E. 131— Nutrition -••• - 

h! E. 132— Dietetics - - 

H. E. 141, 142 — Management of the Home.._ 

Bact. 50— Household Bacteriology. 

H. E. 137— Food Buying and Meal Service 

H. E. 121, 122 — Interior Design 

Electives 



191 



Semester 



I 

2 
2 

3 



II 



Senior Year 

H. E. Ed 102 — Child Study 

H. e! 143— Practice in Management of the Home. 

H. E. 135 — Experimental Foods - 

H. E. 133 — Demonstrations 

H. E. 134— Advanced Foods 

Electives 



3 

4 

17 

3 

4 

8 
15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
8 
2 

17 



3 

2 
3 
7 

15 



li 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY 
SCIENCE AND TACTICS 




''Duty, then, is the sublimest 



word in our lan^ua^e. 



99 



•General Robert E. Lee. 



194 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Personnel 1941-1942 

Colonel Robert E. Wysor. Jr., Commandant 

Sergeant George E. Martin, Assistant 
Sergeant F. J. Norris, Assistant 
Sergeant C. J. Uhrinak, Assistant 
Sergeant Otto Seibeneichen, Band Leader 

MRS. Bertha B. White, Secretary to Commandant 
GENERAL 

sine 1856. Until 191? h7"J«i,?™"''" "' .*= ""ivnity of M.n,l.nd 
time, „l,tory llr" ,i» ha S . Tu?^ ^^ '?°°'',.""' "■"» "»' 
freshman and »phon,or. mak BW.rts ™ ''" *" '""■^''•■"' «' 

TralninJ Corps.' ^nJ™!; "X h, eS t's^' '^"' '""^' 

Th. ™^«i»al work . h.^ » ^f P»vt LTof' C; ^eSr, 
comHantafJ^T/rtln'/ A„"^r°' "' '"" "*«""»' -' «>"« "«« 

for'^hriSnTliLXn-'re V."rsTf '^ZT "j" ■""T" ■»'"«'" 

«s ohi,^ is u, ,„.i,f, ,wo„,s for^.Sv:^iSfr;«rS. ■""""""' ■"■ 
.,i^.rr„s^- So- S"s.ror^ -- 1 - ^rxs: 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 195 

Course Students a certain number for the First Year Advanced Course. 
These students must have junior standing and are required to sign a con- 
tract obligating themselves to complete the Advanced Course. All Advanced 
Course students are paid, at present, 25 cents per day and, in addition, 
they receive a uniform allowance. Upon completion of the course, those who 
are 18 years of age and otherwise qualified will be commissioned as second 
lieutenants in the Army Reserve Corps. 

Credit for Previous R. O. T, C. Training — Students who are grciduates 
of class MS schools which are rated as "Honor Schools" by the War Depart- 
ment, will receive credit for the First Year Basic Course, and will be 
required to complete the Basic Course in their sophomore year. 

Uniforms 

Members of the Basic Courses are issued uniforms without cost to the 
student. Shoes of a type specified by the Military Department must be 
purchased. 

The Advanced Course student receives a total uniform allowance of 
$36.00. Any difference in the allowance and the cost of uniform is borne 
by the student. 

REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 
TRAINING CORPS, 1941-1942. 

Regimental Commander Colonel James E. Dunn 

Regimental Executive (Acting) Lieut. Col. Neal Dow, Jr. 

Regimental Adjutant — Major William A. Holbrook 

Regimental Plans and Training. Captain J. C. Bray 

Battalion Commander, 1st Battalion Lieut. Col. James H. Wharton 

Executive Officer, 1st Battalion ^ Capt. Theodore J. Stell 

Adjutant, 1st Battalion 1st Lt. George L. Wannall 

Battalion Supply Officer^ 5nd Lt. Samuel L. Pfefferkorn 

Company Commander, Company "A" Capt. Samuel V. Moore 

Leader, 1st Platoon ~ 1st. Lt. Robert W. Russell 

Leader, 2nd Platoon ..2nd Lt. Philip C. Heath 

Leader, Third Platoon >..2nd Lt. Roy K. Skipton 

Unassigned ~ 2nd Lt. James E. Malcolm 

Company Commander, Company "B" Capt. Thomas M. Fields 

Leader, 1st Platoon _lst Lt. M. Gist Welling 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. William A. McGregor 

Leader, Third Platoon 2nd Lt. Donald R. Magruder 

Unassigned ~ 2nd Lt. Robert S. Insley 

Company Commander, Company "C". Capt. Walter J. Kerwin 

Leader, 1st Platoon ...1st Lt. Fred C. Hicks 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Daniel L. Gendason 

Leader, Third Platoon „ 2nd Lt. Merle D. DuVall 

Unassigned 2nd Lt. Frank G. Carpenter 



196 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 



li 









Battalion Commander, 2nd Battalion Lt. Col. Louis M. Tierney 

Executive Officer, 2nd Battalion Capt. Harold E. Earp 

Adjutant, 2nd Battalion 1st Lt. John L. Scott 

Battalion Supply Officer 2nd Lt. George C. Pendleton 

Company Commander, Company "D" Capt. John F. Curtin 

Leader, 1st Platoon 1st Lt. Thomas C. Galbreath 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Randall C. Cronin 

Leader, Third Platoon _2nd Lt. Harry A. Boswell 

Unassigned - 2nd Lt. Robert C. Henry 

Company Commander, Company "E" Capt. Lawrence MacKenzie 

Leader, 1st Platoon 1st Lt. Arthur H. Valentine 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Robert E. Stalcup 

Leader, Third Platoon ...2nd Lt. Paul B. Hutson 

Company Commander, Company "F" Capt. Orville C. Shirey 

Leader, 1st Platoon 1st Lt. Bruce A. Douglas 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Joseph L. Gude 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 2nd Lt. Harry Rimmer 

Unassigned 2nd Lt. Rodney L. Boyer 

Battalion Commander, 3rd Battalion Lt. Col. J. Paul McNeil 

Executive Officer, 3rd Battalion Capt. Frank L. Bentz 

Adjutant, 3rd Battalion 1st Lt. William R. Tilley 

Battalion Supply Officer 2nd Lt. H. Henry Spicer 

Company Commander, Company "G" Capt. Vincen J. Hughes 

Leader, 1st Platoon 1st Lt. Robert L. Dom 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Warrent F. Vandervort 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 2nd Lt. Vernon L. McKinstry 

Company Commander, Company "H" Capt. Theodore E. Fletcher 

Leader, 1st Platoon .*. 1st Lt. Lloyd G. Huggins 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Robert B. Ziegele 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 2nd Lt. James A. Hambleton 

Unassigned 2nd Lt. Charles R. Jubb 

Company Commander, Company "I" Capt. Gerald E. Prentice 

Leader, 1st Platoon 1st Lt. William R. Maslin 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Thomas T. Witkowski 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 2nd Lt. Tarleton S. Bean 

Battalion Commander, 4th Battalion Lt. Col. Robert H. Smith 

Executive Officer, 4th Battalion Capt. Jeremiah C. Hege 

Adjutant, 4th Battalion 1st Lt. Charles R. Beaumont 

Battalion Supply Officer 2nd Lt. W. Kingsley Grigg 

Company Commander, Company "K" Capt. Theodore M. Vial 

Leader, 1st Platoon -1st Lt. William T. Riley 

Leader, 2nd Platoon 2nd Lt. Charles A. Rausch 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 2nd Lt. Hugh M. Walton 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 197 

J r«^r.ar,v "L" - Capt. Robert D. Hall 

Company Commander, Company 1. ^^^y^^ ^^^^^ g ^^.^ 

Leader, 1st Platoon - ^^d Lt. J. D. Eyler 

Leader, 2nd Platoon • ^nd Lt. Robert D. Condon 

Leader, 3rd Platoon - ^nd Lt. Charles B. Raymond 

unassigned —■■■"—^^ ^apt. William H. Schoenhaar 

Company Commander, Company M - ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^ Alperstein 

Leader, 1st Platoon ^nd Lt. Joseph A. Sirkis 

Leader, 2nd Platoon ^nd Lt. George R. Cook 

Leader, 3rd Platoon IZ..2nd Lt. Howard M. Trussell 

Unassigned 

TjHTr Band Capt. Edward H. Price 

Commanding Officer, ROTC Band f eompanies will 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, 

AND ATHLETICS . 

The purpose of the program ^^J^^f^^f^S^.^t^SLr^^^^^ 
broadly conceived as l^^ .^^Y^'^l^^^.^^^jTssification tests are given 
plish this purpose, physical examinations ana c ^^ ^^^^ 

[he incoming. students to deter^^ ,^,^,,,,, p,efer- 

yZ:t:der a^Vrsi^ed 1^ tSvarioL activities of the program. 

'"^fslen and sophomores assigned to physical e^^^^^^^^^^^ 

activity classes each week tJ^-^f °;Jj, ^J. ^^^^^ S^^^^^ 

football, and tennis are the ^h^^f activities in the win ^ ^^^.^ 

ball, and other team games; and m the ^P""/' *"S^ a con- 

In addition to these team activities ^"P^J"^/^*^^^^^^ wrestling, 

siderable number of individual ^P^'t^V^Linton Seboard, and the like, 
horseshoes, ping pong, bag punchmg, badminton, »°°^^ ' 

* ^^fT-QTYinral sDorts is conducted also, ioucn lout 

b»ll «nd setter in the toll, "'5"°*. ,„,,.,. A ,. a,is proeram. PUquej, 
.„d tr«:k in the spring, ate Ih. th.rf ^l^'^^^J, 5 ft, p„grm 

lien Department .re to™ oj«, ^^"j^J-'S.tet^hootlng, apparalu, 
:^reinr^xir-«S:C"«H4..=nn,., badminton, and 

The University is particularly fortunate in « ^ education, 

facilities for carrying on the actmties of the programof^p y ^^^^^^ 

Two large modem gymnasia, a new field house, a numoe 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 



198 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



4 



tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute 
the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
soccer, wrestling, golf, and tennis. The University is a member of the 
Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and 
cooperates with other national organizations in the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

For Women 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities 
for conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including 
hockey, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball; individual sports, 
consisting of riding, tennis, badminton, fencing, golf, archery, deck tennis, 
table tennis, and the like, are offered. Opportunity is given for various types 
of dancing including, modern, square, folk, and ballroom. The proximity 
of the University to Washington and Baltimore provides excellent oppor- 
tunity for groups to attend professional programs in dance. 

The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural 
tournaments in the seasonal sports, sports days with neighboring colleges, 
and intercollegiate competition in rifle shooting. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and women 
students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of the 
state, and to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education, see College of 
Education, and Courses of Instruction. 

This department now is being reorganized with a view to adapting its 
broad program to war conditions and necessities. 




If we limit the search for 
truth and forbid men anywhere, 
in any way, to seek knowledge, 
we strike at the vital force of 
truth itself." 

—Phillips Brooks. 



I 



200 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



201 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appelman, Dean. 

Elsie M. Parrett, Secretary to Dean, 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

R. B. CORBETT, Ph.D., Director Experiment Station. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

N. L. Drake, Ph.D.,Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

C. B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

L. V. Howard, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Wilbert J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

L. H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

John G. Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairy Husbandry. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Dean Emeritus of Agriculture. 

W. Mackenzie Stevens, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration. 

A. E. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Modem Languages. 

Walter H. Hartung, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Bal- 
timore) . 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the general faculty. The 
Graduate School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918, and 
organized graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's 
degree was undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School includes all 
members of the various faculties who give instruction in approved graduate 
courses. The general administrative functions of the graduate faculty are 
delegated to a Graduate Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School 
is chairman. 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University libraries the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because 
of the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable 
asset to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminar 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 



ADMISSION ^ . . . .V,, Traduate School must hold a bachelor's 

\r^ flntiUcant for admission to the Uraauaie ocuuui mu. „j:^^ 

^SS degree from a college or university of recognized standing. 

V CSnt Shalt furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record 

'Ivh fo'ulnSi^^^^^^ must show creditable completion of an 

rSat: a=t of undergraduate ^^^^^^^ ^-.^tilTltlt 
\ fl^iH Amplication for admission to the Uraauai^e ocuuui 

;Tpriorto1ats of registration on blanks obtained from the office of 

^Ifterapproval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the 
After appro .+,,aent This card permits one to register in the 

each succeeding registration. ^ . . . 

Admission to the Gradmte School does not necessarily imply admtsswn to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students who wish to graduate work in the University, even though 
they are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in ^e 
Graduate School at the beginning of each semester. In no case wM gradu- 
^tfc^lttgiven unless the student matriculates and regxsUrs ^n the 
gJ:^ SchL. The program of work for the ---\- ^ ^'^^/"ed 
session is arranged by the student with the major department and entered 

;" Trs? carls, which are signed first by the professor in charge 
of the student's major subject and then by the Dean of the Graduate 
h*t Onetard is^etained by the Dean. The f <!-* f ^ *« J*^ 
card and in case of a new student, also the matriculation card, to the 
RegMra's office where the registration is completed Students will not 
be adn^tted to graduate courses until the Registrar has certified to the 

n^t^Sorlhat registration has been completed. Course cards may be 

obtained at the Registrar's office or at the ^^^"^ \?^%J^^.^!^^,^ 
departments usually keep a supply of these cards m their respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in ^^^^l^'f^^^^^Us 
reouirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Gradwates 
7F<rSaduates aid Advanced Undergraduates. Graduate students who 
are inadequately prepared for ^-duate work in their chosen fields or^^^^^^ 
lack prerequisites for minor courses may elect a limited number of courses 
numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate credit will 
nrbe aJlowed for these courses. Courses that are audited are registered 
for in the same way, and at the same fees, as other courses. 



202 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



203 



PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work i, f>, 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate pro^rL Wi . ' 
suitable minor work, which is arranged in cooyraMon wTthe Instruct'"' 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive Lnnl?.f. '• 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limiteTt "a proTraZf /f^T' 
credit hours for the semester. If a student is preparing a thSs during ^ 
minimum residence for the master's degree/the^egiLatio" „ g^afult 
courses should not exceed twelve hours for the semester. S^^luate 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

sh^^Tr" T^ '" "'^'""•^ ''"""^ ^^^ ""'"'"^^ ^^'"^ster and also in the 
short 7%-weeks summer session. 

ce^'iL^th'"'^'""*^ ^"''"*^' ^ 'P^"^' ''""^*'" ^'^'"^ f»" information con- 
cerning the summer sessions and the graduate courses offered therein The 

bullet n IS available upon application to the Director of the SummTr Ses- 
sion, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

th.^ nlT*"- ^T""'.^",'* opportunities for research are offered in some of 

n the nrofr' T f ,'* ^'"™°''- ^*"'^^"*^ P"^^"^"^ graduate work 
in the professional schools must register in the Graduate School and meet 

the same requirements and proceed in the same way as do gradual stud^n 
m other departments of the University. stuaents 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

for'^thriL!^ *!f ^fT^'^y ^J^o has nearly completed the requirements 
Sth tL ^^""^ f ^ ^'^T '"^^' ^"""^ ^'^ '^«t ^^"^^ster of residence. 
sZo^rt^Z "?'' ""dergraduate dean and the Dean of the Graduate 
Jil^i'f I f '". ' undergraduate college for graduate courses, which 
riay later be transferred for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at 

iot ZZT^l' * *^%*°l'' ''' undergraduate and graduate courses must 
w!rT' . . r r :*' ^"^ *" '"'"^^*"'-- E^^^«« <^r«dits in the senior 
cZZ .> 'T'^^'^'^^ ""'"'' '"""^ Prearrangement is made. 

Graduate credits earned during the senior year may not be used to shorten 
the residence period required for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the 
Doctor s degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate 
by the student and submitted to his major department for further action 
and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. An official transcript 
of the candidate s undergraduate record and any graduate courses completed 



at other institutions must be on file in the Dean*s office before the applica- 
tion can be considered. All applications for admission to candidacy must be 
approved by the Graduate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered 
by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate 
study and research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree 
sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship in his graduate 
work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in 
the sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Adyancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
date when instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought (or in case of a summer school student at 
the end of the third summer's residence), but not until at least twelve 
semester course hours of graduate work have been completed. An average 
grade of B in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least two full semesters, or 
equivalent, at this institution, is required. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
sive of research, with an average B grade in courses approved for grad- 
uate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science. If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate 
courses, either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses may be 
required to supplement the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four hours 
required in graduate courses, not less than twelve semester hours and not 
more than sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major subject. 
The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must com- 
prise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
major work. Not less than one-half of. the total required course credits 
for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 200 or above. No credit for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science may be obtained for correspondence or extension courses 
The entire course of study must constitute a unified program approved by 
the student's major adviser and by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit, not to exceed six hours, obtained at other 
recognized institutions may be transferred and applied to the course re- 
quirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of graduate 
character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the student's 
graduate program at the University of Maryland. This transfer of credit is 



204 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



205 



I 

i 



submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the student an.v 

crldft 7™/'^'"'''"'=^ ''' '"^^ ^«^-' Acceptance of the tinsS 
is stbierto"°fi 'f "' '"^^ '"'"™"'" ^^^'^^"'^^ requirement. The S Sa 
JL SeSe. ^^^'"'"-fon by this institution in all work offered S 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hour<i ir, o.,.oj . 

dLt?thn> f' / ?"f ^^*^'" °* ^•^"'=^- It must demonstrate the stu 
dent s ability to do independent work and it must be acceptable fai literal" 
sty e and composition. It is assumed that the time devot^ to thes s woS 

courses. With the approval of the student's major professor and the Dean 
of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared ^! 

insSw '" '""*"" '"' ^"^^'^'°" °* ^ --^- "' the fafuTtyTth- 

rrldlf "?r' ^''°^L "^ ^^^ *^''' '""'* •'^ *'«P'>sited in the office of the 

should f?°^ "1 'f " ****" *^" ^"^'^^ ''«f«'« commencement. The thesi 
should not be bound by the student, as the university later binds aU thei 
uniformly. An abstract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words! 

makf ^pTthrr'^"^ "• It ^' ^'^'"^ ^"" ^--*-- ^- the physic 
make-up of the thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis 

work, and should be consulted by the student before the typTng of th 
manuscript is begun. Individual copies of this manual may be obteined by 
the student at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. ooiamea Dy 

Final examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The students 
adviser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of th 
committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of hi 
major and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified o 
the personnel of the examining committee at least one week prior to the 
period set for oral examinations. The chairman of the commftt^e selects 
the exact time and place for the examination and notifies t'eottr mem- 
bers of the committee and the candidate. The examination shoud be con- 
ducted within the dates specified at the end of the semester but uDon 

TpZirt'^th V"' r ^"*' .''^''''' ^" ^^™-^ erSee 17 

appointed by the Dean at any time when all other requirements for the 
degree have been completed. A report of the committee ?s senTto the Dean 

"sulVedT'tf ' f " *'' rr^"^"""- ^ ^P^"^' ^o- for tS/p^fpTs 
is supplied to the chairman of the committee. Such a report is the basis 

upon which recommendation is made to the faculty that Ze canlate b 
a\'2 on! h 'T: :r^'- ^t^ rr' '°^ *^ °^«' examination is usually 
examinatLi ' '""^ '"""^^ *" '"^^'^ ^" adequate 



The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample 
opportunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the 
examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination 
a comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Course Requirements. Thirty hours of course work are required, which 
may include courses in departments other than Education not to exceed one- 
half of the total thirty hours, such courses to be selected in conformity 
with the student's special needs as agreed upon by the student and his 
adviser. Of the thirty hours, not less than one-half must be on the 200 
level. 

At least four of the thirty hours must be seminar work, which shall 
include one or more seminar papers in the student's major field of concen- 
tration in the Department of Education. 

Included in the program must be courses in educational statistics and in 
procedure of educational research. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of 
credits, and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

The work for this degree is planned on a basis of two years of full-time 
work, fifty-four hours of course work, and a satisfactory thesis. The require- 
ment of fifty-four hours may be reduced if the entering student has already 
completed a substantial amount of satisfactory advanced work in economics 
and business administration. The student should consult the Dean of the 
College of Commerce for the evaluation of previous work. Not less than 
twelve of the minimum of twenty-four semester hours of graduate credit 
shall be from courses numbered 200 or above. 

Since the purpose of the study recognized by this degree is to obtain a 
well-rounded rather than a highly specialized training in business adminis- 
tration, the student's complete program of study should provide for course 
work, research or study in each important field of business administration 
and economics. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy and final oral 
examination are the same as for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master 
of Science. 



206 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



207 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy not later than two semesters prior to the June 
Commencement at which the degree is sought. Applications for admission 
to candidacy for the Doctor's degree are filled out in duplicate by the 
student and submitted to his major department for further action and trans- 
mission to the Dean of the Graduate School, not later than the first 
Wednesday in October of the academic year in which the degree is sought. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Modem Language 
Department a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be 
correspondingly increased. All work at other institutions offered in partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree is submitted to the 
Graduate Council for approval, upon recommendation of the department 
concerned, when the student applies for admission to candidacy for the 
degree. 

The Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and 
work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in 
scholarship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special 
field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four hours, exclusive 
of research, are required in minor work. The remainder of the required 
residence is devoted to intensive study and research in the major field. The 
amount of required course work in the major subject will vary with the 
department and the individual candidate. The candidate must register for 
a minimum of twelve semester hours of research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original type- 
written copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together with 
an abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited 
in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before commmencement. It is 
the responsibility of the student also to provide copies of the thesis for the 
use of the members of the examining conunittee prior to the date of the final 
examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the University 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general University library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be 



bienially by the university in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the ^^^^^^^^^^^^i ^ouM K 
is in the hands of each professor who ^^^^^.^^SsTsb'e^n. Students 
ln«,.lted bv the student before typing of the thesis is oegun. 
maTobtin -pies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral --inf 0^3 heM^b^^^^^^^^ 

t:^^^'t^ = rssnt?:;:ed— Irs -j.. 

student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is ^^{^^^k^ :^ 
the research work of the candidate -%«-^f^^„f ^"^fj^J^^^^^^ detailed 

^iTeste^srit =s-lrrrs;:r.s e—ion. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDIDATES 
FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1 A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a T'i"^; ^^^J" 

; fW>,P possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. The 

nation that he P°^^^^f ^f/J,^f° "^^en from books and articles in his spe- 

passages to be transUte^^^^^^^ -bich the applicant wishes to 

tionary. 

2 Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office 
of ihe DSartment of Modern Languages at least three days in advance of 

the tests. 

3 No' nenalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the un- 
suLsfful'candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these 
tests 

4. " Examinations are held near the office of the Department of Modem 
Languages on the first Wednesday of each semester, at 2 P. M. 



- -^^^ «..->^iB V^M 



208 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows- 
All Students: 

the^Gr:^ur*£hoor "' '''■''■ "^^^ ^^ '^'' ^^ -'>'' "^P- ^dmi^ion to 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduate fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 
College Park: 

stuint'ca^S eight lZt7r SJT ^f."'"^^*^' "^^* ^^^ ^^r 
eight hours, ZoL fofthe semester ' ' '*"''"*' •=""^'"« ""''' *"*" 

BammoTe"'' '"' ""''' ''"" ^'■"" *" *'•"" ^'' ''""^^ ^^^ ^^•"^^t^'- 

or '<;;'; tut ^r^L^^^:^^ each semester, of $6.00 per semester 

who will pay only a ll^atoi'fee oST^Tr iT'T "T ^^^^^*^"*«' 

^ ^^^ "^ ^^-W per semester credit hour. 

Living Expenses: 

month, depending o^thrdlfr^es oTS^JStlT^uiT-'' *° ^^'-^^ ^ 
>s maintained in the offices of the Dean o/women VrlfiT^Ztu:: 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

remission of all graduate fe^s excent S T7" '' "^^"^ *« ^^^O ^"^ *»>« 
fellowships, with varying stipends a?. . "* r'l?^ *'"• ^"^^^^^ ^"dustrial 

Fellows are requirL !o Inlr '^ ! '''" ^'"'^"^ '" '^'^''^ departments, 
departments. The\sullllt'„,Te'4:™ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ •"^^•- 

clock hours per week. Fellows are pemHted r ,"°* ^^'^^*^ *^^'^« 

gram, and they may satisfy thri^/ *"^ * ^"" graduate pro- 

in the normal time. 'in rpUtnTftrtl^nrd"^^^^^^^ ''''-' 

and the United States Fish and WiW Lif7 W ^^ ^"'■^^" "^ **'"«^ 

Cered for research in «e,ds of stuZ^^Lg'tTS rk^lf ^h^S.^r 

a sttlTd o't;m^S^^^^^^^^^ available, carrying 

awarded on the basis of ability and "f ^ ? ''^ ^^'- Scholarships are 

time work and only mint't^Ss'^'ai-^SrrVr ^^^ '^^"^ ^"" 

Applications for fellowshins and .r-hoi^. . ^"''^^'^ ''^ *''« departments. 



Ti/^ GRADUATE SCHOOL 



209 



v^ith the necessary credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean 
of the Graduate School. Applications which are approved by the Dean are 
forwarded to the departments, where final selection of the fellows and 
scholars is made. The awards of University fellowships and scholarships 
are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation for 
these assistantships is $600 to $1000 a year and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed 
for one year and are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class 
devotes one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection with 
Experiment Station projects, and he is required to spend two years in resi- 
dence for the Master's degree. If he continues in residence for the Doctor's 
degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence credit for each academic year at 
this University. The minimum residence requirement from the Bach- 
elor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic years and one 
summer, or three academic years and three summer sessions of eleven or 
twelve weeks each. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned, and appointments are made through the regular channels 
for staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships 
may be obtained from the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is 
conferred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the office of the Registrar before 
April 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to obtain a degree at 
the June commencement. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement. Those 
who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Students' Supply 
Store. Order must be filed before April 1, but may be cancelled later if the 
student finds himself unable to complete his work for the degree. 



210 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



211 



SUMMER SESSION 

Harold Benjamin, Director 

f Jfi^ ^f^lar summer semester conducted on the College Park camnn. . 
the first time in the summer nf ^qao ; ^- -j j . ^^'';'''^^ ^^^^ campus for 

mately seven and oL!h™eeks each T^wT^f^^^^^^^^ °' ^^P^'"''- 

ter is desired particular., ^ter^T the'ntd? ft L^^^^^^^^^^ 

tional workers who wish to c;npn/l r.o>w- ^ 4.1, »'«^^ners ana other educa- 

Terms of Admission 

Credits and Certificates 

Students attending the summer session for the fir^f half r.f fi, 
semester only will ordinarily register for eVht semest^hlS ,"woT 
although in special cases a student with a good record may Se peLTtted 
to register for a maximum of ten semester hours in the first hawTfthl 

uT'^e^refir-t'elT ''T ™^^^*^ ^""^^^^ which arr^ive'lff:'^ tt 
during X summer rf . '""""^ ^'^ ^'^"" ^"" ^^^ ^ «««>««ter only 
h^^ f V,! ^'""'"^'^- ^*^"s a two-semester hour course given for the first 

hotr cour': ^U Zet"? T" ""* '""^ *™^^ ^ ^-'^^ « tht-semesS 
nour course will meet six times a week. Certain other courses which are 

IZZntVr\::tltZrf7r''' ^^^ "^ ^"^^^^^ ^^ ^ surmlr session 
the couie ii a lit! the semester with the purpose of completing 

the course m a later summer when the remainder of the course mav be 
offered during the first half. course maj De 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State Deoartment 
of Education towards satisfying certification requirements of al^daslr 
Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards advanced decrees in 
the summer sessions, special arrangements are made supplementing the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students worWng o 
degrees on the summer plan must meet the same requirements as to 
admission, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do 'studen s enroll^ 
in the regular sessions of the University. 

All teachers or others planning to do work towards graduate degrees 
m Education must apply to the Dean of the Graduate School as earfy a 
possible for admission to candidacy in the Graduate School 



for detailed information in regard to the Summer Session, consult the 
special Summer Session announcement, issued annually in April, A copy 
of this announcement may be secured from the Director, Summer Session^ 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

EVENING CX)URSES 

Harold Benjamin, Chairman, 
Division of Evening Extension Courses. 

The University provides a limited program of evening instruction for 
undergraduates and graduates at College Park, and for undergraduates 
only in various other centers of the State. During the period 1940-1942, 
such courses were given at Cambridge, Denton, Frederick, Easton, Frost- 
burg, Charlotte Hall, LaPlata, Cumberland, and Prince Frederick. 

Courses in any university subject may be offered in the evening program 
when there is a sufficient student demand and instructors are available. 
During 1940-1942 evening courses were given at College Park in Education, 
English, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Zoology. 
During the same period, courses in other centers included work in English, 
History, and Political Science. 

The evening program is carried on primarily as a service to employed 
persons. Although the majority of those enrolled in evening classes are 
teachers in the schools of Maryland, or the District of Columbia, the Uni- 
versity is glad to provide evening courses for other vocational groups to 
the extent of its facilities. 

A separate announcement with regard to Evening Courses is issued 
early in the Fall. A copy of this announcement, or any further informa- 
tion desired may be secured by communicating with: 

Dr. Harold Benjamin, Chairman, 

Division of Evening Extension Courses, 
University of Maryland, 

College Park, Maryland. 

Note: For information as to Evening Courses offered in Baltimore see 
"College of Education, Baltimore Division," Section IH. 



212 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Of 'the srraTjoni:* pI^ " s>r^ ^r^ ^^ *^^ --^^ -io. 

Session and in the BaSe Sct^l^^f ^heT'' "/'^ ^'^"'^ «'''-» 
the separate catalogs issued by tt sevetl sZr ' '" '""'''^^ '" 

Preceding the detailed statement of courses is a hri.f ■ a . 
for the convenience of students in makingTu^' tL> cS cSul s""^^^^ 

for";hSrfnL?S7^\- .t^*^^^^^^^^^^^^ — teo^. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows • 
^ Group I numbered 1 to 49-courses primarily for freshmen, and sopho- 

Group II numbered 50 to 99-<=ourses for juniors and seniors. 

trroup III numbered 100 to l<)Q---/.ni,T.c^o 4? j 
(well-qualified juniors and senloS I^rg^alflV """' -»<^-^raduates 

Group IV numbered 200 to 299-courses for graduates only. 

Courses designated by the letters "f" and "s" follow,-n„ ti, 
unit courses, and both the "f" ffirsn ar^Tfi, ,/?, . '"^ ^-^^ numbers, are 
completed before credit is aiwi S^he 'ourL ^ <^--''> P^^s must b. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses 

platroTme:tLttd olh^i^SrS^r ^^^"^JT-*-' ^ving the hours, 
out his Program^tuderrnhlrsSS "^S^^^^- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



213 



INDEX TO COURSES 

Page 
Accounting ^ 245 

Agricultural Economics 214 

Agricultural Education and' Rural Life 217 

Agricultural Engineering 219 

Agronomy „ 219 

Animal Husbandry 221 

Art 224 

Astronomy „ 225 

Bacteriology 226 

Botany 230 

Business Organization and Manage- 
ment 246 

Chemical Engineering 274 

Chemistry „ 234 

Chinese . 324 

Civil Engineering _ 277 

Classical Languages and Archaeology 243 

Clothing 304 

Commerce and Business Administra- 
tion 244 

Comparative Literature 259 

Dairy Husbandry 261 

Drama 290 

Drawing 279 

Economics 2 50 

Education 2 64 

Electrical Engineering 280 

Engineering 2 74 

English Language and Literature 289 

Entomology 295 

Finance _... 253 

Foods 307 

Food Technology 229 

Forestry 298 

Fren-ch 324 

Geology , 298 

German 328 

Greek _ 243 

History 299 

Home Management 306 



Page 
Home Economics _ „ 303 

Home Economics Education 270 

Home Economics Extension 306 

Horticulture ~ 309 

Industrial Education _ 271 

Institution Management 806 

Italian ^ 330 

Journalism 290 

Latin 243 

Library Science 315 

Marketing 255 

Mathematics 316 

Mechanical Engineering _ 284 

Mechanics 283 

Military Science and Tactics 323 

Modern Languages 324 

Music 333 

Nutrition 307 

Philosophy 334 

Physical Education 336 

Physics 340 

Plant Pathology 232 

Plant Physiology 233 

Political Science 344 

Portugese 330 

Poultry Husbandry 349 

Practical Art 304 

Psychology 351 

Russian 33 1 

Secretarial 257 

Shop 287 

Sociology 3 56 

Spanish 331 

Speech 362 

Statistics 2 58 

Surveying _ 288 

Textiles ^ 303 

Veterinsary Science 364 

Zoology 366 



214 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CoDDiNGTON, Hamilton fAssSxtr"'^™ Professors Walker 
, A. E. 1. Agricultural Indu try ITr "''''°" Popp^nbebger. '^' 
laboratory. "'•'""^'y ^n^ Resources (3)-Two lectures- one 

commercial development? transportation S.T '""*"'"" ^"*1 movements 
sources of the world and their poTentl, it ' ' '^''""^ agricultural re.' 
geographical distribution; t^: £Tt^:;' :,'Z'''''''V''^^''^^<^^. and 
trade routes and markets for agriculturaln f ^ ""'""' *" '^^^'"^ 

|ca„ agriculture is briefly revieS Ci^ "'*'• ^^" ^'^^'''y "^ Amer- 
'« products Of the^nit:rs'Jeri:rer"ZiLg '''''' ""^ ^^ 
A. E. 2. Farm Organization (3). ' 

proVe^s'of tfeTgn?uStdr^^^^^^^^ ^" ^"*^«^-«- *« the complex 
welfare of the individual L mer tore 30^"; T''^^ "'^^'=* *e life and 
choice of agriculture as a vocattn; adap SSnTf^^' '"'"■'' '"''"''^^ '''' 

pnses; types of farming and factor, j-nfl^,! f.™' *" Particular enter- 

the use of labor, machinery, and land in nroTr*'' '"'"'' '^"" r-t""'^.- 
and livestock enterprises as they affect thrf'?' ^°'"»'i"«tion of crop 
of successful and unsuccessful Maryland trmri^n """'' '"' ^ ''"^'^ 

^T t**"*"'*** Undergraduates 
A. E. 90 f s. Seminar (2) 

eur;:L^L-l- et F? S^^^^^^^^ ^ « c literature and 

"lA-^r P^rnrs^si r-*- • '"""' 

A general course in agXulturaT^""'""*^' '^"" ''' ''' ^ S^' 
population trend, agricultura "eaS TaTdT'"' "f ''"''^' ^^^-^"'^e to 

^4-. 102. Marketing of Earm Products (3)-Prere,ui-site, Econ aj 32, 

^^^^f^Z:^t:^TZ;'S^^^-^^--^- -ring, and 
increasing the efficiency of mark\S^iot"tpri„t"""" ??,t°^ ''? 

A. E. 103 Cooperation in Agriculture (3) ^ "^"'^-^ 

Historical and comparative develonmenf nV ^ 
zations with some reference to famer 21.^ .™''"' *=°°P«rative organi- 
essentials to success; commodity ^00^^^^.' "fT' ''' ^^""^« ^^' 
banks for cooperatives; present trends Tail '■^' ^^™ »°«'''^' 

*Q 7~ ' (PoffenbergerJ 

see a,,o ,eU.e. courses in Economies ..a i. Business Administration. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 215 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3). 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm organizations 
and industries. Farm insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance, 
with special reference to mutual development — ^how provided, benefits, and 
needed extension. Spring. ( Poff enberger. ) 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given in the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. 
Summer, Spring. (Staff.) 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. Spring. (Poff enberger.) 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. Fall. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3). 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. Spring. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1, 1). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their 
research problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose 
of making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. Simuner, 
Fall, Spring. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 111. Land Economics (3). 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources. A 
study of major land problems and land policies including erosion and its 
control; farm tenancy; tax delinquency and tax reverted lands; land use 
planning and production control; public policies for facilitating land use 
adjustments; and directional measures for discouraging undesirable land 
uses. Fall. (Coddington.) 



216 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Graduates 

A. E, 200. Special Problems in Farm Economics (1). 

An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the economic prob- 
lems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. Fall, Spring. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203. Research — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under the 
supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original investiga- 
tion in problems of agricultural economics. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(DeVault.) 

A. E. 210. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2). 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture: general prop- 
erty tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license taxes, 
inheritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm tax 
reduction through greater efficiency and economies in local government. 
Spring. (Walker, DeVault.) 

A. E. 211. Agricultural Taxation in Theory and Practice (3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare of 
society; theory of taxation: the general property tax, business and license 
taxes, the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, inheritance 
and estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax reforms; 
conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units; practical 
and current problems in taxation. Fall. (Walker, DeVault.) 

A. E. 212, 213. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3, 2). 

A presentation, by regions, of the basic physical conditions of the eco- 
nomic and social forces that have influenced agricultural settlement, and of 
the resultant utilization of the land and production of farm products; fol- 
lowed by a consideration of regional trends and interregional shifts in land 
utilization and agricultural production, and the outlook for further changes 
in each region. Fall, Spring. (Baker.) 

A. E. 214. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living (3). 

A presentation of the trends in population and migration for the nation 
and by states; of trends in exports of farm products and their regional sig- 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 



217 



„.eance; o. .ends in ^^ ^T^^t^ZZ^^rl^ Lflu- 

Si witl a more sel^sumcin. agnculture. 
,. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperatu.n (^). ^^ ^^^ 

An appraisal of agricultural cooperation as a mea ^ ^^.^.^^^ 

fintnciaf status of farmers. X\^^l^^'l{,ZTcZv^r.tWes. 
analysis and appraisal of specific types ana cias (Poffenberger.) 

.rntriTLTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

*" r,^s c.^»-. c->— ■. A— ^— *"-'■ 

*''^' . A ■ .A to assist the student in relating the learning 

This course is designed *" ^^^ifj^J university with the problems of 
acquired in the several departments »* ^^^ ^nive y .^ ^^^ ^^^ 

doing and demonstrating ^^/'=^. ^f *^f J^ Ms training in the essential 
as a teacher. It aims Particularly to check ^ ^^^ ^^ .„troduce 

practicums and demonstrations m -»«f ;^^iJf,"„^3t ^ carried on in the 
him to the conditions under which s«ch ^^;]^; j departments. Laboratory 

patronage areas and l-1'«'^^*°"%l,;rr pTu; Fafl, Spring. (Ahalt.) 
practice in deficiencies required. Summer, tali, 

\, !.«, QO f s 91 Practice Teaching (4, l-4)-Prereqms,te, R. Ed. 109. 
R. Ed. 90 f s, 91. tract .^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ jg 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the s ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ j^_ 

required to analyze and Pf.^P^'-^^^f ",^'f ^^Jk tei^^^^^ <>f «'*^«'^*- 

sons, and teach in cooperation with the cnticteacn^^^^^^^ agriculture and 
tion, not less than 100 clock hours of day class voc (Cotterman.) 

related subjects. 

For Advanced undergraduates and Graduate^^ Teaching for Agricultural 
R. Ed. 107. Observation and the Analysis »» j j^^^^i 

Students (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Required ot ju 
LeTnd igricultural Education. Elective ^^ <!^^;^. •„ ,,,,, ,^ups. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil l-^-J^mZ Ihai) 
Fall, Spring. . p 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3)-Pre 

requisite, R. Ed. 107. departments of voca- 

A comprehensive course in *« T^^* '^j^'^f placement, supervised farm- 
tional agriculture. It emphasizes f rt^";^\'yj;„ „{ Future Farmer work, 
ing programs, the -gamzat'on -d;<f ^^^^^^^^^^ ,dult instruction, 

and objectives and methods m all-day continu (Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

Fall. 



218 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



«» 

^ 



R. Ed. 110. Rural Life and Education (3). 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural comm., • 

™ nT"^ '" r^^"^ '' ^''^""l P-*--^- areas tie possibSSsi 
SSni rrr'f '''"'• '^'''^ beginnings in rural education, and thrcon 
ditioning effects of economic differences. The course is designed esoecia^^J 
for persons who expect to be called upon to assist in shapi^Teducational 
and other community programs for rural people. Summer, Spring *' 

reSisnts, R^Ed^Torr*'' ^''^"^^''""" ^"'^ Ad.inistration'Trpt. 

R. Ed. 114. Teaching Farm Mechanics in Secondary Schools mtl! 
requisites, R. Ed. 107, Agr. Engr. 54. ocnoois (1)— Pre- 

Objectiyes in the teaching of fami shop and farm mechanics- co»,tpn,r,« 
Slms^metEf:^ determination of projects; shop mZl^Z^l^Z^^t 
SSs. Fatsprini '^ ''^"^"^"*^ "^^^"^'^^^ °^ construction; spedal 
For Graduates ' (Carpenter.) 

li?;f tuTalent ''""' "'^^ ^"-^ ^''"'^"«" <^' 3)-Prerequisite. R. Ed. 
A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a ^on,l Mfo 

L^rndTpTS- 0?^^^"=^^ r ^*"'^ ^' *^^ organrtiolVd^Lttr ! 
nent nartfnfT ^ ^"'^''^^ ^^^"*='^" °* P"^'''^ education as compo- 

develonr^nt n '"""^'»^"* ^'^d as forms of social economy and human 

?erortre\t"urrs"pii7£esr "^^^ -' -^^- '- -r - ^^ 

p Tjij on^ 0/.0 »^ , (Cotterman.) 

anJ'shop (2%) "' " '''^'"""'' Agriculture, Related Science. 

teic\:ii^?izr jS^^^^^^^ ---* ^^""^-^^ ^-^-^ 

have had .several ™o!?f;. <^esigned especially for persons who 

Phlses of the voLho ^ . l'^^"^ experience in this field. The three 

work-rece te IttlZ i^ ""' P^^^^'""^" day, part-time, and adult 

receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-2) (Cotterman.) 

erT^Zl^of^^TJ^'^^'r''' ^^'''-t'-^""^. and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

mu^l; ^bt e'stciair *• V;f * '^""^^ ^^'^^"^ *° ^^^ dorstSt^ 

^eSrch trruiSkr '' ^^~ ^'^^'^ *^ ^-- -^*!i p-«* ^^ 

(Cotterman.) 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERNIG 



219 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter; Associate Professors Krewatch, Burkhardt. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Engr. 54. Farm Mechanics (1) — One laboratory. 

This course consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm shop and 
farm equipment repair and construction projects. It is offered primarily 
for prospective teachers of vocational agriculture. Fall. (Carpenter.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 101. Farm Machinery (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the economics, design and adjustments of modem horse- and 
tractor-drawn machinery, including applications of electricity to farm oper- 
ations. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual machines, their 
calibration, adjustment, and repair. Fall. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 102. Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles (3) — Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the internal combustion 
engines, trucks, tractors and automobiles used in farm practice. Spring. 

(Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 105. Farm Buildings (2). 

A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. Fall. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 107. Farm Drainage (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain- 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, methods of 
construction, and the use of engineering instruments. A smaller amount 
of time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the laws relating 
thereto. Spring. (Carpenter.) 

AGRONOMY 

Division of Crops 

Professor Kemp; Mr. A. W. Woods. 

Agron. 1. Cereal Crop Production (3) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. 
History, distribution, adaptation, culture, improvement, and uses of 
cereal, forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. Fall. 

Agron. 2. Forage Crop Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Continuation of Agron. 1. Summer, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 51. Technology of Crop Quality (1-3) — Students, other than 
those specializing in agronomy, may register for either portion of the 
course. Part one (Grading Farm Crops) — one lecture; one laboratory. The 
market classifications and grades as recommended by the United States 
Bureau of Markets, and practice in determining grades. Part two (Grain, 
Hay, and Seed Judging and Identification) — one laboratory. Fall. 



220 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AGRONOMY 



221 



Agron 54. Selected Crop Studies (1.4)-Credit according to work done 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (2)-Prerequisite, Zool. 104 

in '^^^ P.^^^^^P^^^ ^^ breeding as applied to field crops, and methods uspH 
m crop improvement. Fall. "ietnoas used 

A * (Kemp.) 

Agron. 121. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (2) 
A consideration of agricultural investigation methods at thp v»,; 
experiment stations, and the standardization^f such methis Fall. 

For Graduates (Staff.) 

plithT* "'"'• '''■"'' ^"'"'"^ (2-8)-Credits determined by work accom- 

The content of this course is similar to that of A^ron loq K f •„ u 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range wfll t »n ^ 
in choice of material to suit special cases. Fall ^ be allowed 

Agron. 203. Seminar (l)_One report period each week 

(Staff.) 
Division of Soils 

Professor Thomas; Dr. Madigan, Mr. Specht. 

soils 1. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5)— Thrpo Ip,.fn,^o + i u x • 

Prerequisites, Geol. 1, Chem Ifs 12A AT '^'*'"^\'' ^^^ laboratories. 

laboratory. ' Lectures may be taken without the 

Tht influencf of nhvsw'r'r '"^"^^d'" ^^il formation and classification. 

togtthfrTuh h'e'r VfS^^^^ f -«- - P'ant growth, 

Fall, Spring. lertuizers m the mamtenance of soil fertility. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Soils 53. Soil Geography (3)-Two lectures; one discussion period. 

sizTceSirimnnL^^ '^'^'- ^'^^^ *^^P« ^^" ^e ^ade to empha- 

size certam miportant phases of the subject. Fall. 



for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 102. Soil Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the soil fertility systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems, and the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. Fall. 

(Thomas.) 

Soils 112. Soil Conservation (3). 

A study of the factors relating to soil preservation, including the influ- 
ence of cropping and soil management practices, fertilizer treatments, con- 
structive agencies of man and nature on conservation, history of research 
in soil erosion, and field trips to soil demonstration areas. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Thomas.) 

For Graduates 

Soils 201. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 

Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. . (Staff.) 

Soils 202 f s. Soil Science (3-5 f, 2 s) — Three lectures, two laboratories 
first semester; two lectures, second semester. Prerequisites, geology, soils, 
and organic and quantitative chemistry. The lectures and laboratory may 
be taken separately. 

A discussion of the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved 
in the development of soils with special emphasis on soil water, organic 
matter, structure colloids, base exchange, and plant food deficiencies in 
their relation to soil fertility. The laboratory involves a study of the 
methods used in soil investigation. Fall, Spring. (Thomas.) 

Soils 204. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It 
includes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition 
of organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Leinbach, Meade; Lecturers Finney, Brueckner; 
Assistant Professor Outhouse; Mr. Hensel. 

A. H, 2. Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (3) — ^Three laboratories. 

The relation of livestock to agriculture and the nation's welfare. A study 
of the types, breeds and market classes of beef cattle, sheep, hogs and 
Worses; systems of livestock farming; functions of shows, sales, breed and 



222 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



223 



livestock associations; general problems in breeding, feeding, and manaa« 
men Practice will be given in the selection, fitting showing of liveS 
and livestock farm analysis. Fall, Spring. "vestock; 

A. H. 31. Livestock Judging (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequisite, A H 2 

ol^-^'^f • ", *^' •'"^^'"^^ "^ ^''^ '=^*"^' ^'^^^P- hogs and draft trse " 
Occasional judging trips are made to farms where outstanding herds and 
flocks are maintained. Spring. s '=ius ana 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 52. Feeds and Feeding (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 1 f s and Chem. 12 f s. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock; feeding standards tj 
calculation and compounding of rations. Fall. ' 

A. H. 53. Principles of Breeding (3)— Two lecturpq. at. a IoK ,. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 104. lectures, one laboratory. 

H Ji^ ^""^T^^ ?^^'*' ^'^ ^"™*' breeding, heredity, variation, selection 
SprS.r '''*'"' "' '"^'^"^' ^"^ P^^^^-« --k are ^onsSd 

A.1i. 2.' ^^* '^'''•^'°* Management (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequisite. 

wifh*Jh7nfar!S*"h'^T"^'^T"* '°"'''" ^"^'^^^^ *° familiarize students 
with the practical handling and management of livestock. Students are 
given actual practice and training in the maintaining, feeding? fitting and 
preparation of animals for show and work purposes Spring ^' 

^A^H. 56. Meat and Meat Products (l)_One laboratory. Prerequisite, 

hatiirrof STk *" ^'"' ?' '*"''""* information on the processing and 
an3 swtur.^ d-ff ' ">t^t supply- Included is a study of the physical 

sle Trin/1? T'? ^'^'*=^^ff«*=t *e value of meat and meat products. 
Some trips are made to packing houses and meat distributing centers. 

rei'isUe, f. ittT^^^ Livestock Judging (2)-Two laboratories. Pre- 

„,.1:lf ""^"r*^ r"''? '" .^^^ '^'^*="''" ^"'^ ^''^Sing of purebred and com- 
rt^del v^ r 7T'' ""™"^'- ^"'"^^""^ •'■"'^^'"^ t"P« -re made to afford 
co,Tl7 T "^ . '' '"^*'"^'- "^^^ '"°^* -'^^Pt «t"d«nt« enrolled in this 
HvrtLr- '^'^'' ^P'"'""* *^' University of Maryland in intercollegiate 
livestock judging contests. Fall. 

A. H. 60. Beef Cattle Production (2)-Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles underiying the practical and economical production of beef 
cattle, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability: breeding, 
feedmg, and management of purebred and commercial herds; the feeding of 



A. H. 64, Sheep Production (2) — Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles underlying the practical and economical production of sheep, 
including a study of the breeds and their adaptability. Breeding, feeding 
and management of purebred and commercial flocks; the feeding of market 
lambs. Fall. 

A. H. 67. Pork Production (2)— Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles underlying the practical and economical production of hogs; 
breeding, feeding, and management of purebred and commercial herds; 
breeds of swine and their adaptability. Spring. 

A. H. 69. Draft Horse Production (2) — Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles underlying the practical and economical production and use 
of draft horses, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability. 
Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 112. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2) — Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

History and development of livestock markets and systems of marketing; 
trends of livestock marketing; effect of changes in transportation and 
refrigeration facilities; the merchandising of meat products. Fall. 

(Leinbach.) 

A. H. 114. Animal Nutrition (3) — Prerequisites, Chem. 12 f s A. H. 52. 

Processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutri- 
tional balances; nature of nutritional requirements for growth, production, 
and reproduction. Fall. (Meade.) 

A. H. 116. Light Horse Production (1). 

A study of the light horse breeds with emphasis on the types and useful- 
ness of each. A full discussion of principles of selection and breeding of 
light horses is included in this course. Fall. (Finney, Brueckner, Outhouse.) 

A. H. 117. Advanced Light Horse Production (1) — Prerequisite, A. H. 

116. 

This course is a continuation of A. H. 116. Included is a study of the 
organization of the light horse farm, proper methods of feeding and train- 
ing, control of disease, treatment and care of injuries, sale of surplus stock. 
Spring. (Brueckner, Finney, Outhouse.) 

For Graduates 

A. H. 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (2-3) — Credit given 
in proportion to amount of work completed. 

Problems which relate specifically to the character of work the student 
is pursuing will be assigned. Fall, Spring, Summer. (Staff.) 



ASTRONOMY 



225 



224 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A. H. 202. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research work for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and char- 
acter of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be 
required to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. 
Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Staff,) 

A. H. 204. Advanced Breeding (2) — Prerequisites, Zool. 104, A. H. 53. 

This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity, variation 
recombination, and mutation; selection and selection indices; breeding sys- 
tems; specific inheritance in farm animals; biometry as applied to animal 
breeding. Spring. (Meade.) 

A, H. 206, 207. Advanced Livestock Management (3, 3) — ^Two lectures; 
one laboratory. 

An intensive study of the newer developments in animal breeding, animal 
physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology and other closely allied fields 
as they apply to the management and commercial production of livestock. 
Fall, Spring. (Leinbach.) 

*ART 

Professor Marti; Assistant Professor Highby. 

Art 1. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). 

Prehistoric period and Egypt to 1000 B. C. Survey of architectural 
remains, sculpture, painting. Attention is given to stages of culture as 
reflected in the archaeological and artistic remains. Lectures fully illus- 
trated by slides. Spring. 

Art 2. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). 

Near East and Pre- Greek civilization of the eastern Mediterranean. 
Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian. The important archaeological 
discoveries of Schliemann and Evans at Troy, the Greek mainland and in 
Crete are treated in detail. Conducted with the use of slides. (Not offered 
1942-43.) 

Art 3. Art in Classical Civilization (2). 

Monuments of Ancient Rome. A survey of the architectural remains and 
the decorative art of the Romans. The related Etruscan art development 
will also be treated, as well as the remains of Pompeii and important out- 
lying sites of the Roman world. Illustrated with slides. Summer. 



Art 4 Art in Classical Civilization (2). 

Sratediy slides. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

.,t 11 Medieval Art (3)-Three lectures. Occasional field trips. 

,„ ,nt;oduction to the ^r^^e arts and to ^^^^^f^^^/^^^ 
KrtJtLrar:S:rC^^^^^^^^^^ -..e. (MartD 

Art 13 Modern Art (3)-Three lectures. Occasional gallery visits. 

European art from the Renaissance Jo *e p^sent ^^^^^^^^ fCS 

Visits to the museums in Washington. (Not offered 1942 4^.) 

» f 21 Italian Painting (3)-0ne lecture; two consecutive hours of 
nieum'tturrthl^Nationai Gallery of Art in Washington. 

.1 f ^f Tfplian art since the middle ages, with 

A study of the ^^^^^^^^.^'^fZlnlLnce and the Baroque. 
special emphasis on the pamting "t tne architecture. Lee- 

Occasional comparison of pamting with sculpture 
tares illustrated with slides. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates « • , 

Art 51. Principles of Art Appreciation (3)-Three lectures. Occasional 

gallery visits. , . « 

A course designed to help ^^^se^^^ -^^^JJ^i^^^^^^'^^'^Z 
tive art, and the best enjoyment of it ^e^*J7;j^%,,,pture. painting 
showing sample works from the fields of .^^^^^^f '" ' • J^ j^ criticism. 
and graphic art. Class discussion of principles. Exercises m 
Occasional visits to the museums in Washington. 

rr^ • o=»H «rt activities in our schools confront teachers with the 

course. Spring. 

ASTRONOMY 

Dr. H. E. Newell 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Astr. 51 f s. Astronomy (4). /xT^^roil ^ 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. Summer, Fall. (Newell.) 



'For other courses Jn Art, se© Home Economics. 



226 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BACTERIOLOGY 



227 



BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor James; Associate Professor Hansen; Assistant Professor 
Faber; Dr. Pelczar, Mr. Nolte, Mr. Snyder, Mrs. Goldsmith, Mr. Reed, 

Miss Cragin, Mr. Leise. 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lecture-laboratories. 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; and cell morphology. Appli- 
cation to water, milk, foods, and soils; bacteria causing disease and methods 
of control. Preparation of culture media; sterilization and disinfection; 
microscopic and macroscopic examination of bacteria; isolation, cultivation 
and identification of bacteria. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Pelczar.) 

Bact. 2. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore standing. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathological mate- 
rial; effects of pathogens and their products. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Fall, 
Spring. (Faber.) 

Bact. 2 A. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and soph- 
omore standing. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2. Fall, Spring. 

(Faber.) 

Bact. 5. Bacteriological Technique (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 or 3. 

Isolation of bacteria in pure cultures and their identification. The prepa- 
ration of special bacteriological media and reagents. Advanced staining 
techniques and the measurement of bacteria. Anaerobic cultivation of 
bacteria and the use of specialized bacteriological apparatus. Required of 
all students majoring in Bacteriology. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. (Pelczar.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 50. Household Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior Year. For Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; infec- 
tion and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Fall, Spring. (Pelczar.) 

Bact. 60. Public Health (1) — Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration, by the 
staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, representing 
each of the bureaus and divisions. Offered in alternate years, alternating 
with Bact. 116. Fall, Spring. (James.) 



B„, ,0. Elment. ot Sanitary Ba.l.riology (D-S.nior y»r. For 

%t:i" »rr .r^L„n . »... p.H».a„o„ .„. ™.. .u.«.. 

Fall, Spring. • . -d 

„ . «n 81 Bacteriological Problems (2, 2)-Two laboratories. Pre- 
,^^tctTT:L 5 and any other courses needed for the projects. 

Registration limited. ^^ opportunity to 

Teeds of the Paf-lar student or proble™ J^ be --^ed^^^^^ ^^^^ ^„, 
,^ to be selected, -^''l^f^^^^^'^fZdtve^rirnent. Results are to be 

under the ^^^^'Tl^lZ^S^o graduate credit will be given for 
presented in the form of a thesis. ^^J^^^ ., q^ Summer, Fall. 

students majoring in Bacteriology. Laboratory fee, ?7.uu. ^^^^ ^ 

Spring. 
Bact 90, 91. Journal Club (1, 1)-Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 2 and 5. 

members of the class and statt. JNo graau (Staff.) 

dents majoring in Bacteriology. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates _ 

Bact 101 Milk Bacteriology (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 

$7.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Bact. 102. Dairy Products Bacteriology (3)-0ne lecture; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5, Bact. 101 f desirable. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds \-^^"»' J^S faiJyTrod- 

sional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. bummer, op g v 

Bact. 111. Food Bacteriology (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

Bacteria veasts and molds associated with fruits and vegetables meats 
seatX and poultry P-<i-ts. Methods of -anii-«on ^d sU^^^^^^^^ 
quality. Microorganisms causing food spoilage and methods for th«r «o" 
trol. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Fall, Spring. ^ 



228 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



p.ssf ;n^s/r:r isrft:.;^ s^s^-tir-r ;* 

bage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Standard meSl trT^ ^"• 
of water and sewage and for other sanitary alysesdiff^Lt^^^^^^^ 
Sr" *'^ -"-ogenes group. 'LaborX/S:^;:;^/; 

Ba^rl "'• '""'""' ^'^-''"^ '^^*"'-^^= *-*' laboratories, vl^r^^^^ 

affecting reactions' Tp^at ;nsTS iSSS:' ^tr"^^^ .^^^^ 
nosis of disease. Laboratory fee, $8.00. ''iTr^Tsl^l,':^'''''- ^^^^^^'^ 

trftS in Ba<.':f oTfr '''-^^^^^^^^^^' ^-t. 1 and credit or regis- 

R ^ 110 c^ (Faber.) 

teSlogy ^''''"'"*" Bacteriology (2)-Prerequisite; 10 hours of Bac 

u * -IOC (James.) 

2 frtalf^on^LI:! in^tr^'^-^^^ '^^-^^-^-- ^--'^^-s. Bact. 

tiof X^JlXrid sS^flS" °' ''°°'' ^-Penological exa.ina- 
methods for exam^r/f T l^^' '""=r'>s<=opic and routine chemical 

methods for examination of unne. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Summer, Fall, 

(Faber.) 
For Graduates 

Bact 205. Research Methods (l)-Prerequisite, Bacteriology, 6 hours. 
Methods of research; library practice; current literature- nreoaration 

: aST;;;^!::? "f "^"""t '^.^^^^'^^^ '^^'^' ec,uipl"nt 'anTsSS 
academic practices; professional aids. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

OT^^ur^lLt^''"'''"'"' ^"*"*^«'^«'" (2)-Prerequisites, Bact 1, Chem. 12 fs 

resSo;."fll'iT; P^^^^^^r^^^ inter-relationships; bacterial enzymes; 

teal fPT^^^^^ '^"'^^'^^ ^""^^'^'^^ ^^ microorganisms; indus- 

trial fermentations. (Not offered 1942-43.) 



BACTERIOLOGY 



229 



Bact. 212. Advanced Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture, two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Bact. Ill, or equivalent. 

Microorganisms used in food manufacture; bacterial, yeast and mold fer- 
mentations. Food infections and food poisonings; the role of flies, rodents, 
human carriers, etc., in the contamination of food products. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00. Summer, Spring. (James.) 

Bact. 216. Advanced Serology (2) — Prerequisite Bact. 115 or equivalent. 

Immunology of individual infectious diseases, including virus and rick- 
ettsial diseases. Discussion of recent literature on serological problems. 
Offered for graduate students interested in doing research in immunology. 
Summer. (Faber.) 

Bact. 221. Research (1-6) — Credit will be determined by the amount and 
character of the work accomplished. Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 2, 5, and any 
other courses needed for the particular project. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and, with his approval, the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under the supervision of a faculty member of the department. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00 per credit hour. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Bact. 231. Seminar (2) — Prerequisite, Bacteriology 10 hours. 

Discussions and reports prepared by the students on current research, 
selected subjects, and recent advances in bacteriology. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (James.) 



■Discussions of the gen- 
(Not offered 1942-43.) 



Food Technology* 

F. Tech. 1. Introduction to Food Technology (1)- 

eral phases of study comprising food technology. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

F. Tech. 100. Food Microscopy (2) — Two laboratories. 

Microscopical analysis of foods following the methods used in the Fed- 
eral Government and other agencies. Studies of the structural composition 
of agricultural and manufactured foods. Use of microscopic tests in fac- 
tory control and analyses. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(James.) 

F. Tech. 108. Preservation of Poultry Products (2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Studies of the microbiology of poultry, alive and during storage; micro- 
biology of shell eggs, fresh and during storage; microbiology of frozen and 
dried eggs. This is taught in cooperation with the Department of Poultry 
Husbandry. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Not offered 1942-43.) (James, Gwin.) 

*One or more of the scheduled courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates may 
^Je given during the evening, if a sufficient number of students register. Further informa- 
tion with reference to such evening courses may be obtained from the Department of 
Bacteriology. A special fee is charged. 



230 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BOTANY 



231 



F. Tech. no. Regulatory Control (l)_One lecture and demonstration 

p rp , ' (James.) 

Pre;eqStes'"Bart"'? ^ifl""" <2) Lecture, laboratory, and field work 
ence ^ven ^o S^^^ :;!iZ:-::'S^:^^>^^ "-"ed. with prefer: 

ing. refrigeration dehvdratinr^r t r""'"^' P'"'^""^' ''""ling, preserv- 
ation, dehydration, etc. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Spring. 

F. Tech. 130 f s. Technology Conference (2)-0ne lecture '''"^' 

techXS..%V.'™r °' """* developments in the field of food 

(James.) 

BOTANY 

Professors Appleman, Norton Jfhtf T^^i^^r^r^r. a 

MR. rtERCE, Mr. Stewart, Miss Christensen. 
Bot. 1. General Botany (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories 

principles ra her tL to Jav h^T '!. I" "T"* fundamental biological 
student is also acquainted wfth tL ^ T '"" P^^^^^^**'"^! botany. The 

its methods, an7r value o/'^^tsre'suTTa? "<" ''^^"•*=^' ^"^"*=^' 
Summer. ^^"'*^- Laboratory fee, $5.00. Fall, 

sittBot l!"^"^"' ^'""^ ^''^-^-^ >-*--'• two laboratories. Prerequi- 

motser£rt"d1hei;'relatits''^^Vr^ "' ^'^^^' ^-^^' "~ts, 
relationships orthese ~ ^'^ J Z'^'' ^'*"*'- ''^^ evolutional 
plants by use of manualsTd I ''"'P^^'l^'^- ^he identification of local 

be arranged. WaC^^.or S^rr""'' '^""' '^''^ *^^^^ ^"' 
PrS^qutite'-BTi: :: rSl2;^^-^-° --^--^ -^ - *- '^^oratones. 

Du dirangea mat a student may devot«» naw- n-f i,;„ *•„ ^ ^t. 
important diseases of the nlants ii ..rhL t • ^ • ^ *™^ *° *be 
Laboratory fee, $3.00 Fall "" ^^ '^ particularly interested. 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 50. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, Bot. 2. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles on which 
classification is based; methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, 
herbarium, and library. The identification of plants is continued. Each stu- 
dent works on a special problem during some of the laboratory time. Spring, 
Summer. (Brown.) 

Bot. 51. Plant Microtechnique (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent micro- 
scope slides of plant materials. Practice with the most generally used 
techniques on a variety of tissues. An opportunity for the student to 
make a private collection of several hundred slides. Laboratory fee, $3.00 
Fall. (Brown.) 

Bot. 52. Seminar (1). 

Discussion of current literature, problems, and progress in botany, plant 
physiology and plant pathology. For undergraduate majors and minors. 
Fall, Spring. (Brown.) 

Bot. 70. Research Method in Plant Pathology (1-2) — One conference; 
laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 

Students who are interested in obtaining advanced training in basic 
technics such as preparation of phytopathological culture media, cultural 
methods, isolation of pathogens, and other essential procedures, should 
register for two credits in 104. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Fall, 
Spring. (Staff.) 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 51. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fall. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 104. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 50. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Emphasis on the identification and recognition 
of the Compositae and other species blooming in the fall. Each student 
works on a special problem during the laboratory time. Fall. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Norton.) 



232 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



req^ite'Vir"" "' ^""""" ^''""'^ ^'^-'^^•' laboratories. P.e. 

spi?*7Not :rers:2-43t °' '"' '"''' '^"" ^"' ^nt'^ r- 

(Bamford.) 
Bot. 106. History and Philosophy of Botany (1). 

a ZZlTof rl ?' '^"""'°P'"^"t '^f 'deas and knowledge about plants, also 
1942-730 •=""*"™P°'-^''y ^°rk in botanical science. Fall. (Not offered 

(Norton.) 
For Graduates 

Bo^'^'l ^ 7 ■ , ?«.*'"^'' (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisites 
Bot. 51, Zool. 104, or equivalent 'e^quisues, 

„ (Bamford.) 

req^^sifet! Bot'To, ITo:':^^^-;:^''"' '^""^^ ^"^ demonstrations. Pre- 

.r.t^'^T^^'''^ '*'i'^^ ^'^ ^''^ morphology of the flowering plants with 
« reference to their phylogeny and development. Laborafory f ee^S 00 

(Bamford.) 
Bot. 203. Seminar (l)-Prerequisite. Permission of instructor 

Fan S?rinr' ''""' *""'" '" "''"* morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

(Bamford.) 
Spring. K^^^^'-'^h-C'-edit according to work done. Summer, Fall, 

(Bamford.) 
B. Plant Pathology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

eqSklent'* ""' ""''"''' "' ^'"""' ''"'^' (3)-Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or 

oln^""!"*^ for students of plant pathology, horticulture, agronomy entom- 
tlZ\^ ^'"^ *? .°''*^'" '"<'''" ^''^'^'^ information on difeases of specSl 
of the Si who"''''' " rf .2°- Lectures are given by different member 
oi the staff who are specialists in the fields covered. Fall. 

Pit P^ih inc itf , (Woods, Jehle, Cox, Jeffers.) 

rellZXT ^"^'^'^ '''-''-' ^^^^^^-'- ^- ^^^--^-^ P- 

an^eclnScT^^^^^^ '' t''k ^^^^^^^^^>^' '^'^ ^-tories, classifications, 

ana economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Spring. (Woods.) 



BOTANY 



233 



I<or Graduates 

pit. Path. 201. Virus Diseases (2-3) — Two lectures; or two lectures, 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

Consideration of the physical, chemical, and physiological aspects of 
plant viruses and plant virus diseases. The laboratory credit is earned by 
partially independent work. The instructor should be consulted before reg- 
istering for laboratory credit. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Spring. (Woods.) 

Pit. Path. 205. Research — Credit according to work done. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Pit. Path. 206. Plant Disease Control (3) — Prerequisite Bot. 20 or 
equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant dis- 
ease control. A good general knowledge of elementary plant pathology 
is presupposed. Fall. (Jeffers, Jehle, Cox, Woods.) 

Pit. Path. 209— Seminar (1). 

Attention is given to the advanced technical literature of phytopathology. 
Fall, Spring. (Woods.) 

C. Plant Physiology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 101. Plant Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim in this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Fall. (Brown.) 

Pit. Phys. 102. Plant Ecology (3)— Two lectures; one field trip. Pre- 
requisites, Bot. 1 and Bot. 50. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. Stu- 
dents pay cost of field trips. Summer, Spring. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 201. Plant Metabolism (2) — Prerequisite, an elementary 
knowledge of plant physiology and organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. Spring. (Appleman.) 

Pit. Phys. 202 A. Plant Biophysics (2)— Prerequisites, Bot. 1, Pit. Phys. 
101, or equivalent. 

An advsinced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
plant life processes. Students electing this course should elect Pit. Phys. 
202 B. Fall. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Appleman, Shirk.) 



CHEMISTRY 



235 



234 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Pit. Phys. 202 B. Biophysical Methods (2) — Two laboratories. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. Fall. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Shirk.) 

Pit. Phys. 204. Growth and Development (2) — Prerequisite, 12 hrs. plant 
science. Fall. (Appleman.) 

Pit. Phys. 205. — Mineral Nutrition Seminar (1) — Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. Spring. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Appleman.) 

Pit. Phys. 206. Research — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Drake, Broughton, Haring, White; Associate Professors 
SviRBELY, Wiley; Assistant Professor Creech; Dr. Oesper, Dr. Reeve, 
Dr. Westgate, Mr. Cate, Mr. Chapman, Mr. Crews, Mr. Draper, Mr. 
Drawbaugh, Mr. Eaker, Mr. Ehrich, Mr. Goldman, Mr. Kaufman, Mr. 
Lander, Mr. Linnig, Mr. Longley, Mr. Orban, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Power, 
Mr. Van Hook, Mr. Whiton, Mr. Wingate, Mr. Woodrow, Mr. Young, 

Mr. Yourtee. 
A. Inorganic Chemistry 

Chem. 1 A f s. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of the 
course is to develop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. 

Course A is intended for students who have not had high school chem- 
istry, or have passed their high school chemistry with a grade lower than B. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Chem. 1 B f s. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course covers the same ground as Chem. 1 A f s, but the subject 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade not lower than B. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Chem. 2 f s. Qualitative Analysis (6) — Two lectures and one laboratory 
during the first semester; one lecture and two laboratories during the sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 f s. 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, 
their separation and identification. The physical and chemical principles 
are stressed. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 



Chem. 3 f s. Introductory Chemistry (6)-Two lectures; one demonstra- 

'""The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A. This 
.ourse is designed for students desiring some knowledge of elementary 
chemistry. It is not accepted as a prerequisite for advanced chemistry 
courses. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Summer, Fall. 

• 

For Graduates 
Chem. 200 A f s. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (4)— Prerequi- 

site, Chem. 2 f s. .. . - 

A course devoted to the study of the elements not usually considered in 
the elementary course. Summer, Fall. ^ ^ ^'' 

Chem. 200 B f s. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4)— Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A laboratory study of the compounds of elements considered in Chem. 
200 A f s. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. Fall. (White.) 

Chem. 201. An Introduction to Spectographic Analysis (1). 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mentals of spectographic analysis. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Summer^ Jail. 

Chem. 233. Inorganic Microanalysis (2)— Two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 2 f s, 6 f s, or equivalent. 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint students with the qualitative 
and quantitative techniques available for the analysis of milligram samples. 

The qualitative procedures are carried out on the microscope slide, in the 
microcentrifuge cone, in the capillary, and in the fibre The quantitative 
procedures include residue determinations, the use of the filter stick, etc. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. Summer, Fall. (Westgate.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 4. Quantitative Analysis (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 1 f s. 

Quantitative analysis for premedical students, with special reference to 
volumetric methods. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Chem. 6 f s. Quantitative Analysis (8)— Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2 f s. 

This course includes a study of the principal operations of gravimetric 
and volumetric analysis, the standardization of weights and apparatus used 
in analytical work and a study of indicators and typical colorimetric 
methods The calculations of volumetric and gravimetric analyses are em- 
phasized. Required of all students whose major is chemistry. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 



m\ 



236 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 101 f s. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (8)-Two lectures- t« . 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 f s or equivalent. ' ' 

The first semester is devoted to mineral and gas analysis. During thp 

feT$7 0oT" ' *': Tx''"^ '^ °" instnamental analysis. LaJorat 
fee, $7.00 per semester. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Svirbely ) 

tnr?*p' ""' ^^}' ^•'^."''•=''' Microscopy (2, 2)-0ne lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, special permission of instructor. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of micro- 
scopic analysis. The latter part of the course is devoted to a study of t^xt le 
fibers. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. Fall, Spring. ^Svirbely') 

For Graduates 
Chem. 240. Chemical Microscopy (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory 

wifhTh" ffnTalTntr^f '" '''''"• ''"' '^"^"^'^ *° ^'=^"^'"t *e student 
wrth the fundamentals of microscopic analysis. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

(Svirbely.) 

req^i:^;,'^^'^^^' ''''"''''"" ^^^-^"^ '^•=^"-' °- '^'>o-tory. Pre- 

A course devoted to the study of the optical properties of crystals 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. Spring. ,c."^. , 

(Svirbely.) 

Chem. 243, 245. Special Problems in Quantitative Analysis (2, 2)-Two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 f s. Laboratory work and coWeren^ 

A complete treatment of some special problem or problems chosen to 
meet the needs and interest of the individual student. LaboratTr'y fee $7 00 
per semester. Fall, Spring. ooraiory tee, $7.00 

(Svirbely.) 

C Organic Chemistry 

^ Chem. 8 A f s.-Elementary Organic Chemistry (4)-Prerequisite, Chem. 

oh J^!l'''''''i"'^'':?'' ^"^ f^'^^'^'^'y ^'^^y -f the fundamentals of organic 
chemistry, and is designed to meet the needs of students specializing in 
chemistry, and of premedical students. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Chem. 8 B f s. Elementary Organic Laboratory (4)-Two laboratories. 

rnLor"f\^""'^""^' ]\'^"?''"''Z '^' ^'"^'^'^ ^^^'^ '^' fundamental 
methods of the organic laboratory. This course, with Chem. 8 A f s satisfies 

the premedical requirements in organic chemistry. Laboratory fee $8 00 
per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring ' ^ 



CHEMISTRY 



237 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 116 f s. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Prerequisites, Chem. 
g A f s, 8 B f s, or equivalent. 

A course devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of carbon 
than is undertaken in Chem. 8 A f s. Graduate students who desire an 
accompanying laboratory course should elect Chem. 205 and/or 207. Sum- 
mer, Fall, Spring. (Drake.) 

Chem. 117 f s. Organic Laboratory (4) — One lecture; one or two labora- 
tories. 

A course devoted to a study of organic qualitative analysis. The work 
includes the identification of unknown organic compounds, and corresponds 
to the more advanced course, Chem. 207. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 118 f s. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, 
and halogen are carried out, and representative syntheses, more difficult 
than those of Chem. 8 B f s, are studied. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Reeve.) 

For Graduates 



Chem. 203 A. Stereochemistry (2). 

A comprehensive study of stereoisomerism. Fall. 



(Drake.) 



Chem. 203 B. The Polyene Pigments, and Certain Vitamins (2)— (Not 

offered 1942-43.) 

A study of the structure and reactions of the more important polyene 
pigments and those vitamins whose structure is known. (Drake.) 

Chem. 203 C. — Sterols and Sex Hormones (2). 

A study of the structure and reactions of the more important sterols, and 
the sex hormones. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Drake.) 

Chem. 205. Organic Preparations (2-4) — Two or four laboratories. 

A laboratory study of the synthesis of various organic compounds and of 
the quantitative methods of determining carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, and 
halogen in organic compounds. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 206. Organic Microanalysis (4) — Prerequisite, consent of the 
instructor* 

A laboratory study of the methods of Pregl for the quantitative deter- 
mination of halogen, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc. Laboratory 
fee, $8.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Drake.) 



238 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CHEMISTRY 



239 



^W 



Chem. 207. Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6). 

Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic substances 
and of mixtures. This course serves as an intensive preparation for the 
problems of identification encountered in organic research, and should be 
taken by all students planning to do research in organic chemistry. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 209. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Certain Enzymes and 
Polysaccharides (2) — (Not offered 1942-43.) (Pigman.) 

Chem. 210. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2-3) — Two or three labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Chem. 205, 207, or equivalent. 

A laboratory course designed to fit the needs of a student about to begin 
research in organic chemistry. The course consists of work on the identifi- 
cation of mixtures of organic compounds, difficult syntheses and ultimate 
analyses for carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, and halogen but can be varied 
to fit the needs of the individual student. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 235 A. Chemistry of Certain Nitrogen Compounds (2) — (Not 
offered 1942-43.) 

A study of the chemistry of open chain nitrogen compounds and of 
alkaloids. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 235 B. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2). 

The practical applications of modem theories of physics and physical 
chemistry to the problems of structure and reactions of organic substances. 
Spring. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 235 C. The Heterocyclics (2). 

A study of some of the heterocyclic compounds with special reference to 
those related to natural products. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Reeve.) 

D, Physical Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 102 A f s. — Physical Chemistry (6) — Prerequisites, Chem. 6 f s; 
Phys. 2 f s; Math. 23 f s. 

Graduate students taking laboratory will elect Chem. 231, 232; under- 
graduates will elect Chem. 102 B f s. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, electrochemistry, etc., will be discussed. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Haring.) 



Them 102 B f s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4)— Two laboratories. 

For undergraduates taking Chem. 102 A f s. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

The course consists of quantitative experiments designed to demonstrate 

hvsico-chemical principles, illustrate practical applications and acquamt 

£ student with precision apparatus. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. 

Summer, Fall, Spring. ^^^^^' 

Chem 103 A f s. Elements of Physical Chemistry (4) -Prerequisites, 
Chem. 1 f s; Phys. 1 f s; Math. 8, 9; or 21, 22. Undergraduates takmg this 
course must also register for Chem. 103 B f s. 

The course is designed to meet the needs of premedical students and 
others unable to pursue the subject farther. Accordingly, such topics as 
solution theory, colloid chemistry, reaction rates, equilibrium, the methods 
for determining pH, etc., are stressed. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Oesper.) 
Chem 103 B f s. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)— One 
laboratory. This course must be taken by undergraduates enrolled in Chem. 
103 A f s. Prerequisite, Chem. 4. 

Numerous quantitative experiments illustrating the principles discussed 
in Chem. 103 A f s are performed. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Oesper.) 

For Graduates 

Note: All courses in this group have, as prerequisites, Chem. 102 A f s 
for lecture courses and Chem. 102 B f s for laboratory courses, or their 
equivalents. 

Chem. 202 f s. Theory of Solutions (4). 

A systematic study of the theories and properties of solutions. Subjects 
considered are solubility, regular solutions, dielectric polorization, solu- 
tion kinetics, and theories of dilute and concentrated ^'^'^t'^oly/f ' J.f -' 
Summer. (Not offered 1942-43.) (bvirbeiy.; 

Chem. 212 A f s.— Colloid Chemistry (4). 

A discussion of the effects of surface on chemical reactions; numerous 
practical applications. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Harmg.) 

Chem. 212 B, 213 B. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)— Two lab- 
oratories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 A f s. Lab- 
oratory fee, $7.00 per semester. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Harmg.) 

Chem. 214. Structure of Matter (2). 

A study of the structure of atoms, molecules, solids and liquids. Molecular 
structure and related topics will be studied from the standpoints of dipole 
moments, Raman spectra, and infra-red spectra. Fall. (Oesper.; 

Chem. 215. Valence Theory (2). 

A continuation of Chem. 214. A study of the various forms of chemical 
binding. Summer. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Oesper.) 



240 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Chem, 216. Phase Rule (2). 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria One two »r,H +., 
ponent systems will be considered with r,l 1 i , ' ' ""^ ^^'^ «<"«■ 
(Not offered 1942-43 ) ^"''''^'^'^' ""'^^ P^*<=*>«^1 applications of each. Pa,i, 

Chem. 217. Catalysis (2). (Haring.) 

(SlnZTloSSy' '"*""^ "" *'^ ^'^^"^^ -^ applicationsof catalysis. 
Chem. 218. 219. Reaction Kinetics (2, 2) ^"^""^^ 

iicitd*s\ii:iiTHeis^Ttr^^^^^^ 1-^^^^"°"^ - -— -^ 

(Not offered 1942-43.) t^n^Perature, radiation, etc., on the same. 

Chem. 220 A fs. Electrochemistry (4) ^^^'^'"'^ 

A theoretical discussion coupled with practical applications. Fall, Spring. 

Chem. 220 B, 221 B. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2 2) T ^^ff ^^ 
tones which must accompany or be preceded by Chem 220 A~f 7 Tk"" 
tory fee, $7.00 per semester. Fall, Spring s- Labora- 

Chem. 226 fs. Chemical Thermodynamics (4) ^""^' 

laws reL:L:^Nof :t:i ^zTr '"'-''''' ^^°"^-^ ^^t' ^^^ 

Chem. 231, 232. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)-Two .abo!aTori!s 

Must accompany or be preceded by Chem 102 A ^' t ,, aDoratoncs. 

$7.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spnne Laboratory fee, 

Chem. 244. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry (2 or 4) 

chetiitrr^Lrri ttrrd^zr-^:^^^^*^ -' ^^^"*^°- ^'--■ 

meet the needs of the class. Tno* offered 19S-43"r" " "''' S ) 
Chem. 246. Quantum and Statistical Mechanics (2). ^""^' 

A continuation of Chem 21.'; Tfio Qr^«l.•_ a.- 

E. Biological Chemistry (Oesper.) 

Chem. 12 A f s. Elements of Organic Chemistry (4) 

nomics. Summer, Fall, Spring. -agriculture and Home Eco- 

Chem. 12 B f s. Elements „f Organic Laboratory (2)_0ne laboratory 

A course designed to familiarize the student with f 1,1 i 7 '^*'"'^*''7- 

ods of the organic laboratory. The course is deli^pH^ fundamental meth- 

12 A f s. Laboratory fee, $8^0 per s^est;^ 't^J^^ZZ''^'"- 



CHEMISTRY 



241 



Chem. 14. Chemistry of Textiles (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 12 A f s, 12 B f s. 

A study of the principal textile fibers, their chemical and mechanical 
structure. Chemical methods are given for identifying the various fibers 
and for a study of dyes and mordants. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 50 A. General Physiological Chemistry (2) — Prerequisites, Chem. 
12 A f s, or equivalent. 

This course is designed primarily for students enrolled in the College 
of Home Economics, and must be accompanied by Chem. 50 B. 

The course is a general survey of the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, 
amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and harmones and includes a 
study of the basic principles of nutrition, metabolism, and excretion. Fall, 
Spring. (Creech.) 

Chem. 50 B. General Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2) — Two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 12 B f s, or equivalent. 

A laboratory course which must be taken in conjunction with Chem. 50 A. 

The laboratory schedule consists of experiments involving the subject 
matter of the accompanying lecture course. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Fall, 
Spring. (Creech.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 109 A. Physiological Chemistry (2) — Prerequisite, Chem. 8 A f s 
Graduate students with accredited standing in Chem. 12 A f s may register 
for this course. 

A comprehensive study of certain aspects of the subject matter dis- 
cussed in Chem. 50 A. The course will be adapted to the needs and interests 
of the students. Fall. (Creech.) 

Chem. 109 B, 110 B. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 8 B f s. Graduate students with accredited standing in 
Chem. 12 B f s may register for this course. 

For the first part of the course, the laboratory work consists of experi- 
ments on carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and proteins. Laboratory 
studies of enzymatic action, and blood, tissue and urine analyses are con- 
ducted during the second part of the course. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. Fall, Spring. (Creech.) 

Chem. 115 f s. Food Analysis (4) — Two laboratories. (One hour per we'^k 
is devoted to a regularly scheduled laboratory conference which must be 
attended by all students taking the course.) By special arrangement a 
student may take this course one semester for two credits. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 12 A f s, 12 B f s, or equivalent. 

This course is designed to give the student experience in those analytical 
procedures of particular benefit to workers in the food industries. Particu- 



CLASSICAL 



LANGUAGES AND ARCHAEOLOGY 



243 



242 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



lar attention is given to the problems presented in sampling, and in apply, 
ing standard methods to different types of products. Instrumental analysis 
is stressed. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Fall, Spring. (Wiley.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 208. Biological Analysis (2) — Two laboratories. 

A course in analytical methods of value to the student whose major field 
is in the biological sciences. The work is varied somewhat to fit the need 
or interest of the individual student. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Wiley.) 

Chem. 222 A, 223 A. Advanced Physiological Chemistry (2, 2)— Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 8 A f s or Chem. 109 A. It is also desirable that students 
registering for this course either have accredited standing, or be enrolled, 
in Chem. 116 f s. 

The first part of the course will consist of a comprehensive study of 
carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Enzymes, hormones, nutrition, metabol- 
ism and excretion are considered in detail during the second part of the 
course. Fall, Spring. (Creech.) 

Chem. 222 B, 223 B. Advanced Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) 

— Two laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 8 B f s. 

This elective laboratory course is designed to accompany Chem. 222 A 
and Chem. 222 B and consists of experiments involving the subject matter 
o' the lecture course. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Fall, Spring. 

(Creech.) 

Chem. 224, 225. Special Problems (2-4, 2-4)— Two to four laboratories. 
Laboratory, library, and conference work amounting to a minimum of 10 
hours a week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the prepara- 
tion of carbohydrates or amino acids, or the isolation, purification and 
modification of proteins, or the separation of the fatty acids from a selected 
fat, or the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a protein, or the 
detailed analysis of some specific type of tissue, including the determina- 
tion of trace elements by micro methods. The student will choose the par- 
ticular problem to be studied with the advice of the instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $8.00 per semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Creech or Wiley.) 

Chem. 250. Toxicology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the common poisons, their effects and detection. Lectures by 
various specialists will be arranged. The problems of livestock poisoning 
will be discussed and the effect of spray residues taken up. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Wiley.) 



F History of Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates 7^J^^^;;;72)-Prerequisites, Chem. If s. 
Chem. 121 f s. The History of Chemistry (^f 

8 f s, or equivalent. knowledge and especially of the general 

The development of <=5«'«^«^',]'"°^^S Lginnings up to the presen 
doctrines of chemistry, from their earliest oes (Broughton.) 

day. (Not offered 1942-43.) 
G Seminar and Research 

subject. Fall, Sprmg. • ^ ^^^^^^ tion of special prob- 

Chem. 229. Research in Chem.stry-The -ve ^ «^^^^ .^g^^,. s,^„,er 
lems and the preparation of a thesis towards an ^^^^^^ 

Fall, Spring. 
CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HiGHBY ; MR. BANTA. 

C* reek 
Greek Ifs. Elementary Greek (6). ^^^ ^^^ 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek g 

translation of simple prose. Fall, Spring. equivalent. 

Vatin 1 f 8. Elementary Latin (6). ^„„^i,dge of Latin grammar 

entrance units m Latm R„Hings from Cicero, Ovid and Virgil. 

Review in forms and syntax. Readmgs iroi 

Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates o f = nr 

«,^iriown to the time ot the l.t, Repubhe. F.U. 



244 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Latin 52. Review of fnf t * 
«lulv.len,, ., ap.»i., peil,'"'"""" «)-P™=,«lsi„. La«„ 5, „, 

Latin 61. Livy's History of Rome d^ p 

entrance units in Latin; three unuTI/S^ ^"^''"''""' ^^t'" 2 f s, or 4 
Summer. ' ""'*« '" the case of well qualified students 

Latin 62. Odes of Horace n\ p • (Highby.) 

Spring. """^^-^^ (3)_Prerequ,site, Latin 61 or equivalent 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates '"'"'''' 

Latin 121. R„man Prose Writers r<l^ p • 

^""n 1^1. The Historian Tacitus (%\ d 

beyond Latin 2 f s or equivalent ^'>-P-«'-equisite, 12 credit hours 

Annals and the Germania. Summer 

,„,^'"" "2. Martial, Selected Epigrams (^^ p (Highby.) 

131. (Not offered 1942-43.) ''P'^'^'"^ (3)_Prerequisite, as for Latin 

Latin 141. Lucretino no 

Courses Given in English (Highby.) 

^ 'iSsTurt at^^rsJoXlrrt^^^ ^-^ <^>- 

for more accurate use of EngTist voeair tTI '" ^"^"^^ ^"^ make 

S: 'L"°'^'' " ^'^^ --P-hens on i J;reItior f "''"" *'^ ''^^^^ 
ciature. Spring. ^"« creation of scientific nomen- 

A rSnttir^f te ?or "our T f ^"^^ -- <^>- '"'"'' 

Wuage elements is continZ^dT^ ^^ GrS^ is^dL^^ ''' -'" 

^MMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Stevens, DeVault, Gruchy wit 

Riggleman; Associate PROFEssoRrRrvJ^J^f ''°' ^ectureres Nevins 

ANT PROFESSORS CXSSEI,, cT^k" ^^."^^ ''^::^^^' ^^^KOr, .A^^^l 
MR. REID, MR. SHIRLEY, MR. BENTON MB G^n^r "' ^'^^ ^IRKPATRICK; 

. Some of the specialized courses inTe' f n ' ^^^ ««^^nfieu,. 

.n alternate years, whenever prospect te !« n'"^ '"*^ ""^^ ^« "^ered only 
repeating annually. Such ^ol7::lZ^:^X:.'iZli: ""* -^^' 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



245 



Accounting 

Acct. 31 f s. Principles of Accounting (8) — Three lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

This course has two aims, namely, to give the prospective business man 
an idea of accounting as a means of control, and to serve as a basic course 
for advanced and specialized accounting. A study is made of methods and 
procedures of accounting in the sole proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Acct. 91. Apprenticeship in Public Accounting (0) — Open only to seniors 
in the upper ten per cent of the class. Prerequisites, Acct. 171, 172 (credit 
or concurrent registration). 

A one month's apprenticeship with nationally known firms from about 
January 15 to February 15. Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Acct. 101. Advanced Accounting (5) — Prerequisite, Acct. 31 f s. 

Advanced theory and problems in connection with the following: working 
papers; statements; corporations; actuarial science; cash; accounts receiv- 
able; notes and acceptances; inventories; consignments; installment sales; 
tangible fixed assets; intangible assets; investments; liabilities; funds and 
reserves; correction of statements and books; comparative statements; the 
analysis of working capital; miscellaneous ratios; profit and loss analysis; 
and statement of application of funds. Summer, Fall. (Cissel.) 

Acct. 121. Cost Accounting (5) — Prerequisite, 31 f s. 

Job lot and process costs; preparation of analytical statements; compara- 
tive statements; process cost accounting; standard costs; analysis of vari- 
ances; accounting for standard costs; estimating cost systems; special con- 
siderations; arguments for and against including interest on investments; 
graphic charts; uniform methods. Advanced theory and problems. Fall, 
Spring. • (Cissel.) 

Acct. 161. Income Tax Procedure (3) — Prerequisite, Acct. 102. 

Income tax in theory and practice. Selected cases and problems illus- 
trating the definition of taxable income of individuals, corporations, and 
estates. Fall. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 162. Governmental Accounting (3) — Prerequisite, Acct. 102. 
Fund accounting, and its application to governmental and war agencies. 
Fall. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 171. Auditing Theory and Practice (5) — Prerequisite, Acct. 102. 
Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, 
the preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. Fall, Spring. 

(Cissel.) 



246 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS 



ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 



247 



Acct. 181. Specialized Accounting (5) — Prerequisite, Acct. 102. 

Accounting for partnerships; ventures; insurance; receiverships- 
branches; consolidations; mergers; foreign exchange; estates and trusts' 
budgets; public accounts; savings banks; commercial banks; national 
banks; building and loan associations; stock brokerage; consignments; 
department stores; real estate; extractive industries; hotels; government; 
electric utilities; and others. Fall, Spring. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 186. C. P. A. Problems (3) — Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

This course is arranged to coordinate all previous work in accounting 
with special emphasis on the solution of practical C. P. A. problems and 
the discussion of C. P. A. theory. Spring. (Wedeberg.) 

For Graduates 

Acct. 228, 229. Accounting Systems (3, 3) — Prerequisites, credit for, or 
registration in Acct. 181, 182. 

A discussion of the more difficult problems in connection with the indus- 
tries covered in Acct. 181, 182. Also includes the statement of affairs; 
realization and liquidation account; parent and subsidiary accounting; and 
financing. Fall, Spring. (Wedeberg.) 

Acct. 298, 299. Seminar in Accounting (3) — Prerequisites, preliminary 
courses in the field of specialization, and permission of the instructor. 
Fall, Spring. (Wedeberg.) 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 

Bus. 1. Economic Geography (3) — For freshmen. Sophomores admitted 
with consent of instructor. 

A study of economic and physical factors which are responsible for the 
location of industries and which influence the production, distribution, 
and exchange of goods throughout the world. This course deals primarily 
with regional geography; that is, the industrial development and commerce 
of the separate regions and countries with especial reference to the U. S. 
(Not offered 1942-43.) 

Bus. 4. Development of Commerce and Industry (3) — For freshmen. 
Sophomores admitted with consent of instructor. 

Ancient and medieval economic organization. The guild, domestic, and 
mercantile systems. The industrial revolution, laissez-faire, modern indus- 
trial and commercial organizations in Europe and America. Post-war 
restrictions on commerce. Summer, Fall. 

Bus. 5. Business Organization (3) — For freshmen. A survey course in 
business organization and operation. Spring. 



„rs»io» in college. .«■« «■» '"""'"''^.^^ ft, ,„„Uo™ of P™1~- 

I6i"and consent of the instructor ^ cooperative organi- 

This practical work under guidance m ^^^^^'^f^^Jri^e method of 

Jon may be arranged ^<>^;ZlZer.t:r!oltLlx reading is utilized 

individual conferences, reports, and supervisea ^^ ^^^^^^ 

Summer, Fall, Spring. /oi— Prerequisites, Bus. 

BUS. 92. Supervised Practice in Transportafon (2) Prereq 

112 and consent of instructor. ^nnroved transportation agency. 

Practical work under guidance '^J^^^^^J^^J, supervised collateral 

The method of individual conferences, reports, ^^^^ ^ 

reading. Summer, Fall, Sprmg. .owPrerequisites, credit 

BUS. 94. Supervised P-'-tice^n Foreign Trade ( ) ^^.^^.^^^ 

or concurrent registration in Bus^ f^ and ay ^^^^ ^^ ^^_ ii2, 

needed for proper ^-^^^f^^^'ZtLlt!rTn^ess.ry. 

and Mkt. 122. Consent of the instructor n j ^^ importing 

Practical work under guidance ^^^^ Z'Z'r^S^^'^ter.X reading 
house. Individual conferences, reports, and super ^^^^^ 

Summer, Fall, Spring. 
The following course may also be counted m this group. 
L. S. 2. Sources of Business Information. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and G-^-*- ^^ ^^^^^^, ,, 

Bus. 102. Trade (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 81, 32, Bus. 4, 

instructor. - fHreis-n trade, its develop- 

A study of the basic principles -/ P-* - ^^^^^ naWnal devel- 

ment and significance in re ation to ^°J^^f^^^\^^^,^^^rsy, and the growth 

opment. Modern commercial policies, the tariff cont ^^^^^ 

of economic nationalism. Fall. 
Bus. 112. Principles of Transportation (3)-Prerequisites. Econ. 31. 

^'fstudy of the development "^ --oHa-^^^^^^^^^ 

States, and the regulatory measures that have ^ P ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^. 

ment. The principles of ^^^'^^J.^^'^'^^^J^fu^^^^^ methods ; the 

cultural and business organization. Changing p ^^^y ) 

modem "railroad problem." Fall. 



248 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 



249 



Bus. 133. Industrial Relations (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in indus- 
try with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and 
legal analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitra- 
tion, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and 
injunctions. Fall. (Marshall.) 

Bus. 137. Industrial Management (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32, or 37, 
Bus. Ill, Mkt. 101, or consent of the instructor. 

The course is based upon analysis of actual business cases concerned with 
various aspects of managements' problem of production, including particu- 
larly the following: specialization of plant, equipment, and labor; simpli- 
fication, standardization; diversification; expansion; contraction; integra- 
tion; raw materials supply; purchasing; plant location; plant layout; labor 
supply; job standards and wage payment; personnel relations; planning 
and scheduling; organization and control. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Wyckoff.) 

Bus. 141. World Resources and Industries (3). 

Economic, political and geographic factors affecting the distribution of 
industries. Problems of industrial migration, land utilization, and regional 
planning. Effects of resource patterns upon current world economic and 
political developments. Summer, Spring. • (Gay.) 

Bus. 161. Fundamentals of Cooperative Enterprise (3) — Prerequisites, 
Econ. 31, 32 or 37. 

The principles and development of the cooperative form of business 
enterprise. The achievements, potentialities, and limitations of farm sup- 
ply, financial, home supply, marketing, medical, and producer cooperatives. 
Summer, Spring. (L. Clark.) 

Bus. 164, 165. Business Law (3, 3) — Prerequisite, junior standing. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 
Section A is a more intensive treatment of the law of contracts, sales, 
negotiable instruments, agency and partnerships than is given in Section B, 
and is designed to prepare students for the accounting profession in Mary- 
land. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Fisher, Shirley.) 

Bus. 166. Advanced Business Law (2) — Prerequisites, Bus. 164 and 165. 

The principles of the law of corporations, trusts, and the administration 
of the estates of bankrupts and decedents, presented in a manner calcu- 
lated to prepare students for the accounting profession in Maryland. Fall. 

(Shirley.) 

Bus. 168. Business Cycles and Business Indexes (3) — Prerequisites, 
Stat. 15, Econ. 31, 32, consent of the instructor. 

Advanced work in business and economic indexes and time series analysis. 
Applied to the problems of direction, classification, and control of business 
cycles. Spring. . (Shirley.) 



modern world. Fall. R,„i„ess Administration (1. D-Pre- 

Bus. 195, 196_Special ^'^'>'>';^^ ^J;;^l'J^Sstr.tion and the field of 

requisites, preliminary courses m Business A ^^ ^^^ instructor. 

'ecialized study, high scholastic ^^^^^f.'/^'i.Hzed field. The method 
Independent study of busmess Vro^^lemsm^J^^ ^^ ^.^^^ 

^/individual conferences and reports is ut W. F ^^^ ^.^^ ^^ 

resourcefulness, maturity, and ^igh schoia ^^^^^ administration 

extensive organized reading in a special nelQ ^g^^^ ) 

Summer, Spring. 

The following course may also be counted in this group: 

Econ. 130. Labor Economics. 

Econ. 131. Labor and Government. 

Econ. 145. Public Utilities. 

Econ. 163. Economics of Cooperatives. 

Psych. 161. Personnel Management. 

For Graduates proportion to work accomplished. 

Bus. 201. Kf^^''"^^,^;^ - iified by pUous work to pursue effectively 
Student must be especially quaiinea oy v 

the research to be ""d^';**^""; .^ ^jems of business organization 

Investigation or ongmal .^^^^earch in P^ p^^^ gp^ng. 

and operation under supervision of the mstructor. ^^^^^^ 

♦ „f Riminess Organization (2)— Prerequisites, 
Bus. 208. Legal Aspects «f B;^'7\^X in accounting, nine in eco- 
six semester hours in commercial law, twelve in 

nomics, and six in political science. applicable 

Law as an institution conditiomng econojc beh^^^^^^^^^^^ The lawjPP ^^^^^ 

to problems in management and production, marketing, (ghirley.) 

"^' ^ • 5„ Industry Trade and Transportation (2-3)— 

Bus. 231, 232. Seminar «\.^''*'"**JJ' "„ _^ .^^rses in the field of spe- 

Prerequisites, graduate standing Pj-^J'^^X Spring. (Gay.) 

cialization and permission of the mstrucior. r , i- 

ciaiization, ^n P o„„i„ess Organization and Management (1-3, 

Bus. 291, 292. Seminar in B"«'"^;^ " « ,^ „f specialization, a well- 

l-3)_Prerequisite, preliminary 7^^^^ '^/Ministration, and permission 

rounded training in economics and business admmisi 

of the instructor. problems of business organi- 

Advanced individual in^^^t'^^*'"" .''* f 'f f„ 'Juctor Emphasis and credit 

zation or management under .^"P^^^^^^^^'^^^g'e Esther semester may be 

determined each year at beginning of the course, t-.tn ^^^^^^ 

taken separately. Summer, Fall, Spring. 



4 



250 



ECONOMICS 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



. ECONOMICS 



251 



Econ. 31, 32. Principles of Economics (6) — Econ. 31 is prerequisite to 
Econ. 32. Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the general principles of economics; production, exchange 
distribution and consumption of wealth. Lectures, discussions, and student 
exercises. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring; Spring, Summer. 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics (3) — Not open to students who 
have credit in Econ. 31, 32. Not open to freshmen. 

A brief study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups, such as students 
of engineering, home economics, agriculture, and others who are unable 
to take the more complete course provided in Economics 31, 32. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. 

The following courses may also be counted in this group: 

Bus. 1. Economic Geography. 

Bus. 4. Development of Commerce and Industry. 

Fin. 43. Money and Banking. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Econ. 130. Labor Economics (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 31, 32 or 37. 

Insecurity, wages and income, hours, substandard workers, industrial 
conflict; wage theories; the economics of collective bargaining; unionism in 
its structural and functional aspects; recent developments. Summer, 
Spring. • (Marshall.) 

Econ. 131. Labor and Government (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 31, 32. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor con- 
ditions. State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, 
working conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial 
disputes, collective bargaining, and economic security. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Marshall.) 

Econ. 136. Economics of Consumption (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 31, 32 
or 37. 

The place of the consumer in our economic system. An analysis of demand 
for consumer goods. The need for consumer-consciousness and a technique 
of consumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for consumers. 
Special problems. Fall. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 145. Public Utilities (3)— Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32 or 37. 

Economic and legal characteristics of the public utility status; problems 
of organization, production, marketing, and finance; public regulation and 
alternatives. Fall. (Wyckoff.) 



^.,. ,51. Con,p.,..i« Kc-ie Sy.«n,. <3,-P™-e<,-.l.ite., Econ. 

, , T, • „„= c^^ Prereauisites, Econ. 31, 6S 
Econ. 152. Social Control of Business (3)-Prerequ 

competition as a regulating force '^J"^^ ^ competition. Law as an 

'constitutional aspects of social control. Fall. 
Econ. 153. industrial Combination <^-^^--!^^'^^ '^Z; the 
The development of industrial -f -f;-j;Vad, LTbusiness ^eth- 
cales which brought about the trust n^^^e^en^ trad.^an ^^^._^^^^^ 

ods employed by these combmations tyPJJ «^ ^ ^942-43.) (Costanzo.) 
lation in this country and Its effects. (Not ott 

• „f rooDcratives (3)— Prerequisites. Econ. 31, ^^ 
Econ. 163. Economics of Cooperauves v / 

or 37. " ._ „_„Wom<! and contributions 

Analysis of and contrast ^'-Jl^r^^:^ZsTL significance 

of cooperative and other types «*. ^~^ "'J^^inal fees are collected to 

of cooperation in the free enterprise ^7f"p^7spring (L- Clark.) 

cover the expense of occasional field trips. Fall, Spring. 

Econ. 171. Economic Institutions and War (3). 

An analysis of the economic causes and P-b - of^-r- I^^ ^^^^^ 

mobilization; theory and t^*".^^'^^^ .f J/'^'^a Treigk exchange controls; 
control; war finance; international t^^de and for^ gn ^^^^^^^ .^ ^ 

economic sanctions and autarchy; and the problems (Costanzo.) 

post-war economy. Summer. 

Econ. 190. Advanced Economic Principles (3)_Prerequisites, Econ. 31. 
32, and consent of the instructor. attention to 

An analysis of advanced economic prina^es J^t^^P^I^^^,,^ spring, 
recent developments in value and distribution theory. (Cruchy.) 

Econ. 191. Contemporary Economic Thought (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 

31, 32, and consent of instructor^ American and Continental economic 

A survey of recent trends in English, American ana ^^^^^^^ 

thought, with special attention paid to the instiUtio ^ 

economists, and the mathematical economists. Fall. 



252 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ECONOMICS 



253 



! 



Econ. 195, 196. Special Problems in Economics (1, 1) — Prerequisites 
preliminary courses in Economics and in the field of specialized study, high 
scholastic standing, and consent of the instructor. 

Independent study of economic problems in a specialized field. The 
methods of individual conferences and reports is utilized. For students of 
initiative, resourcefulness, maturity, and high scholastic standing who wish 
to do extensive organized reading in a special field of economics. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

The following courses may also be counted in this group: 

Bus. 102. Trade. 

Bus. 112. Principles of Transportation. 

Bus. 161. Fundamentals of Cooperative Enterprise. 

Fin. 106. Public Finance. 

Fin. 111. Corporation Finance. 

Fin. 129. International Trade. 

Mkt. 101. Principles of Marketing. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 201. Research (2-6) — Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

Investigation or original research in problems of economics under super- 
vision of the instructor, and the preparation of a thesis toward an advanced 
degree. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Econ. 203, 204. Seminar (2-3, 2-3) — Prerequisites, concut"rent graduate 
major in economics or business administration and consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in some field of economics, or business 
administration. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Econ. 205. — History of Economic Thought (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories, including 
the ancients, the Greeks, the Romans, scholasticism, mercantilism, physi- 
ocrats, Adam Smith and contemporaries, Malthus, Ricardo, and John Stuart 
Mill. Fall, Spring. (Marshall.) 

Econ. 206. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 205. 

A study of the various schools of economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, the neo-classicists, the Austrians, and the socialists. Spring. 

(Costanzo.) 

Econ, 210, 211. Seminar in Economic Investigation (1-3, 1-3) — Credit 

in proportion to work accomplished. 

Technique involved in economic research. Practice in drawing up sched- 
ules and programs. Individual conferences and reports. Fall, Spring. 

(Staff.) 



Fall, Spring. R,„i„eas Interrelations (3)— 

Prerequisites, preliminary courses in the field of special ^^^ ^ 

Sn of the instructor. Fall, Spring. 
I 298 299 Seminar in Cooperative Economics d'^. l-^)-^^^^^^^ 
^SLZy courses in the field of concentration and consent of the 

instructor. , , ,^i ^.^ nrnhlems confronted by coopera- 

Consideration at an advanced level of problems <^on ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ 

lives. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Finance . .. t:. qi q9 

Fl„. 43. Mo„., ..d Backing (3)-P«r«,u,s,.e. EconJ . =2. 

concurrent registration in Finance 4rf »«« > business, such as Finance 

~T„o. . an .P-- -r rreS::,:f^aSf:~"- 
For Advanced Uad.rsr.du.te. and Gradnatn 
.,• ,«^ 0,n.um«t Financing (3)-Pr«nq»Wtt. Econ. SI, 32 or 37. 
Z irrLallinent selling; m.hods of fiijancing the cons^nerj 
and operations of the personal finance company. Fall. 

Fin lOfi Public Finance (3)-Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

budgeting. Special emphasis on the practical, , (Qruchy.) 

lems involved. Spring. 01 ' q7 Ar-nt 

Fin. 111. Corporation Finance (3)-Prerequisite, Econ. 31 or 37. Acct. 

''"The organization and financing of a ^^-ZTr^^ln?:^^o^:'Zl 
ties and their utilization in apportioning mcome risk ana 

lems of capitalization, refunding, ^^^IfJ^'^^l^'^^^^^rTrnrner, Fall, 
ment of capital. Public regulation of the sale of ^^'^''"JJJ^ Costknzo.) 



I 



254 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MARKETING 



255 



i 



Fin. 115. Investments (3)-Prerequisite, Finance 111 

statements, adapting the investment noiw f. fu ^n^'ysis of financial 

investor. Summer, Spring ^ ^"'P"'' ^"^ "^"*^^ ''^ the 

Fin lie T . (WyckofF.) 

Fin. 116. Investment Banking (3)_Prerequisite, Econ. 32. 

tiot a"n/ tlL^e'Snt'tt ^^^"^^7^' ""^^^*'"^"* ''^'^-^ -«*"- 
emphasis on the trends and i^^'f- ^"^ '°"^-*^™ '=^^'^'*' -"^^ -"h 
1942-43.) '^ °'''^"' ""^ investment banking. (Not offered 

p. (Gruchy.) 

^^F.n. 118. Stock and Commodity Exchanges (3)_Prerequisite, Econ. 32 

anfmXodfoflrllrSlV' *'.' -"-exchanges. Brokerage houses 

tradmg. Regulation of the exchanges. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

ernmental regiatL°^'Ta„ " "'""""" ^"""^ '^^^'^*'''" ^»<^ ^«- 

(Gruchy.) 

Fin. 125. Credits and Collections (3)-Prerequisite, Acct. 31, 32 

(Kirkpatrick.) 
F,n. 129. International Finance (3)-Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37 

lem and the Bank for International Settlements Spring ^ (Ga" )' 

Econ':"3r32. "*"""■*'' '''''"'"' '"' "-""""^ ^"^"^»"<^« (2)-Prerequisites, 

A survey of fire, ocean marine and inland marine insurance- liahilitv 
risks and casua ty coverages- suretv nr,^ fi^^i-t v T "'^"'^^"ce, liability 
insurance coverage, A.T • * .u ^"^^''^^ ''°"'^^'" ^"^^ miscellaneous 

«m.i w ''"y ^^^^^- Analysis of the insurance contract, kinds of carriers 
application of insurance law. Economir nnH c„..;oi • ,:''' '^'"'^^ °^ carriers, 
Summer. J^conomic and social implications are stressed. 

(Fisher.) 

31, 32. '''■ ^'^"' ^™"'* ""•' ^"""' ^"^"'^"'^^ (2)-Prerequisites, Econ. 

Principles of life insurance, including- kinrlQ .^^^ r^^r • 
premiums, functions of the reserve Hf!i policies, net and gross 

lation, industrial insurance group^^^^^^^^^^^ ^vestments, state regu- 

xaiice, group insurance and annuity contracts. Devel- 



opment and present status of social insurance in the United States. The 
economic significance of personal insurance to the individual and to the 
state. Fall. (Fisher.) 

Fin. 151. Real Estate (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 
The principles and practices involved in owning, operating, merchandis- 
ing, leasing, and appraising real estate and real estate investments. Fall. 

(Bennett.) 

Fin. 199. Financial Analysis and Control (3) — Prerequisite, senior 
standing or consent of instructor, and Finance 111. 

Internal administration of a business from the viewpoint of the chief 
executive. Departmentalization and functionalization, anticipation and bud- 
getary control of sales, purchases, production, inventory, expenses, and 
assets. The coordination of financial administration. Policy determination, 
analysis, and testing. Spring. (Stevens, Costanzo.) 

For Graduates 

Fin. 229. Seminar in Finance (1-3) — Prerequisite, graduate standing, 
preliminary courses in the field of specialization, and permission of the 
instructor. 

Individual study of specific problems as directed by the instructor. Fall, 
Spring. (Stevens, Gruchy.) 

MARKETING 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Mkt. 91. Supervised Practice in Marketing (2) — Prerequisites, credit or 
concurrent registration in Mkt. 101, and any specialized marketing course 
needed for proper understanding of a particular business, such as Mkt. 106, 
108, 109, 115, or 119. Consent of the instructor is necessary; this will not 
be given unless the position assigned a given registrant in a commercial 
business is of such a nature that effective experience can be obtained. This 
internship may be arranged for any period of the year. 

Practice in actual marketing work under guidance. The method of indi- 
vidual conferences, reports, and supervised collateral reading is utilized. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Stevens, Reid, Bennett.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Mkt. 101. Principles of Marketing (3) — Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32 or 37. 

A study of the fundamental principles of assembling and dispersing 
nianufactured goods; functions of wholesale and retail middlemen; branch 
house distribution; mail order and chain store distribution; price and price 
policies; price maintenance; and a discussion of the problem of distribution 
costs. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Bennett, Reid.) 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Mkf ins c I ..• (Kirkpatrick, Reid.) 

Mkt. 108. Salesmanship (2)_Prerequisite, Mkt 101 

equipping, stimulating, and supervising a sales W FaU ^' 7r3' 
^^Mkt. 109. Principles of Advertising (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32 or 

campaign pCing Sw i^s anln'-T'' "^'T*^' *=°P^ ^"*'"^' ^'d 
tiveness Fall. "''•'"*=*'^es, appropriations, and measurements of effec 

itri * -i-ir T^ (Bennett.) 

Mkt. 115. Purchasing (3)-Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32 or 37 
Ascertaining sources of supplv substitntp.!. „t;i;,„4.- 

..nrbLt" rdrSe^irirrr ""'r; ^t'-^ -»"*^' "*• 

control of Invenlorv and .™;... u ■ ^"^ '" """""^i budgetary 

(Kirkpatrick.) 
^^Mkt. 122. Export and Import Trade Procedure (3)-Prerequisite, Bus. 

in'lrpoXln?imno4''"1"^ '^'""^'' '"^"'"^"^^ «"d Procedures used 

-ii :rnt-vraSrssrshfpS^^^^ 



SECRETARIAL 



257 



customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. Field 
trips are arranged to study actual import and export procedure. A nominal 
fee is collected before each trip to cover expenses incurred. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Gay.) 

Mkt. 199. Research (3) — Prerequisite, nine credit hours in marketing. 
A study of the methods and problems involved in marketing research. 
Fall, Spring. (Bennett.) 

The following course may also be counted in this group: 

Econ. 136. Economics of Consi|mption. 

For Graduates 
Mkt. 229 and 230. Seminar (1-3, l-3)--Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

SECRETARIAL 

Sec. 1 f s. Elementary Office Techniques (4) — Two lectures and three 
hours laboratory. 

Elements of stenography and typewriting for all students who have not 
passed qualifying examinations of Sec. 3 y. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Sipe.) 

Sec. 3 f s. Intermediate Office Techniques (6) — Three lectures and three 
hours laboratory. Prerequisites, Sec. 1 f s or qualifying examination. 

Theory of intermediate stenography and typewriting; phonetics, grammar, 
and spelling; techniques of office machine organization and operation; and 
fundamentals of executive and secretarial duties. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Sipe.) 

Sec. 5 f s. Secretarial Work (6) — Prerequisite, Sec. 3 f s or special 
permission. 

Advanced dictation, proof reading, editorial duties, business communica- 
tions, writing original letters from general directions, indexing and filing, 
and business ethics. Fee, $7.50 per semester. Spring. (Sipe.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Sec. 117. Office Procedure and Equipment (3) — Prerequisite, Sec. 5 f s 
or special permission. 

Business forms, business reports, filing systems, utilization of business 
statistics. Office equipment and appliances. Fee, $7.50 per semester. (Not 
offered 1942-43.) (Sipe.) 

Sec. 119. Office Supervision and Management (3) — Prerequisite, Sec. 
117 or special permission. 

Duties of the executive assistant. Training, supervising, and measuring 
output of stenographic and clerical workers. Office organization. Delegation 
and apportionment of authority and responsibility. Organization and flow 
charts. Interdepartmental relations. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Sipe.) 



258 



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COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



259 



STATISTICS 

The courses in Statistics are intended to provide training in the tools and 
methods employed in statistical description and induction, in the interpre- 
tation of statistical data presented by others, and in the gathering and 
organization of original data. 

Stat. 14. Elements of Statistics (3) — Lectures, recitations, and labora- 
tory. Not open to freshmen. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a knowledge of the 
fundamentals necessary in the further study of statistics and its applica- 
tions. Fall, Summer. 

Stat. 15 f s. Busines Statistics (6) — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

The first term is devoted to the collection of data; hand and machine 
tabulation; graphic charting; statistical distribution; averages, index num- 
bers; sampling; elementary tests of reliability; and simple correlations. 

In the second term, seasonal variations, business cycles, trends; partial 
and multiple correlations; and tests of reliability and significance are 
developed with respect to business and economic analysis. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Shirley, Costanzo.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Stat. 112. Biological Statistics (3) — Prerequisite, Stat. 14, or consent 
of instructor. 

A study of statistics pertaining to biology and its applications. Spring. 

(Kemp.) 
Stat. 116. Statistics Design (2)— Prerequisite, Stat. 112. 

A study of the principles of logical design for investigations when the 
resulting data are to be subjected to statistical analysis. Methods and uses 
of randomization, factorial design, and confounding are considered in some 
detail. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Kemp.) 

Stat. 117, 118. Advanced Business Statistics (3, 3) — Lectures and reci- 
tations. Prerequisite, Stat. 15. 

In the first term, uses of statistics, especially business and economic index 
numbers are analyzed and applied to problems of production, management, 
finance, costs, markets, communication, transportation, and general admin- 
istrative efficiency. Selected case studies. 

In the second term, advanced methods of correlation and other selected 
techniques are applied to statistical analyses of economic fluctuations, price 
changes, cost analysis, and market demand indexes and functions. Selected 
case studies. Fall, Spring. (Shirley, Costanzo.) 

Stat. 131, 132. Mathematics of Statistics (2, 2)— Prerequisites, Stat. 14, 
Math. 23 fs. 

A course dealing with the mathematics underlying the study of statistics 
and its applications. Fall, Spring. (Lancaster.) 



. 1^0 Problems (2-4)-Credit in accordance with work done. 
Stat. 150. Problems (i y Sndenendent statistical analysis, 

To acquire training and ^^^'^^^'^'^.^f^Zs^li^^^on^ analysis, and 

'Cr^Special Problems a-4)_Credit in accordance with work don. 
KalsLent' registered in this course wUlcho-^ tVeS^r^^ 
problem for organization, analysis, and presentation ^^^^^ 

offered 1942-43.) 

COMPARATIVE UTERATURE 

Z PK.HL, DB. DAKBY, DR. Faixs, Db. Fit^ugh. Db. Hax.. Db. Mwhv, 
MB. ROBEBTSON, Db. Wab^., Miss Wilcox, db. ZEEVELD. Db^ Zuckbj 
A general pr^rLquisite for all courses in Comparative Literature is Eng. 

2,1 Requirements for major include Comparative Literature 101. 102. 

TomD. Lit. 1. Greek Poetry (2). ^ ^ - ^ -a ^r. 

r^mD Ut. 2. Later European Epic Poetry (2). ^ o r ^ 

their relationship to and comparison with the Gieek epic. y 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Comp. Ut. 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) 

Survey of the background of European literature through study of Eng- 
burvey oi me "•'^'^ lifprature Snecial emphasis is laid 

lish translations of Greek and Latin literature bpec y 

ture to the ancients is discussed and Illustrated. Fall. V 

r^ ts» ift5 Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3)— 

Comp. Lit. 102. I™""";f ° ,^ ', medieval and modern Continental 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101; study of meaievai a (Zucker.) 

literature. Spring. 

Comp. Lit. 104. The Old Testament as Literature (2). 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types. Spring. (Hale.) 

Comn Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (2). 
E.«deWr«. TexK a« read in Engl.sh IranslaUons. Summer, SP^S-^^^ 



260 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



261 



I 



Comp. Lit. 106, Romanticism in Germany (2) — Continuation of Comp 
Lit. 105. 

German literature from Buerger to Heine. The reading is done in Eng- 
lish translations. Fall. (Prahl) 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in EInglish and German Literature (2). 

A study of the Faust Legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment 
by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. Summer, Spring. 

(Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 110. Introduction to Folklore (2). 

Origin, evolution, and bibliography of types. Literary significance, as 
seen in the development of prose fiction. Collections, such as the Pancha- 
tantra. Seven Sages, Arabian Nights, etc., and the continuation of these 
tales through medieval and modem literature. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Robertson.) 

Comp. Lit. 111. A Study of Literary Criticism (3). 

A survey of the major schools of criticism from Plato to the present day. 
Fall. (Murphy.) 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (2). 

A study of the life and chief works of Ibsen with special emphasis on 
his influence on the modem drama. Fall. .. (Zucker.) 

For Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 200. The History of the Theatre (2) — Prerequisite, a wide 
acquaintance with modern drama and some knowledge of the Greek, drama. 

A detailed study of the history of the European theatre. Individual 
research problems will be assigned for term papers. Spring. (Hale.) 

The following courses may also be counted in this group: 

Eng. 104. Chaucer. 

Eng. 108. Milton. 

Eng. 113, 114. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age. 

Eng. 124. Contemporary Drama. 

Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman. 

Medieval Romance in England. 

Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature. 

Seminar in Shakespeare. 
French 204 f s. Georges Duhamel. 
German 203 f s. Schiller. 
German 204, 205. Goethe. 
Spanish 106 f s. Cervantes. 



Eng. 125. 
Eng. 201. 
Eng. 205. 
Eng. 207. 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



::z: ;;; K»c„». a.^.- --- b^. moo., 

^^ Assistant Professor hughes. 

„ H 1 Fundamentals of Dairying (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 
P^^iisite, Che.. 1 f s. Not open ^ fr^shme. ^ 

This course is designed to cover the ^^^^ire field of Y ^ant 

Jy is made o\^^\t:^^-::^^J^ZZ^:^t of the dairy herd; 
breeds of dairy cattle; ^^^^'^^'°^f''°'lf^^^ion of high quality in milk; ele- 
ealf raising; ^^ ;'l^^''''^'^'Jr£T^oAucts; fitting and showing of 
mentary judging of dairy cattle ^•lT'y?,,._i„s. physical and chemical 
Se; LporUnt dairy ^^f -^X^;?:? ' daS P-ducts; and the 
S^i^:^^£l:^^^^- LahUory fee, .2.00. Summer. 

Th. 30. Dairy Cattle Judging (2)-Two laboratories. Not open to 
freshmen. . , .. :^ ^ht^ selection and comparative 

will be made. Spring. 
D. H. 40. Grading Dairy Products (l)-One laboratory. Not open to 

't^ grades and the Judging of millc. butter, cheese, and ice cream in 
Jjotme'iSal field. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates Prpreaui- 

D H. 50. Dairy Cattle Management (2)-Two laboratories. Prerequi 

'^L l^gelnt course -^f -^^^de^^^^^^ 
^^::^.^ZSJ:S^ barns. Summer. (Turk, Berry.) 

:. rw • rattip Tudring (1)— One laboratory, fre- 
D. H. 54. Advanced Dairy Cattle Juaging k^j 

requisite, D. H. 30. students who do 

Advanced work in judging dairy <^^f "• ^^^^f^udging team. Sum- 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle ju g g ^^^^^^ 

"d. H. 60. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (l)-One laboratory. 
Prerequisite, D. H. 40. «hpese and ice cream. 

Advanced work in the judging of milk ^-^^^' ^^^^^^^^B team. 
Open only to students who comprise the dairy proau \^^^^^^i,^ 

Laboratory fee, $3.00. Summer. 



3- 



i 



262 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



263 



D. H. 64. Dairy Mechanics (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 
The theory and operation of the compression system of mechanical re- 
frigeration. Construction, design, and care of dairy equipment; repairing 
soldering, pipe fitting, and wiring. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Fall. (Hughes.) 

D. H. 68. Dairy Accounting (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. 

Methods of accounting in the market milk plant and dairy manufacturing 

plants. Fall. (Hughes.) 

D. H. 70. Dairy Plant Management (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite 
D. H. 1. ' 

This course is designed to give the student practice in the management 
of a dairy manufacturing plant. The course will involve classroom instruc- 
tion and a three-weeks* practice period in management of the University 
Plant. Summer, Spring, Fall. (Hughes.) 

D. H. 72. Dairy Plant Experience (2) — Prerequisite, 10 hours of dairy 
husbandry. 

Ten weeks* practical experience or its equivalent (following completion 
of junior year) in an approved market milk plant or factory manufacturing 
dairy products. A written report of the work is required. Summer. 

(England.) 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 101. Dairy Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1, A. H. 102. 

A comprehensive course in dairy cattle feeding and herd management, 
designed for advanced students in dairy husbandry. It covers the efficient 
feeding of the dairy herd, including milking cows, dairy heifers, calves, and 
dairy bulls; common diseases of dairy cattle and their treatment; dairy 
farm sanitation; problems of herd management; dairy barns and equipment; 
and the factors essential for success in the dairy farm business. Fall. 

(Turk.) 

D. H. 105. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Zool. 104, A. H. 103. 

A study of the historical background; characteristics; prominent blood 
lines; noted families and individuals of the major dairy breeds. A survey 
of breeding systems; genetic and environmental factors as applied to dairy 
cattle. The use of the pedigree, various indices, herd and production records 
in selection and formulating breeding programs. Spring. (Berry.) 

D. H. 109. Cheese Making (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. 

The principles and practice of making casein and cheese, including a 
study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved. Laboratory 
practice will include visits to commercial factories. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Fall. (Hughes.) 



D. H. 110. Butter Making (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. . , - 4.1,^ 

The principles and practice of making butter, including a study of the 
,ZX^elic.l, and'biological factors involved. Laboratory pracUce wxll 
^^elude visits to commercial factories. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Fa^ll. ^^^^ 

D. H. 111. Concentrated Milks (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. 

The principles and practice of making condensed milk, evaporated milk 
anfmifkpowder, including a study of the physical, chemical and biological 
acto" involved.' Laboratory practice will include visits to comme-^^^^^^^^^ 
tories. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Spring. (England.) 

D. H. 112. Ice Cream Making (3)-0ne lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. ^ . . ^ • o 
The principles and practice of making ice cream sherbets, and ices, 
including a study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved 
Laboratory practice will include visits to commercial factories. Labora^^^^^ 
fee, $2.00. Spring. 

D. H. 113. Market Milk (5)— Three lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. 

Commercial and economic phases of market milk, with special reference 
to its transportation, processing, and distribution; <=«rtiflf .^"""^ . ^""T 
mercial buttermilk; milk laws; duties of milk inspectors; d^^f^ff »"' "^'^ 
plant construction and operation. Laboratory practice »«<=l"des vis ts to 
local dairies. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fall. ( England. ) 

D. H. 114. Analysis of Dairy Products (4)— Two lectures; two labora- 
tories Prerequisites. D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 5. Chem. 4, 12 A, 12 B. 

The application of chemical and bacteriological methods to commercial 
dairy practice; analysis by standard chemical, bacteriological, and factory 
methods; standardization and composition control; tests for adulterants and 
preservatives. Laboratory fee. $3.00. Summer, Spring. (England.) 

D. H. 119, 120. Dairy Literature (1, 1)— Prerequisite. D. H. 1. 
Presentation and discussion of current literature in dairying. Fall. 
Spring. (England, Berry, Turk.) 

D. H. 123. 124. Methods of Dairy Research (1-3, l-3)-Credit in accord- 
ance with the amount and character of work done. 

This course is designed especially to meet the needs of those dairy stu- 
dents who plan to enter the research or technical field of dairying. 

Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation of results are 
stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to the work the 

student is pursuing will be assigned. Fall, Spring. 

(England, Berry, Moore, Turk.) 



M 



EDUCATION 



265 



264 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Graduates 

D. H. 201. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and 
management. Readings and assignments. Fall. (Turk, Moore.) 

D. H. 202. Dairy Technology (2). 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physiochemical point 
of view. Fall. (England.) 

D. H. 203. Milk Products (2). 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of milk 
products. Spring. (England.) 

D. H. 204. Special Problems in Dairying (1-3) — Credit in accordance 
with the amount and character of work done. 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is pur- 
suing will be assigned. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

D. H. 205. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on current literature in dairy 
husbandry and allied fields. These reports are presented and discussed in 
the class. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

D. H. 208. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and quality 
of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of 
the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a thesis. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors Benjamin, Brown, Drew, Hand, Joyal, Long, McNaughton; 
Associate Professor Brechbill; Assistant Professor Gaujngton; 
Miss Barr, Dr. Cain, Miss Smith, Mrs. Wang, Mr. Warner, Miss Wiggin. 

A. History and Principles 

Ed. 2. Introduction to Education (2) — Required of freshmen in educa- 
tion and of students in other colleges desiring to elect a curriculum in 
education. 

An exploratory and finding course designed to afford students a better 
basis for deciding whether to enter the field of education. Types of work, 
supply and demand, salaries, tenure, prestige, avenues of advancement, 
ethics, limitations on personal freedoms, types of personal and professional 
competence required, requirements for teaching certificate, and bases of 
selection and rejection in the College of Education are among the topics 
included. 

The selective admission testing and observational program of the College 
of Education is begun in this course. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Fee, $1.00 per Semester. 



Ed. 3. Educational Forum (l)-Required of all sophomores in the Col- 

1 cr0 of Education* 

Tr, this course the prospective teacher is introduced in a variety of ways 
Af various problems and processes of education around wh:ch much 
*f the work in his later professional courses will be centered. 

The selective admission testing and observation P^^^^"^^''^^" i" ^''^^ 
Jshman year is continued in this course, as are the orgamzed but informal 
faculty guidance helps. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ed. 100. History of Education in the United States (2). 
A study of the origins and development of the chief features of ttie pres- 

enf system of education in the United States. Summer, Fall. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 102. History of Modern Education (2). 

A survey of the history of education with emphasis upon the modern 
period in Europe. Summer, Spring. (Long.) 

Ed. 103. Theory of the Senior High School (2). 

The secondary school pupilation, its nature and needs; the school as an 
instrument of society; relation of the secondary school to other schods, 
aims of secondary education; curriculum and methods m relation to aims, 
IlcuScular activities; guidance and placement; the school's opportuni- 
Ss for service to its community; teacher certification and employment in 
Maryland and the District of Columbia. 

This course is somewhat more general than Ed. 110-Theory of the 
Junior High School. Summer, Spring. ^ ' •' 

Ed. 105. Educational Measurements (2)-Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

\ study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construc- 
tion :ld use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; -^^-f ^^^^^^^^^.J 
concepts, and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test ^es" t^' 
schoof marks. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Brechbill, Cain.) 

Ed. 107. Comparative Education (2). 

A study of national systems of education with the primary purpose of 
discovering their characteristic differences and formulating cntena for 
judging their worth. Emphasis upon European systems. Fall. (Long.) 

Ed. 108. Comparative Education (2). 

This course is a continuation of Ed. 107, with emphasis upon the national 
educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. Summer, Spnng.^^_^^^ 



m 



266 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EDUCATION 



267 



Ed. 110. Theory of the Junior High School (2). 

This course is designed to give a general overview of education in the 
junior high school. It includes material on the purposes, functions, and 
characteristics of this school unit; a study of its population, organization 
program of studies, methods, staff; and other similar topics, together with 
their implication for prospective teachers. Summer, Spring. (Joyal.) 

Ed. 112. Eklucational Sociology-Introductory (2). 

This course deals with certain considerations as derived from the data 
of the social sciences which are germane to the work of ttachers and school 
administrators. Prominent among those treated are the following: demo- 
cratic ideology as the value benchmark for all educational endeavor; educa- 
tional tasks imposed by population and technological trends; the distribu- 
tion of welfare and its educational consequences; the weliare status of the 
school population and the consequent demands made upon the school; the 
selective character of the school in welfare terms and the educational impli- 
cations of this class structuring; the socio-economic composition and atti- 
tudes of school board members, school administrators, and teachers and 
the limiting conditions which these impose upon the work of the school; 
the problem of securing academic freedom in the schools; the community 
approach to education. Summer, Fall. (Hand.) 

Ed. 114. Guidance in Secondary Schools (3). 

This course is primarily designed for the classroom teacher in terms of 
the day-by-day demands made upon him as a teacher in the guidance of the 
youth in his classes and in the extra-class activities which he sponsors. 
The stress throughout will be upon practical common-sense guidance pro- 
cedures of demonstrated workability. A variety of practical use-materials 
helpful in the guidance of youth will be examined. Summer, Spring. 

(Hand.) 

See also Agricultural Education and Rural life. 
For Graduates 

Ed. 200. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

This course deals with so-called "external" phases of school administra- 
tion. It includes study of the present status of public school administra- 
tion; organization of local, state, and federal educational authorities; and 
the administrative relationships involved therein. Fall, Summer. (Not 
offered in Summer 1942.) (Joyal.) 

Ed. 202. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Second- 
ary Schools (2). 

This course is designed as a continuation of Ed. 20Q, but may be taken 
independently. It includes what is called ^'internal" administration; the 
organization of units within a school system; the personnel problems 
involved; and such topics as schedule making, teacher selection, public rela- 
tions, and school supervision. Summer, Spring. (Joyal.) 



Ed. 220. Seminar 



Ed. 203. High School Supervision (2). 

This course will deal with the nature and functions of supervision in a 
odem school program; recent trends in supervisory theory and practice; 
fpacher participation in the determination of policies; planning of super- 
visory programs; appraisal of teaching methods; curriculum reorgamzation 
nrl other direct and indirect means for the improvement of mstruction. 
^"" (Joyal.) 

Spring. 

Ed. 216. School Finance and Business Administration (2). 

This course deals principally with these topics: school revenue and tax- 
ation- federal and state aid and equalization; purchase of supplies and 
pnuipment; internal school accounting; and other selected problems of 
local school finance. Spring, Summer. (Not offered in Summer 1942.) 

(Joyal./ 

Students qualifying for the degree of Master of Education will elect the 
required four semester hours of seminar work from the following list of 
seminars. These courses are open for election by any other graduate stu- 
dent in Education. 

in Secondary Education (2). Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Hand.) 

in Adult Education (2). Fall. (Benjamin.) 

in History of Education (2). Spring. (Long.) 

in Administration (2). Summer, Fall. (Joyal.) 

in Special Education (2). Summer, Spring. (Cain.) 

in Science Education (2). Fall. (Brechbill.) 

in Educational Sociology (2). Spring. (Hand.) 

in Comparative Education (2). Summer, Spring. 

(Benjamin.) 

Note- Ed. B236. Seminar in Vocational Education (2), commonly given 
in the summer session and in the Baltimore division, may be used to satisfy 
this requirement. 

Psych. 210fs. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6) may also be used 
to satisfy this requirement. 
Note: See also Phys. Ed. 201, 

B. Educational Psychology 

(For full description of these courses, see Psychology.) 

Psych. 55. Educational Psychology (3). 

Psych. 110. Advanced Educational Psychology (3). 

Psych. 125. Child Psychology (3). 

Psych. 130. Mental Hygiene (3). 

Psych. 210fs. Seminar in Educational Psychology (6). 



Ed. 222. 
Ed. 224. 
Ed. 226. 
Ed. 228. 
Ed. 230. 
Ed. 232. 
Ed. 234. 



Seminar 
Seminar 
Seminar 
Seminar 
Seminar 
Seminar 
Seminar 






268 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EDUCATION 



269 



C. Methods in High School Subjects 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the Graduate School upon recommendation of the College of 
Education. 

Eki. 120. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-English (3) — Prere- 
quisite, Psych. 55. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection 
organization of subject matter in terms of modern practice and group needs; 
evaluation of texts and references, bibliographies; methods of procedure 
and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; measur- 
ing results. Twenty periods of observation. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Smith.) 

Ed. 122. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Social Studies (3)^ 
Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

Objectives and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliogra- 
phies; methods of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary 
materials; lesson plans; measuring results. Twenty periods of observation. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (Kabat.) 

Ed, 124. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Foreign Language 
(3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

Objectives of foreign language teaching in the high schools; selection 
and organization of subject matter in relation to modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring results. 
Twenty periods of observation. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Ed. 126. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- Science (3) — Prere- 
quisite, Psych. 55. 

Objectives of science teaching; their relation to the general objectives of 
secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class-room situation; selection and organization of 
subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and 
laboratory equipment; technic of class room and laboratory; measurement, 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature. Twenty 
periods of observation. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 128. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Mathematics (3)— 
Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature. Twenty periods of observation. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Brechbill.) 

Note: See also H. E. Ed. 103. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home 
Economics; Ind. Ed. 162. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation; Ed. 142. 
Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Physical Education. 



Ed. 138. Visual Education (2). 

Visual impressions in their relation to learning; investigations into the 
pffectiveness of instruction by visual means; projection apparatus, its cost 
Id operation; slides, film strips, and films; physical principles underlying 
Projection; the integration of visual materials with organized courses of 
study means of utilizing commercial moving pictures as an aid m realizing 
the aims of the school. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Summer, Fall. 
''"^^ (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 139. Methods and Practice of Teaching (3)— Prerequisite, approval 
of faculty committee. 

Thirty periods of observation, participation, and teaching in a high 
school class under the direction of the regular teacher of the class and the 
university supervisor. The student carries major responsibility for the 
instruction of the high school pupils for approximately 25 periods. 

Two hours weekly of class sessions are included, in which study is made 
of the principles and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for this course must be obtained and submitted, prop- 
erly filled in, at the time of registration. Students taking this course should 
arrange their schedules so as to avoid serious conflicts with other courses. 



E. English 

L. Language 

M. Mathematics 

C. Commercial Subjects 



SS. Social Studies 
Sc. Science 

P. E. Physical Education 
I. Industrial Education 
Fall, Spring. (Brechbill and Staff.) 



Ed. 140. Methods and Practice of Teaching (6)— Prerequisite, approval 
of faculty committee. 

Students who register in this course serve as apprentice teachers in the 
high schools to which they are assigned. One-half of each school day 
throughout the semester is devoted to this work, which is earned on under 
the direction of a university supervisor. Opportunity is afforded for expe- 
rience in connection with school activities, guidance, records and reports, 
and other phases of school life, as well as class room teaching. 

Two hours weekly of class sessions are included in which study is made 
of the principles and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for this course must be obtained and submitted, 
properly filled in, not less than thirty days before registration. 



E. English 

L. Language 

M. Mathematics 

C. Commercial Subjects 



SS. Social Studies 
Sc. Science 

P. E. Physical Education 
I. Industrial Education 
Fall, Spring. (Brechbill and Staff.) 






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271 



I 



Spring. -Lwenry periods of observation. Summer, Pall, 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Professor McNaughton 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

a course of study; direc ed obseSa«n.« ^'^^^^/^hool girl; construction of 
Of illustrative -teHaIs;ltrSct^^lrrJr^^^^^ 

- EI.. ,0. CHi. Stud. C3)-Prere.uisi,, Ps.cH S5 '"""'"' 

emoti:nrp'h:s'e:'o/ gtwlraZti" "n^" *" ^'^^ ^^"^-^•' --t^'- -<• 
care in high school; olerl'at^on 2 "f • '"**^"^' *<> t^^c^ng of child 
Summer. Fall. Spring. '"''^'^^*'''" ^"^^ Participation in a nursery school. 

H p- pj mo (McNaughton.) 

ments other than the fne in whi ^Sf ^^^^^^^^ ^^ ' -gnomics depart- 

sne nas taught. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

H F KH 1A.I XT (McNaughton.) 

KK \t. ^^- ^"'•s^ry School Techniques r2 ^^ t> 

55^ Not open to Juniors. Designed for nu^^th ^7^7'^' ^^^^'• 

Philosophy of preschool education- princinle. .f i . ^^^^'^'• 
of children's interests and activities oS^^^^^^^ ^^^*^*"^«' ^'^'^ 

ery school. Summer, Spring. ""nervation and teaching in the nurs- 

~~ (McNaughton.) 

Open to men and women. 



H. E. Ed. 105. Special Problems in Child Study (3)— Not open to 
juniors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102. 

Methods and practice in nursery school; making of particular studies 
i^lated to the mental, emotional, or physical development of preschool 
children. Summer, Spring. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106fs. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (2). 

Reports of units taught; construction of units for high school course of 
study; study of various methods for organization of class period; analysis 
of text books; evaluation of illustrative material. Fall, Spring. 

(McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 
H. E. Ed. 201. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Ekionomics (2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. E^. 250fs. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2-4). 

Summer, Fall, Spring. (McNaughton.) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Professor Brown; Assistant Professor Gallington 

For each semester hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

Ind. Ed. 1. Mechanical Drawing (2). 

Fundamental practices in orthographic projection followed by auxiliary 
projection, the drawing of threads and bolts, working drawings and isomet- 
ric views. Sketching and the use of conventions are emphasized. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. Summer, Fall. 

Ind. 'Ed, 2. Elementary Woodworking (3). 

A hand woodworking course dealing with the use and care of tools used 
in bench joinery. A study is made of materials and supplies, and practice 
is given in the fundamentals of wood finishing. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Fall. 

Ind. EJd. 21. Mechanical Drawing (2) — Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1 or equiva- 
lent. 

A more advanced course dealing with working drawings, machine design, 
pattern layouts, tracing and blue-printing. Detail drawings followed by 
assemblies are presented. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Summer, Spring. 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking (3) — Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2 or 
equivalent. 

Practice in the application of design and construction of projects in wood 
involving the use of woodworking machinery suitable for the high school 
shop. It includes furniture construction and machine cabinet work, with 



t\ 



« 



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INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



273 



some emphasis on manufacturing practices. Basic wood turning is taught 
and practice is given in the advanced finishing methods. Laboratory fee 
$4.00. Spring. 

*Ind. Ed. 23. Forge Practice (1). 

Laboratory practice in forging and the heat treatment of metals. Theory 
and principles of handling tools and materials in drawing out, upsetting, 
cutting, bending, twisting, welding, annealing, hardening, tempering and 
grinding of steel. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Not offered in 1942-43; alternate, 
Shop 1.) Summer, Spring. 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (2). 

Information is given on materials, tools and processes. Practice is given 
in soldering, the laying out of patterns, and the making of elementary 
graded projects of practical use. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Spring. 

Ind. Ed. 28. Electricity (2). 

A fundamental course presenting the characteristics of wire, the elec- 
trical circuit and magnetism. Units of work in handling wire, house and 
signal wiring, the construction of the electromagnetic devices and simple 
ignition wiring are presented. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Fall. 

Ind. Ed. 41. Architectural Drawing (2) — Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1 or 
equivalent. 

Practical experience is given in the design and planning of homes and 
other buildings. The making of working drawings, specifications and blue- 
prints are features in the course. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Fall. 

Ind. Ed. 48. Advanced Electricity (2). 

Principles involved in A-C and D-C electrical equipment. Home appliances 
are studied and compared. Units include electrical heating, electrical meas- 
urements, electrical control, A-C and D-C motors, electro-chemistry, the 
electric arc, inductance and reactance, condensers and radio. Projects are 
constructed embracing the units presented. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 67. Cold Metal Work (2). 

This course is concerned with the development of knowledges and skills 
involved in the design and construction of projects from band iron and 
other forms of mild steel. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Summer. 

Ind. Ed. 69. Elementary Machine Shop Practice (2). 

Shop practicum in bench work, turning, planing, milling, and drilling. 
Related technical information is presented from time to time as a supple- 
ment to the various tool operations. Only students having completed ele- 
mentary courses in drawing and metal work are advised to take this course. 
Equivalent abilities and experiences are acceptable. Spring. 



♦Alternate courses are offered by the CoUegre of Engineering. 



.,nd. Ed. 89. Advanced Machine Shop (2) -Prerequisite. Ind. Ed. 69 or 

tdvttd shop pracUcu. !«--—- oper^^ SS^ftS 
i:^ ^^^^^rS^^^ ^tr^a^hineslnd materia, supple- 
ment the shop work. Spnng. 

I„d Ed. 94. Shop Maintenance (2)-Prereqms.te, 8 semester 
3hop credit or equivalent ^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ,„„,, 

Sldll developing practice /" ^f "P^^'/„f ,dged power tools, the design 
3„d equipment, ^aw ming the sharpei^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^,, 

i;;rmrsh1p"iv?^s!' Laboratory fee. $2.50. Fall. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

making. Theory and principles covenng foundry "^J^^^^^' ^^^-^^ gray 

1942-43, alternate, Shop 101.) Fall. . .. t <, va 1 or 

omiivalent and approximately 8 semesT^ei u^u 

Try'of the Lie prii^iples of ^^^J^ ^^ ^^tS 
to the construction of high ^^^^^^^^Jl^^^^ ^J, color, and design, 
and develops abilities in *e ^^y* ^'^^^ freehand and mechanical drawing, 

ind. 'Ed. 162. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3)-Prerequx. 

"^^TtlLs and specmc aims of indust^^^^^^^^ 

to the general objectives of the ^"^^^^^^^J^eni practices and needs; 
and organization of subject matter m terms ^^ ™° J™ ^ professional 

methods of instruction; expected outcomes, ~""S ' Gallington.) 

standards. Twenty periods of observation. Spring. ( 

Ind Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (2). 

™; course re^^TZ^^^^^^^^!^^^^^^ 
care of tools, machines, equipment, and supplies, reco ^^^ ^^^^ 

~7^^.U. courses are offered by the College of Engineering. 



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ENGINEERING 



275 



good school housekeeping. Opportunity is provided for visits to industrial 
plants as a basis for more practical planning of shop instruction and man- 
agement. Summer. (Brown.) 
The following courses in Industrial Education will not be offered during 
the academic year 1942-43: 

Ind. Ed. 26. Art Metal Work^Elementary (2) 
Ind. Ed. 65. Hand Craft (2) 
Ind. Ed. 66. Art Metal Work-Bowl Raising (2) 
Ind. Ed. 102. Advanced Woodworking (2) 
Ind. Ed. 104. Advanced Sheet Metal Work (2) 
Ind. Ed. 106. Art Metal Work-Jewelry Work (2) 
Ind. Ed. 107. General Metal Work (2) 
Ind. Ed. 108. Experimental Electricity (2) 
Ind. Ed. 165. Evolution of Modem Industry (2) 
Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (2) 
Ind. Ed. 167. General Shop (2-4) 
Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2) 

Ind. Ed. 169. Construction of Vocational and Occupational Courses of 
Study (2) 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles and Practices of Vocational Education (2) 
Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2) 
Ind. Ed. 175. Mechanical Drafting Procedures of Industry (2) 
Voc. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Voca- 
tional Education (2) 

Voc. Ed. 240. Research in Vocational Education (2) 

Voc. Ed. 250. Seminar in Vocational Education (2) 

ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Creese, Huff, Younger, Corcoran; Lecturers 
AcHENBACH, Hall, Walker, Davies, Bonney, Jaffee; Associate Profes- 
sors HODGINS, HUCKERT,* ALLEN ; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS HOSHALL, PYLE, 

Machwart, Laning, Green, Barton, Kurzweil, Shreeve; Mr. Sherwood, 
Mr. Frayer, Mr. Hennick, Mr. Bolds, Mr. Hogentogler, Mp, Gohr, Mr. 

Dayton. 

Chemical Engineering 

Ch. K 10. Water, Fuels and Lubricants (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, registration in Chem. 8 A f s, 4; Phys. 2 f s, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual control methods for 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering mate- 
rials. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Fall, Spring. 



*On leave. 



„^„«ring Ma ''™»'"^ "!f°i,S„ and air conditioning, drymg. 

distillation, o. ,5,„m„er Fall, Spring. 

typical processes. Summer, r ai , f ^ . /,■> Ronuired of all 

rh E. 104 f s. Chemical Engineering Seminar (2)-R-quire 

XsSduate students i-^f ---^^ems in chemical engineering 
raS^UX^eTsfuss^nTLhrV-^ Summer, Fall, Spring. 
rTTf Advanced Unit Operations (10)_Two lectures, three la- 
Ch. E. 105 f s. A«7*" pv E 103 f s, Chem. 102 A f s. 

boratories. Prereqmsites, Ch. E. 10^ i engineering operations. 

Advanced theoretical *-- j"-*/ ^^et^H^^^^^ type equip- 

Study and laboratory operation ^^ mall^sc ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

ment A comprehensive problem in^°''''°f . ' ^^nt design requiring 

J8.00 per semester. Summer Fa P ^^ ^^^ 

Ch. E. 106 f s. Minor P'^*"*'™^^^^'^^^^^^^^ of chemical 

Snfernf C^=Srn^ornm-lt=s^g^^^^^^^^^ in - E. lOS f s. 

«nll ordinarily be required. „=signed each student, including 

^^T^ T.cZ:^e::^^r.'l^^^^^^^'- Laboratory fee, $8.00 

m. V 107 f s Fuels and Their Utilization (4)-Prerequisite, Ch. E. 
Ch. E. 107 f s. /";'f , .^ent of chemical engineering. 
103 f s. or permission of department ^^^^ ^^ 

eoLrt?;,i:SbX: a:5 tts^' p--- ^- -- -^s 

Ch. E. 108 f s. Chemical J^hnoiogy^C^^^^^^^^ ^ 

Ch. E. 103 f s, or permission of ^epartoent j„,p,etions, trips. 

A study of the principal chemica industries. F (Machwart.) 

reports, and problems. Summer, Fall, Spring. _ 

Ch B. 109 f s. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (4)_Prerequi 
sites, Chem. 102 A f s "'^■^■^'H'.^^^^ „, ..^ineering and chemical 

of chemical engineering. Summer. Fall. Spring. 



276 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Ch. E. 110 f s Ch 
M Jh.^23 f s., Ch.' E. mTL ^"«'"-""« Calculations (6)-P.erequisites 

matkal aids such as iSS serierE^ *^^ -'->"« and 0?^;,:^ 

ente.on and the engineering Sj o^^elZn/T' ''^ '^^^'^'^^^1^ 

Ch. E. Ill f s p,„. . ^ results. Summer, Fall, Sprine^ 

A study of the properties nr^^, ^- 
For Graduates 

engineemg. Si™, '"""« <" lyplcl unit o»r.ao™ f„ i • 

"ports. laboratory f„, ,8.00 per .^S?^, '"'*''f' "rfmnces, .„j 
Ch.E.202. G„A„.,„i. ' „ '*"■ ^™"". Fall, Spring. 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar m p • 
>n chemical engineering. ""•'' a)-Reqmred of all graduate students 
otudents prepare r(^T\f\r^ 

and participate in the rcronT;rch^^:^r V''^'-' ---- 

^^P^'rts. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

«r.r , ^?^- ««search in Chemical Pn„- • (Staff.) 

special problems and the prepSo^ nf^^?!**'""^-^*^ investigation of 

Ch. E. 207A, 208A. PJanf n^ • « (Staff.) 

sion of department of cll^^L^Z^n!:^^^^ ''' 3)-^P.ere.uisite, per.is- 

-tes. Problems. ^Summer, FS;Sng '""'"" ^^ ^^^^--t anf pCt 

Ch. E. 207B, 2O8B. Plant DesiVn Qf ^- , ^^"^'^ 

of laboratory work which ly be^ect^^^^^^^^^^ "^^'^^^^^^^ ^^ 2)-Six hours 

Ch. E. 207A, 208A. Prerequisite t *^ ^^^^^Pany or be preceded bv 

en^neeHn.. Laboratory feTS^Oo S^s^rtef T^"^^^ '^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

P semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Machwart.) 



ENGINEERING 



277 



Ch. E. 209 f s. Gaseous Fuels (4) — Prerequisite, permission of depart- 
ment of chemical engineering. 

An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles 
involved in the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. 
Problems in design and selection of equipment. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Huff.) 

Civil Engineering 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 50. Hydraulics (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 50. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, dams, and pipes. Flow through orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, open channels, and weirs. Use of Reynold's number. 
Measurement of water. Elementary hydrodynamics. Fall, Spring. 

^ (Kurzweil.) 

C. E. 51. Hydraulics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 50 or 51. Required of juniors in electrical and mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

A shorter course than C. E. 50 with emphasis on water wheels, turbines, 
and centrifugal pumps. Fall, Spring. (Kurzweil, Sherwood.) 

C. E. 52. Curves and Earthwork (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Surv. 2 f s. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; transition curves; vertical and horizontal parabolic curves; railway 
turnouts, track layout, and string lining of curves. Summer, Fall. 

(Allen.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (4) — Three lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Analytical and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 
framed structures. Influence lines for reactions, shears, moments, and 
stresses. Analysis of lateral bracing systems. Elements of slope and 
deflections. Fall, Spring. (Allen.) 

C. E. 101. Elements of Highways (3) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 

Location, design, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements. 
Laboratory problems and field inspection trips. Summer, Fall. 

(Steinberg.) 

C. E. 102 f s. Concrete Design (7) — Three lectures; one laboratory, first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory, second semester. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 100. Required of seniors in civil engineering. 



278 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A continuation of C E inn , -^.i. 
detailing o, p,.i„ ,„j '4,^^ J"* »P«»lal .ppli.ation to ,h. d„|„ 

r'S tisrs £3' -£"r t- -s - 
-c. .„to„, „. .„„es„s- sirrSiS'Is^^ 

"^ v^'^ ^^^^^ ^^' '?-• »"• -C 

An introductory study of the proD^rH J" "'"'' engineering. ^' 

The student selects with f! u ''^'^^ ^°^ seniors in civH L • • "'■^' 
design or research ir? , ''""^ approval, a subiect^n ■, ^'''^^""^• 

needed. WeeSJ proSsfre'' T' ^^'"^ ^ '^botiot'tS'"^'"^^""^ 

-d to c^irr. hsr ^r-^:^,^^f ?.s^^^^^ 

C. E. 107. Elements of Structur.« ri 1' ' ^"''^' (St^ff) 

For Graduates (Allen.) 

S^'ir^Jvalenf ^^ "'*''^'"- "^ Materials (3)-Prere,uisit M . 
A critiea c.f„^ X , prerequisite, Mech. 

Assigned reading /' '""P^^*' ^^d corrosion f iT i '"^^^^^^^s, resist- 
reading from current literature TuZ^' *^e theories of failure. 

• bummer, Fall, Spring. 

(Kurzweil.) 



ENGINEERING 



279 



C. E. 201. Advanced Strength of Materials (3) — Prerequisite, Mech. 50 

or equivalent. 

Special problems in engineering stress analysis. Limitations of flexure 
and torsion formulas, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, combined 
stresses, thin tubes, thick-walled cylinders and flat plates. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Kurzweil.) 

C. E. 202. Applied Elasticity (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. 
Two dimensional elastic problems, general stress-strain analysis in three 
dimensions, stability of beams, columns, and thin plates. Fall, Spring. 

(Kurzweil.) 

C. E. 203. Soil Mechanics (3) — Prerequisite, C. E. 105 or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the properties of engineering soils. Assigned read- 
ing from current literature. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Hogentogler.) 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations (3) — Prerequisite, C E. 102 f s or 
equivalent. 

A detailed study of types of foundations. Design and construction to 
meet varying soil conditions. Fall, Spring. (Allen.) 

C. E. 205. Highway Engineering (3) — Prerequisite, C. E. 101 or equiv- 
alent. 

An intensive course in the location, design, and construction of high- 
ways. Fall, Spring. (Steinberg.) 

C. E. 206 f s. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (6) — Prerequisite, Mech. 52 
or equivalent. 

A thorough review of the methods for the design of concrete mixtures, 
followed by a study of factors affecting the properties of the resulting 
concrete. This course is intended as a background for work in the field of 
concrete, concrete aggregates, or reinforced concrete. Summer, Fall; Fall, 
Spring. (Walker, Kurzweil.) 

C. E. 207 f s. Research (2-6) — Credit in accordance with work outlined. 
The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. Summer, 
Fall; Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Drawing 

Dr. 1. Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. Required of fresh- 
men in engineering. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, technical sketches, 
dimensioning. Drawing from memory; drawing from description; inking, 
tracing, blueprinting, isometric and oblique projection and sections. Sum- 
mer, Fall, Spring. 



280 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1. Be.;.e?:;^^^^^^^ IaWato.es. P.ere...te .^ 

Continuation of Dr. 2, includin^tn '" "mechanical engineering 

developments, fastenings techSlstrv' '"'^"'' ^"'*«'=««' intersection! 
spective. Applications t; pracS eni^n:"^' ^°j'^"^ *^^«^"^« and pL' 
chosen professional field. iZ^ Hu'TZl ' " *'' ^*"'^""^ 

Dr. 4 f s. Mechanical Orawin<r f<>\ n , , 
neering students. '"^ ^^^^-^^^ laboratory. Open to non-engi- 

Lettering, sketching, and worWno- j. • 
ventions. tracing, isometSc a^S cab'^: °' ™^*='^'"^«' -<=l"*ng con- 
Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. ^* Projections, and blueprinting. 

Electrical Engineering 

registration in Math. 23 f s'^'and X "Ts R ^^^^--tes, concurrent 
electrical engineering. ^ * ^ ^ ^- Required of sophomores in 

Current, voltage, power !,r,A « 
Working concepts of^lec;ric Id "^^^7, ff «^^^^^^ - I>-C networks, 
and magnetic field intensity, and elecwS '"'*^"*'^' difference, electric 
tnc and magnetic circuit ^iperimtr ^t^TZ;'^J:'SX ^'"" 
For Advanced Undergraduates ' (Corcoran.) 

E. E. 50. Principles of Electrical vl„: 

laboratory. Prerequisites, Phy Tf 3 M^Sl^f ^'^■^''"° '^^*--^ °- 
in cml engineering. ^' ^^*^- 23 f s. Required of juniors 

tors, motors, and transformers. Fai^ s^^^^^^ characteristics ofgen'L 

E. R 51 f s. Principles of Electrilal En." • (Hodgins.) 

one laboratory. Prerequisites, Phts 2 ff mT."^ «)^Three lectures; 

rumors .n chemical and in mechanTc'al l^nee^^T' "" ' " ^^^^^^^ '' 

Study of elementary direct-curr^r^f "^, ^'^^^• 
teristics. Principles of ^^^^^^^^^^ a^e-ating-current circuit charac- 
ing-current machinery. Experiments"' the" ?' ^''''' ^^^ ^^ternat. 
of generators, motors, traLfor^ers J^ '"''r^"'^ ^"^ characteristics 
Fall; Fall, Spring. ^^ormers, and control equipment. Summer, 

(Creese, Laning.) 



ENGINEERING 



281 



E. E. 52. Direct-Current Machinery (3) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. 
p;rerequisites, Phys. 2 f s, Math. 23 f s, and E. E. 1 f s. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation, and performance characteristics of di- 
rect-current generators, motors, and control apparatus. Experiments on 
the operation and characteristics of direct-current generators and motors. 
Summer, Fall. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 53. Electricity and Magnetism (4) — Three lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, E. E. 1 f s or Math. 23 f s, and Phys. 2 f s. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

Electric and magnetic field theory with special consideration of capaci- 
tance and reluctance calculations by curvilinear-square field mapping meth- 
ods. Elements of electro-chemistry. Network theorems and systematized 
notational schemes emiployed in circuit analysis. Summer, Fall. 

(Laning.) 

• 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

E. E. 100. Engineering Electronics (4) — Three lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, E. E. 53 and concurrent registration in E. E. 101. Required 
of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Theory and application of electron tubes and associated control circuits. 
Emphasis on tube characteristics and electron-tube measuring devices, 
including the cathode-ray oscillograph as a measuring device. Applica- 
tions of thyratrons and other rectifier tubes. Fall, Spring. (Laning.) 

E. E. 101. Alternating-Current Circuits (6) — Five lectures, one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, E. E. 53. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Single- and polyphase-circuit analysis under sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal 
conditions of operation. Harmonic analysis by the Fourier series method. 
Theory and operation of mutually coupled circuits and of electric wave fil- 
ters. Elementary concepts of symmetrical-component analysis applied only 
to static circuit elements. Fall, Spring. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 102 f s. Alternating-Current Machinery (10) — Three lectures, two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. Required of seniors in electrical 
engineering. 

The operating principles of alternating-current machinery considered 
from theoretical, design, and laboratory points of view. Synchronous gene- 
rators and motors; single and polyphase transformers; three-phase induc- 
tion generators and motors; single phase induction motors; rotary con- 
verters and mercury-arc rectifiers. One laboatory period per week devoted 
to theoretical and design calculations; one laboratory period per week 
devoted to actual laboratory tests. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 

(Creese, Hodgins.) 



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ENGINEERING 



283 



K EJ. 103 f s. Radio Communication (6) — Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, E. E. 100 and E. E. 101. Required of seniors in electrical 
engineering. 

Principles of radio communication from both theoretical and laboratory 
points of view. Amplification, detection, and oscillation with particular 
emphasis on audio amplification and broadcast range reception. Summer, 
Fall; Fall, Spring. (Davies, Laning.) 

E. E. 104. Illumination (3) — Two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, E. E. 101. Senior elective. 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems, 
illumination calculations, photometric measurements. Summer, Fall. 

(Creese.) 

E. E. 105. Electric Railways (3) — Prerequisite, concurrent registration 
in E. E. 102 f s. Senior elective. 

Mechanism of train motion. Application of electrical equipment to trans- 
portation. Construction and operation of control apparatus used in differ- 
ent fields of electrical transportation such as urban railways, trunk line 
railways, trolley busses and diesel-electric equipment. Powder requirements, 
distribution systems and signal systems. Summer, Fall. (Hodgins.) 

R E. 106 f s. Thesis (2) — ^One laboratory. Elective for seniors in elec- 
trical engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a special problem in electrical 
engineering. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be needed. 
Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences are held 
with the members of the faculty to whom the student is assigned for 
advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is required 
to complete the thesis. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

E. R 107. Transmission Lines (3). — Prerequisite, concurrent registra- 
tion in E. E. 102 f s. 

Calculation of transmission line inductance and capacitance on a per- 
wire basis. Long-line theory applied to both power and telephone circuits. 
Electrical, mechanical, and economic considerations of power transmission 
and distribution systems. Summer, Fall. (Corcoran.) 

E, E. 108. Electric Transients (3) — Prerequisite, concurrent registra- 
tion in E. E. 102 f s. 

Current, voltage, and power transients in lumped-parameter networks. 
Transient phenomena in sweep circuits and inverters. Starting transients 
in transformers and short-circuit transients in alternators with oscillo- 
graphic demonstrations. Fall, Spring. (Corcoran.) 

R E. 109. Advanced Alternating-Current Theory (3) — Prerequisite, con- 
current registration in E. E. 102 f s. 

Symmetrical component analysis of power networks or high-frequency 
phenomena in communication networks, depending upon the predilections 
of the class. Fall, Spring. (Corcoran.) 



';?t«r symmetrical Components (3)-Prere.uisite, E. E. 102 f s. 

genera tors, transmission 1^"-' /J^f XthodsTJeasuring positive, nega- 
S Ung. and '-^-'^''"^l^::^ot^^L.ons generators and methods 
tive, and zero sequence '^^^''^^"f 1° Jn^es of transmission Imes. Com- 
; akulating these '^oj^^l'^'l'^^'^^Zc.X components and companson 
KestrtirS irhtlS by Classical methods. Summer, ^-;; 

tl 201. operational Circuit Analysis (3)_Prerecuisite. E. E. 102 f s 

or equivalent. ,-„vo1vine both lumped and distributed cir- 

Solution of network transients J^^^';^ f^^^^^^ operational calculus. Car- ■ 
euft parameters by the -^^-^^^^^l^J 3;p;^ theorem. Heaviside's 

on's infinite integral theorem D^*;^'^^^^^^^^^^ Summer, Fall, Sprmg 

expansion theorem and direct operational m (Corcoran.) 

General Engineering Subjects n"*— Required of freshmen in 

Engr. l.-Introducti«n to Engineermg (l)-Keqmre 

engineering. , ^ ^ practicing engineers covering 

A course of lectures by t^«„~%J^''^ork of the engineer, its require- 

the engineering P^-^ff ^^°"*^ ,^f ';d the ethics and ideals of the profession. 
ments in training and <=haracter and the e^ .^ ^^^^^.^^ ^^^ 

SiH^of :Sn:e:i:r^r\S"he is best adapted. Summer. Fall. 

Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and «^*"*"***; .o^-Required of seniors 

Engr. 100. Engineering Law -<». fP^f ^^^ ^nSneeSg departments, 
in civil engineering; t^^'-f ^''^^Srof tw relating to business and to 
A study of the fundamental P'^'^^" °'j^' otiable instruments, corpora- 
engineering; including :^^-'^1^;^;^^l^^^:Xl then applied to the analy- 
tions, and common earners. These P"'^"^ ^^ contracts and specifica- 

sis of general and technical clauses in engmeermg (Steinberg.) 

tions. Fall, Spring. 

Mechanics ^-J-Prerequisite, Dr. 3, and to be taken 

Mech. 1. Statics and DyJ«"»'cs C3) f re q ^^ sophomores m 

concurrently with Math. 23 f s and Phys. 2 f s. Keq 

impulse and momentum. Fall, Sprmg. 



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Mech. 2. Statics and Dynamics (5) — To be taken concurrently with Math. 
23 f s and Phys. 2 f s. Required of sophomores in mechanical engineering. 

Analytical and graphical solution of coplanar and non-coplanar force 
systems, equilibrium of rigid bodies; suspended cables, frictions, centroids 
and moments of inertia, kinematics and kinetics; work, power, and energy; 
impulse and momentum. 

The course also embraces the fundamentals of kinematics necessary to 
the study of kinematics of machinery. Plane motion of a particle and the 
general laws governing the transmission of plane motion are treated by 
vector and graphical methods. Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Mech. 50. Strength of Materials (5) — Prerequisite, Mech. 1 or 2. Re- 
quired of juniors in civil and in mechanical engineering. 

Riveted joints; torsional stresses and strains; beam stresses and deflec- 
tion; combined axial and bending loads; column stresses; principal stresses 
and strains; impact and energy loads ; statically indeterminate beams; shear 
center; unsymmetrlcal bending; composite members including reinforced 
concrete beams. Instruction in the use of an approved handbook containing 
the properties of rolled steel sections. Summer, Fall. 

(Younger, Kurzweil, Barton.) 

Mech. 51. Strength of Materials (3) — Prerequisite, Mech. 1 or 2. Re- 
quired of juniors in electrical engineering. 

A shorter course than Mech. 1. Instruction in the use of an approved 
handbook containing the properties of rolled steel sections. Summer, Fall. 

(Kurzweil.) 

Mech. 52. Materials of Engineering (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50 or 51. Required of juniors in civil, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering, and of the conditions that influence their physical 
characteristics. The interpretation of specifications and of standard tests. 
Laboratory work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, brick, cement, 
and concrete. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Kurzweil, Hogentogler.) 

Mechanical Engineering 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 50. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Math. 23 f s, Phys. 2 f s. Required of juniors 
in civil egineering. 

Elementary thermo-dynamics and the study of heat, fuel, and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for the generation of power. Includes 
study of fundamental types of steam boilers, fuel burning equipment, prime 
movers and their allied apparatus. Supplemented by laboratory tests and 
trips to industrial plants. Summer, Fall. (Shre^ve.) 



M E. 51. Thermodynamics (3)-Prerequisites. Math. 23 f s. Phys. 2 f s. 

,-ired of seniors in ele^^^^^ to the stea^ engine, 

The theory ^"^ application ot y ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ 

site, senior standing. ,^^1^'^^°^ '^^^^ ;„ the production and use of steam 

nautical option. . • i«^ ^-p fVi^ flow of air and of water. 

A study of the fundamental Vrmc^vlesoi t^^o^ of a^ ^ 

Applications with special reference t°,*^,^^^;2n;3fjf performance cal- 
theory; theory of model testing m mnd tunnels, design pe ^^^^^^^ 

culations of airplanes. Fall, Sprmg. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates w,tnrv first 

M F 100 f s Thermodynamics (5)-0ne lecture, one laboratory, first 

Fall; Fall, Spring. 

M V 101 Heating and Ventilation (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 
plfuisiJ :M KIM f s. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering 

''rZ; Of types of heating ^J^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

biiilding; layout of piping and systems, ^!t!^^^°""P'7Jf^'^r ^^11. 

mates oi costs; fundamentals of air conditionmg. Summer, I' ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

M E. 102 Refrigeration (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
.r:ortLSrr^r,tSirfactories Ld homes. F^U.^Spring. 

M r. 1A9 f = Tlipcii^ f3)— One laboratory, first semester; one lecture, 
..r,.tay"-«™mL" E«,».r.. .. senior, in m,ch»i». ».- 

"•Sf«na». ..«t„ witH .-Hv ™,^. •rr,.tX"rdi:t 



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1 

J 



} 



ferences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is 
assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography 
is required to complete the thesis. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

M. E. 104 f s. Prime Movers (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 50, C. E. 51. Required of seniors in mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

A course covering the use of prime movers to convert heat into power. It 
includes a study of heat, fuels and combustion processes followed by the 
theory, construction and operation of internal combustion engines, steam 
engines, boilers, condensers, steam turbines and their auxiliary equipment. 
Theory is supplemented by practical problems and by laboratory tests. The 
entire course is closely integrated with the mechanical laboratory course. 
Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. • (Green.) 

M. E. 105 f s. Mechanical Engineering Design (7) — ^Two lectures, two 
laboratories first semester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

A course embracing the kinematics and dynamics of machinery and the 
design of machine members and mechanisms. Special probems on the 
balancing, vibration, and critical speeds of machine members are treated. 
Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Sherwood.) 

M. EL 106 f Sw Mechanical Laboratory (4) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of seniors in mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and water 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam and internal combustion 
engines, setting of valves, tests for economy and capacity of boilers, engines, 
turbines, pumps, and other prime movers. Feed water heaters and con- 
densers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels; and power 
plant tests. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

M. R 107 f s. Airplane Structures (6) — Prerequisite, M. E. 53. Required 
of seniors in mechanical engineering, aeronautics option. 

The fundamental principles of structural analysis and design of airplanes. 
The air worthiness requirements of the Civil Aeronautics Authority and 
the design requirements of the government service branches are given 
special consideration. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. (Younger.) 

For Graduates 

M. R 200. Mechanics of Vibration (3)— Prerequisites, Mech. 50, Math. 
114, or equivalent. 

The study of characteristic mechanical vibration encountered in engineer- 
ing. Analysis of simple cases of free and forced vibration with damping 
and the combination of several simultaneous motions. Principles of trans- 
mission, resonance and vibration isolation applied to high speed motors, 
wing flutter, wires and many others. Detection and measuring instruments. 

Examples of diagnosis and noise prevention. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

(Barton.) 



M E 201 Applied Elasticity and Elastic Stability (^-Prerequisites, 
M.h. 50, Math. lU, or equivalent saint-Venanfs 

General theorems on the elastic solid wm yp ^^^ ^^ 

PrLiple; sudden loading and ^*--X;^Vtal ^Wastic foundation; 

M. E. 202 f s. Advanced Aircraft Structures (6)-Prerequisite, M. E. 

107 f s or equivalent. , 

' Methods of analysis in advanced problems of d-j^nin. ^^^ of research 
reports in aircraft structures. .Summer, Fall; Fall, Spnng^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

M E. 203 f s. Advanced Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics (6)-Pre- 
requisite, M. E. 53 or equivalent. 
Theoretical and experimental study of the flow of fluids. Summ^e^r.^^a^ . 

Fall, Spring. 
M E 204 f 8. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer (6)-Pre- 

requisites, M. E. lOO f s, 104 f s, or equivalent. 

Application of the laws of thermodynamics *« ind^trial ^rc^^^^^ 
traiJL by radiation, conduction, and convection. Summer, ^^^^^^^ 

Spring. 

M E. 205. Seminar (l-3)-Credit in accordance with work outlined. 

Seminars may be organised in any field of m-hamcal engineering for the 
study of general theory or specific problems. Summer, Fall, , ^ P^^^^ 

1, <-o fl^ Prpdit in accordance with work done. 
M. E. 206 f s. Research (2-8)— t>reait in ace (SUflf.) 

Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 

Shop ,1.4. 

Shop 1. Forge Practice (l)-One combination lecture and laboratory. 

Required of freshmen in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on t^-rinci^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
of steel. Demonstrations m acetylene and electric weia S- ^ g^ing, 

and case hardening. Laboratory practice ^^/'^T^"?' ^f "^'^X %«" 
forge welding, hardening, tempering, and thread cutting. Summer, , 

Spring. 

Shop 2.-Machine Shop Practice (l)-One laboratory. Required of sopho- 
mores in electrical engineermg. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, tapping, knurling, and 
tool sharpening. Summer, Fall, Sprmg. 



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289 



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Shop 3. Machine Shop Practice (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of sophomores in mechanical engineering. 

Study of the fundamental principles of machine tools, such as lathe, 
planer, shaper, milling machine, drilling machine, and grinding machines. 
Calculation for cutting threads, spur and helical gears, fluting and cutting 
speeds. The laboratory work in this course is identical with Shop 2. Sum- 
mer, Fall, Spring. 

Shop 4. Machine Shop Practice (2) — ^Two laboratories. Required of 
juniors in Industrial Education. 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, pipe threading, thread 
cutting, surface grinding, and fluting and cutting spur and helical gears. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Shop 50. Foundry Practice (1) — One combination lecture and laboratory. 
Required of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations on foundry products and layouts, materials and 
equipment, hand and machine moulding, cupola practice and calculating 
mixes. Core making, moulding, and casting in aluminum. Summer, Fall. 

(Hoshall.) 

Shop 51. Machine Shop Practice (1) — One laboratory. Required of 
juniors in mechanical engineering. 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, fluting, cutting spur and helical gears, jig work, and cutter and 
surface grinding. Fall, Spring. (Hoshall.) 

Shop 52. Machine Shop Practice (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Shop 4. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. 

Boring, reaming, broaching, fluting, milling, jig work, gear cutting, and 
sharpening milling cutters. Fall, Spring. (Hoshall.) 

Surveying 

Surv. 1. Elements of Plane Surveying (1) — ^Combined lecture and 
laboratory work. Prerequisites, Math. 21, 22. Required of sophomores in 
chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. 

A brief course in the use of the tape, compass, level, transit, and stadia 
Computation for area, coordinates, volume, and plotting. Summer, Fall 
Spring. 

Surv. 2 f s. Plane Surveying (5) — ^One lecture, one laboratory first se 
mester; one lecture, two laboratories second semester. Prerequisites, Math 
21, 22. Required of sophomores in civil engineering. 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross- sec 
tions, volume, stadia. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 



r„. Advanced ^f^^^'^^^lX^^^^^^^ lectures; two laboratories. 

Surv. 100. Advanced ^^^^^ ^J]^,^„, m civil engineering, 
prerequisite, Surv 2 f s. R^l^'^^^/; longitude, azimuth, time, triangula- 

Adjustment of instruments, latitude, longi ' ^ necessary 

,on precise leveling, ge^^e.. ^:^Y^^^^^^^^^lJ ,,.^. t.^>Xe, ^.r.. 
jrertd tunrrr; t^nU a^nd .ydrograpMc surveys. ^^S^um- 

mer, Fall. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND "TERATURE p^.^^^oBS 

HARMAN, Fitzhugh; ^ssistant r ^^ p^^^^_ ^^ j^^g^^. 

MUBPHV, BAIX, IDE * ; MR. GRAVELY, MISS ^^^^ ^^ MCCOUX.M, 

-^' Ss'S^rBK^-fSv'^iK, MKS. JOS.™, MK. LU.O. 
r^ 1 f , Survey and Composition (6)-Prerequisiie, three u^ts »t 

all students. , T^nnrtnation combined vdth an 

A study of style, syntax, «f "^"S\!"^ ,f "J^ ^J^'^f' the nineteenth and 
;r::; I^JT^::^^^^^- - exer^ses. sum- 
mer. Fall; Fall, Spring; Spring, »r. ^^.^^ „, 

^\^-, ?il "ZrreTof ^1 s ud n r^^fa^ to pass the qualify- 
high -hool English_Requ re^ of a^^^^ ^^^.^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

ing examination. Students wno b others will continue vnth 

of Eng. A will be trans -red^° department re^ ^e the right to trans- 

EngUsh A for one --J^fl\^^^X;^Z.^.e unsatisfactory progress, 
fer from Eng. 1 to E"g- A students ^^^^_^^^ _^^^^ ^^^.^^^ 

toteirJ^rLXs: ;rep^= has been insufficient for Bng. 1. Exer- 

cises, precis writing. Summer, Fall, Spring. 
vJ 2 3 Survey and Composition (3, 3)-0ne general lecture given 
Eng. 2, 3. [survey anu J^^ ^ ^^ sections. Prerequisite, 

by various members of the department, two q Sciences. 

Fall; Fall, Spring; Spring, Summer. 
Eng. 4, 5. Expository Writing ^2, 2)-Prerequisite^E^^^^^^ ^^ 

A study of the princujes o exPO-t>om Analy^^^^^ ^^ first'semester is 

the expository essay. Themes, papers, '*"'^' ^ 

not prerequisite to the second semester. Fall, bpnng. 

♦Absent on leave 1941-42. 



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stutSs'in Co"^:;^:,^''^"^'' <2)-Prere,uisite, En,. 4 or 5. Umite, , 
teJ'XZt '^"'"^^ ''' '''' "^^'^^'^ o' Writing effective business ,.. 
^ Eng. 7, 8. Survey of American Literature (3, 3)-Prerequisite. En, 

First semester, American f>inn«-i,f j 

With emphasis up'on '^oZii Xr^:;;^^::'::^^. '"" t *" ^««^- 

and upon sectional conflict. Reports TnnemSper "" "'*""^"^'"' 
Pall. ^^^' 18^5. Reports and term paper. Summer, 

Eng. n, 12. Shakespeare (3, 3)-Prerequisite, Eng. 1 f s 

experimental production. Preparation of acting script; 

Second semester, ten significant late plays. Fall, Spring 

1 f^s.Votopln^r'pri^^^^^ ^"^-*"- (3)-Prerequisite, Eng. 

An intensive study of representative storie<5 w,», i f 

and technique of the short story and of other narr J '' °" '^' '^'"'"''^ 

J- d lu 01 otner narrative lorms. Summer. 

Eng 14. College Grammar (3)-Prerequisite, Eng 1 f s 
Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. Pall. Spring 
Eng. 15. The Contemporary Novel (2)-Prerequisite, Eng i f s 
tinenr (Vot 'llTlZZ^) ""^ '" ^'■^*^'"' ^'"-^-' ^^^ - t^e Con- 

the^'s'Llr.- "'''^ ''^"'"*="»" ''' 3>-Adniission by the permission of 

Fundamental principles of actine- and r.f ^; *• 
tion. Each student ,vill niakerSueln borof"" °' """*'"'' P'"*'*^"" 
engage in practical laboratory work, slme^ Fall " *""' ""''' '"' 

Jour. 1 f s. Introduction to Journalism ra\ j^ 
Registration only by permission of theTstr^^^^^^^^ ^"^' ' ' '' 

^^Astudy of the elementary principles of journalism. (Not offered 

Jour. 15 f s. Graphic Design (4)-Prerequisite, Eng 1 f s 
A study of typography and its application. Fall, Spring. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



291 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 50, 51. The History and Development of the Novel in England] 

(3^ 3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A study of the origin and development of the novel as a literary form 
in England. Fall, Spring. (Ide.) 

Eng. 54, 55. Playwriting (2, 2) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3, or permission 
of the instructor. 

A study of the principles involved in dramatic form and in writing dia- 
log. Practice in the construction of one act plays. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(McCoUom.) 

Eng. 57. Types of English Literature (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of English Litera- 
ture, with especial attention to the influence of classical myths and legends 
and of classical literary ideals upon English and American writers. Fall. 

(Harman.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language (3) — Prerequisite, Eng. 14. 

An historical survey of the English language; its nature, origin, and de- 
velopment, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in 
English speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. Summer. 

(Harman.) 

Eng. 102. Old English (3)— Prerequisite, Eng. 14. 

A study of Old English grammar and literature. Lectures on the prin- 
ciples of phonetics and comparative philology. Fall. (Ball.) 



Eng. 103. Beowulf (3)— Prerequisite, Eng. 102. 

A study of the Old English epic in the original. Spring. 



(BalL) 



Eng. 104. Chaucer (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the principal 
minor poems, with lectures and readings on the social background of Chau- 
cer's time. Spring. (Hale.) 

Eng. 105. Medieval Drama in England (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its begin- 
i^ing to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 
(Not offered 1942-43.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 106. Elizabethan Drama (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A study of the change in spirit and form from 1540 to 1640, as seen in 
the works of the most important dramatists other than Shakespeare. Class 
discussion of significant plays, outside reading, written dramatic criticism. 
Fall. * (Zeeveld.) 



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Eng. 107. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (%^ p,. 

A study of the literary manifestation; of t ^'^^'^'^^^^''^'^'t^^' ^ng. 2, , 

spirit in sixteenth-centuryTnSd ^th 1 T^"- '"^ ^"*^ '^" ""^ "^"o^al 

More, Lyly, Sidney, Hooker S^n 1^?^'^. "', °" '^^ '"''^ ^^'k^ o 

on the poetry of Spenser ' Summer " '''"''"*°''^ '' *^« ^ible, and 

Eng. 108. MiUon (2)-Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3 ''"""' 

A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. Fall. .Murn. . 

jng^m Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1.0 ^^^^ 

Eng. 110. The Age of Dryden (2)-Prere.uisites. Eng 2 3 '''"'''* 

shS^C2,^^^- ^^'-^-^ - - -^-- century C2. 2>-Pr:- 
son"? steTe'Ce'- "''"'^ " *'' ^^"^'^ ^°™-*«<^ »'^ ^^f-. Swift, Addi- 
J rttrTSS 'summerkr '^^ '''''-' ''' ^^^ ^^ «~icisn,; 
s^'eIS'^^: ""- -- ^-- - -e — ic Age (3. 3)~! 

in'rgTa^Vre^lmVnStfhe^t'^"'?^ °^ *^^ «--«^ — ent 
Lamb, DeQuincy,Tnd others "^ "' ^°'*''^ '' Wordsworth, Coleridge, 

ShX.Te:rand olLt'sut^r! VSr""^ -''''-' ^-"^^^ ^^ 

Eng. 115.— Scottish Poetry (2) Pro.^ • v t, ^^^'*'^ 

of the Scottish language requSd^^"''"'"'' ^"^^ 2' ^- ^^ '^"°^'^<'^« 

an?b\t?H;e:a\;f:rt:^^^^^^^^^^^ ^7-ond of Hawthornden; song 

and Burns. Papers IHeportsmoTr^' ''"'^'' ^""^^>'' F-^"-"' 

P ana reports. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Jng. 116, in. Victorian Prose and Poetry (3. 3)-Prere<iuisites, Eng. 
^^"^^s^l/iXt^^^^^^^^ Nineteenth Century .on; 

Eng"?. "'• ''"'"" ^"'^ Contemporary British Poets (3)-PrerlqutZs, 

Summlr'' "' ''' ^'"' ^"^"^'^ ^"^ ^"^'^ P-ts of the Twentieth Century. 

(Murphy.) 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



293 



Eng. 123. Modern Drama (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A survey of English Drama during the two centuries from 1660 to 1860. 
Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. Summer. 

(Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 124. Contemporary Drama (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen to 
O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 
Summer. ( Fitzhugh. ) 

Eng. 125. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 

7, 8. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, with 
emphasis on transcendentalism, idealism, and democracy. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126. American Fiction (3) — Prerequisites, Eng, 7, 8. 

Historical and critical study of the short story and novel in the United 
States from 1789 to 1920. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — ^Prerequisites, 

Eng. 7, 8. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. Summer. 

(Warfel.) 

Eng. 128. American Drama (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 7, 8. 

Historical study of representative American Plays and playwrights, from 
1787 to 1920. Fall. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 134. Playwriting (2)— Two lectures. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(McCollom.) 

Eng. 135. Introduction to Creative Writing (2) — ^Prerequisites, Eng. 2,3. 

Theory and practice in the short story and lyric, with some study of the 
novelette and play at the election of the class. Major students in English 
must elect either this course or Eng. 136. Summer, Fall. (Bryan.) 

Eng. 136. Magazine Writing (2)— Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 

The production and marketing of such literature forms as the magazine 
article, the personal essay, the biographical essay, and the book review. 
Fall. ' (Bryan.) 

Eng. 137. Advanced Creative Writing (2) — Prerequisite, Eng. 135, or 
136; open to other advanced students by permission of the instruc- 
tor after submission of an original composition. This course may be taken 
twice for credit. 

Study and exercise in original literary expression as an interpretative 
art. Spring. (Bryan.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 



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Eng. 140. Major American Poets (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 
Intensive study of the poetry and poetic theories of the major American 
poets since Bryant. Spring. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 141. Major American Prose Writers (3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 
Intensive study of the major non-fiction prose writers of nineteenth-cen- 
tury United States. Summer. (Warfel.) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Seminar in Special Studies (1-3)— Credit proportioned to the 
importance of the problem assigned. 

Work under personal guidance in some problem of especial interest to 
the graduate student, but not connected with the thesis. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Staff.) 

Eng. 201. Research (2-4) — Credit proportioned to the amount of work 
done and results accomplished. 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations for the doctor's 
degree. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Eng. 202. Middle English Language (2-3)— Prerequisites, Eng. 102, 103. 

A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference to 
etymology and syntax. Spring. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203. Gothic (2)— Prerequisite, Eng. 102. 

A study of forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas Bible. Cor- 
relation of the Gothic speech sounds with those of the Old English. (Not 
offered 1942-43.) (Harman.) 

Eng. 204. — Medieval Romance in England (4). 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical in Medieval Eng- 
land, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. Fall. 

(Hale.) 

Eng. 205. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (2-3). 

Studies and problems in sixteenth-century literature other than Shake- 
speare. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 206. Seminar in Elizabethan Drama (4). 

Lestures and readings in the drama (not including Shakespeare) from 
about 1550 to the closing of the theaters in 1642. Fall, Spring. 

(McManaway.) 

Eng. 207. Seminar in Shakespeare (2-3) — Prerequisites, Eng. 11 and 12, 
or equivalent. 

Studies and problems in Shakespeare. Fall. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 208. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2-3). 

Intensive study of one man's work or of one important movement of the 
century. Spring. (Fitzhugh.) 



^ 9AQ Seminar in American Literature (2-3) 

erature. The subject for 1942-194^ win oe (Warfel.) 

Whitman. Spring- „„„«„«. Period (2-3)-One discussion period 

Eng. 210. Seminar m th« R^^^^^'^g^Yu. or equivalent satisfactory to 
„f two hours. Prerequisites, Eng. lU. n*. ""^ i ^jj^j^ ) 

the instructor. Summer. , 

En. 211. Seminar in the Victorian Period (2-3)_Prerequisit«s. Eng. 
U6, m. or the permission of the instructor ^ 

S ecial studies of problems or P™^"'J^^2'J^h^^^ Summer. 

Jter of the course will vary with the interests of the ^^^^^^^ 

E„g. 212. Old English Poetry (2-3)-Prerequisite, Eng. 102. or equiva- 
't study of Old English poetic masterpieces other than Beowulf. Spring. 

r:Xof^:ro:ria.h a^. ^-^ -^--rs 

Required of all candidates for advanced degrees who egi ^^^.^^^ 

Fall of 1942. Fall. 

ENTOMOLOGY Assistant Professors 

Knight, Ditman. Abrams; Dr. Langford, mr. m , , , „ 

E„t 1 Introductory Entomology (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Prerequisite, 1 year of ^^^^«\^'f^^^^, ^^^ ^^ral principles of insect 
The relationships of insects to man the ^e^^^^V y .^ ^^^ 

structure and classification; the adaptations and J.eha ^^_ 

elementary aspects of economic entomology. Laboratory 

mer, Fall, Spring. . 

Ent. 2. Insect Morphology (3)-Two laboratory periods; occasional lee 

tures. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. cnecial reference 

tory fee, $2.00. Fall, Summer. 
Ent. 3. Apiculture (3)_Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite. 

't Ly of the life-habit. y-^S-J^:::L£^t^ 
honeybee. The value of the ^/^J" ^^^^^^S f or the student of agri- 
the production of honey and beeswax. Designea 
culture, horticulture or biology. Summer, Sprmg. 



'"■I 



296 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 



reSitf: EntT"" ^''"""" ^'^-^^^ '-^--^ «- laboratory, p., 

den^wr^shTArCliLtnLr^^^'"-*- ^---^^ ^- the stu. 
management. Fall, Summer ^ ' * P'**=*''=^' knowledge of bee 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

families within the major oX^^^^^^ ! ''"'^ "' '^^ ^'"P^^^^t 

collection of Maryland insects LaLS''^^^^^^^^^^ ^^' Preparation of a 

y na insects. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Summer, Spring. 

lect;s''pre''rS^^^ eTT^ '''-^^^ '^'^'^''^ -^«^^'- olltl 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

J^nt. 101. Economic Entomology (4)-Prerequisite: consent of depart- 

re^!:Ll%t^^^ "^"'^ ''^-''"^ ^^^^"-^'- -^ ^-boratory period."" Pre^ 

Plattrbte^pl^^^^^^^^ ^' -^ or more groups of economic 

cipally for studentHf^^agSltu^^^^ T' ^"'^'^'- ^^^^^^^ P^^" 

more of the followinArounfof . ^^^^/^^^mology, who may choose one or 

(2) truck croptTs) fS^^ tT" '""'^"^ ''"'^•- ^^^^^ ^f (1) fruit, 
and shade trees 5 forlst tUes ^87^^^ "'"'' ^^"^^^ ^^^ ornamentals 

requtitrEnt'r' "^"^^ '''"^"^ ^^^^"^^^^ ^^ ^^^-atory perL^'d" Pre! 

tert "B^htLrfr?^^^^^^^^^^^^ those students who wish to take two semes- 
?2.00. Spring "'^'''' ^^ entomology. Laboratory fee, 

(Cory.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 



297 



Ent. 105. Medical Entomology (2) — Prerequisite, Ent. 1 and consent of 
the department. 

The relation of the Arthropoda to disease of man, both directly and as 
vectors of pathogenic organisms. The fundamentals of parasitology and 
sanitation as they are related to entomology. The control of pests of man. 
Spring. (Knight.) 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (3) — Prerequisite, Ent. 1 and elementary organic 
chemistry. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and 
other important chemicals, with reference to their chemistry, toxic action, 
compatability, and host injury. Recent research emphasized. Spring. 

(Ditman.) 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (2) — ^Two lectures; occasional demonstra- 
tions. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to blood, 
circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and 
the nervous system, and metabolism. Spring. (Yeager.) 

Ent. 110. Special Problems — Credit and prerequisite to be determined 
by the department. 

The intensive investigation of some entomological problem, preferably 
of the student's choice. A report of results constitutes one of the require- 
ments for the completion of the curriculum in entomology. Students may 
satisfy the requirement in this course in one semester if their schedule 
allows sufficient time. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1) — Prerequisite, senior standing. 

Presentation of original work, review and abstracts of literature, by 
major students in the department. Fall, Spring. (Cory, Knight.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. — Credit and prerequisite to be deter- 
mined by the department. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entom- 
ology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for indi- 
vidual research. Smnmer, Fall, Spring. (Cory.) 

Ent. 202. Research. 

Advanced students with adequate preparation may, with approval of 
the head of the department, undertake supervised research in entomology. 
The student may be allowed to work on Experiment Station or State Hor- 
ticultural Department projects, and may form a part of the final report 
published in bulletin form. A dissertation suitable for publication must 
be submitted at conclusion of the studies as part of the requirement for an 
advanced degree. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Cory.) 



:4 



298 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HISTORY 



299 



ifli 



A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relation.,!,.-, ^f • 
to their environment. Emphasis is nWr^^ ^„ +., • ^^'^^'""ship of insects 

ism adjusted to its surroundings sX, '""* " ' '^^ '^ •''^^ 

sentof ^e depr^menr '''-^"° '^''°'-^*"^ ^«-*'«- ^--'^"^^"e, eon- 

of 1hf l^elnttrTh^^tjhl^^^^^^ °^ ^'^^ ^'-''- ^-P^ 

tory fee, $2.00. Spring- Preparation and microscopy. Labora- 

(McConnell.) 
FARM FORESTRY 

req'lTsites, TtTt" '" ''"'■""■" ^'^-"""^ '^^*"^^^'- "^ '^^o-t»^y- P- 
tothenSisreTt l^e^^fnrllr^T .""^r*^'^^ °^ ^^^^^^ ^^^''^^ 

For. 50. Farm Forestry (2)_Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
on'^hrfon^^ the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 

Prottuo^mafagerr rerre^t: Z'tS^f^^^ ^^^ 
nursery practice; and tree planting. (N^t offered 1942 4^.) 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Hess; Assistant Professor Madigan 
^ Geol. 1. Geologry (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Chem. 

neSni "' ^"^^""""'^^ ^^'^^^ (2)-Required of sophomores in civil engi- 
The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. Fall. 



HISTORY 

Professors Gewehr, Baker-Crothers, Strakhovsky; Associate Professor 
Highby; Assistant Professors Thatcher, Silver, Prange; Dr. Dozer,* 

Dr. Holm. 

H. 1 f s. A Survey of Western Civilization (6) — For freshmen and soph- 
omores; open to upper classmen by special arrangement. It may be entered 
either semester. 

A general course covering the broad movements of European history 
which contributed to the formation of modern institutions. The aim of 
the course is to make the student cognizant of the present trends in this 
changing world. Recommended for all students who expect to major in 
history and for those who expect to elect only one history course. Siunmer, 
Fall; Fall, Spring. 

H. 3 f s. History of England and Great Britain (6) — For freshmen and 
sophomores; open to upper classmen by special arrangement. 

A survey of the evolution of England and Great Britain from the earliest 
times to the present; especially valuable for pre-law students and majors 
in English. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 

H. 5, 6. American History (3, 3) — Primarily for sophomores; freshmen 
may enter only if their curriculum specifically requires it. 

A survey of American history from colonial times to the present. First 
semester, through the Civil War; second semester, since the Civil War. 
Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
H. 5, 6, or equivalent. 

The settlement and development of colonial America to mid-eighteenth 
century. Fall. (Baker-Crothers.) 

H. 102. The American Revolution (3) — ^Three lectures. Prerequisites 
H. 5, 6, or equivalent. 

A consideration of the background and course of the American Revolu- 
tion through the formation of the constitution. Summer, Spring. 

(Baker-Crothers. ) 

H. 107. The United States from the Civil War to 1900 (3)— Prerequi- 
site, H. 6 or equivalent. 

Selected topics intended to provide an historical basis for an understand- 
ing of the problems of the present century. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Thatcher.) 

*Ab8fnt on leave. 



300 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



our own day. Summer. ^ ' ^'^'^ *^^ P"^P°«« "f understanding 

.".^^Pr^JeU^^^^^^ o. .e .... S JX: 

inTrcoSlfperfod ''"""' '^"""^ ^'^'"^ « ^^^t^esis of American life 
Second semester, the period from 1790 to I860. Fall, Spring. 

H. 115 f s. Constitutional Hi^tnrv „f ♦!, rr • (Baker-Crothers.) 

sites, H. 5, 6. ""'*'^ "^ *''*' United States (6)-Prerequi. 

A study of the historical forces re.„.lf,„„ • ^u ^ 
tution, and of the development of A 'l/ '" ^"^^tio" of the Consti- 
and practice thereafter. 5 Spring <=onstitutionalism in theory 

KitS U%T ^''"»7"' «-*-^ of'tJ^e United States (2 ^.'T''"' 
Bites, H. 5, 6, or equivalent ^i«*tes (^z, z) — Prerequi- 

semester, from the RevoZtion to Se c'vil W "*'°" '' '''' ^''''-'- ^^-^^ 
Civil War to the present. Summer, S '' """"'"' ''"''''''' ^^'^ '^^e 

H ": 6.':; i'uiva^ir'' "' "'•^ ^'"^^-" ^-«- (3.' 3)-P ~Is! 

institltifdXtr ?ir''t%:mtT^'r~"* ^" ^^^P-- American 

ond semester, the tLs-Mis^T W^' FaV^^n-n^'^^"^ 7^'- ft 

H. 123. The Old South (3)_Prere<,uisites H 5 7 • ^ '^ 

A study of the institutional and cuTtuTanife of .l" ''""''"*• 
with particular reference to the ^Ji . . ^ ^^^ ante-bellum South 

.round of the Civil wl (No^ oSdTsS t T""'''^" ""'' '""^ ''''■ 
.^L. "^ ^"' "- - — (3)-Prere.uisites. rrt; 

poSs^rraiitsinr^^^^^^^^^ 

ences shaping the present South. (Not oS 1942^^^^^ ^f "" 

^, H. 1.. l.e. History of Maryland C. .>-Prere.uis;:s; H. , J:^::. 

colS Trylan/ "'""' °' *'' '°''"^^'' ''"''''^-^ -o-mic history of 

inrrern"tnforp:ti%^^^^^^^^^ '^-^^"~ -^ -'e as a state 

(Dozer.) 



HISTORY 



301 



H, 127, 128. Latin American History (2, 2) — Prerequisites, 6 hours of 
fundamental courses. 

First semester, a survey of colonial history of Latin America through the 
wars of independence. 

Second semester, the history of the Latin American states from the wars 
of independence to the present, with special attention to Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico, and their relations to the United States. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Dozer.) 

H. 131. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3). 

A brief survey of the ancient empires of Egypt and the Near East, fol- 
lowed by a fuller treatment of Greek history and culture. Summer, Spring. 

(Highby.) 
H. 132. History of Rome (3). 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through the 
republican period and down to the third century of the empire. Fall. 

(Highby.) 

H. 133, 134. Medieval Civilization (3, 3) — Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, or the 

permission of the instructor. 

A study of the medieval period, with emphasis on its life, culture, and 
institutions. First semester, from the fall of Rome to about the end of the 
eleventh century; second semester, the twelfth, thirteenth, and later cen- 
turies. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Holm.) 

H. 135, 136. The Foundations of Modern Culture (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 
H. 1 f s, or the permission of the instructor. 

First semester, the Renaissance and the Reformation; second semester, 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will stress the cul- 
tural achievements in science, the arts, and literature during the different 
periods from 1250 to 1789, set in each case against the social, economic, 
and political background. While of primary interest to history majors, the 
course also aims to be useful to students in the other humanities. Fall, 
Spring. (Holm.) 

H. 137, 138. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2, 2) — Prerequisite, 
H. 1 f s, or equivalent. 
First semester. Revolutionary France and its influence on Europe. 

Second semester, the Napoleonic regime and the balance of power. Fall, 
Spring. (Silver.) 

H. 139, 140. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914 (3, 3)— Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 f s, or equivalent. 

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the World War. Summer, Spring. 

(Strakhovsky.) 



302 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HOME ECONOMICS . 



803 



H. 143, 144. Europe since 1914 (3, 3)— Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, or equiv. 
alent. 

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of 
Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two World 
Wars. Sunmier, Fall. (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 151, 152. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3, 3) — Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 f s, or equivalent. 

A study of European diplomacy, imperialism, and power politics since 
the Franco-Prussian War. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 155, 156. History of Central Europe (3, 3)— Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, 
or equivalent. 

The history of Central Europe from 1600 to the World War, with special 
emphasis on Germany and Austria. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Prange.) 

H. 157, 158. Central Europe in the World Today (2, 2)— Prerequisite, 
H. 1 f s, or equivalent. 

An analysis of the origin, the philosophical bases, and the influence of 
National Socialism and Hitler. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
problems involved in the present world conflict. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Prange.) 

H. 161, 162. History of the Near East (2, 2)— Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, 
or equivalent. 

First semester, a study of the Balkans and of Turkey to the Congress of 
Berlin in 1878. Second semester, a study of the Balkan states and Turkey 
from 1878 to the present. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 163, 164. History of Russia (2, 2) — Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, or equiv- 
alent. 

A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. (Not 
offered 1942-43.) (Strakhovsky.) 

H. 171, 172. History of the British Empire (3, 3)— Prerequisite, H. 1 f s, 
or equivalent. 

First semester, the rise of the Old Mercantilistic Empire in the East and 
West, and its decline in the period of the American Revolution. 

Second semester, the evolution of Greater Britain from Empire to Com- 
monwealth of Nations. Sunmier, H. 172. (Silver.) 

H. 181. The Far East (3). 

A survey of institutional, cultural, and political aspects of the history 
of China and Japan, and a consideration of present-day problems of the 
Pacific area. Summer. (Gewehr.) 



For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (2-4) 

Summer, Fall, Spring. 



-Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

(Staff.) 



. 4 ^ -^o^ History C2^— Conferences and reports in 
H 201. Seminar in American History W ^o (Staff.) 

A required course for all graduate students xna.onng - ^Amencan 

"Hu. Historical Method and Bibliography: «-•»-« "^^J^^^'^J^ 
A required course for all graduate students -,ormg ^.nju^opean 

history. Summer, Fall. Spnng. discussions and 

H. 225. Seminar in European H'^t^'-y/^^-Ro^nd ^^^^^ 

reports on specified topics. Summer, Fall, Sprmg. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Textiles and Clothing 

Textiles 
n V ^^ Textiles (3)-Two recitations; one laboratory. 

P., Ad,.„«. „„d»,„d„..- .nd G„d...„ ^^^ 

„. E. 17. Cn.am„ P""'^^^ "„^'^'^f„, 'ft. inrtr«*r. 
l.b«»tory. Pmeqms,... H. E 16 or »n« toishings; 

torv fee, $3.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

\ .A -^ T*.xtiles (3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 
H. E. 171. Advanced Textiles W ^ 

Prerequisites, H. E. 15, Chem. ^f ^Jj^/J^f /j;,^^,,^^ in textiles; textile 

"HTm^Xri in Textiles C3)-0ne recitation; two laboratories. 
X'elimlit^lwori" textiles. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fall, Spring. 



304 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Clothing 
H. E 11 A. Clothing (3)_Three laboratories. Prerequisite H. E 15 

instructor. construction. Prerequisite, H. E. 15, or consent of 

stis;t izilil':z'tir r' r "{ •='""'"^^'=^^' ^^^^-^ -- 

Spring. garments. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Summer, Fall; Fall, 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H "e. u. «'k rr,t "sr "'-"•™ '""»•'»"-• """'«'*= 

Spring. i-^Doratory fee, $3.00. Summer, Fall, 

H."E.^lll"!;eq^^eTt.''' '''"*'"" '''-'''''''' ^^^°-t""- ^-equisite 

Em?h'i;rs'isX:J';;LtSn"' '^™^n^' ^"'^^^^•^-^^ ^'^'^^^^ p-^'-- 

initfative and'accuracrLp'red^ "'"'"" °^ '"^^^"^'^ -<1 *"« 

oratory fee, $2.50. Spring Performance of the projects. Lab- 

11 Ao!*na ''*""" """'"" '''-''^'° laboratories. Prerequisites H. E. 

fonZTZ:r:tfjoTT:::V^^^^ ^^^^'°''-"* -<» -e of a 

of one design in maJng a earment TT" ? "''"' ""'^ *='°th; application 
s maKing a garment. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Fall 

or n B. "'• '""'"""" ^'^-^"^ laboratories. Prerequisite H. E. 11 A 

tor'/JetS IprilT ''™'"'^ "''"'""^ ^^^^^^--' ^^»- Labora- 
Practical Art 
H. E. 21. Design (3)_Three two-hour laboratories 



HOME ECONOMICS 



305 



H. E. 24. Costume Design (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite H. E. 

21, or equivalent. 

Clothing selection with relation to personality. Adaptation of changing 
fashions to the individual. Designing of costumes in mediums such as 
Conte and lithograph crayon, transparent and opaque water color, soft 
pencil, colored crayon, India ink, and three-dimensional materials. Survey 
of the fashion industry. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

H. E. 25. Simple Crafts (2) — Two two-hour laboratories. 

Creative art expressed in clay modeling, plaster carving, metal working, 
paper mache modeling, wood burning, etc. Emphasis is laid upon inexpen- 
sive materials and tools and simple techniques, which can be pursued in the 
home. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Summer. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. 120. Advertising Layout and Store Coordination (2) — Two two- 
hour laboratories. Prerequisite, H. E. 21, or equivalent. 

Lettering, elementary figure sketching, and freehand perspective drawing 
applied to graphic advertising in the field of each student's major interest. 
Discussion of department and specialty store organization; lectures by retail 
executives from Baltimore and Washington. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Fall. 

H. E. 121, 122. Interior Design (3, 3) — First semester, two lectures, one 
two-hour laboratory; second semester, three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
H. E. 21, or equivalent; H. E. 121 is prerequisite to H. E. 122. 

Analysis of interiors as backgrounds for various personalities. Study of 
good and poor interiors, traditional styles in furnishings, and new develop- 
ments in contemporary housing. Trips to historic homes, a furniture fac- 
tory, and retail house furnishing establishments. In second semester, floor 
plans and wall elevations drawn to scale and rendered in color. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00 each semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

H. E. 123, 124. Advanced Interior Design (2, 2) — ^Two two-hour labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. 21, H. E. 121, 122, or equivalent. 

Designing of rooms, including interior architecture, furniture, fabrics, 
accessories; scale drawing and color rendering in plan, elevation and per- 
spective. A study of furniture manufacture and merchandising. Planning 
of exhibition rooms or houses when possible. Fee, $2.00 each semester. 
H. E. 123, Fall; H.. E. 124, Spring, Summer. 

H. E. 125. Merchandise Display (2) — Two two-hour laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 21, or equivalent. 

Practice in effective display of merchandise through the use of five dis- 
play windows built into the home economics building. Cooperation with 
retail establishments. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 






306 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



H. E. 127, 128. Advanced Costume Design r2 9^ t^ 
tones. Prerequisite, H. E. 21, H. ^ZaZ.^I^ZT^^'' ^"""'^""'^ '^^'-a- 

of original drapfng on tlfdre ^ form Lh ^^^^r ""'^- """^ ^^"'^^t^'^ 
H. E. 127, Fa..; h": E. 128, SmerSpring: " '^^' ^'■'' ^^'^'^ ^^-t- 

Wl-fs! Mkt mrH^t'S ^^^-^--'^"-"-. Speech 1 f s, Eng. , u, 

ctrr^iranTrSxr™^^^^^^^ 

fee, $2.00. Summer, Spring '°'' '" ^'^'"'=^' ^^*- Laboratory 

toL^llji:::;^, eXTs: ^r'^^ ^^^-^^'^ *-^°- >^''- 

Sutm^^'^SHprini ^" ^'^ ''''''' "^ '"-^''-'^-- Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

^■l'S:^-lim2!:T^S.^^ ^t 3) Prerequisites, 
this course. ' ' ^^ ^^^' ^^8, must precede or parallel 

l^^t::Z\\t:t^^^ '^ ^ '^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^-^^^ -ajor interest 

I'ory lee, 4>J.OO each semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. ^^^^^^s^' 

Home Economics Extension 

dir!;tt'SVe'JSTK:,"raL^:r1nn^"^'"" ^^>-«-- -'^er the 
Spring. ^^"^' ^"^ specm.ists. Prerequisite, senior standing. 

Home and Institution Management 

ora'I^r^y. '''' '''' Management of the Home (3, 3)-Two lectures; one lab- 

and civic housing pro jects hous^n^.f f T^ "^ /' ^ '^'^^^ P"^^^^"^^* ^^^^'^^ 
financing a home Se ectTo^ and c-^^^^^^ IV' '""^^^^' ^-^^-^ -^ 

ings. Fall, Spring; Spring' Summer "''^' '^"'^"^^^ ^^ ^--^^^- 



^OM^ ECONOMICS 



307 



H. E. 143. Practice in Management of the Home (3) — Prerequisites, 
H. E. 141, 142. 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
l,er of the faculty and a small group of students for approximately one- 
third of a semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

H. E. 144 f s. Institution Management (6) — Prerequisites, H. E. 31 f s, 
141, 142, 131. The last three may be taken concurrently. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service in dormi- 
tories; organization of institution laundries. Institutional accounting and 
purchasing of supplies, furnishings and equipment. Summer, Fall; Fall, 
Spring. 

H. E. 145. Practice in Institution Management (3) — Prerequisite, H. E. 

144 f s. 

Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 
room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. This must be done under direction for 
not less than six weeks full time. 

H. E. 146. Advanced Institution Management (3) — Two recitations 
weekly and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite, H. E. 

144 f s. 

Special problems in institution management. Spring. 

H. E. 147. Institution Cookery (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 31 f s, 137, 131. 

Application of principles of food preparation to large quantity cookery; 
study of standard technics; menu planning and costs; standardization of 
recipes; use of institutional equipment; practice in cafeteria counter service. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. Fall, Spring. 

H. E. 148. The School Lunch (2) — Two laboratories. Prerequisites, H. E. 
31 f s, H. E. 131. 

The educational and nutritional aspects of the school lunch and its 
administration; equipment, finances and accounting; planning and prepara- 
tion of menus. Summer, Spring. 

Foods and Nutrition 

H. E. 30 f s. Introductory Foods Study (6) — One recitation; two labora- 
tories. 

Elementary food selection and preparation for students not majoring in 
home economics. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per semester. Fall, Spring; Spring, 
Summer. 



i| 






308 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



( W i fV ^- ^'^^ ^«^-^- -^*««-.- two laboratories. Prerequisite 

■ uets. Laboratory fee. ROoTe/^Llr i^rSpIS 1 ^^^"'^"^ '''^^- 
H. E. 32. Elements of Nutrition (3) ' ''' ''™"' '""^-'• 

ni4raL^r.?;t:rr--'- ;-rs- - - .aitb. ... 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
H. E. 131. Nutrition (3)_Prerequisites H E 9i f r>v, 
A scientific study of Drincinl«= I v. '' ^''^'"- ^2 A f s. 

cy pnnciples of human nutrition. Fall, Spring. Sum- 

kWu'- •''^'^"'^ <^>-^- Citations; one laboratory. Prerequisite. 
A study of food selection for healfTi. r.io • 

«. t^. 134. Advanced Foods r3^ Or,^ %. .• ^P^ng. 

«. E. 135. Experimental Poods (-4) Tw^ ,. .. 

TT d"''' ""• ^- '' ' '' ''^' Chem ^ If recitations; two laboratories. 

PractL-inMnt' Sry-ferST S^eT^X""' ^^«--- 
4isH;.'H.- E^^m ''"'''"'•" ^^>-^- -stations; one 'laboratory. Pre- 

and clinics. Pall. Spring. ""''^"y ''^'^^'''' '" children's hospitals 

labo;ato'riel'' Pr^r^uiSl E^ffl ^'''''' ^*^~°"" recitation; two 

fary%r1urrrX;rr nu-tSUtn-eT ^"h^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^ 
entertaining. Laboratory fee $7 00 ^ ^"*^ '"'*• ^"<=>"des simple 

H P i,« ,.• Summer. Pall. Spring. 

H- E. 138. Diet in Disea<iP r^\ r\ 
requisite, H. E. 131. (3)_0ne recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 

Modification of thp nWn/>ir^l^ -e i 



HORTICULTURE ^ 309 

For Graduates 
H. E. 201. Seminar in Nutrition (2). 

Oral and written reports on current literature of nutrition. Spring. 

H. E. 202. Research — Credit to be determined by amount and quality of 
work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The result may form the 
basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. 

H. E. 203. Advanced Experimental Foods (3) — One recitation; two lab- 
oratories. 

Individual experimental problems. Special emphasis on use of Maryland 
products. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Spring. 

H. E. 204. Readings in Nutrition (2). 

Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and investi- 
gations. Fall. 

H. E. 205. Nutrition (3) — One recitation; laboratory by arrangement. 

Feeding experiments are conducted on laboratory animals to show effects 
of diets of varying compositions. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Mahoney, Schrader, Thurston, Walls; Associate Professors 
Haut, Lincoln, Shoemaker; Dr. Hitz, Mr. Bailey, Mr. Fossum, 

Mr. Shutak. 

Hort. 1. General Horticulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, sophomore standing. 

A foundation course planned to give the student a background of methods 
used in the commercial production of fruits and vegetables. The production 
problems of the commercial growers are presented to acquaint the student 
with a general outlook on the future of the industry in the state and in the 
country as a whole. The laboratory work consists of actual practice by the 
student on the various procedures used by successful producers of fruits and 
vegetables. Summer, Spring. 

Hort. 2. General Horticulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, sophomore standing. 

One-half of semester is devoted to a consideration of the landscape de- 
velopment of the suburban home and farmstead, so as to increase the use- 
fulness, efficiency and attractiveness of such areas. Simple and practical 
information is given covering the proper arrangement of trees, shrubs, 
and flowers; the location and construction of walks and drives; planting 



i( 



310 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

_ 'I 1 • 



methods; lawn builrf* 

«g, Plant feeding and W 3 df "^ '"'^ "laintenance problems as 
-ork and p,an making. ^"<^ '^'^-^ -"trols. Illustrated ,X^/^^;- 

The second half of fi, ' "®^^ 

Wort. 3. Fruit Production (2-3)-On. I . 

nnt ?^^ °' commercial varieties and r?"''' ""' '"' *^" '-^oratories 
Pnnciples and practices i„ ^"^"5^ and the harvesting ffradir,., j 
to the actual IZTT ^''^^ ^™'t Production Or,» f^^^^^' and storage 
field trips to LmZ? '"^'"^^'^ ^" t^ese orchard nri'^"'"*''^^ ^« ^^^Z 

A continuation of Hon ? , j ^ 

<'.'^.wz;i;i:r».Xiv„*''»'- <"vo,„.wo p^„«on ^i. 

production anH t.To>,* ^^ ^maintenance of '^c^^^ % ^." ^* -^^^s course 

and storage the f, ^!°^"^ structures, methods I 1^^'*^' ^^'^^'' P'ant 

-arket Sr menTs ." ^7 / ^"^^^ *^P- and t^rie" ^t"' 'f" ^^«"^ 
insect peste anH X •' ^ <Jiscussion of the mnr-/- *** S"'* various 

use, as wen as on a"' '""*'"'' ''"^^'^' ^^-^^1^1^"' ^'''^'' ^^^ 
T «!, . commercial scale. ""^^^^table production for home 

■Liaooratory work will 
vegetable growine- W.L-"^^'" P^'actical exercises in fh. u 
insure an adeo^Ttl' .^"/'''"^ out of detailed nlanc ^ .^^"''^ Phases of 
the maintenance o1 f dJ"^^^ ^^ '^^ ^amfly'Sl bt^!/^™ ^-'^-. *» 

of a demonstration garden. sSne%'f^""""''' ^^ ^«" ^« 
Hort. 6. Greenhouse Constr„.f '"^'■• 

one laboratory. ^— ^- and Management (3)-Two lectures; 

A detailed consideration r.f 
ment; location with rtsZtf ""^r^' *^P^« «^ ^^ouses and fh.' 
tion, and cost^ J\^^F• *^ ^'^^^ and market<;. IT *^^''' "^a^age- 



HORTICULTURE 



311 



Hort. 7. Greenhouse Management (3-4) — Two or three lectures; one 
laboratory. No prerequisite. 

A continuation of Hort. 6. Fall. 

Hort. 8. Small Fruits (2-3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Lectures 
may be taken without laboratory. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of the 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, black- 
berries, cranberries, etc. Plant characteristics, varieties, propagation, site 
and soils, planting, soil management, fruiting habits, pruning, fertilizers, 
harvesting, and marketing receive consideration. Spring. 

Hort. 9. Garden Flowers (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous peren- 
nials, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 
Summer, Spring. 

Hort. 10 f s. Commercial Floriculture (6-7) — Two lectures; one or two 
laboratories. Prerequisites, Hort. 6, 7. 

Methods of handling florists' bench crops and potted plants, the market- 
ing of cut flowers, the retail business, and floral design and decoration. 
Trips to important commercial centers and flower shows will be made. 
Spring, Summer. 

Hort. 11. Landscape Gardening (2). 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their ap- 
plication to private. and public areas. Special consideration is given to the 
improvement and beautification of the home grounds, farmsteads, and small 
suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to specialize in 
landscape, but who wish some theoretical and practical knowledge of the 
subject. Summer. 

Hort. 12. Landscape Design (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 11. 

A consideration of the principles of general landscape design supple- 
mented by direct application in the drafting room. Attention is given to 
the reading of plans, practice in lettering, and the technique, of landscape 
drafting. Practice in obtaining field data by various expedient methods is 
given and field trips to observe local examples, illustrating the principles of 
landscape design, will be taken. Simple landscape sketch plans will be pre- 
pared applying the principles of walk and drive locations, the arrangement 
of trees, shrubs and flowers and other items incident to the landscape de- 
velopment of small home-grounds. Summer, Fall. 

Hort. 13. Landscape Design (3)— Three laboratories. Prerequisite. 
Hort. 12. 

A continuation of Hort. 12 f with more advanced application. The solu- 
tion of original landscape problems in the development of home-grounds 



+i 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ation will be given to the princ ^ of Zt^ «>« development. Conside . 
plans will be prepared. The deE of fSt ^ ^'^ ^"^ "'"'P'^ Planting 
^ns used in landscape co^^tilZiT:: ^i^^f Z' '""f *^r^' ^" 
grading plans and constructive drawinJ^ ^iifT 1 '^°''^' ^"*^ simple 

scape architecture, but are desio-n^H V k l^, / ^^'°"^' P'"*'^"«=e °f land- 
some training i„ 'landscape ZfSV:Jlt'^'V\^^^^^ "^° '"-y « '" 
related occupations. IncluL wouTd beTrservZ fl '". '^"""'"^ "^''^^ 
deners, park, estate, and cempt^rv J, "".'^^/'^y'"^"' Aonsts, landscape gar- 

and students of hom; econoSst^^^^^^^^^^ '^"^^^ •=""*'-^- 

for landscape design and who wish to follow tL T P^^^''^"'*'* «P«tude 
complete the course elsewhere. Spri^ Summer P^-o^^^^ionally may 

Hort. 14. Civic Art (2). 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
' -?- lectrelrot^alraTr^' ''*"^^^^"^ "^ «"'"-""-' ^-P« (3) 

grades and grading Tf raw pro£ "^n '"H"^ °' ^^"^ ^"'^ """^ b--' 
ing, such as washing, sfzTng atd bl/.^"^" i"' ^'°''''^^^ ^r treez- 

freezing and storage of frosted fonHn'"^' "^^^"^^ «^ processing and 
-ioring i„ agricuLe,^ifetr Js,?rrt:i.:gr^^^^^ ^^"'"^^ 

onf lalratry'"'"'^'^''^ ^'"^-"-^'^ -" floriculture (2)-0ne lecture; 

bro^adl3 X^:f ev^eU^n: 'Z^ ? '"^^ ^ "^ -ees. shrubs, 
in ornamental plantings. Pra^ct ca, JeZd " cuT"""' ''^"^""^ ^'^"'^ 
tion specifically pertaining to home TropertL and „">:> """"' '"'^ P'^P"^" 
sized. Included will be demonstratinnf ^ P^^^blems will be empha- 

and design of cut flowerfrS home it^TT ^" '""^ arrangement 
develop a design and planting Inlo; fv. ""^""^ ^"' ''« ^«<J"i^«<l ^ 

Juniors and Seniors in all co.lJgL of t^e vZZ^.'^ZZ.r'''''' '"^ ^" 



HORTICULTURE 



313 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Fruits) (2, 2)— 

prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

A critical analysis is mad* of research work in horticulture and allied 
work in plant physiology, chemistry, and botany, the results of which are 
interpreted with respect to their application in commercial production. 
Fundamental principles involved in growth, fruiting, storage, and quality 
of horticultural plants and products are stressed. Fall, Spring. (Haut.) 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Horticultural Plants. (Vegetables) (2, 2) 

—Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

These courses are described under Hort. 101, 102. Fall, Spring. 

(Mahoney.) 

Hort. 105. Technology of Horticultural Plants (Ornamentals) (2) — 

Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

A study of the physiological plant processes as related to the growth, 
flowering, storage, etc., of floricultural and ornamental plants. A critical 
analysis and interpretation of the result of research studies dealing with 
water relations, temperature relations, photoperiodism, rest period, soils, 
fertilizers, and mineral deficiencies on ornamental crops. The applications 
pertaining to commercial production receive special consideration. Fall. 

(Haut.) 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (2). 

A study of the tropical and subtropical fruits and nuts of economic im- 
portance. The orange, lemon, grapefruit, pineapple, banana, date, fig, olive, 
avocado, papaya, mango, walnut, pecan, almond, filbert, tung nut, Brazil 
nut, cashew, and cocoanut receive consideration. Special emphasis is placed 
upon the botanical relationships, composition, varieties, climatic and cultural 
requirements, methods and problems of production, and the development 
and present commercial status of those grown in the United States and its 
possessions. Spring. (Haut.) 

Hort. 107 f s. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 

A field or laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental 
plantings. Spring, Summer. (Thurston.) 

Hort. 108. Canning Crops Technology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Hort. 16, Pit. Phys. 101. 

A course dealing with the more technical physico-chemical methods used 
in the study of the fundamentals or factors influencing the quality of raw 
products; physiological processes prior to and after blanching; and grade 
of processed product. In addition, studies will be made of new types of 
equipment and recent research on methods of processing. Visits to canning 
plants and commercial laboratories will be required. Fall. 

(Mahoney, Walls.) 



1 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Hort.no. Systematic Olericulture <^?% rr ' , ^^aut.) 

A study of the classification "7 T"° ""''"' ""^ '^^'^^^^ory. 

the description and identmcatTon ^f ^rTeS'' Th "^T'^'^^^' '^^^P^' -<• 

to different environmental cond"ti\)nrrH .v," • ^ ^^^P^^tion of varieties 

production. Summer. '""'"^'^'^^^ and their special uses in vegetable 

Hort. Ill f s. Seminar (2) ^^^"'•' 

Hort. 112. Special Problems (2-4)_Cred,> «. ^- ^^*^'^-^ 

An advanced student in any of the H ^ ^"^ *° ^""'^ ^''"«- 

a special problem for study. This mav tZT" 1^ ^"''"^^'t^'-e may select 

available knowledge on a partkuirr ' ^hl *^.' summarizing of all the 

new problem. Where original Sst/a«ot^ *'.' investigation of some 

m most cases start the work during the -J^r J" T' *" '*"**^"* ^''o"" 

ing the junior year. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Graduates (Staff.) 

^^Hort. 201. 202. Experimental Pomology ^ 2>-Pre're,uisite, Pit. Phys. 

-i^'^^::^eS^::^SJ,S-^^^^^ -d opinion as to prac- 
ogy and results of experiments that h!, k ^^P^^'^e^tal work in pomol- 

al. experiment stations LthisldoSrtrntrieT ^T,'''^' ^°"^-*^<l ^" 

Hort. 203. 204. Experimental Olericulture 2 2) p' ': ''''''''''' 

101. """re CA ^)— Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 

done:r:o1ls"SrerS^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ experimental work 

rest period and dormanc^, and ana om^.; ^. ^"^ temperature relations, 
may be applied to the Jeld of vel^Hl ^"'^ '""'•Pho'ogical studies which 
used in research are discussed. S Sprfn""'''' ^^^^"^^ ^"*^ techniques 

Hort. 205. Experimental Pomology (2) ' (Mahoney.) 

A continuation of Hort. 201, 202. Spring 

Hort 206. Experimental Olericulture C2) Tw , . (Schrader.) 

Zool. 120, Pit. Phys. 101, or equivalent ^^~^^° 'e"*"'-^^- Prerequisites, 

A course dealing with the fiAlH «f * 
ture. Sprinff. ^ ^^^^ °^ cyto-genetics in relation to horticul- 

(Mahoney.) 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



315 



Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. 

Methods in use by horticultural research workers in the United States 
and foreign countries are discussed in detail, critically evaluating such 
methods for use in solving present problems. Discussion of photographic 
technique, application of statistical procedures, physical measurements, plot 
designs, survey methods, and experimental materials will be emphasized. 
Fall. (Staff.) 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (4, 6, or 8) — Credit given 
according to work done. 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original re- 
search in pomology, vegetable gardening, or floriculture. These problems 
will be continued until completed and final results will be in the form of a 
thesis. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar (1). 

Oral reports with illustrative material are required on special topics or 
recent research publications in horticulture. Discussion by the students and 
staif members during and after each report is an essential part of the 
seminar. The aim of this course is to develop ability to analyze and to pre- 
sent research results orally as well as to review recent advances in horti- 
culture. Summer, Fall; Spring, Summer. (Staff.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Hintz; Mr. Fogg, Mr. Rovelstad. 

L. S. 1. Library Methods (1). 

This course is intended to help students use libraries with greater facility 
and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of lectures and practical 
work, is designed to interpret the library and its resources to the student. 
The course considers the classification of books in libraries, the card 
catalogue, periodical literature and indexes, and certain essential reference 
books which will be found helpful throughout the college course and in 
later years. Summer, Spring, Fall. 

L. S. 2. Sources of Business Information (1). 

This course deals with the techniques and practices necessary to the 
efficient location of business information and the intelligent evaluation of 
sources of commercial data. Primarily intended for students in the College 
of Commerce but open to others. Not open to those who have received credit 
for L. S. 1. Fall. 






316 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Dantzip- aqo^. 

Jwath. 1. Introductory Algebra (n\ tu 

year of high school algebra On! ^f^^-^hree lectures. Prerequisite onp 
Chemistry and physics" t^o lacrthTltruirTr *" ^*"^^"*^ "^ -^--ri; 

equations. polynomLTs and tSe^f ''!Lr'*""'' «™"'taneous quadratic 
exponentials and logarithnTs. !«/„:?. J^^^^^^^ "'"«'"'«• theorem! 

Math. 2. Solid Geometry (0) Tw i / 
etry. Open to students in engine^I? Jf^TV '■''■''^"''"^' P'^"« ^^o"" 
Offer the entrance credit of olSl^^ZilZ^Zt?^'''''' ^'^ '^ ""' 
^ Ws and Planes, cylinders and, cones, the sph^pShedra. Su..er. 

Math. 3. Plane and Snhprinai t- • 
Prerequisite, high school a^gebTa coIXt^r''' ''' '' '^'^^^^ '-*"- 
Students with credit in Mnfii q -n 

students With credit in Math, t wni^lr^ii:!? 1 '°^ '"^^^ — 
Pln^^ rp . ^^°^^ ^^^ *his course. 

and oblique, logarithms. SSmefll!T'"l' '°'""°" °^ t"'^"^'- -'^ht 
equations. ' '''^"*"'eS' graphs, and solution of trigonometric 

Spherical Triqonometmi ■ q«i, *• 

Math. 4. Soherical T,.i„ x ' ' i^^^n^. 

Math. 3, or 2i;or eTu^^^^^^^ ^^ ^-^-tion (3)-Prerequisite 

inJi^s;rSa\%^^^^^^^^^^^^ o^ers the student intensive train- 

matical principles uLer^ naSa L'""?"" "^" '^ ^^^^ ^" ^^^ ^^t^- 

Math. 5. Genera, MathenL^ ^P """' "^'"^ ''^'""• 
algebra. Required of all students in the CoE nIV"' "^"^^ '^ ^'^^ ^^'^^^ 

This course acquaints the student w^thth^^^^^ 7"^"'" 
essary for the study of statistics anrfinaLe^^^^^^^^^^ "mathematics nee- 
linear equations, ratios, proportion ilv.r ^ ^''^'''^ ^^^^^^^ include 

exponents and radicals logaSms' u e of th'' ^'^'''' '""'^''^'^ ^^--'^^^^ 
tions, graphs, arithme ic proirSon. I .' '^^ ^^"' quadratic equa- 
theorem and elements of stSEs Tall "' Progressions, binomial 



MATHEMATICS 



317 



Math. 6. General Mathematics (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 4. Required of 
all students in the College of Commerce. 

This course includes mathematical topics essential in the problems of 
finance, compound interest, compound discount, annuities, amortization 
funds, sinking funds, valuation of bonds, depreciation, probability, mor- 
tality tables and their application of insurance. Spring. 

Math. 7. Solid Geometry (2) — Prerequisite, plane geometry. This course 
is designed to prepare a student for teaching geometry in high school and 
is open to students in the College of Education. 

Lines and planes, cylinders and cones, the sphere, polyhedra, geometry 
on the sphere, regular solids. Summer, Fall. 

Math. 8. Elements of College Mathematics (3) — Prerequisite, at least 
one year of high school algebra. Required of biological, premedical and 
predental students. 

Algebra: Quadratic equations, theory of equations, exponentials, loga- 
rithms, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations. Trigonometry: 
trigonometric functions, solution of triangles, trigonometric equations and 
identities. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Math. 9. Elements of College Mathematics (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 8 
or equivalent. Required of biological, premedical and predental students. 

Analytic geometry: Cartesian coordinates, the straight line, the circle, 
the ellipse, graphing of elementary algebraic, exponential and logarithmic 
functions. Calculus: elementary theory of differentiation and integrations. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Math. 18 f s. Pictorial Geometry (4) — Two lectures. Required of stu- 
dents whose major is mathematics, and of students in the College of Edu- 
cation with mathematics as their major or minor. 

The story of geometry, classical and modern synthetic and analytic, pre- 
sented by means of drawings and models made by the students themselves. 
Fall, Spring. 

Math. 21. College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry (4) — ^Three lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and satisfac- 
tory passing of a qualifying examination. Required of all students in the 
College of Engineering; of students whose major is mathematics, physics, 
or chemistry; "of students in the College of Education who elect mathematics 
as their major or minor. 

Algebra: binomial and multinomial expansions; progressions; deter- 
minants; combinatorial analysis and probabilities; complex numbers; the- 
ory of equations ; exponential functions and logarithms. 

Plane Trigonometry: Trigonometric functions, solution of triangles 
right and oblique, logarithms, and solution of trigonometric equations. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 



318 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Math. 22. Analytic Geometry (i^ tk^ i x 
requisite. Math. 21 or equrvalent r7„ ! T""'^'' °"" '^bo^atory. p,, 
of Engineering; of students whoL mSor" °f tf n^'^"*^ ^" '"'^'^^C 
istry; of students in the ColIeroTEdur^. T**'"'' P'^^'^'^^' ^^ chem 
their major or minor. ^ Education who elect mathematics as 

^^^^i^^iiSt::i:zts:n;^z ^^-- — of the seco. 

analytic geometry. Summer, FaS S^nn"" """''' P-'»dograms; solid 

sitfs! MaS. 8 or 2t'22 or ^"1,^? £1""^ "^ '^'^^"*'''-^- ^--qui- 
lege of Engineering of studentTS ^T-'"^"^ ^" ^^^^^^^^^ '» the ?ol- 
chemistry; of students in the cJl^ of EdTcIt"" ""Tr''"'' P^^^^-- "^ 
as their major or minor. ^ Education who elect mathematics 

elemS^fcti^ltVrJ^II:;^^^^^^ -•"-'• eurvatu.. 

tives. Indefinite and defi'^iteTn'Ss Sl'T"^^^ P^^'^' '^--- 
arcs, areas, volumes, and momenfs ^inT ^ integrals ; calculation of 
Fall, Spring; Spring! Summer ' "^ ''°" '" '""^^ Summer. Pall; 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

At^e' ^ZTlTrT '''"- ^''^'•--' «*-"-"' C2). 
biological and soTal scie^t td fo"'*''™^"*=^ '"^^^'^^'^ ^- -^^cers in 
and physics. (Not offered T9V43 j Prospective teachers of mathematics 

Jath. e2. college Mathematics (2)-Prerequisite. Math, ei Te::! 

wolTsTn%reTo4riSLT^^^^^^^^ ^"^ *^^ -^-'-. ^-"tended for 

school mathematics a^d phy:rcr;Nroff:rX9ST ^^''^'^^^n"' '''\ 

Math. ea. History of Elementary Mathematics (2) '' 

23?:ortiv°a;!r'^' "'•"^"""^ '- ^-^-- (3)-Prerequisite, Math 

neJri^ ITdelTra^ti^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ the College of Engi- 

theory and practice. Amonf the f ^ T^*''' "^^'"^ ^"«« i» engineering 
differential equations ; advanced 3^^ '1"'^ '''' ^°"''"'"^= "-- 
applications of analy'sis to eleJtrS' IVfts Z^^^'Z ""' '^^™'=^' 
design, etc. Summer, Fall, Spring "^^^^^^' ^ aero-dynamics, bridge 

Math fii? /!„ I- J ^ ■ ' (Martin, Newell.) 

math. 65. Applied Calculus for Chemists fi^ t> ■ -. 

or equivalent. '-nemists (3)— Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s 



MATHEMATICS 



319 



and practise of chemistry. Among the topics treated are the following: 
partial and total derivatives; applications of mathematical analysis to 
thermo-dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physical 
chemistry. Spring. (Lancaster.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 116. Advanced Trigonometry (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or 
equivalent. 

Complex numbers; De Moivre, Euler and allied identities; trigonometric 
series and infinite products; graphing of periodic functions; hyperbolic 
trigonometry; trigonometric solution of equations; principles of sperical 
trigonometry. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 123. Vector Analysis (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Scalars, vectors, matrices and determinants; transformations; linear 
dependence; canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geometry 
and mechanics. Summer. (Alrich.) 

Math. 130. Analytical Mechanics (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s. 

Statics, equilibrium of a point and of flexible cords, virtual work, kine- 
matics, dynamics of a particle, elementary celestial mechanics. Summer. 

(Martin.) 

Math. 131. Analytical Mechanics (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or 

equivalent. 

Lagrangrian equations for dynamical systems of one, two and three degrees 
of freedom. Hamilton's principle. The Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential 
equation. Fall. (Martin.) 

Math. 132. Theory of Probabilities and Least Squares (2) — Prerequisite, 
Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Frequency and probability, combinatorial analysis, addition and multi- 
plication theorems, geometrical probability, inverse probability, applica- 
tions to statistics and the theory of errors. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Lancaster.) 

Math. 140. Seminar (4) — Open to juniors and seniors majoring in math- 
ematics and graduate students. 

This course is devoted to special topics not taken up in the regularly 
scheduled courses. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Math. 141. Higher Algebra (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Identities; multinomial expansion; combinatorial analysis; mathematical 
induction; undetermined coefficients; determinants; elementary theory of 
equations ; complex magnitudes. Summer. (Nilson.) 

Math. 142. Higher Algebra (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Inequalities; continued fractions; summation of series; difference equa- 
tions; theory of numbers; diophantine equations. Fall. (Nilson.) 



4 



4 






ii 



Vi 



320 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Math. 143. Advanced Calculus rs^ t> 
alent. ^aiculus (2) -Prerequisite, Math. 23 f s or equiy 

General methods of intee-ration • rv,, i^- i • 

nations. Summer. ' ' *"*^ '^"^^ic curves; Cremona transfer 

Complex numbers: fundampnfoi +1, 
third and fourth de^" aT/eta e tSnl/^^^^^'- ^''"^^-^ <'^ ^^^ 
numencal solution of equations- criteria „fT a Tf*'°""= ^""^ groups; 
tions. Spring. ' "'*^"* °^ irreducibility; cyclotomic equa- 

Math. 152. lntraAnrti^„ t >* . (Nilson.) 

2^? f o „ • ^f *x'"c»<>n to Modern Alffehra o\ t> 

^<J f s or equivalent. ^"gcDra (2)_Prerequisite, Math 

s™r^ -"""^ ««" O'p-*-. ™<i».ic ,.™., ,.„,„,„ „.,. 

Equations of the first avA^r-. t 

coefficients; change of varSlir sLlX"°"', T'* *=^"^*^"* ^"-l ^--ble 

numerical integration; ordinary difflrf^H, '"*'"""' ^°'"«''» >« series; 

partial differential equations. Summer ^^ equations in three variablesi 

Math. 154. Topics in Analysis r2^ P •■ (Lancaster.) 

alent. •'""'^'^ (2)_Prerequ.site, Math. 23 f s or equiv- 

Theory of vibrations "p 
improper integrals. Pall. °""'' '"""'' "^'""'"^ °^ variations; entropy; 
Math. 155. Introdurtinn #« d • .. (Lancaster.) 

23 f s or equivalent " '" "^"^'"^''^^ «^"-«'^> (2)-Prerequisite. Math. 

The theorems of Desarg-ues anrf Po^ 
projective theory of conies; prTect^veT/ "^f'^.^*'" «"d homography; 
of elementary geometry. Spring interpretation and generalization 

(Jackson.) 



MATHEMATICS 



321 



Math. 156. Introduction to Differential Geometry (2) — Prerequisite, 
Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; transformations; orthogonal 
trajectories; envelopes, roulettes and glissettes; curvilineal coordinates in 
the plane. Summer. (Jackson.) 

Math. 171. Applied Mathematical Analysis (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 
23 f s or equivalent. 

Intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in engineer- 
ing, mathematics, physics and chemistry. Ballistics, dynamical stability in 
flight, stress analysis, graphical statics, cryptography, and communications 
will be included among the subjects discussed. Summer. (Newell.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 220. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 143, 144 or equivalent. 

Complex numbers, power series, integration of analytic functions, Cauchy 
integral formula, Cauchy theory of analytic functions, special analytic 
functions. Summer. (Newell.) 

Math. 221. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Prerequi- 
site, Math. 220 or equivalent. 

Meromorphic functions, Weierstrass theory of analytic functions, analytic 
continuation and Riemann surfaces, conformal representation. Fall. 

(Newell) 

Math. 222. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Prerequisites, 
Math. 143, 144 or equivalent. 

Real numbers, continuous functions, differentiable functions, uniform con- 
vergence, implicit functions, Jacobians, the Riemann integral, infinite series, 
dominant functions, real analytic functions. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Martin.) 

Math. 224. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Prerequisite, 
Math. 222 or equivalent. 

Point sets, Heine-Borel theorem, content and measure of point sets, the 
Lebesque integral. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Martin.) 

Math. 225. Projective Geometry (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 155 or equiv- 
alent. 

Axiomatic development of geometry; fundamental theorems; projective 
equivalence; the group of collineations in the plane and in space; non- 
Euclidean geometries. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Jackson.) 

Math. 226. Differential Geometry (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 156 or equiv- 
alent. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves; kinematical applications; 
geometry on a surface; general theory of surfaces; curvature and space 
structure; Riemannian geometries. Fall. (Jackson.) 



\ 






% 



322 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 



323 



Math. 227. Infinite Processes (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 143, 144 or equiv- 
alent. 

Convergence of infinite series and products; Fourier series; orthogonal 
functions; asymptotic series. Spring. (Lancaster.) 

Math. 231. Partial Differential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Prerequisites, Math. 143, 144, 153, or equivalent. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Martin.) 

Math. 232. Theory of Probabilities and Least Squares (2) — Prerequisite, 
Math. 132 or equivalent. 

Frequency and probability; the concept of "equally likely"; combinatorial 
analysis; addition and multiplication theorems; Bemouilli's Theorem; con- 
tinuous probabilities; applications to statistics, to theories of errors and 
correlations, and to molecular theories. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Lancaster.) 

Math. 235. Modern Algebra (2) — Prerequisite, Math. 151, 152 or equiv- 
alent. 

Sets; classes; groups; isomorphism; rings; fields; Galois theory; ordered 
and well-ordered sets; ideals; linear algebras. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Nilson.) 

Math. 240. Graduate Colloquium. 

A forum for the presentation and critical discussion of mathematical 
research conducted by the faculty and advanced students. (Staff.) 

Math. 250. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (4) — Prerequisite, 
Math. 23 f s or equivalent. 

Celebrated Problems of Mathematics from antiquity to present day. 
History of individual mathematical disciplines such as the theory of num- 
bers, non-Euclidean geometry, vector and matrix analysis, theory of func- 
tions, theory of groups, theory of aggregates. Special emphasis will be 
laid on the evolution of mathematical concepts and principles. (Dantzig.) 
Selected Topics Courses 

In addition to the preceding, a number of courses will be offered from 
time to time by the various members of the staff in their respective fields 
of specialization. These courses are intended primarily for candidates for 
an advanced degree, and aim at developing materials for dissertations ; they 
will, however, be open to any qualified student. 

Math. 242. Selected Topics in Modern Geometry. 

(Dantzig, Jackson.) 

Math. 243. Selected Topics in Modern Analysis. 

(Lancaster, Newell, Nilson.) 



(Martin.) 
M..h. 24.. 5.I«W T.pi.. to "J''"";,^, pk,.,.^ (M.rti..) 

Math. 260. Research. preparation of a thesis 

The investigation of special problems and the pr ^^^^^ 

towards an advanced degree. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 



MILITARY «C...«v.. ^^^- ^ ^ ,^,,^, J,,. 

PHOFESSOK or MIUTABY SCIEKCE A^D TACTICS C ^^^^^^^ LxEUTENAKT 

A DISTANT PROFESSORS OF MILITARY bCIt-r^ CAPTAIN EDWARD F. 

M. I. 1 f 8- ^*«'' ^' ^' 

periods. . 4.- „* tV,f> R O. T. C, Military 

Spring; Spring, Summer. theoretical, three practical 

M. I. 2 f s. Basic R. O. T. C. (i> 

periods. ^ ^ , , ..j-r drill, Tactics of Rifle and 

First Semester: Close and extended order 

automatic rifle squad, Scoutmg and V^^f'^^^' tactics of 

sew Semeste^; ^^Z::! rT^CZ^^^^^^ S^^r. 
the squad in combat. Summer, r ai , 

For Advanced Undergraduates ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^, 

M. L 50 f s. Advanced R. O. 1. ^' ^^^ 

periods. Junior Year. leadership. Weapons, in- 

First Semester: Principles fj^^^^^^J^'Stli^'te of situation. 

eluding heavy .r^^^- f [^te^of gtrd d^^^^ 

Tactics of the rifle platoon, Interior gu A^^al nhoto- 

Summer. 



324 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



M. I. 51 f s. Advanced R, O. T r {({\ t-i, xi. 
periods. Senior year. ^ ^' ^' "-' (6).--Three theoretical, four practical 

First Semester: Annlippfir^r, ^-p 
MODERN LANGUAGES 

to the suitable level of instruction ^^P^^ment assigns each student 

A, Chinese 

Chinese 1 f s. Elementary Chinese (6). 

-e^r!TaTin~"'""' ""'""^^' *^^"^'^*-"' ^^^ ^-Po-tion. Sun. 

I 

B. French 

Frr;:rL\nt"anSTuTwWr''' (6)-Students who offer two units in 
French, receive half credH tr m^r^ " "^ ^'^''"^*^ '"^ ^^^^""^"^^^^ 
me^rlTatsprinr""^ composition; pronunciation and translation. Su.- 

or^BTFrLh^'^rtaLSTr*!"" (D-P-requisite, the grade of A 
-e this course in "coS^ ^hTreS^ t^ t^^^ i^!^^-^ 

French 3 f s. Intermediate Literary French ra\ p • . ^ ,. 

1 f s or equivalent. Second-year French fr^.H 7 !''^"'''*'' ^"'"'^ 

year i-rench for students interested in litera- 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



325 



ture or in fields related to literature. Students who expect to do major or 
jninor work in French are required, however, to take French 6 in place of 
the second semester of this course. 

Translation; conversation; exercise in pronunciation. Reading of texts 
designed to give some knowledge of French life, thought, and culture. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 

French 4. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in French 3 f or 5 f. Qualified students who expect to take advanced 
courses in French literature should take this course in conjunction with 
French 3 s, 5 s, or 6. 

Practical exercises in conversation, based on material dealing with French 
history, art, and music. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

French 5 f s. Intermediate Scientific French (6) — Prerequisite, French 
1 f s or equivalent. Second-year French for students specializing in the 
sciences. Students who expect to do major or minor work in French are 
required, however, to take French 6 in place of the second semester of this 

course. 

Translation; conversation; exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- 
tific texts. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

French 6. Grammar Review (3) — Prerequisite, French 3 f , 5 f , or equiv- 
alent. This course gives the same credit as do French 3 s and French 5 s, 
and may be taken in place of these courses. It is required of second-year 
French students who expect to major or minor in French. 

An intensive review of the elements of French grammar; verb drills; 
composition. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

French 51, 52. The Development of the French Novel (3, 3). 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French 
literature; of the lives, works, and influence of important novelists. Reports. 
French 51 covers the 17th and 18th centuries, French 52 the 19th 
century. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

French 53, 54. The Development of the French Drama (3, 3). 

Introductory study of the French drama. Translation, collateral reading, 
reports. French 53 covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French 
54 the 19th century. Summer, Fall. 

French 55, 56. The Development of the Short Story in French (3, 3). 

A study of the short story in French literature; reading and translation 
of representative examples. French 55, Spring; French 56. 

French 59 f s. French Phonetics (2) — Prerequisite, French 1 f s. Sum- 
mer, Fall, Spring. (Wilcox.) 



326 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



327 



French 60 f s. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (6) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, French 3 f s, 5 f s. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Wilcox.) 

(French 59 f s and 60 f s are required of students preparing to teach 
French.) 

French 75, 76. Introduction to French Literature (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 
French 3 f s or 5 f s. 

An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in French literature. French 75 covers the Middle Ages, 
Renaissance, and Seventeenth century. French 76 is devoted to the eight- 
eenth and nineteenth centuries. This course is given in French. French 75, 
Fall; French 76, Summer, Spring. (Falls.) 

French 99. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (l)— 
Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French litera- 
ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
means of a brief survey of the entire field. Fall. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A more intensive survey of modem French literature is offered by means 
of rotating courses roughly divided by centuries. 

French 101. French Literature of the 16th Century (2). 

The beginning and development of the Renaissance in France. Prose and 
poetry of the period. (Not offered 1942-43.) . (Falls.) 

French 104. French -Prose and Poetry of the Seventeenth Century (2). 

A study of the genres dominated by La Fontaine, Pascal, Boileau, and 
the "ecrivains mondains." Spring. (Wilcox.) 

French 105. The Theatre in France in the Seventeenth Century (2). 

A study of the development of the classical tradition as exemplified by 
the works of Corneille, Racine, and Moliere. A continuation of French 104. 
Fall. (Wilcox.) 

French 106. French Life and Thought in the Seventeenth Century as 
Reflected in Contemporary Memoirs and Letters (2). 

A continuation of French 104 and 105. Summer. (Wilcox.) 

French 107. French Literature of the 18th Century (2). 

A study of the drama, poetry, and novels of the period. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Falls.) 

French 108. French Literature of the 18th Century (2)~Two lectures. 
The philosophical and scientific movement from Saint-Evremond and 
Bayle to the French Revolution. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Falls.) 

French 110. French Poetry in the Nineteenth Century (2). 

A study of the Romantic, Parnassian, and Symbolist movements. Sum- 
mer. (Wilcox.) 



^ 1, 111 French Prose in the Nineteenth Century (2). 
French 111. rrencn in^o „^r,vnc heo-inninff with the 

A study of the evolution of the major P'o^^ genres begmmng 
„ !X Deriod. A continuation of French 110. Fall. ^ 

'" H llT The Theatre in France in the Nineteenth Century (2) 
French 112. The ineaire movement beginning 

A study of the significant dramatic J^f ^ °™iio and HI. Spring. 

J^ the Romantic period. A continuation of French HO (wilcox.) 

French 113. French Literature of the 20th Century (2). ^^^^^^^^ 

The novel in the twentieth century. Fall. 

French 114. French Literature of the 20th Century 2). 

Ca and poetry from Symbolism to the present time. Spnng.^^^^^ 

u iir^ p'rench Thought in the 20th Century (2). 

^"ri:::lises . transition - ^^^^ i^ tf ^^^ ^ XS 
and free composition. The P-'P°^« f ^^^^J French grammar, a finer 
student to acquire a more ^^'^Pl^*; "^^jf |^if gprfng. (Falls.) 

feeling for shades of expression. Summer, * an, dp b ,- -.^ ,•„ 

leeuiig i"i uz^rnture 105. Romanticism m 

(Attention is also called to Comparative Literature lU^, 

France.) 

'Cn. fono™. .»du.U .«»«.s wm b, given upon .u«« 

n„..s. by ,».llft«i «d»tt.) ^^^^ ...™p,isW. 

French 201. Research (2-4)— OreUits aeie (Staff.) 

French 202 f s. Diderot and the ^-^J^'^^l^'^'^^^l^^ 
rn=::t;^tis?^S - -^^^^^ -y of the most impor. 

tant Encyclopaedists. 
^ JonA f s Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novel.st (4). 
French 204 f s. Ueorges u Georges Duhamel, one 

This course offers a critical study '>* J^^J^f ^^f ^3^ ^ (Falls.) 

of the most significant of contemporary French writers. 
French 205 f s. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the^Ren^ajs^ 

sance (4). 



328 



I 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



329 



cZZ;\lX''- "'* ^'■^"^'' ^"^^' *" ''^ ^-* «»'^ o^ the Nineteen, 
f^^::Z^r:^St;' ''- nineteenth-centur, French nove, the 
Jecond semester, the development and transformation of the Romantic 

cZlZ'SV'"' '"^ ^""''' ^"^^' ^" *-^ ^--'^ ««>' «>' *-e Nineteen, 
First semester, Balzac's successors; Realism and Naturalism 
Jsecond semester, chief novelists of the enrf nf tv,^ . ^ ' 

contemporary French fiction. ^ century; sources of 

French 213. Introduction to Old French (2). .f?' 

French 215. Seminar n 9^ n^ .■ (^arby.) 

uate students in f"S. ^ ' '"''*'"^ ^'^'^'^- ^^'l"^^^*! °f «" ^rad- 

French 221, 222. Reading Course (2, 2). ^^^^^'^ 

n£^S^^^^:^^ the background of a survey of French 

ensive outside readmg with reports and connecting lectures. 

C. German (Palls.) 

in'^GZLZ'^nt^ZTtiL^r^ (6)-Students who offer two units 
year German, reTefvrhSftldtrr S^^ '' "°* ^'^'^'''^ ^°^ ^^^-''■ 

S™,"F\n';Vri~'' '=""P°^"'°"' P--neiation and translation. 
ort.TlLn\T%Z sZr """ <^>-P-e,uisite. the grade of A 

1 ^sT/^italn!" ReSfof'^^^'T ^""'^" ^-Prerequisite, German 
and writte'n p^Se.^^tmrr! F^S^r' '''"'"'''' -^^^-' ^^ ^^ 

A or BL^tm'atrf^rff oT^i"" <2)-Prerequisite, the grade of 

work in GTra^lltrature sS^fttrtS^ 

German 3 s, 5 s or 7 PrJLliT ■ ^""""^^ '" conjunction with 

whV™te tllh Tr^^'o,"'™" «.>->"»W»"l particularly to, »t«d.... 

.dvajrwoT,„*;,TG:LrLr..t ir„T„r2„rn "'-"* r f 

pared to take German fiO f c r> , "terature, but who are not pre- 



German 7. Military German (3) — Prerequisite, German, 3 f or 5 f. 

Reading" of technical prose concerned with military tactics and operations. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

German 51, 52. Advanced German (3, 3) — Prerequisite, German 3 f s 
or 5 f s or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent German literature. 
Summer, Fall. 

German 53, 54. Advanced German (3, 3) — Prerequisite, German 3 f s or 
5 f s or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. German 53, 
Spring; German '54 not offered 1942-43. 

German 59. German Phonetics (1) — Prerequisite, German 1 f. Summer, 
Fall, Spring. 

German 60 f s. German Grammar and Composition (4) — Prerequisite, 
German 3 f s or 5 f s or equivalent. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. This course is required of students 
preparing to teach German. Fall. 

German 75, 76. Introduction to German Literature (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 
German 3 f s or 5 f s or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature; a study of 
representative authors and works. Fall, Spring. 

German 99. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1). 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of German litera- 
ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
means of a brief survey of the entire field. Fall. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
German 107, 108. German Literature of the 18th Century (3, 3). 

German 107, the earlier classical literature. German 108, the later classi- 
cal literature. German 107, Spring; German 108 not offered 1942-43. 

(Prahl.) 

German 110, 111. German Literature of the 19th Century (3, 3). 

German 110, Romanticism and Young Germany. German 111, The Liter- 
ature of the Empire. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Prahl.) 

German 113, 114. Contemporary German Literature (3, 3). 

A study of the lives, works, and influence of outstanding authors of the 
present. Summer, Fall. (Prahl.) 

(Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 106, Romanticism in 
Germanyy and Comparative Literature 107, The Faust Legend in English 
^nd German Literature. 



fl 



330 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



331 



i 



For Graduates 

(Any of the following graduate courses will be given unoti «nff; • 
request by qualified students.) ^ suflficient 

German 201. Research (2-4)_Credits determined by work accomplished. 
German 202 fs. The Modern German Drama (4) '^ 

German 203 f s. Schiller (4). 

of tis'^SLas.*'' "'' '"' "'"•'^^ °' "*='''"^^' -*^ -I"^-- on the history 

German 204. Goethe's Faust (2) 

^ „ (Zucker.) 

German 205. Goethe's Works Outside of Faust (2). (Zucker 

German 206 f s. The Romantic Movement (4). (p J' 

Getr" '"• '•""^"^^ (l-2)-Required of all graduate studen" in 

(Staff.) 
German 214. Middle High German (3). (Mutziger.) 

German 220, 221. Readine Cour^jp r9 9^ n 

give graduate students the L^Zn^^f 'a~"su"ev o^ cr" ""r.^^^' "^ 

Extensive outside reading with rfports'anl cll^ilec'rs^" ^'Sil- 
verman 231. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics (3). (Mutziger.) 

D. Italian 

tion and in thp p]pm^r.fe ^-p +v. ^^^^^^cn and Spanish. Drill m pronuncia- 

lake thfs c.„r„ ,„ c.„j™«i<,„ „,a ,j.,i.„ j"^ rXs^p'tag 
E. Portuguese 

and'n ^"hTeLments ^of"""''''' ''"'"'""""^ ^«^-^"" ^ pronunciation 
Spring" Summt " '^'■'"'"''"' composition and translation. Fall, 

Portuguese 2. Elementary Conversation (1)— Prerea,„«,to +>, a ( 

Sg °"' '" ""i"»«i<>n with Portuguese 1 e. Pll, 



F. Russian 

Russian 1 f s. Elementary Russian (6) — Elements of grammar; compo- 
sition; pronunciation and translation. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

Russian 2. Elementary Conversation (1) — Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in Russian 1 f . Qualified students who are interested in Russian should 
take this course in conjunction with Russian 1 s. Fall, Spring. 

G. Spanish 

Spanish 1 f s. Elementary Spanish (6) — Students who offer two units 
in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for second- 
year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 

Spanish 2. Elementary Conversation (1) — Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in Spanish 1 f . 

Qualified students who are interested in Spanish should take this course 
in conjunction with Spanish 1 s. Fall, Spring. 

Spanish 3 f s. Second- Year Spanish (6) — Prerequisite, Spanish 1 f s or 
equivalent. 

Reading of narrative works and plays; grammar review; oral and writ- 
ten practice. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

Spanish 4. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in Spanish 3 f. Qualified students who expect to take advanced work 
in Spanish literature should take this course in conjunction with Spanish 
3 s. 

Practical exercises in conversation based on material dealing with Span- 
ish history, art, and music. Fall, Spring. 

Spanish 6. Grammar Review (2) — Designed particularly for students 
who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who expect to do advanced 
work in the Spanish language or literature, but who are not prepared to 
take Spanish 60 f s. Properly qualified students may elect this course at 
the same time as Spanish 75, 76. Summer, Fall. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 60 f s. Advanced Composition and Conversation (4) — Prerequi- 
site, Spanish 3 f s or equivalent. 

Introduction to phonetics; oral and written composition. This course is 
required of students preparing to teach Spanish. Fall, Spring. 

Spanish 75, 76. Introduction to Spanish Literature (3, 3). 

An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in Spanish literature. Summer, Fall; Spring, Simimer. 



MUSIC 



333 



332 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Spanish 99. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature (1). 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of Spanish litera- 
ture, art, and music. This course provides a rapid review for majors by 
means of a brief survey of the entire field. Fall. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 101. Modern Spanish Thought (3). 

Essays and critical writing of the 20th century. The Generation of 1898. 
(Not offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 102. Epic and Ballad (3). 

The legends and heroic matter of Mediaeval Spain. Summer. (Darby.) 

Spanish 103. The Drama of the Golden Age (3). Fall. . (Darby.) 

Spanish 104. The Drama in the 19th Century (3). Fall. (Darby.) 

Spanish 105. Modern Drama (3).— (Not offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 106 f s. Cervantes (6). 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 107. The Spanish Novel of the Golden Age and the 18th Cen- 
tury (3)— (Not offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 108. The Novel in the 19th Century (3)— (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 109. Modern Novel (3). 

Novels of the 20th Century. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 120. Advanced Composition (3) — Prerequisite, Spanish 60 f s 
or the consent of the instructor. 

Extensive practice in composition and grammar for students who are com- 
pleting major or minor requirements in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish. 
(Not offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 125. Lope de Vega (3). 

Detailed study of characteristic plays. Summer. (Darby.) 

Spanish 135. Galdos (3). 

Detailed study of representative novels and dramas. (Not offered 1942- 
43.) (Darby.) 

Spanish 151. Latin-American Literature: The Colonial Period (3). 

Fall. (Darby.) 

Spanish 152. Latin- American Literature: The 19th Century (3). Spring. 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 153. Latin- American Literature: The Modern Period (3) — (Not 

offered 1942-43.) (Darby.) 



For Graduates sufficient 

(Any of the following graduate courses will be given up 

m 

Spanish 202 f s. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6). ^^^^^^ 
Detailed study of the classical authors. 

QnRnish 203. Spanish Poetry (3). ^ f ^.u^ 

The U, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyrics. Poetry^o^'je 

Golden Age. 
?SSf oftt ^htntrretS-th. and twentieth centuries. (Darhy) 
Srluh 210. seminar (l-2)-0ne meeting weekly. Re.u.red^of^aU 

"■fp::lr2irintroduction to Old Spanish (2). (^arby.) 

Spanish 220. 221. Reading ^^Zl'^^'i-^;:,^^^^^ of Span- 

Designed to give graduate students t"*=;fl°"^l,„rts and connecting 
ish literature. Extensive outside reading with reports ^^^^^^^ 

lectures. 

"^^"^ Assistant Pbofessor Kaotaix; M«s. Gavin. 

M.S1C 1 f s. Mu.k Appr«i.tlon (2)-(l t ™l pt.requl.it. lo 1 =.) 

ru o. .n .,p.s ., C.S*.. „... -5 •,*:i?:^rs.^ s 

that it employs. A study of musical fornu J^J^^^^^^ j.^^^^^^ ^^^jeians 
A comprehensive course in *« /^J^*°7 °' , . .j^. renaissance; the classic 

W.I., sWdenB rto have S^^Lf ^^^^'womenl Chonjs .nd the Men's 

S S- t^-ZrJ^^rl 1™W a. «™.. .0. ».ed *™ 

singing. S»nn,«, Fall, Sprmg. ^^^^ Crrfi. 

,A) Wm^: <^»?";-Jf * Iri^^SnS, at weekly »hears.ls and 
is awarded for each years regular a 
participation in public performances of the chorus. 



334 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHILOSOPHY 



335 



(B) Men*s Glee Club. Study of part-singing for men's voices. Credit is 
awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and par- 
ticipation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4. Orchestra (Vz)- 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of the standard symphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 
modern composers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments are 
eligible for membership. At least one rehearsal of two hours* duration is 
held each week, and all players are expected to take part in public per- 
formances. Fall, Spring. 

Music 5 f s. Harmony (4). 

This course includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, har- 
monic progressions, primary and secondary triads in root position and 
first and second inversions, the dominant seventh chord in its root position 
and inversions, altered and mixed chords and modulation. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basis for ear training, 
dictation, melody writing, and melody harmonization. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. 

Music 6. Survey of Opera (2). 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the librettos, 
music and the composers of the widely used operas. The best examples 
from standard operatic literature will be studied. Operatic singers and 
directors of the past and present will be discussed. Complete operatic 
recordings will be heard and in some cases the student will have the use 
of full scores to follow the recordings. The instructor and other singers 
will occasionally perform excerpts from opera. Summer. 



PHILOSOPHY 



Professor Marti 



Phil. 1. Fundamentals of Philosophy (3) — Required course for pre- 
medical students. Open to others by special permission. 

Problems pertaining to the study of man, presented with a constant 
regard for the needs of prospective students of medicine. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. 

Phil. 2. Ethics (3) — Sophomore course. Open to freshmen only by spe- 
cial permission. 

An introductory course in philosophy, stressing its function in daily life, 
in education, in society, and in statecraft. Spring. 

Phil. 11 f s. The Occidental Tradition (6) — Open to sophomores and 
upper-classmen who attained a 2.5 average in the previous semester. Open 
to others only by special permission of their Dean and of the Department 



ZZtb'.i ot suel. i»t.g~tio». Fall, Spnng. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil. 51. Metaphysics (3)-Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. May 
be Sen simultaneously with the second semester of Phil. " ^ «• • 

'\ course in philosophical t-^in. ^e^n^^^^^ 

clearer conception of basic reality, and for the needs ol p P ^^^^.^ 

and theologians. Fall, Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
„^-, i«i 182 183 184. Proseminar in Philosophy (3)-Two-hour sem- 

Philosophy. . . . ^i^r^^A for sDecially qualified under- 

The philosophical P-^eTce^saty prel^^^^^^ ^^ ^-<^-^ 

graduates who have had the necessary pr y respective 

students desiring the help of philosophy in the study of t P 

fields. The content of the course will ^e chosen so asjo^ r ^ ^.^_ 

of the group of students --f^tstl^tlS^^^^^^^^^ of a faculty mem- 
ferent field every semester. "Pf^f^J^^^Jdin which case there will be a 
ber from another department ^i"^« J^™ ^^^ philosophy and his extra- 
weekly two-hour session, under th^pr^^^^^^^^ of p P^V^^ philosophical 
departmental colleague, and one weeKiy nour y (Marti.) 
tutorials. Summer, Fall, Spnng. 

,>K-, 1Q1 192 Reading in Philosophy (2, 2)-Individual library work. 
.^t^^^eXS, three courses in philosophy, and the permission 
of the Department of Philosophy. 

, ^ ^^.ioiiv nnalified advanced students, under super- 

Individual work for f Pf ?fj\^^^^^^^^^^ reports and essays. Sum- 

vision and with tutorial advice. Regular written rep ^^^^.^ 

mer, Fall, Spring. 



336 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



337 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education for Men and Women 

A. Mr. Warner, Mr. English. 
B. Professor Drew; Miss Davis, Miss Terhune, Miss Watts. 

Phys. Ed. 1 f s. Physical Activities (2) — An activities course for male 
freshmen which meets three periods a week. 

The activities taught are soccer, touch football, basketball, volleyball, soft 
baseball, track and natural gymnastics. 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled in this course. 

Phys, Ed. 2 f s. Personal Hygiene (1) — Freshman course for women. 

This course consists of instruction in hygiene. The health ideal and its 
attainments, care of the body by diet, exercise, sleep, bathing, etc., and 
social hygiene. 

Phys. Ed. 3 f s. Physical Activities (4) — An activities course for sopho- 
more men which meets three periods a week. 

The activities taught are the team sports of the freshman year and indi- 
vidual sports which include fencing, wrestling, tumbling, boxing, ping pong, 
horseshoe pitching, handball, golf, tennis, and badminton. 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled in this course. 

**Phys. Ed. 4 f s. Physical Activities (1) — Freshman course for women. 
Meets twice each week, with the exception of riding which meets one two- 
hour period each week. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Students may elect from a wide range of activities, including archery, 
bowling, dance, equitation, golf, hockey, tennis, etc. 

The cost to the student varies in accordance with the activity chosen, and 
ranges from approximately $0.00 to $17.25 per semester. * 

Phys. Ed. 5 f s. Athletics (4) — Required of male freshmen in physical 
education. Meets five times a week. 

Two periods are devoted to training in activities for squad leadership 
and three periods to participation in the activities of the general physical 
education program. 

A special uniform is required of all men enrolled in this course. 

Phys. Ed. 6 f s. Community Hygiene (2) — Sophomore course for women. 

Continuation of the freshman course. The work in hygiene includes the 
elements of physiology; the elements of home school, and community 
hygiene; and a continuation of social hygiene. Fall, Spring. 



♦♦An activity pro-am suited to need is arranged upon the recommendation of 
the University physician. 



..ny.. Ed. 8 t .. Pto.i»> AttWto (»-S.ph.™... ..»™e f« women. 
,„„ W»» «A we* s™.r, F.«. Sprmg^ ^.^^^_^ ^^ ^ ^^^ ^, ^, 

,4sr i'"inr»>ftSsi>:. .L«v..y «. o«.«d ■» *. ™«^ 

i. Physical Education; open to others ^itn we I* ^ considers the 

ilfs course includes p^ctice -/^"^^^^eS Tda^^^ Opportunity 
.asic principles of time ^o-,-^^^ ZZs^^loZr. and content. Fall, 
is given for creating short dances m re y 

^^""^' ...., .• <•A^ Rpouired of freshmen women whose 

Phys. Ed. 12 f s Athletics (4)-Reqmred^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^. 

™ajor is Physical Edu-tion Meets tw cy a ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ 

ranged in which the student ^^t^^^^; f "^f *X ^rst semester, hockey, soccer, 
The following sports ^'^^'^^^^i'^^'.^f;, /"ftif/ second semester, bowling, 

T^y's. Ed. U f s. Dance C^)--'^--;--^-f ^ZZ^tt 
Required of sophomore women whose major r y 

to others with the f ^^^^^^."/f ^J^^^;?*^^^^^^^^^^ „,odern dance and a study 
This course ^-<^'-''\l^fli;^^:^^VlL to create dance patterns 

tZZT^^^- --" ^-- -' ^""""- '"' '"""a f 

\.. .- f rvmnastics (2)-An activities course required of 
.Ph,. Ed. >8. I..»d«t.,y H,gl.« (2)-K.qui«d ot .11 freshmen m 

TdTir .rr.!! ssio-rpfriv..^ o.ndi«on» .. ^r 

living. Fall. «« v^on 

Ju FH 20 Physical Education (3)-Required of sophomore men 
•Phys. Ed. 20. P^^^' J 1 Education. Meets twice each week. 

'''i^:Z::':::£Z\l^r::Son^ and obiectives of physical education. 

''phTs. Ed. 22 f s. Athletics (4)-Required of sophomore women whose 
major is Physical Education. ^^^^ 1942-43.) 

This course is a continuation of Phys. bd. i^ i s. v 
-^^I^tivity prcran, suited to need is an-an.ed upon the recom„,enda«on of 

the University physician. 
♦Open to men and women. 



338 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



If 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

.or™r:".vcr ^rrzu? r^T^nr'^r -"* 

*Phys. Ed. 66. First Aiii n\ x> - -, . , 
-^or is Physical Edlt^ fc-^S elrjer '''' ^°'"^" -^- 

cidenilTrnStmLfZlra:^^^^^^^^ '"^ "^^""^ -^ « ac- 

is required of all students " '^" ^' '^'^"«'^- P^«<=«cal work 

Phys. Ed. 67 f s. Gymnastics (2)— Prprpnn.cif^ t>i, 
equivalent. An activities cnur-^ t /Terequisite, Phys. Ed. 15 f s or 

periods a week. '" '°'" ^""'*''^ ^"^^ ««"'°rs, which meets three 

This course is a continuation of Phys Ed 1«; f = 4^ ^ , 

Img, apparatus and pyramid building Advanced work in tumb- 

*Phys. Ed. 76 f s. Dance (2)— Reouirprf r,f ■ • 
major is Physical Education- oDpTf! 1 ^ ""^^ ^"'^ ^"nien whose 

instructor. Meets twice each week ' ^'* *^' Permission of the 

roomTnr:t:p?rs SiTht m^r ^'^ i""'^"^ °^ *^« ^-^'—tal ball- 
to ballroom etiquette and' t^e^^L^g ^^t:^:^^. ^^^ ^^en 

*Phys. Ed. 78. Dance (l)-ReauirpH f • • ' i> ^S- 

Physical Education; open to others wS, 1 ^""''"" •'^'"""" ^^°^« ""^Jo' '^ 
Meets twice each week ^'^^ Permission of the instructor. 

This course includes suitable teaching material i. f ^ ■ 
or recreation groups. Fall. material in tap dancing for school 

*Phys. Ed. 90. Dance (1)— Reoii.Vpr? ^t ■ ■ 
Spring. ^^ '^^" ^s "»e costume appropriate for each. 

*Open to men and women. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



339 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

phys. Ed. 113 f s. Athletics (2) — Prerequisite, two years of successful 
intramural participation. Required of junior men in Physical Education. 
Meets once a week. 

Problems of coaching and officiating in intramural play and high school 
athletics. Participation in the intramural program at the University, or in 
nearby schools, is a requirement of the course. 

Phys. Ed. 114 f s. Athletics (2)— Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 12 f s, 22 f s. 
Required of junior women whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice 
each week. 

The student is given the opportunity to coach and officiate under super- 
vision in the intramural program on the campus as well as to officiate in the 
schools of Washington, D. C, and Maryland. With the cooperation of the 
teachers in nearby schools the students plan and administer invitational 
sports days in the respective schools. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Drew.) 

Phys. Ed. 119 f s. Athletics (2)— Prerequisite, Phys. Ed. 113 f s or 
equivalent. A practical course for senior men in Physical Education. 

The aim of this course is to provide students with opportunities to assist 
in teaching, coaching, and officiating in the schools of Maryland and in the 
athletic tournaments conducted by these schools through the State Depart- 
ment of Education. The equivalent of two hours of practice is required 
each week. Individual conferences will be arranged in order that students 
may discuss with the instructor the problems that arise for them, and 
the class will meet occasionally to pool experiences. 

Phys. Ed. 127 f s. Analysis of Activities (4). 

An analysis of activities from the mechanical, anatomical, physiological, 
and psychological standpoint. Discussions, lectures, field study, and reports. 

*Phys, Ed. 133. Nature of Play (2) — Required of junior men and 
women whose major is Physical Education. Meets twice each week. 

The psychology of action, the uses of play, the types and organization 
of play activities and the management of play space are considered in 
the course. (Drew.) 

*Phys. Ed. 137. Recreation (2) — Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 113 f s or 
114 f s, and three years of successful participation in intramural athletics or 
equivalent. Required of all majors in Physical Education. Meets twice a week. 

The purpose of this course is to study the various aspects of character 
guidance through leadership in physical activities. Participation in plan- 
ning, supervising, and directing the University program of intramural 
activities, or an equivalent situation, is a requirement of the course. 



*Open to men and women. 



340 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHYSICS 



341 



*Phys. Ed. 144. Physical Education (2) — Prerequisites, Phys. Ed. 113 f s 
or 114 f s and three years of successful participation in intramural athletics 
or equivalent. Required of all seniors in Physical Education. Meets twice 
a week. 

The organization and administration of programs of Physical Education 
in high school situations. Summer, Fall. (Drew.) 

♦Phys. Ed. 146. Teaching Health (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Phys. Ed. 18, 13, 16. A course required of seniors in Physical Education. 
Meets twice a week. 

Philosophy, aims, objectives, problems, materials, methods, and proce- 
dures for teaching health. (Drew.) 

For Graduates 

*Phys. Ed. 201. Problems of Health and Physical Education (3). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems 
that arise in the administration of health and physical education in public 
schools. An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating the 
effectiveness of programs of health and physical education. 



PHYSICS 

Professor Eichlin; Assistant Professor 

Mr. Smith, 



; Dr. Myers, 



Phys. 1 f s. General Physics (8) — Three lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of students in the premedical and predental curricula. This course 
satisfies the minimum requirement for a science major. Prerequisites, 
Math. 8 and 9, or 21 and 22. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, sound, light, mag- 
netism, and electricity. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Summer, Fall; 
Fall, Spring. 

Phys. 2 f s. General Physics (10) — Four lectures; one laboratory. Re- 
quired of all students in the engineering curricula, and of those with 
chemistry, mathematics, and physics majors. Elective for other students. 
Prerequisites, Math. 21 and 22 and 23 f s. The last may be taken concur- 
rently. 

A study of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, and electricity. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Summer, Fall ; Fall, Spring. 

Phys. 3 f s. Introductory Physics (6). 

This introductory course is designed to meet the needs of students who 
desire to become acquainted with the fundamental principles of physics. 
Instruction will be given by lectures, recitations, and experimental demon- 
strations. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Summer, Fall; Fall, Spring. 



♦Open to men and women. 



For Advanced Undergraduates ^^^^^^^.^ 

Phys. 51 f s. Photography (4)-0ne lecture, o 

$5 00 per semester. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

measurements. The course is mtended as an (Eichlin.) 

experimental work. Fall. 
n,. .02. Pta.l"l M...ur.m.n.. (S)-Two ,«l.r.»i one Lbo^to"- 

SO obtained. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Sprmg. 

Phys 103 f s. Advanced Physics (6)-Prerequisite, Phys. 1 f s 
Phys. ii>6 advanced study of physical 

This course, supplementing Phys. ^J-^' electricity through gases, 

phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, «°"Juct.on of e^ect y ^^ .^_ 

photoelectricity, etc., with a ^"'"P^^f ^"^'^^J^n Un a general survey with 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student in a g ^^.^^^ 

some of the recent developments m physics. Fall, Spring. 

„ . 4„ /•c\ One Ippture* two laboratories. 
Phys. 104 f s. Advanced Experiments (6)-0ne lecture, 

Prerequisite, Phys. 103 f s ^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

This course, supplementing P^^ys^l f J. l^^ J^, $5.00 per Bemes- 

with experience in experimental physics, i^aoor f, (Smith.) 

ter. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

Phys. 105. Heat (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, Phys. 
1 f s or 2 f s, Math. 23 f s. ^ , ^ ^„ +i,p basis 

The classical phenomena of heat ^f -/^^tTtuT ttot' ThT firtttnd 
of the kinetic molecular theory -"<ij^.^ ^^^^^^^^^ *^ pLesses. Labora- 
second laws of thermodynamics are applied to physica p ^^^^^^^ 

tory fee, $5.00. Summer. 



342 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PHYSICS 



343 



Phys. 106. Theoretical Mechanics (3) — Prerequisites, Phys. 1 f s or 
2 f s, Math. 23 f s. 

An analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented with problems to illustrate these principles. The 
use of generalized coordinates is illustrated. The equations of Lagrange 
are applied to selected topics in the field of dynamics. Summer. (Myers.) 

Phys. 107. Optics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 1 f s or 2 f s, Math. 23 f s. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, interfer- 
ence, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed in 
a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectroscope, 
and interferometer. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Fall. ( ) 

Phys. 108 f s. Electricity (6) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 1 f s or 2 f s. Math. 23 f s. 

A study of electrical properties of matter and space with applications to 
common electrical instruments and apparatus. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per 
semester. Fall, Spring. 

Phys. 109 f s. Electron Physics (6) — ^Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 1 f s or 2 f s, Math. 23 f s. 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics, and atomic structure. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Fall, Spring. (Myers.) 

Phys. 110. Sound (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 1 f s or 2 f s. Math. 23 f s. 

A study is made of vibrating systems, the propagation and scattering of 
sound waves, standing sound waves, sound wave energy, etc. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Summer. ( ) 

Phys. Ill, 112. Mathematical Physics (3, 3) — Prerequisites, Phys. 1 f s 
or 2 f s, Math. 23 f s. 

Selected topics in physics will be treated to illustrate certain mathemati- 
cal methods, particularly the use of derivatives and differentials, methods 
of integration, infinite series, vectors, ordinary and partial differential 
equations, orthonormal sets of functions. Fall, Spring. (Myers.) 

Phys. 113, 114. Properties of Matter (3, 3)— Prerequisites, Phys. 1 f s 
or 2 f s. Math. 23 f s. 

A study of the constituent particles of matter and such properties of 
matter as gravitation, molecular attraction, elasticity, special properties 
of solids and of fluids at rest and in motion, wave propagation. (Not offered 
1942-43.) (Eichlin.) 



«• ., Freouency Phenomena (6)-Two lectures, one lab- 
Phys. 115 f s. High Frequency r ^ ^ 

oltory. P^-^'^-^^^'^^^^^i'r/ra'iitics of electron tubes, high fre- 
A study of resonant "'•'^f^'^^^^'^Sc waves, propagation of waves in 

^s^S^ a^rdXTSS: — -• ^- -[ -- 

'li (Not offered 1942-43.) prerequisites. 

^^- "^ i I. 2ltr Rf.:':rof ^^^ cUmical engineermg 

;rspirj-rTtrtSr^^^^^^^^^^ — ?^;;S 

Spring: 

For Graduates 
Phys. 201. Atomic Structure (3). ^^^^.^ 

A development of atomic ^'^JjJ^^/rspSa sct^ter^ of x-rays 
properties, P-ticula^^ t^^^^^^ of^™" (E.chlm.) 

and electrons, and vaiency. 

Phys. 202. Atomic Spectra (3). , ^„_fine structure, line inten- 

interpretation of spectral ^^^'^^l^l^^'J^T^Sern^X fields in light 

sities and polarization, line contours, and effects ^^^^^^ ) 

of modem atomic theory. Fall. 

Phys. 203. Molecular Spectra (3). ,,, reference to the infor- 

A discussion of molecular ^V^X:-^^^:t:JtZl entropy, and 
mation that is given about molecular structure, sp ^^^^^^^ 

related phenomena. Spring. 

Phys. 204, 205. Quantum ^^^^^ ^^'^'^^^ ^,,,,„,,, .^th applica- 
A treatment of the general -f^^^i^^^^S^^^ the theory of collision 

Phys. 206. Nuclear ^^^^^'^^J^ ^ ,,,,,,,,„„ ^f masses, charges. 

The theory of the nuceus IS developed by ^.^ttering, and inter- 

„,agnetic. moments, ^adioactivity^uclear ^j^y,,,.) 

action with radiation fields. Summer. 

Phys. 207. 208. Modern Physics (3, 3). 

A comprehensive survey of developfnt^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ J 

concepts of ^^^-^ .^ .^e ' Stt stk mechanics, cosmology. Fall 
and matter, quantum tneory, ( | 

Spring. 



344 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Phys. 209. Dynamics (3). 

Phy.. 210. DjT„„w<3,. '"""*' 

liquids, vi^osity. (Not „«„"<!, S'sS) ' """ *™* 

Phys. 211. EI«:l,od,„.„l„ <3,. •"""■' 

disp..,„„ ^„,, ;,„.ra:rc:*pS s^r-* r*-; 

Phys. 212. Physical Optics (3). 

Phys. 213, 214. Theory of Elasticity (3, 3) ^ > 

bars, thin plates LesL produced hvH''°"' f '"''"^ '" ''^^'"«' '^"r '«d 
waves in solid media. Fall Spring ''"^'"'*'^' "^"^^^' Propagation of 

Phys. 215, 216. X-Ray and Crystal Structure (3. 3) ^'^''''''""^ 

^^tt:7'iT.;v^:i:t^^^^^ °f x-- with the app. 

(Not offered 1942-43.) Physical properties of crystals. 

Phys. 217 f s. Seminar (2). ( ) 

(otaii.) 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pol.. Sci. 1. American National Government (3) 

the uS l\tTu"^t7an^ sSr "' ''' ""^°"^^ -~-^ "^ 
Pol. Sci. 4. State and Local Government (3)-Prereouisite P«7 q • , 

land. Summer, Fall, Spring^^ ^^pnasis upon the government of Mary- 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



345 



Pol. Sci. 7. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 
j;ot open to freshmen. 

A comparative study of the governments of Great Britain, France and 
Switzerland. Summer, Fall. 

Pol. Sci. 8. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 7. 
A comparative study of the dictatorial governments of Europe, with 
special emphasis upon Italy, Germany, and the U. S. S. R. Spring, Fall. 

Pol. Sci. 9. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 7. 
A study of Latin American Governments with special emphasis on Argen- 
tina, Brazil, and Chile. Summer, Fall. 

Pol. Sci. 10. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 7. 

A study of Far Eastern governments with special emphasis on China 
and Japan. Spring, Fall. 
For Advanced Undergraduates 

Pol. Sci. 51. International Relations (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 or 
consent of instructor. 

The course deals with the major factors underlying international rela- 
tions, the influence of geography, climate, nationalism and imperialism, and 
the development of international organizations. Summer, Fall. (Kitchin.) 

Pol. Sci. 54. Problems of World Politics (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 
or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with governmental problems of an international charac- 
ter, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, propaganda, etc. Stu- 
dents are required to report on readings from current literature. Spring, 
Fall. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 64. Municipal Government and Administration (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A detailed study of selected problems of municipal government, such as 
housing, health, zoning, fire and police, recreation and planning. Course 
includes a visit to Baltimore to observe the agencies of city government at 
work. Summer, Fall. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 71. Political Parties and Public Opinion (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. 
Sci. 1. 

A descriptive and critical examination of the party process in govern- 
ment; nominations and elections, party expenditures, political leadership; 
the management and conditioning of public opinion. Simimer, Fall. 

(Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 88. Law Enforcement (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A survey of the organization and operation of the agencies involved in 
the administration of criminal justice, with special reference to the organi- 
zation and methods of police departments; problems of organized crime 
and its suppression; the role of the prosecutor and the courts; and the 
interrelations between these agencies. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Kline.) 



346 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
PoK Sci. 102. International Law (3)-Prerequisite. Pol. Sci 1 

Pol. Sci. 105. R«cent Far Eastern PnlifiVc <-qn r> 
or consent of instructor (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. i 

PorL^Vconsen^oTS^rul^^^^^^ Administration (3)-Prerequisite. 

the other branches ^f .Z'eZT Oil:, iT"" "" ^""'"1^^; 
Scrin'r; conLt';?tt'rZr ^•'"'^"^«*-"- (3)-PrerequisirPo, 

reL^\o%heZ:7^^Uor:fT " *'^ ^""^'^ «*^*- ^'^ Particular 

compensation P.aT trs^Ln^rrpCef 3 ^ t^^^'^^^*^^" ^"'^ 
personnel. Spring, Fall. employees and the management of 

' (Howard.) 

senTofttril/"'"' ^"'^'^""^ (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. Ill or con- 

centralized purchasing and the re3?^7 nf i settlement of claims, 

offered 1942-43.) reporting of financial operations. (Not 

' (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 117, 118. Government at Work fi ^\ r^ , . 

' (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 123. Government and Busine<sa f^\ d-„ • -x ^ . 

A ^pn»r=i e ^ Business (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A general survey of governmental activities affect, •« a- y ■ vi, 

special emphasis upon recent developments federalardT.!. f ' ^f 

and regulation of, business in their historical 2 7 t assistance to, 
ment ownership and operation. Fummer ?S '^'' ''P"=*^' (^^e")' 

Tcomtr' .''^^r':*'"-^^ ^""^ L«^«'»«- (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. S^. 
rnL:7:tTZ\f:l:l ^'^^ '^^^^'-.^-^ P-cess, bicameralism, the corn- 
Maryland The eou^ fnc udeTl'S' W 'vt '^P"" '""^ '''^^"''^'' ^^ 
at work. Spring, Fall. Washington to observe Congress 

(Bone.) 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



347 



Pol. Sci. 126. Government and Social Security (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. 

Sci. 4. 

An analysis of the Federal Social Security Act with special emphasis 
upon its background, purposes, administration, and deficiencies. Attention 
will be given also to employment assurance and relief policies, and to the 
efforts of European countries and the 48 states to provide a greater measure 
of security. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Bone.) 

Pol. Sci. 131. Constitutional Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American consti- 
tutional system, with special reference to the role of the judiciary in the 
interpretation and enforcement of the constitution; the position of the 
states in the federal system; state and federal powers over interstate and 
foreign commerce; and the rights of citizens and of accused persons. 
Summer, Fall. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 134. Administrative Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the principles involved in the expansion of the discretion of 
administrative boards and commissions, including an analysis of their func- 
tions ; their powers over private rights ; their procedure in making findings ; 
the enforcement of their rules and orders; and judicial control of their 
actions. Spring, Fall. (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 136. Elements of Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

Development of law and legal systems ; comparison of methods ,and proce- 
dure in making and enforcing law in Roman and common law systems; con- 
sideration of fundamental legal concepts; contribution and influence of 
modern schools of legal philosophy in relation to law and government. 
(Not offered 1942-43.) (Kitchin.) 

Pol. Sci. 137. Civilian-Military Relations in the United States (3) — Pre- 
requisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A consideration of the legal position of the citizen in relation to the 
military in war time ; the status of enemy aliens, and of domestic and alien- 
enemy property; martial law and military law. The course will include a 
survey of the legal rights and duties of a state in the international law of 
war, and the position of neutral and non-belligerent nations. Spring, Fall. 

(Kitchin.) 

Pol. Sci. 141. History of Political Theory (3)— -Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 
or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. Fall. (Leath.) 

Pol. Sci. 142. Recent Political Theory (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories of 
socialism, communism, fascism, etc. Spring. (Leath.) 



Hi 



348 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Pol. Sci. 144. American Political Theory (3)— Prerenni^ifp Pic 
or consent of instructor. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. j 

J.I. S.1. ,74. A„.rte.„ G.,.r„„„, ,„ w=„|„. (3)-P„„,„i.i, "pj 

(Bone.) 
For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201 f s. Seminar in International Organization (4) 

FallprLg' *'' '™ '"' '""*^"°"^ °^ ^^'■-- -ternational organizations. 

(Steinmeyer.) 
Pol. Sci. 202. British Empire (3). 

■ partiSat aUnVo"?^recTn1 ^'T'''^'-' '' '^^ British Dominions, with 
1942-43.) '"""* mter-imperial relationships. (Not offered 

• (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (4) 

F> , o, . (Howard.) 

Pol. s... 213. P„bl.m. o, P„Wi. Admlnl.lr.(l„„ (2, 

' ' (Howard.) 

Pol. Sci. 214. Problems of Personnel Administration (2) 

Keports on topics assigned for individual research in tL « i^ * u,- 
personnel administration. Spring, Fall. ''^^^^'"'^ '" t^e field of public 

Pol. Sci. 216. Problems of Government in Metropolitan Regions (2). 

lems"arS;'orof Thf eTJ^!'" T^ ^""^ ^"'"^ '' *^^ "-* P-sing prob- 
number of ^sma l ' ItnmentaT^^ of dense populations spread over f large 
and facilities to conl'Tb .1 t '^^^'"^ ''""^^'^ inadequate powers 

solutions. (Not oSd 19^43 )'"' "'""'' ''"'^"^^'""^ ''^ p'^'*"^ 
p . (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion (2). 
opSorVu"mi7r?F:fr"'' '°' "''^''"^' ^-'^ - t'^^ fi^Kl of public 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



349 



Pol. Sci. 222. Psych. 280. Analysis of Propaganda (3) — Prerequisite, 
consent of instructors. 

Analytical approach to modern propaganda, including study of organi- 
zations which employ propaganda, of techniques in actual use in disseminata 
ing propaganda, and of attempts at measuring the effects of propaganda. 
Responsibility for instruction is shared by the Department of Political 
Science and the Department of Psychology. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Bone, Jenkins.) 

Pol. Sci. 235. Problems in Public Law (2). 

Readings and reports on topics selected with reference to the needs of the 
individual student; special attention will be given to methods of research in 
legal materials and to problems in interstate commerce, police power, due 
process and equal protection. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Kline.) 

Pol. Sci. 251. Bibliography of Political Science (2). 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the literature of the 
various fields of political science and to instruct him in the use of govern- 
ment documents. Spring, Fall. (Staff.) 

Pol. Sci. 261. Research in Political Science (2, 4) — Credit according to 
work accomplished. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jull; Associate Professors Gwin, Bird, Phillips, Quigley. 

P. H. 1. Poultry Production (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

This is a general course designed to acquaint the student with modern 
methods of poultry husbandry. Study of breeds, breed selection, modern 
breeding theory and methods, housing, and principles of incubation are 
discussed. Summer, Fall. (Quigley.) 

P. H. 2. Poultry Management (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Material will be presented in this course to acquaint the student with 
modern methods of feeding, brooding, caponizing, pullet rearing, broiler 
production, sanitation, management for egg production, and marketing of 
poultry products. Spring, Fall. (Quigley.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 50. Poultry Biology (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites, P. H. 1, or equivalent. 

The elementary anatomy of the fowl, selection for eggs and meat produc- 
tion, and for breed standards are studied. Judging teams for intercollegiate 
competitions are selected from members of this class. Summer, Fall. 

(Jull.) 

P. H. 51. Poultry Genetics (3)— Prerequisites, P. H. 1 or 50, Zool. 104. 

The inheritance of morphological and physiological characters of poultry 
are presented. Inheritance of factors related to egg and meat production 
and quality are stressed. Summer, Spring. (Jull.) 



350 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PSYCHOLOGY 



351 



P. H. 52. Poultry Nutrition (2) — One laboratory; one lecture, demonstra- 
tion and quiz period. 

The nutritive requirements of poultry and the nutrients which meet 
those requirements are presented. Feed cost of poultry production is 
emphasized. Summer, Fall. (Bird.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 57. 

P. H. 56. Poultry Physiology (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, P. H. 1. 

The physiology of development and incubation of the embryo, especially 
physiological pathology of the embryo in relation to hatchability, is pre- 
sented. Physiology of growth and the influence of environmental factors 
on growth and development are considered. Summer, Spring. (Phillips.) 

P. H. 58. Commercial Poultry Management (2) — Two lectures, discus- 
sion, demonstration, and quiz periods. Prerequisite, ten hours of poultry 
husbandry, including P. H. 1, 2. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, pur- 
chase of supplies, management problems in baby chick, egg, broiler, and 
turkey production, foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, produc- 
tion and financial records. Prior to this course the student should have 
practical experience with poultry at home, on a commercial poultry farm, 
or under the supervision of the poultry department. Spring. (Quigley.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

P. H. 104. Poultry Marketing Problems (2). 

Live and dressed poultry grades, live and dressed poultry marketing 
channels, relation of transportation and distribution to quality, methods 
and costs of marketing live and dressed poultry, dressing, drawing, eviscer- 
ating and preparing poultry for the table. Fall. (Gwin.) 

P. H. 105. Egg Marketing Problems (2). 

Exterior and interior egg quality factors, wholesale and retail grades 
of eggs, egg marketing channels, relation of transportation and distribution 
to quality, methods and costs of marketing eggs, candling and preparing 
eggs for the table. Spring. (Gwin.) 

Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 

Preservation of Poultry Products, see Bacteriology, F. Tech. 108. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2). 

This course presents the relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole 
and its economic importance. Consumer prejudices and preferences, pro- 
duction, transportation, storage, and distribution problems are discussed. 
Trends in the industry, surpluses and their utilization, poultry by-products, 
and disease problems, are presented. Summer, Fall. (Staff.) 



'itm" Advanced Poultry Genetics (3)_Prerequisite. P. H. 51 or 

C « serves as a ^o-dation for re. r^^^^^^^^^ 

-%Tntrn:eVr'rrn:e t S^ ^^^^^.f f/ environ- 
Tnt oX expression of genetic capacities are considered. Spnng, 

Tr202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3)_Two lectures; one labora- 
,,r, prerequisite. P. H. f2:,Z:'::Lere, intensively. Vitamin, min- 

Srrtrfe-\*5Lrt?rot^^^^^^ are .udied. 

Th 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3)-Two lectures; 

production, is considered. Fert lity, sexual ^ J^ ^ j^ physiology 
egg formation, ovulation, deposition of egg envelopes, ana Ppj^.^j.^^ ^ 

of oviposition are studied. Fall. 

P H. 204. Seminar (1). , 

Reports of current researches by staff members, graduate studen^s,^and 

guest speakers are presented. Fall, bpring. 
P. H. 205 f s. Poultry Literature (1-4). 

Readings on individual topics are ^''X^-^%^'j^^^^''2lrJB.re 
required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

taught. Summer, Fall, Spring. 
p H 20fi f s Research— Credit in accordance with work done. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PROP^SSORS JENKINS*, SPROWLS ; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Bm.UmS* ; 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CLARK; DR. MACMILLAN, DR. HACKMAN, 

Mrs. Thurston. 
Psvcholotrical Testing Bureau. The staff of the Department of Psychol- 
ogy m^ntaTns a bureau of vocational and educational ^-^-07" the ba^^^^^ 
of adequately standardized psychological tests. The services of the bureau 
are available without charge to students. 

•On leave of absence for military service. 



352 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



phases of h»,.„ teh„i„ SuiJe^rf Kprti '°°" to".....!.. 

Psych. 2. Applied Psycholoffv r^^ p,.^ • -. ' 
A general introduction to tl^ , . ^"" '' ^"P''«'"<'^« standing, 
situations. Includes a eons^ratr^^^^^^^^ "' ^r'^"^''^^ '" practical life 
sonal efficiency, in vocatrnal orieltt* • P^y«='^''l°^''=al Problems in p 
ing, and in the professions Fal!!' '" ^^' "°"^'"' '"^ P^^lic speal 
Psych. 3 Applied Psychology (3)_Prerequisite, Psych 1 

auction, advertising, selli:;, arrr^rre^r^i^tpHng "^^''^^ ^' ^^'^ 

Topics m applied psychology which relaf» t„ ^- , 

ness and industry viewed fromTf of !i ■ ° P^^<=t'«al problems in busi- 
Pall. "^ ^'^^'* ^'^'"^ *»>« standpoint of controlled observation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Psych. 55. Educational Psycholopv <-?■> u ■ . . 
of Education. sycnoiogy (3)_Required of students of College 

educS™?eiurmentstnd^*5n,-fi'^''''''°^i'^' problems encountered in 
in. motivation. transfeiTtJaSntr fu^tS^l.^:™' '-- 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates ^'''■"''' 

^^Psych. no. Advance, Educational Psychology (3)-Prerecuisite, PsycH. 

in'^dTca^.tT; mS^^^^^^^^ tZnT'T "' '''''' P^^<=^°'"^-^' P-biems 
(Sprowls.) "'""'l^ of controlled observation. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

Psych. 115. Detection and Treatmpnt „f n * x . 
-e^isHes, Psych. , „, pe™,sI":':"Ll^:J:l; '" """""^ '"-■■"■ 

Psych 120 P ,, , • S^^^^er- (Macmillan.) 

PsycC 1 0I33. ^'^'^'^^^ ^' ^'^^^^^^-^ ^^ff-nces (3)-Prere,uisite, 

, Dusmess, and industry. Fall. (Macmillan.) 



PSYCHOLOGY 



353 



psych. 121. Social Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

A psychological study of human behavior in social situations; experi- 
mental studies of the influence of other persons, of social conflicts and indi- 
vidual adjustment, of the psychology of social institutions and of current 
social movements. Summer, Spring. (Clark.) 

Psych. 125. Child Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or 55. 

Experimental analysis of child behavior; motor intellectual, and emo- 
tional development, social behavior, parent-child relationships, and prob- 
lems of the growing personality. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Clark.) 

Psych. 130. Mental Hygiene (3) — Two lectures; one clinic. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1 or 55. 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of adjust- 
ment. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology (3) — Two lectures; one clinic. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 130. 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of psychological abnormality with 
emphasis on the clinical rather than theoretical aspects. Spring. 

(Sprowls.) 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Market Research (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 3 or permission of instructor. 

Use of methods of controlled observation in determining public reactions 
to merchandise, and in measuring the psychological influences at work in 
particular markets. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Jenkins.) 

Psych. 141. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3) — Prerequisite, 
Psych. 3. 

Experimental and statistical studies of psychological aspects of advertis- 
ing; methods of measuring the effectiveness of advertising; the role of 
such factors as attention, memory, belief, etc.; problems associated with 
specific advertising media. Spring. (Hackman.) 

Psych. 150. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Psych. 120 or permission of instructor. 

Critical survey of psychological tests used in vocational orientation and 
in industry with emphasis on methods by which such tests are validated; 
practice in the use of tests and the interpretation of test data. Simimer, 
Spring. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 155. Vocational Orientation (3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 150 or 

equivalent. 

Psychological methods and results for occupational classification, and for 
worker selection, classification, and individual orientation. Spring. 

(Macmillan.) 



354 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Psych. 161. Personnel r^^ t> (Hackman^^ 

developing aTd L 1*'°"' <=lassification, measur^ T ^m"' ^ '^onsidera- 
^^„_ . and .a,nta,nin, personnel 'eSrVnd tS;"^^:^ 

le?"'"- '''• ^''^-'-' Personnel Psychology (3) p . ^^^^^^ 

A continuation of Pe , <3>-P-requ.ite, Psye, 

tiritrjor-^- ^^° -«^^^^^ -^^-^« on t^e 

Psych L T """"^ ^^-^'=«- Sp"S "'"'*""^ *'^^^"-- 

Interpretation of pcimii, 

onender. (Not offered 1942-43 ) ""'^*'°" "^ &uilt and treatment 
Psych. 190. Techniques of r„v„ '.• ,- (Sprowls.) 

couiis lor interpretation «!„»v,^ "^ootaming data and 

"• Summer, Pall, Spring. 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems i„ p ,. (Macmillan.) 

tioned to work accomnJi^J,!/^ Psychotechnology (2.S) r ^-^ 

Condu t f toward graduate 

(Staff.) 



PSYCHOLOGY 



355 



For Graduates 

Psych. 200. Research in Psychotechnology (4-6) — Credit apportioned 
to work accomplished. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Staff.) 

Psych. 210. Seminar in Eklucational Psychology (6) — An advanced 
course for teachers and prospective teachers. 

Systematic approach to advanced problems in educational psychology 
based upon specific experimental contributions. Fall, Spring. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 240. Seminar in Current Psychotechnological Problems (6) — An 

advanced course for students pursuing major graduate studies. 

A systematic analysis of recent contributions in selected psychotechnolog- 
ical fields. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Jenkins.) 

Psych. 245. Advanced Psychological Problems in Market Research (3). 

Graduate study of the specialized problems and techniques employed by 
the psychologist in market research. The course will attempt to combine 
systematic theory with actual practice in dealing with these research prob- 
lems. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Jenkins.) 

Psych. 250. Participation in Testing Clinic (4-6) — Credit apportioned to 
work accomplished. 

Actual practice in the administration of tests of aptitude, interest, and 
achievement and interpretation of test data in the course of routine opera- 
tion of the testing bureau. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Macmillan.) 

Psych. 251. Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3) — 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150. 

Methods for evaluating criteria and for the analysis and combination of 
test and predictor items. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Bellows.) 

Psych. 255. Occupational Psychology (3) — Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

Experimental development and use of the vocational counseling interview, 
aptitude tests, and related techniques for the occupational orientation of 
youth. (Not offered 1942-43.) (Bellows.) 

Psych. 280. Pol. Sci. 222 Analysis of Propaganda (3)— Same as Pol. 
Sci. 222. (Bone, Jenkins.) 

Psych. 290. Problems of Experimental Design in Psychology (3)— Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

Application of advanced research techniques to specific fields in psycho- 
technology with actual practice in their use. (Not offered 1942-43.) 

(Hackman.) 



S56 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SOCIOLOGY 

-al problems ftrb^' de^Se'r ^T" "' ^™ "a:^-el?Lt:' 
of reorganization. PaS, Sp'^^^*" ^°"^*'- - --es and du4 S 

Soc. 3. Introduction to Sociology n\ n . 
of anstructor. "'"^y (3)-0pen to freshmen with consent 

change. Summer, Spring. '^' ' "'"' P^"'^"*^*^' social interaction- TodJ 

Soc. 5. Comparative Sociology (3). 

•comparative analvse<! r,f «-• ■^■ 
tribution of culture PfL , P™'*'^^ and civilized societies w ,. .- 

r -• ---- Sir r -,r.?4-~^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates ^'""'- 

Soc. 51. Post-War P hi 
consent of instructor. ^ "" "' ^*^'^' Organization (3)-Prerequisite 

'""*"'">" »' the communliy. .^mI "" ««™«nllies; social 

*»«.» and taction, o, .pi'-Scstir. '"If ' """""""^^ «" 

^' g-roups, the community council. 

Of l^i^tor^— - - --. C3>_Prere.uisite, Soc. 3 ^^ 

ThllaSS'^-rmTdir^^^^^^^^^ famii, i„ ,^, .„, ,,,,,. 

irr'*^^"™"^- M^t« selection and c'rtl ''^?;J''"'"'' "^^^""^"ce to the 
relationships, and personality. Familv S ''• .^^'""^^e- Member roles, 
and desertion. The family and sL^ chat^^-"' conflicts, divorce, 

* (Lejins.) 



SOCIOLOGY 



357 



Soc. 71. Social Pathology (3) — Two lectures; one field trip. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

A study of maladjustments which represent deviations from generally 
accepted social norms. Problems to be covered will include poverty, unem- 
ployment, family disorganization, crime, and international war. Summer, 
Spring. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 72. Criminology (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

The concept of criminal behavior. Statistical and case study approaches 
to the phenomena of crime. Etiology of crime: a historical survey of the- 
ories attempting a causative explanation of criminal behavior and some 
prevalent hypotheses. Types and classifications of criminal acts and offend- 
ers. Scientific methods of correction. Prevention of crime. Summer, 
Spring. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 73. Juvenile Delinquency (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 72 or consent of 
instructor. 

Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. Analy- 
sis of factors responsible for juvenile delinquency. Prevention and treat- 
ment: probation, juvenile courts, correctional institutions, community pro- 
grams, and public school programs. Fall. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 81. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Two lectures; one field trip. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 71 or consent of instructor. 

The theory of social work; social case work, generic and specific; proce- 
dure and techniques in social case work; principles of social diagnosis; 
present day types of social work; administration of public and private 
welfare agencies. Fall. (Joslyn.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101. Social Stratification (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of 
instructor. 

Deals with classes, status groups, caste systems, slavery, various types 
of elites, and vertical mobility. Fashion and styles. Presents a theory of 
stratification, social movements, symbol manipulations, and hierarchies of 
power. Traces their import for personal and official roles, and for the dis- 
tribution of prestige. Fall. (Mills.) 

Soc. 103. Rural Sociology (3). 

The structure and functions of rural communities; the evolution of rural 
culture'; rural institutions and their problems; the psychology of rural 
life; composition and characteristics of the rural population; relation of 
rural life to the major social processes; the social aspects of rural planning. 
Summer, Spring. (Holt.) 



358 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Soe. 104. Urban Sociology (3). 

Ane origin and s-rowfii /^-p -x- 
populations; the sliTl:^^^':^'^?,''''^^ ^"^^ characteristics of citv 

"ty, the planning and control of urba^devejopS Taf. ''°'^^"^ °^*^' 
. Soc. 105. P„p„,ati„„ pr„„^^^ ^°'^"*- ^^"- (Holt.) 

instructor. ""'^'^^ (3)_Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of 

Population growth in thp tt -f ^ o 
and mortality; differential ferS .^^h''' •^^^^'^Porary trends in fertilitv 
«tion of our population and ttfr ,i l^^^ality; changes i„ the c^Z 
modern times; qualitative problem, 'r^^'^"'"' Population migration t 
growth and decline. Sprfng. '''"' "' Population; theories of porrtio„ 

inst-ct^- "-■"-' — C3)-Prere,uisite. Soc. 3 or consn; 

^^^^:t^:^^--^^ ^differentiation of regions- 
metropolitan, cultural. aS^ fdlStSivlf ^"^ ''^^""^ *« t^^ese regtns 
ism on social institutions- reS» V ^'°"'' *'^^ ™Pact of regional' 
planning. Summer, Spring. ^""'' ^^"""'"^ ^''^ emphasis on pSSar 

o.1:;trrtor."^"^^ ---^ — (3)-Prere.uisite. Soc. 3 ol^l! 

tion; their adjustment to the new sSh ' ^^ '^"'"" °^ *heir migra- 
States. Ethnic minorities in Europland thH' k, ' '^"^"'' '" ^^e United 
cussion of proposals for the solutTon of f f ^^'l'^'"" ^''^^ P^-^sent. A dis- 
expenences and desiderata fof^V^^l^^ll^,^ "^^V^-^t 

sentof Virutt^- "^ ^ — <3>-P.reUite:Soc. 3 ori! 

Structure and funrfinr, ^4? j- • • 
shifting occupational *rms;[r:rmot"^*'^^^ ^^'^*-- *° t-^^nology; 
ions of selected professions in tL so^L, " '-*"^' '°"^"^^' *"« P^' 

the concept of career; the distribution oT^inT' ^"^ P^'^t^'^al orders; 
of occupations on personality. OccupatLt ;",'^'"'"'=^" ^""^t^- Effect 
professional associations and ethS spring ' ^"*^ organizations; 

See. 125. Sociology of War (3). " ^^'"''^ 

tivf ^:^br5nga*„^tat%tT^^^^^^^^^^ -eerning factors opera- 

class: jts role in war and its Muence „/f ''^' °" '°'''*^- ^''^ '"""^^ 
Technology and war. The modern'TorepToI? itaT";^ ^"' ''''''''''■ 

^ ^^^^^ war. Summer, Spring. 

(Lejins.) 



SOCIOLOGY 



359 



Soc. 130. Recent Social Thought (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of 
instructor. Required of all sociology majors. 

A general survey and critical study of leading schools of sociological 
thought. Fall. (Mills.) 

Soc. 135. Sociology of Law (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of 
instructor. 

Law as a form of social control. Interrelation between legal and other 
conduct norms as to their content, sanctions, and methods of security con- 
formity. Law as an integral part of the culture of the group. Factors and 
processes operative in the formation of legal norms: an analysis of some 
historical data and of more typical and important situations in modern 
western society. Legal norms as determinants of human behavior. Fall. 

(Lejins.) 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of 
instructor. 

Varieties and sources of religious experience. Religious institutions and 
the role of religion in social life. Fall. (Holt.) 

Soc. 140. Design of Investigation in Sociology (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 
3. Required of all sociology majors. 

A critical study of the rationale, both implicit and explicit, underlying 
the concepts, procedure, and methods employed by a nimiber of outstand- 
ing sociological investigations. Fall. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 141. Techniques of Investigation in Sociology (3) — Three periods of 
practice and discussion. Prerequisite, Soc. 3. Required of all sociology 
majors. 

A study of quantitative methods in sociology and actual practice in vari- 
ous methods of obtaining, analyzing, and interpreting data. Summer, 
Spring. (Holt.) 

Soc. 150. Field Practice in Social Work (3) — Prerequisite, Soc. 81 or 
consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available opportunities. 

Supervised field work of various types undertaken during the summer 
months and suited to the needs of the individual student. Summer, Fall, 
Spring. (Joslyn.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 200. Seminar in Methodology (3) — Required of all graduate stu- 
dents in sociology. 

A study of fundamental methodological problems in sociology. Among the 
subjects to be considered will be language problems in scientific discourse; 
operational concepts in sociology; the postulates, procedures, and methods 
of science; the uses and limitations of quantitative methods; the sociology 
of knowledge; controversial issues in sociology; techniques of investigation. 
Fall. (Staff.) 



SOCIOLOGY 



361 



360 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Soc. 201. Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3). 

A study of the structure of social action systems in relation to the st rue- 
tural requirements of the means-end fields in which these systems operate. 
Sunmier, Spring. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 202. Sociological Theory (3). 

An examination of the works of European and American theorists. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to Max Weber, Simmel, Horney, Mannheim, 
Tonnies, Lasswell, Durkheim, and G. H. Mead. Fall. (Mills.) 

Soc. 203. Sociology of Knowledge (3). 

Social bases of ideologies and mentalities; a sociological theory of lan- 
guage, mind, and types of intellectual change. Bias and objectivity. Posi- 
tions of intellectual, technical, and literary elites; periodicals and their 
publics. Thought and action; social conditions of constraint and freedom of 
thought. The place of science in western civilization. Studies of selected 
ideologies. Spring. (Mills.) 

Soc. 204. Social Organization (3). 

An intensive study of selected problems pertaining to the structure and 
organization of basic social institutions. Spring. 



(Joslyn.) 



Soc. 205. Community Organization (3). 



Criteria of community organization and disorganization; variables in 
community organization and their conditioning factors; special problems in 
the organization of rural, village, suburban, and urban communities; com- 
munity stability and instability; the lay and professional leader in the 
community. Classroom and field studies will be made of the composition, 
structure, and functioning of selected communities. Fall. (Dodson.) 

Soc. 206. Comparative Sociology (3). 

Studies in the social formation and selection of types of personality in 
the frameworks of primitive and historical societies as compared with con- 
temporary American society. Fall. (Mills.) 

Soc. 207. Rural-Urban Sociology (3). 

A study of the differences between rural and urban societies with refer- 
ence to composition of population, social mobility, social relationships, dif- 
ferentiation of social groups, standards of living, mores and attitudes, and 
various pathological conditions. Spring. (Holt.) 

Soc. 210. Special Problems of Population (3). 

An intensive study of selected problems in the fields of population growth, 
fertility and mortality, population composition, and population migration. 
Fall. (Holt.) 



S„c. 211. Advanced Regional ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^,, states and vari- 

^ comparative analysis of -f '""^^ *™ ^ju mdude the meanings and 

V foreign countries. Topics to be ^ov^jed wi ^^^^ti^^ of regions 

^pS o'ns of .egionalism; or^ms o regiona^^- ^^^^^^^^^ demographic 

the United States on the basis oi ^^^ ^ ^ problems peculiar to 

•^* „T .i""d development Spr,.g 

JtS:^,^^t^[^ "=•■ •— "'SIS 

and designs of research projects. Spring. 
Soc. 216. Sociology of the Family (3). ^^^ ^^^.jy 

A study of selected recent researches m the sociology ^^^..^^^ 

Summer, Spring. 

soc. 217. Seminar in the ^--'"^f "/^^^^^/'^.^tive in the formation 
An intensive study of factors and processes op ^^^..^^ ^ 

of law. Fall. 

Soc. 221. Advanced Criminology (3). .^^^ ^^search. Fall. 

An intensive study of selected problems m crmimolog ^^..^^^ 

Soc. 222. Recent Criminological -^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ical criminology. 
A survey of -cent developments -J^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ 

Sr t^rmo^n^SSyor — er. Spring. 

Soc. 223. Juvenile Delinquency (3). ^^ ^^^^.^^ ^^^^. 

Theories of juvenile ^^'^'^-^■^^^Xetn^X^tes. An intensive study 
quents, with particular ^f^/^^^^^^^^ted problems in the field. Fall. 
will be undertaken of one or more selectee p (Lejins.) 

„ in Sociology-Credit apportioned to work accom- 
Soc. 250. Research m bocioiogy 

plished. . . ,. „ -it.her field work or analysis of 

individual research projects involving either ^^^^^^ 

compUed data. Summer, Fall, Sprmg. 



362 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SPEECH 

Speech 1 f s. Public Speaking ^i^ . "^' ""''' '''''''^ 

-te for advanced speech ZtTel ^'^"^^^--^ "^ «" students. Prerequi- 

students. Summer, FaU Spr^ "'"*'' '*" '^^^* ^'-- '"e^t 
Speech Clinic-No credit. 
i>peech examinations- tramir,,, • 
minor speech difficulties'. The w?rk"ofT'^•^"'^ ^°''="' -^'"^dial work i„ 
conferences and in small group meetin w "'' '' '"'"^'''^'^ i" in^ividu 
-n With the respective sp^eeT i^ttl^/ Su^^r %T? '' ''^^ 
Speech 2. Fundamentals of Speech (3) ' '""^• 

Studies m the bases and mechar„vr ./ ,. 

with public speaking eJuXl I ■' T'""- ?'« '^""rse does not deal 
function in private as well as public manSS "r' *^ "'^"'^ ^P^" 
for students who expect to do extensve w! I '^ " '" ^'^"" P^marily 
electing this course may take it concuTreZ •?.'^''*- ^"^ «*"1e"t 
Speech 1 f s. Summer, Fall, Spring ^ °' ^^*"" completing 

EduSn.'- ^"'" '»"'' ^^^«- (3)-Por students in the College of 

in^pl^ter^^^^^ opportunity to 

sound production, physics of so^nd aftribL f"'''''''^''o. of spLh 
mechanism, the larynx and ear are combin^H .."^ ^°'*^"' *^ ^'^^^thing 

te::rr".r""-- ^---^ ^". cr ^^'^^ ^"-^ ^" -- 

Of ^rnmic^J'^'Zt::^^^^^^ (4)-For students in the College 
Advanced work on ba^of Spe/eh l fT ^f ^""^^^ °^ Agricultur'e 
adaptations. At each session of the class a ^f 'r'"' ^PP'--«-s and 
the speeches-civil, social, and pohtLl „' ! ^T^^ '""'"^ ^^ ^'ven for 
tions in the fields of the prosnect 1 "'^f "'^^t'^n^. etc., and organiza- 
Summer, Fall, Spring. ^'"'^^''''^^ ^-^c^tions of the different students. 

Speech 5. Oral Technical English (2>i p 

dents. Limited to engineering sfudents ^^Ph^more engineering stu- 

ine preparation and deliverv of ^ni:. \ 
and general subjects. Summer, FaH S^'*'^'''*'' "^"•' ^" ^oth technical 

Speech 6. Advanced Oral Technical Fnc^r i, .n. 
students. Limited to engineering ^^^^^^ ^'^"^^^ J--r engineering 

This course is a continuation of Speech 5 c,^ • , 
gineering projects that fall within student^ n ^ '^^ ^^Phasis upon en- 
sion and criticism of all speeches and repol ^^ experience. Class discus- 

^ reports. Summer, Fall, Spring. 



SPEECH 



363 



Speech 7 f s. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — Senior seminar. For 
senior engineering students only. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 6. Work not confined to classroom. 
Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies in tne 
university and elsewhere. Summer, Fall, Spring, 

Speech 8 f s. Group Discussion (2). 

The theory and practice of the panel, round-table, symposium, and other 
methods of group discussion. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Speech 9 f s. Debate (4). 

This course stresses not formal debating, but forms of persuasion which 
will be useful in business and professional life. It deals, to a great extent, 
with ways in which human beliefs and behavior may be influenced by 
logical discussion. Summer, Fall, Spring, 

Speech 10. Oral Reading (3). 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation 
of literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 
Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Speech 11. Stagecraft (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Open to sophomores. 

Planning and construction of stage settings, costumes, properties. Prac- 
tice in the stagecraft shop and on stage in performance. Fall. 

Speech 12. Stagecraft (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Speech 11. 

Stage design and lighting. Spring. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students 

Speech 101. Introduction to Radio (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Admission by audition or consent of instructor. 

A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the various aspects of 
present-day broadcasting. Extensive practice in microphone speaking. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 102. Radio Program Production (3) — Laboratory Course. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 101 or consent of instructor. 

The preparation and production of radio dramatizations and other types 
of programs. Laboratory fee, $2.00, Spring. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 103 f s. Speech Composition (6) — Not allowed for graduate 
credit except in English and Education. 

A study of rhetorical principles and models of speech composition in 
conjunction with the preparation and presentation of both general and 
specific forms of public address. Students electing this course cannot 
receive credit for Speech 4. Fall, Spring. (Ehrensberger.) 



364 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Speech 104. Spe«:h Pathology (3). 

s^XJ^l.t'-' ^«- <^>-- lectures,, one ..0..^;^::;: 
A course dealine- wffh ^\^^ 

in Cinic With caL Liltn^L^r^'^ '." ^''^^^'=*^-- ^'^t-, .ork 
Spring. y research and detailed reports required 

^xruportrCr^r-/^^^^^^^^^^ 

t--e .itahle .^fl^ ^ ^ c.^ __ ^^^^. 

Speech 107 s. Teacher Problems in Speech (3) <P-vensen.) 

A practical course dealing with tf,« • 
ment of minor speech defects. The cours'^TT'"'"* °^ ^"^^^^ and the treat- 
speech problems that confront tZ 7 I ^^^signed to meet the every dav 
and practice clinic. Summer *'"'^" ^'^^^ -"' ^e a demonstratt 

VETERINARY SCIENCE • (Hutcheson.) 

Assistant Prop^ssor dXs ^^^^^°«''' ^^Volt; 
Fo^ Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

st"ru;tir ^fThrrir/rr ^-^ ""^^^-'-^ <^>- 

relationship betweertTe^la'^oirorg^anrr^^^^ ^^''^ "^-'^ ^n*er- 
S: -«- --^ o^ ---Tca-l^cS^ro^rT it:; 
V. S. 102. Animal Hvffienp r^^ t> (Crawford.) 

Care and mana^emlt Td ^^^'^^^^^^ ""' ^' '''' 

maintenance of hSh" rtSLt, TJT' ^^^^ ^^^^^ reference to 
recognition of abnormal condition "^^^^^^^ ,f '' ^'^"^"'^^^ ^^^ early 
epizootics; enzootics; internal and exte-^I "^^ sanitation; infections; 
Spring. ^^^ external parasites; first aid. Fall! 

V. S. 103 Hematology (2)^Two laboratories ^''""'"''^ 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic si^n^fi 
taking samples; estimating the amount of 1^^- r.'' '^ '^^"^^« ^'^ blood; 
jcal count of erythrocytes and leuXtes s^^^^^^ ^/^ -^ex; numer- 

in fresh and fixed stained preparatw'. h ^^ •''^'^ '^"'' ^"^ leucocytes 
vitel staining; sources and developm^^^^^^^ ^^"^^ -^ leucocyL; 

pathological forms and counts Si ' ^'™'^ ^^^^^^^s of bloodi 

(Welsh.) 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 



365 



V, S. 104. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance of kidney excretions, 
use of clinical methods including microscopic examination for casts, cells, 
blood, parasites, bacteria, and interpretation of results. Spring. 

(Brueckner.) 

V. S. 105. Pathological Technic (3) — Three laboratories. Bact. 1 desir- 
able. 

Examination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectioning by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin embedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. Fall. (Breuckner.) 

V. S. 106. Pathological Technic (continued) (2-5) — Laboratory course. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory procedures 
as applied to clinical diagnosis. Spring. (Brueckner.) 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory period. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 1, P. H. 106 f. 

Study of causes, symptoms, dissemination, life cycle, seasonal appearance, 
methods of control and eradication of various virus, bacterial and protozoan 
diseases of poultry including internal and external parasites. The lectures 
are supplemented by laboratory demonstrations. Spring. (DeVolt.) 

V. S. 108. Avian i^^^atomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 1 s. 

A study of the gross and microscopic structure of the body of the 
domestic fowl. The lectures include references to physiological processes. 
The laboratory provides for a study of systematic anatomy by dissection 
work combined with demonstrations. The course is designed to meet the 
needs of the student in poultry husbandry. Fall. (DeVolt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 201. Animal Disease Problems (2-6) — Credit according to work 
done. Prerequisite, degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veteri- 
nary college or consent of instructor. Laboratory and field work by assign- 
ment. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Welsh.) 

V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research (2-6) — Credit according to work 
done. Prerequisite, degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veteri- 
nary college or consent of instructor. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 



ZOOLOGY 



367 



366 



ZOOLOGY 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Professor Truitt; Associate Professor Phillips; Assistant Professors 

BuRHOE, Hard, Tressler; Mr. Clarke, Mr. Cronin, Mr. Filippi, 

Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Winbury, Miss McCutcheon, Mr. Piness. 

Zool. 1. General Zoology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory course, which is cultural and practical in its aim. It 
deals with the basic principles of animal development, structural relation- 
ships, and activities, a knowledge of which is valuable in developing an 
appreciation of the biological sciences. Typical invertebrates and a mam- 
malian form are studied. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Summer, Fall, Spring. 

Zool. 2 f s. Fundamentals of Zoology (8) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classification, and life history of repre- 
sentative animals. During the first semester, emphasis is placed on inverte- 
brate forms and during the second semester upon vertebrate forms includ- 
ing the frog. 

This course satisfies the freshman premedical requirements in general 
biology. Freshmen who intend to choose zoology as a major should register 
for this course. Either semester may be taken first. Both semesters must 
be completed before credit is granted. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 
Summer, Fall; Spring, Summer. 

Zool. 3. Introductory Zoology (3) — Two lectures; one demonstration. 

A course for students desiring a general knowledge of the principles 
underlying the growth, development, and behavior of animals, including 
man. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fall. 

Zool. 4. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. Required of students whose major is zoology, and of premedical 
students. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Summer, Spring. 

Zool. 5. Economic Zoology (2) — Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

The content of this course centers around the problems of preservation, 
conservation, control, and development of economic wild life, with special 
reference to Maryland. The lectures are supplemented by assigned readings 
and reports. 

Combined with Zool. 6, this course should form a part of the basic 
training for professional foresters, game proctors, and conservationists. 
Spring. 

Zool. 6. Field Zoology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequisites, 
one course in zoology and one in botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis on the higher 



* r: ' LCl^rlrph.,.., <4)-Tw. ..*«.. .wo ..bo^to™. 
,SS«i'o< stu.l»,. wh.se major 1= zoo ..y^^^^^^^ ,„, ,„„„p, ot 

science or uiuiu^^* -*— ^ ^ 4-ckA 

summer. Fall; Spring, Summer ^^^ laboratory. Not 

Zool. 16. Human Physiology W 

open to freshmen. „hvsiology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Summer, 

An elementary course m physiology. 

Spring. . , . /•Q^ One lecture; two laboratories. 

'zool 20. Vertebrate Embryology ^»>-^-J\\,de;ts whose major is 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology Required 
zoology and of P--edical students. ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^,^ 

The development of the cnicK x-o t 
.JmLaUan embryology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. FaU. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Zool. 53. Physiology of ^^^^^^^^^/^'.^is^ of muscular contraction; the 
A detailed consideration ^I'^^^J^^^^Tesvonses in exercise; and their 

metabolic, circulatory, and the '^^^^^J^JJ^ Required of all jumors m 

integration by means of the nervous system. 4 (Phillips.) 

Physical Education. Fall. 
Zool. 55. Development of the Human Bo<ly (2>^ development of the 

A study of the mam f actor^^^^^^^^^^^ tveTopment. Spring. (Burhoe.) 

child with especial empnasis on 
Zool. 75 f s. Journal Club (2). literature. Required of all 

Reviews, reports, and d^^^^^^^J.^^^.V Spring. Summer. (Staff.) 

students whose major is zoology. Summer, all, &P 



368 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A course in the dissection of the cat ! ^l " ""^"^ '^ ^""^^^^ 

mission of the instructor, a vertebratf „^h 1"' '""'"'"^'- ^^ «Pecml per 
study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Sp^! " *^' '^^ "^^^ ^« "«ed i" 

Zool. 103 f s Opn^-oi A • , (Phillips ) 

tory. Prerequisites rJ veT of ^"r""*"^ ^'^-^^ '-t-es; one labora 
anatomy. Registrat on LuS to t r^'''^ ""'^ ""« '^''"-^e in ver eb°t 
be obtained before registra«o„ £^7;^' T™""'^" "" -«t™cSt; 

'T::tsr:re:,:r'^*^'' '>e^o^-ednt:nt^f '^^ ^^'^^^ «-*• «°" 

general Sysi2ry.'VrtcS''sei*L*' fundamentals of cellular and 
these principles to the higher animrs Labo' f""'f '' "" application o 
Summer, Fall; Spring, lummer ^^'"""^t^ry fee, $5.00 each semester. 

Zool. 104. Genetics CSI—R • ^ (Phillips.) 

courses in plant and aiii,tTed7ng°lS"l? ^^^^"f "^ *« take advanced 

A general course designed to " '""'''^^ "^J^'S- 

genetics or of heredity; .'T^^lS, :," ^f f ^^ into the principles of 
transmission of characters throuS, ,Ll ^'*°'' instrumental in the 

prepare students for later courses L the hr.'- ^^"«^^«°"«5 and also to 
Summer, Fall. "^^^^ ^" t^e breeding of animals and plants 

Zool. 105. Aquiculture d^ T , . (Burhoe.) 

one course in zoology. ^ ^~^'^'' '"'=*"'««' one laboratory. Prerequisite 

-^^^:sis^::^:ssr''r r- « -- 

onmental purposes. Laboratory fee $500 T " *''''" '"'*^'''« ^^r envir- 

rr , ' *°-""- fc>ummer. Pall /a, ... , 

Zool. 108. Animal Histoloffv (^^ c, , ^ "'^ 

requisite, one course in zoology. ^^~°"^ '^^ture; two laboratories. Pre- 
A microscopical study of tis«!iiP« ^^a 

Zool. 120. Advanced Genetics ri^ t , ^"^'"''•^ 

requisite, Zool. 104. (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 

A consideration of salivarv ri,,. 

moso^e irregularities tS^^^^^^ ^^^ «^ the ,ene, ehro- 

with Drosophila and small mammarwiU b. . ^''^'^"^ experiments 

$5.00. Spring. "^"^^'^ ^^" be conducted. Laboratory fee, 

(Burhoe.) 



ZOOLOGY 



369 



Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Biological, 
physical, and chemical factors of the environment which affect the growth, 
behavior, habits and distribution of animals are stressed in lecture and 
laboratory. The use of ecological instruments is studied in the laboratory 
and on field excursions to local areas of special interest. The course is 
designed to give a broad survey of the field of ecology and to offer a back- 
ground for students who wish to continue with some special problem in 
the field. Laboratory fee, $5,00. Summer, Spring. (Tressler.) 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Marine Zoology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Problems in salt water animal life of the higher phyla. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Fall. (Truitt.) 

Zool. 201. Microscopical Anatomy (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A detailed study of the morphology and activity of cells composing 
animal tissues, with specific reference to the vertebrates. Laboratory work 
includes the preparation of tissues for microscopic examination, and oppor- 
tunity to pursue special research problems. Recent advances in the field of 
cytology are covered in lectures, assigned readings, and reports. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Fall. (Hard.) 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology and development of 
animals, including a consideration of tissue culture and transplantation. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Spring. (Burhoe.) 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Fall. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 205. Hydrobiology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical factors which determine 
the growth, distribution, and productivity of microscopic and near micro- 
scopic organisms in marine and freshwater environments with special ref- 
erence to the Chesapeake Bay region. Microscopic examination, identifica- 
tion of plankton, and experience with hydrobiological equipment and meth- 
ods are provided for in the laboratory and field. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Spring. (Tressler.) 

Zool. 206. Research — Credit to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each 
semester. Summer, Fall, Spring. (Staff.) 

Zool. 207 f s. Zoological Seminar (2). 

Summer, Fall; Spring, Summer. (Staff.) 



370 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




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SECTION III 
Resident Instruction 

BALTIMORE DIVISION 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 

PROFESSORS 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Oral Pathology. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Orthodontics. 

Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
Clifford W. Chapman, Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 
Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 
Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 

of Nursing. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 

Otology. 
David M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany and 

Materia Medica. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry) ; 

Professor of Oral Surgery (Medicine). 
Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the 

School of Pharmacy. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., D.H.L., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 
Ophthalmology. 



371 



370 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




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SECTION III 
Resident Instruction 

BALTIMORE DIVISION 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 

PROFESSORS 

MOTION S. AiSENBERG, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Oral Pathology. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Orthodontics. 

Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
Clifford W. Chapman, Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 
Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 
Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School 

of Nursing. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 

Otology. 
David M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany and 

Materia Medica. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry) ; 

Professor of Oral Surgery (Medicine). 
Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the 

School of Pharmacy. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., D.H.L., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 
Ophthalmology. 



371 






372 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



WILLIAM s. Gardner m n d ^ 

Gravson W^Gavb.. 'd^dS; fTcT P^f *"^ "^ Gyneeolo^. 

Dental Prosthesis. ^-A-C.D., Professor of Crown Srf r.-^ 

JOSEPH E. GICHNEB MD P . '^^^ ^""^ 

Therapeutics. ' •' ^^°'^'^or of Clinical Medicine anH pk 

Andrew C. Gillis AM iw n r r ^^y^^-^a' 

A; J. Gillis. M.D ', cia^^f ''•^•' ^-^essor of Neurolo^ 
Frank W. Hachtel M n I^'^^f^^sor of Genito-Urinarv%^ 

HON. H.NRV D. Si^l^^^^-B °;,^-*-iolo^ '"^"^'•^' 
^^ Law. ' •^^•' LL.B., LL.D., Dean Prv.^ -^ 

WALTER H. HaRTUNG Ph D P . "' ^'^ '<=''<"" 

Roger Howell, Ph.D' ll r" p''°S^^^°'- ^^ Pharmaceutical r),« • . 
J. Mason nx3^v>i^\^\,\' ^Z°i^''°^ "^ Law, DelnoTllS^T^'y- 
E-^^OTT H. Huif A M M ;f •' P-ofessor ;f G^necoW^'^^''^^ "' ^«^- 

Burt B. IDE, D.D.S., F.^c D Prof °''"°^ ^^ Clfni X^_ 
^. L. Jennings m n r^ : ' ^^ofessor of ODprafiNr^ r. '^r^^^y- 

M. RANDOLPH kIhn M'?°rr°' °^ Pediatrics^ '^• 

^r.^r^' Phanaro'^^rprof "^°^ °^ Ophthalmology 

JOHN C. KRANTz,'jR^- Ph^'^*'"^ f'^'^-^^or of Roentgendo^v 

J-NNETH D. LEGGE, k^vfcmfjTl;' ^^— ^ ^^• 

G. Carroll Lockard, m D Pr 'f ^^^f^ssor of Genito-Urinarv 9, 

E-WARD A LOOPB^, MD;DOpt%?'/""'*=^'^-J-i--^^^^^ ^^^^^ 
ihroat -^P^', -rToiessor nf ni*«^ 

H-HKV B. MCCARTHV D B . . "' *'^ """^^ -'^ 

Dentistry. ™'^' ^-^-S-. F.A.C.D.. Professor of rn • , 

Robert L. MITCHELL PharD m. ^''^ ^^ «'--' Operative 

ology. "" ^^^'••D-. M.D., Professor of BacteH„7„ 

THEODORE H. MoRRzsoN MD CI" • , . ^-^-ology and Path- 

D. J. Pessagno, A.B M B rr -'T^^ Professor of Gastro F f , 
Maur,c. c. Pi^corPs, B S ■ M L"t ^/°'^^^°^ °^ Surjry "^''^^^^y- 
J. DAWSON REEDER, M.DfpSsor'IfT "' ^^^-'-- 
G. Kenneth Reiblich p^ n t 1 °^ Diseases of th*. p..-.* 
Russell R. r^no, S S 'f,-^'^-''-' Professor of Law " '"' ^'''°"- 
COMPTON RiELv. M.D., cS Prof •' '''°'''"'' °^ La- 
Harrv M Robinson, W.D. ProS^o'/'Jn"' ^'^^P^edic Surgery 

ABRAM S. SAMUELS,' aIb ' M D r^'"''?'"- °' Law. 

AK.H.R M. SHIP., M.B., sclt^r;:f3- ::,«--ogy. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



373 



IRVING J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

HUGH R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

THOMAS P. Sprunt, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D., Professor of Law 

(Law) ; Instructor in Jurisprudence (Dentistry.) 
W. H. TOULSON, M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Roentgenology. 
Huntington Williams, M.D., D.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Health. . • 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., B.S., Sc.D., Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry, Acting Dean of 

the School of Medicine. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Nose 
and Throat and Otology. 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

J. McFarland Bergland, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Physician in 
Charge of Medical Care of the Students. 

C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Carl Dame Clarke, M.A., Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medi- 
cine. 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurological 
Surgery. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Associate Professor of Economics and 
Pharmaceutical Law. 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

Frank H. J. Figge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, Instructor in 
Pathology. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

T. Campbell Goodwin, M.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

Thomas C. Grubb, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Anatomy (Dentis- 
try) ; Instructor in Oral Surgery (Medicine). 

0. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Histology. 

Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 



374 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Edward s. Johnson M D a 

WILLIAM S. Love, Jr., A.B M n a ^ Clinical Surgery 

H J "m " ''^*''°^°^y- '""'*' ^''''''''' ofVdicine W 

^. J. Maldeis M n a . ' ^nstruc- 

Histology. •' ^''°*^'^t« Professor of EmLoW 

SYDNEY R. Miller B S m n a -Embryology and 

EMiL Novak, A.B. M D D^': ^T"'^'' ^'°''''°' °f Medicine 

A. W. RicHEsoN Ph n A • ^'"■■ 

Harrv L. Rogers, M.d;; tlTZt v ''/'''' °^ Mathematics 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph D LI r ! Professor of Orthopaedic Sur.^ 
G. M. Settle a r n/T ;; ^^'"^^^^^^'ate Professornf r; . ?"reery. 

Medicine • •^•' ''•^- ^^^-'e Professor TCrotr'^ ?^"'^*^^- 
D. CONRAD SMITH Ph D A • Neurology and Clinical 

William H. Smith mh" r^°"ate Professor of Phv^ioi. 
RALPH P. TRmT? M D A ''*?*='"*^ P^-'^-^^or of CHnS£. • 
GHANT E. Ward. A^B.^ M i) I'^Lf^^rj °^ P^Sry""''""^- 

"The^misr ' "-^•' --^^^^^^^ 

LAWRENCE P. W^, ^ ^ ^^ . ^ '"°^^^"- -<^ Analytical 

Helen E. Wright R n T" ^^.^^^^^e Professor of Psvchi.f. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

H. F. BONGARDT M n Ac«- X 

J. Edmund Bra^^y gt m n ^"'"^^''^ "^ Surgery 

Leo Brady A B M n f' ^■^■' Assistant Professn/^^- r, .• 

H. M. Bub;.^ M-RstiSr;-'^-- °^ gS^^^'^-^- 
Ross Davies, m.d. M P H A^ ^'''°'' °^ ^«d'«ne. 

Health. ' ^^•"•' Assistant Professor of Hv^;. 

Paul a. deems, D.d.S., PA CD a • " ''"''' 

Pathology. ' "•^■^■"■y Assistant Professor nf nv ■ 

J. S. Eastland, A.B M D a • . '^' ^''' 

FKANCis ELLIS,' A.B.:m.-D.: As^Ltnl Prt""^ ""^ ^^'-e. 
OAVU«. B. Estabrook, PhlD., A^lrt^SeTso^^?^^^^^ 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



375 



William E. Evans, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

MAURICE Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro- Enter ology. 

A. H. FiNKELSTEiN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., Assistant Professor of English and Public 
Speaking. 

THOMAS K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. James Greiner, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Karl F. Grempler, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

Hugh T. Hicks, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Periodontology. 

Orville C. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and Bridge. 

Frederick W. Invernizzi, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

George C. Karn, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Oral Roentgen- 
ology. 

John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Histology. 

George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Samuel Morrison, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Harry M. Murdock, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

Walter L. Oggesen, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Crown and 
Bridge. 

Robert H. Oster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

James C. Plagge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy. 

William A. Purdum, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

J. Thomas Pyles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Instructor 
in Pathology, Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Isadore a. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

Frank J. Slama, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

Edw. p. Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

Frederick B. Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Edgar B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

A. Allen Sussman, A.B., D.D.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Guy p. Thompson, A.M., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Sur- 
gery. 



376 






, Chemistry. ' "' Assistant Professor .f t 

I^ECTURERs ^oiessor of Surgery, 

*^- N. BiSPHAM CoJ M n 

«oN. Eli Frank a r i t ^ ' "•^•' Lecturer on r„„i 

f- B. Freeman B s M n ?' ^""^^"^^^ <>" TorL "*'^'^*^- 

JONAS FRXEBENWA.': M A ' M n"T " ^^'^-'"e 

per L^-r.~i -r uir ?tti^ --.. 

«ox Emory h. Niles, A B r a' ^"P^^^^««r of Legal Aid rr ■ 
m.ralty and Evidence " ' ^•^•^•' M.A., LL B r ."'• 

G. RiDGELY Sappxngton LL R r '*""'" °" Ad- 

Court. ' ^L.B., Lecturer on Pr. *• 

^- I^OHSEY W..XKX.S, Pi. D LL P . ' ''^"'^''^^ °^ ^-'=«- 

' •^•' LL.B., Lecturer on T„^ 

ASSOCIATES °'^*' ^"'^ Mortgages. 

John r. Abercrqmbie a r ,. r. 

Margaret b. Ballard m d" I " ^''°''^'' '" Dermatolo. 

KENNETH B. Bo^D, M D i, f^"*^ ^'^ Obstetrics' 

Houston Everet; m n f " ^''^^^^te in Gyneco W '^^'^• 

Eugene L. Flippxn m D If ^^^^'^^-Unnary l^r^erv ' 

Wetherbee Fort M n ;' Associate in Koente-enni ^' 
J^ANK J. GerStv* a'b TS'^ ^^ Medidn?^"^^^^- 
Francis W. Gillis Vd ' ^- "^^^^^^'^^^ ^'^ Medicine 
Samuel S. Guck, m D \f '''^^'^ ^'^ G^^ito-UHnTrv Sn 

' ^'^" Associate in Pediatrics Surgery. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



377 



ALBERT E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Harold M. Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. . 

L. P. GUNDRY, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

JOHN T. Hibbitts, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

JOHN F. HOGAN, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Clewell Howell, B.S., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Associate in Surgery, Assistant in Pathology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Frank B. Kindell, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Edward A. Kitlowski, M.D., Associate in Plastic Surgery. 

Henry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, B.S., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and 
Throat. 

L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

James W. Nelson, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
and Otology, Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Benjamin S. Rich, A.B., M.D., Associate in Otology and in Diseases of the 
Nose and Throat. 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., B.S., M.D., Associate in Dermatology, Assistant 
in Medicine. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics, Assistant in Path- 
ology, Acting Superintendent of Hospital. 
William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Richard T. Shackelford, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
Sol Smith, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Cleo D. Stiles, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
E. H. TONOLLA, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
I. RiDGEWAY Trimble, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 



I 



378 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF. BALTIMORE 



379 



INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, Assistant in Path- 
ology. 
Thurston R. Adams, M.D., Instructor in Surgery.^ 

A. Russell Anderson, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 
Bern HARD Badt, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Carl E. Bailey, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Jose R. Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontics. 
J. Carlton Biddix, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Diagnosis. 
George C. Blevins, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Edward G. Boettiger, M.A., Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Douglas A. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Crown and Bridge. 
Samuel H. Bryant, A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Diagnosis. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Albert T. Clewlow, D.D.S., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Morris E. Coberth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontics. 
Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery. 
Murray M. Copeland, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Edward F. Cotter, M.D., Instructor in Pathology, Assistant in Neurology. 
E. Eugene Covington, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Benjamin A. Dabrowski, A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Oral Roent- 
genology. 

B. Matthew Debuskey, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. - 

W. Allen Deckert, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, Assistant in 

Surgery and Obstetrics. 
Amelia C. DeDominicis, M.S., Instructor in Botany. 
S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Francis G. Dickey, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Stanley H. Dosh, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
Ernest S. Edlow, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Director of Orthodontic Clinica. 
William L. Fearing, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
Jerome Fineman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Phiup D. Flynn, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Irving Freeman, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Robert W. Garis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Georgiana S. Gittinger, M.A., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Harold Golton, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Instructor in Diagnosis. 
Robert L. Graham, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 



, SifS HERSPEBGER, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
f^K HEWITT. A.B., M.D., Instructor m Surgery. 
J. FRANK n ^ Instructor in Nursing. 
LiLLiE B. HOKE, K r<. Ophthalmology. 

P. A. HOLDEN, MD., Instructor in P ^^^^^^^ 

FRANK HUKST, I>-^-S-. I«J™j; .^ Embryology and Histology. 

JOHN M. HYSON, D-D-S.. Instructor 1 ^^^^^^ (Dentistry) ; In- 

R Wallace Inman, D.D.S., Inf^'?'=?°J 

'• structor in Oral Surgery ^Medicmei- .^ ^^..^hetics (Dentistry) ; 

roNRAD Inman, D.D.S., i-A-y^-^-, " 
Instructor Oral Surgery (Medicine). 

w tIcobson M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
MEYER W. JACOBSON, m.^, ^ j Surgery. 

WILLIAM R. JO^'^^^^'J^^;; V^'Srct^r in Clinical Orthodontics. 

HAMMOND L. JOHNSTON D.D.S^, In^tnic^ Medicine. 

LwARD S. KALLINS, ^-S-. M-D Instr-tor -^.^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^,^„ 

VERNON D. KAUFMAN, ^^■l'^f'^^"u.6icine) . 

try) ; Instructor in Oral Surgery q ^thalmology. 

F. EDWIN l^^^^^'-'^^^i^^^^^tleTm^tology. 

LESTER N. K«^M^N'3,^-'i^;tSr in Gastro-Enterology. 
M. S. KOPPELMAN M.D., I«J^J^;\^ Clinical Orthodontics. 

SrS? A.B.; M.D ins^uctor in Medicin.^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ,^^. 
RICHARD C. LEONARD, D.D.S., F.A.(..U., 

ventive Dentistry. instructor in Neurology. 

H. Edmund Levin, B.b., m.i^., ^ 

SYTB'rAN,"rsrUrltr in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
L™ E. Litti., M.D instructor in^urgery.^ ^^^^^^^ 

LirrMiYrMrin-cto^ - — — ^--^^' "^^"^" 

H. bLtoTmSI-v. jr., D.D.S., instructor in Clinical Oral Roentgen- 

IV jScDouoLE. ^^■■^C^Z^^I^'Z^^^. 

HUGH B. MCNALLV, RS., M^D^, in^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ p^„,,,,tics. 

C. PAXIL ^^^^^'^f-^;^^XX Bacteriology and Pathology. 

M.«c MILLER, D.D.S., I"st™ Instructor in Medicine. 

ROBERT B. Mitchell, Jr., B.S., ^-i^-. ^nsx 

J. Di;er Moores, ^.S-, M.D^, Ins ructor - S-ge y. ^^^ ^^^^^^^.^ 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., 1"^™°^'" ^; 
RUTH MUSSER, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 



380 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



'"^tr^C' ^•^•^•' ^■^■' ^-ruetor in Medicine, Assistant in Cast. 

EUG... L. pSn^: a'b D Dt7\^*T^^^ °^ *^« «-*- -^ Colon 
Kyrle W. Preis D D S t,^<=; f ■' ^"'*'-"*=t°r in Dental Technics. 
GOROO. S. P.G J et D D ? T T " O^J'O'^ontics. 
James E. Pyott, D d's "f a r n ?'*°'" '" °^"*^' T^'^J^-''^^- 
Kenneth V. Randolph D D 5 ;' ^"^*""^t°^ i" Cental Technics. 

HERBERT E. Reipschne'ioer A B mTV".""""'^ ^''^'■^^'^•^ ^-««trv. 
Assistant in Surgery (MldWr,!^ 't ^f ^^^'^t"^ '" Oral Surgery and 
(Dentistry). ^ ^ (Medicine); Instructor in General AnestheJJs 

Robert a. Reiter, A B lu n t ^ 

Frank J. Roh D dT"t ; ' ^"'*'""<=t°'- i" Medicine. 

M. S. Shiling, a B M d ^; ri ?■' '"'*'"'*°'' ^" Orthodontics. 

ALBERT J. SHOCHAT 'b S M D T . '''' '" ''^''''^■"«- 

ARTHUR G. SiwiNSKi, A^^ M D I^n t^ ^ " «^^*-Enterology. 
Robert L. Smith B '/-^-'/f-' Instructor m Surgery. 

KAK. J. stexnmSS At'MTt:: ' V"^'^^' ^^^--^- 

David TfeNNER M n t . ' ^"^tructor in Surgery. 

Harry A t.^'. ' ^"■^^'•"'^tor i" Medicine. 

JiAKKY A. TEITELBAUM R 9 M T^ t ^ 

in Neurology. ' ^•^- ^^ ^•' ^"^*'-'^<=t°r in Gross Anatomy, Assistant 
BoRSEY R. Tipton d n q t 4. 

tor in Oral S^rge^f (M^dSeT " °''' ^"'"^^''^ ^^^""^^^^^ ^ I-t-c- 
James E. P Tom an pv, n t x 

tor in Physiolog;. ^Deniy™^^^ '" ^'^^'°'°^ (Medicine); Instruc- 
Myron G. Tull AB Mn t V' . 

W. Kennedy Waller, AB Mn t 5^^*^'^"^- 

Principles of Medicine, Physkikn ? Phi ^^'^^^''^^l Diagnosis and 
Students. ' "ys'"*n »« Charge of Medical Care of Dental 

L. Edward Warnfr n n c t ^ 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



381 



ASSISTANTS 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 

Nurses, Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 
J. Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Benjamin F. Allen, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Kenneth L. Andrew, A.B., Assistant in Physics. 
Leon Ashman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
John L. Atkins, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Charles E. Balfour, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Nathaniel M. Beck, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Gastro-Enter- 

ology. 
Frank A. Bellman. B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Joseph M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Obstetrics. 
Harry C. Bowie, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Gross Anatomy. 
George H. BrouilleT, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Ann V. Brown, A.B., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 
A. V. Buchness, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Paul E. Carliner, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William S. Cheney, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Robert F. Chenowith, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Nancy Craven, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
DwiGHT M. CURRIE, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Nachman Davidson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
E. HoLLiSTER Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 
George H. Davis, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Theodore T. Dittrich, B.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
D. McClellen Dixon, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Bernard W. Donohue, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Joseph U. Dorsch, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Thelma Doyle, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing Private Patients, 

Supervisor of Private Halls. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 
Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Herbert M. Foster, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Marguerite Foster, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor of 

Wards. 
Walter C. Gakenheimer, M.S., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
William L. Garlick, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Shirley M. Glickman, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Economics. 
Robert J. Gore, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
George Govatos, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
H. L. Granoff, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 
William Greenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 



382 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



lur.Jr^ -D. UKOVE, M.D., Assistant in Surcerv 
M.4RGARET Hammap p xt a • . ^"^gery. 

Gwendolyn HAurw pm .^'*.""^"^- 

Visor of ?S Separt::'„r * '"^*''"*=*°^ ^" ^""^^ ^---. Super- 

?.?f ^ ^- ^'=^''''' ^•^•' A««i«tant in Surgery 
Jeannette R. Heghinian B S m n " rp"- ^ . 

BENJAMIN HiGHsmN, M i iiftant ^ n "V? ^^""^t-'lo^y- 
David Hollander a r m n ! • *" ^dermatology. 

MAKK HOLL™' M d" AsSstanTf T " ''l'^^^"^- 
Bertha Hoffman Rm" ?'' '^"* f Dermatology. 

JOYE E. Jacobs, A.B., Assistant in Physiolo^v 
Charles JARowqicT r q a ■ j. ! . "y^'°'o?y- 

T, „ "AKowsKi, iJ.b., Assistant in Chemistrv 

Jacob r. Jensen b «? m n * • x ^"""'^''^y. 
Joseph V jERARm r "4 ^^'^ Assistant in Obstetrics. 

HUGH jEWE^Ti As;,-,^ ;' •^'^"*""* '" ^^^-y- 

MARius P jrHN^;;S" A B M D '"/-^-Urinary Surgery. 

FERD. E. KADAK, A^. iJ/if Assift^nt fn o^t^'^''™^''"'*'^ ^^^ ^^^'^^-- 
Clyde F. Karns R q iw t^ assistant m Obstetrics. 

LAWRENCE kSnsS'mH ?'*'"* '" ^'''^''^■ 

F. A Kay^er M n A ;' ^^^'^t^"* in Medicine. 
T„r. fr*^^^' M.D., Assistant in Disea^iPs «* +1, xr 

VER.OK E. K„ M^st A;S;tt zX" ^^^^-^- 

NORBERT G. lSahn 'b S ' A "*;" ^^^*''"''"°'°^- 

C. EDWARD LEACH M'DAi?'*f"* l" Pharmacy. 

Ephraim T. I^sa^XJ-'/b Mn'".^".'^'""^- 

JOHN w. Machen. M.D., Assi^-l/itw '''*'°'°"^ ^""^ ^^'''^'■"^• 

MAx^Tl^^rM d' !•' ^; V-^--" Wtrics. 

SAMUEL McLanahan, Jr A R m n a ". "^«^®n^- 
William A. Parr, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



383 



Samuel E. Proctor, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Eldred Roberts, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

DANIEL R. Robinson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Israel Rosen, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

WT. J. ScHMiTZ, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Theodore A. Schwartz, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

John A. Scigliano, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Eable S. Scott, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Joseph W. Shook, B.S., in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

GEORGE Silverton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Margaret Smith, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Obstetrical Nursing, Super- 
visor of Obstetrical Department. 

Pierre F. Smith, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Jerome Snyder, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Samuel Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Elsie Sperber, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

Arminta Taylor, R.N., Night Supervisor. 

Robert E. Thompson, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Richard N. Tillman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Margaret Turner, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor of Surgical Wards. 

William K. Waller, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Edith Walton, Assistant in Massage. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Bernard L. Zenitz, B.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Isabel Zimmerman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in First Aid, Supervisor of 
Accident and Admission Department. 

FELLOWS 

Richard H. Barry, M.S Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Frederick K. Bell, Ph.D U. S. Pharmacopoeia 

Sidney Berman, M.D „ Psychiatry 

Harry C. Bowie, B.S., M.D Gross Anatomy 

Charles H. Davidson, M.D „ Roentgenology 

Fred W. Ellis, Ph.D Pharmacology 

Guy M. Everett, B.S - Physiology 

Murray Finkelstein, M.S Pharmacology 

Sylvan Forman, Ph.D Pharmacology 

Wilson C. Grant, M.S.... International Cancer Research Foundation, 

Research Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Hans Loewald, M.D Psychiatry 

Norman Pinschmidt, M.S .._ Pharmacology 



384 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Maurice M. Rath, A.B 

E. Emmet Eeid, Ph.D " Pharmacology 

Marjorie E. Ruppersberger, A.B Pharmacology 

Donald L. Vivian, Ph.D ' Pharmacology 

Frederick J. Vollmer, RafMTr) " ^^^^^acology 

John A. Wagner, B.S., M.D. *.„. " Medicine 

Pathology 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BALTIMORE DIVISION 

versity of Maryland Professor of Physaology (Baltimore), Uni- 

Glen D. Brown M A C^ nf ^^l '-n '^''■''*^ ''^ Maryland. 

Education. wtif;S Mafyllnd '''''''"^"*' ^^°'^^^°' ''' ^"'^-*™, 

leL^Tc/s 'srNo ir?T' ^"^^^^^'-^^ ^' ^-^'-<^- 

DoNAU, M DozeL Phn n ■• 2»2. Baltimore Public Schools. 

Info^ation •' """" '' '^^^^^ Information, Coordinator of 

Clyde B. Edgeworth. M A t t p e„ 

Baltimore Public ScWls ' ^"^^''^^^^^ "^ Commercial Education, 

"""^Sch^r^"' ^•^•' ^"^^-^-^ °^ H- Economics, Baltimore Public 

Gardner p. h Fotpv ma a • . 

^ (BaItimore).'SSrs^ty ■;f mI'SL";/^*'^^^^- «^ ^"^'-h and Speech 

Uni?eXrM'arylfnd ^"^^*^"* ^'^'-^^ °^ ^"'^-^-l Education, 
''"scL?Smot"ptirst:o^^^^^^^^ ^^"™ ^--^ «-'or Hi.h 

nrc'- lTS.lXT'^,^JJ^^-\'^^^^^^ «^'«-e Public Schools, 
land. ' ^"^t^^ctor m Psychology, University of Mary- 

"""'puTlic'sc^h^o'i?"^' ^■'•' ^*=*^"^ ^^^""P^'' School No. 295, Baltimore 
L™nc. H. J.M.S, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology, University of Mary- 

How!L\^¥ School, B^ltL'^^'pX'sr^^ Vice-Principal, Patterson 

"^Z o1 M^a^yTand'-^' ^^^'■^^"* ^^^^ '''^ Political Science, Univer- 

'Tt^Bai^^rPuSchl^:;^ ^"^*^"^*-' ^^'*^-- ^-^echnic Insti- 

'";" ttorTp^blie^^^^^^^^^^ ^«-- ^--^-- School of Printing, 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, BALTIMORE 



385 



Irwin D. Medinger, B.S., LL.B., Placement Counselor, Baltimore Public 

Schools. 
John Michaelis, M.A., Instructor in Education, University of Maryland. 

Polly K. Moore, M.S., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Frances D. North, M.A., Instructor in Commercial Education, Western 
High School, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Albert G. Packard, M.A., Supervisor of Industrial Education, Baltimore 
Public Schools. 

Stanley J. Pawelek, Ed.D., Acting Supervisor of Industrial and Trade 
Education, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Michael, J. Pelczar, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology, University of 
Maryland. 

Thomas Pyles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English (Baltimore), Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

A. W. Richeson, Ph.D., Associate of Mathematics (Baltimore), University 
of Maryland. 

D. Conrad Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology (Baltimore), 
University of Maryland. 

Edwin H. Stevens, M.D., J.D., Principal, Aberdeen High School, Aberdeen, 
Maryland. 

Charles W. Sylvester, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Baltimore 
Public Schools. 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physi- 

cal Chemistry (Baltimore), University of Maryland. 

Claribel p. Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods, University of Maryland. 

Gladys A. Wiggin, M.A., Instructor in Charge, Baltimore Division, College 
of Education, University of Maryland. 

Paul A. Willhide, B.S., Principal, General Vocational School No. 57, Balti- 
more Public Schools. 

Riley S. Williamson, M.Ed., Head of Technical Department, Baltimore 
City College, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Howard E. Ziefle, M.A., Principal, General Vocational School No. 294, 
Baltimore Public Schools. 



SCHOOL OP 
DENTISTRY 




''Dentistry rests its claims upon 
its scientific, physiological and 
moral purposes and obligations^ 
— the preservation and restora- 
tion of function, the relief and 
prevention of suffering and 
pain, the restoration of ^r ace 
and symmetry, and the aid it 

^ives that there may he a sound 
mind in a sound body.'' 

— Horatio C. Meriam. 



388 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



889 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean 

Katherine Toomey, Administrative Assistant 
The Faculty Council 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C D 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
History 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery occupies an important anH 
interesting place in the history of dentistrv At rt» ot-i 1* *i. , 

session. 1939^40, it completed L or^'^Lt^^i:^: :ri^,X'ZZ 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr Horace 
the y:ars"l823*^' University of Maryland. School of Medicin^'bftwS 
tfte years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 
dissensions m the School of Medicine and were discontinued It wasTr 

feen Sin h\''''* H-'"""^ "^'''=""°" '"^"^^^ ^'^'^' attention thT haS 
been given it by medicme or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of 
dental teaching then in vogue. "iiioridi pian oi 

for a sS^Hfi! m^ T^t ^ '"^'"''^ ^""""P* *<> '^^ ^e foundation 

came T„ R^n/nf ? f dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris 
™*, in """^ '^ study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of 
unusual ability and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing 
and promoting formal dental education. Since Dr. HayX's iSSres had 

^nrrmouTa^Hl,*',: """n^"^- "' ^^^'^"^ ^^ *'^-'"- -^S-" 
n mX«f i^ f '^ confronting the creation of dental departments 
m medical schools, an independent college was decided upon. A charter 
was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. 

trihS^" ^*1 J^k"^': ^^l *1™'"^** ^"""'^^'"^ °^ *« ^^""^^ profession, con- 
tributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities 

for professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of 
Dental Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. 
Hams continued fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into peri- 
odic dental literature to the time of his death. The files of the old 
American Journal of Dental Science testify to the fine contributions made 
by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society of Dental Surgeons was 



founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its president and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris as its corresponding secretary. This was the beginning of dental 
organization in America, and was the forerunner of the American Dental 
Association, which now numbers approximately forty-five thousand in its 
present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual influence Balti- 
more dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have exercised 
on professional ideals and policies. 

Building 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest comer of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occu- 
pied by the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is 
ideally arranged for efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large 
lecture rooms, classrooms, a library and reading room, science laboratories, 
technic laboratories, clinic rooms, and locker rooms. It is furnished with 
new equipment throughout and provides every accommodation necessary 
for satisfactory instruction under comfortable arrangements and pleasant 
surroundings. 

Library 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the best equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. It is 
located in the main building and consists of a stack room, collateral offices 
and a reading room that will accommodate ninety-six students. It contains 
over eight thousand bound volumes of dental textbooks and files of dental 
magazines, numerous pamphlets, reprints, etc.; while over 140 current 
dental magazines reach its reading tables. The two full-time librarians 
promote the growth of the Library and serve the student body in its use 
of library material. The Library is financed by direct appropriations from 
the State, by the income from an endowment established by the Maryland 
State Dental Association and by the proceeds of the sale of books to 
students. One of the most important factors of the dental student's educa- 
tion is to teach him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal 
education and in promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during 
practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to 
take care of this phase of dental study. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in 
the medical sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction 
consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, confer- 
ences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train 
the student in the value and use of dental literature. 



SCHOOL OF 
LAW 



390 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Requirements for Admission to the School of Dentistry 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having success- 
fully completed two years of work in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high-school course. No 
applicant will be considered who has not completed all requirements for 
advancement to the jimior year in the arts and sciences college from 
which he applies. His scholastic attainments shall be of such quality as 
to ensure a high quality of achievement in the dental course. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School 
considers particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education 
and his successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate 
training. The requirements for admission and the academic regulations 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly 
adhered to by the School of Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of 
Dentistry until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of 
$10.00, and is not enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $50.00 to 
insure registration in the class. 

Fees and Expenses 

The tuition fee for residents of Maryland is $137.50 per semester, and 
for non-residents $187.50 per semester. In addition, there are a number of 
miscellaneous fees, such as those for laboratory, locker, dissecting, etc. A 
complete schedule of all fees will be found in the separate Catalogue of the 
School of Dentistry, a copy of which may be obtained from Dean, School of 
Dentistry, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Personal expenses, such as board and lodging, books, laundry, etc., depend 
to a large extent on the financial condition and resourcefulness of the 
individual student. 

In addition to the above expenses, each student must provide himself 
with necessary instruments and materials for technic and clinic courses. 

Advice to Predental Students 

Students registered in the Predental Curriculum should secure a copy 
of the latest catalogue of the School of Dentistry early in their first year 
in college, in order to acquaint themselves with the requirements for 
admission. 

The catalogue of this School may be secured by writing to the Dean, 
School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 




"Justice is the ^reat interest 
of man on earth . . . Wherever 
her temple stands, and so lon^ 
as it is duly honored, there is a 
foundation for social security, 
general happiness and the 
improvement of our race. 

— Daniel Webster. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



398 



392 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 



Roger Howell, Dean. 

Gertrude M. Anderton, Secretary to Dean. 

The Faculty Council 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chbsnut, A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, Esq., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

Academic Standing 

The University of Maryland School of Law is a member of the Associa- 
tion of American Law Schools, an association composed of the leading law 
schools in the United States, whose member schools are required to main- 
tain high standards of entrance requirements, faculty, " library and curric- 
ulum. It, also, has been officially recognized by the Council of Legal Edu- 
cation of the American Bar Association as meeting the standards of that 
association, and has been placed upon its approved list. It is registered as 
an approved law school on the New York Regents* list. 

History 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. The 
institution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of financial 
support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and in 1870 regular 
instruction therein was resumed. From time to time the course of study 
has been made more comprehensive and the staff of instructors strength- 
ened. Graduates of the School now number more than three thousand, and 
include a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench and Bar of the State 
of Maryland and many who have attained prominence in the profession 
elsewhere. 



^ 



^th? present Law School Building, erected in 1931 is located at the 

Jner of Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore. In add tion to proving 

corner oi iveuw faculty, it contains a large auditorium, 

from 9.00 a. m. to 10.30 p. m. 

^ ThrShool of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and the 
Ev?nLg School The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the 

rdar'ds of work and graduation -tT:hr:e^:artyrr;y-two weeks 

The Dav School course covers a period of three years oi uiiriy 
eaJh exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the day 
chiefly to the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on 
Monday evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 p. m. thirty-six 

Accelerated Program , , i. „^^r^f^/q qti 

Due to the War emergency, the ^-l^f/J^pS^^^^^^^^^^^ 
accelerated educational program, providmg ^o^ op-ation o ^ ^^^^ 

on a three semester plan. The ^^'"f ^^rs are e pp semester 

weeks in length, the summer semester beginning June tne 

early in October and the ™ ^^f ^/^^^ Sthe '"he Day School or 
period required for ^on^P^f "'I "^ 1 w Is much as one academic year 

enter upon their studies at the beginning of any term. 

Course of Instruction . , • a 4.i,-.,.«„ <rV.lv to 

equip the student for the practice oi m^ y statute law 

in the various ^^^fi:'^^:^^^ '^'^ISt^sXl course of 
Of Maryland, and of the public law oi v e 

U, set an intimaU -"»llX'^'i:L^t^''' <» Marytod, .»d K. 



394 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



395 



subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included in the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 

Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work; that is, the equivalent of completion of at least one-half the work 
acceptable for a Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year 
period of study by the University of Maryland or other standard college 
or university in the State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and exclusive of 
credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
without intellectual content of substantial value. Such prelegal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with a scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation in the institu- 
tion attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
age ntimber of students admitted as beginning regular law students during 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in liberal arts and law, leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students enrolled in this combined program spend the first three years 
of their course in the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. For the 
fourth year they register in the School of Law, and upon the successful 
completion of the work of the first year in the Day School, or the equivalent 
work of the Evening School, are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
The degree of Bachelor of Laws is awarded upon the successful completion 
of the work prescribed for graduation in the School of Law. For detailed 
information as to this combined course, see Section II, College of Arts and 
Sciences. 



Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws 

The University also offers a combined program in commerce and law 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program are required to spend the first 
three years in the College of Commerce at College Park. For the fourth 
vear they will register in the School of Law, and upon the successful com- 
Sion of the work of the first year in the Day School, or the equivalen 
tSeof in the Evening School, are awarded the degree of Bachelor of 
Science The degree of Bachelor of Laws is awarded upon the completion 
of the work prescribed for graduation in the School of Law. 

For detailed information as to this combined course, see Section II, 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, ^ addition, successfully pursued the study of aw elsewhere in 
r law Sool which is either a member of the Association of American 
T ^w Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, m the dis- 
Son of tt^^^^^^ Council, upon presentation of a certificate from such 
aw school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the successful 
ompTet^^^^ of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many hours 
as rrrequired for such subjects in this school, receive credit for such 
courses and be admitted to advanced standing. No student transferring from 
another Taw school will be admitted unless eligible to return to the school 
from which he transfers. No degree will be conferred unti after one year 
of residence and study at the University of Maryland School of Law. 

Maryland Non- 

Fees and Expenses Residents Residents 

Tuition Fee per semester: ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Day School --I 75.00 100.00 

Evening School 

Other fees: (Payable only once) 

Registration fee, to accompany application............ 2.00 ^-uu 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration 10.00 10.00 

Diploma fee, payable just prior to graduation.. 15.00 15.00 

Notef The tuition fee is payable in full at the time of registration for 

each semester. 

The School of Law publishes a special catalogue, and a copy of this or 
anv further information desired, may be secured from: Dean, School of 
Taw, Untersiy of Maryland, Lombard and Redwood Streets, Baltimore. 

Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF 
MEDiaNE 




The Most Hi^h hath created 
medicines out of the earth, and 
a wise man will not abhor them. 



— Ecclesiasticus XXXVIII, 4, c. 180 B. C. 



398 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



399 



SCHOOL OP MEDICINE 

^' ^^^ Wylie. Acting Dean. 
Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Hugh R. Spenc^, M.D. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D. 
Maurice C. Pincopps, B.S M D 
FfeANK W. Hachtel, M.D. ' ' ' 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph D 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., m.A., M.D. 
WILLIAM R. Amberson, Ph.D 
Louis h. Douglass, M.D. 
History 

ranking fifth in point of a J am„." i ^^''^^ education in America, 

States. In the school buMinf a^Lomba H ""fn^^ """^^^^ «' ^^e United 
was founded one of theTmmed^J^ll * ^T""^ ^*'"«*« '» Baltimore 
library in the United States. "^' ^""^ ^^^ «"* '"«<1'<=«1 college 

At this Medical School for tJia ««,* *• • . 
made a compulsory part of the currfcullm TnH " ^"^"i^' •"'^^'=*'<'" ^«« 
teaching of gynecology and peScs Z'flvf '"f Pf '^«"* «*«irs for the 
otology (1873), were installed ^ ^' ^"'^ °' ophthalmology and 

hospital intramural /eside^y rs^Jiir^l^ ^ ^ ^^ S^i^. *"' 
dinical Facilities 

ber. 1823. and at that t£e conSjS^ Maryland. It was opened in Septem- 
served for eye patients. ^^ ^'•"'" ^'''"^^' «"« of which was re- 

annually are treated. "" ""'P'*^'' '" ^^'*='> thousands of patients 

In connection with the Univer^ifv w^o^-^ i 
is conducted which, during Sepal? fl? ' ^". ''"**^""' obstetrical clinic 
cases, ^ ^ P*^* y^*'^' supervised the delivery of 1,131 



The hospital now has 435 beds and 50 bassinets — ^for medical, surgical, 
obstetrical, and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical 
material for third-year and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy Hos- 
pital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be the 
same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Oncology, Ophthalmology and Otology, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro- 
Enterology, Oral Surgery, Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Ortho- 
pedics, Proctology, Psychiatry, Dermatology, Laryngology and Rhinology, 
and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work each day during 
one-third of the year in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery of the 
dispensaries. In their senior year, all students work one hour each day 
in the special departments, where more than 150,000 cases were treated 
last year. This gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical 
teaching. 

Student laboratories conducted by the School of Medicine purely for 
medical instruction are as follows: Gross Anatomy, Histology and Embry- 
ology, Physiology, Bacteriology and Immunology, Biological Chemistry, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Operative Surgery and Sur- 
gical Anatomy. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Randolph Winslow Scholarship; Uni- 
versity Scholarship; Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky 
Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships; Israel 
and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarship; Dr. Horace Bruce Hetrick Scholarship, 
and the Medical Alumni Association Scholarship. 

Admission to First Year Class 

All applications for admission must be submitted on forms which may be 
secured from the Committee on Admissions, School of Medicine, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Applications for admission should be submitted well in advance of the 
date when the student desires to enter the School of Medicine, and will be 
accepted by the Committee on Admissions any time after the beginning of 
the academic year just preceding the academic year in which the student 
expects to enter. Selections for the Freshman Class are usually completed 
about six months in advance of the date of actual enrollment 



400 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Admission to Advanced Standing 

applicants must be prepared to meet ^e ctrr " t f'l^'^^^^ <=l«««es. These 
ments in addition to presenting accitable™.^ ^^ TY '"*'"*"*=^ ^^'l^i^- 
medical school record based on courTes whi^h 1 ''^7 credentials, and a 
tatively equivalent to similar corr™ Tll?s sch" l'""*"*"*"^^^ "'^'^ '^"^^'- 

Application for advanced sfnnrliTio. -c j . 
tions accompanying the app^SSm."'" " '"°''''"*=^ ^'^ *« '"^true- 

Minimum Requirements for Admission 

The minimum requirements for admission tn ti,» c u , ^ , 
(a) Graduation from an annrov^r ^ ^^''"^ °^ ^"^'"»« ««= 

entrance exami'atLns 'a„T '"'"'"^ '"'''''' "'^ ^^^^ -'^"--lent in 

this preprofessional course of study ahaTlhr^'J,*'' ^"'^ ''"^''^^ «* 
quired for recommendation by the inStion w. V''^'' *^^* ^^- 
courses are being, or have been, stu3 *''" Premedical 

Biology 

Inorganic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Physics 

French or German 

English ,a„ .dv^oed CiS^Svf v7?.e p ''-"« «■*"•« 
course in Enrfish K>«of^ a ^ v e r t e - Economics 

composition shoufdt EmCo^""^ ff^^, 

taken, if possible) Phvsical A^^v,- * Political Science 

Scientific German or Q^an^itatt T^^^^^^ "^^^^^^^^^^ (^ ^-- 

French (a reading sis ^' course should be 

knowledge of either Mathematics o *^^f "^ 

language is desirable, Sociology, etc. 

although German is 
preferred) 
Philosophy 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



401 



Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses in 
the natural sciences. Accordingly, it is suggested that the elective list 
given above be a guide in this connection and that the remainder of the 
college credits be accumulated from courses designed to promote a broad 
cultural development. Students should avoid the inclusion of college courses 
in subjects that occur in the medical curriculum, for example, histology, 
histological technique, human anatomy, bacteriology, physiology, neurology, 
physiological chemistry. 

It is not intended that these suggestions be interpreted to restrict the 
education of students who exhibit an aptitude for the natural sciences or 
to limit the development of students who plan to follow research work in 
the field of medicine. 

In accepting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have acceptable scholastic records in secondary school and 
college, satisfactory scores in the Medical Aptitude Test, favorable letters 
of recommendation from their premedical committees, or from one instruc- 
tor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics, and who 
in all other respects give every promise of becoming successful students 
and physicians of high standing. 

Those candidates for admission who are accepted will receive certificates 
of entrance from the Director of Admissions of the University. 

Fees and Expenses 

The tuition fee for Residents of Maryland is $225 per semester, and for 
Non-Residents $300 per semester. In addition, there are a number of mis- 
cellaneous fees, such as those for laboratory, student health service, students 
activities, maintenance and service, etc. A complete schedule of all fees 
will be found in the bulletin of the School of Medicine, a copy of which 
may be obtained from the Committee on Admissions. 

Personal expenses, such as board and lodging, books, laundry, etc., natu- 
rally depend to a large extent on the financial condition and resourcefulness 
of the individual student. They range from $400 to $750 per year; the 
average being about $600. 

In addition to the above expenses, each student must provide himself 
with a suitable microscope. 
Advice to Pre-Medical Students 

Students registered in the Pre-Medical Curriculum should secure a copy 
of the latest catalogue of the School of Medicine early in their first year in 
college in order to acquaint themselves with the requirements for admis- 
sion. A copy of this bulletin may be obtained by writing to the Committee 
on Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore, Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF 
NURSING 




4( 



'Nursing is one of the most 



beautiful and tender of all the 



arts of life. 



ff 



-M. Adelaide Nutting. 



404 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



405 



SCHOOL OP NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and Superintendent of Nurses 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland. The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services 
being morning prayers. 

The new University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital, contain- 
ing 4^ beds and 50 bassinets. It is equipped to give young women a 
thorough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered 

The program of study of the school is planned for two groups of students: 
(a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present record 
showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required amount of pre- 
paratory study. Preference will be given to students who rank in the 
upper third of the graduating classes in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 16 units for entrance: 8 required units 
and 8 elective units. 

Required units: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; history, 1 unit; chemistry, 1 unit. Total, 8 units. 

Elective units: Any subject offered in a standard high school or prepara- 
tory school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or uni- 
versity entrance. Eight units must be submitted from this group, of which 
not more than four units can pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet certain other 
definite requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for 
nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. 
Women of superior education and culture are given preference, provided 
tliey meet the requirements in other particulars. If possible a personal 
interview with the Director of the School should be arranged preferably on 
Tuesday or Friday from 11:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 

An application blank will be furnished upon application to the Director 
of the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 



Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

Z .e^at^on of the f^^^^^l^:^^^^:. V^^^l 
:r£c:r:?eSrw?iT^SaS l^^der . ^ en^Ue for exa^- 
Ition and license on completion of the course 

The fitness of the applicant for t^^« ^f -^Jf^/;^^^^^^^ the decision 
0. retaining her at the ^^l^l^^'^^M^ ii^^^-<^-' insubordination. 
tSenT eVc . -d Sut toSop those qualities considered essen- 

iSf^a nVare causes for d— - - ^ ^^^^, ^^„^_ ,, ,,« 
The requirements for ^dm^^^ °» ^o ^he f e f ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

school of Nursing are ^^l^^' ^^^"^'^/^^hr.equirements for the diploma 
SSirrn^dTmprirr^^^^^ -ond. and third hospital 

years. 

Admission T?^hriiarv for the fall term 

students for the spring ^^ ^^^ ^^^^Zr^Zr^t^ter^^er. 
in September or October; and for tne nve ye<*r 

Hours of Duty ,.„Hpnts are engaged in class work for the 

During the preparatory P^^od students are engag remainder 

first four months with no ^^^^\^l:^^l^7^^ duty. During the 
of this period they are sent *» t"^s on g ^^^y and 

first, second, and third years the ^tudwits are on eg ^^^ ^.^^^^ 

nine-hour night duty, with six hours °" J^^^^y^^ ^h one day at the 
r^TfofTachrmTof: strnd r"e:::aUorThe period of night duty 
;:Tp;tSatr«"rsix months dunng the three yea. 

The first four --W^e Pre^^^^^^^^^^ training 

instruction given m the lecture anu mi^ average number of 

school, hospital, -<! ™«<^;-^^^:;^;^SntJttre and laboratory 

hours per week in * ^^^^^If^^^^^S^^^ i" anatomy, physiol- 

periods, is 30 hours. Th^s in^tructa^^ inc bacteriology. 

ogy. cookery and ""*"*;f' /^^^^ J^g, bandaging^ 

chemistry, materia medica, P'^^f '''7 ", . ^/' t^g of the probation period 

and history of "«• ^^^ ^'^l^^t^^^^^^ fo'r instruction in 

the students are placed on duty in ti^^ nosp assigned to them 

"f Inicton i. In .l«nd.n„ each day, and .11 *.d.nts, "^J'-^^ 



406 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



407 



during the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the 
school decide that, because of time lost, the theoretical work has not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in the current year, 
it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A vacation period of 
four weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first year, and 
a similar vacation at the completion of the second year. 
Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student. A 
student activity fee of $5.00 is to be paid each year at the beginning of 
the first semester by each student. These fees will not be returned. A 
student receives her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry 
from the date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides her 
own uniforms, obtained through the hospital at nominal cost. After being 
accepted as a student nurse, she wears the uniform supplied by the hospital. 
The student is also provided with text-books and shoes. In her senior year 
she should be prepared to meet an expense of $30.00 for affiliations. Her 
personal expenses during the course of training and instruction, naturally, 
will depend upon her individual habits and tastes. 

General Plan of Instruction 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years, including the 
preliminary term of six months. The course of instruction is, in general, 
as follows: 

First Year 
First Semester 

The first semester, or preliminary term, is devoted to theoretical instruc- 
tion given in the class rooms of the Nursing School and in lecture rooms 
and laboratories of the Medical School, and to supervised practice in the 
wards of the hospital. The courses offered are anatomy, physiology, 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solutions, chemistry, bacteriology, hygiene, 
history of nursing, ethics, psychology, principles and practice of nursing, 
bandaging and surgical supplies. 

Excursions are made to a filtration plant, hygienic dairies, markets, 
and other places of interest. 

At the close of the first semester the students are reqtiired to pass 
satisfactorily both written and practical tests. Failure to do this will be 
sufficient reason to terminate the course at this period. 

Second Semester 

During this term the students receive theoretical instruction in general 
surgery, surgical technic, massage, diet therapy, materia medica, advanced 
nursing procedures and charting, and the case study method. Ward 



,.,^ents and instruction ^^^^^^TTSX^ ^S^^P^^ 
S'l^S "Sf exp=Vi:r r direction a^d supervision of 
SeCe^^ors of the departments. 

Second Year instruction includes general medicine, 

During this period the theoretical "^'^J ^^^ra, communicable 

eliS Uology. venereal and skmdis^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ „f 

diseases. Pediatrics, "^^f 5, CpTal as ignment here Provides xnstruc- 
S rd re^:;cerSe p^UicTards. on the p.vate .oors. and . the 
operating room. 

nnS. in obstetrics and pediatrics. 

Attendance at Class^ ^„^^,, f^^ which the student 

,CsS- ^AXtte"etred onl. in cases of iUness or other 

satisfactory reason. 

Examinations , . include practical tests. 

Examinations are both ^^'^"^"jf jjjitate increasing the length of 
Failure in two or more subjects may necess 

the course. ^vnerience in the various depart- 

During the three years "^ "^^fKHtudent's nursing work is 
ments of the hospital, a montHy record of ^^^^^^ .^ ^^^ 

submitted by the nurse xn char^e^ Th^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^,^,^ ,^ords. 
the examinations m the tneorewv. 

Graduation , , . x^u^se who have success- 

The diploma of the school v^U be aw rd^d ^ th se^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

fully completed the ^^^^^^Z ^Le of work, 
the required average m each course ana P 

Five-Year Program ,. „^^ear course of training, the University 

In addition to the ^^S^'^\^'^^jX'^roer^m leading to the degree of 
offers a combined Academic and Nuking P^ 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma »" ^urs. g^^ ^^^ ;„d), consisting of 

The first two years of *Vrthe SCe of A^an^ Sciences of the 
68 semester hours, are spent i" tne s ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ i^tro- 



408 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of Nursing in Baltimore. ^ ^^^'"^ ^""^ "P^"* ^° t^e School 

The degree of Bachelor of Science anH ti,<. T^• i . , 

conferred upon students who complete succ^fS^v^ '" •^'!?^ '"^^ ''^ 
academic and nursing program mwJ!^ !t ^ *^f prescribed combined 
branch of the course ' '"*'"*^'""e the required averages in each 

Scholarships 

Sc?o"oi:!?cre!Sti?-rra"^^^^^^^^^^^ *^e Training 

Columbia University, New YorlT T^^TlY T"^^ ^* ^^**^" College, 
of the third year to thi staLf^^ scholarship is awarded at the close 
excellence, and who dedres L n.. 7* ^ ^^"^ °^ «»« ^ghest 

Ther. are' two scholat^ of tl^ZuT^To ol""'' ^V'f^ '-^• 
Leander M. Zimmerman prize torlZT^ i * • ^^^'- ^^^ ^*^^'» and 
greatest interest anTs^'JX for !^e „'! •T''"^*"*^ ^°'- '^'^P'^^i'^^ *« 
Lee prize, given to the3e5^ha4ie thf ^^^^^^ '^"^'^*'^ ^•>»''^ 

arship. An alumnae pin is preset hw^^,** ^^^^^^ ^''^'^^^ ^"^ schol- 
a student who at the completioT^ tW """f ' ^"^^^^ ^'^^^ ^ 
ability. A Prize of $25.^^2^^" by £'£ L mT r*"* ^^^*="«- 
who at the completion of three vear<, nf J^^u ^ ^'*e'^"'-st *« a student 
ability. ^^ y^*"^^ °^ ^°* shows exceptional executive 

of '''his'tneti°n! or 1"; fuXr'"T"' f- ^^"'^^ *=^*^'«^-' -<» a copy 
application to: "" ^^'' ^formation desired may be had upSn 

Director, School of Nursing, 
University of Maryland, 
Redwood and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF 
PHARMACY 




''Pharmacy has for its primary object 
the service which it can render to the 
public in safeguarding the handling, sale, 
compounding and dispensing of medicinal 
substances. 

''The practice of pharmacy demands 
knowledge, skill and integrity on the part 
of those en^a^ed in it . . . The states 
restrict the practice of pharmacy to those 
persons who by reason of special training 
and qualifications are able to qualify 
under regulatory requirement 

"In return the states expect the Phar- 
macist to recognize his responsibility to 
the community and to fufil his profes- 
sional obligations honorably ....'' 

—From the Code of Ethics of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association. 



410 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



411 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 

Miss B. Ouve Cole, Secretary of Faculty 
Faculty Council 

• A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
E. P. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D. 
Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 

CLIFFORD W. CHAPMAN, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D. 

J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Ouve Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 

H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 

Thomas C. Grubb, A.B., Ph.D. 

„. ■ -^- W. RiCHEsoN, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 

History 

Ph^fct'^'Thl f .^^^'^y ^ea" '*« existence as the Maryland College of 

S Sn^d^'^'^'^L'" *'^ P"^^"* University when Sfold UnSS 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920 Wth 
but one short intermission, just nrior to iSfi-; if i,L „ !• , '*'' 

its function as a teaching /nsWtaSon ' <=<»»t^«"o»«ly exercised 

Location 

The School of Pharmacy is located at 32 South Greene StrP^t .•„ .i„c 
proxumty to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and DentStTy. ' ""' 

Aims 

for the intPlH<r»^t t^o *™ 1, .. ^'®^ *'" *^ *<' prepare its matriculant- 

practice of thp nfi,«r^ k, "T^^^s^fy/or the attainment of proficiency in the 
p^actace of the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical re- 

Recognition 

Ed™ tio'nTJ h'oldTm'emblS^ the A^e-an Council on Phamaceutical 
Pharmacy ^e obi^r„fTv. "* '" *^' '^"''™^" Association of Colleges of 

holding memberS^rin thrlf ^f^*"*""'^ accredited by the Council or 
requirem"n'7foP entrl. ^^«°"^t'°" ^^^^ maintain certain minimum 
Councn Midori ZaTX *"'* eradiation. Through the influence of the 

£3"S STatTeteJaf Ster^^r o1 b^S ^7 '^^" ^^^^t' 
st^dards of the Association is J^.^Zll^^LT' '^'"^'^ ''' 

i^%t:lVS::r,:^^ts^:: ^-^ department Of Education, and 



Requirements for Admission* 

The requirements for admission are those prescribed by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Admission to Freshman Class from Secondary Schools 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate 

An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary school which is approved 
by the State Board of Education of Maryland or by an accrediting agency 
of equal rank, and which requires for graduation not less than 16 units, 
grouped as follows: 

Required units, 8; elective units, 8; total units, 16. 

Required units: English, (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 8 
units. 

Elective units: Any subjects offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted towards college or university 
entrance. Total, 8 units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full-year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, .recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units 
are allowed for four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been 
taken, an extra unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets 
the certification requirements of the State Department of Education or the 
Department of Education of Baltimore City will be admitted upon the pre- 
sentation of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does 
not meet fully these requirements may be required to present further evi- 
dence of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the Director 
of Admissions, this may include an appropriate examination. Such exami- 
nations will be given during the first week of July, August, and September 
at Baltimore and at other convenient places in the state. Applicants con- 
cerned will be notified when and where to report. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a secondary school not 
located in Maryland must be recommended by the principal, and must 
have attained the certification-to-college grade of the school. If the school 



•The right is reserved to refuse admission to any applicant whose presence in 
the School would, in the judgment of the Faculty Council, be detrimental to the 
best interests of the School. 



412 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



413 



does not have such a quality grade, then the average of the applicant's 
school grades must be at least ten points or one letter higher than the 
lowest passing grade of the school. 

Admission by Examination 

An applicant from a secondary school who is not eligible for admission by 
certificate may seek entrance through either of two types of examination: 
(1) he may appeal to the Director of Admissions for permission to report 
at the University for an examination, the result of which will be used 
in conjunction with the secondary school record to determine whether the 
applicant should be admitted, or (2) he may be admitted on presenting 
evidence of having passed satisfactorily other approved examinations in 
the subjects required for graduation from an accredited secondary school. 
Such examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th Street, New York City; the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, Albany; and the Department of Public Instruction 
of the State of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. 

Applications for admission must be approved, not only by the Director 
of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty 
Council of the School of Pharmacy. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

A student who presents, in addition to high school requirements, credit 
for work done in a school of pharmacy accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education will receive credit for the courses which 
correspond in length and content to those prescribed for the first three 
years of the curriculum and be admitted with advanced standing, provided 
he presents an official transcript of his record and a proper certificate 
of honorable dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to a student pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work in an accredited academic insti- 
tution equal in value to that outlined in this catalogue. 

A transferring student in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
ional requirements outlined under "Requirements for Admission to Fresh- 
man Class from Secondary School." 

Special Students 

An applicant who cannot furnish a sufficient number of entrance credits 
and who does not desire to make up the units in which he is deficient may 
enter as a special student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, 
but will not be eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The 
Faculty Council reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant 
whose preliminary training is deemed to be insufficient. 



Reauirements for Graduation 

^e degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. m Ph-^;) J^^ 
be?onfe?ed upon a candidate who has met the following requirements 

1 rnmnletion of the full prescribed curriculum. The work of the last 
'• year mt^^^^^^^^^ in courses offered in this school, and must have 

been done in residence at this school. 

2 A total semester hour credit of not less than 140 with a grade point 
count for each of the last two years of not less than twice the total 
semester hours of credit scheduled for these years. 

"^^rmSuraJonllS^^^^^^^^ be procured from the office of the School 
of Pha^Tcy! and must be teken out before one enters classes. After 
ItricXtS all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. 
Expenses Maryland Residents Non-Residents 

.^ $110.00 $135.00 

Tuition fee, per semester - * ^ 

Laboratory and breakage fee, per semester ^0-"" 

Other fees: (Payable only once) 

Matriculation fee (Payable on first regis- ^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

tration ) ••• •; — ;- ■; 

Diploma fee (Payable at beginmng of 

final semester of Senior Year) !&•"" 

Notes: The tuition fee and the laboratory and ^^^^^^^^^'^'ZirZ 
able in full at the time of registration for each semester JJ^ ^ip^J^ fe^^ 
will be returned in the event the student fails to complete the requireme 
for graduation. 

S,tS :« P^«. ™v,„Uy o< M.ry,a.d, B...l,no«. Maryland. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Redwood and Greene Streets 

Baltimore, Maryland . 

J. E. SAVAGE, M.D., Acting Superintendent. 
The university Hospital, located ^nfltimorea^^^^^^^^^ the Mea.al 

School group, was first opened ,*t*«/^'XersHy of Maryland, Medical 
Streets, Baltimore, as the hospital of *^^^niversrty ot y ^^^ 

School, in 1823. Originally confining *»- J^f ^f^j^^ addition of the 
additions from time to time until ^t'""*^;^ ™f"'^^^^^^ 250 beds, 

Greene Street wing it T^if^^^VS^^iel the present new hospital 



414 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



In addition to furnishing the clinical facilities for the students of the 
University of Maryland, School of Medicine, the hospital offers to residents 
of the State of Maryland the facilities of a modem General Hospital. 

During the fiscal year which ended September 30, 1941, there were 
admitted to the University Hospital 10,742 patients who were furnished 
a total of 153,606 days of patient care. During this period 1,453 babies 
were bom in the hospital. During the same period there were registered 
in the Out-Patient Department of the Hospital (Emergency Department and 
general dispensaries) 46,081 patients never previously served who, during 
the year, made a total of 135,114 visits to the Out-Patient Department. 

The exteme service delivered 1,131 mothers at home. A total of 23,807 
visits were made to these homes by the doctors, nurses and senior students 
of this service. 

The patients admitted to the hospital during the past year represented 
residents of every county in the State of Maryland ; 23 States of the United 
States and the District of Columbia; Peru and Porto Rico, and seamen of 
12 foreign registrations. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BALTIMORE DIVISION 

Because approximately one-half of the State's population and its largest 
school district are in the City of Baltimore, the University of Maryland 
operates the Baltimore Division of the College of Education primarily for 
the training of teacher^n service and those preparing to teach. Originally 
the Division's work was exclusively in the field of Industrial Education, but 
with increasing demands the scope of instruction gradually has been 
enlarged until now it includes many phases of education for teachers. 

The Baltimore Division is fortunate in having two teaching staffs on 
which to call: the regular faculty of the University in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, the College of Education, and the Baltimore professional 
schools; and a special faculty of Industrial Education specialists drawn 
largely from the Baltimore Public Schools. It is the policy of the University 
to use in all of its Divisions, including the Baltimore and the extension 
courses of the College of Education, in so far as possible, instructors who 
are regular members of its day school staff. When members of that staff 
are unavailable, the University calls on outside instructors. 

Although the Baltimore Division is primarily an instructional division 
for teachers, the full time staff stands ready to give service to all indivi- 
duals and agencies that need its help. It is particularly anxious to assist 
adult groups with special problems of leadership training, and to cooperate 
with industrial and business organizations in their personnel training 
programs. The growing importance of the instruction given in the Balti- 
more Division is evidenced by the fact that steadily increasing demands 
are being made upon it. 



SECTION IV 
Records and Statistics 

DEGREES, HONORS, 
SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1940-1941 

(AH degrees conferred at Commencement, June 6, 1941, except as noted.) 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Laws 

Paul Vories McNutt 

Doctor of Science 

Howard Bruce 
George Eli Bennett 
Henry Armit Brown Dunning 
*WoRTLEY Fuller Rudd 

Doctor of Pharmacy 
♦Robert Sentman McKinney 

Honorary Certificates in Agriculture 
Levin Otis Corkran 
Clay Pennington Whiteford 
Daniel Ewing Wight 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Marriott Warfield Bredekamp 
Carl Kester Dorsey 
Fred Wilson Ellis 
Harriet Louise Frush 
Howard Wiluam Gilbert 
Lester Philip Guest 
Kenneth Eldred Hamlin, Jr. 
John Clarke Hammond 

James Grant Haydbn, Jr. 

Chester W. Hitz 

George Lawrence Kalousek 

Leonard Karel 

John Wellington Knowlton 

Herman Fink Kraybill 

Joseph Sidney Lann 



Russell Ernest Leed 

Nathan Levin 

Solomon Love 

Marlow William Olsen 

Robert Frederick Peterson 

Wiluam Arthur Purdum 

Mark Schweizer 
Leonard Smith 
Elsie May Sockrider 
Wiluam Alexander Stanton 
Carl Kerry Stoddard 
John Keenan Taylor 
Albert Edward Tepper 
William Bird Terwilliger 



♦Degree conferred June 5, 1941. 



415 



416 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Master of Arts 



WiLLARD Osborne Ash 

Frank Graham Banta 

Ada Missoura Beall 

Lola Elizabeth Boyd 

Harold Edwin Carter 

Henrietta Elizabeth Chesley 

Jerome Denaburg 

Charles Wesley Dudderar 

Raymond Francis Dugan 

MiLO Vivian Gibbons 

Mary Olivia Green 

George Eastham Hand 

Albert Franklin Herbst 

Raymond Jump 

Mary Eleanor Kephart 

Mabel Adele Swanson Livingston 



Cletus Dilmond Lowe 
Myrtle Thom McKnew 
Joseph Martin Mehl, Jr. 
Joe Corby Newcomer 
Orpha-Bonita Pritchard 
Virginia Geraldine Pritchard 
Virginia Lee Riley 
Carrie Elaine Robey 
Robert L. Smith 
Ruth Purvis Smith 
Walter Marion Sparks 
John Perry Speicher 
John Sherman Thatcher 
Ralph Irwin Williams 
Howard Edward Ziefle 



Master 

Richard Warren Akeley 

Maurice David Atkin 

Irvin Bach man 

Richard Henry Barry 

Thomas Harold Bartilson 

William Howard Beamer 

Nellie Monroe Cone 

John Cotton 

Edward French Davis 

Guy Ervin, Jr. 

Walter Christian Gakenheimer 

Leon Goldman 

Philip Classon Harvey 

Daniel Kaufman 

Margaret Cobey Kemp 

WiLUAM James Lodman 

Richard Everett Mai 



of Science 

Robert Eugene Mather 
Earl Edward Miller 
Ada Fanjoy Peers 
D. Vincent Provenza 
Harold Berkeley Robinson 
Milton Jacques Rosen 
John Parrish Secrest 
Roger William Snyder 
Alston Wesley Specht 
Francis C. Stark, Jr. 
Patricia Willingham Stier 
William Winfield Walton 
Carolyn Isabelle Webster 
Arthur Paul Wiedemer 
Charles Simpson Williams 
Sara Elizabeth Wise 



Master 

ROWANNETTA SaRAH AlLEN 

Doris Lanahan Bowie 
Earl Franklin Brain 
John Thomas Bruehl, Jr. 
Nellie Margaret Hollabaugh 

Davidson 
Chari^s Raymond Gross 
Clifford Alfred Hack 



of Education 

Clark Heironimus 
James Homer House 
Robert Wilson Jones 
Roger Dennis McDermott 
Thorman Archer Nelson 
Theresa Barbara Nicht 
Katheryne Severance Porter 
Edward Dennis Reed 



DEGREES CONFERRED, lH0-19Jfl 



417 



Louis Kennard Rhodes, Jr. 

Dorothy Marie Schneider 

RUTH White Sessions 

F. Elizabeth Smith 

Ethel Snyder 

Albert Reynolds Van Metre 



Robert Sidney Watkins 
David Sterling Wheelwright 
Dorothy Eugenia White 
Charles Merrick Wilson 
Arthur John Wondrack 
Nadia Wright Zimmerman 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Bachelor 



Harry Wilbert Anderson 

Howard Monroe Bailey 

James Monroe Beattie 

Donald Stanton Bierer 

Glenn Miles Bosley 

Henry C. Bothe 

Virginia Lombard Brown 

Georgianna Elizabeth Calver 

Charles Marion Chance 

Hilde Marie Christensen 

Charles Elwood Clendaniel, Jr. 

Daniel Townsend Cox 

Lexey Jane Cragin 

Lee Sharp Crist 

Thomas Chandler Cruikshank, IV 

Jorge de Alba M. 

Maryan Singleton Donn 

William B. Durm 

Laura Hampson Eyler 

Edgar Frederic Faulkner 

Charles Edgar Fogle 

Ian Forbes, Jr. 

Jack Lewis Gordon 

Lelia Marguerite Goss 

Howard Milton Gross 
*John Judson Gude 

Walter Oliver Hawley 

Frank Henry Hoffman, Jr. 

Samuel Albert Jacques 

David Okey Johnson 

Hugh Bradley Jones 

David Cleveland Kelly, Jr. 

Robert Warren Kolb 

Phyllis Stein Lange 

Clayton Payne Libeau 



of Science 

Lawrence Daniel Lichliter 
Mary Elizabeth Mahrer 
Donald Powell Marshall 
Calvin Springfield Martin 
Robert Clough Meyer 

♦Alan Randolph Miller 

*Lee Amos Miller 
Norman A. Miller, Jr. 
John Thomas Mullady 
Clark Oland Nicholson 
Carl Edward Nordeen, Jr. 
Alvin Francis Polan 
Ruth Suzanne Punnett 
Carroll Martin Radebaugh 
Robert Du Bois Rappleye 
J. Thomas Reid 
Floyd English Rice 
Hilda Helen Ryan 
John Jerome Ryan 
Carl August Sachs 
Rowan Lester Scarborough, Jr. 
Joseph David Schaffer 
Raymond Maxwell Scoville 
Emma Shelton 
James Hubert Skinner 
♦Robert LeRoy Stevens 
William Jack Suit 
Thomas Boyd Taliaferro, Jr. 
Frank Whilmore Taylor 
Margaret Jane Thurston 
Hugh Charles Treakle 
Charles Wilson Wannan, Jr. 
Jack Edward Weber 
*N. Bond Weber 



'Degrree conferred August 2, 1940. 



418 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bessie Leeada Arnold Helene Louise Kuhn 

ROBERT Edmond Ashman David Lane 

Frances Marie Augustine Naomi H. Levin 

Edna Patricia Beattie Laura Euzabeth Luber 

Maulsby Ness Blackman Jeanne Amelie Makover 

Mary Elizabeth Brice Lola Marguerite Mangum 

Eva Brooks g. Franklyn McInturff, III 

John Wilson Brown, Jr. William Edwin McMahon,II 

Ritchie Buckingham John Leonard Meakin 

♦Joseph Bubk Brooke Meanley 

AucE Virginia Cann Martha Putnam Meriam 

Betsy Jane Carson George Carlton Moore, Jr. 

John Waters Chaney, Jr. Charles Branson Morris 

Elizabeth Mackenzie Cissel Adrienne Irene Nichols 

Clara Marie Clark Kathryn Louise Nichols 

*WlLLIAM PURRINGTON COLE, III MARJORIE NiELSEN 

Albert Stillman Coleman Theodore White Norcross, Jr. 

Ralph Johnson Culver Thelma Virginia Lee Pohlman 

Robert Ernest Dammeyer Betty Houston Raymond 

Frank I. Davis, Jr. jqhn G. Reckord 

Charles Duncan Davy Richard Carlton Savage ilEiD 

Margaret Warren Day Barbara Ann Richmond 

Frances Antoinette Dicus Naomi Mae Richmond 

WiLUAM B. DiGGS, Jr. Matilde Jane Ricketts 

Dorothea Eleder Kathryn Elaine Riedel 

George C. Evering auce Cahill Robertson 

Robert William Farkas Patricia Ann Royster 

Belmont Greenlee Farley Harriet Mildred Sandman 

(Honors in Mathematics) Katherine Maxine Schindel 

Allan Carroll Fisher, Jr. June C. Schmidt 

Harvey Eldred Fox, Jr. Walter Henry Schuler 

Donald Harrison Frye Margaret Wallace Scott 

William Larkin Gardner Shirley Anne Stapf 

Joseph Genovese Worthington Heaton Talcott 

John Brinkley Hayman, Jr. *Armand Terl 
Charlotte Magdalen Hellstern Molly B. Tulin 

Mary Dawson Henderson *John Parsons Wade, Jr. 

Treva Fay Hollingsworth William Wirth Watson 

Bette Evora Holt William Van Arsdale West 

William Purnell Johnson John Moss Whitten 

Bertha Katz Irene Leora Wilson 

Hildreth Kempton Julia Worth Woodring 

Harriet Virginia Kirkman Charles William Woodward Jr. 

Btonice Edith Kress June Lee Yagendorf 



♦Degree conferred August 2, 1940. 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 19^0-19^1 



419 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Science 

ruth Ella Almony Paul G. Hutson 

Melvin Anchell William Henry Isaacs 

Harold Abner Axtell, Jr. Harry Elliot ICaplan 

Janet King Baldwin Victor Kassel 
Edgar Hamilton BonDurant, Jr. Charles Ferdnand Ksanda 

Eleanor Jayne Bradley * Milton Leonard Lehman 

♦Josephine Maria Bragaw Stuart Charles Levine 

Herbert Sage Bridge Thomas Hamilton Lewis, IV 

Warren Daniel Brill Charles Renwick MacDonald 

Sylvia Brooks Irving Madorsky 

Dorothy Mae Campbell Alexander Mazur 

Edith Ann Christen sen Bernard Milloff 

Richard Alvan Clark Samuel McCready Mills 

Elizabeth Stella Clarke A. Manley Powell 

Paul Montague Coe Raymond Veto Rangle 

Martha Adelaide Corcoran Orr Esrey Reynolds 

Elizabeth Jane Curtis Helen F. Rice 

David George Drawbaugh, Jr. *Owen Edward Ringwald 
John Wallace Walker Epperson Marjorie Elizabeth Ruppersberger 

Ruth Estelle Evans Betty Jean Silver 

Lydia Frances Ewing Richard Edward Tiller 

Ellen Catherine Foote Arthur Quincy Tool, Jr. 

Clara Gale Goldbeck Joseph John Velenovsky, Jr. 

♦Albert Gubnitsky * Robert Worthington Waters 

William Baker Hagan Kenneth Scott White 

Marjorie Elizabeth Hall David Kuykendall Worgan 

James Edward Hamill Stanley Norman Yaffe 

Daniel Julius Harwood Carolyn Doris Zeller 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 
Bachelor of Science 



Andrew Taylor Altmann 
Bert Winfried Anspon, Jr. 
Bernard Lewis Aymold, Jr. 
Charles Mitchell Barr 
Carolin Louise Barry 
John Edgar Boice, Jr. 
Alan Thomas Bradley 
Robert Burke 
Robert Bailey Burns 
Frank Williams Carey, Jr. 
Edmond Thayer Chandler 



John Joseph Clunk 
Donald Claude Corridon 
John Alexander Daiker 
Francis Jame:s Detorie 
Frank Arthur Dvtv^r, Jr. 
Raphael Hyam Ehrlich 
Herman Ehudin 
Mary Louise Engel 
Ralph Wylie Frey, Jr. 
Guy Gray Gantz, Jr. 
John Brown Gunter, Jr. 



'Degree conferred August 2, 1940. 



420 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 19A0-19U 



421 



Norman Hal Himelfarb 

Raymond Louis Hodges 

Norman McClave Holzapfel 

William Joseph Hopps 

Eugene Howard 

Richard Francis Hutchinson 

George August Waldemar Jansson, 

Jr. 
Paul Elmer Jarboe 
George Overton Kephart 
John Edwin Lewis, Jr. 
Clarence Marcus 
John Alexander McConnachie 
Robert Leonard Moog 
John L. Mueller 



J. Leo Mueller, Jr. 

Huyette Beck Oswald 

Franklin Kellogg Peacock 

Robert Culler Rice 

Jose Cristobal Sanchiz Sanchez 

Robert Warfield Saum 

Leonard J. Shields 

Norman Harold Silverman 

Richard T. Skeen 

William Benjamin Thurston, IH 

Norman Donald Tilles 

GiNO Valenti 

Ernest Gunther Wagner 

David Raymond Weathersbee 

Raymond Leroy Worthington 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Doctor of 



Frederick Aurbach 
Robert Nelson Baker 
Sterrett Patterson Beaven 
Daniel Elihu Berman 
Robert L. Betts 
Benjamin Birschtein 
Edmund Louis Bohne 
Edward Bressman 
Melvin Robert Briskin 
A. Alfred Brotman 
Joseph Paul Carl Burch 
Gilbert Lee Caldwell 
John Samuel Callaway 
Nicholas James Capone 
Paul Castelle 
Abraham Chernow 
Phillip Lee Chmar 
William Melick Collins 
Donald Carder Corbitt 
Jerome S. Cullen 
Joseph Charles Dembo 
Frank Louis DePasquale 
Morton DeScherer 
Paul Samuel Dubansky 
James Fender Easton, Jr. 
Daniel Lawrence Farrell 
Donald Tiemeyer Frey 



Dental Surgery 

Michael Fulton 

Philip Gold 

Maxwell Solomon Golden 

Abraham Gudwin 

Warren Dunning Haggerty, Jr. 

Virgil Randolph Hawkins, Jr. 

Stanley Heller 

Earl Christian Hewitt 

Harold Paul Hyman 

Nathan William Hymanson 

Bernard Kapiloff 

Leonard Kapiloff 

Seymour Martin Karow 

Sidney Kellar 

Herbert Ernest Klingelhofer 

Leonard Koenig 

Kenneth Donald Kornreich 

Mario Arthur Lauro 

Ronald Lawrence 

Benjamin Levy 

Frank Aurelius Marano 

Anthony Francis Matisi 

Joseph Govane McClees 

Edward Paul McDaniel, Jr. 

Edward Abraham Mishkin 

Abraham Ollman 

Malcolm Marsh Parker 



MYRON Aaron Policow 
George Reusch 
Edward G. Rosenberg 
Frederick Bernard Rudo 
John Raymond Santeramo 
LeRoy Edward Schiller 
Carl Haid Schultheis 
Max Singer 
Harry Sloan 
Bernard Smith 



Joseph Hurst Smith 
Russell Spina 
Murray Storch 
Charles Taub 
John Walter Toffic 
Leonard Joseph Tolley 
Erminio Ralph Vitolo 
Irving I. Weinger 
Jack Irving Zeger 
Raynard F. Zuskin 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor 



Ellen Carr Adams 
Jack Stealton Bierly 
Mildred Virginia Bodine 
Ethel Mae Broome 
Philip Burkom 

William Kenneth Gumming, Jr. 
Mary Lyle Glotfelty 
Thomas Nelson Haase 
Marguerite Gardner Hall 
Helen Beatrice Kalbaugh 
Reita Margaret Lanahan 
Frances Naomi Lucas 
Charles J. R. McClure 
Marguerite S. Monocrusos 
Frances Leone Nordwall 
Ellsworth Bassford Nowell 

Bachelor 

*Ralph Luther Angel 

Vivian Elizabeth Applegarth 
*Ralph Wheeler Baumgardner 

JuDSON Harry Bell 

Susan Elizabeth Benson 
* JosiAH Alexander Blacklock 
*Charles Leslie Blentlinger 
*Nellie Elizabeth Blentlinger 

Mary Virginia Bolden 

Katherine Ogle Boone 

Barbara Ellen Boose 

John Joseph Boyda 

*Clara Eleanor Brown 



of Arts 

Philomena Osso 
Jane Claire Owings 
Lillian Powers 
Elizabeth Jeanne Reese 
Hope Reynolds 
Mary Julia Ryon 
Lid A Esther Sargent 
Rosalind Schwartz 
Mary Sgrignoli 
Keel Silbert 
Mildred Virginia Stubbs 
*Mary Susan Sullivan 
Maxine Eleanor Trout 
Helen Isabel Yelton 
Margaret Catherine Zimmerman 



of Science 

Basil Melville Burton 

Isabel Reed Butler 
*Henry L. Byer 
♦Hammond Dawson Cantwell 
*Mary Lillian Cheezum 
♦Beatrice Streaker Cissel 
♦Margaret Ann Claytor 

Carl Albert Cline, Jr. 

Maidee Elizabeth Coffman 
♦Timothy Edgar Conroy 

Grace Roberta Copes 

Ruth Claybrooke Creery 
♦Hilda Cunningham 



*Degree conferred Au^st 2, 1940. 



422 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



David K. Davidson 

Alice Elinor Deitz 

Gertrude Carton Denaburg 

Sister M. Constance Domning 

Paul Colter Edwards 

Alice Clara Farrell 
*Edna Shelton Feddeman 
*L. Louise Freeman 
♦Virginia Robinson Fristoe 
*Edna Marie Fulmer 

Joseph Norris Galley 

George Hilary Gienger 

Catherine Eleanor Gilleland 

Carolyn Barnes Gray 

Albert N. Greenfield 
*Ann Marcylean Griffith 

Ruth Souder Gue 
*Ola King Hagenbuch 
♦Elizabeth Matthews Harris 

Mary Elizabeth Hill 
♦Mildred Himmel 
♦Nadine R. Holt 

Robert Herman Horn 

Robert Francis Hurley 

William Edward Hutzell 

Hilda Mae Hyatt 
♦Marie Douglas Ingles 

Ethel May Ivins 

Charles Jirsa 
♦Gladys Leoda Judy 

♦WiLLAMY SiMONDS KiNG 

♦Dorothy Elizabeth Knotts 
Mildred Betty Krieger 
Hildreth Schaffer Lambert 

♦Tilden Theodore Lawlis 
Mary Rebecca Lennon 
Sol Levin 
Francis Albert Lewis 

♦Nannie Dick Livingstone 
Frederick Charles Maisel, Jr. 
Arthur Lee Martin 
Herbert Geer McCarriar 
John McDairmant 
Janet Marie McFadden 



Margaret Fay McGuire 

Virginia Lee McLuckie 
♦Florence Louise Meese 

Pershing Laurence Mondorff 
♦Agnes Louise Motyka 

Louise Frances Muhlenfeld 

Joseph Michael Murphy 

Jerome L. Nathanson 

Edward Thomas Naughten 
♦Glendora Ellen Needy 
♦Jeanette Robinson Newman 

Nellie Mae Nordwall 
♦Elsie Fleek Padgett 
♦Gladys Elizabeth Phillips 
♦Frances Price 

Evelyn Jean Ramer 
♦Mary Louise Klein Repp 

Marion Lockwood 

Elizabeth Leota Ross 

Charles Schiff 

Wilhelmina Virginia Schmidt 

Melvin James Schultz 

Richard William Shaffer 

Kathleen Eva Shanahan 
♦Bryan Lee Schockley 

Celia S. Silbert 
♦Ursula Cecilia Sleeman 

Arthur-etta Grayson Smith 
♦Gertrude Wilson Stanley 

Herman Alexander Tapper 
♦Nellie Gertrude Thomas 
♦Emily Blanche Turner 
♦Philip James Valle 
♦Vallie Brilhart Warehime 

Mary Elizabeth Waters 
♦Ruth Olive White 

Helen Lucille Willard 
♦Gertrude Virginia Wonn 
♦Robert Kennedy Wright 

Paul Yaffe 

♦Mildred Fletcher Yeager 
♦Lionel Yohn 

Alice Ruth Zerbola 

Harriet Curry Ziegler 



*De^ee conferred August 2, 1940. 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1H0-19U 



423 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Bachelor 

John Norman Bauernschmidt 
Frank John Blazek 
William Charles Booze 
William Bralo\^, Jr. 
Victor Charles Buhl 
John Merriken Carter 
John William Clark, Jr. 
R.\LPH Frost Crump 
John Douglas Custer 
William Myron Darling 

Louis Rodney Daudt 

Donald Chatterson Davidson 

George Walter Dorr 

Hugh Gifford Downs, Jr. 

Howard Conrad Filbert, Jr. 

James Robert Finton 

William Francis Gannon 

Francis Warner Glaze, Jr. 

Vaden Jones Haddaway, Jr. 

Thomas Addison Hall 

Robert Brooks Harmon 

Lawrence Howard Haskin, Jr. 

Samuel Earl Hatchett 

Edward Carroll Hawkins 

Frederic Maxey Hewitt 

Lawrence Judson Hodgins, Jr. 

Junius Oscar Hutton 



of Science 
Alden.Elon Imus 
Willard Cecillius Jensen 
Holly Martin Keller, Jr. 
Henry Frankland Kimball, Jr. 
James Michael Lanigan, Jr. 
Robert Wynne Laughead 
John Chesley Marzolf 
Robert Douglas Mattingly 
Arthur Charles Mehring 
Carl William Meyer 
Daniel Thomas O'Connell 
Donald Spoerer Onnen 
John Marvin Powell 
William Rimmer 
Ernest Clifford Saltzman, Jr. 
Charles Anton Shivoder, Jr. 
Paul Otto Siebeneichen 
Stanley Herbert Smith, Jr. 
Samuel Cloke Streep 
Walter Hart Suter, Jr. 
Turner Grafton Timberlake 
Thomas Eugene Watson, Jr. 
LAvniENCE LeRoy Wilson 
Fred Lee Witherspoon, Jr. 
John Frederick Worden 
Charles Mell Young 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Bachelor 

Muriel Etta Anderson 
Helen Scott Black 
Helen Edith Bondareff 
Emma Lydia Boss 
Lillian Elizabeth Brookens 
Mary Frances Buckler 
Alice Kathryn Burkins 
Mary Helen Cook 
Norma Lurene Cornnell 
Barbara Jean Davis 
Dorothy Marie Davis 



of Science 

M.Adele Dixon 

Milbrey Alice Downey 

Marguerite Chaffin Dunlap 
♦Marjorie Lee Enfield 

Bernice Jones 
♦Helen Jennison Jones 

Lydia Inez Lewis 

Margaret Thomson Loar 

Mary Elizabeth Lung 

Earla Ball Marshall 

Catherine Honore McCarron 



'Degree conferred August 2, 1940. 



424 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



*Verneena McGinnis 
Emma M. Mike 
Dorothy Nellis 
Elizabeth Wilson Owens 
Patricia May Pierce 
Mary Elizabeth Powers 
Daphne Reynolds 
Jeanne Madelaine Santamarie 
Doris Elizabeth Schutrumpf 
Margaret Ellen Setter 
Lelia Marle Simpson 
Mary Angeline Skidmore 



Ruby Elizabeth Soper 
Elizabeth L. Stephenson 
Bernice Stevenson 
IsABELLE Irene Tomberlin 
Eileen Clare Upson 
Marcia Mary Vorkoeper 
Evelyn Nadine Watson 
Mary Eloise Webb 
Ruth Rosina Wegman 
Margaret Weil 
Helen Edythe Williams 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



Bachelor 
Irving Daniel Alter 
t Charles Chester Wilson Atwater 
Robert Taylor Barbour 
John Deems Barnard 
George Charles Bast, Jr. 
John Darby Bowman, Jr. 
tRiCHARD Bertram Brenner 
Augustus Freeborn Brown, III 
William Hutchins Cole 
C. Osborne Dltvall 
Matthew Strohm Evans 
Merton Sykes Fales, Jr. 
t Charles Raymond Fowler 
John Brockenborough Fox 
John J. Ghingher, Jr. 
Max Glickman 
tRoBERT Martin Goldman 
John Stephen Hebb, III 
James Knox Huff, Jr. 
Thomas Irving Insley, Jr. 
Charles Earle Kelly 
fWiLLiAM Branson Kempton, III 
Anthony Walter Kraus, Jr. 
Victor Hartv^ll Laws, Jr. 
t Abraham A. Light 
James Barrett Maginnis 



of Laws 

t John Nevin Maguire 
Elmer Joseph Mahoney 
Joseph Aloysius Mattingly 
William Edwin Holt Maulsby 
tKENNETH Frederick McClure 
William W. Mohlhenrich 
tWiLLiAM Joseph O'Donnell 
Herman Elwood Perdue 
F.Leroy Peters 
Louis Posner 
Sara Purrington 
t John Edward Raine, Jr. 
George Bacon Rasin, Jr. 
Fred Burnett Rhodes, Jr. 
Morton Pitt Rosenberg 
Bertram Royce Russell 
William H. Sallow 
Samuel Schenker 
John Henry Skeen, Jr. 
Marvin Hugh Smith 
Hall Everett Timanus 
t James Joseph Treacy 
Bernard Charles Vincenti 
George Waingold 
John Philip Wenchel, II 
W. A. Stewart Wright 



Certificates of Proficiency 

Charles Jacob Hendrickson Darwin B. Martin 



♦Degree conferred Augnst 2, 1940. 
tWith Honor. 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1H0-19j^1 



425 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
Doctor of Medicine 



Aurora Frances Alberti 
Fred Alexander 
Jerome Cayton Arnett 
Charles Phelps Barnett 
Joshua Warfield Baxley, III 
Joseph John Bowen, Jr. 
Julius Culpepper Brooks, Jr. 
William Ross Bundick 
John Marshall Carter 
Pierson Melvin Checket 
Carlos Miguel Chiques 
Charles Edgar Cloninger 
Richard Alexis Conlen 
LeRoy Gerald Cooper 
Joseph Vincent Crecca 
Gene Albert Crocb 
DwiGHT Phelph Cruikshank, III 
John McCleary Culler, Jr. 
Michael Louis DeVincentis 
Emilio Diez-Gutierrez 
Anthony Francis DiPaula 
John Edward Esnard 
Camille Mary Evola 
Edward Leonard Frey, Jr. 
Jose Garcia-Blanco 
Julius Gelber 
William Goodman 
Theodore Joseph Graziano 
Thomas Ardis Hedrick 
Newton Webster Hershner, Jr. 
AsHER Hollander 
Pearl Trogdon Huffman 
James Stanley Hunter, Jr. 
Vita Rebecca Jaffe 
NoRVAL Foard Kemp 
Keaciel Kenneth Krulevitz 
Frank Edward Lach 
Franklin Earl Leslie 
Lorman Leon Levinson 
Jose S. Licha 
William Cook Lowe 
Thomas Frank Lusby, II 



Raymond Nasif Malouf 

Jacob Barry Mandel 

William Arthur Mitchell 

Jose Gilberto Molinari 

Margaret Elaine Morgan 

Felix Raymond Morris 

William Herbert Morrison 

James Joseph Patrick Nolan 

Miguel Novoa-Caballero 

Idalia Ortiz Ortiz 

Margaret Virginia Palmer 

Benjamin Pasamanick 

Thompson Pearcy 

Joshua Melvin Perman 

Irene A. Phrydas 

Charles Eugene Pruitt 

Francis Stanley Renna 

Walter Jones Revell 
Charles Richardson, Jr. 
Marion Ballard Richmond 
Christian Frederick Richter, Jr. 

Jonas Samuel Rosenberg 
Clyde Arthur Rossberg 
Robert Bowie Ghiselin Sasscer 
William Hamilton Sawyer, Jr. 
John Andrew Scholl 
Stanley Eugene Schwartz 
Edwin Lincoln Seigman, Jr. 
Edward Patrick Shannon, Jr. 
Joseph Chester Sheehan 
Elizabeth Brown Sherrill 
Thomas Courtland Sims 
Benedict Skitarelic 
Tracy Neil Spencer, Jr. 
Henry Robert Spinnler 
John Sutehall Stevens 
Webster Mills Strayer 
Raymond Kief Thompson 
Richard White Trevaskis 
George John Ulrich 
Edmund Joseph Virusky 
James H. Walker 



'Degree conferred September, 1940. 



426 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AWARDED, 1940-1 HI 



427 



Lester Aubrey Wall, Jr. 
Dayton 0*Lander Watkins 
John Bernard Wells, Jr. 
Thomas Carroll Wilder 



Edwin F. Wilson, Jr. 
Kazuo Yanagisawa 
John David Young, Jr. 
Kenneth Levie Zierler 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Graduate 



Ruth Ella Almony 
Charlotte Sue Barkdoll 
Ruth Ferrell Chesson 
Elizabeth Stella Clarke 
Margaret Bernice Edmundson 
Flora Elizabeth Evans 
Mildred Elizabeth Foster 
Nell Urbanna Hammer 
Phyllis Jeanne Heintz 
Mary Ellen Higgins 
Thelma Madge Jones 
Rebekah Spencer Lightbourne 
Judy Liles 
Charlotte Lee Matthews 



in Nursing 

Catherine Lorraine Neel 
Anna Janet Parker 
Margaret Lois Reynolds 
Helen F. Rice 
Myra Mae Sample 
Mary Catherine Scholl 
Etta Mae Shaver 
Edna Virgie Simmons 
Frances Jane Stanley 
Martha Charlene Wilson 
Philena Sue Wilson 
Elizabeth Louise Wolfe 
Mary Grace Yates 
Carolyn Doris Zeller 



Francis Ignatius Codd 
George Oscar DeGele 
Mary Rosula DiGristine 
Alvin Jay Fainberg 
Samuel Harry Ginsberg 
Abraham Ellis Glaser 
Leon Goodman 
Walter K. Hendin 
John Mayo Jernigan, Jr. 
Reuben Kahn 
♦Frank Thomas Kasik, Jr. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

George Joseph !Kreis, Jr. 



Albert Lindenbaum 
♦Maurice Victor Mayer 
Manual Miller 
Irvin Noveck 
Bernard Rosenthal 
Oscar Rudoff 
Milton Sarubin 
Harold W. Siegel 
Kenneth Gordon Sp angler 
Irving F. Zerwitz 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES, 1940-41 

Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 

Frank John Blazek Victor Charles Buhl 

Mildred Virginia Bodine Isabel Reed Butler 

Eleanor Jayne Bradley Dorothy Mae Campbell 

Virginia Lombard Brown Frank Williams Carey, Jr. 



Richard Alvan Clark 

Mary Helen Cook 

Lexey Jane Cragin 

Lee Sharp Crist 

William Kenneth Gumming, Jr. 

Elizabeth Jane Curtis 

Dorothy Marie Davis 

Jorge de Alba 

Ruth Estelle Evans 

Lydia Frances Ewing 

Belmont Greenlee Farley 

Howard Conrad Filbert, Jr. 

H.^RRiET Louise Frush 

Mary Lyle Glotfelty 

Clara Gale Goldbeck 

Lester Philip Guest 

Lawrence Howard Haskin, Jr. 

Helen Beatrice Kalbaugh 

Bertha Katz 

Charles Fernand Ksanda 

Frances Naomi Lucas 

Frederick Charles Maisel, Jr. 

John Chesley Marzolf 

John Alexander McConnachie 



Arthur Charles Mehring 
Nellie Mae Nordwall 
Robert Du Boise Rappleye 
Robert Culler Rice 
Kathryn Elaine Riedel 
Patricia Ann Royster 
John Jerome Ryan 
Harriet Mildred Sandman • 
Jeanne Madelaine Santamarie 
Doris Elizabeth Schutrumpf 
Leonard J. Shields 
Norman Harold Silverman 
Bernice Stevenson 
Carl Kerry Stoddard 
Mildred Virginia Stubbs 
Albert Edward Tepper 
Molly B. Tulin 
George Britton Vogt 
Ernest Gunther Wagner 
John Moss Whitten 
Arthur Paul Wiedemer 
Julia Worth Woodring 
David Kuykendall Worgan 



*Degree conferred August 2, 1940. 



Citizenship Medal, Offered by Dr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

John G. Reckord 

Citizenship Prize, Offered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 

Carolyn Barnes Gray 

Athletic Medal, Offered by the Class of 1908 
Robert Herman Smith 

Maryland Ring, Offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
Thomas McCoy Fields 

Goddard Medal, Offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

William Addison Holbrook 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 

Theodore Allison 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 
Margaret Susan Clarke 



428 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AWARDED, 19A0-19U 



429 



Medal and Junior Membership, Offered by the American Institute of Chemists 

Richard Alvan Clark 

•» -= 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal, Offered by Benjamin Berman 

Kenneth Macmillan Uglow, Jr. 

* 

Mortar Board Cup 

Mildred Virginia Stubbs 

Honor Key, Offered by the Class of 1926 of the School of 

Business Administration 

Norman Harold Silverman 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal 

Irene Florence Zaladonis 

Service Award, Offered by the Staff of Office of Dean of Women 

LiDA Esther Sargeant 

Bernard L. Crozier Award 

Lawrence Judson Hodgins, Jr. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award 
Lawrence Judson Hodgins, Jr. 

Tau Beta Pi Award 

Robert Welsh Russell 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit 

Alden Elon Imus 

Alpha Lambda Delta Sorority Award 
Mildred Virginia Stubbs 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards 

Albert Stillman Coleman 
Earla Ball Marshall 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award 
Ruth Estelle Evans 

Hillegeist Memorial Award 
Molly B. Tulin 

Edward Powell Lacrosse Trophy 
John L. Mueller 

Louis W. Berger Baseball Trophy 
William Henry England, Jr. 



The Diamondback Medals 

Orville Cresap Shirey Mary Ann Griffith 

Judson Harry Bell Mary Dawson Henderson 

Lola Marguerite Mangum Julia Worth Woodring 

Turner Grafton Timberlake Carolyn Barnes Gray 

The Terrapin Medals 

David Okey Johnson Donald Stanton Bierer 

Lida Esther Sargeant John Gilroy Luntz 

Gerald Eugene Prentice Eva Buchwald Brooks 

Wilson Gillis Ingraham Mary Elizabeth Powers 

The Old Line Medals 

Charles Fern and Ksanda George Overton Kephart 

F. Margaret Wallace Scott Walter Joseph Kerwin 

Joseph Hilliary White 

Battalion Trophy, OflFered by Mahlon N. Haines (1894) 
Fourth Battalion, Commanded by Cadet Lt. Col. John Chesley Marzolf 

Governor's Drill Cup 
Company L, Commanded by Cadet Captain David Cleveland Kelly, Jr. 

Reserve Officers' Association Award 
Cadet Captain David Cleveland Kelly, Jr. 

Alumni Cup 

Third Platoon, Company G, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant John Leonard Me akin 

Scabbard and Blade Cup 

Third Platoon, Company G, Commanded by 
Cadet Lieutenant John Leonard Meakin 

Military Medal, Offered by the Class of 1899 
Cadet William Hamilton Pindell, Jr. 

Pershing Rifles Medal to Each Member of Winning Squad, 
1st Squad, 2nd Platoon, Company F 



Cadet Sergeant William Welch 

Bagby 
Cadet Frederick Miller Johnson 
Cadet Eugene Arnold Gough 
Cadet George Wilson Cairnes 
Cadet August Ernest Eckels, Jr. 
Cadet Albert George Goldberg 



Cadet John Edward McCarty, Jr. 
Cadet Gail Ray Holmes 
Cadet Robert Hugh Yeatman 
Cadet Fred I. Edwards 
Cadet Robert Harold Benson 
Cadet Robert Barton Willis 



430 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AWARDED, 1940-1941 



431 



Third Corps Area Intercollegiate Rifle Match 
Championship Medals, First Place 



Felt Shields to Members of the R. O. T. C. Rifle Team and Managers for Rifle 



Cadet James Atkins Clark 
Cadet Lawrence Howard Haskin 
Cadet John Chesley Marzolf 
Cadet Alden Elon Imus 
Cadet Robert Delafield Rands, Jr. 



Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 
Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden 
Cadet Raymond Louis Hodges 
Cadet Robert Harold Benson 
Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 



National Intercollegiate Rifle Match Championship, Medals for Fourth Place 



Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 
Cadet Raymond Louis Hodges 
Cadet Alden Elon Imus 
Cadet William Alexander Reith 
Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden 



Cadet Lawrence Howard Haskin 
Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 
Cadet James Atkins Clark 
Cadet Joseph Murray Decker 
Cadet Robert Delafield Rands, Jr. 



Military Department Gold Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Varsity Rifle Team 

Cadet Alden Elon Imus 

Military Department Gold Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Freshman Team 

Cadet Dorsey Meredith Owings 

Col. R. E. Wysor Medals to Individuals Firing High Average 

Score on Varsity Rifle Team 

Cadet Alden Elon Imus, High Average 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller, Second High Average 

Cadet Fletcher Hudson Jones, Jr., Third High Average 

Col. R. E. Wysor Medals to Individuals Firing High Average 

Score on Freshman Rifle Team 

Cadet Dorsey Meredith Owings, High Average 
Cadet Joseph Murray Decker, Second High Average 
Cadet Clifton Bradford Currin, Third High Average 

Gold Medal to Individual Winning the Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition 

Cadet Alden Elon Imus 

A. L. Mehring All-American Silver Medal for Rifle Competition 

Cadet William Alexander Reith 

District of Columbia Marine Corps Rifle Club Championship, 

Medals for Second Place 
Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller, Second High Individual 
Cadet Robert Wynne Laughead, Third High Individual 
Cadet Willard Cecillius Jensen 
Cadet Alden Elon Imus 
Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden 



Cadet James Atkins Clark 
Cadet Lawrence Howard Haskin 
Cadet John Chesley Marzolf 
Cadet Alden Elon Imus 
Cadet Robert Delafield Rands, Jr. 
Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 
Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden 
Cadet Raymond Louis Hodges 
Cadet Robert Harold Benson 
Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 



Cadet Frank Gilbert Carpenter 
Cadet Guy Howard Goodman, Jr. 
Cadet William Alexander Reith 
Cadet Dorsey Meredith Owings 
Cadet Joseph Murray Decker 
Cadet John Francis Conlon 
Cadet Stanley Morris Whalen 
Cadet Lacy Hall 
Cadet Clifton Bradford Currin 



WAR DEPARTMENT AWARD OF COMMISSIONS AS SECOND 

LIEUTENANT OR CERTIFICATE OF CAPACITY AS SECOND 

LIEUTENANT IN THE OFFICERS' RESERVE CORPS 



John Norman Bauernschmidt 
James Monroe Beattie 
William Kendig Brendle 
Elmer Francis Bright 
James Bradford Burnside 
Jack Foster Cherry 
Richard Alvan Clark 
Carl Albert Cline, Jr. 
John Lynwood Crone 
Ralph Frost Crump 
John Douglas Custer 
Hugh Gifford Downs, Jr. 
David George Drawbaugh, Jr. 
Frank Arthur Dwyer, Jr. 
James Robert Finton 
William Francis Gannon 
Francis Warner Glaze, Jr. 
John Francis Greenip 
Robert Ashby Groves, Jr. 
Vaden Jones Haddaway, Jr. 
Daniel Julius Harwood 
Elliott Brooke Harwood 
Lawrence Howard Haskin, Jr. 
Thomas Eldon Hitch 
Lawrence Judson Hodgins, Jr. 
Arthur Warren Max Horn 
Alden Elon Imus 
William Purnell Johnson 
Nelson Riede Jones 



Bobby Lee Jones 
David Cleveland Kelly, Jr. 
Edward Melvin Lloyd 
Frederick Charles Maisel, Jr. 
Donald Powell Marshall 
John Chesley Marzolf 
Richard Charles McDevitt 
William Edwin McMahon, II 
John Leonard Me akin 
Norman Albert Miller, Jr. 
Allen Vogel Minion 
Donald Spoerer Onnen 
Michael Pennella 
John Marvin Powell 
Joseph Howard Randall 
Robert DuBois Rappleye 
John Gekler Reckord 
Richard Carlton Savage Reid 
Alvin Blair Rice 
Robert Culler Rice 
Henry Jacob Rockstroh 
John Jerome Ryan 
Robert Warfield Saum 
Leonard Treherne Schroeder, Jr. 
Paul Otto Siebeneichen 
Norman Harold Silverman 
Richard Tinney Skeen 
Samuel Cloke Streep 
Wiluam Jack Suit 



432 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AWARDED, IHO-lHl 



433 



WORTHINGTON HEATON TaLCOTT 

Herman Alexander Tapper 
GiNo Valenti 
Ernest Gunther Wagner 
Charles Wilson Wannan, Jr. 



Thomas Eugene Watson, Jr. 
Jack Edward Weber 
Robert Ramsay Westfall 
Stanley Morris Whalen 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors-HowARD Milton Gross, Virginia Lombard Brown, Robert 

Dubois Rappleye, Jorge de Alba M., Lexey Jane Cragin. 

Second Honors— John Jerome Ryan, Lee Sharp Crist, J. Thomas Reid, 

Hilde Marie Christensen, Ruth Suzanne Punnett' 
Jack Edward Weber, Maryan Singletton Donn. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

First Honors-JoHN Moss Written, Belmont Greenlee Farley, Dor- 
othy Mae Campbell, Elizabeth Jane Curtis, Richard 
Alvan Clark, Julia Worth Woodring, Bertha Katz, 
Kathryn Elaine Riedel, David Kuykendall Worgan,' 
Eleanor Jayne Bradley, Lydia Frances Ewing, Clara 
Gale Goldbeck, Molly B. Tulin, Frank I. Davis Jr. 

Second Honors-GEORGE C. Evering, Patricia Ann Royster, Harriet 

Mildred Sandman, Ruth Estelle Evans, Charles 
Fernand Ksanda, Marjorie Elizabeth Hall, Orr Esrey 
Reynolds, Warren Daniel Brill, Edith Ann Christen- 
sen, Daniel Julius Harwood, Barbara Ann Richmond, 
Martha Putnam Meriam, Irving Madorsky. 

College of Commerce 

First Honors-NORMAN Harold Silverman, Ernest Gunther Wagner 

Leonard J. Shields, Robert Culler Rice, Frank 
Williams Carey, Jr. 

Second Honors— George Overton Kephart, Ralph Wylie Frey Jr 

George August Waldemar Jansson, Jr., Franklin 
Kellogg Peacock, Bert Winfried Anspon, Jr. 

College of Education 
First Honors-^MiLDRED Virginia Stubbs, Mary Lyle Glotfelty 

William Kenneth Gumming, Jr., Helen Beatrice Kal- 
BAUGH, Mildred Virginia Bodine, Isabel Reed Butler, 
Frances Naomi Lucas. 

Second Honors-FREDERicK Charles Maisel, Jr., Jack Stealton Bierly, 

Carolyn Barnes Gray, Judson Harry Bell, Jane Clare 
OwiNGs, Paul Yaffr 



College of Engineering 

First Honors — Howard Conrad Filbert, Jr., John Chesley Marzolf, 

Victor Charles Buhl, Frank John Blazek, Arthur 
Charles Mehring, Lawrence Howard Haskin, Jr. 

Second Honors — Thomas Eugene Watson, Jr., John Merriken Carter, 

Alden Elon Imus, Lawrence Judson Hodgins, Jr., 
Donald Spoerer Onnen. 



First Honors- 
Second Honors- 



College of Home Economics 

-Bernice Stevenson, Mary Helen Cook, Doris Elizabeth 
ScHUTRUMPF, Dorothy Marie Davis. 

-Jeanne Madelaine Santamarie, Daphne Reynolds. 
Margaret Weil. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
George Rehjsch 



Certificates of Honor 

Sterrett Patterson Beaven Donald Tiemet^er Frey 

Warren Dunning Haggerty, Jr. Stanley Heller 

Frederick Bernard Rudo 

School of Law 

Elected to the Order of the Coif 

Charles Chester Wilson Atwater Robert Martin Goldman 
Richard Bertram Brenner William Joseph 0*Donnell 

John Edward Raine, Jr. 

Alumni Prize for the Best Argument in the Honor Case in the Practice Court 

Augustus Freeborn Brown, III 

George 0. Blome Prizes to Representatives on the Honor Case 

in the Practice Court 

August Freeborn Brown, III William Joseph O'Donnell 

John J. Ghingher, Jr. Hall Everett Timanus 

School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 
James Stanley Hunter, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

Margaret Virginia Palmer George John Ulrich 

NoRVAL Foard Kemp , Lester Aubrey Wall, Jr. 

Jose S. Licha . Raymond Kief Thompson 



434 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The Dr. A' Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the Best Work 
in Genito-Urinary Surgery During the Senior Year 

Raymond Nasif Malouf 

School of Nursing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship, given by the University of Maryland 
Nurses' Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in AdmListration 

CoTrh'^' T^- ''"'?"*= "^"'^'^ W^^J^ -t Teachers CoiWe"' 
Columbia University, to the Student Having the Highest 

Average in Scholarship 

EuzABETH Louise Wolfe 

The Elizabeth Collins Lee Prize to the Student Having 

the Second Highest Ave-age in Scholarship 

Nell Ukbanna Hammer 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize for the Highest Average 

m Executive Ability 
Carolyn Doris Zeller 

The Edwin and Leander M. Zimmerman Prize for Prp^f.Vai m • 

Displaying the Greatest Interest a:dTym;;t^hrf ^f ^^^^^^^^^ ''' 

Carolyn Doris Zeller 

The University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association Pin and Member 
ship :n the Association, for Practical Nursing and Executive AbmS 

Charlotte Lee Matthews 

School of Pharmacy- 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

Alvin Jay Fainberg 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
For the Academic Year 1941-1942 as of April 1942 

Resident Collegiate Courses — College 
Academic Year : Park 

College of Agriculture 415 

College of Arts and Sciences.... 1,126 

College of Commerce 404 

College of Dentistry 

College of Education 598 

College of Engineering 734 

Graduate School 379 

College of Home Economics 288 

School of Law 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 

Total 3,944 

Summer School, 1941 1,244 

Grand Total 

Duplications 461 

Total Dess Duplications 

Education Subcollegiate 



Baltimore 


Total 


.............. 


415 




1,126 




404 


364 


364 


276 


871 (3 dupl.) 




734 


94 


460(13 dupl.) 




288 



5,188 



4,727 



175 
380 
148 
124 

93 

70 



1,561 



1,654 



1,584 



175 
380 
148 
124 

1,337 



5,489 



6,826 
604 (+16 above) 

6,222 

130 



Mining Courses, Western Maryland _ 226 

Engineering, Defense Extension ^ 2,030 

Short Courses and Conferences: 

Atlantic Grange Lecturers' Conference ^ 288 

Boys 'and Girls' Club Week _ 573 

Canning Crop School 200 

Cattle Feeders' Day 100 

Dahlia Field Day 20 

Educational Advisors' Conference C. C. C 73 

Farm Dairying Short Course 25 

Fertilizer Manufacturers' Conference 52 

Garden School ~ 60 

Greenkeepers Short Course 37 

Guernsey Breeders' Field Day 90 

Horticulture Short Course 37 

Milk Testers' Short Course 7 

Northeastern States Vegetable Variety Trials and 

Vegetable Breeding Conference 96 

Nurserymen's Short Course 85 

Nutrition Institute - 80 

Poultry Short Course 26 

Rural Women's Short Course 786 

School Administrators' Conference 140 

State Parent-Teacher Conference 127 

Volunteer Firemen 311 

Total Short Courses and Conferences 3,213 

Grand Total, All Courses, Baltimore and College Park, 

less duplications 11,821 



EXTENSION 
SERVICE 




EXT E^iSlOH WORKERS' CREED 

I love the big out-of-doors; the smell of the soil; the touch of the rain; 
the smile of the sun; the \iss of the wind; the song of the birds and the 
laughter of the summer breezes in the trees. 

I love the growing crops; the rustle of the com; the golden billow of the 
ripening wheat; the fleecy cotton bursting from the boll; the mus\y odor 
of the ripening fruit and the shimmer of the grass that is blue. 

I love God's creatures, great and small, that minister to mans needs; 
the friendship of the horse; the confidence of the sheep; the gentleness of 
the cow and the contented confidence of the fattening swine. These repre^ 
sent the response of service to \indness and care. 

Because I Love These Things 

I believe in the open country and the life of country people; in their 
hopes, their aspirations and their simple faith; in their ability and power 
to enlarge their own lives and plan for the happiness of those that they love. 

I believe in the farmer as the T^ations sure defense; the reservoir of its 
prosperity; its haven of security from those who would despoil it from 
within or without. 

I believe in the farmer s right to a comfortable living; to such recom- 
pense for his capital and labor and s\ill as will ma\e him the peer of those 
who wor\ in office, shop or mine; in his right to co-operate with his neigh^ 
hors for the security of his business life and in the helping service science 
sends as handmaid to his common sense. 

I believe in the sacredness of the farmer s home; in the holiness of the 
country womans love and the opportunity that home should assure to 
culture, grace and power. 

I believe in the country boy and girl; in their longings for opportun'.ty; 
their right to trained minds, healthy bodies and clean hearts, and to the 
country's call and claim to their service. 

I believe in my own wor\; the opportunity it offers to be helpful; in 
its touch of human sympathy and its joy of common fellowship. 

I believe in the public institutions of which I am a part; of their right 
to my loyalty and my enthusiasm in extending the established principles 
and ideals of those who see\ and find the truth. 

1 believe in myself; in humility, but with sincerity of purpose, I offer 
to wor\ with country man, woman and child in ma\ing the farm prosper- 
ous, the country home comfortable and beautiful; the rural community 
satisfying and my own life useful. 

Because I Love These Things and Believe These Things, I 
Am An Extension Worker. 



SECTION V 
Agricultural Extension, Research and 

Kegrulatory Agrencies 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
College Park 

Thomas Baddeley Symons m <? n a t^ 

Director. ' ^■^•' ^•^^'••' ^««n' College of Agriculture, 

Edward Ingram OswAi.n r cj r>_ * . 

Venia Merie Kellar T^ p" .^^°^^"^°^' Assistant Director. 
Ernest ml S^P^n " J^^f^^^"'"' Assistant Director. 

mologist, AsSant S;e?or "' ''"*'"""" Entomology, State Ento- 

PaTedwxn Mv^^^""^ ^■^■' P™^«^«-' Editor. 

£w^Tr^™rKfN^AtrSVr ^^^^ ^^""*^ ^-* ^-^er. 
Dorothy Emerson Associate tIT ^^°^«««°^. Boys' Club Leader. 

FLORENCE HaR^St MaTk B S A "'' ^'!''' ^''^'^ ^«^^^- 

Furnishing, District Agent '""^*' ^''*'^^^°^' ^^-"^ion Home 

Jst^Lr^^roT-Br rn^*7 ^^^^*-*- 

HARRINGTON, B.A., Assistant Professor, Illustrator. 
George Jenvey AB^f^ MATTER SPECIALISTS 

ARTHUR Montra1?Sh^^m rSj "fT^' ^'^*^"^'- AP'->t-- 
tural Education. ' ' ^^^^^t^"* Professor, Extension Agricul- 

Walter Raymond Baltarh p q a 

and Landscape ^Sng. ' "''^*" ^''^'''^'- ^^t^^^^on Vegetable 
Howard Clinton Barker r q r> 4? « 

Waltob Crothers Bea^S Ph B ito "^ ^^*'"''"'^ °^'^ Husbandry. 
^^ AVEN, Ph.B., Associate Professor, Extension Market- 

Herbert Roderick Bird pii n a 

Nutrition. ' ^^•^•' ^^^°"*t« Professor, Extension Poultrj- 

Ray Wilpord Carpenter A r t r u n ^ 

Engineering, State Drainage EnS'Aefr ' ^^''^'°" Agricultural 

JOHN ALFRED CONOVER, B.S., LsS p;ofessor Ext. • r. 

bandry. ^ xroiessor, Extension Dairy Hus- 

nomics. ' ^roiessor, Extension Agricultural Eco- 

LiNDEN Seymour Dodson, Ph D AQQicfor.f p * 

, ±-^.1^., Assistant Professor. Extension Sociology. 

438 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



439 



La^vrence Elden Downey, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing* 

Mylo Snavely Downey, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Boys* Club 
Work. 

Castillo Graham, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension Entomology. 

* J AMES Martin Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Egg Marketing. 

William Edgar Harrison, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Russell Cheney Hawes, B.S., Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Canning Crops. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology, State 
Pathologist. 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Extension Rural 
Electrification. 

Albin Owings Kuhn, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

George Shealy Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Ento- 
mology. 

John Winfield Magruder, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Arthur F. Martin, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Nutrition. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Charles Percival Merrick, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Drainage 
Engineering. 

Jambs Burton Outhouse, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Animal 
Husbandry. 

Calvin Platt Poppell, Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Walter Benjamin Posey, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Tobacco. 

Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Assistant Professor, Extension Music. 

Wade Hampton Rice, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Franklin Kirk Sampson, Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Pomology. 

Stewart Baker Shaw, B.S., Professor, Extension Marketing, Chief State 
Department of Markets. 

Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Clothing. 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor, Extension 

Landscape Gardening. 
Alston Wesley Specht, M.S., Instructor, Extension Agronomy. 

Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor, Extension Landscape Garden- 
ing. 

Howard John Twilley, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Joseph McNaughton Vial, B.S., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 



*0n leave 1942-1943. 



ii 



'ii 



440 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



441 



^TJJr""" '''^---^' M.S.. Associate Professor, Extension Horti- 

Pathology. ' ^^■^•' ^««'«tant Professor, Extension Plant 

IT^^t'^SZ.^T^' ''''''■' ^^°'^^^°^' E-t-"^ion Canning Crops 

ZoZ ^™^«^«'^' ^-S-. Assistant Professor, Extelion En- 

Forestry. * ^•^•' ^■^■' Assistant Professor, Extension 

*L.™^Gk™h Wo.xhxkc.0., B.S., Instructor, Extension General Edu- 

COUNTY AGENTS (Field) 

<^''"»*2' Name „ , 

Allegany. Ralph Frank McHenrv r « a • "^'^'^luarters 

MCHENRY, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Anne Arundel...... Stani^v Everest Dav, B.S., Associate Professor,"'"'"' 

Balti„,ore.....__HoBACE Bennett Derrxck. B.S.. Associate Proft^""^ 

Calvert John Boome Morsell, B.S., Assistant Professor, '^'"'"'" 

Caroline georce Watson C^ndanxe., B.S., AssocS?e"?rfit?' 

''"'■''" ^"^^°^ CRAWFORD BURNS. B.S.. Associate Professor,"*" 

Chlrles ^;-^^^-- MX.X.R. B.S., Assistant ProfessoT.".*1;£ 

'• ^"^'^"-^^ ^"««^^^ MCKNIGHT, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Frederick Henrv Reese Shoemaker, B.S., M.A., Associate^'pToSso; 

Harford henrv Morrxson Carroll, B.S., Associate Professor. 

Howard Warren Graham Mvers, B.S., Assistant Professor^'' """ 

Kent JAMES Dx;nham McVean, B.S., Associate pfoW,'''*' 

Montgomery. Otto Watson Anderson, M.S., Associate Profestf*""^ 

^ — Rockville 

*0n military leave. 

tOn military leave. " - _ 



Prince Georges Percy Ellsworth Clark, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Upper Marlboro 

Queen Annes Mark Kermit Miller, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Centerville 

St. Marys Joseph Julius Johnson, Assistant Professor, 

Leonardtown 

Somerset Clarence Zeigler Keller, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Princess Anne 

Talbot Rudolph Stocksdale Brown, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Easton 

Washington _.MiLTON Donaldson Moore, M.S., Associate Professor, 

Hagerstown 
Wicomico ...James Paul Brown, B.S., Assistant Professor Salisbury 

Worcester ...Robert Thornton Grant, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Snow Hill 

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGENTS 

Allegany and 

Washington .....Harry Wesley Beggs, B.S., Instructor Cumberland 

Baltimore. ....John Wheeler Ensor, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Harford .« Walter Sherard Wilson, B.S., Instructor Bel Air 

Kent. Stanley Burr Sutton, Instructor - Chestertown 

Montgomery. Rufus Bacher King, A.B., Instructor Rockville 

Carroll and 

Frederick Chester Marvin Cissell, B.A., Instructor „ Frederick 

Dorchester ..*Charles Fuller, M.S., Instructor Cambridge 

Queen Annes James Walter Eby, B.S., Instructor Centreville 



LOCAL AGENTS— NEGRO WORK 

Southern 

Maryland _..Martin Green Bailey, B.S., Instructor _. 

Eastern Shore ....Louis Henderson Martin, Instructor „ 



- Seat Pleasant 

Princess Anne 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS (Field) 
County Name Headquarters 

Allegany Maude Alberta Bean, Associate Professor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel Frances E. Beegle, B.S., Assistant Professor Annapolis 

Baltimore Anna Trentham, B.S., Associate Professor ..Towson 

Calvert Florence E. Buchanan, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Prince Frederick 
Caroline Bessie Marguerite Spafford, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Dentoir 
Carroll Adeline Mildred Hoffman, M.A., Assistant Professor, 

Westminster 

*Acting County Agent. ' - ' 



442 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



443 



Cecil Helen Irene Smith, B.A., Associate Professor Elkton 

Charles Mary Graham, Associate Professor. ^ La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie Estella Brooks, A.B., Associate Professor, 

Cambridge 
Frederick Florence Elizabeth Williams, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Frederick 

Garrett Marianna Lee Long, B.A., Assistant Professor. Oakland 

Harford Catharine Maurice, B.S., Associate Professor Bel Air 

Howard. Mildred Jane Flanagan, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Ellicott City 
Kent JIelen Nickerson SchellinGER, Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 

Montgomery Edythe Margaret Turner, Associate Professor...Rockville 

Prince Georges Ethel Mary Regan, Associate Professor Hyattsville 

Queen Annes JIelen Marie Harner, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Centreville 

St. Marys .....Ethel Joy, A.B., Assistant Professor. Leonardtown 

Somerset. Hilda Topfer, B.S., Assistant Professor Princess Anne 

Talbot Margaret Smith, B.S., Associate Professor Easton 

Washington Ardath Ellen Martin, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico. Esther Weightman Bower, M.S., Assistant Professor, 

Salisbury 
Worcester Lucy Jane Walter, Associate Professor - Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

Allegany Margaret Thomson Loar, B.S., Instructor. Cumberland 

Baltimore Mary Elizabeth Hahn, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Local Home Demonstration Agents — Negro Work 
Southern 

Maryland Ethel Lawrence Bianchi, B.S., Instructor, 

Seat Pleasant 
Eastern Shore Sibyl E. Nance, Instructor.....^ Princess Anne 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

T. B. Symons, Director 

Katherine Connolly, Administrative Assistant 

Elsie G. Linkous, Secretary to Director 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and home economics, estab- 
lished by State and Federal Laws in 1914, is designed to assist farmers and 
their families in the problems of agriculture and rural homes. Most of the 
work is carried on in the local communities, on the farms and in the homes 
throughout the State. It is conducted under a Memorandum of Understand- 
ing between the Extension Service of the University of Maryland and the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



The Federal Government, the State and the Counties contribute to the sup- 
ort of the Extension Service in Maryland. There is a County Extension 
rrlice in each county, with a County Agent and Home Demonstration 
fS in charge, and a sistants where funds permit and the work requires. 
Sli by a st;ff of Specialists at the University, these Agents are in 
eio e contLt with rural people and their problems. There are tremendous 
Imands for expansion at present, as a result of the war. Various pro- 
ems of the Department of Agriculture are launched by the County Agents. 
Ihey are working closely with the County War Boards, servmg as executive 
secretaries in carrying on war activities. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home Kfe comes within 
tJ scone of extension work. The Extension Service teaches largely by 

eJSratts and carries the scientific and economic "suits of the Depa^^^ 
ment of Agriculture and Experiment Stations to rural people m ways that 
they understand and use. 

All group and general education essential to understanding the so-called 

actlon^roiams arranged recently by the Department of Agriculture is a 

sponsSy of the E^ension .Service. It is in best posit on to handk some 

of the special war tasks that involve education, organization, and other 

work. 

In Maryland, the Extension Service works in close association with all 
rual organizations. It assists especially in promoting better mark^trng of 
am products and encourages the marketing of home supplies by rural 
women Work with rural women is one of the most extensive phases of 
extension education, including both the practical problems of the home and 
tfe cultural, economic, and community activities in which present-day 
women are engaging. 

In addition to work with adults, thousands of boys and grls are developed 
as leaders and given practical education through the 4-H <=1«^«- J^'^^ 
their diversified activities, the boys and, girls are given a valuable type 
of instruction and training and afforded an opportunity to develop self- 
confidence, perseverance, and citizenship. 

EXTENSION SHORT COURSES 
Rural Women's Short Course 

In response to requests of rural women for special training in * variety 
of subjects the Rural Women's Short Course was inaugurated m 1922. It 
has been conducted under the auspices of the Home Demonstration Depart- 
ment of the Extension Service. The attendance at the course, extending 
for one week, has steadily grown, reaching more than one thousand women 
at the last session, taxing the facilities at the University. The course has 
been given about the second week in June for the past nineteen years. 



444 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Canners' Short Course 

Fourteen years ago there developed a demand from the canners of the 
State for a Short Course designed especially to aid them in the fundamen- 
tals of the industry. A good attendance from Maryland and adjoining states 
is always registered. It is given by the Horticultural Department, usually 
the third week in February. 

Nurserymen's Short Course 

A few years ago the organized nurserymen of the State requested a short 
course covering problems of their business. The lectures and demonstrations 
reflect advanced technique in production of nursery stock and control of 
insect pests and disease. It is given by the Departments of Horticulture, 
Entomology and Pathology. 

Greenkeepers' Short Course 

The annual Greenkeepers* Course was inaugurated to meet requests of 
golf course managers for assistance in the problem.s incident to maintain- 
ing grass generally and golf greens in particular. A number of out-of-state 
managers and assistants register each year. The course is usually given 
in February. 

Gardening Short Course 

In order to meet the requests of a large number of people for assistance 
in gardening, a special two-day course was offered several years ago. The 
work given discusses up-to-date varieties of flowers and vegetables, soil 
treatment and control of pests. It is given by the Horticultural Depart- 
ment each year in March. 

Florists' Short Course 

In the latter part of March or first of April each year a special short 
course is given for the benefit of florists. The course usually extends two 
day/, with a special evening feature held in the Coliseum for the display of 
flower decorations and a style revue. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Week 

From 500 to 600 4-H Club boys and girls attend a conference of leaders 
from all sections of the State at the University. Class work and demon- 
trations are given by specialists in various phases of club work. The course 
extends over a week and is usually given the latter part of August. 

Farm Labor Short Courses 

Special arrangements were made during the past year, in response to 
the U. S. Women's Volunteer Service, for practical short courses in garden- 
ing, fruit growing, poultry and dairying. These courses were designed to 
familiarize women with practical work in these respective fields. They 
were given two days a week for four weeks, and were designed to aid in 
the farm labor situation. 



EXPERIMENT 
STATION 




To read textbooks is easy, but 
to do research work is to grapple, 
inch by inch, with the obscure, 
and battle, step by step, with the 



unknown. 



— Victor Robinson. 



* 



446 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



447 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

Roger Bailey Corbett, Ph.D y.. 

Agricultural Economics: " irector 

ApTrxT^o Tv/r^ . Assistant Professor, Agricultural Economics 

Arthur Montraville Ahalt, M.S., 

T> ^ Assistant Professor, Agricultural Education 

S'ro.T''"';^™"'""' "^^ ^ ^'''^^^' Africultural EconoS 

Paul Routzahn Poffenbergek, M.S Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering: 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LLB., 

rr^r. T ^^^^^^^^^' Agricultural Engineering, State Drainage Engineer 
George John Burkhardt, M.S., ^^n&ineer 

-'^^^^^^^^^ Professor, Agricultural Enffineerin^ 
Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., i^n^meermg 

Agronomy: Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D. T>^^i. 



RoYLE Price Thomas, Ph.D.... p^ ; ^ ^ -i 

George FRANCIS Madigan, Ph.D Assistant Prof 

ALBiN OwiNGS KUHN. M.S Assistant Professor, 

ALFRED Damon Hoadley, Ph.D Assistant 

Albert Westle Woods, B.S. t«c+„,,* 

Stanley Philups Stabler B S --instructor, ^gronomy 

4 , b™^ ■nr.,,..^ T, ° ' ^-^ - Assistant, Agronomy 



omy 



- Assistant, Agronomy 



Albert White, B.S. 
Animal Husbandry: 

Animal Pathology: 
Mark Frederick Welsh, B.S., D.V.M., 
■a ,. Professor, Veterinary Medicine, State Veterinarian 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M._....... Associate Professor, pXS 

LEO JOSEPH POELMA. M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor Pa ho oS 

S'B^rDvT'"' ''•''•'' Instructor,' Patholog^ 

CLYDE BEAN, D.V.M Cooperative Agent, Pathology 

Bacteriology : 

Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D. PmfPQc^^ t3„ + • i ^r 

George Wiluam Eastment...... Assistant, Bacteriology 



Botany, Plant Physiology and Pathology: 
Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., 

Professor, Botany and Plant Physiology 

John Bitting Smith Norton, D.Sc Professor, Plant Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.Di Professor, Botany 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., 

Professor, Plant Pathology, State Pathologist 

Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D *........ Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Herman Gerard DuBuy, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Mark Winton Woods, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

*Harold George Shirk, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Earnest Artman Walker, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Harold Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D „ Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Carroll Eastburn Cox, M.S _.... Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Clifton Elwood Pierce, M.S Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Wilson Levering Smith, Jr., B.S ...Assistant, Plant Pathology 

Sarah Elizabeth Wise, M.S Assistant, Plant Pathology 

Dairy Husbandry: 

Kenneth LeRoy Turk, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Lane A. Moore, Ph.D ., Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Charles Walter England, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.S Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Glenn Hoffman, B.S Assistant Dairy Inspector 

Entomology : 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D Professor, Entomology, State Entomologist 

Harold Sloan McConnell, M.S - Associate Professor, Entomology 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S Assistant Professor, Apiculture 

Horticulture: 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D Professor, Olericulture 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D Professor, Pomology 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D...... > Professor, Canning Crops 

Francis Busy Lincoln, Ph.D ...Associate Professor, Plant Propagation 

Irvin Charles Haut, Ph.D Associate Professor, Pomology 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S Associate Professor, Canning Crops 

*Howard Livingston Stier, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Horticulture 

Jack Amatt, B.S Instructor, Horticulture 

Dean Manter Bailey, M.S Instructor, Horticulture 

Chester Wood Hitz, Ph.D Assistant, Horticulture 

Herman Todd, B.S Assistant, Horticulture 



*0n military leave. 



448 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



449 



Poultry : 

MoRLEY Au^N JuLL, Ph.D - Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

George DeWitt Quigley, B.S Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Robert Emmett Phillips, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

Herbert Roderick Bird, Ph.D — Associate Professor, Nutrition 

♦James Martin Gwin, M.S., 

Associate Professor, Poultry Production and Marketing 
Charles Simpson Williams, M.S Instructor, Poultry Husbandry 

Seed Inspection: 

Forrest Shepperson Holmes, M.S _ Chief Seed Inspector 

John Thomas Mullady, B.S Analyst 

Ellen Phelps Emack Analyst 

Olive Marian Kelk Analyst 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Roger B. Corbett, Director 

Clara T. Marton, Secretary to Director 

The Agricultural Experiment Stations are for agriculture what the re- 
search laboratories are for large corporations. Great corporations pool 
huge sums of money to finance their operations and can afford to use a 
percentage of their income for research. Thus the General Electric Com- 
pany has its "House of Magic" in Schenectady, New York, the DuPont 
Company has its famous research laboratories, and many other corporations 
are conducting research. Agriculture is made up of six million small 
individual businesses, and there is not sufficient capital, or sufficient income 
so that any one of these businesses can conduct research. Yet the problems 
which face a biological business such as farming, are as numerous and per- 
plexing as the problems of any business. Certainly our production of food 
and fibre would be much more costly if it were not for the research results 
that have been obtained by the agricultural experiment stations. 

These stations are for the most part joint Federal and State undertakings. 
While a number of states had already established experiment stations prior 
to any Federal action, the passage of the Hatch Act in 1887, which made 
available a grant in aid to each state for the purpose of establishing an 
agricultural experiment station, gave a great impetus to the development 
of research work in agriculture. This work was further encouraged by the 
passage of the Adams Act in 1906, the Purnell Act in 1925, and the Bank- 
head — Jones Act in 1935. 

The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station which is sup- 
ported by these Acts and by State appropriations centers at College Park. 
On the University campus are to be found laboratories for studying insects 



*On military leave. 



.A diseases soil fertility problems, botanical problems, and others. This 
falso the location of the livestock and dairy barns with their experimen al 
Iris About eight miles from the campus at College Park, near BeltsvUle 
flocated the pfant Research Farms of about 500 acres devoted to work 
is Sth soil fertility, plant breeding and ^^-^^\^;:;^^^''^^^f :::l; 
Ims Near Ridgely, Maryland, is a farm of approximately 50 acres owned 
Tthe Station, VUich the problems of -nning crops growers on the 
Fastern Shore, are studied. There is also an experimental farm at Upper 
Marlboro wh^ch is operated cooperatively by the Federal Government and 
fhe Sl-d Agricultural Experiment Station, and which - J- -- 
exclusively to the problems of tobacco growing and curing. There is also 
a numS of acres rented near Pocomoke on the Eastern Shore, used for 
teS new varieties of potatoes. This work is checked and other varieties 
used on firms in Garrett County, Maryland. Near Ellicott C.ty there is 
fL™ of S acres which is devoted to livestock problems. These v^ious 
beations give a chance to conduct experiments under the ;-d'tio"S which 
exist where the results will be put into practice. This, of course, is very 
important m making results reliable and quickly usable. 

The station in general, exists as the "trouble-shooter" for Maryland 
far'mrs' men Maryland farmers have a problem, tbe first a.ency^o 
attempt to meet this problem is the Agricultural Experiment Station The 
solution of many difficult problems in the past has given th«JIar>land 
Agricultural Experiment Station an excellent standing among the farmers 
of the State. 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

H. C. Bybd, Executive Officer 

F. K. Haszaed, Executive Secretary 

The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of Agriculture 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of tbe University of Maryland^ 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Powers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows: 

"The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding the breeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
thereof, and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the ras- 
ing, distribution, and sale of farm, orchard, forest and nursery products 
generally, and plant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same; the 
preparation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection control, ajid distri- 
bution of animal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds fertilizers 
agricultural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals, and biological 



450 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE 



451 



products; and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
publish such information, statistics, and the results of such investigations 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the 
efficient dissemination thereof; and except where such powers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
control of the herein recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
the agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of 
desirable immigration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
regulations in respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
of the State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
law, and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
punished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execution and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested with such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
on the other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE STAFF 

(College Park) 

Mark Frederick Welsh, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Science, 
State Veterinarian. 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Animal Pathology, 
in Charge of College Park Laboratory. 

Leo Joseph Poelma, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 

William Rush Crawford, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

Harold Moon DeVolt, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Path- 
ology. 

Clyde LoRayne Everson, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, Veterinary Inspector. 

Charles Robert Davis, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

(Field) 

IRVIN M. MouLTHROP, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, in 
Charge of Salisbury Laboratory. 

George Edwin Daniel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Parasitol- 
ogy. 



r„.RLES HENRY CUNNINGHAM. D.V.M., M.S.. Assistant Professor of Vet- 

^ erinary Science, in Charge of CentreviUe Laboratory. 

wJiTm B Coughlin. D.V.M.. Assistant Professor in Charge of Baltimore 

M Jm Mos^'rabstein, V.M.D.. Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. 

U S. Cooperative Agent. 
avDE W. BEAN, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, U. S. 

Jjn'Zl^^^-.T^.^M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspec- 

j^M^W. CKOWL. D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

H. BTootD.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. Hagers- 

cZTc J. GIBBS. D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

, ^l^ ^:^Z, D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

J J ''Z'^^tvM., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector LaPlata. 
CHAS R."oCKWOo; D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

MahI^nT TROUT. D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

H. l'1rms?rong, D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

F. H^'b^'amin. D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

North East. ^ . _ .^^ 

CHAS. B. Breininger, D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

OraThoffman. D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

EDwlTrrcLAUGHLiN, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary In- 

snector, Salisbury. . 

CHARLES A. TURNER. D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspec- 

tor, Chestertown. , ,. ^ • t „^^/, 

CHARLES B. Weagley, D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspec- 

tor. Middletown. . _ . 

CHARLES OMER, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector. 

CARiTsTmi'lNKS. D.V.M.. Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspec- 
tor, Rockville. 



452 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 



453 



LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

Mark Welsh, Director, State Veterinarian 
Katherine Conlon, Secretary 



Executive Offices 

816 Fidelity Building, 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Main Laboratory 

College Park, Maryland 



The Live Stock Sanitary Service is charged with the control and eradi- 
cation of the diseases of live stock and poultry. The work is closely corre- 
lated with the State Board of Health, the College of Agriculture of the 
University, the Experiment Station and the Extension Service. 

It is becoming increasingly apparent that many diseases may attack both 
man and animal and the various infections must be controlled in the lower 
animals to safeguard the health of the human population. These include 
rabies in dogs, tuberculosis and Bang's disease in cattle, a virus disease of 
horses known as encephalomyelitis which has recently been found to cause 
severe nerve and brain disturbances in humans, trichinosis of swine and 
some 25 other known diseases or infections common to both man and ani- 
mal. The work of this Service, therefore, is two fold in that it conserves 
the investment made in live stock and poultry and protects the human 
population. 

The diagnosis of animal and poultry disease requires the same skill, 
training and equipment necessary for determining human ailments. It is 
imperative that a rapid and accurate diagnosis be made before intelligent 
treatment or control measures can be instituted. For this reason, a labora- 
tory was established at College Park to serve the general needs of the 
state for diagnoses and research work. A regional laboratory was estab- 
lished at Salisbury primarily to serve the large and growing poultry indus- 
try of that section. One was established in the University buildings in 
Baltimore, chiefly for testing the large volume of blood samples submitted 
for examination from that section and another at Centreville where all 
types of diagnostic work are conducted to serve the needs of the area. 

Veterinary inspectors are assigned to each of the counties having large 
live stock populations or to two or more counties where the numbers are 
smaller. For several years the major program was the identification and 
elimination of cattle affected with tuberculosis. This infection has now been 
reduced to less than one-half of one per cent of the cattle in the various 
counties but it is imperative that annual herd tests be continued if the 
present gains are to be held. The major field program at present is the 
control and eradication of Bang's disease. This is now being accomplished 
chiefly through the identification and elimination of the infected and by 
immunization of the calves. Most desirable progress has been made since 
1934 but there is little reason to hope that the task can be completed with- 
in the next few years. Through the field force, much assistance is given 



. ctnrkmen noultrymen and veterinarians in diagnosing and controlling 
't^^S^oTS^^^ are maintained when such senous out^ 

fZll rabies occur in a community or similar restrictions may be placed 
^' I indivtual f^^^^ where the swine have hog cholera or ammals have 
VrcoSons anTinfectious diseases. It is quite commonly recognized 
t^^^^f^Z poultry disease may spread with the speed of our trucks 
hl™ted animals or contaminated materials are transported. Am- 
il dLeS^^^^^ is not only an individual misfortune but is also a 

community and state responsibility. . ,4. ^^ 

state iL and regulations of the Maryland State Bo^d of Agncultu^e 
require that only healthy live stock may be imported ^^^^ f « f^^^^ 
Through cooperative working agreements vdth officials of other stetes the 
Itf stl'of live stock moving interstate is certified by the officx^l. of 
the state of origin. This to a large measure protects both the buyer ana 
1 sener TheS protective laws and regulations are admimstered by he 
?ive S ock sStax? Service. As herds and flocks are co-enteated for the 
.!Lmv of care and management, the diseases and pests which limit the 
7^UJ^cZe2.t^l When individuals are bred, fed and managed^ 
L ma^mum production purposes conditions often arise which are seldom 
oLreZnTnS^Sduals mint^ed at lower levels. Specific and non-specific 

Ses are frequently the limiting factor i» T r SrrnrS'/^t,;^ 
• 4- oeencf +>iP Qt/ickmen and poultrymen that the Maryland Lave ^tocK 
?alr£*cet:^-lVone Tthe most efficient laboratory and 

field services of any of the states. 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

Agricultural Building, College Park, Md. 

S B Shaw, Chief 

W C BEAVEN, Marketing Specwlist arid Chief Inspector 

l'e' DOWNEY, Marketing Specialist and Inspector vn Chmge of 

the Enforcement of the Fresh Egg Law 
A F MARTIN, Assistant Marketing Specialist in Change of Egg. 

■ bressed Poultry, Butter and Cheese Inspections 
H J TWILLEY Assistant Marketing Specialist and Inspector 
C* p" POPPELL,' Assistant Marketing Specialist and Inspector 
F. K. Sampson, Assistant in Marketing and Inspector 

The State Board of Agriculture of Maryland has by resolutions : 
, A J ^^ QAntpmber 25 1925, authorized the State Department of 
M rket of4e Stn Se^ce of the University of Maryland, to execute 
fsfgent of said Board the powers relating to the marketing of farm prod- 
ucts, f^ stock and live stock products heretofore conferred upon the Board 
bv Law. 



454 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 



455 



I 



2. Adopted September 25, 1925, authorized the Department of Markets 
to execute as its agent the general powers of the Board relating to the 
mspection and regulation of Weights and Measures used in the sale and 
purchase of agricultural products. 

3. Adopted February 1, 1928, authorized the Department of Markets to 
exercise the powers of said Board in the enforcement of the Maryland 
Apple Grading Law. 

^ By Law, the Department is the agency for the State Board of Agriculture 
m the enforcement of the following laws: 1, Cantaloupe Maturity Law 
2, Poultry Sale and Transportation Law; 3, Trade Mark Law covering all 
fruits and vegetables, fresh or processed; 4, Grading Law covering fresh 
fruits and vegetables; 5, Inspection Law covering inspection and certifica- 
tion of fruits and vegetables, and 6, Fresh Egg Law. 

The Department of Markets is the cooperating agency under joint memo- 
randums of agreement with the Federal Bureaus of Agricultural Economics 
and Ammal Industry for the inspection and certification of fruits, vege- 
tables, live and dressed poultry, eggs, butter, cheese, canning crops; and 
the preparation and release of Market News reports. 

In 1939 the State Department of Health deputized certain of the per- 
sonnel of the Department of Markets to act as agents of the State Depart- 
ment of Health in preventing the sale or shipment of fruit containing ex- 
cessive spray residue, 

^J^^^ J^epartment of Markets issues final inspection and certification for 

the Seed Certification Board on Irish and Sweet potatoes and tomato seed 

stock: In cooperation with the U. S. D. A. maintains daily Market News 

bervice m Baltimore on fresh fruits, vegetables, dressed poultry and eggs, 

also seasonal daily reports at Pocomoke on strawberries and Irish potatoes: 

and acts as agent for the U. S. D. A. in carrying out all purchasing pro- 

grams for frmts and vegetables, including all details in connection there- 
with. 

The headquarters of the State Department of Markets is at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Field offices are located in Balti- 
more, Hancock, Hagerstown, Salisbury and Pocomoke. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland 

T. B. Symons, Director of Extension Service 

E. N. Cory, Assistant Director of Extension Service, State Entomologist 

R. A. Jehle, State Pathologist 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for the 
inspection of all nurseries and the suppression of injurious insects and dis- 
eases affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is con- 
ducted m close association with the departments of Entomology and Pathol- 



ogy of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under the author- 
ity of the law creating the department as well as the State Board of Agri- 
culture. For administrative purposes, the department is placed under the 
Extension Service of the University on account of the close association of 
the work. 

Work in this field is designed to control insects and plant diseases and 
to protect the public in the purchase of products of nurserymen and florists. 
A considerable part of the time of the staff is occupied by inspection of 
orchards, crops, nurseries and floral establishments. Cooperation with the 
Federal Goverment in the inspection and certification of materials that come 
under the Japanese beetle quarantine is another major function of the 
department. The department also enforces the provisions of the apiary law, 
including the inspection of apiaries, etc. All activities pertaining to the 
control of insects is conducted under the direction of Dr. E. N. Cory, State 
Entomologist and Assistant Director of Extension. 

Activities of the department in the field of plant disease control are under 
the direction of Dr. R. A. Jehle, State Plant Pathologist. This service 
includes the control and eradication of diseases of strawberries and other 
small fruits, diseases of peaches, apples, etc., inspection and certification 
of potatoes and sweet potatoes for seed purposes, control of white pine 
blister rust of pine trees, Dutch elm disease, etc. In this phase of the work, 
the department cooperates actively with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine 
of the United States Department of Agriculture and with the State Depart- 
ment of Forestry. 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

Chemistry Building, College Park, Maryland 

Feeds, Fertilizers, Agricultural Liming Materials, Insecticides and Fungicides 

L. B. Broughton, State Chemist 

L. E. BoPST, Associate State Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson, Chief Inspector 

E. M. Zentz, Inspector 

W. J. FoOTEN, Inspector 

W. C. SUPPLEE, Bio-Chemist 

Theodore J. Weiss, Assistant Chemist 

H. R. Walls, Chemist and Micro-Analyst 

Albert Heagy, Chemist 

Robert Baumgardner, Chemist 

John E. Schuler, Jr., Agricultural Chemist 

Max Rubin, Laboratory Assistant 

The Inspection and Regulatory Service is charged with the enforcement 
of the laws regulating the manufacture and sale of feed, fertilizer, lime 
and agricultural insecticides and fungicides used in Maryland. These laws 
are referred to as correct labeling acts. 



456 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DAIRY PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE 



457 



Primarily, the laws provide for the licensing of these agricultural com- 
modities with the Inspection Service under specific brand names and with 
definite guarantees as to quality and composition. Since quality and com- 
position can be ascertained only by careful chemical and microscopical 
examination, a laboratory is maintained for this purpose. The principal 
activities of the Service are, consequently, the registration of the various 
products, the collection of samples from points throughout the State, the 
examination of such samples, the publication of results obtained and the 
prosecution of those parties found responsible for violations. 

It is the policy of the Inspection Service to publish in bulletin form, four 
times each year, the results of all examinations that are made. These pub- 
lications are available to all and furnish current information at a time 
when it will be most valuable to prospective purchasers. 

In addition to the regulatory activities mentioned, this department also 
examines, gratuitously, samples forwarded by residents of the State. 
These samples are not of a miscellaneous nature, however, but must be 
confined to those coming within the jurisdiction of the laws enforced and 
must be taken in a manner prescribed by the Inspection Agency, thereby 
insuring proper representation. This constitutes a very useful public 
service and is taken advantage of by many buyers. 

Other activities include the collection of seed samples for the Seed Test- 
ing Laboratory, participation in collaborative studies on new and more 
accurate methods of analysis and independent investigations designed to 
increase the efficiency and usefulness of the departmnt. 

The operation of the Inspection and Regulatory Service serves and pro- 
tects both the manufacturer and the consum.er. The consumer may buy 
feed, fertilizer, lime and insecticide on the basis of the manufacturer's 
guarantee, knowing that if the guarantee is not correct he is entitled to 
redress The manufacturer, in turn, may sell his product on a stated 
analysis knowing that his competitor must follow the same procedure. This 
service has removed suspicion and rewarded honesty. It has built confi- 
dence in the mind of the farmer toward the manufacturer as well as fost- 
ering a feeling of confidence between the manufacturers themselves. 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

Horticultural Building, College Park, Maryland 

F. S. Holmes, Inspector 
Ellen P. Emack, Analyst 
Olive M. Kelk, Analyst 
J. T. Mullady, Analyst 

The Seed Inspection Service, a division of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, administers the State seed law; inspects seeds sold throughout the 
State; collects seed samples for laboratory examination; reports the results 
of these examinations to the parties concerned; publishes summaries of 



these reports which show the relative reliability of the label /f o"nf i«" 
„rplied by wholesale seedsmen; cleans and treats tobacco seed intended for 
In ing in the State; makes analyses, tests, and examinations of seed sam- 
£s submitted to the Laboratory; and advises seed users regarding the 
Tonomic and intelligent use of seeds. The Service also cooperates with the 
Agricultural Marketing Service of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture in the enforcement of the Federal Seed Act in Maryland. 

Two and a half million dollars worth of seeds are planted annually m 
Maryland. Perhaps twenty-five percent of the field seeds and ninety percent 
of the vegetable seeds planted in the State pass through trade channels and 
are thus subject to the seed law. The work of the Seed Inspection Service 
is not restricted to the enforcement of the seed law, however, for State 
oitizens may submit seed samples to the Laboratory for analysis, test, or 
examination. Specific information regarding suitability for planting pur- 
noses of lots of seeds is thus made available to individuals without charge. 
The growth of this service has been steady since the establishment of the 
Laboratory in 1912. In 1913 only slightly over a hundred samples were sub- 
mitted to the Laboratory; in 1941 the number was over thirty-five hundred. 
Few Maryland home-owners, city or country, are not directly interested in 
seeds for planting in flower-bed, lawn, garden, or field. 

DAIRY PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE 

Dairy Building, College Park, Md. 

Dr. Charles W. England, Chief Examiner 
Mr. Glenn T. Hoffman, Inspector 
The Maryland Dairy Inspection Law became effective June 1, 1935. The 
purpose of this law is to insure producers who sell milk and cream on the 
basis of butterfat test or weight that the tests and weights of such mdk 
and cream will be correctly made, and likewise to insure ^^e dealers who 
purchase such products that their agents or testers shall correctly weigh 
and test the milk and cream; also, to insure that tests made for official 
inspections or for public record will be correctly made. ^ ^ , ,. 

The present service is based on Article 43 of the annotated code of Mary- 
land, Chapter 403 of the Laws of Maryland, 1941. _ , ^ 
The dairv department of the Agricultural Experiment Station is charged 
with the administration of the Dairy Inspection Law. It is the pohcy in 
administration of the law to use the service as a means of education to 
promote the mutual interests of dairy producers, dealers and manufacturers. 
The aim has been to aid all interests concerned and not to impose burdens. 
\ total of 140 plants were issued licenses in the different classifications 
for 1941. They were as follows: 68 milk plants in Class I (0-2,000 Ibs^ pro- 
duction) ; 64 plants in Class II (2,000-40,000 lbs. production) ; and 8 plants 
in Class III (over 40,000 lbs. production). Licenses were issued to 240 
testers and 121 weighers and samplers. 



458 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



459 



Since the Dairy Inspection Law has been in operation the dairy industry 
in the State has, as a whole, been benefitted. All plants purchasing milk 
and cream from producers under the provisions of the Act are operating 
on a more nearly equal basis. Much has been done toward eliminating 
unfair competition and it is now recognized by the dairy industry that 
proper methods of weighing and sampling and testing milk and cream are 
essential to fair trade practices. The checking of scales for accuracy, the 
maintenance of proper weigh tanks, and the proper methods of sampling 
and testing have helped to avoid losses to either the dealer or producer. 
The licensing of employees to weigh, sample and test milk and cream 
assures both the producer and the dealer that the men engaged in such 
work are competent. 

The calibration of glassware used for the Babcock Test and the calibra- 
tion of weights has resulted in culling out many pieces of inaccurate equip- 
ment. This has resulted in eliminating errors from this source, both in 
purchasing products and in plant control work. 

Fees for Dairy Plants Purchasing Milk or Cream 

Class A — For purchasing or handling not exceeding an equivalent of 500 
pounds of milk daily. Annual fee $1.00. 

Class B — For purchasing or handling more than an equivalent of 500 
pounds but not exceeding 2,000 pounds of milk daily. Annual 
fee $5.00. 

Class C — For purchasing or handling more than an equivalent of 2,000 
pounds but not exceeding 40,000 pounds of milk daily. Annual 
fee $10.00 

Class D — For purchasing or handling the equivalent of more than 40,000 
pounds of milk daily. Annual fee $25.00. 

Fees for testing glassware and weights for accuracy ^. $ .05 

Fee for Weigher's and Sampler's examination 1.00 

Weigher's and Sampler's license fee _ 2.00 

Fee for Babcock tester's examination 1.50 

Babcock tester's license fee 3.00 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

College Park, Maryland 

Ray W. Carpenter, State Drainage Engineer 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties 
are to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the 
State, to correlate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the 
State and to cooperate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of 
a permanent program of improved drainage. 

This department administers funds appropriated by the State in 1939 
for drainage of lands in Wicomico and Worcester Counties. 



SECTION VI. 
Federal, State and Private Agencies 

This section includes agencies and <>^S^^^^^ior>s'>nthe^'fZn^^,^^ 
MaSland campus at College Park which are not ^«<l^\th« ^''^^^^^'Vltlte 
Boa^ of Regents of the University of Maryland or the Maryland State 

Board of Agriculture. 

FEDERAL AGENCIES 

EASTERN EXPERIMENT STATION OF THE 
BUREAU OF MINES 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

College Park, Md. 

RuDOtF KUDUCH, Superintendent 

The United States Bureau of Mines maintains at College Park its Eastern 
ExDeriment Station, housed in a splendid laboratory building erected in 
mf The Stete of Maryland deeded to the Federal Government a part of 
hUnlerlS campus as a site for the building. Although the Eastern 
Sper^ent Station is entirely under the operation -d con f of^ 
Federal Government, its presence on the Umversity campus is of great 
value to the University. The laboratories, library and museum of the 
Bu^iu of Mines are freely available to students and faculty, ^d a con- 
Stoable number of students are enabled to earn a part of their college 

xpenses by Employment provided by the Bureau. The Un versity and the 
Burtau of mnes, jointly, offer a number of Graduate Fellowships for re- 
search in the fields of chemical engineering, chemistry, physics and mathe- 
matics 

The 'varied character of research and ^^S^^^^^J''^''^^^^?'-'T^^°^,t 
the Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mmes is ^ndica ed by the 
following Ust which covers the most important divisions of work. 

Non-Metals Division: Technological research in the field of production and 
utilization of non-metallic minerals, such as clays, sands, earths, etc. An 
important current activity is an investigation of sources of aluminum. 

Mining Division: Research in the mining of non-metallic minerals (exclu- 
sive of coal and oil); metal mining and quarrying. Methods of mmmg 
bauxite for aluminum content are now being given special attention. 

Explosives Division: Administrative headquarters for research and testing 
work in connection with commercial explosives. Testing laboratory located 
at Bruceton, Penna. 



458 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



459 



Since the Dairy Inspection Law has been in operation the dairy industry 
in the State has, as a whole, been benefitted. All plants purchasing milk 
and cream from producers under the provisions of the Act are operating 
on a more nearly equal basis. Much has been done toward eliminating 
unfair competition and it is now recognized by the dairy industry that 
proper methods of weighing and sampling and testing milk and cream are 
essential to fair trade practices. The checking of scales for accuracy, the 
maintenance of proper weigh tanks, and the proper methods of sampling 
and testing have helped to avoid losses to either the dealer or producer. 
The licensing of employees to weigh, sample and test milk and cream 
assures both the producer and the dealer that the men engaged in such 
work are competent. 

The calibration of glassware used for the Babcock Test and the calibra- 
tion of weights has resulted in culling out many pieces of inaccurate equip- 
ment. This has resulted in eliminating errors from this source, both in 
purchasing products and in plant control work. 

Fees for Dairy Plants Purchasing Milk or Cream 

Class A — For purchasing or handling not exceeding an equivalent of 500 
pounds of milk daily. Annual fee $1.00. 

Class B — For purchasing or handling more than an equivalent of 500 
pounds but not exceeding 2,000 pounds of milk daily. Annual 
fee $5.00. 

Class C — For purchasing or handling more than an equivalent of 2,000 
pounds but not exceeding 40,000 pounds of milk daily. Annual 
fee $10.00 

Class D — For purchasing or handling the equivalent of more than 40,000 
pounds of milk daily. Annual fee $25.00. 

Fees for testing glassware and weights for accuracy ^. $ .05 

Fee for Weigher's and Sampler's examination 1.00 

Weigher's and Sampler's license fee -. 2.00 

Fee for Babcock tester's examination 1.50 

Babcock tester's license fee 3.00 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

College Park, Maryland 

Ray W. Carpenter, State Drainage Engineer 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties 
are to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the 
State, to correlate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the 
State and to cooperate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of 
a permanent program of improved drainage. 

This department administers funds appropriated by the State in 1939 
for drainage of lands in Wicomico and Worcester Counties. 



SECTION VL 
Federal, State and Private Agencies 

Board of Agriculture. 

FEDERAL AGENCIES 

EASTERN EXPERIMENT STATION OF THE 
BUREAU OF MINES 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

College Park, Md. . 

Rudolf Kudlich, Superintendent 

Th» United States Bureau of Mines maintains at College Park its Eastern 
Experiment Stattnhlsed in a splendid laboratory building erected .. 
S The Stete of Maryland deeded to the Federal Government a part of 
he University campus as a site for the building. Although the Eastern 
Experrent Itation is entirely under the operation and control of the 
FeErCovemment, its presence on the University campus is of great 
jjeaerai uo • laboratories, library and museum of the 

"r.u'°o<''M,„"rr£e„ ..a.,ab>e ., =«».. - '-''y., »^ -«- 
siderable number of students are enabled to earn a part of their college 
expenses by mployment provided by the Bureau. The University and the 
Bu'eau of Mines, Jointly, offer a number of Graduate Fellowships for re- 
SSTin the fields of chemical engineering, chemistry, physics and mathe- 

matics. . . . , ^. 

The varied character of research and -^^^^^^^^^'^'''^'^^^^'^^^ ^'^ ,^^ 
the Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mmes ^s-dica ed by the 
following Ust which covers the most important divisions of work. 

Non-Metals Division: Technological research in the field of production and 
utiUzation of non-metallic minerals, such as clays, sands, earths, etc. An 
important current activity is an investigation of sources of aluminum. 

Mining Division: Research in the mining of non-metallic minerals (exclu- 
sive of coal and oil); metal mining and quarrying. Methods of minmg 
bauxite for aluminum content are now being given special attention. 

Explosives Division: Administrative headquarters for research and testing 
work in connection with commercial explosives. Testing laboratory located 
at Bruceton, Penna. 



460 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



461 



Metallurgical Division: Research into the physical properties of metals 
and alloys. 

Coal Mining Inspection Division: Acts as a clearing house for the Federal 
Coal Mine Inspection System which has recently been established. 

Explosives Control Division: Administrative headquarters for the Explo- 
sives Control Act. Licenses the manufacture, sale, transportation and utili- 
zation of commercial explosives in the United States. 

Office of the Principal Mineralogist: Identification and classification of 
minerals. 

Secondary Metals Statistics Section: Collects and compiles statistics on 
scrap metals. 

Mine Accidents Statistics Section: Collects statistics on mine accidents. 

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
College Park, Md. 

Two important divisions of the Fish and Wildlife Service are located at 
College Park in a building constructed in 1941, on a part of the University 
campus deeded to the Federal Government by the State of Maryland. 
While the building is entirely under Federal control, its presence on the 
University campus is a valuable asset. Splendid cooperative relationships 
have been developed between the University and the Fish and Wildlife 
Service, and many University students are enabled to earn a portion of 
their college expenses through work provided at the Technological Labora- 
tory. Also, the University and the Fish and Wildlife Service, jointly, offer 
a number of graduate fellowships for research conducted at the laboratory 
on important problems relating to fishery industries and fishery biology. 

DIVISION OF FISHERY INDUSTRIES 
Technological Laboratory 

J. M. Lemon, Technologist in Charge 
H. W. NiLSON, Associate Technologist 

The new Technological Laboratory Building contains laboratory space for 
studies dealing with the chemistry, bacteriology, and food value of various 
seafoods. The nutrition and vitamin laboratories are equipped for making 
assays on various fishery products by means of animal and optical instru- 
ments. The canning laboratory contains a complete canning plant on a 
small scale. All of the problems under consideration have a direct appli- 
cation looking towards the improvement of the methods of handling and 
processing of various seafoods. 



Market Development 

Keith 0. Burr, Assistant Fishery Econxymist 

The Market Development Unit of the Division of Fishery Industries is 
concerned with promoting the efficient distribution of fishery products and 
stimulating in consumers a wider recognition of the advantages of servmg 
seSoods often. Under present conditions the activities of the personne 
arf primarily designed to promote the full utilization of all commercial 
food fishes which are abundant, including many species which have yet to 
gain full public acceptance in some areas. 

DIVISION OF FISHERY BIOLOGY 

Shellfish Investigation 

Paul S. Galtsoff, Senior Biologist 

The laboratory of Shellfish Investigations is primarily concerned with 
the studies of the physiology and ecology of the oyster. During the past 
year the specific research problems carried out at the^^^oratory were: 
(a) the carbohydrate metabolism of the oyster tissue, and (b) the study of 
ihe iepoition, Wh and repair of the oyster shell. The first problem is 
of practical significance because the accumulation of glycogen m the oys- 
ters determine their nutritive value. It is hoped that this study may le^ 
to a development of a practical method of producing oysters of highe^^^ 
nutritive value. Study of the formation and growth of shell ^- ^^^^^^ 
in comiection with the self-protection of the orgamsm ^P^^^^^^^^^^^ 
of boring sponges, drills, conchs and other enemies which penetrate and 
sometimes destroy commercial stocks of oysters. 

Middle and South Atlantic Fishery Investigation 

R. A. Nesbit, Aquatic Biologist 
J. C. Pearson, Associate Aqimtic Biologist 

Biological studies of the effect of fishing on abundance of food fishes. 

WATER RESOURCES BRANCH, U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Rooms 104-106 New Engineering Building, College Park, Md. 

A. H. HORTON, District Engineer 
V. R. Bennion, Associate Engineer 

The Water Resources Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey is engaged 
in investigating the flow of streams in the Potomac River basm m the States 

f mSS and West Virginia. The daily, monthly, and annua flow of 
strean? is being obtained at some 40 gauging stations in Maryland ^d 
adjacent States. Since the flow of any stream changes from day to day. 



462 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



month to month, and from year to year, records for long periods shown^ 
the amount of water flowing in streams and its seasonal distribution are 
essential for the safe and economical design and construction of all struc 
tures and works involving the use of water in streams. There are now 
available for use records for some streams approaching 50 years in length 
and for many other streams all over the United States for shorter periods. 

AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ADMINISTRATION 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Maryland State Committee 

Room 313, Agricultural Building, Colle&e Park, Maryland 

J. H. Blandford, Acting Chairman, Maryland State Committee 
Roland 0. Stelzer, Executive Officer 
E. C. Jenkins, Field Supervisor 
J. Spencer Dyott, Field Supervisor 
Dudley C. Aist, Field Supervisor 

The State office of the Agricultural Adjustment Committee is an agency 
whereby the counties are kept informed of the programs, and all work 
done in the counties is checked prior to passing on such information as is 
necessary to the Washington office. Approximately 25,000 farms represent- 
mg 90 per cent of the crop land in the state are included in one or more 
of the A. A. A. programs. The work of the State office is largely concerned 
with the administration of the following phases of the Agricultural Con- 
servation Program. 

^ 1. Maintaining and building the soil through specific soil building prac- 
tices and adjusting the acreage of major commodities such as wheat, corn 
and potatoes. 

2. Administering the Wheat Crop Insurance Program. 

^ 3 Working with the State USDA War Board of which Mr. Blandford 
IS chairman. 

4. Administering the Parity Program as relating to wheat and corn. 

5. Administering the Conservation Materials program of furnishing 
lime and phosphate to producers on request. 

e. Administering the Marketing Quota program for wheat which is in 
ettect now and corn when applicable. 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 463 

MARYLAND CROP REPORTING SERVICE 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
Room 144, Arts and Science Building, College Park, Maryland 

Charles E. Burkhead, Statistician in Charge 
Donald B. Wilson, Assistayit Statistician 

The Maryland Crop Reporting Service is a cooperative agency of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture and the Extension Service, University of Maryland, the primary func- 
tion of which is to gather, compile, analyze, and issue official agricultural 
statistics for Maryland. The reports issued by the Maryland Crop Report- 
ing Service cover not only all of the important crops and livestock produced 
in Maryland but in the entire United States as well, thus providing a gen- 
eral picture of agricultural conditions of the country as a whole. Informa- 
tion is also gathered monthly on prices paid and received by Maryland 
farmers for commodities bought and sold. Price reports are issued to the 
public once each month. Reports on field crops begin in March and con- 
tinue through November. In December the annual crop summary is issued. 
Each month a report is issued on milk and egg production and on farm 
labor supply and demand. Each quarter an estimate is made on grain 
stocks on farms and day and monthly wages of farm labor. Three live- 
stock reports are made annually. The first report which is issued in early 
February gives the report as of January 1 on the number and value of all 
species of livestock, chickens and turkeys. The report on the spring pig 
crop and intended fall farrowings is made in June. The report on the fall 
pig crop and intended spring farrowings is made in December. The annual 
summary in December gives the acreage, yield per acre, production, price 
and value of practically every crop produced in the State of Maryland. 
During the growing season reports are made at two-week intervals on indi- 
cated production, movement, and other marketing information for all im- 
portant truck crops produced in Maryland and in competing States as well, 
thus providing the grower with valuable information on market supply and 
demand. 

The strictest secrecy surrounds the release of crop reports. Government 
crop reports are unbiased, disinterested and authoritative, reduce specula- 
tion, and prevent wide price fluctuations due to uncertainty. They also 
prevent the issuance of biased, faulty, and misleading reports by private 
agencies. For many crops, production is forecast far in advance of harv- 
esting or marketing. These reports are useful as a guide in planning fu- 
ture operations. The latest estimates may be obtained free of charge by 
writing the Agricultural Statistician, College Park, Maryland. All reports 
released are usually on file in each County Agent^s Office, all public libraries, 
and obtainable from practically every other agency interested in agricul- 
ture. 



464 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



465 



The Crop Reporting Service of both Maryland and Delaware is under 
the supervision of the Agricultural Statistician for Maryland, the combing 
office being located on the Campus of the University of Maryland mT 
ware Office ""'^^^^ '^ Statistician in Charge of the Maryland and' Del: 

MARYLAND HEADQUARTERS OF AGRICULTURAL 
PLANNING FIELD SERVICE 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
Administration Building, College Park, Maryland 

James W. Coddington, State Representative 

The Bureau of Agricultural Economics is charged with the economic 
research and general planning necessary for the improvement of existing 
programs of the Department of Agriculture and for the development of 
new farm programs. All planning in this field is done in cooperation 
with other bureaus and agencies of the Department of Agriculture, the 
Land Grant Colleges and other State Agricultural agencies, and xvith repre- 
sentative committees of farm people. 

This office of the Bureau is the Maryland Headquarters for the Agricul- 
tural Planning Field Service. It had been established in the office of the 
""^l T> ^'"''^^''^ ^^^ is responsible for facilitating the entire program 
of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. It helps all divisions of the 
Bureau in carrying out their respective activities. 

At the present time the Bureau is directing all of its efforts toward war- 
time needs. Specifically, the Bureau has the responsibility for the general 
planmng needed to bring about more effective use of this nation's total 
agricultural resources in the war effort. An immediate part of this job is 
to study the distribution of the 1942 production goals as a basis for the 
establishment of production goals in 1943 and subsequent years. 

This office has been made responsible for coordinating the efforts of the 
various State and Federal organizations in helping to solve the farm labor 
problem. Likewise, attention is being devoted to the development of desir- 
able programs for post war agriculture and rural people. 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Room 103, Agricultural Building, College Park, Maryland 

Edward M. Davis, State Coordinator 

(a) The Soil Conservation Service assists soil conservation districts 
organized under the Maryland State Law, which was passed by the State 
Legislature m 1937, in planning and applying farm programs of erosion 
control, drainage and improved land use, and assists tax ditch associations 



in carrying out extensive drainage work on large main channels; conducts 
soil conservation demonstrational projects in cooperation with the farmers 
of selected areas; supervis-es the technical activities of C. C. C. Camps 
assigned to erosion control and to farm drainage work; manages a program 
of sub-marginal land purchase and subsequent development for more bene- 
ficial uses; cooperatively carries on farm-forestry projects to demonstrate 
the value of sound woodland management; and as a background to opera- 
tions work on the land, makes surveys as a basis for planning and field 
operations in soil conservation, drainage, and upstream flood control. 

Harold W. Hobbs, In Charge, Hydrologic Resea/rch 

(b) The Soil Conservation Service, cooperating with the University of 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station is conducting rainfall runoff 
studies on agricultural watersheds at the Experiment Station farm near 
College Park and in the Soil Conservation demonstrational project area near 
Hagerstown. A relative effectiveness of the following land uses will be 
determined: contour and off -contour tillage; strip cropping with or without 
diversion terraces; broad base terraces; plain and contour furrowed pas- 
tures; cutover and mature woodlands. Studies are being conducted to deter- 
mine the effect of the utilization of plant residues in various ways on total 
runoff, soil loss, moisture conservation and crop yields. 

Clarence S. Slater, In Charge, Conservation Experiment Station 

(c) The Experiment Stations Division of the Soil Conservation Service 
maintains a laboratory at College Park, and conducts investigations that 
are based on field and plot tests. The investigations are basically those 
that require laboratory facilities for their solution, and may involve deter- 
minations in the physical, chemical, and microbiological fields. A special 
study was set up in 1940 to develop adequate methods of soil moisture 
measurement as a means of evaluating soil and water conservation prac- 
tices. Field tests of instruments developed here have been in operation 
one year. Investigations of factors related to soil erodibility and its meas- 
urement, and the effects of various soil management practices are in prog- 
ress. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE SCHOOL 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT, CHEMICAL WARFARE SERVICE 

College of Engineering, College Park, Maryland 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, Contact Officer 

The Civilian Defense School of the Chemical Warfare Service, War 
Department, formerly located at Edgewood Arsenal, Edgewood, Maryland, 
has been established on the campus of the University. 

This school is operated and controlled by Chemical Warfare Service 
personnel for the training of firemen, policemen, and directors of air raid 
protection groups located in the third and fifth Army Corps Areas. 



466 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



NATIONAL anZENSHIP EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Division of Teachers Education and Teaching Materials 
Room 104, Library Building, College Park, Maryland 

Dr. Glenn P. Kendall, In Charge 

The National Citizenship Education Program is a cooperative program 
of the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department SjT 
tteVlc^stofir"^ Administration of the Federal Wo^rks l^^'Z 

The basic purpose of the program is to promote intelligent citizen.hin 
and national solidarity by an intensified effort to prepare rrargfnumh' 
of the approximately five million aliens residing in th'e UnLdlLtes 
functioning American citizenship. '^'^^s, lor 

The general program is under the direction of Dean William F Russell 
of Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City 

The Division of Teachers Education and Teaching Materials located »t 
the Umversity of Maryland, is concerned with the development ^f ma eJa^s 
for teacher education and student use on the basic point of view tC fun 
tioning citizenship is as broad as life itself, and teaching maTeriaJs Z^t 
be approached through the real life problems of the groups c^nce^ed. 

STATE AGENCY 
BUREAU OF CONTROL SURVEYS AND MAPS 

Department of Public Works, State of Maryland 
Room 313, Engineering Building 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

C. B. Kegarice, Engineer in Charge 

antstaTineTh^no.l''^'*"","^ ^•""' ''''''^^^^- coordinates for defining 

w"th.n the Statfof m' "\ TT' "' P"'"*^ °" '""^ ^"^^«« °f the earth 
withm the State of Maryland known and designated as the "Marvland 

Coordinate System," together with a law establishing the Bureau of Str" 1 
Surveys and Maps in the Department of Public Works to adlw^ 2 
laws of the Maryland Coordinate System, was eLtldt 1939 
Special authorized functions of the Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



467 



are: 



city rru„r'f^H'*' *: "''°"\' °' *''" "^"^ «^^"*='««' federal, state, 
city, county and private, making surveys and maps in Marvland in 
order to avoid duplication and overlapping. JViaryland in 

2. To develop permanent records of surveys and maps in the State. 

3. To develop uniform specifications for surveying and mapping. 



4. To collect and preserve all worth-while survey data, thereby 
salvaging for future use much valuable information now being lost; 
and to transcribe information to a master map. 

5. To encourage engineers and surveyors to tie their surveys into 
the horizontal and vertical control network of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, thereby making their lines permanent. 

6. To encourage engineers and surveyors to adopt the use of the 
single plane coordinate system now being developed in Maryland, for 
engineering projects, for municipal and county boundaries and for 
private surveys. 

7. To become a depository for file copies of Maryland maps by all 
agencies and to establish a Library of Maps and Charts of the State. 

8. To serve as an information bureau concerning maps of the State 
or any portion thereof; to retail standard maps such as are in general 
demand; and, to a limited extent, reproduce maps for a reasonable 
charge. 

9. To serve annually as a central meeting point for representatives 
of Maryland map making organizations to discuss, coordinate and plan 
for mapping of the State; to direct the trend of surveys and maps of 
the State; and to advocate consolidation of State mapping bureaus to 
promote efficiency. 

10. To promote the continuation and completion of the local control 
surveys begun in Maryland under the C. W. A.; to serve as the 
coordinating agency for any program of mapping launched by the 
Federal government; and to determine priorities. 

PRIVATE AGENCIES 

NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

Room A-27, Arts and Sciences Building, College Park, Md. 

Stanton Walker, Director 

The National Sand and Gravel Association has by arrangement with the 
College of Engineering established its testing and research laboratory at 
the University. 

The purpose of the Research Foundation is to make available to the 
Association additional facilities for its investigational work in the fields of 
aggregates, concrete, and related topics. This arrangement provides for 
the College of Engineering additional testing and research equipment and 
opportunities for increasing the scope of its engineering research. 



468 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AVIATION DIVISION, 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

Engineering Building, College Park, Md. 

Dr. John E. Youxgeb, Permanent Secretary 

The Aviation Division National Headquarters of the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers is located at the University of Maryland 

,J^%nZ^^^ f *'''" '•'""^ ^' ^ '■^"**^'" P>-ofessional service to the more 
than 2,000 members of the Aviation Division. 

Dr John E. Younger, head of the Department of Mechanical Engineerinir 

DivSLyrrs: ^^ ^^^^'^"^' ^^ ^~* «— ^ - ^^^^ 



GENERAL INDEX 



A Page 

Administration 6 

board of regents 6 

officers of administration 8 

boards and committees (College Park) 6 
officers of instruction (College Park) 11 
officers of instruction (Baltimore).. 371 

faculty committees (Baltimore) 7 

administrative organization 22 

buildings, grounds and 23 

libraries 25 

Admission 26 

methods of admission 26 

undergraduate curricula 28 

advanced standing 27 

certificate, by 27 

examination, by 27 

physical examinations 37 

transfer, by .^ 26 

unclassified students 29 

Agencies, Federal; State and Private 459 

Research and Regulatory 438 

Agents 440 

assistant county 441 

assistant home demonstration 442 

county 440 

county home demonstration 441 

local 441 

local home demonstration 441 

Agricultural Adjustment Administra- 
tion „ _ 462 

Agricultural Economics 214 

Agricultural Education 60, 217 

•Agricultural Engineering 63, 174 

five year program 63 

Agricultural Experiment Station 446 

Agriculture, College of 52 

advisory councils 56 

chemistry 59 

curricula in 56 

departments 54 

equipment 54 

farm practice 55 

regulatory activities 53, 54, 455 

requirements for graduation 55 

special students in agriculture 83 

State Board of 6, 449 

Agricultural Planning Field Service.— 464 

Agronomy 65, 219 

Alumni 50 

American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers, Aviation Division 468 

Animal Husbandry 69, 221 

Applied Science, fellowship in 174 

Aqniculture 368 

Art 186, 224, 304 



• Page 

Arts and Nursing, five-year combined 

program 116 

Arts and Sciences, College 80 

advisers 90 

degrees 87 

divisions 86 

electives in other college and schools 89 

lower division _ 90 

normal load 89 

requirements 86, 87 

Astronomy 225 

Athletics 24, 197, 336, 339 

Aviation Division, American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers _ ~ 468 



Bacteriology 93, 226 

Biochemistry, plant physiology 71, 233 

Biological Sciences, division of 99 

Board of Regents 6 

Book Store and Post Office 49 

Botany 70, 230 

Buildings 23, 370 

Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps 466 
Bureau of Mines....24. 174, 175, 459, 460 

Eastern Experiment Station 459, 460 

lectures 1 76 

research fellowships in 174, 17.'> 

Business Administration 244 



Calendar 3 

Certificates, Degrees and 31 

Chemical Engineering 168, 274 

chemistry 169, 234 

research fellowships in 174 

Chemistry 59, 106, 169, 234 

analytical 235 

biological 240 

general „ 106, 234 

organic 236 

physical 238 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 97 

Chorus 335 

Citizenship Edncation, National 466 

Civil Engineering 170, 277 

Civilian Defense School 465 

Classical Languages 243 

Clubs* miscellaneous 47 

College of Agriculture 52 

College of Arts and Sciences 86 

College of Commerce 124, 244 

College of Education 142, 264 

College of Engineering 160, 274 

College of Home Economics 182, 303 



469 



470 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INDEX 



An 



Page 

Commerce, College of 124 

combined program in Commerce and 

Law 13Q 

cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration 134 

curriculum in accounting 131 

curriculum in Agricultural Economics 138 

curriculum in Finance 131 

curriculum in General Business 128 

129, 130 
curriculum in Marketing and Sales 

Administration 132 

curriculum in Secretarial adminis- 
tration 136 

electives from other colleges 125 

scholarship requirements 125 

Committees „ 7 

Comparative Literature 259 

Conservation Service, Soil 464 

County agents 440 

demonstration agents 441 

Courses of study, description of 212 

Crop Reporting Service, Maryland 463 

D 

Dairy Husbandry 72, 261 

Dairy Manufacturing 74, 261 

Dairy Plant Inspection Service 457 

Defense School, Civilian 465 

Defense training — Engineering 178 

Degrees and Certificates ^ 31 

Delinquent students 31 

Dentistry, School of 388 

building 389 

curriculum „ 120 

expenses 390 

Diamondback 48 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 

biological sciences 92 

humanities 100 

lower division 90 

physical sciences 103 

social sciences Ill 

Drainage, State Department of 458 

Drawing 279 

E 

Economics 114, 250 

agricultural 214 

Education 142, 264 

agricultural 60, 146, 217 

arts and science 146 

commercial 150 

curricula 145 

degrees 145 

facilities 142 

home economics 151, 270, 303 

industrial 153, 271 

methods in arts and science sub- 
jects (high school) 268 

physical 24, 29, 156, 197, 336 



Page 

Education, College of 142 

Educational Psychology 267, 35i 

Electrical Engineering 171, 280 

Employment, student 41 

Engineering 160, 274 

admission requirements I60 

agricultural 174 

bachelor degrees 161 

chemical 168, 169, 274 

chemical engineering — chemistry 106, 169 

civil 170, 277 

curricula 167 

defense training 178 

drawing 279 

electrical 163, 171, 280 

equipment 161 

experiment station 180 

fire service extension department.... 179 

general subjects 283 

library 166 

master of science in 161 

mechanics 283 

mechanical 164, 172, 284 

professional degrees in 161 

shop 287 

short courses 178 

surveying 166, 167, 288 

English Language and Literature 289 

Enrollment, student 435 

Entomology _75, 100, 295 

Entrance 2 6 

Evening courses 211 

Examinations 30 

Expenses 32, 176, 177, 208, 390, 395 

401, 406, 413 
Experiment Station 

Agricultural 446 

staff 446 

Eastern, Mines „ 459 

Engineering „ 165, 180 

Extension Service 53, 442 

short courses - 443 

Staff 438 



Faculty 11 

Farm Forestry 298, 449 

Farm Management 77 

Federal, State and Private Agencies.. 459 
Feed, Fertilizer, Lime, etc.. Service.... 455 
Fellowships -.174, 175, 208 

Fish and Wildlife Service 460 

Fishery Biology, division of 461 

Fishery Industries, division of 460 

Five-year combined Arts and Nursing 
curriculum 116, 407 

Floriculture 80, 312 

Food Technology 96, 229 

Foods and Nutrition 190, 307 



Page 
48 
. 298 
4 



Footlight Club 

Forestry 

Foreword 

Fraternities and Sororities 47 

French 



324 



Genetics 349, 351, 

Geological Survey 

Geology 

German 

Grading System 

Graduate School, The 

admission 

council 

courses 

fees - " 

fellowships and assistantships 

registration 

requirements for degrees 203, 

residence requirements 203, 

summer graduate work 202, 

Greek - 



368 
461 
298 
328 
30 
200 
201 
200 
201 
208 
208 
201 
206 
206 
210 

243 



Health Service 

High School Teachers, certification of, 

89, 144, 

Historical Statement 

History 

Home Economics 182, 

curricula 

degree 

departments 

facilities 

general 

Home Economics Education 151, 

Home Economics Extension 

Honors and Awards 42, 

Horticultural State Department 

Horticulture 78, 

Hospital 37, 

Housing rules 

Humanities, division of 



36 

145 
21 

299 

303 
183 
183 
184 
182 
184 

270 
188 
415 
454 
309 
413 
38 
100 



Industrial Education 153 

Infirmary rules 37 

Inspection and Regulatory Service 455 

Inspection Service 

Dairy Plant 457 

Seed 456 

Institution Management 189 

Instructional Staff (Baltimore) 371 

Instructional Staff (College Park) 11 

Italian _ 830 



I, Page 

Landscape Gardening ~ 311 

Latin - 243 

Law, School of 392 

admission 393, 394, 395 

advanced standing ~ 395 

combined program of study 394, 395 

fees and expenses ~ 395 

Librarians (College Park) 10 

Libraries 2 5 

Library Science 315 

Livestock Sanitary Service 450 

Living arrangements 38 

Loans - 4 1 

Location of the University 20 

Lower division 90 



'♦M" Book 49 

Markets, Maryland State Department 

of 453 

Marks 30 

Maryland Crop Reporting Service 463 

Mathematics _..104, 316 

Mechanical Engineering 164, 172, 284 

Mechanical Engineers, American So- 
ciety of. Aviation Division 468 

Mechanics 283 

Medals and Prizes 42, 426 

Medical Technology 95 

Medicine, School of 398 

admission 399, 400 

clinical facilities 398 

dispensaries and laboratories 399 

expenses 401 

prizes and scholarships 899 

Metallurgical division, Bureau of Mines 460 

fellowships in 174 

Military Science and Tactics .29, 194, 323 

Mines 24, 174, 175, 459, 460 

Modern Languages, courses in 324 

Music 333 

Musical Organizations 333, 334 



N 

National Citizenship Education Pro- 
gram 

National Sand and Gravel Association 
Research Foundation 

Naval Reserve Commission 

Nursing, School of 

admission 404, 

combined program 116, 

exi)enses 

hours of duty 

programs offered 



466 

467 

177 

404 
405 
407 
406 
405 
404 



472 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



O Page 

Officers, administrative 8 

of instruction 11, 371 

Old Line 49 

Olericulture 79, 314 



Pharmacy, School of 410 

admission 411, 412 

expenses 413 

location 410 

Phi Kappa Phi 47, 426 

Philosophy 334 

J»hj-sical Education 24, 29, 156, 197 

Physical Examinations 37 

IMiysical Sciences, division of 103 

Physics 107. 340 

Pilot Traininj;, Civilian 176 

Plant Pathology 232 

Plant Physiology 233 

Political Science 234 

I'omology 79, 314 

Poultry Husbandry 81, 349 

Predental curriculum 120 

Preliminary information 20 

Premedical curriculum 117 

Prenursing curriculum 117 

Preprofessional curricula 116 

Princess Anne College 20 

Psychological Testing Bureau 351 

Psychology 267, 351 

Publications, student 48 

Public Administration 113, 346, 348 



ilccords and Statistics 415 

Recreation 197 

Refunds 35 

Regimental Organization 195 

Registration, date of 3, 26 

penalty for late 34 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 26 

degrees and certificates 31 

elimination of delinquent students.. 31 

examinations and marks 30 

junior standing 31 

regulation of studies 30 

reports 3 1 

Regulation of studies 30 

Regulatory Service, Inspection of 455 

Religious influences 45 

Research and Regulatory Agencies.... 438 
Research Foundation, National Sand 

and Gravel Association, 467 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps....29. 194 

195, 323, 427, 429-431 

Residence and Non-Residence 29 

Room Reservation 38 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories.— 38 
Rural Life 60, 217, 218 



S Page 

Sand and Gravel Association Research 
Foundation, National 467 

Scholarships - 49 

Science curriculum, general 120 

Secretarial Administration 13(5 

Seed Inspection Service 45^ 

Social Sciences, division of m 

Societies 47 

fraternities and sororities _ 48 

honorary fraternities 47 

miscellaneous clubs and societies.... 48 

Sociology 356 

Soil Conservation Service 464 

Soils 68, 220, 464 

Solomons Island Research 07 

Sororities _ 48 

Spanish 33 1 

Speech 362 

State Board of Agriculture 449 

five year program 63 

State Department of Drainage 458 

State Horticultural Department 454 

Statistics 258, 415 

Student 

employment 41 

government _ _ 46 

organization and activities 46, 55 

publications 48 

Summary of Student Enrollment 435 

Summer Session 210 

credits and certificates 210 

graduate work 202, 210 

terms of admission 210 

Surveying 166, 288 



Torrapin 49 

Textiles and Clothing 184, 3(>3 

Three-semester plan 22 

Transcripts of records 36 

U 

Uniforms, military 195 

University Hospital 413 

University Post Office and Book Store 49 



Veterinary Science 364 

W 

Water Resources Branch, U. S 461 

Welfare 36 

Wildlife Service 460 

Withdrawals 35 

Z 

Zoology 97, 366 



An admission application form, or any further infor- 
mation desired concerning the University, will gladly be 
furnished, on request, by 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



V 



472 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



O Page 

OlYicers, administrative 8 

of instruction 11, 371 

Old Line 49 

Olericulture 79, 314 



IMiarniacy, School of 

admission 41 1, 



expenses 
location 



IMii Kappa Plii 47, 

IMiilosophy 

lMij"sical p]din*ation 'J4, 2".». !.")(>, 

rhysical K.\aminati<»ns 

IMiy.sical Sciences, division of 

Pliysics 107, 

Pilot Training;. Civilian 

riant Patholoj;y 

Plant Physiolo}j:y 

Political Science 

Pomology 79, 

Poultry Husbandry 81, 

Predental curriculum 

Preliminary information 

Premedical curriculum 

Prenursinjr cuniculum 

Preprofessional curricula 

Princess Anne College 

Psychological Testing Bureau 

Psychology 267, 

Publications, student 

Public Administration ll'J, ^40, 

R 

llecords and Statistics 

llecreation 

Refunds 

Regimental Organization 

Registration, date of ?>, 

penalty for late 

Regulations. Grades. Degrees 

degrees and certificates 

elimination of delinquent students.. 

exanunations and marks 

junior standing 

regulation of studies 

reports 

Regulation of studies 

Regulatory Service. Inspection of 

Ixrligious influences 

Research and Regulatory Agencit's... 
Ri'si'arch Foundation, National Sand 

and Gravel Association 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps....29. 

195, 323, 427, 429 

Residi'uce and Non-Residence 

Room Reservation 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories.... 
Rural Life 60. 217, 



410 
412 
413 
410 
42r) 
3;34 
J 97 
37 
1(»3 
340 
176 
232 



O •> '» 
J.JO 



234 
314 
349 
120 

20 
117 
117 
116 

20 
351 
331 

48 
348 



415 
197 
35 
195 
26 
34 
26 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 

30 

455 

45 

4:58 

467 

194 

-431 

29 

38 

38 

218 



S Page 

Sand and Gravel Association Research 
Foundation, National 4^7 

Scholarships 40 

Science curriculum, general 120 

Secretarial Administration 130 

Seed Inspection Service 45(3 

Social Sciences, division of 11] 

Societies 1 7 

fraternities and sororities _ 18 

honorary fraternities 17 

miscellaneous clubs and societies... 48 

Scxiology 350 

Soil Conservation Service 464 

Soils 68, 220, 4t;j 

Soloujons Island Research 07 

Sororities 48 

Spanish 3:i I 

Speech 302 

State Board of Agriculture 440 

five year program 63 

State Department of Drainage 458 

State Horticultural Department 454 

Statistics 258. 415 

Student 

emi)loyment 41 

government 46 

organization and activities 46, 55 

publications 48 

Summary of Student Enrollment 435 

Summer Session 210 

credits and certificates 210 

gradiiate work 202, 21 

terms of adujission 210 

Surveying 166, 288 



Terrapin 40 

Textiles and Clothing 184, 303 

Tliree-semester plan 22 

Transcripts of records 36 

U 

I^niforms. military 195 

University Hospital 413 

University Post Office and Book Store 49 



A'eterinarv Science 



364 



W 



Water Resources Branch, U. S 461 

Welfare 36 

Wildlife Service 460 

Withdrawals 35 

Z 
Zoology 97, 366 



An admission application form, or any further infor- 
mation desired concerning the University, will gladly be 
furnished, on request, by 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland.