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Full text of "Catalogue"

1/ f ' 



/ . 



iif ERSiw OF mmm 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



EPRAL OATALOli 
1944-1945 




\^he ~J-ou,ndation of C^veru ^iait 
w the (LducatCon of its Uoutk 



DIOGENES 



AGRICULTURE 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

EDUCATION 

ENGINEERING 

HOME ECONOMICS 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

GRADUATE STUDIES 



DENTISTRY 



LAW 



MEDICINE 



NURSING 



PHARMACY 



EXTENSION 



RESEARCH 



Official Publication of .he University of Maryland 

Tunc 15, 1944 
Vol. 41, No. 3 



ORGANIZATION OF THIS CATALOG 

This catalog has six major sections as follows: 

Section I. General Information Pages 18 to 45 

Administrative Organization, Facilities, Ad- 
mission, General Requirements, Fees, Living 
Arrangements, etc. 

Section II. Resident Instruction at College Park. .Pages 46 to 174 

The organization and curriculimi require- 
ments of the several colleges and departments 
of the University at College Park. 

Section III. Course Offerings at College Park Pages 175 to 306 

A listing of all courses offered at College 
Park, arranged alphabetically by departments 

Section IV. Resident Instruction at Baltimore. . .Pages 307 to 316 

Section V. Agricultural Extension, Research, and 

Regulatory Agencies Pages 317 to 335 

Section VI. Degrees Conferred and Statistics of 

Enrollment Pages 336 to 378 



Table of Contents, Page 6 



The Index begins on Page 379 



CATALOG 



1944 



1945 



The provisions of this publication are not 
to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. 
The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action is for the best 
interests of the University. 




, A ffl.i«1 nublication issued semi-monthly during May, 
University of Maryland 0*0-1 Pub« ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

June and July and — ^ [j^^^^ * ^.^ J congress of August 24. 1912. 
Entered as second class matter, unaei ^ 



OfflcUl Publication of .he University of Maryland 

Tunc 15, 1944 
Vol. 41, No. 3 



ORGANIZATION OF THIS CATALOG 

This catalog has six major sections as follows: 

Section I. General Information Pages 18 to 45 

Administrative Organization^ Facilities, Ad- 
mission, General Requirements, Fees, Living 
Arrangements, etc. 

Section II. Resident Instruction at College Park. .Pages 46 to 174 

The organization and curriculum require- 
ments of the several colleges and departments 
of the University at College Park. 

Section III. Coarse Offerings at College Park. . . .Pages 175 to 306 

A listing of all courses offered at College 
Park, arranged alphabetically by departments 

Section IV. Resident Instruction at Baltimore. . .Pages 307 to 316 

Section V. Agricultural Extension, Research, and 

Regulatory Agencies Pages 317 to 335 

Section VI. Degrees Conferred and Statistics of 

Enrollment Pages 336 to 378 



Table of Contents, Page 6 



The Index begins on Page 379 



CATALOG 



1944 



1945 



The provisions of this publication are not 
to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. 
The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action is for the best 
interests of the University. 




Entered as second class matter, unaer ac 



GENERAL CALENDAR ' 



1944 


1945 


1946 




JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


41 


5 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


111 


n 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


is! 


19 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25! 


26 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


31 


9 • 


• ■ 


• • 


29 


30 


31 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


• • 




30 


31 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


* • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


"? 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T F S 


S M T W T F 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


• • 


• • 


25!26 


27 


28 


• • 


• • 


• • 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


• • 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


• • 


• • 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


T 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T F 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 2 


3 


• ■ 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


• « 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9' 


10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


t 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


• • 


* • 


• • 


• • 


• • • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


30 


• • 


• • 


• « 


• • 


• • 


• • 


31 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T F 


S 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


..1234 


5 6 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


8 9il0!ll!l2 13114 


71 8 910111 


12 13 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


15 16 17 18I19I20I21 


14115 1617 18 


I19I20 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


2223 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


22123 24 25126127 28 


21 22 23124125 


26127 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


29|30i31 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


29i30 


28 29 30 31 . . 


• • • • 


28 


29 


30 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T F S 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


.... 1 2 3 4 


5 


!.. 1! 2! 3 


• • 


• • 


• « 


1 


2 


3 


! 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6! 7 81 910111 


12 


4 5 6 7 8 9!10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


Il4 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 14115116117 18 


119 


11 12 13!14 15 16 17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


i20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 21 22 23124 25 


26 


18 19120 21122 23124 


19 


20 


21 


22 


123 


24 


25 


26 

• • 


27 

• • 


28 

• • 


29 

• • 


30 

« • 


• • 

• • 


• • 

• • 


27 

• • 


28 29 30131 . . 

!.- 


• • 

• • 


25126 27 28 29130 .. 

I 

1 


26 

• • 


27 

• • 


28 

• • 


29 

• • 


30 


31 .. 

• • • • 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MT W T F S 


^ ^ 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


• • 


!.. 


• • 


1 

1 

1 • • 


• • 


1 


2 


.. ..!.. .. 


• • • • J. 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 3 4 5 


6 7 8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


I 


8 


10 


111 


12 


13 


14 


il5 


16 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 1011112 


13 14 15 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


115 


17 


18 


19 


20 


2122 


23 


17 


18 


19 


120 


21 


122 


23 


161711819 


20 21 22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


2122 


24 


|25 


26 


27 


28129 30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 28 29 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 


31 


i.. 


• • 


• • 


..!.... 


• • 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


30 


131 


• • • • 




30 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • • • 



1944 

July 7-8 
July 10 
August 18 

September 4 

Sept. 25, 26, 27, 28 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1944-1945 

COLLEGE PARK 

Summer Quarter 




Friday, Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday 
Monday-Thursday 



Re^stration for summer quarter 

Instruction begins 

Closing date, short summer session 

Labor Day, holiday 

Examinations 



Fall Quarter 



October 6-7 
October 9 
November 23 
December 22 

1945 

» 

January 5-6 
January 8 
February 22 
March 25 



Friday, Saturday 
Monday 
Thursday 
Friday 



Registration for fall quarter 
Instruction begins 
Thanksgiving, holiday 
Closing date, fall quarter 







March 26, 27, 28, 29 Monday-Thursday 



Winter Quarter 
Friday, Saturday Registration for winter quarter 

Instruction begins 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
Observance of Maryland Day 
Examinations 



Monday 

Thursday 

Sunday 



Sjyring Quarter 



April 6-7 

April 9 

May 30 

June 25, 26, 27, 28 



Friday, Saturday 
Monday 
Wednesday 
Monday-Thursday 



Registration for spring quarter 
Instruction begins 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Examinations 



f ^\^a nrof essional schools in Baltimore will 

i; 



5 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar for 1944, 1945, and 1946 Page 

UNIVERSITY Calendar FOR 1944-45 4 

Board of Regents 5 

SECTION I-GENERAL 8 

Preliminary Information 

Organization of the University 18 

Physical Facilities ... 20 

Admission Procedure and R^guiation'of Studies ^^ 

Definition of Residence studies ^3 

Pees and Expenses * 27 

Student Health and Welfare. 28 

Living Arrangements 33 

Student Aid and Employment. ^4 

Honors and Awards. 37 

<,VrlTnT ""''"'"'' ^"^ Organkation;: ." :: .' ^8 

SECTION II— RESIDENT INSTRITr-rrr^xT , n. ^2 

College of Agriculture _ f^^^^^CTION AT COLLEGE PARK 

College of Arts and Sciences 46 

College of Business and Public Admin.U' 'I- '1 

College of Education Administration ^g 

College of Engineering . . . . ' 118 

College of Home Economics 134 

Department of Military SciencV and Tactk; ^^'^ 

Department of Physical Education vJ T 161 

Graduate School ^|'"'^^*'°"' Recreation, and Athletics. ... i63 

Summer Session for Teachers 165 

Evening Courses 173 

SECTION III-COURSE OFFERiNrQ' '^^' '^V. ^^^ 

"C 'oI-D^f »^". ™^™"CT,ON AT BALT«OKE ■••• " 
School of Law 307 

School of Medicine 309 

School of Nursing [[ 311 

School of Pharmacy ' . ' * 312 

University Hospital 313 

College of Education (Baltimor'e Division) ^^^ 

SECTION V-^AGRICULTURAL EXTENSTOxr* '.^ ^'' 

AND REGULATORY AGENcS ' RESEARCH, 

SECTION VI^RECORDS AND STATISTICS ^'' 

Degrees Conferred and Certificates and Wn^ 336 

1942 and 1942-1943 and Sn ''''' Awarded, 1941- 

1942-1943 and 1943-1944 ""^'^ '' Enrollments for 

GENERAL INDEX 

* 379 

6 



BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND AND 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Eo^vfatNl> K. ADAMy, Chairrnwn. : Baltimore 1948 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Baltimore 1947 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer Baltimore 1944 

E. Paul Knotts ^ ^" jr ' -Denton . , 1945 

.William P. Cole, Jr. . ;-. IT.V/.JiVrfrfr!:^.!^^^^^^ 1949 

Harry H. Nuttlb Denton 1950 

Phillip C. Turner Parkton 1950 

W. Calvin Chesnut Baltimore 1951 

John E. Semmes Baltimore 1951 

Thomas R. Brookes Bel Air 1952 

Stanford Z. Rothschild Baltimore 1952 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the third Friday of each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman, 
Miss Preinkert, Secretary. 



Representing The 
College Park Division 



Dean Appleman 
Mr. Benton 
Dr. Brueckner 
President Byrd 
Dean Cotterman 
Colonel Griswold 
Director Huff 



Dr. James 
Dean Joyal 
Miss Kellar 
Director Kemp 
Dr. Long 
Dean Mount 
Miss Preinkert 
Dean Pyle 



Dean Reid 
Dr. Spears 
Dean Stamp 
Dean Steinberg 
Deian Symons 
Dr. White 
Dr. Zucker 



Representing The 
Baltimore Division 

Dean DuMez 
Dean Howell 
Dean Patterson 
Dean Robinson 
Dean Wylie 




^ 



0^ 



\ 



\ 



oo 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agri., Director of Extension Service, Dean of Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration and Acting Dean of College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of School of Dentistry. 

Arnold E. Joyal, Ph.D., Acting Dean of College of Education, Acting 
Director of Summer School. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate School. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law. 

Robert U. Patterson, M.D., CM., LL.D., -Dean of School of Medicine, 
Superintendent of University Hospital. 

Ivy B. Clifford, A.M., R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of School 
of Nursing. 

Andrew G. DuMbz, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of School of Pharmacy. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of College of Agriculture. 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Acting Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Acting Dean of Men. 

Adble H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

H. C. Griswold, Col. Inf., U. S. Army, Commandant and Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. » 

Clarence W. Spears, M.D., Director of Physical Education. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions. 

Charles L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Chief Accountant. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

T. A. Hutton, M.A., Purchasing Agent. 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Office of the President 

LuciLB Smith, B.S Secretary to the President 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Mary Burke Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Office of the Registrar 

Mary G. Bauer Assistant to Registrar 

Lisettb Thompson Assistant, Records 

Florence Stafford Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES ^ 

Dean of Women's Office ^^^.^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ 

ROSALIE LESLIE, M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

MARIAN Johnson, M.A 

Office of Business Management ^^.^^ Accountant 

C. L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A Cashier 

W. W. Cobby, A.B * * '" .Purchasing Agent 

T. A. HUTTON, M.A Chief Engineer 

HB31BERT E. RUSSELL ' * .Personnel Officer 

EDITH M. Frothingham • .MUitary Property Custodian 

GERMAN V. RiCB • • University Postmaster 

ERNEST Gelinas In charge, University Press 

HERMAN P. STEWART Assistant Comptroller (Baltimore) 

W. V. Maconachy ^j^.^^ QY^j.y. (Baltimore) 

J. H. TUCKER 

Dining Hall General Manager 

CHARLES V. DELAHUNT 

student Health Service Director of Health 

DR. Clarence W. Spears .Physician Consultant 

Dr. W. Allen Griffith Supervisor of Nurses 

Miss Estella C. Baldwin, R.N 

Publicity Editor 

RAYMOND W. Wild, Ph.M 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

,, X d "Hi rector of Libraries 

CAKL W. E. HiNTZ, A.B., A.B.L.S., A.M.L.S D-ector 

College Park 

Elizabeth A. Gardner, A.M., ^•^•^'^^^^.^g Reference and Loan Librarian 

ANNA M. URBAN, A.B., ^f^^^^^^^^,^^,^ Reference and Loan Department 

Helen T. Armstrong, A.B., ^'^jJ^'J;'^^^^ Reference and Loan Department 

A T^ Assistant, Reference and Loan Department 
N. Virginia Phillips, A.B. . . ^.Assistant, r^ ^^^^ Cataloger 

Louise W. Getchbll, A.B., B.S.L.b • • Assistant Cataloger 

Ruth V. Hewlett, A.B., A.M.L.S Assistant Cataloger 

Ruth Sbabolt, A.B., A.B.L.S. . .^ ^^^^^ Librarian 

Harold C. O'Neal, A.B., B.S.L.S '/.**.... Assistant 

Kate White SecreUry to the Director 

Elizabeth Diggs 




p 



r 

10 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Dental-Medical-Pharmacy Libraries 
Thelma R Wiles, A.B., A.B.L.S 

BEATRICE Marriott, B S \" : Librarian 

Ruth Lee Briscoe. . . Assistant Librarian (Dentistry) 

Gladys Mambert, A.B a m T* ^ -Assistant Librarian (Medicine) 

Florence Kirk " * Assistant Librarian (Pharmacy 

Julia Wilson, B.S, b's.L S Assistant (Dentistry-Pharmacy) 

Ann Lemen Clark * * Assistant (Medicine) 

Edith R. McIntosh, A B * A B L S Cataloger (Dentistry-Pharmacy) 

Mary Scarpulla ' Cataloger (Medicine) 

Law Library Assistant to the Catalogers 

Anne C. Bagby, a.B., b.L.S 

Librarian 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Dr. Bamforh no n 

Mrs. Thurston, Dr. White. ' Schindler, De an Stam p, 

Athletics and Physical Education 

Coordination of AgrklJu;:;:^ Activities 

Dr. Symons, CAarrmaw; Mr Bop«;t n„ tj 

Cot^erman, Mr. Holmes Dr jZ^' Z 1'^"^^^' Dr. Cory. Dr. 

Mahoney, Mr. Oswald. Mr. Shaw ' ^™''' '''^ Leinbach. Dr. 

^ Dk" t"™ 'S' '''"''"■•'^' ^""^ Coordination 

JJR. ZUCKER, Chairman- Dr RAxrrm t^ -r. 

Extension and Adult Education lounger. 

Professor G. d Rrow^t r^i. • 

Dr. Steinmeyer. ' •^'^'' '^"^^^' ^iss Kellae, Mr. Oswald. 

Libraries 

Publications 

Mr. Snyder, Chairman • Mtqq t? t?t,^ 
MISS Preinke;,t. Mr. Tilo Dl^zucKr""'''' '^'- ^^'^^ ^«- 0«^^' 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



11 



Public Functions and Public Relations 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Baker, Mr. Bopst, Dr. Cory, Dr. DuMez, 
DR. Gewehr, Colonel Griswold, Dr. Jull, Dean Mount, Miss Preinkert, 
Mr. Randall, Dean Reid, Dean Robinson, Mr. Snyder, Dean Stamp, 
Dr. Steinmeyer, Dr. Younger. " ' 

Religious Affairs and Social Service 

Miss Leslie, Chairman; Dr. Gewehr, Mr. Hamilton, Dr. Haring, Pro- 
fessor QuiGLEY, Dean Reid, Dr. White, 

Scholarship and Student Aid 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Mr. Cobey, Dr. Cotterman, Dean Mount, Dean 
Reid, Dean Stamp, Dr. Steinmeyer. 

Student Life 

Dr. White, Chairman; Professor Allen, Dr. Baker, Dr. Benton, Dr. 
Griffith, Colonel Griswold, Dr. Harman, Dr. James, Professor Kramer, 
Dr. Lejins, Dr. Phillips, Miss Preinkert, Dean Reid, Dr. Spears, Dean 
Stamp, Professor Svirbely. ^"^ 

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK* 

George J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture. 

Paul R. Achenbach, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation and Re- 
frigeration. 

Arthur M. Ahalt, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

George F. Alrich, Ph.D., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Mary L. Andrews, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Gustave W. Andrian, B.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Charles 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology. 

Ross E. Backenstoss, Ph.D., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

M. Alberta Bailey, B.A., Assistant in Mathematics. 

Harry S. Baker, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Oliver E. Baker, Ph.D., Professor of Geography and Lecturer on Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Cecil R. Ball, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Herman Ball, B.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Frank G. Banta, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

James V. Barker, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Rachel J. Benton, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Myron H. Berry, M.S., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 



*A3 of April. 1944. 



12 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Herbert R. Bird Ph n a 

Allison T. Brown lnstr,.'nZ ■r^^^'"' ""^ Physics. 
Gi^N D. Bkown M a P^. '" ^"*^"°'- »««'«»• 
Hazel M. Brow; m S . r' °^ Industrial Education 

H-s^ G. BRo:;'^t:Dt a; fs"tl„^tTr °' ^•'-•^^ -^ Nutrition. 
Marie D. Bryan. A.B., In trucw •„ I vT "* ^'^"* Physiology. 
Sumner o. Burhoe, Ph D TlZ \ ^"^ '"^ ^"*^ Education. 
Charles Carl, AssistanrV ^ ^"* Professor of Zoology 
Mary K. Carl R N Assi L?-''^."''^"' Engineering. ^• 
RAY W. CARPE^raf A B S"* m Physical Education. 

John W. Cassell. Majo'; U S A a ?' ''^ ^^ricultural Engineering 
HAR^ 7r *=^- " * """'"^"^ "^ Miliary "Snee 

ilARVEY J. CheSTON Tr M a a . 

Julian J. Chisolm/ii Wr„;fn''- '*^"* '" Mathematics. 

FiTZHUGH T. Clark bst".'" Entomology. 

Weston R. Clark, Ph D pttr i".*^'^" Engineering. 

Harold J. Clem Ph n a ^.'^f ^««<»- ^^ Psychology. 

Eu W. Clemen; Ph^' ^pf f "* P^°*«««°r of flfstory. 

GEORGE F. Corcoran M'sptr^' "' ?'=°««'»'«- 

GCSTAVO CORREA. As^nt lltZl o1 f^'^''^' Engineering. 

Ernest N. Cory, Ph.D., Prof esst oT Fn. ','^° languages. 

Harold F. Cotterman Ph n p / Entomology. 

CARROLL E. cox. Ph.D., Ini^ructTTv^' t^j'''''''''^' ^i^xcmor.. 
Hugh J. Creech Ph n . "^ .<=*°r in Plant Pathology. 

Myron Creese, b S E E T"f ' ^''''''"'' °^ Chemistry. 
Dnm« CUNZ. Ph d: SstLt S7 °' "^'r*™^' Engineering. 
VIENNA CuRTiss, ul.XTJrtlZ r f?"^" Languages. 
ToBLAs Dantzig Ph D P^r/ . P'^^'^t'cal Art. 

GOMER L. DaviL R ?■' f "*'^«'>^ «f Mathematics. 

A. B. C. DAVIS, bapfain u sT \ "^'f "^' Communications. 

. and Tactic^. "' ''•^•''•' ^--t^"* Professor of Military Science 

Evelyn DAviq p a t ^ science 

HUGH D. DA^is^Captiru^^A^ 7''T' ^'^"•=^«- ^- Women. 

^ and Tactics. "' ''•^•^•' ^^^'^t^"* Professor of Military Science 

Samuel H. DeVault Ph D Pmf . 

Management. " ^'"''^^*''- *>* Agricultural Economics and Farm 

Harold M. DeVolt M <? m;^ ht . 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



13 



NATHAN L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

George W. Dunlap, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

Allen L. Edwards, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Professor of Speech. 

Curry N. England, M.A., Instructor in Home Management. 

William E. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Stanley Fifer, B.A., Assistant in Mathematics. 

Michael J. Fiuppi, M.S., Instructor in Zoology. 

Alice H. Finckh, B.A., Instructor in English. 

Fanny F. Fitzwater, Instructor in Practical Art. 

L. Webster Frayer, B.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Frank B. Freidel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

William K. GAuriiai, M.A., Instructor in Physics. 

Elizabeth K. Genger, M.S., Instructor in Textiles and Clothing. 

Wesley M. Gewehr, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Carl W. Gohr, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Margaret T. Goldsmith, M.S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

William H. Gravely, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Wilson P. Green, M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

RoMAiN G. Greene, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Harland C. Griswold, Colonel, U.S.A., Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Allan G. Gruchy, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Eugene Guerster, Ph.D., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Louise Hagel, B.S., Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 

Dick W. Hall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Harry R. Hall, B.S., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

P. Arne Hansen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Malcolm M. Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

Susan E. Harm an, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 

Donald C. Hennick, B.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.B., A.M.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science. 

Lawrence J. Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Richard I. Hofstadter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Chester A. Hogentogler, Jr., B.S., Lecturer on Soils and Foundations. 

Harry B. Hoshall, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Wilbert J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

George B. Hughes, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Elizabeth Jullien Hurst, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for 
Women. 

Richard R. Hutcheson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 



14 



T 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



''ZZi.t^''^' ^■'■' --•. Assistant Professor of MecHa.eal K„,. 

stKS.vrML!'p??-'p^rr:-* ?f -- °^ ^-'^-tics. 

Walter F. Jepfers Ph D a ! *" "^ bacteriology. 

Robert a. Jehle I'h D p' f ''''"^"i 1'"^'''°' ^f Plant Pathology 

ARNOLD E. JOYAL Ph d' Pr„f "' "'/if"* ^^t^ology. ""'^■ 

HARRV E. KORAB, B.S IssSaT"' i" ?^"^^' ^'^"<^««°»- 
Charles F. Kram^ ma / '" Bacteriology. 

A^IN 0. KuHrM^i^A^LfrS^f-/-; Of Foreign Languages. 

i7Z"w IT'T' ^''•^- Assoctt^Troi/o7 eT- , 
WAZEL W. Lapp, M.S., Instructor in Fn«/ ^ >r Entomology. 

Laurence L. Layton Ph n a . ^ ^""^ Nutrition. 

FREDERICK H. LEiNBr^H Ph'D p" r* "'"''""" ''^ Chemistry. 

Peter p. Lejins, Ph.D Asiarrp''^'' °^ Animal Husbandry. 

Irving Linkow M A tL^ . Professor of Sociology. 

ROBERT A. Lio^Lep;,^^ Ph d r ^" ^^''"''■ 

Roberta Mack, B.S Assta^/p 7 "^ '" ^'''''^■ 

Norman W. Macleod, Tl aSITI 1 '"'"*"""» Management. 

George F. Madigan Ph ^ a /*^"* Professor of English. 

CHARLES H. MAHONEY iS D p"*r* ^^"^^^^^^ «* Soils^ 

Monroe H. Martin Ph D pJ/ "^/^ Olericulture. 
Robert H. McBride,' istft vflZ °' ^*'^«'»-«'=- 

and Tactics. ' ^■^■^■' ^^s'^tant Professor of Military Science 

WILLL4M G. McCOLLOM M A T ^ 

FRIEDA W. McFAR^i^o' ma' Pror'"'" T ^"^'-h- 

Edna B. McNaughton m a"' Prl ""■ 1 ?''^*""^ ^"'^ Clothing. 

^. Fay Mitchell, M.A A^si^f^r^f t3 ^^^^^^ ^^ Sociology. 

il.ARL W. MOUNCE, MA T T P A • ^"^^^^^- 

M. MARIE MOUNT m:a:; Pro?e;sor 'of ' k' ''''"'''''' "^ ^aw and Labor 
AGNES R. NEYLAN, M.A. Instruetrfn IT^ '"'. '"^*""««" Management 
Peter Oesper, Ph.D Assi.trJfp V ""^^ ^"'^ Nutrition. 

EVELYN L. OGiNSK^'j^rtstruIo "°p"' ''''^^''=^' ^^emistry. 
Martha A. Olson M A i^r . '" Bacteriology. 

HAROLD C. O'Neal; I^b'bsITT T ^f "«'»««- 

Arthur C. Parsons M A A.i ^7*™*=*"'- '» Library Science. 

S. M.A.. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



15 



Arthur S.^ Patrick, M.A., Assistant Professor of Secretarial Training. 

Milton A. Petty, Jr., Ph.D., Instructor in Plant Pathology. 

Norman E. Phillips, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Robert E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

James R. Pinkerton, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Henry W. Price, B.S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

Hester B. Provensen, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing. 

George D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Marguerite C. Rand, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

B. Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Ennes C. Rayson, A.B., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Harry H. Rice, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Fausto Rubini, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Alvin W. Schindler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Albert L. Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 

Mark Schweizer, Ph.D., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

A. Wiley Sherwood, M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

H. Burton Shipley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Robert V. Shirley, M.B.A., Instructor in Business Law and Statistics. 

Mark M. Shoemaker, M.S., M.L.D., Associate Professor of Landscape 
Gardening. 

Charles A. Shreeve, B.M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Arthur W. Silve31, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

John E. Smith, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Joseph M. Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. ' 

W. Conley Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Robert E. Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer on Entomology. 

Clarence W. Spears, B.S., M.D., Professor of Physical Education 

Jesse W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Kenneth M. Stampp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

S. Sidney Steinberg, 15-E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Reuben G. Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

William J. Svirbely, M.S., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Jean Tenney, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women. 

RoYLE P. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soils. 

Alice J. Thurston, M.A., Instructor in Psychology. 

Arthur S. Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. 

Theron a. Tompkins, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Edward D. Trembly, M.B.A., Associate Professor of Accounting. 



16 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Emil S. Troelston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Anna M. Urban, A.B., A.B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

John L. Vanderslice, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

William VanRoyen, Ph.D., Professor of Geography. 

Paul M. Wadell, 1st Lt., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

T. C. Gordon Wagner, Ph.D., Assistant in Mathematics. 

Robert N. Walden, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

Stanton Walker, B.S., Lecturer on Engineering Materials. 

W. Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Edgar P. Walls, Ph.D., Professor of Canning Crops. 

Dorothy M. Watson, M.S., Assistant in Geography. 

Donald C. Weeks, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Marie Wheatley, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Charles E. White, Ph.D., Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. 

Helen B. Wilcx>x, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Raymond C. Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Harold C. Yeager, 2nd Lt., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

James F. Yeager, Ph.D., Lecturer on Entomology. 

John E. Younger, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Harold Yourman, 2nd Lt., U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

W. Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Alice R. Zerbola, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Adolf E. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 



V 

,nst«™™n« staf,. college bark 



17 



. . • • • 



FdwakdObban, B.S...-^ 

SsON L. ROSENBE^. B.S 

SS-h\?— o. B.S.. 

^BTHUK H. THOMPSON, B.S 

LEUA M. TOOLE. B^S. • 

Xmanda A. urn, B.S^.^ 

CHARLES M. WEISS. B.S 



. ♦ • • • 



Fellows 

ROBERT L.BORENSTEIN,B.b... 

LomSAG.DlLLARD,M.A .•• 
BHr^TYE. HOFFMASTER^B.b... 

KathrynC. Kenny,B.A..... 

VXVIENNE C. MACLEOD, M.A.. 
WALTER S. SANDERLIN, B.A.. 
JULIUS SEEMAN, B.S 



Chemistry 

.....Chemistry 

" Botany 

*V.V. .Chemistry 

Home Economics 

_ .Horticulture 

..Botany 



Botany 

'..Chemistry 



Chemical Engineering 

\ Pnhlic Administration 

. .Business and Public Aa ^^^^^^ 

.Psychology 
.... English 
....History 
..Education 







GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AND FELLOWS 

Graduate Assistants 

Name Department 

Laura M. Brilliantine, M.S Bacteriology 

Carl Blumenstein, B.S Chemistry 

Jean Boyer, B.A Mathematics 

Lawrence E. Flesch, B.S Agricultural Economics 

William H. Form, M.A Sociology 

Larry Q. Green, B.S Chemistry 

Helen Gysin, B.S Zoology 

Hillman G. Harris, B.S Chemistry 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, M.S Entomology 

Erich Heftman, B.S Chemistry 

William Keller, B.S Zoology 

David N. Kramer, B.S Chemistry 

Cecil Martin, B.A English 

J. Philip Mattingly, B.S Poultry Husbandry 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



19 



SECTION I— General 



PRELIMINARY INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland, in addition to being a State University, is 
the "Land-Grant" institution of Maryland. The University is co-educational 
in all of its branches. 

College Park 

The undergraduate colleges and the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland are located at College Park, Prince George's County, Mary- 
land, on a beautiful tract of rolling, wooded land, less than eight miles from 
the heart of the Nation's capital, Washington, D. C. This nearness to 
Washington, naturally, is of immeasurable advantage to students because 
of the unusual library facilities afforded by the Library of Congress and 
the libraries of Government Departments; the privilege of observing at 
close range sessions of the United States Supreme Court, the United States 
Senate and the House of Representatives; the opportunity of obtaining 
almost without effort an abundance of factual data which is constantly 
being assembled by the numerous agencies of the Federal Government; and, 
especially in these days of war, the keen sense of interest which necessarily 
exists when one is in such close proximity to history in the making. 

The University is served by excellent transportation facilities, including 
the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, by the Washington street 
car system, and by several bus lines. The campus fronts on the Baltimore- 
Washington Boulevard, a section of Federal Route No. 1, which makes the 
University easily accessible by private automobile travel. 

College Park, and the adjacent Calvert Hills and College Heights, con- 
stitute a group of fine residential communities close to the University 
campus, where are located the homes of many of the members of the faculty 
and staff, and where students who prefer to live off campus may find de- 
sirable living accommodations at reasonable rates. 

Baltimore 

The professional schools of the University — Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
Nursing, and Pharmacy — the University Hospital, and the Baltimore Divi- 
sion of the College of Education, are located in a group of splendid build- 
ings, most of them erected in recent years, at or near the adjacent corners 
of Lombard and Greene Streets and Lombard and Redwood Streets, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Baltimore, a thriving, modern industrial city of more than a million in- 
habitants, has an old established culture represented by outstanding educa- 
tional institutions, libraries, museums, parks, public buildings, and places 
of historical interest. 

Baltimore is justly proud of its well earned reputation as a center of the 
highest type of professional education, and no finer location could be chosen 
by a young man or young woman desiring to prepare for a professional 
career. 

18 



«RIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY ^ ^^ ^^^^.^^^- 

"Cu. ... -»ni5.S"«n=.r i"» .SP«* »p.a, the 

Mo«\ school in the United States, ^ne erection of the 

rpemanent home --^ ^^''''^tZ'XB^Jore, the oldest struc- 
u win^ at Lombard and Greene Stieets in founded one of the 

building at 1^ devoted to medical teaching. Here ^^^^ ) ^^^ ^^.^^^ 

r: medS Ubraries (and the fi'-^* ^n "ISw au^^^^^^^^^ the College 
Stair In 1812 the General Assembly ll^;;^^^,,,^,, of divinity, law, 
TTe^iL of Maryland to "-«- ^^J^^ de l-ed that the "colleges or 

r'cS,f^ rp.!i™.r(.»"- '" -'• - *'" *=' "-■" ] 

college in the United States). , ^^t.^ed in 1856 under the name of 

The Maryland State College v.as eh^^^^c^nd agricultural college m the 
J^MaryJnd Agricultural Co^.^^^^^^^^^^ 
Western Hemisphere. I* or tnree > ^r^^^^ states passed the Lana ur<t 

to the "endowment, support, -"J "^^"^J^^g other scientific and classical 
the leading object shall be -f ^ jf ^^^^^ ,uch branches of learning 
studies, and including military tj*= "^^'^^^^^^i, ^^ts, in such a manner as 
as are related to agriculture and t^^ m^f^ prescribe, in order to pro- 
LTegislatures of the states may re pectv^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^.^^ , 

mote the liberal and practical education ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^,y the 

"etral pursuits and P-^-^T^^^th Maryland Agricultural College was 
General Assembly of Maryland^ and tti« Ma j ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ , ^ 

named as the beneficiary of *« gr^«*^ ^^ 1914 control was taken ovei 
in part, a State institution In the f a^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^, , ,,, charter 

entirely by the State. I" \^/J ^^^^^yi^nd State College, 
to the College, and made it the ma y 



20 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



In 1920, by an act of the qt«f r • 
was merged with the Marvlt.!,!.^*^'''^*"^^' ^e Universitv nf nr . 

1943 a four a,^!! ^^^rgency the Universitv .f JT 

tion or clmUTSwSn th^ ^*"'^"* -"^'e; aS^^^^^^^^^ in 

a student mav in J^ . ^''^ "®"a' ^our years R,. o.? ?^ ^'^ gradua- 

in five quarters, or if fiT ! / Pre-veterinary curnVnlo 

secondary school tfaS. ''''''' ^^ ^'^^ -venient of%SeTtLy"i" 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF THV rr. 

The government of the Un.V^ ^ ^ UNIVERSITY 

Regents, consistin<r „f , ^"'^ersity is, by law vp<=f.-i • 

State, e^ch foTa"4^^f^^" "'^""'^^^ -PPo^nted bj the '" ' ^°"'-' "^ 

'""Tt'c:„:g?;:r """""^*^- ^^^^-^^^ of the university. 

College of Agriculture o . ^^ Baltimore 

College of Arts and Sciences fj""! "^ ^en««try 

College of Business and Prh,; o"''""' "^ ^^^^ 

Administration "''''" School of Medicine 

College of Education ^'^''"^I of Nursing 

College of Engineering f^"^""' "^ Pharmacy 

College of Home Economics University Hospital 

Graduate School ^°"«se of Education ^Balt,.. 
Summer Session Division) (Baltimore 

Agricultural Ex^^„t Station 
Agricultural and Home EconoS 
Extension Service 

State- Wide Activities 

The Agricultural and Hom^. P„« • 

^tate. These representatives, County 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



21 



Agents and Home Demonstration Agents provide expert assistance to 
farmers and farm families in their areas and, when necessary, call upon 
the large staff of specialists at the headquarters of the Extension Service 
at College Park. 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service, which is charged with responsibility for 
the control and eradication of diseases of live stock and poultry, maintains 
local veterinary inspectors throughout the State, in addition to specialists 
and laboratory technicians at the main laboratory at College Park and the 
branch laboratories in Salisbury, Centreville and Baltimore. 

PHYSICAL FACILITIES — GROUNDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park comprise 600 acres. 
A broad rolling campus is surmounted by a commanding hill which over- 
looks a wide area and insures excellent drainage. Most of the buildings 
are located on this eminence, and the adjacent grounds are laid out attrac- 
tively in lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. 
Below the brow of the hill, on either side of the Washington-Baltimore 
Boulevard, lie the drill grounds and the athletic fields. 

Approximately 300 acres are used for research and teaching in horticul- 
ture, agriculture, dairying, livestock, and poultry; and an additional 500 
acres for plant research work are located on a farm five miles northwest 
of the campus. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 30 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at College 
Park. 

Administration and Instruction, This group consists of the following 
buildings: Administration Building, which accommodates the Office of the 
President, Dean of Men, Comptroller, Registrar, Director of Admissions, 
Director of Athletics, and Alumni Secretary; Agriculture Building, which 
houses the College of Agriculture, Agricultural and Home Economics Exten- 
sion Service and Auditorium; Arts and Sciences Building, Engineering 
Building, Morrill Hall, which houses a portion of the work in the Sciences; 
Poultry Building; Horticulture Building; Dairy Building; Dean of Women's 
Building, in which are the offices of the Dean of Women and her staff; 
Music Building, which provides accommodations for the Department of 
Music, the student band, and glee club; Home Economics Building; Chem- 
istry Building, in which are located laboratories and classrooms for instruc- 
tion in chemistry, and laboratories for analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and 
lime; and College of Education Building. A new Shop Building has just 
been completed. 

Experiment Station. The headquarters for the Agricultural Experiment 
Station are in the Agriculture Building. The laboratories and green houses 
for this work are located in various buildings on the campus. 

Physical Education. This group consists of the Ritchie Coliseum, -which 
provides quarters for all athletic teams, an athletic office, trophy room, and 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



23 



22 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



'I 

!i 
>' 



visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and permanent seating 
arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium, with a permanent seating 
capacity of 8,000, is furnished with rest rooms for patrons, dressing rooms, 
and equipment for receiving and transmitting information concerning con- 
tests in progress; Gymnasium- Armory , used in part by the Military De- 
partment, and for physical education work for men; and the Girls* Field 
House, for all girls* sports. Playing and practice fields and tennis courts 
are adjacent to the field houses. 

Armory, A new Armory, considered one of the finest structures of its 
kind in the nation, is modern in every respect. It houses the Department 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

Dormitories, The men's dormitory group, consisting of nine buildings, 
of brick, fireproof construction, provides accommodations for 860 men stu- 
dents. The women's residence group consists of two modern dormitories 
of Colonial architecture, accommodating 228 women students. These are 
designated as Margaret Brent Hall and Anne Arundel Hall. 

Rosshorough Inn, This historic Inn, built in 1798, is the oldest building 
on the campus and for many years housed the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Entirely restored, this is now one of the most beautiful and in- 
teresting buildings on the campus. 

Service Structures. This group includes the Central Heating Plant; 
Plant Maintenance and Operations Building; Infirmary, with accommoda- 
tions for forty patients, physician's office, operating room, and nurses' 
quarters; and Dining Hall, 

United States Bureau of Mines, The Eastern Experiment Station of 
the United States Bureau of Mines is located on the University grounds. 
The general laboratories are used for instruction purposes in Engineering 
as well as the United States Government for Experimental work. The 
building contains a geological museum, and a technical library. 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service Laboratory. The technological 
research laboratory of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is located on the 
University campus. It contains laboratories for conduct of research in the 
fisheries dealing with chemical, chemical engineering, bacteriological, nutri- 
tional, and biological subjects. Through a cooperative arrangement with 
the University it is possible for students, who have undergraduate degrees, 
to pursue studies toward graduate degrees in any of the subjects men- 
tioned above. 

Baltimore 

The group of buildings, located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets, provides available' housing for the Baltimore division of the Uni- 
versity. The group comprises the original Medical School Building, erected 
in 1814; the Old Hospital, now used as a dispensary; the Neiv University 
Hospital with approximately 450 beds; the Frank C, Bressler Research 
Laboratory; the Dental and Pharmacy Building; the Nurses* Home; the 
Law School Building; Davidge Hall, which houses the Medical library; and 
the Administration Building, 



UBKARV FACIUTIES ^^^^^^^ ^^^., ,„, Baltimore divisions 

Libraries are located at ^^^^^^.^^ 

of the University. ^^^^^ '"''^^^'fZT^ the second floor 

The General ^"f^J The main reading room on ^^^3 ^n 

-^. trrdtastb":r5:000 reference ^^;^^\T^Z. and des.s 

S^P^stt:.^^^^ are current. . 

Graduate School, and _ ^^ ^^^^.^^^^ - 

received. . „,,=„„„ consist of the Libraries of the b ^^^^^^. ^^^ 

Facilities m Baltimore ^^^ School of Law. 19."^ ^^^^^ 

^rf :f S cine: 23,000 volumes; and tt^e Schoo oij ^^^ ^^ 

School of Me^^^ ^^1 Library is housed ^^^^^xLz^ of their respective 

volumes, ^ne meu quarters m the 0^"°*"^.,... , f-_ the courses 

in Arts and Sciences are 

Dentistry and ^^^^f university total in the agg-^^J^^f^J'S" United 

r\s''?;rGeneiS Ubr^Iy is a ^^^o.^^^:^^^ -"-^^^^ ■ 
volumes. Ihe ue ^^^ers some 15,000 docume ference service 

Congress, the uniieu o 
agencies in Washington. 

.„Unre Arts and Sciences, Business communicate with the Uirec 

May 1 for the summer quarter, 



» 



24 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



for the winter quarter, and Marr-h l f„ ^v. 
from students complet ng their !»«/ *''" "^""^ ^"^'•ter. Application 

coura^ed. If accept'ableTupltrnTalrrrrtjaV^^^^^^^ ^"^ - - 
Apphcants from Other Colleges anH rr ^ ''"* "P°" graduation 

blank from the Director of AdSons K^r^''^^^ «^^»r« an application 
ask secondary school princiDal nt f' / '" Personal data requested anH 
record and send the b.anTtoTh D recW Si""' • '"^^^ -cond'ar/fchTo 
trar of the College or University attended tlt^T"'" ^^''"^^t t^e Regis 
of Admissions, College Park, Maryland '""^ ^ ^''^^^-Vt to the Director 

the ^^^i^SZ'^^ enter the University at 

ever, wUl be admitted at any quarter ""' ^°''''''^- «*"<!«»*«. W 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 
Admission by Cerfifi f r* 

Maryland or the DistriS' :; CoIumbt^I VrT' "'=*'"^^^^ ^''-^ of 
the recommendation of the principal Xt ^^'"""^ ^^ certificate upon 
should have attained college cert^Zn ^^^''"^^es of out-of-state schools 

than one letter or ten PoiSs h ^tr ^nThe '' "'' '"^'''^^ ^'^ ''^ -* 'e 
Graduates who fail to obtain fi,7 • " Passing mark. 

^dered by the CommUt^ „" AdS^ ' ^ T"'^"'^^""" -'" "« - 
including aptitude tests, will determ ^p ^^' .^^"^P'^'^entary information 
mission. determine whether they are eligible for ad- 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Only students in eood sfanj; 
l» transfer. Adv.LS .C,„/? ^ "^"^'"^'P '"' conduct .„ .Hjn,, 

1- A minimum on one vp^v ^-p -j "«^^ions. 

^ hours is necessary for" degre" "* "''^' "' "'** '^^ ^''^ ^5 quarter 

'• ^^^^^:^2^^^,:^^^o^ advanced 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

Engrlish 4 V 

Mathematics ...*.*.' J ""^^^ Required for all divisions of the University 

^^ units, including SoIiM r^r. ^ ^versity. 

Engineering, MathfmS . Jh^Ld cf /"^ 
One unit each of Algebra anTpro'**^- 
is desirable for Arts Ind <?.i ^"' Geometry 

Business AdmintsfratIL ^T^f^^''^ P»hlic and 
lowed for certain !?•, ^^^'«tion may be al- 

, . , , . of the UniversTy """'^ ^"*^ '"^^ "^'^^ -^-Ueges 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science 1 unif t,.^ 

geS.'"" ^^^•^ ^'•""P '« -''-red; two are sug- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



25 



Foreign Languages None is required. However, those who will follow 

the professions, enter journalism, foreign trade 
or service, study the humanities or do research, 
should have a good foundation in one or more. 

Electives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are ac- 
ceptable. In selecting students more emphasis 
will be placed upon good marks and other indi- 
cations of probable success in college than upon a 
fixed pattern of subject matter. 

Special Students: Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age, 
and who have not completed the usual preparatory course, may be admitted 
to such courses as they seem fitted to take. Special students are ineligible 
to matriculate for a degree until entrance requirements have been satisfied. 

Unclassified Students: Applicants who meet entrance requirements but 
who do not wish to pursue a program of study leading to a degree are in- 
eligible for admission to pursue courses for which they have met pre- 
requisites. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

All women students whose bodily condition indicates that they are phys- 
ically fit for exercise are required to take physical education for a period 
of four years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

Men are likewise required to take physical education for a four-year 
period. During the present emergency this, for men, consists of three two- 
hour periods a week. 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

m 

Course Numbers. Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 

Group I — Numbered 1 to 49 — courses primarily for freshmen, and 
sophomores. 

Group II numbered 50 to 99 — courses for juniors and seniors. 

Group III numbered 100 to 199 — courses for advanced undergraduates 
(well-qualified juniors and seniors) and graduates. 

Group IV numbered 200 to 299 — courses for graduates only. 

Schedule of Courses. A quarter time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
quarter. Classes are scheduled beginning at 8.20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The quarter hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one quarter. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are equiva- 
lent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to devote 
three hours a week in classroom or laboratory, including outside preparation 
for each credit hour in any course. 



ill 



26 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



27 



I 



? 



tests. prescribed type of examination book in these 

an?ttstr.; .rrnzr f - - - -- a, b, , 

J::;r::rttt ^t7-'^^-^ a. ass^..^ as .01- 
statdinf '" ^'"^"^ "' ^ '^ ^^^"'--^ ^- ^-duation and for junior 

of students. ^ " ^''^ academic work and other activtities 

REPORTS 

J^ .xT.^t St:, zz* " "" ■"^«'" *» "-"'^ «' 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing mark« i^ fift 
hours for which he is registered J t? f ^ ^^'^ ^^"* "^ t'^^ ^^arter 

University. The Registrar nott^.T .,, '%^"t<'">^«<=«»y dropped from the 

and the student's ^eTortC^L^'tZtt'^rrr '^'''^'^' 
for scholastic reasons may anneal i.,' -^ . I ^^° ^^^ ^^«n dropped 

sion, Guidance, and AdTuTtStrrZlTemLf TtT""^^- "" ^'^"^'^- 
powered to grant relief for just cause A If 7 1 . Committee is em- 
from the University for scholastic ™ ^ t"* '^''° ^^^ ''^^^ dropped 

ment is denied, may agS SSon T'' '". '"^''' '''''"°" ^^^^ "-^'"^t^t^- 
The University reser?eTthe Sht t/ ^ f ^'" °^ "* ^^^^* °"^ ^^^rter. 
of a student who can^t oJ doel^Ut ^rf-'^r^ ""^ *^ withdrawal 
scholarship, or whose continuance in thTn" ?' '■''^""^'' ^*^"^-<l ^^ 
to his or her health, or to the health of ^J^^''^^ \°"'d be detrimental 
satisfactory to the authorities of the Un^Jersuf' S Tr'"^* ^^ "°* 

.a. be as.ed to withdraw even ^o^^S^,!^ ^ 1!::--^^ 

is riS h"y Sirs: thT ::'= itXt ^^r ^ ^-- - — 

sistent absence from any course ^nibe" repolT oTh! p" f "5 "' Pre- 
appointed representative for final disciplinary actLn! "' *" ^" 
JUNIOR STANDING 
No student will be pprfifiori oo „ • • 



passed with an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number of 
quarter credits required for junior standing in any curriculum. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Mastor 
of Business Administration, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil Engineer, Mechan- 
ical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy. 

Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certificates. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last forty-five credits 
of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in resi- 
dence at the University of Maryland. Candidates for the baccalaureate 
degree in combined curriculums at College Park and Baltimore must com- 
plete a minimum of forty-five quarter credits at College Park. 

An average mark of C is required for graduation. In the case of a can- 
didate for a combined degree or of a transfer student with advanced stand- 
ing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit towards a degree in more 
than one-fourth of the credits earned at this institution. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. Full information regarding specific 
college requirements for graduation will be found in the college sections 
of the catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar three 
months prior to the date he expects to graduate, a formal application for a 
degree. Candidates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees 
are conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statef 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time 
of their registration they have been residents of this Statef for a least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 



*The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual cir- 
cumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to 
such minor students. 



28 



t 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



non re3ide„t to a residen't sLlufZtll S Wiy^ri-"* '^'^'^^^ ^-'" 
tration for a semester in any academic year "^ ^"^ him prior to regis. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 
General 

from the bill. °^ such scholarship or grant will be deducted 

All fees are due and pavablo at f».„ *• 
should come prepared to^ay the full amou^^ ^"-^ ^^"dent. 

will be admitted to classes until such navZff I u '^^''^''- ^o student 

The University reserve, thl I- TI . P^^"*^"* has been made. 

charges as may LTunTneeesZy \T' -<=V\-^- - ^ees and other 

to, ^^=ti?Lrn^rariiXs^^^^^ 

War Ration Books 

preteS ar^r SL^B^l^^I^fo^^ir ^ ^ "^ «^" ^^ ^^-^^-d to 
registration line before he receives Ws H^n "^ » ""' °^ ^^^ "^^^J^^ ^n the 
bill he will not receive his dTning hai tZlf i ''"'' "^^^^^ ^^ P^^« ^- 
stamped that his ration books hfve been L^ ''^TT'' ""'"^^ the bill is 
sentative. If any stamp in the blok T, / T^ *^^ '^'"'"^ h«" repre- 
than food the book wilf be returned to tT^.'^^'"' ^°"« ^^icle other 
may need it. returned to the student for such time as he 

tStudents in the CoIIeee Park r„ii 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Fees for Undergraduate Students 

Summer 

Maryland Residents Quarter 

Fixed Charges $48.50 

Athletic Fees 5.00 

Special Fees 5.00 

Student Activities Fees 5.00 

Infirmary Fees 2.00 

Post Office Fees 1.00 

Advisory and Testing Fee .50 



29 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Quarter 


Quarter 


Quarter 


$48.50 


$48.50 


$48.50 


15.00 






10.00 






10.00 






2.00 


2.00 


2.00 


1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


.50 


.50 


.50 



Total for Maryland Residents.. $67.00 $87.00 *$52.00 t$52.00 



District of Columbia Residents 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from District of Columbia in 
addition to fees shown above. 



17.00 



17.00 



17.00 



17.00 



Total for District of Columbia 

Students $84.00 



$104.00 *$69.00 t$69.00 



Residents of Other States and 

Countries 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from other states and coun- 
tries in addition to fees shown 
above 



$42.00 $42.00 $42.00 $42.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $109.00 $129.00 *$94.00 t$94.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $110 $110 $110 $110 

Dormitory Room $28— $45 $28 — $45 $28 — $45 $28 — $45 



Total for Board and Room $138— 155 $138— 155 $138— 155 $138— 155 



The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other University 
projects that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics and recreation. 
This fee now is devoted to a fund for construction of a stadium, an addition to the coliseum, 
and a swimming pool, as soon as the fund is sufficient and materials are available. 

The Students Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, 
since, in normal times, it covers subscription to the student newspaper, the magazine and 
the yearbook; class dues, including admission to class dances and to the performances of 
the musical and dramatic clubs. There will be some curtailment of this program until after 
the war. 

*Students entering the University for the w^inter quarter will pay the following addi- 
tional fees; Athletic, $10.00; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $7.50. 

tStudents entering the University for the Spring quarter will pay the following addi- 
tional fees: Athletic, $5.00; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $5.00. 



30 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 



s 



other Fees and Charges 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at time of first 
registration in the University $5.00 

Engineering College Fee 2.00 

Home Economics College Fee 6.00 

Special Fee for students enrolled in Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental 
course : 

For Residents of Maryland 17.00 

For Residents of the District of Columbia 17.00 

For Residents of other states or countries 42.00 

Fee for part-time students per credit hour 4.00 

(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to mean under- 
graduate students taking 6 quarter credit hours or less. 
Students carrying more than 6 quarter hours pay the regular 
fees.) 

Laboratory Fees — Fees are charged in Chemistry, Bacteriology, 
Botany, Physics, Home Economics and other Science subjects, 
per course 1.00 to 8.00 

Late Registration Fee 3.00 to 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, includ- 
ing the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular 
registration days. Those who complete their registration one 
day late will be charged a fee of $3.00, and those who are more 
than one day late will be charged $5.00.) 

Fee for change in registration after first week of instruction 1.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment. . . . 2.00 

Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per quarter 
hour 3.50 

Makeup Examination Fee — (for students who are absent during 
any class period when tests or examinations are given) 1.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to graduation 10.00 

Property Damage Charge — Students will be charged for damage to 
property or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can 
be fixed, the individual student will be billed for it; where respon- 
sibility can not be fixed, the cost of repairing the damage or re- 
placing equipment will be pro-rated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from general library before ex- 
piration of loan period 05 per day 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before ex- 
piration of loan period — 



GENERAL INFORMATION ^^ 

25 

First hour overdue q^ 

Each additional hour overdue * * * ' ' ' ' 

I„ ease of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution 
must be made. j^ ^^^ 
Text books and classroom supphes-These costs vary 
course pursued, but will average per quarter 

Fees for Graduate Students 
Tuition charge for students carrying more tban 8 quarter cred.t ^^^^ 

Xn cha;ge'fo; ■s;ud;n;s "carVying s'quaHer credit hours or less 4.00 

Post Office Fee, payable by ^V*"*^""*' V;," I "oVfl^st registration. . 10.00 
Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of first legist ^^^^ 

Diploma Fee (For Master's Degree) ^^^^ 

Graduation Fee (For Doctor's Degree) ; 

vr ..«• Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students. 

'"''" whether residents of the State of Maryland or not 

All fees except Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee. are 
^ payaW; at the time of registration for each quarter. 
Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee must be paid pnor to 
graduation. 

non-candidates) . ^ qq 

For Undergraduates ^^^^ 

For Graduates * * 

Tuition Charge (same for all students)-Limit six hours, per ^^^ 

credit hour j. ^^ tv,q 

Laboratory Fees-A small ^f -ato^j/^^.^es." Thes^tet v^y 
terials used, is charged in l**'«'^f ""^^ ,7"'''!- J^^ ^y inquiry of 
with the course and can be — ^-^^J/^XXTn chargi of 
the Director of Evening Courses, or the instructor in en g 

the course. 

wiTHFiRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Tas^nt desires or is compelled ^^;-;^ ^^^^^^^ 

any time dunng the -f-J^f JS^tts iJaJeHn th'e^orm, with 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signa application form may 

is registered, or from the Registrar. 



32 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



33 



1 



In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be en- 
titled to an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund 
to which he might otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the University within five days after the 
beginning of instruction for the quarter are granted a full refund of all 
charges except board and lodging, with a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost 
of registration. Board and lodging are refunded on a pro-rata basis. 

Students withdrawing from the University after five days and before 
the end of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any quarter 
will receive a pro-rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $5.00 to 
cover cost of registration. After the expiration of the three-week period 
referred to, refunds will be made onfy'for board. The refund for this 
item will be on a pro-rata basis. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic record 
from the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so furnished, 
but for each additional copy, there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcripts of records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or 

alumnus for such personal use as he may wish; and 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal which are for- 

warded, on request, to educational institutions, Government 

agencies, etc., as attested evidence of the student's record at 

the University mnd his honorable dismissal therefrom. 

Persons desiring transCifipts of records should, if possible, make request 

of the Registrar for same at least one week in advance of the date when 

the records are actually needed. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have 
not been satisfied. 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students classified academically as freshmen or sophomores, 
who are citizens of the United States, and physically fit to perform military 
duty and not less than 14 or more than 26 years of age, are required to 
take basic military training for a period of two years as a prerequisite to 
graduation. Any student excused from taking basic military instruction 
because of a physical disability must take physical education. Physical 
disabilities must be substantiated by examination at the University Health 
Center. 

Transfer students who do not have the required two years of military 
training will be required to take military until the completion of the re- 
quired two years or until graduation. 



STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE ^^,^^,,,,„, ,he health 

The University recognizes its responsibihty ^"^^^^^^^^^ this end. 

„f its student body and takes every l^^fl^^^^^^ from his family 
Each student should present ^J^/^^^f ^f Jf^^i^ersity. In exceptional 
physician at the time of »"^^^\"*[^*J",/^^„ation. it will be given by the 
,,,es. if it i^ -P«-^;:J; t addiSn to health instruction which is 
University Health Service, in -^ ^.„A^^ts a modern, well equipped 
,i.e„ to all f-f -- ;;f j:2n^ students. A small fee 

with him his r-f'^-'^^-^'^^''Z^^::£^lL.\n case it is impossible 
furnishes a "-* »T„ J^f to^e S a physical before entrance, a physical 
S— ofS r^en "atT UnivLW Health Service. 

Infirmary Service and Regulations ..„,„,„„ service and med- 

physician in charge. m -1 to 2 P. M.-4 to 5 P. M. In the 

Nurses' office hours, 8 to 10 A. m- 

evening for emergency only. p ji ^aily except Sunday. Other 

Doctor's office hours, 11 A. M. to 1 r. m. a-x y 
times by appointment only ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ g^^^^^,^ 

J-4uSrrreTor?re:rdu"4 office aours unless the case is an 

TTt^ients not living -^^^^^/^^rL^:^^.^^ 
and who are unable l^rjort to th^I^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^, .„ ..^es 

versity physicians. »"<* /i^«^ J^^ p^^ such additional visits as may 
where addition ^ v- « a -^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^.^ ^^^, ^j, .^ual charge. 
be necessary, the University p y ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^. 

4. Students not '^^^^ing in their o ^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

the University P^^^;"*"' ^y^'Ttho live off the campus will be charged 

the facilities available. Students wno 

a fee of one dollar and a quarter a day. ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^^^ 

5. The visiting hours are 10 ^ U A^M ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 
Each patient is allowed only three visu .^ ^^^^^^ 

versity activities. 



11 

'ii 



34 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



85 



7. Students living in the dormitories, who are ill and unable to attend 
classes, must report to the Infirmary, between 8:00 and 9:00 A. M. If they 
are too ill to go to the Infirmary, they must notify the house mother so 
that the physician can be called to the dormitory. When possible this 
should be done before 8:30 A. M. If a student is taken sick at any other 
time he must report to the Infirmary, before going to his room. 

8. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examina- 
tions, and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion 
of the University physician, may be desirable. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories 

Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormitories 
should request room application cards, being careful to check the admis- 
sions blank properly if housing accommodations are needed. The Director 
of Admissions will refer these to the offices of the Dean of Men and Dean 
of Women respectively. Application cards or blanks will be sent to appli- 
cants and should be returned promptly. A fee of $15.00 will be requested 
which will be deducted from the first quarter charges when the student 
registers. Room reservations not claimed by freshmen or upper-classmen 
on their respective registration days will be cancelled. A room will be held 
by special request until after classes begin providing the dormitory office 
is notified by the first day of registration. Room reservation fees will not 
be refunded if the request is received later than one month before the first 
day of registration for the quarter for which arrangements were made. 

Reservations by students in attendance at the University should be made 
at least two weeks before the close of the preceding quarter. New students 
are urged to attend to their housing arrangements about three months in 
advance of registration. 

All freshmen men except those who live at home, are required to room 
in the dormitories. 

There are two dormitories on the campus for women, each under the 
supervision of a Director of Residence and the Office of Dean of Women. 

Annexes 

There are four dormitory annexes, formerly fraternity houses now op- 
erated as dormitory residences. Annex A was formerly Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity house; Annex B was formerly Kappa Alpha fraternity house; 
Annex C was formerly Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity house; and Annex D 
was formerly Sigma Chi fraternity house. 

All housing arrangements for women students must be approved by 
the Office of the Dean of Women. 



dormitory to which he or she has been assigned. 

Equipment ^„^™itories should provide themselves with sufficient 

J::^^!::^:^^^:^^ S s^J., . Piuow. piUow case, towels. 

a laundry bag and a waste paper basket^ ^^ ibility for all dormitory 

The individual student m^st assume r P ^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

iTZrSl llJlnirotZtU wear and tear will be charged to 

the student con<=e^«^- .„ arrangements which are made for the 

/^to^Sbem^ade" S^ S " iut Uned in exchange for the 
key at the end of the yean ^^^^^^^ ^^^.^^ ^^^ 

Laundry. The University ao ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^i 

student is responsible for 1»^ or her o ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

reliable laundry concerns in College Park or u ^^^.^ ^^.^ 

-"V^^ ?ThriauX ImTn tcttrS;! not'including bed linen, 
laundry m the laundry room i ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^ 

.ro:^SrwrbeTi;ter:hen the ^student concerned notices 
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSES ^^^ ^^^„ ,^, 

graduate Women The householders ^^^ i,^g;„ess arrange- 

the same -^'-l-:^^;X:^Jl^:Ze:t and the householder. Students 
ments are made entirely between accommodations personally and 

and their parents should plan to see these a ^ ^o woman 

talk with the householder before '"^^;"f ^^"J^^'^'.^^^^lolder without first 

student ^^o'^l Vr oit oTthTSrof WomJn^^^^^^^^ house is on the 
ascertaining at the Office of the uean ux 

approved list. 

"^ AU students who live in University dormitories must board at the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall. 



-Ji 



36 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



37 



Students not living in the dormitories may make arrangements to board 
by the quarter at the Dining Hall, get their meals in the University Cafe- 
teria or at eating establishments in College Park. A few "off-campus" 
houses provide board as well as room. 

Estimated Expenses of "Off-Campus** Residence 

Most of these houses have only double rooms with twin beds. The stu- 
dent provides her own linens as in the dormitory. Price per person for 
room is about $15.00 a month, all rooms being registered with the rent 
control board. 

No rebate is made for meals not eaten at the University Dining Hall 
or in other places where board is paid in advance. Therefore, with care, 
students may save enough money on their meals to make up for the differ- 
ence in rent between the off -campus houses and the dormitory. Some even 
find this less expensive. 

Girls may find desirable rooms in good homes where they can earn their 
room and board by applying to the Office of the Dean of Women. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 

The Office of the Dean of Women exists for the purpose of furnishing 
friendly counsel and helpful guidance to women students in connection 
with any of their personal problems, especially those relating to financial 
need, employment, housing, etc. In addition, it coordinates the interests 
of women students, handles matters of chaperonage at social functions, 
regulation of sorority rushing in cooperation with Panhellenic Association, 
and so forth. It has supervision over all housing accommodations for 
women students, whether on or off campus. A personal interview with one 
of the Deans of Women is required of every woman student on entering 
and on leaving the University. Any woman student is invited to avail 
herself of all of the services of this department. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN 

The Office of the Dean of Men exists for the purpose of furnishing 
friendly counsel and helpful guidance to male students in connection with 
any of their personal problems, especially those relating to financial need, 
employment, housing, etc. This office also handles for male students mat- 
ters of discipline and infringement of University regulations. 

ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The above services are closely coordinated with the activities of the 
Psychological Testing Bureau which also provides academic and vocational 
counseling. Remedial work in reading and in speech are available through 
the College of Education and the Department of Speech respectively. All of 
the above services are available to the student without fee. 



STUDENT AID 

Legislative Scholarships ^^ ^^^ Legislature 

their respective districts. requested to contact either a 

districts. 

srr.;' ss.s,"ist rr« .^ .* ...o, p..c,pa... 

Roebuck Agricultural Foundation lor ^"""^Xs freshmen in the College 

farms in the State of Maryland and -"^« ^^ ^^^f ^ ™^ ,ear. 

of Agriculture. These Slants apply only m the freshm^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

Applications may be obtained from H. F. Cotterman, 
the College of Agriculture. 

Graduate Fellowships ^ ' , T.v„„w.hiD<; see Graduate School. 

For information concerning Graduate fellowships, 

^^rK^:ppr^prG::.a.^^^^^^^^^^ 

':S:^:rX1^^^^TS^ ApS^- sWd be made 
TITw ZrZ l^Pr ;t:irth:rerican Asso.. 

tiot- ot .^.^-rrwonit ItSains a -d -^^^^^^^ ^n iratte^t 

to women students "^u jr o^ -- ^^ ^^^,^,,,„„ 

ance at the University of Maijland loi a 

blanks may be obtained through ^^ ^^^ ^'J^; t^^"" i,5,„3 of the will 
Catherine Moore Brinkley Loan F«"^- ^^J^f ^*'^^„ rtlblished, available 
of Catherine Moore Brinkley a loan fund "^^^^^^ ^ „f Maryland, 

for worthy students who are natives -^/-^^^"^V^^^^^^^^^ of Mary- 

studying mechanical engineering or agricultu^^e^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ 

land. Details concerning loans and application lor 
to the Secretary of the Scholarship Committee. 



# 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



majonng in Home Economics. ^°"'*^' '^ «^«"«We for studentl 

From time to time othpr f a 
» WMons i„ ,h. S..1, Jut,'", ""'' "•"•Mo ky 'ariou. w„m„, 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of studpnt'. . 
ment while in attendance at the Univer',"t "™m """^^ *'^»-''"^h emplov- 
however, to earn enough to pay ali Tv ^^ ^° '^"'•^"t ^h«"ld expect 
but some earn from one-fourth to hree t T' T^' ^''^ «""^""t« varv' 
Generally the first year is the hard ",4^'':. '" *'^ ^^^""-^"^ ^""'l"' 
After one has demonstrated that he L ? .u "'^ ''"^'""^ employment 
less difficulty in finding work. ''^'^'''^^ ^"'^. '=«P«We, there is much 

It't:s!'tr4t ricr:v":y"er;^^^^^ -^r-*- -"»> employment 

towns and the University a^e canvassed l'"'t^'*"/^"*" '^''^ nearby 
t ""^^'f ^* t^'e disposal of students I'^Sf ''*. °^ ^^^"^'''e Positions 
be made to the Dean of Men. Applications for employment should 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors Final i, 
awarded to one-fifth of the gradual J/ '^'"""'^ '" scholarship are 
are awarded to the upper hatfof tw! ' ' '" '^'^ '^""ege. /.^«, ^onor' 
half. To be eligible for honor' ft t' f?"""' ''""^ ^"^'^ *» t^e lowe 
be completed. "°'^'' ^* '«««* two years of resident work mTsl 

The Goddard Medal Th t 
awarded annually to the residenfof J^^f^^^''"'^"''*' ^^"^<'"-' Medal is 
who makes the highest avera^in 1, f !.^'*"'^^" ^^^nty. born therein 
embodies the most -anl/IStes. ThTmel^ "'" ^* *^^ ^^ S 
Goddard James, of Washington DC '' ^^^" ''^ ^rs. Anne K 

during the first semester. ^ ^''^ highest scholastic average 

Alpha Zeta Medal The w 

awards annually a medal to r'a^ictS ""^^'^^"^^^ ^^ ^^P^a Zeta 

who attains the highest average rS^^^^^ 'Y'"^' ^" ^^^ ^^eshman class 
sentation of the medal does not Sthp ?r'' ^''^' ^^' «^^^e Pre- 
simply indicates recognition of ^h'igttchlt s^^^^^ '' ^^^ ^-temity/but 

l^inah Herman Memorial Medal Tf,. n- u ^i 
awarded annually to the sopWe wL h.T^l^."'"^^" ^^"^^^^^^ Medal is 
average of his class in the CoTege o^En^ ^''^^^'^ *^^ ^^^^^«^ scholastic 
Benjamin Berman. ^^ ''^ Engzneenng. The medal is given by 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Mortar Board Scholarship Cup. This is awarded to the senior girl who 
has been at the University for four years, and who has made the highest 
scholastic average for three and one-half years. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

Class of *26 Honor Key. The Class of 1926 of the School of Business 
Administration of the University of Maryland at Baltimore offers each 
year a gold key to the senior graduating from the College of Commerce 
with the highest average for the entire four year course taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
has attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the entire 
undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final semester. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl in the College of Home Economics who attains the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. , 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 

to the senior member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
for the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Engineers to the senior in the 
Department of Civil Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty of the 
Department, is the outstanding student in his class. 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi awards annually a certificate of merit to the initiate of the Chap- 
ter who, in the opinion of the members, has presented the best thesis during 
the year. 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The Footlight Club recognizes 
annually the man and woman members of the senior class who have done 
most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This is awarded to the senior student 
majoring in Bacteriology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

Hillegeist Memorial Award. This is offered annually by Mrs. W. M. 
Hillegeist in memory for her husband for excellence in English. 



40 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



V 



P 



CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Mon a 

H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the ciasrof 'l<^!rT'f """"«»>' '»' President 
class who, during his collegiate caZrhr' \ '^^ "^'"''^^ "^ the senfo 
cu:ze„ , has done mosf f^r tJe ^neralTd "'"^'^ ^^^'"^^ ^^^^ ">o7e 
of the University. ^ general advancement of the interests 

Albe'TwLd::^^^^^^^^ Prize is offered by Mrs 

to the woman member of the sSc2"L ]''• "^T^""^ "^ ^-^'an"' 
has most nearly typified the model cSj^' ^""v^ ^"•' *=°"«^'«t« «=«reer 
genera, advancement of the interest ofSrUnTvers'S. '"" """'' '"^ ^''^ 
MILITARY AWARDS 

Mahlon N. Haines '94 Troohv TJ„<= • a> 

ning battalion. '™'"'^- ^'''^ '« oiTered to the major of the win- 

Military Department Award rnW 

major of the winning battaHon.' '"'""** "eutenant's insignia to the 

The Governor's Cun Tii* • ^ 

Company Award. The Reservp Offi , * 
Chapter awards annually to thTc^ptroftrf?!^^ Montgomery County 
bmversity. gold second lieutenant^insi^'a ^"""'^ '^"'"P^"^ ^^ t^o 

The Alumni Cud Tli^a a i • 
officer of the best'driHed pllZn. '''''' '^^' ^^" ^ ^^ ^o the commanding 

Scabbard and Blade Cud ti,,-. 
winning platoon. "^' ^^'' ^"^ ^« ^^^red to the commander of the 

Class of '99 Gold Medal T>,^ i 

to the member of the ba^l^t^wLrpltf ^''^^ ^ '^^^ ^ ^^'^^ -''a, 

A Gold Medal is awarded to thT T *'' "''* '""^** ^°'<1-- 

Team who fired the uTt I "'^"'^rs of the varsity R. O T C Riflp 

™ tne high score of each season. ^ «■■ ^J. i. i^. Kifle 

A Gold Medal is awarded tn +i,„ ^ .^ 
fired the high score :f teh seLon' "'"^ ^' ^'^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ Team who 

to the student showing greatest irn^^""- ^ ^^'^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^ven 
petition. ^ ^'^"'^^' improvement during the year in thistm- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



41 



ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold Avatch is offered 
annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics." The 
watch is given in honor of a former President of the University, R. W. 

Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

Edward Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the class of 1913 to 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the outstanding 
senior baseball player. 

PIBLICATIONS AWARDS 

Medals are offered in Diamondbackf Terrapin and Old Line work, for 
the students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout 
the year. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the stu- 
dents, not solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities 
whose development along all lines, including the moral and religious, is in- 
cluded in the educational process. Pastors representing the major denomi- 
national bodies assume responsibility for work with the students of their 
respective faiths. Each of the Student Pastors also serves a local church 
of his denomination, which the students are urged to attend. 

Committee on Religious Affairs and Social Service. A faculty commit- 
tee on Religious Affairs and Social Service has as its principal function 
the stimulation of religious thought and activity on the campus. It brings 
noted speakers on religious subjects to the campus from time to time. 
The committee cooperates with the Student Religious Activities Council and 
the student pastors and assists the student denominational clubs in every 
way that it can. Opportunities are provided for students to consult with 
pastors representing the denominations of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religions is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs, each representing a de- 
nominational group, have been organized among the students for their 
mutual benefit and to undertake certain types of service. This year the 
list includes the Baptist Student Union, the Episcopal Club, the Lutheran 
Club, the Newman Club, the Hillel Foundation, the Methodist Club, and the 
Presbyterian Club. These clubs meet regularly for worship and discussion, 
and occasionally for social purposes. A pastor or a member of the faculty 
serves as adviser. A local Y. W. C. A. also provides a variety of activities 
and services on a non-denominational basis. 






42 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



^TW ^''^''^'^^^^ «™«^NT ACTIVITIES 

The following descrinHn>, ^^ ^ j ^^^nt.:^ 

graduate divisiL oTS^ey P^^ J^^^^^^^^ -ers those of the u„de. 
•nore divisions is included elsewhet descriptions of those in the Bat 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
Regulation of Student Activities Th« • • 

i^ed bodies for the purpose of car;vin^ r'^'f*'"" "^ '*"d^"t« '" organ 
orderly and productive ways is ?! ? ? ^"'""t^ry student activitief ?.' 
student activities are uZIV '^e*=°^'^ed and encouraged AH or^l 

tration Con^^itlL TubTcft ':h:Tp;;"? "J \'^ Studfnt'Lifl" anTj^^ 
'zations are formed only with thl ^^ ^^ °^ ^'^^ President. Such orSn 
tration Committee and thrlpprtaTorS f ^ ^*"*^«"* ^^^^e -^ R^ 
sent and approval no studentTr^ Lin th T^'^"*- '^'*°"* ^"<=h 'o" 
University before the nubl.V Z l-^"" ^hich m any way represent, T 

.anization or an orgL^t uSrs^"^std ^^ "^ ^^'^--"^ ' 
of the University in connection with its „*^ *''"*'' ""^^ "«« the name 
Its members as students. ' """^ "^'"e- <"• in connection with 

The Student Board Thp Qf ^ 
incident to managing student a^ffSs \"'^' ^^f ™^ the executive duties 
Student Life and Registration C«f. """t^' '" cooperation with th 
Chan-man, Woman Member at LargeTnd F-" /* ^T"''"*^ °^ ^^e Stud n 
Heads of major student organizatS s^te aTex"o«,'"'"'' ^'-Chairmen 

The Women's CommittP. i. ex-ofRcio members. 

Women handles ZTs'l^^^T: ^'"^ '""^ ^^'^ '>^ '^^ ^^.n of 
and enforcing social rules p[annTn<f ft T""^" students, such as making 
oth^er all-women's activities."^ "'"^ *"' ^"""^' M^" Day celebration ani 

M^^ -t^rreWlUT^lt" sSn^r ^^- - -^ -- Of 

ing vUsTam'St ':>it:Lrw;^*JLr ^"*/oard ^^^^ ^^' -<>-t- 
and salvage campaigns, blood donations »^/» f- *' ^""^ *^"^e«' scrap 
Paigns have been prosecuted very successfulfv H " l^- ^''"^*^ ^°^ «'><=h cam 
The Red Cross Unit is a suhH" ."?''''^""5^ ^y this group. 

stdf t ^" *'t ^'=*-«- o^he A~j;^*JV°^^ --ty chapter and 
students on this campus. ^'"erican Red Cross as they concern the 

point^d^S'lhe Pr^sid;n\\tSl'"c"os?Tot^ '"'="'*^ — 'ttee ap- 
ditions excepting classroom 14 that aff^? .T* ^" ^"^"^''ties and con- 

tnW4?srelttr^^ annually and dis- 

-ent matters as well a3 a stat^'^tTE Lt/^^^ ^.^.^r^ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



43 



Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. In 
addition, various student organizations have established certain other re- 
quirements. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass the 
required number of hours as determined by the Athletic Board. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and 
faculty rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The 
student who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives 
honorably and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the 
interest of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to main- 
tain these standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct 
supervision of the University only when on the campus, but they are respon- 
sible to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

General Statement 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and 
financial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon 
sound business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed, 
individual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and 
thereby become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules 
governing the different activities will be found in the list of Academic 
Regulations. 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national honorary fraternity open to 
honor students, both men and women, in all branches of learning; Sigma Xi, 
an honorary scientific fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa, men's national honor 
society, recognizing conspicuous attainment in non-curricular activities and 
general leadership; Mortar Board, the national senior honor society for 
women recognizing service, leadership and scholarship; Alpha Lambda 
Delta, a national freshmen women's scholastic society requiring a 3.5 aver- 
age; Phi Eta Sigma, national freshmen honor society for men. A group 
of honorary fraternities encourage development in specialized endeavor. 
These are Alpha Zeta, a national honorary agriculture fraternity recog- 
nizing scholarship and student leadership; Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary 
engineering fraternity; Alpha Chi Sigma, a national professional chemical 
fraternity; Phi Delta Kappa, a professional educational fraternity; Scab- 
bard and Blade, a national military society; Pershing Rifles, a national mili- 
tary society for basic course R.O.T.C. students; Pi Delta Epsilon, a national 
journalistic fraternity; Omicron Nu, a national home economics society; 
Alpha Psi Omega, a national dramatic society; Beta Alpha Psi, a national 
accounting honorary fraternity; Pi Sigma Alpha, an honorary political 



t 



44 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



science fraternity and Rofo n 

frate^ity. '' ^^^ «-.a Si,., a national honorary eo.n... 

Fraternities and Sororities Tt,»r. 
:,t^f »-«-aI sororities It' cSefe P^V'T"" ■ "^"^"^' ^-^-niti, 
establishment at the Universitv °" ir ^^^^« '" the order of ti, 

Kappa, Delta Sigma PM /i / ^^' ^^^^^ ^'Ph*. Sigma Nu PM « " 
fPs.lon Phi. Alph^Ta^ Wa Ph?Z' S«' ^heta ChrPh.A^pL ^^ 
Lambda Tau. Sigma Al.^! m.'^'** ^«*«' lambda Chi Aloh^ a, ." 
Sigma Chi «n/c- ^"* ^"' Alpha Epsilon Pi ^i.- L ^^' ^'P'^a 

Clubs and Societies. Manv rlnKc ^ ^^^' ^ ^^^^1 sororitv 

Athletic Association. Pootlirtl a2 B„.\ ^^ "''»'<' Cl»b. Wom,„' 

?^, 7^"t Grange, Farm Economics ri.XT' T « ^'"'''' Terrapin Trail Cluh 
Club, Colleeiato ri,„ u """""'cs Club, Future Farmers of a /'^^"^'ub, 
T « ' ""^ '^^'fte Chamber of Commerce n^r nl 4. T^ ^ America, Riding 
L^ Cercle Fran<>aic« n\. ■ .' ^^'^ Deutsche Verpin <:«- •.. ^, * 
Soript^ A .^"^^^'se. Chemical Engineerinor nu u ^^^^^' Spanish Cliib, 
society, American Chemical Societv Z,TT "''' freshmen Chemical 
chology Club. '"'"^*y' Daydodgers Club, Art Club and Psj . 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

'^^^^^^^:^:'^^::^ -^- ^^^ -Pe^vlsion Of the 

si fr r ^^^^"^-^ ': '^ -^-- -^- p-- 

^^ for the discussion of matLs r^nTetsT^thrsturtTanl tt 

a -«:c"L77;Sde;rar^ '^'^^^^^^ "^^ the Senior Class U i 

events of the college year * "' '"'""'^ ^" commemorate theTrinJpa; 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

pctcKages, and for inter-office 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



45 



communications. This office is located in the basement of the Administra- 
tion Building. It is not a part of the United States Postal System and no 
facilities are available for sending or receiving postal money orders. 
Postage stamps, however, may be purchased. United States mail is re- 
ceived and dispatched several times daily. 

Each student in the University is assigned a post office box at the time 
of registration, for which a small fee is charged. Also, boxes are provided 
for the various University offices. 

One of the major reasons for the operaiton of the Post Office is to 
provide a convenient method by which Deans, teachers and University 
officials may communicate with students, and students are expected to call 
for their mail daily, if possible, in order that such communications may 
come to their attention promptly. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' 
Supply Store, located in the basement of the Administration Building, 
where students may obtain at reasonable prices text books, stationery, class- 
room materials and equipment, confectionery, etc. 

This store is operated on a basis of furnishing students needed books 
and supplies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any, are turned 
into the general University treasury to be used for promoting general stu- 
dent welfare. 

Students are advised not to purchase any text books until they have been 
informed by their instructors of the exact texts to be used in the various 
courses, as texts vary from year to year. 

The bookstore is operated on a cash basis and credit is not extended to 
students. 

ALUMNI 

The Alumni Council, which is composed of representatives of each school 
and college in the University, coordinates all general Alumni interests, 
Alumni activities are further unified in two ways. There are organized 
alumni associations in the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, 
and Nursing located in Baltimore. The alumni of the Colleges of Agri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics, located at College Park, constitute a general association, each 
group having its own Board of Representatives. Each school and college 
Alumni organization exerts an active interest in the welfare of its respective 
graduates. 

An Alumni Office is maintained at College Park, in the Administration 
Building, to direct the work of the association and to form a point of con- 
tact between the University and its graduates. 



f 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



47 



SECTION II 
Resident Instruction-College Park 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Thomas B. Symons, Dean 
H. F. COTTERMAN, Assistant Dean 
^^ ^O'^'s A. Land, Secretary 

for stud'e^t'lht ^rrptp -«i specialized training 

of agricultural endeavor. SuZtZZ''''^^ '''"^ ^^ the broad field 
correlating technical work wztl X^^'"'- "' '"'"^'' '''''' " "'^^ 
Education in fundamentals rrceLs nl ,'"?""' ^"'^ <="lt"ral subjlcts 
men and women are given ah!! attention. Accordingly vou.l' 

Instructed in the variTuTbrlnl:: oTag^iLutr"'''? ^'"^ they t'e Sj 
this opportunity for thorough groundinf 1 ^" ^''^'«°n to offering 

social sciences, it is an objective of tv,lr . " '■''^*'^ ''^^''^ °«tural an5 

General 

The College provides curricula for th.. 
armi,^, live stock P-ductiordafrTin?" ^^^^^^^ '^ -^^^e in general 

table growing, floriculture or ornaS^^ husbandry, fruit or vege- 

tion, or in the highly specialized sden^^^^^^ horticulture, field crop produc- 
mdustnes It prepares men to serve as ft- "' '^"^^^^^^ ^''^ these 

commercial concerns related to agriculluTe f """^^^«' '^^ Positions with 
teachers in agricultural colleges and ,n H ^ . '^ responsible positions as 
ture in high schools or as invest g^rs in exT"'"^^ '' "^^^^^^^^^ -^-cul- 
work, for regulatory activities anH fl ^^P^^^n^ent stations, for extension 
ment of Agriculture. rcur'ricut T-"' ^" '^' ^^^^^^ States Depart 
Plant Physiology and pfant Pa £^^^^ Animal Science, Botany (LSS 
euiural Science, Poultry Science, fn^^ Entomology, HorS 

tunities to students with a scientific bent of L T J'P "^"^' ^^^^ oppor- 
many ramifications in teaching, research ^ 

Through research the frontiSsTt'S .'"''"''' ^"^ regulatory work 
the fundamental sciences undeH^^^^^^ '"'^''^^ '^ agriculture and 

solutions for important problems are beT T'T'^ '^^"^ '^''^^^d Td 
many fields are in progress, sldents takfn ''""'• ^^^^^^^^ Projects in 
nstructors who devote part time to J L^c^^^^ ''"'''? '^ agriculture from 
t, are kept in close touch with the atest t' ^"" '^"'"^^ associated with 
the investigations under way. The finlgHrr ''' ^^^^^^-nts in 

namgs of these research scientists 
46 



provide valuable information for use in classrooms, and make instruction 
virile and authentic. The results of the most recent scientific investigations 
are constantly before the student. 

Close contact of workers in the College with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State, through the county agents, 
home demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident 
instruction in the College of Agriculture. These contacts operate in two 
ways: problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of 
research workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are 
taken to farmers and their families in their home communities through 
practical demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State 
contribute to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College 
helps them in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. 

Through their regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are continually dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and analyzing and testing germination quality of seeds 
to insure better seeds for farm planting. 

These fields contribute largely to agricultural education, as standardiza- 
tion and education go hand in hand in the development of an industry. 
Direct contact on the part of professors in their respective departments 
with the problems and methods involved makes for effective instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland 
lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, and 
regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the several 
departments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the several 
departments are closely associated with the research, extension and regula- 
tory work being carried on in their respective fields, and, in many cases, 
devote a portion of their time to one or more of these types of activities. 
Close coordination of these four types of work enables the University to 
provide a stronger faculty in the College of Agriculture, and affords a 
higher degree of specialization than would otherwise be possible. It in- 
sures instructors an opportunity to keep informed on the latest results 
of research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends and problems 
which are revealed in extension and regulatory activities. Heads of de- 
partments hold staff conferences to this end, so that the student at all times 
is as close to the developments in the frontiers of the several fields of 
knowledge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

In order that the work of the College shall be responsive to agricultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several agricultural 






48 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



industries in the State and th=f *i, 
be made most helpful' til Z a f *'°"''^^' "^ instruction shall at «li f 
have been constituted n^Lmar T'' ^"^^"^ *'>^'»' ^dt^ory 0!?^ 
oils are composed of lead Js in X """''"'^ '' agriculture. Sse Sn^ 

and and the instructio^lfsUff ^hTcX" t^ ^' ^^^^^"'^^^ ^" ^ v".' 
Of their counsel and advice Rv f J ^^^^^ge of Agriculture has the h^t I 

".. *a,* .„ kep. .Est!? r.,;r„,r "•""-■ "•" ^---"h".': 

Facilities and Equipment 

the University of Maryland is prov ded 'i.T ^"f. '" '^^ «"'t"ral subjecS 
and instruction in agrioulture."^ U^tsUv^r ?* '""^"'"^^ ^"^ ^es a ' 
acres, are operated for instructions !^?^ ^'■'"^' *°*^"nff more than 12nn 
the most complete and moS pSs for ^l" ''"^""°"^' P"^P°^'«- One 
m the country, together witE herds of .?'"'' -^"^ ^"''"^' husbandry work 
beef cattle, and other livestock, prov des faHlf'""''^' '''''''' "^ <^airy and 
t on and research in these industries /'*'"' ^"'^ materials for instru" 
t.es are available in the AgronomrDeStme'nl TT'^'' ^"^ ^^^^^ ^ ' ■ 
m farm crops, and for soils research The Poul/v'n''"''''"^ """^ «^l-<^tion 
'ng for laboratories and classronmc , ^"""^^^ Department has a builH 

and flocks of all the important brS of fT. •=°'»P"si„g thirty-four ac t 
ment i3 housed in a separate buSng and'ha?' ''^ H-«<="'ture Depa^ 
for Its various lines of work. ^*' *"P'^ orchards and gardens 

Departments 

tuJafctX^ISlirrr^^^^^^^^^^^^ Agricu, 

BoTanTr"^; ^•^^""°'»^ ('-Tudifg'^cCTa^j'son^r'.'^''^'- ^^"-'"-' 
Botany (including Morphology, plant Ph- , ^^ ' ^"''"^' Husbandry; 

Dairy Husbandry (including^kiry Ma.^/ . ?^ ^"'^ ^'^"^ Pathology?- 
«ng Bee Culture) ; Farm Managem.Jf / f *"""^^ ' Entomology (irSi 
culture (including Pomoirgy^XS^t ""l^'^r^' Economics/ Hortt 
Horticulture) ,- Poultry Hu.fbld%T V^t^r^LrTSncT' ^"' °^"^'"-*^' 
Admission 

Junior Standing 

To attain junior standing in thp r.ii 

Requirements for Gradnatiop 

A minimum of 195 ouarfo^ u 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



49 



Farm and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and w^ho is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College. These organizations 
are as follows: Student Grange, Livestock Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Alpha Zeta, Agricultural Economics Club, and the Agricultural 
Student Council. 

Membership in these organizations is voluntary, and no college credits 
are given; yet much of the training obtained is fully as valuable as that 
acquired from regularly prescribed courses. 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers* fraternity 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges throughout 
the State. The Livestock Club conducts the Students* Fitting and Showing 
Contest held on the campus in the Spring. The Future Farmers of America 
foster interest in vocational education, and the Collegiate Chapter serves 
as host Chapter in connection with high school judging contests held at 
the University. The Agricultural Economics group conducts special studies 
in the field of Agricultural Economics. All these organizations have regular 
meetings, arrange special programs, and contribute to the extra-curricular 
life of students. 

Membership in Alpha Zeta, national agricultural honor fraternity, is 
chosen from students in the College of Agriculture who have displayed agri- 
cultural and executive ability. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from 
the various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its pur- 
pose is to coordinate activities of these students and to promote work which 
is beneficial to the College. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes: Technical, Scientific, and Special. 

(1) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools; as executives, 
salesmen, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricul- 
tural contact and point of view. 

(2) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 



50 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



51 



various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal 
State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment 
stations; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return to 
the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty 
adviser, either departmental or general. Departmental advisers consist of 
heads of departments or persons selected by them to advise students with 
curricula in their respective departments. General advisers are selected for 
Ftudents who have no definite choice of curriculum in mind, or who wish 
to pursue the general curriculum in agriculture. 

Cases of students with poor records are referred to the Admission, 
Guidance, and Adjustment Committee, for review and advice. 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow afford opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirement^ of his particular need. 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is the 
same for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student 
an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
and the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a student 
before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to another, 
or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in some other 
college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisers for counsel as to the wisest 
selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests 
and their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year 
with no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to general advisers, who 
assist with the choice of freshmah electives and during the course of the 
year acquaint the students with the opportunities in the upper curricula 
in the College of Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. 
If by the close of the freshman year a student makes no definite choice of 
a specialized curriculum, he continues under the guidance of his general 
adviser and at the beginning of the sophomore year enters Agriculture 
(General Curriculum). 



AGRICULTURE CURRICULUM , Quarter ^ 

freshman Year 3 3 3 

1 9 3— Survey and Composition ^ 

Eng. i» ^» ^ " •' 

*Bot. 1— General Botany 5 

2ooi 1— General Zoology " & 

Bact 1— General Bacteriology 2 2 

qneech 1, 2— Public Speaking.. • *; 3 S 3 

tM I 1. 2. 3-Basic R. O. T. C (men) :;;;;;;:::: 1 1 \ 

'physical Activities * • 

Freshman Lectures 

Elect one of the following : ^ , , 

Modern Language 3 » * 

*Math 10, 11. 12 ••,•;• 3 » 

Phys. 6. 7. 8-Introductory Physics 

Introductory Agriculture: s 

A B 2— Farm Organization 3 

a' E*. 1-Agr. Ind. and Resources ■".'/.'.'.'.'.'.*.'.'.*. •*•• ___! 

Agriculture Elective — ^^ 

Agriculture— General ^^^ ^^^^ 

::2LS\S.ie'™«a .. ..HcuUur. .nd for .h.^ P«P«™ «« 

be county agents, teachers, etc. curriculum, a student may 

By proper use of the f^^r:^,f:::^:^:^:\ZTL Ume time elect 
choose a field of concentration >" «g"™'" 
courses that contribute to liberal education. 



General Agriculture Curriculum , Quarter 

Sophomore Year 5 5 

Chem. 1. 3— General Chemistry ^ 

p H. 1— Poultry Production * * * * 6 

Agron. 1— Crop Production. ' * .... 

D H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying '.'.'.*.*.*..'. 

Soils 1— General Soils «'^lrn laniruage Sequence.... 3 .3 

Physical or Biological Science or Modern Languag ^ 3 

M. L 4, 5. 6-Basic R. o. T. c. ('"^'^^ ;;;;;;• z;; i l 1 1 

Physical Activities 

17 17 



/// 



4 

5 

3 

8 

1 

16 



- .y^ :^ Agricultural Chemistry and Agricultura 

♦Students who expect ^<> J^""!. ^Tt'chJr 1-2,^ chemistry, instead of general 

Engineering must be prepared t^ ^^^^/^^^^^^'J^ ^^^ instead of Math. 10. 11. and 12. 

botany and general zoology and Math. . . ^^^^^^ .^ ^^^.^^^ 

tWomen in the College of Agriculture will take 



52 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



! \ 



I Qwarter 

Junior Year I II 

Eicon. 37 — Fundamentals of £k:onomics ^ 5 .... 

Hort. 1, 2 — General Horticulture 8 3 

A. H. 2 — ^Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

A. H. 52 — Feeds and Feeding 4 

Engr. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Soils 2 — Principles of Soil Fertility 3 .... 

Electives 6 

1« 16 

Senior Year 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 4 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

R. Ed. 110 — Rural Life and Education 4 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems .... 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 12 4 



/// 



2 

1 

12 
15 



16 



16 



3 
3 
1 

8 

15 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 



This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the fundamentals of both 
the physical and biological sciences. It may be adjusted through the selection 
of electives to fit the student for work in agricultural experiment stations, 
soil bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer industries and 
those handling food products. 

The outline calls for five years of study. Completion of four years leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science, stressing chemistry particularly and 
related subjects as they apply to agriculture. By the proper use of electives 
in the fourth year, continuation of this course of study for the fifth year, 
and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, the student may qualify for 
the Master's degi^ee. 



Agricultural Chemistry Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 10, 11, 12 

Chem. 17 — Qualitative Analysis 

Chem. 21, 23 — Quantitative Analysis 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Geol. 1 — Geology 

M. I. 4, 5, 6 — Basic R. O. T. C. (Men). 
P. E. — Physical Activities 



'■■ — * 

/ 


II 


/// 


3 


s 


3 


3 


• • a • 


• • . > 


• • • • 


s 


5 


5 


.... 


• • • . 


• • • • 


• • • • 


5 


• • • • 


4 


• • • • 


3 


8 


3 


1 


1 


1 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ^8 

r Quarter ^ 

/ // /// 

Junior Year ^ ^ 

Chem 35, 37— Elementary Org. Chem. Lectures ^ 

Chlm. 36, 38-Elementery Org. Chem. Laboratory ^ ^ ^ 

Math. 20, 21. 22-Calculus ••••••; 3 S 8 

Modern Language (German or French) ^ , 

English 7. 8-Expo8itory Writing ^ .^ 

g^-lg 2— Principles of Soil Fertility ^ ^ ^ j 

p B.— Physical Activities 5 

Klectives in Biology or Chemistry * ^ _ ^ 

17 n 17 

Senior Year 3 8 3 

Modern Language (German or French) ^ ^ 5 

Physics 3, 4, 5— General Physics ^ j 3 

Econ. 31, 32. 33— Principles of Economics •••• ill 

p B.— Physical Activities 3 3 3 

Klettives in Chemifitry and Biology 

16 18 IS 

Pi.Ht Graduate 338 

Chem. 141. 143-Adv. Organic Chemistry Lecture ^ ^ ^ 

Chem. 142. 144-Adv. Organic Chemistry Lab ^ ^ 

Chem. 187, 189-Phy8cial Chemistry Lecture ^ ^ 

Chem. 188. 19(>-Phy8ical Chemistry Laboratory g 

Electives in 200 courses 'J_^ 

14 14 14 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE , , ,. c. 

The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare for teaching 
J^J^To^^tiorll agriculture, work as county agents and alhed hnes of 
he ruraTeducation services. Graduates from this curriculum are in deniand 
;;\raf btTnles, particularly of the -P^.^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 
entered the Federal service. Others are engaged ^".^^J^f /^^^^^^^^ 
agricultural colleges. Quite a few have returned to the farm as ownei 

managers. , ^^ . .^ . ^^ ,„ 

I„ addition to the -ula-t^: ^^^^^^^^^^ "^Z^'^ 

acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 
Students with high average may upon petition be '^^l^;/ "* . ^^J J^^J 
leouirements in this curriculum, when evidence is presented that either 
lequiremems m uu» ■.';„:„„ „ nrescribed course is non-essential, 

through experience or previous training a prescrioea cou s 

Or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 



IS 



i« 



17 



I i 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Agricultural Education Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

Hort. 1, 2— General Horticulture 

Econ. 37--Fundamentals of Economics. ". 

Agrron. 1— Crop Production 

Soils 1— General Soils 

D. H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying 

A. H. 2^Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

M. I. 4. 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

^- E.— Physical Activities ... 



Junior Year 

SoUs 2— Principles of Soil Fertility 

A. E. 100— Farm Economics 

Afirr. Ensrr. 54— Farm Mechanics 
D. H. 101— Dairy Production 
Ind. Ed. 85, 105— General Shop 



Senior Year 

R. Ed 107-Observation and Analysis of Teaching for 
Agricultural Students 

K ^ 9r:p^*'':!''"^S^°"'^«'^' Vocational Apiculture; 
It. J!,<i. 90 — Practice Teaching 

Psycif* 8(ii";J'"t"^ P-rt-time' and 'Adult' Classes.:::: 
I'sych. 80— Educational Psychology 

R. Ed. 110— Rural Life and Education 

R. Ed^ 112, 113-Departmentel Management 

Agron T;i_!^'~^" ^T""^' '^^^^^^ -^ AutomobUes 
Agron. 151— Cropping Systems 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 

R. Ed. 114— Organization and Manage 
in Secondary Schools 

P. E.— -Physical Activities 

Electives .... 



rement of Farm Mechanics 



— Quarter 
I II 

6 5 

3 S 

6 

S 



3 
1 

17 



3 
3 
2 

4 



Speech 5, 6— Advanced Public Speaking ^ 

Agr. Engr. 101-Farm Machinery : ^ 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding 

Hort. 3— General Horticulture ...::::::: 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

*P. H. 2— Poultry Management 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology .::::: 

R. Ed. 51— Departmental Organization: 
P- E.— Physical Activities ... 



16 



3 
4 
6 
2 



16 



3 
1 



17 



1 
2 
4 
4 



n 



6 

4 

1 



1 

4 

15 



/// 



5 
4 
4 
3 
1 

17 



5 
4 
4 



3 



17 



1 

4 
3 
S 

2 
1 



14 



e.:f ^h" Tpour/c^tir *"" ^^"^ ^ --"-■^^ "-'-"«- "• ^-^ -w, .„. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



55 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department offers to students of agriculture training in those agri- 
cultural subjects which are based upon engineering principles. These sub- 
jects may be grouped under three heads : farm machinery and farm power, 
farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

Five- Year Program in Agriculture — Engineering 

For those students who wish to specialize in the application of engineering 
principles to the physical and biological problems of agriculture there is 
offered a combined program, extending over a five-year period, arranged 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineering, and 
leading to a degree from each of these colleges. 

This program prepares graduates to enter state, federal or commercial 
fields of activity in such work as soil and water conservation, rural electri- 
fication, design and sale of farm machinery and structures, and in the 
development of new uses for farm products and the profitable utilization 
of farm wastes and by-products. 

To be properly trained in these fields a student needs a broader knowledge 
of basic and applied engineering principles than could be provided in a 
four-year course in agriculture. He also needs a broader training in the 
fundamentals of agriculture than a standard four-year course in engineer- 
ing could furnish. 

Upon completion of the normal four year course of study the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture is granted. For the fifth year the student 
registers in the College of Engineering, and at the end of that year, upon 
satisfactory completion of the required course of study, receives a degree 
in civil, electrical, mechanical or chemical engineering. 



Curriculum in Agriculture- Engineering q . 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 S 

Speech 1 — Public Speaking . 

Math. 15 — College Algebra 5 .... 

Math. 16 — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry S 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry .... 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 5 6 

Dr. 1, 2 — Engineering Drawing 2 2 

Dr. 3 — Descriptive Geometry — . 

Shop 1 — Forge Practice .... 

Engr. 1 — Introduction to Engineering .... 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 

Freshman Lectures (Agriculture) 



/// 

3 
2 



3 
1 
1 
3 
1 




19 



19 



19 



56 






THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

Math. 2a-Difrerential Calculus 

Math. 21--Integral Calculus 

Math. 22— Applied Calculus ....." 

Phys. 3. 4, 5— General Physics.. 

Dr. 4-Advaneed Engineering Drawing 

Mech. 1-Statics and Dynamics 

Surv. 2— Plane Surveying 

Econ. 37-FundamentaIs of Economi 



Quarter 

I II 



lies. 



M. I. 4. 5, 6-Basic R. O. T. c7"(Men) 



^ E.— Physical Activities 



Junior Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

Speech 5— Oral Technical English 

Geol. 2— Engineering Geology 

Mech. 50, 51-Strength of Materials.*.' 

C. E. 5a— Hydraulics 

Mech. 53-Materials of Engineering 

C F 't"!,"'^"^^"^ °^ Electrical Engineering.;.' 

^. i!i. 52— Curves and Earthwork. 

Bot. 1— General Botany . . 

Agr. Engr. 107-Farm Drainage.. 

Agr. Engr. 102— Gas Ensrine*? T,.o«*^«^ o '. 

A^r. E„«r. 64-Fa™ Mee^kils " *""* ^"*<"»'"'"- 

^- E.— Physical Activities 

Electives in Agriculture . . 



Fourth Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

C. E. 100— Theory of Structures 

Surv. 100— Advanced Surveying 

M. E. 50-Principles of Mechanical Engineering' 
Agr. Engr. 101-Farm Machinery 
Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings 

Zool. 1— General Zoology ... 

Soils 1— General Soils 

A. E. 108— Farm Management...... 

P. E.— Physical Activities 

Approved Electives . 



5 
3 



3 
1 

20 



5 
5 
3 

2 
1 



20 



1 
9 



6 

• • 

6 



2 
5 

3 
1 



21 



4 
6 



1 
7 

20 



A 
A 
3 
5 



/// 



5 
5 

5 
2 

3 
1 

21 



3 
4 



1 
4 

19 



5 
8 
1 
4 



Fifth Year (Civil Engineering Option) '' '' 

The curriculum for the fifth vear i^ fi,^ . • 
engineering, .vithout change L shown uL rV^^' curriculum in civil 

ange, as shown under College of Engineering. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



57 



AGRONOMY 

The curricula in this department are separated into two major divisions; 
namely Crops and Soils. The Crops division includes Crop Production and 
Crop Breeding. The Crop Production curriculum is designed to prepare 
students for general farming, specilized crop farming, the production of 
improved seeds, employment with commercial firms, state and federal 
experiment stations, or county agent work. The curriculum for Plant 
Breeding is designed to prepare students to work with commercial seed 
companies or federal and state experiment stations. The curriculum in Soils 
is designed both to equip future farmers with adequate knowledge of soils 
and to prepare students for teaching, research, and special soils work. 
Although the Soils curriculum is placed in the Department of Agronomy, 
its courses are designed for all students who have soil interests regardless 
of the line of their major specialization. 



Agronomy Curriculum — Sophomore Year 

Sophomore Year 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 

Soils 1 — General Soils 

M. I. 4, 5, 6-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) *^ 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Selected Electives 



— Quarter 
I II 



5 
2 

3 
1 
5 



6 
5 
2 

3 
1 



16 



16 



Crop Production Curriculum — Junior and Senior Years 
Junior Year 

Agron. 51 — Technology of Crop Quality 

Agron. 54 — Selected Crop Studies 2-4 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 

PI. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology 5 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 

Selected Electives 4-2 



2 

2-4 

3 

1 



1 

4-2 



16 



16 



/// 



6 
3 
1 
7 



16 



2-4 



5 
1 

8-6 

16 



58 



. ''^^ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Senior Year • 

Agrron. 103--Crop Breeding ^ 

Afirron. 161-Cropping Systems 3 

A. E. 100-Farm Economics 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 3 

Asrr. Enar. 101-Farm Machinery 

Airr En^. 107-Farm Drainaire .' ••. 

Ion ?;;; '^''"^^^^'^^"^-^"ity.: 3 

Soils 103-Soils Geography .. 3 

P. E.— Physical Activities 

Selected Electives 1 

3 

Crop Breeding Curriculum t„«: ^ « 16 

s curriculum— Junior and Senior Years 
Junior Year 

Agron. 51-Technolofiry of Crop Quality 

Agron. 64-Selected Crop Studies 

Chem. 31, 33-Element8 of Organic rh '• : 2-4 

Chem. 32, 34-Elements of Organi Lahf^ « 

PI- Phys. 101-P,a„t PhysioC '''" 1 

Zool. 104— Genetics 5 

Econ. 37-Fundamentals of Economics :: ' ' 

^- *-.— Physical Activities 

Selected Electives 1 

^ 

4-2 

Senior Year 16 

Agron. 103— Crop Breeding 

Agron. 151-Cropping Systems 3 

Stet. 112-Biological Statistics 

SUL 150-Elements of Statistics 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 4 

Agr. Eng. 101-Farm Machinery 

Agr. Eng. 107-Farm Drainage...; •••• 

Soils 2-Principles of Soil Fertility 3 

Soils 103-Soils Geography 3 

^- E-— Physical Activities -^ 

Selected Electives "' 1 

2 

Soils Curriculum i6 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 1, 3-General Chemistry 

Chem. 7-<Juantitative Analysis 5 

Eng. 7. ^-Expository Writing 

Agron. 1— Crop Production 2 

Soils 1— General Soils ; .... 

M. I. 4, 6, 6— Basic R. o. T C rM^^^ * 

P V r»u • 1 . '-'• A- ^. (Men) 

^. iJ..— Physical Activities .. 3 

Selected Electives 1 

6 



Quarter 
II . 



11 



16 



2 

2-4 

3 

1 



1 

4-2 

16 



1 

7 

16 



/// 



2 
5 

3 
1 



3 
3 



4 
1 

5 

16 



2-^ 



6 

1 

8-6 

16 



4 
1 
5 



If 



16 



16 



6 

Z 
1 

2 

16 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

t Quarter 

junior Year I II 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chembtry 3 3 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 . . 1 

Soils 2 — Principles of Soil Fertility 8 .... 

Soils 51 — Laboratory Problems in Soils 3 

Soils 103 — Soils Geography 

Geol. 1 — Geology 4 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics — . 

Agr. Eng. 107 — Farm Drainage 3 

p. E. — Physical Activities .* . . . 1 1 

Selected Electives 1 8 

c ' ^ 16 16 

Senior Year 

Soils 102 — Soils Management 3 

Soils 112 — Soils Conservation 3 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

PI. Phys. 101 — Plant Physiology 6 

Agronomy 161 — Cropping Systems 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 

Selected Electives 7 12 



59 



/// 



4 

• • 

ft 
1 



16 



S 
1 

f 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY ^* ^^ ^* 

The curriculum in Animal Husbandry is organized for the purpose of 
preparing students for various phases of work in the field of animal 
industry as: operators and managers of livestock farms, as investigators 
and research workers in federal, state, and private institutions, and as 
workers in specialized fields where a knowledge of the livestock industry 
is necessary. 

By proper use of electives, the student may equip himself to become a 
county agricultural agent; to meet the requirements of positions with 
certain types of private and cooperative business concerns; or, with more 
technical and specialized training, to become qualified for instructional work 
in colleges, for investigational work in state and federal experiment stations 
or in commercial research laboratories. Students who desire to enter the 
field of teaching or highly specialized research should elect the more 
scientific courses offered by this and by other departments. 

Animal Husbandry Curriculum q . 

Sophomore Year I II III 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 6 5 

Eng. 7, 8— Expository Writing 2 1 

A. H. 2 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 .... 

D. H. 1 — ^Fundamentals of Dairying .... 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 5 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 5 .... .... 

Soils 1— General Soils fi 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 1 

M. I, 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 S 



18 



16 



16 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



i Quarter 

Junior Year I II 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 8 3 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

A. H, 62 — Feeds and Feeding 4 

A. H. 53 — Principles of Breeding 

A. H. 55 — Livestock Management 2 .... 

A. H. 31 — Livestock Judging .... 

•A. H. 64— Sheep Production 8 

♦A. H. 67— Pork Production 8 

♦A. H. 69 — Draft Horse Production 

^lOOl* X U4 ' ' '^jiCuc vies •••••••••••••«•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• O •••• 

Soils 2— Principles of Soil Fertility 3 

P. E. — ^Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 2 .... 

15 15 

Senior Year 

A. H. 112 — Livestock Markets and Marketing 8 .... 

♦A. H. 60— Beef Production 3 

A. H. 114 — Animal Nutrition 4 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production S 

V. S. 101 — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology S 

V. S. 102— Animal Hygiene 6 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 4 2 



/// 



4 

2 



1 

7 



17 



1 

11 



16 



17 



15 



BOTANY 



The department offers three major fields of work: general botany and 
morphology; plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology. The 
required courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same for all 
students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botanical courses 
to suit his particular interests in botanical science. Both the junior and 
senior years also allow considerable freedom in the election of non- 
botanical courses, in order to provide a fairly broad cultural education. 
Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish to 
meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates may 
elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined lays a good foundation for students who wish 
to pursue graduate work in botanical science in preparation for college 
teaching and for research in state experiment stations, in the United States 
Department of Agriculture, and in private research institutions and 
laboratories. 



COLLEGB OF AGB/CULTt/RE " 

. , , Quarter 

Botany Curriculum ^ ^j ^ 

Sophomore Year 5 

Bet. 20— Diseases of Plants 6 .-^ 

Bot 2— General Botany 

Pot 60— Plant Taxonomy 6 6 

Chem- 1. 3-General Chemistry ' • 8 - • « 

^^:!^C:Lentaisc.sp^^ ;;;;:::;:: -s ^. 3 

M I 4. 5, 6-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) • , i 1 

p E.— Physical Activities '•• 

El«^^^^ "^ "^ 16 

Junior Year 5 

PI Phys. 101— Plant Physiology . . 3 •■- 

g^t 51— Plant Microtechnique . . .... * 

PI Path. 108— Mycology 5 5 - 

Phys. 1, 2-General Physics ■■- 1 1 1 

P. E.— Physical Activities 5 "» ^J^ 

Electives " "I t£ 

16 16 *• 

Senior Year s 

Bot. 101— Plant Anatomy .... » • • - 

Zool. 104-Genetics ..•.• ■■- 

PI. Phys. 102— Plant Ecology l 1 1 

Bot 52— Seminar '^ " * 1 '■ 

Bot. 106-History and Philosophy of Botany •■ ^ ^ 1 

P. E.-Physical Activities * ! 4 

Botany Electives 4 4 

Electives 

IS 16 16 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY ^^^ 

The department offers if -'^^"'J'Vh" curriS are designed to prepare 

public concerns. 



n-:-i-tt 



♦Only two production courses are required for graduation. The student may choose any 
two of these four courses to fulfill this requirement. 



# 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dairy Production Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

Chem. 5— General Chemistry ^ 

n 2* ^-Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry '.'. , 

IJ. H. 1— Fundamentals of Dairying "* 

Soils i—General Soils 

Agron. 1— Crop Production 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

M. I. 4, 5. 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ^ 

^- E.— Physical Activities ^ 

•^*^«'- •::"::::■.:::::::::::::::::::••• ...' 

Junior Year ^^ 

Chem. 31, 33-Elements of Organic Chemistry. . 

EnrV l!t~'^'''^'^*^ "' ^^''^^^^ Laboratory ! ! ! ! \ 

Eng. 7, 8— Expository Writing .... * 

Soils 2— Principles of Soil Fertility 

Zool. 104— Genetics 3 

A. H. 53— Principles of Breeding 

A. H. 62— Feeds and Feeding 

D. H. 50— Dairy Cattle Management 

D. H. 30— Dairy Cattle Judging 

V I' i'!,'"?""",™""^ '"""'""^ »"<' phy^'ioioey ;.■.■.■.':.•.■ 5 

V. t>. 102 — Animal Hygiene ° 

^' E.—Physical Activities ... 

1 

Senior Year ^* 

D. H. 101— Dairy Production 

D. H. 105— Dairy Breeds and Breeding '* 

D. H. 113— Market Milk 

A. E. 108— Farm Management ^ 

A. H. 114— Animal Nutrition 

D. H. 119. 120, 121-Dairy Literature . .' 

P- E.— Physical Activities . * 

*Electives 1 

4 



16 



Quarter 
II 



4 
1 
1 
< 

16 



/// 



• • • • 


4 


■ • • ■ 


5 


6 


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1 


2 


• • ■ • 


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18 


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5 


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• • ■ . 


1 


1 




. 


19 


15 



«> 
u 



1 
1 

10 



15 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Dairy Manufacturing Curriculum Quarter 

Sophomore Year I II 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 6 6 

J) H. 1 — Fundamentals of Dairying 4 .... 

Chem. 5 — General Chemistry .... 

Phys. 6, 7, 8 — Introductory Physics 3 3 

Bact. 5 — Bacteriological Technique 2 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 2 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

p, E. — Physical Activities 1 1 

♦Electives .... 

16 16 
Junior Year 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry .3 S 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Bact. 101 — Milk Bacteriology 5 .... 

Bact. 102 — Dairy Products Bacteriology 6 

D. H. 40 — Grading Dairy Products .... 

D. H. 64 — Dairy Mechanics .... 

D. H. 109— Cheese Making 4 

D. H. 110— Butter Making 2 

D. H. Ill — Concentrated Milk .... 

D. H. 112 — Ice Cream Making .... 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 

*E!ectives 2 4 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Analysis 5 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 6 

D. H. 113— Market Milk 5 

D. H. 114 — Analysis of Dairy Products 6 

D. H. 68 — Dairy Accounting 1 .... 

D. H. 70 — Dairy Plant Management 1 

D. H. 72 — Dairy Plant Experience .... 

D. H. 119, 120, 121— Dairy Literature 1 1 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 

*Electives 3 S 



63 



/// 



6 
Z 

2 

S 
1 

2 



16 



2 
3 



Z 
4 
1 

S 



16 



2 

1 

1 

12 



16 16 IC 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This curriculum trains students for work in state and federal entomo- 
logical bureaus, in preparation for commercial pest control operations and 
for actual insect control on their own farms. In addition, entomology is 
taught as a cultural subject because of its wide field of application, its 
varied subject matter, and the general interest of the public in the small 
creatures about it. 



JZt:::^ rLzJ::z. """"'""^*-'- --> Husb.„dr.. a.r„„„™, ,„, .,,,^„.„, 



*Elective8 from dairy production, chemistry and bacteriology are recommended. 



64 



( 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



This curriculum is based upon the ontinn r.t „i 
the freshman year, and the su'bstitut on' Ent 1 f^ bS T^'T''^' ^" 
quarter of the same year; Bact. 1 to be taken in thP.n '" ^^' '^'^^^ 

sophomore year. "^ *^^ ^P^'^^^ quarter of the 



Entomology Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' Quarter 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry I II 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology ^ « 

Ent. 2— Insect Morphology 

Ent. 3, 4— Insect Taxonomy ^ 

Modern Language 

Eng. 7, 8— Expository Writing .... ^ 

Eng. 9— Business English 2 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Afen) 

^- E.— Physical • Activities ... ' ^ 

1 

Junior Year ^^ 

Chem. 31. 33-Elements of Organic Chemistry 
^2.:\lt-^r^'' - organic ChemistrA^ahoratory::::::: \ 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants ^ 

Ent. 109— Insect Physiolog>- " • • • 

Ent. 101— Economic Entomology* ^ 

Ent. 105— Medical Entomology ' 

P. E.— Physical Activities ... 

Electives 1 

6 

Senior Year ^* 

Phys. 6. 7, 8— Introductory Physics 

Ent. 103, 104— Insect Pests ^ 

Ent. 110. Ill— Special Problems** 

Ent. 112— Seminar 

^- E.— Physical Activities ... ^ 

Electives 1 

11 



15 



o 

o 



4 
2 
1 
1 
5 



16 



16 



/// 



8 


3 


8 


3 


2 


• . 


.... 


2 


3 


.3 


1 


1 


17 


16 


8 


* • • • 


1 





8 


3 


. . . . 


5 


. . . 


• • • . 


3 


• . . . 


. . . 


3 


1 


1 


4 


4 



i<; 



3 
4 
2 
I 
1 



16 



iulf .rr ''"'' ""*• "' "- "' *'"'- '" the senio. .e„ a„<. Ent. 1,3. X04 in t.. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



65 



FARM MANAGEMENT* 

The curriculum in farm management is designed to prepare students for 
the following types of positions: on the farms as farm operators and farm 
managers; with farm organizations, such as the Farm Bureau and farmers' 
co-operatives; with private and corporate business concerns; and positions 
with state and federal agencies, such as college teachers, agricultural 
extension workers, and research with federal and state agencies. 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental train- 
ing in the basic economic principles underlying farming. Tlie curriculum 
includes courses in farm management, general agricultural economics, 
marketing, finance, prices, and land economics to give the student the 
foundation needed to meet the production and distribution problems con- 
fronting the individual farmer in a progressive rural community. 



Curriculum in Farm Management 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Math. 5, 6 — General Mathematics 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 5 

Soils 1 — General Soils 

A. H. 2 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C 3 

P. H. 2 — Poultry Management 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

Electives 









. Quarter - 

I II 


III 


\ 


6 S 
3 S 


• • • • 

• • • • 





1 

3 



Junior Year 

Soils 2 — Principles of Soil Fertility 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 

Eng. 9 — Business English 

Hort. 1 — General Horticulture 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 

A. H. 52 — Feeds and Feeding 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 

A. E. 101 — Marketing Farm Products 

A. E. 104 — Farm Finance 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems 

B. A. 130 — Statistics 

B. A. 131— Statistics 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



17 

3 
2 



15 



17 



5 

4 



4 
1 



4 

1 



3 

8 



1 

8 



16 



19 



IS 



•Students electing the Farm Management curriculum must present evidence of havinsr 
acquired at least one year of practical farm experience. 



66 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



67 



I 



I 



II 

ti 



Senior Year 

A. E. 90, 91— Seminar 

A- E. 103 — Cooperation in Agriculture . 
A. E. 106 — Prices of Farm Products . . 
A. E. 107 — Analysis of Farm Business . . 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

A. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 

R. Ed. 110 — Rural Life and Education 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 




1 
10 



8 

S 

4 
4 
1 



3 
S 

1 

17 



2 



2 
8 

1 
8 



/// 



1 
10 

15 16 14 

HORTICULTURE 

This department offers instruction in pomology (fruits), olericulture (vege- 
tables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening. These courses 
prepare students to enter commercial production and the horticultural indus- 
tries. Students are likewise prepared to enter the allied industries as horti- 
cultural workers with fertilizer companies, seed companies, equipment manu- 
facturers, and others. Students who wish to enter specialized fields of re- 
search and teaching may take advanced work in the department. 



Pomology and Olericulture Curriculum Quarter 

Sophomore Year I II 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 5 6 

Soils 1 — Soils and Fertilizers .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 8 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 5 .... 

Ent. 1 — Introduction to Entomolofiry . . • . 

Hort. 1, 2, 3 — General Horticulture 3 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

17 

Junior Year 

Pit Phys. 101— Plant Physiology 5 

Hort. 8 — Vegetable Production 

Hort. 5, 6 — Fruit Production 2 

Bot. 105 — Structure of Economic Plants 

Bot. 101 — Plant Anatomy 3 

Hort. 14— Small Fruits 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 2 

Pit. Path. 101 — Diseases of Special Crops 

Soils 2 — Principles of Soil Fertility 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

♦Supervised Electives 



4 
3 
3 
1 



16 



4 

3 



3-4 



16 



16 



1 

4-5 

16 



Senior Year ^ 

Zool. 104— Genetics ^ 

Hort. 118. 119— Seminar 

Hort. 103, 104— Technology of Vegetables • 

Hort. 101, 102— Technology of Fruits ^ 

p E.— Physical Activities ^ 

♦Supervised Electives 

16 

Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers 

g^^n 37_Fundamentals of Economics 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

Hort. 1, 2 — General Horticulture 

g„t l_Introduction to Entomology ^ 

^ \ 4^ 5^ 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) * 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 

17 

Junior Year 

Pit. Phys. 101— Plant Physiology ^ 

Eng. 7, 8, 9— Expository Writing and Business English ^ 

Hort. 22— Landscape Gardening ^ 

Soils 2— Principles of Soil Fertility 

Hort. 16— Garden Flowers ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities ^ 

♦Electives 

16 

♦Supervised Electives: 

Hort. 10, 11, 12— Greenhouse Management 

Hort 23, 24— Landscape Design ^ 

Surv. 2, 8, 4— Plane Surveying ^ 

Dr. 1, 2 — Engineering Drawing 

Pit. Path. 101— Diseases of Special Crops 

Bot. 101 — Plant Anatomy 

Bot. 105— Structure of Economic Plants 

Senior Year 

Hort. 107, 108, 109— Plant Materials ^ 

Hort. 118, 119— Seminar ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities ^^ 

Electives 

* - 

15 



Quarter 



z 
z 
1 

8 



16 



5 

5 

3 

3 
1 



17 



2 



15 



1 

3 

1 

10 



15 



4 
S 
1 

z 



16 



• • • • 


3 


1 


1 


14 


10 


17 


16 


8^ 


3 


Z 


3 


s 


2 


2 


• • • • 


3 


. . . • 



2 


2 




1 


1 


1 


12 


11 



15 



♦Student must elect at least one of the following: Bot. 50, Hort. 114, or Hort. 116. 



68 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



69 



r 

I 


Qtmrter - 
II 


/// 


3 
3 

3 


3 
3 


3 



Supervised Electives: 

Hort. 18, 19, 20 — Commercial Floriculture. 

Hort. 25 — Advanced Landscape Design . . . 

Hort. 26— Civic Art 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Hort. 8 — Vegetable Production 

Hort. 105 — Technology of Ornamentals . . . 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry im- 
provement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. For example, most students will be expected to take the 
courses in Agricultural Industry and Resources and Farm Organization 
offered in the general curriculum for the freshman year. Superior students, 
definitely anticipating preparation for a professional career in poultry 
husbandry, will be expected to take language instead. However, all students 
majoring in poultry husbandry will be required to complete 24 semester 
hours in poultry husbandry. 

Poultry Curriculum ^ q^^^^^, 

Sophomore Year I II III 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 6 5 .... 

Soils 1 — General Soils .... 5 

Speech 5, 6 — Advanced Public Speaking : 2 2 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 5 

P. H. 1 — Poultry Production 5 .... 

P. H. 2 — Poultry Management 4 .... 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 3 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Elect from the following: 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 2 2 

Math. 10, 11, 12— Elements of Collegre Math 3 3 3 

A. E. 1 — Agricultural Industries and Resources 3 . 

A. E. 2 — Farm Organization 3 .... 

Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 4 4 



// 



17 



18 



17 



4 
6 



2 
1 



S 

• • 

4 



8 
3 

16 

3 

4 



/// 

■ • • 

3 



2 
1 



3 
3 

4 
3 
2 
3 
3 



15 



( Quarter 

Junior Year ^ 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

P. H. 50— Poultry Biology 

p. H. 51— Poultry Genetics ' 

p jj 52 — Poultry Nutrition 

P. H. 56— Poultry Physiology " 

g* ^ 130— Elements of Statistics 

Stat. 112— Biological Statistics 

Bact. 2— Pathogenic Bacteriology 

gnt. 1— Introductory Entomology • 

g^jjls 2— Principals of Soils Fertility 

Eng. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 

P E. — Physical Activities 

Elect from the following: 

Math. 10, 11, 12— Elements of College Math ^ 

A. E. 102— Marketing of Farm Products. • 

B. A. 20, 21, 22 — Principles of Accounting 

Chem. 81— Biochemistry 

Chem. 82— Biochemistry Laboratory 

Phys. 6, 7, 8— Introductory Physics 

Agriculture Elective 

IS 

Senior Year 

p. H. 105— Egg Marketing Problems 

V. S. 107— Poultry Hygiene ' 

V. S. lOS^Avian Anatomy 

P. H. 58— Commercial Poultry Management 

P. H. 104 — Poultry Marketing Problems 

p H. 107— Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems 3 

P H. 108— Special Poultry Problems ^'^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities ; 

Elect from the following: 

R. Ed. 110— Rural Life and Education 

French, German, Spanish 1, 2, 3— Elementery French. ^ 

German, Spanish 

Bact. 108— Preservation of Food Products 

Bact. Ill— Food Bacteriology _ 

Group Electives 

15 

Pre-Theological Students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with the officers of any 
theological seminary who desire to urge its prospective students to pursue 
courses in agriculture as a preparation for the rural mimstry. Such pre- 
theological students may enroll for a semester or more or for the usual 
four year training of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College of Agriculture. 



1-2 

1 


1-2 
1 


4 


• • • • 


8 

• • ■ • 

5 


S 
S 
5 
6 


15 


IC 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



71 



I 



The electives of this curriculum may be used for such pre-theological 
requirements as seem desirable. Elections may be made from any of the 
offerings of the University such as history, political science, philosophy, 
agricultural economics, rural sociology, modern language, English, economics, 
psychology, sociology, natural science, education and the like. Students 
desiring to pursue a pre-theological program in the College of Agriculture 
of the University of Maryland, should consult with the president or admis- 
sions officer of the theological seminary which they expect to attend. 

Special Students in Agriculture 

Mature students may, with consent of the Dean, register as special 
students and pursue a program of studies not included in any regular 
curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs of the individual. All university 
fees for these special students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrangements 
have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission 
to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different departments. 
This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit-growers, 
gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to get away 
from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are $5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour 
per month for the time of attendance. One registration is good for any 
amount of regular or intermittent attendance during a period of four years. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

J. F. Pyle, Acting Dean. 
Reba a. Turner, Secretary. 

rr,,» rolleee of Arts and Sciences is meeting the war emergency needs in 
The College of Arts ^^^^^^.^^ ^.^^ ^^^.^^^^ ^^^^^, 

^'Terstr^ physTcl Lthematics. bacteriology, and food technology. It .s 
!e:?n7oSvtrtraining needs in the required pre-profess.onal tramxng 
"or medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and nursmg. _ 

For the civilian student the college provides liberal traimng in the 
JogicS sdences, economics, history, languages and litera ure, philosophy 
.i X!ifal sciences political science, psychology, and sociology. This tram 

;Ss the sSen? an opportunity to acquire a ^en-al ^^^^^^^^^^ 
5 serve as a foundation for whatever profession or vocation he may choose. 

The college offers to the students of the other colleges of the Universi y 

The CO lege oners subiects both classical and scientific, which should 

service. 

"'Thl" college of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division and 
The college oi ai us. - grouped the following 

four Upper Divisions. Under the latter are giuui, 

departaents:^^^^^^ of Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entom- 
ology, Genetics, and Zoology. 
R The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages and Litera- 
to' s Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philology. 
FoSgn Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

C. The Division of Physical Sciences: Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 

Mathematics, and Physics. „ ,-^- i o i-.„n» 

D. The Division of Social Sciences: Economics. History, Political Science, 

Psychology, and Sociology. ^ . ^ j 

The work of the first and second years in the College of Arts and 

ScSfceHs taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student 

a bS gLTil education, and to prepare him for specialization in the 

junior and senior years. 

The unner divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
Jjor work in "he College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and 
senior years. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
in generXSTsame as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. 



I 



72 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



73 



ments for admission to the sX, of MedS an^thTr v' *'! "^"'- 
the pre-medical curriculum may be obta^^ld hv !• u°" °^ *"^*' *« 
Admissions. obtained by writing the Director of 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met. fh» 
faTerfrnte""- "' ^^ ^^ -ence^a^ rchl^ T^ 3 

the%"Soro;^riSLt%ris^^^^^^ --- ^« -h. 

the degree of bachelor of arts Anv ZZt \ v. ^"""'^^ ^'"^ ^^^''^^'l 
for the degree of bachelor osctencei^aJar^d tftT *"' ^^•'"'— ^^ 
major portion of the work has bLn In 1 /^ ^^^^' ^^^^^^^^ the 

application has the appiwal of thTl. !," •"" '^"''' "' ^"^''<=^' ^''d the 
work has been carrieS '"""" department in which the major 

Students who have elected the combined program of art« .r,A ■ 
medicine may be granted the decree of hSl * * ^ sciences and 
Pletion of at least 150 quarter SL in t?„ '"'"""" *""" **>« «=«>"■ 
the School of Medicine so that th. ' ?-w '°"'«^' ^""^ *•»« ^^-^t y^ar of 
are met, and he is Te'Zl'l^/.TTT.: ITZlT.'"'}'' "^^'''^ 

Those electing the combined five-year academic ''""' 

which the degree of bachelor J^ ^^^^ academic nursing curriculum, for 

the completioLf the fu 1 cturs/ ™^^^ ? ""'"u^ ""^ ''^ ^"-^«d "P- 

in the College of Arts aL ScieLTbefor^^^^^^^ '''• ^''^---^ -"iculu. 

Those taking th» k- " ^^"'^ ^^^ ""''^'ng "^^urse in Baltimore. 

bache":: ofrrfs'deg re? S ri' ", T ^"' '^^ "^^^ "^ ^ <^ed the 
this college and one^ear S tht frtteT. "' **"■" ^^^" "^ *^^ --■< >" 
the School of Law. The total J^^ u """'"' "^ '*^ ^^"ivalent, in 

graduation is 195. """""""^ ""'»''^'- «* <=redits required for 

Residence 

deJrttnhttltge^rrranTs?"*'^"'"'" ^^^'^^"^ '^ ^ ^'--^--ate 
this University. "'^ ^"'"'^' '""^t ^e taken in residence in 

ererTthTfi';:;^f;ee7eaf;t:rn^^- ^-es must earn the last .. 
College Park. '" ^''^ *^°"«&« °f Arts and Sciences, 

Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Art, »n^ « • 
conferred upon a student who has satisS tL f n "'^^^ "^^ *" 

1. University requirements. '' '""''""^ requirements: 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements: 



A minimum of 195 quarter credits must be acquired, including the 
requirements in basic military science and physical activities for men or 
the requirements in hygiene and physical activities for women. 

A student must acquire a minimum of 98 credits, with an average grade 
of at least C in the Lower Division, before being admitted to an upper 
division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as possi- 
ble, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before 
graduation : 

I. English and speech — twenty-one credits. Of these. Survey and Com- 
position I (Eng. 1, 2, 3.) and public speaking (Speech 1, 2) are required. 

II. Foreign languages and literature — eighteen credits of one language, 
(including Latin or Greek). Students wishing to enroll in a language they 
have studied in high school will be given a placement test. 

III. Social sciences — eighteen credits. This requirement is fulfilled by 
electing courses in economics, history, political science, psychology, and 
sociology. 

IV. Natural science and mathematics — eighteen credits. Of these, one 
year must be in natural science. 

V. For men, military science — eighteen credits, physical activities — six 
credits. For women, hygiene — four credits, physical activities — four credits, 
to be completed by the end of the sophomore year. Six additional credits in 
physical activities are required for both men and women, to be completed 
during the junior and senior years. 

3. Major and minor requirements — When the requirements of the Lower 
Division have been completed each student must select a major in one of 
the fields of study of an upper division, and before graduation must com- 
plete a major and a minor. The courses constituting the major and the 
minor must conform to the requirements of the department in which the 
major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or minor the student must have an average of 
not less than C in fundamental courses in the fields chosen. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 30 to 54 hours, of which 15 must be in courses numbered 100 
and above. 

A minor shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 18 to 30 hours, of which 12 must be in courses numbered 
100 and above. Minor courses shall be chosen with the advice of the major 
in consultation with the minor department to supplement the student's 
major work. 

The average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields must 
be at least C. A general average of at least C is required for graduation. 



'' THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Certification of High School Teachers 

sc^Lnrrr:?:;^^^^^^^^^^^^^ a prospective Hi.H 

>n one of the upper divisions of tWs Cone^r ' ^''^ '"^^'"^ "^^ '»«o' 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses msi.r k« . , 

Arts and Sciences for vTkdr! "T^'^ ^'"" ^'^^'^'t '» the College of 
University. ^'^''^ '^''''^ '« "ther colleges and schools of the 

The number of credit*? ^\^'^n\. 
and schools is as follow^: "'^ '^ ^""'^'^^ ^^^ *"« various colleges 

College of Agriculturfr-twenty-three • 

College of Business and Public Adm,«,«t .• 
College Of Education-thirty ''''""•^*'-«*— ^-nty-three. 

College of Engineering-twenty-three 

College of Home Economics-twenty-three 

School of Law_In the combined program the fi . 

completed. Program the first year of law must be 

School of Medicine-In the combined program the fi . 

must be completed. Program the first year of medicine 

'''l:t%?c"mpye;.*'' '=°"'^''^'' P-^- t'^e three years of nursing 
Normal Loail 

The normal load for th(^ cnr.1,^ 
in. military science an?;hystT:d:crtioV^ " ^"'"^^ ^^^ ''"-'- '-'«d- 

The normal load in the iunior ur^A - ' 
With the permission of th'e Dean "f the'Sir" f I' "'''''' ^^ ^^-^er. 
load may be increased to 17 a ° v; ^^ ""^ ^'^^ «"d Sciences, this 

load Of honor students sha I lie S L'th" 7'V''' '"""^ ^*"*^-t- ^h 
Chairman of the Department, bTt in no M .'"n "' ^''^ ^^*" «"d the 
per quarter. ' ""' m no case shall it exceed 19 credits 

Advisers 

Freshmen and sophomore.! in ti,; i. 
College their general aTiser. ' '""'^^ ^'"" -"-^er the Dean of the 

Juniors and seniors will con^ir^or. <-u i. • 
their adviser, and shoul "erstirh.m ^^^^^^ 
schedules of courses. ^'"^ ^^^"* *^^ arrangements of their 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



75 



The Lower Division 

The work of the first six quarters in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare him 
for specialization in the latter part of his course. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into one 
of the Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general 
scholastic ability must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major 
study is to be obtained. 

Suggested courses of study are given under certain of the upper divisions. 
The student should follow the curriculum for which he is believed to be 
best fitted. It will be noted that there is a great deal of similarity in these 
outlines for the first six quarters, and a student need not consider himself 
attached to any particular upper division until the beginning of his seventh 
quarter, at which time he is required to select a major. 

The minimum requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, as 
outlined on page 73, should be completed as far as possible by the end of 
the sophomore year. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES GENERAL CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

♦♦English 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

♦Foreign Language (including Latin and Greek) . . . . 

Science (Bot., Chem., Math., Physics, Zool.) 

M. I. 1. 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

P. E. 42, 4— Hygiene I, II (Women) 

Elect from the following so that the total credits 
each quarter is from 16 to 18. 

Econ. 1, 2, 3 — Economic Resources 

H. 1, 2, 3 — Survey of Western Civilization 

H. 4, 5, 6 — ^History of England and Great Britain. 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 

Psych. A — Psychology of Adjustment 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

L. Sci. 1 — Library Methods 



/ 


■ 'qf 




/// 


3 




s 


3 


2 




2 


.... 


o 

o 




3 


3 


3 or 


5 


3 or 5 


3 or 5 


3 




3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


2 




2 


• • « • 


2 




2 


2 


3 




S 


5 


3 




t 


3 


3 


or 


3 or 


3 


3 


or 


3 or 


3 






3 or 


3 


2 


or 


2 or 


2 



*A placement test is given during Registration Week for students wishing to pursue a 
language they have studied in high school. 

**A placement test in English is given to assist in determining whether a student is 
adequately prepared for Eng. 1. After this the student is given five weeks trial in Eng. 1. 
If he has failed the original examination and is also unsuccessful in an examination at the 
end of the five weeks period, he is transferred to Eng. A. A preparatory course without 
credit. He may also be placed in Eng. A if he passes the original ?3?amination, but fails 
the second. 



76 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



77 



f Quarter 

Sophomore Year I II /// 

Ensrlish 4, 5, 6 — Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 S 3 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 S 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 1 

General electives fulfilling as far as possible the specific 
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

16-18 16-18 16-18 

A— DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Biological Sciences is organized to stimulate close 
coordination between all activities in the field of biology. The Division 
includes the Departments of Bacteriology and Zoology. 

Each department within the Division has one or more established 
curricula. To meet the demands for technically trained workers in the 
biological sciences these curricula are designed to give specialized training, 
particularly during the last two years of college work. They provide, more 
specifically, the basic knowledge and experience required for (1) teaching 
in secondary schools; (2) research and regulatory work in federal, state, 
and municipal departments and bureaus; (3) admission to graduate study 
in the preparation for college teaching and advanced research; and (4) 
entrance to the professional schools of medicine, dentistry, and nursing. 

Instruction 

Alliance of the biological sciences presents an opportunity for the pursuit 
of a well coordinated program of study. Completion of a suggested under- 
graduate curriculum under any one of the departments fulfills the require- 
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Science. Advanced work also is pre- 
sented in each of the biological sciences for the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Although the undergraduate training in any Department of the Division 
is both thorough and well-balanced, nevertheless, one or more years of 
post-graduate instruction and experience and the attainment of an advanced 
degree are desirable in preparation for the larger opportunities that arise 
in this rapidly expanding field. The need for workers in the fields of 
agriculture, home economics, industry, public health, etc., presents almost 
unlimited opportunities for specialization and has made it necessary to 
correlate closely the undergraduate courses in this Division with those 
offered in the Graduate School in order to equip the advanced student 
adequately in his own work and in related fields. 

A special curriculum in general biological science is presented primarily 
for those interested in teaching biological science or general science in 
elementary and high schools. Students in the preprofessional schools who 
expect to complete their work for the degree of bachelor of science may, in 
following the preprofessional curriculum, complete a major in certain 



of courses. „„h lines of work for which each department 

The particular P-fessions a«d -^ of .^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^„,,, 

•„ this Division prepares its stuaenis a 
i description of each department. 

Kequirements for Graduation 

1 Urdversity Requirements. See Section I. 

o CMeae of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 

2. College oj ».< complete basic courses in 

o Physical Scierices-The student must compie 

"• Chemistry. Mathematics and Physics. 

Fields of Study represents the courses 

The curriculum outlined in ^^<=^if .°* ^dc^vision, are necessary for 
.hich in the judgment o\^: ^^^^:Z^l^,X most curricula enough 
an adequate training in the P^^^*^™ ' ^^^^ opportunity to study sub- 
electives are included to give "^^ f'^^^^^.r. which he may have become 
iects outside his major or minor deP^'^t^^'T .'"^ 
tested or in which further training is deseed ^^ ^^^^ 

The courses in Bacteriology ^^^^^^ S^:^'^^t^\.rAcXv^X ^e,.rt- 

nepartment of Bacteriology .^ ^.^^ ^^^ ^^^, 

The Department has been ^^^^^ir ^ P-"ions as bacteriologists in 

^^-^^^:T:..^ Of the .niversity a 

:^^!Z^Zl:^^^^- as may be desired. 

Bacteriology Curriculum provide training in all the 

The curriculum in bacteriology is arranged to^ pro^lde t^i^^ ^^g^^^^.^^ ^^ 

principle phases of the -f^^!^^'^'"'^''^! ^^ causative bacteria, (2) the 
disease, including the identification o^ ^^^ ,^ ^i^^ase. (3) the 

phenomena of immumty. >»*^»"^'?f^ ^j^^Jf technicians, (4) the microbi- 

ological work. 



78 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



79 



I 



in the lives of man, plants andTnimTl, F^ ™Portance and function 

that they follow theco^eZ^ZiblZZr '^.'^t^' '' '' ^^'^"■^^ 
nated Bacteriological Technique Ceourei^?'' ""''' '''' ^""'^^ **^^'s- 
bacteriology laboratory courses Onl^ Prerequisite to all other 

outlined in the suggested curriLu^ ''""'^ "'* "^^^^^ ^-ses «; 

f'Lfto'lS'r^^^^^^^^^^^^ and Should . 

the unprecedented demand for bactPrJi! fF^J^' However, because of 
and civilian life, a studenfmfy^ an aratderltTd ^r^a t^ '""^' ^^^^"- 
Such a student will find it necessary to devTatefrom tL ''"'''^'' ^'■''^'■"'"• 
m the curriculum and except for cert^T h sequence presented 

permitted considerable leeway ^''' requirements he will be 

of bacterial physiology. bacteriology, as well as in various aspects 

University and Experiment Station p^ii„ i.- 
students of high staU^g stllent" rece^^^^^ 

research along specified lines, and SallvasTJ ^'HTu'"' "'" '^^^^ «" 
m the beginning classes. Experience TntL I ^ laboratory instruction 
for all graduate students a?d oZV ! "^ bacteriology is desirable 

far as the facilities oflte'StpXenTpl^U^^^^^^ ^^^"^''^^ - - 

commercial concerns also are freonTril P^™'*' /^"owships sponsored by 

for research in problems imTorSTt^tlTry ^rthTe "^^^ ^^^^^'^^^^^'^ 
for business contacts. ^naustry, with frequent opportunities 

All students planning to maior in Ko.f • i 
Department before registration bacteriology should consult the 

Medical Technology 

The modern Dractiop ni^ *v,«^- • curriculum in bacteriology. 

trained PersonnT^thfs "'^cT tT r *'.^^l' °' ^'^ ^^'°^^*°^^ -^ 
person who by education and ^»- • ■ *"*' laboratory technician is a 

routine mlcroLpic^emi"? ^nSZT''''. °' P-f«™ing the various 
and treatment of disease bacteriological tests used in the diagnosis 

BiSk^Blrerilij. ChSt^^tdTh '^''' .r ^*"^-* *-^«^»- ^" 
required before the^'udent^Stars JrtS h^o'lSaltlinLr- ^^ 



The curriculum is essentially that required in the first two years of a 
major student in Bacteriology. The Bacteriology Department offers under 
its direction only this basic training. Before qualifying as a Medical 
Technologist the student must spend at least twelve months in a hospital 
laboratory under proper supervision in order to obtain practical experience 
in the routine laboratory procedures. 

Further information may be obtained from the Department of 
Bacteriology. 

Food Technology 

This curriculum offers combinations of courses that will equip the student 
with an unusually broad knowledge of the many aspects involved in food 
manufacture. In the curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals of 
biology, chemistry, and engineering which, when supported by the proper 
electives and by practical experience, will serve as an excellent background 
for supervisory work in food factory operation, research in the food 
industries, etc. 

Zoology 

The Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
teaching and for service in the biological bureaus of the United States 
Government, in the biological departments of the various states, and in 
various branches of the military service. Emphasis is placed on morphology, 
physiology, and marine biology. Instruction and opportunities for original 
investigation in the latter are supplemented by the research facilities and 
courses of instruction offered at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, is 
on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University of Mary- 
land in cooperation with the Maryland Conservation Department, Goucher 
College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Maryland 
College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to afford a 
center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward a fuller 
appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. 

The laboratory is open throughout the year. Ordinarily work is offered 
for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, during a summer 
session. Students pursuing a special research may establish residence for 
the summer, or for the entire year. All formal courses have been tem- 
porarily suspended. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Zoology Curriculum 

Freshman Year ' ^<?"«'^««'- 

Zool. 2. 3— Fundamentals of Zoology 

Zool. 20— Vertebrate 'Embryology ^ 

Chem. 1, 3, 5— Gen. Chemistry, Qual. Anal ^ '"' 

Eng. 1, 2, 3— Survey and Composition o , 

Sp. 1— Public Speaking ' 

P. E.— Physical Activities 

M. I. 1, 2. 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) I l 

P. E. 42, 44-Hygiene I. II (Women) t ? 

Electives (Women) * 

^ , 16-17 .16-17 

cyoptiomore Year 

Zool. 4— Comparative Vertebrate Morphology e 

Zool. 7— Field Zoology 

Zool. 8 — Invertebrate Morphology 

Eng. 4, 5, 6 — Survey and Composition. 3 

Math. 10, 11. 12-Algebra. Plane Trig., Anal. Geom. , ! 

Sp. 2— Public Speaking ' 

Modern Language * ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities ^ ^ 

M. I. 4, 5. 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) , l 

Electives (Women) ' 

2 2 

, . ,^ 17-18 17-18 

Junior Year 

Zool. 101 — Mammalian Anatomy 

Zool. 108— Animal Histology ..." 

Zool. 104— Genetics ' * 

Zool. 121— Animal Ecology ^ 

Modem Language 

Physics 1, 2 ^ ^ 

Social Science (Electives) ^ * 

Biological Sciences (Electives) ^ * 

P. E.— Physical Activities f" * 

Senior Year 

Zool. 102, 103— General Animal Physiology.. 

Zool. 75, 76— Journal Club " 

Social Science (Electives) ^ 

Zoology (Electives) ^ ^ 

Electives * / ' ^ ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities 5 ' ^ 

1 1 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



81 



17 



17 



III 

5 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 

3 

17 



3 

• • • • 

3 
1 
3 
2 

15-16 



3 

3 
3 

• • 

3 
4 
1 



17 



4 

1 
3 

4 
4 
1 



General Biological Sciences 

A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in 
biology but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biological 
sciences. The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general 
principles and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. Also by a 
proper selection of electives, the educational requirements of the State 
Department of Education for certification can be met. 

Requirements 

A major and a minor, comprising together not fewer than 80 credits, 
shall be completed, with at least 25 of these credits in the courses for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates in the Division. 



Curriculum for General Biological Science q . 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 5 

Language — (French or German) 3 

Speech 1, 2 2 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 5 

Ento. 1 — Introductory Entomology 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II (Women) 2 

Elective (Women) 

16-17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5, 6 3 

Math. 10, 11 3 

Language (French or German) 3 

Bot. 1 — Introductory Botany 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

Electives (Biological Science) 7 

17-20 

Junior Year 

Phys. 1, 2 — General Physics 6 

Electives (Biological Science) 6 

Electives (Social Science) 3 

Electives 2 

P* E. — Physical Activities 1 



o 



4 

3 
1 
2 



18-19 



/// 

Z 
S 
3 
2 



3 
1 

3 

17-19 



3 


3 


3 


. • . • 


3 


3 


5 


.... 


. 


S 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


9 



18-21 



15-18 



5 
6 
3 
2 
1 



17 



17 



10 

S 

s 
1 

17 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



83 



t Quarter 

Senior Year I II /// 

Electives (Biological Science) 9 9 9 

Electives (Social Science) 8 3 3 

Eleetives 4 4 4 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

B— DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and 
Literature, Modern Languages and Literature, Music, Philosophy and 
Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts; (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for those 
taking preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the depart- 
ments of the Division. 

At present, the Division offers major and minor work for the Master of 
Arts and the doctor of philosophy degrees in English language and litera- 
ture and in modern languages and literatures; major work for the 
linguistics, and minor work in philosophy. Detailed requirements for these 
degrees are given under the departmental announcements and in the catalog 
of the Graduate School. 

Training for the Master of Arts degree is directed especially toward 
acquainting the candidate with methods of research and the literature in 
his own fields. For the degree of doctor of philosophy, the candidate is 
required not only to be thoroughly acquainted with his major and minor 
fields and with the scholarly accomplishments therein, but also to devote 
himself intensively to a specific research problem in which he shall make 
an original contribution to human knowledge. 

Division Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

The following requirements in addition to those of the College of Art? 
and Sciences (including a general average of C, see page 73) should be 
completed, as far as possible, before the beginning of the junior year. 

1. Library Science — two credits. 

2. English — nine credits. 

3. Foreign Language — To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of 
Humanities, a student must have attained a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language, either ancient or modern. In satisfaction 
of this requirement, he must pass one of the general language 
examinations, which are given during the first and last days of each 
quarter, with a grade as high as C. Maryland students should take the 
examination not later than the close of the sophomore year or the 



beeinnine of the junior year. Transfer students should take the 
examination upon entrance. The student must show m this examma- 
'„ hat he has attained the reading ability to be expected after 
To years of a college language course. When the student has passed 
the general language examination he will have satisfied the language 
reauSent! but in no case will a student in the Dmsion be 
;rduated wL has not acquired at least 18 credits of one foreign 
language in college. 
4. Philosophy— three credits. 
5 Psychology— three credits. 

fi' Maior and Minor Requirements-ln selecting a major or a minor, a 
Sent must have acquired eighteen credits in fundamental coursesm 
i: field chosen or in a closely related field -fff ^J^^f ^ ^^^^^^ 
ment and the division, with an average grade of at least C before 
"edit will be allowed toward the completion of the major and minor 
requirements. In addition: 

A major shall consist of not fewer than 30 nor more than 54 
credits, in addition to the eighteen credits required in the Lower 
Division in one of these fields of study. At least 23 of these credits 
must be taken in courses listed for advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 18 nor more than 30 
credits in addition to the 18 credits required in the Lower Division, 
in one of the above fields of study not selected for the niajor or in 
some other field of study authorized in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. At least 14 of these credits must be taken in courses 
listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 
The student must acquire at least 45 credits in courses not included in 
the major or minor. 



MAJOR AND MINOR 

Fields of Study 

Comparative Literature 
English 
French 
** General Linguistics 
German 



* Greek 
Latin 

*Philosophy 
Speech 
Spanish 



Additional Requirements in English 

In addition to the 18 hours of basic freshman and sophomore English a 
stint tS l^iB major work in this department must pass one quailer 



* Not available at present for a major. 
**Major only for Master of Arts Degree. 



84 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of advanced writing or ma^azinp wvifi«^ 

and one quarter o/eitheTh™ If "eVnrfisr"'" *" '^""'^^^ ^'•^-"-'. 

In addition, he must complete oL of tt Jchfif bTo^ "^ ^'' ^"^''^^ 

ture, Shakespeare, and at Lst'T tu f f rt'^T ^-^ ^^.^'^^ ^itera' 
Literature of the 18th Century Prose anH p T ! fo'^^^'ni:: Milton; 
Victorian Literature- Modern an/ r. ^^""^ °^ ^^"^ Romantic Age- 

Thoreau, and Whit.fnf ^e LrSoT^'^cf.^f ' "^^'^= ^'"--' 
Poetry and Prose; the Enriish Nnvl^ i^r u .^'"^^''^'^y American 
American Poets. ^ ^""^^'^ Ehzabethan Drama; Major 

Drama, American Drama Plav Prn^ V t ? *'"^' Contemporary 

Literature (first .uarteTf: T^S p'rhTaml^^it Pau t\ """^^^ 

D. Major work in En<rJicT, t -^ . ^'^^'"a. ^he Faust Legend, Ibsen, 

hours in the departmL'rtn^rcr:;3fttr^^^^^^^^^^ ^"'^ V'^' '' 
Minor work may also be elected in these fiWs but "'*""• 

combination of A and B or of A and D J:?^ beTermitted"; "'•■" '"' "'"" 
Additional Requirements in Modern Languages 

are strongly advised to take the rpv^l ^ ""P" ^'*- "!)' ««d they 

Spanish 99). The folIowinrLir es a Tr """' ^/'^"*='^ '^' ««™^n 99^ 
Civilization (Hist. 1, 2, 3) Stroduc^n ?Tv.T'"^''^^ ^"^^^^ *»* Western 

Testament as Literkture \comp l ^ "4^ p""'"^ ^'''"' '^' ""'^ ""'' 
Romantic Age (Eng. 113 Sro^^.k • ' '''" ^"'^ ^^^^^ "^ the 

Honors in English 

Qualified major students who wish tn v«>o^ ^^ ,. 
apply to the chairman of the department ?L h""'"' '" ^"^'•^'' ^''-l'' 
Jast two years, but should, if po^rbe begurearffer"'' '^ '"''' '" '"^^ 

C^DIVISION OP PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Phvsical ^/»ior,^« 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



85 



for completion, leading to the degrees of bachelor of science or bachelor 
of arts together with five year programs in chemistry — chemical engineer- 
ing and applied physics. The departments of study have developed courses 
to contribute to the liberal education of students not primarily interested 
in science; to provide the basic knowledge of the physical sciences necessary 
in so many professions such as agriculture, dentistry, engineering, home 
economics, medicine, pharmacy, and others; to equip teachers of the 
physical sciences for secondary schools and colleges; and to train students 
for professional service as chemists, chemical engineers, geologists, mathe- 
maticians, physicists, and statisticians; and to prepare for graduate study 
and research in the physical sciences. 

The fields of knowledge represented by the physical sciences are so vast 
and their applications are so important that it is impossible to deal ade- 
quately with any one in a four-year undergraduate curriculum. Students 
who aspire to proficiency are therefore encouraged to continue their studies 
in the graduate years. In the work leading to a Master's degree, the student 
becomes acquainted with the general aspects of the field. In partial fulfill- 
ment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the 
student must demonstrate a command of his chosen field sufficiently great 
to permit him to make independent investigations and creative contributions. 

No degree will be granted to a student in any department of the Division 
of Physical Sciences whose general average in all courses offered for the 
degree is below C. To enroll in the Division of Physical Sciences, at the 
beginning of the junior year a student must select a major in one of the 
departments and before graduation must complete a major and a cognate 
minor selected to conform to the requirements of the department in which 
the major work is done. 

The candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will be governed by the requirements for that degree established 
by the University and the College. A student will be considered a major in 
one of the departments of the Division of Physical Sciences only w^hen he 
has completed a program approved by the department concerned. The 
following suggested curriculum outline the general requirements of these 
departments. 

Chemistry 

The science of chemistry is so vast in scope that completion of a well- 
planned course of undergraduate study is necessary before specialization. 
The curriculum outlined below describes such a course of study. The 
sequence of courses given should be followed as closely as possible; it is 
realized, however, that some deviation from this sequence may be necessary 
toward the end of the program. All of the courses in chemistry listed are 
required of students majoring in chemistry. 



86 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Chemistry Curriculum q^^^^^^ 

Freshman Year I II III 

Chemistry 1, 3, 15 6 6 5 

English 1, 2, 5 3 S 3 

Mathematics 10, 11, 12 3 S 3 

Modern language (German or French 1, 2, 3) 3 8 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. 1, 2, 3 (Men) 3 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I. II (Women) 2 2 

Elective (for women) .... 3 

17 or 18 17 or 18 18 

Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 17, 35, 36, 37, 38 3 5 S 

English 7, 8 3 3 

Mathematics 20, 21, 22 5 5 5 

Modern language (German or French 4, 5, 6) 3 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. 4, 5, 6 (Men) 8 3 3 

Electives (for women) 3 3 

18 17 17 or 20 

Junior Year 

Chemistry 21, 23 5 5 

Chemistry 141, 143 3 ' 3 

Chemistry 142 ; 3 

English Elective 3 .... 

Physics 3, 4, 5 5 5 5 

Social Science Electives .... € 

Speech 1, 2 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 1 

17 It 17 

Senior Year 

Chemistry 187, 189 5 S 

Chemistry 188, 190 3 8 

Chemistry 144, 146, and 148 or 161 3 8 3 

Chemistry 101 3 

Economics 31, 32, 33 3 3 3 

Social Science Elective .... 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 1 






15 IS 18 

Mathematics 

The Mathematics curriculum offers training in the fundamentals of 
Mathematics in preparation for teaching, industrial work, or graduate work 
in Mathematics. 

For a major in Mathematics a student is required to enroll in Junior and 
Senior Tutorial. 

Students majoring in mathematics who complete freshman and sophomore 
courses in mathematics with distinction are eligible to try for honors in 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES S"^ 

..ematics To receive the honors degree in rr^^^^^^^^l ^^tlfTfn 
rSmpS *« curriculum in ^--^^^^^^ ^ZZZc^Jt^^ end of the 

Sbrthrcha^^oft: l^:^":^^ eonC^on o. their 
sophomore year. 

• i„«i / Quarter • 

Mathematics Curriculum / // W . 

freshman Year s 3 t 

^ 2. 3-Survey and Composition 3 3 » 

^^" \ o 3— French or German 5 5 * 

^h 1^ 1^, 17-Ai.., Tri... Anal. G— ••;;;;;;;;:;;;;;;;; 3 3 • 

ffT7"!^a^- ---'<--*••• :::: I I ■■ 

p- E 42, '44-Hygiene I. II (Women) .... S 

Elective (for Women Only) " 1 I ^ 

Physical Activities 

18 18 « 

Sophomore Year . 3 s « 

Lang 4,. 5, 6-French or German ' ' 5 5 6 

Math. 20, 21. 22-Calculus •••••• 5 « • 

T>v,xr« ^ 4 5 — Physics , 3 » 

Tl: 1'5^'e-Basic R. o. T. c. (Men) ;;;;;;;;;;;.. 3 s « 

Electives (for Women Only) ' 1 1 

Physical Activities ^^ 

Junior Year .3 8 8 

Ene 4 5. 6-Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

Math. 11(1. lU. U2-Advanced Calculus , , 1 

TWofV, 70 71 72— Junior Tutorial 3 3 • 

.Erell-Mathen.aties (Upper Division) ..........•.•••• •••••• 3 3 « 

Electives— Minor 3 

Electives-Social Sciences ' • l J^ ^ 

Physical Activities 

17 1< *' 

Senior Year 3 « ' 

Math 130, 131. 132-Analytic Mechanics ^ 1 1 

Math. 80, 81. 82-Senior Tutorial . ^.^ • • • g • * 

*Electives-Mathematics (Upper Division) ^ t .... 

Speech 1. 2-Public Speaking 3 « * 

Electives-Minor and Social Sciences ..•••• ^ ^1 ^1 

Physical Activities 

16 !• ^^ 

, . , ^„^t include at least six quarter 

^^— 77na senior electives ^r.r..ty.er.^^J^-^ 
hours in algebra and six quarter hours m geometry. 



88 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



89 



/// 

3 
8 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 



General Physical Sciences 

This general curriculum is offered for students who desire a basic 
knowledge of the physical sciences without immediate specialization in any 
one of them. By proper selection of courses in the latter six quarters, a 
student may concentrate in the field of his choice. 



Curriculum for General Physical Sciences Quarter 

Freshman Year I II 

English 1, 2, 3 3 8 

Modern Langruage (German or French) 3 S 

Mathematics 10, 11, 12 3 8 

Chemistry 1, 3, 5 5 5 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Elective (for women only) .... 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II (Women) 2 2 

17 or 18 17 or 18 

Sophomore Year 

Speech 1, 2 2 2 

Modern Language (German or French) 3 8 

Mathematics 20, 21, 22 5 5 , 

Physics 3, 4, 6 5 6 

Elective (for women only) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

19 19 

Junior Year 

Electives (Chemistry) 6 8 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 8 

Electives (Social Sciences) 3 8 

English 7, 8 3 

Electives 3 .... 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Elective (English) 8 

Senior Year 

Electives (Social Sciences) 

Electives (Physics) 

Electives (Physical Sciences) 

Electives 

Physical Activities 



16 



8 
6 
6 

8 
1 
8 



17 



8 
8 

8 
8 
1 



15 


17 


16 


3 


8 




3 


8 




5 


6 




3 


8 




1 


1 





piiv4ics Curriculum . . 

The physics curriculum is designed for students who desire training in 

The Pfy" ni,v<5ics in Drenaration for teaching, graduate work, 

''\'^^::^^n^o::Z^^lL.stn^^ and biophysical laboratories. 

f coLction "th the curriculum suggested below a minor may be chosen 

I^the field of study selected. A minor may be taken in biology, 

The^ttr^ci^l engineering, electrical engineering, mathematics, mechan- 

ical engineering or any allied field. 

, Quarter 

V / // III 

Freshman Year 338 

English 1. 2, 3 5 5 8 

Chemistry 1. 2, 5 g g ^ 

Math. 15, 16. 17 3 3 s 

Basic R. O. T. C. 1. 2. 3 ^ ^ ^ 

Physical Activities " ' ^ g 

Hygiene I. II .^...^^. ....•■ ^ 

Speech 8 

Electives (Women) ^ 

16-17 16-17 17 

Sophomore Year 3 s « 

English 4, 5, 6 g g g 

Mathematics 20. 21, 22 * * ^ g 5 

Physics 3 A, 4A. 5A ^ j i 

Physical Activities 3 ^ 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. 4, 5, 6 

Speech 8 • 

Electives (Women) 'J_ . 

16-19 17 17 

Junior Year . , 

3 8 « 

Language 1, 2, 3 j ^ 3 

Social Sciences 3 3 3 

Physics 105, 106, 107 ^ ^ g 

Electives (Major or Minor) ^ j j 

Physical Activities . 

16 16 16 

Senior Year . „ 

3 8 ^ 

Language 4, 5, 6 3 3 3 

Social Sciences jq |q g 

Physics __ ,... 5 

Electives (Major or Minor) j ^ i 

Physical Activities . 

17 17 17 



15 



15 



15 



90 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



91 



D— DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions 
and other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of 
Social Sciences offer opportunities for advanced training in the several 
fields represented. A major in economics is available for students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, although the work is given in the College of 
Business and Public Administration. During the freshman and sophomore 
years, in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences requirements. Principles 
of Economics, Econ. 31, 32, 33, should be completed and as many other lower 
division social science courses taken as practicable. The Departments of 
Political Science and Economics offer the first three years of a combined 
Arts-Law course. The Department of Psychology is identified with the 
development of applied psychology and is in position to supply training in 
the industrial arid clinical phases of the subject. The Department of 
Sociology provides a course of study preparatory to professional training 
in social work and offers the courses demanded by civil service examinations 
for certain positions. All five departments present courses aligned with 
the teacher-training program represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees 
of master of arts and doctor of philosophy. These advanced degrees are 
increasingly required for secondary school teaching and for professional 
positions in the several fields represented. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY 

In addition to the general requirements of the University and of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the History Department requires that all 
credits for a major and at least 18 credits for a minor be acquired in 
courses offered for advanced undergraduates and graduates. No work below 
a grade of C will be accepted towards a major. History majors must also 
take 18 credits of the three fundamental courses. 

The Curriculum in Economics is on page 102. 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school. 

The University offers also a combined program in arts and law leading 
to the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete 
the prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, or a total 
of 150 credits, and they must complete the requirements for graduation, as 
indicated below. If students enter the combined program with advanced 



standing, at least the third full year's work, i.e. forty-five credits-must be 
ompleted in residence at College Park. Upon the successful completion of 
one vear of full-time law courses in the School of Law in Baltimore the 
Lree of bachelor of arts may be awarded on the recommendation of the 
Dean of the School of Law, and provided the student has earned at least 
a total of 195 credits with a C average. The degree of bachelor of laws may 
be awarded upon the completion of the combined program. 



Arts-Law Curriculum , Quarter 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2, 3— Survey and Composition ^ 

Science or Mathematics 

jj 4^ 5^ 6— History of England and Great Britain 

p^l 'sc'i, i_American National Government • - • - 

Foreign Language ^ ^ 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking ., 

M. I. 1. 2. 3-Basic R. O. T. C ^ ^ 

Physical Activities . 

p. E. 42. 44— Hygiene I, II, (Women) ^ 

17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

English 4, 5, 6 or 7 and 8 

Econ. 31. 32, 33— Principles of Economics ^ ^ 

H. 7, 8, 9 — American History 

Foreign Language ^ 

M. L 4, 5. 6— Basic R. O. T. C ^ ^ 

Physical Activities 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Pol. Set. 7. 8, 9— Comparative Government 2 

H. 135, 136, 137— Constitutional History of the United States... 3 » 

Soc. 1— Contemporary Social Problems 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology 

Psych. 14 — Applied Psychology 

Soc. 135 — Sociology of Law ' 

Econ. 140 — ^Money and Banking 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

P. A. 180 — Government and Business ■ 

*EleoJtives 

Physical Activities 

Senior Year — Taken in Law School. 



8 



4 
1 



/// 

% 
% 

S 
S 
8 

8 
1 



16-19 

3 

8 
8 
8 
3 
1 



17 

2 
3 



3 
3 



4 
1 

17 



*Pre-law students who expect to engage in income tax practice should take a year of 
accounting. 



92 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



93 



PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Five- Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

The first two years of this curriculum comprising a minimum of 98 
credits is taken in the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park and the 
professional training is taken in the School of Nursing of the University in 
Baltimore or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with advanced standing, 
but the second year, consisting of a minimum of 45 credits, exclusive of 
physical training, must be completed in College Park and the professional 
training must be completed in the schools indicated above. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of bachelor of science 
in nursing may, upon the recommendation of the Director of the School of 
Nursing, be granted at the end of the professional training. Full details 
regarding this curriculum may be found in the section of the catalog dealing 
with the School of Nursing. 



Arts — Nursing Curriculum ^ . 

^ > Quarter 

Freshman Year I II 

Ensr. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 

Foreigrn Lansruasre 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 5 S 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Hist. 1, 2, 3 — Survey of Western Civilization 3 8 

L. S. 1 — Library Methods .... 

Physical Activities 1 1 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II, (Women) 2 2 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Engr. 7, 8 — Expository Writing 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 6 .... 

Soc. 1 — Contemporary Social Problems S 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 8 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

Pol. Sci. 1 — ^American National Government .... 

Phsrsical Activities 1 1 

Electives 3 2 



III 

3 
S 

i 

8 
2 
1 



17 



3 
1 
6 



17 17 17 

Premedical 

The curriculum recommended for admission to the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland consists of nine quarters of academic training 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. Curriculum I meets these requirements 
and also fulfills those requirements prescribed by the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association. 



rurriculum II meets the requirements of the Council on Medical Education 
„f the Ame^e-n Medical Association for entrance to Class A Med.cal 

^'curriculum I offers to students a combined program leading to the degrees 
f Bacielo- of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The Pfe-professional tram- 
"?,« t^ken in residence in the College of Arts and Saences at College 
S and the professional training in the School of Medicine - Balt:more^ 
(sle Special Bulletin of School of Medicine for details of quantitative and 
nualitative premedical course requirements.) 

Students who have elected the combined program of Arts and Sciences 

,nd MeSSnTmay be granted the degree of bachelor of science after the 

ompfe fon of Z least L quarter credits in this college and the first year 

of the School of Medicine, so that the quantitative requirements of 195 

ieins are met, and provided that he is recommended by the Dean of the 

School of Medicine. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with advanced standing 
but the last yeL, consisting of a minimum of 45 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
physical training and military instruction must be eo-pleted ,n Col ege 
Park and the professional training must be completed m the School of 
Medicine in Baltimore. 

For requirements for admission see Section I of this catalog, page 24. 

Premedical Three Year Curriculum I 

For students expecting to enter the University of Maryland 

School of Medicine 



- Quarter 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2, 3— Survey and Composition 

Math. 10, 11. 12-Algebra. Plane Trig., Anal. Geom ^ 

Zool. 2, 3— Fundamentals of Zoologry 

Zool. 5— Comparative Vertebrate Morphology ^ 

Chem. 1. 3, 6— General Chem., Qual. Anal ^ 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II ^ 

Physical Activities „ 

M. I. 1. 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5, 6— Survey and Composition ^ 

Chem. 35, 36, 37. 38— Organic Chemistry 

Zool. 20— Vertebrate Embryology ^ 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 

Social Sciences (Philosophy, Psychology. Elective) ^ 

Modern Language (German or French) ^ 

Physical Activities ^ 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C 

20 



II 

3 
3 
5 

S 

t 
1 

a 



20 

S 
5 

2 

S 

s 
1 
s 

20 



/// 

s 
s 



5 

s 

1 
s 

18 



3 

3 
1 

3 

18 



94 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



95 



Junior Year 

Modern Langniage (German or French) 

Physics 1, 2— General Physics 

Chem. 181, 182— Elements of Physical Chemistry! 
Social Sciences Electives 
Biologrical Science Electives 
Physical Activities 



Quarter 
II 



3 
5 

4 
3 
1 



3 
5 
3 
1 
3 
1 



/// 

3 



6 
3 
1 

16 



Senior Year ^® ^* 

Ty,?'/!!'"r^""'/l ^^' ^''* ^'^" ^^ ^^^ S^^^^l ^^ Medicine is accepted 
The student must, however, present a total of at least 195 credits for 
graduation for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The student also may elect advanced courses offered in the College of 

bI Ll rr"' 'f ''"^'^'^ '' ^^"^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ requirements for th 
Bachelor of Science degree, as outlined on page 72. 

Premedical Curriculum II 

For students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to a Class A Medical School, but not for the combined degree. 

Freshman Year ' y Quarter 

Eng. 1, 2, 3— Survey and Composition , 

Math. 10, 11. 12-Al8rebra, Plane Trig.. Anal. Geom. I I 

Zool. 2, 3— Fundamentals of Zoology * 

Zool. 5— Comparative Vertebrate Morphology .. ' * 

Chem. 1, 3, 5— General Chem.. Qual. Anal. ^ 

Speech 1— Public Speaking " 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I. II \\\\\ „ 

Physical Activities ^ 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C \ 

o 

Sophomore Year ^^~^^ 

Eng. 4, 5, 6— Survey and Composition 

Chem. 35, 36. 37, 38— Organic Chemistry...... 

Physics 1, 2— General Physics 

Speech 2— Public Speaking o 

Social Sciences (Electives) 

Modern Language (German or French) ... f 

Physical Activities 

M. I. 4, 6. 6— Basic R. O. T. C ^ 

o 



/// 

3 
3 



2 
1 
3 

19-20 

3 
6 



5 
3 



1 
3 



3 
1 

3 



20 

3 

5 

3 
3 
1 
3 



predental 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to prepare 
themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following curriculum, 
which meets the predental requirements of the American Association of 
Dental Colleges. This curriculum may also be followed by the student if he 
desires to continue his college training and complete work for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. 



Predental Curriculum 

/ 

freshman Year I 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 

Math. 10, 11. 12— Algebra. Plane Trig., Anal. Geom 3 

Chem. 1, 3, 5 — General Chem., Qual. Anal 5 

Zool. 2 — Fundamentals of Zoology 

Dr. — ^Mechanical Drawing 1 

Physical Activities 1 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C 3 

18 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 35. 36. 37, 88— Organic Chemistry 

Zool. 3 — Fundamentals of Zoology 5 

Physics 1, 2 

Modern Language (German or French) 3 

Social Sciences (Electives) 6 

Physical Activities 1 

M. I. 4, 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C 3 



Quarter 
II 

3 
2 
3 
5 

1 
1 

3 



/// 
8 

3 

S 
B 
1 
1 
3 



18 



19 



3 



3 



o 



5 
3 
3 
1 
3 



18 20 20 

Preveterinary Curriculum 

Students who desire to prepare themselves for the study of veterinary 
science are offered, by the College of Arts and Sciences, a curriculum which 
meets the entrance requirements of colleges of veterinary science. The 
course is identical with that required of pre-medical students as outlined 
in Curriculum II on page 94. 



20 



20 



20 



96 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

John Freeman Pyle, Dean, 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of Business and Public Administration and Economics. Downtown 
Washington is only twenty-five minutes away in one direction, while the 
Baltimore business district is less than an hour in the other. There is 
frequent transportation service from the University gates to each city. 
Special arrangements are made to study commercial, manufacturing, 
exporting, and importing agencies and methods in Baltimore, assistance is 
given qualified students who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the far- 
flung economic activities of the national government or to utilize the 
libraries, government departments, and other facilities available in 
Washington. 

Aims 

The College of Business and Public Administration offers training 
designed to prepare young men and women for service in business firms and 
governmental agencies, and for the teaching of commercial subjects and 
economics in high schools and colleges. It supplies scientific business train- 
ing to students and prospective executives on a professional basis comparable 
to university training in the other professional fields. Administration is 
regarded as a profession, and the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration prepares its students for this profession by offering courses of 
instruction which present general principles and techniques of management 
and administration and bring together in systematic form the experiences 
of business firms and governmental units. This plan of education does not 
displace practical experience, but supplements and strengthens it by 
shortening the period of apprenticeship otherwise necessary, and by giving 
a broad and practical knowledge of the major principles, policies, and 
methods of administration. 

During the first half of the college study programs the student secures 
a broad foundation upon which to base the professional and the more 
technical courses offered in the last half of the course. The managerial 
and operating points of view are stressed in the advanced courses in pro- 
duction, marketing, labor, finance, real estate, insurance, accounting, 
secretarial training and public administration. The purpose of the training 
offered is to aid the student as a prospective executive in developing his 
ability to identify and to solve administrative and managerial problems; 
and to adjust himself and his organization, policies, and practices to chang- 
ing social, political and economic situations. 

The aim of the college is to present and illustrate such sound principles 
of management as are applicable to both big business and small business. 
Large-scale business, because of its possible economies will be expanded 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



97 



. inHn^tries under certain well-known conditions. There are, on the 
r^^ri^aStrtries and many situations .hich still call ^or the smal 
kLss If these small-scale businesses are to be operated with profit to 
downer and with satisfactory and economical service to the public at is 
Iterative that authentic principles of administration be applied to them 
S^S principles of ethical conduct are emphasized at all times throughout 

the various courses. . 

The primary aim of collegiate education for government and business 
service ito train for effective management. The College f Business 
fnd Public Administration, University of Maryland, was established to 
iply scientific training in administration to the young men and women 
whose isk will be the guiding of the more complex business enterprises 
trLvernmental units resulting from industrial, social and political 
dtlorent and expansion. This statement does not mean that the gradua e 
S expi" to secure a major executive position upon graduation. He will 
r thedtrary. usually be required to start near the well publicized 
-bottom" -^f the ladder and work his way up through a number of minor 
nosSs He will, however, be able to move up at a faster rate if he has 
S n full aLnt;ge of the opportunities offered by the College in develop- 
Sg his ^lents and in acquiring technical and professional information, 
point of view, skills, and techniques. 

Graduation Requirement 

A minimum of 195 quarter hours of credit in courses ^"^f f «^ ^^ ^Jf, 
Colleee is required for graduation. The student is required to have a C 
av rage for all courses used in meeting the quantitative graduation require- 
ments A student who receives the mark of D in more than one-fourth of 
Ws credits must take additional courses or repeat courses until he has met 
Sse requirements. The time required to complete the requiremen s for he 
bachelors degree for the average student is twelve quarters. Under the 
accelerated program this work may be covered in three calendar years. 
A superior student, by carrying more than the average load, may complete 
the work in ten quarters or two and one half calendar years. 

Degrees . „ . j 

The University confers the following degiees on students of Business and 

PubUc Adrinistration: Bachelor of Science, Master of Business Admin- 

fs^tU and Doctor of Philosophy. (See bulletin of Graduate School for 

graduate rules and regulations.) 
Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the ^-^'^'^'^l^J 

date announced for each quarter a formal fPPl'-;>°" /^VJefar, 
candidates for degrees must attend a convoct ^^ H egr^es are 

conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conieire 
only in exceptional cases. 



I 



98 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



99 



Junior Requirement 

To be classified as a junior a student must have earned 96 quarter hours 
in his freshman and sophomore years with an average grade of at least 
"C". If a student has better than a "C" average and lacks a few credits 
of having the total of 96, he may be permitted to take certain courses 
numbered 100 and above providing he has the prerequisites for these 
courses and the consent of the Dean. 

Senior Residence Requirement 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to the extent of 150 quarter 
hours either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere he must earn a 
subsequent total of at least 45 quarter hours with an average grade of "C" 
or better at the University of Maryland. No part of these 45 credits may be 
transferred from another institution. 

Programs of Study 

The College offers programs of study in economics, business administra- 
tion, secretarial training, public administration, and a number of combina- 
tion curricula, e. g., business administration and — ^law, commercial teaching, 
industrial education, chemistry, agriculture, or basic engineering courses. 
Research is emphasized throughout the various programs. 

The executive manager or administrator in modern business enterprises 
and governmental units and agencies should have a clear understanding of: 

(a) the business organizations and institutions which comprise the busi- 
ness world; 

(b) the political, social, and economic forces which tend to limit or to 
promote the free exercise of his activities; and 

(c) the basic principles which underlie the efficient organization and 
administration of a business or governmental enterprise. 

In addition, the executive or the prospective executive should: 

(a) be able to express his thoughts and ideas in correct and concise 
English ; 

(b) have a knowledge of the fundamental principles of mathematics and 
the basic sciences, such as, physics, chemistry, biology, and geography; 

(c) have a knowledge of the development of modern civilization through 
a study of history, government, and other social science subjects. 

(d) have a sympathetic understanding of people gained through a study 
of psychology, sociology, and philosophy. 

If the executive is to be successful in solving current business and 
governmental problems, he should be skilled in the scientific method of 
collecting, analyzing, and classifying pertinent facts in the most significant 
manner, and then, on the basis of these facts, be able to draw sound con- 
clusions and to formulate general principles which may be used to guide 
his present and future conduct. In other words, probably the most important 
qualities in a successful executive are: 



(a) the ability to arrive at sound judgments; 

rb) the capacity to formulate effective plans and policies, and the 
i Jgination and ability to devise organizations, methods, and procedures 

for executing them. , „ . a 

The teaching staff and the curricula of the College of Business and 
Public Administration have been selected and organized for the purpose 
of providing a type of professional and technical training that will aid the 
elpable anf ambftious student in developing his potential talents to their 

full capacity. 

The college study programs on both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels presuppose effective training in English history government, 
lantage, science, and mathematics.* The program of study for any mdm- 
dual student may be so arranged as to meet the needs of those preparing 
for specific lines of work, such as accounting, advertising, banking foreign 
rade industrial administration, marketing administration, personnel admin- 
istration, real estate practice, insurance, government employment, secre- 
tarial work, teaching, and research. 

Advisory Councils 

In order to facilitate the prompt and continuous adjustment of courses, 
curricula, and instructional methods to provide the training most in demand 
by industry and commerce; and in order constantly to maintain instruction 
abreast of the best current practice, the advice and suggestions of business 
men and public officials are constantly sought from outstanding leaders 
in each major field of business activity. Each council has its own particular 
interest to serve, such as advertising, marketing, or finance ; and the view- 
point and suggestions of these business men are proving to be invaluable in 
developing the instructional and research program of the College. 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

During the first half of the program of study each student is expected to 
complete the following basic and core subjects, except as indicated in a 
particular curriculum: 



•The major portion of this training is usually s«ured in the four years of high school 
and the first two years of college. 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Required Courses: n ± ^. 

Quarter Hours 
lL.nglish and speech -« 

Mathematics, science or foreign language* o 

■ Economic Resources g 

Economic Developments g 

Military training and physical activities for men . 24 

Hygiene and physical activities for women ', iq 

Accounting ... 

^ • 12 

Principles of Economics 

Organization and Control « 

o 

Total requirements -~ 

Required Electives: social science ^ 

Free Electives: The remaining electives, of 4 to 18 credits 

may be profitably selected with the help of a faculty 

advisor 

18-4 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



101 



98 

A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
thaTlV. ?: "^ f .'"'"" "^^" *'^ satisfactory completion of " tfewe 

of J^i kVI . V"'^"^'"^ ^"^'^^^ *^^^"^"^ ^"^ Phy^^^^l activities required 
of all able-bodied men students, or required courses in hygiene and phyS 

activities for women. Students who are unable to take the physical traSng 

TrrOf These 1.7"?/%^" ^^"^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ - -^^- -ade-i! 
work. Of these 195 credits, forty per cent of the total number of credits 

Freshmen who expect to make a concentration in foreign trade or who 
tZl" ^"^^P."^^^^ ^^^-- -^--<^' «^ould elect an approprTate foreign 

Freshmen wishing to make a concentration in the Secretarial Training 

TrSn^l anr^^^^^^ """^"^^^ ^^^^'^^^ ^^-^^ ^^-^ Lleta rial 

iraimng 1 and 12. There are no prerequisites for these courses Such 

students should elect English 4, 5 and 6 in the sophomore year N^fedt 

sl.!lT^e'pS^^^ concentrate in the field of public administration 
Should take Political Science 1 and 4. All students are required to take 9 
quarter hours in Mathematics, a Natural Science or a foreign langL^^^^^ 
9 quarter hours in the Social Sciences, exclusive of Economics 

*U a student elects a foreigrn language he must complete two years of fh. w i, • ^ 
to secure university credit, unless he takes an advanced course '" ^'^''' 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIRExMENTS 

During the junior and senior years each student is required to complete 
in a satisfactory manner the following specified courses: 

Evjon. 140 — Money and Banking 4 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management 4 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 4 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 4 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 4 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 4 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Statistics 4 

B. A. 180, 181, 182— Business Law I, II, III * 9 

Physical Activities - 6 



Total 43 

The remaining credits for the juftiors and seniors may be used to meet 
the requirements for one of the special concentration programs, for example, 
in Economics, Natural and Human Resources, Public Administration, 
Secretarial Training, Commercial Teaching, and in the fields of Business 
Administration, such as: Accounting and Statistics, Production Administra- 
tion, Marketing, Advertising, Retailing, Purchasing, Foreign Trade, Labor 
Relations, Real Estate, Insurance, Investment, and general Finance. 
Juniors and seniors may elect appropriate Secretarial Training courses. 

Combined Administration and Law Program 

When a student elects the combination Administration-Law curriculum, 
he must complete in a satisfactory manner the specific requirements listed 
for the first three years in the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion plus enough electives to equal a minimum of 153 credits with an 
average grade of at least "C". The last three years of the six years of 
required work for the combined degree is taken in the Law School. The 
Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of the first year in 
the Law School and the recommendation of the Dean of the Law School; 
provided the quantitative requirement of 195 credits is earned. Business 
Law cannot be used as credit in this combined curriculum. 

STUDY PROGRAMS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The College of Business and Public Administration comprises five major 
divisions: Business Administration, Economics, Public Administration, 
Natural and Human Resources and Secretarial Training. A student can so 
arrange his grouping and sequence of courses as to form a fair degree 
of concentration in one of these divisions. When, however, he wishes to 
become a specialist in any one of the major departments, he should plan 
to continue his studies on to the graduate level, working toward either 
the Master's or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 



102 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



103 



I. ECONOMICS 

The program of studies in the field of Economics is designated to meet 
the needs of students in the University who wish to concentrate either on a 
major or minor scale in this division of the Social Sciences. Students who 
expect to enroll in the professional schools and those who are planning to 
enter the fields of Business or Public Administration will find courses in 
economics of considerable value to them in their later work. A student of 
economics should choose his courses to meet the requirements for the 
Bachelor, Master, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. (See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for the general requirements for the advanced degrees.) 

Requirements for an Economics Major 

A student majoring in Economics is required to complete satisfactorily 
195 quarter hours of work. A general average of at least **C" is required 
for graduation. A student must maintain at least an average grade of "C" 
in his major or minor in order to continue in his chosen field. 

The specific requirements for the Economics Major are: 

I. Econ. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 31, 32 and 33 — a total of 22 quarter hours of 
specifically required courses in Economics.-B. A. 20, 21, and 22 (Principles 
of Accounting I, II and III) and B. A. 130 and 131 (Statistics) are recom- 
mended. Other courses in Economics to meet the requirements of a major 
or minor are to be selected with the aid of a faculty advisor. 

II. Social Science, in addition to Economics, 9 quarter hours. 

III. English and Speech 22 quarter hours, comprising Eng. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
and Speech 1 and 2. 

IV. Foreign Language and Literature, 18 quarter hours in one language, 
unless a second year course is taken. Candidates for the Ph. D. degree are 
required to have a reading knowledge of French and German. 

V. Natural Science and Mathematics, 18 quarter hours. At least one year 
must be in a Natural Science. 

VI. Military Science and Physical Activities. The present University 
requirement is 24 quarter hours for all able-bodied male students. Women 
students are required to take 16 quarter hours credit in hygiene and 
physical activities. 

A student who elects economics as a major must have earned 21 quarter 
hours in the prerequisite courses in economics prior to his beginning the 
advanced work of the Junior and Senior years. These are normally taken 
during the freshman and sophomore years and must be completed with an 
average grade of not less than "C". The major sequences are not completed 
until at least 30 and not more than 54 credits, in addition to the required 
prerequisite courses, are satisfactorialy earned, that is, with an average 
grade of at least "C". At least 21 of these credits must be earned in courses 
listed for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 



A „.inor in economics consists of the 21 P^^r^^t "ff^ifof thTst 
A minor m additional credits in economics. At least 15 of these 

objective and major interest. 



Study Program for Economics Majors . Quarter - 

freshman Year ^ 

Econ. 1. 2. a-Economic Resources of the World I, II. Ill ....... - ^ ^ 

Econ. 4. 5. 6— Economic Developments I. 11. m ^ , 

Eng. 1,' 2. 3— Survey and Composition ^_g 3^5 

Mathematics and Natural Science 3 g 

Foreign Language - ' -^ „, "^^ ^^^^ pijy V,^/ Activ^ ^ \ 

M. I. 1. 2, 3 — Basic R. O. T. ^. ana i-uy»*^ ^ ^ 

Physical Activities and Hygiene I. II 

17 n 

Sophomore Year 3 3 

Econ. 31. 32. 33-Principles of Economics I. H, lU ^ 3 

Eng. 4. 5. 6— Survey and Composition • ^ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology • ^ 2 

B A. 10. 11. 12— Organization and Control ^ 

Speech 1'. 2-Public Speaking ' •; 

Physical Activities (Women) 

18 i'7 

Junior Year ^ 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking * ^ 

Econ. 150— Marketing Principles ^ 

g A. 130— Elements of Statistics 4 

B. A. 140— Financial Management 4 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 4 

B A. 131 — Business Statistics 

Econ. 131— Comparative Economic Systems • 

Econ. 130— Economics of Consumption [[[[[]., 3 S 

Electives 1 1 

Physical Activities 

1€ 16 



/// 

t 
t 
Z 
3-5 
3 
4 
1 

17 



S 
3 

S 

2 

t 

• • 

4 
1 



Vt 



4 
3 
4 
1 



16 



104 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I Quarter 

Senior Year I II 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 4 .... 

Econ. 134 — Contemporary Economic Thought 4 

Econ. 141 — Theory of Money, Credit and Prices 4 

Econ. 170 — Industrial Combinations and Competition .... 

Econ. 171 — Economics of American Industries 4 

P. A. 140 — Public Finance and Taxation 4 .... 

P. A. 180 — Government and Business .... 

P. A. 170 — Transportation I, Regulation of Transportation 

Services 4 .... 

P. A. 137 — Economic Planning and Postwar Problems .... 

Electives 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 



/// 



16 



16 



4 
3 
1 

16 



11. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Modern business administration requires a knowledge of and skill in the 
use of effective tools for the control of business organizations, institutions, 
and operations. The curriculums of the Division of Business Administration 
emphasize the principles and problems of the development and the use of 
policies and organizations, and the methods, techniques and procedures of 
execution, in other words, the essence of Management and Administration. 

The programs of study in the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion are so arranged as to facilitate concentrations according to the major 
function of business organization. This plan is not, however, based on the 
assumption that these major divisions are independent units, but rather 
that each is closely related and dependent on the others. Every student in 
the college, therefore, is required to complete satisfactorily a minimum 
number of required basic and core subjects in economics and in each of the 
major functional fields. Each graduate upon completion of the requirements 
for the bachelor's degree finds himself well grounded in the theory and 
practice of administration. There are five commonly recognized major 
business functions, viz; production, marketing, finance, labor relations, and 
control. 

The function of control may be thought of as comprising two divisions, 
viz, internal and external. Internal control has to do with men, materials, 
and operations. External control is secured through the force of law, court, 
board and commission decisions, custom, and public opinion. Management 
endeavors to make adequate adjustments to these forces. Courses in law 
and public administration, for example, aid in giving the student an under- 
standing of the problems, devices, and methods of external or "social*' control. 

Study programs of the Division of Business Administration furnish an 
opportunity for a small amount of concentration in one of the major 
sections during the undergraduate period. The basis of these curriculums is 
the general study program. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 105 

The following suggested study programs will aid the thoughtful student 
in planning his concentration according to his natural aptitudes and the 
line of his major interest: 

The General Curriculum in Administration 

This curriculum is set up on a twelve quarter basis which corresponds to 
the traditional four-year course that leads to a bachelors degree. A student 
Ilv complete the full course in three calendar years by attending four 
Tarters a year. A superior student may, however, complete the course 
Za shorter period of time by carrying a heavier load each quarter. 

, Quarter 

/ // /// 

freshman Year 522 

Econ. 1, 2, 3— Economic Resources of the World ^ ^ ^ 

Econ. 4, 5, 6— Economic Developments ^ ^ ^ 

Eng. 1, 2, 3-Survey and Composition^ ^^ 3^ 

Math.— Natural Science, or a Foreign Language • ^ ^ 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking / W-' •*• " /Mo«^ 4 4 4 

M I 1 2. 3-Basic R. O. T. C. and Physical Activities (Men) * * ^ 
Physical Activities and Hygiene I, II (Women) 

IT 17 17 

Sophomore Year « 2 « 

B. A. 10, 11, 12— Organization and Control 3 3 t 

Econ. 31, 32, 33— Principles of Economics 444 

B. A. 20, 21, 22 — Principles of Accounting 

Electives ." . ./. /»» \ a A 4 

M. I. 4. 5. 6-Basic R. O. T. C. and Physical Activities (Men) .4 4 ^ 

Physical Activities (Women) 

16 16 1« 

Jtmior Year 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking ^ 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management * 

B. A. 130— Elements of Statistics " "^ 

Econ. 150— Marketing Principles ^ 

B. A. 150— Marketing Management ". 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics ^ 

B. A. 160— Personnel Management ^ '"^ ^ 

Electives « j \ 

Physical Activities . 

6 16 16 



106 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



107 



f Quarter 

Senior Year I II 

B. A. 180, 181, 182— Business Law I, II, III 8 S 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 4 .... 

Econ. 170 — Industrial Combinations and Competition >. . .... 

Econ. 171 — Economics of American Industry 4 

P. A. 140 — Public Finance and Taxation 4 .... 

P. A. 170 — Regulation of Transportation 4 

P. A. 180 — Government and Business .... 

Electives 4 4 

Physical Activities 1 1 



/// 
8 



16 



16 



4 
4 
1 

16 



Electives may be chosen under the direction of a faculty advisor from 
courses in Accounting, Statistics, Geography, Public Administration, 
Secretarial Training, Education, Home Economics, Natural Science, or 
other courses that will aid the student in preparing for his major objective. 
The electives indicated in the General Course are provided so that students 
can arrange their schedules, under the guidance of a faculty adviser, in such 
a way as to secure a concentration or major when desired in: 

A. Production Administration E. Natural and Human Resources 

B. Marketing Administration F. Accounting and Statistical Control 

C. Financial Administration G. Secretarial Training 

D. Personal Administration 

There are prescribed curriculums for Accounting and for Secretarial 
Training majors. 

A. Production Administration 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of 
organization and control in the field of industrial production. Theory and 
practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes, and 
techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and criticized. The student is required to 
go on inspection trips and when feasable is expected to secure first-hand 
information through both observation and participation. He should be 
familiar with the factors that determine plant location and layout, types of 
buildings, and the major kinds of machines and processes utilized; he 
should understand effective methods and devices for the selection and 
utilization of men, materials and machines. 

The courses, in addition to those required of all students in the college, 
which will aid the undergraduate student in preparing himself for a useful 
place in this field of effort are: 



B. A. 10 — Business Organization and Con- 
trol (2) 

B. A. 11 — Industrial Organization and Con- 
trol (2) 

B. A. 121 — Cost Accounting (5) 



B. A. 122— Auditing (4) 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Statistics (4) 

B. A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics (4) 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management (4) 



g ^ 163— Industrial Relations (4) 
g ^ 165 — Office Management (3) 
g ^ 170— Industrial Management (4) 
p ^ 170 — ^Transportation I — ^Regulation of 
Transportation Services (4) 



B. A. 171 — Transportation II — Services, 
Rules, and Practices (4) 

B. A. 172 — Transportation III — ^Traffic Rates, 
Tariffs, Classifications and Interpreta- 
tions (4) 



Industrial Management students may so arrange their study programs as 
to take a series of related courses in one of the following : 

1. Physics • 3. Some basic engineering courses 

2. Chemistry 4. Agriculture 

B. Marketing Administration 

Modern business administration is concerned largely with marketing 
activities. Buying and selling of products and services comprise the major 
portion of the time and energies of a large group of our population. The 
ideals of our system of private property, individual initiative and free 
enterprise are closely related to present-day marketing organization and 
practice. Effective solutions of the problems of marketing are necessary to 
the success of the individual business enterprise and for the welfare of the 
consumer. If the costs of distribution are to be reduced or kept from rising 
unduly, it is necessary that careful study of the organization, policies, 
methods, and practices of advertising, selling, purchasing, merchandising, 
transportation, financing, storing, and other related activities be made, and 
corresponding appropriate action taken by qualified marketing technicians 
and executives. 

The purpose of the marketing administration program of study is to give 
the alert and serious student an opportunity to analyze, evaluate and other- 
wise study the problems connected with marketing institutions, organiza- 
tions, policies, methods, and practices. He may, for example, develop his 
aptitudes, on the technical level, for research, selling, buying, and preparing 
advertising copy; and on the administrative level he may develop his 
abilities for organizing and directing. 

Thoughtful selection of courses from the following lists in addition to 
those required of all students in the college, will aid the student in pre- 
paring himself for an effective position in the field of marketing. 

B. A. 186 — Real Estate Law and Con- 
veyancing (3) 

P. A. 170 — ^Transportation I — Regulation of 
Transportation Services (4) 



Econ. 150 — ^Marketing Principles and Or- 
ganization (4) 
B. A. 150— Marketing Management (4) 
B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and Cam- 
paigns (3) 
B. A. 152 — Copy Writing and Layout (3) 
B. A. 153— Purchasing Management (3) 
B. A. 154 — Retail Store Management (4) 
B. A. 143— Credit Management (3) 
B. A. 165 — Office Management (3) 
B. A. 146 — Real Estate Financing and Ap- 
praisals (3) 
B. A. 156 — Real Estate Principles and 

Practices (3) 



B. A. 171 — Transportation II — Services, 
Rules, and Practices (4) 

B. A. 172 — ^Transportation III — ^Traffic Rates, 
Tariffs, Classifications and Interpreta- 
tions (4) 

B. A. 250 — Problems in Sales Management 

(3) 
B. A. 251 — Problems in Advertising (3) 
B. A. 252— Problems in Retail Store Man- 
agement (3) 



108 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



109 



B. A. 257— Seminar in Marketins: Managre- 

ment (arranged) 
B. A. 258 — Research in Marketing 

(arranged) 



B. A. 259 — Studies of Special Problems in 
the fields of Marketing Policies, Manage- 
ment and Administration (arranged) 

B. A. 299 — Thesis (3-6 hours) (arranged) 



For those especially interested in foreign trade; selections may be made 
from the following courses: 



N. H. R. 100 — Physical Resources of the 
United States and Canada (3) 

N. H. R. 102— The Geography of Manufae- 
turing in the United States and Canada 
(3) 

N. H. R. 110— The Geography of Middle 
America (3) 

N. H. R. Ill— The Geography of South 
America (3) 

N. H. R. 112 — Recent Economic Trends in 
Latin America (3) 

N. H. R. 120, 121 —Economic Geography of 
Europe (6) 

N. H. R. 122 — Economic Geography of 
Africa (3) 

N. H. R. 203 — Advanced Physiography (3) 

N. H. R. 204— Advanced Climatology (3) 

N. H. R. 221 — Seminar in Regional Geogra- 
phy (3, 3. 3) 

N. H. R. 222— Research Work 



P. A. 130 — International Economic Policies 
and Relations (4) 

P. A. 137 — Economic Planning and Post- 
war Problems (4) 

P. A. 141 — International Finance and Ex- 
change (4) 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking (4) 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles (4) 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management (4) 

B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and Cam- 
paigns (3) 

B. A. 157 — Foreign Trade Procedure (4) 

P. A. 170 — Transportation I, Regulation of 
Transportation Services (4) 

B. A. 173— Transportation IV (4) Overseas 
Shipping. 

P. A. 180 — Government and Business (4) 

N. H. R. 4 — Regional Geography of the 
Canada (3) 

N. H. R. 101— Land Utilization & Agricul- 
tural Geography, United States and 
Continents (3) 

C. Financial Administration 

i 

A nation with a highly developed industrial system requires an effective 
financial organization. Production and marketing activities of business 
enterprises must be financed; a large volume of consumer purchases depend 
on credit; and the activities of local, state, and federal governments 
depend, in large part, on taxation and borrowing. To meet these needs a 
complicated structure of financial institutions, both private and public, has 
evolved together with a wide variety of financial instruments. The methods 
used are equally varied and complicated. Since the financing service is so 
pervasive throughout our economic life and because it is an expense which 
must be born by the ultimate purchaser, the management of the finance 
function is endowed with a high degree of public interest. 

This study program is designed to give the student fundamental informa- 
tion concerning financing methods, institutions, and instruments; and to aid 
him in developing his ability to secure and evaluate pertinent facts, and to 
form sound judgments with reference to financial matters. Through a wise 
selection of subjects the student may prepare himself for positions in the 
commercial, savings, and investment banking fields; trust company work; 
credit management; investment management; corporate financial manage- 
ment; real estate financing; and insurance. A student may qualify himself 



,„ enter government service, e.g.. in departments ^e^ulatrng banking 
'Lratrons international finance, the issuance and sales of --'^^^'f^'^f.^ 
"number of financial corporations owned and operated or controlled by 

the government. 

A student who wishes to form a study concentration in the field of 

financtl admi^Sration may select, with the aid of his -Jvisor. from he 

ITses listed below, those that will prepare him to achieve h.s majo. 

bLtTve These subjUs are in addition to those required of all students .n 

the College of Business and Public Administration. 

Financing and 



Econ. 140— Money and Banking (4) 

g ^ l40_Financial Management (4) 

B A. 141— Investment Management (4) 

g ^ 142— Banking Policy and Practice (4) 

g ^ 143— Credit Management (3) 

B. A. 147— Business Cycle Theory (3) 

g ^ 165— Office Management (3) 

p' ^ i40_Public Finance and Taxation (4) 

Econ. 141— Theory of Money. Credit and 

Prices (3) 
B. A. 144— Life, Group and Social Insur- 
ance (3) J T • 

B. A. 145— Property, Casualty and Lia- 
bility Insurance (3) 



B. A. 146— Real Estate 
Appraisals (3) 

p ^ 141— International Finance and Ex- 
change (4) 

P. A. 137 -Economic Planning and Postwar 

Problems (4) 

Econ. 241— Seminar in Money, Credit and 
Prices (arranged) 

B. A. 240— Seminar in Financial Organiza- 
tion and Management (3) 

B A 249— Studies of Special Problems in 
the Field of Financial Administration 
(arranged) 



D. Personnel Administration 

The recent development of large scale operation on the part of both 
.r^vate enter^^^^ and government has emphasized the growing vital 
fZrUncf o^^^ ^relationships. Successful operation depends on 

Zmonrous cooperation between employer and employee. J^^^^^^^^^^ 
the public, the owners, and the management, as well as those of the 
empCes may be greatly affected by the solutions evolved m any given 
c^e of per^^^^^^^ relationship. The growth of large-scale, centrally con 
roTle?iabor organizations and the increased participation of governmental 
agette?^^^ disputes have created problems ^^y^^^^l^^^^^^^^^ 

ment union officials, and government representatives have been on the 
whoi Unprepared to solve satisfactorily. The government, the unions, and 
:ul;ss n'ee/men and women qualified to deal f ^^^^ ^^^^^^ 
lems. They should have broad training and technical ^^^™^^^^^^^^^^ 
fields of business and public administration, f -^^1^^;^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
together with suitable personalities. They must be f^^^^^/^f ^^"^^ 
problems with an open mind, unbiased by personal and class prejudices 
Personal administration has to do with the direction of ^-"^f ^/^^^^^^^^ 
is concerned with securing, maintaining, and utilizing an effectiv^^ .^r^^^ 
force. People adequately trained in personnel admimstration find employ 
ment in business enterprises, governmental departments, ^overnmen^ 
corporations, educational institutions, charitable institutions, and with 
the armed forces. 



110 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A student may select from the following courses those which will, in 
addition to those required of all students in the college, best prepare him 
for the kind of personnel work he wishes to enter. 



Econ. 160 — Labor Economics (4) 

B. A. 160 — -Personnel Management (4) 

B. A. 162 — Contemporary Trends in Labor 

Relations (4) 
B. A. 163— Industrial Relations (4) 
P. A. 161 — Recent Labor Lesrislation and 

Court Decisions (3) 
Econ. 130 — Economics of Consumption (3) 
B. A. 170 — Industrial Management (4) 
P. A. Ill — Public Personnel Administration 

(3) 
Psych. 4 — Psychology for Students of 

Business and Public Administration (3) 
Psych. 121 — Social Psychology (3) 



Psych. 160 — Psychology of Personnel (3) 

Psych. 161 — Advanced Phychology of Per- 
sonnel (3) 

P. A. 211 — Problems in Public Personnel 
Administration (arranged) 

B. A. 262 — Seminar in Contemporary Trends 
in Labor Relations (3) 

B. A. 266 — Research in Personnel Manage- 
ment (arranged) 

B. A. 269 — Studies of Special Problems in 
Employer-Employee Relationships 
(arranged) 

B. A. 299 — Thesis, 3-6 hours (arranged) 



E. Accounting and Statistical Control Study Program 

Internal control in modern business and governmental organizations is a 
major over-all administrative function. The rapid growth in size and com- 
plexity of current governmental units and business enterprises has 
emphasized the importance of the problems of control in management. In 
order to control intelligently and effectively the manifold activities of these 
units, it is necessary to establish an organization, formulate policies, and 
develop methods of procedures. In order to perform satisfactorily these 
managerial activities, it is necessary to have pertinent facts concerning the 
operations of the various units, divisions, and departments. It is the function 
of the accounting and statistical department to secure, analyze, classify, 
and, to a limited extent, interpret these facts. 

The accounting and statistical study program is designed to give the 
student a broad training in administrative control supplemented by specific 
technical training in the problems, procedures, methods and techniques of 
accounting and statistics. If the program is followed diligently, the student 
may prepare himself for a career as a public accountant, tax specialist, 
cost accountant, auditor, budget officer, comptroller, credit manager, or 
treasurer. 

The following study program provides courses for those wishing to con- 
centrate in this important field: 

Students majoring in accounting and statistics follow the general 
study program in the freshman and sophomore years. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION m 

, Quarter ^ 

/ // /// 

Junior Year ^ 5 .... •••• 

P ^ 120— Intermediate Accounting ^ 

■ ^ 121 — Cost Accounting g 

P ^ 122— Auditing Theory and Practice • ' " * '"^ 

P ^ 130— Elements of Statistics ' 4 

P^ 131_Business Statistics ^ 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking ^ 

^ 140— Financial Management 

Boon.' 150-Marketing Principles and Organization ' • - 

g ^ 150— Marketing Management 4 

Econ. 160— Labor Problems ..^....^... 3 .... ^ 

Electives i 1 1 

Physical Activities -^ 

17 18 17 

Senior Year b ...••• • 

B A. 123— Income Tax Accounting g 

^ A. 124-Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice ^ 

B. A. 125— C. P. A. Problems ^ * "3 g 

B. A. 180, 181, 182— Business Law g 

p A 183— Business Law for Accountants ' * ^ 

P. A. 124 — Governmental Accounting ^ 

p ^ 160— Personnel Management ^ g 4 

Electives 1 1 1 

Physical Activities . 

16 16 !• 

The student interested in this field may select electives >-f f ^ f j/, 
his advisor, from the following list of subjects such courses as will best 

meet his needs. . , ^ a\ 

R A 299— Thesis, 3-6 hours (arranged) 
P. A. 114-Public Budgeting (3) r a 221 222 - Seminar in Accounting 

B A. 129-Apprenticeship in Accounting B. A. 221, 222 

(arranged) 

V") . «^ X- u A 99« Research in Accounting 

B. A. 132. 133-Advanced Business Statis- ran ed ) 

tics I and II (4 and 4) AT29^tudies of special problems in 

B. A. 165-Office Management (3) ^ ' statistical Control (arranged) 

B. A. 143— Credit Management (3) ^"« "*= 

B. A. 220 — Managerial Accounting (3) 

III. SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

The development of the program of studies in Secretarial Training in the 



"2 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

merely technical or vocatinnni +>.«; • 

student in developing his or heTnaturS anS/~'"* ""f ''"• *" *'*^ ^he 
become an efficient secretary or offi.! *P*'*"*'^^ '« such a way as to 
student's capacity to plan orgL?2 d.>t?^'''^ ""'' development of th 
principle followed in this curSXm Th ' ^""^ '^"*="'' '^ ^^^ ^^ding 
the young man and woman who" Tmb^H^f:^"™ n' ''"'^ "^" «PP^«^ *^ 
to work, and to those who Realize th« 7 ' °^*,"''^"y <=«P«We. and willing 
and secretarial service requ'e mlh IJe'thT ""^"' '"^"^ —gemen? 
stenography. These are essentirtllT k . , "^'""'^ ''^'" '» ^^^^^S and 

Freshman Year ■ Quarter , 

Econ. 1. 2. 3_Eco„omic Resources of the World I ii i„ ' " "' 

Er 1 • 2' t"?»'""-"= Developmenta I. ll.lix '. '\ "' "' ^ 

9^u ,»"*'' *"" Composition.. * 2 2 

Speech 1. 2-PubIic Speaking 3 3 3 

S. T. 10— Advanced Typewriting I 2 2 

H Jt'iv«. ."'. "-^•"'■^•'=°d Principles' I.' n; ni: .■:.■:::.■:.:.•.;:: ■ "3 ■ • i ' 

Phv!""^, T"i"'"^ *""* ^"^^'"'J Ac«vities ■ (Men) ^'"^ " ^ 

Physical Activities and Hygiene (Women) . •* * * 

'. ' 8 1 

forTr? Td'a^con ''' ^r °"^ ^'■^•"'"^ •" typewriting win registl 
o. 1. 1 and 2, concurrently with S. T. 12 and 13. ^egistei 

Sophomore Year 

Econ 31 32 33 r^"''" "' Accounting I, „, „i \ « 2 

con. 31, 32 33-PnncipIes of Economics I, II. m t ^ * 

S. T. ll—Advanced Typewriting II ' ' ^" 3 $ z 

S. T 16, 17. 18-Advanced Shorthand I. H.' m ^ 

Electives . ^x, m ^ ^ 

Military Training: and Physical Activities " (Men ^ ^ ^"^ 1-4 

Physical Activities (Women) ^^^"^ 4 4 4 

_1 1 1 

17 17 17 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



113 



Junior Year 

B, A. 130 — Elements of Statistics 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 

B. A. 14O7— Financial Management 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles 

B, A. 150 — Marketing Management 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 

S. T. 118 — Business Communications 

B. A. 154 — Retail Store Management and Merchandising 

Electives 

Physical Activities 



— Quarter 
I II 

4 



4 
4 



/// 



3 
1 



3 
1 



4 
4 
4 
8 
1 



16 



16 



16 



Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181, 182— Business Law I. II, III 

S. T. Ill — Office Training 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 

S. T. 119 — Conference and Court Reporting 

Electives to meet the requirements of concentration. 
Physical Activities 



12 
1 



8 


8 


8 


• • • • 


3 


. . . • 


• 


S 


6 


T 


1 


1 



16 



16 



16 



Combined Secretarial Training and Commercial Teaching Curriculum 

Capable students may elect courses offered by the College of Education in 
such a manner as to qualify themselves for commercial teaching in high 
schools and colleges. 

Typing may be taken by any student but no university credit will be 
allowed unless accompanied by the corresponding course in shorthand. The 
special fee for typewriting is $5.00 for each quarter. Credit for shorthand 
is not granted unless accompanied by satisfactory proficiency in typing. 

IV. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The world-wide trend on the part of governments, especially strong 
centralized governments toward the assumption of greater responsibility for 
guiding, controlling, and regulating the activities of the citizenry has 
created a strong demand and a real need for better trained govern- 
mental personnel. This trend toward increased governmental participation 
in the fields of our economic, political, and social life has been developing 
for a number of years but more rapidly in some countries than others. 
The growth was pronounced in the European countries during the 
twenties, it grew rapidly in the United States during the thirties. Thou- 
sands of men and women are now employed in developing organizations, 
evaluating policies, and devising methods and procedures for administering 
and supervising the manifold governmental activities required in the far- 
flung scheme of economic and social control. Our government, for example. 



114 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



has now become the largest "business" enterprise in the country. The 
gigantic task of organization, management and control was undertaken 
before an adequately qualified personnel could be selected and properly 
trained. Federal, State, and Local Governments have called upon the 
universities to aid in training young men and women for effective public 
service. Graduates who are mentally alert, can think clearly, form critical 
judgments, express their thoughts and conclusions succinctly, have a well 
balanced mind, and who possess a professional point of view with reference 
to their work, are needed in a number of government divisions. 

The curriculum in Public Administration is designed primarily to aid in 
the preparation of young men and women for technical, supervisory, and 
managerial positions in the various state and federal services. The particu- 
lar selections of subjects in any individual case will depend on the specific 
position for which the student wishes to prepare. The full course resources 
of the University are available for this training. Courses, for example, in 
foreign languages, geography, history, philosophy, and government, as well 
as studies in social, legal, political, and economic institutions may be 
advisable in addition to the required courses in Business and Public 
Administration. 

Properly qualified graduates can usually find employment in the field of 
their major interest. Large numbers of people trained in such technical 
fields as statistics, accounting, finance, personnel, marketing and transporta- 
tion are employed by governmental agencies. There is a need for people 
trained for and interested in the various aspects of research in the social 
science and business administration fields. Graduates fitted by nature and 
equipped through proper training and experience for the broader fields of 
administration and management can find interesting work in governmental 
units and at the same time satisfy their normal desire to render a special 
service to society. 

Some of the governmental agencies which employ college trained people 
are given as an illustration of the opportunities available. Many of these 
are within the "Civil Service" System, such federal agencies as the Social 
Security Board; Central Statistical Board; Federal Trade Commission; 
National Resources Committee; Federal Housing Administration; Federal 
Reserve Board; Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Tennessee Valley 
Corporation; Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics; Bureau of the Census; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; 
and the Division of Research and Statistics in the Treasury Department 
demand the services of many professionally and technically trained people. 
The Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, State, Labor, and Treasury 
use many college trained men and women. 

The undergraduate student who expects to make his concentration in the 
field of Public Administration will find the following curriculum serviceable : 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 115 

, Qvuirter 

, ^r . ! , I , II III 

'freshman Year , s 3 

,1,1 2 s—Survey and Composition j 

^", ti 1-American National Government ^ , j 

Pol. °'='- ' , , • 

Poreien Language t it Til * • 

'o^'' „ 3_Economic Resources I, II, III g 2 « 

f" 4 5, 6-Economic Developments ■ 3 .... 

fsych. 'l-lntroduction to Psychology .... « 

1 ^ or 5 — Sociology ' « v 4 ^ * 

^litaV Training and Physical Activities (Men) ^ 3 ^ 

C"e and Physical Activities (Women) __ _ __ 

"'^^ 16-17 16-17 16-" 

Sophomore Year . . «, 2 t 

E„g 1. 8-Bxpository Writing (or Eng. 4, 5. 6) , , 

sneech 1, 2— Public Spealcing j S « 

^1 31. 32. 33-PrinclpIes of Economics ... , , , 

Foreign Language 3 

P 1 Sci 4-State and Local Government. • ' ^ ^ . S « 

Pol. oci. « iJvo«^ .^lO'fTQQiOBl and 54 ^ 

Pol Sci.-Selection from Pol. Sci. 7. 8, 9 10. 51 a 2 t « 

B A 10, 11, 12-Organization and Control •:•;;:.... 2 .... • - 

^^^Trainlngand Physical Activities (Men)::::. ...^ ^ 4 4 

Physical Activities (Women) 

17 n n 

Junior Year 3 

P A no-Principles of Public Administration 3 

P. A. Ill-Public Personnel Administration ^ 

g^.Q„ 160— Labor Economics ' ' 4 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking y 4 

g ^ 140— Financial Management 4 

Econ. 130-Elements of Statistics 4 

Econ. 150— Marketing Principles .... 4 

P. A. 184— Public Utilities 4 .-.• 

T> A 1S1— Business Statistics ' • 4 

P. A.' m-B!rnomic Planning and Postwar Problems .......... • • • ■ , , 

Electives 1 ^ 

Physical Activities 

16 1« 1* 

Senior Year 4 — 

P A 180— Government and Business ....... •• 4 

P. A.- 126-The Government and Social ^^^ ■■::::- .... 

P A 141-International Finance and Exchange... ^ 

P A 140— Public Finance and Taxation ^ 

Econ. 132-Advanced Economic ^"'^"P^^^ ' .... 4 

Econ. 134-Contemporary Economic Thought 4 

Econ. 131-Comparative Economic Systems ^ .^^^^^ ■ • .^^^^ 

Electives (to be selected in terms o the student ^ ^ , 

objective with the aid of his advisor) ^ ^ ^ 

Physical Activities 

IS 16 16 



116 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Selection of electives may be made from the following courses : 



p. A. 214 — Problems of Public Personnel 
Administration (3) 

P. A. 235 — Seminar in International Eco- 
nomic Relations (3) (arransred) 

P. A. 240 — Research in Governmental Fiscal 
Policies and Practices (arranged) 

P. A. 280 — Seminar in Business and 
Government Relationships (arranged) 

P. A. 284— Seminar in Public Utilities 
(arranged) 

P. A. 299 Thesis (3-6 hours) (arranged! 



P. A. 124 — Governmental Accounting (4) 

P. A. 161 — Recent Labor Legislation and 
Court Decisions (4) 

P. A. 170 — Transportation I, Regulation of 
Transportation Services (4) 

P. A. 114— Public Budgeting (3) 

P. A. 126 — Government and Social Security 
(4) 

H. 135 — Constitutional History of the 
United States (3-3) 

P. A. 201 — Seminar in International Or- 
ganization (3) 

P. A. 213 — Problems of Public Administra- 
tion (3) 

If the student expects to enter the foreign service he should be well 
grounded in the language, geography, history, and politics of the region oi 
his anticipated location as well as in the general principles and practices of 
business operations. It should be recognized that only a limited training can 
be secured during the undergraduate period. When more specialized or 
more extensive preparation is required, graduate work should be planned. 
The individual program, in either instance, however, should be worked out 
under the guidance of a faculty advisor. 

V. NATURAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES 

Agriculture, industry, trade, social customs and politics of a given 
geographical region are influenced to a great extent by the natural resources 
of that area. Climatic conditions, topography, mineral deposits, water power, 
soils and other physical factors largely determine the economic possibilities 
of a country. The characteristics of the philosophy, political ideals and 
degrees of technological maturity of the people within a given geographical 
unit, in turn, determine in large measure the degree of effectiveness with 
which the natural resources are utilized. The standard of living, the pur- 
chasing power, and the political outlook of the inhabitants of a country 
are, in the main, the result or the expression of the interrelationship exist- 
ing between the people and their physical environment. 

The curriculum of the Department of Natural and Human Resources is 
designed to aid the student in securing the facts concerning the major 
geographical areas of the world and in studying and analyzing causes and 
results as they affect economic, political, and social activities. The student 
interested in international trade, international political relations, diplomacy, 
overseas governments and national aspirations will find the courses in this 
department of great practical value. Work is offered on both the under- 
graduate and the graduate levels. Considerable emphasis is placed on 
research activity on the part of faculty members and graduate students. 

The student interested in this field of human endeavor should select his 
courses from those listed below with the aid of a faculty member who is 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



117 



t selection of such «— ^^.r should' be made in tenns of the 
''''^' '^S't^nthSthe student expects to operate, 
geographical area in w ^ ^ ui-South America (3) 

„ r> 4_Rcgional Geography of the .. , ^ 

N. *»• ^' 



/sTet el! 63-Economic Geography 

^ H R lOO-Physical Resources of the 

TTnited States and Canada (^) ^ ^ . 

/s R lOl'L-d Utilization and Agri- 

'eultu;al Geography, United States and 

'HTl02-The Geography of Manufac- 
^■"ring in the United States and Canada 

N H. R 110- Middle America (3) 



N. H. R. 112-Recent Economic Trends in 

Latin America (3) , ^* 

N. H. R. 120. 121-Economic Geography of 

N.^.'^R^122-Economic Geography of Africa 

N H. R. 203-Advanced Physiography (3) 
N H R 204-Advanced Climatology (3) 
N.H:R.221-Seminar in Regional Geogra- 

phy (3, 3. 3) 
N. H. R. 222 Research Work 



I 



I' 



118 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

iT't ^- ''^^^' ^'^ting Dean 
of the Maryland Sta^^n'""^ ^^ ^^^yland with tt , "^ ''''' "^""'^^ 

:""•"" - ■--.»='=.- sr sir ^--=^^ 

iypes of Persons Served 

The Colleg'e of VA 
students- (^\ . a ^'^"^^"on meets the neeHc ^^ ^i. . 

tory scto L/and :S'"r ^^^"^""^ "ttU i^'^^Jf-^T '''^'^'^ ^^ 
teachers wL ^"'^at'onal schools; (2) nre Jn/ ^ ^*'^<*°'^' Prepara- 

to become WeT '" '^^ ^'^^^' «"<! industries'- m ."^'"*' P^'^P^'-'ng 

(in coope'rat r SThet "' '^'"'^ ^ -~ y reaSorf T^^^'"' 

graduate ^^^^^n^VXi^^'fT::!^' «--^oi,Todarw rkt^' S 
positions requirine- «n r^ , teaching, supervisorv ^>, ^"^«ers, (5) 

Special Facilities 

Because of the loeatinn * ^i. 
capital, unusual facilities for .1 ^"'^^'"^'ty in the suburbs of th« .• 
students and faculty rt r k ^^""^^ "^ education are «v .f ^ "^fo"''^ 
of Education «nT -T^ Library of Congress T)!! i k ^^^^^^^^^ to its 

sible, as we,"' as the''- T' ""^""^^ "^ "^her governmen '''''-"' ^''^ ^^''^^ 

o^ --- - 3uK^^:^s^^^^ ??r S'stS 

Requirements for Admission '''"'""' cooperation. 

- to see. ad^- -lrc^-_ e.^^^^^^^^^^ J--s f. a. 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matrioniot- 

year, tor students from 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



119 



other colleges who have not already entered upon the sequence of profes- 
sional courses, it is highly desirable that this work in the College of Educa- 
tion be begun in the freshman year. Students who propose to teach (except 
Vocational Agriculture) should register in the College of Education, in 
order that they may have continuously the counsel and guidance of the 
faculty which is directly responsible for their professional preparation. 

Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. To be eligible to enter the professional 
courses, a student must have attained junior status, that is, he must have 
completed 96 quarter-hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average 
grade of C or better. 

Education Courses in Baltimore 

The majority of the professional courses and some of the arts and sciences 
courses required for undergraduate preparation in Education are offered 
in Baltimore in late afternoon and evening courses primarily for employed 
people. On a part time basis, a student may complete some or all of his 
work for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Education 
in the Baltimore Division of the College of Education. Through special 
arrangement with the Graduate School, graduate courses are also available 
for students working on masters' and doctors' degrees in education. 

A separate announcement of these courses is issued in the spring of each 
year. This announcement may be obtained from the Baltimore Division, 
College of Education, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Certification of Secondary School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." (See Maryland School Bidletin, Vol. 23, No. 3.) 

From the offerings in Education, the District of Columbia requirement of 
36 quarter hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of a minimum of 195 quarter 
hours of credit in conformity with the requirements specified under "Cur- 
ricula" and in conformity with general requirements of the University, 
the appropriate degree will be conferred. 



■ 



i 



I 



N' 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(1) ^o^mic,Thrch7s"iTpi*J\ ^''^ ^°"^^^ °^ Education, as follou, 
of English, social^td L:: setnee^^^ ^'^"^ ^ »>-- te i:: 

EnSL!!f z^ri? raiTf ^^^ -™ - ^" -.... 

. -the„,atics-9 quarter h;ursTeducattr~4' '"^^^ '^""^^^ -"-« - 
Voice and Diction-3 quarter h^ursphls^TfV^^^^^^^ hours; Speech 2- 
as required by the University ^^ '^^ education and military science 

a stdt:;ust1at1"td: PC-:; a:e" ^*"';"* ^^^-^^'"^ <^^- 139 or 140, 
courses in education and tn the ma^ ^'n^' ''■ '•'''• ""^'^^ « «" -qui • 
Exceptions to curricular Z, "'"""" ™"'* ^^ ^ or higher. 

'•';;~»" «* - not j;ss ;'L"»: o',''L'""t"'' '""•' 

(1) English, 18 quarter hours sophomore year: 

^'^ Ts^trt^rE; ;- r r^^^^^^^^^^ «. ai. degre. 

years of foreign language credits 9 „? ? ? ^'*'' '"^^ t''^" ^^^^^ 
three years of such crSits m'o f^ '.^''"'■'' '' ^^ ^"^ers ^vith 
any student who enters with four ^ZT^, «ng"age is required of 
candidates for the bachelor of IrneT/egrl t"'"^^^ "'"^'''^ "^ "^ 

(3) Social sciences (history, geoeranhv • , 

■ science), 18 quarter hours '^' '''"°'"^^' ^^^"""'"ics, and political 

(4) Science or mathematics, 18 quarter hours. 

(5) Education, 30 quarter hours. 
AH students who eler-t th^ „ j . 

P-cedi„g ,,^,,, requireltts anT^LtrTn"^^ r"''^"'"'" -'» ^«'fi" t^e 
school subjects which will involve meetiner.r *" *"^*='' ^* ^^^^^ *«"> high 
subject matter fields called majo" or «^- requirements in parti Jar 

Pie es one major and one minor The oTarJrh '^ *'" ^^'"'^^"* «=°- 

•najor and minor are detailed under "Specl^/p""'- '""''"'■■«'"«"*« for each 
The specific requirements by suMect field '^^'''"'■™*«" "«'-• 

English. A major in En.l ^ ' "^ ^' ^°"°^« = 

Survey and Comp^^Ln :'':^': "^"'^^^ '' ''"-*- '^-rs as follows: 

Survey of American Literature. ^^ Quarter hours 

Electives 9 quarter hours 

27 quarter hours 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



121 



A minor in English requires 39 quarter hours. It includes the 27 hours 
prescribed for the major and 12 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen with the approval of the adviser who w^ill guide 
the student in terms of College of Education records and recommendations 
of the English Department. 

Social ScieTices. For a major in this group, 54 quarter hours are re- 
quired, of which at least 27 hours must be in history including 9 hours in 
American history and 9 hours in European history. Nine of the 27 hours 
must be in advanced courses. For a minor in the group, 36 hours are 
required, of which 27 are the same as specified above, and 9 of which must 
be in advanced courses. 

History (including Survey of Western Civilization and 
American History) 27 quarter hours 

Economics or sociology 9 quarter hours 

Electives 18 quarter hours 

For a minor, the requirements are the same less the electives. 

Modern Languages. All students whose major is in modern languages 
are required to take Comp. Lit. 101 — Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature, and they are strongly advised to take the review course 
(Fr. 99, Ger. 99, Span. 99). The following courses are recommended: 
H. 1, 2 — Survey of Western Civilization; Phil. 1 — Fundamentals of Phi- 
losophy; Comp. Lit. 104 — Old Testament as Literature; Eng. 113, 114 — 
Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age; Comp. Lit. 105, 106 — Romanticism 
in France and Germany. For a major in German, Eng. 106 — Old Eng- 
lish and Eng. 103 — Beowulf. 

Specific requirements for the major in the different languages are as 
follows: French— Fr. 61, 62, 63, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 'and three additional 
year courses in literature in the 100 group; German — Ger. 61, 71, 72, 73, 
75, 76, 77, and three additional year courses in the 100 group; Spanish — 
Span. 61, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, and at least twenty-four hours in the 
100 group. 

Classical Languages, Both a major and minor are offered in Latin 
consisting of 45 and 30 quarter hours respectively. The courses are 
chosen with the advice of the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

Mathematics. A major in Mathematics requires 54 quarter hours as 

follows : 

Math. 7 — Solid Geometry 3 quarter hours 

Math. 15, 16, 17 — Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytical Ge- 
ometry 15 quarter hours 

Math. 20, 21, 22— Calculus 15 quarter hours 

Electives (Mathematics or physical sciences) 21 quarter hours 

For a minor the requirements are the same less the electives. 



i 






122 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Electives will be chosen by the student after consultation with the ColW 
of Education and the department of mathematics. 

Nine of the 54 hours required for a major should be in courses numbered 
100 or above. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry may be excused from 
Math. 7. 

Science. In general science a major of 60 quarter hours and a minor of 
45 quarter hours are offered, each including elementary courses in chem- 
istry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany) . The major should include 
one of the following programs. 

Program I, emphasizing chemistry: Math. 15, 16, 17; Chem. 1, 3, 5, 19, 
31, 32, 33, 34, 101, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186; Phys. 1, 2; Zool. 1; Bot. 1; 
Bact. 1. 

Program II, emphasizing physics: Math. 15, 16, 17; Chem. 1, 3, 5; 
Phys. 3, 4, 5, and 9 quarter hours of physics chosen from Phys. 104 to 
Phys. Ill; Zool. 1; Bot. 1; Bact. 1. 

Program III, emphasizing botany: Chem. 1, 3, 5; Phys. 1 and 2 or 
Phys. 6, 7, 8; Zool. 1; Bot. 1, 2, 50, 101; Pit. Phys. 102; Bact. 1. 

Program IV, emphasizing zoology. Chem. 1, 3, 5; Phys. 1 and 2 or 
Phys. 6, 7, 8; Zool. 2, 3, 14, 15, 7, 121 or 104, 75, 76; Bot. 1; Bact. 1. 

Minors of thirty quarter hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and 
in biological sciences. A minor in biology must be supported by a course 
in chemistry (Chem. 1 and 2 or 7 and 9). A minor in physics must be 
supported by a basic course in chemistry (Chem. 1 and 2). A minor in 
chemistry must be supported by a basic course in physics (Phys. 1 and 2). 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be applied to both provided that 
they number not less than 78 quarter hours in natural sciences. 

Academic Education Curriculum Quarter 

Freshman Year ' / // /// 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 3 or 3 .... 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

Speech 3 — Voice and Diction .... 3 

M. I. 1, 2. 3— Basic R, O. T. C. I (Men) 3 3 3 

P. E.~Physical Activities 1 1 1 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II (Women) 2 2 

General requirements .... . . . • 

Major and minor requirements .... . . . • 

Electives .... . . • • 

/ Total 17 17-18 17 18 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ^23 

t Quarter ^ 

/ // /// 

Sophomore Year ^ or i 

^j 3__-Educational Forum 3 g » 

'^ . r 6_Survey and Composition o § i 

7/i 5. elBasic R. 0. T. C. II(Men) \ ^ i 

^- E.__Physical Activities 

General requirements 

Major and minor requirements ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;... '_^ 

Electives 

17-18 17-18 17-18 

Total 

Junior Year ^ 

psych. 80— Educational Psychology ,,....... ^ 

VA 112— Educational Sociology 3 .... 

W 03-Theory of the senior High school or ••• _ , .... 

tj' iiA_Thcory of the Junior High School • 

^ 'AVm m, 126. or 128-CurHculum. Instruction, and Ob- 

servation ^'.'.'.\Z'.'. . • 1 ^ ^ 

P. E.-Physical Activities 

General requirements *•• 

Major and minor requirements •••••• 

Electives 

16-18 16-18 16-18 

Total 

Senior Year g 

Ed 105— Educational Measurement 5 or 5 or B 

Ed 139-Methods and Practice of Teaching or ^ ^^ ^ ^^ 9 

Ed. 140— Methods and Practice of Teaching [",'.[','..'.'... 1 ^ ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities ' 

Major and minor requirements 

12-18 12-18 12-18 

Total 

Business Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year j 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education * ' * * 3 g 

Eng. 1, 2. 3— Survey and Composition • ^ ^ 

S^ T, 1^ 2— Principles of Typewriting 1, II • 

S. t! 10-Advanced Typewriting I . . • • • • • '_•'•"_' '^' * ' j" * * ' ' ; \ [\ 2 « 

Econ. 1, 2. 3-Economic Resources of the World I, II, lU • ^ ^ 

Econ. 4, 5, 6-Economic Developments I, H. Ui ;;;..... 3 S 

H. 1. 2. 3— Survey of Western Civilization ^ j 

M. I. 1. 2, 3-Basic R. O. T. C.I (Men) '.'.'.*'.''.**.*'.... 1 ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities 2 

P. E. 42. 44— Hygiene I. II (Women) *"..*........... 

Electives " 

17 17-18 17-18 

Total 



3 



1 

2 

2 

3 

3 

1 

2 



9 



\i 



■\i 



125 



124 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



t Quarter ~ — ^ 

Sophomore Year I II //j 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 1 .... 

Eng. 7, 8, 9 — Expository Writing 2 2 ^ 

S. T. 12, 13, 14— Shorthand Principles I, II, III 3 3 3 

S. T. 11— Advanced Typewriting II 1 

Econ. 31, 32, 33— Principles of Economics I, II, III 3 3 3 

B. A. 20, 21, 22— Principles of Accounting I, II, III 4 4 4 

Speech 3 — "Voice and Diction 3 

M. I. 1, 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. II (Men) 3 3 3 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Total 18 18 19 

Junior Year 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 5 .... .... 

Ed. 112 — Educational Sociology .... 3 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School or . 3 

Ed. 110 — Theory of the Junior High School 3 

Eld. 150 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Business Sub- 

B. A. 10, 11, 12— Organization and Control I, II, III 2 2 2 

S. T. 16, 17, 18— Advanced Shorthand I, II, III 3 3 3 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 4 .... .... 

S. T. Ill— Office Training 3 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 17-18 

Senior Year 

Eld. 105 — Educational Measurements 3 .... 

EM. 140 — Methods and Practice of Teaching or 9 or 9 or 9 

Eld. 139 — Methods and Practice of Teaching 5 or 5 or 5 

B. A. 180, 181. 182— Business Law I, II, III 3 3 3 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 3 .... 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 1 1 

Total 12-18 12-18 12-18 

Business Elducation majors not pursuing the Secretarial Training Course may take: 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization (4) 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management (4) and 

B. A. 154 — Retail Store Management and Merchandising (4) 
instead of S. T. 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18. 

Elementary Education Curriculum 

This curriculum is open only to persons who have completed two or three 
year curricula in Maryland State Teachers Colleges or other accredited 
teacher eduAsation institutions whose records give evidence of ability and 
character essential to elementary teaching. Such persons will be admitted 
to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate classes. 

Credit for extension courses given by other institutions may be accepted 
in an amount not exceeding 45 quarter hours. The last 45 quarter hours 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
^, .orlc preceding the conferring of the degree must be done in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. students who are admitted with 
approximateiyao q ^ ,„_,.„) are as follows: 




«phy) -is" quarter' hours. Electives to be chosen 

Led and approved by adviser ^.^^ ^ ^^^^j. 

Electives— as above. 

Home Economics Education designed for students who 

The Home Economics Education ^^"l^^" ^^^t^,,, or to engage 

are preparing to teach --^-"^1 ^^^^h .e^u^res'^^ knowledge of teach- 

in any phase of home ^^^^^^Lof aU itses of home economics and the 

Electives may be chosen from other colleges. 

■J. t „-i^i+i«Tial training and practice is given tnrougu u 

Opportunity for additional training y „anaeement house, 

teaching and through experience m the home "^"^^^^^ g^^^^. 

Students electing this cu™lum may register m^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Home Economics Education Curriculum ^ Quarter — . 

Freshman Year .333 

Eng. 1, 2, 3— Survey and Composition *."...... .... ^ 5 

Chem. 'l, 2— General Chemistry *.*.**.'.'.'........... ^ 

H. E. 10— Textiles.... 3 

H. E. 70— Design ' ... ^ 

H, E. 71— Costume Design * i 

H. E. 1— Home Economics Lectures ^ 2 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, n i 1 >• 

p. E.— Physical Activities ' ' q_i 

Math 0— Basic Mathematics * 

Speech 3— Voice and Diction 3 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education * * 

Electives 

15 n 18 

Total 



•i 



\ 



^ I 



til 



126 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



127 



Sophomore Year 

Phys. 6, 7, 8 — Introductory Physics 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

H. E. 20A or B — Clothing 

H. E. 31, 32, 33— Foods 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Econ. 37 — ^Fundamentals of Economics 
Soc. 3 — Contemporary Social Problems 

Bot. 1 — Introductory Botany 

Electives . . . 



• ••••• 



r 


Quarter 


/ 


II 


3 


S 


3 


s 


3 


• • • • 


3 


s 


1 


1 



Total 



• • • • • 



Junior Year 

H. E. — 160, 151 — Home Management.. 
H. E. 135 — Nutrition 

H. E. 130 — Food Economics 

H. E. 131— Meal Service 

H. E. Ed. 101 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Home 

Economics 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology 

P. E- — Physical Activities 

H. E. 74— Survey of Art History 

Electives 



Total 



Senior Year 

H. E. 152 — Home Management 

H, E. 153 — Practice in Management of the Home 

H. E. 170, 171— Interior Design 

H. E. 132 — Demonstrations 

H. E. Ed. 103 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics.. 5 

H. E. Ed. 106, 107 — Problems in Teaching Home Elconomics 

XI. h*, litd. lUZ~~~v^niiQ otudy .....•..••*.*•>••.............•.. 

Ed. 105 — Educational Measurements 

Ed. 112 — Educational Sociology 

Ed. 110 — Theory of the Junior High School or 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School 

P. E. — Physical Activities 



17 



5 
5 



16 



3 

• • • • 

3 

• • • • 

or 9 



3 
1 



Total 15-19 



5 
8 

18 



3 
8 



« • • • 



15 



8 

8 



3 

» • 

8 
1 



15 



/// 



3 
1 
5 
3 

> • • 

3 

18 



17 



3 

2 
5 

> • 

3 



14 



Nursery School Curriculum preparation of nursery 

n ^:rr:'^:'^^f^nT.:\ZL the per^nal development of 
'''' tnt and to give training in homen.aU,ng. ^__ ^^^^^^ 



sc 
the s 



freshman 

12, 3— Survey and Composition 



• • • • • 



8 



3 



Chem. 1, 2— General Chemistry.. 

H E. 10 — Textiles 

H E. 70 — Design 

' £ rji — Costume Design 

Ed 2— Introduction to Education 

^„lech 4— Voice and Diction 

S^. 1-^ntemporary Social Problems ;:::;;.*.'.'.'..... 2 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I. H ' i 

p" B.— Physical Activities ® 

Electives 

17 

Total 



Sophomore 

H. E. 31, 32, 33-Food8 

♦H E. 34— Elements of Nutrition 

S^c *5— Comparative Sociology 

Soc 61— Marriage and the Family 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology...- 

Psych 18— Child Psychology 

Psych 80— Educational Psychology 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics.. 

P^ E.— Physical Activities 

Electives 



Total 



3 
5 



1 

G 

17 



Juifiior 

H. E. 150, 151, 152-Home Management ;;:;;'.*.'.*.*. 

H. E. 130— Food Economics ' 

H F 131 — Meal Service 

H. E. ^ 104-Nursery School Techniaues •••••; 

H. E. Ed. 102-Child Study •••••••;•• \\ 

H. E. Ed. lU-Play and Play Materials .••• 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 

P. E.— Physical Activities * * * " ' 

Electives 



Total 



1 

8 

17 



// 

8 
5 



3 



2 

i 

8 

17 



8 

• • 

3 
3 

• • 

3 



1 

4 

17 



8 
2 



6 

1 


16 



/// 

8 
S 



8 



1 
2 

17 



5 

S 
1 
8 

17 



« 



s 

• • 

8 



1 

7 

17 



~~7i;;;ie„ts «i»hi„. to n.a5or in Child Nut'^«o» ^ ^^'l^^.^t Zceo^Ti T 
Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 33) and Nutr.t.o 
Rlcments of Nutrition. 



128 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Senior 

H. E. 153 — Practice in Management of the Home 

H. E. Ed. 103— Teaching Nursery School 

H. E. 121— Children's Clothing 

H. E. 138— Child Nutrition 

H. E. Ed. 112, 113, 114 — Creative Expression-Literature, Art, 

Music, Science 

H. E. 132 — Demonstrations 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



— Quarter 
I II 



111 



3 

3 

3 
1 

i 

17 



5-9 



S 

s 
1 

4-0 
16 



1 

9 

IT 



Total 

Suggested Electives: 

Freshman — History, Clothing, Development of the Human Body. 

Sophomore — Rural or Urban Sociology, Individual Differences, Household Bacteriology. 

Junior — Juvenile Delinquency, Mental Hygiene. 

Senior — Psychology of the Adolescent, Political Science. 

Industrial Education 

The program of studies in Industrial Education provides: (a) a four- 
year curriculum leading to the degree of bachelor of science in industrial 
arts and vocational education; (b) a program of professional courses to 
prepare teachers to meet the certification requirements in vocational and 
occupational schools; (c) a program of courses for the improvement of 
teachers in service. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. Experience in some trade or industrial activity will 
benefit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. The curriculum 
is designed to prepare teachers of trade and industrial shop and related 
subjects, and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient latitude of 
electives so that a student may also meet certification requirements in some 
other high school subject. Students entering an industrial education curri- 
culum must register in the College of Education. 

Industrial Education Curriculum 
Freshman Year 



— Quarter 
I II 



III 



Ind. Ed. 1 — ^Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 21 — ^Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 2 — Elementary Woodworking 

Ind. Ed. 22 — ^Machine Woodworking 

Ind. Ed. 42 — Machine Woodworking 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Speech 3 — ^Voice and Diction 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 

if ath. 10 — Algebra 

Math. 11 — ^Trigonometry (Plane) 

History or Social Science 

M. I. 1, 2. 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. — Physical Activities 



3 
3 



Total 



3 
3 

3 
3 
1 

19 



3 

» • 

8 

> • 

S 



• 


3 


s 


3 


• 
• 


• • • • 

3 


3 


3 


S 


3 


1 


1 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



129 



Sopho7nore Year 

Tnd Ed. 24— Sheet Metal Work 

md Ed. 26-Art Metal Work... 

Ind Ed. 41— Architectural Drawing. . . . 

Ind Ed. 28— Electricity • 

Ind' Ed. 48— Advanced Electricity 

Ind' Ed! 23— Forge Practice 

Ed 3— Education Forum 

^^^^ 4^ 5^ 6— Survey and Composition. 

Math. 12— Analytical Geometry 

Math. 7-Solid Geometry • • 

Chem. 5, 6- Introductory Chemis ry... 

^ J 4 5^ 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Math. Elective 

p. B.— Physical Activities 



/ 

3 



Quarter 
II 



2 

• • 

3 

3 
3 
3 



Total 



18 



Junior Year 

Ind. Ed. 67-Cold Metal Work. . . .... • • -^ • • • • • • 

Ind. Ed. 69— Elementary Machine Shop fr&cuce 

Ind. Ed. 110— Foundry 

Ind Ed 121— Essentials of Design • • ; • • 

Ind'. Ed. 162-Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation- 

Education 

Psych 80— Educational Psychology 

Ed U2-Educational Sociology-Introductory 

^ 103-Theory of the Senior High School or 

Ed 110— Theory of the Junior High School 

Phys. 6, 7, 8-Introductory Physics • • • • 

History or social science 

P^ E.— Physical Activities 

Electives 



-Industrial 



Total 



19 



Senior Year 

Ind Ed. 89— Advanced Machine Shop • • 

Ind! Ed. 164-Shop Organization and Management, 

Ed. 105— Educational Measurement 

Ed 114-Guidance in Secondary Schools ....... • 

Ed. 139 or 140- Methods and Practice of Teaching. 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

p. E.— Physical Activities 

Electives 



3 



3 
3 



3 

3 

• • 

8 
3 

• • 

1 
19 



18 



III 

m • • 

3 



1 

S 



3 
3 

1 

17 



3 
3 



3 


or 


3 


. • • • 


3 




3 


3 


3 




3 


S 


1 




1 


1 



1€ 



Total 



16 



5-9 
3 

1 



16 



5-9 
» » » • 

1 

• • • • 

16 



19 



19 






^li 



^■if 



s 



1 


• . . , 


2 


• • . . 


• • • • 


1 


• • • • 


2 


3 


• • • • 


• • • • 


3 



130 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Physical Education Curriculum for Women* 

Freshman Year ' Quarter 

Eng. 1. 2, 3— Survey and Composition 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology ^ * 

Bact. 1— Bacteriology []\ ^ 

Zool. 14— Human Anatomy and Physiology..... * ' 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 

Speech 4— Voice and Diction 

P. E. 30— History and Principles of P. E...... ; 

P. E. 52— Dance Techniques ^ 

P. E. 62— Technique of Sport Skills ^ 

P. E. 54— Dance Techniques ^ 

P. E. 64— Technique of Sport Skills. 

P. E. 56— Dance Techniques ] * 

P. E. 66— Technique of Sport Skills 

P. E. 40 — Personal Hygiene \\\ 

P. E. 50 — Community Hygiene 

Total 

16 17 

Sophomore Year 

Zool. 1.6— Human Anatomy and Physiology - 

Zool. 53— Physiology of Exercise 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology! !!!.!!.!!... * 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum ^ 

Soc. 3— Introduction to Sociology 

Psych. 18— Child Psychology 

Social Sciences 

P. E. 60-Theory and Practice of Gymnastics .*.'.*.*.' ' 

P. E. 72— Dance Techniques ^ 

P. E. 82— Technique of Sport Skills ^ 

P. E. 74 — Dance Technique ^ 

P. E. 84— Technique of Sport Skills 

P. E, 80 — Kinesiology 

P. E. 32 — History of Dance 

P. E. 76— Dance Techniques 

P. E. 86— Technique of Sport Skills. 

Electives 

• .... 

Total ' 

17 17 



1 

Z 

s 



1 

2 



/// 



IT 



5 
5 
1 
2 



16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Junior Year 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

g(j^ 110 — Theory of Junior High School 

gj_ 112 — Educational Sociology 

Ed. 142 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Physical Edu- 
cation 

p. B. 120 — Mental Hygiene in Physical Education 

Zool. 55 — Development of the Human Body 

Social Sciences 

p. EI. 132 — Dance Composition 

P. E. 102— Technique of Sport Skill 

P. E. 122 — Tumbling and Apparatus 

P. E. 110 — First Aid and Accident Prevention 

P. E. 134 — Dance Composition 

P. E. 104— Technique of Sport Skills 

P. E. 160 — Community and Industrial Recreation 

P. E. 136 — Dance Composition 

P. E. 106— Technique of Sport Skills 

Electives 



131 



— Quarter 
I II 

o .... 

3 



3 
2 
3 
1 
1 



Total 



17 



• • • • • 



Senior Year 

Ed. 139 — Methods and Practice of Teaching or. 
Ed. 140 — Methods and Practice of Teaching.... 

Ed. 105 — fkiucational Measurements 

P. E. 116 — Organization and Administration of P. E., 
P. E. 108 — Recreational Activities , 

E. 142 — Methods in Dance and/or 

E. 124 — Coaching and Officiating , 

E. 140— Therapeutics 

E. 150 — Recreational Dance 

E. 144 — Methods in Dance and/or 

P. E. 126 — Coaching and Officiating 

P. E. 148— Teaching Health 

P. E. 170 — Recreational Dance , 

P. E. 146 — Methods in Dance and/or , 

P. E. 128- -Coaching and Officiating 

Electives 



P. 
P. 
P. 
P. 
P. 



5 
9 

3 
1 
1 
2 



• • • • • 



^ 
/// 



3 
5 



2 
5 

1 



17 



3 
2 
1 



16 



3 



5 
1 
1 

2 



Total 



16 



16-17 



S 
1 
1 

2 



16-18 



end in zero are open to ZThZnLT I '""**"*" ""'>'• ^""^ ^^ose numbers 

Juniors and Senior. """"'"■ *^"'^^ "'*" ""'"''ers above 100 are for 



132 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
Curriculum in Physical Education for Men* 



Freshman Year 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology. 



- Quarter 
II 



Bact. 1— General Bacteriology ,... ^ 

Zool. 14 — Human Anatomy \\ 

Eng. 1, 2. 3— Survey and Composition. 

L \ ^ w!!L''^'?^ ^"^ Principles of Physical Educaiion .* .'.*.*;.""* 5 

i!id. 2--Introduetion to Education 

P. E. 40— Health— Personal Hygiene. 

P. E. 50— Health— Community Hygiene. 

P. E. 31 33. 35-Physical Education Leadership .'.'.' I 

^' i'.— Physical Activities ^ 

M. I. 1. 2, 3— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) .. ...'..['' **" ^ 



Total 



18 



Sophornoi'e Year 

Zool. 15 — Physiology 

P. E. 70— Physiology of Exercise ^ 

P. E. 80 — Kinesiology 

P. E. 60-Theory and Practice of Gymnastics .*.*.*.'.".' ' 

r, E. 51— Mass Games Programs 

P. E. 53 — Organization of Intra Murals. 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 

Speech 4— Voice and Diction 

P. E. 41, 43, 45— Varsity Game Skills. 

P- E.— Physical Activities \\ 

M. I. 4. 5, 6— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 



Total 



3 
2 
1 
3 

17 



Junior Year 

Psych. 80— Education Psychology 

^ torr.^"'"''!""*' ^""'"^^'"^"^^ «"^ Tesis 'in' Phy'sical' Edu^al ' 

Ed. 112--Educational Sociology 

^E Hi'?4.''f]r v"'" "' J--V '(Senior)* H;gh*s;h;>o;::;.'::: "•3 

p. E. 141. 143. 145-Varsity Team Organization t 

p E iiLf '' / Y.T^'r '"* '''""'^"^ ^"^^*-" Lead;;ship; : : ; \ 

P. E. no— First Aid and Accident Prevention.... 

P. E. 161— Youth Organizations... 

^catfet"!^.""'.''"*"™' ^'^^^^'^^or., and Ob;e;vaiion-Ph'ysical Edu^ * " * 

P* E.— Physical Activities... 

1 



/// 



Totel 



• • 


5 


3 


3 


* • 


* • • • 


3 


* • • . 


8 


* • ■ . 


• 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


S 


3 



19 



2 
1 
3 



14-18 



or 



3 
2 

1, 
6 



16-ia 



3 
1 
3 

16 19 



3 
1 



5 
1 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Senior Year 

p. E. 120 — Mental Hygiene and Physical Education 

P. E. 171 — Coordination and Administration of Physical Eklucation 

P. E. 140 — Therapeutics 

P. E. 150 — Recreative Dance 

P. E. 181 — Training and Conditioning 

P. E. 160 — Community and Industrial Recreation 

Ed. 139-140 — Practice Teaching. Major and Minor 

P. E. Physical Activities 



133 



/ 

3 



Quarter 
II 



— \ 
/// 



6-9 
1 



or 



Total 16-19 



3 

2 

• • • • 

5-9 
1 

16-19 



or 



3 
5-9 
1 

14-16 



In conformance with the general minimum requirements of the College of 
Education, nine hours of social studies are required. The following courses 
are recommended: Introduction to Sociology, Juvenile Delinquency, IVTunici- 
pal Government. 

Students who carry a major in another teaching field and who wish to 
prepare to coach interscholastic athletics may develop a minor in physical 
education by taking the following courses: 

P. E. 30 — History and Principles of Physical Education 5 

P. E. 171 — Coordination and Administration of Physical Education 3 

P. E. 1-12 — Physical Education Activities 12 

P. E. 40— Health (Personal Hygiene) 3 

P. E. 110 — First Aid and Accident Prevention 5 

P. E. 181 — Training and Conditioning 2 

P. E. 120 — Mental Hygiene and Physical Education 3 

P. E. 41, 43, 45— Varsity Game Skills 7 

P. E. 141, 143, 145— Varsity Team Organization 7 

Ed. 142 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Physical Education 5 



16-18 16-18 



16-18 



ottered to both men and women start It 100 al T "" '""• ^''"""' '""^ ^^"'O' ""•"^"^ 
eduction maio.. not open to wirn^Lr^n^letn ILtr, .^'''''^^^ "'"'' """ "*-'-' 



t 



134 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean. 

Margaret G. Engle, Secretary to Dean. 

The activities of the College of Engineering during the present emer- 
gency are all directed toward furthering the war effort. These activities 
include training civilian students to practice the profession of Engineering; 
giving special courses for personnel in the armed forces; holding training 
classes for adults to expedite production in war industries; and conducting 
research on vital war problems in the several engineering fields. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. In the Mechanical Engineering 
Department an option in Aeronautical Engineering is offered in the junior 
and senior years. In order to give the student time to choose the branch of 
engineering for which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several 
courses is the same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the stu- 
dent to make a proper selection. The courses differ only slightly in the 
sophomore year, but in the junior and senior years the students are directed 
definitely along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathe- 
matics. See Admission, Section I. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the 
unit of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry. The 
program for such students would be as follows: during the first term, 
five hours a week would be devoted to making up advanced algebra and 
solid geometry; in the second term, mathematics of the first term would 
be scheduled, and the second term mathematics would be taken in the third 
term. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chem- 
ical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, and mechanical engineer- 
ing with aeronautical option, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by stu- 
dents registered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engi- 
neering, which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that 
required for bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



135 



ate School. See Graduate School. Section II. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer. E'ectrical Engmeer 

cant must satisfy the following conditions: . 

1 He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work 
not less than four years after graduation. 

^ u -.^^ciHerprl eliffible by a committee composed of the Dean 
2. He must be considered e'>S">'ejy J Departments of Chem- 

of the College of Engineering and the heads ot the uepa 

ical Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 
3.' His registration for a degree must be '^VVr^lfJ^^:^:^, .Te^lS 

prior to the date on which the degree is to ^« -^J^^//^ J^^^^^rf J,e and 

with his application a complete report of his engineering v 

an outline of his proposed thesis. 
4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

^ . • K.i;uiin(r« are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 

neering work. 

n f.in. Rooms The drafting-rooms are fully equipped for practical 
worf The er;rn;ering student Ut provide himself with an approved 

drawing outfit, material, and books. 

Graduate Research. 

industrial chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

,„g. organ,. P™- j;j™ ^U „" «" »Trp»n,a„». Mra.H. 



i 



i' 



136 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity of 
100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed type, 
direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evaporation 
can be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is equipped 
with a horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube bundle. 
This evaporator is equipped with vacuum and pressure gauges, stirrer, wet 
vacuum pump, a condensate pump, and a salt filter with different types of 
packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may be made. 
The organic process equipment is all self-driven and designed to afford 
flexibility in use. Filtration studies may be made either on a large plate 
and frame press or on the ordinary Sweetland type press. Gas absorption 
equipment includes a blower and a stoneware packed column. Combustion 
equipment available consists of an industrial carburetor, pot furnace, pre- 
mix gas fired furnace and the usual gas analysis equipment. Shop facilities 
include a lathe, drill press, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools 
necessary for unit operation and research studies. For grinding there is a 
jaw crusher, a disc crusher, and a ball mill. A mechanical shaker and 
standard sieve are available. for particle size separation. 

Cooperative and Graduate Research Laboratories. These laboratories are 
arranged to permit the installation of such special equipment as the par- 
ticular problems under consideration may require. Effort is made to 
maintain cooperation with the industries of Maryland and the Chemical 
Engineering activities of the State and Federal governments; for such work 
important advantages accrue because of the location of the Eastern Experi- 
ment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines on the University 
campus. 

Electrical Machinery Laboratories. There is provided a motor-generator 
set, consisting of a synchronous motor and a compound direct-current gen- 
erator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish direct current 
for testing purposes. Through a distribution switchboard, provision is made 
for distributing to the various laboratories direct current at 125 volts, and 
alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 and 220 volts. 

High-current potential dividers and auto-transformers are available at 
the testing stations for individual voltage control. A single-phase induc- 
tion regulator with control panel is also available for voltage regulation of 
experimental circuits. At the individual testing stations, use is made of 
specially constructed instrument tables which are designed to facilitate 
measurements in fundamental, direct-current machinery, and alternating- 
current machinery experiments. 

The test equipment includes a variety of direct- and alternating-current 
generators and motors, distribution transformers, a synchronous converter, 
an induction regulator, and modern control apparatus. Most of the 
machines are of modem construction and of such size and design as to give 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



137 



1. 4- ;of,v« Flpxibilitv of operation is provided in 
typical Vertorr..ncec^r^t^^c^^^^^^J^^^^ P^^ alternating-current 
several ways: for example, direct current ' nrovisions for easy mechan- 
ihines are mounted «\-— ^^^^..^^ ^erected electricaUy to any 
ical coupling and any machme may be readily con _ ^ 

:,her machine through a CO -^^d^^^^^^^^^ ^,, ,„, 

SL'mrctlefprS trsl^- available for machine testing 
Cuted in the test equipment are the -^^^^^^^^^ 

-ttC^irSer.^^^^^^^ ^-'^-- ■ 

bridges, impedance bridges, and oscillographs. 

mu^ination Laboratory. The e.uip-nt in^^^^^^^^^ tf tetSkSf o^f 
and reflectors of -nous ypes; bar ^P^^^^^^ ,, ^,^. 

candle-power distnbution "^ "^;a'^~ illumination intensities. Several 
tlS'C:^:rZT^^:Z^^.r.s are available for study in nearby 
rooms. . 

Electrical Measurements Laboratory. The c^^^jrcl^^^^^^^^^^ 
of standards of potential and resistance -^ich are ^^f J^ J^^^^^,,, 
with modem potentiometers to maintain cahbration of ^ jtand^ 
voltmeter, and watthourmeter. f^^^^lfl^^'^tlnlrA^.rs de- 

galvanometers are also available. 

A flve-machine -tor-ge-a-Vet deliver -^-rtl^'^o 

alternating and direct, to test tables for ^^f^^^.^^'y^^g^^ti'e fields, non- 
available for the experimental study of el to^^^^^^^ ^^^ 
linear circuit elements and other topics m the neiQ o 
magnetism. 

, ^ * Tv,;= lahnratorv is housed in the same room as 

Electronics Laboratory. This laboratory is """ , measure- 

equipment is also provided tor mala„g 1??S i^S^menrincludos c^thcd^ 

o^mllators 

Electrical Communications ^f-^^ST^r^^^T^Xt 

Sinrar^sriin^rfli^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

device! are provided. A transmission loss or gain set is ^vailab e 

Rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators, and a demonstration radio set are pro- 
vided for making radio communication studies. 




m 



\i 



138 



I 



Hi' 



r 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Mechanical Engineering Laboratorio* Tl,^ 
valve automatic steam engines e"XZ' Ji^VrZTt '""'''*^ "^ ^"''« 
generator set, Waukesha Diesel engine research 'nH >t f ' '*"'■" *"'"'"■"«■ 
eter and other accessories, two-stage steamdXen 1 "*"' ^^""'"'"^■ 
engines, fans, pumps, indicators, gaJLs feed "T T ^''"'P^^^^or, gas 
densers, tachometers, injectors ff^^, \ ^' ''^^t^'^. steam con- 

Planimeters, thermom'eterrlnTott ZT^l'ZT^' '^ ^^"^^ 
for a mechanical engineering laboratorv a ^ apparatus and equipment 
.ng and ventilation unit have been Sled '''"^^'^'^'^ «-* -"^ a heat- 

restr il^^i^ttlS Jta^crsTi? ^™^^ ^^ --«- -^ 
tion and noise, and aerodynamics A thrl^f?' f '^'=*"'-*' *««*«' ^ibra- 
fully equipped with balances^nd other ! ""^^""^ *^P^ ^'"^ tunnel, 

ated. has been constructed for standard T '"*' ^"'^ electrically oper- 

for student thesis research experiments in aerodynamics and 

turtt^Sri^Tnrstlr --- struc- 

also available for studentfin co^X ' t ""^" '"^*='»'"« ^^op is 

speed motors are available for eC^eSi^^^^^^ Variable 

^^oJ.lzZ\'tMj^i^^i::r:if' r -^'^^-^ -->^-; a sixty. 

Tuckerman gauges, oscillographTwHh I """"'''^' *"^""^ '"^^^hine. 

jack system for static testing^ accessories, and a Timby hydraulic 

Hydraulics Laboratory Tht^ 
centrifugal pumps, measuring tanks" va'^^fo'!.*. T"'"''', "^ electrically driven 
nozzles, Pelton water wheel with Prlvht l"^^ "^ ^^'''' ^^"t"^ "meters, 
use, hook gauges, dial gaugls tachomet-' ^ '''''"■^"'' '"' '^''°^^t«'->' 
ratus necessary for theUrofTr ThaSe^s^^f ^te"^^^^^ -- 

gravel, steel, concrete, timber and bSk'"" '""*'""'^' ^"'^'^ ^^ «-<>' 

lOO^ot^rd untet, LS^acS t'^'^^""^ *-«"- ™-'^^-. two 
tester, abrasion testing mSn? rati; *"™ ^f""^ '""'=''•"«' ''-«'»««^ 
cement-testing apparatus, extens ' 1^ . h ^"^ ^"* temperature chamber, 
special devices for ascertaiSwhT!. . •"'""'"«*«'■ g«u&es. and other 

Special apparatus ^l^T^ 1 ^'"^''^''^ "' ^'f^^^"* '"^t-ials. 

University 'ZTj^Si^X'X.t^^ToX'''' -''' ^" *^^ ^'^^ "^ *»>« 

nie?h:i"i!tiul!"S"rti:L"r3;j!r ^^f ™^*- ^^^-^^ ^-^ the 

Equipment is also available for^stiVrSs Z th? p^ot^S^? ^-J 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



139 



Engineering Soils Laboratory. Equipment is available for performing 
the usual tests on engineering soils. This includes apparatus for grain size 
analysis, Atterberg limits, permeability, optimum moisture content for 
compaction, Proctor penetration, and consolidation. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association has, 
by arrangement with the College of Engineering, established its testing 
and research laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research 
Foundation thus organized is to make available to the Association additional 
facilities for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of 
Engineering additional facilities and opportunities for increasing the scope 
of its engineering research. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 
milling machines, drill presses, shaper, midget mill, and precision boring 
head. Equipment is available for gas and electric arc welding. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 



and 
A 

as 



Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane, topographic, i 
geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties, 
wide variety of surveying instruments is provided, including domestic 
well as foreign makes. 

Special Models and Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department main- 
tains a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering maga- 
zines. The class work, particularly in advanced courses, requires that 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 

The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and Transport, founded by 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, President of the National Highways Association, 
is part of the Library of the College of Engineering. The many books, 
periodicals, pamphlets, and other items included in this library cover all 
phases of highway engineering, highway transportation, and highway traffic 
control. 



I : 

1: 



140 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans- 
portation library of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington, D. C. The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transportation problems, 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies. 

Freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
by practicing engineers covering the work of the several engineering pro- 
fessional fields. The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in 
selecting the particular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 
The student is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecture. 
A series of engineering lectures for upper classmen is also provided. These 
are given weekly by prominent practicing engineers in the various branches 
of the profession. 

Student branches of the following national technical societies are estab- 
lished in the College of Engineering: American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The student 
branches meet regularly for the discussion of topics dealing with the various 
fields of engineering. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior 
when he shall have passed at least 102 term credit hours with an average 
grade of C or higher. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



141 
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

.mc CURRICULUM FOR ALL FRESHMAN STUDENTS 
BASIC CUKR^ ENGINEERING . , 

IN THE COLEGE OF fc«u following curriculum 

All freshman students are required to take tne 
during their first year: , Quarter — ^ 

preshmanYear « * 2 

2 3— Survey and Composition 

s^h' i-P"Mic Speaking ;•;;■;;; r. .... •••• 

'T^t^i::^'^^^^^^'^^^-^^^ •.•.•.::; ■.:■.■. •••• ""' ■ 

M^th n-Ansly"" Geometry •;••;• B 5 

''T 2-EngineerinB Drawing .... 8 

i;:: ^Descriptive Geometry .•••••••••;• .... \ 

1 TTnrce Practice • • • • ^ 

rr.\-rt™auetion to engineering.. ...^ 3 » \ 

Basic R. O. T. C. I-l. 1-2. 1-3 1 ^ 

Physical Activities -— ^^ ^ 

Total 

to apply this under executive d^f.^^^^'^f "modern chemical research has 
or fhe attainment of ^•^"'^"'"l^tS sodal wSe that the field of the 
contributed so much to -dustm^.^^^J oTer practically every operation in 

f Quarter ^ 

/ // /// 

Sophomore Year . b .... •••• 

Math. 20-Differential Calculus 6 -^ 

Math. 21-Integral Calculus ... .... 

Math. 22-Applied Calculus . . .... • • - ^ "^ (Lectures) » * ' \ 

Chem. 35. 37-Elementary Organic Chemistry .... i 

Surv. 1-ElemenU of Plane Surveying .... « 

Speech 7-Oral Technical English 5 6 » 

Phys. 3A. 4A. 5A-General Physics •■ 2 t « 

M. I. Il-Basic R. O. T. C •••;;• 1 _J- _J^ 

Physical Activities „, 

21 *• * 

Total 



^ . ,^^ wMks to determine whether the 
-TXlTamying test is given at the clc.e of the first^two weeWs^ ^^^^ ^^^ ,^ ^^„,^ ^ 
student is adequately prepared for Math. 16. A 
take Math. 1, without credit. 



142 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



5 

S 

z 

4 
1 
3 

22 



3 
6 



3 
4 
1 
3 

20 



Chemical Engineering ^ Quarter 

Junior* Year I II /// 

Ch. E. 103, 105, 107— Elements of Chemical Engineering 8 3 

Mech. 3 — Statics and Dynamics .... 

Chem. 187, 189 — Physical Chemistry (Lectures) 5 

Chem. 188, 190 — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 3 

Econ. 31, 32, 33 — Principles of Economics 3 

E. E. 51, 52, 53 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 

Physical Activities 1 

Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Total 22 

Senior Year 

Ch. E. 109, 111, 113— Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 

Ch. E. 115, 117, 119— Advanced Unit Operations 5 

Ch. E. 127, 129, 131— Fuels and Their Utilization 2 

Ch. E. 133, 135, 137— Chemical Technology 2 

Ch. E. 139, 141, 143 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 2 

Ch. E. 145, 147, 149 — Chemical Engineering Calculations 3 

C. E. 112, ,113— Elements of Structures 2 

Physical Activities 1 

Non-Engineering Elective 2 

Total 20 20 18 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 

of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams and surveying and mapping. 



1 


1 


5 





2. 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


• • • • 


1 


1 


2 


2 



Civil Engineering Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' / 

Math. 20— Differential Calculus 5 

Math. 21 — Inteerral Calculus 

Math. 22 — Applied Calculus 

Phys. 3A, 4 A, 5A— General Physics 5 

Dr. 4 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 3 

Mech. 1 — St&tics and Dynamics 

Surv. 2, 3, 4 — Plane Surveying 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Basic R. O. T. C. II-l, II-2. 11-3 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 20 



Quarter 

n 



6 



2 
5 

3 
1 

21 



/// 



6 

5 

> • 

5 
2 

> • 

3 
1 



21 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

, Quarter - 

,,„,ior Year 2 

.neech 8-Advanced Oral Technical En^I.sh • • • 

r„i 2-Engineering Geology...... 4 * 

S«h. 50. 51-Strength of Materials .■•••■•• 6 

V 50 — Hydraulics 

'•hsV-Materials of Engineering........; 4 

ME 50-Principles of Mechanical E.gmeerxng • • .... 

?• I' 50-Principles of Electrical Engineering • • ^ .... 

C E 52— Curves and Earthwork 

' g 100— Theory of Structures e 

Surv. 100-Advanced Surveying •••••• s » 

Non-engineering elective ****....... ^ \ 

Physical Activities 

19 20 

Total 

Senior Year 2 2 

u Q Advanced Oral Technical English 

Z':XV-^^IZ:^'^^. Law and Specifications .....••; ^ .... 

C E 101-Elements of Highways 3 6 

C E 102. 103, 104-Concrete Design 3 5 

r f'i05 106, 107-Structural Design 3 3 

C E lOs', 109, no-Municipal Sanitation •••••• . .... 

C E. Ill— Soils and Foundations ' 3 3 

Non-engineering elective ^ t 

Physical Activities ^^ 

Total ''■ 



143 



/// 

• • ■ 

3 



3 
1 

20 



3 
3 

S 
4 
3 
1 

20 



Electrical Engineering c^^^pration transmission, and dis- 

Electrical Engineering deals -^^^^^^^^^^^ communication, 

tribution of electrical ener^^^^^^^ 
illumination, and manufactunn^, ana n 
in industry, commerce, and home life. 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum ^ Q^^^rt^^^ — ^ 

Sophomore Year 2 

Speech 7-Oral Technical English "•' 5 

Math. 20-Differential Calculus •• 5 .-.^ 

Math. 21— Integral Calculus ,^. • 

Math. 22-Applied Calculus • .^ • 5 5 

Phys. 3A. 4A. 5A-General Ihysics 2 

Surv. 1-Elements of Plane Sureying y 2 .... ■' 

Shop 2-Machine Shop Practice i * 

E E 1 2— Direct Current Theory 

Mech. 2-Statics and Dynamics •••; 5 .... 

Econ. 37-Fundamentals of Economics ••• 3 3 » 

Basic R. O. T. C. H-l. 11-2. "-^ ; • 1 J _^ 

Physical Activities — 

.20 ^* 

Total 






til 



144 



111 



•i 



!::l 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junwr Year , Quarter 

M^Ml^-l;"! ^'Jfl Technic, E„gH.h ^ " III 

MecH. 53-sr:r: ^rr '°- ^-•---••■•■•■•■.■.■::::::: -a ' ■■■ 

C. E. 61-HydrauIics . . . ' ' •, •• 

Mech. 63-Materials of Engin^ri„: .'.".■ 

£ t It^'^*''"''"* "-^^--■••: ■■■« 

E R ioT~f """^"'^ ^""<">' Circuits 6 .... 

ERloi_Entrmeeri„g Electronics... 7 '■■• 

*iiective .... 

Physical ActiCi;;;; •::;:::::::::: ••••••••' '*'' "s ! 

1 , * 

Total : ^ 1 

Senior Year 

E. E 05 loL^-^r^"''"'"^ ^"~»t Machine y.' f * .... 

E E iotI^ ^^~ Communications « 5 4 

E P 1!I~^?"""'"'''=="»" Networks .. . < 4 

E. E. io8_Electric Transients 4 

E. E. 109- Ultra Hirt FrequeLy ■"■ -; 

M. E. 61-n,en„odyna«ir. r ■'■ t 

M E. 62-Power Plants . . • ' ' ,, * 

Elective * -.. 

Physical Activities •■•..■.■:.■.■.■:::.■:::::.•::::::::;;• ^'^ '"» 

Total ' . ^ 1 

."*->--lL ^^ 19 21 

Mechanical Engineering ^ --*-----.-.^ . , j ^ ^ 

t^on; and the organisation and ol'ZlJrifZ:^^^:;^:!'' -«-- 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

Sophomore Year • Quarter , 

Matt "zlln';' '^"'"''■='" *="^'-'> ' " '" 

Math. 20-Differential Calculus . 2 

Math. 21_Inte^al Calculus .!. 6 ■•• -• 

Math. 22-Applied Calculus ... ■-, •■• 

Phys^A 4A. 6A-General Physic.;:.:: - ... -6 

sL^^E?" . ="«'"^*^"'^ Drawing . .' .' ; 6 , ' 

Q^ .'*"*"*' °f Plane Surveying 3 

«ech. 3— Statjcs and Dynamics . . 3 

• • • • 
• • • • Q 

5 

^ • • • • 

• • • • 9 

• • . . . 

3 8 3 

1 1 , 

Totel * 

22 22 22 




COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Junior Year — General I 

Speech 8 — Advanced Oral Technical English 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 5 

Mech. 50, 51 — Strength of Materials 4 

C. E. 51 — Hydraulics 

Mech. 53— Materials of Engineering 

E. E. 51. 52, 53 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 

Shop 50 — Foundry Practice 

Shop 51 — Machine Shop Practice 

M. E. 100, 101, 102 — Thermodynamics 3 

^on» j^jIljB^lIlGCriilK JljIOCuIVC ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• o 

Physical Activities 1 

Totel 20 

Junior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Speech 8 — Advanced Oral Technical English 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 5 

Mech. 50, 51 — Strength of Materials 4 

M. E. 53 — Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics 

Mech. 53— Materials of Engineering 

E. E. 51, 52, 53 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 

Shop 50 — Foundry Practice 

Shop 51 — Machine Shop Practice 

M. E. 100, 101, 102 — Thermodynamics 3 

Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 20 

Senior Year — General 

Speech 9 — Advanced Oral Technical English 2 

M. E. 103, 104— Heating and Ventilation '6 

M. E. 105 — Refrigeration 

M. E. 106, 107, 108— Thesis 1 

M. E. 109, 110, 111— Prime Movers 4 

M. E. 112, 113, 114 — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 

M. E. 115, 116, 117— Mechanical Laboratory 2 

Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 20 

Seyiior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Speech 9 — Advanced Oral Technical English 2 

M. E. 118, 119, 120 — Airplane Structures 3 

^" • Jl'* XUOf J.Uiy xUo 1. il&SlS •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• X 

M. E. 109, 110, 111 — Prime Movers 4 

M. E. 112, 113, 114 — Mehcanical Engineering Design 4 

M. E. 115, 116, 117 — Mechanical Laboratory 2 

Non-Engineering Elective 3 

Physical Activities 1 



Quainter 
II 



4 
4 



3 
3 

1 



19 



3 
3 
1 

19 



2 

4 
4 
2 
3 
1 



19 



Total 



20 



3 
2 
4 
4 
2 
3 
1 

19 



145 



^ 
/// 



3 
4 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 

19 



2 



8 

4 
1 
2 
S 
8 
1 

19 



3 

2 
4 
4 
2 
8 
1 



8 
t 
4 
4 
2 
3 
1 

19 



K 



h' 



m 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AGRICULTURE -ENGINEERING 

n»ts students to become candidates for 1 ^ ^ ^^^ "^ Engineering, pe, 
>n Agneulture at the end of four yefrs I„d Z"^?.' "f ^"'=''^'«'- "^ Science 
Science m Civil, Electrical m^u^, ^ ^*"" ^^^^ ^^^gree of Bachelor ! 
end of the -fifth ^ear"'' »*^^''^"'<=-'. or Chemical Engineering atthe 

Of Al:;Xr ^^--"^ -^" ^« ^-^ 'i^ted in this catalog under College 

The University of MarvlanH ^"^ ENGINEERING 

offers fellowship's forlZZlVZTT T*'' '""^ «"-- of Mines 
sciences. Fellows enter upon the." duti f engineering and apS 

months including one rnonS^ ftl^TonV"'' '' ^"'^ '^""«»"« ^or 
are made at the end of each month i.H ^^^'"ent^ ""der a fellowship 
The University will remit payment off T"""* ^'^ ^^^O for the year 
fellowship privileges. '^^^"* °' *"'t'on fees, and will grant all' 

Fellows register as students in tJ,. r^ ^ 
Maryland, and become candidates Jor^h!;^*' ^'^""' °^ ^^^^ University of 
Class work will be directed by the leads ofl^ "' °"^*"^ "^ P^ilosoph 

of the Bureau of Mines staff. " research, under the direction 

Appropriate problems in nK • , 
mathematics will be chosen aSw 'J'™'"*'?' *=''«'"''=«1 engineering, or 
the mterests of the Bureau 5^2x1; fu'' °' '''^ candidates and 
P..fessor of Chemical Engineerin^Tf^fj^^^ ^ 7--- will be the 

The above fellowships will ho i. university of Maryland. 

Ships. The recipients'li?" XttTeVh: f ,T ""' """^'^ «— ^ Fellow- 
frontmg the mineral industries tL' 1°" "^ ^^«"'t« Problems con- 

Eastern Experiment Station of tL R ^^'^'^ ^"' ''« Performed at the 
recently completed on the campl" of 2" n • '''"^^' « '-^^ "tfi ding 
College Park. """P"^ of the University of Maryland in 

~nd1n\rr°"ctLS r-"^^- - ^--^ and to develop 
land will offer two fellowships rctmST""^' *'^ ^"'^^'^"i' ^^ Ma >- 
den T ' '"^^"'^ °^ ^^00 per "ear each anT"'.!""^" '"'^^^^ fellowships 

technical collet" Jh^trtfe ^^U? tr^ ^'^'^"^*- "^ ™-ities and 
Physical sciences, and who are Z, fied 7^ '". engineering or applied 
Preference will be given fo men who hat^ f , ^\ ""*l«rtake research u^rk. 
work, and who have experience Tn resdrch '■^^''' ^'^ ""' ^^^"^ "^ ^^^duate 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



147 



Applications should include a certified copy of college record, applicant's 
photograph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and 
letters from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering spe- 
cifically the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. The 
application should be addressed to Fellowship Committee, Eastern Experi- 
ment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, 
College Park, Maryland. 

STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 
NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate prob- 
lems related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their 
duties on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vaca- 
tion. Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month 
and amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 

This fellowship is open to graduates in Engineering from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications should be accom- 
panied by a certified copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, 
statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and letters from 
three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering specifically the 
applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean, College of Engineering, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT WAR TRAINING 

The College of Engineering is offering, in cooperation with the U. S. 
Office of Education, specialized training in engineering, science and man- 
agement courses essential to the war effort. These courses are designed 
to train men and women now employed in war industries for more respon- 
sible positions, and to train others who desire to enter war work. This 
training is also available for personnel of the Army and the Navy. 

The courses under this program are chiefly part-time evening courses in 
the fields of aeronautics, radio, drawing, mapping, metallurgy, testing, and 
industrial safety. Additional courses may be organized as the demands of 
industry or the armed forces require. 

The instruction is given by members of the faculty of the College of 
Engineering and by specialists from industry. 



148 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Ml 



Qualifications for AHmi • 

."»."i: st„r »'"'™ -«^ t^sctrn- — - 

Cost. There is no h 

?s -i i~ taa-iSESB 

Training Centers. To meet th. . ^^ 

Employment Thp P ii 

ENCmEERING SHORT COURSES 

■tnrough short coursp^ f>,z. rr n 

m pubhc health and i„ public safety! '"^^^"*^ '" P^^lic works' 

Mining Extension C]as<iP« t 
*fine3 and the State DeSmentrorS""."^*'^ *^^ ^^^'-d Bureau of 

and equipment maintenance. ^*'"" "" inspection, arson investigation 

--«rs" s. srj^ srx- — - ^ 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



149 



FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Service Extension Department is organized under the College 
of Engineering in cooperation with the State Department of Vocational 
Education, and operates with both Federal and State funds. The Depart- 
ment provides in-service training for firemen with classes conducted 
throughout the State by three regional instructors and about 50 local 
instructors. Basic training of 75 clock hours is given in the. fundamentals 
of firemanship, as well as an advanced course of 69 clock hours, covering 
the technical field of fire prevention, control and extinguishment. A training 
course of 45 clock hours for industrial plant fire brigades is also available. 
Firemen who have completed the prescribed training courses have been 
given preferential rating in positions in the military and naval fire fighting 
forces. 

To meet the demands of the national emergency, the Department has 
expanded its activities to the training of auxiliary fire forces and rescue 
units in defense duties. There is also available a comprehensive training 
course of 24 clock hours in connection with incendiaries, war gases, infernal 
machines, sabotage and fire fighting as applied to military explosives and 
ammunition, that is available for all civilian defense groups. 

The Department also serves in an advisory capacity to the State Fire 
Marshal and municipal authorities in matters of fire prevention, fire protec- 
tion engineering, and fire safety regulations. 

Additional information may be obtained from Chief J. W. Just, Director, 
Fire Service Extension Department, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Director, 

The Engineering Experiment Station carries on cooperative investiga- 
tions with industries of Maryland and Departments of the State and Fed- 
eral Governments. A diversity of engineering training, experience, and 
equipment represented by the staff and laboratories of the College of Engi- 
neering is thus made available for the problems under inquiry. 

Among the researches that have been conducted are studies on (1) 
streamlined steel tubes under loading conditions; (2) high speed wings for 
airplanes; (3) eccentric rivet groups; (4)D tube sections under various load- 
ing conditions; (5) expansion joints for concrete roads; (6) the design of 
concrete culverts; (7) the conversion of petroleum products to aromatic 
hydrocarbons; (8) sabotage by explosives; (9) magnetic properties of spe- 
cial alloys. Recently completed reports have involved topics such as (a) 
the action of manufactured gas on ceramic ware, (b) the fluid characteris- 
tics of betonite suspensions, (c) the ferro-magnetic properties of hematite, 
(d) the separation and estimation of the four general classes of hydrocar- 
bons occurring in the gasoline range of petroleum. 



150 



in 



f 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OP HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dearu 
Tl.. Co,,.,, ., „ JT "°""'""- """"'■ 

In the professional phase<! nf ^ 
members of the faculty anTwith J '"'°^^"'' ^^^ «t"dent advises u-.^. 

-- .. 0.0..., 4 ^s — eS:r:.s.^r£rt 

The student is ur^pH f.. « • 
This might begin wSfthe TZl" r^"'"''''' ^^P^"«"<^« ''"ring vacation. 

Organization 

. ^''f administrative purposes th. n „ 

Facilities 

Loctai, .. ,1,, »» '«>■ e»pon,„co in homem.ki„,. 

research and creative work in the arts fhJ J° ^''^""^' *« scientific 

economics student. "^ ""^ "'^''^'^^ P'---«eal experience for the home" 
Professional Organizations 
The Home Economics Club in «,h- u 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



151 



Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, is open to stu- 
dents of high scholarship. 

Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of 195 quarter hours, as prescribed in any of the following curricula. 

Curricula 

At the close of the freshman year a student, who has not already done 
so, may elect the curriculum in general home economics which is non- 
professional, or one of the following professional curricula, or a combi- 
nation of curricula: home economics education, textiles and clothing, prac- 
tical art, home economics extension, institution management, and foods 
and nutrition. A student who wishes to teach home economics may regis- 
ter in home economics education in the College of Home Economics, or in 
the College of Education (see home economics education). 

The student who has not decided to specialize at the close of the fresh- 
man year may follow the general home economics curriculum until she 
makes a choice. Before continuing with the third year of any curriculum, 
the student must have attained junior standing: or 98 credit hours with a C 
grade average. 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 

The general home economics curriculum is planned to give a young 
woman a good basis for her best personal development, as has been de- 
scribed earlier. It also provides good training for her as a future home- 
maker. This curriculum also forms the basis of all the professional cur- 
ricul. The additional requirements of the professional curricula are listed 
under the description of each curriculum. 

( Quarter - 

// 



Freshrnan Year I 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry or 

Chem. 7, 8 — Introductory Chemistry 

H. E. 10— Textiles 5 

H. E. 70— Design 

P. E. 42— Hygiene I 2 

P. E. 44— Hygiene II 

P. E.— Physical Activities 1 

Math. — Basic Mathematics 

H. E. 1 — Home Economics Lectures 1 

H. E. 71 — Costume Design 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 

Electives 3 

Total 17 



S 
S 

s 



^ 

/// 

8 
6 

S 



t 
I 



2 
2-4 

18 



• • • • 



5-7 



I 



17 



152 



Sophomore Year 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



H- E. 31, 32. 33-Food8 . . 

ftE. 20Aor20B-CIothi„g". 

Phy.cs 6 7 8-I„trodu.tory ^^^ 

„• E— Physical Activities 

PsyclloloEy 1— I„*,„j ,. 

-- J..Jrrr^..X^-'-•• 
^E:2^^I^^trr'-^-o;o„i;;:::::: 
• •••••• 



• • • . 



••••..•., 




• • • . 



• • • • • 



Total 



Junior Year 

H. E. 150, 151 ICO Ttr 

H. E. las-Nu^tio^";'"'"^'"*"' "' *»■- Ho^e.... 

^' ^*~^^^^^^ of Nutriiion ' 

ZooK le-Human Pliysiology 

P- E—Physical Activities 

H. E. 170, 171-Interior Desfen' • 

H. E. 122-Draping 

Ir^tivr"""-'-""^-*^"'-;"::;:::::;:: 



16 



8 



18 



18 



•••••, 



3 
5 
5 







8 



6 
1 
S 
6 



• • • . 



15 







• • • • 



17 

2 
8 



• . . , 



1 
11 

15 



1 

8 

14 



6 
1 
9 

15 



Senior Year 

p. E— Physical Activities 

E'ectives 



Home Economics Education 

(See College of Education; page 125.) 

Textiles and Clothing 

magazine and radio personnel. 



• • . . 
1 

3 

• • • • 

5 
3 

15 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



freshrnan Year 

Eng. 1» 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 
p E. — Physical Activities ..... 

p. E. 42 — Hygiene I 

p. E. 44— Hygiene II 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

H. E. 10 — Textiles 

Speech 1, 2^ Public Speaking . 
Math. — Basic Mathematics . , 

H. E. 70 — Design , 

H. E. 1 — Home Economics Lecutres 
Electives 



Total 



Sophomore Year 

Physics 6, 7, 8 — Introductory Physics 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 
Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

H. E. 20A — Clothing 

H. E. 21 — Clothing 

H. E. 71 — Costume Design 

H. E. 30 . . Introductory Foods 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 
See. 3 — Introduction to Sociology .... 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



Laboratory 



Total 



Junior Year 

H. E. 150, 151, 152 — Management of the Home. 

H. E. 135— Nutrition or 

H. E. 34 — Elements of Nutrition 

H, E. 74— Survey or Art History 

H. E. 170, 171— Interior Design 

H. E. 120— Pattern Design 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 

Psych. 1 — Psychology 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology 

Electives 



Total 



I 

3 
1 
2 



2 

3 
1 
3 



15 



3 
3 
1 



1 
3 



16 



3 
5 
5 
3 



• • • • 



3 



18 



Quarter 
II 

3 
1 



2 
5 



3 



16 



3 
3 
1 
3 



1 

3 

17 



• « • • 



3 
1 



3 

18 



* 



153 



/// 

8 

1 



5 
6 



17 






5 

8 
1 

8 

18 



• • • • 



3 

1 

I • • 
I • • 

8 
8 

15 



154 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



155 



m 



Senior Year . q„„^^^^ 

H E !,'?• "'-Advanced Textiles . . ^ U /;, 

"• E,'^-^"'"'-"-- Clothing S , "' 

H. E. 131-Meal Service . 2 

H. J .'itsr.'" ^•"-■■•■■•' ■ :^ ■ ■■■■■■ ..:: 

H. E. Ed. 102~ChiId Study I •• 

J-, i-.— Physical Activities 

H E i25_Pr„b,e„s in ciMhi,;^:: j' ""i ' 

i<lectives . . ' 1 



, 3 

Total ^ 3 

15 15 "^ 

Practical Art Curriculum 

des^^'{ :rriZeTsf;„.^ tS;i*r J'^''%°^ concentration: interior 
furnishings and wearing appaS!!^^ '',^'^^" *° ^^e selection of house 
available to graduates begin wfth seHinl h ". *" P^'-«*>"-"ty- PosS 
textile analysis, and radio woS thlv h!' f^'-^^' '^"'"P^rison shoppin " 
these fields or in departmental b^yt den.t'' '?" "*^"^"*=«^ Positfons 'in 
nation, personality consulting, desSinf ^'"'"* -"anaging, style coorc^ 
personnel work. ^' '^^^'Snmg, advertising, and training Td 

Freshman Year ' Quarter , 

H p,n r'"*'"''"""'-*' Chemistry. . 3 , ,' 

H. E. 10- Textiles ... . ' ^ 

H.E.70-Design.... ; •• » ^ 

P. E. 42, 43-Hyeiene I, li ' ' 3 •• ' 

Math. O-Baaic Mathematics';; 2 ■■, 

«. E. 1-Home Economics Lectures 

H. E. 71-Costume Design 1 

^„vV""*^°' Art History;;;; -3 •■• 

Speech 1, 2_public Speaking 

P. E.-Physical Activities 2 -o ' 

Modern Language, or elective;;;;;; ;;;;;; 1 j "■; 

3 • , 

Total ___° * 

15 17 18 



• • • • • 



Sophomore Year 

H. E. 30 — Introductory Foods 

H, E. 20, 21— Clothing 

H E. 72 — Costume Illustration. 

Elective Science 

H. E. 34 — Elements of Nutrition 
Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 
Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Elconomics 

goc^ 3 — Introduction to Sociology 

p E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



• • • • • 



Total 



Junior Year 

H. E. 150, 151, 152 — Management of the Home. 

H. E. 198 — Graphic Design 

H. E. 122— Draping 

H. E. 170, 171 — Interior Design 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study 

H. E. 131 — Meal Service 

P, E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



Total 



• • • • • 



Senior Year 

H. E. 177 — Store Experience 

H. E. 113 — Consumer Problems in Textiles 

H. E. 174 — Merchandise Display 

H. E. 176 — Advertising Layout and Store Coordination 

H. E. 178 — Radio in Retailing 

H. E. 172 — Advanced Interior Design. 

H. E. 120— Pattern Design 

H. E. 196 — Journalism in Home Economics 

H. E. 153 — Practice in Management of Home 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 

B. A. 154 — Retail Store Management and Merchandising 

P. E. — Physical Activities 

Electives 



• • • • • 



5 
3 
3 
5 



17 



3 
3 



3 
5 



17 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Quarter 
II 



s 



17 



s 



1 

4 
1« 



3 

4 



Total 



17 



1 

S 

16 



/// 



5 

3 
1 
7 

16 



3 
1 
9 

16 



4 
1 
3 

IG 



Home Economics Extension* 

This curriculum outlines the training necessary for the young woman 
who wishes to work with rural people through extension service or other 
agencies interested in the education and social problems of rural living. 



•Practice work in the field of Home Economics Extension or in social case work is 
encouraged for all students majoring in this curriculum. Such experience should be gained 
before the completion of the senior year. 



157 



156 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Total 



( 

Freshman Year I 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 6 

H. E. 10— Textiles 

H. E. 70 — Design 3 

P. E. 42— Hygiene 1 2 

p E 44 Hveienp II 

^ • ■Cj* i lljr S>Ix^c*l A^wLlVlvltro •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• X 

Math — Basic Mathematics 

H. E. 1 — Home Economics Lectures 1 

H. E. 71 — Costume Design 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Speech 1 — Public Speaking 

Electives 2 

Total 17 

Sophomore Year 

H. E. 31, 32, 33— Foods 3 

H. E. 20A or 20B— Clothing 3 

Physics 6, 7, 8 — Introductory Physics 3 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Lab 1 

Soc. 3 — Introduction to Sociology 

H. E. 21— Clothing 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

Electives 2 

Total 16 

Junior Year " f 

H. E. 150, 151, 152 — Management of the Home 3 

H. E. 135— Nutrition 5 

P. E. — Physical Activities 1 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 

H. E. 136— Dietetics 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

XX« Jli« X ^y} JL OOCl x!/COTlOIillCS •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••• 

XX« jSj» XOX JXLtJuX o6f VlC€ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••• 

H. E. Ed. 101 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

Electives 2 



16 



Quarter 
II 



3 
5 



2 
1 



2 

9 



18 



3 
3 
1 
3 



17 



1 
5 



16 



/// 



3 
2 
4 

18 



5 
5 



17 



3 
3 



15 



Quarter - 
II 


> 

/// 


• • • • 

• • • • 

1 

3 
3 
S 


. . • • 

1 

• . • • 

• • • • 

3 


• • • • 

• • • • 

4 


• • • • 

S 

• • • • 


• • • • 

2 
16 


• • • • 

2 
14 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

( 

I 

Senior Year 

E l33__Experimental Foods 5 

H E Ed. 102-chiid Study •;;•;; 1 

P E.— P^ys^*^*^ Activities ' * 

* * 1 09 Demonstrations • 

"• E 153-Practice in Management of Home ..•.• 

u F ' 170, 171— Interior Design 3 

\^' ni Qiirvpv of Art History 

I' t ^l^Sds in Home Economics Extension .;;; 

Lai Ed. no-Rural Life and Extension ..•.• 3 

Psych. 17-Mental Hygiene '/.'/.V.' *.*.*.*. **'. ^ 

Electives ~" 

........ 1" 

Total 



Institution Management " interested in housing and the 

— ;:;Xr/-tai -ti. ^^^^^^ ^e .. o.^.— 
training in a hospital offe"ng a course approved J ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ,„t,,„ee 
Association. This curriculum meets the academic 4 

to such a course. , -^^44 ^.jn be re- 

is not required to take Curriculum, Instruction ana 

in Disease. ^ Quarter ^ 

I II in 

Freshman Year 3 % 3 

E^p 1 2, 3— Survey and Composition *........ .... * ^ 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry '.'.'.'.*.*..........••• ^ 

H. E. 10— Textiles 3 

H. E. 70— Design 2 

P. E. 42— Hygiene I *.*......... ^ 

P. E. 44 — Hygiene II • • . • • • * * 

Math. 0— Basic Mathematics 1 

H. E. 1— Home Economics Lecture ' * * t 

Soc. 3— Introduction to Sociology • •*•* * 

H. E. 20— Clothing " 2 2 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 1 1 ^ 

P. E.— Physical Activities * * * * 3 

Electives ' ' " "Z 

17 16 16 

ToUl 



158 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Year 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 
Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Lab 

n.. £«. ol , oZ, oo — r oOuS ••• .•••• 

H. E. 71 — Costume Design 

Physics 6, 7, 8 — Introductory Physics 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 

H. E. 74 — Survey of Art History 

Bact. 50 — Household Bacteriology .... 
Chem. 81 — General Bio-Chemistry . . . 
Chem, 82 — General Bio-Chemistry Lab 
P. E. — Physical Activities 



Total 



• • • • 



Junior Year 

H. E. 135 — Nutrition 

H. E. 136 — Dietetics 

H. E. 133 — Experimental Foods 

H. E. 150, 151, 152 — Management of the Home 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

H. E. 163 — Institutional Cookery. . 

H. E. 160 — Institution Organization and Management 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Elconomics.. 

H. E. 131— Meal Service 

H. E. 162 — Accounting and Food Control 
P. E. — Physical Activities 



• •••••• 



Total 



Senior Year 

H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study 

Psych. 17 — Mental Hygiene 

H. E. 163 — Practice in Management of Home 

H. E. 137 — Diet in Disease 

H. E. 161 — Institution Equipment and Food Purchasing. 

H. E. 166 — Advanced Institutional Management 

H. E, 101 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

H. E. 170, 171 — Interior Design 



• ••••• 



• • • 9 • 



Total 



3 
1 
3 
3 
3 

• • • • 

3 

• • • • 



17 



3 
5 



17 



15 



Q 



uartcr 
II 

S 
1 

s 

• • • • 

3 
5 



16 



6 

I • • 

I • • 

3 

> • • 

1 
17 



16 



/// 



5 
3 
2 
1 

17 



5 

3 



3 
I 

17 



« • • • 


• • • ■ 


3 


• • • • 

• • • • 

4 


• • « • 

5 

• • • • 


• • • • 

• • • • 


• • • • 

5 


3 

• • • • 


• • • • 

• ■ • • 


• • • • 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


• • • • 


3 


6 



16 



Foods and Nutrition 

This department offers the following curriculum for students desiring 
professional training in both foods and nutrition. Research in govern- 
ment agencies, commercial organizations besides newspaper, magazines, 
and radio, offer opportunity for students in these fields. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS l^^ 

f Quarter ^ 

/ // /// 

freshman Year , 3 « 

2 3— Survey and Composition 5 » 

^^^' \ '3— General Chemistry 5 

Chem. 1. •* ^^ s 

^^ E. 10-Textil« 

^ETO-Design 2 ■■- ■■- 

P. E. 42-Hygiene r « ^ 

p E. 44-HygieneII... 1 * 

P E -Physical Activities o 

Math 0-Basic Mathematics i .... ..•• 

uE 1-Home Economics Lectures .... 3 

te 3-Introductory Sociology 2 2 .... 

speech 1, 2-pubiic Speaking * ;;;;. ;;'. *.*. V. * ^ __^ _ 

Electives — ^^ j^ 

Total 

Sophomore Year s s 3 

H E 31, 32, 33-Foods •••• '" 3 3 

u cfi 7 8-Introductory Physics ^ i 1 

Physics 6, 7, o xui- 

P. E.-Physieal Activities ••• 3 .... •••■ 

ChX: 32. U^Z.n. oi organic Che.Utr. Lab.. . . • • • • • • • • • • • , ...^ 

H E 20— Clothing * " 

Chem Gen 81-General Bio-chemistry. .... 1 

Chem Gen. 82-General Bio-chemistry Lab •... .... S 

Ecot*37-Fundamentals of E-^^^'""^' ;; y.;;; :;;;;: _^ _! llll 

Electives -"^ ^^ „ 

Total 

Junior Year ... 3 • * 

H. E. 150. 151, 152-Management of the Home............. ^ ... .... 

H. E. 135-Nutrition 1 1 

P. E.-Physical Activities 5 

Zool. 16-Human Physiology 6 

H. E. 136-Dietetics 2 

H. E. 130-Food Economics S "-^ 

H. E. 131— Meal Service • .... 

Bact. 50-Household Bacteriology .... » 

Psychology ^ 

Electives " ,^ ,- 

16 16 1» 

Total 



''' THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Senior Year < Quarter 

H. E. 133-Experimental Foods ^ // 

H. E. Ed. 102-Child Study.. 

P. E.~Physical Activities 5 

H. E. 74~Survey of Art History. 

H. E. 170. 171-Interior Design.. 

H. E. 134-Advanced Foods 

H. E. 138-^hild Nutrition. 

Electives 



/// 



1 
3 



• • • • • 



••••••• 



6 

• • 

1 

• m 

3 



Total 



15 



3 



16 



4 

3 



IG 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 161 

DEPARTiMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Personnel 1944-1945 

Colonel Harland C. Griswold, Commandant 

MAJOR John W. Cassell, Officer in Charge R.O.T.C. Training 

CAPT. George M. Bohler, Transportation and Supply Officer 

CAPT. George W. Dunlap, Commanding Officer, Company "A" 

Capt. John E. Smith, Commanding Officer, Company "C" 

CAPT. James V. H. Barker, Adjutant, 2510th S.U. 

Capt. James R. Pinkerton, Commanding Officer, Company "D" 

Capt. Robert N. Walden, Commanding Officer, Company "B" 

CAPT. Hugh D. Davis, Tactical Officer, Company "C" 

Capt. A. B. C. Davis, Classification Officer 

1ST Lt. Paul M. Wadell, Commanding Officer, Hq. Det. 

1st Lt. Robert H. McBride, Dental Surgeon 

2nd Lt. Harold C. Yeager, Tactical Officer, Company "A" 

2nd Lt. Harold Yourman, Tactical Officer, Company "B" 

Capt. German V. Rice (Retired), Military Property Custodian 

Master Sgt. Otto Seibeneichen (Retired), Band Leader 

Miss E. Ann Little, Secretary to Commandant 

M/Sgt. Charles H. Dodson, 1st Sgt. Company *'C" 

M/Sgt. Howard L. Seebo, Sergeant Major 

T/Sgt. James K. McGrain, Personnel Sergeant Major 

S/Sgt. Fay J. Norris, R.O.T.C. Instructor 

S/Sgt. Llewellyn W. Davis, Acting 1st Sgt. Company "A" 

S/Sgt. Max Moses, Chief Clerk and Typist R.O.T.C. 

S/Sgt. Elias M. Fox, Personnel N.C.O. and Payroll Clerk 

S/Sgt. Charles R. Christla^nsen, Acting 1st Sgt. Company "D" 

S/Sgt. John P. Roberts, Supply Sergeant 

Sgt. Salvatore Gagliemo, R.O.T.C. Instructor 

T/5 George Mannello, Jr., Classification Clerk 

T/5 William S. Hall, Company Clerk, Company "D" 

T/5 Pullen D. Martin, Company Clerk, Company "C" 

T/5 Robert C. Tacey, Mail Clerk 

T/5 Laurence H. Waple, Acting 1st Sgt. Company "B" 

T/5 Michael Avedisian, Company Clerk, Company "A" 

T/5 Samuel L. Abrams, Driver 

Pfc. John D. McCagg, Company Clerk, Company "B" 

Pvt. Herbert F. Schaumann, Medical Clerk 

PvT. Kenneth L. Schooley, Truck Driver 

PvT. George E. Fislek, Supply Clerk and Truck Driver 



162 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



General 

Instruction in Military Science and Tactics has been an important feature 
of the work of the College Park Division of the University of Maryland 
since 1856. Until 1916, the institution was a military school, and since 
that time military instruction has been a required course for all physically 
fit freshmen and sophomore male students under 26 years of age and 
registered for more than six quarter credits, until six quarters have been 
completed. Each quarter carries three credits. 

The Reserve Officers* Training Corps was established at the University 
under the provisions of the Act of Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 
The instructional work is based on the provisions of Army Regulations 
No. 145-10. For the duration of the war, the War Department has changed 
the R. O. T. C. course of instruction and offers Basic I and Basic II courses, 
which are designed to prepare young men for any branch of the service in 
which they may serve. 

Credit for Previous R. 0. T. C. Training 

Students who are graduates of class MS schools which are rated as 
"Honor Schools" by the War Department, will receive credit for the work 
completed there. 

Uniforms ^ 

Members of the Basic Courses are issued uniforms without cost to the 
student. Shoes of a type specified by the Military Department must be 
purchased. 

Army Specialized Training (AST) 

In June, 1943, the War Department sent in the first group of soldiers 
for Specialized College Training. By October, 1943, there were 1146 soldiers 
receiving Academic and Military Training at this University in Basic 
Engineering, Advanced Engineering, Area and Language, and Pre-profes- 
sional Medicine and Dentistry. 

The War Department realized the necessity for the continual flow of 
educated men into the services and encourages every qualified young man 
to enjoy the advantages of this program. 

BATTALION ORGANIZATION, RESERVE OFFICERS' 
TRAINING CORPS— 1944 

Battalion Commander Colonel Franklyn M. Seeley 

Executive Officer Major Phillip A. Grill 

Adjutant Captain James W. Dorsett 

Supply Officer 1st Lt. Leonard E. Eisenberg 

Personnel Adjutant 1st Lt. Charles C. Eads 



PEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 163 

A.r. rnmnanv "A" Captain Sesley B. Smiler 

company Commander, Company A ^^ P^^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ 

Executive Officer ^^^^^ Rennert M. Smelser 

Leader. 1st P a oon • • ^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^.^^^ 

Leader, 2nd P atoon ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ j ^ 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 

J o «»v,„ "R" Caotain Thomas P. Grahm 

romoany Commander, Company B ^-apiai 

Company ^^^ ^^ j^^^ Stuntz 

Executive Officer ^^ ^^^^^ ^ Karangelen 

Leader, 1st Pa con ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^und 

Leader, 2nd P atoon • • • • ^^ ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 

company Commander, Company "C" -pta. ^am^H^ S^^^^^^ 

Executive Officer • ^^ ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ 

Leader, 1st P atoon ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Leader, 2nd P atoon ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ 

Leader, 3rd Platoon 

^- nffin.r ROTC Band Captain Avron H. Maser 

Commandmg Officer, R.O.T.C. Bana ^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Executive Officer 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. RECREATION. 

AND ATHLETICS . . 

The purpose of the program of ^^^^^J^Z^^ 
broadly conceived as the ^^-^'<>^'^^''l.''\'^^'''^^^^£^^on tests are given 
plish this purpose, Pl'y-<=-l «™"*^2 ' TlifHSS fitness of each, 
the incoming students to determine the J^^*^- J^^^^^^^ ,^^,,^,,, p^efer- 

rs,^:^d^;: ^aXld rrvtiraSivW of the program. 

For Men , , , ^ur-ae^ 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical ^-<^^onJe^^ three 
activity classes each week throughou h^^^ year. ^ he fa^. ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

football, and tennis are the '^l^^^^/.*^*'!;^ "■;" f 't,lk. bkseball, and tennis, 
ball, and other team games; and m the «P'^"^' ™^ elect a con- 

In addition to these team f^w'^ies sophomore students may ^^ 

siderable number of individual f "'^t^^^lton sSeWd, 7nA the like. 

Horseshoes, ping pong, ^^^^ f^^-^:^ZTJ":Z^ alsl Touch foot- 
An adequate P-gram of -tramural spo .^ ^^^ ^.^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

ball and soccer m the fall, *'\^^®*^^."/"° . ,,=.5 :„ this program. Plaques, 

and track in the ^P-«' "^^f .^^^ Tn II^'^^^^^^^ of the program 

medals, and other appropriate awaras in ^. ^„„y,„-s 

are provided for the winning teams and individual members. 



I 



164 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and 
ping pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical educa- 
tion. Two large modem gymnasia, a new field house, a number of athletic 
fields, tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, con- 
stitute the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, 
lacrosse, soccer, wrestling, golf, and tennis. The University is a member of 
the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and 
cooperates with other national organizations in the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

For Women 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities 
for conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including 
hockey, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, Softball; individual sports, 
consisting of riding, tennis, badminton, fencing, golf, archery, deck tennis, 
table tennis, and the like, are offered. Opportunity is given for various types 
of dancing, including modem, square, folk, and ballroom. The proximity 
of the University to Washington and Baltimore provides excellent oppor- 
tunity for groups to attend professional programs in dance. 

The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural 
tournaments in the seasonal sports, sports days with neighboring colleges, 
and intercollegiate competition in rifle shooting. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and 
women students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools 
of the State, and to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education, see College of 
Education, and Courses of Instruction. 

This department now is being reorganized with a view to adapting its 
broad program to war conditions and necessities. 



165 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. O. AppIaEMAN, Dean. 
Elsie M. Parbett, Secretary. 

History and Organization ^^^^.^ ^^^^^^ ^,^, j,,. 

In the earlier years of the J"^f *"7^^^^^t^ gt^dents was in charge 
quently conferred, but the work of the ^-^u^t^ ^.^.^„ „f ^he general 
Jf the departments concerned. ""/ie'LY^sTty of Maryland was estab- 

aculty. The Graduate School o^ tj^ U™^^^^^^^ ^ Jing to both the 

Ushed in l^f ; -VcWs tgr'ee ^s i^^ ^he faculty of the 
Master's and the Doctor s degree w faculties who give 

Graduate School includes all ^^^"^'^^^^J^'r^^^ general administrative 
■^-TTof\7^r7::Jl^l - Te?egated t^o a Graduate Council, 
ff which the ieln'o'f the Graduate School is chairman. 

Admission .„ th^ Graduate School must hold a Bachelor's 

An applicant for adniission to *e Graduate b^ recognized standing. 

or a Master's degree from a college or 'jnive'jity ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

The applicant shall furnish .^""f^J^^^Xw creditable completion of an 

Dean, is issued to the student, ^his card pe ^^culation card 

the Graduate School. After Pavm-t ^^^ the f-, the^^^.^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

iSTn^hrGr^^rsloranrSd be retained by the student to 
present at each succeeding registration. admission 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessar.ly imply adm 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 

Registration . , TTniversitv, even though 

All students pursuing graduate -'<>;'i:;J'';JZ^S^ register in 
they are not candidates for higher degrees are requ ^^^^ ^.^^ 

the Graduate School at the ^egmmng of each quarter^ ^^ 

graduate credit be given ""^^ ^J^;^"^:f rrlfor each session is 
in the Graduate School. The P^og^am ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^.^ed upon 

arranged by the student ^^^ .*^^ ."l^j!: y,^ V professor in charge of 
two course cards, which are ^'S^^*!,^^^* J^^e Dean of the Graduate 
the student's major subject and then by the Dea ^^^ ^^^^^ 

School. One card is retained by the ^^^ J^^.^iation card, to the 
card, and in case of a new student, also the m 



I 



166 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



167 



Registrar's office, where the registration is completed. Students will 
not be admitted to graduate courses until the Registrar has certified to 
the instructor that registration has been completed. Course cards may be 
obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads of de- 
partments usually keep a supply of these cards in their respective offices. 

Graduate Courses 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates 
or For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Students who are inade- 
quately prepared for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack 
prerequisites for minor courses may elect a limited number of courses 
numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate credit will 
not be allowed for these courses. Courses that are audited are registered 
for in the same way as other courses, and the fees are the same. 

Program of Work 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including 
suitable minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of 
fifteen credit hours per quarter. If a student is preparing a thesis during 
the minimum residence for the master's degree, the registration in gradu- 
ate courses should not exceed twelve hours for the quarter. 

Summer Session for Teachers 

In addition to the regular summer quarter, the University will conduct a 
six-weeks summer session for teachers at College Park, with a compre- 
hensive undergraduate and graduate program. The University publishes a 
separate bulletin giving full information on this summer session for 
teachers. This bulletin is available upon application to the Director of 
Summer Session for Teachers, University of Maryland, College Park. 

Graduate Work by Seniors in This University 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the total of 
undergraduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
quarter. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be transferred 
unless such prearrangement is made. Graduate credits earned during the 
senior year may not be used to shorten the residence period required for 
advanced degrees. 



.amission to Candidacy for ^^^^^^^'J^^^^' ^^^ ^^^,^,^ ,,, for the 

Application for admission to ca^d^^^^^fo^^ ttie ^^^^.^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

n .tor's degree is made on application b ^nks w .^ ^^^^.^ 

^£"0 the Dean of the Graduate SchooL J^^-^/^^^^^^^ for further 

Srby the student -^\^^^''^,:'' X^Z^nZ School. An official 

\\nu and transmission to the Dean oi t graduate courses 

S Tcrfpt of the candidate's unde^J^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^,, ....^e 

-^n^t^trbf rnXerAU%pplications for admission to can- 
the application can oe co graduate Council. 

didacy must be approved by the Graa ^^ ^ ^^^^^^^ . 

Admission to candidacy in no aseas^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ .^ 

b„t ^.erely signifies he has "i^* ^" ^''^ ^ed and able to pursue such 
idered by his instructors suffi„en«y prep ^^^ requirements of 

IZ'ZT^^ XtandL^te must sho. superior scholarship m 
graduate work already -mpleted^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ j„ 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
BEQUIKt-M ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^p SCIENCE 

Advancement to -^d- .rappK^^^^^^ ^ 

ter's degree is required to •"^''^ ^P^' ^ ^ -^^ f^, the quarter in which 
not later than the date -^^ ^f ^^^^oSete^ at least twelve quarter 
the degree is sought. He ^^^l^'^lv quarter hours of graduate work 
hours, but not more than t^^^^Y^^^J , g^ade of "B" in all major 
at the University of Maryland. An average g 

equivalent, at this institution, is required. 

» • • „«, r^f thirtv-six quarter hours, exciu 
Course Requirements A minimum of thMy s q ^^ ^^^^ .^ ^^^^^^^ 

sive of research and thesis ^-^* ^" ^^Jf J^^^ the degrees of Master of 
approved for graduate credit, is requ ^^ ^^^ ^^^.^^ department 

Arts and Master of Science A.t ^ne p ^^^ ^ maximum 

concerned the students may be required J^^" *» J^ ^he total numoer 
of nine quarter hours ^^ ^^f /^/^ee ^d then be forty-five. If 
of credit hours required for t^ej\«S ^ required graduate courses, 
the student is inadequately prepared ^^^^^^ \^^^^^^ ^^y be required 
either in the major or minor s^^'J^^ts.^^J'^^e thirty-six hours required 

to supplement the ""^^f [^<^^^*^,72hteen quarter hours and not more 
in graduate courses, not less than «f ^een^ q ^^^ .^ ^^^ ^^.^^ ^^^^.^^^ 

than twenty-four quarter hours musi ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^_ 

The „™inin. '"^^ ™f ^^nSJ" »PP— »" ««»« 

prise a group of conereni cuu 




i 



168 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



169 



courses numbered 200 or above. No JeStr^^tel T£tt'''''l 
Arts or Master of Science may be obtained for correspondence or S. 
sion courses. The entire course of study must constitute a un-fi-^ 
SuaTeTbo?^ "^ ^"""^'^ -•- '^^^-^ andtrSe^r^o^f ^: 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed nine quarter hours obtainoH 
at other recognized institutions, may be transferred and app'td to ^ 
course requirements of the Master's degree nrovid^H tZf 7i^ , * 

the student applies for admission to candidacy for the degree lS>t 
ance of the transferred credit does not rpHnr^« "'«.°e&ree. Accept- 
reouirpmpnf Ti,» „ j-j x • ?. reduce the mmimum residence 

requirement. The candidate is subject to final examination by this insti 
tution in all work offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the thirty-six quarter hours in graduate courses 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees o 

fbilitl't H ''r' ^"'*^'' '' ^"^"'=^- " --^^t demonstratfthe studLt' 
ability to do mdependent work and it must be acceptable in literarv stvl. 

win ZToTZ than%h~^' f^* '^' ''"'^ ^'^°*^^ *» ^^^ 
graduate courles WHh tt ''T* /'"'"" *^"*'*^'- ^'''^^^ «a™ed i" 

be .::: t r orTdttfLzriisi rcSL'-rs-tr r 

^aX^^^SSitS: ^"^"^- -^ — ^^- »^ ^ ™embe?:f^;^; 

Gi::iir/otia£: sr trit^f e;^ i:tf^Y "^ 

which the degree is sought. The thesis sSuldtt be bound 1^17/^ 
dent, as the University later binds all theses uniformly An abs ract o^ 
the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 words in length n^n^t. / 

A manual giving full direction., fnr '1,''/''^'".'^"^*^, must accompany it. 
,-., ;„ *i, 1. J ; airections for the physical make-up of the thpsi^ 
IS in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work and shouW 

In^dJ^fdu Ipt^^^^^^ '^'T *'^ *^^"« '' '"^^ manusc'ripMs C 

DeltijTnolin'ai^o'sr^' "^^ '^ ""''''''' '' *^^ ^^'^^-^ ^'^^^ 

Rnal Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The studenJs 
adviser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members o 
the committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of 
his major and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate a^enotf 
fied of the personnel of the examining committee at least one week Prior 
to the period set for oral examinations. The chairman of the commit ee 



selects the exact time and place for the examination and notifies the 
other members of the committee and the candidate. The examination 
should be conducted within the dates specified at the end of the quarter, 
but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, an examining com- 
mittee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School at any 
time when all other requirements for the degree have been completed. A 
report of the committee is sent to the Dean as soon as possible after 
the examination. A special form for this purpose is supplied to the 
chairman of the committee. Such a report is the basis upon which 
recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the 
degree sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about one 
hour, but the time should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample 
opportunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the 
examination. 

S A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other re- 

quirements for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral exami- 
nation a comprehensive written examination may be required at the 
option of the major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Course Requirements. Forty-five quarter hours of course work are 
required, which may include courses in departments other than Educa- 
tion not to exceed one-half of the total forty-five hours, such courses to 
be selected in conformity with the student's special needs as agreed upon 
by the student and his adviser. Of the forty-five hours, not less than 
one-half must be on the 200 level. 

At least six of the forty-five quarter hours must be seminar work, which 
shall include one or more seminar papers in the student's major field of 
concentration in the Department of Education. 

Included in the program must be courses in educational statistics and 
in procedure of educational research. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of 
credits, and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree of Master of Business Administration represents a minimum 
of three quarters of graduate work in addition to the satisfaction of all 
undergraduate requirements for the Bachelor's degree. This will normally 
include a minimum of thirty-six quarter course hours and the completion 
of a satisfactory thesis. 



170 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



111 



.60. .„4 Busl„e„ a5L!„ ,m" ;• m'\Z'^ ^'T'""/ »»• '«. 

and thesis work should contrihnf. f^ aaministration. To this end course 
Accounting, Marketing Sntt.* L !,"» VtSS^T^"^ T'^ ^ 
or to son,e other field of the candidate's spedaILd Sest "^^ ^"'^• 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

be'atSt clSa^ :r.eartr "^ '\ ''^ ^^^'^ ^-- - 

rid^tr £^{F^^ ^^^^"^^ = 

.ujjer ac«on aL tJanSl- ttDr o^thto'^Xatf Sh^r ^- 

J : srenTf iVe^„\TaVr ^'^^ ^^^'^ "^ *^^ ^"'^^ ^- 

of French and German SLn ^°''''''' ^ ""^^'"^ knowledge 

stantial tests as the ZartmeSsl^'^^^^ "'' ^"^^^ "t^'^' «"b- 

to candidacy. ^«P«rtments may elect are also required for admission 

gradtt^^"dy''a:dltath^s1he m' '''" ^""^ ^"^^^^^> «^ ^"" «.,. 
the equivalent'of at E te yet^™- -«• «/ the three years 
versity. On a Dart tim« Kocr/I ^^ P®"* '" residence at this Uni- 

•ndworrbu' 1?™W »,;'™" ""t>'. ■" ' "«'«»>. of resid.n,. 
.P«lal fl..d i„ whic'h "e AS'/woTrd:". '"*'*"'""' "''»"'■ '" «" 



will vary with the department and the individual candidate. The candi- 
date must register for a minimum of eighteen quarter hours of research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a 
dissertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original 
typewritten copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together 
with an abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be 
deposited in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before the convoca- 
tion at which the degree is sought. It is the responsibility of the student 
also to provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of the 
examining committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the university 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general university library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be 
obtained at the students* supply store. The abstracts are published bi- 
ennially by the university in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students 
may obtain copies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

w 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's' major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and 
covers the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and 
his attainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other 
detailed procedures are the same as those stated for the Master's ex- 
amination. 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Candidates 
for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written exami- 
nation that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. 
The passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in his 
specialized field. Some 300 pages of text from which the applicant wishes 
to have his examination chosen should be submitted to the head of the 
Department of Modern Languages at least three days before the exami- 
nation. The examination aims to test ability to use the foreign language 
for research purposes. It is presumed that the candidate will jknow 
sufficient grammar to distinguish inflectional forms and that he will be 
able to translate readily in two hours about 500 words of text, with the 
aid of a dictionary. 



172 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



2. Application for admis^iinTi fr. +1,^ x . 

of the Depart„,e„t of'^!Z\lSZst\r:\^ T ^ *^^ o«ce 
Of the tests. "^uages at least three days in advance 

4. Examinations are held near the offi Tf "* '"' *^^^ *^«t^- 

Lan.ua.es, on the first WelilVS :ath%1ar.^r2Tr °' ^°^- 
FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Ur^5^?i.eftiZdttt?;^:^^^^^^^^ been estab„shed V ,e 
of all graduate fees except theTnl? / ' '" ^^^^ ^°<^ ^^^^ remission 
ships, with varying stipends are aJ f rrilabt • "'T- ''^''"^*"^^ *^"-- 
Fellows are required to tLT ^ '" '''■**^" departments. 

departments. ThTul'aJ^rnTorsrvirS^^^^^^^ ^ ^'^^^ '"^- 

clock hours per week. Fellows are ^^1^^ t "°* '^''^** **^'^« 

credentials, is sent by the an^HrW 7- ^, «PP''<=ation, with the necessary 

School. ApplicationsVhth L "approtTbv'tl: D ' ''''" ^' *''^ ^^^'^-'^ 
departments, where final selection of th. f^i ^'^ forwarded to the 

University fellowships are tTcompeSive ^^^^ '"^'^- ^'^^ -""^^ ^^ 

Graduate Assistantships. A number nf +.o„.,- 
assistantships are available in several V^'"^ ^"^ '""'^^'•^ ^^^^uate 
for these assistantships fs |600 tosTooo l'^^"'™""*; ' ^he compensation 
graduate fees except the diploma fee ? /'f """^ *^^ "^'»^««'*>" of all 
for one year (fou'r quarters) and are ^S: T''""'' -^^^ ^^^^'^'^' 
assistant in this class devotes one h^lf ./! .• ^'^^PPointment. The 
research in connection with E7per?mentstlH ™' *" instruction or to 

to spend six quarters in residence f^rthfMT ''""f '*'' ^""^ ^^ '« ^«1"i«d 
in residence for the Doctor's decree tb. ' ^^^''- " ^^ <=«»«n««^ 

from the Bachelor's degree mayT^;aS^e"d rreiretr^J^"^'^^'"^"^^ 

rn^^^J::StZ£T'''''r -''' '^^-^^y^'t^e depart- 
for stafl? appointment. TuSrii,";i ^''T' *^ ^^^"'^ 'channels 

-y be obtained from theXarrrcXTctjefn:; ''''''''''''''' 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



173 



SUMMER SESSION FOR TEACHERS 

Arnold E. Joyal, Acting Director. 

A Summer Session for Teachers of six weeks is conducted at College 
Park during the first half of the regular summer quarter. The program, 
designed for teachers in service, serves the needs of persons who wish to 
spend a part of the summer in study but do not find it possible to attend 
the university for the entire summer quarter. 

Terms of Admission 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. 
Before registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the 
Dean of the College or School in which he wishes to secure the degree. 
Teachers and special students not seeking a degree are admitted to the 
courses of the summer session for which they are qualified. All such selec- 
tion of courses must be approved by the Director of the Summer Session. 

Credits and Certificates 

The quarter hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the Uni- 
versity. In the summer session, a course meeting five times a week for 
six weeks and requiring the standard amount of outside work has a value 
of three quarter hours. 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State Depart- 
ment of Education toward satisfying certification requirements of all classes. 

• 

Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards advanced degrees in 
the summer sessions, special arrangements are made supplementing the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students working for 
degrees on the summer plan must meet the same requirements as to 
admission, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do students enrolled 
in the regular sessions of the University. 

All teachers or others planning to do work towards graduate degrees 
in Education must apply to the Dean of the Graduate School as early as 
possible for admission to candidacy in the Graduate School. 

For detailed information in regard to the Summer Session, consult the 
special Summer Session announcement, issued annually in April. A copy 
of this announcement may he secured from the Director, Summer Session, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 



/ 



if 



I 



m 



174 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

EVENING COURSES 

Arnold E. Joyal, Chairman 
Division of Evening Extension Courses. 

The University provides a limited program of evening instruction for 
undergraduates and graduates at College Park, and for undergraduates 
only in various other centers of the State. During the period 1942-1944, 
such courses were given at Cambridge, Frederick, Easton, Charlotte Hall, 
LaPlata, Cumberland, and Salisbury. 

Courses in any university subject may be offered in the evening program 
when there is a sufficient student demand and instructors are available. 
During 1942-1944, evening courses were given at College Park in education, 
English, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and zoology. Dur- 
ing the same period, courses in other centers included work in English, 
history, and political science. 

The evening program is carried on primarily as a service to employed 
persons. Although the majority of those enrolled in evening classes are 
teachers in the schools of Maryland, or the District of Columbia, the Univer- 
sity is glad to provide evening courses for other vocational groups to the 
extent of its facilities. 

A separate announcement with regard to Evening Courses is issued early 
in the Fall. A copy of this announcement, or any further information 
desired may be secured by communicating with: 

Division of Evening Extension Courses, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park, Maryland. 



SECTION III 
Course Offerings-College Park 



THIS section contains a list of all courses offered in the ^^^^^^^^^ 
Jt university at College Park^ C-rs-^o ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^„,,, 

for Teachers and in the Ba'*»"'^;\. ^al schools. 

the separate catalogs issued *>y ^ej^J^^^^^^ „, discontinue any course 
The University reserves the ^i^W^'^^^l h^ve registered to warrant. 
J'Shich an -^^^^^^ll^^XX rXr will be charged for transfer to 
giving the course. In sucn an i^ , 
another course, 
courses are designated by numbers as f^Uow ^^^ ^^^^ 

Group I numbered 1 to 49-courses pnmanly 

"^^^^^' 4?^,. inniors and seniors. 

-» " »"--;:: iTjr: ri»e.a .^..^^ 

the course. , ^ quarter, giving the hours 

A separate schedule °;,f~rmation rtqui^^^^^ the student in making 
places of meeting. -^^"^'^ ^^^^^^^^^^ schedules when they register, 

out his program. Students oota 



175 



M'l 



w 



"6 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTUKAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 
A. E. 1. Agricultural Industry and Resoruces (3). Winter 

IS briefly reviewed. Emphasis is udo« T^ ^"^^"^ °^ American agricultur 
of the United States. "^°" *^^ ''^'^^ '^'-OP «nd "vestock producfe 

A. E. 2. Farm Organization (3). Fall 

and welfare of the individual famer! ^'■''"'™' ^*^*=* ^''^ ^^ 

A E 90 Qi « •^*"" ^'''^'"*=«'' Undergraduates 
A. E. 90. 91. Seminar (1,1). Fall, Winter. 

curre"nt?r:b7ems.'"^^^^ ^""^ ^^^^^"* ^^-ts on economic literature and 

A E TOO T ^''"""'' ^"''*'«-''-'«« and Graduates 
or Ecol 37"- ^"'^ "^^"""'^^ (^>- F-»- Prerequisite, Econ. 31, 32, 33, 



PopulSrlrndrti: Z:^^:^--^^ ^P-lal reference to 

wealth, land tenure, farm labor agricuTturi r.f'-"'"""^ agricultural 
ments, and marketing. agricultural credit, the tariff, price move- 

^^tXtZTil^;', ^-- P---*« (3). Winter. Prerequisite, 

The development of marVofiV^ -4. 

A. EMS. C«>p,r,tlo„ to Ag,|,„|,„„ (,^ p^l, 

tives; present trends. operative practices; banks for coopera- 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3). Spring. 

extrj;aVrcfedTt:"t;:^^:^^^ £„:«? rr--- ^-^^ ^'^^ --^i- 

'ng fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance ^"^ insurance, includ- 

tort pti'ofa wel' 'stZ'"''''''"'' '''- '^^ '-*- and one labora- 

This course is designed to 
grading, standardizing and inspection of?"".*" ^""j™*''^ instruction in the 
ucts. poultry products. meats.Tndrhfr w/rl^r '''-' '^^''^ ^'^^ 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 177 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Winter. 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3). One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Winter. 

A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing 
of farm accounts. 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3). Spring. 

A study of the organization and operation of farms from the standpoint 
of efficiency selection of farms, size of farms, leasing systems, and factors 
affecting profits. Students will make an analysis of the actual farm busi- 
ness and practices of different types of farms, and make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as 
successful businesses. 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional class meetings 
for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. 

A. E. 111. Land Economics (3). Fall. 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources; a study 
of major land problems and land policies; land use adjustments; and 
measures for better use of our land resources. 

A. E. 112. Agricultural Policy (3). Spring. 

A study of the effect of governmental programs and policy on agricultural 
production, prices and income. 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2, 2). Winter, 

Spring. 

An advanced course dealing extensively with economic problems affecting 
the farmer. 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1-3). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current economic 
subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members of 
the class and the instructor. 

A. E. 203. Research (1-6). Credit determined by work accomplished. 
Pall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under the 
supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original investiga- 
tion in problems of agricultural economics. 



I 



178 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



f; 



problems in taxation. ^^'^^'^"•"^"tal functions; practical and current 

Fati: WinS: '''• '^'"' ''"'"^"•'" '"'•' Agricultural Production (3, 2). 

agricultural settlement, and X ™«»^ant ^l^^T ?''"' *.^\* ''^"^ '"«"^"'^«'' 
by a consideration of the re^ioLTt! ^T "*'''^^*"'" <'^ t^e land, followed 
utilization and agrifultu^arp'r^dlS '"' -*--^--l shifts in land 

Spring '"• C-^-'-P""" of Farm Products and Standards of Living (3). 

^^t^rS^Z^:':,t:t'Z:^^^^ -al-urhan migration, of 

o.^.e trends in per capita^nrm^^-/:- StoS^^ ^ 

A. *.. 2lD. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation r^>^ w; f 
^niVaSS of fSr-' cooperation^:rm:2s ofi^Ling the 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

R 1.J r, ''"'' '^*'^«n«ed Undergraduates 

K. Jid. 51. Departmental Orsanizatinn (%\ r\ ^ ^ 

tory periods a week. Spring ^^ ^""^ ^ *'^'' '**'°^^- 

information acquired at the Un veStv wkh thf m"" '" '"'^""^ ** 
demonstrating which he faces as a teacher H """""' ""^ *^°'"^ ""'' 
for deficiencies which are corre^Ld briabo;ato"ry p^raXe""^ ^" ^'^^"^^ 
R. Ed. 90. Practice Teaching (6). Fall. Prerequisite R FH in7 

operation .,^2 ™" ?/*«' 7««'. P'" l«»ns, .„d Kach i„ ... 

..0 ..... .„„ ., :s,.r- sr::' ;^:stsr '- '^•" 

^': R eIdo '" '■""""^ "■«• ™'' "'■*■■. Spring. P^„,.,. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 



179 



A continuation of R. Ed. 90 for those students wishing to acquire addi- 
tional experience in teaching. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural Stu- 
dents (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Fall. Required 
of majors in Agricultural Education. Elective for others. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agricultural (.5). Fall, 
prerequisite, R. Ed. 107. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised 
farming programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer 
work, and objectives and methods in all-day instruction. 

R. Ed. 110. Rural Life and Education (4). Winter. 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural com- 
munities, stressing an analysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities 
of normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the 
conditioning effects of economic differences. 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Part-time and Adult Classes (2). Fall. 

Characteristics of part-time and adult class instruction. Determining 
needs for and organizing a course; selecting materials for instruction; and 
class management. Emphasis is placed on the conference method of 
teaching. 

R. Ed. 112, 113. Departmental Management (1, 1). One laboratory 
period a week. Winter, Spring. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107, 109. 

The analysis of administrative programs for high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. Investigations and reports. 

K. Kd. 114. Organization and Management of l^arm Mechanics in 
Secondary Schools (2). Two laboratory periods a week. Spring. Pre- 
requisites, Agr. Engr. 54, R. Ed. 107. 

An analysis of programs in well-equipped farm mechanics laboratories. 
Contemporary developments; objectives; determination of projects; pro- 
curement of supplies and repairs; shop management; care and operation 
of equipment; methods of group and individual instruction; safety pre- 
cautions; keeping records; and the development of charts designed to 
promote order in shops. 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202, 203. Rural Life and Education (3, 3, 3). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 110 or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good 
life in rural communities. 



180 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AGRONOMY 



181 



R. Ed. 207, 208, 209. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Sci. 
ence, and Shop (2, 2, 2). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems 
facing teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for 
persons who have had several years of teaching experience in this field. 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-3). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the 
several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

R. Ed. 251. Research. Credit hours according to work done. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Engr. 54. Farm Mechanics (2). Two laboratory periods a week. 
Fall. 

This course consists of laboratroy exercises in practical farm shop and 
farm equipment repair and construction projects. It is offered primarily 
for prospective teachers of vocational agriculture. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 101. Farm Machinery (4). Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Winter. 

A study of the economics, design and adjustments of modern horse and 
tractor-drawn machinery, including applications of electricity to farm 
operations. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual machines, 
their calibration, adjustment, and repair. 

Agr. Engr. 102. Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles (4). Three 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Spring. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the internal combustion 
engines, trucks, tractors, and automobiles used in farm practice. 

Agr. Engr. 105. Farm Buildings (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Winter. 

A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm lighting, heating, 
water supply, and sanitation systems. 

Agr. Engr. 107. Farm Drainage (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Fall. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain- 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, methods of 
construction, and the use of engineering instruments. A smaller amount 
of time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the laws relating 

thereto. 



AGRONOMY 

,i,^i.ion of aops^^ Production (5). Three lectures and two laboratory 

'•*£,'r«rn'::dap..Uo„. »,»., .™~ve.e„. »d u,., o. Ce,.., 

and Forage crops. ^^^^^^ed Undergraduates 

^ 1*,. ^9^ One lecture and one labora- 

stroetot. ...... „rf|„, term crops, including market classiS- 

JS'S'^S^dt » "—"'«' "v *• """«' "^'" """•" " 

"C-. M. S.,«..a C,.P S.ndi.. («. ^^'. *'-'. --»- '- 
requisite. Agron. 1. .^^^^^^^ t„ the 

Advanced individual study of field crops 
students. ^^^ Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (3). ^ ^'^^'^sZ r.^^ 
The principles of breeding as applied to field crop p 
used in plant improvement. 
Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (3). Sprmg. ^^ 

The bringing to bear of ^^^^^^^r^^ ^^^^^^'' «^^^^*^^^^ 
velopment of balanced croppmg systems, appropr 

and different areas of the state. 

For Graduates . 

X, J- <-^ K\ Fall Prerequisite, consent of m- 
Agron. 201. Crop Breedmg (3-6). tall. 

'^™'^''* . 1 n<t but better adapted to graduate students and oflfer- 

i„ffS:; r^eVf chS rmateriS to suit special cases. 

o • o^ n 1 1^ Fall, Winter, Spring. 
C'by sfHo^^'ctiL scientific publications on crops or soils. 

Agron. 209. Research (6-12). Any ^-;*«- „^ ^^^g^stion 

Credit according to worlc -comphshed^ ^^^ ^P- ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ 

of the head of the department, the student wi 

for study. 

Division of Soils prerequisites, General Chemistry. 

Soils 1. General Soils (5). Spnng. J ^^^^j^^^^nt of soils as a 

A broad conception and aj.pre«ation o^: th^^^^ J.^ .^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ 

home for plants; major soil areas oi 



182 



if 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



^^^r^::1SJ!-' --^^-^^ the relation o. SoHs . 

-e.a.3 a. r.^Jt'Z^£:2-:t:^^T--^:^ 

Soils 51 i,h * ^°'" '^*'^^"*=«<' Undergraduates 
period a weef^ wL"/*""''*'"'^ '" ^»''« <3). Two three hour .«H 
Che^istr.. '-'• ^-*- ^-ecuisites. Soils X and^^^n^^^^iSS' 

a s^n irrTabotSyl detT^"'' ^"'^ P^^^^^' methods of exa„.i„- 
'evel. The student is Uuire/r^ '^^/"tritional and potential ?eSf 
own use in this study. '''*^ *' ^''''^'^^ ^^out a bushel of soJL for £ 

Soils los. sircZzt r?;::" r: ^-^ ''^^-'- 

a week Spring. PrereiisVet ' So^t i' tt Sof"' °"^ '^''^'^^^^'-^ ^--d 

The factors and processes nf 1 i J Geology, 

the develop„.ent and' use of so^ Zs^io^ ", ^''^ ""^"^ ^^^ Maryland- 

tionsT'th'''^. ^^""^^^^'^^^ period rSr; fl^T''""^ ^-"P^^'- and 
tions of the state to examine soils in Ll q ^' '"*" different see- 
to the interests of the student are required f;r ^'!;'' ^'""^'^'"^ «^'=-ding 

Soils 112. soi, Conservation (3) ^ , T ^"'^' 

Penod a week. Fall. Prerequisite!^ Soilfl" "^'""^ ^"' '^"^ ^'-"-on 

Ane factors affectino- fi,^ 

their influence on'sSt;'^ J^^SH?" "f ^^" ^"^ ''^ -" -isture, and 

conducted to see Practicaf 'appSt of hese'rrd"""; ^'^'^ *"P^ "- 

Soils 120. Soil Management (3, r 7 °' '"' conservation. 

a week Winter. Prerequisites LJTl'nd 2" "' ''"^ '^"""•^t-^ P--<1 
Detailed soil problems- Drp^f i i 

Soils 201 ^ ^^^ Graduates 

libra,, „.,;,. rnr;„X'"' "" "'"'"I' <««■■»■ Labo„Wy .„, 

Soils 202, 203, 204 <^n,i c«- . 

W».ter, Spring. Pr;req':ifers:i,?i 1^^ ^ J'T •'^^*"- ^ --^- ^a.l, 

A review of the development and Th ^^'^ ^''"'^alent. 

Fall quarter, the physical Tature of s^ls'™ •T'^'P*'"" "^ ««" science, 
nature of soils; spring quarter, tL-Lt^-^n^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^mical 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



183 



Soils 212, 213, 214. Soil Technique (2, 2, 2). Two laboratory periods a 
week. Fall, Winter, Spring. 
To accompany the Soil Science course; procedures for obtaining data 
i and research methods for studying various soil problems. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 2. Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (4). Four laboratory 
periods a week. Fall or Spring. 

A study of the types, breeds and market classes of beef cattle, sheep, 
hogs and horses; general problems in breeding, feeding and management. 
Practice in the selection, fitting and showing of livestock. 

A. H. 31. Livestock Judging (2). Two laboratory periods a week. 
Spring. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Training in judging of beef cattle, sheep, hogs and draft horses. Occa- 
sional trips to farms w^here outstanding heards and flocks are maintained. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 52. Feeds and Feeding (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Winter or Spring. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, 31 and 33. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock; feeding standards; the 
calculation and compounding of rations. 

A. H. 53. Principles of Breeding (4). Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Fall or Spring. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, 
development, systems of breeding, and pedigree work are considered. 

A. H. 55. Livestock Management (2). Two laboratory periods a week. 
Fall or Spring. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

A course designed to familiarize students with the practical handling 
and management of livestock. Practice and training in the feeding, fitting 
and preparation of animals for show and work purposes. 

A. H. 56. Meat and Meat Products (1). One laboratroy period a week. 
Winter. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Designed to give information on the processing and handling of the 
nation's meat supply. A study of the physical and structural qualities 
which affect the value of meat and meat products. Trips are made to 
packing houses and meat distributing centers. 

A. H. 58. Advanced Livestock Judging (2). Two laboratory periods a 
week. Fall. Prerequisite, A. H. 31. • 

An advanced course in the selection and judging of purebred and com- 
mercial meat and work animals. The most adept students enrolled in this 
course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in intercol- 
legiate livestock judging contests. 



184 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A. H. 60. Beef Cattle Production (3) p.ii d 
Principles and practices underlyLi the ^^^'"^'J^^^'t^. A- H. 2. 

cattle, including a study of breeds and tt '7"'"»'<=«1 Production of be., 
and management of purebred InLTr^JeZ^^^''''''' ''^^''"^' ^-J^ 

p" n";;: a^rp^aT^trxr;- "^"^^- ^--"^-«' - - . 

eluding a study o^f th b^eedf a^fhr^ ^^^^^^^^ "^ ^W ,„ 

and management of purebreed «?/ adaptability. Breeding, feed,!" 

pureoreed and commercial flocks needing 

A. H 67. Pork Production (3). Winter. Prereauisite A u o 
Principles and practices underlying th. '^'^''^^'''^'^^' ^- «• 2. 

bre'dts f"'^"" r' --«rof'';uXrat^ "^ ^«^^: 

breeds of swine and their adaptability. ^ ^'"'^^^ ^"^^ cpmmercial herds; 

A. H. 69. Draft Horse Production (^^ <i ■ 

Principles and practices und!! ^""^^ P^^^-^q^isite, A. H. 9 

-ft horses, i e J,, a^UrStLT^S a^d^^ ^ ^ ^ 

^ ^ ^ Livestock Markets and Marketing (3). Pall. Prerequisite 

ing^tS^^^^ and systems of market- 

refngeration facilities; the merchtdt^ :f ^TpLrcr^^^*^""" ^^ 

and-33,A"H.5f*'"^'^"*"'"''"^''>- Winter. Prer'ecuisites, Chem. 3, 
Processes of dis-pstinn oK^, 

tiona. balances; nftur of nutSna"' Z' ™^*^''°"^'" "^ -*"-*«; nutri- 
and reproduction. "«r,tional requirements for growth, producSo" 

A. H. 116. Light Horse Production (1). PaH 

...ne;;s :t rdL^SnXiSrti - - *- - - 

light horses is included in this course ^ '"''="^" ^""^ breeding of 

site, A^h! ne.^'^^'"^^'' ^'^"^ «-e Production (1). Spring. Prerequi- 

A continuation of A H lift t i j , 
the light horse farm, proper methods oVfe'/'"'^ "' *^ organization of 
d'sease, treatment and ca'e o?SL sll^ / '"' *^"™»^' '=-"troI of 

injuries, sale of surplus stock. 

A H 201 « • ^""^ Graduates 

. Problems which relate specifically to th . ^^ ^'' ^^"'^• 

IS pursuing will be assigner "^ '" '^" ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ work the student 



ART 



185 



A. H. 202. Seminar (1). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
iDublications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research work for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. 

A. H. 203. Research. Credit to be determined by the amount and char- 
acter of work done. Fall, Winter, Spring. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be re- 
quired to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a 
thesis. 

A. H. 204. Advanced Breeding (3). Spring. Prerequisites, Zool. 104, 
A. H. 53. 

This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity and varia- 
tion; selection and selection indices; breeding systems; specific inheritance 
in farm animals. 

A. H. 206, 207, 208. Advanced Livestock Management (3, 3, 3). Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. Fall, Winter, Spring. 

An intensive study of the newer developments in animal breeding, animal 
physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology and other closely allied fields 
as they apply to the management and commercial production of livestock. 

*ART 

Art 1. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). Spring. Prehistoric period and 
Egypt to 1000 B. C. Survey of architectural remains, sculpture, painting. 
Attention is given to stages of culture as reflected in the archaelogical 
and artistic remains. Lectures fully illustrated by slides. 

Art 2. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). Near East and Pre-Greek civil- 
ization of the eastern Mediterranean. Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, 
Persian. The important archaelogical discoveries of Schliemann and 
Evans at Troy, the Greek mainland and in Crete are treated in detail. 
Conducted with the use of slides. 

Art 3. Art in Classical Civilization (2). Summer. Monuments of 
Ancient Rome. A survey of the architectural remains and the decorative 
art of the Romans. The related Etruscan art development will also be 
treated, as well as the remains of Pompeii and important outlying sites 
of the Roman w^orld. Illustrated with slides. 

Art 4. Art in Classical Civilization (2). Greek Art: Architecture, 
sculpture, and vase-painting. The course covers the achaeic period, treats 
in detail the highly developed forms of the Golden Age, and shows the 
niain trends in the late Greek or Hellenistic era. Illustrated by slides. 



* For other courses in Art, see Home Economics. 



I 



186 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BACTERIOLOGY 



187 



and painting, from the Jw^d centu fl DTtte" R "'"'*=*""' ^'="'^*-^ 
means of slides. ^ ° ^''^ Renaissance, studied by 

Eut;er„-arZ tie R^2;iss?nre%rthTn "rr' -"^ ^'^'t. 
Visits to the museums in WaSSon "^ ' "'"'*'''*^' '^'=*"^^^' 

.utL^^;tur:rt^^^^^^^^^^ w. . 

spe1iaretpW%t\te''Sil"fXt '"^^ '''' ^^'^^'^ ^--' ^''^ 
Occasional comparison of Da nS .,! ^^"^'^««n<=e ««<> the Baroque. 

tures illustrated wUhsHdes'' " ' ''"'P*""''' ^"'^ «'-<=Wtecture. L 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Art 51. Principles of Art ADDreciatinn (^\ t^i, i ^ 
gallery visits. Spring. ^PP'^^^^ation (3). Three lectures. Occasional 

ASTRONOMY 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Astr. 51, 52. Astronomy (4). Summer, Fall. 
An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Tht''lelretro\atro:ries^^ '''• ^"'"'"-' ^^"' ^^"*-. SPri". 

^:^:i^Li^^:t!i. n^£rirco^;,r^^re';f t^-n -r 

.abtlries'^SetuSite. Btc'tT^ '''■ ^^"' '^^^"^^ ^^ '-*-= - 

rattn'XIcLrSerioE^^^^ ^"'.*''^*' identification. The prepa- 

techniques anTthe meTsur™t^f^^^^ ""^'"'" ^^^""^^'^ ^t^'"'"^ 

bacteria and the uL^f ^nJ , /k *'^'*'"^- ^n^^robic cultivation of 
fee, $7.00 specmhzed bacteriological apparatus. Laboratory 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

junior year. For Home Economics students only. 



I A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; relation to v^rater, milk, dairy products, and other foods; in- 
fection and immunity; personal, home and community hygiene. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 60. Pathogenic Bacteriology (5). Winter, Summer. Three lec- 
tures; two laboratories. Sophomore standing. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathological mate- 
rial; effects of pathogens and their products. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 60 A. Pathogenic Bacteriology (3). Winter, Summer. Prerequi- 
sites, Bact. 1 and 5. 
This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 60. 

Bact. 65. Public Health (2). Fall. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration, by 
the staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, repre- 
senting each of the bureaus and divisions. Offered in alternate years, 
alternating with Bact. 116. 

Bact. 70. Elements of Sanitary Bacteriology (2). Fall. Senior year. 
For Engineering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sew^age disposal. 

Bact. 91, 92, 93, 94, Journal Club (1, 1, 1, 1). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Prerequisites, 16 hours Bacteriology, including Bact. 1, 5 and 60. 

Students report on current scientific literature or on individual prob- 
lems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticized by members of 
the class and staff. No graduate credit for students majoring in bac- 
teriology. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101. Milk Bacteriology (5). Summer, Winter. Three lectures; 
two laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

The sources and development of bacteria in milk; milk fermentation; 
sanitary production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preserva- 
tion of milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Stand- 
ard methods of milk analysis; the bacteriological control of milk supplies 
and plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Bact. 102. Dairy Products Bacteriology (4). Spring, Fall. Two lec- 
tures; two laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5; Bact. 101 is desirable. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
fermented milks, starters, butter, ice cream, cheese, and other dairy 
products; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; 
occasional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Bact. 111. Food Bacteriology (5). Fall, Spring. Three lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 



188 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BACTERIOLOGY 



189 



Bacteria, yeasts and molds associated with fruits and vegetables, meats, 
seafoods, and poultry products. Methods of examination, and standards 
of quality. Microorganisms causing food spoilage and methods for their 
control. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Bact. 112. Sanitary Bacteriology (4). Fall, Spring. Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purification; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal; disposal of gar- 
bage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Standard methods for examination 
of water and sewage and for other sanitary analyses; differentiation and 
significance of the coli-aerogenes group. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Bact. 115. Serology (5). Fall, Spring. Three lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 60. 

Infection and resistance; agglutination, precipitation, complement fixa- 
tion reactions, principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness. Prepara- 
tion of necessary reagents; general immunological techniques; factors 
affecting reactions; applications in the identifications of bacteria and diag- 
nosis of disease. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 116. Epidemiology (2). Winter. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and credit 
or registration in Bact. 60 or 60A. 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, including history, charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and control; 
periodicity; principles of investigation; public health applications. 

Bact. 118. Systematic Bacteriology (4). Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, 10 hours of Bacteriology. 

History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; international 
codes of nomenclature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. 
Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Bact. 125. Clinical Methods (2). Fall, Spring. Two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, Bact. 5 and 60 and consent of instructor. 

Methods for microscopic examination of blood; bacteriological exami- 
nation of sputum, feces and spinal fluids; microscopic and routine chemical 
methods for examination of urine. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 181, 182, 183, 184. Bacteriological Problems (1-3). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Three laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 5 and any 
other courses needed for the projects. Registration limited. 

This course is arranged to provide qualified students an opportunity 
to continue specific bacteriological problems under the supervision of a 
member of the department. Results are presented in the form of a thesis. 
No graduate credit for students majoring in Bacteriology. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00. 



For Graduates 

«o.t 211 Bacterial Metabolism (3). Wmter. rre 4 

trial fermentations. lectures; two 

Bact 212. Advanced Food Bacteriology (4). Spring, 
laboratories. Prerequisites, Bact. lU or e<l--^-^; ^^, ^„i. 

Microorganisms used in food -^---f^^''J^^X:\r2x. of flies, 

fermentations. Food ^-^^^^i::l^:^jZ7!ooi products. Labors- 
rodents, human carriers, etc., m the coniamina 

b. determined b, the ™7^"<'„ .^'SU needed for the p»r«»l.r 

Prerequisites, Bact. 1, o, ana any 

V^^i^^^' .„ u o^rv,iffpd uDon approval of the de- 

Properly qualified students ^^•.n be ^^^^'^^^^Zayle^ect the subject 
partment head and, ^vith his approval he sudent my ^.^^ ^^^ ^^^ 
for research. The investigation is out hned an co ^^ ^^^ department, 

sued under the supervision of a faculty me 
I ahoratorv fee, $3.00 per credit hour. 

seleeted subjecB, and i«ent advanees in bactemlogy. 

7x^^.11*. .. rood Te.b„..o,, <1.. <N.. o^ered 1«.45,. 
U^J:. of t .»e», Pb.»» Of s.nd, eonopHsin. food t^bnolo^- 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

. /-.N T?ail Sorine. Two laboratories, 

F. Tech. 100. Food Microscopy (3). Fall, hpnng. 



190 



THE VmVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



position of ag,icultu„, „d m.nuEuS i'Vi / """°'" "»' 
.. factory control .nd analyses. L.boSto^TL I? M '°""™'"« <•* 

tu J, p-ia..r "J- l-;'r-S <«• ■'^P-.. one ,.. 

and dried eggs. This is fo., LT .^"^^"^ storage; microbiology of frn^. 
Poultry Hus^Lj'lalL^T^^'elTor"" "^^"^ ^''^ ^fp^tLeTo; 

stratilf • ""• ^•'^"•^''"•'' C-^- (!)• Summer. One lecture an. .e„.o„. 

Methods followed in fi,^ « ^ , . 
con,™... ConslSif ,,rXlirof'» 'T?'* •»" '""*" 
work. 1>™,„„|„„,, B^„ , „■*,„,'"*;'«■ laboratory „d d.U 

P^feronco given ,o «*.te 'n,.;, iTn'Sl.d'^""""""' '™"««1. "" 

o.c"„r:, —rrcZriaTrnS"? r*-"-- -*-. 

r. lecn. 130. Technology Conference (\) Wir,t«.. c 
Reports and discussions of curr. fi , ' "'"'"^'■- ^ne lecture, 

technology. °^ •=""«"* developments in the field of food 

BOTANY 

twftbo'rat^rrperiSs'fweek ^"'"'""' """"' ^''""^- ^h^^^ 'ectures and 

suSr us:xVor" ^--^^^-^ ''^^^«^ - «" pws of t.. 

B«t. 2. General Botany (.5) Winfer tt. , . 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. l! ^^^ ^^ ^"'^ ^'^^ laboratory 

A continuation of Bot 1 A k • ^ 

liverworts, mosses, ferns'and their reiaUvif'^^^rv. '*"'^^ "^ «'s««' ^"ng'' 
tory fee, $3.00. "^ relatives, and the seed plants. Labora- 

Bot. 20. Diseases of Plants C^^ Poii o • 
laboratory periods a week. PrereauisHj P f',"'- '^^'^^ '"*=*"'•«« «"d two 

An introductory study in the fil I' ^ ' ""■ ^''"'^^'^"t- 
of symptoms, causal agents and' To^^ ^''"''^t^'-y' ^^^ i" the literature, 
Laboratroy fee, $3.00. ' ^ '""*'"*" "^^^^^res of plant diseases. 

Bot 50 PU . ^ ^"' Advanced Undergraduates 
oor. i>u. Plant Taxonomy rs) Qr^ • r\ 

periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot 2!"'"^' ^^''^''''^ ^"^ ^^^ laboratory 



BOTANY 



191 



Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles on which 
classification is based. 

Bot. 51. Plant Microtechnique (3). Winter. One lecture and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent micro- 
scope slides of plant materials. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bot. 52. Seminar (1-3). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Discussion of current literature, problems, and progress in botany, plant 
physiology and plant pathology. For undergraduate majors and minors. 

Bot. 70. Research Methods in Plant Pathology (2). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 

For students who are interested in obtaining advanced training in basic 
technics of plant pathology. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per quarter. 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Anatomy (3). Fall. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 51. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the 
vascular plants. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Bot. 104. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3). Summer. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 50. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of 
current taxonomic literature. 

Bot. 105. Structure of Economic Plants (2). Winter. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A detailed microscopic study of the chief fruit and vegetable crops. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Bot. 106. History and Philosophy of Botany (1). (Not offered 1944-45.) 
Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201. Cytology (5). Spring. Three lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 51, Zool. 104, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and the 
relation of these to current theories of heredity and evolution. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. 

Bot. 202. Plant Morphology (2). (Not offered 1944-45.) Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 50, 101, or equivalent. 

A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to their phylogeny and development. Laboratory fee. $3.00. 



192 



THE VNIVERSITy OF MARYLAND 



of t'titt.'^"^"^- '"'• ^^"' ^-*-' Sprin,. Prerequisite. per„,issio„ 
The study of special topics i„ p,a„t .orphoIo.y, anato.y, and cytoW 
Bot.204. Research. Credit according to work done. ''' 

B. Plant Pathology 

p". Path, ii: ot:r rrsTTr ^"'^ "^'•'-'- 

Bot. 20, or equivalent! ^''"""' ^'"•"^ ^3). Fall. Prerequisite, 

Intended for students who wish tn ^^f • 
diseases of special crops than Ts taUlel" STt'o ^''"'' '"'°^'"^«- - 

Pit. Path. 108. Mycoloffv (^^ Qr. • 
to^y^ periods a week.' Prfr^^site, 6^2. " •"*""^ ''"' *^° l^"-- 

anf ecr:lTo7th:Tu^;' L^^oTawS' So.'^^^''^^^^' f-^^-*-. 

PI* D .u „„ *'"'■ Graduates 

Pit. Path. 201. Virus Diseases (2 ^\ q 

lectures and one laboratory period a week p""^' •^.^° '"'=*"^««' »' two 
Consideration of the physical oi 7 Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. loi. 

Viruses and plant viruslSel^^XttTi^/ftH^^^^^^^^ ^^^^"^ '' ^'- 

or eq^ivS^t'"'- ^"•"^ ^*«^^- ^-*-' (3). Winter. Prequisite, Bot. 20, 

An advanced course dealine with th^ <-u 
ease control. "^ ^'^^ ^^^ theory and practices of plant dis- 

iiur i:te'r::: ?• ^f • "•^-- ^p^m, 

C. Plant Phyr; ""'" "^^^^"^^ ^' ^^^-— 

Pit. Phys. m pLT;; '!"^^^^''"'»*- -«» G-duates 

laboratory periods Tteek'^Te 7^ S' b"^"; "^^^ ^-^-- -^ two 
A summary view nf f>,^ , 4UiMte, ±>ot. 1. 

oratory fee, I'i.OO '' ^'"''■"' Physiological activities of plants. Lab- 

Pit. Phys. 102. Plant Ecology (S\ q, 

Pit Di. „«, ^"'" Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 201. Plant Biochemistrv U\ w . 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



193 



This course deals with the important substances in the composition of 
the plant body. 

Pit. Phys. 202 A. Plant Biophysics (2). (Not offered in 1944-45.) Pre- 
requisites, Bot. 1, Pit. Phys. 101, or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
plant life processes. 

Pit. Phys. 202B. Biophysical Methods (2). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 

Pit. Phys. 203. Plant Metabolism (3). Spring. Prerequisite, an ele- 
mentary knowledge of plant physiology and organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. 

Pit. Phys. 204. Growth and Development (2). Fall. Prerequisite, 18 
hours of plant science. 

P4t. Phys. 205. Seminar (1). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. 

Pit. Phys. 206. Research. Credit according to work done. 

Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

B. A. 10, 11, 12. Organization and Control I, II, III (2, 2, 2*). Fall, 
Spring, Summer. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Required for B. P. A. 

students. 

A survey course treating the internal and functional organization of a 
business enterprise. B. A. 12 includes industrial management, organization 
and control. 

B. A. 20, 21, 22. Principles of Accounting I, II, III (12). Fall, Spring, 
Summer. Required of all B. P. A. students. 

The fundamental principles and problems involved in the accounting 
system; capital and surplus; bonds; and manufacturing and cost ac- 
counting. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

B. A. 120. Intermediate Accounting (5). Fall, Summer. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 22. 

A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, 
corporation accounts and statements, consignment and installments, and the 
interpretation of accounting statements. 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting (5). Winter. Prerequisite, B. A. 22. 



194 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



If 



B. A. m''- ''•"'•""" ^''•^"^^ »"" P-<=«- (5)- Spring. Prerequisite. 

Of tr/4 ^ri^ssf \- rp^Sororfi-f ^•^•'^ ^^^"-- 

reports. Preparation of audit working papers and 

^^B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (5). Winter. Prerequisite, B. A. 

Vidua,, partnership, JlZltZ::^!':^^^:^ Z^T^^ " '"^*- 
^^B. A. 124. Advanced Accounting (5). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite. B. A. 

and liquidation! ' "' ""''^''^ """^ consolidations, receivership 

insLttof" ^- P- ^- P'-*'"*"'^ (5). Spring. Prerequisite, consent of the 
Designed to coordinate all previous? ^^^nr'l' ;r. « 

8.1. %o"- """"'" ^""•"" ">• «""'"• Summer. P„r«,„.s„., 

B. A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics (i a\ p^n o^ • 
requisite, B. A. 131 •^^"^^iics (^4, 4;. i^all, Spring. Pre- 

of U,. .ours, .dv^oed ™«,.a, of oorroMou .„d .fh"'Si S„4"' 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



195 



are applied to statistical analyses of economic fluctuations, price changes, 
cost analysis, and market demand indexes and functions. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (4). Winter, Summer. Prequisite, 
Econ. 140. Required for graduation. 

This course deals with the problems to be faced by management in the 
organization and financing of corporate enterprise; the various types of 
securities and their use in raising capital and apportioning income, risk, 
and control. 

B. A. 141. Investment Management (4). Spring. Prerequiste, B. A. 140. 
A study of the problems and methods involved in the analysis, selection, 
and management of investments. 

B. A. 142. ' Banking Policies and Practices (4). Spring. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 140. 

A study of the organization and management of the commercial Bank, 
the operation of its departments, and the methods used in the extension 
of commercial credit. 

B. A. 143. Credit Management (3). Spring. Prerequisite, B. A. 140. 

A study of the nature of credit and the principles applicable to its exten- 
sion for industrial, commercial, and consumer purposes; the organization 
and management of a credit department, and the collection of accounts. 

B. A. 144. Life, Group, and Social Insurance (3). Fall, Summer. Pre- 
quisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

A study of the types of life insurance and the basic principles underlying 
all life insurance relating to reserves, investments, premiums, and regula- 
tions. 

B. A. 145. Property, Casualty, and Liability Insurance (3). Winter. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

A survey of the insurance coverages written to protect business and 
personal risks arising from such hazards as fire, windstorm, ocean and 
inland transportation, fidelity, and liability. 

B. A. 146. Real Estate Financing and Appraisals (3). Spring. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 33 or 37, B. A. 156. 

A study of the methods used in financing real estate of all types — resi- 
dential, industrial, and commercial. The fundamental problem of valua- 
tion will be studied from the viewpoint of the appraiser. Appraisal tech- 
nique will be applied in the field. 

B. A. 147. Business Cycle Theory (4). Spring. Prerequisite, Econ. 
140 and senior standing. B. A. 131 recommended. 

Definition and measurement of business cycles, theories of the business 
cycle and the dynamic interrelations of economic processes; the problem of 
controlling economic instability. 



m. 






196 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



197 



\ 



[ 

1 ■' 



1 i 



t 



B. A. 150. Marketing Management (4). Winter, Summer. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 150. Required for graduation. 

A study of the work of the marketing division in a going business organ- 
ization. The problems of developing organizations and procedures for the 
control of marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the 
course is placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices 
for the effective marketing of merchandise. 

B. A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (3). Fall. Prerequi- 
site, B. A. 150. 

Deals with the fundamental principles of advertising. Covers the organ- 
ization and carrying through of advertising campaigns and programs, the 
selection of ideas, types of appeal and different media, and the methods 
of judging the effectiveness of advertising. 

B. A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (3). Winter. Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 151. 

Studies the practices and techniques of copy writing and layout that are 
useful for those who expect to prepare advertising or to direct the actual 
production of advertising. Covers the most essential principles of various 
kinds of copy writing. Surveys the process of production from the original 
idea to the published advertisement, and analyzes methods of testing its 
effectiveness. 

B. A. 153. Purchasing Management (3). Spring. Prerequisite, B. A. 
150. 

Studies the problems of determining the proper sources, quality and 
quantity of supplies, and of methods of testing quality; price policies, price 
forecasting, forward buying, bidding and negotiation; budgets and stand- 
ards of achievement. Particular attention is given to government purchas- 
ing, the sources and supplies of war materials, and methods and procedures 
used in their procurement. 

B. A. 154. Retail Store Management (4). Spring. Prerequisite, Econ. 
150. 

Retail store organization, location, layout and store policy; pricing poli- 
cies, price lines, brands, credit policies; records as a guide to buying; 
purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and supervision of 
retail sales force; and administrative problems. 

B. A. 156. Real Estate Principles and Practice (3). Fall. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

The principles and practices involved in the acquisition and utilization 
of land and the improvements thereon. 

B. A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (4). (Not offered 1944-45.) Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 150. 



,„*.. 0. various »p.,«n. ..endes; ^'TntrLtK^t 
i. .„ort« .n6 importing ™"~"7;-,|,^l„,., diing through the 

•'"'•" srr.'', rSbui:Ttis'',n .ho unu.d s..^.. 

■*■'■ '*•• T.ro.»:.Sr«th"fune«.„.l ..d .d™n«,.tive roWon- 
This course deals essentially wun i comprises a survey of 

,hips between management --l^lJ^X'^:,,. training, Job analysis. 
the scientific selection of ^^^^^^^^ employees, employee adjustment; 
SfiSvete^tryi d^iSranl t:cli^ni;es of supervision, elimina- 

r:r rterrz-as . .abor ...... .. - p.. 

requisite, B. A. 160. „„Hetv's effort through legislation, 

A study of contemporary trends in society s ^"^ relationship 

„,ediation, and other methods to bring ^^o^t ^ ^^^'.^ ,,^ ,ourt de- 

between labor and management. State ana reae 

cisions affecting labor relations are studied. 
B A 163. industrial Relations (3), Spring. P'7'l-^'*^\^7" '"; 
rl of the development -d method fo^^^^^^^^^^ e^^rand S 

with reference to the settlement »« ^^^^ ^^^.^ activities, arbitration. 

analysis of labor union and ,f "^P^^^^^^^Sing t^ade agreements, strikes. 

mediation, and conciliation; ^'>^'':'''''' ''^^^'^^^^^X^r.t^^^^^ and injunc- 

boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee represe 

Ta. 165. Office Management (3). Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, B. A. 

10 or junior standing. principles of scientific management in 

Considers the application of the principles oi 

their application to office work. _ 

B A 170. Industrial Management (4). Spring. Prerequisites. B. A. 

duction planning, etc. prerequisite, 

B. A. 171. Transportation II (4). l^oi; oueic 

"^ Dti^ed for students interested in the practical aspects of transporta- 
tion or example, shippers, traffic managers and regulators. 

b! a. 172. Transportation III (4). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequisite, 

' TMsTourse treats the details of classification and rate construction for 
the inland transportation services. 



I 






CHEMISTRY 



199 



198 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



B. A. 173. Transportation IV (4), Overseas Shipping. (Not offered 
1944-45.) Prerequisite, P. A. 170, 171. 

B. A. 180, 181, 182. Business Law I, II, III (9). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of all graduates in B. P. A. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instru- 
ments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and 
sales. 

B. A. 183. Law for Accountants (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequi- 
site, B. A. 181. 

Principles of law relating to the accounting profession, special emphasis 
being placed upon sections of the Maryland Annotated Code dealing with 
accountants, corporations, estates, and trusts. 

B. A. 186. Real Estate Law and Conveyancing (3). (Not offered 1944- 
45.) Prerequisite, B. A. 156 and 181. 

This course attempts to cover in a general way those phases of real 
property law which are of interest not only to real estate dealers but to all 
business men. 

For Graduates 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting (4). (Not offered 1944-45.) 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 229. Studies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and 
Organization. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (1-3). Prerequisites, 
Ec. 140, B. A. 22, B. A. 140. 

B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management (3). Spring. 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3). 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3). Spring, Summer. 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations. Fall, 
Summer. 

B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management. (Arranged.) Winter. 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 269. Studies in Special Problems in Employer-Employee Rela- 
tionships. (Arranged.) 

B. A. 299. Thesis. (Arranged.) 



CHEMISTRY 

A. Inorganic Chemistry ^ g^^^^r. 

Uboratory fee. $7.00 per <^--*- ,^, Analysis (3). 

Chem. 5. General ^ircZlnTl On! lectnre and two three-hour 
Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Chem. 1, 
laboratory periods per week. ^^.^^ ^j^^ p^g- 

«. course U "I'-^'^.'^^'^Z.^J^'Z^^^.i^ry te. I^-.O- 

Chem. 7, 9. Introductory y.u meeting per week. 

Math. 0. Three lectures and one section m g ^,,^i,ige 

A course designed for fJ-^^.^S^f prerequisite for more ad- 
of chemistry; this course »« 'lot acceptea . 

anced courses. Demonstration fee, ?3.00 per q ^hree lectures 

Chem 101. Advanced Inorganic Chennstry (3). Spring, 
-"t TS^:f%rdrc "it.- Chemistry. 

rm rr - Cistry of Karer Elements CS). FaU. Winter. 

Tstrrer:rnot usual, considered ^j;— --,,,. 

Chem. 202. 204. ^^^J^^^S'''Z\^:1:Z llbora'tory periods per 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

we^^- A r.^ oiPTYipnts considered in Chem. 201. 

A laboratory study of the compounds of elements 
Laboratory fee, $7.00 per quarter. ^.^^^^_ 

Chem. 206. An Introduction to Spe^rog^^^^^^^^^^ 
Spring. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

periods per week. snectrographic analysis. Laboratory 

A study of the fundamentals of spectrogr p 

fee, $7.00. 

B. Analytical Chemistry g •„ Winter, Summer. 

Chem. 15, 17. Qualitative Analy- W^^^ J^ ,„, o„e lecture 

Three lectures and two labo'-atory V^^'"'^^^^^^^,,^ chem. 1, 3. 
and two laboratory periods (Chem. u). ^^^ anions; 

A study of the separation of the ^""""f.^^JJfr Laboratory fee. |7.00 
thfphysical chemistry of the processes is stressed. L 

per quarter. . prerequisite. Chem. 

Chem. 19. Q«-t''«^t. tlC^^^^^^^ laboratory periods per week. 
1, 3. Two lectures and three three nour 



200 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 



.^r^reSr iErCSo^^ -"^ -— -erenee to vo,. 

-?^ Ve;;,^it^^^^^^^^^^^^^ -al, Sp.„, winter. Su.. 

laboratory periods per week. ''*"''^' ^"^ tl^'-ee three-hour 

This course includes a studv nf tt,o • • , 
and volumetric analysis Required of „,rrT' operations of gravimetric 
Laboratory fee. |7.00 per quarter "*' "'"^""""^ '" •^hemistn' 

. site for Chem. 123. "^y periods per week. Chem. 121 is a prerequl 

mic^'roscopkaSS.'^ Chem'lS^L MuI'*"*^?*. ^'* *^ fundamentals of 
tory fee, $7.00 per quarter ^"' ^ ''''^'^ "^ t«^«'« Abers. Labora 

twXe'htuftbo^- S^^^^ -a„. Winter. One lecture. 

islrertTa^futoftS^S^^^^^^^ -'-is; Chem. 2.3 

17.00 per quarter. "^ °P*'<=a' Properties of crystals. Laboratory fee, 

spS,rs^r2: ?::::z£,trr:; f„::'i- <'• ^'- -■"• *'--. 

laboratory periods per week instructor. Three three-hour 

C. Organic Chemistry 

^^^. ^rZ^SS^S^^ '''■ ^-' --- Pre- 

Sraalt'::!^^^^^^^^^ ^". -^-*- - -- economics, 
laboratory ^ertd perTel^"-^^"'^ ^-''«-tory (^^ Fa,., Winter. One 

A course designed to accompany Chem 31 q, r k 
per quarter. '^ "^nem. ji, 33. Laboratory fee. $8.00 

Supm:^.\^ie fe'rrp7rrk"%?^S?/«>- J^' ?-- Winter, 

A course for chemists, chemical engineers Tnd ^^ ' '' 

^ Chem. 36. 38. Elementary OrganfcLa^' T T "' '*"''"*^- 
ter. Summer. Two three-hour laboratory ^^"^'^ ^^"' ^''""^' ^'"■ 

A"'e7 " """"'"* registtttlS ^" ""'" ^^^^'J-^'te, 

ChrT4L\r3!TdvTnc?d'o ''' ^'■'^'''''^'-^^ f-. ?8.00 per quarter, 
lectures per week. ptT^^^it^erCwt'Jr '"'■ ^^"' «P^^»^- ^hree 



CHEMISTRY 



201 



An advanced study of the compounds of carbon, 

I Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (3, 3). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Three three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 19 or 23 and Chem. 37, 38. 

Syntheses and the quantitative determination of carbon and hydrogen, 
halogen, and nitrogen are studied. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per quarter. 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (3, 3). Fall, 
Winter, Spring, Summer. One lecture, and one or two laboratory periods 
I per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. Laboratory fee, 
$8.00 per quarter. 

(One course from the group 241-251 is offered each quarter excepting 
the Summer quarter.) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2). Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 243. The Polyene Pigments and Certain Vitamins (2). Two lec- 
tures per week. 

Chem. 245. The Sterols and Sex Hormones (2). Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 247. The Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds (2). Two lectures 
per week. 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2). Two lectures 
per week. 

Chem. 251. The Heterocyclics (2). Two lectures per w^eek. 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (3 to 5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Three to five three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per quarter. 

Chem. 256. Organic Microanalysis (5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Five 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced 

Course (3 to 5). Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Three to five three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per quarter. 

Chem. 260. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2 to 3). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Two or three three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

An orientation course designed to demonstrate a new student's fitness 
to begin research in organic chemistry. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

D. Biochemistry 

Chem. 41. The Chemistry of Textiles (4). Summer. Three lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. 

A study of the principal textile fibres. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 






1 



y 



202 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Chem. 81. Genpr^ii r,-««i. . . 

- A laboratory course which m«<;f k<. <• i 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. ^ *^^^" concurrently with Chem. 8i. 

«-' CW stTsltr^^^^^^^^^^ lectures per week. P., 

A comprehensive study of certain aspects of biochemistry 

threeTo^rSbttlrf ptrjf ;^^^^^^^^^^^^^ <^' ^>- Winter. Sprin, Two 

?8:^o';er;uX!"^^ ^'^^'^ "-^^ ---^-^ Che.. X^l. Laboratory fee, 

On?L"tal!\r;wfThtt hour'lh'' ?' ^^"' «P""^' Winter. Summer 

«i-. Chem. 3, 32. 33, stlS^SeL'r Tabo^to^J JT ^t "^^'-^- 

Chem 261 2fi? aj ""'^^^"ry fee, $8.00 per quarter. 

A comprehen^fvo cf ^ r ' ' ^^ ^^^ equivalent, 

tion. met'aboC rd^trttir ^^ '''''^' ^-*^^-' enzymes, nutri- 

T^':h;eellf fabotat^Te^^^^ (4). Pa„. Winter. 

^ An elective laboratory cou'edes T. "^^^"-^^"^^'t^^' ^hem. 36. 38. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per quarter accompany Chem. 261, 26,3. 

E. Physical Chemistry 

10, 11. rerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 1, 2; Math. 

the birSlTde"^^^^^^^ ''SEturfrm^^Tf ^^ ''"'?"^^ ^^^ students in 

course must be accompanied by Chem. 182, 184. 



CHEMISTRY 



203 



Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2). Fall, 
Winter. One three-hour laboratory per week. May be taken only when 
accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. 

The course includes quantitative experiments illustrating the principles 
studied in Chem. 181, 183. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per quarter. 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (10). Fall, Spring, Winter, Sum- 
mer. Five lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 21, 23; Phys. 3, 4, 5; 
Math. 20, 21, 22. 

A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (6). Fall, Spring, 
Winter, Summer. Three three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

A laboratory course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00 per quarter. 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187, 189 
and Chem. 188, 190, or equivalent. 

Chem. 281, 283. Theory of Solutions (3, 3). Fall. Three lectures per 
week. 

Chem. 285, 287. Colloid Chemistry (6). Fall, Winter. Three lectures 
per week. 

A discussion of the effect of surface on chemical reactions. (Not given 
1944-45.) 

Chem. 286, 288. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Fall, Winter. 
Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. This course must accompany 
or be preceded by Chem. 285, 287. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per quarter. (Not 
given 1944-45.) 

Chem. 289. Quantum and Statistical Mechanics (3). Fall. Three lec- 
tures per week. (Not given 1944-45.) 

Chem. 291. Valence Theory (3). Winter. Three lectures per week. 

A course to follow Chem. 289. (Not given 1944-45.) 

Chem. 295. Phase Rule (3). Winter. Three lectures per week. 

Chem. 297. Catalysis (3). Spring. Three lectures per week. 

Chem. 299, 301. Reaction Kinetics (4). Fall, Winter. Two lectures 
per week. 

Chem. 303, 305. Electrochemistry (6). Fall, Winter. Three lectures 
per week. 

Chem. 304, 306. Electrochemistry Laboratory (3, 3). Three three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.00 per quarter. 

Chem. 307, 309. Chemical Thermodynamics (6). Winter, Spring. Three 
lectures per week. (Not given 1944-45.) 

Chem. 351. Seminar (1). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Chem. 360. Research. Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 



fit 



204 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chem. E. 11, 13. Water, Fuels and Lubricants (8). Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Summer and Fall quarters, 1944; Spring and 
Summer quarters, 1945. Prerequisites, registration in Organic Chemistry 
lectures; General Physics; or permission of instructor. ><This is a course 
extending through two quarters, and completion of both quarters is re- 
quired.) 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual control methods for 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering materials. 

Chem. E. 103, 105, 107. Elements of Chemical Engineering (9). Summer, 
Fall, Winter. Three hours a week. Chem. E. 103 offered in Spring, 1945. 
Prerequisites, General Chemistry; Chem. lA, 3A; General Physics; Physics 
3A, 4A, 5A. 

Theoretical discussion of underlying philosophy and methods in chemical 
engineering and elementary treatment of important operations involving 
fluid flow, heat flow, evaporation, humidity and air conditioning, distillation, 
and absorption. Illustrated by problems and consideration of typical 
processes. 

Chem. E. 109, 111, 113. Chemical Engineering Seminar (3). Summer, 
Fall, Winter. One hour a week. Chem. E. 109 offered in Spring, 1945. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Chem. E. 115, 117, 119. Advanced Unit Operations (15). Summer, Fall, 
Winter. Two lectures and one all-day laboratory period a week. Chem. E. 
115 offered in Spring, 1945. Prerequisites, Chem. E. 103, 105, 107; Chem. 
187, 188, 189, 190. (This is a course extending through three quarters, 
and completion of all quarters is required.) 

Advanced theoretical treatment of basic chemical engineering opera- 
tions. Study and laboratory operation of small scale semi-commercial type 
equipment. A comprehensive problem involving theory and laboratory 
operations is included to illustrate the development of a plant design 
requiring the utilization of a number of fundamental topics. 

• 

Chem. E. 121, 123, 125. Minor Problems (18). Six hours a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. E. 115, 117, 119, or simultaneous registration therein. 
(Not offered 1944-45.) 

Original work on a special problem assigned each student, including prep- 
aration of a complete report covering the study. 

Chem. E. 127, 129, 131. Fuels and Their Utilization (6). Summer, Fall, 
Winter. Two hours a week. Chem. E. 127 offered in Spring, 1945. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. E. 103, 105, 107, or permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

A study of the sources of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, their economic 
conversion, distribution, and utilization. Problems. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



205 



,1ms, C» ^- ' rt„„i of Cheniicl Engm..r.ng. 

i-o and problems. 

105, 107, or permission of instructor. pn^ineering and chemical 

of chemical engineering. • . . ,. ,qN qnm- 

Chen.. E. U5, UT. 149. Chemica. Engineering Ca,c«,aU^^^^^ 

,,, Fall, Winter Jh- ho^s a we^^ Cliem. E^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

1945. Prerequisites, Math. 20,^1 , ^„„i_eering problems along 

A study of methods for analyzing ^^VSus a'nl other mathe- 

.uantitative and -^^^^'^fJ^'Ir^X^sis is placed on graphical pre- 

::Si:td t£ Z^rS^ of L results. 

.r pSrSsS: Sanr^s-rars?. ^p^ic^i^ che-strr -, 

188, 189, 190. (Not offered 1944-45.) ^ 

A study of the P-P-«-' P-tf Ih^'weS^^^^ gases, 

outstanding explosives and a few of the weu 

For Graduates 

a,.„. E. 2... m. m «'«'»":,s';THsr.^ - " ""-»"" 

hour conference, thr« ""o" tamM En^n-ring, (This i. . ccum 
=r;inTrr,nlSTd' confp.t,on o, .U ,n„.e„ . «- 

^^^^^^') ^ - +.rT.iPal unit operations in chemical 

Advanced «..o»«cal .^»»^,;' J^" jL T. L,« seal. »»-»• 

=?«% ^P™. »S rP..m.n«y reading, c.n.e.ences. and 

'^'^°''*^" ^ » , i^cK) One lecture and two laboratory periods 

Chem. E. 207. Gas ^^^ ^ ^>;f ^i^epart^^^^ of Chemical Engineering. 

a week. Prerequisite, permission oi uep „aseous vapors, 

and important gaseous impurities, rrou • . „f 

■:!•„, n-> One hour a week. Required of 
Chem. E. 209. Graduate Seminar (1). One nou 
all graduate students in Chemical Engineering. 



206 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



207 



Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Chem. E. 211. Research in Chemical Engineering. Credit hours to be 
arranged. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. 

Chem. E. 213, 215, 217. Plant Design Studies (9). Three conference 
hours a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical En- 
gineering. 

Chem. E. 214, 216, 218. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (6). Three 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of 
Chemical Engineering. (This is a course extending through three quar- 
ters, and completion of all quarters is required.) 

This laboratory work may be elected to accompany or be preceded by 
Chem. E. 213, 215, 217. 

Chem. E. 219, 221, 223. Gaseous Fuels (6). Two hours a week. Pre- 
requisite, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles 
involved in the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. 
Problem in design and selection of equipment. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 50. Hydraulics (6). Winter. Five lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 and to be taken concurrently with 
Mech. 51. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, dams, and pipes. Flow through orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, open channels, and weirs. Use of Reynold's number. 
Measurement of water. Elementary hydrodynamics. 

C. E. 51. Hydraulics (4). Winter, Spring. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 or Mech. 52. Required 
of juniors in electrical and mechanical engineering. 

A shorter course than C. E. 50 with emphasis on water wheels, turbines, 
and centrifugal pumps. 

C. E. 52. Curves and Earthwork (5). Fall. Three lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Surv. 2, 3, 4, and concurrent 
registration in Surv. 100. 

Computation and field work for simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves and spirals; parabolic curves; earthwork computations; complete 
survey and map, including mass diagram, of a short route. 



ror Advanced ^^'-^-l^^'^X''^^^^^^^^^^^ and one 

, J;S;rP.ra%- ^^^^^^ .d U.e .ad ..... 

iS: 0? slope and deflection ^^^^^^^^ ^^, ,,„ 

C. E. 101. Elements of ^^^^:^:^^,r. 
'^^"'To:"" reltetr r^d ..ntenance of .ads and pavements 
,i:SS ri.s and fleld ^^^^^^^^ ,,,.. Sp.n. T..ee 
C. E. 102. 103. 104. con-;: ^^Tr^'Lr lectUs and one laboratory 
hours a week, Fall and Spr mg ^^^ J c. E. 100. 

period a week, Winter quarter. ^"^^^^^ ^^^^^te structures, appb- 

^Isi^ and detailing of V^^^^^^^^:::^^^, theories; rigid frames, 
cations of slope-deflection and momen ^.^^^^^ ^^^.^^ 

r V 105 106, 107. Structural Design (11). ' ^^^^^,^8 and one 

^JlJ^es a 'week, FaU and ^^^^^IZ^^^^ C. E. 100. 
laboratory period a ^^^\'^'^''; ^^^^uctur^l steel members and their 

Design and ^f^^J.^^'m^, frames; structural frameworks, 
connections; wmd stresses in ^.^^^^_ gp„„g. 

C. E. 108, 109, 110 Municipal Samt^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^, 50. 

Two lectures and one laboratoiy period ^^^.^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^,^ 

Methods of estimating consumption for 

and sewerage systems. Three lectures and one 

C. K 111. SOUS and Foun^;^"- .^^^^^^ ^^P-^^, 
laboratroy period a week^ ^'^^ ,„, ,ehavior of soil as an engi- 

An introductory study of the PJP j^g construction, 

neering material. Applications to eng ^^^^ ^_^^^^ ^^^^^^^._ 

C. B. 112. 113. Element oj ^'^f^oTcivilengineUng students, 
sites, Phys. 5A, or Mech. 1 or^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ,,„„ections for 

.orSrncrr:n^S:^edUrete structures. 

For Graduates 

,. . • w (V, Fall, Winter, Spring. 
C E 200 Advanced Properties of Materials (3). 

Pre;equisite, Mech. 53, or ^l^^'^";- ^^.^p^^ies, flow of materials resist- 
A critical study of elastic -^ P^^^nS co'rr^^^^^^ the theories of failure, 
ance to failure by fracture, ™P^^*' ^^^^ 

Assigned reading from current literature ^^^^^^ ^^^.^^ 

. J ^ <atr«.neth of Materials H)- ^.lu, 
C. E. 201. A«*rTn>^l or equivalent. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50, 51, or equiva 



P 



»? 



208 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



fi 



Special problem^ in ^ • 
and torsion fo™!.ll ^"^'"^«"n«r stress analysis UmH ,■ 

^wo dimensional ela^fiV r. ui 

C. E 20^ c 1 ., " plates. '^'^ 

C F 11, "'' Mechanics (3) Paii w . 

C. E 111, or equivalent. ^'^^ ^^"' ^mter. Spring. Prerequisite 

A detailed studv n^ fu 

-et varying soil eonditirs! "' '°"'''^^*'^-- ^-^n and construction to 

site:a-|"^OlX;fvatn?"'-*"^^^>- ^«"> Winter. Spring. P^ereq.i 
An intensive course in the location desi«, ^ 

C- E. 206. Theory of r construction of highways 

«.uis., Mech. aTLl,^--- -a„, Winter. Spring. P^' 

A thoroug'h revipw r^^ ^u 

^he solution of st^ifiVoii • ^ ' 

Winter. Spring. ^^"'•- ^-^'* - accordance with work outlined. Ea„, 
DRAWING 

C-plvLal-rr- """■"" «>. F..,. W,„.„ 3pH„,. ,„, ,.^„ 
Oi-SSr °' '"""»'"••• ""■«^~P-.. P..,«o„. ^.,„,„, ,,..^,.. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



209 



Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line, and plane. Intersection of planes with solids; 
development. Applications to practical problems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 4. Advanced Engineering Drawing (3). Fall, Winter, Spring. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 

Continuation of descriptive geometry, including applications to practical 
engineering drafting. 

Dr. 5. Mechanical Drawing (2). Fall, Winter, Spring. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. Open to non-engineering students. 

Lettering, sketching, and working drawings of machines; including con-: 
ventions, tracing, isometric and cabinet projections, and blueprinting. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

E. E. 1, 2. Direct-Current Theory (7). Winter, Spring. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, Winter quarter; three lectures and one 
laboratory period a w^eek, Spring quarter. Prerequisites, concurrent regis- 
tration in Math. 22, 23, and Phys. 4A, 5A. Required of sophomores in 
electrical engineering. 

Current, voltage, power, and energy relationships in D-C networks. 
Working concepts of electric and magnetic potential difference, electric and 
magnetic field intensity, and electric and magnetic flux density. Electric 
and magnetic circuit experiments. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 50. Principles of Electrical Engineering (4). Spring. Three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 22, Phys. oA. 
Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

Fundamentals of direct-current and alternating-current machinery; appli- 
cation of machines for specific duties; operating characteristics of genera- 
tors, motors, and transformers. 

E. E. 51, 52, 53. Principles of Electrical Engineering (12). Fall, Win- 
ter, Spring. Three lectures and one laboratory period a w^eek. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 22, Phys. 5 A. Required of juniors in chemical and in mechan- 
ical engineering. 

Study of elementary direct-current and alternating-current circuit char- 
acteristics. Principles of construction and operation of direct and alter- 
nating current machinery. Experiments on the operation and characteristics 
of generators, motors, transformers, and control equipment. 

E. E. 54. Direct-Current Machinery (6). Fall. Five lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 22, Phys. 5A, and E. E. 
1, 2. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 




'HI 



m 






210 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



211 



Construction, theory of operation, and performance characteristics of 
direct-current generators, motors, and control apparatus. Experiments on 
the operation and characteristics of direct-current generators and motors. 

E. E. 55. Electricity and Magnetism (6). Fall. Five lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 22, Phys. 5A, and E. E. 
1, 2. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Electric and magnetic field theory with special consideration of capaci- 
tance and reluctance calculations by curvilinear-square field mapping meth- 
ods. Elements of electro-chemistry. Network theorems and systematized 
notational schemes employed in circuit analysis. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating Current Circuits (7). Winter. Five lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 55. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

Single- and polyphase-circuit analysis under sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal 
conditions of operation. Harmonic analysis by the Fourier series method. 
Theory and operation of mutually-coupled circuits and of electric wave 
filters. Elementary concepts of symmetrical-component analysis applied only 
to static circuit elements. 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics (6). Spring. Five lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 55 and concurrent registra- 
tion in E. E. 100. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Theory and application of electronic tubes and associated control circuits. 
Emphasis on tube characteristics and electron-tube measuring devices, in- 
cluding the cathode-ray oscillograph as a measuring device. Applications 
of thyratrons and other rectifier tubes. 

E. E. 102, 103, 104. Alternating-Current Machinery (14). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Fall and Win- 
ter quarters; three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Spring quar- 
ter. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

The operating principles of alternating-current machinery considered from 
theoretical, design, and laboratory points of view. Synchronous generators 
and motors; single and polyphase transformers; three-phase induction gen- 
erators and motors; single phase induction motors; rotary converters and 
mercury-arc rectifiers. 

E. E. 105, 106. Radio Communication (8). Fall, Winter. Three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 100 and E. E. 
101. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

Principles of radio communication from both theoretical and laboratory 
points of view. Amplification, detection, and oscillation with particular 
emphasis on audio amplification and broadcast range reception. 

E. E. 107. Communications Networks (4). Fall. Prerequisites, con- 
current registration in E. E. 102. 



graphic demonstration. pive lectures and one 

E E 109. Ultra-High-Frequency (6). Spring. 

E. E. US. B«W. ''»'-'\^£„ l'l.l. 102. 103, 104. 

week. Senior elective. problem in electrical 

The student selects. v.ith f acu y -^^ZtiorT^^i^s as may be needed^ 
engineering. He makes such field orjab^^^^^^^ conferences are held 

Weekly progress reports ^re required ana 4 .^ ^^^.^^^^ ^^^ ^^ 
with the members of the 2-lt^^^^ MbUography. is required to 

A written report, mciuamg 
complete the thesis. ^^^ Graduates 

♦o /'^^ Fall Prerequisite, E. E. 104, 
E. E. 200. symmetrical Components (3). Fall. 

or equivalent. ^^ptrical components to synchronous 

Application of the method f JJ^'J^ tatic Lds possessing mutual 

generators, transmission l»f ^' ^^^^^^^^Sd, of measuring positive, nega- 

coupling, and induction -°tor loaf ^^ Synchronous generators and methods 

tive, and zero sequence reactances ot syn 



212 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



GENERAL ENGINEERING SUBJECTS 

'-"»„';„ !:r,r„'S '" -"-- <.,. sp„„,. ^„,, ,, ^„ 

■=-• «. E:;^^r:t ''"^•— - -- g„,„„.. 



MECHANICS 



Solutions of force «>v.f. 
ments of inertip- l ^^^*^'»«'' graphic statics- fnVK 

and .o^eXj;"' '^"^'"^"^ -^ kinetics/ w^i^tow;;!?'''^ ^^ - 
Mech 2 St»r ''''' ""P"^^^ 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



213 



Mech. 3. Statics and Dynamics (6). Spring, Fall, Winter. Prerequi- 
site, Dr. 3 and to be taken concurrently with Math. 22 and Phys. 5A. 

Analytical and graphical solutions in statics. Kinematics and kinetics; 
work, power, energy; impulse and momentum. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Mech. 50, 51. Strength of Materials (8). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 1, 2 or 3, or equivalent. Required of juniors in civil and mechanical 
engineering. 

Thin-walled cylinders; riveted and welded joints; torsion; stresses in 
beams; design of columns; use of structural steel handbook. Beam deflec- 
tions; statically indeterminate beams; combined loadings; composite beams; 
impact and energy loadings. 

Mech. 52. Strength of Materials (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Mech. 1 or 
2. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

A shorter course than Mech. 50, 51 designed for non-civil engineering 
students. 

Mech. 53. Materials of Engineering (3). Winter, Spring. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50, 51. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering; performance of standard tests; interpretation of speci- 
fications and tests.- 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 50. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (4). Winter. Three 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A, 
and Math. 21. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Elementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for generation of power. Supplemented 
by laboratory tests and trips to industrial plants. 

M. E. 51. Thermodynamics (4). Winter. Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 22, Phys. 5A. Required of 
juniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, steam 
turbine, etc. 

M. E. 52. Power Plants (3). Spring. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of seniors in Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

The theory and operation of steam engines, boilers, condenser, steam tur- 
bines, and their accessories. 



'.in 



i 



215 



214 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SHOP 



M. E. 53. Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics (4). Winter. Three lee- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 22, Phys. 
5A. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering, aeronautics option. 

A study of the fundamentals of the flow of air and of water. 

For Advanced Undegraduates and Graduates 

M. E. 100, 101, 102. Thermodynamics (9). Fall, Winter, Spring. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Required of juniors in Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors. 

M. E. 103, 104. Heating and Ventilation (6). Fall, Winter. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101, 
102. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Design of heating and ventilation systems. 

M. E. 105. Refrigeration (3). Spring. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101, 102. Required of seniors in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories and homes. 

M. E. 106, 107, 108. Thesis (5). Fall, Winter, Spring. One laboratory 
period a week. Fall quarter; one lecture and one laboratory period a week, 
Winter and Spring quarters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of 
seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

The student carries out a research project under faculty supervision. 

M. E. 109, 110, 111. Prime Movers (12). Fall, Winter, Spring. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Required of seniors in 
Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisites, Mech. 50, M. E. 100, 101, 102. 

Design and use of prime movers to convert heat energy into power. 

M. E. 112, 113, 114. Mechanical Engineering Design (12). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Mech. 50, M. E. 100, 101, 102. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

The design of machine members and mechanisms. 

M. E. 115, 116, 117. Mechanical Laboratory (6). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, senior stand- 
ing. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Experiments on engines and other machines are performed in the labora- 
tory. Reports are required on tests. 

M. E. 118, 119, 120. Airplane Structures (9). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Three hours a week. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering, aero- 
nautics option. 

The fundamental principles of structural analysis and design of airplanes. 



•■•« G'»«"«"» f.,„. Winter, Spm!^ 

„ .« Ml, « A-'""- ■""*"'" ' 

'""^■^ ' TtLrems of elastic bodies with applicaUons. ^_^^^^ 

General t^--^^^^^ ^^^^„,^ Mrcraft Structures (6)- 

^' "': ^Xr^rtancea pro.e.s o. airplane desi.n. Stud. . 
Methods of analysis in a 

Application of the laws o ^_^^^^^ ^^^^^ credit m 

M V 215 Seminar Cl-^^- ""^ ' 
J- trk outlined. . ^^,, ^, Mechanical Engineering for 

Seminar may be "'^g^^'^^tpcific problems. . , 

J; of general ^^-^^J^^^l'^l, Winter. Spring. Credit in accord- 

M. E. 216. Research (1-3)- 
ance with work outlined. 



SHOP ^^, s^ri„g. One combination lecture and 

cu 1 Forge Practice (D- f P" °.^<,v,n,en in Engineering. 
Shop 1. J^o.'Se Required of freshmen welding, 

laboratory penod a week. U q ^^^^^^^^^ Demonstration of 

Principles of forging and "^J* practice. 

P,.etW i» bench «»k, «™"e. , ^„„ 

,k.p 3. M.*i». Shop P'«f • <i>.k" » in Mechanical En^mcenng. 

-"H;:^« «r":t::n« p-incp- - — -'•• 

-* "' "" .„ ....ncc. — r:™hin..i«n .,«„ -na 
- - -;- .r "S,S"a !r;So«°" M^haniC Wn.™. 
laboratory period a weeK. 



216 



THE UmVEBSITY OF MARYLAND 

• ■ 



-L.ectures and recitaHnr.. 

SURVEYING 
S"«-v. 1. Elements of Pia„^ « 

oi^'LlTKrt^T''" ,«""««"! (6). F.U T),, , 

COMPAPArrr^rx. ■ "^veys. 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



Entl-^.f'Jf'"^' prerequisite for all n„ 

"■nor i„ E„E,n. "'"•«»'« «.«r,e. c.n b<, comL ,™.m""""« '""• 
r«».„ .-. major or 

Comp. Lit. 1. Greek Poetry r2> t. „ 

Homer's Iliad «n^ ^^ ^ -^' ^^"' Spring. 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



217 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). 

Fall, Spring. 

Survey of the background of European literature through study of 
English translations of Greek and Latin literature. The debt of modern 
literature to the ancients is discussed and illustrated. 

Comp. Lit. 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). 

Winter, Summer. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101; study of medieval and modern Conti- 
nental literature. 

Comp. Lit. 104. The Old Testament as Literature (3). Spring. 
A study of the sources, development, and literary types. 
Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3). Winter. 

Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau 
to Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany (3). Spring. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German literature from Buerger to 
Heine in English translations. 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature 

(3). Fall, Spring. 

A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment 
by Marlov^e in Dr, Faustus and by Goethe in Faitst. 

Comp. Lit. 110. Introduction to Folklore (3). 

Origin, evolution, and bibliography of types. Literary significance, as 
seen in the development of prose fiction. Collections, such as the Pancha- 
tantra, Seven Sages, Arabian Nights, etc., and the continuation of these 
tales through medieval and modern literature. 

Comp. Lit. 111. A Study of Literary Criticism (3). 

A survey of the major schools of criticism from Plato to the present day. 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (3). Spring. 

A study of the life and chief works of Ibsen with special emphasis on 
his influence on the modern drama. 

For Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 200. The History of the Theatre (3). Prerequisite, a wide 
acquaintance with modem drama and some knowledge of the Greek drama. 

A detailed study of the history of the European theater. Individual 
research problems will be assigned for term papers. 

The following courses may also be counted in this group: Eng. 104. 
Chaucer; English 108. Milton; Eng. 113, 114. Prose and Poetry of the 
Romantic Age; Eng. 124. Contemporary Drama; Eng. 125. Emerson, 



218 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



219 



Thoreau, and Whitman; Eng. -201. Medieval Romance in England; Eng. 
205. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature; Eng. 207. Seminar in 
Shakespeare; French 204. Georges Duhamel; German 203. Schiller; Spanish 
107. Cervantes. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D. H. 1. Fundamentals of Dairying (4). Fall, Spring. Three lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1, 3. 

This course is designed to cover the >entire field of dairy husbandry. 
The content of the course deals with all phases of dairy cattle feeding, 
breeding and management and the manufacturing, processing, distributing 
and marketing of dairy products. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

D. H. 30. Dairy Cattle Judging (2). Spring. Two laboratory periods 
a week. Not open to freshmen. 

This course offers complete instruction in the selection and comparative 
judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various dairy farms for judging practice 
will be made. 

D. H. 40. Grading Dairy Products (2). Spring. One laboratory period 
a week. Not open to freshmen. 

Market grades and the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream 
in the commercial field. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

For Advanced Undergaduates 

D. H. 50. Dairy Cattle Management (2). Fall, Spring. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. 

A management course designed to familiarize students with the practical 
handling and management of dairy cattle. Students are given actual prac- 
tice and training in the University dairy barns. 

D. H. 54. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging (1). Fall. One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, D. H. 30. 

Advanced work in judging dairy cattle. Credit only to students who do 
satisfactory work in competition for the dairy cattle judging team. 

D. H. 60. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (1). Fall. One labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, D. H. 40. 

Advanced work in the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 
Open only to students who comprise the dairy products judging team. Lab- 
oratory fee $3.00. 

D. H. 64. Dairy Mechanics (3). Spring. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. 

The theory and operation of the compression system of mechanical re- 
frigeration. Construction, design, and care of dairy equipment; repairing, 
soldering, pipe fitting, and wiring. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



r .r rn Fall One laboratory period a week. 
pH. 68. Dairy Accounting (1). i^aiu 

prerequisite, D. H. 1. ^^.^^ ^manufacturing plants. 

Methods of accounting m market m ^^^^^^^ 

n H 70. Dairy Plant Management (1). Fall, Win 
On'e'l^boratory period a week. P--^-^^; ^^^ .^ ,,, management of 
%\is course is designed ^^^^^^^^^^^^ instruction 

, ,,,,, manuf actur^^^^^^^^^^ of the University Plant. 

and a three weeks practice pe prerequisite, 10 hours 

D H 72. Dairy Plant Experience (2). Spring. 

„ H .... D:;'p..d..«.. (... Fa«. TU„. lectures .nd one .ab«»- 

agement, designee lor winter Two lectures and 

„. „. 53. Da.,, B.'.t.rP«S:St2 -D. hTzo... ^<". *■ ». "^^ 

one laboratory period a week, fre q , „^^,teristics; prominent blood 

A study of the >>-^-;f ,.^t£sTf 4e^ S^^^^^^^^ ^-^^- ^ ^"^^^^ 
lines; noted families -<i '"f ^^^f.^^^Ut^^^^^^^ factors as applied to dairy 
„, .reedin. syjems; Jjf ^ -^t"^^,,,,, i„aices. herd and production 

' ; r^elSon and formulating breeding programs. 

records in selection and ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^. 

D. H. 109. Cheese Making (4). Winter. 
tory periods a week. P-^-^'f^^J^" ;1 ,,d cheese, including a 

The principles and practice °f«^Jj"2cal factors involved. Laboratory 
study of the physical, <:h-\f ' ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

p.actice will include visits t c— ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

D. H. 110. Butter Making (2). ^mter. 
period a week. Prerequisites, D. H^ 1, B . • -^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

The principles and practice of '"^ ""^^^^^ed. Laboratory practice 
physical, chemical, and b-lo^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
will include visits to commer^l ^— ^^^^^^ ^^, ,^, ,,,,,,. 

D H 111. Concentrated Milks (3). Spring. 

tor; p;riods a week^ ^^^['^^'ifZl^co:^^^^^ -C e;aporated milk 
The principles and practice fj^^J"^^ lysicB.\, chemical, and biologica 

scf .=vS '^sJxr;»-.X5,^nc,«d. ..... .. — «... 

factories. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



220 



THE VmVBBSITY OF MARYLAND 



D. H. 113, Market Milk (5). Pali tv. , 
penods a week. Prerequisites, D.H.i, SeTl "*""^ ^"' *"" '^''-^tor, 

buttermilk; milk laws; dutie^ of Ifif ''"' ''^^'^^^ ^^'k; commerci 

construction and operation Ah. . '"'P^^tors; distribution; ZkZ 
dairies. Laboratory fee! S.OO.^'''''^*^'-^ ^^^'^^^ '-'"Oes vi^itT'to IZ 

fp^^o^'lS:^?::^'^^ ^^^; Winte. two .ectures an. 
19. 31, 32, 33, 34. ^^''- Perquisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1 CJiem 

"methods; standardization and co^positt?"^^' ^^t«"°logical, and S 
preservatives. Laboratory fee |Too ' ""''°''' *^^*^ ^«^ adulterants aS 

Prei":* D.V'l: ^"'^ ''"^'»*"- (>' '. »)• Pan, Winter, Spnn. 

requisites, D. H. 1, D. H. 101 ^"** '=''^'"^^*^'- "^ work done. Pre 

2^«^^ „eeds Of those dai. 

Methods of conducting dairy research '5 T *''^"''"^^ A^W of dairy^. 

stressed. A research problL wh 't A ^^^ P'-esentation of resultf a" e 

student is pursuing wil! be Signed ^ ''" ^^^'^'^'^^"^ *» the work Z 

D IT 9ni A . *'*'■ ^""aduates 

A study of the 7"'"' ^"''' '''■"''•''="«" <3). Fall. 
a^ement'^LadLranVaSmrnts" '"™^' ""*"«-' breeding, and man- 

D. H. 202. Dairy Technology (2). p^ll 

A consideration of milk an^ ^ • 
point of view. , ^"<^ ^^-^y products from the physiochemical 

D- H. 203. Milk Products (2). Winter 

^^An advanced consideration of the scienti«c and technical aspects of milk 



ECONOMICS 



221 



D. H. 204. Special Problems in Dairying (2-5). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Credit in accordance with the amount and character of work done. 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. 

D. H. 205. Seminar (1). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Students are required to prepare reports on current literature in dairy 
husbandry and allied fields. .These reports are presented and discussed in 
the class. 

D. H. 208. Research (2-5). Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Credit to 
be determined by the amount and quality of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the Head 
of the Department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy hus- 
bandry, carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a 

thesis. 

ECONOMICS 

Econ. 1, 2, 3. Economic Resources (3, 2, 2). Spring, Summer, Fall; 
Summer, Fall, Winter; Fall, Winter, Spring. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week for Econ. 1. Freshman requirement in College of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 

General comparative study of the geographic factor underlying produc- 
tion economics. Emphasis upon climate, soils, landforms, agricultural prod- 
ucts, power resources, and major metallic minerals, concluding with brief 
survey of geography of commerce and manufacturing. 

Econ. 4, 5, 6. Economic Developments I, II, III (6). Fall, Spring, Sum- 
mer. Freshman requirement in the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. 

An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, develop- 
ment, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, 
and age of mass production. Emphasis on developments in England, West- 
ern Europe and the United States. 

Econ. 31, 32, 33. Principles of Economics I, II, III (9). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A con- 
siderable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and 
explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major problems of 
the economic system. 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics (5). Fall, Winter, Spring, Sum- 
mer. Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31, 32, and 33. Not 
open to freshmen. 

A survey study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups such as students of 



222 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Econ. 33 or 37. """""" "^ Consumption (3). Spring. Prerequ,,, 

~''^^^^^^^^^^^ -te.. An ana,,.. „, J 

technique of consumption. CooperS ! ^ '^""^"'"er consciousness and t 
sumers. Special problems. '^""^^'^^^'^^ «»d governmental agencies fo^con 

Ecf;:' 33 ItV.^-P-tive Economic Systems C4). Kail. Prerequisite 

systr^tSlrf tJ^Zr '-'''- ^' -- t^es Of econo.- 
capitalistic system, and SilZZ Z 1? T'T"" ^"^ --'uation ofTh 
economic systems such as fascism sociaHsm and" °' ''*^.^"^*'^^ ^^^^^ 

:^£pir- ^ Sop- ------- sj^. 

^'?Er ''• '"""""" ^•""•"^'^ "''""^'•' <^>- «Prin.. Prere,ui. 

nomicThought wTh^spSf ittentt„"r' ''"^"''' ""'^ Continental Eco- 
economists as W. C mLj,.! ^ « ' ''^'"^ ^^^n to the work nf u 

Hobson and other' cfnltu'ors t thTT"', ^^ ^^'"^"' ^ «-'« "t Tt 
^'"^^ 1900. *° *^^ development of economic thought' 

sU?e";„"I3 of^r*' '-'""«- -«• War (4). Summer. Prere<^, 

An analysis of thp 

»«bi]iz.ti„„. ,h„^ .;;Zw,„t:; r' """"" -' -■■■ hf^™, 

A study of our money and banH^^ ^ 
volved in its proper operati^ '"'''"^ ^^^*^'" ^^^ the basic principles i„- 

sitpcon^3?nd74a' ^"''^^' ^'^''' -«« ^'i- (4). Pall. Prere.ui- 

dolr L^J Lr^aSr^ptble^ ^''^^^^ -^ --^^ and credit of 
PoI^ces in their relation to tLTroCT/'J-j/Cr- ^^ ^^^^ 



ECONOMICS 



223 



Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (4). Fall, Spring. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. Required for graduation in B. P. A. 

This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose is 
to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, 
institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural 
products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

Econ. 151. Economics of Cooperatives (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Econ. 
33 or 37. 

Analysis of and contrast between economic problems and contributions 
of cooperative and other types of business organizations; the significance 
of cooperation in the free enterprise system. Nominal fees are collected to- 
cover the expense of occasional field trips. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (4). Fall, Winter, Summer, Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. Required for graduation in B. P. A. 

The historical development and chief characteristics of the American labor 
movement are first surveyed. Present day problems are then examined in 
detail: wage theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, 
collective bargaining. 

Econ. 170. Industrial Combination and Competition (4). Spring, Fall. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Growth of large-scale production, development of industrial combinations, 
the economies of vertical and horizontal combination, the anti-trust acts, 
and some conclusions as to policy in relation to competition and monopoly. 
Problems of small business. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industry (4). Fall, Summer. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

A study of the technology, economics and geography of twenty represen- 
tative American industries. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (4). Fall. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 132 and graduate or senior standing. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories including 
the Greeks, Romans, canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, 
Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic policy. 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (4). Spring. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. 

A study of various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of eco- 
nomic thought, particularly the classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, Ger- 
man historical school, American economic thought, the socialists, and the 
economics of J. M. Keynes. 

Econ. 237, 238, 239. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3, 3, 3). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. 



224 

Econ. 240. 

Econ. 270. 

ranged.) 

Econ. 299. 
EDUCATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Comparative Banking Systems (4). Winter. 
Seminar in Economics of American Industries (3), 

Thesis. (Arranged.) 



EDUCATION 



225 



(Ar- 



Courses Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores 

« 

Ed. 2. Introduction to Education (3). Fall, Winter, Spring. Required 
of freshmen in Education and recommended for other students who are in- 
terested in teaching. 

An exploratory or guidance course designed to help students choose wisely 
in their preparation for the teaching profession. Types of positions, 
teacher supply and demand, favorable and unfavorable aspects of teaching, 
and types of personal and professional competence required of teachers 
are among the topics included. The testing and observational program of 
the College of Education is begun in this course. Fee, $1.00. 

Ed. 3. Educational Forum (1). Fall, Winter, Spring. Required of sopho- 
mores in the College of Education. 

In this course the prospective teacher is introduced in a variety of ways 
to problems and processes of education around which much of the work in 
later professional courses will be centered. Guidance is stressed. 

Ed. 4. Reading Clinic (2). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

This course is designed for anyone wishing t5 improve reading skill. 
Reading difficulties are diagnosed through telebinocular eye examinations, 
photographs of eye movements, and standardized tests. Remedial treat- 
ment is given to improve speed, comprehension, and organization of ideas. 
Attention is given to the improvement of study habits. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. 100. History of Education in the United States (3). Winter, 
Summer. 

A study of the origins and development of the chief features of the 
present system of education in the United States. 

Ed. 102. History of Modern Education (3). Fall, Spring. 

A survey of the history of education with emphasis on the modern period 
in Europe. 

Ed. 103. Theory of the Senior High School (3). Fall. 

The secondary school population; the school as an instrument of society; 
relation of the secondary school to other schools; aims of secondary educa- 
tion; curriculum and methods;" extra-curricular activities; guidance and 
placement; teacher certification and employment in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia. This course is somewhat more general than Ed. 110. 



„ ,04 p,i..l|.l» ot Eduction (3). WinW, Summer. 

education. winter Spring, Summer. 

Ed 105 Educational Measurements (3). Wmter, ap g, 

school marks. h^aa Ar^\ 

Kd 107 Comparative Education (3). (Not offered m 1944-45.) 

iudging their worth. 
VA 108 Comparative Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 
Ed. 108. Compara emphasis upon the national 

This course is a contmuation of Ed. 107, witn emp 

educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. 
Ed. 110. Theory of the Junior High School (3). Wmter, Spnng, 

'"ourse gives a general overview of the i^^^^^^. ^^ 
eludes consideration of the ^^'"^ZHoTor^alSL Vvogr^r^ of studies. 

::irirstSfanir:d^^^^^^ -- — 

for prospective teachers. 
Ed 112 Educational Sociology-Introductory (3). Fall, Spnng. 
Ed. 11^. iJ'Out" sciences vi^hich are germane to 

This course deals -th data of * social s„^ j^pUcations of democratic 

the work of teachers. Consideration is giv imposed by changes 

ideology for educational ^-^'^r^^'^^^tSre status of pupils, the 
in population and technological .trend^' ^he we ^^^ ^^^^^ 

socio-economic attitudes of »f ^^^^u^^^Jf ° "J^^;" significance in relation 
elements of community background which have sig 

to schools. _, 

Ed 114 Guidance in Secondard Schools (3). Winter, Summer 
Ed. 114. uuiodi ., ^ . , ,^ ^y.. classroom teacher in terms of 

This course is primarily designed for the classroom ^^^^^^ ^^ 

the day-by-day demands made -l^l^ZZs^ciT.mes\.y.ic^ he sponsors, 
the youth in his <=1--^ .^^J^^^t /aTd^ton p-ctical common-sense guid- 
The stress is upon usable mater ais »"" J' 
ance procedures of demonstrated workability. 

Ed. 120. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-English (5). Fall. 
Winter. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 



M' 



226 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EDUCATION 



227 



I 



Objectives in English; selection and organization of subject matter- 
methods of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials- 
lesson plans; measuring results; extra-curricular activities of English teach. 
ers. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 122. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Social Studies (5), 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Trends in the social studies; sources of instructional materials; basic- 
teaching procedures; types of learning activities; lesson planning; unit 
planning; selection and organization of content; maps and their uses; 
evaluations. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 124. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Foreign Language 
(5). Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Objectives of foreign language teaching; selection and organization of 
subject matter; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring 
results. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 125. General Science for the Elementary School (3). Spring, 
Summer. 

This course is designed principally for students who are candidates for 
the B. S. degree in Elementary Education. It is accepted by the College 
of Education to meet the general requirement in science, but not as a part 
of a major or minor. General principles and practical applications of 
science are stressed. (Undergraduate credit only.) 

Ed. 126. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Science (5). Win- 
ter, Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Objectives of science teaching; selection and organization of subject 
matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and labora- 
tory equipment; technic of class room and laboratory; measurement; pro- 
fessional organizations and literature. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 127. High School Course of Study — Literature (3). Spring, Summer. 

The course is concerned with literature for junior and senior high schools. 
It includes study of the literature as well as selection of literature for differ- 
ent grade levels. 

Ed. 128. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Mathematics (5). 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content 
and construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; 
methods of instruction; measurement of standardized tests; professional 
organizations and literature. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 129. High School Course of Study— English (3). Winter. 



"^ ^;r;o'raJ;ttotSaI e^^ents o. for., style, and usa.e. 

rttrfrr bott elementary and secondary school teachers. 

Z 1.8 Visual Education (3). Fall, Spring, Summer. 
Ea. 138. Visua investigations into the 

Visual impressions m their '^e'^"^" Droiection apparatus, its cost • 

effectiveness of instruc^on ^^l^-^l^^^;^! ^^^^ p^ndples underlying 
and operation; shdes ^'^^f Xuatmaterials with organized courses of 

mit*^^* . . i.- ^ryA fparhine: in a high school 

Thirty periods of observation P-t.n>«^^^^^^^^^^^ ,,p^.. 

class under the direction of tl^« "^^ ^^J^ty for the instruction of the 
visor. The student <^-\''%\'^^'''ZZlTiZ hours of class sessions are 
pupils for approximately 25 class P«"«^^. ^^^^ ,^,thods of teaching, 
ncluded, in which study is made of principles and 

Application forms for ^^--Z^\t:uZrJ.eTZ\.^^e.s^.^ 

at the time of "^'f :*)„""•. fthtJudent teaching assignment. In reg- 
schedule to allow ample time for the stude ^ ^^^ Language, 

istering. add to the course number. E ^J>^ ^\ (^ g^^^^^^. gc for 
M for Mathematics, C *<>' Commercial, SS ^or Soc^ ^^^ Education. 
Science, P. E. for Physical Education, or I 

high schools to which they ^'//f'!?"^-^^,^ which is carried on under 

throughout the quarter is <l«-t«^*° ^^^J^X^u^ty is afforded for experi- 
the direction of a university super^^sor.Opportu^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

ence in connection with school ^^"■'^'^^''^^^''^^^ teaching. Two hours 
other phases of school Me as we^l as da ^ room _^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^.^_ 

weekly of class sessions are incluflea 
ciples and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for ^^'l^'^^'l^Xiortr^^^^ ^ registering, 

erly filled in, not less than thirty days J«°"ijJ^^ ^uate credit only.) 
add letters as indicated above in Ed. 139. (^ 



228 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EDUCATION 



229 






Ed. 141. Administration and Supervision in the Elementary School (3), 
Summer. 

A study of the problems connected with organizing and operating elenien- 
tary schools and directing instruction. 

Ed. 142. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Physical Education 
(5). Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Materials and procedures in relation to program planning, physical exam- 
inations, records, grading, directed observation, reports, conferences, and 
criticisms. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 143. The Elementary School Curriculum (3). Winter, Summer. 

A study of important developments in elementary education with par- 
ticular attention to methods and materials which may be used to improve 
the development of pupils in elementary schools. Problems which are 
encountered in day-to-day teaching situations receive much attention. 

Ed. 150. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Commercial Sub- 
jects (5). Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

Aims and methods for the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and book- 
keeping in high schools. Twenty periods of observation. 

Ed. 180. Introduction to Special Education (3). Fall, Summer. 

This course is designed to give teachers, principals, attendance workers, 
and supervisors an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional 
children. Preventive and remedial measures are stressed. 

Ed. 182. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children (2). 
Spring. 

A study of retarded and slow-learning children, including discovery, analy- 
sis of causes, testing techniques, case studies, and remedial educational 
measures. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 
Fall. 

This course deals with so-called "external" phases of school adminis- 
tration. It includes study of the present status of public school administra- 
tion; organization of local, state, and federal educational authorities; 
and the administrative relationships involved therein. 

Ed. ^02. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 
Schools (2). Winter. 

This course is designed as a continuation of Ed. 200, but may be taken 
independently. It includes what is called "internal" administration; the 
organization of units within a school system; the personnel problems in- 
volved; and such topics as schedule making, teacher selection, public rela- 
tions, and school supervision. 



to the school law. Problems (3). Summer, 

Ed 211. The Adolescent: Charactenst.es and Problein ,J 

This course deals vnn<^i^'%::^,^fj;;Z:ni equipment; internal 

Ed. 217. Research Methods (3). ^^f ^' f~;;;,,,,i,„es and devices 
A study of the types of -^^^^^^ f ^^^^^^^^ writing. 

Is VeU as the carrying on of research. 

cominarts for Graduate Students 

Seminars for U Education will elect the 

Students qualifying for the d^S'^^ "J^f^X following list of seminars, 
required four ^^-s o^ /-rLrb^ oSg^duate students in Education. 

These -™ - 7;;; :^ „, Z.c..U>n (2). Fall. Summer. 
Ed. 220. Semmar m Seconda (Not oilered in 1944-45.) 

Ed 222. Seminar in Adult Educat.on (2). (Not otte 

Ed. 226. seminar in ^^--'^lf-^\'''''^; ,,,,,, ,„ 1944-45.) 
Ed. 228. Seminar in Special Education (2). (No 
Ed. 230. Seminar in Science Education (2)- ^alL 
FH 2^12 Seminar in Educational Sociology (2). Wmter. 
Ed. 232. Semna ^^ ^.^^^^Hon (2). (Not offered m 1944- 

Ed. 234. Seminar m Comparative c.» 
45.) 



230 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 i 



Ed. B236. Seminar in Vocational Education r3> r 

I'L wr;:Tir tr • ^" *" ^--^- -- <3>. ...... 

procedures in the mafor fields of iw'^'T'"'"* "^ ^^^t^nt and teachl 
Ed. 299. Research (1-6). 

-or the dese.:r If ChT";/^^^^^^^ 
courses in Psychology, see pa^S'sslli""^^''"-' ^^^'^'••>'»-^. and othe, 

See also Agricultural Education and Rural UU 

See also H. E. Ed 101 t. u- '^®- 

and Ind Ed leo A .^^''"''S Secondary Vocatm„„i « 
Educati^on."^- ^«^-^-c„,„.. Instructionf a'TliriSS^-^SS; 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

H. E. Ed. 1^; ^tr^\ Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spring. Required o^ Srin'R^'^^r ''"'^ ^''^vation (5) p „ 
site, Psych. 80. '""'""^^ ^" Home Economics Educatiol ^'^erequ?' 

cha?aSL:Urtr'"- ^'^"^^"^"^ — nity survey a 1 • 
nf « "it-tirests, and need«? nf +i,« i.- , survey; analysis nf 

of a course of study: dir9of.A *^^ ^^^^ school fi-irl- ^nr^cf !• 

tion of illn^fvof a^i^ected observations- usp nf ,. • ' construction 

n Illustrative materials; the home pr^t ''"' '''^^^'^' ^^^^^- 

Observation and teaching in a vn. f , '"^'*^' »• E. Ed. 101. 

H. E. Ed. 104. Nurserv S.i, . r„ 
requisite, H. E Ed in9 .xr "' techniques (3). Paii o 
school teacheJ.- ^'^ '''■ ^^"^ ^Pen to iunioi^ DtUTr^rs'^y 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



231 



philosophy of preschool education; principles of learning; routines; 
study of children's interests and activities; observation and teaching in the 
nursery school. 

H. E. Ed. 105. Special Problems in Child Study (5). Winter. (Not 
open to juniors.) Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102. 

Methods and practice in nursery school; making of particular studies 
related to the mental, emotional, or physical development of preschool 
children. 

H. E. Ed. 106, 107. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (2, 2). Win- 
ter, Spring. 

Reports of units taught; construction of units for high school course 
of study; study of various methods of organization of class period; analysis 
of text books; evaluation of illustrative material. 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics (3-5). 

(Arranged.) 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

H. E. 250. Seminar in Home Economics Education (3-5). (Arranged.) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For each quarter hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

*Ind. Ed. 1. Mechanical Drawing (3). Fall. 

Fundamental practices in orthographic projection followed by auxiliary 
projection, the drawing of threads and bolts, working drawings and iso- 
metric views. Sketching and use of conventions are emphasized. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

*Ind. Ed. 21. Mechanical Drawing (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 
1, or equivalent. 

A more advanced course dealing with working drawings, machine design, 
pattern layouts, tracing and blue-printing. Detail drawings followed by 
assemblies are presented. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 41. Architectural Drawing (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Ind. 
Ed. 1, or equivalent. 

Practical experience is given in the design and planning of homes and 
other buildings. Working drawings, specifications and blue-prints are fea- 
tured. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 101. Mechanical Drafting Procedures of Industry (3). Summer. 
Prerequisitie, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 



•Alternate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



232 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



233 



A comprehensive drafting course designed to give students practice in 
the modern methods of industry. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 121. Essentials of Design (3). Fall. Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. i 
and basic shop work. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application 
to the construction of high school shop projects. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking (3). Fall. 

A hand woodworking course dealing with the use and care of tools used 
in bench joinery. It deals with materials and supplies, and practice in 
wood finishing. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Ind. 
Ed. 2, or equivalent. 

Practice in the application of design and construction of projects in 
wood involving the use of woodworking machinery suitable for the high 
school shop. Basic wood turning is introduced. . Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Ind. Ed. 42. Advanced Machine Woodworking (3). Spring. Prerequisite, 
Ind. Ed. 22, or equivalent. 

Advanced production methods with emphasis on cabinet making and 
design. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Ind. Ed. 102. Advanced Woodfinishing and Design (3). Summer. Pre- 
requisite, Ind. Ed. 22, or equivalent. 

Advanced finishing room methods applied. The application of color and 
its use in the improvement of design. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

♦Ind. Ed. 23. Forge Practice (1). Fall. 

. Laboratory practice in forging and the heat treatment of metals. Theory 
and principles of handling tools and materials. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (3). Fall. 

Information is given on materials, tools and processes. Practice is given 
in soldering, the laying out of patterns, and the making of elementary 
graded projects. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 104. Advanced Practices in Sheet Metal Work (3). Summer. 
Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 24, or equivalent. 

Study of the more complicated processes involved in commercial items. 
Calculations and pattern making are emphasized. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 65. Hand Craft (3). Summer. 

Arts and crafts experiences in designing and constructing projects in 
woodwork, weaving, bookbinding, metalwork, leatherwork, block printing, 
and practice with other materials, including home mechanics activities. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 



♦Alternate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



T A Fd 85, 105. General Shop (1-1). Fall, Winter. 

A tn n„,et needs in organizing and administering a high school 
^"Tfhop course StuiLts are rotated through skill and knowledge 
Sif-iXrin mechanical drawing electricity, woodworking, and 
general metal working. Laboratory fee, |2.50. 
inrf Ed 125. Fundamentals of Shopwork (3). Summer. 

Ih to eive direct help to those interested in conducting the War 
,ep:r:nV;rSdSn ba'sic course in Fundamentals of Shopwork. 

Laboratory fee, f3.50. 

Ind Ed. 26. Art Metal Work— Elementary (3). Spring. 

Dells with the designing and construction of art metal projects, mchidmg 
suJoperations as spotting, saw piercing, etching, and enamehng. Labora 
tory fee, $3.50. 

Ind. Ed. 66. Art Metal Work-Bowl Raising (3). Summer. Prereqm- 
site Ind. Ed. 6, or equivalent. , , i 

Advanced practicum. It includes methods of bowl raismg and bowl 
ornamenting. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
Ind. Ed. 106. Art Metal Work-Jewelry Work (3). Summer. 

stones as settings. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Ind. Ed. 67. Cold Metal Work (3). Spring. 

This course is concerned with the development of knowledges and skills 
Jolved iX Sesign and construction of projects from band iron and other 
forms of mild steel. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 28. Electricity (2). Winter. 

Deals with the characteristics of wire, the electrical circuit, jnagnetistn, 
house ani signal wiring, and simple ignition wiring. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 48. Advanced Electricity (3). Spring. 

ing, measurements, motors and control, electro <=nemibt y , 

inductance and reactance, condensers, and radio. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Ind. Ed. 108. Experimental Electricity (3). Summer. Prerequisite, 
Ind. Ed. 28, or equivalent. ' , . 4. 

A shop practicum course in the development of apparatus and equipment 
for teaching the principles of electricity. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

*Ind. Ed. 69. Elementary Machine Shop Practice (3). Spring. Prerequi- 
site, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 

SUteiiiate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



234 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



235 



If 



*Ind. Ed. 110. Foundry (1). Fall. 

Bench and floor molding and elementary core making tj,... 
gj^ covering foundry materials, tools ^anTappHanTes. "SXt 

equtme"^^"^ ^^^^"^^ ^° *^^ "P-'^-P -^ care of school shop tools and 
Pr^re^ufst'Sych.To"'"'"' '"'*'""*="""' ^•"' Oh-^at-n (5). Winter. 

totr^raitb-e^uteroftUt;-'^' ^"'r*"^' ^'^-^^^'-^ *^- -'^tio„ 

and orgLization of suS ct matl^^^^^^^^ T . '^'^'^ '"'''"'''' ^^'^'=«°" 

methods of instruction r^Lri ? ' "^ ™'"^"''" P^-a^Wces and needs; 

.^tandards. Trnrp;rLrtfVbrr:^^^^^^^^ '•-""^'- ^^'-^-^ 

Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (3). Fall 

Pupr^-STssltrsHSot taS"^;„f :!LTt='- ^T*^^ 

equ.pment, and supplies; records and reports'; Tnd good shVkeepinr''""' 
^^Ind. Ed. 165. Evolution of Modern Industry (3). (Not offered in 1944- 

ofrt"red fn 'lit^So'"""""'' Foundations of Industrial Arts (3). (Not 

reading and reports! ^ ^ education. Lectures, class discussions, 

lolSis?- '''• "'""'"^ •" Occupational Education (2). (Not offered in 

da^r^rtf ;!;i^ 'zt :hi:tr;„Tert'- "^•^^"^- ^'•^ ^-^^-^ 

education. cnaracter and effectiveness of occupational 

♦Alternate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



^ Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (3). Spring, Summer. 
Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis which is 
basic in organizing industrial education courses of study. This course 
should precede Ind. Ed. 169. 

Ind. Ed. 169. Construction of Vocational and Occupational Courses of 
Study (3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 

Surveys and applies techniques of building and reorganizing courses of 
study for effective use in vocational and occupational schools. 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles and Practices of Vocational Education (3). 

Summer. 

The course develops the vocational education movement as an integral 
phase of the American program of public education. 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (3). (Not offered in 
1944-45.) 

An overview of the development of vocational education from primitive 
times to the present. The evolution of industrial arts is also considered. 

Yoc. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Voca- 
tional Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 

This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, super- 
vision, curricular spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational 
education. Alternate, Ed. 200. 

Voc. Ed. 236. Seminar in Vocational Education (3). (Arranged.) 

This seminar deals with the issues and functions of vocational education, 
particularly in respect to the emerging changes in educational planning on 
the secondary school level. Opportunity is given to students majoring in 
Industrial Education to write one of the seminar reports required for the 
degree of Master of Education. 

Voc. Ed. 240. Research in Vocational Education (3). (Arranged.) 

Direction will be provided for persons currently engaged in research in 
vocational education. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Eng. 1, 2f 3. Survey and Composition (9). Repeated in all quarters. 
Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful passing of 
the qualifying examination given by the department, or successful com- 
pletion of Eng. A. Required of all students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. 

Eng. A. Special Preparatory Course (0). Fall, Winter, Spring. Pre- 
requisite, three units of high school English. Required of all students who 



236 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



will continue with Eng A Ifon; "1; ''^''f^-\^o Eng. 1. Othe 
right to transfer from Eng 1 to Enf A !r^ ^ ^^^P^rtment reserves the 
progress. ^ ^ *^"^- ^ students who make unsatisfactorj 

A laboratory course in grammatical and rhetorical nri„.;ni. 
dial readmg designed to help student, wLIf Principles and reme- 

ficient for Eng. 1. Exercis^! precis wrfSr ^"""'■"'"" ^"^ ^^^ -^"f" 

Eng. 4, 5, 6. Survey and ComDositinn rq q o\ t^ 
ters. One general lecture given bvvalS ' \ Repeated in all quar- 
two quiz sections. PrerequisTte Eng I" 1 "'' *'*' '^^P^^'^ent; 

^^A^continuation o, ^^^^^^c^^^^^^^^^^^^ on the work accompl.he. 

ning to the Romantic Age. '^^ett blk^Xts'^S^fr '^' '''- 
req^uiStJ; Eng.^r.T"?'"' "^"""^ ''' '^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ -" <>-rters. Pre- 

the^etXtsaTt;™ Ztf "^ /"^'^^^^ -<^ ^"*-P-tation of 
not prerequisite to second qTarter" ' "^°'^" ''^^ «^^* ^^^^^^^^ '« 

sit?l„g"-l. Tr^""" *" ^'"^"- ^"«-*"- («)• Spring. Prerequi. 

aiijsrtfrex-— d":?r- ^^^^^^^^^ - -- 

Eng. 11, 12. Survey of American Literature r^ q>i w ^ 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2, 3. ^"eraiure (3, 3). Winter, Spring. 

eJptrsi^urn^tsr;u;^^^^^^^^^^^^ -». to ^se, w.^ 

and upon sectional conflict. Reporlard LmTaper' "" °' -"onalis., 

^^ Eng. 13. 14. Shakespeare (3. 3). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 

dis«n?t ZTy:r Dr?m;tic"'c'v ' "''''' "^"^*^^«"^ '"^^ '^^^^ - a 
experimental production "*'"''"'' P'-^P^'ation of acting script; 

Second quarter, ten significant late plays. 
Cl 2%.'^""'"^ ^'^"""'^ ^^^- ^«". Spring (repeated). Prerequisite, 
Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. 

req^u^sVe'Enlttt""'""" """''' ^'^- (^ot offered inl944-45.) Pre- 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



237 



r A study of the contemporary novel in Britain, America and on the 

I Continent. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 50, 51. The Novel (3, 3). Summer, Fall. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 

A study of the novel in England and on the Continent. 

Eng. 52. Children's Literature (2). Summer. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2, 3. 
A study of the literary values in prose and verse for children. 

Eng. 54, 55. Play Production (2, 2). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite, Eng. 
4, 5, 6. 

The theory and practice of acting and directing. 

Eng. 57. Types of English Literature (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Eng. 
4, 5, 6. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of English 
literature, with especial attention to the influence of classical myths and 
legends and of classical literary ideals upon English and American writers. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language (5). Summer, Winter 
(repeated). Prerequisite, Eng. 15. 

An historical survey of the English language; its nature, origin, and 
development, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in 
English speech and upon rules which govern modern usage. 

Eng. 102. Old English (3). Fall. Prerequisite, Eng. 15. 

A study of Old English grammar and literature. Lectures on the prin- 
ciples of phonetics and comparative philology. 

Eng. 103. Beowulf (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Eng. 102. 
A study of the Old English epic in the original. 

Eng. 104. Chaucer (3). Fall. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the principal 
minor poems, with lectures and readings on the social background of 
Chaucer's time. 

Eng. 105. Medieval Drama in England (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 

Eng. 106. Elizabethan Drama (3). Spring. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

A study of the change in spirit and form from 1540 to 1640, as seen in 
the works of the most important dramatists other than Shakespeare. 

Eng. 107. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3). Summer. Prerequisite, 
l^ng. 4, 5, 6. 



238 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I»I 



Eng. 108. Milton C^\ c • ^ 

lumon c^;. Spring. PrerequisitP^ ir««. a r ^ 

^ng. 109. Literaturp of *i,« o 
«er. Prerequisite.Eng.l's^'e/^^^"'^^"*'' Century to 1660 (3). Su«. 

tra^ditt„t^:VoX'''' """ ""*«^^ -'^ «^ the Metaphysical and Cavalie, 

Eng. 110. The Acr** r»f rk j 
Bite, Eng. 4, 5. e! ^' "' ''"^'"' ^2). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequi 

-vSenro^thrS:^-^ ^'^^ — «^ "-atu. to the philosophic. 

^^^'•^J^Zrl ts^-'^-^'' ^-- C3, 3>. (Not Offered 
StferP^pr '■' "^^^-^ ^" ^'^^ -^o^' "dominated hy Befoe. Swi., Addiso, 

an?trtlJeTw;itts/°'"°" ^"' ^^^ ^^^^^^ The Rise of Romanticist; 

Eng 113, 114. Prose and Poetry of fh« R 
ter. Prerequisite. Eng. 4, 5, e! ""''""*^ ^^^ (3, 3). Fall. Win- 

Fall quarter, a studv nf fi,« ^ i 
England as e^empMelby tZ\tZfZT ^^ *'^ ^^'"^""^ -cement in 
Lamb, DeQuineey, and others • the revo"utf„r/'' of Wordsworth, Coleridge 

Winter quarter a studv .' "'V'^"^"*'"" toward democracy. ^ ' 

Shelley. Kelts. Tm others ^'^^ ^'""^'^"'= -'*-«' -eluding Byron, 

Eng. 115. Scottish Poetrv 0\ /\r . 
Eng. 4. 5. 6. No knowledge of the ScSL^fr*" "''■''•> ^^^equisite, 

Headings in the Scottish ChauceriaT ""'"' "'^'''^^'^• 

P™t'. Z. 4:?r" ^«- -'^ Poetry (3. 3). Spring. Summer., 

the^ir^/t\fLt;\ifptLV"^^^^^ °' ^''^ ^'-t-^tl^ Century fro. 

req^4^;e"lng.r5r6". ^"'^ ^"^^-— «^"^^H Poet. (3). Winter. Pre- 

A study of the chief English 5,r.^ t • u 

^ Kn|. no. Tennyson an Bro^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ''' ^« Century. 

^' 5. 6- """""^ ^3>- Summer. Prerequisite, Eng. 

y^LZloi:'' '''''' ^"-^ --of the longer works of the two major 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



239 



Eng. 123. Modern Drama (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequisite, Eng. 
4, 5, 6. 

A survey of the English drama during the two centuries from 1660 to 
i860. Class discussion of significant plays; outside readings, reports. 

Eng. 124. Contemporary Drama (3). Fall. Prerequisite Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen to 
O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays; outside reading, reports. 

Eng. 125. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) 
Prerequisite, Eng. 11, 12. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, with 
emphasis on transcendentalism, idealism, and democracy. 

Eng. 126. American Fiction (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequisite, 
Eng. 11, 12. 

Historical and critical study of the short story and novel in the United 
States from 1789 to 1920. 

Eng. 127. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3). Spring. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 11, 12. 

Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. 

Eng. 128. American Drama (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequisite, 
Eng. 11, 12. 

Historical study of representative American plays and playwrights, from 
1787 to 1920. 

Eng. 134. Play writing (2). Spring. Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1, 2, 3. 

Practice in the construction of one-act plays. 

Eng. 135. Creative Writing (3). Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

Theory and practice in the short story and lyric, with some study of the 
novelette and radio verse drama at the election of the class. Major studen' s 
in English must elect either this course or Eng. 136. 

Eng. 136. Magazine Writing (3). Summer. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

The production and marketing of such literature forms as the magazine 
article, the personal essay, the biographical essay, and the book review. 

Eng. 137. Advanced Creative Writing (3). Winter. Prerequisite, Eng. 
135 or 136; open to other advanced students by permission of the in- 
structor after submission of an original composition. This course may be 
taken twice for credit. 

Study and exercise in original literary expression as an interpretative art. 

Eng. 140. Major American Poets (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 



240 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Intensive studv of fii 
poets since Bryam. '' ^'"''^ ^^^ P-«c theories of the major America, 

^^^J^, E?AtT''" ^-- Writers (3). ,^^, ^,^^^^ J^^ 

Intensive studv of f^^ • ^^ 

century United States. ^'^ "^^"^ "''»-«^«- P-se writers of nineteenth- 

Eng. 200 Spini • ^^^ Graduates 

v^iig^mai research unA +1, 
decree. As requested ' *"' ^^^^^-«°" "^ dissertations for the docto • 

102^ V- ""''''^ ^•'-««'' I^an.ua.e (3). Sprin. P • 

A St d Prerequisite, Eng 

.•™.c:i ,?:S" »' *-' «'■""• E"»«.h P.™. „„, „,.„„, ,^ 

Eng. 203. Gothic CS^ q„.^ 

A study of forms and svnt ^^^^^^"-^«' ^ng. ,02. 

-- Of the <^o^t^^T^::t:s^::z^isT' -- -- 

f "«• 204. Medieval Romance in En., T. "^'"'• 

andTher ^"' ^^^-^'"^^ ^" ^he eye lauTd ' '^ '''*'' ^^^^^^ ^^^^"^S) 
ana their sources innii,^,- . ^^^ncai and non-cvclipai m^^- , 

^".. 205. SelCar s' ^"^""^ '^^"^ ^^^ Sd^e^h:^-^ ""^'-^' 

Studies and problems inTtelh "'7 '^"''■^*"'-^ ^^>- ^all. 

-xteenth-century literature other than Shake- 
Eng. 206. Seminar in EI* k 

studies .„d p„i,,,„, ,„ Sh.tep,.„ 

"ipoztant movement of the 
Eng. 209. Seminar in American I U , 

mencan Literature (3). (Not offered 1944-45.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 



241 



Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth-century American 
literature. 

Eng. 210. Seminar in the Romantic Period (3). Spring. One discus- 
sion period of two hours. Prerequisite, Eng. 113, 114, or equivalent satis- 
factory to the instructor. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
movement. 

Eng. 211. Seminar in the Victorian Period (2-3). (Not offered 1944-45.) 
Prerequisite, Eng. 116, 117, or the permission of the instructor. 

Special studies of problems or persons in the Victorian age. The subject 
matter of the course will vary with the interests of the class. 

Eng. 212. Old English Poetry (2-3). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 102, or equivalent. 

A study of Old English poetic masterpieces other than Beowulf, 

Eng. 213. Bibliography (2).. (Not offered 1944-45.) 

A study of methods of research and standard bibliographical works. 
Required of all candidates for advanced degrees. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite, General Zoology 
desirable. 

The position of insects in the animal kingdom, their gross structure, clas- 
sification into orders and the principal families, their general economic 
status. Fee, $3.00. 

Ent. 2. Insect Morphology (2). Two laboratory periods a week. Fall. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 1. 

Intensive study of the external anatomy of the grasshopper. Less inten- 
sive study of internal anatomy and comparison with homologous structures 
of other insects in preparation for insect taxonomy. Fee, $2.00. 

Ent. 3, 4. Insect Taxonomy ( 3, 3). Two laboratory periods a week. 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite, Ent. 2. 

Intensive study of the classification of the orders and principal families 
based on individual collections supplemented by typical material from the 
department collections. Fee, $2.00. 

Ent. 5. Apiculture (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 
Spring. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 desirable. 

A study of the life-habits, yearly cycle, behavior and activities of the 
honeybee. The value of the bee in the pollination of economic plants and 
in the production of honey and beeswax. Fee, $3.00. 



242 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



periods a weet^'T,! ^"''^"""'•^ (4). Two lectures an^ . , 

-ho Wishes r4rberofr:r'""^"^ Designed for the . 

ment. Pee. $4.00/ °' "''"'''^^ « Practical knowledge of bee ma^at' 

E„t. 101. eII^-:;"::' ':'""^^^^«''-*- -«l Graduates 
the d Bnto.0,0.. C3). Winter. Prerequisite, consent 0. 

. An intensive study of thp fV,. 

-^udin. ,i,e histor/eeo,:^;. ^SZoT^S^^Z '' -^"^'^ —'0., 
Ent. 103, 104. Insect Pests U 4, ' *"''"*'""' Parasitism and contS' 
periods a week. Winter c ^ ' *^- ^wo lectures and u., . u 

, A comprehensire tJdy TfT. '''''' "^^^^'^ ^^^^'S.) '''''"*"^>' 

Household, man and foresL^^^: iS'"' ^^"^ ^' ^P^' "vestock. the 

Pe^a^^eekXt^^^^^^^^^ -^ one lahorato. 

The relation of the Arfi,>, ^ ^^^^^equisite, consent of the r?*.r.ov./ * 
vector*? f^f ^ ^1. Ai^thropoda to disea^i:. r.^ , department. 

P«, W.M. "'""i «• entomology. Tho co„t„| „, "1?'T ""'' 

"^ pests of man 
Ji^nt. 107. Insecticides n^ w ^ 
tary o a„,.c chemistry. '''■ ^"'*-- ^-requisites, Ent. 1 and elemen 
The development anH .. r «'emen- 

other important chem^lrw thTer '"' ^*'''"^'^'' P^--- fumigants . W 

r r r : t ir ^— -- --^^^ - -t 

circulation, digestion u "'^^*'* ''"''y ^'th particular r»f 

'— tTe t:Sr '■ -- - --„. o, ,,to„.„„ ., „.,„ 

Ent. 113. Photomicography (2^ t , 

occasional lectures. Winter "^ ^^^^ ^^° '^''^^^tory periods a week and 

An elementary mnvo^ • 
Fo., ,5.00. "■«" ." P-...n,...„pH, .„, „„„„,„^,^^^^ 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



243 



For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology . Credit and prerequisite to be deter- 
mined by the department. Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. 

Ent. 202. Research. Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. This course 
involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for pub- 
lication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as part of the 
requirements for an advanced degree. 

Ent. 203. Insect Morphology (3-5). Three lectures, additional laboratory 
work and credit by special arrangement with the department. Winter. 

Insect anatomy with special reference to function. Given in preparation 
for advanced work in physiology or research in morphology. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. Winter. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of in- 
sects to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic 
organism adjusted to its surroundings. 

FARM FORESTRY 

For. 1. Introduction to Forestry (3). Two lectures; one laboratory. (Not 
offered 1944-45.) Prerequisites, Bot. 1, 2. 

A general survey of the field of forestry. Principles of forestry applied 
to the establishment, care, and protection of stands of timber. Identifica- 
tion and distribution of commercially important trees. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

For. 50. Farm Forestry (2). (Not offered 1944-45.) Prerequisite 
Bot. 1. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in managing woodlands 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of trees; forest 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest crops; 
nursery practice; and tree planting. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

At the beginning of each quarter a placement examination is given for all 
students who have had some foreign language and wish to do further work 
in that language. By this means the Department assigns each student to 
the suitable level of instruction. 

Any advanced course listed in this catalog ivill be given upon application 
and sufficient demand. 



^'0 



244 

Classical Languages 
A. Greek 

Greek 1 2 q ^t 

Reading and tr?'"'"''^ '"'^^'^ W. 

«-k Authors (0). P,,, 

«-<^ing Of parts of Xenophon Plato . 
B. Latin **'' '"'^ ^''^ ^^ Testan,ent. 

J:»"n 1. 2, 3. Elementary Latin (9) 

This course is int H ^ 

and syntax. Part of Caeslr'fr' n- '"''''"""^^ knowledge of T k 

Latin 5 6 7, "'" ^'^'- '^ «ad in the thi !. " ^'■^"""«' 

aiin a, (,, 7, Intermediate r .- . *"""d quarter 

entrance units in Latin '"'^ "-''"^ <«>• Prerequisite, Latin 1 2 ' 

Readings from Cicero OvM ' '"' *^^' 

"-icero, Ovid, and Virgil. 

equivalent. "^ ^^"" Literature (3) p,„. . . 

Review of lit. . Prerecuisue, Latin 51, or 

of I'terature continued. A^e .f . 
Latin 6L Livv's Hi * Augustus and the Earlv ir • 

equivalent. '^ «-- of Rome (3). Prerequisite. La«n ^ e T^^' 

^'««n 62. Odes of Horace (3) p 
3 I-^t- 71. Intermediate Latin r "''""*^' ^^«" S' «, 7, or equivalent 
3^ or equivalent. ^^^"^ Composition (3). Prere,„,3,,e, Latin!" 

, ^-in ^n. Rlattr wt'"^""^'^^ -' «-«'-es 
"eyond Latin 5. 6. 7. "^"^ ^"'^^ C^). Prerequisite, six quarte . 
Essays of Cicero and Seneca ^ <l"arter hours 

La«nl22. Roman Satire (3) p 

Satires of Horace and Juvenal. ""''"■^'*^' ^ ^^r Latin 121. 
Latin 131. The Wi«f • 
hours bevond T of , '''^^"an Tacitus (3) p 

oeyond Latin 5, 6, 7. ^^^^^ Prerequisite, twelve ono>^ 

Keadinffsin-A^.;._,_,. ^^ive quarter 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



245 



Readings in "Agriclla" and ..Ger^ania." 



Latin 132. Martial, Selected Epigrams (3). Prerequisite, as for Latin 

131. 

Latin 141. Lucretius, "De Rerum Natura" (3). Prerequisite, as for 
Latin 131. 

Latin 152. Catullus (3). Prerequisite, as for Latin 131. 

Latin 171. History of the Latin Language (3). Prerequisite, two years 
of Latin or special permission. 

This course is of interest to majors in English or Romance Languages. 
Lectures will be suited to the needs of the class. 

Latin 172. Medieval Latin (3). Prerequisite, Latin 62, or equivalent, or 
special permission. 

Excerpts from various types of medieval texts will be read, with attention 
to the linguistic peculiarities of this period. 

Courses Given in English 

4 

Classics 21. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (3). 

This course aims to show how Latin roots are used in English and to make 
for more accurate use of English vocabulary. It also supplies the basic 
knowledge involved in the comprehension and creation of scientific nomen- 
clature. 

Classics 22. Latin and Greek in Current English Usage (3). 

A continuation of the course outlined above. The study of the Latin lan- 
guage elements is continued and that of the Greek is added. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

A. Chinese 

Chinese 1, 2, 3. Elementary Chinese (9). 
Elements of pronunciation, writing, and translation. 

Chinese 4. Elementary Conversation (1). Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in Chinese 1, 2. 

Qualified students who are interested in Chinese should take this course 
in conjunction with Chinese 3. 

B. French 

French 1, 2, 3. Elementary French (9). Students who offer two units 
in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for second- 
year French, receive half credit for this course. 

French 4. Elementary Conversation (1). Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in French 1, 2. 

Qualified students who are interested in French should take this course 
in conjunction with French 3. 



246 






^ Practical exercises in ' ^*^'«issio„ by 

'^^^tor., art, iite^u^- ^""^--*-. ''ased o„ Materia, .ealin. >. 
French n, 12,, . , '^''"^ ^'t^ I^re„eh 

Frencli 1 i -> intermediate Sriflnf.« x, 

« i. A 3, or equivalent. ^"entific Frencli (9) p^^ 

Second-year Frenrh t ^^^erequisite 

1^0 expect to mS or'''"''"*^ specializing in th : ' 
^r««ch 17 in Place o/t;: twT " ^^^"«'^' Wver 'LfT"" ^^^^^ents 

or permission of ins^ctf^ '^ ^^>- ^-equisite, French 6 Fre . 

ihjs course gives th« e ' ^^^^nch 12, 

be taken in place of f h ^^ ^'"^'^^t «« do French 7 . 

-^l expect ?o mXt^roH^V'^^r^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^"^ -^ 

An intensive review J^ ^^"^''- ''^ ^'"^^^nts 

composition. ^ °^ ^^e elements of French gramma 

For Ai^. grammar; verb drills; 

^ench 51. 52. 53. Z otlT ^""-^-''"ates 

Introductory study of the I ?"""* "^ '^' ^^ench Novel r. , ,. 
literature. French ^T ^'^'°ry and growth * x[ ^^' ^' 3>- 

Century, French s/tLxS.^'; ^^"* Sly FrfnL^r '" ^--^ 

French 54. 55. 56. ruTu . "'• 
, Introductory studv .f ! "*''*''"P™ent of the French n. 
literature. French 54 ^' ^''^'''y and growth T^u"* ^^' ^' ^>- 
Century. French 5' tVxS''^ ^^"''^ SSy*^'^ ,^„^^f -a in French 

3, 3). "' ^«' ^«- The Development of the Short St • 

French 61. 62 63 v ' '" *'^*"<^h (3, 

Fr« u. ^'■*"''' Phonetics r3> p • 

Site, French '^5 ^ ^7 ^"^'•^^^"ction to Frenrh r •. 

' ench 5, 6, 7, or French H io V^ ^^^^^ature (3, 3 3^ p 
, An elementary survo, . ' ' ^^- ^* ^^^^equi- 

literature. '"^ '"^^^^ ^^ the chief authors and 

sent of instructor ^'"'"^^^ Conversation (5, 5 5) p 

' ^>- Prerequisite, con- 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



247 



Intensive daily drill in the spoken language. 

French 99. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (1). 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French litera- 
ture, art, and music. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A more intensive survey of modern French literature is offered by means 
of rotating advanced courses offered as required by the needs of majors 
and minors. 

French 101. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3). 

The beginning and development of the Renaissance in France. 

French 104. French Prose and Poetry of the Seventeenth Century (3). 

A study of the genres dominated by La Fontaine, Pascal, Boileau, and 
the "ecrivains mondains". 

French 105. The Theatre in France in the Seventeenth Century (3). 

A study of the development of the classical tradition as exemplified by the 
work of Corneille, Racine and Moliere. A continuation of French 104. 

French 106. French Life and Thought in the Seventeenth Century (3). 

Study of contemporary memoirs and letters. A continuation of French 
104 and French 105. 

French 107. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3), 
A study of the drama, poetry and novels of the period. 

French 108. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3). 

The philosophical and scientific movement from Saint-Evremond and 
Bayle to the French Revolution. 

French 110. French Poetry in the Nineteenth Century (3). 

A study of the Romantic, Parnassian and Symbolist movements. 

French 111. French Prose in the Nineteenth Centruy (3). 

A study of the evolution of the major prose genres, beginning with the 
Romantic period. A continuation of French 110. 

French 112. The Theatre in France in the Nineteenth Century (3). 

A study of the significant dramatic writers beginning with the Romantic 
period. A continuation of French 110 and French 111. 

French 113. French Literature of the Twentieth Century (3). 

Novel in the twentieth century. 

French 114. French Literature of the Twentieth Century (3). 
Drama and poetry from Symbolism to the present time. 

French 115. French Thought in the Twentieth Century (3). 



248 






A survey of fh * ^- *^vzy 

p,^ L ^contemporary i,> 

French 121, 122, t,, . ^ "■ 

grade of C or abo4 in Pr^ I''^'^^'' Compbsition (9) p 

^' German 

in German for enV. ^'^'"^"^^ry German (9) q.. ^ . 
German 4 p, * ^°'" t'^^s course. ^''^^"^t^ for second- 

German 5 fi 7 r . ^ aue ot 

nian 12 9 ' . ^"^^'•n»ediate Literary r- 

«ea in/; r^'-*- ""^^ ^^'"^•' ^«^- ^-requisite. Ger- 

Practice. "^^-*'- P-se, grammar review a . 

review, and oral and written 
German 8, 9 lo t , 

German 1 2 '9 ' ^^' ^"'^rmediate ScienHfi„ ^ 

n i, 2, 3, or equivalent. *««nt'fic German (9). Prereoui.if 

Readmg of technical prose witJ, '"^requ.szte. 

«-"an 14. Militar. G ""^ '"""^^ ^^^^-• 

equivalent. '^^ ^-an (3). p^ere,,,,,,, ,^^^^ 

Keadmg material: articles on the G. ^' 2, 3, or 

G-man 15, u Germ " ""^' "^^^' -^ force 

C3, ^3>. ^^ --. a Geo^raphieal. Hi.orieal. Po,,, ,_^ 

;tpTe:rtr^~^^^ 

not prepared to take rl ^^""^^ ^^ "'ore unit, in r 

take German 71. ""'^« ^n German, but who are 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



249 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

German 51, 52, 53. Advanced German (3, 3, 3). Prerequisite, German 
5 6, 7, or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent German literature. 

German 54, 55, 56. Advanced German (3, 3, 3).. Prerequisite, German 
5, 6, 7, or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. 

German 61. German Phonetics (1). Prerequisite, German 1, 2, 3, or 
equivalent. 

German 71, 72, 73. German Grammar and Composition (6). Prerequi- 
site, German 5, 6, 7, or equivalent. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. This course is required of students 
preparing to teach German. 

German 75, 76, 77. Introduction to German Literature (3, 3, 3). Pre- 
requisite, German 5, 6, 7, or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature. 

German 80, 81, 82. Advanced Conversation (5, 5, 5). Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. 

Intensive daily drill in the spoken language. 

German 99. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1). 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of German litera- 
ture, art, and music. Rapid review for majors. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 107, 108, 109. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century 
(3, 3, 3). 

German 110, 111, 112. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century 
(3, 3, 3). 

German 113, 114, 115. Contemporary German Literature (3, 3, 3). 

(Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 106, Romanticism 
in Germany, and Comparative Literature 107, The Faust Legend in Eng- 
lish and German Literature.) 

D. Italian 

Italian 1, 2, 3. Elementary Italian (9). Open to freshmen. Also recom- 
mended for advanced students in French and Spanish. 

Italian 4. Elementary Conversation (1). Prerequisite, the grade of \ 
or B in Italian 1, 2. 



250 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HISTORY 



251 



E. Portuguese 

Portuguese 1, 2, 3. Elementary Portuguese (9). 

Portuguese 4. Elementary Conversation (1). Prerequisite, the grade of 
A or B in Portuguese 1, 2. 



F. Russian 

Russian 1, 2, 3. Elementary Russian (9). 

Russian 4. Elementary Conversation (1). 
A or B in Russian 1, 2. 



Prerequisite, the grade of 



G. Spanish 

Spanish 1, 2, 3. Elementary Spanish (9). Students who offer two units 
in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for second- 
year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Spanish 4. Elementary Conversation (1). Prerequisite, the grade of A 
or B in Spanish 1, 2. 

Spanish 5, 6, 7. Intermediate Spanish (9). Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, 
3, or equivalent. 

Spanish 8, 9, 10. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2, 2). Admission by 
consent of instructor. Qualified students who expect to take advanced work 
in Spanish literature should take this course in conjunction with Spanish 
5, 6, 7. • 

Practical exercises in conversation based on material dealing with Span- 
ish history, art, and music. 

Spanish 17. Grammar Review (3). For students who enter with three 
or more units in Spanish, but who are not prepared to take Spanish 71. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 61. Spanish Phonetics (1). Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, 3, or 
equivalent. 

Spanish 71, 72, 73. Intermediate Composition and Conversation (9). 
Prerequisite, Spanish 5, 6, 7, or equivalent. 

Oral and written composition. This course is required of students pre- 
paring to teach Spanish. 

Spanish 75, 76, 77. Introduction to Spanish Literature (3, 3, 3). 
An elementary survey of Spanish literature. 

Spanish 80, 81, 82. Advanced Conversation (5, 5, 5). Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. 

Intensive daily drill in the spoken language. 

Spanish 99. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature (1). 



„, ,W lectures stressing the high points in the history of Spanish ht 
trt art and music. A rapid review for majors. 
' ' For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

cU 101 Epic and Ballad (3). 

1 104 The Dram, ot the OoMen Age <3). 

rail ": The Spanish NOV. Of the Oo.^^^^^^ 
Spanish 106. t^e Poetry of the Golden Age (3). 
Spanish 107. The Spanish Mystics (3). 
Spanish 108. Lope de Vega (3). 
cnanish 109. Cervantes (3). 

Crsh no. The Poetry in the Nineteenth Century (3). 
S alsh 111. The Novel in the Nineteenth Century (3). 

Spanish 112. Drama in the Nineteenth Century (3). 

Spanish 113. The Modern Novel (3). 

Spanish 114. Modern Poetry (3). 

Spanish 115. Modern Spanish Thought (3). ^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

Essays and critical writings of the XXth Century. 

Spanish 116. Modern Drama (3). prerequisite. Spanish 

Spanish 121, 122, 123. Advanced Composition (9). Prexeqmsite. 
71 T2 S, or 'the consent of the instructor. 
. • V. i=;i 152 153. Latin- American Literature (3, 3, 6). 

/;:„;* ;5i'r,;il .>.. .ov.,, sp»ish «2 ^«. pee*, sp.™* ^.^ 

with the essay. 

GEOLOGY . . 3 

Geol. 1. Geology (3). Fall. ^l'''''''''''X^lT^6:yZl.X and structural 
A study dealing primarily with the Vr^'^j'^ ^^fy^^^i minerals com- 

geology. Designed to give a g^^^/J"''"^ . jt^ surface features and the 

posing the earth; the movement within it, and 

•r/r'zt:. ««....». ->■ «.,..«. ,, .pho„.es . 

HISTORY .« « «N Three hours a 

H. 1. 2, 3. A survey of ^^Z^-^X^S;i ctsmen by special 
week. For freshmen and sophomores, open 

arrangement. It may be entered any quarter. 



252 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HISTORY 



253 



A general course covering the broad movements of European history 
which contributed to the formation of modern institutions. Recommended 
for all students who expect to major in history. 

H. 4, 5, 6. History of England and Great Britain (3, 3, 3). Three hours a 
week. Fall, Winter, Spring. For freshmen and sophomores; open to upper 
classmen by special arrangement. 

H. 7, 8, 9. American History (3, 3, 3). Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Freshmen may enter only if their curriculum specifically requires it. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. American History 

H. 101. American Colonial Histroy (3). Fall. Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 
9, or the equivalent. 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the 
eighteenth century. 

H. 103. The American Revolution (3). Winter. Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 9, 
or the equivalent. 

The background and course of the American Revolution through the 
formation of the Constitution. 

H. 105, 106, 107. Social and Economic History of the United States (3, 

3, 3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 9, or the equivalent. 

A synthesis of American life from the colonial period to the present. 

H. 115. The Old South (3). Fall. Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 9, or the 

equivalent. 

A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South 
with particular reference to the background of the Civil War. 

H. 116. The American Civil War (3). Winter. Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 
9, or the equivalent. 

Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and eco- 
nomic effects of the war upon American society. 

H. 117. Reconstruction and the New South (3). Spring. Prerequisites, 
H. 7, 8, 9, or the equivalent. 

The problem of reconstruction in the North and South after the Civil 
War; evolution of the New South and problems of the present South. 

H. 121, 122. History of the American Frontier (3, 3). Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 9, or the equivalent. 

A study of the influence of the westward movement in shaping American 
institutional development. First quarter, the trans- Alleghany West ; second 
quarter, the trans-Mississippi West. 



„ ,„ Tte l«.' SU..S 1" ••" Twentieth Ce.tu.y (»• F.ll. P~- 

\" "its* .:Sf °4« ,~ "o:?he E.™.u.,o„ .. .he ClvU war-, 

•' "". ™2fer ?Sm the Civil W.r to the present. 

second quarter, nu"' . _ • „ f^>. qnrine Prerequi- 

H 129 The United States and World Affairs (3). Spring. 

,„ee to the rest of the world since 1917. 

H 133 134. The History of American Ideas (3 3). Fall, Winter, p 
SummS Prerequisites, H. 7. 8, 9, or the equivalent. , , . ,, 

TLlleetual history of the American people, emhracing such topics as 
religious liberty, democracy and social ideas. . _, ^^ ^ ... ™ _„ 

H 135 136 137. Constitutional History of the Uni ed States (9). Th ee . 
i a week. (Not offered in 1944-45.) Prerequisites, H. 7, 8, 9, 

equivalent. ,^. • 4-1,0 -Pnrmation of the Constitu- 

A study of the historical forces r^^^^^^J^^^.^L in theory and 
tion, and of the development of American consi 
practice thereafter. .^ ^^^^.^^ ^ 

H 141 142. History of Maryland (3, S). (.J>'«'' 
Pre;equis'ites, H. 7, 8, 9, or ^^-^^^ ^^^.^^ ^„, ,,„„,„,, ^story of 
eoS Z^l Xr^frirSand. historical development and 
vole as a state in the American Union^ 

H 145, 146, 147. Latin- American History (3, 3, 3). ra , 
Pre;equisite, 9 hours of f-<i— "^^^^ ,,,„ ,,,„,ial origins to the 
A survey of the ^f^^^'^^^TetZZ and social development, with 
reS'e=2 -rrirnTwIlhthe United States. 

B. European History 
H. 151. 152. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3. 3). (Not 

'''pirlCrtera survey of the -"-* ^^f j:^:^ S^e rlon^ ^u- 
East, with some attention to *e>r economics, Me and 
ter, ; similar treatment of Greek history and culture. 

H. 153. History of Rome (3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) 



254 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



First quarter, from the fall nf fh^ i> r. '"^^^c^or. 

Firs. „„,„. ,k, E.„.,;3,„ ;'„'• rj"'/'™'™ '" «■' '«""o,. 

First quarter, Revolutionary France «nrl ,> • « 

The history of Central Europe from ifinn * ^u 
emphasis on Germany and Austria. Present, with special 

First auartPr fi,^ ^ » n. i, ^, d, or the equivalent. 



HISTORY 



255 



H. 191, 192. History of Russia (3, 3). (Not offered in 1944-45.) Pre- 
requisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or the equivalent. 

A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. 

H. 193. History of the Near East (3). Summer. Prerequisites, H. 1, 
2, 3, or the equivalent. 
A study of the Balkans and of Turkey from earliest times to the present. 

H. 195. The Far East (3). Summer. 

A survey of institutional, cultural and political aspects of the history of 
China and Japan, and a consideration of present-day problems of the Pa- 
cific area. 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3). Spring. 

Discussions and term papers designed to acquaint the student with the 
methods and problems of research and presentation. The students will be 
encouraged to examine those phases of history in which they are most 
interested. Recommended to history majors. 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (3-6). Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 
(Arranged.) 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (2, 2). (Arranged.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3.) 

(Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on the critical and source materials explaining 
our social and economic evolution. 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3). (Arranged.) 

Readings and conference* designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the sources and literature of American Colonial History. 

H. 215. The Old South (3). (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the standard sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum 
South. 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3). (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on the' controversial literature of the Civil War. 
Attention is focused upon the conflicting interpretations and upon the social 
and economic impact of the war on American society. Opportunity is also 
given to read in the rich source material of this period. 

H. 221. History of the West (3). (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to give the student an acquaintance 
with some of the more important sources and some of the most significant 
literature of the advancing American frontier. 



256 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 233. Topics in American Intellectual History n) / a 

Readings and conferences on ,.I. , ^ . (Arranged.) 

emphasis on religious trad tons socTarand r."/', ^r"'''^^" ^^^^^^t, .,, 
ment of American ideas. ^ ^"^'^'"^^ ^^^^V' and the develol 

H. 250.. Seminar in European History (2, 2). (Arranged.) 
H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3). (Arranged ) 

PortrtXr^urrariSL^Sr '' ^^^"^'"* ''' ^*"^- -^*h the i„ 
medieval Church, schools and n'^^it^^ 'T' '' '^"^^"^ ^^e" 

art and architecture. ^ersities, Latin and vernacular literature. 

Readings and conferences in fV,^ w ^ 
-^^-<^^ to the present, toZZlttLT/\'''-'i'''''^' ^"«P« from Ei. 
secondary sources. SpeciarempVai' wurL^n, "^ '^^'"^ ''"'"-^ -" 
and Hitlerian periods. ''^ P'^*'^*^ on the Bicmarckian 

(3)"' (ItaJS " *'^ "^^'"^^ »' ^"•'-" ^"-'-O -d Greater Britain 

Readings and conferencp^ r,n +1,^ a 

in. with the transforTa on y tSrTnrr ' "*"^'^ '"^^^-'^ <^->- 
the British Empire since 1763. *^^ ^''"^t'' ^^d evolution of 

H. 287. Historians and Historical Criticism f^^ / a 

Readings and occasional lectures on th vT ^^"-"ged-) 

evolution of critical standard the rise of a" ?i7 "' '"'''"'=^' ""«"^' *"« 
of selected masters. auxiliary sciences, and the works 

HOME ECONOklCS 
Home Economics Lectures 

H. E. 1. Home Economics Lecture^ rn i? - . 

freshmen. Fall. lectures (l)-Required of Home Economics 

Lectures, demonstrations ^ronn ar,^ • ^- -^ 

and Clothing budget for thl' cTg^g r, ■ pe'rl'^:; atT^^"^ "" ^^''--^ 
habits; social usage. ^ ' Personal adjustments; good study 

Textiles and Clothing 

labtaH7^^"'" '''-^^''' ^-*-' Spring, Summer. Three lectures, two 

anf Xr:fi;:;r3:' ^^-^'-dizatlon and labeling of textiles; collection 



HOME ECONOMICS 



257 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

g. E. 110, 111. Advanced Textiles (6) — Fall, Winter. One lecture, two 
laboratories. Prerequisite: H. E. 10, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. 

Detailed study of physical and chemical properties of fibers; of standard 
testing methods for serviceability of fabrics; of textile finishes, color 
application, laundering, dry cleaning. 

H. E. 112. Problems in Textiles (3) — Spring. One lecture, two laboratories, 
prerequisite: H. E. 111. 

Individual experimental problems in textiles. 

H. E. 113. Consumer Problems in Textiles (3) — Fall, Summer. Two lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: H. E. 10 or consent of the instructor. 

Evaluation, purchase and care of wearing apparel and household textiles; 
government specifications and regulations; field trips. 

H. E. 20A. Clothing (3)— Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Three laborator- 
ies. Prerequisite: H. E. 10. 

Wardrobe planning; interpretation and use of commercial patterns; mak- 
ing of garments involving difficult techniques of construction. 

H. E. 20B.— Clothing (3)— Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: H. E. 10., or 
consent of the instructor. 

Wardrobe planning; interpretation and use of commercial patterns; con- 
struction of simple garments. * 

H. E. 21. Clothing (3) — Winter, Spring, Summer. Three laboratories. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 20A or B. 
Renovation; special problems in clothing construction. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. 120. Pattern Design (3) — Winter, Summer 1945. Three laboratories. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 20A or 20B. 

Comparative study of commercial patterns; development and use of a 
foundation pattern; creation of designs in paper and cloth. 

H. E. 121. Children's Clothing (2)— Fall, Summer 1944. Two laboratories 
Prerequisite: H. E. 20A or 20B. 

Children's clothing from the standpoint of age, health, beauty, personality 
and economy. 

H. E. 122. Draping (5) — Fall, Winter, Spring. Five laboratories. Pre- 
requisite: H. E. 20A, H. E. 71, or equivalent. 

Draping of garments in cloth on a dress form stressing style, design, and 
suitability to the individual. 

H. E. 124. Tailoring (3) — Fall, Spring. Three laboratories. Prerequisite: 
H. E. 20A or 20B. 

Construction of tailored garment requiring professional skill. 



n 



258 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



W 



^^s'i^Jl^^Z Z^ ^^>-^^- '— SpHn.. sun,., 

PrCe., rep... on current ^i^^r:-:^^:^^::^^:^ £-. 
Practical Art 

Clothing selection with rplafinr, ^-^ 
fashions to the individual, iestn^ne of '/nT *^- ^'^P*^"°" «* changing 
and lithograph crayon, transSS anror" '" T''"'"^ ^""=*' ^« ^ont 
India ink. and three-di^ensionarrteS.TurvroflL?"!'- "'* ^^"^"' 
H.E.72. Costume Illustration (3) _ , 'T^^ °' ^'^^ ^-'"^ -dustry 
Prerequisites: H. E. 70, H. E 71. or l~^Se„T"^" '''"^ '^^<'^^*-'- 
Advanced techniques in rendering of fashion 'illustration 
H. E 73. Simple Crafts (3)-Summer. Three laboratories 

paperlirldSrwoid buTnir S^E "T' '''■'''^- ^^^^ ^-kin, 

materials and too. aJd si^pleteSut. ^Tan i^itrd"iiTr ^ 

H. E. 74. Survey of Art History (3) p.„ ^ • " *^' ''""'^• 

Study Of historical evolution of fur^H^; f 'k '"^ '"^""^• 

costume. Illustrated lectures, assigned taXs' ^akfufof'^f '''""' ^"^ 

auiiigs, making of picture notebook 

H E 170 J"'. '^*'''"''' Undergraduates and Graduates 
H. *.. 170, 171. Interior Design (a^ Foii 

Three laboratories. PrereqSe : HE. 70 H E 7T"' '^'"*''" """ ^P""""' 

Analysis of interiors as backgTo„r,Hc f ' " •' " 
good and poor interiors. TvtsrhTstoi /"""""' Personalities. Study of 
retail house furnishing establ shL„rOrigS"fl;^ 'T"*""^ ''''''''^- -" 
tions drawn to scale and renderedTn color ^ ^"^ ^^" ^'^^«- 

H. E. 172. Advanced Interior Design n^ q 
Prerequisites: H. E. 74, H E 170 iTl ^^^-^P^ng. Three laboratories. 

spective, or making of maauette, Z,J / J P^"' elevation and per- 



H0M£7 ECONOMICS 



259 



H. E. 174. Merchandise Display (3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Three 
laboratories. Prerequisite: H. E. 70, or equivalent. 

practice in effective display of merchandise. Cooperation with retail 
establishments. 

H. E. 175. Advanced Merchandise Display (3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Sum-, 
mer. Three laboratories. Prerequisite: H. E. 174. 
Advanced problems in the display merchandise. 

H. E. 176. Advertising Layout and Store Coordination (3) — Fall. Three 
lectures. Prerequisite: H. E. 70, or equivalent. 

Lettering, elementary figure sketching, and freehand perspective drawing 
applied to graphic advertising. Discussion of department and specialty 
store organization; lectures by retail executives from Baltimore and 
Washington. 

H. E. 177. Store Experience (4)— Fall. 160 Clock hours, or 20 eight- 
hour days. Prerequisite: senior standing in Practical Art curriculum. 

Selling, buying, advertising, or executive work, done under supervision 
in a specified department store. 

H. E. 178. Radio in Retailing (3) — Fall. Three lectures. Prerequisites: 
Speech 1, 2, Eng. 1, 2, 3, junior standing. 

Writing and production of promotional programs for the merchandising 
of wearing apparel and house furnishings. Collaboration with speech 
department staff and representatives of Washington and Baltimore broad- 
casting stations and retail stores. 

H. E. 179. Upholstering and Slipcovering (3) — Summer. Three laborator- 
ies. Prerequisite: H. E. 170, 171. 

Practice in upholstering. Students provide their own furniture and 
materials. 

H. E. 185, 186. Individual Problems in Design (3, 3). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Tliree lectures; by appointment. Prerequisites: H. E. 70, 71, 72, 
74, 170, 171, 172 must precede or parallel this course. 

Advanced design problems in the field of the student's major interest. 

H. E. 196. Journalism in Home Economics (4) — Winter (Practical Art 
Students), Spring (other students). Two lectures, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites: Speech 1, 2, Eng. 1, 2, 3, junior standing. 

Elements of journalism applied to newspaper, journal, and copy of 
particular interest to women. 

H. E. 198. Graphic Design (3) — Fall. Three lectures. Prerequisites: H. E. 
70, Eng. 1, 2, 3, junior standing. 

A study of typography and its application. 



260 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION 

P-e..s.e:Se.or..„..-ri;e.aM^^^^^^^^^^ 

HOME AND INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 
A. Home Management 

H. E. 150 ^^^ ico n* 
Summer. Tkree'leLe?""^"*^"* ''^ ^"^ «-^ W-Fall, Winter, Spring 

equipment and furnishings. ' "^'" '"'"*=*'°'' and conservation of 

SpHn": S^mm^r^tU^^ (3)-PalI. Winter. 

Six weeks experience in nl^r,..- ^^^' ^^^' 152. 

"^z iX" p«-"S" „n rifT;v>-™'- r.,. 

ton™, „,8,„i„a„„ „, ,„s,i,„r„ jauSr" "' ™" """^ '» ■'"".i- 
te«t,'i ,ir;si° ^""'""' •"■' •■««■'' ■""«'."i.« (-)-w,„,., Th» 

H. E. 163. Institution Cookerv r^^ iir- ^ 

laboratories. Prerequisites H^^. Sir'fisf'iTf ''"" ^^•=*--' t''- 
Application of princinles of f. r* ' ' ^^^' ^^^• 

study Of standard%echn,e ;Lrpr„S"V'' '^^'^ "-"«*- -kery; 

-«pes; use of institutional equipment p'aTticTfn Taf/ ^.^^^^-^'-tion ^f 

H. E. 164. Practice in Insfif.f »/ '^ '"""*«'• ^'^rvice. 

Summer. Arranged. Pr^erSSerV'rfeT^"* ^^^-^^"' ^'•"*-- ^Pring. 
Practice work in one of fi.^ -p n * • ' 

room hospital, cafeteria, or hotJ ^rSust'L^""^"^ '''"'"^ ''-"' tea 
specified length of time. ""^^ ^^ '^"ne under direction for a 

H. E. 165. The School Lunch n^ q • 

laboratoj.. Prerequisite: H. E. Srs'^'s'"?? orTsr" ''"° '^•^*"-' -« 
The educational and nntvif,-^ i ' ^^- 

administration; equipmenrfircTaXl^^^^^ school lunch and its 
tion of menus. ^""^ accounting; planning and prepara- 



FOODS AND NUTRITION 



261 



POODS AND NUTRITION 

g. E. 30. Introductory Foods Study (5) — Fall. Two lectures, three labora- 
tories. For students in other colleges and for majors in textiles and clothing 
and Practical Art. 

H. E. 31, 32, 33. Foods (9) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. One lecture, 
two laboratories. Prerequisite: Chem. 1, 3. 

Composition, selection, and preparation of food, with a study of the 
scientific principles involved; analysis of recipes and study standard 

products. 

H. E. 34. Elements of Nutrition (5) — Fall, Winter. Five lectures. For 
students registered in other colleges and for majors in Textiles and Cloth- 
ing, and Practical Art. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
H. E. 130. Food Economics (2) — Winter. One lecture, one laboratory. 
Sources of our food supply; buying food for the family. 

H. E. 131. Meal Service (3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. One lecture, 
two laboratories. Prerequisite : H. E. 30 or 33. 

Planning and serving meals for family groups in relation to nutritional 
needs and costs, includes simple entertaining. 

H. E. 132. Demonstrations (3) — Winter Spring. Three laboratories. Pre- 
requisites: H. E. 10. 20, 30, or 33. 

Practice in demonstrations. 

H. E. 133. Experimental Foods (5) — Winter, Summer 1945. Two lectures, 
three laboratories. Prerequisites: H. E. 31, 131. 

A study of food preparation processes from the experimental viewpoint. 

H. E. 134. Advanced Foods (5) — Spring. Two lectures, three laboratories. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 131. 

Advanced study of manipulations of food materials. 

H. E. 135. Nutrition (5)— Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: H. E. 33, Chem. 33, 
34. 

A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. 

H. E. 136. Dietetics (5) — Fall, Winter. Three lectures, two laboratories. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 135. 

A study of food selection for health, planning, and calculating dietaries 
for children and adults. 

H. E. 137. Diet in Disease (5) — Winter. Five lectures. Prerequisite: H. E. 
135. 

Modifications of the principles of human nutrition to meet dietary needs 
of certain diseases. 



262 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Mlif 



H. E. 138. Child Nutrition (4)-Sprin. <3 
laboratory. Principles of human n„t>^^' ^""""^'•- Three lectures „„ 

OraT.!d' wri.r'"' '" ''°'""°" «'-^''"»^. Summer. 
H P 2^4 i> . literature in food research 

iditthettitiTr ^ «-^"- «—. 

-- basis Of a'tStr t^„ ll~Sr "^ "^ the .or. ,one. Ma. 

H. E 235. Nutrition-Spring, Summer. 

Credit to be determined by the amnn^f j 
experiments on laboratory animals '""''^ "' ""''^ '^°"«. deeding 



HORTICULTURE 



263 



HORTICULTURE 



A general basic conr^P r.io ^ . botany 1. 

Hort. 2. General Hn.f ,. vegetable production. 

A general basic course nlannpr? f. • f 
methods and practices used'Tthe mrrciafpror';^ ^ ''^^'^^--<^ "^ 

Hort. 3. General Horticulture rn Production of fruit crops, 

and one laboratory .JoZ'7:,'?::ZZ^ bT'T^ '^^^ '-*"- 

-t~anrattrro2-;^^^^^ home ana 

Hort. 5, 6. Fruit Production <S .^71 ^^'^^^^^^o-- 

and one laboratory periodTweek ^ '"' ^''''''' «P""^- Two lectures 



Hort. 8. Vegetable Production (4) — Spring. Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, Bot. 1. 

A study of the principles and practices of commercial vegetable 
production. 

Hort. 10, 11, 12. Greenhouse Management (3, 3, 3) — Fall, Winter, Spring. 
T\vo lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A detailed study of greenhouse construction and management. 

Hort. 14. Small Fruits (3-4) — Spring. Three lectures, one or laboratory 
periods a week. Lectures may be taken without the laboratory. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, black- 
berries, and cranberries. 

Hort. 16. Garden Flowers (3) — Spring. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. 

The various species of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, bedding 
plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 

Hort. 18, 19, 20. Commercial Floriculture (2, 2, 2)— Fall, Winter, Spring. 
One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

Growing and handling bench crops and potted plants, and the marketing 
of cut flowers. 

Hort. 22. Landscape Gardening (3) — Fall. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 
application to private and public areas. 

Hort. 23. Landscape Design (3) — Winter. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 22. 

A consideration of the principles of general landscape design supple- 
mented by direct application in the drafting room. 

Hort. 24, 25. Landscape Design (3, 3) — Spring, Fall. Three laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 23. 

Advanced landscape design. 

Hort. 26. Civic Art (3) — Winter. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 
improvements. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 55. Commercial Processing (4) — Fall. Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. 

The fundamentals of canning, freezing, and dehydration of horticultural 
crops. 



f 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



265 



I 



■t ' 






264 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Hort. 56. Landscape Ornamentals and Floriculture (3) — Spring. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A course dealing with the basic principles in the use of trees, shrubs 
broad-leaved evergreens, evergreens, annual and perennial flowering plants 
in ornamental plantings, 

Hort. 58. Elements of Camouflage (3) — Winter, Spring. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. 

The principles employed in the protective concealment of military and 
industrial installations from aerial observation and attack. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits (3, 3)— Fall, Winter. Prerequisite, 
Plant Phys. 101. 

A critical analysis of research w^ork in horticulture and applied work 
in plant physiology, chemistry, and botany. 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Vegetables (3, 3)— Winter, Spring. Prere- 
quisite, Plant Phys. 101. 

For a description of these courses see the general statement under 
Hort. 101, 102. 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals (3) — Winter. Prerequisite, Plant 
Phys. 101. 

A study of the physiological plant processes as related to the growth 
flowering, and storage of floricultural and ornamental plants. 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (3)— Winter. 

A study of the tropical and subtropical fruits and nuts of economic 
importance. 

Hort. 107, 108, 109. Plant Materials (2, 2, 2)— Fall, Winter, Spring. One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental plantings. 

Hort. 112. Canning Crops Technology (4) — Winter. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Hort. 55 and Plant Phys. 101. 

A course dealing with the more technical physico-chemical methods used 
in the study of the fundamentals or factors influencing the quality of raw 
products; physiological processes prior to and after blanching; and grade 
of processed product • 

Hort. 114. Systematic Pomology (3) — Fall. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. 

A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, and description 
of fruits. 



"l S:"." rl».«».... ana „.».™...»r. o. ve....bU crop.. 

Hort. 122. Special Problems (2-4)-Fall. W.ntex. Spnng. Cr 
to work done. 

For Graduates 
„„. m. »^ »5. E,p.rin,»la, P.n,o,o., O. ». S.-F* Winter, Sp.in.. 

T;":;X" ™ o,:L««c Un.Mea.e .nd p...«c.. »P.H.n« .. 

\aA to commercial practices in pomology. 
*t« n. E J,.n.»..l 0,.,..uHn,e <S, S,-Fa„, W,n.«. P»«- 

Hort. »». H.rtlcultur.1 Cyto-g.n.t... <!)-Sp».nir- l^ 

A course ae^i b , „ u f^\ Fall Two lectures and 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (3)-Fall. Two 
one laboratory period a week. ^^^ •„ 

A critical study of research methods which are or maj 

horticulture. .,„,.,■, Fall Winter, Spring, 

Hort 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2-12)-Fall,AM 

Summer Credit given according to work done. 

Hort. 20S. Advanced Seminar ^'^J^^ZU^ .pics or 
Oral reports with illustrative material are lequ r 
recent research publications in horticulture. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE . 

,. xu J <-9^ 'Summer Fall, Winter, Spring. 
T S t Library Methods (2)— bummer, r an, f„„:m„ 

Tht course is Ltended to ^-^ ^^^^.^^^^i:^^^]:^ 
and effectiveness. Instruction f^^.V" ^^^X^^ Resources to the student, 
work, is designed to interpret the library and its^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

The course -side- the^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ,^,,^^,, reference 

rkr:;icrv:^lternrh:i;f^^ throughout the conege course and ,n 
later years. 



266 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MATHEMATICS 

Math. 0. Basic Mathematics (O)-Summer Pall w * ., 
lem course emphasizing the fundamtn^? . ' ^'"*^'"' ^P""»- A prob 

and geometry. ^ fundamental operations in arithmetic, algebt 

I..nes, pl.„«, eylintes, ,h. .ph,„, pd^.j,^ 
MMh. 7. Solid Geometrj <3)_F.n ti,. i. 
Plane geometry. Open to "^^^LTt^tLiZ\\Z:L ^''''^'^' 

five hours a week Prlre7ulirr ^'"' '^'"*^^' ^P""^- Three hours „r 
course will register r'^h^u^ pe^'Ve v'^l^" '*"'^^"*^ ^^^'-^ thl 
students will continue to attend fivfL ^' ,*''" ""** °* *^° ^"^eks 

according as they .ail or .^Tt^^^^:^^- '^^ ^ -^ 

^o^JS^TZZ^ZL^^'^I:^^ r ""- exponents, radical, 
theorem. ^ "^' '^^*'*'' Proportion and variation, binomial 

Math. 11. Trigonometry (3)— Summ<.r Poii nr- x 
a week. Prerequisite, Math. 10 or em!i; J 1' "*'"■• ^P""^* ^hree hours 
Math. 10. • ^" """ equivalent, or concurrent enrollment in 

Trigonometric functions, identitip.! +i,» j- 
formulas, solution of triangles! ^'^'^'^ *"^ ">"' ^"-^Ph^. addition 

Math. 12. Analytic Geometrv r^i^ c 

Math. 15. College Algebra (5)~Summer F.l] w . 
hours a week. Prerequisite, high scS X' h ^ ;""*""' ^^^^^^^ ^ive 
two weeks students failing a qValSw ^ ^.^^P^eted. At the end of 

this course and enroll in Math 1 "^^ examination are required to drop 



MATHEMATICS 



267 



Fundamental operations, factoring, linear equations, ratio and proportion, 
variation, exponents and radicals, logarithms, progressions, permutations, 
combinations, probability, determinants, theory of equations. 

Math. 16. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry (5) — Summer, Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Five hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 15 or equivalent. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian and mil, graphs, the 
addition formulas, solution of triangles, solution of spherical triangles. 

Math. 17. Analjrtic Geometry (5) — Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. Five 
hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 15 and 16 or equivalent. 

Rectangular coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, 
graphs, transformation of coordinates, . conic sections, polar coordinates, 
parametric equations, transcendental equations, solid analytic geometry. 

Math. 18, 19. Pictorial Geometry (4) — Fall, Winter. Two hours a week. 
Open to students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as 
their major or minor. 

The story of geometry, classical and modern, synthetic and analytic, pre- 
sented by means of drawings made by the students themselves. 

Math. 20, 21, 22. Calculus (15)— Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. Five hours 
a week. Prerequisite, Math. 17 or equivalent. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, definite and indefinite integrals, partial 
derivatives, multiple integrals, infinite series, differential equations, 
geometrical and physical applications. 

Math. 25. Elements of Mathematical Statistics (3) — Fall, Spring. Three 
hours a week. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. 

A course in statistical methods covering the following topics: frequency 
distributions, averages and moments, measure of dispersion, the normal 
curve, curve fitting, correlation theory. 

Math. 60, 61. Elementary Mathematics (4) — Summer, Fall. Two hours a 
week. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. Open to students in 
the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major or minor. 

Plane geometry, trigonometry, number theory, algebra. 

Math. 62, 63. College Mathematics (4) — Winter, Spring. Two hours a 
week. Prerequisite, two years of college mathematics. Open to students in 
the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major or minor. 

A review of college mathematics, the objective being to integrate the 
material for the benefit of the prospective teacher. 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers (5) — Summer, Fall, 
Winter, Spring. Five hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 
Required of all mechanical and electrical engineers. 

Differential equations of the first and second orders with particular 
emphasis on their engineering applications, Fourier series. 



268 



THE UmVBRSITr OF MAEVLAND 



Math. 70. 71. 72. Junior Tutorial f?^ q 

hour a week. Required of inZTr^l^r^^Zt^^'- f "^er. Spring. One 
Math. 80 87 «9 G • r« J^^uig- in mathematics. 

«nt. ou, 01, jj^. Senior Tutorial /'Q^ o 

A. Algebra 
Math. 100, 101. 102 TTin-K^ Ai , 

Ratio, proportion and variaHnr. ^ . • ^''"'''^'^nt- 
progressions, permutations and comb, w""'"^"*"' ""^thematical induction 
^equalities, infinite series? undetrined"' ^^f'^'*"'*'^- •''--al theo C 
summation of series, theory 'of*™ <=««ffi"ents, partial fractioi 

^^^^:s:?:^^:^£^ ^^^. o.ered, i...,. 

Number, groups rint., fi.,^ equivalent. 

' s'""PS, rings, fields, matrices. 

Math. 200, 201, 202. Algebra «\\ m . a, 
Prerequisite. Math. ^Oo't^l: St^t^Xt''''''- "'^^ ^^^^ « -e-^- 

.rou^ringrfi:S^loTtWy ^"^''^^"^ ^--' ^^ementary diWsors, 

Math. 250. Selected Topics in Algebra rs) Th u 
B. Analysis ^ "'"' '""''^ ^ ^'^«k. Arranged. 

Math. 110. Ill 719 \A 

1^45. Three hour; a^et:'?rquS;f mU^I^^"*-'- ^-^'^^ «— . 

Limits, continuous functions hL '^^^^- ^2 or equivalent, 
tion to mechanics, i.iX^^^tZ^'i^:^}^' '"' "*^^^^«°" ^^^ applica- 
vanab es, differential equations wJh IZ^^r ''T' '""^"«"« ^^ several 
multiple integrals, the theorem! of rf"'/° '""'^^^"^^ ^nd Physics, 
variations. "*'""'"' «^ Gauss and Stokes, the calculuT of 

Math. 113 114 iif^ Ti'cc 
1944. Three hour! ^^^::^£^ ^~^^^^. Summer. Pall 

First and second order eau^fi! ^ °'' ^l^'^^lent. 

theorems, systems of equatrrt^e' ^rrSL'"''""™*'"- ^"^ --*-« 
Physical applications, partial differed eVXn:'""' ^^"^--^rical and 



MATHEMATICS 



269 



Math. 210, 211, 212. Functions of a Complex Variable (9) — Winter, Spring, 
gmnmer, 1945. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 110, 111, 112 or 
equivalent. 

Complex numbers, infinite series, Cauchy-Riemann equations, conformal 
mapping, complex integral, the Cauchy theory, the Weierstrass theory, 
Riemann surfaces, algebraic functions, periodic and elliptic functions, the 
theorems of Weierstrass and Mittag-Leffler. 

Math. 213, 214, 215. Functions of a Real Variable (9)— Spring. Summer, 
Fall 1944. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 110, 111, 112 or 
equivalent. 

The real number system, point sets, the Heine-Borel theorem, continuous 
functions, derivatives, infinite series, uniform convergence, the Riemann 
integral, Jordan content and Lebesgue measure, the Lebesgue integral, 
Fourier series. 

Math. 251. Selected Topics in Analysis (3) — Arranged. Three hours a week. 

C. Geometry 

Math. 120, 121. Advanced Analytic Geometry (6) — Spring, Summer 1944. 
Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 

Linear and quadratic forms, conic sections and quadric surfaces. 

Math. 123, 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (9) — Spring, 
Summer, Fall 1944. Three hours a week. Prerequisite Math. 22 or equivalent. 

Elementary projective geometry largely from the analytic approach, 
projective transformations, cross ratio, harmonic division, projective coor- 
dinates, projective theory of conies, Laguerre's definition of angle. 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry (6)— (Not offered 
1944-45.) Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 

The differential geometry of curves and surfaces with the use of vector 
and tensor methods, curvature and torsion, moving frames, curvilinear 
coordinates, the fundamental differential forms, co variant derivatives, 
intrinsic geometry, curves on a surface, dynamical applications. 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (6)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three 
hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 126, 127 or equivalent. 

Curves and surfaces, geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet fonnula, 
ovaloids, surfaces of constant curvature, projective differential geometry. 

Math. 223, 224. Topology (6)— Winter, Spring 1945. Three hours a week. 
Prerequisite, Math. 110, 111, 112 or equivalent. 

Mathematics based on a system of axioms, abstract spaces, connectivity 
and separation properties, topological properties of Euclidean spaces, set 
theoretic and combinatorial methods, continuous transformations. 

Math. 252. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3) — Arranged. Three 
hours a week. 



271 



MUSIC 



270 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



D. Applied Mathematics 

Math. 130, 131, 132. Analytic Mechanics (9)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three 
hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 

Statics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, elementary celestial mechanics 
Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, two and three degrees 
of freedom, Hamilton's principle, the Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential 
equation. 

Math. 133, 134. Vector Analysis (6)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three hours 
a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 

Vector algebra, with applications to spherical trigonometry and solid 
geometry, vector fields of one, two and three parameters with applications 
to kinematics, surfaces, dynamics and potential theory. 

Math. 135, 136. Probability (6)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three hours a 
week. Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. 

Combinatory analysis, total, compound and inverse probability, con- 
tinuous distributions, theorems of Bernoulli and Laplace, applications to 
statistics and the theory of errors. 

Math. 137, 138. Mathematical Statistics. (6)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three 
hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 22, 25 or equivalent. 

The mathematical principles underlying modern statistical methods. 

Math. 230, 231, 232. Applied Mathematics (9)— Spring, Summer, Fall 1944. 
Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 110, 111, 112 or equivalent. 

The subject material for this course will be chosen from one of the 
following fields: dynamics, elasticity, hydro-dynamics or the partial differ- 
ential equations of mathematical physics. 

Math. 233, 234. Tensor Analysis (6)— (Not offered 1944-45.) Three hours 
a week. Prerequisite Math. 126, 127 or equivalent. 

Algebra and calculus of tensors, Riemann geometry and its generaliza- 
tions, differential invariants, transformation groups, applications to mathe- 
matical physics, the theory of relativity. 

Math. 253. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3) — Arranged. Three 
hours a week. 

Math. 240, 241. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (4) — Arranged. 
Open to first year graduate students. 

This seminar aims at a triple objective: first, an integrating review of 
undergraduate mathematics; second, development in the student of a proper 
historical perspective and a critical attitude toward fundamental concepts; 
third, an interpretation of the mathematical masters of the past. 

F. Colloquium and Research 
Math. 260. Colloquium— Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Math. 270. Research — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 



,,UTABY SCIENCE AND TACTICS ^^ 

\..ic I Terms 1, .. and 3 R- O T- C^ <3) ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ hou^ da-;- 

^«o hour periods of iniantiy Courtesies; intenui 

'^"TsubTects- Military Discipline. Customs an^^^^^„,i,ip., ^^^^ „f 

£rE:=;:r.:^ '^.^iH Hr 3=r rs 

photogid.p" Military Law. 

Military Information, Military .o^Every Quarter. 

Basic II Terms 1. 2. and 3 R. O. T. C. (3) ^ ^ ^^^ ^^^^ classroom 

v,onr periods of Infantry Drill ana m Training and 

"^"^sTubiectsrinfantry Drill and C-emonies Tact^ca ^^,^,r.v^ 
periods. ^""^®"'' .. „. Rjfle Marksmanship; Map ana Applica- 

Z o, Mn«»7 "'., ^„.„.., B. o. T. C.-H.™ b.." ■«-»«»°'^ '" 
M I. 50 and M. I. 51- ^^"^^^ 

the duration of the war. 

MUSIC . r^^— Fall, Spring. 

Music 1. Music Appreciation (3) Fa . P ^_^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^.^^ ,^, 

A study of all types of classical music w 
ability to listen and enjoy. ^^^.^^ 2, Summer 3. 

--^'^•. rrolToT:tsrc!vtilg tbe development of all forms 

/ '""from ^e Gr eS to the present. 
^^rrriellrGlee Club (D-Fall Winter. Sprin. 

r;tai Of eight ^:^2r:;^---^' «--- 

TSarofrrc^erraV^Uarned. 
Music 6. Orchestra (D-Fall, Winter Spring. 
A til of eight credits may be earned 
Music 7. 8. Harmony (4)-Fall. WS,^^^^^^^^ ,,,ies. intervals, 

M 1ft Band (D-Fall. Winter, Spring. 
rSLl'fS credits may be earned. 



V 



272 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

NATURAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES 

N.H.R. 4. Regional Geography of the Continents a, ^ 

Classification of earl, <■■ """nents (3)— Summer, 

physical conditions and eTonS ^"*° "T''»« «"d description of .. 
especially for teachers """''= "*=*'"'*'«« ^« -ch region; inJendJl 

N. H. R. 61 fi2 ftQ 1? 

- ...... .o„ „„„ ^,. „, ^-^ .:::r::r:Ir""'' 
C".*';:;*:;,5:'' ""'"■ "■"■ •"" »'-""'■ two „ «,„ ^, ,., « 

N. H. R. 102 Tho r arming. One or more field trips 

"hick see to description °''""' '"' »« Dwrtaenl „, Socl„l.„, 

N.H.I1. no. MMdl, AmerJe. (3)_p,„ 

N-H.R.ni. South A»,ric. «,_Wi„le,. 

. -.:.,:: o^r ;„:r„::r; - ""- ^»'- «— »■ 

.ncre.sed e,p,oi,..,„, .f „ineT.T«"t:r.r?„"d'" ."■ f"^ "O '•™-'' 
N H R 120 191 1. industrialization. 

pHnica, . J.er:::':!:^'':; " "-- «'-^--- ^---^ 



PHILOSOPHY 



273 



N. H. R- 122. Economic Geography of Africa (3) — Fall. 

physical resources and the existing stages of economic development 
economic potentialities. 

Soc. 108. Population Problems of Europe and Africa (3) — Winter. 

This fourth course in the series is offered by the Department of Sociology, 
which see for description. 

For Graduates 

N. H. R. 203. Advanced Physiography (3)— Fall. 

A comparative study of major types of land forms, including genesis and 
economic significance. 

N. H. R. 204. Advanced Climatology (3)— Winter. 

A study of the climates of the world and associated economic activities. 

Soils 103. Soil Geography (3)— Spring. 

Offered in the Department of Agronomy and is recommended as the third 
in this series of courses in applied science. 

A. E.212, 213. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3, 2)— Fall, 
Winter. 

This course, given by a member of the geographic staff, is offered in the 
Department of Agricultture Economics which see for description. 

A. E. 214. Consumption of Farm Products (3) — Spring. 

This course, given by a member of the geographic staff, is offered in the 
Department of Agriculture Economics, which see for description. 

N. H.R. 221. Seminar in Regional Geography (3, 3, 3)— Fall, Winter, 
Spring. 

N. H. R. 222. Research Work. 

The preparation of the "Economic Atlas of the World", a joint project of 
the University of Maryland, and the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, provides facilities for graduate students to study under the guidance 
of experts in government departments, particularly in the Department of 
Agriculture, as well as in the University. It also provides a vehicle of 
publication for part or all of such research work. The sections of the Atlas 
in preparation during 1944-45 are wheat, rice, land utilization and 
population. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. 1. Fundamentals of Philosophy (3) — Summer, Fall, Spring. Required 
course for premedical students. Open to others by special permission. 

Problems pertaining to the study of man, presented with a constant 
regard for the needs of prospective students of medicine. 



274 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Phil. 2. Ethics CS'i ^ r\ 

, An introduetoj:„'r;:'pHts:r^^^^ °"'^ ^^ --•^' P-..,, 

>n^education. i„ society, and f„ sSetaft """^ '*^ '""'="- '" ^-^^ life 

-?e^"d^tpplt,arerwhr:^^^^^^^ ^^^■^-^- Open to .p, 

quarter. Open to others o„?y by lee' '"■' "''"^^ '" ^'^^ P' io 

Department of Philosophy b/ spel nr'" °" °' ^''^'^ »-» -' o I 
one .course in philosophy may reTX P'™'^^'^''' « student who has hi 
quarters separately. ^ '^'^'*"'' ^"^^ ^^t credit for either of Z tw! 

quaririltn7and '^eas in the Occident, p,,, 

The purpose of the course is to Jve sfudent't. '"*''*"'• ^ ^"-l^^" ^houg f 
to integrate their collegiate growth t^^Tt ^ *=""^«Pt"al means by which 
integration. ^ ^^''^^^' ««d to tra.n them in the method of sucj 

Phil ,, M . . ^*"' ^•'^«'"=«'» Undergraduates 

"ul. 51. Metaphysics (3)_FaIl q« • 
philosophy. May be taLr, f.^"'^ SP""^- Prerequisite, one cour«. • 
Phil. 11, 12. *"''^» simultaneously with the s;cond quarter I 

eletrrceZf ^iTal^^^^^^^^^^^^^ -r students desiring a 

and theologians. ^"'^' ^"<^ ^^^ the needs of prospective teachers 

PW'. 181. 182 "l83 'rrl ^""^'^-"-tes and Graduates 
Spring. Two-ho'ur s;minar tsZ' "" '1 ^'""'^'"'^ (3)-Summer Fall 
Open to undergraduates onlj by s'ecTal '^^ *"'--'• Or three le'ctures! 

sSrrejtri^-r^^ -^ = e=rri:^. -s-- 

JilL^ettrhtl h^aTtTe^ntLL^rS- "^ ^^^^^ -««- unde- 
students desirino- fi,» u i '"=^«ssary preliminary work nn^ 4>„ 
fields 'V\.7 y ^ ''^'P "f philosophy in th^ \ZT f *"" ^^aduate 
nelds. The content of the course will be Ph. "''^ ''^ ^''eir respective 

the group of students enrolled. "''"'"" '" *« *« serve the needs of 

Individua? Hb^ry wo^t a^nd'tutfriar^^^ (2, 2)_Summer, Fall, Sprin. 

"wi:; :rfre -' ^^^^^^^;^r- ^" --- 

-n and with -i^TSe^- ^^^^^ _ 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
P- E. 30. History and Principles of Physical Frf„ ,• , 

Designed to give an overview of the J "" ^'^-^«"- 

t'ves Of Physical education from Primrtitt'mornt^r'^^^ ^"'^ "^^ 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 



275 



P. E. 31, 33, 35. Physical Education Leadership (1) — Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The basic elements of physical education leadership are studied; routine 
niocedures involved in handling large groups in physical activities are 
discussed. The student is given experience in assisting in the required 
physical education program. 

p. E. 40. Health (3)— Winter. 

A personal hygiene course given to physical education majors with 
special emphasis on hygiene to be taught at high school and grade school 
level. 

P. E. 50. Health (3)— Spring. 

Community hygiene — a study of the causative factors of various diseases, 
means of transmission, and prevention of the same with a. study of modern 
health methods. 

P. E. 1 - 12. Physical Activities (1) — each quarter. Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Required of all men students. 

An orientation course with a wide sampling of activities; emphasis on 
physical fitness. Remedial activities for those designated by the Student 
Health Service by arrangement. 

P. E. 60. Theory and Practice of Gymnastics (3) — Fall. Prerequisite, 
P. E. 30. 

Application of the science of physics is made to the bodily movements in 
man^s every day life as well as to the more exacting motor skills of 
tumbling and gymnastics. Emphasis on methods of teaching gymnastics as 
well as student's skill in execution. 

P. E, 41, 43, 45. Varsity Game Skills (2, (2), (3)— Prerequisite, P. E. 30. 

Study and practice of the fundamental skills of interscholastic sports. 
Emphasis on technique of the skills and methods of teaching. P. E. 41 — (2) 
Fall. Football and soccer, or crosscountry. P. E. 43 — (2) Winter. Basketball 
and boxing. P. E. 45 (3) Spring. Baseball, track, and lacrosse. 

P. E. 51. Mass Games Programs (2) — Winter. Prerequisites, P. E. 30, 
and P. E. 31, 33, 35. 

A study of mass games for the various age and grade levels. Playground 
activities, recess periods, stunts, and public demonstrations are included. 

P. E. 53. Organization of Intramurals (3) — Winter, Spring. Prerequisites, 
P. E. 30, P. E. 31, 33, 35. 

Methods of organizing and administering an intramural sports program 
at the various school levels will be offered. Type of tournaments, leagues, 
awards, scoring systems, the projection and motivation of programs, and the 
handling of student leader personnel will be considered. 

P. E. 100. Individual Game Skills (3)— Winter, Spring. 

The technique of the "carry over" sports skills of handball, badminton, 



276 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



tennis, golf, archerv Pf^ " 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 



277 



methods for instructing thesP^r.'*?^''*^ *"'' practiced with emnh. • 
and social techni^ues-^^b: 1^^^^''' "^"^^^ P-i-S: 



P- ^.^^lI^s/S "'• ^'''^'*^ ^-- «'-a„izatio„-Prere,uisites, P. e. 3„ 

and defeL^-^storrar^:-^^^^^^^^^^ h^'^'^t:y2z:Tic 

^Ibe emphasized. P. E. 141-72) ^^^p'' T"^'"'"^ "^ ^^^m morale !'' 
Winter. Basketball and boxL I °°*''^" and soccer. P E 14^' !' 

track, and lacrosse. '"""^' "^ ^^"»--^- P- E.-(3) Spring; Ba^tS 

P.'^'araX?: E'tr" ^-''-'•*'' CD-Each quarter. Prere...,. 
Experience in working i fi, 

P- E. 161. Youth Organizations (S) q„ • 

The various types of youth ^^~^P""^- Prerequisite, P. E. 30 
Y.M.C.A., Boys cfubs etc " m ^''^^^'^ations. such as the Boy Sc!' . 
aims, objectives, and bast prt ipt TT, "^? --"cieraUon L ^ 

* • E. 120. Mental W 
Psych. 80. P. E. 30. Paf "" '*'""*=*^ ^''"-tion (3)-Prerequisites- 

Emphasis is placed on fi,« j- 
individual's emoL„:? a "d sodaY^dT a ;V"^*^"'="-^' -^'^O'^s to the 

teTch-r ^ '^^™'°^- P-otica^ appniS of th^'f'''" "^ «" «*--Ph 
teaching of motor skills is discussed ^''^ '^^" "^ learning to the 

^^'LrS:S:^:'^^-^'^^^r^io. of Phy^^eal Education. (3)- 

Emphasis on the need f 
physical education, intramurl TnH "'f^^''' "^ coordination of reauired 

oTtSbrTi r'^'^^'^'^^^'^lSZrtZ f'^' ^^PartmenT S 
Of the broad educational system will k , ^''"^^ation instructor as a navt 

Of public relations. athleS eTigMitv ''^'''''T^- Problems of schedulinl 
fields, finance, etc. are included. '^' "''' "' e<l-Pment, buildings S 

P.".Vand^t;Tlo'" ^-•'^«-- <^>-PaII, Winter. Prerequisites- 

S^d plaJr^^m-etrdsX" e' ^S^ t ^^ ^ ^ 
traimng room regulation. massage, tapmg. bandaging, along with 



p. E. 160. Community and Industrial Recreation (3) — Spring. 

This course offers a comparative study of the various types of community 
and industrial recreation programs. Planning and projection to fit local 
needs are emphasized. 

■ 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

physical Activities (1) — Each quarter. Required of all women students 
entering the University on or after October, 1942. 

Class activities may be elected from the following: soccer, speedball, 
hockey, volleyball, softball, basketball, tennis, swimming, archery, fencing^ 
badminton, rhythmic fundamentals, modem dance, body mechanics, tumbl- 
ing, physical fitness. Each student is required to take one quarter of the 
following, preferably during the first four quarters : rhythmic fundamentals, 
individual sport, team sport, physical fitness. 

P. E. 32*. History of Dance (5)— Spring. Prerequisites— P. E. 52, 54, 56; 

p. E. 72, 74, 76. 

Designed to give an overview of the development of dance from primitive 
to contemporary times. Students have experience in planning dances for 
specific historic periods. Students interested in drama and pageantry will 
find this course of value. 

p. E. 42. Hygiene I (2) — Required of all freshmen women. 

A course designed to acquaint the women students with individual be- 
havior in relation to health. 

p. E. 44. Hygiene II (2) — Required of all freshmen women. 

A course concerned with the health of people as a group, and with the 
community, governmental and social organizations and activities which 
attempt to better the environmental factors of the community. 

P. E. 46. Hygine III (2)— Prerequisites— P. E. 42, 44. 

A course designed to consider more fully the physiological functions of the 
body in health and* disease. 

P. E. 52, 54, 56. Dance Techniques (1) — Each quarter. 

A basic course which includes movement techniques of Modern Dance and 
a foundation in the principles of dance composition. Two periods per week. 

P. E. 62, 64, 66. Techniques of Sport Skills (2)— Each quarter. 

Theory and practice in the techniques and the teaching of sports. Hockey, 
soccer, basketball, badminton, track. Three periods per week. 

P. E. 72, 74, 76. Dance Techniques (1) — Each quarter. 



*Open to men and women. 



278 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A continuation of P. E. 52, 54, 56. More advanced movements of the 
Modern Dance techniques are studied. Students have the opportunity to 
create and participate in simple group dances. Two periods per week. 

P. E. 82, 84, 86. Technique of Sport Skills (2)— Each quarter. 

A continuation of P. E. 62, 64, 66. Speedball, basketball, volleyball, soft- 
ball, archery, tennis. Three periods per week. 

P. E. 102, 104, 106. Technique of Sport Skills (1)— Each quarter. 

A continuation of P. E. 82, 84, 86. Golf, fencing, swimming, bowling. Two 
periods per week. 

P. E. 108. Recreational Activities (1) — Fall. Theory and practice in the 
techniques and the teaching of recreational games. Two periods per week. 

P. E. 116. Organization and Administration of Physical Education (3)— 
Fall. Prerequisite— P. E. 30. 

A study of current practice in curriculum building, organization of per- 
sonnel, programs, intramurals and sports days. Administration of activities, 
equipment and facilities. 

P. E. 122. Tumbling and Apparatus (2)— Winter. 

A study of the teaching and techniques of marching, tumbling, stunts, 
calesthenics and apparatus. Three periods per week. 

P. E. 124, 126, 128. Coaching and Officiating (2)— Each quarter. Prere- 
quisites— P. E. 62, 64, 66; P. E. 82, 84, 86; P. E. 102, 104, 106. 

Theory in coaching and officiating sports for women. Practice in the 
intramural programs of the University and in the schools in Washington, 
D. C. and Maryland. Opportunity for National Officials Ratings. Two 
lectures, two practice periods per week. 

P. E. 132, 134, 136. Dance composition (1) — Each quarter. Prerequisites — 
P. E. 52, 54, 56,; P. E. 72, 74, 76. 

This course is a practical laboratory in dance composition. Opportunity 
is provided to create and produce dances and to participate in group produc- 
tions. Two periods per week. 

P. E. 142, 144, 146. Methods in Dance (1) — Each quarter. Prerequisites — 
P. E. 52, 54, 56; P. E. 72, 74, 76. 

This course is planned to assist students to develop procedures of teach- 
ing dance. The physical abilities and interests of various age levels are 
considered. Students have actual experience in teaching dance techniques, 
and in planning dance festivals related to the school or community interests. 
Two periods per week. 

P. E. 148. Teaching Health (3)— Spring. Prerequisites— P. E. 42, 44, 46 or 
equivalent. 

A study of materials and methods in health instruction and health 
supervision. Three periods per week. 



279 
PHYSICS 

r.nics and principles of physiology ^^^ 55, 

mechanics * f winter Prerequisites— f. «^- 

^ ''^''clLrPeS^lr., correction of postural defects, 
massage. Causes, P ^^^ ^^^^^.^^^ 

PHYSICS Fall and Winter, Spring and Summer. 

Phys. 1. 2. General Physics (lO)-l'a j^ „etism and Elec- 

Prerequisite, Main. 

quarter. (5)_Every quarter. Four lectures; 

Phys. 3A. General Physics: Dynamics (5) 
one laboratory. „„nneering curricula and of ^l^se wi 

u .A General Physics: Sound, Heat 

JSs.'F;ur'lectures; one laboratory. ^^^ ^^ ,^ 

Required of all students in the eng^ning^^ 3^. Math, 

chen^stry. mathematics ^-^^^^^^^^^ \,, $4.00 per quarter. 
21 is to be taken currently. Labora y j^ity (5)-Alternate 

= * r^^neral Physics: Magnetism and r- 

chemJstry, "mathematics and physic^ m 3^ ^^ .^ ^^^^ ^,,,, phjs. 
21 is to be taken concurrently 
Laboratory fee $4.00 per quarter. 



280 



^ T«E umy,«s,Ty OF MARYLAND 

surr»Pco^„i ^_. . ^"^ Pi'ofessional ^n\.r.^^^ ^ ^^ ^^^^ not 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



281 



successful passing of the oualiJv'"""^' ''=''°"'«- ^^erequ sitts m1 ''''^^>' 
Demonstration fee $An !„!'''y'"^ «^««ination in elem^tL!!; J^ff*''- « or 



successful passing of the ouaHfv' "^' '''''^^'- P^erequ sites m1 '"''^^^ 
Demonstration fe^e .^^Jo r^Sr"""^^" ^» ^'---J m^tt'j,: 

PH.S. 10. AtntT:::' .^"''--'^-- -«« Graduates 

two laboratory Derin7 *'''''*''""ents (3)_Not offered IQAa ac ^ 

fee ?8.00 per^^qu^arte^ ^ "^^'^- ^--'^"-•tes. 4TLZYLTjo7:r- 

Phys. 105, 106 107 Ti, . ^^*"^^ 

quarters. Three 'ipnf ^'•^'"et'^al Mechanics (■6)_p«i7 w 
Math. 20. "' ^'-^^^''^^ ^ --k. Prerequisites, ^rhy3'47'"*^;' SP^n, 

Du *"^ 5A and 

Phys. 108. Optics fS)_Q,..- 

tures two laboratory UodsTwtr'pl!.' ^'^^^ *^''*^ «'-'•*- Three ,ee 
Phys 109 iL''' ^'■'" '" ^-rter. ""''""*^^' ^^^^ ^A and 5A M^; 

■ i^^atE™ lectures, two 

y lee $,8.00 per quarter. *"*' ^A and Math 20 

Phys. 111. Sound (5)~Wir,t^r. 

- s. *.r itrc sir-- --Sl'C%?s -s 

Phys. 112, 113 ,j4 ^®'" ^"arter. ^ ^^ ^nd 5A 

tures, one labor'atorv ^l^lT" ^^^'^'"^ (9)-Not offered 1044 ^s r,v. 
Math. 20. Laboratory £ $4 oV"' ^''^^^'1"'-*- ^ 4A and^/ '"• 

Phys. 115. Heat (,)!p '" '^"^^^^'•- ' '"^ "^^ 

two laboratory periods « t .^^^f^ted every third quarter Th , 

Phys. 119, 120, 121 H.vi. r 
45.) Two lectures n.o f '^•"^^uency Phenomena (9) m * ^ 

and 5A and Math on . \ ^^^'''-y Period a week P.pT^^°*. '''^"^^'J' 1944- 
M^th. 20. Laboratory fee $4.00 per quaver!'""'*''' ^'''^- '^ 

Phys. 201. 202 203 n ^"' G'-^duates 

' ''"^' '^''^- Dynamics r9)_TK,.„ > . 

Pi^ys. 20., ,07. P.3..ea, Op.es C^Lt! I'T"' ''''"'''^ 
Phys. 208, 209, 210. Th^rn, . ""'' ^ ^^^k' 

thermodynamics (6)— mnf • 

^o^— (jVot given 1944-45.) 



Phys. 211, 212, 213. Statistical Mechanics and the Kinetic Theory of Gases 

(g)_-(Not given, 1944-45.) 

Phys. 214, 215, 216. Quantum Mechanics (9)— (Not given, 1944-45.) 
Phys. 217, 218. Atomic Structure (4)— (Not given, 1944-45.) 
Phys. 219, 220. Molecular Spectra (4)— Two lectures a week. 

Phys. 221, 222, 223. X-rays and Crystal Structure (9)— (Not given, 

1944-45.) 

Phys. 225, 226, 227. Modern Physics (9) (Not given, 1944-45.) 

Phys. 224. Application of X-ray and Electron Diffraction Methods (4)— 
Winter, Spring. Two laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee $8.00 per 
quarter. 

Phys. 228, 229, 230. Seminar (1)— Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Phys. 250. Research — Credit according to work done. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Pol. Sci. 1. American National Government (3) 

A study of the organization and functions of the national government of 
the United States. 

Pol. Sci. 4. State and Local Government (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the organization and functions of state and local government 
in the United States, with special emphasis upon the government of 
Maryland. 

Pol. Sci. 7. Comparative Government (2)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A comparative study of the governments of Great Britain, France and 
Switzerland. 

Pol. Sci. 8. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 
A comparative study of the dictatorial governments of Europe, with 
special emphasis upon Italy, Germany, and the U. S. S. R. 

Pol. Sci. 9. Comparative Government (2) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of Latin American Governments with special emphasis on 
Argentina, Brazil and Chile. 

Pol. Sci. 10. Comparative Government (2)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of Far Eastern governments with special emphasis on China 
and Japan. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Pol. Sci. 54. Problems of World Politics (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 or 
consent of instructor. 



282 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



283 



, The course deals with governmental problems of an international charac- 
ter, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, propaganda, etc. Students 
are required to report on readings from current literature. 

Pol. Sci. 71. Political Parties and Public Opinion (3) — Prerequisite, Pol 
Sci. 1. 

A descriptive and critical examination of the party process in govern- 
ment; nominations and elections, party expenditures, political leadership, 
the management and conditioning of public opinion. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 102. International Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the principles governing international intercourse in time of 
peace and war, as illustrated in texts and cases. 

Pol. Sci. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 10 or 
consent of instructor. 

The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far 
East and their influence on world politics. 

Pol. Sci. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A comprehensive study of the legislative process, bicameralism, the com- 
mittee system and the lobby, with special emphasis upon the legislature 
of Maryland. The course includes a visit to Washington to observe Con- 
gress at work. 

Pol. Sci. 131. Constitutional Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American con- 
stitutional system. 

PoL Sci. 141. History of Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 
or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. 

Pol. Sci. 142. Recent Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 4 or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories of 
socialism, communism, fascism, etc. 

Pol. Sci. 144. American Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci 4 or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of the writings of the principal American Political theorists 
from the colonial period to the present. 

For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201, 202. Seminar in International Organization (2, 2) 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 



p 1 Sci 251. Bibliography of Political Science (2) . , , ,. 

onrse is intended to acquaint the student with the literature of the 
Jfo^Ss of poliS science and to instruct him in the use of govern- 
«ipnt documents. 

PoL Sci. 261. Research in Political Science (2. 6)-Credit according to 
work accomplished. 

Pol. Sci. 299. Thesis, (3, 6)— Arranged. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 
P.H. 1. Poultry Production (5)-Fall. Three lectures and two laboratories 

' Thtis a general course designed to acquaint the student with modern 

and brooding are discussed. 
P.H. 2. Poultry Management (4)-Winter. Three lectures and one labora- 

'Z Tdfof modern methods of pullet rearing, housing, y-ding Pasture 

.atagrment, broiler production 7;f^^"f J^t^f Toul^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
vention, management for egg production, and marketing oi pou y p 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

P H. 50. Poultry Biology (3)-Summer, Spring. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisites, P. H. 1, or equivalent. • 

The elementary anatomy of the fowl, selection for egg and meat produc- 
tion aniTorSed standards are studied. Judging teams for intercollegiate 
competitions are selected from members of this class. 

P. H. 51. Poultry Genetics (3)-Summer, Winter. Prerequisites, P. H. 1 or 

and quality are stressed. 
p. H. 52. Poultry Nutrition (3)-Fall. Two lectures and one laboratory 

^ Thfnutritive requirements of poultry and the nutrients which meet those 
requtmertsa^e presented. Feed cost of poultn. production is emphasized. 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 57. 

P.H. 56. Poultry Physiology (3)-Spring. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 1. „^^;on^r 

The physiology of development and incubation "^^^he ^b^^o^^^^^^^^ 
physiological pathology of the embryo in relation to hatchabihty, is pre 



284 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PSYCHOLOGY 



285 



sented. Physiology of growth and the influence of environmental factors on 
growth and development are considered. 

P. H. 58. Commercial Poultry Management (3) — Spring. Two lectures 

and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, ten hours of poultry husbandry, in- 
eluding P. H. 1, 2. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, pur- 
chase of supplies, management problems in baby chick, eggy broiler, and 
turkey production, foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, produc- 
tion and financial records. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

P. H. 104. Poultry Marketing Problems (3) — Fall. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. 

Live and dressed poultry grades, poultry marketing channels, relation of 
transportation and distribution to quality, methods and costs of marketing 
live and dressed poultry, dressing, drawing, eviscerating and preparing 
poultry for the table. 

P. H. 105. Egg Marketing Problems (3) — Winter. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. 

Exterior and interior egg quality factors, wholesale and retail grades of 
eggs, egg marketing channels, relation of transportation and distribution 
to quality, methods and costs of marketing eggs, candling and preparing 
eggs for the table. 

Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 

Preservation of Poultry Products, see Bacteriology, F. Tech. 108. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (3)— Fall. Three 
lectures and one laboratory a week. 

Relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole and its economic importance. 
Consumer prejudices and preferences, production, transportation, storage, 
and distribution problems are discussed. Trends in the industry, surpluses 
and their utilization, poultry by-products, and disease problems, are 
presented. (Staff) 

P. H. 108— Special Poultry Problems (1-2)— Fall, Winter, Spring. One or 
two lectures a week. 

For Senior poultry students. The student will be assigned special prob- 
lems in the field of poultry for individual study and report. 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, P. H. 51 
or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. 
Linkage, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in 



t inheritance of resistance to disease, and the influence of the 
''''"^^ on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 
" HoT Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3)-Spnng. Two lectures and one 

^- ''; ' V perfod a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 52 or equivalent 
laboratory perioa a considered intensively, especially 

Deficiency ^^^^iJ^^^^^^-L. Synthetic diets, metabolism 
^rfe'pSSy of diSSon, growth curves and their significance, and 
:-ScS in^owth and ^^^^^^^^^^ ,..„ ,._ 

^/- ntJSy ;" o1 rrerrretS:"! H^e or its equivalent.. 
,„d one 'f^'^^^j;^^^.^^^ i„ reproduction, especially with respect to egg 
The role of the «"f"'"% '" , ^ ^^^^^1 maturity, broodiness, molting, 

oviposition are studied. 

D u "Xli Seminar (1)— Fall, Winter, Spring. 

p. H. 204. seminar k / ,„™hers eraduate students, and 

Reports of current researches by staff members, graau 

guest speakers are presented. 
P H 205 Poultry Literature (l-4)-Fall, Winter, Sprmg. 

LfdC on -^^^-^^^z^i^^^j:^:!:^^^ 

required. Methods of analysis and presentation o 

^^"^^^' , c T^oil Winter Snring. Credit in accordance 

P.H. 206. Research— Summer, Fall, Winter, spring. 

with work done. ^onltrv mav be conducted under 

Practical and fundamental research ^f ^^^^^^^^^^^ ,,, the degrees 

the supervision of staff members toward the requirements 

of M. S. and Ph. D. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

mlnfln. a bureau ot vocational •'"', "f" tfaud ueraonal counseling. The 

P.,ch.A. P.,.1..1.8> «' Ali-'"'"' <"-■""• '°""""- °'"° 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3)-Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Open to second quarter freshmen. ...i^nlno-ist^ are 

\ ^ne„l in.r«l.e.io„ to ^'■;'^\^;^^Z°VST:^X:S::,Z 

at work. Review of experimental investigations oi 

phases of human behavior. 



286 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



lO^S.) '• ''''''''"''' '"' ^'^'^-'^ o^ Commerce (3)-(Not offe.a, 
Topics in applied psychology which rpl«f^ f^ ^- , 

propaganda. ' """MOCT, education, public opinion, .« 

pS'i. '*• •""""""''>' »' «"-- <3)-F.II, Spring. P„,c.,„., 

tlon. advertising, ,e,ling!ittlt TselS ''^'«"»"' ™"'* »' P-*- 

reSt t^K^T'-irgrref .-"Sic*'"*-'' '^■"""^' ''"»'"-• ■•»■ 
adS,:n,rt" "™" ""'•«"' »' «»»».'«y; typical methods o, 

. "'ate'L^rurXS'o'g^™*'' '-"""■ '^"O"'^"'. P-* 

*S™Tir Saif 'ijctiid "r '"?""*»•' "•' —'-I 

the growing personality. P'"»«-«k'l<l relationships, and problem, of 

rerSe,-kyrrr.X"e' rtL"?— i^r " ' ™- - 

The scientific methodoloffv untiprlvir,,, tu ^ j 
ences among people, including a basfc " „i . . "^ °^ Psychological diffcn- 
and interpretations. ^ understanding of statistical concepts 

r^^llXT^r^^ "' '"''^^"^»"- - P^^chCog, (3)_Winter. P.o- 

ef reirnll^Ll oT^S d^^atdt 7^ *^^ ^^^ ^ 
interpretation. ^ ^^ ^'''^ '" treating these results for 



PSYCHOLOGY 



287 



For Advanced Undergraduates 
psvch. 80. Educational Psychology (5) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

A study of basic psychological problems encountered in education. 
Measurements and significance of individual differences, learning, motiva- 
tion, emotions, personality. 

Psych. 90. Independent Study in Psychology (1-3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, 

Summer. 

Special reading and report assignments on an individualized basis. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Psych. 118. Psychology of Adolescence (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 18. 

Psychological aspects of development during the adolescent period with 
emphasis on mental, emotional, and physical problems. 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Market Research (3) — (Not offered, 
1944-45.) Prerequisite, Psych. 19. 

Use of methods of controlled observation in determining public reactions 
to merchandise, and in measuring the psychological influences at work in 
particular markets. 

Psych. 141. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3) — (Not offered, 
1944-45.) Prerequisite, Psych. 19. 

Experimental and statistical studies of psychological aspects of 
advertising. 

Psych. 147. Psychological Problems in Aviation (3) — (Not offered, 
1944-45.) Prerequisite, Psych. 29. 

Study of researches dealing with human response in conditions met 
(luring flight. 

Psych. 149. Legal Psychology (3) — (Not offered, 1944-45.) Prerequisite, 
Psych. 17. 

Interpretation of researches pertaining to accuracy of observation and of 
testimony, psychological aids in determination of guilt and treatment of 
the offender. 

Psych. 150. Advanced Social Psychology (3) — Fall. Prerequisite, Psych. 15. 

A systematic analysis of motivation, learning, and culture as related to 
the development of attitudes. 

Psych. 155. Psychology of Personality (3) — Winter, Spring. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 15, or permission of Instructor. 

A systematic survey of various approaches to the study of personality. 

Psych. 156. Pro-seminar in Advanced Personality (2) — Prerequisite, Psych. 
155, or permission of Instructor. 



288 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



l< 



f 



P-SSt, w.*""" '"'•"'■"" " ""M .. public „p,„i.„, ..„ 

orS;r„ oStr ' ■■""""■" "'-*■"■• P»",„,s,.., P.„, „ 

Psychological Droblpma ir> 4.u 

ness and industry .nl^Zll^^ZTA .1 T°""^^ ^" -''- "-i" 
techniques in employee selection and castficrtt'*'"" °' ^^^'^''^'^^'-^al 
>nterv,ew procedures, and in personnel ctunselini """'" '' "''""^•' 

ps"r..;:;;pt^rnr?itjL- :: '—^ ^^>-— -ere,.,, 

A continuation of Psvch i«n -^.u 
and maintaining personnel" effideTcv aTd" m"' T '""''"'^^ "^ '^^^^'^P'ng 
ratmg methods, motivation, etc. "'''"^'^' P'"*'^'^'"^ of training 

Psych. 165. Industrial Psycholoffv (^\ <i ■ 

Controlled observation appliedTo ^'^-f^,""^- ^''-equisite. Psych. 16. 

Pr^uction, including p"sy?hSgVa St rL^^f ^"^ ^" -''-''-> 
of work. ^ ^"ects of conditions and methods 

TwTltur'i, ottX:: ''^"""'"^^ .^^>-^^--- -ere,uisite. Psych, n. 

■ine nature occurrpnpp j1 
emph.™ o„ .;. .„„i„, ,;,»:, ZThiSt'S' '"'"'"■°"""' "" 

in tr,;:-? ™pZttt- £?r Vv--"™" "'-- - 

«XC »r"* "'""■""'"' ^"""^ «>-F.U, Wlnte. P„,,. 

Instruction and practice in * • 
emphasis on the Binet intellig" nSlest •' « I'l,"^' 7'^'='^°'*'^^^^' *««*«. with 
tests to educational, vocationraLl^c^f ^^Sa^e'^ '=""*^^'"""" ^' ^^^' 

.uSt? Psyth. nr""*' ^'•^^"**"»» <^>-(^ot Offered, 1944-45.) Prere- 
Psychological methods and result, fr. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



289 



psych. 179. Detection and Treatment of Defects in Reading (3) — (Not 
offered, 1944-45.) Permission of Instructor. 

A survey of the psychological problems involved in the discovery and 
treatment of reading defects at the college level. 

Psych. 180. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) — (Not offered, 1944-45.) 
prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. Systematic 
approach to advanced problems in educational psychology based upon 
experimental contributions. 

Psych. 190. Psychology of Learning (3) — Winter. Prerequisite, Psych. 29. 

A consideration of the principles of human learning, and their application 
to various problems: habits, skills, phobias, traits, etc., as they relate to 
education, business, and social relationships. 

Psych. 192. Psychology of Early Man (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, Psych. 15, 
or permission of Instructor. 

A study of cultural and anthropological origins and continuities in man 
from Pithecanthropus to the historic period; interpretation of the arti- 
facts and customs in the light of the mental processess involved in their 
evolution. Periodic observation trips to the Museum of National History 
in Washington. 

Psych. 194. History of Psychology (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, 9 hours of 
psychology. 

A survey of the historical antecedents of modem psychology with special 
reference to German, French, British and early American contributions to 
the formation of the science of psychology. 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology (2-3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer, 

Conduct of original research under the supervision of some member of 
the staff. Satisfactory completion of this project may lead to publication 
in one of the standard psychological journals. 

Psych. 199. Proseminar: Contemporary Problems in Psychology — (Not 
offered, 1944-45.) 

For Graduates 

Psych. 200. Research in Psychology (3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Psych. 240. Seminar in Current Psychotechnological Problems (3) — (Not 
offered, 1944-45.) 

An advanced course for students pursuing major graduate studies. A 
systematic analysis of recent contributions in selected psychotechnological 
fields. 



290 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



291 



Psych. 245. Advanced Psychological Problems in Market Research (3)^ 
(Not offered, 1944-45.) 

Graduate study of the specialized problems and techniques employed by 
the psychologist in market research. 

Psych. 257, 258. Seminar in Psychology of Morale in Wartime (3, 3)— Fall, 
Winter. 

A study of the problems arising in wartime conditions including reactions 
to privations, hostile attacks, family disruption, and war psychoses. 

Psych. 260. Seminar in Personnel Psychology (2) — Spring. 

Psych. 275, 276, 277, 278. Participation in Testing Clinic (2-4)— Fall, 

Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Actual practice in the administration of tests of aptitude, interest, and 
achievement, and interpretation of test data in the course of routine 
operation of the testing bureau. 

Psych. 272. Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3) — (Not 
offered, 1944-45.) 

Methods for evaluating criteria and for the analysis and combination of 
test and predictor items. 

Psych. 274. Field Work in Clinical Psychology of the Abnormal (3-5)— 
Spring. 

Supervised training in the field of clinical psychology and in testing of 
the abnormal person. Field work will be done at St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
or other authorized institutions. Enrollment limited. 

Psych. 279. Occupational Psychology (3)— (Not offered, 1944-45.) 

Experimental development and use of the vocational counseling inter- 
view, aptitude tests, and related techniques for the occupational orientation 
of youth. 

Psych. 280. Seminar in Educational Psychology (3) — (Not offered, 1944- 
45.) 

Psych. 285. Seminar in Clinical Psychology for Teachers (3) — Not offered, 
1944-45.) 

A systematic consideration of a clinical procedure in treating student 
problems of the teacher. 

Psych. 290. Problems in Experimental Design in Psychology (2) — Spring. 

Application of advanced research techniques to specific fields in 
psychology with practice in their use. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION c^.^uates 

^^ For AdTanced Undergraduates a prerequisite, 

p A. 110. Principles of Public Administration (3)-W.nter. 

/ C/.4 A and Econ. 33. . ., TTnited States with 

''I functional study of public admu.^^-^^ ^V^ip^ of organisation 
• 1 «rr,nhasis upon the application of the p J ^ government, 
special «""?***f',^ administration of the various divisions oi g 
and operation in the admin (3)-Spring. Prerequisite. P. A. 

p. A. Ill- Public Personnel Administration ».»; 

110 and Econ. 160. j ^ gt^tes with particular 

'a study of civil ---/;;trtL pel onnel agency, the classification 
reference to the orga-a^^J oi^ej ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^,,, of 
and compensation plans, tntj 
governmental personnel ^ ^^^^_^^^ prerequisite, 

P. A. 114. Public Budgeting W K^^ 
u A. 22 and Econ. 33. United States, including 

\^-study of ^^f^ZSZl:^^:^' Se settlement of claims. 
systems of financia ^°"*^?V^freporting of financial operations, 
centralized purchasing and the report g ,^,,, b. A. 124. 

P. A. 124. Governmental Accounting C*>-J'^^^^^^^^^^ ^ Jti.ns of govern- 
The content of this course -!«; ^^^^^T^ generally applicable to aU 
„,ental accounting. It '^^^''^f^.J^^iTlnd a basic procedure adaptable 
forms and types of ^"^^nul^ternmental accounting as a distinct 
to all governments. It ^^^\^^,^\y^^rn, talcing full account of the 
field and develops and P-ent« ^^ l^^^,,, carried on by government 
conditions governing the -^---^ ^ (3)_Spring. Prerequisite. 

P. A. 126. Government and Social 
Pol'. Sci. 4, Econ. 33. Security Act with special emphasis 

An analysis of the Federal Social Jcujy deficiencies. Attention 

upon the background, P^P-'^^^.V^^^urneeS relief agencies and policies, 

^Tt:rertsTE^rr =- -^ - - ''^'- '' ^^°^" ' 

TA^r::!-^ --ie polices and^Helations C4>-rall. Pre- 

.ititr^c^. 33 or 3^-/--J^\rb:re nomic, social and political 
This course surveys and ^nalV-es the basic^^^^.^^^.^^ ^^ ^^^.^ ^^^^^^,, 

factors that influence ^o-— ^^^^p .ith other nations. 

policies and practi^s in th. ^^^^^^^^ ^^^_^^^^^^ ,^_ 

i> A 1^7 Economic rianmug «" 
q^t, Son. 33 or 37. Econ. l^^-—-^^'- economic planning in the 
• An analysis of the theory and P^^'^^^^^j^^^tigation of the relation of 
united States ^-^^<^^i:ZT:^r^c^Vro^^^ras and the stabilization of 
economic planning to postwdi 
economic enterprise. 



292 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SECRETARIAL TRAINING 



293 



l9 



I 



r 



I > 

■ I 

* I 

' if 



It 



P. A. 140. Public Finance and Taxation (4) — Fall. Prerequisite, Econ 33 
or 37. 

A study of government finance and fiscal policy which deals with the 
nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, the tax system, and 
budgeting. Special emphasis on the role of fiscal policy in relation to 
business enterprise. 

P. A. 141. International Finance and Exchange (4) — Spring. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 140, Econ. 141 recommended. 

This course considers the theory and practice of international finance and 
exchange. The increased importance of public authority in foreign trade, 
international policies, and finance is given due emphasis. 

P. A. 161. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (4) — Winter. 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160. B. A. 160 recommended. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor conditions. 
State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, working 
conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial disputes, 
collective bargaining, and economic security. 

P. A. 170. Transportation I, Regulation of Transportation Services (4)— 
Fall. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

This course is designed for students of Transportation, Public Adminis- 
tration, and General Business. It covers the world practices in the regula- 
tion and control of transportation facilities. 

P. A. 180. Government and Business (4) — Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Econ. 
33 or 37. Senior standing. 

The reasons for and the methods of avoidance, escape, and abuse of 
competition as a regulating force in business. Social control as a substitute 
for, or as a modification of, preservation of competition. Law as an instru- 
ment of social control through administrative law and tribunals. The con- 
stitutional aspects of social control. 

P. A. 184. Public Utilities (4) — Spring. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37 and 
senior standing. 

This course comprises an analysis of the economic, social, and political 
status of the public utility industry. The following topics are among those 
studied during the semester, regulation and management with attention 
given to the economic conditions of production and sale of utility services, 
legal and social nature, valuation, depreciation, rate of return,, ratemaking, 
financing and special problems. 

For Graduates 

P. A. 201. Seminar in International Organization (3) — Arranged. 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organi- 
zations. 



« vi o ^f Public Administration (3)— Arranged. 

d state administration. 

, r i> ,KH/. Ppr«5onnel Administration (3) 

P.I m R.s..~h i. G,«™»»t., r^^ Po«.= and P»«...= «)- 

Atrenged. „idance of special probl.m. in fhe 

Individual research under faculty gu 

.., ., n. «—---_. .,.„,n.«P^A„a.^. 

Tr:«. S™,.n„ -n P«- miUU« CS>-P..«,»>.,«. P. A- - »- 

""sC'nd f^ in p.*"''' P""=™ °' '°™= °** "'^"'"'"*"' 
and regulation. 
P. A. 299. Thesis (3-6 hour8)-Arranged. 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING no Credit Fall, Winter, Spring 

^^1£^^^ :^Lir^?iaa:r aetral. . t.e .e o. 
the "touch" system. ^.^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

S.T. 10, 11. Advanced Typewntmg I^ II ^^'Z g t. 2 or consent of 
Summer. Three laboratory hours a week. Prereq 
instructor. Laboratory fee ?5.00. . ^i,,..-™ business forms, rough 

, « . • 1 « T TT TTT CO')— Fall, Winter, bprmg. 
.S.T. 12, 13, 14. ^^^^i:^;Zr^:^^^leSniXrin; 1945.) 
(Second sequence for the school year win dictation. 

Theory of Gregg Shorthand: Emphasis placed upon reading 

„ .^h tViis seouence unless the student has had 

•S. T. 1. 2. 10 must be taken <=oncurren«y w.th th» se, ^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^.ti^factory com- 
the eanivalent. Credit will be withheld tor S. T. 
pletion of S. T. 14. 



294 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SOCIOLOGY 



295 



tS.T. 16, 17, 18. Advanced Shorthand I, II, III (3, 3, 3)— Fall, Winter 
Spring. Prerequisite, S. T. 10 and 14 and/or consent of instructor. (Second 
sequence for the school year will begin in Spring, 1945.) 

Advanced principles and phrases of. shorthand; dictation covering 
vocabularies of representative businesses; development of skill in trans- 
cription. 

S. T. 20. Interpretation of Business Records (3) — Fall, Spring. Open to 
students having had no previous accounting courses in college. No credit 
granted to accounting majors. 

Particular attention is given to the structure and methods of interpreting 
financial statements. 

S.T. 111. Office Training (3) — Winter, Summer. Six laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, S. T. 16 or consent of instructor. Laboratory 
fee $5.00. 

This course is designed to give training in the use of modern office 
devices, and in the standard methods of filing. 

S. T. 118. Business Communications (4) — Spring. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Secretarial training not a prerequisite. 

The systems of communications used in modern business; techniques of 
communication forms, administrative memoranda, order, bulletin, digest, 
reports; communication problems in production, marketing, personnel 
administration, and public relations. 

S.T. 119. Conference and Court Reporting (5) — Winter, Summer. Prere- 
quisite, S. T. 18 or qualifying examination. 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing reporting skills and upon 
medical, legal, business, and governmental terms. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Contemporary Social Problems (3) — Fall, Spring. 

This course attempts to develop a method of thinking about modern 
societies. Through background and analysis it offers an orientation to 
current social issues; isolates some major tendencies in present-day social 
structure; and traces their import for types of human nature and for 
several problems faced by democratic societies in crises and during periods 
of reorganization. 

Soc. 3. Introduction to Sociology (3) — Fall, Spring. Open to freshmen 
with consent of instructor. 



t Students who have taken shorthand in high school may register for the appropriate 
course in college shorthand for which they demonstrate satisfactory proficiency. This 
proficiency will be determined by the instructor prior to registration. Credit will be given 
only for the work done in residence. 



H nf basic social processes; characteristics of 
. analysis of society and of basic sociai p culture in the 

m comparative Sociology C3)-Wint^^«^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^. 
comparative analysis ^{^^'^^^^^^S ^eoyles of the south seas 
^^ 5Sn: Llia":TarL':r Ld southeast Asia. Significance of 
£ngs for the general study of man. 

Courses Primarily for Juniors and Seniors 

o Ki n.« of Social Organization (3)- (Not offered, 
Soc 51 Post-War Problems of bociai urg 

1944-45.) prerequisite, consent of ins^^^^^^^^^^ ^^.^^^.^^^ ^^^^.^^^ 

A study of ^'•g-^f f °":i,SoLTikely to prevail at the close of the 
successful adjustment to conditions likeiy 

Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. ^articular reference to the 

The family in modern western society, with particular 
4?o,v.iiv War and the family. 

sent of instructor. , ^ ^ . ,;,,ti^tical and case study approaches 

. .. i^ qnrial Work (3)-Fall. Prerequisite, consent oi 
Soc. 81. Introduction to Social woxk v / 

instructor. • i ,,,p work and the administration of 

A general introduction to social case work ana 
public and private welfare agencies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

•r. *• r^^ Summer Winter. Prerequisite, Soc. 6 
Soc. 101. Social Stratification (3)-Summei, 

or consent of instructor. 



o 
O 



296 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SOCIOLOGY 



297 



i 



Deals with classes, status groups, caste systems, slavery, various types 
of elites, and vertical mobility. Fashion and style. A theory of stratifica- 
tion, social movements, symbol manipulations, and hierarchies of power 
and their import for personal and official roles, and for the distribution 
of prestige. 

Soc. 103. Rural Sociology (3) — Summer. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
The structure and functions of rural communities. 

Soc. 104. Urban Sociology (3) — Winter. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the social ecology of the city; the planning and control of 
urban development. 

Soc. 105. Population Problems (3) — Summer, Fall. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 
or consent of instructor. 

Population, composition and growth in the United States and Canada. 
Trends in fertility and mortality, migration, qualitative population problems. 

Soc. 106. Regional Sociology (3) — ^Winter. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent 
of instructor. 

The meaning and implications of regionalism; types of regions in the 
United States: metropolitan, cultural, and administrative regions. Regional 
planning. 

Soc. 107. Ethnic Minority Groups (3) — Summer. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or 
consent of instructor. 

Basic processes in the relations of ethnic groups. Immigrant groups and 
the Negro in the United States. Ethnic minorities in Europe and the 
problems they present. A discussion of proposals for the solution of these 
problems in the light of past experiences and desiderata for the future. 

Soc. 108. World Population Problems (3) — Winter. Prerequisite, Soc. 105 
or consent of instructor. 

Population, distribution, growth and migration in Europe and Africa. 
Cultural, ethnic and political aspects. 

Soc. 109. World Survey of Rural Organization (3)— (Not offered, 1944-45.) 
Prerequisite, Soc. 103 or consent of instructor. 

A comparative study of rural social organization in selected contemporary 
cultures of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. 

Soc. 110. Sociology of the Professions (3) — Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1 or 3 or consent of instructor. 

Structure and function of divisions of labor; their relations to tech- 
nology; shifting occupational compositions of modern industrial societies; 
the positions of selected professions in the social, economic, and political 
orders; the concept of career; the distribution of skills in American society. 



£, pro..— a=s.ci..io„s »a e,^c ^ ^ 

Soc 112. Sociology of Communication (3)-SumTner, win 
soc. 1 or 3 or consent of instructor. ^^^^_ 

A study of channels of ««— icat-n, the P -o« ^ ^^^^,3 ,p,„ 

-rnSTnrirat ^^ d^l^tJ^^Z 

and world communication centers. ,aAAA<^\Vre- 

Soe 120. community Disorganization (3)-(Not offered, 1944-45.) Pre 
requisite, Soc. 52 or consent of instructor. 

S from internal deterioration or inadequacy. 

Soc 121. Community Welfare Planning (S)-(Not offered, 1944-45.) Pre 
requisite Soc. 120 or consent of instructor .^^^ ,„ ,„pi„g 

means of implementing such programs. ' 

SOC 123. Public Welfare Services (3)-(Not offered, 1944-45.) Prere 

,uisite, soc. 71 and 81, or consent ':';^^^^\^^, ,^ ,,,,,,, ,tate. 
A comprehensive study of the social services maintained by 

and oc"f governments in the united states. 

Soc 124. Public Welfare Administration (3)-(Not offered, 1944-45.) 
prerequisite SOC. 123 or consent of i^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ 

.etaSX^entlt sttteteo^ and cities of -^ ^^^^ 

c w rQ^ TTnil Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
<4ft^ 12^ Sociology of War (3)— rail, rrerequis , 

Mnology .nd ™r. The moton ».»pl ot tol.l ««. 

„ consent of instrurtor. ^^ ^^^ 

..Xfo/?.S"ip':ns.-r :L% I.«M»«. P— "^ 

Tm. C.„..i» P-o.-™ of C.„. con.,.. «>_F.». P..".^.'te, 

Soc. 72 or consent of instructor. 






% 



298 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SOCIOLOGY 



299 



This course is designed to acquaint students with programs for preventing 
crime and delinquency through mobilization of the community's own 
resources. City, small town, and rural situations are analyzed. Special 
attention is given to problems in Maryland. 

Soc. 128. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents (3)^ 
Spring. Prerequisite, Soc. 72 or consent of instructor. 

An intensive study of the functions and organization of penal and 
correctional institutions. 

Soc. 130. Recent Social Thought (3) — Fall, Spring. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 
or 3 or consent of instructor. 

A general survey and critical study of leading schools of sociological 
thought. 

Soc. 135. Sociology of Law (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent 
of instructor. _ 

Law as a form of social control. Interrelation between legal and other 
conduct norms as to their content, sanctions, and methods of securing con- 
formity. Law as an integral part of the culture of the group. Factors and 
processes operative in the formation of legal norms. Legal norms as 
determinants of human behavior. 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion (3) — Spring. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent 
of instructor. 

Varieties and sources of religious experience. Religious institutions and 
the role of religion in social life. y 

Soc. 140. Design of Investigation in Sociology (3) — Fall.' Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

A critical study of the rationale, both implicit and explicit, underlying 
the concepts, procedure, and methods employed by a number of oustanding 
sociological investigations. 

Soc. 141. Introduction to Social Research and Statistics (3) — Summer, 
Spring. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

Quantification and interpretation of statistical materials in sociological 
literature. Techniques of computing such measures as central tendency, 
dispersion, correlation, significant differences. Sampling theory, graphic 
presentation, and factor analysis. 

Soc. 142. Statistical Problems in Social Analysis (3) — Fall. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

Exercises in the application and interpretation of more advanced statis- 
tical techniques in sociological investigation. 

Soc. 150. Field Practice in Social Work (3)— (Not offered, 1944-45.) Prere- 
quisite, Soc. 81 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available 
opportunities. 



ijidividual student. 

For Graduates 
,00 Seminar in Methodology (3)-Fall, Spring. 

'"; dv' of lldamental methodological problems in sociology. 

A study ot lunudiu offered, 1944-45.) 

Soc 201. Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3)-(Not 

soc. 202. Sociological Theory (3)--Fall ^^^^.^^^ ^^^^^.^^^ 

Tunnies. Lasswell, Durkheim, and G. H. Mead. 
Soc. 203. Sociology of Knowledge C3)--Wmter. ^^^^^^ ^^ 

social bases of ^<^-oXo,i.sZl^^^^2 Bia and obiectivity. Posi- 
language, mind -^Xlirid iL-V^^^^^^^ periodicals and therr 
tions of intellectual technical, ana constraint and freedom of 

publics. Thought --^-'^^^;^^'^:':::^::, ^^^^n. studies of selected 
thought. The place of science in we 

organization of basic social institutions. ^ ,aAAA<^^ 

selected communities. 
soc. 206. Comparative Sociology <«-»;• ^^ personality in 

.n-ri:: st.="r i:sr..is . ».„.. ««. 

oontempoiary Americn society. ,,<,,,«) 

r In.™ co„p.»«™ -* o. ™.a, - — ■« ;^ „„,,, 

s... m. sp~« p"'^™-';:';* ■:: tK,r.. p.p..at..n. 

An intensive study Of seiecteu pi a ^QAAA^\ 

A comparative analysis of regional trends in 
various foreign countries. Q„,.inp 

Soc. 215. seminar in Sociology of the ^^,^^-^^1^-;^^^ ,, Soc. 

Advanced and more detailed '^^^-'^^J^^ "'^ ^^^^^^^^ materials. 

101 and 110 with emphasis upon theoretical relevance, 
and designs of research projects. 



>r- 



300 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Soc. 216. Sociology of the Family (3) — Summer. 

A study of selected recent researches in the sociology of the family. 

Soc. 217. Seminar in the Sociology of Law (3) — Spring. 

An intensive study of factors and processes operative in the formation 
of law. 

Soc. 218. Sociological Problems of Leadership (3) — (Not offered, 1944-45.) 
An analysis of the leader-follower relationship. 

Soc. 221. Advanced Criminology (3)— Fall. 

An intensive study of selected problems in criminological research. 

Soc. 222. Recent Criminological Theories (3) — Winter. 

A survey of recent developments in the field of theoretical criminology, 
with a view to providing a deeper insight into the complex of problems 
facing the modern criminologist. 

Soc. 223. Juvenile Delinquency (3) — Spring. 

Theories of juvenile delinquency. Methods of treatment of juvenile 
delinquents with particular reference to the United States. An intensive 
study will be undertaken of one or more selected problems in the field. 

Soc. 250. Research in Sociology (credit apportioned to work accomplished) 
— Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 
compiled data. 

SPEECH 

Speech 1, 2. Public Speaking (4) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Required 
of all students. Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches. 

Speech Clinic — No credit — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Remedial work in minor speech defect. Hours arranged. 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of Speech (3) — Fall. 
Study in the bases and mechanics of speech. 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction (3) — Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Required 
of students in the College of Education. 

Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation and phonation. 

Speech 5, 6. Advanced Public Speaking (2, 2) — Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1-2. Special emphasis is placed upon 
the speaking situations the students will face in their respective vocations. 



301 
SPEECH 

,«.* 7. 0». T..^n.a. En.Us. «.-F.U, Wl.U. Spri... U^U4 .o 

^nthin student's own experience. 

H . Advanced Oral Technical English (2)-Fall, Spnng 
irjted to ir engineering students. Special speech projects. Wor. 
not confined to classroom. 

Speech 10. Group Discussion C2)--Fall. ^.,,,3,ion, and their 

. . A.r nf the principles, methods, and types oi ai 
A study of the prm i' . ' nontemnorary problems, 

application in the discussion of contempora y p 

u 11 19 Debate (2, 2)- (Not offered, 1944-45.) 
Speech 11, 12. Debate k^. ^j ^^^ivsis evidence, reasoning, 

speech. . 

in the art of reading. ' , 

o. ft r, 3W(Not given. 1944-45.) Two lectures and 

Speech 14, 15. Stagecraft (3, 3)-lJN0i g 

one laboratory period a week. 
«;taffe design and lighting. 

The W=p».nt, s»p., ...a ,.«»„. of ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

„ K ,«. IM S«««h Compositloi. (6)-(Not given, 1944-46.) 

public address. 

speech 105. Speech Pathology (^>-^^^;;^ ^^^^„^ ,p,,,, .^.orders. 

The causes, nature, symptoms, and treatment 



302 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Speech 106. Speech Clinic (3)_Wint*,r P 
A course dealing with the vl Prerequisite. Speech 105. 

in the clinic. ' "'*'' '""^ ^^^^ -^^ods of correction plus actual wo., 

sX^"- ^---- «- '—ion C3)-Sprin. Prerequisite 
Eniphasis upon the longer reading. Program planning. 
Speech 108. Teacher Problems in Speech «) ^ 

Kver.-day speech problems that JZl^LZZ' "'' '''''''' ""'^• 

^TJt iTeSi^seatr '''~'''- ^^^^^ ^ -^^ -Jors. 
VETERINARY SCIENCE 
V S 1„, _.^" ^'"""' Undergraduates and Graduates 

to physiological activities. '^"'""^^^^^^^ ^^^mals; relationship of structure 

V.S. 102. Animal Hygiene Ci^ ttoIt o 
Nature nf ^i ^5;— Fall, Summer. 

■*.rr.lr"^ '""""'• -""on .M c.».„, .„„,„ ,„.... 



ZOOLOGY 



303 



For Graduates 

Laboratory and field work h^r o • 

worK by assignment. 



Studies of practical disease phases. 



ZOOLOGY 

Zool. 1. General Zoology (5) — Fall, Winter, Summer. Three lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. 

This course, which is cultural and practical in its aim, deals with the 
basic principles of animal life. Typical invertebrates and a mammalian 
form are studied. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 2, 3. Fundamentals of Zoology (10)— Fall and Winter; Spring and 
Summer. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classification, and life history of repre- 
sentative animals. During the first quarter, emphasis is placed on inverte- 
brate forms and during the second quarter upon vertebrate forms including 
the frog. 

This course satisfies the freshman premedical requirements in general 
biology. Freshmen who intend to choose zoology as a major should register 
for this course. Either quarter may be taken first. Laboratory fee, $5.00 
per quarter. 

Zool. 4. Introductory Zoology (3) — Spring. Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

A course for students desiring a general knowledge of the principles 
underlying the growth, development, and behavior of animals, including 
man. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Zool. 5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (5) — Fall, Spring. Three 
lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, one course of zoology. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. Required of students whose major is zoology, and of premedical 
students. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 6. Economic Zoology (3) — Winter. Three lectures. Prerequisite, one 
course in Zoology. 

The content of this course centers around the problems of preservation, 
conservation, control, and development of economic wild life, with special 
reference to Maryland. The lectures are supplemented by assigned readings 
and reports. 

Zool. 7. Field Zoology (3) — Spring. Prerequisites, one course in Zoology 
and one in Botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis on the higher 
invertebrates and certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, environment, 
and modes of living. 

Intended for teachers of Biology, and also for those who have a special 
interest in nature study and outdoor life • 



304 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



'0 



This course consists in ^ ^ Zoology. ^< 

tr '°""*"' ^"'"''- ^°*«^'^*i:'s »" '"" ""•"»*■■» .. 

The preparation of aniTnQi <-• 
tory fee, $5.00. '"""^' ^'^^^^ ^o^ microscopical examination. Labo • 

Spi and SumtrThtlrtLeran?f "'rY ^^»>-^«" --^ Winte. 
Prerequisite, one course in 7, ° '^^'"'^tories a week. '' 

Physical Education and of ^^^^^ ""'^""■"'^ "^^ «t"dents whose m«- • 
biolocv Fifi,^ ^^ ^'^^se preparine- fn f^o u ^^ose major is 

oiogy. Either quarter may be taken first ^"'^""^^ ^^^^"^e or 

^or students who dP^iVo « 

2o«l. 16. Hum., Ph„i„i„„ ,,, „ ' • ''■™ f" <l»«H.r. 

An elementary coursp in r^i, • , 

and t laboratoHe:*: we'KS.utiT'"^"'^^' «"™- ^''-e lectures 
Of ^udents Whose ma^'or is ^ZZro^ ZlZ::^ I^ ^T^' ^^ 

The development of the chi^V , *u P'^^'"^**'"*' students, 
mammalian embz^olo^^. LaboSo^ Z, Z'^o! *'^ '^"^* "^^^ -"^ -H, 

Zool 53 Ph . , ^"' A^^^r^ced Undergraduates 

^nysical Education. "^ '""^^ responses m exercise; and their 

Zool. 55. Development of tK^ xx 
a week. ^ *^^ Human Body r2) 9t.>.,- 

^ ^ C^^-Spring. Two lectures 

..«.„ .".u, — ' "- «>-p.... w,„.„, ,„,„, „, 3_^^ ^^^ 



ZOOLOGY 



305 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Zool. 101. Mammalian Anatomy (3) — Spring. Three laboratories a week. 
Registration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. Recommended for premedical students, and those whose major 
is zoology. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. By special permis- 
sion of the instructor, a vertebrate other than the cat may be used for 
study. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 102, 103. General Animal Physiology (8)— Fall and Winter; Spring 
and Summer. 

Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in vertebrate 
anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of instructor must 
be obtained before registration. Either quarter may be taken first. Both 
quarters must be completed before credit is granted. 

The first quarter work deals with the fundamentals of cellular and 
general physiology. The second quarter is devoted to an application of 
these principles to the higher animals. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each quarter. 

Zool. 104. Genetics (3) — Fall, Winter. Three lectures a week. 

Required of students intending to take advance courses in plant and 
animal breeding, and also of zoology majors. 

Zool. 105. Aquiculture (3) — Summer, Fall. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

The course deals with the practices employed in rearing aquatic animals 
and the properties of natural waters which render them suitable for 
environmental purposes. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology (3) — Fall, Spring. One lecture and two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

A microscopical study of tissues and organs selected from representative 
vertebrates, but with particular reference to the mammal. Laboratory 
fee $5.00. 

Zool. 120. Advanced Genetics (3) — Winter. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

A consideration of salivary chromosomes, the nature of the gene, 
chromosome irregularities, polyploidy, and mutations. Breeding experiments 
with Drosophila and small mammals will be conducted. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3) — Summer, Spring. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Biological, 
physical, and chemical factors of the environment which affect the growth, 
behavior, habits and distribution of animals are stressed in lecture and 
laboratory. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 



306 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

For Graduates 



Zool. 200. Marine Z„o,„,, (5) p r" 
« --k. °^>' C5)-Fal,. Three lectures and two laborato • 

feXir '"^ '''' -^- -i-, I,-.e Of the . . 

' ^^•''°- °^ ^^^ ^'e^^^ phyla. Laborato • 

^aboTa' io?:; a^::^:-^^- ^"-- <«)-Wlnter. Three lectures and .^ 
A detailed study of th. . ° 

animal tissues, with snec fi^ "norphology and activity of cell, 
includes the prenaLff ! ^^^^^ence to the vertebratef t I ^''""Posing 
tory fee, ,,.0^^^''''^'' ^^ «-- ^or -icrosc^ptll^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Zool. 203. Advanced FmK , ^ "^^^ 

laboratories a week ^""^^"'"^^ (5)-Spring. Three lectures and . 

Mechanics of fertiIi..K **" 

tributions in the fioM i'"" ^"^^ growth. A review nf fu • 

the field of experimental embrvoll r *''^ '"Portant con- 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Phv • . "'"^°^"«^- laboratory fee, $50! 

twojaboratories a weelc. '^"^-'"^^ ^5)-Winter. Three lectures a! 

I^abo;?^-;ieXr-' -^ -"-^^ P^-^o.^ as found in animal lif 

a tt.^"^- «^''-''^'"- (^)-Pal,. Three lectures and t , 
A St d f laboratories 

-n££»^=^^^ ^ch determi. 

-Terence to the ChesapTaLX" reS^ar T^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^Zl 
Zool- 206. Research fCreW. , u ^^'"'''^t^'-y fee. $5.00. "^ "" 

Summer. Laboratory fee $5 Jm ^^^ arranged.)_FaIl, Winter <?n.- 
7„„i o«, ^ ^^ ^^'^h quarter. '^' Spring and 

Zool. 207. Zoological Q„ . 



SECTION IV 
Resident Instruction at Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean 

Katharine Toomey, Administrative Assistant 

The Faculty Council 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., A.B., M.S. 

Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., D. Sc. 
Building 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occu- 
pied by the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is 
ideally arranged for efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large 
lecture rooms, classrooms, a library and reading room, science laboratories, 
technic laboratories, clinic rooms, and locker rooms. It is furnished with 
new equipment throughout. 

Library 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the best equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in 
the medical sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. 

Requirements for Admission to the School of Dentistry 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having success- 
fully completed two years of work in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high-school course. No 
applicant will be considered who has not completed all requirements for 
advancement to the junior year in the arts and sciences college from 
which he applies. His scholastic attainments shall be of such quality as 
to ensure a high quality of achievement in the dental course. 

307 



308 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Fees and Expenses 

A complete schedule of all f.. 

otudents resistert^f^ * 

admission. ^'^ ^"^"^^«t themselves with th! "* ^""'^ ^^^^ 

with the requirements for 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



309 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean, 

Gertrude M. Anderton, Secretary to Dean. 

The School of Law is a member of the Association of American Law 
Schools and is on the list of approved schools of the Section on Legal 
Education of the American Bar Association. 

Building 

The Law School Building is located at the corner of Redwood and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore. In addition to providing classrooms and offices for the 
Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room, students'- 
lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter containing a col- 
lection of over 18,000 carefully selected text-books, English and American 
reports, leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. 

Organization 

The School has two divisions, the Day School and the Evening School. 
The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the standards of work 
and graduation requirements are the same. The normal Day School course 
covers a period of three years of thirty weeks each, exclusive of holidays. 
The class sessions are held during the day, chiefly in the morning hours. 
The normal Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty- 
four weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6:30 to 9:40 
p.m. This plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation 
by the student. 

Accelerated Program 

During the War emergency, the Law School will operate on a three 
semester basis, with a summer term added to the regular school year. The 
normal period required for completion of the course in either the Day 
School or the Evening School may be shortened by as much as one year 
through attendance during two summer semesters, but such acceleration is 
optional. Entering students may enroll at the beginning of any semester. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are 
required to produce evidence of the completion of at least one-half the work 
acceptable for a Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year 
period of study by the State University of the State in which the pre-law 
work is taken or other standard college or university in such State. Not 
more than ten per cent of the credit presented for admission may include 
credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 



I 



310 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



without intellectual contenf n^ i . 

institution attended *^' ^^^''^^^ required for grlduat^on t "' 

Combined Program<i nf «♦. a , 

of Arts of Bachelor Tf f ^ ^*'"'''"S *" *»•« Degree of R» m 
Tk TT *'*^'°'^ »f Science and Baclielor „f r ^^'helor 

The University off«,-= ,. • "•'^neior of Laws 

awarded upon the c,„.r J f Science. The degree of ^\ i ^^""^^ ^f 

«» in .h.'schr.rsr"' '»**'» ■>' «.» s ;^^S',« ^2,1 

further Information 

see tL^CdL'^itetorof\t*'"^'i'''/'"'' <=""'<="lun>, or other inf • 

greets, Baltimore-1, Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 311 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Robert U. Patterson, Dean 

History 

The school of Medicine of the University of Maryland, organized in 1807, 
is one of the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United States. In the 
school building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded 
one of the first medical libraries and the first medical college library in the 
United States. 

Clinical Facilities 

The original University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest 
institution for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in Sep- 
tember, 1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye patients. 

Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which thousands of patients annually 
are treated. _ 

Advice to Pre- Medical Students 

Students registered in the Pre-Medical Curriculum should secure a copy 
of the latest catalog of the School of Medicine early in their first year 
in college in order to acquaint themselves with the requirements for 
admission. 

Applications for admission should be submitted well in advance of the 
date when the student desires to enter the School of Medicine, and will be 
accepted by the Committee on Admissions any time after the beginning of 
the academic year just preceding the academic year in which the student 
expects to enter. Selections for the Freshman Class are usually completed 
about six months in advance of the date of actual enrollment. 

Accelerated Program 

In cooperation with the National war effort, the medical course of the 
School of Medicine at the present time consists of four full academic sessions 
completed in three calendar years. This practice will be followed until 
further notice. 

The minimum requirements at the present time are two academic years 
(60 semester or 90 quarter hours) of credits exclusive of physical education 
and military science, acquired at or acceptable to an approved college of 
arts and sciences. These requirements include minimum credits in basic 
subjects. 

For Further Information 

For details concerning requirements of the School of Medicine write to 
the Committee of Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 



312 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OP NURSING 

The „,„ Uii,v«„|.„ „, „ , ^'"« 

*^rograms Offered Phases of nursing. 

The School of Nursino- nff 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 313 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. DuMez, Dean 

Miss B. Olive Cole, Secretary of Faculty 

Faculty Council 

A. G. DuMez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Sc.D. 

Walter H. Hartung, B.A., Ph.D. 
Clifford W. Chapman, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D. 
J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 
Thomas C. Grubb, A.B., Ph.D. 

A. W. Richeson, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 

History 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy. The latter was organized in 1841, and operated as an inde- 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 
professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Mary- 
land. It became a department of the present University when the old 
University of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College 
in 1920. 

Location 

The School of Pharmacy is located at 32 South Greene Street, in close 
proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry. 

Recognition 

This school is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education and holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The school is registered in the New York Department of 
Education, and its diploma is recognized in all states. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those prescribed by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy. They are the same as the requirements for admis- 
sion to the College of Arts and Sciences. (See page 71.) Applications for 
admission must be approved, not only by the Director of Admissions, but 
also by the Committee on Admissions of the Faculty Council of the School 
of Pharmacy. 

Admission With Advanced Standing 

A student who presents credit for work done in a school of pharmacy 
accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education will re- 



I. 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

^^S^t^^Se:^:':^^^^' ^" ^-^^ -^^ -tent to t. 
advanced standing. P-vided he presl s a^ffi^'r^ ^"' "^ ^'J-itteViS 
and a proper certificate of honor' birdiLTsslf"' '^^"^"^'^^ «^ ^^ C 

in. e:?Lt^rh:;t:trn,T:,^"'^^ -^" ^« ^-n to a student n 
e.ua. in value to tLT o^S^t^ ^^^^ aea^^ltS^ 

tionarr.Sre-:-'^-* '" ^^^''^ -- -- -isf. the preH^ina.. eaue. 

Special Students 

Applicants who are at Ipncf + 
completed the usual preparatoryl'^r^"' ""T' '' '^'' ^"^ who have not 
they seem fitted to take Specfalstud ' ^'^ be admitted to such courses a 
a decree until entrance re^^:St::: S:rrSSi " "'"^^-'-^^"^ 
Unclassified Students 

PufsufaTroUm^fTudyleaS t?"^'"^"*^ ^ut who do not wish to 
pursue courses for ^^U^t^^:',^'^^;!^''^ '^ ^^^'^^^ *« 
Matriculation and Registration 

The matriculation ticket mncf u 
of Pharmacy, and must be Ske^ ZTTf '"" ^''^ ''^^ "^ ^^e School 
J«atnculation, all students are reouTrL.' °"' ^"^^''^ <=l*««es. A^ 
Director of Admissions. ^""^'^ ^-^ "-^^'^ter at the office of the 

Expenses 

Tuition fee, per quarter ^^"^'^"^ ^^^•'^^"t^ Non-Eesidents 

Laboratory and breakage fee, per quartet ' ' ' I'! 00 *''•'" 

Other fees (payable only once) • 20.00 

Matriculation fee (payable on first regis- 

Diploma fee (payable' 'at ' b^gi'nni^g ' of ^"'"^ ''■'' 

final quarter of Senior Year) . . ^ ^ , , „„ 

Further Information ^^"0 

™S 0? a?;Ser^--;:: -- ^, ^ « catalog, and a 
-n, school Of Pharmacy, -iversr^^^SdrBL^: ^^^^^^^ 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 315 

I^^MVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Robert U. Patterson, Superintendent 
and Dean of the Medical School 

Location and History 

The University Hospital, located at Redwood and Greene Streets in Bal- 
timore, adjacent to the Medical school group, was first opened as the 
hospital of the University of Maryland, Medical School, in 1823. Originally 
containing four wards, it was increased through additions from time to 
time until about 1875 when, with the addition of the Greene Street wing, 
it reached the capacity of approximately 250 beds, continuing this number 
of beds until 1934, when the present new hospital building was opened 
which now provides 435 beds, plus 50 bassinettes. In addition to furnishing 
the clinical facilities for the students of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine, the hospital offers to residents of the State of Maryland the 
facilities of a modern General Hospital. 

Present Facilities 

During the fiscal year which ended June 30, 1943, there were admitted to 
the University Hospital 12,253 patients who were furnished a total of 
166,241 days of patient care. During this period 2080 babies were born 
in the hospital. During the same period there were registered in the Out- 
Patient Department of the Hospital (Emergency Department and general 
dispensaries) 17,010 patients never previously served who, during the year, 
made a total of 76,649 visits to the Out-Patient Department. The Acci- 
dent Room of the Hospital rendered emergency care to approximately 
18,000 patients for the year 1943. 

The externe service delivered 1063 mothers at home. A total of 22,323 
visits were made to these homes by the doctors, nurses and senior students 
of this service. 

The patients admitted to the hospital during the past year represented 
residents of every county in the State of Maryland; 20 States of the United 
States and the District of Columbia, and seamen of 9 foreign registrations. 



316 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BALTIMORE DIVISION 

Glen D. Brown, Director 
Location 

Offices of the Baltimore Division of the College of Education are located 
on the second floor of the Administration Building on the University 
Campus, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Courses Available 

Because approximately one-half of the State's population and its largest 
school district are in the City of Baltimore, the University of Maryland 
operates the Baltimore Division of the College of Education primarily for 
the training of teachers in service and those preparing to teach. Originally 
the Division's work was exclusively in the field of Industrial Education, 
but with increasing demands the scope of instruction gradually has been 
enlarged until now it includes many phases of education for teachers. 

Instructional Stafif 

The Baltimore Division is fortunate in having two teaching staffs on 
which to call: the regular faculty of the University in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, the College of Education, and the Baltimore professional 
schools; and a special faculty of Industrial Education specialists drawn 
largely from the Baltimore Public Schools. It is the policy of the University 
to use in all of its Divisions, including the Baltimore and the extension 
courses of the College of Education, in so far as possible, instructors who 
are regular members of its day school staff. When members of that staff 
are unavailable, the University calls on outside instructors. 

Although the Baltimore Division is primarily an instructional division 
for teachers, the full time staff stands ready to give service to all individuals 
and agencies that need its help. It is particularly anxious to assist adult 
groups with special problems of leadership training, and to cooperate 
with industrial and business organizations in their personnel training 
programs. The growing importance of the instruction given in the Balti- 
more Division is evidenced by the fact that steadily increasing demands 
are being made upon it. 

For Futher Information 

For a special catalog listing the course offerings of the Baltimore Division 
of the College of Education write to the Director at the above-noted address. 



SECTION V 

EXTENSION SERVICE 
Administrative Staff 

Director. Professor, Assistant Director. 

EowAKD INGRAM OswALO B.S Profe ,^^^^^^^ ^_^^^^^ 

^^"^ " ^r'^P^D ; Professor; Extension Enton.olo.y. State Ento- 

ERNEST NEAL CORY, rn.^ , 

„ologist, Assistant ^^-^^ ,^ Editor. 

AooxsoK HOGAK S^--^' f -p^",, county Agent Leader. 
PAUI. EDwm NYSTKOM. M.S., ?'» ;-«J ^^^,,,. 

DOKOTHV EMKKSOK, Professor «-!« ^^ ^^^^^^,^, Home Furnishing, 
FU)KENCE HARBiETT MASON, B.S., Professor, 

District Agent. i„;«trative Assistant. 

K..HHH™. GKAC. COKNO..V A— ;;;;-;, eiub Leader. 
Urw SNAVELY DOWNEY, B.S., Professo 

subject Matter Specialists ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^p,,„Hure. 

GBOKGE JENVEY ABKAMS M.S., As-t ^^^^^^^^^_ ^^^^^^.„„ ^,,, 

ARTHUR MONTRAVILLE AHALT, M.b., A 

cultural Education. .^^ ^^^^ Husbandry. 

FLOYD JAY ARNOLD, M.S., ^'f^'^soci^ie Professor, Extension Vegetable 
WALTER RAYMOND BALLARD, B.S., Associate 

and Landscape «— g^ ^^^ension Plant Pathology. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Ph.D., Professo . Marketing. 

WALTER CROTHERS ^^'^'' ' .^^'^'J^^, Extension Animal Husbandry. 
URAL GUY B^, M.S., Associate P-^^^''^^^^^^^^^,, Extension Agricultural 

PAY WILFORD CARPENTER, A.B., Ll^'^-J 

nn'lUing, State Drainage Engmeer.^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

JOHN JULIAN CHISOLM "' ^"l; ^^ Extension Soil Erosions 
JOHN COTTON, B.S., Assistant Prof ess pj^^t Pathology. 

CARROLL EASTBURN Cox, ^^^^^ ^-^7;^ ^ ^p^^f essor. Extension Forestry. 
HARRY WIU.IAM DENGLEB, B^S Assoc .^^ Agricultural Eco- 

SAMUEL HENRY DeVault, Ph.D., Professo 

nomics. 

317 



I 



318 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Randolph Sampson Forrester, Assistant in Extension Marketing. 

Castillo Graham, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Extension Entomology. 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Farm 
Management. 

William Edgar Harrison, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Russell Cheney Hawes, M.S., Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Canning 
Crops. 

George Hyatt, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Dairy Husbandry. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology, State 
Pathologist. 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Extension 
Rural Electrification. 

Albin Owings Kuhn, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

George Shealy Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Ento- 
mology. 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

John Winfield Magruder, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Agron- 
omy. 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Horticulture, 
Olericulture. 

Arthur F. Martin, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Nutrition. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Charles Percival Merrick, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Drainage 
Engineering. 

Martin Hammond Muma, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Entomolpgy. 

Milton Andrew Petty, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Robert Emmett Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry. 

Walter Benjamin Posey, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Tobacco. 

Wade Hampton Rice, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Pomology. 
Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Clothing. 
Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor, Extension 
Landscape Gardening. 



319 
EXTENSION SERVICE 

, ,^ PiaCE THOMAS, Ph.D., ^^^'^1^%^^^^^^^^ Landscape Gar. 

^ ,HUH SBARLE THURSTON, M.S., Professor, Extension 

^dening. ; Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

JOHN WiLUAM WESSELS, A.B., Assistam r 

County Agents (Field) 

^ Headquarters 

. Name 

County D c A «<ociate Professor, 

RALPH FRANK MCHENRY, B.S.. A..ociate ^^^^^^1^^^ 

Aii^s^^y 

,„„e Arundel... Stanley Everett Dav, B.S.. Associate P-fessor, ^^^^^^^ 

3^,^.^,,, HORACE BENNETT DERRICK, B.S.. Associate Professor^^^^^ 

,^l,,rt JOHN BOOME MORSELL, B.S., Associate P-f--;^^^,,,^,, 

^^^^,„, GEOROE WATSON Clenoaniei. B.S.. Associate Profejso.^^ 

ZoM - LONDON CRAWFORD BURNS, B.S., Associate Pr^-^;^^^ 

T3 c A *i«;ociate Professor . . . Elkton 

Cecil J-- ^-- ^'^Z' B s" t s a Professor. .LaPlata 

Charles P-^ Dennis B--^' J-S-^;^;^^ ^^^^,,,, professor. 

D„,,hester *Wiluam Russell McKnight, B.&., Cambridge 

HARRY Wesley Beogs, B.S.. Associate ^^"^^^^"^^^^^.^^^^ 

Frederick • . • HENRY REESE SHOEMAKER, B.S., M. A., p^^^erick 

Associate Professor • ■ • " •; " " 'p j^^^,,, Oakland 

T^xxM HURLEY CARTER, B.S., Associate Professor. v^.i 
Garrett JOHN HURLEY ^^ ' Associate Professor, 

yi^^iord HENRY MORRISON CARROLL, B.b., g^j ^j,. 

H,,,,, WARREN GRAHAM MYERS, B.S., Associate Prof e^ssor. ^^^ 

^^^, JAMES DUNHAM McVean, B.S., Associate P-^--^'^^^ 

♦On military leave. 



320 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Montgomery .... Otto Watson Anderson MS A.. ■ . r. 

. ^'^' M-S., Associate Professor 

nnce Geor.es.. P^ov Eu^wohth Cz.hk. B.S., Associate Profes^s^ "'^ 
Queen Annes.... J.mes Waltb. Ebv. B.S., Assistant Pro'^fX''^^''"- 

"'■ """"' ''''''' "^^'"^ JOHNSON, Assistant Professor, ''^"*"^""' 

'"""* "^"^'^^^ ^^«^ KELLER, B.S., Associate piZZ^'" 

''""* • • ■ ''"''""" ^^--^- BHOWN, B.S., Associat! tZst"" 

Washington . . . . Makk Kerh,t M.^, b.S., Associate Professor. ^'''"^ 

icomico James Paul Brown r q a • . ^ Hagerstown 

Worcester . . . PnRiri>m m. ^"^^^» -^-fe., Associate Professor ^5^1; , 

KOBERT Thornton Grant r q a ^^^^ssor. . bahsbury 

URANT, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Assistant County Agents > Snow' Hill 

Allegany and 

n^^^^^^ Joseph Matthew Steger r c. t . 

^e"t Stani-pv R,m„ o '^^^^N, B.S., Instructor Rpi , ,-,. 

Montgomery *RtZ^ ^ ^"™N, Instructor. ri^I'r 

« '"ery Rupus BACKER KlNr A R T 4. 1 Chestertown 

o„.. A ^°«c«E Newton wSpp ' b s t ? """ ^"'^kvilie 

Queen Annes. . . .fCHARLEs Reynolds Eat»p;?"t'*'"'*°'" Ro'^kvilk 

. Washington •... Daniel VEaS^'oLTErB J r^^ ^-^^''"^ 

JV HOLTER, B.S., Instructor. . . .Hagerstown 

Local Agents— Negro Work 

Southern 
^"y'^»<' Martin Green Bailey R c, t . 

Eastern Shore iriHT "^ ^^-RrB^S^n'Scr .^: " " -f-* ^--J 
re. . . LOUIS Henderson Martin. Instructor. . .-.Vprce^sire 
County Home Demonstration Agents (Field) 

County XT 

^,, ^ Name 

t^^^^^^y Maude Alberta Rpaxt a • Headq^mrters 

Anne Arundel ... Mirum F SME^^Ji ^^^f ^^-fessor. ^^ 

iutMBNTER, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

altimore anna Trentham B <? a „ - . ^ Annapolis 

Calvert ... PT^i>r.xr^ t^^' "^•^•' Associate Professor t, 

^ LORENCE E. Buchanan b q a t , ^^^^^ Towson 

^aANAN, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

•On miiif.«^ I ^^^"^^ Frederick 

"n military leave. tPart time. 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



321 



Caroline BESSIE MARGUE31ITE Spafford, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Denton 

QsLYToll JusTiNA C. Crosby, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Westminster 

Cecil Helen Irene Smith, B.A., Associate Professor, 

Elkton 

Charles Mary Graham, Associate Professor La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie Estella Brooks, A.B., Associate Professor, 

Cambridge 

Frederick Jesse Murray Hammerly, B.S., M.A., 

Associate Professor Frederick 

Garrett Mrs. Mildred Barton Hoffman, A.B., 

Assistant Professor Oakland 

Harford Catharine Maurice, B.S., Associate Professor. . .Bel Air 

Howard Mildred Jane Flanagan, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Ellicott City 

Kent Helen Nickerson Schellinger, Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 

Montgomery Edythe Margaret Turner, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Rockville 
Prince Georges . . Ethel Mary Regan, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Hyattsville 
Queen Annes. . . . Marianna Lee Long, B.A., Assistant Professor, 

Centerville 

St, Marys Ethel Joy, A.B., Associate Professor Leonardtown 

Somerset Hilda Topfer, B.S., Associate Professor. . .Princess Anne 

Talbot Margaret Smith, B.S., Associate Professor Easton 

Washington Ardath Ellen Martin, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico Helen Florence Willerton, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Salisbury 
Worcester Lucy Jane Walter, Associate Professor Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

Allegany Margaret Thomson Loar, B.S., Instructor. . .Cumberland 

Local Home Demonstration Agents — Negro Work 

Southern 

Maryland Ethel Lawrence Bianchi, B.S., Instructor, 

Seat Pleasant 
Southern 

Maryland Evelyn Vivian Kent, B.S., Instructor Seat Pleasant 

Eastern Shore... Mrs. Omega Moore Jones, A.B., Instructor, 

Princess Anne 



322 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



323 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

T. B. Symons, Director 

KATHARINE COXKOLLV, Administrative Assistant 

ELSIE G. LiNKOus, Secretary to Director 

and their families in the Probltrof aStL anT'' V^"' '^^"^"^ 
the work IS carried on in the local communSl, T\l f ^''"'^'- ^"'^ »' 
homes throughout the Stat^ Tf '• *="''""\""'t>es, on the farms and in th. 

Understanding betwet frExtlronTetw^of" thtu^ Memorandum 'I; 
land and the U. S. Department of Agriculture University of Mary. 

-"^"^-T.^^^-^^^^^ contribute to the 

Service in each county, with a County iLt a J K ^ ^T'^ '^"'^"^'°" 
Agent in charge, and assistants wherr/undf n . "."'"^ demonstration 
Backed by a staff of Specialists at the UnlverSHb"'/'' ""^'^ ^^•'"'-^• 
contact with rural people and their problmsT? ^'"*' ^"" '" '^'^ 

mands for expansion at present, Ts a reluTt of thT ""' l^^'«-<'«"^ Re- 
direct responsibility for recruiting InA T ^^''- ^" addition to 
farm labor program, the ExteS Serv.V ""I "°''''''' '" ^"^^ ^^^^gencv 
Phases of all programs afd measures aVec^^^^ "'''* *'^ ^'*»<=^«o„a' 

=i '-' — - p=vatf :Lrn/:tt; 'wis 

demonstrations and carries the scientific anT" ''■^''" ''"'=*'^^ ^^^^^'y b^' 

ment Station and Department ;rASuUur!T'"''r"''^ °' **^^ ^^P-'" 
they understand and use. ^^"<=ulture to rural people in ways that 

In Maryland, the Extension Service worV« i« i 
rural organizations. It assists esDJcTriir '" association with all 

farm products and encourages the m^^^kL'^^^^^^^ 

women. Work with rural women is on »«f 1 "^ ""^P^^^ ''^ ^"ral 

extension education, including both rhrr.t .• f '"'''* extensive phases of 

the cultural, economic, arcoiintrat-l'''""''"^ '' *'^ ^"^^ ^"^ 
women are engaging. community activities m which present-day 

In addition to work with adni+o +»,„, j 
as leaders and given practicSedir".? "' l"""' ""'^ ^'''' ^^ developed 

their diversified^ctiviLs the bo^Ind gSrf"^ '''' '''"'" '''^^°"^'' 
instruction and training and Zlr7.A ^ ^'''^" ^ ^^'"«»"e type of 

confidence, perseverance and citrztsHp. ^" ^^P^^^^^ty *« develop self- 

Extension Short Course 



have been held regularly over a period of years and others are added as 
the need and demand develop. Wartime conditions have made it necessary 
to suspend them for a time, but they will be resumed when conditions 
permit. Others will be added as needs arise. 

Rural Women*s Short Course 

In response to requests of rural women for special training in a variety 
of subjects, the Rural Women's Short Course was inaugurated in 1922. 
Attendance at the course, extending for one week, has grown steadily, 
reaching more than one thousand women at the last session. It is given 
about the second week in June. 

Canners* Short Course 

Some fifteen years ago there developed a demand by canners of the State 
for a Short Course designed especially to aid them in the fundamentals 
of their industry. Such a course was arranged, usually the third week 
in February, and has been well attended. 

Nurserymen's Short Course 

A few years ago the organized nurserymen of the State requested a short 
course covering problems of their business. The lectures and demonstrations 
reflect advanced technique in production of nursery stock and control of 
insect pests and diseases. Instruction is given by the Departments of 
Horticulture, Entomology, and Plant Pathology. 

Greenkeepers' Short Course 

The annual Greenkeepers' Course was inaugurated to meet requests of 
golf course managers for assistance in the problems incident to maintaining 
grass generally and golf greens in particular. The course is usually given 
in February and attracts registrants from out of the State as well as from 
Maryland. 

Florists* Short Course 

In the latter part of March or early in April each year a special short 
course is given for florists. It usually extends two days, with a special 
evening feature held in the Coliseum for display of flower decorations and 
a style revue. 

Boys* and Girls* Club Week 

Members and leaders of boys' and girls* 4-H Clubs come to the University 
for a week each year, usually the latter part of August. Class work and 
demonstrations are given by specialists, and a broad program of education, 
inspiration and recreation is provided. 



i 



324 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D.. 

^cti7ig Director 

Agricultural Economics 
Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D. 

AHrHUH B™ HAM..OK. ^l^;^^^*^^^°^--'^^-Hura, Economies 

Associate Professor, Agricultural F^««« • 
Arthur Montraville Ahalt, M.S., ^ricuitural Economics 

EMiL S. TROELsoN Ph D t'""'*' '''"'''"'■• ^^"'^^'t-^' Economics 

IROELSON, Ph.D Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., 

Professor and Head, Agricultural Engineering State n.»,- ^ ■ 

GEORGE John Burkhardt, M.S., "'^' ^"^'"^^'• 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 
Agronomy 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D. t> . 

RUSSELL GROVE RoTHGEB, Ph D ^^^--^ and Head, Agronomy 

ROVLK PRZCE THOMAS, P^.D "^^ ^'''''''''''' ^^'"^^ 

Howard Barr Winant MS Professor, Soils 

GEORGE FRANCIS Madigan,' Ph D t'"'''"* ^'^'^^^ov, Soils 

ALBiN OWINGS KUHN MS •••• "Assistant Professor, Soils 

STANLEY PHILLIPS STABLER^, BS ^--t-* J-fessor, Agronomy 

JOHN WINPIELD MAGRUDER, M.S.. .'. '.V " ' ' Associa;,: P /"'' ''^'"""™"* 

Walter Benjamin Posey m S ! ^™*'^^'"-' Agronomy 

Kenton Charles Reynold, B S ' Professor, Tobacco 

MiYE Yamasaki, B.S '. Assistant in Soils 

Conrad Liden, B.S Assistant in Soils 

Assistant Agronomist 1 

Agronomy— Seed Inspection 

Forrest SHEPPERSON Holmes, M.S pj.. , ^ ,, 

Olive Marian Kelk ^^° Inspector 

Assistant Seed Analyst 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 325 

Jlninial Husbandry 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D., 

Professor and Head, Animal Husbandry 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Professor, Animal Husbandry 

Animal Pathology 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Leo Joseph Poelma, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Melvin M. Rabstein, V.M.D Instructor and Assistant Pathologist 

Cornelia M. Cotton, Ph.D Cooperative Agent 

Bacteriology 
Lawrence Henry James, Ph.D Professor and Head, Bacteriology 

Botany y Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D., 

Professor and Head, Botany and Plant Physiology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D Professor, Botany 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., 

Professor, Plant Pathology, State Pathologist 

Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Botany 

Harold Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Carroll Eastburn Cox, Ph.D Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Milton Andrew Petty, Ph.D Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Dairy Husbandry 

Lane A. Moore, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.S Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Entomology 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., 

Professor and Head, Entomology, State Entomologist 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D Assistant Prof essor. Entomology 

George Jenvey Abram, M.S Assistant Professor, Apiculture 

Horticulture 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D Professor and Head, Olericulture 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D Professor, Pomology 



ii 



I 



THE VmVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph D 

IRVIN Charles Haut, Ph.D '' " ^""^^^^^r. Canning Crop. 

Herman Aull Hunter, m S V '^'"''"^^^ Professor. Po„,oi ; 

Herman Todd. B.S Associate Professor. Canning Crop! 

Leland E. Scott, M.S Assistant in Horticulture 

James E. Hawes, B.S.. . .'.' Associate Professor. Pomologj. 

Agnes Louise Marks, MS t Assistant in Horticulture 

Instructor and Research Assistant 

Poultry 

MORLEY Allan JuLL, Ph D p . 

GEORGE DEWiTT QriGLEy' M s" ^ X '"' ""'''• ''°"'*^y Husbandry 

ROBERT EMMETT Phillip; Ph d' A """'' ''"'""'•' ^""'^^^ husbandry 
Marv Juhn, Ph.D. . . • • ''"""*^ ^™^--r. Poultry Husbandry 

Instructor, Poultry Husbandry 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

W. B. Kemp, Acting Director. 

Isabel A. Blackhalt <?^ , 

Thp 4 „ • , CKHALL, Secretary to Director. 

ihe Agricultural Experimenf Qt .• 

r^^ ! House of Mae-ic" ,„ q i, "^ General ElectnV 

ings Wh I ' ^"^ ^°'- *he most part iointv ! ^^P""'"^"* Stations, 
tiot ."^^V-tLlr :r ^--Sy'Sshel e"? — 
Which made availabl7a Jrlntt'"';!'' '^'^'^^ °^ the Hatch 1:?'"^^- 
I'shing an agriculture? ^''^ *° ^^<=h state for tb. '" ^^S^' 



LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE 



327 



The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station which is 
supported by these Acts and by State appropriations centers at College 
park. On the University campus are to be found laboratories for study- 
ing insects and diseases, soil fertility problems, botanical problems, and 
others. This is also the location of the livestock and dairy barns with their 
experimental herds. About eight miles from the campus at College Park, 
near Beltsville, is located the Plant Research Farm of about 500 acres, 
devoted to work connected with soil fertility, plant breeding and general 
horticultural problems. Near Ridgely, Maryland, is a farm of approxi- 
mately 50 acres owned by the Station, at which the problems of canning 
crops' growers on the Eastern Shore, are studied. There is also an experi- 
mental farm at Upper Marlboro, which is operated cooperatively by the 
Federal Government and the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, 
and which is given over exclusively to the problems of tobacco growing 
and curing. There is also a number of acres rented near Pocomoke on the 
Eastern Shore, used for testing new varieties of potatoes. This work is 
checked and other varieties used, on farms in Garrett County, Maryland. 
Near Ellicott City there is a farm of 234 acres which is devoted to live- 
stock problems. These various locations give a chance to conduct experi- 
ments under the conditions which exist where the results will be put into 
practice. This, of course, is very important in making results reliable and 
quickly usable. 

The Station, in general, exists as the "trouble-shooter" for Maryland 
farmers. When Maryland farmers have a problem, the first agency to 
attempt to meet this problem is the Agricultural Experiment Station. The 
solution of many difficult problems in the past has given the Maryland Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station an excellent standing among the farmers of 
the State. 



LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE STAFF 

College Park, Maryland 

Arthur Louis Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., Professor of Veterinary Science 
and Animal Pathology, Acting Director. 

Leo Joseph Poelma, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Pathology. 

Harold Moon DeVolt, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Animal 
Pathology. 

Clyde LaRayne Everson, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, Veterinary Inspector. 

Charles Robert Davis, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 

George Charles Poppensiek, V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science. 



328 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 

1; 



Harold Francis Burton V ht n a • ^ 

George Edwin Dani^i.. Ph^' A 11 p *?'"' "* ^"''"^' Patholog;'^' 
(Parasitology). " ^''•'*^"* ^roi^s.ov of Animal Patholo«v 

Melvin Moses Rabstein V M n r. .• 

Industry. ' ^•^•^•' Cooperative Agent. Bureau of Animal 

Cornelia M. Cotton Ph n <-„ 

LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

A. L. Brueckner, /icfmf, Z>t>ec<or. 

jr.. *■ r.^ ^^th^ine CONLON, 5ec,etar« 

Executive Offices: " 

816 Fidelity Building •^''*'' Laboratory: 

Baltimore 1, Maryland College Park 

JtaftL^^r^^^^^^^ state fartTproteet 

dure is along two lines, prevention of i! \ f^' ^^^ ^""^'•^' P'""- 
Maryland and control and eradS ion of h '"''•^d^ction of diseases into 
Coupled with these functio^a e h'^'J^^f^^^PT'"' ^'*'''" ^^^ ^tate. 
human health as influenced by animal disea e7"n •=°"^''^-^«-« of the 
tamed with officials of the State «.h *^''^^?'- ^lose cooperation is main- 
regard. ^*^*" ^"d County Health Departments in thl 

To prevent the introduction of diseasp, «,h., • 
pnate regulations are Promulgated, settrgfrrth r^"*!^ • ""™"'^' «PP- 
animals may be brought into the State T^ ! '=°"*^'t'«ns ""der which 
sent to sanitary officials in all states I^H . !! '"t^'-^t^te regulations are 
guidance. Cooperation with other sates inM- t''^' Government for 
lines is freely extended. ^' "" ^^^'"^ ''^^'^^ along the same 

Disease control within the «!to+« • 

where such are Possible^fd unrgeLri^ol""'" T''^'^ ''^^^^-^' 
force of field men, located in a number of Z I- '" "^^^"^ ^'^^^«««- A 
work. Satisfactory diagnosis of d^eases f. ^ "T^'T' ^^^^^ ^^''^ "^ t^^ 
tion of control and eradication The ^ain aho f ''' *'^ "''^'^ °P-a- 
with branches at Baltimore, CentrevUle al fr l''^ '' ^* ^""^^^ P^rk, 
conducted in these several locations d-?^ Salisbury. The type of work 

nature of the live stock indusry but each t ^ ^'^' "*'"* "'"'" ^''^ 
the whole program. ''^ furnishes facilities of value to 

the branch laboratories. StudTes in^Le llbo ""^ investigations are made at 
field when sufficient progress has bee. '^TT'"' ^'' ^^^^^^^^ ^^to the 
results of such projects VeusS for'idt •'"';'^ '^^' '''^'^' ^he 
eradication of disease. guidance m plans for control and 



MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 



329 



BKANCH LABORATORY AND FIELD STAFF 

IRVIN M. MouLTHROP, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, 
in charge, Salisbury Laboratory. 

J. Walter Hastings, Jr., V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, in charge, Centreville Laboratory. 

William B. Coughlan, V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, 
in charge, Baltimore Laboratory. 

Robert B. Shillinger, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology, 
Salisbury Laboratory. 

James W. Crowl, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Centreville. 

Horace B. Wood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Hagerstown. 

Clarence J. Gibbs, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Upper Marlboro. 

J. Walter Hastings, Sr., V.M.D., Assistant Professor and Veterinary 
Inspector, Cambridge. 

Charles R. Lockwood, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary In- 
spector, Towson. 

Mahlon H. Trout, D.V.M., Assistant Professor and Veterinary Inspector, 
Salisbury. 

Carlos S. Wilbanks, D.V.M.,- Assistant Professor and Veterinary In- 
spector, Rockville. 

Wilson M. Reynolds, D.V.M., Veterinary Inspector, Oakland. 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

Agricultural Building, College Park, Maryland 

S. B. Shaw, Chief, 

W. C. Beaven, Marketing Specialist and Chief Inspector. 

A. F. Martin, Assistant Marketing Specialist in Charge of Egg, 
Dressed Poultry, Butter and Cheese Inspections, 

J. W. Wessells, Assistant Marketing Specialist and Inspector. 

R. S. Forrester, Assistant in Marketing and Egg Inspector. 

, Assistant Marketing Specialist and Inspector. 

The State Board of Agriculture of Maryland has by resolutions: 

1. Adopted September 25, 1925, authorized the State Department of 
Markets of the Extension Service of the University of Maryland, to exe- 
cute as agent of said Board the powers relating to the marketing of farm 
products, live stock and live stock products heretofore conferred upon the 
Board by law. 



330 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 



331 



2. Adopted September 25, 1925, authorized the Department of Markets 
to execute as its agent the general powers of the Board relating to the in. 
spection and regulation of Weights and Measures used in the sale and pur- 
chase of agricultural products. 

3. Adopted February 1, 1928, authorized the Department of Markets 
to exercise the powers of said Board in the enforcement of the Maryland 
Apple Grading Law. 

By law, the Department is the agency for the State Board of Agricul- 
ture in the enforcement of the following laws: (1) Cantaloupe Maturity 
Law, (2) Poultry Sale and Transportation Law, (3) Trade-Mark Law 
covering all fruits and vegetables, fresh or processed, (4) Grading Law 
covering fresh fruits and vegetables, (5) Inspection Law covering inspec- 
tion and certification of fruits and vegetables, and (6) Fresh Egg Law. 

The Department of Markets is the cooperating agency under joint memo- 
randums of agreement with the Food Distribution Administration for the 
inspection and certification of fruits, vegetables, live and dressed poultry, 
eggs, butter, cheese, canning crops; and the preparation and release of 
Market News reports. 

In 1939 the State Department of Health deputized certain of the person- 
nel of the Department of Markets to act as agents of the State Department 
of Health in preventing the sale or shipment of fruit containing excessive 
spray residue. 

The Department of Markets issues final inspection and certification for 
the Seed Certification Board on Irish and sweet potatoes and tomato seed 
stock. In cooperation with the F. D. A. maintains daily Market New? 
Service in Baltimore on fresh fruits, vegetables, dressed poulry and eggs. 
also seasonal daily reports at Pocomoke on strawberries and Irish potatoes; 
and acts as agent for the F. D. A. in carrying out all purchasing pro- 
grams for fruits and vegetables, including all details in connection therewith. 

The headquarters of the State Department of Markets is at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Field offices are located in 
Baltimore, Hancock, Hagerstown, Salisbury and Pocomoke. 

STATE HORTICLTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland 

T. B. Symons, Director of Extension Service, 

E. N. Cory, Assistant Director of Extension Service, State, 

Entomologist, 
R. A. Jehle, State Plant Pathologist, 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for in- 
spection of all nurseries and suppression of injurious insects and diseases 
affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is conducted 
in close association with the departments of Entomology and Plant Path- 
ology of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under authority 



to protect the public in the purchase oi p ^ecupied by inspection of 

^ considerable part of the time of t^« ^^att 's ^ ^^^^^ Coopera- 

oXds, crops, nurseries, greenhouses and floral esta ^^^^.^^^^ion of 

on with the Federal Government in *« ^^^P"*^^^ j^ ^„^ther major func- 
:Uals that come ^^'lIJ^;:Ze:tiC^Le. the provisions of the 
tion of the department. The department activities pertaining to 

control of insects ib nirector of Extension. 

Entomologist and Assistant Director oi ^.^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Activities of the department in the f d ^f P .^^ ^^,^ ^^,,, 

under direction of Dr. R. A". J^^'/' f^^f^ of strawberries and other small 
includes control and eradication of diseases oi ^^rtification of pota- 

S^its, diseases <>\rl%::7S' ^^rTS^^^e pine blister rust, Dutch 
toes and sweet potatoes for seed, con^ 

elm disease, etc. 

INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

and Fungicides ^, • ♦ 

L. E. BOPST, State ChemisL 
*W C. SUPPLEE, Chemist, . , .* 

H.' R. WALLS, Chemist and Micro- Analyst. 
A. B. HEAGY, Chemist. 
R. E. BAUMGARDNER, Chemist. 
*T. J. Weiss, Chemist. 
J. E. SCHUELER, Chemist. 
♦T. H. Lewis, IV, Chemist. 
*R. G. Fuerst, Chemist. 
♦M. Rubin, Chemist, 
E. C. Donaldson, Chemist, 
W. J. FOOTEN, Inspector. 

E. M. Zentz, Inspector. 

F. G. BAGGS, Clerk. , . . ^ 
M. E. HIGH, Laboratory Technician, 

\ 

♦Entered the armed forces. 






332 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



It also conducts investigations arisi^^ j m.sbranded or adulters . 

ment activities. ^ ^"^'"^ '" connection with its law enW 

4- "itsiSS. '"CTe" t f r. '^"^ -^^^ ^^ <l'vided into l 
cultural commodities under specS 'brand ^^^'^*r*t-« of these a'? 

which must be shown at all Hr^l! 1 "^""^^ ^"^^ guarantees of au«if. 

distributed in the Stated Ltd .rLtft- '" ^'^'^ *^« eommoditi s'S 
died by two inspectors who are consta. . f '^"'P^^^' ^^ch is haT 
chemical and physical examination of th! '"'"".^ '''' ^'^''' t^ird, thj 
accuracy of label representation fourth th" "m^''' *° -bstantiate th 
tests which are made— these nnhi ! ' ^ Publication of the result, Z 
current information at a time wh^r' T.^'^''^'''' ^ all anrfutist 
t.ve purchasers; fifth, the pr^secrtl; of 7i! " """'' "^'"^^'^ '« P^osJ c 
flagrant violations. ^ ose<="t.on of those parties found responsible for 

^t is the policy of i-h^ t\ 
Which may be forwarded by bu'^e'rand ^"hT'""^ gratuitously, samples 

t"2"on*S '""^'•'="^" «' theTwstfoTced T^-"* -^terials coming 
tests on these samples do not furnishT h? * * ''"'^' ^^^^ "suits of 
results published in the bulletins However inrv-^"f ''="°"' °^ ^'"^ '"« 

structive.ltTstrthXi:tur"r^r^-«- -her than de- 
police power. However, it ha aTwa^ beT ';.'''!^"*^*^ '^^ enforcin/or 
his organization to carry on rscientffi. . '^^ ^'''''' ^"'^ intention of 

the sale of quality material^ tf ? constructive control in order th! 
Primaril, upon edLSftelT a'nVtheT'V ^'^^ ^^P-^ment tepe„d 
tries for successful enforcement In thn """^ <=ooperation of the indus- 
there is no other alternative but o eso'rVtTrv."'"^ ''"''' '"^^'^o'^^ f-1. 
action. As a result of the operation Jfl *^ '^"'"^^ ^<»- appropriate 
agricultural commodities may maLtH ' '"^Pection service, buyers of 

of obtaining value received fo'r m:!::;'^*'""''"' "'*'' '^''^ <=-«"-- 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

Horticultural Building, College Park. Maryland 

F. S. Holmes, Inspector. 
Ellen P. Emack. ^noZ^/s^. 
OUVE M. Kelk, /InaZj/st. 

T,j,^ „ ^ , ''■ ^- MULLADY, 4«a;2/st. 

ine i>eed Inspection Serviro ^ a- ■ ■ 



Z)A//2F PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE 



333 



State; collects seed samples for laboratory examination; reports the results 
of these examinations to the parties concerned; publishes summaries of 
these reports which show the relative reliability of the label information 
supplied by wholesale seedsmen; cleans and treats tobacco seed intended for 
planting in the State; makes analyses, tests, and examinations of seed 
samples submitted to the Laboratory; and advises seed users regarding the 
economic and intelligent use of seeds. The Service also cooperates with 
the Agricultural Marketing Service of the United States Department of 
Agriculture in the enforcement of the Federal Seed Act in Maryland. 

Two and a half million dollars worth of seeds are planted annually in 
Maryland. Perhaps twenty-five percent of the field seeds and ninety percent 
of the vegetable seeds planted in the State pass through trade channels arid 
are thus subject to the seed law. The work of the Seed Inspection Service 
is not restricted to the enforcement of the seed law, however, for State 
citizens may submit seed samples to the Laboratory for analysis, test, or 
examination. Specific information regarding suitability for planting pur- 
poses of lots of seeds is thus made available to individuals without charge. 
The growth of this service has been steady since the establishment of the 
Laboratory in 1912. In 1913 only slightly over a hundred samples were 
submitted to the Laboratory; in 1941 the number was over thirty-five hun- 
dred. Few Maryland home-owners, city or country, are not directly in- 
terested in seeds for planting in flower-bed, lawn, garden, or field. 

DAIRY PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE 

Dairy Building, College Park, Maryland 

The Maryland Dairy Inspection Law became effective June 1, 1935. The 
purpose of this law is to insure producers who sell milk and cream on the 
basis of butterfat test or weight that the tests and weights of such milk 
and cream will be correctly made, and likewise to insure the dealers who 
purchase such products that their agents or testers shall correctly weigh 
and test the milk and cream; also, to insure that tests made for official 
inspections or for public record will be correctly made. 

The present service is based on Article 43 of the annotated code of 
Maryland, Chapter 403 of the Laws of Maryland, 1941. 

The dairy department of the Agricultural Experiment Station is charged 
with the administration of the Dairy Inspection Law. It is the policy 
in administration of the law to use the service as a means of education 
to promote the mutual interests of dairy producers, dealers and manu- 
facturers. The aim has been to aid all interests concerned and not to 
impose burdens. 

A total of 125 plants were issued licenses in the different classifications 
for 1943. They were as follows: 16 milk plants in Class A (0-500 lbs. pro- 
duction); 30 plants in Class B (500-2,000 lbs. production); 67 .plants in 
Class C (2,000-40,000 lbs. production); and 12 plants in Class D (over 



''' THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

40,000 lbs. of milk dailv^ t • 

wdgrhers and samplers. '^' "^'"'"'^^ ^«^« "««"ed to 206 testers and 89 

na cream from producers under the nr^! • ■ P^*"*^ Purchasing miit 

♦I. . "^ trade practiVpQ t«i,« t. , . ''^^^^"s n^ilk and cream q>.« 

the maintenance nf r. ^ "^^^^^s- The checking of sral^c ^ ^^^ 

nient. This has resulted in elimfn J^ ^ ^^^^^^ ^^ inaccurate eauin 

<..iass A— For purchasing or handHn»^ * 

Class C— For purchasing or handr 

pounds but not exceedingTo ^0^^ *^J ^" equivalent of 2,000 
fee 110.00. '"''^ ^"'000 pounds of milk daily. Annual 

V^iass D — For miY./»l,« • 

Fee for weigher's and T "'"'^^'' '"' ^''^^^'^y 

Wei<.her's aS ? '"P'"' ^ examination ^ '^^ 

vy either s and sampler's license fee 1-00 

Fee for Babcock tester's examination 2.00 

Babcock tester's license fee ;■/ ' 1.50 

3.00 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 
College Park, Maryland 

are to promote and enconL .'u*^^ ^^^ established in 1937 if a .- 



AFFILIATED AGENCIES 



335 



State and to cooperate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of 
a permanent program of improved drainage. 

This department administers funds appropriated by the State in 1939 
for drainage of lands in Wicomico and Worcester Counties. 

Affiliated Agencies on the University of Maryland Campus 

at College Park 

The following Federal, State and private agencies are located on the 
College Park campus but are not under the direction of the Board of 
Regents of the University of Maryland or the Maryland State Board of 
Agriculture: 

FEDERAL AGENCIES 

Eastern Experiment Station, Bureau of Mines, U. S. Department of the 
Interior. 

Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Department of the Interior. 

Water Resources Branch, U. S. Geological Survey, U. S. Department of 
the Interior. 

Agricultural Adjustment Administration, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. 

Maryland Crop Reporting Service, Bureau of Agricultural Economic^, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Maryland Headquarters of Agricultural Planning Field Service, Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

STATE AGENCY 

Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps, Department of Public Works, State 
of Maryland. 

PRIVATE AGENCIES 

National Sand and Gravel Association Research Foundation. 
Aviation Division, American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 



SECTION VI 
Records and Statistics 



DEGREES, HONORS, 1941-1942 AND 1942-1943 
SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT, 1942-1943 AND 1943-1944 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1941-1942 
(All degrees conferred at Commencement, May 30, 1942, except as noted) 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Letters 

Fulton John Sheen 

Doctor of Engineering 
Forrest Eugene Ricketts 

Doctor of Laws 

Horace Edgar Flack 

HONORARY CERTIFICATES IN AGRICULTURE 

Walter Edward Burall Martha Emily Hopkins 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Harry Davis Anspon 
Willis Harford Baldwin 
William Henry Brittingham 
Aurelius Franklin Chapman 
Gordon Frederick Dittmar 
Theodore Thomas Dittrich 
Felix Frederick Ehrich 
Carroll Pross Foster 
Albert Barney Godfrey 
Wilson Clark Grant 
Samuel Grober 
George Philip Hager 
Alfred Damon Hoadley 
Robert Edwin Jones 
Carl Williams Kelley 



Amihud Kramer 
Paul Charles Marth 
Bernard Patrick McNamara 
Helen Broughall Metcalf 
J. Victor Monke 
Selmer Wilfred Peterson 
Elwood Clifton Pierce 
August Raspet 
Maurice Monroe Rath 
Lisette Riggs 
Max Rubin 
Vladimir G. Shutak 
Richard Corley Tollefson 
Phillip Jerome Wingate 
John Paul Wintermoyer 



DEGREES CONFERRED, tHl-m^ 



337 



Margaret Brereton 

William Dr«z ^ , 
jlarian Grace Eyler 
^ddie James Hovvard 
David Spergin Jenkms 
limes Buckner Massey, Jr. 
Floyd Alfred Myrick 



Master of Arts 

Russell Bradley Rice 
S. Samuel Selsky 
Florence Louise Spicknall 
Viola Buhrow Stargel 
Wilton Roy Todd 
Wilma Louise Watkins 



Master of Science 



George Stanley Abshier 
Fred Frank Bartel 
Jessica Trussell Biddle 
Franklin Anderson Bolth 
j,„,es Franklin Brownell 
Hilde Marie Christensen 
Joseph William Cotter 
Lewis Eugene Cronm 
Thomas Joseph Davies 
Virginia Elizabeth Davis 
Herbert William Everhart 
Ellen Hepburn Gray 
Ralph Curtis Hammer 



W. J. Haney 
Richard K. Lynt, Jr. 
Marvin Richard McClung 
John Stephen Nowotarski 
James Burton Outhouse 
Betty Runner 
Robert SimonofE _ 

Wilson Levering Smith, Jr. 
Robert Nielsen Stewart 
Richard Edward Ti ler ^ 

Arthur Woodward Warner, Jr. 
Martin N. Winbury 
Frederick Bernhard Wmkier 



Master of 



Katherine B. Baroniak 
Jack Stealton Bierly 
George Francis Carrmgton 
Judith V. Colon-Yordan 
Marie Denecke 
Catherine Mehegan Doyle 
W. L. Edwards 
William Cacy Feddeman 
Inez Ellen Flanagan 
Ruth Bell Hall 
Clarabeth Joy Holt 



\ 



Education 

William John Hucksoll 
Raquel M. Landron 
Henry Franklin Lehr 
Rebekah Liebman 
Edward LeRoy Longley 
Bessie Arterburn Rich 

Mary Emily Margaret Smith 

PhylUs Larue Kemp Sommerfield 

Edward Guy Stapleton 

Carrie Orilla Sutton 

Dorothy Oliver Young 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Bachelor of Science 



Frank Lawrence Bentz, Jr. 
William Wilson Boyer 
Melvin James Bradley 
Donald James Brauner 
James Edgar Bryan, Jr. 
John Daniel Cooley, Jr. 



Joseph Crane Cox 
William Winston Day 
Rudolph Graham Degen 
Marshall Hardcastle Downes 
Harold Preston Dunster, Jr. 
Robert Hobart Edwards 



336 



338 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, mi-m^ 



339 



James Daniel Eisenberger 
Howard Edward Elliott, Jr. 
Matthew Franklin Ellmore 
Chester Gaitley Ernst 
Paul Allen Finney 
Thomas Crawford Galbreath 
William Burroughs Groome 
Joseph Lane Gude 
Edward Wright Harcum 
Robert William Heslop 
J. Bo6rie Jarrell, Jr. 
Richard Lloyd Jenkins, Jr. 
Joseph Woodrow Jones 
Charles Richard Jubb, Jr. 
Elmer Cecil Keller 
Roland Edwin King 
Harold Paul Klahold 
* Gordon Leroy Kluge 
Conrad H. Liden 
Mehrl Foye Mayne 
William Alan McGregor, Jr. 
Robert Hicks McKay 
George Gibson Meredith 
Sheldon Michaels 
William Ward Miles 



Marl D. Myers 
David Edward Northam 
James Grafton shorn 
Mary Roberts Patrick 
Carlton Harvey Porter 

*Karl Frederick Reiblich 
Frank Sam Reid 
Donald Bondy Rose 
Mary Frances Ryon 

*John Manns Schilling 
Jacob Calvin Siegrist 
Charles Harold Smelser, Jr. 
Ernest Edward Smith 
Verlin William Smith 
John Jones Smoot 
Marvin Bernard Solomon 
Clifford Vernon Sparrow, Jr. 
Robert Edward Stalcup 
Leslie Wayne Teller, Jr. 

* George Britton Vogt 
Hugh McKelden Walton 
Maurice Clagett Ward 
John Schell Wehrle 
Mordecai Gist Welling 
Roscoe Newton Whipp 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Bachelor of Arts 



*Charles Burke Allen 
Carl W. Bacharach 
Esther Ethel Balton 
Katherine Ellen Barker 
Barbara Louise Bartlett 
Harry Griffith Baugher 
Randa E. Beener 
John Francis Benecke 
Henry Doterer Blair, Jr. 
Phyllis Juanita Booher 

♦Frank C. Borenstein 
Foster Boyd 
Margaret Brooke 
Helen Adele Bruns 
Doris Beryl Bryant 



* Richard Werber Case 
Ruth Elizabeth Catling 
Elizabeth Ruth Chamberlin 
Samuel Cohen 

Milton Steward Cole 
George Robert Cook 
Clayton Sherwood Dann 
Elizabeth Jane Dennis 

* Charles Raimond Dorr 
Charlotte Eisele 
Helen Thomas England 
Elizabeth Leila Eves 
Yolanda Lucille Farina 
Hariette Esther Feldman 
Maxwell Boone Fleek 



than Frederick Gehman 

SSrSsley Grig.. Jr. 
Se Winston Grollman 
r! ris Ellen Groves 
^" ' Lorraine Hampshire 
Sam Jules «andley 
rucile Anne Hanlon 
tines William Hardey, Jr. 
iTrian Wilson Harvey 

SSrSyrnariCson 
Slheid Marie Hermann 
Kathleen Hope Hevener 
Anne Ghantt Hoen 
.lane Carter Howard 
Erma Kathryn Hughes 
tory Marshall Hutson 
Wilson GiUis Ingraham 
Irving Jacobs 
Helen Mice James 
Wilbur Thompson Jefferys 
Stuart Lesser Kadison 
Celeste Hale Karlsted 
Marie L. L. Kennedy 
Walter Joseph Kerm^. Jr. 
Nancy Ridgeway King 
Carolyn Lacey 
Richard Hyatt Lansdale, Jr. 
Betty Stansbury Lynch 
Rosalie Thornton Lyon 
Valentine Machen 
Cecil Roscoe Martin 
Klovia Elizabeth McKennon 
Anne Gary McKinley 
Joan Marie Moon 



Julian George Murphy 

"^^"'^ "^'aSefochsenreiter, Jr. 
Eugene Charles v^^ 
Eileen Marguerite O Neil 
Elmire Pearson 
*Henry Ralph Pearson 
Katherine Perkins 
Marjorie H. Pinschmidt 
Dorothy Podolsky 
Marvin Morris PoUkoff 
*Bettie Virginia Porter 
Roy Stuart Ramsey, Jr. 
Hennie Froma Rand 
Edna Blanche Raybum 
Beverly Jean Remstedt 
Albert Ritzenberg 
Ann Elizabeth Ryon 
Alan Louis Sagner 
Tanet Lucille Scott 
Martha Holland Shelton 
David Laurence Sheridan 
Orville Cresap Shirey 
Charles Francis Simins 
Annarose Catherine Sleeth 
Theodore John Steli 
Bette Roslyn Stone 
Frances Isabel Stotler 
Alice Louise Striblmg 
Janet Eileen Stubbee 

Richard Craig Sullivan 
Morton Field Taylor 
Norma Louise Thompson 
Rose Marie Udell 
Adrian Herman van Huizen 
tosepWne Wilma Weare 
tRobert A. Wiggms 
Sarah Jemima Yates 



* Degrree conferred August 1, 1941. 



1 

^^ 4 UTS AND SCIENCES 
COLLEGE OF ARTS Ar^u 

Bachelor of Science 

Stewart Lee Baker, Jr. 
Dorothy Anne Aiello ^^,^ workman Baldwin 

Benjamin Amsterdam ^^^^je Margaret Ballard 

Grace Elizabeth Angleberger 

T^ee conferred AuguBt 1,1941. 
tHonors in English. 



340 



David Fowler Bell, Jr. 
Arturo Benavent, Jr 
Mary Lillian Boggs ' 

Frederick Bertram Brandt 
William Kendig Brendle 

Shirley Byers 
Oscar Wilde Camponeschi 
Celeste Esther Capone 
Vesta H. Cassedy 
♦Kenneth James Clark 
Elmer Ellsworth Cook, Jr. 
Ralph Fletcher Davis 
Harry Michael Doukas 
•Nancy Jeanne Duby 
Donald Philips Easter 
Dons May Etzler 
Emma Gladys Foster 
Elizabeth Patricia Frohbose 
Esther Blanche Garrett 

Russell Howard Goir 
Sol Howard Goodgal 
Joseph Roy Guyther 
Robert Charles Henry 
Shirley Heyman 
Harry Edward Hill 
Julia Lee Hodges 

Sir "" »*»«". ■"■ 

Gilmore Hyman 
Robert Settle Insley 



THE VmVEnsiTY OF MARYLAND 



Bobby Lee Jones 

Nancy Lee Jones 
^^an Franklin Keenev 
"I^aniel Kindler 
Irene E. Kuslovitz 
■ Vernon Monroe Lesley 
Margaret Matilda Logan 

- f ;"^>; Wadsvvorth Moore, Jr 
John Morton, II ' ' 

John Michael Palese 
Edgar Thornton Pfeil, j^ 

Edward Hector Price 
Robert Delafield Rands, Jr 
Hammond Rau 
Martha Virginia Repp 
imogene Lola Rice 

7,7^?^ I'^^^^y Rogers, Jr 
^iarvm Rudo 

f%^^^nedy Skipton 
LaRhett Livingston Stuart Jr 

lalmadge Stanley Thompson 
Howard Marshall Truss^S " 

Rebecca Alden Tucker 
^heodore Merriam Vial 
Edward Walton 
Joseph Weintraub 
^■Howard Ferdinand Wilds Tr 
Arthur Fletchall w a ^' 

WilJi^rv. T^ V^oodward 

^ilham Bruce Yowell, Jr 
Paul Randall Ziegler 
^^orman Earl Zinberg 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

John Matthew Bennett ^"'^'^^ ^' '^^^^^^ 

William Tilghman Booth ^^^^^^* ^^^^coll Condon * 

*MMf ^ "^'■^^"^ ^^s^ell ^^"^^d Russell Damuth 

Milton Bunevich f ^^ncis Paul DiBlasi Jr 

Albert Joseph Carry ^^"^^^ Edward Dunn ' * 

Robert Stanley Cartee, Jr ^^{ ^^^^^"^e Emrey 

Garwood Chamberlin ' f ^,^^^^ Preston Evans 

Wilham West Christopher f ^^" ^^^^^^t Eyler, Jr 

~~^eeconf .. ^^^^« Andrew Fanning 

egree conferred August 1. 1941. 



DEGREES CONFERREDrl9U-lH2 



341 



Landy Roman Hales 
Keal LeRoy Hathaway 
Frank Nicholas Heyer, Jr. 
William Wylie Hopkins, Jr. 
Herbert Steele Huff 
Paul Breathed Hutson, Jr. 
Donald Herbert Jermain 
Lowell Truscott Keagy 
William Earl Krouse 
John Gilroy Luntz 
Lawrence MacKenzie 
Stanley Roy Mann 
Paul Donathan McCloskey 
Richard Horace Meacham 
*Allen Vogel Minion 
Samuel Varick Moore 
Robert Thomas Moran 
Robert Marshall Moseley 
Edward Warren Nylen 
Charles Elton Parker 



George Cassity Pendleton 
William Carter Pennington 
Samuel L. Pfefferkorn, Jr. 
Gerald Eugene Prentice 
Charles August Rausch, Jr. 
Elmer Louis Reese, Jr. 
Marjorie Stinson Reside 
Harry Rimmer 
John Dexter Rogers, III 
Alvin Cyril Salganik 
Martin Philip Seigel 
William Nelson Seitz 
Carolyn Elizabeth Seviour 
Hiram Henry Spicer, III 
*Earl Victor Springer 
Edgar Reed Tilton 
Albert Eugene Vogel 
Frederick Bitzer Walker 
John Douglass Wallop, III 
Joseph Hilleary White 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



William Albert Aldridge 

Andrew James Amatrudo 

Clifford Frederic Askins 

Alexander Nathaniel Berman 

Stanley Gerald Biega 

Daniel Bixby 

Peter Jeremiah Coccaro 

Sylvan Phillip Cohen 

Woodrow Wilson Corder 

Joseph Thomas Coroso, Jr. 

James T. Criss 

Paul Deneroff 

Paul Maroni Edwards 

Morris Eilenberg 

Stanley Entelis 

Stewart Everson 

Charles Gibel 

Richard Harold Goldstein 

Ezra Ben Ami Gratz 

Bernard Helitzer 



Alan H. Herman 

Arthur Herschaft 

Seymour George Hyman 

Isador Gilbert Katz 

Samuel Leonidas King 

Irvin Oscar Kolman 

Seymour Koppelman 

Henry Robert Lasch, Jr. 

Algert Peter Lazauskas 

Jason Russell Lewis 

Lawrence Lichtenstein 

Ricardo Martinelli 

Victor William Mintz 

Jorge Eugenio Muiioz Vecchini 

Louis Leo Murzin 

Norman Richard Nathanson 

Murray Nussbaum 

Raymond Thomas Ouellette 

Arthur Anthony Pecoraro 

Julius Benjamin Powell 



* Degree conferred August 1, 1941. 



Vw 



342 



David Samuel Rakosky 
Oiester Bflerck Ralph 
Mario Felix Ramirez Acosta 
Joseph Ralph Reynolds 
iJidney Rogoff 

David Marshall Salutsky 

Alvm Henry Savage 

Harold Schwartz 

Glenn Daniel Steele 

Chester Jerome Stoopack 

Joseph Michael Tighe 



THE VrnVERSlTY OP MARYLAND 



Lewis Cole Toomey 
Bosalind Irene Toubman 
Donald Hovis Towson 
Edwin Beard Waltman 
Howard Felix Watsky 
Earle Harris Watson 
Hans Ernest Weise 
Howard G. Weiss 
John Thomas Wieland 
Roger Elwood Williams 
RUey Seth Williamson, Jr 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Sevier Semmes Baumer 
Hope Dorothy Beauchamp 
Marian Hemmons Bochau 
Martha Elizabeth Bowling 
Helen Joan Carnin 
Shiriey Nudd Conner 
Hiltrude Adelaide Duvall 
Mearie Daniel DuVall 
• Hester Ann Farlow 
Dorothy Maxine Garlitz 
Joseph Ernest Gerstell 
Francis Vernon Getty 
Betty Deloris Hall 

Dorothea Kathleen Bockover 
Esther Handler 

ffiry Catherine Kahl 
Mary Elizabeth Kane 
Mane Poole Kuehle 



Bachelor of Arts 



r , Bachelor 

Isobel Adkins 

isadore Hotsy Alperstein ^ 

Elsie Francis Amoss 
Gertrude Mildred Amoss 

*S H^Be^r ^"^-- 
^^va Frances Beard 

•DegreeconferredAueust 1,1941. 



Vivian Carson Lamm 
Euri h Linthicum Maynard 
Caroline McGill 

*Suzanne Frances Morse 
Cecil Virginia Myers 
William Francis Oberle Jr 

Mary Dorsey Parlett 

Mary Virginia Powell 

Ruth June Ramsdell 

Morris Roseman 

Katherine Jean Shea 

Jean E. Stealey 

Charlotte Mae Stubbs 

Chariotte Blake White 

Dale Bryant Woodburn 



of Science 

*Mabel Vivian Becraft 

*GenfTf '''°'"^" ^^^^^^o^th 
i^ene Thomas Benbow 

*£tSet^™ ^^--- 
Athol Byrd Boone 
Lydia Isabel Boone 
Camilla Angle Boward 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1H1-1H2 



343 



Blanche Lucile Bowie 
>'Emma May Bowman 
=*^Mary Eva Breakall 

Agnes Hayden Carpenter 
*Edward Maurice Clark 
*Orpha Agnes Clark 
*Henry Clayman 
*Mary Amelia CofFman 

Elias Cohen 

Helen Louise Crane 

Mary Carter Dillon 
*Ocie Ella Dodd 
♦Charles Thomas Dubin 
♦Sophia Norman Emmerich 
*Fern Folk Epstein 
*Janet Alma Erickson 

Floyd Charles Faulkner 

Thomas McCoy Fields 
*Zelma Lorraine Fluharty 

Dorothy Helen Foerster 

Katherine Guinnette Garner 
*Hettie Madeline Gibson 
♦Milton Thomas Goedeke 

Harold Goldstein 
♦Gertrude Hope Greenwell 

Helen Casteele Griffin 
♦Susan Quidort Griffith 
♦Margaret Emory Haile 

Mildred Elaine Hamilton 
♦Leila Virginia Hardesty 

Phillip Charles Heath 
♦Donald Cummins Hennick 

♦Ida Louise Hepbron 

♦Miriam McDonnell Holmes 

♦Anne Mildred Hoyle 
Stella Hutchison 
Sylvan William Jacobs 
Marjorie Evelyn Jost 
Elizabeth Jane Jullien 

♦Virginia Margaret Kalbaugh 

♦Gee L. Kaufman 
Claire S. Kennedy 
William Harold Kinlock, III 

♦Charles Robert Kinna 



Helena Mathilda Alma Knauer 
*May Talbert Kyle 
Norma Louise Leonard 
Eleanor Elizabeth Linthicum 
♦Evelyn Louise Lippy 
♦Margaret Marie Lyons 
Dora Mildred Magaha 
Robert Louis Main 
♦Mary Elizabeth Manley 
Carroll Ely Markowitz 
Alice Ray Martin 
♦Hilda Catherine McGuigan 
Mary Josepha McGuigan 
Dora Malcolm McLuckie 
♦Catherine Elizabeth McMahan 
J. Paul McNeil 
♦Helen Ashcom Medinger 
Margaret Reed Meiser 
Elna Mae Miller 
♦Mary Emma Mitchell 
♦Robert Lee Mohle 
'^Mary Elliott Monroe 

Lillian Gertrude Morgan 
♦Mary Morgan 
♦Louise Cusick Mullendore 

J. Harvey Nichols 

Carole Novick 
♦George Vincent Oberle 
♦Pauline Hilda Omett 
♦Marie Martha Parrish 

Harry Austin Peregoy 
♦Esther Virginia Phillips 

Nina Claflin Piozet 
♦Albia Eleanor Riggin 

George Milford Riggin 

William Thomas Riley, Jr. 

Henry J. Rockstroh 

Florence Broughton Rost 

Harriet Miller Schacht 

William Harvey Schoenhaar 
♦Dorothy Wilmot Shires 

Harold Gerstell Showacre 

♦Rose Carney Shuck 

Olivia Kerby Sims 



♦ Degree conferred August 1, 1941. 



344 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



t 



1 

I 



Robert Herman Smith, Jr. 

* Henry Sokolsky 

*Letty H. Souder 
Helen Kuhn Sperry 
Ruth Hammond Staley 
Henry Norman Steckler 
Catherine E. Stiles 
Ruth Faye Surosky 

*Audrey Sansbury Teunis 
Effie Orra Thomas 
Jean Campbell Thomas 
Anna Marie Urquhart 
Eleanor James Vaughan 



*Mary Beth Wackwitz 
*Fred John Ward 
*Dorothy Helen West 

James Henry Wharton 

Aileen Marie Williams 
^Elinor George Wilson 

Josephine Eleanora Wilson 
-*Treva Burgoon Wink 

Ann Oldham Wolf 

Margaret Estelle Wolfinger 

Doris Wood 

Millicent-Lois Yamin 
* Grace Robinson Zeller 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Bachelor of Science 



Robert Drury Baldwin 
Jack Ralph Barrett 
Hyman Alexander Berg 
Joseph Hendricks Bilbrey, Jr. 
George William Bollinger 
Rodney Leonard Boyer 
Robert August Brand, Jr. 
Frank Gilbert Carpenter 
John Edward Cordyack 
John Francis Curtin, Jr. 
Harold Elwood Earp, Jr. 
John M. Eberhart 
Thomas Renwick Finlayson 
Elmer Leroy Freemire 
Paul Diehl Freeze 
Gumey Lindale Godwin 
William McLean Graham, Jr. 
Robert Edward Greene 
Robert Ashby Groves, Jr. 
Stuart Haywood 
Jeremiah Collins Hege 
Reginald Kenning Hoddinott, Jr. 
Page Fillmore Hopkins 
John LeRoy Hutchinson 
Bernard Bertram Klawans 
Howard Joseph Klug 
Philip Elledge Kurz 
John Lopata 



James Edwin Malcolm 
Richard White McCusker 
Benjamin Morris Owens 
Ernest Herbert Peterson 
Weldon Newton Rawley, Jr. 
William Marshall Redd, Jr. 
Elijah Rinehart, Jr. 
Thomas McDowell Rives, Jr. 
Samuel Thomas Robertson, Jr. 
Robert Welsh Russell 
Francis Robert Schmidt 
Irwin Joseph Schumacher 
Robert Wellington Searls 
Fred Shulman 
Joseph Alvin Sirkis 
John Franklin Stevens, III 
William Reeves Tilley 
Vahl Elbert Underwood 
Arthur Howard Valentine 
George Lawrence Wannall 
Norwood Reeves Warehime 
Edward Webster 
Robert Ramsay Westfall 
Roland Gilbert White, Jr. 
Donald Herbert Wick 
John Wright Williams 
Thomas Theodore Witkowski 



DEGREES CONFERRED, IHl-m^ 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



345 



Marjorie Leah Allen 
Helen Irene Bedell 
ffvelyn Byron 
Doris Madeline Clements 
Adelaide Emma Coe 
Mary Elizabeth Cole 
Rebecca Ruth Dashiell 
Mary Johnston Davidson 
'alberta Rose Dorsey 

Erin Ellis 

Audrey Louise Erickson 

Alice Catherine Fisk 

M. Elizabeth Funk 

Mary Ann Griffith 

Susan Gusack 

Jessie Wallace Halstead 

Edwina Hambleton 

Eleanor Elizabeth Jenkms 

Louise Bendette Ladd 
Mary Bessant Latimer 
Margaret Alice LiUie 
Marian Loomis 
Agnes Louise Marks 



Doris Helen McFarland 
Dorothy Ann Medbery 
Ruth Louise Meehan 
^Marjorie Lillian May Miller 
Mildred Melton Muma 
Elizabeth Munn Mumma 
Betsy Anne Myrick 
Phyllis June Newmaker 
Jane Elizabeth Page 
Martha Locke Rainalter 
Carol Remsberg 
Elma Louise Staley 
Ruth Elaine Stowell 
Betty Lou Sullivan 
Margaret Louise Teller 
Ruth Lee Thompson 
Catherine May Trundle 
Edvthe M. Turner 
Elizabeth Louise Tydmgs 
Mary Virginia Vaiden 
Clara Elizabeth Vawter 
Dorothy Werth 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



* Degree conferred August 1, 1941. 



Bachelor 

Thomas Carlyle Carrico 
Richard Werber Case 
John Thomas Clark, Jr. 
Albert Patterson Close 
William Paul Frisco 
Edwin Anthony Gehring 
Alberto Gerardino-Villanueva 

Louis Click 
tJoseph Harold Grady 
Harry Lindley Grubbs, Jr. 
William Gulbransen 
Frank Lloyd Hamniond 

Frances Neff Harris 

Samuel Miltcn Ivrey 

Earle Leonard Kassirer 
tWilliam Woodrow Mahoney 

♦ Degree conferred August 1. 1941. 
t With honors. 



of Laws 

Marvin Mandel 
Homer Lerch Miller 
tWilliam Bruce Oswald 
Maurice Judson Page 
Edward Bernard Reddy 
Vaughn Edward Richardson 
tJohnReitz Royster 
MiUon Herman Franklin Saul 
William Armiger Skeen 
John Lee Smith, Jr. 
Harold Solomon 
Arthur E. Tarantino 
Albert Edward Weir 
Meredith Richardson Wilson 
Clark Thompson Wisotzki 



'1 ?' 



i 



1^'' 

!« 



346 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Doctor of Medicine 



William Alstrom Ahroon 
David Bacharach, Jr. 
Earl Rudolph Baldwin, Jr. 
Robert Amthor Barthel, Jr. 
Morton Edward Bassan 
Van Boring Bennett 
Joseph Gordon Bird 
Francis Dorsey Thomas Bowen 
Alexander Emmanuil Brodsky 
William Luther Byerly, Jr. 
Richard Alexius Carey 
Harry Franklin Coffman, II 
Frank Concilus 
Sybil Corbett 
Matthew Mordica Cox 
Warren Eugene Crane 
William Ward Currence 
Thomas Eugene Davies 
Jose G. Davila Lopez 
John Russell Davis, Jr. 
Newland Edward Day 
Karl Anton Dillinger 
Philip Lafayette Dixon, Jr. 
Richard Gushing File 
John Howard Franz 
Marion Friedman 
Jose R. Fuertes 
Joseph Charles Furnari 
Jewett Goldsmith 
Arthur Edward Gramse 
Exie Mildred Gregory 
Morton L. Hamburger 
Prevost Hubbard, Jr. 
Albert Lester Ingram, Jr. 
Robert Clark Irwin 
Hansford Fred Johnson 
Everett Davis Jones 
Theodore Kardash 
Joseph Francis Keeley, Jr. 
Robert Allan Kiefer 
Stanley Benedict Klijanowicz 
Lawrence Jacob Koleshko 
Martin William Krepp, Jr. 



John Gregory Kroll 

Paul Charles Kundahl 

Etta Carolyn Link 

Robert Hamilton Longwell 

Irving Robert Lowitz 

Louis Ottone Joseph Manganiello 

Frank Sebastian Marino 

Robert Mazer 

James Nathaniel McCosh, Jr. 

Malcolm Thomas McGoogan, Jr. 

John James Meli 

Edgar Allen Miller, Jr. 

Robert Abram Moses 

George Roy Mullins, Jr. 

Caesar Francis Orofino 

John Carlton Osborne 

Patrick C. Phelan, Jr. 

Otto Charles Phillips 

Dale Morton Posey 

William Thomas Raby 

Edward Peyton Ritchings 

John David Rosin 

Anthony Peter Rousos 

Henry Harrison Sadler, Jr. 

Wallace Hyman Sadowsky 

Isadore Sborofsky 

Mary Louise Lyons Scholl 

Joseph Whiddon Scott 

William Jeffress Senter 

Edgar Roderick Shipley 

Maurice Isaac Shub 

Louis Harry Shuman 

James George Stegmaier 

Andrew James Summa 

Francis James Townsend, Jr. 

Francis Willoughby Traynor 

Joseph Wallace, Jr. 

Charles Monroe Ward 

Charles Herman Williams 

Edgar Percival Williamson, II 

Edwin Andrew Zepp 

Loy Miller Zimmerman 



DEGREES CONFERRED, lUl-im 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Graduate in Nursing 



347 



Ivy May Albaugh 

Anna Doris Alt 

?race Elizabeth Angleberger 

Fmilie Margaret Ballard 

Emmett Elizabeth Beach 

Nancy Mae Black 

Shirley Byers 

Louise Mason Coard 

Jean Louise Conrad 
Helen Pauline Cope 
Doris May Etzler 
Emma Gladys Foster 
Grace Cecilia Frederick 
Esther Blanche Garrett 



Julia Lee Hodges 
Florence Hubbard 
Nancy Lee Jones 
Gladys Maude Leonard 
Margaret Matilda Logan 
Marguerite Elizabeth Loock 
Louise Dukes Magruder 
Mary Ruth Petry 
Martha Virginia Repp 
Karolyn Gwendolyn ShaiTer 
Rachel Louetta Skiles 
Rosalind Jane Small 
Anna Penelope Tucker 
Rebecca Alden Tucker 



/ 



SCHOOL 
Bachelor of 



OF PHARMACY 



Elmar Bernard Berngartt 
Sidney Gary Clyman 
John Michael DeBoy 
Milton Stanley Getka 
Milton Goldberg 
Mice Emily Harrison 
Alfred Marion Jankiewicz 
Sidney Raymond Klavens 
Elmer Wilson Nollau 



Science in Pharmacy 

Stephen Panamarow 
Sherman David Pritzker 
Milton Reisch 
Sidney Sacks 
Melvin Shochet 
Sidney Smulovitz 
Warren Eldred Weaver 

Eugene Clayton Weinbach 
Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 



348 



V 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
DEGREES CONFERRED, 1942-1943 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Laws 

George L. Radcliffe c? 

"^^^ne Sumner Welles 

HONORARY CERTIFICATF^ tm a^t, 

Guy Everett Harmon ^ AGRICULTURE 

David Benjamin McDowell ^T^ ^i<^h^vd Phillips, Jr 

Robert Wilbur Shermamine 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Ross Ellwood Backenstoss, Jr. 
iiichard Henry Barry 
Cornelia Marie Cotton 

Carroll Eastburn Cox 

Julian Cobum Crane 

John Milton Cross 

Guy M. Everett 

Walter Christian Gakenheimer 

VVilIiam Henry Gaub 

William Holland Griggs 
Walter Judson Haney 
Robert Isaac Jaffee 
Charles Jarowski 
Thomas Morton Little 
Raymond Irving Longley, Jr. 



John Udell Michaelis 
Martin Hammond Muma 

A^Ioyd Elwin Parks 

Robert Collom Rand 

George Bergin Reynard 

Roy Schneiter 

Donald Emerson Shay 

Robert Edward Thompson 

George Clarence Vedova 

Thomas Charles Gordon Wagner 
Alfred Case Whiton ^ 

Edmond Grove Young 
John Ashby Yourtee 
Bernard Leon Zenitz 



John Conrad Appel 

Louisa Gardner Dillard 

Prank John Getty 

Albert Norm.an Greenfield 

Edwin P. Heinrich 

Raymond Frederick Hesler 
Ruth Amanda Jehle 
Harry William Krausse 
Edward Nelson MacConomy 
Norman Hill Maring 
Nicholas George Nides 
George Vincent Oberle 



Master of Arts 



Jr. 



Edward Wiltse Paulette 
Howard Geisler Phillips 
Edith Palmer Popenoe 
Helen Wade Pressley 
Morris Roseman 
Cora Dodson Sasscer 
Walter Henry Schuler 

Marguerite Martindale Stone 

Olive Wright Sudler 

Jean Burke Wheeler 

Gladys Hildreth Young 

Alice Ruth Zerbola 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1H2-1HS 



349 



Master of Science 



Ming-Chien Chiang 
Lexey Jane Cragin 
Leon Webster Frayer, Jr. 
William Kanode Gautier 
Margaret Towell Goldsmith 
Harold Ernest Hensel 
John Joseph Lander 
Joshua Melvin Leise 



Hazel B. Murray 
Orr Esrey Reynolds 
Aaron Wiley Sherwood 
Charles Alfred Shreeve, Jr. 
Samuel Cantor Temin 
Ruth Lee Thompson 
Edith-Jane Wiegand 
Carroll Christian Woodrow 



Master of Education 



Louis Pinckney Allen, Jr. 
Benjamin Franklin Barger 
C. Paul Barnhart 
Louise Robey Birch 
Dora Goldiner Bresler 
Mary Frances Barr Bush 
Richard Rowland Clopper 
Louise Roberts Colip 
Florence Newell Cornell 
Kenneth Walden Frisbie 
Charles Henry Gontrum 
Vernon Brooks Gunther 
Nellie Griffith Hardell 



Sara Horton 
Sidney Taylor Lawler 
Robert Faust Lesher 
Daniel Cruzen Link 
Arria Griffith McGinniss 
Ruth Henrietta McRae 
Sister Philomena Ossenmacher 
Gustavus Adolphus Sieverts 
Ruth Elizabeth Smith 
Sister Barbara Storms 
Robert Henry Weagly 
Ruth Alberta Wynn 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Bachelor of Science 



Lee William Adkins 

Julian Bradley Anderson 

Nevin Snader Baker 

Blair Barnard Barger 

Robert Harold Benson 

Alice Ruth Bentz 

Paul Curtis Betts 

Lloyd Carroll Biser 

Donald Mitchell Boyd 

Alan Wolf Brylawski 

Philip Nash Buddington 

Nicolas Manrique Cartagena 

Hartley Douglas Crist 

William Evans Crow 

James Paul Duke, Jr. 

Richard VanDriel Eck 

Irving McKim Gordy, Jr. 

Oliver Richard Carroll Gore, Jr. 



Francis Alexander Gray, Jr. 

Sylvan Leonard Handen 

John Hansen Hoffman 

Philip Raymond Hogue 

Marion Clark Hudson 

Max VanKuren Hunt 

Lester Kiefer 

Harry Edward Korab, Jr. 

Thaddeus Joseph Kott 

Emory Childress Leffel 

Theodore Leizman 

John Philip Mattingly 

Leib McDonald 

Russell Francis Mizell, Jr. 

Harry Ivan Neuman 

Robert Lee Nixon, Jr. 

Nestor Obando 

Elmer Hammond Owens, Jr. 



350 



I 



Gilbert Willard Perry 
Arthur George Phillips 
Kenneth Lester Ports 
James Murray Prigel 
Norvell Stanley Ralston 
Henry John Rassier 
Kenton Charles Reynolds 
Orlando Ridout, IV 
Norman H. Rosenberg 
Aaron Rosenstadt 

Charles William St. Clair 

Robert Sandler 

Edgar A. Schaeffer 

Eugene Stanley Schlosnagle 

Irvin Philip Schloss 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Charles Philip Seltzer 
Joseph Miller Shaw 
Jane Luray Showacre 
Paul Earl Sigrist 
Warren Charles Smith 
Joseph Matthew Steger 
Clyde William Stephens 
William Codding Stevens 
Eugene John Sullivan 
Daniel William Talmadge 
Amanda Adelaide Ulm 
Joyce Jacquelyn Uthus 
Glen Earl Weston 
Donald Fillmore Whinerey 
John Robert Williams 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 19^2-19^3 



351 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



John Franklin Adams 
Richard Luther Andrews 
Anna Virginia Auslund 
William Henry Badenhoop 
Read Turner Bailey 
Ruth P. Barsky 
Cynthia Baylin 
Betty Fahmey Beachy 
Charles August Bechtold, Jr 
Mary Joan Bell 
Rex Ricardo Venn Benson 
t>hirley Berman 
Robert Foust Bierly 
Margaret Elizabeth Bond 
Mary Clare Bonham 
Norman Irving Broadwater 
Muriel Frances Brockman 
Mary Elizabeth Brooks 
Eleanor Alice Broome 
Margaret Washington Brown 
Herbert Gabriel Carhart, Jr 
Bemiece Brown Chambers 
Mary Alice Clark 
Alexander Slater Clarke 
Jane Mary Cooper 
Robert Vigert Cormack 
Ploomie Elva Criner 



Bachelor of Arts 

Ann E. Criswell 
Joseph McLain Crockett 
William Earl Dixon 
Rose Veronica Doyno 
Sidney Tzvie Efross 
Margaret Ann Engel 
Garland William Fairbanks 
Rosadean Flaks 
Leonard Stanley Freedman 
Frances Eileen Long Freet 
Elsie May Flom 
Ellen Frances Gray 
Aria Georgeanna Guild 
Oliver Robert Guyther 
Dagmar Barbro Hansson 
Pauline Hardy 
Carl August Harris 
Vernon Thomas Hart 
David Saul Hurwitz 
Bernard M. Hyatt 
Belno Edward Ingram 
Robert Edward Inman 
Betty Cecile Jacoby 
Marie Marilyn Janof 
Miriam Dianna Kellman 
Charlotte Melcher Kidd 
Dorothea Theresa Kilmain 



Walter Owen Koehler 
j^ary Virginia Langbein 
Joseph Ganam Lindamood, Jr. 
Nancy Masters 
Marjory Jean Matting] y 
Ernest Ray Mattoon 
Thomas Stephen McCeney 
Alma R. Merican 
Frank Savage Mervine 
Muriel Ellen Miller 
Ruth Morgan 
John Neumann 
Jeannette Owen 
Bertha Ann Paterson 
Dorothy Lee Powell 
Mary-Stuart Montague Price 
Florence Primm 
Jacqueline Anne Pritchett 
Daniel G. Rice, Jr. 
Nelle Price Robertson 
Jacob N. Rothstein 



Doyle Preston Royal 
Nancy Tyler Royal 
Mary Ellen Ruff 
Irene Jean Scher 
Kathryn Gertrude Sheely 
Shirley Cynthia Sherman 
Loy Monroe Shipp, Jr. 
Magdalena Martha Siposs 
Martha Ladd Sparhawk 
William Perry Stedman, Jr. 
William Selby Stewart 
George Ely Suser 
William Ellsworth Tolley 
Robert James Torvestad 
Florence Eleanor Trinkle 
Frederic Benson Warder, Jr. 
Ruth May Weinstein 
Sonia Weisberg 
Mildred Anita White 
George Blaine Wix 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Science 



Ellsworth George Acker 
Norman H. Alshan 
Jeanne Dorothy Amlicke 
John Louis Apuzzio 
Joseph Stanley Ardinger, Jr. 
Frederick Louis Bach, Jr. 
James Baido 
David Hargis Barker 
Houston Lesher Bell 
Walter Jose Benavent 
Elmar Bernard Berngartt 
Alfred Dement Bonifant 
Gilbert Canter Bowen 
Raymond Bradshaw, Jr. 
Herbert Gibbs Brandes 
Richard James Brown 
Louise Paddon Buckner 
Francis Vernon Burke 
Marguerite Elsie Burr 
Robert Francis Byrne 
George Russell Callender, Jr. 



David Harry Chambers 
Paul Chmar 

Edmund Parker Churchill, Jr. 
Davis Hall Corkran 
Gilbert Herbert Cullen 
Harry Kirk Dansereau ' 
Joseph Louis Dantoni 
John Murray Dennis 
Patricia Dodd 
Charles Manley Dodson 
William Milton Eareckson, III 
William Carl Ebeling, III 
Bertram Joseph Frankel 
Franklyn Drennan Gassaway 
Doris Louise Gerwig 
Henry Glassner 
Daniel Ware Goldman 
Eleanor Louise Gordner 
Larry Quentin Green 
Albert C. Herrmann 
Frederick Landis Hill 



DEGREES CONFERRED, m2-lW 



353 



352 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Betty Elaine Hoff master 
James Eden Horn 
Robert Wanton Ireland 
Irwin Seymour Jacobs 
Alexander Palmer Kelly, Jr. 
Catherine Elizabeth Kurzenknabe 
David Raymond Lawrie 
Daniel Bair Lemen 
Charles Teddy Lempke 
Charles Milton Linthicum 
Alan Campbell Macpherson 
Mary Katherine Martin 
George Alexander Maxwell, Jr. 
Ula Virginia Maxwell 
Margaret Elizabeth McCathran 
Elizabeth Jane McCauley 
Donald Willis Mintzer 
Joseph Herman Mintzer 
William Henry Mosberg, Jr. 
Paul Woolever Newgarden, II 
Richard Baxter Norment, III 
Alfred Simpson Norton 
Allen Jay O'Neill 
Vitale Xavier Paganelli 
Richard Merle Peck 
Edwin Lowell Pierpont 
Robert Lee Porter 
Mildred Radin 
Mark Raum 



Ilenneth Albert Richer 
Eugene John Riley 
I.Iargaret Eagle Roelke 
Harry Franklin Rolfes 
Ruth Eleanor Schene 
Charles Edward Shaw, Jr. 
George Murray Simons 
Walter Karl Spelsberg 
Stanley Herbert Steinberg 
William Herman Stellhorn, Jr. 
Frederick Louis Stichel, Jr. 
Miriam Elizabeth Stultz 
Lorraine Long Thomas 
Clarence Ashton Thumm, Jr. 
Mary Louise Touchet 
Dominick Robert Traina 
Max Tryon 
Roy B. Turner, Jr. 
Homer Edward Uhland 
Milton H. vanden Berg 
Raymond Albert Watson 
William Edward Waxter 
Harvey O'Neil Webster, Jr. 
Gunther Adolf Werner 
William Fringer Wheeler 
Frances Danby Williams 
Charles Randolph Wolfe 
Janet Eugenia Wyvell 
Mary Agnes Yeager 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Science 



Charles Ralph Barker, Jr. 
Joseph George Berlin 
Abraham William Birnbaum 
Thomas Earle Bourne, Jr. 
Walter E. Christmas 
James Richard Coffman 
Martin Irving Collins 
A. Budd Cutler 
Burton Fairall Davis 
David Messick Dayton 
James Elmer Degges, Jr. 
John Jenkins Dobler, II 
William Leslie Ellis 



Harry Drew Fisher 
William J. Fulton 
Clemens Weaver Gaines 
Charles Pearson Gay, Jr. 
Norman Milton Glasgow 
William Martin Goldenzweig 
Harry Randolph Gordon 
Thornton Francis Green 
David Harry Greenberg 
Kenneth Delos Hall 
Robert Braden Hammond 
Joseph Charles Harry 
William Cramer Heathcote 



Herman Farr Kaiser 
Svlvan L- Katz 
Tomes Nolan Kmsel 
Sam Hubert Krehnbrink 
nnnald Edward Lacey 
Jias Joseph Lanahan, Jr. 
Saul Laniado 

l1!^T^^Se\y Longanecker, Jr. 

Robert George Mahon 

William Henry Mattingley, Jr. , 

Anne Louise Maxwell 

Swift McKinney 

John Frederick Miller 

Robert Morgan Miller 

Keith Nicholas Montgomery 

John Joseph Murphy, Jr. 

Donald Elliott Newe 1 

Robert Willms Petzold 

Page Boyd Pratt 



John Frank Rabai 
Alexander S. Rabins 
William Oakley Roach, Jr. 
Edward Charles Robinson 
Norman Philip Rosenfield 

Russell Melvin Rumpf 

Clarence Albert Schauman, Jr. 

John Reed Scott, Jr. 

Wendell Ellsworth Shawn, Jr. 

Norman Starr Sinclair 

James Gibbons Sneeringer 

George Francis Sprott 

Edward Harris Steinberg 

John Kefauver Tate 
Daniel Cleveland Triplett 
Bernard Ulman, Jr. 

Carl Elmer Vincent 
Reginald Charles Vincent 

Frederick Ernest Wurzbacher, Jr. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



Murray Birghenthal 
John Pershing Blevins 
David Randall Book 
Frank Jackson Bryce 
Asher Burton Carey, Jr. 
William Page Carter, Jr. 
John Costa Carvalho 
Oscar Check 
Irving Jay Cierler 
William Cirrito 

George Peter Cook 

Harry Wolf Cooper 

Leo Joseph Czachorowski, Jr. 

George Marinus DeYoung 

Charles L. DiGristine 

James Vincent DiTrolio 

Sidney Manuel Dulberg 

Lepo Eff 

Joseph Anthony Emburgia 

Irving Feigenbaum 

Milton Feldman 

Leo Fishman 



Paul Barr Foxman 

Mont Morris Gardner 

Harold H. Goodman 

Willard Theodore Greene 

Albert Bernard Greifer 

Howard Joel Hauss 

Stanley H. Heller 

Paul Alden Herman 

Morton Kaufman 

Joseph Klein 

Seymour Stanley Klmger 

Hyman Kraman 

Leonard Krugman 

Jack Kushner 

Lester Langel 

George Porter Leatherbury 

William Glenwood Lee 

Bernard Benjamin Leibowitz 

Arthur J. Lepine 

Lawrence Bertram Levme 

Herbert Stanley Levy 

Lewis Simpson Libby, Jr. 



I 



354 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, m2-ms 



355 



W1 



Michael Peter Liloia 
Alfred Albert Martino 
Calvin Mass 
Joseph Masserman 
Kenneth Stuart McAtee 
Richard Sterling Mehring 
John White Menius, Jr. 
Philip Nussbaum 
John Owen O'Meara 
Vincent Robert Onesti 
Philip Pedinoff 
Harry George Pfeffer 
James Thomas Reilly 
Maurice C. Robinson 
Kalman Morris Rosenberg 
Mortimer Rosenfeld 
Norman Harold Rubin 
William Rubin 
Donald Gerow Russell 
Alexander Schechter 



David Bytovetzski Scott 

Justin Manfred Seides 

Sylvan Myron Elliott Shane 

Daniel Shaw 

Robert Theodore Shilkret 

Thomas Rex Simpson 

Marvin Skowronek 

Russell Phillips Smith, Jr. 

Eugene Spanier 

Riley Eugene Spoon, Jr. 

Martin Stem 

Sidney SucoU 

William Massie Tunstall, Jr. 

Alberto Jose Walsh 

Benjamin Miller Watson 

Milton Snell Wilkinson 

Anthony Peter Yablonski 

Marvin Sigmond Yalovitz 

Julius Zahn 

John B. Zimmerman 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



Lottie Stevenson Adkins 

B. Bernard Cohen 

Anthony Louis de Christopher 

Mary Dunn 

John Thomas Franey 

Ramon Grelecki 

Janet Heggie 

Mari M. Ellicott Hess 

Charles Lingo Hudson 

Lucille Humphreys 

Glennis Lundberg Kabat 

Irvin W. Katz 



Alma Barbara Laurer 
Audrey Betty Levy 
Judson Duley Lincoln 
Ernest Alvin Loveless, Jr. 
Harry Jack Mier, Jr. 
Harriet Eleanor Morris 
Emma W. Rawlings 
Samuel William Seidel 
Mary George Stavropoulos 
Elizabeth Laura Stratmann 
Barbara Jane Wagner 
Frank Frederick White, Jr. 



Bachelor of Science 



Saville Mathews Allnut 
Loretta Joy Ashby 
Alice Harper Bailey 
Gladys Marie Beall 
Mary Elizabeth Beard 
Mary Mildred Frances Beck 
Elisabeth Benner 
Marian Birch 



Margaret Mary Blocher 
Margaret Elizabeth Bouton 
Ellen Hooe Bowling 
Sara Elizabeth Bowlus 
Theresa Elizabeth Brinsfield 
Frances Louise Brown 
Mabel Catherine Burke 
Elva Rebecca Butler 



I 

I 

'it 



Betty Hopkins Callahan 

Patrick Joseph Carolan 

T ouis George Chacos 

Mary Josephine Chapman 

Grace Irene Cookson 

Mildred Virginia Cromwell 

William Walter Culler, Jr. 

Preston James Daisey 

Leviah Williams Daniel 

Ann Alexander Dilgard 

Edna Kennedy Downs 

Edwena Scott Durr 

Laura R. Durst 

Edith May English 

Thomas Howard Evans 

Helen Hargett Horine Everhart 

Catherine Faulkner 

Grace E. Filer 

Mary Edna Fleming 

Lillian Ozzella Forsythe 

Catherine Anne Gannon 

Mildred Pauline Garvin 

Francis Gill 

Gloria I. Gottlieb 

Katharine L. Gough 

Abraham Granek 

Hilda Brandenburg Greene 

Anne Ruth Greenwald 

Herbert Joseph Gunther 

Mary Elizabeth Hanson 

Lillian L. Harvey 

Margaret Lee Hatcher 

Maria Elizabeth Heame 

Dorothy Donaldson Hendrix 

Conrad Hohing, Jr. 

Malinda Bennett Holland 

Joseph Luther Hoopengardner, Jr. 

Margaret Sampson Ingles 

Hazel Inskeep 

George William Jarmoska 

Martha Roberta Jones 

Frederick William Kaufman 

Emmett Patrick Kavanaugh, Jr. 

Frances Jones Keenan 

Frances Marie Keesee 

Helen Irene King 



Olive Elizabeth King 

Margaret Menefee Kline 

Catharine Elizabeth Krafft 

Gladys Irene Lam 

Clara Berry Leonard 

Katherine Marshall Leonard 

Parepa Fidelia Linthicum 

Margaret Morgan Lippy 

Mary Margaret Longridge 

Harriet Ellen Magness 

Robert Lee Maisel 

Margaret Rose Manley 

Amy E. L. Mason 

Everett Stewart McCauley 

Alice Anna McCormick 

Arnold Mermelstein 

Edna Marie Michael 

Catherine Mileto 

Hilda Jane Moore 

Dorothy Mudd 

Addie Moore Mumford 

Eleanor Haggett Murphy 

Ruby Welker Myers 

Wilma Constance Myers 

Clifford LeRoy Nelson, Jr. 

Willa Lee Ott 

Alex Passen 

Margaret Powell Payne 

Edna Irene Peters 

Novella Hamer Phillips 

Sallie Rae M. Phillips 

Elmer Luther Poffenberger 

Elizabeth Smith Pumphrey 

Patricia Elizabeth Captolia Richards 

Pearl Josephine Romm 

Helen Mae Rudy 

Maurice Herbert Schreiber 

Howard Ferdinand Schwarz 

Annette Shalowitz 

Virginia Sharp Shinn 

Dorothy Elise Shue 

Herbert Silver 

Evelyn Smith 

Klora Estella Smith 

Mary Jane Smith 

Kathryn Alma Snook 



356 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, m2-lHS 



357 









! 



Jessie Gallahan Soper 
Kathryn Elizabeth Soper 
Nellie Ida Speicher 
Margaret Stevens Stack 
Clara Beattie Stauffer 
Isadore Loy Stein 
Samuel Carl Sterling 
Margaret Ellen Harriet Stevens 
Lottie Simmons Stoker 
Elizabeth Baughman Swisher 



Lida Maye Testerman 

Anna H. Thomas 

James Gale Townsend 

Louise-Marie Umali 

Mary Margaret Vandegrift 

Clara Gertrude Weller 

Virginia Jane White 

Phyllis Edna Harvey-Williams 

Electa Jane Williamson 

Cynthia Quackenbush Wilmer 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Bachelor of Science 



Redfield Wilmerton Allen 
Richard Walter Armstrong 
Elwood Bates 
Clarence Edward Becker 
Anson Wesley Biggs 
Richard R. Bransdorf 
David Timothy Brown 
Ralph Mosher Burlin 
Fitzhugh Taliaferro Clark 
Donald Dwight Davis 
Andrew Stilley Deming, Jr. 
Leland Arthur De Pue 
Charles Raymond Dietz 
Howard Frederick Emrich, Jr. 
David Alexander Falck 
Louis Flax 
Samuel Fradin 
Richard Harrison Funke, Jr. 
Charles Luther Gransee 
Morris William Green 
John Charles Hamilton 
Norman Edward Hathaway 
Charles Raymond Hayleck, Jr. 
Charles Fiske Hochgesang 
Leon Davis Hoffman, Jr. 
Edwin William Inglis 
Robert Newton Just 
Irving Kabik 
Elliott Katzen 
Howard Lee Keller 
Richard Henry Kent 
Jackson Arthur Kessinger 



Guy Senseny Kidwell, Jr. 
William O'Connor King 
Frederick Henry Kohloss 
Tolbert Harding Konigsberg 
Harry Sylvester Leasure, Jr. 
George William Lewis, Jr. 
Charles Cooke Love 
Angelo Louis Lozupone 
Edward Warren Lusby 
Edmund Frank Magill 
Joseph Valentine Mariner, Jr. 
James Nathan Marsden 
Paul Rhodes Mattix, Jr. 
Russell Whitney McFall 
Robert Clifton McKee 
Daniel Merritt McNally 
John T. Mitchell, Jr. 
George Joseph Newgarden, III 
Emmet Dennis Owens 
Arnold George Rawling 
George Eugene Reynolds, Jr. 
Robert Matthew Rivello 
George Victor Rodgers 
Hugo Grotius Sheridan, Jr. 
Paul Johnson Smith 
Burton Solomon 
James Robert Spicer 
John Robert Spielman 
Willis Ray Stafford, Jr. 
George Ray Stuntz, Jr. 
Henry Gilbert Thompson 
John Bonar Tucker 



^^^neth Macmillan Uglow, Jr. 
^.y Norman unman, II 
James Edward Updegraff, Jr. 
Edward Joseph Warren 
Harry Boss Weaver 
George Conner Webster 



Harry Kennady Wells 
Donald Parker Whittemore 
Leonard Frederick Williams 
Seymour David Wolf 
Robert Hugh Yeatman 
Willis Harold Young, Jr. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Marian Louise Beck 

Phyllis Beilock 

Shirley Luella Bennett 

Mary Margaret Bohanan 

Elizabeth Marie Burke 

Betty Burner 

Joyce Anne Cafferty 

Eileen Beryl Carr 

Mary Charlotte Farrington Chaney 

Jane Almy Chapin 
Ruth Cohen 
Marjorie Louisa Cook 
Lois Roberta Davis 
Mary Jane Dawson 
Elizabeth Jean Donahue 
Frances Jean Dunberg 
Betty Lou Fike 
Evelyn Mary Foerster 
Anna Rebecca Freeman 
Rita Christine Frey 
Mary Hilda Gautier 
Jennette Lucile Giovannoni 
Beulah May Gisriel 
Doris Marie Green 
Elizabeth S. Haase 
Mary D. Harris 
Mary Catherine Henley 
Frances Evelyn Hidnert 
Nancy Brandes Holland 
Shirley Claire Hubel 
Mary Anne Hunter 
Louise AUene Jones 
Mary Jeannette Kaylor 
Velma Jeanne Kepner 



Myrtle Jean Killingsworth 
Mabel Klebold 
Carlyn Beatrice Lowe 
Shirley McKay 
Marilyn Gene Mason 
Helen Louise McDaniel 
Miriam Rose Mednick 
Caroline Tandy Meng 
Esther Gulick Mooney 
Ellen C. Notz 
Jane Bradley Park 
Sylvia Perlstein 
Jean Murday Persons 
Nancy Jean Phillips 
Rosaleen Bernardeth Pif er 
Margaret Price 
Catherine Marianna Ritchie 
Katherine Lucy Rolph 
Dorothy Alice Bundles 
Jean Frances Sexton 
Ruth Anne Sleeman 
Reta Elizabeth Isele Smith 
Lora Marie Stauber 
Lois Gertrude Suit 
Doris Mae Thompson 
Ruth Marie Volland 
Charlotte Elizabeth Warthen 
Elizabeth Eileen Wascher 
Charlotte Elissa Weikinger 
Harriet Titus Whitson 
Doris Adele Wood 
Elizabeth Jean Wood 
Anne Lacy Young 
Irene Florence Zaladonis 



/ 



% 



358 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 19^2-19^3 



359 



Leroy Stanley Applefeld 
Margaret Elizabeth Coonan 
Charles Thomas Dubin 
♦George Christian Evering 
Donald Harrison Frye 
William Larkin Gardner 
John Silvio Guandolo 
*Dorothy Eileen Holden 
Evelyn Mamay LaNeve 
Eugene Pomeroy Martin, Jr 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Laws 



Joseph Vernon Niemoeller 
Francis Edward Rugemer 
Archibald Leon Russell 
Edward Melvin Seidl 
Samuel Louis Silber 
George Raymond Steven.^ 
Ernest Morris Thompson 
George Bothwell Watson 
*Mary Howard Whaley 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Alberto Lotfalla Adam 

Marcus Lafayette Aderholdt, Jr 

Richard Charies Allsopp 

Ramon Ignacio Almodovar 

Emory Forester Baker 

John David Barnes 

Robert Zinn Berry 

James Wooten Bizzell 

Charies Vernon Bowen, Jr 

Thomas Joseph Brennan 

Sherman Simons Brinton 

Ralph King Brooks 

Ross Chilton Brooks 

William James Bryson 

Ralph Stallings Chenowith 

Harry Cohen 

John Benedict Coughlin 

Donald Lawrence Courtney 

Phihp Crastnopol 

Benedict Albert Cusani 

Miguel Sebastian Dalmau 

William Joseph Graham Davis 

John Daniel Diorio 

Thomas Benjamin Dunne 

William Robert Eaton 

John Wallace Walker Epperson 

Kichard Lowman Fowler 

Samuel Lawson French 

Paul Norman Friedman 

* With honor. 



Doctor of Medicine 

Alfred Selman Garrison 
Tony Robert Giglia, Jr. 
Raymond Bernard Goldberg 
Jose Ignacio Grave de Peralta 
David Benoni Gray 
William Baker Hagan 
Frank Stanley Hassler, III 
Alvin Herbert Honigman 
William Jack Hunt 
William Romulus Jenkins 
Robert Franklin Keadle 
Robert Charies LaMar, Jr. 
Ferdinand Wayne Lee 
Richard Quaries Lewis 
Robert Charles Livingstone 
Paul George Lukats 
Charies Renwick MacDonald 
Joseph Charies Matchar 
Marcy Emory McMillan, Jr 
Vincent James Mele, Jr. 
Nestor Heman Mendez * 
James Delmar Miller 
Robert Virginius Miner\ani 
John David Morris 
Henry Musnick 
Joseph Carl Myers 
Kenneth Powell Nash 
Charles Amos Neff 
Maria Amalia Pares 



Frank Strong Parrott 
Enrique Perez 
Henry Baker Perry, Jr. 
Preston Horsley Peterson 
Joseph Emmett Queen 
Raymond Veto Rangle 
Josephine Elizabeth Renshaw 
Granville Hampton Richards 
Martin Albert Robbins 
Louis Nathan Rosenstein 
Earl Linwood Royer 
Richard Sprogoe Rude 
Seymour Sacks 
Irving Leonard Samuels 
Nathaniel Sharp 
John Wiltshire Sigler 
Marta Emilia Soler-Favale 
Andrew Allan Spier 
Harold Rellinger-Stafford 
Edwin Harvey Stewart, Jr. 



Howard William Stier 
James Ernest Stoner, Jr. 
Irving Julian Taylor 
Jose Manuel Torres 
Charles Weldon Trader 
Robert Boone Tunney 
Stephen Joseph Van Lill, III 
Joseph Gregory Varhol, Jr. 
Irvin Louis Wachsman 
Samuel Haywood Walker 
Frank Orville Warren, Jr. 
Thomas Clyde Webster 
Maurice Richard Weiss 
Joseph Carlton Wich 
Oliver Wayne Williamson 
Thomas Leslie Wilson 
Robert Edward Wise 
Arthur Overton Wooddy 
David Kuykendall Worgan 
Leonard Emory Yurko 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Graduate 

Jane Elizabeth Adams 
Mary Evelyn Allen 
Ethel Webster Beard 
Irma LeNora Bennington 
Ada Brown 
Rebecca Brown 
Marguerite Elsie Burr 
Florence Estelle Darden 
Estelle Neel Davis 
Amy DeShane 
Perry Ruth Dougher 
Evelyn Doloris Eselhorst 
Martha Carroll Fanning 
Ruth Elizabeth Forsyth 
Doris Louise Gerwig 
Eloise Josephine Goode 
Eleanor Louise Gordner 
Elizabeth Harlan 
Phyllis Moore Holbrook 
Sarah Hollister 
Bernice Horner 
Miriam Elisabeth Hutchins 
Betty Mae James 



in Nursing 

Francis Jones 

Catherine Elizabeth Kurzenknabe 

Clara Gertrude Lebeck 

Ula Virginia Maxwell 

Idona Elizabeth Mehring 

Mary Michael 

Ruth Michaels 

Ruth M. Misener 

Pauline Moore 

Marguerite Pannill 

Shirley Virginia Pratt 

Thelma Ann Price 

Clara Roberts 

Margaret Eagle Roelke 

Maria Sagardia 

Rita Dorothy Schwinger 

Margaret Florence Sellner 

Elizabeth Jane Smith 

Miriam Elizabeth Stultz 

Helen Wellham 

Anna Wiegert 

Frances Danby Williams 

Susan Margaret Yeager 



360 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Leonard Applebaum 
Albert Julius Blankman 
Gilbert Morris Carouge 

James Phillip Cragg, Jr. 

Herbert Ehudin 

Frederick Robert Haase 

Alfred Klotzman 

Beryle Philip Kremer 

Leo Baden Lathroum, Jr. 

Evelyn Shirley Levin 

Harold Paul Levin 

Morton Myers 
Leonard Rodman 
Robert Rosenberg 



Bachelor of 



Science in Pharmacy 

Benjamin Scheinin 
Nathan Schwartz 
Theodore H. Schwartz 
Joseph Shear 
Alvin M. Siegel 
Alder Irvin Simon 
Melvyn M. Sindler 
Morton Smith 
Norman Sober 
Sherman Steinberg 
Hamilton Boyd Wylie, Jr. 
Jack Joseph Yarmosky 
Benjamin Yevzeroff 



HONORS, MEDALS AND PRIZES-1941.1942 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 

TMCJ 



Isobel Adkins 
Katherine Ellen Barker 
Fred Frank Bartel 
Harry Arthur Boswell 
Martha Elizabeth Bowling 
Albert Joseph Carry 
George Robert Cook 
John Edward Cordyack 
M. Elizabeth Funk 
Francis Vernon Getty 
Gurney Lindale Godwin 
Russell Howard Goff 
Sol Howard Goodgal 
Jerome Winston Grollman 
Stuart Haywood 
Anne Ghantt Hoen 
Harry Marshall Hutson 
Irene E. Kuslovitz 
Carolyn Lacey 
Cecil Roscoe Martin 
Doris Helen McFarland 
Samuel Varick Moore 



Cecil Virginia Myers 
Merl D. Myers 
Benjamin Morris Owens 
Katherine Perkins 
Edward Hector Price 
Marjorie Stinson Reside 
George Bergin Reynard 
Morris Roseman 
Robert Welsh Russell 
Ann Elizabeth Ryon 
Jacob Calvin Siegrist 
Hiram Henry Spicer, III 
Helen Duer Stephens 
Charlotte Mae Stubbs 
Ruth Lee Thompson 
Edythe M. Turner 
Dorothy Werth 
Roscoe Newton Whipp 
Charlotte Blake White 
Phillip Jerome Wingate 
William Bruce Yowell, Jr. 



HONORS AWARDED, 19^1-19j^2 

Citizenship Medal, Offered by Dr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

William Addison Holbrook 

Citizenship Prize, OflFered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 

Ruth Lee Thompson 

Athletic Medal, Offered by the Class of 1908 
Ralph Mosher Burlin 

Maryland Ring, Offered by Charles L. Linhardt 

Mearle Daniel DuVall 

Goddard Medal, Offered by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James 

Levin Bamett Broughton 

Sigma Chi Freshman Medal 

Sidney Herman Sachs 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 

Ruth Margaret Blackwell 

Medal and Junior Membership, Offered by the American 

Institute of Chemists 

Edward Hector Price 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal, Offered by Benjamin Berman 

Felix Joseph Cardegna 

Mortar Board Cup 

Charlotte Mae Stubbs 

Honor Key, Offered by the Class of 1926 of the School of 

Business Administration 

Albert Joseph Carry 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal 
Mary Alice Spielman 

Service Award, Offered by the Staff of Office of Dean of Women 

Mary Virginia Powell 

Bernard L. Crozier Award 

Thomas McDowell Rives, Jr. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award 

Fred Shulman 



361 



362 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Tau Beta Pi Award 

Tolbert Harding Konigsberg 

Alpha Lambda Delta Sorority Award 

Charlotte Mae Stubbs 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Award 

Walter Lee Neal 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award 

Irene E. Kuslovitz 

Hillegeist Memorial Award 

Cecil Roscoe Martin 

Edward Powell Lacrosse Trophy 

William Alan McGregor, Jr. 

Louis W. Berger Baseball Trophy 

James Henry Wharton 

Diamondback Award, for Outstanding Football Player 

Ralph Mosher Burlin 



Marvin Morris Polikoff 
Helen Alice James 
Alan Louis Sagner 
Doris Helen McFarland 



The Diamondback Medals 



Gerald Eugene Prentice 
Paul Donathan McCIoskey 
Ruth Lee Thompson 



Paul Breathed Hutson, Jr. 
Charles Batchelder Raymond 
Rosalie Thornton Lyon 

The Terrapin Medals 

George Cassity Pendleton 
Dorothy Anne Aiello 
William Rowland Maslin 



ToT^r, r* . ^^ ^^^ ^ine Medals 

John Douglass Wallop, HI m i t t. 

Carolyn Lacey ^^^^ ^^^^^ Hathaway 

Walter Joseph Kerwin, Jr S'''^ ^''''''' ^^^'^^" 

^' ^^- Norman Edward Hathaway 

r, , Governor's Drill Cup 

Company K, commanded bv Cadef r.r.fo- rn. , 

^ oy cadet Captam Theodore Merriam Vial 

rn.' A ^^ Alumni Cup 

Third Platoon, Company L, commanded by Cadet c.. . t • 

Robert Driscoll Condon ""' "^"^^^^^^^ 



HONORS AWARDED, 1H1-1H2 

Military Medal, Offered by the Class of 1899 
Cadet James Polk LaCroix, Jr. 

Pershing Rifles Medals to the Members of the Best Drilled Squad 

Second Squad, Third Platoon, Company B, 
commanded by Cadet Sergeant Peter Fancis Vial 

Military Department Gold Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Varsity Rifle Team 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 

Military Department Gold Medal to Individual Firing High Score 

on Freshman Team 

Cadet Stephen Tyree Early, Jr. 

Gold Medal to Individual Winning the Mehring Trophy 

Rifle Competition 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition Silver Medal to Individual 

Showing Greatest Improvement 

Cadet Levin Bamett Broughton 

Third Corps Area, William Randolph Hearst Trophy Rifle Match 

Awards for Second Place 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller Cadet Stephen Tyree Early, Jr. 

Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden Cadet Joseph Murray Decker 

Cadet Dorsey Meredith Owings 

Third Corps Area, William Randolph Hearst Trophy Rifle Match 

Awards for Third Place 

Cadet Walter Hammond Wessels Cadet Henry James Greenville 

Cadet Conrad Hohing, Jr. Cadet Levin Barnett Broughton 

Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 

National Intercollegiate, Shoulder to Shoulder Rifle Match 

Bronze Medals for Third Place 

Cadet Ulrich Aloysius Geller Cadet Joseph Murray Decker 

Cadet Paul Woolever Newgarden Cadet Robert Delafield Rands, Jr. 

Cadet Dorsey Meredith Owings 



363 



11 



364 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Felt Shields to Members of the R. O. T. C. Rifle Team 

and Managers for Rifle 



HONORS AWARDED, IHl-im 



365 



Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 



Ulrich Aloysius Geller 
Dorsey Meredith Owings 
Joseph Murray Decker 
Robert Delafield Rands, Jr. 
Paul Woolever Newgarden 
George Joseph Newgarden, III 
Robert Harold Benson 
Levin Bamett Broughton 
Clifton Bradford Currin 



Cadet Robert Matthew Rivello 
Cadet Stephen Tyree Early, Jr. 
Cadet Conrad Hohing, Jr. 
Cadet Hilton Lee Carter 
Cadet Henry James Greenville 
Cadet Walter Hammond Wessels 
Cadet Vernon LeRoy McKinstry 
Cadet Bastian Hello 



Fifth Regimental Drill Meet, National Society of 

Pershing Rifles Award 

Company C 

Fifth Regimental Rifle Match Trophy, National Society of 

Pershing Rifles 

Company C 

War Department Award of Commissions as Second Lieutenant, 

United States Army 



Isadore Hotsy Alperstein 
Tarleton Smith Bean, Jr. 
Charles Rawlings Beaumont, Jr. 
Frank Lawrence Bentz, Jr. 
Harry Arthur Boswell 
Rodney Leonard Boyer 
J. C. Bray 

Frank Gilbert Carpenter 
Robert DriscoU Condon 
George Robert Cook 
John Francis Curtin, Jr. 
Robert Lee Dom 
Bruce Allan Douglas 
Neal Dow, Jr. 
James Edward Dunn 
Mearle Daniel Duvall 
Harold Elwood Earp, Jr. 
John Dechert Eyler, Jr. 
Thomas McCoy Fields 
Theodore Eiswald Fletcher, Jr. 
Thomas Crawford Galbreath 
Daniel Leonard Gendason 
Walter Kingsley Grigg, Jr. 
Joseph Lane Gude 



Robert Dale Hall 
Phillip Charles Heath 
Jeremiah Collins Hege 
Robert Charles Henry 
Fred Carlisle Hicks, Jr. 
William Addison Holbrook, Jr. 
Lloyd Gordon Huggins 
Vincen Joshua Hughes, Jr. 
Paul Breathed Hutson, Jr. 
Robert Settle Insley 
Charles Richard Jubb, Jr. 
Walter Joseph Kerwin, Jr. 
Lawrence MacKenzie 
Donald Richard Magruder 
James Edwin Malcolm 
William Rowland Maslin 
James Elden McFarland, Jr. 
William Alan McGregor, Jr. 
Vernon LeRoy McKinstry 
J. Paul McNeil 
Samuel Varick Moore 
George Cassity Pendleton 
Samuel L. Pfefferkorn, Jr. 
Gerald Eugene Prentice 



FdNvard Hector Price 
Krles August Rausch, Jr. 
Charles Batchelder Raymond 
Frank Sam Reid 
William Thomas Riley, Jr. 

Harry Rimmer 
Robert Welsh Russell 
William Harvey Schoenhaar 
John Lester Scott 
OrviUe Cresap Shirey 
Joseph Alvin Sirkis 
Roy Kennedy Skipton 
Robert Herman Smith, Jr. 



Robert Edward Stalcup 
Theodore John Stell 
Louis Martin Tierney 
William Reeves Tilley 
Arthur Howard Valentine 
Warren Francis Vandervoort 
Theodore Merriam Vial 
Hugh McKelden Walton 
George Lawrence Wannall 
Mordecai Gist Welling , 
James Henry Wharton 
Thomas Theodore Witkowski 
Robert Raines Ziegele 



First Honors 



Second Honors, 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

TD K.vf Wirks McKay, Jacob Calvin bie- 
.Merl D. Myers, Robert ^^^J^^l{, Lawrence Bentz, 
grist, Roscoe Newton Whipp, Frank i.a 
L, Matthew Franklin Ellmore. 

Melvin James Bradley. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



First Honors 



College 01 Ari& aiiw ^ 

Price, Harrv "'"^''^ "^S? WilBa>" Bn.ce V.«.ll, Jr., 
man, Kathenne Ellen BarKet, £,i„i>eth Eyon, 

Talmadg. Stanly Th«»P7'*"Vtharin. PerWn.. 

<=~'^' ""ShS: ■ s."t S Roy o-'-^' ^' 

raTooXrU Ghan« Hoen. 

A p^ff Marcaret Brooke, Edith Hoii, 
..R,3seU Howard Goff Ma ja ^^^^^^ ^,,, Louise 

Samuel Cohen, mary Ramsey. 

Thompson, Elizabeth L^Ua IWes R^y ^^^.^ ^^^^.^ 

Jr., LaRhett ^-"^^CiS: ^o-Ue Thornton Lyon, 
r^inXdo^hf^a Alden Tuc.er. Nancy Jeanne 
Duby, Erraa Kathryn Hughes. 

College of Commerce 

V. r,rrv Harry Arthur Boswell, Samuel 
...Albert Joseph Carry, Harry Marjorie Stinson 

Varick Moore, Hiram Henry Spicer, lU. 
Reside, Paul Donathan McCloskey. 



366 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Second Honors . . . Robert Stanley Cartee, Jr., John Douglass Wallop, m 

Robert Marshall Moseley, William Carter Pennington 
Lowell Truscott Keagy. 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



College of Education 

.Charlotte Mae Stubbs, Isobel Adkins, Martha Elizabeth 
Bowling, Helen Duer Stephens, Cecil Virginia Myers, 
Charlotte Blake White, Olivia Kerby Sims, Josephine 
Eleanora Wilson, Francis Vernon Getty, Morris Roseman. 

.Effie Orra Thomas, Joseph Ernest Gerstell, Betty Deloris 
Hall, Mary Carter Dillon, Doris Wood, Caroline McGill, 
Sevier Semmes Baumer, Elias Cohen, Catherine Audrey 
Stewart. 

College of Engineering 

First Honors Stuart Haywood, Frank Gilbert Carpenter, John Edward 

Cordyack, Robert Welsh Russell, Gumey Lindale Godwin, 
Benjamin Morris Owens. 

Second Honors ... Vahl Elbert Underwood, James Edwin Malcolm, Jere- 
miah Collins Hege, Arthur Howard Valentine, Thomas 
McDowell Rives, Jr. 



First Honors 



College of Home Economics 

...M. Elizabeth Funk, Doris Helen McFarland, Dorothy 
Werth, Ruth Lee Thompson, Mary Johnston Davidson. 

Second Honors . . . Mary Bessant Latimer, Agnes Louise Marks, Jessie Wal- 
lace Halstead, Alice Katherine Fisk, Louise Bendette Ladd. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Riley Seth Williamson, Jr. 



Donald Hovis Towson 
Samuel Leonidas King 
Stewart Everson 



Certificates of Honor 

Lewis Cole Toomey 
Harold Schwartz 



School of Law 

Elected to the Order of the Coif 



Richard Werber Case 
Joseph Harold Grady 



William Woodrow Mahoney 



Alumni Prize for the Best Argument in the Honor Case in the 

Practice Court 

Richard Werber Case 



HOWRS AWARDED, IHl-m^ 



367 



George u. x> ^^^ practice Court 

Mar\an Mandel 
Richard Werber Case ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ Reddy 

Louis Glick 

School of Medicine 

UniA^ersity Prize Gold Medal 

Joseph Whiddon Scott 

Certificates of Honor 

•1 Rroa^kv Etta Carolyn Lmk 

Mexander Emmanuil BrodsKy Anthony Peter Rousos 
ratrick C. Phelan, Jr. 

Joseph Gordon Bird . , ^ • ^ ^f $25 00 for the Best Work in 

otto Charles Phillips 

School of Nursing ^^^ 

The Janet Hale Menu.rial ScholarMp^Gvven ^ ^''^J^ZZVLsPion. 
Nurses' Alumnae Asso<natwn to Pursu ^^^^^^^^ j ^ta 

Jean Louise Conrad 

„. «.*.. com- ... p*. .. '»;xt:Lr""" '" """ 

Highest Average in Schoiarsnw 
Helen Pauline Cope 
T,e Mrs. JoHr. L. WHtekurst Pri.efortke Hi^Kest A.era.e 
^^"^ in Executive Ability 

Jean Louise Conrad 

^n^ Prize for Practical Nursing and 

' Anna Penelope Tucker 

. ^ xr o..' Alumnae Association Pin and Mem- 

TKe University of ^'^r^^^^^ ^J^JcTZsing aM E.ecuti.e AUliiy 
hership in the Association, for Practical 

Margaret Matilda Logan 
School of Pharmacy 

«« «*' '«' <"~'"' ^'tZl Monro. Wh.,.„ Jr. 

Warren Eldred Weaver 



368 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The William Simon Memorial Prize for Proficiency in Practical Chemistry 

Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 

The L, S, Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 
Warren Eldred Weaver 

The Conrad L, Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

Milton Reisch 



Milton Reisch 



Certificates of Honor 
Sidney Gary Clyman 



Alice Emily Harrison 



HONORS, MEDALS AND PRIZES— 1942-1943 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 



Saville Mathews Allnutt 
David Hargis Barker 
Charles August Bechtold, Jr. 
Robert Harold Benson 
Paul Curtis Betts 
Eli Matthew Brown 
Margaret Washington Brown 
Berniece Brown Chambers 
Edmund Parker Churchill, Jr. 
Benjamin Bernard Cohen 
Jacquelin Stuart Cooley 
Charles Raymond Dietz 
James Paul Duke 
William Carl Ebeling, III. 
Leon Goldman 
Margaret Towell Goldsmith 
Ellen Frances Gray 
Ramon Grelecki 
Elizabeth S. Haase 
Mary D. Harris 
Joseph Charles Harry 
Charles Fiske Hochgesang 
David Saul Hurwitz 
Irving Kabik 
Mary Catherine Kahl 
Richard Henry Kent 
Catharine Elizabeth Krafft 
Robert Lee Maisel 
Marjory Jean Mattingly 
Ernest Ray Mattoon 



Russell Whitney McFall 
Robert Clifton McKee 
Robert Morgan Miller 
Joseph Herman Mintzer 
Martin Hammond Muma 
Harry Ivan Neuman 
John William Neumann 
Emmet Dennis Owens 
Richard Merle Peck 
Jean Murday Persons 
Robert Willms Petzold 
Mildred Radin 
Robert Matthew Rivello 
Margaret Eagle Roelke 
Edgar A. Schaeffer 
Irvin Philip Schloss 
Hugo Grotius Sheridan, Jr. 
Jane Luray Showacre 
John Robert Spielman 
Stanley Herbert Steinberg 
William Ellsworth Tolley 
John Bonar Tucker 
Kenneth Macmillan Uglow, Jr. 
Homer Edward Uhland 
Milton H. vanden Berg 
George Conner Webster 
Alfred C. Whiton 
Robert Hugh Yeatman 
Edmond Grove Young 
Irene Florence Zaladonis 



369 
HONORS AWARDED. im-lHS 

Nancy Brandes Holland 

. ^ M ^«1 Offered by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James 
Goddard Medal, Ofierea oy „^„._d 

Arthur Holcomb Ballara 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 
Margaret Ruth Beattie 

, V !.;„ nffered by the American 

Milton H. vanden Berg 

Miriam Kleeger Ueria 

Mortar Board Cup 

Catharine Elizabeth KrafEt 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal 

Ruth Maurine Lingle 

. . ,rd Offered by the Staff of Office of Dean of Women 
ServKe Award. Offered J^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Bernard L. Crozier Award 

Joseph Valentine Mariner 

Tau Beta Pi Award 

William Earle Sturges, III 

Aria Georgeanna Guiia 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award 
Robert Sandler 

Hillegeist Memorial Award 

Florence Primm 

Edward Powell Lacrosse Trophy 

Milton H. vanden Berg 

The Diamondback Medals ^ 

Fueene John Sullivan 
Herbert Gabriel Carhart, Jr. j Jq^eline Anstead Brophy 

Jane Luray Showacre 



370 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



HONORS AWARDED, lU2-19i3 



371 



Rosaleen Bernardeth Pifer "'" "^^"''^ 

"oseph McLain Crockett ^"'■*«" ^airall Davis 

Jeannette Owen Jenkins ^^"1 ^oolever Newgarden 

Frederick Miller Johnson 

Pauline Hardy ^"^ ®'^ ^'"^ **edals 

Frederick Louis Bach, Jr If'''^'"^^ Anita White 

Edward Harris Steinberg f^"^^^ ^""^ Paterson 

n- ^^^*''' ^"^Lain Crockett 

Diamondback Awarrf f„ .u 

Award for the Outstanding Footba,, P„,er of I94, 
Thomas Allison Mont. Jr. '^ "' ''*' 

txold Medal to Individual w;„ 

vidual Winning the Mehring Trophv Rifl n 

Paul Woolever Newgarden CompetiH„„ 

A. L. Mehring All-American Silver Meda, for Rifle C 

David Pountian Jen^s ''"""'•'""«" 

The George E Meeks Memorial Rifle Match Troph. 

Joseph Murray Decker 



The National In.ercollegiate 
James Lockhart Baker 
Robert Harold Benson 
Wilton Lee Carter 
James Atkins Clark 
Chfton Bradford Currin 
Joseph Murray Decker 
Omus Denitz 



r^ J , Certificates 

David Miller Abercrombie Jr 
John Franku„ ^^^^^""^e, Jr. 

Walter Orrin Allen, Jr. 
Julian Bradley Anderson 
Mervm Wilham Arps, Jr. 
Stanley Julian Asrael 
Frederick Louis Bach, Jr. 
Eugene Filippo Baldi 
iJurton Lee Bank 



Thomas Richard Hogan 
J^dwm Jacobsen 
r>avid Fountian Jenkins 
A^ana John Keller 
Milton Charles Kurtz 
Walter Hammond Wessels 
of Military Training 

George Wimmel Barnard, Jr 

Richard Alfred Barr 
Rollison Hall Baxter 
^harles August Bechtold, Jr 
Richard Edwin Berger 
William Spencer Betts 

J,'f " V^^^adge Beuermann 
Anson Wesley Biggs 
Robert Byron Bird 



Abraham William Bimbaum 
Richard Brown Blackwell 
paniel Underdown Boothe 
Thomas Earle Bourne, Jr. 
Donald Mitchell Boyd 
Edward Lee Boyer 
Harold Roger Bradshaw 
Thomas Marshall Brandt 
John Augusta Brenner 
Samuel Bernard Burch, Jr. 
Philip Nash Buddington 
Harry Millaway Butler 
William Kirkland Byrd 
Donald Marshall Call, Jr. 
Felix Joseph Cardegna 
Richard David Carr 
Peter John Carroll 
Nicolas Manrique Cartagena 
Hilton Lee Carter 
Giles Leonard Chapin 
Paul Chmar 
James Atkins Clark 
Harry Speake Cobey 
Alan Kolker Cohen 
Luther Burkey Conrad 
Jacquelin Stuart Cooley 
Robert Vigert Cormack 
George Washington Couch, Jr. 
Nelson Roger Cox 
Charles Willard Crawford 
Joseph McLain Crockett 
John Yoder Crow 
William Evans Crow 
Louis Culiner 
Clifton Bradford Currin 
Charles Covode Davis, Jr. 
Robert McCloud Davison 
Franklin Richard Day 
J. Kirkwood Decker 
Joseph Murray Decker 
John Edward deKowzan 
Robert Curtis Diehl 
Hugo Gaetano DiMichele 
Jack Stanley Dittmar 
John Jenkins Dobler, II 
Edwin Burton Donaldson, Jr. 



Joseph Francis Dougherty 

Oscar Herbert Du Bois 

James Paul Duke, Jr. 

William Dykes Dulaney 

Rochester Z. DuTeil 

Roy Stanley Eckert 

Warren Harding Eierman 

James David Engle 

Joseph Robert Esher, Jr. 

David Robert Fetters 

Louis Flax 

Clemens Weaver Gaines 

Jack Arthur Gaines 

Charles Pearson Gay, Jr. 

Ulrich Aloysius Geller 

Harold Napoleon Gilbert, Jr. 

James Joseph Gill 

John Douglas Gilmore, Jr. 

Vernon Ragan Gingell 

Olin Chappell Gochenour 

William Martin Goldenzweig 

William Gordon 

Irving McKim Gordy, Jr. 

Francis Alexander Gray, Jr. 

Ramon Grelecki 

Donald Shaeffer Gross 

Herbert Joseph Gunther 

Thomas Benjamin Hagerman, Jr. 

James Edward Haines 

J. Oakley Hall 

Kenneth Delos Hall ^ 

Robert Spencer Hall 

Herbert Andrew Haller 

Daniel Seitz Harbaugh 

Herbert William Harden 

John Philip Hauswald 

Norvell Hamner Hawkins 

William Cramer Heathcote 

William Paul Helbock 

Bastian Hello 

Robert George Hill, Jr. 

Harvey Hodges Holland, Jr. 

Jack Witherington Hoskinson 

John Harry Hoyert, Jr. 

Clark Joseph Hudak 

Max VanKuren Hunt 



372 



S ? t^""" Hurlock, Jr. 
Robert Wanton Ireland 
Thornton Ennells Ireland 
Robert Chelmers James 
David Pountian Jenkins 
Edward McKenna Johnson, Jr 
Charles Hudson Jones, Jr. 
Herbert Omar Jones 
Richard Nathan Jones 
Thomas Wesley Jones 
Sylvan L. Katz 
James Alexander Kearney 
Stirling Vincent Kehoe 
Deane Ellington Keith 
Howard Lee Keller 
Edwin Joseph Kelly 
Guy Senseny Kidwell, Jr 
Lester Kiefer 
George David Kieffer 
James Gamble Kinsman 

Frederick Henry Kohloss 
William Hubert Krehnbrink 
Marvin Joseph Lambert 
Roberts Edwin Latimer, Jr 
Audrey Brooks Leaman 
Harrison Lee 
John Newman Libby 
James Paul Libertini 
Judson Duley Lincoln 
John Frederick Loos, Jr 
Carl Ceroid Luebben 
Arthur Eugene Lundvall 
Alan Campbell Macpherson 
Robert George Mahon 
Lloyd Lowndes Mallonee, Jr 
Joseph Valentine Marine^, j; 
James Nathan Marsden 
Barton Hirst Marshall, Jr. 

?^nrZ.TZ ^««'"gley, Jr. 
i-aul Khodes Mattix, Jr 

Donald Cooper Maxcy ' 

Robert Clifton McKee 

Daniel Merritt McNally 

Edward Dickinson Meares 

Alfred Ben Merendino 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



E. Clark Mester 
Harry Jack Mier, Jr 
John Frederick Miller 
John Lawrence Milligan 
John T. Mitchell, Jr 
Thomas Allison Mont, Jr 
<-harles Acker Morell 
James Casper Myers 

Geoffrey MacDonald Nairn, Jr 
William Wallace Nairn, III 
Anthony Charles Nardo 

Paul Woolever Newgarden, II 
John Francis Newman 
George Nick Nikolopoulos 
John Gray Norris 
William Bradford Norris 
Byron Hopkins Nuttle 
Raymond Merrimen O'Kellv 
Juan Luis Oliver, Jr 
Ehner Hammond Owens, Jr. 
Thomas Alan Payne 
Leon Pear 

Charles Wesley Pearce, Jr 
Mervm Leroy Peterson, j; 
George Osbourn Phillips 
Edward Richardson Pierce, Jr 
William Hamilton Pindell, Jr 
William Lockhart Port 
Kenneth Lester Ports 
Page Boyd Pratt 
Henry John Rassier 
Mark Raum 
Edward McGee Rider 
Andress Owen Ridgway 
Orlando Ridout, IV ' 
Elmer Charles Rigby 
John Blackstone Riley 
Hobert Matthew RiveJIo 
I;Ioyd Wherry Roberts 
^amuel Hamilton Rogers, Jr 
George Jefferson Ross 
Carroll Louis Rowny 
I>oyIe Preston Royal 
Julian Roger Sanders 
James Baines Saum 



HONORS AWARDED, 1H2-1H3 



373 



Edgar A. Schaeffer 
Charles Philip Seltzer 
Robert Willard Senser 
Loy Monroe Shipp, Jr. 
Benjamin Stump Silver 
John Leonard Slade 
James Gibbons Sneeringer 
David Maxwell Snyder 
Burton Solomon 
Robert Hoagland Steen 
Edward Harris Steinberg 
John Charles Stidman 
William Codding Stevens 
William Selby Stewart 
Draper Krum Sutcliffe 
Daniel William Talmadge 
William Lupo Tarbert 
John Kef auver Tate 
Philip Wesley Tawes 
Edmond Gilmore Taylor 
Preston William Taylor 
David Dallas Thoma 
John Edward Thomas, Jr. 



Fred Paul Timmerman, Jr. 
Homer Edward Uhland 
Bernard Ulman, Jr. 
James Edward Updegraff, Jr. 
Earle Mason Uzzell 
Milton H. vanden Berg 
Peter Francis Vial 
Reginald Charles Vincent 
Frederic Benson Warder 
Gerard Theodore Warwick 
Roderick Dows Watson, Jr. 
Robert Alden Webster, Jr. 
Ernest Conrad Wegman 
Chester Carlton Westfall, Jr. 
Glen Earl Weston 
Richard Lee Whelton 
Donald Fillmore Whinerey 
Douglas Jerome Willey 
Paul Millard Wimert, Jr. 
David Kenelm Winslow 
James Bernard Witkowski 
Myron Leonard Wolfson 
George Gene Younger 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

.James Paul Duke, Jr., Edgar A. Schaeffer, Irvin Philip 
Schloss, Harry Ivan Neuman, Robert Harold Benson, Jane 
Luray Showacre, John Robert Williams. 

Paul Curtis Betts, John Hansen Hoffman, Glen Earl 
Weston, Eugene John Sullivan, Robert Lee Nixon, Jr., 
Donald Fillmore Whinerey. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

David Hargis Barker, Marjory Jean Mattingly, William 
Ellsworth Tolley, Edmund Parker Churchill, Jr., Charles 
August Bechtold, Jr., Sidney Tzvie Efross, Margaret 
Washington Brown, Richard Merle Peck, Stanley Herbert 
Steinberg, Ellen Frances Gray, Joseph Herman Mintzer, 
Milton H. vanden Berg, Mildred Radin, Margaret Eagle 
Roelke, Bemiece Brown Chambers, Bernard M. Hyatt. 

.John William Neumann, Jeanne Dorothy Amlicke, Flor- 
ence Primm, Homer Edward Uhland, Louise Paddon 
Buckner, Pauline Hardy, Larry Quentin Green, Ruth 



375 



L 



374 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Eleanor Schene, Mary Virginia Langbein, Mary Louise 
Touchet, Albert C. Herrmann, Alan Campbell Macpherson 
Dagmar Barbro Hansson, Ann E. Criswell, Anna Virginia 
Auslund. 

College of Business and Public Administration 

First Honors Joseph Charles Harry, Robert Morgan Miller, Robert 

Willms Petzold, John Reed Scott, Jr., A. Budd Cutler, 
William Martin Goldenzweig. 

Second Honors ... Wendell Ellsworth Shawn, Jr., Harry Drew Fisher, John 

Frederick Miller, Thomas Earle Bourne, Jr., Thornton 
^ Francis Greene. 



First Honors . . . 
Second Honors. 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



First Honors 



Second Honors 



College of Education 

.B. Bernard Cohen, Catharine Elizabeth Krafft, Robert 
Lee Maisel, Edna Irene Peters, Saville Mathews Allnutt. 

.Ramon Grelecki, Irvin W. Katz, Parepa Fidelia Linthi- 
cum, Olive Elizabeth King. 

College of Engineering 

.Kenneth Macmillan Uglow, Jr., Russell Whitney McFall, 
John Robert Spielman, Hugo Grotius Sheridan, Jr., George 
Conner Webster, John Bonar Tucker, Irving Kabik, 
Robert Hugh Yeatman. 

.Richard Henry Kent, Robert Clifton McKee, Robert 
Matthew Rivello, Emmet Dennis Owens, Charles Raymond 
Dietz, Charles Fiske Hochgesang, Leonard Frederick 
Williams. 

College of Home Economics 

.Elizabeth S. Haase, Mary D. Harris, Irene Florence 
Zaladonis, Jean Murday Persons, Charlotte Elissa 
Weikinger, Ellen C. Notz, Mabel Klebold. 

.Frances Jean Dumberg, Nancy Brandos Holland, Dorothy 
Alice Rundles, Evelyn Mary Foerster, Charlotte Elizabeth 
Warthen. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Riley Eugene Spoon, Jr. 



John Pershing Blevins 
Arthur J. Lepine 
David Randall Book 



Certificates of Honor 

Jack Kushner 

John White Menius, Jr. 



HONORS AWARDED, m^-^^S 

School of Law 

Elected to t.e Or^er oijUC^f^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 
Dorothy Eileen Holden^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

School of Medicine 

u,. Prize Gold Medal 
University frtze ^ 

Paul Norman Friedman 

Philip Crastnopol p^^id Kuykendall Worgan 

Kenneth Powell Nash 

Martin Albert Robhms ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ .^ ^^«,. 

David Kuykendall Worgan 

school of Nursing ^^ ^^^,^^ 

UrnversUv, to the ^^^_^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^^.^ 

,, J ,e PHze to the Student Havin, tke Seco.^ 
The Eli.al>etk ^"^^.fj/.^.^.e in Scholarship 

Miriam Elisabeth Hutchins 

• . .t Prize for the Highest Average 
rue Mrs. John L. ^^^^rettfriU 

Maria Teresa Sargardia 

D V. for Practical Nursing and 

. . . ^ p{yi and Hem- 
Urshiv ^n the Asso ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^.^^ 



^ THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medals for Genera, Excellence 
Joseph Shear 
The William Simon Memorial PHze for P , ■ 

"'' '• '■ ^t'"^ -— ' Pharmacy Rri.e 

Sherman Steinberg 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany anrJ. PA 

r.-IK . ,, ^^"'^'^coffnosi, Prize 

Gilbert Morris Carouge 

Morton S.ith''^''''^^"'^^ '' f^- 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
For the Academic Year 1942-43, as of June, 1943 



377 



tesident Collegiate Courses 

Three Semesters: College 

Summer, Fall, Spring Park 

'ollege of Agriculture 313 

College of Arts and Sciences 1,243 

Icollege of Business and Public 

I Administration 358 

[School of Dentistry 

College of Education 338 

College of Engineering 826 

[Graduate School 272 

College of Home Economics 289 

School of Law 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 



Baltimore 



390 
290 

> • • • 

78 

» • • • 

121 
480 
172 
149 



Total Less 
Duplications 

313 
1,243 

358 

390 

626 (2 dupl.) 

826 

341 (9 dupL) 

289 

121 

480 

172 

149 



Total 

Duplications 



3,639 



1,680 



5,308 



10 



72 



Total 3,629 

Summer School, 1942 324 



1,676 5,236 

60 384 



Total 
Duplications 



3,953 



59 



25 



1,736 5,620 

98 (+ 11 above) 



Total Less Duplications 



3,894 



1,711 



5,522 



Mining Courses, Western Maryland 77 

Engineering, Defense Extension 2,750 

C. A. A., Civilian Pilot Training Program 114 

Short Courses and Conferences 

American Home Economics Association 326 

Boys* and Girls* Club 4-H Victory Day 750 

Food Conservation Conference 40 

Gardenkeepers' Short Course 38 

Hatchery School 60 

Homemakers' Day 1,850 

Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers 75 

Training Women for Farm Labor, Short Course 54 

Turkey Improvement School 25 

Volunteer Aids in Child Care, Short Course 50 

Women^s Farm Short Course 27 



Total Short Courses and Conferences 3,295 



GRAND TOTAL, All Courses, Baltimore and College Park, 

less duplications 11,758 



378 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
For the Academic Year 1943-1944, as of June, 1944 
Resident Collegiate Courses 

Academic Year *CoIIege Total Less 

College of Agriculture . ,!>^^ tBaltimore Duplications 

Pnii^^^ "f Arts and Sciences' .' .' .' Ifn ' ' ' " 106 

College of Business and Public " ' • • 980 

Administration 

School of Dentistry ... ^^^ •■■■ 130 

College of Education ...[ k:x 402 402 

College of Engineering ^10 sei 57^ 

Graduate School |^6 .... g^g 

ShoTof l2r ^*=<'"'^'»'- ■•••••-■••■ 'II . .^^ III (10 dupl., 

School Of Medicine W 99 99 

bchool of Nursing . 475 475 

School of Pharmacy '.* 193 193 

Advanced Engineering .* .* ^'}%^ • • • • 1,185 

Foreign Area and Language jsn * * * * 1^9 

Pre-Prof essional ^ ^ ^^^ .... ^g^ 

^^ •••• 69 

Total . 

°Sits„'"*"-''««.''^-'s-T:i,: "'"^ ■•™ »» 

Duplications College Park 'and ^ ® H 

Joaltimore 

42 

Net Total . . 

Short Summer Session,' 'l943 ,J'^^^ ^'^^^ ^'^^^ 

^^1 •••• 141 

Total 

Duplications [ "^'^^^ ^^^^^ 5,687 

^^ 39 

Net Total . . . 

Mining Courses, Western 'naVyland ' * * * ''''' ''''' '^''^ 

Engineering, Defense Extension . 98 

i^ ire Service Extension '"' 2,778 

Short Courses and Conferences 
Boys' and Girls' Club Day. 

ureenskeepers' Course 660 

Maryland Boys' Legislature 20 

171 

Total Short Courses and Conferences 

851 

""^^S IS&^f ':?^!'-' ^^'«'»- -^ college Park, 

Four Quarters: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring. 
t Three Semesters : Summer Foii o««- 

summer. Fall. Spnng. except Pharmacy which is four quarters. 



GENERAL INDEX 



▲ Page 

Administration 7 

board of regents 7 

oflEicers of administration 8 

boards and committees (College Park) 10 
officers of instruction (College Park) 11 

administrative organization 20 

buildings, grounds and 21 

libraries 23 

Admission 23 

methods of admission 23 

subject requirements 24 

certificate, by 24 

physical examinations 33 

transfer, by 24 

unclassified students 25 

Agencies, Federal, State and Private. . 335 

Research and Regulatory 331 

Agents 319 

assistant county 320 

assistant home demonstration 321 

county 319 

county home demonstration 320 

local 320 

local home demonstration 321 

Agricultural Adjustment Administra- 
tion 335 

Agricultural Economics 176 

Agricultural Education 53, 178 

Agricultural Engineering 55, 180 

five-year program 55 

Agricultural Experiment Station 326 

Agriculture, College of 46 

advisory councils 50 

chemistry 52 

curricula in 49 

departments 48 

equipment 48 

farm practice 49 

regulatory activities 47, 48, 331 

requirements for graduation 48 

special students in agriculture 70 

State Board of 7 

Agricultural Planning Field Service. . 335 

Agronomy 57, 181 

Alumni 45 

American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Aviation Division 335 

Animal Husbandry 59, 183 

Applied Science, fellowship in . . . .' 146 

Aquiculture 305 

Art 154, 185, 258 



Page 

Arts and Nursing, five-year combined 

program 90 

Arts and Sciences, College 71 

advisers 74 

degrees 72 

divisions 71 

electives in other colleges and schools 74 

lower division 75 

normal load 74 

requirements 72, 73 

Astronomy 186 

Athletics 21, 41, 163, 274 

Aviation Division, American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers 335 

B 

Bacteriology 77, 186 

Biochemistry, plant physiology. .59, 192, 201 

Biological Sciences, division of 76 

Board of Regents 7 

Book Store and Post Office 44, 45 

Botany 60, 190 

Buildings 21, 307 

Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps. 335 

Bureau of Mines 22, 146, 335 

Eastern Experiment Station 335 

research fellowships in 146 

Business Administration 104, 193 



Calendar 5 

Certificates, Degrees and 27 

Chemical Engineering 142, 204 

chemistry 142, 199 

research fellowships in 146 

Chemistry 52, 85, 86, 141, 199 

analytical 199 

biological 201 

general 86, 199 

organic 200 

physical 202 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 79 

Civil Engineering 142, 206 

Classical Languages 244 

Clubs, miscellaneous 43 

College of Agriculture 46 

College of Arts and Sciences 71 

College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 96, 193 

College of Education 118, 316 

College of Engineering 134, 204 



379 



^! 



380 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Page 

College of Home Economics 150, 230 

College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 96 

accounting and statistical control.. 110 

study program 103 

business administration 104 

financial administration 108 

marketing administration 107 

natural and human resources 116, 272 

personnel administration 109 

production administration 106 

public administration 113 

secretarial training Ill 

Committees 10 

Comparative Literature 216 

Conservation Service, Soil 335 

County agents 319 

demonstration agents 320 

Courses of study, description of 175 

Crop Reporting Service, Maryland 335 

D 

Dairy Husbandry 61, 218 

Dairy Manufacturing 63, 219 

Dairy Plant Inspection Service 333 

Defense training — Engineering 147 

Degrees and Certificates 27 

Delinquent students 26 

Dentistry, School of 307 

Diamondback 44 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 

biological sciences 76 

humanities 82 

lower division 75 

physical sciences 84 

SOCIaX SCI6X1C6S ■•••••••••■•••••••••• vU 

Drainage, State Department of 334 

Drawing 208 

E 

Economics 102, 221 

agricultural 176 

Education 118, 224, 316 

agricultural 53, 178 

arts and science 120 

commercial 123 

curricula 120 

Q6^^x 660 •••••••••«•••••••••••••••••• XX«7 

laClllXlCS ••••«••••••••••••••••••••• XXO 

home economics 125, 152, 230 

industrial 128, 316 

physical 21, 25, 130, 163, 274 

Education, College of 118 

Educational Psychology 230, 285 

Electrical Engineering 143,209 

Employment, student 38 



Page 



Engineering 134^ 204 

admission requirements jo, 

agricultural j^^ 

bachelor degrees jji 

chemical 141, 142, 204 

chemical engineering— chemistry. .85, 141 
civn •••••••••••••• ••••••••••»« X4^, 20fi 

cux & icviis •••••••••••••••••••«»•««, ^ X40 

defense training 14-^ 

drawing 2O8 

electrical 136, 143, 209 

equipment 135 

experiment station 149 

fire service extension department 149 

general subjects 204 

library 139 

master of science in 134 

mechanics 212 

mechanical 138, 144, 213 

professional degrees in 135 

short courses 148 

surveying 139, 216 

English Language and Literature 235 

Enrollment, student 376, 377 

Entomology 63, 81, 241 

Entrance 23 

Evening courses 174 

Examinations 26 

Expenses 28, 148, 308, 310,314 

Experiment Station 

Agricultural 326 

staff 324 

Elastern, Mines 335 

Engineering 149 

Extension Service 47, 322 

short courses 322 

P 

Farm Forestry 243 

Farm Management 65 

Federal, State and Private Agencies.. 335 
Feed, Fertilizer, Lime, etc.. Service... 331 

Fellowships 146, 147, 172 

Fish and Wildlife Service 335 

Five-year combined Arts and Nursing 

curriculum 92, 312 

Floriculture 67, 263 

Food Technology 79, 189 

Foods and Nutrition 158, 261 

Footlight Club 44 

Fraternities and Sororities 44 

Frpnoh 245 



GENERAL INDEX 



Genetics 



Geolog 



leal Survey 



g Page 

283, 284, 305 

335 

251 

Geology ■;*.*.■.*".*.* 248 

German 26 

Grading System... — ••••;• i65 

Graduate School, The... ^^^ 

admission i65 

council ; 166 

-;;^:,ip;andassistantships.......i;2 

registration ...•^—••^g^^ ^gg^ ^0 
requirements for degre ^^^^ ^^^ 

residence rea-^re'nents ^- • • • ^^^^ ^,3 

summer graduate '^'^''^•"" 244 

Greek 



33 



Health Service . .^^^ • • ' ' ' ^^.^„ ^f . 
High School Teachers, certinc ^^^ ^^^ 

... 1« 
Historical Statement ;"//.*'..... 251 

History ; _ .150, 256 

Home Economics • ' ^5^ 

curricula ' * 151 

degree '" 150 

departments ^50 

facilities ' " * 151 

general • • • ' • ' ' ' " ' ' ^25, 152 

Home Economics Education ^^^ 

Home Economics Extension -^^ ^^^ 

Honors and Awards ... . "---^^ 330 

Horticultural State Department ... ^^^ ^^^ 

Horticulture * * 33^ 315 

Hospital * 34 

Housing rules • ^ g2 

Humanities, division of 



128 



Industrial Education 33 



331 



381 



Page 

18 



Location of the University ••••••• ' ' * ' ,5 

Lower division 



Infirmary rules * * * * V * ' * c' Vvice .. 
Inspection and Regulatory Service. • 

Inspection Service 

Dairy Plant 

Seed 

Institution Management . . . • •_•;•:'• 
Instructional Staff (College Park) .. • ^^^ 

Italian 



"M" Book 



44 



333 

332 

157 

11 



Markets, Ma;yland State Department ^^^ 

^^ :::::.:':. 26 

Marks ' Q„-vice .. 335 

Maryland Crop Reporting Service- '-^^ ^^^ 

Mathematics ; ' ^^^ 213 

Mechanical Engineering . ^.^-^38 1 . 
Mechanical Engineers, American ^^^ 

ciety of. Aviation Division . . . . ... ^^^ 

Mechanics 38, 360 

Medals and Prizes ^^ 

Medical Technology 3^^ 

Medicine, ^c^^^^f •;• B^;;au' of Mines 335 
Metallurgical division. Bureau o ^ .^^g 

fellowships in •••; -^j^'.^s ';;.".*. 1*61, 271 
Military Science and tactics- -^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

Mines '. . 245 

Modern Languages. ^''''''^^\'^'''''\,, 271 

Music ; .. 271 

Musical Organizations 



National Sand and Gravel Association ^^^ 

Research Foundation ""•• 272 

Natural and Human Resources .- ^^^ 

Nursing, School of 



263 



Landscape Gardening 244 

Latin 309 

Law, School of • • 9 

Librarians (College Park).. •••••• gS 

Libraries 265 

Library Science 328 

Livestock Sanitary Service • • • ^^ 

Living arrangements 37 

Loans 



O 



8 



Officers, administrative **'/.'.*.*. 11 

of instruction ..66, 265 

Olericulture 



313 



Pharmacy, School of .*. . . . .43, 360 

Phi Kappa Phi * * 273 

Philosophy • • • • • • • '3^ ■ ^63, 274 

Physical Education.... 21. ^^> 33 

Physical Examinations ...•• ^^ 

Physical Sciences, division o^" ' ' ' ' * * gg^ 279 

Physics 192 

Plant Pathology ^92 

Plant Physiology 28I 

Political Science .'.'.'.'.... .66, 265 

Pomology gg^ 283 

Poultry Husbandry 95 

Predental curriculum 

Preliminary information 

Premedical curriculum 

Prenursing curriculum 

Preprofessional curricula 

Psychological Testing Bureau . .... .^.^-^.^ ^^^ 

Psychology 44 

Publications, student ^^^ ^91 

Public Administration 



18 
92 
92 
92 
2S5 



382 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



R Page 

Records and Statistics 336 

Recreation 163 

Refunds 31 

R. O. T. C. Organization 162 

Registration, date of 5, 23 

penalty for late 30 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 23 

degrees and certificates 27 

elimination of delinquent students ... 26 

examinations and marks 26 

junior standing 26 

regulation of studies 25 

reports 26 

Regulation of studies 25 

Regulatory Service, Inspection of 331 

Religious influences 41 

Research and Regulatory Agencies.... 317 
Research Foundation, National Sand 

and Gravel Association 335 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 

32, 161, 162, 271, 362-365 

Residence and Non-Residence 27 

Room Reservation 34 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories... 34 
Rural Life 53, 178. 17U 

S 

Sand and Gravel Association Research 

Foundation, National 335 

Scholarships 37 

Science curriculum, general physics ... 88 

Secretarial Training Ill 

Seed Inspection Service 332 

Social Sciences, division of 90 

Societies 43 

fraternities and sororities 43, 44 

honorary fraternities 43 

miscellaneous clubs and societies.... 44 

Sociology 294 

Soil Conservation Service 335 

Soils 58, 182, 335 



Solomons Island Research ., 

Sororities ^^ . 

Spanish 250 

Speech ; 3,,^ 

State Board of Agriculture 

State Department of Drainage 33, 

State Horticultural Department ^-u 

Statistics 1 -M, 335 

Student 

employment ^^ 

government 42 

organization and activities 42, 49 

publications 4^ 

Summary of Student Enrollment. .377, 37^ 

Summer Session 173 

credits and certificates 173 

graduate work 166, 173 

terms of admission 173 

Surveying 139, 216 

T 

Terrapin 44 

Textiles and Clothing 152, 256 

Transcripts of records 32 

U 

Uniforms, military 162 

University Hospital 315 

University Post Office and Book Store. 44 

V 

Veterinary Science 302 

W 

Water Resources Branch, U. S 335 

Welfare 33 

Wildlife Service 335 

Withdrawals 31 

Z 

Zoology 79, 305 



An admission application form, oir any further infor- 
mation desired concerning the University, will gladly be 
f umished) on request, by 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



. 'i 



•/ 



* » 



SMi. 



t^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR NEW 



STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR THE 



SUMMER QUARTER 



JULY 10 TO SEPTEMBER 28, 1944 



Friday, July 7 

REGISTRATION FOR FRESHMEN AND OTHER NEW STU- 
DENTS ACCORDING TO THE FIRST LETTER OF LAST NAME, 
AS FOLLOWS. Report to the office of the dean of the college in 
which you are registered. 

Time 

8 :30 A. M. A G 

9 :30 A. M H P 

10 :30 A. M. Q Z 

7:30 P. M.— DEAN OF MEN'S MEETING— All men students- 
Room A-1. 

DEAN OF WOMEN'S MEETING— All women students- 
Women's Lounge, Dean of Women's Building. 

8:15 P. M.— STUDENT BOARD MEETING— All new students. 
Room A-1. 



Saturday, July 8 

9:00-10:00 A. M.— LANGUAGE QUALIFICATION TEST— All in- 
coming students, registering for second or third year French, 
German, or Spanish — Room A-1, Arts and Science Building. 

8:00 P. M. — Dormitory Party for All Women, Anne Arundel Hall. 



Sunday, July 9 
10:30 A. M.— CATHOLIC SERVICES AT LOCAL CHURCHES. 
11:00 A. M.— PROTESTANT SERVICES AT LOCAL CHURCHES. 



Monday, July 10 



8:20 A. M.— CLASSES BEGIN. 



Friday, July 14 

9-00 P. M.— MIXER AND DANCE FOR ALL STUDENTS- 

Gymnasium. 



Saturday, July 15 

1-30 p. M.— APTITUDE TESTS— All new students. Room A-1. 
Students entering with advanced standing are required to 
take this test. 



SPECIAL NOTES 

LIBRARY LECTURES: All new students are required to attend one of 
the following lectures: 

Friday, July 7 3:00 P.M. 
Saturday, July 8 10:00 A. M. 

11:00 A.M. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR MEN: All incoming men students 
who do not present acceptable medical certificates must report to the boxing 
room. Basement, Armory, for physical examinations during registration days. 
Instructions will be given at the Medical Certificate Desk during registration. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR WOMEN: All incoming women stu- 
dents who do not present acceptable medical certificates will be given physical 
examinations during the first weeks of school. Appointments for examinations 
will be made in the regularly scheduled classes of Physical Education. 

R. O. T. C. UNIFORMS: Men students registered for military training 
should report on Monday, July 10, to the store room (basement of Armory) 
to draw unifoms and puchase a pair cf shoes of approved type. 



DINING HALL STUDENTS— Meals will be served (cafeteria style) as 
follows: Breakfast— 7:30 a. m.; Lunch — 12:30 -noon; Dinner— 5:50 p.m. 

Before receiving a dining hall card which admits the students to the dining 
hall for meals, the student must deposit at the Cashier's OfRce, War Ration 
Book No. 4.