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mmm 




^ 



MU.tJ-c4eA^ ^^^^^ ' 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



GNERAL OATALOG 
1945-1946 




AGRICULTURE 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

EDUCATION 

ENGINEERING 

HOME ECONOMICS 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

GRADUATE STUDIES 

DENTISTRY 

LAW 

MEDICINE 

NURSING 

PHARMACY 

EXTENSION 

RESEARCH 



ORGANIZATION OF THIS CATALOG 

This catalog has six major sections as follows: 

Section I. General Information Pages 17 to 47 

Administrative Organization, Facilities, Ad- 
mission, General Requirements, Fees, Living 
Arrangements, etc. 

Section II. Residei^t Instruction at College Park. . Pages 48 to 184 

The organization and curriculum require-, 
ments of the several colleges and departments 
of the University at College Park. 

Section III. Course Offerings at College Park. . . . Pages 185 to 325 

A listing of all courses offered at College 
Park, arranged alphabetically by departments 

Section IV. Resident Instruction at Baltimore . . . Pages 326 to 342 

Section V. Agricultural Extension, Research, and ., 

Regulatory Agencies Pages 343 to 358 

Section VI. Degrees Conferred and Statistics of 
Enrollment 

Table of Contents, Page 6 



• • • < 



Pages 359 to 372 

The Index begins on Page 373 



t < 

^ 



I O 



(9 

i 

8 



H 

Pi 

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o 




ORGANKAHON OP THIS CATALOG 

Th. catalog has ^ „«,„r 3eetio„a as foUows: 

Sect,.!, I. General Information. 

Administrative 0rKanl2a«n» v"iL' ****" ^ *• 47 

mission. General ^^^' ^*«I>«e8. Ad- 
Arrang;^^ et?^--«^*«' Fees. Living 

Sec««, IL ReXnn«tmction at CoDege Park P 

The organization and curriculum '' ' "^ ** *» *«* 

ments of the spv»r=] „ 11 *'°™*=™"ni reqmre-, 
of tJ,- TT • ^^7^'^^ colleges and departments 
of the University at College Park. ^"^^^ 

Section m. Course Offerings at CoUeire P«,i, „ 

A luting of all courts oi^^Jtr"^ '"^ *** ''' 
Park, arranged alphabeticallyCepa^SeS 
Section IV. Resident Instruction at Baltimore p 
SecUon V a^- w »«""«»ore. . Pages 326 to 342 

•oecuon Y. Agricultural ExtenniAi. »-_ • 

Regulatory AgencieT ^ ^*"*'^ •»" 

Section VL Degrees C„«f.«l*. V' * ^***' ^' ** ^« 

Enrofimen? <^»f*"«i and Statistics of 

* Pages 359 to -372 

The Index begins on Page 373 



Snroiiinent 
Table of Contents, Page 6 




official Publication of the University of Maryland 



Vol. 42, No. 3 



May, 1945 



I" 
<• ■ 

r 



CATALOG 



1945 



1946 



The provisions of this publication are not 
to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. 
The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student^s term of residence. The 
University further reserves the right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action is for the best 
interests of the University. 



University of Maryland official publication issued semi-monthly during May, 
June and July and bi-monthly the rest of the year at College Park, Maryland. 
Entered as second class matter, under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CALENDAR 



1945 



JULY 



S M T W T P S 



1! 2 

8! 9 

15116 



22 23 
29130 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 

12 
19 
26 



6 

13 
20 

27 



7 
14 
21 
28 



AUGUST 



S MT W T F S 



1 
8 
15 
19120121122 



51 6! 7 
12113114 



2 

9 

16 

23 



26!27|28I29|30 



3 

10 
17 
24 
31 



4 
11 
18 
25 



SEPTEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



2! 3 

9!l0 

16117 



6 
13 



1112 
18|19|20 

23I24I25I26I27 

30!.. I. 



7 
14 
21 
28 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



OCTOBER 



S M T W T F S 



1 

8 



2 
9 



3! 4! 5 
10111112 
14I15!16|17!18!19 
21I22!23I24!25(26!27 
28'29!30!31!. 



6 
13 
20 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



I.. I 



1 

41 5i 6| 7| 8 
Illl2il3!l4!l5 
18119!20!21I22 
25i26l27i28l29 



2| 3 

9;io 

16ll7 
23124 
30 .. 



DECEMBER 



1946 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



..!..! II 2i 31 41 5 
61 71 8! 9I10I11I12 
13il4ll5|16|17|18ll9 
20I21|22!23!24!25I26 
27l28i29!30|3l!..!.. 
.J..i.M..|..|..|.. 



FEBRUARY 



S MT W T F S 



..!..!..!.. I.. I 1! 2 

31 41 51 61 71 81 9 

10I11I12113114115I16 

17118119I20I21I22I23 

24!25126!27128'.J. . 



MARCH 



S M T W T F 

. .1. .1. .1. J. 1 



S 

2 

9 



31 41 5' 61 71 81 
10111I12I13114I15I16 
17I18119'20121'22I2,? 
24!25'26'27'28129I30 

311. J. J. .I..!..!.. 



APRIL 



S M T W T F S 



..1 II 21 31 41 51 6 

71 81 9110111112113 

14I1.'>!16I17I18119!20 

21I22123124125I26I27 

?8!29130I..1..|..1.. 



MAY 



g M T W T F S 

..I..I..I II 21 31 4 
51 61 71 81 9110111 
12113114!15I16117118 
1 9120121 I22123I24I25 
26127128129I30I31I.. 
..I. .!..!.. !..!..[.. 



JULY 



S M T W T F S 



1 
8 



2 

9 



14 
21 



15116 
22123 



28!29'30 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



41 5! 6 
11112113 
18il9i20 

25I26I27 

I I 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 



.1..!..! 1! 21 3 

41 51 6! 71 81 9'10 

11!12!13I14!15|16!17 

18!19!20!21!22!23'24 

25i26'27:28!29!30|31 



SEPTEMBER 



S MT W T F S 



II 21 3! 4! 5! 6' 7 

81 9110111112I13114 

15I16117I18119I20I21 

22i23l24!25l26'27!28 

29'30l..l. 

..|..|..!. 



OCTOBER 



S 



M T W T 

2T 



F S 



..1..I 11 21 31 4! 5 
6! 7! 8' 9I10!11'12 
13!l4il5!16!17i8!l9 
20l2l!22!23'24'25!26 
27'28'29'30!31 !..!.. 



NOVEMBER 



S MT W T F 



I. .I..!.. I.. I II 



S 

2 
9 



S M T W T F S 



2 

9 



31 4 
10111 



1617 



23!24 
30131 



18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 
13 

20 



7 
14 
21 



27128 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



JUNE 


S 


MT W T 


F 


S 


.. 


..I..I..I..I 


..1 


1 



21 31 41 51 6! 71 8 

9110111112I13I14115 

16117I18119120I21I22 

23124125126127128129 

301. .I.J. .!..!.. I.. 



1 

31 41 51 61 71 81 
10!11112113114I15I16 
17118119120121 122123 
24'25I26!27'28I29!30 

..1..1..I..1..1 



1947 



JANUARY 



S MT W T F s 



5 
12 
19 



6 

13 
20 



7 
14 
21 



26127128 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



2 

9 

16 

23 



3 
10 
17 
24 



4 
11 
18 
25 



30131 



|..i..|..|..|..| 



APRIL 



MAY 



S MT W T F S 



4 
11 
18 
25 



5 
12 
19 
26 



6 7 



13 
20 
27 



1 
8 
15 
22 
28 29 



14 
21 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



3 
10 
17 
24 
31 



DECEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



li 21 3! 41 5! 61 7 

8! 9I10|11!12!13!14 

15116117118119120121 

22 23|24|25126|27!28 



29 



301311..!.. I.. I 



JUNE 



S M T W T F S 



1' 2' 3' 4i 51 6! 7 
8 9;10!ll 12il3|14 
15,1617 18 192021 



22|23|24 
29:30.. 



25 26127 28 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1945-1946 

COLLEGE PARK 



1945 

July 9 
July 10 

August 17 



Summer Session 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Friday 



A/ rw 

Registration for summer session 

Instruction begins 

Closing date, summer session 



m 





FEBRUARY 


I 


SMTWTFS 1 


• • 

2 


• • 

3 


• • 

4 


• • 

5 


• • 

6 


• • 

7 


» 1 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 1 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 1 


23 24i25j26l27 


128 


1 



First Semester 





< 


MARCH 


1 


SMTWTFS 1 


• • 

2 


• • 

3 


• • 

4 


.J..!.. 

5' 6' 7 


^ 1 


9 


10 


11 


121314 


15 1 


16 


17 


18 


19i20;21i22 ■ 


23 


24 


25 


26i27i28|29 | 


30 


31 


• • 


• • 


1 



S 


MT W T 


F S I 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


4! 5 1 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1112 I 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


1819 I 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25<26 ■ 


27 


!28 


29 


i30 


1 


1 



September 19-22 
September 24 
November 22-25 
December 22 

1946 

January 2 
January 26, 28, 29, 30 

February 4-6 
February 7 
February 22 
March 25 
April 19-23 
May 30 
June 1, 3, 4, 5 
June 8 

June 24 
June 25 
August 2 

June 17-22 
August 5-10 



First ^>emeoi^^' 

Instruction begms 
Monday 
Thursday-Sunday Thanlcsgiving recess 

Christmas recess begms 
Saturday 

Wednesday Christmas recess ends 

Saturday-Wednesday Fail semester exammat.ns 

Second Semester 

Instruction begins 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
Observance of Maryland Day 
Easter recess 
Memorial Day, holiday 

Thursday semester examinations 

Saturday-Wednesday Sprmg se 

Saturday , Commencement 



Thursday 
Friday 

Monday 
Friday-Tuesday 

Thursday 



Summer Session— 19 Ue 

' , Registration for summer session 

Monday ^ ^ . 

, . Instruction begins 

"^""f *'' Summer session ends 

Friday 

Short Courses 

Rural Women's Short Course 

4-H Club Week 



. T^Jw^ional schools in Baltimore will 

5 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar for 1945, 1946, and 1947 4 

University Calendar for 1945-1946 . . . '. 5 

Board op Regents 6 

Officers of Administration and Instructional Staff at 

College Park 8 

SECTION I— GENERAL 

Preliminary Information 17 

Organization of the University 19 

Physical Facilities 20 

Admission Procedure and Regulation of Studies 22 

Definition of Residence 27 

Fees and Expenses 29 

Student Health and Welfare 33 

Living Arrangements 35 

Student Aid and Employment 37 

Honors and Awards 40 

Student Activities and Organizations 43 

SECTION II— RESIDENT INSTRUCTION AT COLLEGE PARK 

College of Agriculture 48 

College of Arts and Sciences 72 

College of Business and Public Administration 100 

College of Education 123 

College of Engineering 139 

College of Home Economics 156 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 167 

Programs for Careers in Penology and Prison Administration 

and Operation 171 

Graduate School 174 

Summer Session . . . 183 

Evening Courses 184 

SECTION III— COURSE OFFERINGS AT COLLEGE PARK, 

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY DEPARTMENTS 185 

SECTION IV— RESIDENT INSTRUCTION AT BALTIMORE 

School of Dentistry 326 

School of Law 329 

School of Medicine 333 

School of Pharmacy 338 

University Hospital 342 

School of Nursing 342 

SECTION V— AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, RESEARCH, 

AND REGULATORY AGENCIES 343 

SECTION VI— RECORDS AND STATISTICS 359 

Degrees Conferred, Certificates and Honors Awarded, and Sum- 
mary of Enrollments for 1944-1945 372 

GENERAL INDEX 373 

6 



BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UN.VEBSITV OP 
^°*^- MARYLAND AND ^,^„_,,„_ 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



Term 
Expires 

1949 

^^ . ^^ . .Baltimore 

wtixiam P. COLE, JR., Chairman ^ ^^^^ 

WlLbiA^^^ ^ Rnltimore 

,. L WHiTEHURST, Secretary Baltim ^^^^ 

Baltimore 



MRS. John 

J. MILTON PArrB^soK. Treasure., 

B. PaulKnotts ^^^^^^ 

HARKV H. Nurro: ^^^^^^ 

PHIUP C. TURNER. ^^^^.^^^^ , 

GLENN L. MARTIN ^^^^.^^^^ . 

JOHN E. SEMMES ^^^^.^ 

THOMAS R. BROOKES ^^^.^^^^ 

STANFORD Z. ROTHSCHIU, • _• _ ^^^^^^^^ 

Members of the Board -- ^^^^"^^^^^^^^ ^t Monday in June, 
terms of nine years each, begmmng ^^^^.^^ ^^^^^ 

The President of the University of Maryland .s. by 
of the Board. TJe^ents of the University of 



1954 

1950 

1950 

* . 1951 

1951 

1952 

1952 

of the State for 



except during 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE 

_ ,«, -Dvun Chairman 



BOARD 



DEAN APPLEMAN 

Mr. Benton 
DR. Brueckner 
President Byrd 
Dean Cotterman 
Dean DuMez 

COLONEL GRISWOLD 

Dean Howell 
Director Huff 



PRESIDENT BYRD, Chairmxtn 
MISS PREiNKERT, Secretary 

Dean Joyal 
Miss Kellar 
Director Kemp 
DR. Long 
DEAN Mount 
Dean Patterson 
Miss Preinkert 

DEAN Pyle 

Dean Reid 
7 



Dean Robinson 

DR. Sayles 

DR. Spears 
DEAN Stamp 
DEAN Steinberg 
Dean Symons 

DR. WHITE 
DEAN WYLIB 

Dr. Zucker 



8 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agri., Director of Extension Service, Dean of Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration and Acting Dean of College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of School of Dentistry. 

Arnold E. Joyal, Ph.D., Acting Dean of College of Education, Acting 
Director of Summer School, Acting Director of Evening Extension 
Division. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate School. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law. 

Robert U. Patterson, M.D., CM., LL.D., Dean of School of Medicine, 
Superintendent of University Hospital. 

Ivy B. Clifford, A.M., R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of School 
of Nursing. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of School of Pharmacy. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of College of Agriculture. 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Acting Dean of Men. 

Adelb H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

H. C. Griswold, Col. Inf., U. S. Army, Commandant and Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

Clarence W. Spears, M.D., Director of Physical Education. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions. 

Charles L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

T. A. Hutton, M.A., Purchasing Agent. 

Harold A. Saylbs, A.B., Assistant Superintendent of University Hospital. 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

OflSce of the President 

Elsie M. Caldwell Secretary to the President 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Mary Burke Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Office of the Registrar 

Mary G. Bauer Assistant to Registrar 

LiSETTE Thompson Assistant, Records 

Florence Stafford Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Oean of Women's Office . .Assistant Dean of Women 

ROSALIE Leslie, M.A . .Assistant Dean of Women 

MARIAN JOHNSON, M.A 

Office of Business Management Comptroller 

c L. BENTON, M.S., C.P.A ::::::::.'.* ^^f^^^i 

W W. COBEY, A.B Purchasing Agent 

T*A. HurroN, M.A ' Chief Engineer 

HERBERT E. RUSSELL Personnel Officer 

EDITH M. Frothingham Military Property Custodian 

GERMAN V. RICE As'sistant Comptroller (Baltimore 

W. V. MACONACHY Chief Clerk (Baltimore) . 

J. H. TUCKER " * 

Dining Hall General Manager 

CHARLES V. DELAHUNT 

Student Health Service ^ Director of Health 

DR. CLARENCE W. SpeaRS. .V.V.V. Physician Consultant 

DK, W ALLEN Griffith • Supervisor of Nurses 

MISS ESTELLA C. BALDWIN, R-N 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

^ A Ti/rT Q .Director of Libraries* 
CARL W. E. HINTZ. A.B.. A.B.L.S., A.M.L.S 

College Park , r, c t «; 

ELizABirrH A. Gakdner, A.M., ^■^■^■\^^^^ Reference and Loan Librarian 

ANNA M. URBAN. A.B., A|^;;:^^;^,,i,tant. Reference andLoan Department 

H^N T. ARMS^ONO. A.B.. ^•^iS^.n^.K^eren^^ 

N VIKGINIA PHimPS, AB.^. Assistant, Ref ere g^.a Cataloger 

T omSB W. GCTCHELL, A.B., B.S.L.b. ....••■• Assistant Cataloger 

r"^H S^BOLT. A.B.. A.B.L.S .^ ■••••• order Librarian 

HAROLD C. O'NEAL. A.B.. B.S.L.S Assistant 

Kate White ' ' " ' / Secretary to the Director 

Elizabeth Diggs 

Baltimore jKrari^s 

Dental-Medical-Pharmacy Libraries Librarian 

IDA M. ROBINSON. A.B., B.S.L.S • •• ■ ' ^^^^ Librarian (Dentistry) 

BEATRICE MARRIOTT, B.S ' ' " ^ggistant Librarian (Medicine) 

RUTH LEE BRISCOE. ••••••• Assistant Librarian (Pharmacy ) 

HILDA E. MOORE, A.B., A.B.L.^ 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Florence Kirk a • ^ . /.. 

Julia Wilson, B.S B S L S Assistant (Dentistry-Pharmacy) 

Edith R. McIntosh, A.B., A.B L S Assistant (Medicine) 

Charlotte Jubb ' Cataloger (Medicine) 

Assistant to the Catalogers 

Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B., B.L.S 

Librarian 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 
Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Dr. Bamford, Dr. Gruchy Dp Pxxttt. 
Preinkert, Professor OTiirrpv nr^Axr t> ^^^^^y, Dr. Phillips, Miss 
Mrs. THURSTonrWH^l ' ^""^ """• Schindler, Dean Stamp, 

Athletics and Physical Education 

Dr. Spears, Acting Chairman; Dr. Benton Dr Papv rr^rr. 
WOLD, Dr. Kemp, Dean Stamp. ^«nton, Dr. Cory, Coix)nel Gris- 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Co??ERMir''Mp^^^''"^''' ^^ ^^^'^' ^^- Brueckner, Dr. Cory Dr 
i^oTTERMAN, Mr. Holmes. Dr. Juit r>n !?•..«„ t^ x ^^^^- "»• 

Mahonby, Mr. Oswald. ^ ^^^^' ^^- Leinbach, Dr. 

Educational Policy, Standards, and Coordination 

DEVAo?rDT'H'^^~DR.^Lr.?'D?-/r^^^^^ ^-"-' -• 

Extension and Adult Education 

MR. OswalS ^J^o^sor Greene, Dean Joyal, Miss Kellar. Dr. Martin. 
Libraries 

MR^^'^NGrNrSrSlN" dHa""' ^''•.««. D«. W. R. CLARK, 
STEINMEY^. Pi^oSsfRTlSHORVDTY^U'L."^^^' ^'^ .^^^^^^ ^'^ 

Publications 

Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Miss E FROTWTvrwAA>r n» tt 
Miss Preinkert, Dr. Zucker. ^^^^^ngham. Dr. Kemp, Mr. Oswald, 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Dr. Baker Mp Pr^oem n« /-. ^ 

Dr. Gewehr, Colonel Griswold Dr^h/t n.f^^^ ""' ^''- ^""^^^ 

Mr. Randall, Dean Rbid Sm Pn» ' ,? ^''''''^' ^'"^ Preinkert, 
DR. SteinmSer DR SngST "''"^' """• ^^^^' ^^^ Stamp, 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



11 



Religious Affairs and Social Service 

Miss Leslie, Chairman; Dr. Gewehr, Mr. Hamilton, Dr. Haring, Miss 
Johnson, Professor McNaughton, Professor Randall, Dean ReidTDr. 
White. 

Scholarship and Student Aid 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Mr. Corey, Dr. Cotterman, Dean Mount, Dean 

Reid, Dean Stamp, Dr. Steinmeyer. 

« 

Student Life 

Dr. White, Chairman; Professor Allen, Dr. Baker, Dr. Benton, Dr. 
Griffith, Colonel Griswold, Dr. Harman, Professor Kramer, Dr. Lejins, 
Dr. Phillips, Miss Preinkert, Dean Reid, Dr. Spears, Dean Stamp, 
Professor Dillard. 

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK* 

George J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture. 

Paul R. Achenbach, B.S., Lecturer on Heating, Ventilation and Re- 
frigeration. 

Arthur M. Ahalt, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Oscar N. Allen, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

George F. Alrich, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Mary L. Andrews, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Charles 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology. 

Ross E. Backenstoss, Ph.D., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Alice C. Baker, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

H. Stanley Baker, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Oliver E. Baker, Ph.D., Professor of Geography and Lecturer on Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Cecil R. Ball, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Herman Ball, B.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Frank G. Banta, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Madge Beauman, R.N., Assistant in Physical Education. 

Ural G. Bee, M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Charles L. Benton, M.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

Rachel J. Benton, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Myron H. Berry, M.S., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Angela Bianchini, B.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Donald T. Bonney, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Sidney F. Borg, B.S., C.E., M.C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Henry H. Brechbill, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 



* For the year 1944-45. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



13 



12 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Ferdinand G. Brickwedde, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Allison T. Brown, Instructor in Interior Design. 

Glen D. Brown, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 

Hazel M. Brown, M.S., Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Russell G. Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

Marie D. Bryan, M.A., Instructor in English and Education. 

Sumner O. Burhoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Leo Cain, Ph.D., Instructor in Education. 

Margaret B. Cain, Ed.D., Instructor in English. 

Guy a. Cardwell, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Suzanne F. Cassels, B.A., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Julian J. Chisolm, II, Instructor in Entomology. 

Weston R. Clark, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Harold J. Clem, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

Eli W. Clemens, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Lucienne C. Clemens, B.A., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Gladys A. Colgrove, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

George F. Corcoran, M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Gustavo Correa, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Ernest N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Carroll E. Cox, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Hugh J. Creech, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Elnora R. Criswell, M.A., Instructor in English. ' 

Jane H. Crow, M.S., Instructor in Institutional Management. 

Dieter Cunz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Professor of Practical Art. 

Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Richard C. Darnell, B.S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Gomer L. Davies, B.S., Lecturer on Radio Communications. 

Evelyn Davis, B.A., Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 

William L. Deam, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

Samuel H. DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm 

Management. 
Harold M. DeVolt, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Animal 

Pathology. 
Louise A. Dickson, B.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Dudley Dillard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Lewis P. Ditman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 
EiTEL W. DoBERT, Assistant in Foreign Languages. 
James C. Dockeray, Ph.D., Professor of Finance. 
Charles H. Dodson, M/Sgt., U.S.A., Instructor in Military Science and 

Tactics. 
Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 



Science and Tactics. 
K„ EH«NS.H.O^ PI..B, P.-.f»»' ;'„S? .( Horn. M.».g."..nl. 

^l:: r.rs%tt' P^rr :r^^ ....... 

SaSL E Fowkes/m.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 
R™ FRANK. M.A.. instructor in Foreign Lan^-J^ 
FRANK B Fbeidbx, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of H.stoiy. 
IZl^lIl. GaiIdiner. A.M., Instructor in Educat.ou. 
wTlliam K. Gautier. M.S., Instructor m Phys.cs. 
p Vernon Getty, B.A., Instructor in English. 

WESLEV M. GEWEHR, Ph.D., f^o'^^^.f^^^.li,^ 

CAR. W. GOHR. B.S., Instructor - ^ ^^ f^.^^^^^^^^^^ 
xtakparet T Goldsmith, Ph.D., Instiuctoi m ^^ 
Margaret a- ^^ Pmfp^^or of Dairy Manufacturing. 

S'.^°„Ta,^iv,rri:Li.f pro..- «' ->" 

^ro.V=;.^M:s':r^- --Hi """"'"" """"""■ 

Tactics 
»...vtP PRiirHY Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

F LOUISE hTel! B^ , Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 

Lk W HA^ P*^-°- ^^^"'""' """'""' of Mathemat.cs. 

DICK w. tiAi,!., Lecturer on Municipal Sanitation. 

a™ bS-S, M.tA,s«i.U Pr,..=s» of A„«.»,.l E.on.n,,... 

Lawrence J. Hodgins, u.&m ^ . „.i_t„nt Professor of History. 
S^ i.S'rLX'BrS»» « sou. ana Po„„..«o... 

Engineering. p,.ofessor of Chemical Engineering. 

T"Z R HrcHEsr; ma! Isttant Professor of Speech. 
J;™. JackLn. m!^.. M.E., Associate Professor of M^hanical Eng.- 

Stak^'b^" JACKSON. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

bTANU!.x p.p Professor of Bacteriology. 

^:r F "™-pX A»>.«. P,.<..sor o, P,.n. P..ho,.,«. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1V11.MER, I'h.D., Assistant Professor nf Pi,^^- 4. 
Charles F. Kramfr m a a • -^ ^"lessor of Chemistry. 

GEORCE S. LAKE'S. Ph D ^rst^ctte f r "■ "' ^^'^ ^— ^- 

HA.BX w. LAPP, M.s:, A£:t^:^^t!:r:tToof ^TT''^- 

Laurence L. Lavton, Ph D xJilt^Tt I ' *"'* Nutrition. 

Frederick H. Leinbach Ph'n p ^ ^''"^^^^^^ "^ Chemistry. 

p^T^ P. LE,x.s. S^^st;:^i;te'■Sl:^fS,''"^^^^ 

William B. Lemmon Jr pv, n ^ \ Sociology. 

IHVX.0 LxKKow. i7, tk^£; rsSh ^" "^^^•''''°- 

Myrne L SS ^i'f-' A«f «tf t Professor of Soils. 
Monroe H. mI^^in Ph I'v' f'"^'"'"/ "^ 0'«"<="'ture. 

Fhma r> TIT XT ' Pri^B., Lecturer in English 

iiiDNA B. McNaUGHTON M A Vr-r.i^^cc - rt 

Thomas P. MoM„,„ M f S™^"?"'- ''=«"" ""i Oolhlne. 
"il,."'""''""' "■*■• ■■■■■«•. '■'■■«•. A-so^a.. P„,^, ., ,„ .„, 

Evelyn L. Oginsky m <5 t^ * ^^oiessor of Physical Chemistry. 
Harold C. oS i b B S T^'r /" ^^^^"-^<>^y- 

ARTHUR C. Parsons, M.A., Assistant Professor of ForP.V. t 

LOUIS A. PARSONS, Ph.D., Instructor in PhysTcs ^ ^--^-ages. 

s>ER, ±'h.D., LL.D., Lecturer on Foreign Languages. 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, COLLEGE PARK 



15 



NoRMAN E. Phillips, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

ZiTA PoNTi, A.B., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Hester B. Provensen, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing. 

George D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

B. Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Associate Professor of Music. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Harry H. Rice, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Elon G. Salisbury, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Leslie A. Sandholzer, Ph.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology. 

Elaine Scanlon, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Alvin W. Schindler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Albert L. Schrader, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 

Mark Schweizer, Ph.D., Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Leland E. Scott, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

L. Harold Sharp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

H. Burton Shipley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Mark M. Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor of Landscape 
Gardening. 

Charles A. Shreeve, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Otto Siebeneichen, M/Sgt., U.S.A., Band Instructor, Military Science and 
Tactics. 

W. Conley Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

W. Mayo Smith, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Robert E. Snodgrass, A.B., Lecturer on Entomology. 

Clarence W. Spears, B.S., M.D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Jesse W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Kenneth M. Stampp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

S. Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Reuben G. Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

William J. Svirbely, M.S., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Jean Tenney, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

RoYLE P. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Soils. 

Charles W. Thornthwaite, Ph.D., Professor of Natural and Human 
Resources. 

Arthur S. Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. 

Theron a. Tompkins, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Edward D. Trembly, M.B.A., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Emil S. Troelston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Matthew A. Troy, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. 

Anna M. Urban, A.B., A.B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

John L. Vanderslice, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

William VanRoyan, Ph.D., Professor of Geography. 



16 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DOHOTHV M. W.rs^j^s 'lnsl^^::^-^^otessor ^^ English. 

Catherine MacN. Weav^' M 1 t V" ^^"""^^ ^'''^ ^""^^ Resources 
Charles E. White. Pr^Pr^±' ^"^t^^tor in English. "'"'■ 

Milton J. Wiksei^ ma" I^^^l 1 1 ^"*'^^^"''= Chemistry. 
Raymond c. WiLE^'pho" tZT ^"^"^^^^ ^^ SP^eeh. 

JAMES F. YEAGER, Ph.D LI r^ ^n E^f'T '' ^"^'^'^^ Chemistry. 
John E. Younger Ph n pI * Entomology. , ^• 

HAROI.I. Yourman;m.Ba: S uVs ft''""^' Engineering. 

Science and Tactics. ^ ^^•' ^^^'^tent Professor of Military 

Vv. Gordon Zeevetii pi, n a . 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AND FELWWS 

Graduate Assistants 

Name 

Jean M. Boyer, b.S.. 

Elizabeth E. Haviland! MS 

Edith B. Hitz, M A " 

Betty E. Hoffmaster* b s 

William P. Keller, b S 

Salvatore F. MARTmo, B s 

Marvin Schwartz, B.A. 

Claudia L. Sebeste, B S 

Helene G. Sherwood *b*s 

Amanda A. Ulm, B.s' 

Frieda Wertman, A B 

Vivian Wolfman, B s 



SECTION I— General 



Fellows 
Sidney R. Galler, b.S 
Morton A. Hyman, B.S. 
Beatrice J. Thearle, b a 



Department 

Mathematics 

Entomology 

Zoology 

Zoology 

Zoology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Zoology 

Botany 

Botany 

Chemistry 



• • a 



Zoology 

Mathematics 

Education 



PRELIMINARY INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland, in addition to being a State University, is 
the "Land-Grant" institution of Maryland. The University is co-educational 
in all of its branches. 

College Park 

The undergraduate colleges and the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland are located at College Park, Prince George's County, Mary- 
land, on a beautiful tract of rolling, wooded land, less than eight miles from 
the heart of the Nation's capital, Washington, D. C. This nearness to 
Washington, naturally, is of immeasurable advantage to students because 
of the unusual library facilities afforded by the Library of Congress and 
the libraries of Government Departments; the privilege of observing at 
close range sessions of the United States Supreme Court, the United States 
Senate and the House of Representatives; the opportunity of obtaining 
almost without effort an abundance of factual data which is constantly 
being assembled by the numerous agencies of the Federal Government; and, 
especially in these days of war, the keen sense of interest which necessarily 
exists when one is in such close proximity to history in the making. 

The University is served by excellent transportation facilities, including 
the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, by the Washington street 
car system, and by. several bus lines. The campus fronts on the Baltimore- 
Washington Boulevard, a section of Federal Route No. 1, which makes the 
University easily accessible by private automobile traveL 

College Park, and the adjacent Calvert Hills and College Heights, con- 
stitute a group of fine residential communities close to the University 
campus, where are located the homes of many of the members of the faculty 
and staff, and where students who prefer to live off campus may find de- 
sirable living accommodations at reasonable rates. 

Baltimore 

The professional schools of the University — Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
Nursing, and Pharmacy — the University Hospital, and the Baltimore Divi- 
sion of the College of Education, are located in a group of splendid build- 
ings, most of them erected in recent years, at or near the adjacent corners 
of Lombard and Greene Streets and Lombard and Redwood Streets, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Baltimore, a thriving, modern industrial city of more than a million in- 
habitants, has an old established culture represented by outstanding educa- 
tional institutions, libraries, museums, parks, public buildings, and places 
of historical interest. 

Baltimore is justly proud of its well earned reputation as a center of the 
highest type of professional education, and no finer location could be chosen 
by a young man or young woman desiring to prepare for a professional 
career. 

17 



18 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



— — AFJ 

In 1807 the CoJe;rorMT°" "^"-^ "^^^^^ in lalr^^^"-' ^""^^^^ 
-djal school in the^nlJtr Thf ^1^ "^^ -^--<'. the fifth 

build „ra7L'T%"- -tablSdl'^"8r4 itrnr^"^*^^ - ^S 

and arts and scienc?"L*d byTh? " ""^*'*"*^ '-'^-^^^^l^^iS'l^ 
faculties thus united Lho^rw k ^*™^ ^^^^ declared that the 3' ' 

added; in 1««9 o t^ ^"^"<^n m law was opened q»Kc , "^^^^ ^ 

tfia p i! ^ I>epartment of Denti^fr^ ^- ^ Subsequently there were 

the Baltimore College of DentTl ^^^''^'^^'^ ^^^^ was absorbed in ll^T 

The Maryland Stat^ r-^ii 
the Maryland AgriculLrT. r^',7^' chartered in 1856 under th 

Western HemispfeTe Cthre'"^'' *^^ ^^"^''^'^ ^^ricuItS eonL"?'.."' 
agement. In 1862 fL r ^ ^'^^rs the College was «^T. ■ "* *''^ 

the Legislatures of the qtJ mechanic arts, in such « ,«= ^ 

mote the liberal anj prlS S,"'/ ''^^'^-^^y Prescribe I ord^rir '' 
-eral pursuits and'pS^ / f"^5 °" V' ^'^^^^'^^VZ 
General Assembly of Maryland and thX ,' ^*"* ^«« a<=«Pted by the 

fft fi,« n II '-'^«^e. m iyi6 |;hg Genprai a.,„ ii ^^ taken over 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



19 



In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution 
was given the name. University of Maryland. 

THE UNIVERSITY YEAR 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately seven- 
teen weeks each, and a summer session of six weeks. The quarter system, 
in operation since July, 1943, was discontinued July, 1945. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The government of the University is, by law, vested in a Board of 
Regents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the governor of the 
State, each for a term of nine years. The administration of the University 
is vested in the president. The deans, directors and other principal officers 
of the University form the Administrative Board. This group serves in an 
advisory capacity to the president. 

Following is a list of the administrative divisions of the University: 



At College Park 
College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Education 
College of Engineering 
College of Home Economics 
Graduate School 
Summer Session 
Department of Military Science 

and Tactics 



At Baltimore 

School of Dentistry 

School of Law 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 

University Hospital 

College of Education (Baltimore 
Division) 

Maryland State Board of Agricul- 
ture 



Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agricultural and Home Economics 
Extension Service 

State- Wide Activities 

The Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service maintains local 
representatives in every county of the State. These representatives. County 
Agents and Home Demonstration Agents provide expert assistance to 
farmers and farm families in their areas and, when necessary, call upon 
the large staff of specialists at the headquarters of the Extension Service 
at College Park. 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service, which is charged with responsibility for 
the control and eradication of diseases of live stock and poultry, maintains 
local veterinary inspectors throughout the State, in addition to specialists 
and laboratory technicians at the main laboratory at College Park and the 
branch laboratories in Salisbury, Centreville and Baltimore. 



20 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



21 



PHYSICAL FACILITIES — GROUNDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park comprise 600 acres. 
A broad rolling campus is surmounted by a commanding hill which over- 
looks a wide area and insures excellent drainage. Most of the buildings 
are located on this eminence, and the adjacent grounds are laid out attrac- 
tively in lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. 
Below the brow of the hill, on either side of the Washington-Baltimore 
Boulevard, lie the drill grounds and the athletic fields. 

Approximately 300 acres are used for research and teaching in horticul- 
ture, agriculture, dairying, livestock, and poultry; and an additional 500 
acres for plant research work are located on a farm five miles northwest 
of the campus. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 30 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at College 
Park. 

Administration ayid Instruction. This group consists of the following 
buildings: Administration Building y which accommodates the Office of the 
President, Dean of Men, Comptroller, Registrar, Director of Admissions, 
Director of Athletics, and Alumni Secretary; Agriculture Building ^ which 
houses the College of Agriculture, Agricultural and Home Economics Exten- 
sion Service and Auditorium; Arts and Sciences Building, Engin^eering 
Building y Morrill Hall, which houses a portion of the work in the Sciences; 
Poultry Building; Horticulture Building; Dairy Building; Dean of Women's 
Building, in which are the offices of the Dean of Women and her staff; 
Music Building, which provides accommodations for the Department of 
Music, the student band, and glee club; Home Economics Building; Chem- 
istry Building, in which are located laboratories and classrooms for instruc- 
tion in chemistry, and laboratories for analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and 
lime; and College of Education Building, A new Shop Building has just 
been completed. 

Experiment Station. The headquarters for the Agricultural Experiment 
Station are in the Agriculture Building. The laboratories and green houses 
for this work are located in various buildings on the campus. 

Physical Education. This group consists of the Ritchie Coliseum, which 
provides quarters for all athletic teams, an athletic office, trophy room, and 
visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and permanent seating 
arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium, with a permanent seating 
capacity of 8,000, is furnished with rest rooms for patrons, dressing rooms, 
and equipment for receiving and transmitting information concerning con- 
tests in progress; Gymnasium- Armory, used in part by the Military De- 
partment, and for physical education work for men; and the Girls* Field 
House, for all girls' sports. Playing and practice fields and tennis courts 
are adjacent to the field houses. 



^ o nf the finest structures of its 
, , A new Armory, considered one of the n ^^^ j^.p^rtment 

/'aTthe nJZ is modern in every respect. 

tSr\tVoLn*^ -^^^^^^^ Td^tinTSf women students. These are 

as well as tne , „ical museum, and a teen. technological 

building contains a f "^^ J*L ,. ,, ger^^ce Laboratory. The techno g 

United States F^sha^ ^idWe ^^^ ^.^^j.,^ ^^ fofr searct "n the 
research laboratory of the^ ^^ laboratories for <^or^^XJu^:^Z^^^, nutri- 
TJniversity <=,*«'P"^:. A'^^jjal, chemical engineering bactenoUy ^.^^ 

fisheries dealing with chemicai, j^ cooperative ar»»nge 

"", .«d "olor.^ *»?•, SS, «ho l».e »"d«^;X~SC:: 
*%''urS',rrrV.d..« d,.e„ .n »>■ »' 

tioned above. Baltimore ^^^^ ^^^ Greene 

and well-equippe" reference booKS ai>" 

seats 236, and has about 5.00U 



22 



• THE VmVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



/ 



open shelves. The five f 

Facilities in B«H,- Periodicals are currently 

containing somTuZr T"'"* **^ **»« Libraries of tl,» « r. , 
School o/S ine'^3 000 T'' *'^ ^'^h""' ^V^ u\To '\'^''''''''^' 
volumes. The MeScal LiL "*""' ^"'^ ^^^ School' ofS '^*""'""^' ^^^^ 
three libraries hav. o^ ^'"^ '^ '^""sed in David^l I f ^^'•'"acy, lo.ooo 

schools, where they aJeS '^"^'^-^ - the buSfnL :f i,*'^ ^^'"^'"-^ 
in Arts and Scipnil ''"'^ available for use P?^f-.° ''®''* ''espective 

Thp liK,.« • « • "J^ tne Schools of 

J^ne libraries of thp TTr.- • 

srd-staSr o^-- 3^^^^^^^^ --iS:/frsSici?- -- 

^t:^:^;ersity.b ^^^^^^ ^^"^^ -- ^^ t ^s^ 

BLtrt^r^-^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Lr-- -ee 

Congress, the Un^S StL'T^'"^ ^*''- Personal workt^H''^.^""" "^ 
agencies in Washin^fn^*^^ ^^^^^*-"* "^ AgricuCe Lirar^^'and'oL? 
ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Undergraduate Schools- Ar.^v ^ 
culture. Arts and Scienct ''i^"^'''' ^^r admission to the Coll.. . . 
Engineerin? anH „ "^^®' Business and Public Arf,v,- • . ^°"ege of Agri- 

i^rauate School: Those seeking. .^ • . ' Maryland, 

address the Dpan ^^ ^u \;^®^^"Sr admission to thp p>.«^ . 

concerned or to the Director of Xh "^ -^^'^"^ *^ ^^e dean of th. T^^ 
^Applicants from SecZZysl ^^^^ '' '"^ Univers'y:' ''^ ^^"^^^ 

work are eLour" e^^ ^^"^^^^^^ thefr ast setVe'"^^ ^^"^^^- 

upon graduation! ^'- '' "^^^^^^^^^^ -PP^ementLrXds willTe"'"^ 

blatrtTthrDi ""'f " "^^"^^^ -d Universities. . 

'^" ^^^^^^^^ -f Admissions. Fnnn ' I ? ^"^ application 

" in personal data requested 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



23 



and ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the 
Registrar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to 
the Director of Admissions, College Park, Maryland. 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to enter the University at 
the beginning of the fall semester if possible. Students, however, will 
be admitted at the beginning of either semester. 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate : Graduates of accredited secondary schools of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia will be admitted by certificate upon 
the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out-of-state schools 
should have attained college certification marks, such marks to be not less 
than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Graduates who fail to obtain the principal's recommendation may be 
considered by the Committee on Admissions. Supplementary information, 
including aptitude tests will determine whether they are eligible for 
admission. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college than upon a fixed pattern of 
subject matter. 

Veterans and other mature persons who are not high school graduates 
may qualify for admission to the freshman class by passing prescribed tests 
comparable to those employed by state authorities to establish high school 
equivalence. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 3 ^ units, including Solid Geometry, required for 

Engineering, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. 

One unit each of Algebra and Plane Geometry 
is desirable for Arts and Sciences and Public and 
Business Administration. Deviation may be 
allowed for certain curricula and for other col- 
leges of the University. 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science .. 1 unit from each group is required; two are 

suggested. 

Foreign Languages None is required. However, those who will follow 

the professions, enter journalism, foreign trade 
or service, study the humanities or do research, 
should have a good foundation in one or more. 

Electives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are 

acceptable. 



24 



THE vmvEBsiry of Maryland 



Transfer Students: Only studpnt • 

standing if the tra^'stl^H "!?''* ^' ""^ «">« *« revoke aH. 
Special Students: AppHelnts "t '"^"" '^ unsatisfrcSi"''*""'^ 

».!t~f ":^c,irr =«"• - ss 

as juniors 9fn^« ^^iwes three hours per week nnf,-i i .^ *^® required 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN r. 

, ^orlc in American S«^^ CIVILIZAHON 

details conceX ,,^"^^'' ''' "American Ci^£i;-io„^r « ''^cription of 
Graduate slS' *'^ ^^'^-^^ P-^^-. <^^\'ZlZ. ^"/ tf 

'r;rudr;:rs:\^^^^^^^ 

J^^rSr si '£' ^^--Str- -- ^^ printed curricula) 
hours 'of soJZ'^y^^'^f^oftl.eDep.nrn:!;t^^^^^^^ and 

hours of govemi^^JJ, ^^7"^^ **' ^^^^^^^^-^ithZ' ''""''''' 
hours of history (H sTlm V~^'"^"*=«n Government) -kn^- ""^'*^'" 
who are sophomoS JuSi^f itf.f ^'«^"<=«n CivilizatVo„rrt Tf *'' 
history courses as Hist 5 fi m?"f ""^ '^^ ^^'J-'ired to take th- V "''f "*' 

A hese several mi *" • ; 



GENERAL INFORMATION^ 



25 



velopment, and with the richness of our cultural heritage. It should be 
especially noted that the required program goes into effect for entering 
freshmen in September ^ 19^5. 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 
1 — 99; courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates, by numbers 
100 — 199*; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200 — 299. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double number extends through two semesters. 

Schedule of Courses. A quarter time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
quarter. Classes are scheduled beginning at 8.20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit. of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are equiva- 
lent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to devote 
three hours a week in classroom or laboratory, including outside preparation 
for each credit hour in any course. 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are required 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final examinations; and, 
also, when requested to do so by the instructor, in tests given during the 
semester. 

Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 
character of the work will permit the instructor to note frequently the 
progress and proficiency of the student — in which case they may be omitted 
upon approval of the head of the department and dean of the college. 
Periodic examinations and tests are given during regularly scheduled class 
periods. Final examinations, where required, are given according to schedule 
and are of not more than two hours' duration. 

Marking System: The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, 
and D, passing; F, Failure; I, Incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, 
fair scholarship ; and mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical values are assigned as fol- 
lows: A — 4; B — 3; C — 2; D — 1; F — 0. 

A scholastic average of C is required for graduation and for junior 
standing. 

Academic Regulations. A separate pamphlet is published each year list- 
ing the regulations which govern the academic work and other activtities 
of students. 



* But not all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit. 



26 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 



I 



REPORTS 

V 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passine- marks ,•« Mt^ 
hours for which he is registered Z^- !^ ^"^ '^"* "^ ^^^ ^^"^^^^^^ 
University. The Register „otk; tte s*^d T?'"^ ^'''''^^^ ''^^ *e 
and the student's dean orthTs action A f !!*' ^' P^"^"* °' ^^"^^an- 
for scholastic reasons m^y appea t writinf l^'tJ "p° '^-^ '^^" '^^''PP^'^ 
sion, Guidance, and AdjuL^rfo^ rrst^e^t rrr '**"'• °" """"''■ 
powered to grant relief for just cause A,tnr I \ Committee is em- 
from the University for scholastic r^^n" ^^T '"^'^ ^^^ ^^^^ dropped 

to his or h., health, or to tt. TJlth of "7 ' T'" ^ «™"tol 

i/zs s sirs r-r; Tir-r "»■" - -» 

sistent absence from any course wTh!' ^*"f "*^ ^^'^ «re guilty of per- 
appointed representative^r^n^riSH^t^^^^^^^ ^'''''^'^' - *<> '^^^ 
JUNIOR STANDING 

passed with an avera^ad: a^'h^hrc'^r^oH^e m°- ^'^ ^'^" ''^^^ 
quarter credits required for junior sLding ii^^ytrr'Zr ""'"'^'' °' 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

of Business Administratt^ DoctJ^ 'J^pkm 'l' ^^'*"'" °' S*='^"*=«' Castor 
ical Engineer, ElectS E^S^ee^^ ihemST ^'■^"" ^"^•"^^^' »*«<=•>«- 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor oTnlnt^iQ ^"^^f^"''' ^**=''^'°'- "^ Laws, 

Pharmacy. °^"**' ^"'"^^^'y' ^^d Bachelor of Science in 

Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certificates 
credits of any curriculum IPaHin., 7 university. The last thirty semester 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



27 



laureate degree in combined curriculums at College Park and Baltimore 
must complete a minimum of thirty semester credits at College Park. 

An average mark of C is required for graduation. In the case of a can- 
didate for a combined degree or of a transfer student with advanced stand- 
ing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit towards a degree in more 
than one-fourth of the credits earned at this institution. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. Full information regarding specific 
college requirements for graduation will be found in the college sections 
of the catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar three 
months prior to the date he expects to graduate, a formal application for a 
degree. Candidates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees 
are conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time 
of their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

General 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount of the charges. 

In cases where students have been awarded Legislative Scholarships or 
University Grants, the amount of such scholarship or grant will be deducted 
from the bill. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, and students 
should come prepared to pay the full amount of the charges. No student 
will be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 



* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual cir- 
cumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to 
such minor students. 



28 



i 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAXD 



-de to keep the costs to the studenTas lo^^Zsibir ^ ''''''' ""' ^^ 

WAR RATION BOOKS 

Each student who boards u. ^u tt • 
present all War Ration B^k % r^^^^^^^ ^^^^"^ «-^^ - -Quired to 

regristration line before hrrece'ves ht T"""" f '"' "' *^^ ^^^^s in the 
his bill he will not receive hrdiL7n,,^n? ^" '^^^- ^^^^ ^e pays 
's stamped that his ration books havp ^ "f.^f^ admission unless the bfll 
tentative. If any stamp in the Jook u"^ ""''^ ^'^ '^^ ^^"^^^ ^^11 repre 
than food the book wilf be « S th'e Th'' /T ^^"^ ^^'^^^^^ ^'her 
may need it. ^turned to the student for such time as he 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Fees for Undergraduate Students 

First 
Maryland Residents Semester 

Fixed Charges $67.00 

Athletic Fees 15.00 

Special Fees 10.00 

Student Activities Fees 10.00 

Infirmary Fees 5.00 

Post Office Fees 2.00 

Advisory and Testing Fee 1.00 

Total for Maryland Residents $110.00 



District of Columbia Residents 

Non-Resident Fee for students from 
District of Columbia in addition to 
fees shown above 



$25.00 



$25.00 



Total for District of Columbia Students $135.00 






Second 




Semester 


Total 


$78.00 


$145.00 




15.00 




10.00 




10.00 




5.00 




2.00 


• • • • 


1.00 



$78.00 $188.00 



$50.00 



=$103.00 $238.00 



Residents of Other States and Countries 

Non-Resident Fee for students from 
other states and countries in addition 

to fees shown above $62.50 $62.50 $125.00 

Total for Non-Resident Students $172.50 *$140.50 $313.00 

Board and Lodging 

Board $170.00 $170.00 $340.00 

Dormitory Room *. $35— $55 $35 — $55 $70 — $110 

Total for Board and Room $205—225 $205—225 $410—450 



The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other University 
projects that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics and recreation. 
This fee now is devoted to a fund for construction of a stadium, an addition to the 
coliseum, and a swimming pool, as soon as the fund is sufficient and materials are available. 

The Students Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Associa- 
tion. Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, 
since, in normal times, it covers subscription to the student newspaper, the magazine and 
the yearbook ; class dues, including admission to class dances and to the performances of the 
musical and dramatic clubs. There will be some curtailment of this program until after 
the war. 

* Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the following 
additional fees : Athletic, $7.50 ; Special, $5.00 ; Student Activities, $8.00 ; Infirmary, $2.60 ; 
Post Office Fees, $1.00. 



30 



f 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
Special Fees 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's decree nav^'wl"-' ',.'"■ ^^^'^^ 

Engineering College Fee, V.rtZZ '"''* *" ^'■^'"^*'"'" ^-^^O 
Home Economics College Fee, Per Semesier ^'^^ 

if or Residents of Maryland ^"ove; . 

For Residents of the Districi'of Columbia.' f ''' 

For Residents of other states or countries ...'.' .' .' .* .' .* .* .* .* .* 

Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 



9.00 



25.00 
62.50 



5.00 
8.00 



Bacteriology ^^^^ 

Botany 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 

Introductory ^^^ 

All Other 

Dairy 

Home Economics 

(Non-Home Economics 
Students) 
Art 

Foods and Practice 

House (each) q^qq 

Textiles and Clothing 3.00 



1.00 
3.00 



8.00 
3.00 



2.00 



Education 

Industrial Education 
Physics 

Introductory 3 qq 

^"o^her ;;;;;;; g^^ 

Psychology 4 ^^ 

(Psych. 172, 173, 174) 

Radio Speech 2.OO 

Secretarial Training 
Zoology 

Introductory 3 qq 

All Other 

Entomology o 



7.50 



6.00 



00 



6.00 



Miscellaneous Fees and Charges 

Fee for part-time students per credit h6ur 

^rJZTe ^^^£:'£^' '^ interpreted'to'mean'under: 

Students carrS?moretLn /''"''''' '"'^^* ^^^^« '- less, 
fees.) ^ ^ """^^ *^^^ ^ semester hours pay the regular 

Late Registration Fee 

(All students are exnectPrl fV \ 1 \" \ ^'^^ *^ ^'^^ 

ing the filing of "Tl^^ 

regular registratLZs Thof .^ '' '^"^' ^« the 

tion one day late willt^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Itfth^^^- 

Fee for f'r\" "^"'^'^'^^^ ^''^^ ^^^ -ek of instructions 
for fa.ure to report for medical examination appointm n .* * * ' 



1.00 
2.00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



SI 



Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per semester 
hour $5.00 

Makeup Examination Fee — (for students who are absent during 
any class period when tests or examinations are given) 1.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Property Damage Charge — Students will be charged for damage to 
property or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can 
be fixed, the individual student will be billed for it; where re- 
sponsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of repairing the damage or 
replacing equipment will be pro-rated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from general library before 

expiration of loan period 05 per day 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before ex- 
piration of loan period — 

First hour overdue 25 

Each additional hour overdue 05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution 
must be made. 

Text books and classroom supplies — These costs vary with the 

course pursued, but will average per semester 30.00 

Fees for Graduate Students 

Tuition charge for students carrying more than 8 semester credit 
hours 50.00 

Tuition charge per semester hour for students carrying 8 semester 

credit hours or less 6.00 

Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of first registration . . 10.00 

Diploma Fee (For Master's Degree) 10.00 

Graduation Fee (For Doctor's Degree) 25.00 

Notes: Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students, 
whether residents of the State of Maryland or not. 

All fees, except Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee, are pay- 
able at the time of registration for each quarter. 

Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee must be paid prior to 
graduation. 

Fees for Evening Courses 

Matriculation Fee (Payable once, at time of first registration by all 
students — ^full time and part time; candidates for degrees, and 
non-candidates.) 

For Undergraduates 10.00 

For Graduates 10.00 






32 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 



$6.00 



'tedH ho'r . ''T. . 'Z. .^" ^'-^^^^-^^^ six hours, per 

"^^^t^^^^^^^ -f oV niateHals used, 
course and can be ascertaS Tn' . ^^^' ^^''^ ^^^ the 

Director of Evening CouVseror V ."^^ ^"^ '"-^"'^y "^ the 
course. ^ courses, or the instructor in charge of the 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

any Un^^trtf rLId^^^^^^^ ^-n. the University at 

withdrawal, bearing the proper"^ signatures " ^'l^ '•"''"*' appHcation'^fo, 
the Registrar's Office. A copv of fhif !! , '"^^'^^ted on the form, with 

obtained from the Office of the Dein ofTe pT' '•''"'"'"" '"^™ "'«"^' 
registered, or from the Registrar. ^""'^^ '" ^'''<=h the student is 

--- ortr.:i- rarLrrgS;^t"™^"ed o... ... ,He written 

A student who fai]« f^^ «r-4.i-j 
entitled to an honorab L disSalTn. *'>«/«<l"'red manner wiU not be 
to which he might otherwt be etSd" '"•^^'* '^'^ "^''^ *° -^ -fund 

Students withdrawing from fii^ tt •' . 
beginning of instruction f^The sem^™"*^ ^'^^^^ Ave days after the 

charges except the matriculation irboardLft?' " '"" ^^^""^ "^ «» 
of 15.00 to cover cost of registration r '^'*/"^ lodging, with a deduction 
a pro-rata basis. e&>sttation. Board and lodging are refunded on 

Students withdrawing from t»,<. tt • • 
November 1. the first UesTer t mSII T '^^ '^'^ ^^^ -«' 
leceive a pro-rata refund of all charter £ Iv ^^'^^^'^ semester, will 
deduction of |5.00 to cover cost otrel I " "'^^"^^"'^tion fee Ld a 
first semester, or March 1 'i th ^^^'stration. After November 1 th! 

for board. The refuTdM%S itrtiul"*"' "^'""'^^ ^'" be^mtde'oS. 

No refunds of laboratory f ees wTlI K T ' '"■°"'*" ''^^•^• 

October 15 and in the seconVslmeTJ^'aftrMarri^ '"* ^^""^^^^^ *^*- 
TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

J^'thf Sl;;f Xn^^^^^^^ his scholastic record 

but for each additional copy, there is a chat^ of'sfoo """ ^'^ ^"^"'^''«<'' 
Transcripts of records are of two kinds: *'•""• 

^; srus^XeT^i-r ^e o^^^^^^^ ,, ,, ,,„,^„^ ^^ . 

(b) Official transcripts. bearW the tt ""'^ ^'''' ^^^^ 

warded, on "eqiiesr^^du atlnaT^ ^^.r' "'^''^'^ «« ^- 
agencies. etc.. as attesVedeS^ee if '"t? "!'"."'' G°-«™ment 
the University and his honTratrdillSl tS^^ ^'^ «* 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



33 



Persons desiring transcripts of records should, if possible, make request 
of the Registrar for same at least one week in advance of the date when 
the records are actually needed. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have 
not been satisfied. 

REQUIREMENTS IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take basic military training for a period of two years. The 
successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation but it 
must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of attend- 
ance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. Transfer 
students who do not have the required two years of military training will 
be required to complete the course or take it until graduation, whichever 
occurs first. 

« 

EXEMPTIONS: 

1. Students who are not citizens of the United States. 

2. Students who have completed the course in other senior units of the 
R. O. T. C. 

3. Students holding commissions in the Reserve Corps of the Army, Navy, 
Marines or Coast Guard. 

4. Students who have served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast 
Guard for a period of time long enough to be considered equivalent to the 
training received in the R. 0. T. C. Short periods of service in any of the 
branches named above will be evaluated and allowed as credit toward 
completion of the course. 

5. Graduate students. 

6. Students classified as "Special Students" who are registered for less 
than seven semester credits. 

7. Students who have passed their thirtieth birthday before starting 
the course. 

Students excused from basic military training are required to take an 
equivalent number of credits in other subjects, which substitution must be 
approved by the dean of the college concerned. 

STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health 
of its student body and takes every reasonable precaution towards this end. 
Each student should present his physical examination from his family 
physician at the time of his entrance at the University. In exceptional 
cases, if it is impossible to get this examination, it will be given by the 
University Health Service. In addition to health instruction which is 



34 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



_ • 

Physical Examinations 

furnishes a uniform blank for tL.I ^ Physician. The Universitv 

for the entering student to Tecdve a'pTvTif TV '" "^^^^ '* '« ^™p"-S^ 
examination wi„ he given at t^r^^.tSt^:^^'^::^:-'^' '^ ^'^^^^'^^ 
Infirmary Service and Regulations 

physician in charge. ^ ^'^"^ "''''=« hours established by the 

Nurses' ofl5ce hours 8 tn in a ht , 
evening for emergency on£. ^^ ""-' '^^ ' ^- ^-^ ^o 5 P. M. In the 

Doctor's office hours H A M t 
times by appointment only. ' ' ^ '^ ^- ^- daily except Sunday. Other 

emergency. ''^ °"""^ "^ce hours unless the case is an 

3. Students not living in th^;- „ i 
and who are unable to report to th.T i*"""' "^° "^^'^ ««<!»<=«' attention 
versity physicians. Such vkite wHI h "^"'^ ''^°"'*' *=«» «»« "^ the UnT 
where additional visits areTecessTry I.""' f ^^^''^^ ^^^^P* ^ cases 
be necessary, the University phSn wSI Zv l''"'°"^' ^'^'^^ «« -ay 

4. Students not residin/i„ T *"'' "'"^' •='»*^««- 

^e University physSn.X ^et f o^Tn JheTnfir' "^'"^ ^''^ -'^^ »' 
the facilities available. Students who live S tl" '^ *° ^^^ ^^*^"t ^^ 

a fee of one dollar and a quarter a day! '*'"^"' """' ^' '^''^^e^^ 

6. The visiting hours are 10 to n 4 m 
Each patient is allowed only three lit^;s^; ^"'^ J *° '••'•* ^^ M- daily, 
-e any patient until permission is grnS by Z *'"'• • ^° ^'t^^ ™«y 

e. Hospitalization is not av«n ,,T "■'" '" *=''*'««• 

dents and employees BCn7::Tst!L t J"'™^ ^°' ^-''-^^ «tu- 
ate students and employees who are in u;e5 TnT ' '' '^""""^ ^°^ «r«du- 
versity activities. mjured m University service or Uni- 

''•V""'"*^^^^^^^ ill and unable to attend 

are too ill to go to the Infirmwv iiT . ^""^ ^'^^ ^- M- If they 

that the physician can be XTt! tLT T^^ *^ ^''"^ '»<'th« o 
should be done before 8:30 A. M If « l,^"!"**"^' ^^» P^^^^le this 
time he must report to the ^^n^.^^: ^iCf'^ t^: ^^^^ - other 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



35 



8. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examina- 
tions, and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion 
of the University physician, may be desirable. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories 

Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormitories 
should request room application cards, being careful to check the admis- 
sions blank properly if housing accommodations are needed. The Director 
of Admissions will refer these to the offices of the Dean of Men and Dean 
of Women respectively. Application cards or blanks will be sent to appli- 
cants and should be returned promptly. A fee of $15.00 will be requested 
which will be deducted from the first quarter charges when the student 
registers. Room reservations not claimed by freshmen or upper-classmen 
on their respective registration days will be cancelled. A room will be held 
by special request until after classes begin providing the dormitory office 
is notified by the first day of registration. Room reservation fees will not 
be refunded if the request is received later than one month before the first 
day of registration for the semester for which arrangements were made. 

Reservations by students in attendance at the University should be made 
at least two weeks before the close of the preceding semester. New students 
are urged to attend to their housing arrangements about three months in 
advance of registration. 

All freshmen men except those who live at home, are required to room 
in the dormitories. 

There are two dormitories on the campus for women, each under the 
supervision of a Director of Residence and the Office of Dean of Women. 

Annexes 

There are four dormitory annexes, formerly fraternity houses now op- 
erated as dormitory residences. Annex A was formerly Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity house; Annex B was formerly Kappa Alpha fraternity house; 
Annex C was formerly Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity house; and Annex D 
was formerly Sigma Chi fraternity house. 

All housing arrangements for women students must be approved by 
the Office of tKe Dean of Women. 

Applications for rooms are considered only when a student has beeri 
fully admitted academically to the University. A student for whom 
a reservation has been inade should report at registration time to the 
dormitory to which he or she has been assigned. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



37 



36 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



i 






Equipment 

Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves with sufficient 
single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow cases, towels, 
a laundry bag, and a waste paper basket. 

The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormitory 
property assigned to him. Any damage done to the property other than 
that which would result from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to 
the student concerned. 

It is understood that all housing arrangements which are made for the 
fall semester are binding for the spring semester also. 

Each student will be furnished a key for his room for which a deposit 
of Jl.OO will be made. This deposit will be returned in exchange for the 
key at the end of the year. 

Laundry. The University does not provide laundry service and each 
student is responsible for his or her own laundry. There are several 
reliable laundry concerns in College Park; or if a student prefers, he may 
send his laundry home. Women students may, if they wish, do their own 
laundry in the laundry room in each dormitory, not including bed linen. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked with a 
dormitory address will be delivered when the student concerned notifies 
the College Park express office of his arrival. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSES 

Men: Only upper classmen are allowed to live in houses off the campus. 
Inquiries about these should be addressed to the Office of the Dean of Men. 

Women : Undergraduate women students who cannot be accommodated in 
the women's dormitories are referred to private homes which are registered 
in the Office of the Dean of Women as "Off-Campus Houses for Under- 
graduate Women." The householders in these homes agree to maintain 
the same rules and regulations as in the dormitories but business arrange- 
ments are made entirely between the student and the householder. Students 
and their parents should plan to see these accommodations personally and 
talk with the householder before making final arrangements. No woman 
student should enter into an agreement with a householder without first 
ascertaining at the Office of the Dean of Women that the house is on the 
approved list. 

Meals 

All students who live in University dormitories must board at the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall. 

Students not living in the dormitories may make arrangements to board 
by the semester at the Dining Hall, or at eating establishments in College 
Park. A few "off-campus" houses provide board as well as room, 



Most of th.se houses h.v. only double ""^J^'" ^,„„ ,„ 

„ ,„ other pUees »bere board " t^" ^t"""' "L up to th. dlfter- 

r r«Threertro=p:: rr-ua .h. do™.te.. S.™ ...n 

find this less expensive. ^^^^ their 

.ri:SZ^:^^'^ -l^-Se Oe. o. Wo.e. 

friendly counsel and helpful ^'^'^l^^XZlot reUirn^ to financial 
with any of their personal Pjf T^'^S, it coordinates the interests 
need, employment, housing, «*^ ..^^/J^haperonage at social functions, 
of women students, handles i«atters^ of en P ^^^^^^^^^ Association, 

regulation of sorority rushing J^/^^P^'f ^J ^v^^^^g accommodations for 
and so forth. It has ^^^^^^'J'^'f A personal interview with one 
women students, whether on or o« ^^r^^^^ ^ I ^^^^^nt on entering 

^"LrvU%ruTivLrtrt;V:rn student is ^.ted to avaU 

hlei? of aT?f the services of this department. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN furnishing 

The Office of the Dean oiJ^^J^'mX ^deSn connection with 

friendly counsel -"^ ^^^^^^.f J,"'t^^^^^^^^^^^ relating to financial need, 

any of their personal problems e^P^ia V ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^,^ ^^,, 

■ ADDITIONAL P-.H^««^;f ^^^^^^^^^^ with the activities of the 

Tounseling. Remedial --VthrC'tmen ofTptc^^ All of 

re S^setrrav^t- "- ^^^^^^ without fee. 

STUDENT AID 

Legislative Scholarships members of the Legislature 

jz sr'trpSei. «sr.:«;s,p. to ..... ..^^^^ - 

their respective districts. 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



39 



i 



districts. °* ^^^ ■"""«« of Delegates in their respective 

University Scholarships 

Atet^fSr^-^-J^r^^^^^^^^^^ ^^'^o'-hip, is open to 

-t count. .ppHcation ^^l^^^ i^: Zr.S^Li:--^^^'^ - 

Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation Grants , 

Roeburiti^ut^pl^^^^^^^^^^^ made available by the Sears 

farms in the State of MaryJand Id II "^ T" ^^'^ ^^^^ ^'^^^ reared on 
of Agriculture. These grants ap"y o''^ ZZ 7 T '"^" ^" *^^ ^''"^^^ 

Applications may be obtained from H F Cott: . '"" 

the College of Agriculture. Cotterman, Assistant Dean of 

Offer ti:.^^rm\friorhip:tl^^^^^^^^^^^ l"^-^"^ ^— ^ o^ St. Louis 
to outstanding Freshmerfn'^ertarn coHe^l"^ Home Economics Juniors and 
States. The purpose of thislTlowshioT^^J universities in the United 
young women for leadership training *"^^*^^'' ^^t^tanding 

^ Thl''r?r°'"'" *"' Agricultural Scholarships 

Three hundred dollars is given bv tho n j J, 
economics student, who, upon entering tZ •'''" ^"""^^^^ **> '^^ home 
or more courses in food and nutrS and >. ''^'''l^^^^' h«« completed two 
and other requirements of eligible students^' ^^ '* ''''°'^^"'= ^^^''''i"^ 

A Borden Agricultural Scholarshin nf «Qnn • 
m the College of Agriculture whoTas had ! '' ^*"*"^ **' *^** «t«dent 
hsted courses in dairying and, X ujn enteriLThe"""-*'' *'^ ^^^"'^^'^ 
has achieved the highest average grade and iTl, "*'' ^^^"^ "* ^^^^y, 

similar eligible students in all Jrefedtg^jlet woT'""^"'^ °' ^" °*''^'- 
Jhe^above Scholarships are granted by the Borden Company of New 

WHliam Randolph Hearst Scholarship and Fellowship 

theB:itittrPot:t^^^^^^^ established through a gift of 

Randolph Hearst. The scholaLh^ worJh ir„r'''"' 1^ ''^'""^ "" W"»-™ 
graduate of any high school in AnTerka S Tn^"^' '' ^P^" ^o the 
annually, is open to the graduate of anvTn^i f«»owship, worth $600 

s cauate ot any college or university in America. 



Edward L. Israel Inter-faith Scholarship 

The sum of $300 is given to the student, who, upon entering the senior 
year, is adjudged to have contributed most to fostering inter-faith under- 
standing and relations. This Scholarship is in honor of the late Edward L. 
Israel and is sponsored by the National Hillel Foundation. The funds are 
given by the B'nai B'rith Federation of Maryland and the District of 
Columbia. 

Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships 

These scholarships, numbering five, have been established through the 
benefaction of the late Mrs. Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of the late 
Congressman Charles J. Linthicum who served in Congress from the Fourth 
District of Maryland for many years. One of these scholarships will have 
a value of $400 annually, the other four will have a value of $150 each 
annually. These scholarships are known as the Helen Aletta Linthicum 
Scholarships. 

Graduate Fellowships 

For information concerning Graduate Fellowships, see Graduate School. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority Loan. Annually a Sigma Delta loan 
of one hundred dollars, without interest, is made to a woman student regis- 
tered in the University of Maryland. Application should be made to the 
Dean of the College in which the student is registered. 

A. A. U. W. Loan. The College Park Branch of the American Association 
of University Women maintains a fund from which loans are made to women 
students of junior or senior standing who have been in attendance at the 
University of Maryland for at least one year. Application blanks may be 
obtained through the Office of the Dean of Women. 

Catherine Moore Brinkley Loan Fund. Under the provisions of the will 
of Catherine Moore Brinkley, a loan fund has been established, available for 
worthy students who are natives and residents of the State of Maryland, 
studying mechanical engineering or agriculture at the University of Mary- 
land. Details concerning loans and application for loans should be made to 
the Secretary of the Scholarship Committee. 

Home Economics Loan Fund. A small loan fund, established by the 
District of Columbia Home Economics Society, is available for students 
majoring in Home Economics. 

From time to time other funds are made available by various women's 
organizations in the State of Maryland. Information regarding these may 
be secured upon request from the Office of the Dean of Women. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employ- 
ment while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, 



X 



40 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



f 



■•v 1 



buHlme irrfH"°"^^*'* ^^^ ^" °f his expenses TJ, 

uiue earn from one-fourth in +i,»^„ j: "^^"^^s. The amounts varv 

Generally the first year is th^ '^'T '''' ""' "" ''^^ -quired fu^' 

^« Placed at the d^pTlVsTudeT":'' T' ' "^* "^ avSabfe poSot 
be made to the Dean of Men "'" Applications for employmen'SuS 

HONORS AND AWARDS 
Scholarship Honors p,„oi i, 

awarded to one-fifth of the^adrtint T '"''"^"'=« » scholarship are 
are awarded to the upper hTo"f Sf ''lV\'''''\'f'''- ^-** W 
half. To be eligible for honors at L.f?^' '""^ '^*'«^« *» the lower 
be completed. ^"' ^* '^ast two years of resident work Zs[ 

The Goddard Medal TVio t 
awarded annually to the residenrof S"*"^'^' ^°^*^^"** Memorial Medal is 

5:f r »t;rsf -^^rjs 2's.=- -^^^^^ 

Alpha Zeta Medal The w 
awards annually a medal tfthr^''^- ^f'""'*"^^' Fraternity of Alpha 7., 

awarded annually to the sophomore It ^'"^ ^"'■'"^" Memorial Medal is 
average of his class i„ the CoTege o" En^n '**^'"'' ^'^^ ^^^'^^^t «<=ho2 t J 
Benjamin Berman. ^^ °' Engineering. The medal is given by 

Mortar Board Scholarship Cun Ti,- • 
has been at the University for four ve'J! ^T*^"** *° '^^ ^^"'•'r girl who 
schoia « average for thre'e a^'re-S^afs "'" '^^ '"^'^^ ^'^^ ^ightt 

Delta Delta Delta Medal TT.,e • 

^irl who attains the hi^tt l^:^::^. T^'^ ^ "^^^^ — "y to the 
more year. ^ ^"^^^^^^ ^^ academic work during the sopho 

Class of '26 Honor Key Thp pi 

Administration of the SveStv IT M ?'' "' '^^ School of Business 
year a gold key to the se™ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ Baltimore offers each 

with the highest average for Se S ^ f """ ^^" ^^"^^^ of Commerce 
University of Maryland ' ""'^'" ^^"^ y^^^ course taken aTthe 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



41 



American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
has attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the entire 
undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final semester. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl in the College of Home Economics who attains the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 
to the senior member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
for the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Engineers to the senior in the 
Department of Civil Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty of the 
Department, is the outstanding student in his class. 

Tau Beta Pi Certificate of Merit. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi awards annually a certificate of merit to the initiate of the Chap- 
ter who, in the opinion of the members, has presented the best thesis during 
the year. 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The Footlight Club recognizes 
annually the man and woman members of the senior class who have done 
most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This is awarded to the senior student 
majoring in bacteriology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. An award is presented annually by President 
H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior 
class who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model 
citizen, and has done most for the general advancement of the interests 
of the University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods, wife of a former president of the University of Maryland, 
to the woman member of the senior class who, during her collegiate career, 
has most nearly typified the model citizen, and has done most for the 
general advancement of the interests of the University. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



43 



42 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MILITARY AWARDS 

Mahlon N. Haines '94 Trophy. This is offered to the major of the win- 
ning battalion. 

MilitM-y Department Award. Gold second lieutenant's insignia to the 
major of the winning battalion. 

The Governor's Cup. This is offered each year by His Excellency, the 
Governor of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

Company Award. The Reserve Officers' Association, Montgomery County 
Chapter, awards annually to the captain of the best drilled company of the 
University, gold second lieutenant's insignia. 

The Alumni Cup. The Alumni offer each year a cup to the commanding 
officer of the best drilled platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Cup. This cup is offered to the commander of the 
winning platoon. 

Class of '99 Gold Medal. The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal 
to the member of the battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the members of the varsity R. 0. T. C. Rifle 
Team who fired the high score of each season. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the members of the Freshman Rifle Team who 
fired the high score of each season. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to each member of the winning squad 
in the squad drill competition. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to the three best drilled students in 
Pershing Rifles. 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition. A Gold Medal is awarded to the 
student firing highest score in this competition. A Silver Medal is given 
to the student showing greatest improvement during the year in this com- 
petition. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold watch is offered 
/ annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics." The 
watch is given in honor of a former President of the University, R. W. 
Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

Edward Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the class of 1913 to 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the outstanding 
senior baseball player. 



PUBLICATIONS AWARDS TP„-avin and Old Line work, for 

the year. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES j^^^^ ^f the stu- 

The University recognizes its ^^-^^ns^^^ for t ^^^^^^^ p,,3„nalities 

dents, not solely in their ^"^f ^/f fJ,Sg\e moral and religious, is m- 
lU; development along an ns, -^.t 'representing the major deno.n - 
eluded in the educational Pro^-e^^- [; y. ,vith the students of *eir 

national bodies assume responsibihty&^^ ^^^^ ^^^^.^^ ^ ,,,,, ehurch 

respective faiths. Each of the Student J ^^ ^^^^^^ 

of his denomination, which the st'^de^ts ^ ^^^^^^^. 

committee on Religious Affairs jd Jo f^-^^i^s ,^,^,, function 
tee on Religious Aifairs ^"^ Social Service ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ 

the stimulation of religious thought and aaiv y ^^^^ ^^^ ^ 

Itted speakers on ^^^^'^^tr'^'TstvZnTLT^^s Activities Council and 
The committee cooperates -^^^^^f.^fj^^Xt denominational clubs in every 

the student P-^ors ^d as^s^Vare ^-^^^^ ^^ ^^^-^^^^ '" *=""'"'* " 

^^^^^^z::^.:: :^ ::^s ....^^ ^^, 

JZ^Z:^:^^^^' -ially and religious activities 

Ssbjterian Club. These clubs meet regu^ariy for ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

I^d oSasionally for -cial P-P^-- /.C^des a variety of actmUes 

-ri-ce^r a n^oXJional basis. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDENT ^^'^^^^^^^^^ those of the under- 
The following description of /^^^^^^^^^^ „, those in the Balti- 

o-rnduate divisions of College i arK. 
"Jor '^visions is included elsewhere. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT association of students in organ- 

Regulation of Student ^<^'^^l''^;J^; ::ZLt.ry student activities in 
i.ed bodies for the V^wose o^<^-^V^^ encouraged. AH organized 

orderly and productive ways, is ^ecogn ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^„^ Regis- 

student activities are -^^^ ^l^:""^^,,,, of the President. Such organ- 
tration Committee, subject to tne app 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



45 



44 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



V 



I 



izations are formed only with the consent of the Student Life and Regis- 
tration Committee and the approval of the President. Without such con- 
sent and approval no student organization which in any way represents the 
University before the public, or which purports to be a University or- 
ganization or an organization of University students, may use the name 
of the University in connection with its own name, or in connection with 
its members as students. 

The Student Board. The Student Board performs the executive duties 
incident to managing student affairs, and works in cooperation with the 
Student Life and Registration Committee. It consists of the Student 
Chairman, Woman Member at Large, and First and Second Vice-Chairmen. 
Heads of major student organizations serve as ex-officio members. 

The Women's Committee in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of 
Women, handles matters pertaining to women students, such as making 
and enforcing social rules, planning the Annual May Day celebration and 
other all-women's activities. 

The Men's Committee, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of 
Men, handles matters pertaining to men students. 

The Victory Council is that part of the Student Board which is conduct- 
ing various campaigns concerned with the war effort. Bond drives, scrap 
and salvage campaigns, blood donations and publicity efforts for such cam- 
paigns have been prosecuted very successfully by this group. 

The Red Cross Unit is a subdivision of the local county chapter and 
directs all the activities of the American Red Cross as they concern the 
students on this campus. 

The Student Life and Registration Committee, a faculty committee ap- 
pointed by the President, keeps in close touch with all activities and con- 
ditions, excepting classroom work, that affect the student, and, acting in 
an advisory capacity, endeavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions 
that may exist. 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and dis- 
tributed to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning 
student matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. In 
addition, various student organizations have established certain other re- 
quirements. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass the 
required number of hours as determined by the Athletic Board. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and 
faculty rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The 
student who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives 
honorably and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the 
interest of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to main- 



students are under the direct 
^ A. .rP asked to withdraw. Students a respon- 

tain these standards are askea ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^t they ar 

,,..BB.mB. -KOK.™s, S«a,^ES AND C.CBS 

General Statement ' ^^^^^ ^nd organizations 

inJiriaml ■"""'■"'""L;,^ f„ their life's work »"« /• , Ac«iemlc 

t^arraSr^-cUvities Win .e .und . tKe 

"^r:::' Fraternities. Honorarv ^^^^^^t^^ ^^^ 

an honorary «««'?tf j^^^^^ attainment in "^'^'^^to^or society for 
society, recognmng ^^^^P^'^^^rd, the national ^f"^"' ^°'?f_ ^^ Lambda 
general leadership; Mortar «°* ' j^. ^^^ scholarship; Alpha i. 

Snen -ognizing C^ ^et^^^^^^^ -"ttrfTmen^ A%-up 
Delta, a nationa f'«™" ^ freshmen honor society for me 

a national military socictjr fraternity; Omicron Nu, a " 

honorary political science fraternity, 

honorary commerce fraternity. ^^^.^^^^ f^atermties 

Fraternities and Sororities. T^^^^ f J Jj^ These in the order of heir 

^ vyw AlT>ha Tau Omega, Phi Delta inc , Kappa Sigma, 

Epsilon Phi, Alpna i^u Epsilon Pi, ^^^ ; f v>o Omi- 

cron Pi, Kappa Delta, r^<^vy 



46 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



\ 



».!.. and <,«,„ ,p„T., o"S?,;i* •"" -?»«-. with ,«,«,,, „,„„,, 

Athletic Association, Pootlight Cub p"'''^ ^^^^e^ Debate Club, WomS 

of Mechanical Engineers, Amencanir. ?^'* ^'"''' ^mericln sS 
Institute of Electrical vJ^- Society of Civil En^ino^^ \ ^society 

Relations Clu^ C,ef Id f^^^^^ ^"'''' ^^"^^^^Sl^Zt^:?''^ 

Student Gran^; Far^LSmt ciu^p' ?"^^^ «ub^e„apS™?S;^' 
Chib Collegiate Chamber of Cormelt' D^erTe^r" "^ America if^^' 

^ociety, American Chemical Societv n^^^^ ^ '"'*' ^^eshmea Chemica 
Club, and Veterans Club. *^' ^^^''"dgers Club, Art Club, Psych™ 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

The University operates an office fn. ,u 
of Umted States mail, includinfparn^, J' ?''P"°"' '^'^P-^'^h and deliverv 

^rBuiSsrit i^z:t f -- - - ra:ts :^^:v^^^ 

facilities are ava labl. ^ ^^'' °* ^'^^ United Statrs pLt-l 9 t'^'"'''^'^^- 

ceived and dispatched several times daHy ^'"*''^ States mail is re- 

Each student in the Universitv ;« 

fo/srjrs' r- ^'•^^^ ^ -"'^- iXed "srr ''^^ ^* ''^^ «- 

^we various University offices. *^ ^Iso, boxes are provided 

^eans, teachers and University 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



47 



officials may communicate with students, and students are expected to call 
for their mail daily, if possible, in order that such communications may 
come to their attention promptly. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' 
Supply Store, located in the basement of the Administration Building, 
where students may obtain at reasonable prices text books, stationery, class- 
room materials and equipment, confectionery, etc. 

This store is operated on a basis of furnishing students needed books 
and supplies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any, are turned 
into the general University treasury to be used for promoting general stu- 
dent welfare. 

Students are advised not to purchase any text books until they have been 
informed by their instructors of the exact texts to be used in the various 
courses, as texts vary from year to year. 

The bookstore is operated on a cash basis and credit is not extended to 
students. 

ALUMNI 

The Alumni Council, which is composed of representatives of each school 
and college in the University, coordinates all general Alumni interests, 
Alumni activities are further unified in two ways. There are organized 
alumni associations in the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, 
and Nursing located in Baltimore. The alumni of the Colleges of Agri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Commerce, Education, Engineering, and Home 
Economics, located at College Park, constitute a general association, each 
group having its own Board of Representatives. Each school and college 
Alumni organization exerts an active interest in the welfare of its respective 
graduates. 

An Alumni Office is maintained at College Park, in the Administration 
Building, to direct the work of the association and to form a point of con- 
tact between the University and its graduates. 



^ 



.1 



SECTION II 
Resident Instruction-College Park 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Thomas B. Symons, Dean 

H. F. COTTBRMAN, Assistant Dean 

Doris A. Land, Secretary 

^^P^^^^el^^^^^^ and specialized training 

of agricultural endeavor. Student nrn^'""^^ ^'"^ '" the broad fieW 
correlating technical ^oJI^S^'^Z^Zr '"^"^^^ "•*" « -- o 
Education in fundamentals receives peetlattrr ^"^ «"""»•«• Bubjects. 
men and women are given a basic gene ', .d. . "' (Accordingly, young 
nstructed in the various branches of a^rt, t °^ '"''"" ^^^^^ ^^^^ being 
this opportunity for thorough groundinfi"""'' /" ^''*^'«°» *» offering 
socml sciences, it is an objecUve S the Jol " ! ^ '''"*'.' '^^''^ "^t-^' and 

r: aiTnTS :r "^t -;£3V:=^^^^^^^ 

-ed curricula., -.reared stSts^^^^t ^.^-^ -r^^^^^^ 

General 

The College provides curricula for tu ^ 

farming, livestock Productioriai^ng LTtr^ t'\ ^"/"^^^^ '" ^--a' 
table growing, floriculture or ornami; ,IZ husbandry, fruit or vege- 
t.on or in the highly specialized JcTe^ aTt'v'"" ' ''" ^^^^^ P-'^"" 
•ndustnes It prepares men to ser^e a" 1^- ' '°""''*"^ '^'*'' ^'^^^^ 

comj^ercial concerns related to apiculture f"!"""^^"-^' ^'^ P°-tions with 
teachers m agricultural college, «„h ^ ' ""^ responsible positions as 
ture in high schools or asTnvestLaJors"! ^'P"'-*!"^"*^ "^ vocational agr cut 
work, for regulatory activities aS^ '^P'"'"^"* «t««°n«. for extLs'on 
ment of Agriculture. 1 7 curricut T-"' '" '^^ United States Deplrt 
Plant Physiology and Plant Pa Sg") ^"'^^ Science. Botany (mS"g 
culural Science. Poultry Science a„i ' SotTerT' ^"t°-°'o^y. Horti^ 
tunities to students with a scientific bent J ^^f^^^ogy offer rich oppor- 
many ramifications in teaching research .""^'-^"^ ''""^ *'' Positions with 
Through research the fronti L kno , ! "' '"' ^^^'^^^^^ --k 
the fundamental sciences undlrlyine ^t 7 ^ ^' '''"*'"^ *" agriculture and 
solutions for important problems are h.'' 'T'^'^''^ ^^^^^ extended a^d 
many fields are in Progress. s"X 3 "Tn."'' ''"^"*='' P-^'^-^t^ in 
instructors who devote part time to resell or ''? '" agriculture from 
t are kept in dose touch with the la est 15 "v^'' ''"'"^'^ ^'"""^^^'^ ^ith 
the investigations under way. The find '^7^ '"' ''^^^'°P"'«nts in 

amgs of these research scientists 
48 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



49 



provide valuable information for use in classrooms, and make instruction 
virile and authentic. The results of the most recent scientific investigations 
are constantly before the student. 

Close contact of workers in the College with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State, through the county agents, 
home demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident 
instruction in the College of Agriculture. These contacts operate in two 
ways: problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of 
research workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are 
taken to farmers and their families in their home communities through 
practical demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State 
contribute to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College 
helps them in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. 

Through their regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are continually dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and analyzing and testing germination quality of seeds 
to insure better seeds for farm planting. 

These fields contribute largely to agricultural education, as standardiza- 
tion and education go hand in hand in the development of an industry. 
Direct contact on the part of professors in their respective departments 
with the problems and methods involved makes for effective instruction. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland 
lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, and 
regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the several 
departments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the several 
departments are closely associated with the research, extension and regula- 
tory work being carried on in their respective fields, and in many cases, 
devote a portion of their time to one or more of these types of activities. 
Close coordination of these four types of work enables the University to 
provide a stronger faculty in the College of Agriculture, and affords a 
higher degree of specialization than would otherwise be possible. It in- 
sures instructors an opportunity to keep informed on the latest results 
of research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends and problems 
which are revealed in extension and regulatory activities. Heads of de- 
partments hold staff conferences to this end, so that the student at all times 
is as close to the developments in the frontiers of the several fields of 
knowledge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

In order that the work of the College shall be responsive to agricultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several agricultural 



I 



1 

i 



50 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



51 



have been constituted in tL La^- inls^tr^BTr *''"', ^'^'^°^^ ''^^ 
cils are composed of leaders in the rfnecHv. . ^«^™'''t"«- These Coun- 
'and. and the instructional staff of the r!l. T! °^ «^i*="lt"re in Mary- 

of their counsel and advice BvtHc *^°"^«^V^ Agriculture has the benefit 

the students are kept arr:ast!ne::ioprents^ ''°"^"^' '""^ •"'*«^*"-' ^^^ 
Facilities and Equipment 

^^'^ ^:S:: ^SJ:^^:^-: «^-ries. and equipment for effec- 
the University of Maryirnd -^ pLTded'Srl, '". ?' ^"'*"^' -"i-"- 
and instruction in agriculture UnflrsTtlVr* '^"^'""^^ '°^ '•^-^"ch 
acres, are operated for instructiona a^ff T^' ^^^^""^ """^^ ^^^^ 1200 
the jnost complete and modern pTanti for "r '^'.''"""^ '"''^°'''- One of 
.n the country, together witS herds S tJe Tw""' "r?"' ''"^''^"'•^y -<»-k 
beef cattle, and other livestock, provdes facm«"^!' ^''"^' "^ ^^^'^^ «"d 
.on and research in these industrLs Et'n ?.*J! '"^*'"^'' ^°^ '"«*^»<=- 
ties are available in the A^ro™ n ^""f "^"^ laboratory and field facili- 

in farm crops, and for soilt^eseS The Tft '^'^^^'^^ ^"^ -'-«- 
■ng for laboratories and classroom, , . "'^ Department has a build- 

and flocks of all the important br-d; o'f nou", ""'.?"^ *''-*^-^°- --• 
ment is housed in a separate buSt and hf''' ?' Horticulture Depart- 
for its various lines of work. ^' ^^' ^™P'" "'"^''^'-d^ and gardens 

departments 

tur^ai%tXy;\^S::rrarEt^ I'' '^""^^"^ ^«^-*-"ts: Agricu,- 
Engineering; Agronomr S^i^ CTan'd S ^1"^' .^''^' Agriculturi 
Botany (including Morphology PW pL , '^ ' "^"^^^ Husbandry; 
Dairy Husbandry (including DkifvM«n/."?^ ^"'^ ^'^"* Pathology^; 
■•ng Bee Culture) ; Farm mL^ n^Td f ""f? '' ^"to'^-'o^^ (inS: 
culture (including Pomology SlSltur. ^."'""r^' Economics; Horti- 
Horticulture) ; Poultry Hus?and':!;rvt:rLf;ri:!;er' ^"' ^^"^-^"*«' 
Admission 

toTJ: SrSr '"" ^'""^^^'"' ^- ^^-'^ -<^- Admission requirements 
Junior Standing 

Requirements for Graduation 



activities. Women must acquire in addition ^ hours in hygiene, and 4 hours 
in physical activities. 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College. These organizations 
are as follows: Student Grange, Livestock Club, Future Farmers of 
America, Alpha Zeta, Agricultural Economics Club, and the Agricultural 
Student Council. 

Membership in these organizations is voluntary, and no college credits 
are given; yet much of the training obtained is fully as valuable as that 
acquired from regularly prescribed courses. 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers' fraternity 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local Granges throughout 
the State. The Livestock Club conducts the Students' Fitting and Showing 
Contest held on the campus in the Spring. The Future Farmers of America 
foster interest in vocational education, and the Collegiate Chapter serves 
as host Chapter in connection with high school judging contests held at 
the University. The Agricultural Economics group conducts special studies 
in the field of Agricultural Economics. All these organizations have regular 
meetings, arrange special programs, and contribute to the extra-curricular 
life of students. 

Membership in Alpha Zeta, national agricultural honor fraternity, is 
chosen from students in the College of Agriculture who have displayed agri- 
cultural and executive ability. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from 
the various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its pur- 
pose is to coordinate activities of these students and to promote work which 
is beneficial to the College. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Curricula within the College of Agriculture divide into three general 
classes: Technical, Scientific, and Special. 

(1) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools; as executives, 
salesmen, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricul- 
tural contact and point of view. 



52 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



w 



(2) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually in the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal, 
State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment 
stations; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return to 
the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty 
adviser, either departmental or general. Departmental advisers consist of 
heads of departments or persons selected by them to advise students with 
curricula in their respective departments. General advisers are selected for 
students who have no definite choice of curriculum in mind, or who wish 
to pursue the general curriculum in agriculture. 

Cases of students with poor records are referred to the Admission, 
Guidance, and Adjustment Committee, for review and advice. 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow afford opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is the 
same for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student 
an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
and the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a student 
before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to another, 
or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in some other 
college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisers for counsel as to the wisest 
selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests 
and their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year 
with no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to general advisers, who 
assist with the choice of freshman electives and during the course of the 
year acquaint the students with the opportunities in the upper curricula 
in the College of Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. 
If by the close of the freshman year a student makes no definite choice of 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ^^ 

--S TS-S^- ^^ "— -^■- 

(General Curriculum). 

_ r — Semester — x 

Agriculture Curriculum j jj 

freshman Year American Literature J ^ 

Eng. 1. 2-Compo8ition and Readings m American , . . 

Pol. Sc. 1-American Government. .•.••• .. » 

Soc 7-Sociology of American Life. 3 5 

Mil 2-Basic R- O. T. C. (Men) 1 I 

Physical Activities • ^ 

P E 42. 44-Hygiene (Women).. 

R Ed i-Introduction to Agriculture 

.E^f either of the following pairs of co-es :^^^^^ , 4 

Bot. 1. General Botany and Zool. 1. ^en 4 

Chem 1. 3, General Chemistry. 

Chem. 1. . following each semester: s S 

Elect one of the foiiowmK ^ 

Modern Language ..••• * 

^T'-'-^t^^^^^'^-^- ::: « ••• 

ITa-Funda-ntals of Animal Husbandnr. .....•■••••••••• . .... 

Agron. 1— Farm Crops 

\ffriculture— General :^i,;r,o' to return to the farm, 

This curriculum is designed for Pe--^ jj^^'^^, '^^^Z rather than a 
enter work allied to *%^--^' jj-^^f;"^^^^^^^^ those preparing to 

specialized knowledge of the field of agncuit 

be county agents, teachers, etc. curriculum, a student may 

rSs^th'afcontrS to liberal education. 

General Agriculture Curricu.umJ ^Semester-. 

Sophomore Year S « 

|^^l^:tiy^fA-;icanciviiiz;a;on::::^ ! 

Chem. 1. 3-General Chemistry •• 8 ..■ 

p H 1— Poultry Production .... 

D H 1-FundamenUls of Dairying 2 2 

^neech 1. 2— Public Speaking • 3 ^ 

M I 3. Veasic R. O. T. C. (Men) . . . ..... ...••••;;• ^ __1 

Physical Activities ^^ ^^ 

Total 

—7^ pairs of courses are reauired for .raduaUon [-^ ^^^^^^i^ ct ^Si'rT' m^^t ^ 
It'den'ts W.O expect to PV-Sf LSTr^Sen"ts¥/A.ricuHura. Kn..neer.n. U. 
prepared to elect Math. 15. 11 or 1 , ^^^ 

Is and n. „^ „„t elected in the Freshman year they must 

t If A. H. 2 and Aeron. 1 are n i, 
in subaeqaent years. 



54 



^ THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Year ' — Semester—^ 

ZooL 104— Genetics J II 

Hort. 1— General Horticulture 8 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology • • • . 3 

Soils 1-General Soils ... .... 3 

Agr. Engr. 101-Farm Machinery'. I 

n.1rol^:Lt--:r --"■«--.»;.•,.:•.•;;;;;.•.::::: ...» •••• 

Econ. 37-Fundamentals of Economics .'.* '' 3 

Biological or Physical Science Sequence.:.::; ••• 3 

^'^'''''' 3 3 

3 3 

Total . 

Senior Year " " 

A. Jj.. 108— Farm Management . . « 

Agron. 151-Cropping Systems ••. S 

RjEd. 114-Rural Life and Education .'.*::: • • 2 

Electives „ 

•••••• •••. •••« 3 

12 9 

Total 

15 17 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

of electives to fit the student fo™^^ ^^T'"^. '^"^"^^ '^^ selection 

soil bureaus, geological surveys f^^^^^^ k agricultural experiment stations, 
those handling f oof products^^^ laboratories, fertilizer industries and 

Agricultural Chemistry Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' — Semester — ^ 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 / // 

Chem. 15, 17-Qualitative Analysis.'.*.* 3 3 

Math. 20. 21— Calculus S 3 

Bot. 1 — General Botany .\ 4 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Speech 18. 19— Introductory * Sp'e^ch 4 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 1 1 

Physical Activities S 3 

Total . 

Junior Year ^* 

Chem. 36, 37-EIementary Organic Lecture 

Chem. 36, 38-Eleme„tary Organic Laborato;, ' ' « 

Chem. 21 22-Quantitative Analysis. . . . ^ « 2 

Modern Language 4 4 

Geol. 1-Geology ...'.'.*. ;.■;:.; '. S 3 

Soils 1— General Soils S 

Electives in Biology .......* ... '"^ 

3 3 

Total 

17 17 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Senior Year 

H. 6, 6 — ^History of American Civilization 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 

Total 



55 

Semester- — n 
/ // 



3 
3 
5 

6 



3 

S 

c 



17 



17 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

The curriculum in agricultural economics and farm management is de- 
signed to prepare students for the following types of positions: On the 
farm as farm operators and farm managers; with farm organizations, such 
as the Farm Bureau and farmers' cooperatives; with private and corporate 
business concerns; and positions with state and federal agencies, such as 
college teachers, agricultural extension workers, and research with federal 
and state agencies. 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental 
training in the basic economic principles underlying farming. The curricu- 
lum includes courses in farm management, general agricultural economics, 
marketing, finance, prices, taxation, and land economics to give the student 
the foundation needed to meet the production and distribution problems 
confronting the individual farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farm 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and 
operating the farm as a business enterprise. It requires knowledge of farm 
resources and taxation, methods of financing agricultural production and 
marketing, including agencies involved, services rendered and the cost of 
getting products from the producer to the consumer through cooperative 
and private types of organization. 

Agricultural Economics and Farm Management Curriculum* « . 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 S t 

H. 5, 6 — ^History of American Civilization S S 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry : 4 4 

Math. 5 — General Mathematics S .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... S 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) t t 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 



* If A. H. 2 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the Freshman Year, they must be elected 
in subsequent years. 



4 

4 



1 



56 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



-Semester — ^ 
/ // 

3 «... 

• • • • o 

w • • • • 



Junior Year 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 

A. E. 101 — Marketing of Farm Products 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 

A. E. 104 — Farm Finance .... 3 

B. A. 130, 131 — Statistics 8 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

P. H. 1 — Poultry Production 8 .... 

HorL 1 — General Horticulture 3 

Soils 1 — General Soils : 8 .... 

Electives 3 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

A. E. 103 — Cooperation in Agriculture 8 

A. E. 106 — Prices of Farm Products .... 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — ^Farm Machinery 8 .... 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management .... 3 

R. Ed. 110 — Rural Life and Education .... 3 

A. H. 52 — Feeds and Feeding 3 .... 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems .... 2 

A. E. Ill — Land Economics 8 .... 

A. E. 90, 91 — Seminar 1 1 

Electives 6 6 

Total 18 18 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare for teaching 
secondary vocational agriculture, work as county agents and allied lines of 
the rural education services. Graduates from this curriculum are in demand 
in rural businesses, particularly of the cooperative type. A number have 
entered the Federal service. Others are engaged in teaching and research in 
agricultural colleges. Quite a few have returned to the farm as owner- 
managers. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, involv- 
ing graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of having 
acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high average may upon petition be relieved of certain 
requirements in this curriculum, when evidence is presented that either 
through experience or previous training a prescribed course is non-essential. 
Or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



icuttural Education Curriculum' 



AS" 

Sophomore Year 

, Chem. 1. 3-Genera. Chemistry • • • 

ri:Vi-BrsrK.rraVMe„):::::;;. 

physical Activities 



57 



Semestei n 



Total 



3 
3 

4 
3 

• • 

2 

t 
1 

19 



t 
3 

4 

• • 

t 
S 
1 

If 



Junior Year 

Math. 5-General Mathematics 

Phys. 1. 2-Elements of Physics 

Bot. 20-Diseases of Plants. 

Ent 1— Introductory Entomology 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding 

Soils 1— General Soils 

Hort 1— General Horticulture 

Agr.' Engr. lOl-Farm Machinery 

A E 108— Farm Management ••••••• 

ton. 37-Fundamentals of Economics 
Psych. 80— Educational Psychology • • • 



Z 

s 

8 

• • 

S 

3 



3 



Total 



18 



3 
S 
S 

18 



Senior Year . Teaching 

R- ^ '"-^^-^'^Z^^ and' Demon^tVations 



R. Ed. 61— Farm 

Agr Engr. 64-Farm Mechanics 

Agron. 151-Cropping Systems 

D H 101— Dairy Production •• 

R Ed 112-Departmental Management 
R Id 114-Rural Life and Education. 
Ed. itl-Theory of Senior High School. 
Electives 



8 
8 
1 
b 

2 

2 



Total 



16 



2 

3 

1 

3 

2 

5 

16 



farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

. . „ 1 are not elected in the Freshman Year, the, must be elected 

♦ If A. H. 2 and Agron. 1 are noi e 
in subsequent years. 



58 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Fire-Year Program in Agriculture-P„ 
For those students whn^ u! ^"'**""«^ 

Upon completion n^ ^^u 

satisfactory compieS of ,^"^'"^^""?. «nd at the end of that v '^'"* 

in civil elpr.tw„„i *^® required course of =t a ^^*'"' "PO" 

' "*"*=^^' '"^'^»'«'^''^«1 or che„,ical enjnltg ^' '''''''' ' '^^^-^^ 

C!lirriAii1..._ • 



Curriculum in Agriculture-Engineering 

freshman Yea?- > 

Math. l5-College Algebra . 

""*''■ V-A„alytic Geo^eWV. 

DrT 2 • |r°^"^^.«' Chemistry.;;;;;. 

R ^ r'"/™"'"'"'*" *° Engineering- 

m. 1. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T C ntr . 

Physical Activities . . . * ^^^°^ .".V ' 



Semestei^ — ^ 
/ // 



Total 



2 

Z 

• • • 

4 

2 
1 

3 
1 

19 



3 
2 



4 
4 
2 



S 
1 

19 



Ihe balance of f\\\ • 



Engineering. 



* A qualifying f pcf ;„ • ^ 

M«h. ^. mtroauetor. A,geb«a^.^4^„r„i5.^ ^ -"''-^^"'"nrtir^'^tl^- J^« 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Sophomore Year (Civil Engineeriyig Optioii) 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Math. 20, 21 — Calculus 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 

Mech- 1 — Statics and Dynamics 

Surv. 1, 2 — Plane Surveying 

M. I. 3, 4 — Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 



Total 

Junior Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 

Math. 16 — Spherical Trigonometry 

Geol. 2 — Engineering Geology 

Mech. 50 — Strength of Materials 

Mech. 52 — ^Testing of Materials 

C. E. 50 — Hydraulics 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Agrr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage 

Agron. 1 — Farm Crops 

Elective in Agriculture 



Total 



Fourth Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

C. E. 100 — Theory of Structures 

Surv. 100 — Advanced Surveying 

M. E. 50 — Principles of Mechanical Engineering 

E. E. 50 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles. 

Agr. Engr. 105 — Farm Buildings 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Electives in Agriculture 



• • • • 



Total 



Fifth Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

Speech 108 — Public Speaking 

C- E. 52 — Curves and Earthwork 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications 

Eng. 7— Technical Writing 

Bact. 54 — Lectures in Sanitary Bacteriology 

C. E. 101 — Elements of Highways 

C. E. 102 — Structural Design 

C. E. 103 — Concrete Design 

C. E. 104, 105 — Municipal Sanitation 

C. E. 106 — Soils and Foundations 



59 

Semestei % 

/ // 



4 
5 
2 

2 
3 
1 

20 



3 
2 



3 



3 



20 



3 

4 
3 



2 
8 

20 



3 
3 



1 
3 
6 



S 
4 
S 

• • • 

S 
t 
t 
1 

21 



S 
t 

> • 

2 
4 



2 



20 



t 
4 



3 

S 

s 

4 
20 



2 

2 



Total 



19 



S 

s 

18 



60 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AGRONOMY 

The curricula in this department are separated into two major divisions; 
namely Crops and Soils. The Crops division includes Crop Production and 
Crop Breeding. The Crop Production curriculum is designed to prepare 
students for general farming, specialized crop farming, the production of 
improved seeds, employment with commercial firms, state and federal experi- 
ment stations, or county agent work. The curriculum for Plant Breeding 
is designed to prepare students to work with commercial seed companies 
or federal and state experiment stations. The curriculum in Soils is de- 
signed both to equip future farmers with adequate knowledge of soils and 
to prepare students for teaching, research, and special soils work. Although 
the Soils curriculum is placed in the Department of Agronomy, its courses 
are designed for all students who have soil interests regardless of the line 
of their major specialization. 

Crop Production Curriculum* r-Semester—. 

Sophomore Year > I II 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 3 8 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 S 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry • 4 4 

Soils 1 — General Soils 8 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... S 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 % 

Id. X. 8« 4 — Basic R. O. T.m C (Aien) 3 8 



Junior Year 

Afirron. 51 — ^Technology of Crop Quality 

Agri'on. 54 — Selected Crop Studies 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Bot. 101 — Plant Physiology 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

Math. 6 — General Mathematics 

Electives 



19 



19 



2-4 
t 
8 



4 
4 
3 
3 
2 



Senior Year 

Agron. 103 — Crop Breeding 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems. . . . 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery. 
Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage. . 

Soils 112 — Soil Conservation 

A. H. 52 — Feeds and Feeding 

Electives 



• • • • • • • 



• ••••• 



18 



8-10 



18 



• • • • • 



• •• ••••• 



• ■••«•••• 



• « • • « • 



• • • • • 



• •••••• 



2 
8 



• • • ■ • 



3 
3 
6 



Total 



16 



16 



• If A. H. 2 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the Freshman Year they must be elected 
in subsequent years. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



p,„p Breeding Curriculum* 

Sophomore Year 

r5*6-H^oW'oVAmeHe«nav«i.atio^ 
Ltl.B-Gene.'.lCHen-.st^...-; ...... 

Soils 1-General SoUs ^ .^^ -^^.^^mic / 

-;, „_ Q7 Fundamentals oi 

Vl 2-PubUc Speaking • 

Speech 1. ^ ^^" n T C. (Men) 

M. I. 3. 4-Basic B. O. T. C 

Physical Activities 

Total 



61 



-Semestei ^ 
f U 



t 
s 

4 
8 

• « 

2 
S 
1 

19 



t 
8 
4 

• • 

3 

2 
3 
1 

19 



Junior Year 

Agron. 51 



„._Techno.o.y ot Crop Quality. . ...-- • • 

A^on. 54-Selected Crop Stud.es 

Zool. 104— Genetics ..■••• 

1:1 1-Gene«l Bacteno^^ ..•••• 

Rnt 101— Plant Physiology ■••• 

Electives 



2-4 

S 



Total 

Senior Year 

1 n<l— Crop Breeding 

ZZ m-Cro^P^- systems^ 
E. 108-Farm Management. 



4 

4 

S 
8 
2 

18 



2 




2 
8 



^' r^Engr. loi-Farm Machiner>. 
Agr*. Engr. 107-FarmDramage.. 



Agr. 



Soils 112-Soil Conservation . • • • 
lH.52-Feeds and Feeding.... 

Electives 



8 

8 
S 

16 



9 

16 



Total 



Soils Curriculum' 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5. ^ ' ' ' '.^^^r^,^ civilization 
H. 5, 6-History of America 

Rot 1— General Botany . • • 

1:1 1-C-e.alBacteriolo^. ■••■•••• 

c M 1 fipneral Soils 

Soils 1— Genera Fertility 

^ni\s 2— Principles of bou r 

1 1 2— Public Speaking 

Speech 1. 2--l^^«^ n T C. (Men) 

M. I. 3. 4-Basic R. O. 1- ^ V 

Physical Activities 



8 
8 
4 



3 







2 
8 
1 

19 



8 
2 
8 
1 

19 



Total 



v^of fhev must be elected 

. ^ , . ,,e not elected in the Freshman Year they 

♦ If A. H. 2 and Agron. 1 are 
in subsequent years, 



62 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



63 



I 



■;■■ \ 



m 



3 



Junior Year r-Semeater— 

Soil, 51-SoiI Investigation Methods ^ // 

Sous 103-Soii Geography. . . 2 

Bot. 101-Plant Physiology. . 

Agr Engr. lOT-Farm Drainage.' " "t 

Geol. 1-GeoIogy ^' 

cheT f^ ^E'r-r "' Organic ch^^uv-;::: ' ... 

EIec«;i '. '"-E'^^-t^ of Organic Laboratory. ...::;: 2 2 

J 

Total ; * 1' 

Senior Year " " 

Soils n2-SoiI Conservation.... 

So,Is 120_SoiI Management.. 1 

Agron. 151-Cropping Systems . ' " 'i 

Zool. 104-Genetics •• * 

A. E. 108— Farm Management.. > 

B. A., 3a-EIements of Statistics..:. .... ' ' ', 

^'""'"•^ 3 

••.. 

7 fl 

Total ^ * 

16 16 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in Animal WneKo a 
preparing students for varot Xl::t7'L''r^t'f '"' '"^^ ^^P-e of 
as: operators and managers of Hvestock fZ, " ^" ^''^ °* *"™^' '"^-^fy 
workers in federal, state, and private i'^Si "'i'^**""^ *"^ ^«««««=h 

emhzed fields where a knowledge If the 1^!^^^' ?^ *' ^''^^^^^ ^^ «Pe- 

By proper use of electives LZT 1 ' "'*'"^ '' necessary, 

county agricultural agent- to m^pM.""*^ ^'''"•P ''''"self to become a 
types of private and co^p; ^Z;* us^^^^^^^ "^^ P°-«o- with c^ai: 

and specialized training' toTecorZ ST' "•''' ^^'^ '"^^^ *«<='»»'<=«> 
colleges, for investigational work^ stSe it f 7 '"^tructional work in 
or :n commercial research laboratories Studti^'t' 'T^^^^^^ stations 
field of teaching or highly speciaXp-l ^*"''^"*^ ^^^ desire to enter the 
-entific courses offered Uhrarrothrdtartrs;'^" ''' ™- 
Animal Husbandry Curriculum 
Sophomore Year . ' — Semester — ^ 

Engr. 3, 4 or 6, 6 . . I II 

c^^.t!i!S:^e:fil;;:i^-^^^^^ I I 

soiifx!:^r"~'^°^°"'--"-"-''-V.v.v.;::::.:.v;.-:.-.:: ^ - * 

Speech!. 2-Pubiicspeaki;g::::: '••■.•.■ "i ' 

M. I 3 4-Basic R. 0. T. C. (Meni t " ' 2 

Physical Activities ." ' , * 

Total [ 1 



/ — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I 11 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 S 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 .... 

,/*^« XX* O X^~~Xj1 V6o vOCJL tl Uu^lU^ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••• 4h 

A.9 XX* v^ ~ X G6uS &.I1C1 X 66Q1H£^* •••••••••••••••••••••••••*••••*••••••• w •••• 

A. H. 53 — Principles of Breeding .... 3 

** A. H. 64 — Sheep Production 2 .... 

* j\.0 xx« o I X oric x^rouuCLion ...••.••...•...•......•.•............... .•.. m 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management .... 3 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 3 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... S 

Electives S 2 

Total 18 1ft 

Senior Year 

A. H. 55 — Livestock Management .... S 

/\.» XX* Ov'^^^iJCd XrXOCIuCXiOu •••••••*•••*•••••■«••••••■•••••••>>••••* *« •••• 

**A. H. 69 — ^Draft Horse Production .... 2 

A. H. 112 — Livestock Markets and Marketing 2 . 

A. H. 114 — Animal Nutrition S .... 

V. S. 101 — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology S .... 

V. S. 102 — Animal Hygiene .... 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery S .... 

Electives 3 8 

Total 1€ 16 

BOTANY 

The department offers three major fields of work: plant morphology and 
plant taxonomy; plant pathology or plant physiology and plant ecology. The 
required courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same for all 
students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botany courses 
to suit his particular interest. Courses are elected in other subjects to 
contribute toward a broad cultural education, and to support the courses 
selected in the chosen field of botany. 

Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish 
to meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates, 
may elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined, provides a complete survey of the field of 
botany for prospective high school teachers, and lays a good foundation for 
graduate work in botany in preparation for college teaching and for research 
in state or federal experiment stations, or in private research laboratories. 

Students are also afforded an opportunity for training in other vocations 
involving various botanical applications, such as extension work, and 
positions with seed companies, canning companies and other commercial 
concerns. 



•♦ Only two production courses are required for graduation, 
any two of these four courses to fulfill this requirement. 



The student may choose 



64 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



4 



Botany Curriculum « j. 

•^ f — Semester — x 

Sophomore Year I II 

JaLOQCXH Xj£LIlS^ll£lS^6 •a*»««««*«» ••••a«* •••a«* ••• 3 3 

BoL 20 — Diseases of Plants 8 

Bot. 2 — General Botany .... 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total • 19 20 

Junior Year 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization S S 

Modern Langruage S 8 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 50 — Plant Taxonomy '. .... 8 

Bot. 51 — Plant Microtechnique .... 2 

-L^CA^Ua X XJC*^ UCf AvAvj^ jf ••••••a«*aaaaa**aa««a«aa«aa*aa****aa»«aa*aa«a ^B • • • • 

Electives 2 

Total 18 17 

Senior Year 

Bot. 52 — Seminar 1 1 

Bot. Ill — Plant Anatomy 3 • .... 

Bot. 102 — Plant Ecology 3 

Bot. 115 — Structure of Economic Plants .... 2 

Bot. 116 — History and Philosophy of Botany 1 .... 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 8 .... 

Botany Electives 3-8 3 5 

Electives 5-0 7-5 

Total 16 1$ 

Students specializing in Plant Morphology or Plant Taxonomy will elect 
Bot. 114 and Bot. 128; those specializing in Plant Pathology will elect Bot. 
70, Bot. 121 and Ent. 1; those specializing in Plant Physiology will elect 
Organic Chemistry, Chem. 161. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The department offers instructions in two major lines of work; dairy 
production and dairy manufacturing. The curricula are designed to prepare 
students for practical work in dairy farming and dairy manufacturing in- 
dustries, for scientific work in the dairy industry, and as technical workers 
with milk cooperatives, dairy breed associations, and private and public 
concerns. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ^^ 

Dairy Production Curriculum' ^Semester— ^ 

Sophomore Year s * 

TCi^^^^'ot'A^ri.^'<^^^^'^°"'-- ■.:::•.•.•.:•.•.•.•.■.: 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 

Bact. 1— General Bacteriology 8 

Agron. 1-Farm Crops. ••••-• .'.'.!... ^ ? 

mTl 3. 4 Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) • 1 1 

Physical Activities ■ ~" 

18 18 

Total 

Junior Year , 2 * 

01 fi<t Figments of Organic Chemistry ^ 1 

Chr. 3'.: stlKSu of organic Chemistry I^aWator,. . . . .... • • • • » 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics • 2 « 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking " ' 4 

Bact. 133— Dairy Bacteriology % 

Zool. 104— Genetics " " S 

Soils 1-Soils t •••; 

A. H. 52— Feeds and Feeding .... 3 

^ H, 53— Principles of Breeding .... t 

J)' H 30— Dairs' Cattle Judging t 

D. H. 101— Dairy Production [...... * 

D H. 113— Market Milk 

18 18 

Total 

Senior Year t — 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery •••• .... 3 

A E 108— Farm Management '".'. * 

V. S. 101-Comparative Anatomy a«d Phys,oU*y •••■•••;;;; .... S 

V. S. 102 — Animal Hygiene * " S 

a! H. 114— Animal Nutrition 1 

jy' ji 50— Dairy Cattle Management 2 

D. H. 105— Dairy Breeds and Breeding ' * * * ' ^ 1 

D. H. 120, 121— Dairy Seminar * ^^ 

Electives " " 

17 17 

Total 

Dairy Manufacturing Curriculumt 

Sophomore Year a » 

Eng. 8, 4 or 5, 6 .*/.*'. * * 

H. 5. 6— History of American Civilization 4 4 

Chem. 1. 3— General Chemistry " ' 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Bact, 1— General Bacteriology 3 t 

^ I 3^ 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) .......! ^ ^ 

Physical Activities ■ - 

IS 18 

Total 

the freshman year. If A. n. -6 is » 

'"'•TstulMrpUnnln. to pu.ue tMs .urHou.um shouM e,«=t D. H. .in tHe Kres.,nan Vea. 



66 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



67 



r m 




Junior Year ' Semester — ^ 

Chem. 31, 33— Elements of Organic Chemistry.. „ ^^ 

Chem. 32. 34-EIement8 of Orsranic Chemistry LabiiatoiV *.* '. i ? 

Chem. 19— Quantiative Analysis ^ 1 

Econ. 37— Fundamentols of Economi^ "* 

Bact. 133— Dairy Bacteriology 3 

Speech 1. 2— Public Speaking . . . . ] ^ 

D. H. 40— Grading Dairy Products. * 2 

D. H. 102— Dairy Technology [''/' 2 

D. H. 110— Butter and Cheese Making "* 

D. H. 113— Market Milk * 

Total 

17 18 

Senior Year 

D. H. Ill— Concentrated Milk Products 

D. H. 112— Ice Cream 2 

D. H. 114— Special Laboratory Methods. . . * 

S' S* }}^^^''^ ^^"^^ Ordinances a«d Standards .' .' .V. J 

IJ. H. 116— Dairy Plant Management. ' 

D. H. 120. 121— Dairy Seminar. . . * 

Electives 1 1 

8 10 

Total 

18 17 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This curriculum trains students for work in state and federal enton, 
ftrTtL'r '"^; '" P-r ^^-" '^^ ^^"^"--^^ P-^ -n"ol opeTat o^^^^^^^ 

Entomology Curriculum* 

Sophomore Year ' Semester — n 

Eng. 3. 4 or 6. 6 ^ ^^ 

H. 6. 6— History of American Civilization. * * 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry * • 

Ent. 2 — Insect Morphology .*..!.'. "* * 

Ent. 3 — Insect Taxonomy ' • • • • 

Speech 1. 2— Public Speaking. ..!... * 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men)... ^ * 

Physical Activities 8 S 

1 1 

Total 

19 19 



of th'e^^^T^n'^^^r^ '° ^"""^ '"^^ ^""-»^"- should elect Ent. 1 the second semester 



t — Semester — x 
Junior Year I II 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Lab 1 1 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

CiTlv* XUoy Xv4 X(lS6CX x CoLO ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 9 o 

Phy. 1, 2 — Elements of Physics S 8 

M-J M ^TVr I- f V \Xt ••••••■••••••••■••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■ £ M 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants S .... 

Ent. 105 — Medical Entomology 8 

Ent. 101 — Economic Entomology .... 3 

*Ent. 110. Ill— Special Problems 1 1 

Ent. 112 — Seminar 1 1 

Foreign Language S 3 

Electives • 8 

Total M 16 

HORTICULTURE 

This department offers instruction in pomology (fruits), olericulture 
(vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening. These 
courses prepare students to enter commercial production and the horticul- 
tural industries. Students are likewise prepared to enter the allied indus- 
tries as horticultural workers with fertilizer companies, seed companies, 
equipment manufacturers, and others. Students who wish to enter spe- 
cialized fields of research and teaching may take advanced work in the 
department. 



Pomology and Olericulture Curriculum 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 6, 6 

H. 6, 6 — ^History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Soils 1 — General Soils 

Hort. 5, 6 — Fmit Production 

M. L 3. 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Electives 

Total , 



Semester — \ 

/ // 

8 
3 
4 



2 
3 
1 

4 



20 



20 



* Students may satisfy this requirement in one semester, if their schedule permits, or 
expand the work and credits upon departmental approval. 



68 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



f'f 



N' 



4 

) ' 
1 ' 



Junior Year 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 

Bot. Ill— Plant Anatomy 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 

Hort. 58 — ^Vegetable Production 

Hort. 59— Small Fruits 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Ek:onomics 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

Hort. 55— ^Commercial Processing of Horticultural Crops 

Hort. 101, 102 — Technology of Fruits 

Hort. 103, 104— Technology of Vegetables 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Bot. 115 — Structure of Economic Plants 

Hort. 118, 119 — Seminar 

Electives 

Total 

Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Soils 1— General Soils 

Hort. 22 — Landscape Gardening 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Electives 

Total 

Junior Year 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiologj' 

Bot. 50 — Plant Taxonomy 

Hort. 107, 108— Plant Materials * * 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 

Bot. Ill — Plant Anatomy 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

Electives 

Total 



Semester — % 

/ // 

V • • • • 

w • « • « 

V • • • • 

• • • • 4 

• • • • O 

5 2 

• • • • %) 

6 5 



17 



4 
2 
2 
S 

> ■ 

1 

4 



16 



S 

S 

.4 

S 
2 
S 
1 



12 



17 



2 
2 

■ • 

2 
1 
9 



16 



3 
8 
4 



S 
1 

6 



19 



• • • • 

2 




2 




2 


• « V * 


• • • « 




3 


• • « • 


7 




12 


12 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Senior Year 

Bot. 121 — ^Diseases of Special Crops 

Hort. 16 — Garden Flowers 

Hort. 118, 119 — Seminar 

Electives 

Total 

Required of students specializing in floriculture: 

Hort. 10, 11 — Greenhouse Management 

Hort. 50, 51 — Commercial Floriculture 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Required of students specializing in landscape and ornamental 
horticulture : 

Hort. 52, 53 — Landscape Design 

Dr. 1, 2 — Engineering Drawing 

Hort. 54 — Civic Art 

Surv. 1, 2 — Plane Surveying 



69 



-Semester- 



1 

12 



// 

2 

1 

12 



16 



2 
3 

2 



2 
2 



U 



2 
2 



2 
1 
t 
2 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry im- 
provement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. Superior students, definitely anticipating preparation 
for a professional career in poultry husbandry, will be expected to take 
a language. However, all students majoring in poultry husbandry will be 
required to complete 24 semester hours in poultry husbandry. 



Poultry Curriculum* 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

P. H. 60 — Poultry Biology 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

H. 6, 6 — ^History of American Civilization, 

Math. 5 — General Mathematics 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 



Semester — \ 

/ // 

2 
4 

• • • • 

2 
2 
2 
2 
1 



It 



If 



* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect P. H. 1 the first semester of 
the Freshman Year. If Agron. 1 is not elected the Freshman Year it must be elected in 
subsequent year. 



n 



R 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Semester 



Junior Year , / 

P. H. 52— Poultry Nutrition 8 

P. H. 56 — Physiology of Hatchability — . 

P. H. 61 — Poultry Genetics .... 

Bad. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 8 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Statistics .... 

Electives 7 

Total 17 

Senior Year 

p. H. 104 — Poultry Marketing Problems 2 

P. H. 105 — Egg Marketing Problems .... 

V. S. 108 — Avian Anatomy 8 

V. S. 107— Poultry Hygiene 

P. H. 58 — Commercial Poultry Management .... 

P. H. 107 — Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems 2 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology .... 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery (3) 1 

or J. 3-2 

Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings (2) J 

P. H. 108— Special Poultry Problems 1-2 

Electives 5-7 

Total '. * 17 



» • • 
3 
3 



3 
3 
5 



17 



3 
2 



12 
6-6 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



71 



There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the f arni^ Arrangements 
have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission 
to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different departments. 
This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit-growers, 
gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to get away 
from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are $5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour 
3er month for the time of attendance. One registration is good for any 
amount of regular or intermittent attendance during a period of four years. 



17 



Pre-Theological Students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with the officers of any 
theological seminary who desire to urge its prospective students to pursue 
courses in agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. Such pre- 
theological students may enroll for a semester or more or for the usual 
four year training of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College of Agriculture. 

The electives of this curriculum may be used for such pre-theological 
requirements as seem desirable. Elections may be made from any of the 
offerings of the University such as history, political science, philosophy, 
agricultural economics, rural sociology, modern language, English, economics, 
psychology, sociology, natural science, education and the like. Students 
desiring to pursue a pre-theological program in the College of Agriculture 
of the University of Maryland, should consult with the president or admis- 
sions officer of the theological seminary which they expect to attend. 

Special Students in Agriculture 

Mature students may, with consent of the Dean, register as special 
students and pursue a program of studies rot included in any regular 
curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs of the individual. All university 
fees for these special students are the same as fees for regular students. 



72 



fHE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



73 



m 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

J. P. Pyle, Acting Dean 

Reba a. Turner, Secretary 
The College of Arts and Sciences is maHno. *u 
to meet the educational needs of nost wTr ^. t necessary adjustments 
with the government during the war ^th 7 " '''^''^''^ ^""^' 

providing war training courses in T.™! \^'" ^°^"'"' '" ^"''"P^ ^y 
n^atics. and other esse^ntrfi^^ofltr In/r^^^^^^^^^^ 
training needs in the reauired nrp r.r.^^^/ research. It met other war 

tistry. veterinary medicintrnd nurSf"""'' ^"""""^ '" •»^'^--' ^^r.- 

^^^ij:z^^^z^fr rr -^ ^^^ ^-- 

in the physical sciences, the soSal sZ ' T t. H^'f '"^ '''^''''^^ *^^'"'"^ 
humanities. This form of !h,?! ^"^^''^^' *^« biological sciences, and the 

acquire a genl^ edTat „ whTcr^,^^^^^^^ '""^ ^'f'^' - opportunity to 
profession or vocation^ "10- '' ' '''""'*"^" ^°^ -^«*-- 

men^atTotirthlt :tTa?a f 7"^-^*^ ^ o^ered training in funda- 
The new program in r^rLnSr^^^^ '"' '"""^ ^-^--onal education, 
university as well as ttZsl^ A^ rrs^cr " f ""^^"*^ "^ ^"^ 
Divisions 

departments: ^"^"^ ^""^ «™"Ped the following 

senior years. ^ ^p^^idnzanon m the junior and 

The upper divisions direct the coiir«p« r.f ^r a ^ 

n.aior work in the College of Lt Tnd sLnret^lrr '"^"' ^'^^^ 
senior years. sciences during their junior and 



Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are/ 
in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. 

For admission to the pre-medical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language are recommended. A detailed statement of the requirements for 
admission to the School of Medicine and the relation of these to the pre- 
medical curriculum may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the requirements pre- 
scribed in the College of Arts and Sciences are bachelor of arts and bachelor 
of science. 

Students of this college who complete the regular courses in Humanities 
and Social Sciences are awarded the degree of bachelor of arts. Students 
who complete the requirements for the degree of bachelor of science are 
awarded that degree, provided the major portion of the work has been done 
in the field of science, and the application has the approval of the science 
department in which the maj'or work has been completed. 

Students who have elected the combined program of arts and sciences and 
medicine may be granted the degree of bachelor of science after the com- 
pletion of at least 90 semester hours credit in addition to the required work 
in military science, hygiene and physical education in this college and the 
first year of the School of Medicine, so that the quantitative requirements of 
120 credits are met, and they are recommended by the Dean of the School 
of Medicine. 

Those electing the combined five-year academic nursing curriculum, for 
which the degree of bachelor of science in nursing may be awarded upon 
the completion of the full course, must first take the pre-nursing curriculum 
in the College of Arts and Sciences before the nursing course in Baltimore. 

Those taking the combined course in arts and law may be awarded the 
bachelor of arts degree after the completion of three years of the work in 
this college and one year of the full-time law course, or its equivalent, in 
the School of Law. The total minimum number of credits required for 
graduation is 120 semester hours exclusive of military science, hygiene, and 
physical activities. 

Residence 

The last thirty semester hours credit of any curriculum leading to a 
baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in 
residence in this University. 

Students w^orking for one of the combined degrees must earn the last 30 
semester hours credit of the arts program in residence, in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, College Park. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



75 



74 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ii 



1,1 

1 



i 



M 



Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements: 

A minimum of 120 semester hours credit in academic subjects other than 
military science is required for a bachelor's degree. Men must acquire in 
addition 12 semester hours in military science, and 4 semester hours credit 
in physical activities. Women must acquire in addition 4 semester hours 
credit in hygiene and 4 semester hours credit in physical activities. 

A student must acquire a minimum of 58 credits exclusive of the require- 
ments in military science, hygiene, and physical activities with an average 
grade of at least C in the Freshman and Sophomore years before being 
admitted to an upper division. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as pos- 
sible, before the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before 
graduation: 

I. English — twelve semester hours. 

II. Foreign Language — ^twelve semester hours in one language. Students 
wishing to enroll in a language they have studied in high school will be 
given a placement test. 

III. Social Sciences — twelve semester hours. 

IV. Speech — two to four semester hours depending upon the particular 
schedule. 

V. Natural Science and Mathematics — ^twelve semester hours. 

VI. Military Science for men, twelve semester hours. 

VII. Hygiene, for women, four semester hours. 

VIII. Physical Activities, for both men and women, four semester hours. 
Military science and physical activities are required throughout the fresh- 
man and sophomore years. Hygiene during the freshman year. 

3. Major and minor requirements — When the requirements of the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years have been completed each student is expected to 
select a major in one of the fields of study of an upper division, and before 
graduation must complete a major and a minor. The courses constituting 
the major and the minor must conform to the requirements of the depart- 
ment in which the major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or minor the student must have an average of 
not less than C in fundamental courses in the fields chosen. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 24-40 hours, of which at least 10 must be in courses numbered 
100 and above. 

A minor shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 12 to 20 hours, of which at least 10 must be in courses numbered 



certification of High School Teachers ^^^^^.^^^ ^ prospective 

U courses are properly '^osen m the^ ^ejl ^.^^ ^^jor and 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools ^^^^^^^ ^^ 

"'^'Z^^r .f credits wMch ».y b. ««pud .»» th, ,.ri... -«- 
and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture-20. t.«t;nn_20 

College of Business and Public AdmmistraUon-20. 

College of Education— 24. 

College of Engineering— 20. 

sa.:". «n^.» - .o.bi..d p™«,» .k. «.- -« •' »'^'«'" 

must be completed. 
Normal Load ^ semester hours credit 

unless they have a "B" average for the piecedi g 
of the Dean of the College. 

Ad^is*"^^ . ,vi« college shall consider th4 Dean of the 

Freshmen and sophomores m this college 

College their general adviser. department 

schedules of courses. 



It 




'' THE VmVBRSITY OP MARYLAND 

Work in the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

desi/nelTo ^vete'sTuVert^Ta^yUta^t^^ "' ^^'' -'^ ^--ees , 
for spee. Hzation i„ the latter vTrt rMst:^^'''''' ^"'^ *^ ^^P^ hi- 

Pro«<5:„t%r£r\rh^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ tnese earlier .ears sue. 

one of the Upper Divisions of thec Jlet "T'^'' '"' '^'^ ^'^-^-i - i"„ 
scholastic ability must also be demS' . r°"*' ^P"*"*^^ «nd a generic 
major study is to be obtained ^'"''''''"'^''^' '^ Permission to pursue , 

Suggested courses of ^fn^,r « 
The student should f olWth'e rrrTrurft; Ttl ''' '""^ "^^^ ''---s 
fitted. It will be noted that a core L ^^ '' *'^"^^^'' *° ''^ ^e^t 

students who are candidates for a bacheToT/' '*"''"^ '^ ^^^^'^ed of a 
be taken, when possible, during the Fr^!l ' ^^^''^^- '^^^^^ ^"bjects should 
's a great deal of similarity "n these n^,tr'" "i"* Sophomore years. S 
and a student need not consiL hlmseTf r' tZ '''' ^^^* ^""^ ^^^---te 
division until the beginning of his ^nior^^ '^!'' *° ^"^ Particular uppeV 
* «>«Jor. ^ J"n'or year, at which time he is to select 

The following curriculum e-ivp« ti,^ u • 
Humanities and the Socia" Id LS iSe V'""?'^ "^ ^'"'^-t^ - the 
Physical or Biological Sciences wi?i fill ,t *^ ^'^^ing to major in the 

listed on the following pages '^"' ''^^ requirements in the curriculums 

Freshman Year r~ Semester--. 

•Foreign Language ^ '""^ American Government) ' 

Mathematics or Natural Science "■■'■'. " "% \ 

L. S. 1, 2-Library Science, .r , ' 

Speecl,l2-P„Wic Speaking.;. \ J 

M. I. 1. 2_Basic R. o T C \m V i ' 

Ph^'- tV^«^--« <womJ"":^ ■:..•.■.•: 

Physical Activities ' 

*^ 2 „ 

: 2 

Total 1 1 

Sophomore Year ^^^^ ^^20 

£i•Si-=---I^^"- . . 

Natural Science and Mk;h;m;Vic;. •■.■.■.■.■::;;;: 3 I 

Elective .. ^ 3 

p-^ica: Activities^MVan'd wo:^n^\\\\;::: ::;;;;; •;• ••••■■•• •.•.•.■.• .' I 

Total ^ 1 

______ ^ 16-19 16-19 

Un^eVte-Vs^d/^at^Vh-X^'--- -— students wishing to pursue . 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



77 



AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The program in American Civilization embraces required work, a combined 
major-minor plan for juniors and seniors, and graduate studies. (For 
information concerning the required work, see page 24 of this bulletin; 
for information concerning the graduate program, see the bulletin of the 
Graduate School.) 

The Committee in charge of the program represents the departments of 
English, History, Political Science, Economics, and Sociology. Members 
of the committee serve as official advisers to students electing to work in 
the field. 

The principal objectives of the work for majors are cultural rather than 
professional; yet the work is excellent preparation for certain careers. 
Students are directed towards an understanding of the configuration of our 
civilization, and this understanding should prove valuable in (for example) 
business, government, journalism, the law, and teaching. 

The program is intended to have generous breadth, but the danger of 
securing breadth without depth is offset by the requirement of an area of 
concentration. Studies in American civilization are supplemented by studies 
in source cultures and interacting cultures; however, in choosing a curricu- 
lum, students are required to stress literature or history. Some work in 
American history and American literature is required of all who enroll in 
the program; but work in English literature is required of students who 
elect to emphasize literature, and work in European history is required of 
students who elect to emphasize history. Elective courses are, with the 
aid of an official adviser, chosen from courses offered in the humanities, in 
the social sciences, or in education. Normally, most elective courses are in 
history, English, foreign languages, comparative literature, economics, 
sociology, political science, and philosophy; but it is possible for a student 
to fulfill the requirements of the program and to elect as many as thirty 
semester hours in such subjects as art and psychology provided that such 
work fits into a carefully planned program. 

In his senior year, each major is required to take a conference course in 
which the study of American civilization is brought to a focus. During 
this course, the student analyses eight or ten important books which reveal 
fundamental patterns in American life and thought and receives incidental 
training in bibliographical matters, in formulating problems for special 
investigation, and in group discussion. 

American Civilization Curriculums 

A student working in American Civilization must decide upon a program 
which emphasizes history or literature and must consult an official adviser 
before selecting electives. 



N 



78 



i 



•« 



H-# 



« 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Emphasis History 

Junior Year 

American History 
American Literatur 



Semester — ^ 



""-^iiwtn i^iierature ... 

E«rop..n History ::;.::.:: ■.■ 

^'"'"« .■;.•.•.•.•.•.•.• 



Total 



I 


// 


3 


3 


3 


t 


3 


1 


6 


6 



Senior Year 



15 



15 



American History 

Enirfish History ..*.*.* 

Conference Course 

Electives . 





Total 

Emphasis Literat 
Junior Year 



M 


S 


t 


3 


t 


8 


6 


6 



ure 



16 



16 



American Literature 

American History 

English Literature':; ;.* 

ini^^. . ^ 

^^~**^^ :::::::::,\:\\'^ 



Total . 
Senior Year 



s 


8 


s 


3 


8 


8 


6 


6 



16 



16 



American Literature 

English Literature ' 

C^^^ ••VMXC 

Conference Course 

*='«*•'«" 





Total » 

Total numbers of hours* 128 



3 


8 


3 


8 


8 


3 


6 


6 



or 136. 



16 



16 



A-DIVISION OP BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

liie Division of Biological ^^i^« 

Each department within the Division >.„ 
ncula To meet the demands for echnic«.. "T " '"°'' ^^tablished cur- 
logical sc ences these curricula are desSl^ *'"'' ^'''''''' »» *»»« "o- 
particularly during the last two years of^"n^ ^ ^^^ specialized training 
specifically, the basic knowledge and e,l ^^' '^'''^- '^^y Provide, more 
secondary schools; (2) resear^^and 31?^ '"'*'"r "^ '°^ <1> t^aehinT n 
municipal departments and bureaus- ^f)!"^ ''■'"^ '" '^''^'^^'' state, and 
the preparation for college teachw' 1h *^"'''^'°» **> graduate study i„ 

uay. Completion of a suggested under- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



79 



graduate curriculum under any one of the departments fulfills the require- 
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Science. Advanced work also is pre- 
sented in each of the biological sciences for the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Although the undergraduate training in any Department of the Division 
is both thorough and well-balanced, nevertheless, one or more years of post- 
graduate instruction and experience and the attainment of an advanced 
degree are desirable in preparation for the larger opportunities that arise in 
this rapidly expanding field. The need for workers in the fields of agricul- 
ture, home economics, industry, public health, etc., presents almost unlimited 
opportunities for specialization and has made it necessary to correlate 
closely the undergraduate courses in this Division with those offered in 
the Graduate School in order to equip the advanced student adequately in 
his own work and in related fields. 

A special curriculum in general biological science is presented primarily 
for those interested in teaching biological science or general science in 
elementary high schools. Students in the preprofessional schools who 
expect to complete their work for the degree of bachelor of science may, in 
following the preprofessional curriculum, complete a major in certain de- 
partments of the Division of Biological Sciences by the proper selection of 
courses. 

The particular professions and lines of work for which each department 
in this Division prepares its students are outlined in greater detail under 
the description of each department. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. University Requirements, See page 23. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. 

3. Physical Sciences — The student must complete basic courses in 
Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics. 

Fields of Study 

The curriculum outlined in each field of study represents the courses 
which in the judgment of the Department and Division, are necessary for 
an adequate training in the particular subject. In most curricula enough 
electives are included to give the student ample opportunity to study 
subjects outside his major or minor departments in which he may have 
become interested or in which further training is desired. 

The courses in Bacteriology prepare students for such positions as dairy, 
sanitary, and food bacteriologists in federal, state, and municipal depart- 
ments and for public health, research, and industrial positions. 

Department of Bacteriology 

The Department of Bacteriology functions with three purposes in view. 
One of these is to provide fundamental training for those students who 



80 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



choose bacteriology as a major subject. Three major fields of study are 
provided: (1) applied bacteriology, in preparation for such positions as 
dairy, sanitary and agricultural bacteriologists in federal, state and com- 
mercial laboratories, (2) medical bacteriology, or the more recently recog- 
nized specialty of medical technology in relation to hospital, public health 
and clinic laboratories, and (3) the practical field of food technology. The 
second objective of the department is to provide desirable courses for those 
students who are majoring in closely allied departments and desire vital 
supplementary information. Every effort has been made to plan these 
courses so that they satisfy the demands of these related departments as 
well as the needs of those students who have chosen bacteriology as a major. 
The third purpose of the department is to encourage and foster original 
thought in the pursuit of research. 

The Bacteriology Curriculum 

The field of bacteriology is too vast in scope to permit specialization in 
the early stages of undergraduate study. Accordingly, the applied curri- 
culum outlined below includes the basic courses in bacteriology and allied 
fields. 

The course in Physiology of Bacteria (Bad. 5) is required for all 
bacteriology majors, and should follow General Bacteriology (Ba^t. 1), 
Bacteriology 5 is not required as a prerequisite for upper division courses 
for majors or minors in other departments provided the student has been 
introduced to certain aspects of bacteriology, or their equivalent, pertinent 
to their specialty. Bacteriology 1, however, is required. 

The sequence of courses in the following curriculum should be pursued 
as closely as possible although it is realized that some deviation may be 
necessary. Sufficient latitude is provided in the senior year for the student 
to obtain several courses that are correlated with his or her particular 
interests. 

All students planning a major in Bacteriology should consult the Head 
of the Department during the first year concerning his particular field of 
study and his choice of a minor. Chemistry, as outlined below, is the pre- 
ferred minor, however, another field of study may be chosen by the student 
who has a particular objective in view. 

f — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Ens:. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature S S 

Fr. 1, 2 or Ger. 1, 2 — Elementary French or German S S 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 8 .... 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) S t 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 t 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 16-17 20-21 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES «! 

.' — Semestei — ^ 

I n 

<;ovhomore Year . ,. * ^ . » • 

Bu. . XS;..;. •> A.«u.. oMtou.. ::,;::::;•;■;.■; 

gp 18^ 19— Introductory Speech 4 

Bact. 5— Physiology of Bacteria * * * * * .... 4 

M. L3. 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ;;;*/.".'.'. ^ ^ 

Physical Activities — '' 

17-20 17-20 

Total 

Junior Year s — 

Math. 10— Algebra * 

Math. 11— Trigonometry •■•;•• 4 •••• 

Bact. 101— Pathogenic Bacteriology • • .... 4 

Bact. 103— Serology 4 

Bact. 133— Dairy Bacteriology 4 .... 

Chem. 19— Quantitative Analysis .... 5 

Chem. 161, 162— Biochemistry .■.'*.'.".*.*..'.'*....**.. ••• ! 

Elective ' 

15 15 

Total 

Senior Year .... i 

Bact. 108-Epidemiology and Public Health •••••• 4 

Bact. 131— Food Bacteriology " ' 4 • • • 

Bact. 135— Soil Bacteriology .... 4 

Bact. 161-Systematic bacteriology ... .•• ••••••;; 4 ^ 

Phvsics 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics • ^ 

E^cXe in Chemistry (fuimi minor r^^^^^^ 4 ..... 

Electi ves in the Minor and in Social Sciences 

15 15 

Total 

Medical Technology Curriculum • ' students who desire 

This is a professional -rriculum — ^^^^^^^^ j,,„,,. 

to prepare for technical work in l^ospitaWmc^^^^^^ ^^^.^^ .^ ^^^ 

tories. Specialization in the field of Medica ^^^.^^ ^^^^ 

?£= in^ curLrrirupTfur^rntal couLs in Bacteriolo^. 

^rr" rSws tMs e--. is e^^^^^^^^^ 
opportunities to -f ";<*;^i^t:^^^^^^^^^^ in a labora- 

r^ °n'^ratTente as sol af M^^ permits. Plans for the 

feJ^gnmr o?'Sf prentice work are bein. formulated. 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



t — Semester — 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 8 3 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life S .... 

Pol. Sci. 1 — ^American Government .... 3 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10 — Algebra 3 

Math. 1 1 — Trigonometry 3 

M. L 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 8 8 

Fr. 1, 2 or Ger. 1, 2 — Elementary French or German 3 8 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. 5 — Physiology of Bacteria .... 4 

Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34 — ^Elements of Organic Chemistry 8 8 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-21 18-21 

Junior Year 

Fr. 6, 7 or Ger. 6, 7 — Intermediate Scientific French or German 3 8 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 S 

Bact. 101 — Pathogenic Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. 103 — Serology .... 4 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Analysis 4 .... 

Chem. 161, 162 — Biochemistry .... 6 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Zool. 12 — Histological Technique .... 2 

Total 18 17 

Senior Year 

Bact. 105 — Clinical Methods 4 .... 

Bact. 53 — Sanitary Bacteriology .... 4 

Bact. 108 — Epidemiology and Public Health .... 8 

Bact. 133 — Dairy Bacteriology 4 .... 

Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

Elective in Chemistry (to fulfill minor requirements) 3 .... 

Electives .... 3 

• — 

Total 15 14 

Food Technology 

This is a professional curriculum designed to equip the student with an 

unusually broad knowledge of the basic aspects of food production and 
handling. In this curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals of 

bacteriology and chemistry in conjunction with the more technical aspects 

of food processing. These basic sciences, when supported by the proper 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

suDsyiw poultry and meat products. 

conjunction with the prescribed course of study. ^Seme.ter-^ 

Freshman Year , .. ^ ^ S 3 

Eng. 1. 2-Composition and Readings in American Literature. . ..... . • ^ 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life ' ' 3 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government ' • ' " j 1 

Sp. 18, 19— Introductory Speech ** ' 4 4 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry .......!.... * 

♦Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

Bact 1— General Bacteriology 3 t 

^ I* 1^ 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) * * * 2 * 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) ^ ^ 

Physical Activities — 

17-18 17-18 

Total 

Sophomore Year $ s 

Eng 3 4-Composition and Readings in World Literature ; • ^ , 

Hist! 5. 6-History of American Civilization ' •.'. ... 4 

Bact. 5— Physiology of Bacteria 4 

♦Hort. 8— Vegetable Production 3 

♦Hort. 14— Small Fruits S 3 

M I 3. 4— R. O. T. C. (Men) ^ 1 

Physical Activities 

17-20 18 21 

Total 

Junior Year ^ 3 

Fr. 1. 2 or Ger. 1. 2-Elementary French or German • • • • • • • ^ 

Bact. 131— Food Bacteriology s 

F Tech. 100— Food Microscopy " 1 

F Tech. 140— Technology Conference ^ 

Chem. 19— Quantitative Analysis ... ^ 

Chem. 161, 162— Biochemistry ^ 

Math. 10— Algebra ' 8 

Math. 11— Trigonometry ^ 

Electives " 

16 1« 

Total 



S4 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



85 



Senior Year ' Semester — 

I'J: mi?;.\l-;;^:::;r;^---- -- o, ce™. / "^ 

Hort. 55~Commercial Processing .. -* 

F. Tech. 120— Food Sanitation. . . 4 

F Tech. 140-TechnoIogy Conference... 3 

iiilective in Chemistry rto fulfill r«;««>. '•* 1 i 

Phvsic^ 10 n IP , '"^^^^ requirements) ^ 

r-nysics 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics ' * * * 3 

4 4 

Total 

Zoology ^^ 

Government, in the bioToi Ipt ^ TtT "'•*'' ''"'*^'^ ^*^*^^ 
various branches of the military seSe fL/ ''T'''"' '***^^' *"'' '" 

Physiology, and marine biology Instructlr^nH'' '' ""f"^ "" morphology, 
investigation in the latter are suppLmen e^ and opportunities for original 
courses of instruction offered .^T^^^, ^^^tj^. ^^ 
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 

Maryland in cooperatl^'Sh ^e XSTolse ' K^ ''^''''''' ^' 
Goucher College, Washington ColleL Joh„rHn ^ t?*'**" Department, 

temporarily suspended. '"'"'"^^ ^^"^'^^s have been 

Zoology Curriculum 

Freshman Year , — Semester — . 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and Readincr^ ;« a • . I II 

Soc. 7-SocioIogy of AmerieL Ufe! . "'" "^^'"'^'"^^ ^ 3 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government. . « 

^ool. 2, 3— Fundamentals of Zoology 3 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry.. 4 4 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) -* 4 

P. E. 42. 44— Hygiene (Women). « 3 

Physical Activities . 2 9 

** ^ 

1 J 

Total ~ 

17-18 17-18 



Semester 



Sophomore Year I 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 

Zool. 5 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 4 

Zool. 20 — Vertebrate Embryology 

Zool. 12 — Histological Technique 3 

Zool. 8 — Invertebrate Morphology . - . • 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 17-20 

Junior Year 

Zool. 101 — Mammalian Anatomy 3 

Zool. 108 — Animal Histologry .... 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 3 

Zool. 121 — Principles of Animal Ecology .... 

Phys. 10, 11 — Mechanics and Heat ; Sound, Optic ; Magnatism and 

Electricity 4 

Modern Language 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 3 

Total 16 

Senior Year 

Zool. 102, 103 — General Animal Physiology S 

Zool. 75, 76 — Journal Club 1 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 

Modern Language 8 

Electives ( Zoology) 3 

Electives 4 

Total 15 



// 

S 
8 



S 
8 
8 
1 

17-20 



8 

• • 

3 

4 
8 
8 

16 



8 
1 
1 

8 
8 
4 



16 



General Biological Sciences 

A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in biology 
but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biological sciences. 
The courses as outlined familiarize the student with the general principles 
and methods of each of the biological sciences. 

By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the fields of 
study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. Also by a 
proper selection of electives, the educational requirements of the State 
Department of Education for certification can be met. 

Requirements 

A major and a minor, comprising together not fewer than 54 credits, 
shall be completed, with at least 8 of these credits in the courses for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates in the Division. 



86 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



87 



General Biological Sciences ^Semester-^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature S S 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life S .... 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government .... S 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Bot. 1 — General Botany .... 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

M. I, 1. 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) S 3 

P. E. 42, 44 Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-1» 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature S S 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization S S 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 3 

Modern Language 8 3 

M. L 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Junior Year 

Phy. 10, 11 — ^Mechanics and Heat; Sound, Optic; Magnetism and 

Electricity 4 4 

Modern Language 8 3 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 6 6 

Electives 2 2 

Total IS 15 

Senior Year 

Speech 18, 19- -Introductory Speech 1 1 

Electives (Biological Sciences) 12 12 

Electives 2 2 

Total 16 15 

B— DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, 
Classical Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Litera- 
ture, Modern Languages and Literature, Music, Philosophy and Speech. 

This Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major 
students thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the 
fine arts: (2) to furnish for students in other Divisions, especially for those 
taking preprofessional work, background and elective studies in the depart- 
ments of the Division. 



Graduate School. ^ ^ ^^^„, 

Training for the Master of Arts degr«« >« ^ ^^^ literature in 

acquainting the c-d^^^^^/te '^f DocL ^r?^^^^^^^ **>« '^^"'^^"^^'^ " 

his own fields. For the degree of Doctor ot ^_^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

required not only to be thoroughly acquaintea ^^ ^^^^^^ 

fields and with the ^-^<>'-^'\^'^''''^^^^^ll,T^:.^^cy. he shall make 
himself intensively to a specific research problem 
tn original contribution to human knowledge. 

Division Reauiren.ents for the Bachelor's Degree 

The following -uirements «. f ^^^^^^^^^ ,e 

1. Philosophy—three credits. 

9 Psychology — ^three credits. 

2. Psyckology ^^^„,,_i„ selecting a major or a minor, a 

3. Major and Mtr,or R^'^^'T^welve credits in fundamental courses m 
student must have .«<=^"'f «f .^^^^J^^^^^^ satisfactory to the depari- 
the field chosen or in a closely related n ^^^^^^ ^^^^.^ ^.j, ^^ 

ment, with an average grade of at i requirements, 

allowed toward the completion of the major a 

In addition: ^j^^„ 40 

A major shall consist of not *«-«;^f;"Xd °^ The Freshman 

credits, in addition to the ^-f ^^ *=f i^Jiudy At least 15 of 

s;L^tr:u^Trxtrrrtt^ 

c:;rirr:: Of not -. - - m.e t^n^^o 

credits in addition to the twel- -^ ^-^ J - ^^^ ^^j,,,,, 
and Sophomore years, in one "/J^^^^j^^j ^^^^y authorized in the 
for the major, or in some ^^^^ f ^^J™f%hese credits must 
S"Xf r r ses^lXd • f o^ rnLd undergraduates and 

The st:::t:st acq^re at least 30 credits in courses not included in 
the major or minor. 



88 



MAJOR AND MINOR 
Fields of Study 

Comparative Literature 

English 

French 

'General Linguistics 
German 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



S'J 



**t 



*Greek 
Latin 

*Philosophy 
Speech 
Spanish 



Honors in English 

years, but should, if Possiblt be^'e^.r^Lr^ '^ '""^ '" '"^^ '-* *- 

C-DmSION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Ihe Division of Phvsip^i] q^; 

pages the division outlines a number ^f .^V"^- °" ^^e following 

E:,orV:rf ""' ^^^^-"^ "« '^ /eZr^r n' "^'"'""^ ^o- 

oacneior of arts together with five vear T bachelor of science or 

engineering and applied physics rZT '''?^''«'"« '" <=hemistry_,;hemicll 

tnteresierf m science; to provide thp >,= , °^ students not primarilv 

necessary i„ so many profeSnVLeH ^l^^"" u'^^ °' ^''^ Physicaf scTene ^ 
home economics, medicine, pharmacy anf ,7 *"'"' ^"""^t^^' engineering 
Physical sciences for secondary rchools^n^^' *° "^'''P t««ehers of the' 
for professional service as chemfsts JL-^ '''''' *"*^ *° *'"'" ^*"d^"t' 
maticians. physicists, and statiTtSa'ns ™ ""^'»««'-«. geologists, maJJe 
and research in the physical sciences '''''''•' '"'• ^^-'^"«te study 

and tlettppt'at.r t: sT^r ^^.^ ''^-^-^ ^^-es are so vast 
quately with any one in a four TaTif . '* '* '^ '"""^-"^ *« ^ea? Le 
who aspire to proficiency are theSr " ^'■^'"^*'"^*' curriculum. Students- 

sJude^tfr'"^*^ '^'^^ In tttS ZZTT '" r"""^ theifSS 
student becomes acquainted with f»,o reading to a Master's degree fho 

fulfillment of the requirements fowhr/^ *'^''=*^ °^ **>- field fnpartfa 
student must demonstrate a omma„d ofT' l' ""'''"^ °^ Philosoph; IhJ 
to permit him to make independen?rnvest gait? d '''' ^"'^'^'^^^y ^-a 
No degree will be granted to a student ""'^''^^ contributions, 

d Jee'Tst f "T^ ^'^-^ -en^i^a;: .rge*?„^ tT^"^^^' <>' ^^e Division 

^!^ents and before --rnt^st^^otSeVr^^^^^^^ oJ tt 



minor selected to conform to the requirements of the department in which 
the major work is done. 

The candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will be governed by the requirements for that degree established 
by the University and the College. A student will be considered a major 
in one of the departments of the Division of Physical Sciences only when 
he has completed a program approved by the department concerned. The 
following suggested curriculums outline the general requirements of these 
departments. 

Chemistry 

The science of chemistry is so vast in scope that completion of a well- 
planned course of undergraduate study is necessary before specialization. 
The curriculum outlined below describes such a course of study. The 
sequence of courses given should be followed as closely as possible; it is 
realized, however, that some deviation from this sequence may be necessary 
toward the end of the program. All of the courses in chemistry listed are 
required of students majoring in chemistry. 

Chemistry Curriculum « * 

'' r — Semester — n 

Freshman Year I II 

Chem. 1, 3 — (leneral Chemistry 4 4 

Ens:. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 S 

Math. 15 — College Algebra 3 

Math. 11 or 17 — Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 or 4 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life .... S 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

M. L 1. 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total— Men 18 18 or 19 

Total— Women 17 17 or 18 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 15, 17 — Qualitative Analysis 3 S 

• Chem. 35, 37 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 X 

Chem. 36, 38 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Ger. 1, 2 — Elementary German 3 3 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

M. L 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total — Men 18 18 

Total— Women 15 16 

> 



\ 



I 



90 



Junior Year 



THE VrnVERSlTY OF MARYLAND 



Chem. 142.' utZttlTI ^'''^^"' '^'^-^^r,'. 

•En«. 5, 6-Compositio„ and Re>.'"^' "" '^°^"' I"'**™* 



Semester 



ure. 



'«o Ge;™;;"" '" *^°^"^h Literature. . . 



Total 

Senior Year 

nu± t:«^«^-^ Of An,en 



4 
2 
2 

S 
t 

s 

6 



// 

4 
2 
2 
S 

s 

3 

5 



can Civilization. 



Chem.' 1877^-1 Phv .^'"!'"«^"°io Chemistry. 

«- "tijS ^^^^^ ' ' ■■ ■ ■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■■:: : 

t/nem. 148 tu^ tj 

^o„.- 3"'^^:'.''. "-"«-«o„ „, or^an/; Co„,pou„d, 



Total ... 



19 



8 

• • 

S 
2 
2 
2 



8 



19 



3 
2 
3 
2 



8 

2 

3 



13 or 15 13,15 or 16 



Mathematics 

This curriculum offers h-o- • 

"7Tr '°^ ^^^^''^"- '"S/r; ^Tr'^'^ '>^ Mathematics in 
eouiettlt™^ '" mathematics ZocoZTT "°^' '" Mathematics 
-th'LTies'^^o^et^r.^^^^-^^^^^^ -^nSbttoT r ^°^'^-- 
1- Complete the cuScu,! ^"""'^ "^^^^^ '" mathetatic^ ^^.''"'"^^^ » 
«U subjects; 2. PasT«n ^ '" «'«thematics with an av! * "'^^"* ""^t" 
the senior ^etr 3 w.-^""'"^ examination in mathl f-'^' ^'^^^ '^^ ^ i" 



- e.«.ri:tr.si7,fr.- ««-. ..P. 



hou 



^-re Matkernatios '" "' ''"'"'• ^^--'""""^ "'"'"^ ''" ^''^ *="-- 



option. Electives in 



rs ,n each of the fields of algebra r/" '»«*''«'««tics must include • 
^«o«ed Mathemnu. "'geora and geometry. include six 



and 
or 
in 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Mathematics Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

'Bng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

Lang. 1, 2 — French or German 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

♦Math. 14 — Plane Trigonometry 

Math. 15 — College Algebra 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 42, 44 — Hygiene (Women) 

Phjrsical Activities • 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 

Lang. 4, 5 — French or German 

Alath. 20, 21 — C^alculus .........»......•.••.•••••••••••••••••••••• 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization ( Women ) 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

Math. 110, 111 — Advanced Calculus 

Math. 70, 71— Junior Tutorial 

Electives — Mathematics 

Electives — Minor 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization (Men) 

Elective (Women) 

Total 

Senior Year 

Math. 114, 115- Differential Equations 

Math. 80, 81- Senior Tutorial 

Electives — Mathematics 

Electives — Minor 

Total 



91 



-Semesteir- 
1 

3 
1 
3 
8 

• • • • 

2 

3 

■ • • • 

3 
2 
1 



// 

S 
1 

s 



3 



4 
S 
S 
1 



18 or 19 17 or 18 



3 
3 
4 
6 
3 
3 
1 



S 
S 
4 
B 
8 
t 
1 



19 



8 

1 

8 
f 
3 
3 



19 



8 
1 
8 

f 
8 
8 



16 



8 
1 

€ 
8 



16 



8 
1 

6 
8 



15 



18 



• Choose one. 



GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

This general curriculum is offered for students who desire a basic 
knowledge of the physical sciences without immediate specialization in 
any one of them. By proper selection of courses in the latter semesters, a 
student may concentrate in the field of his choice. 



♦ students who pass an attainment examination in trigonometry with a satisfactory grade 
are excused from this requirement, and should elect another course in its place. 



u 



r, 



92 

Cnrnculun. for General Physical S.J 

Freshman Year T'^ 

Chem. 1 3-_r^« , ^ ' Semester — , 

Eng 1 2 p^'^"^^^^ Chemistry. ... In 

1"^- sc" :!-7re°".rGor ^-^"-'^-e;;. •■ ,' • 

Speech 18 TO 71° /"^'■■'^an Life , * 

M- I. 1 LRr^"^""""^ Speech .. . ' 

*• 1, ^ — Basic R. O T r> /,, • • • • • 

^. E. i2 Al-^vf^ . ^- ^- (Men) .... , « 

--.•.lv^2"-/w°'"-> ■•■■■.•.•.•.•:::;:;:::: « \ 

9 

m O 

Total 1 \ 

Sophomore Year 17-18 I^ 

Chem. 31 .q9 wi 

Che„. 32 3Le :^:::: "^ O^^a-o Chemistry. . . 

,.„ . *"'"^'"'-/« '" Worm Literature'. ^ 1 1 

Elecfves in Biological ScienVes .'::;.■: « • 

1 1 

Total .... 4 ; 

♦ 4 

Junior Year 15^18 ^7^ 

H% ';f-.B'«me„tary German ... 

xi. o, 6 — History of Ar«« • 

Physics 20, 21- Meet '"" ^''"■"^tion .... , 

^ and Electricity .'^'•^"-'^' ^"^ «-*• and Sound Optic» ' » « I 

E.ective.-Phy,.-L, Science,' '• ' *"""'*''^'"' 

S ( 

Total S I 

Senior Year 17 ^ 

E^-t,ves (Physical Science;; ;:; ^ S 

3 , 

Total 9 I 

Physics Curriculum ^ ~I^ 

The physics curriculum ; ^ • 

^o 3uit the fiZoTlZ"""'"'}'''^ ^"^^-«ted belot a ^ "^'^'^^ laboratories 
chemical enginTeril ch/ "t''^^' ^ minor Jay TT^'^^'' ^^ ^^««- 
-athematics^n^echan^^^^^^^^^ -^^-eerinTeltetrS^ '^'''''^^y^ 

m applied or engineeHnr n."'^ "^' ^"'^ ^"ied I;id £' , r^^'""'"^"^' 

^"^ physics should minor in oup f ^u' ^"'"""^^^^ 

<^"e of the fields of 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 

engineering. Entering freshmen who may want to select physics as a major 
should consult the Head of the Physics Department before making up their 
schedules. 

Physics Curriculum ^^^^^^^^.^^ 

freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 S 

Math. 14, 15, 17 — Trig., Alg., Anal., Geom 5 4 

Pol. Sci. 1- — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life .... S 

Phjrsics, Language, or Chemistry 3-4 8-4 

Dr. 5, 6 — Mechanical Drawing (Women) 1 1 

M. L 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 S 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 3 S 

Math. 20, 21 — Differential and Integral Calculus 4 4 

Physics 5 S 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization (Women) 3 S 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 t 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

H. 5, (^ — History of American Civilization (Men) 3 S 

Dr. 5 -Mechanical Drawing (Men) 1 1 

Physics 5 5 

Language, Mathematics, or Chemistry 6-7 6-7 

Eleetives (Women) 5 6 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Senior Year 

Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics and Physics 16 16 

Total 16 16 

D— DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the department of Economics, 
History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions 
and in other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of 
Social Sciences offer opportunities for advanced training in the several 
fields lepresented. A major in economics is available for students in the 
College. of Arts and Sciences, although the work is given in the College of 
Business and Public Administration. During the freshman and sophomore 



94 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



years, in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences requirements, 
Principles of Economics, Econ. 31, 32, should be completed and as many 
other lower division social science courses taken as practicable. The De- 
partments of Political Science and Economics offer the first three years of a 
combined Arts-Law course. The Department of Psychology is identified 
with the development of applied psychology and is in position to supply 
training in the industrial and clinical phases of the subject. The Depart- 
ment of Sociology provides a course of study preparatory to professional 
training in social work, prepares students for research positions in several 
fields of sociology, and for positions in the field of crime and delinquency 
control. It offers many courses demanded by civil service examinations for 
certain positions. All five departments present courses aligned with the 
teacher-training program represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees 
of master of arts and doctor of philosophy. These advanced degrees are 
increasingly required for secondary school teaching and for professional 
positions in the several fields represented. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY 

In addition to the general requirements of the University and of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the History Department requires that all 
credits for a major and at least 12 credits for a minor be acquired in courses 
offered for advanced undergraduates and graduates. No work below a 
grade of C will be accepted towards a major. History majors must also 
take 12 credits of the three fundamental courses. 

The Curriculum in Economics is on page 107. 

In addition to the general requirements of the University and of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, students majoring in Sociology are required 
to take Introduction to Sociology, Soc. 3, Principles of Economics I and II, 
Econ. 31, 32, Recent Social Thought, Soc. 130, and Introduction to Social 
Research and Statistics, Soc. 141. No work below a grade of C will be 
accepted towards a major. 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school. 

The University offers also a combined program in arts and law leading 
to the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete the 
prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies as outlined below, or a total of 106 
semester hours for men and 98 for women, and they must complete the 
requirements for graduation, as indicated below. If students enter the 
combined program with advanced standing, at least the third full year's 
work, i.e. 30 semester hours of credit — must be completed in residence at 



^n AJ?T^ AND SCIENCES 
COLLEGE OF ARTS ANu 



95 



' of full-time law 

courses in t^^ ^choo ^^.^dation of *« ^«f . ^^0 credits exclusive 

„,av be awarded on "»« ' porned at least a total oi i^" degree 

program. 



Arts-Law Curriculum 

^. ,_S<.iolo.V of A^eHca. Ufe. • . • • ■ 

Sp«ch 1. 2_ ^^,^<^. . . . 

^ L I' 2-Basic B. O. T. C. (Men) .... 

Ptosicai Activiti^ ^ . •—-•;;;:: ... 

p. Ed.— Hygiene I, " V" 



Semester > 





. • • • 1 

J 







s 
% 







. • • • 



Total 



t 

t 

1 

3 

1 

2 

18 la 



t 

S 

3 

2 

1 

S 

1 

t 

18 19 



Sophomore Year , ^^^,,,^ m World Literature 

Econ. 31. 32-P"""^)^. ^^rican Civilization 

Hist. 5. 6-History of America 

Science or Mathematics 

Foreign L^^^^^^^' 'o t *C.'(Men) 

M. I.-3. 4-Basxc R. O. T. V 

Physical Activities 



Total 



t 
t 

s 
s 
s 
1 

16 19 



s 
s 

3 
3 
3 



16 19 



Junior Year „* . . 

Pol. set. 7. S-C-P^-l-rHtnteU; S., 



Htot.lS5/l36-<^-«*"«°;:i,hology.. 
„ „i, 1 Introduction to i^^^ 

p:;t. 14-AppUed psychology • 

I^r 135-SocloloBy ol Law 

Ec:nl4(H-MoneyandBanK.ng..... 

Econ. 160-I^bor Eeonom- ^^ 

■P A 180— Government ana x^ 

y. A. xow— 

♦Electives 



2 

S 

s 



3 
S 



2 
16 



2 
S 

• • 

3 

S 



3 
2 



16 



Total 



Senior Year-Taken in 



Law School 



..X oractiee should take a year at 

. ,^pect to engage in income tax practi 

•Pre-law students who expect 
least of accounting. 



96 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Five- Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

The first two years of this curriculum comprising a minimum of 60 
semester hours exclusive of hygiene and physical activities is taken in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park and the professional training 
is taken in the School of Nursing of the University in Baltimore or in the 
Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. ♦ 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with advanced standing, 
but the second year, consisting of a minimum of 30 credits, exclusive of 
physical training, must be completed in College Park and the professional 
training must be completed in the schools indicated above. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of bachelor of science 
in nursing may, upon the recommendation of the Director of the School of 
Nursing, be granted at the end of the professional training. Full details 
regarding this curriculum may be found in the section of the catalogue 
dealing with the School of Nursing. 

Arts Nursing Curriculum ^Semester-. 

Freshman Year I II 

Ens:. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 S 

See. 7 — Sociologry of American Life 3 .... 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government .... Z 

Chem. 1, 2 — General Chemistry 4 4 

L. S. 1, 2— Library Methods 1 1 

Modem "Language 3 8 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech .^ 1 1 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 18 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 3 S 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 S 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... S 

Modem Language 3 S 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 

PREMEDICAL 

The curriculum recommended for admission to the School of Medicine of 
the University of Maryland consists of three years of academic training in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Curriculum I meets these requirements 
and also fulfills those requirements prescribed by the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



97 



. 4^ fV,p Council on Medical Educa- 
, TT r«PPts the requirements of the Council u ^yjedical 

Curriculum II "^^^^J^^^^^ for entrance to Class A 

tion of the American Meciicai ^ 

semester hours are met, ana pr 

of the School of Medicme. curriculum with advanced standmg. 

A student may enter tWs eombxned -x^-« ^^ ^^ r'ToUeS 

but the last year. ^^J^fry Jt-^Uon, must be completed jn CoUege 

physical traimng ^^'^.^'J^J^^'V.^g must be completed m the Umvers y 



Premedical Three Year Curriculum 

Freshman Year American Literature 

E«.. 1. ^-oo^-t ^r tr. :". ^ 

=oc 7— Sociology of American 

t^' Scl 1-American Government 

Z^l.t3^F«ndamenUlBofZoolog,.....-..-^;; 

Chem.l.8-^neralChem»tnr.^^;^.- 

M L 1. 2— Basic K. O. 1. ^- V 

PE 42. 44-Hygiene (Women) 

Physical Activities 



Semester- 
I II 



% 
% 

• m 

A 
4 
t 
t 
1 



S 

4 
4 
3 
2 
1 



. • • • 



Total 



17-18 17-18 



Sophomore Year ^^din^s m World Literature 



S 

4 



Ens. 
Zool 



. 3. *-^°"'^:;"; Vertebrate Morphologry 
5 — Comparative verteora*^ 



Embryology 



Physical Activities ^^ ^i 

Total 



18-21 



9B 



THE UmVBRSlTY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Yea/r 

Chem. 181, 182. 183 i«j t?i 

rh^. 10, ll-Mrha„t"!'„7*"*= "^ f <«-■•-=«' Chemistry 

M<.tn^!^r'.---"--«o„:::;:::::::::v:^ 

Se^^B^rS-F^-------:-":::::::::::::::::;;;; 



Total 



Semester — ^ 
/ // 



4 
S 
S 
1 
4 



Senior Year-^Premedical '"^ " 

of science degree. "" *'*""'^ «"^ Physical education for the bachelor 

ArtsU^'^lTeLt^ndy^Ste^^^^^^^^ courses offered in the College of 
bachelor of science degree He should h'^' ^l^ ^^^^ requirements fTthl 
ments for the major fnd mi^r ^tdedd^V'"* ""' """' •»«' *"« requite! 
degree on the College Park campus *° '*'™P^"** '''^ ^o^k for the 

Premedical Two-Year Curriculum 

freshman Year 

^t ^\ l-American Government 



Semester — ^ 



p 

Phys 



-: «. .4ii;^:;e <w;mirr»> .•..::r.::::::;: 

hysical Activities 



Total 

Sophomore Year 



s 

8 

• • 

4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 



// 

S 



3 

4 

4 

t 

S 

2 

1 



20-21 20-21 



ic Chemistry. 



-", a.x jnecnanics and H*»nf • o j 

»^~'"«"'' „..'*• ^""''- O-*-; Magnetism and 

Moden.Lan^^, ■.:: 

?hi,»^'^^"^A^«•o•T.c.(Men).;;.::::••:• 



Physical Activities 
Totel 



S 
S 

4 

4 
S 
8 
1 



8 
8 

4 

4 
8 
8 
1 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



99 



PREDENTAL 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to prepare 
themselves for the study of dentistry are offered the following curriculum, 
which meets the predental requirements of the American Association of 
Dental Colleges. This curriculum may also be followed by the student if 
he desires to continue his college training and complete work for the 
Bachelor of Science degree. 



Predental Two-Year Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Ensr. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Zool. 2, 3 — Fundamentals of Zoology 

Chem. 1, 2 — General Chemistry 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 

JWM-» a* Ay M ^3cmiV' JVa Vi^a A* ^/* • • •••••••• • •••••••• • •• ••••••••••••••••• 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Lierature 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Dr. 5, 6 — Mechanical Drawing 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Physics 10, 11 — Mechanics and Heat; Sound, Optics; Magnetism and 

Electricity 

M. L 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C 

Physical Activities 

Total 



Semester- 

I 

8 
8 

• • • • 

4 

4 
8 
8 
1 



// 
8 

3 

4 
4 
3 
8 
1 



21 



8 
8 
1 

4 

4 
8 
1 



21 



8 
8 
1 

4 

4 
8 
1 



19 



19 



PREVETERINARY CURRICULUM 

Students who desire to prepare themselves for the study of veterinary 
science are offered, by the College of Arts and Sciences, a curriculum which 
meets the entrance requirements of colleges of veterinary science. The 
course is identical with that required of pre-medical students as outlined 
in Curriculum II on page 98. 



18-21 18-21 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

John Freeman Pyle, Dean 

The University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of Business and Public Administration and Economics. Downtown 
Washington is only twenty-five minutes away in one direction, while the 
Baltimore business district is less than an hour in the other. There is 
frequent transportation service from the University gates to each city. 
Special arrangements are made to study commercial, manufacturing, ex- 
porting, and importing agencies and methods in Baltimore, assistance is 
given qualified students who wish to obtain a first hand glimpse of the 
far-flung economic activities of the national government or to utilize the 
libraries, government departments, and other facilities available in 
Washington. 

Aims 

The College of Business and Public Administration offers training 
designed to prepare young men and women for service in business firms 
and governmental agencies, and for the teaching of commercial subjects 
and economics in high schools and colleges. It supplies scientific business 
training to students and prospective executives on a professional basis 
comparable to university training in the other professional fields. Admin- 
istration is regarded as a profession, and the College of Business and 
Public Administration prepares its students for this profession by offering 
courses of instruction which present general principles and techniques of 
management and administration and bring together in systematic form the 
experiences and practices of business firms and governmental units. This 
plan of education does not displace practical experience, but supplements 
and strengthens it by shortening the period of apprenticeship otherwise 
necessary, and by giving a broad and practical knowledge of the major 
principles, policies, and methods of administration. 

During the first half of the college study programs the student secures 
a broad foundation upon which to base the professional and the more 
technical courses offered in the last half of the course. The managerial 
and operating points of views are stressed in the advanced courses in pro- 
duction, marketing, labor, finance, real estate, insurance, accounting, secre- 
tarial training and public administration. The purpose of the training 
offered is to aid the student as a prospective executive in developing his 
ability to identify and to solve administrative and managerial problems; 
and to adjust himself and his organization, policies, and practices to chang- 
ing social, political and economic situations. 

The aim of the college is to present and illustrate such sound principles 
of management as are applicable to both big business and small business. 
Large-scale business, because of its possible economies will be expanded in 
some industries under certain well-known conditions. There are, on the 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



101 



.«,„ h.nd. Industrie. »<l ».ny ""»'»».t't 'opll^S 5ltt P- •«« 

the various courses. o-nvernment and business ser- 

The primary aim of collegiate education for governme ^^^ ^^^ 

Je is to train for effective management. The C^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^,^ 

He Administration, University of Maryland ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Sentiflc training in admm.stra^um « Jhe voung^^^^ ^^^^^^^.^^^ 
task will be the gmdmg of the more comp ^^.^.^^^ development 

ernmental units resulting ^'-''f .^'I'J^f "^^^ that the graduate may expect 
and expansion. This statement does ""* '"^^™ ^j^^. Re will, on the con- 
to secure a maior execut^e P»f ^'^^ J.'^f^tCblicized "bottom" of the 
trary, usually be required to start "^^^ ^^^^"/^f ^i^or positions. He 
X and work his way up ^^^-^f fi^^^Hate if L has taken full advan- 
will. however, be able to move uP at ^^^^^ developing his talents and 

tage of the 0PP«^umt'es offered b^^^^^^^^^ ^^.^^ „f .i^w. stalls, 

in acquiring technical and professions 
and techniques. 

Graduation Requirement courses suggested by the 

A minimum of 120 semester hours fj^'.^^^,,^ ,eience. physical 

College in addition to the ^P^f/J ?~^ io„. The student is required 
activities and hygiene are required for grad^^^^ ^^^^.^^ ^^^ quantitative 

to have a "C" average for al ^""f n^^^^^^i^^s the mark of D in more 
graduation requirements. A ^t'^d^^^.^^^JSJ^^i courses or repeat courses 
than one-fourth of his "'edits must take addit^a ^ complete the 

until he has met ^-^J^^^^^He" for the average student is eight 
«'l"^--V:^rL sfuS. bTearrying more than the average load. 
ra^cSete^h^S m a shorter period of time. 

%runiversity confers the following jeg.es on^^^^^^^^^^^ 
-i:^J:!tSTtr^^^^^S^^ Of Graduate School for 
graduate rules and regulations.) ^^^ Registrar on a 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the o» ^^^ ^ ^^^^^e. 

date announced for each semester a f o™* ^ ^, ^^jch degrees are 

Candidates for degrees must attend a conv ^^^^^^^^^ .^ ^^^^^^^^ 

conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees 

only in exceptional cases. 

Junior Requirement ^ gg semester 

To be classified as a ^^^^^l^^tyLm^r. average grade of at 
hours in his freshman and sophomore yea 



102 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



103 



least "C", plus the required work in military science, hygiene and physical 
activities for the freshman and sophomore years. If a student has better 
than a "C" average and lacks a few credits of having the total of 58, he 
may be permitted to take certain courses numbered 100 and above providing 
he has the prerequisites for these courses and the consent of the Dean. 

Senior Residence Requirement 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to the extent of 90 semester 
hours either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere he must earn a 
subsequent total of at least 30 semester hours with an average grade of 
"C" or better at the University of Maryland plus any credit for work in 
military science and physical education required in the senior year. No 
part of these 30 credits may be transferred from another institution. 

Programs of Study 

The College offers programs of study in economics, business administra- 
tion, secretarial training, public administration, and a number of combina- 
tion curricula, e.g., business administration and law, commercial teaching, 
. industrial education, chemistry, agriculture, or basic engineering courses. 
Research is emphasized throughout the various programs. 

Professional Objectives 

The executive manager or administrator in modern business enterprises 
and governmental units and agencies should have a clear understanding of: 

(a) the business organizations and institutions which comprise the 
business world; 

(b) the political, social, and economic forces which tend to limit or to 
promote the free exercise of his activities; and 

(c) the basic principles which underlie the efficient organization and 
administration of a business or governmental enterprise. 

In addition, the executive or the prospective executive should: 

(a) be able to express his thoughts and ideas in correct and concise 
English; 

(b) have a knowledge of the fundamental principles of mathematics and 
the basic sciences, such as, physics, chemistry, biology, and geography; 

(c) have a knowledge of the development of modern civilization through 
a study of history, government, and other social science subjects; 

(d) have a sympathetic understanding of people gained through a study 
of psychology, sociology, and philosophy. 

If the executive is to be successful in solving current business and govern- 
mental problems, he should be skilled in the scientific method of collecting, 
analyzing, and classifying pertinent facts in the most significant manner, 
and then, on the basis of these facts, be able to draw sound conclusions and 
to formulate general principles which may be used to guide his present and 



successful executive are: 

for executing them. 

Facilities Furnished „f fv,^ Polleee of Business and Public 

The teaching staff and *e curricula of the CoUeg^^^ ^^ ^^^^^_ 

Administration have ^'.^^^^^^f tlhl^tS nV that wUl aid the capable 
ing a type of professional ^"^ \;*;^^^^^^^^^ talents to their full 

and ambitious student in developing ms v 

capacity. , undergraduate and graduate 

The college study programs °" . ''f^.^'^English, history, government, 

levels presuppose eff-tive ™mg^ \hf program of study for any 

language, science, and rnattiematic^;^ V ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ those pre- 

retarial work, teaching, and research. 

Advisory Councils „„„ti„„ous adjustment of courses, 

in order to facilitate the promp -d -ntmuous^^^^^^^ ^^^^ .^ 

curricula, and instructional ""^^^^f *° //"^^stantly to maintain instruction 
by industry and commerce; *"d m order consta y ^f business 

abreast of the best current P-^<= !^^.^\^JX%Tom outstanding leaders in- 
men and public officials are constantly ^-^^l^ ^^^ i,, ^^ particular 

PRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE »W«m™EN^ .^ 

particular curriculum: 



'— ^- of this training is usually secured in the four years of high school 

♦ The major portion of this training 
and the first two years of college. 



104 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



105 



Required Courses: Semester Hours 

Engrlish, Composition and American and World Literature . .' 12 

Mathematics* € 

Economic Resources 4 

Economic Developments 4 

American Government 8 

Sociologry of American Life S 

History of American Civilization € 

Military Training and Physical Activities for Men 16 

Hygiene and Physical Activities for Women 8 

Accounting 8 

Principles of Economics 8 

Organization and Control 4 

Total specified requirements 64-72 

Free Electives 4 

6»-76 

A student who has met all entrance requirements may be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science upon the satisfactory completion of not 
fewer than 120 semester hours credit exclusive of military training and 
physical activities required of all able-bodied men students, or required 
courses in hygiene and physical activities for women. A minimum of forty 
per cent of the total number of credits required for graduation must be 
in subjects with designations other than Business Administration; forty 
per cent must be in Business and Public Administration subjects, the other 
twenty per cent may be in either group or comprise a combination of the 
two groups of subjects. 

Freshmen who expect to make a concentration in foreign trade, or who 
plan to enter public service abroad, should elect an appropriate foreign 
language. 

Freshmen wishing to make a concentration in the Secretarial Training 
course or to prepare for commercial teaching should elect Secretarial 
Training 1 and 12. There are no prerequisites for these courses. Such 
students should take English 4 and 5 in the sophomore year. No credit is 
allowed when only typing is taken. The laboratory fee for typewriting is 
$7.50 for each semester. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

During the junior and senior years each student is required to complete 
in a satisfactory manner the following specified courses: 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 8 

B. A. 140 — ^Financial Management 3 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 3 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 8 

B. A. 130— Elements of Statistics 3 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law I, II 8 

Total 29 

* Students who have had two years of high school algebra will omit Math. 5 and take 
Math. 6 only, other students will take both Math. 5 and 6. 



?o«lr. seme, S~^'^"'' r™™' ^1" o"ntl„s »d Su.i.Uc;. P.o- 

Training courses. 

combined Administration and ^*^ J'^f*", , . .gt^ation-Law curriculum. 
When a student elects the '^^^'^'^^''Zr^Z'^^reciuiremmis listed 

he must complete in a -^-J-^SleToTBul^^^^^ Public Administra- 
f or the first three years m the College "^ » ^j^g exclusive of 

on plus enough electives to ^.'^^^ ^J^ZX'^tLn average grade of 
military science, physical ^'^^"'^^^^^^^^"torl bTfore entering the Law School 
at least "C". The last y-^^J.^" JfpX The Bachelor of Science degree 
must be done in residence at Co»^g« r^^ff'^^^i^istration is conferred upon 
from the College of Business an^ PuW»^ ^^^ j„ ,^^ l^w School and the 

the satisfactory --Pf^^y^J^^ Law School. Business Law cannot be 
rpcommendation of the L»ean oi. tuc 

TS e^ o, Business .nj P«.»c ^Sr P»r1=.S" 

Natural .nd Humui E.sources, Foteign ira g„„pmg and 

„d Secreuriul Trains. A =«"*J ™ ^^^LJmo. in one of these 

losophy degree. 

I. ECONOMICS Economics is designed to meet the 

The program of studies m the he'a oi ^^ ^.^^^ ^^^^^ 

needs of students who wish to !^°"<^«"*'*%^;*J;„\ri expect to enroll in 
in this division of the Social S^^^^^^^^^^ are^l^ng to enter the fields of 
the professional schools and those ^n° ^^ j ^ju find courses m 

Business or Public Adm-istration or Fom^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^ ^, 



106 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Requirements for an Economics Major 

A student majoring in Economics is required to complete satisfactorily 
120 semester hours of work in addition to the required work in military 
science, hygiene and physical activities. A general average of at least "C" 
is required for graduation. A student must maintain at least an average 
grade of "C" in his major or minor in order to continue in his chosen field. 

The specific requirements for the Economics Major are; 

I. Econ. 1, 2, 4, 5, 31 and 32 — a total of 14 semester hours of specifically 
required courses in Economics. B. A. 20, 21 (Principles of Accounting) and 
B. A. 130 (Statistics) are recommended. Other courses in Economics to 
meet the requirements of a major or minor are to be selected with the aid 
of a faculty advisor. 

II. Social Science, — American Government (3); Sociology of American 
Life (3); American History 6; — a total of 12 semester hours. 

III. English — 12 semester hours, comprising Eng. 1, 2, and 3, 4; or 5, 6. 
Speech when it can be arranged in the student's program, 2 to 4 semester 
hours. 

IV. Foreign Language and Literature, 12 semester hours in one language, 
unless an advanced course is taken. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are 
required to have a reading knowledge of two modern foreign languages. 

V. Natural Science and Mathematics, 12 semester hours. 

VI. Military Science, Hygiene, and Physical Activities. The present 
University requirements in 16 semester hours in Military Science and Phys- 
ical Activities for all able-bodied male students. Women students are re- 
quired to take 8 semester hours credit in hygiene and physical activities. 

A student who elects economics as a major must have earned 14 semester 
hours credit in the prerequisite courses in economics prior to his beginning 
the advanced work of the junior year. These are normally taken during 
the freshman and sophomore years and must be completed with an average 
grade of not less than "C". The major sequences are not completed until 
at least 26 and not more than 40 credits, in addition to the required 
prerequisite courses, are satisfactorily earned, that is, with an average grade 
of at least "C". At least 20 of these credits must be earned in courses 
numbered 100 and above. 

A minor in economics consists of the 14 prerequisite credits mentioned 
above plus at least 18 additional credits in economics. At least 12 of these 
must be in courses numbered 100 and above. 

As many as 24 additional semester hours may be taken by the economics 
students from Business and Public Administration courses. 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of studies should 
be selected with the aid of a faculty advisor in terms of the student's 
objective and major interest. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Study program for Economies Majors ^Sernester-. 

':r::-~- -.e. o. .« wo.......;-;;;;;-;;:;:::::: \ \ 

Econ: 4. ^Economic D-"^^^, \^ AJn^rican Literature » , 

E„g. 1. 2-Compos.t>on and ^^^^^.^^ ^■■■- ■ .... 

Mathematics 5. ^T^^GolZ^elt (or Soeiolo^ of American We) ... , 

Pol. Sci. 1-Amencan Gov^nn-^ ^ American Government) , 

Soc. 7-Sociology of American me (or A s ^ 

ForeignLangnage.^..^.-^ •• — ••• • , , 

Ik* T 1 2 — Basic R. O. 1. »^- v"*^ / 

P E. 42. 44-Hygiene (Women)....- • 1 ^ 

Physical Activities (Men and women) __ ^^^^ 

Total 

Sophomore Year 8 * 

Foreign Language ^ j 

fri'\fi^intr;du;wsp;;;h-.v.-. •••••■.•.•.:; 

H B 6-Hi"ory of American Civilization ..•.•■••••• 

"• "' " „ •« T? o T C. (Men) 1 * 

M T 3 4 — Basic K. U. 1. v^' V ' 

Physical Activities (Men and women) _-_ -^^ 

Total 

Junior Year » 

Tl' 130-Elements of Business Stat.st.cs • • • , .... 

^.on. nO-^o.or.^'-- oi^rr.TA.n:u^^^^^on^ __» _! 

Electives in Economics, Buh. & ru . ^^ ^^ 

Total 

Se7iior Year 3 — 

' IT 1^2— Advanced Economic Principles .... 3 

r: IsU—porary Economic ~ht^. ••••■•■•••;•. .... 

„ -lii Theory of Money, v^reaiT- a"u .... 

r. m-^on7mics of American I^^^^^^^^^^ 3 .... 

P A 140— Public Finance and Taxation 3 ... 

piAilSO-GovernmentandB-in-^...^;^-— ^^^^ ^ __2 

Electives in Economics. Bu^ness « - ^ 

Total 



1 nf the student's adviser in Economics. 

, *• ^ mav be selected with the approval of the stuaen 

♦ Other electives may oe seieci 



108 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



11. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Modern business administration requires a knowledge of and skill in the 
use of effective tools for the control of business organization, institutions, 
and operations. The curricula of the Division of Business Administration 
emphasize the principles and problems of the development and the use of 
policies and organizations, and the methods, techniques and procedures of 
execution, in other words, the essence of Administration and Management. 

The programs of study in the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration are so arranged as to facilitate concentrations according to the 
major function of business organization. This plan is not, however, based 
on the assumption that these major divisions are independent units, but 
rather that each is closely related and dependent on the others. Every 
student in the college, therefore, is required to complete satisfactorily a 
minimum number of required basic and core subjects in economics and in 
each of the major functional fields. Each graduate upon completion of 
the requirements for the bachelor's degree finds himself well grounded in 
the theory and practice of administration. There are five commonly 
recognized major business functions, viz: production, marketing, finance, 
labor relations, and control. 

The function of control may be thought of as comprising two divisions, 
viz. internal and external. Internal control has to do with men, materials, 
and operations. External control is secured through the force of law, court, 
board and commission decisions, custom, and public opinion. Management 
endeavors to make adequate adjustments to these forces. Courses in law 
and public administration, for example, aid in giving the student an under- 
standing of the problems, devices, and methods of external or "social" 
control. 

Study programs of the Division of Business Administration furnish an 
opportunity for a small amount of concentration in one of the major sections 
during the undergraduate period. The basis of these curriculums is the 
general study program. 

The following suggested study programs will aid the thoughtful student 
in planning his concentration according to his natural aptitudes and the 
line of his major interest: 

The General Curriculum in Administration 

This curriculum is set up on an eight semester basis which corresponds 
to the traditional four-year course that leads to a bachelors degree. A 
student may complete the full course in a .shorter period of time by attend- 
ing summer sessions. A superior student may, however, complete the course 
in a shorter period of time by carrying a heavier load each semester. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



109 



freshman Year 

Econ. 1. 2-Economic Resources of the World. . . . • '^'^■'-'\^^^^ 
Econ. 4. 6-Economic Developments. . .^. -.^^ Literature.... 

Enir 1 2- -Composition and Readings in American 

I A. 10. U-Organization and Control ...... • • • • • • • • • ' 

Mathematics 5,* and 6 • • • • • ' '^j V * „ f American Life) 

P. S. 1-American Government or S--logy ^^^^^^^,,,) . . 

Soc 7-Sociology of American Life (or Amen 

M I 1. 2-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) ' 

P* E 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) • 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 



Total 



Sophomore Year Literature. 

Eng. 3. 4 or 5. 6-Composition and Readings in n 

Econ. 31. 32-Principles of Economics.^ • 

B A 20. 21— Principles of Accounting 

si>eech IS. 19— Introductory Speech 

rtV-iistory of American Civilization ■•';;:::_,, 

Electives (Girls) ^' Vw'„; 

M L 3. 4-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men).. 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 



Total 



Junior Year 

Econ 140— Money and Banking 

B A 140— Financial Management 

B A 130-Elements of Business Statistics ... ..^^ 
Lt I'tlMarketing Principles and Organization 

B. A. 150— Marketing Management 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 



iJ^:T;fs=i ra"^^na».-™«o„- -^ Kcono... 



Total 



Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181— Business Law I. II 



Semester 
1 

2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 

• • • • 

t 

2 
1 



// 

2 



18-19 18-19 



S 

S 

4 
1 
S 

'S 
2 
1 



t 

2 

4 

1 

3 

8 

3 

1 



17-18 17-18 



3 

• • 

3 

2 

• • 

2 

• • 

2 
16 



2 
6 



IS 



Econ. 13l'-Comparative Economic ^T^^^ '::;:: ::::':: 



Total 



4 
2 

2 

6 

16 



4 

3 

3 
6 



16 



' K K^v*. had two years of high school algebra may 

• Students who have haa iwo y«r« 



be excused from Math. 5. 



110 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



111 



Electives may be chosen under the direction of a faculty advisor from 
courses in Accounting, Statistics, Geography, Public Administration, Secre- 
tarial Training, Education, Home Economics, Natural Science, or other 
courses that will aid the student in preparing for his major objective. The 
electives indicated in the General Course are provided so that students can 
arrange their schedules, under the guidance of a faculty adviser, in such 
a way as to secure a concentration or major when desired in: 

A. Industrial Administration F. Accounting and Statistical 

B. Marketing Administration Control 

C. Financial Administration G. Secretarial Training 

D. Personnel Administration H. Foreign Trade and International 

E. Natural and Human Resources Relations. 

There are prescribed curriculums for Accounting, Financial Administra- 
tion, Foreign Trade and International Relations, and for Secretarial 
Training. 

A. Industrial Administration 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of 
organization and control in the field of industrial management. Theory and 
practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes, and 
techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and criticized. The student is required 
to go on inspection trips, and when feasible is expected to secure first-hand 
information through both observation and participation. He should be 
familiar with the factors that determine plant location and layout, types 
of buildings, and the major kinds of machines and processes utilized; he 
should understand effective methods and devices for the selection and 
utilization of men, materials and machines. 

The courses, in addition to those required of all students in the college, 
which will aid the undergraduate student in preparing himself for a useful 
place in this field of effort are: 

B. A. 121— Cost Accounting (4) 
B. A. 122— Auditing (4) 
B. A. 132, 133 — Advanced Business Statis- 
tics (3,3) 



B. A. 170 — Industrial Management (3) 
P. A. 170 — Transportation I — Regulation of 

Transportation Services (3) 
B. A. 171 — ^Transportation II — Services, 



B. A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) 
B. A. 163 — Industrial Relations (3) 
B. A. 165 — Office Management (3) 
B. A. 166 — Business Communications (3) 



Rules, and Practices (3) 
B. A. 172 — Transportation III — Traffic 
Rates, Tariffs, Classifications and In- 
terpretations 



Industrial Administration students may so arrange their study programs 
as to take a series of related courses in one of the following fields: 

1. Physics 3. Some basic engineering courses 

2. Chemistry 4. Agriculture 

B. Marketing Administration 

Modern business administration is concerned largely with marketing 
activities. Buying and selling of products and services comprise the major 



•.e nf a laree group of our population. The 
portion of the time ^^^^^'^'Fllfj.X^^ 'ndividual initiative and free 
fdeals of our system of private P-P^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^,^^ organization and 
enterprise are closely re ated t;> ^^^^^^^^^^ ^f marketing are necessary 
practice. Effective solutions of t^^^^^^^^^ ^^, ,^, ,^e welfare of 

to the success of the ^^^'I'^^f ^^^^^ be reduced or kept from 

the consumer. If the costs ^^J^^^^^^^^^^^ of the organization, policies, 

rising unduly, it is "^^^^^^^/^^^^IX Celling, purchasing, merchandising, 
methods, and practices of ^^"^.^f^^^^^^ activities be made, and 

transportation, f^---<^^-^l''^^^; l^Ln^y <,u.Uf.ea marketing technicians 
corresponding appropriate action taken oy q 

and executives. . :.4.^of;nn nroeram of study is to give 

The purpose of the xnarketing ^— -*X ,„ analyze, evaluate and 
the alert and serious -^"J"* *" "^^ with marketing institutions, 
otherwise study the P'^°^»T^,T"tetVces. The student who elects this 
organizations, policies, ^'''Y":.^fJs7SAes, on the technical level, for 
Jd of concentration may ^^"^^^^^^iSertisLz copy, and on the admin- 
research, selling, ^"y^^^'^^l^jT/ abilities for organizing, planning, and 
istrative level he may deve op ^^^s abUit ^^^^^.^^ 

directing the various activities m *« ««'^ ^^^^ j^ addition to 

Thoughtf ^ ;f i«ldlt:rt?e SgrwiU lid tJstudent in preparing 
SilfTor 11«ire position in the -- o^^-^^ „„ _... . 

B. A. 132. 13*-Advanced Business Stat,s- •,,,;.„,p<.rtation Services (3) 

ti« (3. 3) .„d Cam- B. A. ni-Transportet.on H-be 

B. A. 151-Advertising Programs and Cam ^^^^ ^^^ p^^^,.,^ 3 ^ 

„.i^n. (2^ R A 172 -Transportation m '•>» 

B A 144 Ute. Group, and Social Insur- B.^ A^ ^^^.^^ classifications and Inter- 

B-ri^'^^opv Writin. and U..out (.) .^'TtT-^^Zur.. in Sa.es Management 

B. A 145- ProP^H. and Casuait, ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

B T IM-Purchasing Management (3) |- *■ ^^^^__.p^y,,,^ i„ Retail Store Man- 

r" A 147— Business Cycle Theory (3) .irement (3> „ „. 

B A m-ReUil Store Management (3) ^ "^'asT-Seminar in Marketing Manage- 

B A 143— Credit Management (3) ^^^^ (arranged) 

B A 166— Office Management (3) B A. 258— Research in Marketmg 

tices (2) the field of Marketing Policies. Manage 

B T 186-Real Estate Law and Convey- t^^ « administration (-"''»^«'> . 

B -r MllKeal Kstate financing and B. A. 2.-Thesis <3-5 hours) .arranged) 

"rtw especially interested in foreign trade; selections may be made 

from the following courses: i5i__Advertising Programs and Cam- 

P A. 130-International Economic Policies B A. ^^ ^^^ 

and Relations (3) g a. 157-Foreign Trade ^^^^""^ ^^ . 

P A. 137-Economic Planning and Post- «• ^ ^^^^^p^^tation I. Regulation of 

war Problems (3) Transportation Services (3) 

P. A. 141-Intemational Finance and t.x- 

change (3) 



112 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Overseas 



B. A. 178 — ^Transportation IV, 
Shippinsr (8) 

P. A. 180 — Government and Business (8) 

N. H. R. 4 — ^Resrional Geography of the 
Continents (8) 

N. H. R. 100, 101 — Regional Geography of 
the United States and Canada (8, 3) 

N. H. R. 102 — The Geography of Manufac- 
turing in the United States and Canada 

(8) 
N. H. R. 110— Middle America (8) 



N. H. R. Ill — South America (8) 

N. H. R. 112 — Recent Economic Trends in 
Latin America (3) 

N. H. R. 120, 121 — Economic Geography of 
Europe (3. 3) 

N. H. R. 122 — ^Economic Resources and De- 
velopment of Africa (8) 

N. H. R. 221— Seminar in Geography 
(arranged) 

N. H. R. 222 — ^Research Work (arranged) 



C. Financial Administration 

A nation with a highly developed industrial system requires an effective 
financial organization. Production and marketing activities of business 
enterprises must be financed; a large volume of consumer purchases depend 
on credit; and the activities of local, state, and federal governments depend, 
in large part, on taxation and borrowing. To meet these needs a com- 
plicated structure of financial institutions, both private and public, has 
evolved together with a wide variety of financial instruments. The methods 
used are equally varied and complicated. Since the financing service is so 
pervasive throughout our economic life and because it is an expense which 
must be borne by the ultimate purchaser, the management of the finance 
function is endowed with a high degree of public interest. 

This study program is designed to give the student fundamental informa- 
tion concerning financing methods, institutions, and instruments; and to 
aid him in developing his ability to secure and evaluate pertinent facts, and 
to form sound judgments with reference to financial matters. Through a 
wise selection of subjects the student who selects this curriculum may 
prepare himself for positions in the commercial, savings, and investment 
management; corporate financial management; real estate financing; and 
insurance. A student may qualify himself to enter government service, 
e.g., in departments regulating banking operations, international finance, 
the issuance and sales of securities, and a number of financial corporations 
owned and operated or controlled by the government. 

Students wishing to form a concentration in Financial Administration 
should follow the general study program for the freshman and sophomore 
years, the program for the junior and senior years is outlined below. 

/ — Semester — > 
Junior Year I 11 

Econ. 140 — ^Money and Banking t .... 

B. A. 140 — ^Financial Management .... S 

B. A. 180 — ^Elements of Business Statistics S .... 

B. A. 120 — Intermediate Accounting S .... 

B. A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting .... 4 

Eicon. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 8 .... 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management .... S 

Electives in Economics, Business and Public Administration 8 S 

Total 17 1« 



BVSWESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIOS 

, — Semeste)^— 

I n 

Senior Year 4 4 

B A. 180, m-Busines. Law..... 3 ■■■■ 

B A I41-Inv«tment Management • .... 3 

1 1 ;^rr::f::.rMfr;::e;.;::::;:::::.:: ......•.•••;: - ...• 

B. A. 165— Office Management • • ' t • 

Electives in Finance — ^ ^^ 

"^^^^^ * '. ^^.y, the aid of the advisor from the 

Selection of electives may be made with the aid 

following list of subjects: 241-Seminar in Money. Credit and 

R A 142-Banking Policy and Practice (3) ^ (arranged) 

B A 147-Business Cycle Theory (3) ^^ 240-Seminar in Financial Orgamxa- 

P a' 140-Public Finance and Taxation (3) «• -^ Management (3) 

Econ. 141-Tbeory of Money. Credit and ^ tion ^^^^^^^^ ^, «?f t^^^^ti ^n 

Prices (3) . . . the Field of Financial Administration 

B. A. 146-Real Estate Financing and Ap- (^^anged) 

praisals (2) , — 

p. A. 141— International Finance and Ex- 
change (8) 

D. Personnel Administration and Labor Economic ^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

The recent development of ^^'/.^^f ^T^w^^ed the growing vital impor- 
private enterprise and government "^^^^^^^^.^^^^ depends on har- 
tance of personal relationships, ^u^^^^f ^^"^^yee. The interests of the 
monious cooperation beirween ^'"P^f ^^ ^"^VweU as those of the employees 
public, the owners, and *« ™X/X*;„\' I^olved in any given case of 
may be greatly affected by ^"^l^f^^'JZx^, centrally controlled labor 
personnel relationship. The g'^T*^^*^^;^^ J^„f 'governmental agencies in 
Organizations and the '^l^^j^^^^'fT^Z^Vs^^^^ management union 
labor disputes have created PJ^^ems for ^^ ^^^ ^^^.^ j„. 

officials, and government ^fP'*'^!^*^ '^^'.^^ent, the unions, and business 
prepared to solve satisfactorily The governme ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

need men and women ^^^l^^^ ^t^f "* " n^m^ti^^ in the fields of business 
should have broad traimng and t«<=?>"^*=*^ ''^''Xlogy. together with suitable 
and V^^^^^^^'^^^ nbrS':;prS\besTproblems with an open 
SiLrulirsedly Unal and class preju^ces^ ^^ ^_^ 

Personnel administration which ^^^ * J^j^^^^^^ utilizing an effective 
effort, is concerned f* securing, ma^^^^^^^^ administration find 

working force. People *<l«^^**fXeT governmental departments, govem- 
employment in busmess ^"^^^'^^'^^T^r^d. charitable institutions, 
mental corporations, education »"^*f *^""JJ"^ ^^,,^ ^Wch will, in 

A student may select ^-m JKeJoll^^^^ --- ,^^, ^,,,„e him 
addition to those required of all ^*'?*^"f J" ^ 
L the kind of personnel work he wishes to enter. 



114 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



B. A. 162 — Contemporary Trends in Labor 

Relations (3) 
B. A. 163 — Industrial Relations (8) 
P. A. 161 — Recent Labor Legislation and 

Court Decisions (3) 
Econ. 130 — Economics of Consumption (3) 
B. A. 170 — Industrial Management (3) 
P. A. Ill — Public Personnel Administration 

(») 

Psych. 4 — Psychology for Students of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration (3) 
Psych. 121— Social Psychology (8) 
Psych. 160 — Psychology of Personnel (3) 



Psych. 161 — Advanced Psychology of Per. 
sonnel (3) 

P. A. 211 — Problems in Public Personnel 
Administration (arranged) 

B. A. 262 — Seminar in Contemporary 
Trends in Labor Relations (3) 

B. A. 266 — Research in Personnel Manage- 
ment (arranged) 

B. A. 269 — Studies of Special Problems in 
Employer-Employee Relationships 
(arranged) 

B. A. 299 Thesis, 3-6 hours (arranged) 



E. Accounting and Statistical Control Study Program 

Internal control in modem business and governmental organizations is a 
major over-all administrative function. The rapid growth in size and com- 
plexity of current governmental units and business enterprises has 
emphasized the importance of the problems of control in management. In 
order to control intelligently and effectively the manifold activities of these 
units, it is necessary to establish an organization, formulate policies, and 
develop methods of procedures. In order to perform satisfactorily these 
managerial activities, it is necessary to have pertinent facts concerning 
the operations of the various units, divisions, and departments. It is the 
function of the accounting and statistical departments to secure, analyze, 
classify, and, to a limited extent, interpret these facts. 

This study program is designed to give the student a broad training in 
administrative control supplemented by specific technical training in the 
problems, procedures, methods and techniques of accounting and statistics. 
If the program is followed diligently, the student may prepare himself for a 
career as a public accountant, tax specialist, cost accountant auditor, budget 
officer, comptroller, credit manager ,or treasurer. 

The following study program provides courses for those wishing to 
concentrate in this important field: 

Students who select a concentration in accounting and statistics follow 
the general study program in the freshman and sophomore years. 



Junior Year 

B. A. 120 — Intermediate Accounting 

B. A. 121 — Cost Accounting 

B. A. 122 — Auditing Theory and Practice 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management i 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

B, A. 160 — Personnel Management 

Total 



-Semester — n 
/ // 



3 
3 

• • 

S 

t 



4 
4 



S 

■ • 

s 

s 



17 



17 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

( — Semester — n 
/ // 

Senior Year 4 .... 

R A 123— Income Tax Accounting. * * * *p;_:;iee 

B A 124-Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice ^ . 

B.' a! 125. C. P. A. Problems^. .V;;;;;.'.* * J 

« A 180. 181. Business Law ••:• •• * 

B. I 183. Business Law for Accountants............ • c ^ 

Blectives — ^ ^^ 

^^^^ his needs. ^ ^ 220-Managerial Accounting (3) 

P A 114— Public Budgeting (3) ' 299— Thesis, 3-6 hours (arranged) 

I' ^; 129-Apprenticeship in Accounting »• A. ^^^ 222-Seminar in Accounting 

B.^ A. 132. 133— Advanced Business Statis- B.^A.'^2l-Research in Accounting 

^»<» (3.3) (arranged) emblems in 

B A 165— Office Management (3) ^ ^ 229— Studies of special problems in 

b' A 166— Business Communications (3) -^^^ ^^^^ ^^ statistical Control 

B* A*. 143-Credit Management (3) (arranged) 
P. A. 124— Governmental Accounting {6} 

III. SECRETARIAL TRAINING ^^^.^.^^ .^ ^^^ 

The development of «»« P^^.^'^*'^^' ™Ton has been in response to the 
College of Business and ^-^l^^^^^^Zei.ri.l and office personnel, 
rapidly growing need Jor college tra.nea ^^^ opportunity to prepare 

Both men and women students are provw ^^^ activities, 

themselves for effective f'^vice m the fieM of ^^^^^^^ ^^^ emphasized 
The major objectives of the «°"«/^ J ^f ^t^dies outlined for secre- 

throughout the P^-ntation of 1*e P-gr^^^^^ ^^^^.^^^^^ -^ ^,, ^ famish 
tarial and office training Jhe purpose o mechanical perfection m 

merely technical or vocational training, *» ^ ^he purpose of this 

typing, filing, machine °P«^**>;" ^"^eCnl her natural aptitudes in such 
curriculum is to aid the student ^-^'^^^'^^^f^,, manager. The develop- 
a way as to become an «*'=f"\^;Xn organize, direct, and execute is the 
ment of the student s capacity to ^^^^^m This program of study will 
guiding principle followed »« t*"^^™ „ is ambitious, naturally capable, 
appeal to the young man ^\^;^^^^)l^,, that the positions of office 
and willing to work, and to ^^"^^ J"° .^^ ^uch more than merely skill 
management and secretarial -- « JJ^^ 2^,^,, ^ools, but knowledge and 
i^rX^SrLTofrator importance for the more responsible 

positions. 

Placement Examination ^^ equivalent 



116 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



examination in those subjects prior to, or at the time of, their first registra- 
tion in a shorthand or typewriting course at the University. 

Based on the results of this examination, the student may be exempt 
from certain of the beginning courses in either, or both, shorthand and 
typewriting. Credit will be given only for the work done in residence. 

Record of Competency 

Students must make a grade of "C" in each course in the Secretarial 
sequence before they may progress to the next advanced course. 

Senior Requirement 

A vocational level of competency in business skills is imperative at the 
time of graduation. As a requirement for graduation, students following 
the secretarial curriculum must either take S. T. 16 and S. T. 17 (or S. T. 18) 
within the six-month period preceding graduation, or take a proficiency 
examination on the material covered in these courses within this six-month 
period. 

The following program of study is designed to give the capable student 
an opportunity to develop his potential aptitudes to an effective end. 

f — Semester — n 
Freshman Year I II 

EnfiT. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature S 3 

P. S. 1 — American Government S .... 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

Econ. 1, 2 — ^Economic Resources of the World 2 2 

Econ. A, 5 — Economic Developments 2 2 

♦Math. 5, 6 — General Mathematics and Mathematics of Finance S 3 

S. T. 1 — Principles of Typewriting t 

S. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting .... 2 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 S 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 18-19 18^19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature S S 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization S S 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 . 3 

S. T. 12, 13— Principles of Shorthand I, II 4 4 

S. T. 10 — Office Typewriting Problems 2 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) S 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 17-20 16-17 



♦ Students who have had two years of high school algebra may omit Math. 5 and take 
only Math. 6. 



BVM^iESS AND PVBLIC ADMINISTRATION H? 

f — Semester ^ 

I n 

Junior Year t \ 

R A 10 U-Organixation and Control 4 

B A 20;21-Principles of Accounting t --.. 

S* T 16— Advanced Shorthand 2 • • • • 

S T 17— Gregg Transcription 

B. A. 166-Busine88 Communications ••••• S ...- 

S. T. Ul-Office Machines ; .... | 

S.T. 112-Filing ••••••; ••; 2 

Econ. 140-Money and Banking ... • • •..•;; * ' « ^ 

Blectives ^^ ^g 

Total 

Senior Year s — 

S T 110— Secretarial Work • ' .... » 

S. t! lU-Secretarial Office Practice '•;;;- » '•- 

B A. 165— Office Management 4 * 

B A. 180. 181— Business Law * *." * •*•* 

Econ 160— Labor Economics ' .' * ' 1' ' Vq T 18) « 

S^^^Ud Elective-<Jre« Shorthand D.ct.t.o„ (S. T. 18) • • _ , 

xo *^ 

Total 

c.„«n^ s«,.u,>.. T,..».. .»- B..j.^ rrcoC:r^u„..on 

schools and colleges. Twenty semester hours 

The ,«,ulr.™nl, t. U«h ">"""•" ™'";trr«.r..rti«e.tlon lo «.d, 

Columbia. 

IV. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ^^^^,„^,„ts. especially strong 

The world-wide trend on the ^^j'Jj;^^Tzv,<^ter responsibility 

centralized governments toward ^he *^\\7;Xities of the citizenry has 

for guiding, controlling and regulaUng the a^^^^^^^^ ^^^.^^^ governmental 

created a strong demand ^^^^ ^.J^t*^^^";; ^^'^ernmental participation in the 
personnel. This trend toward "^J^f ^^ Jf ^^ has been developing for a 
fields of our economic. PoMical and ^"^ml f e ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

number of years but f'^'^^^^^^'lll.^'Zntvies during the twenties, it 
growth was P'^""""",^-^-, States during the thirties. Thousands of men 
grew rapidly in the "^ted States dunng „ „i,,tions, evaluatmg 

and women are now ^'^f^^^^JlJ,^:^!^^ for administering and super- 
policies, and devising methods "^dj^X"/^' ^"^ed in the far-flung scheme 
vising the manifold governmental '^^tivit^^; re^^„,^ ,,, example, has now 



118 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



of organization, management and control was undertaken before an 
adequately qualified personnel could be selected and properly trained. 
Federal, State, and Local Governments have called upon the universities 
to aid in training young men and women for effective public service. 
Graduates who are mentally alert, can think clearly, form critical judg- 
ments, express their thoughts and conclusions succinctly, have a well- 
balanced mind, and who possess a professional point of view with reference 
to their work, are needed in a number of government divisions. 

The curriculum in Public Administration is designed primarily to aid in 
the preparation of young men and women for technical, supervisory, and 
managerial positions in the various state and federal services. The par- 
ticular selections of subjects in any individual case will depend on the 
specific position for which the student wishes to prepare. The full course 
resources of the University are available for this training. Courses, for 
example, in foreign languages, geography, history, philosophy, and govern- 
ment, as well as studies in social, legal, political, and economic institutions 
may be advisable in addition to the required courses in Business and Public 
Administration. 

Properly qualified graduates can usually find employment in the field of 
their major interest. Large numbers of people trained in such technical 
fields as statistics, accounting, finance, personnel, marketing and transporta- 
tion are employed by governmental agencies. There is a need for people 
trained for and interested in the various aspects of research in the social 
science and business administration fields. Graduates fitted by nature and 
equipped through proper training and experience for the broader fields of 
administration and management can find interesting work in governmental 
units and at the same time satisfy their normal desire tS render a special 
service to society. 

Some of the governmental agencies which employ college trained people 
are given as an illustration of the opportunities available. Many of these 
are within the "Civil Service" System, such federal agencies as the Social 
Security Board; Central Statistical Board, Federal Trade Commissions; 
National Resources Committee; Federal Housing Administration; Federal 
Reserve Board; Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Tennessee Valley 
Corporation; Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Bureau of Labor Statistics; 
Bureau of the Census; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; and the 
Division of Research and Statistics in the Treasury Department demand the 
services of many professionally and technically trained people. The Depart- 
ments of Agriculture, Commerce, State, Labor, and Treasury use many 
college trained men and women. 

The undergraduate student who expects to make his concentration in the 
field of Public Administration will find the following curriculum serviceable: 



i 



N 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

f — Semester — ^ 

1 // 

rres}.mar^^ Year ^^^^.^^ ^.^^^^,,,, S » 

Eng. 1. 2— Composition and Keaaings • ^ 

P S 1— American Government. .... ^ 

S^c. '7-Sociology of American Life. 8 ^ 

Foreign Language •'••••••••* "' . , _ ^^rld « 2 

Econ. 1, 2-Economic Resources of the Wo t 

Econ. 4, 5-Economic Developments S 3 

Mathematics5 6_.^....^... — • ^ 

M. I. 1. 2— Basic R. O. T.^- K^^ ^ 

P E 42. 44— Hygiene (Women) •.• 1 

\ ■ 1 A ^+ivities (Men and Women) 

Physical Activities ^men ^^^^ ^^^q 

Total 

Sophomore Year Literature » » 

Ene 3 4 or 5, 6— Composition and Readings , t 

^°- f •H'';;S:':fAmertarc"«on VAmeHean History) 

H. 5, 6— History of Americ ^ 

Poreien Language « 

SS. 4-State and Local Gov«nment ...... ^^^^^ . S 

Pol Sci.— Selection from Pol. Sci. 7. 8. ». i". S • 

7l 3 4-Basic R. O. T. C. (Men). 1 1 

PhysWl Activities (Men and women) __ -— 

Total 

Junior Year • •••; 

P A UO-Principles of Public Administration • .... 3 

P A Ul-Public Personnel Administration • g .... 

E^ion. 160— Labor Economics ' S • • • ^ 

Econ. 140-Money and Banking . . • ^ 

P A 140— Financial Management ••;;••••• 3 

Ecot ISolElements of Business Statistics •• 3 ..-^ 

Econ 150— Marketing Principles .... • 

B I 132-Advanced Business Statistics 1 1 

Speech 18. 19-Introductory ^^^^' ''[[[[['//, JJ^ ! 

Electives ^^ ^g 

Total 

Senior Year » •••• 

P A 180— Government and Business ...••■ ••••• .... • 

pll26^he Government and Social Security . $ 

P A Ultllnternational Finance and Exchange .- • , .... 

P A UO-Public Finance and Taxation , .... 

Z' its Advanced Economic Principles .... 3 

ir m-I^oXmporary Economic ~^^ .... 

^::;^^'^r'^^"^""^^'^^^-^ --- -'r!. "^^"^ « * 

with the aid of his advisor) ^^ 

Total 



120 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



r 



Selection of electives may be made 

P. A. 124 — Governmental Accounting (3) 

P. A. 161 — Recent Labor Legislative and 
Court Devisions (3) 

P. A. 170 — Transportation I, Regrulation of 
Transportation Services (3) 

P. A. 114— Public Budgeting (3) 

H. 135 — Constitutional History of the 
United States (3, 3) 

P. A. 201 — Seminar in International Org- 
anization (3) 

P. A. 218 — Problems of Public Administra- 
tion (3) 

P. A. 214 — Problems of Public Personnel 
Administration (3) 

P. A. 235 — Seminar in International Eco- 
nomic Relations (3) (arranged) 

P. A. 240 — Research in Governmental Fiscal 
Policies and Practices (arranged) 



from the following courses: 

P. A. 280 — Seminar in Business and Gov- 

ernment Relationships (arranged) 
P. A. 284— Seminar in Public Utilities 

(arranged) 
P. A. 299 — Thesis (3-6 hours) (arranged) 
P. S. 2 — American National Government (3) 
P. S. 7, 8, 9, 10 — Comparative Government 

(2, 2, 2, 2» 
P. S. 51 — International Relations (3) 
P. S. 64 — Municipal Government and Ad- 
ministration (3) 
P. S. 102 — International Law (3) 
P. S. 105 — Recent Far Eastern Politics (8) 
P. S. 131 — Constitutional Law (3) 
P. S. 201 — Seminar in International Law 
^3) 



V. FOREIGN TRADE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

If the student expects to enter the foreign service he should be well 
grounded in the language, geography, history, and politics of the region of 
his anticipated location as well as in the general principles and practices 
of business operations. It should be recognized that only a limited training 
can be secured during the undergraduate period. When more specialized 
or more extensive preparation is required, graduate work should be planned. 
The individual program, in either instance, however, should be worked out 
under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The following study program is 
offered as a guide in the selection. 

Study Program for Foreign Trade and International Relations 

r — Setnester — ^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature S 3 

P. S. 1 — American Government t .... 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

Foreign Language (Selection) t 3 

Eicon. 1, 2 — Ekionomic Resources of the World 2 2 

£k:on. 4, 5 — Economic Developments S 2 

Mathematics 6, 6 t 3 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) S 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) t 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 19-20 19-20 



9!ST 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 12. 

, — Semester — > 

/ u 

Sophomore Year . Readmits in world Literature • * 

Tn ^ « 1 or 5 6— Composition and Readings *" " . S • 

r:fei^ ^.^tncontinuation of Fr»hn»n year se.ect.o.) ....... - , 

Econ. 81, 32-Princlple8 of E^"""!^; " •; .V » » 

student's need * J * 

So 18 19— Introductory Speech t » 

^"^'l 8 4-Ba8icR.O.T. C. (Men) i 1 

piys'ical Activities (Men and Women) _— - 

16-19 iD-i» 

Total 

Junior Year . s 

Econ. 150-Marketing Principles and Organization ^ . 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking .... « 

B A. 150— Marketing Management 8 

1 1- irEret^rBrrs-UisVic.::.:.:::::-.-.--"- « -, 

Ttt:^:^:^^^^^^'^^ «v.ude„t.; needs::::.. ... ^ «. 

Electives to meet student's major interest 

16 16 

Total 

Senior Year ' s 8 

B. A. 180. 181— Business Law ' ' 8 

p'. a! 180-Govemment and ^.^^"^^ * * ' ;* * * * * jj^^^ " V34." Contemporary 

Econ. 182— Advanced Economic Principles, or Jujon. ^ 

Econ. ~^VnalResVuVces-couVses*to*m^^^^ ^^^ \ . . .' 

P* A ?80-I^temational Economic Policies and Relations • • • • , 

P A 141-International Finance and Exchange ..;•••;•• 3 8 

^eft\v« to meet the needs of the student's ma^or interest 

IB 16 

Total 

VI. NATURAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES i^^^^^^l ^^ ^ ^.,,„ 

Agriculture, industry, trade. ^-f-'j^^^^J't the natU resources 
geo^aphical region are influenced to a great extent by^the ^^^^^ 

of Saf area. Climatic ^^on^'^^^^.J^XVy^J; ZeZine L economic 
power, soils and other 5^^^"=*^ .*^^^*^^^^^^^^^ the philosophy, political 

possibilities of a country. The .'^^'f '^^^^^^^f.^yj^e people within a given 
fdeals and degrees of 'f^^'^'T^^XVrJrJ^^^re the degree of 
geographical unit, in turn, determine m *»je^ J^J .. ^ ,^^ standard 

Se^tiv'eness with which the -^^-V^-^iSLrolSiro^ ^ ^habitants 
of living, the purchasing power, and *« P^^^^^^^^^ expression of the inter- 
of a country are, in the mam the «^«" J'; *^ ^^^^^ environment, 
relationship existing between the people '^'^^ the« phy ^^^ 

This curriculum is designed to f ^y*^^^"^;;^/^! studying and 
cerning the major geographical areas of the worm 



122 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



123 



analyzing causes and results as they affect economic, political, and social 
activities. The student interested in international trade, international 
political relations, diplomacy, overseas governments and national aspirations 
will find the courses in this department of great practical value. Work is 
offered on both the undergraduate and the graduate levels. Considerable 
emphasis is placed on research activity on the part of faculty members and 
graduate students. 

The student interested in this field of human endeavor should select his 
courses from those listed below with the aid of a faculty member who is 
conversant with his objective and the requirements for success in this field. 
The selection of such essential courses as foreign language, history, geogra- 
phy, government, and social customs should be made in terms of the 
geographical area in which the student expects to operate. 



N. H. R. 4 — Regional Geography of the 
Continents (3) 

N. H. R. 30— Principles of Physical Geogra- 
phy (3) 

N. H. R. 40— Weather and Climate (3) 

N. H. R. 50 — Map Interpretation and Field 
Work (1) 

N. K. R. 61, 62— Economic Geography (3,3) 

N. H. R. 100, 101— Regional Geography of 
the United States and Canada (3, 3) 

N. H. R. 102 — The Geography of Manufac- 
turing in the United States and Canada 
(3) 

N. H. R. 110— Middle America (3) 

N. H. R. Ill— South America (3) 

N. H. R. 112 — Recent Economic Trends in 
Latin America (3) 

N. H. R. 113— The Peoples of Latin 
America (3) 

N. H. R. 120, 121— Economic Geography of 
Europe (3, 3) 

N. H. R. 122 — Economic Resources and 
Development of Africa (3) 

N. H. R. 123— Problems of Colonial Geogra- 
phy (3) 



N. H. R. 130, 131— Economic and Political 
Geography of Southern and Eastern Asia 
(3,3) 

N. H. R. 140, 141— The Natural Resources 
of the Union of Socialist Soviet Repub- 
lics (3, 3) 

N. H. R. 203 — Geomorphology (3) 

N. H. R. 205— Micro-Climatology (3) 

N. H. R. 206 — Advanced General Clima- 
tology (3) 

N. H. R. 221 — Seminar in Geography 
(arranged) 

N. H. R. 222 — Research Work (arranged) 

A. E., 212, 213— Land Utilization and Agri- 
cultural Production (3, 3) 

A. E. 214 — Consumption of Farm Products 
in the United States (3) 

A. E. 215 — The Land Programs and Poli- 
cies of the United States, Departments of 
Agriculture and Interior (3) 

Soc. 115, 116 — Population Problems and 
Policies in North America and Eurasia 
(3.3) 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Arnold E. Joyal, Acting Dean 
Alma Frothingham, Secretary 

The nation now faces an -^^:^^:^S ::jtl^:r:l::rLtt 
teachers. The next few years will ^^J^lTZS^^evsion of our war-time 
services. With the advent of peace and th« --"J^r ^.^^^.^^^ ^.^^ ^^ 

economy to peace-time activities, the '•°l«f/^"?r college of Education, in 
of great significance to our -f^^J'^lZJ^oTmTc.tion, is doing its 
Sr^ept^e ':::n'':T:o:r.ofTX..o.sm^^^^ that face them 
in our schools. 

teachers who wish to supplement ^^^^ ^^f *. ^A students preparing 

for educational work in the trades and ^^^^^^^^' [''J^^^^^^^^ leaders, and 

to become home demonstrators, club ^^ ^^"T^^^'Zll workers; (5) 

(in cooperation with the department of Sociology) soc ^.^^^^^^^ 

graduate students Vrevjn.^^^l^^^^^^^^ EnTs ;hose major interests 

«ncitinn<^ reauiring an advancea aegree, v^/ 

Se "« oth« Heldf. but «ho d.slre ..««.. .n «i™.to». 

of Education, and special libraries of °"^/'f°™tf„„/ Education Asso- 

sible, as well as the ^-^--^^'^^^"'7.1 US Office of Education, and 
ciation, American Council on Education U.SOfficej ^^^ ^.^^^.^^ 

other institutions, public and private Jhe schoo^ syst ,„ ^tion. 

of Columbia and suburban counties of Maryland offer gener 

Zt to seek admission to the College of Education. 

Guidance in Registration t.„f«Hv«^lv assigned to a 

1 At the time of matriculation each ^^^^^^ ^^f^^^^^^^^^^^ Svfser. The 

n,ember of the faculty who acts as the J*"/-^;. J^^^^^ teach and 

tetlelir X: pXral^^^^^^^^^^^^ «n- faculty guidance 



J 



124 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



125 



during the first year in the Introduction to Education course, required of 
all freshmen. While in particularly fortunate cases it may be possible to 
make satisfactory adjustments as late as the junior year, for students from 
other colleges who have not already entered upon the sequence of profes- 
sional courses, it is highly desirable that this work in the College of Educa- 
tion be begun in the freshman year. Students who intend to teach (except 
Vocational Agriculture) should register in the College of Education, in 
order that they may have continuously the counsel and guidance of the 
faculty which is directly responsible for their professional preparation. 

Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. To be eligible to enter the professional 
courses, a student must have attained junior status, that is, he must have 
completed 60 semester hours of freshman-sophomore academic courses plus 
the other required work with an average grade of C or better. 

Education Courses in Baltimore 

The majority of the professional courses and some of the arts and sciences 
courses required for undergraduate preparation in Education are offered 
in Baltimore in late afternoon and evening courses primarily for employed 
people. On a part time basis, a student may complete some or all of his 
work for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Education 
in the Baltimore Division of the College of Education. Through special 
arrangement with the Graduate School, graduate courses are also available 
for students working on masters* and doctors* degrees in education. 

A separate announcement of these courses is issued in the spring of each 
year. This announcement may be obtained from the Baltimore Division, 
College of Education, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Certification of Secondary School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." 

From the offerings in Education, the District of Columbia requirement of 
24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. 



etc n:-^n — two professional o.ani.«<.. PHi 
oJt:Ka;pa' the national P-^-siona, fr ter^^^^^^^^^^^ ^nd^S EduTa' 

IXtanX professional leadership in their fields of service. 

fURBICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 

tUKRivi^ . Education, as follows: 

^English, ^i.. '«f ^J-trS.Sr ? eSSS Kdltio.; 

Im Edmatim: .Id (8) ?%«*»' «!<«•«»«• „„ie„l,- 

Th. Mowin. mini™ '^"'Ti' 7^ TX hl^ ^2'^: 

:-ir„r.s; =n;7.« s::^" "- ssi; .,»„ .. ....a 

bv the University. ,t^, i>.o lyiQ /^T. 

"in order to be admitted to a course in student t-f "| f d- 1^3 148, or 

''e "Options to curricular requirements and rules of the Coll^^^f Educa- 
tion must have the approval of the student's advxser and the dean. 

Academic Curriculum-General and Specific Requirement. 

» A ir, tV,U curriculum will meet the following general 

(1) English, 12 semester hours. 

(2) Foreign language for -f J,f J,,^-;^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Sree years of such credits. No foreign language i^^.^^^^'^^Vindf 
Sen'who enters with four years of language credits nor of candi- 
dates for the bachelor of science degree. 
<•,, Social sciences 12 semester hours as follows: Soc. 7-Soc,ology of 
^' imerUn Tife'; Pol. Sci. 1-America„ Government; and H. 5. 6- 
History of American Civilization. 

(4) Science or mathematics, 12 semester hours. 

(5) Education, 20 semester hours, 



126 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



All students who elect the academic education curriculum will fulfill the 
preceding general requirements and also prepare to teach at least two high 
school subjects which will involve meeting specific requirements in particular 
subject matter fields called majors or minors. Usually the student completes 
one major and one minor. The requirements for each major and minor are 
detailed below. 

The specific requirements by subject fields are as follows: 

English. A major in English requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Survey and Composition 12 semester hours 

Survey of American Literature 6 semester hours 

Electives 18 semester hours 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 18 
semester hours prescribed for the major and 8 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen with the approval of the adviser who will guide 
the student in terms of College of Education records and recommendations 
of the English Department. 

Social Sciences. For a major in this group 36 semester hours are re- 
quired, of which at least 18 hours must be in history, including 6 hours in 
American history and 6 hours in European history. Six of the 18 hours 
must be in advanced courses. For a minor in the group, 24 hours are 
required, of which 18 are the same as specified above, and 6 of which must 
be in advanced courses. 

History (including Survey of Western Civilization and 

American History) 18 semester hours 

Economics or sociology 6 semester hours 

Electives 12 semester hours 

For a minor, the requirements are the same less the electives. 

Foreign Languages. All students preparing to teach French, German, or 
Spanish are required to take Comparative Literature 101 and 102 and are 
strongly advised to take the review course for majors (Fr., Ger., or Sp. 99). 
Further courses in comparative literature along with work in European or 
Latin American history are also recommended. 

Specific minimum requirements in the three languages are a semester 
each of intermediate and advanced conversation (Fr., Ger., or Sp. 8 and 80), 
a semester of grammar review, six hours of introductory survey of the 
literature (Fr., Ger., Sp. 75 and 76) and six hours in literature courses 
numbered 100 or above. 

Classical Languages. Both a major and minor are offered in Latin con- 
sisting of 30 and 20 semester hours respectively. The courses are chosen 
with the advice of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Mathematics. A major in mathematics requires 36 semester hours as 
follows: Math. 7, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, 100, 128, 140, 141, and six elective credits 
in mathematics. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ^^T 

For a minor, the requirements are: Math. 7, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, and four 
oipr»tive credits in mathematics. 
ThI following courses are recommended for electives in mathematics: 

Math. 13, 16, 18, 19, 101, 102, 129. 

^ Students who pass an attainment examination with a satisfactory grade 

are excused from the requirement in Solid Geometry. 

Science In general science a major of 40 semester hours and a minor of 
3o'=te; h'ours are offered each ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
chemistry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany), me maj 
include one of the following programs. , <, .; lo qi ^2 

Program I, emphasizing chemistry: Math. 14, 15; Chem 1^3 ^ 19, 31 32 
33, 34; 101, 181, 182, 183, 184; Phys. 10, 11, or 20, 21, Zool. 1, Bot. 1, 

^Trogiam II, emphasizing physics: Math. 14 15; Chem 1 3; Phys. 20, 21, 
and sfx additional hours in physics; Zool. 1; Bot. 1; Bact. 1 

Program III, emphasizing botany: Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 1, 2, or 10, 11, 
Zool. 1; Bot. 1, 2, 50, 111, 102; Bact. 1. ^, , o ., .n 11- 

Program IV, emphasizing zoology: Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 1, 2 or 10, U, 
Zool. 2, 3, 14, 15, 107, 121 or 104, 75, 76; Bot. 1; Bact. 1. 

Academic Education Curriculum r-Semester—. 

Freshman Year 2 or 2 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education ;•••:"•: *'''*/,'"*. 3 3 

E„g. 1, 2-Compo8ition and Readings in American Literature •••••; 3 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life ^ 2 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking "' s 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government ^ j 

HI. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) '.*.*........ 1 ^ 

Physical Activities 2 2 

P. E. 42. 44— Hygiene I. II (Women) .".'.'.'.'.7 

General requirements 

Major and minor requirements 

Electives ■ 

17 17-18 

Totel 

Sophomore Year ^ ^^ ^ 

Ed. 2— Educational Forum ***,.'/* \* * * S * 

Eng 3. 4-Composition and Readings in World Literature » ^ 

♦H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization ^ j 

M. L 3. 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) '.*.*........... 1 ^ 

Physical Activities 

General requirements " 

Major and minor requirements .........!.. 

Electives ■ 

17-18 17-18 

Total 

♦ Not required of sophomores in 1945-46. 



1' 



128 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Year 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

Ed. 160 — ^Educational Sociology 

Ed. 130 — Theory of the Junior High School or 

Ed. 131— Theory of the Senior High School 

Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation, 

General requirements 

Major and minor requirements 

Electives • 



-Semester — ^ 
/ // 



3 
2 



2 

9 

3 



Total 



16-18 



16-18 



Senior Year 

Ed. 160 — Educational Measurements 

Ed. 148 — Methods and Practice of Teaching or. 
Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching. . . 
Major and minor requirements 



2 
4 

9 



Total 



Business Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature. 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Math. 6 — General Mathematics 

Math. 6 — Mathematics of Finance 

Econ. 1, 2 — ^Economic Resources 

S. T. 1 — Principles of Typewriting 

S. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting 

M. I. 1. 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II (Women) 

Physical Activities 



12-18 



Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Eklucational Forum 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature. 

Hist. 5, 6 — ^History of American Civilization 

S. T. 12, 13— Principles of Shorthand I, II 

S. T. 10 — Office Typewriting Problems 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

M. L 3. 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 



or 4 

or 9 



12-18 



• 


2 


s 


3 


2 


2 


S 


• • • . 


• 


3 


3 


• • • ■ 


• 


3 


2 





2 


■ ■ • • 


• 


2 


8 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


• 


1 


S 


8 


3 


8 


4 


4 


t 


• 
• • • • 


t 


• • • • 


8 


8 


1 


1 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 129 

f — Semester — > 

. ^ I II 

Junior Year 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation— Business Subjects » 

Ed. 146— Techniques of Teaching Office Skills 2 

Ed. 160— Educational Sociology * " ' 

Ed. 130— Theory of Junior High School, or 

Ed. 131— Theory of the Senior High School 

S. T. 16 — Advanced Shorthand 

S. T. 17 — Transcription * * ' * 

B. A. 20, 21 — Accounting Principles 

S. T. 112— Filing ' 

S. T. Ill — Office Machines 

Senior Year 

EJd. 150— Educational Mea-surement ^ 

Ed. 149— Methods and Practice of Teaching ' 

S. T. 110— Secretarial Work ' * ' * * 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 

Suggested Elective : 

Gregg Shorthand Dictation (S. T. 18) • 

Dental Education 

In cooperation with the School of Dentistry, the College of Education 
offers a curriculum in dental education leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree, with course work offered in the Baltimore Division only. This 
curriculum is designed to prepare superior graduates of the Dental School 
for positions as teachers of dentistry. Details of the program may be 
obtained from the Deans of the School of Dentistry or the College of 
Education. Persons entering the program must be approved by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions of the Dental School. 

Curriculum Requirements 

For students who are dental school graduates with the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Surgery (acquired since 1936-37, after six years of study) and who 
have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the Dental School: 

A. Ninety-eight (98) semester hours (or the equivalent of three years of 
work) may be credited for the dental school work provided none of the 
dental school marks were lower than "B". 

B. The additional 32 semester hours, as follows, are required: 

1. English. English language and literature 8 

2. Social Science. Four (4) of which are in American History 
and the other 4 directed electives 8 

3. Education, as follows : ^^ 

History of Dental Education 2 

Educational Psychology 4 

Secondary Education 2 

Educational Tests and Measurements 2 



130 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects 2 

Organization and Management of Vocational Classes 2 
Directed electives 2 

Elementary Education Curriculum 

This curriculum is open only to persons who have completed two or three 
yearcurrtcularn a Maryland State Teachers College or other acZeduZ 
teacher educatron institutions whose records give evidence of abTty and 
character essential to elementary teaching. Such persons will be admittS 
to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate classes 

Credit for extension courses given by other institutions may be accepted 
m an amount not exceeding 30 semester hours. The last 30 semester ho^rs 

Additional curriculum requirements for students who are admitted with 
approximately 64 semester hours of advanced standing (two y^r normal 
school graduates) are as follows: normal 

Education--4 semester hours; English-10 semester hours; science 
(chemistry, physics, zoology, botany, bacteriology, entomology) -10 semester 
hours; social science (history, sociology, economics, politicafscience. gTog t. 
Phy)-12 semester hours. Electives to be chosen according to individual 
need and approved by adviser. "uiviauai 

matt't«"*' eurriculum requirements for students who enter with approxi- 

g7arat::)rerfo!;:ws: " ^'^^-^^^ "^'^'^^'^^ ^^'^-^-^ ---• -^-^ 

abfvtrfi^r" TT*"" '*""''' ^"^"^•^-e ^eniester hours; science (as 

EiSv;irat:: '°"'"" ^"^^' ^'^^^-'^^ <^^ ^^^^^^-^^ -'»-^- »»--• 

state Department of Education requirements provide that a teacher in 
service may present for certificate credit not more than six semester hou^s 
of credit completed during a school year. The College of Education assumi 

Home Economics Education 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed for students who 

n any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge o5 

t^amL '" '\r^"'r ^'^'^^^ ^' ^" P^^^^^ ^' ^o- economTcs and 

the allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects 
Electives may be chosen from other colleges. suojects. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching and through experience in the home management housf 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



131 



With the expansion of the vocational program there is an increased 
demand for teachers in this field. A student majoring in this curriculum 
may also qualify for a science minor. 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Education 
or the College of Home Economics. Students will be certified for graduation 
only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of this curriculum. 



Home Economics Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

EJd. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Eng:. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Ijiteratiire 

Sec. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 

H. E. 1 — Home Economics Lectures 

Pr. Art 1 — Design 

*Math. 10 Algebra, or Elective 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I, II 

Physical Activities 

Electives 

m 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum , 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature. . . 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design 

Clo. 20A or B— Clothing 

Foods 2, 3, — Foods 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

H. E. Eld. 101 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

Home Mgt. 150, 151 — Home Management 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition 

Foods 100— Food Economics 

Foods 101 — Meal Service 

Clo. 120— Draping 

Pr. Art 140 — Interior Design 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Total 



Semestei > 

/ // 

M • • • • 

3 S 

w • • • • 



2 
1 
3 

2 
1 



17 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
1 



16 



3 
3 



3 
3 
4 



18 



S 

2 



3 

2 
1 

t 



17 



1 

2 
2 



8 

2 
1 



17 



3 

2 

2 
2 



18 



* Not required of students who pass the qualifying examination which is given during 
the first semester. Prerequisite for chemistry. 



132 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



133 



o • *» ^ — Semester — ^, 

bemor Year » ,. 

H. E. Ed. 102— Problems in Teaching Home Economics 2 

H. E. Ed. 103— Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics ^Ig 

Home MfiTt. 162— Practice in Management of the Home • 

H. E. Ed. 110 — Child Development • 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurement « 

* .... 

Bact. 51 — ^Household Bacteriology 

Ed. 130— Theory of the Junior High School or 2 

Ed. 131— Theory of the Senior High School ^ 

Ed. 160— Educational Sociology 

fHectives 

1-2 3 

Totol 

17-18 10-14 

Nursery School Education Curriculum 

The nursery school education curriculum has as its goal the preparation 
of nursery school teachers. It is also planned to further the personal 
development of the student and to give training in homemaking. 

Freshman Year . 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and Readings in American Literature f ^ 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life ^ 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government * 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking ' 

2 2 

Pr. Art 1 — ^Design 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene I. II _ * 

Physical Activities ^ 

Electives * 

• 2 8 

Total 

17 1« 

Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 

Eng. 3. 4— Composition and Readings in World Literature , •" 

P. E. 56, 58— The Dance 

• J 2 

Foods 1 — Introductory Foods 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 

Zool. 55— Development of the Human Body 

H. 6, 6— History of American Civilization j 

Physical Activities 

Electives ^ * 

4-5 1 

Total ..., 

t ..,..,..,.. , , ^ . , . ^ ^ ^ ^ 17-18 l^ 



f — Semester — n 
Junior Year . I II 

Psych. 80 — ^Educational Psychology • • • • • 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... S 

H. E. Ed. 110 — Child Development t .... 

H. E. Ed. 112— Play and Play Materials 2 

Home Mgt. 150, 151 — Management of the Home S S 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition .... S 

Foods 100 — ^Food Economics 2 .... 

Foods 101 — Meal Service t .... 

Bact. 51 — Household Bacteriology .... t 

Electives • S 

Total If 17 

Senior Year 

H. E. Ed. Ill — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Nursery 

School S .... 

H. E. Ed. 118 — ^Teaching Nursery School 4-8 

Psych. 18 — Child Psychology t .... 

Home Mgt. 152 — Practice in Management of the Home 3 .... 

Clo. 123 — Children's Clothing 2 

Nut. Ill— Child Nutrition 2 

Soc. 61 — Marriage and the Family .... 3 

Eng. 52 — Children's Literature 1 .... 

H. E. Ed. 116 — Creative Expression — Art, Music, Dance S .... 

Electives .... 0-4 

Total 14 15-17 

Industrial Education 

The program of studies in Industrial Education provides: (a) a four-year 
curriculum leading to the degree of bachelor of science in industrial educa- 
tion; (b) a program of professional courses to prepare teachers to meet 
the certification requirements in vocational and occupational schools; (c) a 
program of courses for the improvement of teachers in service. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for the other curricula offered 
in the University. Experience in some trade or industrial activity will 
benefit students preparing to teach industrial subjects. The curriculum is 
designed to prepare teachers of trade and industrial shop and related 
subjects, and teachers of industrial arts. Reasonable adaptations of this 
curriculum are made for trade and industrial teachers in service. There is 
sufficient latitude of electives so that a student may also meet certification 
requirements in some other high school subject. Students entering an indus- 
trial education curriculum must register in the College of Education^ 



j 



134 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Industrial Education Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Ens;. 1. 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Ind. Ed. 1 — Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 21 — Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 2 — Elementary Woodworking 

Ind. Ed, 22 — Machine Woodworking I 

Math. 10 — Algebra 

Math. 11 — ^Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 

M. I. 1, 2— Basic R. O. T. C 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Education Forum 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature, or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and Readings Mainly in English Literature.... 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Ind. Ed. 24 — Sheet Metal Work 

Ind. Ed. 26— Art Metal Work I 

Ind. Ed. 41 — Architectural Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 23 — Forge Practice 

Math. 7 — Solid Geometry 

Math. 12 — Analsrtical Geometry 

Chem. 7, 9 — Introductory Chemistry 

M. I. 3, 4 —Basic R. O. T. C 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

Ind. Ed. 67— Cold Metal Work 

Ind. Ed. 69 — Machine Shop Practice I 

Ind. Ed. 28— Electricity I 

Ind. Ed. 110 — Foundry 

Ind. Ed. 160 — Essentials of Design 

Ind. Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Industrial 

Education 

Ind. Ed. 166 — Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts, or 

Ind. Ed. 171 — History of Vocational Education 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology , 

Ed. 160 — Educational Sociology 

Ed. 130— Theory of the Junior High School, or 

Ed. 131— Theory of the Senior High School 

Phys. 00 — Introductory Physics 

Directed Electives in Industrial Education 

Electives 

Total 



Semester — n 
// 



/ 

2 

s 

2 
3 

2 

• • 

2 

• • 

2 

8 
1 



20 



19 



2 
1 

2 



2 
2 
2 

• • 

2 
2 
8 

3 



S 
2 

2 

2 

2 
3 
1 



18 



8 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


• • • • 


• • • « 


2 


2 


• * • ■ 


• • « « 


1 


2 


• • • • 


• • • • 


2 


8 


8 


8 


3 


1 


1 



19 



2 



8 
8 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Senior Year 

Ind. Ed. 89 — Machine Shop Practice II 

Ind. Ed. 48— Electricity II 

Ind. Ed. 42 — Machine Woodworking II 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management. 

Ed. 150 — ^Educational Measurement 

Ed. 161 — Guidance in Secondary Schools 

Ind. Ed. 168 — Trade or Occupational Analysis 

Econ. 37 — ^Fundamentals of Economics 

Ed. 148 or 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching. . 
Electives 



135 



Semester — > 
/ // 

2 • • • • 



4-9 



Total 



18-17 



8-9 



17 



15 



Curriculum in Physical Education for Men* 

Freshman Year 

2 
Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education * " * 

P. E. 30— History and Principles of Physical Education 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology " ' ' 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology " ' ^ 

Eng. 1, 2— Compositions and Readings in American Literature 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life " "^ 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking ^ 

Physical Activities ^ 

M. L 1, 2 — Basic R. O. T. C 

Electives '" 

18-20 19-20 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum * * * * 

P. E. 41. 43, 45, 47— Varsity Game Skills ^ 

P. E. 61— Minor Sports Skills * * * * 

P. E. 53 — Organization of Intramurals * * * * 

P. E. 60 — Gymnastics * * * " ^ 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and Readings in World Literature » ^ 

II 5^ 6 — History of American Civilization 

Zool. 14— Human Anatomy and Physiology * ' * * 

Zool. 15— Human Anatomy and Physiology ^ ^ 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C ^ ^ 

Physical Activities 

......... .... .... 

Electives 

16-18 16-18 

Total 

• courses offered to both men and women physUal^e^^^^^^ 
^^T^'^rZ:^nr^^lfs^^^lil^o'':L'^it '^£ Co-rses offered men ph^iea. 
education majors, not open to women, end in uneven numbers. 



136 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



137 



Junior Year r— Semester-— 

Psych. 80— Educational Psychology 

Ed. 160— Educational Sociology * _ * 

Ed. 130-Theory of the Junior High School, or. ^ 

Ed. 131— Theory of the Senior High School ^ 

Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation * 

P. E. 40— Hygiene * 

P. E. 67 — Combative Sports Skills 

P. E. 70— Physiology of Exercise ^ 

P. E. 80— Kinesiology \ ^ 

P. E. 141, 143. 146. 147-Varsity Team Organization * ' 

Electives ^ ^ 

••.. .... .... 

Total 

15-18 16-18 

Senior Year 

Ed. 150— Educational Measurement 

Ed. 143-Methods and Practice of Teaching, or. ! 

Ed. 149-Methods and Practice of Teaching ^'^ ^ 

P. E. 180-Tests and Measurements in Physical EducaUonV. ^ " ! 

P ?U^'T'"" '"' Administration of Physical EducationV. '. '. .' " , 

r. Jj*. 148 — Teaching Health 

P. E. 181— Training and Conditioning * 

Electives * ^ •••. 

«... .... 

Total 

15-18 16-18 

pre'patt T^^l.TZL':^!^^':^'''' '^^^^^^ ^^'^ -'^ who wish to 
education by t.iCZ^S^,t^:^Zr'' '"'^"^ ' "'""'* ^" P^^^'^' 

P. E. SO-History and Principles of Physical Education 

P. E. 40— Hygiene 3 

P.E.41. 43. 45. 47-Var8ity Game Skills........... ^ 

P. E. 181— Training and Conditioning 2 

P.E.63. 65-Officiating .... 1 

P. E.120-Mental Hygiene In Physical' EduVaW.V.V. ' 

P. E. 171— Coordination and Administration ^ 

P. E. 53— Organization of Intramurals ^ 

P. E. 140-Curriculum, Instruction, and Obse^aiion. ^ 

3 



Physical Education Curriculum for Women* 
Freshman Year 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition an Readings in American Literature 

See. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriologry 

P. E. 30 — History and Principles of Physical Education 

P. E. 52. 54 — Dance Techniques 

P. E. 62, 64 — Techniques of Sport Skills 

Electives 

• 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 

P. E. 50 — Accident Prevention , 

P. E. 70— First Aid 

P. E. 56, 58 — Dance Techniques 

P. E. 66, 68 — Techniques of Sport Skills 

Electives 

Total • 

Junior Year 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology 

Zool. 53 — Physiology of Exercise 

Ed. 160 — Educational Sociology 

P. E. 190, 200 — Kinesiology 

P. E. 40 — Hygiene 

P. E. 150, 170 — Recreational Dance 

P. E. 102, 104 — Techniques of Sport Skills 

P. E. 160— Introduction to Recreation 

Ed. 130— Theory of Junior High School 

Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, Observation in Physical Education 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Electives 

Total 



Semester- 
I 

t 
t 
S 



// 



2 
t 
1 



17 



t 

S 
4 
f 

• • 

2 
2 
1 



17 



S 

2 
2 



17 



4 
3 
2 
2 



17 



1 
3 
3 

4 

» • 

2 
2 
2 



17 



S 
S 
2 
2 
2 
2 
S 
2 
1 



19 



* Physical Education courses which have even numbers are open to women students only. 
Courses which have odd numbers are open to men students only. Courses whose numbers end 
in zero are open to both men and women. Courses with numbers above 100 are for juniors 
and seniors. 



138 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



139 



Senior Year 

P. 
P. 

p^E. iiz-kzz^zvzr''"' '" '"■^'"=" Eduction::;;. ; 

Total 



Semester^- 



5 
2 
3 



t 
2 



17 



3 
3 
2 
• • • 
2 
5 

17 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean 

Margaret G. Engle, Secretary to Dean 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

In training professional engineers it has become evident that greater 
emphasis than heretofore must be placed on the fundamentals of mathe- 
matics, science and engineering so as to establish a broad professional base. 
Experience has also shown the value of a coordinated group of humanistic- 
social studies for engineering students since their later professional activi- 
ties are so closely identified with the public. 

Accordingly, our engineering curriculums have been revised to increase 
the time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which are 
a necessary part of the equipment of every educated man. It is well 
recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient preparation for 
many callings in public and private life outside the engineering profession. 

The length of the normal curriculum in the College of Engineering is 
four years and leads to the bachelor's degree. In the case of most students 
these four years give the engineering graduate the basic and fundamental 
knowledge necessary to enter upon the practice of the profession. Engi- 
neering students whose scholastic records are superior are advised to 
supplement their undergraduate programs by at least one year of graduate 
study leading to the master's degree. Graduate programs will be arranged 
upon application to the chairman of the engineering department concerned. 

In order to give the new student time to choose the branch of engineering 
for which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several curriculums 
is the same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the student in 
making a proper choice. The courses differ only slightly in the sophomore 
year, but in the junior and senior years the students are directed definitely 
along professional lines. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Aeronautical, 
Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. Under a large 
endowment recently received by the University from the Glenn L. Martin 
Company of Baltimore, which is being supplemented with funds from the 
State of Maryland, it is planned to expand the activities of the College of 
Engineering, to erect a new physical plant, and to broaden the scope of its 
engineering and industrial research. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathe- 
matics. See Admission, Section I. 



140 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



It is possible, however for h^a^\. v. , 

nujnber of entrance units^fentf th^Colle^enr^^^^^^^^ ''^ -<'--*« 

unit of advanced algebra, or the on^ }Zf •! Engineering without the 
program for such student woJd be as foUoT / •'""' ^''""^'^y- The 
five hours a week would be devoted to t^ """^ *^" ^''^ ^^^^^t^'. 

solid geometry; i„ the second simester ZtZ^ ? ''r"*=^'^ ^^^^''^^ «"<) 
would be scheduled, and the second ,!^w^^'' °* ^^^ ^^^t semester 
m the third semester. semester mathematics would be take,^ 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the deo' 
aeronautical, chemical, civil. Tjr^l^^^tLl^^^'Z^^^^^^^ '" 
Master of Science in Engineering ^" 

The degree of Master of Science in ir„„- 
dents registered in the Graduatrq!i, ^"f "««""& may be earned by stu- 
neering. which represent an al,„S ,71:'^ "":'' '"'"'''"''^ ''^^-es in'^engi- 
required for bachelor degreeHn the rnn ^^'?^" ^"^ ^'''^ ^™"ar to that 
sity of Maryland. ^^^ ^°""«^ °^ Engineering of the Univer- 

Candidates for the degree of M t 
accepted in accordance with the procedurTand r!f ""' '" Engineering are 
School. See Graduate School. Section II ^^''""•^•nents of the Graduate 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

Ele^tH^f Tn^Ltrr S^^^^^^^^^ ^''-eer. Civil Engineer 

graduates of the Universify th" tavf E' 7'" ^ ^^^"^^'^ '>»'y to' 
engineering. The applicant mu^t satfsfy the f o" ' "^"''' "^'^''^ '" 

1- He shall have en^a^«H T following conditions: 

not less than f ourjerrSr IZ^f^^. ^" ^'^^^^^^^^^ ^^-eering work 

2. He must be considered plio-iKi^ u 

of the College of EnSneerSf LXTa"^^ ^' *« Dean 

Aeronautical, Chemical. Civil, Electrical ^.hm/^ ^'^^ departments of 

3. His registration for a d gr e t'st V "' Engineering, 
prior to the date on which the degree t to Tr^'"'/ ^* ''^'* *^«^^« """"th^ 
with his application a complete report' of h' ?""''•• "^^ ^''^" P''^^^"* 
an outlme of his proposed thesis engineering experience and 

engineering work. ' ^"'^ ^**°PS for various phases of 

Drafting-Rooms. The draftino. ^^ 
work. The en^ineerin, '^^^'ZlTl^^^^^^ ^™^^ ^or practical 
drawing outfit, supplies, and books ^'""'^^^ ^^^^ ^" ^PProved 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



141 



Chemical Engineering Laboratories. For instruction and research, the 
Chemical Engineering Department maintains laboratories for (1) General 
Testing and Control; (2) Unit Operations; (3) Cooperative Research; 
(4) Graduate Research. 

General Testing and Control Laboratory. In this laboratory there is 
available complete equipment for the chemical and physical testing of water, 
gases, coal, petroleum, and their by-products; and for general industrial 
chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

Unit Operations Laboratory. This laboratory contains equipment for the 
study of fluid flow, heat flow, drying, filtration, distillation, evaporation, 
crushing, grinding, combustion, gas absorption, extraction, and centrifuging. 
Organic process equipment includes an autoclave, nitrator, reducer, and 
mixing kettle. For the study of fluid flow a permanent hydraulic assembly 
is available, and this includes flow meters of most types. 

In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity of 
100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed type, 
direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evaporation can 
be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is equipped with a 
horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube bundle. This 
evaporator is equipped with vacuum and pressure gauges, stirrer, wet 
vacuum pump, condensate pump, and salt filter. Gas absorption equipment 
includes a blower and a stoneware column packed with different types of 
packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may be made. 
The organic process equipment is all self-driven and designed to afford 
flexibility in use. Filtration studies may be made either on a large plate 
and frame press or on the ordinary Sweetland type press. Combustion 
equipment available consists of an industrial carburetor, pot furnace, premix 
gas fired furnace and the usual gas analysis equipment. For grinding 
there is a jaw crusher, a disc crusher, and a ball mill. A mechanical shaker 
and standard sieve are available for particle size separation. Shop facilities 
include a lathe, drill press, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools 
necessary for unit operation and research studies. 

Cooperative and Graduate Research Laboratories. These laboratories are 
arranged to permit the installation of such special equipment as the 
particular problems under consideration may require. Effort is made to 
maintain cooperation with the industries of Maryland and the Chemical 
Engineering activities of the State and Federal governments; for such work 
important advantages accrue because of the location of the Eastern Experi- 
ment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines on the University 
campus. 

Electrical Machinery Laboratories. There is provided a motor-generator 
set, consisting of a synchronous motor and a compound direct-current gen- 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



143 



142 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



erator with motor and generator control panels, to furnish direct current 
for testing purposes. Through a distribution switchboard, provision is made 
for distributing to the various laboratories direct current at 125 volts, and 
alternating current, single-phase, and three-phase, at 110 and 220 volts. 

High-current potential dividers and auto-transformers are available at 
the testing stations for individual voltage control. A single-phase induc- 
tion regulator with control panel is also available for voltage regulation of 
experimental circuits. At the individual testing stations, use is made of 
specially constructed instrument tables which are designed to facilitate 
measurements in fundamental, direct-current machinery, and alternating- 
current machinery experiments. 

The test equipment includes a variety of direct- and alternating-current 
generators and motors, distribution transformers, a synchronous converter, 
an induction regulator, and modem control apparatus. Most of the 
machines are of modem construction and of such size and design as to give 
typical performance characteristics. Flexibility of operation is provided in 
several ways: for example, direct-current machines and alternating-current 
machines are mounted on common bases with provisions for easy mechan- 
ical coupling and any machine may be readily connected electrically to any 
other machine through a common distribution panel. Metering and control 
boards are provided for rapid change of operating conditions with any 
machine. Water-cooled prony brakes are available for machine testing. 

Included in the test equipment are the measuring instruments essential 
for practical electrical testing, namely, ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, 
watthourmeters, frequency meters, tachometers, stroboscopes, Wheatstone 
bridges, impedance bridges, and oscillographs. 

Illumination Laboratory. The equipment includes electric lamps, shades, 
and reflectors of various types; bar photometers for determination of 
candle-power distribution of incandescent lamps; and four types of port- 
able photometers for the measurement of illumination intensities. Several 
rather large fluorescent light installations are available for study in nearby 
rooms. 

Electrical Measurements Laboratory. The calibrating equipment consists 
of standards of potential and resistance which are used in conjunction 
with modem potentiometers to maintain calibration of a standard ammeter, 
voltmeter, and watthourmeter. Secondary standards of potential, resist- 
ance, inductance, capacitance, and frequency are available. Auxiliary de- 
vices such as oscillators, amplifiers, rectifiers, wavemeters, bridges, and 
galvanometers are also available. 

A five-machine motor-generator set delivers voltages and currents, both 
alternating and direct, to test tables for meter testing. Equipment is also 
available for the experimental study of electric and magnetic fields, non- 
linear circuit elements and other topics in the field of electricity and 
magnetism. 



Th\^ laboratory is housed in the same room as 

Electronics Laboratory. This ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ect use of the measure- 

the measurements laboraWt^^^^^^^^^^ ^^3.^,,, tubes, and 

ments equipment. Vh for sSy^ng t^^^^^ characteristics. Associated 

and wireless communication ^^ PJ»J^J^ J^,^^^^ ^,d coupling devices are 
artificial lines, filter sections, attenuation 

provided. „it,ra-hieh-frequency oscillators 

Audio-frequency, high-frequency 2^ «to^^ ^^^^,^^, ^,,,,ri„g 

together with standard ^^ll-ll^^^^:,,,^,^. radio receivers and trans- 
equipment are available, f J^^^ f ™^„i^i„g radio frequencies and several 

mitters are used in 1*^^'^^*°'^^/^*' '"Arrays are employed in ultra-high- 
wave guide configurations and antenna arrays 

frequency testing. laboratories are equipped 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratori^. transmission, fuels and 

conditioning and heating and ventilation. laboratory consists 

The apparatus in the ^^-^^J^^^jta^: /^^^^^^^ steam driven air 

of steam engines «q"'PP^**^^*;.rV nlanimeters. pumps, gauges and their 
compressor, me^anica>nd.aU.r-^—^ P^^^^^^^^^^ ,„.,,,„,.. and 

testing equipment, leeo w»i.ci 

ejectors, and a steam turbine ^^^^^^^^^ ^, ,„^, ,„, gas calorimeters 
The fuels and lubricants ^^^^^^^^^^^'^Sr^es, hydrometers, chemical 
viscosimeter. octane *"^-°fXaust gas analyzing equipment, 
balances, drying ovens, and exhaust ga j ^^^ research there 

For internal combustion ^^f^f .^^^^^/^f^^h ,,nit with electric dynamom- 

zrs^^^ ?^EEinr ^s.rSn.r= - 

study of metals. Research -"'l.P"^;;^*^^ Xy systems, heat treatment 
in the following fields: crystallography and a^ y I .^^ „f betels. 

and strength of --^ft'/heatSeatiSar melting furnaces, bakeltte 



144 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



145 



equipment, Rockwell hardness tester, Jominy and quench testing equipment, 
creep testing machine, cutting off wheels, thermocouples and pyrometers, 
and other special instruments. 

The laboratory has a Bausch and Lomb I L S metalloscope for producing 
photomicrographs up to 2,000 magnifications. 

Aeronautical Laboratory. The present aeronautical laboratory is equipped 
for practice and research in engines, metal aircraft construction, structural 
tests, vibration and noise, and aerodynamics. A three-foot return type wind 
tunnel, fully equipped with balances and other instruments and electrically 
operated, has been constructed for standard experiments in aerodynamics 
and for student thesis research. 

A sheet metal shop equipped to construct components of aircraft struc- 
tures in aluminum alloy and steel is available. This shop includes such 
equipment as automatic air riveting hammer, planishing machines, squar- 
ing shears, rolls, brake, heat treating furnace, etc. A small machine shop 
is also available for students in constructing research apparatus. Variable 
speed motors are available for experiments in vibration and noise. 

The laboratory also includes a research spot welding machine, a sixty- 
thousand-pound Baldwin- Southwark aircraft universal testing machine, 
Tuckerman gauges, oscillographs with accessories, and a Timby hydraulic 
jack system for static testing. 

Hydraulics Laboratory. The equipment consists of electrically driven 
centrifugal pumps, measuring tanks, various types of weirs, venturi meters, 
nozzles, Pel ton water wheel with Prony brake built especially for laboratory 
use, hook gauges, dial gauges, tachometers, stop watches, and other appa- 
ratus necessary for the study of the flow characteristics of water. 

Materials Testing Laboratories. Apparatus and equipment are provided 
for making standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
gravel, steel, concrete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes a 300,000-pound hydraulic testing machine, two 
100,000-pound universal testing machines, torsion testing machine, impact 
testing machine, Rockwell, Brinnell and Shore hardness testers, abrasion 
testing machine, rattler, constant temperature chamber, cement-testing 
apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and other special devices 
for ascertaining the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also available for student work. 

The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 
Equipment is also available for study of models by the photo-elastic method. 

Engineering Soils Laboratory. Equipment is available for performing 
the usual tests on engineering soils. This includes apparatus for grain size 
analysis, Atterberg limits, permeability, optimum moisture content for 
compaction, Proctor penetration, and consolidation. 



HesearcH FoundaUon - National Sd^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

by arrangement with the ""^^^^^'l^^g "^Tv^r^ose of the Research 
Z, research laboratory at the UTUvers^ ^ P^ Association additiona 

lighted and fully equipped. Shops tor v< 

foundry practice are provided. . „f v,;.nd and power machinery. 

The wood-wor.ing shop has ^^^/^iCs vp: of lathes, planers. 

The machine shops are ^^^^^PP^^^^^Xt Ul- ^^^ P^^"^^^^*''^ ^''""^ 
™mng machines drill ^J^^^^Xr7::'ZSciAc Lrc welding, 
head. Equipment is available for gas ^^^ instruction for 

The shop equipment -t only^rn.h- ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^,,,^s 

students, but makes .P^^^'^f *%X Jh work in engineering. 

for conducting experimental and research topographic, and 

surveying Equipment. ^:^-;y^^^Ztri;' £::^^Zi v"r^^^- A 
geodetic surveying is P'^o^^^^'^P^'^'tl^is provided, including 'domestic as 

ri\\tation^ and use of aerial photographs. ^^^ ^^^^^ 

Special Models and Specimens. ^ number of^mo ^^^^^^^^ 

types of highway construction ^^^^^^^^^r common minerals and rocks 
hatb^ cInS tr= ::crnsTthe country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library department main- 

In addition to the general Umversjy ^^^^^^^^^ ^^P ^^^^^^ ^,g,. 

tains a library for reference, and receives ttest ^^^^.^^^ ^^^ 

zines. The class --^^P^/^^/^XeL and"eurrent technical literature. 

students consult special books of reference transport, founded by 

The Davis Library of Highway Engjneenng and Jj-P;; ^3,,,i,tion, 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, ^l^l':^lilJ':,Z^erinl The many books 
is part of the Library "^ *^^,^°"f,^!,, winded in this library cover all 

portion Ubr.,y«. ft. >.«^^^7^,"tSr«^^^^^^^ 



146 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies. 

Freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
by practicing engineers covering the work of the several engineering pro- 
fessional fields. The purpose of this course is to assist the freshman in 
selecting the particular field of engineering for which he is best adapted. 
The student is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecture. 
A series of engineering lectures for upper classmen is also provided. These 
are given by prominent practicing engineers in the various branches of the 
profession. 

Student branches of the following national technical societies are estab- 
lished in the College of Engineering: American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The student 
branches meet regularly for the discussion of topics dealing with the various 
fields of engineering. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior 
when he shall have passed at least 68 semester credit hours with an average 
grade of C or higher. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ^^'^ 

BASIC CURRICULUM FOR ALL FRESHMAN STUDENTS 
m THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

AH freshman students are required to take the following curriculum 
during their first year: ^ — Semester — - 

Freshman Year ■ . , .. ..,„„ s » 

Eng. 1. 2-Composition and Reading, in American Lrterature. ....... ^ 

Speech 7— Public Speaking 2 

♦Math. 14— Plane Trigonometry " * " " ' 3 

♦Math. 16— College Algebra * 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry 4 4 

Chem. 1. 3— General Chemistry 2 t 

Pp I 2— Engineering Drawing i 

Engr.' 1— Introduction to Engineering *.'.*..*."... » » 

M. I. 1. 2-Basic R. O. T. C .'.'.'.*.*.'.'.'!'. ^ ^ 

Physical Activities 

19 W 

Total 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

^ Aeronautical Engineering deals ^ith th^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

tion and operation of industrial aircraft plants. 

Aeronautical Engineering Curriculum ^Semester-. 

Sophomore Year , 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government ' * " 3 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life ,,.... * * 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus '" ( 5 

Phys. 20, 21— Engineering Physics * 2 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying 2 

Dr. 3— Advanced Engineering Drawing * g 

Shop 1— Machine Shop Practice * _ . 5 

Mech. 2— Statics and Dynamics 3 i 

M. I. 3. 4-Basic R. O. T. C .' .*.■.**.'.'.*'.'.'. '. ^ * 

Physical Activities 

22 21 

Total 



-ll^alif^ing test is ^^;^n ..^.^^^os.o,^-',,^r..^^7^,^^^^^^ 
TiX ^airr^n^ro'Sr^^^^eJirwkout credit. 



/ 



ll 



148 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



-Semester — 



Junior Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 

Mech. 50 — Strength of Materials 

Mech. 52 — Testing of Materials 

Aero. E. 101, 102 — Aerodynamics 

M. E. 100. 101— Thermodynamics 

Aero. E. 103 — Airplane Detail Drafting 

Aero- E. 104 — Airplane Layout Drafting 

Aero. E. 105, 106 — Airplane Fabrication Shop 

E. E. 51, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 

Total 

Senior Year 

H, 5, 6 — ^History of American Civilization 

Speech 109 — Speech Seminar 

Aero. E. 107, 108— Airplane Design 

Aero. E. 109, 110— Aircraft Power Plants 

Aero. E. 115, 116 — Mechanics of Aircraft Structures 

Aero. .E. Ill, 112 — Aeronautical Laboratory 

Aero. E. 113, 114— Thesis 

Total .• 



/ 

3 



3 
3 
1 

1 
4 



20 



3 

2 

4 
4 
3 
2 
1 



77 

3 
3 



2 
3 
S 

• • 

2 
1 
4 

21 



4 
4 
S 
2 
2 



19 



IS 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information on 
chemical operations and processes of importance in modern life and to 
apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods, for 
the attainment of economic objectives. Modern chemical research has con- 
tributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of the 
chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation in 
which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 



Chemical Engineering Curriculum 
Sophomore Year 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American Government 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Chemical Analysis 

Ch. E. 10 — Water, Fuels and Lubricants 

Surv. 1 — Elements of Plane Surveying 

M. I. 3, 4— Basic R. O. T. C 

Physical Activities 

Total 



Semester — % 
7 77 



3 
4 
5 
4 



8 
1 



4 
6 

4 
2 
S 
1 



20 



19 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Junior Year 

L 3. 4-Composition and Readings in World Literature. 

Qi Q9 Prinpioles of Economics 

f:\ W3 rr-Ell'nts of Chemical Engineering 

rtm' 187 X89-Elements of Physical Chemistry Lectures. 

Chem m iVphysical Chemistry Laboratory 

nu TT 108 f s —Chemical Technology 

Chem.' 35? S7-ElemenUry Organic Chemistry Lectures. . . 

Total 

Senior Year 

*n 5, 6-History of American Civilization 

r'y. V 105 f 8.— Advanced Unit Operations :••••.• 

Ch E 109 f .-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 
.*Ch E ul^kdvanced Chemical Engineering Calculations. 

Ch* E 107— Fuels and their Utilization 

BE 51, 52-Principle8 of Electrical Engineering • 

Mech. 2-^tatics and Dynamics * * 

Ch. E. 104 f, s— Seminar 

Total 



140 



Semester — 

/ 77 

s t 

3 t 

s s 

s s 

2 t 

2 2 

2 « 



18 



S 

2 
S 
S 

4 



21 



18 



S 

5 
o 



4 
5 
1 

20 



CIVIL f «NE^«^f ^.^^ ,^^ ,,,jg„, construction, and maintenance of 
Civil Engineenng dea^;^>^J th^^^^^ buildings, water supply and sewer- 
"^^l^^^r^'Z^oX^^^^-^- aams. and surveying and mapping. 
Civil Engineering Curriculum ^Semester-. 

Sophomore Year ^ 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government * ' " " S 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life .'....!.. * * 

Math. 20. 21— Calculus **" S 5 

Phys 20, 21— General Physics • 2 

Dr. 4— Advanced Engineering Drawing _ 3 

Mech. 1— Statics and Dynamics 2 2 

Surv. 1, 2— Plane Surveying t 3 

M. L 3, 4-Ba8ic R. O. T. C .'.*.'.".'.'..'.'.".'. ^ ^ 

Physical Activities — — 

20 21 

Total 



graduate program. 66-Applied Calculus, will be assigned as a substitute 

♦♦Under some conditions. Matn. do— ^pk 
for Ch.E 110— Chemical Engineering Calculations. 



150 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



151 



Junior Year ' Semester — 

s^^tiz^srer,^.*^.'"" '" ™ ^"""-^ ' " 

Math. le—Spherical Trigonometry . ••• 2 

GeoL 2— Engineering Geology 2 

Mech. 60— Strength of Materials. 2 

Mech. 52--Testing of Materials ...*.'.*.*.'.*.*.* I.*.'* * ^ 

C. E. 50 — Hydraulics • • • • 2 

C. E. 62~Curves and Earthwork. . . 4 

C. E. 100— Theory of Structures .* * 

Surv. 100— Advanced Surveying 4 

^'p'rfr!"/""'^';^"" ""^ Mechani^i'Engine;dn*g:;;::;; \ 

fi. E. 60— Principles of Electrical Engineering V.V.'. 

Total 

*• 20 

Senior Year 

H. 6, 6— History of American Civilization. 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics. * » 

llV'n ^^^-^^^5^^^^°^ Contracts and Specification^ .' .' * 

Eng. 7— Technical Writing •• • 2 

r*^* ^^^^*^*^^«s in Sanitary' *Bacteriology*. *. * * • ' « 

^ C. E. 101— Elements of Highways 1 

C. E. 102~Structural Design * * • 

C. E. 103 — Concrete Design • 

C. E. 104. 105— Municipal Sanitation. * * ' * « 

C. E. 106— Soils and Foundations ^ * 

Total 

19 U 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

tr^:^''lt^:S^^r,t^^:^f^ f « f-atio„. transmission, and dis- 
illumination, and manufJS;. ^ *^ transportation, communication, 
in industry/commrrrlnd ie iS -scellaneous electrical applications 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

Sophomore Year ' Semester — ^ 

Pol. Sci. 1— American Government i II 

Soc. 7— Sociology of American Life ^ 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 8 

Phys. 20. 21— General Physicl! -* 4 

Mech. 1— Statics and Dynamics. ^ 6 

Surv. 1— Plane Surveying S 

M f }~^^^^^''^^^ Engineering Fundamenials* 'l.'\ ^ 

M. I. 3. 4— Basic R. O. T. C. . . 4 

Physical Activities • 3 

1 1 

Total — 

«1 20 



Junior Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature, 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials 

C. E. 51 — Hydraulics 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations 

E. E. 2 — Electrical Engineering Fundamentals II 

E. E. 54 — Direct Current Machinery 

E. E. 100 — Alternating Current Circuits 

E. E. 101 — ^Engineering Electronics 

E. E, 104 — Communication Networks 

ToUl 

Senior Year 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

M. E. 61 — ^Thermodynamics 

M. E. 52 — Power Plants 

E. E. 102, 103 — Alternating Current Machinery 

E. E. 106, 106 — Radio Engineering 

♦Electrical Engineering Elective 

Total 

E. E, 113 — Electric Railwajrs 

B. E. 114— Applied Electronics 

E. E. 108 — Electric Transients 

E. E. 112— Illumination 



Semester — n 
/ // 



S 
t 

• • 

s 

4 



S 
% 



% 



19 



S 

4 

• • 

4 
4 
S 



If 



4 
4 
4 
t 



18 

% 
% 



18 



S 
S 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and main- 
tenance of machinery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and refrigera- 
tion; and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 



Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 
Sophomore Year 

Pol. Sci. 1 — ^American Government 

Soc. 7 — Sociology of American Life 

Math. 20, 21 — Calculus 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying , 

Dr. 3 — ^Advanced Engineering Drawing 

Shop 1 — Machine Shop Practice , 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics 

PhyBical Activities 

Total 



Semester — s 
/ // 



4 

S 
2 
2 
2 

S 
1 



3 

4 
S 



S 
S 
1 



22 



21 



♦Two of the following courses may be elected : 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Junior Year ' r—Semester--^ 

Math. 64— Differential v^«-t- I 

-. 3^^„aar„trorz„r,^^^^^^^^ :■•■•:: -» ...^ 

C. E. 51-Hydraulics ... 2 

M E 100, loi^Thennodynami;;;:: .... '"a 

Shop 60-Foundry Practice .. S 8 

Shop 61-Machine Shop Practice* '.V.V;.' ;;;;;;;; ' 1 

Total 

,. . ,, 20 20 

oemor Year 

Mp"i.^^*°""«»"<' Ventilation.. 3 t 

M. E. 103-Eefrigeration 3 

M. E. 104-106-Thesis . . . ■•, 

M. E. 106. 107-Pri„e Mover.:.' 1 j 

M.' E 110 u'rT^'r"'' Engineering Desi.n .■.■;.■.•. * * 

<5nJlV,„„ ^^"'''°"'="' Laboratory. 4 4 

Speech 109-Speech Seminar . .". 2 2 

" 8 

Total 

W 18 

AGRICULTURE - ENGINEERING 

■ ^-ointlXThrcX^tri^^^^ En^-Hn,, arranged 

mite students to become caSaterfoTthl/''n°' E"^"-™^- Per- 
m Agriculture at the end of W "frs Ind f'^?.' °5 ^"'^'^^'"^ <>* Science 
Science in Civil, Electrical, MechanTcal or ^ f f" "^ ^**«1°' o^ 
end of the fifth year. ecnanical, or Chemical Engineering at the 

of aSuC'^ ^"^"'" ^" '^ ^-"'^ '-ted in this catalog under College 
The University of uZy'^ ^ ^"""^"^ ^''^ ENGINEERING 

offers fei.owshiprL''s:;cVLir?:rof^*'* ^'^ ""^^^" "^ ^^-• 

sciences. Fellows enter upon their ThU »/ engineering and applied 

months, including one month for vacation V "" I '"' ''""""^ '"^ ^^ 
are made at the end of each month ,«^' ^^y'"^"*^ ""d^r « fellowship 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



I5:i 



Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments of instruction, 
but about half the time will be spent in research, under the direction 
of the Bureau of Mines staff. 

Appropriate problems in physics, chemistry, chemical engineering, or 
mathematics will be chosen according to the abilities of the candidates and 
the interests of the Bureau Divisions. The faculty supervisor will be the 
Professor of Chemical Engineering of the University of Maryland. 

The above fellowships will be known as Bureau of Mines Research Fellow- 
ships. The recipients will undertake the solution of definite problems con- 
fronting the mineral industries. The research will be performed at the 
Eastern Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines, a large building 
recently completed on the campus of the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

To encourage cooperation with the industries of Maryland and to develop 
research and instruction in Chemical Engineering, the University of Mary- 
land will offer two fellowships in Chemical Engineering. These fellowships 
will pay a stipend of $500 per year each, and will ordinarily require resi- 
dence during the university year from September to June. 

All the foregoing fellowships are open to graduates of universities and 
technical colleges who have the proper training in engineering or applied 
physical sciences, and who are qualified to undertake research work. 
Preference will be given to men who have already had one year of graduate 
work, and who have experience in research. 

Applications should include a certified copy of college record, applicant's 
photograph, statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and 
letters from three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering spe- 
cifically the applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. The 
application should be addressed to Fellowship Committee, Eastern Experi- 
ment Station, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, 
College Park, Maryland. 

STANTON WALKER FELLOWSHIP OF THE 
NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIATION 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association, offers a fellowship for research on appropriate prob- 
lems related to the sand and gravel industry. Fellows enter upon their 
duties on July 1, and continue for 12 months, including one month for vaca- 
tion. Payments under the fellowship are made at the end of each month 
and amount to $600 for the year. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland. Class work will be directed by the heads of the departments 
of instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. 
The faculty supervisor will be the Professor of Civil Engineering of the 
University of Maryland. 



154 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



» 



Pamed by a certified copy of colLJZ \ "^PP'^^^^ons should be accom 
statement of technical and pracS evn ' *PP"««»t'« "cent photogZt 

ENGINEERING SHORT COURSES 

iHrough short coursPQ fi,^ n n 

en.ineeri„, teaching to'^e^S n^SX^jr ^^^^^ *^^ "-efits of 

Ihese courses offer in aHHif,- /^ ^^dustnes m various parts nf ^h^ LT . 

the dj i„„ ,, p;o;"ier rinS^r^r*-*-' aC/o^x t: 

in pubhc health and in public s^ety '"^^^"^ « P"»>lic works! 

Mining Extension ClassM t» 
Mines and the State DeXment TSr."'*'' *^^ ^^^'-<i Bureau of 
Counties, night mining classes are condSeH^r °1 ^"^^^^^ «nd Gaiiett 
tra»„ng centers in the western part ^J th^ V. ^"^^1°"* '^' ^^^^ in severa 
eoal mme gases, coal mine ventSion map tt"^^' ^"''^■^*=*^ «*«<l^e<l - 

Volunteer Firemen's Short Course l! '' "' """^ ^^^*^- 

ment provides in-service LwJorfi '"' ^*'*' '""*^^- ^he Cart 
throughout the State by three r! J .^^"^" ^^^ classes conducted 
instructors. Basic training of 75 cwH '"'•"''=*"" ^"*^ about 50 local 

sfe tS:rLd^T ^^ ^" ^^--2'crurof^r^^^^^^^^ ^-^---" 
-rse Of 45' fs tt r S;i:rr t^ ^'^ -« '-^^^'nri ss 

foremen who have -completei tSe Trlf k i'"" ^"^^-^^^ ^« a'^o avSaWe 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



155 



To meet the demands of the national emergency, the Department has 
expanded its activities to the training of auxiliary fire forces and rescue 
units in defense duties. There is also available a comprehensive training 
course of 24 clock hours in connection with incendiaries, war gases, infernal 
machines, sabotage and fire fighting as applied to military explosives and 
ammunition, that is available for all civilian defense groups. 

The Department also serves in an advisory capacity to the State Fire 
Marshal and municipal authorities in matters of fire prevention, fire protec- 
tion engineering, and fire safety regulations. 

Additional information may be obtained from Chief J. W. Just, Director, 
Fire Service Extension Department, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Director. 

The Engineering Experiment Station carries on cooperative investiga- 
tions with industries of Maryland and Departments of the State and Fed- 
eral Governments. A diversity of engineering training, experience, and 
equipment represented by the staff and laboratories of the College of Engi- 
neering is thus made available for the problems under inquiry. 

Among the researches that have been conducted are studies on (1) 
streamlined steel tubes under loading conditions; (2) high speed wings for 
airplanes; (3) eccentric rivet groups; (4)D tube sections under various load- 
ing conditions; (5) expansion joints for concrete roads; (6) the design of 
concrete culverts; (7) the conversion of petroleum products to aromatic 
hydrocarbons; (8) sabotage by explosives; (9) magnetic properties of spe- 
cial alloys. Recently completed reports have involved topics such as (a) 
the action of manufactured gas on ceramic ware, (b) the fluid characteris- 
tics of betonite suspensions, (c) the ferro-magnetic properties of hematite, 
(d) the separation and estimation of the four general classes of hydrocar- 
bons occurring in the gasoline range of petroleum. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



157 



I 



156 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount. Dean 
Greeba Hofstetter, Secretary 

The College of Home Economics serves Maryland and the surrounding 
area with its educational program for young women. This program com- 
bines good personal development with education for homemaking and for a 
livelihood. Information on better health principles, good study habits, 
efficient use of time, good grooming, becoming dress and proper adjustment 
to new situations constitute the student's program for self -development. 

In the professional phases of her program, the student consults with the 
faculty member assigned as her adviser and with women well known in 
home economics who aid in choosing the particular curriculum in which she 
expects to specialize. 

The student is urged to acquire practical experience during vacations in 
the actual management of her family's home for a period of time and in 
some professional phase of home economics. Students preparing to teach, 
gain experience on playgrounds in caring for children and in executing 
home projects. Commercial firms and institutions provide opportunities 
for other types of experience. 

Organization 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Textiles and Clothing, Practical Art, Home and 
Institution Management, and Foods and Nutrition. 

Facilities 

The home of the College of Home Economics, following campus tradition, 
is a new colonial brick building planned and built to present the best equip- 
ment and facilities for education in home economics. A home management 
house is maintained on the campus for experience in homemaking. 

Located, as the campus is, between two large cities, unusual opportunities 
are provided for both faculty and students. In addition to the University's 
excellent general and specialized libraries, Baltimore and Washington 
furnish the added library facilities so essential to scientific research and 
creative work in the arts. The art galleries and museums with their price- 
less exhibits, the government bureaus and city institutions, stimulate study 
and provide practical experience for the home economics student. 

Professional Organizations 

The Home Economics Club, in which membership is open to all home 
economics students, is affiliated with the American Home Economics 
Association. 

Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, established Alpha 
Zeta chapter at the University of Maryland, November 1937. Students of 
high scholarship are eligible for election to membership twice during the 



r 4-1. ^f the senior class is elected 

the spring. 

Honors and Awards p,i„t„n Purina Company of St. Louis 

The Danforth Foundation and *e ff ^*°- ^^^^^^^^ ,„d to outstandmg 

» o%,immer Fellowship to outstanding o g^.^^^^ The 

Shien'Tc^n colleges ^^^^f S^l^ryrng^onien for leader- 
purpose of this fellowship is to bring g ^ 

ship training. Award- Three hundred dollars is 

Borden Home Economic Scholarship Award. ^^^^^^^^ ^ho upon 

,iven by the Borden Company ^o theJ.ome„^;, ^^^^^^^ .^ j^,, ^„a 

Sng her senior year, has '^^'J^^^^^^f^^^^^g of eligible students, 
nutrition and has the highest «<=holastic standing o ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

-reronNu Medal: Oniicro^N^^^^^^^^^ ,,,est scholastic 

ZZ:^ - r Uster. 

^rL^ree of Bachelor of Science^J ^^i^ ^ ^i^^t^ ^J 
t^^.^^ ;ho=^hfgiene and . hours in physical activities 

^^tolTa^^^g": the Master of ^Scj^^ -- £ ^^^^^J^.. 

page 29. 

^r reload in the College ^^ -^ -^ rirhrde^ 
^^:tS^;ttS^XS^i^^^^ .ades and must have the 
approval of her adviser and dean. 

Curricula student who has not already done so, 

At the close of the freshman year ^ «tu<i«"*. w^^,, „, one of the following 
.nay elect the curriculum in ge"«'^^.^°"^^„^*'of curricula: home economics 
nrfessTonal curricula, or a c°«^b^".^*\°" ° „Sts home economics exten- 
SSon, textiles and clothing, ^l^ l^d nSktion. A student who 
sion. institution '"-"^^^'^^^i.^ly register in home economics education 
^"T SrgfofTomrE—ror i^ the College of Education. (See 

^'Z^:z^t^----^ to ^^^-^::^:-^::^'£r: 

ve^niay follow the general home econornic ™^„,,,i,„, the student 
choice. Before continumg '[^^ *^ ^^fjed't hours with a C grade average, 
must have attained junior standmg. 



i 



''' THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

. f .pt'r s:^: -^-»j; *« . „v, . „„„, ,.^„ 

It provides good training for her asa f ntT I ^' ^^^" described earlier 
also fom,s the basis o/al, the profLfwf ^•".^'"«'^-- This curriculu^- 
qmrements of the professional ^SZTt.Tl"^''- 7^^ ^^^'^^^^' re- 
°f ««<=h- curricula are hsted under the description 

Freshman Year . — Semester—. 

^ ^^^^:^^7::;i:r^^ ■- — - — I '[ 

Sp«ch 18 ,9_i„t,^„,t„^ S^^^ • 3 . " 

T.,,';;*^"=°"°°""« Lectures... 1 "i 

Tex. l_Te:.tile3 , 

Pr. Art 1-Des«„ ' ■• 

P.E.42.44-Hygie„eI.II.;. " ' 'j ' 

Physical Activities ... , 

'Math. 0-Basio Mathe^ati; o;;;.:; Z 

'""*'^^ ■.::::::::::::. •- \ 

q « 

Total I 3 

oophomore Year 

Chen,. „. 13-Ge„e«rch:^^''t^'""^^- "''""^ '" ^"-'-•' ^-'t^^ture.' : : ,3', » 

Foods 2. 3_Foods ^ 7 '»> 

p^y^ch f-^-^/-»t<"« °^ Economic;:::: . I 

c.r20A~orB-ci:!°i."*°;'^''-°'»«- ••••■.■.■.■.: » ■• 

pr. Art 2,^'ostuLT^^r ^■^-•'•'> :::.:::-.v::::: -3 ' 

Physical Activities ^ ,_ ' • • ', 

» 

„ 1 , 

Total ' 1 

Junior Year 

-n"f^t!f:-;r~^^ " , 

Nut 10-EIements of Nutrition:: :: 8 ' 

Pr. Art. 140. 141— Interior Desiirn n\ 

Clo. 120-Drapin^ .''.''^"^" ^^> ••; 

Foods lOl^Meal Service . ' ? 

Foods 100-Pood Economics..;:: :: " I 

Physics 1. 2--Elements of Physics 2 

^^'^^^^ :: ^ '", 

S , 

Total 3 

17 ~^ 



those* tho'pas'S' wYli°So! V^^*^"^^«<^« ^i" be given to fro«K 

w,II not be required to take MaTh S. '"^ ^""^*""^" ^""*"8r the first semester ; 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Senior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Home Mfirt. 152— Practice in Management of the Home. 

H. E. Ed. 110 — Child Development 

Bact. 51 — Household Bacteriology 

ZooL 16 — ^Human Physiology 

Electives 

Total 



159 



Semester 




I 


// 


3 


ft 


• • • • 


ft 


3 


• • • 


• • • • 


ft 


3 


• « • 


6 


5 



15 



14 



Textiles and Clothing • 

The curricula below have been planned to meet the demand for tech- 
nically trained college women in the textile, clothing and fashion industries. 

Specialization in textiles or clothing begins in the junior year. 

Students who prefer a combination curriculum may satisfy the require- 
ments for such a curriculum by taking all the courses common to both the 
textile and clothing curricula and a minimum of five additional credits in 
each field. 



-Semester- 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and Readings, mainly in English Literature. 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 

Foods 1 — ^Introductory Foods 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design 

Clo. 20 A or B — Clothing Construction 

Clo. 21 — Personal Problems in Clothing ^ 

Elective 

Totel 

Textiles 

Junior Year 

Home Mgt. 150, 151 — Management of the Home 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition or 

X^ U V* XX w XN U vXlvlv/U •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

Pr. Art 140 — Interior Design 

Physics 1, 2 — ^Elements of Physics 

Chem. — Organic Chemistry 

■i * Xtft LJI1« X V ' **Xj^wfc/X"cL ••••••«•••••*•••••••••••••••••• • • • •• 

Tex. 100 — Advanced Textiles 

Electives 



S 

(3) 
3 



// 

ft 

(ft) 

ft 
ft 

* • • 

ft 
ft 



ft 

2 
1 
1 



16 

/ 

ft 

3 

(8) 
3 

ft 
4 



IC 



// 

ft 
t 



• • • • 



ft 
ft 
ft 



Total 



16 



U 



160 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



161 



Senior Year r—Semester-^ 

Bact' !r^^^"l i5 ^^^^^^^ Civilization. . . ^ U 

oJ!^p:r^"--.:;:::.v;;.::;::..;.;.::::;.v.,;;;: ; .^• 

..v.;; » ••.. 

^ • _ 

Total 3 

Clothing ^^ 16 

Junior Year 

. Home Mgrt. 150, 151-Management of th. w 

?r AtJrf ^™^^*^ °^ Nutrftion .°' *^' ""^^^ 3 . 

^"^0^^^^;:^^ . 3 .,' 

^.m^pat^^De;:-:::;;::: :;:;:;:;; l ^ 

Science ^ 

"^"^"^ : •;;. ... I 

^ 

Total 2 

Senior Year " " 

Bact ^^b'°'^u°^ American Civilization. 

„^ "7^<"^«hold Bacteriology . . S , 

?e, io^^lr"'^'"" °*'''°~- •■••■-■ » • 

Ce"^;;!'— prti^rM'" ^-"-•■■•••■■■•••■•■•■•■::;:: -• ■« 

Clo. 122-Tailorin/ Management of the Home " " •. » 

c,o. m-Prob,emf i„ci;;hi- ..■■■■.■■.■.■: \ ■■■■ 

^^^f ."^-Introduction to Eadio: . •-, 

I'sycholoey " 2 

Electives » ... 

•••• 8 

Tot., 1 ___2 

Practical Art (For Women) ' '^"" " 

This curriculum permits a r.ii«,-«-. .» .,. 
tising interior design, costum: design'' Em.'h''-''' o^. concentration : adver- 
house furnishings and wearing a J^-'elS?^' ^'^"" *" *'^« ««I^««on of 
tions available to graduates begfn wfth^^t ! '"" *" Personality. Posi- 
Panson shopping, textile anaS '„/ ! '"'^' '""'"^' '^'^P'^y- corn- 
advanced positions in these fields ;rTn He ! '^'''^'' '^'^ ''^^^'"P into 
managing, style coordination, person^itv 5*^'"*^' ^"^'"^' department 
■ng and personnel work. P^'-^onal.ty consulting, designing, store train- 



^Freshman Year 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and Readings, mainly in English Literature. . . . 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 

Foods 1 — Introductory Foods 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design 

Clo. 20 — Clothing Construction 

Pr. Art 30 — Typography and Lettering 

Physical Activities 

Electives 

Total 



Junior Year 

Home Mgt. 150, 151 — Management of the Home 

Foods 101 — Meal Service 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition 

Pr. Art 140, 141 — Interior Design 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 

B. A. 154 — Retail Store Management and Merchandising 
**P^ench, Spanish, German or Elective 



Semester — ^ 
/ // 



s 

(3) 

S 

s 
s 



1 

t 



• • • • • 



T^l Vv> d V%S9 ••••••••■••••••••••••• • • • » • •••• 



• • • • 



• ••••• 



18 



S 
2 

• • 

S 

s 

• • 

s 

2 



Total 

Senior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Home Mgt. 152 — Practice in Management of the Home 

Pr. Art 136 — Merchandise Display 

Pr. Art 132 — Advertising Layout 

H. E. Ed. 110 — Child Development 

Tex. 105 — Consumer Problems in Textiles 

Speech 115 — Radio in Retailing 

Pr. Art 120 — Costume Illustration or 

Pr. Art 142 — ^Advanced Interior Design 

Electives 



16 



Total 



16 



3 

(8) 
8 



3 
3 
1 
2 



18 



S 
S 

* • 

3 
8 
2 



17 



s 


8 


(3) 


3 


2 


(2) 


2 


• • • • 


• • • • 


8 


• • • • 


8 


8 


• • • • 


(2) 


(2) 


2 


2 


4 


• • • • 



14 



• Pr. Art 2 — Survey of Art History (2) is a required subject which should be taken the 
fall term of the Freshman Year. 

•* One year of French, Spanish, or German is required of every student who has not 
completed two years of one of these languages, with a grade of C or better, in high school. 

Note: Students, who are majoring in Costume Design, are advised to take Pr. Art 21 
Action Drawing (2), Clo. 120 Draping (3), Clo. 121 Pattern Design (2). 

Students who are interested in Merchandising, are advised to take Pr. Art 198 Store 
Experience (3) the summer following their junior year ; they must make their arrangement^^ 
with the Head of the Department of Practical Art durinfir the spring semester cf the 
junior year. 



162 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Practical Art (For Men) 

Requirements are the same as for the curriculum in Practical* Art, as set 
up for women, with the following exceptions: 

Omissions— H. E. 1; Pr. Art 20; Clo. 20; Foods 1, 101; Home Mgt. 150, 
151, 152; Tex. 105; H. E. Ed. 110. 

Additions — H. E. 2; M. I. 1, 2, 3, 4; also, 15 hours in art and merchandising 
courses to be selected in consultation with the Head of the Department of 
Practical Art. 

Crafts (For Women) 

This curriculum serves persons who are interested in crafts for recrea- 
tional, therapeutic, and professional purposes. Emphasis is given to the joy 
of creation through crafts. Positions available to graduates include indus- 
trial designing, occupational therapy, instruction at recreation centers, and 
classroom teaching of crafts. 



^Freshmfian Year 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and Readings, mainly in English Literature. 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 

Foods 1 — Introductory Foods 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design 

Clo. 20 — Clothing Construction 

Cr. 2— Simple Crafts , 

Pr. Art 3 — Creative Art Inspired by Primitive Art 

Pr. Art 4 — Three Dimensional Design 

Physical Activities 



-Seniestei^ 



s 

(3) 
3 
S 

s 

• • 

s 



2 

• • 

1 



s 

(S) 

s 



s 

2 

» • 

2 
1 



Total 



Junior Year 

Home Mgt. 150, 151 — Management of the Home. 

Foods 101 — Meal Service 

Nut. 10— Elements of Nutrition 

Pr. Art 140, 141 — Interior Design 

Cr. 20, 21— Ceramics 

Cr. 30, 31— Metalry 

•♦French, Spanish, German, or Elective 

Electives 



18 



8 

2 

• • 

8 
2 

2 
8 
2 



17 



3 

8 
2 
2 
8 
2. 



Total 



17 



18 



♦ Pr. Art 2 Survey of Art History is a required subject which should be taken the fall 
term of the Freshman Year. 

*♦ One year French, Spanish, or German is required of every studejit who has not 
completed two years of one of these languages, with a grade of C or better, in high school. 

Note : Students, who expect to work in occupational therapy, are advised to elect courses 
in physiology, kinesiology and mental hygiene. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 163 

r — Semesfei ^ 

/ // 

Senior Year 3 % 

H 5 6— History of American Civilization. ••••••• 3 (3) 

Home Mgt. 152-Practice in Management of the Home • • • 3 

H. E. Ed. 110— Child Development g 2 

Cr. 40, 41— Weaving *..*......... 4 * 

Advanced Crafts 2 

Cr. 198— Crafts in Therapy * * ' 3 

Electives 

15 14 

Total 

"CL'irL the »™ .. f» th. C«™,.„ in C,.«., „ ».t «P 

for women, with the following exceptions: ,, . ir;n 

Omissioris-H. E. 1; Pr. Art 20; Clo. 20; Foods 1, 101; Home Mgt. 150, 
151, 152; H. E^Ed. 110^ ^j^„ ,5 ^,^, i„ .^ courses to be 

J^TI^JJL^^ L^id'oSe Department o. Practical Art. 
Hnme Economics Extension* , 

TnCud ii; U.. ed»...io».l »d s.ci.1 p,obU». .< »»! "-'^^^^^^^^ 

Chem. 11. 13— General Chemistry ' 3 s 

Foods 2, 3— Foods ; 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics j 

Psych. 80— Educational Psychology *.....!... * 

Pr Art 20 — Costume Design g 

Clo. 20 A or B— Clothing Construction **.'...........!... 1 ^ 

Physical Activities 

16 16 

Total 

Junior Year ,^«^« • * 

Home Mgt. 150. 151-Management of the Home • • • • ^ 

Foods 100— Food Economics •" * 

Nut. 110 — Nutrition ^ 4 

Chem.— Elements of Organic Chemistry '.'.*..*.......... * 

Foods 103— Demonstrations ^ g 3 

Physics 1, 2— Elements of Physics •••••* 2 

E^ 190— Principles of Education •••• ^ 

Clo. 120 — ^Draping _ 3 

R. Ed. 114— Rural Life Education *'.".*. *.*.".*.'. *.*.'. *.*.*• ^ 

Electives 

It 16 

Total 

—r^^Uce work in the «e.d of Hon,e Econo.i« E.t^^^^^^^ 

encouraged for all students majormg in this curriculum 

b2fo?e the completion of the senior year. 



164 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Senior Year 

H. 5, 6 — ^History of American Civilization 

Home Mgrt. 152 — ^Practice in Management of the Home 

Zool. 16 — Human PhyBiology 

Bact. 51 — Household Bacteriology 

H. E. Ed. 110— Child Development 

Foods 102 — ^Experimental Foods 

H. E. Ext. 100 — Methods in Home Economics Extension 

Pr. Art 140, 141— Interior Design 

Total 



Semester — v 


I 


// 


3 


S 


• • • • 


t 


3 


• . • • 


• • • • 


8 


3 


• • • • 


3 


• • • • 


• • • * 


3 


3 


s 



16 



16 



Institution Management 

This curriculum provides training for those interested in housing and the 
food service administration for large groups of people. The work is of two 
general types: (1) food service and (2) housekeeping in such institutions 
as hospitals and schools and in commercial organizations such as 
restaurants, inns, hotels and industrial cafeterias. 

The preparation for a hospital dietitian requires one year of graduate 
training in a hospital offering a course approved by the American Dietetic 
Association. This curriculum meets the academic requirements for entrance 
to such a course. 

The student of this curriculum graduating after June 1944, will be re- 
quired to have a period of field work of satisfactory length and experience 
before entering the senior year. 

A student planning to do institutional work other than hospital dietetics 
is not required to take Curriculum, Instruction and Observation and Diet 
in Disease. 

f — Semester — ^ 
Sophomore Year ' I II 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature or 3 S 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and Readings, mainly in English Literature. . . (3) (3) 

Chem. 11. 13 — General Chemistry '. 3 t 

Foods 2, 3— Foods 3 S 

Econ. 37 — ^Fundamentals of Economics 3 .... 

Psych. 80 — Educational Psychology .... 8 

Phsrsical Activities 1 1 

♦Electives 8 8 

ToUl 16 16 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 165 

f — Semesteir---^ 

I II 

Junior Year ^ % 

Home Mgt. 150. 151-Management of the Home ;;;;;;.;; .* .* 8 

Nut. uo-Nutrition •;;;;;; .... 8 

Nut. 112-Dietetics 4 

Chem.-Organic Chemistry .... 4 

Phem 81. 82— General Bio-Chemistry • • ' ' * 3 

?nst mU 160-Institution Organization and Management • • , 

Inst. Mit. 161-Institution Purchasing and Accounting , 

g^ 190— Principles of Education g 

pi^ys. 1— Elements of Physics ... ^ 

Elective 

1« !• 

Total 

Senior Year ^ % 

H 5 6— History of American CivUi^ation.......^. ^ 

Home Mgt. 1B2-Practice in Management of the Home. • . . . . . ' ' ' • ' ' ' , 

Pr. Art 140 — Interior Design g 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 8 

Bact. 61— Household Bacteriology .. 3 

H. E. Ed. 110— Child Development * * ' " * 3 

Foods 102— Experimental Foods * * 3 

Inst. Mgt. 162— Institution Foods *• g 

Nut. 113— Diet in Disease * * 2 

Inst. Mgt. 164— Advanced Institution Management 

17 14 

Total 

F««l, »d Nutritio" currkutam is t«o Md-t, 

The p»rp».e <-! «• '^^^ '~, ,;,'7„j„ia„j., p^^on.l »,e or for u.o 

'»r»S rrri^l-l.tSr^LTSun. Jd .od. pro- 
motion on newspapers, magazines and the radio. ^semester— > 

I n 

Sophomore Year . | 

Chem. 11, 13— General Chemistry .'.'.*.."..... « * 

Foods 2. 3 — Foods ... 8 • • • • 

Econ 37— Fundamentels of Economics . 3 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology • • • ' ' • ' *' .... 8 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design * ' 3 

Clo. 20— Clothing Construction * * ' * * .' /. . . . . . . . 1 1 

Physical Activities 

1$ l^ 

TotaJ ' 



* One of the following selection of courses is to be taken in place of a freshman or 
sophomore elective: Pr. Art 20, Costume Design (3), Clo. 20 A or B, Clothing Construction 
(3), Clo. 21« Personal Clothing Problems (2). 



! 



166 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



s 

2 

» • 

3 

• • 

4 

• • 

3 



S 

• • 

2 



Junior Year ' Semester — > 

?T ^n^lf '• 1^1-Management of the Home ^ ^^ 

Foods 100— Food Economics 

Foods 101— Meal Service 

Nut. 110— Nutrition ....*.'.*.'. 

Nut 112— Dietetics 

Chem.-EIements of Organic Chem'istn^ .'.* .' 

Chem. 81, 82— General Bio-Chemistry.. 

Physics 1, 2— Elements of Physics *.*.'.*.*.*.*.'. 

Total 

• 15 

Senior Year 

H. 6, 6— History of American Civilization.... 

?r "Irf f4o'?47''rf " ^^^^^^^-t of the Home.V.V.V.*. W ' 

rr. Art 140, 141 — Interior Design ... 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 8 

Bact. 61— Household Bacteriolo^ » 

H. E. Ed. 110— Child Development. • • • • 3 

Nut. Ill— Child Nutrition 8 

Foods 102— Experimental Foods 2 

Foods 103— Demonstrations 3 

Foods 104— Advanced Foods 2 

.... 2 

Totel . 

17 16 



4 

S 

15 



8 

8 
8 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 167 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Personnel 1945-46 

Colonel Harland C. Griswold, Professor, Military Science and Tactics, 

Commandant 
Captain George W. Dunlap, Assistant Professor, Military Science and 

Tactics 
First Lieutenant Harold Yourman, Assistant Professor, Military Science 

and Tactics 
Captain German W. Rice (Retired), Military Property Custodian 
Master Sergeiant Otto Siebeneichen (Retired), Band Leader 
Miss Ann Little, Secretary to Commandant 
Master Sergeant Charles H. Dodson, Instructor 
Technical Sergeant Fay J. Norris, Instructor 
Technician Fourth Class Pullen D. Martin, Sergeant Major 

Instruction in Military Science and Tactics has been an important feature 
of the work of the College Park Division of the University of Maryland 
since 1856. In 1864 the General Assembly of Maryland accepted the 
provisions of The Act of Congress of 1862, whereby public lands were 
donated to States providing colleges in which a course of military training 
was maintained. Such colleges receiving this federal aid are known as 
land-grant colleges, and on the consolidation of the old University of 
Maryland and the Maryland State College of Agriculture the present insti- 
tution was brought within the provisions of the Federal Act by Act of the 
General Assembly of Maryland of 1916 Chapter 372. Until 1916 the institu- 
tion was a military school, but since the first World War military training 
has been reorganized and given as specified in the Acts of Congress of 1916 
and 1920, as amended, which are commonly known as National Defense 
Acts. Under these laws the Reserve Officers* Training Corps was organized 
to provide the required basic training and to offer advanced training leading 
to a commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps on a selective plan. Its 
program of instruction is normally a part of the academic program of the 
College Park departments of the University since military training course 
with its wide variety of subjects covered has valuable educational functions 
in the development of character, leadership and good citizenship as well as 
practical values of national defense. Planned primarily for times of peace, 
the basic R. 0. T. C. course was accelerated, after the out-break of the 
present war, and the Advanced Course was suspended for the duration. 

Staff, Units, and Equipment 

Army Officers, approved by the President of the University are detailed 
by the War Department to administer the course. They serve under appoint- 
ment by the University, the senior as the Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics, and the others as Assistant Professors of Military Science and 
Tactics. Selected non-commissioned officers of the Army are also detailed 
by the War Department and serve as instructors. 



I 



168 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 



An Infantry Unit and a Signal Corps Unit, the latter open only to students 
registered for mechanical or electrical engineering were maintained during 
times of peace. For the duration, however, they are suspended and Basic I 
and II Branch Immaterial has been substituted. This is a thorough, com- 
prehensive course designed to prepare men for any branch of the service. 
Information available at this time indicates that the units mentioned above 
will be reactivated soon after the conclusion of the present war. 

The necessary training equipment including uniforms, weapons, and 
technical material is loaned to the University by the War Department. 
Students in the basic courses are loaned uniforms without cost, but must 
purchase their own shoes of a type specified by the Military Department. 

The New Armory located East of the Administration Building has been 
declared by a War Department inspector to be one of the finest buildings 
used for Military instruction in the country. It contains clothing and 
ordnance storerooms, class rooms, offices, projection room, a ten firing point 
small bore range, and a drill floor 240 feet long by 120 feet wide. Drill 
field, parade grounds, obstacle course, and outdoor range are nearby. 

Commissions 

In normal times a student who completes the Advanced R. 0. T. C. Course 
and is recommended by the President of the University and the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics is eligible for appointment by the President of 
the United States as a Second Lieutenant in the Officers* Reserve Corps. 
During the existing emergency the Advanced Course has been suspended, 
but resumption is anticipated shortly after the cessation of hostilities. The 
hundreds of Maryland graduates who receive their commissions through 
this unit were found ready and capable when the national crisis arose, and 
they have achieved an inspiring and enviable record of which the State 
may well be proud. 

Band 

The University Band functions under the Military Department and its 
instruction is conducted by an experienced Band Master. Although it is 
composed largely of R. O. T. C. students, places are open to all students of 
the University. One credit per semester not to exceed a total of eight 
credits may be earned by participation in this activity. Members are re- 
quired to play at the military drills, parades, athletic events, and special 
occasions. Instruments and uniforms are furnished by the Federal and 
State Governments. 

The Varsity Rifle Team 

The Varsity Rifle Team is under the supervision of the Military Depart- 
ment. Rifle competition at the University of Maryland is rated as a major 
sport activity, and the varsity letters and sweaters are awarded each year 
to team members. The rifle teams representing this institution have a high 
national standing as they have consistently placed in the top brackets in the 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 169 

n • .» Uifle Match They have been consistent wnners in 
National Intercollegiate Rifle Matcn. x n » Service Command 

Z William Randolph Htr^^roty^Mat^h '^^^^^^^ ,f the regular 

B. 0. T. C. Match as ^«" *^™"/, ^^ Ri/es and ammunition are fur- 
schedule of postal and ff'^'^^'t'^^^^JTZ the rifle range in the 
nished by the State and Jederal G-e-ment^„^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^.^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

New Armory used by the team nas r country. 

National Rifle Association to be one of "'^ fi'^^y ^^^ ^^^ed in corn- 

In peace time a V-ity ^--^^/Jrbrg ard:d cLs numerals. 

£TWt^e^:Snmer1ery 1ZL are eligible for the varsity team 

and no Freshman Team is maintained. 

BATTALION ORGANIZATION. RESERVE OFFICERS' 

TRAINING CORPS— 1945 

^•^^ _, .Major John P. Moran 

Battalion Commander • ^^^^^.^ g^^^^ W. Schuster 

AdJ«t*"t • • • • — ■•■•^•■^ •.;^,V ■ ■ ■ ■ Captain Howard J. Rymland 

Company Commander, Company a ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^ Rosenberry 

Leader. First Platoon ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^ilja 

Leader, Second Platoon . . • — •;_;, ' .„ ^^^^ r. Baylus 

Company Commander, Company B ^J^^ ^.^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^ 

Leader, First Platoon ^^^^^ ^^^.^ j ^^^^^ 

Leader, Second Platoon .^.^. .^.--^ ■ ■ ■ ■ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^y 

Commanding Ofiicer. R. 0. T. C. Band. ^^^^^.^ ^.^^.^^ ^ Madison 
Executive Officer 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS rWersity is 

^e purpose of the program f P^^-f ^^ Tndi^dr rrn^ To 
broadly conceived as the <l«r^ "P^^^n^Ls and classification tests are 
accomplish this purpose ^^y^'^Klf^'^^^^'Z relative physical fitness of 
given the incoming students *«^^etemme fe 'e J ^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

Lh. upon the basis^f ^^^^ f to heT^^^^^^^ activities of the program, 
preferences, students are assigueu 



170 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Tests have shown that men coming into the Army during World War II 
are inferior physically to any previous group. Despite all advances in 
medical care, public health and the like, our male population has become 
less fit. The situation has developed because the modern machine has 
emancipated man from vigorous muscular activity and reduced the amount 
of physical labor required in everyday life. Physical fitness testing records 
in colleges and universities have also clearly shown the declining strength 
endurance, agility and coordination of the past two or three generations. 

This weakening influence of our modern machine civilization makes 
essential a progressive course, especially designed to condition and develop 
the human body to the point where it can retain normal responses to stimuli 
in the face of fatigue and exhaustion and continue to function effectively in 
the routine and emergency tasks of life. 

In addition to the required activities, sophomore students may elect a 
considerable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, 
horseshoes, ping pong, bag punching, badminton, shuffleboard, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted also. Touch 
football and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, 
baseball and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. 
Plaques, medals, and other appropriate awards in all tournaments of the 
program are provided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Educa- 
tion Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and 
ping pong are the most popular contests engaged in. • 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
Two large modem gymnasia, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute the 
major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
soccer, wrestling, golf, and tennis. The University is a member of the 
Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and co- 
operates with other national organizations in the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

For Women 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities 
for conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including 
hockey, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball; individual sports, 
consisting of riding, tennis, badminton, fencing, golf, archery, deck tennis, 
table tennis, and the like, are offered. Opportunity is given for various types 



pEP^SrMENT OF mUTABY SCW^CK ASD TACT.OS .71 
Th. Unl.er.lly ..«. ».."«"»■ "«""'' .t S^t to tL™ ii-h «h~.U 

pares young men and women * or ««efta servuse i j^^tit^tions of 

^he Federal Prison ^yf^/l^t^^Z^^^ziSs. which constitute the 
various types in the United »* J^f^f ^wk of correctional machinery, 
final step in a huge f ^^"'"f ^^Sor^'^J^nstructive service for qualified 
There is a real opportunity to P^rf^"^"" institutions but also in such 
people not only in federal and ^^^^^ Pf"*;;^ „„ie work. 
Allied fields as crime prevention, ^'"^^^"^ral areas of service and 
The Federal Prison System provides six general areas 

opportunity, viz: . 

1 The Administrative and Final Services 

2 The Mechanical and Engineering Services 

3 The Agricultural Production Services 

4 The Culinary and Dietetic Services 

5 The Treatment^Advisory Services 
Classification and diagnosis 
Education and vocational training 
Case work and parole planning 
Religious training and education 
Medical and Health 

"' • ';: wC^f Bu..n.» .nd P»U1. Adn.U,U».«o. 

2. The College of Engineering 

3 The College of Agriculture 

4 The College of Home Economics 



172 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



5. The College of Education 

6. The College of Arts and Sciences 

7. The Medical School 

whnrte^zrrdtsroTafr^ -^ ^^-^-^ ^^--o„ 

Administration. ^n^n.^^StiZJTZ-'^t ^^^^"""^ » *e fields of 
Medicme. the factor of human reLtr'-^"*'"""''^' H""»e Economics anrf 
tant aspects of the program T^e pTfson ^ °» -^V-- the moSSp^r 
following subject matter as BastRV.uZZT'^' *'^"'**'-^' ^^^^''^ 'he 
Pnnciples of Sociology 

Principles of Psychology 

Principles of Economics 

Principles of Political Science 

Community Organization 

Abnormal Psychology 
Principles of Criminology 
If the professional student in Pno.; 
finds it impossible to fit aU of th.^L ^^""^ °' Agriculture, for examnle 
should take Principles of ti^X, JL^af "^'^ '"*" "^'^ curriculT^t' 
list as possible. The regular curncufvfn, J .'"*"^ °*^«'- ^"''jects in the 

Work in Penal Institutions Admm.strative 

The student wishing to enter t.l,» ™o 
operation, is expected to havfcol LgiaTtS"*-""* '' ^'^^' '-^t^^ion 
requirements" listed above in the foSL ^^ '" ^'^''•"*'" *» *»>« "basic 



Accounting Principles 

Intermediate Accounting 

Cost Accounting 

Statistics 

Labor Economics 

Personnel Management 

General Business Organization and 

Administration 
Business Law 

Public Administration 



Federal Government 
Municipal Government 
Political Philosophy 
Rural and Urban Sociology 
Family and Marriage 
Races and Ethnic Groups 
Social Psychology 
Social Institutions 

Penology or Advanced Criminology 
Criminal Law • 



Student * >i- ^rimmal Law 

ITr^T ^"'^"^^^^^^ ^^--^ will find 

If S' 1^''' Requirements." These SuTs^^^^ ^""''^^^' ^" ^^^^*^-" 

of the advanced courses in sociology iS'TX" 1"^^^^^"^^^ ^or some 
and General Administration. "''^^'" *^^ ^^^^^ng of Business 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 173 

The preparation for the Culinary and Dietetic Services, for the male 
student, should be taken in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the 
College of Business and Public Administration with a major in dietetics 
and /or nutrition offered in the College of Home Economics. The particular 
courses recommended for this preparation in Home Economics are: 

Problems of Food Supply Nutrition 

Food Preparation Dietotherapy 

Quantity Cooking Institution Administration 

The Treatment-Advisory Services division of the Federal prison system 
covers a broad field. The list of employees in this service comprises 
physicians, psychiatrists, education, and parole and classification specialists. 
For the Medical Man the opportunities lie with the United States Public 
Health Service which furnishes the medical and hospital service for the 
Federal Prison System. For the Education Worker, preparation should 
come from a recognized school of education and the curriculum should 
include the seven courses mentioned in **Basic Requirements" and concen- 
tration of education courses in any of the following fields: 

Adult Education Vocational Education 

Clinical Guidance Physical Education 

Students wishing to prepare themselves for entering the classification 
Parole Work and Social Wo7^k fields should take the following courses, in 
addition to the "Basic Requirements": 

Statistics (one year) Penology or any advanced 

Social Psychology Criminology 

Social Problems Poverty and Dependency 

Mental Testing Counseling and Guidance 

Applied Psychology Psychology of Personality 

Public Administration 

Students contemplating a possible career with the Federal Bureau of 
Prisons or with a similar state organization should recognize the fact that 
technical and professional training alone will not insure success. He must 
have a real desire to do this kind of work, he must have the right kind of 
personality to "get along" with the people he works with, he must have 
good judgment, be able t<y recognize the relationship between cause and 
effect, and at all times demonstrate his capacity for intellectual honesty. 



''' THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean. 
^"^'^ ^- Pa««ETT, Secretary. 
History and Organization 

In the earlier vear<! «f +1, • ,. 
quently conferred 'but the S^rfcTf tf °" 'f ^^^^^^ degree was fre 

Admission 

After approval of the anni^'no^- 

Registration 

thtv^r^^^T P"""^"^"^ ^'^d»ate work in t)« tt • 

arranged by the student wS theT^ "/ ^"^'^ ^''^' «-<=h sessfo" L 
two course cards, which 1. ■ \ ^"'^ department and enfpr!^ 



TH^ GRADUATE SCHOOL 



175 



Registrar's office, where the registration is completed. Students will 
not be admitted to graduate courses until the Registrar has certified to 
the instructor that registration has been completed. Course cards may be 
obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads of de- 
partments usually keep a supply of these cards in their respective offices. 

Graduate Courses 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates 
or For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Students who are inade- 
quately prepared for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack 
prerequisites for minor courses may elect a limited number of courses 
numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate credit \vill 
not be allowed for these courses. Courses that are audited are registered 
for in the same way as other courses, and the fees are the same. 

Program of Work 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including 
suitable minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of 
fifteen credit hours per semester. If a student is preparing a thesis during 
the minimum residence for the master's degree, the registration in gradu- 
ate courses should not exceed twelve hours for the semester. 

Graduate Work by Seniors Jn This University 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the total of 
undergraduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be transferred 
unless such prearrangement is made. Graduate credits earned during the 
senior year may not be used to shorten the residence period required for 
advanced degrees. 

Admission to Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in dupli- 
cate by the student and submitted to his major department for further 
action and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. All applica- 
tions for admission to candidacy must be approved by the Graduate Council. 



176 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



177 



Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, 
but merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is con- 
sidered by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such 
graduate study and research as are demanded by the requirements of 
the degree sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship in 
graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in 
the sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 

AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the Mas- 
ter's degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy 
not later than the date when instruction begins for the semester in which 
the degree is sought. He must have completed at least twelve semester 
hours, but not more than eighteen semester hours of graduate work at the 
University of Maryland. An average grade of "B" in all major and minor 
subjects is required. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least two semesters or equiva- 
lent, at this institution, is required. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, ex- 
clusive of thesis and of research, with an average grade of "B" in courses 
approved for graduate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science. At the option of the major department concerned 
the student may be required also to register for a maximum of six semester 
hours for research and thesis work. The total number of credit hours re- 
quired for the degree would then be thirty. If the student is inadequately 
prepared for the required graduate courses, either in the major or minor 
subjects, additional courses may be required to supplement the under- 
graduate work. Of the twenty-four hours required in graduate courses, 
not less than twelve semester hours and not more then sixteen semester 
hours must be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits must 
be outside the major subject and must comprise a group of coherent courses 
intended to supplement and support the major work. Not less than one-half 
of the total required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, 
miist be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. No credit for the 
degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science may be obtained for corre- 
spondence or extension courses. The entire course of study must constitute 
a unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours, obtained 
at other recognized institutions, may be transferred and applied to the 
course requirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was 
of graduate character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in 



of fViP University of Maryland. This 
the student's graduate program ^ *\^^^J'^,in for approval when 
transfer of credit is submitted to the Graduate ^^^^^^^ 

the student applies for admission to candidacy to ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

^.1^. ^rrlr ts stSlc? t t. examination h. this insti- 
tution in all work offered for the degree. 

Thesis, in addition to the twenty^oursem^^^^^^^^^ 
a satisfactory thesis is required o^^l^f^'^^^^y,, ^^de in the case of 
of Arts and Master of S"ence. (Except^ns m y^ civilization. See 

candidates for the degree °f ^^^^^^4,"™ Student's ability to do indepen- 
page 178.) The thesis must d«'«°"!*'^^*^,;J^^„_. ^tyie and composition. It 
Sent work and it must be acceptable >« l;t«'^^^^S be not less than the 
is assumed that the time devoted to J^-is ^ork,^^^^ ,,,,,es. With the 
equivalent of six semester hours eajned in g Graduate 

approval of the student's major P'^ff^^'^^tld iAaLntia under direc- 
School. the thesis in certam cases J^ ^J P/J^^^^^^^^^ institution, 
tion and supervision '^^^ ^^^^ ^X^' Ivosii.^ in the office of the 
The original copy of the thesis ™ '" ^ ^^e convocation at 

Graduate School not later than t-o je^ksj^^^^ ^e bound by the stu- 
which the degree is sought. The f es'^ji'^eg uniformly. An abstract of 

dent, as the ^t^t'^^.f |Jo t io^ w^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^"=°'"^^? ^'• 

the contents of the thesis, 200 to j&o wo ^akc-up of the thesis 

A manual giving full f ections Jor «>« ^l^\^^^ J^k, and should 

as in the hands of each f "^^.f;/,,^"! of the manuscript is begun. 

be consulted by the^jj f^^^^^l JS bf oUained by the student at the 
Individual copies of this manual may 
Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

• .• T^P final oral examination is conducted by a corn- 

Final Examination. Tlie Anal oral ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ , 

mittee appointed by the Uean 01 ^ .^ -j-he other members of 

adviser acts as the chairman of t^, ^"'"^f J^^ent has taken most of 
the committee ^l^-:Z:^'^e^^n ^d'^he candidate are noti- 
his major and minor courses, ine . ^ , t one week prior 

fied of the personnel of the ^^^^'^^^^''^^'ZtLs.n of the committee 
to the period set for '-^lJ^^:''^\^T:.^r..tio. and notifies the 
selects the exact time and place for tn examination 

other members of the commrttee -d ^e^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^_ 
should be conducted withm the dates spec^^^^^^ ^^ examining corn- 

but upon recommendation of the stiident s ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

mittee may be appointed by the ^ean o completed. A 

time when all other requirements Jor^^e degree ^^^^^ 

report of .the committee is^ser.^ t^ ^^ ^^^^^^ , 

the examination. A special lor ^^.^ ^^,^y, 



178 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



179 



degree sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about one 
hour, but the time should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample 
opportunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the 
examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other re- 
quirements for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral exami- 
nation a comprehensive written examination may be required at the 
option of the major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS IN 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Studies in American Civilization are intended to prepare the student for 
teaching, for further study, and for research in the general field of American 
Civilization but with emphasis on one of two disciplines: history, including 
European backgrounds; or literature, including European literatures, par- 
ticularly English. All students will be expected to understand the develop- 
ment of American institutions and to demonstrate proficiency in the 
literary, social, economic, and political history of the United States. 

With the approval of his adviser, a candidate for the Master of Arts 
degree with a major in American Civilization may elect in lieu of the thesis 
six additional hours of course work, to include at least two substantial 
seminar papers. The total number of credit hours required for the degree 
would then be thirty semester hours. 

Each candidate must present credits for at least fifteen semester hours 
of work in American literature and American history, and credits for at 
least fifteen semester hours in supporting courses (nine hours if a thesis is 
elected). Supporting courses will normally be in such fields as European 
or Latin-American history, English literature, comparative literature, 
philosophy, art, education, sociology, economics, and political science. 

Each candidate must demonstrate in a written examination that he 
possesses a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degree of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science in other fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Thirty semester hours of course work are required, which may include 
courses in departments other than Education not to exceed one-half of the 
total thirty hours, such courses to be selected in conformity with the 
student's special needs as agreed upon by the student and his adviser. Of 
the thirty hours, not less than one-half must be on the 200 level. 

At least four of the thirty semester hours must be in seminar work in 
connection with which two seminar papers will be prepared in specially 



rr^A ^r^ writine by the instructor in charge of the 
prescribed form approved m wntmg ^y ^" ^ ^^^ ^^ the College 

credits, and final oral examination are the same as 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree of Master of Business Admii^^ion r^J^^t.^:::^'^^ 
of two semesters of graduate 7.'\^" ^^J^^fde^e^ This will normally 

"^;h:tS:i™uisites .r gi^^ate ^^^ ^^^^ 

I the university of Maryland, or by ^'I'^T^^'^^J^^itHf sufficiently 

sponding <ie.- t/^'-ZSrSeCrdt^is Zst satisfy the pre- 
high quality. Holders of """^^^^^.^ Science degree in Busi- 

of Science. business Administration represents specialized 

The degree of ^a^*^^ °^„f ^^e's aLinistration To this end course 

work in a particular field of business a specialization such as 

r ^'tgTarkit S; n riiU-pubt Uti£. Foreign Trade. 
rr^ome^tSrof the candidate's specialized interest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the ^^cU^'s^^ej^l 

be admitted to candidacy -' i^-^'.'^-' ^'^^IZl'^^fS^ DocWs degree 
nation. Applications for admission to «^"7^<=y f ^' ^ department for 
are filled out by the studen and ^"^-^* J^\^ ^^ ^Xte School, 
further action and transmission to the Dean of tj^ waau 

The applicant must have obtained fro™ ^e^^^^^^^^^ 
^age Department l^^'XTt^TZ^^T:^^^ major department and 
t:o::^::tcoZr^nV^Sc:Z another foreign language may be 



180 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



181 



substituted for either French or German. Preliminary examinations or 
such other substantial tests as the departments may elect are also required 
for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. The equivalent of three years of full time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent in residence at this university. On a part-time 
basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work at other 
institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon recommenda- 
tion of the department concerned, when the student applies for admission 
to candidacy for the degree. 

The Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence 
and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attain- 
ments in scholarship, and ability to carry on independent research in the 
special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four semester hours, 
exclusive of research, are required in minor work. The remainder of 
the required residence is devoted to intensive study and research in the 
major field. The amount of required course work in the major subject 
will vary with the department and the individual candidate. The candi- 
date must register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a 
dissertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original 
typewritten copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together 
with an abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be 
deposited in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before the convoca- 
tion at which the degree is sought. It is the responsibility of the student 
also to provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of the 
examining committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the university 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general university library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be 
obtained at the students* supply store. The abstracts are published bi- 
ennially by the university in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students 
may obtain copies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions \vho are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 



detailed procedures are the same as those stated 

amination. 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Candidates 

for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

„.tt» U„t h. IJ»-3,^";f„7, S ftfn. book, .„d .rtiC. 1. b» 
The passages to be transiatea wiu u applicant wishes 

specialized field. Some 300 pages of ff ^'^^'^ Jf^ '^^ J head of the 
tS have his examination chosen f^J'^.^/^trTedays before the exami- 

Department of Foreign L-^^^^^^^ Stty ^ use the foreign language 
nation. The examination aims ^ test^abiliQr ^^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^^ 

for research P^'^P^f ^•, . " '^.^Xtional forms and that he will be 
Tbfetnrfnre^reaXIXo^^ about 500 words of text, with the 

aid of a dictionary. 

^ . • f^ fViP^P tests must be filed in the office 

Of the tests. ,,„,v,^ to failure in the examination, and the unsuc- 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in ^^^^ 
cessful candidate is free to try agam at the next date set 

4. Examinations are held near ^^^^^f^rV^^^T^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Languages, on the first Wednesday of October, February, ana 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

„ „ ,,• = A number of fellowships have been estabhshed by the 

'"LJ, .„ .«..roa « -t\T";st::".""--' «-^ = 

d.p.rtn,.nl.. The «...! «"»«»' 'f f ™ ,',Jj ^ .„„ . full gr.du.K 
Xr^d^^W Lt s^rr^ico ,«..««nt.o. h„H» de,.»s 

s^za i-XTpfr d.»^^« -• d-sttj: 

University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 



182 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE SUMMER SESSION 



183 



Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research assistant- 
ships are available in several departments. The compensation varies with 
the nature and amount of service required and with the term of appoint- 
ment. The amount of credit that may be earned toward a degree likewise 
varies with the amount of time available for graduate study. The research 
assistants, especially those in the Experiment Station, usually participate 
in research that meets the requirements for a master's or a doctor's degree. 

The compensation for assistantships usually ranges from $600 to $1,000 
a year, plus the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned and appointments are made through the regular channels 
for staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships 
may be obtained from the department or college concerned. 



SUMMER SESSION 

Arnold E. JOYAL, Acttns- Director 

A summer Session of ^^^^^ £i:^:X7t%i^er^sC^^^^ 
instruction is offered in most of the departme^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

because of lower «'^':«"«'«"*t *J,^" ^ in sle divisions. In the College 

Terms of Admission become candidates 

The admission requirements for ^^°^' ^J^^/l^tn oiZ University, 
for degrees are the same as or -^J^l.^iX^Tec^irei to consult the 
Before registering, a candidate for ^degree wu ^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

Dean of the College or School in ''hich he admitted to the 

?eachers and special students not sjin^dgr^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^_ 

courses of the summer session for ^J'^J ^^^^^^^^^j the Summer Session, 
tion of courses must be approved by the Director 

of two semester hours. , _ .„ , „edited by the State Depart- 

Courses satisfactorily completed ^" J^ " „ Requirements of all classes, 
ment of Education toward satisfying certification requi 

in the regular sessions of the Umyersity. graduate degrees 

AH teachers or others plan««g *» ^° .^^ Graduate School as early as 

in Education must apply to the D^^'^J^^^Xte School. 

possible for admission to candidacy ^-'^^^^ler Session, consult ike 
For detaUed information ^n ^'^"'^^ '" '^'J'Z^Zuy in April. A copy 

special Summer Session -^-''^^'^Z^'Z^liZ^'or. SuZer Session, 

of this announcement may be seared fr^ the Uxre 

iniversity of Maryland. College Park, Md. 

ft 



184 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EVENING COURSES 

Arnold E. Joyal, Chairman 
Division of Evening Extension Courses. 
The University DroviHp« a \\^\4. j 
undergraduates and' .ratates J^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 7^^ -^truction for 

only m various other centers of the S ^^"^'.^^^/^^ undergraduates 
such courses were given at CambrS^ fL. T^ '^' ^"'^"^ 1942-1945, 
LaPlata, Cumberland, and SaHsbury ^"'^^^^^^' ^^^^^^^ Charlotte Halli 

wh«X„'",.T .°Sf stTdtt Sn'j "T T "» ""'-^ ■>"<=- 

During 1942-1945, evening courses wer^t t j^^f ^^^tors are available. 

English, history, political sconce pTvcL!'" ^' ^f''' ^^"^ ^^ ^d"<^^tion, 
ing the same period, courses in' c^ll ^.' '"""^"^^^ ^^^ ^^«^«^y- ^^r- 
history, and political science! " ""*"^ '"^^"^^^ ^^^ in English, 

-^^^^^^^^^^^ -Vice to employed 

teachers in the schools ofSSd or S nT f^.^^i. '^'"'^^ '^^''^^ -- 
sity is glad to provide evS co ' -. / 1'''' ^^ Columbia, the Univer- 
extent of its facilities. ^ ''' ^"' '*^^" vocational groups to the 

in V:'fS^ TcTyTflif aV^^^^' ^^ ^^--^ ^— is issued early 
desired may be sSL^ ctUrnS^^^ ^"^ ^"^^^^ ^^^--tion' 

Division of Evening Extension Courses, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



SECTION ra 

Course Offerings — College Park 



This section contains a list of all courses offered in the regular sessions 
of the University at College Park. Courses offered in the Summer Session 
and in the Baltimore Schools of the University are described in the separate 
catalogs issued by the several schools. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to 
another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 

Group I numbered 1 to 49 — courses primarily for freshmen, and sopho- 
mores. 

Group II numbered 50 to 99 — courses for juniors and seniors. 

Group III — numbered 100 to 199 — courses for advanced undergraduates 
(well qualified juniors and seniors) and graduates. 

Group IV numbered 200 to 299 — courses for graduates only. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
hours* credit is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 



185 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



187 



AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Aero. E. 101, 102. Aerodynamics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 
21; Phys. 20, 21. 

Basic fluid mechanics and the aerodynamic theory of airfoils. Airplane 
performance and stability calculation. Laboratory demonstration. 

Aero. E. 103. Airplane Detail Drafting (1) — First semester. One 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dr. 1, 2, 3. 

Standards of airplane drafting. Lofting. 

Aero. E. 104. Airplane Layout Drafting (2) — Second semester. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 103. 

Layout of component parts of airplanes, wings, fuselage, etc. 

Aero. E. 105, 106. Airplane Fabrication Shop (1, 1) — First and second 
semesters. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Shop 1. 

Machine shop, sheet metal forming and fabrication; wood and plastics; 
riveting, and welding. 

Aero. E. 107, 108. Airplane Design (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Mach. 50; 
Aero. E. 102 and 104. 

Theory and practice of airplane design. 

Aero. E. 109, 110. Aircraft Power Plants (4, 4) — First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Mech. 
50, M. E. 100, 101. 

Thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plant design. Gas 
turbines and jet propulsion. Study and tests of aircraft engines in 
laboratory. 

Aero. E. Ill, 112. Aeronautical Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

Wind tunnel tests. Structure tests. Experiments on hydraulic systems, 
landing gear operation, etc. Performance tests of aircraft engines and 
propellers. 

Aero. E. 113, 114. Thesis (1, 2) — First and second semesters. One 
laboratory period a week first semester and one lecture and one laboratory 
period a week second semester. 

The student lays out a research program, carries the program out, and 
writes a report. 

Aero. E. 115, 116. Mechanics of Aircraft Structures (3,3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 and Math. 64. 

Principles and problems of airplane stress analysis and design. 



For Graduates 

semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory perioa a 
Aero. E. 101, 102, Math. 64. aircraft Design of 

Special problems in performance --\^'^^^Zf ^^^^^--el reZcY.. 
aircraft for speeds approaching the velocity of sound. Wx 

Aero. E. 202. 203. Advanced Ai-aft Jt-^^^^^^^^^^^ p^ 

second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory peiioa 

'iS^it^ttitl^irrLports^^^ 

i^ri^rsr^tr^td^SL^^^^^^^^^^^ 

on structures in laboratory. pirst and second semes- 

Aero. E. 204. 205. Aircraft Dy-™-« .^J '^~!k Prerequisites. Mech. 
ters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a weeK. 

50, Math. 64. , dvnamics of landing. 

requisite. M. E. 100. 101; Aero. E. 109. 110. 

P * J A- ^„ff nA«i?n and Construction (3,3) — 

Aero. E. 208, 209. Advanced Aircraft Design and C ^^^^^^^^ ^^^.^^^ ^ 

First and second semesters. On«,Jf/™f *"^, 

Z^.. Prerequisite, Aero. E. ^O^. 108; M^^^ e^- ^^^^^^^ ^_,,,, 

A course in project engmeenng J^f ~*^St. Problems in design, 
in the design, production, and flight testing of aircrait 
production, management, testing, etc. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

* For Advanced Undergraduates 

rent agricultural economic problems. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
A V 100 Farm Economics (3)-First semester. 

marketing. 



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189 



A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Second semester. 

The development of marketing, its scope, channels and agencies of dis- 
tribution, functions, costs, methods used, and services rendered. 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture (3) — ^First semester. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers* cooperative organiza- 
tions; reasons for failure and essentials to success; commodity develop- 
ments; operative practices; banks for cooperatives; present trends. 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3) — Second semester. 

A study of credit principles as applied to private and cooperative farm 
businesses and the agencies extending farm credit. The needs for and benefits 
of farm insurance, including fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance. 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2) — Second semester. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. 

This course is designed to give students primary instruction in the 
grading, standardizing and inspection of fruits and vegetables, dairy prod- 
ucts, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical instruc- 
tion will be given in the form of lectures, while the demonstrational and 
practical work will be conducted through laboratories and field trips to 
Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — First semester. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a wetk. 

A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing 
of farm accounts. 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3) — Second semester. 

A study of the organization and operation of farms from the standpoint 
of efficiency, selection of farms, size of farms, leasing systems, and factors 
effecting profits. Students will make an analysis of the actual farm busi- 
ness and practices of different types of farms, and make specific recom- 
mendations as to how* these farms may be organized and operated as 
successful businesses. 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2) — First and second semesters. 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional class meetings 
for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. 

A. E. 111. Land Economics (3) — First semester. 

Concepts of land economy are discussed, as well as conditions and ten- 
dencies influencing land requirements in relation to land resources; a study 



^ , A nolicies- farm tenancy; tax delinquency 

of our land resources. .,^_ Second semester. 

production, prices and income. 

For Graduates ,, zWFirst and 

o • 1 PrnMcms in Farm Economics (2, 2)— J? irsi^ 
A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems 
second semesters. . ... ^g of the economic prob- 

"Zr. .dv..crf ~«m d,rii»S ""■■'* "^'i:"*.,.*... c«dit, pries. 

class and instructional staff. ^. .„ „-„t accomplished. 

A. E. 203. Research-credit -'^'^'^j'^ ^'^^^Seconor^cs under the 
Students .ill be. assigned research n agricultu_^^ ^^ ^^.^.^^^ .^^^^^^^^. 

supervision of ^^l^l^^J':Jn:na.s. 

tion in problems of agncultura . .^ ..^^g (2)-Second semester. 

A. E. 210. Taxation in Relation o AgncuU^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^.^^^^^^^^ 
Principles and practices «* ^^^^f ^^/i^vies, taxation in relation to land 
special reference to the f ^^"f ^f ^^Hy ^ Pay and benefits received, 
utilisation, taxation m relation to ability P ^^^^.^^ (3)-First 

A. E. 211. Agricultural J''^^^" ;" Jy^'Xld a week, 
semester. Two lectures -^ one laboratory peri ^^^^^ ^^^.^^^.^ 

Economic effects of ^f-^^JJ *d ifcense taxes, and income tax the 
of the general property ^^a-. ^-^^^^^j^^^^^ ,„d estate taxes as applied 

sales tax, special ^^^^'^^:iZ::^:;:'f.nci^o.s; practical and current prob- 
to the support of rural gove 
lems in taxation. Agricultural Production (3,2)— 

A E 212, 213. Land Utilization and AgncuRu ^^^^^^^^ 

Thte hours' a week, first -mestjr; 70 h^urs a w^^^^ . ^^^.^.^^^ ^^ 

joSTS:r;o£;^S]^^^^^^^ 

iT^:S^^rT^X^- and interregional shifts in land 

ization and agricultural P-^^^^^^^^ ^„, ^^.^els of Living (3)- 
A E 214. Consumption of Farm rro 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



191 



A. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (3) — First semester. 

An appraisal of agricultural cooperation as a means of improving the 
financial status of farmers. More specifically, the course includes a critical 
analysis and appraisal of specific types and classes of cooperatives. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

R. Ed. 1. Introduction to Agriculture (0) — First semester. Required of 
all Freshmen in the College of Agriculture. 

A non-credit series of lectures introducing the student to the broad field 
of agriculture. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 51. Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (2) — First semester. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Open only to students majoring in Agri- 
cultural Education. 

This course is designed to assist the student in relating the learning 
acquired in the several departments with the problems of doing and demon- 
strating which he faces in the field and in the classroom as a teacher of 
agriculture. Deficiencies are checked and corrected by laboratory practice. 

R. Ed. 90. Practice Teaching (5) — First semester. Open only to students 
majoring in Agricultural Education. 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student is required to analyze 
and prepare special units of subject matter in agriculture, plan lessons, and 
teach in cooperation with the critic teacher, exclusive of observation, not 
less than 100 clock hours of vocational agriculture and related subjects. 

R. Ed. 91. Practice Teaching (1-4) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, R. Ed. 90. 

A continuation of R. Ed. 90 for those students wishing to acquire 
additional experience in teaching. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 
Students (3) — Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Open only 
to students majoring in Agricultural Education. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — First 
semester. Open only to students majoring in Agricultural Education. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised 
farming programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer 
work, and objectives and methods in all-day instruction. 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Part-time and Adult Classes (1) — First semester. 
Open only to students majoring in Agricultural Education. 



A o^nlt class instruction in agriculture. 
Characteristics of part-time and -^^^^^^ materials for instruc- 

Determining needs for orga-zmg a ^^^^^^^^^^ J ^^^ ^^^,,,,,,3 method 

tion- and class management. Emphasis is piac 

^^rS: m. .epa.t.ental Ma„a.e«e„^ a)-See<.nd se.este. One 

iatory period aw e^P^^^^^^^^^ departments of 

The analysis «* ^^^rnxms^ratwe p g ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

vocational agriculture. In'«^]»sa ...gecond semester. 

R Ed 114. Rural Life and Education (»>-^^^**;^ . ^^^^i communi- 
An^lnsive study of the educational ag^^^^^^^ ^rat the possibilities of 

:oSSonrng effects of educational offerings. 

, Ed aOl .0. Kural Jr:^^^-^-^^^ ^ -- 

'TTT^^^ro.Ur.s in Voiational Agriculture. Related Science. 

a„d"shop (2.'2)-First and ^--"^/^^^^^J^;" ,^, current problems facing 
m this course special emphasis is P^^^^f ^^J^J ^^^ especially for persons 

teachers of vocational -g'*;* " ^',p7iLe in this iield. 

.ho have had several years of teaching ^ ^^_^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Kurai 

semesters. , « ^ministration, and supervision of the 

ArRTCULTURAL ENGINEERING 

AGRICULTUK ^^^^^^^ Undergraduates 

Agr. Engr. 54. Farm Mechanics (2)-First semester. Two 

periods a week. . -^^ctical farm shop and 

,,. course con^sts of .^^^^^^^^^^^^ ,,,,.,, only to 

rorrraTrt^e^gineerlng. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

.. u-„«„v ft-»— First semester. Two leciuies. 
Agr. Engr. 101. Farm Machinery (3) 

S Stotion. ^iustm.nt, »d «p»r. 



\ 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



193 




Agr. Engr. 102. Gas Enffine^ Tro^f^ ^ . 

semester. .Vo lectures andTelkblS^yVrfodrrr "^ ^^^"^^-^^ 

A study of the design, operation, and renair nf fh^ • * 
engines, tractors, and automobiles used in farm practL ' '°'"''^'*'°" 

Agr Engr 105. Farm Buildings (2)-First semester. 

water^TpIy atdtrnrtfofsyst^r "'^^= ^'^ '' '^^ '-»>«- ^-i„, 
onf fa'bo^rrV'JIrioJne^k'"^^^ '''~^^^^-^ ~ster. One lecture and 

struction, and the use oV enSneerin- ^nlt " 1 ^'^^''' '^''''°^' "* <=on- 
time will be spent upon drafna^e hv ' .T^*"" ^ '™*"«^ *'»°«nt of 
thereto. ^ dramage by open ditches, and the laws relating 

AGRONOMY AND SOILS 
Division of Crops 

labtSoVperioTa wSr"" '''-'"°"^ ^^'"-*- '^^ >-*"- and one 
anf ^orge'goTs!"""' ^''^^*^«<^"' -'*-' improvement and uses of Cereal 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Agron. 51. Technology of Crop Quality (2) Pi... 

rtrSof^--- -^- « -«^ ^-SLi^fsXrr.?^^^^^^^^^^ 

ca^SfnTSiraf^^^^^^^^^^ -rket classifi-' 

(Not offered in 1945-46.) ^ ^"'^"'^ ^***^^ bureau of Markets. 

Prfrf,:;;ittAgrt!T ''"'' '*"''*- ^^■^>-^'-* -^^ second semesters. 
Advanced individual study of field crops of special interest to the student. 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

.t:;n::ies:7:r::s z^:--'- ;~«' -• - 

in plant improvement. (Not oSe^ln 194^46? ^ "'' '"' "^*^"''^ "^«<^ 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (2)--Seco„d semester. 

ine bringing to bear of informflfi^r, ^ 
development of balanced cropZr3tlm/''r ^^"^"^ '=«"rses upon the 
tives and different areas of the State appropriate to different objec- 



For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Crop Breeding (2-4) — First semester. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

Similar to Agron. 103, but better adapted to graduate students and offer- 
ing a wider range of choice of material to suit special cases. (Not offered 
in 1945-46.) 

Agron. 203. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. 

Reports by students on current scientific publications on crops or soils. 

Agron. 209. Research (4-8) — First and second semesters. 

Credit according to work accomplished. With approval or suggestion of 
the head of the department, the student will choose his own problem for 
study. 

Division of Soils { 

Soils 1. General Soils (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 1 or 
registration therein. 

A broad conception of the fundamentals of soils showing the origin, de- 
velopment, relation to natural sciences, soil uses, effect on civilization, soil 
properties and relation to soil problems. 

Soils 2. Soil Fertility Principles (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one two-hour demonstration laboratory each week. Prerequisites, Soils 
1, Organic Chemistry, General Bacteriology. 

A study of the biological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils 
that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical fertility 
or biological nature and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, 
organic materials and rotations are discussed and illustrated. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 51. Soil Investigation Methods (2) — First semester. Two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Soils 2 and Quantitative and 
Organic Chemistry or registration therein. 

A laboratory study of the common biological, chemical, and physical 
methods of examining a soil to determine its nutritional needs and fertility 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 103. Soil Geography (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Soil 1 and Geology. 

A study of the factors and processes of soil formation in the world and 
Maryland, the relation of soils to related geographic features, in develop- 
ment and use of soil classification and soil capability grouping and uses. 
The laboratory period is used largely for field trips to examine soils in place. 

Soils 112. Soil Conservation (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the factors affecting the preservation of the desired physical, 
chemical, and biological functions of soil and soil moisture; the influence of 



I 



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s* 




THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



* 1 ^ 

"■...on Of .„„ ^ .„,„,.„^ an*S,r,r„r"''"*"'»' •"" '"• 

9nli« OA1 c. ^^^ Graduates 

ooils 201. SoeciAl p-^Ki 

discussion periods a week. PreSiTe apt:"' T "'. '^"^^*«^^- ^^ree 
A review of the devpln,.^,^ * / approval of instructor. 

chemical and .iolo^ie^r---^^^^^^^^^^^^ of the p.siea, 

Soils 212, 214. Soil Research T u «=°"*nbution to soil science. 

ters. Two three-hour laboratory itnTdr'^ ^^ --"^ -mes- 

of instructor. ""'^ P«"°ds a week. Prerequisite, approval 

^afe ttTaSL'^on'rlhr '*^'^' technique, and equipment used . • 

^"•' P-^'-- It is the laborator'y p'a^of ZT.ll Se 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

""f "s/TT^^^^^^^^^^^^ i:"'''"''' ""^''^-'"■^ <3>-First semester. 

pS3^'P^, -"-' -irin^tel^^^^^ ^^^^ -*«^- ^Heep. 

Practice m the selection, fitting and show^^Tii't^tS "" "^"^^^-"t- 

A. H. 31. Livestock Judeintr r2^ q^ j 
periods a week. Prerequisite A H^^~^«'=«"d ^^'"ester. Two laboratory 

s leias and flocks are maintained 

A. H 52 F..H ^^' ^^^^"^^^ Undergraduates 
• ^' ^^' I'eeds and Feeding- (x\ ^' ^ 

one laboratory period a week. PreriqT^S 0^^? , """^ '^*=*"^^« -^ 
Elements of nutrifio« 4uibites, Chem. 1, 3. 

various feeds to ttZ;::TZ£r:^'r'''T' *"' ^'^^'^^^^y Of the 
calculation and compounding of rltLs ""*"*=''" '^^'^'"^ ^^-^-ds; the 

A. H. 53. Principles of Breeding (%\ <i 
and one laboratory period a week. Pre^eTulsTe! ZoTm- ""^^ '^"^^"^^^ 



COURSES OF STUDY 



195 



The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, 
development, systems of breeding, and pedigree work are considered. 

A. H. 55. Livestock Management (3) — Second semester. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

A course designed to familiarize students with various systems of live- 
stock farming, together with practical methods of handling and managing 
livestock. Practice and training in the feeding, fitting and preparation of 
animals for show and work purposes. 

A. H. 56. Meat and Meat Products (1) — First semester. One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Designed to give information on the processing and handling of the 
nation's meat supply. A study of the physical and structural qualities which 
affect the value of meat and meat products. Trips are made to packing 
houses and meat distributing centers. 

A. H. 58. Advanced Livestock Judging (2) — First semester. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 31. 

An advanced course in the selection and judging of purebred and com- 
mercial meat and work animals. The most adept students enrolled in this 
course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in intercollegiate 
livestock judging contests. 

A. H. 60. Beef Cattle Production (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 2. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production of beef 
cattle, including a study of breeds and their adaptability; breeding, feeding 
and management of purebred and commercial herds. 

A. H. 64. Sheep Production (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles and practices underlying economical production of sheep, in- 
cluding a study of the breeds and their adaptability. Breeding, feeding 
and management of purebred and commercial flocks. 

A. H. 67. Pork Production (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, A. H. 2. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production of hogs; 
breeding, feeding and management of purebred and commercial herds; 
breeds of swine and their adaptability. 

A. H. 69. Draft Horse Production (2) — Second' semester. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 2. 

Principles and practices underlying economical production and use of draft 
horses, including a study of breeds and their adaptability. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 112. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2) — ^First semester. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 2. 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




^n^eration .aeiHties; the ^/rkfnSnl S^S protr ""^^ ^^^ ^'- 

31. 32. 33/34, aT l"""*"""" ^'>-^-* —ten Prerequisites, Chen. 
Processes of die-p^sfiAn «k 

tional balances; nSSfjf tSrai Zn^Tf^ ^' ^^^-^^^ -tri- 
and reproduction. *' requirements for growth, production 

fulness o^ eac?^ A^dL^"S>nX>SeTr 1 ''^ ^'^^ ^^^ ^^ - 
I'ght horses is included in this course '''''*'"" ^""* ^^^^^ing of 

Prtq^isit^-A^'J-r ''^''* «"'- ^-"-^ a)-Seeo„d semester. 

A continuation of A TT iic t i 
the light horse farm, proper meSs.f 11'*"'^ f *« organization of 
disease, treatment and car^ of injurt fale':' s'SpS S^'' '=^"*^"' «^ 

A H 201 ^^^ Graduates 

A. H. 202, 203. Seminar (1 n_F,V«t = a 
Students are required tn 1 ^^'""^^ ^'''^ ««<=ond semesters, 
publications relating to animrhus'banTv '' ^^"'^ "P°" *=""«"» ^"entific 
presentation before and discussion bythe cfass'" *'"'" ""^^^'^ "^'^ ^o^ 

actt ?f Trk dtr"""-""^*^'* ^'^ •'^ ''^^-^-d by the amount and char- 

With the approval of the head nf ^\.^ a . 
to pursue original researJh ^ some phirlr*' ^*'?'r*^ "'" ^« -"--<! 
the same to completion, and reporHhe ts^Itf t^T\ '"'^^^'^^'^ry. carrying 

A.H.205. Advanced Breeding '77'*^ " ^''^ ^^^ "^ « thesis. 
Zool. 104. A. H. 53. ^ (2)-Second semester. Prerequisites. 

This course dealc -ttrifVi 4-1, 

tion; selection and seTeSioni^s-^l'et^^^^^ "' '^^'^^'^^ -^ -"a- 
m farm animals. ^' "reedmg systems; specific inheritance 

sectd°;e2eVrr T^fSes^Tot^ab'^^r^'"^"* ''' ^^-^-* -<» 
An intensive study of thp . . laboratory period a week. 

Physiology. anirLtilTeTd^crTnt^V-r^'"^^ ^-^^"^' ^^^1 
as they apply to the --^^^':T:Z:^fZ^^:^^ 



COURSES OF STUDY 



197 



*ART 

Practical Art, see page 268. 

Art 1. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). 

Prehistoric period and Egypt to 1000 B. C. Survey of architectural re- 
mains, sculpture, painting. Attention is given to stages of culture as 
reflected in the archaelogical and artistic remains. Lectures fully illustrated 
by slides. 

Art 2. Art in Ancient Civilization (2). 

Near East and Pre-Greek civilization of the eastern Mediterranean. 
Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian. The important archaelogical dis- 
coveries of Schliemann and Evans at Troy, the Greek mainland and in Crete 
are treated in detail. Conducted with the use of slides. 

Art 3. Art in Classical Civilization (2). 

Monuments of Ancient Rome. A survey of the architectural remains and 
the decorative art of the Romans. The related Etruscan art development 
will also be treated, as well as the remains of Pompeii and important out- 
lying sites of the Roman world. Illustrated with slides. 

Art 4. Art in Classical Civilization (2). 

Greek Art: Architecture, sculpture, and vase-painting. The course covers 
the achaeic period, treats in detail the highly developed forms of the Golden 
Age, and shows the main trends in the late Greek or Hellenistic era. 
Illustrated by slides. 

Art 11. Medieval Art (3). 

An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. 
European architecture, sculpture, and painting, from the third century A. D. 
to the Renaissance, studied by means of slides. 

Art 13. Modern Art (3) — Three lectures. Occasional gallery visits. 

European art from the Renaissance to the present. Illustrated lectures. 
Visits to the museums in Washington. 

Art 23. Italian Painting (3) — One lecture, two consecutive hours of 
museum study in the National Gallery of Art in Washington. 

A study of the development of Italian art since the Middle Ages, with 
special emphasis on the painting of the Renaissance and the Baroque. 
Occasional comparison of painting with sculpture, and architecture. Lectures 
illustrated with slides. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Art 51. Principles of Art Appreciation (3) — Three lectures. Occasional 
gallery visits. 

A course designed to help those who seek the proper approach to figurative 
art, and the best enjoyment of it. 



♦ For other courses in Art, see Home Economics. 



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ASTRONOMY 

BACTERIOIOGV AND FOOD TECHNOLOGY 
Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4)— Firc;t 5»n^ 
Ie«"»s „d two ..boralory periods . wSj ^™e3l<,r.. Tw. 

tory fe,, 58.00. " "" ""' I"" mvironmml. Ubora- 

.^f Sy tr£ i;;,ss siZyC.jrTr « '»™-^ «< 

13.00. ^ ^« *°r more advanced courses. Demonstration fee, 

Bact. 5. Physiology of Bacteria (4)— First anH ... a 
lectures and two laboratory periods i Un^eSS Terr* '"'' 

Emphasis upon the fundamental physiolorical «.! /" 

cytology and growth; respiration. PrSrTt S „. u ""^ ^^''^^''^^^ 

and staining solutions; introduction to nr.n.° """^ '"^'^'*' ^«*&«nte 

finement of bacteriological techniZ *^Py.^P^^«*'°n ^°om procedures. Re- 

n..t «, „ technique. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Kact. 51. Household Bacteriology r3)_p,v<!t «r.^ . 

growth. Relationship of microbLfo/v t« 1 *^^ *=''"*'^<'^ "^ microbial 

Bact. 53. Sanitary Bacteriology (4)-First ..H . 

lectures and two laboratory periods a week P ^^^""^^ semesters. Two 

Bacteriological and nuhli. r u^ Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

pool sanitation^let^te'^^^^^^^ -PPHes; swimming 

sanitation. Standard methods o^^^^^^^^^^ 
Occasional inspection trips. LaboratoryT^,^^^^^^^^ water ^ and sewage. 

tefs^VL^^^^^ ftfet'-^T \''''^'''' ^^^ ---^ --S. 

students majoring In Enginemng '^"^^"^^"^- ^^^ Junior and Senior 
This course comprises the lectures only of Bact. 53. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



199 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — First semester. fTwo lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

The role of microorganisms in the diseases of man and animals with 
emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of bacterial species, types of 
disease, modes of disease transmission; prophylactic,- therapeutic and 
epidemiological aspects. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 102. Lectures in Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — First semester. 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

This course comprises the lectures only of Bact. 101. 

Bact. 103. Serology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

Infection and resistance; principles and types of immunity; hypersensi- 
tiveness. Fundamental techniques of major diagnostic immunological 
reactions and their application. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 105. Clinical Methods (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 103. 

A practical course designed to integrate clinical laboratory procedures 
in terms of hospital and public health demands. Examination of sputum, 
feces, blood, spinal fluids, urine, etc. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health (3) — Second semester. Three 
lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. Strongly recommended, Bact. 53. 

History, characteristic features and epidemiology of the important com- 
municable diseases; public health aspects of man's struggle for existence; 
public health administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. 

Bact. 131. Food Bacteriology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts and molds to fruits, vegetables, meats, sea- 
food, and poultry products. Methods of examination, and standards of 
quality. A study of control measures. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 133. Dairy Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts and molds to milk, cream, butter, ice-cream, 
cheese and other dairy products. Standard methods of examination, public 
health requirements, plant sanitation. Occasional inspection trips. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 135. Soil Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

The role played by microorganisms in the soil ; nitrification, denitrification, 
nitrogen-fixation and decomposition processes; cycles of elements; relation- 
ships of microorganisms to soil fertility. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Bact. 161. Systematic Bacteriology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 20 hours of Bacteriology. 



/ 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



<^^7 1^S:SS.;'^^^^^'^ -•^.fo-'^iPs.- international 
Laboratory fee. $8.00. ''*''*^"*' variation as it affects classification. 

ter!"VereUSe fo'^edSn 1^""^ ^'^~^'''' ^^ --"^ --s- 
only upon the consent ofihe instrSor" ^^^ "' '""' ''''" Registration 

BaIttiororand^"S'L^lr/',? '^"^"''^'^ -^er^aduate majors in 
fie bacteri'oUalToSer'Sef tt^;^^^^^^^^ ^^> ^"^^ ^P-^" 

department and (b) report on currenrsciSffie Seratrl "'"''" '' *'^ 

For Graduates 

lectut; l"d ttr EaforpTil^r^^^^^^^ ---*- ^wo 

Bacteriology and allied fieWs.TncTudU SaS" 103""*^""*^' '" "«^"^ ^ 

coi^pr^^I^r^ir 'i^r^^^^^^^ -^ ^— 'o.y m the disease 

protozoa; tissue culture the stud vn^ T: V^"""^'' "'''""^'* ''°d'««. and 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 ^ ^'^"* literature in the medical field. 

Bact. 205. Bacterial Metabolism /•l^ a 
and two laboratory periods 1 wej Pre^TSre ioTl^' ■ 1"° '^'^^"^^^ 
and allied fields, including Chemistry I6O and lei '" bacteriology 

biotf; pTottiT t'r:ZL^'T'eS'''r''''' inter-re,ationship.. anti- 
.nicroorganisms in indusS^^nltSr Urr^y^ k^^^^^^^^^ - 

tuiefln^d ^wo^raraL^rpeSrdrr ---*- -^o 'ec- 

Bacteriology including Bact 131 Prerequisite. 30 credits in 

advance£ in microbiology. selected subjects dealing with recent 

cre^dtttinlctSgy.-^'"* ''"' ^"'^"'^ — *-• P-equisite, 30 

suSS^TtrandU^efunt^^^ '''^ investigation is outlined in con- 
of the departmS """ ^''^ supervision of a senior staff member 

Food Technology 

tZ\I::ttlll\2^^^^ f tTT ^'^^^'''' ^^"^^^^- ^- ^-ture and 
1946.) ^ ^ '^''^- Prerequisite, Bact. 131. (Not offered 1945- 



COURSES OF STUDY 



201 



Microscopical analysis of foods following the methods used in the Federal 
Government and other agencies. Studies of the structural composition of 
agricultural and manufactured foods. Use of microscopic tests in factory 
control and analyses. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

F. Tech. 108. Preservation of Poultry Products (3) — First semester. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 131. 
(Not offered 1945-1946.) 

Studies in the microbiology of poultry, alive and during storage; micro- 
biology of shell eggs, fresh and during storage, frozen and dried eggs. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

F. Tech. 110. Regulatory Control (2) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and demonstrations a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 131. (Not offered 1945- 
1946.) 

Methods followed in the control of foods in interstate and intrastate 
commerce. Laboratory standards of control. 

F. Tech. 120. Food Sanitation (3) — Second semester. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week and field work. Enrollment limited to majors 
in Food Technology. (Not offered 1945-1946.) 

Principles of sanitation in food manufacture and distribution; methods 
of controlling sanitation in commercial canning, pickling, bottling, preserv- 
ing, refrigeration, dehydration, etc. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

F. Tech. 140. Technology Conference (1) — First and second semesters. 
(Not offered 1945-1946.) 

Reports and discussions of current developments in the field of food 
technology. 

BOTANY 

Bot. 1. General Botany (4) — ^First and second semesters. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the 
subject. Emphasis is on the fundamental biological principles of the higher 
plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 2. General Botany (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A brief evolutionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and 
their relatives, and the seed plants, emphasizing their structure reproduction, 
habitats, and economic importance. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 20. Diseases of Plants (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

An introductory study of the symptoms and causal agents of plant dis- 
eases and measures for their control. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 50. Plant Taxonomy (3) — Second semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. 



202 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



203 



if 



pe^ll'wSVe'CitX.f-'""'' """*"■ ■^o ■"""•to,, 

Principles and methods involvpH ^r^ fi,^ « 
scope slides of plant m.teS''tZr^:,:;7^^^Z "' '"'"'"^"* "•^^"- 
Bot. 52. Seminar (l)_First and second semesters. 

all s:;:ryizT ?of:;rr;yf r^^- -f -^ -<^ ^--ss i„ 

biological science. ^' "^J*"^^ ^^'^ ^^nors in botany or 

Bot 70. Research methods in Plant Patholoffv (2^ v<- ^ ., 

A. Plant Morphology and Plant Taxonomy 
Bot 111 pf"'/;'^*""'' Undergraduates and Graduates 

laborato""peSs\^rrPrtlTSS ZT' ""^ ^-^ ^^^ ^^o 
The origin and development 7th l^n^ L/t'' ^^ 

vascular plants. Laboratory fee $5:00. "^ '^'*^™' '" **"= 

Bot. 114. Advanced Plant Taxonnmv r^\ v i. 

Pl«.t». Labomorj. t„SZ. "" »'""«»«<>" «' M.ryl„d 

For Graduates 

tory" peSds a^er PreTe'St^Tof Jl "T ^^^^ ^^^ *- '«^- 
equivalent. rerequisites, Bot. 51 and Zool. 104 (Genetics) or 

$5.00. , neredity and evolution. Laboratory fee, 



Bot. 212. Plant Morphology (2) — ^First semester. Two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 50, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. 

A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to the phylogeny and development of floral organs. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 213. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. 
Discussion of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

Bot. 214. Research — Credit according to work done. 

B. Plant Pathology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 121. Diseases of Special Crops (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. 

Offers more detailed information on the diseases of special crops than is 
given in Bot. 20. 

Bot. 128. Mycology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 2. 

An introductory study of the morphology, classification, life histories, 
and economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Virus Diseases (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 20 and Bot. 101. 

Consideration of the physical, chemical and physiological aspects of plant 
viruses and plant virus diseases. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 225. Research, Pathology — Credit according to work done. 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 
20, or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant disease 
control. 

Bot. 229. Seminar, Pathology (1) — First and second semesters. 
Discussion on the advanced technical literature of plant pathology. 

C. Plant Physiology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and general chemistry. 

A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 50, or equivalent. 

A study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant successions and 
formations of North America are treated briefly and local examples studied. 



204 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



205 



I 



For Graduates 
elementary or.anicth:Sy!rSutvai:t ' ^^^'^'»"-*-' ^»*- ^^^ -d 

Plal.; it Toirr ''^""^ "^*' ^•'^ °P^'««- ^^ P^^^-al phenomena in 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Metliods (9,\ /m«+ a j . 
laboratory periods a week Labor2;7 "^'^ '" ^^^^-^«-> Two 

Laboratory ?ee, $5.oS. I^^bo'^atory course to accompany Bot. 202. 

Bot. 204. Growth and DevelonmAnf r9\ t?- 4. 
12 semester hours of plant science ^^^-^'''' ««"»««*«»•• Prerequisite, 

Bot. 205. Salt Nutrition Seminar m rM«t » j ■ 

Bot 206. Research-Credit according to work done. 

students must be qualified to pursue with „r„fi<. *i, 
undertaken. pursue with profit the research to be 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Accounting and Statistical Control, see page 114 

Busmess Education, see page 128. 

Economics, see page 105. 

Financial Administration, see page 112 

Foreign Trade and International Relations, see page 120 

Industrial Administration, see page 110 

Marketing Administration, see page 110 

Putr ah"**- T'" ''''•""^^ (Geography), see pages 120. 292 
fublic Administration, see page 117. 

Secretarial Training, see page 115. 

ter!:^Rti"d o?Tr R A. rdent" ' '''''-^'"'' ^"'^ ^--^ — 

buiire^te'rTri;: ^BA^t /?"'!, ^"' '""'^«*»-^ organisation of a 
and control. "^ ^^^ " '"*='"*'^^ '"<^"^*"^J management, organization 

RequtedVal, R^t'Ttulentr"""^ ^'•'^-^•^^* «"^ --""^ -">-*-. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

B.A. 120. Intermediate Accounting (5) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 21. 

A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, 
corporation accounts and statements, consignment and installments, and the 
interpretation of accounting statements. 

B.A. 121. Cost Accounting (4) — Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. 

A study of the fundamental principles of cost accounting including job 
order, process, and standard cost accounting. 

B.A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (4) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, B.A. 120. 

A study of the principles and problems of auditing and the application of 
accounting principles, to the preparation of audit working papers and 
reports. 

B.A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (4) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 120. 

A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax Law, using illus- 
trative examples, selected questions and problems, the preparation of indi- 
vidual partnership, estate and trusts, and corporation returns. 

B.A. 124. Advanced Accounting (4) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 120. 

Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized problems in partner- 
ships, estates and trusts, banks, mergers and consolidations, receivership 
and liquidations. 

B.A. 125. C. P. A. Problems (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, consent 
of the instructor. 

Designed to coordinate all previous work in accounting with special 
emphasis placed on the solution of problems typical of those presented in 
C. P. A. examinations. 

B.A. 129. Apprenticeship in Accounting (0) — Prerequisites, minimum of 
20 semester hours in accounting and the consent of the accounting staff. 

A period of apprenticeship is provided with nationally known firms from 
about January 25 to February 15. 

B.A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, junior standing. Required for graduation. 

This course is devoted to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. 
Emphasis is placed upon the collection of data; hand and machine tabula- 



206 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



tion; graphic charting; statistical distribution- average.,- in^.^ 
sampling; elementary tests of reliability; and simpL cofreiaMons """'"^^ 

^^.^"' pI^'^^- ^'^"«"- <^' 3)-Pirst and seeon. 

cost a^n^ai^ ar^St^"::^:- t^z ;=r '-'- ^^-- 

This course deals with the problems tn h« fo-.<.j k 
organization and financing of cornTL ! ^ "management in the 

securities and their Te in rfisi^? . enterprise; the various types of 
and control. ^ '^'"'^' ^""^ apportioning income, risk, 

slm' '■ '""*"""* Management (3)-First semester. Prerequisite, 

A study of the problems and methods involved in tbp a.,=i„ • , .. 
and management of investments. ^'''' ^^l^'ti"". 

B.A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices (^\ a^ a 

requisite, Econ. 140. ractices (3)-Second semester. Pre- 

A study of the organization and manaeement «f th^ 
the operation of its departments ^nnT To. f commercial Bank, 
of commercial credit. ""P*"""""*"' ^"-^ *»>« ""^thods used in the extension 

bI-^'uT' ''"'" M-««--t (3)-Second semester. Prerequisite, 

slot T'rSJ^iTzi::^'::' *'^ ^'^^-^ ^^^"-"^ *» ^*« -*- 

and management o'f a rdrdla-l:ra:rth^e7:So^^^^^ 
refufsiti'LfS T:?: *"' '"^^' '"^"^"^^^ ^^>-^-* -™-ter. Pre- 

a/rtl^nt^atingt =r fnlVt" ^ ^^"-'^ "^^ 
lations. reserves, investments, premiums, and regu- 

B.A 145. Property. Casualty, and Liability Insurance (2) Pir«f 
ter. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. "surance (2)— First semes- 

A survey of the insurance coveraees wn^f^., +^ i. ^ , . 
sonal risks arising from such hazard" aTfirewi^^ ^'""^ '^' ^^^- 

transportation, fidelity, and liability ' ^vindstorm, ocean and inland 



COURSES OF STUDY 



207 



B.A. 146. Real Estate Financing and Appraisals (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37, B.A. 156. 

A study of the methods used in financing real estate of all types — resi- 
dential, industrial, and commercial. The fundamental problem of valuation 
will be studied from the viewpoint of the appraiser. Appraiser technique 
will be applied in the field. 

B.A. 147. Business Cycles (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140 
and senior standing. 

A study of the causes of depressions and unemployment, cyclical and 
secular instability, theories of business cycles, and the problem of con- 
trolling economic instability. 

B.A. 150. Marketing Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 150. Required for graduation. 

A study of the work of the marketing division in a going organization. 
The work of developing organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the course 
is placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices for the 
effective marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

B.A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (2) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 150. 

^ Deals with the fundamental principles of advertising. Covers the organ- 
ization and carrying through of advertising campaigns and programs, the 
selection of ideas, types of appeal and different media, and the method of 
judging the effectiveness of advertising. 

B.A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 151. 

Studies the practices and techniques of copy writing and layout that are 
useful for those who expect to prepare advertising or to direct the actual 
production of advertising. Covers the most essential principles of various 
kinds of copy writing. Surveys the process of production from the original 
idea to the published advertisement, and analyzes methods of testing its 
effectiveness. 

B.A. 153. Purchasing Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 150. 

Studies the problems of determining the proper sources, quality and 
quantity of supplies, and of methods of testing quality; price policies, price 
forecasting, forward buying bidding and negotiation; budgets and standards 
of achievement. Particular attention is given to government purchasing, 
the sources and supplies of war materials, and methods and* procedures used 
in their procurement. 

B.A. 154. Retail Store Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 150. 



208 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



209 



Retail store organization, location, layout and store policy; pricing 
policies, price lines, brands, credit policies, records as a guide to buying; 
purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and supervision of 
retail sales force; and administrative problems. 

B.A. 156. Real Estate Principles and Practice (2) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 ot* 37. 

The principles and practices involved in the acquisition and utilization 
of land and the improvements thereon. 

B.A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (3)— (Not offered 1945-46). Pre- 
requisite, B.A. 150. 

Functions of various exporting agencies; documents and procedures used 
in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring goods in 
foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through the cus- 
toms districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 160. Required for graduation. 

This course deals essentially with functional and administrative relation- 
ships between management and the labor force. It comprises a survey of 
the scientific selection of employees, "in-service" training, job analysis, 
classification and rating, motivation of employees, employee adjustment, 
wage incentives, employee discipline and techniques of supervision, elimina- 
tion of employment hazards, etc. 

B.A. 162. Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A.160. 

A study of contemporary trends in society's effort through legislation, 
mediation, and other methods to bring about a harmonious relationship 
between labor and management. State and Federal laws, and court deci- 
sions affecting labor relations are studied. 

B.A. 163. Industrial Relations (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 160. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry 
with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal 
analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitration, 
mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, 
boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and injunc- 
tions. 

B.A. 165. Office Management (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 
11 or junior standing. 

Considers the application of the principles of scientific management in 
their application to office work. 

B.A. 166. Business Communications (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
junior standing. 



B.A. 11 and 160. . ^i„^;r,«y nlant layout and location. 

Factory organization and n-nagement mcludmg p ant lay ^^^^^^.^^ 

product design, personnel relations, wage setting, 30b a y 
''Bil'TrTransportation II (3)-(not offered 1945-46). Prerequisite. 
'-Designed for students interested in the P-tical aspects of transporta- 

B.A. 172. Transportation III (3)— inoi: out^i 
'■Thil'tourse treats the details of classification and rate construction for 

the inland t-sportation se^^^^^^ ,3,_overseas Shipping (not offered 

BA 173. Transportation IV K^) ^''^ 
1945-46). Prerequisite P.A. 170. ^.^^^ ^^, ,,,„,d semesters. Pre- 

B.A. 180, 181. Business ^^ ^(^*/„>-^'^fXates in B. P. A. 
requisite, senior standing. Required ot a g negotiable instru- 

®*'*'^" . . ,•9^ fnot offered 1945-46). Prerequisite, 

B.A. 183. Law for Accountants (2)— (not olterea iv 

^■^" ^^^" , 1 .• „ fn the accounting profession, special emphasis 

accountants, corporations, estates, and trusts 

B A 186. Real Estate Law and Conveyancing (2)-(not offered 
Prerequisite, B.A. 156 and 181. ^^ ^^^^ 

prlttyTaw wtrS Tf =esrn:t^oZ to rell estate dealers hut to 
-all business men. ^^^ Graduates 

B A. 220. Managerial Accounting (3)-(Not offered 1945-46.) 
R A 228 Rese'arch in Accounting-(Arranged.) 

Organization-(Arranged.) Prerequisites, Ec. 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (l-3)-Preiequis 

140, B. A. 21, B. A. 140. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



211 



210 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management (3) — (Not offered 1945-46.) 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3)— (Not offered 1945-46.) 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3) — Second semester. 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing — (Arranged.) ^ 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations — ^First 
semester. 

' B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management — Second semester. 
(Arranged.) 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 269. Studies in Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relation- 
ships — ( Arranged. ) 

B. A. 299. Thesis— (Arranged.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $8.00 per semester with the excep- 
tion of Chemistry 7 and 9. Demonstration fee in these courses is $3.00 
per semester. ' 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry (3, 3) — Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period per week. 

An abbreviated course in general chemistry especially designed for 
students in home economics. 

A. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 15, 17. Qualitative Analysis (3, 3) — Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period the first semester; one lecture and two three-hour 
laboratory periods the second semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. 

Chem. 19. Quantitative Analysis (4) — First and second semesters. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1, 3. 

Chem. 21, 23. Quantitative Analysis (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 15, 17. 

This course includes a study of the principal operations of gravimetric 
and volumetric analysis. Required of all students majoring in Chemistry. 

Chem. 121, 123. Chemical Microscopy (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Chem. 121 is 
a prerequisite of Chem. 123. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of 
microscopic analysis and with the use of the polarizing microscope. 



c^ «. ^^ -.,..= «^-' ?™r. jrcSr^-i's 

three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

33. 34- 9.-»_First and second semesters. 

j:.:rrrir..'-'op«i> »--• -x« .-- - 

individual. . . , :. ra-i Second semester. Two three-hour 

Chem. 266. . Bjolofa^^Analy^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^_ 3^^ 3,^ 33, 3,. 

laboratory periods per weeK. rrerey 

B. Biochemistry (4)-Second semester. Two lec- 

-Chemical study ^ ^ ::;^ ;;::::Z.^. ..o lectures per 

Chem. 81. G^-^'^^Vr^ Tl 32 33 34 or Chem. 35. 36, 37. 38. 
^IL r sr S.X— ; I; students in home economics. Chem. 
82 must be taken concurrently. . ^^^^^^^^. ^^^ 

Chem. 82. General ^'^'^'^'^'^J ^^^'''TvJlLites. Chem. 32, 34 or 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 36, 38. r\,cm R1 

A course designed to accompany Chem. 81. 

A course as semester. Three lectures per week. 

rKom 161 Biochemistry (3)— becona semes 
Chem. i«>i. "• 3^ Chem. 35, 36. 37, 38. 

chemistry. semester. Two three- 

^^* ^^' ^ r>- K^«,?«trv (2 2)— First and second semes- 

the instructor. ^. , j 

second semesters. Two tnree nou 
quisite, consent of the instructor. 



212 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



semt:;rTw!rtX:^^^^^^^ <^-^>-^irst and second 

.unites, Chem. 161. 162 anSl^s^ 'f^tLlZ'' ''' -^^'^- ^-" 
C. Inorganic Chemistry 

Chem. 1, 3. General Chemistry (4 4) Pir=f ^ 
lectures and two three-hour laboratlV p;;^:; wteT ' ^~^^'^^- ^^ 

•^^urses. *^^P*«^ as a prerequisite for more advanced 

leet"-pr„ikXtS,"c\*t'5^ «>-^-»^ -»... T„, 
second semesters.- T^^o^ StTrrp^ Vel^^"^ ^'^"^"^^ ^2' 2>-Fi-t and 

seSst^-s^^Tf ^;v. "^'^r"'*'*' ^""'S«ni<= Laboratory C2 2^ p- . . 
Chem 206 1 '' laboratory periods per we^k ' '''""'' 

seconTsemesterl" otet^Il^Cr lll^"^^^^^^^^ <1)-First and 

ictooratory period per week 

D. Organic Chemistry 
Chem. 31, 33. Elements of Orsanir ri,. • , 

semesters. Two lectures per week P^er^"^^^^^^^ ^ 2)-F:rst and second 

eco-m-i ^--- - — ^n :=:t:r;iy ., ,.., 

septts^^t tfieToi 1--- p^rdt7^->-- - second 
A course designed to accompany Chem. 31. 33 
Chem. 35, 37. Elementary Organic Ph. • * , 
semesters. Two lectures per week Prere^^^^^ (2. 2)-First and second 
A course for chemists, chemical engL^s ^d !' '? '' '' 
Chem. 36. 38. Elementary Organic Lah T ^*"'"*^- 

semesters. Two three-hour llrtorytT^^^^^^ ^'' ^^~^'''' ""^^ «««»nd 
Chem. 35. 37 or concurrent registrationVerefn "'^ "'^'- ^''-^'l-sites, 

Chem. 141. 143. Advanced Organic Ch.^- . , 
semesters. Two lectures per weer Pr^JeTuStes 'cf -^o'"' ^"'^ --"-^ 
An advanced study of the compounds of rartn '"^ ''' '^^ 



COURSES OF STUDY 



213 



Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 19 or 23, and Chem. 37, 38. 

Syntheses and the quantitative determination of carbon and hydrogen, 
halogen, and nitrogen are studied. 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2) — First 
and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

(One course from the following group 241-255 will customarily be offered 
each semester. If staff facilities permit, one or two of these courses will 
be presented in the academic year 1945-46.) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2) — Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 243. The Polyene Pigments and Certain Vitamins (2) — Two lec- 
tures per week. 

Chem. 245. The Sterols and Sex Hormones (2) — Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 247. The Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds (2) — Two lectures 
per week. 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2) — Two lectures 
per week. • 

Chem. 251. The Heterocycles (2) — Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 to 4) — First and second 
semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 255. The Chemistry of Therapeutic Agents (2) — Two lectures per 
week. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced 
Course (2 to 4) — First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 260. Advanced Organic Laboratory (1 or 2) — ^First and second 
semesters. One or two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

An orientation course designed to demonstrate a new student's fitness to 
begin research in organic chemistry. 

E. Physical Chemistry 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry (2, 2) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 1, 
2; Math. 10, 11. 

A course intended primarily for premedical students and students in the 
biological sciences. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 182, 184. 



214 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



Chem. 182. 184_Elements of Physical Phon,- ♦ , . 
and second semesters. One three hour 1»?^*''' Laboratory (1. l)_First 
taken only .hen accompanied b" Chemm S ''""' ^" "^^'^- ^^^ ^^ 

St "cJ:drcirit\8T""*"^^^ ^^-'•^-"*^ ^^-tratin. the principles 

ajr^Te'ctl^^^^^^^^^^^ ^'%^:^,X;;:^i-^r^'^ -— 

^"' 21. ' ^nem. Ji, 23; Phys. 20, 21; Math 

A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers 

r^:::^:^::^:^:^ --. .^ 1^8. 

and Chem. 188, 190, or tS equivalent "^ """^^ ""-^ ^''->- ^S^, 189 

Chem. 280. Distillation and High Vacuum Ti. 

TWO .-^s pT jr?„°:.s;:r<?£^'Tsnr -«"- ~- 

Chem 285. 287. Colloid Chemistry (2 2) Pirl. '^ 
Two lectures per week. ^ ^ ' ^-'— ^^'^st and second semesters 

Tw«te„rp.rrr •"" '""•""' ««'»-'" «>-F,„t 1...,, 

Chem. 291. Valence Theory (2) <!»„ ^ 
week. "'"'y (2)-Second semester. Two lectures per 

A course to follow Chem. 289. 

Chem. 295. Phase Rule (2) P.Vcf 
(Not given 1945-46.) ^2)_F,rst semester. Two lectures per week. 

(Nof^;ef 1945^46?''' ^^^"^^'^'''l ««™ester. Two lectures per week. 

Chem. 299, 301. Reaction Kinetics (2 2^ i?- . 
Two lectures per week. (Not given 1945 46^ ' *"" '''""*' semesters. 

Chem. 303, 305. Electrochemistry f4 4/ p- . 
Two lectures per week. ^ ^^' ^^-^'^st and second semesters 



COURSES OF STUDY 



215 



Chem. 307, 309. Chemical Thermodynamics (4) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures per week. (Not given 1945-46.) 

Chem. 351. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. 

Chem. 360. Research — First and second semesters, summer session. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chem. E. 10. Water, Fuels and Lubricants (4) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19; Phys. 
20, 21, or permission of instructor. 

Laboratory work consists of exercises in the usual control methods for 
testing water, fuels, and lubricants, and some related engineering materials. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. E. 103, f. s. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3, 3) — Three 
hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 20, 21. 

Theoretical discussion of underlying philosophy and methods in chemical 
engineering and elementary treatment of important operations involving 
fluid flow, heat flow, evaporation, humidity and air conditioning, distillation, 
and absorption. Illustrated by problems and consideration of typical 
processes. 

Chem. E. 104 f, s. Chemical Engineering Seminar (1, 1) — One hour a 
week. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Chem. E. 105 f, s. Advanced Unit Operations (5, 5) — Two lectures and 
one all-day laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. E. 103; Chem. 
187, 188, 189, 190. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of basic chemical engineering operations. 
Study and laboratory operation of small scale semi-commercial type equip- 
ment. A comprehensive problem involving theory and laboratory operations 
is included to illustrate the development of a plant design requiring the 
utilization of a number of fundamental topics. 

Chem. E. 107. Fuels and Their Utilization (3) — First semester. Three 
hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. E. 103, or permission of Department of 
Chemical Engineering. 

A study of the sources of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, their economic 
conversion, distribution, and utilization. Problems. 

Chem. E. 108 f, s. Chemical Technology (2,2) — Two hours a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. E. 103, or simultaneous registration therein, or per- 
mission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

A study of the principal chemical industries. Plant inspections, trips, 
reports, and problems. 



216 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



217 



Chem. E. 109 f, s. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (2, 2) — Two 

hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 188, 189, 190; Chem. E. 103, or 
permission of instructor. 

A study of the application of the principles of engineering and chemical 
thermodynamics to some industrial problems encountered in the practice 
of chemical engineering. 

Chem. E. 110. Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations (3) — First 
semester. Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21; Chem. E. 103. 

A study of methods for analyzing chemical engineering problems along 
quantitative and mathematical lines, with the calculus and other mathe- 
matical aids. Emphasis is placed on graphical presentation and the 
engineering utility of the results. 

Chem. E. Ill f, s. Explosives and Toxic Gases (2, 2) — Two hours a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 37; Chem. 187, 188, 189, 190. (Not offered 1945-46.) 

A study of the properties, production, testing, use and defense against 
outstanding explosives and a few of the well-known industrial and war gases. 

For Graduates 

Chem. E. 201, f, s. Graduate Unit Operations (5, 5 or more) — One hour 
conference, three or more laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of typical unit operations in chemical 
engineering. Problems. Laboratory operation of small scale semi- 
commercial type equipment with supplementary reading, conferences, and 
reports. 

Chem. E. 202. Gas Analysis (3) — One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. One semester. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Quantitative determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseous vapors, 
and important gaseous impurities. Problems. 

Chem. E. 203. Graduate Seminar (1) — One hour a week. Required of 
all graduate students in Chemical Engineering. 

The content of this course is constantly changing so a student may 
receive a number of credits by re-registration. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

Chem. E. 205. Research in Chemical Engineering — Credit hours to be 
arranged. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. 

Chem. E. 207 f, s. Plant Design Studies (3, 3) — Three conference hours 
a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 



T>i.«t Design Studies Laboratory (3, 3)— Three 
Chem. E. 209 f s. J -t ^^'^ permission of Department of 

laboratory periods a weeK. ri« h 

Chemical Engineering. ^ ^^^^ p^^^^^^j. 

^1. «• T? 910 f s Gaseous Fuels (2, Z)— iwu nu 

Sim in design and selection of equipment. 

riVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil, i^i ^^^ Advanced Undergraduates 

i-^Y* Three lectures and one 
C. E. 50. ^y'^f:::J''^::::i^ZT^O. Required of juniors in 
laboratory period a weeK. ri^i ^ 

civil engineering. p^ through orifices, 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, ^^--^'^^f^^^^^tj.e of Reynold^s number. 
i«o T.inp lines open channels, and weirs. ^^^ 
nozzles, pipe l^^^^^P Elementary hydrodynamics. 
Measurement of water. r.iei lectures and one 

and centrifugal pumps. _ semester. One lecture and 

C. E. 52. curves ^^^if^'^tZ^ZS, "urv. 1. 2 and concurrent 
two laboratory periods a week, rre 4 

™ -d^ Xl^'cluTr'assXia; of a s.ort route. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and G-duates 

f <5tr.,rtures (4)— Second semester. Three lectures 

TTm "cr-r »;..,. «>— -rr; ■ -» •-""' 

C. E. lUl. riiemci Prereauisite, Mech. 50. 

C E 102. Structural Design (6)-First semes 
two'lSoratory periods a .eek. ^^^^'^^^^^l^'Zt rner.y>er. and their 



218 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



C. E. 103. Concrete DesiVn tti\ o 

v.. Ji, 104. 105. Municipal Sanitation C3 3) F.Vcf a 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a weer P ''■ '^"''"^ semesters. 

. Methods of estimating consuLptionl/atd JT~' ""^ "=• ''• 

and sewerage systems. ^ ^^® ^^^^^"^ of water supply 

r 

C. E. 106. Soils and Foundations r^\ q 

and one laboratory period a we^rVrt^TutrcTir '^'' '^"^^"^^^ 
An mtroductorv stuHv ^f fi, . ^ '^^' ^- •*^- -^00. 

neering materL7 IppL^^^^^^ Tr'"' '"' '^'^"^^^ ^^ -^ - an engi- 

applications to engineering construction. 

For Graduates 

C. E. 202. Applied Elasticifv r^\ v ^ 
site, Math. 64 or equivalent ^^^~^''^^ o^ second semester. Prerequi- 

C. E. 203. Soil Mechanics f^^ i?- . 

C. E. 106 or equivalent. ^^^"^'''st "r second semester. Prerequisite, 

from'cltnVSattf ^""^^^'^^ "^ ^"^^"-^"^ -^s. Assigned readin. 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations r1^ wi * 
requisite, C. E. 102, 103, 106 or eq^valenl *"■ '^"""^ ''"'^'*^''- P''^- 

vafyS^sin condftions.'"''"' "^ ^"""^^tions. Design and construction to meet 
^£^^:^:::,SX:^'''^ ^^>-^^-t or second semester. Pre- 
An intensive i„ .He location, design, and construction of highways 

ters-. ^^^^^:!^^T::;S;:^ ^3.3)-Pirst a„d second semes-' 



COURSES OF STUDY 



219 



A thorough review of the methods for the design of concrete mixtures, 
followed by a study of factors affecting the properties of the resulting 
concrete. This course is intended as a background for work in the field 
of concrete, concrete aggregates, or reinforced concrete. 

C. E. 207. Advanced Structures (4) — First or second semester. Three 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, C. E. 102, 103. 

The solution of statically indeterminate structures by classical and modern 
methods, with emphasis on the latter. 

C. E. 208. Research — Credit in accordance with work done. First and 
second semesters. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES, see page 267. 

COMMERCE, see BUSINESS ADJMINISTRATION, page 204. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Requirements for major include Comparative Literature 101, 102. Com- 
parative Literature courses can be counted toward a major or minor in 
English when recommended by the student's major adviser. 

Comp. Lit. 1. Greek Poetry (2) — First semester. 

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey with special emphasis on the literary form and 
the historical and mythological background. 

Comp. Lit. 2. Later European Epic Poetry (2) — Second semester. 

Virgil's Aeneidf Dante's Divine Comedy, Nibelungenlied, Song of Roland, 
and other European epics, with special emphasis on their relationship to 
and comparison with the Greek epic. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) — 

First semester. 

Survey of the background of European literature through study of English 
translations of Greek and Latin literature. The debt of modern literature 
to the ancients is discussed and illustrated. 

Comp. Lit. 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) — 

Second semester. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101; study of medieval and modern Con- 
tinental literature. 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature (2) — First semester. 
A study of the sources, development, and literary types. 

Comp. Lit. 104. Chaucer (3) — First semester. 
Same as Eng. 104. 

Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3) — First semester. 

Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau to 
Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. 



220 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



221 



Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany (3) — Second semester. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German literature from Buerger to 
Heine in English translations. 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature 
(3) — First semester. 

A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment 
by Marlowe in Dr, Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. 

Comp. Lit. 108. Some Non-English Influences on American Literature 

(3) — Second semester. 

Comparative study of European, chiefly French and German, and Ameri- 
can writers, illustrating our literary debt to the Old World and original 
features of the New. 

Comp. Lit. 109. Cervantes (3) — Second semester. 
Same as Spanish 109. 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (2) — First semester. 

A study of the life and chief works of Ibsen with special emphasis on 
his influence on the modern drama. 

Comp. Lit. 113. Prose of the Renaissance (3) — Second semester. 

Same as Eng. 113. 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama (3) — First semester. 

The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes in 
English translations. Emphasis on the historic background, on dramatic 
structure, and on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of the 
civilized world. 

Comp. Lit. 121. Milton (3)— (Not offered 1945-46.) 
Same as Eng. 121. 

Comp. Lit. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. 

Same as Eng. 129, 130. 

Comp. Lit. 144. Modern Drama (3) — First semester. 
Same as Eng. 144. 

Comp. Lit. 145. The Modern Novel (3) — Second semester. 
Same as Eng. 145. 

Comp. Lit. 155, 156. Four Major American Writers (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Same as Eng. 155, 156. 

For Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 201. Bibliography and Methods (3) — First semester. 
Same as Eng. 201. 



, «. ^ ^f fKo Thpater (3)— Second semester. Pre- 
^^!f^.^:^:^^:i^^^^^ ana see .nowW.e o. 
'T^Z^^^y o. the history of the European theater. Individual re- 
search priwems ^11 be assigned for term papers. 
Comp. Lit. 203. Schiller (3)-First semester. 

Same as German 204. First semester. (Not offered 

Comp. Lit. 204. Medieval Romances (3)-First semest 

in 1945-46.) 

First and second semesters. 

Same as French 203, 204. Century Literature (3, 3)- 

Comp. Lit. 206, 207. Seminar m Sixteenth Century 1. 

First and second semesters. 

Same as Eng. 206, 207. ra-j—First semester. 

Comp. Lit. 208. The Philosophy of Goethe s Faust (3) 

Same as German 208. First and second semes- 

Comp. Lit. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3)-First 
ter. (Not offered 1945-46.) 

Same as Eng. 216, 217. :»„,„*„,» (^ 3") ^First and 

Comp. Lit. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3) 

second semesters. 

Same as Eng. 227, 228. 

periods a week. Not open to freshmen .. ,^^ti„„ ^nd comparative 

Laboratory fee, $3.00. 



COURSES OF STUDY 

f 



223 



222 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

D. H. 50. Dairy Cattle Management (1) — First semester. One labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. 

A management course designed to familiarize students with the practical 
handling and management of dairy cattle. Students are given actual prac- 
tice and training in the University dairy bams. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 101. Dairy Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, A. H. 52. 

A comprehensive course in dairy cattle feeding, breeding and herd man- 
agement, designed for advanced students in dairy husbandry. 

D. H. 102. Dairy Technology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 101, Chem. 1, 
3, 31, 33, 32, 34. 

Composition standards for milk and milk products, critical interpretation 
and application of the Babcock and other practical factory methods of 
analyses for fat; moisture determinations; quality tests. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. 

D. H. 105. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (2) — First semester. Prere- 
quisites, D. H. 1, Zool. 104, A. H. 103. 

A study of the historical background; characteristics; prominent blood 
lines; noted families and individuals of the major dairy breeds. A survey of 
breeding systems; genetic and environmental factors as applied to dairy 
cattle. The use of the pedigree, various indices, herd and production records 
in selection and formulating breeding programs. 

D. H. 110. Butter and Cheese Making (4) — First semester. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, 
Chem. 1, 3. 

Commercial methods of manufacturing butter and cheese. Consideration 
is given to the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved; procedures 
of manufacture; quality control. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

D. H. 111. Concentrated Milk Products (2) — Second semester. One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, 102, 114. 

Theories and practice of manufacturing condensed and evaporated milk 
and milk powder; plant processes; quality factors; utilization. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. 

D. H. 112. Ice Cream Making (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, 102, 114. 

The ice cream industry; commercial methods of manufacturing ice cream; 
fundamental principles; ingredients; controlling quality. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. , . 



^^*^^' */f ^u^A^ r^^— First semester. One lee- 

D. H. 114. Special Laboratory Methods WJ^-^^ ^ ^^^ 3^^, 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisii 

1, 101, Chem. 1, 3, 19. . , • , „oti,„as used in control and 

Application of '^^^'^^l^'^^Ztr.S^:^^^^^ the Mojonnier 

7^^\:rir.Tso^X^t: :^^ -d cleamn.. Laboratory 

Th"i5. Dairy Inspection Ca)-:First —te^, ^^ ^"^ ^^ "^ . 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites D. H. ^•J^'' application 

Study and interpretation of dairy ordinances and standards, app 
to farm and plant inspection. 

tures and two laboratory periods a week, frer q 

dairying. Research (2-4)-Second semester. Pre- 

D. H. 124. Methods of Da, y f^^^^^'^J^^^^^^ p. g. 1, 101; students 

Sthfamount and character of work done ^^^^ 

This course is designed ^^^^^^^^J^^^Z^^^r^Zl field of dairying, 
students who plan to enter the re^^arch or ^^ ^^^^n, ^.-e 

student is pursuing will be assigned. 

For Graduates 
B „ »,. A4..n.«i Dairy Pr~lu«». <»-«». -«»«.. P.-.,ulsi.e, 

agement. Readings and assignments. 



If 



224 



11 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



^^^^:^^^:iZ^^^y '''-'--' -ester. P.. 

Milk and milk products from r.j, '• 
points of view, with atltion d^reSftrhJ. '' '"' ''•°'°^'-' <=hemical 
trometric titration, oxidation-reducni .^f "^^" '^" concentration, elec 
system of milk, milk enzymes. '''^"'*"'"' electrometric conductivity, buffer 

accordance with the amount and character nf ^'f ''^ '^°'^- Credit in 

Special problems which relate slTfi,, °''^ *^°"^- 
pursuing will be assigned «P«"fieally to the work the student is 

^tulZ\rtrZ::Jl''~^'-' -'^ — <^ --esters. 

husbandry and allL field: 'Z7: r^S: :: '=""^"* "^^^^^^^ ^ "^-y 
. the class. "ese reports are presented and discussed in 

*-'• H. 208. Research C3 8^ t?* 

"r rde^n^ ::;; rr "^i ^-^^ " ^ir ^-^- -- - - 

of the Department, an orS ^^Z^^T *'' '^^'°^^' "^ ^'^e H-d 
bandry, carrying the same to completion a^H '!""" ^^^^^ ''^ '^^''^y hus- 
thesis. completion, and report results in the form of a 

DRAWING 

Dr. 1, 2. Engineering Drawine- r? 9\ n- ^ , 

laboratory periods a week. ^^— First and second semesters. Two 

soS:X"r^^^^^^^ as applied to the 

sections and developments. Auxularv nW ' ?' ^'"' P^^"^- I»t«r- 
screw threads. Pictorial represent^. ^Lre^s^r"^' ^^^"°"^' ^"'^ 

tory periods aTeS RetTefo? s^prhlmV'^-''^^^* ^^'"-^^ ^^ ^abora- 
mechanical engineering.' Prerequ'le Sr! f 2" '''°"^"«'=^'' ^" "-" and in 

Continuation of Dr 1 2 To i, • \ ' » • 
working drawings and'pe^spective T^L k'^'"^' transitions, fastenings, 
lems in the student's pLessionll fietf "^ *'""' *' '''^''''^' ^^^afting prob- 

Dr. 4, 5. Mechanical Drawing n n i?- . 

ECONOMICS 

Econ. 1, 2. Economic Resources (9 ->\ i:<- . 
lecture and one 2-hour laboratory peno7!''^ ?1 '''°"'' semesters. One 
requirement in the College of BusLrl^ ^ ^Z^L^^^-- 



COURSES OF STUDY 



225 



General comparative study of the geographic factor underlying production 
economics. Emphasis upon climate, soils, landforms, agricultural products, 
power resources, and major metallic minerals, concluding with brief survey 
of geography of commerce and manufacturing. 

Econ. 4, 5. Economic Developments (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Freshman requirement in the College of Business and Public Administration. 

An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, develop- 
ment, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, and 
age of mass production. Emphasis on developments in England, Western 
F]urope and the United States. 

Econ. 31, 32. Principles of Economics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Required of all B. P. A. students. 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A con- 
siderable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and 
explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major 'problems of 
the economic system. 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics (3) — First and second semesters. 
Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31, and 32. Not open to 
freshmen. . 

A survey study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups such as students of 
Engineering, Home Economics, Agriculture and others who are unable to 
take the more complete course provided in Economics 31 and 32. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Econ. 130. Economics of Consumption (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

The place of the consumer in our economic system. An analysis of 
demand for consumer goods. The need for consumer consciousness and a 
technique of consumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for 
consumers. Special problems. 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

An investigation of the theory and practice of various types of economic 
systems. The course begins with an examination and evaluation of the 
capitalistic system, and is followed by an analysis of alternative types of 
economic systems such as fascism, socialism, and communism. 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32. 

This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory with special 
attention being paid to recent developments in the theory of imperfect 
competition. 






226 



THE vmvEnsnr or Maryland 



A survey of recent trends in 4^ • 
nornac thought with spedaT attentToTT"' '^"^"^''' «"d Continental E.. 
economists as W. C. Mitchel JR p ^'"^ ^'^^"^ *« the work of ft 
Hobson and other contributor; t ^r'!!""'' ^' ^^*"«"' W. sTmbarf J ? 
smce 1900. ""^^^ ^o the development of economic tLught 

repX:itn"3To?i;. ,'— - and War (3)-Pirst semester Pre 
An analysis of th • ■»• xe- 

mobilization, theory and Tl' • '*"'^' *"^ P^-^^ems of war Tn^ . • 

"lv.d i„ I,. „.,,„ .prji''"'""^ .«..« .nd the b„,c prt„„p„, ,„. 

Econ 141 TK 
P-e,uisite;, EcoTLl^r/o" "'*''''*' ^""^ ^'^ C3)-Second semester 

do« rl Lr„\tt;i°;re ^ ;;,,f « ''^-^^ «^ -ney and> credit of 
Pohc.es m their relation to thTplC' l^^^i^n^m f "''"^^^'^ -'^ -'^ 
Econ. 150. Marketino- p • • . employment. 

Prerequisite, Econ 32 Iq?"^'"^^ ^'"' Organization (3)-Pir«. 
Tk; • ' ^*-*">- ^-i or 37. Required for o^roj ...'^^■'^'rst semester. 
This ,s an introductory course in 1 I f/^<^"ation in B.P.A. 

•equisite, Econ. 32 or 37 ^-P-^tives (2)-Second semester Pre 

Analysis of and contrast K»f, 
cooperative and other types 07^? ''""""^'^ P'-''"«'»« ^nd contribution, . 
coope at,„„ i„ ,,, ,,^^ enTer^L'r^S,"^^^^ *^^ ^^^ 2 

cover the expense of occasional field Sp^' '"'" ^''^ ^^^''^-^t^d to 

or 3r K^qUt; g^Tat: 2^^^rl~-- — i^He. Econ. 32 
-f r:;:tt-X^*;- 2^^^ of the ..e^can labor 

^^^' — ™? --X! lar oSSSoF 
Econ. 170. MonoDoIv anH p . • ' 

requisite, Econ. 32 or 3^ "' Competition (3)-Seco„d semester Pre 



COURSES OF STUDY 



227 



and some conclusions as to policy in relation to competition and monopoly, 
problems of small business. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industry (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A study of the technology, economics and geography of twenty repre- 
sentative American industries. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 132 and graduate or senior standing. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories including 
the Greeks, Romans, canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, 
Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic policy. 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. 

A study of various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic 
thought, particularly the classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, German his- 
torical school, American economic thought, and the socialists. 

Econ. 237, 238. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3,3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Econ. 240. Comparative Banking Systems (3) — Second semester. 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Indus- 
tries (3) — arranged. 

Econ. 299. Thesis — arranged. 

ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, see NATURAL AND HUMAN 
RESOURCES, page 292. 

EDUCATION 

Academic Education, see page 125. 
Agricultural Education, see page 56. 
Business Education, see page 128. 
Home Economics Education, see pages 131, 233. 
Industrial Education, see pages 133, 234. 
Nursery School Education, see page 132. 
Physical Education for Men, see pages 135, 239. 
Physical Education for Women, see pages 137, 241. 

Courses Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores 

Ed. 2. Introduction to Education (2) — First and second semesters. Re- 
quired of freshmen in Education and recommended for other freshmen who 
are interested in teaching. Not open to upper classmen. 

An exploratory or guidance course designed to help students choose 
wisely in their preparation for the teaching profession. Types of positions, 
teacher supply and demand, favorable and unfavorable aspects of teaching, 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



229 



and types of personal and professional competence required of teachers are 
among the topics included. The testing and observational program of the 
College of Education is begun in this course. Fee, $1.00. 

Ed. 3. Educational Forum (1) — First and second semesters. Required 
of sophomores in the College of Education. 

In this course the prospective teacher is introduced in a variety of ways 
to problems and processes of education around which much of the work in 
later professional courses will be centered. Guidance is stressed. Open to 
sophomores only. 

Ed. 4. Reading Clinic (2) — First and second semesters. 

This course is designed for anyone wishing to improve reading skill. 
Reading difficulties are diagnosed through telebinocular eye examinations, 
photographs of eye movements, and standardized tests. Remedial treat- 
ment is given to improve speed, comprehension, and organization of ideas. 
Attention is given to the improvement of study habits. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ed. 100. History of Education I (2) — First semester. 
A study of educational institutions and thought through the ancient, 
mediaeval, and early modern periods. 

Ed. 101 History of Education II (2) — Second semester. 
Emphasis is placed on the post-Renaissance periods. 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States (2) — Not offered in 
1945-46. 

A study of the origins and development of the chief features of the 
present system of education in the United States. 

Ed. 105. Comparative Education (2)— Nc^ offered in 1945-46. 

A study of national systems of education vith the primary purpose of 
discovering their characteristic differences . nd formulating criteria for 
judging their worth. 

Ed. 106. Comparative Education (2)— Not offered in 1945-46. 
This course is a continuation of Ed. 107, with emphasis upon the national 
educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education I (2) — First semester. 
A study of the great educational philosophers and their contributions to 
modern education. Earlier periods. 

Ed. 108. — Philosophy of Education II (2) — Second semester. 
Systems of thought affecting the development of education with emphasis 
on recent periods and the United States. 

Ed. 110. The Teacher and School Administration (2) — Not offered in 
1945-46. 

This course is designed to acquaint the classroom teacher with the general 
field of school administration. It considers the relationships of the te^icher 



,„ the several administrative and su^^^^^^^^ 

Utem. with emphas. on ^^« ^^^^ ^,,_s,,„„a semester. 

Ed. 126. The Elementary School Curn ^^^^^^.^^ ^^h par- 

X study of important developments ^^^^^^^ J ^^ ^^ed to improve 
,eular attention to methods -d -t-^ ^ wh.h - V^^^^^^^^ ^^^y, ,re 
t ^7-P-l;!jatUyrratfons receive much attention, 
encountered m day-to aay (2)_Second semester. 

Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior H,.hSchooU« ^^ 

'prospective teachers. _ (2)-Second semester. 

Ed. 131. Theory of the Semor High ^ instrument of society; 

The secondary school PoPf ^--' J^Vtw" aims of secondary educa- 
relation of the secondary ^^^^^I'l^^^.Z^^X^r activities; guidance and 
tion; curriculum and methods extra ^ .^ ^TI" Fa 130 

placement; teacher cert»n ^^ J^^, ^„,, general than Ed. 130. 
District of Columbia. This cours .^^ (3)-Second semester. 

Ed. 140. Curriculun., Instruction, ^^^^^j'^: 'J,^^^ ^ub^ect matter 
This course is offered in -Pf-^^f ^ifg" language, science mathe- 
arL. namely, ^"f «\ -"^tdSrS' education, and P^y-alef cation^ 
matics business education, jndusww ^4^^ area as well as tne 

matter area are treated. 
Twenty periods of observation. ,,. .o^-First semester. 

Ed. 141. High school course "^ «*" ff^^'^V ^aLtion of content 

This course is ^-^^::^;':^'i^ ^^ i« -^-^^ - 

for English classes ''[J^^^^'^i^^^, style, and usage. 

clarify controversial elements of for . J (2)-Second semester. 

Ed. 142. High school Course of ^^udy^ ^^ 'f Junior and senior high 
Literature adapted to the various grade levels 

schools is studied. ^ u- « r^^— First and second semes- 



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This course is identical with Ed. 149 except that the time spent in the 
high school consists of three half days per week throughout the semester. 
It is open only to physical education majors. 

Ed. 146. Techniques of Teaching Office Skills (2) — Second semester. 

An examination and evaluation of the aims, methods, and course contents 
of each of the office skill subjects offered in the high school curriculum, 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education (2) — ^First semester. 

Sensory impressions in their relation to learning; projection apparatus, 
its cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and films; physical principles 
underlying projection; auditory aids to instruction; learning in the motion 
picture theaters; field trips; pictures, models, and graphic materials; in- 
tegration of sensory aids with organized instruction. 

Ed. 148. Methods and Practice of Teaching (4) — ^First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Ed. 140, grade-point average of 2.275, and approval 
of faculty. Undergraduate credit only. 

Forty-five periods of observation, participation, and teaching in a high 
school class under the direction of the regular teacher and the university 
adviser. Two hours of class sessions are included in which study is made 
of principles and methods of teaching. 

Students should arrange their university schedules so as to allow ample 
time for the student teaching assignment. Application forms for this 
course, properly filled in, must be submitted to the Director of Student 
Teaching not later than the time of registration, preferably earlier. In 
registering, add to the course number the subject matter field in which 
the teaching is to be done, English, foreign language, mathematics, science, 
social studies, business, physical education, or industrial education. 

Ed. 149. Methods and Practice of Teaching (9j — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Ed. 140, grade-point average of 2.275, and approval of 
faculty. Undergraduate credit only. '^ 

Students who register in this course serve as apprentice teachers in the 
schools to which they are assigned. One-half of each school day for not 
less than 15 weeks is devoted to this work, which is carried on under the 
direction of one or two teachers in the school and of the university adviser. 
Opportunity is afforded for experience in connection with school activities, 
guidance, reports, records, and other phases of school life as well as class- 
room teaching. Two hours weekly of class sessions are included in which 
study is made of the principles and methods of teaching. 

Application forms for this course, properly filled in, must be submitted 
to the Director of Student Teaching not less than thirty days before 
registration. In registering, add to the course number the subject matter 
field or fields in which the teaching is done; English, foreign language, 
mathematics, science, social studies, business, physical education, or 
industrial education. 



Ed. ,50. MuCion.! !«».»«»..> .'""^'^f ""■"»* ,»ns«.««n 
» ,t»dy ot tests and «™»«'r.\T«S »»'•'» »'«'»'" T' 

sr-i':, tti..™r, .n. .«»d.. sa.o, «.*„^ 

Ed 152. Th. Ado.««n.: Ch„..Uri..,» .».! P"""™ 

nroblems which arise m tuc 

Lulthood. the secondary schoo P--<^-^ ^^^^^^.^^ school 

Ed. 155. Child Development and Guidance m 

(2)_Not offered in 1945-46. characteristics of elementary school 

This course is concerned with (1) the chai^ct .^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

children and (2) their imphcations f°;^«~^i,. factors which influence 

areas: significant character-tics of gys»ca^^^^ '^ ^^ ^^.^ ^„ adequate 

social, emotional, -"^ ^'^.^^"f^^'^^'^^eTstS and directing the problem 
understanding • of ;"divid"^^^' j^me influences; basic personality needs of 
child; utilizing and f^^^J^'^^J'^^l,^^ of personality differences; how to 
children; influences *-'f »"^/'!;fX pupU-teacher relationships. 

^v «n+Vi children, including clesiraoie pup 
work with childr ^„ .„i„_y_introductory (2)-First semester. 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology m ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ 

This course deals with data ^^^^^f^^enTo implications of democratic 
the work of teachers. Cons.d-atu,n ^^^^^^^^ ^^ imposed by changes 
ideology for educational endeavor ea ^^^^^ ^^ ^^p j^^ the 

in population ^"dtechnolog^ca trends,^ ^^^ ^^^^^j^_ ^^^ t^er 

r ;r :f eo^ut; tCr w^ch have significance m relation 

''^:l auldanee in Secondary Scho.s C---^^^^^ _ , 

This course is primarily '^^^;;;^^X^''lTu::i:^r in the guidance of 
the day-by-day demands made "^P;^ f;^^!*^^, ^^^^ities which he sponsors, 
the youth in ^^^^^.^t^^sZ^on practical common-sense guid- 

The stress is "P^^YnemonTtrated workability. 

ance procedures of demonstratea Mot offered inl945-46. 

Ed. 170. introduction to Special ^'^^-^'^^^^^^^p^^ workers. 

This course is designed ^^^^^'^^trneV^Sti types of exceptional 
:Mtdr^^ren^rarrmrdiy ~^^^ are stressed. 



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Ed. 171. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children (2) — Not 

offered in 1945-46. 

A study of retarded and slow-learning children, including discovery, analy- 
sis of causes, testing techniques, case studies, and remedial educational 
measures. 

Ed. 190. Principles of Education (2) — Second semester. 

This is a course designed for students in any college in the university who 
wish a general overview of public education. There is no prerequisite. 
The course takes up such problems as the purposes of education, the nature 
of public schools and the characteristics of the population to be served, and 
general methods of teaching and learning. The course is especially recom- 
mended as an elective for students in Arts and Sciences and Home 
Economics. 

Ed. 191. Conservation of Natural Resources (3) — First and secon(i 
semesters. 

This course, which is given in collaboration with the State Department 
of Research and Education, is designed to acquaint students with the neces- 
sity, means, and methods of protecting the soil, animals, plants, and mineral 
resources of the State and Nation. Credit for it is accepted as part of the 
science requirement of students in the College of Education. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 205. Seminar in Comparative Education (2) — Not offered in 1945-46. 

Ed. 207. Seminar in Philosophy of Education (2)— Not offered in 1945-46. 

Ed. 209. Seminar in History of Education (2) — Second semester. 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2) — 
First semester. 

This course deals with so-called "external" phases of school adminis- 
tration. It includes study of the present status of public school administra- 
tion; organization of local, state, and federal educational authorities; and 
the administrative relationships involved therein. 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 
Schools (2) — Second semester. 

This course is designed as a continuation of Ed. 210, but may be taken 
independently. It includes what is called "internal" administration; the 
organization of units within a school system; the personnel problems in- 
volved; and such topics as schedule making, teacher selection, public rela- 
tions, and school supervision. 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration (2) — Not offered 
in 1945-46. 

This course deals principally with school revenue and taxation; federal 
and state aid and equalization; purchase of supplies and equipment; internal 
school accounting; and other selected problems of local school finance. 

Ed. 215. Public Education in Maryland (2)— Not offered in 1945-46. 
A study of Maryland Public School system with special reference to 
school law. 



ro\ Not offered in 1945-46. 
Ed. 216. High School Superv.s.on (2)-Not off ,^,. recent 

This course deals with the ^^^^^l^^^^'^^^^^Jici^.tion in the 
trends in supervisory .^^^J^f^/'^^f supervisory programs; appra.sa 

1TeSe"«.^-dst-^^^^^^^^ -' -^- -- "' "^ 

'TrrA^I--: a. supervision in Eie.entary Sehoois .)- 
^r stX' " "rprohiems connected with organising and operating 
elementary schools and directing i-truct,o. .^ ^^^^_^^ 

Ed. 219. seminar in School A«l--;-*;;/;^ _^;;^^^, ^,^,3,,,. 
Ed. 229. seminar in Elementary ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ,^,„„, ,,,_K„t 
Ed. 236. Curriculum Development m the Secondary 
offered in 1945-46. ^^.^^^ ^^^^^,^^^ 

Ed. 239. Seminar m Secondary H-ciu N„t offered in 1945-46. 

o, • _ Sn Qrionce Education (2) — Not onereu 
Ed. 247. Seminar in Science i=.o ^^^^^^ 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special ^ Mot offered in 1945-46. 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adult Education < >7^^*;« ^^^,,, 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials in Education (2) 

in 1945-46. . , sources of information and tech- 

A study of research in ^<l-^*>-;^5\;Te fn ^ preparation of research 
niques available, and approved form and style 

reports and theses. offered in 1945-46. 

Ed. 281. Source Materials '« f ^^^^^f ^"citef Se^ "How to 

A course based on the text and work-book by Cart^^ .^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 

Locate ^f -^^^uf ^rtr^ddS^al hours of work in the library. 
eIpSi^-SS students interested in research. 
Ed. 289. Research (1-6). 

Home Economics Education rraduates 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

unit construction. 



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235 



H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (3) — First 
semester. Required of seniors in Home Economics Education. Prerequisite, 
H. E. Ed. 101. 

Study of various techniques; analysis of textbooks; evaluation of illustra- 
tive material; the home project. 

H. E. Ed. 103. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (4-8) — 
Second semester. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 101 and 102. 

Observation and supervised teaching in an approved secondary vocational 
home economics department in Maryland or the District of Columbia. 
Students are encouraged to elect the longer teaching period. 

H. E. Ed. 110. Child Development (3) — First and second semester. 

The study of the child in relation to the physical, motor, emotional and 
social aspects of development; adaptation to the teaching of child care in 
high school; field trip to well-baby clinic; observation in nursery schools; 
reviews of current books. 

H. E. Ed. 111. Curriculum, Instruction, Observation-Nursery School (3) 

— First semester. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 110. 

Guidance of children in relation to developmental needs; observation of 
children, teachers, and parents; participation in a nursery school. 

H. E. Ed. 112. Play and Play Materials (2) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. Ed. 110. 

Study of play materials and play equipment in relation to use by different 
age levels; observation in nursery school; participation with a play group 
in a home. 

H. E. Ed. 116. Creative Expression; Art, Music, Dance (3) — First 
semester. Prerequisite, P. E. 56, 58. 

Correlation of arts as related to the abilities of the child in terms of 
his development. 

H. E. Ed. 118. Teaching Nursery School (4-8) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. Ed. 111. 

Teaching in an approved nursery school; participation in teachers' work- 
shop; attendance at parents' meetings; observation in other nursery schools 
after teaching is completed. 

Industrial Education 

For each semester hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

*Ind. Ed. 1. Mechanical Drawing (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Fundamental practices in orthographic projection followed by auxiliary 
projection, the drawing of threads and bolts, working drawings and iso- 
metric views. Sketching and use of conventions are emphasized. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. 



.T A Fd 21 Mechanical Drawing (2)-Second semester Two labora- 
*Ind. Ed. il. Jyiecndiiiva equivalent, 

f.rv neriods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. H-d. i, or «q 

: Ire advanced course deaU.. ^■^^;:-^^l^^Z'"Z'^^y 
pattern layouts, tracing -"^ blue-pnntxng^ Detail draw 
assemblies are presented. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

T d Ed 41 Architectural Drawing (2)-First semester. Two labora- 
to ^'periods a JZl Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1. or e.uxvalent. 

featured. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
ind Ed lOlS. operational Drawing (2)-Suxnmer. Two laboratory 
"i,^ week Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 
Tlpre live couL designed to give students practice in the modern 
driting methods of industry. Laboratory fee, $3.00. , , , ^^ 

I d la 160 Essentials of Design (2)-First semester. Two laboratory 
Ind. Ed. 160. l^ssenu<iis> ux ^ f* -p, , . ^^a K^sic shop work. 

to the construction of shop projects. " t'^**^ 
color, and design. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking (2)-First semester. Two labora- 

wood finishing. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

T H Vd 22 Machine Woodworking I (2)-Second semester. Two 
laWat?'; periods Iweek. Prerequisite. Ind. Ed. 2. or equivalent, 
laboratory pe construction of projects in wood 

Practice in the application of design anu , , . ^v j^jgh school 

is included. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind Ed 42 Machine Woodworking II (2)-First semester. Two labora- 
toJ; peSds a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 22, or equivalent. 

Advarcod production methods with emphasis on cabinet making and 
design Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

T„d Ed 102S Advanced Woodflnishing and Design (2)-Summer. Two 

lab^ratfry J rtds a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 22, or equivalent, 
laboraiory penv^^^ or^nliration of color and 

Advanced finishing room methods applied. The appHcation 
its use in the improvement of design. Laboratory fee. $3.00. 



* Alternate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



TTi^Trnate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



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*Ind. Ed. 23. Forge Practice (1) — Second semester. One laboratory 
period a week. 

Laboratory practice in forging and the heat treatment of metals. Theory 
and principles of handling tools and materials. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Information is given on materials, tools and processes. Practice is given 
in soldering, the laying out of patterns, and the making of elementary 
graded projects. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 104S. Advanced Practices in Sheet Metal Work (2) — Summer. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 24, or equivalent. 

Study of the more complicated processes involved in commercial items. 
Calculations and pattern making are emphasized. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 65S. Hand Craft (2) — Summer. Two laboratory periods a week. 

Arts and crafts experiences in designing and constructing projects in 
woodwork, plastics, metalwork, leatherwork, weaving, bookbinding, block 
printing, and practice with other materials, including home mechanics 
activities. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 85, 105. General Shop (1-1) — First and second semesters. One 
laboratory period a week. 

Designed to meet needs in organizing and administering a high school 
General Shop course. Students are rotated through skill and knowledge 
developing activities in mechanical drawing, electricity, woodworking, and 
general metal working. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 26. Art Metal Work I (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. # 

Elementary course in designing and construction of art metal projects, 
including such operations as spotting, saw piercing, etching, and enameling. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 66S. Art Metal Work (2). — Summer. Two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 26, or equivalent. 

Advanced practicum. It includes methods of bowl raising and bowl 
ornamenting. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 106S. Art Metal Work (2) — Summer. Two laboratory periods 
a week. 

Simple operations in the art of making jewelry including ring making, 
stone setting, etc. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Ind. Ed. 67. Cold Metal Work (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Development of knowledges and skills in the design and construction of 
projects from band iron and other forms of mild steel. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 



l„d. Ed. 28. Electricity I (2)-First semester. Two laboratory periods 
a week. • ^ fV,o ^Iprtrical circuit, magnetism, 

.rirr-r :srrs;:L r;"«r.sr i..o™... .-, ,3... 

* ^^^' , . A n r.A T>C electrical equipment, including heat- 

Principles involved m A-C and ^"^ ^1^™ ^^ ^^.^^ ^^e electric arc, 
ing, measurements, motors and contiol, ff^^'^J^^^'^^J^^^^^, Laboratory 
inductance and reactance, condensers, radio, and electron 

fee, $3.00. . ,„ „ 

X.. . • •. TTT (9^ Summer. Two laboratory periods a 
Ind. Ed. 108S. Electricity III (2)— bummei. 

week Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 28, or equivalent. , , ^,. „ th. 

tperimenL development of apparatus and equipment for teaching the 
principles of electricity. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

*i H VA 69 Machine Shop Practice I (2)-Second semester. Two 
*Ind. Ed. by. jnacninc ^«yF eauivalent. 

information. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

and gear cutting. Work-production methods employea. 
information. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

^ ., ,^^ First semester. One laboratory period a 
•Ind. Ed. 110. Foundry (1)— Fust semesie 

'"il'Z. ,.S. SHOP M.>.u,n..„ <.>-Su™,. P~e,«,.i.., S »».3«r 
hours of shop credit, or .,oiv.lent. 

Skill dovoloplng P'«'i" 1» "" "■'-'""' "'' "" 

equipment. ' ^. 

to tho 8.n.r.l obioctLos of tho )""'«' "f^f^'.^p.^.tes .„d needs; 

:ir:nr:Ltj »p::r.ir • !:».. L.ts, p,.o,es..o„., 

standards. Twenty periods of observation. 



♦ Alternate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



Tli^Trnate courses offered by the College of Engineering. 



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239 



Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (2) — Second semester. 

Organization and management of pupils; daily programs; projects; pupils' 
progress charts; selection, location, and care of tools, machines, equipment, 
and supplies; records and reports; and good shop keeping. 

Ind. Ed. 165S. Modern Industry (2) — Summer. 

A review of modern factory organization and practice. 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (2) — ^First 
semester. 

A study of the factors which definitely place industrial arts education in 
any well-rounded program of general education. Lectures, class discussions, 
reading and reports. 

Ind. Ed. 167S. Problems in Occupational Education (2) — Summer. 

The purpose of this course is to secure, assemble, organize, and interpret 
data relative to the scope, character and effectiveness of occupational 
education. 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2) — First semester. 

Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis which is 
basic in organizing industrial education courses of study. This course 
should precede Ind. Ed. 169. 

Ind. Ed. 169S. Construction of Vocational and Occupation Courses of 
Study (2) — Summer. 

Surveys and applies techniques of building and reorganizing courses of 
study for effective use in vocational and occupational schools. 

Ind. Ed. 170S. Principles and Practices of Vocational Education (2) — 

Summer. 

The course develops the vocational education movement as an integral 
phase of the American program of public education. 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2) — First semester. 

An overview of the development of vocational education from primitive 
times to the present. The evolution of industrial arts is also considered. 

Ind. Ed. 220S. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Voca- 
tional Education (2) — Summer. 

This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, super- 
vision, curricular spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational 
education. Alternate, Ed. 200 or Ed. 202. 

Ind. Ed. 236S. Seminar in Vocational Education (2) — (Arranged.) 

This seminar deals with the issues and functions of vocational education, 
particularly in respect to the emerging changes in educational planning on 
the secondary school level. Opportunity is given to students majoring in 
Industrial Education to write one of the seminar reports required for the 
degree of Master of Education. 



. ^A 910S Research in Vocational Education (2)-(Arranged.) 
'^:Jir,\. :.",« ,0. p„.o» c«»* »...d .n „s».c. ,» 

vocational education. 

Physical Education for Men 
P. B. 30. History and Principles of Physical Education (3)-Second 

semester. , • • i«c «^ T^>iv<;iral education with 

p. E. 41, 43, 45, 47. Varsity Game Skills (1). (D, U), u; 

second semesters. interscholastic sports. 

Study and practices of the « ""d^^""" n ' P E 41. Football CD- 
Emphasis on techniques and methods of teachmg^^^^ ^ ^ ^^ 

^th three hours theory and ^^^[^ ^_^,,,. ,,,,e hours 
P. E. 51. Minor Sports Skills (.i; ^ecunu 

Tbiock of courses which cover the fundamental skills, rules, and 
strategfetof touch football, volley ball, soccer, and speedball. 
P F "13 Intramurals (1) or (2)-First and second semesters. 

^oiiL::: administration, ^^^^-i:^^:^^^^^^^ 
school levels. Types o -~^ J.^^^^J/^ t^e^ ,nay be earned by 
£Sr:L^=ttortrprSramby arrangeme.^^ 

P E 55. Individual Sports Skills (l)-Second semester. Three 

TS:r 3 Totr tLh cover the fundamental skills, rules, and 
strategies of tennis, badminton, golf, and handball. 
P. E. 57. Combative Sports- Skills (l)-First semester. Three hours 

Tbiock of courses which cover the fundamental skills, rules, and 

strategies of boxing. ^f^''.'l\'^\.^^^ ^^, ^^^^,, semesters. Three 
P. E. 59. Advanced Swimming (1)— First ana secoiiu 

hours weekly. ^ 

Advanced instruction and participation m water safety. 



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P. E. 60. Gymnastics (3) — Second semester. Lecture and laboratory. 
Five hours weekly. 

Theory and practice of activities designed for instructing large groups in 
small areas. Covers calisthenics, elementary tumbling and gymnastics, and 
mass games and relays. 

P. E. 61. Advanced Gymnastics (1) — ^First and second semesters. Three 
hours weekly. 

Instruction for those students who wish to practice advanced techniques 
of apparatus and tumbling activities. 

P. E. 63. Football and Basketball (1)— Fall; P. E. 65. Baseball, Track, 
Soccer (1) — Spring. 

A thorough study of the rules and techniques of officiating. Students will 
officiate in university intramural program. 

P. E. 65. Officiating (1), (1) — First and second semesters. 

P. E. 80. Kinesiology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 14, 
15, 53. 

The study and analysis of human motion comparing to the law of 
mechanics and principles of physiology and anatomy. 

P. E. 120. Mental Hygiene in Physical Education (2) — First semester. 

Emphasis on methods of adjusting instructional methods in physical 
education and athletic coaching to the individual's emotional and social 
needs. 

P. E. 140. Therapeutics (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 80, 
Zool. 55. 

A study of the common structural abnormalities; corrective exercises; and 
massage; causes, prevention, and correction of postural defects. Includes 
testing methods. Theory and practice. 

P. E. 141, 143, 145, 147. Varsity Team Organization (1), (1), (1), CD- 
First and second semesters. Three periods weekly. Prerequisite, P. E. 41, 
43, 45, 47. 

The theory and strategy of team play and organization of interschool com- 
petitive games. Staff organization; practice schedules, systems of offense 
and defense and team coordination. P. E. 141. Football (1) — Nine weeks; 
P. E. 143. Basketball (1)— Nine weeks; P. E. 145. Track (1)— Nine weeks; 
P. E. 147. Baseball (1)— Nine weeks. 

P. E. 148. Teaching of Health (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
P. E. 40. 

A study of the methods and materials for the teaching of health on the 
various school levels. 



1 T^ « ri^ First and second semester. Two 
P E 150. Recreational Dance (1)— tirst ana 

social life of the school and community. 

!> P' ifiO Introduction to Recreation (2)-Second semester. 

P. E. 160. mtroaucuun i.„„^tions of recreational programs. 

a swdy of the summer eamp as an educational agency. 

A «»* .< .he P'»».e™ o, -;S3r»*iib'm«r.f.hein.t™ct.r 
:r~;t-lt1SSd.'SSU. public «l.ti™. car, »-d pnr- 
chaae of equipment, etc. are ai.cussed. ,2,_S.cond 

P. E. 180. Te.U and MeaauremenU In Physical Education (2) 

":r ;. the theory and ''f^?^^'^:^-^^.-^^^^-^^- 
yrtSts'^tr^Sc";™ "'Sr-pr?...-'^' PHv.ic.1 eduction. 

Phvsical Education for Women 

L • 1 Activities (I 1)-Rrst and second sem.sUrs. Two periods . 
„:n^,*rrrali<Uman and >oP-"- ~- ,^ _, ,,„,,.. 

^11 ^/^T. TTrPshman Orientation; tnis courbe yiyj^ 
,nsi:LSrrd7:S°n^^rrmenta.. o, sports and rhythms, and 

SS. 1» the hasio skills »^^V -.».«.. 

Sophomores may elect from ***** /°"°3:' ",. _ archery, fencing, bad- 
voLjball. Softball, basketball. ^^^X^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^*"^*^' 
„.i„ton.. dance, body ^f^X^^'.^tTr wh^^ the University physician 
^^^ZrTS^^iS^S^ classes are offered for those who need 

correction in posture and body mechamcs. 

- P. E. 42. Hygiene I (2)-First semester. Required of all freshmen 

Tturse designed to acquaint the women students with individual be- 
havior in relation to health. • . f ,,1 freshmen 
P. E. 44.-Hygiene II (2)-Second semester. Required of all freshmen 

women. 



J 



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attempt to better the enyirZeZlj^TXT '"' ^'=«^'*- -^'h 
, P- E. 52. 54. Dance Techniques « 7^Z\ ''^^^^^^y- 
laboratory and one lecture pS a ^^e^ "* *"^ ^^-^^ -^-ters. Two 

and aXirrir and Xtitir."'"^"* *^'='^"^''"- ^^ Modern Dance 

labPo^Vnd oneTct^p-S iM^^'^' ^^' ^-^ -esters. Two 

A continuation of P E 52 ka m 
dance techniques are studied StuZ,? t'^^*"'«'l movements of the modern 
participate in simple .rZ^J^t'^X'^^, T^""'*^ *** --"« -^ 

P. E. 62, 64. Techni„n»« f o ^ teachmg methods. 

A continuation of P V ao ^a o 

A continuation of P E fifi rl T ^^"''** ^ ^««k. 
marching, badminton, t;ack. '^'""''' ^*""t«' tumbling, apparatus, 

se^ir^^^^^^ 2) Pirst and second 

A continuation of P. E. 102, 104 sl-^- '^^^''• 

^ P- E. 112. History of Dance a. 7 7"^' ^'"''' ^"'^ ^">^- 

62. 52, 56. 58. °"'"=* <'>-I^'rst semester. Prerequisites. P E 

Designed to give an overview of tho ^ , 
to contemporary times. Studlnts havp''' """'"* °^ ''^"*=" ^^""^ Pri'^itive 
specific historic periods. '" ^^""^ experience in planning dances fir 

^^Pte^'SSSZ::^ Ad^Jistration of Physical Education (3)- 

A study of current nractiVp ,v ' 
sonnel, intramurals and sports dayT'^r' -^ •*""'"^' organization of per- 
ment and facilities. ^^^- Administration of activities, equfp- 

P- E. 124, 126. Coachin? anH n#B • *• 



COURSES OF STUDY 



243 



P. E. 138. Advanced Modern Dance (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tories and one practice teaching period a week. Prerequisites, P. E. 52, 
54, 56, 58. 

Advanced techniques and practice in teaching dance. 

P. E. 148. Teaching Health (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 
40, or equivalent. 

A study of materials and methods in health education. Planning the 
health education curriculum. 

Physical Education Courses Open to Both Men and Women 

P. E. 30. History and Principles of Physical Education (3) — Second 
semester. 

Designed to give an overview of physical education from primitive to 
modern times. 

P. E. 40. Hygiene (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, Bact. 1, Zool. 14 
and 15. 

A course in personal and community hygiene for major students. 
Emphasis on causative factors of various diseases, means of transmission 
and prevention of same with a study of modern health methods. 

P. E. 50. Accident Prevention (2) — First semester, 

A study of safety in the home, school, and on the highways and streets. 
Planning school safety courses. Emphasis on prevention and care of 
athletic injuries. 

P. E. 70. First Aid (2) — Second semester. 

Standard and Advanced Red Cross course in First Aid. 

P. E. 140. Therapeutics (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 
190, 200. 

A study of common structural abnormalities, corrective exercises and 
massage. Causes, prevention and correction of postural defects. Includes 
testing methods. Theory and Practice. 

P. E. 150, 170. Recreational Dance (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Two laboratory and one lecture period per week. 

This course includes American square and country dances, folk and social 
dancing. It is planned to be of value to men and women interested in the 
social life of the school and community. Research in pertinent books and 
methods of teachings. 

P. E. 160. Introduction to Recreation (2) — Second semester. 

A survey of the entire field of recreation. Emphasis is placed on history, 
aims, objectives, organization, leadership, areas, facilities, and programs. 



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seLtrf'"' '^"''' ••"• Measurements in Physical Education (2)-Second 
Survey of tests u«;«»ri * -u 

p. E. 190, 200. Kinesiology (3 3)_Pir«f a 
requisites, Zool. 14. 15; Zool 53 ' '^^ ^"^^ ""^ second semesters. Pre- 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

'^^^^^^^'^rf^TtotZ^^^^ I C'^-Second semester, 

registration in Math. 21 and Phys ^f i„.r1- /'^''^^^'i^^. concurrent 
engineering. ^"y^" ^^^ Required of sophomores in electrical 

■ WorkTng cUeptfoV SeSc an"d r^ZT,- ^«^*«°««hips in D-C networks 
magnetic field intensitraTd elecrrLan^' ''"*'"*'*' '^^^••«»-' electr^^d 
and magnetic circuit experiments *^"'*'*= ^"'^ «l«"«'ty- Electrfe 

Tl^;e"i;cU't„T:L"^^^^^^^^ i-d r- V^-^^- — ste. 

E. E. 50. PrincipJTf''E.?r'.'''L'"''"''"**^^ 

Two lectures and on'etbotto^/Sd f^7 ^^>-«--<^ --ster. 
Math. 20. 21. Required of JunL's rciwrefginetTnr """' ^^^^^ ''' ''-' 

ear=:f Sr :srist^r~ — -h- 

tors, motors, and transformers. "Perating characteristics of genera- 

V P* f^l ffO 

second semesters. ThrSectures^anTl?' .^"sineering (4. 4)-First and 
requisites, Phys. 20. 21; Math 20 5l R ' ^''T^f^ '"''°'' ^ ^««k. /re- 
chemical and mechanical engineering ^^"'^ "^ ^""'"^^ '» aeronautical, 

teS " sSsTf c^=::rniroptr «-— - ^^-^ e'^-. 

eurrent machinery. Experiments on th?"°' '^"''''- ^""^ alternating- 
.enerat^s. motors, tranLrmS! aTd t^X^XVe" ^'^^^^"-*^«- ^^ 

E. E. 54. Direct Current Machinery r4) «„ T 
tures and one laboratory period a week pT^Z '"Z"''''- '^'^^ 'ec- 
of juniors in electrical engineering ^'"^'-equisite. E. E. 2. Required 

Construction, theorv nf r^r.^ ^- 
direct-current generatL, ^to"^^^^^^^^ "ntrol^^^"^^^^ characteristics of 
the operation and characteristics ' of dire"^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Experiments on 

irect current generators and motors. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



245 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating-Current Circuits (6) — First semester. Five lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 20, 21; Math. 
20, 21. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Single- and polyphase-circuit analysis under sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal 
conditions of operation. Harmonic analysis by the Fourier series "method. 
Theory and operation of mutually-coupled circuits. Elementary symmetrical 
components. 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics (6) — Second semester. Five lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. 

Theory and application of electronic tubes and associated control circuits. 
Emphasis on tube characteristics and electron-tube measuring devices, in- 
cluding the cathode-ray oscillograph as a measuring device. Applications 
of thyratrons and other rectifier tubes. 

E. E. 102, 103. Alternating Current Machinery (4, 4) — First and second 
semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 54 and E. E. 100. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

The operating principles of alternating-current machinery considered 
from theoretical, design, and laboratory points of view. Synchronous 
generators ,and motors; single and polyphase transformers; three-phase 
induction generators and motors; single phase induction motors; rotary 
converters and mercury-arc rectifiers. 

E. E. 104. Communication Networks (3) — Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, E. E. 100. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. 

Calculation of transmission-line inductance and capacitance and high- 
frequency resistance of electrical conductors. Long-line theory applied to 
telephone circuits and to ultra-high-frequency systems. Elements of filter 
theory and wave guide theory. 

E. E. 105, 106. Radio Engineering (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 
Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 

Principles of radio communication from both theoretical and laboratory 
points of view. Amplification, oscillation, modulation, and detection, with 
particular emphasis on audio amplication and broadcast-range reception. 
Elements of wave propagation and ultra-high frequency techniques. 

E. E. 108. Electric Transients (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 101. Senior elective. 

Current, voltage, and power transients in lumped-parameter networks. 
Transient phenomena in sweep circuits and inverters. Starting transients 
in transformers and short-circuit transients in alternators with oscillo- 
graphic demonstrations. 



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247 



E. E. 109, 110. Ultra-High-Frequency Techniques (3, 3)— First and sec- 
ond semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prere- 
quisite, E. E. 106. 

Theoretical and experimental studies of ultra-high-frequency oscillators, 
detectors, wave guides, transmission lines, and antenna arrays. Most of 
the experimental work is performed at 200 megacycles and at 3000 
megacycles. 

E. E. 112. Illumination (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, senior 
standing. 

Electric illumination; principles involved in design of lighting systems, 
illumination calculations, photometric measurements. 

E. E. 113. Electric Railways (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, senior 
standing. 

Mechanics of train motion. Application of electrical equipment to trans- 
portation. Construction and operation of control apparatus used in different 
fields of electrical transportation such as urban railways, trunk line rail- 
ways, trolley busses and diesel-electrical equipment. Power requirements, 
distribution systems and signal systems. 

E. E. 114. Applied Electronics (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 
101. 

Analysis of controlled rectifiers, power switching, electronic inversion of 
electric power, and industrial control circuits. Some time is devoted to 
problems in design of electronic apparatus with pertinent laboratory 
demonstrations. 

E. E. 116. Alternating-Current Machinery Design (3) — First semester. 
Two lectures and one calculation period a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 103. 

Numerical design of transformers, synchronous machines, and induction 
machines. 

E. E. 117. Transmission and Distribution (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, E. E. 103. 

Inductance and capacitance calculations of polyphase lines on a per-wire 
basis. Generalized parameters of four-terminal networks and long-line 
theory applied to power systems. Use of transmission line charts. 

E. E. 118, 119. Industrial Electronics (3, 3) — First and second semesters; 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prei4quisite, E. E. 101. 

A more detailed study of electron tubes with particular emphasis on 
industrial types. The principles of operation of industrial electronic devices 
including ignition rectifiers, air cleaners, voltage, and speed regulators, 
photo relays, and high frequency heating equipment with laboratory exer- 
cises and performance tests. Some time is deviated to design problems. 



For Graduates 
E E 200. 201. symmetrical Components (3. 3)-First and second 

semesters, ^'^^'^^'^f '*"' f/ J' 'f '^^^etrical components to synchronous 

Application of the me hod ^^J^^^^'j^^tic loads possessing mutual 

generators, transmission lines, ^ranslorm , jng positive, nega- 

Lupling. and induction motor lof^s. Methods o ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ,, 

tive, and zero sequence «^« "J^^^f rJLLission lines. Complete 
'^'^''^''T^'^Z i:ZZo/s^::^c:X components and comparison of 
network solution in terms oi &y -lossical methods, 

those solutions with those obtained by cl«^«»^*^ "» ^^^ ^^..^a 

ing or physics. ^nechanical systems by the Leplace 

Transient analysis of electrical ana m transformers and 

transformation method. The ^orr^^^nj ^^P^;;^^,,, ^, ..^es to 

Heaviside Operators ^^^/^f^^^ ^'^^^i^Jemethod of analysis. 

acquaint the student with the Heaviside met pj^^^ ^^j second 

V E 210 211. Advanced Radio Engineering (3,3) 
semest;rs. 'Prerequisite, E. E. 106. ^^^;':^l^,^_,^,^^^^,, oscillation 
■ .o^S Stir TnIS b!=p.tude-modulation systems and 

a course of study leading to the degree of Master 

T::: -fcovering an approved research ^bjem ;^^^;;;^!^^ 

StJ efo/ SeHf Se^ee^-SLl engineering. 

ENGINEERING-(General Engineering Subjects) 
Aeronautical Engineering, see P»g«« l^J'^*^' 
Chemical Engineering, see pages 148, 215. 
Civil Engineering, see pages 149, 217. 
Electrical Engineering, see pages 150, 244. 
Engineering Drawing, see page 224. 
Mechanics, see page 287. 
Mechanical Engineering, see pages lol, 288. 

Shop, see page 290. 

Surveying, see page 321. • j „* 

. .• ♦„ P'n^ineering (l)-First semester. Required of 
Engr. 1. Introduction to Engineering k^^j 

all freshmen in engineering. practicing engineers covering 

A course of lectures by ^h^-f ^^jf^Ji^^^^^^^^^^ is to assist 

the engineering professional fields. Ihe purp 



I 

-1= 



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COURSES OP STUDY 



249 



the freshman in selecting the particular field of engineering for which he 
is best adapted. 

* 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Engr. 100. Engineering Contracts and Specifications (2) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering. 

The fundamental principles of law relating to business and engineering, 
including contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, corporations, and 
common carriers, and their application to engineering contracts and 
specifications. 

ENGINEERING DRAWING, see page 224. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Eng, 1, 2. Composition and Readings in American Literature (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. Required of freshmen. Both courses offered each 
semester. Prerequisite, three units of high school English. 

Grammar, rhetoric, and the mechanics of writing; frequent themes. 
Readings will be in American literature. 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and Readings in World Literature (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4 or Eng. 5, 6 or 
some combination of the two required of sophomores beginning in 1946-1947. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. 

Eng. 5, 6. Composition and Readings, mainly in English Literature (3, 3) 

— First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 5, 6 or Eng. 
3, 4 or some combination of the two required of sophomores beginning in 
1946-1947. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to major English writers; 
several foreign classics to be read in translation. 

Eng. 7. Technical Writing (2) — First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

For students desiring practice in writing reports, technical essays, or 
popular essays on technical subjects. 

Eng. 8. College Grammar (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

An analytical study of Modern English grammar, with lectures on the 
origin and history of inflectional and derivational forms. 

Eng. 9. Introduction to Narrative Literature (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and other narrative forms. 



Eng. 10. Advanced Composition (2)-Seeond semester. Prerequisite. 
%';attL in writing exposition, brief narration/feature articles, and 
"trr'children's Literature (2)-Su..er session. Prerequisite. 

^ Tstudy of literary values in prose and verse for children. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
T. mi History of the English Language (3)-Second semester. 
Eng. 101. History oi me b Fn^lish language: its nature, 

An historical and critical survey of the English langu g 

origin, and development. 
Vne 102 Old English (3)— First semester; 

English. 
Eng 103. Beowulf (3)— Second semester. 
A literary and linguistic study of the Old English epic. 
Eng. 104. Chaucer (3)-First semester. ^^^ -j^, „„d 

A literary and language study of the Canterbwy la 
Criseyde, and the principal minor poems. 
Tg ilO. 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3. 3)-First and second 
semesters. Not offered in 1945-1946. .>,„„ qhakesoeare. 

The most important dramatists of the time, other than Shakespeare. 
v„. 112 Poetry of the Renaissance (3)-First semester. 
Z' cMe'f 'r from SUelton to Jonson, with particular attention to 

S Denser 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Renaissance (3)-Second semester. 

The chief prose writers from More to Bacon. 
Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare (3. 3)-First and second semesters. 
Twenty-one important plays. 

En.r 120 English Drama from 1660 to 1800 (3)-First semester 
?Limporta!t dramatists from Etherege to Sheridan, with emphasis upon 
the comedy of manners. 

Eng. 121. Milton (3)-Not offered in 1945-1946. 

The poetry and the chief prose works. 

Eng 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3)-First semester. 

Th^maior literary figures (exclusive of Milton), emphasizing their rela- 
tion to the philosophical movements of the century. 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



251 



Prominent poets and prose writers from Swift to Burns. 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period (3 3) Fi,.«t ^ 
second semesters. renoa {.a, 6) — inrst and 

wSf «";• ""• ''""""" " "" ""°""" '•"'«' O- "-(Not "ff"*! In 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel (^ q^ /m^^- «? j • .^ 

"siian i^iovei (,d, ^;— (Not offered m 1945-1946 ) 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry (3)-First semester. 

The chief English. Irish, and American poets of the twentieth century 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama (3)— First semester. 

The drama from Ibsen to the present. 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel (3)-Second semester 

Major English and American novelists of the twentieth century. 

f sLTf ,>"* f "'*"" "' '""*'"''"' Democracy (3)_First semester. 
A study of hterature which relates closely to the democratic tradition. 

semefter?' '"' '""'"'="" "**■•**"* *« '''' ^'' 3)-First and second 

Representative American poetry and prose from colonial times to WOn 
with special emphasis on the literature of the nineteenth century. ' 

I9S9460' '^^' '^"''"''" ^''""" '^""'' ''"" ^'' ^>-<Not offered in 

twL\yth llTy""" ^'''' °' ''"'' «*=«- ^-- '^^ '>e^-nings to the 

Eng. 155, 156. Four Major American WritAr« r^ Q^ t?- ^ 
semesters. American writers (3, 3)— First and second 

Two writers are studied intensively each semester. 
Eng. 170. Creative Writing (2)-First semester. 

qufsHe En^ lloT?.^ ''''"''"' '^"'''^^ (2)~Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Jj^ng. 170 or the permission of the instructor. 



A high level of performance is expected; some attention is given to 
forms not studied in English 170. 

Eng. 172. Play writing (2) — Second semester. 

Analysis of plays, and practice in writing at least one short play. 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Thesis (3-6) — (Arranged.) Credit in proportion to work done 
and results accomplished. 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods (2) — First semester. 
An introduction to the principles and methods of research. 

Eng. 202. Middle English (3) — Second semester. 

A study of selected readings of the Middle English period with reference 
to etymology, morphology, and syntax. 

Eng. 203. Gothic (3)— (Not offered in 1945-1946.) 

A study of forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas Bible; 
correlation of the Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. 

Eng. 204. Medieval Romances (3)— (Not offered in 1945-1946.) 

The Middle English metrical and prose romances and their sources, with 
emphasis on the Arthurian cycle. 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3, 3) — ^First and 
second semesters. ♦ 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3) — (Not offered 
in 1945-1946.) 

Eng. 212. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3) — Second 

semester. 

Eng. 214. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature (3) — (Not offered 
in 1945-1946.) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-1946.) 
The pratice and theory of criticism from Plato to Croce. 

Eng. 225, 226. Major American Writers (3,3) — (Not offered in 1945- 
1946.) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Eng. 230. Studies in American Language (3) — (Not offered in 1945- 
1946.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, one semester of 
college Zoology. 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



253 



status of insects. A collection of common insects is reqllLd F^e, $3 Jo 

Ent 2. Insect Morphology (3)_First semester. One lecture and tw« 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent 1 ^'^ 

inff' ^' ^'"^*** Taxonomy (3)-Second semester. Two three-hour labora 
tory periods a week, occasional lectures. Prerequisite, Ent. 2 

Ent. 4. Apiculture (3)— Second semester. Two lectures anH «»» fu 
hour laboratory period a week. Ent. 1 desirabll ' *^'''- 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology (3)-(Not offered 1945-46.) 

Ent. 103 104. Insect Pests (3, 3)-First and second semesters Tw„ 

department. -trerequisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the 

vec?o:s'':? pithtn-: t:sr %£t: "' t:- •'^^'^ ^^^^•^"^ -<* - 

sanitation as they' are Se tTentoL ^ ^h^llfolT'^? ^"' 
Fee, $3.00. tumoiogy. ine control of pests of man. 

19S6.r' ''""''"" '""* ^"""""^ ^'^-^"'' ^^•»-*-- (Not offered 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (3)-Second semester. Prereauisite Fr,f i ^ 
Elementary Organic Chemistry. freiequisite, Ent. 1 and 



The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and 
other important chemicals, with reference to their chemistry, toxic action, 
compatability, and host injury. Recent research emphasized. 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (2) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
occasional demonstrations. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to blood, 
circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and 
the nervous system, and metabolism. 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, to be determined by the department. 

An intensive investigation of some entomological problem, preferably of 
the student's choice. Required of majors in entomology. 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. 

Presentation of original work, review and abstracts of literature. 

Ent. 113. Photomicography (2) — First semester. Two laboratory periods 
a week and occasional lectures. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

An elementary course in photomicography and macrophotography. 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology — Credit and prerequisites to be de- 
termined by the department. First and second semesters. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entom- 
ology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. 

Ent. 202. Research — First and second semesters. 

Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. This course 
involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for pub- 
lication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a part of the 
requirements for an advanced degree. 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology (2-4) — First semester. Two lec- 
tures, additional laboratory work and credit by special arrangement with 
the department. 

Insect anatomy with special reference to function. Given in preparation 
for advanced work in physiology or research in morphology. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (2) — Second semester. One lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

A study of fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects to 
their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic organism 
adjusted to its surroundings, 



254 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



255 



FOODS AND NUTRITION, see page 274. 
FOOD TECHNOLOGY, see page 275. 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

At the beginning of each semester a placement examination is given for 
all students who have had some foreign language and wish to do further 
work in that language. By this m^ns the Department assigns each student 
to the suitable level of instruction. 

Two types of majors are offered in French, German, or Spanish: one for 
the general student or the future teacher and the other for those interested 
in a rounded study of a foreign area for the purpose of understanding 
another nation through its literature, history, sociology, economics, and 
other aspects. 

Literature and Language Major 

Language and literature as such are stressed in the first type of major. 
Specific minimum requirements beyond the first two years are a semester 
each of intermediate and advanced conversation (Fr., Ger., or Span. 8 and 
80), a semester of grammar review (Fr., Ger., or Span. 71), six hours of 
the introductory survey of literature (Fr., Ger., Span. 75 and 76), and 
twelve hours in literature courses numbered 100 or above — a total of 26 
semester hours. Beyond this minimum further courses in the Department 
are desirable and as electives work in American and in Comparative Litera- 
ture is strongly recommended. 

Foreign Area Major 

The area study major endeavors to provide the student with a knowledge 
of various aspects of the country whose language he is studying. Specific 
minimum requirements beyond the first two years are ten hours of con- 
versation. Life and Culture (Fr., Ger., or Span. 161 and 162), three hours 
of Advanced Composition (Fr., Ger., or Span. 121) and six hours in litera- 
ture courses numbered 100 or above — a total of 25 semester hours. In addi- 
tion the student takes, in lieu of a minor in one department, twenty to 
thirty-six hours in geography, history, political science, sociology, or eco- 
nomics, distributed through these fields in consultation with advisors in the 
Foreign Language Department. The student is urged to take some elective 
work in American and in Comparative Literature. 

French 

French 1, 2. Elementary French (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Students who oflfer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in com- 
position and translation. 

French 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, the grade of A or B in French 1. Qualified students who are 
interested in French should take this course in conjunction with French 2. 

A practice course in simple, spoken French. 



French 4, 5. Intermediate Literary French (3, 3)-First and second 

semesters Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Second-year French 

orstudents interested in literature or in fields related to literature. 

Students who expect to do major or minor work in French are required. 

however, to take French 17 in place of the second semester of this course. 

Translation; conversation; exercises in pronunciation Reading of texts 
designed to give some knowledge of French life, thought, and culture. 

French 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French (3, 3)-First and second 

semesters Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Second-year French 

orstudents specializing in the sciences. Students who expect to do major 

or minor work in French are required, however, to take French 17 in place 

of the second semester of this course. 

Translation; conversation; exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scien- ^ 

tific texts. 

French 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2. 2)-First and second semes- 
ters Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Practical exercises in conversation, based on material dealing with French 
life and customs. 

French 17. Grammar Review (3)-First and second semesters. Pre- 
reSte, French 4, French 6, or permission of instructor. This course gives 
the same credit as do French 5 and French 7, and may be taken m place of 
ttese Tourses. Required of second-year French students who expect to 
major or minor in French. 

An intensive review of the elements of French grammar; verb drills; 
composition; conversation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
French 51, 52. The Development of the French Novel (3, 3)-First and 
second semesters. 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel i" French 
literature: of the lives, works, and influence of i^P"'^^"* "T^^fg^- ^i;^'' 
French 51 covers the 17th and 18th centuries. French 52 the 19th century. 

(Not offered 1945-46.) 

French 53, 54. The Development of the French Drama (3, 3)— First and 
second semesters. 

Introductory study of the French drama. Translation, collateral readmg, 
reports French 53 covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French 
54 the 19th century. 

French 55, 56. The Development of the Short Story in French (3, 3)- 
First and second semesters. 

A study of the short story in French literature; reading and translation 
of representative examples. (Not given in 1945-46.) 



256 



TH^ VNlVERStTY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



257 



French 61, 62. French Phonetics (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, French 1 and 2. 

A practical course in the pronunciation of French: study of phonetics, 
oral exercises and ear training. 

French 71, 72. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, French 17 or equivalent. 

This course, more advanced than the Grammar Review (French 17), is 
designed for students who, having a good general knowledge of French, 
wish to become more proficient in the written and spoken language. 

French 75, 76. Introduction to French Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, second-year French or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the chief authors and movements in French 
literature. 

French 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

This course is intended for students who have a good general knowledge 
of French, and who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the 
language. 

French 99. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (1) — 

Second semester. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French litera- 
ture. This course provides a rapid review for majors by means of a brief 
survey of the entire field. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3) — First 
semester. 

The beginning and development of the Renaissance in France. 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3, 3) — 

First semester and second semester. 

First semester, a survey of the great classical writers other than Corneille, 
Racine, and Moliere. Second semester, the significant plays of Corneille, 
Racine and Moliere. 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

First semester, a study of the drama, poetry, and novels of the period. 
Second semester, the philosophical and scientific movement from Saint- 
Evremond and Bayle to the French Revolution. 

French 105, 106. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First semester, drama and poetry from Symbolism to the present time. 
Second semester, the contemporary novel. 



u 191 122 Advanced Composition (3, 3)-First and second 
Z^Ss 'kJSl^o.toT^n.Xisy. to French, free composition, and letter 

"plench 161, 162. French Life and Culture (3. 3)_First and second 
semesters. ^^^.^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ their 

J:.'S::'T:o^ii^:^l^^^^^^> Lr.n and ^^. Wit^n. 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
French 201. Research-Credits determined by work accomphshed^ 
French 203. 204. Georges Duhamel. Poet. Dramatist. Novelist (2. 2)- 

^;::: rri:::: Uterature of the Middle Ages C2. 2>-First and 

Xlrri. The French ^W in the First Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2)— First and second semesters. 

Tench 209. 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2)-First and second semesters. 

French 211. Introduction to Old French (3)-Second semester. 

French 213. 214. Seminar (2. 2)-First and second semesters. 

Required of all graduate students in French. 

,. r^ „^ <-9 9->_One conference a week, first 
French 221. 222. Readmg Course (2, 2)— Une com 

and second semester. 

Tin 1,2. Elementary German f^l-^^:^-:,^:^.^:::^^ 
^1^^^^::^::^^^^=^^^ -it for t^s course. 
German 3. Elementary Conversation (D-First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, the grade of A or B in German 1. 

German 4. 5. Intermediate Literary German (3 3) -First and second 
semesrers. Prerequisite, German 1, 2, or e^^--^-*. ^^, ^.,^, 

Reading of narrative prose, grammar review, and oral 

'Can 6. T. Intermediate Scientific German (3. 3)_First and second 

semesters. ^otH^w 

Reading of technical prose, with some grammar review. 

German 8. 9. Intermediate Conversation (2. 2)-First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 



258 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



259 



The object of this course is to help the student acquire the ability to 
speak and understand simple colloquial German. 

German 17. Grammar Review (3) — First and second semesters. 

For students who enter with three or more units in German, but who 
are not prepared to take German 71. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

German 61, 62. German Phonetics (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, German 1, 2, or equivalent. 

German 71, 72. German Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. This course is required of students 
preparing to teach German. 

German 75, 76. Introduction to German Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of German literature. 

German 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

t 

Intensive drill in the spoken language. 

German 99. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1) — 

First and second' semesters. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of German litera- 
ture, art, and music. Rapid review for majors. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

The earlier and the later classical periods. 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

Romanticism and young Germany. 

German 105, 106. Contemporary German Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

The literature of the Empire and of the Twentieth Century. 

German 107, 108. Goethe's Faust (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
First and second parts of the drama. 

Attention is called to Comparative Literature 106, Romanticism in Ger- 
many, and Comparative Literatjire 107, The Faust Legend in English and 
German Literature. 



•*-^« a ^^— First and second semes- 

far as seems expedient. 

For Graduates 
. i students will determine which courses will 
(The requirements of students wi 

°^"""^'^ o ,h Credits determined by work accomplished. 

German 201. Research-Credits 3)_First and second 

902 203 The Modern German Drama (3, 6) 
German 202, zu». !■"= 

semesters. 

_ ..,.„_ (9\ First semester. 

German 204. Schiller (3) (2)-Second semester. 

German 205. Goethe's Works outs.de ^^^^ J ^^^^^,^^. 
German 206. The Romantic Movement 3) ^^^^^^^^ 

90R The Philosophy Of Goethe sFanstl^J 

r ..e. o. - — --" :;:;::;„. „a .«o.a ..»..«-.. , 

G.,n... 22». 221- "'-"« ^° lj„t the background of • s«my ol 
German literature, r.^ 

Italian Q)_First and second semesters. 

rrJ-f™.«rr riiofa .o, .v.ooo. «..„« . .... 

and Spanish. nwFirst and second semesters. 

o Vlpmentary Conversation (I) J^"'>'' 
Itahan 3. Elemeniary . ^^ r ;„ Italian 1. 
Prerequisite, the grade of A oi B m 

Spanish ' a") —First and second semester. 

Spanish 1, 2. Elementary SP^"-^ ^;',^^ ,„trance, but whose prepara- 
Students who offer two - ^ ^ ^Hf^nish, receive half credit for this 

tion is not adequate for secona y 

course. 



260 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



261 



Spanish 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, the grade of A or B in Spanish 1. 

A practice course in simple, spoken Spanish. 

Spanish 4, 5. Intermediate Spanish (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent. Students who do major or minor 
work in Spanish are advised to take Spanish 17 in place of the second 
semester of this course. 

Translation, conversation, exercise in pronunciation. Reading of texts 
designed to give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin-American life, 
thought, and culture. 

Spanish 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

The object of this course is to help the student acquire the ability to 
speak and understand everyday and colloquial Spanish. 

Spanish 17. Grammar Review (3) — First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite Spanish 4 or consent of instructor. Designed particularly for 
students who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who expect to do 
advanced work in the Spanish language and literature, but who are not 
prepared to take Spanish 71. 

An intensive review of the elements of the Spanish grammar, verb drills, 
composition. 

Spanish 61, 62. Spanish Phonetics (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 

A practical course in the pronunciation of Spanish; study of phonetics, 
oral exercises and ear training. 

Spanish 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semester. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5, or equivalent. 

This course is more advanced than Spanish 17 and is designed to give 
the students a thorough training in the structure of the language. It is 
also intended to give an intensive and practical drill in Spanish composition. 

Spanish 75, 76. Introduction to Spanish Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5, or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of Spanish literature. 

Spanish 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Spanish 8, 9, or consent of instructor. This course is 
more advanced than Spanish 8 and 9 and is intended to give the students 
the ability to speak fluently about subjects of general interest. 

Spanish 99. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature (1) — 

Second semester. 

Weekly lectures stressing the leading concepts in the History of Spanish 
Literature. Especially designed for majors. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

o • 1, 101 Epic and Ballad (3)-First semester. 

Spanish 101. i^-pw ""» Medieval Spain. 

The legends and heroic ™^"^' "™^^^^ semester. 

semester. n^w^n Aee (3)— First semester. 

. 1. ma ThP Poetry of the Golden Age \*^^ 

Spanish 106. The Poetry ,3)__Second semester. 

Qnanish 107. The Spanish Mystics k.oj 

M 108. Lope de Vega (3)-First semester. 

fpanish m. Cervantes ^^^-^^^^^^^^^ ,3)-First semester. 
Spanish 110. The Poetry o the ™ ^c*^";"Jy\3)_Second semester. 
Spanish 111. The Novel "^^ *^* ™ceMu;7(3)-Second semester 

Spanish 112. The Drama f ;''«^^f^*'clTurV(3)-First semester. 
Spanish 113. The Novel of the ^^ CeMu y C _^_^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

Spanish 114. The Poetry of *;*. ^f J^^iJllcLtury (3)-First semester. 
Spanish 115. Spanish Thought m ^^J^f^^^^^f^^^^^^^^^^ of 1898. 

Essays and critical ^'"^^^ f'^^'^^^c^J ,,)-Secon^ semester. 
Spanish 116. The Drama of the '^^ J ^^^^J^pV^t ^^d second semester. 
s'panish 121. 122. Advanced Compc>s.7j^^^ ,,,,,, ^,,^,. 

Translation from English to Spanish ^ ^^^^^ 

Spanish 151. Latin-American ^oveU3)^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Spanish 152. Latin-Amenean Poetry (3) ^^^^^^^^ 

Z^"^, rCrLir::d^Cu- a3>_First and second 
semesters. ^ ^.^ ^^^^ prlucational, artistic traditions, great 

far as seems expedient. ^^__First and second 

Spanish 163. 164. Latin-American Civilization (3. 3) 

semesters. ^ ,.^ ^^^^ prlucational, artistic traditions, great 

far as seems expedient. „, j *„ 

For Graduate Students 
u PrpHits determined by work accomphshed. 
Spanish 201. ^--^^-^^^jl^^ ^^^^^ Literature (3)-First semester. 
Spanish 202. The Golden Age m SP^^J^ ^^^^^ ^.^esters. 

Spanish 203. 204. Spanish Poetry (3. 3) First 

r -t fl" ^Tt*:!;:^';:;!: Spamsh (3)--Second semester. 
Z^ fn, 2" Reading Course_(Arranged.) 
FRENCH, see page 254. 



262 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

GEOGRAPHY, see NATURAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES, page 292. 

GEOLOGY 

Geol. 1. Geology (3) — Prerequisite, Chem. 1, 3. 

A study dealing primarily with the principles of dynamical and structural 
geology. Designed to give a general survey of the rocks and minerals com- 
posing the earth; the movement within it, and its surface features and the 
agents that form them. 

Geol. 2. Engineering Geology (2). 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. 

GERMAN, see page 257. 

HISTORY 

H. 1, 2. History of Modern Europe (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
The basic course, prerequisite for all advanced courses in European History. 

A study of European History from the Renaissance to the present day. 

H. 3, 4. History of England and Great Britain (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. For freshmen and sophomores; open to upper classmen by 
special arrangement. 

H. 5, 6. History of American Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Required for graduation of all students who enter the University 
after 1944-45. Normally to be taken in the sophomore year. See page 24. 
for further explanation. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. American History 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3)— -(Not offered in 1945-46.) Pre- 
requisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the 
eighteenth century. 

H. 102. The American Revolution (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Pre- 
requisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The background and course of the American Revolution through the 
formation of the Constitution. 

H. 105, 106. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1860 
(3, 3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisites H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. 
A synthesis of American life from the colonial period to the present. 

H. 107. Social and Economic History of the United States, 1860-1900 

(3) — First semester. Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The development of American life and institutions, with emphasis upon 
the period since 1876. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



263 



H. 5, 6, or the equivalent ante-bellum South 

A study of tl^ei-^^-^riracCS^ Civil War. 

,ith particular reference to the ^-^^^^ ^ ,3,5.45.) 

H 116 The Civil War and Reconstruction (3)-(Not one 
Prerequisites, H. 5, 6. or the ^^^^^^f ' ^^^^^,,y. political, social, and 

Military aspects; problems of ^^ f/f/^^Jt^/ |ost-bellum problems 
economic effects of the war upon American y 

Tr^econstruction in North and south. pj^^t and second 

H 121 122. History of the American Frontier (3, 3)-First 
.eLtel;. Prerequisites. H. 5 6. or the eq— ^^^^^^^ 

A study of the influence o^ thj -^^ J ^^ ^^^^^^^^ West; 

institutional development. First semeste , 
second semester, the trans-Mississippi West. 

„ 127 128 Diplomatic History of the United States (3, 3)-First and 
H. 127, 1^». t»ip>">»» H t; fi or the equivalent, 

second semesters. Prerequisites. H. 5 6, «J J ^^^^^^^^^ 

r« Th. «ni«d St.... »d world A...r. (3>-(Not .»«rf ■» l'^" 

pnce to the rest of the world since 1917. 

ence xo tne ^^^ ^^__First and second 

H 133 134. The History of American Ideas (3,3) 

U. I66y lo*. w ^ 6 or the equivalent. 

religious liberty, democracy, and social ideas. 

^ *•* ♦v.„»i Historv of the United States (3, 3, 3)— 
H. 135. 136, 137. Constitutional History ot tn j^^j^^t. 

(Not offered in 1945-46.) Prerequisites, H 5, 6, or the j ^^^_ 

A study of the historical ^--^^^^-^^/i^^^^^^^^^^^ in theory and 
stitution, and the development of American con 

practice thereafter. , qic 4fi \ Pre- 

H 141 142. History of Maryland (3, 3)-(Not offered m 1945-46.) 

requisites, H. 5. 6, or the -<^-^^^^^', ^^^,^, .^^ economic history of 

eoS -ZZ^ = sltterryl-and-s historical development and 
vole as a state in the American Union. 



<' 



264 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



265 



H. 145, 146. Latin-American History (^ ^^ t?,\.o4^ j 
Prerequisites, 6 hours of fundamental courses ^"'^ '"'""'' '''^''''''■ 

special emphasis7prrir:":s.rss^^^^^^^^^^ ''^-•<'--*' -^^^ 

B. European History 

offlf il; 1945- 46?'"" "' *'"' ^""*"'* «"-* -d «-ece (3, 3)-(Not 

wiStraSiort^XirttoS"-^^^^^^^^^ rf ^^^^* -^ N- East, 
similar treatment of Greek h1~S tCe. '""' "^"""^ ^^™«^*«'-' « 
H. 153. History of Rome (3)-(Not offered in 1945-46 ) 

First semester, from the fall nf +i,» r. ,, 

century. ^''^ ^*" "* ^^^ ^oman Empire to the thirteenth 

1789-1815. ''spoUomc regme and the balance of pew„ 

A »t,.j , „ "erequisites, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. 

Frtfo^gufsifnwT ''''''™'^^' '™^^"^"^- ^^^ ^-^ PoHtics since the 



H. 181, 182. History of Central Europe (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 
Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. 

The history of Central Europe from 1600 to the present, with special 
emphasis on Germany and Austria. 

H. 185, 186. History of the British Empire (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. 

First semester, the development of England's Mercantilist Empire and 
its fall in the war for American Independence (1783); second semester, the 
rise of the Second British Empire and the solution of the problem oi 
responsible self-government, 1783-1867; the evolution of the British Empire 
into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the development and problem of the 
dependent Empire. 

H. 191. History of Russia (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) Prerequisites, 
H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. 

A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. 

H. 193. History of the Near East (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Pre- 
requisites, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. 

A study of the Balkans and of Turkey from earliest times to the present. 

H. 195. The Far East (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

A survey of institutional, cultural and political aspects of the history of 
China and Japan, and a consideration of present-day problems of the 
Pacific area. 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3) — Second semester. 

Discussions and term papers designed to acquaint the student with the 
methods and problems of research and presentation. The students will be 
encouraged to examine those phases of history in which they are most 
interested. Required of history majors in senior year. 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (3-6) — Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 
(Arranged.) 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (2) — (Arranged.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3) — 

(Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on the critical and source materials explaining 
our social and economic evolution. 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the sources and the classical literature of American Colonial History. 



266 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



267 



H. 215. The Old South (3)— (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the standard sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum South. 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3)— (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on the controversial literature of the Civil War. 
Attention is focused upon the conflicting interpretations and upon the social 
and economic impact of the war on American society. Opportunity is also 
given to read in the rich source material of this period. 

H. 221, 222. History of the West (3, 3)— (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to give the student an acquaintance 
with some of the more important sources and some of the most significant 
literature of the advancing American frontier. 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History (3, 3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on selected phases of American thought, with 
emphasis on religious traditions, social and political theory, and the develop- 
ment of American ideas. 

H. 250. Seminar in European History (2) — (Arranged.) 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with the im- 
portant literature and interpretations on such topics as feudalism, the- 
medieval Church, schools and universities, Latin and vernacular literature, 
art and architecture. 

H. 281. Topics in the History of Central Europe (3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences in the history of Central Europe from Bismarck 
to the present, to acquaint the student vnth the leading primary and 
secondary sources. Special emphasis will be placed on the Bismarckian and 
Hitlerian periods. 

H. 285, 286. Topics in the History of Modern England and Greater 
Britain (3, 3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and conferences on the documentary and literary materials deal- 
ing with the transformation of England and the growth and evolution of 
the British Empire since 1763. 

H. 287. Historians and Historical Criticism (3) — (Arranged.) 

Readings and occasional lectures on the history of historical writing, the 
evolution of critical standards, the rise of auxiliary sciences, and the works 
of selected masters. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Art, see pages 197, 268. 

Foods and Nutrition, see page 274. 

Home Economies Education, see pages 131, 23^. 

Home and Institution Management, see page 21S. 

Practical Arts and Crafts, see page 268. 

Textiles and Clothing, see below. 

• o 1 ^nfiires a)— First semester. Required of 
H. E. 1. Home Economics Lectures \,i) rust 

Home Economics freshmen. discussions on grooming 

Lectures, dernonstrations J-P/^^l^p S SuXnts; good study 
and clothing budget for the college giri, p« 
habits; social usage. 

and analysis of fabrics. 

. J.' /Q\ TrivQt and second semesters, rre- 

aduMd to students with sewing «KP«™n"- 

. X- /'Q\ TTiTcf and second semesters, rre- 

'='°^t*iexTTL2"r»r/i'i.S"'w'ir 

TCluon ana uT. :< eon, J„i.i P-t-ns. oon..™tio„ .. .—U 

.dapted to studonts without sowing .xp.ri.nce. 
«» 21 Person.l ProWoms in Clothing (2)-First somester 
o:. i o,«; wa,d,,he planning; s.iecUon and p.rohas. o< acoosso™. 

and ready-to-wear. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

»a Textiles (3)— Second semester. One lecture and two 
Tex. 100. ^'l;;^"7^J^"%',^S^^^^^ Tex. 1, Organic Chem. 
laboratory periods a l''^-J'J^^l^^^^^, ^.^p^rties of fibers; of standard 
Detailed study of physical ^"f f ~^?,^.P„f textile finishes; of color 
testing methods for serviceability of fabrics, oi 
application; of laundering and dry cleaning. 

„ . , „ ;„ Tpxtiles (4)— First semester. One lecture ana 
Tex. 101. P"'>'«"?^, " J"*r' Prerequisites: Tex. 100, Organic Chem. 
three laboratory periods a week, t^y^'^^:* 
Individual experimental problems m textiles. 

w^ LI ;« T^YtilGs CS') — Second semester, iwo 

j-s'"Lr"So:ST.."/r:^^!'p..,-t., .... . .. 

equivalent. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



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Economic and trade conditions that affect consumer-trade relationships; 
buying guides for purchase of household linens and clothing; performance 
tests of fabrics. 

Tex. 108. Decorative Fabrics (2) — One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week. Not offered in 1945. 

Study of historic and conteriiporary fabrics and laces. 

Clo. 120. Draping (3) — First and second semesters. Three laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites: Tex. 1, Clo. 20a. 

Demonstrations and practice in creating costumes in fabrics on individual 
dress forms; modeling of garments for class criticism. 

Clo. 121. Pattern Design (2) — First and second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite: Clo. 20a or b. 

Development and use of a basic pattern in dress making. 

Clo. 122. Tailoring (2) — First and second semesters. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite: Clo. 20a or b. 

Construction of tailored garments requiring professional skill. 

Clo. 123. Children's Clothing (2) — First semester. One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: Clo. 20a or b, or equivalent. 

Children's clothing from the standpoint of age, health, beauty, personality; 
development of original designs. 

Clo. 124. Projects and Reading in Textiles and Clothing (2) — Second 
semester. 

Special projects; survey of current literature in the field or related fields. 

For Graduates 
Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles (2-4)— Not offered in 1945. 
Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing (2-4)— Not offered in 1945. 
Tex. and Clo. 230. Seminar (1, 1)— Not offered in 1945. 
Tex. and Clo. 231. Research — Not offered in 1945. 

Practical Art and Crafts 

The Department of Practical Art reserves the right to retain one art 
problem, from each student, from each class, for illustrative purposes; 
however, it will retain only such problems as are needed by the department. 

Pr. Art 1. Design (3) — First and second semesters. 

Art expression through the use of materials, such as opaque water color, 
wet clay, colored chalk, and lithograph crayon, which are conducive to free 
techniques. Elementary lettering, action figures, abstract design and 
general composition study. Consideration of art as applied to daily living. 



I. A^i History (2)— First semester. 
Pr. Art 2. Survey of Art ^^^^^^^ \ ^^^ twentieth century, 

A rapid survey of art, from P-^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^hich each period has 
shting the great human movements and art ^^ , ^.^^.^^^^,, ,, ^rt m . 
Saected ^^^-^^^^ZZ^ examinations. F.eld 

today's livmg. ^^^^^f ^^^^^^^ '^_ .^g offered 1946-47. 

trips when transportation permits^ ^^^__^.^^^ 

pr. Art 3. Creative Art ^-P^^ p,. ^^ 2, or consent of 

Two laboratory periods a week. 

the instructor. ^ a ^^ ^7^o.orous primitive art as found 

'^Modern design produced afta: ^^l^':^:ZZ^^^ester. part of the 

in the prehistoric art of Spam, F^an^^, a ^ ^^^^^ ^^d 

United'states; archaic ^^^<>^'^';^Jf^;,:::^i.^e tribes; provincial and 

Peruvian cultures; past and present y 

peasant groups. (2)— Second semester. Two labora- 

%r. Art4. Three-dimensional Design ^^ ^.^^^^^^ 

tory periods a week. P^^'^^^*^'^" "^^ ^g „ass. volume, and depth in 
Abstract and symbolic X^:;^,^f;;^:^^^^., screen, wire, thin sheet 
construction problems, which ^^'^'^-tl^^^^^rse stimulates resourcefulness 
Ltal. ^^^-n^^t'dSrit tespedaS valuable to persons interested 
and imagination in design, 
in display. ^ ^^^^^^d semesters. Three 

Pr. Art 20. Costume Design (3)-^ ^^ ^^ ^^ equivalent, 

laboratory periods a week. Prerequi ' Adaptation of changmg 

Clothing selection with :^^'%^2^;^;TcoZrnes in mediums, such as 

Sr L? iSo^r^b -on"=^^^^^^^^ t^^ 

Setrindia ^^ ^^--S::^:^.:^^^ the fashion industry^ 
figure drawmg. Suivey ot n ..^-^^^ and second semesters. Two 

. -rSS^e ilfusSSioTl^ raiding. Pr. Art . prerequisite 
\?A:r^: Typography and Lettering (.-second semester. Prere- 

survey of processes of reproduction- ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

P. Art 38, 39 P^otoj^'^ph^J/eqSltes. Pr. Art 1, or equivalent, and 
laboratory periods a week. 

consent of the instructor. emphasis upon pictures 

Experimental effects in V^o^^^^VJ^^^ ^P^^ ^^j„„ exhibits. Offered 
for advertisements, store display, 
1946-47. 



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Cr. 2, 3. Simple Crafts (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. 

Creative art expressed in clay modeling, plaster carving, wood burning, 
thin metal working, paper mache modeling, etc. Emphasis is laid upon 
inexpensive materials and tools and simple techniques, which can be pursued 
in the home. Excellent for teachers and directors of recreation centers. 

Cr. 20, 21. Ceramics (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Pr. Art 1 or Cr. 2, if possible. 

Elementary pottery-making, modeling in relief, intaglio and in the round, 
simple glaze effects. Good design is stressed. Offered 1946-47. 

Cr. 30, 31. Metalry (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Pr. Art 1, or Cr. 2, if possible. 

Etching, repousse, and sawed filigree in metals, such as copper, aluminum, 
brass, pewter and German silver. Good design is stressed. Offered 1946-47. 

Cr. 40, 41. Weaving (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Pr. Art 1, if possible. 

Hand weaving on simple looms. Good color, texture, and general design 
are stressed. Offered 1946-47. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pr. Art 100, 101. Mural Design (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 2, 3, 21, or consent of 
the instructor. 

Consideration of mural design with relation to propriety of setting. Study 
of traditional and contemporary techniques. Experiment in colored chalk, 
gouash, oil paint, and fresco; stone, glass, and tile mosaic, when available. 

Pr. Art 102, 103. Advanced Mural Design (2, 2)— First and second 
semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 2, 3, 
21, 100, 101. 

Advanced techniques in mural design. 

Pr. Art 120, 121 — Costume Illustration (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, and 21, 22, if 
possible. 

Advanced techniques in rendering of fashion illustration. Experience in 
use of Ben Day and Craftint. Organization of fashion shows. 

Pr. Art 124, 125. Individual Problems in Costume (2, 2)— First and 
second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, 20, 120, 121, and permission of the instructor. 

Advanced problems in costume design or costume illustration for students 
who are capable of independent work. 

Pr. Art 132. Advertising Layout (2) — First semester. Prerequisites, 
Pr. Art 1, 20, 30, and 21, 22 if possible. 



. A finished advertisements utilizing lettering, type speci- 
Rough layou s --^J^^^^^^ ,,ed in large work, 

fications, and Illustration. Air b . ..ertising (2, 2)-First and 

""n ^^20 ?32 or eqSent, Ind permission of the instructor. 

1, 20, 30, 120, 132 eq ,^ ^^, are capable of 

Advanced problems in advertising 
independent work. semesters. 

Pr. Art 136. Merchand^e msP^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^ ,,^ 3^., ,20, 132 

Two laboratory periods a week, t rereq 

"r^izz^ «sp>.. «< — «- ^-" «" -^^ "*•» 

establishments. ^ ^j 

„ A * i^R nfl Advanced Photography <2, 2)— Urst ana 
Pr. Art 138, li»- Aa>* Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 38, <J». 

semesters. Two laboratory periods a week^ Prereq 

Advanced problems in photography. Offered 1946-47. 

Aflvanceu v . ^ . r^ «-> First semester, two lectures and 

good and poor interiors. Hif f^^^^^^S Lbrics, and accessories. When 
domestic architecture fumture l^^^^jj^^^^^^ ; f^^niture factory, and 

rlns drawn to scale and rendered m co or 

P. Art 142, 143. Advanced .If^^^ZeTTrJX^sZX Art 1, 140, 
semesters. Two laboratory periods a week, fre 

or houses when possible. . ., , . /o o^ First and 

X J- -j^oi Problems in Interior (2, 2)— rirsi; anu 

are capable of independent work. 



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Pr. Art 198. Stor*^ V^^ - 

Selling, buying, adverti<:,-r,o. 
a specified departmerst'et" «!""? "'"•'^' "^^^ ""^^ supervision i 

Cr. 120 121 AH 

•». k„„. o,„«, jsr,. "'""■"' ■"">"•'»» »' .w .„a ,.„„,„, „, 

Cr. 124, 125. Individual Pr«Ki 

semesters. Two laboratory peSri w 'T'^''=^ (2' 2)--First and second 
12 land permission of the^St "'''• ^--<i--tes. Cr. 20, 21T20 

Advanced problems in ceram.V. 'v 
pendent work. Offered 1946 47! '*"''"*^ ^''° -« -Pable of inde- 

'^r^^^^^^^^'s^ second semesters. Xwo 
Advanced technimi^o • "' ^^- 

fine etching. Offerr^iMT''^^' ^"^'"^'"^ ^^^-ing. stone-setting, and 

^:£3'^^ Pe?odT: t^"Z ^^V"^-* -'^ -ond 
^^1, and permission of the instructor Prerequisites, Cr. 30, 31, 130 

Advanced problems in MetaTr,. t . 
pendent work. Offered 194X4?.^ " '*"''^"*^ ^^^^ are capable of inde- 

^^ techniques m weaving. Ofl'ered 1946-47. 

semesters "to L"?"t"''' ^'"'^^^^^ in Weaving (2 2> tt- . 
141 and n.. • °''***''"y P"iods a week p"f/ '• l~^""^* «"<! second 
; *"'' P^^'ssion of the instructor ^^^equisites, Cr. 40, 41, 140 

Advanced problems in • ' 

pendent work. Ofl^ered 1946™^ '"' ^*"''^"*^ ^^o «e capable of i„de- 
Cr. 198. Crafts In Theraov (2^ q 

war veteran <» n^^ ^^eiient for persons who nlan f^ V ' niinimum 
veterans. Offered 1946-47. ^ ^ ^^ ^^^^^ with disabled 



COURSES OF STUDY 



273 



HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION 

H. E. Ext. 100. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) — Second 

semester. 

Three lectures. Given under the direction of Venia M. Kellar and 

V 

specialists. Students must have senior standing in the College of Home 
Economics. 

HOME AND INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 
Foods and Nutrition, see page 274. 



Home Management 

Home Mgt. 150, 151. Management of the Home (3, 3) — ^First and second 
semesters. 

The family and human relations; household organization and manage- 
ment; planning of time and money; housing as a social problem; selection 
and care of household equipment and furnishings. 

Home Mgt. 152. Practice in Management of the Home (3) — ^First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Home Mgt. 150, 151. 

Six weeks experience in planning, guiding, directing and coordinating the 
activities of a household, composed of a faculty member and a small group 
of students. 

Institution Management 

Inst. Mgt. 160. Institution Organization and Management (3) — ^First 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Foods 2, 3; Home Mgt. 150, 151 to precede or parallel. 

The principles of scientific organization and management applied to 
institution administration, personnel management, and supervision of food 
services. 

Inst. Mgt. 161. Institution Purchasing and Accounting (3) — Second 
semester. Two lecturers and one laboratory period a week. 

Purchasing of food, supplies, and equipment for institutional use, and 
the principles involved in accounting as applied to food services. 

Inst. Mgt. 162. Institution Foods (3) — Second semester. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3 ; Inst. Mgt. 160, 161. 



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Inst. Mgt 163 P 
Three labor^ perforrwetk '^Jf «•*" • ^"-^e^ent (3)-Arran. . 

Practice work i„ food seJee „„r "*"' '"*• ^^'^ ^^"^ ^^ 

service under supervision. 

*nst. Mfirt lfi4 KA 
ter. One le'cture and onTf J"««t"«on Management r2. « 
Met. 160. 161. 1?/"'' *»"« ^«^-t<»T period a'w^et PreTe'SsT" 

Special problems i„ institution Management. 

Inst. Mgt. 165. The 9..i,« i t 

and one laboratory period tltrV'^-'^'^""'' -^-^er. TVo lecture 
equivalent. * "^^^^^ Prerequisites, Poods 2 q. m ! ,'^*"'^es 

"°is A 3; Nut. 110, or 

Problems relating to the nl»r.„- 

f'oods and Nutrition 

Foods 1. Introductory Foods CK^ i.- 

laboratory Derinr^c « \ ^ooas (3)— First and ^Pmr,^ 

xy periods a week. ^ second semesters Three 

foods 2, 3. Foods (% v\ V 

two laboratory neriowl' ' ^~* ""^t a"** second semesters n . 

11, 13. "^ P'"'''^^ « ^««><- Prerequisite. Genera rh?- I "'' ''"' 

eneral Chemistry, Chem. 

Composition, selecting „„j 

:;=. ~ -r sr»; :l- - -^- 

N«t. 10. Elements of Nutrition C3)-Pirst . 
For students i„ other colleges and \ '''""' ^^rr^^^t^m. 

and Practical Art. '^'^ ^"'^ '^^ ™aiors in Textiles and Clothing 

For Advanced Undprir..a^ x 

Sources of our fn^^ , period a week, 

tory periods a week. Prerequisite ^dTl 117' """'^^^- ^^^ ^^^-- 



/ 



COURSES OF STUDY 



275 



Planning and serving meals for family groups considering nutritional 
needs, and cost; includes simple entertaining. 

Foods 102. Experimental Foods (3)— First semester. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry; Foods 3. 

A study of food preparation processes from the experimental viewpoint. 

Foods 103. Demonstrations (2) — First and second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, Tex. 1, Clo. 20, Foods 1 or 3. 

Practice in demonstrations. 

Foods 104. Advanced Foods (2)— Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 3. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food materials. 

Foods 105. Foods of Other Countries (3) — Second semester. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 3 or 
equivalent. 

Food preparation and food customs of the peoples of other countries. 

Nut. 110. Nutrition (3)— First semester. Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry. 
A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. 

Nut. 111. Child Nutrition (2) — Second semester. One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Nut. 110. 

Principles of human nutrition applied to growth and development of 
children. Experience in a nursery school. 

Nut. 112. Dietetics (3) — Second semester. One lecture and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Nut. 110. 

A study of food selection for health; planning and calculating dietaries 
for children and adults; and methods of teaching food values. 

Nut. 113. Diet and Disease (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, Nut. 110. 

Modifications of the Principles of human nutrition to meet the dietary 
needs in treating certain diseases. 

For Graduates 

Foods 200. Advanced Experimental Foods (3-5) — Second semester. Two 
lectures, three laboratories. 

Includes experimental problems, special emphasis on use of Maryland 
products. 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Nut. 210. Readings in Nutrition (3) — First semester. 

Reports and discussion of outstanding nutritional research and 
investigation. 

Nut. 211. Problems in Nutrition (3-5) — Second semester. 

Experience in a phase of nutrition research which is of interest to the 
student by the use of experimental animals, human studies, or an extensive 
and critical survey of the literature. 

Nut. 212. Nutrition for Community Service (3) — Second semester. 

Applications of the principles of nutrition to various community problems. 
Students may work on problems of their own choosing. 

Foods and Nut. 220. Seminar (1, 1) — One hour a week, first and second 
semesters. 

Foods and Nut. 221. Research — Two lectures and 1 laboratory period a 
week. First and second semesters. 

Investigation in some phase of foods or nutrition which may form the 
basis of a thesis. 

HORTICULTURE 

Hort. 1. General Horticulture (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A general basic course planned to give the student a background of 
methods and practices used in production of horticultural crops. 

Hort. 5, 6. Fruit Production (3, 2) — First and second semesters. One or 
two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 1. 

A study of commercial varieties and the harvesting, grading, and storage 
of fruits. Principles and practices in fruit tree production. 

Hort. 10, 11. Greenhouse Management (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A detailed study of greenhouse construction and management. 

Hort. 16. Garden Flowers (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. 

The various species of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, bedding 
plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 

Hort. 22. Lanscape Gardening (2) — First semester. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 
application to private and public areas. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



277 



of «=«' fl"^^'^" „ . „ (3. First semester. One lecture and two 

Hort. 52. Landscape De«'|;Jf^ J^es, Hort. 22, Eng. Dr. 1, 2. 

.aboratory periods ^J^^' ^^^ ,, i,„ascape design supplemented by 
A consideration of the pnnP 

direct application m the dratting laboratory 

J ^ Tlesien (3)— Second semester. 

Hort. 53. Landscape I>*«»8n W 
periods a week. Prerequisite. Hort. 

Advanced landscape design. 

Hort. 54. Civic ^r\''^--'^::fZZ^^^^on to village and rural im- 
Principles of city planning and their app 
provements. ^^-First semester. Three lectures 

Hort 55. Commercial P'^-^^^t^^^^^equisite, Chem. 1. 

t.r Two lectures and one laboratory p ^^^^^ ^j^rubs, 

A col se dealing with the ^a- f -^P^^^^^^^ p^nts in orna- 

.rlV eve-reeni^^^^^^^^^^^^^ wishing a broad coverage 

mental plantings, uesign 

in this field. semester. Three lectures 

Hort. 58. vegetable ^f -^.^^.^TeZisites, Chem. 1, Bot. 1. and 
and one laboratory period a week. 

soils 1. . . . ,„, practices of commercial vegetable 

A study of the prmciples and P 

'^^"'t small FruiU (3)-Second semester. Two lectures and one 
JirTp"'--^-Trc;ir^n;ol^ - - production^ 

A study of ^^^r^:,:t^::^^> --^-^- ^^^^^^"^^^' "'^ 

small fruits mcludmg grapes, 
berries, and cranberries. 

. .. .A Undergraduates and Graduates 
For Advanced Underg^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^,^,,. 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 



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A critical analysis of 

plant physiology, chemistr7and'bor''\'" '^^'^''=«lt"re and application . 
production of fruit crops. '^' "' '"'^"^ *° ^-<=«-l P-blems in^^Z^^ 

Hort. 103, 104 T^^u , 

^ ^^ statement under Hort. 

Prttist;, Sf^raLlnTr*'^ ^^^-^-* - -ond semester 
A study of the physiological nianf . 

Hort. 106. World P. %. 

A field and laboratory studv nf f 
mental plantings. ^'""^^ "^ *«-^ shrubs, and vines used in orna- 

A study „, ,h^ „, "on. 5, 6. 

°' '"""• '■ "'■"°""'= »'«'™.WP., and fe„ip.,.„ 

Hort. 118. 119. Seminar (1 i)__p. , ' '"""P^- 

Oral presentation of the re'sults T '"' """' '''^'''^''■ 
-- -entific literature in ^^^tZ^^^!:^^::^ ~ 



COURSES OF STUDY 



279 



Hort. 122. Special Problems (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Credit 
arranged according to work done. For major students in horticulture or 
botany. 

^ For Graduates 

Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology (3, 3) — ^First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A systematic review of scientific knowledge and practical observations as 
applied to commercial practices in pomology. 

Hort. 203, 204. Experimental Olericulture (2, 2)— First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A systematic review of scientific knowledge and practical obser^vations as 
applied to commercial practices in olericulture. 

Hort. 205. Experimental Pomology (3) — Second semester. 
This course is a continuation of Hort. 201, 202. 

Hort. 206. Horticultural Cyto-genetics (3) — Second semester. Prere- 
quisites, Zool. 104, Bot. 101, Bot. 201, or equivalents. 

A course dealing with the field of cyto-genetics in relation to horticulture. 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (3) — First semester. One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

A critical study of research methods which are or may be used in 
horticulture. 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2 to 12) — First and second 
semesters. Credit granted according to work done. 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Five 
credit hours for five semesters can be obtained. 

Oral reports with illustrative material are required on special topics or 
recent research publications in horticulture. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, see page 234. 

ITALIAN, see page 259. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 1. Library Methods (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

This course is intended to help students to use libraries with greater 
facility and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of lectures and 



280 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



281 



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practical work, is designed to interpret the library and its resources to the 
students. The course considers the classification of books in libraries, the 
card catalog, periodical literature and indexes, and certain essential 
reference books which will be found helpful throughout the college course 
and in later years. 

L. S. 101. School Library Administration (2) — First semester. 

The organization and maintenance of effective library service in the 
modern school. Planning and equipping library quarters, purpose of the 
library in the school, standards, instruction in the use of books and libraries, 
training student assistants, acquisition of materials, repair of books, 
publicity, exhibits and other practical problems. 

L. S. 102, Cataloging and Classification (2) — Second semester. One 
lecture; one two-hour laboratory. 

Study and practice in classifying books and making dictionary catalog for 
school libraries. Simplified forms as used in the Children's Catalog, 
Standard Catalog for High School Libraries, and Wilson printed cards are 
studied. 

MATHEMATICS 

The following courses are open to students who offer one unit of algebra 
for entrance: Math. 1, 5, or 10. 

The following courses are open to students who offer two or more units 
of algebra for entrance: Math. 5, 15, 16. 

Qualifying examinations are given in Math. 10 and 15 shortly after regis- 
tration to determine if the preparation of the student is adequate for the 
course in which he is enrolled. In case the student is inadequately prepared, 
the department endeavors to place him in a course in line with his mastery 
of mathematics. 

Attainment examinations are open to properly qualified students in Math. 
5 and 14. These examinations are three hours in length and are held each 
semester on the Saturday following the beginning of classes in E 131 from 
9:00 to 12:00 A. M. 

Students who make a satisfactory grade on an attainment examination in 
a course are not required to take the course and may, subject to the approval 
of their Dean, elect: 

Math. 6, or 13 in place of Math. 5, 

Math. 16 in place of Math. 14. 

A grade of failure in a course cannot be removed by taking an attainment 
examination and can only be removed by repeating the course. 

The department strongly recommends that a student who receives a grade 
of D in a course in mathematics consult a member of the mathematics staff 



Tinrinff registration a senior 
in E-226. ^ semesters. Recom- 

.eSSe-'one unit of agbra. Op- - t^Sation in MatK. 15. 
,uLd of students who ^^^^^^ ^^^„„, .^urse in algebra. 
A review of the topics covered xn prerequisite. 

Math 2. Solid Geometry (0>-^^i ^^tfdeficient in solid geometry, 
pun: geometry. Open to studen s who en^r , ^ ary em- 

Lines, planes, cylinders con- th. ^sp ^^^^ ^^^ ^^.^^,, ,,,aents. 
phasis on MensuraUon. Intended ^^^^^^^^^ p,^. 

^ ti, R Mathematics Review (O-First ana 

;. ^ne year of college mathematics. trigonometry, and 

T^X-iew of ^^^ ::f:^j^^^ -^^-^■ 

^r: rc:::i"- ->--t ---r rmr^nitrs 

Math. 5. Ge««5/' f ^i^ebra. Students who oflfer two o ^^^ents 

requisite, one unit of a^f JJ*' j^ ^^^dit for this course. Open to s 
algebra for -^^^f-J^^rand Public Administration, and the College 
in the College of Business an 

-rental operation .Uo-r-S^ ^e .d; 

^Z^^:^:^^^^--- r :i:r:-semesters. Pre- 
Math. 6. Mathematics of^Finance (3)-^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^,^ ,,,,,e of Business 
reauisite, Math. 5 or equivalent, up 
Ind public Administration. amortization, sinking funds. 

Simple and compound .^''^^^^\' jties. and insurance, 
valuation of bonds, ^eprec-txon -J^u • ^^^^^^^^ p,,,equisite. plane 

Math. 7. Solid Geometry (3^ ^^ Education, 

geometry. Open to student m the^ development of the subject. 

.r?aSb.iX^ SU5:a?:^e=U predental. and general Art. 
theory of equations. 



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semeste'rs vTettTZ'Z T ^"*'^«« Geometry a^ ^. . 

medical, predenT,! ] ' ^**- ^^ °^ equivalent n^^""^* *'"* second 

Math 15 c II Demoivre's theorem. . ^^''^' «'^<^»t'on 

P„^ , ^'"^^^cal scieneces. •-"uents m engineerine- 

i* undamental operations • 

Math. 16. Spherical T.; 

Math. 18 19 p- X . 

P-ente. ., Lafr/S^SrieT, tt^S T ^ ^ ^ -,.tie 

Math. 20. 21. calcums (4 4) Th ^ ' themselves, 

tory periods a week fir=7 J ''-'--Three lectures and twn 
Prerequisite, Mlth.'le "ndTr ^^•=-'^. — ters. secondrndTrs';" '''°^^- 
">.. education, and thi Ssila^Teref -" ^Pen to stillr.-S: 



COURSES OF STUDY 



283 



Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kwnematics, integration, geometric and physical applica- 
tions of integration, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, 
infinite series, differential equations. 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Required of all students 
in mechanical and electrical engineering. 

Ordinary and partial differential equations of the first and second order 
with emphasis on their engineering applications. 

Math. 66. Applied Calculus (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 
or equivalent. 

The fundamental mathematical principles underlying problems of flow, 
thermodynamics and physical chemistry. 

Math. 70, 71. Junior Tutorial (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Re- 
quired of Juniors majoring in mathematics. 

Math. 80, 81. Senior Tutorial (1, 1) — ^First and second semesters. Re- 
quired of Seniors majoring in mathematics. 

A. Algebra 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100, 101. Higher Algebra (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Pre- 
requisite, two years of college mathematics. Open to students in the 
College of Education and to students of statistics. 

Selected topics in algebra will be taken up from a point of view designed 
to strengthen and deepen the grasp of the subject. 

Math. 102. Theory of Equations (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, two 
years of college mathematics. 

Solution of equations of third and fourth degree, construction of regular 
polygons, trisection of an angle, symmetric functions. 

Math. 103. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, two years of college mathematics. 

Linear dependence, matrices, group, vector spaces. 

For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Algebra (3, 3)— (Not offered 1945-46.) 
Matrices, groups, rings, fields, algebraic numbers, Galois theory. 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra (3) — (Arranged.) 

B. Analysis 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 110, 111. Advanced Calculus (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 




284 




i«i c 



f 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ables differential equations ^h rX^^""'! '""*=*'<'"^ *'^ severaf vari" 
mu tiple integrals, the theorems ^f '"^^^'''''^ *» mechanics and phyi " 
variations. "''""'"^ "^ Gauss and Stokes, the calcSlus of 

Math. 114 115 Diff 
Prerequisite; Math. 20, 2roXifarn?" ^'''^~(^ot offered 1945-46.) 

tionrsXL^rr^i^^^^^^ successive appro... 

Theory. Partial differential equatiois „f « "?' ^^'''^ f"n<=«ons, SturmTan 
.st.cs, boundary value problems ^Sa^fsvsS ^ ""'' "^^^^' '^haraS 
^ Math. 116. Introduction to Col, v '''''*""^' -PP"-«ons. 

er. Prerequisite, Math 20, 2^ Seoul^aw" n* ''"^''^^ ^'^-^-^ semes- 
Jng. and the physical sciences Cr^ . *' °P'" *« «*"dents of enginl' 
enroll in Math. 210, 211 '^ '''^^'''''' ''^^^^'^ of mathematics should 

-ra^yrt-ot^^^^^ and integra- 

t'y i^y residue theory, power series. 

T^ ,^ ^or Graduates 

Math. 210, 211 Fun f 

Complex numbers infir^u • ^aicuius. 

-ppin., comple/ i^ti" tl" cku'chT'^r^^^ ^''"^«-' -formal 
Riemann surfaces, algebrai^ functions LrS''^' *.'" ^eierstrass theory 
theorems of Weierstrass and Mittlg Sffler. ' ^"' ''''^'"' ^"»'=«°"«. th^ 

19jt)'^ie;::;J-^^^^^^^^^ (3.3)-(^,o, „,ered in 

integral, Jordan content and Lebeslue m^ '=°"\«'-^«"<=e. the Riemann 
Fourier series. . ^^''^^^"e measure, the Lebesgue integral" 

Math. 215, 216. Analysis n <!•> r- . 
quisite, advanced calculus and a cou^f if *"'! '""^""'^ semesters. Prere- 

Theory of residues infinit.V "^'^'^ ^*"*b'« ^eory. 

series, ^^ifferentiaCdlt^;-?;^^^^^^^^^ ^r ^^°-' *'^^onometrical 

Math. 272. Selected Topi ilTT *;:~'^^"**^ ^"-«<'-- 

topics in Analysis (3)_ (Arranged.) 

C. Geometry 

For Graduates and Advancprf TT«^ 
Math 120 A ^ ^ ^avanced Undergraduates 



COURSES OF STUDY 



285 



< • 



Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (3, 3) — (Not 
offered in 1945-46.) Prerequisite, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 

Elementary projective geometry largely from the analytic approach, pro- 
jective transformations, cross ratio, harmonic division, projective coordin- 
ates, projective theory of conies, Laguerre's definition of angle. 

Math. 126. Introduction to Differential Geometry (3) — ^First semester. 
Prerequisite, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 

The differential geometry of curves and surfaces with the use of vector 
and tensor methods, curvature and torsion, moving frames, curvilinear co- 
ordinates, the fundamental differential forms, covariant derivatives, intrinsic 
geometry, curves on a surface, dynamical applications. 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, two years of college mathematics. Open to students in the 
College of Education. 

This course is designed for students preparing to teach geometry in high 
school. The first semester is devoted to the modem geometry of the 
triangle, circle, and sphere. In the second semester emphasis is placed on 
the axiomatic development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry. 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 
Prerequisite, Math. 126 or equivalent. 

Curves and surfaces, geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet formula, 
ovaloids, surfaces of constant curvature, projective differential geometry. 

Math. 223, 224. Topology (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Prerequisite, 
advanced calculus. 

Mathematics based on a system of axioms, abstract spaces, connectivity 
and separation properties, topological properties of Euclidean spaces, set 
theoretic and combinatorial methods, continuous transformations. 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3) — (Arranged.) 

D. Applied Mathematics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130, 131. Analytic Mechanics (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 
Prerequisite, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 

Statics, Kinematics, dynamics of a particle, elementary celestial me- 
chanics, Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, two, and three 
degrees of freedom, Hamilton's principle, the Hamilton-Jacobi partial 
differential equation. 

Math. 132, 133. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists 

(3, 3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 64, or equivalent. 
Intended for students of engineering and physics. 



286 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



287 





Designed to introduce the student to advanced mathematical methods and 
their applications to problems arising in the fields of aeronautical, electrical, 
and mechanical engineering and in the physical sciences. 

Math. 134. Vector Analysis (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
20, 21. 

Vector algebra with applications to geometry and mechanics. 

Math. 139. Operational Calculus (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Math. 64, or equivalent. Intended for students of engineering and physics. 

Operational solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. 
Fourier and Leplace transforms. 

For Graduates 

Math. 230, 231. Applied Mathematics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, advanced calculus and differential equations. 

The subject material for this course will be chosen from the fields of 
dynamics, elasticity, hydro-dynamics or the partial differential equations 
of mathematical physics. 

Math. 233, 234. Tensor Analysis (3, 3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Pre- 
requisite, advanced calculus and differential equations. 

Algebra and calculus of tensors, Riemann geometry and its extensions, 
differential invariants, transformation groups, applications to physics and 
engineering, the theory of relativity. 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3) — (Arranged.) 

E. History of Mathematics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 140, 141. Celebrated Problems of Mathematics (2, 2) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, two years of college mathematics. Open 
to students in the College of Education and to qualified students. 

This course aims at integrating the mathematical knowledge acquired by 
the student in high school and college through the study of some of the 
famous historical problems in the fields of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, 
and the calculus. 

For Graduates 

Math. 240, 241. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (2, 2) — 

(Arranged.) Open to first year graduate students. 

This seminar aims at a triple objective: first, an integrating review of 
undergraduate mathematics; second, development in the student of a proper 
historical perspective and a critical attitude toward fundamental concepts; 
third, an interpretation of the mathematical masters of the past. 



F. Statistics Advanced Undergraduates 

For Graduates and Advancea .945.46.) Prere- 

M th 150 151 Probability (3, 3)-(Not offered m 1945 46.) 
quVs^tc'differential and integral calculus. ^.....uity, continuous 

and the theory of errors. 3)_First and second semes- 

Math. 152. 153. ^!^2'''^t!Tln^'SZ'''£-^-^- 
ters. Prerequisite, differential and »"t«^- ^.lUvariate analysis and 

Frequency distributions -Jf^^jrof variance, statistical inference, 
correlation, theory of sampling, analysis 

G Colloquium and Research 

For Graduates 

• _ wivst and second semesters. 
Math. -290. Colloquium-Fust antt 

Math. 300. Research-(Arranged.) 



ECHANICS semester. Prerequisite, 

Mech. 1. Statics and Dynamics )-f -f^ ,,^ 
,0 be taken concurrently with Math. 21 ^^^^^^^_^ ^^_ _ _„,^^ ^„, 



MECHANICS 

Mech. 1. Sv.. — Moth 21 and fnys. ^a- 

to be taken concurrently with Math. 21 a ^^^^^^.^^ 

.-^". sfer u= »"-- «-■ -"• -"'■ '°""" 

and momentum. semester. Four lectures 

Mech. 2. Statics and Dynamics (5)-Se- ^.^^^ ^^. 3 ,„a to be taken 
and one laboratory period a week- 

concurrently with Math 21 and P y ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

A more intensive treatment of the suDje 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

• I f^^ First and second semesters, ire- 
« u t;ft Strength of Materials (D)---Hrsi ai aeronautical, 

Mech. 50. Streng j^^lent. Required of juniors m 

requisite, Mech. 1 or <i, 01 ^^ 
civil, and mechanical engineering. .^^. ^^^^^^^^ ^ 

Thin-walled cylinders; "-^^f/^J^tlu tl It S ha'ndbook. Beam deflec- 
rrUSy1n^e=rb:ir:oUined loadings., composite beams, 

impact and energy loadings. ,„;,„ 



' loadings. ,,. Fjrst semester. Prerequisite, 

Mech. 51. Strength «' /atermls W .^ ^^^^^^^^, engineering. 

Mech. 1 or 2, or equivalent. Requi^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^.^.^ ^„gi„eering 



jnecn. ox. ^-^ — «>- T?onnired oi luniors m ^*— ^ 

ech. 1 or 2, or equiv^ent. Requ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^.^^ ^^^^^^^^, 

A shorter course than mecn. 
students. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



289 



288 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



n 



Mech. 52. Testing of Materials (2) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 or 51. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering; performance of standard tests; interpretation of speci- 
fications and tests. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 50. Principles of Mechanical Engineering (3) — First semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 20, 21 
and Math. 21. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Elementary thermodynamics and the study of heat, fuel and combustion 
in the production and use of steam for generation of power. Supplemented 
by laboratory tests and trips to industrial plants. 

M. E. 51. Thermodynamics (4) — First semester. Three lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 21, Phys. 21. Required 
of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, steam 
turbine, etc. 

M. E. 52. Power Plants (4) — Second semester. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The theory and operation of steam engines, boilers, condensers, steam 
turbines, and their accessories. 

•For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

M. E. 100, 101. Thermodynamics (3, 3) — ^First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Required of juniors in 
Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors. 

M. E. 102. Heating and Ventilation (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101. Required 
of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Design of heating and ventilation systems. 

M. E. 103. Refrigeration (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101. Required of 
seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories, and homes. 

M. E. 104, 105. Thesis (1, 2) — First and second semesters. One labora- 
tory period a week first semester and one lecture and one laboratory period 
a week second semester. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required of seniors 
in Mechanical Engineering. 

The student carries out a research project under faculty supervision. 



/. 4^ First and second semesters. Two 
M E lOe, 107. Prime ^o.ersJ.i^J>^^^^^ Hech. 50; M. E. 

JurS and two labo-tory P^J^^^^^^ Engineering. 
S, 101. Required of -^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ,,,,ert heat energy into power. 

S 50; M. E. 100, 101. mechanisms. 

The design of machine members and m ^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^,. 

M. E. 110, HI. ^-^tS^:^^^^^^^^ Prerequisite, semor 

ters. one lecture and ^^^^^ZZ^^^^ Engineenng. 
standing. Required of seniors m ^^^ ^^^.^^^^^, ,, ^he labora 

Experiments on engmes and other 
tory Reports are required on tests. 

,or C^-^-- ^^^^^^ ^,, 3eeond semesters. 
M E 200, 201. Advanced Dynamics (3 3^ ^i ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^ ,,,, ,o,. 
P.!;equisites, Mech. 2, Hech. 50,^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ,, ..,.Ung parts. 

Mechanics of ^^^^^^^^^.^^^^^^^ speeds. 

Vibrations and vibration damping.^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ semesters. 

M E 202 203. Applied Elasticity (3, ^) ^^^ 

^' ... MPch 2 Mech. 50; Math. 64, M. r.. p^^uiem involving 

,„,.bmty<.t .«»>;«- J5,»S 'materials. , „ ,, 

.r»«lvsis Advanced strengtn oi Transfer (3, 3)— 

semesters. One i*:^^ 

M. E. 108. 109. Application of advanced methods of stress 

semesters. One leciu „„^noses 

M E. 106, 107. , .^ „o^er plants for specific purposes. 

The design and specifications of s-^^^^^^ J^,^^ detail drawings. 
Each student will carry out com e ^^ ^^_^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^,,, 

M. K 210. 211. -^^-f^'^/'stMath. 64. 
semesters. Prerequisites. C. i^. ^ • 



290 






}f 



Advanced theory of f>,. « 
EnjineeHn, appHJatti': '"" ''^ ""^'^^ -'^ -ses. Hydrody„a™ie th 

M. E. 212 21? A J aynamic theory, 

second semesters ■ n ,"'^'' ^'^^m Power Lah« , ' 
-.^uisite, re Jratio^ •: ^'^1.7^ "^ "»>otX r/rio? '^-^-* -'' 
Research on adv.n. ", '^' ^^^- '^*'^''- P'-e- 

steam power theory P "" P"^^'- Problems to n. . 

M. E. 214 215 ./ "''"' '^^* ''^'--s! *° '""^*^^*« «"d advance 

and second semesters r** .^'"'"*'<' Mechanics Lah„ . 
^-e,„isi,es. re.Stio„^r;^Tloorn °"« ^^^^^lZ£f~^''^' 
I lustrative experiments . h" "' ^"^ ^'''^ M. E. 202 209 ^ '^^^'^- 

First and sec'ond ^emtJer' o'"*f '"''"' Combustion Enein. n •" 
Prerequisites, M E loT , n^ ,"^ ^^"^"^^^ and two laht . ^^'^" ^3, 3)- 

201 and M. E. 204 205' '''' ^^ ^^ '''' 109; and ^eSrll'^-e ^ "-'^• 
Each student wil, earrv „ . " ^- ^- '''' 

t;:2is2i. J ""^'^^^""^^^-----n 

M. E. 220 S» • '"*^'""^' «=««- 

. ^''"- oeminar CroW.t • 

chanical engineerin., «* « ^ "* accordance w,>J, 

en^ineerin/ '""^ ^^^f" Prerequisite, gradul e sraS ""•""^'^ ^^ -- 
M. E. 221. Resear '" "mechanical 

chanical engineerinrst,/'"1^'* '" accordance with w.,u 
engineering. "^ ^'^f" Prerequisite, gradulte stlnl"""'"^*^ "^ ">-- 

, Research i„ any field nf ^ '" «>echanical 

heat transfer thJ ! ^ mechanical ent^in^^ • 

nster, thermodynamics, heat „' ^"^'"^^rmg as applied me^hc • 
^ . . ' "^at, power, etc. i'i'wea mechanics, 

Mechanical Engineering Shop 

PeSoSs a"wfer'''R ^''"'' ^'^'^^'^e (2)_First s 

For L pri„eiples of machine tools. • 

^ Shop 50. Foundry Practt ?,?' ^"^'-^'aduates 

t"re and laboratory nVrf . ^^^-First semester o. 

Engineering. ^ a wee. Required *:? iu^n^LTSrnJS- 



COURSES OF STUDY 



291 



Lectures and recitations on foundry products and layouts, materials and 
equipment, molding, casting, etc. 

Shop 51. Machine Shop Practice (1) — First semester. One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Shop 1. 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, fluting, cutting spur and helical gears, jig work, and cutter and 
surface grinding. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

M. I. 1, 2. Basic R. O. T. C. (3)— Every semester. 

Two one hour periods of Infantry Drill and three one hour classroom 
periods. Subjects: Equipment and Clothing, Military Courtesy, Dismounted 
Drill, Extended Order, First Aid, Sex Hygiene, Interior Guard, Ml Rifle, 
Mechanical Training, Rifle Marksmanship, Marches and Bivouacs, Forma- 
tions, Ceremonies, and Processing, Map Reading, Elevation and Relief, 
Practical Field Work in Map Reading, Protection Against Carelessness, 
Cover and Movement, Concealment and Camouflage, Scouts, Patrols, Brown- 
ing Automatic Rifle. 

M. I. 3, 4. Basic R. O. T. C. (3)— Every semester. 

Two one hour periods of Infantry Drill and three one hour classroom 
periods. Subjects: Associated Arms, Map Reading, Safeguarding Military 
Information, Training Management, Articles of War, Application of Mili- 
tary Law, Personal and Sex Hygiene, Administration, Training Tests, Pistol 
and Carbine, Machine Gun, Tactical Training, Marches and Bivouacs, Forma- 
tions, Ceremonies, and Processing, Review of Weapons, First Aid, Field 
Sanitation, Chemical Warfare, Aerial Photography. 

P. E. 1-4. Physical Activities (1) — Each semester. Required of all men 
students in freshman and sophomore years. 

A course designed to promote individual physical development and to raise 
and maintain a physical fitness level. 

Remedial activities for those designed by the Student Health Service to 
be arranged. 

MODERN LANGUAGES, see FOREIGN LANGUAGES, page 254. 

MUSIC 

Music 1. Music Appreciation (3) — First semester. 

A study of all types of classical music (not including opera) from the 
time of Haydn, with a view to developing the ability to listen and enjoy. 

Music 2, 3. History of Music (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
A course in the history of music covering the development of all forms 
of music (not including opera) from the Greeks to the present. 

Music 4. Men's Glee Club (1) — First and second semesters. 
A total of six credits may be earned. 



\ 



292 



™^ ^*»™«7-r or MAnvu.vn 




I 




Musics. Women's Chorus fn v . 

; ^ota, of Six credits «ay be ~LT "'' """' ^^"-*-- 

Music 6. Orchestra (l)__pi,,, T 

Music 7, 8 H,r • ^"*^ ■"^^'^'"'1 semesters. 

', ». Harmony (2, 2)— First anrf 
This course includes a stu/ 7 """"'^ "^'"esters. 

The object of th^s co^rsrist"^'""' '""^^*^^- 

Classification of each co^r" "^ """ Continents (3)-First 
conditions anH » *'^*=" continent into region., ^^a j semester. 

teachers.^ '"' ^^°"°'»- -tivities in eaTje;i „'.l!f «-"' ^"^ "'^^'--l 
N.H.R.30 Pw„., ■ ""*-''«<^ specially for 

^'•-Hbuti/ra^tE elil '•°^"'^' *^^^'S: I^^^^^^^^^^ the 

Elements of the weather alX^^r/'^-^-"'' --ester. 

^- H- «• 50. Map mterprl . """" "' ''^ ^^id. 

semesters. '^ interpretation and Field Work rn r.- 

Study in laboratory class and • « ^"' ^"""^ 

-« P.sentin/,eo- ^^^^^^ types of maps^nd other 

economic and " ^'orT"-'** ^"^''•^---^TptrnTslTT'^' '''^ ^*"^-t« 
and fishing flZl^ .'''"f anization of productivpT "^ instructor. The 

-^ne climate JanH -f^ ^^' 

and commerce th» ^^' '""' *"d "'inerals fore.f 



COURSES OF STUDY 



293 



N. H. R. 102. The Geography of Manufacturing in the United States 
and Canada (3) — First semester. 

The geographic factors which are associated with the location of manu- 
facturing industries. One or more field trips. 

N. H. R. 110. Middle America (3) — First semester. 

Regional geography of Mexico, Central America and the islands of the 
Caribbean; an analysis of the physical and human resources. 

N. H. R. 111. South America (3) — Second semester. 

Regional geography of the South American republics; an analysis of the 
physical and human resources. 

N. H. R. 112. Recent Economic Trends in Latin America (3) — Second 
semester. 

An analysis of the improvements and expansion in grazing and farming, 
increased exploitation of mineral resources and industrialization. 

N. H. R. 113. The Peoples of Latin America (3) — First semester. 

Population distribution, composition and growth, trends in fertility and 
mortality; migration, rural -urban and interregional, cultural, ethnic and 
political aspects. 

N. H. R. 120, 121. Economic Geography of Europe (3, 3)— First and 
second semesters. 

Physical resources, agricultural and industrial development; major eco- 
nomic regions and trade relations between regions and countries. 

N. H. R. 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa (3) — 

First semester. (Not offered until 1946-47.) 

Physical Resources and the existing stage of economic development, 
economic potentialities. 

N. H. R. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography (3) — Second semester. 

Problems of development of colonial areas, with special emphasis upon 
the development of tropical regions and the possibilities of white settlement 
in the tropics. (Not offered until 1946-47.) 

N. H. R. 130, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and 
Eastern Asia (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

A brief review of the climate, soil and mineral resources; transportation 
facilities; economic, social and political conditions. 

N. H. R. 140, 141. The Natural Resources of the Union of Socialist 

Soviet Republics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. (Not offered until 

1946-47.) _ ^ , 

For Graduates 

N. H. R. 203. Geomorphology (3) — Second semester. 
An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic processes and 
land forms; theories of land form evolution and gomorphological problems. 



294 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



^- H. R. 205. Micro-riimof i 

N. H. R. 221. Seminar !n r^ 
-cond semesters. ""'"'' '" «^"^"P'«y (Credit to be arra„ged)-First and 

N. H. R 222 R 
semesters and summer" ^"''^ ^^^^^^ ^^ be a.an.ed)-Kir, and seeon, 

:^'^r'''^Tn^:or£t:luy:T\ ^™-''^*^*«' ^^^ P-Paratlon of t. 
land, and the United States n' f * ^'^-'^'^t »* the Universitv" f 1r *' 



COURSES OF STUDY 



295 



NUTRITION, see page 274. 



PHILOSOPHY 
Prob/* Fundamentals of Philosophy (3) ' 

^.p.,.My. """ ""«" "-i B«t .red,, ,„ .,.,fc„ ".^'"f "• ">;"• 

. ^ ^"^ ^wo semesters 

An introductory survev nf fi, i.. 

?h?pt"' ^"r * -'^ -«^-t tLS^^^^^^ - the Occident. First 

-eh integration." *=°"^^'^*^ ---*^. -^ to train th^ lLTe"Leth:''S 

PW> 51 M t h ^"' '^''''"""' Undergraduates 
- -en --a- LTiS^rrSf^^^^^^^^ Ma. 



A course in philosophical thinking, designed for students desiring a 
clearer conception of basic reality, and for the needs of prospective teachers 
and theologians. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phil. 181, 182, 183, 184. Proseminar in Philosophy (3) — Two-hour seminar 
session, one hour tutorial. Or three lectures. Open to undergraduates only 
by special permission of the Department of Philosophy, and to graduates 
only after consultation with the Head of the Department of Philosophy. 

The philosophical proseminar is designed for specially qualified under- 
graduates who have had the necessary preliminary work, and for graduate 
students desiring the help of philosophy m the study of their respective 
fields. The content of the course will be chosen so as to serve the needs 
of the group of students enrolled. 

Phil. 191, 192. Readings in Philosophy (2, 2) — Individual library work, 
and tutorials. Prerequisite, three courses in philosophy, and the permission 
of the Department of Philosophy. 

Individual work for especially qualified advanced students under super- 
vision and with tutorial advice. Regular written reports and essays. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN, see page 239. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN, see page 241. 

PHYSICS 

Phys. 1. Elements of Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound (3) — First 
semester. Two lectures, and one recitation a week. The first half of a 
survey course in general physics. This course is for the general student 
a7id does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. Pre- 
requisite, successful passing of the qualifying examination in elementary 
mathematics. Lecture demonstration fee $3.00. 

Phys. 2. Elements of Physics: Magnetism, Electricity, and Optics (3) — 

Second semester. Two lectures and one recitation a week. The second half 
of a survey course in general physics. This course is for the general student 
and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 1. Lecture demonstration fee $3.00. 

Phys. 10. Fundamentals of Physics: Mechanics and Heat (4) — First 
semester. Two lectures, one recitation, and one three hour laboratory 
period a week. The first half of a course in general physics.' This course 
together with Phys. 11, satisfies the minimuni requirements of medical and 
dental schools. Prerequisite, Math. 11 or concurrent enrollment in Math. 14 
and 15. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

Phys. 11. Fundamentals of Physics: Sound, Optics, Magnetism, and 
Electricity (4) — Second semester. Two lectures, one recitation, and one 



296 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



297 



three hour laboratory period a week. The second half of a course in general 
physics. Prerequisites, Phys. 10, or 20, and Math. 11 or concurrent enroll- 
ment in Math. 17. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

• ^^ 

Phys. 20. General Physics: Mechanics and Heat (5) — First semester. 

Two lectures, two recitations and one three hour laboratory period a week. 

The first half of a course in general physics. Required of all students in the 

engineering curricula. Math. 20 is to be taken concurrently. Laboratory 

fee $5.00. 

Phys. 21. General Physics: Sound, Optics, Magnetism, and Electricity 

(5) — Second semester. Two lectures, two recitations, and one three hour 
laboratory period a week. The second half of a course in fireneral physics. 
Required of all students in the engineering curricula. Prerequisite, Phys. 
20. Math. 21 is to be taken concurrently. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

Phys. 50, 51. Applied Mechanics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11, or Phys. 21. 

Phys. 52. Heat (5) — First semester. Three lectures and two three hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 20 is to be 
taken concurrently. Laboratory fee $10.00. 

Phys. 54. Sound (5) — Second semester. Three lectures and two three 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 21 is 
to be taken concurrently. Laboratory fee $10.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments (3) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture and two three hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 
11 or 21 and Math. 21. Laboratory fee $10.00 (Not offered 1945-46.) 

Phys. 102. Optics (5) — First semester. Three lectures and two three hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math. 21. 
Laboratory fee $10.00. 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism (5, 5) — Second and first 
semesters. Three lectures and two three hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math. 21. Laboratory fee $10.00. 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math. 21. 

Phys. 108, 109. Electron Physics (3, 3) — ^First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and one three hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 104. Laboratory fee $5.00 (Not offered 1945-46.) 

Phys. 110, 111. High Frequency Phenomena (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 105. Laboratory fee $5.00. (Not offered 1945-46.) 



fov Three lectures, one 
PHys. 112. Modern Physics ^^^^^^^., Phys. 102 and 104. 
Jee hour laboratory peric a week. 
Laboratory fee ?5.00. f^. Graduates 

. . Theoretical Physics (5)-First semester. 
Phys. 200. Introduction to Theoret.ca 
Five lectures a week. ^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^.^^^ ^^ot offered 

Phys. 202, 203. Dynamics (2, i) 

''''-"'■^ ] A amies (4)-Second semester. Four lectures a 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics (*) 

^veel<- ,,,t^,es a week. (Not offered 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics (3)-lhree 

1945-46.) _ ^ ^eek. (Not offered 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics (2)-Two 

1945-46.) . , . Kinetic Theory of Gases 

Phys. 210, 211. Statistical ^ecJanKs^and^^^^^^^^^^^ 

(2, 2)-Two lectures a week. ( _p.^^ ^^d second semesters. 

Phys. 212, 213. Quantum Mechanics (2, 2) Fir 

Two lectures a week. lectures a week. (Not 

Phys. 214, 215. Atomic Structure (2, 2)-Tv 

offered 1945-46.) swTwo lectures a week. (Not 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Spectra (2, 2) Iw 
offered 1945-46.) ^ 3)-Three lectures a 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal 
week. (Not offered 1945-46.) ^ pwtron Diffraction Methods (2)- 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and El et-^^^^,„,^ ^.^ods a week. 
First or second semester. Two ^^^ . 

Sor^tory fee $10-00. (Not offered 1945 46.) 
Laboratory JP ,.. pi^st and second semesters. 

Piivc 230 Seminar (.1; rus^ 

Phys. 230. Credit according to work done. 

Phys. 250. Research— Cieait ac 

PLANT PATHOLOGY, see page 203. 
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, see page 203. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PoL Sci. 1. American Government (3)^ ,„t for the Ameri- 

This course is designed ^\'''^J^Z:;TcoLvre^en.i.e study of govern^ 

can Civilization program^ tconipns^^ ^^ ^,^„^,„, ,,eial and 

ments in the United States ana 

economic conditions. 



298 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Pol. Sci. 2. American National Government (3) 

the uSJtatlr"'"'^^*'"^^"' ^""'^^---^ '^^ -«onal governn^ent of 
Pol. Sci. 4. State and Local Government (3)_Prerequisite Pol 9 • o 

Pol Sci 7 r *" ^"'P''*"'" »P°» the government of Maryland. 

Pol. Sc 7. Comparative Government (2)-Prerequisite Pol Sci 2 
A comparative ^tnHTr ^-p +i, viu^oite, x-oi. feci. 2. 

Switzerland '"^ "' ^''^ governments of Great Britain, France and 

Pol. Sci. 8. Comparative Government (2)-Prerequisite Pol Sci 2 
A comparative study of tho Hi.f=f„ • , * 

special emphasis upon 1:1^^^7:1^^^^' '=""^^' -"'^ 

I^'stut ';f LTTm: '"T"^" <2>-P-equisit:, Pol. Sci. 2. 
Argentina^razn, and CWIe " ^"^^'^ *« -th special emphasis on 
Pol. Sci. 10. Comparative Government r9^ t> 

A study of Far Eastern governmenrslhr '""*'' ^''- ^"^ '• 
Japan. governments with special emphasis on China and 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
constt'S ins'tructr:""""'" '"'''''"""^ (3)-Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2 or 

tion'%irSfl„tt ifgeltaThy %h:^^^^^ ""'^f''^'"^ international rela- 
and the development of ZTn^^t/Zl^XZT'''"' ^"' ^"P^"^"-' 

Ji'^ol. ti. r"''^*"^' ^•^^™'»^''* -<• Administration (3)-Prere- 

hoti?;:taltrzLfn;t?lr"^^^ °^ --^^^Pal government, such as 

includes a visit to Baftil" to obse^'; tir*"" -^"^ ^^^""'"^' ^ourL 
at work. •'"^^'^e the agencies of city government 

jol. Sci. 7. Political Parties and Puhlic Opinion (3)-Prerequisite. Pol. 

^<^^^S^St:rT^::l:Z^ -^ty process in government; 

management and conditioning ofpuSSSr* ^''^'"'^^^ '-'^-^hip; the 

Pol S.- ,nr'"/''"""' Undergraduates and Graduates 
i'ol. Sci. 102. International Law f^\ t> 

A study of the principles ^e ninl nTfrr'^f •^' ''''' '•=' '■ 
peace and war, as illustrated in ters^S el" es."" "*"""" " ""^ ''' 



COURSES OF STUDY 



299 



Pol. Sci. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 
2, or consent of instructor. 

The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far 
East and their influence on world politics. 

Pol. Sci. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2. 

A comprehensive study of the legislative process, bicameralism, the com- 
mittee system and the lobby, with special emphasis upon the legislature 
of Maryland. The course includes a visit to Washington to observe Congress 
at work. 

Pol. Sci. 131. Constitutional Law (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American consti- 
tutional system, with special reference to the role of the judiciary in the 
interpretation and enforcement of the constitution; the position of the 
states in the federal system; state and federal powers over interstate and 
foreign commerce; and the rights of citizens and of accused persons. 

Pol. Sci. 141. History of Political Theory (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2 
or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. 

Pol. Sci. 142. Recent Political Theory (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2 or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of recent political ideas, with special emphasis upon theories of 
socialism, communism, fascism, etc. 

Pol. Sci. 144. American Political Theory (3) — Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2 
or consent of instructor. 

A study of the writings of the principal American Political theorists from 
the colonial period to the present. 

Pol. Sci. 154. Problems of World Politics (3)— Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 2 
or consent of instructor. 

The course deals with governmental problems of an international char- 
acter, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, propaganda, etc. 
Students are required to report on readings from current literature. 

For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201. Seminar in International Organization (4). 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

Pol. Sci. 202. British Empire (3). 

A study of the constitutional development of the British Dominions, with 
particular attention to recent inter-imperial relationships. 

Pol. Sci. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (4). 
Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of recent 
federal-state relations. 




300 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



301 



Pol. Sci. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion (2) 

opinir ^ °" ''''"'' ^^^'^-^ ^- -'dividual res'earch in the field of p„,, 
Pol. Sci. 251. Bibliograpi,y „f P„„tiea, Science (2) 

ment documents. ** *° instruct him in the use of gove,". 

woTafclpShed''"""' '" ^"""'^'" «-- (2, 4)-Credit according , 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



labomoi prriodlweet"'""" ^'^~'^'''' -^'^ester. Two lectures and one 

PoX hUa'T;tarcrs:Slr^^^^^^^^^ P^-- of mode.,, 

feeding, culling, marketing, caponiz^nl IZ^L '"'"'*^*'<^"' brooding, housing, 
distribution of poultry products '^' ' «<=onomics of production and 

P « m ^*"" '^•*''*'"^«<» Undergraduates 

Th ^""'*'"^ ^'"'"^y (3)-Second semester 

otherr^in^ty^^^^^ as a ,,„„,,,,., ,^,. 

iur:-cSatt:ies^-2^^^^^^^^ 

feathers, growth, anLelatTproblem?"'"'^*"^ ^"^ «"^-"- ^y^^erU:, 
or 50, Zool.' lO^""'*""^ Genetics (3)-Second semester. Prerequisites, P. H 1 

and quality „, ,(„,«. """' "'■« «» =88 «nd meat pioducllo. 

P. H. 52. Poultry Nutritinn /'Q^ n- . 
laboratory period a week <3)_First semester. Two lectures and one 

Nutritive requirements of noult 
requirements are presented. StudS are m,!""*/''"'" ^^'"^ ""^^^ those 
eases commonly encountered under p^aetic'lndLrnr"^ ""'"*'°"^' '«^- 

tuLtd^eltt?ofypl«ff:S^^ ^^^-^--^ — Two lec- 

^~^ ^:^r:;^i^rT n '■^'^^^'^ ^« --^^^^ o. 

dustry are discussed. Laboratorv .1 " «"««"ntered in the hatchery i„- 
hatchability are assigned. ^'"'"^"''^ ^''^'''^'^es stressing fundamentals of 



P. H. 58. Commercial Poultry Management (2) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, ten hours of poultry husbandry, including P. H. 1. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, purchase 
of supplies, management problems in baby chick, eggy broiler, and turkey 
production, foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, production and 
financial records. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

P. H. 104. Poultry Marketing Problems (2) — First semester. One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period a week. 

Live and dressed poultry grades, poultry marketing channels, relation of 
transportation and distribution to quality, methods and costs of marketing 
live and dressed poultry, dressing, drawing, eviscerating and preparing 
poultry for the table. 

P. H. 105. Egg Marketing Problems (2) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period a week. 

Exterior and interior egg;, quality factors, wholesale and retail grades of 
eggs, egg marketing channels, relation of transportation and distribution 
to quality, methods and costs of marketing eggs, candling and preparing 
eggs for the table. 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107. 

Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2) — First semester. 

Relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole and its economic importance. 
Consumer prejudices and preferences, production, transportation, storage, 
and distribution problems are discussed. Trends in the industry, surpluses 
and their utilization, poultry by-products, and disease problems, are 
presented. 

P. H. 108. Special Poultry Problems (1-2) — First and second semesters. 

For senior poultry students. The student will be assigned special prob- 
lems in the field of poultry for individual study and report. 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, P. H. 51 or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. Link- 
age, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in develop- 
ment, inheritance of resistance to disease, and the influence of the environ- 
ment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite P. H. 52 or 
equivalent. 



302 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



and carbohydrates is iv/n t S as ittul "JT^ "•"^-'^' -^^--s, 
bohsm of these substances. Del Lev difp" "^ "^ **•' '^•^^^«<^" ^"^ "'eta- 
synthetic diets are considered. "^ ^'^' ^' P''<'^"'=ed by the use of 

Its equivalent. ^ ^^"°'' ^ ^^^k. Prerequisite. P. H. 56 or 

Pvo'dttTon.fs t'n'dt:^^^^^^^ -P--"y with respect to e,, 

egg formation, ovulation, deposition ^f! "^^"*y' ^roodiness. moltin/ 

oviposition are studied. ^"P""'*'**" »' ^^^^ envelopes, and the phy;iology of 

P. H. 204. Seminar (l)_Fir<!t a.,^ ^ 

Reports of current rese rche; / ' 7 Z'™^^^^^^ 
guest speakers are presented "^ ^ "^'""^'''^ ^^«d"«te students, and 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature Cl-4) P.r<=t a 

Readings on individual toni. *^-^'^«t «"<» second semesters. 

of M.S. and Ph.D. ^"^^'"^ ^^^ requirements for the degrees 



PRACTICAL ART, see page 268. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

tional guidance on the bas.^ «/ ^ ","*" °^ vocational and educa 

tests and personal c^Tnl The TrS IT.' ^ '^^^ PsychoIoS i 
without charge to students. ' °^ *^^ ''"'•««" «re available 

enfeSgftshmr.'"'"^^ '^ ^'^'^'^^^' (3>-First semester. Open to 

Open .o-sejrrr;',::^;''*" <^'-'""' -1 »~n„ .„„..„. 

phases of human behavior. ^"^estigations of the more fundamental 



COURSES OF STUDY 



303 



Psych. 4. Psychology for Students of Commerce (3) — (Not offered 
1945-46.) 

Topics in applied psychology which relate to practical problems in business 
and industry viewed from the standpoint of controlled observation. 

Psych. 14. Applied Psychology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

A general introduction to the application of psychological principles in 
the field of medicine, law, criminology, education, public opinion, and 
propaganda. 

Psych. 15. Social Psychology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. 

A psychological study of human behavior in social situations; experi- 
mental studies of the influence of other persons, of social conflicts and 
individual adjustment, of the psychology of social institutions and of current 
social movements. 

Psych. 16. Psychology of Business (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. 

Application of controlled observation to practical psychological problems 
in business and industry, including industrial selection, methods of pro- 
duction, advertising, selling, and market research. 

Psych. 17. Mental Hygiene (3) — First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, Psych. 1. Two lectures, one clinic. 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of 
adjustment. 

Psych. 19. Psychology of Individual Differences (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 15. 

The scientific methodology underlying the study of psychological differ- 
ences among people, including a basic understanding of statistical concepts 
and interpretations. 

Psych. 29. Interpretation of Statistics in Psychology (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Psych. 19. 

A study of statistical concepts, methods, and terminology as a basis for 
understanding and evaluating psychological investigation. Emphasis is on 
interpretation rather than on computation. 

For Advaticed Undergraduates 
Psych. 80. Educational Psychology (3) — First and second semesters. 

A study of basic psychological problems encountered in education. 
Measurements and significance of individual differences, learning, motiva- 
tion, emotions, personality. 

Psych. 90. Independent Study in Psychology (1-3) — First and second 
semester. 

Special reading and report assignments on an individualized basis. 



304 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I'sych 108 ^ZtT'^' Undergraduates and Graduates 

"yen. 108. Child Psychology a) p;^e+ 
Experimental analysis of JL :^~^"^'* semester. Prerequisite, Psych i 

development, social be^: of'l :;rchM= ^r ' '"*^"-*-l -^ emot onai 
the growing personality. ' P^'^^"*-'=h>ld relationships, and problems o1 

J^^. l^r"^'"^^ "^ ^''"'— (3)-Second semester. P.re 
e«^^^^^^^^^ period .. 

o^:: i.i"e.r%r:Sl,^e"%--" --- -search C3>-.Kot 

to f elre:^d^^r:^,:^^^^^^^^^^^^ r,^-^- pub., reactions 
particular markets. "^ *" Psychological influences at work "n 

^^rS?; 'tUSX;;. tr^^- -- «^"- C3)-(Hot o^ere. 
adp™" ^" ^^— --es Of psychological aspects of 

46.)";t;^UeX'h.ir' '""'^'"^ ^" ^''^-- (3)-(Not Offered 1945- 
^^^^udy Of researches dealing with human response in conditions met during 

'£'£' '"" '"'"^'"^ ^'^-^^"^ ^'^-^^ ^^«-6.) Prerequisite, 

testtX!*psKhoUrara?ds fn 'hI""^- *° "^'^^''^'^y °* observation and of 
the ofl^ender. "'^^ '" determ.nation of guilt and treatment ^f 

.uS^Psyl. tt""''' «-'^' ^^-hology (3)_p,.s't semester. Prere- 

A systematic analvsi*? of rv, 4-- ^. 
.1.. <i.v.kp„.„, „, Sul""""*""- ""»''>^' •«<' «"lt«~ « r.l.w ,0 

An analytical approach to <=. • / P^™»ss>on of Instructor, 
eance in the poster Jorld.""' Psychological problems of special signifi. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



305 



Psych. 159. Psychology of Propaganda (3) — Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Psych. 29 and 150, or permission of Instructor. 

Principles of effective propaganda as related to public opinion, and 
psychological warfare. 

Psych. 160. Psychology of Personnel (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 16, 29 or permission of Instructor. 

Psychological problems in the management of personnel in modern 
business and industry. A consideration of psychological techniques in em- 
ployee selection and classification, measures of ability, interview procedures, 
and personnel counseling. 

Psych. 161. Advanced Psychology of Personnel (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 160 or permission of Instructor. 

A continuation of Psych. 160, with emphasis on methods of developing 
and maintaining personnel efficiency and morale; problems of training, 
rating methods, motivation, etc. 

Psych. 165. Industrial Psychology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 160 or permission of Instructor. 

Controlled observation applied to psychological problems in industrial 
production, including psychological effects of conditions and methods of 
work. 

Psych. 170. Abnormal Psychology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 17. Two lectures, one clinic. 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of psychological abnormality with 
emphasis on the clinical rather than theoretical aspects. 

Psych. 172. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Psych. 29. Laboratory fee $4.00. 

Critical survey of psychological tests used in vocational orientation and 
in industry with emphasis on methods by which such tests are validated; 
practice in the use of tests and the interpretation of test data. 

Psych. 173. Individual Psychological Testing (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 172. Laboratory fee $4.00. 

A thorough treatment of individual testing procedures with emphasis on 
the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler-Bellevue techniques; practice in test ad- 
ministration, scoring, interpretation and application in educational, voca- 
tional, and clinical guidance. 

Psych. 174. Advanced Psychological Testing (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 172. Laboratory fee $4.00. 

Instruction and practice in the use of individual psychological tests with 
emphasis on diagnostic methods, other than of general ability; intensive 
training in the application of these methods to the needs of the school, 
clinic, court, and social agency. 



306 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



quis1te!'''psy!}i T?r*'p **' ^^V^ntation (3)-(Not offered 194^ 4« . r. 

P..»"i.'rP.tt'r ■'^"'«'"»" ^•"'«'«- <a>-s„o„a „^, 

An advanced course for teaphp,.= ^ 
approach to advanced probkt" /■:', Prospective teachers. Systematic 
expenmental contributions. " «ducat,onal psychology based upo„ 

^ ^^H^ai^Tytt^^^^^^^ ^" ,^r "^ ^^>-econd semester, 

business and indu^tr.r fiT ^^arning: applied to problems ^^^ ^ • • 

and customs m the lig-ht of fv,^ x ,P^^^^^' interpretation of thp ar-f^v t 

^•^ v-6 d;--i< irst and second 

the'^lT itrslto'ryToLXi'tf tv '"^^-"■^'°" "^ -«« member of 

- one Of the standard Psych^oSLV^SLr"* '"^^ '^^'^ *» P-'-Uo;' 

Psych. 196, 197 t^«l . 

Psych. 200. Research * p 

~r.r: "^"""""^ -""rc;ix,r >--- - -na 

Offered 1-945-46.) '"""''' '" ''''''''^' P^^chotechnological Problems (3)--^ t 
An advanced course for stnH» . ^ -' (Wot 



COURSES OF STUDY 



307 



psych. 245. Advanced Psychological Problems in Market Research (3) — 

(Not offered 1945-46.) 

Graduate study of the specialized problems and techniques employed by 
the psychologist in market research. 

Psych. 257. Seminar in Psychology of Morale in Wartime (3) — Second 
semester. 

A study of the problems arising in wartime conditions including reactions 
to privations, hostile attacks, family disruption, and war psychoses. 

Psych. 260. Seminar in Personnel Psychology (2) — Second semester. 

Psychological techniques applied to problems of employee morale in 
business and industry. 

Psych. 262. Seminar in Personnel Counseling (3) — First semester. 

Consideration of psychological activities involving face-to-face contact in 
a controlled relationship. Emphasis is placed upon employee counseling 
techniques as they relate to business and industry. 

Psych. 271. Psychology of Group Instruction (3) — (Not offered 1945-46.) 
Consideration of the psychological problems involved in group interaction 
in a controlled situation. Although emphasis is placed on training students 
for instruction in psychology on the college level, it has direct relevance in 
fields where group guidance or instruction may be used, as in personnel 
work, parent education, industrial conferences, etc. 

Psych. 272. Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3) — 

(Not offered 1945-46.) 

Methods for evaluating criteria and for the analysis and combination of 
test and predictor items. 

Psych. 274. Field Work in Clinical Psychology of the Abnormal (3-5) — 

First and second semesters. 

Supervised training in the field of clinical psychology and in testing of 
the abnormal person. Field work will be done at St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
or other authorized institutions. Enrollment limited. 

Psych. 275. Participation in Testing Clinic (2-4) — First and second 
semester. 

Actual practice in the administration of tests of aptitude, interest, and 
achievement, and interpretation of test data in the course of routine opera- 
tion of the testing and counseling bureau. 

Psych. 279. Occupational Psychology (3)— (Not offered 1945-46.) 

Experimental development and use of the vocational counseling interview, 
aptitude tests, and related techniques for the occupational orientation of 
youth. * 

Psych. 280. Seminar in Educational Psychology (3) — First semester. 

Systematic approach to advanced problems in educational psychology 
based upon specific experimental contributions. 



S08 



THE UmVERSITV OF MARYLAND 



Psych. 285. Seminar in rr , 

-r;.s ,°f trr -- -.n,,„. .. .„,,, ,„^ ,„ _^^^^^; 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

A functional studv f^f ui- 

'^ > ^. A. 110 and Econ. 160. ^^:^— Second semester. Pre 

A study of civil s * 

A Study of budffetarv o^ • • 

»fu- II toi, with g^r~,', "™ "'"•""^ •f.pt.w. to" j;™ •"" 

An analysis of the Feder«] q • , o 



COURSES OF STUDY 



209 



p4 A. 130. International Economic Policies and Relations (3) — First 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Econ. 131 recommended. 

This course surveys and analyzes the basic economic, social and political 
factors that influence governments in the determination of their economic 
policies and practices in their relationship with other nations. 

P. A. 137. Economic Planning and Post-war Problems (3) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Econ. 131 recommended. 

An analysis of the theory and practice of economic planning in the 
United States and other countries, and an investigation of the relation of 
economic planning to postwar economic problems and the stabilization of 
economic enterprise. 

P. A. 140. Public Finance and Taxation (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A study of government fiscal policy in regard to the nature of public 
expenditures, sources of public revenue, the tax system, the public debt, 
and government budgets. 

P. A. 141. International Finance and Exchange (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 140, Econ. 141 recommended. 

This course considers the theory and practice of international finance and 
exchange. The increased importance of public authority in foreign trade, 
international policies, and finance is given due emphasis. 

P. A. 161. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (3) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 160. B. A. 160 recommended. 

A study of society's efforts through legislation to improve labor condi- 
tions. State and federal laws and court decisions affecting wages, hours, 
working conditions, immigration, convict labor, union activities, industrial 
disputes, collective bargaining, and economic security. • 

P. A. 170. Transportation I, Regulation of Transportation Services (3) — 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

This course is designed for students of Transportation, Public Administra- 
tion, and General Business. It covers the world practices in the regulation 
and control of transportation facilities. 

P. A. 180. Government and Business (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. Senior standing. 

A study of the role of government in modern economic life. Social control 
of business as a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise arising from 
the decline of competition. Critera of and limitations on government 
regulation of private enterprise. 

P. A. 181. Administrative Law (3) — Second semester. Prerequite, 
junior standing. 

A study of the principles involved in the expansion of the discretion of 
administrative boards and commissions, including an analysis of their 



310 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



311 



functions; their powers over private rights; their procedure in making 
findings; the enforcement of their rules and orders; and judicial control of 
their actions. 

P. A. 184. Public Utilities (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37 and senior standing. 

This course comprises an analysis of the economic, social, and political 
status of the public utility industry. The following topics are among those 
studied during the semester: Regulation and management with attention 
given to the economic conditions of production and sale of utility services, 
legal and social nature, valuation, depreciation, rate of return, ratemating, 
financing and special problems. 

For Graduates 

P. A. 201. Seminar in International Organization (3) — (Arranged.) 
A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

P. A. 213. Problems of Public Administration (3) — (Arranged.) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the field of national 
and state administration. ^ 

P. A. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual research in the fields of public 
personnel administration. 

P. A. 235. Seminar in International Economic Relations (3) — (Arranged.) 
A study of selected problems in International Economic Relations. 

P. A. 240. Research in Governmental Fiscal Policies and Practices (3) — 

(Arranged.) 

Individual research under faculty guidance of special problems in the 
field of government finance and taxation. 

P. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships — 

(Arranged.) 

A study of selected problems in the relationship of government to business. 

P. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities (3) — Prerequisite, P. A. 184 and 
consent of instructor. 

Study and research in particular problems of public utility management 
and regulation. 

P. A. 299. Thesis (3-6 hours)— (Arranged.) 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

S. T. 1. Principles of Typewriting (2) — First and second semesters. 
Five laboratory periods per week. Laboratory fee $7.50. 



^ifpr continuously witn t^<^ 
^'Ch- system. g^^,„, semester. Five periods 

'\ T. 2. intermediatejype-*- ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ of grade C 

filrovrng stroking skill will be used ^ ^^^, ^,^,,,er. Five peric^s 

Tt.10. Office Typewnting^P-W-^^^^ C 

^TtI' or^tn'eTof instructor „f accuracy and 

^t\his^oursetl.eai.saretod^^^^^^^^^^ ,,_ed tec.n.ues of 

^^^^£^^^^^^2:^^:^^^ .., .eond semesters. 

n. T. 12, 13. ^^^^f'%::,!^STtl^e^ 0^ ^--r-of Gregg Short- 
Five periods per --^ J^^^e mastery of the P"n"Ples °^ ^ng from 
, If ?rrrrg aP^oacl is used, stressing readmg 

copy and dictation. .3>_First semester. Five P^^^^^^^^ 

tS T 16. Advanced Shorthand (3) ^^ g ^_ ^3 ^nd S. T. 2 

t Prerequisite, minimum grade of t. 

^ for each individual. -p ^ periods per 

mum for eacu /'9^— First semester. ^""\r,„ . o t 

*S. T- "• «-^^, fsTrCre Ssite, minimum grade of "C m S. T. 
--^- ^tf oTL-ent of Instructor. ^„, ,, ,,« related 

'TcouJe L intensive transcriptional speed bmldmg, 

skills and ^-;^«^^^^_^^,^„, Dictation (3)--Second semester ^^^ve 
S. T. 18. Gregg ^Shorthand^^ ^^^^^ ^^^,^ „f c m 

rri.C cTLnt of ir.tru.to. ^^^^^^ ^^^, ^^^...s placed on 

A special course m ^^^^^^^^^^hlnd vocabulary, 
the development of a specu^l ^^^^^^ ^^^^^,,,. six periods per week. 

3. T. 110 Secraanal W^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ T t .1niaHS:™ation in addi- 
Prerequisite, S. ^ • ^ ^^^^^ specific and funeral ml ^ggigned 

This course is d«^^^"^^. ,° needed by a secretary. Units win 
tion to the stenographic skills. ^^ ^ 

, ,, „^i«- to enrollment in A^d^*""^^^. ^ ^^-t be concurrently. 

— ;^. 10 should be eomP^^^^;- ^ t. IT. Gregg Tran.cr>P«on. must 
tS. T. 16. Advanced Shorthana, 



312 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



on communication proceHnroe ^ 
S. T. 111. Office Machines CK^ v^- . 

S. T. 112. Filinff (2) q^« ^ 

SHOP, see page 290. ' 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Contemporary Social Pr«».i 

This course attempts to 7 f (3)_(Not offered in 1945 46 ) 

societies. Through h! u ''^''^'''P * "method of thinkino- u '^''^"''^•^ 
current socialTssues S^""' ^"^ ^"-l^^i^ it offt" "f ''""' "°'^^'-" 

o^^reorS^^^^^^^^ ^^ —tie socieS in^traVrri^riot 

-^"it'h cirntStstrt^ "^^ ^^^-^^-t semester. Open to fresh 

An analysis of societv anri ^ i. • 
collective behavior- fvr.,' i ^^'"^ ^^^ial processes- r>l,o . • ' 

development or ;St;Toii:r ^^"''"' *^« " ^ ^fTuS ifthe 
change. y- socml products; social interaction, soda! 

Soc. 5. Comparative Socioloffv rQ^ /xr 

Comparative analysis of " . ^~^^°* "^^'^'^ '» 1945-46 ) 



COURSES OF STUDY 



313 



Soc. 7. Sociology of American Life (3) — First and second semester. 

An analysis of contemporary American society. Institutions, groups, 
social processes and personality structures will be discussed within the 
framework of the American rural community, the American small town 
and the American metropolitan area. 

Courses Primarily for .Juniors and Seniors 

Soc. 51. Post- War Problems of Social Organization (3) — (Not offered in 
1945-46.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A study of organizational changes in basic institutions required for 
successful adjustment to conditions likely to prevail at the close of the 
present war. 

Soc. 52. Community Organization (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

An analysis of the community and its component social groups. 

Soc. 61. Marriage and the Family (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

The family in modern western society, with particular reference to the 
American family. The effects of war on the family. 

Soc. 72. Criminology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 3 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

The concept of criminal behavior. Statistical and case study approaches 
to the phenomena of crime. Etiology of crime: a survey of theories attempt- 
ing a causative explanation of criminal behavior. Typologies of criminal 
acts and offenders. Punishment, correction and protection. Prevention of 
crime. 

Soc. 81. Introduction to Social Work (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

A general introduction to social case work and the administration of 
public and private welfare agencies. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101. Social Stratification (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) Prere- 
quisite, Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

Deals with classes, status groups, caste systems, slavery, various types 
of elites, and vertical mobility. Fashion and styles. A theory of stratifica- 
tion, social movements, symbol manipulations, and hierarchies of power and 
their import for personal and official roles, and for the distribution of 
prestige. 

Soc. 103. Rural Sociology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soc 3 or 
consent of instructor. 

The structure and functions of rural communities, composition and char- 
acteristics of the rural population; rural planning. 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



315 



Soc. 104. Urban Sociology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, See. 3 
or consent of instructor. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the social ecology of the city; the planning and control of 
urban development. 

Soc. 106. Regional Sociology (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

The meaning and implications of regionalism; types of regions in the 
United States: metropolitan, cultural, and administrative regions. Regional 
planning. 

Soc. 107. Ethnic Minority Groups (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

Basic processes in the relations of ethnic groups. Immigrant groups and 
the Negro in the United States. Ethnic minorities in Europe and the 
problems they present. A discussion of proposals for the solution of these 
problems in the light of past experiences and desiderata for the future. 

Soc. 109. World Survey of Rural Organization (3) — (Not offered in 
1945-46.) Prerequisite, Soc. 103 or consent of instructor. 

A comparative study of rural social organization in selected contemporary 
cultures of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. 

Soc. 110. Sociology of the Professions (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or 3 or consent of instructor. 

Structure and function of divisions of labor; their relations to technology; 
shifting occupational compositions of modern industrial societies; the 
positions of selected professions in the social, economic, and political orders; 
the concept of career; the distribution of skills in American society. Effects 
of occupations on personality. Occupational ideologies and organizations, 
professional associations and ethics. 

Soc. 112. Sociology of Communication (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or 3 or consent of instructor. 

A study of channels of communication, the personnel operating them, 
their changing content, and their social and psychological effects upon 
various nations and strata. Governmental and private control of com- 
municational media. Technological changes in communication during the 
twentieth century. Types of listening groups, readerships, film audiences, 
and world communication centers. 

Soc. 115, 116. Population Problems and Policies (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite Soc. 3 or consent of instructor. 

Population distribution, composition and growth in North America and 
Eurasia; trends in fertility and mortality; migration, rural-urban, inter- 
regional and international; population prospects and policies. 



soc. 117. The Peoples of Southern and Eastern Asia (3)-First semester. 

Prerequisite, consent «* j^^t^'^*"'. ^^^ distribution of population. 

Regional cultures of ^o-oon A -• S - and ^^^ ^^^.^.^^ 

Population growth, present and potential. ^^^ 

Soc. 118. The Peoples of Latin America (3)-Secona 
requisite, consent of instructor- ^^ ^^^^^ America. 

Differential characteristics of the Peoples a ^^^ settlement. 

Population distribution, composition and growth. g ^^^^_^^^ 

Soc 120. Community Disorganization (3)-(Not olte 
Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or consent of ^^^^""^^^ j.^^ ^,,^iting from the 

Urn internal deterioration or inadequacy. 

Soc 121. Community Welfare Plannmg (3)-(Not offered 
Prerequisite, Soc. 120 or consent of ^"^™J. ^o^^jmities in coping 

- r2rc:Tei;r src:::3._.ot offered . ..-..> p.. 

and local governments in the United ^t-*- ^^^^_^^^ 

soc. 124. Public welfare Adm-st-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Prerequisite, soc. l^;i;^;;-X'^o:ir., functioning of public welfare 
A comparative study of the organ ^^^^^^ 

Soc. 125. Sociology of War (S) rirbi, 
of instructor. Hypothesis concerning factors opera- 

The concept and typologies »* J^^^ f/J„f ^,, „„ society. The military 

72 or consent of mstructor. problem of crime. Analysis 

Juvenile ^^'^^^^1 Zl^Ze^^^Ser^<^y- "^Prevention and treatment. 

of factors responsible for juvenile q D,„„,„ency Control (3)- 

Soc. 127. Community Programs ^['^"^^^fj^.J.^t of instructor. 
(Not offered in 1945-46.) ^^''''''^'f^'^'^2VL\rosr^r.s for preventing 
This course is designed to acquaint students w^th p ^ ,^ „^ ,,. 

^^-'^^^'^^^^ - -'''-'■ ^^"" 
attention is g^en to problems in Maryland. 




316 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Soc. 128. Institutional Treatm^nf ^^ n - , 

Second semester. Prere.uSttltv? or Tn'S o^' r^"""^"'^ '''~ 

An intensive study of th« fnn f instructor, 

correctional institutions. ^"n<=t'ons and organization of penal and 

Soc. 130. Recent Social Thouffht d) <?. a 
Soc. 1 or 3 or consent of instructor ^^^-^^<=°"d ^^"'ester. Prerequisite. 

t^tSr^' survey and critical study of leading schools of sociological 
So^a ol^nS^I^-Lrr '''-'"''' ^'^-^ ^» ^«<'^--> Prerequisite. 

conformity. Law as an integral part of tt h ^"'' '""*'*^^^ "' ««<="ing 
and processes operative in tL form1«l „^ TT "' ^''^ ^'"''"P- Factor! 
determinants of human behavior '''*' ""'™^- ^^^^^^ ""rms as 

the^rS%:Sir[:- 1-^J^^^^ -P-ience. Religious institutions and 

thecoTcl'Slttdl!td^S^^^^^^^ and explicit, underlying 

sociological investigations. employed by a number of outstanding 

semtLi^'pJCSt?!^^^^ 

-tre^::;.— ^^^^^^ . socioiogi. 

PrXiSe. tt:^::^-^^^^^ (3)-Second semester. 

"efrssr ?: s?sri reis:r- - -^ — d statis. 

P-eVisL. It r/^r^TonLnt^tf' -^^ ^^^"^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ 1945-46 ) 
available opportunities. "^ instructor. Enrollment restricted to 

Supervised field work of various i-v„»c. -^ . 
student. ^*"*'"^ types, ^u.ted to the needs of the individual 

For Graduates 
hoc. 200. Seminar in Methodology (3) Firof 



COURSES OF STUDY 



317 



Soc. 201. Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

Soc. 202. Sociological Theory (3) — Second semester. 

An examination of the works of European and American theorists. 
Special attention will be given to Max Weber, Simmel, Horney, Mannheim, 
Tonnies, Lasswell, Durkheim, and G. H. Mead. 

Soc. 203. Sociology of Knowledge (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

Social bases of ideologies and mentalities; a sociological theory of 
language, mind and types of intellectual change. Bias and objectivity. 
Positions of intellectual, technical, and literary elites; periodicals and their 
publics. Thought and action; social conditions of constraint and freedom 
of thought. The place of science in western civilization. Studies of 
selected ideologies. 

Soc. 204. Social Organization (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

An intensive study of selected problems pertaining to the structure and 
organization of basic social institutions. 

Soc. 205. Community Organization (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

Criteria of community organization and disorganization. Classroom and 
field studies will be made of the composition, structure, and functioning of 
selected communities. 

Soc. 206. Comparative Sociology (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

Studies in the social formation and selection of types of personality in 
the frameworks of primitive and historical societies as compared with 
contemporary American society. 

Soc. 207. Rural-Urban Sociology (3) — Second semester. 
An intensive comparative study of rural and urban societies. 

Soc. 210. Special problems of Population (3) — First semester. 
An intensive study of selected problems in the fields of population. 

Soc. 211. Advanced Regional Sociology (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

A comparative analysis of regional trends in the United States and vari- 
ous foreign countries. 

Soc. 215. Seminar in Sociology of the Professions (3) — (Not offered in 
1945-46.) 

Advanced and more detailed consideration of topics dealt with in Soc. 101 
and 110 with emphasis upon theoretical relevance, available materials, and 
designs of research projects. 

Soc. 216. Sociology of the Family (3)— (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

A study of selected recent researches in the sociology of the family. 

Soc. 217. Seminar in the Sociology of Law (3) — (Not offered in 1945-46.) 

An intensive study of factors and processes operative in the formation 
of law» 



318 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



l.,t,,T '"""'»«-• P-'-« Of Leadership (3)_(Not offered J 
An analysis of the leader-follower relationship. 
7l'- f *• . '^•'^'"''"'^ Criminology (3)-First semester 
An -ns.ve ... , .elected problems in eri.inolX research. 

A :z Of rcrd™r:i!;r;r/r -"-^ ^" ^--' 

with a view to providing a d^e" r insSh. ^^ of theoretical criminologv 

facmg the modern criminologist ^ '"*" *^' *='""P'«^ <>' ProbleSs' 

Soc. 223. Juvenile Delinquency (3)-Second semester 

Theories of juvenile delinquency MethnH, * f '"^^*^'^- 

linquents with particular reference io thfnf °* *'^**"^"* °* J"^«ni'e de- 

win he undertaken of one or :::: ^^^^^^^ ,;^^-^^ stud. 

plish"ed)--FirftTnrstc;L «S '"*'''* "'"''•^"»"^'' *» -'k accon,. 
eomSdl:^^^^''^'' ^^°^-^'=*^ ^"-'^^"^ either field work or analysis oi 
SOILS, see page 192. 
SPEECH 

work^nTbHc VeaL'^C^^^^^^ functions: (1) to provide 

students in the universify^S) "rtSv .! I . '"" '^''' *'^ "^^^« ''^ «" 
will allow a student Jmajor in SpeeT "T^'"''^ "!!'* '' ""•''^ -l'-" 
minimum of 30 hours of which 15 hours tu^A '"" '''^" '=°"^'st of a 
and above. A student majoring in 8^1^ "" '°"'''^' numbered 100 

speaking; (b) drama; (c) speech Sciences Tmi""'Tn*^ '"= <^> P"'"- 

opeecli 1, 2. Public Speaking (2 2^ T?,v ^ ^ 
requisite for advanced speech courses '""^''^ semesters. Pre- 

The preparation and delivprv nf ei,« 4. • . , 
reports; etc. It is r'SZ^lfj"^^^^^^^ '^^^^"^^^ -^side readings; 

freshman year. ^^^^ *^^^ ^^^rse be taken during the 

Speech Clinic— No credit. 

dufr^iSLirLir a^t- s"ri -' -^ *^^ ^"^- ^« -. 

ar^nged by consultation with tL TeUirsLriLr^ir ""-- 

students Who ^xp^ S^ do'e'Sn'fvVlT- '^ ^^ ^""^^^ ^ -^-^^-d for 
currently with Speech 1, t ^ ^"""^ '" speech. May be taken con- 



COURSES OF STUDY 



319 



I 



h 



Speech 4. Voice and Diction (3) — Second semester. 

Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation, and phonation. 

Speech 5, 6. Advanced Public Speaking (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite Speech 1, 2 or consent of the instructor. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1, 2. Special emphasis is placed upon 
speaking situations the students will face in their respective vocations. 

Speech 7. Public Speaking (2) — Second semester. Limited to freshman 
engineering students. The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, 
etc., on technical and general subjects. 

Speech 8, 9. Acting (3, 3) — First and second semesters. Admission by 
consent of instructor. 

Basic principles of histrionic practice. 

Speech 10. Group Discussion (2) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the principles, methods, and types of discussion, and their 
application in the discussion of contemporary problems. 

Speech 11, 12. Debate (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the principles of argument, analysis, evidence, reasoning, 
fallacies, briefing, and delivery, together with their application in public 
speaking. 

Speech 13. Oral Interpretation (3) — First semester. 

The oral interpretation of literature and the practical training of students 
in the art of reading. 

Speech 14, 15. Stagecraft (3, 3) — First and second semesters. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Stage design and lighting. 

Speech 16. Introduction to the Theatre (3) — First semester. 
A general survey of the fields of the theatre. 

Speech 17. Make-Up (2) — Second semester. One lecture and one labora- 
tory a week. 

A lecture-laboratory course in the theory and practice of stage make-up, 
covering basic requirements as to age, type, character, race, and period. 

Speech 18, 19. Introductory Speech (2) — First and second semesters. 

This course is designed to give those students practice in public speaking 
who cannot schedule Speech 1, 2. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Speech 101. Introduction to Radio (3) — First semester. Two lecture 
one laboratory a week. The development, scope, and influence of American 
broadcasting. Extensive practice in microphone speaking. 



320 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COURSES OF STUDY 



321 



111 



i 

II 



m 



Speech 102. Radio Production (3) — Second semester. One lecture and 
two laboratories a week. Prerequisite, Speech 101. 

The production of radio dramatizations and other types of programs. 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition and Rhetoric (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

A study of rhetorical principles and models of speech composition in 
conjunction with the preparation and presentation of specific forms of 
public address. 

Speech 105. Pathology (3) — First semester. 

The causes, nature, symptoms, and treatment of common speech disorders. 

Speech 106. Clinic (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite Speech 105. 

A laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction plus 
actual work in the clinic both on and off the campus. 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation (3) — Second semester. 
Emphasis upon the longer reading. Program planning. 

Speech 108. Public Speaking (2) — Second semester. Limited to Junior 
Engineers. Prerequisite, Speech 7. 

Continuation of Speech 7 with emphasis upon engineering projects that 
fall within student's own experience. 

Speech 109. Speech Seminar for Senior Engineers (2) — Prerequisite, 
Speech 7, 108. 

Speech 110. Teacher Problems in Speech (3) — Second semester. For 
students who intend to teach. 

Every-day speech problems that confront the teacher. 

Speech 111. Seminar (3) — Second semester. Required of speech majors 
and minors. 

Present-day speech research. 

Speech 112. Phonetics (3) — Second semester. 

Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken 
English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice in transcription. 
Mastery of the international phonetic alphabet. 

Speech 113. Play Production (3) — Second semester. 

Development of procedure followed by the director in preparing plays for 
public performance. 

Speech 114^ Costuming (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratories a week. 

Consideration of the use of color, line, and texture in designing, con- 
structing, and adapting costumes for the stage. 



:ld BSorfradio stations and retaU stores. 

SURVEYING ^^^^^^ ^^^^^,^^^. one 

Surv. 1, 2. Plane Surveying (2. 2) M ^^ ^^ sophomores 

lecture ^^^ ^:,''^^ZS,n^rLTi:^ Mechanical Engineering. Surv. 

in Aeronautical, cnemicdi, Fn^ineering. 

\, 2 required of sophomores xn Cwx Eng n- g ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

Theory and practice in ^Z:!^ JT clorL.tes, profiles. cross- 
General survey methods, traversing, 

sections, volume, stadia. lectures and 

^A «5nrveving (4)— First semester. Iwo leciu 

Surv. 100. Advanced ''''jr'""^^;^^ jsite, Surv. 1, 2. 
two laboratory periods a week. P™^;; ^^^^,^, time, triangula- 

Adiustment of i-truments, latitude 1^^^^^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^ e ,y 

tion, precise leveling, geodet - survey m g^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^,j^^ ,^,^ 

^^Z iZrX. Jnn^el! an^d hydrographic surveys. 



TEXTILES AND CLOTHING, see page 267. 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 

. . 1 Ti^o-?pne (3)— Second Semester. 
LLrS dref— :•. 1:-., prevention, and control, common 
diseases of farm animals. ^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ „„^ 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (3)-^-; - ^ 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. prevention, control. 

Bacterial and protozoan diseases, parasitic 
and eradication. lectures and one 

V S 108. Avian Anatomy (3)-Second semester. Two 
laboratory. Prerequisite, ZooL l^s ^^^^^^^^.^ .j^section and 

Gross and microscopic structure, pny 
demonstration. 



S22 



THE VmVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Hi 



i! 



I 



if 



V S 201 A • ^""^ Graduates 

ZOOLOGY 
Zool. 1. General ZooWv (i^ v 

-d two laboratory periodf a'ttk^^'^" ^"'^ ^^^^ --sters. Two lecture 
inis course, which is n 

Zool ^^"^^^''^y fee, $6.00. "''^'^^'''«t«s and a mammalian form 

"^^SBii[^^^^^^^ -nd semesters, 

tend to cho'ose ^o :L7s""'"^^^^^ '" genera bioW T^t ^^"^«^^ ^'^^ 
A thorough studt:;the:nr" ^'""^' "^^^*- ^ol'tl.t.^Z'' ''"' '- 
Satlir ir d "-^- ^^'^^^^-^^ "^^ ^^-- Of repre- 

'^Xl '""lEP:^^^^^^^^ ---*- Two 

studeSi. ^^^'^ "^ ^^"''-ts Whose Z^' isZZTt'.r '=*'"^^^ ^" 
A comparative studv f . '""''"*' 

groups. Laboratory fe^ jloa "*'' "^^^^ ^^^tems i„ certain vertebrate 
2ool. 8. Invertebrate y^ i 

^- laboratory periodr:^:tUt7^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Two lecture and 

selS:/""'' *=^"^'«*« « a study of 1 '^*'^'^^^«»«J-'>'- is zoology 

selected mvertebrate groups r„h f *'*^ structure and relating k- 

Z-ol. 12 Hist I ^^''O'-atory fee, $6.00. '^ ^«'at,onsh,p of 

two laboratory 1^!' technique (3)_First semester n , 
Obtained befor^ rSLtn:^-^- "----^^ <^^s^::1Z:^ 

The preparation of anim«] f 
"^n. f«,, «.... "'"»' "-» '•' *ro.op,„, „.„,„„„ 

Zool. 14 15 ij 
semesters.' Two lecTure tTf"^ *"** Physiology (4 4) p,- , 

'ecture and two laboratory period VlTek'^'p""*^ '""''"' 

week. Prerequisite, 



COURSES OF STUDY 



323 



one course in zoology. Required of students whose major is physical educa- 
tion, and of those preparing to teach general science or biology. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy and 
physiology. Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, circula- 
tion, respiration, and reproduction. Laboratory fee, $6.00 each semester. 

Zool. 16. Human Physiology (4)— First semester. Two lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Not open to freshmen. 
An elementary course in physiology. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

ZooL 20. Vertebrate Embryology (4)— Two lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Required of students 
whose major is zoology and of premedical students. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and early 
mammalian embryology. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 53. Physiology of Exercise (2)— Second semester. One lecture and 
one laboratory period a week. Required of all juniors in physical education. 

A detailed consideration of the mechanism of muscular contraction; the 
metabolic, circulatory, and the respiratory responses in exercise; and the 
intergration by means of the nervous system. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Zool. 55. Development of the Human Body (2)— First semester. Two 
lecture periods a week. 

A study of the main factors affecting the growth and development of the 
child with especial emphasis on normal development. 

ZooL 75, 76. Journal Club (1, 1)— First and second semesters. One 
lecture period a week. Required of all majors in zoology. 
Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Zool. 101. Mammalian Anatomy (3)— First semester. Three laboratory 
periods a week. Registration limited. Permission of the instructor must 
be obtained before registration. Recommended for premedical students, and 
those whose major is zoology. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. By special per- 
mission of the instructor, a vertebrate other than the cat may be used for 
study. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

ZooL 102, 103. General Animal Physiology (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Two lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
one year of chemistry and one course in vertebrate anatomy. Registration 
limited to twelve, and permission of instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 



324 



'1 



THE VmVERSITY OF MAEYLAm 



^^e first semester work ^o i . 

Zool 104 r^ . '^"imajs. Laboratory fep «« nn ^f "^^"^n of 

"oi. 104. Genetics (3)— .f,Vo4. * ^^'^^ ^^ch semestpr^ 

Prerequisite, one enure. -^^^ semester. Three loof ^^ester. 

advanced courses Tl '"^ ^^^^^^^^ Required of 't, ^ T ^'^^^^^ ^ week 

"^ ==s £— -^^^^^^^^^ 

tory periods a week P ^^-'— First semester. Two l«.f 

The course dea s^trtr"^^'^' °"^ '^^-^ ^ -o o^" ^"' '^"^ ^^''°- 
and the properties .^^ Practices employed in r« 

environmental ptpos2 T^ "^*^^^ ^^S endeT^L''^"'*" ^"™«'« 
Zoo'- 107 fL r ^"•'°r«*»ry fee. $6.00. "'""^ *''^'" ^^'t^ble for 

laboratory periods a wetk^%^'>--S--d -mester. One W 
botany. ^^^^^ Prerequisites, one course in , ^"""^ «"'* two 

This course co • '^'^ ^""^ °"« '" 

^£^tS^^^^^S^^ I- - aquatic 

„ , , 'animal. Laboratory fee 

Zool. 120. Adranced C.r,.,- . • 

one laboratory period 1 iTel V'^~^''"'''' ''"^^^^-'- Two W 

A consideration of salivTr ^ ^'^"^^''"'^"e. Zool. 104. ^° ''"*"^^ and 
some irre^ularifi-^ -^^^vary chromosomes fha y.^4. 

^tiessed. Laboratory fee, 
Zool 200 M • ^""^ C^raduates 



■I 



COURSES OF STUDY 



325 



Zool. 201. Microscopical Anatomy (4) — Second semester. Two lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. 

A detailed study of the morphology and activity of cells composing animal 
tissues, with specific reference to the vertebrates. Laboratory work includes 
the preparation of tissues for microscopic examination. Laboratory fee, 
$6.00. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (4) — Second semester. Two lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (4) — First semester. Two lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 
Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Zool. 205. Hydrobiology (4) — Second semester. Two lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical factors which determine 
the growth, distribution, and productivity of microscopic and near micro- 
scopic organisms in marine and freshwater environments with special refer- 
ence to the Chesapeake Bay region. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Zool. 206. Research (credit to be arranged)— First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $6.00 each semester. 

Zool. 207. Zoological Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture a week. 



SECTION IV 
Resident Instruction at Ba,ti„.ore 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J- Bkn Robinson, Dean 

fVRON S. AZSENBEHG, D.D.S 

GEORGE M. Anderson, D D S 
B-CK M. DoRSEV. D.D.S 

GRAVSON W. GAVER, D.D.S. 

William e. Hahn, D D «? a „ 

Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 
Ernest b. Nuttall. d.d.s. 
History "^ '''"^^«^' »I>S., D.Sc. 

The Balf* 

The first lectures o ant'cipating the 

^^^^^i^^^^iS:iS^^^ ^^ - Horace 

^dea that dental educattn ""T/ ^^'^ <^'«eonti;;ed jt^ '"*^™«1 '^'^^en- 

by medicine or couldte ^vlTb ^.^^^^ ««-tion1han h"" h ' ""'-^'^"'^ 
then in vogue. ^'^^"^ '* ^y the preceptorial olan n^f ^" ^^^^ '* 

Dr. Horace H Havd. k "**' *"^'='»'»^ 

-e^^s--i?l5V^C^^^^^^^^ Balti..e in 

- -n^r— :f^ «;3;n.MS £^ Ff - S«^2 

apparent unsurmountabje d^ffi ^u ^^''^'ty "^ Ma^L/' fd^^'^ '^•=*"'-^« 
Partments in med,v»T 1 '''Acuity confrontine. tifi "*^ *''^'"e was an 

charter was ap'tr/rtf' ^" '"''^^-^S"-^^^^^^^^ '^-^-^ '^e" 

1. 1840. The fircf B^ ^ '^ granted by the Mar,,! ^ T^ decided upon. A 

««« Dr. Horace HK^ '"''*'"^ ^as hef^^rn ^^^f '«*"re February 
Harris. Dean The infT'" ^«^ ^'^^ted Prelrd'?'^ .'' '^'"' «* ^Wch 
November 3, J^ to Sf f '"^ '^*=*"^^ was dewLT S"' ^^^^'^ A. 
Thu« was created 'as the foJda?''"*^ -atricu7atS^ t tl f^" ''^ 
-We Colle. o. BentaX--.re Z^ B^;^ 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



327 



s 
1 



In 1839 the American Journal of Dental Science was founded, with 
Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued fully responsible for 
dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to the time of his 
death. The files of the old American Journal of Dental Science testify to 
the fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society 
of Dental Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its Presi- 
dent. He continued as its President until his death in 1844. This Society 
was the beginning of dental organization in America, and was the fore- 
runner of the American Dental Association, which now numbers approxi- 
mately fifty-nine thousand in its present membership. The foregoing 
description of important incidents in Baltimore suggests the unusual in- 
fluence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
have exercised on the professional ideals and policies of American dentistry. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery became the Dental School of 
the University of Maryland in 1923. 

Building 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occu- 
pied by the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square 
feet of floor space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is 
ideally arranged for efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large 
lecture rooms, classrooms, a library and reading room, science laboratories, 
technic laboratories, clinic rooms, and locker rooms. It is furnished with 
new equipment throughout. 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. The 
Library is located in the main building and consists of a stack room, offices 
and a reading room accommodating ninety-six students. Over 10,000 books 
and bound journals on dentistry and the collateral sciences, together with' 
numerous pamphlets, reprints and unbound journals are available for the 
student's use. More than 160 journals are regularly received by the Library. 
An adequate staff promotes the growth of the Library and assists the 
student body in the use of the Library's resources. The Library is financed 
by direct appropriations from the State, by the income from an endowment 
established by the Maryland State Dental Association and by the proceeds 
of the sale of books to students. One of the most important factors of the 
dental student's education is to teach him the value and the use of dental 
literature in his formal education and in promoting his usefulness and value 
to the profession during practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
is ideally equipped to achieve this aim of dental instruction. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in 
the medical sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. 



328 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 1 



will be considered who has nJ "'"''7'^' ^igh-school Louise V^""^ 't'''^'^^ 
to the Junior year i„ th^ . *=*"»Pleted all requiremenrff .° ^PP"*'^"' 
His scholastic fltT./" ^"^^ *"<* ^"ences coIwIT '"'' ^''^ancement 

laboratory insw;- ^" '^""''ses in science shonW • , . ^^^''^ '^'•edit in 
of Maryland under the f„'*"'^'"*' ^^'"'"ed to the Dental q ,, . 

«' «.. C..,2. o^'aS:""",'"/" """""n .Z.hV". '?'"'»' ""'^f 

•*»«^ .. ^y £ i?j:t g™-. u.,..„,., x:^- j^^^t^n. 

Pees and Expenses 
A complete schedule of all f«. 

Advice to Predental Students 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



329 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean. 

Gertrude M. Anderton, Secretary to Dean. 

The Faculty Council 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chestnut, A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M. 

Edwin G. W Ruge, Esq, AB., LL.B. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, Esq., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D. 

Academic Standing 

The School of Law is a member of the Association of American Law 
Schools, an association composed of the leading law schools in the United 
States, whose member schools are required to maintain high standards 
of entrance requirements, factulty, library and curriculum. It, also, has 
been officially recognized by the Council of Legal Education of the Ameri- 
can Bar Association as meeting the standards of that association, and has 
been placed upon its approved list. It is registered as an approved law 
school on the New York Regents* list. It is the only school in Maryland 
so recognized or which offers what is regarded by those agencies as proper 
preparation for the practice of law and whose standards of admission and 
instruction meet with their approval. 

History 

While the faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the Study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. The 
institution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of financial 
support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and in 1870 regular 
instruction therein was resumed. From time to time the course of study 
has been made more comprehensive and the staff of instructors strength- 
ened. Graduates of the School now number more than three thousand, and 
include a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench and Bar of the State 
of Maryland and many who have attained prominence in the profession 
elsewhere. 



330 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



331 



Building 

^n^r ^^"^ !?°°' ^"""^'"^ '^ '"•^•«*«d «t the southeast corner of RedwooH 

officef rihf w'/''';r°"- '" ^*''^*^''" *° ^---^-^ classrooms a" 
r^r! f / ! . f '"'*^' '* """^^'''s ^ l^'-ge auditorium, practice-court 

room students' lounge and locker rooms, and the law library thriTH 
contammg a collection of some twenty thousand carrfXiUteVw 

on weekdays "^ ' '"''"''^ '" °P"" ''•°'" ^'^^ ^- ™- *<> 10-30 p. m. 

Organization 

votW Se.v'fun^r^ ""^^r ''"•"°"" '''' ^^y S'^*'""! f- ^t^dents de- 
part"time udents ^h? ^^^^^y.^V""' """^ *^^ ^^^^"^ School for 

the standa ds of work /ndTallT^^^^^ '"'^"' " ^^* ^^'^°<''' ^^ 

TV., n c. . , graduation requirements are the same. 

chiefly in the mominrhours The P ''k '°"r "'' ^'^^ *^"""^ ^^^ ''^J' 
Monday evenings from"^ 8 oo'^ 10 o'S p';^" "' """"^ ^'^ '^''^ '''' 

The Evening School course covers a nAvJn-i -.* * " 

weeks each, exclusive of holidavs tL T '^ ^"^"^ °* ^'^^''^y^'" 

Wednesday, and Fridav evplfn / / '^''"'"' ^'^ '^^''^ «" Monday, 

plan leave^the alSaTe eveSff "t J"' '"^ '•'*' *° '"^^ P" ™- This 

alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student. 

Course of Instruction 

JdttTorthe iTaSf Of I ''' T'^' ^' ^-- - -tended to equip the 
various branches of th! / Profession. Instruction is offered in the 

Maryland. a"nfof VllJ:^^, Si; la^fVu^irf " '^^ °^ 
course of study is desie'upH t^ „; Zu ! / * *® ^"'t*'*^ States. The 

development, and f utSf W t'o^S. ''1' ' ''"''^'' ^'^" "' ^^"^ -^-' 
edge of its principles and thir' ^, !' '"*'' ^ *''°^""^h practical knowl- 
the principles of substantive an/" !,; /"^'^^^^^l ^^^^y i« »«ade of 
practice court enables the'tudent r"T""' '""' *"** « '^^^^^""y <lirected 
procedure. '*"'^'"* *" ^^* ^" ">timate working knowledge of 

anfp'elTunfriStf 'tlT; ^ SLtt^^ 'j! '"^"^^ '" ^-^'-^' -^^ to 

the subjects upon whLh thTa;p, ca„t f^r t'he^Br- 'T T ^"'='^- ^" ^^ 
are included in the curriculum Rwv, '" Maryland is examined 

more important branches of public rLn' • 'TT'""" '"'='"*^^^ «» °f the 

student adequately for ad^is^t te CTf It^ SaS' ^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Admission 



required to produce evidence of the completion of at least one-half the work 
acceptable for a Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year 
period of study by the State University of the State in which the pre-law 
work is taken, or other standard college or university in such State. Not 
more than 10 per cent of the credit presented for admission may include 
credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses with- 
out intellectual content of substantial value. Such pre-legal work must 
have been done in residence and must have been passed with a scholastic 
average at least equal to the average required for graduation in the insti- 
tution attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the 
average number of students admitted as beginning regular law students 
during the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than 
the academic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be 
admitted as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the 
degree, where, in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, 
such as the maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify 
a deviation from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such 
applicants must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped 
by training and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in liberal arts and law, lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students enrolled in this combined program spend the first three years 
of their course in the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. For 
the fourth year they register in the School of Law, and upon the success- 
ful completion of the work of the first year in the Day School, or the 
equivalent work of the Evening School, are awarded the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. The degree of Bachelor of Laws is awarded upon the successful 
completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the School of Law. 
For detailed information as to this combined course, see Section II, College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws 

The University also offers a combined program in business and public 
administration and law leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program are required to spend the first 
three years in the College of Business and Public Administration at Col- 
lege Park. For the fourth year they will register in the School of Law, 



332 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



333 



and upon the successful completion of the work of the first year in the 
Day School, or the equivalent thereof in the Evening School, are awarded 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. The degree of Bachelor of Laws is 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

For detailed information as to this combined course, see Section II, Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administration. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere in 
a law school which is either a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association, may, in the 
discretion of the Faculty Council, upon presentation of a certificate from 
such law school showing an honorable dismissal therefrom, and the suc- 
cessful completion of equivalent courses therein, covering at least as many 
hours as are required for such subjects in this school, receive credit for 
such courses and be admitted to advanced standing. No student trans- 
ferring from another law school will be admitted unless eligible to return 
to the school from which he transfers. No degree will be conferred until 
after one year of residence and study at the University of Maryland School 
of Law. 

Fees and Expenses 

Maryland Non- 

Tuition Fee, per semester: Residents Residents 

Day School $100.00 $125.00 

Evening School 75.00 100.00 

Other Fees: (Payable only once) 

Registration fee, to accompany application 2.00 2.00 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration 10.00 10.00 

Diploma fee, payable just before graduation.. 15.00 15.00 

NOTE: The tuition fee is payable in full at the time of registration for 
each semester. 



The School of Law publishes a special catalogue, and a copy of this, or 
any further information desired, may be secured from: Dean, School of 
Law, University of Maryland, Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, 
Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Rob't. U. Patterson, 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., 

Faculty Board 
William R. Amberson 
THOMAS B. Aycock 

Charles Bagley, Jr. 
Otto C. Brantigan 
HOWARD M. Bubert 
T. Nelson Carey 
C. Jelleff Carr 
Ross McC. Chapman 
Clyde A. Clapp 
Beverly C. Compton 
Albertus Cotton 

Carl L. Davis 

E. HoLLisTER Davis 

Louis H. Douglass 

Page Edmunds 

Charles Reid Edwards 

Frank H. J. Figge 

A. C. GiLLIS 

Rob't. U. Patterson 
H. Boyd Wylie 
Frank W. Hachtel 
0. G. Harne 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr. 

Elliott H. Hutchins 

C. LORING Joslin 

Edward A. Kitlowski 

John C. Krantz, Jr. 



M.D., CM., LL.D., Dean 
Assistant Dean 

G. Carroll Lockard 

Edward A. Looper 

Howard J. Maldeis 

James G. McAlpine 

Zachariah Morgan 

Thomas R. O'Rourk 

C. W. Peake 

H. R. Peters 

J. G. M. Reese 

Charles A. Reifschneider 

Harry M. Robinson 
Milton S. Sacks 
Emil G. Schmidt 
Arthur M. Shipley 
Dietrich C. Smith 
Irving J. Spear 
Hugh R. Spencer 
Thomas P. Sprunt 
W. Houston Toulson 

RALPH p. TRUITT 

Eduard Uhlenhuth 
Allen Fiske Voshell 
Henry J. Walton* 
Huntington Williams 
Walter D. Wise 
Thomas C. Wolff 
Robert B. Wright 



^ ....••. nf the University of Maryland, organized in 1807, 

The School of Medicine of the V^;^^^^^^^^^ education in America, ranking 
is one of the oldest foundations ^ <>^ 5^^f ^^^^^^^ ^f the United States. In 
fifth in point of age among ^f -^^eS^ Baltimore was founded 
the school building at Lombard aitd Gieene btr ^^ .^ ^^^ 

one of the first medical libraries, and the first medical 
United States. 



I 



♦ Retired May 31, 1945. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



335 



334 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 






At this Medical School for the first time in America, dissection was made 
a compulsory part of the curriculum, and independent chairs for the teach- 
ing of gynecology and pediatrics (1867), and of ophthalmology and otology 
(1873), were installed. 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital. 

The Baltimore Medical College was taken over by the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine in 1913, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in 1915. 

Clinical Facilities 

The original University Hospital, located on the corner of Greene and 
Lombard Streets, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in Mary- 
land. It was opened in September 1823, and at that time consisted of four 
wards, one of which was reserved entirely for patients suffering from 
ophthalmological conditions. That building is now used as the outpatient 
(dispensary) department of the modern University Hospital, located at the 
corner of Greene and Redwood Streets, and opened its wards for the 
reception of patients on November 12, 1934. Besides this hospital, the 
School of Medicine also has control of clinical teaching facilities at the 
Mercy Hospital, and the Baltimore City Hospitals, both of which treat many 
thousands of patients annually. It also utilizes the facilities of the James 
Lawrence Kernan Hospital for Crippled Children, and the Sydenham 
Hospital for the treatment of contagious diseases. Special clinics in 
psychiatry are held at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt and the Spring Grove 
Hospitals. In addition to the regular obstetrical service in the University 
Hospital, an active outpatient or home delivery service is conducted by the 
Medical School. The University Hospital provides 435 patients and 50 
bassinets for all classes of patients, except mental diseases, contagious 
diseases, and tuberculosis. A wealth of clinical material is available for 
the instruction of students. The University Hospital also conducts a School 
of Nursing which has been in existence since 1889. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be 
the same in each. Each dispensary has departments of medicine, surgery, 
oncology, ophthalmology and otology, genito-urinary, gynecology, gastro- 
enterology, oral surgery, cardiology, pediatrics, neurology, orthopedics, 
proctology, psychiatry, dermatology, laryngology and rhinology, and 
Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work each day during one- 
third of the year in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery of the dis- 
pensaries. In their senior year, all students work one hour each day in 
the special departments. This gives an idea of the value of these dispen- 
saries for clinical teaching. 



student laWoHes conducted \^^^f^tst.^fZ EmbryotW. 
Jtruction are a^ *»"»-- .XmuXyBioTS^^^^^ ^^-^-: 

Anatomy. 

Prizes and Scholarships . ^ g^^^^i of 

The following prizes '^^^^^^^'^^'^ZlZl £«„.) 
Medicine. (For details see School "^ Med.« ^^^^^.^^ ^^.^^ 

The Faculty Prize: The Dr. A- Bradley U« ^^^ ^^^^^ 

awarded during the period of acceleraUonJ-^eD^^^ 

Scholarship; The Charles ^^ Hj^^^^^^^^ttS^^^^^^ The University 

Scholarship; The Dr^ Leo ^'"'^'^^^^^^''^X^^^rship; The Clarence and 
Scholarship; The Fredenca Gehrmann bch J ^ ^^^^^ ^^ 

r^Cm^or^Tr '^tHrslw^^^^^^ The Henry Kolando 
Scholarship; and The Read Scholarships. 

Admission to First Year Class ,v„„ted on forms which may be 

All applications for admission must be —^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^, 

secured from the Chairman of *%»';;^i' Maryland. 

Medicine, University of M^yl^nd. Baltimore IM y ^^ ^^^ 

Applications for admission ^^^^^^\^''ZZt olL^cine, and will be 
date when the student desires to jj« J^^f ^^^ ^^e after the beginning 
considered by the Committee on Ad~J^ / .„ ^^^^^ an applicant 

of the academic year just P^ecedrng the academic y .^ ^^^^^^ 

expects to enter. However, «>"^«^/"^^^f^tt„g ^pon an accelerated schedule . 
all others in the country have been operating P ^.^^^ .^ 

which graduates students ^ter four scholastic y ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

calendar years. The School at Pj;«"* ™^, ^f students each year, the 
Navy Departments to train a ^P^^Jf^^J^X "ave been physically rejected 
remainder of the students being cmlians -bo ^^ ^^.^^ .^ g 

by the military or nava service veter«^s^or ^,,,. guch classes 

ber 1945, a freshman class wi 1 !>«^ ^^^^'f^^g as there are any military 
will continue upon an a-«'«f*^^X?Jfthat unless there is some change by 
or naval students. It is quite P'^f^^^f. *^,\ervice regulations, there will 
an Act of Congress, or l^^-XrTlSSrr^n^ler of Navy personnel in the 
be no Army personnel, and a ^«^yj™ . eonceming draft deferments. 
School in 1946. Because of tbe un«rta y ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

and the handling of premedica -d -ed - ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^.,,,, ,„ 

students should seek f^Jf*^f 'formal application. 
Admissions before submitting a formal app 

Admission to Advanced Standing „ .=„. -chools are eligible to flic 



336 



THK VmvBRSnv OP MABYLAm 



Application for adv^n..^ . courses m this school. ^ ^"^"^ 

W Graduation ,„„ a^pp^ '*""'"" «" «>' «""»■ «( Medic™ ,„. 

id; Three calendar years of 

this prep„,e3^l „,.??■ Jl" "l»an«ty and qualiiv „; 

r«l«.red for reeommenj."", i' S"* S"" t" >■«* Im L„ ,h2 

I»»e.ni. CheS.rC"> S '""""" "'"' '•"- » English Blolo 

- ...«.a ._ ./„^,%-™-. Es';rr ~sS 

"y««r- ~ -r '- - 'o„„ln, th„. „.„p,. 
B«l;h ,.n .d™„, , •-•;--.^ .eonlt^"^" ^ 

orate Anatomy 
Embryology 

Physical Chemistry or 
Quantitative 
Analysis 

Mathematics 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



337 



History 

Political Science 
Psychology (a basic 

course should be 

taken) 

Sociology, etc. 



course in English 
composition should be 
taken, if possible) 
Scientific German or 
French (a reading 
knowledge of either 
language is desirable 
although German ij 
preferred) 

Philosophy 
^or admission to th^ 

Careful attention should h. • foreign language, 

the natural sciences. WdXit is" *'' "'^*^*^°" "^ «'-«- courses i„ 



It is not intended that these suggestions be interpreted to restrict the 
education of students who exhibit an aptitude for the natural sciences or to 
limit the development of students who plan to follow research work in the 
field of medicine. 

In accepting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have acceptable scholastic records in secondary school and 
college, satisfactory scores in the Medical Aptitude Test, favorable letters 
of recommendation from their premedical committees, or from one instructor 
in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics, and who in 
all other respects give every promise of becoming successful students and 
physicians of high standing. 

Those candidates for admission who are accepted will receive certificates 
of entrance from the Director of Admissions of the University. 

During the present war effort, and the period of acceleration of scholastic 
instruction in the Medical School, minimum requirements for admission for 
those in the military or naval services have been temporarily reduced. For 
precise information as to those requirements, and the dates of opening and 
closing of each semester, apply directly to the Chairman of the Committee 
on Admissions of the Medical School. 

Fees and Expenses 

The tuition fee for residents of Maryland is $225 per semester, and for 
non-residents $300 per semester. In addition, there are a number of mis- 
cellaneous fees, such as those for laboratory, student health service, students' 
activities, maintenance, and service, etc. A complete schedule of all fees 
will be found in the Bulletin of the School of Medicine, a copy of which may 
be obtained from the Committee on Admissions. 

Personal expenses, such as board and lodging, books, laundry, etc., 
naturally depend to a large extent on the financial condition and resource- 
fulness of the individual student. They range from $400 to $750 per year, 
the average being about $600. 

In addition to the above expenses, each student must provide himself with 
a suitable microscope. 

Advice to Premedical Students 

Students registered in the premedical courses should secure a copy of 
the latest catalogue of the School of Medicine early in their first year in 
college in order to acquaint themselves with the requirements for admission. 
A copy of this bulletin may be obtained by writing to the Committee on 
Admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 



I« 



111 



If 



338 

SCHOOL OP PHARMACY 

A. G. DuMez, Z>ea» 

Mx«s B. OuvK Cole, 5ec.e.a., 

Walter H.HAHTUNG.B.S., PhD 
Clifford W. Chapman b a m o 

^. C.RL.O. WOLF, B.:; p^;:^ " '^"• 

B. OLX^ COLE, Phar.D., LL.B. 
«• E. WiCH, Phar.D 

rnf • '"-• «•«- M.S., Ph.D. 

History ^''"''''"' «•«' ^M.. Ph.D. 

The School of Phnr™, 
Maryland College of P^^ "' *^ University of Marvin a . 
f-ard-lookinf^^XpSc"" "'•^-^-^ of ^/^^--r'^^ the 
the State of Marvl«n^ "^ apothecanes and physicianc /u "' ''^ ^ 

educated and bSr . ' • ^° ^«<=o^i^ed the necS v f P'-«<=ticing in 

medical service "^rb. ^'•^™--*« ^^ ^^^^^^l^^Z' ^'T"^'''^ 
January 27 iS4i ^ f. ^ Properly develoned i^ Sfrowmg phase of 

of the 'same yel; ^Th'r'r ~"'- "^ Suts wasT. "'^"^"'•^*«'' ^ 
institution untn 190/ t ^°"^^^ continued to 0!^^. ^"" '" November 

^ional sehoolffn Silt the^t ^'^^'^^-^'^^^S'^^: il^T'^'r 

as a teaching institution. ^^ continuously exercised its 

Location 
The School of Pharma..,. • i 

The School of Phflrmo 

practice of thToth. k ""'"''*'-y ^or the attSSt 1 t'"" »«'«'•« the 
research. "^'^^^ ^^«"<=''«3 of the professTon a„d in ."'"^^ '" *"« 

and m pharmaceutical 

Recognition 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



339 



holding membership in the Association must maintain certain minimum 
requirements with respect to number and qualification of faculty members, 
physical plant, laboratory and library facilities, curriculum, admission, 
graduation, etc. 

The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 
its diploma is recognized by all the states. 

Requirements for Admission* 

The requirements for admission meet fully those prescribed by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Admission to Freshman Class from Secondary Schools 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certifi- 
cate, or by examination, or by a combination of the two methods. 

Admission by Certificate: An applicant must be a graduate of a secondary 
school which is approved by the State Board of Education of Maryland or 
by an accredited agency of at least equal rank, and which, requires for 
graduation not less than 16 units, grouped as follows: 

Distribution of Units between Required and Elective Subjects: Required 
subjects 8 units, elective 8 units, total, 16 units. 

Required Subjects: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 8 units. 

Elective Subjects: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, vocational subjects (agriculture, 
commercial drawing, home economics, shops, etc.), foreign languages, 
mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any subject offered in 
a standard high or preparatory school for which graduation credit is granted 
toward college or university entrance. Total, 8 units, of which not more 
than four shall be vocational units. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, and 
constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It presupposes 
a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, 
and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Double laboratory 
periods in any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent to 
one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units are allowed for 
four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been taken, an extra 
unit will be granted. 

A graduate of an approved secondary school in Maryland who meets the 
certification requirements of the State Department of Education, or the 
Department of Education of Baltimore City, will be admitted upon presenta- 
tion of the proper certificate from the principal. A graduate who does not 
fully meet these requirements may be required to present further evidence 
of ability to undertake college work. At the discretion of the Director of 



* The right is reserved to refuse admission to applicants with sufficient scholastic credit, 
whose presence in the School would in the judgment of the Faculty Council be detrimental to 
the best interests of the School. 



340 



ii 



TBE VmVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Admissions, this may include an 

tion will be given during £ fi^. ^PP^^^P^^te examination S,..,, 

August and SentpmK . ^ ^"^^^ ^^^k of each of t),» 1, ^'^^ examina- 

notified when ani ^'^ ** ^""^^^^^ Park, Md Ann, T"*^' °^ ^"ne. July 

irattSne?rS^" ^-"-- ^Hhe^ ^^7 -ool not 

of the school. "^""^^ "^ ''"^ l««er higher thi th" J)iest ^"""'^^ ™"«* 
Admission by ExaminaK "'''"'^ ^''^'^^ 

oirott^^e^al^n^-^^^ -^- -o 

sions for permlssLn ."^*'°"= ^'> '^^ «>ay appeaUo .H n '" *'^'"°"^h «ther 
result of S wiUe Je?"* ^* *^« Univ'Sy fof a„''T''' °^ ^d-- 
to determine whrther the "','=*'"-'»»«=«on .vith the seconds V"^"*'"' ^^e 
«<^-tted on presenting^Sr ^ ??^^ ^^ admitted orTsrhr' "^ 
approved examinations in ^1.-'*' ^^^^"^ Passed satLfai , ^^ ''^ 
accredited secondary school I "f'^"'' ^^"^^ired for graduSf''"!^ "^^^^^ 

Entrance Examinatfon totd '?' WeTTf""- -« ^CrbyThe ^1 *" 
iiegents of the TTmV^ -^ ^^^^ 117th Strppf xr -^/ College 

Department if^'SrSur ''l'*^*^ °^ New t;rk All"" ^'*^' ^^e 
Anr.n ^- instruction of the State nf p / Albany, and the 

If^c'Sl'^S'lfr ?!"''»»» with .d,.„<»d „„j, 

these requirements fl ^*^^^- Upon the sati«.foT Jp^^^^ficate of 

^tandingls fX^ *'^ ^^^"^-* ^^ ^e aSm^J^d T^^'r * «^ 
^ A student transferring from ' „ ' 

of the work o? thTfi "J .!^^'"'"^«<'n and be Se^^f It ,*'*'"'"^'^ ^o ad- 
-y have ctiSe?- ^^^ -rs of the Phirint^^-^t^^^^^^^^^^ 
A student transferrine- fy 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 341 

In order that the training of the applicant for advanced standing may be 
equal to that of the members of the class which he seeks to enter, he will be 
required to take those courses, which the class has completed but which he 
has not completed and such courses will be given precedence over the more 
advanced courses in preparing his schedule of studies. 

An applicant for advanced standing will not be given more favorable 
classification than he would have received in the college from which he 
transfers. 

Special Students 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not desire to make up units in which he is deficient may enter as a special 
student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be 
eligible for graduation and will not receive a diploma. The Faculty Council 
reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary training of the 
applicant is sufficient to permit admission under these conditions. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in Pharm.) will be 
conferred upon a candidate who has met the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the full prescribed curriculum. The work of the last 
year must have been in courses offered in this school and must have 
been done in residence at this school. 

2. A total semester credit of not less than 140, with a grade point count 
for each of the last two academic years of not less than twice the total 
semester hours of credit scheduled for the respective years. 

Matriculation and Registration 

All students are required to report in person for enrollment at the office 
of the School of Pharmacy, 32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Maryland, 
during the registration period at the beginning of each semester. A student 
entering for the first tim« must matriculate before he will be permitted to 
enroll. 

Expenses 

Application fee (With application) $ 2.00 

Matriculation fee (First-year only) 10.00 

Tuition fee (per semester) : 

Residents of Maryland 110.00 

Non-Residents 135.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester) 25.00 

Graduation fee (Senior year) ♦ 15.00 

Locker fee and breakage deposit (per semester) 5.00 

' The School of Pharmacy publishes annually a separate catalogue, and a 
copy of this, or any further information desired, may be obtained from 
Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 



I 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Robert U. Patterson, M D cm t r r. 

Harold A. Sayles, Assistant ^ ' ^"P«"ntendent. 

I-cation and History Supenntendent. 

The Universitv Hn v 
in Baltimore, adiacen? . """^ '"^^^^'J «* Redwood ar,H r 
opened as tlie h„ ?^ *° ^'^^ '"edical school Z,M- ^'"^^"^ Streets 

in 1823 At th». ^'' °^ ^'^^ University of Marti ,!Tl ^^^ °"«i"««y 
by addlwot f .™' '' •^""t^'n^d four wards ^J*^ ^'''°°' °* Medicine 

approxlX ,50 tds*° r^ ""*" ^ "« ^^ i hldTeaTed""^ ''"'''''-' 
when the presenf " ! ^* ^*« continued at th«/! ^ capacity of 

f Patientj^d^prvlrs '/sf^i ''""'^-^ -s opened^ V""^ '''^' 
furnishing the rlinf! w ''^d^' and 50 bassiLff^ r reception 

Maryland sJLllrMLf'""*"^ '"^ *»»- stulST'e n ''''"°" "" 

During the fiscal year «,».; u , 
to the University «r -^ ^"^^^^ June 30 1944 ,,. 

ooin m the hospital, ikrok „ ":.""& the same period 2 074 ». u- 
Partment of th^ v,/ -I , Patients were treated ,J ^^^'^^ were 
hospital rendlrr^ ^'*^' ''"""^ ^at year Th a *^ ''"^'Patient de- 

cared for 920 caseTl^H "^"^'"^ ''^"-^y" e^ice T^h'''*"."*^ '°^ *^« 
by doctors, nurses ir ^ *°*^' °^ ^^''^^O visits^ere L*^ <™''^'"^' ^'^'^^''^ 

admitted to tie ho plrdu'^lr^ ''""''^'^ onThtsrlV^x "^ '°"^^ 
county of the State 2i ^st I ^ ^^^ ^^^"^ '•^Presented reX. . . ^*"^"*^ 

SCHOOL OP NURSING 

Ivy B. Clifford, Director aW Q, • 
The University of Maryland S. ^"^^"-^-'^««^ 0/ iV.,..«. 

oTMa^L.^--^ - Thafit in the 

coming prayers. ""' '^ """-sectarian, the only rSo ' ?' ^"'"'^^'^^ 

y religious services being 

"ograms Offered 

The School of Nursine- nff 
those who desire to comDlf.f. fu ^- ^ P''°^'"am of study to tw. 
(b) tW desiring otete! ,•■ ^«'''' ^" ^PP'-^-i^^ ^"> 

training i„ „ursin|. TW 1. '"'''^'' '^°™''^"«d academic stuiv .'"""*''"' 
receive the degree of R«^t, ° '^"'nP'ete the latter coTrl ^ ^"*^ 'P^"^' 

Bachelor of Science as we,, ^ :TXr r/i-^ 



I 



SECTION V 
Agricultural Extension, Research and Regulatory Agencies 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

Administrative Staff 

College Park 

Thomas Baddeley Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Dean, College of Agriculture, 

Director. 
Edward Ingram Oswald, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director. 
Venia Merie Kellar, B.S., Professor, Assistant Director. 
Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Entomology, State Ento- 
mologist, Assistant Director. 
Addison Hogan Snyder, B.S., Professor, Editor. 
Paul Edwin Nystrom, M.S., Professor, County Agent Leader. 
Dorothy Emerson, Professor, Girls* Club Leader. 
Florence Harriett Mason, B.S., Professor, Extension Home Furnishing, 

District Agent. 
Katherine Grace Connolly, Administrative Assistant. 
Mylo Snavely Downey, M.S., Professor, Boys' Club Agent. 

Subject Matter Specialists 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Apiculture. 
Arthur Montraville Ahalt, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Agri- 
cultural Education. 
Floyd Jay Arnold, M.S., Professor, Extension Dairy Husbandry. 
Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology. 
Walter Crothers Beaven, Ph.B., Extension Marketing. 
Ural Guy Bee, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 
Robert Peary Calloway, M.S., Professor, Marketing. 
George McSpadden Briggs, Ph.D., Assoc. Professor, Poultry. 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor, Extension Agricultural 

Engineering, State Drainage Engineer. 
John Julian Chisolm II, B.S., Instructor, Extension Entomology. 
"^JOHN Cotton, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Soil Erosion. 
Carroll Eastburn Cox, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 
Harry William Dengler, B.S., Associate Professor, Extension Forestry. 
Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agricultural 
Economics. 

343 



i 






344 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



«i 



Randolph Sampson Forrester, Assistant in Extension Marketing. 

Castillo Graham, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Entomology. 

Arthur Bryan Hamilton, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Farm 
Management. 

William Edgar Harrison, Assistant, Extension Marketing. 

Russell Cheney Hawes, M.S., Professor, Extension Marketing. 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Canning 
Crops. 

George Hyatt, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Dairy Husbandry. 

Walter Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D., Instructor, Extension Plant Pathology. 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Plant Pathology, 
State Pathologist. 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Poultry Husbandry. 

-William Beck Kemp, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

Albert Victor Krewatch, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Extension 
Rural Electrification. 

Albin Ov/ings Kuhn, M.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Agronomy. 

George Shealy Langford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Extension Ento- 
mology. 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal 
Husbandry. 

John Winfield Magruder, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Agron- 
omy. 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Horticulture, 
Olericulture. 

Arthur Martin, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

' Margaret McPheeters, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Nutrition. 

Devoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 

Charles Percival Merrick, B.S., Assistant Professor, Extension Drain- 
age Engineering. 

« 

Walter Benjamin Posey, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Tobacco. 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Pomology. 

Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Clothing. 

Mark Mercer Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D., Associate Professor, Extension 
Landscape Gardening. 

Helen Irene Smith, B.A., Associate Professor, Home Management. 

Royle Price Thomas, Ph.D., Professor, Extension Soils. 

Arthur Searle Thurston, M.S., Professor, Extension Landscape 
Gardening. 

Joseph McNaughton Vial, B.S., Professor, Extension Animal Husbandry. 



345 
EXTENSION SERVICE 

AT <^ Associate Professor, Extension Horti- 
AlbeRT Frank Vierheller, M.S., Associate 

culture. Professor, Extension Canning Crops. 

EDGAR PEKKINS WALLS, ^^'""^J'''^^^^^ p,,fessor. Plant Pathology. 

EAKNEST ARTMAN ^A^KER, Ph.D. AsSOC ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

,.MES KOLAN. WAR., ^^'^^;;:^^Z^ Extension Marketing. 
John William Wessels, A.B., Assistant r 

County Agents (Field) Headquarters 

County ^''T.TT^MRY B S . Associate Professor, 

RALPH FRANK McHenRY, i^.^^m ^ Cumberland 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . • Stanx^v Evkkett Dav. B.S., Associate P-fesso^^^^^,^ 
3^,,,„„,e HOKACE BK.N.TT D.KK,CK, B.S., Associate P-fesso-^^^ 

' u c A<5=iociate Professor, 

j^^^,. John Boone Morsell, B.S.. Associ ^^.^^^ Frederick 

JJ'^.^^ F«;,NCis MAKiON ROGERS. B.S., Associate Professor,^^^^^ 

^Jjjj LANOON CRAWFORP BURNS, B.S.. Associate P-f--^^^^, 

Tj Q A ^^ociate Professor . . Elkton 

Cecil J--^^ 2^^"^ ''^""''' ^t ' A o ate Prof essor . LaPlata 

Charles Pa- !>--« ^"r™T?S Associate Professor. 

Dorchester *William Russell McKnight, a.i>., Cambridge 

HAKRV WESLEY Beggs, B.S., Associate ^-'>'--^^'^^^^,^^, 

4 

„ ^ vv HENRY REESE SHOEMAKER, B.S.. M. A., Frederick 

Frederick Associate Professor ' 

,^^^^,, JOHN hLey CAR.ER. B.S.. Associate P-fessor^^^^^^^ 

2L HENRY MORRISON CARROLL. B.S.. Associate P-fes^-'^.^ 

Holard WARREN Graham Myers. B.S., Associate Prof^essor,^ ^.^^ 

^r r -D Q Associate Professor, 
^^^^ JAMES DUNHAM McVean. B.S.. Associa ^^^^^^^^^^ 

^^T M «^ Associate Professor, 
Montgomery ... Otto Watson Anderson. M.S., Asso ^^^.^^^ 

r-T »nv B S Associate Professor, 
Prince Georges. . Pebcy Ellsworth Clark. B.^., ^^^^ Marlboro 

• On military leave. 



346 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 






Queen Annes . . . James Walter Ebv, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

'*• ""'^'^ -^--H JUUCS JOHKSO.. Assistant Professor '''^"^""^^ 

"''^''-' ^™- ^— K...B.. B.S., Associate Pr^etr" 

'^'^" ^— «™— BHOW.. B.S., Associatf ?rrssr 

Washington . . . . Makk Kkrmix Miller. b.S.. Associate Professor, ^"*" 

^r^r ir T ""^^' "^•' ^--^- --esso "ir:: 

"'*'' ^"^^«^ T«°«^™^ G«ANT. B.S., Associate Professor, 

Assistant County Agents ^""^ ^'" 

Allegany and 

Garrett Joseph Matthew Stet™ r « r„ t 

Baltimore Tn,,„ w ^^TEGer, B.S., Instructor. . . Cumberland 

T'TT Wheeler Ensor, B.S., Instructor. . . . Towson 

"''■'°''' *^^^™« SHERARD WILSON. B.S.. Instructor. . .' ' ' Be.T 

Kent T''^^'' ^™'"'^'' ^"■"°^' ^-S-' Instructor Bel Air 

^"* Stanley Burr Sutton, Instructor ru , 1 

Montgomery *Ritpit<, d .„ t. "isiructor Chestertown 

g mery . . . nv.vs Backer King, A.B., Instructor Roekville 

Wa,h,„ , '^''*''' ^'''^^' B-S- Instructor Roekville 

Washington .... Daniel Vernon Holter R q T„ . . • • • • • Kockville 

iv«uN molter, B.S., Instructor Hagerstown 

Local Agents— Negro Work 

Southern 

Maryland .... Martin Gk,en Bailev, B.S., Instructor. . .Seat Pleasant 

Eastern Shore ^0^^^' ^^''°"' ^•'•' ''''''''''''■ ' " "S-* P'^-nt 
Shoxe .. LOUIS Henderson Martin. Instructor. .. .Princess Anne 

County Home Demonstration Agents (Field) 

^''««<2' Name „ , 

unaei . . Miriam F. Parmenter, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Itr^ f - ^--H-, B.S.. Associate Professor. . "^Z^ 

'''*''"' ^^^''^-^^ E- BC^HANAN, B.S.. Assistant Professor 

'-'- «-- ^---- Sp-or. B.S., Assritl^^otror' 

Denton 

* On military leave. 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



347 



Carroll JusTiNA C. Crosby, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Westminster 

Cecil Ruth Robinson, B.S., Associate Professor Elkton 

Charles Ernestine Garofalo, B.S., Associate Professor. .LaPlata 

Dorchester Hattie Estella Brooks, A.B., Associate Professor, 

Cambridge 

Frederick Jesse Murray Hammerly, B.S., M.A., 

Associate Professor Frederick 

Garrett Mrs. Mildred Barton Hoffman, A.B., 

Assistant Professor Oakland 

Harford Catharine Maurice Carroll, B.S., Associate Professor 

Bel Air 

Howard Mildred Jane Flanagan, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Ellicott City 

Kent Helen Nickerson Schellinger, Associate Professor, 

Chestertown 

Montgomery . . . Edythe Margaret Turner, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Roekville 

Prince Georges. . Ethel Mary Regan, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Hyattsville 

Queen Annes . . . Marianna Lee Long, B.A., Assistant Professor, 

Centerville 

St. Marys Ethel Joy, A.B., Associate Professor Leonardtown 

Somerset Hilda Topper, B.S., Associate Professor. .Princess Anne 

Talbot Margaret Smith, B.S., Associate Professor Easton 

Washington .... Ardath Ellen Martin, B.S., Associate Professor, 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico Helen Florence Willerton, B.S., Assistant Professor, 

Salisbury 

Worcester LucY Jane Walter, Associate Professor Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

Allegany Margaret Thomson Loar, B.S., Instructor. .Cumberland 

Local Home Demonstration Agents — Negro Work 

Southern 

Maryland Ethel Lawrence Bianchi, B.S., Instructor, 

Seat Pleasant 
Southern 

Maryland .... Evelyn Vivian Kent, B.S., Instructor. . . .Seat Pleasant 

Eastern Shore. . . Mrs. Omega Moore Jones, A.B., Instructor, 

Princess Anne 



348 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



349 



I 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

T. B. Symons, Director 

Katherine Connolly, Administrative Assistant 

Elsie G. Linkous, Secretary to Director 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and home economics, estab- 
lished by State and Federal Laws in 1914, is designed to assist farmers and 
their families in the problems of agriculture and rural homes. Most of 
the work is carried on in the local communities, on the farms and in the 
homes throughout the State. It is conducted under a Memorandum of 
Understanding between the Extension Service of the University of Maryland 
and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

The Federal Government, the State, and the Counties contribute to the 
support of the Extension Service in Maryland. There is a County Exten- 
sion Service in each county, with a County Agent and Home Demonstration 
Agent in charge, and assistants where funds permit and the work requires. 
Backed by a staff of Specialists at the University, these Agents are in close 
contact with rural people and their problems. There were tremendous 
demands for expansion during the war period and the demands will be as 
great or greater in the post-war adjustment period. In addition to 
responsibility for recruiting and placing workers in the farm labor program, 
the Extension Service is charged with the educational phases of all programs 
and measures affecting rural people. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home life comes within 
the scope of Extension work. The Extension Service teaches largely by 
demonstrations and carries the scientific and economic results of the Experi- 
ment Station and Department of Agriculture to rural people in ways that 
they understand and use. 

In Maryland, the Extension Service works in close association with all 
rural organizations. It assists especially in promoting better marketing 
of farm products and encourages the marketing of home supplies by rural 
women. Work with rural women is one of the most extensive phases of 
extension education, including both the practical problems of the home and 
the cultural, economic, and community activities in which present-day 
women are engaging. 

In addition to work with adults, thousands of boys and girls are developed 
as leaders and given practical education in 4-H Clubs. Through their 
diversified activities, the boys and girls are given a valuable type of in- 
struction and training, and are afforded an opportunity to develop self- 
confidence, perseverence and citizenship. 

Extension Short Courses 

The Extension Service arranges and conducts short courses in various 
lines, most of which are held at the University. Some of these courses 
have been held regularly over a period of years and others are added as 
the need and demand develop. 



wiiral Women's Short Course 

offered has been broadened through the years. The secona we 
the date usually selected. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Week " ^ ^^^ ^^.^^^.^.^^ 

Members and leaders of boys and girls 4 H ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

for a week each year, usually the J.atte'- P^^^* bro2d program of education, 
demonstrations are given by speciahsts, and a broad progra 
inspiration and recreation is provided. 

« 

third week in February. 

Nurserymen's Short Course ■ ^^^ ^ ^y,^,.^ course covering 

The organized nurserymen %^\^^^^l"^fZr.onstr.tions reflect ad- 
problems of their business The lectures a ^^ .^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

rd^iratn^r^ctnT J^^^^^^^^^^^ o^ H--^-- 

Entomology, and Plant Pathology. 

a style revue. 



i 



350 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

William Beck Kemp, Ph.D 

Director 

Agricultural Economics 

Samuel Henry DeVault, Ph.D. 

WIU..M P.O. W..KEK. M-s"!"'"" '"' "^''' ^^''^"'*"'-^^ ^^~- 

AHTHVK BHVAN Ham^. mT^^^^ ''■"'"^"'' ^^^*^"'^"'^' '='=""*""- 

ir„„ Q. ^ ^^^°<='ate Professor, Agricultural Economics 

Emil Samuel Troelston, Ph.D., 

r „ Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics: 

Luther Beecher Bohanan, M.S., J^-conomics 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Ray Wilford Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., 

Professor and Head, Agricultural Engineering, State Drainage Engineer 
George John Burkhardt, M.S., ^ngineei 

Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 
Agronomy 

Wiluam Beck Kemp. Ph D d * , „ 

r-mr, rn.u Professor and Head Airmnnmir 

Russell Grove Rothgeb Ph D a • . t, " Agronomy 

xvi-iH^tB, fn.u Associate Professor, Agronomv 

Royle Price Thomas, Ph.D « ' ^ °"°"^^ 

Howard Barr Winant MS 1" '■ ^'■°^«^«°'-' So»3 

r .«o.. r. '^ "^^N'^' ^-^ Assistant Professor, Soils 

GEORGE FRANCXS Madigan. Ph.D Assistant Professor Soils 

ALBIN OWXNGS Kuhn, M.S Assistant Professor, Agr nomy 

JOHN WiNKiELD Magrudeb, M.S Associate Professor, Agronomy 

WALTER BEN.AMXN PosEY, M.S Associate Profess r,Tobac" 

Kenton Charles Reynolds, B.S a ■ ' 

MIYE YAMASAKI, B.S.. • t ' '" ^"'^ 

CONRAD LIDEN,B.S... ••• -Assistant in Soils 

Assistant Agronomist 

Agronomy—Seed Inspection 

Forrest Shepperson Holmes, M.S.. . . ru:^^ o. ^ j 

Olive Marian Kelk . . . . 

Assistant Seed Analyst 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 351 

Animal Husbandry 

Frederick Harold Leinbach, Ph.D., 

Professor and Head, Animal Husbandry 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Professor, Animal IJusbandry 

Animal Pathology 

Harold Moon DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Leo Joseph Poelma, M.S., D.V.M Associate Professor, Pathology 

Cornelia M. Cotton, Ph.D Cooperative Agent 

Botany, Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D Professor and Head, Botany 

Charles Orville Appleman, Ph.D Professor, Plant Physiology 

Robert Andrew Jehle, Ph.D., 

Professor, Plant Pathology, State Pathologist 

Russell Guy Brown, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Botany 

Earnest A. Walker, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Harold Fulton Jeffers, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Carroll Eastburn Cox, Ph.D Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Dairy Husbandry 

Gordon M. Cairns, Ph.D Professor and Head, Dairy Husbandry 

Ira a. Gould, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Myron Herbert Berry, M.S Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Floyd J. Gregarek, M.S Assistant Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Entomology 

Ernest Neal Cory, Ph.D., 

Professor and Head, Entomology, State Entomologist 

Lewis Polster Ditman, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

George Jenvey Abrams, M.S Assistant Professor, Apiculture 

Horticulture 

Charles Harold Mahoney, Ph.D Professor and Head, Olericulture 

Albert Lee Schrader, Ph.D Professor, Pomology 

Edgar Perkins Walls, Ph.D Professor, Canning Crops 

Irvin Charles Haut, Ph.D Associate Professor, Pomology 

Herman Aull Hunter, M.S Associate Professor, Canning Crops 

Herman Todd, B.S Assistant in Horticulture 

Leland E. Scott, M.S Associate Professor, Pomology 

James E. Hawes, B.S Assistant in Horticulture 



I 



I 



3»2 THE VNIVEttSlTY OF MARYLAND ' 

Poultry 

MoRLEY Allan Jull, Ph D p^ f 

George DeWitt Quigley' m'^* * /^^''°'' ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^try Husbandry 

GEORGE M. BRXGGS Ph D f"" ^^ '^'''^"^^' ^^"^^^^ ^^^-^ 

Mary Juhn, Ph D p * "^'"^f ^*^ Professor, Poultry Nutrition 

^'''^'''^ ^^-f-^^or in Poultry Husbandry 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

W. B. Kemp, Director 
^^ S- A. BORTNER, 56cre«ar2/ fo Director 

the reVr^nitrl^^^^^^^ ^^ ^- ^-^land agriculture what 

is made up of forty th Land sm^ ^-^^-^ agricuSr 

sufficient capital, or sufficient t^ome^tS^ ""' '"^^^ ^« ^^^ 

can conduct research. Yet the pr^bU . ^t ll ''''^ ^^ *^^^^ businesses 
such as farming, are as numLora^d L J^^ '"'' ^ '^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ess 
business. Certainly our productrnn n// ?"'^ ^' *^^ problems of any 
it were not for the reseaS r^^^^^^^^^ "^'l'^ ^^ ^^^^ more costly ij 

cultural Experiment Station ^'^''' ^""" ^^^^^^^^ by the Agri- 

the purpose of establishing an agrTcSturai - '"^ '" '^'^ ^'^'^ ^^^ 

impetus to the development of res^aTi i!^^''''^^''* '^^*^^"' ^^^e a great • 
further encouraged by the pLsal nf .? . ? ^^^^^^^^^^e. This work was 
Act in 1925, and'the BankLXT^^^^^^ ^^' ^ ^^«^' the Purnell 

Park. On the University campus arfto beTund f .'" "^'^^^ '' ^^"^^^ 

insects and diseases, soil fertilitv TtoKi . laboratories for studying 

This is also the location of th^^^^^^^^ P^^^ems, and others' 

mental herds. About eight millfrl fT "" ^^''''' ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^P^^i- 

Beltsville, is located the PlanTRLrr^h F^^^^^ "^^"^^^ ^-^' — 

to work connected with soil fert 0^ ,1^^^^^^^^ ''' ^^^^«' <^--oted 

cultural problems. Near Ridgely £W^^^^^^^^^ '^^^'^ ""' ^^"^^^^ ^-^i- 

50 acres owned by the Station at whiS .J' \f ^™ "^ approximately 

growers on the Eastern Shore ^rfst'difd '""^Z "^^ ^' — -^ -ops' 

farm at Upper Marlboro, which L one '^^^^^ '' ^^'^ ^^ experimental 

Government and the Mar;iand AgricSrafF^ ^^ *^^ ^'^'^-^ 

is given over exclusively to the nrohi f""^'''"^^^^ Station, and which 

There is also a number of Ic es re^' '"'r^ ^^'"'"^ "^^ ^^^-^• 

Shore, used for testing new var7e4^^^^^^^ '^'T'''' '"^ ^^^ Eastern 

other varieties used, on faTn^s 7n S/.r^ "'' ^^'' ^^^^ ^« ^^^^ked and 

City there is a f arm "f Sra "ef Xh T"' '''^^^^^'- ^^^ ^"-tt 

These different locations give a cha^t^^^ '' 7 '' '' '''''''''' P^^^^^-- 

give a chance to conduct experiments in various 



MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 



353 



parts of the state under conditions which exist where the results will be 
put into practice. 

The Station, in general, exists as the "trouble-shooter" for Maryland 
farmers. When Maryland farmers have a problem, the first agency to 
attempt to meet this problem is the Agricultural Experiment Station. The 
solution of many difficult problems in the past has given the Maryland 
Agricultural Experiment Station an excellent standing with the farmers 
of the State. 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

Agriculture Building, College Park, Maryland 

, Chief 

W. C. Beaven, Marketing Specialist and Chief Inspector. 

A. F. Martin, Assistant Marketing Specialist, Supervising Inspector 
of Eggs J Dressed Poultry and Dairy Products, 

J. W. Wessells, Assistant Marketing Specialist, Supervising Inspec- 
tor of Fruits and Vegetables, and Inspector of Eggs and Dressed 
Poultry, 

Louis Holland, Assistant Marketing Specialist, Supervising Inspec- 
tor of Fruits and Vegetables, 

R. S. Forrester, Assistant in Marketing, Inspector of Eggs, Dressed 
Poultry and Dairy Products, 

R. C. Hawes, Marketing Specialist, and Administrator of the Egg 
Quality Program, 

The State Board of Agriculture of Maryland has by resolutions: 

1. Adopted September 25, 1925, authorized the State Department of 
Markets of the Extension Service of the University of Maryland, to exe- 
cute as agent of said Board the powers relating to the marketing of farm 
products, live stock and live stock products heretofore conferred upon the 
Board by law. 

2. Adopted September 25, 1925, authorized the Department of Markets 
to execute as its agent the general powers of the Board relating to the in- 
spection and regulation of Weights and Measures used in the sale and pur- 
chase of agricultural products. 

3. Adopted February 1, 1928, authorized the Department of Markets 
to exercise the powers of said Board in the enforcement of the Maryland 
Apple Grading Law. 

By law, the Department is the agency for the State Board of Agricul- 
ture in the enforcement of the following laws: (1) Cantaloupe Maturity 
Law, (2) Poultry Sale and Transportation Law, (3) Trade-Mark Law 
covering all fruits and vegetables, fresh or processed, (4) Grading Law 
covering fresh fruits and vegetables, (5) Inspection Law covering inspec- 
tion and certification of fruits and vegetables, and (6) Fresh Egg Law. 



354 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I 



^ 



The Department of Markets is the cooperating agency under joint memo- 
randums of ag^reement with the Food Distribution Administration for the 
inspection and certification of fruits, vegetables, live and dressed poultry, 
eggs, butter, cheese, canning crops; and the preparation and release of 
Market News reports. 

In 1939 the State Department of Health deputized certain of the person- 
nel of the Department of Markets to act as agents of the State Department 
of Health in preventing the sale or shipment of fruit containing excessive 
spray residue. 

The Department of Markets issues final inspection and certification for 
the Seed Certification Board on Irish and sweet potatoes and tomato seed 
stock. In cooperation with the F. D. A. maintains daily Market News 
Service in Baltimore on fresh fruits, vegetables, dressed poulry and eggs, 
also seasonal daily reports at Pocomoke on strawberries and Irish potatoes; 
and acts as agent for the F. D- A. in carrying out all purchasing pro- 
grrams for fruits and vegetables, including all details in connection therewith. 

The headquarters of the State Department of Markets is at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Field offices are located in 
Baltimore, Hancock, Hagerstown, Salisbury and Pocomoke. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 
College Park, Maryland 

T. B. Symons, Director of Extension Service. 

E. N. Cory, Assistant Director of Extension Service, State 
Entomologist, 

R. A. Jehle, State Plant Pathologist. 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for in- 
spection of all nurseries and suppression of injurious insects and diseases 
affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is conducted in 
close association with the departments of Entomology and Plant Pathology 
of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under authority of 
the law creating the department a« well as the State Board of Agriculture. 
For administrative purposes, the department is placed under the Extension 
Service of the University because of the close association of the work. 

Work in this field is designed to control insects and plant diseases and 
to protect the public in the purchase of products of nurserymen and 
florists. A considerable part of the time of the staff is occupied by inspec- 
tion of orchards, crops, nurseries, greenhouses, and floral establishments. 
Cooperation with the Federal Government in the inspection and certification 
of materials that come under quarantine regulations is another major 
function of the department. The department also enforces the provisions 
of the Apiary Law, including inspection of apiaries. All activities pertain- 
ing to control of insects is conducted under the direction of Dr. E. N. Cory, 
State Entomologist and Assistant Director of Extension. Activities of the 
department in the field of plant disease control are under direction of 



^.'.^ .^^^ir*> includes con 



355 



STATE /iv^— — ^^^,^„, ,,d 

• 4- TVii«4 service inciuat5& ^ 

potatoes for seea, 

,„» mSPKCrlON AN» BEG«LATO«V SERV.CB 
« i^i^a College Park, Maryland 

and Fungicides ^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^,„^, 

*w r SxJPPLEE, Chemist 

A B. HEAGY, Chemist 
R. E. BAUMGARDNER, Chemist 
J E SCHUELER, Chemist 
*T. H. LEWIS, IV, Chemist 
*R. G. FUERST, Chemist 

E. C. D0NAU)S0N, Chemist 

\V. J. FOOTEN, Inspector 

E. M. ZENTZ, Inspector 

F G. BAGGS, Clerk 

.0 t.e State ^^^^^:^S^Sr:^^ -- Ma... 
• r;C::;^I-Se ana -^^ -^^^ __ o. .aU. 

All phases of the work are performed y^^^^ p,,Ucation of results, and 

tion. interpreting ^-^-'''^^'^'Zln\ actions against violators, 
when necessary, preparation of lega ^uitously samples for 

It is the policy of the Deparfn^nt to^ex ^^^^^ ^^^ i-^^^^ast for 

...rded by P-^--X.^etH: of these tests ^oj^^^^^,:::: The 
laws enforced. Generany, ^ rjublished m the omciai 

by Maryland state institutions. 
^E^red the arm«<l '<>"** 






356 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



are subject to test and colllbottion with AT",* ""' '"^'''"'^^ "^ ^"a'y s 
practically continuous At th? 7 ! ^'^^''"^ *"^ «***« investigators ! 
3tn^ly avoided, and tHus^I SLT- ^^^^.^^ "^^ ^ -"- - 

«ve. "tTs%rrtriiEf;i^^^^^^^^^^^ -^- *^- ^-.e. 

pohce power. However, the DepartmeT h" "^ f"^^''^ '^^ ^"^"^"ng or 
tional means and direct coopLtLn^fr**!^'"^' primarily „po„ educa 
-ent. Only in cases wher'such ^thVdt^"^^ l"' ^"^^^-^"' -^ o- - 

As a result of the operation of Tv '°"''* *'""" instituted, 

tura. commodities maytX IhS^ "uS:" T"^ ""^^^^ °^ «^"-- 
obtaining value received for money spent ^^^'^ confidence of 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

Horticultural Building, College Park. Maryland 

F. S. Holmes, Inspector. 
Ellen P. Emack, 4noZj/s«. 
Olive M. Kelk, Analyst. 

ine beed Inspection ServiVo = j- • . 
Station, administers i's a Tseed JaTin"' *^ Agricultural Experiment 
State; collects seed samples for SboraTort r^*' '^^' '"" throughout the 
of these examinations to the parties coL? 7**'?'' '''''''' '^' results 
these reports which show the relaZ T^f'' Publishes summaries of 
supplied by wholesale seedsmen clean andf *7 f.'""' '^"^^ information 
Planting in the State; makes atlllr f "*='='' ^^^'^ '"^^"d-d for 
samples subn^itted to the Laboratorvrndf' ^""^ ^^^'"inations of seed 
economic and intelligent use of seeds The T' '"' .""'"^ regarding the 
the Agricultural Marketing Service of thp tt 7^0*''° cooperates with 
Agriculture in the enforcement of the P.i Y c*'^ ^*^*"^ Department of 

Two and a half million dn^ll ! ^''** ^'^ '" Maryland. 

Maryland. Perhaps ^^l^^^Z^ fheT td ^^!i ''^''''' ^"-"^ » 
of the vegetable seeds planted in the Stat 1 1 "^^l ^""^ "'""*y P^^-^^n* 
f re thus subject to the seed law Th.^ I ! *^'''*"^'' *'"^'1« «=hannels and 
IS not restricted to the enforclenf of the *^,^"' '"^P^*=*'°» Service 
citizens may submit seed samples Jo the ftK'""^. ^^^' ^''^^''^'' '"r State 
examination. Specific informatVon re^»^ '^•^^''^ ^'"' *"^'y««. test, or 
poses of lots of seeds is thus mad^ aSabw "' *f "i'^ '°^ P'^"«"^ P"- 
The growth of this service has been steadl , '"tr**"^'' ^'*^°"* «=harge. 
Laboratory in 1912. In 1913 only si S *u ^^^^''''^h'nent of the 

submitted to the Laboratory; in 1941 £ 1"^ ""T ^ '*""**'■"'* ^^"'PJ^s were 
dred. Few Maryland home-owners ciJv "^ T' """"• ^^'^-^y-fl^^ ^un- 
terested in seeds for planting in ierld^rg^d:;: Tf^T^ '^ 



DAIRY INSPECTION SERVICE 



357 



DAIRY INSPECTION SERVICE 

Dairy Building, College Park, Maryland 

I. A. Gould, Chief Examiner 

The Maryland Dairy Inspection Law became effective June 1, 1935. How- 
ever, the present activities of the Dairy Inspection Service are based on 
Article 43 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Chapter 403 of the Laws of 
Maryland, 1941. The dairy department, functioning under the Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the University of Maryland, is charged with the 
administration of this law. 

The purposes of the Dairy Inspection Law are as follows: (1) To insure 
producers who sell milk and cream by measure, weight and butterfat test, 
that samples, weights and tests used as the basis of payment for such 
products are correct; (b) To insure dealers who purchase milk and cream 
that their agents shall correctly weigh, sample, and test these products; 
(c) To insure correctness of tests made for official inspections or for public 
record. To achieve these purposes the law requires the licensing of all 
dealers who purchase milk and cream from producers, whether the purchases 
are by measure, weight, or test, and the licensing of all persons sampling, 
weighing and testing milk and cream when the results of such samples, 
weights, and tests are to serve as a basis of payment to producers. 

Duties of the Dairy Inspection Service, resulting from enforcement of 
the Inspection Law, deal with the calibration of that glassware used in 
testing milk and cream and the rejection of inaccurate items; examination 
of all weighers, samplers, and testers and the issuance of licenses to those 
satisfactorily passing the examination; and inspection of the pertinent 
activities of weighers, samplers, testers and dairy plants. 

The Dairy Inspection Law benefits the entire dairy industry by preventing 
unfair competition and unfair trade practices which result from improper 
methods of weighing, sampling and testing milk and cream, and the use of 
inaccurate and improper equipment. Also, requirements governing the 
accuracy of scales, construction of weigh tanks, and proper procedures result 
in greater efficiency and thus less loss to dealers and producers alike. The 
licensing of weighers, samplers, and testers assures both the producer and 
the dealer that the men engaged in such work are competent. 

The Dairy Inspection Law is administered on an educational basis with 
the view of promoting the mutual interests of dairy producers, dealers, and 
manufacturers. It is the belief of the administrating agency that since the 
producers of milk and cream and the dealers in these products both benefit 
by the law, they also should share in the responsibility for its enforcement. 
Such a responsibility involves close cooperation and harmony between all 
groups affected by the law. 

During 1944, 127 permits were issued to dealers as follows: 9 plants in 
Class A (buying less than 500 lbs. of milk daily); 29 in Class B (buying 
from 500-2,000 lbs. of milk daily); 68 in Class C (buying from 2,000 to 



/ 



358 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



40,000 lbs. of milk daily); and 21 in Class D (buying more than 40,000 of 
milk daily). In addition, 218 licenses were issued to testers and 106 licenses 
were issued to weighers and samplers. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

College Park, Maryland 

Ray W. Carpenter, State Drainage Engineer, 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties 
are to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the 
State, to correlate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the 
State and to cooperate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of 
a permanent program of improved drainage. 

This department administers funds appropriated by the State in 1939 
for drainage of lands in Wicomico and Worcester Counties. 

Affiliated Agencies on the University of Maryland Campus 

at College Park 

The following Federal, State and private agencies are located on the 
College Park campus but are not under the direction of the Board of 
Regents of the University of Maryland or the Maryland State Board of 
Agriculture: 

FEDERAL AGENCIES 

Eastern Experiment Station, Bureau of Mines, U. S. Department of the 
Interior. 

Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Department of the Interior. 

Water Resources Branch, U. S. Geological Survey, U. S. Department of 
the Interior. 

Agricultural Adjustment Administration, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. 

Maryland Crop Reporting Service, Bureau of Agricultural Economic^s, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Maryland Headquarters of Agricultural Planning Field Service, Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

STATE AGENCY 

Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps, Department of Public Works, State 
of Maryland. 

PRIVATE AGENCIES 

National Sand and Gravel Association Research Foundation. 
Aviation Division, American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 






SECTION VI 
Records and Statistics 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1943-1944 
HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Science in Business Administration 

William Sidney Gordy 



Doctor of Laws 

Emerson Columbus Harrington 



Milton A. Reckord 



UONORARY CERTIFICATES OF MERIT IN AGRICULTURE 
HONORARY CERii ^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

Susan Fry William Alfred Walker Koy 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Harry Kaoru Iwamoto 
William Henry CowgUl ^^^^^^ Edwards Scott 

Leon Goldman , ^ .^, navid Sterling Wheelwright 

Margaret Towell Goldsmith ^^avia 



Master of Arts 



Mildred Marshall Atkinson 
Mary Alberta Bailey 
Mabel Vivian Becraft 
Harvey Jackson Cheston, Jr. 
B. Bernard Cohen 
Ruth Parker Eason 
Charles Joseph Eckenrode 

Floyd Charles Faulkner 

Stanley Fifer 

Gaza Kenneth Horvath 

Mary Catherine Kahl 



Shirley Rose Boulanger 
Tracy Gillette Call 
Murray Edelstein 
Frederic John Linnig 
Agnes Louise Marks 
Alfred Tennyson Myers 



Kathryn Claire Kenney 

Ruby Matson Robins 

Alfred Cyrus Roth 

Walter S. Sanderlin 

Charles Edward Pohlman Scott 

Julius Seeman 

Angeline Musmaker Sunday 

Raymond Martin Taibl 
Pedro J. Vergne Roig 
Kathleen Elizabeth Wolfe 
Paul Yaffe 

Master of Science 

Nestor Obando 
Edward Lester Reed 
John Anthony Scigliano 
Marguerite Goss Toole 
Wilson Monroe Whaley, Jr. 
Cathryn M. Wood 

359 



360 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1HS-19U 



361 



Gertrude Larman Biggins 
Sarah Malissa Boyd 
Eunice Eveline Burdette 
Esther Gary Burnside 
Margaret Elizabeth Cook 
Paul David Cooper 
Arnold J. Croddy 
Edith Marie Grove 
Frances Hiestand Hartzell 
Margaret Carolyn Jones 



Master of Education 

Agnes Holsapple Kain 
Grace Wooden Kurtz 
Catherine Elizabeth Manley 
Dorothy George Miller 
Gladys Wilkie Nelson 
Nancy Rideout Opperman 
James Laton Reid 
Ann Helena Rowell 
Julia Wakefield Watkins 
Edith Margretta Williams 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Earl C. Baity 
John Henry Bennett, II 
Daniel Carl Bralove 
Samuel Bernard Burch, Jr. 
John Yoder Crow 
Joseph Francis Dougherty 
Robert E. Gilbertson 
Lilian June Hastings 
Robert George Hill, Jr. 
Norman Louis Horn 
John Harry Hoyert, Jr. 
Charles Kenneth Jewell 
Richard Nathan Jones 



Bachelor of Science 



Carl Ceroid Luebben 
John Lawrence Milligan 
Robert Edward Moreng 
Raymond George Mueller 
Paul Edison Noland 
Ira Deward Porterfield 
Lloyd Wherry Roberts 
Boiling Lynn Robertson, Jr. 
James Baines Saum 
Benjamin Stump Silver 
Heino Staff el, Jr. 
William Lupo Tarbert 
John Newton Yeatman 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Janet Andreae 
Shirley Seymour Armstrong 
Stanley Julian Asrael 
Mildred Marshall Atkinson 
Clementine S. Barship 
Shalvo Schwartz Berkowitz 
Marcella Marie Biebusch 
Robert Arthur Bishton 
Jane Lorimer Boswell 
Sylvia Harriet Bravman 
Helen Virginia Broome 
Jacqueline Anstead Brophy 
Louise Catherine Brown 



Bachelor of Arts 



Ruth Edith Buchanan 
Walter Eggleston Buck, Jr. 
Ruth Pendleton Carson 
Mary Jane Chase 
Ann Beverly Connor 
Thomas Arthur Conroy 
Nelson R. Cox 
Marylouise Day 
George-Anna Diehl 
*Faith Elizabeth Farquhar 
Sylvia Feldman 
Alma G. Finkelstein 
Nettie Frances Carman 






Genevieve Jean Geissler 
Lois May Glenn 
Clariece Renee Glickman 
Beryl Mary Gompers 
Jane Lois Hahn 
Mary Jane Hambright 
Leighton Ernest Harrell, Jr. 
Constance Armstrong Hartman 
Marjorie Ellen Herman 
Muriel S. Horrowitz 
Elsie Pauline Howland 
Mary Louise Isaacs 
Dorothy Theresa Jackson 
Koppel Michael Jeffrey 
Lois Virginia Jennings 
Ralph Harvard Jones 
Dorothy Roberta Kells 
Kathryn Claire Kenney 
Phyllis Soryl Kolodner 
Ruth Wallace Lehman 
Roberta Leighton 
Janet Lucile Lingle 
Barbara Louise Love 
Bernice Margulis 
Evelyn Lucile Mendum 
Lucille Loring Moncrieff 
Ruth Hamlyn Osann 



Marcelle Frances O'Shaughnessy 
Charlotte Claire Packman 
Helen Frances Pfeiffer 
Audrey Lois Pringle 
James Magruder Rea 
June Drummond Rightor 
Joan Rodgers 
Martin Gilbert Rude 
William DeVries Sampselle 
Jean Elizabeth Scheller 
Mildred Eaton Sears 
Theodore Sherbow 
Margaret Ann Sherman 
Harry Edwin Shilling, Jr. 
Edith Iris Simmons 
Phyllis Marian Skinner 
Joseph Woodruff Sowell 
Mitchell Samuel Stevan 
Elsie Lois Stevens 
Evelyn Florence StoU 
Patricia Sydney Ward 
Frances Quigley Whyte 
Shirley Minna Wilcox 
Phyllis Ellen Wolfe 
Mary Ellen Wolford 
Jane Hurst Woodring 



Bachelor of Science 



* Honors in English. 



Gladys Martha Allen 
Ruth Margaret Blackwell 
Aleksey Bobenko 
Jean Marie Boyer 
John George Brickner, III 
Marjorie Amber Brigham 
Jo Ann Whitworth Brill 
Eli Matthew Brown 
Harold Vernon Cano 
Amelia Fisher Carroll 
Margaret, Susan Clarke 
Caroline Elizabeth Clinite 
Sidney Gary Clyman 
Polly Ann Day 
Vincent 0. Eareckson, Jr. 
Samuel Goldhagen 
Stanley Henry Gottlieb 



Harry William Gray 
Hildwin Clare Headley 
Elizabeth May Hobbs 
Nancy Wrenn Holman 
Frederick Miller Johnson 
Deane Ellington Keith 
William Francis Keller 
Robert Francis Kienhofer 
Lawrence Joseph Knox 
Lillian Dorothy Koch 
Eileen Marjorie Kohout 
Herbert Joseph Levickas 
Gwendolyn Dale Likely 
Margaret Mae Ludwig 
Allan Harris Macht 
Leonard Thomas Maholick 
Ellen Martin 



/ 



362 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1H3-19U 



363 



Ken Matsuda 

Marjorie Elaine McCann 

Earl Boyd McFadden 

William Hunter Myers 

Dorothy Jean Nelson 

Ellsworth Howard North, Jr. 

Milton Reisch 

Ralph Alan Reiter 

Carl Hutchins Richmond, Jr. 

A. Owen Ridgway 

James Alwin Roberts 



Robert Crittenden Rossberg 

Joan Rowe 

Sidney Sacks 

E. Milton Smith, Jr. 

John Charles Stidman 

Herbert Van Arden Swindell 

Virginia Lapp Todd 

Richard Lee Whelton 

Alexander William Young, Jr. 

Betty May Young 

Gunter Zweig 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Science 



Leslie Bailey 
Peter Benjamin 
William Spencer Betts 
Herbert Talmadge Beuermann 
Meta Lucile Boyd 
Richard Alexander Brooks 
William Thomas Carrigan, III 
Roy Dobson Cromwell, Jr. 
Warren Harding Eierman 
Roy Hart Gilfix 
Fay Zelda Goodstein 
Norvell Hamner Hawkins 
Frederick William Heine III 
William Thomas Higgins 
Harvey Hodges Holland, Jr. 
Joseph Michael Joyce 
Edward Calvin Kaighn, Jr. 
William Frederick Koehnlein 



Marvin Joseph Lambert 
John Patrick Lenihan 
William Israel Levenson 
Lee Joseph Maisel 
Patricia Anne McAnallen 
William T. Miller 
Manuel M. Nicolaides 
Barbara Elizabeth Reed 
Irma Hanche Roston 
Julian Roger Sanders 
David S. Schwartz 
Robert Willard Senser 
David Maxwell Snyder 
Robert Allen Stockbridge 
Joseph John Thomas 
Erma Louise Welsh 
Paul Melvin Williams 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Caryl Tracy Adams 
Stanley Auerbach 
Melvin Carlos Beaumont 
Fred Vance Beerbower 
Joseph L. Berkeley 
Robert Harvey Bernert 
Edward Joseph Biczak 
William Richard Bisgeier 
Fred Samuel Blake 



Doctor of Dental Surgery 

Albert Joseph Brett 
Robert J. Bruckner 
Harry Frank Butler 
Harry H. Camp, Jr. 
Pasquale Edward Capalbo 
Bernard Meyer Capper 
Henry Frank Cerny, Jr. 
Frank Merlin Chereskin 
Leonard Davitz 



John Robert Famulari, Jr. 
Herbert Samuel Fine 
Alfred Justus Frost 
Harry Robert Gibson 
Henry Sylvan Hohouser 
Morton Herbert Hollander 
Leon Joseph Horwitz 
Daniel Hurewitz 
Harold Hyman 
Robert Gilbert Kahn 
Stanley Herbert Karesh 
Stanley Katz 
Jerome Kaye 
Joseph Kessler 
C. William Kossowan 
Donald Kramer 
Mervin Kramer 
Herbert Austin Krasner 
George Milton Lacher 
William Charles Landy 
Bernard Sidney Lavine 
Seymour Lehrman 
Mahlon Poff Leiphart 
Stanley Michael Lipman 
August Raymond Machen 
William Robert Martin 
Eugene Leonard Piven 
Robert Norton Pollak 



James Farris Pruitt 
Leonard Erwin Quitt 
Wilbur Owen Ramsey 
Albert Andrew Reitman 
George Yale Richman 
Robert Bogert Rowland 
Gerald Rubin 
Morton Samet 
Nicholas J. Santaniello 
Emil M. Scheinberg 
Raphael Silverman 
Roy Julius Sloat 
Robert Henry Smith 
Carl Benjamin Shpiner 
Leon Steinberg 
Sidney Jonathan Stillman 
Walter Brooks Stillwell, Jr. 
Justin F. Stolitsky 
Raymond Kent Tongue, Jr. 
Felix Thilo Trommer 
Edward White Vandegrift 
Norman Vernick 
Martin Weiselberg 
Fred Jack Witzburg 
Walter Wodka 
Herbert Wilson Young 
Philip J. McCarthy Zeender 
Edward Zuckcrman 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



Elizabeth Dolores Anderson 
Helen Jane Biesecker 
Eleanor Caryl Block 
Martha Dillon 
Margery Ruth Dopkin 
Rhoda Betty Eskwith 
Kathryn Elizabeth MacMorris 
Beatrice Marriott 



Dorothy Manger Merkel 
Lois Byer Mills 
Russell Fredrick Schumacher 
Barbara Nutwell Simons 
Eleanor Ann Spickard 
Annie-Ruth Topping 
Jeanne Ermold Wirsing 
Helen Gertrude Zepp 



Bachelor of Science 



Frances Virginia Ahalt 
Vernon Norman Albrecht 
Dorothy Richardson Ayers 
Lena Powell Barkdoll 



Aileen Florence Beauchamp 
Lucille Allene Bowser 
Betty Jane Bryan 
Alice H. Carney 



/ 



364 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Anne Mary Compronie 
Edna Catharine Culler 
Dorothy Shaw Dare 
Edith Bear Dunford 
Hazel Spencer Dyott 
Natalie R. Higbie 
Elizabeth Ann Hine 
Agnes Thomson Howat 
Clark J. Hudak 
Florence Mary Hunter 
Maude Mary Jarboe 
Theresa Loretta Kahler 
James Gamble Kinsman 
Mary Theresa Kroen 
Grace Hopkins Lyons 
Abigail Garner Matthews 
Eleanor Anne Matthews 
Anne H. Morgis 
Hester Anita Neild 



Mabel Harrison Parker 
Elizabeth Hayman Powell 
Leah G. Miller Proutt 
Thelma Irene Rogers 
Elizabeth Helen Rohnacher 
Elizabeth Jane Saum 
George Allen Schwarzmann 
Mary Frances Shepperd 
John Leonard Slade 
Nell Dreyer Smith 
Hannah Vera Stevens 
Gloria Mason Stewart 
Edward C. Turner 
Jane Carolyn Turner 
Anna Lauretta White 
Otis Carlyle White 
James B. Witkowski 
Albert Wolman 
Emma Elizabeth Ziegler 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Bachelor 

Paul David Arthur 
Harold Bernard Atkinson, Jr. 
David William Baker 
Harold Oliver Balough 
Earl Benjamin Bell 
Victor Emanuel Bieber 
Robert Lee Borenstein 
Ralph Weaver Bromley 
Bruce Holden Burnside 
Felix Francis Joseph Cardegna 
James Atkins Clark 
Maurice Cohen 
Manuel Paul Comulada 
John Carroll Curlander 
Clifton Bradford Currin 
Donald Smith Delahay 
Roland Austin Ebner 
Roy Stanley Eckert 
Carl Walter Eicker 
J. Robert Esher, Jr. 
Aleck Smith Evans 
Kenneth James Evans 
Arthur Chilton Farnham 
Dwight Otterbein Fearnow 



of Science 

Edward Paul Fine 
Milton Alfred Fischer 
John Jack Fishbein 
Evan Dearborn Fisher 
James Edward Forbes 
Kenneth Eugene Foss ^ 

Miriam Kleeger Gerla 
George Ward Gibble 
Jerome William Golomb 
Charles Eli Gottlieb 
Grantham Tracy Graham 
Philip August Grill, Jr. 
John Anthony Gurklis 
Daniel Seitz Harbaugh 
Herbert William Harden 
Randolph Adolphis Harding, Jr. 
George Winfield Harmon, Jr. 
William Paul Helbock 
Edward L. Hoffman 
John Witherington Hoskinson 
Arthur Eugene Jehle 
George Arthur Kaufmann 
William George Keat, Jr. 
Max Francis Kerschensteiner 



DEGREES CONFERRED, IHS-IHU 



365 



Millard Franklin Kirk 
James Wellington Kirkpatnck 
Joseph Wencislaus Kriz 
Lynn Taylor Loomis, Jr. 
Charles R. Lund, Jr. 
Lawrence John Mattingly 
Donald Cooper Maxey 
Gene Howard Melton 
Lyal N. Merriken 
Leonard Michaelson 

Carson F. Moyer 

Arthur Ellsworth Naylor, Jr. 

George Nick Nikolopoulos 

Henry Harrison Osborne, Jr. 

Edward Richardson Pierce, Jr. 

Donald Everett Pilcher 

Edward Charles Polhamus 



Henry Williams Price, Jr. 
Millard Collins Ross 
Carroll Louis Rowny 
Ira Robert Schwartz 
Lisle Herbert Senser, Jr. 
Morton Stanley Silberstem 
Kenneth Walter Simpson, Jr. 
Ralph Emerson Stine 
William Earle Sturges, Jr. 
Oscar Palmer Swecker 
Norman Willis Todd 

Nelson Henry Van Wie 

Peter Francis Vial 

Jere Clifford Wannan 

rharles Edward White 

Srald Edward Garrett Wilkinson 

David Kenelm Winslow 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Irma Jean Bennett 
Isabelle Hamilton Boswell 
Phyllis Virginia Brooks 
Sarah Frances Brown 
Ann Revell Chadeayne 
Ruth Georgiana Chapman 
Mary Posey Conklin 
Martha Ann Cotterman 
Hattie Alberta Cross 
Martha Lindsay Cross 
Frances Elizabeth Demaree 

Ruth Dubb 

Audrey Helen Dugdale 

Elizabeth L. Fell 

Rhea M. Galloway 

Jane Neepier Gambrill 

Edna Mae Gilbert 

Virginia Ellen Giles 
Kathryn Cornelia Harder 
Dorothy Patricia Hardie 
Helen Elizabeth Heiss 
Marilyn Henderson 
Edna Jeanne Hovey 
Virginia Jane Hutchinson 
Winifred Ellen Jeff ers 



Mary Helen Keough 
Beverly Ladd 
Grayce Elayne Martin 
Margaret Lettie Martin 
Dorothy Virginia McCalhster 
Elizabeth Joyce Murdock 
Masako Nagao 
Betty Steely Oberle 
Ethel M. Regan 
Agnes Estelle Richmond 
Sarah Elizabeth Reid 
Barbara Ann Rivenburgh 
Betty Laura Rowley 
Jeanne Rudelius 
Lina Mae Saum 
Edith Janet Scales 
Catherine Elizabeth Schmoll 
Eleanor May Seiter 
Mary E. Sharp 
Marean D. S. Shea 
Mary Howard Simmons 
Olive Jean Elizabeth Smith 
Nancy Spies 
Florence Pearl Spivak 
Lucy Jane Stewart 



11 



366 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



11 
II 

fi 



1 



Vera May Tompkins 
Elizabeth Thomas Uhler 
Gloria Waldman 
Helen Adair Walker 
Ruth Serena Walton 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 191^3-1 9 U 



• 36' 



Mary Arabian 
John Landon Askew 
Sara Abbott Brown 
Hans William Callmann 
John Wilfred Doub 
*Robert Homer Engle 
Leonard Stanley Freedman 
Charles Cleveland Grice 
Fredric Kay Killingsworth 
Joseph Ernest McCann 



Roberta Mae Wathen 
Evelyn P. Wasserman 
Mildred Ann Whitlow 
Millicent Elizabeth Wright 

SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Laws 

Katherine Araminta Mclntyre 

Bert Sig Muller 

Ernest Lee Perkins 

James Alexander Pine 

Philip James Skipp 
*Annarose Catherine Sleeth 
'Joseph Sarsfield Sweeny 

Marjorie Temple 

Francis Louis Tetreault 

Virgil Van Street 



Certificate of Proficiency 

W. Carl Lohmeyer 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Elizabeth Acton 
Ruth Workman Baldwin 
William Riley Ballard, Jr. 
Lillian Feykert Bennett 
Herbert Lee Berry 
Joseph William Bitsack 
Frederick Bertram Brandt 
Henry Thomas Brobst 
Charles William Brown 
James MacKay Brown 
Ernesto Colon-Yordan 
Elmer Ellsworth Cook, Jr. 
William Nye Corpening 
Robert MacGonigle Crosby 
Robert Kimber Curtiss 
Alfred Henry Dann 
Edward Colson Day 
Harold Dillon 
Hamilton Peacock Dorman 
John Justin Doyle 

♦ With honor. 



Doctor of Medicine 



Daniel Ehrlich 
Henry Guy Ferri 
Aaron Nathan Finegold 
Mary Jane Foley 
Augustus Homer Frye Jr 
Eli Galitz 

Richard Mitchell Garrett 
Albert Gubnitsky 
Joseph Roy Guyther 
William Myrick Harris 
John Stevenson Haught 
Francis Eugene Hornbrook 
Manuel Antonio Iguina-Jimenez 
Gabriel Andrew Ingenito 
Charles Hal Ingram 
Luis Manuel Isales 
Melvin Joseph Jaworski 
Dan Franklin Keeney 
Charles Alexander Kemper 
Earl Ray Kinney 



Ishmael Worth Kirby 
Allen Kleiman 

Clarence Vinette Latimer, Jr. 
Frederick Wilbur Lurting 
Peter Mamula 
Arnold Robert Marks 
Lloyd Leo McCormack 
Robert Burns McFadden 
William Edward McGrath, Jr. 
Joseph Frederick McMullin 
DeVoe Kepler Meade 
Angel Neftali Miranda 
Jack Calvin Morgan 
Myron Joseph Myers 
Alfred Turner Nelson 
Isaac Floyd Nesbitt 
John Casimir Ozazewski 
John Michael Palese 
Robert Joseph Peters 
Edgar Thornton Pfeil 
Samuel Ronald Pinas 
William Henry Pomeroy, II 
Francisco Luis Raffucci-Arce 
James Jacob Range 
Cliff Ratliff , Jr. 



Norman B. Ream 
John Munn Recht 
Arthur Middleton Rinehart 
Merritt Ezekiel Robertson 
George Carraway Rogers 
William Brannon Rogers, Jr. 
Stevenson Parker Santiago 
Rocco Louis Sapareto 
Irving Scherlis 
Frank Mollman Shipley 
James Samuel Shortle 
Frank Mason Sones, Jr. 
John Thomas Stegall 
Harold Sterling 
Martin Edward Strobel 
Glenn Olson Summerlin 
Talmadge Stanley Thompson 
LeRoy Wortendyke Tilt, Jr. 
Dharma Luz Vargas 
Grayson Spencer Waldrop 
Harry Ernest Walkup 
George Brooks West, Jr. 
David Reid Will 
Thomas Richard Williams, Jr. 
Paul Randall Ziegler 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Graduate in Nursing 



Dorothy Jeanne Adams 
Virginia June Beane 
Lois Coffman Beegle 
Katherine Elizabeth Bloom 
Marjorie A. Brigham 
Jo Ann Whitworth Brill 
Margaret Susan Clarke 
Caroline Elizabeth Clinite 
Mary Jane Custer 
Violet Mabel Dayhoff 
Barbara Clarissa Devanna 
Alice Margaret Elste 
Marianne Gillelan 
Jeannette Eleaine Gingrich 
Ella Elizabeth Gooch 
Janet Reid Gow 
Hildwin Clare Headley 



Mary Ellen Hertzog 
Jane Grosh Hornbaker 
Henrietta Katherine Hubbard 
Margaret Ernestine Johnson 
Emma Jane Kercheval 
Doris Mae Kessler 
Eloise Rae Kindig 
Myrtle June Kite 
Claire Mary Konold 
Mary Florence Laws 
Annette Catherine Leaf 
Frances Bertha Lister 
Ann Elizabeth Love 
Margaret Mae Ludwig 
Angeline Magalotti 
Marjorie Elaine McCann 
Mary Ann Michelitch 



368 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Mabel Margaretta Miller 
Lorraine Brechbiel Montgomery 
Dorothy Jean Nelson 
Mary Lou Nicol 
Ellen Lorraine Olson 
Dorothy Pearson 
Margaret Ella Rothhaupt 
Avis Hardin Simons 



Eleanor Randolph Smith 
Cora Virginia Storey 
Ruth Lenore Strother 
Nancy Lee Walker 
Helen Edythe Williams 
Elizabeth Perrin Wright 
Mildred Lorraine Yingling 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Charlotte Thelma Bosch 
Joseph Freiman 
Nathaniel Enteral 
Jerome Gaber 
Jack Gelrud 
Jacob Glushakow 
William John Hutchinson 
Morris Jaslow 
Joseph Kanowsky 
Albert G. Leatherman, Jr. 
George Lichter 
Emanuel Wolfe Massing 



E. Taylor Meiser 

Bernard Myers 

Anthony Gus Padussis 

Israel Morris Ruddie 

Raymond Sachs 

Paul Sif en 

Charles Irvel Smith 

Leon Strauss 

Charles Hammond Wagner 

William Weiner 

Edward M. J. Wlodkowski 

Margaret Wong 



HONORS, MEDALS, AND PRIZES— 1943-1944 



Elected Members of 

Paul David Arthur 
Jane Lorimer Boswell 
Margaret Susan Clarke 
Miriam Kleeger Gerla 
Marilyn Henderson 
Nancy Wrenn Holman 
Edna Jeanne Hovey 
Barbara Louise Love 
Lee Joseph Maisel 



Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Society 

John Lawrence Milligan 
Dorothy George Miller 
Nagao Masako 
Edward Orban 
Joan Rowe 
David S. Schwartz 
Morton Stanley Silberstein 
Shirley Minna Wilcox 



Omicron Nu Sorority Medal 

Hilda Frances Joska 



HONORABLE MENTION 
College of Agriculture 



First Honors 

John Lawrence Milligan 
John Harry Hoyert, Jr. 



Second Honors 

Raymond George Mueller 
Samuel Bernard Burch, Jr. 



HONORS AWARDED, 1H3-19U 
College of Arts and Sciences 



369 



First Honors 
Ruth Margaret Blackwell 
Galdys Martha Allen 
Janet Andreae 
Shirley Minna Wilcox 
Evelyn Lucile Mendum 
Joan Rodgers 
Jean Marie Boyer 
Barbara Louise Love 
Margaret Susan Clarke 
Clementine S. Barship 



Second Honors 

Mary Ellen Wolford 
Jane Lorimer Boswell 
Stanley Julian Asrael 
Audrey Lois Pringle 
Amelia Fisher Carroll 
Kathryn Claire Kenney 
Ellsworth Howard North, Jr. 
Joan Rowe 

Nancy Wrenn Holman 
Gwendolyn Dale Likely 
Patricia Sydney Ward 
Janet Lucile Lingle 
Margaret Ann Sherman 
Ruth Hamlyn Osann 
Frances Quigley Whyte 

College of Business and Public Administration 

Second Honors 
First Honors , ., . i 

^ , ^ . Lee Joseph Maisel 

Fay Zelda Goodstem Hammer Hawkins 

Patricia Anne McAnallen ^^"^^ 

David S. Schwartz 
Marvin Joseph Lambert 

College of Education 

First Honors 

Elizabeth Ann Hine 
Maude Mary Jarboe 
Mabel Harrison Parker 
Elizabeth Dolores Anderson 
Abigail Garner Matthews 



First Honors 



Morton Stanley Silberstein 

Miriam Kleeger Gerla 

Felix Francis Joseph Cardegna 

Paul David Arthur 

J. Robert Esher, Jr. 

Carson F. Moyer 

William Earle Sturges, Jr. 

Randolph Adolphis Harding, Jr. 

John Carroll Curlander 

Bruce Holden Burnside 



College of Engineering 

Second Honors 

Clifton Bradford Currin 

Harold Oliver Balough 

David Kenelm Winslow 

Philip August Grill, Jr. 

Milton Alfred Fischer 



370 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



College of Home Economics 

First Honors Second Honors 

Marilyn Henderson Martha Ann Cotterman 

Masako Nagao Ann Revell Chadeayne 

Edna Jeanne Hovey Audrey Helen Dugdale 

Elizabeth Longacre Fell Margaret Lettie Martin 
Mildred Ann Whitlow 
Eleanor May Seiter 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Edward White Vandegrift 



Caryl Tracy Adams 
Wilbur Owen Ramsey 



Certificate of Honor 

Roy Julius Sloat 
Morton Herbert Hollander 
Herbert Wilson Young 



School of Law 

Elected to the Order of the Coif 
Robert Homer Engle Annarose Catherine Sleeth 

School of Medicine 

University Prize Gold Medal 
Lillian Feykert Bennett 

Certificates of Honor 

LeRoy Wortendyke Tilt, Jr. Arnold Robert Marks 

Joseph Roy Guyther 
Edgar Thornton Pfeil 



Ernesto Colon-Yordan 



HONORS AWARDED, 1H3-19U 



371 



Mary Jane Custer 

ne university of Maryla.. Nu,.e.J^eAssoc^ 
hershiv in the Association, for Practical Niasing ana 

Dorothy Jeanne Adams 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence 

Charles Irvel Smith 

• 7 P.:,v^ fnr Proficiency in Practical Chemistry 
The William Simon Memorial Prize fot Proficiency 

Charles Irvel Smith 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharinacy Prize 
Anthony Gus Padussis 

The Conrad L. Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 

' George Lichter 



Jerome Gaber 



Certificates of Honor 

Morris Jaslow 
William Weiner 



School of Nursing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship, given by the University of Maryland 

Nurses* Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in Administration, 

Supervisory, or Public Health Work, to the Student Having 

the Highest Average in Scholarship. 

Janet Reid Gow 

The Elizabeth Collins Lee Prize to the Student Having the Second 

Highest Average in Scholarship 

Lois Coffman Beegle 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize for the Highest Average 

in Executive Ability 

Marjorie A. Brigham 



II 



41 




372 THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SUMMARY OP STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
For the Academic Year 1944-1945, as of June, 1945 

Resident Collegiate Courses ,<-. n 

Academic Year p"^ tR ,r Jot^l Less 

^ „ - '^^^^ TBaltimore Duplicatinn, 

College of Agriculture joS P"cations 

College of Arts and Sciences i 03i " ' " , „,, 

College of Business and • • . .... 1,031 

Public Administration 210 

School of Dentistry * " ' f^^ 

College of Education 052 ^in II. 

College of Engineering 207 oi^^ H 

Graduate School ::;:::;■ 224 ' " 65 IrL, . , 

College of Home Economics 308 fff ^' '^"* 

School of Law •••: ^''8 

School of Medicine .' ", "^ 

School of Nursing tH ^3^ 

School of Pharmacy ^tl "^f 

Army Specialized Training Program 

(Summer, Fall) 262 .... 262 

Duplicatbns Intercoliege,* A.S.T.P.' , ^'^^^ ^'^^^ ^'^^^ 

and Civilian 1 25 ofi 

Duplications College Park and Baltimore o 

• • • • .... y 

Net Total « eoc i r,r,« . „ 

Short Summer Session. 1944 .....: .' .' .' .' ' ' 131 ' ^'^'^ , ,/'^^^ 

xox .... lol 

DupiicJtIons ::::::::::;:: J'''^'^ , ^-^^^ 

^^'^ .... 48 

Mining^'clrsr :::::::::::::::::;::::.. ~^'««^ ~^'^^" ~~^'^^^ 

Engineering, Defense Extension o o?? 

Fire Service Extension 'Ztl 

658 

Short Courses and Conferences 

Dairy Field Men's Short Course . . ' gut 

4-H Club Day .':::;::::::;;: 12JJ 

Junior Leadership Work Shop Conference '92 

Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers . . 1 1 1 

Maryland Holly Society ^^ 

Sawmill Operators' Conference ' .* .* * ' * * ] ' * [ [ [ ] ] ' 97 

Total Short Courses and Conferences T7^, 1 624 

GRAND TOTAL, All Courses, Baltimore and College Park, 

less duplications * Q 01 Q 

♦ Four Quarters : Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring 
^uLV^l%^^^^^tFiu^:^^^^^ P^™^' -h-h is four quarters and 



GENERAL INDEX 



A Page 

Administration 7 

board of regents 7 

officers of administration 8 

boards and committees (College Park) 10 
officers of instruction (College Park) 11 

administrative organization 19 

buildings, grounds and 20 

libraries, 21 

Admission 22 

methods of admission 22 

subject requirements 23 

certificate, by 23 

physical examinations 34 

transfer, by 24 

unclassified students 24 

Aeronautical Engineering 147 

Agencies, Federal, State and Private, 

Research and Regulatory 343 

Agents 345 

assistant county 346 

assistant home demonstration 346 

county 345 

county home demonstration 346 

local 347 

Agricultural Adjustment Administra- 
tion 358 

Agricultural Economics 55, 187 

Agricultural Education 56, 190 

Agricultural Engineering 67 

five-year program 58 

Agricultural Experiment Station 352 

Agriculture, College of 48 

advisory councils 50 

chemistry 64 

curricula in 51 

departments 52 

equipment 50 

farm practice 61 

regulatory activities 49, 343 

requirements for graduation 50 

special students in agriculture 70 

State Board of 7 

Agricultural Planning Field Service. . . 358 

Agronomy 60, 192 

Alumni 47 

American Civilization 77 

curriculums 77 

graduate program 178 

required courses 24 

American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Aviation Division 358 



Page 

Animal Husbandry 62, 194 

Applied Science, fellowship in 152 

Aquiculture 324 

Art 160, 197. 268 

Arts and Nursing, five-year combined 

program 96 

Arts and Sciences, College 72 

advisers 75 

degrees 73 

divisions 72 

electives in other colleges and schools 75 

lower division 76 

normal load 75 

requirements 73 

Astronomy 198 

Athletics 20, 42, 169, 239 

Aviation Division, American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers 358 

B 

Bacteriology 79, 198 

Biochemistry, plant physiology 60, 211 

Biological Sciences, division of 78 

Board of Regents 7 

Book Store and Post Office 46, 47 

Botany 63, 201 

Buildings 20, 326 

Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps . . 362 

Bureau of Mines 21, 152, 352 

Eastern Experiment Station 352 

research fellowships in 152 

Business Administration 100, 204 



Calendar 5 

Certificates, Degrees and 26 

Chemical Engineering 148, 216 

chemistry 148, 152 

research fellowships in 146 

Chemistry 64, 89, 148, 210 

analytical 210 

biological 211 

general 89, 210 

organic 212 

physical 213 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 84 

Civil Engineering 149, 217 

Clubs, miscellaneous 45 

College of Agriculture 48 

College of Arts and Sciences 72 



373 



it 



GENERAL INDEX 



375 



374 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 






Page 

College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 100, 204 

College of Education 123, 227 

College of Engineering 139, 247 

College of Home Economics 156, 267 

College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 100 

accounting and statistical control... 114 

study program 102 

business administration 108 

economics 105 

financial administration 112 

foreign trade 120 

industrial administration 110 

marketing administration 110 

natural and human resources. .. .121, 292 

personnel administration.. 113 

public administration 117 

secretarial training 115 

Committees 10 

Comparative Literature 219 

Conservation Service, Soil 352 

County agents 345 

demonstration agents 346 

Courses of study, description of 185 

Crop Reporting Service, Maryland.... 358 

D 

Dairy Husbandry 64, 221 

Dairy Manufacturing 65, 222 

Dairy Plant Inspection Service 357 

Degrees and Certificates 26 

Delinquent students 26 

Dental Education 129 

Dentistry, School of S26 

Diamondback 46 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 72 

biological sciences 78 

humanities 86 

lower division 76 

•physical sciences 88 

social sciences 93 

Drainage, State Department of 358 

Drawing 224 

E 

Economics 105, 224 

agriculture 55, 187 

Education 123, 227 

academic 125 

agricultural 56, 190 

business education 128 

curricula 125 

degrees 124 

dental 129 

facilities 123 



Page 

home economics 130, 23H 

industrial 133, 234 

nursery school 132 

physical 135, 239 

Education, College of 123 

Educational Psychology ZO'i 

Electrical Engineering 150, 244 

Employment, student 39 

Engineering 139, 247 

admission requirements 139 

aeronautical 147 

agricultural 57 

bachelor degrees 140 

chemical 148, 215 

chemical engineering — chemistry .. 89, 215 

civil 149. 217 

curricula 146 

drawing 224 

electrical 150, 244 

equipment 140 

experiment station 155 

fire service extension department.... 154 

general subjects 147 

library 1 4.^ 

master of science in 140 

mechanics 287 

mechanical 151, 288 

professional degrees in 140 

shop 290 

short courses 154 

surveying 321 

English Language and Literature. . .86, 248 

Enrollment, student 372 

Entomology 251 

Entrance 22 

Evening courses 184 

Examinations 25 

Expenses 27 

Experiment Station 

Agricultural 352 

staff 350 

Eastern, Mines 358 

Engineering 156 

Extension Service ". 49, 348 

short courses 348 

staff 350 

F 

Faculty 11 

Federal, State and Private Agencies... 358 

Feed, Fertilizer, Lime, etc.. Service... 355 

Fellowships 153, 181 

Fire Service Extension 164 

Fish and Wildlife Service 358 

Five-year combined Arts and Nursing 

curriculum , 96 



Page 

Floriculture ^8. 277 

Food Technology ^82,274 

Foods and Nutrition 165. 274 

Fraternities and Sororities 45 

, 254 

French 

G 

^ ^. 324 

Genetics 

Geography 12>- f/^ 

Geological Survey *»' 

„, 262 

G^^°^^ 257 

German 

Grading System ^^ 

Graduate School, The Yl* 

■, . -^ 174 

admission 

American civilization 178 

174 
council 

. 175 
courses -^ 

fellowships and assistantships 181 

registration 

requirements for degrees 176 

residence requirements 176 

summer graduate work 183 

H 

Health Service ^ 

High School Teachers, certification of. 

75, 124 

Historical Statement 1^ 

History ^^^ 

Home Economics l^^' 267 

curricula 

degrees 1" ' 

departments *"" 

facilities 1^^ 

general ^^^ 

Home Economics Elducation 130, 233 

Home Economics Extension 163 

Honors and Awards 40, 368 

Horticultural State Department 364 

Horticulture ^7, 276 

Hospital ^4, 342 

Housing rules ^^ 

Humanities, division of 86 

I 

Industrial Education 133, 234 

Infirmary rules ^^ 

Inspection and Regulatory Service 355 

Inspection Service 

Dairy Plant ^^"^ 

Seed 356 

Institution Management 1^4 

Instructional Staff (College Park) H 



Page 

L 

Landscape Gardening 276 

Law, School of ^^9 

Librarians (College Park) ^ 

21 
Libraries 

Library Science 279 

Living arrangements ^5 

Loans 

Location of the University 17 

Lower division ' " 

M 

"M" Book *^ 

Markets, Maryland State Department 

of ^'^^ 

Marks ^^ 

Maryland Crop Reporting Service 358 

Mathematics ^^' 280 

Mechanical Engineering 1B1» 288 

Mechanical Engineers, American So- 
ciety of, A^ation Division 358 

287 
Mechanics 

Medals and Prizes 40. 368 

Medical Technology ^^ 

Medicine, School of ^^^ 

Metallurgical division. Bureau of Mines, 

fellowships in ^^^ 

Military Science and Tactics 167, 291 

Mines 21,167.358 

Modern Languages, courses m 291 

... 291 

Music 

Musical Organizations 291 

M 

National Sand and Gravel Association 

Research Foundation 3^8 

Natural and Human Resources 121, 292 

Nursing, School of ^^^ 

Nursery School Education 132 

O 

Officers, administrative ^ 

11 
of instruction • • ' 

Olericulture ^7. 279 

P 

Pharmacy, School of 338 

Phi Kappa Phi 45, 368 

Philosophy '^^^ 

Physical Education.... 20. 24, 135, 239, 241 

Physical Examinations 34 

Physical Sciences, division of 88 

Physics 92, 295 

Plant Pathology 203 

Plant Physiology 20S 



m 



376 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1 



Page 

Political Science 297 

Pomology 67, 278 

Poultry Husbandry 69, 300 

Predental curriculum 99 

Preliminary information 17 

Premedical curriculum 96 

Prenursing curriculum 96 

Preprofessional curricula 96 

Psychological Testing Bureau 302 

Psychology 302 

Publications, student 46 

Public Administration 117, 308 

R 

Records and Statistics 359 

Recreation 169 

Refunds 32 

R. O. T. C. Organization 167 

Registration, date of 5, 22 

penalty for late 30 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees . . * 25 

degrees and certificates 26 

elimination of delinquent students . . 26 

examinations and marks 25 

junior standing 26 

regulation of studies 25 

reports 26 

Regulation of studies 25 

Regrulatory Service, Inspection and .... 355 

Religious influences 43 

Research and Regulatory Agencies 343 

Research Foundation, National Sand 

and Gravel Association 358 

Reserve Officers* Training Corps, 

33, 167, 291 

Residence and Non-Residence 27 

Room Reservation 35 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories.... 35 

Rural Life 56, 190 

8 
Sand and Gravel Association Research 

Foundation, National 358 

Scholarships 37 

Science curriculum, general physics.. 91 

Secretarial Training 115 

Seed Inspection Service 356 

Shop 290 

Social Sciences, division of 93 



Page 

Societies 45 

fraternities and sororities 45 

honorary fraternities 45 

miscellaneous clubs and societies ... 46 

Sociology 312 

Soil Conservation Service 358 

Soils 61, 192 

Solomons Island Research 84 

Sororities 45 

Spanish 259 

Speech 318 

State Board of Agriculture 7 

State Department of Drainage 358 

State Horticultural Department 354 

Statistics 205 

Student 

employment 39 

government 43 

organization and activities 44 

publications 46 

Summary of Student Enrollment 372 

Summer Session 183 

credits and certificates 183 

graduate work 183 

terms of admission 183 

Surveying 149. 821 

T 

Terrapin 46 

Textiles and Clothing 159, 267 

Transcripts of records 32 

u 

Uniforms, military 168 

University Hospital 342 

University Post Office and Book Store 46 

V 

Veterinary Science 321 

W 

Water Resources Branch, U. S 358 

Welfare 33 

Wildlife Service 358 

Withdrawals 32 

Z 
Zoology .84. 322 






i-! 



m 



■\ 



An admission application f onn, or any further h 
mation desired concerning the University, wiU gUdly be 
listnished, on request, by 

THE DPUBCTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



*'-^-.' 



V,- 



\ 



376 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Page 

Political Science 297 

Pomology 67, 278 

Poultry Husbandry 69, 300 

Predental curriculum 99 

Preliminary information 17 

Premedical curriculum 96 

Prenursing curriculum 96 

Preprofessional curricula 96 

Psychological Testing Bureau 302 

Psychology 302 

Publications, student 46 

Public Administration 117, 308 

R 

Records and Statistics 359 

Recreation 169 

Refunds 32 

R. O. T. C. Organization 167 

Registration, date of 5, 22 

penalty for late 30 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees. . • 25 

degrees and certificates 26 

elimination of delinquent students.. 26 

examinations and marks 25 

junior standing 26 

regulation of studies 25 

reports 26 

Regulation of studies 25 

Regulatory Service, Inspection and .... 355 

Religious influences 43 

Research and Regulatory Agencies .... 343 
Research Foundation, National Sand 

and Gravel Association 358 

Reserve Officers* Training Corps, 

33, 167, 291 

Residence and Non-Residence 27 

Room Reservation 35 

Rules and Regulations, dormitories .... 35 
Rural Life 56, 190 

S 

Sand and Gravel Association Research 

Foundation, National 358 

Scholarships 37 

Science curriculum, general physics.. 91 

Secretarial Training 115 

Seed Inspection Service 356 

Shop 290 

Social Sciences, division of 93 



Page 

Societies 45 

fraternities and sororities 45 

honorary fraternities 45 

miscellaneous clubs and societies ... 46 

Sociology 312 

Soil Conservation Service 358 

Soils 61, 192 

Solomons Island Research 84 

Sororities 45 

Spanish 259 

Speech 318 

State Board of Agriculture 7 

State Department of Drainage 358 

State Horticultural Department 354 

Statistics 205 

Student 

employment 39 

government 43 

organization and activities 44 

publications 46 

Summary of Student Enrollment 372 

Summer Session 183 

credits and certificates 183 

graduate work 183 

terms of admission 183 

Surveying 149. 321 

t. mm 

Terrapin 46 

Textiles and Clothing 159, 267 

Transcripts of records 32 

U 

Uniforms, military 168 

University Hospital 342 

University Post Office and Book Store 46 

y 

Veterinary Science 321 

W 

Water Resources Branch, U. S 358 

Welfare 33 

Wildlife Service 358 

Withdrawals 32 

z 

Zoology 84, 322 



'\ 



An admission application form, or any further infor- 
mation desired concerning the Univerrity, wiU gladly be 
furnished, on request, by 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



X 



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