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Full text of "Catalogue"

NEW BEDFORD 



TEXTILE INSTITUTE 



1949-1950 



NEW BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 



New Bedford 
Textile Institute 

A College of Textiles and Engineering 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 



Bachelor of Science 

Textile Engineering 

Textile Chemistry 

Machine Design 



Catalogue 
1949-1950 



FOREWORD 

The purpose of this issue of the Catalogue is to provide 
information for prospective students, or anyone else who 
may be interested, regarding the history, traditions, ob- 
jectives, resources, programs, equipment and staff of the 
Institute. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/catalogue19491950newb 



Administration and Staff 




Entrance 



Board of Trustees 
Administrative Officers 
Instruction Staff 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN A. SHEA, President 

FREDERICK ROLLINSON, Vice-President 

GUSTAVE LaMARCHE, Clerk 

TRUSTEES 

Ex-officio, HIS HONOR ARTHUR N. HARRIMAN, Mayor 
Ex-officio, JOHN J. DESMOND, JR., Commissioner of Education 
Ex-officio, W. KENNETH BURKE, Superintendent of Schools 

Term expires June 30, 1949 

LAURENT FAUTEUX, 241 State Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 
JAMES J. KENNEDY, 15 Branchaud Court, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 
RAYMOND R. McEVOY, U. S. Civil Service Commission, Office of Director, 
Boston, Massachusetts. Res.: 156 Porter Street Stoughton, Massachusetts. 

WILLIAM RICHARDS, 519 North Front Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 
JOHN VERTENTE, JR., 460 County Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Term expires June 30, 1950 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON, West End Gas & Electric Appliance Co., New|Bed- 
ford, Massachusetts. Res.: 62 Grant Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

GUSTAVE LaMARCHE, Wamsutta Mills, New Bedford, Massachusetts. Res.: 
175 Phillips Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

EDWARD L. MURPHY, JR., Brown-Durell Co., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Res.: 209 Hobart Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts. 

WALTER H. PAIGE, 12 Lincoln Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

FREDERICK ROLLINSON, Soule Mill, New Bedford, Massachusetts. Res.: 63 
Florence Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Term expires June 30, 1951 

MISS E. FERRIS ALMADA, Gosnold Mills Corporation, New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts. Res. : 6 Ocean Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

JOSEPH DAWSON, JR., Knowles Loom Reed Works, New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts. Res.: 190 Sj^camore Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

PHILIP MANCHESTER, Berkshire Fine Spinning Associates, Inc., Fall River, 
Massachusetts. Res. : Westport Harbor, Massachusetts. 

NILS V. NELSON, N. V. Nelson & Co., 93 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Res.; 8 Temple Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts. 

JOHN A. SHEA, Neuss, Hesslein Co., New York. Res.: 384 Washington Street, 
Taunton, Massachusetts. 



John A. Shea, President, Trustee Board 

Frederick Rollinson, Vice-President, Trustee Board 

George Walker, President 

Mary F. Makin, Principal Clerk and Treasurer 

Cecelia Zeitler, Senior Clerk 

Loretta B. Lavoie, Junior Clerk and Typist 

Millicent K. McGrath, Junior Clerk and Typist 



2 

INSTRUCTION 

Department Heads 

Fred Beahdsworth, Department of Weaving 

Edward H. Clotjtier, Department of Knitting 

John E. Foster, B.S., in C.E., Department of Engineering 

James L. Giblin, Department of Design 

Thomas H. Gotjrley, Department of Testing 

Frank Holden, Department of Carding and Spinning 

Francis Tripp. B.S. in Ch.E., M.S., Ch.E., Department of Chemistry 

Instructors 

John R. Barylski, Instructor of Mechanical Drawing and Machine Shop Practice 

Adam Bayreuther, Instructor of Machine Shop Practice 

John C. Broadmeadow, B.S., in Ch.E., Instructor of Chemistry 

Edmund J. Dupre, B.S. in T.C., Instructor of Chemistry 

Louis E. F. Fenaux, B.S. in Ch., M.S. in Ch., Instructor of Chemistry 

Ferdinand P. Fiocchi, B.S., Instructor of Chemistry 

William S. Kirk, Instructor of Carding and Spinning 

Louis Pacheco, Instructor of Carding and Spinning 

Antone Rodil, Instructor of Weaving 

David Ward Saltus, B.S., M.A., Instructor of Mathematics and Physics 

Augustus Silva, B.A., M.A., Instructor of English 

Leo M. Sullivan, B.S., M.A., Instructor of History and Sociology 



General Information 




History 

College Facilities 

Student Organizations 

Admissions 

Graduation Requirements 

Attendance Regulations 

Expenses 

Scholarships 

Athletics 



3 

NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

1898-1948 

The New Bedford Textile Institute was established and incorporated by the 
Board of Trustees of the New Bedford Textile School on August 1, 1895, under 
Chapter 475 of the Acts of 1895 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on January 27, 1896 and 
committees were appointed to supervise activities with relation to building, finance, 
machine^, education and other necessary executive functions. During the year 
1897 the city of New Bedford appropriated $25,000 for the use of the school and 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts appropriated an additional $25,000 the fol- 
lowing yea,r. With these funds the first of the present five buildings was con- 
structed. 

The first building, consisting of three stories and a basement, comprised about 
22,000 square feet of floor space. During the first 25 years of the school's existence, 
four buildings were added; three in the form of additions and one, the recitation 
building, a separate structure, was connected to the others by an overpass and 
tunnel. 

The present Institute has approximately 110,000 square feet of floor space. It 
is one of the most modern and best-equipped textile institutes in the world. 

The first course offered by the Institute was entitled, "General Cotton Course." 
In 1902, two additional courses in Knitting and Chemistry were offered. A me- 
chanical engineering department was added in 1905. This department offered 
courses in mechanical drawing, machine shop practice, shop mathematics, me- 
chanics, electricity and steam. These courses at first were offered only in conjunc- 
tion with the general cotton course. Later, a separate course in Junior Mechanical 
Engineering was offered and it was from this beginning that the present engineering 
department evolved. 

Today the following courses of study are offered : 

Degree Courses — 4 years 

Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering 
Bachelor of Science in Textile Chemistry 
Bachelor of Science in Machine Design 

Diploma Courses — 3 years 

General Textile Manufacturing 
Textile Designing 
Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing 
Knit Goods Manufacturing 

Certificate Courses — 2 years 
Textile Technology 
Drafting and Machine Shop Practice 

Along with the development and expansion of the Curricula, there has been an 
almost complete renewal of equipment and a modernization of working facilities, 
i.e., laboratories, lighting, etc. It is estimated that during the past ten years ap- 
proximately 450,000 dollars have been spent for new equipment and modernization. 

At the present time, extensive additions to the school plant are being planned. 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has recently appropriated funds toward the 
purchase of considerable property adjoining the institute. Engineers are now work- 
ing on tentative plans for a large addition which will house more laboratories and a 
modern library. 

The New Bedford Textile Institute is proud of its professional standing and of 
the recognition it receives throughout the world. This recognition is evidenced by 
the large number of foreign students who attend each year. The current enrollment 
consists of students from approximately fifteen states and twelve foreign countries. 
Among the latter are France, Palestine, Chile, Bolivia, Mexico, Canada, China, 
Haiti, Egypt, Brazil and Greece. 



ENVIRONMENT 

The Institute is situated in the city of New Bedford, Massachusetts. It is located 
along the main bus line; both the bus terminal and railroad station are within walk- 
ing distance. 

New Bedford, being an industrial city is an especially suitable location for a school 
of this type. For many years it has been recognized as the worlds largest manu- 
facturer of fine cotton yarns and fancy fabrics. In recent years the industry of this 
city has become more diversified. Many new industries have found New Bedford, 
with its skilled manpower, particularly suited to their type of work. These indus- 
tries include the world's largest manufacturers of electronic equipment along with 
an important manufacturer of condensers. One of the world's most important manu- 
facturers of rubber equipment has long been established here and more recently a 
leading manufacturer of machine tools has migrated to this industrial city. 

Textile, machine tool and rubber manufacturing or processing do not constitute 
the whole of New Bedford's diversified industry. This historical city has long been 
recognized as a leading fishing port. Each year, millions of dollars worth of fish are 
brought into this port, either for direct shipment or for New Bedford's large fish 
processing houses. 

These industries, both old and new, afford the Institute, many opportunities for 
planned inspection trips. This, we feel, is an invaluable aid in acquainting the stu- 
dent with the practical phases of his academic work. 

Students wishing to remain in New Bedford during the summer recess will find 
many opportunities to work during this period. Because of the nature of the city's 
industry, the student often finds work which is in his chosen field, thereby gaining 
practical experience as well as financial aid to meet the expenses incurred during 
the school year. 

The civic center of New Bedford is a few minutes walk from the school grounds. 
Here the student will find the municipal building, the main library, veterans ad- 
ministration building and many other city and county buildings. Close to the civic 
center he will find the city's largest shopping and theater district. 

COLLEGE FACILITIES 
Library 

The institute maintains a main library and several small departmental libraries. 
The present main library contains approximately 4,000 volumes, all of which per- 
tain, for the most part, to textile manufacturing, chemistry and general engineering. 
Present plans call for a library in the new addition to house a minimum of 15,000 
volumes. 

Each of the smaller departmental libraries contain volumes pertaining to the 
work of each particular department. Included among these are bound volumes of 
some twenty publications which are received monthly. These volumes make a very 
important reference for those students engaged in research. 

The students also have access to the New Bedford Public Library. This library 
contains a very comprehensive collection of about 250,000 volumes. All courses 
offered at the institute require the student to make full use of all these facilities. 

Bookstore 

The institute maintains a bookstore on the second floor of the administration 
building. This store is operated on a non-profit basis. All supplies, books, etc., are 
sold at very little above cost — this difference covering the cost of maintaining 
the store. 

The student will find ail the supplies he needs in this bookstore. Although the 
student is not required to purchase these supplies, he is advised not to buy else- 
where until he is certain those things he will buy are approved by the person in 
charge of the course in which the equipment is to be used. All supplies in the book 
store are approved. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Council. This is a body consisting of elected representatives from 
each of the twelve classes, and one faculty representative. Its purpose is to study 
problems of the student body, class activities and the various matters of student 



organizations. This body represents the student body in proposing changes or mak- 
ing recommendations to the college authorities. 

Interfraternity Council. An organization consisting of members representing 
each of the men's and women's fraternities. One member is chosen from the faculty. 
This body determines the rushing season and the rules which control rushing. It 
has charge of enforcement of all institute rules regarding membership in fraternities. 

Fraternities. There are three national, professional and social men's fraternities 
and one women's sorority. These are: 

Phi Psi Delta Kappa Phi Sigma Tau Phi 

The women's sorority is: Phi Zeta Sigma. These fraternities maintain chapter 
rooms and all play a major part in the social and athletic affairs of the institute. 

Athletic Council. This is a body consisting of representatives of the Board of 
IYustees and representatives of the faculty. The purpose of this group is to deter- 
tnine all athletic policies. The athletic council determines the budgets for each sport 
md all schedules must meet their approval. 

ADMISSIONS 

Entrance Requirements for All Degree Courses 

The Institute will accept for admission to the freshman class graduates of recog- 
lized high schools having 15 high school credits. 

Degree Courses 

Subjects required for entrance 

1. Prescribed 7 units 

English — 3 units 
Algebra — 1 unit 
Geometry — 1 unit 
U. S. History — 1 unit 
Lab. Science — 1 unit 

2. Optional units 

Mathematics — unlimited 
Science — unlimited 
Social Studies — not more than three 
Foreign Language — not more than three 

Other high school credits — varied and subject to evaluation by the 
faculty committee on admissions 

Diploma and Certificate Courses 

The number of students admitted to these courses will be limited according to 

the number of degree students admitted. 
Requirements for entrance : 

All applicants must have a high school diploma or its equivalent. 
Subjects required for entrance will be determined by the courses to be 

taken. 
All applicants must present with their application a certified transcript of 
their secondary school record. 

Advance Standing 

Applicants will be admitted to advance standing if the following conditions are 
iilfilled: 

The Faculty Committee on Admission must be satisfied that his secondary 

school record meets the entrance requirements of the institute. 
He must present a certified transcript of the work completed at the previous 

college. 
He must have completed all work required of those classes previous to the 

class in which he wishes to enter. 
He must show that work completed at the previous institution is equivalent to 

that given at this institution. 
A minimum of two years resident study must be completed at this institution 

in order for the applicant to receive a degree. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Requirements 

The requirements for graduation are the satisfactory completion of all courses 
in one of the prescribed curricula of the Institute, a total of not less than 160 term 
credits, with not fewer than 160 honor points. 

2. Grading System 

The following grading system shall be used in determining the above: 

A. Excellent, 90-95 

B. Good, 80-90 

C. Passing, 70-79 

D. Passing without credit points, 60-69 
F. Failure, below 60 

Abs. Absent from examination 

Inc. Incomplete. Cannot be given unless student has average "C" on the course 

Wi. Withdrew officially from course 
"Dropped." Dropped without permission or after final date 

3. Explanations 

a — A student absent from a final examination shall not be allowed to make up 
the examination until the instructor receives a notice from the Dean indi- 
cating that the absence was excused. An unexcused absence from examina- 
tion becomes "Fa" on the students record. 

b — "Incomplete" indicates that the student has had an average of "C" or 
above, but has not completed the work specified for the course, has been 
allowed an extension of time by the instructor. The grade of "Incomplete" 
must be replaced by a regular grade the next time the course is given during 
the student's residence, or the "Incomplete" will become a "Failure" "Fi." 

c — A grade of "Fd" is posted if the instructor reports a student has dropped 
a course for which he was scheduled. The student may not have dropped 
the course officially or he may have dropped it after the final date for drop- 
ping courses. 

d — A "Failure" may be made up only by repeating the subject. Such a repeat 
course may be regularly scheduled on the students roster. 

4. Credits and Averages 

The Institute operates on the credit point system. Term credits represent the 
number of hours of work completed successfully; honor points are determined by 
the grade earned: (a) 3 honor points for each credit hour; (b) 2 honor points for 
each credit hour; (c) 1 honor point for each credit hour. In order to be graduated, 
each student is required to have a minimum number of honor points equal to the 
number of credit hours required for graduation in his curriculum. 

a — The scholastic average of e&ch student is determined by the following 
formula: 
(Net honor points minus the number of hours failed) 10 

Credit hours earned plus the number of hours failed 

b — Transfer credits and points are not included in scholastic averages. 

c — Grades of absent count as failures. Grades of incomplete do not count 
at all. 

d — The roster of the student's courses, duly approved, and copies filed with 
the Dean of the Institute, must contain every subject for which the student 
is allowed credit. 

e — No student may exceed a load of 24 hours without the approval of the Dean 
of the Institute, and no student may schedule less than 15 hours without 
the permission of the faculty committee. In computing student loads, non- 
credit courses are included. 

5. Attendance Regulations 

a — Absence 

(1) Being absent from any ONE class shall constitute ONE absence. 

(2) After THREE absences from any one class, the Institute office shall 



(3) 



be notified by the head of the department in which the absence occured 
Any absence shall be considered an unexcused absence unless excused 

by the Dean. v. . « + 

(4) Each THREE unexcused absences from any one class shall auto- 
matically reduce the earned term mark for that subject, ONE grade. 
Example: An "A" will drop to a "B." 

(5) Any recorded unexcused absence shall be corrected to an excused ab- 
sence on the written order of the Dean. 

(6) In case of an absence from any examination and/or quiz period, no 
student shall be permitted to take a makeup one without written per- 
mission of the Dean. 

(7) When THREE UNEXCUSED ABSENCES are reported to the office, 
any student so reported shall be subject to such disciplinary action as 
is deemed necessary by the Dean. 

(8) Only the Dean shall have authority to grant excuses. 

(1) Entering any lecture, laboratory or shop period after the hour that 
class was scheduled shall constitute a tardiness. 

(2) Entering any lecture, laboratory or shop period which is more than 
ONE THIRD in progress shall constitute an absence. 

(3) Three tardy arrivals in any one class shall constitute an absence from 
that class. 

Under certain circumstances, an instructor may dismiss any student or 
students from any class, if in the instructors opinion, the student or students 
work is satisfactorily completed and/or his or their presence is not con- 
ducive to the best efforts and interests of the other students m the class or 
group. 

EXPENSES, TUITION AND FEES 

The tuition for all courses varies according to the residential status of the student. 
For residents of Massachusetts, the rate is one hundred dollars per year, for resi- 
dents of other states, the fee is two hundred and fifty dollars. The rate for all 
foreign students is five hundred dollars. 

All students pay a registration fee of two dollars and titty cents 

Students majoring in chemistry pay a laboratory fee of ten dollars. I hose stu- 
dents majoring in Textile Engineering or machine design pay a laboratory tee ot 
five dollars. In addition to these laboratory fees, all non-residents of Massachusetts 
must pay a ten dollar fee for chemicals. 

All students are assessed a $15.00 athletic fee. 

The cost of books and supplies varies with the type of course and the year in 
which it is taken. This cost is more emphasized during the first year and less em- 
phasized during the remainder of the instructional program. This cost varies from 
approximately fifty dollars to one hundred dollars per year depending, ot course, 
on the aforementioned factors. m . 

Under prevailing conditions it is impossible to estimate the living costs tor stu- 
dents. There are many variable factors and much depends on the standard ot living 
of the student. 

ENDOWMENTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The New Bedford Textile Institute is wholly supported by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts and has no endowments. ■ 

There are four scholarships offered and controlled by the school authorities. 
There are also available about ten other scholarships which are controlled else- 
where. Those which are controlled by the school authorities are as follows : 

William Firth Scholarship Fund: if 1T1 , ' _, . ^ , 

A 3,000 dollar fund deposited in the New Bedford Five Cents Savings Bank. 
Only the interest of this fund may be used for scholarships. 



8 

The Manning Emery, Jr., Scholarship Fund: 

A 3,000 dollars fund deposited in the New Bedford Institution for Savings 
Bank. Only the interest may be used for scholarships. 
The Neuss, Hesslein & Co. Scholarship Fund: 

A 5,000 dollar fund set up by the Neuss, Hesslein and Co. of New York City. 
This is a recent contribution and no action has yet been taken in regard to the 
scholarships to be awarded. 

Everett H. Hinckley Scholarship: 

This is an annual award of 100 dollars made by the New York Chapter of 

the New Bedford Textile Institute Alumni Association. It is offered in memory 

of Everett H. Hinckley, former head of the Institute's Chemistry Department. 

The other scholarships which are offered and controlled elsewhere are offered by 

the New England Textile Foundation and the Berkshire Fine Spinning Company. 

AWARDS 
The National Assocation of Cotton Manufacturers Medal 

The National Association of Cotton Manufacturers offers a medal to be awarded 
each year to the student in the Textile Engineering graduating class who shows the 
greatest proficiency in scholarship. This is determined by an examination of all 
students records and the medal is awarded to that student having the highest aver- 
age according to the credit point system of determining averages. 

The competition for this medal is also open to all evening students who have 
completed the full course of study required for a degree in Textile Engineering. The 
association offering the medal has made it a condition of the award that at least four 
members of the graduating class be eligible to the competition. 

The William E. Hatch Key 

This award is made to the member of the freshman class of Textile Engineering, 
who has the highest credit point average for the year. It is awarded by the Alumni 
Association of the Institute, to commemorate the day of William E. Hatch's retire- 
ment from the presidency of the Institute. 

The Morris H. Crompton Award 

This key is awarded to the student of the graduating class of Machine Design, 
who has the highest four year average according to the credit point system of de- 
termining averages. It is awarded in honor of Morris H. Crompton, former head 
of the Department of Engineering. 

The Fred E. Busby Award 

This key is awarded by the Alumni Association to the student of the graduating 
class of chemistry, who has attained the highest four year average according to the 
credit point system. It is presented in honor of Fred E. Busby, former head of the 
Department of Chemistry. 

ATHLETICS . 

The New Bedford Textile Institute, its administration and faculty, approve and 
encourage a full program of intercollegiate and intramural athletics. The Athletic 
Council, in cooperation with the student council plans, and provides for, the fullest 
possible program of inter-class and inter-fraternity sports. 

Varsity teams include football, baseball, basketball and soccer. The Institute 
schedules for its games, most of the recognized colleges of its athletic class. These 
schedules include many varied and interesting road trips. 

The Faculty Committee on Rules and Regulations strictly enforce the eligibility 
code for membership on athletic teams. This code is based on the Institute's credit 
point system of determining averages. Under this system the student must have an 
average of 65% or better in order to take an active part in athletics. 




Designing 




Microscopy 




Machine Shop Practice 




Weighing 




Chemistry Laboratory 




Physics Laboratory 




Engineering Drawing 




Rayon Testing 




Knitting 




Carding 




Weaving 




Jacquard 




Power Sewing 




Physics Lecture 




Physics Laboratory 






% w 



t i 



? 



I 








English Class 




Machine Shop 



9 
COURSES OF STUDY 

Degree Courses — 4 Years 

1. Textile Engineering 

2. Textile Chemistry 

3. Machine Design 

Diploma Courses — 3 Years 

1. General Textile Manufacturing 

2. Textile Designing 

3. Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing 
4.f[Knit Goods Manufacturing 

Certificate Courses — 2 Years 

1. Textile Technology — primarily for girls 

2. Drafting and Machine Shop Practice 

Evening Courses 

1. Carding and Spinning 

2. Weaving and Designing 

3. Chemistry and Dyeing 

Bachelor of Science 
Major — Textile Engineering 

This course, of four years duration, is especially designed to equip the student 
with the technical and practical background necessary for one who is to enter one 
of the various fields of textile manufacturing, i.e., textile engineering, fabric produc- 
tion, converting, selling, testing, factoring, etc. 

Many years of experience in the field of textile education have resulted in a sys- 
tematically arranged course of study. In order that the student will thoroughly 
understand and intelligently apply the principles involved in modern manufacture 
of fabrics from both natural and man made fibres, he will, in his first two years, pur- 
sue these courses of study which are basic to all engineering, i.e., mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, engineering drawing, English composition, etc. In the interim 
he is gradually introduced to the more elementary phases of fabric construction. 

He is thoroughly instructed in both the theoretical and practical phases of pick- 
ing, carding, drawing and weaving. This work begins with elementary stages in the 
first year and continues through four years to the most advanced stages. Designing 
and cloth analysis are introduced during the second year and the scope is gradually 
broadened through the third and fourth years. The blending of natural and man- 
made fibres of cotton, wool, worsted, rayons, etc., is considered. During the fourth 
year the student studies the processing of rayons, nylon, vinyon and other con- 
tinuous filaments. 

The student must complete other courses of study necessary for one who would 
compete successfully in the textile field. Among these are thorough courses in 
knitting, textile dyeing, merchandising, economics, applied electricity, machine 
tool laboratory practice and modern industrial plant construction. 

A review of the curriculum will reveal a rigid four year schedule. However, past 
experience and the results achieved by our graduates have warranted such a sched- 
ule and have shown that its successful completion is well within the grasp of those 
who will succeed. 



10 



Bachelor of Science 
Major — Textile Engineering 



Course Name 

First Term 
Mathematics M-1A & 2 

(Alg. & Trig.) 
Textile Chemistry TC-101 

(Inorg.) 
English E-l (composition) 
Engineering Drawing ED-1 
United States History H-l 
Textile Engineering TE 1, 7 
& 9 (Cotton Yarn 
Preparation, Yarn Calcu- 
lations & Weaving) 
Engineering EG-20 (Mach. 
tool Lab.) 



CI. hrs. 30; Cr. hrs. 23 



First Term 

Physics P-l 

Mathematics M-4A (Cal- 
culus) 

English E-2 (Tech. reports) 

Textile Chemistry TC-109 
(Dyeing) 

Textile Engineering TE-3A, 
8 & 10 (Cotton Yarn 
Prep; Warp Prep; and 
weaving) 

Textile Designing TD-1, 9 
& 17 (Deisgning, Cloth 
Analysis and Hand Loom) 



CI. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 21.5 



First Year 



CI. Lab. Cr. 



4 4 



5 4 7 
2 1 



Course Name 

Second Term 
Mathematics M-1B & 3 
(Algebra & Analytic 
Geom.) 
Textile Chemistry TC-107 

(Dyeing) 
English E-l 

Engineering Drawing ED-1 
United States History H-l 
Textile Engineering TE-2, 
8A & 10A (Cotton yarn 
prep.; warp prep.; weav- 
ing) 
Engineering Eg-20 (Mach. 
tool lab.) 



Cl. Lab. Cr. 



4 4 



Cl. hrs. 31 ; Cr. hrs. 22 



Third Year 



First Term 

Economics EC-1 2 2 

Textile Designing TD 3, 7 
& 11 (Cloth analy. ; de- 
signing & color) 5 3 6.5 

Textile Engineering TE5A 
& 11 (Weaving; Combing 
& Twisting) 2 7 5.5 

Knitting K-l 1 2 2 

Engineering Eg-5 (Elec- 
tricity) ' 2 2 

Engineering Drawing ED-3 2 1 

Textile Technology TT-3 

(Microscopy) 12 2 



Cl. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 21 



5 4 7 
2 1 



Cl. hrs. 30; Cr. hrs. 23 

Second Year 

Second Term 
3 2 4 Physics P-2 3 2 4 

Mathematics M-4B (Cal- 
2 2 cuius) 2 2 

2 2 English E-3 (Business Writ- 
ing) 2 2 

4 3 Textile Engineering TE-3, 4 
11 & 14 (Cotton Yarn 
prep.; Advanced Calcula- 
tions; Weaving and Cot- 

5 6.5 ton Classing) 4 7 7. 
Textile Chemistry TC-109 

(Dyeing) 1 4 3 

Textile Designing TD-2, 10 
& 17 (Hand loom, design- 
ing and cloth analysis) 2 4 4 



Second Term 

Engineering Eg-5 (Elec- 
tricity) 2 2 

Sociology S-l 2 2 

Economics Ec-2 2 2 

Textile Designing TD 4 & 
12 (Designing & Cloth 
analysis) 4 2 5 

Textile Engineering TE 5B, 
12 & 13 (Weaving; comb- 
ing and Twisting) 2 4 4 

Knitting K-4 1 1 1.5 

Textile Technology TT-1, 2 
and 3 (Fabric testing and 
Microscopy) 16 4 



Cl. hrs. 27; Cr. hrs. 20.5 



11 



Fourth Year 



Course Name 

First Term 
Textile Chemistry TC-118 

(Finishing) 
Knitting K-5 
Textile Engineering TE-13A 

& 17A (Weaving and 

rayon processing) 
Textile Designing TD-5 & 

13 (Cloth Analysis & De- 
signing) 
Textile Engineering TE-11A 

(Applied Research) 
Textile Engineering TE-15A 

(Merchandising) 



Cl. Lab. Cr. 



1 4 3 
1 1 1.5 



1 7 4.5 

2 3 3.5 
6 3 

2 2 



Cl. hrs. 28, Cr. hrs. 17.5 



Course Name 


Cl. 


Lab 


Cr. 


Second Term 








Textile Chemistry TC-118 








(Finishing) 


1 


4 


3 


Knitting K-8 


1 


1 


1.5 


Textile Engineering TE-13B 








& 17B (Weaving and 








Rayon Processing) 


1 


6 


4 


Textile Designing TD-6 & 








14 (Cloth Analysis & De- 








signing) 


3 


3 


4.5 


Textile Engineering TE-11B 








(Applied Research) 





6 


3 


Engineering Eg-17 (Mill 








Eng.) 


1 


2 


2 



Cl. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 18 
Total Cr. Hrs. 149 hrs. 



Bachelor of Science 
Major — Textile Chemistry 

Through a well balanced program of training in the fundamental sciences and the 
humanities, together with the practical application of the principles involved, this 
department trains students for careers in the chemical industries, particularly in 
the field of textile chemistry, dyeing and finishing. 

The curriculum provides a sound fundamental training in the fields of inorganic, 
organic, analytical and textile chemistry. Courses in mathematics, physics, history, 
economics, sociology, merchandising and technical writing yield a well-rounded pro- 
gram which prepared the student for industrial professions or for graduate training. 

Bachelor of Science 
Major — Textile Chemistry 

First Year 

Course Name Cl. Lab. Cr. 

Second Term 
Engineering Drawing ED-2 4 2 
Mathematics M-1B & 3 

(Alg. & Anal. Geometry) 4 4 
Textile Chemistry TC-1 (In- 
organic Chem.) 3 3 
Textile Chemistry TC-2 

(Qual. Anal.) 2 

English E-l 3 

Textile Technology TT-3 

(Microscopy) 1 

United States History H-l 2 



Course Name Cl. 


Lab 


Cr. 


First Term 






Mathematics M-1A & 2 






(Alg. & Trig.) 4 





4 


Chemistry Ch-1 (Inorganic 






Chem.) 3 


6 


6 


English E-l 3 





3 


Engineering Drawing ED-1A 


4 


2 


United States History H-l 2 





2 


Introductory Survey of Tex- 






tiles 1 





1 


Textile Technology TT-3 1 


2 


2 



Cl. hrs. 26; Cr. hrs. 20 



Cl. hrs. 25; Cr. hrs. 20 



12 



Coubse Name CI. Lab. Cr 

First Term 

Physics P-l 3 2 4 

Mathematics M-4A (Cal- 
culus) 2 2 

English E-2 (Tech. reports) 2 2 

Textile Chemistry TC-3 
(Quan. Anal.) 2 

Textile Chemistry TC-13 
(Organic) 1 

Textile Chemistry TC-7 
(Elem. Dyeing) 2 

Textile Designing TD-16 
(Fabric Classification) 1 



CI. hrs. 28; Cr. hrs. 20.5 

First Term 

Economics Ec-1 

Textile Chemistry TC-15 
(Organic) 

Textile Chemistry TC-9 
(Adv. Dyeing) 

Textile Chemistry TC-5 
(Advanced Quan. Analy- 
sis) 

Knitting K-l 

Textile Engineering TE-14 
(Cotton Classing) 

Textile Technology (Cotton 
Mfg.) 



CI. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 19.5 

First Term 
Textile Chemistry TC-16 
Textile Chemistry TC-18 

(Finishing) 
Textile Chemistry TC-11 

(Adv. Dyeing II) 
Textile Chemistry TC-21 

(Thesis) 
Textile Chemistry TC-22 

(Microbiology) 
Textile Engineering TE-15A 

(Merchandising) 



CI. hrs. 35; Cr. hrs. 20.5 



Second Year 

Course Name CI. Lab. Cr. 

Second Term 

Physics P-2 3 2 4 

Mathematics M-4B (Cal- 
culus) 2 2 

English E-3 (Business writ- 
ing) 2 2 

Textile Chemistry TC-4 

(Quan. Analysis) 2 4 4 

Textile Chemistry TC-8 

(Elem. Dyeing) 14 3 

Textile Chemistry TC-14 

(Organic) 14 3 

Textile Designing TD-16 

(Fabric Classification) 1 1 1.5 



4 4 

4 3 

4 4 

1 1.5 



CI. hrs. 27; Cr. hrs. 19.5 



Third Year 



2 





2 


2 


6 


5 


2 


6 


5 


1 
1 


6 



4 
1 


1 


1 


1.5 


1 





1 



Second Term 
Textile Technology TT-1 
Textile Designing TD-7 

(Color) 
Sociology S-l 
Knitting K-5 
Economics Ec-2 
Textile Chemistry TC-20 

(Printing) 
Textile Chemistry TC-10 

(Advanced Dyeing II) 
Textile Chemistry TC-6 

(Advanced Quan. Anal.) 



1 2 2 



1 


1 


1.5 


2 





2 


1 





1 


2 





2 


1 


6 


4 


2 


4 


4 


1 


6 


4 



CI. hrs. 30; Cr. hrs. 20.5 

Fourth Year 

Second Term 
1 6 4 Textile Chemistry (Colloid) 

Textile Chemistry TC-17 
1 6 4 Textile Chemistry TC-19 
(Finishing) 

1 6 4 Textile Chemistry TC-12 

(Adv. Dyeing IV) 
7 3.5 Textile Chemistry TC-21 

(Thesis) 
14 3 Knitting K-10 

Textile Technology TT-2 

2 2 (Ravon Testing) 



1 
1 


2 

6 


2 

4 


1 


6 


4 


1 


6 


4 




1 


7 



3.5 

1 





2 


1 



CI. hrs. 34; Cr. hrs. 19.5 
Total Cr. Hrs. 160 hrs. 



Bachelor of Science 
Major — Machine Design 

Due to the increased demand for men skilled in the field of machine design, the 
original two-year course in Junior Mechanical Engineering has been increased to a 
four-year course. The course has been greatly broadened in scope and includes many 
new academic and technical subjects. The addition of these new subjects, we be- 
lieve, will give the student the necessary background for one who will compete in 
the field of Machine Design. 



13 



The student is trained thoroughly in the field of mathematics, beginning with a 
review of high school algebra and continuing through a practical course in applied 
calculus. These courses in mathematics, particularly the course in trigonometry, 
are designed to meet the problems ordinarily encountered by one engaged in the 
various fields of engineering. 

Full courses in mechanical drawing, geometry of engineering drawing, mechan- 
isms, jig, fixture and tool design are undertaken. As an aid in the better under- 
standing and application of the principles involved in these courses, other subjects 
such as applied engineering mechanics, strength of materials, metallurgy, etc., are 
included in the curriculum. 

In the past few years we have received several requests for men skilled not only 
in machine design but who also had a good basic knowledge of textile machinery. 
With this in mind we have arranged a special course in the textile division of the 
school, to be pursued by all taking the course in machine design. This, we believe, 
will train the student in the general field of machine design and also in the particular 
field of textile machine design. 

As in the past, the student will make frequent trips to a wide variety of industrial 
plants, thereby gaining a first hand knowledge of actual working conditions and 
methods. 

Bachelor of Science 
Major — Machine Design 

First Year 

Couese Name CI. Lab. Cr. 

Second Term 
Mathematics M-1B & 3 

(Alg. & Anal. Geom.) 
Textile Chemistry TC-101 
English E-l 

Engineering Drawing Ed-2 
Engineering Eg-20A (Shop 

Theory & Calc.) 
United States History H-l 
Textile Technology TT-5 

(Cotton Manufacture) 2 1 

Engineering Eg-20 (Mach. 

tool lab.) 4 2 



Coubse Name 


Cl. 


Lab. 


Cr . 


First Term 








Mathematics M-1A & 2 








(Alg. & Trig.) 
Textile Chemistry Ch-101 
English E-l 
Engineering Drawing ED-1 


5 
2 
3 





2 

6 


5 
3 
3 

3 


Engineering Eg-20 (Mach. 

tool lab.) 
Engineering Eg-20A (Shop 

theory & Calc.) 
Jnited States History H-l 
Fextiie Technology TT-5 




1 

2 


4 





2 

1 

2 


(Cotton Manufacture) 





2 


1 



51. hrs. 27; Cr. hrs. 20 



First Term 

Physics P-l 3 2 4 

Mathematics M-4A (Cal- 
culus) 2 2 

Engineering Drawing ED-3 6 3 

English E-2 (Tech. reports) 2 2 

Engineering Eg-21 (Mach. 
tool Lab.) 6 3 

Engineering EG-21 A (Shop 
theory & Calculation) 2 2 

Engineering Eg-lA (Heat & 
Power) " 2 2 3 



2 





2 


3 





3 


2 


2 


3 


3 





3 





6 


3 


1 





1 


2 





2 



Cl. hrs. 27; Cr. hrs. 20 

Second Year 

Second Term 

Physics P-2 3 2 4 

Mathematics M-4B (Cal- 
culus) 2 2 

Engineering Drawing Ed-4 

(Descriptive Geometry) 2 4 3 

English E-3 (Business Writ- 
ing) 2 2 

Engineering Eg-21 (Mach. 

tool lab.) 6 3 

Engineering Eg-21B (Shop 

Theory & Calculation) 2 2 

Engineering Eg-IB (Heat & 

Power) 2 2 3 

Textile Technology TT-3 

(Microscopy) 2 1 



31. hrs. 27; Cr. hrs. 19 



Cl. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 20 



14 



CorESE Name 

First Term 

Sociology S-l 

Economics EC-1 

Engineering Eg-2A (Me- 
chanics) 

Engineering Eg-4 (Metal- 
lurgy) _ 

Engineering Eg-5 (Elec. cir- 
cuits & machines) 

Engineering Eg-7A (Me- 
chanisms) 

Engineering Eg-22 (Mach. 
tool Lab.) 

Knitting K-l (Machinery) 



CI. hrs. 25; O. hrs. 19.5 



First Term 

Engineering Eg-9 (Jig, Fix 
ture & Tool Design) 

Engineering Eg-11 (con 
tracts) 

Engineering Eg-23 (Mach 
tool lab.) 

Engineering Eg-lOA (Ma- 
chine design) 

CI. hrs. 35; Cr. hrs. 20 





Third Year 


Cl. 


Lab 


Cr. 


Coubse Name 

Second Term 


2 





2 


Economics Ec-2 


2 
3 
1 







2 
3 

1 


Engineering Eg-2B (Me- 
chanics) 

Engineering Eg-3 (Strength 
of Materials) 

Engineering Eg-7B (Me- 
chanisms) 


3 


2 


4 


Engineering Eg-8 (Tool in- 


2 




4 
4 


4 
2 


spection) 
Knitting K-l (Machinery) 
Engineering Eg-6 (pattern 

making) 


1 


1 


1.5 


Engineering Drawing ED-8 
(Electrical Drafting) 



2 12 


8 


1 


1 


8 


4 


2 10 


7 



I Cl. hrs. 29; Cr. hrs. 21.5 

Fourth Year 

Second Term 
Engineering Eg-lOB (Ma- 
chine Design) 
Engineering Eg-23A (Ma- 
chine tool lab.) 
Engineering Eg-12 (Indus- 
trial Plants) 



Cl. Lab. Cr. 

2 2 



1 3 
1 4 



1 3 2.5 

1 1 1.5 



2.5 
3 



2 12 8 

8 4 

1 2 2 



Engineering Eg-15 (Thesis) 12 6 



Cl. hrs. 37; Cr. hrs. 20 
Total Cr. Hrs. 160 hrs. 



General Textile Manufacturing 
Diploma — 3 years 

First Year 



First Term 



Pickers and Cards TE-1 
Weaving TE-9 
Cloth Analysis TD-9 
Designing TD-1 
Hand Loom TD-1 7 
Mechanics E-l 
Mechanical Drawing E-3 
Slide Rule E-2 
Chemistry TC-101 
Yarn Calculations TE-7 
Microscopy TT-3 
Rayon Testing TT-2 



Hrs. per 
week 

&A 

3 

13^2 

i 

i 

6 

Hi 

Hi 

35 



Second Term 



Cards and Drawing Frames TE 
Weaving TE-10 
Warp Preparation TE-8 
Designing TD-2 
Cloth Analysis TD-10 
Hand Loom TD-17 
Mechanical Drawing E-3 
Elementary Dyeing TC-107 
Microscopy TT-3 
Rayon Testing TT-2 



Hrs. per 

week 
■2 4^ 

sy 2 

3 

iy 2 

6 
2 
3 



35 



15 



Second Year 



First Term 



Roving and Spinning Frames 

TE-3 
Weaving TE-10 
Designing TD-3 
Cloth Analysis TD-11 
Machine Drawing E-4 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Steam Engineering E-13 
Advanced Dyeing TC-109 
Microscopy TT-3 



Hrs. per 

week 

*A 

3 

3 

2V 2 

1 
5 
2 



31 



Second Term 



Advanced Calculations TE-4 
Applied Research TE-6 
Cotton Classing TE-14 
Weaving TE-11 
Designing TD-4 
Cloth Analysis TD-12 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Machine Drawing E-4 
Steam Engineering E-13 
Physical Testing TT-1 
Advanced Dyeing TC-109 



Third Year 



First Term 



Combing and Twisting TE-5 

Weaving TE-11 

Designing TD-5 

Color TD-7 

Cloth Analysis TD-13 

Electricity E-16 

Knitting K-10 

Rayon Processing TE-17 

Merchandising TE-15 

Economics TE-16 



Hrs. per 
week 

%A 
VA 

2 

3 
3 

Hi 
Hi 



S2A 



Second Term 



Applied Research TE-6 
Weaving TE-12, 13 
Designing TD-6 
Color TD-8 
Cloth Analysis TD-14 
Mill Engineering E-17 
Textile Finishing TC-118 
Rayon Processing TE-17 
Merchandising TE-15 
Economics TE-16 



Textile Designing Course 
Diploma — 3 years 

First Year 



Hrs. per 
week 

2 ■ 

3 . 
2 

±A 

3 

3 

2A 

i 

Hi 

5 



31 



Hrs. per 

week 
8 

$A 
3A 
2 

3 
3 

2 
2 ,' 

Hi 
ha 



33 



First Term 




Second Term 




Hrs. per 


Hrs. per 




week 


week t 


Pickers and Cards TE-1 


3 


Cards and Drawing Frames TE-2 %A 


Weaving TE-9 


QA 


Weaving TE-10 6^ 


Cloth Analysis TD-9 


3 


Warp Preparation TE-8 ' Z l A 


Designing TD-1 


3 


Designing TD-2 2]/ 2 


Hand Loom TD-17 


IA 


Cloth Analysis TD-10 3 


Mechanics E-l 


1 


Hand Loom TD-17 V/%: 


Slide Rule E-2 


1 


Mechanical Drawing E-3 %A 


Mechanical Drawing E-3 


W2 


Elementary Dyeing TC-107 6 


Yarn Calculations TE-7 


Hi 


Microscopy TT-3 2 


General Chemistry TC-101 


6 


Rayon Testing TT-2 3 


Microscopy TT-3 


Hi 




Rayon Testing TT-2 


W* 





35 



35 



16 





Second Year 




First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Roving and Spinning Frames TE-3 SA 


Advanced Calculations TE-4 


2 


Weaving TE-10 


&A 


Cotton Classing TE-14 


iy 2 


Designing TD-3 


&A 


Weaving TE-11 


8 


Color TD-7 


2 


Designing TD-4 


3 


Cloth Analysis TD-11, 12 


±A 


Color TD-8 


2 


Rayon Testing TT-2 


3 


Cloth Analysis TD-13 


5 


Machine Drawing E-4 


2 


Machine Shop Practice E-10 


&A 


Machine-shop Practice E-10 


m 


Machine Drawing E-4 


2 


Steam Engineering E-13 


i 


Steam Engineering E-13 


1 


Advanced Dyeing TC-109 


5 


Physical Testing TT-1 


iy 2 






Advanced Dyeing TC-109 


5 




343^ 




34^ 




Third Year 




First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Weaving TE-12 


6 


Weaving TE-12 


$A 


Jacquard Designing TD-5 


§A 


Jacquard Designing TD-6 


8 


Cloth Analysis TD-14 


8 


Cloth Analvsis TD-14 


5 


Knitting K-10 


2 


Styling TD-15 


W2 


Color TD-8 


2 


Mill Engineering E-17 


3 


Machine-shop Practice E-10 


3H 


Merchandising TE-15 


VA 


Electricity E-16 


lA 


Economics TE-16 


m 


Merchandising TE-15 


m 


Physical Testing TT-1 


2 


Economics TE-16 


m 


Textile Finishing TC-118 


2 



32M 



33 



Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing 
Diploma — 3 years 

First Year 



First Term 



Mechanics E-l 
Mechanical Drawing E-3 
Inorganic Chemistry TC-1 
Designing and Cloth Analysis 

TD-1 
Slide Rule 
Microscopy TT-3 



Hrs. per 

week 

1 

9 

3^ 
1 

3M 
19 



Second Term 



Mechanical Drawing E-3 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Qualitative Analysis TC-2 
Microscopy TT-3 
Inorganic Chemistry 



Hrs. per 

week 

Wz 

3 

6 

VA 
3 



19 



17 



Second Year 



First Term 





Hrs. per 




week 


Color TD-7 


2 


Machine Drawing E-4 


2 


Machine-shop Practice E-10 


3 


Steam Engineering E-13 


1 


Quantitative Analysis TC-3 


6 


Organic Chemistry TC-13 


5 


Dyeing TC-7 


6 



First Term 
Physical Testing TT-1 
Electricity E-16 
Dyeing TC-9 
Organic Chemistry TC-15 
Merchandising TE-15 
Economics TE-16 
Advanced Quantitative TC- 



Second Term 



Color TD-8 

Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Machine Drawing E-4 
Steam Engineering E-13 
Dyeing TC-8 
Organic Chemistry TC-14 
Cotton Classing TE-14 
Cotton Manufacturing TT-5 
Quantitative Analysis TC-4 



25 

Third Year 



3 

8 
8 

\y 2 
m 

7 
30^ 



Second Term 
Textile Printing TC-20 
Merchandising TE-15 
Economics TE-16 
Advanced Dyeing TC-10 
Advanced Quantitative TC-6 



Hrs. per 
week 
2 
3 
2. 
1 
5 
5 
2 

Hi 

6 

27^ 



7 

iy 2 

6 

7 



23 



Knit Goods Manufacturing 
Diploma — 3 years 

First Year 



First Term 



Pickers and Cards TE-1 
Mechanics E-l 
Mechanical Drawing E-3 
General Chemistry TC-101 
Knitting K-l, 5 
Yarn Calculations TE-7 
Microscopy TT-3 
Rayon Testing TT-2 



First Term 



Roving and Spinning Frames 

TE-3 
Machine Drawing E-4 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Steam Engineering E-13 
Advanced Dyeing TC-109 
Knitting K-2, 6 
Microscopy TT-3 
Rayon Testing TT-2 



Hrs. per 
week 

1 

V/2 



"2 

iy 2 

iy 2 

3 

31M 



Second Year 



Second Term 



Cards and Draw Frames TE-2 
Mechanical Drawing E-3 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Elementary Dyeing TC-107 
Knitting K-l, 5 
Microscopy TT-3 
Rayon Testing TT-2 



Hrs. per 

week 

2 

sy 2 
i 

5 

&y 2 

2 
3 

31« 



Second Term 



Advanced Calculations TE-4 
Applied Research TE-6 
Cotton Classing TE-14 
Machine-shop Practice E-10 
Machine Drawing E-4 
Steam Engineering E-13 
Knitting K-3, 7 
Physical Testing TT-1 
Advanced Dyeing TC-109 



Hrs. per 
week 

3 
6 
10 
2 
3 



32 



Hrs. per 

week 

2 

3 

iy 2 
*y 2 

2 

1 

ny 2 

5 
31 





18 
Third Year 




First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Machine Shop Practice E-10 


&A 


Mill Engineering E-17 


3 


Electricity E-16 


IX 


Dyeing TC-12 


7 


Dyeing TC-12 


7 


Knitting K-4, 8, 9 


18 


Knitting K-4, 8, 9 


20 


Color TD-8 


2 


Color TD-8 


2 


Microscopy TT-3 


6 


Microscopy TT-3 


2 








36 




36 


Textile Technology 


Course for Girls 






Certificate — 2 years 






First Year 




First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Cotton Manufacture TT-5 


m 


Weaving TE-9 


IK 


Yarn Calculations TE-7 


m 


Designing TD-2 


3 


Weaving TE-9 


2 


Cloth Analysis TD-10 


3 


Designing TD-1 


ty 2 


Color TD-8 


2 


Cloth Analysis TD-9 


3 


Textile Fabrics TD-16 


2 • 


Color TD-7 


2 


Elementary Dyeing TC-107 


6 


Textile Fabrics TD-16 


3 


Physical Testing TT-1 


3 


General Chemistry TC-101 


6 


Rayon Testing TT-2 


63^ 


Physical Testing TT-1 


Hi 


Microscopy TT-3 


3 


Rayon Testing TT-2 


5 






Microscopy TT-3 


3 






Hand Loom TD-17 


m 








31Ji 

Seconi 


) Year 


30 


First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Designing TD-3 


3 


Designing TD-4 


3 


Jacquard Designing TD-5 


sy 2 


Jacquard Designing TD-6 


2y 2 


Cloth Analysis 


3 


Cloth Analysis TD-12 


3 


Styling TD-15 


2 


Styling TD-15 


iy 2 


Retailing TT-4 


2 


Retailing TT-4 


i 


Economics TE-16 


Hi 


Economics TE-16 


iy 2 


Merchandising TE-15 


Hi 


Merchandising TE-15 


m 


Physical Testing TT-1 


3 


Rayon Testing TT-2 


3 


Rayon Testing TT-2 


3 


Microscopy TT-3 


3M 


Microscopy TT-3 


5 


Physical Testing TT-1 


3 


Weaving TE-10 


Hi 


Cotton Classing TE-14 


1 


Quantitative Analysis TC-103 


4 


Weaving TE-11 


m 






Textile Printing TC-120 


5 



33 



31 



19 



Drafting and Machine Shop Practice 
Certificate — 2 years 

First Year 



First Term 




Second Term 






Hrs. per 




Hrs. per 




week 




week 


Mathematics M-l-S 


4 


Mathematics M2-S 


4 


Physics Pl-S 


2 


Physics P-2S 


2 


Slide Rule E-2 


1 


Engineering Drawing ED-3S 


12 


Engineering ED-IS 


12 


Machine Shop MS-2 


14K 


Machine Shop MS-1 


13K 








32^ 




32^ 




Second Year 




First Term 




Second Term 




Steam Engineering EG-1A 


3 




Hrs. per 


Electricity EG-5 


3 




week 


Engineering Drawing EG-3 


11 


Steem Engineering EG-1B 


3 


Machine Shop M-3 


12 


Electricity EG-5 


3 


Microscopy TT-3 


2 


Engineering Drawing ED-5S 


12 


Economics TE-16 


IK 


Machine Shop MS-4 


13 






Economics TE-16 


V/2 



32^ 



32^ 



EVENING COURSES 

A diploma will be awarded to those students of the evening classes who success- 
fully complete the work specified under the following courses: 

1 — Carding and Spinning. Picking, Carding and Drawing, Roving Frames, 

Combing, Ring Spinning and Twisting, Physical Testing, Cotton Classing, 
Advanced Calculations in Carding and Spinning, Mechanical Drawing and 
Advanced Drawing. 

2 — Weaving and Designing. Spooling, Warping and Slashing, Plain Loom 

Fixing, Fancy Loom Fixing, Elementary Designing and Cloth Analysis, Ad- 
vanced Designing and Cloth Analysis, Jacquard Designing, Mechanical Draw- 
ing, Advanced Drawing and Cost Finding. 

3 — Chemistry and Dyeing. General Chemistry, Qualitative Analysis, Quanti- 

tative Analysis, Organic Chemistry, Textile Chemistry 1, Textile Chemistry 11, 
Dyeing 1, Dyeing 11, Dyeing 111, Mechanical Drawing and Advanced Draw- 
ing. 



20 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

TE-1 Pickers and Cards 

Cotton yarn mill machinery. Lists of processes in cotton mills for different num- 
bers of yarn. Proper sequence of processes. 

Objects of blending cotton. Methods of mixing same. 

Methods of blending and mixing the different types of synthetic fibers. 

Bale breakers and opening and cleaning machinery. Picker rooms. Automatic 
feeders, construction, capacity and suitability for the purpose intended. Various 
styles of openers, their use and object. Connection of feeders to openers. The vari- 
ous types of cleaning trunks. 

Calculations in connection with openers, breaker pickers, intermediate and fin- 
isher pickers, and single process pickers with blending reserve. 

Construction of aprons, beaters, bars, screens, fans, lap heads, evener motions, 
measuring motions, etc. The setting and adjusting of the different parts of these 
machines. 

The revolving top flat card. Its principal parts described, including feed, licker-in, 
cylinder, doffer, coiler, screens and flats. Different setting arrangements. Calcula- 
tions in connection with all types of cotton cards. 

Clothing, grinding, setting and stripping cards. 

TE-2 Cards and Drawing Frames 

Study of Cards continued. 

Drawing frame roller drafting, setting and calculations. Method of arranging 
and constructing drawing frames, its use and objects. Gearing, types of weighing 
and stop motions. Varieties of rolls. 

TE-3 Roving and Spinning Frames 

Slubbers, first and second intermediates, inter-draft, super-draft, long draft, 
roving frames and jack frames. The construction and use of these machines. Calcu- 
lations in connection therewith. Changing, fixing and re-setting frames, etc. 

The ring spinning frame, its construction and use. Its principal parts, as creels, 
rolls, rings, travelers, speeds, builder motions, calculations, etc. 

TE-4 Advanced Calculations and Costs 

Figuring the number of doublings and amount of draft required from picker to 
spinning frames. 

Calculations for organization of machinery required for different counts of yarn. 
Amount of production and cost of production of yarn. 

Practice work consists of running work from picker to spinning frames. 

TE-5A Combers and Twisters 

The object of twisting. Wet and Dry Twisting. The different methods of pre- 
paring yarns for twisting. The direction and amount of twist in different ply and 
cord threads. Size of rings and travelers for the different counts of yarn. Calcula- 
tions for twist and production. 

TE-5B 

Sliver and Ribbon Lap machines. Construction of the different types of Comb- 
ers. Methods of setting, adjusting and operation of these machines, and calcula- 
tions in connection therewith. 

TE-6 Applied Research 

Research as applied to one or more machines consists of running original work, in 
laying out the machines to be used for the different types of yarns, as regards speeds, 
weights, etc., from the raw stock to the finished yarn. Tests at the different pro- 
cesses. Methods of testing. Blending and running all kinds of natural and synthetic 
fibers. 



21 

TE-7 Yarn Calculations 

Methods to establish the Count, Weight, or Length in all the different types of 
fibers are given with examples. Equivalent yarn numbering systems. New Fiber 
systems. Suggested system for universal numbering of all yarns. » 

TE-8 Warp Preparation 

Spooling or winding — The various types of packaging explained on the machine 
with respect to cost and manner of usage in the next preparatory manufacturing 
step. 

Warping — High speed warping from cones, and slow speed from spools is 
taught, with the necessary instructions for production and cost figuring. Warping 
with the Silk system. 

Slashing — The need for sizing. Methods of sizing. Difference in requirements as 
to heat, kind of size, and methods of operation with the various kinds of fibers. 
Cotton methods. Rayon methods. Silk methods. 

TE-9. Plain Looms 

The primary movements required in weaving. Elementary power loom construc- 
tion. Shedding by Cams. Plain Cams. Twill and Satin Cams. Side cams. Split 
time cams. Double set cams. Construction of cams for special conditions. Timing 
of cams and its effect on the cloth. Methods of calculations for gearing of different 
cam drives. Picking motions. 

Bat-wing and cone motions in detail from a practical weaving basis. 

Shuttles — Different kinds of shuttles. Woods and other materials used in their 
manufacture. Care and treatment of shuttles. 

Protector motions. 

Reeds — Calculations for reeds. Care of reeds. 

Take-up motions — Various kinds, with the necessary calculations to insure the 
greatest range of use. 

Filling stop motions of all types. 

Temples — The various types and makes and their distinctive features. The 
operation and maintenance of plain cam looms. Starting of warps. Faults and 
remedies in weaving and loom fixing. 

Discussions on general loom accessories. 

TE-10. Dobby and Box Looms 

Looms with a much greater range of pattern than the cam loom. The dobby 
shedding machine. Dobby construction, with the timings and settings necessary 
for correct operation. Single and Double Index. Chain pegging and reading. Box 
looms. Different kinds of drop box mechanisms. Practical settings, with the best 
operational methods for the different types. Multiplier motions as applied to box 
looms. Dobby box looms with special weave mechanisms for such weaves as hand- 
kerchiefs, terry and other toweling, curtains, etc. 

TE-11. Automatic Filling Change Looms 

Draper looms of numerous models. Maintenance, operation, and possibilities of 
the different models of Draper looms. Practical settings for the feeler and transfer 
mechanisms. Warp stop motions. Various types of mechanical beam tension 
control. 

Crompton and Knowles multiple box looms, with automatic selective filling 
transfer. All of the required settings for complete loom operation. Chain building 
and co-ordination for varied patterns. Stafford shuttle changing looms. All set- 
tings for the shuttle changing mechanisms explained in detail. 

Student assembly and operation of all the above looms. 

TE-12. Jacquards 

The principle of construction of Jacquard machines. Single and double lift ma- 
chines. Jacquard machines for special purposes. Principles of harness tying. Lay- 



22 

over, Center tie, etc. Care and treatment of harness lines. Practical work in cutting 
cards and weaving the students' own designs. Double cylinder Jacquard construc- 
tion and operation with a 4 x 1 automatic box loom and center filling motion. 

TE-13. Special Mechanisms and Costing 

Dobby looms with leno mechanisms for the weaving of all pattern lenos. Re- 
quirements and methods for the weaving of lenos on Jacquard looms. 

Analysis and application of direct and indirect weave room costs. 

"Weaving yarn requirements and the preparatory machinery necessary to produce 
it. 

Weave room operation and management under different product, labor, and 
power conditions. 

Room lay-outs best suited to different kinds of product. 

TE-14. Cotton Classing 

Different species of cotton plants. Cultivation of cotton. The different varieties 
of cotton and the classes of goods for which they are best adapted. Cotton picking, 
ginning and marketing. The selection of cotton for different classes of goods. 
Cotton grading and stapling. 

TE-15. Merchandising 

Products, trade marks, markets, distribution, broker, commission house, adver- 
tising, seasons, pricing, market analysis, business policies, price charts. 

TE-16. Economics 

Problems in textile management, production, labor. relations, social, accident 
and fire insurance, stabilization, business policies, depreciation and obsolescence, 
financial setup, taxes, tax returns. 

TE-17. Rayon Processing 

Raw materials, from which the various raj^ons are produced, and the steps in 
the manufacture of rayon yarn from the raw material to the filament and yarn 
form comprise the first part of this subject. Included in this part is the study of 
the chemical treatments and reactions which occur during the evolution from solid 
raw material through the rayon solution and finally into the regenerated solid form 
of rayon yarn. The second part of this subject covers the various conditioning and 
preparatory processes applied to the rayon yarns which are necessary in the pro- 
duction of rayon fabrics. These processes include soaking, spooling, throwing, 
winding, warping and slashing of rayon yarns. 

TD-1. Designing 

Definitions of the words and terms used in designing and analysis. Character- 
istics of the various classes of fabrics. Design paper and its application to design- 
ing and analysis. Cloth structure, with a study of the various sources from which 
the patterns of fabrics are obtained. Twills. Wave effects. Diamonds. Sateens. 
Granites. Checkerboards. Rearranged twills. Figured twills. 

TD-2. Designing 

Designing for single fabrics continued, such as honeycombs. Mock and imita- 
tion lenos. Entwining twills. Spots weaves arranged in various orders. Cord 
weaves. Imitation welts. Elongated twills. Check effects. Corkscrew weaves. 
Four change system of designing. Damask weaves. 

TD-3. Designing 

Designing for more complicated fabrics, such as figure fabrics, using extra ma- 
terials. Fabrics backed with extra material. Fabrics having the face and back of 
different material or pattern. Double plain fabrics. Reversible fabrics. Em- 
bossed effects, such as Bedford cords, piques, Marseilles weaves. 



23 

TD-4. Designing 

Designing for leno, pile and lappet fabrics, such as methods of obtaining leno 
patterns. Mechanical appliances for the production of lenos, yoke and jumper 
motions. Bottom doups. Top doups. Check lenos. Jacquard leno-effects. 
Weaving with wire doups. Weaving with the bead motion. Russian cords. 
Marquisettes. Full turn lenos. 

Pile fabrics, such as velveteens, corduroys, velvets, plushes, carpets, terry 
toweling. 

TD-5. Jacquard Designing 

Design paper. How to figure the design paper necessary to reproduce any 
Jacquard pattern. Defects of Jacquard patterns and how to avoid them. Trans- 
ferring designs to plain paper. Transferring sketches to design paper. Changing 
the sley of Jacquard fabrics. Method of casting out. Ground weaves. Rules 
for finding sley, pick, warp and filling. Foundations upon which Jacquard pat- 
terns are based. 

TD-6. Jacquard Designing. 

Different methods of making designs. Sketching original designs by the differ- 
ent methods commonly used. Working out the sketches upon design paper. Cut- 
ting cards on the piano card-cutting machine. Card lacing. Weaving of at least 
one original design. Method of weaving Jacquard leno designs. Mechanisms re- 
quired in weaving Jacquard lenos. Making Jacquard leno designs. 

Harness tying. Various systems of tying Jacquard harnesses. Lay-over ties. 
Center ties. Compound ties. 

TD-7. Color 
Theory of colors. Complementary colors. Hue, value and chroma scales. 
Practical work in color scales. 

TD-8. Color 

Nunsell system of coloring. Color harmony, color effects. Analyzing color 
effects. Practical work in making sequences and in producing colored designs. 

TD-9. Analysis 

Standard methods of representing harness and reed drafts. Harness drafts on 
design paper. Written harness drafts. Chain drafts. Layout plans. Finding 
weight of warp yarns, weight of filling yarns. Yards per pound of cloth. 

TD-10. Analysis 

Finding counts of warp and filling b}' various methods. Finding yards per pound 
of cloth from a small sample by weighing. Making original designs and weaving 
them on the power loom. Reproduction of woven samples. 

TD-11. Analysis 

Analyzing more difficult samples. Methods of analysis on various rayon fabrics. 
Finding average counts. Percentage of each material. Production of loom. Price 
per yard for weaving. Weaving of more difficult original designs. 

TD-12. Analysis 

Analysis of leno fabrics, making both written drafts and harness drafts on de- 
sign paper. Chain drafts. Weaving of original leno designs. Changing the con- 
struction of fabrics and preserving balance of structure. 

TD-13. Analysis 

Analysis of more difficult samples continued. Weaving of original samples. 
Work on changing over samples to different constructions. 



24 

TD-14. Analysis 

Continuation of the work outlined in TD-13. Weaving of students' original 
Jacquard designs. Work on cost of manufacturing fabrics. 

TD-15. Styling 

Study of common fabrics. Application of cloth analysis to the requirements of a 
converter or of a commission house. 

Methods of ascertaining counts of warp and filling; also sley and pick for new 
fabrics. 

Determining use of colored yarns in striped and figured fabrics with relation to 
cost of dyed yarns and woven colored patterns. 

This is a continuation of analysis. Changing the construction of fabrics. Making 
sketches for alteration of fabrics. Finding cost of fabrics. 

TD-16. Fabric Classification 

A study of the characteristics of a wide range of staple fabrics made of cotton, 
wool, rayon, silk, nylon, aralac, glass and other fibers. In this subject, the student 
is supplied with samples of the various materials together with the information per- 
taining to their characteristics such as construction, composition, weave, perform- 
ance and uses. At the conclusion of the subject, the student has a notebook con- 
taining about 300 samples of staple cloths and the data applying to each sample. 

TD-17. Hand Loom 

The hand loom, its construction and use. Harness drafts as affecting the weave. 
Building harness chains. Practice on the hand loom in weaving fabrics from original 
and other designs, and putting into practice the designing lessons. 

TT-1. Physical Testing 

This course is a study of the best methods recognized in the textile industry for 
testing cottons, sliver, roving, yarns and fabrics. It includes atmospheric condi- 
tions and their effect on carding, spinning, weaving and testing; determining mois- 
ture content and regain. Tensile strength in single, ply and cord yarns. Breaking 
load of fabrics by the grab, strip and cut strip methods. Serigraphing of yarns. 
Analysis of twists. Fiber sorting of raw material and of yarns to analyze whether 
carded or combed. Identification of fibers. Weight of fabric in square yards and 
linear yards. Yarn counts in .fabrics and skeins. Expansion, contraction and 
elasticity. 

TT-2. Rayon Testing 

This includes testing of other sjmthetic fibers such as nylon, vinyon, aralac, etc. 
This subject covers methods of tests for construction, weight, fiber identification and 
content, yarn sizes, filament count, yarn twist, fabric strength, yarn slippage, color 
fastness, shrinkage and all other tests conducted for determining quality and per- 
formance of fabrics. Wherever available, test methods taught are the accepted 
standard procedures. Analysis of knit fabrics and hosiery included. 

TT-3. Microscopy 

The object of this course is to instruct the student in the use and manipulation of 
the microscope. Methods of mounting, cross sectioning, micrometry, camera lucida 
drawings, calibration, measuring and counting are taken up. 

Instruction is also given in photomicrography; that is, the taking of photographs 
through the microscope, in developing and printing, obtaining the magnifications 
and enlarging. 

On completion of the above the student is given yarns and fabrics, which are 
unfamiliar to him or which have defects, to analyze. 

TT-4. Retailing 

This subject is included in the girls' course to give the student, who desires to 
make use of her textile training in a career within the field of retailing, a knowledge 



25 

of the principles of retailing. Buying and merchandising are stressed. A study of 
the data to use in composing labels for merchandise to conform with an informative 
selling program is made. 

TT-5. Cotton Manufacture 

Cotton Manufacture is the name assigned to a course of lectures given to the first 
year students in Textile Technology and the second year students in Chemistry, so 
that they may become acquainted with the methods employed in the manufacture 
of cotton yarn and cloth. The various machines are thoroughly described and the 
methods of using them discussed in the lecture room. Because of the limited amount 
of time allowed for this subject, the students are not taught to operate the machines, 
but are given an opportunity to examine them at rest and later to observe them in 
operation. 

TT-6. Freehand Drawing 

This consists of a study of procedures used in the creation of original patterns in 
sketch form. Several types of exercises are carried out to make the student familiar 
with the use of the pencil in decorative designing for textiles. The principles of 
design and the forms of application are studied. The students produce several 
original sketches of print patterns, shirtings, dress patterns and others, both with 
and without the use of color. 

K-l. Elementary Knitting 

A study of the various types of winding machines used for cotton, wool and 
synthetic yarns preparatory to running on hosiery knitting machines. 

K-2 Needle Study 

A complete study of the latch and spring board needles, and full knowledge of 
insides on all types of knitting machines. 

K-3 Hosiery Finishing 

Fundamental principles and a study of various types of loopers, fine and coarse 
gauge, for circular and full fashioned hose, and back seaming for full fashioned hose. 

K-4 Hosiery Manufacture 

Winding, inspection, pairing, stamping, folding, boarding and boxing, manage- 
ment and the handling of knitted goods throughout the mill. 

K-5 Underwear Finishing 

A study of the various finishes used on underwear, setting-up, adjusting and study 
of the various types and makes of sewing machines used in the manufacture of 
underwear. 

K-6 Warp Knitting 

A study of the construction of a warp knitting machine, timing and warp making, 
designing of the warp and of the pattern wheel. 

K-7 Circular Knit Underwear 

A study of a plain Jersey stitch and rib stitch machine, sweater machines and 
Jacquard sweater machines. 

K-8 Circular Knit Hose 

A study of circular hose and half hose to the point of study of rib top and applying 
top to machine and completing the hose to the looping operation. 

K-9 Full Fashioned Hose 

A study of ladies' full fashioned hose to the point of size, style and operation of 
machines and their upkeep and learning to loop and backseam. 



26 

K-10A K-lOB Dyeing and Finishing 

The final study of the dyeing of nylon and synthetic, washing and boarding of 
hose and knitted goods. 

TC-1 TC-1L Inorganic Chemistry 

This course is required of those students enrolled for the Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry Degree. The course is divided into two sections. Section I is taken dur- 
ing the first three months of the 1st semester and comprises a thorough study of 
basic chemical facts (study of matter, atomic structure and its applications to 
chemical reactions, the states of matter, solutions and equilibrium; certain elements 
and their compounds are studied in order to show more clearly the relation between 
theory and practice) . Section II is taken during the last month of the 1st semester 
and comprises a study of the manufacture of chemical materials of importance to 
Textile Chemists (acetic acid, sulfuric acid, soda ash, caustic soda, the artificial 
fibers, etc.). The laboratory work associated with TC-1 is designed to accompany 
the lectures very closely and thus enable the student to better learn the facts and 
theories they are studying. 

TC-2 TC-2L Qualitative Analysis 

This course enables the student to tell what inorganic, and a few organic, sub- 
stances are present in a compound. The latest semi-micro technique of analysis 
is used. In the laboratory the student applies what he has studied in the analysis 
of both "known" and "unknown" materials. Problem work dealing with equilibrium 
and the other important phases of qualitative analysis is stressed and the student is 
taught how to think for himself. 

TC-3 TC-3L Quantitative Analysis 

The lectures in this course comprise a thorough and complete discussion of the 
theories of solutions, a quantitative approach to oxidation reduction reactions 
(redox reactions) and a study of some precipitation methods. The laboratory work 
is an application of the lectures. It consists of the calibration of the columetric ware 
used and the analysis of materials by neutralization, oxidation-reduction and pre- 
cipitation methods. Quality rather than quantity is stressed . 

TC-4 TC-4L Quantitative Analysis II 

This course is a continuation of TC-3 and consists of a study of the gravimetric 
methods of analysis. 

TC-5 TC-5L Advanced Quantitative Analysis 

TC-6 TC-6L Advanced Quantitative Analysis II 

These are primarily laboratory courses in which the student analyzes many ma- 
terials of a more advanced nature than encountered in TC-3 and 4. He employs 
many methods used in commercial practice and analyzes ores, silicate rocks, min- 
erals, etc. The student uses electroanalysis, photometry, colorimetry and gas 
analysis. He also studies more at length and more deeply certain special topics of 
Quantitative Analysis (indicators, redox equilibrium, etc.). Frequent reference is 
made to recent advances and discoveries in current chemical literature. 

TC-7 TC-7L Elementary Dyeing 

This course consists of (1) a study of the physical and chemical constitution of 
the textile fibers, both natural and artificial; (2) a study of the action of physical 
and chemical agents upon the fibers; and (3) a study of the methods of application 
and the effect of the various classes of dyes upon fibers. 

TC-8 TC-8L Elementary Dyeing II 

This course, which is a continuation of TC-5, teaches the student how to process 
the various fibers; how to test the dyed fibers for the various characteristics and how 



27 

to enhance certain of these characteristics by special treatment of the fibers, before 
and or after dyeing. 

TC-9 TC-9L TC-10 TC-10L Advanced Dyeing I & II 

In this course the student learns how to dye various textile fiber combinations 
(cotton and wool, cotton and rayon, acetate and rayon, etc.). Various types of 
dyes are used, natural, mineral, coal tar, singly or in combination. The student 
also learns how to obtain maximum benefits from the various classes of dyes as 
applied to the various fibers in combination. 

TC-11 TG-11L Advanced Dyeing III 

The theory and practice of color matching are principally emphasized in this 
course. The student is taught proper method of obtaining a given shade by using a 
combination of several dyes. The testing of various classes of dyestuffs for their 
coloring powers and money value is included. The characteristics of the various 
dyestuff combinations is considered. 

TC-12 TC-12L Advanced Dyeing IV 
Dyeing of Knit Goods 

This course primarily teaches the student how to dye all types of knit goods 
(hosiery, sweaters, sleeving, etc.). Lectures describing the various processes are 
given, and the necessaiy claculations are taught in connection with this course. 
Scouring and bleaching are also taught. The student is required to make use of the 
knowledge acquired in the previous courses in dyeing. 

TC-13 TC-13L Organic Chemistry 

This course consists of a study of those compounds of carbon comprising what 
is known as the "aliphatic" family. Particular stress is placed upon structural 
formulas the while a classification of properties and group reactions is made. The 
laboratory course comprises a study of the more common methods of synthesis, the 
preparations exemplifying the principles studied in the lectures. 

TC-14 TC-14L Organic Chemistry II 

This course is a continuation of TC-13 in which compounds of carbon constituting 
the "aromatic" family and also certain heterocyclic compounds are studied. 

TC-15 TC-15L Organic Chemistry III 
Manufacturing of Dyes and Intermediates 

This course is a specialized continuation of TC-13 and TC-14. It deals with the 
chemical nature of dyes, their preparation as well as of their intermediates. In the 
laboratory, the student prepares certain intermediates and dyes. He then tests them 
by comparing material dyed with his dyes, to fibers dyed with commercially pre- 
pared dyes of the same class. 

TC-16 TC-16L Textile Chemistry 

The student learns, during this course, how to determine the properties, and 
analyze, many of the chemical materials used in the textile industry. He will 
analyze soap, bleaching agents, caustic soda, soda ash, etc. He is expected to apply 
the knowledge and experience acquired during the previous courses in Chemistry. 

TC-17 TC-17L Textile Chemistry II 

This course, a continuation of TC-16, teaches the student how to analyze coal, 
oil, water, certain types of organic materials (using the Kjeldahl Method) and fin- 
ishing compounds. 

TC-18 TC-18L Textile Finishing 

This course deals with the study of the finishing of textile fabrics. Lectures ex- 
plain the theory and functions of the machinery involved in the finishing of the com- 



28 

mon textile fabrics. Practice in the singeing, scouring, bleaching, drying, calender- 
ing and mercerization of cotton cloth is provided in the finishing laboratory. The 
finishing of rayon, nylon and mixed fabrics is also studied. 

TC-19 TC-19L Textile Finishing II 

This course is a continuation of TC-18. The processing of wool aralac and mixed 
fabrics is studied. The latest methods and machinery used in the industry are dis- 
cussed and constant consultation of the literature on the subject is required. The 
student is given practice in the application of dyestuffs by the padder and jigger. 
The methods of yarn dyeing and the machinery involved, the organization and 
management of finishing plants are studied. The course is supplemented, and its 
value enhanced, by field trips to bleacheries, dyehouses and printing plants. 

TC-20 TC-20L Textile Printing 

This is primarily a laboratory course in which the student becomes familiar with 
the theory and practice of the various styles of printing of the fabrics. Both roller 
and screen printing are used to enable the student to apply what he has studied. 

TC-21 TG-21L Thesis 

Every student, in his senior year, is obliged to undertake, and report on, some 
original research problem. The choice is left to the student under the supervision 
of the members of the Department of Chemistry. The student is left on his own 
in order to help him develop originality in thought and action. However, frequent 
consultation with his thesis supervisor, at least once a week, enables the student to 
make certain that he is not going astray nor that he is wasting his time and effort. 

TC-22 TC-22L Microbiology 

This course includes the study of various micro-organisms and their importance 
to man and his textile world. Sterilization, disinfection, fumigation and staining, 
and methods of studying the action of molds and bacteria on textile fabrics are con- 
sidered. Laboratory work includes preparation and sterilization of culture media, 
staining and microscopic observation of bacteria, miidewproofing tests on textile 
fabrics, and the bacteriological examination of water, milk and other products. 

TC-23 TG-23L Colloid Chemistry 

An introduction to the colloidal state of matter, covering a consideration of the 
characteristics and behavior of colloidal substance; methods of preparing colloidal 
substances; a study of natural colloidal substances and a special study of the appli- 
cation of colloidal behavior to the chemistry of textiles, dyeing and finishing. 

In the laboratory the student observes the fundamental characteristics and be- 
havior of materials in the colloidal state; learns how to prepare colloidal substances 
and applies this knowledge to selected problems dealing with textile chemistry, dye- 
ing and finishing. 

TC-101 TC-I01L General Chemistry 

This is an introductory course in Chemistry required of all students attending the 
Institute, with the exception of those enrolled for the degree in chemistry, during 
their freshman year. It comprises a general survey of chemistry, its basic laws and 
theories, a general study of the commoner elements both metallic and non-metalic 
and a study of the use and application of chemistry to daily life. In the laboratory 
work which accompanies this course, the student performs experiments selected with 
a view to enabling him to learn to draw correct conclusions from definitive hap- 
penings. It also enables him to acquire a certain manipulative technique in using 
the basic chemical tools. 

TC-107 TC-107L Elementary Dyeing 

This course is adapted to the needs of the student taking the Textile Engineering 
Course. The content of this course is essentially that of TC-7 only in a much short- 



29 

ened form. Much of the elaborate knowledge and laboratory work is omitted. The 
student obtains sufficient knowledge to enable him to become familiar with the 
terms and practices of the Dyeing Industry. 

TG-109 TG-109L Advanced Dyeing 

This course is adapted to the needs of the students taking the Textile Engineering 
Course. The contents of this course are essentially that of TC-9 only in a much 
shortened form. 

TG-113 Quantitative Analysis 

This is a semester course designed primarily for students in the Textile Tech- 
nology Course. It is so designed that the student aquires a working knowledge of 
the fundamentals of volumetric and gravimetric analysis: concentration of solu- 
tions, normality and how determined, use of the burette and other volumetric ap- 
paratus, simple neutralization titrations, pH — its meaning and properties; the use 
of the analytical balance, the make-up and use of the Gooch filter, chemical factors 
and their applications, simple gravimetric processes. 

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student is well equipped to 
perform simple, routine analytical work and understand what she is doing. 

TC-118 TC-118L Textile Finishing 

This course is simply a lecture course of the material contained in TC-18 and 
TC-19. The students enrolled in the Textile Engineering Course take this course 
in their Senior year. They also are offered the opportunities presented by the field 
trips. 

TC-120 Textile Printing (Screen Printing) 

This is a semester course given in collaboration with the Designing Department 
to the students in the Textile Technology Course. The students learn how to make 
their own designs, their own screens, how to print their designs and finish the 
prints. They are given some training in the making of the pastes and dyes and the 
simplified reactions involved in the printing. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

M-1A Algebra 
Review of high school algebra through quadratic equations. Includes a further 
study of simultaneous quadratic equations. 



Prerequisites M-1A. Continuation of M-1A to include a study of complex num- 
bers, higher degree equations, inequalities, logarithms, exponential functions, 
progressions, mathematical induction, binomial theorem and determinants. 

M-2 Trigonometry 

Prerequisites M-1A. A study of the functions of the acute angle and the relations 
among the trigonometric functions. A thorough consideration of the right triangle 
and the oblique triangle and the important formulas relating to all triangles. Ap- 
proximately ten hours is spent in studying the use and application of the slide rule. 

M-3 Analytical Geometry 

Prerequisites M-1A, IB, 2A. A study of plane and solid analytical geometry. 
Functions and graphs, linear functions, polynomial curves, transformation of co- 
ordinates, the circle, algebraic and trigonometric curves, parametric equations, 
polar equations, planes and lines, surfaces and curves. 

M-4A Differential Calculus 

A study of the various formulas, variables, functions and limits. Differentiation 
and the rules for differentiating ordinary algebraic terms. Applications of the de- 
rivative and successive differentiation. A study of curvatures, radius and circle 
of curvature. 



30 

M-4B Integral Calculus 

A study of integration and the integrating of standard elementary forms. Con- 
siders the constant of integration, the definite integral, process of summation, re- 
duction formulas and their practical applications. 

P-l Physics 

A study of heat, heat quantities, heat transfer, expansion, temperature measure- 
ment, etc. A thorough study is made of the properties of solids, the gas laws, mo- 
tion, forces, vector quantities and simple machines. 

P-2 Physics 

Continuation of P-l to include a study of electricity including sources and effects 
of electric currents, the simple series and parallel circuits, measuring instruments, 
etc. A further study is made of the various phases of sound and light. 

MS-1 through MS-4B Machine Tool Laboratory 

A continuous course systematically arranged according to the tool course in- 
volved. Consists of a thorough study of the most modern machinery used in the 
present day machine shop practice. The student is trained in the use of measuring 
instruments, turning, facing, boring, etc. Continued instruction is given on all ma- 
chinery, incttfding the miller, shaper, a planer and grinders. This course is supple- 
mented by lectures in shop theory and classes in shop calculations. 

ED-1 Engineering Drawing 

The use and care of the drawing instruments, lettering, theoiy of shape descrip- 
tion, orthographic projection, sketching, sectional views, auxiliary views, methods 
of dimensioning, screw fasteners, isometric, detail and assembly of machine parts. 

ED-2 Engineering Drawing 

Continuation of ED-1. 

ED -3 Engineering Drawing 

Complete detail and assembly drawings of small machines, with complete prac- 
tical limit dimensions and tolerances, notes and all information necessary for a 
working drawing. 

ED-4 Descriptive Geometry 

A more direct method of the applications of the principles of descriptive geometiy 
from the point of view of the engineer. A wide variety of topics such as straight 
lines, curves and curved lines, planes, intersections and development of surfaces, 
single and warped curved surfaces, double curved surfaces. 

ED-8 Electrical Drafting 

Prerequisite EG-5. Consists of both lecture and drafting room practice. Con- 
siders the proper methods of laying out wiring for both light and power. All proper 
sizes for wire, protective devices, etc., are determined by actual calculation accord- 
ing to the loads involved. Constant reference is made to the recommendations of 
the National Board of Fire Underwriters. 

ED-28 Engineering Drawing 

A course especially arranged for the students of textile engineering. Consists of 
detail and assembly drawing with the proper application of dimensions, tolerances, 
etc. A study of gears and cams as applied to textile machinery is also taken. 

ED-38 Engineering Drawing 

A continuation of ED-28. 



31 

Eg-IA Eg-IB Heat and Power 

A typical power plant, including the various types of boilers, heaters, pumps, 
steam engines, turbines and all the necessary auxiliaries and accessories as found in 
a modern power plant is studied in detail. Calculations for evaporation, efficiency, 
horsepower, boiler rating, heat, fuel consumption, heating surface, boiler losses, etc., 
are determined in lecture periods. Practice is given in handling steam engines, ap- 
paratus and equipment, and exercises also consist of setting valves on the engine 
and taking and determining indicator diagrams. 

Eg-2A Applied Engineering Mechanics 

A study of those topics ordinarily considered under the subject of statics. The 
various force systems, friction, centroids and center of gravity, moments of inertia 
of areas, etc. 

Eg-2B Applied Engineering Mechanics 

A study of those topics ordinarily considered under the subject of dynamics, 
kinematics of rectilinear motion, kinetics of rectilinear motion, curvilinear motion, 
kinematics and kinetics of rotation, plane motion, work, power and energy, impulse 
and momentum. 

Eg-3 Strength of Materials 

Simple stresses, shear, riveted joints, stresses in thin walled cylinders, torsion, 
beams, deflections, combined axial and bending stresses. 

Eg-4 Metallurgy 

A lecture course on the various processes of working metals and separating them 
from their ores. 

Eg- 5 Electric Circuits and Machines 

A thorough study of direct and alternating circuits, their characteristics and laws. 
Detailed consideration is given the characteristics and operation of both direct and 
alternating current motors and generators of various types. 

Eg- 6 Pattern Making 

A study of pattern making as associated with foundry and metal trades. In 
order that the student will design more intelligently he is instructed in the various 
phases of this trade, i.e., the use of the shrinkage rule, allowing for draft, etc. 

Eg-7A Mechanisms 

A study of mechanisms and machines, transmission of motion by the various 
means, friction wheels, flexible connectors, cams, centres, gears, etc. A study is 
also made of velocity diagrams and accelerations in mechanisms. 

Eg-7B Mechanisms 

A continuation of Eg-7A. 

Eg- 8 Tool Inspection 

A careful study of the use and application of precision instruments as applied to 
tool inspection. This course includes both lectures on the proper use of these instru- 
ments and actual laboratory practice in tool inspection. Laboratory practice in- 
cludes the use of the various precision gages, size block, shadow graphs, hardness 
testers, sine bars, etc. 

Eg-9 Jig, Fixture and Tool Design 

This course consists of both lectures on the various types of jigs, fixtures and 
tools, and actual practice in the drafting room. The student is instructed in the 
generally accepted methods of construction, the proper allowances, fits, clearances, 
etc. Particular attention is paid to the simplicity of construction, always keeping 
in mind the use to which tool is to be put. 



32 

Eg-lOA Machine Design 

Consists of both lectures and actual drafting room practice. For the most part 
the design is empirical but the student is encouraged to use, whenever possible, a 
combination of empirical and scientific design. In this manner he will draw into use 
a good many of the principles he has become familiar with in his study of mathe- 
matics, physics, chemistry, mechanics, etc. He is also encouraged in the frequent 
use of the many reference books and hand goods that are available. 

Eg-lOB Machine Design 

A continuation of Eg-lOA. 

Eg- 11 Engineering Contracts 

An elementary study of the interpretation and writing of engineering-commercial 
agreements. The aim of this course is to enable the man in the field of engineering 
to co-operate more fully with lawyers if the necessity should arise. 

Eg- 12 Industrial Plants 

This course, consisting of both lectures and drafting room practice, is designed to 
familiarize the student with modern plant layout. Particular attention is paid to 
the proper layout of machinery, modern lighting methods and in general those 
things which contribute to better working conditions. He will be assigned a project 
to carry out in the drafting room and will be guided and advised by his instructor. 

Eg- 17 Mill Engineering 

Proficiency in this course depends on the thoroughness with which the work of 
the previous courses was carried on. It consists of lectures supplemented by work in 
the drafting room. Problems in design, construction and equipment of textile mills 
are taken up by the student. Each student must determine the machines and equip- 
ment required for manufacturing a certain type of goods assigned to him, and floor 
plans are made with the machines in their proper positions. The method of gen- 
erating and transmitting the power, with the type of drive to be used and the neces- 
sary horsepower of the motors needed must be determined. Methods of lighting, 
heating and ventilation, as well as protection from fire are also taken into con- 
sideration. 

E-l English Composition and Literature 

A basic course in rhetoric and composition. Consists of a thorough drill in the 
fundamentals of writing. Particular attention is paid to the four forms of discourse, 
viz., description, narration, exposition and agumentation. The course is supple- 
mented by a study and discussion of a group of selected essays. 

H-l United States History 

The aim of this course is to provide the student with a clear over-all picture of 
the history of the United States to the present time. Emphasis will be placed on 
such topics as the colonial background, the American Revolution, the founding of 
the National Government, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War, industrialism, expan- 
sion, World War I, world depression, the New Deal and World War II. 

The first half of the course will cover the period from colonization to the Civil 
War. The second half will be the continuation of the first, covering the period from 
the Civil War through World War II. Special attention will be given to the period 
from World War I to the present. 

S-l Sociology 

The aim of this course is to aid the student in developing an understanding of the 
principles of sociology in order that he may live more intelligently and deal more 
effectively with the social problems of the world about him. 

Topics to be covered in the course include, factors in the social life of man, the 
role of culture, heredity and personality, group and personality, personality disor- 
ganization, group life, suggestibility, status, cooperation, competition, conflict, 
population distribution and growth, communities, social institutions and social 
change. 

Special attention will be given to some of the current social problems. 



33 

NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

CALENDAR 



Day Classes 
1949 



September 12, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 
September 26-30, Monday-Friday 
October 12, Wednesday 
November 11, Friday 
November 23, Wednesday, 12 m. 
November 28, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 
December 16, Friday, 3:40 p.m. 



First semester begins 
Class elections 
Columbus Day — Holiday 
Armistice Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



1950 



January 2, Monday 

January 3, Tuesday, 8 :30 a.m. 

January 16, Monday 

January 27, Friday 

January 30, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 

February 22, Wednesday 

March 17, Friday, 3:40 p.m. 

March 27, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 

April 7, Friday 

April 19, Wednesday 

May 22-31, Monday-Wednesday 

May 30, Tuesday 

June 2, Friday, 8 p.m. 



New Year's Day — Holiday 
Christmas recess ends. 
Mid-year examinations begin 
Mid-year examinations end 
Second semester begins 
Washington's Birthday — Holiday 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends 
Good Friday — Holiday 
Patriots' Day — Holiday 
Final examinations 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Commencement exercises — 
Assembly Hall x 



Evening Classes 
1949 



September 26, Monday, 7 :30-9 p.m. 
September 26, Monday, 7 :30 p.m. 
October 12, Wednesday 
November 11, Friday 
November 24, 25, Thursday, Friday 
December 12-16, Monday-Friday 
December 16, Friday 



Enrollment 
First term begins 
Columbus Day — Holiday 
Armistice Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Examinations 
First term ends 



1950 



January 2, Monday 
January 3, Tuesday, 7 :30-9 p.m. 
January 3, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. 
February 22, Wednesday 
March 13-17, Monday-Friday 
March 17, Friday 



New Year's Day — Holiday 
Enrollment, second term 
Second term begins 
Washington's Birthday — Holiday 
Examinations 
Second term ends 



Day Classes 
1950 



September 11, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 
September 25-29, Monday-Friday 
October 12, Thursday 
November 22, Wednesday, 12 m. 
November 27, Monday 8:30 a.m. 
December 15, Friday, 3:40 p.m. 



First semester begins 
Class elections 
Columbus Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



34 
1951 



January 1, Monday- 
January 2, Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 
January 15, Monday 
January 26, Friday 
January 29, Monday, 8 :30 a.m. 
FebTuary 22, Thursday 
March 16, Friday, 3:40 p.m. 
March 23, Friday 
March 26, Monday, 8:30 a.m. 
April 19, Thursday 
May 21-29, Monday-Tuesday 
May 30, Wednesday 
June 1, Friday, 8 p.m. 



New Year's Day — Holiday 
Christmas recess ends 
Mid-year examinations begin 
Mid-year examinations end 
Second semester begins 
Washington's Birthday — Holiday 
Spring recess begins 
Good Friday — Holiday 
Spring recess ends 
Patriots' Day — Holiday 
Final examinations 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Commencement exercises — 
Assembly Hall 



Evening Classes 
1950 



September 25, Monday, 7 :30-9 p.m. 
September 25, Monday, 7:30 p.m. 
October 12, Thursday 
November 23, 24, Thursday, Friday 
December 11-15, Monday-Friday 
December 15, Friday 



Enrollment 
First term begins 
Columbus Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Examinations 
First term ends 



January 2, Tuesday, 7 :30-9 p.m. 
January 2, Tuesday, 7 :30 p.m. 
February 22, Thursday 
March 13-16, Monday-Friday 
March 16, Friday 



1951 



Enrollment, second term 
Second term begins 
Washington's Birthday — Holiday 
Examinations 
Second term ends 



35 
INDEX 



Administration and Staff . 

Board of Trustees . 

Faculty 

Officers of Administration 



Page 
1 

1 
2 
1 



Courses of Study 
Degree Courses 

Machine Design . 
Textile Chemistry 
Textile Engineering 



Diploma Courses 

Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing . 
General Cotton Manufacturing 
Knit Good Manufacturing 
Textile Designing 

Certificate Courses 

Drafting and Machine Shop Practice 
Textile Technology 

Evening Courses ..... 
Carding and Spinning . 
Weaving and Designing 
Chemistry and Dyeing 



9 

9 

12 
11 

9 



16 
14 
17 
15 



19 

18 

19 

19 
19 
19 



General Information 

Admissions .... 
Admissions to Advance Standing 
Athletics .... 
Attendance Regulations 
Bookstore .... 
Environment 

Expenses .... 
Graduation Requirements 
Historical Background . 
Library .... 

Scholarships .... 
Student Organizations . 

School Calendar 
Subjects of Instruction 



5 
5 

8 
6 
4 
4 
7 
6 
3 
4 
7 
4 

33 
20 



Publication op this Document Approved by the State Purchasing Agent 
2500-3-49-25825. 




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