(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue"

NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF 
TECHNOLOGY 





. A . .. ,- 




BULLETIN 1961-1963 






For all information pertaining to college admission, address: 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSION 

NEW BEDFORD INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

TECHNOLOGY CENTER— NEW BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

Visitors to the school are welcome, and guides are available. The Administration 
Offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
New Bedford, Mass. 




COEDUCATIONAL 



BULLETIN FOR THE 
ACADEMIC YEARS 

1961-1963 



FOREWORD 

The purpose of this issue of the Bulletin is to provide 
information for prospective students, or anyone else 
who may be interested in the history, traditions, ob- 
jectives, resources, programs, equipment and staff of 
the Institute. 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Calendar of Events . 












4 


Directory of Personnel . 






6 


General Information . 






. . . 11 


The College 












11 


Admission Procedures 












15 


Student Expenses . 












17 


Student Regulations 












18 


Grading and Degrees 












19 


Graduation Requirements 












20 


Student Facilities and Services 












21 


Endowments and Scholarships 












23 


Student Awards . 












24 


Student Organizations 












27 


Athletics 












29 


Office of Public Relations 












30 


Research Foundation 












30 


Alumni Association 












31 


Undergraduate Courses of Study 








33 


Business Administration 












34 


Chemistry .... 












39 


Engineering .... 












42 


Textiles ...... 












46 


Graduate School .... 






51 


Evening School .... 






54 


Description of Courses 






56 


Index 












88 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Calendar of Events 

ACADEMIC YEAR 
1961-1962 



Year 1961 

SEPTEMBER 

6, 7— Wednesday & Thursday, 9:00 A.M 

8— Friday, 9:00 A.M 

8— Friday, 9:00 A.M. 

12— Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. . 

25-29 — Monday through Friday 

OCTOBER 

12 — Thursday 

NOVEMBER 

3— Friday, 3:50 P.M. 
22— Wednesday, 11:50 A.M. . 
27— Monday, 8:00 A.M. . 

DECEMBER 

15— Friday, 3:50 P.M. . 



Freshman Registration 
Freshman Orientation 
Upper Class Registration 
First Semester Begins 
Freshman Class Elections 



Columbus Day — Holiday . 

Mid-Semester Marking Period 
Thanksgiving Recess Begins 
Thanksgiving Recess Ends 

Christmas Recess Begins 



Year 1962 

JANUARY 

2— Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. 
15— Monday, 9:00 A.M. . 
24, 25— Wednesday, Thursday 9:00 A.M 
26— Friday, 4:00 P.M. 
29— Monday, 8:00 A.M. . 

FEBRUARY 

22— Thursday .... 

MARCH 

23— Friday, 3:50 P.M. . 



APRIL 



MAY 



2— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
19 — Thursday 
20— Friday 



7, 11 — Monday through Friday 
21— Monday, 9:00 A.M. . 
30 — Wednesday 



Christmas Recess Ends 
Mid-Year Examinations Begin 
Registration-second semester 
Mid-Year Examinations End 
Second Semester Begins 

Washington's Birthday — 
Holiday 

Mid-Semester Marking Period 
Spring Recess Begins 

Spring Recess Ends 
Patriot's Day — Holiday 
Good Friday — No Classes 

Upper Class Elections 
Final Examinations Begin 
Memorial Day — Holiday 



Academic Calendar 



JUNE 



1— Friday, 4:00 P.M. 
2 — Saturday 
3 — Sunday 



Final Examinations End 
Baccalaureate 
Commencement and 
President's Reception 



ACADEMIC YEAR 
1962-1963 



Year 1962 



SEPTEMBER 

5, 6— Wednesday & Thursday, 9:00 A.M 

7— Friday, 9:00 A.M. . 

7— Friday, 8:00 A.M. . 
11— Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. . 
24-28 — Monday through Friday 

OCTOBER 

12 — Friday 

NOVEMBER 

2— Friday, 3:50 P.M. . 
'28— Wednesday, 11:50 A.M. . 

DECEMBER 

3— Monday, 8:00 A.M. . 
18— Tuesday, 3:30 P.M. . 



Freshman Registration 
Freshman Orientation 
Upper Class Registration 
First Semester Begins 
Freshman Class Elections 



Columbus Day — Holiday 

Mid-Semester Marking Period 
Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

Thanksgiving Recess Ends 
Christmas Recess Begins 



Year 1963 

JANUARY 

2— Wednesday, 8:00 A.M. 
14— Monday, 9:00 A.M. . 
23, 24 — Wednesday, Thursday 
25— Friday, 4:00 P.M. 
28— Monday, 8:00 A.M. . 

FEBRUARY 

22— Friday 

MARCH 

22— Friday, 3:50 P.M. . 

APRIL 

8— Monday, 8:00 A.M. . 
12 — Friday 
19 — Friday 



MAY 



JUNE 



6-10 — Monday through Friday 
20— Monday, 9:00 A.M. . 
30 — Thursday .... 
31— Friday, 4:00 P.M. 

1 — Saturday .... 
2 — Sunday .... 



Christmas Recess Ends 
Mid-Year Examinations Begin 
Registration-second semester 
Mid-Year Examinations End 
Second Semester Begins 

Washington's Birthday — 
Holiday 

Mid-Semester Marking Period 
Spring Recess Begins 

Spring Recess Ends 
Good Friday — No Classes 
Patriot's Day — Holiday 

Upper Class Elections 
Final Examinations Begin 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Final Examinations End 

Baccalaureate 
Commencement and 
President's Reception 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Directory of Personnel 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1961 

Dr. Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner of Education 

Francis J. Lawler, Mayor, Municipal Bldg. 

Miss Ruth B. McFadden, Superintendent of Schools, 166 William St. 

Term Expires 1961 

Joseph A. Dancewicz, 12 Locust St., New Bedford, Mass., Hunt & Spiller 
Co., 383 Dorchester Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Nils V. Nelson, 8 Temple Ave., Winthrop, Mass., N. V. Nelson Co., 
Cotton, 157 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 

Milton Gollis, 567 Rockdale Ave., New Bedford, Mass., Proprietor, 
Gollis Women's & Men's Apparel, 562 Pleasant St., New Bedford, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Beatrice P. Thomas, 63 No. Summer St., Fairhaven, Mass. 

Raymond R. McEvoy, 156 Porter St., Stoughton, Mass., U. S. Civil Serv- 
ice Commission, Office of Director, Federal Building 

Term Expires 1962 

Mrs. Ida Epstein, 8 Hawthorn Terrace, New Bedford, Mass., Medical 
Social Worker, St. Luke's Hospital Clinic 

Herbert M. McAdams, 76 Walker St., Falmouth, Mass., Proprietor, 
Shoe Store 

Richard B. Rymszewicz, 406 Union St., New Bedford, Mass., Assistant 
Cashier, Merchants National Bank 

Mrs. Rosalind Poll Brooker, 419 Union St., New Bedford, Mass. (At- 
torney) 

Paul Rodrigues, 979 Lloyd St., New Bedford, Mass., Teacher 

Term Expires 1963 

Francis P. Delaney, 143 Pleasant St., Fairhaven, Mass., Supervisor in 
Education, Mass. Rehabilitation Commission, 628 Pleasant St., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

George E. Carignan, 386 Union St., New Bedford, Mass., Director Fi- 
nancial Secretary, New Bedford Joint Board Textile Workers Un- 
ion of America, 888 Purchase St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Dr. John B. O'Toole, Jr., 89 Mt. Pleasant St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Mrs. Lydia B. Nunes, Attorney, 97 Hillman St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Joseph M. Souza, 25 Junior St., New Bedford, Mass., Third District 
Court 



Directory of Personnel 



ADMINISTRATION 



John E. Foster, B.S.C.E., Sc.D 

President 

James L. Giblin, M.S. 

Dean of the Faculty 

Augustus Silva, A.B., M.A. 

Dean of Students 
George Walker 

President Emeritus 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIGNMENTS 

Edith Booth 

Director of the Bookstore 
Edward A. Cormier, A.B.B.A., Ed.M. 

Director of the Summer School 

James A. Flanagan, B.S. in Ed. 

Director of Public Relations 
Director of Placement 

Warren M. Holt, B.S., Ed.M. 

Director of Admissions 
Mary F. Makin 

Treasurer 
Dwight F. Mowery, Jr., A.B., Ph.D. 

Director of the Graduate School 
Louis Pacheco, Jr., B.S.T.E., Ed.M. 

Director of the Evening School 
Claire N. Riley, A.B. 

Director of the Library 

Fred R. Tripp, B.S., Ch.E. 

Director of the Research Foundation 

The Advisory Committee to the Administration is composed of 
all Department Chairmen. 

FACULTY 

Milton S. Briggs, B.B.A. 

Professor of Business Administration 
Chairman of the Department 

James L. Giblin, M.S. 

Professor of Textile Engineering 
Chairman of the Department 

Lenine M. Gonsalves, B.S., M.S.E.E., P.E. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Chairman of the Department 



8 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Anthony J. John, B.S., M.A., M.S. 

Professor of Mathematics 
Chairman of the Department 

D wight F. Mowery, Jr., A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Augustus Silva, A.B., M.A. 

Professor of English 
Chairman of the Department 

Leo M. Sullivan, B.S. in Ed., M.A. 

Professor of Social Sciences 
Chairman of the Department 

Howard C. Tinkham, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Chairman of the Department 

Francis Tripp, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C, M.S.Ch., Ch.E. 

Professor of Chemistry 
Chairman of the Department 

Adam Bayreuther 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 

Fred Beardsworth 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering 

John C. Broadmeadow, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C, Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Edward H. Cloutier 

Associate Professor of Textile Engineering 

Earl J. Dias, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of English 

Edmund J. Dupre, B.S.T.C, Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Louis E. F. Fenaux, B.S.Ch., M.S.Ch. 

Associate Professor of Che?nistry 

Sheldon H. Harris, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Social Sciences 

Harbhajan S. Hayre, A.B., B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., P.E. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Frank Holden 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Engineering 

Warren M. Holt, B.S., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Frederic R. Mattfield, B.S. in B.A., M.B.A., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

Louis Pacheco, Jr., B.S.T.E., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Textile Engineering 



Directory of Personnel 

John R. Barylski, B.S.M.E., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Clifford N. Beck, B.S.T.E. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 

Alden W. Counsell, B.S.M.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Michael Crowley, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Ferdinand P. Fiocchi, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Celestino D. Macedo, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Margot Neugebauer, B.F.A., M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design and Fashion 

John T. Regan, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Conrad P. Richard, B.S.M.D., P.E. 

Assista?it Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Antone Rodil 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
William A. Silveira, B.S.T.E., M.S.T.T. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Arthur V. Swaye, B.S.T.E. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Henry Swift, A.B., M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
George J. Thomas, B.S.C.E., P.E. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
Robert C. Booth 

Instructor in Textile Design and Fashion 
Edward A. Cormier, B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Business Administration 
James A. Flanagan, B.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
Frank Golen, Jr., B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Fryderyk E. Gorczyca, B.S.M.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Walter E. A. Mierzejewski, A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Evelyn Ramalhete, B.S.T.D.F. 

Instructor in Textile Design and Fashion 

Louis J. Robitaille, B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Social Sciences 



10 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Joseph L. Roberts, B.S.M.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Fred R. Tripp, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Richard W alder, B.S.E.E. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

John F. Wareing 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

Vivian M. Zerbone, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Languages 

George Jacobs, A.B., LL.B. 

Visiting Lecturer in Business Law 

Hans E. Picard, B.S.E.E. 

Visiting Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 




Chemical Research 




Textile Engineering 




Metallurgy Laboratory 




Lecture Room 




Electrical Engineering Laboratory 




Business Administration 




Design and Fashion 




Chemistry 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

General Information 



THE COLLEGE 

Objectives 

As an educational institution, the New Bedford Institute of Tech- 
nology is dedicated to the task of stimulating intellectual growth. It 
seeks not only to provide each student with a solid foundation for 
professional training, but also to cultivate in him a lifelong intellectual 
curiosity and a yearning for truth. It also seeks to instill a desire for 
self-improvement, not only professional but cultural as well, in order 
that each graduate may take his place among educated men and women 
in every walk of life. Attainment of this objective is facilitated through 
the creation of an atmosphere conducive to learning provided by a 
capable and inspiring faculty and an enlightened and progressive 
administration. 

As an institution of higher learning, the Institute is charged with 
the responsibility for the advancement of learning through research 
and also for the preservation and interpretation of accumulated knowl- 
edge. Upon the proper discharge of this responsibility depends the 
welfare not only of the nation but of the world. Its importance is so 
great that no institution possessing the capability can afford to neglect 
it. In addition, this activity on the part of the faculty members keeps 
them intellectually curious, alert, and resourceful and enables them to 
offer the student the maximum in exemplification and inspiration. 

As a technological institution, this Institute devotes its major 
activity to technical subjects. In a broad sense these may be defined as 
mathematics, the pure sciences, the applied sciences, the business sciences 
and those practical arts utilizing scientific or systematic procedures. 

History 

Founded in 1895, the New Bedford Institute of Technology has 
been, from its very beginning, one of the most modern and best-equipped 
schools of its type in the world. 

At the first meeting of the Board of Trustees on January 27, 1896, 
committees were appointed to supervise the building and financing of 
the school, the establishment of a curriculum, and the installation of 
machinery and other equipment. In 1897, the city of New Bedford 
appropriated $25,000 for the use of the school, and the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts appropriated a similar amount in the following year. 
With these funds, the first of the present buildings was constructed. The 
Institute is now one of the Massachusetts state colleges. 



12 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Since its founding, the Institute has moved with the times. During 
its first years, it was concerned primarily with training students to play 
important roles in the textile industry. Instruction was emphasized in 
both the theory and practice of all phases of manufacturing, finishing, 
and distribution of textiles. 

In recent years, however, in adjusting to the demands of the 
economic climate, the Institute has, in addition to its internationally- 
known curriculum in textiles, introduced first-rate programs in other 
forms of technology. Such educational fields as mechanical engineering, 
electrical engineering, chemistry, textile chemistry, textile design and 
fashion, and business administration have become part of an ever- 
expanding curriculum. 

Furthermore, a new emphasis has been placed on purely cultural 
courses in the arts and social sciences, since any engineer, technologist, 
or student of business administration will be a better-rounded individual 
if he has an acquaintance with what Matthew Arnold has called "the 
best that has been thought and said." 

Part of the educational policy of the Institute is its strong belief 
that any college graduate be afforded the opportunity to gain knowledge 
and appreciation of the ideas, the movements, the creative contributions 
that are the basis of the heritage of Western civilization. 

The New Bedford Institute of Technology is justifiably proud 
of its professional standing and the recognition it receives throughout 
the world. This recognition is evidenced by the many representatives of 
foreign countries who have matriculated at the Institute. This repre- 
sentation has, over the years, included students from Canada, Mexico, 
Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Bolivia, Salvador, the Philippines, Korea, 
Pakistan, India, Formosa, Haiti, France, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, and 
Iraq. 

Environment 

Situated in New Bedford, Massachusetts, a city with a population 
of more than 100,000, the Institute boasts an exceptionally good location 
for a technical college. The Institute is located on the main bus line of 
the city; in addition, it is only a brief ride from the city's modern and 
busy Municipal Airport. 

New Bedford was, for many years, recognized as the greatest 
whaling city in the world. In fact, it was from New Bedford in 1841 
that Herman Melville, the author of "Moby Dick," sailed for his historic 
voyage on the bark, Acushnet. Later in its history, with the expansion 
of the Industrial Revolution, New Bedford became the world's most 
important manufacturer of fine cotton yarns and fabrics. 

Today, the city is a center for many diversified industries. These 
include the manufacturing and processing of rubber products, electronic 
equipment, aircraft, machine tools, screws and facets, and food produc- 
tion, in addition to textiles. Besides this, the city is the world's leading 
scallop port and is also in the first rank as a fishing port. 



General Information 13 

The fishing industry is a multi-million dollar enterprise, with the 
large fishing fleet supplying the city's many fish-processing houses and 
other consumers throughout the nation. In recent years, the port of New 
Bedford has also been used increasingly by merchant ships. 

Of interest, too, is New Bedford's new and attractively constructed 
Industrial Park, located on the outskirts of the city and already attracting 
a number of new industries to the community. 

These industries, both old and new, afford students at the Institute 
many opportunities for planned inspection trips, a valuable aid in 
acquainting the student with the practical phases of his academic work. 
In addition, the presence in the community of so many industries pro- 
vides the student with numerous opportunities for part-time and summer 
employment. 

Nor are New Bedford's advantages solely industrial. The city 
itself has all the picturesque charm of an old New England port — colorful 
harbor, sandy beaches, fine examples of Federalist architecture — plus the 
modern atmosphere of a progressive industrial city. 

In addition, the city has always maintained a busy and rewarding 
cultural life. Only a few minutes walk from the Institute is the civic 
center, with its handsome buildings (including the excellent public 
library) attractive shopping areas, theatre district, and the world-famous 
Whaling Museum. And for those interested in the arts, New Bedford 
offers active amateur theatre groups, several first-rate concert and lecture 
series, the New Bedford Symphony Orchestra, art exhibits, and the like. 

In summary, this old New England city, offering the best of the 
traditional and the new, is a pleasant place in which to live and to study. 

Status 

The New Bedford Institute of Technology is approved by the 
Collegiate Board of Authority of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
This authority grants a Bachelor of Science degree to graduates who 
have successfully completed the prescribed courses. The Collegiate 
Board of Authority has also granted the Institute permission to confer 
the Master of Science degree in Textile Technology and Textile 
Chemistry. 

The honorary Doctoral and Master of Science degrees are awarded 
to those whose outstanding achievements have made them leaders in 
their chosen fields of endeavor. 

The Institute also plays a prominent role in the National Council 
of Textile Education. Student chapters at the Institute are sponsored 
by the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Institute of Radio 
Engineers, the American Association of Mechanical Engineers, the 
American Chemical Society, the American Association of Textile 
Chemists and Colorists, the American Association of Textile Technolo- 
gists, and the National Office Management Association. 



14 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

The Institute is approved for the education of veterans under 
P. L. 550, 87th Congress, and P. L. 894, 81st Congress. 

The Institute is approved by the offices of the Attorney General 
for the admission of alien students. 

Buildings and Equipment 

Art and Library Building — This was the first building erected on the 
present campus by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Completed in 
1898, the three-story building now houses all art studios, the microscopy 
and photo-microscopy laboratories, the warp preparation laboratory, the 
Bookstore, a student office for the college newspaper, "Tech Talk," and 
a student lounge. 

Each of the art studios is equipped with drawing tables, stools, 
easels, and reference material to provide the training facilities needed 
for the successful study of design, drawing, and painting. 

The microscopy and photo-microscopy laboratories are used in 
conjunction with courses relating to the quantitative and qualitative 
study of the composition of textile and other related materials. These 
laboratories also are equipped with a wide range of microscopes, 
cameras, and supplementary instruments used in obtaining experimental 
data. 

Winding, warping, and slashing equipment for both the cotton 
and synthetic systems are available for student use and demonstration in 
the warp preparation laboratory. 

Textile Engineering Building — Erected in 1902 by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as an addition to the Art and Library Building, this 
structure was enlarged in 1905 to provide an additional 20,000 square feet 
of floor space for textile manufacturing equipment. 

The complete line of manufacturing equipment enables the 
student to learn the mechanics and capabilities of the individual 
machines in processing any fibers, whether natural or man-made, into 
yarn and woven or knitted fabrics of various types. 

A testing laboratory provides instruction in the determination of 
all fiber, yarn, and fabric appearance and strength characteristics. 

Chemistry and Engineering Building — Completed in 1911, this separate 
structure houses the following laboratories: chemistry, tool manufactur- 
ing, engineering drawing and machine tool, electronics, and dyeing and 
finishing. Modern lecture rooms, a pilot plant for chemical research, 
and the library also are located in this building. 

All chemical, engineering, and electronic laboratories provide the 
student with the necessary equipment to perform practical experiments 
or projects in order to correlate class theory with practical and experi- 
mental proof. The dyeing and finishing laboratory allows the student 
to learn full-scale commercial dyeing and finishing of natural and man- 
made yarns and piece goods. 

Engineering and Science Building — The most recent building on the 
campus was completed in the spring of 1956. The structure supplements 



General Information 15 

the facilities of the college with modern engineering, science, and research 
laboratories and well-designed classrooms. The laboratories include 
those devoted to mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, physics, 
physical chemistry, and microbiology. In addition, the building houses 
all administrative offices, an amphitheater, and a modern gymnasium. 

Each of the laboratories is notable for its modern equipment, 
comparable to that of any other college of comparable size in New 
England. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

Matriculation in any of the undergraduate curricula offered by 
the Institute is governed by the following procedures and requirements. 
(Admission requirements and procedures for graduate study are listed 
under the Graduate School section of this bulletin page 51.) 

Each applicant must: 

Obtain an application blank which contains Form A and 
Form B. 

Submit Form A with application fee to the Institute. 
Submit Form B to High School Guidance Director. 

Make application to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of 
the College Entrance Examination Board — the applicant 
is responsible for having the test scores sent to the Institute.* 

General Requirements 

The entrance requirements are intended to assist in selecting 
from among the many candidates for admission, those best qualified to 
take advantage of the educational opportunities at the Institute. 

The general requirements pertaining to all curricula are: 

The satisfactory completion of a four year high school 
curriculum or its equivalent, yielding 16 units of secondary 
school work. A unit is the equivalent of at least four recita- 
tions a week for a school year. 

The primary basis for admissions is the student's standing 
in his high school graduation class. All applicants are 
required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, preferably no later 
than March of the senior high school year. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 

Business Administration: 

Required subjects, 7 units 

English 4 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

U. S. History 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 



Refer to page 17 for further information on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 



16 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

An applicant may meet these requirements if he has been 
graduated from a high school curriculum other than the College 
Preparatory program; however, it is required that he show an aptitude 
for business and related subjects and complete his secondary school 
curriculum with high scholastic standing. 

Chemistry or Textile Chemistry: 

Required subjects, 9 units 

English 4 units 

Algebra 2 units 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

U. S. History 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Electrical, Mechanical or Textile Engineering: 

Required subjects, 9 units 

English 4 units 

Algebra 2 units 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

U. S. History 1 unit 

Physics or 1 unit 
Chemistry 
(including lab) 

Textile Design and Fashion: 

Required subjects, 6 units 

English 4 units 

U. S. History 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 

Textile Technology: 

Required subjects, 8 units 

English 4 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

U. S. History 1 unit 

Physics or 1 unit 
Chemistry 
(including lab) 

Since each applicant is considered individually, the Director of 
Admissions may take exception in unusual cases to any of the require- 
ments. 

Advanced Standing 

Undergraduates of other recognized colleges who apply for admis- 
sion to New Bedford Institute of Technology as transfer students with 
advanced standing must present an official statement of honorable 
dismissal, a transcript of college record and a marked copy of the 
college's catalog to describe courses completed and offered for transfer 



General Information 17 

credit. Only those courses will be accepted which fit the curriculum 
requirements of the Institute, and for which the earned grade was "C" 
or better. 

Scholastic Aptitude Test Information 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board is required in order that the Director of Admissions may 
better evaluate the student's ability to succeed at the collegiate level. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College Ex- 
amination Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. When ordering 
forms, applicants must state whether they wish applications for December, 
January, February, March, May or August test. Applications must be 
made early enough to allow sufficient time for scheduling of each test. 
Each application submitted for registration must be accompanied by 
the examination fee of $4.00. 

Applications received within three weeks of December, February 
and August testing dates and within four weeks of the January, March 
and May testing dates will be subject to a penalty fee for late registration. 

Applications received at Princeton within two weeks of each 
testing date cannot be guaranteed acceptance. 

The Board will report the results of the test to the colleges indi- 
cated on the candidates' application. Candidates do not receive a report 
of their test scores directly from the Board. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

Tuition and General Fees 

Tuition for all courses varies according to the residential status 
of the student. For residents of Massachusetts, the rate is two hundred 
dollars per year ($200.00); for resident of other States, the fee is two 
hundred and fifty dollars ($250.00). The rate for all foreign students is 
five hundred dollars ($500.00). 

All prospective students must pay a fee of $10.00 when submitting 
their application for admittance. This fee (non-returnable) may be 
applied toward tuition in the event of matriculation. 

LABORATORY AND SPECIAL FEES (for one academic year) 

Athletics $15.00 

Student Activities 10.00 

General Laboratory fees for all students 10.00 

General Laboratory fee for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year 

Chemistry major students 20.00 

Chemical fee (additional fee for all out-of-state 

and foreign students) 10.00 

Graduation fee — all seniors 10.00 



18 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Registration fee (non-returnable) but applied to 

tuition in the event of matriculation 15.00 

Registration fee (foreign students) (non-return- 
able) but applied to tuition in the event of 
matriculation 50.00 

Late registration fee 5.00 

Books and supplies — Freshmen (estimated) 150.00 

Books and supplies — Upperclassmen (estimated) .. 100.00 

Library fee 5.00 

Refunds 

Any student withdrawing during the first six weeks of the semester 
is eligible to receive a refund according to the following schedule: 

Requests Refunds 

Less than one week 100% 

Less than two weeks 80% 

Between two and six weeks 40% 
After six weeks 0% 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

Conduct 

It is assumed that students matriculating in any one of the various 
programs offered by the Institute have attained sufficient maturity and 
developed those attributes conducive to an adequate preparation for 
professional careers. This means that the administration at the Institute 
expects that each student will have developed an ability to get along well 
with others and to maintain a personal high standard of honesty and 
moral conduct. The Institute has not established any rigid rules 
restricting the conduct of individuals or groups of students. However, 
it will be understood that a student may be dropped from the rolls or 
subjected to other disciplinary action, for conduct which is illegal, 
immoral, or not in keeping with the best interest of the Institute. 

Attendance 

Every student is expected to be present at all lectures and labora- 
tories for which he is registered, unless a satisfactory excuse can be 
presented for his absence. Excessive absence will result in disciplinary 
action which may lead to loss of credit for a course, suspension or 
dismissal. 

Withdrawals 

No freshman will be permitted to withdraw from a course. 

An upperclassman may be permitted to withdraw from a 
course, without penalty, only during the first six weeks of 



General Information 19 

the semester. Withdrawals without permission or alter the 
first six-week period will be recorded as failures. To 
withdraw from a course without penalty a student must: 

notify his faculty advisor of his intention. 

receive permission from the Dean of Students to 

withdraw from a course. 
Any student withdrawing from the Institute must first con- 
sult with the Business Office. Failure to do so will prevent 
the Institute from giving the student a certificate of honor- 
able dismissal. 

A deficiency resulting from failure may be removed by: 

repeating the course the next time it is scheduled, or 
securing transfer credit in a comparable course from some 
other accredited institution. Only grades of "C" or better 
are accepted for transfer credit. Such courses for transfer 
must be approved in advance by the Registrar. When a 
subject which has been failed is repeated at the Institute, 
the new grade is entered on the student's record in addition 
to the original grade. 

Eligibility 

No student placed on the probation status is eligible to participate 
in athletics or hold an elective office in non-athletic activities. 



GRADING SYSTEM AND HONORS 

Grading System 

At the completion of a course the student receives toward gradua- 
tion the number of semester hour credits at which the course is rated. 
The level of performance in the course is indicated by a letter grade: 

A, superior; B, above-average; C, average; D, passing, but not satisfactory; 
F, failing; Inc., Incomplete; WF, withdrew failing; WP, withdrew 
passing. The arithmetical equivalents of the letter grades are A, 90-100; 

B, 80-89; C, 70-79; D, 60-69; F, below 60. 

A student can obtain credit for an Incomplete only by finishing 
the work of the course before the end of the fourth week following the 
completion of the course. A grade of Incomplete will be automatically 
converted to a failure if the course requirement has not been satisfied 
by this time. The initiative in arranging for the removal of the Incom- 
plete rests with the student. 

Quality Point Average 

Beginning with the class entering in September of 1959, the 
following Quality Point System went into effect. 

The student's semester quality point rating is a weighted value 
used to denote his relative standing. The point values assigned are A=4 



20 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

points, B=3 points, C=2 points, D = l point and F=0 points. These 
point values, when multiplied by the credit hours assigned to the subject 
and added together, are divided by the sum of the credit hours to give 
the student's semester rating. The cumulative rating for more than 
one semester will be obtained in the same manner as the computation 
for the rating of a single semester. 

If a student repeats a course, both grades are entered on his 
record and the quality points and credit hours corresponding to each are 
considered in computing the average. 

Credit granted for work taken at another institution is not 
included in the quality point average. 

The quality point average for the term will be computed at the 
end of each term. The summer session is not considered as a term, and 
grades earned in summer session courses are included only in the 
cumulative quality point average. 

A course in which a passing grade is obtained will not be repeated 
for credit. A course in which a passing grade is obtained may be audited. 
In such a case, a grade will appear on the student's transcript with an 
explanation that the course had been audited and no credit received. 

Dean's List 

A student who, at the end of a semester, has a high scholastic 
standing will be placed on the Dean's list. This list will be posted on the 
official bulletin board. 

Degrees with Distinction 

Students completing graduation requirements with exceptionally 
high scholastic records are graduated with distinction; that is, with 
distinction, with "high" distinction, or with "highest" distinction. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for graduation are the satisfactory completion 
of all courses in one of the prescribed curricula of the Institute, with a 
total of quality points not less than the minimum number of credit hours 
required in the individual curriculum. 

STUDENT FACILITIES AND SERVICES 

Library 

The library is under the supervision of a full-time professional 
librarian and contains approximately 15,000 volumes as well as audio- 
visual materials. By gift or subscription the library receives 250 publica- 
tions issued periodically. These include magazines, journals, publications 
of professional societies, and house organs of industrial organizations. 

The library, located on the third floor of the Chemistry and 



General Information 21 

Engineering building, consists of a stack room, a reading room, and a 
work room. Hours are from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Monday through 
Friday and from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M., Monday through Thursday. 
Professional reference assistance is available 30 hours a week. 

The Institute has established inter-library loan privilege with the 
New Bedford Free Public Library and can borrow freely from its book 
collection of 265,000 volumes. In addition, the facilities of this large 
municipal library are available without cost to all students at the Institute 
whether or not they are residents of New Bedford. 

Bookstore 

The Institute's bookstore is located on the first floor of the Art 
and Library building. Here the student will find all the approved books 
and supplies for all courses offered by the Institute. 

Students, although not required to purchase materials from the 
bookstore, are advised not to buy elsewhere without first obtaining 
approval from their instructors. 

All proceeds from the bookstore, after operating costs have been 
met, are used to provide student services at the Institute. 

Housing 

Dormitory facilities are not provided by the Institute. For non- 
residents, however, excellent accommodations with private families living 
within walking distance of the Institute are readily available. A list of 
approved rooms is maintained and arrangements may be made through 
the Institute to secure suitable living quarters. Accommodations for 
fraternal brothers of Phi Psi and Delta Kappa Phi are available at their 
respective fraternity houses. 

Lounges 

Two lounges are maintained for student use; one is located in the 
Art and Library building, and the other, in the Engineering and Science 
building. 

Both lounges are suitably furnished with chairs, tables, television 
sets, and refreshment dispensers. The lounges are used by all students 
for relaxation and for social contact. 

Guidance and Counseling 

Because the Institute is a small college, a close personal relation- 
ship is maintained between the student body and the faculty. Through 
the Dean of Students and the Faculty Advisors, assistance is given to 
students during the year in the scheduling of their classes and in solving 
problems which may arise during the year. Whenever it is deemed neces- 
sary, correspondence and interviews are entered into between the Dean 
of Students and families of those students whose performance is not con- 
sidered satisfactory. 



22 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

The freshman year begins with a Freshman Orientation Period 
immediately preceding the Fall Term. Registration, general intelligence 
and aptitude tests are completed, orientation lectures on campus and 
professional life are given. Interpretive results of the intelligence and 
aptitude tests are available to the students, to the Dean of Students, and 
to the faculty advisors to aid in the making of decisions throughout the 
student's college career. 

An average of one and one-half hours of preparation for each 
hour of lecture or recitation will be required of freshmen. 

Each student's performance is evaluated four times during the 
academic year; that is, his scholastic standing is obtained at the end of 
the first eight weeks and at the end of each semester. This procedure 
is followed in order to allow the administration to inform the student 
of his standing and advise him more effectively as to the need for re- 
medial action should such action be required. 

Psychological Services 

A counseling service is provided by the school for students with 
problems of personal adjustment. Such students may be referred to this 
service by faculty members, advisors, or others on the college staff, or 
they may seek consultation directly. 

Placement 

A Student Placement Service is maintained at the Institute on a 
full-time basis. The main purpose of this office is to aid and assist the 
graduating students to secure positions in their chosen fields of endeavor. 
This office keeps abreast of the needs of the various industries and passes 
this information along to the graduates. 

The Placement Officer arranges for all on-campus interviews and 
helps both the visiting officials and the students to get the most out of 
such on-campus interviews. The graduate can also find many application 
forms for employment with various concerns in the Placement Office. 
Also he is allowed to utilize many of the College Directories and Place- 
ment Annuals which list possible employment offers that are housed in 
the College Placement Office at Tech. 

The U. S. Government listings are also posted weekly and many 
of Tech's graduates have gone into one of the many departments of 
government work. The government also has employed many of our 
students for summer-time work in their various fields and this informa- 
tion is also passed on to the underclassmen. 

The Placement Service is not a guarantee of employment but it 
does serve the graduate toward successfully positioning himself. In addi- 
tion to student placement the service is also extended to Alumni mem- 
bers who are desiring a change of position or re-location. The Placement 
Office handles all requests for experienced personnel through the Alumni 
membership. 



General Information 23 

ENDOWMENTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The New Bedford Institute of Technology offers to its under- 
graduates a number of scholarships made possible through the generosity 
of private and industrial endowments. All scholarship awards are made 
on the recommendation of the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty or 
of the committee appointed by the individual or organization establishing 
the scholarship. Applications for scholarships and financial assistance 
should be made to the Dean of Students. 

The following tuition scholarships are available to undergraduates. 

William Firth Scholarship. A one-hundred-dollar tuition scholar- 
ship made available from the William Firth Memorial Fund. Available 
to students in all courses. 

The Manning Emery, Jr. Scholarship. A one-hundred-dollar tui- 
tion scholarship made available from the Manning Emery, Jr. Memorial 
Fund. Available to students in all courses. 

Aerovox Scholarships. Two two-hundred-dollar annual awards to 
students majoring in mechanical or electrical engineering or chemistry. 
Preference will be given to close relatives of Aerovox employees. Also 
available to entering freshmen students. 

Acushnet Process Scholarships. Two one-hundred-dollar tuition 
scholarships to students in mechanical or electrical engineering or 
chemistry. Available to residents of greater New Bedford and preference 
will be given to close relatives of Acushnet Process employees. 

Berkshire-Hathaway Inc. Scholarships. Two two-hundred-dollar 
awards to students majoring in textiles who have indicated an interest 
in pursuing their textile careers in New England. 

Morse Twist Drill Scholarships. A one-hundred-dollar tuition 
scholarship to a student in mechanical or electrical engineering or 
chemistry. Preference to alumni or active members of Junior Achieve- 
ment. 

Barnet D. Gordon Family Foundation Scholarship. A fifty-dollar 
grant to students majoring in any of the textiles curricula. 

Revere Copper and Brass. Two two-hundred-dollar awards to 
students majoring in mechanical or electrical engineering or chemistry. 

/. C. Rhodes Scholarship. Four one-hundred-dollar awards to 
students in mechanical or electrical engineering or chemistry. 

Sandoz Chemical Scholarship. A two-hundred-dollar tuition 
scholarship to a student in textiles. 

Everett H. Hinckley Scholarship. A two-hundred-dollar scholar- 
ship made available by the New York Club of the New Bedford Institute 
of Technology Alumni Association. It is awarded to a textile major in 
memory of Everett H. Hinckley, former head of the Institute's Chemistry 
Department. 



24 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Chemstrand Corporation Scholarship. Two two-hundred-and-fifty 
dollar tuition scholarships are awarded each year to students majoring in 
textile technology or in textile chemistry. 

City of New Bedford Scholarships. Under an ordinance of the 
City of New Bedford, five four-year tuition scholarships are awarded each 
year to seniors of the New Bedford High School, Holy Family High 
School, Vocational High School and St. Anthony High School. These 
are distributed as follows: two to seniors of New Bedford High School, 
one to each of the other schools. 

Abraham S. Novick Memorial. A one-hundred-dollar grant 
awarded annually and available to students in all curricula. 

Allied Chemical. A one-hundred-dollar scholarship available to 
all chemistry majors. 

New Bedford Plating Corporation. A one-hundred-dollar award 
available to all textile majors. 

Robert J. Swain Memorial Scholarship. A one-hundred-and-fifty 
dollar scholarship available to Business Administration majors. 

New Bedford Institute of Technology Alumni Association Scholar- 
ships. Several scholarships of varying amounts available to students in 
all curricula. 

The Abram Holland Memorial Scholarship. One-hundred-dollars 
awarded annually to a business administration student entering his 
junior year. 

Several other scholarships are available under the auspices of the 
Scholarship Fund of the New Bedford Institute of Technology. 

STUDENT AWARDS 

The following awards are made annually: 

Northern Textile Association Medal. The Northern Textile 
Association offers a medal, to be awarded each year to the student in the 
Textile Engineering graduating class who shows the greatest proficiency in 
scholarship. This is determined by an examination of all students records 
and the medal is awarded to that student having the highest average 
according to the credit point system of determining averages. 

The competition for this medal is also open to all evening students 
who have completed the full course of study required for a degree in 
Textile Engineering. The association offering the medal has made it a 
condition of the award that at least four members of the graduating class 
be eligible to the competition. 

The William E. Hatch Award. This award is made to the member 
of the freshman class of Textile Engineering, who has the highest credit 
point average for the year. It is awarded by the Alumni Association of 
the Institute, to commemorate the day of William E. Hatch's retirement 



General Information 25 

from the presidency of the Institute. This award is sponsored by the 
Alumni Association. 

The Morris H. Crompton Award. This award is made to the 
student of the graduating class of Mechanical Engineering, who has the 
highest four-year average according to the credit point system of deter- 
mining averages. It is awarded in honor of Morris H. Crompton, former 
head of the Department of Engineering. This award is sponsored by the 
Alumni Association. 

The Fred E. Busby Award. This award is made by the Alumni 
Association to the student of the graduating class of chemistry, who has 
attained the highest four-year average according to the credit point 
system. It is presented in honor of Fred E. Busby, former head of the 
Department of Chemistry. 

The American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists 
Award. This award is presented annually to the outstanding senior in 
the Textile Chemistry Course. The award is in a form of a book. 

The Samuel Holt Designing Award. This award is sponsored by 
the Alumni Association. Presentation is made, annually, to a graduating 
student in recognition of excellence in Textile Designing. The award is 
made as an expression of appreciation and grateful acknowledgement on 
the part of the Alumni in Mr. Holt's honor. Mr. Samuel Holt, former 
head of the Designing Department retired from the faculty in 1938. He 
is respectfully remembered by all who studied under him for his kindness, 
patience, understanding and ever-willing desire to assist the individual 
student just a little bit more. 

The American Association of Textile Technologist Award. The 
basic objective of the American Association of Textile Technologists is 
to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner the advancement 
of textile technology. The furtherance of this objective is certain progress 
by the Association's encouragement in the field of textile education. 

In order to fulfill this objective, the American Association of 
Textile Technologists is presenting the plaque to an outstanding student, 
who has been selected by the faculty of the New Bedford Institute of 
Technology as that member of the graduating class who as an under- 
graduate has shown outstanding achievement in scholarship, technical 
ability, industry, judgment, leadership, reliability and ability to work 
and cooperate with others. 

The Phi Psi Award. The Phi Psi Award is a beautiful pocketbook 
and leather case set made of ostrich leather and lined with calfskin. Each 
article is embossed with the coat of arms of the fraternity, also the 
recipient's name in gold. In addition, he is presented with a suitably 
engraved certificate, certifying the honor that has been given him. This 
award is presented, regardless of fraternity affiliations to the outstanding 
graduating student on the basis of his scholastic standing which includes 
analytical powers, accuracy and reliability. In addition he must be 
possessed with leadership, initiative and personality. 



26 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

The Delta Kappa Phi Award. The Delta Chapter of the Delta 
Kappa Phi Fraternity, the oldest professional textile fraternity in the 
world, sponsors this award. This trophy and its accompanying certificate 
is awarded annually to the member of the graduating class who, in the 
opinion of the selection committee, has done the most for New Bedford 
Institute of Technology in athletics during his four years here. His 
qualities of leadership, sportsmanship and fair play are all considered. 

The Kappa Sigma Phi Award. This award is given annually by 
the Kappa Sigma Phi Sorority, to the graduating female student who, in 
the opinion of the members of this sorority is outstanding in scholastic 
achievement, leadership, initiative and personality. 

Textile Veterans Association Award. This award is presented by 
the Textile Veterans Association to the outstanding veteran in the 
graduating class majoring in a textile course. His standing is determined 
by an examination of all students records. His qualities of leadership, 
sportsmanship and fair play are all considered. 

Design and Fashion Award. A citation of excellence presented 
annually to a graduate who has majored in Textile Design and Fashion. 
This award is sponsored by the Alumni Association. 

Electrical Engineering Award. A citation of excellence presented 
annually to a graduate who has majored in the Electrical Engineering 
Course. This award is sponsored by the Alumni Association. 

Mathematics Achievement Award. This award, a book of standard 
mathematical tables, is sponsored annually by the Chemical Rubber 
Company and presented to a member of the freshman class for excellence 
in freshman mathematics. 

Physics Achievement Award. The current edition of the HAND- 
BOOK OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS is awarded to the engineering 
major achieving the highest standing in physics. This prize is presented 
annually by the Chemical Rubber Company. 

The Institute of Radio Engineers Award. This award is made to 
an outstanding senior in engineering or science. The basis for this award 
is professional development, activities in the AIEE-IRE Joint Branch, 
original work, scholarship, and meritorious extra-curricular activities. 
The award is an engraved certificate and one year's membership in the 
parent IRE organization. One or more students may also receive Honor- 
able Mention. 

The American Institute of Electrical Engineers Most Outstanding 
Branch Member Award. This award is made to an outstanding senior in 
engineering or science. The basis for this award takes into account such 
activities as preparation and presentation of technical papers in the 
Joint Branch Paper Contest, contributions to the membership campaign 
of the branch, and work spent in developing and presenting program 
throughout the year. This award is an engraved certificate. 



General Information 27 

The Bernice Walder Arenberg Member Scholarship Award is a 
beautiful trophy which is awarded to the sorority or fraternity with the 
highest cumulative point average. The organization which can win for 
three consecutive years will retire the trophy permanently. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The following organizations are available at the Institute for 
student participation: 

Camera Club 

An organization for all students interested in photography as a 
hobby. A well-equipped darkroom is available for processing and the 
application of most photographic techniques. Color processing equip- 
ment is being added as rapidly as possible. Many of the photo illustra- 
tions for the student publications and the yearbook are handled by the 
Camera Club. 

Circle K Club 

This organization is sponsored by Kiwanis International. It is a 
service organization similar to Kiwanis and other service clubs. It serves 
at the college level. It is a character building group which offers service 
on the campus, to the school and to the community. 

College Glee Club 

For all students interested in music, a Glee Club has been organ- 
ized. The Glee Club is supported by the Student Council. The purpose 
of the Club is to furnish both a musical and social outlet to its members, 
who meet weekly with a capable director, preparing a repertoire of songs 
for different functions during the school year. 

Mainstay 

The Mainstay is the College Yearbook published by and for all 
students at the Institute. This Yearbook provides for the most part a 
pictorial record of all classes and of all principal events of the school year. 

International Students' Organization 

The International Students' Organization (I.S.O.) has for its 
primary purpose the promotion of fellowship between Americans and 
foreign students enrolled at Tech and the growth of better understand- 
ing of world problems. The I.S.O. wishes to hold out a helping hand to 
all foreign guests enrolling at Tech and urges them to make themselves 
known to the organization in order that it may be of immediate assistance 
to them. The club also welcomes all interested local students. 

Fraternal Societies 

The Institute has three national, professional and social men's 
fraternities. These are Phi Psi, Delta Kappa Phi, and Nu Beta Tau. 



28 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Kappa Sigma Phi is the only women's sorority at the Institute. These 
organizations all play a major role in the social and athletic affairs of 
the Institute and are governed to some extent by the Interfraternity 
Council. 

The Interfraternity Council consists of members from each fra- 
ternal organization and an advisor chosen from the faculty. This body 
determines the rules governing rushing and the scheduling of events; it 
also enforces all Institute rules regarding membership in fraternities. 

Professional Societies 

American Chemical Society. This organization is devoted to the 
academic as well as the professional development and advancement of 
the chemistry student. These goals are approached by presenting tech- 
nical movies, sponsoring industrial tours, and offering lectures which are 
of primary interest to him. This club is affiliated with the American 
Chemical Society, and membership in the club is open to all chemistry 
majors. 

American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists. This 
chapter is a student unit of the national organization whose student 
membership is open to students who are preparing for a career in the 
application of dyes or chemicals in the textile industry, in the manufac- 
ture and research of these products, or in the testing of textile materials. 
It holds regular meetings of its own, and participates in the activities of 
the regional section. (The Rhode Island Section) of the parent organi- 
zation. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers. This student branch 
was established February 2, 1956. The objective of the A.I.E.E. student 
affiliate is to provide an organization through which the technical de- 
velopment and ideas of the engineering profession outside the classroom 
may be shared with the students and to provide the student with the 
opportunity to contribute also. Any engineering student registered in 
a four-year course is eligible for membership. 

Mechanical Engineering Club. This organization is available to 
students in the Sophomore, Junior and Senior classes majoring in Me- 
chanical Engineering. The purpose of this group is to develop in the 
student a better concept of industries' problems, and the benefits of af- 
filiation with professional engineering societies. This is accomplished 
by sponsoring technical sessions, arranging plant tours, attending joint 
meetings with professional societies, and holding dinner meetings with 
industrial representatives as invited guests. 

American Association of Textile Technologists. The purpose of 
this organization is to bring about a more intimate relationship between 
the textile industry and undergraduates majoring in the field of textiles 
or related areas. 



General Information 29 

Religious Groups 

Newman Club. The Newman Club is an organization of Catholic 
college students dedicated to the wider application of the teachings of 
the Catholic Faith to their private and social lives. The Club has a 
chaplain to minister to the spiritual needs of the members. This organiza- 
tion is affiliated with the National Federation of Newman Clubs. 

Protestant Youth Fellowship. This is an organization of Protestant 
college students whose purpose is to instill in its members a greater ap- 
preciation and need for applying to their lives the precepts of the Protes- 
tant Faith. 

Student Council 

This is a body of elected representatives from each of the four 
classes, and one faculty representative. Its purpose is to study problems 
of the student body, class activities, and the various matters of student 
organization. The council represents the student body in proposing 
changes or making recommendations to the college authorities. 

Tech Talk 

Tech Talk is the official student publication on campus. It is 
managed and published solely by student effort. A faculty member is 
appointed by the administration to act as an advisor to the group. This 
publication appears monthly and it is supported in greater part by a 
portion of the student's activities fee. The purpose of this publication 
is to make available to the student body a channel for expression and 
information. 

ATHLETICS 

The New Bedford Institute of Technology, its administration and 
faculty, approve and encourage a full program of intercollegiate and 
intramural athletics. The Athletic Council plans and provides for the 
fullest possible program of intraclass and intrafraternity sports. This 
organization, composed of representatives of both the Board of Trustees 
and the faculty, also determines athletic policies, budgets for each sport 
and approval of all sport schedules. 

Varsity teams include baseball, basketball, tennis and soccer. The 
Institute schedules for its games most of the recognized colleges within 
its athletic class. The Institute is an active member of the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and of the Southern New England 
Coastal Conference. Membership of the Southern New England Coastal 
Conference comprises, in addition to "Tech," Stonehill College, Quin- 
nipiac College, Bridgewater State College, Bradford Durfee College 
of Technology, and Nichols College. 



30 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The Office of Public Relations at the New Bedford Institute of 
Technology is under the Direction of Mr. James A. Flanagan. This 
office handles all of the publicity material for the school and makes 
regular releases to newspapers and radio stations. A system of intra- 
college communication also is maintained for the benefit of students and 
faculty. 

Through its releases and various publications and brochures the 
Office of Public Relations endeavors to further the aims of the college in 
every possible way, to create a better understanding of the Institute and 
higher education in general, to keep the public informed of worthwhile 
college activities and of individual and group accomplishments, to 
acquaint prospective students with the college and to assist in their 
orientation upon enrollment and to further the Institute's reputation as 
a good neighbor and as an essential part of the community. 

In addition to regular news from the college, the Office of Public 
Relations handles all of the sports news of the four varsity athletic teams. 
Three brochures are prepared annually and sent to dozens of news 
agencies throughout the state and country. This office works in con- 
junction with the newspaper and radio stations to keep the community 
informed of the different college sports attractions that are presented 
throughout the year. 

Close working contact is maintained with the many student or- 
ganizations in the college in order that they may receive the proper 
amount of publicity and that their efforts may be well coordinated. 
Through this office also, the Tech Alumni is kept fully informed by 
means of a monthly newsletter of the developments and advances of 
their Alma Mater. 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

In May, 1957, the Massachusetts State Legislature authorized the 
establishment of the New Bedford Institute of Technology Research 
Foundation. This Foundation marks a recognition of the excellent 
facilities and personnel available at the Institute to aid private industry 
and governmental organizations in the fields of textiles, chemistry, and 
engineering. 

The aims of the Foundation are to cooperate with groups such 
as those mentioned above and to aid them by conducting research, 
development, and consulting programs. The Foundation also serves to 
further the knowledge of its research staff and to utilize this knowledge, 
both practically and theoretically, in meeting successfully the aims and 
objectives of the Foundation. 

During the past ten years, chemical and biological research on 
fish and fish by-products has been conducted in relation to the manu- 
facture of fish meal and fish solubles, the manufacture of fish hydroly- 
sates, the nutritive values of fish and shell fish, and methods of deodoriz- 



General Information 31 

ing fish processing plants. For the past three years, research has been 
conducted on the pilot plant production of fish hydrolysates for animal 
feeding, in co-operation with the Department of Food Technology of the 
Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Other recent research projects include the following: Quarter- 
master Research and Development Command, U. S. Army: 

Study of commercial soil resistant finishes. 

Field dry cleaning compounds for soil resistant fabrics. 

Knitting Army mufflers to government specifications. 

Dyeing of nylon twill with specialized dyestuffs. 

New method of dyeing sulfur and vat colors (Shade OG-107) 
for U. S. Army poplin field jackets. 
Industrial Research Projects: 

The development of a waterproof window package box for cran- 
berries. 

The fungicidal properties of paper, Mylar film, and winding 
cement. 

The use of "Biostat," a broad spectrum antibiotic, for extending 
the freshness of fish. 

Manufacturing of various yarns and fabrics requiring certain 
properties not available in market type fabrics for purposes of dyeing 
and finishing research problems. 

Weaving of synthetic yarns into terry towels for the client's 
further research into the practical use of such material. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of the New Bedford Institute of Tech- 
nology has a twofold purpose: In its social aspect it serves to continue 
and renew the friendships and feelings of comradeship which all alumni 
felt as students; from a service viewpoint it aids the administration of 
the Institute by bringing to its attention those curricula omissions and/or 
changes which would up-grade the standards of its graduates; the as- 
sociation serves the alumni as a focal point for placements; it serves as 
a clearinghouse for news about, and of interest to, the alumni; it helps 
the Institute in those cases where alumni financial aid can be of the ut- 
most assistance; and it furnishes both the administration of the Institute 
and all alumni a common and unifying point of contact. 

All who have spent a minimum of the equivalent of one academic 
year at the New Bedford Institute of Technology are considered alumni 
of the Institute. 

The Alumni Association maintains an up-to-date file of all gradu- 
ates. Each month during the academic year every alumnus receives a 



32 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

News-Letter that brings him the latest information about the Institute 
and the activities of the alumni. At the end of May each year, the Alumni 
Association has an Alumni Reunion Weekend to which alumni come 
from far and near to renew acquaintances and see at firsthand the 
progress being made at Tech. 

Further information can be obtained by contacting James F. 
Flanagan '47, Secretary, at the New Bedford Institute of Technology. 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Undergraduate Courses of Study 



Six undergraduate curricula, with majors in ten fields, leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree are offered by the Institute: 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Design and Fashion 

Electrical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Textile Technology 

The curricula which are outlined in the following pages have 
been arranged according to fields of interest — i.e. Business administra- 
tion, chemistry, engineering, and textiles. Curricula are under constant 
study and are subject to change whenever the Institute feels that such 
change will benefit both student and industry. 



34 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Economic productivity and progress are dependent to a consider- 
able extent upon sound and effective business management. As industry 
and our economy expand, education for business at the collegiate level 
becomes more significant. Collegiate instruction in business administra- 
tion, according to the American Council on Education, is now being 
offered in more than five hundred institutions of higher learning in the 
United States. A recent report of the United States Office of Education 
stated, "Collegiate education for business has had one of the fastest — if 
not the fastest — growths of any of the areas of higher education and today 
constitutes an important and significant part of collegiate instruction." 

In recognition of these facts, the Board of Trustees at the Institute 
voted in 1958 to add to the curricula a complete program in Business 
Administration. The program was inaugurated with a freshman class of 
seventy students in September of that year. The Massachusetts Board of 
Collegiate Authority has approved this new curriculum and the award 
of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration to all 
students who complete the four years of prescribed study. 

The Business Administration curriculum offered at the Institute 
reflects the increasing awareness in industry of the fact that merely tech- 
nically-trained personnel are not adequate to meet the changing needs 
of world economy. It recognizes that the ultimate aim of education 
is to produce an intellectually and emotionally mature person with a 
sound sense of values as well as competence in technical skills. Conse- 
quently, the new curriculum incorporates the standard adopted by the 
American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business that at least forty 
per cent of the total hours required for the Bachelor's degree must be in 
the area of general or liberal arts education and at least forty per cent 
in the area of business administration. Its specific objective will be in 
the education of students to their fullest potential for competence in 
business and effectiveness in civic life. 

This course of study is planned to aid students in preparing for 
positions of responsibility in business. During the first two years funda- 
mental courses in English, mathematics, accounting, physical and social 
sciences, a foreign language, and basic courses in economics are required. 
After completion of the sophomore year, students are permitted a choice 
of three major fields for study in their junior and senior years: Account- 
ing, Marketing, or Management. At this point, aptitude and ability of 
the student, as well as his interest in subject matter of the curriculum, 
are re-examined with his advisers for the purpose of providing proper 
guidance in the selection of his major field, a matter of primary im- 
portance. 

Accounting 

The need for personnel trained in the skillful application of ac- 
counting principles has become increasingly apparent in all lines of 
industry and business. The accurate interpretation of financial reports 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 35 

and the necessity for efficiency as well as competence in record keeping 
for business are considered of paramount importance to business man- 
agement. Accounting is often considered the ' 'backbone" of manage- 
ment. Public, private, institution and government accounting present 
almost unlimited opportunities for the practice of the skilled accountant. 
Opportunities for women as well as men are rapidly increasing. Also 
to be considered is the fact that an accountant is frequently in a favor- 
able position to move up to executive or managerial responsibilities as 
the result of his background knowledge and experience. 

Marketing 

The sale and distribution of the products of industry and the 
many public and private services necessary to the economic life and 
progress everywhere provide a great many people with absorbing and 
lucrative vocations. Trained personnel in these fields may progress faster 
and further than those who have not had the opportunity for study at 
the collegiate level. 

The marketing program provides specialized training in the tech- 
nicalities of buying as well as selling. Market research, government 
regulation of business, taxation, insurance and management principles 
are included in addition to the required core curriculum. 

Management 

The course of study here is aimed to assist the young man or 
woman who is interested in preparing to assume responsibilities in busi- 
ness that may lead to junior executive or management positions. The 
possibility of proprietorship interest in his own or his family's business 
is also considered. Study in the management major should facilitate 
advancement toward top executive positions following some years of 
business experience. This program of study includes fundamental 
courses in accounting, business law, principles of management, labor 
relations, government regulation of business, effective speaking and 
seminars in the problems of business. 

tp tP tP TP 

In each of the three major areas, provision may be made for 
electives in other departments at the Institute for students who indicate 
special interests and aptitudes. Such elective courses may be arranged 
by the student in consultation with his faculty adviser and with the 
department heads concerned. 



36 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Business Administration Program 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Credit Hours 

E-101 English Composition and Literature 3 

M-lll Introductory Mathematics I 3 

SS-322 Economic History of the United States 3 

CH-114 Biological Science 3 

BA-101 Basic Accounting* 4 

16 

Credit Hours 

3 
3 

3 
3 
4 
3 



Second Semester 


E-102 


English Composition and Literature 


Ml 12 


Introductory Mathematics II 


SS-333 


Economic Geography 


CH-115 


Biological Science 


BA-102 


Basic Accounting* 


SS-110 


General Psychology 



19 



* Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory each week. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Credit Hours 

BA-203 Effective Communication 2 

SS-220 History of Western Civilization I 3 

SS-231 Principles of Economics 3 

L-201 Modern Language 3 

BA-201 Intermediate Accounting 3 

BA-205 Marketing Principles 3 

17 

Second Semester Credit Hours 

BA-204 Effective Communication 2 

SS-221 History of Western Civilization II 3 

SS-232 Economic Problems and Policies 3 

L-202 Modern Language 3 

BA-202 Advanced Accounting 3 

BA-206 Marketing Principles 3 

17 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 



37 



JUNIOR YEAR— ACCOUNTING MAJOR 



First Semester Credit Hours 

M 211 Algebra and Analytic 

Geometry 
E 301 Masterpieces in World 

Literature 
L 301 Modern Language 
BA 301 Cost Accounting 
BA 303 Business Law 

Socio-Humanistic Elective* 



3 E 302 



18 



Second Semester Credit Hours 

M 212 Mathematics of Finance 3 
Major Writers in American 

Literature 3 

Modern Language 3 

Cost Accounting 3 

Business Law 3 

Socio-Humanistic Elective* 3 



18 



L 

BA 

BA 



302 
302 
304 



301 



301 



BA 303 
BA 305 
T 309 



JUNIOR YEAR— MARKETING MAJOR 



Masterpieces in World 

Literature 
Modern Language 
Business Law 
Advertising and Selling 
Materials and Fabrics 
Socio-Humanistic Elective* 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



L 

BA 
BA 
T 



302 

302 
304 
306 
310 



Major Writers in American 

Literature 
Modern Language 
Business Law 
Advertising and Selling 
Materials and Fabrics 
Socio-Humanistic Elective* 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR— MANAGEMENT MAJOR 



E 


301 


Masterpieces in World 
Literature 


3 


E 


302 


L 


301 


Modern Language 


3 


L 


302 


BA 


303 


Business Law 


3 


BA 


304 


BA 


301 


Cost Accounting 


3 


BA 


302 


BA 


307 


Management Principles 
Socio-Humanistic Elective* 


3 

3 


BA 


308 



Major Writers in American 

Literature 
Modern Language 
Business Law 
Cost Accounting 
Management Principles 
Socio-Humanistic Elective* 



18 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



•Elect one of the following: 



E 


311 


Shakespeare 


3 


E 321 


E 


312 


Contemporary Drama 


3 


E 332 


E 


331 


Whitman and James 


3 


SS 423 


SS 


311 


Psychology of Adjustment 


3 




E 


322 


Chaucer-Canterbury Tales 


3 


SS 311 



Poetry of Milton 3 

Selected English Novels 3 
History of American 

Civilization 3 

Psychology of Adjustment 3 



38 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 



SENIOR YEAR— ACCOUNTING MAJOR 



First Semester 


Credit Hours 


Second Semester 


Credit Hours 


E 401 
M 311 


Technical 
Statistics 


Report Writing 3 
3 


E 402 
M 312 


Effective 
Statistics 


Speaking 2 

3 


BA 401 
BA 403 


Auditing 
Taxation 


3 
3 


BA 402 
BA 404 


Auditing 
Taxation 


3 
3 


BA 405 


Insurance 


2 


BA 406 


Insurance 


2 


BA 409 


Business ] 


'olicy Seminar 3 


BA 410 


Business 


Policy Seminar 3 



17 



16 



E 401 
BA 407 
BA 413 
BA 403 
BA 405 
BA 409 



SENIOR YEAR— MARKETING MAJOR 



Technical Report Writing 3 
Market Research 3 

Labor-Management Relations 3 



Taxation 
Insurance 
Business Policy Seminar 



3 
2 
3 

17 



E 402 
BA 408 
BA 414 
BA 404 
BA 406 
BA 410 



Effective Speaking 2 

Market Research 3 

Labor-Management Relations 3 



Taxation 
Insurance 
Business Policy Seminar 



3 
2 

3 

16 



E 401 
BA 411 
BA 413 
BA 403 
BA 405 
BA 409 



SENIOR YEAR— MANAGEMENT MAJOR 



Technical Report Writing 3 
Personnel Administration 3 
Labor-Management Relations 3 



Taxation 
Insurance 
Business Policy Seminar 



3 
2 
3 

17 



E 402 
BA 412 
BA 414 
BA 404 
BA 406 
BA 410 



Effective Speaking 2 

Business Fluctuations 3 

Labor-Management Relations 3 



Taxation 
Insurance 
Business Policy Seminar 



3 
2 
3 

16 



Note: In each of the three major areas in the Business Administration Curricu- 
lum, provision may be made for electives in other departments at the Institute for 
students who indicate special interests and aptitudes. Such elective courses may be 
arranged by the student in consultation with his faculty adviser and with the Depart- 
ment Heads concerned, and may serve as substitutions for certain required courses. 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 39 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry is the study of matter, its properties and transforma- 
tions. Since all manufacturing industries must start with some form 
of matter for the fabrication of their finished products, the science of 
chemistry is fundamental to all industry and for this reason, chemists 
are employed by many concerns other than those actually manufacturing 
chemicals. In recent times manufacturing companies are tending more 
and more to develop, on their own, new materials for specific purposes. 
As a result, the need for chemists is continually increasing. The advent 
of the space and atomic age has produced many problems that must be 
solved by the chemist. For example, development of materials capable 
of withstanding and insulating against terrific heat, rocket fuels of much 
greater power, stronger and lighter alloys, and lighter and more efficient 
materials for shielding against radiation are necessary before engineers 
can advance very far in space vehicle design. 

The chemistry curricula at the Institute are designed to give a 
solid foundation in the fundamental principles of chemistry and to 
provide sufficient training in laboratory techniques to form a basis for 
specialized work in the chemical or allied industrial fields chosen by the 
student. Courses in the fundamental sciences of mathematics and 
physics coupled with instruction in the socio-humanistic studies yield 
a well-balanced program which prepares the student for industrial 
careers or for graduate school. 

The Institute offers two chemistry curricula leading to a Bachelor 
of Science degree: 

Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry offers a specialized curriculum 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. Students are 
prepared for positions in any chemical field by arranging their course 
time so that approximately the same number of hours are taken in the 
four fundamental branches of chemistry, i.e., organic, inorganic, analyti- 
cal and physical. 

Textile Chemistry 

The Textile Chemistry curriculum is planned so as to give the 
student a thorough preparation in basic chemistry in addition to spe- 
cialized instruction in textile chemistry. The particular areas of indus- 
trial employment of graduates include control work, production, research 
and development, sales and purchasing. 



40 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 



Chemistry Program 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 



CH 111 General Chemistry 

M 101 College Mathematics I 

E 101 English Comp. .& Lit. 

SS 230 Principles of Economics 

SS 110 General Psychology 





Second Semester 




3 6 5$ 


CH 112 


General Chemistry 


3 3 


5 5 


M 102 


College Mathematics II 


5 5 


3 3 


CH 113 


Qualitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


3 3 


E 102 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


3 3 


P 102 


Physics I 


3 2 4 



19 



18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



CH211 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH212 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH231 


Organic Chemistry 


3 4 4 


CH 232 


Organic Chemistry 


3 4 4 


M 201 


Differential Calculus 


3 3 


M 202 


Integral Calculus 


3 3 


P 201 


Physics II 


3 2 4 


P 202 


Physics III 


3 2 4 


L 211 


German I 


3 3 


L 212 


German II 


3 3 


SS 220 


History of Western 




SS 221 


History of Western 






Civilization 


3 3 




Civilization 


3 3 



CH461 
CH441 

E 401 



CH465 



20 



JUNIOR YEAR 



CH 332 


Advanced Organic 




CH 312 




Chem. 


3 4 4 


CH365 


CH 311 


Instrumental Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH314 


CH 313 


Physical Chemistry 


4 3 5 


CH360 


L 313 


German III 
Socio-Humanistic 


3 3 






Elective* 


3 3 






Chemistry Elective 


3 





21 



SENIOR YEAR 



Organic Qual. Analysis 
Industrial Chem. 

Analysis 
Technical Report 

Writing 
Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 
Thesis 



2 4 3 



2 5 4 



2 3 



CH462 
CH442 
E 402 



CH 466 



3 



Instrumental Analysis 
Chemical Metallurgy 
Physical Chemistry 
Chemical Literature 
Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 
Chemistry Elective 



Organic Quan. Analysis 
Industrial Chem. Anal. 
Effective Speaking 
Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 
Thesis 



20 



3 



18 



4 3 

5 4 
2 

3 
4 



16 



17 



CHEMISTRY ELECTIVES 

CH 351 Bacteriology 

CH 401 Colloid Chemistry 

CH 352 Introduction to Chemistry of High Polymers 

CH 391 Industrial Chemistry 

CH 481 Chemistry of Food and Nutrition 

M 321, 322 Introduction to Statistical Theory 



JRefer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
* Refer to page 50. 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 



41 



Textile Chemistry Program 



First Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Second Semester 



CH 111 


General Chemistry 


3 6 5$ 


CH 112 


General Chemistry 


3 3 


M 101 


College Mathematics I 


5 5 


M 102 


College Mathematics II 


5 5 


E 101 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


CH 113 


Qualitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


SS 230 


Principles of Economics 


3 3 


E 102 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


SS 110 


General Psychology 


3 3 


P 102 


Physics I 


3 2 4 




19 


18 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




CH211 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH212 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH231 


Organic Chemistry 


3 4 4 


CH232 


Organic Chemistry 


3 4 4 


M 201 


Differential Calculus 


3 3 


M 202 


Integral Calculus 


3 3 


P 201 


Physics II 


3 2 4 


P 202 


Physics III 


3 2 4 


CH221 


Introductory Text. 




CH222 


Dyeing 


2 3 3 




Chem. 


2 3 3 


SS 221 


History of Western 




SS 220 


History of Western 
Civilization I 


3 3 




Civilization II 


3 3 




20 
JUNIOR 


YEAR 


^ 


20 


CH 331 


Advanced Organic 




CH 312 


Instrumental Analysis 


2 4 3 




Chem. 


3 4 4 


CH 321 


Advanced Dyeing 


2 2 3 


CH 311 


Instrumental Analysis 


2 4 3 


CH342 


Textile Printing 


2 2 3 


CH 313 


Physical Chemistry 


4 3 5 


CH314 


Physical Chemistry 


4 3 5 


CH 341 


Textile Printing 
Socio-Humanistic 


2 3 3 


TE 306 


Fabric Technology 
Socio-Humanistic 


2 2 




Elective* 


3 3 




Elective 


3 3 




Chemistry Elective 

S 


3 


> YEAR 








1Q 




21 
ENIOR 


LJJ 


CH 421 


Advanced Dyeing 


2 3 3 




Chemistry of Fibers 


3 2 4 


CH451 


Chem. Technology of 




CH452 


Industrial Chem. 






Finishing 


2 3 3 




Analysis 


2 5 4 


CH453 


Microbiology 


2 4 3 


E 402 


Chemical Technology 




TE 409 


Microscopy and 




CH431 


of Finishing 


2 3 3 




Testing 


2 2 3 


CH442 


Effective Speaking 


2 2 


E 401 


Technical Report 






Socio-Humanistic 






Writing 


2 3 




Elective 


3 3 




Socio-Humanistic 
Elective 












3 3 






16 



18 

CHEMISTRY ELECTIVES 

CH 351 Bacteriology 

CH 352 Introduction to Chemistry of High Polymers 

CH 391 Industrial Chemistry 

CH 401 Colloid Chemistry 

M 321, 322 Introduction to Statistical Theory 

CH 461 Organic Qualitative Analysis 

CH 462 Organic Quantitative Analysis 



JRefer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
* Refer to page 50. 



42 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

ENGINEERING 

With the ever-increasing influence of science and technology on 
our civilization, the demand of modern industry for young engineers, 
competently trained and capable of assuming responsibilities, has like- 
wise increased. 

The engineering curricula at the Institute are designed to meet 
the rapid changes of our day and to prepare qualified young men and 
women interested in an engineering career. The content of each cur- 
riculum is arranged to provide a well-rounded professional education by 
maintaining a proper balance between the fundamental sciences of 
mathematics, chemistry and physics; the socio-humanistic studies such 
as English, literature, economics and psychology; and the required 
basic engineering and technological subjects. 

Specific options or majors are not offered by the Institute's en- 
gineering curricula. Each curriculum, however, is organized to give 
a thorough training in the various phases of the field of specialization 
without over-emphasizing any one phase to the neglect of any others. 
Specialization in any one phase is left for industry or to graduate study. 

Inasmuch as the fundamentals of engineering are common to all 
segments of this profession, the program of study for all freshman 
engineering majors is basically the same. This allows the student an 
opportunity to reverse any decision made earlier as to the engineering 
curriculum best adapted to his abilities and interests. It also allows 
faculty advisers to help the student in deciding where his potential can 
be more fully realized. 

The Institute offers three Bachelor of Science degrees in the field 
of engineering: 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering is concerned with the generation and 
utilization of electrical energy. With the rapid expansion of this field 
many new areas of specialization such as instrumentation, computation, 
guidance, control and automation have become part of the Electrical 
Engineering field, yet only yesterday these areas were unknown. For 
this reason, it is felt that tomorrow many of our present-day students 
will find themselves working with aspects of Electrical Engineering 
which today are virtually unknown. 

The curriculum in Electrical Engineering contains a select series 
of fundamental studies to provide the student with the background 
necessary to meet the challenge of the present and of the future. In 
keeping with current thought relative to engineering curricula, a study 
of the basic concepts of mathematics, chemistry and physics as empha- 
sized during the first two years; engineering sciences and the appli- 
cability of these sciences to engineering analysis and design is developed 
in the latter two years. 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 43 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering extends into practically all branches of 
manufacturing and processing industries, as well as power generation, 
transportation and plant construction. 

In each industry there are several functions which the Mechanical 
Engineer may perform; that is, he may be assigned to general research, 
or to testing of materials or to testing of machine elements. He may be 
employed in the design of machinery relative to the development of 
manufacturing processes and plants; he may be engaged in the con- 
struction of machinery and in the production of goods; he may become 
associated with plant efficiency or with problems of management; or 
he may be attracted to the excellent opportunities in sales engineering. 
In all cases, placement in these fields leads to positions of responsibility 
and trust. 

Emphasis in the freshman and sophomore years is placed on the 
fundamental sciences of mathematics, physics and chemistry common to 
all engineering curricula. In the junior and senior years, such subjects 
as strength of materials, metallurgy, applied mechanics, thermodynamics, 
fluid mechanics, electronics and electrical engineering are given the 
greater emphasis. The Mechanical Engineering curriculum also offers 
exceptional opportunities for training in the fundamentals of machine 
design. A laboratory program including design, machine shop and 
engineering laboratory experiments provides association with the prac- 
tical application of engineering operations. 



44 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 



Electrical Engineering Program 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Sem 


ester 




Second Sen 


ester 




M 101 


College Math. I 


5 5$ 


M 102 


College Math. II 


5 5 


CH 111 


General Chem. I 


3 2 4 


CH 112 


General Chem. II 


3 2 4 


ME 111 


Eng. Drawing 


6 2 


ME 211 


Descriptive Geom. 


2 3 3 


E 101 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


E 102 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


SS 110 


General Psychology 


3 3 


P 102 


Physics I 


3 2 4 



17 



19 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



M 201 
P 201 
ME 214 
EE 202 

SS 230 


Calculus 
Physics II 
Mechanics (Statics) 
Elements of EE 
Principles of Economics 


3 3 
3 2 4 

3 3 

4 4 
3 3 


M 202 
P 202 
ME 310 
EE 207 
EE 200 
SS 221 


Calculus II 
Physics III 

Mechanics (Dynamics) 
Circuit Analysis I 
EE Lab I 

History of Western 
Civilization 


3 3 
3 2 4 
3 3 
3 3 
3 1 




17 


3 3 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



M 301 Calculus III 
EE 309 Circuit Analysis 
EE 310 Electric Machinery 
EE 300 EE Lab II 
ME 319 Thermodynamics 
ME 313 Strength of Materials 
Socio-Humanistic 
Elective** 



3 
3 
3 
3 1 
3 
2 4 



3 3 



20 



M 302 
EE 311 
EE 304 
EE 301 
ME 425 
ME 219 



Calculus IV 
Circuit Analysis III 
Electronics I 
EE Lab III 
Fluid Mechanics 
Eng. Metallurgy 
Socio-Humanistic 
Elective** 



3 3 



20 



SENIOR YEAR 



E 401 


Report Writing 


2 3 


E 402 


EE 405 


Electronics II 


3 3 


EE 411 


EE 413 


Feedback Control I 


3 3 


EE 414 


EE 400 


EE Lab IV 

Technical Elective* 
Socio-Humanistic 


3 1 


EE 401 




Elective** 


3 3 






16 




EE 424* 


Logic Circuit Design 




EE 425** 


EE 412 


Intro. Network Synthesis 




EE 422 


EE 415 


Advanced Electric Mach 


mery 


EE 416 


ME 424 


Vibrations 




EE 421 


M 321 


Introduction to Statistical 


M 322 



Theory I 
TOTAL CREDITS: 141 



Effective Speaking 
Eng. Electromagnetics 
Feedback Control II 
EE Lab V 

Technical Elective** 
Socio-Humanistic 
Elective** 



3 3 



15 



Wave-Forming Circuits 
Intro. Information Theory 
Transistor Circuits 
Power System Analysis 
Introduction to Statistical 
Theory II 



JRefer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
♦Refer to page 50. 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 



45 



Mechanical Engineering Program 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semest 


er 




Second Semester 




M 101 


College Math. I 


5 5$ 


M 102 


College Math. II 


5 5 


CH 111 


College Chemistry 


3 2 4 


CH 112 


College Chemistry 


3 2 4 


ME 111 


Engineering Drawing 


6 2 


ME 211 


Descriptive Geometry 


2 3 3 


E 101 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


E 102 


English Comp. & Lit. 


3 3 


SS 110 


General Psychology 


3 3 


P 102 


Physics I 


3 2 4 



17 



19 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



P 201 


Physics II 


3 2 4 


P 202 


Physics III 


3 2 4 


M 201 


Calculus I 


3 3 


M 202 


Calculus II 


3 3 


ME 214 


Eng. Mech. (Statics) 


3 3 


ME 310 


Eng. Mech. (dynamics) 


3 3 


ME 201 


Mfg. Processes 


2 3 3 


ME 202 


Mfg. Processes 


2 3 3 


ME 212 


Machine Drawing 


6 2 


ME 219 


Eng. Metallurgy 


3 2 4 


SS 230 


Princ. of Economics 


3 3 


SS 221 


History of Western 
Civilization 


3 3 




18 



20 



JUNIOR YEAR 



ME 320 


Thermodynamics 


3 3 


ME 321 


Thermodynamics 


3 3 


EE 303 


Circuit Theory 


3 2 4 


EE 310 


Electric Machinery 


3 2 4 


ME 314 


Strength of Materials 


3 3 


ME 322 


Machine Design I 


2 3 3 


M 301 


Calculus III 


3 3 


ME 316 


Mechanisms 


2 3 3 


ME 314L 


Mat'ls Laboratory 
Socio-Humanistic 


3 1 


ME 326 


Mech. Eng. Laboratory 
Socio-Humanistic 


3 2 




Elective** 


3 3 




Elective** 


3 3 



17 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



EE 419 


Introductory 




ME 425 


Fluid Mechanics 


3 3 




Electronics 


3 2 4 


E 402 


Effective Speech 


2 2 


E 401 


Report Writing 


2 3 


ME 422 


Machine Design III 


2 2 


ME 421 


Machine Design II 


2 3 3 


ME 420 


Industrial Engineering 


2 3 3 


ME 424 


Vibrations 


3 3 




Socio-Humanistic 






Socio-Humanistic 






Elective** 


3 3 




Elective** 


3 3 


ME 426 


Mech. Eng. Laboratory 


3 2 




Tech. Elective* 


3 




Tech. Elective* 


3 




19 


18 


*Elect one 


of the following: 




ME 428 


Adv. Str. of Materials 


3 3 


ME 419 


Tool Engineering 


2 3 3 


ME 436 


Heat Transfer 


3 3 


ME 435 


Internal Combustion 




M 302 


Calculus IV 


3 3 




Eng. 


3 3 


EE 420 


Industrial Electronics 


2 3 3 


ME 434 


Adv. Metallurgy 


3 3 









JRefer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
* Refer to page 50. 



46 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

TEXTILES 

Because food, clothing and shelter are recognized as the three 
basic needs of man, the manufacture of textiles has become one of the 
world's leading industries. For this reason, the textile industry has so 
developed that it now ranks among the top five American industries in 
value of its product. It has been estimated that one-sixth of the total 
working population is employed in textile and allied industries. 

Recent developments in new fibers, methods of processing, and 
dyeing and finishing technology have resulted in the need for specially 
trained men and women with a knowledge of the technology of textile 
processing and /or chemistry and engineering. Because the industry also 
recognize the importance of a well-rounded education, it is felt that a 
knowledge of socio-humanistic studies, along with accounting and man- 
agement will allow the textile graduate to meet more successfully the 
demands made of him. 

Because of the size and diversity of textile and related industries, 
numerous opportunities are available for young men and women whose 
interests might lie in research, engineering, production, technology, sales, 
marketing, chemistry, design and fashion, and management. Starting 
salaries in the textile industry are comparable to those of any other 
major industry. Ambitious and alert college graduates will find excellent 
opportunities for advancement in these fields. A recent survey has 
shown that textile executives reach the top sooner and hold their jobs 
longer than any other industrial executive. 

Two programs are offered, leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree. 

Textile Technology 

The curriculum in Textile Technology is designed to prepare 
students to become competent textile technologists for eventual super- 
visory, administrative, or executive positions within the industry and 
related fields. This curriculum also provides a sound background for 
careers in sales and technical services. The main concern of this pro- 
gram is to acquaint the student with the theories and practical applica- 
tions of yarn and fabric processing, fabric design and structure, determi- 
nation of fiber and fabric strength and appearance characteristics, and 
the technology of dyeing and printing. The student is also acquainted 
with the properties, characteristics, uses, types, and availability of all 
textile fibers, natural or man-made. Twenty-six credit hours or sixteen 
per cent of this curriculum is devoted to accounting and management 
courses. Such courses prepare and aid the individual for administrative 
ind managerial positions. An equal percentage of the curriculum is 
also devoted to socio-humanistic studies in order to give the student a 
well-balanced education. 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 47 

Knitting Option 

This option in the Junior and Senior years has been made avail- 
able so that the knitting segment of the textile industry may receive 
trained personnel in the fundamentals and practices of processing 
knitted textiles. Because of the selected courses in this curriculum, 
students will be prepared for a future not only in the knitting industry, 
but also in the yarn manufacturing industry. In either case, the student 
will have a background sufficient to allow him, should he so desire, to 
enter the fields of sales and technical services. 

Design and Fashion 

Modern advancements in textile technology point up a paramount 
need for a co-ordination of the special techniques of fabric and apparel 
designers. The styling, designing and development of fabrics and tex- 
tures now require an expanded technical knowledge on the part of those 
concerned with the artistic and functional elements of textile materials. 

The Textile Design and Fashion curriculum at the Institute 
offers the student instruction in design, drawing, painting and the history 
of art as the principal subjects during the Freshman Year. The latter 
years are concerned with such courses as applied textile design, theories 
and practical studies in textile manufacturing, graphic arts and further 
studies in the history of art, drawing and painting. With the exception 
of the Freshman Year, projects are completed whereby students create 
and execute their own original fabric and apparel designs. 

To give the student a well-balanced college education, courses 
in the socio-humanistic studies, such as English composition, psychology, 
economics and literature are included in the curriculum. 



48 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 



Design and Fashion Program 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Second Semester 




E 101 


English 


3 3$ 


E 102 


Design 


3 3 


SS 230 


Principles of Economics 


3 3 


SS 110 


General Psychology 


3 3 


TD 107 


Design 


6 3 


TD 108 


Design 


6 3 


TD 101 


Nature Drawing 


3 2 


TD 102 


Nature Drawing 


3 2 


TD 103 


Life Drawing 


3 2 


TD 104 


Life Drawing 


3 2 


TD 105 


Drawing & Painting 


3 2 


TD 106 


Drawing & Painting 


3 2 


TD 111 


Anatomy 


1 1 


TD 112 


Anatomy 


1 1 


TD 113 


History of Art 


2 2 


TD 114 


History of Art 


2 2 


TE 101 


Intro. Survey of Textiles 


1 1 


TD 116 


Projection Drawing 


2 1 






19 


TE 102 


Fabric Class 


1 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



TD 301 Textile Design 
TD 307 Handloom Weaving 
TD 315 History of Costume 
TD 309 Apparel Design 
TD 311 Fashion Illustration 
Socio-Humanistic 
Elective* 



TD 302 
TD 308 
TD 316 
TD 310 
TD 312 



3 3 



18 



Textile Design 
Handloom Weaving 
History of Costume 
Apparel Design 
Fashion Illustration 
Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 
Elective, Design or 

Fashion 



J Refer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
♦Refer to page 50. 



20 



SS 220 


History of Western 




SS 221 


History of Western 






Civilization 


3 3 




Civilization 


3 3 


TE 208 


Design and Structure 


4 3 


TE 209 


Design and Structure 


4 3 


TE 206 


Yarn Technology 


1 1 


TE 207 


Fabric Technology 


2 1 


TD 203 


Life Drawing 


3 2 


TD 204 


Life Drawing 


3 2 


TD201 


Nature Drawing 


3 2 


TD 206 


Drawing & Painting 


3 2 


TD 205 


Drawing & Painting 


3 2 


TD208 


Textile Design 


6 3 


TD207 


Textile Design 


4 2 


TD 210 


Fashion Illustration 


2 1 


CH203 


Introductory Dyeing 


3 2 


CH204 


Finishing Technology 


2 2 


TE 210 


Fabric Testing 


2 1 






17 



8 6 
4 2 

2 2 
4 3 
3 

3 3 
2 

20 







SENIOR YEAR 






E 401 


Technical Report Writing 2 3 


E 402 


Effective Speech 


2 2 


TD403 


Handloom Weaving 


2 1 


TD 404 


Handloom Weaving 


2 1 


TD 401 


Textile Design 


6 4 


TD 402 


Textile Design 


8 6 


TD 409 


Degree Project 


4 2 


TD408 


Apparel Design 


4 3 


TD407 


Apparel Design 


4 3 


TD 412 


Fashion Illustration 


4 3 


TD411 


Fashion Illustration 


4 3 




Socio-Humanistic 






Socio-Humanistic 






Elective* 


3 3 




Elective* 


3 3 
19 






18 



Undergraduate Courses of Study 



49 



Textile Technology Program 



First Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Second Semester 



E 101 English Composition 3 3$ E 102 

SS 110 General Psychology 3 3 

BA 111 Accounting Principles 3 3 

ME 131 Engineering Drawing 3 1 

M 111 Mathematics 3 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry 3 2 4 



17 



SS 230 
BA 112 
M 112 
ME 132 
CH 102 
TE 100 



English Composition 3 3 

Principles of Economics 3 3 

Accounting Principles 3 3 

Mathematics 3 3 

Engineering Drawing 3 1 

General Chemistry 3 2 4 
Survey, Textile 

Technology 2 2 

19 





SOPHOMORE YEAR 




SS 220 


History of Western 




SS 221 


History of Western 






Civilization 


3 3 




Civilization 


3 3 


P 211 


Physics 


3 2 4 


P 212 


Physics 


3 2 4 


M 212 


Mathematics 


3 3 


TE 201 


Yarn Technology 


2 2 3 


TE 200 


Yarn Technology 


3 1 3 


TE 203 


Fabric Technology 


3 2 3 


TE 202 


Fabric Technology 


1 2 2 


TE 205 


Design and Structure 


2 2 3 


TE 204 


Design and Structure 


2 2 3 


CH 292 


Dyeing Technology 


2 2 3 



18 



19 





JUNIOR 


YEAR 


EE 313 


Electric Circuits and 

Machines I 3 3 


EE 314 


TE 300 


Yarn Technology 2 2 3 


TE 301 


TE 302 


Fabric Technology 2 3 3 


TE 303 


TE 304 


Design and Structure 2 2 3 


TE 305 


BA 307 


Management Principles 3 3 
Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 3 3 


BA 308 



Electric Circuits and 

Machines II 3 3 

Yarn Technology 2 2 3 

Fabric Technology 2 3 3 

Design and Structure 2 2 3 
Management Principles 3 3 

Socio-Humanistic 

Elective* 3 3 



18 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



E 401 


Technical Report 




E 402 


Effective Speech 


2 2 




Writing 


2 3 


TE 407 


Microscopy 


2 3 3 


TE 406 


Physical Testing 


2 3 3 


TE 401 


Yarn Technology 


3 2 


TE 400 


Yarn Technology 


3 3 4 


TE 403 


Fabric Technology 


1 3 2 


TE 402 


Fabric Technology 


1 3 2 


TE405 


Knit Technology 


2 1 2 


TE 404 


Knit Technology 


2 1 2 


TE 408 


Quality Control 


3 3 


M 311 


Statistics 
Socio-Humanistic 


2 2 3 


CH403 


Fabric Finishing 
Socio-Humanistic 


2 2 




Elective* 


3 3 




Elective* 


3 3 




20 


19 



JRefer to page 56 for an explanation on course coding systems. 
* Refer to page 50. 



50 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

SOCIO-HUMANISTIC ELECTIVES 

Students in all curricula are given the opportunity to elect freely 
from the program comprising socio-humanistic courses. In this respect, 
all students are required to include a socio-humanistic elective in each 
semester of the Junior and Senior years. This program consists of two 
areas: social sciences and literature. It is intended to afford the student 
an opportunity to develop a broader acquaintance with personal, social, 
and cultural values. Although the student is permitted to elect in terms 
of his own interests and preferences, it is recommended that he consult 
with his faculty advisor before making a final choice. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

SS 232 Economic Problems and Policies 3-0-3 

SS 31 1 Psychology of Adjustment 3-0-3 

SS 322 Economic History of the United States 3-0-3 

SS 333 Economic Geography 3-0-3 

SS 334 Current Economic Issues and Policies 3-0-3 

SS 423 History of American Civilization 3-0-3 

LITERATURE 

E 301 Masterpieces of World Literature 3-0-3 

E 302 Major Writers in American Literature 3-0-3 

E 311 Shakespeare 3-0-3 

E 312 Modern Drama 3-0-3 

E 321 Milton's Poetry and Selected Prose 3-0-3 

E 322 Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 3-0-3 

E 331 Walt Whitman and Henry James 3-0-3 

E 332 Eighteenth-Century English Novel 3-0-3 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

The Graduate School 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The New Bedford Institute of Technology has been authorized by 
Act of the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
confer the degrees of Master of Science in Textile Technology and Mas- 
ter of Science in Textile Chemistry. 

These graduate programs are designed to allow able students to 
further their studies in a specialized area not possible in the undergrad- 
uate curriculum. In addition to taking advanced courses in his field of 
special interest, a candidate is required to investigate a specific problem 
such as might be encouraged in a research laboratory or textile plant 
and, under competent guidance, to carry it through from start to finish; 
finally, the candidate is required to evaluate and interpret his finding in 
his Master's thesis. This experience is deemed excellent preparation to- 
ward a more advanced degree or a position of supervisory capacity in 
textile or allied industries. 

Admission 

Following are the admission requirements and conditions neces- 
sary for eligibility to the Graduate School: 

The applicant must have received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in an appropriate field from an institution recog- 
nized by the Institute. 

An average grade of "B" or better in the undergraduate 
major is required. 

All graduate candidates must designate a major field; no 
unclassified students will be admitted to the Institute. 
Admission will be to full graduate standing only. No 
provisional or special students will be admitted to graduate 
courses. 

Application Procedure 

A student interested in graduate studies at the Institute should 
file an application with the Director of the Graduate School. Applica- 
tions may be obtained from the Business Office of the Institute. 

Applicants should also: 

File an application by the first of May preceding the fall 
term in which the applicant wishes to enroll. 



52 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Send directly to the Director of the Graduate School two 
letters of reference from persons qualified to judge the ap- 
plicant's ability to carry on graduate work- 
Have official transcripts of all undergraduate records (and 
graduate, if any) sent to the Director of the Graduate 
School by the institutions previously attended. The con- 
tent, credit hours and semesters related to each subject 
taken must also be included. This information must be 
received at the Institute no later than the first of May pre- 
ceding the fall term in which the applicant wishes to enroll. 

Expenses 

Tuition, fees and other expenses for graduate students are the 
same as those listed for undergraduate courses on page 17 of this bulletin. 

Credits 

A minimum of thirty semester credits is required by students for 
a graduate degree. Credits towards the Master of Science degree may be 
obtained as follows: 

At least ten credits must be acquired from subjects desig- 
nated as graduate courses. 

Ten credits will be allowed for graduate or undergraduate 
courses relating to the particular major and must be ap- 
proved by the head of the department of that field in which 
the degree will be granted. 

All candidates for the graduate degree must prepare a 
thesis representing an original investigation. The thesis 
will represent ten credits. 

No more than six credits will be accepted from other in- 
stitutions. 

At least twenty-four credits must be obtained through resi- 
dence study. 

Requirements for Graduation 

In order to be granted the Master of Science degree the candidate 
must have fulfilled the following requirements: 

Satisfactorily completed the prescribed course of study lead- 
ing to the degree in the field in which the student has en- 
rolled. 

Have obtained a minimum of thirty credits; twenty credits 
obtained in the prescribed courses, of which fourteen are 
to be earned in the field of specialization and six in any 
other related field. 

Satisfactorily completed a thesis covering original research 
and approved by the head of the department concerned. 



The Graduate School 53 

All compiled data must be satisfactorily analyzed and in- 
terpreted. 

Have passed a comprehensive oral examination to satisfy 
the examining committee that the candidate possesses a 
reasonable mastery of knowledge in his major and minor 
fields and that this knowledge can be used with prompt- 
ness and accuracy. This examination will not be held un- 
til all other requirements, except completing the course 
work of the last semester, are satisfied. The examination, 
however, must be taken not later than two weeks before 
the end of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Have maintained a minimum standing of "B" in both the 
graduate and undergraduate subjects studied. 

A reading knowledge of at least one approved foreign 
language. 

Have a minimum of one year of academic residence. 

Have the approval of his graduate adviser in consultation 
with the department in which he is enrolled for all subjects 
studied. 

Must complete all graduate work within two calendar 
years. 

GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY 

The Institute offers curricula leading to the Master of Science 
degrees in Textile Chemistry and Textile Technology. The graduate 
courses offer the candidate considerable latitude in the particular area 
of specialization within the field. All candidates are, however, expected 
to have their choice of courses approved by their faculty advisor so as to 
provide a well-balanced over-all program to enable the successful candi- 
date to adapt himself easily to industrial and graduate work. 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

The Evening School 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Evening School is an integrated administrative unit of the 
New Bedford Institute of Technology. It is oriented to the need for 
supplying competently trained personnel to the professions and industries 
which the Institute serves. In addition, courses are offered to meet a 
growing need for the continuing education of the adult community. 

The Evening School offers a wide range of courses in the fields 
of business administration, chemistry, engineering and textiles. Courses 
in the socio-humanistic studies are also offered. No degrees are granted 
by the Evening School, but some courses carry credits which may be 
transferred toward a Bachelor of Science degree in the day program. 

Admission 

Admission to the Evening School varies with the subject selected. 
Students taking evening courses for college credit must be graduates of 
a recognized secondary school. Applicants for credit in any course are 
required to present qualifying records. For all other programs, the only 
requirement, in general, is graduation from grammar school and the 
necessary professional or industrial experience. 

Registration 

Registration forms may be procured in advance at the Business 
Office. Registration is normally held during the second week of Sep- 
tember for the Fall term and during the second week of December for 
the Spring term. No new registrations will be accepted after the first 
two weeks of classes, except with permission of the Director of Evening 
School and the instructor concerned. Students cannot apply for a 
transfer to a college credit program after the first two weeks of classes. 

Expenses 

Expenses charged for attendance at the Evening School are as 
follows: 

Audited credit courses have a tuition charge of $5.00 per 
credit hour for all residents and non-residents of New Bed- 
ford or the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

A $9.00 fee per credit hour is charged to all students en- 
rolled in a course for college credit. Out-of-state students 



The Evening School 55 

will be charged $11.00 per credit hour if college credit is 
desired. 

A $2.00 laboratory fee is required of students enrolled in 
Chemistry and Machine Shop courses. 

No refunds for evening school classes will be made after two 
weeks from the date of enrollment in any class. An application for re- 
fund must be made by the student. 

Attendance 

Students must attend 85% of classes held and complete prescribed 
assignments in order to receive a certificate for the subject. Students in 
college-credit courses must be present for 90% of scheduled classes. 

The academic year consists of two 12 week semesters in the Eve- 
ning School. The first semester begins at the end of September and ex- 
tends to the middle of December. The second semester starts during the 
first week of January and is completed about the end of March. 

The sessions per week and the semesters required to complete a 
subject are outlined in a separate bulletin. A session consists of two hours. 
In most courses, one session is given in one night; however, due to the 
nature of the course, in some cases two sessions (three hours) are com- 
pleted in one night. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Information on the credit and non-credit courses of study offered 
by the New Bedford Institute of Technology Evening School are out- 
lined in a separate bulletin obtainable from the Business Office of the 
Institute or by addressing: 



DIRECTOR OF EVENING SCHOOL 

New Bedford Institute of Technology 
Technology Center — New Bedford, Massachusetts 



NEW BEDFORD INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY 

Description of Courses 



Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by course num- 
bers. Each number is composed of a code, which signifies the department 
offering the course, and a numerical value ranging anywhere between 
100 and 499, inclusive. Courses bearing a number from 100 to 199, 
inclusive, are normally offered to freshmen; those from 200 to 299, 
sophomores; 300 to 399, juniors; 400 to 499, seniors. Following each 
course number and title, the number of lecture recitations, laboratory 
hours and the total credit hours for a semester are given a numerical 
value. It will be found, however, that the lecture and laboratory hours 
are combined for all courses offered in the Textile Design and Fashion 
curriculum. 

COURSE CODE TO DEPARTMENTS 

Business Administration BA 

Electrical Engineering EE 
English and Modern Languages E or L 

Mathematics M 

Mechanical Engineering ME 

Physics P 

Social Science SS 
Textiles 

Design and Fashion TD 

Textile Technology TE 

Examples of the above coding systems are as follows: 

P-102 — Engineering Physics — (3-2-4). The letter "P" indicates 
the Department of Physics; "102" that the subject is offered in the 
Freshman year; (3-2-4) that three lecture recitations, two labor- 
atory hours and four credits are given. 

TE-300, 301— Yarn Technology— (2-2-3). This course in Yarn 
Technology has been given two course numbers indicating that 
it is taught for two semesters. The code "TE" represents the De- 
partment of Textile Engineering; "300, 301" shows that the course 
is normally offered in the Junior year; (2-2-3) means that two 
lecture hours, two laboratory hours and three credits are given for 
each semester. 



Description of Courses 57 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BA 101 — Basic Accounting — (Three lectures, one two-hour labo- 
ratory period each week; four credit hours) . This course covers the basic 
principles and procedures in the development of the accounting cycle 
with emphasis on use of accounting knowledge as a fundamental aid to 
management and marketing. 

BA 102 — Basic Accounting — (Three lectures, one two-hour labo- 
ratory period each week; four credit hours). Introduction to partnership 
and corporation accounting. Consideration is given to the effects of 
automation in accounting procedures. 

Prerequisite: BA 101. 

BA 111, 112 — Accounting Principles — (3-0-3 each semester). This 
course has been designed to give non-business administration students a 
general knowledge of accounting principles and techniques, and to ac- 
quaint them with the problems and methods involved in accounting for 
manufacturing costs. The course includes a presentation of the more 
important principles of cost accounting, taxation, budgeting, and the 
analysis and interpretation of financial statements. 

BA 201 — Intermediate Accounting — (3-0-3). Review of the na- 
ture and presentation of basic financial reports and records. A de- 
tailed analysis of profit and loss accounts and the effect on the balance 
sheet equation. Consideration of errors and corrections required by the 
most reputable standards in current professional practices. 
Prerequisite: BA 102. 

BA 202 — Advanced Accounting — (3-0-3). A detailed study of 
procedures in partnership and corporation accounting. Installment and 
consignment sales, consolidations and fiduciary and budgetary account- 
ing. 

Prerequisite: BA 201. 

BA 203, 204 — Effective Communication — (3-0-3 each semester). 
The fundamental principles of effective writing with emphasis on clear- 
ness, conciseness, concreteness, character, and courtesy. Practical prob- 
lems and practice in the preparation of inquiries and replies, notices, 
announcements, invitation, orders, acknowledgments, human-interest 
messages, the letter of application, effective sales letters and sales talks, 
adjustments, credit and collection letters. 

Prerequisite: E 102. 

BA 205, 206— Marketing Principles — (3-0-3 each semester). The 
study of the role of distribution in a dynamic economy. Social and eco- 
nomic value of marketing activities. Analysis of the processes and insti- 
tutions involved in the distribution of commodities: product line selec- 



58 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

tion, choice of wholesale and retail channels, advertising and determina- 
tion of pricing strategy. Analysis of consumer demand through sampling 
techniques. 

BA 301, 302 — Cost Accounting — (3-0-3 each semester). A study 
of cost methods used in manufacturing, distribution and service opera- 
tions. This course covers job order, process and standard cost systems. 
Costs of materials and labor including inventory and payroll records. 

Prerequisite: BA 202. 

BA 303 — Business Law — (3-0-3). Study of legal principles and 
laws applicable to business. Courts and court procedures. Sales, insur- 
ance, contracts, agency, common carriers, partnerships. Text and case 
method are used. 

BA 304 — Business Law — (3-0-3). Laws pertinent to corporations, 
property sales, negotiable instruments and bankruptcy. 
Prerequisite: BA 303. 

BA 305, 306 — Advertising and Selling — (3-0-3 each semester). A 
study of the principal forms of advertising. Practice in the planning of 
advertising campaigns. Integration of advertising and selling principles. 
Methods of selling and their application to specific cases with emphasis 
on sales management at both wholesale and retail levels. 

BA 307, 308 — Management Principles — (3-0-3 each semester). 
The study of the applications of basic economic principles to managerial 
decisions. A survey of the various techniques for planning, organizing, 
and controlling production. Case studies are used to provide familiarity 
with actual problems of production control, purchasing, location, physi- 
cal facilities and personnel. 

BA 401, 402 — Auditing — (3-0-3 each semester). Procedures and 
practices in auditing programs. Duties and responsibilities of an auditor. 
Preparation of audit working hours, financial statements and audit re- 
ports. 

Prerequisite: BA 202. 

BA 403 — Taxation — (3-0-3). A course designed to acquaint the 
student with basic tax problems affecting the individual and the business 
organizations with which he may become associated. In addition to in- 
dividual income taxes, sales and excise taxes as well as real and per- 
sonal property taxation are treated. 

BA 404 — Taxation — (3-0-3). A study of the Internal Revenue 
Code as it affects individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Practical 
application through the preparation of tax returns for all types of tax- 
payers. 
Prerequisite: BA 403. 



Description of Courses 59 

BA 405, 406 — Insurance Fundamentals — (2-0-2 each semester). 
The fundamental principles of insurance, economic and social aspects. 
A study of the most common forms of insurance: Life, property, 
casualty, and suretyship. Visiting lecturers recognized as authoritative 
in each field. 

BA 407, 408 — Market Research — (3-0-3 each semester) . A study 
of techniques of market research and principles applied to marketing 
problems. Field work and practice in making market surveys. 

BA 409 — Business Policy Seminar — (3-0-3). An analytic examina- 
tion of the principles which govern the executives of a corporation in es- 
tablishing the procedures and policies to be adopted in the operation of 
the business. A number of cases, taken from actual business situations, 
are analyzed with a view to developing the student's ability to determine 
the problems involved and to arrive at logical solutions based on reason- 
ing and judgment. 

BA 410 — Business Policy Seminar — (3-0-3). A continuation of 
BA 409. In addition to participation in group discussion, students are 
required to submit a number of comprehensive reports on business 
situations presented to them. 

BA 411 — Personnel Administration — (3-0-3). Methods of recruit- 
ing, selecting and training personnel. Consideration of employee services, 
union-management relations, handling grievances, Cases and problems 
are utilized. 

BA 412 — Business Fluctuations — (3-0-3). Analysis of recurrent 
business fluctuations differentiating the typical business cycle and its 
phases. Treatment of the history, theories of causation and proposals for 
control of the business cycle. 

BA 413, 414 — Labor-Management Relations — (3-0-3 each semes- 
ter). This course is designed to familiarize the student with problems 
in the field of labor-management relations, the approach of labor and 
management to these problems, the historic and economic background 
from which these problems have arisen, and government regulations in 
this field. Emphasis will be placed upon the following topics: The his- 
tory of unionism in the United States, labor law and its enforcement, 
the structure and function of unions, collective bargaining, strikes, boy- 
cotts, lock-outs, and labor economics. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

CH 101, 102 — General Chemistry — (3-2-4). An introductory 
course in Chemistry required for all students in the Textile Technology 
curriculum. It comprises a general survey of Chemistry, its basic laws 
and theories, a general study of the common elements both metallic and 
non-metallic and a study of the use and application of chemistry to daily 



60 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

life. In the laboratory work which accompanies this course, the student 
performs experiments selected with a view to enabling him to learn 
to draw correct conclusions from definitive happenings. It also enables 
him to acquire a certain manipulative technique in using the basic 
chemical tools. 

CH 111— General Chemistry— (3-2-4)*, (3-2-5)t- This course 
is required of those students matriculating for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Chemistry or Engineering. The course comprises of a thorough 
study of basic chemical facts: The study of matter, atomic structure and 
its applications to chemical reactions, the states of matter, solutions and 
equilibrium; the elements of Period III and their compounds are studied 
in greater detail in order to show more clearly the relation between 
atomic structure and chemical properties. The laboratory periods are 
designed to run concurrently with the lectures. 

CH 112— General Chemistry— (3-2-4) *, (3-0-3)1*. A continuation 
of Ch 111. Second Semester. 

Prerequisite: Ch 111. 

Ch 113 — Qualitative Analysis — (2-4-3). This course enables the 
student to tell what inorganic, and a few organic substances are present 
in a compound. The latest semi-micro technique of analysis is used. In 
the laboratory the student applies what he has studied in the analysis of 
both "known" and "unknown" materials. Problem work dealing with 
equilibrium and the other phases of qualitative analysis is stressed. 
Prerequisite: Ch 111. 

Ch 114 — Biological Science — (3-0-3). A survey course in micro- 
biology, predominantly the study of bacteria, which aims to show the 
importance of microorganisms to foods, sanitation and disease. Demon- 
strations are made of the simple techniques employed in the study of 
microorganisms. 

Ch 115 — Biological Science — (3-3-3). Nutrition and its place in 
the every day world. A course intended to aid the individual to under- 
stand the importance of food and nutrition in achieving and maintaining 
good health. Lectures and Demonstrations. 

Ch 203 — Introductory Dyeing — (1-2-2). A course especially de- 
signed for the Textile Design and Fashion students. Introduction to 
laboratory procedures. Preparation of cotton, rayon and synthetic fab- 
rics for dyeing. Preparation and application of various dyes. Introduc- 
tion to screen printing. 

* For all engineering students. 
f For all chemistry students. 



Description of Courses 61 

CH 204 — Finishing Technology — (2-0-2) . This course is ar- 
ranged for the students enrolled in the Textile Design and Fashion 
Course. It deals with the application and end use of the various classes 
of textile finishes. 

Ch 211 — Quantitative Analysis — (2-4-3). The lectures in this 
course comprise a thorough and complete discussion of the theories of 
solutions, a quantitative approach to oxidation-reduction reactions 
(redox reactions) and a study of some precipitation methods. The 
laboratory work is an application of the principles discussed in the lec- 
tures. It consists of the calibration of the volumetric ware used and the 
analysis of materials by neutralization, oxidation-reduction and precipi- 
tation methods. 

Prerequisite: Ch 113. 

Ch 212 — Quantitative Analysis — (2-4-3). This course is a continu- 
ation of Ch 211 and consists of a study of the gravimetric methods of 
analysis. 

Prerequisite: Ch 211. 

Ch 221 — Introductory Textile Chemistry — (2-3-3). This course con- 
sists of a study of the physical and chemical constitution of the textile 
fibers, both natural and synthetic; a study of the physical and chemical 
changes that result from the action of various inorganic and organic 
agents on the fibers; a study of the methods of application and the ef- 
fects of the various classes of dyes on the fibers. 
Prerequisite: Ch 112. 

Ch 222 — Dyeing — (2-3-3) . This course consists of a study of 
preparation of the textile fibers for dyeing; a study of the application of 
the various classes of dyestuffs to the textile fibers. 
Prerequisite: Ch 221. 

Ch 231, 232 — Organic Chemistry — (3-4-4). A systematic study of 
the chemistry of the compounds of carbon as presented by the more 
prominent authorities in the organic field. Proper laboratory practice 
acquaints the student with the set-up of organic laboratory experiments 
and the synthesis, identification and proper handling of the compounds. 
Prerequisite: Ch 113. 

Ch 292 — Dyeing Technology — (2-2-3). This course is designed to 
acquaint the student enrolled in Textile Technology with the funda- 
mental properties of the several classes of dyes as related to their ability 
to color textile fibers and to acquaint him with terms and practices of 
their use in the industry. 

Prerequisite: Ch 102. 



62 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Ch 311, 312 — Instrumental Analysis — (2-4-3). This is primarily 
a laboratory course in which the student studies the analysis of various 
materials by means of analytical instruments. He studies the theory 
involved in the use of optical (colorimeters, abridged spectrophotom- 
eters, spectrophotometers) instruments, electrical (pH, potientiometry, 
electroanalysis) instruments and others. The laboratory work enables the 
student to make use of this theoretical knowledge in using the instru- 
ments. 

Prerequisite: Ch 212, 232. 

Ch 313, 314 — Physical Chemistry — (4-3-5). A study of the funda- 
mental laws and theories of chemistry and of the various factors which 
modify and change the reactions and properties of chemical substances. 
The laboratory work is chosen to illustrate the principles studied. The 
problems given are a very important part of the course and quantitatively 
exemplify these principles. 

Prerequisites: Ch 212, M 202, P 202. 

Ch 321 — Advanced Dyeing — (2-2-3). This course is taken con- 
currently with Ch 342 in order that the special attention necessary in 
preparing ground shade for discharge printing and the details of over- 
dyeing resist printed fabrics may be better understood by the student. 
The theory of the selection of dyes for those purposes and the need for 
the addition of special chemical agents to the dye-baths is studied in 
detail. 

Prerequisite: Ch 222. 

Ch 331 — Advanced Organic Chemistry — (3-4-4). The study of 
more complex organic compounds and reaction mechanisms, with em- 
phasis being placed on dyestuffs and their intermediates. 
Prerequisite: Ch 232. 

Ch 332 — Advanced Organic Chemistry — (3-4-4). Study of the 
laboratory practice of synthetic organic chemistry, with particular em- 
phasis on the methods of isolating and purifying organic compounds. 

Prerequisite: Ch 232. 

Ch 341 — Textile Printing — (2-3-3). In this course the student is 
introduced to the methods of textile printing (roller, screen, hand block, 
etc.) and the basic styles of printing (direct, discharge and resist) . The 
preparation of print pastes for direct style printing of direct, basis, 
mordant insoluble azo, vat, leuco vat dyes, resin bonded pigments and 
oxidation colors is considered in detail, especially the complex chemical 
considerations of many of these print color preparations. All prepared 
color pastes are roller printed and the prints finished off by the students. 

Ch 342 — Textile Printing — (2-2-3). This course is taken con- 
currently with Ch 321. The more complex styles of printing, discharge 
and resist, are covered in detail. The preparation of white and colored 



Description of Courses 63 

print paste for all classes of dyed backgrounds is considered. All print 
pastes are screen printed. 
Prerequisite: Ch 341. 

Ch 351 — Bacteriology — (2-4-3). An introductory course in bac- 
teriology. The lectures present the fundamental concepts of this science 
and explains to the student bacterial classification and the significance 
of pathogenic and non-pathogenic micro-organisms. The laboratory 
work includes: preparation of culture media; sterilization of equipment 
and cultures; aseptic preparation and handling of pure cultures and 
simple and differential staining. 

Prerequisite: Ch 112. 

Ch 352 — Introduction to Chemistry of High Polymers — (3-0-3). 
The chemistry of large molecular substances such as textile synthetics, 
resins and plastics. 

Prerequisite: Ch 232. 

Ch 360 — Chemical Literature — (2-0-2). The course is designed 
to familiarize the student with the numerous journals and source books 
in chemistry. It requires a facility in reading German or French. The 
student will be expected to finish and hand in a report on some phase of 
chemical literature chosen by the instructor, before credil will be given. 

Ch 365 — Chemical Metallurgy — (2-0-2). A lecture course on the 
various processes of working metals and separating them from the ores. 
Prerequisite: Ch 112. 

Ch 391 — Industrial Chemistry — (3-0-3). The student undertakes 
a detailed study of the more important chemical industries. Field trips 
to various plants will be arranged with a view to crystallizing what the 
student has learned and detailed reports will be expected. 
Prerequisite: Ch 232. 

Ch 401 — Colloid Chemistry — (2-3-3). An introduction to the 
colloidal state of matter, covering a consideration of the characteristics 
and behavior of colloidal substance; methods of preparing colloidal 
substances; a study of natural colloidal substances and a special study of 
the application of colloidal behavior to the chemistry of textiles, dyeing 
and finishing. 

Ch 403 — Fabric Finishing — (2-0-2). A general course in fabric 
finishing designed for students not majoring in textile chemistry. Em- 
phasis is placed on garment-type fabrics including stabilization finishes, 
water repellency, crease resistance and mildew proofing. 

Ch 421 — Advanced Dyeing — (2-3-3). The theory and practice of 
color matching are principally emphasized in this course. The student 
is taught the proper methods of obtaining a given shade by using a com- 



64 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

bination of several dyes. The testing of various classes of dyestuffs 
for their coloring powers and money value is included. The characteris- 
tics of the various dyestuff combinations are considered. 

The more important AATCC tests procedures are also carried out. 
Prerequisite: Ch 321. 

Ch 431 — Chemistry of Textile Fibers — (3-2-4). A course empha- 
sizing: the relationship between the chemical structure and physical 
properties of fibers; the nature of the chemical reactions which produce 
degradation of fibers; the production of synthetic fibers. The short 
laboratory period is devoted to tests that serve to identify the types of 
fibers and their degradation products. 
Prerequisite: Ch 232. 

Ch 441 — Industrial Chemical Analysis — (2-5-4). Analytical pro- 
cedures used in industrial laboratories. Foods, fuel, water, oils, marine 
products, industrial chemicals. Laboratory work consists of the analysis 
of representative samples. 

Ch 442 — Industrial Chemical Analysis — (2-5-4). A continuation 
of Ch 441. Specialized procedures used in textile laboratories. Analyses 
include soap, fungicides, caustic, bleaching, solutions, water, chemicals, 
finishing compounds. 

Prerequisite: Ch 312. 

Ch 451 — Chemical Technology of Finishing — (2-3-3). This 
course is restricted to students in the Textile Chemistry Course and deals 
with the application and end uses of the various classes of textile finishes 
and the procedures used in the application of these finishes to fabrics. 

Prerequisite: Ch 321. 

Ch 452 — Chemical Technology of Finishing — (2-3-3). This 
course, a continuation of Ch 451, gives particular attention to special 
finishes, such as water repellent, fire retardant and crush resistant effects. 
This course is supplemented by field trips to various plants, bleacheries, 
dyehouses and textile printing plants. 

Prerequisite: Ch 342. 

Ch 453 — Microbiology — (2-4-3). This course includes the study 
of various micro-organisms and their importance to man and his textile 
world. Sterilization, disinfection, fumigation, staining, and methods of 
studying the action of molds and bacteria on textile fabrics are studied. 
Laboratory work includes the preparation and sterilization of the specific 
culture media, the staining and microscopic observation of the specific 
micro-organisms involved, and mildew and bactericidal tests on textile 
fabrics. 
Prerequisite: Ch 351. 



Description of Courses 65 

Ch 461 — Organic Qualitative Analysis — (2-4-3). In the first 
semester the student learns the systematic methods for the classification 
and identification of organic compounds (qualitative). 
Prerequisite: Ch 332. 

Ch 462 — Organic Quantitative Analysis — (2-4-3). During the 
second semester the student determines, by so-called ultimate analysis, 
the quantity of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, halogens, and other substances 
usually present in organic compounds (quantitative). 
Prerequisite: Ch 461. 

Ch 465, 466 — Thesis — (4). A thesis covering the related back- 
ground of one year's investigation in some selected subject is required. 
For Seniors in Chemistry. 

Ch 481 — The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition — (3-0-3). Com- 
position of foods. Vitamins, proteins, fats, carbohydrates, minerals. 
Analytical methods used in food analysis. 
Prerequisite: Ch 212. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EE 200— EE Laboratory I— (0-3-1). 

EE 202 — Elements of Electrical Engineering — (4-0-4). Funda- 
mentals of electrical engineering including electrostatics, magnetostatics, 
structure and behavior of semi-conductors and electron ballistics. 

EE 207 — Circuit Analysis I — (3-0-3). Course includes such topics 
as the following: network topology; network theorems — loop currents, 
nodal voltages, super position, Thevenin's and Hor ton's theorems; maxi- 
mum power transfer; durability; energy storage in electric circuits; initial 
conditions. 

Prerequisites: M 202 (taken concurrently), and EE 202 or P 201. 

EE 300— EE Laboratory II— (0-3-1). 

EE 301— EE Laboratory III— (0-3-1). 

EE 303 — Circuit Theory — (3-2-4). Includes circuit theory of d.c. 
and sinusoidal quantities, application of network theorems, polyphase 
circuits and an introduction to electrical measurements. Problem ses- 
sions and laboratory accompany regular assignments. 
Prerequisites: M 202. Not open to EE majors. 

EE 304 — Electronics I — (3-0-3). Analysis of basic vacuum tube 
circuits and an introduction to semi-conductor devices. 

Prerequisite: E 309. 



66 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

EE 309 — Circuit Analysis II — (3-0-3). Topics to be studied in- 
clude impulse response, convolution, Fourier Series and Fourier Integral, 
Laplace Transformation, pole and zero configurations and their inter- 
pretation. 

Prerequisites: EE 207 and M 301 (taken concurrently). 

EE 310 — Electric Machinery — (3-0-3). Course includes the study 
of electromechanical energy conversion devices, transformers, and other 
transducers. (Mechanical Engineering students have an accompanying 
laboratory session. (3-2-3).) 

EE 311— Circuit Analysis III— (3-0-3). A continuation of EE 309 
to include a study of circuit response by Fourier and Laplace transform 
methods, and Foster and Cauer networks, two-terminal-pair ladder net- 
works, constant -k filters, m-derived filters, and lattice and composite 
niters. 

Prerequisite: EE 309. 

EE 313 — Electric Circuits and Machines I — (3-0-3). Course offered 
to non-engineering majors emphasizing operating principles rather than 
detailed mathematical theory. Topics include basic d.c. circuits, electro- 
magnetic principles, d.c. generators and motors, and motor control. 
Prerequisite: M 102. 

EE 314 — Electric Circuits and Machines II — (3-0-3). Continua- 
tion of EE 313 including basic single-phase circuits, three-phase circuits, 
transformers, a.c. generators and motors, and motor control. Introduc- 
tion to electronics. 

Prerequisite: EE 313. 

EE 400— EE Laboratory IV— (0-3-1). 

EE 401— EE Laboratory V— (0-3-1) . 

EE 405 — Electronics II — (3-2-4). Course includes a study of the 
application of vacuum tubes and semi-conductor devices to perform 
specific functions in communication systems including modulation, 
amplification, and oscillation; and factors affecting frequency response; 
input and output impedances. 
Prerequisite: EE 304. 

EE 411 — Engineering Electromagnetics — (3-0-3). An analytical 
approach to static and time-varying field problems including such topics 
as Divergence Theorem, Poisson and Laplace equations, boundary -value 
problems; wave propagation along transmission lines, reflections, standing 
waves, matching, and the use of the Smith Chart. 
Prerequisite: Senior EE. 



Description of Courses 67 

EE 412 — Introduction to Netiuork Synthesis — (3-0-3). This course 
may be considered a sequence to EE 311. It includes a study of max- 
imally-flat filter functions, physical realizabitity of impedence and admit- 
tance functions, Hurwitz polynomials, R-L and R-C Foster and Cauer 
Forms, and the methods of Brune, Bode and others. 

Prerequisite: EE 311. 

EE 413 — Feedback Control Theory I — (3-0-3). This first course 
will comprise of a review of modern operational methods as applied to 
closed-loop feedback systems, determination of roots of polynomials, 
electrical analogs, signal-flow diagrams, Routh's criterion, and Nyquist 
criterion. 

Prerequisite: EE 309 (EE 311 desirable). 

EE 414 — Feedback Control Theory II — (3-0-3). Continuation of 
EE 413 including the root-locus method, the Bode diagram, compensa- 
tion techniques, other stability-considerations, and an introduction to 
sampled-data systems. 
Prerequisite: EE 413. 

EE 415 — Advanced Electric Machinery — (3-0-3). Generalized 
analysis of machines used for energy control and conversion using matrix 
transformations, etc. Application of methods of analysis to systems con- 
taining electric machines. 

Prerequisites: EE 310, M 302. 

EE 416 — Transistor Circuits — (3-0-3). Course covers the basic 
methods of transistor circuit analysis and design including biasing, study 
of various models for transistor circuits, noise considerations, and some 
transistor applications. 
Prerequisite: EE 405. 

EE 419 — Introductory Electronics — (3-2-4). A course for non- 
electrical engineering majors consisting of a study of basic electron cir- 
cuit components and electron tubes. Performance of vacuum tubes as 
rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators and relays. 
Prerequisite: EE 316. 

EE 420 — Industrial Electronics — (3-2-4). Study of vacuum tube 
applications to industrial control. Performance of electronic controls in 
instrumentation, regulation and relaying. Functions and limitations of 
commercial electronic control devices including metadyne control prin- 
ciples and photoelectric relays. 

Prerequisite: EE 419. 

EE 421 — Electric Power Systems — (3-0-3). Power system param- 
eters, steady-state calculations, fault calculations and transients stability. 
Theory of symmetrical components with application to the operation of 



68 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

electric power systems under unbalanced and steady-state conditions, 
components of instantaneous currents and voltages and their use in 
transient problem. Characteristic of synchronous plants. 
Prerequisite: EE 310. 

EE 422 — Introduction to Information Theory — (3-0-3). Noise, its 
kinds and equivalent noise circuits. Basic concepts of probability theory 
as applied to communications and information theory. Random proc- 
esses, power spectral density. Mathematical definition of information 
theory and related topics. 
Prerequisite: EE 311. 

EE 424 — Logic Circuit Design — (3-0-3). Boolean algebra. Simpli- 
fication and minimization methods of switching circuits; sequential cir- 
cuits, pulsed sequential circuits. Discussion of some special digital com- 
puting circuits including counters, differentiating and integrating circuits 
and others. 

Prerequisite: Engineering senior standing. 

EE 425 — Wave Forming Circuits — (3-0-3). Theory and design of 
generators and shapers of non-sinusoidal waves including clampers, clip- 
pers, stretchers, selecting circuits, limiters, peakers and ringing circuits. 
Prerequisites: EE 304 and EE 311. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES 

E 101 — English Composition — (3-0-3). In the first semester, the 
aim of the course is to introduce the student to the principal uses of 
language. Emphasis is placed on the ability to write clearly. The funda- 
mentals of grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, paragraph struc- 
ture, proper organization of materials and problems of style are con- 
sidered. In addition, attention is given to the problem of straight and 
logical thinking, with frequent writing exercises and supplementary 
readings. 

E 102 — English Composition and Introduction to Literature — 
(3-0-3). In the second semester, the student is introduced to imaginative 
literature and literary theory. The aim is to guide the student through 
a series of reading experiences illustrating that novelists, poets, and play- 
wrights say important things about human life; in addition, emphasis is 
placed on techniques of literary communication and differences between 
literary art and other forms of discourse. Frequent exercises in writing 
will be required for review of principles of composition. 

E 301 — Masterpieces of World Literature — (3-0-3). The course 
covers a study of selected classics from the Golden Age of Greece to the 
Twentieth Century. Emphasis is placed upon some of the fundamental 
ideas and literary forms that are an important part of the heritage of 
Western Civilization. 



Description of Courses 69 

E 302 — Major Writers in American Literature — (3-0-3). A survey 
of selected American writers from the Colonial Period to the present. 
Emphasis is placed upon the development of characteristic literary forms 
and upon ideas important in the evolution of American thought. 

E 311— Shakespeare— (3-0-3). (Offered, Fall Semester, 1961-62). 
The course is concerned with the careful reading of from ten to twelve 
of Shakespeare's plays selected from the histories, comedies, and tragedies. 
The plays are read with Shakespeare's Elizabethan background in mind, 
and emphasis is on an understanding of Shakespeare's skill as a dramatist, 
his artistry as a poet, the universality of his appeal, and the reasons for 
his place as the greatest writer in the English language. Some outside 
reading will be required in Shakespearean criticism and in the history of 
the period. 

E 312— Modern Drama— (3-0-3). (Offered, Fall Semester, 
1962-63). The course is designed to acquaint the student with works of 
important modern dramatists from Ibsen and Chekov through such near- 
contemporaries or contemporaries as Shaw, Fry, Anouilh, Giraudoux, 
T. S. Eliot, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams. Emphasis is placed 
on the changes and developments in dramatic technique that have oc- 
curred in recent years. In addition, there is emphasis on the place of the 
theater as a medium through which men have constantly explored the 
meaning of the world around them. 

E 321— Milton's Poetry and Selected Prose— (3-0-3). (Offered, 
Spring Semester, 1962-63). A study of Milton's poetic achievement based 
on the reading of selected minor poems and their developmental rela- 
tionship to Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. 
Selected prose pamphlets are read either in their entirety or in selection 
to demonstrate the development of the mind of Milton as a writer of the 
Renaissance. 

E 322— Chaucer's Canterbury Tales— (3-0-3). (Offered, Spring 
Semester, 1961-62) . A study of Chaucer as a literary artist based on the 
careful reading and critical discussion of the complete text of The Canter- 
bury Tales. This work is developed not only to demonstrate its perma- 
nent value as literature, but also to relate its significance to the under 
standing of the society of Chaucer's time. 

E 331 — Walt Whitman and Henry James — (3-0-3). A critical 
analysis of two of America's greatest and yet most widely-maligned and 
praised literary figures. Both of these writers are approached with rela- 
tion to their expression of an American consciousness. In each case, 
emphasis is placed on form, style, content, and literary technique. In 
addition to Whitman's Leaves of Grass, the following prose writings are 
studied: Prefaces to the 1855, 1872, and 1876 editions; A Backward 
Glance O'er Travel' d Roads; and selections from Democratic Vistas. 



70 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

James is represented by two novels — The American and The Ambas- 
sadors — and also selected short stories illustrating the development 
of his style and literary craftsmanship. 

E 332 — Eighteenth-Century English Novel — (3-0-3). The novels 
of Defoe, Richardson, and Fielding are studied not only as masterpieces 
of 18th-century English prose, but as landmarks in the development of 
modern realism. These writers are considered as products of the social 
forces of their day; and their works, as commentaries on the social and 
moral thought of the time. Emphasis is placed on Defoe's Moll 
Flanders, Richardson's Pamela, and Fielding's Tom Jones. 

E 401 — Report Writing — (2-0-3). The approach to report writing 
is a flexible one; that is, the course is concerned with basic principles 
relating to structure, organization, and effective communication. No 
attempt is made to establish standardized forms in report writing. A 
substantial report based on individual research among literary sources 
is required at the end of the semester. 

E 402 — Effective Speaking — (2-0-2). The course attempts to cover 
the theory and practice of speaking to both professional and lay groups. 
Various speaking situations are studied and participated in. The course 
includes considerable attention to and evaluation of the individual prob- 
lems of each student. 

L 201, 202 — French I, II — (3-0-3) . A course in the fundamentals 
of the French language. Grammar, composition, and reading of French 
prose. 

L 211, 212 — German I, II — (3-0-3). An elementary course in the 
German language. Covers grammar, composition, and reading of German 
prose. 

L 301 — French III — (3-0-3). A survey course of French literature 
of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: L 202 or consent of the department head. 

L 302 — French IV — (3-0-3). Surveys literature of the Classical 
Period to 1850. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: L 301 or consent of the department head. 

L 303 — French V — (3-0-3). Reading and writing of French sci- 
entific and technical material and the acquisition of an extensive sci- 
entific vocabulary. This course may be substituted for L 302. 
Prerequisites: L 201, L 202 or consent of the department head. 

L 313 — German III — (3-0-3). Reading and writing of German 
scientific and technical material and the acquisition of an extensive sci- 
entific vocabulary. This course may be substituted for L 315. 
Prerequisites: L 211, L 212 or consent of the department head. 



Description of Courses 71 

L 314 — German IV — (3-0-3). A survey of German literature of 
the nineteenth century. Conducted primarily in German. 

Prerequisites: L 211, L 212 or consent of the department head. 

L 315 — German V — (3-0-3). Surveys German literature of the 
twentieth century. Conducted primarily in German. 

Prerequisite: L 314 or consent of the department head. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 

M 101 — College Math. I — (5-0-5). A newer treatment of the tradi- 
tional pre-calculus material with emphasis placed on the unifying con- 
cept of a mathematical relation as a subset of X x Y. In the first semester 
the usual topics of polynomials, algebraic fractions, and exponents are 
covered along with more recent topics as elements of logic, sets, elements 
of matrix algebra, and inequalities. Algebraic, trigonometric, exponen- 
tial and logarithmic functions are treated as special cases, following a 
study of the general concept of a mathematical function. 

M 102 — College Math. II — (5-0-5). A continuation of M 101 
with a brief review of trigonometry (emphasis placed on analytics, rather 
than numerics) , an intensive study of analytic geometry and an intuitive 
approach to integral and differential calculus. 

Prerequisite: M 101. 

M 111 — Introductory Math. I — (3-0-3). The elements of algebra. 
This course is intended primarily for students with only one entrance 
unit of algebra. The course continues, after a thorough review of the 
fundamentals of algebra, with functions, determinants, complex num- 
bers, quadratic equations and inequalities. 

M 112 — Introductory Math. II — (3-0-3). This course consists of a 
study of the laws of logarithms and their use, exponential equations, the 
logarithmic and exponential curves, power functions and their graphs, 
parabolic and hyperbolic type curves, logarithmic plotting, trigono- 
metric functions of angles with liberal table work, vector applications of 
trigonometry, concise treatment of reduction formulae, trigonometric 
formulae and identities, trigonometric equations, complex numbers and 
fundamental theorems relating to polynomial equations. 
Prerequisite: M 111. 

M 201 — Calculus I — (3-0-3). After a preliminary discussion of 
limits, continuity, the derivative and the validation of theorems pertain- 
ing to these concepts, all the derivatives of elementary functions are 
developed and applied along with pertinent theorems. The integral 
concept is introduced early in the course and the various techniques of 
anti-differentiation, including the methods of partial fractions and inte- 
gration by parts, are developed and used. 
Prerequisite: M 102. 



72 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

M 202 — Calculus II — (3-0-3). This course is a continuation and 
amplification of the methods and techniques of the M 201. It also em- 
braces an extensive study of the theory and applications of integration 
methods in both rectangular and polar coordinates. Limits and sequences 
are considered along with a thorough treatment of infinite series. Mul- 
tiple integration and an introduction to linear systems, partial differenti- 
ation and differential equations complete the course. 
Prerequisite: M 201. 

M 211 — Algebra and Analytic Geometry — (3-0-3). This course 
offers a detailed study of topics from analytic geometry. These topics 
include the equation of the straight line with its parameter, normal form 
of the equation of the line, the equation of the circle, translation of axes, 
circles determined by three conditions, the parabola and its equation, 
the ellipse, the hyperbola, rotation of axes, discussion of the general 
second degree equation, conic section through five points. Also treated 
are a discussion of the locus, symmetry, excluded values, asymptotes, 
algebraic curves, parametric equations, polar coordinates and curve 
fitting. 
Prerequisite: M 112. 

M 212 — Mathematics of Finance — (3-0-3). This course covers the 
basic mathematics essential to an understanding of financial computa- 
tions. The following mathematical principles and applications are 
studied; simple and compound interest, annuities, depreciation, valua- 
tion of bonds and insurance, taxes — property and personal, partial pay- 
ment, discounts, wage payments, installment buying, sinking funds. 
Prerequisite: M 112. 

M 301— Calculus ///—(Differential Equations)— (3-0-3). This 
course embraces a study of ordinary and partial differential equations 
of the first and higher orders with especial emphasis placed on applica- 
tion to mechanical and electrical systems. The solutions to some non- 
linear equations are treated. Additional topics included in the course 
are: methods of Taylor and Picard, Frobenius solutions, Numerical 
solutions, Boundary-value problems, Fourier Series and the Laplace 
Transformation including the convolution Theorem. 
Prerequisite M 202. 

M 302— Calculus IV (Advanced Calculus)— (3-0-3) . This course 
begins with an exposition and validation of the basic techniques of 
vector analysis with ample applications to mechanics, hydrodynamics 
and electromagnetism. Bessel and Legendre functions are treated along 
with Fourier-Bessel and Legendre series and the Fourier Integral. The 
latter part of the course deals with a study of the partial differential 
equations of mathematical physics and their solutions and an introduc- 
tion to the functions of a complex variable, including analytic functions, 
residues and conformal mapping. 
Prerequisite: M 301. 



Description of Courses 73 

M 311 — Statistics I — (2-2-3). A course to acquaint the student with 
the basic concepts in statistics. A study is made of the meaning of statis- 
tics, the collection of statistical data, tabular presentation, ratios, per- 
centages, bar charts, line charts, statistical maps, pi-charts, basic concepts 
of frequency distribution, histograms, frequency polygons and Lorenz 
curve. A laboratory period is included to allow time for a comprehensive 
term project. 
Prerequisite: M 112. 

M 312 — Statistics II — (2-2-3). A continuation of M 311 including 
the arithmetic mean, median, mode, dispersion, skewness, quartile, devia- 
tion, standard deviation, kurtosis, moments of frequency distribution, 
random samples, statistical inference, index numbers, correlation, time 
series analysis including the secular trend, the seasonal fluctuation, 
cycles and forecasting. A project on business research is conducted by the 
class. 
Prerequisite: M 311. 

M 313 — Theory of Equations — (3-0-3). This course offers a full and 
explicit development of complex numbers, polynomials in one variable, 
algebraic equations and their roots, rational roots, cubic and bi-quadratic 
equations, separation of roots, the theorem of Sturm, approximate evalu- 
ation of roots, determinants and matrices, solution of linear equations 
by determinants, some applications of determinants to geometry, sym- 
metric functions and elimination. 

Prerequisite: M 202. 

M 321 — Introduction to Statistical Theory I — (3-0-3). A first 
course in statistics intended to inculcate upon the student an apprecia- 
tion of the logical foundations and universality of inferential statistics. 
A brief treatment of traditional descriptive statistics serves as a prelude 
to a mathematical probabilistic approach to the concept of a distribution 
function and an intensive study of the normal frequency distribution 
and its first and second moments. 

Prerequisite: M 102. 

M 322 — Introduction to Statistical Theory II — (3-0-3). A continu- 
ation of M 321 dealing with curve fitting, simple correlation, sampling 
and reliability, testing of hypotheses, and multiple and partial correla- 
tion. 

Prerequisite: M 321. 

M 323 — Vectors and Matrices — (3-0-3). This course is designed 
primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences and engineering. 
It deals principally with linear algebra, matrices and quadratic forms 
and constitutes a background for advanced courses such as abstract 
algebra, mechanics and mathematical statistics. Topics included in the 
course are: vectors and vector spaces, matrices and the algebra of 



74 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

matrices, linear transformations in a vector space, reduction of quadratic 
forms, vector spaces over the complex field. 

Prerequisite: M 202. 

M 401 — Philosophy of Science I — (3-0-3). A survey course de- 
signed to expose the students of science and engineering to the principles 
that underlie the mathematical and physical sciences and the human 
processes that seek to justify their formulation. Several problems that 
arise in science are met and discussed; e.g., Relativity, the Uncertainty 
Principle and Free Will, Causality, etc. The inadequacies of scientific 
formulations and epistemological problems such as the inductive method, 
statistical inference and the relation between sense deliverances and the 
real world are considered. 

Prerequisite: M 301 or M 202. 

P 102 — Physics I — (3-2-4). High school physics desired but not re- 
quired. A study of Mechanics dealing with kinetics, statics, elasticity, 
hydrostatics, hydrodynamics and mechanics of gases. Laboratory con- 
sists of measurements related to above topics. 

Prerequisite: M 101. 

P 201 — Physics II — (3-2-4). A course study in Electricity and 
Magnetism dealing with the fundamental laws of electric and magnetic 
fields, electrostatic fields, potential, steady-state currents, induced emf's, 
inductance, dielectrics, capacitance, and elementary transients. Labora- 
tory consists of measurements related to the above topics. 

Prerequisite: P 102. 

P 202 — Physics III — (3-2-4). A study of Heat dealing with tem- 
perature, calorimetry, change of state, heat transfer, thermal properties 
of matter, elementary thermodynamics. Wave motion, vibrating bodies, 
acoustical phenomena, geometrical optics, reflection, refraction, mirrors 
and lenses are also studied. Laboratory consists of measurements related 
to the above topics. 

Prerequisite: P 201. 

P 211 — College Physics I — (3-2-4). This course is designed for 
students not majoring in engineering. The general subjects to be cov- 
ered in the first semester are mechanics and heat. Demonstrations of phys- 
ical principles are incorporated into lecture periods and the laboratory 
schedule follows closely the material covered in the lectures. 

P 212 — College Physics II — (3-2-4). This course follows the same 
general development and laboratory program as P 211. The subjects 
covered in this course are sound, light and electricity and magnetism. 

Prerequisite: P 211. 



Description of Courses 75 

P 301 — Modern Physics — (3-0-3). An introduction to modern 
physics including atomic and nuclear physics, spectroscopy, photoelec- 
tric phenomenon, solid state physics, wave mechanisms and X-ray 
crystallography. 

Prerequisite: P 202. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ME 111 — Engineering Drawing — (0-6-2). A course which provides 
a background of freehand lettering, orthographic projections, instru- 
mental and freehand execution of auxiliary, isometric, oblique and 
sectional drawings. Blueprint reading, threads, fasteners and principles 
of dimensioning are stressed to prepare the student to read and write in 
the language of the practicing engineer. 

ME 127 — Theory of Projection — (0-2-1). An orientation course 
in the field of orthographic projection to develop skill in the use of 
drawing instruments and the ability to visualize and prepare three di- 
mensional drawings. 

ME 131, 132 — Engineering Drawing — (0-3-1) (0-3-1). A course 
for textile technology students. The content is similar to that of ME 111. 

ME 201 — Manufacturing Processes — (2-3-3). A study of processes 
and equipment envolved in machining materials. Included are turning 
machines, boring, milling, grinding, and thread cutting. The laboratory 
provides instruction in the use of the basic machine tools of industry. 
Emphasis is placed on the capabilities and limitations of the machines. 
Various operations involving the use of the engine lathe, drilling, and 
polishing machines are also included. 

Prerequisite: Simultaneous registration in ME 212. 

ME 202 — Manufacturing Processes — (2-3-3). A continuation of 
ME 201, covering gears and gear manufacturing, casting, hot and cold 
working processes, welding, and allied processes. The laboratory con- 
tinues with instruction in machining processes with inclusion of opera- 
tions involving the use of the milling machine and heat treating 
techniques. 
Prerequisite: ME 201. 

ME 211 — Descriptive Geometry — (2-3-3). A course that integrates 
the theory and practice of descriptive geometry as applied to engineering 
problems in the field. The course covers topics on point line and space 
relations, intersections, perpendicularity, mining and civil engineering 
problems, revolutions, vectors, tangencies, development, conies, map 
projection and spherical triangles. 
Prerequisite: ME 111. 



76 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

ME 212 — Machine Drawing — (0-6-2). This course is concerned 
with teaching the engineering student to be able to prepare detail and 
assembly working drawings of machines and elements. Topics covered 
are dimensioning gears, cams, welding drawings, charts and graphs. A 
practical project is assigned to groups for analysis and development for 
manufacture. 
Prerequisite: ME 111. 

ME 214 — Engineering Mechanics (Statics) — (3-0-3). An intro- 
ductory course in mechanics dealing with the statics of particles — forces 
in a plane and space; statics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; 
equivalent systems of forces and equilibrium of rigid bodies; analysis of 
structures; trusses, frames, and machines; friction; distributed forces; 
moments of inertia — areas. 

Prerequisite: P 102. 

ME 219 — Engineering Metallurgy — (3-2-4). The course presents 
the fundamentals of metal structure, factors affecting engineering prop- 
erties, static, and dynamic properties of metallic materials, corrosion 
and extraction of metals from their ores. Also includes a study of phase 
diagrams and simple alloy systems, heat treatment, light alloys, and 
construction of steel. Supplemented by a series of laboratory assignments. 

Prerequisite: CH 112. 

ME 310 — Engineering Mechanics (Dynamics) — (3-0-3). An intro- 
duction to the kinematics and kinetics of particles, force, mass and ac- 
celeration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Deals also 
with the kinematics and the kinetics of rigid bodies, dynamic equil- 
ibrium, work and energy, impluse and momentum and mechanical 
vibrations. 

Prerequisite: ME 214. 

ME 313 — Strength of Materials — (3-2-4). A course for students 
in Electrical and Textile engineering curricula supplemented with ap- 
proximately seven experiments in the materials testing laboratory. 
Emphasizes the fundamental principles. Considers concentric loading 
emphasizing stress and an introduction to Mohr's circle; torsional lead- 
ing of circular cross sections, flexural loading, statically indeterminate 
beams, combined loading, columns, repeated loading and dynamic 
loading. 

Prerequisite: ME 214. 

ME 314 — Strength of Materials — (3-0-3). A study dealing with 
elementary stresses and strains, stresses due to change in temperature, 
combined stresses, torsion, shear and moment in beams, deflections in 
beams, beams of two materials, statically indeterminate beams, col- 
umns and strain energy applications. 

Prerequisite: ME 214. 



Description of Courses 77 

ME 314 — L Strength of Materials Laboratory — (0-3-1). A series of 
approximately twelve laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the 
properties of engineering materials, and some of the methods for their 
testing. 

Prerequisite: With or following ME 314. 

ME 316 — Mechanisms — (2-3-3). A study of the relative motions 
of machine parts. Operating principles are analyzed to determine dis- 
placement, velocity, and acceleration by analytical and graphical 
methods. Emphasis is placed upon linkages, cams, rolling contact, gear- 
ing, flexible connectors, gear trains, translation screws, and dimensional 
synthesis. 
Prerequisite: ME 212. 

ME 319 — Thermodynamics — (3-0-3). A course presented to non- 
mechanical engineering majors in elementary thermodynamics. Areas 
of study include properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, 
the ideal gas, the gas turbine, liquids and vapors, heat exchangers, steam 
turbines and the reversed cycle. 
Prerequisites: M 202, and P 202. 

ME 320 — Thermodynamics — (3-0-3). A course presenting the 
fundamental concepts of thermodynamics for the engineering majors. 
The course includes a study of the first law of thermodynamics, the 
general energy equation, properties of the common working substances, 
the second law of thermodynamics, analysis of cycles and internal com- 
bustion engines. 
Prerequisites: M 202, and P 202. 

ME 321— Thermodynamics— (3-0-3). A continuation of ME 320, 
this course includes a study of vapors, Mollier diagrams, vapor cycles, 
steam power plants, refrigeration and heat transfer. 
Prerequisite: ME 320. 

ME 322 — Machine Design I — (2-3-3). A course designed to fur- 
nish work in the fundamentals of machine design. The design point of 
view is developed and the student is gradually encouraged to make de- 
sign decisions after due consideration of the factors involved. Lecture 
and laboratory periods are devoted to the major areas of simple stress 
analysis, tolerances and allowances, variable loads and stress concentra- 
tions, screw fastenings and springs. 
Prerequisite: ME 314. 

ME 326 — Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — (0-3-2). A series 
of experiments for students in Mechanical Engineering including solid 
and liquid fuels, combustion products, lubricants. Measurement of 
steam flow and steam properties. 



78 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

ME 419 — Tool Design — (2-2-3). Lecture and laboratory work for 
the purpose of providing Mechanical Engineering students with a sur- 
vey of the Tool Design field. Detailed discussions of the principles and 
practices of tool design are carried on in lectures; their practical applica- 
tions being carried out during the laboratory sessions. 

Prerequisites: ME 202 and ME 212. 

ME 420 — Industrial Engineering — (2-3-3). Designed to teach a 
practicable method whereby full advantage can be taken of all the 
different interconnected modern techniques by which a satisfactory 
and workable layout can be developed. Modern mass production 
methods and the major problem of the essential coordination between 
plant layout, material handling, methods engineering, production plan- 
ning, and control are discussed. A project is assigned to students for the 
purpose of providing practice in application of the above techniques. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

ME 421 — Machine Design II — (2-3-3). Theory and problems 
involving both analysis and design of machine parts used in the con- 
struction of modern machines. Some of the topics studied are: combined 
stresses, shaft design by the analytical and graphical methods, lubrica- 
tion of plain surface and journal bearings, ball and roller bearing 
selections, keys and couplings. 

Prerequisite: ME 322. 

ME 422 — Machine Design III — (2-0-2). A continuation of ME 
421 Lectures, computation, and laboratory covering such topics as flat 
belts and pulleys, brakes and clutches, V-belts and flexible connectors, 
gear design, gear train analysis and further application of graphical 
methods to the solutions of curved member problems. 
Prerequisite: ME 421. 

ME 424 — Vibrations — (3-0-3). The basic theory of mechanical 
vibrations. Such topics as simple harmonic motion, single degree of free- 
dom systems with and without damping, forced vibrations, vibration 
absorbers, critical speed in shafting, and dynamic balancing are among 
those studied. 
Prerequisite: M 301. 

ME 425 — Fluid Mechanics — (3-0-3). Fluid statics, fluid dynamics, 
ideal and viscous fluids, boundary layer, losses in systems, compressible 
and incompressible fluids, flow around immersed objects, lift and drag, 
are among topics studied. 
Prerequisite: ME 320. 

ME 426 — Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — (0-3-2). A labora- 
tory course for senior students in Mechanical Engineering. Selected 
experiments in strain measurements, heat power, fluid mechanics, and 
properties of engineering materials. 



Description of Courses 79 

ME 428 — Advanced Strength of Materials — (3-0-3). Selected 
topics such as theories of elastic failure, unsymmetrical bending, curved 
flexural members, thick walled cylinders, localized stress concentrations 
are among those covered in this course. 

Prerequisite: ME 314. 

ME 434 — Advanced Metallurgy — (3-0-3). Introduction to Physi- 
cal Metallurgy encompassing atomic structure; crystal structure imper- 
fections; equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase studies for 1, 2, and 3 
component systems; theory of mechanical working of metals including 
elastic and plastic deformation, impact, fatigue, and creep; and theories 
of relieving work effects including recovery, recrystallation, and grain 
growth. 

Prerequisite: ME 219. 

ME 435 — Internal Combustion Engineers — (3-0-3). A study of the 
internal combustion engine processes including the air-standard cycle 
analysis, engine cycles, deviation of real engines from ideal engines. 
Also includes study of detonation and knock testing, carburation and 
fuel injection, combustion chamber and cylinder head design, engine 
lubrication, cooling and performance. Supplemented by visual aids and 
laboratory assignments. 

Prerequisite: ME 321. 

ME 436 — Heat Transfer — (3-0-3). Steady and unsteady state 
conduction; free and forced convection; radiant heat transmission. Em- 
phasis on fundamentals and application of these fundamentals in the 
solution of heat transfer problems and the design of heat transfer 
equipment. 

Prerequisite: ME 321. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

SS 110 — General Psychology — (3-0-3). An introductory course to 
assist the student in developing an understanding of the fundamental 
principles of psychology and their application. Among the topics to be 
included are: growth and development, motivation, learning, emotion 
and feeling, attention and perception, intelligence, thinking, personality 
and human adjustment. 

SS 220 — History of Western Civilization I — (3-0-3). This course 
introduces the student to the main stream of our Western cultural herit- 
age. It traces the history of man from earliest times to the Age of Louis 
XIV. While political history serves as a framework, emphasis is placed 
on the social, intellectual and economic factors of our past. 

SS 221 — History of Western Civilization II — (3-0-3). This course 
continues the History of Western Europe from 1715 to the present. Em- 
phasis is again placed on the political, social, intellectual and economic 



80 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

factors which contributed to the development of our Western European 
cultural heritage. 

SS 230 — Principles of Economics — (3-0-3). A survey of basic eco- 
nomic principles to include: the structure of the American economy, 
production, exchange, money and banking, pricing and national income 
determination. This course is not a substitute for SS 231. 

SS 231 — Principles of Economics — (3-0-3). This course is designed 
to provide understanding of the organization and function of the 
economic system. Consideration will be given to such topics as produc- 
tion, exchange, money, banking, analysis of demand and supply, de- 
termination and distribution of national income, pricing, labor and 
industrial relations and business cycles. For Business Administration 
majors only. 

SS 232 — Economic Problems and Policies — (3-0-3). This course 
covers price determination, competition, monopolies, consumption, sav- 
ing, investment, rent, wages, interest, profits, analysis of national income, 
financing government and international trade. Required for Business 
Administration majors. 

Prerequisite: SS 230 or 231. 
Elective. 

SS 311 — Psychology of Adjustment — (3-0-3). This course is de- 
signed to assist the student in developing an understanding of the dy- 
namics of human adjustment. Among topics studied are motivation, 
frustration, conflict, the role of learning in adjustment, adjustive and 
non-adjustive reactions, neurotic adjustments, psychotic adjustments, 
the nature of psychotherapy and mental hygiene. 
Prerequisite: SS 110, Junior standing. 
Elective. 

SS 322 — Economic History of the United States — (3-0-3). A study 
of the major developments in the American economy from the Colonial 
Period to the present time. The course treats of the influence of the 
frontier, the influx of immigrants, the growth of technological knowl- 
edge, the evolution of business organizations, government regulation 
and control, the growth of the machine process and of business enterprise. 
Emphasis will be placed on case studies of selected business enterprises 
leading to the evolution of public policy. Required for Business Ad- 
ministration majors. 

Prerequisite: SS 221. 
Elective. 

SS 333 — Economic Geography — (3-0-3). A study of the regional 
distribution of the world's resources, industries and population. Em- 
phasis is on the distribution and importance of manufacturing, mining, 



Description of Courses 81 

forestry, agriculture, trade in relation to the factors of power resources, 
raw materials, climate, landforms, centers of population and world trade 
markets. This course provides an essential background for understand- 
ing industrial and commercial opportunities and limitations in various 
areas of the world. Required for Business Administration majors. 

Elective. 

SS 334 — Current Economic Issues and Policies — (3-0-3). An analy- 
sis of the nature of current economic issues and policies and their effects 
upon national economic conditions. Emphasis is on developing the 
student's ability to apply economic principles to problems of our econ- 
omy with analysis of policy criteria. Current issues to be studied include: 
protectionism and free trade, effects of taxation, Soviet economic 
growth, the "core" problems in farming, unemployment, competition vs. 
monopoly, dwindling gold reserves and expansion of the middle income 
class. 

Prerequisite:* SS 230 or 231. 
Elective. 

SS 412 — Industrial Psychology — (3-0-3). A study of the principles 
of psychology as applied to business and industry. Topics to be in- 
cluded are: individual differences and their nature, job satisfaction, 
morals, supervision, communication, personnel selection, interviewing, 
measurement of attitudes and the maladjusted worker. 
Prerequisite: SS 110, Senior standing. 

SS 423 — History of American Civilization — (3-0-3). This course 
traces the history of our unique American Civilization from its founding 
to the present time. Emphasis is placed on cultural developments in the 
United States; political and economic developments, however, are not 
ignored. Stress is placed on such diverse topics as our European heritage, 
foundations of the new nation, division and integration (1820-1876), 
industrialization of American Life and the triumph of democracy in 
America. 

Prerequisite: SS 221. 
Elective. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES 

Division of Design and Fashion 

TD 101, 102 — Nature Drawing — (3-2). A beginning study in the 
structures, patterns and colors found in nature. The student draws and 
paints actual specimens, studying the forms and textures in detail. 

TD 103, 104 — Life Drawing— (3-2). The study of the human 
figure, its form, mass and proportions, with emphasis on movement. A 
course in anatomy assists the student in the study of form and structure 
of the human body. 



82 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

TD 105, 106 — Drawing and Painting — (3-2). An introductory 
course to explore the capacity of paint and other media to symbolize the 
sensory images of sight and touch and translate these symbols into pic- 
torial composition. The first semester is devoted to the study of the 
language, principles and traditional concepts of picture making. 

TD 107, 108 — Design — (6-3). Problems in two and three dimen- 
sional design involving color, line, form, texture and spatial relationships, 
give the student a basic knowledge for future courses in further design. 

TD 111, 112 — Anatomy — (1-1). A study of the bones of the skele- 
ton, the muscles, and complete construction of the human figure. This 
is the basis of life drawing, fashion illustration and fashion design. 

TD 113, 114 — Introduction to Art History — (2-2). An investiga- 
tion of man's creative efforts in the visual arts at selected moments in 
history, to evaluate the meaning of art of the past and its value for us 
today (that is, the various kinds of information it gives us, including 
that on taste and style). Visits to art museums are included in the course. 

TD 116 — Projection Drawing — (2-1). This course provides a basic 
understanding of the methods used by engineers, designers and illus- 
trators to describe the size, shape or the layout of an object. 

TD 201 — Nature Drawing — (3-2). More detailed study of natural 
forms, using watercolors, tempera and scratchboard. The student is made 
aware of the vast inspirational material to be found in plants and other 
natural objects. 
Prerequisites: TD 101, 102. 

TD 203, 204 — Life Drawing — (3-2). An advanced study of the 
human figure. Study includes exploration in color of the draped figure. 

Prerequisites: TD 103, 104. 

TD 205, 206 — Drawing and Painting — (3-2). An expansion of the 
introductory course designed to increase the appreciation of the funda- 
mental restrictions of the picture plane and the painter's tools. Further 
study of composition is carried on to stimulate individual expression. 

Prerequisites: TD 105, 106. 

TD 207, 208— Textile Design— (4-2) (6-3). This course begins 
with practice in rendering techniques to study the elements involved in 
designing printed and woven materials. Experiments in color and pat- 
tern and printing processes acquaint the student with the fundamentals 
of designing fabrics. 

TD 210 — Fashion Illustration — (2-1). An introduction to fashion 
illustrators, and concentration on the development of the fashion figure. 



Description of Courses 83 

TD 301, 302 — Textile Design — (8-6). Theoretical problems in 
fabric design and printing are keyed to industrial production for a va- 
riety of uses. Students develop original designs and learn to carry them 
to completion as printed goods by using the silk screen process. 

Prerequisites: TD 208, 109. 

TD 307, 308 — Handloom Weaving — (4-2). This course gives the 
student the opportunity to learn the basic principles of hand weaving, 
and to experiment with colors and textures suitable for application to 
the power ioom. He is encouraged to design directly on the loom, and 
to use a variety of available materials. 

TD 309, 310 — Apparel Design — (4-3). Lectures on fashion design 
theory and the fashion industry are followed by the construction and 
use of a basic pattern, which are the first steps to originating an idea 
and conceiving it in the drafting class. 

TD 311, 312 — Fashion Illustration — (3-2). The course includes 
the study of layouts and advertising, and the development of rendering 
and techniques necessary for reproduction purposes. 
Prerequisite: TD 210. 

TD 315, 316 — History of Costume — (2-2). A survey of clothing 
development from earliest times to the present day. The utilization of 
source material from libraries, museums, etc. and the application of 
ideas from this research contributes to original designs. 

TD 401, 402— Textile Design— (6-4) (8-6) More advanced prob- 
lems in designing, and experiments in production techniques using the 
silk screen process are encountered during the last year. In the final 
semester individual problems are carried out, and a portfolio is compiled. 
Prerequisites: TD 301, 302. 

TD 403, 404 — Handloom Weaving — (2-1). The advanced course 
gives the student an opportunity to develop some original designs which 
can be produced on a hand loom. The designs are then illustrated in 
the form of paintings. 
Prerequisites: TD 307, 308. 

TD 407, 408 — Apparel Design — (4-3). Further study of advanced 
methods of pattern drafting and draping. 
Prerequisites: TD 309, 310. 

TD 409 — Degree Project — (4-2). In the senior year each student 
selects a specific part of the textile design and fashion field and completes 
a required amount of creative work and research. This project is sub- 
mitted for approval before graduation. 



84 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

TD 411, 412 — Fashion Illustration (4-3). A further study of 
rendering and layouts. Drawing from live models serves as a discipline 
for observing details and the fall of fabrics on the human figure. During 
the second semester the student completes a series of fashion drawings 
to be used in his portfolio. 
Prerequisites: TD 311, 312. 

TD 440 — Advanced Design Elective — (3-2). A course, open to 
juniors and seniors, in which the student explores several different 
media. He is encouraged to do independent research and must complete 
several original projects in the course of the semester. 

Division of Textile Engineering 

TE 100 — Introductory Textile Technology — (2-0-2). A course de- 
signed for the purpose of indoctrinating Freshmen of the Textile Tech- 
nology course in the non-technical phases of the textile industry. It gives 
the student an elementary understanding of the origin, types and uses 
of textile fibers. The course also provides a general discussion of the 
machinery involved in processing these fibers into yarn and fabrics. The 
theory and application of the yarn numbering systems are also discussed. 

TE 101 — Introductory Survey of Textiles — (1-0-1). An intro- 
ductory course designed to familiarize the student of the Textile Design 
and Fashion course with the elementary and non-technical phases of the 
textile industry. A study is made of the definitions of the common terms 
used in manufacturing and finishing of textiles. The properties and 
characteristics of the natural and man-made fibers as well as the use of 
flow-charts for processing these fibers into a finished product are also re- 
viewed. 

TE 102 — Fabric Classification — (1-0-1). A course relating to the 
characteristics, performance, properties and uses of a wide range of staple 
fabrics. Special emphasis placed upon the manner of producing various 
textures in woven fabrics, incorporating both natural and man-made 
fiber content. 
Prerequisite: TE 101. 

TE 200— (3-1-3). TE 201— (2-2-3). Yarn Technology. The earlier 
lectures and laboratory periods of this course are devoted to the history, 
development, classification, ginning and marketing of cotton. Following 
this brief introduction, the lectures are devoted to the theory of process- 
ing, both natural and man-made fibers into sliver; this is coupled 
with t lie mechanics and application of the equipment involved. Com- 
parative studies are made of opening and cleaning systems with special 
emphasis being placed on the statistics of blending, evening and the 
attenuation of fibers. All speed and production calculations that are 
associated with the mechanisms are also considered. 



Description of Courses 85 

TE 202— (1-2-2). TE 203— (3-2-3). Fabric Technology. Courses of 
study in the fundamentals and principles of the mechanisms related to 
the fabrication of materials by the process of weaving. Cam operation 
is basic in this introduction phase. Theory of motions for the shedding, 
picking, beat-up, let-off, and take-up principles are also basic. Progress 
follows into the study of the dobby mechanism and semi-automatic 
motions, as well as the introduction of multicolor mechanisms. A study 
is included regarding the preparation of materials and equipment prior 
to weaving. 

TE 204, 205 — Fabric Design and Structure — (2-2-3). The pur- 
pose of this course is twofold: to instruct the student on the technology 
of weave formation, and simultaneously, to instruct the student on ana- 
lyzing and reproducing fabrics. In the technology of weave formation, 
the student studies the basic weaves and their derivatives. Such weaves 
as the twill, sateen and cord are among those considered. The student 
is also taught the methods employed in determining the structure of 
the simplier fabrics and how these fabrics may be reproduced. These 
methods include determining over-all and ground construction, yarn 
counts, fabric weight, drawing-in drafts, chain drafts, reed plan and 
color arrangement. 

TE 206 — Yarn Technology — (1-1). A course in the theory of the 
various procedures employed in the processing of raw materials into 
yarns. The natural and manufactured types of fibers are included in 
the course content. 

TE 207 — Fabric Technology — (2-1). A course in the theory of 
material fabrication, covering principally the weaving process in its 
variations and capabilities as related to application of fabric design. 

TE 208, 209 — Fabric Design and Structure — (4-3). A course simi- 
lar to TE 204, 205 and tailored to the needs of students taking the Tex- 
tile Design and Fashion curriculum. Students are concerned only with 
the developing of the more common weaves as well as with the analyzing 
and reproduction of the simplier fabrics. The designing of jacquard 
materials is given special emphasis. 

TE 210 — Fabric Testing — (2-1). A laboratory course in testing 
and analysis of fabrics working from fabric sample swatches. Elementary 
yarn testing and fiber identification is included. This course offers lim- 
ited technical knowledge of physical characteristics of fabrics to the stu- 
dents majoring in design and fashion. 

TE 300-301— Yarn Technology— (2-2-3). A continuation of TE 
200, 201 on the mechanics, theories and applications involved with the 
roving and spinning equipment in the processing of sliver into spun 
yarn. Comparative studies are made of the various systems of drafting 
and its relation to sound economics. Cost factors with respect to the 



86 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

problems of mill organization and equipment are introduced in the 
latter portion of this study. 

Prerequisite: TE 201. 

TE 302, 303 — Fabric Technology — (2-3-3). A comprehensive ex- 
tension into study of more complicated mechanism related to various 
types of weaving equipment. The design, related calculations, operation, 
timings and settings on the multiple mechanical devices are explored 
and studied. 

Prerequisite: TE 203. 

TE 304, 305 — Fabric Design and Structure. — (2-2-3). A continua- 
tion of the Fabric Design and Structure course given the previous year. 
The study of the technology of weaves includes double cloths, leno and 
jacquard constructions. Students are given more advanced fabrics to 
analyze for the determination of the data necessary in their reproduction 
as well as the methods employed in the development of fabrics with 
technical specifications. 

TE 306 — Fabric Technology — (2-0-2). A survey course relating to 
the characteristics, performance, properties and uses of various staple 
fabrics. Special emphasis is placed upon manner of development of 
textures in both natural and man-made fiber composed fabrics. The 
first part of the course consists of orientation in definition of terms and 
in the theory of fiber to yarn processing. 

TE 309 — Materials and Fabrics — (3-0-3). A survey course to fit 
the needs of the Business Administration student majoring in marketing. 
The classification of the natural and synthetic fibers is first discussed; 
this is then followed by the processes used in manufacturing the various 
yarns and fabrics. Continued study involves terminology as well as yarn 
and fabric characteristics. 

TE 310 — Materials and Fabrics — (3-0-3). A continuation of TE 
310. The student familiarizes himself with the basic weaves and their 
effect on fabric construction and end use. Simple testing procedures for 
the identification of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics are also studied. 

TE 400— Yarn Technology— (3-3-4). A continuation of TE 300, 
301 on the mechanics, theories and applications involved with the use 
of combing and twisting equipment. In addition, laboratory problems 
are posed to the students in conjunction with their study of said ma- 
chinery. Simultaneously, an analysis is made of man-made fibers and 
their methods of being processed. 
Prerequisite: TE 301. 

TE 401 — Yarn Technology — (0-3-2). This course consists of 
projects as applied to one or more pieces of equipment. A term paper 



Description of Courses 87 

is prepared as a technical report in which a thorough discussion is made 
of the project. Library facilities are used to supplement and document 
this project. 
Prerequisite: TE 400. 

TE 402, 403 — Fabric Technology — (1-3-2). Further extension of 
study of specific weaving mechanisms and processes, including reproduc- 
tion of complicated and elaborate types of patterns such as Jacquard, 
leno, pile and looped textures. 

Prerequisite: TE 303. 

TE 404 — Knit Technology — (2-1-2). A course of study in the 
fundamentals of the mechanisms and equipment relative to the manu- 
facture of fabric by the process of knitting. The design, control, settings 
and mathematics pertaining to the various types of knit fabrication are 
explored and studied. The numerous processes of interlooping are basic 
elements of the course. 

TE 405 — Knit Technology — (2-1-2). An extension of TE 404 into 
the mechanical principles and the design of more intricate mechanisms 
related to the knitting process. Analysis and creation of fabric designs 
and patterns, basic and extensive, are an important part of the course. 
Prerequisite: TE 404. 

TE 406 — Physical Testing — (2-3-3). A course designed to train 
the student in the techniques and instruments used for the determina- 
tion of the fiber, yarn, and fabric properties studied. Special emphasis is 
placed on the theories underlying the determined properties as well as 
the interpretation of the data obtained. 

TE 407 — Microscopy — (2-3-3). A course designed to instruct the 
student in the use of an optical microscope; its value and limitations. 
The microscope is used in conjunction with fiber identification and 
structure; determination of blends, maturity, mercerization, and the 
physical, chemical and biological damage to textiles. The use of the 
various types of micrometers in the measure of length, diameter, area 
and other quantitative techniques. Recording of data by photomicrog- 
raphy. 

TE 408— Quality Control — (3-0-3). A study of industrial quality 
control by statistical methods as applied to manufacturing processes. 
The methods of data analysis, inspection methods, determination of 
sample size and the construction and use of control charts. 

TE 409 — Microscopy and Physical Testing— (2-2-3). A course 
comprising the elements of TE 406 and TE 407 for Textile Chemistry 
majors. 



NEW BEDFORD 
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



General Index 

PAGE 

Accounting, see Business Administration. 

Administrative Assignments 7 

Administration 7 

Admission Requirements 

Evening School 54 

Graduate School 51 

Undergraduate School 15 

Alumni Association 31 

American Chemical Society 27 

Application Procedures 

Evening School 54 

Graduate School 51 

Undergraduate School 15 

Athletics 24 

Attendance 

Evening School 55 

Undergraduate School 18 

Board of Trustees 6 

Bookstore 21 

Buildings and Equipment 14 

Business Administration 34 

Majors 

Accounting 34 

Management 35 

Marketing 35 

Program 36 

Description of Courses 57 

Calendar of Events 4 

Academic Year, 1961-1962 4 

Academic Year, 1962-1963 5 

Camera Club 27 

Chemistry 39 

Program 40 

Textile Chemistry 46 

Program 41 

Description of Courses 56 



General Index 89 

PAGE 

Circle K Club 27 

College Glee Club 27 

Conduct , 18 

Courses of Study 

Evening School 54 

Graduate School 51 

Undergraduate School 33 

Credits and Averages 

Graduate School 52 

Undergraduate School 19 

Dean's List 20 

Degrees with Distinction 20 

Description of Courses 56 

Business Administration 57 

Chemistry 59 

Electrical Engineering 65 

English and Modern Languages 68 

Mathematics 71 

Mechanical Engineering 75 

Physics 71 

Social Sciences 79 

Textiles 

Textile Design and Fashion 81 

Textile Engineering 84 

Directory of Personnel 6 

Electrical Engineering, see Engineering. 

Eligibility 19 

Endowments and Scholarships 23 

Engineering 42 

Electrical Engineering 42 

Program 44 

Description of Courses 65 

Mechanical Engineering 43 

Program 45 

Description of Courses 25 

English and Modern Languages, Description of Courses 68 

Environment 12 

Evening School 54 

General Information 54 

Courses of Study 55 

Faculty 7 

Fraternal Societies 27 



90 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

page 

General Information 

Evening School 54 

Graduate School 51 

Undergraduate School 11 

Grading and Degrees 19 

Graduate School 51 

General Information 51 

Courses of Study 52 

Graduation Requirements 

Graduate School 52 

Undergraduate School 20 

Guidance and Counseling 21 

History of the Institute 11 

Housing 21 

International Students Organization 27 

Library 20 

Lounges 21 

Mainstay 27 

Management, see Business Administration. 

Marketing, see Business Administration. 

Mathematics, Description of Courses 71 

Mechanical Engineering, see Engineering. 

Objectives of the Institute 11 

Physics, Description of Courses 71 

Placement 22 

Professional Societies 28 

Psychological Services 22 

Public Relations, Office of 30 

Refunds 18 

Religious Groups 29 

Research Foundation 30 

Rooms, see Housing. 

Social Sciences, Description of Courses 79 



General Index 91 

PAGE 

Status of the Institute 13 

Student Awards 24 

Student Council , 29 

Student Facilities and Services 20 

Student Organizations 27 

Student Regulations 18 

Tech Talk 29 

Textiles 46 

Textile Chemistry 

Graduate 53 

Undergraduate 51 

Program 41 

Description of Courses 56 

Textile Design and Fashion 47 

Program 48 

Description of Courses 81 

Textile Technology 46 

Graduate .-. 53 

Undergraduate 44 

Program 44 

Description of Courses 84 

Tuition and Fees 

Evening School 54 

Graduate School 52 

Undergraduate School 17 

Undergraduate Courses of Study 33 

Withdrawals 18 




Publication of this Document Approved by Alfred C. Holland, Stats Purchasing Agent. 
Form Ed.-NBIT-14. 3m-7-61-931068 Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.496