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Full text of "Catalogue"

new 

Bedford 

institute 

of technology 



EVENING DIVISION 



Academic Counseling 

Faculty advisors will be present at 
registration and must be consulted by 
the students in making out their 
programs. 

Counseling on academic matters is 
available during the school year to all 
evening students. Routine questions 
can usually be answered in the office 
of the Director of Evening Division. 
For more specific counseling the stu- 
dent should arrange for an appoint- 
ment with the instructor concerned. 
This appointment must be made in 
the Evening College Office. 



New Bedford Institute 
ot Technology 



CALENDAR 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
AND FACULTY 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



Louis Pacheco, Jr., Director 

EVENING DIVISION 



EVENING SCHOOL CALENDAR 

REGISTRATION, FALL SEMESTER 

Sept. 10, 11, 12, 1963 7 P.M. to 9 P.M. 

FALL SEMESTER BEGINS 

Sept. 30, 1963 7 P.M. or 8:30 P.M. 

according to class schedule 

HOLIDAYS 

November 11, Monday Veterans Day 

November 27, Wednesday Thanksgiving Recess 

November 28, Thursday Thanksgiving Recess 
December 20, Friday through 

January 1, 1964 Christmas Recess 

FALL SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS 

January 20, 21, 22, 23, 1964 7 P.M. to 9:45 P.M. 

REGISTRATION, SPRING SEMESTER 

January 20, 21, 22, 23, 1964 7 P.M. to 9:45 P.M. 

SPRING SEMESTER BEGINS 

February 3, 1964 7 P.M. or 8:30 P.M. 

according to class schedule 

HOLIDAYS 

March 20 through March 29, 1964 Spring Recess 

March 30, 1964 Classes Resume 

April 20, Monday Patriots' Day 

SPRING SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS 

May 18, 19, 20, 21, 1964 7 P.M. to 9:45 P.M. 

ALL CLASSES WILL START PROMPTLY AT 

7:00 P.M. or 8:30 P.M., 

ACCORDING TO CLASS SCHEDULE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

George E. Carignan, Chairman 

Dr. John B. O'Toole, Jr., Vice-Chairman 

Walter Smietana, Secretary 

Dr. John E. Foster, Clerk of Board 

Trustees 

Ex-officio, Dr. Owen B, Kiernan, 
Commissioner of Education 

Ex-officio, Hon. Edward F. Harrington, Mayor 

Ex-officio, Dr. James R. Hayden, 
Superintendent of Schools 

George E. Carignan Francis P. Delaney 

Joseph Dawson, Jr. James F. Francis 

Milton Gollis Alfred J. Gomes 

Waldo E. Haydon Serafin E. Mello 

Nils V. Nelson Mrs. Lydia B. Nunes 

Dr. John B. O'Toole, Jr. Walter Smietana 

Joseph M. Souza Mrs. Beatrice P. Thomas 
John E. Vertente, Jr. 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE 

John E. Foster, B.S., C.E., Sc.D., President 
George Walker, M.S., President Emeritus 

Edith Booth 

Director of Bookstore 
Edward A. Cormier, B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Director of the Summer School 
James A. Flanagan, B.S. in Ed. 

Director of Public Relations 

Director of Placement 
James L. Giblin, M.S. 

Dean of Faculty 
Warren M. Holt, B.S., Ed.M. 

Director of Admissions 
Mary F. Makin 

Treasurer 
Dwight F. Mowery, Jr., A.B., Ph.D. 

Director of the Graduate School 
Louis Pacheco, Jr., B.S.T.E., Ed.M. 

Director of the Evening School 
Claire N. Riley, A.B. 

Director of the Library 
J. Louis Roberts, B.S.M.E., P.E. 

Superintendent of the Buildings 
Augustus Silva, A.B., M.A. 

Dean of Students 
Fred R. Tripp, B.S., Ch.E. 

Director of the Research Foundation 

FACULTY 

Milton S. Briggs, B.B.A. 

Professor of Business Administration 

Chairman of the Department 
James L. Giblin, M.S. 

Commonwealth Professor of Textile Engineering 

Chairman of the Department 
Lenine M. Gonsalves, B.S., M.S.E.E., P.E. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Chairman of the Department 
Anthony J. John, B.S., M.S., M.A. 

Professor of Mathematics 

Chairman of the Department 
Dwight F. Mowery, Jr., A.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 
Augustus Silva, A.B., M.A. 

Professor of English 

Chairman of the Department 
Leo M. Sullivan, B.S. in Ed., M.A. 

Professor of Social Sciences 

Chairman of the Department 
Howard C. Tinkham, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Chairman of the Department 
Francis Tripp, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C, M.S.Ch., Ch.E. 

Professor of Chemistry 

Chairman of the Department 
John C. Broadmeadow, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C, Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Peter O. Cioffi, B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Edward H. Cloutier 

Associate Professor of Textile Engineering 
Earl J. Dias, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of English 
Edmund J. Dupre, B.S.T.C, Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Louis E. F. Fenaux, B.S.Ch., M.S.Ch. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Warren M. Holt, B.S., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Frederic R. Mattfield, B.S. in B.A., M.B.A., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 
Louis Pacheco, Jr., B.S.T.E., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Textile Engineering 
John R. Barylski, B.S.M.E., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Clifford N. Beck, B.S.T.E. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Alden W. Counsell, B.S.M.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Michael Crowley, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ferdinand P. Fiocchi, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Frederyk E. Gorczyca, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Celestino D. Macedo, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Walter E. A. Mierzejewski, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Margot Neugebauer, B.F.A., M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Design and Fashion 
John T. Regan, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Conrad P. Richard, B.S.M.D., P.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
J. Louis Roberts, B.S.M.E., P.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Antone Rodil 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
William A. Silveira, B.S.T.E., M.S.T.T. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
Arthur V. Swaye, B.S.T.E. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering 
George J. Thomas, B.Sc.E., P.E. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
Fred R. Tripp, B.S.Ch.E., B.S.T.C. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Richard Walder, B.S.E.E. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Robert C. Booth 

Instructor in Design and Fashion 
Lance C. Buhl, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Social Sciences 
Edward A. Cormier, B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Business Administration 
James A. Flanagan, B.S. in Ed. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
Frank Golen, Jr., B.S. in B.A., Ed.M., C.A.G.S. 

Insructor in Business Administration 
Daniel J. Murphy, B.S.E.E. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
Evelyn Ramalhete, B.S.T.D.F. 

Instructor in Design and Fashion 
Louis J. Robitaille, B.S. in B.A., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Social Sciences 
Priscilla Tabachnik, B.S. in B.A. 

Instructor in Business Administration 
Rosemary S. Tierney, A.B., Ed.M. 

Instructor in English 
John F. Wareing 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
Vivian Zerbone, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Languages 
George Jacobs, A.B., LL.B. 

Visiting Lecturer in Business Law 
June F. Devine, B.F.A. 

Visiting Lecturer in Music 
Frederic Alpert, A.B., M.B.A. 

Visiting Lecturer in Business Administration 






THE EVENING SCHOOL 

Organization and Purpose 

The Evening School is an integrated administrative unit 
of the New Bedford Institute of Technology. It is oriented 
to the need for supplying trained personnel to the pro- 
fessions and industries which the Institute serves. In ad- 
dition, courses are offered to meet a growing demand for 
the continuing education for the adult community. 

Accreditation 

New Bedford Institute of Technology is a member of 
the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

Entrance Requirements 

Entrance requirements vary with the program or sub- 
ject selected. Applicants for college credit are required 
to present qualifying high school records. For all non- 
credit programs, the only requirement in general, is the 
necessary professional or industrial experience. All applica- 
tions must be reviewed by the department concerned prior 
to acceptance. Duly enrolled day school students may, 
with the permission of the Dean of Students, participate 
in the Evening School program. 

Each applicant for the Associate Degree program must 
have earned a high school diploma, or its equivalency, 
and must have a minimum of one unit of algebra. It is 
further recommended that, if at all possible, the applicant 
show a background in the area of specialization. Each 
student is to be interviewed by the department chairman 
for approval into the particular program. 

Registration 

Registration forms may be procured in advance at the 
office of the Director. Registration is normally held dur- 
ing the first week of September for the Fall Semester. 
(See Evening School calendar on page 2.) No new reg- 
istrations will be accepted after the first two weeks of 
classes except with the permission of the Director of Even- 
ing School and the instructor concerned. Students cannot 
apply for a transfer to a college credit program after the 
first two weeks of classes. 

Tuition and Fees 

Tuition and Fees charged for attendance at the Even- 
ing School are as follows: 

1. Non-credit courses are available without tuition 
charge to residents of New Bedford. (This is in lieu of a 
$10,000 annual grant to the Institute from the City of 
New Bedford.) 

2. Non-credit courses have a tuition charge of $10.00 
per course to non-residents of New Bedford. 



3. A $9.00 per credit hour fee is charged to all stu- 
dents enrolled in a course for college credit. Out-of-state 
students will be charged $11.00 per credit hour if college 
credit is desired. 

4. Audited credit courses have a tuition charge of 
$5.00 per credit hour. 

5. The Five Year Associate Degree programs in Busi- 
ness Administration, Electrical Engineering Technology 
and Mechanical Engineering Technology have a tuition 
charge of $20.00 per semester. 

6. A $2.00 laboratory fee is required of students en- 
rolled in Chemistry and Machine Shop courses. 

7. All fees are payable on, or prior to, the first week 
of scheduled classes. 

8. No refunds for evening school classes will be made 
after two weeks from the date of initial class participa- 
tion. An application for refund must be made by the stu- 
dent concerned; it is not the function of the Institute. 

Veterans 

Any resident of Massachusetts who has served in any 
branch of the armed services for at least 90 days, ten of 
which must have been served either between September 
16, 1940, and December 31, 1946, or between June 25, 
1950 and January 21, 1955 and who has a discharge other 
than dishonorable may enroll without charge for instruc- 
tion in any course here offered within the established limi- 
tation of 120 semester hours. To establish his eligibility 
the veteran must present his discharge (or a photostatic 
copy) or certificate of satisfactory service in the case of 
officers, together with proof of residence, in advance of 
the opening date of class meeting. 

Attendance 

Students must attend 85% of classes held and complete 
prescribed assignments in order to receive a certificate 
for the subject. Students in college credit courses must 
be present for 90'% scheduled classes in addition to com- 
pleting the necessary assignments. 

The sessions per week and the semester(s) required to 
complete a subject are shown with each course. All lec- 
ture sessions will be of seventy-five (75) minutes dura- 
tion, and will be conducted from 7:00 P.M. to 9:45 P.M. 
with a class break between 8:15 P.M. and 8:30 P.M. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

To effect a withdrawal, a student must notify the Di- 
rector of his intent to withdraw from a course. Until such 
is done, a student is considered to be a member of the 
class even though he absents himself therefrom. 

A student may withdraw from a course without prej- 
udice provided that this withdrawal takes place with the 
permission of the Director of Evening School and within 

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the first three weeks of the semester. A student withdraw- 
ing with permission after the first three weeks will receive 
on his transcript a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or 
WF (withdrew failing). Any student withdrawing from a 
course without permission will incur a grade of F ( Failing ) . 

Grading System 

At the completion of a course the student receives the 
number of semester hour credits at which the course is 
rated. The level of performance in a course is indicated 
by a letter grade: A, superior; B, above average; C, aver- 
age; D, passing, but not satisfactory; F, failing; Inc., In- 
complete; WF, withdrew failing; WP, withdrew passing. 
The arithmetical equivalents of the letter grades are A, 
90-100; B, 80-89; C, 70-79; D, 60-69; F, below 60. 

Quality Point Average 

The student's semester quality point rating is a weighted 
value used to denote his relative standing. The point 
values assigned are A = 4 points, B = 3 points, C r= 2 
points, D = 1 point and F =: points. These point val- 
ues, when multiplied by the credit hours assigned to the 
subject and added together, are divided by the sum of 
the credit hours to give the student's semester rating. 

Students who are matriculated in the Associate Degree 
program must, at the completion of their program, have 
a cumulative quality point average of 2.0 or higher in 
order to meet the qualitative requirements for the degree. 

All rules and regulations pertaining to the grading sys- 
tem and quality point average not herein mentioned but 
so recorded in the Institute's day school bulletin shall, 
in effect, apply to the Evening School Division. 

Special Regulations 

Students will be held responsible for damage that they 
may cause to Institute property. The Institute cannot 
assume the responsibility for losses of personal property 
upon its premises. The Institute reserves the right to with- 
draw courses due to insufficient registration. 

Bookstore 

The Institute-operated bookstore is located on the 
first floor of the Library & Art building. It is opened for 
the convenience of the Evening School students during 
the first three weeks of evening school. The hours are 
from 6:45 P.M. to 8:30 P.M. 

Library 

The facilities of the library and audio-visual aid room 
are made available to all evening school students. The 
library and reading rooms are open from 7:30 P.M. to 
9:30 P.M. on the regularly scheduled nights for evening 
classes. 



PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The Evening Division of the New Bedford Institute of 
Technology offers three formal programs of study leading 
to the Associate Degree. 

1. Associate in Business Administration. 

2. Associate in Engineering, Electrical Engineering 
Technology. 

3. Associate in Engineering, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology. 

These programs cover several of the technological sub- 
jects usually included in our day school offerings, but the 
curricula, in some instances, are less extensive in scope 
than those required for the Baccalaureate degree. For these 
reasons, some credits earned in the Associate degree pro- 
grams cannot be transferred to advanced standing leading 
to the Bachelor's Degree. 

THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM AT THIS 
INSTITUTE IS A TERMINAL PROGRAM OF INSTRUC- 
TION. 

In addition to the Associate Degree program, this In- 
stitute will offer some credit and non-credit courses in 
the following areas: 

1. Art and Design 

2. Business Administration 

3. Chemistry 

4. Electrical Engineering 

5. English and Modern Languages 

6. Mathematics and Physics 

7. Mechanical Engineering 

8. Social Sciences 

9. Textiles 



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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Leading to the Degree of Associate in Science 

FIRST YEAR 
1st Semester 

R 

E-101 English I 3 

ABA- 11 Basic Accounting I 3 



2nd Semester 

E-102 English II 3 

ABA- 12 Basic Accounting II 3 



SECOND YEAR 

1st Semester 

AM- 23 Introductory Mathematics 3 

ABA- 21 Intermediate Accounting 3 

2nd Semester 

AM- 24 Mathematics of Finance 3 

ABA- 22 Advanced Accounting 3 



THIRD YEAR 

1st Semester 

SS-231 Principles of Economics 3 

ABA- 31 Marketing Principles I 3 



2nd Semester 

SS-232 Economic Problems and Policies 3 
ABA- 32 Marketing Principles II 3 



FOURTH YEAR 

1st Semester 

SS-412 Industrial Psychology 3 

ABA- 41 Management Principles I 3 



2nd Semester 

ABA- 42 Management Principles II 3 

ABA- 44 Effective Communication 3 



FIFTH YEAR 
1st Semester 

ABA- 51 Business Law I 3 

or 
ABA- 53 Labor-Management Relations I .. 3 

and 
ABA- 55 Taxation I 3 

or 
AM- 51 Statistics I 3 



2nd Semester 

ABA- 52 Business Law II 3 

or 
ABA- 54 Labor-Management Relations II 3 

and 
ABA- 56 Taxation II 3 

or 
AM- 52 Statistics II 3 



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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 
1st Semester 

R T C 

E-101 English I 3 3 

AM- 11 Technical Mathematics I 3 3 

AME- 11 Engineering Drawing I 3 2 

8 
2nd Semester 

E-102 English II 3 3 

AM- 12 Technical Mathematics II 3 3 

AME- 12 Engineering Drawing II 3 2 

8 
SECOND YEAR 

1st Semester 

AM- 21 Calculus I 3 3 

AP- 12 Physics I 3 3 

AEE- 32 Electrical Engineering Materials Vk II 

TA 
2nd Semester 

AM- 22 Calculus II 3 3 

AP- 21 Physics II 3 3 

AEE- 32 Electrical Engineering Materials Vk Vk 

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THIRD YEAR 
1st Semester 

AME- 24 Mechanics I 3 3 

AEE- 21 Electric Circuits I 3 3 

AEE- 34 Electrical Measurements I Vk 1 

7 
2nd Semester 

AME- 31 Mechanics II 3 3 

AEE- 22 Electric Circuits II 3 3 

AEE- 34 Electrical Measurements II Vk 1 

7 
FOURTH YEAR 

1st Semester 

AEE- 41 Electronic Fundamentals 3 3 

AEE- 43 Electric Machinery 3 3 

AEE- 45 Electrical Engineering Lab. I .... 3 2 

8 
2nd Semester 

AEE- 42 Electronic Circuits I 3 3 

SS-412 Industrial Psychology 3 3 

AEE- 46 Electrical Engineering Lab. II .. 3 2 



FIFTH YEAR 
1st Semester 

AEE- 51 Electronic Circuits II 3 3 

AEE- 44 Transmission Lines 3 3 

AEE- 55 Electrical Engineering Lab. Ill 3 2 



2nd Semester 

AEE- 52 Transistor Circuits 3 3 

AEE- 53 Control Systems 3 3 

AEE- 56 Electrical Engineering Lab. IV 3 2 



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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 
1st Semester 

R L C 

E-101 English I 3 3 

AM- 11 Technical Mathematics I 3 3 

AME- 11 Engineering Drawing I 3 2 

8 
2nd Semester 

E-102 English II 3 3 

AM- 12 Technical Mathematics II 3 3 

AME- 12 Engineering Drawing II 3 2 



SECOND YEAR 
1st Semester 

AM- 21 Calculus I 3 

AP- 12 Physics I 3 

AME- 21 Machine Tool Processes I 

2nd Semester 

AM- 22 Calculus II 3 

AP- 21 Physics II 3 

AME- 22 Machine Tool Processes II 






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AME- 24 
AEE- 21 
AME- 33 



AME- 31 
AEE- 22 
AME- 34 



THIRD YEAR 
1st Semester 

Mechanics I 3 

Electric Circuits I 3 

Machine Drawing I 

2nd Semester 

Mechanics II 3 

Electric Circuits II 3 

Machine Drawing II 






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AME- 43 
AME- 45 



AME- 42 
AME- 32 
AME- 46 



FOURTH YEAR 
1st Semester 

Thermodynamics I 3 

Metallurgy 3 

Mechanisms 

2nd Semester 

Thermodynamics II 3 

Strength of Materials 3 

Mechanical Engineering Lab. I 






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FIFTH YEAR 

1st Semester 

AME- 44 Hydraulics 3 

AME- 51 Machine Design I 3 

AME- 53 Mechanical Engineering Lab. II 



2nd Semester 

SS-412 Industrial Psychology 3 

AME- 52 Machine Design II 3 

AME- 54 Tool and Die Design 






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CREDIT AND NON-CREDIT COURSES 

Art and Design 

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Basic Photography 

Drawing and Painting ( 2 sem. ) 
Screen Painting (2 sem.) 

Business Administration 



BA-101 Basic Accounting I 3 

BA-102 Basic Accounting II 3 

BA-201 Intermediate Accounting 3 

BA-202 Advanced Accounting 3 

BA-301 Cost Accounting I 3 

BA-302 Cost Accounting II 3 

BA-303 Business Law I 3 

BA-304 Business Law II 3 

*BA-501 Curriculum Dev. in Bus. Ed. 3 

Federal Income Taxes 2 



Chemistry 

General Inorganic Chemistry .... 1 2 

Ch-111 General Chemistry I 3 2 4 

Ch-112 General Chemistry II 3 2 4 

Ch-351 Bacteriology 2 2 3 

Electrical Engineering 

EE-412 Feedback Control Systems I .... 3 

EE-413 Feedback Control Systems II .. 3 

EE-416 Transistor Circuits 3 

EE-417 Transient Analysis 3 

EE-424 Logic Circuit Design 3 

English and Modern Languages 

E-101 English Composition 3 

E-102 English Comp. & Intro, to Lit. 3 

E-301 Masterpieces of World Lit 3 

E-322 Chaucer's Canterbury Tales .... 3 

L-201 French I 3 

L-202 French II 3 

L-211 German I 3 

L-212 German II 3 

Spanish 3 

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Mathematics and Physics 

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Pre-College Mathematics 3 

M-101 Algebra and Analytic Geometry 4 

*M-102 Calculus I 4 

*M-201/2 Calculus II & III 3 

*M-223 Linear Algebra 3 

*M-250 Descriptive Astronomy 3 

•M-311/12 Statistics I & II 2 

*M-340 Linear Programming 3 

*M-401 Philosophy of Science 3 

*P-102 Physics I 3 

*P-201/2 Physics II & III 3 

P-211/12 College Physics I & II 3 

*P-301 Modern Physics 3 

Mechanical Engineering 

ME-131/32 Engineering Drawing I & II .... 

ME-214 Mechanics (Statics) 3 

ME-310 Mechanics (Dynamics) 3 

*ME-410 Engr. Draw, for H.S. Teachers 1 

*ME-417 Advanced Kinematics 3 

*ME-424 Vibrations 3 



Social Sciences 

S'S-110 General Psychology 3 

SS-221 Hist, of Western Civilization II 3 

*SS-231/32 Economic Analysis Problems 

and Policies I & II 3 

*SS-240 Government 3 

*SS-311 Psychology of Adjustment 3 

*SS-333 Economic Geography 3 

*SS-334 Contemporary Economic Issues 3 

*SS-341 Formation of Am. Foreign Pol. 3 

*SS-412 Industrial Psychology 3 

*SS-423 Hist, of American Civilization 3 

Textiles 



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Power Sewing Vk 

Sewing Machine Maintenance Vk 



Graduate Credit upon acceptance by participating college 



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DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

ABA- 11— Basic Accounting 1 (3-0-3). This course 
covers the basic principles and procedures in the develop- 
ment of the accounting cycle with emphasis on use of 
accounting knowledge as a fundamental aid to manage- 
ment and marketing. 

ABA-12— Basic Accounting II (3-0-3). Introduction 
to partnership and corporation accounting. Consideration 
is given to the effects of automation in accounting proce- 
dures. 

Pre-requisite ABA-11. 

ABA-21— Intermediate Accounting (3-0-3). Review 
of the nature and presentation of basic financial reports 
and records. A detailed analysis of profit and loss accounts 
and the effect on the balance sheet equation. Consideration 
of errors and corrections required by the most reputable 
standards in current professional practices. 

Pre-requisite ABA-12. 

ABA-2 2— Advanced Accounting (3-0-3). A detailed 
study of procedures in partnership and corporation ac- 
counting. Installment and consignment sales, consolidations 
and fiduciary and budgetary accounting. 

Pre-requisite ABA-21. 

ABA-31, 32-Marketing Principles I & II (3-0-3) 

(3-0-3). The study of the role of distribution in a dy- 
namic economy. Social and economic value of marketing 
activities. Analysis of the processes and institutions in- 
volved in the distribution of commodities: product line 
selection, choice of wholesale and retail channels, adver- 
tising and determination of pricing strategy. Analysis of 
consumer demand through sampling techniques. 

ABA-41, 42— Management Principles I & II (3-0-3) 

(3-0-3.) The study of the applications of basic economic 
principles to managerial decisions. A survey of the vari- 
ous techniques for planning, organizing and controlling 
production. Case studies are used to provide familiarity 
with actual problems of production control, purchasing, 
location, physical facilities and personnel. 

ABA-44— Effective Communication (3-0-3.) The 

fundamental principles of effective writing with emphasis 
on clearness, conciseness, concreteness, character and cour- 
tesy. Practical problems and practice in the preparation 
of inquiries and replies, notices, announcements, invita- 
tions, orders, acknowledgments, human-interest messages, 
the letter of application, effective sales letters and sales 
talks, adjustments, credit and collection letters. 

Pre-requisite E-102. 

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ABA-51— Business Law I (3-0-3). Study of legal prin- 
ciples and laws applicable to business. Courts and court 
procedure. Sales, insurance, contracts, agency, common 
carriers, partnerships. Text and case methods are used. 

ABA-52— Business Law II (3-0-3). Laws pertaining 
to corporations, property sales, negotiable instruments and 
bankruptcy. 

Pre-requisite ABA-51. 

ABA-53, 54— Labor-Management Relations I & II 

(3-0-3) (3-0-3.) This course is designed to familiarize the 
student with problems in the field of labor-management 
relations, the approach of labor and management to these 
problems, the historic and economic background from 
which these problems have arisen, and government regu- 
lations in this field. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
following topics: The history of unionism in the United 
States, labor law and its enforcement, the structure and 
function of unions, collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts, 
lock-outs and labor economics. 

ABA-55— Taxation I (3-0-3). A course designed to ac- 
quaint the student with basic tax problems affecting the 
individual and the business organizations with which he 
may become associated. In addition to individual income 
taxes, sales and excise taxes as well as real and personal 
property taxation are treated. 

ABA-56— Taxation II (3-0-3). A study of the Internal 
Revenue Code as it affects individuals, partnerships, and 
corporations. Practical application through the prepara- 
tion of tax returns for all types of taxpayers. 

Pre-requisite ABA-55. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

AEE-21— Electric Circuits I (3-0-3). Introduction to 
electric circuit theory including a study of passive and 
active circuit parameters. Kirchhoff's Laws, loop-current 
and node-voltage equations, principle of superposition, 
power relationships and graphical analysis techniques. 

AEE-22-Electric Circuits II (3-0-3.) Continuation of 
AEE-21. Network topology, duality, other network theo- 
rems, maximum power transfer, and simple transient re- 
sponse of RL-, RC-, RLC-circuits. 

AEE-31 -Electric Circuits III (3-0-3). Continuation of 
AEE-22. Alternating-current theory. Immittances, steadt- 
state performance, three-phase circuits, frequency response, 
and resonant circuits. 

15 



AEE-32— Electrical Engineering Materials (3-0-3). 

Elementary study of dielectric, magnetic, and conductive 
properties of materials, including semi-conductors, and 
their application in electrical engineering. 

AEE-34— Electrical Measurements (1-2-2). Lecture- 
laboratory course including a study of types of electrical 
instruments, theory of operation, and methods of measure- 
ment. 

AEE-41— Electronic Fundamentals (3-0-3). Introduc- 
tion to electronic ballistics and semi-conductor theory. 
Vacuum diode and semi-conductor diode operation, triode 
and multi-element tubes, and transistor operation. 

AEE-42— Electronic Circuits I (3-0-3). Study includes 
rectifier circuits, feedback circuitry, cascaded circuits, os- 
cillators. 

AEE-43-Electric Machinery (3-0-3). Study of DC 
and AC rotating energy conversion machinery and their con- 
trol. Transformers and transformer theory. 

AEE-44— Transmission Lines (3-0-3). Introductory 
field theory and traveling-wave phenomena. Topics in- 
cluded: transient waves, sinusoidal waves, transmission effi- 
ciency, impedance matching, equivalent lumped-parameter 
circuits, Smith Chart. 

AEE-45— Electrical Engineering Laboratory I 
(0-3-2). 

AEE-46— Electrical Engineering Laboratory II 
(0-3-2). 

AEE-51— Electronic Circuits II (3-0-3). Continuation 
of AEE-42 including the study of filter circuits, regulators, 
communication systems, pulse circuits, and other wave- 
shaping circuits. 

AEE-52— Transistor Circuits (3-0-3). Review of semi- 
conductor properties. Study of basic transistor circuits, in- 
cluding limitations; input, output, and transfer parameters; 
amplifiers; oscillators; and biasing techniques. 

AEE-53— Control Systems I (3-0-3). Study of various 
transducers, electrical measurement of physical character- 
istics, indicators and recorders, controllers, and actuators. 
Discussion of control applications. 

AEE-54— Control Systems II (3-0-3). Introduction to 
feedback control theory including system stability, block 
diagrams, network reduction, transfer functions obtained 
by experimental methods, classical and graphical methods 
of determining system response. 

AEE-55— Electrical Engineering Laboratory III 

(0-3-2). 

AEE-56— Electrical Engineering Laboratory IV 

(0-3-2). 

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DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
AND PHYSICS 

AM-ll— Technical Mathematics I (3-0-3.) This is an 
introductory mathematics course for post-secondary stu- 
dents who intend to enter some field of technology. A 
thorough review of basic algebra is followed by a sub- 
stantial treatment of analytic geometry. 

AM-1 2— Technical Mathematics II (3-0-3). A con- 
tinuation of Technical Mathematics I with a study of ad- 
vanced algebra and logarithms. Numerical trigonometry is 
included with emphasis on the oblique triangle and trigono- 
metric applications. 

Pre-requisite aM-11. 

AM-21 -Calculus I (Differential) (3-0-3). This course 
begins with a study of the pertinent concepts of analytic 
geometry which lead to the notion of the derivative. Then 
the derivatives of elementary functions are developed and 
applied. The concepts of limit and continuity are introduced 
and discussed at appropriate stages in the course. The 
course concludes with the integral concept and an intro- 
duction to the process of integration. 

Pre-requisite AM-12. 

AM-22-Calculus II (Integral) (3-0-3). After a brief 
review of the basic notion of integration and a discussion 
of the Fundamental Theorem of Integral Calculus, the vari- 
ous techniques of integration of elementary functions are 
discussed and applied. The study of limits and sequences 
serves as an introduction to infinite series. Multiple in- 
tegration and applications conclude the course. 

Pre-requisite AM-21. 

AM-23— Introductory Mathematics (3-0-3). An in- 
troductory course in algebra. The following topics are stud- 
ied in detail: factoring, fractions, functions and graphs, 
systems of linear equations, exponents and radicals. 

AM-24-Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3). This 
course covers the basic mathematics essential to an under- 
standing of financial computations. The following mathe- 
matical principles and applications are studied: simple and 
compound interest, partial payments, bank discount, an- 
nuities, depreciation, valuation of bonds and insurance. 

AM-51— Statistics I (3-0-3). A course to acquaint the 
student with the basic concepts in statistics. A study is 
made of the meaning of statistics, the collection of statisti- 
cal data, tabular presentation, ratios, percentages, bar charts, 
line charts, statistical maps, pi-charts, basic concept of 

17 



frequency distribution, histograms, frequency polygons and 
Lorenz curve. 

Pre-requisite AM-12. 

AM-52— Statistics II (3-0-3). A continuation of AM-51 
including the arithmetic mean, median, mode, dispersion, 
skewness, quartile, deviation, standard deviation, kurtosis, 
moments of frequency distribution, random samples, statis- 
tical inference, index numbers, correlation, time series 
analysis including the secular trend, the seasonal fluctua- 
tion, cycles and forecasting. 

Pre-requisite AM-51. 

AP-1 2— Physics I (3-0-3). This course is designed to 
meet the needs of a student in the Associate Degree pro- 
gram. Mechanics and heat are covered in the first semes- 
ter. Demonstrations of physical principles are incorpo- 
rated into the lecture periods with an occasional laboratory 
period to further amplify the development of this course. 

AP-21— Physics II (3-0-3.) This course follows the 
same development as Physics I in both classroom and lab- 
oratory assignments. The areas of study in this semester 
are: electricity and magnetism, sound and light. 

Pre-requisite AP-12. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 

AME-l 1— Engineering Drawing I (0-3-2). A course 
which provides the student with a background in free-hand 
lettering and sketching, multiview projection, isometric and 
oblique drawing, sectional views and blue-print reading. 

AME-l 2— Engineering Drawing II (0-3-2). A con- 
tinuation of the first semester. Auxiliary views, intersec- 
tions and developments, dimensioning, tolerancing, threads 
and fasteners, and descriptive geometry are some of the 
areas which are stressed in this phase of study. 

AME-21, 22-Machine Tool Processes I & II (0-3-2) 

(0-3-2). A course consisting of laboratory and a series of 
lectures designed to familiarize the student with the basic 
machine tools of industry. The laboratory consists of op- 
erating the lathes, shapers, milling machines and grinders 
while the lectures point out the theory of operation and 
the capacities and economics of the various devices. 

AME-24— Mechanics I (Statics) (3-0-3). An introduc- 
tory course in mechanics beginning with a study of the 
statics of particles— concentric, coplanar force systems 
through non-coplanar, nonconcentric forces in space; statics 
of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; equivalent 

18 



systems of forces and equilibrium of rigid bodies; location 
of centroids and centers of gravity; analysis of structures, 
strusses, frames and machines; friction; distributed forces; 
and moments of inertia. 

AME-31 -Mechanics II (Dynamics) (3-0-3). An in- 
troduction to the kinematics and kinetics of particles, force, 
mass and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and 
momentum. Considers the kinematics and kinetics of rigid 
bodies, dynamic equilibrium, work and energy, impulse 
and momentum, and impact. It further includes a study 
of rectilinear and curvilinear motion, rotation and plane 
motion of bodies. 

AME-32— Strength of Materials (3-0-3). A course 
emphasizing the fundamental principles used in design and 
selection of materials. Considers concentric loading; a study 
of thin- walled cylinders; emphasizes stress and introduces 
Mohr's circle; torsional loading of circular cross sections; 
flexural loading, statically indeterminate beams, combined 
loading; columns; repeated loading and dynamic loading; 
welded and riveted connectors. There is further included 
a study of energy-strain and mechanical and physical prop- 
erties of materials. Approximately seven laboratory experi- 
ments are conducted and written reports submitted. 

AME-33— Machine Drawing I (0-3-2). An applica- 
tion of the principles learned in Engineering Drawing I & 
II by preparing detail working and assembly drawings of 
machine parts. Introductory welding and piping drafting. 

AME-34— Machine Drawing II (0-3-2). Topics cov- 
ered are spur, bevel, rack and worm gearing. A study is also 
made of cam motions and design in addition to elementary 
jig and fixture design. 

AME-41, 42-Thermodynamics I & II (3-0-3) 

(3-0-3). A series of lectures discussing that branch of phys- 
ics dealing with the laws of transformation of heat into 
other forms of energy and vice versa. Topics for discussion 
include thermodynamic properties, conservation of energy, 
energy relation, the ideal gas, first and second laws of 
thermodynamics. 

The second semester is a continuation of the first with 
emphasis being placed on liquids and vapors rather than 
the ideal gas. 

AME-43— Metallurgy (3-0-3). A course consisting of 
lectures supplemented by a series of laboratory assign- 
ments. The course presents the fundamentals of metal 
structure, factors affecting engineering properties, static 
and dynamic properties of metallic materials, corrosion and 
extraction of metals from their ores. Also included is a 
study of phase diagrams and simple alloy systems, heat 
treatment and the iron-iron carbide diagram. 

19 



AME-44— Hydraulics (3-0-3). A course devoted to the 
study of incompressible fluids covering static fluids, flow 
measurement and instrumentation, dynamic fluid, losses in 
systems and a brief coverage of pumps and fluid machines. 

AME-45— Mechanisms (0-3-2). A study of the rel- 
ative motions of machine parts. Operating principles are 
analyzed to determine displacement, velocity and accel- 
eration by analytical and graphical methods. Emphasis is 
placed upon linkages, cams, rolling contact, gearing, flexible 
connectors, gear trains, translation screws and dimensional 
synthesis. 

AME-46, 53— Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

I & II (0-3-2) (0-3-2). A series of experiments designed to 
illustrate physical properties of materials and to integrate 
the various subjects covered showing methods of testing 
and methods of measurement. 

AME-51— Machine Design I (3-0-3). An introduction 
to design and selection of components used in the design 
of machines. Simple stress analysis, use of physical proper- 
ties of materials in design, design factors, power and power 
transmission, design and selection of key pulleys and belts 
are some of the topics covered. 

AME-52— Machine Design II (3-0-3). A continuation 
of Machine Design I providing instruction in the design 
and selection of the following elements: gears, couplings, 
bearings, clutches, fastenings and springs. Supplementary 
work with fits and tolerances with combined stresses are 
also included. 

AME-54— Tool and Die Design (0-3-2). A laboratory 
course providing an opportunity to discuss the basic prin- 
ciples involved in the design of jig fixtures and simple dies. 
Problems involving the selection of standard parts from 
manufacturers catalogues are assigned which provide an 
experience similar to that of industry. 



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