(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue"

UNIVERSITY OF MAIYLMII 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



ABBREVIATED CATALOG 
NUMBER 



943-1944 




Jhe ^foundation of C^veru J5taL 
id the Education of its Lyouth" 



DIOGENES 



AGRICULTURE 

ARTS and SCIENCES 

BUSINESS and PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

EDUCATION 

ENGINEERING 

HOME ECONOMICS 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

GRADUATE STUDIES 

DENTISTRY 

LAW 

MEDICINE 

NURSING 

PHARMACY 

EXTENSION 

RESEARCH 



GENERAL CALENDAR 



1943 



1944 



JULY 



S M T WT F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 
111213 14151617 
1819 20 2122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 



S M T WT F S 

4 5 6 7 

11 12 13 14 

18 19 20 21 

25 26 27 28 



15 
22 
29 



SEPTEMBER 



JANUARY 



SM T WT F S 



FEBRUARY 



SM T WT F S 



MARCH 



S M T WT F S 



5 
12 
19 
26 



OCTOBER 



S M T WT F S 



(SM T WT F S 



APRIL 



SM T WT F S 



NOVEMBER 



SM T WT F S 



DECEMBER 



S M T WT F S 



5 

12 
19 
26 



MAY 



S M TWT F S 
4 5 6 
11 12 13 

1819 20 
25 26 27 



JUNE 



S M TWT F S 



JULY 



S M TWT F S 



AUGUST 



S M TWT F S 



SEPTEMBER 



S M TWT F S 



1945 



JANUARY 



S M T WT F S 



2829 



FEBRUARY 



S M TWT F S 



MARCH 



OCTOBER 



S M TWT F S 



NOVEMBER 



S M TWT F S 



S M TWT F S 



APRIL 



SM TWT F S 



MAY 



SM TWT F S 
5 

12 
19 
26 



DECEMBER 



S M T WT F S 



7 

14 
2122 

28 29 



JUNE 



S M TWT F S 



2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



Official Publication of the University of Maryland 
Vol. 40, No. 6 September 15, 1943 



ABBREVIATED CATALOG 
NUMBER 

1943 - 1944 



The provisions of this publication are not 
to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. The 
University reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The Uni- 
versity further reserves the right at anytime, 
to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such action is for the best interests 
of the University. 



University of Maryland official publication issued semi-monthly during May, 
June and July and bi-monthly the rest of the year at College Park, Maryland. 
Entered as second class matter, under act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1943-1944 
COLLEGE PARK 



Summer Quarter 



1943 



July 9-10 Friday, Saturday 
July 12 Monday 

Sept. 6 Monday 

Sept. 27, 

28, 29, 30 Monday-Thursday Examinations 



Registration for summer quarter 
Instruction begins 
Labor Day, Holiday 



Fall Quarter 



Oct. 8-9 
Oct. 11 
Nov. 25 
Dec. 23 



Friday, Saturday 
Monday 
Thursday 
Thursday 



Registration for fall quarter 
Instruction begins 
Thanksgiving, Holiday 
Closing date, fall quarter 



1944 



Winter Quarter 



Jan. 7-8 Friday, Saturday Registration for winter quarter 



Jan. 10 Monday 

Feb. 22 Tuesday 

March 25 Saturday 
March 27, 
28, 29, 30 Monday-Thursday Examinations 



Instruction begins 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
Maryland Day 



Spring Quarter 



April 7-8 Friday, Saturday 
April 10 Monday 
May 30 Tuesday 

June 26, 

27, 28, 29 Monday-Thursday 



Registration for spring quarter 
Instruction begins 
Memorial Day, Holiday 

Examinations 



Note: The academic calendars of the professional schools in Baltimore will be found in the separate 
catalogs published by these schools. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

University Calendar 2 

Board of Regents and Officers of Administration 4 

Location 5 

Organization 5 

Four Quarter Plan 5 

Army Specialized Training Program 5 

Admission 5 

Admission of Freshmen 6 

Advanced Standing 7 

Admission Requirements 7 

Requiremenets in Military Instruction 9 

Physical Education for Women 9 

Residence and Non-Residence 9 

Regulation of Studies 9 

Reports 10 

Delinquent Students 10 

Junior Standing , . 10 

Degrees and Certificates 11 

Fees and Expenses 11 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 14 

Transcript of Records 14 

Automobiles 15 

Student Health and Welfare 15 

Living Arrangements 16 

Office of Dean of Men 18 

Office of Dean of Women 18 

Scholarships and Fellowships 18 

Student Employment 19 

Student Loan Funds 19 

University Post Office 19 

University Bookstore 19 

Religious Influences 19 

College of Agriculture 20 

College of Arts and Sciences 24 

College of Business and Public Administration 36 

College of Education c . 41 

College of Engineering 43 

College of Home Economics 49 

The Graduate School 53 

Professional Schools in Baltimore 54 

Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics 57 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 58 



4 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Rowland K. Adams, Chairman Baltimore 1948 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary Baltimore 1947 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer Baltimore 1944 

Paul S. Knotts Denton 1946 

Harry H. Nuttle Denton 1948 

William P. Cole, Jr Towson 1949 

Thomas Roy Brookes Bel Air 1950 

Phillip C. Turner Parkton 1950 

W. Calvin Chesnut Baltimore 1951 

John E. Semmes Baltimore 1951 

Stanford Rothschild Baltimore 1952 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D. Sc, President of the University. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agri., Director of Extension Service, Dean of College of 
Agriculture. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Administration. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of School of Dentistry. 

Arnold E. Joyal, Ph.D., Acting Dean of College of Education, Acting Director 
of Summer School. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate School. 

M. MARD3 Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph. D., Dean of School of Law. 

Robert U. Patterson, M.D., CM., LL.D., Dean of School of Medicine, Super- 
intendent of University Hospital. 

Katheryn Shea, R.N., Acting Superintendent of Nurses, Director of School of 
Nursing. 

Andrew G. Dumez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of School of Pharmacy. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of College of Agriculture. 

Roger B. Corbett, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

James H. Reid, M.A., Acting Dean of Men. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

H. C. Griswold, Lt. Col. Inf., U. S. Army, Commandant and Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Clarence W. Spears, M.D., Director of Physical Education. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Acting Director of Admissions. 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

T. A. Hutton, M.A., Purchasing'Agent. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION 

The undergraduate colleges and the graduate school of the University of Mary- 
land are located at College Park, four miles from Washington. This nearness to 
Washington is of immeasurable advantage to students because of the unusual 
facilities for studying provided by the various government departments and the 
Library of Congress. 

The University of Maryland is adequately'served by excellent transportation 
facilities, including the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio^Railroad, the Wash- 
ington street railway system, and several bus lines. 

The professional schools of the University — Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, 
and Pharmacy — the University Hospital and the Baltimore Division of the Col- 
lege of Education, are located at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is, by law, vested in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of eleven members appointed by the governor of the State, each for a 
term of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the president. 
The deans, directors and other principal officers of the University form the Ad- 
ministrative Board. This group serves in an advisory capacity to the president. 

FOUR QUARTER PLAN 

In order to meet the present emergency the University of Maryland has shifted 
to a four quarter system, in which a student may either accelerate his graduation 
or complete his work in the usual four years. By attending all quarters a student 
may, in most curricula, graduate in three years. The engineering curriculum 
may be completed in a minimum of two and one half years. 

The pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary curricula may be taken in five 
quarters, or, if the student is under eighteen^years_of age, in six quarters. 

Under the present plan the academic year is divided into four quarters of ap- 
proximately twelve weeks each. In addition there is a summer session of six weeks, 
organized largely for the convenience of elementary and secondary school teachers. 

ARMY SPECIALIZED TRAINING PROGRAM 

The War Department and the University have established on the campus 
a three term curriculum for basic students, from which they may go on to ad- 
vanced engineering or other specialized work. There is also a curriculum for 
language-area students in intensive language, geography and history courses. 
These students are being prepared to assist in the policing, intelligence service and 
administration of occupied territories. 

The first three quarters of the College of Engineering are identical with the three 
terms of the Basic Army Specialized Training Program. 

ADMISSION 

Undergraduate schools: Applicants for admission to the Colleges of Agriculture, 
Arts and Sciences, Business and Public Administration, Education, Engineering, 
and Home Economics should communicate with the Director of Admissions, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Graduate School : Those seeking admission to the Graduate School should ad- 
dress the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Maryland, College Park. 

Professional Schools: Information about admission to the professional schools 
in Baltimore may be had by writing to the dean of the college concerned or to the 
Director of Admissions of the University. 

Applicants from secondary schools: Procure an application blank from the 
Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your principal 
or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail the blank to the 
Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than May 1 
for the summer quarter, August 1 for the fall quarter, December 1 for the winter 
quarter, and March 1 for the spring quarter. Applications from students com- 
pleting their last semester of secondary work are encouraged. If acceptable sup- 
plementary records may be sent upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application blank 
from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask secondary 
school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school record and send the blank 
to the Director of Admissions. Request the Registrar of the College or University 
attended to send a transcript to the Director of Admissions, College Park, Mary- 
land. 

Time of Admission : New students should plan to enter the University at the 
beginning of the summer quarter, in July, if possible. Students, however, will 
be admitted at any quarter. 

Registration: New students will register for the fall quarter of 1943 on Friday 
and Saturday, October 8 and 9, for the winter quarter of 1944 on Friday and Satur- 
day, January 7 and 8, and for the spring quarter of 1944 on Friday and Saturday, 
April 7 and 8. The English, Placement, Psychological, and other required tests 
are a part of the registration procedure. 

The Freshmen Week Program includes registration, placement and aptitude 
tests, physical examination, assemblies, and the President's reception. 



ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates of secondary schools accredited by 
regional associations or the State Department of Education will be admitted 
by certificate upon the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out- 
of-state schools should have attained college certification marks, such marks 
to be not less than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Graduates who fail to obtain the principal's recommendation will be con- 
sidered by the Committee on Admissions. Supplementary information, includ- 
ing aptitude tests, will determine whether they are eligible for admission. 

Admission by Examination: Applicants, who have passed the examinations 
set by the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, 
New York City, the Regents of the University of the State of New York,Albany; 
or the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, Harris- 
burg, will be admitted upon presentation of the proper credentials. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ADVANCED STANDING 

Only students in good standing as to scholarship and conduct are eligible to 
transfer. Advanced standing is assigned to transfer students from accredited 
institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 45 quarter hours 
is necessary for a degree. 

2. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced stand- 
ing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Below are shown (1) requirements for admission to the various under-graduate 
curricula, and (2) the curricula offered in the different colleges. The letter fol- 
lowing the curriculum indicates the column in the table where the particular re- 
quirements are given. 



English 

Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry 

Mathematics 

History 

Science 

Foreign Language 

Stenography 

Typewriting 

Bookkeeping 

Electives 

Total 16 16 16 16 16 



A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


1 




*2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 

*V2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
2 


1 

**2 
1 


8 


8 


6H 


6 


5 



* An applicant deficient a second unit in algebra and solid geometry may be admitted to the 
College ot Engineering, and to the curricula in Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, but will be 
obliged to make up the second unit of algebra and the solid geometry before the beginning of the 
second semester of the freshman year. 

** Students preparing to teach in the field of Business Practice may substitute electives for [sten- 
ography and typewriting. 



8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry — C 
Agricultural Education and Rural 

Life— B 
Agriculture, Engineering — C 
Agriculture, General — B 
Agronomy 

Farm Crops — A 

Soils— A 
Animal Husbandry — B 
fBotany 

General Botany and Morphology 
—A 

Plant Pathology — A 

Plant Physiology and Ecology — A 
Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Manufacturing — B 

Dairy Production — B 
fEntomology — A 
Farm Management — B 
Horticulture 

Floriculture and Ornamental 
Horticulture — B 

Pomology and Olericulture — B 
Poultry Husbandry — B 
Preforestry — A 
Preveterinary — A 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bacteriology — A 
♦Botany — A 
***Chemical Engineering — C 

Chemistry — C 
{Economics — A 
**Education — A 

English — A 

♦Entomology — A 

Food Technology — A 

French — A 

General Biological Sciences — A 

General Physical Sciences — C 

German — A 

History — A 

Latin — A 



College of Arts and Sciences (con'd) 

Mathematics— C 

Physics — -C 

Political Science — A 

Predental — A 
{Prelaw — A 

Premedical — D 

Prenursing — A 

Psychology — A 

Sociology — A 

Speech — A 

Spanish — A 

Zoology — -A 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 

Accounting — A 

Agricultural Economics — A 

Cooperative Organization and Ad- 
ministration — A 
fEconomics — A 

Finance — A 

General Business — A 

Marketing and Sales Administration 

—A 
t Prelaw — A 
College of Education 
tArts and Sciences — -A 

Commercial — E 
****Home Economics — B 

Industrial — A (also in Baltimore) 

Physical — A 
College of Engineering 
fChemical — C 

Civil— C 

Electrical — C 

Mechanical — C 

Mechanical with Aeronautical op- 
tion — C 
College of Home Economics 
♦♦Education— B 

Extension— B 

Food and Nutrition — -B 

General Home Economics — B 

Institution Management — B 

Practical Art — -B 

Textiles and Clothing — B 



Special Students: Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age, and 
who have not completed the usual preparatory course, may be admitted to such 
courses as they seem fitted to take. Special students are ineligible to matriculate 
for a degree until entrance requirements have been satisfied. 

Unclassified Students: Applicants who meet entrance requirements but who 
do not wish to pursue a program of study leading to a degree are ineligible for 
admission to pursue courses for which they have met prerequisites. 



* Also College of Agriculture. tAlso College of Arts and Sciences. tAlso College of Business and 
Public Administration. **Also College of Education. ***Also College of Engineering. ****Also Col- 
lege of Home^Economios. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 9 

REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students who are citizens of the United States and are physically 
fit to perform military duty and who are not less than 14 or more than 26 years of 
age, are required to take military training as a prerequisite to graduation. Any 
student excused from taking basic military instruction because of physical dis- 
ability must take physical education. 

Students excused from basic military training and physical education with- 
out academic credit are required to take an equivalent number of credits in other 
subjects. Substitutions must be approved by the dean of the college concerned. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

All women students who are physically fit for exercise are required to take 
physical education for a period of four years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 



RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the time 
of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statef for at least 
one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of their 
registration they have been residents of this Statef for at least one year; pro- 
vided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal residents of this 
Statef, by maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. However, 
the right of the student (minor) to change from a non-resident to a resident status 
must be established by him prior to registration for a semester in any academic 
year. 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Schedule of Courses. A quarter time schedule of courses, giving days, hours, 
and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each quarter. 
Classes are scheduled beginning at 8.10 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The quarter hour, which is the unit of credit in the 
University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week for one quar- 
ter. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. The student is expected to devote three hours a week in 
classroom or laboratory, including outside preparation for each credit hour in 
any course. 



* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circumstances, 
have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to such minor students. 

t Students in the College Park Colleges who are residents of the District of Columbia are charged 
two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Normal Student Load. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 quarter hours, 
according to curriculum and year. 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the close of each quarter. Students are 
required to use the prescribed type of examination book in these tests. 

Marking System. The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D, 
passing; F, Failure; I, Incomplete. 

Mark A denotes suparior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, fair 
scholarship; and Mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical values are assigned as follows: — 
A— 4; B— 3; C— 2 ; D— 1; F— 0. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be earned 
with marks of A, B, and C. A student who receives the mark of D in more than 
one-fourth of his credits must take additional courses or repeat courses until he 
has met these requirements. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student with 
advanced standing, a mark of D will not be recognized for credit towards a degree 
in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this institution. 

REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guardians at 
the close of each quarter. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing marks in fifty per cent of the quarter hours for 
which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped from the University. The 
registrar notifies the student, his parent or guardian, and the student's dean of 
this action. A student who has been dropped for scholastic reasons may appeal in 
writing to the Committee on Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment for reinstate- 
ment. The Committee is empowered to grant relief for just cause. A student who 
has been dropped from the University for scholastic reasons, and whose petition 
for reinstatement is denied, may again petition after a lapse of at least one quarter. 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, or 
whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her health, 
or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities 
of the University. Students of the last class may be asked to withdraw even 
though no specific charge be made against them. 

According to University regulations, excessive absence from any course is 
penalized by failure in that course. Students who are guilty of persistent absence 
from any course will be reported to the President or to his appointed representative 
for final disciplinary action. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major or 
minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have passed with 
an average grade as high as C (2.0) the minimum number of quarter credits re- 
quired for junior standing in any curriculum. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Busi- 
ness Administration, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil Engineer, Mechanical En- 
gineer, Electrical Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of 
Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. 

Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certificates. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less than 
one year of resident work in this University. The last forty-five credits of any 
curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at the 
University of Maryland. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be earned with 
grades of A, B, and C. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student with 
advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit towards a degree 
in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this institution. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar three months 
prior to the date he expects to graduate, a formal application for a degree. Can- 
didates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees are conferred and 
diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia only in exceptional 



FEES AND EXPENSES 
General 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of Mary- 
land for the exact amount of the charges. 

In cases where students have been awarded Legislative Scholarships or Uni- 
versity Grants, the amount of such scholarship or grant will be deducted from the 
bill. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, and students should 
come prepared to pay the full amount of the charges. No student will be admitted 
to classes until such payment has been made. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges 
as may be found necessary. For example, board and lodging may vary from quarter 
to quarter, although every effort will be made to keep the costs to the student as 
low as possible. 

No degree will be conferred upon, nor any diploma or certificate awarded to, 
a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

War Ration Books 

Each student who boards in the University Dining Hall is required to present 
all War Ration Books for food rations at one of the desks in the registration line 
before he receives his dining hall card. When he pays his bill he will not receive 
his dining hall card of admission unless the bill is stamped that his ration books 
have been filed with the dining hall representative. If any stamp in the book is 
designated for some article other than food the book will be returned to the stu- 
dent for such time as he may need it. 



12 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fees for Undergraduate Students 

Summer 

Maryland Residents Quarter 

Fixed Charges $48.50 

Athletic Fees 5.00 

Special Fees 5.00 

Student Activities Fees 5.00 

Infirmary Fees 2.00 

Post Office Fees 1.00 

Advisory and Tesdng Fee .50 

Total for Md. Residents $67.00 



District of Columbia Residents 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from District of Columbia in 
addition to fees shown above .... 

Total for District of Columbia 
Students 



17.00 



Residents of Other States and 
Countries 

Non-Resident Fee for students 
from o;her sia'es and countries 
in addition to fees shown above $42.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $109.00 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Quarter 


Quarter 


Quarter 


$48.50 


$48.50 


$48.50 


15.00 






10.00 






10.00 






2.00 


2.00 


2.00 


1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


.50 


.50 


.50 



$87.00 



$52.00 



17.00 



17.00 



$42.00 
$129.00 



$42.00 
$94.00 



^$52.00 



17.00 



.00 $104.00 $69.00 *$69.00 



$42.00 
*$94.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $110 $110 $110 $110 

Dormitory Room $28— $45 $28— $45 $28— $45 $28— $45 

Total for Board and Room $138—155 $138—155 $138—155 $138—155 



The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other University projects 
that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics and recreation. This fee now is 
devoted to a fund for construction of a stadium, an addition to the coliseum, and a swimming pool, 
as soon as the fund is sufficient and materials are available. 

The Students Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Association. 
Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, since, in normal 
times, it covers subscription to the student newspaper, the magazine and the year book; class dues, 
including admission to class dances; and admission to the performances of the musical and dramatic 
clubs. There will be some curtailment of this program until after the war. 

* Students entering the University for the winter quarter will pay the following additional fees; 
Athletic, $10.00; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $7.50. 

* Students entering the University for the Spring quarter will pay the following additional fees: 
Athletic, $5.00; Special $5.00; Students Activities, $5.00. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

Other Fees and Charges 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at time of first registra- 
tion in the University $5.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to graduation... 10.00 
Special Fee for students enrolled in Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental course: 

For Residents of Maryland 17.00 

For Residents of the District of Columbia 17.00 

For Residents of other states or countries 42.00 

Fee for part-time students per credit hour 6.00 

(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to mean students tak- 
ing 6 quarter credit hours or less. Students carrying more than 6 
quarter hours pay the regular fees.) 

Late Registration Fee 3.00 to 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular registra- 
tion days. Those who complete their registration one day late will be 
charged a fee of $3.00, and those who are more than one day late will 
be charged $5.00). 

Fee for change in registration after first week of instruction 1.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment 2.00 

Special Examination Fee— to establish college credit — per quarter hour.. 2.00 
Makeup Examination Fee — (For students who are absent during any 

class period when tests or examinations are given) 1.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Laboratory Fees — Fees are charged in Chemistry, Bacteriology, Botany, 

Physics, Home Economics and other Science subjects, per course.. 1.00 to 8.00 
Property Damage Charge — -Students will be charged for damage to prop- 
erty or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, 
the individual student will be billed for it; where responsibility can 
not be fixed, the cost of repairing the damage or replacing equipment 
will be pro-rated. 

Library Charges 

Fine for failure to return book from general library before expiration 

of loan period 05 per day 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before expiration of 
loan period 

First hour overdue 25 

Each additional hour overdue .05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution must be 
made. 
Text books and classroom supplies — These costs vary with the course 

pursued, but will average per quarter 18.00 

Fees for Graduate Students 

Tuition charge for students carrying more than 8 quarter credit hours... $50.00 

Tuition charge for students carrying 8 quarter credit hours or less $6.00 

Post Office Fee, payable by all students $1.00 

Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of first registration 10.00 

Diploma Fee (For Master's Degree) 10.00 

Graduation Fee (For Doctor's Degree) 20.00 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Notes: Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students, 
whether residents of the State of Maryland or not. 
All fees, except Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee, are payable 

at the time of registration for each quarter. 
Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee must be paid prior to graduation. 

Fees for Evening Courses 

Matriculation Fee (Payable once, at time of first registration by all stu- 
dents — full time and part time; candidates for degrees, and non-can- 
didates). 

For Undergraduates $5.00 

For Graduates 10.00 

Tuition Charge — (same for all students) (Limit six hours ...per credit hour 6.00 
Laboratory Fees — A small laboratory fee, to cover cost of materials used, 
is charged in laboratory courses. These fees vary wi^h the course and 
can be ascertained in any case by inquiry of the Director of Evening 
Courses, or the instructor in charge of the course. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

If a student desires or is compelled to withdraw from the University at any 
time during the academic year, he should file a formal application for withdrawal, 
bearing the proper signatures as indicated on the form, with the Registrar's 
Office. A copy of this withdrawal application form may be obtained from the 
office of the Dean of the College in which the student is registered, or from the 
Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written con- 
sent of the student's parent or guardian. 

A student who fails to withdraw in the required manner will not be entitled to 
an honorable dismissal and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he might 
otherwise be entitled. 

Students withdrawing from the University within five days after the beginning 
of instruction for the quarter are granted a full refund of all charges except board 
and lodging, with a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. Board and 
lodging are refunded on a prorata basis. 

Students withdrawing from the University after five days and before the end 
of three weeks from the beginning of instruction in any quarter will receive a pro- 
rata refund of all charges, less a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. 
After the expiration of the three week period referred to, refunds will be made 
only for board. The refund for these items will be on a pro rata basis. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Any student or alumnus may secure a transcript of his scholastic record from 
the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy so furnished, but for each ad- 
ditional copy, there is a charge of $1.00. 

Transcripts of records are of two kinds: 

(a) Informal transcripts which may be obtained by the student or alumnus 
for such personal use as he may wish; and 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

(b) Official transcripts, bearing the University seal which are forwarded, on 
request, to educational institutions, Government agencies, etc., as 
attested evidence of the student's record at the University and his 
honorable dismissal therefrom. 

Persons desiring transcripts of records should, if possible, make request of the 
Registrar for same at least one week in advance of the date when the records are 
actually needed. 

No transcript of a student's record will be furnished in the case of any student 
or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have not been satisfied. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Students living in Fraternity Houses, or in other houses near the campus are not 
permitted to drive automobiles on the campus. Those students who live at a 
distance who require automobiles for transportation must register their auto- 
mobiles with the University. They must park their cars in designated parking 
areas when they arrive and may not remove them until they leave for the day. 



STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Student Health Service 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health of the 
student body and takes every reasonable precaution to this end. In addition to 
the physical examinations which are given all students on entrance to the Uni- 
versity, health instruction is given to all freshman and sophomore students, and a 
modern, well equipped infirmary is available for the care of sick or injured stu- 
dents. A small fee is charged undergraduate students for infirmary service. 
Physical Examinations 

As soon as possible after the opening of the quarter, as a measure for protecting 
the general health, all students who enter the undergraduate colleges at College 
Park are given a physical examination. The examination of the men students is 
conducted by the University Physician in cooperation with the Physical Education 
and Military Departments. 

The examination of women students is conducted by a woman physician in co- 
operation with the office of Physical Education for Women. The woman physician 
has her offices in the Infirmary. She is available for consultation by all women 
students. 
Infirmary Service and Regulations 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and medical ad- 
vice at the Infirmary during regular office hours established by the physician in 
charge. 

Nurses' office hours, 3 to 5 p. m. and 6 to 8 p. m. daily except Sunday; 10 a. m. 
to 12 noon— 6 to 7 p. m. Sunday. 

Doctor's office hour 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. daily except Sunday, Office hour on Sun- 
day by appointment. 

2. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours in the Infirmary. Students are re- 
quested to report illnesses during office hours unless the case is an emergency. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical attention and who 
are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of the University physicians. 
Such visits will be free of charge. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon the order of the Uni- 
versity physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the facilities avail- 
able. Students who live off the campus will be charged a fee of one dollar and a 
quarter a day. 

5. The visiting]hours are 10 to ll'a. m. and 7 to 7.30 p. m. daily. Each patient 
is allowed only three visitors at one time. No visitor may see any patient until per- 
mission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for graduate students 
and employees. Dispensary service, however, is available for graduate students 
and employees who are injured in University service or University activities. 

7. Diagnostic laboratory and X-Ray tests are available. A nominal charge will 
be made for this service. 

8. Students living in the dormitories, who are ill and unable to attend classes, 
must report to the Infirmary, between 8.00 and 9.00 a.m. If they are too ill to re- 
port to the Infirmary, they must notify the house mother so that the physician 
can be called to the dormitory. When possible this should be done before 8.30 a. m. 
If a student is taken sick at any other time he must report to the Infirmary, before 
going to his room. 

9. For employees of the University who handle fopd and milk, the University 
reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, and such 
inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of the University 
physician may be desirable. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, the ad- 
ditional expense must be borne by the student. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories 

Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormitories should 
request room application cards. Men should apply to the Dean of men, and women 
to the Office of the Dean of Women. When the room application card is returned, 
it must be accompanied by a $15 deposit. This fee will be deducted from the first 
quarter charges when the student registers. Room reservations not claimed by 
freshmen or upper-classmen on their respective registration days will be cancelled. 
A room will be held by special request until after classes begin providing the dormi- 
tory office is notified by the first day of registration. Room reservation fees will 
not be refunded if the request is received later than one month before the first 
day of registration for the quarter for which arrangements were made. 

Reservations by students in attendance at the University should be made at 
least two weeks before the close of the preceding quarter. New students are urged 
to attend to their housing arrangements well in advance of registration. 

All freshmen students, except those who live at home, are required to room 
in the dormitories. 

There are two dormitories on the campus for women, each under the supervision 
of a matron and the Office of Dean of Women. 



GENERAL INFORMATION ' 17 

All housing arrangements for women students must be approved by the Office 
of the Dean of Women. 

Applications for rooms are considered only when a student has been fully ad- 
mitted academically to the University. A student for whom a reservation has 
been made should report at registration time to the dormitory to which he or she 
has been assigned. 

Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves with sufficient 
single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow cases, towels, a laundry 
bag, a shoe bag, and a waste paper basket. 

The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormitory property 
assigned to him. Any damage done to the property other than that which would 
result from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to the student concerned. 

It is understood that all housing arrangements which are made for the fall 
quarter are binding for the winter and spring quarters also. 

Each student will be furnished a key for his room for which a deposit of $1.00 
will be made. This deposit will be returned in exchange for the key at the end of the 
year. 

Laundry. The University does not provide laundry service and each student is 
responsible for his or her own laundry. ^There are several reliable laundry concerns 
in College Park; or, if a student prefers, he may send his laundry home. Women 
students may, if they wish, do their own laundry in the laundry room in each 
dormitory. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked with a dormitory 
address will be delivered when the student concerned notifies the college Park 
express office of his arrival. 

Off-Campus Houses. 

Men: Only upper classmen are allowed to live in houses not under the control 
of the University. Inquiries about these should be addressed to the Office of the 
Dean of Men. 

Women: Undergraduate women students who cannot be accommodated in the 
women's dormitories are referred to private homes which are registered in the 
Office of the Dean of Women as " Off-Campus Houses for Undergraduate Women." 
The householders in these homes agree to maintain the same rules and regulations 
as in the dormitories but business arrangements are made entirely between the 
student and the householder. Students and their parents should plan to see these 
accommodations personally and talk with the householder before making final ar- 
rangements. No woman student should enter into an agreement with a house- 
holder without first ascertaining at the office of the Dean of Women that the house 
is on the approved list. 

Meals 

All students who live in University dormitories must board at the University 
Dining Hall. 

Students not living in the dormitories may make arrangements to board by the 
quarter at the dining hall, get their meals in the University Cafeteria, or at eating 
establishments in College Park. A few "off-campus houses" provide board as well 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN 

The office of the Dean of Men exists for the purpose of furnishing friendly 
counsel and helpful guidance to male students in connection with any of their 
personal problems, especially those relating to financial need, employment, 
housing, etc. 

This office also handles for male students matters of student discipline and in- 
fringement of University regulations. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 

The office of the Dean of Women serves in the same capacity for women stu- 
dents as does the Office of the Dean of Men for men students. In addition, it 
coordinates the interests of women students, handles matters of chaperonage 
at social functions, regulation of sorority rushing, etc. It has supervision over all 
housing accommodations for women students, whether on or off campus. 

SCHOLARSHIPS^AND FELLOWSHIPS 

Legislative Scholarships 

By Act of the Maryland Legislature in 1941, members of the Legislature were 
given the privilege of awarding scholarships to worthy students from their respective 
districts. Members of the House of Delegates may award one four-year scholar- 
ship. Members of the Senate may award three four-year scholarships. 

Students desiring these scholarships are requested to contact either a State 
Senator or a member of the House of Delegates in their respective districts. 
University Grants 

The University of Maryland offers a limited number of tuition scholarships 
covering fixed charges to graduates of high schools or preparatory schools. 

Since the University of Maryland is interested in encouraging students who show 
promise, these scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student's contribution 
to his high school, preparatory school, or'University, his scholastic average, special 
talents, and evidence of leadership. 
Albright Scholarship 

A scholarship, known as the Victor E. Albright Scholarship, is awarded to a 
boy or girl of good character, born and reared in Garrett County and graduated 
from a high school in Garrett County during the year in which the scholarship is 
awarded. This scholarship is worth $200.00 a year. The names of prospective 
scholars are forwarded to the Scholarship Committee by the high school principals 
of Garrett County and the selection is made by'lot. The recipient of this award 
must maintain a B average for each quarter. 
Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation Grants 

A limited number of scholarships have been made available by the Sears Roe- 
buck Agricultural Foundation for young men who have been reared on farms in 
the State of Maryland and who enroll as freshmen in the College of Agriculture. 
These grants apply only in the freshman year. 

-Application may be obtained from the Committee on Scholarships at the Uni- 
versity. 

Graduate Fellowships 

E? *For information concerning Graduate Fellowships, see section on Graduate 
School. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employment 
while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, however, to earn 
enough to pay all of his expenses. The amounts vary, but some earn from one- 
fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. At this time there are exceptional 
opportunities of this nature. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. It 
does, however, make every effort to aid needy students. The nearby towns and 
University departments are canvassed, and a list of available positions is placed 
at the disposal of students. Applications for employment should be made to the 
Dean of Men. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

Loan funds for worthy students are made available each year by the Kappa 
Kappa Gamma Sorority, the College Park Branch of the American Association of 
University Women, the District of Columbia Home Economics Society, and under 
the provisions of the will of the late Catherine Moore Brinkley. For details re- 
garding these loan funds write to the Director of Admissions, College Park, Mary- 
land. 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

The University operates an office for the reception, dispatch and delivery of 
United States mail, including Parcel Post packages, and for inter-office communica- 
tions. This office is located in the basement of the Administration Building. It 
is not a part of the United States Postal System and no facilities are available 
for sending or receiving postal money orders. Postage stamps, however, may be 
purchased. United States mail is received and dispatched several times daily. 

Each student in the University is assigned a post office box at the time of regis- 
tration, for which a small fee is charged. Also, boxes are provided for the various 
University offices. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE W 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' Supply 
Store, located in the basement of the Administration Building, where students may 
obtain at reasonable prices text books, stationery, classroom materials and equip- 
ment, confectionery, etc. 

Students are advised not to purchase any text books until they have been in- 
formed by their instructors of the exact texts to be used in the various courses, as 
texts vary from year to year. 

The bookstore is operated on a cash basis and credit is not extended to students. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the students, not 
solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities whose development 
along all lines, including the moral and religious, is included in the educational 
process. Pastors representing the major demoninational bodies are officially ap- 
pointed by the Churches for work with the students of their respective faiths. 
Each of the Students Pastors also serves a local church of his denomination, which 
the students are urged to attend. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



The College of Agriculture offers both general and specializad training for stu- 
dents who wish to prepare for professional work in the broad field of agriculture. 
Student programs are arranged with a view to correlating technical work with 
related sciences and cultural subjects. Education in fundamentals receives special 
attention. Accordingly, young men and women are given a basic general educa- 
tion while they are being instructed in the various branches of agriculture. In 
addition to offering this opportunity for thorough grounding in the related basic 
natural and social sciences, it is an objective of the College to provide trained per- 
sonnel for agricultural and allied industries. This personnel is recruited from rural 
and urban areas. Farm-reared students enter either general or specialized curri- 
cula, while city-reared students tend to follow the specialized programs. 
General 

The College provides curricula for those who wish to engage in general farming, 
live stock production, dairying, poultry husbandry, fruit or vegetable growing, 
floriculture or ornamental horticulture, field crop production, or in the highly 
specialized scientific activities connected with these industries. It prepares men 
to serve as farm managers, with commercial concerns, as teachers in agricultural 
colleges, in departments of vocational agriculture, and as investigators in ex- 
periment stations, extension work, regulatory activities, and the United States 
Department of Agriculture. Its curricula in Animal Science, Botany (in- 
cluding Plant Physiology and Plant Pathology), Dairy Science, Entomology, 
Horticultural science, Poultry Science, and Soil Technology offer rich opportun- 
ities to students with scientific interests, and lead to positions in teaching, research, 
extension, and regulatory work. 
War Effort 

At the present time, in accordance with the problems confronting the nation as a 
whole, the work in the College of Agriculture is geared to the war effort. In the 
fields of Animal Husbandry, Crop Production, Dairying, Horticulture, and 
Poult%, special problems as they apply to food production are emphasized. Stu- 
\ tnts receive the latest instruction in animal nutrition, fertilization and rotation 
crops, economy in the use and production of concentrates, the dehydration and 
drying of foods, their preservation, grading, and shipment as these problems are 
peculiarly effected by the war. The effective use of machinery, its reconditioning 
and repair, and cost problems in terms of the labor situation receive special atten- 
tion. 
Admission 

The requirements for admission are given under Admission requirements to 
the University. 
Junior Standing 

To attain junior standing in the College of Agriculture, a student must have an 
average grade of C in not less than 90 quarter hours. 
Requirements for Graduation 

A minimum of 195 quarter hours is required for graduation. The detailed re- 
quirements for each department are included in the discussion of Curricula in 
Agriculture. 
Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty adviser, 
either departmental or general. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 21 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is the same 
for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student an opportunity 
to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture and the related sciences, 
to articulate beginning work in college with that pursued in high or preparatory 
schools, to provide opportunity for a wise choice of programs in succeeding years, 
and to make it possible for a student before the end of the year to change from 
one curriculum to another, or from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in 
some other college of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Agriculture Curriculum 

Quarters 
Freshman Year I II III 

Eng. 1-2-3— Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

Chem. 1-2 — General Chemistry 5 5 

Soils 1— Soils and Fertilizers 5 

BoL 1 — General Botany 5 

Zoo. 1 — General Zoology 5 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 5 

*MI— Basic R.O.T.C. (men) 2-2-2 2 2 2 

Freshman Lectures 

Elect one of the following* 

Modern Language 3 3 3 

**Math. 10-11-12 3 3 3 

Phys. 6-7-8— Introductory Physics 3 3 3 

Introductory Agriculture : 

A. E. 1 — Agr. Ind. and Resources 3 

A. E. 2 — Farm Organization 3 

Agriculture Elective 3 

18 18 18 

With successful completion of the prescribed courses of the freshman year the 
student is prepared to follow any of the curricula in the College of Agriculture 
described in the following pages. 

Agriculture — General 

This curriculum is designed for persons wishing to return to the farm, 
enter work allied to farming, for those seeking a general rather than a specialized 
knowledge of the field of agriculture and for those preparing to be county agents, 
teachers, etc. 

By proper use of the electives allowed in this curriculum, a student may choose 
a field of concentration in agriculture and at the same time elect courses that con- 
tribute to liberal education. 
Agricultural Chemistry 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the fundamentals of both the 
physical and biological sciences. It may be adjusted through the selection of elec- 

* Women in the College of Agriculture will take the usual requirement in physical education for 
women . 

** Students who expect to pursue curricula in Agricultural Chemistry and Agricultural Engineering 
must be prepared to elect Math. 15, 16 and 17, and Chem. 3. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

tives to fit the student for work in agricultural experiment stations, soil bureaus, 
geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer industries and those handling food 
products. 

The outline calls foT five years of study. Completion of four years leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, stressing chemistry particularly and related sub- 
jects as they apply to agriculture. By the proper use of electives in the fourth year, 
continuation of this course of study for the fifth year, and the presentation of a 
satisfactory thesis, the student may qualify for the Master's degree. 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare for teaching secondary 
vocational agriculture, work as county agents and allied lines of the rural educa- 
tion services. Graduates from this curriculum are in demand in rural businesses, 
particularly of the cooperative type. A number have entered the Federal service. 
Others are engaged in teaching and research in agricultural colleges. Quite a few 
have returned to the farm as owner-managers. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, involving 
graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing the agri- 
cultural education curriculum must present evidence of having acquired adequate 
farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high average may upon petition be relieved of certain require- 
ments in this curriculum, when evidence is presented that either through experi- 
ence or previous training the program is non-essential. Or they may be allowed to 
carry an additional load. 

Agricultural Engineering 

The department of Agricultural Engineering offers to students of agriculture 
training in those agricultural subjects which are based upon engineering principles. 
These subjects may be grouped under three heads: farm machinery and motors, 
farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

Five-Year Program in Agriculture-Engineering 

Students who wish to specialize in engineering with emphasis upon the physical 
and biological problem of agriculture may take a five year program in the College of 
Agriculture and Engineering. This program prepares students to enter State, 
Federal or commercial fields of activity in such work as soil and water conserva- 
tion, rural electrification, design and sale of farm machinery and structures, and 
in the development of new uses for farm products and the profitable utilization of 
farm wastes and by-products. 

Upon completion of the normal four year courses of study the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Agriculture is granted. For the fifth year the student registers in the 
College of Engineering and at the end of that year, upon satisfactory completion 
of the required course of study, receives a degree in Civil, Electrical, Mechanical 
or Chemical Engineering. 

Agronomy 

The curricula in this department, Crop Production, Plant Breeding and Soils, 
are designed to prepare students for the following occupations: specialized crop 
farming, general farming, technical workers in private and public concerns, 
scientists in soil and crop technology, and agricultural representatives with com- 
mercial and industrial organizations. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 23 

Animal Husbandry 

The curriculum in animal husbandry is designed to prepare students for three 
distinct professional fields: livestock farming, research, and as technicians and con- 
sultants in industry and business. 

Botany 

The department of Botany offers three major fields of work: general botany and 
morphology, plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology. The required 
courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same for all students. In 
the junior and senior years, the student elects botanical courses to suit his parti- 
cular interests in botanical science. Through cooperation with the College of 
Education, students who wish to meet the requirements for the state high school 
teachers certificates may elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum lays a broad foundation for students who wish to pursue grad- 
uate work in botanical science in preparation for college teaching and for research 
in state experiment stations, in the United States Department of Agriculture, and 
in private research institutions and laboratories. 

The curriculum also affords students an opportunity to train for extension work, 
for positions with seed and canning companies, spray manufacturers, and other 
commercial concerns. 

Dairy Husbandry 

This department offers instructions in two major lines of work: dairy production 
and dairy manufacturing. The curricula are designed to prepare students for 
practical work in dairy farming and dairy manufacturing industries, for scientific 
work in dairy industry, and as technical workers with milk cooperatives, dairy 
breed associations, and private and public concerns. 

Entomology 

This curriculum trains students for work in State and Federal entomological 
bureaus, in preparation for commercial pest control operations and for actual 
insect control on their own farms. In addition, entomology is taught as a cultural 
subject because of its wide field of application, its varied subject matter, and the 
generaljinterest of the public in the small creatures about it. 

Farm Management* 

The curriculum in farm management is designed to prepare students for positions 
as farm operators and managers; with farm organizations, such as the Farm 
Bureau and farmers' co-operatives, with private and corporate business concerns; 
and with State and Federal agencies, such as college teachers, Extension and in- 
vestigational workers. 

Horticulture 

This department offers instruction in pomology (fruits), olericulture (vegetables) 
floriculture (flowers), and ornamental gardening. These courses prepare students 
to enter commercial production and the horticultural industries. Students are 
likewise prepared to enter the allied industries as horticultural workers with 
fertilizer companies, seed companies, equipment manufacturers, and others. Stu- 
dents who wish to enter specialized fields of research and teaching may take ad- 
vanced work in the department. 



* Students electing the Farm Management curriculum must present evidence of having acquired at 
least one year of practical farm experience. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Poultry Husbandry 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a thorough 
knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the marketing, dis- 
tribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry improvement work, and as 
a basis for graduate training for teaching and research in poultry husbandry. 

Special Students in Agriculture 

Mature students may, with consent of the Dean, register as special students 
and pursue a program of studies not included in any regular curriculum, but ar- 
ranged to meet the needs of the individual. All university fees for these special 
students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses in 
their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrangements have 
been made to permit such persons to register at the office of the Dean of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission to visit classes and 
work in the laboratories of the different departments. This opportunity is created 
to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit-growers, gardeners, or other interested persons 
who are able to get away from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are $5.00 for registration and $1.50 per credit hour per 
month for the time of attendance. One registration is good for any amount of reg- 
ular or intermittent attendance during a period of four years. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The College of Arts and Sciences is meeting the war emergency needs in educa- 
tion by offering in the natural sciences essential war training courses in Chem- 
istry, Physics, Mathematics, Bacteriology, and Food Technology. In the Social 
Sciences, training preparatory to the field of Personnel Management and Social 
Work is offered. The Foreign Service Curriculum comprises training in Modern 
Languages, History, Political Science, Economics, Geography, and allied subjects. 
Meeting other war training needs is the required pre-professional training for 
medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and nursing. 

For the civilian student the college provides liberal training in the Biological 
Sciences, Economics, History, Languages and Literature, Philosophy, the Physical 
Sciences, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. This training affords the 
student an opportunity to acquire a general education which will serve as a founda- 
tion for whatever profession or vocation he may choose. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division and four 
Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the following departments: 

A. The Division of Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, 
Genetics, and Zoology. 

B. The Division of Humanities: Art, Classical Languages and Literatures, 
Comparative Literature, English Literature and Philogy, Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

C. The Division of Physical Sciences. Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 
Mathematics, and Physics. 

D. The Division of Social Sciences. Economics, History, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 25 

The work of the first and'second'years'in the Col lege'of Arts and Sciences is 
taken in the Lower Division. It is designed to give the student a basic general 
education, and to prepare him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

The Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their major 
work in the College of Arts and Sciences during their junior and senior years. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, in 
general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools of the 
University. 

For admission to the pre-medical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language are required. A detailed statement of the requirements for admission to 
the School of Medicine and the relation of these to the pre-medical curriculum may 
be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 
Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the requirements prescribed 
in the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Students of this college who have completed the regular course in either the Di- 
vision of Humanities or the Division of Social Sciences are awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Any student who has met the requirements for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science is awarded that degree, provided the major portion of the 
work has been done in the field of science, and the application has the approval of 
the science department in which the major work has been carried. 

Students who have elected the combined program of Arts and Sciences and 
Medicine may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science after the completion 
of at least 150 quarter credits in this college and the first year of the school of 
Medicine. 

Those electing the combined five-year Academic Nursing curriculum, for which 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing may be awarded upon the completion 
of the full course, must first take the Pre-Nursing curriculum in the College of Arts 
and Sciences before the Nursing Course in Baltimore. 

Those takingthe combined course in Arts and Law may be awarded the Bachelor 
of Arts degree after the completion of three years of the work in this college and 
one year of the full-time law course, or its eqivalent, in the School of Law. 
Residence 

The last forty-five credits of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree in 
the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in residence in this University. 

Requirements for Degrees 

The Baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be con- 
ferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University Requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences Requirements: 

A minimum of 195 quarter credits must be acquired, including the twenty-seven 
credits of basic military science required of all able-bodied men students, or the 
eighteen credits of physical education for women and for such men as are excused 
from military science. 

A student must acquire at least 98 credits, with an average grade of at least C 
in the Lower Division, before being admitted to an Upper Division. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as possible, be- 
fore the beginning of the junior year and must be completed before graduation: 
I. English and Speech — twenty-one credits. Of these, Survey and Com- 
position I (Eng. 1, 2, 3,) and Public Speaking (Speech 1, 2) are required. 
II. Foreign Languages and Literature — eighteen credits of one language, 
(including Latin or Greek). Students wishing to enroll in a language they 
have studied in high school will be given a placement test. 

III. Social Sciences — eighteen credits. This requirement is fulfilled by electing 
courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Soci- 
ology. 

IV. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — eighteen credits. Of these one year 
must be in natural science. 

V. Military Science or Physical Education — eighteen credits or twelve 
credits, respectively in physical education. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — When the requirements of the Lower Di- 
vision have been completed each student must select a major in one of the fields of 
study of an Upper Division, and before graduation must complete a major and 
a minor. The courses constituting the major and the minor must conform to the 
requirements of the department in which the major work is done. 

Before beginning a major or minor the student must have an average of not less 
than C in fundamental courses in the fields chosen. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental requirements, 
of 30 to 54 hours, of which 15 must be in courses numbered 50 to 99. 

A minor shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental requirements, 
of 18 to 30 hours, of which 12 must be in courses numbered 50 to 99. Minor courses 
shall be chosen with the advice of the major in consultation with the minor de- 
partment to supplement the student's major work. 

The average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields must be at 
least C. A general average of at least C is required for graduation. 
Certification of High School Teachers 

If courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective high 
school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with major and minor in one 
of the Upper Divisions of this College. 

Advisers 

Freshmen and sophomores in this college shall consider the Dean of the College 
and the Chairman of the Lower Division their general advisers. 

On admission to the University each student of the College of Arts and Sciences 
is assigned to a member of the faculty of the College, who serves as his special 
adviser. The student should consult his special adviser on all matters of his uni- 
versity life in which he may need advice. 

Juniors and seniors will consider the chairman of their major department their 
adviser, and shall consult him about the arrangements of their schedules of 
courses and any other matters in which they may desire advice. 

The Lower Division 

The work of the first six quarters in the College of Arts and Sciences is designed 
to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare him for specializa- 
tion in the latter part of his course. 



Quarters 




II 


III 


3 


3 


2 




3 


3 


3 or 5 3 


or 5 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 27 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such proficiency 
in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into one of the Upper 
Divisions of the College. Personal aptitude and a general scholastic ability must 
also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major study is to be obtained. 

Suggested courses of study are given under certain of the Upper Divisions. The 
student should follow the curriculum for which he is believed to be best fitted. 
It will be noted that there is a great deal of similarity in these outlines for the 
first six quarters, and a student need not consider himself attached to any par- 
ticular Upper Division until the beginning of his seventh quarter, at which time 
he is required to select a major. 

The minimum requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, as outlined on 
page 25, should be completed as far as possible in the Lower Division. 

Arts and Sciences Curriculum 

Freshman Year Required: I 

*Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 3 

Speech, 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 

**Foreign Language (including Latin and Greek) 3 

Science (Bot., Chem., Math., Physics, Zool.) 3 or 5 

M. L— Basic R. 0. T. C. ) 

Phys. Ed. — Personal Hygiene > 2 

Phys. Ed. — Physical Activities ) 

Elect from the following so that the total credits each 
quarter are 16 to 18: 

Hist. 1, 2, 3 — Survey Western Civilization 3 

Hist. 4, 5, 6 — History of England and Great Britain .. 3 

Hist. 7, 8, 9 — American History 3 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government 3 

Library Science 1 — Library Methods 

Comp. Lit. — Greek Poetry 2 

Comp. Lit. — Later European Epic Poetry 

Music 1, 2, 3, 4, 5... 3 

16-18 

Sophomore Year IV 

Eng. 4, 5, 6 — Survey and Composition 3 

Foreign Language 3 

General Elecuves fulfilling, as far as possible, the speci- 
fic requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences 9-10 9-10 9-10 
M. I.— Basic R. 0. T. C. ) 

Phys. Ed. — Community Hygiene > 2 2 2 

Phys. Ed. — Physical Activities ) 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


or 3 


or 3 


2 


or 2 


2 




2 


2 


3 


3 


16-18 


16-18 


V 


IV 


3 


3 


3 


3 



17-18 17-18 17-18 



* A placement test in English is given during Registration Week to assist in determining whether 
a student is adequately prepared for Eng. 1. After this the student is given five weeks trial in Eng. 1. 
If he has failed the original examination and is also unsuccessful in an examination at the end of the 
five weeks period, he is transferred to Eng. A, a preparatory course without credit. He may also be 
placed in Eng. A if he passes the original examination, but fails the second. 

** A placement test is given during Registration Week for students wishing to pursue a language 
they have studied in high school. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Division of Biological Sciences 

The Division of Biological Sciences is organized to stimulate close coordination 
between all activities in the field of biology. The Division includes the Depart- 
ments of Bacteriology and Zoology. 

Each department within the Division has one or more established curricula. 
To meet the demands for technically trained workers in the biological sciences 
these curricula are designed to give specialized training, particularly during the 
last two years of college work. They provide the basic knowledge and experience 
required for (1) teaching in secondary schools; (2) research and regulatory work 
in Federal, State, and municipal departments and bureaus; (3) admission to grad- 
uate study in the preparation for college teaching and advanced research; and (4) 
entrance to the professional schools of Medicine, Dentistry, and Nursing. 

Bacteriology. The curriculum in Bacteriology is arranged to provide training 
in all the principal phases of the science; namely, (1) the cause and prevention of 
disease, including the identification of the causative bacteria, (2) the phenomena 
of immunity, including application in disease, (3) the laboratory diagnostic pro- 
cedures for medical technicians, (4) the microbiology of foods and milk, soil, sani- 
tation and water purification, and (5) bacterial metabolism and classification. 

Medical Technology. The Department of Bacteriology offers two years of 
training for those students desiring to become medical technicians, but who are 
not in a position to complete the four-year curriculum in bacteriology. 

The modern practice of medicine requires the aid of the laboratory and trained 
personnel for this service. The clinical laboratory technician is a person who, by 
education and training, is capable of performing the various routine microscopic, 
chemical, and bacteriological tests used in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. 
Food Technology. This curriculum offers combinations of courses that will 
equip the student with an unusually broad knowledge of food manufacture. In 
the curriculum are combined many of the fundamentals of biology, chemistry, 
and engineering which, when supported by the proper electives and by practical 
experience, will serve as an excellent background for supervisory work in food fac- 
tory operation, salesmanship, research in the food industries, etc. 

Zoology. The Zoology Department offers courses designed to train students for 
teaching and for service in the biological bureaus of the United States Govern- 
ment, in the biological departments of the various states, and in various branches 
of the military service. Emphasis is placed on morphology, physiology, and marine 
biology. Instruction and opportunities for original investigation in the latter are 
supplemented by the research facilities and courses of instruction offered at the 
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 
B — The Division of Humanities 

The Division of Humanities is composed of the Departments of Art, Classical 
Languages, Comparative Literature, English Language and Literature, Foreign 
Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, and Speech. 

The Division has two main functions: (1) to provide for its own major students 
a thorough training in literature, philosophy, languages, and the fine arts; (2) to 
furnish a background for students in other Divisions, espe cially for those taking 
pre-professional^work. 

The Division offers major and minor work for the Master of Arts and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in English Language and Literature and in Foreign 
Languages and Literatures. Major work for the Master of Arts may be elected 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 29 

in General Linguistics and Comparative Literature, and minor work in Philosophy. 
Detailed requirements for these degrees are given in the catalogue of the Grad- 
uate School. 
C — The Division of Physical Sciences 

The Division of Physical Sciences is composed of the departments of Astronomy, 
Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Physics. On the following pages the di- 
vision outlines a number of curricula, each requiring twelve quarters for com- 
pletion, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts together 
with fifteen-quarter programs in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Applied 
Physics. The departments of study have developed courses to contribute to the 
liberal education of students not primarily interested in science; to provide the 
basic knowledge of the physical sciences necessary in such professions as agri- 
culture, dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, pharmacy, and others; 
to equip teachers of the Physical Sciences for secondary schools and colleges; and 
to train students for professional service as chemists, chemical engineers, geologists, 
mathematicians, physicists and statisticians; and to prepare for graduate study 
and research in the Physical Sciences. 

The fields of knowledge represented by the Physical Sciences are so vast and 
their applications are so important that it is impossible to deal adequately with 
any one in a four-year undergraduate curriculum. Students who aspire to pro- 
ficiency are therefore encouraged to continue their studies in the graduate years. 
In the work leading to a Master's degree, the student becomes acquainted with 
the general aspects of the field. In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the student must demonstrate a command of 
his field sufficiently great to permit him to make independent investigations and 
creative contributions. 

Mathematics. The mathematics curriculum is designed for students who desire 
a thorough training in the fundamentals of mathematics in preparation for teach- 
ing, research, or graduate work in mathematics. 

Students majoring in mathematics who have completed freshman and sopho- 
more courses with distinction in the honors sections are eligible to try for honors 
in mathematics. To receive the honors degree in mathematics, a student must: 
(1) complete the curriculum in mathematics with an average grade of B in all sub- 
jects; (2) pass an honors examination in mathematics at the end of the senior year; 
(3) write a satisfactory thesis on an assigned topic in mathematics in the latter half 
of the senior year. Students who wish to try for honors in mathematics should con- 
sult the chairman of the department at the conclusion of their sophomore year. 

The curriculum suggested below offers the student a minor in Physics. It is 
possible, however, for the student to minor in other fields, such as statistics or 
chemistry. 

Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry includes analytical, biological, in- 
organic, organic, and physical chemistry. 

Physics. The Physics curriculum is designed for students who desire a thorough 
training in the fundamentals of Physics in preparation for graduate work, and the 
teaching of Physics. It is also intended to prepare students for positions in govern- 
mental laboratories and in the laboratories established by many industries for 
testing, research, and development through the application of physical principles 
and tools. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

D — The Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, History, 
Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

In addition to supplying such courses as are required by other divisions and 
other colleges of the University, the departments in the Division of Social Sciences 
offer opportunities for advanced training in the several fields represented. A major 
in Economics is available for students in the College of Arts and Sciences. During 
the freshman and sophomore years, in addition to the College of Arts and Sciences 
requirements, Principles of Economics should be completed and as many other 
lower division social science courses taken as practicable. The Department of 
Political Science offers the first three years of a combined Arts-Law course and 
also offers training in the field of public administration. The Department of 
Psychology is identified with the development of applied psychology and is in 
position to supply training in the industrial and clinical phases of the subject. 
The Department of Sociology provides a course of study preparatory to profes- 
sional training in social work and offers the courses demanded by civil service 
examinations for certain positions. All five departments present courses aligned 
with the teacher-training program represented in the Arts-Education curriculum. 

All of the departments offer graduate instruction leading to the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. These advanced degrees are increasingly re- 
quired for secondary school teaching and for professional positions in the several 
fields represented. 

Combined Program In Arts and Law 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic credit for 
admission to the school, or 102 quarter hours of college credit. 

The University also offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing this com- 
bined program will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences 
at College Park. During this period they will complete the prescribed curriculum 
in pre-legal studies as outlined below, or a total of 147 quarter credit hours, and 
they must complete the Requirements for Graduation. If students enter the com- 
bined program with advanced standing, at least the third year's work must be 
completed in residence at College Park. Upon the successful completion of one 
year of full-time law courses in the School of Law in Baltimore, the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts may be awarded on the recommendation of the Dean of the School 
of Law. The degree of Bachelor of Laws may be awarded upon the completion of 
the combined program. 

Public Administration 

A curriculum, consisting of a major in Political Science and a minor in Eco- 
nomics, is offered for the benefit of those students who are looking forward to an 
administrative career in the public service. 

Economics: A major in Economics is available to students in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. During the freshman and sophomore years, in addition to the re- 
quirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, Principles of Economics, Econ. 
31, 32, 33, and 18 other credits in the social sciences should be completed. Prin- 
ciples of Accounting, B. A. 20, 21, 22, is strongly recommended as an elective 
course which'may be taken in either the sophomore or junior years. Elements of 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 31 

Statistics and Business Statistics, B. A. 130 and 131, are also recommended for 
those students who intend to enter Government work. 

Clinical Psychology 

A curriculum of studies is offered which will provide basic training in psychology 
and allied subjects for students who anticipate entering the growing field of clinical 
psychology. It is designed as a broad undergraduate background leading to spec- 
ialization, preparatory to entering the field of psychological diagnosis and guidance 
in schools and universities, mental hospitals, child welfare organizations, mental 
health clinics, and similar institutions. 
Personnel Management 

A program of training in Personnel Management is available in the College of 
Arts and Sciences with primary work in Psychology, designed for students looking 
forward to personnel activities in the Armed Services, Business and Industry, 
and Government. It is intended that the curriculum will be flexible enough to 
meet the needs and interests of students in each of these special services. 
Foreign Service Curriculum 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students for positions in the foreign 
service of the Federal Government and private business organizations. It is 
anticipated that numerous positions in this field — such as commercial attaches, 
marketing specialists, sales representatives, economic advisers, relief administra- 
tors — will develop out of the larger responsibilities the United States will be called 
upon to assume in the postwar period. In addition to training in the fundamentals 
of the natural and social sciences, the students will receive ins ruction (so far as 
available teaching personnel permits) in the language, geography, demography, 
economic resources, government and social institutions of the peoples inhabiting 
the region where he expects to do his work. The training in language will be suffi- 
c ntly intensive to give the s udent a useful conversational ad reading abili y 
in the shortest possible time. 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2, 3 — Survey and Composition 

Speech 2 — Fundamentals of Speech 

Natural Science 

Foreign Language 

Hist. 1, 2, 3 — Survey of Western Civilization 

Econ. 1, 2, 3— Economic Resources of the World 

M. I.— Basic R. 0. T. C 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 4, 5, 6 — Survey and Composition 

Econ. 31, 32, 33 — Prins. of Economics 

Natural Science 

Foreign Languages— Conversation 

Soc. 5— Comparative Sociology 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Pol. Sci. 1 — American National Government. 
M. I.— Basic R. 0. T. C 





Quarters 




I 


II 


III 


3 


3 


3 
3 


5 


5 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


18 


18 


16 


IV 


V 


VI 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 



19 19 19 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Junior Year VII VIII IX 

Pol. Sci. 7, 8. 9. — -Comparative Government 2 2 2 

Foreign Language — Advanced Composition 3 3 

N. H. R. 110— Geog. Background of Md. Probs 3 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Econ. Systems 4 

Pol. Sci. 54— Probs. of World Politics 3 

N. H. R. 112— Geog. of Southern Asia 3 

Hist. 129— U. S. in World Affairs 3 

P. A. 130 — International Econ. Policies and Rels 4 

P. A. 137— Econ. Planning and P. W. Probs 4 

Soc. 51 — Postwar Probs. of Sec. Org 3 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Prins. and Org 4 

M. I. —Advanced R. O. T. C 2 2 2 

15 18 16 

Senior Year X XI XII 

Pol. Sci. Ill — Public Administration 3 

Pol. Sci. 102 — International Law 3 

Language 4 4 4 

B. A. 157 — Foreign Trade Procedure 4 

P. A. 170 — Transportation I, Public Regulation 4 

Soc. 108— World Population Problems 3 

M. I. —Advanced R. O. T. C 2 2 2 

Electives 8 8 

17 17 17 

The Pre-Professional Curricula 

Combined Arts and Nursing. The first part of this curriculum is taken in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. If a student enters this combined 
program with advanced standing, at least the second full year of this curriculum 
must be completed in this college. 

The professional training is taken in the School of Nursing of the University 
in Baltimore or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. In addition 
to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing may, 
upon the recommendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be granted 
at the end of the professional training. 

Pre-Medical. The College of Arts and Sciences has established a course of study, 
the completion of which fulfills the academic requirements for entrance to the 
School of Medicine. This course incorporates the requirements of the Army 
Specialized Training Program and those of the Council on Medical Education of 
the American Medical Association. Students who complete this work are qualified 
to apply for admission to any Class A Medical School. 

This work as outlined below may be completed in five quarters or six quarters, 
depending upon the amount of time available to the student. The two courses are 
essentially the same except that the six-quarter course offers greater opportunity 
for advanced work in the natural sciences and a broader study of the social sciences. 







Quarters 






I 


II 


III IV 


V 


VI 


3 


3 


3 




3 


5 


5 


3 5 


5 








5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 






3 


2 


2 2 


2 


2 






3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 

3 


3 




2 


2 


2 2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 


2 


2 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 33 

Pro-Medical, Pro-Dental and Pro-Veterninary Corricalufn as established 

on a six-quarter basis 



Mathematics 10, 11, 12,25 

Chemistry 1, 3, 5, 35, 36, 37, 38... 

Physics 1,2, 3 

Zoology 2, 3, 5 

English 1,2,3, 7, 8,9 

History 7, 8, 9 

Geography (Economic Resources) 

Psychology 1, 2 

Physical Training 

Military Training 

22 21 19 22 22 17 
Students may elect other courses. Courses in Modern Language and Public 
Speaking are recommended as electives. 

Combined Arts and Medicine. This curriculum offers to students a combined 
program leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. 
The professional work consists of a minimum of 150 quarter credits, to which are 
applied the college regulations regarding the attainment of an average of C or 
higher and a maximum of one quarter of the total hours in B. The professional 
training is taken in the School of Medicine in Baltimore. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medicine, and 
upon the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Medicine, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences at the 
Commencement following the second year of professional training. 

At least one year of residence in the College of Arts and Sciences is required of 
students transferring from other colleges and universities who wish to become can- 
didates for the two degrees. 

Pre-Veterinary. Students who desire to prepare themselves for the study of 
Veterinary Science are offered, by the College of Arts and Sciences, a curriculum 
which meets the requirements of the Army Specialized Training Program. The 
successful completion of this curriculum qualifies the student to apply for ad- 
mission to any College of Veterinary Science. The increased need for men trained 
in this field is met by the accelerated study found in this pre-professional cur- 
riculum. 

The course is identical with that required of pre-medical students as outlined 
on this page. 

Pre-Dental. Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who desire to 
prepare themselves for the study of dentistry are offered a curriculum which meets 
the pre-dental requirements of the American Association of Dental Colleges and 
the Army Specialized Training Program. This curriculum may also be followed 
by the student if he desires to continue his college training and complete work for 
the Bachelor of Science degree. 

This curriculum is identical with that offered to pre-medical students and is 
outlined on this page. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

General Science. For students who desire a general basic knowledge of the 
physical and biological sciences without immediate specialization in any one, a 
general curriculum is offered. By proper selection of courses in the junior and 
senior year a student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any one of the 
fields of study to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. 

Students interested in this curriculum should consult the Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Pre-Service Training for Men and Women 

A special curriculum of study, arranged for women students who desire to enter 
the WAVES, WACS, or Marines and for men who wish to emphasize their prepara- 
tion for Officers Candidates School, is offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Stress is laid on such courses as American History, Psychology, Physics, Govern- 
ment, International Relations, English, Languages, Transportation, Map making, 
and Secretarial Training. 



Curriculum for Men 

Quarters 

I II III 

English 1-2-3 3 3 3 

Speech 1-2 2 2 

Mathmatics (Alg.-Trig.-Anal.) 3 3 3 

American History 3 3 3 

Psychology (A) 3 

Language 3 3 3 

American National Government 3 

Comparative Government 3 3 

R. O. T. C 2 2 2 

Physical Education 2 2 2 

21 21 22 



IV V VI 

English, Second Year 3 3 3 

Physics 5 5 

Engineering Drawing 1 2 

3 3 3 

3 3 3 

3 3 3 



Languages «. 

Psychology 

Economics 

R. O. T. C 2 2 2 

Physical Education 2 2 2 

21 21 18 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



35 



Language 

Geography 

Engineering Drawing 2 

Chemistry 

Geology 

International Relations, Pol. Sci. 51 

Political Parties. Pol. Sci. 71 

International Law. Pol. Sci. 102 

American Government in Wartime. Pol. Sci. 174 

Electives 

R. O. T. C 

Physical Education 

Language 

Plane Surveying 

Map Making 

Elective 

R. O. T. C 

Physical Education 



VII 


VIII 


IX 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 








5 


5 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 
3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


18 


18 


24 


X 


XI 


XII 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 




3 


3 


10 


8 


8 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 



20 



20 



20 



Curriculum for Women 



Engishl-2-3 

Speech 1-2 

Mathematics. 10-Algebra 

Mathematics. 11-Trig 

American History. Hist. 7-8-9 

Psychology (A)-l-15 

Chemistry 1 

Secretarial Training. S. T. 1-2 

Secretarial Training. S. T. 10-11 

Physical Education 

Expository Writing. Eng. 7-8 

Business English. Eng. 6 

Chemistry 2 

Physics 1-2 

American Nat'l Govt. Pol. Sci. 1 

Comparative Govt. Pol. Sci. 7-8 

Secretarial Training. S. T. 12-13-14. 
Physical Education 



Quarters 



I 


II 


III 


3 


3 


3 


2" 


2 




3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 
5 












1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


16 


17 


17 


IV 


V 


VI 


3 


3 


3 


5 








5 


5 


3 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 



16 



16 



16 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

VII VIII IX 

Economics 31-32-33 3 3 3 

Principles of Accounting. B. A. 1-2-3 4 4 4 

Elements of Statistics. B. A. 130 4 

Business Statistics. B. A. 131-132 4 4 

World Politics. Pol. Sci. 54 -3 

International Relations. Pol. Sci. 51 3 

International Law. Pol. Sci. 102 3 

Secretarial Training. S. T. 16-17-18 3 3 3 

Physical Education 2 2 2 

19 19 19 



X XI XII 

Business Law. B. A. 180-181-182 3 3 3 

Money and Banking. Econ. 140 3 

Theory of Money. Econ. 141 3 

Transportation 3 

World Geography 3 3 3 

Electives 6 6 6 

Physical Education 2 2 2 

17 17 17 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The College of Business and Public Administration offers an accelerated pro- 
gram of study and training designed to prepare young men and women for service 
in business firms and government agencies, and for the teaching of commerical 
subjects and economics in high schools and colleges. It supplies scientific 
business training to students and prospective executives on a professional basis, 
comparable to university training in the other professional fields. Administration 
is regarded as a profession, and the College of Business and Public Administration 
prepares its students for this profession by offering courses of instruction which 
present general principles and techniques of management and administration and 
bring together in systematic form the experiences of business firms and govern- 
mental units. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 37 

Degrees 

The University confers the following degrees on students in the College of 
Business and Public Administration: Bachelor of Science, Master of Business 
Administration, and Doctor of Philosophy. (See bulletin of Graduate School for 
graduate rules and regulations.) 

Programs of Study 

The College offers programs of study in economics, business administration, 
secretarial training, natural and human resources, foreign trade, public admin- 
istration, and a number of combination curricula, e.g., business administration and 
law, commercial teaching, industrial education, chemistry, agriculture, and basic 
engineering courses. Research is emphasized throughout the various programs. 
The college study programs on both the undergraduate and graduate levels 
presuppose effective training in English, history, government, language, science, 
and mathematics. The program of study for any individual student may be so 
arranged as to meet the needs of those preparing for specific lines of work, such 
as accounting, advertising, banking, foreign trade, industrial management, market- 
ing management, personnel management, real estate practice, insurance, govern- 
ment employment, secretarial work, commercial teaching, and research. 
Freshman and Sophomore Requirements 

During the first half of the program of study each student is expected to com- 
plete the following basic or core subjects: 

Required Courses: English and Speech, 12 quarter hours 12 

Mathematics, Science, or Language, minimum of 9 

quarter hours 9 

Economic Resources, 6 quarter hours 6 

Economic Developments, 6 quarter hours 6 

Military or Physical Education, 12 quarter hours 12 

Accounting, 12 quarter hours 12 

Principles of Economics, 9 quarter hours 9 

Organization and Control, 6 quarter hours 6 

Total Requirements 72 

Required Electives: 9 quarter hours in Social Science 9 

Free Electives: The remaining electives, of approximately 17 credits, may be 
profitably selected with the help of a faculty adviser 17 

Total 98 

Freshmen who expect to make a concentration in Foreign Trade, or who plan 
to enter public service abroad, should elect an appropriate foreign language. If a 
student elects a foreign language he must complete two years of the work in order 
to secure university credit, unless he takes an advanced course. Certain courses in 
history and government may prove beneficial in later work. 

Freshmen wishing to make a concentration in Secretarial Training or to prepare 
for commercial teaching should elect Secretarial Training 1 and 12. There are no 
prerequisites for these courses. Such students should elect English 4 and 6 in the 
sophomore year. No credit is allowed when only typing is taken. The laboratory 
fee for typewriting is $5.00 for each quarter. 

Students expecting to concentrate in the field of Public Administration should 
take Political Science 1 and 4. All students are required to take 9 quarter hours in 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Mathematics, a Natural Science or a foreign language, and 9 quarter hours in the 

Social Sciences exclusive of Economics. 

Junior and Senior Requirements 

During the junior and senior years each student is required to complete in a 

satisfactory manner the following specified courses: 
Course Designation Course Title 

B. A. 130 Elements of Statistics 4 

Econ. 140 Money and Banking 4 

B. A. 140 Financial Management 4 

Econ. 150 Marketing Principles and 

Organization 4 

B. A. 150 Marketing Management 4 

Econ. 160 Labor Economics 4 

B. A. 160 Personnel Management 4 

B. A. 180, 181, 182 Business Law, I, II, III 9 

Military Military Training 15 

Total 52 quarter hours 

The remaining hours for the juniors and seniors may be used to meet the re- 
quirements for one of the special concentration programs, for example, in Eco- 
nomics, Natural and Human Resources, Public Administration, Secretarial Train- 
ing, Commercial Teaching, and in the fields of Business Administration, such as: 
Accounting and Statistics, Production Management, Marketing, Advertising, Re- 
tailing, Purchasing, Foreign Trade, Labor Relations, Real Estate, Insurance, In- 
vestment, and General Finance. Juniors and seniors may elect appropriate 
Secretarial Training courses. 

The following basic study program furnishes an opportunity for general train- 
ing in the field of Business and Public Administration and, also, provides the cen- 
tral or core subjects for specialized study programs in the various functional and 
vocational fields. 
Basic Curriculum 

This curriculum is set up on a twelve quarter basis which corresponds to the 
traditional four-year course that leads to a bachelor's degree. A student may, 
therefore, complete the full course in three calendar years by attending four quar- 
ters a year. A superior student may complete the course in a shorter period of 
time'by'carrying'a heavier load each quarter. 

Freshman Year 

Quarters 

I II III 

Econ. 1, 2, 3. Economic Resources of the World, 

I, II, III 2 2 2 

Econ. 4, 5, 6. Economic Developments, I, II, III.... 2 2 2 

Eng. 1,2,3. Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

Mathematics, Natural Science or Foreign Language . 5 5 elective 

Speech 2. Public Speaking 2 2 elective 

M. I. Basic R. O. T. C. and Physical Ed. (men) 2 2 2 

Phy. Ed. Physical Activities and Hygiene (women) 3 3 3 

16-17 16-17 16-17 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 39 



Sophomore Year 



B. A. 10, 11, 12. Organization and Control, I, II, III. 
Econ. 31, 32, 33. Principles of Economics, I, II, III. 
B. A. 20, 21, 22. Principles of Accounting I, II, III 

Electives 

Military Training and Physical Education (men) 

Physical Activities (women) 





Quarters 


IV 


V VI 


2 


2 2 


3 


3 3 


4 


4 4 


6-7 


6-7 6-7 


2 


2 2 


1 


1 1 



17 



17 



17 



Junior Year 



Econ. 140. Money and Banking 

B. A. 140. Financial Management 

B. A. 130. Elements of Statistics 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization. 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management 

Electives * 

Physical Education (men) 

Physical Activities (women) 



VII 

4 



7-8 
2 

1 



Quarters 
VIII IX 



4 — — 



4 
4 

3-4 
2 

1 



4 

7-8 

2 

1 



17 



17 



17 



Senior Year 



B. A. 180, 181, 182. Business Law, I, II, III 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems 

Econ. 170. Industrial Combinations and Competition 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industry 

P. A. 140. Public Finance and Taxation 

P. A. 170. Regulation of Transportation 

P. A. 180. Governmental Control of Business 

Electives 

Physical Education (men) 

Physical Activities (women) 



X 

3 
3 


Quarters 
XI 
3 

4 


XII 
3 

4 


4 

-6 
3 

1 


4 

3-5 
3 

1 


4 

3-5 

3 

1 



17 



17 



17 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Electives may be chosen under the direction of^a faculty'adviser from courses 
in Accounting, Statistics, Geography, Public Administration, Secretarial Train- 
ing, Education, Home Economics, Natural Sciences, or other courses that will aid 
the student in preparing for his major objective. The electives provided for in 
the General Course make it possible for a student to arrange his schedule, under 
guidance of a faculty adviser, in such a way as to secure a concentration or major 
when desired in one of the following curricula: Economics, Accounting and Statis- 
tical Controls, Secretarial Training, Marketing Administration, Financial Ad- 
ministration, Personnel Administration, Production Administration, Human and 
Natural Resources, and Public Administration. 

Economics 

The program of studies in the field of Economics is designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to concentrate either on a major or minor scale in this division 
of the Social Sciences. Students who expect to enroll in the professional schools 
and those who are planning to enter the fields of Business or Public Administra- 
tion will find courses in Economics of considerable value to them in their later work. 

Accounting and Statistical Control Study Program 

The Accounting and Statistical Study Program is designed to give the student 
a broad training in Administrative control supplemented by specific technical 
training in the problems, procedures, methods and techniques of accounting and 
statistics. 

Secretarial Training Study Program 

The purpose of this curriculum is to aid the student in developing his or her 
natural aptitudes in such a way as to become an efficient secretary, or office man- 
ager. The development of the student's capacity to plan, organize, direct, and 
execute is the guiding principle followed in this curriculum. 



Marketing Administration 

If the costs of distribution are to be reduced or kept from rising unduly it is 
necessary that careful study of the organization, policies, methods, and practices 
of advertising, selling, purchasing, merchandising, transportation, financing, 
storing, and other related activities be made and corresponding appropriate action 
taken by qualified marketing technicians and executives. 

Financial Administration 

This curriculum deals with the study of our complicated structure of financial 
institutions and the methods used in financing business activities. 

Personnel Administration 

Personnel Administration has to do with the direction of human effort, it is con- 
cerned with securing, maintaining, and utilizing an effective working force. People 
adequately trained in personnel administration find employment in business enter- 
prises, governmental departments, governmental corporations, educational institu- 
tions, charitable institutions, and with the armed forces. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 41 

Production Administration 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of control 
in the fields of industrial production. Theory and practice with reference to organ- 
ization, policies, methods, processes, and techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and 
criticized. The student is required to go on inspection trips and when feasable, is 
expected to secure first-hand information through both observation and participa- 
tion. 

Human and Natural Resources 

The student interested in this field of human endeavor should select his courses 
under the direction of a faculty member who is conversant with his objective and 
the requirements for success in this field. The curriculum of the Department of 
Human and Natural Resources is designed to aid the student in securing the facts 
concerning the major geographical areas of the world and in studying and analyz- 
ing causes and results as they effect economic, political, and social activities. The 
student interested in international trade, international political relations, diplo- 
macy, overseas governments and national aspirations will find the courses in this 
department of great practical value. Work is offered on both the undergraduate 
and the graduate levels. 

Public Administration 

The curriculum in Public Administration is designed primarily to aid in the 
preparation of young men and women for technical, supervisory, and managerial 
positions in the various State and Federal services. The particular selections of 
subjects in any individual case will depend on the specific position for which the 
student wishes to prepare. The facilities of other departments of the university 
are available for this training. Courses, for example, in foreign languages, geo- 
graphy, history, philosophy and government, as well as studies in social, legal, 
political, and economic institutions may be advisable in addition to t'ie required 
courses in Business and Public Administration 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

In times of war it is essential that public education be continued as nearly as 
possible in normal fashion. There should be no curtailment of the usual flow of 
capable, well-educated teachers from the colleges and universities to the schools 
of the nation. Consequently, the Maryland State Department of Education and 
the College of Education of the University of Maryland are doing everything 
possible to maintain and, where possible, to improve the standards of the teach- 
ing profession. 

To date there have been no basic changes in the teacher certification laws of the 
state and relatively few changes in the program of the College of Education. 
Every effort is being made, however, to speed up the process and turn out a better 
and more effective product. There is great present need for teachers. 

Types of Persons Served 

The College of Education meets the needs of the following classes of students: 
(1) undergraduates preparing to teach in high schools, preparatory schools, and 
vocational schools; (2) students who will enter higher institutions to prepare for 
work in specialized educational institutional fields; (3) students preparing for edu- 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

cational work in the trades and industries; (4) students preparing to become 
home demonstrators, club or community recreation leaders, and (in cooperation 
with the Department of Sociology) social workers; (5) students whose major in- 
terest is in other fields, but who desire courses in education; (6) graduate students 
preparing for teaching, supervisory, or administrative positions requiring an ad- 
vanced degree. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in general the 
same as for the other colleges of the University. Candidates for admission whose 
high school records are consistently low are strongly advised not to seek admis- 
sion to the College of Education. 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is tentatively assigned to a mem- 
ber of the faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. The choice of sub- 
ject areas within which the student will prepare to teach and the selection of his 
professional courses will be made under faculty guidance during the first year 
in the Introduction to Education course, required of all freshmen. While in 
particularly fortunate cases it may be possible to make satisfactory adjustments as 
late as the junior year, for students from other colleges who have not already 
entered upon the sequence of professional courses, it is highly desirable that this 
work in the College of Education be begun in the freshman year. Students who 
propose to teach (except Vocational Agriculture) should register in the College of 
Education, in order that they may have continuously the counsel and guidance 
of the faculty which is direc:ly responsible for their professional preparation. 

Curricula 

There are, in general, three types of curricula in the College of Education, as 
follows: 

1. Arts and Science Education Curricula — for students who wish to become 
high school teachers of academic and scientific subjects, such as English, 
social studies, science, and languages. 

2. The Special Subjects Curricula — for students who wish to become high 
school teachers of the commercial subjects and physical education. 

3. Vocational Subjects Curricula — for prospective teachers of Industrial 
Education (shopwork and related subjects) and Home Economics. 

These curricula differ considerably in terms of required subjects. Detailed 
statements of the required courses may be obtained from the Dean of the College. 
The basic pre-professional and professional courses listed below are required in all 
the curricula. 

Pre-professional and Professional Courses 

The courses required of all students who elect an education curriculum are 
classified into two categories: (1) pre-professional and (2) professional. The 
professional courses are all recognized for certification purposes by the Maryland 
State Department of Education provided they are taken in the junior and senior 
years. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 43 

Pre-professional courses: Introduction to Education; Educational Forum. 

Professional courses: Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; The 
Theory of the Senior High School or The Theory of the Junior High School; 
Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (in field of teaching major); Educational 
Measurements; and Methods and Practice of Teaching. 
Admission of Teacher College Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curricula of Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges and other accredited teacher-education institutions whose records give 
evidence of the ability and character essential to teaching will be admitted to 
advanced standing and classified provisionally in appropriate classes. 
Education Courses in Baltimore 

The majority of the professional courses and some of the arts and science courses 
required for undergraduate preparation in Education are offered in Baltimore in 
late afternoon and evening courses primarily for employed people. On a part time 
basis a student may complete some or all of his work for a Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree in Education in the Baltimore Division of the College 
of Education. Through special arrangement with the Graduate School, graduate 
courses are also available for students working on masters' and doctors' degrees in 
education. 

A separate announcement of these courses is issued in the spring of each year 
This announcement may be obtained from the Baltimore Division, College of. 
Education, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 
Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional work 
of the junior and senior years. To be eligible to enter the professional courses, a 
student must have attained junior status, that is, he must have completed 96 
quarter-hours of freshman-sophomore courses with an average grade of C or better. 
Certification of Secondary School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved high 
schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have satisfactorily 
fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Specifically it limits certi- 
fication to graduates who "rank academically in the upper four-fifths of the class 
and who make a grade of C or better in practice teaching. " 

From the offerings of Education, the District of Columbia requirement of 36 
quarter hours of professional courses may be fully met. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions prescribed 
for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science. Upon completion of a minimum of 195 quarter hours of credit in con- 
formity with the requirements specified under "Curricula" and in conformity with 
general requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will be conferred. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men to 
practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time to equip 
them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service and in industry. 

The principal objective of the College of Engineering during the present emerg- 
ency is to provide students with the fundamental specialized technical training 
required ^of officer'personnel in the armed forces of our country. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Chemical, Civil, Elec- 
trical, and Mechanical Engineering. In the Mechanical Engineering Department, 
Aeronautical Engineering is offered as an option in the junior and senior years. 

Each of the curricula offered is coordinated with the Army Specialized Training 
Program and it is possible for a civilian student to secure a degree in Engineering 
upon satisfactory completion of 2]/9 years of instruction in one of the outlined 
curricula. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in general, 
the same as for admission to the undergraduate departments of the University, 
except as to the requirements in mathematics. See Admission. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite number of 
entrance units to enter the College of Engineering without the unit of advanced 
algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry. Provision will be made for such 
students to make up their deficiencies in entrance credits. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in chemical, 
civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, and mechanical engineering with 
aeronautical option, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned by students reg- 
istered in the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engineering, which 
represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that required for bachelor 
degrees in the College of Engineering of the University of Maryland. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are accepted in 
accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Graduate School. See 
Graduate School Announcement. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Chemical, Civil, Electrical or Mechanical Engineer will be granted 
only to graduates of the University who have obtained a bachelor's degree in 
engineering. Further information may be obtained by applying to the Dean of the 
College of Engineering. 

Basic Curriculum 

All Freshman students are required to take the following curriculum: 

I 

Freshman Year Class Lab. 

AST -406, 407, 408 Mathematics 6 

AST-304, 305, 306 Physics 4 2(1*) 

AST-001 Engineering Drawing 

AST-205, 206, 207 Chemistry 3 

AST-Ill English 3 

AST-133 History 3 

AST-163 Geography 2 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

* One hour for writing reports. 



Quarter 






II 




III 


Class 


Lab. 


Class Lab. 


5 







5 


4 


2(1*) 


4 2(1*) 










6 


2 




4 





2 







2 


2 







2 


2 







2 


3 




2 


3 Z 







6 


6 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



45 



Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic trans- 
formation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information on chemical 
operations and processes of importance in modern life and to apply this under 
executive direction, according to engineering methods, for the attainment of econo- 
mic objectives. Modern chemical research has contributed so much to industrial 
and social welfare that the field of the chemical engineer may now be said to cover 
practically every operation in which any industrial material undergoes a change in 
its chemical identity. 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 



Quarters 
IV Class Lab. 

AST-401 Mathematics 5 

AST-401 Qualitative Analysis 2 4 

AST-402 Quantitative Analysis 2 6 

AST-403 Physical Chemistry 3 2 

AST-403 Industrial Chemical 

Calculations 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

V 

AST-404 Physical Chemistry 3 3 

AST-405 Organic Chemistry 4 6 

AST-415 Unit Operatons 1 4 2* 

AST-401 Mechanics 6 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

VI 

AST-401 Strength of Materials 4 

AST-416 Unit Operations II 3 

AST-401 Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 4 4 

AST-417 Unit Oper. Laboratory I.. 7 

AST-335 Thermodynamics 5 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

VII 

AST-418 Unit Operations 

Laboratory II 8 

AST-406 Chemical Technology 3 4 

AST-410 Physical Metallurgy 3 2 

AST-420 Chemical Engineering 

Problems 6 

Physical Activities 6 



Quarters 
VIII Class Lab. 

Chem. 37 Organic Chemistry 3 

Ch.E.112A Advanced Chemical 

Engr. Calculations 4 
Ch.E.113A Advanced Thermodyna- 
mics 4 

Speech 5 Oral Technical Eng 2 

Econ. 31 Principles of Economics 3 
Ch.E.114 Advanced Unit Opera- 
tions Laboratory 8 

Physical Activities 6 

IX 

E. E. 56 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 3 

Ch.E.112B Advanced Chemical En- 
gineering Calculations 4 

Ch.E.113B Advanced Thermodyna- 
mics 4 

Econ. 32 Principles of Economics 3 
Language** 3 

Ch.E.115A Chemical Engineering 

Processes 3 3 

Physical Activities 6 

X 

E.E. 57 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 3 

Ch.E.112C Advanced Chemical En- 
gineering Calculations 4 

Ch.E.115B Chem. Engineering 

Processes 3 6 

Language** 3 

Econ. 33 Principles of Economics 3 

Surv. 5 Elements of Plane 

Surveying 1 3 

Physical Activities 6 



* Computations. 

** Students expecting to do graduate work should take German or French; other students may 
elect English composition. 



46 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of high- 
ways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and sewerage systems, 
harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 

Civil Engineering Curriculum 



Quarters 
IV Class Lab. 

AST-401 Mathematics 5 

AST-401 Mechanics 6 

AST-407 Surveying (Elementary) 2 4 
AST-401 Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 4 4 

AST-408 Engineering Drawing 1 

Structural Drafting 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

V 

AST-401 Strength of Materials 4 

AST-401 Materials Testing 

Laboratory 3 

AST-413 Stress Analysis 2 3 

AST-401 Fluid Mechanics 4 

AST-408 Surveying-Advanced 2 3 

AST-405 Internal Combustion 

Engines 3 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

VI 

AST-403 Structural Design 4 3 

AST-403 Water Supply and 

Sewerage 3 3 

AST-403 Transportation 3 3 

AST-403 Foundations 3 3 

AST-409 Engineering Drawing 1 

Topographic Drafting . 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 



Quarters 
VII Class Lab. 

Math. 22 Applied Calculus 5 

C.E. 114 Theory of Structures 4 3 

Dr. 7 Descrptive Geometry 6 

Surv.104 Higher Surveying 2 6 

Physical Activities 6 

VIII 

Speech 5 Oral Technical Eng 2 

Econ. 31 Principles of Economics.. 3 
Math. 64 Differential Equations 

for Engineers 5 

C.E. 115 Concrete Design 2 3 

C.E. 118 Structural Design 2 3 

Physical Activities 6 



IX 

Speech 6 Oral Technical English.... 2 

Econ. 32 Principles of Economics.. 3 

Geol. 3 Engineering Geology 3 

C.E. 116 Concrete Design 3 3 

C.E. 119 Structural Design 3 3 

Physical Activities 6 



X 

Speech 7 Oral Technical English 2 

Econ. 33 Principles of Economics 3 
Engr. 101 Engineering Law and 

Specifications 3 

C.E. 117 Concrete Design 3 3 

C.E. 120 Structural Design 3 3 

Physical Activities 6 



Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, and distribution 
of electrical energy; electrical transportation, communication, illumination, and 
manufacturing and miscellaneous electrical applications in industry, commerce, 
and home life. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



47 



(Communications and Power Specialists) 

Quarters 
IV Class Lab. 

AST-401 Mathematics 5 

AST-401 Mechanics 6 

AST-403 Elec. Measurements 6 

AST-405 Electric and Magnetic 

Phenomena 5 3 

AST-406A Shop Practices 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 



Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

(Power Specialist) 



VI 



Quarters 
Class Lab. 



AST-411 A.C.Machinery 4 

AST-415 Electronics and Associated 

Circuits 5 

AST-416 Electric Circuits- 
Transients 2 

AST-401 Themodynamics 5 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 

Physical Activities 



(Communications and Power Specialists) 
V 

AST-414 Electric Circuits 5 6 

AST-403 Engineering Mathematics 3 

AST-401 Strength of Materials 4 

AST-401 Materials Testing 

Laboratory 3 

AST-409 Direct Current Machinery 3 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 

(Communications Specialist) 

VI 
AST-415 Electronics and Associated 
Circuits, Theory and 

Laboratory 5 6 

AST-416 Electric Circuits- 
Transients 2 3 

AST-417 Electric Circuits— Dis- 
tributed Constants 3 

AST-410 Alternating Current 

Machinery 5 3 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 2 

Physical Activities 6 



(Communications Specialist) 

VII 

AST-420 High Frequency and 
U.H.F. Circuits and 
Laboratory 6 6 

AST-422 Communication Networks 3 3 

AST-424 Servo-Mechanisms and 

Control Devices 3 3 

AST-426 Radiation and Propaga- 
tion 3 

Physical Activities 6 

(Power Specialist) 

VII 

AST-412 A.C. Machinery 3 6 

AST-424 Servo-Mechanisms and 

Control Devices 3 3 

AST-410 Internal Combustion 

Engines 6 

AST-411 Internal Combustion 

Engines Laboratory 4 

AST-412 Electric Power Trans- 
mission 3 

Physical Activities 6 



The eighth, ninth and tenth terms are alike for all electrical engineering seniors. 

VIII 

Speech 5 Oral Technical English . 2 

Econ. 31 Principles of Economics 3 

Math. 22 Applied Calculus 5 x 

IVllO Jc^achin^r^ 3 Speech 7 Oral Technical English.. 2 

E.E. 110 A-C. Machinery 3 Econ _ 33 Princip]es of Economics 3 

Fnysicai Activities u b E E ng Radio Communications 3 

IX E.E. 116 Advanced A-C. Theory 3 

Speech 6 Oral Technical English.. 2 Non-Eng. Elective 3 

Econ. 32 Principles of Economics 3 Physical Activities 

Math. 64 Differential Equations .. 5 
Surv. 5 Elements of Plane 1 j 

Surveying 1 3 

E.E. 114 Illumination 3 3 ] 

Physical Activities 6' 



48 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Mechanical Engineering — General 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 
of machinery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and refrigeration; and the 
organization and operation of industrial plants. 



Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 



IV 



Quarters 
Class Lab. 



AST-401 Mathematics 5 

AST-401 Mechanics 6 

AST-401 Thermodynamics 5 

AST-406 Engineering Drawing 

AST-406 Shop Practices 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 

Physical Activities 

V 

AST-401 Strength of Materials 4 

AST-401 Materials Testing 

Laboratory 

AST-410 Internal Combustion 

Engines 6 

AST-420 Mechanical Laboratory .. 

AST-402 Kinematics 3 

AST-430 Metallography and Heat 

Treatment 4 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 

Physical Activities 

VI 

AST-410 Mechanical Vibrations .... 3 

AST-408 Machine Design 3 

AST-401 Fluid Mechanics 4 

AST-411 Internal Combustion 

Engines Laboratory 

AST-401 Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 4 

Basic R.O.T.C 3 

Physical Activities 

VII 

Speech 5 Oral Technical English.. 2 

Math. 22 Applied Calculus 5 

Surv. 5 Elements of Plane 

Surveying 1 

Dr. 7 Descriptive Geometry .. 

Econ. 31 Principles of Economics 3 

Elective 2 

Physical Activities 



Speech 6 
Math. 64 

Econ. 32 
M.E. 121 
M.E. 124 
M.E. 130 



Speech 7 
Econ. 33 
M.E. 122 
M.E. 125 
M.E. 128 
M.E. 131 



M.E. 123 
M.E. 126 

M.E. 127 



M.E. 
M.E. 



129 
132 



Quarters 
VIII Class Lab 

Oral Technical English.. 2 
Differential Equations 

for Engineers 5 

Principles of Economics 3 
Heating and Ventilation 2 3 

Thesis 3 

Mechanical Laboratory 1 3 
Physical Activities 6 



IX 

Oral Technical English.. 2 
Principles of Economics 3 
Heating & Ventilation .. 2 

Thesis 

Prime Movers 3 

Mechanical Laboratory 1 
Physical Activities 



X 

Refrigeration 2 

Thesis 

Mechanical Engineering 

Design 2 

Prime Movers 3 

Mechanical Laboratory 1 
Physical Activities 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



49 



Mechanical Engineering Curriculum — Aeronautical Option* 



Quarters 
VII Class Lab. 

Speech 5 Oral Technical English . 2 

Math. 22 Applied Calculus 5 

Surv. 5 Elements of Plane 

Surveying 1 

Dr. 7 Descriptive Geometry .. 

Econ. 31 Principles of Economics 3 
M.E. 54 Aerodynamics and 

Hydrodynamics 2 

Physical Activities 

VIII 
Speech 6 Advanced Oral Tech- 
nical English 2 

Math. 64 Differential Equations 

for Engineers 5 

Econ. 32 Principles of Economics 3 

M.E. 133 Airplane Structures 3 

M.E. 124 Thesis 

M.E. 130 Mechanical Laboratory 1 

Physical Activities 



Quarters 
IX Class Lab. 
Speech 7 Advanced Oral Tech- 
nical English 2 

Principles of Economics 3 

Airplane Structures 3 

Thesis 6 

Prime Movers 3 3 

Mechanical Laboratory 1 3 

Physical Activities 6 

X 

Airplane Structures 3 

Thesis 6 

Mechanical Engineering 

Desicrn 2 9 

M.E. 129 Prime Movers!'.'. !!'.'.'!!!!!!!!! 3 3 

M.E. 132 Mechanical Laboratory 1 3 

Physical Activities 6 

3 
3 
6 



Econ. 33 
M.E. 134 
M.E. 125 
M,E. 128 
M.E. 121 



M.E. 135 
M.E. 126 
M.E. 127 

M.E. 129 
M.E. 132 



*First six terms of Mechanical Engineering Curriculum- 
Mechanical Engineering Curriculum — General. 



-Aeronautical Option are the same as 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The College of Home Economics serves Maryland and the surrounding area 
with its educational program for young women. This program combines good 
personal development with education for homemaking and for a livelihood. 
Information on better health principles, good study habits, efficient use of time, 
good grooming, becoming dress and proper adjustment to new situations constitute 
the student's program for self-development. 

In the professional phases of her program, the student advises with members 
of the faculty and with women well-known in home economics who aid in choosing 
the particular curriculum in which she expects to specialize. 

The student is urged to acquire practical experience during vacations. This 
might begin with the actual management of her family's home for a period of time. 
Students preparing to teach, gain experience on playgrounds in caring for children 
and in executing home projects. Commercial firms and institutions provide op- 
portunities for other types of experience. 

Organization 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized into 
the Departments of Textiles and Clothing, Practical Art, Home and Institution 
Management, and Foods and Nutrition. 

Facilities 

The home of the College of Home Economics, following campus tradition, is 
a new colonial brick building planned and built to present the best equipment 
and facilities for education in home economics. A home management house is 
maintained on the campus for experience in homemaking. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Located, as the campus is, between two large cities, unusual opportunities are 
provided for both faculty and students. In addition to the University's excellent 
general and specialized libraries, Baltimore and Washington furnish the added 
library facilities so essential to scientific research and creative work in the arts. 
The art galleries and museums with their priceless exhibits, the government 
bureaus and city institutions, stimulate study and provide practical experience 
for the home economics student. 

Professional Organizations 

The Home Economics Club, in which membership is open to all home economics 
students, is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association. 

Omicron Nu, a national home economics honor society, is open to students of 
high scholarship. 

Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory completion of 
195 quarter hours, as prescribed in any of the following curricula. 

Curricula. 

At the close of the freshman year a student, who has not already done so, may 
elect the curriculum in general home economics which is non-professional, or one 
of the following professional curricula, or a combination of curricula: home 
economics education, textiles and clothing, practical art, home economics exten- 
sion, institution management, and foods and nutrition. A student who wishes to 
teach home economics may register in home economics education in the College of 
Home Economics, or in the College of Education (see home economics education) 

The student who has not decided to specialize at the close of the freshman year 
may follow the general home economics curriculum until she makes a choice. Be- 
fore continuing with the third year of any curriculum, the student must have at- 
tained junior standing: or 98 credit hours with a C grade average. 

General Home Economics 

The General Home Economics Curriculum is non-professional. It is planned 
to give a young woman a good basis for her best personal development and pro- 
vides good training for her as a future home maker. This curriculum also forms 
the basis of all the professional curricula. The additional requirements of the pro- 
fessional curricula are listed under the description of each curriculum. 

Freshman Year 

Quarters 

I II III 

Survey and Composition 3 3 3 

General Chemistry — 5 5 

Textiles 5 — — 

Design 3 — — 

Hygiene 2 2 

Physical Activities Ill 

Basic Mathematics — — 

Home Economics Lectures — 1 — 

Custume Design — 3 — 

Clothing — — 3 



Eng. 


1,2,3 


Ch 


em 


. 1,3 


H. 


E. 


10 


H. 


E. 


70 


Math 


. 


H. 


E. 


1 


H. 


E. 


71 


H. 


E. 


20 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



51 



Speech 1 
Electivea 



Public Speaking 



17 



Sophomore Year 



IV 

H. E. 31, 32, 33 Foods 3 

H. E. 21 Clothing 3 

Physics 6, 7, 8 Introductory Physics 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Speech 2 Public Speaking 2 

Psych. 1 Introduction to Psychology — 

Soc. 3 Introduction to Sociology — 

Econ. 37 Fundamentals of Economics — 

Electives 4 



18 

Quarters 
V 
3 

3 
1 

3 
3 



18 



VI 
3 

3 

1 



16 



Junior Year 



VII 

H.E. 150,151,152 Management of the Home 3 

H. E. 135 Nutrition or { 

H. E. 34 Elements of Nutrition f 5 

Zoo. 16 Human Physiology 5 

Physical Activities 1 

H. E. 170 Interior Design — 

H. E. 122, 123 Advanced Clothing — 

Bact. 50 Household Bacteriology — 

Electives 2 



17 

Quarters 
VIII 
3 



16 



IX 

3 



Senior Year 



16 



16 



16 



Quarters 
X XI XII 

H. E. 130 Food Economics 2 — — 

H. E. 131 Meal Service 3 — — 

Physical Activities Ill 

H. E. 153 Practice in Management of the Home .... — -3 — 

H. E. Ed. 102 Child Study — — 5 

Electives 9 11 9 



15 



15 



15 



Home Economics Education 

(See College of Education, Page 41) 

Textiles and Clothing 

This curriculum affords an opportunity for professional training in the fields o f 
textiles and clothing. Such positions as style coordinators or fashion experts in- 
the clothing industry, teaching in secondary schools and colleges, radio work, re 



52 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

search in government testing laboratories, commercial firms or private research 
institutions are now available to graduates of this curriculum. 

A student whose interests are centralized in the fashion field of clothing may be 
allowed, with the consent of the head of the department, to substitute related 
courses for certain work listed in this curriculum. 

Requirements in addition to those in the General Home Economics Curriculum 
are: Elements of Organic Chemistry — {8), Introductory Foods, (substitute for H. 
E. 31, 32, 33, Foods)— (5), Pattern Design— (3), Advanced Textiles— (6), Children's 
Clothing — (2), Problems in Textiles — (3), Introduction to Radio — (3). 

Students particularly interested in the textile field should elect Quantitative 
Analysis, Elements of Statistics and Chemistry of Textiles. 

Practical Art 

This curriculum permits a choice of two fields of concentration: interior design 
and costume design. Emphasis is given to the selection of house furnishings and 
wearing apparel with relation to personality. Positions available to graduates 
begin with selling, display, comparison shopping, textile analysis, and radio work; 
they develop into advanced positions in these fields or in departmental buying, 
department managing, style coordination, personality consulting, designing, ad- 
vertising, and training and personnel work. 

Requirements in addition to those in the General Home Economics Curriculum 
are: Introductory Chemistry — (6) (substitute for General Chemistry), Modern 
Language — (6), Survey of Art History — (3), Costume Illustration — (3), Intro- 
ductory Foods— (5) (substitute for H. E. 31, 32, 33 Foods), Clothing— (3) 
Graphic Design — (3), Upholstering and Slipcovering — (3), Store Experience — (4), 
Advanced Costume Design — (3), Merchandise Display — (3), Advertising Layout 
and Store Coordination — (3), Consumer Problems in Textiles — (3), Marketing 
Principles and Organization — (4), Introduction to Journalism — (4), Advanced 
Interior Design — (3), Radio in Retailing — (3), Retail Store Management and 
Merchandising (4), Pattern Design (3). 

Courses Not Required: Human Physiology — (5), Household Bacteriology — (5). 
Home Economics Extension 

This curriculum outlines the training necessary for the young woman who wishes 
to work with rural people through a State Extension Service, or other agencies in- 
terested in the education and social problems of rural living. 

Requirements in addition to those in the General Home Economics Curriculum 
are: Elements of Organic Chemistry — (8), Dietetics — (5), Educational Psychology 
— (5), Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — (5), Experimental Foods — (5), 
Demonstrations — (3), Methods in Home Economics Extension — (3), Rural Life 
and Education — (3), Mental Hygiene (3). 

Courses Not Required are: Advanced Clothing — (3). 

Institution Management 

This curriculum provides training for those interested in housing and the food 
service administration for large groups of people. The work is of two general 
types: (1) food service and (2) housekeeping in such institutions as hospitals 
and schools and in commercial organizations such as restaurants, inns, hotels and 
industrial cafeterias. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 53 

The preparation for a hospital dietitian requires one year of graduate training in a 
hospital offering a course approved by the American Dietetic Association. This 
curriculum meets the academic requirements for entrance to such a course. 

The student of this curriculum graduating after June 1944, will be required 
to have a period of field work of satisfactory length and experience before entering 
the senior year. 

A student planning to do institutional work other than hospital dietetics is not 
required to take Curriculum, Instruction and Observation and Diet in Disease. 

Requirements in addition to those in the General Home Economics Curriculum 
are: Elements of Organic Chemistry — (8), General Bio-Chemistry — (5), Nutri- 
tion (5), Dietetics — (5), Experimental Foods — (5), Institution Management and 
Organization — (3), Institution Equipment and Food Purchasing — (4), Accounting 
and Food Control — -(3), Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — (5), Educa- 
tional Psychology — (5), Mental Hygiene — (3), Institutional Cookery — (5), Diet 
in Disease — '(5), Advanced Institutional Management — (3). 

Foods and Nutrition 

If our country is to meet, successfully, the demands made by war, our people 
must be strong. This means that the great amount of malnutrition now existing 
must be decreased to a minimum. In doing this , many of our food habits must be 
changed, and better use made of scientific knowledge in the planning, purchasing, 
preparing and serving of food. 

The first purpose of the Foods and Nutrition Curriculum is to teach each young 
woman the daily use of scientific information in the choice of food, now for herself, 
and in the future for her family. The second purpose is professional, preparation 
for positions in foods and nutrition research with government and state agencies 
and with commercial organizations. Newspapers, magazines for home makers, 
and radio stations employ home economists with special training in foods and nutri- 
tion. As the program in Nutrition and Food Conservation makes further progress, 
opportunities for the trained person will increase. 

Additional courses required for the Foods and Nutrition Curriculum are: 
Elements of Organic Chemistry — (8), General Bio-Chemistry — (5), Nutrition — 
(5), Dietetics — (5), Experimental Foods— (5), Demonstrations— (3), Advanced 
Foods— (5), Child Nutrition— (4). 

Courses Not Required: Advanced Clothing — (6). 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School administer? the graduate work offered by the university. 
The faculty of the Graduate School includes all members of the various departments 
who give instruction in approved graduate courses. The general administrative 
functions of the graduate faculty are delegated to a Graduate Council of which the 
Dean of the Graduate School is chairman. 

The following degrees are conferred: Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of 
Education, Master of Business Administration, Doctor of Philosophy. 

Each student working toward an advanced degree must formulate a unified 
graduate program, including major and minor work, which must be approved by 
the student's major adviser and by the Dean of the Graduate School. A thesis is 
required for the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Master of Busi- 
ness Administration. 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the equivalent of three years of full 
time graduate study and research is required, of which at least one year, or equiva- 
lent, must be spent in residence at this university. The doctor's degree, however, is 
not given merely as a certificate of residence and work, but is conferred only upon 
sufficient evidence of high attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on in- 
dependent research in the special field in which the major work is done. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a bachelor's or a 
master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. The applicant 
shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record which for unconditional 
admission must show creditable completion of an adequate amount of undergrad- 
uate preparation for graduate work in his chosen field. Application for admission 
to the Graduate School should be made prior to dates of registration on blanks ob- 
tained from the office of the Dean. In no case will graduate credit be given unless 
the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. Application for admission to candidacy is 
made after a certain specified amount of work, showing superior scholarship, has 
been completed at this university. Applicants for admission to candidacy for the 
Ph.D., degree must present evidence of a reading knowledge of French and Ger- 
man, and meet such other requirements as the departments may elect. All ap- 
plications for advancement to candidacy are acted upon by the Graduate Council. 

Fellowships and Assistantships 

A number of fellowships and graduate assistantships have been established by 
the university in the various departments. Fellows and assistants render service to 
the university and carry such graduate work as may be arranged in the terms 
of the appointment. Applications for fellowships are made on blanks obtained 
from the office of the Graduate School and are sent to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned. 

A separate bulletin, The Graduate School Announcements, is published by the 
university, setting forth in detail the Graduate School regulations and listing the 
graduate courses offered in the various departments of the university. Copies of 
this bulletin may be obtained upon application to the office of the Graduate School. 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

School of Dentistry 

The School of Dentistry offers a four year academic course in dentistry devoted 
to instruction in the medical sciences, the dental sciences and clinical practice. To 
meet the overall shortage of dentists and the urgent need to provide professional 
services for members of the armed forces and civilian population, the University 
of Maryland School of Dentistry has inaugurated an accelerated program'of in- 
struction under which the four academic years required for the degree may be 
completed in three calendar years. 



THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 55 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having successfully completed 
two years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences based upon the 
completion of a four year high school course. No applicant will be considered who 
has not completed all requirements for advancement to the junior year in the arts 
and sciences college from which he applies. His scholastic attainments shall be of 
such quality as to insure a high standard of achievement in the dental course. 

See the catalog of the School of Dentistry for details on entrance, fees and ex- 
penses. A copy may be secured by writing the Dean of the School of Dentistry, 
University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

School of Law 

Due to the war emergency, the School of Law of the University has adopted an 
accelerated program, providing for operation on a three semester plan. The normal 
period for completion of the course in either the day or evening school may be 
shortened by as much as one academic year through attendance during the summer 
semester. Beginning students may enter upon their studies at the beginning of 
any term. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American Law 
Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are required to produce 
evidence of the completion of at least one half the work acceptable for a bachelor's 
degree granted on the basis of a four year period of study by the University of the 
state in which the pre-law work is taken or other standard college or university in 
such state. Students may prepare for admission to the College of Law of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in the College of Arts and Sciences or Business and Public 
Administration. 

For further details on entrance to the School of Law see the special catalog of the 
school. A copy may be had by writing the Dean, School of Law, University of 
Maryland, Greene and Lombard Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

School of Medicine 

In cooperation with the war effort, the medical course of the School of Medicine, 
which consists of four full academic sessions of 32 weeks each, will be completed in 
three calendar years. 

Wartime Requirements for Admission 

The minimum admission requirements are two academic years (60 semester or 
90 quarter hours) of credits, exclusive of physical education and military science, 
acquired at or acceptable to an approved college of arts and sciences. Included in 
these requirements are minimum credits in basic subjects which must be completed 
by every applicant before admission. 

For details on requirements of the School of Medicine write to the committee 
on admissions, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

School of Nursing 

The school of Nursing offers a program of study which is planned for two groups 
of students: (a) for those desiring to complete their work in approximately 30 
months and (b) for those desiring to take a five year combined academic and nurs- 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ing program. The degree of bachelor of science and the diploma in Nursing may 
be conferred on those students who complete successfully, the latter course. 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for the School of Nursing must' be a graduate of an accredited high 
school and must present a record showing that she has completed satisfactorily 
the required amount of preparatory study. Preference will be given to students 
who rank in the upper third of the graduating classes in their preparatory schools. 
Candidates are required to present sixteen units for entrance: 8 required units and 
8 elective units. In addition to the above requirements, students must meet other 
definite requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for nursing work. 

The'requirements for]admission to the combined program of the School of Nurs- 
ing are similar to those of the undergraduate colleges. The 30 months program is 
designed to meet the requirements for the Diploma in Nursing and comprises the 
work of the first, second and third hospital years. 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February, for the fall term in 
September or October, and for the combined course as indicated in the school 
calendar. 

The School of Nursing annually issues'a special catalog, a copy of which may be 
obtained from the Director, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, Redwood 
and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

School of Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic" instruction" in Pharmacy, the 
collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed essential in the education 
of pharmacists. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants for the intelligent prac- 
tice of dispensing pharmacy but it also offers the facilities and instruction necessary 
for the attainment of proficiency in the various branches of the profession and in 
pharmaceutical research. The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education and holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. The School is registered in the New York 
Department of Education and its diploma is recognized in all states. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those prescribed by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education and the American Association of College of Phar- 
macy. These requirements are the same as required for admission to the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Application for admission must be approved, not only by 
the Director of Admissions, but also by the Committee on Admissions of the Facul- 
ty Council of the School of Pharmacy. Students who desire to take up the study 
of pharmacy are advised to make application as early as possible before completing 
their high school work so as to facilitate registration. 

W The School of Pharmacy publishes a separate catalog, a copy of which may be 
obtained from the Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Lombard 
and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 57 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is broadly 
conceived as the development of the individual student. To accomplish this pur- 
pose, physical examinations and classification tests are given the incoming students 
to determine the relative physical fitness of each Upon the basis of the needs dis- 
closed by these tests, and individual preferences, students are assigned to the vari- 
ous activities of the program. 

For men 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three activity 
classes each week throughout the year unless they need remedial work in which 
case they take two additional hours of body building work per week. In the fall, 
soccer, touch football, and tennis are the chief activities; in the winter, basketball, 
volleyball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore' students may elect a considerable 
number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, horseshoes, ping 
pong, bag punching, badminton, shuffleboard, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted also. Touch football 
and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, baseball and track 
in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, medals, and other 
appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program are provided for the winning 
teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Education 
Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized recreation. 
Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus work, fencing, 
boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton; and ping pong are the most 
popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent facilities 
for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. Two large 
modern gymnasia, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, tennis courts, 
baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, constitute the major part of the 
equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a full 
program of intercollegiate athletics for men, provided there are men students 
available. Competition is promoted in varsity and freshman football, basketball, 
baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, soccer, wrestling, golf, and tennis. The University 
is a member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion, and cooperates with other national organizations in the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

For Women 

The Department of Physical Education for Women has excellent facilities for 
conducting a full activities program. Seasonal team sports including hockey, 
soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball; individual sports, consisting of 
riding, tennis, badminton, fencing,golf, archery, deck tennis, table tennis, and the 
like, are offered. Opportunity is given for various types of dancing including, 
modern, square, folk, and ballroom. The proximity of the University to Washing- 



58 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ton and Baltimore provides excellent opportunity for groups to attend professional 
programs in dance. 

The Women's Athletic Association sponsors and conducts intramural tourna- 
ments in the seasonal sports, sports days with neighboring colleges, and intercol- 
legiate competition in rifle shooting. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and women stu- 
dents to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of the state, and 
to act as leaders in recreational programs in communities. 

This department now is being reorganized with a view to adapting its broad 
program to war conditions and necessities. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The Government maintains at the University of Maryland a Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, consisting of two Units, Infantry and Signal Corps. All instruc- 
tion is under the supervision of Army Officers detailed by the War Department. 

The course is compulsory for all physically fit students, and is a prerequisite to 
graduation. 

The objective of the course is to prepare men for service in the armed forces, in- 
cluding Officers Candidate Schools. All training is as realistic as time and facilities 
permit with emphasis on the practical application of doctrine and procedure. 

Course 

On June 1, of this year the Advanced Course was altered to meet the four quarter 
programs. The Basic Course (I and II) extends through six quarters — 180 hours 
per course. 

Basic I includes: Military Courtesy and Discipline, Close and Extended Order 
Drill, Map Reading, Rifle Marksmanship, Military History, Military Organization, 
Scouting and Patrolling, Combat Principles Squad, Telephone and Switchboard 
Operation, Field Wire, Marches, and Guard duty. 

Basic II (Infantry) includes: Military Law, Close and Extended Order Drill, 
Weapons, Tactics Small Units, Aerial Photo Interpretation, Guard Duty, Asso- 
ciated Arms, Military Speech, Methods of Instruction, Field Fortification and 
Marches. 

Basic II (Signal) includes: Military Law, Close and Extended Order Drill, Radio, 
Code practice, Signal Organization, Field Communication, Aerial Photo Interpreta- 
tion, Telephone and Switchboard Operation, Tactics, and Methods of Instruction. 

Credits 

Two credit hours per quarter. 

Uniforms 

Uniforms, except shoes, are issued without cost to the student. 

Physical Training 

All Physical Training will be integrated with the Army Specialized Training 
Program, which has as its objective the production of a state of health and general 
physical fitness which will enable the student to perform the arduous duties he 
may be called upon to perform in the Armed Services. 

The course is compulsory for those students taking Military Training.