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Full text of "Catalogue of exhibitors in the United States sections of the International universal exposition, Paris, 1900"

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1 

CATALOGUE 

OF 

Exhibitors in the United States 

Sections 



of the 



International Universal Exposition 

Paris, 1900 



b 



PARIS 
SOCIETY ANONYME DES IMPRIMERIES LEMERCIER 

1900 



r 



1 






^. THE EXHIBITS 

'A 

1 JN THE 

> SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The Republic of France issued to her sister republic over 
*the sea an invitation to unite in the International Universal 
'^ Exposition to be held in Paris in the year 1900, and this 
(^invitation the people of the United States accepted with the 
most cordial gratification. The time of this celebration 
is the latest landmark of history, marking the division 
between the expiring century, luminous in its events, and 
the century to come, yet more alluring with its expecta- 
tions. The nation which has undertaken the enterprise is 
of all nations the best fitted in genius, in versatility, in /e 
savoir faire^ to carry it to a successful issue. The place 
is the omphalos of the world. 

To the people of the United States the invitation was 
a challenge. Only a few years before, upon the farther 
shore of a remote inland sea, from whose sands the track 
of the deer and the print of the moccasin were hardly 
effaced, whose breezes were yet fragrant with the aromatic 
odors of fir and cedar and pine, that people had evoked an 
exposition magnificent in outline and perfect in detail, 
springing up like an exhalation, revealing a strength as of 
the hills, a breadth as of a western sky, the repose of true 
grandeur, tinged with the radiance of the aurora of the 
dawn. To the success of the exposition at the White City 
the contributions of *the French people, acting as individu- 
als and as a nation, were worthy and abundant. Their 

3 



4 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

generous assistance was cordially received and kindly 
remembered. When, therefore, that nation, with a spirit 
of courteous rivalry not less debonair than that displayed 
by their fathers to our fathers upon the Field of the Cloth 
of Gold, said to the people of the United States, **Come 
over the sea, and let us show you how we make an exposi- 
tion," the people of the United States could not fail to 
respond. 

Nor is this all. Passing by the belief prevalent in every 
American of youth and culture that Paris and paradise 
differ in spelling only, one may not fail to note the strong 
undercurrent of friendship for the French people every- 
where prevalent among the people of the United States. 
It is involved in all the traditions of the nation, and is per- 
petuated by the instruction given even in its elementary 
schools. Every schoolboy knows about the material aid 
given by the French king at the crisis of our revolutionary 
struggle. He knows of Lafayette and De Grasse and 
Rochambeau, and of the" victory at Yorktown. He knows, 
too, that fully half of the great continental domain of the 
United States was once French, under the name of Louisi- 
ana. He finds the names of French explorers and mission- 
aries, like Champlain and La Salle, Marquette and Henne- 
pin, with Detroit and Illinois, Saint Louis and New Orleans, 
written all over the maps of the States. The children of 
the United States will erect in the heart of Paris, in the 
park of the Louvre, a memento of their affection for 
France in the statue which will perpetuate the beloved 
name of Lafayette. 

Beyond all considerations such as we have suggested, it 
was recognized by every intelligent man of affairs that the 
time had fully come when the United States of North 
America should assume its proper place in all the interna- 
tional assemblings of the nations of the world. Whether 
the subjects to be discussed at such conferences are the 



^ 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 5 

methods of conducting war or the means of preserving 
peace, whether they are scientific, social, educational, or 
commercial, the condition of the United States as to area 
of country, number of inhabitants, wealth accumulated and 
power of accumulation, the intelligence of her people, their 
skill, energy, and aggressiveness, their productive and 
commercial ability and attainment — all the elements of 
national greatness are present in such degree as to make 
it incumbent upon her to assert her position among the 
nations, to take a seat in international councils, and to have 
a_voice in deliberations which concern the welfare of the 
world. For more than a century the United States has 
attended strictly to her own affairs, and while she will 
retain that attitude, she may not forget that her affairs are 
inextricably involved in the affairs that concern one com- 
mon humanity. 

But responsibilities and duties are inseparable. It was 
not merely a privilege to accept tBe invitation of the French 
nation to join in the exposition of 1900; it was not simply 
to meet the honorable challenge of a worthy competitor; 
it was not alone in obedience to a sentiment living in the 
hearts of her people; it was in response to a well-known 
and fully appreciated international obligation that the peo- 
ple of the United States, speaking through their represen- 
tatives in Congress, determined to assume their proper 
position at the exposition of 1900. 

To the invitation the response was, **We come, with full 
hearts and full hands." 

A preliminary investigation and report was made by 
Moses P. Handy, a special commissioner, whose death, 
occurring soon after his report was made, all deeply 
deplored. His mission, both difficult and delicate, was to 
convey to the French the response of the United States 
to the proffered invitation, and to report upon the condi- 
tions requisite for proper action. On July i, 1898, Congress 



6 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

passed enactments authorizing the national participation in 
the exposition, the appointment of a commissioner-general 
and other officials, and the appropriation of funds necessary 
to carry its enactments into effect. The appropriations 
made at that time, and increased by subsequent legislation, 
amount in the aggregate to $1,369,500. 

Pursuant to that authority, the President appointed 
Ferdinand W. Peck, of Chicago, Commissioner-General; 
Benjamin D. Woodward, of Columbia University, New 
York, Assistant Commissioner-General; and Frederick 
Brackett, of the Treasury Department, Washington, Secre- 
tary. In the organization which was afterward perfected 
two principal departments were created, one of exhibits and 
the other of business. Frederick J. V. Skiff, of the Field 
Columbian Museum of Chicago, was placed at the head of 
the first as Director-in-Chief of Exhibits, and Paul Black- 
mar, also of Chicago, at the head of the second, as Director 
of Affairs. The classification determined by the French 
authorities provided for the arrangement of exhibits in 
eighteen groups, but for reasons of economy and of efficiency 
these groups were distributed by the United States Com- 
missioner among ten chief officers, called directors. In 
some cases two, or even three, groups were assigned to a 
single director. The resulting departments are as follows: 

Departments. Directors. 

Education and Social Economy, . Howard J. Rogers. 

Fine Arts James H. Cauldwell. 

Liberal Arts and Chemical Industries, . Alexander S. Capehart. 

Machinery and Electricity, . Francis E. Drake. 

Transportation, Military and Naval Exhibs., Willard A. Smith. 

Agriculture, Horticulture, and Foods, Charles RichardsDodge. 

Forestry and Fisheries, .... Tarleton H. Bean. 

Mines and Metallurgy, .... Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

Textile Industries, John H. McGibbons. 

Furniture and varied Industries, . M, H, Hulbert, 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 7 

In February, 1900, the President appointed eighteen 
honorary commissioners, as follows: 

Bertha Honore Palmer, . . . Illinois. 

James Allison, Kansas. 

Brutus J. Clay, Kentucky. 

Charles A. Colliefi Georgia. 

Michel H. de Young, .... California. 

William L. Elkins, Pennsylvania. 

Ogden H. Fethers, .... Wisconsin. 



Peter Jansen, 
Calvin Manning, 
Franklin Murphy, 
Henry A. Parr, 
Henry M. Putney, 
Alvin H. Sanders, . 
Louis Stem, 
William G. Thompson, 
William M. Thornton, 
Arthur E. Valois, 



Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

New Jersey. 

Maryland. 

New Hampshire. 

Illinois. 

New York. 

Michigan. 

Virginia. 

New York. 



Thomas F. Walsh, Colorado. 

Offices were opened at the Auditorium in Chicago, at 
the Equitable Building in New York, at the Agricultural 
Department at Washington, and at 20 Avenue Rapp in Paris. 
Negotiations for space were at once entered upon with 
the French. After some discussion, in which the highest 
diplomatic talent of both countries was involved, the 
authorities responded with a degree of liberality, perhaps 
as great as the limiting conditions would allow. The aggre- 
gate of space which has been assigned to the United States 
sections is 338,987 square feet gross — that is, inclusive of 
aisles and passages. 

A national pavilion, covering 9,935 square feet of area, 
and 167.5 ^cct h*g^i b^s been erected upon the Quai 
d'Orsay, in a style worthy of the dignity and position of the 
nation which it represents. Other buildings have been 
erected as they were found necessary, upon the Quai 
d'Orsay, the Esplanade des Invalides, the Avenue Suffren, 



8 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

and at Vincennes. Several buildings have been erected 
at Vincennes by exhibitors. 

The spaces provided for exhibits from the United States, 
either by assignment in the great palaces of the exposition 
or in the buildings erected for the purpose, have been filled 
with material selected with the care made imperatively 
necessary by the relatively restricted exhibition areas. 
The exhibits are thoroughly representative in their various 
classes. The total number of exhibitors presenting distinct 
exhibits appears from the catalogue herewith presented to 
be 6,563. Were the contributors to collective exhibits 
included in the reckoning, the total number of exhibitors 
would be considerably more than 7,000. The number of 
distinct exhibits has not yet been ascertained, as it rests 
under the necessary uncertainty of the limitation of an 
exhibit. Conservative estimates will place the number of 
exhibits at from 25,000 to 30,000. 

It is believed that no citizen of the United States need 
go away disappointed after viewing the exhibits which his 
country makes at this exposition. It is expected that 
a reasonable proportion of the articles displayed will receive 
the commendations of those appointed to determine their 
comparative merits. The Commissioner-General feels 
assured that the sections of the United States will present 
their full share of exhibits notable for conspicuous merit, 
illustrative of the progress of science and the march of 
invention. It is nevertheless the fact that the best things 
of a nation's production — those which contribute most 
largely to its glory and assign to it a commanding place 
among its competitors — are slich as will not submit to be 
encased in the pavilions of an exposition, to be ticketed 
and numbered and inscribed in its catalogue. Some of 
these things are visible and tangible, like the trains and 
tracks and bridges of railways; steel buildings that reach 
above the clouds; the Chicago drainage canal; the Yerkes 



^ 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 9 

telescope ; forests and plains ; wheat fields bounded by the 
horizon; cotton fields, ivory white beneath the moon's cold 
radiance; unbroken areas of rustling maize that a flying 
train may skirt for an hour; the deep cafions and resound- 
ing waterfalls, and the towering summits of snow-clad 
mountains. 

The chief exhibit which the nation of the United States 
of North America has to present before the world is herself, 
her people, her institutions, and the results which she has 
achieved. One hundred and twenty-four years have passed 
since thirteen British colonies in America declared their 
independence; one hundred and seventeen since their inde- 
pendence was recognized by the mother country. The 
years which passed between these events and the opening 
of the nineteenth century were full of effort and fertile of 
results, not to be slightly esteemed; but it still remains true 
that the United States, as viewed at the close of the nine- 
teenth century, has been, in the main, developed within the 
nineteenth century. Under the methods of the exposition 
of 1900 it may not be inappropriate to present, with a brev- 
ity imposed by the conditions, 

A RETROSPECTIVE EXPOSITION OF THE UNITED 

STATES OF AMERICA. 

In 1 801 the United States was a country but lately 
admitted to the family of nations and scarcely come to its 
majority. Its inheritance- was rather in posse than in esse. 
Its capital, like many a young man's wealth, consisted 
chiefly of youth, vigor, hope, and freedom. Its principal 
asset was a virgin forest, traversed here and there by 
a stream or a trail, and occupied only by savage and hostile 
men. A strip of territory, inhabited and cultivated, 
extended inland from the sea from one hundred to three 
hundred miles, and along the coast about a thousand miles, 
having an area of about 280,000 square miles. In this 



r 



10 ,THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

area dwelt about four millions of people, most of whom 
were farmers, wrestling hard to wring a scanty subsistence 
from a churlish soil. There were few manufactories and 
most of the farmers served themselves in widely varied 
handicrafts. The wonderful feat was sometimes performed 
to shear a sheep m the early morning; during the day to 
carry its wool through the various processes of spinning, 
weaving, and dyeing; and from the cloth so made to cut 
out, make, and finish a suit of clothing before the day 
should end. 

Cities were few; Philadelphia and New York in the 
center, Boston in the north, and Charleston in the south. 
Philadelphia, the largest of these, numbered only 81,000 
inhabitants. Distances were great and journeys were tedi- 
ous. From Boston to New York the time in a carriage was 
from one to two weeks, according to the state of the roads 
and of the weather. The postmaster-general himself car- 
ried the mails in a chaise, and the time of service from 
Washington to New York was about a week. 

The titles to territory which the several colonies brought 
with them into the union of States were generally vague 
and often conflicting. In some cases the claims ran osten- 
sibly to the Pacific Ocean. When the conflict with the 
mother country was settled, the United States found itself 
in possession of an area bounded in the north partially by 
the great lakes and the St. Lawrence River, on the east by 
the ocean, on the south by the Spanish possessions of the 
Floridas, and on the west by the Mississippi River. The 
area of this territory was about 807,000 square miles. 

The first half of the century was especially an era of 
expansion. The Floridas were obtained from Spain. From 
France was purchased the Louisiana country, which occupied 
on the gulf coast the land between the mouths of the Missis- 
sippi and the Sabine rivers, extended northwardly along the 
great river to Canada, and included all the land between 



^ 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 11 

Canada and Mexico as far as the western range then called 
the Rocky Mountains, but since more definitely known as 
the Sierra Nex^da. West of this range, the Oregon country 
in the north was claimed by right of discovery. California, 
with the arid land of the great central plateau, and Texas in 
the east, came from Mexico, through a combination of influ- 
ences, of which revolution, conquest, and purchase were the 
most conspicuous. Without attempting a strict enumera- 
tion of metes and bounds, it is enough to note that the 
United States of to-day occupies a broad belt of land lying 
across the North American continent from ocean to ocean, 
from east to west about 3,000 miles, and from north to 
south about 1,200 miles in extent. The area of its central 
continental mass is not far from 3,500,000 square miles, 
besides its outlying portions, Alaska and its dependencies, 
the islands of Hawaii and Porto Rico, and the recent 
Philippine acquisitions. The territory acquired during the 
first half of the century is about double in area that owned 
at the beginning of that period. The value of the Alaskan 
country and the utilities of the recent acquisitions are sub- 
jects upon which opinions yet differ. 

But this acquisition of territory, although the necessary 
antecedent to subsequent development, is the least impor- 
tant item in the history of progress in the hundred years. 
Starting at about the beginning of the century and continu- 
ing with an ever-swelling tide that does not yet show evi- 
dence of diminution, a grand migration of peoples has dis- 
tributed many millions of inhabitants over this broad land. 
The movement began in the eastern States of the seaboard, 
and presently the currents were found flowing from all 
European lands. Men came seeking free homes or fertile 
soils or wealth of precious metals. They came because 
their friends came. They came to escape exactions upon 
their persons in the shape of military service, upon their 
purses in the form of severe taxation. They came because 



12 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

by so doing they could shake off the trammels of oppressive 
institutions and place themselves where they could think 
and speak their own free thoughts. This tide of migration 
swept over the eastern mountains and across the wide 
interior plain until it surged against the great central moun- 
tain masses of the continent. The mountains did not arrest 
its onward movement, which continued until it covered the 
western slope even to the Pacific shore. Millions of acres 
of arable lands came into the possession of millions of men, 
either without price or at such prices as could be paid out 
of the profits of a single harvest. As might be expected, 
the choicest lands are how occupied, but yet there remain 
millions of acres more well worth the possession of those 
who would occupy and cultivate them. 

After the settler followed those who built railways, laid 
out towns, founded cities, erected mills, foundries and fac- 
tories, and wrought in every form of handicraft and of 
artisan's skill. They built dwellings, they planted forests, 
they made highways, they erected churches. And near the 
center of every village the largest, the costliest and the 
most elegant building, seen from everywhere, and known 
at once by every stranger, was the public school. Amid 
the farms, by every hillside, in every valley, in some bright 
spot planted with trees and decorated with flowers, was 
the house for the rural district school. 

In this movement of the people the railroads did not 
follow; they led the way. The iron track was pushed 
across the wild prairie, where were no dwellers; but scarcely 
were the rails laid before the coming trains brought the 
coming immigrants, with their families, their cattle, and 
their household goods, and the wilderness, once inhabited 
by the timid deer, the lumbering bison, and the howling 
wolf, and swept by the shadows of the migrating fowl, 
became a magnificent mosaic of broad farms, everywhere 
beautified by happy homes, the dwellings of successful 



^ 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 13 

workers. At this close of the century the people of the 
United States number more than seventy-five millions of 
souls. 

The full significance of this great migration to the 
United States needs a moment's consideration to be fully 
understood. From the census of 1880 the fact was ascer- 
tained that at least two-fifths of those enumerated were 
inheritors of citizenship in other countries, chiefly 
European. Their parents were born elsewhere than in the 
United States. Later it was the boast of a mayor of Chi- 
cago that in his city there were more Irish than in Dublin, 
more Germans than in Berlin, more Swedes than in Stock- 
holm, more Greeks than in Athens, and so on through 
a very considerable list. Those native in the United States 
were in a minority. 

In changing their nationalities most of these immigrants 
had made great sacrifices, often not appreciated until later 
in their experience. No one knows how large a portion of 
his capital in life is really an inheritance from his ancestry 
until he has, for some reason, lost this inheritance and has 
gone to construct new environments in a distant country. 
The intangible elements of home, family, social ties, habits, 
and affections, as well as the visible things, churches with 
God's acres adjacent, the mountain summits, golden at 
sunrise or purple at nightfall, the fields lying silent under 
the midday sun, orchards and meadows, highways and 
hedges, and the homestead, however humble, have vanished 
utterly, and must be wholly reconstructed and adjusted to 
strange conditions. Old things have passed away, and with 
new scenes and new relationships, new standards of life, 
duty, freedom, and even of faith, are found to have 
assumed control. 

The immigrant to the United States lost much, but he 
found much more. First of all, he found freedom in mat- 
ters political, social, and religious. The trammels of tradi- 



14 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

tion were loosened, the shackles of caste were shaken off. 
Even the humblest man became a factor in social organiza- 
tion, and in the forces which control local and general 
government. It does not follow that in the outset, or even 
at later periods, he always acted wisely, but it made a great 
enlargement of his whole spiritual nature that he was able 
to act at all. He soon learned that freedom meant 
restraint. Not restraint from without, from sources which 
would restrict and confine him, but from within, born of 
the evidence that to be himself free he must respect and 
protect the liberties of others. 

With freedom, he found intelligence, somewhat for him- 
self, but mostly for his children ; the intelligence of a pub- 
lic school system everywhere in evidence, though oft^n 
more notable for the generous diffusion of the opportunities 
of elementary training than for the extent or completeness 
of that training. The intelligence diffused by an active and 
untrammeled press broadened the scope of his vision and 
constantly rectified his judgments. 

Next came unity, a unity which is perhaps the most 
remarkable characteristic of the new life which these 
migrated elements presently took upon themselves. Noth- 
ing is so remarkable in the history of the increase of the 
population of the United States, by the gathering of peo- 
ples from every land and every clime, as the rapidity and 
the degree of completeness with which these apparently 
conflicting elements have become unified as Americans and 
united as the citizens of a common country. The parents 
of a family may, for example, be Germans or Poles, Swedes, 
Swiss, or Irish, as the case may be. They naturally and 
necessarily retain much of that to which they were born, 
their habits of life, speech, manners, instincts; little else 
could be expected. Ask a man of what nationality he is, 
and he will answer instinctively according to the fact of his 
birth. But a single generation finds a transformation. The 



^ 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 15 

children are Americans, more intense in their earnest sym- 
pathies, more proud of the name and the relationship, more 
anxious that no mistake be made in the recognition, than 
are those whose inheritances of a like nature run through 
several generations of ancestry. The son of an Irishman, 
a Scandinavian, a German, a Bohemian, is always ready to 
acknowledge his parentage, but he is still more proud of 
being born under the stars and stripes, and he wants every- 
body to be cognizant of the fact. 

Whether 'from the mingling of so many types and the 
blending of all into one, whether as the result of newly 
active influences and the elimination of some thought to be 
effete or harmful, whether from breathing an atmosphere 
replete with ozone and surcharged with electric forces 
attractive and repellent, somehow the American has devel- 
oped a type of character peculiar to himself. Known and 
read of all men, admired by some, feared by some, but 
admitted to have a positive function among the forces now 
active in all mundane affairs, the American — for such the 
citizen of the United States of America usually styles him- 
self — is decided in his views, nervous and vigorous in 
expressing them, prompt in action as he is quick in appre- 
hension, respects the future far more than the past, is con- 
fident of himself, and has the strength of his convictions. 
He is cool, clear-headed, and deliberate, and he never 
recognizes defeat. 

The American citizen is himself the most notable ele- 
ment in this retrospective exhibition. 

What has he accomplished? 

As we have already seen, he has subdued the wilderness, 
whether forest or prairie, and has dotted it over with mil- 
lions of farms and homes. The first work of the settler was 
to provide a shelter for his family. The next was to civil- 
ize the soil, which in nature was raw and savage. If his 
lands were covered with forest, the forest was to be 



r 



16 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

removed; if the land were prairie, the sod must be disin- 
tegrated; fences must be made, roads opened, swamps 
drained, dwellings and other buildings erected. When the 
farm was brought into proper subjugation, and was fitted 
with the equipment and conveniences necessary to make 
life comfortable and labor remunerative, most of its value 
consisted in that which its owner had put into it out of his 
own patient and persevering effort. The land was little 
more than an opportunity, useful according as it was used. 

Assuming that the normal area of a farm is a quarter 
section of land — that is, a square half a mile long and 
wide — we find that about 9,000,000 of farms have been made 
in the United States during the century. In the earlier 
days the settler paid $100 for his quarter se'^tion; in later 
days he received title to it free of money cost, after he had 
lived upon it and cultivated it for five years. An estimate 
of the present value will depend upon a value assumed for 
the unit, upon which opinions will vary greatly. At $20 
per acre, which most valuers would consider low, the aggre- 
gate value of the farms of the United States would reach 
the sum of $115,200,000,000. 

An exhaustive estimate of the productive power of these 
lands will not be attempted. The great variety of soil, of 
temperature, and of moisture existing in the various parts 
of an area so extended provide for an equally great variety 
of possible products. Three items are especially notable, 
furnishing directly or indirectly the chief articles which the 
nation may offer in trade with other peoples. These are 
hay, grain, including principally wheat in the northern and 
maize in the central regions, and cotton. Wheat and cot- 
ton are exported chiefly in their natural, non-manufactured 
form; hay and maize are used in feeding of animals, and 
appear in the world's markets transformed into less bulky 
commodities in the form of animal food products. In 
respect to cotton the United States stands as the recognized 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 17 

source from which the world's supply is chiefly drawn. As 
to grain and meats the United States furnishes the reserve 
from which other nations may draw when their own 
resources prove to be inadequate. 

A few quotations will indicate the capacity of the United 
States in these respects. 

In 1896 the United States produced of the articles named : 

Wheat 430,000,000 bushels, valued at $429,000^:00 

Maize 1,903,000,000 bushels, valued at $501,000,000 

All forms of grain 3,227,000,000 bushels, valued at $1,1 74,000,000 

Hay 60,000,000 tons, valued at $401,000,000 

Cotton 5f^7iOOO,ooo pounds, valued at $294,000,000 

The three vegetable products, hay, grain, and cotton, 
produced in a single year, aggregate a value of $1,809,000,- 
000. 

If to this sum be added the values of other products of 
the soil, less important relatively, but yet of large real 
moment, such as lumber, vegetables, fruits, tobacco, with the 
increased value of animal products above that of the food 
consumed in producing them, the aggregate annual returns 
from the agricultural resources of the United States do not 
fall short of $2,500,000,000. 

Nor does this express the enormous productive power 
of this country. In 1897 the mines of the United States 
yielded quantities and values stated- in round numbers as 
follows: 

Iron Ore, 18,000,000 tons. 

Pig Iron, 10,000,000 tons $ 95,000,000 

Coal, 179,000,000 tons 199,000,000 

Petroleum, 60,000,000 barrels 41,000,000 

Gold and Silver 00,000,000 

Copper, Lead and Zinc 73,000,000 

Mineral products, metallic 302,000,000 

Mineral products, non-metallic 329,000,000 



18 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

Thus do we present in a few of the more important items 
the power of the United States of 1900 in the production of 
material wealth out of its own resources. 

Mention has already been made of the railroads as fac- 
tors aiding the settlement of the country and subjugation 
of the soil. The history of the growth of railways in the 
United States is brief, as it is elsewhere in the world. 
Seventy years only have passed since the beginning of this 
great industry in this land. In the earlier days the rail- 
roads extended themselves slowly; they joined places 
already established, they accepted routes under the pres- 
sure of conditions imposed upon them, they were the serv- 
ants of the public. In later periods their progress was 
rapid and irresistible; they pushed beyond the outposts of 
civilization, moving as an advanced guard into the wilder- 
ness, and leaving a finished map behind. The builders 
swept across the prairies, laying ties upon the ungraded 
earth, dropping rails from flat-cars, which rolled on over 
the irons themselves had brought; they spanned the streams 
and the arroyos; they threaded the cafions; some moun- 
tains they climbed, others they pierced. No difficulty was 
so formidable that it could not be passed by a route that 
went over or around or through it. The first requisition 
was to **get there** — from terminus to terminus — ^by struc- 
tures no matter how temporary in appearance if only they 
could endure the tramp of the iron steed. Once the track 
was laid, it was used as a factor in its own perfection. 
It was aligned, graded, ballasted, provided with sidings, 
turnouts, stations, passenger and freight cars, and loco- 
motives. A wide river was crossed by boats; the per- 
manent bridge of steel came later. The mountain was 
flanked by a switch-back, anticipating the tunnel which 
afterward pierced it through and through. Thus it hap- 
pened that the road was in active and profitable use long 
before it was finished — if, indeed, an American /ailroad is 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. l9 

ever finished. To-day the trunk lines of the Unit/ed States, 
the great arteries of traffic, challenge comparison with any 
railroads of the world upon the following items : Solidity 
and durability of permanent way in every minutia of detail ; 
strength and swiftness of motive power; comfort and con- 
venience of its passenger equipment; the accuracy of con- 
nections, making all the roads of one great area to act as 
if they were under the control of a single management; the 
care with which baggage is handled and the certainty with 
which it is made to arrive at its destination and be restored 
to its rightful owner. Sleeping-cars, dining-cars, vestibuled 
trains, automatic braking systems, self-acting car-couplers, 
all have their origin and their acme upon the railroads of 
the United States. 

Of these roads, 184,603 miles are in operation. Their 
service requires 36,000 locomotives, 26,000 passenger cars, 
8,000 baggage and mail cars, and more than 1,250,000 
freight cars. They represent a capitalization of eleven and 
a quarter billions of dollars ($11,233,529,588), and their 
annual earnings are $338,000,000. 

The railroad recognizes but one messenger, the tele- 
graph, as fleeter than himself, and this messenger he has 
taken into his own service. The telegraphs are as ubiqui- 
tous as the railroads, having in operation 875,000 miles 
of wire. 

In every form the applications of electricity are constant 
and effective. Every village has its electric street-car serv- 
ice, its system of electric lighting, and its telephone serv- 
ice. The statistics thereof vary too rapidly to be quoted. 
One would as soon think of asking if the sun shines in Osh- 
kosh or in Kankakee as of inquiring if electric lights and 
tramways and telephones could be found there. 

Several causes have aided in developing in the United 
States a manufacturing system scarcely less important than 
the agricultural system which has been described. The 



20 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

first is the possession in unlimited amounts, by the gift of 
nature, of the materials for manufactures. The forests 
abound in woods, each variety having a peculiar merit. 
In the making of a heavy farm-wagon more than twenty 
. kinds of wood are used, and each is found in some region 
which produces it of the quality which best fits it for its 
peculiar use. Immense fields of anthracite and bituminous 
coals, scattered all over the country, furnish fuel for the 
production of motive power. The mountains furnish ores 
of all the useful metals and of the most excellent quality. 

The second cause is the imperative demand for the aid 
of nature's forces, working through machinery and accentu- 
ated by the relative scarcity of manual labor. Men's hands 
were too few to perform the labor which their heads devised, 
and the powers of the wandering winds or of running 
streams or of throbbing steam were made to delve and 
pound, grind and spin. Four hundred millions of bushels 
of wheat grown in a single season would fall in the field 
before such a mass of grain could be reaped with the sickle, 
or would rot in the stack before it could be thrashed by the 
flail. Out of such needs came the invention of machinery 
for doing almost every kind of agricultural labor. Similar 
causes stimulated invention in other directions, producing 
machines of which those for sewing, for writing, for setting 
type are examples. 

The third element, and one which produced the greatest 
effect in the advancement of American manufactures, is the 
skill which has invented and applied machinery for making 
machines, after what has been distinctively called the 
American system. To illustrate what is meant by this 
term, and its application as well, let us suppose that a com- 
plex object, say a revolver, is to be produced in consider- 
able quantities. Doubtless a thoroughly skillful workman 
can produce the implement by working out piece after piece, 
fitting, adjusting, failing, and trying again, and in time 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 21 

evolve one revolver and after that another. But the suc- 
cessful manufacture of revolvers cannot be conducted in 
that way. The first step will require the careful and com- 
plete analysis of the weapon, separating it into its minutest 
elements, and determining the mechanical processes by 
which each separate element may be produced in the best 
and most economical manner. For each process a machine 
is devised, and this machine is made to do that particular 
piece of work with the utmost accuracy. So small a thing 
as a screw may require a separate machine for each of such 
processes as turning and threading, or slotting the head; 
each screw produced must be absolutely perfect, answering 
the strictest tests for length or for diameter. If at any 
time the screws are found not to answer to the tests, the 
fault must be sought in the machines which make the screws, 
and these machines must be readjusted to their special 
function. A thousand revolvers reqiiire one thousand 
pieces of each different kind, and these ^eces, being made 
each by the same processes, in the action of the same 
machines, are not acceptable unless each is absolutely per- 
fect, and therefore all of the same kind are absolutely alike. 
The parts being assembled, the thousand resulting weapons 
are perfect specimens of their kind. Any piece fits equally 
well in any revolver. 

The method requires high inventive genius in devising 
and keeping at its best service the varied and intricate 
machinery which constructs the parts; it requires capital 
adequate to the outlay; it must be sure of a market which 
will regularly absorb the product. It requires workmen 
educated to keep the machinery up to its ideal standard. 

This method has been applied to the production of fire- 
arms, of sewing-machines, writing-machines, watches, 
bicycles, printing-presses, steam-engines, pianofortes, and 
other things without number, abundantly displayed at this 
exposition. 



22 THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

The limits of space permit the presentation of only a few 
items illustrating the retrospective view of what the United 
States has accomplished in the nineteenth century. Busy 
in solving the material problems which nature and necessity 
have compelled them to consider, her people have neither 
forgotten nor neglected others of a more strictly scientific, 
intellectual, or aesthetic character. America with her cen- 
tury of retrospection may not be expected to parallel alh 
the results which Europe may proudly present as the record 
of a thousand years. But in the living to-day, in propor- 
tion to the number of her citizens, she presents in every 
field of intellectual attainment her sons and daughters, who 
represent her with distinguished honor. Statesmen, legis- 
lators, jurists, soldiers, sailors, historians, discoverers, 
inventors, authors, poets, painters, sculptors, musicians, 
educators, — upon the roll of living men in any of these 
groups the names of Americans will appear, frequent in 
number and cons^cuous in position. 

Of two results in education is she particularly proud. 
The first is the provision generously and universally made 
for the free instruction of every child within her borders. 
Every state makes the primary education of its children its 
especial care, an education sufficient for their guidance in 
all the ordinary avocations of life. Fourteen millions of 
children are enrolled in the common schools of the United 
States. The annual expenditure for their instruction is 
more than $183,000,000. 

The second is the rapid and vigorous development within 
the last thirty years of technical schools and universities. 
Among the technical schools those established by the aid 
of the general government are worthy of special com- 
mendation, as upon the foundations so laid have been 
erected some of the most advanced schools. The last ten 
years have been especially notable for generous endow- 
ments of important universities. Some of the elders, like 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 23 

Harvard, Yale, Columbia, and Princeton, have acquired 
large sums, surpassed only by the yet more magnificent 
endowments which have fallen to the University of Cali- 
fornia, the Leland Stanford, Jr., University, and the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Endowments are significant of possible 
opportunities; but much more significant of actual advance- 
ment has been the forward steps taken by these institutions, 
and others as well, by providing instruction in the class of 
subjects known by common consent as university courses. 
It is now possible to obtain doctorate standing from Amer- 
ican universities equal in actual significance, if not in repu- 
tation, to those acquired in European institutions. The 
day has already arrived when students from other countries 
are attracted to schools in the United States by the special 
advantages offered in special lines of study. 

The attitude of the United States of America before the 
other great nations of the world is interesting and peculiar. 
She is the first great republic of modern times founded upon 
the freedom, integrity, and intelligence of the citizen. She 
is free from the traditional inheritances which hamper 
nations of a longer life. She is isolated in her position, 
which has been to her a better protection than costly arma- 
ments. She has freed herself from the evil influences of 
human bondage. Her people are intelligent, industrious, 
and prosperous. She presents in the retrospective exposi- 
tion of the nations, herself, her people, and her history. 



RETROSPECTIVE EXPOSITION. 

GROUP III.— CLASS II. 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, New York. — Exposition showing 
the development of writing machines, from 1863 to 1900. 

Remington-Sholes Company, 127 Rees Street, Chicago. — Retro- 
spective exhibit of writing machines. 

GROUP IV.— CLASS 19. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Machinery, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of improvements in steam engines. 

CLASS 20. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Machinery, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of various motors and their improve- 
ment. 

CLASS 21. 

Francis E, Drake, Director of the Department of Machinery, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of improvements in various machines. 

CLASS 22. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Machinery, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of improvements in machine-tools. 

GROUP v.— CLASS 23. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Electricity, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of apparatus for the production and 
mechanical utilization of electricity. 

CLASS 24. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Electricity, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of articles applicable to electro-chem- 
istry. 

24 



RETROSPECTIVE EXPOSITION. 25 

CLASS 25. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Electricity, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of apparatus applicable to electric 
lighting. 

CLASS 26. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Electricity, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of apparatus applicable to telegraphy 
and telephony. 

CLASS 27. 

Francis E. Drake, Director of the Department of Electricity, 
Cleveland, Ohio. — Exhibit of various applications of electricity. 

GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 

WiLLARD A. Smith, Director of the Department of Civil Engineer- 
ing, Chicago. — Exhibit illustrating the development of the con- 
struction of bridges in the United States. 

CLASS 30. 

American Bicycle Company, New York.— Retrospective exhibit 
of bicycles, showing the evolution of their construction. 

CLASS 32. 

Willard a. Smith, Director of the Department of Transportation, 
Chicago. — Exhibit showing the development of railway carriages 
and of locomotives. 

CLASS 33. 

Massachusetts, State of, Boston. — Exhibit of vessels, showing 
the development of their construction from 1626 to 1900. 

GROUP VII.— CLASS 35. 

Dbering Harvester Company, Chicago. — Exhibit showing the 
progress in one hundred years in the means of harvesting grain. 



r 



^ 



CATALOGUE OF EXHIBITS 



FROM THE 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



GROUP I. 

EDUCATION AND INSTRUCTION 

HOWARD J. ROGERS, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 1. 

EDUCATION OF THE CHILD. ELEMENTARY INSTRUC- 
TION. INSTRUCTION OF ADULTS. 



American Book Company, Hew York City. 

School publications and text-books. 

American Sohool Board Journal, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Publication. 



School Furniture Company, Hew York City. 

School furniture and appliances. 

Bardeen, C. W., Syracuse, Hew York. 

School publications and text-books. 

Blow, Susan E., Cazenovia, Hew York. 

Monograph on the kindergarten. 

Board of Education, Albany, Hew York. 

Photographs, reports, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Aurora, Illinois. 
Reports. 

27 



r 



28 GROUP I.— CLASS 1. 

Board of Education, Binghamton, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Board of Education, Boston, Uassacliusetts. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils* work. 

Board of Education, Cairo, Illinois. 

Photographs, reports, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, California State, Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Chicago. 

Examination of teachers; courses of study, pupils' work, reports, 
blanks. Child study, physical measurements. Photographs. 

Board of Education, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, drawing work. 

Board of Education, Coldwater, Michigan. 

Photographs of building, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Columbus, Oeoi^a. 

Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Denver, Colorado. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils* work. 

Board of Education, Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs, reports, blanks. 

Board of Education, Fort Scott, Kansas. 

Pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Oalesburg, Illinois. 

Report. History of the High School. 

Board of Education, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Reports and photographs. 

Board of Education, Los Angeles, California. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Maiden, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, Massachusetts State, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report ; school reports of the 353 towns and cities of the 
state ; monographs, catalogues, office blanks. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 



^ 



GROUP I.— CLASS 1. 29 

Board of Education, Middletown, Hew York. 

Pliotograph of buildings, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Photographs, reports. 

Board of Education, Missouri State, Jefferson City, 

MissourL — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Hashua, Hew Hampshire. 

Photographs, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Hewark, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Hew Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, Hew Jersey State, Trenton, Hew 

Jersey. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Hew York City. 

Organization, management, equipment of public school system, 
results. 

Board of Education, Omalia, Hebraska. 

Photographs, reports, blanks used, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Faterson, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Fensacola, Florida. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Feoria, Illinois. 

Photographs. 

Board of Education, Bhode Island State, Frovidence, 

Rhode Island. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Bockester, Hew York. 

Photographs of kindergartens. 

Board of Education, Saratoga Springs, Hew York. 

Drawing work. 

Board of Education, Somerville, Massaokusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, Springfield, Massaokusetts. 

Public school work. 



90 GROUP I.-CLASS 1. 

Board of Education, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Photographs, pupils* work. 

Board of Education, Tacoma, Washii^^n. 

Photographs, reports, blanks. 

Board of Education, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Historical sketch; administrative forms; photographs. 

Board of Education, Toledo, Ohio. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, TTtica, Kew York? 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, West Sprii^eld, Massachusetts. 

Public school work ; photographs, reports, blanks. 

Board of Education, Whitehall, Hew York. 

Manual training work of high school pupils. 

Board of Education, Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. 

Portfolio of drawings. 

Board of Education, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of School Directors, Earrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Photograph of buildings ; reports, regulations. 

Bureau of Education, IT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Charts, statistics, publications. 

Central School Supply House, Atlas Block, Chici^o. 

Relief map of the United States. 

Denton Brothers, Wellesley, Massachusetts. 

Natural history collections for school use. 

Department of Education, IT. S. Commission to Paris. 

Administrative and organization blanks of public school systems. 
Nineteen monographs on education in the United States. Graphic 
charts illustrating educational development in the United States. 
Photographs, publications and results obtained. 



^ 



GROUP I.— CLASS !• 31 

Draper, Andrew Sloan, tTniyersity of Illinois, Champaign, 

Illinois. — Monograph on educational organization and administra- 
tion. 

Edncational Beview, Hew York City. 

Publications. 

Harris, William T., Commissioner of Ednoation, Washington, 

D. C. — Monograph on elementary education. 



Hinsdale, B. A,, TTniversity of Miehigan, Ann Arhor, Mich- 
igan. — Monograph on training of teachers. 



Howell, Edwin E., Washii^^ton, D. C. 

Relief maps of the continents and adjacent ocean bottoms. 

Inland Publishing Company, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

School and college text-books. 

Jonmal of Ednoation, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications. 

Heen, Bora, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

System of developing children of low intelligence. 

Idton Bradley Company, Springfleld, Massachusetts. 

Materials and appliances for kindergartens. 

Morrison, Gilbert B., Kansas City, Missouri 

Monograph on school architecture and hygiene. 

Mott, John M., 6106 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago. 

Phonetic alphabet with spellings in Bve languages. 



national Oerman-American Teachers' Seminary, Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin. — Herbarium of the flora of the United States. 

Hew York Education, Albany, Hew York. 

Publication. 

Hormal Instructor, Bansville, Hew York. 

Publication : The Normal Instructor. 

Pennsylvania School Journal, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Publications. 

Perry Pictures Company, Malien, Massachusetts. 

School charts and publications. 

Prang Educational Company, Hew York City. 

Educational publications. 



32 GROUP I.— CLASS 1. 

Primary Instmotor, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications. 

Public Instmotion, Colorado State Department of, Denver, 

Colorado. — Photoffraphs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instmotion, Illinois State Department of, Springfield, 

Illinois. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Indiana State Department of, Indianap- 
olis, Indiana. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Iowa State Department of, Des Moines, 

Iowa. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Kansas State Department of, Topeka, Kan- 
sas. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Maryland State Department of, Baltimore, 

Maryland. — Photographs of buildings, reports. 

Public Instruction, Montana State Department of, Helena^ 

Montana. — Pamphlets. 

Public Instruction, Nebraska State Department of, Linooln, 

Nebraska. — Reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Hew York State Department of, Albany, 

New York. — Reports, blanks, publications. 

Public Instruction, North Carolina State Department of, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. — Reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, North Dakota State Department of, Bis- 
marck, North Dakota. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, South Dakota State Department of, Pierre, 

South Dakota. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Wisconsin State Department of, Madison, 

Wisconsin. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

School Bulletin, Syracuse, Hew York. 

Publications. 

School Journal, Kew York. 

Publications. 

Silver, Burdett & Company, Boston and Hew York. 

Educational publications. , 



^ 



GROUP I.— CLASS 2. 33 



Stem's School of Languages, Hew York City. 

Method of instruction in French and German. 

Western Sohool Tonmal, Topeka, Kansas. 

Publication : Western School Journal. 



CLASS 2. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION. 



secondary education of boys; classical education; modern 

education; education of girls. 

Albany Female Academy, Albany, Hew York. 

Maps, photographs (girls' education). 



Book Company, Hew York. 

Educational publications. 

American School Board Journal, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Publications. 

American School Furniture Company, Hew York. 

School furniture and appliances. 

Bardeen, C. W., Syracuse, Hew York. 

Educational publications. 

Board of Education, Albany, Hew York. 

" Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, California State, Sacramento, California. 

Photographs, reports, blanks. 

Board of Education, Chicago. 

Courses of study and pupils' work in high schools. Photographs 
of buildings ; laboratories, gymnasiums ; physical measurements. 

Board of Education, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, drawing work. 



34 GROUP I.— CLASS 2. 

Board of Ednoation, Denver, Colorado. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Reports, photographs. 

Board of Education, Maiden, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, Massachusetts State, Boston, Mass. 

Annual reports ; school reports of the 353 towns and cities of the 
state ; monographs, catalogues. Office blanks. 

Board of Education, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Photographs, reports (public schools). 

Board of Education, Newark, Hew Tersey. 

Photographs, reports, blanks, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Hew York City. 

Organization, management, equipment of public school system; 
results obtained. 

Board of Education, Omaha, Hebraska. 

Photographs, reports, blanks used, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Peoria, Illinois. 

Photographs. 

Board of Education, Somerville, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Board of Education, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Photographs, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Vermont State, Montpelier, Vermont. 

Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Board of Education, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs, pupils' work. 

Board of Education, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Public school work. 

Brown, Elmer Ellsworth, Berkeley, California. 

MonogH'^ph on secondary education. 

Denton Brothers, Wellesley, Massachusetts. 

Natural history collections for schools. 



^ 



GROUP I.— CLASS 2. 35 

Department of Education, XT. S. Commusion to Paris. 

Collective exhibit of photographs, publications and results obtained 
in public school work. Administration blanks, etc. 

Educational Beview, Hew York. 

Publications. 

Poote Mineral Company^ Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Collections of minerals for schools and colleges. 

Hinsdale, B. A., TTniyersity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 

Michigan. — Monograph on training of teachers. 

Tonmal of Education, The, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications. 

Keen, Dora, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

System of developing children of low intelligence. 

Morrison, Gilbert B., Kansas City, Missouri. 

School architecture and hygiene. 

Hew York Education, Albany, Hew York. 

Publications. 



la School Journal, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Publication. 

Perry Pictures Company, Maiden, Massachusetts. 

Publications and school charts. 

Physical Education Society of Hew York and Vicinity, 

New York City. — Photographs, statistics, publications. 

Prang Educational Company, Hew York City. 

Educational publications. 

Public Instruction, Colorado State Department of, Denver, 

Colorado. — Photographs, reports, laws, blanks. 

Public Instruction, Hew York State Department of. Hew 

York. — Statistics, courses of instruction for secondary schools. 

School Bulletin, Syracuse, Hew York. 

Publications. 

School Journal, Hew York. 

Publications. 

School Beview, Chicago. 

Publications. 



36 GROUP I.— CLASS a 

Silver, Burdett & Company, Boston and Hew York. 

Educational publications. Secondary education. 

Society, Beck Literary, Albany Academy, Albany, Hew York. 

Statistics, etc 

Thiry, J. E., Long Liland City, Hew York. 

Statistics and reports relating to school savings banks. 

Velasoo School of Languages, The, 288 Schermerhom 

St., Brooklyn, New York. — Portfolios of written work. 

Washington TTniversity, St. Lonis, Uissonri. 

Manual training department ; clay models ; manual training work. 

Western School Jonmal, Topeka Kansas. 

Publications. 



CLASS 3. 

HIGHER EDUCATION. SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



Adams, Herbert B., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Monograph on summer schools and University extension. 



Book Company, Hew York. 

Publications for superior education. ' 

American Library Association, Albany, Hew York. 

Statistics, publications, library appliances. 

American School Fnmitnre Company, Hew York City. 

School furniture and appliances. 

American Hnsenm of Hatnral History, Hew York. 

Photographs and papers illustrating methods in research and 
anthropology. 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 183 Delaware Ave., Buf- 
falo, New York. — Charts, photographs, methods specially applied 
to superior education of women. 

Bardeen, C. W., Syracuse, Hew York. 

Publications and educational books. 



GROUP I.— CLASS 3. 37 

Board of Education, Hassaohiuetts State, Boston, Haas. 

Collective exhibit of state normal schools. 

Brown and White, Easton, Fennsylrania. 

Publication. 

Brown Herald, Providence, Ehode Island. 

Publication. 

Bryn Hawr College, Bryn Hawr, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs, publications, charts, special work. 

Catholic TTniversity of America, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs, publications. 

Cattell, James HcEeen, Columbia TTniversity, Hew York. 

Monograph on scientific societies and associations. 



Cerde Eranoais de lITniversite Harvard, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, per James Hazen Hyde. — Photographs, programs, publi- 
cations, charts of methods of the society, statistics. 

Colby College, Waterville, Maine. 

Photographs, publications. 

Colnmbia Spectator, Hew York City. 

Publication. 

Colnmbia TTniversity, Hew York City. 

University publications, library, education, psychology, and law. 

Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs, publications, charts. 

Cornell Daily Snn, Ithaca, Hew York. 

Publication. 



Cornell TTniversity, Ithaca, Hew York. 

Charts, publications, photographs of app 
and of engineering and pedagogical sections. 



Charts, publications, photographs of appliances of the University 

da ' 



Dana Hatnral History Society, Albany, Hew York. 

Publications. 

Department of Education, TT. S. Commission to Paris. 

Collective exhibit of material illustrating phases of college work. 
Series of graphic charts illustrative of educational development 
in the United States. Student publications in American colleges. 
Theological schools. Typical college games and sports. 



Educational Beview, Hew York. 

Publication. 



I 



38 GROUP I.— CLASS 3. 

Foote Mineral Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Collections of minerals for schools and colleges. 

Tredonia Normal School, Fredonia, Hew York. 

Photographs, various charts, statistics. 

Harvard Crimson, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Publication. 

Harvard Lampoon, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Publication. 

Harvard TTniversity, Astronomical Observatory, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts. — Charts, astronpmical objects, illuminated photo- 
graphs. 

Harvard TTniversity, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Photographs, charts, maps, publications. Peabody Museum, 
glass models of flowers. 

Hemment, J. C, 110 Fifth Ave., Hew York City. 

Photographs of sports and games in American colleges. 

Blini, The, Champaign, Illinois. 

Publication. 

Johns Hopkins TTniversity, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Scientific publications ; maps of solar spectrum ; work in biology, 
pathology, geology, and climatology. 

Lafayette, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Publication. 

Lafltyette College, Easton, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Lehigh TTniversity, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs, publications, statistical charts. 

MacFarlane, Alexander, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Treatise upon geometry in space. 

Massachusetts Commission to the Paris Exposition. 

Monograph upon the system of Normal Schools in Massachusetts. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Charts, statistics, publications, photographs, program, and work. 

Mendenhall, T. C, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Monograph on scientific technical and engineering education. 



GROUP I.— CLASS 3. 39 

Ht Eolyoke College, Ht Eolyoke, Hassacliiuettt. 

Map, photographs. 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Photographs, statistical charts. 

Oiwego Hormal School, Hew York. 

Publications, school work, manual training, photographs. 

Parsons, James Bxissell, TTniyersity of the State of Hew 

York, Albany, N. Y. — Monograph on professional education. 

Pedi^ogical Seminary, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Publications. 

Fennsylvanian, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication. 

Perry, Edward Delavan, Colnmbia TTniyersity, Hew 

York. — Monograph on the American university. 

Prang Educational Company, Hew York City. 

Educational publications. 

Princetonian, Princeton, Hew Tersey. 

Publication. 

Hew York TTniyersity, School of Pedagogy, Hew York City. 

Charts, plans and investigations in the pedagogic department. 

Public Instruction, Hew York State Department of, Albany, 

New York. — ^Reports, blanks, pamphlets. Normal school exhibit. 

Butgers College, Hew Brunswick, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs, charts, statistics. 

St. Frauds Xavier, College of. Hew York City. 

Photographs, publications. 

Silyer, Burdett & Company, Hew York. 

School publications and text books. 

Smith, Harlan J., Hew York. 

An archeological study of Lytton, British Columbia. 

State Hormal College, Michigan, Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

Photographs, publications, charts, and statistics. 

State Hormal College of Pennsylvania, Westchester, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Written work, photographs of buildings. 



40 GROUP I.— CLASS 3. 

Stevens Institute of Technology, Eoboken, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs, publications. 

Teachers^ College, Colombia TTniyersity, Hew York City. 

Organization, equipment, results obtained. 

Thomas, M. Carey, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Monograph on education of women. 

TTniversity of California, Berkeley, California. 

Architects' plans of buildings and grounds. 



TTniversity of Chicago, Chicago. 

Physics, apparatus, astronomy, I _ _ 

charts ; University extension clivision ; charts, publications. 



Physics, apparatus, astronomy, photographs; history, sociology, 
" di^ 



TTniversity of Colorado, Bonlder, Colorado. 

Photographs, charts, statistics. 

TTniversity of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Photographs of buildings, special publications. 

TTniversity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Charts, statistics, photographs. 

TTniversity of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. 

Photographs. 

TTniversity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Charts, graphics, and photographs illustrative of the departments 
of archeology, chemistry, and medicine. 

TTniversity of Princeton, Princeton, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs, publications, statistical charts. 

TTniversity of the State of Hew York, Albany^Hew York. 

Methods of education by means of reading and rotating libraries. 

TTniversity of the State of Hew York, Museum Department, 

Albany, New York. — Publications pertaining to paleontology. 

TTniversity of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Collection of charts, graphics, photographs, special methods, and 
investigations. 

University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming. 

Photographs. 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, Hew York. 

Special works in history and sociology. 



^ 



GROUP I.— CLASS 4. 41 

Wake, C. S., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Publication : Philosophical diagrams. 

Welledey College, Wellesley, Hassaobiuetts. 

Work of the college in philosophy and literature. 

West, Andrew Fleming, Frinceton TTniyernty, Frinceton, 

New Jersey. — Monograph on the American College. 

Wilson, Mrs. L. L. W., Fhiladelphia, Fennsylvania. 

Graphic chart showing the methods of teaching natural history in 
the Philadelphia Normal School. 

Tale TTniyersity, Hew Haven, Connectiout. 

Exhibit from Sheffield Scientific School ; exhibit relating to paleon- 
tology. 



CLASS 4. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION IN FINE ARTS. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR TEACHING DRAWING AND MUSIC 

American Book Company, Hew York. 

School publications and text books. 

Art Students' League of Hew York, 216 West 67tli St., 

New York City. — Students' work. 

Bailey, Henry, Boston, Hassackusetts. 

Monograph on the history of art education in Massachusetts. 

Clarke, Isaac Edwards, Department of Education, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Monograph on artistic and industrial education. 

line Arts School of Chicago, Chicago. 

Charts, statistics, publications, explanatory works of students. 

Hormal Art School, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Illustrative work of school. 

Prang Educational Company, Hew York. 

Educational publications. 

Silver, Burdett db Company, Hew York, 

School publications and text books. 



42 GROUP I.— CLASS 6. 

CLASS 5. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE, 



Higher or scientific education in agriculture, veterinary science and 
forestry ; instruction in which theory takes precedence over prac- 
tice; instruction in which practice takes precedence over theory; 
practical instruction in apprentice schools ; special schools for tech- 
nical instruction in industries related to farming; special agricul- 
tural education in normal schools for the training of teachers in 
colleges, in schools, and in primary schools; instruction by con- 
sulting or visiting professors ; practical instruction. 

Amerioan Book Company, Hew York City. 

School publications and text books. 

Dabney, Ckarles W., TTniyeraity of Tennessee, Knozville, 

Tennessee. — Monog^raph on agricultural education. 

Department of Edncation, IT. S. Commission to Paris. 

Collective exhibit of schools of agriculture and experiment stations. 

Lyon, Prof. T. Littleton, TTniyersity of Nebraska, Linooln, 

Nebraska. — Photographs of laboratories. 



CLASS 6. 



SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL 

EDUCATION. 



Albany Business College, Albany, Hew York. 

Students' work, statistics, publications. 

American Book Company, Hew York City. 

School publications and text-books. 

Board of Education, Boston, Kass. 

Evening industrial drawing schools. 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, Illinois. 

Photographs of students' work and class-room. 



GROUP I.— CLASS 6. 43 

Bureau of Education, IT. S. A., Wasliing^n, D. C. 

Charts, statistics, publications. 



Bureau of Indian Affairs, XT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Collective exhibit of Indian education. 

Carlisle Indian School, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs, charts, statistics, pupils' work. 

Colored Industrial Institute, Fine Bluff, Arkansas. 

Literary work; map and free hand drawing. Herbarium. 

Department of Education, TT. S. Conunission to Paris. 

Nineteen monographs on education in the United States, edited 
by Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler. 

Hailuiann, William H., Dayton, Ohio. 

Monograph on education of the Indian. 

Haines Industrial Institute, Augusta, Georgia. 

Sewing done by young colored girls. 

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. — Photographs, charts, statistics, pupils' work. 

Heald's Business College, San Francisco, California. 

Students' work. 

Hirsch, Baron de. Agricultural and Industiial School, 

Woodbine, New Jersey. — Pupils* work ; photographs of buildings. 

Howard TTniyersity, Washington, D. C. 

Charts and photographs illustrating methods of teaching among 
the colored people. 

Tames, Edmund J., TTniyersity of Chicago, Chicago. 

Monograph on commercial education. 

Lowry Institute, Hayesville, South Carolina. 

Photographs, portfolios. 

Metropolitan Business College, Chicago. 

Students' work. Photographs. 

Hew York Trade School, East 67th St., Hew York City. 

Photographs, charts, statistics, pupils' work. 

Packard's Business College, Hew York City, Hew York. 

Students' work, statistics, publications. 

Philadelphia Business College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Students' work, statistics, publications. 



r 



44 GROUP I.— 6lASS 6. 

Soohester Commercial College, Soohester, Hew York. 

Students' work, statistics, publications. 

Soger Williams TTniyersity, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Photographs and catalogue. 

Silver, Bnrdett & Company, Hew York. 

School publications and text books. 

Soule Commercial College and Literary Institute, Hew Or- 
leans, Louisiana. — Students' work. 

Spencerian Commercial School, 422 Superior St., Cleveland, 

Ohio. — Students' work. 

Tnskegee Hormal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee, Ala- 
bama. — ^Exhibit of twenty-eight industries connected with the 
school. 

TTnivernty of Atlanta, Georgia. 

Charts showing the development of people of color in the United 
States. 

TTniversity, lisk, Haskville, Tennessee. 

Written work by colored students ; photographs. 

TTniversity of Hebraska, Lincoln, Hebraska. 

Photographs of laboratories. 

Washington, Booker T., Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, 

Alabama. — Monograph on education of the negro. 



^ 



GROUP II. 

WORKS OF ART. 

JAMES H. CAULDWELL. Director. 



CLASS 7. 

PAINTINGS, CARTOONS, ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Abbey, Edwin Anstin, bom at Philadelphia, Femuiylyaiiia. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Paris, 1879, first 
class medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. Chevalier of the Legion of 
Honor. Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. 

1 — Hamlet. \ 

2 — The Deserted Village ; — illustration. 

3 — Daffodil ; — illustration. 

4 — The Good-Natured Man; — illustration. 

Abbot, Eatherine 0., bom at Zanesville, Ohio. 

Pupil of H. Siddons Mowbray, Wm. M. Chase, Merson, jGeoffroy 
and Delance. Paris, France. 

5 — Anxiety. 

Alexander, John W., bom at Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Royal Academy, Munich, and Frank Duveneck. Paris. 

6 — The Mother. ' 

7 — Portrait of Rodin. 

8 — Autumn. 

Allen, Thomas, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

9 — On Grassmere Meadows. 

Anderson, A. A., Hew York. 

10 — Hon. Elihu Root. 

Baer, William J., bom at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pupil of Mtmich Royal Academy. New York. 

11 — Mrs. Wm. M. C. ; — miniature. 

12 — Friends ; — miniature. 

45 



46 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

13 — Sara ; — miniature. 

14 — The Golden Hour ; — miniature. 

15 — Lady in Blue and Pink; — miniature. 

16 — My First Born ; — miniature. 

Baker, Martha S., bom at Evansville, Indiana. 

Pupil of Art Institute, Chicago. Chicago. 

17 — Miss Ethel Coe ; — miniature. 

18 — Ideal Head ; — miniature. 

Barlow, J. Hoble, bom at Manchester, England. 

Pupil of Constant, Lefebvre and Delance. Paris, 1899, medal, 
third class. Providence, Rhode Island and Cornwall, England. 
19 — One Summer Night. 

Baxter, Martha Wheeler, bom in Vermont. 

Pupil of Mowbray, Kenyon Cox, Carroll Beck with, F. Vincent, 
Du Mond. Paris and Windsor, Vermont. 

20 — Portrait of Miss T. ; — miniature. 

Beaux, Cecilia, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Wm. Sarlain, the Julien Academy, Chas. Lazar. Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

21 — Mother and Daughter. 

22 — Mother and Son. 

23 •^ Portrait of Miss Fisher. 

Beckington, Alice, bom at St. Charles, Missouri. 

Pupil of Lefebvre, Constant and Lazar. Sciiuaie, Massachusetts. 

24 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

25 — Helen ; — miniature. 

Bechwith, J. Carroll, bom at Hannibal, Missouri. 

Pupil of Carolus Duran. Honorable mention, Paris, 1887 ; Paris, 
1889, Exp'n, bronze medal. New York. 

26 — Portrait of Mrs. Beckwith. 

27 — The Glance ; — illustration. 

Benson, Frank W., bom at Salem, Massachusetts. 

Pupil of Boulaiiger and Lefebvre. Chicago, 1693, medal. Salem, 
Massachusetts. 

28 — Children in the Woods. 

29 — The Sisters. 

30 — Decorative figure. 

Bisbing, E. S., bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of J. H. L. de Haas and F. de Vuillefroy. Paris. 

31 — The Meadow. 

32 — Cattle. 

Blakelock, Balph A., bom at Hew York. Hew York. 

33 — Landscape. 



^ 



^ 



GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 47 

Blun, Bobert, bom at Cinoinnatii Ohio. 

Pupil of MacMicken School of Design and Academy of Fine Arts, 
Philadelphia. Qiicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

34 — " The Ameya." 

35 — The Flower Market at Tokio. 

Bogeit, Oeorge E., born at Ifew York. 

Pupil of Puvis de Chavanne and Aime Moreau. New York. 

36 — Sea and Rain. 

Bobniy Max, bom at Cleyeland, Ohio. 

Pupil of Jean Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant. Gold medal, 
185S. Etaples, France. 

37 — On the Sea. 

Boskercky Robert W. yan, Sew York. 

38 — Landscape. 

Brekenridge, Hugh E., bom at Leesborg, Virginia. 

Pupil of Bouguereau, Farrier and Doucet. Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
yania. 

39 — Lantern Glow ; — pastel. 



Ln, F. A., bom at Tnskegee, Alabama. 

Pupil of Gerome. Paris, 1877, medal ; 1878, Exp'n, medal ; 1899, 
Exp'n, medal. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Paris. 

40 — Pharo. 

41 — The Arab with a Horse. 

Brown^ J. 0., bom at Dnrham, England. 

Pupil of Robert Scott Lander, Wm. B. Scott and Thomas Cum- 
mings. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, honorable mention. New York. 

42 — Heels Over Head. 

Browne, Charles Franois, bom in Hassachusetts. 

Pupil of Boston Art Museum, Philadelphia Academy of Fine 
Arts, Gerome. Chicago. 

43 — Reflections. 

Bnuhy Oeorge de Forrest, born in Tennessee. 

Pupil of Gerome. Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

44 — Mother and Child. 

45 — Mother and Child. 

46 — The Artist. 

Bnnce, W. Oedney, Hew York. 

47 — Venice. 

Bnrbank, E. A., bom at Harvard, Illinois. 

Pupil of Emil Carlsen, Felix Regimy, J. F. Goodkins, Paul Navin 
and Frederick Fehr. Chicago. 

48 — Thi-ich-na-pa ; — Navajo. 



48 GROUP II.-~CLASS 7. 

Butler, Howard Biusell. ChioagOi 1893, Medal. Hew York. 

49 — Clearing ; — marine. 

Camp, Tosepli De, bom at Cinoiimati, Ohio. 

Pupil of Frank Duveneck. Boston, Massachusetts. 

50 — Woman Drying Her Hair. 

Carl, Kate, bom in Louisiana. Henilly-snr-Seine, Franee. 

51 — The Mirror. 

Carleton, Clifford, Hew York. 

52 — The Letter. 

Champney, Marie, Hew York. 

54 — Portrait of Mrs. H., as Geisha Girl ; — miniature. 

Chapman, Carlton T., bom at Hew London, Ohio. 

Pupil of Art Students' League, N. Y., and Julien Academy, Paris. 
Chicaffo, 1893, medal. New York. 

55 — Out of Reckoning ; a Narrow Escape ; — illustration. 

56 — Constitution and Guerriere. 

57 — The Oregon in Action. 

Chase, William M., bom at Franklin. 

Pupil of Wagner and Piloty. Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Paris, 
1881, honorable mention; Paris, 1889, silver medal. New York. 

58 — Woman with a White Shawl. 

59 — Landscape. 

60 — The Big Brass Bowl. 

Christy, Howard Chandler, bom in Ohio. 

Pupil of Wm. M. Chase. New York. 

61 — Instead, she buried her face in its folds ; — illustration. 

Chnroh, F. S., bom at Grand Bapids, Michigan. 

Pupil of Walter Shirlaw. New York. 

62 — The Sorceress. 

Clark, Walter Appleton, bom at Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Pupil of H. Siddons Mowbray and Wm. M. Chase. New York. 

63 — Perfectly content if she looked up now and then ; — illus- 
tration. 

64 — Naturally, he was surprised and considerably annoyed ; — 
illustration. 

6s — Francisca kept the house ; — illustration. 

66 — It was to bean affair of boats ; — illustration. 

Clark, Walter, bom at Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Pupil of Wilmarth and Art Students' League, N. Y. New York. 

67 — A New England Village. 



^ 



GROUP II.^CLASS 7. 49 

dinediiiBt, B. West, New York. 

68 — Marooned ; — illustration. 

Coffin, William A., bom at Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Leon Bonnat. Paris, Exp'n, 1899, bronze medal. New 
York. 

69 — Sunrise. 

Coman, Charlotte B., bom at WaterviUe, New Hampshire. 

Pupil of James R. Prevoort, Harry Thompson, and Emile Ver- 
nier. New York. 

70 — A Winter Momincr ; — aquarelle. 

71 — ►A Hill of Hazel Bushes ; — aquarelle. 

Cooper, Emma Lamport, bom at Nnnda, New York. 

Pupil of Harry Thompson, J. Kever and Wm. M. Chase. Chi- 
cago, 1893, medal. London, England. 

72 — The Breadwinners. 

Conse, E. Irving, bom at Sigman, Hiohigan. 

Pupil of Bougeareau, Fleury. New York. 

73 — Along the Quai. 

Cowles, Hand Alioe, bom at Farmington, Conneotiont. 

Pupil of Robert Brandegee and Prof. Niemeyer. Farmington, 
Connecticut. 

74 — The meeting on the bridge; — illustration. 

Coz, Eenyon, bom at Warren, Ohio. 

Pupil of Jerome and Carolus Duran. Chicago, 1893, medal. New 
York. 

75 — The Pursuit of the Ideal. 

Coz, Mrs. Lonise, bom at San Franoisco, California. 

Pupil of National Academy of Design and Art Students' League. 
New York. New York. 

76 — Leonard. 

Crane, Bmoe, bom at New York* 

Pupil of A. H. Wyant. New York. 

77 — Signs of the Spring. 

Cnrran, Chas. C, bom at Hartford, Eentnoky. 

Pupil of Benjamin Constant and L. Doucet. Paris, 1890, honorable 
mention; Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

78 — The Dew. 

79 — The Peris. 



Constance, bom at Washington, D. C. 

Pupil of Wm. M. Chase and Robert Reid. New York. 
80 — Joan ; — aquarelle. 



60 GROUP n.— CLASS 7. 

Dannat, William T., Paris and New York. 

8i — Portrait of Otero. 

82 — Portrait of the Duchess of Mecklenburg. * 

83 — Portrait of Miss C. 

Darling, W. IL, bom at Sandnaky, Ohio. 

Pupil of Je^n Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant. Laren, 
Holland. 

84 — Helping the Mother. 



Charles E., bom at Amesbory, Massachnsetts. 

Pupil of Otto Grundmann, Boulanger and Jules Lefebvre. Paris, 
1889, honorable mention; 1889, Exp'n, silver medal; Chicago, 
1893, medal. Boston. 

85 — Summer Evening. 

86 — Clouds Over Water. 

De Wentworth, Cecilia. 

Pupil of Cabanel. New York and Paris. 
S3 — Portrait of Cardinal Ferrara. 

Dearth, Henry Oolden, New York. 

87 — Autumn. 

Dessar, Lonis Fanl, bom at Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Pupil of W. A. Bouguereau and Robert Fleury. Paris, 1891, gold 
medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

88 — Sheep in the Dunes. 

89 — Evening in Picardie. 

Dickson, H. E., bom at St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Pupil of Tony Robert, Fleury and Lefebvre. Paris, 1896, honor- 
able mention. Paris. 

90 — Fancy Head. 

Donoho, Boger 0., East Hampton, New York. 

91 — Moonlight in Egypt Lane. 

Drake, Will E., New York. 

92 — The tiger's roar filled the cave ; — illustration. 

Eakins, Thomas, bom at Coving^n, Eentncky. 

Pupil of Gerome, Bonnat and Dumont. Chicago, 1893, medal. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

93 — The 'Cello Player. 

94 — Salutat. 

Eaton, Charles Warren, bom at Albany, New York. 

Pupil of National Academy of Design and Art Students' League, 
New York. 

96 — The Marsh in Winter ; — pastel. 

97 — Spirit of the Twilight ; — aquarelle. 

98 — River at Evening. 



^ 



GROUP IL— CLASS 7. 51 

Eiohelbnrger, B. H., New York. 

99 — The Wave. 

Ellis, Harvey, Bocliester, New York. 

100 — Silhouettes ; — aquarelle. 

Emmet, Lydia Field, New York. 

loi — Garden Days. 

Enneking, J. J., Boston, Massaoknsetts. 

102 — Twilight. 

Fisher, Hark, bom at Boston, Massachnsetts. Weddington, 

Newport, Essex, England. 

103 — The Swineherd. 

Foss, Miss Harriot C, New York. 

104 — Pink Phlox ; — pastel. 

Foster, Ben, North Anson, Maine. 

Pupil of Abbott Thayer. Luc Olivier Merson and Aime Morot. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

105 — Lulled by a Murmuring Stream. 

Franzen, Angnst, bom at Norrkoping^, Sweden. 

Pupil of Dagnan and Bouveret. New York. 

106 — Charity. 

107 — The House Builders. 

Fromnth, Charles H., bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins. Concarneau, France. 

108 — A Dock Harmony. 

109 — Dismantled Boats. 

Frost, A. B., Convent Station, New Jersey. 

1 10 — What happened ; — illustration. 

111 — Somebody blundered ; — illustration. 

Fnller, Lncia Fairchild, Windsor, Vermont. 

112 — Girl Drying Her Foot ; — miniature. 

113 — Girl with Hand Glass ; — miniature. 

114 — Portrait of a Child ; — miniature. 

Oallagher, Sears, bom at Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Pupil of Thomas Juglaris, Jean Paul Laurens and Benjamin Con- 
stant. Boston, Massachusetts. 

115 — Foggy Weather ; — aquarelle. 

Oallison, Henry E., bom at Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Pupil of Bonnefoy. Boston, Massachusetts. 

116 — A Gray Day. 



52 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Oarnsey, E. E., New York. 

117 — Decorative painting of lunettes and ceiling, rotunda Na- 
tional Pavilion. 

Oanley, Bobert David, bom at Ballylag, Ireland. 

Pupil of Denman Ross. New York. 
118— Polly. 

Oay, Walter, bom at Hingbam, Massacbiuetts. 

Pupil of Leon Bonnat. Third-class gold medals Paris, 1898 ; hors 
concours, Paris Exp'n, 1889. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. 
Paris. 

119 — Maternity. 

120 — The Weavers. 

Oibson^ Charles Sana, bom at Boxbory, Massachnsetts. 

Pupil of Augustus St. Gaudens and Julian Academy. New York. 

121 — Rejane ; — illustration. 

122 — No respecter of a widow's grief; — illustration. 

Oifford, B. Swain, bom at Iiland of Kanshon, Hassaohnietts. 

Pupil of Albert Van Beest. New York. 

123 — Headwaters of Westport River. 



Oibon, Albert Dakin, bom at Fortsmontb, Kew 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins, Constant, J. P. Laurens, G^rome, Aman 
Jean, Georges Moteley. Paris. 

124 — Old Mill ; — Picardy. 

Olackens, William, New York. 

125 — In town it's different ; — illustration. 

126 — She wheeled about and stamped her foot. " Silence pigs,** 
she screamed ; — illustration. 

Orothjean, Mrs. Fanny, bom at Hambnrg, Oermany. 

Pupil of Courtois Girardot, Paul J. Blanc, Pierre Fritel and A. G. 
Delecluse. New York. 

127 — The August Moon. 

128 — The New Moon. 

Onerin, Jnles, bom at St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Pupil of Benjamin Constant and Jean Paul I^aurens. New York. 

129 — University Heights, Harlem River; — illustration. 

Ony, J. Seymonr, bom at Oreenwioh, England. 

Pupil of Ambroise Jerome and Buttersworth. New York. 

130 — Rest. 

131 — Preparing for To-morrow. 

Halmick, H., New York. 

132 — On the floor lay Bemin Cozart; — illustration. 



1 



GROUP XL— CLASS 7. 53 

Eambridge, Jay, Staten Island^ New York. 

133 — Studies from Life. 

134 — Trouble Ahead ; — illustration. 

Hairison, Alexander, bom at Fhiladelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Pupil of Gerome and Lepage. First class medal; Paris Exp'n, 
1889. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Paris. 

135 — Twilight ; — marine. 

136 — Mysteries of the Night ; — marine. 

137 — Fires in the Sun ; — landscape. 

Hairison, Birge, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Carolus Duran and Cabanel. Paris Exp'n, 1889, silver 
medal; Chicago, 1893, medal; hors concours, salon. Plymouth, 
Massachusetts. 

138 — Morning off Santa Barbara. 

Trummm, Childe, bom at Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lefebvre. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, bronze 
medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

139 — Snowy Day in Fifth Avenue. 

Haydon, Charles E., bom at Plymouth, Massaohnsetts. 

Pupil of Boulanger, Collin and Lefebvre. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, 
honorable mention. Belmont, Massachusetts. 

140 — A Connecticut Hillside. 

Eerter, Albert, bom at New York. 

Pupil of F. Cormon and Jean Paul Laurens. Paris, 1890, honor- 
able mention. New York. 

141 — Sorrow ; — aquarelle. 

Eills, Mrs. Lanra C, bom at Kewbnryport, Massaohnsetts. 

Pupil of Helen M. Knowlton, Cowles Art School and the Art 
Students' League, New York. Boston, Massachusetts. 

142 — Laura ; — miniature. 

143 — Dorothy ; — miniature. 

144 — Portrait of Beatrice Heaford ; — miniature. 

145 — Portrait of Miss T. ; — miniature. 

146 — Study in Pink ; — miniature. 

Eitchoook, Oeorge, bom at Providenoe, Bhode Island. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lefebvre. Paris, 1889, gold medal ; Chi- 
cago, 1893, medal. Egmond Half, Holland, and Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

147 — Magnificat. 

148 — Vanquished. 

Eitchoook, Lnoins W., bom at West Williamsfield, Ohio. 

Pupil of Jules Lefebvre, Benjamin Constant and Jean Paul 
Laurens. Buffalo, New York. 

149 — Ready ; look pleasant ; — illustration. 

150 — The house was in a roaring humor; — illustration. 



54 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Holman, Frank, bom at Attleborougli, Hassaohiuetts. . 

Pupil of Carolus Duran and the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Paris. 

151 — Portrait of My Mother. 

Eomeri Winslow, bom at Boston, MaMachnsetts. 

Pupil of Frederick Rendel. Scarboro, Maine. 

152 — The Fox Hunt. 
153 — The Maine Coast 

154 — All's Well. 

155 — Summer Night. 

Houston, Caroline A., bom at Brooklyn, New York. 

Pupil of Frank Dumond, Raphael Collin and Eugene Trasset. 
Paris. 

156 — Portrait of Miss C. ; — miniature. 

157 — Portrait of Miss M. J. C. ; — miniature. 

Houston, Franoes C, New York. 

158 — Portrait. 

Hyde, W. H., New York. 

162 — Portrait. 

Inness, Oeorge (Deceased), bom at Newbnrg, New York. 

Pupil of Regis Gignoux. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, bronze medal. 

163 — Sunny Autumn Day. 

164 — The Clouded Sun. 

165 — The Valley on a Gloomy Day. 

166 — The Mill Pond. 

Johnson, Eastman, bom at Lorel, Maine. 

Pupil of Lentye. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, medal. New York. 

167 — Prisoner of State. 

Jones, H. Bolton. 

168 — November. 

Josepbi, Isaac A., bom at New York. 

Pupil of Art Students* League, New York, and Leon Bonnat 
New York. 

169 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

170 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

171 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

Eeelin, C. S., bom at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pupil of Cincinnati Art School and Art Students' League, New 
York. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

172 — Melting Snows ; — pastel. 

Keller, Arthur I., bom at New York. 

Pupil of Prof. Wilmarth and Prof. Loefftz. New York. 

173 — Allie Connan's first and last duel ; — illustration. 

174 — Col. Washington's wedding reception ; — illustration. 



GROUP IL— CLASS 7. 55 

Kendall, Margaret, Kew York. 

175 — Pastures and Pudding Stones. 

Kendall, Sergeant, bom at Spnyten-Dnyvel, New Tork. 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins, Oliver Merson. Paris, 1891, honorable 
mention ; Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

176 — "St. Ives, Pray for Me." 

177 — Cloud Shadows. 

Knight, Lonis Aston, bom at Paris. 

Pupil of Lefebvre, Tony Robert Fleury and Ridgway Knight. 
Poissy, France, and Philadelphia. 

178 — The Riverside Path ; — aquarelle. 

Knight, Bidgway, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Glayre and Meissonier. Paris, 1884, honorable men- 
tion; 1888, third-class gold medal; 1889, £xp'|i» silver medal. 
Chevalier of the Legion of Honor ; Chicago, 1893, medal. Poissy, 
France. 

179 — A July Morning. 

Sbopman, Angostns, bom at Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Pupil of Bouguereau and Fleury. Paris and Philadelphia. 

180 — The Two Forces. 

Kost, Frederiek W., bom at New Tork. 

Pupil of National Academy. New York. 
181. Old Vandcrbilt Dock, New Dorp. 

Kronberg, Lonis, bom in United States. 

Pupil of Jean Paul Laurens, Benjamin Constant and Raphael 
Collin. Boston, Massachusetts. 

182 — Study from the Nude ; — pastel. 

La Tkrge, John, bom at New Tork. 

Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. New York. 

183 — Girls Making Kava. 

184 — Mt. Tohivea, Society Islands. 

Lathrop, Francis, bom in Hawaiian Islands. 

Pupil of Ford Madox, Brown and Sir Edward Jones. Phila- 
delphia, 1889, gold and silver medal. New York. 

185 — Portrait of the Artist 

Lathrop, W. L., bom at Warren, Illinois. New Tork. 

186 — A Gray Day. 

187 — Landscape. 

Lee, Homer, bom at New Tork. New Tork. 

188— The Building of a Sky- Scraper. 



56 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Lee-Bobbins, Lucy, bom at New York. 

Pupil of Carolus Duran and Henner. Paris, 1887, honorable men- 
tion. Paris and New York. 

189 — A Study in Blue. 

Lewis, Artbnr, bom at Mobile, Alabama. 

Pupil of George Bridgman and G6r6me. Paris and Mobile, Ala- 
bama. 

190 — Portrait of Michel Robinson. 

Locke, Caroline T., New York. 

191 — Purple Rhododendrons. 

Lookwood, Wilton, bom at Boston, Massaclmsetts. Boston, 

Massachusetts. 

192 — The Violinist. 

Low, Will E., bom at Albany, New York. 

Pupil of G6r6me and Carolus Duran. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, medal ; 
Chicago, 1893, medal. Bronxville, New York. 

193 — At the Spring. 

HaoCarter, Henry, bom at Horristown, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of National Academy, New York, and Julien Academy, 
Paris. New York. 

194 — The Legends of Mont Saint Michel ; — illustration. 

HaoCbesney, Clara, bom at San Francisco, California. 

Pupil of William Mowbray, Coutois and Girardot. Chicago, 1893, 

two medals. New York. 

19s — Pomegranates ; — aquarelle. 

196 — The Old Blind Fiddler ; — aquarelle. 

HaoEwen, Walter, bom at Chicago. 

Pupil of Cormon, Tony Robert Fleury. Paris. 1886, honorable 
mention ; 1889, Exp'n, silver medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. Che- 
valier of the Legion of Honor. Paris and Chicago. 

197 — Portrait. 

198 — Sunday in Holland. 

199 — Pieter Van Wint. 

Macllhenny, C. H., New York. 

200 — November. 

MacEnbin, Florence, bom at Florence, Italy. 

Pupil of Louis Deschamps, Julius Rohlshoven and Prof. Herter- 
rich. Baltimore, Maryland. 

201 — Portrait of Mrs. Rockwood Hoar ; — miniature. 



1 



GROUP II.^CLASS 7. 57 

HaoMonnies, "Mis. Mary F., bom at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Pupil of Jules Lefebvre, W. A. Bouguereau and Carolus Duran. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. Paris, France, and New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

202 — Lilies and Roses. 

Kanh^ F. D., bom at Chicago. 

Pupil of La Farge and Beckwith. Paris and Chicago. 

203 — Portrait. 

Martin, Homer, bom at Albany, New York. 

Pupil of William Hart, deceased. 

204 — Newport Neck. 

205 — The Adirondacks. 

206 — Westchester Hills. 

Manrer, A. H., bom at New York. 

Pupil of Edgar M. Ward. Paris and New York. 

207 — Portrait 

Maynardi Oeorge Willongbby, bom at Washington, D. C. 

Pupil of Academy of Fine Arts, Belgium. Chicago, 1893, medal. 
New York. 

208 — In Strange Seas. 

209 — Sport. 

Maynard, Ony, Paris and New York. 

210 — Portrait. 

Meakin, L. H., bom in England. 

Pupil of Prof. Raupp, Cysis and Loeffts. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

211 — Eden Park Reservoir. 

Melcbers, (}ari, bom at Detroit, Michigan. 

Pupil of Lefebvre and Boulanger. Chevalier of the Legion of 
Honor. Paris, 1886. honorable mention ; 1888, medal, third class ; 
1889, grand pnx. Paris and Detroit, Michigan. 

212 — The Fencing Master. 

213 — Portrait. 

214 — The Sisters. 

Metcalf , Willard L., New York. 

215 — Summer Twilight. 

Millet, Francis D., bom at Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. 

Pupil of Van Lerins, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. 
Paris, 1889, Exp'n, second class medal ; Chicago, 1892, medal. 
Broadway, Worcester, England. 

216 — The Expansionist. 

217 — Unconverted. 



58 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Uinori Bobert C, bom at New York. 

Pupil of Van Luppen, Diez and Boulanger. New York. 

218 — Moonlight. 

Hoelleri LoniSi bom at New York. 

Pupil of Prof Dietz and Duveneck. New York. 

219 — Bluffing. 

Muhrman, Henry E., London, England, and New York. 

220 — Trees and Pond. 

221 — Broad Stairs. 

Murphy, J. Francis, bom at Oswego, New York. Cbicago, 

1893, medal. New York. 

222 — Landscape. 

223 — Under Gray Skies ; — aquarelle. 

Needbam, Charles Austin, bom at Buffalo, New York. 

Pupil of Augustus Will and Art Students' League of New York. 
New York. 

224 — Park Snows. 

225 — A River Bank ; — aquarelle. 



Nelson, H., Paris and New York. 

226 — Portrait of a Little Boy ; — miniature. 

Nettleton, Walter, New York. 

227 — Early Snowfall. 

Newman, B. L., bom at Bichmond, Virginia. 

Pupil of Thomas Conture. 

228 — Christ Stilling the Tempest. 

Newman, Mrs. W. B., bom in Tennessee. 

Pupil of F. S. Noble, Benjamin Constant and Jean Paul Laurens. 
Paris. 

229 — Reverie (moonlight eflFect). 

Nicholls, Bhoda Holmes, bom at Coventry, England. 

Pupil of Bloomsbury School of Art of London. Chicago, 1893, 
medal. New York. 

230 — Search the Scriptures ; — aquarelle. 

Norton, William E., London, England, and Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

231 — Normandy Fish Weir. 

Nourse, Elizabeth, bom at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pupil of Boulanger, Lefebvre, Carolus Duran and Henner. Chi- 
cago, 1893, medal. Paris. 

232 — In the Church at Volendam, Holland. 



. GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 59 

Oclitman, Leonardi bom at Boniiemaire, Holland. Chicago^ 

1893, medal. Mianus, Connecticut. 

233 — Winter Morning. 

234 — Autumn Twilight. 

Palmer, Walter L., bom at Albany, New York. 

Pupil of F. £. Church, Carolus Duran. Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Albany, New York. 

23s — The Senator's Birthplace. 

236 — San Marco, Venice. 

Pape, Eric, New York. 

237 — Midnight in a Two-Cent Lodging House ; — illustration. 

Parrisli, Clara W., bom at Selma, Alabama. 

Pupil of Art Students' League, New York. New York. 

238 — Portrait ; — pastel. 

Farrisb, Maxfield, Windsor, Vermont. 

239 — The Sandman. 

Pearce, Cbarles Spragne, bom at Boston, Hassaobnsetts. 

Pupil of Leon Bonnat. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Paris, 
1881, honorable mention; 1883, gold medal, third class; hors con- 
cours, salon. Auvcrs-sur-Oise, France. 
240— The Shawl. 

Fennell, Joseph, bom at PbiladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Awards at Paris, 
Philadelphia and London. London, England, and Philadelphia. 

241 — Cathedrals of France ; — drawing. 

Perrine, Van Bearing, bom in Kansas. 

Pupil of Cooper Union, New York, National Academy of De- 
sign, William M. Chase. New York. 

242 — The Flower Market in Winter. 

Picknell, W. L., bom at Boston, Massachusetts. 

Pupil of G^rome, George Inness. Chicago, 1893, medal; Paris, 
i^5> gold medal. Deceased. 

243 — Morning on the Loing. 

Piatt, Charles A., bom at New York. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lefebvre. New York. 

244 — Winter. 

245 — Qouds. 

Poore, E. B., bom at Newark, New Jersey. 

Pupil of Peter Moran, Pennsylvania Academy o? Fine Arts, Na- 
tional Academy, New York, Loumeneis and Bouguereau. Orange, 
New Jersey. 

246 — The Wounded Hound. 



60 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Porter^ Benjamin C.^ bom at Melrose, Massacliusetts. New 

York. 

247 — Portrait of Mrs. P. 

248 — Portrait of Master P. 

Proctor, P. A. 

Pupil of Pucch and Anglebert. Paris and New York. 

249 — A Puma. 

Pyle, Howard, Wilmington, Delaware. 

250 — The Buccaneers' Christmas; — illustration. 

Banger, Henry W., New York. 

251 — Becky Cole's Hill. 

252 — Brooklyn Bridge. 

Bedfleld, Edward W., bom at Bridgeville, Delaware. 

Pupil of Bouguereau and Fleury. Paris and Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

253 — The Bridge, Joinville. 

254 — Road to Edge of Hill. 

Bebn, P. K H., bom at PbiladelpUa, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. New York. 

255 — A Northwester in Gloucester Harbor. 

Beid, Bebert, bom at Stookbridge, Massachusetts. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lefebvre. Chicago, 1893, medal. New 
York. 

256 — Azalea. 

257 — Decorative painting in the hemicycle of the porch of the 
United States Pavilion. 

Beinhart, C. S., bom at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Paris, 1889, Exp'n, gold and silver medal; Chicago, 1893, two 
medals. Deceased. 

258 — High Tide at Gettysburg ; — illustration. 

Beynolds, Mrs. Virginia, bom at Chicago. 

Pupil of Prof. Herterrich and Carl Marr, Lazar School. Chicago. 

259 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

260 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

261 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

Bichards, P. T., bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins, Edmund B. Bensell and Art Students' 
League, New York. New York. 

262 — Doctor's Mistakes ; — illustration. 

Bobinson, Theodore, bom at Irasburg, Vermont. 

Pupil of Carolus Duran and Gerome. Deceased. 

263 — In the Sun. 



^ 



GROUP II.— CLAjSS 7. 61 

264 — The Canal. 

265 — A Sardine Booth ; — illustration. 

Bobinson, Will S., Kew York. 

266 — Early Evening. 

Bogen, W. A., New York. 

267 — Faro at El Paso ; — illustration. 

Bolslioven, Jtdiiu, St. Louis, Missouri. 

268 — Great-Grandmother's Finery. 

269 — Portrait. 

Sargenty Jobji S., born at Florence, Italy. 

Paris, 1881, hors concours ; 1889, medal. Chevalier oi the Legion 
of Honor. London, England, and Boston, Massachusetts. 

270 — Portrait of Miss Thomas. 

271 — Portrait of Mrs. Wertheimer. 

272 — Portrait of Mrs. Meyer. 

Saxon, John 0., New York. 

273 — Sunset in the Dunes. 

Scbofleld, J. Elmer, Ogontz, Pennsylvania. 

274 — January Evening. 

Scbreyrogel, Charles, New York. 

275 — My Bunkie. 

Scott, Mrs. E. H., bom at Spring Water, New York. 

Pupil of National Academy of Design and Art Students' League, 
New York. New York. 

276 — Yellow Roses ; — aquarelle. 

Sears, Mrs. Sarah C, bom at Cambridge, Hassachnsetts. 

Pupil of Cowles Art School and Museum of Fine Arts. Chicago, 
1893, medal. Boston, Massachusetts. 

277 — Portrait of Lady in White ; — pastel. 

278 — Romola. 

Sharp, J. E., bom at Bridgeport, Ohio. 

Pupil of Chas. Verlat, Carl Marr, Jean Paul Laurens and Benja- 
min Constant. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

279 — Head of Cheyenne. 

280 — Head of an American Indian ; — illustration. 

Sherwood, Bosina Enunet, bom at New York. 

Pupil of Wm. M. Chase. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, silver medal ; Chi- 
cago, 1893, medal. New York. 

281 — Portrait Study ; — aquarelle. 

282 — Portraits of Children ; — illustration. 



62 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Smedleji William S., born in FennBylvania. Bronxville, ITew 

York. 

283 — Challenged ; — illustradon. 

284 — The Stem Parent ; — illustration. 
28s — In a gallery ; — illustration. 

286 — Old People in a Park; — illustration. 

Snell, Henry B., New York. 

287 — Twilight at Sea ; — aquarelle. 

Spicer-Simson, Margaret, bom at Washington, S. C. 

Pupil of Krauss, Boutet de Monvel and Carriere. Paris and 
Washington, D. C. 

288 — Portrait of Miss Affnes Money ; — miniature. 
289 — Portrait of Miss Money Coutts ; — miniature. 

Steele^ Theodore C, bom in Indiana. 

Pupil of Prof. Bentzur and Loefftz. Indianapolis, Indiana. 
29 — The Bloom of the Grape. 

Stephens, Alice Barber, bom in New Jersey. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academv of Fine Arts and Julien Academy. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

291 — Pierre was mother as well as father ; — illustration. 

Sterner, Albert £., bom at London, England. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lafebvre. Paris, 1891, honorable men- 
tion. Nutley, New Jersey. 

292 — Portrait of a Lady ; — aquarelle. 

293 — Mother and Child ; — aquarelle. 

294 — Little Nell and Schoolmaster ; — illustration. 

295 — The Bride ; — illustration. 

Stewart, Jules, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of G^rome. Paris, 1885, honorable mention; 1890, medal, 
third class. Chevalier of the Lepon of Honor. Chicago, 1893, 
hors concours, Paris. Philadelphia. 

296 — Nymphs of Nysa. 

297 — Laughing Woman. 

Story, Julian, bom at Oxford, England. 

Pupil of Frank Duveneck, Boulanger and Lefebvre. Paris, 1889. 
Exp'n, medal, third class. Paris and Boston, Massachusetts. 

298 — Columbine. 

299 — Portrait 

Straf er, Harriette B., bom at Covington, Kentuoky. 

Pupil Academy of Fine Arts, Cincinnati. Ohio; Mrs MacMon- 
nies, Gustave Dourtois and Colin. New York. 

300 — Portrait of Mrs. S. ; — miniature. 



i 



1 



GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 63 

Taber, E. H., New York. 

301 — Mount Mansfield in Winter. 

Tanner^ H. 0., bom at IPittsbnrgi Pemuylvaiiia. 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins, Laurens, Constant. Paris, 1896, honor- 
able mention ; 1897, third class medal. Paris and Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

302 — Daniel in the Lions* Den. 

Tarbell, Edmund C, bom at West Orotoiii Massachusetts. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lefebvre. Chicago, 1893, medal. Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

303 — The Venetian Blind. 

304 — Across the Room. 
30s — The Bath. 

Taylor^ Mrs. Emily Drayton, PMladelpliia, Fennsylyania. 

306 — Dr. S. Weir Mitchell ; — miniature. 

307 — Mrs. Chas. M. Lea; — miniature. 

Taylor, C. J., Kew York. 

308 — The Chelsea Pensioner ; — illustration. 

Teasdel, Mary, bom at Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Pupil of F. Brush, R. Collin and L. K Garrido. Paris and Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 

309 — Maxime ; — miniature. 

Thayer, Abbott, born at Boston, Massacbusetts. 

Pupil of Wilmarth and Henry D. Morse; Lehman and G^rome. 
Paris, 1889, Exp'n, medal, second class. Dublin, New Hamp- 
shire and Boston. 

310 — Brother and Sister. 

311 — Virgin Enthroned. 

312 — Young Woman. 

Thayer, Theodora W., Boston, Massachusetts. 

313 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

314 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

315 — Portrait ; — miniature. 

Theriat, Charles 7., bom at New York. 

Pupil of Lefebvre and Boulanger. Paris, 1899, Exp'n, honorable 
mention ; 1896, honorable mention. Paris and New York. 

316 — Portrait. 

Thomas, S. Seymour, bom at San Augustine, Texas. 

Pupil of Lefebvre, Constant and Alexander Harrison. Paris, 
1895, honorable mention. Paris and San Augustine, Texas. 

317 — Lady in Brown ; — pastel. 



64 GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 

Vaily Eugene^ bom at Saint Servaiii France. 

Pupil of Caban, Dagnan, Bouveret and Q>llin. Paris, honorable 
mention; 1889, Exp'n, first class Rold medal; Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor. Paris and New York. 

318 — Evening in Brittany. 

319 — Voice of the Sea. 

320 — Morning in October. 

Vedder, Simon E., bom in Montgomery Connty, Hew York. 

Pupil of Bouguereau, T. Robert Fleury, Gerome and Glayse. 
Paris, honorable mention. London, England, and New York. 

321 — Portrait. 

Vintoiii Frederick P., bom at Bangor^ Maine. 

Pupil of Wm. M. Hunt, Dr. Wm. Rimmer, Leon Bonnat and Jean 
Paul Laurens. Paris, 1890, honorable mention; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. Boston, Massachusetts. 

322 — Portrait of Hon. A. W. Beard. 

Vonnolii Bobert W., bom at Hartford, Connecticnt. 

Pupil of Boulanger and Lcfebvre. Paris, honorable mention ; 1889, 
Exp'n, medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. Rockland Lake, New York. 

323 — Portrait of Miss Mildred Blair. 

324 — Little Louise. 

Walden, Lionel, bom at Horwich, Connecticnt. 

Pupil of Carolus Duran. Paris, honorable mention. Norwich, 
Connecticut. 

325 — Fishing in the Bay. 

Walker, Horatio. 

Paris, 1889, third class medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

326 — Spring Plowing. 

Wall, A. Bryan, bom at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of A. Wall. Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

327 — Sheep. 

Waters, Sadie, Paris and New York. 

328 — The Virgin with Lilies ; — miniature. 

Weeks, E. Lord, bom at Boston, Massaclinsetts. 

Chevalier of the Legion of Honor ; Paris, 1889, Exp'n, first class 
medal. Paris and Boston, Massachusetts. 

329 — Indian Barber. 

330 — The Awakening of Noureddin. 

Weidner, Carl A., bom at Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Pupil of National Academy of Design and Art Students' League, 

New York. Paul Nanen. New York. 

332 — Portrait of Victor Weidner ; — miniature. 



1 



GROUP II.— CLASS 7. 65 

Weir, 7. Alden^ bom at West Point, Hew York. 

Pupil of Gerome. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, silver medal. New York. 

333 — The Ice Cutters. 

334 — Portrait of a Young Girl in Gray. 

335 — Noonday Rest. 

Weir, Jolm F., Hew Haven, Conneoticnt. 

336 — Roses. 

Weyden, Harry Van der, bom at Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Pupil of Legros, Fred Brown and Jean Paul Laurens. Paris, 
1891, third class medal. Montreuil-sur-Mer, France, and Boston. 

337 — Calm. 
338— The Hillside. 

Whistler, T. MaoHeil, Paris and Hew York. 

339 — Portrait ; — gray and gold. 

340 — Portrait ; — pearl and silver. 

Whittemore, William 7., bom at Hew York. 

Pupil Art Students' League, New York; National Academy, 
Benjamin Constant and Lefebvre. Paris, 1899, Exp'n, silver 
medal. New York. 

341 — Portrait in Green ; — miniature. 



Wiles, Irving B., bom at ITtica, Hew York. 

Pupil of his father, Lefebvre and Carolus Duran. Paris, 1889, 
Exp'n, honorable mention.' New York. 

342 — Portraits. 

Woodbnry, Charles H., bom at Lynn, Massaohnsetts. 

Pupil of Bouianger and Lefebvre. Boston, Massachusetts. 

343 — The Green Mill. 
344 — A Rock in the Sea. 

Woodbnry, Maroia 0., bom at Lynn, Massaehnsetts. 

Pupil of Julien Academy, Paris. Boston, Massachusetts. 

345 — Mother and Daughter ; — aquarelle. 

346 — The Smoker; — aquarelle. 

Wnerpel, Edmnnd H., bom at St. Lpnis, Uissonri. 

Pupil of W. A. Bouguereau, Gabriel Ferrier, Edmund Aman- 
Jean. St. Louis, Missouri. 

347 — Dreaming Waters. 

Wyant, A. E., bom in Ohio. 

Pupil of Hans Gude. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, honorable mention. 
Deceased. 

348 — Sunlit Vale. 

349 — In the Adirondacks. 



66 GROUP II.— CLASS a 

Yolm, F. C, New York. 

350 — Lord Chief Justice ; illustration. 

Zogbaum, BnfnB F., Hew Bochelle, Hew York. 

351 — Hawkins at San Juan ; illustration. 

352 — Cutting the Cable Off Cienfuegos ; illustration. 



CLASS 8. 

ENGRAVINGS AND LITHOGRAPHS. 



AikmaiLi Walter H., bom at Hew York. 

Pupil of Frank French, J. G. Smithwick. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, 
medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. Brooklyn, New York. 

1 — Landscape. 

2 — Jade Screen. 

Aitken, Peter, bom at Dnndas, Canada. 

Pupil of Timothy Cole. Chicago, 1893, medal. Brooklyn, New 
York. 

3 — Little Princess. 

4 — Portrait after Gilbert Stuart. 

5 — Madonna and Child. 

Blaneyi Henry B., bom at Dedham, Hassachnfletts. Ipswicb, 

Massachusetts. 

6 — Chinese Bronze. 

7 — Aquatint. ( Still Life. ) 

Bemstrom, Victor, bom at Stockbolnii Sweden. Cbici^, 

1893, medal. New York. 

8 — Shepherdess. 

9 — River Scene. 

10 — Inspiration. 

Chadwick, Clias. Wesley, bom at Bed Hook, on tbe Hndson. 

Pupil of Frank French, Frederick Juengling, William Miller. 
Brooklyn, New York. 

11 — Napoleon, Lieutenant at Valence, Realier-Dumas. 

12 — Arch of Steel, Jean Paul Laurens. 

13 — La Rade de Toulon, Gaston Roullet. 

14 — Death of Braddock, Howard Pyle. 

15 — Riff Moor, Francis Day. 



GROUP II.— CLASSES. 67 

Cole, Timothyi bom in London, England. 

Pupil of Bond, Chandler. Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 
16 — Duke of Wellington, Sir Thos. Lawrence. 
17 — Interior of Stable, Geo. Moreland. 

18 — Mrs. Siddons, Sir Thos. Lawrence. 

19 — Lady Derby, Sir Thos. Lawrence. 

20 — William Pitt, John Hopper. 

21 — Mrs. Siddons, Sir Thos. Gainsborough. 

22 — The Parson's Daughter, Geo. Romney. 

23 — Cicero's Villa, Richard Wilson. 

24 — Lord Newton, Sir Henry Raeburn. 

25 — William Hogarth, William Hogarth. 

Comitook, Kn. Anna B., bom at Otto, Hew York. 

Pupil of John P. Davis. Ithaca, New York. 

26 — Plate of Moths. 

27 — Plate of Butterflies. 

28 — Plate of Moths. 

29 — Plate of Butterflies. 

30 — Dandelions. 

31 — Tiger and Butterfly. 

32 — Cherry Blossoms. 

Davidson, Harry, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Frederick Faust. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, honorable mention. 
New York. 

33 — Illustration for Serial Story, after L. Loeb. 

34 — Illustration for Serial Story, after L. Loeb. 

35 — Afternoon at a Ranch, after Mary Hal lock Footc. 

36 — Exercises at Wellesley College, after Metcalf. 

37 — The Golden Gate, Chicago, after Castaigne. 

38 — Canterbury Cathedral, after Jos. Pennell. 

DaviSy Samnel P., bom at Schenectady, Hew York. 

Pupil of A. V. S. Anthony, John P. Davis. Chicago, 1893, medal. 
New York. 

39 — After Dinner Nap, after Delph. 

40 — Cat, Kittens and Parrot, after Ronner. 

41 — Cat, Kittens and Cage, after Ronner. 

42 — Hound, after Bonheur. 

Evans, John W., bom at Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Pupil of P. R. B. Pierson. Brooklyn, New York. 

43 — Avignon, after Castaigne. 

44 — The Artist, after Castaigne. 

45 — The Ford, after Charlier. 

46 — The Charge, after Charlier. 

French, Frank, bom at London, New Hampshire. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

47 — fieggar Girl, Louis Deschamps. 



68 GROUP II.— CLASS 8. 

48 — Rose Leaves, Albert Moore. 

49 — Shower in the Meadow, original. 

50 — The New Year, original. 

51 — Izaak Walton and Sie Milkmaid, after Boughton. 

Heinemann, E., bom at Bmnswick, Germany. 

Pupil of A. Closs, Brendeamour, Art Students' League, New 
York. Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island. New York. 

52 — Edouard and Casimir Joseph Mortier. 

53 — A Moment of Peril. 

Hopson, William F., bom at Watertown, Conneoticnt. 

Pupil of Sandford, J D. Feltes and August Wile. New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

54 — Ex Libris, Engravings on Copper. 

Johnson, Thomas, bom at London, England. 

Pupil of F. Williams. Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

55 — Portrait of Washington, after Gilbert Stuart 

56 — Marshal Soult. 

57 — Gen. Marmont. 

58 — Sir Thomas Sloan. 

59 — Chas. Palthazar, after Val. 

60 — Gen. Joe Wheeler. 

61 — Cromwell. 

62 — Tennyson. 

• 

Jones, Alfred, bom at Idveipool, England. 

Pupil of National Academy of Design, New York. Yonkcrs, 
New York. 

63 — Portrait of Geo. Washington. 

King, F. S., bom in Maine. 

Pupil of John Orr. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, medal; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. Roseville, New Jersey. 

64 — Paul Revere. 

65 — Isaiah L. Thomas, Esq. 

(^ — Book Plate of the Printer's Devil. 

67 — The Golden Galleon. 

Eingsley, Elbridge, bom at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pupil of Cooper Union, New York. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, gold 
medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. Hadley, Massachusetts. 

68 — Autumn Evening, after D. W. Tryon. 

69 — Old Homestead, after J. Francis Murphy. 

70 — Spring-time, after D. W. Tryon. 

71 — Tragedy of Spring, ori^nal. 

72 — New England Elms, original. 



^ 



GROUP II.— CLASS a 69 

Kraell, OnstaY^ bom at Dnesseldoif. 

Pupil of R. Brendamour. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, honorable mention ; 
Chicago, 1893, medal. East Orange, New Jersey. 

73 — Abraham Lincoln. 

74 — Gen. William T. Sherman. 

75 — Gen. Robert E. Lee. 

IClleri William^ bom at Hew York. 

Pupil of Frank Leslie's Publishing House. Chicago, 1893, medal. 
New York. 

76 — Portrait of an Unknown Man. 

77 — Confectioner. 

78 — Moonlight 

79 — Maine Coast. 

HorthootOi Stafford M., bom at Brooklyn, New York. 

Pupil of E. Heinemann, Prof. Boyl. New York. 

80 — Japanese Romance. 

Feimelly Joseph^ bom at Philadelphia, Feimsylvania. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Awards at Paris, 
Philadelphia, and Chicago. London, England, and Philadelphia. 

81 — The Devil of Notre Dame. 

82 — The Most Picturesque Place in the World. 

83 — Aquatints of London. 

Fowel^ Kiis Caroline A., bom at Dublin, Ireland. 

Pupil of J. W. Linton and Timothy Cole. Chicago, 1893, medal. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

84 — Gorilla and Circassian Girl. 

85 — Holy Night. 

86 — Windmill. 

87 — In the Sun. 

Pntnam, S. 0., bom at Hashna. 

Pupil of H. W. Herrick, Frank French and E. J. Whitney, Brook- 
lyn Art Association and Art Students* League. Paris, 1889, 
Exp'n, bronze medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. Oredell, New 
Jersey. 

88 — A Street Musician. 

89 — Princess Marie of Austria. 

90 — The King's Messenger. 

91 — Mirabeau and the King's Messenger. 

Sohladits, E., bom at Leipzig, Germany. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. New York. 

92 — Geo. Washington. 

93 — Queen Louise. 



70 GROUP II.— CLASS 9. 

Sohwartzbnrgeri C, bom at Leipzig, Oermany. Brooklyn, 

New York. 

94 — Arrival of High Chinese Authorities, after drawing. 

95 — An Arrest in the Village, after painting. 

96 — The Chew Mansion, after H. Penn. 

State, Charles, bom at Montreal, Canada. 

Pupil of John H. Walker. New York. 

97 — Dumond's "Holy Family." 

98 — Preparing for the Final Dance, Castaigne. 

99 — Oflfice of the Hebrew United Charities. 

100 — Tyrolean Village, after Louis Loeb. 

Tinkey, Jobn, bom at Hew York. 

Pupil of J. D. Felter. Chicago, 1893, medal. New York, 
loi — A 3wineherd of the Danube. 

Wellington, Frank E., Passaic, New Jersey. 

102 — The Sea Fight, after Howard Pyle. 

103 — Holland Landscape, after W. H. Ranger. 

Wolf, Henry, bom in Alsace. 

Pupil of Jacques Levy. Paris, 1888 and 1889, Exp'n, honorable 
mention ; Chicago, 1893, medal ; Paris, 1895, honorable men- 
tion. New York. 

104 — Miss Beatrice Goelet, after Sargent. 

105 — Cynthia, after Cecilia Beaux. 

106 — Reverie, after Cecilia Beaux. 

107 — La Bernoise, after Dagnan-Bouveret. 

108 — Le Crepuscule, after Alexander Harrison. 

109 — The Evening Star, original. 

1 10 — Un Canal en Artois, after J. C. Cazin. 

111 — Through the Looking Glass, after J. A. Weir. 



CLASS 9. 

SCULPTURE AND ENGRAVING UPON MEDALS AND 

GEMS. 



Barnard, George Orey, Hew York. 

1 — God Pan. 

2 — Hewer. 

3 — The Two Natures. 



GROUP II.— CLASS 9. 71 

Barnhom, Clement J. 

Pupil of Mercie, Peuch, Bouguereau, Ferrier, Academic Julien. 
Paris, 1895, honorable mention. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

4 — A ^fagdalen. 

BarUett, Paul W., bom at Hew Haven, Connecticnt. 

Pupil of Fremiet. St. Leu, S-et-0, France and New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

5 — Statue of Michel Angelo. 

Beveridgei Miss Eneliney London, England, and Lonisville, 

Kentucky. 

6 — Veiled Venus. 

7 — Wm. A. Chandler. 

Bitter, Karl, Weehawken, Hew Jersey. 

8 — Dancing Children, fountain; bronze. 

9 — Boy Stealing Geese, fountain ; bronze. 

Bo^liun, Solon H., bom at Ogden, Utah. 

Pupil of Louis Rebisson and Fremiet. Paris, 1889, honorable 
mention. Paris and Cincinnati, Ohio. 

10 — Lame Horse. 

11 — Horse with Colt in Wind. 

12 — Horse and Indian. 



Brenner, Viotor David, bom at Sbavley, Bnssia. 

Pupil of Louis Oscar Roty. Paris 
13 — Panel with Three Medallions. 



Brooks, Carol HacHiel, bom at Chicago. Paris. 

42 — Fiasco Holder, bronze. 

43 — Samovar, bronze. 

44 — Giotto Giovane, bronze. 

Brooks, Bichard E., bom at Braintree, Massachnsetts. 

Pupil of T. H. Bartlett and Inj albert. Paris, 1895, honorable 
mention^ 1899, gold medal, 3d class. Paris and Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

14 — Statue of Col. Cass. 

15 — O. W. Holmes. 

16 — Song of the Wave. 

Calder, Alexander Sterling, bom at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Chapu 
and Falguieres. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

17 — Narcissus. 

Ballin, Cyms E., Boston, Hassachnsetts, 

x8 — Medicine Man, 



72 GROUP II.— CLASS 9. 

Flanagan, Jolin, bom at Newark, New Jersey. 

Pupil of Ellen Kitson, Joseph Smith, Henri Chapu, Falguieres. 
Paris and Newark, New Jersey. 

19 — Swift Runners. 

20 — Ten or Eleven Medallions in Metal on Board. 

21 — Eagle for Top of Dome of United States Pavilion. 

22 — Decorative Motive Crowning Angles of United States 
Pavilion. 

23 — Head of Athlete. 



French, Daniel C, bom at Exeter, New Eampsliire. 

Pupil of Thomas Ball. Paris, 1892, gold medal. New York. 
24 — Equestrian Statue of Geo. Washington. 

Oelert, JohanneB Sophus, born in Schleswig, Oermany. 

Pupil of Royal Academy of Fine Arts. New York. 
2$ — The Little Architect, marble. 

Orafly, Cliarles, bom at Fliiladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pupil of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Chapu, Dampt. 
Paris, 1891, honorable mention; 1893, medal. Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

26 — The Symbol of Life. 

27 — From Generation to Generation. 

28 — Portrait of Mrs. Chas. Grafly. 

29 — Portrait of My Mother. 

30 — Vulture of War. 

Harvey, Eli, bom at Ogden, Ohio. 

Pupil of Lentz, Noble, Rebisso, Constant, Lefebvre, Doucet, 
Deiance, Chaillou, Fremiet. Paris and Cincinnati, Ohio. 

31 — Lion Cubs. 



Herring, Hiss Mabel C, bom at Boothlay, 

Pupil of Merson, Collin, St. Gaudens, and MacMonnies. Paris 
and Boothlay, Maine. 

32 — Echo. 

Eitson, Henry Hudson, bom at Hnddersfleld, England. 

Pupil of Bonnassieux. Paris, 1889, Exp'n, meda]; Chicago, 
1893, medal. Boston, Massachusetts. 

33 — Queen Elizabeth of Roumania, Carmen Sylva, marble. 

Lncas, Albert P., Paris. 

34 — Sambo. 1 

MacHonnies, Frederick, bom at Brooklyn, New York. 

Pupil of Augustus St. Gaudens, Falguicres. Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor. Paris, 1889, honorable mention; 1891, 2d 
class medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. Paris, New York. 

35 — Bacchante. 

36 — Sir Henry Van^. 



GROUP II.— CLASS 9. 73 

37 — Shakespeare. 

38 — Two Groups Horses. 

39 — Group Navy. 

40 — Group Army. 

41 — Venus and Adonis. 

MacHeili E. A., bom at Chelsea, Hassachusetts. 

Pupil of Henri Chapu, Falguieres. Chicago, 1893, medal. Paris, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

45 — The Sun Vow. 

46 — Last Act of the Moqui Snake Dance. 

47 — Spandrels on Portico of the United States Building. 

Mnrrayy Samnely bom at Philadelphia, Fennsylvaiua. 

Pupil of Thomas Eakins. Paris, 1894, gold medal. Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 

48 — Portrait of Benjamin Eakins, Esq. 

« 

Peddle, Caroline C, bom at Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Pupil of Augustus St. Gaudens, Kenyon Cox. Paris and Terre 
Haute, Indiana. 

49 — Bronze Qock. 

Proctor, A. Phimister, Paris and Hew York. 

50 — Quadriga for United States Pavilion. 

51 — Indian Warrior. • 

52 — The Challenge Elk. 

53 — Standing Puma. 

54 — Standing Puma, pendant. 

55 — Panther, "Fate." 

56 — Young Fawn. 
57— -Panther. 

Bondebnst, T. H., Hew Tork. 

59 — The Wrestlers. 

St. OandenSy Angnstns, Paris and Hew Tork. 

60 — Equestrian Statue of Gen. Sherman with Victory. 

61 — High Relief — The Shaw Memorial. 

62 — Angel with the Tablet. 

63 — The Puritan. 

64 — Frame with Medallion ; — portraits. 

Senddery Janet, Paris and Hew Tork. 

65 — Decorative Panel for Music Room. 

SimonSy Amory C, bom at Charleston, South Carolina. . 

Pupil of Dampt, Peuch. Paris and Charleston, South Carolina. 

66 — Surprise. 

Tilden, Douglas, Oakland, California. 

67 — Football Ptayers. 



74 GROUP II.— CLASS 10. 



Vonnoliy Kn. Besue Fotteri bom at St. LoniSy KiMOiirL 

Pupil of Art Institute, Chicago. Rockland Lake, New York. 

68 — A Young Mother. 

69 — Girl Dancing. 

Yandell, Enid, bom at Louisville, Eentncky. 

Pupil of Philip Martiney, MacMonnies and Rodin. Paris and 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

70 — Mermaid and Fisher Boy. 



CLASS 10. 

ARCHITECTURE. 



Almirall. See Ingle. 

Andrews, Jaqnes & Bantonl, Boston, Massachusetts. 

1 — House at Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Babb, Cook & WiUard, New York. 

2 — Building for the Devinne Press. 

Benson. See Tlagg. 
Berg, Charles I., New York. 

3 — Gillender Building. 

Boring and Tilton, New York. 

4 — Bureau of Immigration at Ellis Island. 

Brite & Bacon, New Haven, Connecticnt. 

5 — Qub House, New Haven, Connecticut. 

Brockway. See Flagg. 
Bnrnham, D. E., Chicago, Illinois. 

6 — Masonic Temple, Chicago. 
Theatre and Office Building. 
Illinois Trust Company, Chicago. 

Carrere & Hastings, New York. 

7 — Hotel Ponce de Leon, St. Augustine, Florida. 
New York Public Library. 

Benedict House. 

Residence of Henry T. Sloane. 



^ 



GROUP II.— CLASS 10. 75 

Clan. See Terry. 

Coolidge and OonBtiauz^ Cliici^. 

8 — United States Pavilion, Paris Exposition. 

Cope ft Stewardsoiiy FhiladelpMa, FeniiBylTania. 

9 — House of Mr. John Sims, Laverock, Pennsylvania. 
School for the Blind, Overbrook, Pennsylvania. 

Dormitories of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 

Craniy (Goodhue ft Fertnisony Boston, Hassaclinsetts. 

ID — Church at Ashmont, Massachusetts. 

Day, Frank Kiles, ft Brothers, Fhiladelphia, Fennsylvania. 

11 — The Crozer Building, Philadelphia. 
House of C. W. Bergner, Ambler, Pennsylvania. 
House on Locust St.. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Eyre, Wilson, Jr., Fhiladelphia, Fennsylvania. 

12 — House of Craig Heberton, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. 
House of Charles L. Boree, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. 
Cottage, Lehman St., Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

A Broker's Office, Philadelphia. 

Ferry ft Class, Hilwankee, Wisconsin. 

13 — Milwaukee Public Library. 

Flagg, Benson ft Brockway, Hew Tork. 

14 — Singer Building, New York. 
Scribner Building, New York. 

Hardenbe^, H. J., Hew York. 

15 — Hotel Waldorf-Astoria, New York. 

Hewlet. See Lord. 

Heyden ft Shepard, Hew Tork. 

16 and 17 — Church at Scarborough. 

V 

Enll. See Lord. 
Hnnt, B. H., Hew York. 

18 — Schieffelin Building. 
Country House of John Jacob Astor. 

Biltmore, Country Residence of George Vanderbilt. 

Ingle and Almirall, Binghamton, Hew York. 

19 — Town Hall, Binghamton. 

Jaqnes. See Andrews. 



i 



76 GROUP II.— CLASS 10. 

Kimball. See Walker. 

Kimball ft ThompBon, Hew York. 

20 — Manhattan Life Building, New York. 

Lord, Hewlett ft Hull, Hew York. 

21 — Cedarhurst, House at. 



, Head ft White, Hew York. 

. 22 — University Club, New York. 
Boston Public Library. 
Columbia College Library, New York City. 

Horris. See Walker. 

Feabody ft Steams, Boston, MassacImsettB. 

23 — Wheatleigh, Lenox, Massachusetts. 

Post, Oeo^e B., Hew York. 

24 — Union Trust Bank, New York. 

Price, Bruce, Hew York. 

25 — American Surety Building, New York. 

BantoU. See Andrews. 

Boid Brotbers, San Francisco, California. 

26 — Claus Spreckels Building, San Francisco, California. 

Scbweinfurt, A. C, San Francisco, California. 

27 — Hearst House, California. 

Shepard. See Hayden. 

Shepley, Bntan ft Coolidge, Boston, Massachusetts, and Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

28 — Ames Building, Boston. 
Porch of Trinity Church, Boston. 
House in Dedham, Massachusetts. 

Thompson. See Kimball. 

Vanghan, Henry, Boston, Massachusetts. 

29 — Interior of Chapel of St. Paul's School, Concord, New 
Hampshire. 

Exterior of Church, New Haven, Connecticut. 

Walker ft Kimball, Omaha, Nebraska. 

^o — Omaha Exposition, 



GROUP II.— CLASS 10. • 77 



Walker and Horris, Hew York. 

31 — Bronxvillc, New York. 



& EaYon, Boston, Hassachnietts. 

32 — Bowdoin School, Boston. 

Brighton High School, Brighton, Massachusetts. 



r, Warren, Hew York. 

33 — New York Yacht Qub. 



r 



GROUP III. 



APPLIANCES AND GENERAL PROCESSES RE- 
LATING TO LITERATURE, SCIENCE, 

AND ART. 

ALEXANDER S. CAPEHART. DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 11. 

TYPOGRAPHY— VARIOUS PRINTING PROCESSES. 

EQUIPMENT, PROCESSES, 'aND PRODUCTS. 



Addressograph Company, 173 S. Canal St., CMcago. 

Machines for addressing envelopes, wrappers, etc., and machine 
for making printing plates. 



Idfhog^pliing^ Company, 19th Street and 4th Ave- 
nue, New York. — Art and commercial lithography. 



Postal Machine Company, Boston, Hass. 

Cancelling machines. 

American Society of Hational Advertisers, Chicago. 

Collection of hangers, calendars, etc., of advertisers of the United 
States. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

American Lithomph Company, New York City. — Calendars. 

California Fig Sjrrup Company, San Francisco, Cal. — Litho- 
graph. 

Drummond Tobacco Company, St. Louis, Mo. — Lithograph. 

Dunston G. H. & Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — Lithograph. 

Fairbank N. K. & Companv, Chicago. III. — Calendars and signs. 

Gillim Print Company, New York City.— Theatrical litho- 
graphs. 

Gray Lithograph Company, New York City.— Calendar. 

79 



^ 



80 GROUP III.— CLASS 11. 

Greve Lithograph Company, Milwaukee, Wis. — ^Lithographs. 
Harter Medicine Company, Dayton, Ohio. — Lithograph. 
Hawes Hats, New York City. — Lithographs. 
Hilson Company, The, New York City. — Lithographs. 
Hood C. L & Company, Lowell, Massachusetts. — ^Lithographj. 
Kaufmann & Strauss Company. New York City. — Lithographs. 
Leggett & Myers, St Louis, Mo. — Lithograph. 
Liebig Company, New York City. — ^Advertising cards. 
Liebig Extract of Beef Company, New York City. — ^Lithograph. 
Liebig Extract of Meat Company, New York City. — ^Lithograph. 
Matthews-Northrup Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — Lithograph. 
Michigan Stove Company, Chicago, 111. — Lithograph. 
Niagara Lithograph Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — Lithographs 
and calendars. 

Ottman J. Lithograph Company, New York City.— Lithographs. 
Pond's Extract Company, New York City. — Advertising cards. 
Pope Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Conn. — ^Lithograph. 
Prescott J. L. & Company, New York City.— Lithograph. 
Rogers & Wells, Chicago, 111. — Calendars. 
Sherwood Lithograph Company, Chicago, 111. — Lithograph. 
Street & Smith, New York City.— Lithograph. 
Swift & Company, Chicago, 111. — Lithographs. 
Witter, J. C, New York City.— Lithograph. 

Amenoan 3 Color Company, 161-169 S. Canal St., Chioi^^o. 

Prints produced by three-color process. 

American Type Founders' Company, 26 William St, 

New York City. — ^T3rpe, t3rpe founders' supplies ; modem compos- 
ing, imposing, and commercial printing office. 

American Typewriter Company, 265 Broadway, Hew York. 

American typewriting machines. 

American Writing MacMne Company, 316 Broadway, Hew 

York. — New Century t5rpewriting machine. 

Babcock Printing Press Mannf actnring Company, New Lon- 
don, Connecticut. — Babcock flat bed cylinder printing press. 

Bamkart Brotkers & Spindler, Great Western Type Foundry, 

185 Monroe street, Chicago. — Type, type founders' supplies, mod- 
ern composing, imposing, commercial printing office. 

Barr-Fyke Cancelling Mackine Company, Kansas City, 

Missouri. — Cancelling machine. 

Barrie, Cteoi^, & Son, 1313 Walnnt St., Pkiladelpkia, 

Pennsylvania. — Engravings, etchings and color fac-similes. 

Barry Postal Supply Company, Oswego, New York. 
Cancelling machine. 



1 



GROUP III.— CLASS 11. 81 

Bliekenaderf er Mannf aotnring Company, The, Stamford, 

Connecticut. — Blickensderfer typewriting, electrical writing, and 
cipher code machines. 

Bowen, William H. P., 57 Waterman St., Providenoe, 

Rhode Island. — Carbon holder for manifold Rewriting. 

Brassenr, Charles L. A., 10 E. 15th St., Hew Tork. 

Specimens of color typography. Sampolo-Brasseur process. 

Bureau of Eng^ving and Printing, TT. S. A., Washington, 

D. C. — United States money, bonds, certificates, postal and rev- 
enue stamps. 

Chandler & Prioe Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gordon printing presses, composition rollers, chases, etc. 

Chicago Colortype Company, 1205 Bosooe St., Chid^. 

Three-color process; reproductions from drawings of articles of 
merchandise. 

Chicago Writing Machine Company, 96 Wendell St., 

Chicago. — Tsrpewriting machines; Munson interchangeable steel 
typcwheel. 

Columbia Typewriter Manufacturing Company, The, 

43 W. ii6th St, New York City. — Columbia bar-lode typewriting 
machines. 

Comley, William J., 11 Broadway, Hew Tork City. 

Colored gravure engravings. 

Cottrell, C. B., & Sons Company, 41 Park Bow, Hew Tork. 

High-speed Cottrell four-roller two-revolution printing press. 

Bensmore Typewriter Company, 309 Broadway, Hew Tork. 

Densmore typewriting machines. The five styles of machines 
shown all have the unique ball-bearing type-bars. 

Bet Jardins, B. M., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Adding attachment for typewriting machines. 

Bes Jardins Type Justifier Company, The, Hartford, Connecti- 
cut — ^Automatic machines for justifying type in connection with 
setting and distributing type. 

Bick Company, A. B., 164 Lake St., Chicago. 

The Edison mimeograph. 

Boremus Cancelling Machine Company, St. James Building, 

Broadway, New York. — Cancelling machine. 



82 GROUP III.— CLASS 11. 

Dow Composing Maohine Company, The, Park Bow Bnild- 

ing. New York. — Machines for setting, justifying, and distribut- 
ing movable type. 

Xhmcaji, J. S., 173 S. Canal St., Chioago. 

Graphotype machine for making metal address plates ; rubber type 
made from metal molds. 

Dnrant, W. H., 237 22nd St., Milwankee, Wisconsin. 

G)unting machines for use on printing presses; line casting and 
other machines. 

Frank Leslie FnblisMng Honse, 143 Fifth Ave., Hew York. 

Orig[inal art sketches in water color, wash drawing, pen and ink 
speamens. 

Franklin Typewriter Company, 320 Broadway, Hew York 

City. — Franklin typewriting machines. 

Oerry & Marry, 31 Broad St., Hew Tork. 

Reproductions of type-written and autogfraph letters. 

Golding & Company, Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Printers' rule, lead cutter, and composing sticks. 

Goodson Graphotype Company, 21 Park Bow, Hew York. 

An automatic machine for casting and setting individual type in 
justified lines on galley. 

Ooss Printing Press Company, The, 16th St. and Ashland Av., 

Chicago. — Goss straightline mtdtiple newspaper perfecting printing 
press. 

Hamilton Hannf aotnring Con^any, Two Bivers, Wis- 
consin. — ^Wood tjrpe, ornaments; printing house furniture and 
supplies. 

Hammond Typewriter Company, The, 537-551 E. 69th St., 

New York City. — Hammond typewriting machines. 

Harris Antomatio Press Company, Kiles, Ohio. 

Rapid automatic job printing presses. 

Heinicke Fiegel Lithographing Company, First and Chestnut 

Streets, St. Louis, Missouri. — Specimens of commercial litho- 
graphy. 

Hempel & Dingens, Buffalo, New York. 

Printers' mechanical quoins. 

Imperial Mannfactnring Company, Elkhart, Indiana. 

Cardboard stencil cutting machine. 



GROUP III.— CLASS IL 83 

Inland Printer Company^ The^ 214 Monroe St., CMoago. 

Specimens of printing from The Inland Printer. 

Jewett Typewriter Company^ Des Moines, Iowa. ' 

Duplex and Jewett typewriting machines. 

Lambert Typewriter Company, The, 83 WasMi^^n St., 

Brooklyn, New York. — Lambert typewriting machines. 

Lanston Monotype MacMne Company, Washington, D. C. 

Key-board to manual process, and automatic tsrpe casting and 
composing machines. 

TAthawi Machinery Company, 197 S. Canal Street, Chioi^^. 

"Monitor" perforating machine for printing-house work. 

Levy, Lonis Edward, 824 H. 8th St., Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Acid blast method of chemical engraving, and machinery 
for its application. 

Levy, Max, 1213 Bace St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Screens for half-tone process, and proofs from engravings. 

MoKinley, William, Souvenir Committee, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Historical water color pictures. 

Mergenthaler linotype Company, Hew York. 

Machines for the mechanical composition of t3rpe. 

Meyeroord Company, The, Chamber of Commerce, Chicago. 

Decalcomania transfer ornaments in both vegetable and mineral 
colors. 

Miehle Printing Press ft Mannfactnring Company, 75 

N. Qinton St., Chicago. — Miehle two revolution fiat-bed book 
and color printing press. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Miehle, Robert, Chicago. 

Improvement in bed motion and sheet delivery of printing presses. 

Mitchell, John J., Company, The, 105 Fifth Ave., New Tork. 

Specimens of printing in the production of fashion plates. 

Mittag & Vogler, Park Bidge, New Jersey. 

Typewriter carbon papers, ribbons and oils; pencil and stylus 
carbon papers ; stamping ribbons and metal stamp ink. 

Morjg^an, W. J., & Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lithographs; i. Reproduction of Rosa Bonheur's painting, The 
Horse Fair. 2. Portrait of President McKinley. 
Chicago, 1893, Medal. 



r 



84 GROUP III.— CLASS 11. 

National Association of Fhoto-Eng^yers; 176 Clark Street, 

Chicago. — Messo-tint impression, photo mechanical reproduction 
processes. 

National XacMne Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Gaily Universal Printing Press. 

Neostyle Mannf actnring Company, The, 102 Chnrch St., New 

York. — Various types of Neostyle duplicating machines. 

Oliver Typewriter Company, The, Washington and Dearborn 

Sts., Chicago. — Oliver typewriting machines. 

Osgood Art Colortype Company, Woman's Temple, Chicago. 

New process for color printing. 

Pittsburg Writing Machine Company, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Pittsburg visible writing machines. 

Poole Brothers, Chicago. 

Printers' benzine can. 

Quigley Furniture Company, Whitesboro, New York. 

Adjustable tables for typewriters. 

Bendngton-Sholes Company, 127 Bees Street, Chicago. 

Remington-Sholes typewriting machines. Publication. 

Bicketts, C. Lindsay, First National Bank Building, Chicago. 

Engrossed and illuminated addresses of congratulations, thanks, 
etc., in gold and colors. 

Bouse, Harry B., 1163 N. 70th Ave., Chicago. 

Printers' lead and rule cutters, and printers' adjustable composing 
sticks. 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Company, The, Syracuse, New 

York. — Smith- Premier typewriting machines. Publication. 

Smith, B. H., Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. — Easy sign markers, rubber type and office stamps. 

Tenney, J. F., Company, 70 Madison Street, Chicago. 

Rubber tsrpe in fonts, price and sign markers' outfits. 

Thomson, John, Press Company, 253 Broadway, New York 

City. — Platen printing presses and embossing machines. 

Tiffany & Company, TTnion Square, Hew York. 

Copper and steel plate and intaglio printing; stamping and em- 
bossing from dies. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 12. 85 

TTnderwood, John, & Company, 30 Vesey St., Hew York 

Gty. — Typewriter supplies. 

United States Oovemment Printing Office, WasMngton, D. C. 

Specimens of t3rpography, reports of executive departments, scien- 
tific publications, etc. 

Unitype Company, The, New York City. 

Simplex typesetting machine. 

Yerbeok, Oeoi^ J., Michigan Avenne and Madison Street, 

Chicago. — Bank note engraving. 

Wagner Typewriter Company, 220 Broadway, New York 

Gty. — ^The Underwood t3rpewriting machines. 

Wesel, F., Mannfaotnring Company, New York City. 

Printers' brace galleys. 

Western Bank Note & jingraving Company, Chicago. 

Specimens of steel plate engraving and printing. 

White, James, & Company, 177 Monroe St., Chicago. 

Sample-book of printing and art papers. 

Williams Typewriter Company, Derby, Connecticnt. 

Williams typewriting machines. 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 327 Broadway, New York 

City. — Remington typewriting machines; publication. 

Yesbera Mannfaotnring Company, Toledo, Ohio. 

Adjustable combination tables for exhibition purposes. 

Yost Writing Machine Company, 320 Broadway, New York ; 

50 Holborn Viaduct, London, E. C, England; 36 Boulevard des 
Italiens, Paris, France. — Yost typewriting machines. 



CLASS 12. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 



EQUIPMENT, PROCESSES, AND PRODUCTS. 

American Aristotype Company, Jamestown, New York. 

Photographic prints. 

Baker Art Gallery, 106 S. High Street, Colnmbns, Ohio. 

Genre photographs. 



86 GROUP III.— CLASS 12. 

Bausoh & Lomb Optical Company, Boohester, Hew York. 

Lenses, shutters, and fine photographic instruments ; photographs. 

Bendann, Daniel, 205 N. Carey St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Portraiture-photography. 

BoUes, C. E., 244 Fnlton Stireet, Brooklyn, Hew Tork. 

Yachting and marine photographs. 

Brassenr, Charles L. A., 10 E. 15th St., Hew Tork. 

Polychrome screens, Sampolo-Brasseur color process and appa- 
ratus. 

Brenner, W. N., 14-16 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Portraiture photography. 

Bnrton Photography Company, 9 W. 42nd Street, Hew Tork. 

Yachting photographs. 

Byron, Joseph, 1286 Broadway, Hew Tork City. 

Flash-light photographs of scenes in American theaters. 

Come, W. F., 76 State St., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Framed photograph, Mater Dolorosa. 

Cnrtis & Cameron, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs known as Copley prints. 

Detroit Photographic Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Platinum and silver print photographs, phostint, and monocrom. 

Dodge, Charles Bichards, 30-36 Vermont Avenne, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Artistic photography. 

Eastman Kodak Company, Bochester, Hew Tork. 

Kodaks, photographic apparatus and pictures. 

Gibson Art Galleries, 195 Wabash Avenne, Chicago. 

Portraiture photography. 

Gnerin, F. W., 506 Olive St., St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Portraiture photography. 

Inglis Photo Paper Company, West Pnllman, Chicago. 

Photographic enlargements and photographic papers. 

Lawrence, Geoi^ E., 2701 Indiana Ave., Chid^. 

Photog^raphs by artificial light. 

Lnbin, Siegmnnd, 21 S. 8th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Apparatus and materials for obtaining and reproducing cinegraph 
photography. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13.1 87 

HacDonaldy Fine, 496 Broadway, Albany, Hew York. 

Portraiture photography. 

Hepera Chemical Company, Nepera Park, Hew York. 

Photographic prints made on Nepcra Chemical Company's pro- 
ducts ; demonstration of new velox products. 

Photo-Materials Company, Bochester, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Popular Photograph Company, 114 Bleecker St., Hew York. 

Apparatus for instantaneous photography, known as Nodark. 

Sampolo-Brassenr Company, The, 10 E. 15th St., Hew York. 

The Sampolo-Brasseur process of color photography. 

Sohnmacher, P. G., Los Angeles, California. 

Photographs. 

Shepherd Photo Company, Eendriok Block, St. Panl, Minne- 
sota. — Portraiture and landscape photography. 

Steckel, Cteoi^, Los Angeles, California. 

Studio photography. 

Tabor Photographic Company, San Francisco, California. 

Photographs and carbon prints. 

Wheatley, Elizabeth S., Temple Conrt, Hew York City. 

Photographic designing for illustrative purposes. 

Wheatley, E. A., Temple Conrt, New York. 

Photographic designing for illustrative purposes. 

White Company, The, H. C, North Bennington, Ver- 
mont. — Patented dark chamber stereoscopes and stereoscopic 
views. • 



CLASS 13. 



BOOKS, MUSICAL PUBLICATIONS, BOOKBINDING (EQUIP- 
MENTS AND PRODUCTS), NEWSPAPERS. POSTERS. 






Advance Fnblishing Company, 215 Madison St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Advance. 

American Baptist Fnblishing Society, 1420 Chestnnt Street, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Publications: The Advance Quar- 
terly and various religious publications. 



' 



88 <5ROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Amerioan Drngg^ Fublislimg Company, 68 W. Broadway, 

New York. — Publication: American Druggist & Pharmaceutical 
Record. 

American Electrician Company, 120 Liberty St., New 

York City. — Publication : American Electrician. 

American Florist Company, 324 Dearborn St., Cbici^. 

Publication : The American Florist. 

American Homes Publishing Company, Knozville, Penn- 
sylvania. — Publication: American Homes. 

American Lutheran Publication Board, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 

' vania. — Publications: Lutheran Guide, and Lutheran Witness. 

American Machinist Press, 218 William St., New York 

City. — Publication : American Machinist. 

American Medical Association, 61 Market St., Chicago. 

Publication: Journal American Medical Association. 

American Newspaper Directory, New York. 

Directory of American Newspapers. 

American Peace Society, The, 3 Somerset St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publication: The Advocate of Peace. 

American Seamen's Friend Society, The, 76 Wall St., 

•New York City. — Publication: The Sailors* Magazine. 

American Shipbuilder, 7 Coenties Slip, New York. 

Publications. 

American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 

Madison Ave. and 26th St., New York City. — Publication: Our 
Animal Friends. 

American Society of National Advertisers, Chicago. 

Collection of posters and cover designs of advertisers of the 
United States. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

Achert & Henckel Lithograph Company, Cincinnati, Ohio.— - 
Posters. 

Adams & Westlake Company, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Ainslee & Company, Howard, New York City. — Cover designs. 

American Cereal Company, Chicago, 111. — Posters. 

American Lithograph Company, New York City. — Posters. 

Art Amateur, The. New York City. — Posters. 

Baker, Walter, & Company, Dorchester, Mass. — Poster. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 



89 



Bicn, Julius, & Company, New York. — Posters. 

Bookman, The, New York City.— Posters. 

Century Company, The, New York City.— Cover designs. 

Courier Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — Posters. 

Denslow, W. W., Chicago, 111.— Posters. 

Dew Drop Cigar Company, New York City. — Poster. 

Dunston, G. H., & Company, Buffalo, New York.— Cover 
designs. 

Edwards, Deutch & Heitman, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Fairbank, N. K., Company^ Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Franco American Soup Company, New York City. — Cover 
design. 

Gillen Lithograph Company, Philadelphia, Pa. — Posters. 

Greve Lithograph Company, Milwaukee, Wis. — Posters. 

Harper Brothers, New York City. — Posters. 

Hart, Shafner & Marx, Chicago, 111. — Posters. 

Hood, C. I., & Company. Lowell, Mass. — Posters. 

Inland Printer Company, The, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Kaufmann & Strauss Company, New York City. — Posters. 

Ketterlinus Lithograph Company, Philadelphia, Pa. — Posters. 

Leggett & Meyers, St. Louis, Mo. — Poster. 

Liberty Cycle Company, Bridgeport, Conn. — Poster. 

Liebi^ Extract of Meat Company, New York City. — Posters. 

Michigan Stove Company, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Niagara Lithograph Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — Posters. 

Orcutt Lithograph Company, New York City. — Posters. 

OttmanL J., Lithograph Company, New York City. — Posters. 

Pabst brewing Company, Milwaukee, Wis. — Poster. 

Pond's Extract Company, New York City. — Poster. 

Prang, L., & Company, Boston, Mass. — Cover design. 

Pyle, James. New York City. — Posters. 

Rogers & Wells, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Round Oak Stove Works, Dowagfiac, Mich. — Poster. 

Sherwood Lithograph Company, Chicago, 111. — Posters. 

Soper, J. H., Gardner, New York City. — Cover design. 

Sterling Remedy Company, Attica, Ind. — Posters. 

Stokes, Frederick A., & Company, New York. — Posters. 

Street & Smith, New York City. — Cover design. 

Strowbridge Lithograph Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Posters. 

Thomas & Wylie Lithograph Company, New York. — Poster. 

Walker. Gfdrge H., & Company, Boston, Mass. — Posters. 

Wellman & Dwyer Tobacco Company, St. Louis, Mo. — Poster. 

Winship & Company, Chicago, 111. — Poster. 

Woman's Home Companion, Springfield, Ohio. — Cover designs. 

American 3 Color Company, 91 Plymouth Place, Chicago, 

Illinois. — Commercial catalogues and art publications. 

Andrew, Thomas H., 811 Western Ave., Seattle, Wash- 
ington. — Publi^tion: The American Forester. 



i 



90 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Angrns Sinclair Company, 95 Liberty St., New York City. 

Publication : Locomotive Engineering. 

Anthony, E. & H. T., & Company, 591 Broadway, New York. 

Publication: Anthony's Photographic Bulletin. 

Anil, Elbert H. & Company, Newberry, South Carolina. 

Publications. 

Barnes, A. S., & Company, 156 Fifth Ave., New York. 

Publication. 

Barrie, Qtoige, & Son, 1313 Walnut St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publications; printing, binding, reproductions. 
Paris, 1878, bronze medal ; Philadelphia, 1878, bronze medal ; 
Vienna, 1873, diploma; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Benjamin, W. E., 22 W. 33rd St., New York City. 

Publications. 

Benz, Angost, 813 Dayis Street, Evanston, niinois. 

Publication. 

Bergstresser, T. C, 339 Fifth Ave., Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Publication: Insurance World. 

Bettelheim, E. S., 1441 Broadway, New York City. " 

Publication: New York Democratic News. 

Bill, Edward Lyman, 3 E. 14th St., New York City. 

Publication : Music Trade Review. 

Birmingham, Ernest F., Park Bow Building, New York. 

Publication : The Fourth Estate. 

Blnmenberg Press, 214 William Street, New York. 

Books, publications, catalogues, artistic prints. 

Bohn, H. J., & Brother, 324 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Hotel World. 

Bolton, W. E., Woodward, Oklahoma. 

Publication : Live Stock Inspector. 

Bonner's, Bobert.. Sons, New York. 

Publication : Ledger Monthly. 

Book-Keeper Publishing Company, Limited, The, Bnhl 

Block, Detroit, Michigan. — Publication: The Book-Keeper. 

Bowen, Clarence W., 130 Fnlton St., New York City. 

Publication : The Independent 



GROUP III.—CLASS la 91 

Bowker, B. B., 59 Daane St., Hew York City. 

Publication: Publishers' Weekly. 

Bowleg J. M.9 234 Congress St., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications : Modern Arts, and Arts and Crafts. 

Branday, F. C, WMtney's Point, Hew York. 

Publication: Practical Poultrjrman. 

Brewers' Jonmal, The, 24 Park Place, New York City. 

Publication : The Brewers' Journal. 

Broadway Publishing Company, 1123 Broadway, New York. 

Publication: Broadway Magazine. 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, The, Brooklyn, New York. 

Guide to Paris Exposition. 

Brush and Pencil Publishing Company, The, 215 Wabash 

Avenue, Chicago, Ills. — Publication. 

Burrelle, Frank A., 32 Park Bow, New York City. 

Publications: Book of Press Clippings, etc. 

Butterick Publishing Company, Ltd., 17 W 16th Street, New 

York. — Publication: The Delineator. 

Butterworth, T., 152 50th St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Live Stock Journal. 

Calla, Kax, ft Company, 237 Dock St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publications: Presbyterian, and Reformed Re- 
view. 

Campbell, J. B., Monon Building, Chicago. 

Publication : History of the Paris Exposition of 1900 and of the 
Chicago Exposition. 

Campbell's Illustrated Journal, Monon Building, Chicago. 

Illustrated publication. 

Carl, William C, 34 W. 12th St., New Tork City. 

Pamphlets, subject, The Church Organ. 

Cassell & Company, limited, 9 W. 18th St., New Tork 

Qty. — Publication: Cassell's Magazine. 

Catholic Standard and Times Publishing Company, The, 

211 S. 6th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Publication. 

Central Seventh Day Adventist Publishing Association, 

Battle Creek, Michigan. — Publication : Advent Review and Sab- 
bath Heral4. 



92 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Century Company, The, Union Sqnare, Hew York. 

The Century Magazine, St. Nicholas; original drawings and 
manuscripts. 

Paris, 1889, Grand prix. 

Chandler, A. D., 11 Warren 8t., New Tork City. 

Publication: North American Review. 

Chandler & Price Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Paper cutter. 

Chandler, Hannibal H., & Company, Chicago. 

Publication : The Farmer's Review. 

Chappie, Joe Mitchell, 71 Bedford St., Boston, Hass. 

Publication : National Magazine. 

Chassaignac & Dyer, Drs., 163 TTniversity Place, Hew Orleans, 

Louisiana. — Publication: New Orleans Medical and Surgical 
Journal. 

Chicago Horseman Newspaper Company, 358 Dearborn 

St., Chicago. — Publication: The Horseman. 

Christian Publishing Association, Dayton, Ohio. 

Publication : Herald of Gospel Liberty. 

Church, W. C. & F. P., 93 Nassau St., New Tork City. 

Publication : United States Army and Navy Journal. 

Churchman Company, The, 47 Lafayette Place, New York. 

Publication : The Churchman. 

Clark, Charles L., 10 Pacific Ave., Chicago. 

Publication : Grain Dealers* Journal. 

Clissold, H. B., 188 Hadison St., Chicago. 

Publication: Bakers' Helper. 

Cobb, Benjamin F., 184 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 

Publication : The Redford Review. 

Colby, Clara Bewick, Washington, D. C. 

Publication : The Woman's Tribune. 

Cole, Frank B., Tacoma, Washington. 

Publication: West Coast and Puget Sound Lumberman. 

Colliery Engineering Company, The, Scranton, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Publications : Science & Industry, Mines & Minerals. 

Columbia University, New York City. 

Publication : School of Mines Quarterly. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 93 

Conant, William Cowper, 466 W. ISlst St., New Tork 

City. — Publications: Salvation, Modem Medical Science. 

Confectioners' Journal Fnblisliing^ Company^ 209 S. Sixth St., 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Publication : Confectioners' Journal. 

Connecticut Magazine Company, Hartford, Connecticut 

Publication : Connecticut Magazine. 

Craig, E. H., 63 Beach St., Hew Tork City. 

Publication : Sewing Machine Times. 

Criterion Publishing Company, 13 Paciflc Ayenue, Chioi^^. 

Publications: Mida's Criterion; Mida's Illustrated Magazine. 

Criterion Publishing Company, 166 Fifth Ave., New 

York City. — Publication: Criterion. 

Grouse, J. N., D. D. S., 2231 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

Publication : The Dental Digest. 

Curtis Publishing Company, The, 421 Arch St., Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Publication : The Ladies' Home Journal. 

Cycle Trade Publishing Company, Heed Building, Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania. — Publication: Cycle and Automobile 
Trade Journal. 

Be Castello, Bev. S. M., 888 South Eedzie Ave., Chici^. 

Publication: Krestansky Posel. 

Delano Publishing Company, The, T. H., 102 Chambers 

St., New York City. — Publication: Tobacco. 

Be Lestry, Edmund Louis, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Publication : De Lestry's Western Magazine. 

Be Puy, Clarence C, 320 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, Hew 

York. — Publication: American Poultry Advance. 

Bexter Folder Company, Pearl Biver, New Tork. 

Machines for folding books and magazines. 

Bezter, Marie L., 853 Carnegie Hall, New Tork City. 

Publication: The Parisian. 

Bodd, Head & Company, 149 Fifth Ave., New Tork City. 

Publication : The Bookman. 

Bominion Company, The, 334 Bearbom St., Chicago. 

Publication: Facts and Fiction. 

Bowst Brothers Company, 30 S. Clinton St., Chicago. 

Publication : National Laundry Journal 



94 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Dnnlap, Tolin B., 122 Liberty St., New York. 

Publication : The Engineering Magazine. 

Dnstin, William S., Bwight, Illinois. 

Publication: The Banner. 

Eastern Uennonite Conference, Schwenksville, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Publication : The Mennonite. 

Educational Publishing Company, SO Bromfield Street, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. — Publications : Popular Education and Prim- 
ary Education. 

Edwards, Dr. London B., Bichmond, Virginia. 

Publication: Virginia Medical Semi-Monthly. 

Electrical Beview Publishing Company, 41 Park Bow, 

New York City. — Publication: Electrical Review. 

Electrical World and Engineer, 120 Liberty Street, New York 

City. — Publication. 

Engelhard, 0. P., 358 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

Publication: Western Druggist. 

Engineering Uechanics Publishing Company, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication : Engineering Mechanics. 

Engineering News Publishing Company, 220 Broadway, New 

York. — Publication: Engineering News and American Railway 
Journal. 

Epitomist Publishing Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication: Agricultural Epitomist. 

Era Publishing Company, Chicago. 

Publication: Medical Era. 

Estes, Dana & Company, 208 Summer St., Boston, Uassaohu- 

setts. — Books, bookbinding. 

Ezekeil, Herbert T., Bichmond, Virginia. 

Publication: The Bi-Monthly Guild. 

Farm and Banch Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas. 

Publication : Farm and Ranch. 

Farm Implement Ne's^ Company, 701 Masonic Temple, 

Chicago. — Publication: Farm Implement News. 

Farmers' Voice, The, 334 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication: The Farmers' Voice. 



GROUP III.— CLASS la 95 

Fassetty Cliarles Wood, Sixth and Charles Sts., St. Joseph, 

Missouri. — Publications: American Medical Journalist, Medical 
Herald. 

Fassett, Herbert S., 263 Washington Bonlevard, Chioago. 

Publication : The Western Undertaker. 

Fern Bulletin Company, Binghamton, New York. 

Publication : The Fern BiMletin. 

Finkel, B. F., Springfield, Missonri. 

Publication: American Mathematical Monthly. 

Fitzgibbon-Clark, Mrs., St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Publication : St. Louis and Canadian Photographer. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, 346 Broadway, 

New York City. — Publication : Forest and Stream. 



Frank Leslie Publishing House, 143 Fifth Ave., New 

York City. — Publication : Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly. Orig- 
inal poster designs. 

Frank, U. U., 506 Aroh St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication: Textile Colorist. 

Fuller, K Chubb, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication: The Practical Dairyman, 

Funk & Wagnalls' Company, 30 Lafayette Place, New 

York City. — Standard Dictionary and other works. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Gazette Publishing Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Publication : Hotel Gazette and Outing News. 

Oeological Publishing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Publication : American Geologist. 

Gibson, Joseph W., 757 Broadway, New York City. 

Publication: The Haberdasher. 

Golden Bule Company, The, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : Christian Endeavor World. 

Goodman A Sickerson Company, 324 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago. — Publication : The Standard. 

Green, Monte L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publication : Spokesman of the Carriage Trade. 



96 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Oriswold, Kate S., 227 Washington St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts.— Publication : Profitable Advertising and Art in Adver- 
tising. 

Onild & Lord, 620 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : Textile World. 

Eaight^ B. T., 334 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

Publication: The Monumental Nei^. 

Halloran, T. £., 330 Market St., San Francisco, California. 

Publication: Mining and Scientific Press. 

Harbison, Joseph L., 1113 Chestnnt St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication : Table Talk. 

Harvey, Thomas F., 218 La Salle St., Chicago. 

Publication: International Confectioner. 

Haynes, D. 0., A Company, 396 Broadway, New York. 

Publications. 

Heimstreet, E. B., Janesville, Wisconsin. 

Publication: Wisconsin Druggists' Exchange. 

Holler, John, 31 Broad St., New York City. 

Publication: Dickerman's United States Treasury Counterfeit 
Detector. 

Holzapfel, 0., Cleona, Lebanon Connty, Pennsylvania. 

Publications: The Pulpit, The Treacher's Helper. 

Home Science Publishing Company, The, 485 Tremont Street, 

Boston, Massachusetts. — Publication: American Kitchen Maga- 
zine. 

Housekeeper Corporation, The, 51 S. Fourth St., Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. — Publication: The Housekeeper. 

Hubbard, Harlan Page, 38 Times Building, New York. 

Publication: Hubbard's Newspaper and Bank Directory of the 
World. 

Hudson, Bev. Daniel E., Notre Dame, Indiana. 

Publication : The Ave Maria. 

Huebsoh, D. A., & Company, 31 Bose St., New York. 

Publication : Huebsch's Year Book. 

Hughes, William, 7134 Wentworth Ave., Chioago. 

Publication : The Engraver and Electrotypcr. 



1 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 97 

Hunter Fnblishing Company, Oak Park, Illinois. 

Publication : The Star. 

Idea Publishing Company, The, 61 Essex St., Boston, Mass. 

Publication : Boston Ideas. 

Inland Printer Company, The, 214 Uonroe St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Inland Printer. 

Inland Publishing Company, 315 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Inland Architect. 

International Board of Women's Christian Association, 

217 W. Ormsby Ave., Louisville, Kentucky. — Publication : Inter- 
national Messenger. 

International Uonthly, The, Bnrlin$rton, Vermont. 

Publication. 

Iron and Steel Publishing Company, 40 Dearborn St., 

Chicago. — Publication : Iron and Steel. 

Jenkins, William B., 851 Sixth Ave., New York City. 

Publications. 

Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Books and periodicals on science, mathematics, philology, history 
and politics. 

Johnson, I. S., A Company, 22 Custom House St., Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. — Publication: Farm — Poultry. 

Journal of Commerce Company, Fullerton Street, St. Louis, 

Missouri. — Publications: The St. Louis Lumberman, The Age 
of Steel. 

Judge Company, 110 Pifth Ave., New York City. 

Publications : Judge Library ; Leslie's Weekly. 

Judge, E. J., 38 S. Holliday St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Publication : The Trade. 

Juvenile Literature Publishing Company, Hyde Park, 

Massachusetts. — Publication : The Favorite. 

Kansas Farmer Company, Topeka, Kansas. 

Publication: Kansas Farmers. 

Katlinsky, A. L., 5930 South Park Ave., Chicago. 

"MizraWi," a picture cut out of card board. 



98 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Kealing:, K T., 631 Fine St., ]^liiladelpliia, Fenn. 

Publication: African Methodist Episcopal Church Review. 

Kellogg, Warren F., S Fark Square, Boston, Uassachiuetts. 

Publication: New England Magazine. 

Eeppler A Sohwansmann, New York City. 

Publication: Puck. 

Kilmer, H. E., Alliance, Ohio. 

Publication : Woman's Journal of Reformed Church. 

Kindergarten Literatore Company, 203 Michigan Ave., 

Chicago. — Publication : Kindergarten Magazine. 

Knaner, Erhard, 119 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Publication : Manufactures of the United States. 

Knox, Frank H., Troy, New York. 

Publication: City Government. 

Koenig, Adolph, U. D., 108 Ninth St., Fittsbnrg, Fennsyl- 

vania. — PubKcation : Pennsylvania Medical Journal. 

Langdon, Falmer H., 218 William St., New York City. 

Publication: The Aluminum World. 

Lasher & Osborne, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publication: Journal and Messenger. 

Latham Uachinery Company, 197 S. Canal St., Chicago. 

Monitor wire, stitching, and paging and numbering machines for 
books and pamphlets. 

Lea Brothers & Company, 706 Sansom Street, Fhiladelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication: American Journal of Medical Sci- 
ence. 

Leffingwell, Charles W.^ Chicago. 

Publication : The Living Church. 

Life Fnblishing Company, 19 W. Thirty-first St., New 

York City. — Publication : Life. 

Light of Tmth Fnblishing Company, Colnmbns, Ohio. 

Publication : Light of Truth. 

Lippincott, J. B., Company, 720 Filbert St., Fhiladel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Publications. 

Little, Brown & Company, 254 Washington St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Books and illustrations. 



GROUP III.— CLASS la 99 

Idving Age Company, The, 13 1-2 Bromfleld St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publication : The Living Age. 

Loeser's, Charles UoE., Sons, 34 Beaver St., New York 

City. — Publication : Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. 

Lord A Thomas, Wabash and Bandolph Sts., Chicago. 

Publication : Directory of the American Press. 

Lothrop Publishing Company, 530 Atlantic Ave., Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. — Publications. 

Low, George P., 320 California St., San Eranoisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Publication : Journal of Electricity, Power and Gas. 

Lutheran Hinisterinm of New York, 12 State Street, New 

York. — Publication : Der Lutherische Herald. 

McCall, Irvii^ 0., & IMokson, J. A., 1526 Uarqnette Building, 

Chicago. — Publication : Advertising Experience. 

UcClure, The S. S. Company, 141 £. 25th Street, New York. 

Publication: McQure's Magazine. 

UcCormiok & Oray, 67 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication: The Interior. 

UcCune, 0. E., New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Publication : The Morning Star. 

MoOraw Publishing Company, 120 Liberty Street, New York. 

Publications: American Electrician and technical works. 

McKinley, William, Souvenir Committee, 1313 Walnut Street, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Naval and military history of the 
Nation. 

Kacmillan Company, The, 66 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Publication : Science. 

Kallett, D. P., 89 Chambers St., New York City. 

Publication: Hardware Dealers' Magazine. 

Karine Becord Publishing Company, Western Beserve Build- 
ing. Qeveland, Ohio. — Publication: The Marine Record. 

Marine Beview Publishing Company, The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Publication: Marine Review. 

Kason, Perry, A Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : The Youth's Q>mpanion. 



100 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Mason, Thomas, 414 East Pearl St., Cinoinnati, Ohio. 

Publication: Western Tobacco Journal. 

Hassaohnsetts Institute of Teehnology, Boston, Mass. 

Publication : Technology Quarterly. 

Hassaohnsetts New Chnroh Union, 16 Arlington St., 

Boston, Massachusetts, — Publication: The New Church Review. 

Mayers, Jaoob, 21 Park Bow, New York City. 

Publication: Butchers' Advocate. 

Meade, Nathaniel W., 430 Walnnt St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication: Ladies' Home Magazine. 

Mensoh, Panl, & Company, 92 LaSalle Street, Chioage. 

Publication : Directory of Chicago Office Buildings, illustrated. 

Mercantile Adjuster Publishing Company, 160 Nassau St., 

New York. — Publication : The Mercantile Adjuster. 

Merck A Company, 13 University Place, New York. 

Publications : Merck's Report and Merck's Archives. 



0. and C, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Webster's International Dictionary of the English Language, and 
its abridgements. 

Meyer, C. F. 0., 316 Clark Ave., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Publication : Meyer Brothers' Druggist. 

Meyer, Henry 0., 100 William St., New York City. 

Publication : Engineering Record. 

Meyer, T. S., 57 Washington St., Chicago. 

Publication: Deaconess' Advocate. 

Midland Publishing Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Publication: Farm Machinery. 

Miller, Mrs. L. E., Dayton, Ohio. 

Publication : The Woman's Evangel. 

* 

Miller Publishing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Publication: Northwestern Miller. 

Miner, E. N., 102 Fulton St., New York City. 

Publication: Typewriter and Phonographic World. 

Mitchell, John T., Company, 103 Pifth Ave., New York. 

Publication : Fashions for Tailors. 



I.. 



GRQUP III.— CLASS 13. 101 

Modem Miller Company, The, TMrd and Chestnut Sts., 

St. Louis, Missouri. — Publication: The Modern Miller. 

Montfort & Company, Cincinnati, OMo. 

Publication : Herald and Presbjrter. 

Mone, T. Vernette, Fine Arts Building, CMoago. 

Publications : Arts for America ; Art Study Pictures. 

Mowry, F. T., Some, New York. 

Publication: Harness Gazette. 

Mnller, L., Jr., Manhattan Building, Chicago. 

Publication : The Architectural Studies. 

Mumf ord, A. W., 203 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Publication : Birds of All Nature. 

Municipal Engineering Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication : Municipal Engineering. 

Munn A Company, 361 Broadway, New York City. 

Publications : Scientific American and its various editions. 

Murphy, Tames Shields, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication: The Golfer. 

National Iron & Steel Publishing Company, Pittsburg, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication: American Manufacturer and Iron 
World. 

National Printing Company, 509 S. 12th St., Omaha, 

Nebraska. — Publication : Hospodar. 

National Bailway Publication Company, The, 24 Park 

Place. New York City. — Publication : Travelers' Official Railway 
Guide. 

Hew England Publishing Company, 3 Somerset Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publication : Journal of Education. 

New York Daily Times, Park Bow, Hew York City. 

Processes showing United States methods of producing a daily 
newspaper. 

Hew York Lumber Trade Toumal, The, Hew York City. 

Publications : The New York Lumber Trade Journal. 

Hew York Musical Courier Company, 19 Union Square, 

New York City. — Publication : Musical Courier. 



102 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Nolan FubliBliing Company, Drexel Building, Fhiladelpliia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication: The Implement Age. 

Ohmann-Dnmesnil, A. K, St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Publication : St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal. 

Olszewski, Anton, 924 33rd St., Chicago. 

Publication: Lietuva. 

Orange Tndd Company, 52 Lafayette Place, New York 

City. — Publication: American Agriculturist, 

Ormsby, F. E., 368 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication : Planets and People. 

Outing Publishing Company, The, 239 Pif th Ave., New 

York City. — Publication : Outing. 

Outlook Company, The, 287 Pourth Ave., New York 

City. — Publication : The Outlook. 

Overland Uonthly Publishing Company, San Pranoisoo, 

California. — Publication: Overland Monthly. 

Paoiflc Press Publishing Company, Oakland, California. 

Publications: Pacific Health Journal, etc. 

Paine, Cassius H., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

.Publication: Whist. 

Palmer, Mrs. Lucia A., Yonkers, New York. 

Books : Grecian Days, Oriental Days. 

Parkinson & Kengla, 1121 Sutter St., San Pranoisoo, 

California. — Publication: Occidental Medical Times. 



), A. E., Seattle, Washington. 

Publication : Washington Odd Fellows. 

Pasadena Exhibition Association, Pasadena, California. 

France in American Magazines. 

Pathfinder Publishing Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Publication : The Pathfinder. 

Pettingill & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : National Newspaper Directory and Gazette. 

Phelps Publishing Company, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Publication : Farm and Home. 



^ 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 103 

FhiladelpMa College of Fhannaoy, 145 N. lOth Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. — Publication : American Journal of Phar- 
macy. 

Photographic Times Pnhlishing Association, The, New 

York City. — Publication : The Photographic Times. 

Poet-Lore Company, 16 Ashburton Place, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Publication : Poet-Lore. 

Porter, 'Taylor & Company, Chicago. 

Publication : The National Builder. 

Potter-Kendall Company, The, Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Publication : The Nickel Magazine. 

Potter, W. W., Company, 91 Bedford Ave., Boston, Mass- 
achusetts. — Publication: The National Magazine. 

Powell, Edwin C, Chatham, New York. 

Publication : Fancier's Review and Fruit Grower. 

Price, Charles W., 41 Park Bow, New York City. 

Publication : Electrical Review. 

Professional Photographer Publishing Company, 220 Wash- 
ington St., Buffalo. — Publications: Professional Photographer, 
and Process Review and Journal of Electrotyping. 

Publishers' Weekly, The, 59 Dnane St., New York 

City.-*-Periodicals and books of reference. 

Pntnam, Eben, I)anve|*s, Massachusetts. 
Publication: Putnam's Historical Magazine. 

Putnam, 0. Fs, Sons, 29 W. 23rd St., New York City. 

Publication: American Anthropologist. 

Bailroad Gazette, The, 32 Park Place, New York City. 

Publication : The Railroad Gazette. 

Bailway Beview, The, 1305 Manhattan Building, Chi- 
cago. — Publication: Railway and Engineering Review. 

Band, MoNally A Company, Chicago. 

Publications: Bankers' Monthly and Directory. Educational 
text-books. 

Bandall, T. A., A Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication : The Qay Worker. 



104 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Bedding, W. E., 127 Duane St., New York City. 

Publication: Harness. 

Beinert Publishing Company, The, Denver, Colorado. 

Publication: Daily Mining Record. 

Beinnagel, 0. H., 39 Cortlandt St., New York City. 

Publication : The Fireman's Herald. 

Beview and Herald Publishing Company, Battle Creek, 

Michigan. — Publications : Review and Heradd, etc. 

Beview of Beviews Company, The, 13 Astor Place, 

New York City. — Publication : Review of Reviews. 

Beview Publishing and Printing Company, Walnut and 

Fourth Streets, Philadelphia. — Publication: American Exchange 
and Review. 

Bhodes, Bradford A Company, 78 William St., New 

York City. — Publication: Bankers* Magazine. 

Bich, E. S. A Company, 177 LaSalle Street, Chieago. 

Publication : The Western Brewer. 

Bidenor &i Jenks, Washington Post Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Publication : Army and Navy Register. 

Bodkinson, Hiohael L., 1332 Pifth Ave., New York 

City. — Publication: New Edition Babylonian Talmud. 

Bogers A Mason, Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Publication: The Brickbuilder. 

Bollins, C. E., 161 LaSalle St., Chieago. 

Publication : The Argus. 

Boot, The A. I., Company, Medina, Ohio. 

Publication : Gleanings in Bee Culture. 

Bosbaok, Pred P., 60 S. Canal St., Chieago. 

Wire stitching machine for books and pamphlets. 

Bough Notes Company, The, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication: Rough Notes. 

Bowell, Oeorge P., A Company, 10 Spruce St., New York City. 

Publication: Printers* Ink. 

Byan, P. T., D. D., 211 S. 6th St., Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Publication: American Catholic Quarterly Review. 



\ 



^ 



GROUP III.— CLASS la 105 

Sanderii T. K, Publishing Company, 356 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago. — Publication : The Breeders' Gazette. 

Sannden, W. L., 26 Cortlandt St., New York City. 

Publication: Compressed Air. 

Seafer^ William, 161 LaSalle St., Chicago. 

Publication : Cement and Engineering News. 

Sheagne, 0. A., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publication : Express Gazette. 

Sherron, Charles B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication: Varnish. 

Shoe and Leather Beporter, New York City. 

Publications: Shoe and Leather Reporter; The Shoe Retailer. 

Shoe Trade Tonmal, 192 Pifth Ave., Chicago. 

Publication : Shoe Trade Journal. 



Short Story Publishing Company, 144 High St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publication : The Black Cat. 

Sibley Tonmal of Engineering, Ithaca, New York. 

Publication : Sibley Journal of Engineering. 

Singer Hannfactnring Company, The, 149 Broadway, New 

York. — Machines for binding books and pamphlets. 

Small, Maynard & Company, 8 Beacon St., Boston, Xassachn- 

setts. — Publications. 

Smalley, E. V., St. Panl^ Minnesota. 

Publication : Northwest Illustrated Monthly Magazine. 

Stager, Henry T., 938 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication : Camp News. 

Starchroom Publishing Company, The, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publication : Starchroom Laundry Journal. 

Stem, Daniel, 69 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

Publication: American Artisan and Hardware Record. 

Stiggers, E. 0., Washington, D. C. 

Publication: Inventors* Age. 

Stone, Herbert S., A Company, Eldridge Conrt, Chicago. 

Publications. 



106 GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 

Street & Smith, 238 William St., New York City. 

Publication : Ainslee's Magazine. 

Street Bailway Fublisliiiig Company, 120 Liberty St., 

New York City. — Publications: Street Railway Journal; Street 
Railway Investments. 

Strong, Henry B., 514 Centnry Building, St. Louis, 

Missouri. — Publication: National Druggist. 

Stnder, Jacob H., 114 Fifth Avenne, New York. 

Publication: Imperial Quarto Book. 

Swedish Methodist Episcopal Book Concern, 152 Oak 

St, Chicago. — Publication: The Herald (Sandebudet). 

Taltavall, John B., 253 Broadway, New York City. 

Publication : The Telegraph Age. 

Terhnne, W. L., 13 Columbia St., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : Boot and Shoe Recorder. 

Textile Publishing Company, The, 78 Walker St., New 

York City. — Publication : The Dry Goods Economist. 

Thirlkeld, Bev. L. A., 6 S. Calvert St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Publication: Baltimore Methodist. 

Thompson Publishing Company, Chicago. 

Publication : The Confectioner and the Baker. 

Town Topics Publishing Company, 208 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. — Publications : Town Topics, and Tales from Town Topics. 

Trades Weekly Company, The, 65 Nassau St., New York City. 

Publications : Jewelers' Weekly and Qothiers* and Haberdashers* 
Weekly. 

Universal Peace Union, 219 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publication: Peacemaker and Court Arbitration. 

United States Industrial Publishing Company, 31 State 

St., New York City. — Publications. 

United States Trade Mark Association, The, 34 Nassau 

St., New York City. — ^Trade marks, etc. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Publication : The Wisconsin Engineer. 

Van Oost, John W., 23 Union Square, New York City. 

Publication: The Art Amateur. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 13. 107 

Vegetarian Company, The, 78 Madison St., Chicago. 

Publication : The Vegetarian Magazine. 

Voigt, Henry E., Hamburg, Wigconsin. 

Publication: Der Gefluegel Zuechter. 

Von Elenner, Uadam K. Evans, 40 Stnyvesant St., Hew 

York City. — ^Vocal musical pamphlets, documents, etc. 

Ware Brothers, 1118 Market St., Philadelphia, Fenn- 

Publications : Carriage Monthly, Export Carriage. 

Wasson, B. S., A Company, 91 and 93 S. Jefferson Street, Chi- 
cago. — Publication: Roadmaster & Foreman. 

Watchman Publishing Company, The, Tremont Temple, 

Boston, Massachusetts. — Publication: The Watchman. 

Webster, Alice, and Pratt, Candace B., 325 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago. — Publication: The Household Realm. 

Werner, Edgar S., Publishing and Snpply Company, 48 E. 

Nineteenth Street, New York. — Publication : Werner's Magazine. 

West, Miss Bina M., Port Hnron, Michigan. 

JPttblication : The Ladies' Review. 

Wetter, Joseph, & Company, 515 Kent Ave., Brooklyn, Hew 

York. — Numbering machines. 

Whitaker, George P., 36 Bromileld St., Boston, Mass- 
achusetts. — Publication : Zion's Herald. 

White City Art Company, The, 315 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago. — Publication: Great Pictures. 

White, Prank B., Company, Pisher Bnilding, Chicago. 

Publication: Agricultural Advertising. 

Wild, Edwin 0., St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Publication : Journal of Commerce. 

Wiley, John, & Son, Hew York. 

Publications upon mineralogy and minerals. 

Wilkins, William E., 66 W. Broadway, Hew York City. 

Publication : Merchants' Review. 

Williams, Edwin, 295 Adams St., Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Publication : Harmony evolved as an exact science. 

Williams, Thomas A., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Publication: Asa Gray Bulletin. 



108 GROUP IIL— CLASS 13. 

Willy, John, 325 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication: The Hotel Monthly. 

Wise, Leo, A Company, Pif th Avenue and Bace Street, Cin- 
cinnati. — Publications : American Israelite and Die Deborah. 

Wisser, John P., Fortress Monroe, Virginia. 

Publication : Journal of the United States Artillery. 

Woman's Board Home Missions Presbyterian Chnrch, 

156 Fifth Ave., New York City. — Publication: Home Mission 
Monthly. 

Woman's Board of Foreign Missions Bef ormed Chnrdh 

in America, 25 E. Twenty-second St., New York City. — Publica- 
tion: The Mission Gleaner. 

Woman's Christian Association of Philadelphia, Eighteenth 

and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Publication: 
Faith and Works. 

Woman's Medical Jonmal, The, 311 Superior Street, Toledo, 

Ohio. — Publication devoted to the Science of Medicine. 

Wonderly, Mrs. A., Lyons, Kansas. 

Publication : Weavers* Herald. 

Wood, Lovett M., Seattle, Washington. 

Publication : The Trade Register. 

Wood, William A Company, 51 Fifth Avenne, New York. 

Publications : Medical Record and Journal of Obstetrics. 

Woodward, T. B., 300 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Publication : The National Engineer. 

World's Maritime News Company, The, 63 William St., New 

York City. — Publication : New York Maritime Register. 

Yale Medioal Sohool, New Haven, Conneotiont. 

Publication : Yale Medical Journal. 

Yates, C. L., Boohester, New York. 

Publication : The National Nurseryman. 

Young Chnrchman Company, The, Milwankee, Wisoonsin. 

Publication : Our Young People. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 16. 109 



CLASS 14. 

MAPS AND APPARATUS FOR GEOGRAPHY AND COS- 
MOGRAPHY. TOPOGRAPHY. 



California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, 

California. — Relief maps of Yosemite Valley, California, and State 
of California. 

Central School Supply House, Atlas Block, CMcago. 

Relief map of the United States. 

Department of the Navy, TJ. S. A., Bureau of Equipment, 

Washington, D. C. — Model or relief map of the West Indies and 
Caribbean Sea. 

Lord A Thomas, Trude Building, Chicago, Illinois. 

Maps and charts illustrating newspaper and publishing industry in 
the United States. 

Rand, McNally & Company, 160 Adams St., Chicago. 

Geographies, maps, charts, etc. 



CLASS 15. 

INSTRUMENTS OF PRECISION. COINS AND MEDALS. 



APPLIANCES, PROCESSES, AND PRODUCTS. 

Arithmometer Company, 2102 Washington St., St. 

Louis, Missouri. — Automatic adding and registering machines. 

American Hnmismatic and Archaeological Society, The, 

17 N. 43d St., New York City. — Coins and medals. 

American Optical Company, Sonthbridg^, Massachusetts. 

Optical goods. 

Bay State Optical Company, Attleboro, Massachusetts. 

Optical goods and machines for making same. 



110 GROUP III.— CLASS 15. 

Brandt-Sent Company, The, Watertown, Wisconsin. 

Automatic cash register. 

Brashear, Tolrn A., Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

Astronomical and physical instruments. 

Brassenr, Charles L. A., 10 E. 16th St., New Tork. 

Colorimeter, synthesis of spectrum. 

Brown & Sharpe Hannfaotnring Company, FroTidence, 

Rhode Island. — Standard gauges, micrometer and vernier calipers, 
rules, try squares, straight edges, index and surface plates, etc 

Bnrean of the Hint, TJ. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

United States coin money. Medals issued by United States. La- 
fayette coin dollars, and dies. 

Department of the Havy, TJ. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Medals voted by Congress to United States naval officers. Seal 
of the Navy Department carved in wood. 

Des Tardins, B. M., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Labor saving computing instruments. Automatic computing 
scales for commercial purposes. 

Ferraoute Machine Company, Brixton, New Jersey. 

Presses, dies and other machinery for the manufacture of all kinds 
of metal coins, medals, badges, etc. 

Hastings, Prof. Charles S., New Haven, Connectiont. 

Isochromatic object glasses. 

Hygienic Optical Company, 1147 Broadway, New York. 

Optical goods. 

International Arithmachine Company, Boanoke Bnild- 

ing, Chicago. — Calculating machines. 

King, Tnlins, Optical Company, New York. 

Optical goods. 

Le Haitre Optical Company, New York. 

Optical goods and machines for making same. 

Lnbin, Siegmnnd, 21 S. 8th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Eye testing apparatus. 

Mills Novelty Company, 23 S. Jefferson St., Chicago. 

Automatic coin operating machines. 

National Cash Beg^ster Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Cash registers, adding details or totals, printing checks, etc. 



GROUP III.— CLASS 16. Ill 

Kowlandy Frof. Henry A., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Diffraction gratings. 

Seriptnre, Prof. Edward W., 109 Elm St., Hew Haven, 

Connecticut. — Color sense tester for detection of color-blindness 
and color-weakness. 



Tolin, Company, Hew Tork. 

Optical goods. 

Spencer Optical Company, Hew York. 

Optical goods. 

TJniversal Calcnlator Company, Fisher Bnilding, CMcago. 

Calculating machines. 

Warner A Swasey, ClcYcland, Ohio. 

Astronomical instruments. 



CLASS 16. 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 



American Hard Enbber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Special rubber parts of apparatus for correcting deformities of 
human body. 

Banning Orthopedic and Mechanical Therapeutic Company, 

Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Appliances for correcting deformities and 
malpositions of the internal organs of the human trunk. This 
company manufactures the "Perfected Banning System of Sup- 
ports" 

Beck, E. S., Hew York City. 

A formal generator, with automatic diaphragm pressure valve. 

Bloom, T. D., M. D., Hew Orleans, Lonitiana. 

Glass bowl for preserving vaseline in sterile form. 

Boldt, H. T., M. D., Hew York City. 

General operating table. 

Boston Dental Parlors, 146 State Street, Chicago, and 44 E. 

14th Street, New York City. — Dental supplies and artificial sets of 
teeth. 

Brand, A. 7., Brooklyn, H. Y. 

Aseptic wheel stretcher. 



112 GROUP III.— CLASS 16. 



• 



Clark, A. C, & Company, Uasonio Temple, Chicago. 

Cuspidors for dentists' chairs. 

Clark, T. C, M. D., New Tork City. 

Apparatus for the sterilization of catgut by cumol. 

Cleveland, Clement, M. D., New Tork City. 

Gynecological operating table. 

Crescent Steel Company, Pittsburg, Fennsylvania. 

Special steel parts of apparatus for correcting deformities of 
human body. 

Dental College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Models and specimens of work. 

Dental Department, University of California, San Francisco. 

Models and specimens of work. 

Dental Department, University of Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Models and specimens of work. 

Dental Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. — Models and specimens of work. 

Dental Department, Western Beserve University, Cleveland, 

Ohio. — Models and specimens of work. 

Dental Sn^gery, CoUegre of, Chicago, Illinois. 

Models and specimens of work. 

Harvard Company, The, Canton, Ohio. 

Dental chairs, surgical chairs, and instrument cabinets. 

Invalid Chair Company, 701 Broadway, New York City. 

Invalid chairs. 

Jackson, Victor H., M. D., 240 Lenox Ave., New York. 

Orthodontia: Models showing a system of correcting irregulari- 
ties of the teeth and deformities of the jaws. 

Kelly, F. D., M. D., Peoria, Illinois. 

Prosthetic dentistry. 

Kelly, Howard, M. D., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Endoscopic instruments for examining the rectum. 

Knopf, S. A., M. D., New York City. 

Pocket sputum flask for tuberculosis patients. 

Kny, Sichard, New York City. 

Aseptic glass hospital washstands. 



[GROUP III.— CLASS 16. 113 

Kny-Soheerer Company, The, 17 Park Sow, New York 

City. — Surgical operating theatre-sterilizing laboratory, armarium 
chirurgicum and sick, room supplies. 

lagai, George, H. S., Hew Tork City. 

Apparatus and instruments. Preparations and specimens. 

Laplaoe, Ernest, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Set of anesthomosis forceps. 

Harks, A. A., 701 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Artificial limbs with rubber feet and hands. Surgical appliances, 
crutches, and invalid chairs. Inventors of rubber hands and feet. 
Philadelphia, 1876, medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Harks, Cteorge E., 701 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Knife and fork combined. 

Harks, William L., 701 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Qamp buckles for surgical appliances. 

Meyer, John H., 117 W. 48th St., New Tork City. 

Improved artificial teeth of continuous gum. 

Meyer, Willy, M. D., New Tork City. 

Storage battery for galvano-caustic operations. 

Miller Bnbber Mannf aeturing Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Specialties in rubber for physicians and surgeons. 

Monger, E. E., H. D., Spencer, Iowa. 

Invalid and fracture bed. 

National Institute of Dental Pedagogy of America. 

Collective exhibit representing six dental colleges of the United 
States, with models and dental work. 

New England Cmtch Company, 701 Broadway, New Tork 
Qty. — Crutches. 

Bitter Dental Mannf actnring Company, The, Bochester, 

New York. — Dental chairs and electrical appliances. 

Borick Air Cnshion Tmss Company, The, 1224 F St. N. W., 

Washington, D. C. — Air cushions, trusses, and abdominal sup- 
ports. 

Seabnry & Johnson, 69-61 Maiden Lane, New Tork City. 

Medicinal and surgical plasters, surgical dressings and specialties. 

Sibley, Gideon, 1214 Filbert St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Dental instruments, appliances, and supplies. Dental chairs. 



114 GROUP III.— CLASS 17. 



CLASS 17. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



MATERIALS, PROCESSES, AND PRODUCTS. 

Adek Hannf actnring Company, 121 W. 42d St., New York. 

Self playing pianos and attachments. 

Amerioan Felt Company, The, Dolg^ville, New York. 

Felts for musical instruments. 

Amerioan Oraphopkone Company, Bri^port, Conneotiont. 

Graphophones and supplies. 

Art Joinery, The (Charles Dannenfelser), Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Workmanship in wood. 

Baldwin, D. H., and Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Model of piano factory, showing inside and outside views, statis- 
tics, etc 

Baldwin Piano Company, The, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Concert grand pianos; grand and upright pianos. Parts used in 
piano construction ; sections of cases ; samples of woods. 

Upright grand piano for National Building, American design, 
San Domingo mahogany. 

Upright g^rand piano for office Liberal Arts Department, 
Colonial design, carved. 

Small grand piano for Salon, white mahogany. Louis XVI. 
style, carved. 

Bamhom, Clement T., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Design and carving of Baldwin upright piano. 

Bohmann, Joseph, Chicago, Illinois. 

Stringed and vibrating instruments. 

Brown & Patterson, Brooklyn, New York. 

Piano plates. 
Burton, C. H., & Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Veneers and cabinet woods used in construction of pianos and 
organs. 

Chicago Brass Company, Chicago. 

Reeds and reed boards for cabinet organs. 



k 



GROUP III.— CLASS 17. 115 

Colombia Phonos^raph Company, 143 Broadway, New Tork, 

and 34 Boulevard des Italiens. Paris. — Complete series of graph- 
ophones, phonographs, records, etc. 

Comfltock, Cheney & Company, Ivoryton, Connecticut. 

Upright piano action, keys and keyboard. 

Consalyi, Icilio, 5 Garden Court, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Banjo consisting of 39,987 pieces. 

Elzner & Anderson, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Plans and specifications of Baldwin piano factory buildings. 

Flagg Manufacturing Company, 110 Lincoln St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — ^Zithers and harps. 

Fry, William H., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Carving on Baldwin pianofortes. 

Suerin, P. E., Hew York City. 

Gilt and bronze ornaments for upright piano cases. 

Hall, Thomas T., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Joinery in construction of grand piano cases. 

Hamilton Organ Company, The, Chicago, Illinois. 

Reed organs and upright pianos. 

Kelly, The 0. S., Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Baldwin upright piano plate casting. 

Xerr, Clarence E., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Workmanship in grand and upright piano sounding boards. 

Kleist, Eugene de. North Tonawanda, New York. 

Automatic organs and metal wind instruments. 

larapedie. Christian, 6 Germain St., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Violins and violoncello. 

Ludwig A Company, New Tork City. 

Pianos and self-playing attachments for same. These pianos are 
built with full iron frame, four-ply running pin blocks, double 
veneered cases and turpentine varnish finish; the seli-playing 
attachment has the principle of air pressure (not suction) ; having 
a multiplied force, its action is a direct transmission of power 
on the keys. 

Hacy, John W., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Scheme of construction for the Baldwin pianos. 



r 



lie GROUP III.— CLASS 18. 

Hannello, Angelo, 680 Eagle Ave., New Tork City. 

Mandolins and guitars. 

Moran, Horace, Hew Tork City. 

Original design of ca^ for upright piano. 

Piano and Organ Snpply Company, Ckicago. 

Keyboards for organs. 

Pratt, Beed & Company, Deep Eiver, Connecticut. 

Three sets of piano keys. 

Beindahl, Knnte, 663 H. Caroline St., Ckicago. 

Violins. 

Skriver, T., & Company, Hew Tork City. 

Baldwin grand piano plate casting. 

Sorenson, Andrew T., Ckicago. 

Design for cabinet organ and scheme of construction for case work. 

Staib-Abendsckein Company, Tke, Hew Tork City. 

Three actions for upright pianos and model. 

Stranck Brotkers, Hew Tork City. 

Upright pianoforte action and keys. 

Wickkam, Ckapman & Company, Springfield, Okie. 

Iron plate for upright piano. 



CLASS 18. 

THEATRICAL APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT. 



Andrews, Tke A. H., Company, 300 Wabask Ave., Cki- 

cago.—Opera chairs. 

Bnckkolz, Herman, Springfield, Hassacknsetts. 

Theatrical and American jewelry. 

Byron, Tosepk, 1286 Broadway, Hew Tork. 

Flash light photographic scenes in American Theaters. 

Ckicago Auditorium Association, Ckicago, Illinois. 

Exterior and interior views of the Auditorium Opera House. 



GROUP IV. 

MACHINERY. 

FRANCIS E. DRAKE, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 19. 

STEAM ENGINES. 



Adyanoe Faddng and Supply Company, Chioago. 

CTuiii G>re Packing. 

Ambler Asbestos Air Cell Covering Company, New Tork 

City. — Boiler and pipe covering. 

American Fire Engine Company, Seneca Falls, New Tork. 

Water tube boilers and stationary steam engines. 

Ameriean Injeotor Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Injector. 

American Steam Oange Company, Boston, Hassacbn- 

setts. — Steam engine indicator. 

American Steam Facking Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Steam packing. 

Ashton Valve Company, The, 271 Franklin St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — ^Valves for boilers, pumps and engines; safety 
and relief valves ; pressure and vacuum gauges. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Ball Engine Company, The, Erie, Fennsylvania. 

Automatic steam engine for electric light and power service. 

Blake, Gkorge F., Mannfaotnring Company, New York 

City. — Steam pumps. 

117 



118 GROUP IV.— CLASS 19. 

Bowen Hannf aotnring Company, Anbnm, Hew Tork. 

Dust-proof oil cups. 

Brady, T. P., 1946 N. Ealsted St., Chioago. 

Brady turbine (rotary steam engine). 

Brandt, Bandolph, 38 Cortlandt St., New York. 

Packing for steam engines, jackets for boilers. 

Burt Mannfaotnring Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Purifiers and filters for lubricating oils. 

Canfteld Mannfaotnring Company, The, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Spiral and ring packing. 

Chesterton, A. W., & Company, Boston, Massaehnsetts. 

Steam packing. 

Cleveland Bnbber Works, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Steam hose. 

Clonbroek Steam Boiler Company, Brooklyn, New YorlL. 

Steam boilers, vertical water-tube type. 

Coale Unffler & Safety Valve Company, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. — Combined pop valve and muffler. 

Crandall Paoking Company, Palmyra, New Tork. 

Packing. 

Crane Company, Chieago. 

Brass and iron valves and fittings, screwed and flanged, for 
wrought iron pipe, for all pressures of steam, gas, or water. Steam 
and gas fitters' tools, engine trimmings, etc. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Crosby Steam Gange & Valve Company, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Steam indicators, gauges and valves. 

De Byeke, Joseph, New York City. 

Steam separators. 

D'Estes & Seeley Company, Boston, Massadhnsetts. 
Steam traps. 



Detroit Lnbrioator Company, Detroit, 

Apparatus for lubricating steam engines; "Detroit" sight feed 
lubricator. 

Direet Separator Company, Syraonse, New York. 

Steam separator. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 19. 119 

Dixon, Tosephy Crucible Company, Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Lubricating graphite. 

Eagle Oil & Snpply Company, Boston, Hassaebnsetts. 

Ring packing. 

Kike Brotbers Beflning Company, New York. 

Lubricating oils for steam engines and all kinds of machinery. 

Forbes^ W. D., & Company, Eoboken, Hew Jersey.* 

Vertical type steam engines. One engine of 25 H. P. to be in 
operation direct connected to generator of Bullodc Electric Manu- 
facturing Company. 

Ford, Thomas P., New York City. 

Regulator valve, water valve. 

Fort Wayne Safety Valve Company, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Safety valve, 

Foster Engineering Company, Newark, New Jersey. 

Valves. 

Oalvanic Uetal Paper Company, New York City. 

Metal packing. 

Ooodsell Paoking Company, Chioago. 

Rubber-back packing, flax and stitched packing for engines and 
steam pumps. 

Hayden & Derby Mannfaotnring Company, New York 

City. — Metropolitan injectors. 

Higbee Joint Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Pipe joints. 

Homestead Valve Hannfacturing Company, Homestead, 

Pennsylvania. — Patent three-way cocks. 

Hoyt Ketal Company, St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Metallic packing. 

Hnbbard & Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Phoenix flue cleaner. 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Company, New York City. 

Regulators and governors for steam engines. 

Johns, H. W., Mannfactnring Company, New York. 

Asbestos covering for steam pipes. 



120 GROUP IV.— CLASS 19. 

Kennedy Valve Uannfaoturing Company, The, New Tork 

City. — Globe and check valves. 

Keystone Engineering & Mannfactnrii^ Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. — Steam separator. 

Laokawana Lnbrid^tor & Mannf actnring Company, Soranton, 

Pennsylvania.^Grease cups. 

Lee Injector Mantifactnring Company, The, Detroit, Mich. 

Injectors for boiler feeding. 

Leonard A Ellis, Hew Tork. (Henry Hamelle, Agent, Paris.) 

Lubricating oils for engines and machines. 

Locke Begnlator Company, Salem, Uassachnsetts. 

Pump governing and reducing valves. 

Lnnkenheimer Company, The, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Brass and iron engineering appliances ; globe, angle, cross, check, 
gate, and stop valves, cocks, pop safety valves, whistles, water 
gauges, injectors and lubricating devices. 

Uabbs Hydraulic Packing Company, Chicago. 

Packing. 

UcDondland, Oeorge T., Brooklyn, New Tork. 

Steam gasket. * 

Manzel Brothers, Bnffalo, New Tork. 

Automatic oil-pump. 

Mosher, Charles D., New Tork City. 

Steam separator and grease extractor. 

Nathan Mannfactnring Company, New Tork. 

Lubricators. 

National Injector Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Injector. 

New Bedford Boiler & Machine Company, New Bedford, 

Massachusetts. — Boiler stop valves. 

New Jersey Car Spring & Bnbber Company, Jersey City, 

New Jersey. — Packing and gaskets. 

Oil Well Supply Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Portable boilers and engines, valves, joints. 

Orvis & Hawkes, Chicago. 

Model of improved boiler furnace. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 19. 121 

Peerless Snbber Hanufaoturing Company, New York City. 

Steam packing and hose. 

Penberthy Injector Company, Detroit, Micliigan. 

Injector. 

Phoenix Uetallic Packing Company, Chicago. 

Metallic packing. 

Phoenix Steam Packing Company, New Tork City. 

Packing. 

Pittsbnrg Steam Jacket Lnbricating Company, Pittsbnrg, 

Pennsylvania. — Steam cylinder lubricator. 

Powell, William, Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Compression grease cups. 

Beid Mannf aotnring Company, Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Patent oil cups. 

Belianoe Oange Colnmn Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Safety water column. 

Bestein, Clement & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Asbestos diagonal packing. 

Bobins Conveying Belt Company, Park Bow Bnildings, New 

York City. — Conveying machinery for feeding boilers and coal 
pockets; handling broken stone, coke, ore and cement, waste 
from excavations ; loading vessels and railroad cars. 

Schaffer & Budenberg, Brooklyn, New York. 

Calorimeter. 

Sellers, William, & Company, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Self-acting injector. Automatically adjusts water supply with- 
out waste at overflow. Restarts automatically if jet is broken. 
Capacity increases with steam pressures from 15 to 225 pounds. 
Minimum capacity at 180 pounds 43 per cent of maximum. 

Paris, 1867, gold medal ; Vienna, 1873, Diploma of Honor and 
hvt medals ; Philadelphia, 1876, three medals ; Paris, 1889, Grand 
prix. 

Sherwood Hannfaotnring Company, Bnffalo, New York. 

Automatic injector. Double tube injector. 

Smoothpn Hannfactnring Company, Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Compound for repairing boilers and pipes. 

Tannton Locomotive Hannfaotnring Company, Tannton, 

Massachusetts. — Feed water heater. 



122 GROUP IV.— CLASS 20. 

Thorpe, Pratt & Company, New York. 

Geipel's patent steam trap. 

TJnited States Uetallic Packing Company, Philadelpliia, 

Pennsylvania. — Metallic paclcing. 

Vacnnm Oil Company, Sochester, New Tork. 

Lubricating oil for steam engines and machinery. 

• 

Walworth Mannfactnring Company, 14 Oliver St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — ^Valves, cocks, joints, piping, etc. 

Watson, N. A., Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Injector. ► 

Watt's, John U.'8 Sons, New York City. 

Packing grease and metal polish. 

Welsh Packing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Combination gasket. 

Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company, 120 Liberty St., 

New York. — Feed water heaters, pumps and condensers. 

Whitfield Company, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Compound steam engine. 

Wilkinson & Company, Boston, Uassaohnsetts. 

Oil cups. 

Winkley, F. D., Uadison, Wisconsin. 

Dust proof oil hole covers. 



CLASS 20. 

VARIOUS MOTORS. 



Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Company, New. Tork City. 

Engines and motors operated by compressed air. 

Meitz & Weiss, 128 Mott St., New York City. 

Oil engine operated by crude or volatile oils. 

Pelton Water Wheel Company, San Francisco, California. 

Water wheels. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 21. 



123 



Bider-Eriosson Engme Company, 22 Cortlandt St., New York. 

Hot air engines. 

Smith, S. Morgan, Company, York, Pennsylvania. 

Hydraulic motors, turbines for horizontal and vertical shafts. 



CLASS 21. 



GENERAL MACHINERY. 



Allington & Cnrtis Company, Boston, Massaehnsotts. 

Dust collector and exhaust piping. 



American Fire Engine Company, Seneoa Falls, New York. 

Steam fire engines, pumps and apparatus. 

Ashoroft Mannf actnring Company, New York. 

Steam gauges. 

Batckeller Fnenmatio Tnbe Company, New York City. 

Air compressors and pipes. A complete system of pneumatic 
transmission applicable to mail, express and freight. 



Hngo, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Fine bevel gears. 

Boston Belting Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Hose, valves and mechanical rubber goods. 

Bristol Company, The, Waterbnry, Connecticut. 

Special recording pressure gauges. 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, 

Massachusetts. — ^Valves and hydrants. 

Chicago Baw Hide Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

Rawhide pinions. 

Christensen Ei^^eering Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Portable automatic air compressor. 

Cleveland Gear Works, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gear. 

Cleveland Bubber Works, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Air hose. 



i 



124 GROUP IV.— CLASS 21. 

Crane Company^ CMoago. 

Water pipes, valves and accessories. 

CreBson^ George V., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Power transmitting machinery, shafting, pedestals, etc. 

Crosby Steam Oange & Valve Company, Boston, Hass. 

Steam gauges. 

Dresser, S. B., Bradford, Pennsylvania. 

Piping, joints and accessories. 

Dnrant, Walter N., Uilwankee, Wisconsin. 

Automatic revolution counting device, 

Eire Extinguisher Hannf aotnring Company, Chicago. 

Apparatus for fire protection, portable and semi-portable. 

Fisher Governor Company, HarshaUtown, Iowa. 

Pump governors and reducing valves. 

Ford, Thomas P., New York City. 

Pump regulating and reducing valve. 

Oraber, H. S., St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Automatic water gauge. 

Oreenwood, Oliver, E., Baltimore, Haryland. 

Anti-friction metal for bearings. 

Harris & Baldwin, Jamestown, New York. 

Friction clutches. 

Henderer's, A. L., Sons, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Hydraulic jacks. 

Hollands Hannfactnring Company, Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Pipe cutters. 

Horsburgh & Scott, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rawhide gears. 

Hoyt Hetal Company, St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Special "white metal" for bearings. 

IngersoU-Sergeant Drill Company, New York City. 

Air and gas compressors, motors, regulators and receiver inter- 
coolers. 

Jeffrey Hannfactnring Company, Colnmbns, Ohio. 

Conve3ring and elevating machinery. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 21. 125 

Kennedy Valve Company, New York City. 

Water valves. 

Idppenoott Steam Specialty Company, New York City. 

Steam indicators. 

Locke Begnlator Company, Salem, HassaohnBetts. 

Stop governor for steam engines. 

Lndlow Valve Hannfactnring^ Company, The, Troy, New 

York. — Water valves, hydrants, and accessories. 

Mabbt Hydranlic Faoking Company, Chicago. 

Hydraulic packing. 

Konaroh Fire Appliance Company, 27 William St., New York. 

Powdered chemical compound for extinguishing fires, incased in 
metal cylinders. 

Konarch Governor & Machine Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Governor for steam engine. 

Monarch Mannfactnring Company, The, Waterbnry, Conn. 

Device for speed limits on engines. 

Neptnne Meter Company, 263 Broadway, New York City. 

Water meters. 

New Process Bawhide Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Pinions in rawhide. 

Oil Well Supply Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Brass and iron fittings for steam, gas, water and oil pipes. 

Olson, Tinius & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Power automatic and autographic tensile compression and trans- 
verse testing machines, micrometer, measuring instruments and 
viscosimeters. 

Band Drill Company, New York City. 

Air compressors and accessories. 

Beeves Pulley Company, Columbus, Indiana. 

Power transmitting devices. Wood split pulleys, clutches, speed 
varying countershafts. 

Bice Gear Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Gears. 

Bobins Conveying Belt Company, Park Bow Buildings, New 

York City. — Conveying apparatus for coal, ore, etc. 



126 GROUP IV.-CLASS 21. 

BootSi The, P. IL, and F. H., Company, Connersville, Indiana. 

Positive pressure blower-motor. 

Sannder's, B., Sons, Tonke^^ New York. 

Pipe cutter. 

Schaffer & Bndenberg, New York. 

Carpenter calorimeter. 

ScMeren, Charles A., & Company, 47-51 Ferry St., New York. 

Oak tanned leather, finished croutons, curried belting, butts, valve 
leather, lace leather, oak bark tanned leather belting, electric and 
perforated electric leathers, leather for dynamos. American 
patent joint leather link belting. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Paris, 1889, medal; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. 

Silverman, Lazanu, Chicago. 

Lubricating material. 

StillweU-Bieroe & Smith-Vaile Company, The, Dayton, Ohio. 

Electrically driven triplex pump; jet condenser. 

Stow Hannf actnring Company, Bing^hamton, New York. 

Flexible shaft and lathe center grinders. 

Stuarts Foundry & Machine Works, New Hamburg, New 

York. — Compression wedge coupling. 

Sturtevant, B. F., & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Exhaust fans and blowers. 

Tabor Manufacturing Company, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Stop motion revolution cotmters. 

Thomson Meter Company, 79-83 Washington St., Brooklyn, 

New York. — The Lambert disc water meter, made entirely of 
bronze, for pipes J^-irch to 6-inch diameter. 

Tight Joint Company, New York. 

Hydraulic flange union. 

Torrey, H. S., 100 Broadway, Hew York. 

Special anti-friction metal for bearings. 

Trautvetter Brothers, Faterson, New Jersey. 

Recording gauges. 

Tripler Liquid Air Company, 121 W. 89th St., Ne^ York. 

System for liquifying air — ^processes and products. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 127 

Tyler, The, W. S., Company, Cleyeland, Ohio. 

Passenger elevator cars in National Pavilion. 

Vacnum Oil Company, Boohester, New York. 

Lubricators, oilers, dynamometers and power measuring devices, 
indicators. 

Walworth Kannfactnring^ Company, 14 Oliver St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Water pipes and accessories. 

Watson-Stillman Company, New York City. 

Hydraulic jack. 

Worthin^n Pnmping: Engine Company, 120 Liberty St., 

New York City. — Steam pumping machinery ; water meters. 



CLASS 22. 

MACHINE TOOLS. 



Acme Machinery Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Machinery for forging, cutting and heading bolts ; for tapping nuts. 

Almond, Thomas B., Brooklyn, New York. 

Drill chucks. 

American Machinery Company, Grand Bapids, Michigan. 

Machines, hand operated for wood trimming. 



Tool & Machinery Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Brass finishing lathes and tools. 

American Turret Lathe Works, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Turret lathes for heavy metal working. 

Armstrong Brothers Tool Company, Chicago. 

Tool holders. 

Atkins, E. C, & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Saws, tools and saw mill specialties. 

Baker Brothers, Toledo, Ohio. 

Kcyway cutters and drill presses. 



i 



128 GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 

Barnes, W. F. & Toliiiy Company, Bookf ord, Illinoii. 

Upright drilling machines. 

Bates Hachine Company, Joliet, Illinois. 

Automatic wire nail machine. 

Becker-Brainerd Hilling Uaohine Company, Hyde Park, 

Massachusetts. — Milling machines. 

Becker, Tokn, Fitohburg, Hassaohnsetts. 

Milling machines. 

Bement, Uiles & Company, FhiladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Machine tools. 

Biokford Drill & Tool Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Radial drill and multiple gear cutter. 

Bowsher, N. P., South Bend, Indiana. 

Balancing ways for balancing revolving parts of machines. 

Bradford Hill Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Engine lathes. 

Bridgeport Onn Implement Company, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Augurs and bits. 

Brown & Sharpe Hannf actnring Company, ProYidence, Bhode 

Island. — Milling, grinding, screw and gear cutting machines, 
milling cutters, and other metal working machine tools. 



Brown, B. H., & Company, New Haven, Connectiont. 

Reid chucks. 

Buffalo Forge Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Tool forge with blower. 

Builders* Iron Foundry, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Grinding and polishing machinery. 

BuUard Hachine Tool Company, Bridgeport, Conneotiout. 

Boring and turning mills and turret machines. 

Burr, John T., & Son, Brooklyn, New York. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Carborundum Company, The, Niagara Falls, New York. 

Grinding wheels. 

Card, S. W., Hanufacturing Company, Hansfleld, Hassa- 

chusetts. — Taps and dies. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 129 

Carpenter, The T. H., Ta|i & Die Company, Fawtnoket, 

Rhode Island. — Taps and dies. 

Cataract Tool & Optical Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Small chiseling lathe, 

« 

Cliicago Pnenmatic Tool Company, Cliicago. 

Pneumatic hammers, drills, riveters, boring machines, flue weld- 
ers, cutters, and rollers; air tools of all kinds. 



Cincinnati Killing HaoMne Company, The, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Milling machines, universal cutters and tool ganders. 

Cincinnati Planer Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Machine tools. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Twist drills, reamers, milling cutters, etc. 

Clongh, B. H., Tolland, Connecticut. 

Adjustable reamers. 

Clongh, Bockwell, Company, Alton, New Hampshire. 

Automatic machines for making wire corkscrews. 

Coes, L., Wrench Company, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Monkey wrenches. 

Coffin A Xeighton, Syracuse, New York. 

Machinists' rules. 

Curtis A Curtis, Bri^port, Connecticut. 

Machines for pipe cutting and threading. 

Cushman Chuck Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Lathe chucks. 

FAmour A Uttledale, New York City. 

Power drill presses. 

Deering Harvester Company, Chicago. 

Automatic machines for working in metal. 

Dock, Herman, Philadelphia, Peimsylvania. 

Center grinding tool. 

Boig, William, S., 64-66 iranklin St., Brooklyn, New York. 

Box nailing machines. 

Eames, G. T., A Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Chucks, drill-grinder. 



130 GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 

Eames, Wilfred Company^ Boohester^ New York. 

Drill grinder. 

Erring^on, F. A., New York City. 

Machine tools, drills, taps, etc. 

Farrini^on, F. A.^ New York. 

Taps and dies. 

Fay, T. A., & Egan Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Wood working, wood sawing and planing machinery. 
Paris, 1889, grand prix; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Fellows Oear Shaper Company, Springfield, Vermont. 

Gear shapers and cutters. 

Ferracnte Haohine Company, Bridgeton, New Jersey. 

Machines for sheet metal working. 

Flather A Company, Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Machine tools. 

Flather Planer Company, The, Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Machine tools, lathes, planers and shapers. 

Foster, Walter H., New York City. 

Twist drill grinder. 

Gay A Ward, Athol, Massachusetts. 

Milling machine cutters. 

Oeometrio Drill Company, New Haven, Connecticut. 

Drills. 

Oibson, A. C, Buffalo, New York. 

Steel stamps for marking tools. 

Oisholt Machine Company, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Machine tools, turret machines. 

Oleason Tool Company, Bochester, New York. 

Gear planers. 

Ooodell-Pratt Company, Oreenfleld, Massachusetts. 

Hack saw blades. 

Gorton, George, Machine Company, Bacine, Wisconsin. 

Machine tools : disc grinders ; universal surface grinders. 

Grant Machine Tool Works, The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Machine tools for working in metal. 



^ 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 131 

Hampden Corandnm Wheel Company, Brightwood, Mass. 

Corundum wheels. 

Hardinge Brothers, Chioago. 

Split or wire chucks. 

Hart Kannfaetnring .Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Hand tools for cutting threads. 

Healy, William P., 616 Chamber of Commeroe, Chicago. 

Automatic box making machinery. 

Hendey Machine Company, Torrington, Connecticut. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Himnbottom-Dayis Journal & Alarm System, Chicago. 

Electric thermostatic device for indicating temperature of machine 
bearings. 

Hilles A Tones Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Metal punching and shearing machines. 

Hill, Hugh, Tool Company, Anderson, Indiana. 

Tool holder. 

Hoggson & Pettis Manufacturing Company, New Haven, 

Connecticut. — Scroll chucks. 

Holland's Manufacturing Company, Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Pipe vises, tongs and cutters. 

Horton, E., & Son Company, Windsor Locks, Connecticut. 

Chucks for brass finishers, milling, grinding, and screw machines ; 
drills ; cutting off lathes ; boring mills for car wheels. 

IngersoU Milling Machine Company, The, Bockf ord, Illinois. 

Heavy milling machines. 

Tones & Lamson Machine Company, Springfield, Vermont. 

Flat turret lathe for rapid work with full outfit of turret tools 
including the Hartness automatic screw cutting die. This machine 
handles rough or smooth bars, round, square, or hexagon, and 
every variety of work under two inches diameter and twenty-four 
inches long. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Kearney & Foot, New York. (Henry Hamelle, Agent, Paris.) 

Files. 

Landis Tool Company, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

Universal grinding machines. 



132 GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 

Le Blond, E. K, Haohine Tool Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Engine lathes for metal working. 

Le Connt, Wm. G., South Norwalk, Conneotient. 

Light steel tool. 

Leisenring, John, Hannf aoturing^ Company, Belmont and Elm 

Avenues, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Machine lead screws and 
portable keyseating machines. 

Leland A Fanlooner Hannf actnring Company, Detroit, Mich. 

Lathe center grinder. 

Udell A Williams, 697 Anstin Ave., Chicago. 

Automatic wood carving machinery for panels, concave and con- 
vex surfaces. 

Lncas, T. L., Providence, Bhode Island. 
Dies. 

Harkt A Company, New York City. 

Machine tools for metal working. 



Headyille Vise Company, Headville, Pennsylvania. 

Culinder boring machine. 

Herohants Hannfactnring .Company, 7 Water St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Automatic machines for placing hinges upon 
boxes. 

Hoisan Machine Company, Boohester, New York. 

Machinery for making wooden boxes. 

Morse Twist Drill & Machine Company, New Bedford, 

Massachusetts. — ^Twist drills, reamers, chucks, milling cutters, 
taps and dies, mandrels, sockets, and machinists' tools. 

Morton Mannf actnring Company, Mnskegon Heig^hts, Mich. 

Shaping machine. 

Mossberg & Granville Mannf actnring Company, Providence, 

Rhode Island. — Metal press and automatic drop. 

New Haven Mannf actnring Company, New Haven, Conn. 

Metal planer, lathes. 

New Process Twist Drill Company, Tannton, Massaohnsetts. 

Hot-forged twist drills. 

Nicholson, W. H., & Company, Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. 

Expanding mandrels. 



GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 133 

Hiles Tool Works Company, Hamilton, Obio. 

Machine tools ; lathes, planers, boring miJU, and special machines. 

Horton Emery Wheel Company, Worcester, Hassaohnsetts. 

Emery and corundum wheels, emery wheel machinery and special- 
ties. 

Oesterlein HacUne Company, Cincinnati, Obio. 

Milling machines for metal work. 

Oneida Hational Clinck Company, Oneida, New York. 

Chucks. 

Oster Kannf actnring^ Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Adjustable threading tools for pipes and bolts. 



Owen Kachine Tool Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Machine tools. 

Pearson Hachine Company, Chicago. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Perkins Hachine Company, Sonth Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Machine tools. 

Pond Hachine Tool Company, Hamilton, Ohio. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Potter A Johnston Company, Pawtncket, Bhode Island. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Pratt A Whitney Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Machine tools for metal working, small tools and standards. 

Pratt Chuck Company, The, Frankfort, New York. 

Drill chucks. 

Prentioe Brothers Company, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Drilling machinery and engine lathes. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Prentiss Vise Company, New York. 

Vises. 

Q. and C. Company, Chicago. 

Pneumatic tools and machines for metal cutting. 

Quint, A. B., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Vertical turret drilling machine. 

Bansom, Perry, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

Grinding machine. 



134 GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 

Seece, E. F., & Company, Greenfield, Hassaohnsetts. 

Taps and screw plates. 

Beed, F. E., Company, Worcester, Hassachnsetts. 

Power lathes for working in metal. 

Sice Oear Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Gear cutting machines. 

Bichardson, C. F., & Son, Athol, Uassachnsetts. 

Machinist level and gauges. 

Bivett-Dock Company, The, Brighton, Hassachnsetts. 

Thread cutting tool. 

Bogers, T. H., Boat Gauge & Drill Works, Gloucester City, 

New Jersey. — Gauges for measuring work. 

Sackman, F. A., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Steels stamps for tool marking. 

Safety Emery Wheel Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Tool grinding machine. 

St. Louis Machine Tool Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bench grinder. 

Saunders', D., Sons., Tonkers, New York. 

Patent wheel pipe cutters. 

Saw Company, ITew York. 

Emery wheels. 

Sawyer Tool Company, Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 

Surface gauge. 

Simonds Manufacturing Company, Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 

Saws and machine knives of all kinds and of higher grades only. 
Six branch houses in the United States. 
Philadelphia, 1876, medal ; Chicago, 1893, three medals. 

Skinner Chuck Company, New Britain, Connecticut. 

Chucks, 

Slocum, T. T., & Company, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Micrometer caliper. 

Smith, H. B., Machine Company, Smithville, New Jersey. 

Various machines for wood working. 

Springfield Machine Tool Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Power lathes for metal working. 



GROUP IV.-CLASS 22. 135 

Springfield Kannfaotnring Company, Providence, fihode 

Island. — Special planer type grinding machine. 

Standard Fnenmatic Tool Company, Cliicago. 

A complete air plant in actual operation, consisting of pneumatic 
drills, hammers, flue rolling, reaming, tapping and boring ma- 
chines, riveters, etc., showinpf various classes of work in railroad 
and boiler shops, shipyards, iron and bridge works, foundries and 
manufactories. 

Standard Tool Company, The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Twist drills (taper shank, straight shank and three gauge), ream- 
ers, milling cutters, chucks, mandrels, sockets. 

Starrett, The L. S., Company, Athol, Massachusetts. 

Tools for machinists, carpenters and draughtsmen; micrometers, 
rules, dividers, calipers, hack saws, etc. 

Stiles & Parker Press Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Sheet metal working machinery. 

Snssfeld, Lorsch & Company, 27-29 Maiden Lane, New 

York City. — Machine tools for working in metal and wood. 

Thompson, Henry, 0., & Son Company, New Haven, Conn. 

Saws for metal cutting. 

T. & B. Tool Company, New Bedford, Massachusetts. Owned 

by Morse Twist Drill Company. — Twist drills, taps. dies, milling 
cutters, reamers, etc. 

Trimont Mannfaotnring^ Company, Boxbnry, Massachusetts. 

Pipe cutters and wrenches. 

Trump Brothers Machine Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Lathe center grinder. 

Union Manufacturing Company, New Britain, Connecticut. 

Chucks. 

Universal Machine Company, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Machine tools. 

Yanderbeck Tool Works, Hartford Connecticut. 

New dividing head. 

Vitrified Wheel Company, Westfield, Massachusetts. 

Emery and corundum wheels. 

Walcott, George B. & Son, Jackson, Michigan. 

Shaper for iron working. 



r 



136 GROUP IV.— CLASS 22. 

Walker, 0. S.,.& Company, Worcester, Massaoliiuetts. 

Magnetic chuck ; a device for holding work to the chuck by mag- 
netism. 

Waltliam Watch Tool Company, Springfield, Kassachnsetts. 

Milling machines for metal working. 

Warner & Swasey, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Machine tools for metal working. 

Waterbnry Tool Company, Waterbnry, Connectiont. 

Patent ratchet hand drill. 

Watson & Stillman, New York. 

Hydraulic presses. 

Wells Brothers & Company, Greenfield, Hassachnsetts. 

Screw plates and taps. 

Westcott Chuck Company, Oneida, New York. 

Chucks for iron working machines. 

Western Mannfactoring Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Tool holders. 

Weston, Thomas A., 38 Park Bow, New Tork. 

Hand punches, shears and wrenches. 

Whiton, D. R, Machine Company, New London, Conn. 

Chucks. 

Williams, David, Company, New Tork. 

Publication : The Iron Age. 



GROUP V. 

ELECTRICITY. 

FRANCIS E. DRAKE, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 23. 

MACHINES FOR GENERATING AND USING ELEC- 
TRICITY. 



Adyance Faoking: A Supply Company, Cliioago. 

Asbestos gum core packing. 

American Commeroial Bnbber Company, Elizabeth, New 

Jersey. — Electric insulating tape. 

American Hard Fiber Company, New Tork City. 

Insulating material. 

American Vitrified Condnit Company, New Tork City. 

Underground and interior conduits. 

American Woven Wire Bnuh Company, Feabody, Mass. 

Woven wire dynamo brushes. 

Anchor Electric Coflipany, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Small switches. 

Andenon, Albert ft T. H., Hannfactnring^ Company, Massa- 
chusetts. — Quick-break switches. 

Automatic Switch Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

. Switch, quick acting. 

Bates, B. L., ft Brother, Dayton, Ohio. 

Electric fans. 

Belknap Motor Company, Fortland, Maine. 

Chapman voltage regulator. 

137 



138 GROUP v.— CLASS 23. 

9 

Billings & Spencer Company, The, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Switches and fuses. 

Bossert Electric Construction Company, XTtica, New York. 

Erickson outlet insulator. 

Bullock Electric Hanufacturing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Continuous current dynamos, motors and appliances; motor for 
direct connection to machine tools; back geared crane motors; 
controllers. 

C. & C. Electric Company, Oarwood, New Jersey. 

Electric motor. 

Central XTnion Brass Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Trolley fittings. 

Chase-Shawmut Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Switches and fuses. 

Chicago Bawhide Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

Rawhide pinions. 

Circular Iron Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Insulating tube or conduit. 

Clark, Tames, Jr., & Company, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Electrically driven tool grinder ; electric motor. 

Cleveland Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Automatic time-switch. 

Commercial Electric Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Electric motor. 

Cook Mercantile Trust Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Slate for electrical purposes. 

Crocker-Wheeler Electric Company, New York City. 

Electric motor. 

Crouse-Hinds Electric Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Special switch for switchboard ammeters. 

Crown Woven Wire Brush Company, Salem, Massachusetts. 

Woven wire brushes for dynamos. 

Cutter Electric and Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Automatic Circuit-breakers. 

Dayton Electrical Manufacturing Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Small motors and switches. 



^ 



GROUP V. CLASS 23. 139 

Delaware Hard Fibre Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Insulation for electrical purposes. 

Diehl Hannfaeturing Company, Elizabethport, New Jersey. 

Direct connected fan-motors. 

Dixon, Tosepli, Cmoible Company, Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Graphite brush for motors and dynamos. 

Eck Dynamo & Motor Works, Newark, New Jersey. 

Small motors. 

Edison Manufaetnring Company, Orange, New Jersey. 

Motors for fans, batteries and specialties. 

Emerson Electrie Mannfactnring Company, St. Lonis, Mo. 

Knife switch. 



China Works, Brooklyn, New York. 

Porcelain insulators. 

Enreka Tempered Copper Works, North East, Pennsylvania. 

Dynamo brushes, commutators. 

Fagan, J. C, Watertown, New York. 

Cut-outs and switches. 

Falcon Electric Manufacturing Company, New York. 

Electric fans. 

Falk Mannfactnring Company, Milwankee, Wisconsin. 

High voltage switches. 

Fisher Electric Mannfactnring Company, Detroit, Mich. 

Circuit breakers. 

Forest City Electrical Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Commutator bars. 

Galvanic Metal Paper Company, New York. 

Dynamo brushes. 

Oarton-Daniels Company, Eeoknk, Iowa. 

Lightning arresters for railway circuits. 

General Equipment Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Automatic circuit breaker. 

Eartwig & Miller, Detroit, Michigan. 

Boring tool for electric wiring. 

Hasard Mannfactnring Company, Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. 

Insulated wire for magnets. 



140 GROUP v.— CLASS 23. 

Eobart Eleotrio Mannf aotniing Company, Troy, Obio. 

Steel dynamos. 

Holmes Fibre Orapbite Mannf actnring Company, 51-65 

Wakefield Street, Germantown, Pennsylvania. — Dynamo brushes. 

Eoltzer-Cabot Electric Company, Brookline, Hassaobnsettg. 

Switches and motors. 

Insnlating Staple Saddle Company, Brockton, Massaobnsetts. 

Insulator. 

Iron Clad Besistance Company, Wes-.deld, New Jersey. 

Dynamo field rheostat. 

Jeffrey Mannf actnring Company, Tbe, Colnmbns, Obio; 41 

Dey St., New York. — Electric and air power coal cutters, drills, 
electric locomotives. Chain belting-steel cable, elevating, convey- 
ing machinery. Elevator buckets, screening machinery, coal 
crushers and pulverizers. 

Jenney Electric Mannf actnring Company, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Motors. 

Jobns, E. W., Mannf actnring Company, New York. 

Non-arcing fuses for electric circuits ; mica insulators for electric 
transmission lines. 

E. & W. Company, Fittsfield, Massacbnsetts. 

D)mamo brushes. 

Eartavert Mannf actnring Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Flexible fiber in sheets, rods and tubing for insulating. 

Eester Electric Manufacturing Company, Cbicago. 

Fuse wire, solder, etc. 

Elein, M., & Sons, Cbicago. 

Line tools ; wire grips. 

Lakon Transformer Company, Elkbart, Indiana*. 

Alternating current transformers. 

La Bocbe & Company, New York. 

Circuit breaker. 

Locke, Fred M., Victor, New York. 

High voltage insulators. 

Lorain Steel Company, Lorain, Obio. 

Double railway equipment; electrical railway motors, controllers 
^nd appars^tus, 



GROUP v.— CLASS 23. 141 

Kanhattan Electrical Supply Company, New York. 

Battery. 

Marshatl, William, New York. 

Electrical condensers. 

Medbiiry, Warren, Company, Sand Hill, New York. 

Inductor; alternator motors. 

miwankee Electric Company, Milwankee, Wisconsin. 

Electric motor. 

Mnnsell, Engene, & Company, New York. 

Micanite insulation for dynamos and motors. 

National Condnit & Cable Company, New York. 

Cement lined, metal conduits for electric wires. 

New Process Bawhide Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Rawhide pinions. 

New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio. 

Alternating current stationary transformers. 

New York Insulated Wire Company, New York. 

Insulating tape. 

Ohio Electrical Specialty Company, Troy, Ohio. 

Woven wire dynamo brushes. 

Okonite Company, New York. 

Insulating tape. 

Onondaga Dynamo Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Enclosed motors. 

Otis Elevator Company, New York.— Otis Elevator Company, 

Ltd., London; Otis Elevator Company, Ltd., 25 Rue de la Paix. 
Paris; Deutsche Otis-Gesellschaft, Berlin. — Electrically operated 
passenger elevators ; an escalator, electrically driven. 



Patrick, Carter & WiUdns, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Switches, sockets. 

Partridge Carbon Works, Sandusky, Ohio. 

Carbon brushes for motors and dynamos. Self lubricating d3mamo 
brush. 



Battery Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Ho. 

Carbon brushes and primary batteries. 



142 GROUP v.— CLASS 23. 

Philadelphia Eleotrioal & Manufactnring Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. — Quick-break electric switches. 

Pittsburg Transformer Company, Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Transformers. 

Bobbins & Meyers Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Fan motors. 

Boyal Electrie Company, Peoria, Illinois. 

Dynamo and transformer. 

Shaw Electric Crane Company, The, Hnskegon, JlichigiUL 

Electric traveling crane and appurtenances. 

Silex Insulation Company, New ^ork. 

Insulating material. 

Sills, W. E., Mica Company, Chicago. 

Mica for electrical purposes. 

Speer Carbon Company, St. Marys, Pennsylvania. 

Carbon brushes for motors and dynamos. 

Sprague Electric Company, New York. 

Armored conduits. 

Standard Paint Company, New York. 

Insulating tape. 

Steward, D. M., Manufacturing Company, Chattanooga, 

Tennessee. — ^Lava insulators. 

Stow Manufacturing Company, Binghamton, New York. 

Multispeed electric drill. Center grinder for lathe. 

Thomas, B., & Sons Company, East Liverpool, Ohio. 

High voltage insulators. 

Thresher Electric Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Motors. 

Union Porcelain Works, Brooklyn, New York. 

Hard porcelain insulators. 

Van Wagoner & Williams Hardware Company, Cleveland, 

Ohio. — Commutator bars. 

Vulcanized Fibre Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Vulcanized fiber for insulating purposes. 



GROUP v.— CLASS 24. 143 

Warren Electric & Specialty Company, Warren, (Hue. 

Transformers. 

Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Alternating current motors, converters and accessories. 

Western Electric Company, CMcago, Illinois. 

Various apparatus for generating, transmitting and using direct 
and alternating current. Various applications to mechanical pur- 
poses. Safety appliances, etc. 

Ward Leonard Electric Company, BronzviUe, New York. 

Field regulating rheostats; motor starting rheostats; motor speed 
regulating rheostats; automatic motor controllers; theater dim- 
mers ; ventilating fan controllers ; automatic circuit breakers ; out- 
let boxes (many types) and many special forms of rheostats for 
various uses. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, 

Pennsylvania. — Electric motors. 

Wirt, Cliarles, & Company, Fhiladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Dynamo brushes and rheostats. 



Zindars & Hunt, Hew York City. 

Switches and meters. 



CLASS 24. 

ELECTRO-CHEMISTRY. 



Abbott Electric & Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, OUo. 

Electric cigar lighter. 

Acheson, E. C, Hiagara Falls, Hew York. 

Primary battery containing graphitized carbon element ; electrodes 
for electrolytic work. 

American Hard Bubber Company, Hew York. 

Battery cells. 

Edison Manufacturing Company, Hew York. 

Battery cells. 

Edison, Thomas A., Jr., Hew York. 

Standard battery of 8 cells. 



144 GROUP V.—CLASS 25. 

Electric Oas-Lighting Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Samson battery, electric gas-lighters. 

Federal Battery Company, Boston, Hassaohnsetts. 

Substitute for sal-ammoniac for carbon batteries. 

Oordon Battery Company, New York. 

Fans, water rheostats, faradic coils, batteries. 

Oould Storage Battery Company, Depew, Hew York. 

Storage cells. 

Leclanche Battery Company, New York. 

Batteries. 

Manhattan Electrical Supply Company, New York. 

Battery. 

New Excelsior Dry Battery Company, 661 Hudson St., Hew 

York. — Non-polarizing dry battery cells. 

Non-Polarizing Dry Battery Company, Hew York. 

Non-polarizing dry battery cells. 

Boliance Lamp Electric Company, New York. 

Electric safety lamp and storage battery. 

Boach, William, Manufacturing Company, Hew York 

City. — Standard dry batteries. 

United States Battery Company, New York. 

Small storage battery cells. 

Voltamp Electric Uanufacturing Company, Baltimore, 

Maryland. — Dry batteries. 



CLASS 25. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTING. 



Adams-Bagnall Electric Company, The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Arc lamps. 

Almond, Thomas B., Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric desk lamps. 



^ 



GROUP v.— CLASS 25. 145 

Ameriean Electric Uotor Company, Fhiladelpbia, Fa. 

Two electric motors. 

American Electric Specialty Company, Hew York. 

Direct reading ohmeters. 

American Endoscopic Company, Providence, Ehode Island. 

Miniature incandescent lamps. 

American Hard Bubber Company, Hew York. 

Electrical hard rubber goods. 

American Miniature & Decorative Lamp Company, Hew York. 

Small incandescent lamps. 

Anderson, H., Feekskill, Hew York. 

Hand magnet winder. 

Baker & Fox, Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Focusing arc lamps. 

Barron, James S., £ Company, Hew York. 

Electric pocket searchlight. 

Belden-Larwill Electric & Hannfactnring Company, Fort 

Wayne, Indiana. — Arc lamps for alternating and continuous cur- 
rents. 

Bossert Electric Construction Company, Utica, Hew York. 

Outlet insulator. 

Bristol Company, Waterbnry, Connecticut. 

Recording volt meters and ammeters. * 

Bryant Electric Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Incandescent lamp sockets and switches. 

Buckeye Electric Company, Cleveland, Obio. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Cbicago Edison Company, Cbicago, Illinois. 

System of records and accounts for central stations. 

Cbicago Fuse Wire & Manufacturing Company, Cbicago. 

Fuse wire and fuse links. 

Colonial Electric Company, Youngstown, Obio. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Columbia Incandescent Lamp Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Incandescent lamps. 



146 GROUP v.— CLASS 25. 

Creaghead Engineering Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Arc lamp specialties and trolley line materials. 

Dale Electric Company, New York. 

Electric sign letter. 

Davis Incandescent Lamp Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Devere Electric Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Electic lighting installation. 

Edwards & Company, New York. 

Electric wiring accessories. 

Electric Gas Lighting Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Samson battery electrical gas lighter. 

Electric Motor & Equipment Company, Newark, New Jersey. 

Portable photometer with spring rotator. 

Fairies Manufacturing Company, Decatur, Illinois. 

Brackets, lamp fixtures, shades. 

Fisher Electric Manufacturing Company, Detroit, Michig^. 

Circuit-breakers. 

Frink, I. P., New York. 

Electric fixtures and reflectors. 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 

Special installation; illustrations, models and methods; views of 
central and isolated stations, and special apparatus; models made 
to scale of factories at^Schenectady, N. Y. ; Lynn, Mass. ; Harri- 
son, N. J.; photographs of electric installations and interiors of 
warships. 
Paris, 1899, grand prix, gold medal ; Chicago. 1893, medal. 

Gilmore Electric Company, South Boston, Massachusetts. 

Incandescent lamps and ceiling rosettes. 

Goehst, Henry, Chicago, Illinois. 

Incandescent lamp shades. 

* 

Hardy Lamp Company, Fittsfield, Massachusetts. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Hart & Hageman Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Conn. 

Snap switches. 

Hart Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Switches, porcelain rosettes. 



GROUP v.— CLASS 25. 147 

Eartwig & Miller, Detroit, Uichigan. 

Boring tool for electric wiring. 

Hecla Iron Works, Brooklyn, New York. 

Special ornamental arc lamp posts with accompanying post for use 
in connecting with railings. 

Helios-Upton Company, Feabody, Massachusetts. 

Various types of arc lamps for use on continuous and alternating 
current; carbons for same; rheostats and special converters for 
same. 

Holophane Olass Company, New York. 

Prism glass globes and shades for artificial lighting. Holophane 
patents. 

Hnebel & Manger, Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric door bells. 

Incandescent Electric Light Manipulator Company, The, 

Boston, Massachusetts. — Incandescent bulb renewer and cleaner. 

Inglis, William, Wire & Iron Works, Detroit, Michigan. 

Wire lamp guards for incandescent lamps. 

Jewell Electric Instrument Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Volt and milliampere meters. 

Kinsman, P. E., New York City. 

Desk lamps. 

Lea Manufacturing Company, Elwood, Indiana. 

Arc lamps. 

Lynn Incandescent Lamp Company, Lynn, Massachusetts. 

Incandescent lamps. 

McLeod, Ward & Company, New York. 

Desk lamps. 

Malcolmson, Charles T., Chicago, Illinois. 

Design for electric arc lamp post and accessories. 

Meyrowitz, E. B., New York. 

Special lamp socket and current connector. 

Morris Arc Lamp Company, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Enclosed arc lamps. 

National Carbon Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Arc light carbons. 



148 GROUP v.— CLASS 25. 

New York & Obio Company, Warren, Ohio. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Onota Uanuf actnring Company, Fittsfleld, Hassaohiuetts. 

Electric hair curlers. 

Orient Electric Company, Youngstown, Obio. 

Incandescent lamps. 

Ozley & Eno8, 35th St. and 5th av.. New York City. 

Special electrical chandeliers. 

Pacific Electric Company, La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Incandescent desk lamps. 

Faiste, H. T., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Porcelain sockets, cut-outs, switches, etc 

Pass & Seymour, Syracuse, New York. 

Porcelain cut-outs and lamp sockets. 

Perkins Switch Manufacturing Company. 

Rosette and switch. 

Phelps, William T., Elmwood, Illinois. 

Incandescent lamps and sockets. 

Bobbins & Uyers Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Electric fans. 

Schiff, Tordon & Company, New York City. 

Carbons for electrical purposes. 

Solar Carbon & Uanuf actnring Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Carbons. 

Speer Carbon Company, St. Marys, Pennsylvania. 

Carbons for arc lamps. 

Splitdorf, C. P., New York. 

Spark coils. 

Stanley Instrument Company, Oreat Barrington, Mass. 

Meters. 

Sterling Arc Lamp Company, New York. 

Arc lamps. 

Stewart, Frank H., & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Handle and adjuster for drop lamp cord. 



GROUP v.— CLASS 26. 149 

Syiaonie Electric Instrument Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Voltmeters. 

Tiffany Olass & Decorating Company, 333 fourth Av., New 

York- — Globes, chimneys and shades for electric lighting. 

Toerring, C. 7., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Arc lamps for continuous and alternating currents. 

TTnited States Carbon Company, The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Cored carbons for arc lamps. 

Vonght, H. I., La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Two ball adjuster for incandescent lamps. 

Washington Carbon Company, Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Carbons for arc lamps. 

West, E. S., Chicago, Illinois. 

Insulated ceiling plate for arc lamps. 

Western Electric Company, Chicago. 

Arc lamps for both continuous and alternating current ; incan- 
descent lamps ; special applications. 

White, 0. 0., Company, The, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Adjustable electric light fixtures. 



CLASS 2(5. 

TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY. 



American Electric Telephone Company, Chicago^ Jllinois. 

Universal and express switchboards for telephones. 



Hard Bnbber Company, New York. 

Telephone receivers. 

American Steel & Wire Company, Worcester, Massachnsetts. 

Samples of telephone and telegraph electrical and power wires 
and cables. 



American Wireless Telegraph Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 

System of wireless telegraphy. 



150 GROUP v.— CLASS 26. 

Anderson, H., Feekskill, New York. 

Hand magnet winder. 

Ansonia Brass & Copper Company, New York. 

Insulated wire. 

Central Telephone & Electric Company, St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Telephone. 

Chicago Insulated Wire Company, Chicago. 

Insulated wire. 

Connecticut Telephone & Electric Company, Heriden, Conn. 

Telephone set. 

Crefeld Electric Works, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Insulated wire. 

Crehore, A. C, & Squier, Oeorge 0., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sine wave methods of telegraphing, both land and submarine, in- 
cluding very rapid transmission for land lines. 

Department of the Post Office, IT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

A collection of models to illustrate the transportation of the 
United States mail on land and water. 

Dicke Tool Company, Downer's Orove, Illinois. 

Workmen's tools for aerial telephone, telegraph, and electric light 
wires. 

Driver-Harris Wire Company, New York. 

Fine wire in all metals for electrical purposes. 

Eureka Electric Company, Chicago. 

Telephone and switchboard. 

Farr Telephone & Construction Supply Company, Chicago. 

Telephones. 

Fisk, H. H., Manufacturing Company, Wheaton, Illinois. 

Telephones. 

Foot, Pierson & Company, New York. 

Combination telephone, lightning arresters. 

Oordon, A. Y., Hassillon, Ohio. 

Adjustable telephone transmitter arm. 

Huebel & Hanger Uanufacturing Company, Brooklyn, New 

York. — Electric bells. 



GROUP v.— CLASS 26. 151 

niinoifl Insulated Wire Company, Sycamore, Illinois. 

Insulated wire. 

India-Bubber & Ontta-Fercha Insulation Company, Yonkers, 

New York. — Insulated wire. 

Indiana Bubber and Insulated Wire Company, Jonesboro, 

Indiana. — Insulated wire. 

Insulating Saddle Staple Company, Brockton, Massachusetts. 

Insulated staples. 

International Cable Directory Company, 30 Broad Street, New 

York. — Systematic code of telegraphing. 

Kokomo Telephone Electric & Manufacturing Company, 

Kokomo, Indiana. — Telephone. 

Klein, Mathias, & Son, Chicago. 

Tools and appliances for installing overhead and submarine con- 
ductors. 

Eusel Telephone & Electric Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Telephone. 

McDermid Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

Silk-covered magnet wire. ** 

Mianus Electric Company, Mianus, Connecticut. 

Telephone. 

National Automatic Telephone Company, Bloomington, 111. 

Telephone system; automatic inter-communicating telephone 
exchange and apparatus. 

National Conduit & Cable Company, New York. 

Overhead conductors, telegraph yd telephone cables. 

National India Bubber Company, Bristol, Bhode Island. 

Wires and cables. 

New York Insulated Wire Company, New York. 

Insulated wire. 

North Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Telephones. 

Okonite Company, New York. 

Insulated wire. 

Ostrander, W. B., & Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Annunciators and house goods. 



152 GROUP v.— CLASS 26. 

Pacific Electric Company, La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Desk lamps. 

Patrick, Carter & Wilkins, PMladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

House goods. 

Pennsylvania Electric Company, Marietta, Pennsylvania. 

Telephones. 

Pern Electric Hannf actnring Company, Pern, Indiana. 

Porcelain* insulators. 

Pettingill Andrews Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Wires. 

Phillip Insulated Wire Company, Pawtucket, Ehode Island. 

Insulated wire. 

Pittsburg Boduction Company, Pittsbur?, Pennsylvania. 

Aluminum wire and cable, bare and insulated. 

Bawson Electric Company, Elyria, Ohio. 

Telephone. 

Boebling's, John A., Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Bare and insulated wire and underground electrical cables. 

Bowland Multiplex Telegraphic Company, 100 S.-Gkiy St., 

Baltimore, Maryland — Multiplex synchronous telegraphy ; an octo- 
plex, printing telegraph, showing both ends of line, with four 
transmitters and four receivers at each end. A detached single 
outfit of transmitters and receivers at each end of line. Other 
multiplex forms of telegraphy. Devices to show operation of 
synchronism ; maps, diagrams, photographs. 

Safety Insulated Wire and Cable Company, 223-239 W. 28th 

St., New York. — Insulated wire. 

Simplex Electric Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Insulated wires and cables. 

Simplex Interior Telephone Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Interior telephones. 

Sprague Electric Company, New York City. 

Armored conduits. 

Standard Telephone & Electric Company, Madison, Wis. 

Standard wall telephone set. 

Stromberg, Carlson Telephone Manufacturing Company, Chi- 
cago. — Telephone. 



i 



GROUP v.— CLASS 27. 153 

Telephone Uannf acturing Company, Snmter, South Carolina. 

Telephones. 

Varley Duplex Magnet Company, Jersey City, Hew Jersey. 

Special magnets and devices for telephone and telegraph instru- 
ments ; special system of manufacture. 

Viaduct Manufacturing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Portable telephone set. 

Western Electric Company, Chicago. 

Apparatus and instruments for telephone and telegraph ; telegraph 
relays, sounders, etc. Telephone switchboards, mstruments and 
appliances. Telegraph and telephone cables, both overhead and 
submarine. 

Western Telephone Construction Company, 250 S. Clinton 

St., Chicago. — Telephones and apparatus for telephone exchanges, 
switchboards, annunciators, connectors, etc. 

Williams-Abbott Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Magnets and telephone transmitters. 

Williams Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Telephones. 



CLASS 27. 

VARIOUS APPLICATIONS OF ELECTRICITY. 



Abbott Electric & Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Electric cigar lighter. 

American Electric Heating Corporation, Cambridgeport, 

Massachusetts. — Electric heating goods ; enamel rheostats. 

American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Electric heaters and soldering irons. 

American Electrical Specialty Company, New York. 

Electrical test instruments. 

Automatic Electric Clock Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Electric clocks. 



154 GROUP v.— CLASS 27. 

Bristol Company, The, Waterbnry, Connecticut. 

Recording volt and ampere meters. 

Consolidated Car Heating Company, Albany, New York. 

Electric car heaters. 

Sale Electric Company, New York. 

Electric fixtures. 

Eastern Electric Cable Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Insulated wire and cable. 

Eldridge Electric Hanuf acturing Company, Springfield, Mass. 

Voltmeter. 

Oeneral Incandescent- Arc Light Company, New York. 

Electric fan motors. 

Gold Car Heating Company, New York. 

Apparatus for heating by electricity. 

Gordon Battery Company, New York. 

Electro-medical apparatus. 

Gray, Elisha, and Mundy, Arthur J., Newtonville, Hass. 

Indicators and recording apparatus for various natural phenomena. 

Hadaway Electric Heating & Engineering Company, New 

York. — Small electric stoves and heaters. 

Herzog Teleseme Company, New York. — ^Variable Signalling 

Apparatus for hotel rooms; electro-chemical annunciators; tele- 
phone signals, adjuncts and switchboards; fairy annunciators. 
Specialties in "Latent" or "Non-Interference" signals for hotel, 
fortification, naval, ship, mining, railway, coast guard, postal, tele- 
phone and telegraph installations. 

Iron Clad Besistance Company, Westfield, New Jersey. 

Field rheostats. 

Johns, H. W., Manufacturing Company, New York. 

Electric heaters. 

Jewell Electrical Instrument Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Portable voltmeter for direct current readings. 

HcCay Engineering Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Electric heating apparatus. 

McGraw Publishing Company, 26 Cortlandt St., New York. 

Bound volumes and current numbers of electrical periodicals. 



^ 



GROUP v.— CLASS 27. 155 

Marshall, William, New York. 

Electrical condensers. 

Keyrowitz, £. B., New York. 

Electro-magnet for abstracting metallic substances from the 
human eye. 

Kontauk Kiiltipliase Cable Company, 100 Broadway, New 

York. — Interior electric fire detective cables. 

Norton Electrical Instrument Company, Manchester, Conn. 

Electrical measuring instruments. 

Onota Manufacturing Company, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

Electric hair curlers. 

Queen & Company, Philadelphic, Pennsylvania. . 

Scientific apparatus; measuring instruments, voltmeters, am- 
meters, various standards for alternating and continuous currents. 

Bitchie, £. S., & Sons, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Induction coil for X-ray. 

Sempire Clock Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Electrical clocks. 

Stanley Instrument Company, Oreat Barrington, Mass. 

Electrical instruments. 

United Electric Heating Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Electric heating apparatus. 

Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Electric measuring instruments. 

Weston Electrical Instrument Company, Newark, New Jer- 
sey. — Scientific apparatus ; measuring instruments, voltmeters, am- 
meters, various standards for alternating and continuous currents. 



GROUP VI. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING— TRANSPORTATION, 

WILLARD A. SMITH, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 28. 

MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES RELAT- 
ING TO CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Amerioan Car Sprinkler Company, Worcester, Kassa^ 

chusetts. — Photographs of street sprinkling machinery. 



Hoist & Derrick Company, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota. — Photograph of hoisting machine. 



Fnenmatic Serrice Company, Boston, Hassachu- 

setts. — A system of pneumatic carriers for post and package de- 
livery. 

Barr, J. Carrol, Horgantown, West Virginia. 

Photographs of engineering work. 

Bowers, A. B., San Francisco, California. 

Model of a hydraulic dredge. 

Bradley Pnlverizer Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs of cement machinery. 

•Broadway Chambers, The, New York. 

A collective exhibit illustrating the materials and construction 
of an American steel office building in New. York City. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

Bradley & Currier Company, New York. — Interior woodwork. 

Brooklyn Electric Equipment Company, Brooklyn, New York. 
— Electric lighting. 

Bullock Electric Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Electric gene- 
rators. 

Byrne, Thomas J., New York City. — Plumbing. 

157 



158 GROUP VI.— CLASS 28. 

Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. — Steel 
frame. 

Clonbrock Steam Boiler Company, Brooklyn, New York. — 
Boilers and fittings. 

Empire City Marble Company, New York. — Marble. 

Fuller, George A., Company, New York City. — Builders* 
models. 

Gilbert, Charles, New York City and St. Paul, Minnesota. — 
Architect. 

Hecla Iron Works, Brooklyn, New York. — Iron supplies. 

Otis Elevator Company, New York City. — Elevators. 

Payne Engineering Company, New York. — Engines. 

Peirce, John, New York City. — Granite. 

Perth Amboy Terra Cotta~ Company, Perth Amboy, New 
Jersey. — ^Terra Cotta. 

Pittsburg Terra Cotta Lumber Company, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Fire proofing. 

Purdy & Henderson, New York City. — Consulting engineers. 

Russel & Irwin Manufacturing Company, New York — Hard- 
ware. 

Taylor, Henry, Lumber Company, Lafayette, Indiana. — Lum- 
ber construction. 

Wells & Newton Company, N«w York City. — Steam heating. 

Bucyms Company, The, South Hilwankee, Wisconsin. 

Model of dredging machine, and photographs. 

Buffalo Pitts Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Photographs of civil engineering machinery. 

Case Hanufacturing Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Photographs of traveling cranes. 

Cleveland Crane & Car Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs of traveling cranes. 

Clulow, P. T., Schenectady, Hew York. 

Photographs of engineering machinery. 

Davis, Charles Henry, New York. 

An album of photographs of engineering work. 

Deering Harvester Company, Chicago. 

Working model of an American factory plant, showing the 
arrangements for handling the materials by trains of cars and 
vessels. 

Diamond State Steel Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Photographs illustrating construction of steel factory. 

Edson Manufacturing Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs of engineering machinery. 



^ 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 28. 159 

Flory, S.y Manufacturing Company^ Bangor, Haine. 

Photo^aphfi of carrying machinery. 

Oillette-Herzog Hanufacturing Company, Hinneapolis, Min- 
nesota. — Photographs of steel construction. 

Oood Boadfl Machinery Company, Kennett Square, New 

York. — Photographs of road machinery. 

Oraves, Edwin S., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Photographs of engineering work. 

Henny, S. C, San Francisco, California. 

Photographs of irrigation work. 

Hill, George, New York. 

Photographs of fireproof warehouse construction. 

Hutton, William E., New York City. 

Photographs of engineering construction. 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Company, 26 Cortlandt Street* New 

York. — Model drills, quarrying machinery, compressors, etc., used 
on the Chicago drainage canal. 

International Association for Testing Materials, Fhila- 

dephia, Pennsylvania. — Photographs of testing machinery, etc. 

Iroquois Iron Works, Buffalo, New York. 

Photographs of civil engineering machinery. 

Jeffrey Manufacturing Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Photographs of conveying machinery. 

Lathbury & Spackman, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of Portland cement manufactories. 

Link Belt Engineering Company, Nicetown, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Photographs of conveying machinery. 

Linton, Harvey, Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of engineering work. 

McKim, Alexander Bice, New York. 

Photographs of engineering construction. 

Marion Steam Shovel Company, Marion, Ohio. 

Photographs of dredging and excavating machinery. 

Mississippi Biver vCommission, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. — Models of graders and dredges. 



leO GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 

Pencoyd Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylyania. 

A collection of parts of bridges and viaducts of ste^, to illus- 
trate American bridge building. 

Phosphdria Phosphate Company, Ltd., St. Ang^tine, 

Florida. — Photographs of pebble phosphate plant 

Band Drill Company, 100 Broadway, New York. 

Rock drills and machinery used on the Chicago drainage canal. 

Beed, B. A., Bnlnth, Minnesota. 

Photographs of engineering work. 

St. Bernard Coal Company, Earling^n, Kentucky. 

Photographs of mining and conveying machinery. 

Sitandard Paint Company, New York. 

Roofing materials. 

Steel Cable Engineering Company, New York City. 

Photographs of conveying machinery. 

Thackray, Oeo^e E., Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs illustrating modern steel building construction. 

Trenton Iron Company, The, Chicago. 

Photographs illustrating the preparation of engfineering mate- 
rials, wire, wire-rope, iron, etc. 

WiUdns, Oeoi^e S., Chicago. 

Photographs of engineering machinery and materials. 

Wood, B. B., & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 



CLASS 29. 

MODELS, PLANS, AND DESIGNS FOR PUBLIC WORKS. 



Abbot, Frederic V., XT. S. A., St. Panl, Minnesota. 

Photographs from United States engineer office. 

American Pipe Manufactnring Company, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Photographs of water works construction, etc. 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 161 

Baldwin, S. E., & Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Model of modern United States piano factory, demonstrating en- 
gineering construction as applied to industrial productions. 

Belknap, W. E., Hew York City. 

Photographs of harbor work, etc. 

Berlin Iron Bridg^e Company, The, East Berlin, Connecti- 
cut. — Designs and drawings of steel construction in the United 
States. 

Board of Park Commissioners, Cambridge, Hassachnsetts. 

Reports. 

Board of Street Commissioners, Cambridge, Hassachnsetts. 

Reports. 

Boiler, Alfred P., New York. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

Boston Terminal Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Maps, plans, photographs, etc., showing the terminal facilities at 
the City of Boston. 

Boston Transit Commission, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Maps, plans, photographs and models showing the building of the 
subway for the use of street railways. 

Broadway Chambers, The, New York. 

A collective exhibit illustrating the materials and construction of 
an American steel office building in New York City. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

Bradley & Currier Company, New York. — Interior woodwork. 

Brooklyn Electric Equipment Company, Brooklyn. — Electric 
lighting. 

Bullock Electric Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Electric gen- 
erators. 

Byrne, Thomas J., New York. — Plumbing. 

Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. — Steel 
frame. 

Clonbrock Steam Boiler Company, Brooklyn. — Boilers and fit- 
tings. 

Empire City Marble Company, New York. — Marble. 

Fuller, George A., Company, New York. — Builders* models. 

Gilbert, Charles, New York and St. Paul, Minnesota. — Archi- 
tect. 

Hecla Iron Works, Brooklyn, New York. — Iron supplies. 

Otis Elevator Company, New York. — Elevators. 

Payne Engineering Company, New York. — Engines. 

Peirce, John, New York. — Granite. 



162 GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 

Perth Amboy Terra Cotta G)mpany, Perth Amboy, New Jer- 
sey. — Terra cotta. 

Pittsburg Terra Cotta Lumber Company, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Fire proofing. 

Purdy & Henderson, New York. — Consulting engineers. 

Russel & Irwin Manufacturing Company, New York. — Hard- 
ware. 

Taylor, Henry, Lumber Company, Lafayette, Indiana. — Lum- 
ber construction. 

Wells & Newton Company, New York. — Steam heating. 

Brown, William M., Jr., Boston^ Massachusetts. 

Photographs of sewerage work. 

Caldwell, W. E., & Company, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Photograph of water tank. 

California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, 

California. — Geographic charts, to be exhibited with the relief 
map of the State. 

Cambria Steel Company, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

Painting of their Johnstown works. 

Chicago Sanitary District, Security Building, Chicago. 

Three models of the Chicago drainage canal, showing the full 
canal, the controlling works, and the heaviest rock cutting. 

Coolidge, C. A., & Horin-Ooustiaux, 0., Chicago, Illinois, 

and Paris, France. — Designs for United States National Pavilion. 

Cummings, Bobert A., Owensboro, Kentucky. 

Photographs of river bank protection, and of grain elevators 
Thetis and Isis. 

Department of Public Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Plans, drawings, and photographs, illustrating the work of the 
Bureau of Surveys of the City of Philadelphia. 

Department of Transportation, XT. S. Commission to Paris, 

Chicago. — Publications, proceedings and reports relating to civil 
^ engineering and public works. 

Dun, James, Chief Engineer, Atchison, Topeka & Santa 

Fc Railway Company, Topeka, Kansas. — Photographs of bridge 
construction and river improvement. 

Engineering News Publishing Company, New York. 

Publication: Engineering News and books on engineering sub- 
jects. 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 163 

Genunell, B. C.^ State Engineer^ Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Photographs of public works. 

Orau, Bernard B., Snperintendeiity Library Buildings and 

Grounds, Washington, D. C. — Photographs o£ engineering con- 
struction, etc. 

Oray, Samuel H., Providence, Bhode Island. 

Photographs of public works. 

Haupt, Louis M., 107 North 36th Street, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Three models of the alluvial bar at Aransas Pass, 
Texas, on the Gulf coast. 

Hermany, Charles, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Photographs of water works construction. 

Hickley, H. V., Huskogee, Indian Territory. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

Eoff, Olaf, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Photographs of engineering structures. 

Illinois Central Bailroad Company, Chicago. 

A model of a ballast floor trestle. 

Johnson, Wallace C, Niagara Palls, New York. 

Photographs of water power and transmission construction. 

Jorgensen, Edward C. P., Chicago, Illinois. 

Drawings of exterior design of United States Machinery building 
at Vincennes. 

Kansas City & Memphis Bailway & Bridge Company, Kansas 

City, Missouri. — Model of the Memphis bridge, with photographs. 

Kenly, William L., Chief Engineer, Water Department, Bal- 
timore, Maryland. — Photographs of public works. 

King Bridge Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

Kuichling, Emil, Bochester, New York. 

Photographs of water works construction. 

Lawrence Sewerage Board, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Model of the Lawrence sewerage plant, with plans and photo- 
graphs. * 

Leavitt, Charles W., New York. 

Photographs of public works. 



164 GROUP VI— CLASS 29. 

Llewellyn, Frank J., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Photographs of engineering structures. 

Long Island Bailroad Company, New York City. 

Maps, photographs, . and albums of the railroad, showing the 
plans of the line, and main engineering features. 

Loweth, Charles T., C.E., St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Photographs of engineering construction. 

MeOnire, James C, New York. 

Photographs of engineering construction. 

Massachnsetts, Commonwealth of, Boston, Massachusetts. 

A map of the Commonwealth, showing the steam railroad and 
street railway lines. 

Metropolitan Park Board, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Maps, plans, photographs, and reports. 

Metropolitan Sewerage Board, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Maps, plans, photographs, and reports. 

Metropolitan Water Board, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Maps, plans, photographs, and reports. 

Mississippi Biver Commission, XT. S. A., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Models, relief maps, plans, photographs, etc., illustrating river 
improvement and apparatus used for that purpose. 

Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Works, Leavenworth, 

Kansas. — Photographs of steel structures. 

Modjeski, Balph, Chicago. 

Photographs of the Rock Island Bridge. 

Munster, A., City Engineer, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

New York, City of. 

Topographical maps of New York City in 1700, 1800 and 1900. A 
relief map of the city in 1776. 

Ockerson, J. A., 1119 FuUerton Building, St. Louis, Missouri. 

River improvement, mapping machine, survey marks, and targets. 

Ostrom, John N., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

Phoenix Bridge Company, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 29. 165 

Pitt & Scott, 39 Broadway, New York. 

Models, plans, maps of transportation of merchandise. 

Boebling's, John A., Sons Company. 

Model of Brooklyn suspension bridge. 

San Francisco, City of, California. 

Maps of the city in 1837, 1838, 1849, and 1899. 

Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Colored drawings of shooting gallery. 

Sonne, Otto, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs of a profile taking machine. 

Standard Electric Company of California, San Francisco. 

Relief map illustrating power transmission. 

State Board of Health, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Plans, photographs, reports, etc. 

Thacher, Edwin, Paterson^ New Jersey. 

Photographs of river bridge construction. 

United States Express Company, 49 Broadway, New York. 

Appliances pertaining to the transportation and delivery of ex- 
press material. 

Vickers, Thomas McE., Syracuse, New York. 

Photographs of water works. 

Warren City Boiler Works, Warren, Ohio. 

Photographs of water tanks. 

West Gallatin Irrigation Company of Montana, Man- 
hattan, Montana. — Photographs of engineering work. 

Wilkins, George S., Chicago. 

Photographs of public works. 

Wrought Iron Bridge Company, Canton, Ohio. 

Photographs of bridge construction. 

Youngstown Bridge Company, Youngstown, Ohio. 

Photographs of bridge construction, etc. 



166 GROUP VI.— CLASS 30. 



CLASS 30. 



CARRIAGES AND WHEELWRIGHTS* WORK— AUTO- 

MOBILES AND CYCLES. 



American Electric Vehicle Company, 1545 Michigan Ave., 

Chicago. — Various types of automobiles. 

American Hotor Company, 32 Broadway, New York. 

Automobiles. 

American Seller Bearing Company, Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Automobile bearings and automobiles. 

American Saddle Company, Elyria, Ohio. 

Bicycle saddles, tool bags, etc. 

Ball and Pedal Factory, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Bicycle pedals, steel balls, stampings, etc. 

Buffalo Factory, American Bicycle Company, Buffalo, New 

York. — Envoy and Fleetwing bicycles. 

Chain Factory, American Bicycle Company, Indianapolis, 

Indiana. — Bicycle chains. 

Cleveland Axle Manufacturing Company, Canton, Ohio. 

Carriage and wagon axles. 

Cleveland Factory, American Bicycle Company, Thomson- 

ville, Connecticut. — Cleveland chain and chainless bicycles. 

Cleveland Machine Screw Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Automobiles and automobile supplies. 

Columbia and Electric Vehicle Company, Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. — Hart. O. Berg, 54 Avenue Montaigne, Paris, Director for 
Europe. — Electric automobile vehicles, petroleum automobile vehi- 
cles; station equipment and apparatus for charging and trans- 
ferring the storage batteries of electric automobiles. 

Columbia Factory, American Bicycle Company, Hartford, 

Connecticut. — Columbia chainless and chain and Hartford 
bicycles. 

Columbus Buggy Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Light and heavy vehicles, for business or pleasure. 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 30. 167 

Colnmbiu Factory, American Bicycle Company, Columbus, 

Ohio. — Columbus bicycles for jobbing trade. 

Consolidated Subber Tire Company, 40 Wall Street, New 

York. — Rubber tire wheels and wheels with roller bearing axles. 

Crawford Factory, American Bicycle Company, Hagerstown, 

Maryland. — Crawford bicycles. 

Crescent Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicago. 

Crescent chainless and chain bicycles. 

Electric Vehicle Company, 100 Broadway, New York. Hart 

O. Berg, 54 Avenue Montaigne, Paris, Director for Europe. — 
Automobile vehicles. 

Fay Factory, American Bicycle Company, Elyria, Ohio. 

Fay juvenile bicycles. 

Featherstone Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicago. 

Featherstone bicycles. 

Freeport Factory, American Bicycle Company, Freeport, 

Illinois. — Phoenix bicycles. 

Gteneva Factory, American Bicycle Company, Oeneva, Ohio. 

Geneva bicycles for jobbing trade. 

Orand Bapids Cycle Company, Orand Bapids, Michigan. 

Clipper chainless and chain bicycles. 

Imperial Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicago. 

Imperial bicycles. 

Lamb Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicopee Falls, 

Massachusetts. — Spalding chainless and chain bicycles. 

Locomobile Company of America, 11 Broadway, New York 

City. — Steam automobiles. 

Hilwankee Factory ,American Bicycle Company, N. Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin. — Meiselbach, Famous, and Carnival bicycles. 

Monarch Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicago. 

Monarch chainless and chain bicycles, Waverly chain bicycles. 

North Buffalo Factory, American Bicycle Company, North 

Buffalo, New York.— Niagara bicycles. 

N3rack Factory, American Bicycle Company, Nyack, New 

York. — Nyack bicycles. 



168 GROUP VI.—CLASS 30. 

Overman Wheel Company^ Chicopee Falls, Hassachiuetts. 

Automobiles and accessories. 

Flymonth Factory, American Bicycle Company, Flymouth, 

Indiana. — Bicycle wood rims and guards, etc. 

Bambler Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chicago. 

Rambler bicycles. 

Beading Factory, American Bicycle Company, Beading, Penn- 
sylvania. — Stover, Pennant and Mars bicycles. 

Biker Electric Vehicle Company, Elizabethport, New 

Jersey. — Automobiles and separate parts. 

Bubber Tire Wheel Company of America, 11 Broadway, New 

York. — The "Kempshall" rubber tire for light or heavy auto- 
mobiles. 

Shelby Factory, American Bicycle Company, Shelby, Ohio. 

Ideal bicycles. 

Smith Farts Factory, American Bicycle Company, Hilwankee, 

Wisconsin. — Bicycle parts, stampings, etc. 

Sterling Factory, American Bicycle Company, Kenosha, Wis- 
consin. — Sterling chainless and chain bicycles. 

Syracuse Factory, American Bicycle Company, Syracuse, New 

York. — Steams, Barnes and Syracuse bicycles. 

Thomas, John F., 439 31st Street, Chicago. 

A double ball bearing axle, with an inner revolving sleeve. 

Thompson Farts Factory, American Bicycle Company, Chi- 
cago. — Bicycle frame sets, stampings, etc. 

Toledo Factory, American Bicycle Company, Toledo, Ohio. 

Cleveland chainless and chain, and Viking bicycles. 

Tribune Factory, American Bicycle Company, Erie, Fennsyl- 

vania. — Tribune chainless and chain bicycles. 

Veeder Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Cyclometers for bicycles and automobiles. 

Westfield Factory, American Bicycle Company, Westfield, 

Massachusetts. — Westfield bicycles. 



^ 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 169 

CLASS 31. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 



Hallanan, H., 186 W. 4th St., New York. 

Rubber horseshoe pads and horseshoes. 

McKerroiiy J. A., San Francisco, California. 

Horse boots, harness, saddles, parts of harness and materials per- 
taining to harness and saddlery. 

O'Kane, J., San Francisco, California. 

Harness, saddles, parts of harness and materials pertaining to 
harness and saddlery. 



CLASS 32. 

EQUIPMENT FOR RAILWAYS AND STREET RAILWAYS. 



AUis, Edward P., Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Photographs of engines for generating electric power for street 
railways. 

American Balance Slide Valve Company, Jersey Shore, Penn- 
sylvania. — Slide valves on Richmond lo-wheeled locomotive. 

American Brake Company, St. Louis, Hissouri. 

Brakes on Richmond locomotive. 

American Car & Foundry Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Railroad equipment. 

American Car Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Photographs of car bodies. 

Appleton, T., Houghton, Michigan. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Ashcroft Manufacturing Company, New York. 

Steam gauge ^displayed on Baldwin locomotive. 



170 GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 

Auditor, West Virginia State, Charleston, West Vii^nia. 

Reports. 

Babcock & Wilcox Company, New York. 

Photographs of power house stations. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 

Express passenger locomotive. Freight locomotive. Mogul type. 

Brill, J. G., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Working models in brass of trucks for tramway electric cars. 

Brown, Harold P., 120 Liberty Street, New York City. 

Photographs of plastic rail bonds. 

Chisholm & Hoore Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, 

Ohio. — Photographs of engineering and railroad machinery. 

Coale Muffler & Safety Valve Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Safety valves ,and mufflers, on Richmond locomotive. 

Comptroller of the Treasury, New Jersey State, Trenton, 

New Jersey. — Railroad and canal reports. 

Consolidated Car Fender Company, Providence, Bhode 

Island. — Photograph of car fender. 

Consolidated Car Heating Company, Albany, New York. 

Photographs of cars and car heating apparatus. 

Continuous Bail Joint Company of America, Newark, 

New Jersey. — Rail joints, small sections, and photographs. 

Cornell University, College of Civil Engineering of, Ithaca, 

New York. — Proceedings. 

Corporation Commission, North Carolina, Baleigh, North 

Carolina. — Reports. 

Crosby Steam Oauge & Valve Company, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Safety valves, on Baldwin locomotive. 

Diamond State Steel Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Bolts, nuts, spikes, fish-plates, and angle bars for railroads. 

Doane, W. A., Meadville, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of railroad bridge construction. 

Engineering Becord, New York City. 

Publication. 



^ 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 171 

Engineering Society, Iowa, Cedar Bapids, Iowa. 

Proceedings. 

Engineering Society, Michigan, Climax, Michigan. 

Proceedings. 

Engineering Societies, Joomal of the Association of, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. — ^Journal. 

Engineering, Western Society of, Chicago. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers and Surveyors, Illinois Society of, Peoria, Illinois. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers, Civil, American Society of. New York. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers' Club of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Proceedings. 

Engineers' Club of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers, Montana Society of, Helena;, Montana. 

Proceedings. 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Proceedings. 

Equalization, Wyoming State Board of, Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

Reports. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Company, Franklin and Monroe Sts., 

Chicago. — Petroleum motor-car, hand-car, push-car and veloci- 
pede car. 

French, A., Spring Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

All springs used on the Richmond locomotive. 

Galena Oil Company, Franklin, Pennsylvania. 

Lubricating oils for railroads, street railways, etc. 

Goodwin Car Company, New York. 

Two complete dump-cars with air-brakes and air dumping appa- 
ratus. Attachments to change into armor car. 



172 GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 

Gould Coupler Company, 25 W. 33d Si., New York City. 

Master car-builders' couplers, vestibule, and continuous plat- 
forms. 

Hall, £. L., 50 N. 23d St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Headlight, displayed on Baldwin locomotive. 

Hendricks Brothers, 49 Cliff Street, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Furnace material displayed on Baldwin locomotive. 

Hipwood-Barrett Car & Fender Company, 66 Broadway, Hew 

York. — Photographs of car fenders. 

Hotchkiss, C. W., Chicago. 

Outline plans of railroad engineering. 

International Brake-Shoe Company, Old Colony Building, 

Chicago. — Brake-shoes, and diagrams of tests. 

Johnson, Thomas H., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Kimball, George A., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Latrobe Steel Works, Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

Tires for driving wheels of Richmond locomotive. 

Leach, Henry L. £., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sand-blast on Richmond locomotive. 

Leonhardt Wagon Manufacturing Company, Baltimore, 

Maryland. — Photographs of revolving tower wagon for use on 
street railways. 

McCann, Thomas H., Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Photographs of street-railway construction, etc. 

McCardell, J. B., & Company, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Photographs of 'Trenton Trolley Wagon," used on street rail- 
ways. 

McConway & Torley Company, The, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Janney automatic car couplers. 

HcOuire Manufacturing Company, 122 Sangamon Street, Chi- 
cago. — Electric snow-plow and sweeper, solid steel Columbian 
trudc, bicycle truck, elastic brake hanger, etc. 

McEee, Fuller & Company, Catasaqua, Pennsylvania. 

Car wheels and axles. 



^ 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 173 

Hathan Manufacturing Company, New York. 

Injectors and lubricator on Richmond locomotive. 

national Hollow Brake Beam Company, Chicago. 

Brake beam on Richmond locomotive. 

national Hallway Publication Company, New York. 

Official guide of the railways and steam navigation lines of the 
United States, Porto Rico, Canada, Mexico, and Cuba. 

National Tnbe Works, 267 S. Fonrth Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Tubes displayed on Baldwin locomotives. 

New York Air Brake Company, The, 86 Broadway, New York 

York City. — Automatic quick-action compressed air-brakes for a 
train of 50 freight cars, and for a passenger train of 10 cars, 
models, diagrams, etc. 

Chicago, 1893, two medals. 

New York Car Wheel Works, Buffalo, New York. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Ohmer, William I., Bayton, Ohio. 

Odometers and conductors* ticket-issuing machines. 

Page, Newell & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Steel tired wheels for Richmond engine and tender. 

Parkhurst, H. W., Engineer of Bridges, Illinois Central 

Railway System, Chicago. — Photographs of railroad construction. 

Porter, H. E., Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of light locomotives. 

Powers, Joseph A., Lansingburg, New York. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Pressed Steel Car Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Pressed steel cars, car trucks and bolsters. 

Pullman Company, The, Chicago. 

Photographs illustrating the development of sleeping cars. 

Q. & C. Company, Chicago. 

Samples of ties illustrating protection afforded by tie-plates and 
method of applying same. Illustrations and photographs. 

Bailroad & Warehouse Commission, Illinois State, Springfield, 

Illinois. — Reports. 

Bailroad & Warehouse Commission, Minnesota State, St. 

Paul, Minnesota. — Reports. 



174 GROUP VI.—CLASS 32. 

Bailrcad & Warehouse Commission, Missouri State, Jefferson 

City, Missouri. — Reports. 

Bailroad Association, The, Western, Chicago. 

Proceedings. 

Bailroad, Chattanooga & Lookout Hountain, Chattanooga, 

Tennessee. — Photographs of double incline railway. 

Bailroad, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, Chicago. 

Model of a Howe bridge, with approaches. 

Bailroad Commission, Alabama State, Montgomery, Alabama. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Arkansas State, Little Bock, Arkansas. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Florida State, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Oeorgia State, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Kentucky State, Frankfort, Ken- 
tucky. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Massachusetts State, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Mississippi State, Jackson, Mississippi. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, New Hampshire State, Concord, Hew 

Hampshire. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Texas State, Austin, Texas. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Vermont State, Burlington, Ver- 
mont. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commission, Virginia State, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioner, Bhode Island State, Providence, 

Rhode Island. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, California State Board of, San 

Francisco, California. — Reports. 



GROUP VI. -CLASS 32. 175 

Bailroad Commissioners, Connecticut Board of, Hartford, 

Connecticut. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, Iowa State Board of, Des Hoines, 

Iowa. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, Kansas State Board of, Fort Scott, 

Kansas. — Riports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, Haine State, Augnsta, Haine. 

Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, New York State Board, of, Albany, 

New York. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, South Carolina State, Columbus, 

South Carolina. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, South Dakota State, Sioux Falls, 

South Dakota. — Reports. 

Bailroad Commissioners, Wisconsin State, Hadison, Wis- 
consin. — Reports. 

i 

Bailroad Company, Lehigh Valley, New York. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

 

Bailroad Company, Michigan Central, Detroit, Hichigan. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Bailroad Company, Philadelphia & Beading, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Photographs of railroad construction. 

Bailroad Gazette, New York. 

Publication upon engineering. 

Bailroad, New York Central & Hudson Biver, Albany, New 

York. — Photographs of railroad construction. 

Bailroad, Northern Pacific, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Atlas of standard bridge plans. 

Bailroads & Telegraphs, Ohio State Commissioner of, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. — Report. 

Bailroads, Commissioner of, Michigan State, Lansing, Michi- 
gan. — Reports. 

Bailroads, Commissioners of, North Dakota State, Bismarck, 

North Dakota.— Reports. 



176 GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 

Bailway Accounting Officers, Association of American, Chi- 
cago. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Age, Chicago. 

Publication : The Railway Age. 

Bailway and Engineering Beview, Chicago. 

Publication. 

Bailway Association, the American, New York. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway, Boston & Maine, Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Photographs and descriptive publications. 

Bailway Car Accountants, International Association of. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. — Proceedings. 

Bailway, Chicago & West Michigan, Grand Bapids, Michi- 
gan. — Photographs of railroad construction. 

Bailway Club, Central, of Buffalo, Hew York. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Club,. New England, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Club, New York, Brooklyn, New York. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Club, Northwest, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Club, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Club, Western, Chicago. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Company, Colorado Midland, Denver, Colorado. 

Photographs of railroad and tunnel construction. 

Bailway Company, Oulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, Oalveston, 

Texas. — Photographs of railroad machinery. 

Bailway Company, Metropolitan West Side Elevated, Chi- 
cago. — Photographs of elevated railway construction. 

Bailway Company, Missouri Pacific, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Photographs of railroad work. 



GR0UI> Vl.—CLASS 52* 111 

Bailway Company, Peoria & Eastern, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Bailway General Passenger & Ticket Agents, AmerioaH 

Association of, Cleveland, Ohio. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Master Car & locomotive Painters' Association, 

Kent, Ohio. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Master Car Builders' Association, Chicago. 

Proceedings. 

Bailway Master Mechanics, American Association of, Chi- 
cago. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Bead Masters' Association of New England, Ware, 

Massachusetts. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Signalling Club, West Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Proceedings. 

Bailway Superintendents of Bridges and Buildings, Associa- 
tion of. Concord, New Hampshire. — Proceedings. 

Bailway Telegraph Superintendents, Association of, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. — Proceedings. 

Bailways, Pennsylvania State Bureau of, Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Reports. 

Beading Iron Company, Beading, Pennsylvania. 

Tubes displayed on Baldwin locomotive. 

Bichmond Locomotive and Machine Works, Bichmond, Vir- 
ginia. — ^Ten wheeled passenger locomotive, built for the Finland 
State Railways, cylinders, 16x24 inches. 

Richmond "Tramp," compound freight locomotive, No. 2427, 
cylinders, 20x32x26 inches. 
Front end of compound locomotive showing valves. 

Bicker, George A., Buffalo, New York. 

Photographs of railway construction. 

Boad Masters' Association of America, Sterling, Illinois. 

Proceedings. 

Bodd, Thomas, Chief Engineer, Pennsylvania lines West of 

Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. — Photographs of track eleva- 
tion. , 

Booke Begister Company, Peoria, Illinois. 

Portable fare registers. 



178 GROUP VI.— CLASS 32. 

Safety Car Heating & Lighting Company, New York. 

Gas lighting system on Richmond ten-wheeled locomotive. 

Scotty Charles, Spring Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Springs on Richmond locomotive. 

Scripture, Edward W., New Haven, Connecticut. 

Color sight testing instruments. 

Sellers, William,. & Company, Inc., Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Self-acting injector. Automatically adjusts water 
supply without waste at overflow. Restarts automatically if jet 
is broken. Capacity increasts with steam pressures from 15 to 
225 pounds. Minimum capacity at 180 pounds 43 per cent of 
maximum. 

Paris, 1867. gold medal. Vienna, 1873, diploma of honor and 
five medals. Philadelphia, 1876, three medals. Paris, 1889, grand 
prix. 

Signal Oil Company, Franklin, Pennsylvania. 

Locomotive and car lubricating oils. 

Standard Steel Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Railroad wheels, axles, tires, and forgings. 

Street Bailway Association, American, Chicago. 

Proceedings. 

Street Bailway Publishing Company, New York. 

Street Railway Journal. 

Surveyors and Civil Engineers, Ohio Society of, Columbus, 

Ohio. — Proceedings. 

Taunton Locomotive Manufacturing Company, Taunton, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs of light locomotives. 

Tax Commissioner, Maryland State, Annapolis, Maryland. 

Reports. 

Tax Commissioners, Indiana State Board of, Indianapolis, 

Indiana. — Reports. 

Track Elevation and Depression Commission, Chicago. 

Plans and photographs of track elevation and depression. 

Transportation, Nebraska State Board of, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Report. 

United States Metallic Packing Company, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Metallic packing, displayed on Baldwin locomo- 
tive. 



GROUP VI.-CLASS 33. 179 

Weber Railway Joint Manufacturing Company, New York. 

York. — Railway joints and bonds, photographs and drawings. 

Westinghonse Air Brake Company, Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Brakes on Richmond locomotive. 

Wilgns, William J., New York. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 

Worth Brothers & Company, Coatesville, Pennsylvania. 

Boiler material, displayed on Baldwin locomotive. 

Yard, K T., Salt Lake City, ITtah. 

Photographs of railroad construction. 



CLASS 33. 

MATERIAL AND EQUIPMENT USED IN THE 
MERCANTILE MARINE. 



Advance Coal Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Model of towboat, with barges. 

Alleman, A., Brenham, Texas. 

Live-saving; apparatus. 

Allen, Frederick S., Cnttyhnnk Island, Hassachusetts. 

Live-saving apparatus. 

American Hotor Company, 32 Broadway, New York City. 

Motor launches. 

American Steel Barge Company, New York City. 

Models of whaleback barges and others. 

Arnold, Krs. W. A., New York. 

Model of schooner yacht "Sachem." 

Astor, John Jacob, New York. 

Model of electric yacht "Eutopian." 

Atlantic Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of steam yacht "Presto." 



180 GROUP VI.— CLASS 33. 

Bagg, S. F., Tarrytown^ New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bartiiolomew, J. S., Onerneville, California. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Benson, Oliver, 111 Fourth Avenue, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bergfeldt, N. H., 341 E. 59th St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bethlehem Steel Company, South Bethlehem, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Photographs illustrating the manufacture of armor-plate, 
ordnance, hollow or solid forged shafting; general forgings and 
castings. Commercial product steel forgings for marine and 
stationary engines, machine tools, and for general use in the 
trades ; made of fluid-compressed open hearth plain or nickel steel, 
solid or hollow, hydraulically forged and annealed or oil-tem- 
pered. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. 

BoUes, Charles £., 244 Fulton St., Brooklyn, New York. 

Yachting and marine photographs. 

Bowles, Francis T., Naval Constructor, V. S. Navy. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Boyle, Patrick F., 17 Conlin Court, Worcester, Massachu- 
setts. — Life-saving apparatus. 

Bradley, J. B., Barker, Niagara County, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bragard, A., Bonaldsville, Louisiana. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Brokaw, W. Gould, New York Yacht Cluh, New York. 

Model of schooner yacht "Amorita" and painting of same. 

Bullock, George, Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, New 

York. — Model of sloop yacht "Narota.** 

Burton-Hoffman Photo Company, 9 W. 42d St., New 

York. — Yachting and marine photographs. 

Busk, Mrs. J. B., Newport, Bhode Island. 

Model of schooner yacht and model of schooner yacht "Mischief." 

Cainsbensy, Frank, 27 N. Hoyne Ave., Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 



GROUP VI.— Class 33. I8I 

Carley, Horace L, 123 ElmtiiLsrton Avenue, Hyde Park, 

Massachusetts. — Life-saving apparatus. 

Carter, W. C, Delaware, Ohio. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Castillo, Emeit, West Tampa, Florida. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Chapman, W. H., Salt Lake City, ITtah. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Cobb, J. L, Salina, Kansas. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Colombia Safety S. S. Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Crawshaw, C. B., Jonesville, Virginia. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Darlot, Cyrus E., 465 E. 57th St., Hew York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bepartment of Transportation, V. S. Commission to the Paris 

Exposition. — A collective exhibit illustrating the development of 
American yachts. 

Dickenson, Charles 0. L. 0., Washington, D. C. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bingman, T. A., Spring Valley, Illinois. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Boremus, Dr., College, City of Hew York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Brein, Thomas, A Company, Wilmington, Belaware. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bubreuil, Victor, 107 W. 43d St., New York. 

Life-saving boat. 

Duncan, John P., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Modd of steam yacht Kanawha. 

Elliott, William B., 6222 S. Halsted St., Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Ellis, W. H., Premont, Nebraska. 

Life-saving apparatus. 



182 GROUP VI.— CLASS 33. 

Flint, Charles E., Hew York Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of a steam yacht. 

Forbes, T. Malcolm, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Model of sloop yacht "Puritan." 

Fnrgerson, Alan B., 253 Broadway, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Gardner & Cox, 1 Broadway, New York City. 

Half models of sloop yacht **Syce" and of schooner yacht 
"Quisetta." 

Oere, George H., Grand Rapids, Kichigan. 

Gasoline launches. 

German, Solomon, Davidsonville, Maryland. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Goldberg, B. W., 5 Beekman St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Gondy, Arthur L., 1400 Louisiana St., Lawrence, Kansas. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Goodwin Car Company, New York. 

Model of dumping barge. 

Hara, G. B., Salida, Colorado. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Harris, Henry W., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Schooner yacht Quisetta, oil painting of. 

Hatton, J. H., Fort Covington, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Hedberg, Alexander S., 9310 Evans Avenue, Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Herbert, Frederick D., 20 Broad St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Hichbom, Philip, Chief Constructor, TJ. S. Navy, Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Life-saving buoy. 

Higginson, H. C, Orange Lake Ice Yacht 

Club, New York. — Model of ice yacht Cold Wave. 

Higginbotham, Elmer £., 6958 Pamell Avenue, Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 



^ 



GROUP VI.-CLASS 33. 183 

Hoy, H. P., Sosedale, WasMngtdn. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Ensrlies, John P., 35 Walcott St., Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

International Navigation Company, New York. 

Models, pictures, photographs, etc., of the steamships and other 
property of the company, descriptive of trans-Atlantic steamship 
business. 

Iowa Iron Works, limited, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Model of a sternwheel towboat. 

Irwin, Charles P., Bed Bank, New Jersey. 

Full-rigged model of ice,yacht "Georgie." 

lyers, John J., Lowell, Hassachnsetts. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Jaqnes, W. E., 277 Clarendon St., Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Johnson, J., Bridgeport, Alabama. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Kamowsky, William, Florence, Oregon. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Kennedy, W. J., Pier 14, North Eiver, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Knickerbocker, Willis, New Lenox, Illinois. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Kudo, K., Seattle, Washington. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Lake, Levin, Charles and Saratoga Sts., Baltimore, Haryland. 

Life-saving apparatus. Oil shell. 

Leister, William Hammond, Westminster, Karyland. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Leschbrandt, E., 208 N. 6th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Little, Joseph H., 106 E. 123d St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 



184 GROUP VI.— CLASS -33. 

''Long Arm" System Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Devices operating at a distance, for use in ships, mines, and build- 
ings, closing surely, and without jamming, safety bulkheads and 
hatches. Pneumatic, hydraulic, and electric systems and working^ 
gears; electric air compressors. 

Official tests and service. In use more than two years on the 
U. S. cruiser "Chicago." Officially specified by description for 
fifteen U. S. battle-snips and cruisers, and for four monitors. 
The "man at the door" retains full control at all times. 

Lozier Hannfactnring Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gasoline launches, large and small. 

Lund, Waldemar, New York, and 33 Fredericksberggade, 

Copenhagen, Denmark. — Life-saving apparatus. 

Lyden, H. J., 8 Patterson St., Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Lyon, Leonidas S., Jr., Flatonia, Texas. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

HcEinnon, James W., 713 E. 138th St., Hew York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

HcHanus, Thomas F., Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Half models of pilot-boat "America," fishing schooner "Juniata, 
fishing boats "James S. Steele" and "Maggie Sullivan. 



Hagiierson, J. F., 120 Sutter St., San Francisco, California. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Hagoun, F. P., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of steam yacht Viper. 

Harsh, John N., Williamstown, New Jersey. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Massachusetts, State of, Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Collective exhibit of models of vessels. 

Name. Kind. Date of Construction. 

Sparrow Hawk Early Colonial 1626 

Manchester Fishmg schooner 1713 

Black Sloven Chebacco boat I790 

Lucy Old style dogbody boat 1805 

John W. Herbert Fishing schooner 1848 

Congress Fishing schooner 1849 

Harry L. Belden Mackerel schooner 1889 

Nannie C. Bohlan Fishing schooner. 1890 



^ 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 33. 185 

Kassenge, Angnst, 233 Fulton St., Grand Bapicb, Hiohigan. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Kerriman, C. S., Vilisca, Iowa. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Miller, Clark A., Hew York Yaclit Club, New York. 

Model of schooner yacht Mohegan. 

Uimriiiippi Siver Conunisnon, TJ. S. A., St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. — Models of towboats and barges used on the Mississippi 
River. 

Mississippi Valley Transportation Company, St. Louis, 

Missouri. — Model of towboat and barges. 

Moi^:an, E. D., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Models of sloop yacht "Mayflower," schooner yacht "Constella- 
tion," sloop yacht "Gloriana." 

Morgan, J. Pierpont, New York Yaclit Club, New York. 

Model of steam yacht "Corsair." 

Mosher, C. D., 1 Broadway, New York City. 

Models of steam yachts. 

Motley, Thornton N., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of schooner yacht "Magic." 

New York Boat Oar Company, 69 West St., New York. 

Ash, spruce, and spoon oars ; handpikes, mast hoops, etc. 

New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Models of sloop yachts "Defender" and "Vigilant" and of 
schooner yacht "Sappho." 

Nuque, Oustave, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

(VBrien, E. Jefferson, West Superior, Wisconsin. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Omeyer, Endle, 366 W. 36th St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

O'Neill, William E., Chicago Stock Exchange, Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Ostermeyer, William, 3361 California Avenue, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. — Life-saving apparatus. 



I 



186 GROUP VI.— CLASS 33. 

Paine, Oen. A. J., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Model of sloop yacht "Volunteer." 

Fendelton, Andrew F., Franklin, Massachusetts. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Ferley, C. B., 1001 Bush Street, San Francisco, California. 

Life-saving* apparatus. 

Fhoenix, Uoyd, New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Models of auxiliary yacht "Intrepid." 

Flecker, Andrew, Habersham and 2d Sts., Savannah, Georgia. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Fostley, Clarence A., Larchmont Yacht Club, New York. 

Painting of schooner yacht "Colonia." 

Bedmond, Edmond, Bochester, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bichens, John M., Fitzgerald, Georgia; 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bidley, Chris, 216 Laurel St., West Tampa, Florida. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Bolf, A. A., 125 LaSalle St., Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Savage, J. M., 10 N. Desplaines St., Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, Long Island, New 

York. — Half models racing and pleasure yachts. 

Sinclair, W. A., South Bend, Indiana. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Smith, George B., Indianola, Nebraska. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Spalding St. Lawrence Boat Company, Ogdensburg, New 

York. — St. Lawrence river skiff and Canadian type of paddling 
canoe. 

Stanley, William E., Watsonville, California. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Stebbins, Charles M., Orange Lake Ice Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of ice yacht "Katita." 



\ I 



GROUP VI.— CLASS 33. 187 

Stevens Institute, Eoboken, New Jersey. 

Model of ferryboat Hamburgh. 

Stewart, S. N., 168 Jefferson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Snltemeyer, C. F., 1448 N. Halsted St., Chicago. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Tarns, Lemoine & Crane, New York. 

Half model of schooner yacht "Endymion." 

Taylor, W. E., Narragansett Pier, Shode Island. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Thatclier, H. L., Aurora, Illinois. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Thibodran, Emlyde, Cokoes, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Thompson, Edward D., 81 Fulton St., New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Todd, W. E., Charleston, South Carolina. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Tunison, Mary L., 63 Franklin St., Trenton, New Jersey. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Universal Exposition Commission of the State of New York, 

New York. — Models of schooner yachts "Madeline," "Columbia," 
and "America." 

Van Cauenberg, Frank, 1204 Southwest. St., Sockford, Illi- 
nois. — Life-saving apparatus. 

Van Wye, G. P., Park Eow Building, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Wagner, W. F., Wabash, Indiana. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Wright, Henry L., Walden, New York. 

Life-saving apparatus. 

Warren, E. B., New York Yacht Club, New York. 

Model of steam yacht "Ellide." 



r 



GROUP VI I. 

AGRICULTURE. 

CHARLES RICHARDS DODGE, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 35. 



FARM EQUIPMENT AND THE METHODS OF IM- 
PROVING LAND. 



Adrianoe, Piatt & Company, Ponglikeepriey New York. 

Mowers, reapers, binders, harrows and rakes. 

Aermotor Company, The, Ohioago. 

Windmills, pumps, tanks. 

American Cotton Company, Cldcago. 

Cotton gin and cylindrical baling press in operation. 

Amumr Fertilizing Works, Cldeago. 

Fertilizers, dried blood, tankage. 

Anchinoloss Brothers, New York. 

Phosphates, dunnellon. 

Anltman, Miller & Company, Akrbn, Ohio. 

Buckeye mowing machine; Buckeye twine-binding harvester; 
Buckeye reaper. The mower will cut 3J^ feet wide per one horse, 
and 4^ feet, 5 feet and 6 feet per two horses. The binder will 
cut 5, 6 and 7 feet wide. The reaper will cut 4}4 feet wide per 
one horse and 5 feet per two horses. 

Bayle & Laoosta, San Franoisoo, California. 

Fertilizers. 

Brown, Lnoins P., Nashville, Tennessee. 

Tennessee phosphates. 

189 



190 GROUP VII.— CLASS 35. 

California Fertilizer Company, San Francisco, California. 

Fertilizers. 

Central Phosphate Company, Ht. Pleasant, Tennessee. 

Phosphate rock. 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Company, Chicago. 

Hair and wool clipping machines, carriage heaters. 

Deere & Company, Holine, Illinois. 

Agricultural implements. 

Deering Harvester Company, Chicago. 

Harvesting machinery, etc. 

Department of Agriculture, TJ. S. A., Division of Chemistry, 

Washington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of fertilizers and fertilizing 
materials. 

Dutton, H. F., & Company, Chtinesville, Florida. 

Florida phosphates. 

Hughes, A. H., Columbia, Tennessee. 

Tennessee phosphates. 

Indo-Eg3rptian Compress Company, New York City. 

Compress for cotton, hay, hemp, sisal, rags. 

International Phosphate Company, Ht. Pleasant, Tennessee. 

Phosphate rock containing 82 per cent bone phosphate of lime. 

Johnson & Field Manufacturing Company, Bacine, Wiscon- 

sin. — Fanning mill and separator. 

Johnston Harvester Company, Batavia, New York. 

Harvesting machinery, farm tools. 

Eaufmann Fertilizer Comi^any, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Fertilizer, from raw material to finished product. 

Kny Scheerer Company, 17 Park Bow, New York. 

Veterinary surgical instruments. 

McCormick Harvesting Machine Company, Chicago. 

Models of machines invented and developed by Cyrus H. Mc- 
Cormick and his successors. Harvesting machinery. 

Menninger, C. 0., & Company, Bartow, Florida. 

Florida phosphates. 



GROUP VII. -CLASS 35. 191 

Milwaukee Harvester Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Farm machinery, harvesters, binders, reapers and mowers. 

European Representatives : Hugh Reid Griffin & Co., London, 
England; Perrier & Hafft, Paris, France; Knauer & Eckmann, 
Hamburg, Germany; Witt & Svendsen, Danzig, Germany; P. 
Siderow, Helsingfors, Finland; S. Young, Moscow, Russia; G. 
V. Rundstrom & Co., Norrkoping, Sweden; Gjovik Stoberi & 
Mck, Vaerksted, Gjovik, Norway. 

Osborne, D. M., & Company, Auburn, New York. 

Agricultural machinery. 

Perry Phosphate Company, Nashville, Tennessee. Works at 

Tom's Creek, Tennessee. — Phosphate rock. 

Piano Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

Harvesting machinery. 

Stover Manufacturing Company, Freeport, Illinois. 

Windmills, feed-grinding mills, hardware. 

Syracuse Chilled Plow Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Farm machinery, plows, harrows, cultivators, etc. 

Warder, Bushnell & Olessner Company, Chicago. 

Champion binder, mowers and reapers. 

Whitman Agricultural Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Presses for baling hay. 

Whitman & Barnes Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Mower and binder knives and sections. Twist drills, hammers, 
hatchets. 

Withington & Cooley Manufacturing Company, Jackson, 

Michigan. — Forks, hoes, rakes, scythes, snaths, etc. 

Wood, Walter A., Mowing and Beaping Machine Company, 

Hoosick Falls, New York. — Harvesting machinery. 

Paris, 1867, grand prix, two gold medals. Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor. Paris, 1878, grand prix, two gold medals, 
objet d'art. Officer Legion of Honor. Paris. 1889, grand prix, 
two gold medals and special objet d'art. Vienna, 1873, grand 
diploma of honor, imperial cross Francis Joseph. 



r 



192 GROUP VII.— CLASS 37. 



CLASS 37. 

APPLIANCES AND METHODS USED IN AGRICUL- 

TURAL INDUSTRIES. 



American Separator Company, Bainbridge, New York. 

Dairy appliances; cream separator. 

Aspinwall Hannfactnring Company, Jackson, Hickig^. 

Chum. 

Biesecker, J. S., New York City. 

Dairy appliances. 

BnM Stamping Company, Detroit, Mickigan. 

Dairy appliances and stable appliances. 

Ckampion Milk Cooler, Cortland, New York. 

Milk and cream coolers. 

Comisk, Cnrtis & Green Hannfaotnring Company, Fort 

Atkinson, Wisconsin. — Model of an American creamery, fully 
equipped. Dairy appliances. 

Dairymen's Snpply Company, Tke, Fbiladelpbia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Dairy machinery and supplies. 



Department of Agriculture, U. S. A., Dairy Division, Bureau 

Animal Industries, Washington, D. C. — Col 
appliances. By-products of dairy industry. 



Elgin Manufacturing Company, Tke, Elgin, Illinois. 

Dairy appliances. 

Ertels, Oeorge H., Company, Quincy, Illinois. 

Incubators, brooders, poultry appliances. 

Fairfield Dairy Company, Tke, Hontolair, New Jersey. 

Photographs and models illustrating the work of a dairy and its 
fittings. 

Fitek, B. L., Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. 

Scale for butter coloring. 

Oreiner, Emil, New York City. 

Dairy appliances. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 37. 193 

Gnrler, E. B., De Ealb, Illinois. 

Photographs of dairy and fittings. Dairy appliances. 

Hall, William A.^* Bellows Falls, Yeimont 

Dairying by-products. ,j > ^ « 

JoluLSon, J. F.9 & Company, Bacine, Wisconsin. 

Dairy appliances. 

Kann, F. W., Company, Hilford, Hassaclinsetts. 

, Bone cutters. 

Koseley & Stoddard Mannf actiiring Company, Butland, Ver- 
mont. — Dairy appliances. ' 

Hational Specialty Company, Baoine, Wisconsin. . 

Milk pails. 

Helson, Hall & Company, Montgomery, Yennont. ' . 

Butter tubs and boxes. 

Bdd, A. E., 3(ttk and Market iSt., Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Milk separators, hand and power, pasteurizers. 

Sellable Incubator & Brooder Company, Qnincy, Illinois. 

Incubators and broodek's,^ models, poultry appliances. 

St. Lonis Dairy Company, St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Photographs. Plant, equipment and work of handling milk; in a 
city. , 

Sharpies, P. M., West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Cream separators. 

Standard Oil Company, New York. 

. Cheese coating.. 

Star Milk Cooler Company, The, Eaddonfield, New Jersey. 

Milk cooler, bottling machine, etc 

Vermont Farm Machine Company, Bellows Falls, Vermont. 

Dairy appliances. 

Wickson, C. 0., & Company, San Francisco, Cetlifomia. 

Dairy appliances. 

WQder Mannf actnring Company, Springfield, Massacbnsetts. 

Electrical temperature indicator. 

Williams, Thomas) Brookfyn, If ew Yoi'k. ^ 

Felt jackets for milk cans. 



194 GROUP VII.— CLASS 38. 



CLASS 38. 

THEORY OF AGRICULTURE— AGRICULTURAL STA- 
TISTICS. 



Atprioultnral Experiment Station of Alabama, Anbam, Ala- 
bama. — Experiments on improvement of varieties of cotton. 
Monograph on cotton, photographs. 

Atpicultnral Experiment Station of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. 

Charts showing influence of winter irrigation on movement of 
ground water. Photographs. 

Atpricultnral Experiment Station of Arkansas, Fayetteville, 

Arkansas. — Photographs. Fertilizer experiments with wheat. 

Atpricnltnral Experiment Station of Califomia, Berkeley, 

California. — ^Typical soils, soil map, soil analysis, photographs and 
reports. 

Atpioultnral Experiment Station of Colorado, Fort CoUina, 

Colorado. — Photographs. 

Agricnltnral Experiment Station of Conneotient, New Haven, 

Connecticut. — Collection of vegetable proteids separated from 
various seeds. Photographs. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Delaware, Newark, Dela- 
ware. — Photographs. 

Atpicultural Experiment Station of Florida, Lake City, 

Florida. — Photographs. Experiments with pineapples, etc. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Idaho, Hosoow, Idaho. 

Photographs. 

Atpricultural Experiment Station of Illinois, TJrbana, Illi- 
nois. — Photographs. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Indiana, £af ayette, Indi- 
ana. — Plant centrifuge. Photographs. 

Atpicultural Experiment Station of Iowa, Ames, Iowa. 

Photographs, models of fruits, vegetables and meats. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 38. 195 

Experiment Station of Kansas, Manhattan, 

Kansas. — Models of meat, showing effects of breed and feeding. 
Photographs. 

Atprionltnial Experiment Station of Eentncky, Lexins^n, 

Kentucky. — Charts showing effect of fertilizers. Photographs. 

Agrienltoral Experiment Station of Maine, Orono, Maine. 

Photographs. 

Agrienltoral Experiment Station of Maryland, College Park, 

Maryland. — Photographs. 

Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Minnesota, St. Anthony 

Park, Minnesota. — Photographs, charts, samples of crossbred 
wheat 



Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Mississippi, Agrienltnral 

College, Mississippi. — Photographs. 

Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Missouri, Columbia, Mis- 
souri. — Sheep charts showing crossing experiments. Photo- 
graphs. 

Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Montana, Bozeman, Mon- 
tana. — Photographs. 

Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Nebraska, linooln, 

Nebraska. — Photographs. 

Agrienltnral Experiment Station of Hew Hampshire, Dur- 
ham, New Hampshire. — Photographs. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Hew Jersey, Hew Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey. — Monog^a 
mounted specimens. Photograp 



wick. New Jersey .-^Monog^aph on plant diseases; twenty 

hs. 



Agricultural Experiment Station of Hew Mexico, Mesilla 

Park, New Mexico. — Photographs, cereal exhibits. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Hew York, Oeneya, Hew 

York. — Charts, sources of milk fat, coefficients of digestibility of 
American food stuffs. Photographs. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Horth Carolina, Baleigh, 

North Carolina. — Photographs. 



Agricultural Experiment Station of Horth Dakota, 

cultural College, North Dakota.— Root cages, showing distribu- 
tion of grain and grasses in soils. Photographs. 



196 GROUP VII.— CLASS 38. 

Agrioultnral Ezperiment Station of Ohio, Wooster, Ohio. 

Monograph on plant diseases. Charts, photographs. 

Atpicultnral Ezperiment Station of Oklahoma, Stillwater, 

Oklahoma. — Photographs ; tests of orchards and of irrigation on 
forest trees ; feeding experiments. 

Agrioultnral Ezperiment Station of Penntylyania, State Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania. — ^Bulletin on metabolism; experiments on 
steers to determine maintenance ration. Photographs. 

Ag^cultnral Ezperiment Station, Seno, Hevada. 

Photographs. 
Ag^cultnral Ezperiment Station of Bhode Island, Kingston, 

Rhode Island. — Photographs; experiments in crossing geese and 
effects of lime on clover, etc 

Atpicultnral Ezperiment Station of Sonth Carolina, Clemaon 

College, South Carolina. — Photographs. 

Atpricnltnral Ezperiment Station of Sonth Dakota, Brookingi, 

South Dakota. — Photographs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station (Stom), Storn^ Connecti- 
cut. — Bacteria cultures useful or deleterious in dairying. Photo- 
graphs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Tennessee, Knozville, 

Tennessee. — Photog^raphs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Tezas, College Station, 

Texas. — Photographs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Utah, Logan, TTtah. 

Photographs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Vermont, Burlington, 

Vermont — Photographs, charts, monographs. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Virginia, Blacksburg, 

Virginia. — Photogfraphs, charts. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Washington, Pullman, 

Washington. — Photographs, varieties of grasses. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of West Virginia, Morgan- 
town, West Virgfinia.— rPhotographs, monographs, auxanometer. 

Agricultural Ezperiment Station of Wisconsin, Madison, 

Wisconsin. — Milk tests, meat models, charts, photographs. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 38. 197 

Agrionltiiral Ezperiment Station of Wyoming, Laramie, 

Wyoming. — Charts, photographs. 

AModation of Agricnltnral Colleges and Ezperiment Sta- 
tions. — Collective exhibit of the work of experiment stations in 
the United States. 

Chamberlain Publishing Company, Orange, New Jersey. 

Publications, Rackham's Poultry Directory. 



Department of Agricnltnre, TT. S. A., Bnrean of Animal 

Industry, Washixigton, D. C. — Maps, charts, illustrating animal 
industries of the United States. 

Department of i^;ricnltnre, IT. 8. A., Dairy Division, B. A. I., 

Washixigton, D. C — Maps, diagrams and charts illustrating dairy 
industries of the United States. 

Department of Agricnltnre, IT. S. A., Division of Soils, Wash- 
ington, D. C. — ^Electrical apparatus for determining soil moistures, 
samples of soils. 

Department of Agricnltnre, D. S. A., OBLot of Ezperiment 

Stations, Washington, D. C. — Publications, photographs, plans, 
drawings. 

Department of Agricnltnre, D. 8. A., Weather Bnrean, Wash- 

ington, D. C — ^Working weather station and observatory, show- 
ing the recording instruments in operation. 

Ezperiment Station of Alaska, Sitka, Alaska. 

Agriculture products, photographs. 

Ezperiment Station of Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 

Photographs, models. 

Ezperiment Station of Georgia, Ezperiment, Georgia. 

Photographs. 

Ezperiment Station of Hawaii, Eonolnln, Hawaii. 

Lavas and rocks, natural mineral products, coffee, rice, sugar. 
Photographs. 

Ezperiment Station of Lonisiana, Baton Bonge, Lonisiana. 

Photographs. 



Station (Sngar) of Lonisiana, New Orleans, 

Louisiana. — Photographs. 

Ezperiment Station (Hatch), of Hassachnsetts, Amherst, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs, charts. 



198 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Experiment Station of Hichigany Agrionltnral College, Hiohi- 

gan. — Charts, photographs. 

Experiment Station of Oregon, Corrallit, Oregon. 

Photographs. 



CLASS 39. 

VEGETABLE FOOD PRODUCTS. 



Abernathy, J. E., Ocellns, Tennessee. 

New York hard wheat, winter barley, winter rye, oats. 

Abild, Hans, Lodi, Sontb Dakota. 

Indian com. 

Abbott, W. J., TTrbana, Ohio. 

Wheat in the straw. 

Ackman & Tuf tley, Los Angeles, California. 

Olive oil. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station (Eatob), Amberst, Kassa- 

chusetts. — Millet, soy beans, plants, seeds and hay. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of Eentnoky, Lexington, 

Kentucky. — Collective exhibit of wheats. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of Maryland, College Park, 

Maryland. — Wheats, com, emmer. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of New Hexioo, Hessilla 

Park, New Mexico. — Grain, new varieties produced by Prof. A. 
E. Blount. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of North Dakota, Agricnl- 

tural College, North Dakota. — Barley, com, buckwheat, oats, 
emmer, wheats. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of Oregon, Conrallis, Ore- 
gon. — Collective exhibit of export cereals grown in Oregon. 

Agrionltnral Experiment Station of Pennsylvania, State Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania. — Collective exhibit of wheats. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 199 

Ag^ooltural Experiment Station of Washington, Pullman, 

Washington. — Collective exhibit of barley, oats, wheat. 

Aiken, W., Fair Forest, South Carolina. 

Lowland swamp rice. 

Aldredge, W., Hinekley, Utah. 

Alfalfa seed. 
Allen, W. A., Watertown, Tennessee. 

Moscow yellow com. 

Altman, T., Cribbs, Pennsylvania. 

Winter rye. 

Amerioan Cereal Company, The, Chicago. 

Dairy stock and poultry foods. 

Amsden, C. S., Hillbank, South Dakota. 

Barley, "Marble" wheat, winter rye. 

Anable, I. M., Naples, Hew York 

"Qawson Gold Coin" wheat, oats, barley, winter rye. 

Anderson, 0. F., Abilene, Texas. 
Com. 

Anderson, T. C, Abilene, Texas. 

Barley, rye, oats, corn. 

Anderson, T. 0., Abilene, Texas. 

Com, millet, 

Andreus, F. 0., China Orove, Mississippi. 
Rice. 



Ash, Marshal>, Hastings, Nebraska. 

Corn. 

Ashley, D. 0., Ashley, Mississippi. 
Oats, com. 

Atkinson, T. H., OTallon, Illinois. 

**Fultz" and "Fulcaster" wheat, black oats, corn. 

Ayres, A., Lansing, Miehigan. 
Com. 

Bagwell, H. E., Allensville, Kentuoky. 

"Little Willis" com. 



200 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Bailey, M. M., Birdsall, Hiohigan. 
Rye, oats. 

Baird, A., Oreenville, Ohio. 
White oats. 

Baker, 0. 0., Britton, Oklahoma Territory. 

White kaffir com. 

Baker, T. W., Kymalga, Alabama. 

Blue stem wheat, black rye. 

Baker, Theodore, Oiltner, Nebraska. 

Silver white com. 

Baldwin, A., Oberon, North Dakota. 
German rust-proof oats. 

Barker, L. D., Pleasant HiU, Nebraska. 

Black winter rye, white Swedish oats, com. 

Barnes, £. F., Bloomington, Oklahoma. 

"Early Dwarf," "Yellow Paxton," "Hickory King" com. 

Bamett, B. C, Lebanon, Kansas. 
"Snowflake" com. 

Barson, P. S., Clarkston, Utah. 
New Zealand wheat, white oats. 

Barteldes & Company, Lawrence, Missonri. 

Collection of saccharine and non-saccharine sorghums for forage. 

Bass, £. I., Watertown, Tennessee. 

"Neal's" white com. • 

Bass, T. A., Watertown, Tennessee. 

"Burt" oats. • 

Bangh, T. W., Franklin, Tennessee. 

Rye, "Burt" oats, "Fultz" and "Longberry" wheat 

Beck, W. H., Bine Springs, Nebraska. 

Turkey wheat. 

Beeson, H. H., New Market, North Carolina. 

Blue rye, "Fulcaster" wheat 

Benecke, E., Brockfteld, Wisconsin. 

Manchuria barley, German rye, oats, Fife spring wheat, ydlow 
flint hard com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 201 

Bennett & Hillett Company, The, Oonvemenr, Hew York. 

Ground clover poultry food. . 

Bentley, E. L., Abilene, Texas. 
Hay. 

Biggs, B. D., Shippensbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

"Wyandotte" red wheat 

Blackstock, T., Avo, Texas. 

Red oats. 

Blank, IT. T., Fisgak, Missonri. 
Black oats. 

Blatckford, E. W., & Company, Chicago. 

Calf, horse and poultry foods. 

Block, H., St. Angnsta, Minnesota. 

Winter rye. 

Blnme, I., Blnme, Louisiana. 

Black rye, wheats, improved yellow corn. 

Board of Trade, Hew Orleans, Lonisiana. 

Collective exhibit of rice. 

Boehmke, E., Bemsen, Iowa. 

Clover, white and ycUow com. 

Bohannon, Kr., Corvallis, Oregon. 

Banner oats. 



Bowles, Bnder A Weber, Af ton, 

Com, prehistoric and other varieties. 

Bradstreet, H. C, Clifton, Texas. 

Gold chafiF, Mediterranean wheat, winter rye, rust-proof oats, 
com. 

Bradstreet, W. C, Clifton, Texas. 
German millet 

Brey, C. 0., Ursnla, Oklahoma Territory. 
Wliite kaffir com. 

Brewer, T. F., Walla Walla, Washington. 

Red chaff wheat in the straw. 

Brittain, W., Farkman, Wyoming. 
Alfalfa. 



202 GROUP VII.-CLASS 39. 

Brown, A., OreenviUe, Virginia. 

White and yellow dent corn. 

Brown, J. J., Spragnt, Washington. 

"Pelouse blue stem," white winter wheat, blue barley, mammoth 
white oats. 

Brown, L., Clio, Michigan. 

"Jones* Fife" winter wheat, barley, silver hull buckwheat, rye, 
corn. 

Browning, J. A., Church HiU, Kentucky. 

"Fultz," "Fulcaster" wheat, "Big Willie" corn. 

Bruce, H. C, McPherson, Kansas. 

"Golden Beauty" corn. 

Bruch, Edward, Scapoosa, Oregon. 

Rye in the straw. 

Buren, John J., CuUom, Illinois. 

Early yellow dent and "Silver Mine" maize, barley, white "Hunt" 
oats. 

Brumbaugh, J. H., Hangansville, Maryland. 

"Spade" wheat. 

Bryan, J. L., Watertown, Tennessee. 

'Bearded Fulcaster" wheat. 



«i 



Burgan, L. A., Tonica, Illinois. 

"Little Red" oats, corn. 

Burgeson, B. 0., Aurora, Nebraska. 

Mammoth white com. 

Burgess, L. A., Tonica, Illinois. 

German millet. 
Burnett, J., Corvallis, Oregon. 

"Golden Chaff," "Kinney" and white winter wheat. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Forage and grass crops, photographs. 

Bussinger, W. 0., Lebanon, Kansas. 

"Kansas Beauty" kaffir corn. 

Bybee, B. L., Leorin, Idaho. 

White Russian oats. 



^ 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 203 

Byert, W. S., Pendleton, Oregon. 

Red chaff wheat. 

Calhoun, A. A., Hillenbnrg, Ohio. 

"Seisurc" oats. 

CaldweU, E. W., Scottsboro, Alabama. 

Mixed red and white cob, "Ohio white" corn. 

Calif oniia Packing Company, San Francisco, California. 
Olives and olive oil. 

California Paris Commission (San Francisco Produce Ex- 
change), San Francisco, California. — Collective exhibit of cereals 
for export 

California Wharf House Company, Davisville, California. 

"Qub" wheat, barley. 



Cambill, T. H., Tuscuinbia, Alabama. 

"Bird" oats. 

Carl, E. A., Juniata, Nebraska. 

Mammoth white corn. 

Carlock, W. J., Huntsville, Arkansas. 

"Bib" white and "Calico" corn. 

Cameal, Thomas D., Livermore, California. 

"White Admirable" wheat. 

Carrall, T. C, Ursula, Arkansas. 

White com. 

Carter, L. W., Highmore, South Dakota. 

Millets and native grasses. 



Chaflbi, T. J., Chestnut Fork, Virginia. 

Rust-proof winter oats. 

Chaney, T. C, Pittston, Virginia. 

Blue-stem wheat. 

Chaney, T. B., Woodbum, Kentucky. 

Winter oats, "Currell's prolific" wheat. 

Chavez, T. M. C, Abiquiu, Hew Mexico. 

Wheat, oats, vallo beans, Chama Pclombrosa, native Indian, West 
Indian calico corn. 



204 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

demons, L. W., Davenport, Iowa. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat, Iowa white dent and Iowa golden dent 
com. 



Clevenger, C. E., Stevenson, Virginia. 
'Big white" rye, "White 
'Franklin prolific" wheat 



"Big white" rye, "White Western" oats, "Early Red Lyon" and 

~ ' olif ' 



Click, W. W., Elmwood, North Dakota. 
"Fulcaster" wheat. 

Cobb, J. S., Henderson, Colorado. 

White wheat, "New Wampum" oats. 

Coins, J. H., Omega, Oklahoma Territory. 

Late French millet 

Collins, B., Snmmers, Arkansas. 

"Everett's Hybrid" wheat 

CoUiver, B., Snmmers, Arkansas. 

Iowa mixed dent com. 

Commercial Clnb, Denton, Texas. 

Blue-stem wheat, white com. 

Conger Brothers, Himosa, Tennessee. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, "Huffman" com. 

Coontz, J. F., & Company, Vandalia, Missonri. 

"Fultz" wheat 

Cooper, C. W., Corvallis, Oregon. 

White winter wheat. 

Cooper, EUwood, Santa Barbara, California. 

Olive oil. 

Com Exposition of Peoria, Peoria, Illinois. 

G)llective exhibit of Indian com. 

Cotton, W. W., Portland, Oregon. 

Wheat and oats in the straw. 
Conrtright, J., Walnnt, Ohio. 

"Best Poole" wheat, early yellow and "Riber" com. 

Consino, I. C, Erie, Michigan. 

'Red Diehl" wheat, oats. 



«i 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 206 



Contts, D., Argyle, Hiimesota. 
Scotch ]^fe wheat 

Cawan, B. T.^ Elmwood, North Carolina. 
Improved "Fultz" wheat 

C0X9 J. L.y Missonri Valley, Iowa. 
"Velvet blue-stem" wheat 

Craighead, W. A., & Sons, Breekinridge, Texas. 

"Bald" and "Mediterranean" wheat, black rye, com, popcorn, 
white kaffir com. 

Craik, David, Oketo, Kansas. 

Millet Turkey, red winter Fife wheat oats. 

Cramsey, S., Conway, Kansas. 
Turkey wheat 

Crandall, E., Walla Walla, Washington. 

Blue>8tem wheat in the straw. 

Crane, W. W., Tippeoanoe City, Ohio. « 
Wheat com. 

Cranston, J. F., St. Clond, Hinnesota. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat Nos. i and 2, white oats. 

Crawford, W., Arcannm, Ohio. 

White bread com. 
Creager, William H., Snmner, Iowa. 

Green mountain oats in the straw and oats. 

Creamer, E. L., Tr., Frederick, Maryland. 
Yellow mastodon com. 

Crenshaw, J. 0., Knobliek, Kentncky. 

Crenshaw's white wheat 

Cress, C, Shippensbnrg, Pennsylvania. 
Egyptian oats. 

Crosthwaite, C. W., Florence, Tennessee. 
Winter turf oats. 

Crothers, L. M., Crothers, Pennsylvania. 

"Duck bill" barley, "Gold Coin" wheat "Golden Beauty" corn. 

Cram, H. E., Frederick, Maryland. 
Cora. 



206 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Culberson, C. H., Smymai Tennesiee. 

"Culbcrsons' white" com. 

CuUimane, T., Denison, Texas. 

Black oats. 
Cnrrell, W. E.^ Orace Point, Virginia. 

"Currcirs prolific" wheat 

Cnrrie, S., Euclid, Hinnesota. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat 

Dahl, A. P. B., Calera, Alabama. 
Red cob and white dent corn. 

Davis, A., Frederick, Maryland. 

"Longbcrry" wheat, oats. 

Davis, J. A., Buxton, Horth Dakota. 

Improved velvet blue-stem wheat, white Russian oats, Manchuria 
barley. 

Dawes, J. M., Harsbi^, 

"Fultz" wheat 



DeLand, C, Blue Springs, Nebraska. 
"Deland's improved" white com. 



Denison Hilling Company, Denison, Texas. 

Mediterranean wheat. 

Department of Agriculture, Division of Agrostology, Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of food for animals, grasses and 
forage plants and utilization. 

Department of Agriculture, Division of Vegetable Physi- 
ology and Patholojsy, Washington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of 
new American varieties of export cereals. 

Dickerson, J. H., & Son, Bnrgin, Kentucky. 

Red winter "Fultz" and "Winter King" wheat 
Dickinson, The Albert, Company, Chicago. 

Collection of seeds of commercial importance in the United States 
and in the export trade. 

Diehl, E. F., Leesbnrg, Indiana. 

White rye in the straw, rye, "Poole" wheat. 

Doan, C. F., Deans, Texas. 

Small golden millet, "Haws" com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 207 



Boan, J.y Boans, Texas. 

"Sumac" sorghum, com. 

Dodge, C, Norfolk, Hebrask 

Early dent "Multiplier" corn. 



DoliB, &, Erie, Michigan. 
"Side" oats. 

Donaldson, C. S., Bowling Oreen, Kentucky. 
Rust-proof oats. 

Donb, F., Keedysville, Maryland. 
"Red Warder" wheat 



Drew, C, Ardook, North Dakota. 

White Russian oats, Manchuria barley. 

Daell, L S., Woodstown, Hew Tersey. 

Blue-stem wheat, com. 

Doff, T. E. C, Fayetteville, Tennessee. 

White winter oats, winter bearded barley. 

Don, Charles, Ardook, North Dakota. 

Scotch Fife wheat 
Edge Brothers, Colnsa, California. 

• Barley. 

Eggart, W., Parkman, Wyoming. 
"Silver Leaf oats. 

Ekman A Stow, Oroville, California. 

Olive oil. 

Emannel, J. M., Wray, Colorado. 

Early yellow dent corn, wheat, "Goose" oats, millet, sorghum. 

Emerson, S. F., Skowhegan, Maine. 

India buckwheat, white Russian oats. 

Enestredt, 0. 0., Belview, Minnesota. 

"Minnesota No. 163" wheat 

English, B. 0., Manchester, Michigan. 

Rye, "Johnson" oats, "Leaming" com, nigger wheat. 

Ennis, John R, Harcoossee, Florida. 
Hay. 



208 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Everitt, T. A., Indianapolis, Indiana. 

"Fultz/* Mediterranean wheat 

Ezbine, L., Paso Bobles, Calif omia. 

Australian ''salt bush." 

Experimental Farm of Oregon Bailway A Navigation Com- 
pany, Portland, Oregon. — ^Wheat and barley in the straw. 

Experiment Station of Illinois^ ITifbana, Illinois. 

Com stalk. 

Experiment Station of North Dakota, Agricnltnral College, 

North Dakota. — ^Wheat in the straw. 

Experiment Station, Corvallis, Oregon. 

"Feise" and "Kinney" wheat, black winter oats. 

Fain, W. H., Nannie, Georgia. 

"Fulcaster" wheat 

Faugbt, A. E., Sidney, Maine. 

Blue-stem wheat, two-rowed barley, white winter rye, early field 
oats. 

Ferguson, W., Walla Walla, Washington. 

Wheat and barley in the straw. 

Field, J. C, Denison, Texas. 
Com. 

Figard, J. W., Seward, Nebraska. 

Sea Island wheat, oats,, "early white prolific" rye, "Golden dent" 
com. 

Fitch, C. E., Alwilda, South Dakota. 

Seed of cultivated forage crops. 

Flowers, J. L., Colton, Washington. 
"Chevalier" barley. 

Foreman, J. B., Arcanum, Ohio. 

"Budy" and white "Fultz" wheat. 

Fox, T., Harrisonville, New Jersey. 

"Fulcaster" wheat. 

Frankhouser, D. C, Fawcettsgap, Virginia. 

"Fultz" wheat ' 



^ 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 209 

Frazier, B. A., Dayton, Wyoming. 
"Sqtiaw" and flint com. 

Freeman^ W., Alpine, Alabama. 
•'Early lay" wheat 

Oambill, T. H., Tnijcnmbia, Alabama. 

Bearded purple-straw wheat 

Chonmill, L. C, Snbrosa, Arkansas. 

"Harvest King" wheat, "Hickory King" and "Valentine mam- 
moth" com. 

Ckrrish, F. L., Boscawen, Hew Hampshire. 

'White wonder" oats, "Walker" com. 



««i 



Giddings, F., Ayr, Nebraska. 

"White Russian" oats. 

Oillingham, 0. L., Moorestown, Hew Jersey. 

White and black mixed oats, "Winter Fife" wheat, Japanese 
buckwheat, com. 

Oilkey, W. T., Dayton, Oregon. 

White winter oats, white spring barley and varieties of wheat, 
winter alsike. 

Oilkey, W. 1\, Watsonville, Calif omia. 

"Grand Norway" oats, "Canada," "Chevalier" and "Chili" barley, 
com. 

Glucose Sugar Beflning Company, Chicago. 

Gluten food for cattle and commeal. 

Oluyas, W. B., Hofflund, North Dakota. 

Seed of smooth brome-grass (bromus inermis). 

Ooodall, 0. F., La Grande, Oregon. 
Winter wheats and winter barley. 

Goodell, C. T., Morocco, Indiana. 
Barley, oats. 

Grandin, J. L., and E. B., Hayville, North Dakota. 

White Russian oats, wheat. 

Greene, B., and Sutton, George, Manchester, Michigan. 
"Red Gawson" wheat 

Griffin, G. M., Brighton, Colorado. 

"Defiance" wheat 



210 GROUP VII.- CLASS 39. 

Orim, J. J., Aurora, Nebraska. 

"White side" oats. 

Orotelmocke, H., Columbus, Nebraska. 

"Turkey" wheat. 

Oudyel, H. W., Princeton, Illinois. 

"Little white" oats. 

Hade, J. P., Oreencastle, Pennsylvania. 

"Spade" wheat, "Peerless" rye, "Wonder" oats, winter barley. 
"Golden dent" com. 

Hagar, 0., Colusa, California. 

California wheat. 

Haines, J. J.^ Cribbs, Pennsylvania. 

"Longberry" wheat, spring barley, American "Banner" oats. 

Hammond, E. E., Olathe, Colorado. 

"Defiance" wheat, white Russian oats. 

Hancock, W. H., Shullsburg, Wisconsin. 

"Peerless" barley, winter rye. 

Hardeman, T., Davisboro, Georgia. 

Bearded rust-proof oats, red-cob corn. 

Hargett, S., Frederick, Maryland. 

Barley, buckwheat 

Harmon, £. B., Clifton, New York. 

No. 6 Mediterranean wheat, German four-rowed barley. 

Harris, C. 0., Marsh, North California. 

"Fultz" and "Fulcaster" wheats. 

Harris, J. S., Pisgah, Missouri. 

"Fultz" wheat, "white gourd seed" corn. 

Hawkins, B. C, Highlands, North Carolina. 
Com. 

Hawley & Moody, Oasis, Michigan. 

Alfalfa or Lucerne seed. 

Haynes Brothers, Emporia, Kansas. 
Com. 

Hays, J. B., Matson, Missouri. 
Black oats. 



1 



GROUP VH.— CLASS 39. 211 

Hays, T. H., Versailles, Eentneky. 

"Firitz" wheat. 

Heater, C. W., Middletown, Virginia. 

Wheat, spring oats, barley, mammoth white corn. 

Heideman, W. H., Ealispell, Montana. 

Rape seed. 

HeUbanm, F., Latah, Washington. 

Wheat, barley, oats. 

Henry, J. N., McHenry, Ohio. 
Oregon bearded barley. 

Hesla, E. S., WesterviUe, South Dakota. 

"Silver Mine" com. 

Hickman, Prof. J., Fremont, Wooster, Ohio. 

Forage and grass crops. Photographs. 

Hill, Charles L., Bosendale, Wisconsin. 

White "Fife" wheat, white cap corn. 

Hill,. E. C, Anson, Texas. 

Dhoura corn. 

Hill, H. P., Kersey, Colorado. 

"Australian Defiance" wheat, "White Russian" oats. 

Hill, Tohn, Elgin, Oregon. 

"Silver chaff" white winter wheat. 

Hilzwager, C, Perkins, South Dakota. 

Blue-stem wheat. 

Hite, M. L., Windom, Elansas. 

Kaffir com. 

Hoag, Jay, Adrian, Michigan. 
"Gold Coin" wheat. 

Hodgin, £. H., Guilford College, North Carolina. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, "Strawberry" and white flint corn. 

Holnu, William S., Marshall, Missouri. 

Texas red rust-proof oats, "Golden Beauty" corn. 

Hoover, C. C, Hagerstown, Maryland. 
'Mortgage Lifter" oats. 



«i 



r 




212 GROUP Vll.— CLASS 39. 

Hopkins, Prof. A. D., Morgantown, West 

Timothy. 

Hopkins, J. T., Bntteville, Oregon. 

Wheat in the straw. 

Horsldy, W. B., Bogers, Arkansas. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, rust-proof and early white oats, "Strawberry*' 
and "Willie" white com. 

Honz, Mrs. E. H., Colnsa, Califomia. 

"California Club" wheat 

Howard, Hiram, Marshall, Missonri. 

"Pride of Saline" and "Uncle Sam's" corn. 

Hoyt, J. K., Lnther, Horth Califomia. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, winter oats, Japanese buckwheat, "Morgan" 
white com. 

Hoyt, 0. W., Millbank, Sonth Dakota. 

White Russian oats. 

Huff, B. F., Benison, Iowa. 

White Russian oats, "Sayler's Marvel" spring wheat, yellow dent 
com. 

Hug, H.^ Elgin, Oregon. 

"Chili Qub" and "Canada Club" mixed wheat 



», J. H., CarroUton, Texas. 

"Silver Chaff" wheat, rust-proof and white spring oats, "Blue 
Jane" and "Strawberry" com. 

Huggins, W. A., Cave City, Kentucky. 

"Silver" and "Everett's red" com, "Fulcaster" wheat. 

Hughes, M. 0., Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

"Fulcaster" wheat 

Hull, J. H., Langdon, Missouri. 

Branching Dhoura. 

Hurt, J. H., Hollywood, Alabama. 

Mediterranean wheat 

Hysell, Badf ord. Omega, Kansas. 

White kaffir com. 

Illinois Com Growers' Association, El Paso, Illinois. 

Thirty-five varieties of corn gfrown in Illinois. 



i 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 213 

niinois state Grain InBpection, Chicago. 

Wheat, oats, barley, rye, com, of commercial grades. 

Imbodeii, H., Wichita, Kansas. 

Turkey wheat. 

International Food Company, Hinneapolis, Minnesota. 

Foods for cattle. 

Jackson, T. W., Prairie Point, HississippL 

Com, peanuts. 

Tacobson, L. A., Hope, North Dakota. 

Spring rye. 

Tacoby, Peter, Aurora, Nebraska. 

Corn. 

Jennings, Mrs. S., Mayview, Missonri. 

"Pride of Lafayette" rye. 

Jewell Nnrsery Company, Lake City, Minnesota. 
"Silver White" oats. 

Johns, W., Thatcher, Arizona. 

Australian wheat. 

Johnson, D. B., Mooresville, Indiana. 

Michigan amber wheat 

Johnson, D. P., Horeb, Virginia. 

"Fultz" wheat 

Johnson,* Samuel, Clear Spring, Maryland. 
Com. 

JoUy, William, Conrallis, Oregon. 

"Little Club" wheat, white Russian oats. 

Jones, A. H., Newark, New Jersey. 

Wheat heads, threshed grain. 

Kaufman, J. C, Daubenrille, Pennsylvania. 

China wheat, white rye. 

Kearcher, L. M., Milbank, South Dakota. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat. 

Keefe, S. 0., Maine, Minnesota. 

"Blue-stem" wheat, "Lincoln" and white Russian oats, Minne- 
sota com. 



214 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Eeeny, T. W., Erie, MioUgan. 

Corn. 

Eenney, S. H., & Son, Morristown, Minnesota. 

Minnesota "Early Amber" sugar cane. 

Kerr, 0. 0., Newark, Delaware. 

"Deitz," "Longberry," "Fulcaster" wheat. "Golden Dent" com, 
grass seed. 

Kiger, B. C, Conrallis, Oregon. 

Wheat in the straw. 
Kilbome, F. L., Eelloggsville, New York. 

Wheat, white oats, barley, corn. 

Kilen, A. B., Brownsbnrg, Minnesota. 

Barley, velvet blue-stem wheat, oals, corn, timothy. 

Killer, T. S., Minden, Louisiana. 

Red rust-proof oats, com, fescue grass. 

Eohler, John, Morrisonville, Missouri. 
Common red clover. 

Eohler, W. A., Leesbnrg, Indiana. 

Buckwheat. 
Eoiner, W. F., Ladd, Virginia. 

Early yellow corn. 

Eoser, D. C, Shippensbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Mediterranean wheat. 

Eramer, 0., Strausstown, Pennsylvania. 

White barley. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Bailway Company, Toledo, 

Ohio. — Winter wheat of commercial grades. 

Lamb, A. H., Oak Center, Minnesota. 

Manchuria barley. 

Lambie, W., Mayview, Washington. 

"Palouse" blue-stem, "Little Club" wheat, barley. 

Lampton, A. P., China Orove, Mississippi. 

Mixed yellow and white corn, peas. 

Lampton, E. F., China Orove, Mississippi. 
Oats, com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 30. 215 

Landis, T. M., Marlowe, West Virginia. 

Red-chaff wheat, beardless barley. 

Lang, Jacob, Hope, North Dakota. 

Broom com. 

Lankford, C. E., Lexington, Missonri. 

"Pfleger" corn. 

Later, P., Harrisville, Utah. 

"Taos" wheat, com. 

Lawrence, D. 0., Bnmett Junction, Wisconsin. 

"Child's Golden Superb" corn. 

Leckenby, A. B., Portland, Oregon. 

Collection of northwestern forage crops and grasses. 

Lehnert, 0. A., Tnscnmbia, Alabama. 
"Longhead" bearded barley. 

Lenz, Henry, Tnscnmbia, Alabama. 

'Miller" rye, wheat, com. 



«i 



Lewis, J. N., Lima, Arkansas. 

Red bearded wheat, com, oats. 
Lewis, 0. E., Arlington, Nebraska. 

Velvet-chaff wheat 

Loseke, 0., Colnmbns, Ohio. 

White Russian oats. 

Louden, W., Maine Prairie, Minnesota. 
Corn. 

Lowman, W. M., Hastings, Nebraska. 

Mammoth white com. 

Lowry, J. 0., Cartersville, Georgia. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, "Gourd Seed" com, California winter oats, 
Georgia rye. 

McAllister, J. W., Lagrange, Oregon. 

"Forty-fold" wheat. 

McCardells, A. C, Frederick, Maryland. 

"McCardell's Ruddy" wheat, corn. 

McClendon, B. T., Lisbon, Louisiana. 

Com. 



216 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

V 

MoClond, T. A., Lowell, Arkansas. 
"Everett" wheat 

HoCoyi Bavidy Solomon, Kansas. 

Black-chaff kaffir com. 

MoCutchen, W. W., Soottsboro, Alabama. 

"Boughton" wheat 

MoHenry, 0., Modesto, California. 

"Golden Gate Qub" and white Australian wheat, black rye, white 
dent com. 

MoNeal, T. M., MoBea, Georgia. 

Geraian millet 

Hagio Food Company, St. Lonis, Hissonri. 

Stock and poultry foods. 

Hanget, Tobn A., Marietta, Georgia. 

Forage crops. 

March, Tobn A., Shnllsbnrg, Wisconsin. 
Com. 

Marcks, A., Lexington, Missonri. 

Mediterranean wheat, black Texas oats, "Charles" white corn. 

Mariner, F. C, Northville, Sonth Dakota. 

Mediterranean Fife and Scotch Fife wheat, winter rye. 

Markel, E., Montioello, Illinois. 
Popcorn. 

Markert, T. M., Farkman, Wyoming. 

White hull-less barley. 

Markkam, B., Clear Lake, Minnesota. 
Cora. 

Martin, E. T., Nannie, Georgia. 

Maryland flint wheat. 

Martin, H. M., Masontown, West Virginia. 

Black Spanish, red rust-proof oats, red Russian wheat. 

Martin^ T. B., Fairforest, Soutk Caroliiia. 

Dewey oats, purple-straw wheat. 

Mason, E. T., Centerville, Georgia. 

Purple-straw wheat, rye, oats, com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 217 

Katson, W. H., Hatson, Missouri. 

Black rye, eight-rowed "Matson" yellow, "St. Charles" white 

COIIL 

Kathews, Owen^ Allen, Texas. 

Golden-chaff, Niacaragua wheat, oats, soft-grained stock corn. 

Katthews, W. B. H., Sonthport, Tennessee. 

"Fultz" wheat, "Burt" oats, "Tennessee Dent" com. 

Haynard, E. A., Ennis, Montana. 

Barley. 

Maynard, Frank, Jr., Jackson, Michigan. 

Hybrid Mediterranean wheat. 

Messenbnrg, P., St. Clond, Minnesota. 

White Russian oats. 

Metcalfe, T. N., Silver Hill, New Mexico. 

Seeds, specimens, and hay of native grasses and forage plants. 

Meyer, F. W., Bonney, Texas. 

Hay» hay seed. 

Miller, Adam, Jr., Tonica, Illinois. 

Com, "White Banner" oats. 

Miller, C, Sapnlpa, Indian Territory. 
"Poole" wheat 

Mitchell, A. E., Clearwater, Minnesota. 
"Side" oats. 

Moffet, F. L., Chillicothe, Kansas. 

Com, millet, oats. 

Momingstar, P. H., TTtica Mills, Maryland. 

"Long Derby" wheat, "White Hominy" corn. 

Morrin, 7. & L., Erie, Michigan. 
Barley. 

Morris, 7. P., Ireton, Iowa. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat, "Champion Side" oats, "Mansard" bar- 
ley, com. 

Mudges, P. E., La Salle, Illinois. 
Com. 



:\ 



218 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Mumma, A. L., Meohanicsburg, Ohio. 
Com. 

Murphy, S. H., Caledonia, Minnesota. 

"Blue Peter" pea. 

National Bice Milling Company, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Rices, rice bran, rice polish, waste products produced in milling 
rice ; grass and forage plants. 

National Starch Manufacturing Company, The, New York. 

Com oil, gluten food, gluten meal, corn cake, com. 

Naylor, T. L., Moscow, Idaho. 

Red Russian, "Little Club" wheat, barley. 

Neal, XT. W., Watertown, Tennessee. 

Rye, "Fultz" wheat. 

Neely, F. L., Wayne, Nebraska. 

Fife wheat. 

Neff, A. C, Chewsville, Maryland. 

"Neff's" corn. 

Neff, John, Tuscumbia, Alabama. 

Com. 

Nelson, C. C, Flainsburg, California. 

"Golden Gate Club" wheat, barley, rye, corn. 

Nelson, Mr., Coleman, Texas. 

German millet. 

Nelson, N., Colfax, Washington. 

Barley, oats. 

Nelson, B. C, Woodbine, Texas. 

"Fulkerson" Mediterranean wheat, oats, corn. 

Newland, W. T., Santa Ana, California. 

Cornstalks, i8 JFeet long. 

Newton, 0. 0., Corvallis, Oregon. 
Gray oats. 

Nicodemus, C. A., Walkersville, Maryland. 

Australian, Rocky mountain wheat, barley, "Golden Beauty" corn. 

Niemoller, A. F., Stitt^ Kansas. 
Red Texas oats. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 219 

Noyes, 0. B.^ Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. 

Russian Fife wheat 

Oelrich, Herman, Colnmbns, Nebraska. 
Com. 

Oelrich Herman, & Brothers, Columbus, Nebraska. 

"Early Olderburges" oats. 

Oliyer, 7. C, West Charleston, Vermont. 

Barley, oats, buckwheat, com. 

Orbra, Charles, Sapulpa, Indian Territory. 

White kaffir com. 

Oregon Bailroad & Navigation Company, Portland, Oregon. 

Collective exhibit of wheat, barley and rye in the straw. 

Overstreet, 7. B., Franklin, Indiana. 

"Overstreet Peerless," "Overstreet Wonder," "Speckkss Won- 
der" corn. 

Pacific Coast Elevator Company, Portland, Oregon. 

Wheat of commercial grades. 

Parker, W. N., Worthing, South Dakota. 

German millet. 

Parker, W. XT., Worthing, South Dakota. 

"Side," "Northern Scotch White" oats, corn. 

Parkinson, W. W., Pleasant Grove, Minnesota. 

Blue-stem wheat ; red winter, early white barley ; early white and 
New Zealand oats; corn. 

Parks, 7. S., Pleasant Mounds, Minnesota. 

"Red Blaze" com. 

Pattison, A. S., Marengo, Michigan. 

"Red Clawson," "Dawson's Golden Chaff," nigger wheat, white 
Russian oats. 

Patton, B. H., Watertown, Tennessee. 

"Fultz" wheat. 

Paugh, E., Ennis, Montana. 

"Australian Qub" wheat. 

Pawlich, 7., Crete, Nebraska, 

Turkey wheat 



i 



220 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Payne, 7. C, Bookville, Minnesota. 
Com. 

' Peacock, A. £., Eigginsville, Missouri. 

"Red Fultz" wheat. 
Pearoe, T. M., Manor, Maryland. 

"Howard's" barley, buckwheat. "White Dent" com. 

Peddicord, Tolin, Wichita, Kansas. 

"Golden Beauty" com. 

Peeler, I., Center, Mississippi. 
Com. 

Perry, William, Aurora, Nebraska. 
Cora. 

Peterson, W. C, Longshore, Sonth Carolina. 

Wheat, oats, com. 

Philleo, W. W., Ayr, Nebraska. 
Popcorn. 

Phillips, T. M., ft Son, Mercersbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Beardless barley, com. 

Phillips, P. B., Huntsville, Arkansas. 

'Orange" wheat 



*n 



Phillips, W. B., Green Forest, Arkansas. 

Early white oats. "Wild Goose" com. 

Pillsbnry-Washbnm Flour Mills Company, Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. — Wheat, commercial grades. 

Pittman, D. W., Lewiston, Illinois. 

"Fultz" wheat, white oats, rye. com. 

Plasterer, T. B., Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. 

"Rudy" wheat 

Plattner, 7., Scotland, South Dakota. 
Com. 

Porcher, W. D., Charleston, South Carolina. 

Gold seed head, white seed head. rice. 

Porter, E. A., Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

White "Runer" com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 221 



Fonlson, P., Bichfleld, TTtali. 
"Black Spanish" oats. 

Frioe, H. J., Delta, Colorado. 

Odessa wheat, white Russian oats. 

BanouBy Hn. L. P., Hillbank, South Dakota. 

Hard Fife wheat 

Batdiffy J. T., Biolimondi Indiana. 

Rye in the straw. 

Satcliff, W. S., Biclimond, Indiana. 

"New G)lunibia" wheat, oats. 

Say, Andrews, & Company, Salt Lake, TTtah. 
Alfalfa seed. 

Seeord, J. H., Decatnr, niinois. 
"Qydesdale" oats. 

Bediger, C, Anrora, Nebraska. 

Turkey wheat 
Beeder, £., New Hope, PennsylvjEmia. 

Wheat, oats, buckwheat, com. 

Beichard, B., Arcanum, Ohio. 
G)m. 

Beith, 7., Jr., Davisville, California. 
Barley. 

Bene, W. T., Neone, North Dakota. 

Scotch barley, Scotch Fife wheat, white Russian "Squaw" corn, 
oats. 

Benk, W. P., Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. 
"Lincoln" oats. 

Besh, S., Broad Fording, Maryland. 

"Black Tartarian" and "Green Mountain" oats. 

Beynolds, E., Banksville, New York. 

"Bald blue-stem" bearded wheat, winter rye. 

Bichardson ft Company, Chicago. 
Wheat, com. 



Bichardson, Thomas Y., Phoenix, Maryland. 

"Johnson's Yellow" corn. 



222 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Bichmond, John F., Biohmond, Florida. 

"Beggar weed" hay. 

Biohmond, 0., Tyndall, South Dakota. 

Oats, barley, "Sure Crop" com. 

Bickard, E. T., Grinnell, Iowa. 
Com. 

Bine, J. M., Wells, West Virginia. 

"Red Qawson" wheat, white Russian oats, "Early Dent" com, 

Boatcap, Mrs. B. A^ Olathe, Colorado. 

Nebraska white oats, "Angel of Midnight" corn. 

Boberts, Prof. I. P., Ithaca, New York. 

Forage and grass crops ; photographs. 

Boberts, T., lona, Michigan. 
Rye. 

Bobertson, T. T., Florence, Tennessee. 

"Seits improved" com. 

Bobinson, Alexander McK, Ada, Texas. 

Velvet bean seed. 

Bobinson, A. S., Pleasant Mounds, Minnesota. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat. 

Bobinson, T., Pleasant Mounds, Minnesota. 

Velvet blue-stem wheat, black winter rye. 

Boderuck, 0., Frederick, Maryland. 

"Fulcaster" wheat. 

Bogers, 0. W., Laporte, Indiana. 

Corn, rye, barley, oats. 

Bohilly, B. H., Lake City, Minnesota. 
Barley. 

Boot & Cain, Versailles, Kentucky. 

"Terry Fultz'* wheat. 

Boss Brothers, Seed House, Wichita, Kansas. 

Cornstalk, white kaffir corn. 

Boss, 7. B., Boans, Texas. 

"Rose Prolific" com. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 223 

Bowe, Frank, Slmllsbnrg, Wisconsin. 

"Snow Flake" corn. 

Ruppe, A., Pendleton, Oregon. 

Blue-stem wheat, "Cox," red-chaff and "Sonera" wheat. 

Russell, D. B., Shippensbnrg, Pennsylvania. 
"Deitz" wheat. 

St. German, N. C, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Wheat in the straw. 

Salisbury, Mrs. Lydia A., Blue Hound, Illinois. 

"White Squaw" com. 

Salzer, J. A., Seed Company, La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Winter wheat. 

Sawyer, T. T., Alpine, Alabama. 

Purple-stem wheat, blue-stem rye. • 

Scarborough, J. E., Payson, Illinois. 

"Fultz" wheat, northern white oats, "Feeder's Favorite" white 
com. 

Scheer, Frank, Arlington, Nebraska. 

"White Pearl" com. 

Schiermier, W., Cappeln, Missouri. 

"Fultz" wheat. 

Schindel, S. M., Hagerstown, Maryland. 

New variety of "Blue Ridge" wheat, wheat in the straw. 

Schriber, H. F., Colfax, Washington. 

"Bonanza" oats. 



Schuttler & Hotz, Chicago. 

"White Dent" com. 

Scott, J., Plain City, Ohio. 

"Fultz" wheat, Michigan amber wheat straw. 

Scott & Magner, San Francisco, California. 

Stock foods, meal, baled hay. 

Seaver Brothers, Colusa, California. 
Com. 

Seitx, J., Tiffin, Ohio. 

"Fultz," "Gold Coin" wheat, "Lentz and Seiples' Hybrid" corn. 



224 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Seville Packing Company, New York. 

Olives, "pim-olas," olive oil. 

Skaffner, Mnlberry, Tennessee. 

"Evergreen" broom com. 

Skaw, 7. F., West Hampden, Maine. 

"Lost Nation" wheat, "White Hogan" oats, large Canada com. 

Skeldon, C. H., Minnewankon, North Dakota. 

Scotch Fife wheat 

Shelley, 0. £., Kanor, Maryland. 
"Fultz" wheat 

Shelton, D. A., Bome, Oeorg^. 

Red rust-proof oats. 

Shepard, Prof. Tames H., Brookings, South Dakota. 

Forage crops, photographs. 
Shepperson, Daniel W., Langdon, Missouri. 

Branching Dhoura com, rye, oats. 

Sherfey, C. W., Nebraska City, Nebraska. 

"Yellow Turkey" wheat, "Silver Mine" white oats, "Prolific 
White," red cob and other com. 



Shoemaker, P. H., Freeport, Minnesota. 

"Big Four" oats. 

Shof ner, £. M., Mulberry, Tennessee. 
"Poole" wheat 

Shouse, S. H., Versailles, Kentucky. 

"Kentucky Blue Grass" corn. 

Showalter, S. T., Ladd, Virginia. 

Wheat, mixed Virginia milling. 

Shutts, W., Wichita, Eiansas. 

"White Pearl" com. 



Siljan, C. H., Madison, Minnesota. 

"Golden Giant" oats. 

Simpson, 7. B., Dallas, Texas. 

Nicaragua wheat. 

Simpson, J. B., and Oibbs, B., Dallas, Texas. 

Nicaragua wheat. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 225 



Simpson, J. £., Horf oik, Nebraska. 

Com. 

Slade, C. C, Kabor, Maryland. 

"Gold Berry" red wheat 
Smithy A. T.. Lexin|^n| MissonrL 

"FulU" wheat 



P., Brighton, California. 

"White Sonera" wheat. 

Smithy 0. A.| Yankton, South Dakota. 

Peas, timothy, velvet blue-stem wheat, oats, com, popcorn, barley. 

Smith, H. C, Fremont, Ohio. 

"Poole," "Rudy Valley" wheat, "Potato" and "Michigan Won- 
der" oats, com. 

Smith, 7. D., Casselton, North Dakota. 

Red Mediterranean wheat 

Smith, Julius P., Livermore, California. 
Olive oil. 

Smith, L. W., Prairie Point, Mississippi. 

"Mosby White" com. 

Smith, 0., Sapulpa, Indian Territory. 

"Fulte" wheat 
Smith, S. A., Blue Springs, Nebraska. 

Black rye, "Side" oats. 

Smith, W. D., Authon, Texas. 

Early amber sorghum, wheat, oats, com, "Big German" millet. 

Smurthwaite, A., Produce Company, Ogden, Utah. 

Alfalfa and timothy seed. 

Snowden, P., Ashton, Maryland. 

"Fultz" wheat rye, oats, corn. 

Sommerkamp, B. P., Eamp, Alabama. 

Upland rice. 

Southern Cotton Oil Company, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Cotton seed products used for food. 

Southern Bailway Company, Washington, D. C. 

Wheat, oats and rye straw. 



226 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Soverhill, S. 0., Tiskilwai Illinois. 

Early Swedish oats, barley, corn. 

Spencer, E. £., Edgar, North Carolina. 

White winter oats. 

Spenker, Tames F., Biverbank, California. 

Com. 

Spragne, H., Ionia, MicMgan. 

"Dawson's Golden Chaff" wheat. 

Spratt's Patent, Limited, New York City. 

Prepared foods for dogs, poultry, game. 

Sprawls, W. £., Bnrk Place, Louisiana. 

Com. 

Staples, L. 0., St. Tosepli, Minnesota. 

Bearded spring barley. 

Steffen, A., Omndy Center, Iowa. 

Black early white oats, barley, rye. 

Stephen, W. F., Harrisonville, Missouri. 

Timothy. 

Stephens, T., Malad City, Idaho. 

"Odessa Fall," "Spring Sonora," "White Amber," "White Club" 
spring wheat, "Potato" and "White Side" oats. 

Stewart, P. M., Woodstown, New Jersey. 

**Golden Hominy" corn. 

Stine, Fred, Walla Walla, Washington. 

"Little Club" wheat, straw. 

Stinson, B., Colusa, California. 

Egyptian corn. 

Stokes, W. H., Watertown, South Dakota. 

Maize, velvet blue-stem wheat, oats. 

Stouffer, T., Hagerstown, Maryland. 

"Lancaster." "Dietz," "Red Wonder" wheat, "Stauffen's" yellow 
dent corn. 

Strom, H. H., Hillsboro, North Dakota. 

"Hayne's Blue-Stem," "Saskatchewan Fife" wheat, Russian 
white oats. 



^ 



GROUP Vir.— CLASS 39. 227 



Stuart, 7. A., Lyndhunt, Virginia. 

Mixed "Fultz'* and "Fulcaster" wheat, rye, corn. 

Stnckey, T. L, Wichita, Kansas. 

"Big May" wheat. 

Swanders, £. H., Wood, OMo. 

"Golden Chaff" wheat. 

Taft, Anstin, S., Weston, Ohio. 

Cover, barley, oats, wheat, corn. 

Talant, A. W., Cuba, Georgia. 

Com. 

Talant, F. H., Cuba, Georgia. 

"Turf" oats, "Red Fall" wheat. 

Tallman, H. B., Tecumseh, Michigan. 

"Rudy" wheat, "Silver Hull" buckwheat, com. 

Taylor, K. H., Henderson, Colorado. 

Com. 

^ 

Taylor, P. H., Harrisonville, Missouri. 

Texas oats, blue-stem wheat, clover, timothy, corn. 

Tegt, Mrs. E., Arlington, Nebraska. 

"White Russian Side" oats. 

Templeton, W. E., TTrsnla, Arkansas. 

"Fulcaster" wheat. 

Tenney, S. A., Newport, New Hampshire. 

"Mortgage Lifter" oats, "Early Walpole" com. 

Thomas, Samuel, Marshall, Missouri. 

Mammoth white com. 
Thorbum, J. M., & Company, New York City. 

Grain, ensilage and fodder corn, corn. 

Towson, W. P., Hagerstown, Maryland. 
"Fultz" wheat. 

Trumbull & Beebe, San Francisco, California. 

Legumes, grass, clover and other seeds. 

Trump, W., Arcanum, Ohio. 
Oats. 



228 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Tncker, E. F., Axaby, Maryland. 

"Fulcaster" wheat, "Golden Beauty" corn. 

Tnmeri 0. W., Fair Forest, South Carolina. 
"Turf" oats. 

Underwood, S. 0., Council Blnffs, Iowa. 

White Russian oats, oats in the straw. 

TTnion Oil Company, 204 Carondelet St., Hew Orleani, Louisi- 
ana. — Cotton seed cake, meal, hulls ; cotton seed cake, cotton seed 
meal, bolted or unbolted; cotton seed hulls for feeding and fer- 
tilizing. 

Vaden, 7. H., Lanrel Grove, Virginia. 

"Currell's Prolific" wheat 

Van Slyke, A., Ionia, Michigan. 
Oats. 

Venahle, A. B., Farmville, Virginia. 

'Bearded Fulcaster," "Currell's Prolific, ' "Fultz" wheat. 



«<i 



Vine, Emory, Miles City, Montana. 

Plants and seed of alfalfa, smooth brome and native grasses. 

Voorhees, Dr. £. B., New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

Forage crops and methods of making ensilage. Photographs. 

Vorce, H., Mnir, Michigan. 

"Signal" wheat 

Vosbrink, George P., 69 S. Water St., Chici^. 

Bird seeds, food for canary birds. 

Wagner, W., Parkman, Wyoming. 

"English Fife" wheat 

Waite, W. S., Wartrace, Tennessee. 

Peas, "Fulcaster" wheat, corn. 

Walden, W. A., Hnntsville, Arkansas. 

Wheat, oats. 

Waldron, C. A., Ionia, Michigan. 

"Hathaway" dent com. 

Walker, W. P., Griffin, Georgia. 

Red and purple straw wheat. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 229 

Walters, T., laSalle, KicMgan. 

Hybid Mediterranean wheat 

Walters, Moses, Trickliaiii, Texas. 

African and German millet, "Red Top'' sorghum, wheat, oats, 
com. 

Walton, I. K., Allensville, Kentucky. 

"Gill" wheat, "Improved Willis" com. 



Warner, 0. K, Clearwater, Kinnesota. 

"Scotch Fife" wheat 

Warner, E. C, Forestbnrg, Sonth Dakota. 

Millets and native gn'SLSses, wheat, rye, "Nepaul" hull-less barley, 
oats, com. 

Watson, D. A., Lebanon, Kansas. 

"Golden Gem" com. 

Weirick, 0. S., Wiohita, Kansas. 

Texas red oats. 

West Point Mill Company, Charleston, Sontk Carolina. 

Rice, rice straw. 

Whatley, S. 7., Nannie, Georgia. 

"Turf' oats, "Little Red Cob" com. 

Wkeeler, T. C, Watertown, Tennessee. 
Com. 

White, E. M., Hagerstown, Maryland. 

"Fulcaster," "Fultz" wheat 

White, T. A., Hope, North Dakota. 

Wheat, velvet blue-stem, "Scotch Fife." 

Whiteley, John, Oreenville, Ohio. 
Wheat 

Whitesell, T. C, Elon College, North Carolina. 

"Kvit" and "Fulcaster" wheat, "Dexter" winter rye, oats, "Holt 
Wilhide" com. 

Whitney, Charles, Walla Walla, Washington. 

White oats in the straw. 

Whitney-Noyes Seed Company, The, Bnffalo, New York City. 

Collection of clover and other seeds cleaned by special process. 



230 GROUP VII.— CLASS 39. 

Whitten, Trickham, Texas. 

"Red Top" sorghum. 

Wing, J. £., Hechanicsburg, Ohio. 

Beardless barley. 

Wingo, J. W., Montrose, South Carolina. 

"BouRhton" wheat, "Baldwin white" corn. 

Williams, Henry, Spring Banch, Nebraska. 

"Red Club" wheat. 

Williams, P. N., Salem, North Carolina. 

"Beardless Fulcaster" wheat, rye, black spring oats, white corn. 

Wilson, James, Secretary of Agricultnre, Washington, D. C. 

Collective exhibit of manufactures from corn. 

» 

Wilson, John A., Chestnut Park, Virginia. 

Mammoth white com. 

Wilson, J. E., Kenton, Tennessee. 

"Little May" wheat, "Willis" com. 

Wolf rum, J. 0., Bunceton, Kssouri. 

White rye. 

Wood, T. W., & Sons, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Forage and grass crops, wheat, rye, barley, oats. 

Wright, £. H., Salem, Indiana. 

"Improved Leaming" com. 

Wright, B., Summers, Arkansas. 
Cora. 

Yates, J., Colusa, California. 

White barley. 

Young, A. P., Lexington, Missouri. 

"Rough and Ready" corn. 

Young, Bufus, Lexington, Missouri. 

"Sugar" corn. 

Yowell, P. J., Fremont, Kansas. 

Com. 

Yunker, P. N., Lemitar, New Mexico. 

Barley, wheat, oats, maize. 

Zeller, W. N., Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. 

Mediterranean wheat. 



i 



N 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 40. 231 

CLASS 40. 

ANIMAL FOOD PRODUCTS. 



American Condensed Milk Company, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Milk, condensed, evaporated. 

Armour & Company, Chicago. 

Butter, frozen eggs. 

Borden's Condensed Milk Company, New York City. 

Condensed milk, evaporated cream, condensed coffee. 
Gail Borden's **Eagle" brand condensed milk. 
Borden's "Peerless" brand evaporated cream. 
Borden's "Eagle" brand condensed coffee. 

Dairymen's Union, San Francisco, California. 

Milk, cream, butter. 

De Land, A. D., Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 

Cheese. 

Department of Agricnltnre, TJ. S. A., Dairy Division, B. A. I., 

Washington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of dairy products, milk, 
cream, butter and cheese. 

CONTRIBUTOR^. 

Briarcliff Farms, Briarcliff Manor, New Hampshire. — Butter. 
Brush, Dr., New York. — Kumys. 
Candor, John R., Pittsford, Vermont. — Butter. 
Casper, P. H., Nicholson, Wisconsin. — Butter. 
Chandler and Rood Company, Cleveland, Ohio. — Butter. 
College Creamery, Ames, Iowa. — Butter., 
Dawley, F. E., Fayetteville, New York. — Butter. 
Elgin Creamery Company, Chicago. — Butter. 
Embich, Chas. W.. Lancaster. Ohio. — Butter. 
Farmers* Mutual Creamery, St. Johnsbury, Vermont. — Butter. 
Franklin, Mrs. W. A., Vernon, Vermont. — Butter. 
Haggdahl, Sam, New Sweden, Minnesota. — Butter. 
Hampton Co-operative Creamery, Easthampton, Massachu- 
setts. — Butter. 

Hermanson, Hans, Scandinavia, Wisconsin. — Butter. 
Hoards' Creameries, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. — Butter. 
Howard, J. F., Haverhill. Massachusetts. — Butter. 
Karlsen, Jacob, Monroe, Wisconsin. — Butter. 
La Grange Creamery, La Grange, Georgia. — Butter. 
Lawrence, W. A., & Son, Chester, New York. — Butter. • 



232 GROUP VII.— CLASS 40. 

McLarens, A. F., & Company, Detroit, Michigan.— Butter. 

Matzoon, V. T., Company^ New York. — ^Matzoon. 

M'innesota Dairy School, Columbus, Ohio. — Butter. 

Monadnock Farms, Monadnock, New Hampshire. — Butter. 

Montague Creamery, Montague, Massachusetts. — Butter. 

Norton, Edward, Croshen, Connecticut — Butter. 

Ohio Dairy School, Rogersville, Ohio. — ^Butter. 

Reynolds, A. C, New York. — Butter. 

Rice. E. S., Triumph, Ohio.— Butter. 

Rice, H. W., Westford, Vermont— Butter. 

Tloot C. P., Gilbertsville, New York.— Butter. 

Silver Lake Co-operative Creamery, Wisconsin. — ^Butter. 

Sondergaard, H. T., Litchfield, ^linnesota. — Butter. 

Springbrook Creamery, Rockville, Connecticut — ^Butter. 

Vernon Creamery, Rockville, Connecticut. — ^Butter. 

Wells River Creamery, Vermont. — Butter. 

Western Newark Creamery Company, Wisconsin. — Butter. 

Windsor Creamery, Windsor, Connecticut — ^Butter. 

Fairfield Dairy Company, The, Hontolair, Hew Jersey. 

Photgraphs ; methods of suppl3ang milk to cities. 

Hall, W. A., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 

Collection of specimens of the by-products of dairying. 

Harvey, Fred, Oalt, California. 

Milk, cream, butter and cheese. 

Helvetia Milk Condensing Company, Highland, Ulinoii. 

Highland brand cream, evaporated. 

Lamont, 0. Fred, St. Lonis, Missouri. 

Hfirss, crystallized, oil of eggs, egg food. 

Maine Condensed Milk Company, Whitefield, New Hamp* 

shire. — Condensed milk. 

New York State Commission to the Paris Exposition, Low- 

ville, New York. — Butter, creamery, dairy and fancy; cheese, 
factory and fancy. Collective exhibit. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

Babcock, R. H. — Cheese. 

Baumest, A. X., & Company. — Cheese. 

Bent, R. H.— Buter. 

Briarcliflf Farms. — Butter. 

Cook, A. & H. E.— Cheese. 

Dawley. F. E.— Cheese. 

Dunaway, F. P.— Cheese. 

Goodrich, D. A. — Cheese. 

Hall, W. W.— Cheese. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 233 

Meridale G>mpany. — ^Butter. 
Norton, Robert, & G>mpany. — Cheese. 
Rockdale Creamery. — Butter. 
Rosemary Creamery. — Butter. 
Underhill, Stephen. — Cheese. 

Pacific Coast Condensed Milk Company, Seattle, WasMngton. 

Milk, condensed. 
Pacific Creameries^ San Francisco, California. 

Milk, cream, butter, cheese. 

Bnssell Cream Company, The, San Francisco, California. 

Milk, cream, butter, cheese. 

St. Charles Condensing Company, St. Charles, Illinois. 

Unsweetened and sterilized evaporated cream. 

St. Lonis Dairy Company, St. Lonis, Missouri. 

Photographs ; method of handling milk supply in a city. 

Simpson, Hclntire & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Butter, creamery. 

Swift & Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Edible animal oils and fats. 

Vermont Condensed Milk Company, Bichmond, Vermont. 
Milk, condensed. 

Walker-Gordon Laboratory Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Milk, modified ; milk products. 



GLASS 41. 

INEDIBLE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 



Abney, Z., Prattville, Alabama. 

"Dixon" lint cotton. 

Adam's Cotton Company, Charleston, Sonth Carolina. 

Upland middling lint cotton. 

Addison, 7. C, Bnddell, Sonth Carolina. 

"Pcterkin" lint cotton and cotton seed. 



234 GROUP VII.—CLASS 41. 

Adger, Joseph E.^ Hughes Spur. 

Short staple cotton for hill land. 

Adkins, William, Auburn, Alabama. 

"Truitt" lint cotton. 

Advance Oin & Mill Company, Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

"Allen's Hybrid" cottons, "de-lint" and "linters*' from seed after 
ginning. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Alabama, Auburn, Ala- 
bama. — "King" cotton seed. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Georgia, Experiment, 

Georgia. — Ten varieties of cotton. 

Agricultural Experiment Station of Mississippi, Agricultural 

College, Mississippi. — Cotton. 

Agricultural College of Oregon, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Shropshire and Cotswold wool. 

Alexander, William D., Croft, North Carolina. 

White cluster lint cotton. 

Alexander, 7. F., Britton, Texas. 

Mammoth Seed Storm-Proof cotton. 

Allen, B. B., Midlothian, Texas. 

"Goose Egg" cotton. 

Allison, S.'B., New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Ramie stalks and fibre, prepared by Allison machine and process. 

American Cotton Oil Company, New York. 
Cotton seed oils, cake meal, linters and soap. 

American Oinning Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sea Island cotton, ginned by Prior roller gin. 

Anderson, L. L., Boberta, Indian Territory. 

"Storm- Proof" and g^'^en seed cottons. 

Appett's, William, Sons, Hallettsville, Texas. 

Cotton. 

Amim, B. F., Hallettsville, Texas. 

"Meyer's" lint cotton. 

Arthur, W. A., & Company, Texarkana, Texas. 

Cottons. 



GROUP VII. -CLASS 41. 235 

Ashford, W. B., Eockton, South Carolina. 

"King's" lint cotton. 
Bailey, J. S., Baleigh, North Carolina. 

"Williams" and "Davis" lint cottons. 

Baker, Sam, Woodson, Mississippi. 

"Girard" lint cotton. 

Baker & Chapman, Bio Vista, Texas. 

German variety of lint cotton. 
Bankinson, W. S., Yokena, Mississippi. 

"AUen Hybrid" and "China Prolific" cotton. 

Barbee, J. T., Bipley, Tennessee. 
Cotton seed. 

Barper, William Oordan, Hemphill, Texas. 
Cotton. 

Bates, B., Jackson, South Carolina. 

"Bates' " poor-land and "Little Brown" cotton seed. 

Bates & White, Nassau, Iowa. 

Delaine wool. 

Battle, B. B., Baleigh, North Carolina. 
Cotton. 

Battle, M. J., Whitakers, North Carolina. 

"Extra Prolific" improved lint cotton. 

Baxter, C. W., Hopedale, Ohio. 

Blacktop Delaine merino wool. 

Bean, Tarleton H., Washington, D. C. 

Alaska wool. 

Beck, W. S., Coleman, Texas. 

Delaine merino wool. 

Bedell, E. I., Mound, Texas. 

"Bedell" lint cotton. 

Bell, J. C, Benio, South Carolina. 

"Truitt" lint cotton. 

Bell, W. W., Manley, Minnesota. 

"North Star" wool. 



236 GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 

Bell & Hoore, Bed Bluff, Calif oniia. 

Three-fourths blood merino wool. . 

Bendat, L., HcComb City, HississippL 

"Upland Long Staple" cotton. 

Benton, S. H., Beanf ort, Sonth Carolina. 

Sea Island lint and seed cotton. 

Berry, J. L., Hampton, Georgia. 

"Berry Early Big Boll" lint cotton; branches of cotton covered 
with open bolls. 

Beyer, Oeorge, Ponghkeepsie, New York. 

National Delaine wool. 



, Bey. 7. T., Bonnd, Sonth Carolina. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

Billings Farm, Woodstock, Vermont. 
South Down wool. 

Binson, William E., Charleston, Sontk Carolina. 

Sea Island cotton. 
Bishop, H. A., Madison, Alabama. 

"King" lint cotton. 

Blakeney, 7. C, Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

"Ounce Boll," "Sea Island," "Storm-Proof" lint cottons. 

Blanchard & Folsom, Honnd, Texas. 

"Beddl's Best" lint cotton. 

Bogwell, Hardy B., Gamer, North Carolina. 
Cotton. 

Booth, 7. B., Paris, Texas. 

"Bryant" lint cotton. 

Bonohelle, E. F., Boligee, Alabama. 

G>mmon Alabama cotton. 

Braden, B. T., Paris, Texas. 
G>tton. 

Braden, C. C, Paris, Texas. 

"G)ck's" improved lint cotton. 

Branghton, 7oseph T., Oamer, North Carolina. 

G>tton. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 237 



Breaxeale Brothers, Bermuda, Louisiana. 

"Pctcrldn" cotton. 

Breds, 7., Ernest, NatoMtoolies, Louisiana. 

Cotton. 

Brice, A. H., Woodward, Sonth Carolina. 

"Petcrldn" improved lint cotton. 

Bryant, T. W., Midlothian, Texas. 

"Stonn-Proof" cotton. 

Bnttrill, Thomas E., Jackson, Oeorgia. 
Cotton. 

Byrd, A. 0., Omega, Oklahoma. 

"Nadagorish" silk cotton seed, "Pettit" Gulf seed. 

Bjrrd, H. T., Boxie, Mississippi. 

Upland lint cotton. 

Galoots, Allen 0., Bnston, Louisiana. 

jsjng cotton. 

CUdwell, L. E., Lnmberton, North Carolina. 

"Big Boll" and common cottons. 

Callison, 7. W., Oreenwood, South Carolina. 

"Improved King" lint cotton. 

Canty, John, Fort Mitchell, Alabama. 
"King" cotton seed. 

Ci^rton, W. P., Adona, Arkansas. 

"Big BoU" lint cotton. 

Capps, T. W., Oeneva, Alabama. 

"Tmitt's Big Boll" lint cotton. 

Carpenter, John W., Batesville, Ohio. 

National Delaine merino wool. 



Carter, 7. 7., Copeland, South Carolina. 

"Pctcrkin" lint cotton seed. 

Cary, F. M., Seneca, South Carolina. 

"Pcterkin" lint cotton. 

Cary, Bobert A., White Pond, South Carolina. 

"Pctcrkin Cluster" lint cotton. 



238 GROUP VII.-CLASS 41. 

Casey, T. F., Oglesby, Texas. 

"Ounce Boll" lint cotton. 

Cathcart, S. H., Behoboth, Alabama. 

"Cathcart's Improved Cluster" lint cotton. 

Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles, California. 

California cotton in the boll. 

Chandler, B. C, Stokes, Mississippi. 

"Rodger" lint cotton. 

Chaplin, B. W., Jr., Bantowles, South Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Chapman, Max, Harysville, Ohio. 

Standard Delaine merino wool. 

Chilton, 7. B., Comanche, Texas. 

"Chilton Blue Seed" improved lint cotton. j 

I 

Chinn, B. L., Conlterville, Texas. 

"Miles and King" cotton seed. I 

Chisholm, £. N., Bowesville, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

Clapp, A. B., Chatham, Ohio. i 

Dickinson Delaine merino wool. 

Clark, John 0., Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Improved Saxony wool. 

Clark, Judge Walter, Baleigh, North Carolina. 

"Drake's Cluster" cotton seed. 

Clarke, William, Cahto, California. 

Merino cross wool. 

Coates Brothers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Delaine wool. 

Cohn, S., & Son, Magnolia, Mississippi. 

High grade upland lint cotton. 

Colin, L. L., Carbon, Texas. 

*Berville" and common cotton. 

Collins, W. A., Bastcop, Louisiana. 

"Peterkin" cotton seed. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 239 

Collins, W. E., Hayersville, Mississippi. 

"China Prolific," "Dougherty's Long Staple," "Peterkin" lint 
cottons. 

Commercial Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Washed and unwashed wool from various parts of the United 
States. 

Commonwealth Cotton Manufacturing Company, Durham, 

North Carolina. — "Williams' " variety lint cotton. 

Cone, D. S., Bed Bluff, California. 

Merino wooL 

Conn, J. 0., Neal, Texas. 

"Improved Mixture" lint cotton. 

Constant, Edward W., Atherton, Louisiana. 

"Willis" cotton seed. 
Cook, W. A., Xrtica, Mississippi. 

"Cook's" upland long staple lint cotton. 

Corley, J. J., Florence, South Carolina. 

Cotton plant in fruit, seed and lint cotton. 

Cossit, Davis, Onondaga, New York. 

American merino wool. 

Cribb, J. B., Manor, Georgia. 

"Searsland" cotton seed. 

Crow Brothers, Monroe, North Carolina. 

'King's Improved" lint cotton. 



*<i 



Culbertson, H. M^ Sonora, Ohio. 

"Dickinson" Delaine merino wool. 

Currie, J. W., Bio Vista, Texas. 

Storm-proof cotton. 

Curtis, W. S., Thomson, Georgia. 

"Pruitt's" re-improved cotton. 

Davisson, F. M., West Manchester, Ohio. 

Oxford down wool. 

Delta Cotton Company, Memphis, Tennessee. 
Cotton. 

Department of Agriculture, TT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Collective exhibit of wools and goat fleeces. 



240 GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 

Department of Agricnltiire, XT. S. A., Mnsenm Diyiiion, Waih- 

ington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of flax, flax straw, Alaskan flajc 
and fibers. 

Department of Agricnltnrei XT. S. A., Mnsenm, Vinita, Indian 

Territory. — Fleece of Angora goat 

Department of Agricnltnre, XT. S. A., Diyiiion of Statiitios, 

Washington, D. C.-^Collective exhibit of seed and lint cotton. 

Dewey, Oonld & Company, Boston, Uassaohnsetts. 

Graded Michigan wool. 

Dewstoe, Martin B., Monnt Holly, North Carolina. 

"Improved King's" cotton seed. 

Dill, Joseph T., Charleston, Sonth Carolina. 

Extra fine lint cotton. 

Dimler, William M., Fillmore, Indiana. 

Leicester cross wooL 

Dookery & Donelson, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Lint cottons. 

Dodge, Charles Bichards, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs illustrating the fiber industry in the United States. 

Dorgan, £. C, Mobile, Alabama. 
Cotton. 

Dorgan, L. C, & Company, Mobile, Alabama. 

Common and Allen seed cotton. 

Draughn, Alonzo B., Byan, Texas. 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Dn Pre, A. H., & Son, McClellanyille, Sonth Carolina. 

Sea Island and lint cotton. 

Eagleson, A. S., Washington, Pennsylyania. 

Dorset horn wool 

Easley, J. W., Pendletonville, Texas. 

"Woolup" seed cotton lint. 

Ellison, M. £., Williamston, Sonth Carolina. 

"King's" lint and seed cottons. 

Eubank, A. L., Armstrong, Sonth Carolina. 

"Duncan's" mammoth lint cottons. 



1 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 241 

Evans, W. D., Cheraw, South Carolina. 
Cotton. 

'Ewing, Eon. B. T., Centre, Alabama. 

"Texas Storm- Proof" lint cotton. 

Xxperiment Station of North Carolina, Baleigh, North Caro- 
lina. — "King's No. i" cotton seed. 

Fallin, W. E., Bnston, Lonisiana. 
Cotton. 

Farrelli T. W., Blaokville, Sonth Carolina. 

"Pcterkin" lint cotton. 

Farrill, P. W., Blackville, Sonth Carolina. 

"Big BoU Prolific" lint cotton. 
Fer^^nson, 7. 0., Vicksbnrg, Mississippi. 

"Ferguson's Prolific" staple lint cotton. 

Ferrell, B. C, Qninoy, Mississippi 

. Common Mississippi lint cotton. 

Field & Strickland, Carterville, Oeorgia. 

Common Georgia lint cotton. 

Finks, 7. B., Waco, Texas. 

Cotton. 
Fiske, Lonis S., & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wool, washed and unwashed, from various parts of the United 
States. 

Flint, Daniel, Saoramento, California. 
Hops. 

Folts, A. 7., Bipley, Tennessee. 

Green seed cotton seed. 

Forrest, 7ames M., Paris, Sonth Carolina. 

"Chester Big BoU" lint cotton. 

Foster & Olassell, Shreveport, Lonisiana. 
Cotton. 

Frankinbnsh, 7. M., New Orleans, Lonisiana. 

Lint cottons. 

Fripp, William P., Orahamville, Sonth Carolina. 
Sea Island cotton. 



242 GROUP VII.-CLASS 41. 

Fagfoa, H. 7., Anderson, Texas. 

"O'Brien Big Boll" lint cotton. 

Gage, Tolin P., XTnion, Sonth Carolina. 

"Peterkin" and "Thomas" hybridized cottons. 

Gallop, 7. 0., Woodson, Mississippi. 

"Timbcrlake" lint cotton. 

Garland, B. W., Dekalb, Texas. 

Cotton. 
Gilbert, 7. R, & Company, Kasbville, Tennessee. 

Cottons. 

Goodlett, 7ames P., Memphis, Tennessee. 

Long staple, "Heavy Bender" and upland lint cottons. 

Gordon, W. W., & Company, Georgia. 

Commercial collection of East Florida and Georgia Sea Island 
cottons. 

Gracie, 7oIin M., New Gascony, Arkansas. 

"Black Rattler," "Truitt" and "Silk Osier" lint cottons. 

Graham, A. T., Canton, Mississippi. 

Pelican" lint cotton. 



I 



i<' 



Graham, E. M., Buston, Louisiana. 

"King" cotton seed. 

Graham, W. A., Machpelah, North Carolina. 

"Graham's Improved" lint cotton. 

Green, B. A., Easley, Sonth Carolina. 

"Allen's Long Staple," "King's Early" cottons. 

Green, Mo, Altona, Oklahoma. 

"Willow" and "Red Baltic" cotton seed. 

Green, Wesley, Baxter, Arkansas. 

"Big Boll" cotton seed. 

Greene, H. H., Ballettsville, Tennessee. 

"Meyer's" cotton. 

Gregory, W. B., Stovall, North Carolina. 

"Rus.sell's lint cotton. 

Griffin, 7ohn, Greenville, Mississippi. 

"Griffin" cotton. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 243 

Oaesnard, Angpist, Lobdell, Louisiana. 

Cotton lint. 

OumbeU, E., & Company, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Louisiana cottons. 

Ouy, John N., Carbon, Texas. 

"Mir's** variety lint cotton. 

Owin, Davis & Owin, Brunswick, Mississippi. 

Extra staple lint cotton. 

Haile & Waltz, CMco, California. 

Merino wool. 

Hale, Barry, Baxter, Arkansas. 

"Peterkin" cotton seed. 

Hall, J. C, Ordway, South Dakota. 

Shropshire wool. 

Halladay, C. L., Sebewa, Michigan. 

Rambouillet merino wool. 

HaUett, H. C, Morrilton, Arkansas. 

"Cook" lint cotton. 

Halliday, W. P., Drewton, Arkansas. 

Cotton. 

Hallowell, Donald 4b Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Wool, washed and unwashed, from various districts of the United 
States. 

Hancock, Oeorge A., Eugene, Oregon. 

Fleece of Angora goat. 

Harden, W. A., Chester, South Carolina. 

"Pctcrkin" lint cotton. 

Hardie, W. T., & Company, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Cotton. 

Hargrave, Joseph, Madrid, New York. 

Dorset horn wool. 

Harmon, F. 7., Lexington, South Carolina. 

"Peerless" lint cotton. 

Harper, William 0. Hemphill, Texas. 

Texas cotton. 



244 GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 

Harrelly Gteorge K.^ Self ord. North Carolina. 

"Allen's Long Staple" and Hybrid cotton. 

HarriS) George C, Mt. Helena, HississippL 
Cotton. 

Harris, John S., Oakley, Idaho. 

Fleece of Angora goat 

Harris, Thomas, Thomas, (Georgia. 
Cotton. 

Harris, W. P., Yoni^pi, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" cotton. 

Harrison, John, Hash, Texas. 

"Storm-Proof" and "Peterkin" lint cottons. 

Hart, J. S., Stono, South Carolina. 

"Seabrook" lint cotton. 

Hartley, L. H., Salem, Iowa. 

Shropshire wool. 

Hawkins, B. W., Nona, Georgia. 

"Prolific" lint cotton. 

Hawkins, Henry, Shreveport, Louisiana. 

Cottons and unpressed cotton lint. 

Hayes, H. M., Exlivin, Georgia. 

Cotton. 

Hays, X. D., Kent's Store, Louisiana. 

"Perkins" cotton seed. 

Hazlewood, J. D., Fayette Comer, Tennessee. 

Fine Pacific lint cotton. 

Heald, C. H., Healdton, Indian Territory. 

"Ounce Boll" and mixed cotton seed. 

Heoht, Liebmann & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Wools of various breeds and grades. 

Hinson, W. 0., Charleston, South Carolina. 

Sea Island cotton. 

Holtz, Scott, Tiffin, Ohio. 

"Dickinson" Delaine wool. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 245 



Hooker, 0., Eureka, California. 

Merino wool 

Horst Brothers, Hontville, California. 
Hops. 

Hnett, Lee, Baxter, Arkansas. 

"Pcterkin" cotton seed. 

HngkM, W. 0., Hastings, Texas. 

Merino wool 

Indo-]^7ptian Compress Company, Hew York and Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Cotton in bales. 



Taokson, E. B., Amot, Mississippi 

'^Superior Benders" lint cotton. 

Jacob, A. B., Clinton, West Virginia. 

"Saxony Improved" wool. 

Tagode, Phillip, A Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wool, Ohio washed, New Mexican unwashed fleece, New Mexi- 
can scotired. 

Jamison, John B., Maynard, South Carolina. 

"Jones' " and King's" cottons. 

Teter, W. W., Santnek, South Carolina. 

"Jeter Dickson" cotton. 

Teter, L. B., Cantue, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" cluster lint cotton. 

Johnson, J. B., ft Son, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Wool. 

Johnson, T. K., Tallulah, Horth Carolina. 

"La Qede" and "Long Staple" lint cotton. 

Johnston, C. W., Chapel Hill, Horth Carolina. 

"Boyd's" prolific lint cotton. 

Tones, Herenles, Canton, HississippL 

"Jones* Staple" lint cotton. 

Tones, Horace B., Arcadia, Louisiana. 

CottOfaUat 

■¥ 

Tones^T. K., Summerville, Tennessee. 

Long staple lint cotton. 



246 GROUP VII. -CLASS 41. 

Jones, J. Wiley, Banks, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Joyner, N. C, Kingville, South Carolina. 

'Teterkin" lint cotton. 

Justice, Bateman & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Merino, Shropshire and crosses, washed and unwashed wool. 

Keener, M. M., Plaingrove, Pennsylvania. 

Wool. 

Kelly, Thomas 3., Kelly, Alabama. 

"Hawkins' Improved" cotton seed. 

King, J. B., St. Paul, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

King, J. M., Hattiville, Arkansas.. 

Cotton. 

Knoop, Freriohs & Company, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Middling fair lint cotton. 

Kohlmann, Louis, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Moss and vegetable hair for carriage u'pholstery. 

Koshland, M. S., San Franeisco, California. 

Merino wool 

Kosminsky & McFaddin, Texarkana, Arkansas. 

Cottons. 

Lea, F. H., New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Commercially graded lint cottons. 

Lee, Bobert £., Laurinburg, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 
Lee, Samuel, & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wool. 

Lenz, Henry, Leighton, Alabama. 

Green seed lint cotton. 

Leonard, Daniel, Leonard, Iowa. 

Shropshire wool. 

Leslie, P. C, Norman, Oklahoma. 

"Storm King" cotton seed. 



^ 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 247 

LeYi, M. F.| Weaver, Tennessee. 

"Levi's Double Boll" lint cotton. 

Lill, Samnel & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wool, washed and unwashed, from Ohio. 

Lipscomb, A. S., Paoolett, Sonth Carolina. 

"King" lint cotton. 

lipscomb, B. S., Paoolett, Sonth Carolina. 

"King" lint cotton. 

Idpscomb, J. H., Oowcher, Sonth Carolina. 
"Big Boll" lint cotton. 

Logan, T. A., Oordo, Alabama. 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Lord, Krs. Tnlia P., Salem, Oregon. 

Flax straw and fiber produced by the Oregon Women's Flax 
Growing Association. 

Lnce & Manning, Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Graded wools. 

Lndwig, B. T. J., Mt. Pleasant, North Carolina. 

Green seed mixed cotton. 

Lynch, B. McN., Lanrinbnrg, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Lynn, George W., Dnrham, North Carolina. 

"Williams" lint cotton. 

Lyons, T., Enreka, California. 

California wools. 

Macarty, W. W., Choctaw, Oklahoma. 

"Storm- Proof" cotton seed. 

HcBride, John A., Scotland, North Carolina. 

North Carolina cotton. 

McCord, T. W., Sabongla, Mississippi. 

"Russell's Big Boll" and "Colodyce's Long Staple" cotton. 

McDonald, B., Trinity, Texas. 

"Bohemian" and "Peterkin" lint cottons. 

Mclntyre, Patsey, Olass, Mississippi. 

"Ferguson" lint cotton. 



r 



248 GROUP VII.— CLASS U, 

HoEayi B. H.^ Cheraw, South Carolina. 

"Johnson" mixed seed cotton. 

HoEiimoii, A. T.^ Maxton, North Carolina. 

"King's Early," "Peterkin's Improved" and other cottons. 



McEinnon, L. D., Lanrinhnrgy North Carolina. 

"Simpson" lint cotton. 

HoLendony 7. K., Naftel, Alabama, 

Upland and "Big Boll" cotton seeds. 

HoNary, Tames C.^ Washington^ Pennsylvania. 

Delaine merino wool. 

MoNary^ 7. S,| Cannonsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Delaine merino wool. 

Hahan,. W. E., Bandolph, Alabama. 

G>tton. 

Makeig, S. I., Boss, Texas. 

"Big Boll" cotton seed. 

Haloney, W. A., King's Mountain, North Carolina. 

G>tton. 

Martin, F. M., Pecan Orove, Texas. 

"Bedell' lint cotton. 

Maske, 7. B., Polkton, North Carolina. 

"Dixie" cotton seed. 

Massey, B. F., Fort Mill, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

Mauger & Avery, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Wool from the Eastern United States. 

Mauney, W. A., Long Shoals Cotton Mills, Long Shoals, 

North Carolina, — ^''King's Improved" lint cotton. 

Maxey, S. C, Choctaw, Oklahoma. 

"Five Lock" cotton seed. 

May, W. E., King's Landing, Alabama. 

"Southern Prolific" lint cotton. 

Mial, Millard, Baleigh, North Carolina. 
"King" lint cotton. 



^ 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 249 



Miller, C. W., Social Cirdei Georgia. 

"Big Boll" cotton. 



Miller, 7. M., TTpland, Indi 
Merino wool. 

miton, B. K, Kidlofhian, Texas. 

"Goose Egg Five Lock" lint cotton. 

Mingey C. H., & Company, New Orleans, Lonisiana. 

Louisiana cotton lii^t. 

MitclLell, E. B., BaUettsville, Texas. 

"Meyer's" cotton. 

Mitchell, Toseph D., Hewton Landing. 

"China Prolific" lint cotton. 



lu M., Edoise, Tennessee. 

Green seed cotton seed. 

Mobile Cotton Exchange, Mobile, Alabama. 

Alabama cotton; upland and river lint cotton. 

Montgomery, George W., Tallnlah, Lonisiana. 

"Long Staple" cotton. 

Moore, Aaron, Canton, Mississippi. 

"Hawkins" lint cotton. 

Moore, Br. Matt, Warsaw, Horth Carolina. 

"Peerless" lint cotton. 

Moore, T. B., Greensboro, Georgia. 

"Simpson's" cotton. 

Moore, W. E., Paris, Texas. 

"Bryant" cotton. 

Morris, Thomas, Thomas, Georgia. 

Cotton. 

Moseley, Albert K., Salter Bepot, Sonth Carolina. 

Teterkin" lint cotton. 



««i 



Myers, B. L., Mi^^ Vista, Mississippi. 
"Bender's" lint cotton. 

Myers, E. L., Brock, Indian Territory. 

"Ounce Boll" cotton seed. 



250 GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 

Neeley, A. L., Warreiii South Carolina. 

"Truitt's Improved" lint cotton. 

Newoomber, T. L., Lamar, Lonisiana. 

Louisiana cotton lint. 

Nix, F. H., BioOy Texas, 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Noland, B. K., Smithland, Lonisiana. 

"Heavy Bender's" lint cotton. 

Norfleet, F. S., Lecomptei Louisiana. 

"Allen Long Staple" cotton. 

O'Brien, Tames F., Bumsvillei Alabama. 

"Eureka" cotton seed. 

Og^vie, Theodore, Minden, Louisiana. 

Cotton. 

Oklahoma Cotton Compress Company, Oklahoma, Oklahoma. 

Cotton. 

Oliphint, T. W., Buntsville, Texas. 

"Jackson Lintless" cotton seed. 

Oliver, John L., Lancaster, Texas. 

'Green Seed," "Storm-Proof" and "Peterkin" cottons. 



<<i 



Orenbeck, Frederick, Baxter, Arkansas. 

"Peterkin" cotton seed. 

Orr, J. W., Bio Vista, Texas. 

"Storm- Proof" lint cotton. 

Otto, John B., Tecumseh, Oklahoma. 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Parker, John M., New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Twelve varieties of lint cottons. 

Parker, John B., McCall, South Carolina. 

"Brown Texas Wood" lint cotton. 

Patterson, B. A., Airlie, North Carolina. 

"Little White" cotton seed. 

Payne, William B. & Company, New York City. 

Fleeces of Angora goat. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 251 

Pearl, Tames, Fort Oibson, Mississippi. 

"Alden's Improved" lint cotton. 

Peele, John B., Bloomins^n, OMo. 

Dorset Horn wool. 

Feteeti C.| Hadisoiii Oeorgia, 

"Pilson's Big Boll" and "Mallory's Lamb- Wool" lint cotton. 

Peterson, L C, Chase, Texas. 

"Large Boll," white, and "Storm- Proof" cotton. 

Phillips, Charles C, Greenwood, Louisiana. 

"Dickin's Short Staple" cotton. 



Pickett, H. A., Newberry, Florida. 

Sea Island lint cotton. 

Pitts, B. B., & Son, Marshall, Texas. 

Cotton. ' 

Plumb, Charles S., Fayette, Indiana. 

Cheviot wool. 

Pollock, W. A., Beird, Mississippi. 

"Griffin and Pollock's Fancy" lint cotton. 

Porcher, Phillip 0., Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Pordur, Phillip 0., Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. 

"Dullyard" lint cotton. 

Prescott, E., Franklin, South Carolina. 

"Hawkin's" lint cotton. 

Price, W. T., Jones, Oklahoma. 

"Storm- Proof" cotton seed. 

Bhodes, A. S., Crawford, Georgia. 

"Jackson's Limbless" cotton. 

Eice, C. S. C, Orysa, Tennessee. 

Green seed cotton seed. 

Richards, John T., Pisgah, Alabama. 

"Jackson's" lint cotton. 

Richardson, J. C, Robertsville, South Carolina. 

"Tyler's Limited Cluster" lint and seed cotton. 



252 GROUP VII.— CLASS 41. 

Biohardson, Washington, Baxter, Arkanias. 

"Peterkin's" cotton seed. 

Biddnok, H. E., Baleigli, North Carolina. 

North Carolina cotton. 

Biegle, Phillip A., Arlingrton, Ohio. 
Rambouillet wool. 

'Rightf lu W.y Florenoe, Sonth Carolina. 

"Peterkin's-' lint cotton. 

Bigsbee, Atlas H.» Durham, Horth Carolina. 

"William's Limbless" cotton. 

Bobe, 7. W., Oreencastle, Indiana. 

Leicester cro^s wooL 

Boberts, A. 7., Mansfield, Lonisiana. 

'Peterkin's Long- Limb" cotton seed. 



tc 



Boberts, T. W., Chandler Springs, Alabama. 

Long lint prolific cotton. 

Bobertson, T. T., & Son, Eopedale, Ohio. 

Delaine merino wool. 

Bobinson, A., Benhams, Lonisiana. 

"Peterkin's Long-Limb" cotton seed. 

Bobinson, C. A., Bookton, Sonth Carolina. 

"Jadcson Limbless" lint cotton. 

Boby, C. C, Boohefort, MissonrL 

Delaine wool. 

Bolty Company, Smeed's, Mississippi. 

"Bender's" lint cotton. 

Bosenberg Brothers, Ballettsville, Texas. 

"Myers' " lint cotton. 

Bnssell, B. B., Morrilton, Arkansas. 

Twenty-one varieties lint cotton. 

Sanders, Capt. B. E., Oreenboro, Georgia. 

"Jones' Improved" lint cotton. 

Sanders, L., Alba, Texas. 

"Storm-Proof lint cotton. 



'^ 



GROUP VII.^CLASS 41. 253 

SanderSy Orr & Company, diarlotte. North Carolina. 
Cotton. 



Santa Cmz Idand Companji San FranoiscOi California. 

Three-quarters blood merino wool 

Soott, Charles, Boiedale, XiisiBappL 

"Cook's" lint cotton. 

Soott, 7. W., Wisaeky, South Carolina. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

Sootty Lee K., Bnrgettstown, Fenntylvania. 

Delaine merino wool 

Scott, Bichard, Uilwankee, OtegoiL 

'Cotswold" wooL 



t*i 



Sebastian, W. W., Spring Bidge, Louisiana. 
Cotton. 

Shaw, C. C, & Son, Newark, Ohio. 

Sonthdown wooL 

Sheldon, T. D., lUrplay, South Carolina. 

"Colis Peterkin" and "Sheldon's Improved Large Boll" cotton 
seed. * 

Shine, John W., Fendletonville, Texas. 

"Dell's Fine Lock" lint cotton. 



W. A., Auhum, Alabama. 

"Texas Ounce Boll" lint cotton. 

Sibley, B. C, Bobeline, Louisiana. 

"Kimberley" cotton. 

Simmes, S. S., Storeville, Oeorgia. 

"Bush and Bayes Prolific" cotton seed. 

Simmons, William E., Lawrenceville, Georgia. 
Cotton. 

Singleton, W. L., Toddville, South Carolina. 

"Hawkin's Prolific" lint cotton. 

Slater, W. A., Durham, North Carolina. 

"Little King" lint cotton. 

Slaton, 7. P. A J. C, Tuskegee, Alabama. 

"Christopher" lint cotton. 



^ GROUP VII.-CLASS 41. 

Sloan^ J. B., & Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Smith, Alfred, Oklahoma, Oklahoma. 

'* Storm- Proof" and "Cheatham" cotton seed. 

Smith, Charles D., Warthen, South Carolina. 

"King's Improved" lint cotton. 

Smith, George T., Covington, Georgia. 

"Deiring's" small-seed cotton seed. 

Smith, John E., Farr, Texas. 

"Storm -Proof" lint cotton. 

Smith & Fnllertoo, Tecnmseh, Oklahoma. 

Cotton. 

Snow, Clark, Oxford, Alabama. 

"Russell" lint cotton. 

Sommerkamp, B. P., Kamp, Alabama. 

"Nankin" lint cotton and seed. 

Southern Bailway Company, The, Washington, D. C. 

Models of plantation cotton compress, modem compress, wagoti 
and car models. 

Sparkman, John E., Era, Texas. 

"Five Lock Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Speokels, T. C, Warrenton, Texas. 

"Shoepack" lint cotton. 

Spencer, George W., Chesterfield, South Carolina. 

"Jones* Prolific Big Boll" lint cotton. 

Spencer, T. C, Spencer, South Carolina. 

"King's Early" lint cotton. 

Spicer, W. £., Bushnell, Illinois. 

Southdown wool. 

Sprunt, Alexander, & Son, Wilmington, North Carolina. 

North Carolina upland lint cotton. 

Stallings, T. B., Morrilton, Arkansas. 

Cotton. 

Stein, William, New Berlin, Texas. 

"Big Boll" and "Pelican" lint cottons. 



Group vtr.— class 41. ^ 

Stevens, C. C, Crawford, (Georgia. 

"Gold Leaf" cotton. 

Stogner, John, Comanche, Texas. 

"Meyer's" seed cotton. 

Stone, Tames A., & Son, Bradfordton, Illinois. 

Shropshire down wool. 

Stone, Nota B., Independence, Kansas. 

"Big Dixie" and "Excelsior" cotton. 

Stone, B. 7., Stonington, Illinois. 

Oxford down wool. 

Stayresant, Bntlierford, Allamnchy, New Jersey. 

Dorset Horn wool. 

SnlliTan, 7. E., Pilot Point, Texas. 

Cotton. 

Snllivan, Joseph W., Warthen, South Carolina. 

"Hawkin's" lint cotton. 

Tarkington, S. 0., Ballettsville, Texas. 

"Mycr's" lint cotton. 

Taylor, B. L. L., Blevins, Texas. 

"Barwcll and Woolup" lint cotton. 

Thomas, William C, Oold Hill, Alabama. 

Cotton. 

Thompson, S. M., Prestonia, Missouri. 

"White Seed" lint cotton. 

Thompson, Z. T., Strong's Station, Mississippi. 

"Thompson's Improved" lint cotton. 

Tillman, E. D., Van Wyok, South Carolina. 

"Tillman's Pet" lint cotton. 

Todd, Albert M., Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Plants, aromatic and medicinal ; volatile oils. 

Tompkins, D. A., Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Tompkins, Josiah, & Son, Fostoria, Michigan. 

Lincoln wool. 



256 GROUP VII.—CLASS 41. 

Traylor, T. W., White Oak, South Carolina. 

Cotton. 

Tripp, lonis F., Orahamville, South Carolina. 
Cotton. 

Tripp, William P., Orahamville, South Carolina. 

Sea Island cotton. 

Tullis, John W., & Company, Euf aula, Alabama. 

Cotton. 

Turner, William S., Banks, North Carolina. 

Cotton. 
Tuttle, L. C, Eureka, California. 

California wool. 

Union Oil Company, New York. 

Cotton seed oils, cake meal, linters and soap. 

Van Valkenburgfh, J. S., Greene, New York. 

Rambouillet wool. 

Wadley, William 0., Sogers, Georgia. 

"Peterkin" lint cotton. 

Waggoner, S. S., Ellenwood, Georgia. 

"African Limbless" lint cotton. 

Walker, W. S., Tefferson, Texas. 

Cotton. 

Walls, Sam, Ocee, Texas. 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Warwick, T. M., Floumey, Louisiana. 

"Peterkin" cotton. 

Watkins, 1. F., Chappells, South Carolina. 

"Upland Limbless Cluster" lint cotton. 

Watkins, Dr. W. W., Aberdeen, Mississippi. 

Cotton. 

Watts, C. 7., Buston, Louisiana. 

"Peterkin" and "King" cotton. 

Weaner, T. W., Heath Spring, South Carolina. 

"Russell Improved Big Boll" cotton. 



GROUP VII^CLASS 41. 257 



Webb, W. T.9 AlpinCi Alabama. 

"King's Improved" lint cotton. 

Westiiigery P. J., Boyliflton, South Carolina. 

"Texas Oak" lint cotton. 

Wbittaker, F. A., Baleigh, North Carolina. 
Cotton. 

Wilcox, 8., Bed Blnff, California. 

Merino wool. 
Williamfl) J. H., Woodson, Mississippi. 

"Kingfs Improved" lint cotton. 

Williams, W. B., Strongs, Mississippi. 

"Williams' Best" lint cotton. 

Williamson, J. A., Colnmbns, Arkansas. 

"Ocean" and "Moon" lint cotton. 

Williamson, 7. 7., Kiokapoo, Oklahoma. 

"Storm-Proof" lint cotton. 

Willingbam, B. E., Thomson, Georgia. 

"African Limbless" Imt cotton. 

Wilson, C. C, Boyce, Texas. 

"Storm-Proof" cotton. 

Wilson, D. 7., Lois, Texas. 

"Dan Wilson Storm-Proof Five Lock" lint cotton. 

Wing, 7o8eph E., Mechaniosbnrg, Ohio. 

Dorset Horn wool. 

Wingo, B. A., Inman, Sonth Carolina. 

"Truitt" lint cotton. 

Withers, 7. B., Bavidson, North Carolina. 

"King's Improved" lint cotton. 

Womaok, T. A., Manohao, Lonisiana. 

"Long Staple" lint cotton. 

Worthington, C. T., Leota, Mississippi. 

"Bender's Weed" cotton. 

Wright, Harrison, Omega, Oklahoma. 

Green seed cotton seed. 



258 GROUP VIL-.CLASS 42. 

Wright, Simeon, Buston, Lonisiima. 

"Big Boll" lint cotton. 

Wright, W. H., Greensboro, Qeorgia. 

"Peterkin" cotton. 

Ziegler, Jaoob, Clinton, Illinois. 

Shropshire down wool. 



CLASS 42. 



USEFUL INSECTS AND THEIR PRODUCTS— INJU- 
RIOUS INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES. 



Benton, Frank, Washington, D. C. 

Queen-bee cages, specimens of bees, bulletins on bee-keeping. 

California Packing Company, San Francisco, California. 

Honey. 

Clayton, C. H., Lang, California. 

Strained honey in glass jars for table purposes. 

Dadant, Chas., & Son, Hamilton, Illinois. 

Comb foundation. 

Department of Agriculture, IT. S. A., Division of Entomology, 

Washington, D. C. — Collective entomological exhibit illustrating 
devices for the destruction of insects. 

Eastman, A., Sacramento, California. 

Honey in comb, in boxes for table purposes, strained honey, bees- 
wax for manufacturing purposes. 

Falconer, W. T., Manufacturing Company, Jamestown, Hew 

York. — Beehives and sectional honey boxes. 

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles, California. 

Specimens of silk cocoons. 

Mclntyre, T. H., Sespa, California. 

Strained honey in glass jars for table purposes. 



GROUP VII.— CLASS 42. 259 

Xassachusetts State Board of AgrictQture, Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts. — Models and photographs illustrating warfare against 
Gypsy moths. 

Soot, A. I., Company, Medina, Ohio. 

Beehives, bee-keeping appliances, comb foundation, ABC book 
on bee culture, photographs of factory and apiary. 

Shields, Mrs. Emily, Mills, Sacramento, California. 

Honey and wax. 



r 



1 



GROUP VIII. 

HORTICULTURE AND ARBORICULTURE. 

CHARLES RICHARDS DODGE, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 43. 

APPLIANCES AND METHODS OF HORTICULTURE 

AND ARBORICULTURE. 



Albaugh-Oeorgia Orchard Company, Fort Valley, Georgia. 

Photographs of orchard and shipping. 

Allen, 8. L., & Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Tools, agricultural and horticultural. Revolving fflobe. 

Andnbon Park Association, Few Orleans, Lotdsiana. 

Photographs. 

Baron de Hirsch Agrionltnral Industrial School, Woodbine, 

New Jersey. — Photographs. 

Belief ontaine Cemetery, St. Lotus, Missouri. 

Photographs of landscape features. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, A Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of growing crops. 



California Commission to Paris Exposition. 

Photographs of orchard and vineyard scenes in California. 

California Fursery Company, Files, California. 

Photogfraphs of nursery and orchard scenes. 

Cemetery of Spring Orove, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Photographs of landscape features. 

Coldwell lawn Kower Company, Fewbu^, Few York. 

Lawn mowers, settees; automatic exhibit. 

261 



262 GROUP VIII.— CLASS 43. 

Connor, WasMngfton E., Hew York City. 

Photographs of private grounds and vineyards. 

Cooper, Elwood, Santa Barbara, Calif omia. 

Photographs of olive orchards. 

Department of Agricnlture, XT. S. A., Division of Pomology, 

Washington, D. C. — Photographs of orchards, vineyards, parks, 
cemeteries, etc. Models of fruits of the United States. 

Dintelmann, L. F., Belleville, Illinois. 

Photographs of nursery and orchard scenes. 

Dreer, Henry A., PhiladelpUa, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of aquatics. 

Florida East Coast Hotel Company, St. Aug^tine, Florida. 

Photographs of hotel grounds. 

Graceland Cemetery, Chicago. 

Photographs of landscape features. 

Oriffing, Timothy M., Biverhead, New York. 

Photographs of landscape features. 

Hunnewell, H. H., 130 Beacon St., Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Photographs of landscape features. 

Johnson, F. C, Kishwaukee, Illinois. 

Photographs of farm cider and vinegar mill. 

Lyale, Addison, Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

Photograph of laiylscape features. 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park, 

Maryland. — Photographs of horticultural scenes. 

Michigan Seed Company, South Haven, Michigan. 

Photographs of fields of growing crops. 

Milwaukee Park Commission, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Photographs taken in Milwaukee parks. 

Missouri State HorticiQtural Society, Oregon, Missouri. 

Photographs of orchard scenes. 

National Cash Begister Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Photographs, horticultural features of grounds; houses of opera- 
tives. 

Newby, Thomas T., Carthage, Indiana. 

Photographs, garden and orchard scenes. 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 263 



Packard, A. S.^ Covert^ 

Photographs of orchard scenes. 

PennsylTania Bailroad Company, Philadelphia, Pexmsylvania. 

Photographs of station grounds. 

Post, Herbert, Port Worth, Texas. 

Photographs of nut trees. 

Postlewaite, Harry, San Jose, Calif omia. 

Photographs, growing and marketing cherries. 

Boeding^, Oeorge C, Fresno, California. 

Photographs of nursery and orchard scenes. 

St. Panl Board of Park Commissioners, St. Panl, Minnesota. 

Photographs taken in parks. 

Southern Bailway Company, Washingfton, D. C. 

Photographs of orchard and vineyard scenes. 

Stevens, Mrs. Einton, Montecito, California. 

Photographs of tropical and subtropical plants. 

Stnder, Hicholas, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs of ferns and decorative plants. 

XTniyersity of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. 

Photographs of garden, nursery and orchard scenes. 

Vaughan, J. C, Chicago. 

Photographs of growing crops and propagating houses. 

Von Herff, Dr. B., 93 Hassan St., Hew Tork. 

Photographs, orchard and vineyard scenes. 

Wilson, J. P., Ponlan, Georgia. 

Photograph of pecan tree. 



CLASS 45. 

FRUIT TREES AND FRUITS. 



Addleman, Bill, Richmond, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Ainsley, M., Billsboro, Hew Tork. 

Apples and pears. 



264 GROUP VIII.-CLASS 46. 

Aldriohy H. A.^ Neoga, Illmois. 

Apples. 

Alters, John, Belleplaine, Kansas. 

Apples. 

Athertony W. P., Hallowell, Kaine. 

Apples. 

Axtell, 7. H., Oakland, Kaine. 

Apples. 

Babcock, E. F., Waitsbnrg, Washins^n. 

Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Bailey, Jacob, Oreen Mountain, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Baker, 0., Lyons, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Baldwin, K. A., Jacksonville, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Banner, Newton, Sugar Orove, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Barry J., Bed Bluff, California. 

Almonds. 

Bassett, W. A., Farmer, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Beer, S. J., Vandalia, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Belle Lotdse Banoh, Hazana, California. 

Almonds. 

Berry, H. F., Hallsville, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Black, William H., Floradale, Pennsylvtoia. 

Apples. 

Barley, XT. S., Bed Bluff, California. 

Almonds. 

Blair, Oeorge A., Kulvane, Kansas. 

Apples. 



^ 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 26 

Boggs, George E., liYingstone, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Bradley, Ehner, Lyons, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Bream, Samuel, Floradale, Pennsylvania. 
Apples. 

Bryant, A., A Son, Prinoeton, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Bryant, L. B., Prinoeton, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Bn^orf, S. E., Jnnins, Few York. 

Apples. 

Bnrk, Frank, Mesilla Park, Hew Mexico. 

Apples. 

Bnmett, Charles, Lyons, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Bnrton, Joseph A., Orleans, Indiana. 

Apples. 



California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Fruits and vegetables in preserving solution. Fresh 
fruits and nuts. 

Continuous exhibit of one variety of apples from April 15 to 
July 15, igoo. Continuous exhibit of citrus fruits, April 15 to 
November, igoo. 

Chipman, F. B., Bed Blnff, Califomia. 

Almonds. 

Clark, Kerritt M., Bedford, New York. 

Apples. 

Codwell, A., Valley City, Illinois. 
Apples. 

CoiTey, Oeorge W., Eelsey, North Carolina. 
Apples. 

Cone, D. S., Bed Blnff, Califomia. 

Almonds. 

Cone, K. H., Blowing Bock, North Carolina. 

Fresh fruits of North Carolina. 



266 GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 

Connecticut State Pomological Society, J. H. Meriiam, Presi- 
dent, New Britain, Connecticut. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Coyner, Oeorge A., Waynesboro, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Grain, W. R., Villa Bidge, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Crete Nurseries, Crete, Nebraska. 

Apples. 

Crozet Fruit Orowers' Association, Crozet, Virginia. 

Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Davis, A., North Adams, Michigan. 

Apples. 

Belmas, A. 0., Scranton, Mississippi. 

Pecan nuts. 

Department of Agriculture, XT. S. A., Division of Pomology, 

Washington, D. C. — Grand collective exhibit of fresh fruits made 
up of the collective exhibits of the California Paris Exposition 
Cfommission, the New York Commission, and the State Horti- 
cultural and Pomological Societies. 

Dickee, James, Massie's Mill, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Dintelman, L. P., Belleville, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Dorman, Walter, Billsboro, New York. 

Apples. 

Dula, J. A., Lenoir, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Duncan, Mrs. M., Bed Bluff, California. 

Almonds. 

Dunlap, Henry M., Savoy, Illinois. 

Apples and pears. 

Dutton, A. H., Toungstown, New York. 

Apples. 

EbersoU, Oeorge, Centerville, Indiana. 

Apples. 



I 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 267 

Edwards, D. B., Versailles, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Eliason, Alice, Centerville, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Elliott, Jesse P., Alqnina, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Pkcer, William D., Lyons, New York. 

Apples. 

Falkner, IT. E., Mesilla Park, New Mexico. 

Apples. 

Flack, William M., Cane River, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Foster Brothers, Hall's Comers, New York. 

Apples. 

Francis, C. H., Altamont, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Gano, W. 0., West Plains, Missouri. 
Apples. 

Oarretson, J. V., Floradale, Pennsylvania. 

Apples. 

Goodman, L. A., Cuba, Missouri. 
Apples. 

Griest, Amos W., Floradale, Pennsylvania. 

Apples. 

Haden Brothers, Crozet, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Harpster, Henry, St. Peter, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Harris, W. B., Tecumseh, Nebraska. 

Apples. 

Hatcher, M. L., Beba, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Hatley, J. S., Hudson, North Carolina. 
Apples. 



288 GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 

Hendey^ WilBon, Bald Creek, North Carolina. 

Apples. 



Eiester, Oabriel, Harrisbn^, Pennsylvaiiia. 
Apples. 

Hilllioiue^ Cteorge S., Pieroe City, MiBSOiiri. 

Apples. 

Hoffman, Daniel, Arendtsville, Pennsylvania. 
Apples. 

HotehldsB, C. M., Cheshire, l^onneotiont. 

Apples. 

Husband, Joseph, Leanderville, Illinois. 
Apples. 

Illinois State Horticnltnral Society; Henry M. Dnnlap, Presi- 
dent, Savoy, Illinois — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Indiana State Horticnltnral Society, C. M. Hobbs, President, 

Bridget)ort, Indiana. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Jacobus, Philo, Viles, California. 

Almonds. 

James, 0. 0., Exeter, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Johnson, J. B., Manassas, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Kansas State Horticultural Society, Fred Welhouse, Presi- 
dent, Topeka, Kansas. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Eempton, Joseph, CenterviUe, Indiana. 

Apples. 



Eing^, Columbus, CenterviUe, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Kitterman, Enos, CenterviUe, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Kraft, Herbert, Company, Bed Bluff, California. 

Almonds. 

La Bash, S. D., Pekin, Illinois. 

Apples. 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS i5. 269 



Lawyer, Buf qb, Biglervillei PenniylTania. 

Apples. 

Leonard, C. F., Penfldd, Vow Tork. 

Apples. 



Lettennan, D. A., Oreen Mountain, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Linton, W. D., Patoka, niinois. 

Apples. 

Ltvingftone, A. H., Walla Walla, Waahini^n. 

Apples. 

Loo Angelet Cliamber of Commeroe, Los Angeles, California. 

Walnuts, twenty varieties. 

Kaine State Pomologioal Sodety, W. IL Mnnson, President, 

Orono, Maine. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Xanoheiter, Elbert, Bristol, Conneotiont 

Apples. 

Kason, Walter, Belleplaine, Kansas. 

Apples. 

Marshall Brothers, Arlington, Nebraska. 

Apples. 



May, J. E., Wilson, MissonrL 

Apples. 



Molntnrff, C. B., Paint Gap, North Carolina. 

Apples* 

McCoUongh, XT. S., Bed Blnff, California. 

Almonds. 

MoPeters, C. L., Bald Creek, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Merriman, T. E., New Britain, Conneotiont. 

Apples. 

Miller, T. T., Washington, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Mi'lman, Cteorge A., Las Cmoes, New Mexico. 

Apples. 



270 GROUP VIII.^CLASS 45. 

Missouri State Horticultural Society, N. F. Murry, President, 

Oregon, Missouri. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Montgomery, A., WUttier, California. 

Almonds. 

Morse, Charles, Southington, Connecticut. 

Apples. 

Myers, Calvin, Mulvane, Kansas. 

Apples. 

Nebraska State Horticultural Society, Oeorge H. M ars h a l l, 

President, Arlington, Nebraska. — Collective exhibit of fresh 
fruits. 

 

Nelson, A., & Company, Ozark Plateau Fruit Company, Leba- 
non, Missouri. — Apples. 

Newby, Thomas T., Carthage, Indiana. 

Apples. 

New Mexico Agricultural College, Mesilla Park, New Mexico. 

Apples. 

New York State Paris Commission, New York (Sty. 

Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture, Baleigh, North 

Carolina. — Collective exhibit of fresh fruits. 

Parker, J. A., Lakin, Kansas. 

Apples. 

Patchett, Joseph, Billsboro, New York. 

Apples. 

Paul & Ellison, Crozet, Virginia. 

Apples. 

Pearson, N. M., Mexico, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Pederson, Peder, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania. 

Apples. 

Perrine, I. B., Bluelakes, Idaho. 

Apples. 

Phinney, C. S., Standish, Maine. 

Apples. 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 271 

Fhoeniz, F. S., Bloomingfton, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Flatty E. B., Hilford, Connecticut. 

Apples. 

Flatty George F., A Son, Milf ord, Connecticut. 

Apples. 

Flatt, "S. D., Hilford, Connecticut. 

Apples. 

Fott, Herbert, Fort Worth, Texas. 

Pecans. 

Fowelly George T., Ghent, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Froffitt, D. B., Bumsville, Horth Carolina. 

Apples. 

Baffenspai^er, Lizzie J., Biglerville, Fennsylvania. 

Apples. 

Bankin, J., Martinez, California. 

Walnuts. 

Bay, C. D., Bumsville, Horth Carolina. 

Apples. 

Bay, T. S., Bumsville, Horth Carolina. 

Apples. 

Baymond, H. B., Alvord, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Bichmond Horticultural Society, Bichmond, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Bider, Frank, Thornton, Washington. 

Apples. 

Bobarts, M. M., Bepublic, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Bobison, Mrs. Thomas B., Hall's Comers, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Bodenbu^, Charles, Bichmond, Indiana. 
Apples. 



w 



272 GROUP VIII.— CLASS 45. 

Sogers, E., Hew Britain^ Conneotiont. 

Apples. 

Boss, J. A., Thornton, Washington. 

Apples. 



Bnssell, Elmira, Biohmond, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Se^^ok, Biohard, Biohmond, Indiana. 

Apples. 

Shaw, Fred, Snnunerkill, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Shields, Mrs. Emily, Mills, California. 

Almonds. 

Smith, Jaoob, E., Banner's Elk, North Carolina. 

Apples. 

Stone, George A., Biohmond, lOssonrL 

Apples. 

Strong, Mrs. H. W. B., Whittier, California. 

Walnuts. 

Stuart Peoan Company, Ooean Springs, Mississippi 

Pecan nuts. 

Tabor, B. H., Bed Blnff, California. 

Almonds. 

Taylor, Hughey, Waitsbnrg, Washington. 

Apples. 

Taylor, Bobert, Las Cmoes, New Mezioo. 

Apples. 

Tenny, Delos, Hilton, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Trimble, McOill & Company, Seymour, Missouri. 

Apples. 

Troutman, John H., Lakin, Kansas. 

Apples. 

Virginia State Horticultural Society, Samuel B. Woods, Presi- 
dent, Charlottesville, Virginia. — Apples. Fresh fruits. 



\ 



GROUP VIII.— CLASS 46. 273 

Wanier, E. C, New Haven, Conneotiont 

Apples. 

Webster County Hortionltnral Sodety, Seymonri lUMonri. 

Apples. 

Weidner, Aaron T.| ArendtsTille, Pennsylvania. 

Collective exhibit of fresh fruits.' 

Wliately, Walter, Crozet, IHrginia. 

Apples. 

Williams, Fresoott, Williamsburg, Massachusetts. 

Apples. 

Williams, Br. W. W., Hilton, Hew York. 

Apples. 

Wilson, T. 7., Poulan, CteoqnA. 

Pecans. 



Winn, Cliarles C, Origgsville, Illinois. 

Apples. 

Woldert Orooery Company, Tyler, Texas. 

Pecans ; seven varieties. 



Wrey, W. B., Cane Biver, Horth Carolina. 

Apples. 

Wrigbt, Thomas, Helsey, Hortb Carolina. 

Apples. 

Toung, B. K., Morgan City, Louisiana* 

Pecans ; twenty-four varieties. 

Toung, William A., Butler, Illinois. 

Apples. 



CLASS 46. 



TREES, SHRUBS, ORNAMENTAL PLANTS AND 

FLOWERS. 



Lofhrop & Higgins, East Bridgewater, Massaehusetts. 

Growing dahlias. Outdoor exhibit. 



274 GROUP VIII. -CLASS 48. 

Michigan Seed Company, South Haven, Michigan. 

Growing dahlias and gladioli. Outdoor exhibit. 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture, Baleigh, ITorth 

Carolina. — Ornamental shrubs, kalmia, rhododendron, holly, etc 
Outdoor exhibit. 



CLASS 47. 

PLANTS OF THE CONSERVATORY. 



Studer, Nicholas, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs of giant ferns, Nephrolepsis Washingtoniensis, 
errecta and pendula. 



CLASS 48. 

SEEDS AND PLANTS FOR GARDENS AND 

NURSERIES. 



Michigan Seed Company, South Haven, Michigan. 

Collection of garden seeds. 

Trumbull & Beebe (California Paris Commission), San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Collection of garden seeds. 



GROUP IX. 



FORESTRY, HUNTING, FISHING, GATHERING 

WILD CROPS. 

DR. TARLETON H. BEAN, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 49. 

APPLIANCES AND PROCESSES USED IN FORESTRY. 



Department of Agriculture, IT. S. A.^ Washington, D. C. 

Photographs and writings pertaining to forests, their destruction, 
their preservation, and their relations to agriculture. 

Forest & Stream PublisMng Company, 346 Broadway, New 

York. — Publications: Forest and Stream Journal; books upon 
out-door sports. 

Hough, Dr. Franklin B., Lowville, New Tork. 

Publications relating to forestry. 

Hough, Bomeyn B., Lowville, New York. 

Photographs of typical trees, illustrating their manner of growth. 

Southern Bailway Company, 719 13th Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Photographs showing the processes of logging, 
milling, and transporting lumber. 



CLASS 50. 

PRODUCTS OF THE CULTIVATION OF FORESTS AND 

OF FOREST INDUSTRIES. 



Albro, E. D., & Company, 1025 West Sixth Street, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. — Veneers and hardwoods. 

Alleghany Lumber Company, Washington, North Carolina. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

275 



1 



276 GROUP IX.— CLASS 50. 

Atlantic Coast Lumber Company, Norfolk, Virginia. 
Yellow pine lumber. 

Bean, Tarleton H., 60 W. 17th Street, New Tork. 

A cigar case made by Alaskan native on the Island of Atka, from 
a native wild grass. 

Bennett, Wm. A., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Collective exhibit of hardwood lumber. 

Bennett & Witte, 222 West Fourth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Poplar and yellow cottonwood. 

Bixler, Hort L., Beaumont, Texas. 

Collective exhibit of Texas and Louisiana pine lumber. 

Bowie, George H., Whitecastle, Louisiana. 

Cypress lumber, collective exhibit. 

Branning Manufacturing Company, Edenton, North Carolina. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Brenner, Fred., Lumber Company, 416 Pike Building, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. — Hardwood. 

Bridgeport Wood Finishing Company, New Hilford, Con- 
necticut. — Finished hardwoods. 

Buckley, Tames T., Brookville, Indiana. 

Hardwood. 

Buffalo Maple Flooring Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Hardwood flooring. 

Butters Lumber Company, Boardman, North Carolina. 
Yellow pine lumber. 

California Paris Exposition Commission of 1900, Occidental 

Hotel, San Francisco, California. — Collective exhibit of woods for 
building and cabinet work. 

Camp Manufacturing Company, Franklin, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Cape Fear Lumbering Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Cleveland Wholesale Lumber Dealers, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Collective exhibit of lumber. 

Cochran Lumber Company, 222 West Seventh Street, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. — Hardwood. 



GROUP IX.— CLASS 50. 277 

Cramer, Alfred B., Suffolk, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Cnnuner Company, Norfolk, Vii^^a. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Cristadoro, Charles, Saint Paul, Minnesota. 

Collective exhibit of lumber used for the manufacture of boxes. 

Curtis, Oeorge M., Clinton, Iowa. 

Collective exhibit of sash, doors, and blinds. 

Cypress Lumber Company, Bichmond and Harriet Streets, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — Hardwood. 

Davidson, W. V., Lumber Company, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Hardwood lumber. 

Pennis Simmons Lumber Company, Williamton, North Car- 
olina. — ^Yellow pine lumber. 

Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Commercial woods of the United States. 

Department of Forestry, IT. S. Commission to Paris. 

Thin sections of woods of the United States, representing more 
than 250 species. 

Dwight Lumber Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Hardwood flooring. 

Edwards, E. L., Beibold Building, Dayton, Ohio. 

Hardwood. 

Eureka Lumber Company, Washington, North Carolina. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Farrin, M. B., Winton Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Yellow poplar and hardwood. 

Fisher & Wilson Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lumber. 

Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission of New York, Albany, 

New York. — Specimens of native commercial woods of the State 
of New York. 

Foreign Standard Barrel Company, Arthur W. Barnard, Pres., 

Oak Terrace, E. I42d Street, New York.— Barrel made entirely 
by machinery. 



278 GROUP IX.— CLASS 50. 

Forest and Stream Publishiiig Company, New Tork City. 

Publications and illustrations. 

Forman Company, Thomas, Fetoskey, Hiohigan. 

Hardwood flooring. 

Foster, A. 0., Tacoma, Washington. 

Collective exhibit of lumber of the States of Washington and 
Oregon. 

Fuhrmann, A. V., 626 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Yellow pine. 

FuUerton, S. H., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Collective exhibit of lumber and other wood products. 

Oardiner, Silas W., Laurel, Mississippi. 

Collective exhibit of Mississippi pine lumber and other pine 
products. 

Oraham Lumber Company, Ltd., 41 E. Fourth Street, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. — Yellow poplar and hardwood. 

Oreenleaf Johnson Lumber Company, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Harvey, W. S., Forrest Building, Fhiladelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Collective exhibit of lumber and other forest products. 

Herrick, E. M., San Francisco, California. 

Collective exhibit of fir and spruce lumber and other forest 
products. 

Higman, John, St. Joseph, Michigan. 

Collective exhibit of baskets, boxes, and other packages. 

Hill, 0. J., Kansas City, Missouri. 

Collective exhibit of staves and other forest products. 

Hitch, Frank, Lumbering Company, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Hooper, C. A., San Francisco, California. 

Collective exhibit of redwood lumber and other redwood products. 

Hough, B. B., Lowville, New York. 

Preparations of wood for the stereopticon and for the microscope, 
also specimens of wooden cards. 



GROUP IX.— CLASS 50. 279 

Indiana Lnmber Company, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Hardwood lumber. 

Jenks, Bobert H., Lumber Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lumber. 

Kipp, B. A., & Company, 107 West Water Street, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. — Hardwood. 

Kirk-Christy Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lumber. 

Lathrop, Frank H., Biverside, Alabama. 

Collective exhibit of Alabama pine lumber and other pine products. 

Leland, Qt. Banning, Fifth and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ohio. — Mahogany and hardwood. 

Littlef ord, Frank & Brothers, Pickering Building, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. — ^Hardwood. 

Love, Boyd & Company, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Hardwood lumber. 

Lumbermen's Club of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Collective exhibit of hardwoods and other lumber. 

Haley, Thompson & Hoffett, Eighth Street and McLean Ave- 
nue, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Walnut and hardwood. 

Nashville Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers, Nashville, Tenn- 
essee. — Collective exhibit of lumber. 

Nelson, B. F., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Collective exhibit of white pine lumber and other forest products 
of the Mississippi Valley. 

North Branch Lumber Company, 1735 N. Western Avenue, 

Chicago. — Hardwood flooring. 

North Carolina Pine Association, Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina. — Collective exhibit of yellow pine lumber. 

North Carolina State Board of Agriculture, Baleigh, North 

Carolina. — Commercial woods of North Carolina. 

Pierce, W. E., & Company, Milford, New Hampshire. 

Collection of wooden ware. 

Price, W. S., Manufacturers Becord Building, Baltimore, 

Maryland. — Collective exhibit of oak and other hardwoods. 



280 GROUP IX.— CLASS 50. 

Fnngo Inmber Company, Washington, North Carolina. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Bansom, John B., & Company, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Lumber. 

Bittenhonsen & Embree Company, 3500 Centre Avenue, Chi- 
cago. — Hardwood flooring. 

Bitter, W. M., Colnmbns, Ohio. 

Collective exhibit of manufactured hardwoods. 

Boanoke Bailroad & Lnmber Company, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 
Boper, John L., Norfolk, Virginia. 

Collective exhibit of North Carolina pine lumber and other pine 
products. 

Scatcherd, John N., Buffalo, New York. 

Collective exhibit of hardwoods. 

Sloan, Gteorge F., & Brother, Baltimore, Maryland. 
Yellow pine lumber. 

Southern Bailway Company, 719 13th Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Collection of woods of the Southern United States. 
The logs, lumber, etc., used in the construction of the Annex to 
Forestry Building. 

South Side Lumber Company, Ashland Avenue and 22d 

Streets, Chicago. — Hardwood flooring. 

Stephens, Henry, & Company, Detroit, Hiohigan. 

Hardwood flooring. 

Stone, T. B., Lumber Company, 74 Mitchell Building, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. — Yellow poplar and hardwood. 

Suffolk Saw Hill Company, Suffolk, Virginia. 
Yellow pine lumber. 

Surry Lumber Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Swain Brothers, Winton Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Hardwood. 

Tunis Lumber Company, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Yellow pine lumber. 

Wellford, Walker L., Memphis, Tennessee. 

Collective exhibit of cooperage stock. 



GROUP IX.— CLASS 62. 281 

Wilborgy Haima & Company, Oest Street and Mclean Avenue, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — ^Yellow poplar and hardwood. 

Wilce, T., Company, Throop and 22d Streets, Chicago. 

Hardwood flooring. 

Wisconiin Land & Lumber Company, HermanBville, Michi- 
gan. — Hardwood flooring. 

Young, W. D., West Bay City, Michigan. 

Collective exhibit of maple flooring. 



CLASS 51. 

HUNTING EQUIPMENTS. 



Forest and Stream Publishing Company, New Tork. 

Publications and illustrations. 

Oneida Community, Limited, Kenwood, New York. 

The Newhouse animal trap. 

Savage Arms Company, ITtica, New Tork. 

Rep.eating rifles. 

Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Revolvers and pistols, and shooting gallery at Vincennes. 

Tiffany & Company, New York City. 

Hunting equipments. 



CLASS 52. 

PRODUCTS OF HUNTING. 



Department of Agriculture, IT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Mounted groups of raccoons and opossums. 

Elliot, Dr. D. 0., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Publications upon mammals and birds. 



282 GROUP IX.— CLASS 53. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, New York. 

Publications and illustrations. 

Onnther, T., Hiddletown, New York. 

Mounted heads of wild animals. 

Hudson, Charles B., New York. 

Drawings of seals, sea lions, etc., loaned by the "Century Com- 
pany," New York. 

Jordan, Br. Bavid Starr, Stanford University, California. 

Publication upon birds, mammals, etc. 

Mather, Fred, Lake Nebagomain, Bouglas County, Wisconsin. 

Publication upon hunting. 

Nelson, £. W., Washington, B. C. 

Report upon collections made in Alaska. 

North Carolina State Board of Agriculture, Baleigh, New 

York. — Group of aquatic birds, loons, quail, opossums, turtles. 

Shiras, Oeorge, 3d, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Flashlight pictures of living wild animals. 

Wallihan, A. 0., Lay, Colorado. 

Photographs of wild game. 



CLASS 53. 

FISHING EQUIPMENT AND PRODUCTS- 
FISH CULTURE. 



Abbey & Imbrie, New York City. 

Angling tackle. 

American Museum of Natural History, Central Park, New 

York. — Mounted lobster. Weighed 33 lbs. when alive. 

Atwater, Prof. W. 0., Chemical Laboratory, Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Middletown, Connecticut. — Publication upon chemical 
analysis of fishes and invertebrates. 

Baldwin, A. H., Zoological Artist, 1826 Q Street, Washington, 

D. C. — Fish drawings. 



^ 



GROUP IX.—CLASS 53. 283 

Bartlett, Dr. S. P., Qninoyy Illinois. 

Publications upon fishes and fish culture. 

Bean, Barton A., IT. S. National Husenm, Washington^ D. C. 

Publications upon fishes. 



Bean, Tarleton H., 60 West 17th Street, New York City. 

Gill nets, fishing line and salmon spear used 
publications on fish, fisheries and fish culture. 



Benn, John, San Francisco, California. 

Artificial fiies. 

Bien, Tnlins, & Company, 140 6th Avenue, New York. 

Chromolithographs of fish drawings. 

Blackford, Dr. C. H., Jr., Craig Brook Station, East Orland, 

Maine. — Publications upon fish culture. 

Bnmpns, Prof. H. C, Brown TTniversity, Providence, Bhode 

Island. — Publications upon marine zoology. 

California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Fishery apparatus and illustrations. Fish casts. 

Call, Dr. B. Ellsworth, Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 

Sciences, 185 Brooklyn Avenue, Brookl)m, New York. — Publica- 
tions. 

Bean, Dr. Bashf ord, Columbia University, New York. 

Publications upon development and relationships of fishes, etc 

Department of Forests, Fisheries, etc., IT. S. Commission to 

Paris. — Photo^aphs of persons eminent as investigators and 
authors in vanous branches of natural history. 

Eigenmann, Prof. C. H., Indiana University, Bloomington, 

Indiana. — Publications upon fishes and other aquatic animals. 

Evermann, Dr. B. W., U. S. Fish Commission, Washington, 

D, C. — Publications upon fishes of North America, West Indies, 
etc. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, New York. 

Publications and illustrations. 

Fraine, Thomas W., 16 Joslyn Park, Bochester, New York. 

Rainbow trout, Sunapee trout and Graylinj?. 

Gilbert, Prof. C. H., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, Cali- 
fornia. — Publications upon fishes. 



284 GROUP IX.— CLASS 53. 

Oreen, Monroe A., Bochester, New York. 

Shad-hatching box for transporting eggs of fish ; artificial flies on 
barbless hooks. 

Hooper, W. J., Hannfacturi&g Company, 116 South St., Balti- 
more, Maryland. — Models of seines, nets and traps used in the 
fisheries. 

Howarth, S., Florissant, Colorado. 

Artificial flies for trout and grayling. 

Jenkins, Dr. 0. P., Leland Stanford, Jr., ITniversity, Cali- 
fornia. — Publications on fishes. 

Jordan, Dr. David Starr, Leland Stanford, Jr., TTniyersity, 

California. — Publications upon fishes, cetacea, etc. 

Kendall, Dr. W. C, IT. S. Fisk Commission, Wasking^ton, D. C. 

Publications relating to fish, fisheries, and fish culture. 

Eirsck, P. H., Benson, Arizona. 

Publications on fishes. 

Eofoid, Prof. C. A., Illinois State Laboratory of Natural His- 
tory, Urbana, Illinois. — Publications upon fresh water zoology. 

Linton, Prof. Edwin, Biological Laboratory, Waskington and 

Jefferson College, Washington, Pennsylvania. — Publications. 

HeCartky, Engene, Syracuse, New York. 

Publications upon fish and fishing. 

Massacknsetts Board of Paris Exposition Kanagers, Boston. 

Model of Gloucester fishery and fishery apparatus. 

Hatker, Fred, Lake Nebagomain, Douglas County, Wisconsin. 

Publications upon fish and fishing. 

Heek, Setk Eugene, Field Columbian Huseum, Ckioago. 

Publications upon fish. 

Milam, B. C, & Son, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Fishing reels. 

New Bedford Oil Company, East Boston, Hassackusetts. 

Watch, clock, and chronometer oils. 

Bogers, W. H., 257 Waskington Street, Boston, Hassacku- 
setts. — Drawings of the Rogers Fishway. 

Smitk, Hugk M., United States Fisk Commission, Wasking^ 

ton, D. C. — Publications upon fish and fisheries. 



GROUP IX.— CLASS 54. 285 

Smith, Eugene, 317 Washington Street, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Publications upon fish and reptiles. 



Jay C, 26 T. Wharf, Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Models of lobster fishing vessel and apparatus. 

Stejneger, Dr. leonhard, IT. S. National Mnsenm, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Publications upon fur seal, sea cow, natural history of 
Commander Islands, etc. 

Stevenson, C. H., ITnited States Fish Commission, Washington, 

D. C. — Publications upon fishery methods and preservation of fish 
for food. 

Tanner, Commander, Z. L., IT. S. N., 1613 New Hampshire 

Ave., Washington, D. C. — Publication upon deep sea investigation. 

Tiffany & Company, ITnion Square, New York. 

American fresh water pearls and shells in which they are found. 

Titcomb, John W., President Fish and Game Commission, St. 

Johnsbury, Vermont. — Publications relating to fish, fisheries and 
fish culture. 

True, F. W., Washington, D. C. 

Publications relating to fisheries. 

United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries, Washington, 

D. C. — Models of apparatus for hatching and transporting fish; 
models and drawings of fishes. Photographs and statistics. 

Wiloox, W. A., IT. S. Fish Commission, Washington, D. C. 

Publications relating to fish, fisheries and fish culture. 

Wing, T. & W. B., New Bedford, Massaohnsetts. 

Whaling implements. 

Woolman, Prof. A. T., Central High School, Dulnth, Minne- 
sota. — Publications relating to fish, fisheries and fish culture. 



CLASS 54. 

APPLIANCES FOR GATHERING WILD CROPS, AND 

PRODUCTS OBTAINED. 



North Carolina State Board of Agrionltnre, Baleigh, North 

Carolina. — Collection of herbs, roots, barks, seeds, etc., used in 
medicine. 



r 



1 



GROUP X. 

FOOD STUFFS. 

CHARLES RICHARDS DODGE, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 55. 



EQUIPMENT AND METHODS EMPLOYED IN THE 

PREPARATION OF FOODS. 



Armour & Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Operations of meat slaughter and packing. 

Chase, A. T., Sudbury Building, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Chase's patent cold-blast butter cooler. 

Deal, H. M., & Company, Bucyrus, Ohio. 

California grain cleaners and scourers. 

Enterprise Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Food mills. 

Libby, McNeill & Libby, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Illinois. 

Model of packing house in operation. 

liquid Air Bef rigeration and Power Company, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Chase's cold blast refrigerator. 

North Brothers Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Ice cream freezers and accessories. 

Swift & Company, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Illinois. 

Model of a refrigerator railway car. 

Union Stock Yards Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Photographic illustration of facilities and methods of marking 
cattle, sheep, and swine. 

287 



288 GROUP X.—CLASS 56. 



CLASS 56. 

FARINACEOUS PRODUCTS AND THEIR 

DERIVATIVES. 



Alliance Hilling Company, Denton, Texas. 

Flour manufactured from soft winter wheat. 

American Cereal Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Collective exhibit of cereal products. 

Battle Creek Sanitarium Health Food Company, Battle Creek, 

Michigan. — Cereal products and health foods. 

Cascade Hill, Akron, Ohio. 

Cereals : Wheat Farina, Graham, Wheat Graham, Amber Graham. 

Cereal Food Company, Peoria, Illinois. 

Hulled com. 

Cereal Hachine Company, Worcester, Hassachntetts. 

Shredded wheat products. 
Cereal Hill, Akron, Ohio. 

Cereals : American steel cut oatmeal, farinose, cracked wheat, oat- 
meals, oat flour, cornmeal, golden maize, hominy, etc 

Becatnr Cereal Hill Company, Becatnr, Illinois. 

White corn products, prepared by modem processes of milling. 
All kiln dried. 

Bel Honte Hilling Company, San Francisco, California. 

Flour, cereals, and whole grains. 

Empire Hill, Akron, Ohio. 

Cereals: Hominy, cornmeal, com flour, rye flour, barley groats. 

Health Food Company, 61 6th Avenne, New York. 

Wheatena, infants' and invalids' food. 

Imperial Hill, Chicago, Illinois. 

Oatmeals, steel cut and ground. 

Indianapolis Hominy Hills, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Maize products, for food and for brewing. 

National Starch Hannf acturing Company, 1 Broadway, New 

York. — Pearl starch, Maizena (brand of com flour), com oil. 



GROUP X.-CLASS 57. 289 

Korth Star Hills, Cedar Bapids, Iowa. 

Cereals: Flaked oat groats, commeal, bolted comtneal, cream 
commeal, and corn flour. 



r-Washbnm Companyi HinneapoliSi Minnesota. 

Exhibit of flour and cereal products. 

Postnm Cereal Company, Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Grape nuts, breakfast food, and postum cereal coffee. 

Sanitas Hut Food Company, Limited, Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Nut foods, nut meal, brumose, malted nuts, and protose. 

Scotch Oats Mill, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Rolled oats. Scotch rolled oats. 

Sperry Flonr Company, San Francisco, California. 

*'Gcrmea," a food for infants, etc. 

Stone Mill, Akron, Ohio. 

Quaker wheat flour, wheat products. 

Sngar City Cereal Mills, Norfolk, Nebraska. 

Wheatling and Farina. 

United States Fmmentnm Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Frumentum com flakes, also white com flour. 

Washburn-Crosby Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Exhibit of flour and cereal products. 



CLASS 57. 

BREAD AND PASTRY. 



National Biscuit Company, Chicago, Illinois, and New York. 

Exhibit of leading forms of bakery goods, biscuits, cakes, etc., 
manufactured in the United States. 



290 GROUP X.— CLASS 58. 



CLASS 58. 

PRESERVED MEATS, FISH, VEGETABLES, AND 

FRUIT. 



Ames, T. 0., Bed Bluff, California. 

"Kelsey" plums. 

Alaska Packers' Association, San Francisco, California. 

Canned salmon. 

Anderson, 0. H., Bed Bluff, California. 

White cling peaches. 

Anker Manufacturing Company, Hew York City. 

Bouillon capsules, liquid bouillon, junket capsules. 

Armour & Company, Chicago. 

Catmed foods, sausages, smoked meats, extract of beef. 

Armour Packing Company, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Preserved meats. Pork and beef products. 

Barataria Canning Company, Bilozi, Mississippi. 

Canned crab meat, shrimp, fish, oysters, figs, canned and pre- 
served. 

Barr, 0. W., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Beardsley's, T. W., Sons, Hew York City. 

Shredded codfish, sliced smoked beef, boneless herring. 

Bouillon Stock Manufacturing Company, The, Chicago. 

Wahl's bouillon stock, made from yeast plant only. 

Brown, Paul Taylor, Company, Hew York City. 

Vegetables in tin and in glass. 

California Fish Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Sardines. 

California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Canned goods. 

Campbell, Joseph, Preserve Company, Camden, Hew Jersey. 

Soups. 



GROUP X.— CLASS 58. 291 

Castle Brothen, FresnOi California. 

Dried apricots, peaches, and pears. 

Cliipmaii, H. P., Bed Bluff, California. 

**Muir" peaches. 

Cone, D. S., Bed Bluff, California. 

Dried prunes, peaches, and pears. 

Cnrtice Brothers Company, Bochester, Hew York. 

Canned fruits, vegetables, soups, and meats. 
Preserved fruits and vegetables. 

Bairjrmen's XTnion, The, San Franoisco, California. 

Smoked meats. 

Department of Agrionltnre, XT. S. A., Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry, Washington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of meats,, frozen, 
salted and canned ; meat products. 

Doxsee, J. H., ft Sons, Islip, Hew York. 

Canned clams and clam juice. 

Duncan, Mrs. H., Bed Bluff, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Erie Preserving Company, Buffalo, Hew York. 

Canned fruits and vegetables ; table delicacies. 

Porsythe, William, Presno, California. 

Dried figs and raisins ; seeded raisins. 

Pranco-American Pood Company, The, Jersey Heights, Hew 

Jersey. — Preserved soups and meats. 

Presno Chamber of Commerce, Presno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Oerman-American Provision Company, Chicago. 

Canned meats and sausages. 

Geneva Preserving Company, Oeneva, Hew York. 

Canned fruit and vegetables. 

Ooetjen, H., San Prancisco, California. 

Canned soups, meats, and vegetables. 

Hayden Packing Company, San Prancisco, California. 

Evaporated vegetables. 



292 GROUP X.— CLASS 58. 

Eiokmott Canning Company, San Francisco, California. 
Canned asparagus. 

Hobbs, A. L, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit. 

Howell, B. F., Bed Blnff, California. 

Nectarines. 

Hnckins, T. H. W., ft Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Canned soups and deviled meats. 

Imperial Packing Company, Canajoharie, Hew York. 

Canned bacon, beef and ham, sliced. 

Inderriaden, T. B., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit. 

Jensen, H. P., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit 

Eapp & Street, San Francisco, California. 

Canned meats, tamales, chili con carne, frijolas, endiilades, 
chicken soup. 

Hemp, Day & Company, Hew York. 

Canned vegetables, fruits, and fish products. 

Kimble Estate, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Knox, Charles B., Johnstown, Hew York. 

Gelatine for domestic purposes. 

Lewis, W. L., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit. 

Lewis, D. W., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Libby, HcHeill & Libby, Chicago. 

Canned meats, soups, smoked meats, sausage. 

Philadelphia, 1876, bronze medal ; Paris, 1878, gold medal. 

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles, California. 

Dried fruit. 

Loud & Oerling, Pomona, California. 

Dried apricots. 



1 



GROUP X.— CLASS 58. 293 

KcMenamin & Companyi Hampton, Virginia. 

Deviled crabs, in tins. 

Kalaga Co-operatiye Company, Fresno, California. 

Dried fmits. 

Kalone & Smith, Ontario, California. 

Dried prunes. 

Mareariar ft Company, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Michigan Carbon Works, Detroit, Hiohigan. 

Gelatine, for food and for mechanical arts. 

Miley, A. C, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit 

Minnewawa Vineyard, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit 

MoxriS) Velson, A Company, Chicago. 

Canned meats. 

Heal, John B., ft Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Finnan haddie. 

Hoble Brothers, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Pacifio Steam Whaling Company, San Francisco, California. 

Canned salmon. 

Phoenix Packing Company, Fresno, California. 
Dried fruits. 

Bichardson A Bobbins, Dover, Delaware. 

Canned meats, oysters, plum pudding. 

Bnnyon, E. W., Bed Blnff, California. 
Crawford peaches. 

Bnssell,' Edward T., ft Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Canned American sardines. 

Sacramento Biver Packers' Association, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Canned salmon. 

San Oabriel Fruit Company, San Oabriel, California. 

Dried apricots and peaches. 



294 GROUP X.— CLASS 59. 

Santa Ana Chamber of Commerce, Santa Ana, California. 

Dried prunes, apricots, and peaches. 

Sea Beach Pickling Works, Warrenton, Oregon. 

Minced sea clams. 

Swift & Company, Chicago. 

.Canned meats and food products; hams, bacon, lard. 

Tamale I. X. L. Company, San Francisco, California. 

Tamales, frijolas, enchiladas, chili con carne, chicken soup. 

Trowbridge, D. S., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Van Camp Packing Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Canned meats, soups, and vegetables. 

Vian, Lewis, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruits. 

Voice Brothers, Fresno, California. 

Dried yellow and Stanwick nectarines. 

Wagner, Martin, Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Canned pineapple. 

Welch Orape Tuice Company, Westfield, Hew Jersey. 

Grape juice. 

Winkle, 0. W., Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit. 

Wonson, William H., & Son, Gloucester, Massachusetts. 

Halibut. 

Zimmerman Brothers, Fresno, California. 

Dried fruit. 



CLASS 59. 

SUGAR AND CONFECTIONERY— CONDIMENTS AND 

RELISHES. 



Baker, Walter, & Company, Limited, Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts. — Cocoa and chocolate preparation. 

Barrett & Barrett, Chicago, Illinois. 

Vinegars. 



GROUP X.— CLASS 59. 295 

Bishop ft Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Crystallized glaced fruits. 

Clarksville Cider Company, St. Lonis, Missouri. 

Vinegar. 

California Canneries Company, Limited. 

Canned fruits, jams, and preserves. 

California Packing Company, San Francisco, California. 

Preserves and jams. Condiments and relishes. 

Crystal Salt Works, Los Angeles, California. 

Table salt in glass jars; half ground salt for dairy or table pur- 
poses. 

Curtice Brothers Company, Bochester, Hew York. 

Maple syrups and sugars. 

Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Collective exhibit of sugars, syrups and confections. 

Billing ft CDmpany, Marion, Indiana. 

Confections. Satin Finish Stick Candy and Buttercup goods, 
packed in tin or glass. 

Flickinger, 7. H., Company, San lose, California. 

Canned fruits. 

Gulden, Charles, 46-48 Elizabeth Street, Hew York. 

Prepared mustards. 

Eayne & Whitaker, New York. 

Milk sugar. 

Heinz, H. J., Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Pickles, preserves, and food products. Fifty- seven varieties 
shown. Tomato ketchup, tomato chutney, and tomato soup; 
baked beans with tomato sauce ; sweet pickles ; midget gherkins ; 
India relish ; evaporated horseradish. We produce the seed, cul- 
tivate where climate and soil produce in perfection and use perfect 
vegetables only. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Paris, 1878, medal; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. 

Hill, Tames, A Sons, Los Angeles, California. 

Pidded olives. 

Johnson, T., Lompoo, California. 

Brown mustard, condiments, and relishes. 



296 GROUP X.— CLASS 59. 

Joslin, C. T., Maiden, Hassachnsetts. 

Maple syrups and sugars. 

Eenney, Seth, & Son, Horristown, Hinnesota. 

Sorghum molasses. 

Lewis, S. B., Lompoe, California. 

White mustard, condiments, and relishes. 

Los Alamitos Beet Sugar Company, Los Alamitos, California. 

Beet sugar and beet products. 

Harsh, Hiss Bessie, South Pasadena, California. 

Crystallized flowers. 

Louisiana Sugar Planters' Association, Hew Orleans, Louisi- 
ana. — Cane-sugar, molasses, massequite, etc. 

Hichigan Beet Sugar Association, Detroit, Hichigan. 

Collective exhibit of beet sugar of various grades. 

Hiller, Oeorge, & Son, 266-267 South Third St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — A large variety of cocoa, chocolates, and candies, 
bonbons, etc. 

Pan Confection Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Candies and confections. 

Pioneer Salt Works, Hount Eden, California. 

Table salt, rock salt for manufacturing purposes, dairy salt, coarse 
salt, and refined table salt. 

Bedondo Salt Works, Los Angeles, California. 

Table salt in glass jars. 

Bichardson, William D., Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

Pickles. 

San Francisco Packing Company, San Francisco, California. 

Green pickled California olives. 

Shields, Hrs. Emily, Hills, California. 

Orange marmalade. 

Soniat, L. H., Dorceyville, Louisiana. 

Cane sugar, molasses, and cane products. 

Southern California Salt Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Table salt. 



^ 



GROUP X.— CLASS 60. 297 

Spreckels Sugar Company, Salinas, California. 

Beet sugar and beet products. 

Teel, Mrs. A. E., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Candied fruits. 

Towie Syrup Company, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Log cabin maple syrups and sugars. 

Union Faoiflo Salt Works, San Francisco, Calif omia. 

Table salt 

Welch Maple Sugar Company, Burlington, Vermont. 

Maple syrups and sugars. 

l^lliams, George, Los Angeles, California. 

Worcester sauce. 



CLASS 60. 

WINES AND BRANDIES. 



Adams, A. P. & Company, Fresno, California. 

Wine. 

Alberts, Ferdinand, Cloverdale, California. 

Wines and brandies. 

Baldwin, C. A., West Side, Santa Clara, California. 
Wines. 

Barton Estate Company, Fresno, California. 

Wines and brandies. 

Beard, John L., Warm Springs, California. 

Wines. 

Ben Lomond Wine Company, Ben Lomond Vineyard, Santa 

Cruz, California. — Wines. 

Beringer Brothers, St. Helena, California. 

Wines and brandies. 

Boettcher, H., Los Angeles, California. 

Wines and brandy. 



298 GROUP X— CLASS 60. 

Brotherhood Wine Company, Hew York. 

Wine. 

California Taris Exposition, San Franoisco, California. 

Wines, red and white; sweet wines and boiled wines; sparkling 
wines ; brandies. • 

California Wine Aisooiation, San Tranoisoo, California. 

Wines. 

California Winery Company, Saoramento, California. 

Wines. 

Chaiz & Bernard, San Franoisco, California. 

Wines. 

Crellin, Lonis, Fleaianton, California. 

Wines. 

Cupertino Wine Company, '^Las Falmas" Vineyard, Hoontain 

View, California. — Wines "Cabernet Franc," "Cabernet Sauvig- 
non," "Semillion." 

Dewey & Sons, Hew York. 

Wines. 

Duval, A., Livermore, California. 

Wine. 

Eisen Vineyard, Fresno, California. 

Wines. 

Department of Agrioulture, Division of Chemistry, Washing* 

ton, D. C. — Ordinary wines, red and white; sweet wines and 
boiled wines ; sparkling wines ; brandies. 

Empire State Wine Company, Fenn Tan, Hew York. 

Wines. 

Engels ft Krudwig Wine Company, Sandusky, Ohio. 

Wines and brandies. 

Finke's, A., Widow, San Franoisco, California. 

Wines. 

Florida Brandy Distilling Company, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Wines, brandies, and cordials. 

Garrett & Company, Weldon, Horth Carolina. 

Wines. 



GROUP X.— CLASS 60. 299 

Oermain, Edward, Wine Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Wines. 

Germania Wine Cellars Company, Hammondsport and 

Rheims, New York. — Wines and brandy. 

Oier, Theodore, Company, Oakland, California. 

Wines. 

Orierson Oldliam & Company, San Franoiseo, California. 

Wines and brandies. 

Onasti-Secondo, Los Angeles, California. 

Wines. 

Gnndlach Bundsohn Wine Company, Bacohus Vineyards, 

Rhine Farm, Sonoma, California. — Wines and brandies. 

Onnn, Tames 0. B., Windsor, California. 

Wines. 

Hammond, Charles Mifflin, Ha Tel Vineyard, XTpper Lake, 

California. — Wines and brandy. 

Haraszthy, Arpad, San Franoiseo, California. 

Wines. 



I, Estate, La Tota Vineyard, Angwin, California. 

Wines. 

% 

Heney, Biohard, Tr., Chateau Bieardo Vineyard, Cupertino, 

California. — Wines. 

Hess, Frederiek, ''Pine Crest Vineyard," Howell Mountain, 

Napa County, California. — White wine, "Riesling." 

Hoelscher, William, ft Company, San Franoiseo, California. 

Wines. 

Hommel, M., 924 Clinton St., Sandusky, Ohio. 

Wines. 

Italian-Swiss Agricultural Colony, Asti, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Keyes, W. S., Liparita Vineyard, Angwin, California. 

Wines. 



300 GROUP X.— CLASS 60. 

Eoster, John L., Hoimt Hamilton Vineyard, San Jose, Cali- 

fornia. — Wines. 

Lake Eenka Wine Company, Hammondsport, Hew York. 

Wines. 

Helver, C. C, linda ViBta Vineyard, lOssion San Toie, Cali- 
fornia. — Wines. 

Malta, George H., St. George Vineyard, Fresno, California. 

Wines. 

Mann, C. H., Santa Bosa, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Hasson, Paul, San Jose, California. 

Wines. 

Herithew, 7. C, Prospect Vineyard, Westside, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Meyer, John, Santa Cruz, California. 

Wines. 

MigUavacca, G., Hapa City, California. 
Wine. 

Monticello Wine Company, Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Wines. 

Hew Hammondsport Wine Company, Hajnmondsport, Heii^ 

York. — Wines. 

Palmtag, William, Palmtag's Vineyard, HoUister, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Pleasant Valley Wine Company, Bheims, Hew York. 

Wine. 

Badovich, Bozo, San lose, California. 

Wine. 

Bepsold & Company, San Francisco, California. 

Wines and brandies. 

St. Hubert Wine Company, San Francisco, California. 

Wine. 

San Luis Vineyard, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Wines and brandies. 



GROUP X.— CLASS 60. ' 301 

Schilling, C, & Company, San Francisco, California. 

Wines. 

Schram, Jacob, Schramberger Vineyard, St. Helena, Cali- 
fornia. — Wines. 

Sherb, Ignace, La Crescenta, Los Angeles Connty, California. 

Red wine, "Zinfandel." 

Sierra Hadre Vintage Company, Lamanda, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Smith, Julius Fanl, Olivina Vineyard, California. 

Wines. 

Sormano, 0., Los Angeles, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Southern Calitomia Wine Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

To-Ealon Wine Company, Washington, D. C. 

Wines. 

XTrbana Wine Company, XTrbana, Hew York. 

Wines. 
Vina Vineyard and Distilling Company, Vina, California. 

Brandies. 

Wehner, William, Lomas Azules Vineyard, Evergreen, Cali- 
fornia. — Wines. 

West, George, & Sons, El Final Vineyard, Stockton, Cali- 
fornia. — Wines and brandies. 

Wetmore-Bowen Company, Cresta Blanca Vineyards, Liver- 
more, California, and San Francisco. — Wines. 

Woollacott, H. J., Los Angeles, California. 

Wines and brandy. 

Zander, Christian, Washington, D. C. 

Wines. 



302 GROUP X.— CLASS 61. 



CLASS 61. 



SYRUPS AND LIQUEURS— DISTILLED SPIRITS- 
COMMERCIAL ALCOHOL. 



Bernheim Brothers, Louisville, Eentnoky. 

Bourbon whiskeys. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Cook & Bemheimer Company, 144 Franklin St., New York. 

Old Valley and Mount Vernon whiskeys. 

Crown Distilleries Company, San Franoisco, California. 

Bourbon, rye and malt whiskeys ; cocktails. 

Cunningham, 7. 7., Louisville, Eentuoky. 

Bourbon whiskeys. 

Department of Agriculture, XT. S. A., Division of Chemistry, 

Washington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of whiskies, rums, alcohols, 
syrups, and liquors. 

Faure, H., Los Angeles, California. 

Tonic made from fruit juices, "Independence." 

Florida Brandy Distilling Company, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Cordial. 

Hamburger, P. H., Company, Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 

Rye whiskeys. 

Heublein, 0. T., & Brothers, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Whiskeys and cocktails. 

Kirk, H. B., & Company, 67-69 Fulton St., New York. 

Old Crow rye whiskey. 

Large Distilling Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Rye whiskeys. 

HcCulloch, T. W., Owensboro, Kentucky. 

Green River whiskey. 

Maryland Distilling Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Rye whiskeys. 



[ 



1 



GJIOUP X. -CLASS ^2. 303 

Meadville Distilling Company, Vallonia, Pennsylvania. 

Rye wliiskeys. 

Setter, David, & Company, FhiladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Rye whiskey, Telegram whiskey. 

Old Nick Williams Company, Williams, North Carolina. 

Whiskey, "Old Nick WiUiams." 

BJieinstrom, Bettman, Johnson & Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Liquors, cordials, and bitters. 

Steinhart Brothers & Company, 134 Hott St., New York. 

Roxbury rye whiskeys. 

Stitzel Brothers, Lonisville, Kentucky. 

Bourbon whiskey. 

Victor Malt Whiskey Company, San Francisco, California. 

Malt whiskey. 

Zander, Christian, Washington, D. C. 

Cordials and bitters. 



CLASS 62. 

VARIOUS BEVERAGES. 



Ballantine ft Sons, Newark, New Jersey. 

Varieties of malted liquors. 

Baltz, 7. ft P., Brewing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pale and dark lager. 

Barrett A Barrett, Chicago, Illinois. 

Ciders. 

Beadleston A Woerz, New York. 

Gold label. German brew, lager, Culmbacher beers. 

Bolen A Byrne Manufacturing Company, New York. 

Ciders and beers. 



r 



304 GRpUP X.— CLASS 62. 

Clarksville Cider Company, St. Louis, Hissonri. 

Cider. 

Department of Agricnltiire, Division of Chemistry, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Collective exhibit of ales, beers, ciders, fermented 
drinks and mineral waters. 

Feigenspan, Christian, & Company, Newark, New Jersey. 

India pale ale, etc. 

Goebel Brewing Company, Limited, Detroit, Hichigan. 

Beer, Porter, and malt extract. 

Ound, John, Brewing Company, La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Extra Pale and Peerless ale. 

Heissler & Junge Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Malt extract. 

Henrich, Christian, Brewing Company, Washington, D. C. 

Maerzen and Senate beer. 

Ice and Cold Storage Company, Los Angeles, California. 

Ginger ale. 

Indianapolis Brewing Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Beers, Duesseldorfer, etc. 

Jackson, 0. H. T., Napa Soda Springs, California. 

Natural aerated water. 

Lembeck & Betz Eagle Brewing Company, Jersey City, New 

Jersey. — Beers, "Bayerisches Hofbrau," "American Club," and 
"Extra." 

Liebmann's, S., Sons, Brewing Company, 36 Forrest St., 

Brooklyn, New York. — Beer in bottles. Pale beer, Rheingold 
and Wuerzburger beer. 

Lincoln Springs, Saratoga Springs, New York. 

Mineral water. 

Long Island Brewing Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Beers, Black Label, etc. 

Quaboag Mineral Springs, North Brookfteld, Massachusetts. 

Mineral water. 

Quinnipiac Brewing Company, New Haven, Connecticut. 
Beers. 



GROUP X.— CLASS 62. 306 



Bamos, Joaquin, Havana, Cuba. 

Beers. 



Saegertown Mineral Springs Company, Saegertown, Penn- 
sylvania. — Ginger ale, sarsaparilla, birch, lemon sour, and mineral 
water. 

San Erancifloo Breweries, limited, San Franoisco, California. 

Export beer. 

Schoenliofen, P., Brewing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Beers, Edelweiss, Export, and Schoenhofenbrau. 

Seattle Brewing & Malting Company, Seattle, Washington. 

Rainier beer. 

Yartray Water Company, 33-39 Franklin St., Buffalo, New 

York. — Ginger ale, sarsaparilla, seltzer, soda water, and sparkling 
water. 



White Bock Mineral Springs Company, Waukesha,. Wiscon- 
sin. — White Rock ozonate mineral spring water. 



GROUP XL 

MINING AND METALLURGY. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF. DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 63. 

WORKING OF MINES, ORE BEDS, AND STONE 

QUARRIES. 



Abbott, A., lone, California. 

Sandstone. 

Acheson, E. 0., Niagara Falls, New York. 

Carborundum and products as formed by its manufacture* 

Acme Mining Company, Robinson Mine, Amador County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Adams, F., Mesquite Mountain Mine, Kern County, 

California. — Gold quartz (with pyrite). 

Adams, J. W., Ormsby County, Nevada. 

Gypsum. 

Afterthought Mining Company, Shasta County, Cali- 
fornia. — Copper ore. 

Ajax Mining Co., Ajaz Mine, Mammoth, Utah. 

Copper ore. 

Alabama Consolidated Iron & Coal Company, Birming- 
ham, Alabama. — Shelby brown ores. 

Alabama Mining Company, Alabama Mine, Tuolumne 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

307 



308 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Alberene Stone Company, New York City. 

Soapstone and slate. 



Alexander, L. L., Arsenical Hine, El Dorado County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Alexander Mining Co., Galena, Kansas. 

Zinc and lead ore, breccia, sphalerite and chert. 

Allegheny Quarries, Lancaster, Ohio. 

Sandstone. 

Allen, J. P., Eureka Quarry, Placer County, California. 

Granite. 

Alpine Plaster & Cement Company, Acton, California. 

Gypsum. 

Alps Mining Company, Nevadayille, Colorado. 

Gold and copper ore. 

Altoona Coal & Coke Company, Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 



Altoona Quicksilver Mining Company, Altoona .«^»w. 

Trinity County, California.— Quicksilver ore, cinnabar. 

Alvord, J., Alvord Mine, San Bernardino County, Cali- 
fornia.*— Gold in calcite. 

Amador Mining Company, Amador County, California. 

Rich gold quartz, telluride, azurite, foot wall, kaolin clay. 

Amador Sandstone Company, Amador, California. 

Sandstone. 

Amalgamated Copper Co., The, Butte, Montana. 

Copper and silver ores, copper matte; precipitated copper, 
silver, and gold. 

American Coal Mining Company, Strawn, Texas. 

Bituminous coal. 

American Excelsior Consolidated Mining Company, 

Goodyear's Bar Creek, California. — Asbestos. 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City. 

Transactions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. 

American Kaolin Company, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 309 

American Mining Company, Chicago. 

Iron ores. 

American Mining Company, Oilpin County, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 



& Nettie Mining Co., Onray, Colorado. 
Gold ore. 

American Steel & Wire Co. of New Jersey, New York 

Gty. — Ores of iron and zinc. 

Anaconda Coal Mining Company, Belt, Montana. 

Bituminous coal. 

Anamosa Qnarries, Stone City, Iowa. 

Limestone. 

Andrews, Colonel A., San Francisco, Califomia. 

Facsimile of Dome of Pantheon of Paris, made of gold and silver. 

Angel Island Stone Company, Angel Island, Califomia. 

Sandstone. 

Angel's Mining Company, Cooke Mine, Calaveras County, 

California. — Gold Quartz. 

Argillo Works, Carbon Cliff, Illinois. 

Fire clay, for manufacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Arkansas Anthracite Coal Company, Montana, Arkansas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Armstrong, Ckarles, Onray, Colorado. 

Obsidian, occurring with vein material in Bachelor Mine. 

Armstrong, D., Silver City, Nevada. 

Silver ore. 

Armstrong, Hnrlbert & Sanders, Onray, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore, value $1,500 per ton. 

Armstrong, Wheeler, Rome, New York. 

Gay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Arroyo Orande Stone Company, Arroyo Orande, Cali- 
fomia. — Granite. 

Ashland Coal, Iron & Bailway Co., Ashland, Eentncky. 

Bituminous coal. 



310 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Ashley Falls Marble Company, AsUey Falls, Massa- 
chusetts. — Marble. 

Assyrian Oilsonite Company, Salt Lake City, ITtali. 

Gilsonite. 

Atlas Mining Co., Prosperity, Missouri. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite, galena, greenockite, concentrates 
and tailings. Concentrates 60 per cent zinc. 

Anld & Conger, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Slate from Pennsylvania and Vermont. 

Avonmore Coal & Coke Co., Leechburg, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

A. Y. & Minnie Mining Co., Leadville, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

Bacheller, F., Helvetia Mine, San Diego County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz (rich). 

Bachelor Mining & Milling Co., Ouray, Colorado. 

Silver ore, showing minerals tetrahedritc and stephanite. 

Baggley, John, Two Bit, South Dakota. 

Gold ore. 

Bailey, Charles A., Sunoook, New Hampshire. 

Granite. 

Bailey, J. J., Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Galena, showing bunch of native silver. 

Baird, Henry Carey, & Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication upon mining, metallurgy, mineralogy, and geology. 

Baker, Charles, Oro Belle Mine, near Yuma, Arizona. 

Copper ore. 

Baldwin, A. M., Huntingdon, West Virginia. 

Potters' clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Ballard & Martin, Bawhide Mine, Tuolumne County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Ballard, Martin & Nevills, Tuolumne County, California. 

Model of round timbering, one method used in California. 

Bandera Flagstone Company, Bedfield, Kansas. 

Flagstone. 



GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 311 

Bankers Mining Co., Joplin, Hissonri. 

Lead and zinc ores, galena, and sphalerite. 

Banning Company, CataUna Island, California. 

Serpentine marble. 

Baptist Mining Co., Aurora, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, gray calamine. 

Barber Asplialt Paving Company, Vew York City. 

Asphaltum and its manufactured products. 

Barker, J. M., Willard, XTtah. 

Iron ore. 

Barnard, E., Carlin, Nevada. 

Diatomaceous earth. 

Barney Marble Company, Swanton, Vermont. 

Marble panels and columns for mines and metallurgy facade. 

Barrett, J., Ormsby, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Basbf ord & Ferguson, Yavapai County, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Bay State Seam Faoe Oranite Company, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Granite. 

Beal, Professor William, Murphy, North Carolina. 

Asbestos. 

Beard, C, Oerman Light Mine, Placerville, California. 

Gold quartz. * 

Beardsley, Oeorge F., Tarshish, California. 

Silver ore. 

Beasley Mining Co., Aurora, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, calamine. 

Beatty, John, Leete Island, Connecticut. 

Granite. 

Beaver Hill Coal Company, San Francisco, California. 

Bituminous coal 



Beck, C. J., Lott Mine, Fresno County, California. 

Bismuthinite. 



312 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Beloher Mining Company, Comstook, Hevada. 

Sulphurets. 

Belden Mining Co., Oilman, Colorado. 

Lead, sand carbonates of lead. 

Belding, Milo M., Oonyemenr, Hew York. 

Marble. 

Bell, T. J., Belmont, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Benton, J., Benton Mine, Mono Connty, California. 

Auriferous galena. 

Berry, T. L., Santa Barbara, California. 

Clay. 

Bertha Blake Mining Co., Battle Mountain, Eagle 

County, Colorado. — Gray lead, carbonate sand. 



Bertha Zino & Mineral Company, Bertha, Virginia. 

Iron and zinc 



Bertha Zino Co., Pulaski, Virginia. 

Zinc ore, calamite. 

Berwind, White Coal Company, Philadelphia, PennsyL 

vania. — Coal ; collection from the company's mines. 

Bevis Book Salt Co., Lyons, Kansas. 

Salt 



Biokford & Bennett, HiUsboro, Sierra Connty, New 

Mexico. — Gold and copper ore. 

Binns, Charles Fergus, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Clays available for economic uses, chiefly ceramic wares, from all 
parts of the United States. 

Birge, F. E., Yuba Biver, California. 

Qay. 

Bimey, T. L., Bimey Mine, Calaveras County, California. 

Gold quartz. 



Bishop, Joseph, Ambrosia Mine, San Benito County, 

California. — Stibnite. 

Bishop, T. F., Blue Lead Mine, Butte County, Calif omia. 

Auriferous gravel. • 



GROUP XI.~CLASS 63. 313 

Bimarok Mining Co., Oeorgetown, Colorado. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Bitnminons Bock Co., Consolidated, Santa Cruz County, 

California. — Bituminous rock. 

Biwabik Kining Company, Biwabik^ Minnesota. 

Iron ore from Biwabik Mines. 



Bixby, J. F., Tyson Mine, El Dorado Connty, California. 

Chromic iron ore. 

Black Metal Mining Company, Black Metal Mine, Shasta 

County, California. — Silver ore. 

Black, Smith & Oiven, Chloride Mine, Trinity Connty, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Blake, P., Mount Oibbs Mine, Mono County, California. 

Silver ore. 

Blano, A., Kern County, California. 

Native antimony ; also calcite from Placer County. 

Blanding, Louis, Tuolumne County, California. 

Gold quartz (rich) from the mines of San Guiseppe and Pine Nut. 



Block, E., Honolulu Mine, Big Bug Mining District, 

Arizona. — Gold, silver, and lead ote. 

Blossom, J. A., Battle Mountain, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Bogart Mining Co., Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, porphyry and quartz, value $20 per ton. 

Bogart, 0. H., St. Lawrence Mine, Placer County, Cali- 
fornia. — Mariposite. 

Bond, A. L., New Enterprise Mine, Boulder County, Cali- 
fornia. — Ores of telluride. 

Bonelli, D., Lincoln County, Nevada. 

Rock salt 
Booraem, B. E., New York. (Department of Mines, IT. S. 

Commission to Paris.) — Publications of the United States upon 
geology, mineralogy, mines and metallurgy. 

Booth Brothers & Hurricane Isle Oranite Company, 

New York City. — Granite. 



314 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Boston & Aurora Mining Co., Aurora, Missouri. 

Zinc ores, sphalerite, and crystallized calamine, 

Boston & Colorado Smelting Company, The, Argo, 

Colorado. — Ores treated by these works. 

Boston & Montana Consolidated Copper & Silver Mining 

Co., Butte, Montana. — Copper and silver ores, mattes, by-products. 

Boston & ITevada Company, Lyon, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Boston Flint Paper Co., Hallowell, Maine. 

Garnets. 

Boston Little Circle Co., Boston, Mass. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite, from 130 foot level. 

Boston Quicksilver Mining Company, Napa County, 

California. — Quicksilver ore, cinnabar. 

Bourne, Charles, Yavapai County, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Bowen, Daniel, Mayer, Arizona. 

Onyx. 

Boyd, John F., Standard Mine, Mono County, California. 

Gold quartz. 

Braddock Land & Oranite Company, Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas. — Granite. 

Brainerd, Shaler & Hall Quarry Company, Portland, 

Connecticut. — Brownstone. 

Brandon Italian Marble Company, Brandon, Vermont. 

Marble. 

Brandywine Oranite Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Granite. . 

Braun, W., Lyon County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Braverman, M., Drum Valley, California. 

Graphite and other minerals. 

Brazanovich, M., Esmeralda County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 315 

Brazil Block Coal Company, Brazil, Indiana. 

Bituminous coal. 

Briar Block Coal Company, Brazil, Indiana. 

Clay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Brick & Pipe Company, The, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Fire clays, for making fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Brindle Steer Mining Co., Empire City, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite. 



Brown Bear Mining Company, Brown Bear Mine, 

Trinity County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Brooks, W. H., Anne Arundel County, Maryland. 

Potter's clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etp. 

Brown Bake Mining Co., Sterling Mine, Hassayampa 

District, Arizona. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Brown, Oeorge L., Lockwood Mine, Calaveras County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Brown, E., San Luis Obispo County, California. 

Qay. 

Brown, James B., Duncan Mine, Mariposa County, 

California. — Gold quartz, clay. 

Brown, T., Ventura, California. 

Soapstone. 

Brownville Maine Slate Company, Worcester, Maine. 

Slate. 

Bullion, Beck & Champion Co., Bullion Beck Mine, 

Eureka, Utah. — Silver lead ore and hard carbonates of lead. 

Bullion Mining Company, Bullion Mine, Tulare County, 

California. — Gold quartz, copper ore from Plumas County. 

Bullock, M. C, Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

Diamond pointed prospecting core drills, diamond bits, cores, and 
boring tools. 

Chicago, 1893, four medals. 



Bunko Mining Co., Cave Spring, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite, and chert. 



316 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Burke, J., Washoe County, Nerada. 

Mercury ore, cinnabar. 

Bums Mining Co., Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite with fluorite and quartz. 

Bnrrage, A. C, Santa Bita, New Mexico. 

Cuprite crystals in talc. 

Bntte & Boston Mining Co., Bntte, Montana. 

Copper and silver ores., mattes, by-products, etc. 

Button, W., Oolconda, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Cagaloo Mining Company, Cagaloo Mine, Biverside 

County, California. — ^Tin from furnace. 

« 

Calaveras Consolidated Mining Company, Santa Cms 

Mine, Calaveras County, California. — Azurite. 

Calaveras Marble Company, Cave City, California. 

Marble. 

Caledonia Mining Company, Caledonia Mine, Fresno 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

ft 

California Marble & Building Stone Company, Colton, 

California. — Aragonite. 

California Commission to Paris Exposition, San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Collective exhibit of ores and minerals. 

CX>NTRIBUTORS : 

Adams, W. J., Jr., Felix Mine, Azuzo, Los Angeles County. — 
Fluorite. 

Aldrich, H. A., Glenbrook, Lake County. — Iron ore. 

Amargosa Mining Co., Clark's Fork, Inyo Co. — G3rpsum 
crystal. 

Arents, A., Fresno Mine, Fresno Co. — Magnetite and limonite. 

Auburn, Bank of, Auburn, Placer County. — Marble. 

Bartlett, W. P., Livermore, Alameda Co. — Hydromagncsite. 

Bartlett, W. T., Snowflake Mine, Napa County. — Magnesite. 

Bonanza Mining Company, Tuolumne County. — Slate. 

Brian, J. W., San Jacmto Quarry, San Diego Co. — Limestone. 

Burke, Morris, Half Dollar Mine, San Diego Co. — ^Lepidolite. 

Bush, Mrs. A. E., Fresno Co. — Andalusite and selenite. 

Cactus Mining Company, Cactus Mine, Inyo Co.— Calcites. 

Cain, J., Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara Co.— Gypsum 
crystal. 

California Paris Exposition Com'n. — Mineral oils from differ- 
ent mines. 



i 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 317 

Calistoga Minin|f Co., Napa County. — Qay. 

Carbondale Mining Co., Amador County. — Qay. 

Ccrro Gordo Co., Ygfnacio Mine, Inyo County. — Caledonite. 

Chalmers, Lewis, Alpine Cotmty. — Enargitc. 

Choynski, T. N., Folsom, Sacramento County. — Quartz. 

Dark, L., Copper World Mine, San Bernardino Co. — Chryso- 
coUa. 

Coleman, W. T., Death Valley, San Bernardino Co.— Pander- 
mite. 

Copeland, W. J., Mt. Shasta Mine, Shasta Co. — Quartz crystals. 

Coppcropolis Mining Co., Calaveras Co. — Cuprite and mala- 
chite. 

Coso Lime Co., Coso Mine, Inyo County. — Calcites. 

Croissant, A. T., Lincoln, Placer County. — Clay. 

Davis & Cowell, Davis Quarry, Santa Cruz Co. — Limestone. 

Diadem Mining Co., Plumas Co. — Gold quartz. 

Dickenson, T.. Eureka Mine, Humboldt County. — Graphite. 

Donnelly, J. W., Eber Flat, Tulare County.— Epidote. 

Douglas. J., Douglasville, Tuolumne County. — Chalcedony. 

Drew, W. F., Alta Mine, Placer County. — Cobaltite. 

Dyer, Geo., Red Hill Mine, Mariposa Co. — Malachite, bornite. 

Ellis, J., Ellis Ranch, Santa Clara County. — Limestone. 

English, George L., Reed Ranch, Marion Co. — Lawsonite. 

Fair, James G., Morgan Mine, Calaveras Co. — Aras[onite. 

Field, J. D., Limestone Quarry, Tulare County. — Limestone. 

Finell, H. T., Willots, Mendocino Co. — Glaucophane. 

Franconia, L.. San Diego Mine, San Diego Co. — Chalcocite. 

Frazer Bros., Riverside Quarry, Riverside Co. — Cement rock. 

Frost, L. L^ Hayden, Lassen Co. — Mesolite. 

Gale, Mrs. S. A., Argus Mountain, Inyo Co. — Calcite. 

Glenbrook Mining Co., Lake Co. — Micaceous hematite. 

Goff, H. S., Arch Beach, Orange Co. — Fuchsite. 

Goodrich, C. F., Del Norte Co. — Magnetite and limonite. 

Grant Mining Co., Grant Gypsum Mine, Orange Co. — Dolomite. 

Grower, H., Big Pine, Inyo Co. — Bismutite. 

Goucher, J., Berkeley, Alameda Co. — Vivianite. 

Hazard, Geo. W., Los Angeles Quarry, Los Angeles Co. — 
Limestone. 

Heam, Dr. F. G., YreKa, Siskiyou Co. — Arenaceous limestone. 

HeflFeman, H. K., Carga Muchacha, San Diego Co. — Cyanite. 

Hendrickson, A., Hendrickson Quarry, Kern Co. — Limestone. 

Heslewood, J. A., Tehama, Tehama Co. — Pectolite. 

Hidalgo Mining Co., Inyo Co. — Argentiferous galena. 

Hill, A., Hill's Quarry, Monterey Co. — Limestone. 

Hill. M.. Mammoth Mine, Mono Co. — Barite. 

Hills, H. S., Vanderbilt, San Bernardino Co. — Feldspar. 

Hirsh, D., Hirsh Mine, Inyo Co. — Silver ore. 

Hixon, J. W., Bullion Mine, San Diego Co. — Chrysocolla and 
azurite. 

Holmes, H. T., Co., Lynn's Quarry, San Bernardino Co. — 
Limestone. 



318 GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 

Hooper, Edward, Reynolds Mine, Fresno G>. — Tantalite and 
columbite. 

Hughes, D. F., South Fork Mine, Placer Co. — Calcites. 

Hughes, H., Deer Creek, Tulare Co. — Moss agate. 

Hullford, E. W., Placerville, El Dorado Co.— Quartz crystals, 
pyritc. 

Ibex Mining Co., Inyo Co. — Silver ore. 

Ireland W. J., Murphy's Cave, Calaveras Co. — Stalactites. 

I. X. L. Mining Co., Alpine Co. — Silver ore. 

Jerney, J. M., Green Mountain Mine, Fresno Co. — Molybdenite. 

Jocoby, H., Jocoby Creek, Humboldt Co. — Limestone. 

Jolon Mining Co., Monterey Co. — Clay. 

Jones, D., Mount Raymond, Fresno Co. — Limestone. 

Kahn, Charles, Cadmus Mine, Nevada Co. — Gold quartz. 

Katz, M. D., Akar's Quarry, San Bernardino Co. — Limestone. 

Keeney, G. D., Soledad Canyon, Los Angeles Co. — Zeolite. 

Kelsey, P. F., Kelsey Mine, Los Angeles Co. — Erythrite. 

Kennedy Mining Co., Kennedy Mine, Amador Co. — Foot wall, 
1,250 to 1,600 foot level. 

Keystone Mining Co., Keystone Mine, Amador Co. — Foot wall. 

Kimble, Geo. W., Colomo Mine, El Dorado Co. — Magnetite, 
limonite. 

King, M., Yolo Mine, Yolo Co. — Limonite. 

Knight, George, Pit River, Modoc Co. — Calcite. 

Knox, R. F., Manhattan Quicksilver Mine, Napa Co. — Chal- 
cedony. 

Marble Lime Kiln Co., Swartout Canyon, San Bernardino Co. 
— Limestone. 

Mason, W. B., Crescent City Beach, Del Norte Co. — Beach 
pebbles. 

Mason, W. Q., Bald Point, Calaveras Co. — Almandite (garnet). 

Mathyas, B., Buckmountain Creek, Humboldt Co. — Lignite. 

Maxwell, J., Turquoise Mine, San Bernardino Co. — Turquoise, 
cuproscheelite. 

Maxwell, James M., New Idria Mine, Fresno Co. — Cinnabar. 

Mayer, H. H., Lake Mine, Lake Co. — Hyalite. 

McGowan, F., Eureka, Humboldt Co. — Rutile (in granite). 

McMillan, F., Shasta Co. — Limonite, melanterite. 

Mendenhall, A., Mendenhall Mine, Alameda Co. — Chromic 
iron ore. 

Mercer, W. J., Mercer's Cave, Murphys, Calaveras Co. — Stalac- 
tite. 

Merriman, Dr. A. F., Big Lagoon Beach, Humboldt Co. — 
Beach pebbles. 

Moore, N., Moore's Ranch, Santa Barbara Co. — Limestone. 

Mt. Shasta Mining Co., Mt. Shasta. — Gold quartz, $300 per ton. 

Nellis, J. W., Mount Diablo, Contra Costa Co. — Barite. 

Nelson, J.. Nelson Creek, Monterey Co. — ^Jasper (variegated). 

Nichols, Geo.. Calaveras Cave, Calaveras Co. — Stalactite. 

Ogden, A., Union Mine, Calaveras Co. — Chalcopyrite, from 
500 foot level. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 319 

O 'Gorman, J. T., Callaghan's Ranch, Siskiyou Co. — Barite. 

Parker, D. W. C., Modoc Mine, Inyo Co. — Anglesite. 

Pa)rne, P., St. Helena, Napa Co., California. — Chrysolite (in 
serpentine) . 

Perry, Mrs. J. W. S., Calico. — Celestite, thenardite. 

Pope, O. C, Chico Mine, Placer Co. — Millerite. 

Porrie, M., Porrie's Quarry, Kern Co. — Limestone. 

Powers, H., Mayflower Mine, Nevada Co. — Molybdenite. 

Pritchard, J. A., Wyoming Mine, Inyo Co. — Quartz .crystal. 

Randol, J. B., New Almaden Mine, Santa Clara Co. — Calcite. 

Redfern, J. M., Barstow, San Bernardino Co. — Pyrolusite 
(calcite). 

Rich Gulch Mining Co., Plumas Co. — Gold quartz (rich). 

Rockland Lime Quarry Co., Monterey Co. — Limestone, calcitcs. 

Root, Wm. C, Mountain Meadow, Tuolumne Co. — Copper ore. 

Sanders, Edward, Delta, Shasta Co. — Molybdenite in granite. 

San Francisco Mining C)o., Mariposa Co. — Gold quartz (with 
pyritc) . 

Santa Barbara Mining Co., Santa Barbara Co. — Ochre (burnt). 

Satellite Mining Co., Inyo Co. — Copper ore. 

Sem, Sam, Stuckslager Mine, El Dorado Co. — Roscoelite. 

Sheldon, E. P., Jamestown, Tuolumne Co. — Albite. 

Sheppard, L., Sheppard's Canyon, Inyo Co. — Iron ore. 

Shimmin. E. R., Willets, Mendocino Co. — Garnets. 

Sickler, H. O., Julian Quarry, San Diego Co. — Limestone. 

Silver, Lowry, Copper World Mine, San Bernardino Co. — 
Chrysocolla. 

Smith, A., Three River Quarry, Tulare Co. — Limestone. 

Smith, B. W., Specimen Mint, Kern Co. — Calcites. 

Smith, E.,Carpenter's Ranch, San Luis Obispo Co. — Limestone. 

Smith, O. A., San Bernardino Co. — Calcites (Iceland spar, 
\ pyfite). 

Sprague, George E., Mount Hoffman, Mariposa Co. — Epidote. 

Stewart, Charles, Tehachapi Summit, Kern Co. — Semi opal. 

Stone, G P., Forest Hill Divide, Placer Co. — Serpentine. 

Suhren, George H., Suisun, Solano Co. — Agate. 

Thayer, B. B., Guadalupe Quicksilver Mine, Santa Clara Co. — 
Dolomite. 

Theisen, John, Consumers* Mine, El Dorado Co. — Rubescite. 

Thomas, W. P., Thomas Mine, Mendocino Co. — Lignite. 

Thorn, J. N., Lost Mine, San Diego Co. — Copper ore. 

Tregidgo, Al., Hudson Bay Mine, Nevada Co. — Gold quartz 
(rich). 

Tres Pinos Lime Co., San Benito Co. — Limestone, magnetite. 

Turnbow, F. H., Stuckslager Mine, El Dorado Co. — Roscoelite. 

Turner, O., Turner's Quarry, San Diego Co. — Limestone. 

Union Mining Co., Calaveras Co. — Chalcopyrite. 

Ward, W. E., Enterprise Mine, Plumas Co. — Chalcocite. 

Williams, J., Kennet Quarry, Shasta County. — Limestone. 

Woodworth, J. W., Rose Mine, San Bernardino Co. — Hematite 
(auriferous). 

Yates, L. G., Santa Barbara Co. — Pectolite. 



320 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

California Paris CommissioiLy San Francisco, Calif omia. 

Models, gold quartz mill, mine timbering, underground mining, 
hydraulic sluicing, nuggets and dust. 



California ttnicksilyer Mining Company, Tolo Connty, 

California. — Quicksilver ore. 

California State Mining Bnrean, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Reports and colored charts on mineral production of the 
state. 

Calliope Mining & Milling Company, Onray, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

Calnmet & Contact Company, Contact, Nevada. 

Copper matte. 

Calnmet & Heda Company, Calnmet, Michig^. 

Native copper, copper ores. 

Can^bell, C. P., Boomerang Mine, San Bernardino 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Campbell, L. H., Oaffney, Scnth Carolina. 

Monazite sand. 

Campion, Tolin F., Leadville, Colorado. 

Native gold, crystallized and leaf, from Breckenridge and Lead- 
ville collection ; valued at $35,000. 

Capital City Brick Company, Topeka, Kansas. 

Shale, for manufacture of paving and vitrified brick. 

Carbomndnm Company, Niagara Falls, New York. 

Carborundum crystals. 

Carpenter & Brother, Kings Monntain, North Carolina. 

Tin ore. 

Carpenter, A. Y., Contact, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Carpenter, Coles A., Sea Cliff, New York. 

Stoneware clay, for the manufacture of stoneware, etc. 

Carrara Marble Company, Carrara Marble ttnarry, 

Amador County, California — Marble. 

Carthage Marble & White lime Company, St. Lonis, 

Missouri. — Limestone. 



i 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 321 

CatarallOi T.| Oaribaldi Mine, Mono County, California. 

Argentiferous galena. 

Cashin, William T., Cashin, Colorado. 

Copper ore. 

Castrer, Curran & Bnllitt, FhiladelpMa, Fennsylyania. 

Coal collection of the Pocahontas Mines, Western Virginia. 

Cayuga Pressed Briek Company, Caynga, Indiana. 

Gay for making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 



Centennial Eureka Mining Company, Eurekl^ TTtak. 

Gold, silver, and copper, with rare arsenical minerals associated. 

Centerville Bloek Coal Company, Centerville, Iowa. 

Bituminous coal. 

Central Coal & Coke Company, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Central Jellico Coal Company, Pleasant View, Ken- 
tucky. — Bituminous coal. 

Central Lead Company, Flat Biyer, Missouri. 

Lead ore, galena. 

Central Phospkate Company, Beaufort, Soutk Carolina. 

Phosphate rock. 

Central Bailroad of New Jersey, New Tork City. 

Anthracite coal. 

Cerrillos Coal & Bailroad Company, Cerrillos, New 

Mexico. — Bituminous coal. 

Cerro Oordo Company, Tgnaeio Mine, Inyo County, 

California. — Linarite. 

Chadboum & Long, Old Mines, Wasbington County, 

Missouri. — ^Lead ore, galena, and barytes. 



Chainman Mining Company, White Pine County, 

Nevada. — Gold ore. 

Ckapman Coal Company, Taekson, Okio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Ckampion Company, Iron Beacon, Mickigan. 

Iron ore, weighing i,6oo pounds. 



322 GROUP XI.-^LASS 63. 

Chapel Hill Mining Company, Cherokee County, North 

Carolina. — Iron ore. 

Chapin, W. C, Fnmaoe Creek, California. 

Ulexite and gypsum. 

Chase, Captain Oeoi^ W., Bnsh, Arkansas. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite with smithsonite. 

Chatelle, W. B., Oalena, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, crystallized sphalerite. 

Chanvin, A. T., Chanvin, California. 

Gold quartz. 

Cherokee & Pittsburg Coal Company, Pittsburg, Kansas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Cherry Valley Iron Company, Leetonia, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Chestatee Pyrites Company, Lumpkin County, Georgia. 

Iron pyrite. 

Chiatovich, T., Tule Canon, Nevada. 

Silver lead, horn silver and iron ore. 

Chiatowitch, John, Beyeridg^ Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Chicago TTniyersity, Chicago. 

Collection of minerals included in Group III of Dana's Classi- 
fication, collected by J. P. Iddings. 

Chicago, Wilmington & Vermillion Coal Company, 

Braidwood, Illinois. — Bituminous coal. 

Chickamauga Coal & Coke Company, Chickamauga, 

Georgia. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Chisler, 0., Jumbo, Nevada. 

Gold and silver. 

Choctaw, Oklahoma & Oulf Bailway Company, Harts- 
horn, Indian Territory. — Bituminous coal. 

Christy Fire Clay Company, The, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Fire clay, for manufacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Cincinnati Belle Mining Company, Cincinnati Belle 

Mine. San Diego County, California. — Gold quartz (rich). 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 323 



Cinnabar King Mining Company, Healdsburg, Sonoma 

County, California. — Mercury ore, cinnabar. 

City Improyement Company, San Franoisoo, California. 

Bituminous rock and asphaltum. 

Clarke, F. 0., Bine Stone Company, Oxford, New York. 

Bluestone. 

Clark, N., & Son, Carbondale Mine, Amador Connty, 

California. — Clay (fire). 

Clark, W. A., Oallnp, New Mexico. 

Bituminous coal. 

Clerk de Landresse, H., Tosemite ttneen Mine, Fresno 

County, California. — Silver ore. 

Cleyeland Cliffs Mining Company, Ishpeming, Michi- 
gan. — Iron ore from Cleveland Cliffs Mine. 

Cleyeland Mining Company, Cleyeland Mine, San Diego 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Cleyeland Stone Company, Cleyeland, Ohio. 

Sandstone. 

Clinton Mining & Milling Company, Crisman, Colorado. 

Gold ore with the association of roscoelite. 

Clippert & Spanlding, Lansing, Michigan. 

Clay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 



Coal Blnff Mining Company, Terre Hante, Indiana. 

Bituminous coal. 

Coal Creek Coal Company, Enoxyille, Tennessee. 

Bituminous coal. 

Coal Bidge Coal & Coke Company, Fomeroy, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 



Cock Bobin Mining Company, Toplin, Missouri. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite, and galena. 

Colcord, B. E., Yiyian Mine, Neyada. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Collins, B. M., Lewis, California. 

Soapstone (fire brick). 



324 GROUP XI.^^LASS 63. 

Cohnaiii H. T., Hilton Mine, Kariposa County^ Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz, from 900 foot level. 

Colorado Central Mining Companyi Georgetown, Colo- 
rado. — Silver and lead ore. 

Colorado College, Colorado SpringSi Colorado. 

Minerals in the sulphide, selenide, telluride, arsenide, and anti- 
monide group, by R. M. Bagg, Jr. 

Colorado Fnel & Iron Companyi Denyeri Colorado. 

Coal, coke; representing thirty iron and coal mines and coking 
plants operated in Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. . 

Colorado Seientifto Sooiety, Denyer, Colorado. 

Free gold ore from the Smuggler Union Mine, Telluride, Colo- 
rado ; valued at $600. Value per ton, $86,000. 



Colorado Smelting & Mining Co., BnttOi Montana. 

Copper and silver ores, mattes, by-products, etc. 

Colombia Marble ttnarry Company, Colombia Marble 

Quarries, Tuolumne County, California. — Marble. 

Colombia Mining Company, Marion, Eentooky. 

Lead ore, galena, and fiuor spar. 

Colombian Marble Qoarrying Company, Botland, Ver- 
mont. — Square column of La Joya marble in facade. 



Colombian Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Silver copper ore. 

Colombos & Hooking Coal & Iron Company,- Colombos, 

Ohio. — Bituminous coal. 

Comet Coal Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Commodore Mining Company, Creede, Colorado. 

Silver ore. 



Commonwealth Mining & Milling Co., Fearoe, Arizona. 

Gold and silver ore, with free gold and cerargyrite. 

Compere, C. Y., Washington Mine, Calayeras Coonty, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Concrete Qold Mining Company, Oilpin Coonty, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore. 



GROUP XI.--CLASS 63. 325 . 

Cone, H., Blaokman Hiney Nerada Conntyi California. 

Gold quartz. 

Congreas Gold Co., Congress Mine, Congress, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Conn, Fred., Saline Valley, California. 

Tincal (native borax). 



Conrad Hill Mining Company, Davidson County, North 

Carolina. — Copper ore. 

Conroy, B., Bedding, California. 
Limonite (botryoidal). 

Consolidated Bitnminons Bock Company, Santa Cruz 

County, California. — Bituminous rock. 

Consolidated Coal Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Bituminous coal. 

Consolidated Coal Company, St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Bituminous coal. 



Consolidated Stanley Mining Co., Idaho Springs, Colo- 
rado. — Gold, silver, and copper ore. 



Consolidated Virginia Mining Company, Virginia City, 

Nevada. — Sulphurets. 

Continental Coal Company, Mayersdale, Fennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Contracting Company, Clear Creek Station, California. 

Sandstone. 

Cook, S. E., Bnffalo City, Arkansas. 

Zinc blende with smithsonite, dolomite, and mag^esian lime- 
stone, from Alberta Mine, Marion County. 



•Cook Mining & Milling Company, Central City, Colo- 
rado. — Gold ore. 

Cooper Hollow Mining Company, (hdena, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, breccia of sphalerite and chert. 

Copperopolis Mine, Castle Creek, Arizona. 

Gold and copper ore. 

Copper ttneen Consolidated Mining Co., Bisbee, Ari- 
zona. — Copper ores, showing malachite, azurite, cuprite, and 
chrysocolla. 



326 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Copper TTnion Creek Company, Copper TTnion Creek, 

California. — Copper ore. 

Cornell TTniyersity, Ithaca, New Tork. 

Minerals of Groups III, IV, VII and VIII, Dana's Classifica- 
tion, collected by A. C. Gill. 

Comelly, T. B., Tombstone Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Cometti, 0. B., Tombstone Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Cornwall Mining Company, Galena, Kansas. 

Lead ore cerussite. 

Corona Coal & Coke Company, Corona, Alabama. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Corrigan, McEinney & Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Iron ores. 

Cowles, Calvin J., Wilkesboro, North Carolina. 

Potter's clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Craig, John T., Company, Enoxville, Tennessee. 

Marble. 

Crowell, T. P., Alta Antimony Mine, San Benito Connty, 

California. — Stibnitc. 

Crown King Mining Company, Tavapai County, Ari- 
zona. — Gold ore. 

Cmikshank, A. B., Mary Ellen Mine, Tuolumne County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Crown Point Mining Company, Comstock, Nevada. 

Sulphurets. 

Cumnock Mining Company, Cumnock, North Carolina. 

Bituminous coal. 

Curtis, T. 0., Pentz, California. 

Chromic iron ore, limestone. 

Curtis, S. W., Sonoma, California. 

Qay. 

Cutter, W. H., Woodbridge, New Jersey. 

Potter's clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 



GROUP XL-CLASS 63. 327 

Oaggetty A.y San Bernardino Connty, California. 

Silver ore, chalcopyrite, calamine, and smithsonite. 

Daggett, T., Jnniper Mine, Lassen Connty, Califomia. 

Gold quartz (with free gold). 

Damon Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite, fluorite, and quartz. 

Danohe, T., Boss, Neyada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Danville Brick & Tile Company, Danville, Illinois. 

Qay, for making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Dannet, T., Death Valley, Califomia. 

Borate of lime. 

Davidson & Kennedy, Lottie Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Cervantite (oxide antimony). 

Davidson, 0. A., TTtiea Mine, Ward, Colorado. 

Chalcopyrite and bornite, carrying gold. 

Davis, T. Z., Sacramento, Califomia. 

Collection of minerals. 
Day, Dr. David T., Washington, D. C. 

Transparencies showing scenes in mining regions. 

Deaken & Taylor, Old Spanish Mine, Shasta Connty, 

California. — Gold quartz, $75.00 per ton. 

Deaken, F., Evening Star Mine, Shasta Connty, Cali- 
fomia. — (jold quartz, $800.00 per ton. 

de Corse, S., Marble Canyon Mine, near Tnma, Arizona. 

Marble. 

Deep Creek Mining Company, Lander Connty, Nevada. 

Antimony. 

DeOoha, T. W., Grass Valley, Califomia. 

Qay. 

Deidesheimer, P., Tonng America Mine, Sierra County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Deitrick, T. M., Lorraine, Yii^nia. 

Potter's clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 



328 GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 

De la Har^s Miniiig Company, Mercury TTtah. 

Exhibit of the methods of working gold ores. 

Delano Mining Company, Delano Mine, Tulare County, 

California. — Silver ore. 

Delaware & Hudson Company, New York. 

Anthracite coal. 

Delaware & Lackawanna Bailroad Company, New Tork. 

Anthracite coal. 

Dennemora Mining Company, Brown's Summit, North 

Carolina. — Iron ore. 

Denyer Marble & Onyx Company, Denyer, Colorado. 

Marble. 

Dem, John, Mercur, Utah. 

Gold ore, showing cinnabar. 

Derby, C. C, Mirabel Mine, Lake County, California. 

Cinnabar, stibnite from San Benito County, and epsomite from 
Santa Qara County. 

Deseret Museum, The, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Selenite crystals. 

Detroit & Deadwood Company, Deadwood, South Da- , 

kota. — Native copper. 



Detroit Copper Mining Co., Morenei, Arizona. 

Copper ores, cuprite, chalcotrichite, arborescent and bright 
native copper, azurite. 



Detroit Mining Company, Toplin, Mi 

Zinc ore, sphalerite from "soft ground." 

Deyine, J. E., Yoloano Wells Mine, near Tuma, Arizona. 

Alum. 

Deyling, Charles, Boulder, Colorado. 

Silver ore. 

Dewdrop Mining & Milling Company, Ni Wot Mine, 

Ward, Colorado. — Gold ore, iron and copper ore. 



Dew Drop Mining Company, Oronogo, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, breccia of sphalerite, chert, and limestone. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. * 329 

Dickey, W. S., Mannfaoturmg Company^ Deepwater, 

Missouri. — Fire days, for making fire brick, tiles, etc. 



Dickinson Fire Brick Works, Dickinson, North Dakota. 

Fire clays, for making fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Dier, Oeoi^, Draper Mine, Tnolnnine Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 



Dixie Mining & Smelting Company, Dixie Mine, St. 

George, Utah. — Copper aad iron ores. 

Doe Bnn Mining Company, Flat Biyer, Missouri. 

Lead ores, galena, diamond drill cores showing structure of the 
deposit. 

Dooley, W. P., Lincoln Connty, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Doolittle, T., Providence Mine, Tnolnmne Connty, Cali- 

fomia.'^-GoId quartz with pyrite. 

Doran, A. T., Accidental Mine, Arizona. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Dorick Mining Company, Georgetown, Colorado. 

Gold and lead ore. 

Dorset Mountain Marble Company, Bntland, Vermont. 

Marble. 

Douglass, W., Silver Star Mine, Nevada. 

Gold ore. 



Drake Company, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Petrified wood, found near Holbrook, Arizona, cut for ornamental 
purposes, table tops ; granite, quartzite. 

Dresser, S. B., Bradford, Penn. 

Packers for oil and gas wells; couplings for threadless pipe; in- 
sulation to prevent electrolysis of pipes ; clamps for stopping leaks 
at couplings. 

Ducktown Mining Company, Ducktown, Tennessee. 

Copper ore. 

Dunlap Mining Company, Flat Creek, Washington 

County, Missouri. — Lead ore, galena. 

Dunn, lu F., Humboldt County, Nevada. 
Silver ore. 



330 ' GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

DnrkeCy T. H., Coal Company, Weir, Kansas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Dntton, A. J., Ouray, Colorado. 

Gold, silver and copper ore, showing the mineral tetrahedritc. 



Dwight Mining Company, Galena, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite on chert. 

Dwight, Prof. William B., Yassar College, Ponglikeepsie, New 

York. — Petrotomc in operation. 

Eads, Hixter & Heald Zino Company, Mossy Creek, 

Tenn. — Zinc ore, sphalerite, sniithsonite, calamine. 



Eagle Mining Company, London County, Virginia. 

Iron ore. 

Eagle Mining Company, Salem, Kentucky. 

Lead and zinc ores, galena, sphalerite, and fluorite. 

Edgar, C. S., Metnchen, New Jersey. 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

Edwards, A. W., Mark Twain Mine, Lynx Creek, 

zona.— Gold and silver ore. 

Edwards, M. A., Campo Seco, California. 

Granite. 

Eggers & Company, Eagle Mine, Neyada. 

Gold ore. 

Eggers & Hunter, New Orleans Mine, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Eicher, T. C, Morning Star Mine, Butte County, Cali- 
fornia. — Barite with gold and silver. 

Ekman, A., Butte County, California. 

Gypsum, calcite with sulphides. 

Eleventh Hour Mining Company, Prosperity, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite. 

Elkton Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Collection of gold ore and accompanying minerals. 

Elsinore Coal & Clay Company, Elsinore, California. 

Bituminous coal. 



1 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 331 

Empire Iron & Steel Company, New York City. 

Iron ore from New Jersey and Virginia mines. 

Empire Mining Company, Empire Mine, Nevada County, 

California. — Gold quartz, from 1,500 foot level. 

Empire Mining Company, Lynx Creek, Arizona. 

Gold, silver, and copper ore. 



Empire State Mining & Milling Company, Wardner, 

Idaho. — Set of concentrates. 

Engelfl, H. A., Engels' Mine, Flnmas County, California. 

Copper, malachite, chrysocolla, cuprite, chalcopyrite. 

English, B. W., Lumber Company, English, Colorado. 

Lime rock of good quality. 

Ensign, 0. A., Hoodlum Mine, Castle Creek, Arizona. 

Copper ore. 

Enterprise Mining Company, Bieo, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

ErielUdlroad Company, New York City. 

Anthracite coal. 

Esperanza Mining Company, Esperanza Mine, Calaveras 

County, California. — Azurite. 

Etta Mining Company, Etta, Arizona. 

Gold quartz ore. 

Etta Mining Company, Keystone, South Dakota. 

Spodumene, for manufacture of porcelain and medicines. 

Eureka Consolidated Mining Company, Eureka, Ne- 
vada. — Lead and silver ore. 

Eureka Hill Mining Co., Tintic District, XTtah. 

Gold, silver, and copper ore, conichalcite and enargite. 

Eureka Mining Company, Eureka Mine, Plumas County, 

California. — Gold quartz (sulphides of iron and lead). 

Eureka Slate Company, Eureka Slate Mine, El Dorado 

County, California. — Slate. 

Evans, L., Pardee Mine, Lake County, California. 

Chromic iron ore. 



332 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Evaiu Harble Companyi Baltimorei Maryland. 

Marble from Tennessee. 

Ewingy Thomas, San Bernardino County, California. 

Silver ore, from Bonanza King and Bell McGillivray Mines. 

Excelsior Brownstone Company, Ashland, Wisconsin. 

Sandstone. 



Excelsior Fire Brick Company, Ottawa, Illinois. 

Qay, for making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Excelsior Slate Company, Delta, Fennsylyania. 

Slate. 

Exploration Syndicate, The, Hew York City. 

Bituminous coal. 

Eair Eayen Harble & Harbleized Slate Company, Eair 

Haven, Vermont. — Slate. 



Fairhnrst, 0. W., Magnolia, Colorado. 

Gold ore, showing cleavage face of tellurium. 

Fairmont Coal & Iron Company, Hew Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania. — Bituminous coal. 

Fairmonnt Consolidated Mining Company, Oarfleld, Ne- 
vada. — Black metal. 

Fall Brook Coal Company, Coming, Hew York. 

Bituminous coal. 

Falling Bock Cannel Coal Company, Hew York City. 

Bituminous coal. 

Faxon, John T., Sonera, California. 

Soapstone. 

Ferguson Mining Company, York Connty, Sonth Caro- 
lina. — Gold ore. 

Field Colnmbian Museum, Chicago. 

Crystals of the United States illustrating crystallography. 

First national Kansas Mining Company, Oilpin County, 

Colorado. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Fish, A., Golden Wreath Mine, Inyo County, Califomia. 

Gold quartz. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 333 

Fitk Hilling & Hilling Company^ Blackhawky Gilpin 

County, Colorado. — Gold, silver, and copper ore. 

Fitch, A. B.y Graphite Hine and Smelting Works, Hagdalena, 

New Mexico. — Carbonate sands containing lead and ^ver. 

Flemington Coal & Coke Companyi Hemington, Wert 

• Virginia. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Florentine Harble Companyi Beldens, Vermont. 

Marble. 

Flnor Spar Company, The, St. Lotiis, Hissonri. 

Fluor spar. 

Flynt, W. N., Granite Company, Honson, Hassaohnsetti. 

Granite. 

Foley, Tames, Allisonia, Virginia. 

Zinc and lead ore, steel-blende, smithsonite, galena, and cerusite. 



Foote Hineral Company, 1317 Arch St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Collective exhibit of minerals occurring in the 
United States. 

Forney Hining Company, North Carolina. 

Iron ore. 

Fort Hadison & Appanoose Stone Company, Fort Hadi- 

son, Iowa. — Ddomite. 

Fossioh, F. lu, Company, Sheffield, Alabama. 

Limestone. 

Foster, W. E., Blazing Star Hines, Calaveras County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Francis Hining Company, Francis Hine, San Bernar- 
dino County, California.— Gold quartz. 

Frank, J. W., Bed Cap Hine, Hnmboldt County, Cali- 
fornia. — Native copper. 

Franklin, Nelson, Wood Hine, Central City, Colorado. 

Uranium ore, pitch blende. 

Free Coinage Hining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, porphyry and quartz, basalt, fluorite. 

Freedley, J. E. & Sons, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Marble. 



334 GROUP^XI.— CLASS 63. 

Freeland Mining Company, Idaho Springs, Colorado. 

Gold, silver, copper, and lead ore. 

Freeport Granite Qnarries, Freeport, Maine. 

Granite. 

Fremont Marble Company, Hartford, Connectiont. 

Marble. 

French, J. W., Washington Mine, Shasta Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz (telluride). 



French, T. T., Bine Jacket Mine, Seven Deyils Moun- 
tains, Idaho. — Copper ore. 

Fresno Enterprise Company, Enterprise Mine, Fresno 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Fricke, John H., Hillsboro, Sierra Connty, New Mexico. 

Pyritic iron and zinc ore. 

Frick, H. C, Coke Co., Fittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Maps and charts, diagrams, and photographs of equipment. 
Coke collection. 

Friedigh, T. H., Hillsboro, Sierra Connty, New Mexico. 

Gold ore. 

Frost, T. S., Kentucky Mine, Mono Connty, California. 

Chloride of silver. • 

Fuller, L. H., Chicago. 

Lead ore, galena, from Dodgeville, Wisconsin. 

Fultonham Brick Company, Fultonham, Ohio. 

Shale, for manufacture of paving and vitrified brick. 

Oalena Queen Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Oallup, H. H., Buffalo City, Arkansas. 

Zinc ore blende from Lion Hill Mines, Marion County, Arkansas. 

Gambetter Mining Company, Oambetter, California. 

Gold quartz. 

Oambetta Mining Company, Oambetta Mine, San Ber- 
nardino County, California. — Silver ore. 

Gardner, Dr., Bedford, Indiana. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 335 

Ckurdnur, T. I., Wren, Arizona. 

Gold quartz. 

Garrison, T. F., New Tear Mine, Deep Creek, Utah. 

Copper ore. 

Oanley Mountain Coal Company, Anuted, West Vir- 
ginia. — Bituminous coal. 

Oeddes & Seerie Stone Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Granite. 

Oee WMlIeldns Mining Company, Granby, Missouri. 

Zinc and lead ore, calamine and galena. 

Gehrmaiin, Charles, Stanley Mine, Idaho Springs, Colo- 
rado. — Gold, silver, and copper ore, showing bornite and chal- 
copyrite. 

Genesee Salt Company, Fiffard, New Tork. 

Salt. 

Genesee Valley Mining Company, Plnmas Connty, 

California. — Copper ore. 

Genessee-Vanderbilt Mining Company, Gnston, Colo- 

orado. — Ore from Yankee Girl Mine. 

Geological Survey, Illinois State, Springfield, Illinois. 

Reports on geology of Illinois. 

Geological Survey, Indiana State. 

Reports, etc., on geology of Indiana. 

Geological Survey, Iowa State, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Geological photographs and measurements. Reports. 

Geological Survey, Kansas State, Lawrence, Kansas. 

Reports upon geology, mining, metallurgy, and mineralogy. 

Geological Survey, Kentucky State, Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. — Reports upon geology, mining, metallurgy, and miner- 
alogy. 

Geological Survey, Maryland State. 

Geological reports, etc. 

Geological Survey, Michigan State, Lansing, Michigan. 

Reports on geology, mining, metallurgy, and mineralogy. 



336 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Geological Snrveyy.New Jersey. 

Reports and maps of geologicsd formations. 

Geological Sunrey, New Tork State, F. T. H. Merrill, 

Director. — Reports on salt, gypsum, clay, road materials, and 
mineral resources. 

Geological Survey, North Carolina State, Cliapel Hill, 

North Carolina. — Reports on geology, mining, metallurgy and 
mineralogy. 

Geological Survey, XT. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Reports on geology, mining, metallurgy and mineralogy. Educa- 
tional series of rocks. 

Geological Survey, West Virginia, Morgantown, West 

Virginia. — Reports on geology, mining, metallurgy, and miner- 
alogy. 

George, D. S. G., Tnlare Connty, California. 

Semi-opal soapstone. 

Georgia Marble Company, Tate, Georgia. 

Marble. 



Get There Mining Company, Prosperity, Missouri. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite, galena, chert, and greenockite. 

Gettys, L. A., Shelby, North Carolina. 

Monazite sand. 

Gilbert, Charles, Carterville, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, crystallized sphalerite. 

Gilberts, A. T., Zem Zem, California. 

Onyx. 

Gilbreth Seam Face Granite Company, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Granite. 

GilfiUan Flagstone Company, Fort Scott, Kansas. 

Flagstone. 

Gillen Stone Company, Velp, Wisconsin. 

Oil-bearing sandstone. 

Gillis, Tim, Eackass Hill Mine, Tuolumne County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz, rich in silver. 

Gilmore, T. T., Beadwood, South Bakota. 

Silver lead ore. 



GROUP XL-CLASS 63. 337 

Oirard, L. If .^ Castella, California. 

Qay. 

Oladding, MoBean & Companyi linooln, Califoniia. 

Qay, for making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Glasgow Western Exploration Company, Goloonda, Ne- 
vada. — Copper ore. 

Gold Coin Company, Hidden Treasure Mine, Oilpin 

County, Colorado.— -Gold and silver ore. 



Gold Coin Company, Indiana Mine, Gilpin Connty, 

Colorado. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 



Golden Gate Mining Company, Golden Gate a»u.»«, 

Tuolumne County, California. — Gold quartz. 



Golden Mines Company, Alabama Mine, Mariposa 

County, California.— -Gold quartz. 

Golden Wedge Mine, Clear Creek Connty, Colorado. 

Silver and copper ore. 

Gold King Mining & Milling Company, Silverton, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Gold King Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite and quartz, $140 per ton ; fluorite and quartz. 

Goodenongh Mining Company, Carterville, Missouri. 

Lead and galena. 

Gopher Gold Mining Company, MoCabe, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Gorman Mining Company, Nevadaville, Colorado. 

Uranium ore. 

Goss, Tobn L., Stonington, Maine. 

Granite. 

Gonvemenr Marble Company, Gonvemenr, New York. 

Marble. 

Grafton Qnarry Company, St. Lonis, Missouri. 

Dolomite. 

Granby Mining & Smelting Company, Granby, Missouri. 

l^ead and zinc ores, galena, and sphalerite. 



338 GROUP Xt.— CLASS 63. 

Grand Central Mining Company, Mammoth, Utah. 

Gold and silver ore, showing free gfold and cerargyrite. 

Grandelmeyer, T., Good Lnok Mine, Nevada. 

Lead and silver, copper and tungsten ore. 

Grand Prize Mining Company, Tnscarora, Nevada. 

Stephanite and ruby silver. 

Graphic Mines & Smelting Works, The, Magdalena, 

New Mexico. — ^Lead ores and fluxes necessary to smelt success- 
fully all ore from this mine. 

Gray, George D., Empire Mine, Sierra Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Great Eastern Qnioksilver Mining Company, Gneme- 

villc, Sonoma County, California. — Mercury ore, cinnabar. 



Great Falls Fire Brick Company, Great lUls, Montana. 

Flint clays. 

Great Western Qnioksilver Mining Company; offlces, 

San Francisco, California. — Mercury ore, cinnabar. 



Green, 0., Padre Mine, Los Angeles Connty, California. 

Gold quartz. 



Green Mountain Mining Company, Green 

Mine, Plumas County, California. — Gold quartz. 

^T^^SSy S* 0., Snows Canon, Nevada. 

Bromide of silver. 

Ore^ry & Company, Carson Biver, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Grier, T. T., Lead, Scnth Dakota. 

Gold quartz taken from each level of the Homestake Mine. 

Griffith, D., Griffith Qnarry, Placer Connty, California. 

Granite. 

Griswold, M., White Mountain Mine, Mono Connty, 

California. — Melanterite. 

Grizzly Bear Mining Company, Onray, Colorado. 

Silver ore. 

Groezinger, W., Esmeralda Connty, Nevada. 
Coal. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 339 

Onilf oyle, P., Poorman, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Ounnell Mudng Companyi Central City, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 

Onrley Inyeftment Company, Montrose County, Colo- 
rado. — Copper ore. 



Development Company, Gwin Spring Mine, Cala- 
veras County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Haile Hining Company, Lanoaster County, Sontli 

Carolina. — Gold concentrates. 

Haines, T. M., Boise, Idaho. 

Copper ore. 

Hall, F. S., Ojai Valley, California. 

Gypsum. 

Hall, T. B., Cherokee Mine, Tuolumne County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz (rich). 

Halrtead Brothers, Plumas County, California. 

Gold quartz (rfch). 

Hanehet, L., Lamartine Mine, Idaho Springs, Colorado. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Hanoock Hining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Hanks, Mrs. W., Contact, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Hardwioke, Tames E., Madison County, North Carolina. 

iCaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Harmon & Mcllroy, Carterville, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite with chert. 

Harris Clay Company, Dillsboro, North Carolina. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 



Hart, J. W., Crystal Mine, Shasta County, Califomia. 

Gold quartz. 

Hart, B. G., Califomia Quicksilver Mine, Tolo County, 

California. — Quicksilver ore. 



340 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Hartke, Tolm T., Elkridgei Maryland. 

Clays, for the manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 



Hartley^ H. H., Exoebdor Hinei Meadow Lake^ Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

HartmaiLi C. T., Birmingliaini Alabama. 

Clay, for the manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Hatoli Hill Bed Slate Works^ Whitehall, New Tork. 

Slate. 



Hatch, B. S.| Tacna Mine, near Tnma, Arizona. 

Mica. 

Hathenbmok, F. W. C, Provo City, Utah. 

Slate. 
Havens, H. B., & Company, Lone Star Mine, Calaveras 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Hawkins, E. M., Denver, Colorado. 

Publication : The Mining World. 

Hayes Brothers, Ashland, Wisconsin. 

Iron ore from Ashland Mines. 



Heald, E. P., Nevada City Mine, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Heikes, Victor C, Boulder, Colorado. 

Gold ore, showing crystals of gold on sphalerite. 

Heim, Fred., Nasby, South Dakota. 

Silver lead ore. 

Heims, Thomas C, & Company, Osceola Mills, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Bituminous coal. 

Henly, George, Henly, Calif omia. 

Sandstone. 

Henrich, Carl, Flat Biver, Missouri. 

Cobalt and nickel ores, with their associated rocks. 

Henry, C, Mining Company, Empire City, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite. 

Hessleton, B. C, Petaluma, California. 

Melanterite. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. Ml 



Eetzel, David B., Newton, New Jersey. 

Slate. 



Heydenf eldt, S., Coso Hine, Inyo Conntyi California. 

Silver ore ; also partzite from Mono County, and clay from Ama- 
dor County. 

Hickey, B., Ormsby, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Hidden Treasure Mining Company, Gilpin County, 

Colorado. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Hill, T. T., Black Oak Mine, Tnolnnme County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Hislop, T. George, Western Florida. 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

Hogan, T., Opkir, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Holmes Mining Company, Candelaria, Nevada. 

Chloride of silver ore. 



Holy Terror Mining Company, Keystone, Soutk Bakota. 

Gold ore. 



Home Mining Company, Star Skaft, Leadville, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore of the tjrpical gray lead sand carbonate showing 
cerargyrite, assaying i,ooo oz. silver and 25 per cent lead. 

Home-Biverside Coal Company, Leavenwortk, Kansas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Homestake Mining Company, Lead, Soutk Bakota. 

Series of ore specimens from the 200 to 800 foot levels. Photo 
graphs. 

Horsfal Mining & Milling Company, Gold Hill, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Hougkton, S. C, Pioneer Hydraulio Mine, Sierra 

County, California. — Gold in cement. 

Hovey, William, Griffltk Mine, Clear Creek County, 

Colorado. — Silver, lead, and copper ore. 

Hoyt, Howard, Hoyt's Granite Quarry, Placer County, 
California. — Granite. 



342 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Hndson & Chester Granite Company, Chester, Massa- 
chusetts. — Granite. 

Hunt & Alexander, Boyal Book Mine, San Bernardino 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Huntington, W. W., Gilman, Eagle Connty, Colorado. 

Gold ore and gray lead sand carbonates. 

Hnsband, W., Gopher Boulder Mine, Plaoerville, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 



Hyde, Henry C, Ponle Mine, Plaoer Connty, California. 

Gold quartz. 

Hydranlio Press Briok Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Fire clay, for manufacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Hymer, T. P., Copper Hill Mine, Nahant, South Dakota. 

Copper ore. 

Ibex Mining Company, Leadville, Colorado. 

Gold, silver, and copper ore, and iron oxide carrying values in gold 
and silver. 

Idaho Mining Company, Idaho Mine, Nevada County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

I. D. Company, Carson, Nevada. 

Soda crystals. 

Illinois Steel Company, Chicago. 

Iron ores. 

Independence Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. — Gold telluride ore. 

Indiana Coal Company, Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Indiana Paving Brick Company, Brazil, Indiana. 

Shale, for manufacture of paving and vitrified brick. 

Ingalls Zinc Company, Newmarket, Tennessee. 

Zinc ore and concentrates. 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Brill Company, New York City. 

Rock drills and gas compressors, track and bar channelers, coal 
cutters, air receivers, and inter and after coolers. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 343 

Integral MiiiiiLg Company, Integral Mine, Trinity 

County, California. — Quicksilver ore. 

Inter-State Coal & Coke Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Inyo Development Company, Inyo County, California. 

Silver ore, soda, borate of lime and magnesia. 

Iowa Briok Company, Bes Moines, Iowa. 

Qay, for the manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Iowa Consolidated Mining Company, Central City, Mis- 
souri. — ^Disseminated zinc ore, lead ore, breccia of sphalerite 
and chert. 

Iowa Gold Mining & Milling Company, Silverton, Colo- 
rado. — Gold, lead, and silver ore. 

Iron Age Fnblisliing Co., New Tork City. 

Publications relative to the iron industry, charts. 



Iron Hill Mining Company, Carbonate, Sontk Bakota. 

Lead ore. 



Iron Silver Mining Company, Moyer Skaft, Leadville, 

Colorado.—Silver and zinc ore, showing different types of ore for 
concentration. 

Irvine, T., San Joaquin Sanok, Orange Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gypsum (alabaster) . 

Isabella Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, fluorite, and oxydized quartz, from 500 and 1,000 foot 
levels, assaying $400 and $20,000 per ton. 

Ivanboe Mining Company, Gilpin Connty, Colorado. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Jackson, 0. A., Snlpbnr Bank, California. 

Sulphur. 

Jackson's New Jersey Brownstone Qnarry, Haledon, 

New Jersey. — Brownstone. 

Jeffrey Mannfactnring Co., Colnmbns, OMo. 

Coal mining machinery, electric generators, mine locomotives, 
conveyors, crushers, and drills. 

Jeffs, L. A., Bockland, MicMgan. 

Crystallized copper. 



344 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

TenldiLBy W. W., San Felioiane Plaoen, California. 

Gold quartz (rich). 

Toointe Mining Company, Humboldt Connty, Iferada. 

Copper ore. 

Tones, Edward, Snlphnr Creek, California. 

Aragonite. 

Tones, T. F., Blaoksbnrg, South Carolina. 

Iron ore, baryta. 



Tohnson, N., Eem Mine, Eem County, California. 

Clay (Fuller's earth). 



Tolmston, T. A., Tolmston's Mine, San Bernardino 

County, California. — Silver ore. 

Tudd, E. 0., Columbia, Nevada. 

Silver ore. 

Tuniper Mining Company, Tuniper Mine, Mariposa 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Tustioe Mining Company, Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Kaolin Company, The, Sharon, Conneotiout. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Eahl, Charles, Cadmus Mine, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz, with pyrite. 

Kanaka Mining Company, Kanaka Mine, Sierra County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Kelley, W., Lyon County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Kemmerer Coal Company, Kemmerer, Wyoming. 

Bituminous coal. 



Kendall Mount Gold & Silver Mining Company, Silver- 
ton, Colorado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Kennedy, Bavid, Centennial Mine, Georgetown, Colo- 
rado.— -Gold, silver, and copper ore.- 

Kennedy Mining Company, Imperial, Nevada. 

Gold ore. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 345 

Kennedy Milling Company, Kennedy Mine, Amador 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Kennedy Hilling & Mining Co., Taokson, Amador 

County, California. — Mine timbering, showing method of timber- 
ing California mines. 

Kentucky Blnestone Company, Freestone, Kentucky. 

Sandstone. 

Kentucky Construction Company, Mayfteld, Kentucky. 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

Kentucky Fluor Spar Company, Crittenden County, 

Kentucky. — Fluor spar, crude and ground. 

Kesseler Brothers, San Francisco, Calif omia. 

Onyx and aragonite. 

Keystone Oold Mining Company, Keystone, Soutk 

Dakota. — Gold ore. 

Keystone Marble Company, Annville, Pennsylvania. 

Marble. 

Keystone Quarries, Pacolet, Soutk Carolina. 

Granite. 



Kicking Horse Mining Company, Black Tail Gulok, 

Deadwood, South Dakota. — Gold ore. 

King, Dr. T. C. E., Salt Lake City, XTtali. 

Copper ore from St. George. 

King Mining Company, The, King of Arizona Mine, 

near Yuma, Arizona. — Gold ore. 

Kirk, W. H., Welcome, Nevada. 

Plumbago. 

Kirtley Tunnel Company, Georgetown, Colorado. 

Sliver and lead ore. 

Kline, T., Esmeralda, Nevada. 

Black metal. 



Klondike Mining Company, Aurora, Missouri. 

Zinc ores, sphalerite and calamine. 

Knapp, S. A., Mountain King, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 



346 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 



Eniglit, TeBse, Humbug Mine, Enreka, Utah. 

Silver and gold ore, and sand carbonate of lead. 



Eniglit, Tolm W., Connolton Mines, Ward, Colorado. 

Tungsten ore. 

Eniglit, Wilbur C, laramie, Wyoming. 

Collection of Wyoming ores. 

Ennz, George Frederick, 11-15 Union Square, New York. 

Original publications. 

Lackawanna Iron & Steel Company, Soranton, Penn- 
sylvania — Iron ore from Tilly Foster Mine. 



Ladd & Clement, Hard Tack Mine, Trinity Connty, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Lake, H. W., Daggett, California. 

Iron ore. 

Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines, Duluth, Min- 
nesota. — Iron ores. 

Lamartine Mining Company, Idaho Springs, Colorado. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 



Larson, A., Euchre Bar Mine, Placer County, California. 

Gold quartz. 

La Sal Copper Mining Company, Cashin, Colorado. 

Copper ore ; i,ooo tons shipped netted $83,000. 



La Sal Mining Company, Bed Chief Mine, Paradox 

Valley, Colorado. — Silver and copper ore. 

Last Bollar Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite, and oxydized quartz. 

Laswell, T. W., Laswell's Mine, San Bernardino County, 

California. — Silver ore. 

La Tosca Mining Company, Oronogo, 

Zinc ore, sphalerite. 

Lawler & Wills, Hillside, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Lawrence, W. T., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Silver and copper ore. 



GROUP XI. CLASS 63. 347 

Lee, T., Caotns Mine, Inyo Connty, California. 

Argentiferous galena. 

• 

LeGrand Qnarry Company, Marslialltown, Iowa. 

Limestone. 

Lehigli Coal Mining Company, Dickinson, North 

Dakota. — Bituminous coal. 

Lemoine, William, Porcupine Mine, Mono County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Lemmon, H. A., Ormsby County, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore, baryta. 

Leonard, P. H., Denver, Colorado. 

Publication : Ores and metals ; devoted to mining. 

Leopold, Natlian P., 102 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

Copper ores, massive and crystallized, from the Michigan Mines. 

Lepper, 0., Ormsby County, Nevada. 

Infusorial earth. 

Leschinske, Bobert, Minerva Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Cemsite. 

Levy, H. M., Mono County, Califomia. 

Silver ore, partzite (oxide antimony) . 

Lexington Coal Mining Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bituminous coal. 

Idlientbal, A., Tuolumne Mine, Tuolumne County, Cali- 
fornia. — Rich gold quartz. 

Lincoln Granite Company, Lincoln Quarry, Placer 

County, California. — Granite. 

Lindsay, W. E., Douglas County, Nevada. 

Antimony. 

linton, W. D., Wadswortb, Nevada. 

Volcanic ash. 

Ijppincott, T. B., Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publications on minerals, chemistry, engineering, etc. 

Idstie ICning Company, Somerset, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 



348 GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 

little Tolm Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

.little, W. P., CMoo Mine, Shasta Connty, California. 

Silver ore. 



Livingston Gold Mining Company, The, Sugar Loaf, 

Boulder County, Colorado. — Gold ore, showing rusty gold. 

Llewellyn, H. H., Hilkboro, Sierra Connty, New Mexieo. 

Lead ore. 

Logan, H. B., Ormsby Connty, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Lone Pine Mining Company, Big Bng Distriot, Arizona. 

Gold, silver, and copper ore. 

Long Dale Mining Company, Long Bale, Virginia. 

Iron ore from Long Dale Mine. 

Long, T., Elko County, Nevada. 

Coal. 

Long Valley Coal Company, Towanda, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Los Angeles Granite & Brownstone Company, Sespa, 

California. — Sandstone. 

Lost Lillie Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite, and galena. 

Lott, C. T., PMlbrook, California. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Lovelocks, G., Cbnroliill Connty, Nevada. 

Nickel and cobalt, marble. 

Lowe, T. H., Cottonwood, Nevada. 

Basalt. 

Lowe, Henry P., Benver, Colorado. 

Free gold ore from the Topeka Mine, Gilpin County, Colorado; 
value of specimen, $i,8oo ; value per ton, $28,000. 

Lower Mammoth Mining Company, Tintio Bistriot, 

Utah. — Gold and arsenical copper ore, with enargite. 

Low Moor Iron Company, Low Moor, Vii^^a. 

Iron ore from Low Moor Mine. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 349 

Jjaot, W. H., Castle Dome Vine, near Tumai Arizona. 

Fluor spar. 

Lucky Oius Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, showing tellurium, fluorite, and quartz, the characteristic 
phonolite ore of the Cripple Creek district. 

Lukens, T. P., Los Angeles Connty, California. 

Soapstone from Santa Calalina Islands. 

Lyons, S. C, & Brothers, Bennington, Vermont 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

KcAlester Coal & Mining Company, Wilbnrton, Indian 

Territory. — Bituminous coal. 

McBride, James H., Caskin, Colorado. 

Copper ore from vein 14 feet wide. 

McCarty, J., Oold Beef Mine, Inyo Connty, California. 

Gold quartz. 

McCoy, James E., Jackson Connty, North Carolina. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

McDonongh, T., Inyo Connty, California. 

Gold quartz. 

McOeoghegan, J., Consumers Copper Mine, Amador 

County, California. — Copper ore. 

McOill Mining Company, J. F. Jones, Blacksbnrg, Sonth 

Carolina. — Gold and iron ore. 

McEinley Mining Company, Carterville, Missouri. 

Lead ore, galena on chert. 

Mclane, Oeorge B., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Lead ore and fluor spar, crude and ground. 

McLean, John B., Washington, D. C. 

Lead ore, sandstone, limestone, fluorite, etc. 

McMahon, Porter & Company, New Cumberland, West 

Virginia. — Fire clay, for manufacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Mabee, Oeorge W., National Mine, Oilpin County, Colo- 
rado. — Gold ore. 

Mahoning Iron & Steel Company, Bibbing, Minnesota. 

Iron ore from Mahoning Mine. 



350 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Maine and New Hampshire Granite Company, Portland, 

Maine. — Granite. 



Bed Oranite Company, Bed Beach, Maine. 

Granite. 

Malones Mining Company, Malones Mine, Tuolumne 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Mammoth Mining & Milling Company, Mammoth Mine, 

Mammoth, Utah. — Gold and copper ore. 

Mandle, I., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Kaolin and ball clay. 

Manhattan Mining Company, Austin, Nevada. 

Gold and silver ore, ruby silver ore. 

Mann, T. B., Logan Mine, Crisman, Colorado. 

Gold ore, showing free gold and roscoelite. 

Marion Improvement Company, Demming, North 

Carolina. — Monazite sand. 

Marion Mining Company, Oalena, Nevada. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Martha Washington Mining Company, Silver City, 

Utah. — Silver ore. 

Martine, C. E., McClellan Mine, Oeorgetown, Colorado. 

Silver ore, showing mineral polybasite. 

Maryland Coal Company, Lonaooning, Maryland. 

Bituminous coal. 

Mary McEinney Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. — Gold telluride ore, showing tellurium, fluorite, and quartz. 
Assays from $200 to $1,000 gold per ton. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Minerals of the oxygen salts of Dana's Classification. 
Collected by W. O. Crosby. 

Mathews, H. H., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Slate from Vermont and New York. 

Maxwell Land Grant Company, Baton, New Mexioo. 

Gold in nuggets and dust. 



GROUP X1.--CLASS 63. 351 

Kayer, L. W., Mount Cliff, California. 

Clay. 

Mayhngh, J. S., Elko County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Mead, William, Hillsboro, Sierra Connty, Hew Mexico. 

Lead ore. 

Melvina Mining Company, Salina, Colorado. 

Telluride ore. 

V 

Menomonee Hydraulic Press Brick Company, Men- 

omonee, Wisconsin. — Qay, for making brick. 

Merriam, Dr. A. F., Babbit Creek, California. 

Model of gold nugget, value $614.00. 

Metich, J., Cave City Mine, Calaveras Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Michigan Mining Company, Bay City, Michigan. 

Bituminous coal. 

Michigan School of Mines, Houghton, Michigan. 

Collection of native elements, occurring in the United States; 
collected by H. T. Mercer. 

Midas Gh)ld Mining & Milling Co., Deep Creek, TTtah. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Migman, Berryman & Ford, Ward, Colorado. 

Gold ore, iron P3rrite. 



Milford Pink Granite Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Granite. 

MUl Creek Coal & Coke Company, Coopers, West Vir- 
ginia. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Millner, J., Indian Queen Mine, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Milwaukee Cement Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Cement. 

Mine Hill Quarry Company, Bozbury Station, Con- 
necticut. — Granite. 

Mine Hill Mining Company, Bumsville, North Carolina. 

Chromic iron. 



352 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Mine la Hotte Mining Company, Mine la Motte, Mii- 

souri. — Lead and nickel ores and furnace products. This 
mine has been worked continuously for 200 years. 

Minnesota Iron Company, Sondan, Minnesota. 

Iron ores. 

Minnesota Mining Company, 19 Congress Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Native copper. 

Minnesota Sandstone Company, Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota. — Sandstone. 

Mirabel Standard Mining Company, Mirabel Mine, Lake 

County, California. — Quicksilver ore. 

Missouri Granite Company, St. Lonis, Missouri 

Granite. 

Mitohell, Charles, Howard Hill, California. 

Scheelite. 

Mittallbnry Coal & Coke Company, Mittallbnry^ West 

Virginia. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Modesti & Avila, Colorado Mine, Tnma County, Arisona. 

Galena. 

MoUie Gibson Consolidated Mining Company, Aspen, Colo- 
rado. — Native silver ; largest mass ever mined ; value, $3>ooo. 

Monongahela Biver Consolidated Coal & Coke Company, 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Monson Maine Slate Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Slate. 

Montana Coal & Coke Company, Pkirmont, West Vir- 
ginia. — ^Bituminous coal, coke. 

Montana Coal & Coke Company, Horr, Montana. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Monte Cristo Mining Company, Galena, Kansas. 

Zinc ore, greenockite on smithsonite. 

Moonshine Mining Company, Granby, Missouri 

Zinc ore, crystallized calamine, smithsonite, and sphalerite. 

Morgan, D. W. C, Star Light Mine, El Dorado County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 



^ 



GROUP XL-CLASS 63. 353 

KoTgan Milling Company, Canon CitjTi Hevada. 

Copper sulphate. 

Korning Star Mining Company, Ward, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 



Morning Star Mining Company, Morning Star Mine, 

Alpine County, California. — Silver ore (enargite). 

Morrell, J. A«, Cedarberg Mine, El Dorado County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Morrifldale Coal Company, FhiladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Morriflon, E. A., Petersburg, Virginia. 

Fire clay, for mai)iifacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Morris Bnn Coal Company, Coming, Hew York. 

Bituminous coal. 

Morse, H., Viotorine District, Nevada. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Moss, Jerome, Orover, North Carolina. 

Qay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Mountain Copper Company, Shasta Connty, California. 

Refiners' products, copper matte and moss, copper bar, copper ore. 

Mountaineer Mining Company, Mountaineer Mine, 

Nevada County, California. — Gold quartz. 



Mount Airy Granite Quarries, Mount Airy, North Caro- 
lina. — Granite. 

Mount Carbon Coal Company, Powellton, West Vii^nia. 

Bituminous coal. 

Mountf ord, Elijah, South Amboy, New Jersey. 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

Mount Copper Company, Lost Confidence Mine, Shasta 

County, California. — Limonite. 



Mount Diablo Mining Company, Mount Diablo, Nevada. 

Black metal. 

Mount Hope Mine, Humbug, Arizona. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 



354 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

House Biver Lignite Coal Company, Burlington, North 

Dakota. — Bituminous coal. 

Hoyer, J. S., & Company, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Straight and curved slates. 

Hurdock, William A., Norwegian Mine, Tuolumne 

County, California. — Gold quartz (rich). 

Murphy, Arthur, Marguerite Mine, Milf ord, TTtah. 

Copper ore. 

Murphy, F. M., Castle Creek, Arizona. 

Manganese ore. 

Muscovite Mica Company, Auditorium Building, Chi- 
cago. — Fine quality of mica from Idaho. 

Myles Salt Company, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Salt. 

National Bank of Commerce, Seattle, Washington. 

Gold nuggets. 

National Lead Company, St. Louis, Mibouri. 

Lead ore, galena. 

National Nickel Company, Churchill, Nevada. 

Nickel and cobalt; also annabergite and nicolite from Table Moun 
tain. * 

National Steel Company, Chicago. 

Iron ore from Champion Mine. 

Neff, J. H., Penryn, California. 

Granite. 

Neidy, J., Aurora, Nevada. 

Gold ore, obsidian. 

Neodesha Mining Company, Ouray, Colorado. 

Silver ore, showing stephanite. 

Nesbit, J. S., Spring Valley Mine, Butte County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Nettie Mining Company, Griffith Mine, Georgetown, 

Colorado. — Silver and lead ore. 

Nevada & Boston Company, Lyon County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 355 



Hevada CommiBiion to Paris Exposition, Carson City, 

Nevada. — Collective exhibit of Nevada minerals. 

CONTRIBUTORS : 

Aluminium Lustre Co., Esmeralda Co. — Diatomaceou^ earth. 

Eagle Mining Company, Eagle Mine. — Gold ore. 

Fish. G., Ida Mine. — Silver ore. 

Hadley, T. J., Arizona Mine. — Silver and gold ore. 

Hilp, S., Joanna Mine. — Gold ore. 

Hogan, J. W., Wall Street Mine. — Copper ore. 

Ingalls, W., Esmeralda County. — Coal. 

Keystone Mining Company, Keystone Mine. — Gold ore. 

Lang, J., Elko County. — Coal. 

Murphy & Eggers, Bullion Mine. — Copper and silver ore. 

Roberts, G., Pine Mountain. — Lead ore. 

Roberts, S. P., Black Jack. — Gold and silver ore. 

Nevada, State of. 

Collection of minerals representing the resources of the state, 
collected by J. A. Yerington, H. B. Maxson, and W. J. Dooley. 

Hew Almaden Quicksilver Mining Company, New 

Almaden, California. — Glass model of mine; wood model self- 
closing doon Iron floating on quicksilver. 

Newcomb, B. M., Napa Consolidated Mine, Napa Connty, 

California. — Quicksilver ore. 

New Bonderberg Mining Company, Silver Plnme, Colo- 
rado. — Silver and lead ore. 

New England Brown Stone Company, Cromwell, Con- 
necticut. — Brownstone. 

New England 4hts & Coke Company, The, Everett, 

Massachusetts. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Newhonse & Weir, Dragon Mine, Silver City, Utah. 

Gold and silver ore. 

New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company, Tres Pinos, 

San Benito County, California. — Mercury ore, cinnabar. 

New Jersey Zinc Company, Franklin Pnmace, New Jer- 
sey. — Zinc ore, manganese, millemite, franklinite. 

New Sapphire Syndicate, Great Falls, Montana. 

Oriental sapphires, in the rough. 

New Salt & Borax Company, Bhodes, Nevada. 

Borax, borate of lime. 



356 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Newsboy Hining Company, Oniay, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

Newton, E. A., Hanover Minei Fresno County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

New York & Sosendale Cement Company, inster 

County, New York. — Light cement rock. 

New York State Hnsenm, Albany, New Totk. 

Geological reports. 

Niagara Mining Company, Niagara Mine, Trinity 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Nichols, H. W., Chicago. 

Zinc ores from Arkansas ; zinc and lead ores from Wisconsin. 

Nisi Prins Mining Company, Leadville, Colorado. 

Hard carbonate lead ore. 

Nix, C. E., Onray, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore, assaying i,ooo oz. silver to the ton. 

Nixon, 0., Winnemncca, Nevada. 

Refined sulphur. 

Noble, William, Enreka Mine, San Diego Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz (assays $2,000 per ton). 

Noon, A. A., Enreka, Utah. 

Kaolin. 

Norcross Brothers, Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Marble, granite, and sandstone. « 

North Bloomfield Oravel Company, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Model of the largest gold bar ever cast, representing 
one month's run. 

North Carolina Board of Agricnltnre, Baleigh, North 

Carolina. — Gold nuggets. 

CONTRIBUTORS : 

Bunnell Mountain Mine, Montgomery County. 

Caldwell County. 

Dry Hollow Mine, Montgomery County. 

Eldorado Township, Montgomery County. 

Gold Hill Mine, Rowan County. 

Miller Mine, Rowan County. 

Montgomery County — various placer mines. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 357 

Nugget Mine, Cabarrus County. 
Parker Mine, Stanley County. 
Ramslcn Mine, Gaston County. 
Redding Mine, Moore County. 
Smitherman Mine, Montgomery County. 

Horth Carolina Paris Commission, Baleigh, North Caro- 

lina.---Collection of ores, representing the mineral wealth of North 
Carohna. 

CONTRIBUTORS : 

^}|5«P» E. A., Brevard.— Auriferous sulphides. 
Aldnch, M., Washington, District of Columbia.— Auriferous 
hraonite. 

Aldrich Mining Co., Salisbury.— Free milling gold ore. 

American Mills Mining Co., Mecklenburg County.— Chalcopy- 
nte. 

American Mining Co., Cabarrus County.— Chalcopjrrite. 

Ames, M., Charlotte. — Auriferous pyrite. 

Anderson Mining Co., Salisbury.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Ballow & Gentry, JeflFerson, Ashe County.— Magnetite (man- 
ganiferous). 

Bates, J. G., Franklin.— Hematite. 

Bessemer Mining Co., Bessemer City.— Limonite. 

Blue Wing Mining Co., Granville County.— Bornitc, copper, 
malachite. 

Bost, Charles, Cabarrus County. — ^Auriferous sulphides. 
Bost, Martin, Cabarrus County. — Auriferous sulphides. 
Boyleston Gold Mining Co., Henderson County. — Free milling 
ore. 

Brimley, H. H., Raleigh, Ashe County.— Magnetite. 

Bruner, T. K,, Raleigh, Gaston County. — Magnetite. 

Buckley, W. F., Rowan County. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Campbell, J. C. Moore County. — Azurite and malachite. 

Carson, J. H., Charlotte. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Cheek Mining Co., Chatham County.— Bornite with malachite. 

Childers, William, Grimley's. — Limonite. 

Clayton Bros., Davidson County. — Auriferous pyrite, limonite. 

Clegg Mining Co., Chatham County. — Chalcopyrite, azurite, 
malachite. 

Counder, Eli, Indian Trail. — Auriferous sulphides and carbon- 
ates. 

Cowie Creek Mining Co., Macon County. — Argentiferous py- 
rite, galenite. 

Cranberry Iron & Coal Co., Cranberry, Mitchell County. — Mag- 
netite. 

Crowell, M. E., Indian Trail. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Deaton, J. M., Swinton. — Free milling gold ore. 

Deep River Mining Co., Greensboro. — ^Auriferous sulphides. 

Dixon Mining Co., Yadkin County. — Malachite, chalcopyrite. 

Dortch, H. P., Junior, Raleigh.— Hematite. 

Douglass, M., Dunn.— Hematite (manganiferous). 



r 



358 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Dunn's Mountain Mining Co.. Salisbury. — Auriferous sul- 
phides. 

Eames, R., Junior, Ashe County.— Malachite, bornitc. chalcopy- 
rite, copper. 

Fagg, M., Danbury. Sti)kes County. — Magnetite. 

Finch, J. W., & Co., Davidson County.— Argentiferous sul- 
phides. 

Fuller, Dr. A., Jones.— Free milling gold ore 

Furr, Dr. S., Cabarrus County.— Auriferous sulphurets. 

Gillis Mining Co., Person County.— Chalcocite, malachite, bor- 

nite. 

Goggins, George, Eldorado.— Free milling gold ore. 

Graham, W. A., Lincoln County.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Graybeal, Joseph, Jefferson.— Magnetite. 

Greensboro Iron & Steel Co., Greensboro.— Hematite. 

Griffin, J. W., Monroe.— Auriferous limonite. 

Gullowhee Mining Co., Jackson County.— Malachite in limonite. 

Hanks Iron Property, Murphy.— Limonite. 

Hanna, George B., Charlotte.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Harris, J. F., Thomasville.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Hauser, Henry, Lincolnton.— Pyrolusite. 

Hedrick, M. L., Davidson County.— Auriferous sulphides 

Hoke, General R. F., Raleigh.— Hematite (martite schist). 

Holmes, J. A., Chapel Hill.— Chromite. . 

Honeycut, D. W., Gold Hill.— Hacer alluvial dirt. 

Hoover Hill Company, Ltd., Randolph County.-Free milling 

^^^Is^hour, George W., Gold Hill.— Free milling ore. 

Jones. Milton, Eldorado.-Free gold m sulphides and slate. 
Justice, John, Plumtree.— Red hematite. 

Kesler, J. W.. Garfield.-Free "^i"V"/i^''i'^.r;« clnf^ 

Kluttz & Peck. Cabarrus County -Malachite m slate. 

Lawton, Charles L., Bessemer City.— Magnetite. 

L^S L v., Brooklyn, New York.-Auriferous sulphides. 

Link-Benedict Mining Co., Iron Station.— Magnetite. 

McDowell. Manly, Morganton.— Limonite. 

McMackin Mining Co., ^alisbury^ Auriferous pyritic slate. 

Mann, Charles G.T High Point.-Gold bearmg gravel. 

Miller, C. A., Eli.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Mills, J. C, Burke County -Auriferous gravel. 

Monroe, J. L., Swinton.— Free milhng gold ore. 

Morse Mining Co., Murphy.— Limonite. 

Muffley, J. R.. Eldorado.— Auriferous sulphides. 

Newman T. J., Rowan County.— Auriferous copper ore. 

^IZmln W G., Salisbury. -Auriferous sulphides in slate. 

North CaVolina Agricultural Dept Wilkes County.-Sdver ore. 

North Carolina Steel & Iron Co., Greensboro.--Limomte. 

Nussman Mining Co., Cabarrus County.-Aunferous chalcopy- 

bddy. Thomas, Salisbury .--Auriferous sulphides. 
Palmer, Robert, Guildford County.-Aunferous sulphides. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 359 

Parrott & Armstrong, King's Mountain, Gaston County. — 
Magnetite. 

Parton, George, Burningtown. — Limonite (manganiferous). 

Patterson, S. L., Raleigh. — Psilomelane. 

Perkins Mining Co., Caldwell County. — Auriferous sulphides, 
limonite. 

Peters, J. F., Davidson County. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Pharr Mining Co., Cabarrus County. — Chalcopyrite. 

Phoenix Mining Co., Cabarrus County. — Auriferous pyrite. 

Pitcher, Captain A.. Charlotte. — Auriferous suli)hides. 

Plummer, J. R., & Co., Jones. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Pratt, J. H., Chapel Hill.— Chromite. 

Randleman, J. L., Salisbury. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Ray, G. D., Burnsville. — Chromite. 

Reed Mining Co., Cabarrus County. — Chalcopyrite and mala- 
chite. 

Redding, Dr. A. H., Cedar Falls. — Free milling ore. 

Reynolds, J. R. & A. S.^.Winston, Forsyth County. — Magnetite. 

Rives, Miss Lucy. Raleigh. — Magnetite. 

Roan Mountain Iron & Steel Co., Bakersville. — Specular hema- 
tite. 

Rogers, M., Danbury. — Magnetite. 

Russell Gold Mining Co., Glenbrook. — Free milling gold ore. 

Russell, Nelson, Eldorado. — Free milling gold ore. 

Sanders, Tobe, Eldorado. — Free milling gold ore. 

Seacrest, L. M., Indian Trail. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Shipletts Mining Co.. Shipletts. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Silver Mining Co., Davidson County. — Argentiferous sulphides. 

Smart Mining Co., Union County. — Argentiferous galena. 

Smith, A. W. S., Charlotte. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Smith, H. M., Cabarrus County. — Auriferous copper ore. 

Southern Belle Mining Co., Salisbury. — Auriferous limonite. 

Stanley Freehold Mining Co., Stanley County. — Free gold in 
quartz. 

Stanlev, Isaac, Guildford County. — Chalcopyrite and pyrite. 

Tarbcfl, S. H., Indian Trail. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Thayer, N. M., Eldorado. — Free milling and sulphide ore. 

Theis, M., Concord. — Free milling gold ore. 

Thing, C. C, Indian .Trail. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Tierman, Mrs. J. M., Rowan County. — Argentiferous galena. 

Tomlinson, Dr. J. M., Rosedale. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Toneotta Iron Co., Murphy. — Limonite. 

Troutman Mining Co., Rowan County. — Argentiferous sul- 
phides. 

Union Mining Co., Cabarrus County. — Chalcopyrite, malachite, 
limonite. 

Valleytown Mining Co., Murphy. — ^Limonite. 

Viele, C. G., Rowan County. — Auriferous sulphides. 

Warren, S. J., Charlotte. — Auriferous pyrite. 

Welborn Mining Co., Davidson County. — Argentiferous galena, 
pyrite. 



r 



1 



360 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

West Prussian Mining Co., Davidson County. — Silver ores, 
sulphides. 

Widenhouse Mining Co., Cabarrus County. — Free milling ores. 
Wilcox, W. C, Carthage. — Free milling gold ore. 
Wilkes, John, Mecklenburg County. — Auriferous sulphides. 
Wilkins, J., & Co., Davidson County. — ^Auriferous sulphides. 
Williams, Mrs. W., Gold Knob. — Auriferous sulphides. 
Wilson Mining Co., Wilson's Mills. — Limonite. 
Yoke, A. J., Weldon. — Auriferous limonite. 
Yountz, J. L., Indian TraiL^-Auriferous g^lenite. 

North Carolina State Hiueum, Baleigh, North Carolina. 

Collection of unpolished gems. 

North Empire Mining Company, Empire City, Kansas. 

Lead ore, crystals of galena. 

Northern Coal Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Bituminous coal. 

Northern Michigan Marble Company, Foster City, Mich- 
igan. — Marble. 



Northern Pacific Coal Company, Taooma, Washington. 

Bituminous coal. 

North Monson Maine Slate Company, Worcester, Mass- 
achusetts. — Slate. 

North Star Mining Company, North Star Mine, Shasta 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

North Star Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Norton, C. S., Bine Stone Company, Bedford, Indiana. 

Limestone. 

Notla Consolidated Marble, Iron & Talc Company, Kin- 

sey. North Carolina. — Marble. 

Cakes Mining Company, Cove Spring, Kansas. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite, and galena. 

Oak Hill Mining Company, Chatham Connty, North 

Carolina. — Iron ore. 

O'Connor, Con., Bockland, California. 

Granite. 

Ohio Fire Brick Company, Oak Hill, Ohio. 

Flint clays. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 361 

Oil Well Supply Company, Pittsburg, Fennsylvania. 

Oil well machinery in operation ; tools and supplies. 

Old Dominion Copper Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mines at Globe, Arizona. — Copper pseudomorph after cuprite. 

Old Dominion Mining Company, Coville, WasMngton. 

Silver ore, with cerargyrite and bromyrite. 

Old Jordon & Galena Mining Company, Bingham, Utah. 

Gold and copper ore. 

Oleta Marble Company, Oleta Marble Quarry, Amador 

County, California. — Marble. 

Oliver, Dave, Bonanza Mine, Tnolnmne County, Cali- 
fornia. — Hessite and free gold. 

Oliver Iron Mining Company, Milwaukee, Wisoonsin. 

Iron ores. 

Omaha & Grant Smelting Company, Smuggler Mine, 

Aspen, Colorado. — Lead and silver ore. 

Ontario & Western Bailway Company, New York City. 

Anthracite coal. 

Ontario Silver Mining Company, Ontario Mine, Park 

City, Utah. — Silver and lead ores. This mine has paid $40,000,000 
in dividends. 

Ophir Mining Company, Comstock, Nevada. 
Sufphurets. 

Oregon Coal & Navigation Company, San Francisco, 

California. — Bituminous coal. 

Oregon Improvement Company, Seattle, Washington. 

Bituminous coal. 

Ore Knob Mining Company, Oold Hill, North Carolina. 

Copper ore. 

Oro Bella Mining Company, Oro Bella, Arizona. 

Gold ore. 

Orton, Edward, Junior, Columbus, Ohio. 

Publications on geology. 

Osborne, Seager & Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 



362 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Oskaloosa Coal Company, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Bituminous coal. 

Overland Mining & Milling Company, Sunshine, TTtah. 

Gold ore, with orpiment and cinnabar. 

Ozark Mining Company, Galena, Kansas. 

Lead ore, galena, and chert. 

Pacific Coast Borax Company, Mojave Desert, California. 

Borax. 

Pacific Coast Borax Company, San Francisco, California. 

Borax, crude and prepared. 

Pacific Copper Company, Esmeralda County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Pahannes, Captain Isaac, Boyal Snlphnr Mine, near 

Yuma, Arizona. — Sulphur and alum. 

Parfet, 0. W., Gtolden, Colorado. 

Clay, for manufacture of stoneware, etc. 

Parke County Coal Company, Bosedale, Indiana. 

Bituminous coal. 

Parks, S. P., Amador, California. 

Marble. 

Parrett, J., Bonanza Mine, Mono County, California. 

Gold quartz. 

Parrot Silver & Copper Company, Butte, Montana. 

Copper and silver ores, mattes, by-products, etc. 

Parry, E. L., & Sons, Manti, TTtali. 

Sandstone and limestone. 

Parry, B., Washoe County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Patterson, C. W., Lyon County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Patton Coal Company, Patton, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Pearce, Bichard, Manager, Boston & Colorado Smelting 

and Refining Co., Denver, Colorado. — Ores treated at the Argo 
Smelter, Argo, Colorado. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 363 

Pelican Dives Mining Company, Oeorgetown, Colorado. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Penn Mining Company, Favorite Mine, Lynx Creek, 

Arizona. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Pennsylvania Coal Company, New York City. 

Anthracite coal. ' 

Pennsylvania Bailroad Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Anthracite coal. 

Penrod, E., Elko Connty, Nevada. 

Gold ore. 

Penrose Home Mining Company, Leadville, Colorado. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Penrose, B. A. F., Pearce, Arizona. 

Silver, showing cerargyrite. 

Perfnmo, P. B., Perfnmo Banch, San Luis Obispo Coun- 
ty, California. — Limonite. 

Perkins Company, The, New York City. 

Bituminous coal. 

Perry, Mathews & Buskirk, Bedford, Indiana. 

Limestone. 

Perth Amboy Terra Cotta Company, Perth Amboy, New 

Jersey. — Qay, for making brick, with bricklet. 

Pettinos Brothers, Byers, Pennsylvania. 

Graphite. 



Pewabic Mining Company, Iron Mountain, Wisconsin. 

Iron ore from Pewabic Mines. 

Peyton, Oill S., Picnic Mine, Silver City, TTtah. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Phal, Bichard, Piatt & Oilson Mine, Tuolumne County, 

California. — Gold quartz (rich). 



Pharmacist Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, fluorite, and quartz, $ioo gold per ton. 

Pierce, John, 6 Beekman St., New Tork City. 

Polished red granite columns utilized in construction of facade of 
U. S. mining exhibit. 



364 GROUP XL—CLASS 63. 

Fierce, T. Y., Cherokee County, Kansas. 

Collective exhibit of lead and zinc ores. 

Pigeon Boost Belt, Lnmpkin Connty, Georgia. 

Gold ore. 

Pike Manufacturing Company, Pike station, Hew 

Hampshire. — Whetstone of all kinds. 

Pilgrim Mining Company, Cave Spring, Missouri. 

Zinc ore from soft ground, calamine, and concentrates. Concen- 
trates 63 per cent zinc. 

Pinnacle Gold Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. — Gold ore, phonolite, and basalt, from $20 to $2,000 per ton 
in gold. 

Pittsburg & Wheeling Coal Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Pittsburg & Lake Angeline Mining Company, Mar- 
quette, Michigan. — Iron ore from Lake Angeline. 

Pittsburg Coal Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Pittsburg Coal Mining Company, Somersville, Califor- 
nia. — Bituminous coal. 

Pittsburg Crushed Steel Company, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Polishing substances, crushed steel, and steel emery. 

Place, 0. P., Buckeye Mine, Bradshaw Mountains, Ari- 
zona. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Placerville Gold Mining Company, Bosebud Mine, El 

Dorado County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Plastic Kaolin Company, The, Edg^ar, Florida. 

Ball clay, accompanied by example in bricklet form. 

Piatt Pressed Brick Company, Van Meter, Iowa. 

Fire clays, for manufacture of fire brick, tiles, etc. 

Pleasant Biver Granite Company, Portland, Maine. 

Granite. 

Pleasant Valley Coal Company, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Bituminous coal. 



^ 



GROUP XI.—CLASS 63. 365 

Flymoutli Consolidated Mining Company, Flymontli 

Mine, Amador County, California. — Gold quartz (from a 
chute that yielded $10,000,000). 

Pomona Terra Cotta Company, Pomona, North Carolina. 

Shale, for manufacture of paving and vitrified brick. 

Poole Brothers Publishing Company, Chicago. 

Mining Directory and Reference book. 

Poole's Granite & Marble Company, Flmton, Massachu- 
setts. — Granite. 

Polar Star Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Porter, Charles M., Toplin, Missouri. 

Lead ore, galena. 

Portland Cement Company, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Crude and prepared cement. 

Portland Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, including the rare sylvanite of that district. 

Poston, C. L., & Company, Nelsonville, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Prairie Creek Coal Company, Huntington, Arkansas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Pratt, A. C, Bed Canon, Nevada. 

Lead, silver, and iron ore. 

Prescott Mining Exchange, Prescott, Yavapai County, 

Arizona. — Gold, silver, lead, and copper ore. 

Preston, E. B., Evening Star Mine, Hayden Hill, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz, anglesite, aragonite, calcjtes, molybdenite, 
coal. 

Pridgeon, D. E., Salem, Ohio. 

Clay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Princeton TTniversity, Princeton, New Jersey. 

Collection of minerals of the oxide group, occurring in the United 
States, by E. R. Hewitt. 

Providence Gold Mining Company, Providence Mine, 

Nevada County, California. — Gold quartz, assaying $1,200 per ton. 



366 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Pulaski Iron Comply, Pulaski, Virg^inia. 

Iron and zinc ore, limonite, hematite, and zinc accretions from 
stack of furnace. 

Pnrington Paving Brick Company, Oalesbnrg, Illinois. 

Shale for making paving and vitrified brick. 

Putnam's, 0. P., Sons, New Tork City. 

Publications on geology, mining, metallurgy, and mineralogy. 

Pyle, D. M., St. Elmo Mine, Eem County, California. 

Gold quartz (rich — assays $i,ooo per ton). 

Pyramid Mining Company, Pyramid Mine, El Dorado 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Queen County Stoneware Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Stoneware clay, for manufacture of stoneware, etc. 

(luicksilver Mining Company, New Almaden, Santa 

Clara County, California. — Mercury ore, cinnabar. 

ttuincy Mining Company, Hancock, MicMgan. 

Copper rock. 

Bainbow Mining Company, Sierra County, California. 

Arsenical pyrite; silver ore from Inyo County. 

Rand Drill Company, New York City. 

Rock drills for mine and quarry work, air compressors, prospect 
ing and core drills. 

Randolph, B. S., Frostburg, Maryland. 

Sandstone. 

Rangel, Robert, Henly, California. 

Sandstone. 

Ranlett, Captain, Calaveras County, California. 

Copper ore. 

Raton Coal & Coke Company, Raton, New Mexico. 

Bituminous coal. 

Raycraft, £., Douglas County, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Raymond Granite Company, Raymond Granite ttuarry, 

Madeira County, California. — Granite. 



^ 



GROUP XI. -CLASS 63. 367 

Xaymondy H.y Star Mine, Fresno County, California. 

Silver ore. 

Sayinond & Ely, Ely, Nevada. 

Silver ore. 

Beardon, Oeorge W., Ward, Colorado. 

Iron ore. 

Bed TTmbrella Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. — Gold ore. basalt, and quartz, assaying from $20 to $40 per 
ton gold. 

Bedway, T. W., Los Angeles County, California. 

Vivianite, siderite. 

Beed, A. T., Blue Bird Mine, Nevada. 

Copper ore. 

Beed, C, Diamond, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Beed, C. F., Gold Blossom Mine, Flaoer County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Beed, H. W., Ouray, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

Beeves, C. F., Suisun, Solano County, California. 

Sandstone. 

Beid, I. H., TTnion Mine, Calaveras County, California. 

Azurite (rich). 

Beims, Thomas C, & Company, Osceola Mills, Fennsyl- 

vania. — Bituminous coal, 

Beinhold, H., & Company, Custer, South Dakota. 

Spodumene, shipping 1,000 tons to Germany for extraction of 
lithia. 

Bend, W. F., & Company, Chicago. 

Bituminous coal. 

Bepublic Iron & Steel Company, Chicago. 

Iron ore. 

Bepublic Mining Company, Bepublic, Michigan. 

Iron ore from Republic Mine. 



368 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Bepublio Mining & Manufacturing Company, Book 

Run, Alabama. — Bauxite. 

Shode Island Granite Works, Westerly, Bkode Island. 

Granite. 

Rhode Island OrapMte Company, Arlington, Shode 

Island. — Graphite. 

Bkodes, £. & D., Lincoln Connty, North Carolina. 

Potter's clay, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Rhodes, M. 0., Aetna Mines, Napa Connty, California. 

Quicksilver ore, cinnabar. 

Bhopeter, George, Lone Fine Mine, Big Bug District, 

Arizona. — Copper ore. 

Bichardson, T. M., Star of the West Mine, Calaveras 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Bichards, T., Sheridan Mine, Calaveras Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Azurite. 

Bich Hill Coal & Mining Company, St. Louis, Missonri. 

Bituminous coal. 

Bichmond Consolidated Mining Company, Bichmond, 

Nevada. — Lead and silver ore. 

Richmond Mining & Milling Company, Salina, Boulder 

County, Colorado. — Gold ore, showing petzite. 

Bichmond Mining Company, Carterville, Missonri. 

Zinc and lead ores, sphalerite and galena. 

Bickard, Forbes, Seventy Six Mine, Gilpin Connty, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Rider, F. S., Rico, Colorado. 

Collection of the Enterprise ores. 

Ridgway Bnrton Company, Massillon, Ohio. 

Bituminous coal. 

Ridgway Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Rittenhonse, N. M., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Clay, for manufacture of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 



^ 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 369 

Kivenide Iron Works, Wheeling, West Virginia. 

Bituminous coal. 

Boach, Tames, Tnokahoe, Hissonri. 

Zinc ore, sphalerite in clay. 

Boaoh, Thomas, Yavapai Connty, Arizona. 

Gold quartz. 

Boberts, P. Z., North Star Mine, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Sobins Conveying Belt Company, Park Bow Buildings, New 

York City .—-Operating belt conveyors for handling ore, coal, and 
tailings in smelters, cyanide works, and concentrating plants. 

Bobinson Mining Company, Mammoth, TTtah. 

Silver, lead, and copper ore. 

Bochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punzsu- 

tawney, Pennsylvania. — Bituminous coal. 

BockhiU Iron & Coal Company, Bock Hill Furnace, 

Pennsylvania, — Bituminous coal. 

Bocklind Quarry Company, Bocklind Quarry, Placer 

County, California. — Granite. 

Bockport Granite Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Granite. 

Bocky Ford Coal Company, Bed Lodge, Montana. 

Bituminous coal. 

Bock Biver Brownstone Company, Bay City, Michigan. 

Sandstone. 

Bocky Point Granite Works, Exeter, Tulare County, 

California. — Granite. 

Boeder, Henry, New Whatcom, Washington. 

Sandstone. 

Bogers, Brown & Company, 71 Broadway, New Tork 

City. — ^Raw materials used in the manufacture of pig iron. 

Bogers Mining Company, Stokes County, North Caro- 
lina. — Iron ore. 

Bogers, Mrs. L. S., Hem County, California. 

Ingot of antimony. 



370 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Sogers, 0. T., Granite Company^ Qmncy, Massachusetts. 

Granite. 

^hwery Oeorge, lewis Mine, Tellnride, Colorado. 

Silver, gold, and lead ore. 

Somer Mining Company, Easton, Pennsylvania. 

Iron ore from Richards Mine. 

Romona Oolitic Stone Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Limestone. 

Sosenheimer, Tohn, Cedar Lake Park, Wisconsin. 

Clay, for^ making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Bosenthal, T., Empire City, Kansas. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite and galena. 

Sosiclaire Mining Company, Sosiclaire, Illinois. 

Lead ore, sandstone, limestone, fluorite, etc. 

Bnckel, A. D., & Son, White Hall, Illinois. 

Stoneware clay, for the manufacture of stoneware, etc. 

Bnssell, 0., Elko, Nevada. 

Mineral soap. 

Bnssell Mining Company, Potosi, Washington Connty, 

Missouri. — Lead ore, galena. 

3t. Anthony Mining & Milling Company, Snnset, Bonlder 

County, Colorado. — Gold and copper ore. 

St. Bernard Coal Company, Earlington, Kentucky. 

Bituminous coal. 

St. Toe Lead Company, The, Bonne Terre, Missouri. 

Lead ores, limestone, etc. 

St. Toe lead Company, St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Lead ore, galena, and concentrates. 

St. Louis Well Machine & Tool Company, St. Louis, 

Missouri. — Well-drilling machine in operation. 

Sagamore Coal Company, Sagamore, Michigan. 

Bituminous coal. 

Salisbury Mining & Milling Company, Idaho Springs, 

Colorado. — Gold and silver ore, showing bornitc. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 371 

Salmon Biver Mining Company, Contact, Nevada. 

G>ppcr ore. 

Salt Lake City Onjrx Company, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Onyx. 

Salt Lake Coal Company, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Bittiminous coal. 

Sanf ord, Albert B., Oriffith Mine, Clear Creek Connty, 

Colorado. — Silver, lead, copper, and iron ore. 

San Benito Mining Company, New Idria Mine, San 

Benito County, California. — Quicksilver ore, cinnabar. 

Sanderson, F., Biddies, Oregon. 

Nickel ore, genthite. 

San Diego Marble Company, San Diego Marble ttnarry, 

San Diego County, California. — Marble. 

San Fernando Company, San Fernando, Los Angeles 

County, California. — Sandstone. 

San Francisco & San Toaqnin Coal Company, San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Bituminous coal. 

San Francisco Slate Company, Placer Connty, Califor: 

nia. — Slate. 

San Francisco Street Improvement Company, Bitnmen 

Mine, Ventura County, California. — Bituminous rock. 

San Tnan Star Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Sanser, Andre, Caliente Creek, Eem Connty, California. 

Silver ore. 

Schmidt, W., White Plains, Nevada. 

Phosphates. 

Schnabel, D. M., Bellevne Mine, Placer Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Schneider Granite Company, St. Louis, Missonri. 

Granite. 

Schneider, Lonis, Valley Forge Mine, Bonlder Connty, . 

Colorado. — Telluride gold ore, with native tellurium. 



372 GROUP XL- CLASS 63. 

School of Mines, Columbia TTniversity, New York. 

Scientific publications. 

Schreiber, W. A. H., Webster^ North Carolina. 

Nickel and chromic iron ore. 

Sclinritzer & Boyer, dmrcMll Connty, NoTada. 

Copper ore. 

Sebweyer & lAtss, Eing-of-Fmssiai Pennsylvania. 

Marble. 

Scientific Publishing Company, The, New York City. 

Publications: Geology, mining, metallurgy, and mineralogy. 

Schlesinger, Ferdinand, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Iron ores. 

Scott Brothers, Black Oak Mine, Tuolumne County, 

California. — Gold quartz, from 300 to 700 foot levels. 

Scranton, Tewett, Summit Mine, Shasta County Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Seager, A. L., Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, 

California. — Marble. 

Seaton Mining & Milling Company, Idaho Springs, 

Colorado. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Sebewaing Coal Company, Sebewaing, Michigan. 

Bituminous coal. 

Sellwood, Joseph, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Iron ore from Brotherton Mine. 

Semon, Adolph, Meshoppen, Pennsylvania. 

Bluestone. 

Sharwood, W., Soulsby Mine, Tuolumne County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz, with galena (rich). 

Shasta Mining Company, Mount Shasta Mine, Shasta 

County, California. — Silver ore. 

Shawmut Coal Company, St. Marys, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Shearer, F. £., Eagle Bird Mine, Nevada County, Cali- 

Califomia. — Gold quartz. 



^ 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 373 

Sheriff Hinii^^ Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite, and quartz. 

Sherman, W. A., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Gold ores from the Sunshine Mines. 

Shookley, W. H., Honnt Diablo, Nevada. 

Gold and silver ore, lead and silver ore. 

Sierra Bnttes Oold Mining Company, TTncle Sam Mine, 

Shasta G)unty, California. — Gold quartz, $50.00 per ton. 

Sills, W. H., Mica Company, CMcago. 

American mica, natural formation and manufactured products. 

Silver Bow Mining Company, Napa County, California. 

Cinnabar. 

Silver Dick Mining Company, Oronogo, Missonri. 

Zinc ore» crystallized sphalerite. 



Silver King Mining Company, Silver King, Utah. 

Lead and silver ore. 

Silver, Lowry, Comey Mine, San Bernardino Connty, 

California. — Silver and copper ore. 

Silverthom, 0. W., Odalpom Mine, Shasta County, Cali- 
fornia. — Liraonite. 

Simpson, Edward, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Aluminum earth. 

Sims Coal Company, Sims, North Dakota. 

Bituminous coal. 

Sinnamahoning Oold & Copper Company, Sierra Conn- 
ty, New Mexico. — Copper ore. 

Slatington Slate Company, Slatington, Pennsylvania. 

Slate. 

Sloan, B. E., Yei^r Mine, Black Hills, Arizona. 

Copper ore, showing cuprite. 

Sloss Furnace, The, Birmingham, Alabama. 

Iron ores. 

Sloss Iron & Steel Company, Birmingham, Alabama. 

Bituminous coal. 



374 GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 

Smith, A. L., Little Chief Mine, Inyo County, Cali- 
fornia. — Silver ore; magnetite from Coast Range Mine, 
San Benito County. 

Smith, Chandler, Chandler Smith Mine, Shasta Connty, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Smith Granite Company, Westerly, Bhode Island. 

Granite. 

Smith & MoNicol, Addie, North Carolina. 

Kaolin, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Smith, W. T., Elko County, Nevada. 

Shale. 

Smuggler TTnion Mining Company, The, Telluride, Colo- 
rado. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Southern Mining Company, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bituminous coal. 

Southern Bailway Company, Washington, D. C. 

Ores and minerals from North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. 

South Eureka Mining Company, South Eureka Mine, 

Amador County, California. — Gold quartz. 

South Side Mining & Manufaoturing Company, Galena, 

Kansas. — Zinc and lead ores, sphalerite, galena. 

South Spring Mining Company, South Spring Mine, 

Amador County, California. — Wall rock. 

South Swansea Mining Company, South Swansea Mine, 

Silver City, Utah. — Silver and lead ore. 

Southwestern Coal & Improvement Company, Coalgate, 

Indian Territory. — Bituminous coal. 

Southwest Virginia Improvement Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Bittiminous coal. 

Specie Payment Mining Company, Clear Creek County, 

Colorado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Spring Valley Hydraulic Company, Spring Valley Mine, 

Butte County, California. — Wood model of hydraulic sluice box. 

Squier, E. E., & Co., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Foundry moulding sand. 



^ 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 375 

Staddon, Samnel, Santa Barbara, California. 

Quicksilver lead. 

Standard Asplialtnni Company, Standard Mine, Ven- 
tura G>unty, California. — Crude and refined asphaltum. 

Standard Asphalt Company, San Francisco, California. 

Crude and refined asphaltum. 

Standard Coal & Coke Company, Newcomb, Tennessee. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Standard Oil Company, 26 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Petroleum: The conditions of its occurrence, its products, their 
uses, and the methods of their distribution. 

Stanley Consolidated Mining Company, Idaho Springs, 

Colorado. — Gold and silver ores. 

Stanstead Granite Quarries, Beebe Plain, Vermont. 

Granite. 

Star Consolidated Mining Company, Mammoth, Utah. 

Gold, silver, lead, and copper ore. 

Stark & Bolsten, Joplin, Missouri. 

Zinc ore, disseminated sphalerite in chert. 

State Ore Sampling Company, Evergreen Mine, Fine 

Creek, Gilpin County, Colorado. — Gold, silver, and copper ore. 

Steel, T., Oro Mine, Inyo County, California. 

Silver ore from 750 foot level. Gold ore. • 

Stein & Boericke, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Alloys, and rare minerals used in their manufacture. 

Sterling Coal & Coke Company, Salt Lake City, TTtah. 

Bituminous coal, coke. 

Stenbenville Coal & Mining Company, Stenbenville, 

Ohio. — Bituminous coal. 

Stevens, B. E., Calico, San Bernardino County, Cali- 
fornia. — Borate of lime and magnesia. 

Stevens Coal Company, Coalburg, West Virginia. 

Bituminous coal. 

Stevens, E., Calistoga Mine, Napa County, California. 
Qay. 



376 GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 

St. Lawrence Marble Company^ Ooavemeiir, New York. 

Marble. 

Stockbridge Soapstone Works, Colfax, Plaoer County, 

California. — Soapstone. 

Stockwell, H. E., Star Mine, Fresno Connty, California. 

Argentiferous fi^ena. 

Stoiber, Edward 0., & Company, Silver Lake Mine, 

Silverton, Colorado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Stoiber, 0. E., Sobert Bonner Mine, Silverton, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore, showing free gold. 

Stone, W. B., Galena, Kansas. 

Zinc and lead ores, from Galena and Empire City, Kansas. 

Stony Creek Bed Granite Company, Stony Creek, Con- 
necticut. — Granite. 

Storms, W. E., Sheep Banoh, Calaveras Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Limonite. 

Stowe, E., San Bernardino, San Bernardino Connty, 

California. — Qay. 

Stow, E. P., Gold Bank Mine, Bntte Connty, California. 

Quartz crystals and gold quartz. 

Stnmp, S. C, Fine Gold Mine, Fresno Connty, Cali- 

• fomia. — Gold quartz. 

Snblette, William, Carga Mnokaoka Mine, San Diego 

County, California. — Gold quartz (rich). 

Snllivan, William, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver. 

Snmmit Mining Company, San Bernardino Connty, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Snn Dance Mining Company, Silver Trail Mine, Sena- 
tor District, Arizona. — Gold, silver, and copper ore. 

Snnset Mining Company, Granby, Missonri. 

Zinc ore, calamine, and sphalerite. 

Snnset Mining Company, Snnset Mine, Kern Connty, 

California. — Sulphur. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 377 

SnnBhine Mining Company^ Tellnride, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 

Superior China Clay Company, CMppewa Falls, Wis- 
consin. — Kaolins, for manufacture of earthenware, etc. 

Sutherland, W. T., Holmes, Nevada. 

Lead and silver ore. 



W., Gold King Mine, San Diego County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Sweet, W. E., Dudley, Pennsylvania. 

Bituminous coal. 

Sweetwater Coal Company, Bock Springs, Wyoming. 

Bituminous coal. 

Sykes, C. P., 33 3roadway, New Tork City. 

Two onyx slabs and six marble columns furnished for facade 
to mining space; lithographic stone. 

Sylvester, H., Kooky Olen Mine, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Taf t & Dunn, Sterling, Arizona. 

Copper ore. 

Ttiggaxt & Hall, Gold Bronze Mine, San Bernardino, %. 

G)unty, California. — Gold quartz. 

Taylor, E. B., Taylor Mine, Death Valley, Inyo County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Tehaohapi Building & Stone Company, Tehaohapi, 

Kern County, California. — Sandstone. 

Teioh, Frank, San Antonio, Texas. 

Granite. 

Temeseal Mining Company, Temescal Mine, Riverside 

County, California. — ^Tin ore. 

Temple, E. S., I^aanoipation Mine, Salina, Boulder 

County, Colorado. — Gold ore, showing tellurium, and ore roasted 
freeing gold. 

Tennessee Coal, Iron & Bailroad Company, Birming- 
ham, Alabama. — Iron ores, limonite, and hematite, bituminous 
coal. 



378 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Tennessee Frodncers Marble Company, KnoxriUe, 

Tennessee. — Marble. 

Texas & Faoifio Coal Company, Fort Worth, Texas. 

Bituminous coal: 

Texas Briquette & Coal Company, Briquette, Texas. 

Bituminous coal. 

Texas Consolidated Mining Company, Texas Mine, 

Shasta County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Texas Mining Company, Los Angeles Connty, CiQi- 

fornia. — Rich gold quartz. 

Thacker Coal & Coke Company, Thaoker, West Vir- 
ginia. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Thies, T., Hnmboldt, Nevada. 

Sulphur, crude and refined. 

Thompson Mining Company, Deadwood, South Dakota. 

Gold ore. 

Thompson Bun Coal Company, New Castle, Fennsyl- 

vania. — Bituminous coal. 

Thorp & Son, Mountain View, Nevada. 

Antimony. 

Thorp, H. T., Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Shale, for manufacture of paving and vitrified brick. 

Tiffany & Company, Union Square, New York City. 

American gems in the rough, precious and semi-precious. 

Tiger Mining & Milling Company, Silverton, Colo- 
rado. — Gold and silver ore. 

Timber line Mining Company, Ward, Colorado. 

Pyritic gold ore. 

Tinsley, C. D., Frince George County, Virginia. 

Ochre. 

Tomboy Gold Mines Company, Telluride, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 
Trade Dollar Mining & Milling Company, Silver City, 

Idaho. — Silver ore, showing argentite. 



GROUP XI.-CLASS 63. 379 

Tranpell^ Eugene, Dolly Varden Mine, Sunset, €o1(h 

rado^— Chalcopyrite containing gold values. 

Treedley, T. K, & Sons, FMladelpUa, Pennsylvania. 

Marble from Vermont. 

Tregarden Brothers, Yellville, Arkansas. 

Zinc ore blende from White Eagle Mine, Marion County, 
Arkansas. 

Troop, William, Shingle Springs, El Dorado County, 

California. — Yellow ochre. 

Tme Blue Harhle Company, Bntland, Vermont. 

Marble. 

Tuck, T. H. L., Oro lino Mine, El Dorado County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Tungsten Mining Company, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Wolframite, from Hill City, South Dakota. 

Turner Brick Company, West Chicago, Illinois. 

Qay, for making of brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Turner Coal, Coke & Mining Company, Ferris, Penn- 
sylvania. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Tyler, Charles M., King Mine, San Bernardino County, 

California. — Silver ore (rich). 

Tyro Mining Company, Tyro Mine, Nevada County, 

California. — Gold quartz (very rich). 



Tyson Mining Company, El Dorado County, California. 

Chromic iron ore and cinnabar. 

THster Bluestone Company, Maiden, New York. 

Sandstone. 

Uncle Sam Mining Company, Uncle Sam Mine, Shasta 

County, California. — Gold quartz. 

Union Copper Company, Oold Hill, North Carolina. 

Copper ore. 

Union Olee Club of San Francisco, Beward Mine, Ne- 
vada County, California. — Gold quartz, $1,200 per ton. 

Union Oold Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, phonolite, fluorite, showing tellurium and galena. 



r 



380 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Union Iron Works, San Francisco, California. 

Working model of a complete California gold quartz mill. 



Union Lead Company, St. Louis, 

Cobalt, nickel, and lead ores, galena and other sulphides. 

Union Oil Company, San Francisco, California. 

Asphalt. 

Union Pacific Company, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Bituminous coal. 

Union Sand Paper Company, Boxbnry, Connecticut. 

Garnet crystals. 

Union Soap-Stone Company, Boston, Kassackusetts. 

Soap-stone. 

Union Sulpkur Company, Sulpkur, Louisiana. 

Sulphur. 

United Olobe Mining Company, Olobe, Arizona. 

Copper ores, with malachite, azurite, and chrysocolla. 

United States Marble Company, Spokane, Washington. 

Onyx and serpentine. 

United States Mining Company, Bingham, Utah. 

Iron pyrite crystals. 

Universal Company, Chicago. 

Bituminous coal. 

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. 

Collection of minerals included in Group III. of Dana's classifica- 
tion. Collected by J. P. Iddings. 

University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming. 

Block of soda, mirabilite; from Downey deposits. 

Updike, N. B., Lone Oum, Virginia. 

Alum rock. 

Utah Mining Company, Fish Springs, Utah. 

Silver and lead ore. 

Utica Mining Company, Utica Mine, Calaveras Coun- 
ty, California. — Wood model of mine timbering. 

Van Houten, T., Baton, New Mexico. 

Gold dust and nuggets. 



GROUP XI— CLASS 63. 381 

Van Nostrand, D., & Company, New Tork« 

Publications upon geology, mining, metallurgy and mineralogy. 

Verd-Antiqne Karble Company, Cliioago. 

Georgia verd-antique marble. 



▼erdenal, D. F., Bainbow Mine, Inyo Connty, Califor- 
nia. — Silver ore (rich). 

Vermont Karble Company, Frootor, Vermont 

Marble. 

Victor Coal Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Bituminous coal. 

Victor Marble Company, Victor, San Bernardino Coun- 
ty, California. — Marble. 



Tilas Mining Company, Breckenridge, Colorado. 

Lead ore. 



inia Coal & Coke Company, Oayton, Virginia. 

Bituminous coal. 

Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Company, Bristol, Tennes- 
see. — Iron ores from Virginia and Tennessee mines ; coal and coke. 

Voy, C. D., Babbit Creek, Sierra Connty, California. 

Model of gold nugget, value $3,240.50. 



Vulcanized Fiber Company, Eureka Mine, Calaveras 

County, California. — Yellow ochre. 

Wagner, C. M., Dunseitb, North Dakota. 

Ballast clay, for railway ballast, showing prepared product. 



Walsh, Thomas F., Camp Bird Mine, Ouray, Colorado. 

Gold ore, mine producing $5,000 per day. 

Wampum Bun Coal Company, Wampum, Fennsyl- 

vania. — Bituminous coal. 

Ward & Capito, Watsonville Mine, Bradshaw Moun- 
tains, Arizona. — Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Ward, E. B., little Lake, California. 

Sulphur, crude. 

Ward, W. S., Denver, Colorado. 

Ores from Cripple Creek. 



382 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Warsaw Blue Stone Company, Warsaw, New York. 

Bluestone. 

Washington Tnnotion Stone Company, Point of Books, 

Maryland. — Mosaic marbles and brownstone. 

Waterman, W. S., Waterman Quarry, San Diego Coun- 
ty, California. — Granite. 

Watertown Brick Company, Watertown, New Tork« 

Clay, for making brick, accompanied by bricklet. 

Watts & Heikes, Boulder, Colorado. 

Tellurium crystals. 

Watts & Helton, Brown Bear Mine, Trinity County, 

California. — Gold quartz. 

Webber, F., Alum Creek, Nevada. 

Gold ore. 

Webb Oranite & Construction Company, Worcester, 

Massachusetts. — Granite from New Hampshire. 

Webb, I. A., Deadwood, South Dakota. 

Collection of Black Hills ore. 

Wedge Mining Company, Wedge Mine, Ouray, Ouray 

County, Colorado. — Silver lead ore. 

Weir, John, Lead & Zinc Company, Mossy Creek, Ten- 
nessee. — Zinc blende and galena. 

Wells, Oeorge A., Oreat Falls, Montana. 

Sapphires and other gems, in the rough. 

Wells, Heber C, Salt Lake City, Vtak. 

CollectioiT^of ores representative of Utah's mineral wealth. 

Welsbach Light Company, Broad and Arch Sts., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Monazite sand. 

Western Coal & Mining Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bituminous coal. 

Westfleld Marble & Sandstone Company, Westfield. 

Massachusetts. — Serpentinic marble. 

Westmoreland Coal Company, Th«, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Collection of coals. 



i 




GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 383 

Weston, S. 0., Elko County, Nevada; 

Copper ore. 

West Virginia Central & Fittsbnrg Bailway Company, 

Piedmont, West Virginia. — Bituminous coal. 

Wetherby, A. 0., Mitchell Connty, North Carolina. 

Iron ore. 

Wheeler & Hnrlbert, Ouray County, Colorado. 

Silver lead ore. 

Whipsaw Kining Company, Whipsaw, Castle Creek, 

Arizona. — Gold and copper ore. 

White Breast Fuel Company, Chicago. 

Bituminous coal. 

White, Peter, Marquette, Michigan. 

Gold from Michigan Gold Mine. 

Wickford & Snapp, White Star, Yavapai County, Ari- 
zona. — Gold and silver ore. 

Wick, H. E., & Company, Buffalo, New York. 

Bituminous coal. 

Wiley, J., & Son, New York. 

Publications on mineralogy, etc. 

Wilkinson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkinson, Wash- 
ington. — Bituminous coal, coke. 

Williams & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Soapstone, from Vermont and New Hampshire. 

Williams, C. E., & Company, Lehigh County, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Iron oxides, red and yellow, and other mineral paints 

Williams, David, Company, New York. 

Publication : The Iron Age, having relation to the Iron Industry. 

Williams, E. W., Central City, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 

Williams, T. A., Ounsight Mine, Inyo County, Califor- 
nia. — Silver ore. 

Williams, John B., Buckingham, Virginia. 

Slate. 



384 GROUP XI.— CLASS 63. 

Williams, W., Look Out Mine, Trinity County, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Willis, 0. F., Saoramento ttine. Mono Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 



Wilmington Star Kining Company, Coal City, niipoii. 

Bituminous coal. 

Wilson, F. J., Lewisbnrg, Ohio. 

Limestone. 

Wilson, W., Pine Orove, Nevada. 

Gold, silver, and lead ore. 

Windsor Lead & Zine Company, Empire City, Kansas. 

Zinc and lead ore, sphalerite, and galena. 

Winslow, T. H., Biddies, Oregon. 

Nickel ore, showing mineral genthite. 

Winsor, Hnlford, Cibola Quarry, near Yuma, Arizona. 

Building stone. 

Wirth & Hulings, Wirth Mine, Ward, Colorado. 

Gold ore. 

Wise, A., Humboldt County, Nevada. 

Native sulphur. 

Withersbers, Sherman & Company, Fort Henry Mines, 

Port Henry, New York. — Iron ore. 

Wohler, C, Edison Mine, Nevada County, California. 

Copper sulphide. 

Wood, H., & Brothers, Adelaide Mine, Calaveras Coun- 
ty, California. — Gold quartz. 



Wood, H. E., Louisville Mine, Leadville, Colorado. 

Crystallized pyrites. 

Wood, Henry E., Denver, Colorado. 

Galena, iron pyrite, and feldspar crystals. 

Woodhull, S. D., Inyo County, California. 

Quartz crystal, calcites, silver ore, silver lead ore, copper ore 
with cuprite. 

Woods Investment Company, Colorado Springs, Colo- 
rado. — Collection of gold ores. 



^ 



GROUP XL— CLASS 63. 38S 



Wood, T. S.| Lillian Hinei Leadville, Colorado. 

Native gold, crystals and leaf. 

Woodward Iron Company, Birmingham, Alabama. 

Red iron ores. 

Woody, Williani, Cincinnati Mine, Herced Connty, 

California. — Cinnabar. 

Work Mining & Milling Company, Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. — Gold ore, fluorite, and quartz. 

Wormser Filter Plate Company, Carthage, MisBonrL 

Tripoli 

Wright, T. D., Sonora, California. 

Qay. 

Wyatt, T. T., Faith, North Carolina. 

Granite. 

Wyoming, State of. Engineering Department. 

Geological and Engineering reports. 



Wythe Zino & Lead Company, Anstinville, Virgi] 

Zinc lead ore, galena, smithsonite, and sphalerite, concentrates. 

Z-Bay Mining Company, Oranby, MisBonri. 

Lead and zinc ores, galena, calamine, sphalerite, greenockite 
and tallow clay, chert and limestone. 

Tankee Oirl Mining Company, Bed Mountain, Colo- 
rado. — Silver ore, bomite. 

Yellow Jacket Mining Company, Comstock, Virginia 
City, Nevada. — Sulphurets. 

Terington, J. A., Carson City, Nerada. 

Ores and minerals representing mineral wealth of Nevada. 

Yost, John, Tnnction Mine, Tnolnmne Connty, Cali- 
fornia. — Gold quartz. 

Young, B. H., Oold Band Mine, Deep Creek, TTtah. 

Copper silver ore. 

Young, C. W., Calais, Maine. 

Granite. 

Young, Mrs. J., Oold Chief Mine, San Bernardino Coun- 
ty, California. — Gold quartz. 



r 



386 GROUP XI.— CLASS 64. 

Treka Journal Publishing Company, Yreka, California. 

Sandstone. 



Zadig & Company, S. F., Zadig Mine, Ventnra County, 

California. — Asphaltum rock. 

Zanesville Stoneware Company, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Clay for manufacture of stoneware, etc. 



Zenobia Mining Company, Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Gold ore, quartz with tellurium, value $14,000 per ton. 

Zimmerman, Dr., Silverton, Colorado. 

Tungsten ore, wolframite, scheelite, hubnerite. 

Znni Mining Company, Silverton, Colorado. 

Gold and silver ore. 



CLASS 64. 

METALLURGY 



Amalgamated Copper Company, Bntte, Montana. 

Intermediate products from the furnace — slags, mattes, etc. 

American Steel & Wire Company, New Jersey and New 

York City. — Manipulation of iron and steel from the ores. 

American Steel Hoop Company, Pittsburg, Fennsylyania. 

Exhibits illustrating the manufacture of iron and steel. 

American Tin Plate Company, Chicago. 

Tin and teme plates, fine steel sheets, billet to the finished mate- 
rial. 

Ansonia Brass & Copper Company, Ansonia, Coni^ecticut. 

Copper bars, sheets of rolled and planished copper. 

Argillo Works, Carbon Clift, Illinois. 

Refractory clay for metallurgical use. 

Bethlehem Steel Company, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs illustrating equipment for working steel in large 
masses. Armor plates after being tested. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 64. 387 

Boston and Colorado Smelting and Befining Company, Bich- 

ard Pearce, Manager, Denver, G)lorado. — Roasted mattes. 

Boston & Colorado Smelting Company, The, Argo, Colorado. 

Products showing the different stages of process employed in 
smelting. 

Boston & Montana Consolidated Copper & Silver Mining 

Company, Butte, Montana. — Copper matte and smelter products. 

Butte & Boston Mining Company, Butte, Montana. 

Copper matte and smelter products. 

California Paris Commission, San Francisco, California. 

Model quartz stamp mill. 

Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Drawing of Duquesne Blast Furnace ; records of practice ; photo- 
graphs. 

Cliateaugay Iron Ore Company, Plattsburg, New York. 

Series of products of magnetic concentration. 

Christy Fire Clay Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Refractory clay for crucibles, etc., for metallurgical purposes. 

Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Pig iron and steel ingots, billets, rails, nails, and spikes; draw- 
ings and photographs of equipment. 

Colorado Smelting & Mining Company, Butte, Montana. 

Copper matte, ingot copper. 

Copper Queen Mining Company, Bisbee, Arizona. 

Copper, furnace products, and by-products made in reduction of 
ores. 

Crescent Steel Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Crucible and open-hearth steel and applications in the arts. Tool 
and die steel, polished rods, fine wire, hot-rolled sheets, bright 
cold-rolled strips, band-saw blanks, forgings, springs. Finished 
tools, dies and appliances made from the products. 
Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Chicago, 1893, three medals. 

De La Mar Mining Company, Mercur, Utah. 

Products showing process of treating the base and oxydized ores. 

Denver Fire Clay Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Refractory clay for the manufacture of crucibles, etc., for metal- 
lurgical purposes. 



388 GROUP XL— CLASS 64. 

Department of Mines, Conunission to Paris, Chicago. 

Methodical collection of technical metallurgy, ores, products, 
charts, drawings, and photographs. 



Detroit Copper Mining Company, Morenci, 

Copper furnace products, copper matte, refined copper. 

Dfcs Loges Lead Company, Des Logos, MissoiirL 

Lead and furnace products, reverberatory process. 

Dickinson Fire & Pressed Brick Works, Dickinson, Horth 

Dakota. — Refractory clay for metallurgical purposes. 

Edison Ore Concentrating Company, Orange, Hew Jersey. 

Iron ore concentration represented by speciments of raw material 
and intermediate product 

Franklin, H. H., Manufacturing Company, Syracuse, 

New York. — Specimens illustrating fine unfinished iron casting; 
a novel and unique method. 

Oraphic Mines & Smelting Works, The, Magdalena, New 

Mexico. — Ores and fluxes from one mine. 

Oreat Falls Fire Brick Company, Great Falls, Montana. 

Refractory clay for the manufacture and use of metallurgical 
work. 

Howe, Professor H. M., Columbia College, New York City. 

Steel fractures, showing structure of steel by etching. 

Illinois Steel Company, Chicago. 

Blast furnace model: iron and steel in ingots, bars, sheets, or 
finished products. • 

Mackintosh, Hemphill & Company, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Drawing illustrating the construction of large improved 
"Blooming Tram." 

Morris, E. E., & Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Bar iron and steel. 

New Jersey Zinc Company, Franklin Furnace, Hew Jer- 
sey. — Samples illustrating the extraction of zinc from its ores. 

Ohio Fire Brick Company, Oakhill, Ohio. 

Refractory clay for metallurgical use. 

Oliver, Oreenwood E., 1214 John St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Special anti-friction metal, called "Silverine Babbitt," for bear- 
ings. 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 64. 389 

Parrot Silver & Copper Company, Butte, Montana. 

Copper matte and smelter products. 

Pearoe, Bichard, Manager, Boston & Colorado Smelting 

& Refining Company, Denver, Colorado. — Roasted mattes from 
Pearce Turret Furnace. 

Pencoyd Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Structural and axle steel, photographs and statistics of steel 
manufacture. 

Pittsburg Seduction Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Aluminum extraction from the minerals cryolite and bauxite; 
aluminum ingots, manufactured aluminum. 

Boebling's, John A., Sons Company, Trenton, New Jer- 
sey. — Process of manufacture of wire, iron, steel, copper, and 
bronze. 

Bogers, Brown & Company, 71 Broadway, New York 

City. — Specimens of every class of pig iron made in America. 

Stirling-Firth Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Steel armor-piercing projectiles after ballistic test, with details 
of tests. 

Tamarack Mining Company, Hancock, Michigan. 

Specimens illustrating the extraction of copper from copper ores. 

Taylor Iron & Steel Company, High Bridge, New Jersey. 

Cast steel shells after test, with details of test, statistics and 
complete data. 

Taylor Iron & Steel Company, New York City. 

Mine wheels, railroad crossings, stamps, coal crusher, etc. 

United Globe Mining Company, Olobe, Arizona. 

Copper furnace products, copper matte, refined copper. 

Valentine, M. D., & Son Company, Woodbridge, New 

Jersey. — Fire brick and cupola blocks. 

Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Company, Bristol, Tennessee. 

Various ores, irons and steels; coal and coke; exhibit of mines 
and works in Virginia and in Tennessee. 

Ward Pyritic Smelting Company, Ward, Colorado. 

Iron matte and slag. 

Wellman Seaver Engineering Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Drawings illustrating the manufacture of iron and steel. 



390 GROUP XI.— CLASS 65. 

CLASS 65. 

METAL WORKING. 



Amalgamated Copper Company, Butte, Montana. 

Utensils, pipe, drawn tubes of copper. 

American Steel & Iron Hanufactnring Company, Bead- 
ing, Pennsylvania. — Bolts, screws, rivets, punches, nuts, turn- 
buckles, spikes. 

American Steel & Wire Company, New Jersey and New 

York City. — Wire ropes, nails, and all material used by the hard- 
ware trade. 

American Tin Plate Company, Chicago. 

Metal working, and manufactured articles of tin. 

Atkins, E. C, & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Steel saws. 

Atlas Tack Company, Tannton, Massachnsetts. 

Tacks, nuts, bolts, brads, small nails. 

Bommer Brothers, 257-271 Classen Ave., Brooklyn, New 

York. — Spring hinges. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Colorado Fael & Iron Company, Denver, Colorado. 

Merchant iron and steel, railroad supplies, steel plates, etc. 

Copper Qneen Consolidated Mining Company, 99 John 

St., New York City. — Brass and copper bars, special shapes, tubing. 

Crane Company, Chicago. 

Tools for plumbers and steam and gasfitters. Fittings for steam 
engines. 

Devlin, Thomas & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Saddlery hardware, buckles, rings, hooks, hinges, etc. 

Eagle Lock Company, Terryville, Connecticut. 

Locks, padlocks, keys, and small hardware. 

Enterprise Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Special patented hardware. 



^ 



GROUP XI.— CLASS 65. 391 

Franklin, H. H., Kannfaotnring Company, Syracnse, 

New York. — Castings; finished parts made by a process of cast- 
ing which avoids machine work. 

Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Company, Chicago. 

Household enameled ware, and metallic weather strips. 



Bodman, Ely Safe Company, 263 Broadway, New 

York City. Safe in manganese steel, proof against burglars or 
mobs. 

* 

lUinoiB Steel Company, Cliicago. 

Metal plates, flanged, stamped, cut, decorated; drawn tubes and 
piping in iron. 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Company, New York City. 

Equipments for and methods used in foundries of bronze, brass, 
and malleable iron, etc. 

Irwin Anger Bit Company, Wilmington, Ohio. 

Steel augers and bits. 

Jorss, A. F., 315 13th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Railings in iron. 

Kearney & Foot Company, 100 Beade St., New York City. 

Files and rasps. 

Manhattan Brass Company, New York. 

Castings and railings in brass. 

Hetaltic Flexible Tnbing Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Metallic flexible tubing. 

Horris, T. B., Foundry Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Iron castings. 

Horth Brothers Hannfactnring Company, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Spiral screwdrivers, drills, and hardware spe- 
cialties. Photograph of works. 

Ohio Tool Company, Anbnm, New York, and Columbus, 

Ohio. — Mechanics' woodworking tools. 

Oneida Community, Limited, Niagara Falls, New York. 

Weldless chains. 

Feck & Snyder, 126 Nassau St., New York City. 
Ice skates and roller skates. 



392 GROUP XI.— CLASS 65. 

Phoenix Horseshoe Company, Fonghkeepsie, New York. 

Horse and mule shoes. 

Pike Kannf actnring Company, Pike Station, New Hamp- 
shire. — Scythe stones, oil stones, razor hones, emery stones, 
polishing powder, corundum, etc. 

Plumb, Fayette B., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Hammers, hatchets, cleavers, adzes, axes, bush hooks, 
picks, and mattocks. 

Boebling's, John A., Sons Company, Trenton, Hew Jer- 
sey. — ^Wire, wire rope, bridge cables, electrical conductors, 
model of Brookljm suspension bridge. 

Shelton Company, The, Shelton, Connecticut, and 64 

Reade St., New York City. — ^Tadcs, small nails, bolts. 

Standard Caster & Wheel Company, 318 East 2Sd St., 

New York City. — Ball-bearing furniture casters. 

Stanley Eule & Level Company, New Britain, Connecti- 
cut. — Carpenters' tools. 

Staiiley Works, The, New Britain, Connecticut, and 78 

Chambers St., New York City. — Builders' hardware. 

Stein & Boericke, Philadelphia, Pennsylyania. 

Alloys of tungsten and other metals. 

Stover Manufacturing Company, Ereeport, Illinois. 

Builders' hardware. 

Taylor Iron & Steel Company, New York City. 

Burglar-proof safes, made of cast manganese sted. 

Tyler, The W. S., Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ornamental gratings. Employed in the construction ot the Na- 
tional Pavilion. 

Williams, C. E., & Company, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. 

Red and yellow oxides of iron, and other mineral paints. 

Williams, J. H., & Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Drop forgings of iron, steel, bronze, copper, aluminum. ' Vulcan 
chain pipe wrenches. Engineers' machine and railwajr wrenches. 
Hoist hooks, eye-bolts, parts for machine tools, en^nes, cycles, 
fire-arms, automobiles, typewriters. Drop forged mild steel golf 
club heads. 



GROUP XL— CLASS 66. 383 

Winslow Brothers Company, The, CMoago. 

Wrought iron portcullis gateway and adjoining electric bronze 
columns forming central entrance U. S. exhibit of mines and 
metallurgy. This company desired and manufactured the entire 
facade of the United States mmes and metallurgy exhibit, and 
also built the pagoda for the American Steel & Wire Company. 

Yale & Towne Hannf actnring Company, The, New York 

City. — Builders* hardware, employed in the construction of the 
National Pavilion. 



"^ 



GROUP XII. 



DECORATION AND FURNITURE OF PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS AND DWELLINGS. 

M. H. HULBERT. DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 66. 

PERMANENT DECORATION OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND 

DWELLINGS. 



Barney Marble Company, Swanton, Vermont. 

Marble slabs for lavatories. 

Beil & Manoh, 81 Illinois St., Chicago. 

Ornamental plaster. Fa<;ade of Hall of Honor. 

Bitter, Earl, Weehawken, New Jersey. 

Permanent decorations in plaster. 

Brant, C. E., 156 Fifth Ave., New York. 

Plan of permanent decorations. 

Bridgeport Wood Finishing Company, New Hilf ord, Connecti- 
cut — Finished wood and cabinet work^ 

Carr, Lyell, 103 West 54th St., New York. 

Decorative painting on canvas frieze. U. S. Pavilion. 

Colnmbia Marble Quarrying Company, Bntland, Vermont. 

Marble tiles. 

Brake & Company, 359 Drake Block, St. Fanl, Minnesota. 

Arizona petrified wood. 

Eggleson, Thomas, New Yor]^ 

Design for agricultural fa<;ade. 

Oamsey, Elmer E., White Plains, New York. 

Mural decorations. 

396 



396 GROUP XII.— CLASS 67. 

Healy ft Hillet, 225 Wabash A'^e., Chicago. 

Permanent decorations in plaster. 

Herter, Albert, East Hampton, Long Island, New York. 

Decorative painting on canvas. 

Eitson, Arthur, Philadelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Ornamental lamp posts. 

Elee, John, 327 East 40th St., New York City. 

Ornamental work and staff. Groups XII and XV. 

Koch, 0. W., ft Son, 467 5th Ave., New York. 

Parquet in National Pavilion, teak wood, tiger wood and mahaj ua 
wood. 

Koopman, Angnst, 57th St., New York. 

Decorative painting on canvas. 

Uoyd Fresco Cleaning ft Decorating Company, 13 West 

42d St., New York. — Wall and ceiling decoration. 

Hertz, George, ft Sons, Fort Chester, New York. 

Automatic machine-turned and embossed wood moulding. 

Northmp, Henry S., 40 Cherry St., New York. 

Stamped steel ceilings. 

Beid, Bobert, 142 E. 33d St., New York. 

Mural decorations. 

Taft, Joseph H., 41 East 20th St., New York. 

Ornamental joiner work ; decorative plaster and pafnting. 

Wallis, Frank E., Thompson Building, New York. 

Design in facade. 

Zallee, John, 311 1-2 N. 7th St., St. Lonis, Missouri. 

Patent asphalt and cement mixture roofing. 



CLASS 67. 

STAINED GLASS. 



California Art Glass Bending and Cutting Works, San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Stained glass. 

Lamb, J. and B., 23 6th Ave., New York. 

Stained glass. - 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 69. 397 

Lathrop, Frank, 28 Washington Square, New York. 

Stained glass. 

Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, 333-341 Fonrth Ave- 
nue, New York City. — Colored glass windows for churches and 
other buildings. 

Tiffany, Lonis, 333 4th Ave., New Tork. 

Stained glass. 



CLASS 68. 

PAPER HANGINGS. 



Campbell, William & Company, New York. 

Wall paper. 



CLASS 69. 

HOUSEHOLD AND ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 



American Adjustable Folding Chair Company, 1144 Broad- 
way, New York. — Adjustable chairs and reading desks. 

American School Furniture Company, 111 5th Ave., New 

York. — School furniture. 

Bicycle Step Ladder Company, 65 Randolph St., Chicago. 

Rolling store service ladder for high shelving. 

Bierbrier, F. E., 22 East 14th ^t., New Tork. 

Revolving book-case. 

Brunswiok-Balke^Collender Company, New Tork and Chi- 
cago. — Billiard tables and accessories. 

Bavenport, A. H., Washington st., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Furniture. 

Brake & Company, 359 Brake Block, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Furniture in petrified wood. 



i 



398 GROUP XII.— CLASS 69. 

Ford, J. S., Johnson ft Company, 1433-1437 Wabash Ave., Clii- 

cago. — Chairs. 

Oirard, C. C, & Cntler, H., 23 East St., New York. 

Carved and inlaid furniture*. 

Globe-Wemioke Company, The, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Patented "elastic" bookcases for libraries, etc. 

Hayden Company, 1 West 34th St., New York. 

Banking house furniture, colonial designs ; modern show cases. 

Irving & Casson, Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Show cases. 

Keyless Lock Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Office desks, tables, and racks. 

Enipp, John C, & Brother, 121 & 123 N. Howard St., Balti- 
more, Maryland. — Cases made of plain oak, for United States 
Commission in mines, chemical industries, etc. 

Header Furniture Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Show case. 

Falmersberg, J. B., & Sons, 710 Broadway, New York. 

Store fixtures. 

Bevell, Alexander H., & Company, Chicago. 

Store fixtures and showcases. 

Smith, B. & W. B., New York. 

Show cases. 

Standard Furniture Company, Herkimer, New York. 

Flat and roll top office desks and filing cabinets. 

Standard Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Fennsylvania. 

Bath tubs, water closets, lavatory sinks, etc. 

Taft, Joseph H., 41 East 20th St., New York. 

Furniture. Frieze upon the facade of the exhibit of petroleum. 

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, 333 Fourth Avenue, 

New York City. — Furniture. 

Wells, A. J., Manufacturing Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Office furniture. 



GROUP Xn.— CLASS 71. 399 

Weston Paper & Hanuf aoturing Company, Dayton, 01iio« 

Stationers' store fixtures. 

Widdieomb, John, Company, Grand Bapids, HioMgan. 

Bedroom furniture. 



CLASS 70. 

CARPETS, TAPESTRIES AND FABRICS FOR 

UPHOLSTERY. 



Baldwin Brothers & Company, 435 5th Ave., New York. 

Illuminated leather, hand tooled. 

Farr & Bailey Manufacturing Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Floor linoletmi, plain and decorative burlaps for walls and ceilings. 

Hazzard, B. T., & Company, 814 Fine St., New York. 

Permanent decorations in burlaps. 

Northwestern Grass Twine Company, St. Faul, Minnesota. 

American matting. 

Biohter Manufacturing Company, Tenafly, New Jersey. 

Burlaps. 

Sloan, William D., New York. 

Carpets and tapestries. 

Taft, Joseph H., 41 East 20th St., New York. 

Upholstery of jute, leather and embroidery. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Candace, 115 E. 23rd St., New York. 

Decorative hangings. 



CLASS 71. 

UPHOLSTERERS' DECORATIONS. 



Annin & Company, 99 Fulton St., New York. 

Flags, etc. 

Lawrence, Stephen Brainard, 291 5th Ave., New York. 

Decorations for public buildings. 



400 GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 

SiiLger Kannf aoturing Company, Broadwayi Hew York. 

Embroidered bed covering and hangings. 

Stewart Hartshorn Company, East Hewark, Hew Jersqr* 

Self-acting window shade rollers. 

Taf t, Joseph H., 41 East 20th St., Hew York. 

Upholsterers' decorations. 

Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, 333 Fonrth Aye., Hew 

York. — Decorative hangings. 



CLASS 72. 

CERAMICS. 



Adams, Miss Eva E., 2261 Kenmore Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

American Clay Working Machine Company, Bncyms, Ohio. 

Auger and sand mould brick machines, brick cutter, brick repress, 
dies, clay convoy. 

American Encaustic Tile Company, 1123 Broadway, Hew 

York.— American mosaic and encaustic tile. 

Amespangh, Miss Vivian, 569 Bryan St., Dallas, Texas. 

Decorated china. 

Art Department of Hewcomb College, E. Woodward, Director. 

New Orleans, Louisiana. — Decorated china. 

Asbnry, Leonore, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 

Atlan Club, 1741 York Place, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Anlich, F. B., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Baisley, Mrs. Frank, 100 Bose St., Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Decorated china. 

Baker, Constance A., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 401 

Beaoh, Hartha Edwards, 469 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut — Decorated china. 

Beebe, Miss Oraoe F., 2 Park Square, Boston, Itasaohnsetts. 

Decorated china. 

Bischoif, Franz A., Detroit, Hiohigan. 

Decorated china. 

Boyd, Kiss Xyra, Fenn. Aye. near Lang St., Fittsbnrg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Decorated china. 

Browning, Miss Elsie E., 4613 Filmore St., Pittsburg, Penn- 

^Ivania. — Decorated china. 

Burrows, Miss M. E., 142 West 126th St., New Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Candler, Miss Mariam L., 6 Adams Ave., W. Detroit, Mioki- 

gan. — Decorated china. 

Chanssegros, Dr. Clement, Bridgeport, Conneotiont, and Paris, 

France. — Decorated china. 

Cherry, Mrs. K E., 2302 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Decorated china. 

Cole, Miss Lillie E., 3824 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Columbia Encaustic Tile Company, Anderson, Indiana. 

Mosaic tile. 

Cowen, Louise, Hew Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Coyne, Sally E., Cincinnati, Okio. 

Pottery designs. 

Crane, Mrs. Anna B., 11 Woodlawn Park, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Crook, Bussell 0., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Jungle Book tiles. 

Cross, Mrs. Hellie A., 6525 Woodlawn Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Culp, Mrs. S. v., 219 Post St., San Francisco, California. 

Over glaze decoration on china. 



402 GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 

Daly, Matt. A., Cinoiimatiy Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 

Damoiii Xi88 A. L., Hill Hill Ave., Bridgeport, Connectioiit. 

Decorated china. 

Dedham Pottery, Dedham, Masaohiuetts. 

Decorated china. 

Dexter, lOsi H. C, 96 5th Ave., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Dibble, Miss Mabel C, 6235 Monroe Ave., Chioago. 

Decorated china. 

Diers, E. 0., Cinoinnati, Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 

Deremus, Mrs. Carolyn B., 77 West Ave., Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut. — Decorated china. 

Fairbanks, Ella A., 15 Wellington St., Boston, Massaohuetts. 

Decorated china. 

Feohheimer, Bese, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 

Felton, Edith B., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Pottery designs. 



Ferris, Miss Ida, Fostoria, Ohio. 

Decorated china. ^ 

Field, Mrs. Charlotte E., 528 Throop Aye., Brooklyn, New 

York. — Decorated china. 

Frackelton, Mrs. S. S., 695 Cass St., Milwankee, Wisconsin. 

Decorated gray faience. 

Frazee, Mrs. A. A., 4049 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Fry, Mrs. Marshall, 36 West 24th St., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Fry, Marshall T., Jr., 36 West 24th St., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Oirard, C. C, & Cutler, M., 23 East 31st St., New York. 

Artistic pottery. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 403 

Gtordon, Mrs. Joseph H., 236 Bithridge St., Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Decorated china. 

Omeby Faience Company, 164 Devonshire St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — ^Works of faience. 

Omeby, H., Ashmont, Hassaohnsetts. 

Enamels and kiln burner. 

Hammond, Mrs. Ida Story, Lake City, Minnesota. 

Decorated china. 

Hanson, Jennie E., 58 Prince St., New Haven, Connecticut. 

Decorated china. 

Harrison, Mrs L. T., 6 Adams Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

Decorated china. 

Healey, The Misses M. & E., Washington, D. C. 

Decorated china. 

Holzer, Mrs. Philip, 1071 Iranistan Ave., Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut — Decorated china. 

Horloecher, Miss Leta, 28 East 23rd St., Hew York. 

Decorated china. 

Humphrey, Mrs. Edward L., 1741 York Place, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Hurd, Harriet B., 304 Golden Hill, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Porcelain miniature. 

Hurley, E. T., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Design^ for pottery. 

Irelan, Mrs. William, Jr., Boblin Pottery, San Francisco, 

Cal i f omia. — Pottery. 

Johnson, Miss Ida A., 193 St. James Place, Brooklyn, Hew 

York. — Decorated china. 

Heeler, Mrs. Charles, Paterson, New Jersey. 

Decorated china. 

Keenan, Sophie Oaskill, 5550 Hays St., E. E., Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Ceramic ivory miniature. 

Kendrick, George P., Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Designs in pottery. 



404 GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 

Laurence, Stiu^s, Cincinnati, OMo. 

Designs for pottery. 

Lavalle, John, Boston, Hassaohnsetts. 

Moorish tiles designs. 

lawson, Mrs. Adele V., 110 53rd St., CMcago. 

Decorated china. 

Leonard, Anna B.^ 28 K 23rd St., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Leonard, Oenevieve, 606 W. 114th St., New Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Leonard, Mrs. Harriet N., 6 Adams Ave., W. Detroit, Michi- 
gan. — Decorated china. 

Lindeman, Clara C, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Long, Mrs. Marion W., 5338 Washington Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

McCreery, B. M., Marshall Field Building, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

McDonald, W. P., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Mclntyre, Mrs. Anna T., 41 Pittsburg St., Oreensbnrg, Penn- 
sylvania. — Decorated china. 



McLaughlin, Miss M. Louise, 2558 Eden Ave., Mt. Auburn, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — Decorated china. 

McLean, Mrs. Howard A., Colonial Building, West 66th St., 

New York. — Decorated china. 

McMaster, Miss Mary, 125 McDougal Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

Decorated china. 

Marquard, Francis Z., 206 W. 128th St., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Mason, Miss Elizabeth, 1672 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Decorated china. 

Mason, Miss M. M., 1672 Broadway, New York City. 

Decorated china. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 405 

Kayhewy lbs. Julia H., 14 Wellintrton St., Boston, Massa- 

chnsetts. — Decorated china. 

Montfort, Miss Helen E., 142 West 126th St., Hew Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Kooreland, Mrs. W. C, Jr., 402 Xadison St., Brooklyn, Hew 

-York. — Decorated china. 

Mmgaii, lbs. Ada White, 1326 Vine Place, Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. — Decorated china. 

Masmyth, Mrs. Percy, 387 Baker St., Detroit, Michigan. 

Decorated china. 

national Leagne of Mineral Painters, 402 Madison St., 

Brookl3m, New York. — Decorated china. 



Heal, Fanny, 355 W. Main St., Waterbnry, Conneotiont. 

Decorated china. 

Heal, Mary Alley, 1435 Broadway, Hew Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Honrse, Mary, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Ohr, George E., Biloxi Pottery, Biloxi, Mississippi. 

Decorated china. 

Glean, Felix, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Design in tile of American Encaustic Tile Company. 

Osbon, Mrs. E. A., 85th St. and Madison Aye., Hew York. 

Decorated china. 

Osgood, Mrs. Worth, 402 Madison St., Brooklyn, Hew Tork. 

Decorated china. 

Overly, lanra B., 504 Pennsylvania Ave., Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Decorated china. 

Paist, Mrs. H. B., 808 Hioollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Decorated china. 

Patton, Miss Lena B., 439 Lafayette Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

Decorated china. 

Peck, Miss Grace H., 3848 Elmwood Place, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 



406 GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 

Ferley, Kn. H. E., 219 Post St., San EranciBoo, California. 

Overglaze decoration. 

Phelps, Miss Pearle Wanita, 1281 Bergen St., Brooklyn, Hei 

York. — Decorated china. 

Phillips, Mrs. L. Vance, 36 W. 24th St., Hew York. 

Figure and portrait painting on china. 

Phillips, Miss Mary A., 4245 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Pierce, Miss E. M., 36 West 125th St., New York. 

Decorated china. 



Post, Miss Cornelia S., Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Decorated china. 

Prince, Mrs. M. P., 55 Bay 20th St., Bath Beach, New York. 

Decorated china. 

Beed, Geneva, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Bobinean, Adelaide Alsop, 114 E. 23d St., New York. 

Decorated china and miniature. 

Bookwood Pottery Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Under glaze decorated faience. 

Bothenbnsch, P., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Bowell, Mrs. Panny, 96 Pifth Ave., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Sax, Sara, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Schmidt, Charles, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Schon, A. D., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Sessions, Mrs. P. M., 228 54th Place, Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Sharadni, H. W., 121 N. 6th St., Beading, Pennsylvania. 

Decorated china. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 72. 407 

Shirayamadani, Eataro, Cinoiimati, OMo. 

Designs for pottery. 

Sunmons, Harry K, 71 Hurray St., New York. 

Decorated china. 

Sprag^e, Amelia B., Cinoinnati, OMo. 

Designs for pottery. 



Carrie, Cinoinnati, OMo. 

Designs for pottery. 

Stewart, Mrs. Leroy F., 3400 Forest Ave., Chioago. 

De(;prated china. 

Stewart, Mrs. Henry P., 77 Hamilton Ave., White Plains, 

New York. — Decorated china. 

Stiele, Mrs. Frederiok, 3957 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Storer, Mrs. Maria Longworth, IT. S. Legation, Madrid, 

Spain. — Art Pottery. 

Swift, Mrs. Caroline L., 144 Bnthven St., Boxbnry, Massa- 
chusetts. — Decorated china. 

Taylor, Mary A., 37 W. 22d St., Hew York. 

Mineral painting. 

Toohey, Sallie, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 



Topping, Miss Helen M., 4453 Berkeley Ave., Chicago. 

Decorated china. 

Trenton Potteries Company, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Sanitary earthware and vitrified china bath tubs, and water 
closets, etc. 

Trent Tile Company, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Floor, wall and ceiling tile. 

Valentien, Anna M., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Valentien, A. B., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Van Briggle, Artns, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 



408 GROUP XII.— CLASS 73. 

Volkmar, Charles, Corona, New York. 

Decorated pottery. 

Wagner, Mrs. H. L., Detroit, Hiohigan. 

Decorated china. 

Walter, Mrs. W. C, 5625 Broad St., Pittsburg, Fennsylyania. 

Decorated china. 

Wareliam, J. D., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Wilcox, Mrs. Olive, 1107 N. Senate Ave., Indianapolis, In- 
diana. — Decorated china. 

Willcox, Harriet E., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Yonng, Grace, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 

Zenblin, Mrs. Henrietta C, 6052 Kimbark Ave., Chioi^. 

Decorated china. 

Zettle, Josephine E., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Designs for pottery. 



CLASS 73. 

GLASS AND CRYSTAL. 



American Optical Company, Sonthbridge, Kassaohnsetts. 

Optical goods. 

Bay State Optical Company, Attleboro, Hassaohnsetts. 

Optical goods and machines for manufacturing same. 

Chambers, Inskeep & Company, 88-90 Wabash Ave, Chicago. 

Ophthalmometer. 

Holophane Glass Company, 1 Broadway, Hew York. 

Glass globes. 

Hygienic Optical Company, 1147 Broadway, New York. 

Optical goods. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 74. 409 

King, Julius, Optical Company, 2 Maiden Lane, Hew York. 

C^dcal goods. 

Le Maitre Optical Company, 226 W. 42d St., Hew York. 

Optical goods and machines for manufacturing same. 

liong, Adelaide Hnsted, 96 Fifth Ave., Hew York. 

Glass window. 

Iiubin, S., Fhiladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Lenses. 

Kanhattan Optical Company, Hew York. 

Spectacles. 



HeQf eld, Emil M., 228 W. 130th St., Hew York. 

Lens grinding machine, etc 

Hew York Hovelty Company, 907 Hancock St., Brooklyn, Hew 

York. — Imitations of precious stones. 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, 62 Vandam St., Hew York. 

Plate glass. 



, John, Company, Centre St., Hew York. 

Optical goods. 

Spencer Optical Company, Centre St., Hew York. 

Optical goods. 

Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, 333 Fourth Ave., Hew 

York. — Glass mosaic altars and altar furnishings; mausoleums 
and monuments. 



CLASS 74. 

APPARATUS AND PROCESSES FOR HEATING AND 

VENTILATION. 



American Badiator Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Radiators, furnaces, etc. 

Paris, 1889, Medal ; Chicago, 1893, Medal. 

Ashton Valve Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Valves and registering apparatus. 



410 GROUP XII.— CLASS IL 

Barber, A. C, Mannfaotnring Company, Chicago. 

Oil stoves. 

Beckwith, P. D., Estate of, Dowagiac, Hichigan. 

Heating stoves, "Round Oak." 

Board of Schools, New York. 

Drawings, etc., illustrating the methods of heating and ventilat- 
ing the public schools of the City of New York. 

Clark, George M., & Company, 72-74 Lake St., Chicago. 

Gas and gasoline cooking and heating stoves, ranges, etc 

Cortland-Howe Ventilating Stove Company, Cortland, Hew 

York. — Stoves. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Cox, Abram, Stove Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Heating and cooking apparatus. 

Ooodridge, Judson A., Company, Hew York. 

Steam specialties. 

Oriswold Manufacturing Company, Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Kitchen utensils and oil heating stoves. 

Hart & Cronse Company, XTtica, Hew York. 

Steam and water heating boilers. 

Herendeen Manufacturing Company, Geneva, Hew York. 

Water boilers, radiators and valves. 

International Heater Company, Hew York, and XTtica, Hew 

York. — Heating boilers, stoves, etc. 

Eieley & Muler, 13th St., Hew York. 

Valves, cocks and damper regulator. 

Magee, Furnace Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Cooking ranges, water heaters, combination warm air and hot 
water furnaces. Magee Grand cast iron cooking range, with 
water front, removable dock ash grate, oven thermometer ; wrought 
iron radiator, brick lined fire pot, revolving grates, convertible 
into warm air furnace ; cast iron water heater, boiler section in one 
piece; large fire surface and combustion chamber, vertical circula- 
tion. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Mahoney Man^^f acturing Company, Troy, Hew York. 

Heating boilers. 



GROUP XII.— CLASS 74. 411 



lEioliigan Stove Works, Detroit, Michigan. 

Heating stoves and ranges. ' 



Kodel Heating Company, Philadelphia, FennBylvania. 

Cast iron sectional boilers, for low pressure steam and hot water 
heating. 

Mott, The J. L., Iron Works, Hew York. 

Steam boilers, hot water heaters, steam and hot water radiators. 

Hew York Blower Company, Bucyms, Ohio, and 39-41 Cort- 

landt St., New York. — Heating and ventilating engines ; blowers, 
fans, heaters. 

Philadelphia Hardware & Malleable Iron Works, 9th and Jef- 
ferson Sts., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. — Radiators, registers and 
malleable iron fittings. 

Phillips & Clark Stove Company, Hew York. 
Range. 

Powers Begnlator Company, Chicago. 

Automatic temperature regulating apparatus. 

Boohester Badiator Company, Boohester, Hew York. 

Economical heating apparatus. 

Scaif e, William B., & Sons, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Ranges, boilers and expansion tanks. 

Smith & Anthony, 48 XTnion St., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Range. 

Stevenson, Thomas Boberts, & Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Stoves and ranges. 

Troy Hickel Works, Albany, Hew York. 

Stove hardware. 

Tuttle & Bailey Manufacturing Company, 83 Beekman St., 

New York City. — Registers and ventilators. 

Webster, Warren & Company, Camden, Hew Jersey. 

Vacuum system of heating. 

Wade, Bufus B., State House, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Plans for heating public buildings. 



412 GROUP XII.-CLASS 75. 



CLASS 75. 

APPARATUS AND METHODS, NOT ELECTRICAL, FOR 

LIGHTING. 



Adams, Thomas, Jr., Box 226, Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Automatic gas lighters. 

Cassidy & Son Mannfaotnring Company, 133 West 23d St., 

New York City. — Gas and electric fixtures. 

Eolopliane Glass Company, 1 Broadway, Hew York. 

Globes, reflectors, shades, etc. 

Eitson, Arthur, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Arc lamps giving an incandescent light from sprayed oil. 

Oil Vapour Incandescent light Company, 62 Wall St., Hew 

York. — Hydro-carbon incandescent lights. 

Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, 333 Fourth Ave., Hew 

York. — Electric fixtures, favrile glass vases, table ware, globes 
and shades. 



GROUP XIII. 

THREADS AND YARNS, FABRICS, GARMENTS. 

JOHN H. McGIBBONS, Director of Exploiution, in cbarKO. 



CLASS 76. 

MATERIALS AND PROCESSES FOR SPINNING AND 

ROPE-MAKING. 



Deering Harvester Companyi Cliicago. 

Sisal and manila binding twine. 

McCormick Harvester MacMne Company, Cliicago. 

Binding twine for harvesting machines. 



CLASS 78. 

EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES USED IN BLEACHING, 

DYEING, PRINTING AND FINISHING TEX- 

TILES IN THEIR VARIOUS STAGES. 



Troy Laundry MaoMnery Company, CUoago, Illinois. 

Photographs ; samples of work done on machinery. 



CLASS 79. 



EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES USED IN SEWING AND 

MAKING WEARING APPAREL. • 



Boston Blacking Company, Boston, Hassacknsetts. 

Blackings, dressings, inks, cement, stains and wax for boot and 
shoe manufacture. 

413 



414 GROUP XIII.— CLASS 79. 

Fenwick, A. D., Machine Company, Boston, Hassaohnsetts. 

Collar and cuff turning and pasting machine. 

Flagg Manufacturing Company, 110 linooln St., BostoxL, 

Massachusetts. — ^Julian sole rounder. • 

Globe Buffer Company, Moston, Massachusetts. 

Globe scourer, Webster buffer, Webster cleaner, Columbus fin- 
isher, used in making shoes, etc. 

Heibendahl, Miss £., 266 6th Ave., New York. 

Forms for displaying garments. 

International Button-Hole Sewing Machine Company, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. — Sewing machines for making buttonholes. 

McDowell Garment Drafting Machine Company, New York. 

Machines for drafting garments and patterns; system of dress 
cutting. Fashion journals. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Miller, 0. A., Brockton, Massachusetts. 

Boot and shoe treeing and ironing machine. 

Naumkeag Buffing Machine Association, Beverly, Massachu- 
setts. — Naumkeag pneumatic buffer and emery pads, used in mak- 
ing shoes. 

New Home Sewing Machine Company, Hew York. 

Sewing machines for family use. 

Horwich Hickel & Brass Company, Horwich, Connecticut. 

Stands and hangers for displaying goods. 

Bubens, Leon F., Hew York. 

Forms for displaying silks and fabrics. 

Schmidt, Oustav, 438 Canal St., Hew York City. 

Wax figures. 

Singer Manufacturing Company, The, 149 Broadway, Hew 

York. — Sewing machines for family use and for manufacturing 
purposes. 

XTnion Twin Edge Setter Company, 110 Lincoln St., Boston. 

Union twin-edge setter, used in making shoes. 

United Shoe Machinery Company, 111 Lincoln St., Boston. 

Shoe machinery in operation; making Goodyear welt and turn 
shoes. 



GROUP XIII.— CLASS 80. 415 

Wheeler & Wilson Hannfactiiring Company, Bridgeport, 

Connecticut. — Sewing machines for general and special uses, with 
accessories and samples of work. 

WUte Sewing HacMne Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sewing machines for family use. 



CLASS 80. 

THREADS AND FABRICS OF COTTON. 



Aherf oyle Manufacturing Company, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Fabrics in woven colors and designs; mercerized cotton goods, 
novelties in fancy goods, flannels. Selling agents, Galey & Lord, 
New York. 

American Hosiery Company, New Britain, Connecticut. 

Underwear and hosiery for men, women and children. 

American Thread Company, New York. 

Cotton thread. 

Arlington Hills, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Cotton yarns ; fine combed and mercerized yarns. 

Galey & Lord, New York City. 

Fabrics of cotton and cotton wool. 

Hirsch, Joseph, & Sons, New York City. 

Cotton linings. 

Lorraine Manufacturing Company, Fawtucket, Bhode Island. 

Dress goods (worsted and cotton). 



i Pacific Bailway, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Cotton scenes (photograph). 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publications and photographs of the cotton in- 
dustry in the United States. 

Felzer Mills, Felzer, South Carolina. 

Brown cotton sheetings, drills for export and other cotton fabrics. 



r 



416 GROUP XIII.— CLASS 82. 

FMladelpliia Textile Company, Philadelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Publications, photographs and specimens of work. 

Fonemah Hills, Taf tville, Connectiout. 

Plain and fancy dress goods. 

Potomska Kills, Hew Bedford, Hassaohnsetts. 

Fabrics of cotton. 

Schwab & Wolf, Hew York City. 

Novelty cotton draperies. 

Wamsutta Kills, Hew Bedford, Kassaohnsetts. 

Fabrics of cotton ; cotton goods. 

Paris, 1878, gold medal ; Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Whitman, Clarence, & Company, 39-41 Leonard St., Hew 

York City. — ^White cotton dress goods, lace curtains, bedspreads. 



CLASS 81. 

THREADS AND FABRICS OF FLAX. HEMP, 

ETC—CORDAGE. 



Anltman, Killer & Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Binding twine. 

Colnmbia Cordage Company, Anbnm, Hew York. 

Binding twine and cordage of sisal and manila hemp. 

Horthwestem Grass Twine Company, St. Fanl, Kinnetota. 

Binding twine, mats, carpet linings. 

Biohter Kannf actnzing Company, Tenafiy, Hew Jersey. 

Burlap, buckram, decorative stuffs. 



CLASS 82. 

YARNS AND FABRICS OF WOOL. 



Aberfoyle Kannf actnring Company, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Flannels and fabrics of wool. 

American Hosiery Company, Hew Britain, Connecticni 

Underwear and hosiery for men, women and children. 



GROUP XIII— CLASS 82. 417 

Annin & Company, 99 Fulton St., New York City. 

Bunting. 

Arling^n Hills, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Worsted yarns, tops, and dress goods for women and children. 

Ballardvale Kills, Ballardvale, Uassacliusetts. 

Flannels, bedspreads. 

Botany Worsted Hills, Passaic, New Jersey. 

All wool dress goods. 

Castle Braid Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Braids. 

Hockanum Company, Bockville, Connecticut. 

Woolen and worsted goods. 

Lorraine Hanuf acturing Company, Fawtucket, Bhode Island. 

Fabrics of wool. 

Hnhlliauser, The F., Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Wool fabrics. 

National Association of Wool Hanuf acturers, Boston, Hassa- 

chusetts. — Publications and photographs. 

New England Company, The, Bockville, Connecticut. 

Woolens, worsteds and coatings. 

Peace Dale Hanufacturing Company, Peace Dale, Bhode 

Island. — Worsted and woolen goods, worsted serges. 

Slater Woolen Company, Webster, Hassachusetts. 

Broadcloths. 

Springville Hanufacturing Company, Bockville, Connecticut. 

Woolens, worsteds and coatings. 

Standish Worsted Company, New York City. 

Woolen goods. 

XTnited States Bunting Company, Lowell, Hassachusetts. 

Bunting. 



418 GROUP XIII.— CLASS 83. 

CLASS 83. 

SILK AND FABRICS OF SILK. 



Anderson Brothers, Faterson, Hew Jersey. 

Silk fabrics. 

Annin & Company, 99 Fnlton St, Hew York City. 

Silk flags and bunting. 

Arlington MiUs, Lawrence, Hassachnsetts. 

Silks. 

Bridgeport Silk Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Silks and fancy goods. 

Cardinal & Becker, 26 Oreen St., Hew York, Faterson, Hew 

Jersey. — Silk linings. 

Castle Braid Company, Brookljm, Hew York. 

Braids. 

Clifton Silk Mills, Faterson, Hew Jersey. 

Dress silks. 

Doherty & Wadsworth, 138-140 Spring St., Faterson, Hew 

Jersey. — Dress silks. 

Empire Silk Works, Faterson, Hew Jersey. 

Dress silks and tie silks. 

Gotham Silk Hills, Hewwitter & Higel, Froprietors. 

Special designs in silks. 

Johnson, Cowdin & Company, Hew York City. 

Ribbons. 

liberty Silk Company, 469 Broome St, Hew York City. 

Dress silk. 

Faterson Bibbon Company, Faterson, Hew Jersey, 85 Oreen 

St., New York City. — Ribbons 

Felgram & Meyer, 113-117 Spring St., Hew York City. 

Dress silks and ribbons. 



GROUP XIII.— CLASS 84. 419 



Bichardson Silk Company, Belding, 

Sewing and embroidery silk, machine twist, silk and mohair braids. 

Silk AflsooiatioiL of America, New York City. 

Silk and silk fabrics. 

Smith & Eauf man, Jaterson, New Jersey. 

Ribbons. 

Steams, John N., & Company, 68 Greene St., New York City. 

Dress silk. 

Stetson, John B., Company, Philadelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Silk galloons for bands and bindings for hats. 



CLASS 84. 

LACES, EMBROIDERIES, AND TRIMMINGS. 



Adams, Fanny B., 302 Adelphi St., Brookljm, Nek York. 

Embroidered linen. 

Bankey, Mrs. Caledonia J., 62 Washington St., N. Bochester, 

New York. — Embroidered linen. 

Brady, Hiss Florence H., 607 Macon St., Brooklyn, New York. 

Embroidered linen. 

Carter, Hiss Sybl, New York City. 

Indian hand-made lace. 

Decorative Art Society of Baltimore, Maryland. 

Embroidered linen. 

Emerson, Hrs. Harriet 0., Brookline, Uassachnsetts. 

Embroidered linen. 

Foster, Hrs. A. W., 201 West 117th St., New York City. 

Embroidered linen. 

Havens, Hrs. J. H., 107 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, New York. 

Embroidered linen. 



420 GROUP XIII.—CLASS 84. 

MaoEane, Mrs. H. W., Flainfield, New Jersey. 

Embroidered linen. 

Mengle, Mrs. J. C, 122 West 8tli St., Benovo, Feimsyl^cania. 

Embroidered linen. 

New Home Sewing Machine Companji IS'ew York City. 

Machine needlework and embroidery. 

Nichols, Miss E. B., 312 West 22d St., New York. 

Embroidered linen. 



Nolan, Miss H. Jennings, 189 Madison Ave., Albany, New 

York. — Embroidered linen. 

Obery, Mrs. Christine M., Portland, Oregon. 

Embroidered linen. 

Singer Manufacturing Company, 140 Broadway, New York 

City. — Machine needlework, embroideries and tapestries. 

Stephenson, Miss C. J., Bed Bank, New Jersey. 

Embroidered linen. 

Taft, Joseph H., 41 E. 20th St., New York City. 

Embroidery and applique curtains. 

Taylor, Mrs. E. Coxhead, 605 Sixth Ave., New York City. 

Embroidered linen. 

Van Cley, Mrs. J. Charles, Ellenville, Ulster Co., New York. 

Embroidered linen. 

Waring, Mrs. C. E. Scott, Saratoga Springs, New York. 

Embroidered linen. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Candace, New York City. 

Needlework, embroidery and draperies. 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company, Bridgeport, 

Connecticut. — Machine needlework and embroideries. 

White Sewing Machine Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Machine needlework and embroidery. 

Wilson, Mrs. Lilian Barton, 128 Marcy Ave., Brooklyn, New 

York. — Embroidered linen. 



GROUP XIII.~C1>ASS 85. 421 



CLASS 85. 

INDUSTRIES PRODUCING WEARING APPAREL FOR 
MEN. WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 

Asch & Jaeckel, New York City. 

Manufactured furs and skins. 

McDowell Oarment Drafting Machine Company, New York. 

Machines for drafting garments and patterns; system of dress 
cutting. Fashion journals. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Merchant Tailors' National Exchange of the XTnited States 

of America, New York City. — Clothing to measure for men and 
women. 

CONTRIBUTORS. 

Barnwell & Eldridge. — Haberdashery. 

Budd & Company, Madison Square, New York. — Haber- 
dashery. 

Cammeycr, A. J., 6th Ave. and 20th St., New Tork. — Shoes. 

Dostal, A. R., Olive St. and Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri. — 
Garments. 

Dunlap & Company, Brookl)m, New- York. — Hats. 

Glasscoe & Company, 52 W. 30th St., New York. — Lady's 
gown. 

Grady, M. E., Company, 109 Main St., Rochester, New York. — 
Garments. 

Jantzen, H., 242 6th Ave., New York. — Shoes. 

Kaskel & Kaskel. 20 W. 23d St., New York. — Haberdashery. 

McCarthy, M. H. 120 Dearborn St.. Chicago. — Flannel suit. 

McCormick, 349 5th Ave., New York. — Hats. 

McNulty, P. F., 29 W. 34th St., New York.— Shoes. 

Matthews, Albert, Champlain Building, Chicago. — Garments. 

Merwin, B. R., .i2S Fifth Ave., New York. — Garments. 

Messenger & Jones, 388 Washington St., Boston. — Golf suit. 

Miller, Edward, 260 Fifth Ave., New York. — Hats. 

Moore, Olive, Estate, 118 42d St., New York. — Shoes. 

Mullet, J. G., 240 Fifth Ave., New York. — Lady's hunting suit. 

Nelson, Alfred, Company, Ltd., 261 Fifth Ave., New York. — 
Shooting jacket, etc. 

Newell, E. A., 28lh St. and 5th Ave., New York.— Haber- 
dashery. 

Nickerson, Boston, Massachusetts. — Haberdashery. 

Patterson, John, & Company, 2 West 33d St., New York. — 
Liveries. 

Rolflf, W. & Son, 274 Bridge St., Brooklyn, New York.— Shoes. 

Ryley, Rupert A., 256 Fifth Ave., New York. — Garments. 

Schaub Brothers, 80 Monroe Street, Chicago. — Garments. 



422 GROUP XIII.— CLASS 86. 

Schaub Brothers, Pioneer Press Building, St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Automobile suit. 

Schmidt, Gustave, 434 Canal Street, New York. — Forms for 
tr3ring on garments. 

Schmidt, H. A., 7th and Olive Sts., St Louis, Missouri. — 
Frock suit 

Somers, Frank D., South Park, Boston, Mass. — Garments. 

Tenny, New York. — Shoes. 

Tuttle, H. H., & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. — Ballroom 
slippers. 

Twyeffort, E., 381 Fifth Avenue, New York. — Hunting suit 

Weiss, Jules C, & Company, 2$ West 23d St, New York. — 
Full dress suit 

White, Howard, & Company, Madison Avenue, New York. — 
Garments. 

Youmans, Broadway and 2Sth Street, New York. — ^Hats. 

Hitohell, The Jolrn J., Company, 103 Fifth Ave., Hew York 

City. — Fashions for men and women. 

Bevillon Freres, Hew York City. 

Furs and fur garments. 

Warnook Uniform Company, 19 and 21 W. Slst St., Hew York 

Ci^. — Uniform caps. 



CLASS 86. 

VARIOUS INDUSTRIES CONNECTED WITH 

CLOTHING. 



American & Continental Shoe and Leather Sjmdioate, 11 

Broadway, New York. — Men's and women's shoes, boots and 
slippers. 

American Hosiery Company, Hew Britain, Connecticut. 

Underwear and hosiery for men, women, and children. 

Auerbach, Lonis, 836-838 Broadway, Hew York. 

Men's fine neckwear. 

Banister, James A., Company, Hewark, Hew Jersey. 

Fine boots, shoes, and slippers for men and boys. 



©ROUP XIIL— CLASS 86. 423 

Bliis, L. C, & Co., 101-113 Summer St., Boston, Hassaehnsetts; 

Factory, Whitman, Mass.— The "Regal Shoe," for men. 

Budd, Samuel, Hew York. 

Shirts and neckties. 

Ganfield Bubber Company, Bridgeport, Conneotiout. 

Dress shields. 

Childs-Cbamberlain Company, Newport, Hew Hampshire. 
Shoes. 

Cluett, Feabody & Company, Troy, Hew York. 

"Monarch" fancy shirts made from fabrics produced by Aber- 
fbyle Manufacturing Company, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Pkunce & Spinney, Lynn, Uassaohusetts. 

Ladies' Goodyear welts, Goodyear turns, and McKay sewed boots 
and shoes. 

Ford, Charles F., Company, Boohester, Hew York. 

Ladies', misses', and children's fine shoes. 

Oale Shoe Manuf aoturing Company, Haverhill, Hassaehusetts. 

Ladies' McKay boots and slippers. 

Gray, Vincent, Hew Orleans, Louisiana. 
Fans. 

Hanan, John, & Sons, Brookljm, Hew York. 

Men's and women's fine shoes. 

Eerriok, G. W., & Company, Lynn, Massachusetts. 

Ladies', misses' and children's fine shoes. 

Eayier, Julius, Hew York City. 

Gloves, mitts, and underwear. 

Keith, Oeorge E., Company, Campello, Massachusetts. 

Men's fine shoes. 

Laird, Schober & Company, Fhiladelphia, Fennsylyania. 

Ladies', misses', and children's fine shoes. 

Meyers, Louis, & Sons, 662-554 Broadway, Hew York. 

Gloves and glove leather. 



Shoe Company, Milf ord, Massachusetts. 

Men's machine sewed and Goodyear welt shoes. 



424 GROUP XIII.— CLASS ^. 

Hoore, Oliver, 118 W. 42d St., New York City. 

Boots. 

New England Shoe & Leather HannfactnrersV Association^ 

Boston, Massachusetts. — Publications and photographs. 

Noyes, Bead & Company, Haverhill, Massaohnsetts. 

Ladies' McKay sewed and turned boots and shoes. 

Pasadena Ostrich Farm, Pasadena, California. 

Ostrich feathers. 

Perkins, Idnscott & Company, Bochester, New Hampshire. 

Men's machine sewed and Goodyear welt shoes. 

Boelofs, Henry H., & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Soft and stiff fine fur felt hats for men and women. 

Stetson, John B., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Men's soft and stiff fine fur felt hats, ladies' fine fur fek hats, silk 
and cassimere dress hats. 

Torrey, Curtis & Tyrrell, North Weymouth, Massachusetts. 

Men's fine shoes. 

Wichert & Gardiner, Brooklyn, New York. 

Ladies' turned and Goodyear welt boots and shoes. 



GROUP XIV. 

CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES. 

ALEXANDER S. CAPEHART, DIRECIOR. 



CLASS 87. 

CHEMICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL ARTS. 
Equipment, Processes and Products. 



American Wood Fire-Froofiiig Company, Newark, New Jer- 
sey. — Non-flammable wood. 

Arable Cement Company, New York. 

Tableting cement used by printers and bookbinders. 

Armonr & Company, Chicago. 

Inedible animal products, bone and its products, etc. 

Armour Packing Company, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Inedible animal products, horns, hoofs, bones, fertilizers. 

Atlantic Befining Company, Pkiladelpliia, Pennsylvania. 

Petroleum and products. 

Babbitt, B. T„ 82 Washington St., New York. 

Soaps, glycerines, potash and by-products. 

Barrett Chemical Company, 344 Bowery, New York. 

Roachsault. 

Bean-Chamberlain Manufacturing Company, Hudson, Michi- 
gan. — Bean whitewashing and coating machine. 

Binney & Smith, 257 Pearl St., New York. 

Carbon gas blacks, lamp or oil blacks, *' Peerless" black. 

425 



426 GROUP XIV.— CLASS 87. 

Blicliert, The F. A., Hannf aotniing CompaHy, 67 niinoii St, 

Chicago. — Shoe polishes. 

Bnrbank Engraving Company, 55 Olive St., Boston, Kassa- 

chusetts. — Embossing composition. 

Cnprigraph Company, The, 108 N. Oreen St., Chicago. 

The sanitary still, producing pure aerated distilled water. 

Drevet Mannfactnring Company, The, 69 Prince St., Hew 

York. — Charles Marchand's medicinal preparations; hydrozone 
(30 volume solution of H2 O2), glycozone, eye balsam. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Foederer, Bobert H., Fhiladelphia, Fennsylvania. 

Shoe dressings. 

Freek, The Wm., Company, 120 S. Clinton St., Chicago. 

Pharmaceutical and chemical machinery and devices used in drug 
stores, chemists' shops and chemical factories. Specialties : Hand 
and power tablet, suppository, and triturating machines. 

International Chalice Company, 141 Broadway, Hew York, 

Medicinal preparations and rubber cups. 

Jaenecke Printing Ink Company, Hew York. 

Black and colored printing inks and bronzes. 

Jandns, William, 37 Tilden Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Water filters. 

Johns, B. B., 36 Boylston St., Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Daisy brand of stove polish, for use without brush or water. 

Lambert Fharmacal Company, 2101 Locust St., St Lonis, 

Missouri. — Listerine. 

Lawrence, W. W., & Company, Fittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Paints for machinery. 

Leonard & Ellis, 11 Broadway, Hew York 

Machinery oils. 

Matheson, William T., & Company, Ltd., 182-184 Front Si, 

New York.— White lead. 

Michigan Carbon Works, Detroit, Michigan. 

Gelatines and glues. 

Mnralo Company, The, Hew Brighton, Hew York. 

Decorative materials. 



GROUP XIV.— CLASS 89. 427 

Hnzsy Brotlien, Fatenon, Hew Jersey. 

Aquarine cold water paints. Weather-proof and fire-proof. One 
coat enough ; a powder in white or colors ; mixes with cold water. 

Bnssia Cement CompaHy, Oloncester, Hassacliiuietts. 

Fish glues. Le Page's liquid glue for general use. Le Page's 
photo-engraving glue for engraving on zinc and copper; samples 
of plates. 

Seabnry & Tolinsoii, 59-61 Maiden Lane, Hew York. 

Medicinal and surgical plasters, surgical dressings, specialties. 

Solar Beflning Company, Limai Ohio. 

Petroleum and products. 

Standard Oil Company, 26 Broadway, Hew York. 
Petroleum and by-products. 

Swift & Company, Chicago. 

Inedible animal products. 

Thomsen Chemical Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

General chemicals. 

Valentine A Company, 67 Broadway, Hew York. 

G>ach and car varnishes and colors. Japan gold size; Crown 
coach Japan, permanent wood filling, superfine blacks, rough stuff. 
Pure colors in oil. Artists* oil colors in tubes. Enamels. 

Warner, William B., & Company, Fhiladelpbia, Pennsylvania. 

Pills and pharmaceutical products. 



CLASS 89. 

LEATHER AND SKINS. 
Raw BIatbrials, Equipment, Pkocessbs and Products. 



Blatz, F. T., & Brothers, EUzabetb, Hew Jersey. 

Glazed Idd from Roat, calf, and sheep. 

Bnrk Brothers, 409 Arch St., FMladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Glazed kids. 

Bnngan, Hood & Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Glazed Idds. 



/ 



428 GROUP XIV.— CLASS 89. 

Foederer^ Bobert H., FhiladelpMay Fennsylyania. 

Tanned leather from goat and calf skins. Glazed kid of chrome 
tannage known as vici kid is an example of the successful devel- 
opment of the new tannage. The leather is mellow, strong in 
grain and fibre, full and rich in color and gloss, the lustre b^ing 
exceedingly permanent. 
Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Oreen, Cidviii, & Son, Saltillo and lewiston, Fennsylvama. 

North American and Saltillo, Texas, oak sole leather. Texas oak 
sole, cropped sides and bends; a tannage producing solidity and 
durability. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Paris, 1878, medal; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. 

HoUinger, Amos, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

Finished oak harness leather in backs. 

Howard, J. W. & A. P., & Company, Corry, Pennsylvania. 

Hemlock sole leather. 

Leas & HcVitty, 307 N. 3rd St., PMladelpMa, Pennsylvania. 

Oak leather and cut soles. Oak belting butts, backs, and bends, 
tannage producing strong fibre, fine grain and finish. Texas oak 
Sole, cropped sides and bends, a tannage producing solidity and 
durability. Texas cut soles, uniform in quality and grading. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal; Paris, 1878, medal; Chicago, 1893, 
medal. 

Salem Tanning Company, Salem, Virginia. 

Chestnut oak bark leather in rough and prepared for use. 

Scherer, Oscar, & Brother, 29 Spruce St., New York. 

Glazed fancy colors and black chrome kids. 

Schieren, Cliarles A., & Company, 45-51 Ferry St., New York. 

Oak tanned leather. 

Slocomb, F. F., & Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Leather staking machine. Leather stamping machine. 

Vacunm Oil Company, Bochester, New York. 

Leather oils and greases. 

Wagner Leather Company (California Commission), Stock- 
ton, California. — Finished hides; pelts and skins. 

Woodside Patent Calf Hannfactnring Company, The, New- 
ark, New Jersey. — Patent and enamel leather. 



GROUP XIV.— CLASS 91. 429 

CLASS 90, 

PERFUMERY. 
Raw Materials, Equipment, Processes and Products. 



Bremer, A. B., Company, 21 La Salle St., Chicago. 

Coke dandruff cure. 

Colgate & Company, 55 Johns St., New York. 

Perfumery, toilet soaps, and accessories. 

Cream of Lemon Company (California Commission), Los 

Angeles, California. — Cream of lemon. 

Hotchldss, The H. & 0., International Prize Medal Essential 

Oil Company, Lyons, New York. — American essential oils. 

Kochs, Theo. A., Company, 158 Wells St., Chicago. 

Barbers* chairs. 

Lorenz, George, Toledo, Ohio. 

Perfumery and toilet accessories. 

Beiger, Paul, & Company (California Commission), San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Flavoring extracts and perfumes. 

Webb, Mrs. L. T. (California Commission), Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. — Toilet soaps. 

Williams, The T. B., Company, Olastonbnry, Connecticut. 

Shaving and toilet soaps. 

Philadelphia, 1876, medal ; ChicajsfO, 1893. medal. 



CLASS 91. 

TOBACCO AND MATCHES. 
Equipment, Processes and Products. 



Baltimore Leaf Tobacco Association, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Leaf tobacco. 

Bimberg, Joseph, Elmira, New York. 

Leaf tobacco. 



430 GROUP XIV.— CLASS 91. 

Blmnenstiel, Levi & Company, New York, 

Porto Rican tobacco. 

BohlB, H., A Company (Calif omia Commission), San Fran- 
cisco, California. — Cured tobacco and manufactured tobacco. 

Brown, Morris, 336 Broadway, Hew York. 

Patented cigar box. 

Cardwell MaoMne Company, Bichmond, Virginia. . 

Machinery for manufacturing plug and smoking tobacco and aga- 
rettcs. 

Cincinnati Leaf Tobacco Warehonse Company, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. — Tobaccos, "White Burley" for pipe smoking. 

Clark, M. H., & Brothers, Clarksville, Tennessee. 

Tobaccos. 

Clay, Henry, & Bock & Company, Limited, 38 Broadway, 

New York City. — Clear Havana cigars. 

Cnllman Brothers, Hew York. 

Tobaccos grown in Ohio, Zimmer, Spanish, and Little Dutch. 
Wrappers,, binders, and fillers grown in Wisconsin and Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Cnnningham, Col. John S., Cunningham, Horth Carolina. 

Tobaccos grown in North Carolina, bright, mahogany and dark. 

Cytron, Otto, 202 H. Main St., Los Angeles, California. 

Manufactured tobacco, cigar novelties. 

Department of Agricnltnre, IT. S. A., Division of Soils, Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Collective exhibit of leaf tobacco grown in the 
United States. 

Bibrell Brothers, Danville, Virginia. 

Bright, mahogany and dark Virginia leaf tobacco. 

Florida Havana Company, Qnincy, Florida. 

Tobacco, Cuban and Sumatra seed, grown in Florida. 

Hagan-Dart Tobacco Company, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Dark export types of Virginia leaf tobacco. 

Havana Commercial Company, 32 Broadway, Hew York. 

Cigars. 

Hoge, Irwin & Company, Kingston, Horth Carolina. 

Tobacco, bright and mahogany, for export 



GROUP XIV.— CLASS 91. 431 

Jordaiii T. F., Oreensboro, Horth Carolina. 

Tobacco, leaf, bright and mahogany, grown in North Carolina. 

Idttman, Felix, Qnincy, Florida. 

Sumatra and Cuban tobaccos. 

Lonifville Leaf Tobacoo Exchange, Lonisville, Eentneky. 

"White Burley" and dark tobacco grown in Kentucky. 

Manhattan Brass Company, New York. 

Brass castings and railings for tobacco manufacturing machinery. 

Killer, DnBml & Peters Mannfactnring Company, The, 611 E. 

Pearl St, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Machinery for manufacturing cigars 
and cigarettes ; cigarmakers' molds and tools. 

Morris, E. K, ft Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Bar iron and steel for tobacco manufacturing machinery. 

Morns, J. B., Fonndry Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Iron castings for tobacco manufacturing machinery. 

Owl Commercial Company, Quinoy, Florida. 

Tobacco grown in Gadsden County, Florida. 

Bichmond Gold & Silver Cigarette Company, 44 W. 36th St., 
New York City. — Cigarettes, with wrappers of silver and gold 
leaf combined with vegetable fibre. 

Spiller & Bobinson, Ada, Texas. 

Cuban seed tobacco grown in Texas. 

Stranss, L. L., Bichmond, Virginia. 

Bright and dark types of Virginia tobacco. 

Sutter Brothers, 174-176 Pearl St., Hew Tork City. 

Cigar wrapper, binder, and filler grades of tobaccos grown in Wis- 
consin, Ohio, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. 

Texas Tobacco Orowers' Association, Houston, Texas. 

Texas tobaccos. 

TTnited States Tobacco Company, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Leaf, plug and fine-cut tobacco in process of manufacture. 

Veitor, E. E., & Company, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Light, mahogany and dark tobaccos grown in Virginia. 

Willdns, W. A., Winston, Horth Carolina. 

Bright tobacco grown in North Carolina. 

Williamson, T. S., & Company, Danville, Virginia. 

Bright, mahogany and dark Virginia leaf tobacco. 



r 



GROUP XV. 

DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIES. 

.H. H. HULBERT, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 92. 

STATIONERY. 
Machinery, Processes and Products. 



Amerioan Book Company, New York. 

Copy books. 

American Lead Pencil Company, New York. 

Lead pencils. 



ir Fountain Pen Company, 163 Broadway, New York. 

Fountain pens and fluid pencils having a year's supply of ir 
the penholder. Ink of all colors and for copying. 



Caw's Pen and Ink Company, 168 Broadway, New York. 

Fountain pens and writing inks. 

Crane Brothers, Westfield, Massachusetts. 
Linen ledger and record papers. 

Dayton, E. W., Kadison Avenue, New York. 

Stationery. 
Deck, A. B., New York. 

Rotary pencil sharpener. 

Freed, E. P., New York. 

Pens and rubber stamps. 

Hansen & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Pin holders. 

433 



^ 



434 GROUP XV.— CLASS 93. 

Hinde & Danoli, 12 WUte Street, Hew York. 

Qiman bottle wrappers, made of sized paper. 



Inman American Box Macliine Company, Amsterdam, Hew 

York. — Paper box manufacturing machinery. 

Neostyle Envelope Company, Hew York. 

Envelope machine. 

Fomeroy Brothers, East Hewark, Hew Jersey. 

Inks, mucilage, sealing wax, rubber stamps, etc. 

Smith, B. H., Mannfaetnring Company, Sprii^eld, Kassa* 

chusetts. — Easy sign markers and office stamps. 

Tiffany & Company^ TTnion Square, Hew York. 

Stationery. Steel,- copper plate and intaglio printing. 

TTnion Bag and Paper Company, CMcago, Illinois. 

Paper bags. 

United States Flaying Card Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Playing cards. 

Waterman, L. E., Company, Hew York. 

Fountain pens. 

Weston Faper & Mannf aotnrii^^ Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Paper specialties and stationery. 

Wkiting Faper Company, Holyoke, Hassaclinsetts, ^tnd Hew 

York. — Writing papers, envelopes and novelties. 



CLASS 93. 

CUTLERY. 
Equipment, Processes and Products. 



American Shearer Hannfacturing Company, Hashna, Hew 

Hampshire. — Hair clippers. 

Baldwin, Charles I., 17 Charlotte Street, Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts. — Razors and clippers. 



^ 



GROUP XV.— CLASS 94. 435 

Brown & Sharpe, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Hair clippers. 

Oem Cutlery Company, 670 Hudson Street, New York. 

Gem safety razor. 

Jordan, A. J., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Safety razors. 

Feck & Snyder, 126 Nassau Street, New York. 

Ice and roller skates. 

Tiffany & Company, TTnion Square, New York. 

Silversmiths' small ware. 



CLASS 94. 

SILVERSMITHS' AND GOLDSMITHS' WARE. 
Appuances, Processes and Products. 



(}orham Manufacturing Company, Broadway, and 19th Street, 

New York. — Silver and goldsmiths' ware. 

Philadelphia, 1876, gold medal; Paris, 1889, gold medal; Chi- 
cago, 1893, forty-nine awards. 

Hanaweber, L., New York. 

Chased work. 

Begensburg, 0. H., 260 Dearborn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 

Gold and silversmiths' work in aluminium. 

Sandberg, F. W., Oak Park, Chicago. 

Gold and silversmiths' work, done wholly with the hammer. 

Spongier, P., New York. 

Silversmiths' work. 

Swamby, 0., New York. 

Enameling. 

Taylor, S. S., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Burnishing tools. 



436 GROUP XV.— CLASS 95. 

Thoma, J. S., New York. 

Design of silverware. 

Tiffany & Company, TTnion Sqnare, New York. 

Gold and silversmiths' ware, enameled work, etc. 

Paris, 1878, Grand Prix; 1889, Chevalier Legion d'Honncur. 



CLASS 95. 

. JEWELRY. 
Equipmbnt, Processes and Products. 



Attleboro Hannfactnring Company, Attleboro, Massachu- 
setts. — ^Jewelry and novelties. 

Aznre Hinii^ Company, 172 Broadway, New York. 

Turquoises cut and rough, and turquoise jewelry. 

Barber Jewelry Company, 36 Oold St., New York. 

Pyrites jewelry and alligator teeth. 

Codman, Wm. C, New York. 

Designs for jewelry. 

Donohne, E. T., New York. 

Lapidary work. 

Dreyer, H. 0., New York. 

Lapidary work. 

Famkam, Paulding, New York. 

Design for silverware, jewelry, and lapidary work. 

(}orham Hannfactnring Company, 19tli Street and Broadway, 

New York. — Gold and silver jewelry. 

Onentzer, H., New York. 

Design for jewelry. 

Haas, A., New York. 

Design for jewelry. 



GROUP XV.— CLASS 96. 437 

Jordan, Frederick A., New York. 

Decoration for Martele ware. 

Klapp, Mrs. Wm., ''The Plaza/' CMcago, Illiiiois. 

Jewelry. 

Xnnz, Gkorge Frederick, M.A., New York. 

Minerals, semi-precious and precious stones; folklore of precious 
stones. 

Kansileld, K. T.| New York. 

Artistic jewelry. 

Maynard, New York. 

Model for jewelry. 

New York Novelty Company, 907 Hancock St., Brooklyn, 

New York. — ^Jewelry. 

Falmeri, L. T., 97 Saratoga Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 

Novelty jewelry. 

Bider, S. A., Jewelry Company, 705 Washington St., St. 

Louis, Missouri. — ^Jewelry and fancy goods. 

Sandberg, F. W., Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois. 

Metal work done wholly with the hammer. 

Spratt, Charles E., 44th Street, New York. 

Jewelry. 

Straker, Jos. E., New York. 

Jewelry. 

Tiffany A Company, TTnion Sqnare, New York. 

Fine jewelry and jewelry set with precious stones ; lapidary work; 
cut and uncut semi-precious stones. 

Wi^^er Manufacturing Company, Sydney, Ohio. 

Aluminium goods. 

Whitehouse, James H., New York. 

Design for jewelry. 

Wright, T. H., New York. 

Design for jewelry. 



438 GROUP XV.— CLASS 97. 

CLASS 96. 

CLOCK AND WATCH MAKING. 
Equipment, Processes and Products. 



Automatic Electric Clock Company; 231 S. Canal Street, Chi- 
cago. — Automatic electric clocks. 

Brandt-Dent Company, Watertown, Wisconsin. 

Cash register. 

Bnndy Hannf actnring Company, Bingliamton, Hew York, 

Time recorders (clocks). 

Chicago Time Begister Company, Chicago, 

Time registers, clocks. 

Ingersoll, Bobert H., & Brothers, 67 Cortlandt St., New York, 

Watches and specialties. 

International Computing Machine Company, Chicago. 

Comptometer. 

Krahenbnjil, San Bafael, California. 

Model of watches and clocks. 

Spratt, Charles E., 44th Street, New York. 

Clocks and watches. 



CLASS 97. 



WORKS OF ART IN BRONZE, CAST IRON AND WROUGHT 

IRON, REPOUSSE WORK 



Ames, Mrs., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Banr, Theodore, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 



GROUP XV.— CLASS 97. 439 

Bissell, George E., 30 East 14tli Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Bitter, Karl, Weeliawken, New Jersey. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Bonnard, Henry, Bronze Company, 430 W. 16tli Street, New 

York. — Castings in bronze and other metals. 

Boyle, J. J., Watt Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Bracken, Jnlia H., Studio Building, Chioago. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Erolioh, F. H., 1321 Broadway, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Hondon, Jean Antoine, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

lander, H., 44 West 30th Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Lopez, Charles, 249 1-2 East 13th Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Horetti, 0., 118 West 38th Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Bemington, P., 301 Webster Avenue, New Bochelle, New 

York. — ^Works of art in bronze. 

Sandberg, P. W., Oak Park, Chioago, 

Works of art in gold and silver, made wholly with the hammer. 

Spratt, Charles E., 44th Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Storok, George H., 12^ Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

' Storer, Mrs. Maria Longworth, U. S. Legation, Madrid, Spain. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Tiffany & Company, Union Square, New York. 

Works of art in bronze and iron ; repouss6 work. 

Tiffany Glass & Deoorating Company, 333 Fourth Avenue, 

New York City. — Tablets and bronzes. 



440 GROUP XV.— CLASS 98. 

Toberentz, B., Hew York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Ward, J. A., 119 West 52d Street, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 

Whitekoiue, F. W., New York. 

Eng^raving and decorating of copper, plate printing, etc 

Winans, Walter, Snrrenden Park, Ashford, Kent, England, 

and New York. — ^Works of art in bronze. 

Wnertz, K, New York. 

Works of art in bronze. 



CLASS 98. 



BRUSHES, FINE LEATHER ARTICLES, FANCY ARTICLES 

AND BASKET WORK. 



Barnard, Oeorge, & Company, 212 Vanderbilt Building, New 

York. — Leather goods. 

BlBsell Carpet Sweeper Company, Grand Bapids, Hiohigan. 

Carpet sweepers. 

Bmnswick-Balke-CoUender Company, New York and Chioago. 

Articles in ivory. 

Oorkam Mannf aotnring Company, Broadway, New York. 

Fine leather articles, with mountings of gold and silver. 

Philadelphia, 1876, gold medal ; Paris, 1889, gold medal ; Chi- 
cago, 1893, forty-nine awards. 

Howard's, S. E., Son, & Company, Boston, Hassaolinfletts. 

Razor strops. 

Jordan, A. J., St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Strops; wood and other cases. 

Los Angeles Art Leather Company, Los Angeles, Califor- 
nia. — Leather specialties. 

Begensbnrg, 0. H., 261 Dearborn Avenne, Chioago, Illinoii. 

Fancy articles in aluminium. 



GROUP XV.— CLASS 100. 441 

Seidy, Sara, 28 Waflhington Street^ Chioago, IllinoiB. 

Tortoise shells and hair goods for dressing hair. 

Tiffany & Company, New York. 

Fine leather articles, dressing cases, bags, pocket-books, port- 
folios, cigar and cigarette cases. 

Tonng & Bobinson, Fnllman Building, CMoago. 

Machine for making brushes. 



CLASS 99. 

INDIA RUBBER AND GUTTA PERCHA INDUSTRIES. 
Equipment, Processes and Products. 



American Wringer Company, 99 Chambers St.^ Hew York. 

Qothes wringers. 

Arawani KillB, I. E. Palmer, Proprietor, Middletown, Con- 
necticut. — Hammocks. 

Hew Departure Trunk Company, Snmner Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Patent trunks. 

Weston Paper and Hannf aotnring Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

G^mbined chair and hammock. 



CLASS 100. 

TOYS. 



Barnard, George, & Company, 212 Vanderbilt Building, Hew 

York. — Sporting goods. 

Crawford, HoOregor & Canby, Dayton, Ohio. 

Golf clubs. 



442 GROUP XV.— CLASS 100. 

Peck & Snyder, 126 Nassau St.^ New York. 

Ice and roller skates for hockey, polo, la crosse, etc. 

TTnited States Playing Card Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Games. 

Spalding, A. 0., & Brother, Nassau Street, New York. 

Implements used in athletic sports. 

Spanlding Hannf actoring Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Sporting goods in wood. 

Wright and Ditson, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Lawn tennis goods. 



GROUP XVI. 

SOCIAL ECONOMY, HYGIENE, PUBLIC 

CHARITIES. 

HOWARD J. ROGERS, DIRECTOR. 



CLASS 101. 

APPRENTICESHIP— PROTECTION OF CHILD LABOR. 



Department of Social Economy, U. S. Commiuion to 

Paris. — Maps, charts, plans, photog^raphs and publications. 

Dickson Mannfactnring Company, Scranton, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Photographs. 

Honse of Befnge, Boys' Department, Olen Mills, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Publications, photographs. 

Labor Statistics, Bnrean of^ State of Massaclinsetts. 

Charts showing changes in laws in relation to child labor. 

Lowell Textile School, Lowell, Massaclinsetts. 

Catalogues, photographs of building. 

Hew Bedford Textile School, Hew Bedford, Massachu- 
setts. — Catalogues; photographs of buildings. 

Philadelphia Textile School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Photographs. 



GLASS 102. 



WAGES— INDUSTRIAL REMUNERATION— PROFIT 

SHARING. 



Department of Social Economy, IT. S. Commission to ] 

Maps, charts, plans, photographs, books and pamphlets. 

443 



444 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 

Oilman, N. B., Headville, PennsylTania. 

Monograph on Co-operation and profit sharing. 

Labor Satistios, Bureau of, State of New York, Albany, 

New York. — ^Diagrams showing condition of wage-earners in 
the State of New York. 

ashington, D. C, 



Monograph on economic institutions. 



CLASS 103. 



LARGE OR SMALL INDUSTRIES— CO-OPERATIVE 

ASSOCIATIONS FOR PRODUCTION OR FOR 

OBTAINING CREDIT— TRADE UNIONS. 



Alnminium World, 218 William Street, Hew Tork. 

Pubh'cation. 
American Amateur Photographer, 241 Fifth Avenue, Hew 

York. — Publications. 

American Artisan and Hardware Beoord, 69 Dearborn 

Street, Chicago. — Publications. 

American Bee Journal, 18 Michigan Street, Chicago. 

Publications. 

American Building Association Hews, Hew Tork. 

Reports of proceedings. 

American Chemical Journal, University Building, Hew Tork. 

Publication. 

American Federation of Labor, Washington, D. C. 

Statistics; reports; publications. 

American Oinner and Cotton Beporting Agency, Meridian, 

Mississippi. — Publications. 

American Investments, 202 Main Street, Buffalo, Hew Tork. 

Publication. 

American Iron and Steel Association, 261 8. Fourth St., Fhila- 

delphia. — Publication. 



GROUP XVI.- CLASS 103. 445 

Ameiioan Knit Goods BevieWi Vmcent Building, SOS Broad- 
way, New York. — Publications. 



Lumbenoan, Manliattan Building, 315 Dear- 
born St., Chicago. — Publications. 

Amerioan ICannf actnrer and Iron World, Pittsburg, 

Pennsylvania. — Publications. 

Amerioan Shipbuilder, 7 Coenties Slip, New York. 

Publication. 



Telephone and Telegraph Company, 15 Dey 

Street, New York City. — Map of lines. 

Anaoonda Hining Company, Butte City, Montana. 

Photog^raphs. 

Anthony, E. & H. T., & Company, 591 Broadway, New 

York City. — Publications. 

Arizona Lumber and Timber Company, Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Photographs. 

Atehison, Topeka & Santa Fe Bailroad, Chioago. 

Publications. 

Atlanta & West Point Bailroad, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Photographs. 

Ayers, N. W., & Company, Times Building, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Newspaper Directory. 



in looomotive Works, 500 Broad Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Photographs. 

Baltimore and Ohio Belief Assooiation, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Reports, constitution, etc, 

Bangor & Aroostook Bailroad, Bangor, Maine. 

Pamphlets and photographs. 

Bank Commissioners, New Hampshire Board of, Conoord, New 

Hampshi re. — Reports. 

BanUng, Commissioner of, of Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Reports. 

Belden, A. S., 695 Broadway, New York. 

Publications. 



446 GROUP XVI.— CLASS lOa 

Board of Arbitration, Connecticut State, Hartford, Con- 
necticut — ^Reports; statistics. 

Board of j^bitration, UlinoiB State, Springfield, UlinoiB. 

Reports; statistics. 

Board of Arbitration, Indiana State, Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana. — Reports; statistics. 

Board of Arbitration, Massaclinsetts State, Boston, Kassa- 

chusetts. — Reports ; statistics. 

Board of Arbitration, Hew York State, Albany, Hew 

York. — Reports ; statistics. 

Board of Arbitration, Ohio State, Colnmbns, O&io. 

Reports; statistics. 

Board of Arbitration, Wisconsin State, Madison, Wiscon- 
sin. — Reports; statistics. 

Board of Trade, Bangor, Maine. 

Pamphlets. 

Board of Trade, Chicago. 

Reports. 

Board of Trade, Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Pamphlets ; photographs. 

Board of Trade, Nevada State, Bene, Hevada. 

Photographs. 

Board of Trade, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication. 

Board of Trade, Stenbenville, Ohio. 

Publications. 

Board of Trade, Tampa, Florida. 

Photographs. 

Boston & Maine Bailway, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs and descriptive publications. 

Boston Journal of Commerce and Textile Industries, 128 

Purchase Street, Boston, Massachusetts. — Publications. 

Brick, Monon Building, Chicago. 
Publication. 



.GROUP XVI.— CLASS loa 447 

Briokbuilder, 85 Water Street^ Boston, Hassacliiuetts. 

Publication. 

BrotlLerhood of Locomotive Engmeeny Cleveland, OMo. 

Publications. 

Bnilding and Loan Association^ California, Sacramento, 

California. — Reports of proceedings. 

Bnilding and Loan Associations, Illinois State League, 

Springfield, Illinois. — Documents. 

Bnilding and Loan Associations, Indiana State League, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. — Documents, etc. 

Building and Loan Association, Louisiana State League, 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. — Documents, etc. 

Building and Loan Association, Metropolitan League of New 

York, New York. — Documents, etc. 

Building and Loan Associations, Massachusetts State League, 

Boston, Masachusetts. — Documents, etc 



Building and Loan Associations, Micli^;an State League, 

Lansing, Michigan. — Documents, etc 

Building and Loan Associations, Missouri State League, Jef- 
ferson City, Missouri. — Documents, etc. 

Building and Loan Associations, National League of, Wash- 
ington, D. C. — Documents, etc 

BuUding and Loan Associations, Wisconsin State League, 

Madison, Wisconsin. — Documents, etc 

Building and Loan Commission of New York, New York. 
Reports. 

Bureau of American Bepublics, Washington, D. C. 

Commercial directory. 

Bureau of Labor Statistics, of Massachusetts, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Charts showing concentration of industries into large 
establishments. 

Bureau of Statistics, United States Government, Washington, 

D. C. — Report of Chief of Bureau. 

Burlington Bailroad, 209 Adams Street, Chicago. 
Publications. 



4i8 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 

Bnrling^n Volantary Sdief Department, Burlington, 

Iowa. — Reports, constitution and documents. 

r 

California Paris Ezpoiition Conunission, San Franoifloo, 

California. — Photographs. 

California Emit Grower, 320 Saniome Street, San Franoisoo, 

California. — Publications. 

Cliamber of Commeroe, Charleston, Sonth Carolina. 

Photographs. 

CMoago Dry Goods Beporter, 233 Fifth Avenne, Chioago. 

Publications. 



Chioago Pnenmatio Tool Company, Honadnook Building, 

Chicago. — Photographs. 

Chioago Beoord, Chioago. 

Photographs. 

Chioago, Book Island & Paeifio Bailroad, Chioago. 

Photographs and documents. 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chioago & St. Lonis Bailway, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. — Publications. 

Clifford & Lawton, Union Sqnare, New York. 

Publications. 

Clnett, Peabody & Company, 433 Biver Street, Troy, New 

York. — Photographs. 

Colnmbiis Face Brick Company, Columhns, Ohio. 

Photographs; sample of products. 

Commiuioner of Agricnltnre, Lonisiana State, Baton Bonge, 

Louisiana. — Publications. 

Commoner & Olassworker, The, Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania. 

Publications. 

Confectioner's Jonmal, 209 Sonth Sixth Street, Philadelphia. 

Publication. 

Cotton Belt Bonte, St. Lonis, Missonri. 

Publications. 

Crane Company, Chicago. 

Photographs. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 449 

Crockery and Glass Journal, 92 W, Broadway, Hew York. 

Publication. 

Daily Mining Beoord, Denver, Colorado. 

PublicatioxL 

Davidson Publishing Company, 401 Broadway, New York. 

Publications. 

De La Mar's Veronr Mines Company, Meronr, TTtah. 

Photographs. 

Denver & Bio Grande Bailroad Company, Denver, Colo- 
rado. — Pamphlets. 

Department of Social Economy, U. 8. Commission to Paris 

Exposition. — Maps, charts, plans, photographs, books, pamphlets. 

Dixie Miller, Nashville, Tennessee^ 

Publication. 

Dockham, C. A«, & Company, 131 Devonshire Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Directory, Dockham's Textile Manufacturer. 

Dodge Manufacturing Company, Mishawaka, Indiana. * 

Photographs. 

Dowst Brothers Company, 24-30 S. Clinton Street, Chicago. 

Publication. 

DuiMfan, Hood & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs. 

Earl & Wilson, Troy, New York. 

Photographs. 
Electrical Beview, 41 Park Bow, New York. 

Publications. 

Engineering Magazine, 120 Liberty Street, New York. 

Publication. 

Engineering News Publishing Company, 220 Broadway, New 

York. — Publications. 

Export Carriage Monthly, Philadelpl^ia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication, map of carriage manufacturers. 

Express Gazette, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publications. 



450 GROUP XVI.—CLASS 103. 

Farm Implement Newsi Kasonio Temple, Ghioago. 

Publication. 

Fishing Gazette, 203 Broadway, Hew York. 

Publication. 

Eiflk, Haley, Bofton, Kaisadhnsetts* 

Special report concerning the history and character of industrial 
insurance in the United States. 

Fliokenger, J. H., & Company, San Toee, California. 

Photographs. 

Forester, The, Washington, D. C. 

Publications. 

Foresters of America, Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Reports, etc. 

Fostoria Glass Company, Honndsrille, W. Virginia. 

Photogfraphs. 

Fnmitnre Worker, 126 Longworth Steeet, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publications. 



General Electric Company, Schenectady, Hew York. 

Photographs; pen and ink drawings. 

Glass & Pottery World Con^any, 21 Qnincy Street, Chi- 
cago. — Publication. 

Granite, 131 Bevonshire Street, Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Publication, photographs. 

Herald Publishing Company, ^tenbenville, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Herschell, Bhine & Company, 1420 Chestnnt Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Directory, the World's Market 

Hires Tnmer Glass Company, 626 Arch Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Photogfraphs. 

Hocking Valley Bailroad, Columbns, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Hotel Hontiily, 325 Bearbom Street, Chicago. 

Publication. 

Hotel Bed Book and Birectory Company, Grand TFnion Hotel, 

New York. — ^Directory. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 451 

Howe Addrening Oompany, 208 South 4fh Street, Fhila- 

delphia, Pennsylvania. — Publications. 

niinoii Steel Company^ Bookeryy diioago. 

Photographs. 



Ingenoll-Sergeant Brill Company^ 26 Cortlandt Street, New 

York City. — Photographs. 

Inland Printer Company, 212 Monroe Street, Chieago. 

Publications, photographs. 



& Great Northern Bailroad Company, Pales- 
tine, Texas. — Photographs, pamphlets. 

Iron and Steel, 40 Dearborn Street, Chieago. 

Pttblicationa. 

Iron Trade Boview, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Publication. 

JeSttj ICannf aotnring Company, Columbna, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Jones, Edward D., Madison, Wiseonsin. 

Monographs: Resources an 
People of the United States. 



Monographs: Resources and Industries; the Country and the 
e of 1 



Jonmqrmen Stone Cutters' Association, CinetBuati, Ohio. 

Statistics and publications. 

J ourneym en Tidlors' TFnion, Bloomington, Illinois. 

Publication. 

Lehigh Valley Bailroad, 26 CorUandt Street, Hew York. 

Reports; constitution and pamphlets. 

Link Belt Sngineering Company, Philadelphia, Pennsji- 

vania. — Photographs. 



Looomotfre Engineering, 96 Liberty Street, Hew York. 

Publications. 

Looomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Publications. 

LooomotiTe Fireman's ¥agaiine, Peoria, Illinois. 

Publications. 

Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer, 889 Oaronde- 

let Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. — Publication. 



462 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 

Lumber Trade Jonmaly 18 Broadwaji Hew York. 

Publications. 

Lyon, Bobert P., 416 Broadway, New York. 

Directory, Lyon Reference Book. 

Macullar Parker Company, 398-400 Washington St., Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs of their clothing manufacturing 
workshops. 

Manhattan Storage and Warebonse Company, Lexington 

Ave. and 42nd St., New York City. — Photographs. 

ICannfaotnrers' Beoord, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Publications. 

Mannf aetoring Jeweler, Providenoe, Bbode Island. 

Publication. 

Master Builders' Assooiation, New York. 

Publication. 
Merritt & Chapman Derrick & Wrecking Company, 27 

William St., New York City. — Photographs. 

Meyer Brothers' Druggist, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Publication. 



Artisan, Grand Bapids, Michigan. 

Pamphlet. 

Mining and Engineering Beview, 429 Montgomery Street, 

San Francisco, California. — Publications. 

Minnesota^ Iron Company, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Photog^raphs of mines, docks and ships. 



Mississippi Valley Lumberpan, 1013 Lumber Exchange, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. — Publication. 

Missouri Lumber & Mining Company, Oranden, Missouri 

Photographs. 

Modem Miller, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Publications. 

Myrick, Herbert, Springfield, Massachilsetts. 

Publications. 

National Nurseryman Publishing Company, Bochester, New 

York. — Publication. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 453 

Hew England Shoe A Leather Assooiationi 116 Bedford Street, 

Boston, Massachusetts. — Documents, photographs. 



Sorthwestem Miller, XinneapoliSy Minnesota. 

Publications. 

Oregon Short Line Bailroad, Salt Lake City, ITtaL 

Publications. 

Ores and Metals, Denver, Colorado. 

Publications. 

Pennsylvania Bailroad, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Reports, photographs and charts. 

Pennsylvania Bailroad Employees' Savings Fund, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Reports, charts, statistics, photographs. 

Philadelphia and Beading Bailroad, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Reports, constitution and pamphlet 

Philadelphia Commercial Mnsenm, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — General exhibit 

Philadelphia Times, Times Building, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Photographs. 

Piano Mannfaeturers' Association, 113 I4th Street, New 

York. — American Musical Club Directory. 

Pittsburg and Western Bailway Belief Department, Titts- 

burg, Pennsylvania. — ^Reports, constitution, etc. 

Popular Science, 108 Fulton Street, New York. 

Publications. 
Portland, The, Portland, Oregon. 

Photographs ; pamphlets. 

Portland Tradesman, Booms 7-10, 49 1-2 First Street, Port- 
land, Oregon. — Publication. 

Post, L. D., 108 Fulton Street, Hew Tork. 

Publication. 

Postal Telegraph Cable Company, Hew York. 

Map of lines. 

Power, World Building, Hew York. 
Publication. 



4M GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 

Fvwen, E. L., Company, ISO Hasiau Street, Hew Terk. 

Publications. 

Profitable Adyertiiiiig, 227 WaahingrtoiL Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Publications. 

FrogreasiTe Age, The, 280 Broadway, Hew Tork. 

Publication. 

Bailroad Employee, 484 Broad Street, Hewark, Hew Teraey. 

Publication. 



Bailroad Telegrapken, St. £oiii% IUmohtL 

Publications. 

Bailway Age, Monadnook Blook, Ckioago. 

Publication. 



and Engineering Beview, 1305 Manhattan Bnilding, 

Chicago. — Publications. 



Bailwi^ Master Meohanio, 315 Dearborn Street, Chi 

Publication. 



Bandall, T. A., A Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publication. 

Bemington Standard Tjrpewriter, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Betail Druggist, 37 Hodges Bnilding, Detroit, Miohigan. 

Publications. 

Beview A Herald Publishing Company, Battle Creek, 

Michigan. — Photographs. 

Biohardson, T. M., Company, 27 Park Plaoe, Hew York. 

Publications. 

Biley Brothers, 16 Beelonan Street, Hew York. 

Views of large and small industries. 

Beokwood Pottery Company, Cinoinnati, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Butland Bailroad Company, Butland, Vermont. 

Publications. 

Sample lumber Company, Hollins, Alabama. 

Photographs. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 103. 456 

San Eranoisoo Trade Tonrnali San Eranoisoo, OaUf ornla. 

Publications. 

ScUeren, Chaiies A., A Company, 45-50 Ferry Street, Hew 

York City. — Photographs. * 

Sohoff, W. A., Commeroial Mnievm, Thiladelpliia, Pennsyl- 

yania. — Monograph on commercial institutions. 

Sheffield Car Company, Three Bivers, lUchigan. 

Photographs. 

Shoe A Leather Beporter, 17 Sprnoe Street, Hew York. 

Directory, Shoe and Leather Reporter Annual. 

Singer Kannfaotnring Company, 148 Broadway, Hew 

York. — Photographs. 

Skinner, Frank W., 100 William Street, Hew York. 

Photographs of large industrial undertakings. 

Southern Lnmberman, Hathville, Tennessee. 

Photographs. 



Sonthem Planter, Biohmond, Yirgi 

Publication. 

Southern Bailway Company, Washington, D. C. 

Photographs ; publications. 

Springfield Xaohine Tool Company, Springfield, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Standard Yamish Works, 29 Broadway, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Starohroom, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Publications and photographs. 

Steinmeyer, William, & Company, 316-820 Third Street, 
waukee, Wisconsin. — Photographs. 

Stone, 705 Fontiao Building, Chicago. 

Photographs. 

Studebaker Brothers Kanuf aoturing Company, South 

Bend, Indiana. — Photographs. 

9umi Beet, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publications. 



456 GROUP XVI.-CLASS 103. 

Sunset, 4 Montgomery Street, San Erandsoo, California. 

Publication. 

Swift A Company, TTnion^Stock Yards, Chicago. 

Photographs. 

Telephone Itagaadne, Harqnette Bidlding, Chicago. 

Publication. 

Terre Haute Brick Pipe Company, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Photographs. 

Texas Varm and Banch, Dallas, Texas. 

Publication. 

Textile Publishing Company, 78-80 Walker Street, Few 

York City. — Publication. 

Thompson Beporting Company, Boston, Hassachusetts. 

Directory of piano manufacturers. 



Tin and Teme and the Metal World, 53 Hinth Street, Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. — Publication. 

Tobacco Leaf Publishing Company, 96 Haiden Lane, 

New York City. — Publication. 

Trade Journal, Bichmond, Virginia. 

Publication. 



', William B., & Company, Bichmond, 

Photographs. 

Triumph Ice Uachine Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Tyndell, E. T., 920 Walnut Stteet, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Publication : National Barber. 

Vermont Improvement Association, Montpelier, Vermont. 

Publications. 

Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont. 

Photographs. 

Ware Brothers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication: Carriage Monthly. 

Weaver's Herald, The, Wonderly Publifliing Compatiy, 

Lyons, Kansas. — Publication. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 104. 457 

Western Union Telegrapli Company, Few York. 

Map of lines. 

Westinglionse Company, Pittsbni^, Fennsylyania. 

Photographs. 

Wholesale Orooers' and Canners' Directory, Minneapolis, 

M innesota. — Directory. 

WiUonghby, W. F., Washington, D. C. 

Monograph on industrial arbitration and conciliation. 

Winslow Brothers Company, The, Carroll Ave. and Fnl- 

ton St., Chicago. — ^.Photographs. . , 



Wood, Walter A., Mowing and Beaping Machine Com- 
pany, Hoosick Falls, New York. — Photographs. 



CLASS 104. 

FARMING ON A LARGE OR SMALL SCALE— AGRI- 
. CULTURAL UNIONS AND BANKS. 



Alabama Land and Development Company, Mobile, Alabama. 

Photographs. 

Atlantic Coast Line, Wilmington, North Carolina. 

Photographs. • . 

Board of Trade, State of Heyada, Bene, Kevada. 

Photographs. 

Boston ft Maine Bailway, Boston, Massaohnsetts. 

Photographs and descriptive publications. 

California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, 

California. — Photographs. 

Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles, CaUfomia. 

Photographs. 

Chamber of Commerce, Santa Ana, California. 

Photographs. 



468 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 106. 

Corn Belt, 209 Adams Street, Chicago. 

Publications. 

Department of Social Eoonomy, United States Commission to 

Paris, Chicago. — Maps, charts, plans, photographs, books. 



in Dealers' Tonmal, 10 Faoiflo Avenue, 

Publication. 

Hammondsport Wine Conq^any, Hammondsport, Few 

York. — Photographs. 

Hoard's Dairyman, Fort Atkinsoni Wisconsin. 

Publication. 

Hocking Valley Bailroad, ColnmbnSi Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Indiana Farmer Company, 30-36 H. Delaware Street, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. — Publication. 

Tones, Edward D., Hadison, Wisconsin. 

Monographs: The Country and the People; Its Industries and 
Resources. 

HoCormiok Harvesting Machine Company, Chicago. 

Photographs. 

Pleasant Valley Wine Company, Eheims, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Bemtrar of Titles of Cook County, Chicago. 

Blanks in use in office ; copy of Torrens' Law of Illinois. 

Southern Bailway Company, Washington, D. C. 

General exhibit 

Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. 

Reports of Comptroller of Currency. 



CLASS 105. 

PROTECTION OF WORKERS IN FACTORIES. 



American Xachinist, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Brownell, F. H., Bochester, Hew York. 

Publications and photographs. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 105. 459 

Bepcfftment of Soeial Economy, TT. 8. Commisiion to 

Paris Exposition. — Maps, charts, plans, photographs, books and 
pamphlets. 



Inipection of ntotoriesy Connectioiit State Bvieaii of, 

Hartford, Connecticut. — Reports; inspection blanks, statistics, 
photographs. 

Inipeotion of Factories, Illinois State Bureau of, Spring- 
field, Illinois. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, photographs. 



Inspection of Tkctories, Indiana State Burean of, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. — Reports; inspection blanks; statistics; photo- 
graphs. 

Inspection of Tkctories, Massachnsetts State Bureau of, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, photo- 
graphs, special pamphlet. 

Inspection of Factories, Hicliigan State Bureau of, Lan- 
sing, Michigan. — Reports; inspection blanks; statistics; special 
pamphlets; photographs. 

Inmction of Factories, Hew Jersey State Bureau of, 

Trenton, New Jersey. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, 
photographs. 

Inspection of Factories, Hew York State Bureau of, Al- 
bany. New York. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, photo- 
graphs. 

Inspection of Factories, Ohio State Bureau of, Columbus, 

Ohio. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, photographs. 

Inspection of Factories, Fennsylvania State Bureau of, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics, 
photographs. 

Inroection of Factories, Bliode Island State Bureau of, 

rrovidence, Rhode Island. — Reports, inspection blanks, statistics. 
photographs. 

Inspection of Mines, California State Bureau of, Sacra- 
mento, California. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inspection of Vines, Illinois State Bureau of, Spring- 
field, Illinois. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inraeetion of Mines, Iowa State Bureau of, Des Moines, 

Iowa. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 



460 GROUP XVI.-CLASS 105. 

InroeotioA of Hmes, Kansas State Bureau ot^ loprika, 

Kansas. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inspection of Mines, Kentucky State Bureau of, Frank- 
tort, Kentucky. — ^Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inspection of UinM. Maryland State Bureau of, Balti- 
more, Maryland. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inspection of Mines, Montana State Bureau of, Helena, 

MoDtapa. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Inspection of Mines, Ohio State Bureau of, Columbus, 

Ohio. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 



Inspection of Mines, Pennsylvania State Bureau of, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 



Inspection of Mines, South Dakota State Bureau of, Pierre, 

South Dakota. — Reports, photographs, statistics. 



Inspection of Mines, West Virg^inia State Bureau of, 

Wh^Hng, West Virginia. — ^Reports, photographs, statistics. 

Labor, Connecticut State Bureau of, Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. — Reports, statistics. 

Labor, Illinois State Bureau of, Springfield, Illinois. 

Reports, statistics, special pamphlets. 

Labor, Indiana State Bureau of, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Reports, statistics, special pamphlets. 

Labor, Massachusetts State Bureau of, Boston, Massachu- 

setts.'^Reports, statistics, special pamphlets. 

Labor, Minnesota State Bureau of, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Reports, statistics. 

Labor, Nebraska State Bureau of, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Reports, statistics. 

Labor, Neii^ Hampshire State Bureau of, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire. — Reports, statistics, special pamphlets. 

Labor, New York State Bureau of, Albany, New Tork. 

Reports, statistics, publications. 

Labor; Wisconsin State Bureau of, Madison; Wisconsin. 

Reports, statistics, special pamphlets. ^ 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 106. 461 

Labor and Industrial Statistics and Factory Inspection, Kan- 
sas State Bureau of, Topeka, Kansas. — Pamphlets, reports. 

Labor Statistics, Uassachnsetts Bnrean of, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. — Historical charts showing changes in hours of labor. 

Kassachnsetts Insurance Commissioner, Boston,. Massa- 
chusetts. — Charts showing insurance against employers* liability. 

Massachusetts, Chief of the District Police, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Factory inspection; inspection of steam boilers; in- 
spection of sweat shops ; safety devices. 

National Iron Company, The, 1123 Broadway, Few York. 

Models of various patterns of fire escapes. 

Otis Elevator Company, 108 Liberty Street, New York. 

Photographs. 

Williams, T. E., Company, Brooklyn, New York. 

Photographs of buildings and arrangement of plant. 

WiUoughby, W. F., Washington, D. C. 

Monographs on various subjects of Social Economy. 



CLASS 106. 

WORKMEN'S DWELLINGS. 



Apollo Iron A Steel Company, Pittsburg, Fennsylyania. 

Model of an industrial village. ' 

Arohiteetural Becord^ 14-16 Yesey St., New York. 

Publication. 

Crane Kanufacturing Company, Dalton, Massachusetts. 

Photographs of buildings and social institutions. 

Department of Social Economy, IT. S. Commission to Paris 

Exposition. — Maps, charts, plans, photographs, books and pam- 
phlets. 

Draper Company, limited, Eopedale, Massachusetts. 

Photographs. 



402 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 107. 

LucaSy Tohni & dompany, 4fh and Baoe BU., Pliiladelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Model artisan's dwelling. 

Tenement Home Committee, Assoeiated Oharitiet, of Hew 

York City, New York. — Models of tenement houses. 

Yeiller, Lawrenoe, 105 East SSd St., Hew York. 

Monograph on the problem of famishing dwellings for workmen. 

Walker A Pratt Kannf aotnring Company, Boston, Kaasa- 

chusetts. — Reports, publications and photographs. 



CLASS 107. 

CO-OPERATIVE STORES. 



Consumers Supply Company, 396^8 Broadway, Hew York. 

General exhibit. 

Department of Sooial Economy, IT. S. Commission to Paris 

Exposition. — Maps, charts, plans, photographs and publications. 

Harvard Co-operatiTe Society, Cambridge, Hassaokusetts. 

Photographs, publications. 

Institute of Technology Co-operatiTe Association, Boston, 
Massachusetts, — Methods of co-operative distribution. 

Helson Kannf actnring Company, Ledaire, Missouri 

Publications; photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Pillsbury Mills, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Reports and photographs. 

Proctor & Gamble Company, iTorydale, Ohio. 

Photographs of buildings and grounds. Pension fund and profit 
sharing. 

Toledo, Ann Arbor A Horth Michigan Railroad Company, 

Toledo, Ohio. — Publications <ind photographs. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 108, 463 



CLASS 108. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE MENTAL AND MORAL IM- 
PROVEMENT OF WORKINGMEN. 



Aeme Snoker-Bod Company^ Toledo, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Amerioan Cotton Company, 27 William St., How Tork. 

Photographs. 

Amerioan' Waltliam Watoh Company, Waltham, Maasaehn- 

setts. — Photographs. 

Asioeiation of Engineering Societies, 267 S. Fonrth St, Pliila^ 

delphia, Pennsylvania. — Proceedings. 

Bethleliem Steel Company, Sonth Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs. 

Briar Cliff Manor Farms, Briar Cliff, Hew Tork. 

Reports and photographs. 

Brownell Kannf aotnring Company, Boohester, Hew Tork. 

Photographs. 

Cleveland Hardware Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Conant Thread Company, Fawtnoket, Bhode Island. 

Photographs. 

Crane Kannfaotnring Company, Dalton, Uassaohnsetts. 

Photographs of huildings and social institutions. 

Department of Sooial Economy, IT. S. Commission to Paris. 

Charts, plans, photographs, books, etc. 

Eastman Kodak Company, Boohester, Hew Tork. 

Photographs. 

Electric Bailroad Company, Buffalo, Hew Tork. 

Photographs. 

Evening Press, Grand Bapids, Michigan, 

Photographs. 



464 QROUP XVI.— CLASS 108. 

Ferris Brothers, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs. 

Oeneral Electrio Company, Soheneotady, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Oorham Kannf aotnring Company, Frovidence, Ehode Island. 

Photographs. 



A Company, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. 

Photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Illinois Steel Works, Toliet, Illinois. 

Photographs of social institutions. 

Leagae for Social Economy, Collectiye Exhibit. 

Work of the churches. 

Lndlow Kannfaotnring^ Company, Boston, Uassaohnsetts. 

Photographs. 

national Cash Begister Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Photographs and publications. 

Helson Kannf actniing Company, Leclaire, HissonrL 

Photographs of buildings and grounds ; publications. 

Hew York Central Bailroad, Hew York. 

Photographs. 

Orton, Edward, Jr., Colnmbns, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Pope Kannf actnring Company, Hartford, Connectiont. 

Photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Philadelphia School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Photographs and descriptive publications. 

Beporter, The, Logansport, Indiana. 

Publications and photographs. 

Siegel-Cooper Company, Hew York and Chicago. 

Photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Sherwin-Williams Company, Cleteland, Ohio. 

Publications and photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Southern Pacific Bailroad, Chicago. 

Photographs. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 109. 466 

Sprai^e Elevator Companyi Few York. 

Photographs. 

Stetsoiii John B., Company, FMladelphia, FeniuiylYaiiia. 

Publications and photographs of buildings and grounds. 

Tob&an, William Howe, Hew York. 

Monograph on movements for industrial betterment. 

TTniTerrity of the State of Hew York, Albany, Hew York. 

Home education; traveling libraries; study clubs and lectures. 

Wanamaker, John, Hew York. 

Photographs of social institutions. 

Warner Brothers, Bridgeport, Connectient. 

Photographs of social institutions. 

West A Simons, Port Chester, Hew York. 

Photographs and publications. 



Westinghonse Air Brake Company, Pittsbni^, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs. 

Worcester Corset Company, Worcester, Hassachnsetts. 

Photographs. 
Williams, T. H., & Company, Brooklyn, Hew York. 

Photographs. 



CLASS 109. 

PROVIDENT INSTITUTIONS. 



Society of the Propaganda, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications. 

Ancient Order of Hibernians, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Reports, etc. 
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publications and photographs. System of receiving from em- 
ployes deposits, upon which 4 per cent, interest is paid. 



466 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 109. 

Cleveland Terminal A Valley Bailroad Belief Department. 

Reports, constitution, etc. 

Comptroller of Cnrrency, Washington, D. C. 

Reports. 
Department of Social Economy, IT. S. Commission to Paris 

Exposition — Maps, charts, plans, photographs. 

Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, Few 

York. — Charts, statistics, photographs, publications. 

Illinois Central Bailroad, Chicago, Illinois. 

Publications and photographs. 

Independent Order of Foresters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publications, etc. 

Independent Order of Bechahites, New York. 

Reports. 

Knights of the Oolden Eagle, Hew York. 

Reports. 

Knights of Malta, Hew York. 

Reports, publications, statistics. 

Knights of the Maccabees, Port Huron, Michigan. 

Reports. 

locomotive Engineers' Mutual Life and Accident Insurance 

Association, Qeveland, Ohio. — Charts and publications. 

Lyford, James 0., Concord, Hew Hampshire. 

Pamphlet giving the history of savings banks in New Hampshire. 

Massachusetts State Insurance Commissioner, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Charts showing extent of life insurance business in 
Massachusetts. 

Massachusetts Savings Bank Commissioners, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Charts showing development of savings bank system, 
increased deposits, etc. Reports. 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, Hew York. 

Publications, statistics and life insurance methods. 

Mutual Life Insurance Company of New Tork, 32 Nassau St., 

New York City. — Charts, statistics, photographs, publications. 

New Tork State Banking Department, Albany, New Tork. 

Reports, statistics, special monograph on state system. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS llO. 467 

Hew York State Insurance Department, Albany, Hew York. 
Reports. 

Order of Scottish Clans, WasMngton, D. C. 
Reports. 

Pennsylvania Bailroad Company, Fhiladelpliia, Fennsylvania. 

Reports, pamphlets, and photographs. 
Pittsbni^ Junction Bailroad Belief Department, Allegkeny 

City, Pennsylvania. — Reports, constitution, etc. 

Proctor A Oamble, Ivorydale, Ohio. 

Photographs of btiildings and grounds. 

Prudential Life Insurance Company, Hewark, Hew Jersey. 

Publications, statistics, and life insurance methods. 

Boyal Arcanum, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publications, charts. 

Stetson, John B., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publications and photographs of buildings and grounds. 

United American Mechanics, Washington, D. D. 

Reports, etc. 

TTnited Ancient Order of Druids, Hew York. 

Reports, etc. 

Warren, Hathan, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Pamphlet giving history of life insurance in Massachusetts. 

WiUoughby, William Pranklin, Washington, D. C. 

Monograph on economic institutions. 

Woodmen of the World, Hew York. 

Reports, etc. 



CLASS 110. 

PUBLIC OR PRIVATE MOVEMENTS FOR THE 
WELFARE OF THE PEOPLE. 



Academy of Political and Social Science, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. — Publications. 

American Economic Association, Ithaca, Hew York. 

Publications, reports. 



468 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 110. 

American Humane Education Society^ Boston, Massachusetts. 

Reports. 

American Humane Society, Chicago. 

Publications, photographs, statistics. 

Atlanta TTniversity, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Statistical charts showing development of negroes in America. 

Board of Trade, Bangor, Maine. 

Pamphlets. 

Board of Trade, Chicago, Illinois. 

Reports. 

California Paris Exposition Commission, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Photographs. 

Chamber of Commerce, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Photographs. 

Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Consolidation Coal Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Photographs, lantern slides. 

Coleman Manufacturing Company, Concord, Horth Carolina. 

Photograph of cotton mill owned and operated by negroes. 

Colored American, Washington, D. C. 

Bound volumes of negro newspapers. 

Daughters of the American Bevolution, National Society of. 

Reports showing organization and growth of society. 

Department of Social Economy, TTnited States Commission to 

Paris Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. — Maps, charts, plans, photo- 
graphs, books and pamphlets. 

Devaul, Oeoi^e B., Atlanta, Georgia. 

Ornamental cutting on horns. 

DuBois, W. E. B., Atlanta, Georgia. 

Collective exhibit, results of social study of the negro in Georgia. 

Fisk TTniversity, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Written work by negro pupils. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 110. 469 

Pleetwoody C. E., War Bepartment, Washington, B. C. 

Charts showing photographs and official records of negro soldiers 
and sailors and their medals of honor. 



Oeneral Welfare A8fM>ciation, Jackson, HicMgan. 

Publications. 

Good Boads Offices, Washington, B. C. 

Photographs. 

Haines Industrial Institute, Augusta, (Georgia. 

Sewing work by negro pupils. 

Hampton Hormal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. — Photographs of pupils' work in classes, shops and agricul- 
ture. Model bank. 

Harper, Bobert H., Chicago, Illinois. 

Collective exhibit showing homes, business enterprises, etc., of 
the negroes of Chicago. 

Hilyer, Andrew F., Washington, B. C. 

Collective exhibit of negroes in merchandise, factories and allied 
occupations. 

Howard University, Washington, B. C. 

Charts and photographs showing professional education among 
negroes. 

Tones, Edward B., Hadison, Wisconsin. 

Monographs: The country and the people of the United States; 
its industries and resources. 

^'^Lee, Bishop B. F., Wilberf orce, Ohio. 

Charts and photographs of negro self-development in church and 
school. 

Michigan Political Science Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Publications. 

Moran Brothers Company, Seattle, Washington. 

Photograph. 

Murray, Baniel, Library of Congress, Washington, B. C. 

Books and musical compositions by negro authors. 

Hiell, Tames P., Nashville, Tennessee. 

Chart of photographs and percentages of negroes in civil service. 

Patent Office, Washington, B. C. 

Patents issued to negroes. 



470 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 110. 

Political Science Quarterly, Cambridgei Hassacliiuetts. 

Publication. 

Boger Williams TTniversity, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Photographs and catalogue. 

Shaw University, Baleigh, Horth Carolina. 

Photographs and catalogue. 

Shepherd, Harry, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Photogfraphs of homes, schools, churches, etc., of negroes. 

Speirs, Frederick W., Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. 

Monograph on municipal movements and social progress. 

Strong, Tosiah, New York. 

Monograph on religious movements and social progress. 

Tolman, William Howe, New York. 

Monograph on movements for industrial betterment. 

Tucker, Frederick de Latonr Booth, New York. 

Monograph on the ''Salvation Army." 

Tnskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee, Ala- 
bama. — Shop work, agricultural products, and photographs of 
negro pupils. 

University of Chicago, Chicago. 

Publication : Journal of Political Economy. 

University of Pennsylvania, College Hall, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Publication: Studies in politics and social sciences. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

University bulletins in economics, political science, and history. 

Vos, Hubert, New York. 

Portraits illustrating comparative racial and social types of 
nations. 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York City. 

Work for the social improvement of young men. 

Young Women's Christian Association, New York City. 

Work for the social improvement of young women. 

Washington Public Schools, Washington, D. C. 

Miniature models from negro life. Miniature model cotton press. 



^ 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 111. 471 

Waterman, Bichard, Jr., Chicago, niinois. 

Monograph on the social economy exhibit at the Paris Exposition 
of 1900. 

Whittcn, Bobert W., Albany, New Tort. 

Monograph on recent social economic legislation. 



CLASS 111. 

HYGIENE. 



Abbott, Samuel W., Boston, Massaobnsetts. 

Monograph on hygiene and sanitation. 

Aetna Mineral Water Company, Aetna Springs, California. 

Mineral water. 

Albany Filter Company, New York. 

Exhibit of hygienic water filters. 

Alexander & Company, Marietta, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs. Vaccine material. 

Allonez Mineral Spring Company, Oreen Bay, Wisconsin. 

Allouez manganese water. • 

American Climatological Association, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Reports. 

American Public Health Association, Columbus, Ohio. 

Publications. 

Atkinson, Br. W. B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Publication : Public Health. 

Bailey, Leonard C, Washington, B. C. 

Model of folding cot. 

Bartlett Mineral Water Company, Bartlett Springs, Cali- 
fornia. — ^Mineral water. 

Bath Bepartment, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photograph. 



472 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 111. 

Bath House Committee, Brooklinei Massaohiuetts. 

Photographs. 

Bear LitMa Water C^pany, Bear Lithia, Virginia. 

Mineral water. 

Bell, Br. A. W., Brooklyn, New Tork. 

Publication : "The Sanitarium." 

Board of Healtlii Baltimore, Maryland. 

Report. 

Board of Health, Boston, Hassaohnsetts. 

Maps, charts, reports, photographs. 

Board of Healtli, Brookline, Hassaohnsetts. 

Photographs. 

Board of Healtli, Buffalo, Hew Tork. 

Maps, charts. 

Board of Health, California State, Sacramento, California. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Reports. , 

Board of Health, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Report. 

Board of Health, Chicago, Illinois. 

Reports and diagrams. 

Board of Health, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Report. 

Board of Health, Connecticut State, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Charts, maps, reports. 

Board of Health, Delaware State, Dover, Delaware. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Detroit, Michigan. 

Report 

Board of Health, Florida State, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Reports. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 111. 473 

Board of Healthy Ulinois State, Springfield, Ulinois. 

Reports. 

Board of Healtli, Indiana State, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Charts, reports. 

Board of Health, Iowa State, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Kansas State, Topeka, Kansas. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Kentucky State, Frankfort, Kentnoky. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Maine State, Angnsta, Maine. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Maryland State, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Massachusetts State, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Maps, charts, reports, photographs. 

Board of Health, Michigan State, Lansing, Michigan. 

Maps, charts, reports. 

Board of Health, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Reports. 

Board of Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Minnesota State, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Maps, charts, reports. 



Board of Health, Missouri State, Kansas City, 

Reports. 

Board of Health, National, Washington, B. C. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Newark, New Jersey. 

Report 

Board of Health, New Hampshire State, Concord, New Hamp- 
shire. — Reports. 

Board of Health, New Jersey State, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Reports. 



474 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 111. 

Board of Health, Hew Orleans, Louisiana. 

Maps, charts. 

Board of Health, Hew Tork City. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Hew Tork Stat{j Albany, Hew Tork. 

Publications, statistics, methods. 

Board of Health, Ohio State, Columbus, Ohio. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Oklahoma Territory, Oklahoma. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Faterson, Hew Jersey. 

Photographs and reports. 

Board of Health, Pennsylvania State, ^arrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Reports. 

Board of Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Maps, charts, reports. 

Board of Health, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Maps, charts, reports, photographs. 

Board of Health, Providenoe, Bhode Island. 

Maps, charts, reports. 

Board of Health, Bhode Island State, Providenoe, Bhode 

Island. — Charts, njaps, reports. 

Board of Health, Beading, Pennsylvania. 

Report. 

Board of Health, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Maps, charts, reports. 

Board of Health, St. Paul, Kinnesota. 

Maps, charts, reports. 

Board of Health, San Franoisoo, California. 

Report. 

Board of Health, South Carolina State, Charleston, South 

Carolina. — Reports. 

Board of Health, Vermont State, Montpelier, Vermont. 

Charts, maps, reports. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 111. 475 

Board of Health, Washingtoiii B. C. 

Reports. 

Board of Healtlii Wisoonsin Stat^ Hadisoiii Wisconsin. 

Reports. 

Board of Health, Worcester, Kassachnsetts. 

Photographs, reports. 

Bradley, N. F., Clearfield, Pennsylvania. 

Mineral waters. 

Cemetery Association, The Cypress Lawn, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Photographs. 

Cemetery Association, The lindenwood. Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Photographs. 

Cemetery Association, The Odd Fellows, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. — Photographs. 



Cemetery, The Forest Home, Company, Hilwankee, Wiscon- 
sin. — Photographs. 

Cremation Company, The United States, New York. 

Views of the Crematory. 

Cremation, The Bavenport Society for, Bavenport, Iowa. 

Photographs. 

Cremation, The Massachusetts Society for, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. — Photogfraphs. 

Cremation, The Philadelphia Society for, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Views of the Crematory. 

Crematory, The Gardner Earl Chapel and, Oakwood Cemetery, 

Troy, New York. — Photographs and plans. 

Crematory, The Le Moyne, Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Photographs. 

Dairy Commission, New Jersey, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Reports. 



and Food Bivision, Michigan, State Bepartment of, 

Lansing, Michigan. — Reports. 

Department of Agricnltnre, Bnrean of Animal Industry, 

Washington, D. C. — Reports. 



476 GROUP XVI.-CLASS,111. 

Bepartment of the Interior, Census Bureau, Washing^oni B. C. 

Reports, charts. 

Bepartment of the Interior, Commission of Labor, Washii^ 

ton, D. C. — ^Works on sanitation. 

Bepartment of Social Economy, XTnited States Commission to 

Paris Exposition, Chicago. — Photographs, publications, appli- 
ances for facilitating diagnoses of infectious diseases. 

Bepartment of State, Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Reports of registration. 

Biabetic and Hygienic Gazette, New York. 

Publication. 

Experiment Station, State of Connecticut, New Haven, Con- 
necticut. — Photographs. 

French Lick Springs, French Lick, Indiana. 

Concentrated mineral waters and "Pluto." 

Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, White Sulphur Springs, 

West Virginia. — Greenbrier sulphureous water. 

Health Culture, New York. 

Publication. 

Home Science Publishing Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Publication : The American Kitchen Magazine. 

Eenney Company, The, 72 Trinity Place, New York. 

Flushometer ; pamphlets. 

Ladd, E. F., Agricultural College, North Bakota. 

Publication : The Sanitary Home. 

Lytton Springs Sanitarium, Lytton Springs, California. 

Mineral water. 

Medical Society of the State of New York, Lyons, New York. 

Pamphlets on hygiene. 

Mott, T. L., Iron Works, 84 Beekman St., New York. 

Model bathroom. 

Mulf ord, H. E., & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Antitoxine and vaccine material, photographs. 

Natural Mineral Water Company, Saratoga Springs, New 

York. — ^Mineral water. 



GROUP XVI. -CLASS 111. 477 



New York State Commission to Paris Ezpositioiii New York. 

Model Craig Colony for epileptics. 

Parke, Bavis & Company, Detroit, Hickigan. 

Photographs. 

Pocono Laboratories, Tke, Dr. Bickard Slee, Swiftwater, 

Pennsylvania. — Vaccine material, photographs. 

Puerto Sico, Island of, ^n Tnani Puerto Bioo. 

Circulars on sanitation. 

Begistration in Medicine, Hassacknsetts Board of, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Reports. 

Sanitarium, Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. 

Photographs. 

Sanitarium, Gabriels, Gkibriels, (Adirondaoks), New York. 

Photographs. 

Sanitarium, Loomis, Liberty, New York. 

Photographs. 

Sanitarium, Skaron, Skaron, Hassackusetts. 

Photographs. 

Sanitary Plumber, Tke, Ligkting and Ventilating Engineer, 

32 Lafayette Place, New York. — Publication. 

Santa Barbara Mineral Water Company, Santa Barbara, CaU- 

fomia. — Medicinal mineral water. 

Small, Maynard & Company, Boston, Massackusetts. 

Publication: Journal of Massachusetts Association of Public 
Health. 

Standard Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Bath tubs, water-closets, lavatory sinks, etc. 

Street Cleaning Department, New York. 

Photogfraphs. 

Street Department, Boston, Massackusetts. 

Photographs. 

Street Department, New York. 

Photographs. 

Taskimas Mineral Springs Company, Boston, Massackusetts. 

Mineral wat^r, carbonized or not. 



478 GROUP XVI.-CLASS 112. 

Taylor-TorgenseiL Companyi New York. 

Missisquoi mineral water. 

Trenton Potteries Company, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Sanitary earthenware and vitrified china bath tubs and water 
closets. 

Vital Statistics, Division of, MicUgan State Department, 

Lansing, Michigan. 

Von Buck, Dr. C, Asheville, North Carolina. 

Publication : The Journal of Tuberculosis. 

Williams, Daniel H., Chicago. 

Photographs and reports of special surgical cases. 



CLASS 112. 

PUBLIC CHARITIES. 



Allen, Edward E., Oyerbrook, Pennsylvania. 

Monograph on education of defectives. 

Almshouse, Massachusetts State, Tewksbury, Massachusetts. 

Photographs and statistics. 

Audit and Control, Board of Washington State, Tacoma, 

Washington. — Publications, statistics, photographs. 

Blind, School for the. New York State, Batavia, New York. 

Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Blind, Institute for the Instruction of, Oyerbrook, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Photographs, statistics, charts, publications, pupils' work. 

Brown, Herbert S., New York. 

Monograph on public and private charities. 

Charitable Institutions, Board of Trustees of, Kansas State, 

Topeka, Kansas. — Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Charities and Correction, Board of, Colorado ^State, Denver, 

Colorado. — Publications, statistics, photographs.* 



/ 



GROUP XVI.—CLASS 112. 479 

Cliarities and Correction, Board of, District of Columbia, 

Washington, D. C. — Reports. 

Cliarities and Correction, Board of, Missonri State, Kansas 

City, Missouri. — Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Cliarities and Correction, Board of. Hew Hampshire State, 

Concord, New Hampshire. — Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Cliarities and Correction, Board of. Hew York State, Albany, 

New York. — Publications ; statistics ; photographs. 

Cliarities and Correction, Board of, South Dakota State, 

Bridgewater, South Dakota. — Publications; statistics; photo- 
graphs. 

Charities and Correction, Hational Conference, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. — Reports. 

Charities and Bef orm. Board of, Wyoming State, Cheyenne, 

Wyoming. — ^Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Charities, Associated, Boston, Massachnsetts. 

Statistics, reports. 

Charities, Associated, Society^ Charleston, South Carolina. 

Reports. 

Charities, Associated, Society, Charleston, West Virginia. 

Reports. 

Charities, Associated, Tanesville, Wisconsin. 

Reports. 

Charities, Associated, Oakland, California. 

Reports. 

Charities, Associated, Pueblo, Colorado. 

Reports. 

Charities, Associated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Reports. 

Charities, Association, United, Akron, Ohio. 

Reports. 

Charities, Board of, Connecticut State, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Publications; statistics; photographs. 
Charities, Board of, Indiana State, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Publications ; ' statistics ; photographs. 



480 GROUP XVI.—CLASS 112. 

Cliarities, Board of, OMo State, Columbus, Ohio. 

Photographs. 

Charities, Board of. New York State, Albany, Hew York. 

Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Charities, Board of, Tennessee State, Hashville, Tennessee. 

Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Charities, Publio, Board of, North Carolina State, Baleigh, 

North Carolina. — Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Charities, PnbUe, Board of, Pennsylvania State, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. — Publications ; statistics ; photographs. 

Charity and Beneficent Organization, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Photographs, reports. 

Charity, Board of, California State, Sacramento, California. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Charity, Board of, Illinois State, Springfield, Illinois. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Charity, Board of, Maine State, Augusta, Maine. 

Photographs ; reports ; statistics. 

Charity, Board of, Maryland State, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Charity, Board of, Massachusetts State, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. — Publications, statistics, photographs. 

Charity, Board of, Michigan State, Lansing, Michigan. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Charity, Board of, Minnesota State, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Charity, Board of. New Jersey State, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Children's Aid Society, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Statistics ; photographs. 

Children's Aid Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. — Photographs of homes used by the society. 

Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Reports. 



; 



GROUP XVI.-CLASS 112. 481 

Cliildren's Institutions Department, Boston, Massaclinsetts. 

Photographs ; statistics. 

Conuniision on Befective, Belinqnent and Bependent Chil- 
dren, New Jersey State, Elizabeth, New Jersey. — Publications ; 
statistics ; photographs. 

Consumptives, Free Home for, Qnincy Street, Borchester, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs. 

Consumptives, Orove Hall Home for, Boston, Hassaclinsetts. 

Photographs. 

Consumptives, The Massachusetts Hospital for, Butland, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs. 

Consumptives, The St. Joseph's Hospital for. New York. 

Lithograph. 

Consumptives, The Seton Hospital for, Spuyten Buyvil, Hew 

York. — Photographs. 

Control, Board of, Iowa State Institutions, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Publications, statistics, photographs. 

Control, Board of, Wisconsin State, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Publications; statistics; photographs. 

Correction and Charities, Board of, Michigan State, Lansing, 

Michigfan. — Publications ; statistics ; photographs. 

Correction and Charities, Board of, Minnesota State, St. Paul, 

Minnesota. — Publications, statistics, photographs. 

Deaf and Blind, Institution for Instruction of, Berkeley, 

California. — Photographs. 

Deaf and BUnd, School for. North Carolina State, Baleigh, 

North Carolina. — Photographs ; reports ; catalogues. 

Deaf and Dumb, Columbia Institution for Instruction of, 

Washington, D. C. — Charts; publications; photographs; illustra- 
tive work of pupils. 

Deaf and Dumb, Institute for the Instruction of the, New 

York City. — Photographs, pupils' work. 

Deaf, School for, Nebraska State, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Photographs; publications; pupils' work. 



A^ GROUP XVl.—CLASS jll2. 

Department of Social Economy, IT. S. Commission to Paris, 

Chicago. — Collective exhibit of public and private charities in the 
United States. 

Feeble Minded, School for, Hassachnsetts State, Waverly, 

Massachusetts. — Photographs. 

Feeble Minded, School for, Minnesota State, Faribault, Min- 
nesota. — Photographs of grounds and buildings. 

Feeble Minded, Home for, Wisconsin State, Chippewa Falls, 

Wisconsin. — Photographs of institution. 

Guild, St. John's, 501 Fifth Ave., Hew Tork. 

Photographs of a floating hospital. 

Heimath, Isabella, Hew Tork. 

Photographs. 

Home for Aged Couples, Trustees of Massachusetts, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Reports. 

Home tot Aged Men, Trustees of Massachusetts, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Reports. 

Home for Aged Women, Trustees of Massachusetts, Boston, 

Massachusetts. — Reports. 

Home, Presbyterian, for Aged Women, Hew Tork. 

Reports. 

Home, Illinois Soldiers', Quincy, Illinois. 

Photographs of buildings. 

Home, Massachusetts Soldiers', Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs; reports. 

Home, Woman's Belief Corps, Oxford, Hew Tork. 

Photographs. 

Home, Working Women's Temporary, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Statistics. 

Hospital, Boston City, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Reports. 

Hospital, Cambridge, The Trustees of, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. — Photographs. 

Hospital, Massachusetts General, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Reports. 



GROUP XVI.— CLASS 112. 483 

Hospital, TohiiB HopkinB, Baltimorei Maryland. 

Reports. 

Hospital, Laura Franklin, for Children, Hew York. 

Miniature model ward and operating rooms. 

Hospital, Morton, Tannton, Massaclinsetts. 

ReiK>rts. 

Hospital, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

History of Hospital. 

Hospital, Presbyterian, 70th St. and Madison Ave., New York. 

Model ward, containing six beds and other furniture; dolls in 
costume of nurses in training; furniture and apparatus showing 
the best methods of treating medical and surgical maladies. 

Hospital for Children, St. Mary's Free, New York. 

Model ward in hospital. 

House of Befnge — ^Boys' Department, Olen Mills, Pennsyl- 
vania. — Publications, photographs. 

Insane, Conneotient Hospital for the, Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. — Photographs. 

Insanity, Massachusetts State Board of, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. — Photographs, statistics. 

Keen, Dora, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Statistics and charts showing work for defectives. 

Lancaster School, Trustees of, Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

Photographs ; statistics. 

Lyman School, Trustees of, Westboro, Massachusetts. 

Photographs; charts; models of sloyd work. 

Lunacy Commission, Maryland State, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Publications; photographs; statistics. 

Lunacy Commission, New York State, Albany, New York. 

Collective exhibit of photographs of hospitals and asylums for 
insane. 

New York Orphan Asylum, New York. 

Reports. 

Pauper Institutions Department, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Photographs ; statistics. 



484 GROUP XVI.— CLASS 112. 

Poor, Overseen of tht, Bostoiii Massacliiisetts. 

Photographs and statistics of Wayfarer's Lodge and Temporary 
Home. 

Foori Oveneen of fhOi Brooktoni Massachuietts. 

Reports; statistics; photographs. 

Poor, Oveneen of fhOi Fairliaveni Massachuietts. 

Reports; statistics; photographs. 

Poor, Oveneen of the, Natick, Massacliusetts. 

Reports; statistics; photographs. 

Poor, Oveneen of the, Worcester, Massachnsetts. 

Reports; statistics; photographs. 

Prevention of Cmelty to CMldren, Illinois Society for the, 

Chicago. — Reports. 

Prison Commission^ Georgia State, Atlanta, Oeorgia. 

Publications ; statistics ; photographs. 

Public Lands and Buildings, Board of, Nebraska State, Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. — Publications, statistics, photographs. 



GROUP XVIII. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL. 

WILLARD A. SMITH, DIRECTOR. 



EXHIBITS REPRESENTING THE ARMY AND NAVY 

OP THB 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



CLASS 116. 

ORDNANCE AND EQUIPMENT FOR ARTILLERY. 



Department of the Navji Bureau of Ordnanoe. 

Photographs of Naval Gun Factory and of service arms ; models 
of steel rifles; sample cartridge cases, cutlasses and sword 
bayonets. 

Department of the Navy, Navy Yard, New York. 

Photographs showing the equipment and facilities of the Navy 
Yard. 

Bethlehem Steel Company, South Bethlehem, Fenntylvania. 

Photographs illustrating the manufacture of armor plate, ord- 
nance, and hollow or solid forged shafting, and general forgings 
and. castings. 

Chicago, 1893, medal. 

Steele, W. F., New York. 

Photographs of gas plant installed in Forge Shop of U. S. Naval 
Gun Factory, Washington, D. C. 

485 



486 GROUP XVIII.— CLASS 118. 

CLASS 117. 

MILITARY ENGINEERING AND ACCESSORIES. 



Department of War, Signal Corps United Stafes Army. 

Photographs of field operations during Philippine insurrection; 
field telegraphs and telephones ; signal fiags ; fidd signal apparatus. 



CLASS 118. 

NAVAL CONSTRUCTION, HYDRAULICS, TORPEDOES. 



Department of the Navji Washingtoni D. C. 

Photographs of the docks, shops, and plant at the Navy Yard, 
New York, of ships and men, showing life and training of ships' 
crews. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Constmetion and Bepair. 

Models and photographs of naval vessels, full and in section; 
models of ship appliances; photographs of U. S. naval vessels; 
naval electrical apparatus. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Equipment. 

Standard marine electrical apparatus and accessories, furnished by 
General Electric Company; samples of rope, fiags, pennants, and 
signals. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Navigation, Naval Aoad- 

emy. — Photographs illustrating characteristic phases of cadet life 
and training at the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Ordnance. 

Electric motor for ammunition hoist, rammer, or elevating ; photo- 
graphs showing manufacture of and practice with automobile and 
spar torpedoes. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Steam Engineering. 

Photographs, drawings and blue prints of types of engines for 
United States naval vessels; model of beam engine of a Pacific 
mail steamer. 



GROUP XVIII.— CLASS 118. 487 

Ameiioan Ship Windlass Company, Providence, Bhode Island. 

Model of a steam capstan. 

Baboook & Wilcox Company, New York. 

Photographs and plans, and a forged steel header of the Babcock 
& Wilcox water tube boilers of the U. S. S. Chicago and the U. S. 
S. Atlanta. 

Blake, George Fs^ Hannf aotnring Company, New York City. 

Model of a Blak^ vertical twin air pump. 

Bowles, F. T., Naval Constmctor, IT. S. Navy. 

Full size working model of an electrically operated water-tight 
door. 

Flagg, Ernest, Arckitect, 35 Wall St., New York. 

Drawings and photographs of the buildings and grounds of the 
United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 

Photographs of electrical apoaratus manufactured for the United 
States Navy and the United States Army. 

Hickbom, Philip, Chief Constmctor, IT. S. Navy. 

Models of barbette turret for i2-inch breech loading rifles and of 
Franklin life. buoy. 

Holland Torpedo Boat Company, New York City. 

Model of Holland submarine torpedo boat T3rpe 7, 1900, designed 
to run at the surface or submerged. 

Melville, George W., Engineer in Chief, XT. S. Navy. 

Model of a water-tight door designed to be operated by hand or 
power. 

Page Brothers & Company, Boston, Hassachnsetts. 

Marine electrical fixtures, U. S. Navy standard. 

Pain's Fireworks Company, 12 Park Place, New York City. 

Series of life-saving and signal rockets and signal lights. 

Boelker, E. B., 41 Maiden Lane, New York. 

Photographs of Allen I 
sels of the U. S. Navy. 



Photographs of Allen Dense Air Ice Machine, as supplied to ves- 
of tl 



Sellers, William, & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Model of a 40-ton locomotive dock crane ; capacity 64,000 pounds 
at 70 feet radius. Highest hook position 56 feet above rails: 
track gauge t8 feet; trucks eaualize load on wheels and travel 
round on curve of 66 feet radius. 

P^ri?. ^^6^^ gold medal : Vienna, 1873. diploma of honor and 



488 GROUP XVIII.— CLASS 119. 

five medals ; Philadelphia, 1876, three medals ; Paris, 1889, grand 
prix. 

Williamson Brothers Company, FhiladelpUa, Pennsylvania. 

Model of steam steering gear. 



CLASS 119. 

CARTOGRAPHY— HYDROGRAPHY. 

VARIOUS INSTRUMENTS. 



Department of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

Miscellaneous publications relating to Arctic exploration, canals, 
dock yards, gun foundries and armor factories. 

Department of the Navy, Bnrean of Equipment. 

Publications showing the flags of maritime nations and the inter- 
national code of signals. Patent log. Sounding apparatus. 

Department of the Navy, Bnrean of Equipment, Compass 

Office. — United States Navy Standard compensating binnacle, 
complete with correctors ; Pelorus. 

Department of the Navy, Bnrean of Equipment, Hydrographic 

Office. — Publications relating to hydrography, meteorology and 
navigation ; chart construction ; characteristic charts ; relief map. 

Department of the Navy, Bnrean of Equipment, Naval Obserr- 

atory. — Photographs of buildings and instruments; records of 
astronomical observations; navigation instruments; observatory 
time. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Equipment, Nautical 

Almanac Office. — The American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac 
from 1855 to 1902. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Navigation. 

Report of the Chief of Bureau for 1898 and Appendix to same. 

Department of the Navy, Bureau of Navigatioi^ Office of 

Naval Intelligence. — Publications: General Information Series; 
Coaling. Docking and Repair Facilities of the World ; War Notes ; 
War Series. 



GROUP XVIII.— CLASS 120. 489 

HegHB, T. S. ft J. D.| New Tork. 

Marine chronometers; conning tower binnacle; torpedo boat 
compensating binnacle. 



BitoMe, E. S.| ft Sons, Boston, Massachuietts. 

Instruments of navigation; consisting of compasses, azimuth 
circles, pelorus, and magnetic instruments. 



CLASS 120. 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS. 
Department of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

Seal of the Navy Department; medals voted by Congress to 
United States Naval Officers; photographs of ships and men, 
illustrating life and training in the navy. 

Department of the Navy, Bnrean of Supplies and Accounts. 

Uniforms of petty officers and seamen of the United States Navy. 

Qnartermaster's Department, United States Marine Corps. 

Uniforms, arms and accoutrements of the non-commissioned 
officers, enlisted men and bandsmen of the U. S. Marine Corps. 



INDEX. 



ClaiB. Page. 

Abbey, Edwin Austin 7 45 

Abbey & Imbrie 53 282 

Abbot. Frederic V 29 160 

Abbot, Katherine G 7 45 

Abbott, A 63 307 

Abbott Elec & Mfg. Co. . . 

C.24, 27; 143, 153 

Abbott, Samuel W iii 471 

Abbott, W. J 39 198 

Aberfoyle Mfg. Co 

C. 80, 82 ; 415, 416 

Abernathy, J. E 39 198 

Abild, Hans 39 198 

Abney, Z 41 233 

Acheson, E. G. . .C. 24, 63 ; 143, 307 

Ackeman & Tuftley 39 198 

Acme Machinery Co 22 127 

Acme Mining Co 63 307 

Acme Sucker-Rod Co 100 463 

Adams, A. P., & Co 60 297 

Adams-Bagnall Elec. Co... 25 144 

Adam's Cotton Co 41 233 

Adams, Eva E 72 400 

Adams, F 63 307 

Adams, Fanny R 84 419 

Adams, Herbert B 3 36 

Adams, J. W 63 307 

Adams, Thomas J 75 412 

Addison, J. C 41 233 

Addleman, Dill 45 263 

Addressograph Co 11 79 

Adek Mfg. Co 17 114 

Adger, Joseph E 41 234 

Adkins, William 41 234 

Adriance, Piatt & Co 35 189 

Advance Coal Co 33 179 

Advance Gin & Mill Co. . 41 234 
Advance Packing & Sup- 
ply Co C. 19, 23; 117, 137 

Advance Publishing Co. . 13 87 



Glass. Pace. 

Aermotor Co 35 189 

Aetna Mineral Water Co. Ill 471 

Afterthought Mining Co. 63 307 

Agri. College of Oregon . . 41 234 
Agri. Exp. Sta. of Ala. 

C.38,41; 194,234 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Ariz 38 

Agri. E;^). Sta., Ark 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta.. Calif 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Colo 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Conn. ... 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Del 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Florida.. 38 



94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
234 
97 
94 
94 
94 
94 
95 



Agri. Exp. Sta., Georgia. 41 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Hatch. . . 39 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Idaho. . . 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Ills 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Ind 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Iowa 38 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Kansas. . 38 
Agri. Exp. Sta., Kentucky 

c. 38, 39; 195,198 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Maine... 38 194 
Agri. Exp. Sta., Maryland 

....c. 38, 39; 195, 198 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Minn 38 195 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Missouri. 38 195 
Agri. Exp. Sta., Miss 

C. j8, 41 ; 195, 334 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Mont... 38 195 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Neb 38 i§5 

Agri. Exp. Sta., N. Hamp 38 195 

Agfri. Exp. Sta., New Jer. 38 195 
Agri. Exp. Sta., New 

Mex C. 38, 39; 195, 198 

Agri. Exp. Sta., N. York 38 195 

Agri. Exp. Sta., No. Car.. 38 195 
Agri. Exp. Sta., No. Dak. 

c. 38. 39; 195, 198 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Ohio 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Okl 38 196 



491 



492 



INDEX. 



OUv. Page. 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Oregon.. 39 198 
Agri. Exp. Sta., Penn... 

, C. 38, 39 ; 196, 198 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Nevada. . 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., R. Isld. . 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., So. Car. . 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., So. Dak. 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Storrs... 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Tenn... 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Texas. . 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Utah... 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Vermont. 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Virg 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Wash . . . 

C.38.39; 196,199 

Agri. Exp. Sta., W. Virg. 38 196 

Agri. Exp. Sta., Wise 38 196 

Apfri. Exp. Sta., Wyo 38 197 

Aiken, W *39 I99 

Aikman, Walter M 8 66 

Ainsley, M 45 263 

Aitken, Peter 8 66 

Ajax Mining Co 63 307 

Ala. Con. Iron & Coal Co. 63 307 
Ala. Land & Development 

Co 104 457 

Alabama Mining Co 63 307 

Alaska Packers' Asso 58 290 

Albany Business College. 6 42 

Albany Female Academy. 2 33 

Albany Filter Co iii 471 

Albaugh-Georgia Orchard 

Co 43 261 

Alberene Stone Co 63 308 

Albertz, Ferdinand 60 297 

Albro, E. D., & Co 50 275 

Aldredge, W 39 199 

Aldrich, H. A 45 264 

Alexander, J. F 41 234 

Alexander, John W 7 45 

Alexander, L. L 63 308 

Alexander Mining Co. . . . 63 308 

Alexander, William D 41 234 

Alexander & Co iii 471 

Alleghany Lumber Co 50 275 

Allegheny Quarries 63 308 

Alleman, A 33 179 

Allen, Edward E. 1 12 478 

Allen, Frederick S 33 179 

Allen, J. P 63 308 

Allen, R. B 41 234 



Olua. P»ce. 

Allen, S. L. & Co 43 261 

Allen, Thomas 7 45 

Allen, William A 39 199 

Alliance Milling Co 56 288 

Allington & Curtis Co 21 123 

Allis, Edward P. Co 32 169 

Allison, S. B 41 234 

Allouez Mineral Springs 

Co Ill 471 

Almirall 10 74 

Almond, Thomas R 

C. 22, 25 ; 127, 144 

Almshouse, Mass. State.. 1 12 478 
Alpine Plaster & Cement 

Co 63 308 

Alps Mining Co 63 308 

Alters, John 45 264 

Altman, J 39 199 

Altoona Coal & Coke Co, . 63 30S 
Altoona Quicksilver Min- 

inof Co. ,.. 63 308 

Aluminum World 103 444 

Alvord, J 63 308 

Amador Mining Co 63 308 

Amador Sandstone Co 63 308 

Amalgamated Copper Co. 

C. 63, 64, 65 ; 308, 386,390 

Ambler Asbestos Air Cell 

Covering Co.^ 19 117 

Am. Academy Polit. & 

Soc. Science no 467 

Am. Adj. Folding Chair 

Co 69 397 

Am. Amateur Photo 'r 103 444 

Am. Aristotype Co 12 85 

Am. Arithmometer Co... 15 109 
Am. Artisan & Hardware 

Record 103 444 

Am. Bap. Pub. Soc 13 87 

Am. Balance Slide Valve 

Co 32 169 

Am. Bee Journal 103 444 

Am. Bicycle Co 30 25 

Am. Book Co. .C. i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 92 

P. 27. 33,36, 41,42,433 

Am. Brake Co 32 169 

Am. Building Association 

"News" 103 444 

Am. Car & Foundry Co. . 32 169 

Am. Car Co 32 169 

Am. Car Sprinkler Co. . . 28 157 



INDEX. 



493 



OUss. Page. 

Am. Cereal Co. .C. 39, 56; 199, 288 

Am. Chemical Journal. ..103 444 
Am. Qay Working Mac. 

Co 72 400 

Am. Climatolo^cal Asso.iii 471 

Am, Coal Minmg Co 63 308 

Am. Commercial Rubber 

Co 23 137 

Am. Condensed Milk Co. 40 231 

Am. Cotton Co 35 189 

Am. Cotton Co 108 463 

Am. Cotton Oil Co 41 234 

Am. Druggist Pub. Co. . . 13 88 

Am. Economic Asso no 467 

Am. Elec. Heating Corpo. 27 153 

Am. Electric Heater Co. . 27 153 

Am. Electric Motor Co. . . 25 145 
Am. Elec. Specialty Co. . 

c. 25, 27; 145, 153 

Am. Elec. Telephone Co. 26 149 

Am. Electric Vehicle Co. 30 166 

Am. Electrician Co 13 88 

Am. Encaustic Tile Co. . . 72 400 

Am. Endoscopic Co 25 145 

Am. Excelsior Con. Min- 
ing Co 63 308 

Am. Federation of Labor. 103 444 

Am. Felt Co 17 114 

Am. Fire Engine Co 

C. 19, 21; 117,123 

Am. Florist Co 13 88 

Am. Ginner & Cotton Rep. 

Agar 103 

Am. Ginning Co 41 

Am. Graphophone Co.... 17 

Am. Hard Fiber Co 23 

Am. Hard Rubber Co. . . . 

C. 16, 24, 25, 26 

P. III. 143, 145, 149 

Am. Hoist & Derrick Co. 28 157 

Am. Homes Pub. Co 13 88 

Am. Hosiery Co 

C. 80, 82, 86; 415, 416, 422 

Am. Humane Education 

Soc no 468 

Am. Humane Soc no 468 

Am. Injector Co 19 117 

Am. Inst Mining Engi- 
neers 63 308 

Am. Investments 103 444 

Am. Iron & Steel Asso. . .103 444 



444 
234 
114 
137 



OUsf. Page. 

Am. Kaolin Co 63 308 

Am. Knit Goods Review. 103 445 

Am. Lead Pencil Co 92 433 

Am. Library Asso 3 36 

Am. Lithographic Co 11 79 

Am. Lumberman 103 445 

Am. Lutheran Pub. Board 13 88 

Am. Machinery Co 22 127 

Am. Machinist 105 458 

Am. Machinist Press 13 88 

Am. Manfr. & Iron Wrld. 103 445 

Am. Medical Asso 13 88 

Am. Miniature & Dec. 

Lamp Co 25 145 

Am. Mining Co 63 309 

Am. Motor Co. .C. 30, 33; 166, 179 
Am. Museum, Natural 

History C. 3» 53 ; 3^, 282 

Am. Newspaper Directory 13 88 
Am. Numismatic & Arch. 

Soc 15 109 

Am. Optical Co.C. 15, 73; 109, 408 

Am. Peace Soc 13 88 

Am. Pipe Mfg. Co 29 160 

Am. Pneumatic Service 

Co 28 157 

Am. Postal Machine Co. . 11 79 

Am. Public Health Assn.. in 471 

Am. Radiator Co 74 409 

Am. Roller Bearing Co . . . 30 166 

Am. Saddle Co 30 166 

Am. School Board Jour- 
nal C.I, 2; 27, 33 

Am. School Furniture Co. 

. . . .C. I, 2, 3, 69; 27, 33, 36, 397 
Am. Seamen's Friend So- 
ciety 13 88 

American Separator Co. . 37 192 

Am. Shearer M'f g. Co. . . 93 434 
Am. Shipbuilder 

C. 13, 103 ; 88, 445 

Am. Ship Windlass Co. . . 118 487 
Am. Soc. Prevention of 

Cruelty to Animals .... 13 88 
Am. Soc. Nat. Advertisers 

C. II, I3;79.88 

Am. Soc. of the Propa- 
ganda 109 466 

Am. Steam Gauge Co. ... 19 117 

Am. Steam Packing Co. .19 117 

Am. Steel & Iron Mfg. Co. 65 390 



494 



INDEX. 



CDaaa. Page. 

Am. Steel & Wire Co. . . 

C. 63, 64, 65 ; 309, 386, 390 

Am. Steel & Wire Co. ... 26 149 

Am. Steel Barge Co 33 179 

Am. Steel Hoop Co 64 386 

Am. Teleph. & Tel. Co. . .103 445 

Am. Thread Co 80 415 

Am. 3 Color Co. . .C. 11, 13 ; 80, 89 
Am. Tin Plate Co 

C. 64, 65 ; 386, 390 

Am. Tool & Machine Co. 22 127 

Am. Turret Lathe Works 22 127 

Am. Type Founders' Co. . 11 80 

Am. Typewriter Co 11 80 

Am. Vitrified Conduit Co. 23 137 

Am. Waltham Watch Co. 108 463 

Am. Wireless Teleg, Co. . 26 149 

Am. Wood Fire- Proof. Co 87 425 
Am. Woven Wire Brush 

Co 23 137 

Am. Wringer Co 99 441 

Am. Writing Machine Co. 11 80 
Am. & Cont. Shoe & 

Leather Synd 86 422 

Am. & Nettie Mining Co. 63 309 

Ames, J. 58 290 

Ames, Mrs 97 438 

Amespaugh, Vivian 72 400 

Amsden, C. S 39 199 

Anable, L M 39 199 

Anaconda Coal Mining Co 63 309 

Anaconda Mining Co 103 445 

Anamosa Quarries 63 309 

Anchor Electric Co 23 137 

Ancient Order Hiberni- 
ans 109 465 

Anderson, A. A 7 45 

Anderson, Albert & J. M. 

Mfg. Co 23 137 

Anderson Brothers 83 418 

Anderson, H C. 25, 26; 145, 150 

Anderson, L. L 41 234 

Anderson, O. F 39 199 

Anderson, O. M 58 290 

Anderson, T. C 39 199 

Anderson, T. 39 199 

Andreus, F. G 39 199 

Andrew, Thomas H 13 89 

Andrews. A. ri., Co 18 116 

Andrews, Colonel A 63 309 



CDaaa. Puce. 

Andrews, Jacques & Ran- 

toul 10 74 

Angel Island Stone Co. . 63 309 

Angel's Mining Co 63 309 

Angus Sinclair Co 13 90 

Anker Manufacturing Co 58 290 

Annin & Co 

C. 71. 82. 83 '. 399» 4I7» 418 

Ansonia Brass & Copper 

Co C. 26. 64; 150,386 

Anthony, E. & H. T., & 

Co C. 13. i03;90,445 

Apollo Iron & Steel Co.. 106 461 
Appetts, William, Sons. . 41 234 

Appleton, T 32 169 

Arable Cement Co 87 425 

Arawani Mills 99 441 

Architectural Record . . . 106 461 
Argillo Works . .C. 63, 64 ; 309, 386 
Arizona Lumber & Tim- 
ber Co 103 445 

Ark. Anthracite Coal Co. 63 309 
Arizona Lumber & Tim- 
ber Co 103 445 

Arlington Mills 

C. 82, 83; 415, 418 

Arlington Mills 80 415 

Armour & Co 

C. 40, 55, 58, 87 ; 231, 287, 290, 425 
Armour Fertilizing Wks. . 35 189 
Armour Packing Co 

C. 58, 87 ; 290, 425 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 22 127 

Armstrong, Charles *. . . . 63 309 

Armstrong, D 63 309 

Armstrong, H. & S 63 309 

Armstrong, Wheeler 63 309 

Arnim, B. F 41 234 

Arnold, Mrs. W. A 33 179 

Arroyo Grande Stone Co 63 309 
Art Dept. Newcomb Col- 
lege 72 400 

Arthur, W. A., 6l Co 41 234 

Art Joinery 17 114 

Art Students' League .... 4 41 

Asbury, Leonore 72 400 

Asch & Jaeckel S$ 421 

Ash, Marshall 39 199 

Ashcroft Mfg. Co. . . 

C. 21, 32 ; 123, 169 
« 



INDEX. 



495 



CDaaa. Page. 

Ashford. W. R. 41 235 

Ashland Coal, Iron & Ry. 

Co 63 309 

Ashley, D. G 39 199 

Ashley Falls Marble Co. 63 310 

Ashtoq Valve Co 

C. I9,74;ii7,409 

Aspinwall Mfg. Co 37 192 

Assn. Agri. Colleges & 

Exp. Sta 38 197 

Assn. Collegiate Alumnae. 3 36 

Assn. Engineering Soc. . . loB 463 

Assyrian Gilsonite Co. . . 63 310 

Astor, John Jacob 33 179 

A T. &S. F. R. R.......103 445 

Atherton. W. P 45 264 

Atkins, £. C. & Co 

C. 22, 65; 127, 390 

Atkinson, J. H 39 199 

Atkinson, W. B iii 471 

Atlan Qub 72 400 

Atlanta & West Point 

R. R 103 445 

Atlanta University no 468 

Atlantic Coast Line 104 457 

Atlantic Coast Lumber Co 50 276 

Atlantic Refinino: Co 87 425 

Atlantic Yacht Club 33 179 

Atlas Mining Co 63 310 

Atlas Tack -Co 65 390 

Attlcboro Mfg. Co 95 436 

Atwater, W. 53 282 

Auchincloss Brothers ... 35 189 

Audit & Control, Bd. of. .112 478 

Auditor, West Virginia. 32 170 

Audubon Park Assn 43 261 

Auerbach, Louis 86 422 

Auld & Conger 63 310 

Aulich. F. B 72 400 

Aull Elbert H., Co 13 90 

Aultman, Miller & Co . . 

C. 35» 81 ; 189, 416 

Automatic Elec. Clock Co. 

C. 27,96; 153.438 

Automatic Switch Co ... 23 137 

Avonmore Coal&Coke Co 63 310 

Axtell, F. H ds 264 

A. Y.& Minnie Mining Co. 03 310 

Ayers, N. W., & Co 103 445 

Ayres, A. 39 199 

Azure Mining Co 95 436 



CDaaa. Page. 

Babb, Cook & Willard... 10 74 

Babbitt, B. T 87 425 

Babcock, E. F 45 264 

Babcock Print. Press Mfg 

Co II 80 

Babcock & Wilcox Co. . . 

C.32, 118; 170,487 

Bacheller, F 63 310 

Bachelor Minin'-ftMill Co 63 310 

Baer, William J 7 45 

Bagfir. S. F 33 180 

Bafzrglev ^ohn 63 310 

Bagwell. N. E 39 I99 

Bailey, Charles A 63 310 

Bailey Henry 4 41 

Bailey, J. J 63 310 

Bailey, J. S, 41 235 

Bailey, Jacob 45 264 

Bailey,' Leonard C in 471 

Bailey, M. M 39 200 

Baird, A 39 200 

Baird, Henry Carey, & Co. 63 310 

Baisley, Mrs. Frank 72 400 

Baker Art Gallery 12 85 

Baker Brothers 22 127 

Baker, Charles 63 310 

Baker, Constance A 72 400 

Baker, G 45 264 

Baker, G. G 39 200 

Baker, J. W 39 200 

Baker, Martha S 7 46 

Baker, Sam 41 235 

Baker, Theodore 39 200 

Baker, Walter, & Co 59 294 

Baker & Chapman 41 235 

Baker & Fox 25 145 

Baldwin, A 39 200 

Baldwin, A. H 53 282 

Baldwin, A. M 63 310 

Baldwin Brothers & Co. . 70 399 

Baldwin, C. A 60 297 

Baldwin, Charles L 93 434 

Baldwin, D. H., & Co 

C. 17. 29; 114. 161 

Baldwin Locomotive Wks. 

C. 32. 103, 109; 170, 445. 465 

Baldwin, M. A 45 264 

Baldwin Piano Co 17 II4 

Ball Engine Co 19 "7 

Ball & Pedal Factory 30 166 

Ballantine & Sons 62 303 



496 



INDEX. 



CDass. Page. 

Ballard, Martin & Nevills 63 310 

Ballard & Martin 63 310 

Ballardvale Mills 82 417 

Baltimore Leaf Tob. Assn. 91 429 

B. & O. Relief Assn 103 445 

Baltz, J. & P., Brew. Co. . 62 303 

Bandera Flagstone Co... 63 310 

Banp^or & Aroostook R.R.103 445 

Banister, James A., Co. . . 86 422 
Bank Commissioners N 

Hamo 103 445 

Bankers' Mining Co 63 311 

Bankey, Mrs. Caledonia J 84 419 

Banking, Comm. of, Penn.103 445 

Bankinson, W. S 41 235 

Banner, Newton 45 264 

Banning Co 63 31 1 

Banning Orthopedic &. . 

Mechan.Therapeutic Ca 16 iii 

Baptist Mining Co 63 311 

Barataria Canning Co. . . 58 290 

Barbee, J. Y 41 235 

Barber, A. C. Mfg. Co... 74 410 

Barber Asphalt Paving Co 63 311 

Barber Jewelry Co 95 436 

Bardeen, C. W 

C. I, 2, 3;27, 33, 36 

Barker, J. M 63 311 

Barker, L. D 39 200 

Barley, U. S 45 264 

Barlow, J. Noble 7 46 

Barnard, E 63 311 

Barnard, George Grey . . 9 70 
Barnard, George, & Co. . 

C. 98, 100; 440, 441 

Barnes, A. S., & Co 13 90 

Barnes, E. F 39 200 

Barnes, W. F. & John, Co. 22 128 

Barnett, R. C 39 200 

Barney Marble Co 

C. 63, 66; 311. 395 

Barnhart Bros. & Spindler 11 80 

Bamhorn, Gement J 

C.9,i7;7i, "4 

Barper, William Gordan. 41 235 

Barr, G. W 58 290 

Barr, J. Caroll 28 157 

Barr- Fyke Cancelling Ma- 
chine Co II 80 

Barrett Chemical Co 87 425 

Barrett, J 63 311 



OUsK. Page. 

Barrett & Barrett 

C. 59, 62; 294, 303 

Barrie, George, & Sons. . 

C. II, 13; 80,90 

Barron, James S., & Co. . 25 145 

Barry, J ,45 264 

Barry Postal Supply Co. 11 80 

Barsom, P. S 39 200 

Barteldcs & Co 39 200 

Bartholomew, J. S 33 180 

Bartlett Min. Water Co.. in 471 

Bartlett, Paul W 9 7i 

Bartlett, S. P 53 283 

Barton Estate Co 60 297 

Bashford & Ferguson 63 311 

Bass, E. 1 39 200 

Bass, J. A 39 200 

Bassett, W. A 45 264 

Batcheller Pneu. Tube Co. 21 123 

Bates, D. L., & Brother. . 23 137 

Bates Machine Co 22 128 

Bates, R 41 235 

Bates & White ^i 235 

Bath Department in 471 

Bath House Committee ..in 472 
Battle Creek Sanitarium 

Health Food Co 56 288 

Battle, M. T 41 235 

Battle, R. B 41 235 

Baugh, J. W 39 200 

-Baur, The'^dore 97 438 

Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co. 12 86 

Baxter, C. W 41 235 

Baxter, Martha Wheeler. 7 46 

Bayle & Lacosta 35 189 

Bay State Optical Co. . . . 

c. 15, 73; 109. 40S 

Bay State Seam Face 

Granite Company 63 311 

Beach, Martha Edwards.. 72 401 

Beadleston & Woerz 62 303 

Beal, William 63 311 

Bean, Barton A 53 283 

Bean, Tarleton H 

C. 41, 50, 53; 235, 276, 283 

Bean - Chamberlain Mfg. 

Co 87 425 

Beard, C 63 311 

Beard, John L 60 297 

Beardsley, George F 63 311 

Beardsley*s, J. W., Sons.. 58 290 



INDEX. 



497 



GUm. Paire. 

Bear Lithia Water Co 1 1 1 472 

Beasley Mining Co 63 311 

Beatty, John 63 311 

Beaux, Cecilia 7 46 

Beaver Hill Coal Co 63 311 

Beck, C. J 63 3" 

Beck, E. S 16 III 

Beck, W. H 39 200 

Beck, W. S 41 235 

Becker, John 22 128 

Becker-Brainerd Milling 

Machine Co 22 128 

Beckington Alice 7 46 

Beckwith, J. Carroll 7 46 

Beckwith, V. D., Estate of 74 4io 

Bedell, E. I 41 235 

Beebe, Grace F 72 401 

Beer, S.J 45 264 

Beeson, H. H 39 200 

Beil & Mauch 66 395 

Belcher Mining Co 63 312 

Belden A. S 103 445 

Belden Mining Co 63 312 

Belding, Milo M 63 312 

Beldon-Larwill Elec. Mfg. 

Co 25 145 

Belgram, Hugo 21 123 

Belknap Motor Co 23 137 

Belknap. W. E 29 161 

Bell, A. W Ill 472 

BeU, J. C 41 235 

Bell, T. T 63 312 

Bell, W. W 41 235 

Bell & Moore 41 236 

Belle Louise Ranch 45 264 

Bellefontaine Cemetery . . 43 261 

Bement, Miles & Co 22 128 

Bendamm, Daniel 12 86 

Bendat, L 41 236 

Benecke, E 39 200 

Benjamin, W. E 13 90 

Ben Lomond Wine Co.*.. 60. 297 

Benn, John 53 283 

Bennett William A 50 276 

Bennett & Millet Co 39 201 

Bennett & Witte 50 276 

Benson, Frank W 7 46 

Benson, Oliver zz 180 

Benson & Flagg 10 74 

Bentley, H. L 39 201 

Benton, Frank 42 258 



Glass. Paire. 

Benton, J 63 312 

Benton, S. M 41 236 

Benz, AufTust 13 90 

Berg, Charles I 10 * 74 

Bergfeldt, N. H 33 180 

Bergstresser, J. C 13 90 

Beringer Brothers 60 297 

Berlin Iron Bridge Co. . . 29 161 

Bernheim Brothers 61 302 

Bernstrom, Victor 8 66 

Berry, J. L 41 236 

Berry, M. F 45 264 

Berry, J. L 41 236 

Berry, T. L 63 312 

Bertha Blake Mining Co. 63 312 

Bertha Zinc & Mineral Co 63 312 

Bertha Zinc Co 63 312 

Berwind, White Coal Co. 63 312 

Bethlehem Steel Co 

C. 33. 64, 108, 116 

............P 180, 386, 463, 485 

Bettelheim. E. S 13 90 

Beveridge, Miss Ktihne.. 9 71 

Bevis Rock Salt Co 63 312 

Beyer, George 41 236 

Bickford & Bennett 63 312 

Bickford Drill & Tool Co. 22 128 

Bicycle Step Ladder Co. . 69 397 

Bien. Julius, & Co 53 283 

Bierbrier, F. E 69 397 

Biers, Rev. J. T 41 236 

Biesecker, J. S 37 192 

Biggs, B. D 39 201 

Bilgram, Hugo 21 123 

Billings Farm 41 236 

Billings & Spencer Co... 23 138 

Bill, Edward Lyman .... 13 90 

Bimberg, Joseph 91 429 

Binney & Smith 87 425 

Binns, Charles Fergus . . 63 312 

Binson, William G 41 236 

Birge, F. E 63 312 

Birmingham, Ernest F. . . 13 90 

Birney, T L 63 312 

Bisbing, H. S 7 46 

Bischoff, Franz A 72 401 

Bishop, Joseph 63 312 

Bishop, M. A 41 236 

Bishop, T. F 63 312 

Bishop & Co 59 295 

Bismark Mining Co 63 313 



498 



INDEX. 



Olasf. Page. 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co 98 440 

Bissell, George E 97 439 

Bitter, Karl 

C. 9, 66, 97; 71,395,439 

Bituminous Rock Co 63 313 

Biwabik Mining Co 63 313 

Bixby, J. F 63 313 

Bixler, Mort L 50 276 

Black Metal Mining Co. . 63 313 

Black, Smith & Given ... 63 313 

Black, William H 45 264 

Blackford, C. M., Jr 53 283 

Blackstock, J 39 201 

Blair Fountain Pen Co. . . 92 433 

Blair, George A 45 264 

Blake, George F. Mfg. Co. 

C. 19, 118; 117,487 

Blake, P 63 313 

Blakelock, Ralph A .7 46 

Blakeney. J. 41 236 

Blanc, A 63 313 

Blanchard & Folsom 41 236 

Blanding, Louis 63 313 

Blaney, Henry R 8 66 

Blank, N. J 39 201 

Blatchford, E. W.. & Co. 39 201 
Blatz, F. J., & Brother. .. 89 427 
Blichert, P. A., Mfg. Co. . 87 426 
Blickensderfer Mfg. Co. . 11 81 
Blind, Inst for Instruc- 
tion 112 478 

Blind, School for the 112 478 

Bliss, L. C, & Co 86 423 

Block, E 63 313 

Block, H 39 201 

Bloom, J. D 16 III 

Blossom, J A 63 313 

Blow, Susan E i 27 

Blum, Robert 7 47 

Blume, 1 39 201 

Blumenberg Press 13 90 

Blumenstiel, Levi, & Co. . 91 430 

Board of Arbit, Conn 103 446 

Board of Arbit, 111 103 446 

Board of Arbit, Ind 103 446 

Board of Arbit, Mass... 103 446 

Board of Arbit., N. Y 103 446 

Board of Arbit, Ohio... 103 446 

Board of Arbit, Wis 103 446 

Bd. Educa'n, Albany, 
N. Y C I, 2; 27, 33 



GUv. Page. 

Bd. Educa'n, Aurora, IlL i 27 
Bd. Educa'n, Binghamtcm, 

N.Y I 28 

Bd. Educa'n, Boston, • 

Mass C. I, 2, 6; 28, 33, 42 

Bd. Educa'n, Cairo, 111 . . . i 28 
Bd. Educa'n, Calif. State. 

C. I, 2,28, 33 

Bd. Educa'n, Chicago 

C. I, 2:28, 33 

Bd. Educa'n, Qeveland, 

O C.i,2;28,33 

Bd. Educa'n, Coldwater, 

Mich I 28 

Bd. Educa'n, Columbus, 

Ga I 28 

Bd, Educa'n, Denver, 

Colo C. I, 2 ; 28, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Erie, Penn. . i 28 
Bd. Educa'n, Fort Scott, 

Kan I 28 

Bd. Educa'n, Galesburg, 

Ills I 28 

Bd. Educa'n, Kansas City, 

Mo C. I, 2; 28, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Los Angeles, 

Cal I 28 

Bd. Educa'n, Maiden, 

Mass C. I, 2 ; 28, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Mass. State. 

C. I, 2, 3; 28, 34, 37 

Bd. Educa'n, Middletown, 

N.Y I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, Minneapolis, 

Minn C. i, 2 ; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Missouri 

State I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, Nashua, 

N. H I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, Newark, 

N. T C. I, 2; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, New Bed- 
ford, Mass I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, New Jersey 

State I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, New York 

City C. I, 2, 74; 29, 34, 410 

Bd. Educa'n, Omaha, 

Neb C. 1,2; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Patcrson, 

N.J I 29 



^ 



INDEX. 



499 



OUas. Page. 

6d. Educa'n, Pensacola, 

Fla I ag 

Bd. Educa'n, Peoria, Ills. 

.' C. I, 2; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, R. I. State. . i 29 
Bd. Educa'n, Rochester, 

N. Y I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, St. Louis, 

Mo C. i,2;30,34 

Bd. Educa'n, Saratoga 

Springs, N. Y I 29 

Bd. Educa'n, Somerville, 

Mass C. I, 2 ; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Sprinfi^field, 

Mass C. I, 2; 29, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, Tacoma, 

v/ash I 30 

Bd. Educa'n, Terre 

Haute I 30 

Bd. Educa'n, Toledo, O. . i 30 
Bd. Educa'n, Utica, N. Y. i 30 
Bd. Educa'n, Vermont 

State 2 M 

Bd. Educa'n, Washinjrton, 

D. C C. I. 2; 30, 34 

Bd. Educa'n, W. Spring- 
field, Mass I 30 

Bd. Educa'n, Whitehall, 

N.Y I 30 

Bd. Educa'n, Wilkes- 

barre, Pa i 30 

Bd. Educa'n, Worcester, 

Mass C. I, 2; 30, 34 

Bd. Health, Baltimore, 

Md Ill 472 

Bd. Health, Boston, Mass.iii 472 
Bd. Health, Brookline, 

Mass Ill 472 

Bd. Health, Buffalo. N. Y.iii 472 
Bd. Health, Calif. State.. in 472 
Bd. Health, Cambridge, 

Mass Ill 472 

Bd. Health, Charleston, 

S. Car Ill 472 

Bd. Health. Chicago in 472 

Bd. Health. Cincinnati, O . i n 472 
Bd. Health, Cleveland, O . n i 472 
Bd. Health, Conn. State. .111 472 

Bd. Health, Del. State in 472 

Bd. Health.Detroit, Mich. Ill 472 
Bd. Health, Florida State .111 472 



OUas. Page. 

Bd. Health, Ills. State... in 473 

Bd. Health, Indiana State .111 473 

Bd. Health, Iowa State. .in 473 

Bd. Health, Kansas State. Ill 473 

Bd. Health, Ky. State... in 473 

Bd. Health, Maine State, in 473 

Bd. Health, Md. State in 473 

Bd. Health, Mass. State.. in 473 

Bd. Health, Mich. State.. in 473 
Bd. Health, Milwaukee, 

Wis Ill 473 

Bd. Health, Minneaoolis, 

Minn in 473 

Bd. Health, Minn. State.. in 473 
Bd. Health, Missouri 

State Ill 473 

Bd. Health, National, 

Washington, D. C in 473 

Bd. Health, Newark, N.J. in 473 
Bd. Health, New Hamp. 

State in 473 

Bd. Health, is. Jersey 

State Ill 473 

Bd. Health, New Orleans, 

La Ill 474 

Bd. Health, New York 

City Ill 474 

Bd. Health, New York 

State Ill 474 

Bd. Health, Ohio State. . .111 474 

Bd. Health, Oklahoma. ..Ill 474 
Bd. Health, Paterson, 

N. J Ill 474 

Bd. Health, Penn. State.. in 474 

Bd. Health, Phila, Penn.. in 474 

Bd. Health, Pittsburg, Pa. in 474 
Bd. Health, Providence, 

R. I in 474 

Bd. Health, R. I. State.. in 474 

Bd. Health, Reading, Pa.. in 474 

Bd. Health, St. Louis, Mo. in 474 
Bd. Health, St. Paul, 

Minn in 474 

Bd. Health, Vt. State in 474 

Bd, Health, So. Car. State. in 474 
Bd. Health, Washington, 

D. C in 475 

Bd. Health, Wis. State. . .111 475 
Bd. Health, Worcester, 

Mass Ill 475 



500 



INDEX. 



OUsa. Page. 

Bd. Park Com's'rs, Cam- 
bridge 29 161 

Bd. School Directors, 

Harrisburg, Penn i 30 

Bd. Schools, New York. . 74 4io 
Bd. St Com's'rs, Cam- 
bridge 29 161 

Bd. Trade, Bangor, 

C. 103, no; 446, 468 

Bd. Trade, Chicaeo 

C. 103, no; 446, 468 

Bd. Trade, Lynchburg, 

Va 103 441 

Bd. Trade. Nevada 

C. 103, 104; 446, 457 

Bd. Trade. New Orleans. 39 201 

I5d. Trade. Philadelphia. .103 446 

Bd. Trade, Steubenville. .103 446 

Bd. Trade, Tampa 103 446 

Boehmke, Emil 39 201 

Boettcker, H 60 297 

Bogart Mining Co 63 313 

Bogart, O. H 63 3i3 

Bogert, George H 7 47 

Boggs, George E 45 265 

Bogwell, Hardy B 41 236 

Bohannon, Mr 39 201 

Bohls, H., &Co 91 430 

Bohm, Max 7 47 

Bohmann, Joseph 17 ii4 

Bohn, H. J., & Brother. . . 13 90 

Boldt, H. J 16 ni 

Bolen & Bryne Mfg. Co. . 62 303 

Boiler, Alfred P 29 161 

Bolles, Charles E.C. 12, 33; 86, 180 

Bolton. W. E 13 90 

Bommer Brothers 65 390 

Bond, A. L 63 3i3 

Bonnard, H., Bronze Co. . 97 439 

Bonelli, D ......63 3I3 

Bonner, Robert, Sons 13 90 

Bookkeeper Pub. Co., Ltd. 13 90 

Booraem, R. E 63 313 

Booth Brothers 63 313 

iiooth, J. B 41 236 

Borden's Condensed Milk 

Co 40 231 

Borjjlum, Solon H 9 71 

Boring & Tilton w 74 

Boskerck, Robt. W. Van.. "7 47 



Olus. Page. 

Bosscrt Elec. Construct'n. 

C. 23, 25; 138, 145 

Boston BcItinPT Co 21 123 

lioston Blacking Co 79 4^3 

Boston Dental Parlors... 16 in 
Boston Flint Paper Co. . . 63 3^4 
Boston Journal of Com- 
merce & Textile Indus- 
tries 103 440 

Boston Little Circle Co. . . 63 314 
Boston Quicksilver Min- 
ing Co 63 314 

Boston Terminal Co 29 lOi 

Boston Transit Com. .... 29 161 
Boston & Aurora Mining 

Co 63 314 

Boston & Colo Smeltmg 

Co C. 63, 64; 314*387 

Boston & Maine Railway. 

Co C. 103, 104; 446, 457 

Boston & Mont. Consoli- 
dated Copper & Silver 
Mining Co. . .C. 63. 64; 3i4» 387 

Boston & Nevada Co 63 3^4 

Botany Worsted Mills... 82 4^7 

Bouchdlc, E. F 4i 236 

Bouillon Stock Mfg. Co. . 58 290 

Bourne, Charles 63 3^4 

Bowen. Clarence W 13 90 

Bowen, Dc»niel 03 314 

Bowen Mfg. Co 19 "» 

Bowen, William M. P. . . . n 81 

Bowers.A.B 28 I57 

Bowie, George M 5© 270 

Bowker. R. R •• y gi 

Bowles, F. T.. .C. 33» "8; 180, 487 

Bowles. J. M 13 90 

Bowles, Ruder & Weber. . 39 201 

Bowsher. N. P 22 128 

Boyd. John F 63 3M 

Boyd, Myra 72 401 

Boyle, J. J..... 97 439 

Boyle, Patrick F 33 180 

Bracken, Julia M 97 439 

Braddock Land & Granite 

Co 63 314 

Braden. B. T 41 2.^ 

Braden, C. C 41 236 

Bradford Mill Co 22 128 

Bradley, Elmer 45 265 

Bradley, J. D 33 180 



i 



INDEX. 



501 



ClaM. Page. 

Bradley, N. F in 475 

Bradley Polytechnic Inst. 6 42 

Bradley Pulverizer Co... 28 157 

Bradstreet. H. C 39 201 

Bradstreet. W. C 39 201 

Brady, Florence H 84 419 

Brady, J. P 19 118 

Bra^ard. A 33 180 

Brainerd, Shaler & Hall 

Quarry Co 63 314 

Brand, A. F 16 in 

Branday. F. C 13 9i 

Brandon Italian Marble 

Co 63 314 

Brandt, Randolph 19 118 

Brandt-Dent Co. C. 15, 96; no, 438 

Brandywine Granite Co. . 63 314 

BranninR Mfg. Co 50 276 

Brant, C. E 66 395 

Bra shear. John A 15 no 

Brasseur, Charles L. A . . . 

C. n, 12. 15; 81. 86, no 

Braughton. Joseph T ai 236 

Braun, W 03 314 

Braverman, M 63 314 

Brazanovich, M 63 314 

Brazil Block Coal Co 63 315 

Bream, Samuel 45 265 

Breazeale Brothers 41 237 

Breda, J. Ernest 41 237 

Brekenridge, Hugh H. . . . 7 47 

Bremer, A. R., Co 90 429 

Brenner, Victor David. .. 9 71 
Brenner, Fred, Lumber 

Co 50 276 

Brenner, W. N 12 86 

Brewer, J. F 39 201 

Brewers* Journal 13 91 

Brey, C. G 39 201 

Briar Block Coal Co 63 3^5 

Briar Qiff Manor Farms. 108 463 

Brice, A. H 41 237 

Brick 103 446 

Brick & Pipe Co 63 315 

Brickbuilder 103 447 

Bridgeport Gun Imple.Co. 22 128 
Bridgeport Wood Finish- 
ing Co C 50. 66; 276, 395 

Bridgeport Silk Co 83 418 

Bridgman. F. A 7 47 

Rrill, J. G., Co 32 170 



Class. Page. 

Brindle Steer Mining Co. 63 3^5 

Bristol Co 

c. 21,25. 27; 123, 145, 154 

Brite & Bacon 10 74 

Brittain. Wesley 39 201 

Broadway Chambers 

C. 28, 29; 157, 161 

Broadway Pub. Co 13 9^ 

Brockway 10 74 

Brokaw, W. Gould 33 180 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle 13 90 

Brooks, Carol Mac Neil ... 9 71 

Brooks, Richard E 9 7i 

Brooks, W. H 63 315 

Brotherhood Locomotive 

Engineers 103 447 

Brotherhood Wine Co 60 298 

Brown, A 39 202 

Brown Bear Mining Co. . 63 315 

Brown-Dake Mining Co.. 63 315 

Brown, E 63 315 

Brown, Elmer Ellsworth. 2 34 

Brown, George L 63 315 

Brown, Harold P 32 170 

Brown, Herald 3 37 

Brown, Herbert S n2 478 

Brown, J. G 7 47 

Brown, James B 63 315 

Brown, J. J 39 202 

Brown, L 39 202 

Brown, Lucius P 35 189 

Brown, Morris 91 43© 

Brown, Paul Tavlor, Co. . 58 290 

Brown, R. H. & Co 22 128 

Brown, William M., Jr. . . 29 162 

Brown, T 63 3^5 

Brown & Patterson 17 n4 

Brown & Sharoe Mfg. Co. 

C. 15, 22, 93 ; no, 128, 435 

Brown & White 3 37 

Browne. Charles Francis. 7 47 

Brownell, F. rl 105 458 

Brownell Mfg. Co 108 463 

Browning, Elsie E 72 401 

Browning. J. A 39 202 

Brownville Slate Co 63 315 

Bruce, H. C 39 202 

Bruch, Edward 39 202 

Brumbaugh. J. N 39 202 

Brunswick-Balke-Collen- 

der Co C. 69, 98 ; 397, 440 



502 



I>IDEX. 



OUas. Page. 

Brush, George de Forrest. 7 47 

Brush & Pencil Pub. Co. . 13 91 

Bryan, J. L 39 202 

Bryant, A., & Sf n 45 265 

Bryant Electric Co 25 145 

Bryant, L. R 45 265 

Bryant, T. W 41 237 

Bryn Mawr College 3 37 

Buchholz, Herman 18 116 

Buckeye Electric Co 25 145 

Buckley, James T 50 276 

Bucyrus Co 28 158 

Budd, Samuel 86 423 

Buffalo Factory 30 166 

Buffalo Forire Co 22 128 

Buffalo Maple Flooring 

Co 50 276 

Buffalo Pitts Co 28 158 

Buhl Stamping Co 37 192 

Builders* Iron Foundry. . 22 128 
Building & Loan Ass'n, 

Calif 103 447 

Ills. State League. 103 447 

Ind. State League. 103 447 

Louisiana State 

League 103 447 

Mass. State Lea^e. 103 447 

Metropolitan 

League, New York 103 447 

Mch. State League. 103 447 

Missouri State 

League 103 447 

National League, 

Washington 103 447 

Wisconsin State 

League 103 447 

Commission, N. Y. 

State 103 447 

Bullard Machine Tool Co. 22 128 
Bullion, Beck & Champion 

Co 63 315 

Bullion Mining Co 63 315 

Bullock Elec. Mfg. Co 23 138 

Bullock, George 33 180 

Bullock, M. C, Mfg. Co. . 63 315 

Bumpus. H. C 53 283 

Bunce, W. Gedney 7 47 

Bundy Mfg. Co 96 438 

Bunko Mining Co 63 315 

Burbank, E. A 7 47 

Burbank Engraving Co. . . 87 426 



OUn. Paoe. 

Bu. Am. Republics 103 447 

Bu. Education, U. S 

C. I, 6; 30, 43 

Bu. Eng^ving & Print- 
ing II 81 

Bu. Ind. Affairs, Dept Int. 6 43 

Bu. Labor Statist's, Mass. 103 447 

Bu. Statistics, U. S. Gov.. 103 447 

Bu. of the Mint 15 no 

Buren, John J 39 202 

Burgan, L. A 39 Q02 

Burgdorf, S. E. 45 265 

Burgeson, B. 39 202 

Burgess, L. A ^ 202 

Burk Brothers 89 427 

Burk, Frank 45 265 

Burke, J 63 316 

Burlington Railroad Co. .103 447 
Burlington Voluntary Re- 
lief Dept 103 4A8 

Burnett, Charles .\ . 45 265 

Burnett. J 39 202 

Burnham, D. H 10 74 

Burns Mining Co 63 316 

Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co. . 

C. 39. 4^ ; 261, 302 

Burr, John T.,& Son..... 22 128 

Burrage, A. C 63 316 

Burrelle, Frank A 13 91 

Burrows, Miss M. E 72 401 

Burt Mfg. Co 19 118 

Burton, C. H., & Co 17 114 

Burton. Hoffman, Photo 

Co C. 12, 33 ; 86, 180 

Burton, Joseph A 45 265 

Bussinger. W. 39 202 

Busk, Mrs. J. R 33 180 

Butler. Howard Russell. . 7 48 
Butte & Boston Mining 

Co C. 63, 64; 316, 387 

Butterick Publishine Co. . 13 91 

Butterworth, T 13 91 

Butters Lumber Co 50 276 

Button W 63 :^i6 

Buttrill, Thomas H 41 237 

Bybee. R. L 39 202 

Byers. W. S 39 203 

Byrd, A. G 41 237 

Byrd. M. T 41 237 

Byron, Joseph C. 12, 18; 86, 116 



INDEX. 



503 



OUn. Pafe. 

C. & C. Elcc Co 23 138 

Cagaloo Mining Co 63 316 

Cainbensy, Frank 33 180 

Calaveras Consolidated 

MininfiT Co 63 316 

Calaveras Marble Co 63 316 

Calcots, Allen C 41 237 

Calder, A. S 9 7i 

Caldwell. E. W 39 203 

Caldwell, L. H 41 237 

Caldwell, W. E., & Co 29 162 

Caledonia Minin" Co 63 316 

Calhoun, A. A 39 203 

Calif. Art Glass Works. . . 67 396 

Calif. Canneries Co., Ltd. 59 295 

Calif. Fertilizer Co 35 190 

Calif. Fish Co 58 290 

Calif. Fruit Grower 103 448 

Calif. Marble & Building 

Stone Co 63 316 

Calif. Nursery Co 43 261 

Calif. Packing Co 

C. 39» 42, 59; 203, 258, 295 

Calif. Paris Expo. Com., 

1900 

C. 14,29,39,43,45,50, 

53, 58, 60, 63, 64, 103, 104, no 

P. 109, 162, 203. 261, 265, 276. 

283, 290, 298, 316, 387, 448, 457, 

468 

Calif. Quicksilver Mining 

Co 63 320 

Calif. State Mining Bu. . . 63 320 

Calif. Wharf House Co. . 39 203 

Calif. Wine Asso 60 298 

Calif. Winery Co 60 298 

Call,R. E 53 283 

Calla, Max, & Co 13 91 

Calliope Mining & Mill'g 

Co 63 



Callison, T. W 41 

Calumet & Contact Co. . . 63 



320 

237 
320 



Calumet & Hecla Co 63 320 

Cambill, T. H 39 203 

Cambria Steel Co 29 162 

Camp. Joseoh de 7 48 

Camp Mfg. Co 50 276 

Campbell. C. P 63 320 

Campbell, L. H 63 320 

Campbell, J., Preserve 

Co 58 290 



OUas. Pact. 

Campbell, J. B 13 91 

Campbell. Wm., & Co 68 397 

Campbell's 111. Journal... 13 91 

Campion, John F 63 320 

Candler, Mariam L 72 401 

Canfield Mfg. Co 19 1 18 

Canfield Rubber Co .86 423 

Canty, John 41 237 

Cape Fear Lumbering Co. 50 276 

Caperton, W. F 41 237 

Capital City Brick Co. ... 63 320 

Capps, T. W :.. 41 237 

Carborundum Co 

C. 22, 63; 128, 320 

Card. S. W., Mf«r. Co. ... 22 128 

Cardinal & Becker 83 418 

Cardwell Machine Co.... 91 430 

Carl, E. A 39 203 

Carl, Kate 7 48 

Carl, William C 13 91 

Carleton. Clifford 7 48 

Carley, Horace L 33 181 

Carlisle Indian School ... 6 43 

Carlock, N. J 39 203 

Carneal, Thomas D 39 203 

Carnegfie Steel Co 64 387 

Carpenter, A. V 63 320 

Carpenter, Coles A 63 320 

Carpenter, J. M., Tap & 

Die Co 22 129 

Carpenter, John W 41 237 

Carpenter & Brother 63 320 

Carrall, J. C 39 203 

Carrara Marble Co 63 320 

Carrere & Hastings 10 74 

Carr, Lyell 66 395 

Carter, J. J 41 .237 

Carter, L. W 39 203 

Carter, Miss Sybl 84 419 

Carter, W. C 33 181 

Carthage Marble & White 

Lime Co 63 320 

Cary, F. M 41 237 

Cary, Robert A 41 237 

Casarallo, J 63 321 

Cascade Mill 56 288 

Case Mfg. Co 28 158 

Casey, T. F 41 238 

Cashin, William J 63 321 

Cassell & Company, Ltd. .13 91 

Cassidy & Son Mfg. Co. . 75 412 



504 



INDEX. 



Olasa. Page. 

Castillo, Ernest 33 181 

Caslle Braid Co..C. 82, 83 ; 417, 418 

Castle Brothers 58 291 

Castrer, Curran & Bullitt. 63 321 
Cataract Tool & Optical 

Co 22 129 

Cathcart, S. M 41 238 

Catholic St'd & Times 

Pub. Co 13 91 

Catholic Univ. of America 3 37 

Cattell, James McKeen. . . 3 37 

Caw's Pen & Ink Co 92 433 

Cayuga Pressed Brick Co. 63 321 
Cemetery Assn., Cypress 

Lawn Ill 475 

Cemetery Assn., Linden- 
wood Ill 475 

Cemetery Assn., Old Fel- 
lows Ill 475 

Cemetery, Forest Home 

Co Ill 475 

Cemetery, Spring Grove.. 43 261 
Centennial Eureka Min'g 

Co 63 321 

Centerville Block Coal Co 63 321 

Central Coal & Coke Co. . 63 321 

Central Jellico Coal Co. . . 63 321 

Central Lead Co 63 321 

Central Phosphate Co 63 321 

Central Phosphate Co. ... 35 190 

Central R.R., New Jersey. 63 321 
Central School Supply 

House C. I, 14; 30, 109 

Central Seventh Day 

Adventist Pub. Asso... 13 91 

Central Telep. & Elec. Co. 26 150 

Central Union Brass Co. . 23 138 

Century Co 13 92 

Cercle Francaise de I'Uni- 

versite Harvard 3 37 

Cereal Food Co 56 288 

Cereal Machine Co 56 288 

Cereal Mill, Akron, Ohio. 56 288 

Cerrillos Coal & R.R. Co.. 63 321 

Cerro Gordo Co 63 321 

Chadbourn & Long 63 321 

Chadwick. Chas. Wesley. 8 66 

Chaffin, T. J 39 203 

Chain Factory 30 166 

Chainman Minin*? Co 63 321 

Chaix & Bernard 60 298 



OUn. Pace. 

Chamber Com., Charles- 
ton C. 103, no; 448, 468 

Chamber Com., Cleveland, no 468 
Chamber Com., Los An- 
geles C. 41. 104 ; 238, 457 

Chamber Com., Santa 

Ana 104 457 

Chamberlain Pub. Co 38 197 

Chambers, Inskeep & Co. 73 408 

Champion Milk Cooler. . . 37 192 

Champion Mining Co.... 63 321 

Champney, Marie 7 48 

Chandler, A. D 13 92 

Chandler, H. H., & Co. . . . 13 92 

Chandler, R. C 41 238 

Chandler & Price Co 

C. II, 13; 81, 92 

Chaney, J. C 39 203 

Chaney, J. R 39 203 

Chapel Hill Mining Co. . . 63 322 

Chapin, W. C 63 322 

Chaplin, R. W., Jr 41 283 

Chapman, Carlton T 7 48 

Chapman Coal Co 63 321 

Chapman, Max 41 238 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co. . 21 123 

Chapman, W. H 33 181 

Chappie, Joe Mitchell 13 92 

Charitable Inst., Kansas 

State 112 478 

Charities & Correction, 

Bd. of, Colorado State.. 112 478 
District of Co- 
lumbia 112 479 

Missouri State 112 479 

New Hamp. State. 112 479 

New York State.. 112 479 

So. Dak. State 112 479 

Nat'l Conference, 



Cincinnati 112 479 

Charities & Reform, Bd., 

Wyo 112 479 

Charities, Associated, Bd. 

of, Mass. State 112 479 

Janesville, Wise. .. 112 479 

Oakland. Calif 112 479 

Pueblo, Colo 112 479 

Society, Charles- 
ton, S. Car 112 479 

Charleston, W. Va.112 479 

Wilmington, Dela.112 479 



^ 



INDEX. 



505 



Glass. Page. 

Charities, Assn., Akron,0.ii2 479 
Charities, Bd., Conn., 

State 112 479 

Indiana State 112 479 

New York State. .112 480 

Ohio State 112 480 

Tennessee State... 112 480 

Pub. Bd.. N. Car. 

State 112 480 

^ Penn. State 112 480 

Charity & Beneficent Or- 
ganization, Baltimore. .112 480 
Charity, Bd. of, Calif. 

State 112 480 

Illinois State 112 480 

Maine State 112 480 

Maryland State. ..112 480 

Mass. State 112 480 

Michigan State... 112 480 

Minn. State 112 480 

New Jersey State. 112 480 

Chase, A. J 55 287 

Chase, George W 63 322 

Chase- Shawmut Co 23 138 

Chase, William M 7 48 

Chassaignac & Dyer, Drs. 13 92 

Chateaugay Iron Ore Co. 64 387 

Chatelle. W. B 63 322 

Chaussegros, Clement 72 401 

Chauvin, A. T 63 322 

Chavez, J. M. C 39 203 

Cherokee & Pitts. Coal Co 63 322 

Cherry, Mrs. K. E 72 401 

Cherry Valley Iron Co. . . 63 322 

Chcstatee Pyrites Co 63 322 

Chesterton, A. W., & Co. . 19 118 

Chiatovich, J 63 322 

Chiatowitch, John 63 322 

Chicago Auditorium Asso 18 116 

Chicago Brass Co 17 1 14 

Chicago Colortype Co 11 81 

Chicago Drv Goods Rep. . 103 448 

Chicago Edison Co 25 145 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co 35 190 
Chicago Fuse Wire & 

Mfg. Co 25 145 

Chicago Horseman News- 
paper Co 13 92 

Chicago Insulated Wire 

Co 26 150 



Olaas. Page. 

Chicago Pneumatic Tool 

Co C. 22, 103 ; 129, 448 

Chicago Rawhide Mfg. 

Co C. 21 23;'i23, 138 

Chicago Record 103 448 

Chicago, R. I. & Pac. Ry. . 103 448 

Chicago Sanitan' Dist 29 162 

Chicago Time Register Co 96 438 

Chicago University 63 322 

Chicago, Wilm. & Verm. 

Coal Co 63 322 

Chicago Writ. Mach. Co. 11 81 
Chickamauga Coal & Coke 

Co ....63 322 

Children's Aid Society, 

Boston ....112 480 

Children's Aid Society, 

Pennsylvania 112 480 

Children's Hospital, Bos- 
ton 112 480 

Children's Inst's Dept., 

Boston 112 481 

Childs-Chamberlain Co. . . 86 423 

Chilton. J. B 41 238 

Chinn, R. L 41 238 

Chipman, N. P...C. 45, 58; 265, 291 

Chisholm, E. N 41 238 

Chisholm & Moore Mfg. 

Co 32 170 

Chisler, G 63 322 

Choctaw. Okl. & Gulf Ry. 

Co 63 322 

Christensen Engineering 

Co 21 123 

Christian Pub. Assn 13 92 

Christy Fire Clay Co 

6-?. 64; 322, 387 

Christy, How'rd Chandler 7 48 

Church, F. S 7 48 

Church, W. C, & F. P. ... 13 92 

Churchman Co 13 92 

Cincinnati Belle Mining 

Co 63 322 

Leaf Tobacco 

Warehouse Co 91 430 

Milling Mach. Co. 22 129 

Cincinnati Planer Co 22 129 

Cinnabar King Mining Co 63 323 

Circular Iron Co 23 138 

City Improvement Co.... 63 323 

Clapp, A. R 41 238 



506 



INDEX. 



0U88. Page. 

Qark, A. C, & Co i6 112 

Qark, Charles L 13 92 

Qark, George M & Co. . 74 410 

Qark, J. C, M.D 16 112 

Clark, James, Jr., & Co. . 23 138 

Qark, John G 41 238 

Qark, M. H., & Brothers. 91 430 

Qark, Merritt M as 265 

Clark, N., & Sons 03 323 

Clark, W. A 63 323 

Qark, Walter 41 238 

Qark, Walter 7 48 

Clark, Walter Appleton. . 7 48 
Qarke, F. G., Blue Stone 

Co 63 323 

Clarke, I. E 4 41 

Clarke. William. . , 41 238 

Qarksville Cider Co 

C.59, 62; 295, 304 

Class 10 75 

Clay, Henry, & Bock & Co 91 430 

Qa)rton, C. H 42 258 

demons, L. W 39 204 

Qerk de Landresse, H . . . 63 323 . 
Cleveland Axle Mftr. Co. . 30 166 
Cin., Chi. & St. L. 

Ry 103 448 

Clement, M.D 16 112 

Cliffs Mininjr Co. . 63 323 

Crane & Car Co. . . 28 158 

Electric Co 23 138 

Factory 30 166 

Gear Works 21 123 

Hardware Co 108 463 

Machine Screw Co. 30 166 

Mining Co 63 323 

Rubber Works 

C. 19 21; 118, 123 

Stone Co 63 323 

Terminal & Val. R. 

R. Relief Dept 109 466 

Twist Drill Co 22 129 

Wholesale Lumber 

Dealers 50 276 

Clevenger, C. E 39 204 

Click, M. W 39 204 

Clifford & Lawton 103 448 

Qifton Silk Mills 83 418 

Clinedinst, B. West 7 49 

Clinton Mining & Mill. Co 63 323 

Clippert & Spaulding 63 323 



Olasa. Ptge. 

Qissold, H. R. 13 92 

Qonbrock Steam Boiler 

Co 19 118 

Qoueh, R. M 22 129 

Cough. Rockwell Co 22 129 

Cluett, Peabody & Co 

C.86, 103; 423, 448 

Qulow, P. T 28 158 

Coal Bluff Mining Co 63 323 

Coal Creek Coal Co 63 323 

Coal Ridge Coal & Coke 

Co 63 323 

Coale Muffler & Safety 

Valve Co C. 19, 32; 118, 170 

Coates Brothers 41 238 

Cobb, Benjamin F. 13 02 

Cobb, J. 1 33 181 

Cobb, J. S 39 204 

Cochran Lumber Co 50 276 

Cock Robin Mining Co. . . 63 323 

Codman, William C 95 436 

Codwell. A 45 265 

Coes, L., Wrench Co 22 129 

Coffey, George W 45 265 

Coffin, William A 7 49 

Coffin & Leighton 22 129 

Cohn, S., & Son 41 238 

Coins, J. N 39 204 

Colby, Qara Bewick 13 92 

Colby College 3 37 

Colcord, R. K. 63 323 

Coldwell Lawn Mower Co 43 261 

Cole, Frank B 13 92 

Cole, Lillie E 72 401 

Cole. Timothy 8 67 

Coleman Mfg. Co 110 468 

Colgate & Co 90 429 

Colin, L. L 41 238 

Colliery Engineering Co. . 13 92 

Collins, R. M 63 323 

Collins, Richard 39 204 

Collins. W. A 41 238 

Collins, W. E 41 239 

Colliver, R 39 204 

Colman, N. J 63 324 

Colonial Elec. Co 25 145 

Colorado Cent. Mining Co 63 324 

Colorado College 63 324 

Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. 

C. 63. 64. 65 : 324, 387, 390 

Colorado Scientific Soc. . 63 324 



INDEX. 



507 



Clue. Page. 

Colo. Smelting & Mining 

Co C.63, 64; 324, 387 

Colored American no 468 

Colored Industrial Inst . . 6 43 

Columbia Cordafire Co 81 416 

Columbia Encaustic Tile 

Co 72 401 

Columbia Factory 30 166 

Columbia Incand. Lamp 

Co. 25 145 

Columbia Marble Quarry 

Co 63 324 

Columbia Minin*' Co 63 324 

Columbia Phonograoh Co 17 115 

Columbia Safety S. S. Co. 33 181 

Columbia Spectator 3 37 

Columbia Tjrpewriter 

Mfg. Co.. II 81 

Columbia University 

C. 3. 13; 37, 92 

Columbia & Elec Vehicle 

Co 30 166 

Columbian Marb. Quarry- 
ing Co C. 63, 66; 324. 395 

Columbian Mining Co 63 324 

Columbus Buggy Co 30 166 

Columbus Face Brick Co.. 103 448 

Columbus Factory 30 167 

Coulmbus & Hocking C. & 

I. Co. 63 324 

Coman, Charlotte B 7 49 

Comet Coal Co 63 324 

Comley. William J 11 81 

Commercial Club 39 204 

Commercial Elec. Co 23 138 

Commercial Museum 41 239 

Commissioner of Agri., 

La 103 448 

Com. on Defective, Delin- 
quent & Dependent Chil- 
dren, N. J 112 481 

Commoner & Glasswork- 

cr 103 448 

Commodore Mining Co. . . 63 324 
Commonwealth Cotton 

Mfg. Co 41 239 

Commonwealth Mining & 

Milling Co 63 324 

Compere, C. V 63 324 

Compt. of Currency, U. S.109 466 



Glass. Page. 

Cofnpt. of Treasury, N. J. 

State 32 170 

Comstock, Cheney & Co. . 17 115 

Comstock, Anna B 8 67 

Conant Thread Co 108 463 

Conant, William Cowper. 13 93 

Concrete Gold Mining Co. 63 324 

Cone, D. S 

C. 41, 45, 58 ; 239, 265, 291 

Cone, H 63 325 

Cone. Moses H 45 265 

Confectioners' Jour. Pub. 

Co C13, I03;93. 448 

Conger Brothers 39 204 

Congressional Library 3 •>7 

Congress Gold Co 63 325 

Conn, Fred. 63 325 

Conn, J. G 41 239 

Conn. Magazine Co. .... . 13 93 

Conn. State Pomological 

Soc 45 266 

Conn. Tel. & Elec. Co 26 150 

Connor, Washington E. . . a:^ 262 

Conrad Hill Mining Co. . 63 325 

Conroy, B 63 325 

Consalvi, Icilio 17 115 

Consolidated Bituminous 

Rock Co 63 325 

Car Fender Co 32 170 

Car Heating Co. . 

C. 27, 32; 1^4, 170 

Coal Co 63 325 

Rubber Tire Co. . . 30 167 

Stanley Mining Co 63 325 

Virginia Mining 

Co 63 325 

Consolidation Coal Co . . . 

C. 6*1 no ; 325, 468 

Constant, Edward W 41 239 

Consumers Supply Co 107 462 

Consumptives, Free 

Home 112 481 

Grove Hall, Home 

for 1X2 481 

Mass. Hospital 112 481 

St. Joseph's Hos- 
pital 112 481 

Seton Hospital 112 481 



Continental Coal Co 63 325 

Continuous Rail Joint Co. 32 170 
Contracting Co 63 325 



508 



INDEX. 



Oltss. Page. 

Control. Bd., la. State 

Inst'ns 112 481 

Control, Bd., Wise. Statc.112 481 

Cooper, Emma Lampert. . 7 49 
Cook Mining & Milling 

Co 63 325 

Cook, S. E 63 325 

Cook, W. A 41 239 

Cook & Bernheimer Co. . . 61 302 
Cooke Mercantile Trust 

Co ...23 138 

Coolidge, C. A., & Morin- 

Goustiaux, G. .C. 10, 29; 75, 162 

Coontz, J. R, & Co 39 204 

Cooper, C. W 39 204 

Cooper, Ellwood.C. 3Q, 43 ; 204, 262 

Cooper Hollow Mining Co 63 325 

Cope & Stewardson 10 75 

Copper Queen Consltd. M. 

Co C. 63, 64; 325, 387 

Copper Queen Consltd. M. 

Co 65 390 

Copper Union Creek Co. . 63 326 

Copperopolis Mine 63 325 

Corley. J. J 41 239 

Com Belt 104 458 

Corn Expo, of Peoria 39 204 

Come. W. F.... 12 86 

Cornell Universitv 

C. 3, 32 63 ; 37. 170, 326 

Cornelly, J. B 63 326 

Cornetti, G. B 63 326 

Cornish, Curtis & Greene 

Mfg. Co 37 192 

Cornwall Mining Co 63 326 

Corona Coal & Coke Co. . 63 326 
Corporation Com., North 

Carolina 32 170 

Correction & Charities, 

Board of, Mich 112 481 

Minnesota 112 481 

Corrigan, McKinney & Co 63 326 
Cortland-Howe Ventilat- 
ing Stove Co 74 410 

Cossit, Davis 41 239 

Cotton Belt Route 103 448 

Cotton. W. W 39 204 

Cottrell. C. B., & Sons Co. 11 81 

Courtright, J 39 204 

Couse, E. Irving 7 49 

Cousino, I. C 39 204 



OUn. Page. 

Coutts, D 39 205 

Cowan, R. T 39 205 

Cowen, Louise 72 401 

Cowles, Calvin J 63 326 

Cowles, Maud Alice 7 49 

Cox, Abram, Stove Co. . . 74 410 

Cox, J. L 39 205 

Cox, Kenton 7 49 

Cox, Louise 7 49 

Coyne, Sally E 72 401 

Coyner, George A 45 266 

Craig, E. H 13 93 

Craig, John J., Co 63 326 

Craighead, W. A., & Sons. 39 205 

Grain, W. R 45 266 

Craik, David 39 205 

Cram, Goodhue & Fergu- 
son 10 75 

Cramer, Alfred B 50 277 

Cramsey, S 39 205 

Crandall, E 39 205 

Crandall Packing Co 19 118 

Crane Brothers 92 433 

Crane, Bruce 7 49 

Crane Company 

C. 19, 21, 65, 103 

P. 118, 124, 390. 448 

Crane Mfg. Co 

C. 106, 108; 461, 463 

Crane, Anna B 72 401 

Crane, W. W 39 205 

Cranston. J. F 39 205 

Crawford Factory 30 167 

Crawford, McGregor & 

Canby 100 441 

Crawford, W 39 205 

Crawshaw, C. R 33 181 

Creager, William H 39 205 

Creaghead Engineer *g Co. 25 146 

Cream of Lemon Co 90 429 

Creamer, E. L., Jr 39 205 

Crefeld Electric Works.. 26 150 
Cr chore, A. C, & Squier, 

G. 26 150 

Crellin, Louis 60 298 

Cremation Co., The U. S. . 1 1 1 475 
Cremation, Davenport 

Soc Ill 475 

Cremation, Mass. Soc. . . . 1 1 1 475 

Cremation, Philadel. Soc. 11 1 475 



INDEX. 



509 



Glass. Page. 

Crematory, Gardner Earl 

Chapel & Oakwood 

Cemetery iii 475 

Crematory, The Le 

Moyne iii 475 

Crenshaw, J. G 39 205 

Crescent Factory 30 167 

Crescent Steel Co 

C. 16, 64; 112, 387 

Cress, C 39 205 

Cresson, George V., Co. . 21 124 

Crete Nurseries 45 266 

Cribb, J. B 41 239 

Cristadoro, Charles 50 277 

Criterion Pub. Co 13 93 

Crocker- Wheeler Elec. Co 23 138 

Crockery & Glass Journal. 103 449 

Crook, Russell G 72 401 

Cross, Nellie A 72 401 

Crosby Steam Gauge & V. 

C0...C. 19, 21, 32; 118, 124, 170 

Crosthwaite, C. W 39 205 

Crothers, L. M 39 205 

Crouse-Hinds Elec. Co... 23 138 

Crouse, J. N 13 92 

Crow Brothers 41 239 

Crowell. J. P 63 326 

Crown Distilleries Co. .. . 61 302 

Crown King Mining Co. . 63 326 

Crown Point Mininj? Co. 63 326 
Crown Woven Wire 

Brush Co 23 138 

Crozet Fruit Growers* 

Assn 45 266 

Cruikshank, A. B 63 326 

Crum, H. H 39 205 

Crystal Salt Works 59 295 

Culberson, C. H 39 206 

Culbertson, H. M 41 239 

Cullimane, J 39 206 

Cullman Brothers 91 430 

Culp, S. V. (Mrs.) 72 401 

Cummer Company 50 277 

Cummings, Robert A 29 162 

Cumnock Mining Co 63 326 

Cunningham, J. J 61 302 

Cunningham, John S 91 430 

Cupertino Wine Co 60 298 

Cuprigraph Co 87 426 

Curran, Charles C 7 49 

Currell. W. E 39 206 



OUas. Page. 

Currie, J. W 41 239 

Currie, S 39 206 

Curtice Brothers Co 

C.58. 59; 291, 295 

Curtis, Constance 7 49 

Curtis, George M 50 277 

Curtis, T. C 63 326 

Curtis Pub. Co 13 93 

Curtis, S. W 63 326 

Curtis, W. S 41 239 

Curtis & Cameron 12 86 

Curtis & Curtis 22 12^ 

Cushman Chuck Co 22 129 

Cutler, M 72 402 

Cutter Elec'l & Mfpr. Co. . 23 138 

Cutter, W. H 63 326 

Cycle Trade Pub. Co 13 93 

Cytron, Otto 91 430 

Cypress Lumber Co 50 277 

Dabney, Charles W 5 4^ 

Dadant, Charles, & Son.. ^ 258 

Dajreett, A 03 327 

Daggett, J 63 327 

Dahl, A. P. R 39 206 

Daily Mining Record 103 449 

Dairy Com., N. Jer m 475 

Dairy & Food Div.. Mch. 

State Dept m 475 

Dairymen's Supply Co... 37 ^92 

Dairymen's Union 

C.40, 58; 231. 291 

Dale Electric Co.C. 25, 27; 146, I54 

Dallin, Cyrus E 9 7i 

Daly, Matt A 72 402 

Damon, A. L., Miss 72 402 

Damon Mining Co 63 327 

D'Amour & Littledale. ... 22 129 
Dana Natural History 

Soc 3 37 

Danche, J 63 327 

Dannat. William T 7 SO 

Danville Brick & Tile Co. 63 327 

Darling. W. M 7 5© 

Dartot, Cyrus 33 181 

Daughters Am. Revolu- 
tion, Nat'l Soc no 468 

Daunet, J 63 327 

Davenport, A. H 69 397 

Davidson, G. A 6^ 327 

Davidson, Harry 8 67 



510 



INDEX. 



OUn. Page. 

Davidson Pub. Co 103 449 

Davidson, W. V., Lumber 

Co 50 277 

Davidson & Kennedy 63 ^^^ 

Davis, A 39 206 

Davis, A 45 266 

Davis, Charles H 

C.7, 28; 50, 158 

Davis Incandescent Lamp 

Co 25 146 

Davis, J. A 39 206 

Davis, J. Z 63 327 

Davis, Samuel P 8 di 

Davisson, F. M 41 239 

Dawes, J. M 39 206 

Day, David T 63 327 

Day, Frank Miles, & Bro. 10 75 

Dayton, E. W 92 433 

Dayton Elec. Mfjr. Co. . . . 23 138 

Deaf & Blind, Inst 112 481 

Deaf & Blind, School, N. 

Carolina 112 481 

Deaf & Dumb, Columbia 

Inst 112 481 

Deaf & Dumb, Inst., N. 

Y. City 112 481 

Deaf, School for, Neb. 

State 112 481 

Deaken, F 63 327 

Deaken & Taylor d^ 327 

Deal, H. M., & Co 55 287 

Dean, Dr. Bashford 53 283 

Dearth, Henry Golden. . . 7 50 

De Castello, Rev. R. M. . . 13 93 

Decatur Cereal Mill Co. . 56 288 

Decorative Art Soc 84 419 

de Corse, S 63 2^^! 

Deck A. B 92 433 

Dedham Pottery 72 402 

Deep Creek Mining Co . . . 63 327 

Deere & Co 35 190 

Deerinp' Harvester Co... 

C. 22, 28, 29, 35, 76 
P. 25, 129, 158, 190, 413 

DeGoha, J. W 63 327 

Deidesheimer, P 63 327 

Deitrick, T. M 63 327 

De La Mar's Mercur 

Mines Co 

C. 63, 64. 103 ; 328, Z^T, 449 

Delano Mining Co 63 328 



Olasa. Page. 

Delano Pub. Co 13 93 

De Land, A. D 40 231 

DeLand, C 39 206 

Delaware Hard Fibre Co. 23 139 

Delaware & Hudson Co. . 63 328 
Delaware & Lackawanna 

R. R. Co 63 338 

De Lcstry, Edmund Louis 13 93 

Delmas, A. G 45 266 

Del Monte Milling Co. ... 56 :^ 

Delta Cotton Co 41 239 

Denison Milling Co 39 206 

Dennemora Mining Co. . . 63 328 
Dennis Simmons Lumber 

Co. 50 277 

Densmore Tjrpe writer Co 11 81 

Dental College, Philadel. 16 112 

Dental Dept., U. of Calif. 16 112 

Dental Dept, U. of Penn. 16 112 
Dental Dept., Vander- 

bilt U 16 112 

Dental Dept., Western 

Reserve 17. . .-. 16 1 12 

Dental Surgery, College 

of, Chicago 16 112 

Denton Brothers C. i, 2 ; 30, 34 

Denver Fire Clay Co 64 387 

Denver Marble & Onyx 

Co 63 328 

Denver & Rio Grande R. 

R. Co 103 449 

Dept. of Agriculture, U. 

S C.41, 49, 50.52,59 

P. 239, 275, 277, 281, 295 

U. S., Bu. Animal 

Industry 

C. 38, 58. in; 197,291, 475 
U. S., Dairy Div., 

B. A. I.. .37, 38. 40; 192, 197, 231 

U. S., Div. of 

Agrostology 39 206 

— ; U. S., Div. Chem- 
istry C. 35. 60, 61, 62 

P. 190 298, 302, 304 

U. S., Div. Ento- 

moloRfv 42 258 

U. S., Div. Pomol- 
ogy C. 43, 45 ; 262, 266 

U. S., Div. Soils. . 

c. 38, 91 ; 197, 430 



INDEX, 



611 



GUm. nge. 

Department of Agricul- 
ture, U. S., Div. Stat'cs 41 240 

U, S., Div. Veg. 

Phys. & Path 39 206 

U. S., Museum Div 41 240 

U. S., Museum, 

Vinita 41 240 

U. S., Office Ex- 



periment Stations 38 197 

U. S., Weather Bu- 



reau 38 197 

of Educa., U. S. 



Com. to Paris 
C 



. I, 2. 3, 5. 6; 30, 35, 37, 42, 43 
— of Forestry, Com. 



to Paris C. 50, 53 ; 277, 283 

Mines, Com. to 



Paris 64 388 

Public Works, Bu. 



of Surveys 29 162 

Social Economy, 



U. S. Com. to Paris 

C. loi, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107 

108, 109, no, III, 112 

P. 443, 449, 458, 459. 461, 462, 463 
406, 468, 475, 476, 482 



State, Mass in 476 

Interior, Census 

Bu Ill 476 

Interior, Com. of 

Labor in 476 

Navy. 



C. 15, 118, 119; 110,486, 488 

Na^, Bu. Con- 
struction & Repair 118 486 

Navy, Bu. Equip., 



Compass Office 119 488 

Navy, Bu. Equip., 



Hydrographic Office 119 488 

Navy, Bu. Equip., 



Naval Observatory 119 488 

Navy, Bu. Equip- 



ment C. 14, 15, 118, irg 

P. 109, no, 480, 485 



Navy, Bu. Naviga- 



tion, Nautical Almanac 

Office 119 488 

Navy, Bu. Naviga- 



tion, Naval Academy... 118 486 



OUas. Page. 
Department of Navy, 
Bu. Navigation, Office 
of Naval Intelligence. . 

C. 118, 119; 486, 488 

Navy, Bu. Ord- 
nance C. 116, 118; 485, 486 

Navy, Bu. Steam 



Engineering 118 486 

Navy, Bu, Supplies 



& Accounts 120 489 

Navy, Navy Yard. .116 485 

Navy, Quartermas- 



ter's, U. S. Marine 

Corps 120 489 

Post Office, Muse- 



um 26 150 

Transoortation, U. 



S. Com., Paris.C. 29. 33 ; 162, 181 

War, Signal Corps. 117 486 

De Puy, Clarence C 13 93 

Derby, C. C 63 328 

Dern, John 63 328 

De Rycke. Joseph 19 118 

Deseret Museum. dz 328 

DeS Jardins, B. M 

C. II, 15; 81, no 

Des Jardins Type Justifi- 

er Co II 81 

Des Loges Lead Co 64 388 

Dessar, Louis Paul 7 50 

D'Estes & Seeley Co 19 "8 

Detroit Copper Mining 

Co C.63. 64; 328, 388 

Detroit Lubricator Co.... 19 118 

Detroit Mining Co 63 328 

Detroit Photographic Co.. 12 86 

Detroit & Dead wood Co. . 63 328 

Devaul, George R no 468 

Devere Electric Co 25 146 

Devine J. E 63 328 

Devlin, Thomas, & Co... 65 390 

jJevIing, Charles 63 328 

Dewdrop Mining & Mill- 
ing Co 63 328 

Dew Drop Minine Co 63 328 

De Wentworth, Cecilia. .. 7 50 

Dewey, Gould & Co 41 240 

Dewey. H. T., & Sons... 60 298 

Dewstoe. Martin R 41 240 

Dexter Folder Co 13 93 

Dexter, M. C. Miss 72 402 



512 



INDEX. 



Glass. Page. 

Dexter, Marie L 13 93 

Diabetic & Hygienic Ga- 
zette Ill 476 

Diamond State Steel Co . . 

C. 28, 32; 158, 170 

Dibble. Mabel C 72 402 

Dibrell Brothers 91 430 

Dick, A, B., Co 11 81 

Dickenson, Charles G. L. 

33 181 

Dickerson, J. H., & Son. . 39 206 

Dicke Tool Co 26 150 

Dickey, W. S., Mfg. Co. . 63 329 

Dickie, James 45 266 

Dickinson, Albert, Co 39 206 

Dickinson Fire & Pressed 
Brick Works. .C. 63, 64; 329, 388 

Dickson Mfg. Co loi 443 

Dickson, M. E 7 50 

Diehl, E. F 39 206 

Diehl Mfg. Co 23 139 

Di^r, George 63 329 

Diers, E. G 72 402 

Dill, Joseph T 41 240 

Dilling & Co 59 295 

Dimler, William M 41 240 

Dingman, J. A 33 181 

Dintelman, L. F..C. 43, 45 ; 262, 266 

Direct Separator Co 19 1 18 

Dixie Miller 103 449 

Dixie Mining & Smelting 

Co 63 329 

Dixon, Joseph, Crucible 

Co C. 19, 23; 119, 139 

Doan, C. F 39 206 

Doan, J 39 207 

Doane, W. A 32 170 

Dock, Herman 22 129 

Dockery & Donelson 41 240 

Dockham, C. A., & Co... 103 449 

Dodd, Mead & Co 13 93 

Dodge, C 39 207 

Dodge, Charles Richards. 

C. 12, 41 ; 86, 240 

Dodge Mfg. Co 103 449 

Doe Run Mining Co 63 329 

Doherty & Wadsworth. . . 83 418 

Dohn, C 39 207 

Doig, William S 22 129 

Dominion Co 13 93 

Donaldson, C. S 39 207 



OUn. Pace. 

Donoho. Roger G 7 SO 

Donohue, E. T 95 436 

Dooley W. P 63 329 

Doolittle, J 63 329 

Doran. A. J 63 329 

Doremus Cancelling Ma- 
chine Co II 81 

Doremus, Caroline B 72 402 

Doremus 33 181 

Dorgan, L. C 41 240 

Dorean, L. C, & Co 41 240 

Dorick Mining Co 63 329 

Dorman. Walter 45 266 

Dorset Moimtain Marble 

Co 63 329 

Doub, F 39 207 

Douglass, W. 63 329 

Dow Composing Machine 

Co II 82 

Dowst Brothers Co 

C. 13, 103 ; 93, 449 

Doxsee, J. H., & Sons 58 291 

Drake Company 63 329 

Drake, Francis E 

C. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 

P. 24,25 

Drake, Will H 7 50 

Drake & Co C. 66. 69; 395, 397 

Draper, Andrew Sloan... i 31 

Draper Comnany 106 461 

Draughn, Alonzo B 41 240 

Dreer, Henry A 43 262 

Drein, Thomas, & Co. ... 33 181 

Dresser, S. E 63 329 

Dresser, S. R., Co 21 124 

Drevet Mfg. Co 87 426 

Drew, C 39 207 

Dreyer, H. 95 43^ 

Driver-Harris Wire Co. . . 26 150 

Du Bois, W. E. B 110 468 

Dubreuil, Marie V. T 33 181 

Ducktown Mining Co.... 63 329 

Duell, I. S 39 207 

Duff, J. H. C 39 207 

Dula, J. A 45 266 

Dun. Charles 39 207 

Dun, James 29 162 

Duncan, J. S 11 82 

Duncan, John P 33 181 

Duncan, Mrs. M 

C.45 58; 266, 291 



INDEX. 



513 



Class. Page. 

Dungan, Hood & G) 

C 89, 103 ; 427, 449 

Dunlap, Henry M 45 266 

Dunlap, John R 13 94 

Dunlap Mining Co 63 329 

Dunn, L. F 63 329 

Du Pre, A. H., & Son 41 240 

Durant, Walter N 

C. II, 21; 82, 124 

Durkec, J. H., Coal Co. . . 63 330 

Dustin, William G 13 94 

Dutton, A. H AS 266 

Dutton, A. J 63 

Dutton, H. F., & Co 35 

Duval, A 60 

Dwight Lumber Co 50 277 

Dwight Mining Co 63 330 

Dwight, W. B 63 330 



330 
190 
298 



Eads, Mixter & Heald 

Zinc Co 63 330 

Eagle Lock Co 65 390 

Eagle Mining Co 63 330 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co. . . 19 119 

Elagleson, A. S 41 240 

Eakins, Thomas 7 50 

Eames, G. T., Co 22 129 

Eames, Wilfred Co 22 130 

Earl & Wilson 103 449 

Elasley, J. W 41 240 

Eastern Elec. Cable Co. . 27 154 
Eastern Mennonite Con- 
ference 13 94 

Eastman, A 42 258 

Eastman Kodak Co 

C. 12, 108 ; 86, 463 

Eaton, C. W 7 50 

Ebersoll, George 45 266 

Eck Dynamo & Motor... 

Works 23 139 

Edgar, C. S 63 330 

Edge Brothers 39 207 

Edison Mfg. Co 

C. 23, 24; 139, 143 

Edison Ore Concentrating 

Co 64 388 

Edisoit, Thomas A., Jr. . 24 143 

Edson Mfg. Co 28 158 

Educational Pub. Co 13 94 

Educational Review 

C. I. 2, 3; 31, 35, 37 



0U88. Page. 

Edwards, A. W 63 330 

Edwards, D. R 45 267 

Edwards, E. L 50 277 

Edwards, L. B 13 94 

Edwards, M. A 63 330 

Edwards & Co 25 146 

Eggart, W 39 «>7 

Eggers & Co 63 330 

Eggers & Hunter 63 330 

Eggleson, Thomas 66 395 

Eichelburger, R. H 7 5i 

Eicher, J .C 63 330 

Eigenman, C. H 53 28^ 

Eisen, Vineyard 60 2^ 

Ekman, A 63 330 

Ekman & Stow 39 207 

Eldridge Elec. Mfg. Co. .. 27 154 
Elec. Gas Lighting Co. . . . 

C. 24, 25; 144, 146 

Elec. Motor & Equioment 

Co 25 146 

Electric R. R. Co 108 463 

Electric Vehicle Co 30 167 

Electrical Review 

C. 13, 103; 94, 449 

Electrical World and En- 
gineer 13 94 

Eleventh Hour Mining Co 63 330 

Elgin Mfg. Co 37 192 

Eliason, Alice 45 267 

Elkton Mining Co 63 330 

Elliot, D. G 52 281 

Elliott, Jesse P 45 267 

Elliott, William R 33 181 

Ellis, Harvey 7 51 

Ellis, W. H 33 181 

Ellison, M. E.* 41 240 

Elsinore Coal & Clay Co. 63 330 

Elzner & Anderson 17 lOi 

Emanuel, J. M 39 207 

Emerson Elec. Mfg. Co. . 23 139 

Emerson, Harriet O . 84 419 

Emerson. S. F 39 207 

Emmet, Lydia F 7 51 

Empire China Works 23 139 

Empire Iron & Steel Co. . 63 331 

Empire Mill 56 288 

Empire Mining Co 63 331 

Empire Silk Works 83 418 

Empire State Mining &. . 

Milling Co 63 331 



5U 



INDEX. 



OUas. Page. 

Empire State Wine Co. . 60 298 

Enestvedt, 0.0 39 207 

Engels, H. A 63 331 

Engels & Krudwig Wine 

Co 60 298 

Engineering Magazine . . 103 449 

Mechanics Pub. Co 13 94 

News Pub. Co. . . . 

C. 13, 29, 103; 94, 162, 449 

Record 32 170 

Society 32 171 

Societies 32 171 

Western Society of 32 171 

Engineers & Surveyors, 

111 Soc 32 171 

Engineers, Civil, Am. Soc. 32 171 
Club of Cincinnati. 32 171 

Club of Phila'phia 32 171 

Qub of St. Louis. . 32 171 

Montana Soc 32 171 

Soc. of Western 

Penn 32 171 

Englehard, G. P 13 94 

English, B. G 39 207 

English, R. W., Lumber 

Co 63 331 

Enneking, J. J 7 51 

Ennis, John E 39 207 

Ensign, O. A 63 331 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 

C. 55, 65 ; 287, 390 

Enterprise Mining Co 63 331 

Epitomist Pub. Co. ..... . 13 94 

Equalization, Wyo. State 

Bd 32 171 

Equitable Life Assur. Soc. 

U. S 109 466 

Era Pub. Co 13 94 

Erie Preserving Co 58 291 

Erie R. R. Co 63 331 

Errington, F. A 22 130 

Ertels, George M., Co ^7 192 

Esperanza Minincr Co 63 331 

Estes, Dana & Co 13 94 

Etta Mining Co 63 331 

Eubank, A. L 41 240 

Eureka Cons. Mining Co. 63 331 

Eureka Electric 26 150 

Eureka Hill Mining Co. . . 63 331 

Eureka Lumber Co 50 277 

Eureka Mining Co 63 331 



Eureka Slate Co 

Eureka Tempered Copper 

Wks 

Evans, John W 

Evans, L 

Evans Marble Co 

Evans, W. D 

Evening Press 

Everitt, J. A 

Evermann, B. W 

Ewing, R. T 

Ewing, Thomas 

Exbine, L 

Excelsior Brownstone Co 
Excelsior Fire Brick Co. . 

Excelsior Slate Co 

Experiment Sta., Alaska. 
State of 



63 331 



63 331 

63 332 

41 241 

108 463 

39 208 

53 283 

41 241 

63 332 

39 208 

63 332 

63 Z^ 

63 332 

38 197 



Conn Ill 476 



-Cornell Uni- 



versity 



Mass 



-Georgia 

• Hawaii .... 
- (Hatch) of 



Illinois .... 
Louisiana ... 
Michigan . . 
N. Carolina. 
N. Dakota.. 
Oregon. . . . 

...C.38,39; 
• (Sug^r) of 



Louisiana. 
Experimental Farm of O. 

Ry. & Nav. Co 

Exploration Syndicate 

Export Carriage Monthly. 

Express Gazette 

Eyre, Wilson. Jr 

Ezekeil, Herbert T 



38 197 

38 197 

38 197 

38 197 

39 208 
38 197 

38 198 
41 241 

39 208 

198,208 

38 197 

39 208 
63 332 

103 449 

103 449 

10 75 

13 94 



Facer, William D 45 267 

Fagan, J. C 23 139 

Fain, W. N 39 208 

Fair Haven Marble &. . . . 

Marbleized Slate Co... 63 332 

Fairbanks, Ella, A 72 402 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co. . 32 171 

Fairfield Dairy Co 

C. y7> 40; 192, 232 



INDEX. 



515 



OUm. Page. 

Fairhurst, G. W 63 332 

Fairies Mfg. Co 25 146 

Fairmont Coal & Iron Co. 63 332 
Fairmount Cons. Mining 

Co 63 332 

Falcon Elec. Mfg. Co 23 139 

Falconer, W. T., Mfg. Co. 42 258 

Falk Mfg. C9 23 139 

Falkner, N. K 45 267 

Fall Brook Coal Co 63 332 

Fallin, W. H 41 241 

Falling Rock Cannel Coal 

Co 63 332 

Farm Implement News . . 

C. 13, 103 J 94. 450 

Farm & Ranch Pub. Co. . 13 94 

Farmers' Voice ,. 13 94 

Famham '.95 436 

Farr & Bailey Mfg. Co. . . 70 399 

Farrell, T. W 41 241 

FarrUl, P. W 41 241 

Farrington, F. A 22 130 

Farrin. M. B 50 277 

Farr Telephone & Con- 
struction Supply Co 26 150 

Fassett. C. W 13 95 

Fassctt, Herbert S 13 95 

Faught, A. E 39 208 

Faunce & Spjnney 86 423 

Faure, M..." 61 302 

Faxon. John T 63 332 

Fay Factory.* 30 167 

Fay, J. A., & Egan Co 22 130 

Featherstone Factory 30 167 

Federal Battery Co 24 144 

Fechheimer. Rose 72 402 

Feeble Minded, School 

for. Mass 112 482 

Min- 
nesota 112 482 

Wis- 
consin 112 482 

Feigenspan, Christian & 

Co 62 304 

Fellows Gear Shaper Co. 22 130 
Fenwick, A. D., Machine 

Co 79 414 

Fergfuson, J. G 41 241 

Ferguson Mining Co 63 332 

Ferguson, W 39 208 

Fern Bulletin Co 13 95 



OUai. Page. 

Ferracute Machine Co. . 

C. 15, 22; no, 130 

Felton, Edith R 72 402 

Ferfell, B. C 41 241 

Ferris Brothers Co 108 464 

Ferriss, Ida 72 402 

Ferry & Qass 10 75 

Field Columbian Museum 63 332 

Field, Charlotte E 72 402 

Field, J. C 39 208 

Field & Strickland 41 241 

Figard, J. W 39 208 

Fine Arts, School of 

Chicago 4 41 

Finkel, B. F., Springfield, 

Mo 13 95 

Finke's, A., Widow 60 298 

Finks, J B 41 241 

Fire Extinguisher Mfg. 

Co 21 124 

First Nat. Kans. Mining 

Co 63 332 

Fish, A 63 332 

Fisher Elec. Mfg. Co 

C. 23, 25; 139, 146 

Fisher Governor Co 21 124 

Fisher & Wilson Co 50 277 

Fisheries, Game & Forest 

Com. ofN. Y 50 277 

Fisher, Mark 7 5^ 

Fishing Gazette 103 450 

Fish, H. M., Mfg. Co. ... 26 150 

Fisk, Haley 103 450 

Fisk Mining & Milling Co. 63 333 

Fisk University no 468 

Fiske Bros. Refining Co.. 19 119 

Fiske, Louis S.. & Co. . ai 241 

Fitch, A. B 03 333 

Fitch, B. L 37 192 

Fitch, C. E 39 208 

Fitzgibbon-Clark. Mrs... 13 95 

Flack, William M 45 267 

Flagg, Benson & Brock- 
way 10 75 

Flagg, Ernest. . .C. 10, n8; 75, 487 
Flagg Mfg Co . .C. 17, 79; 115, 414 

Flanagan, John 9 72 

Flather Planer Co 22 130 

Flather & Co 22 130 

Fleetwood. C. E no 469 



516 



INDEX. 



atua. Page. 

Flemington G)al & G)kc 

Co 63 333 

Flickinger, J. H., Co 

.... ... ... C. 5Q, 103 ; 29s. 450 

Flint, Charles R 33 182 

Flint, Daniel 41 241 

Florida Brandy Distil'g 

Co C. 60, 61 ; 298, 302 

Florentine Marble Co... 63 333 
Florida East Coast Hotel 

Co 43 262 

Florida Havana Co 91 430 

Flory, S., Mfg. Co 28 159 

Flowers^ J. L 39 208 

Fluor Spar Co 63 333 

Flynt, W. N., Granite Co. 63 333 
Foederer, Robert, H. . . . 

.C. 87, 89; 426, 428 

Foley, James 63 333 

Folts, A. J 41 241 

Foot, Pierson & Co 26 150 

Foote Mineral Co 

^ C. 2, 3, 63 ; 35, 38, 333 

Forbes, J. Malcolm 33 182 

Forbes, W. D., Co 19 119 

Ford, Charles P., Co 86 423 

Ford, J. S., Johnson & Co. 69 398 

Ford, Thomas P 

C. 19, 21; 119, 124. 

Foreign Standard Barrel 

Co 50 277 

Foreman, J. B 39 208 

Foreman, Thomas, Co... 50 278 

Forest City Electrical Co. 23 139 
Forest & Stream Pub. Co. 

c. 13,49,50,51,52,53 

... .P. 95, 275, 278, 281, 282, 283 

Forester, The 103 450 

Foresters of Am 103 450 

Forney Mining Co 63 333 

Forrest, James M 41 241 

Fors3rthe, William 58 291 

Fort Madison & Appa- 
noose Stone Co 63 333 

Fort Wayne Safety Valve 

Co 19 119 

Foss, Harriet C 7 51 

Fissich, F. L., Co 63 333 

Foster, A. G 50 278 

Foster, A. W., Mrs 84 419 

Foster, Ben 7 51 



OUai. Pace. 

Foster Bros 45 267 

Foster Engineering Co.. 19 119 

Foster, W. E 63 333 

Foster, Walter H 22 130 

Foster & Glassell 41 241 

Fostoria Glass Co 103 450 

Fox, T 39 208 

Frackleton, S. S., Mrs. . . 72 402 

Fraine, Thomas W 53 283 

Franch, A., Spring Co... 32 171 

Francis, C. H 45 267 

Francis Mining Co 63 333 

Franco-American Food 

Co 58 291 

Frank, J. W 63 333 

Frank Leslie Pub. House 

C. II, i3;82,95 

Frank M. M 13 95 

Frankhouser, D. C 39 208 

Frankinbush, J. M 41 241 

Franklin, H. H., Mfg. Co. 

C. 64, 65; 388, 391 

Franklin, Nelson 63 333 

Franklin Typewriter Co. 11 82 

Franzen, August 7 51 

Frazee, A. A., Mrs 72 402 

Frazier, R. A 39 209 

Freck, The William, Co. . 87 426 

Fredonia Normal School. 3 38 

Free Coinage Mining: Co. 63 333 

Freed, K. P 92 433 

Freedley, J. K., & Sons. . 63 333 

Freeland Mining Co 63 334 

Freeman, W 39 209 

Freeport Factory 30 167 

Freeport Granite Quarries 63 334 

Fremont Marble Co 63 334 

French, Daniel C 9 72 

French, Frank 8 67 

French, J. W 63 334 

French Lick Springs iii 476 

French, T. J 6j 334 

Fresno Chamber of Com. 58 291 

Fresno Enterprise Co 63 334 

Frick, H. C, Coke Co. ... 63 334 

Fricke, John H 63 334 

Friedigh, J. H 63 334 

Frink, LP 25 146 

Fripp, William P 41 241 

Frolich, F. H 97 439 

Fromuth, Charles H 7 51 



INDEX. 



517 



Page. 

Frost, A B 7 51 

Frost, J. S 63 334 

Fry, Marshall, Mrs 72 402 

Fry, Marshall T., Jr 72 402 

Fry, William H 17 115 

Fugua, M. J 41 242 

Fuhrmann, A. V 50 278 

Fuller, E. Chubb \ 13 95 

Fuller, L. H 63 334 

Fuller, Lucia Fairchild.. 7 51 

Fullerton, S. H 50 278 

Fultonham Brick Co 63 334 

Funk & Wagnalls Co 13 95 

Furgerson, Alan R 33 182 

Furniture Worker 103 450 

Gage, John P 41 242 

Gale Shoe Mfg. Co 86 423 

Galena Oil Co 32 171 

Galena Queen Mining Co. 63 334 

Galey & Lord 80 415 

Gallagher, Sears 7 51 

Gallison, Henry H 7 51 

Gallop, J. O 41 242 

Gallup, H. H 63 334 

Galvanic Metal Paper Co. 

.....C. 19,23; 119,139 

Gambetta Mining Co 63 334 

Gambill, T. H 39 209 

Gamill, L. C 39 209 

Gano, W. G 45 267 

Gardiner, Silas W 50 278 

Gardner 63 334 

Gardner, J. 1 63 335 

Gardner & Cox 33 182 

Garland, B. W 41 242 

Gamsey, E. E C. 7, 66; 52, 395 

Garretson, J. V 45 267 

Garrett & Co 60 298 

Garrison, J. F 63 335 

Garton-Daniels Co 23 139 

Gauley Mountain Coal Co. 63 335 

Gauley, Robert David 7 52 

Gay, Walter 7 52 

Gay & Ward 22 130 

Gazette Pub. Co 13 95 

Geddes & Seerie Stone Co. 63 335 
Gee Whillekins Mining 

Co. 63 335 

Gehrmann, Charles 63 335 

Gdert, Johannes Sophus. 9 72 



Gem Cutlery Co 

Gemmell, R. C 

General Electric Co 

C. 25, 103, 

^.. P. 146, 450, 

General Equipment Co. . . 

General Incan.-Arc Light 
Co 

General Welfare Assn. . . 

Genesee Salt Co.»^ 

Genesee Valley Mining Co 

Genesee- Vanderbilt Min- 
ing Co 

Geneva Factory 

Geneva Preserving Co. . . 

Geological Pub. Co 

Geological Survey, 111... 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas .... 

Kentucky . . 

Marvland. . 

Micnifiran. . 

New Jersey 

New York. 

N. Carolina. 

West Va. . 



atua. Pige. 
. 93 435 

. 29 163 



Geometric Drill Co 

George, D. S. G 

Georgia Marble Co 

Gere, George H 

Germain, E., Wine Co 

German-Am. Provision 

Co 

German, Soloman 

Germania Wine Cellars 

Co 

Gerrish. F. L 

Gerry & Murray 

Get There Mining Co 

Gettys L. A 

Gibson, A. C 

Gibson Art Galleries.... 

Gibson, Charles Dana 

Gibson, Joseph W 

Giddings, F 

Gier, Theodore, Co 

Gifford, R. Swain 

Gihon, Albert Dakin 



108, 118 

464, 487 

23 139 

27 154 

no 469 

63 335 

63' 335 

63 335 

30 167 

58 291 

13 95 

63 335 

63 335 

63 335 

63 335 

63 335 

63 335 

63 335 

63 336 

63 336 

63 336 

63 336 

63 336 

22 130 

63 336 

63 336 

33 182 

60* 299 

58 291 

33 182 

60 299 

39 209 

11 82 

63 336 

63 336 

22 130 

12 86 
7 52 

13 95 
39 209 
60 299 

7 52 

7 52 



518 



INDEX. 



OUn. Page. 

Gilbert, Charles 63 336 

Gilbert, J. E., & Co 41 242 

Gilbert, C. H 53 283 

Gilberts, A. J 63 336 

Gilbreth Seam Face Gran- 
ite Co 63 336 

Gilfillan Flagstone Co — 63 336 

Gilkey, W. T 39 209 

Gillen Stone Co 63 336 

Gillette-Herzog Mfg. Co. a8 159 

Gillihgham, G. L 39 209 

Gillis, Jim 63 336 

Gilman, N. B 102 444 

Gilmore Electric Co 25 146 

Gilmore, T. T 63 336 

Girard, G. C, & Cutler, 

M C. 69, 72; 398, 402 

Girard, L. N 63 337 

Gisholt Machine Co 22 130 

Glackens, William 7 52 

Gladding, McBean & Co.. 63 337 
Glasgow Western Explo. 

Co 63 337 

Glass & Pottery World 

Co .^103 450 

Gleason Tool Co 22 130 

Globe Buffer Co 79 414 

Globe- Wernicke Co 69 398 

Glucose Sugar Refining 

Co 39 209 

Gluyas, W. R 39 209 

Goebel Brewing Co 62 304 

GoehSt, Henry 25 146 

Goetjean, N 58 291 

Gold Car Heatinflr Co 27 154 

Gold Coin Co 63 337 

Gold King Mining Co... 63 337 
Gold King Mining & Mill. 

Co 63 337 

Goldberjr. B. W 33 182 

Golden Gate Mining Co. . 63 337 

Golden Mines Co 63 337 

Golden Rule Co 13 95 

Golden Wedge Mine .... 63 337 

Golding & Co 11 82 

Gondy, Arthur L 33 182 

Good Roads Machinery 

Co 28 159 

Good Roads Office no 469 

Goodall, O. P 39 209 

Goodall-Pratt Co 22 130 



Goodell, C. J 39 209 

Goodenough Mining Co. . 63 337 

Goodlett, James P 41 242 

'Goodman, L» A 45 267 

Goodman & Dickerson Co 13 95 

Goodridge, Judson A., Co 74 410 

Goodsetl Packing Co 19 119 

Goodson Graphetypc Co. ii 82 
Goodwi'i Car Co. C. 32, 33 :i7i» 182 

Gopher Gold Mining Co. 63 337 

Gordon, A. Y 26 ISO 

Gordon Battery Co 

c. 24, 27; 144, 154 

Gordon, Joseph H., Mrs.. 72 403 

Gordon. W. W., & Co. ... 41 242 

Gorham Mfg Co 

C. 94, 95, 98; 435. 436, 440 

Gorham Mfg. Co 108 464 

Gorman Mining Co 63 337 

Gorton, G., Machine Co.. 22 130 

Goss, John L 63 337 

Goss Printing Press Co. . 11 82 

Gotham Silk Mills 83 418 

Gould Coupler Co 32 172 

Gould Storage Battery Co 24 144 

Gouvemeur Marble Co. . 63 337 

Graber, H. S 21 124 

Graceland Cemetery 43 262 

Gracie, John M 41 242 

Grafly, Charles 9 72 

Grafton Quarry Co 63 337 

Graham, A. T 41 242 

Graham, E. M 41 242 

Graham Lumber Co 50 278 

Graham, W. A 41 242 

Grain Dealers' Journal . . 104 458 
Granby Mining & Smelt- 
ing Co 63 337 

Grand Central Mining Co 63 338 

Grandelmeyer, J 63 338 

Grandin, J. L., & E. B.. 39 209 

Grand Prize Mining Co. . 63 338 

Grand Rapids Cycle Co. . 30 167 

Granite IQ3 450 

Grant Machine Tool 

Works 22 130 

Graphic Mines & Smelt- 
ing Works C. 63. 64 ; 338, 388 

Grau, Bernard R 20 163 

Graves, Edwin D 28 159 

Gray, George D 63 338 



INDEX. 



519 



OUa. Pagt. 

Gray, Elisha 2:7 154 

Gray, Samuel M 29 163 

Gray, Vincent 86 423 

Great East'n Quicksilver 

MininpT Co 63 338 

Great Falls Fire Brick Co. 

C. 63, 64; 338, 388 

Great West'n Quicksilver 

Min. Co 63 338 

Green, B. A 41 242 

Green, Calvin, & Son 89 428 

Green,G 63 338 

Green, Mc 41 242 

Green, Monroe A 53 284 

Green, Monte L 13 95 

Green Mountain Mining 

Co 63 338 

Green, Wesley 41 242 

Greenbrier White Sulphur 

Springs ill 476 

Greene, H. H 41 242 

Greene, R 39 209 

Grecnleaf Johnson Lum- 
ber Co 50 278 

Greenwood, Oliver K 21 124 

Gregg, S. G 63 338 

Gregory, W. B 41 242 

Gregory & Co 63 338 

Greiner. Emil 37 192 

Grier, T. J 63 338 

Grierson, Oldham & Co. . 60 299 

Griest, Amos W 45 267 

Griffin, G. M 39 209 

Griffin, John 41 242 

Griffing, Timothy M 43 262 

Griffith, D 63 338 

Grim, J. J * . 39 210 

Griswold, Kate E 13 95 

Griswold, M 63 338 

Griswold Mfg. Co 74 410 

Grizzly Bear Mining Co. 63 338 

Groezmger, W 63 338 

Grotelmocke H 39 210 

Grothjean, Fanny 7 52 

Grueby Faience Co 72 403 

Grueby, H 72 403 

Guasti-Secondo 60 299 

Gudyel, H. W 39 210 

Guentzer. H 95 436 

Guerin, F. W 12 86 

Guerin, Jules 7 52 



CUm Page. 

Guerin, P. E ..17 115 

Guesnard, August 41 243 

Guild, St. Johns 1 12 482 

Guild & Lord 13 96 

Gnilfoyle, F 63 339 

Gulden, Charles 59 295 

Gumbell, E., & Co 41 243 

Gund, John, Brewing Co. 62 304 
Gundlach-Bundschu Wine 

Co 60 299 

Gunn, James O. B 60 299 

Gunnell Mining Co 63 339 

Gunther, J 52 282 

Gurler, H. B n 193 

Gurley Investment Co 63 339 

Guy, John N 41 243 

Guy, J. Se3rmour 7 52 

Gwin, Davis & Gwin .... 41 243 

Gwin Development Co... 63 339 

Haas, A 95 436 

Hadaway Elec. Heating 

& Engineering Co 27 154 

Hade, J. P 39 210 

Haden Brothers 45 267 

Hagan-Dart Tobacco Co. 91 430 

Hagar, G 39 210 

Haight, R. J 13 9^ 

Haile Mining Co 63 339 

Haile & Waltz 41 243 

Hailmann, William N... 6 43 
Haines Industrial Inst... 

C. 6, no; 43, 469 

Haines, J. J 39 210 

Haines, J. M 63 339 

Hale, Barry 41 243 

Hall, E. L 32 172 

Hall, F. S 63 339 

Hall, J. C 41 243 

Hall, J. R 63 339 

Hall, Thomas T 17 115 

Hall, William A 

C.40,37; 193,232 

Halladay, C. L 41 243 

Hallanan, M 31 169 

Hallett, H. C 41 243 

Halliday, W. P 41 .243 

Halloran, J. E 13 Q(S 

Hallowell, Donald & Co. 41 243 

Halmick, H 7 52 

Halsted Brothers 63 339 



520 



INDEX. 



Glass. Page. 

Hambridge, Jay ^ 53 

Hamburgher, P. H., Co. . 6i 302 

Hamilton Mfg. Co 11 82 

Hamilton Organ Co : 17 115 

Hammond, CM 60 299 

Hammond, E. E 39 210 

Hammond, Ida Story 72 403 

Hammond Typewriter Co. 11 82 

Hammondsport Wine C0.104 458 
Hampden Corundum 

Wheel Co .22 131 

Hampton Normal & Agri. 

Inst C. 6, 110; 43. 469 

Hanan, John, & Sons 86 423 

Hanaweber, L 94 435 

Hanchet, L 63 339 

Hancock, George A 41 243 

Hancock Mining Co 63 339 

Hancock, W. H 39 210 

Hanks, Mrs. W 63 339 

Hanson, Jennie E 72 403 

Hansen & Co 92 433 

Hara, G. R ZZ 182 

Haraszthy, Arpad 60 299 

Harbison, Joseph L 13 96 

Hardeman, T 39 210 

Harden, W. A 41 243 

Hardenberg, H. J 10 75 

Hardie, W. T., & Co 41 243 

Hardinge Brothers 22 131 

Hard wicke, James K 63 339 

Hardy Lamp Co 25 146 

Hargett, S 39 210 

Hargrave, Joseph 41 243 

Harmon, E. R 39 210 

Harmon, F. J 41 243 

Harmon & Mcllroy 63 339 

Harper, Robert H no 469 

Harper, William G 41 243 

Harpster. Henry 45 267 

Harrell, George R 41 244 

Harris Automatic Press 

Co 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 



II 



82 

s, C. G 39 210 

339 

244 
182 



s Clay Co 63 

s, George C 41 

s, Henry W 33 

s, J. S 39 219 

s, John S 41 244 

s, Thomas 41 244 

s, W. P 41 244 



Olaai. Pace. 

Harris, W.R 45 ^ 

Harris, W.T i 31 

Harris & Baldwin 21 124 

Harrison, Alexander 7 53 

Harrison, Birge 7 53 

Harrison, John 41 244 

Harrison, L. T., Mrs .72 403 

Hart, J. S 41 244 

Hart, J. W 63 339 

Hart Mfg. Co 22 131 

' Hart Mfg. Co 25 146 

Hart, R. G 63 339 

Hart & Crouse Co 74 4io 

Hart & Hageman Mfg. 

Co 25 146 

Hartke, John J 63 340 

Hartley, H. H 63 34© 

Hartley, L. M 41 244 

Hartman, C. T 63 34© 

Hartwig & Miller 

C.23,25; 139, 147 

Harvard Co 16 112 

Harvard Co-operative 

Soc 107 462 

Harvard Crimson 3 38 

Harvard Lampoon 3 "38 

Harvard University 3 38 

Harvard Univ. Astron. 

Observ 3 38 

Harvey, Eli 9 72 

Harvey, Fred 40 232 

Harvey, Thomas F 13 96 

Harvey, W. S 50 278 

Hassam, Childe 7 53 

Hastings Estate 60 299 

Hastings, Charles S 15 no 

Hatch Hill Bed Slate 

Works 63 340 

Hatch, R. S. 63 340 

Hatcher, M. L 45 267 

Hathenbruck, F. W. C... 63 340 

Hatley, J, S 45 267 

Hatton, J. H 33 182 

Haupt, Lewis M 29 163 

Havana Commercial Co. . 91 430 

Havens, H. B., Co 63 340 

Havens, J. H.. Mrs 84 419 

Hawkins, B. C 39 210 

Hawkins, B. W 41 244 

Hawkins, E. M 63 340 

Hawkins, Henry 41 244 



INDEX. 



521 



OlaaB. Page. 

Hawkley & Moody ... 39 210 

Hay den Company. . . ^ . . . . 69 398 

Hayden Packing Co 58 291 

Hayden & Derby Mfg. Co. 19 119 

Haydon, Charles H 7 53 

Hayes Brothers 63 340 

Hayes, H. M 41 244 

Hayne & Whitaker 59 295 

Haynes Brothers 39 210 

Haynes, D. O., & Co 13 96 

Hays. J. B 39 210 

Hays, J. H 39 211 

Hays, X. D t 41 244 

Hazard. R. T., & Co 70 399 

Hazlewood, J. D 41 244 

Hazard Mfg. Co 23 139 

Heald, C. H 41 244 

Heald, E. P 63 340 

Heald's Business College. 6 43 

Healey, M. & E 72 403 

Healy, W. P 22 131 

Healy& Millet 66 396 

Health Culture iii 476 

Health Food Co 56 288 

Heater, C. W 39 211 

Hecht, Liebmann & Co. . . 41 244 

Hecla Iron Works 25 147 

Hedberg, A. S 33 182 

Heibendahl, Miss E 79 414 

Heideman. W. H 39 211 

Heikes. Victor C 63 i40 

Heim, Fred 63 340 

Heimath, Isabella 112 482 

Heims, Thomas C, &.Co. 63 340 

Heimstreet, E. B 13 96 

Heincmann, E 8 68 

Heinz, H. J., Co 

C.sa io8;295,464 

Heinicke-Fiegel Litho. Co 11 82 

Heissler & Junge Co 62 304 

Helios-Upton Co 25 147 

Hellbaum, F 39 211 

Helvetia Milk Cond. Co. . 40 232 

Hemment, J. C 3 38 

Hempel & DingeiiS 11 02 

Henderers', A. L., Sons. .21 124 

Hendey Machine Co 22 131 

Hendricks Brothers 32 172 

Heney, Richard, Jr 60 299 

Henly, George 63 340 

Henny, D. C 28 159 



CUm Page. 

Henrich, Carl 63 340 

Henry, C, Mining Co 63 340 

Henry, J. N 39 211 

Hensley, Wilson 45 268 

Herald Fub. Co 103 450 

Herbert, Frederick D 33 182 

Herendeen Mfg. Co 74 4io 

Hermany. Charles 29 163 

Herrick, E. M 50 278 

Herrick, G. W., & Co. ... 86 423 

Herring. Mabel C 9 72 

Herschell, Rhine & Co 103 450 

Herter, Albert C 7, 66; 53. 396 

Herzog Teleseme Co 27 154 

Hesla, E. S , 39 211 

Hess, Frederick 60 299 

Hessleton, B. C 63 340 

Hetzel, David B 63 3^1 

Heublein, G..T., & Bros. . 61 302 

Heurich, C, Brewing Co. 62 304 

Hewlet 10 75 

Heyden & Shepard 10 75 

Heydenfeldt, S 63 341 

Hibbard, Rodman, Ely 

Safe Co 65 391 

Hibbard, Spencer. Bart- 

lett & Co 6s 391 

Hichborn, Philip 

C. 33, "8; 182, 487 

Hickey, D 63 341 

Hickly, H. V 29 163 

Hickman, J 39 211 

Hickman, J. F 39 

Hickmott Canning Co 58 292 

Hidden Treasure Mining 

Co 63 341 

Hiester, Gabriel 45 268 

Higbee Joint Co 19 119 

Higginbotham - Davis 
Journal & Alarm Sys- 
tem 22 131 

Higfirinbotham, Elmer E. . 33 182 

Higginson, H. C 33 182 

Hig^an, John 50 278 

Hill, Charles L ;.. 39 211 

Hill, E. C 39 211 

Hill, George 28 159 

Hill,H. P 39 211 

Hill, Hugh, Tool Co 22 131 

Hill, J. T 63 341 

Hill, James, & Sons 59 295 



522 



INDEX. 



Glass. Page. 

Hill, John 39 211 

Hill, O.J 50 278 

Hilles & Jones Co 22 131 

Hillhouse, Georp^e S 45 268 

Hills, Laura C 7 53 

Hilyer, Andrew F no 469 

Hilzwager, C 39 211 

Hipwood-Barrett Car & 

Fender Co 32 172 

Hinde & Dauch 92 43^ 

Hinsdale, B. A C. i, 2 ; 31, 35 

Hinson, W. G 41 244 

Hires-Turner Glass Co. . . 103 450 
Hirsch. Baron de. .C. 6, 43 ; 43, 261 

Hirsch, Joseph, & Sons. . . 80 415 

Hislop, T. Georg:e 63 341 

Hitch, Frank. Lumbering 

Co 50 278 

Hitchcock, George. . .^ . . . 7 53 

Hitchcock, Lucius W 7 53 

Hite, M. L 39 211 

Hoag. Jay 39 211 

Hoard's Dairyman 104 458 

Hobart Elec. Mfg. Co 23 140 

Hobbs, A. L 58 292 

Hockanum Co 82 417 

Hocking Valley R. R 

C. 103. 104 ; 450, 458 

Hodgin, E. N 39 211 

Hoelscher, W., & Co 60 299 

HoflF. Olaf 29 163 

Hoffman, Daniel 45 268 

Hogan, J 63 341 

Hoge, Irwin & Co 91 430 

Hoggson & Pettis Mfg. Co 22 131 

Holland's Mfg. Co 

C. 21, 22; 124, 131 

Holland Torpedo Boat 

Co 118 487 

Holler, John 13 96 

Hollinger, Amos 89 428 

Holman, Frank 7 54 

Holmes Fibre Graphite 

Mfg. Co — 23 140 

Holmes Mining Co 63 341 

Holmes, William S 39 211 

Holophane Glass Co 

c. 25, 73^ 75 ; 147, 408, 412 

Holtzer-Cabot Elec. Co. . 23 140 

Holtz, Scott Ai 244 

Holy Terror Mining Co. . 63 341 



GUflv. Pace. 

Holzapfel, G 13 96 

Holzer, Phillip, Mrs 72 403 

Home for Aged Couples ..112 482 

Home for Aged Men 1 12 482 

Home for Aged Women . . 1 12 482 

Home, Presbyterian 112 482 

Home, Ills. Soldiers' 112 482 

Home, iviass. Soldiers'. ..112 482 

Home Mining Co 63 341 

Home. Temporary for 

Working Women 112 482 

Home, Woman's Relief 

Corps .• 112 482 

Home-Riverside Coal Co. 63 341 
Home Science Pub. Co. . . 

C. 13. in; 96, 476 

Homer, Winslow 7 54 

Homestake Mining Co. . . 63 341 

Homestead Valve Mfg. Co 19 119 

Hommel. M 60 299 

Hondon, Jean Antoine. . . 97 439 

Hooker, G 41 245 

Hooper, C. A 50 278 

Hooper, W. J., Mfg. Co. . 53 284 

Hoover, C. H 39 211 

Hopkins, J. T 39 212 

Hopkins, A. D 39 212 

Hopson, William F 8 68 

Horlocher. Leta 72 403 

Horsburgh & Scott 21 124 

Horsfal Mining & Milling 

Co 63 341 

Horslev. W. B 39 212 

Horst Brothers 41 245 

Horton, E.. & Son Co 22 131 

Hospital. Boston City 112 482 

Hospital. Cambridge 112 482 

Hospital, Mass. GenT.. .: 112 482 

Hospital. Morton 112 • 483 

Hospital, Johns Hopkins. 112 483 

Hospital, Laura Franklin. 112 483 

Hospital, Penn 112 483 

Hospital, Presbyterian. ..112 483 

Hospital for Children 112 483 

Hotchkiss, CM 45 268 

Hotchkiss, C. W 32 172 

Hotchkiss, H. & G 90 429 

Hotel Monthly 103 450 



INDEX. 



523 



OUfls. Page. 

Hotel Red Book & Di- 
rectory Co 103 450 

Hough, F. B 49 275 

Hough. Romeyn B 

C. 49, 50 ; 275. 278 

Houghton, S. C 63 341 

Housekeeper Corporation. 13 96 

House of Refuge 

C. loi 112; 443,483 

Houston, Caroline A 7 54 

Houston, Frances C 7 54 

Houx, Mrs. E. M 39 212 

Hovey, William. 63 341 

Howard, Hiram 39 212 

Howard, J. W. & A. P., & 

Co. 89 428 

Howard's, S. E., Sons' Co 98 440 

Howard University 

C. 6, no; 43, 469 

Howarth, S 53 284 

Howe Addressing Co 103 451 

Howe, H. M 64 388 

Howell. B. F 58 292 

Howell, Edwin E i 31 

Hoy, M. P 33 183 

Hoyt, Howard 63 341 

Hovt, J. K 39 212 

Hoyt Metal Co 

C. 19, 21; 119, 124 

Hoyt, O. W 39 212 

Hubbard & Co 19 119 

Hubbard, H. P 13 96 

Huckins, J. H. W., & Co. 58 292 
Hudson & Chester Granite 

Co. 63 342 

Hudson, Charles B 52 282 

Hudson, Daniel E 13 96 

Huebel & Manger Mfg. 

Co C. 25, 26; 147, 150 

Huebsch, D. A., & Co 13 96 

Huett, Lee.* 41 245 

HufF, B. F 39 212 

Hug, H 39 212 

Huggins, T. H 39 212 

Huggins, W. A 39 212 

Hughes. A. M 35 190 

Hughes, M. 39 212 

Hughes, John P 33 183 

Hughes. W. G 41 245 

Hughes, William 13 96 

Hull ID 75 



Hull, J. H 39 212 

Humphrey, Edward L., 

Mrs 72 403 

Hunnewell, H. H 43 262 

Hunt, "R. M 10 75 

Hunt & Alexander 63 342 

Hunter Pub. Co 13 97 

Huntington, W. W 63 342 

Hurd, Harriet B 72 403 

Hurley, E. T 72 403 

Hurt. J. H 39 212 

Husband, Joseph 45 268 

Husband. W 63 342 

Hutton. William R 28 159 

Hyde, Henry C 63 342 

Hyde, W. H 7 54 

Hydraulic Press Brick Co 63 342 

Hygienic Optical Co 

C 15, 73 1 no, 400 

Hymer, J. P 63 342 

Hysell, Radford 39 212 



bex Mining Co 63 342 

ce & Cold Storage Co. . . 62 304 

daho Mining Co. ... 63 342 

. D. Company 63 342 

dea Pub. Co 13 97 

llini. The 3 38 

lis. Central R. R. Co. . . . 

C. 29. 109 ; 163, 466 

lis. Corn Growers* Assn. 39 212 

lis. Insulated Wire Co... 26 151 

Us. Grain Inspection 39 213 

lis. Horticultural Soc 45 268 

lis. Steel Co 

...C. 63. 64, 65, 103 

P. 342, 388, 391.451 

lis. Steel Works 108 464 

mboden, H 39 213 

mperial Factory 30 167 

mperial Mfg. Co 11 82 

mperial Mill 56 288 

moerial Packing Co 58 292 

ncandescent Elec. Light 

Manipulator Co. 25 147 

ndcDendence Mining Co. 63 342 

nd. Order of Foresters. .109 466 

nd. Order of Rechabites . 109 466 

nderriaden, J. B 58 292 

ndiana Coal Co 63 342 

ndiana Farmer Co 104 458 



524 



INDEX. 



OUai. Page. 

Indiana Horticultural* Soc 45 268 

Indiana Lumber Co 50 279 

Indiana Paving Brick Co. 63 342 

Indianapolis Brewing Co. 62 304 

Hominy Mills 56 288 

Ind. Rubber & Insul. Wire 

Co 26 151 

India-Rubber & Gutta- 
percha Ins. Co 26 151 

Indo-Egyptian Compress 

Co C. 35. 41; 190,245 

Ingalls Zinc Co 63 342 

Ingersoll Milling Ma- 
chine Co 22 131 

Ingersoll, Robert H., & 

Bro 96 438 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co 

C. 19, 20, 21, 28, 63, 65, 103 
P. 119, 122, 124, 159, 342, 391, 451 

Ingle & Almirall 10 74 

Inglis Photo Paper Co. .. 12 86 
Inglis, W., Wire & Iron 

Works 25 147 

Inland Printer Co 

C. II, 13, i03;83, 97, 451 

Inland Pub. Co C. i, 13 ; 31, 97 

Inman Am. Box Machine 

Co 92 434 

Inness, George 7 54 

Insane, Conn. Hospital 

for the 112 483 

Insanity, Mass. Board of. 112 483 
Inspection of Factories, 

Bureau of Conn 105 459 

Ills 105 459 

Indiana 105 459 

Mass 105 459 

Michigan 105 459 

New Jersey 105 459 

New York 105 459 

Ohio 105 459 

Penn 105 459 

Rhode Island 105 459 

Inspection of Mines, Bu- 
reau of Cal 105 459 

Illinois 105 459 

Iowa 105 459 

Kansas 105 460 

Kentucky 105 460 

Maryland 105 460 

Montana 105 460 



OUai. nige. 

Ohio 105 460 

Penn 105 460 

South Dakota 105 460 

West Virginia. ... 105 460 

Inst, of Technology, Co- 
operative Assn 107 462 

Insulating Staple Saddle 

Co C. 23.26; 140, 151 

Integral Mining Co 63 343 

International & Great 

Northern R. R, Co.... 103 45i 

Arithmachine Co.. 15 "o 

Assn. for Testing 

Materials ^8 159 

Bd. of Women's 

Christian Assn 13 97 

Brake Shoe Co. . . . 32 172 

Button Hole Sew- 
ing Machine Co 79 4^4 

Cable Directory Co 26 151 

Chalice Co 87 426 

Computing Mach. 

Co 96 439 

FoodCo 39 213 

Heater Co 74 4io 

Monthly 13 97 

Navigation Co 33 i°3 

Phosphate Co 35 190 

Inter-State Coal & Coke 

Qq 63 343 

Invalid Chair Co... 16 112 

Inyo Development Co 63 343 

Iowa Brick Co 63 343 

Iowa Cons. Mining; Co. . . 63 343 
Iowa Gold Mining & 

Milling Co 63 343 

Iowa Iron Works 33 183 

Ireland, Mrs. William, Jr. 72 403 

Iron Age Pub. Co 63 343 

Iron Clad Resistance Co. . 

C. 23, 27; 140, 154 

Iron Hill Mining Co 63 343 

Iron Silver Minmg Co... 63 343 

Iron Trade Review 103 451 

Iron & Steel Pub. Co 

C. 13. 103; 97, 451 

Iroquois Iron Works 28 159 

Irvine, T 63 343 

Irving & Casson 69 398 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 65 391 

Irwin, Charles P 33 183 



INDEX. 



525 



Olus- Pace. 

Isabella Mining Co 63 343 

Italian-Swiss Agri. Col- 
ony 60 299 

Ivanhoe Mining Co 63 

Ivcrs, John J 33 

Jackson, E. B 

Jackson, G. A 

Jackson, G. H. T 

Jackson, T. W 

Jackson, Victor H 

Jackson's N. J. Brown- 
stone Quarry 

Jacob, A. R 

Jacobson, L. A 

Jacobus, Philo 

Jacoby, Peter 

Jacques , 

Jaenecke Printing Ink Co. 

James, Edmund J 

Jagode, Phillip, & Co 

James, G. G 

Jamison, John B 

Jandus, William 

Jaques, W. H 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co 

.C. 21, 23, 28, 

P. 124, 140, 159, 

Jeffs, L. A 

Jenkins, O. P 

Jenkins, William R 

Jenkins, W. W 

Jenks, Robert H., Lum- 
ber Co 

Jenney Elec. Mfg. Co 

Jennings, Mrs. S 

Jeter, L. B 

Jeter, W. W 

Jewell Electrical Inst. Co. 

C. 25. 27; 

Jewell Nurserv Co 

Jewett Typewriter Co 

Jocinte Mmins: Co 

Johns, B. B . . . ". 

Johns Hopkins Press 

Johns Hopkins Univ 

John, H. W., Mfg. Co... 

C. 19, 23, 27; 119, 

Johns, W 

Johnson, Cowdin & Co. . . 



03 


343 


33 


183 


41 


245 


63 


343 


62 


304 


39 


213 


16 


112 


63 


343 


41 


245 


39 


213 


45 


268 


39 


213 


10 


75 


87 


426 


6 


43 


41 


245 


45 


26^ 


41 


245 


87 


426 


33 


183 


63, 


103 


343, 


451 


63 


343 


53 


284 


13 


97 


63 


344 


50 


279 


23 


140 


39 


213 


58 


292 


41 


245 


41 


245 


I47> 


> 154 


39 


213 


II 


83 


63 


344 


87 


426 


13 


97 


3 


.^8 


140, 


154 


39 


213 


83 


418 



OUai. Page. 

Johnson, D. B 39 213 

Johnson, D. F. 39 213 

Jfohnson, Eastman 7 54 

Johnson, F. C 43 262 

Johnson, I. S., & Co 13 97 

Johnson, J 33 183 

Johnson, J 59 295 

Johnson, J. B., & Son 41 245 

Johnson, J. F., & Co..C. 35, 37; 193 

Johnson, J. M 41 245 

Johnson, J. R 45 268 

Johnson, Ida A 72 403 

Johnson, N 63 344 

Johnson, Thomas H 32 172 

Johnson, Samuel . 39 213 

Johnson, Thomas 8 68 

Johnson, Wallace C 29 163 

Johnson & Field Mfg. Co. 35 190 

Johnston, C. W 41 245 

Jfohnston Harvester Co. . . 35 190 

Johnston, J. A 63 344 

Jolly, William 39 213 

Jones, Alfred 8 68 

Jones, A. N 39 213 

Jones, Ed 63 344 

Jones, Edward D 

. . .C. 103, 104, no; 451, 458, 469 

Jones, H. Bolton 7 54 

Jones, Hercules 41 245 

Jones, Horace R 41 245 

Jones, J. F 63 344 

Jones, J. ivi 41 245 

Jones, J. W 41 246 

Jones & Lamson Machine 

Co 22 131 

Jordan, A. J, . . .C. 93» 98; 435, 440 

Jordan, D. S C. 52, 53 ; 282, 284 

Jordan, F. A 95 437 

Jordan, J. F 91 430 

Jorgensen, E. C. F 29 163 

Torss, A. F 65 391 

Josephi, Isaac A 7 54 

Joslin, C. T., Co 59 296 

Journal of Commerce Co. 13 97 

of Education 

C. i,2;3i,35 

Journeymen Stone Cut- 
ters' Assn 103 451 

Tailors' Union. ... 103 451 

Joyner, N. C 41 246 

Judd, E. G 63 344 



526 



INDEX. 



OUsB. Pacre. 

Judge Co 13 97 

Judge, E. J 13 97 

Juniper Mining Co 63 344 

Justice, Bateman & Co. ... 41 246 

Justice Mining Co 63 344 

Juvenile Literature Pub. 

Co 13 97 

K. & W. Co 23 140 

Kahl, Charles -63 .344 

Kanaka Mining Co 63 .344 

Kan. City & Memphis Ry. 

& Bridge Co 2Q 163 

Kansas Farmer Co •. . 13 97 

Kansas Horticultural Soc. 4S 268 

Kaolin Co 63 " .344 

Kapp & Street s8 2Q2 

Karnowsky, W 33 183 

Kartavert Mfg. Co 23 140 

Katlinsky, A. L 13 97 

Kaufman Fertilizer Co. . . 35? 190 

Kaufman, J. C .39 213 

Kayser, Julius 86 423 

Kealing, H. T 13 98 

Kearcher, L. M .39 213 

Kearney & Foote Co.... 

C. 22, 65 ; 131, .391 

Keefe, D. G .39 213 

Keeler, Mrs. Charles 72 403 

Keelin, C. S 7 • 54 

Keen, Dora 

C. I, 2. 112; 31, 35. 483 

Keenan, Sophie Gaskell . . 72 403 

Keener, M. M 4i 246 

Keeney, J. W 39 214 

Keith, Georsre E. Co 86 423 

Keller, Arthur 1 7 54 

Kelley, W 63 344 

Kellogg, Warren F 13 08 

Kelly, C. S. Co 17 115 

Kelly, F. D 16 112 

Kelly, Howard A 16 112 

Kelly, Thomas B 42 246 

Kemmerer Coal Co 63 344 

Kemp, Day & Co .qS 202 

Kempton, Joseph 45 268 

Kendall, Margaret 7 55 

Kendall Mount Gold & 

Silver Mining Co 63 344 

Kendall, Sergeant 7 55 

Kendall, W. C 53 284 



Olaas. Page. 

Kendrick, George P 72 403 

Kenly, William L 2Q 163 

Kennedy, David 63 .344 

Kennedy Mining Co 63 .344 

Kennedy Mining Co..... 63 345 
Kennedy Milling & Min- 
ing Co 63 .345 

Kennedy Valve M'f'g Co. 

C. 19. 21 ; 120, 125 

Kennedy, W. J .33 183 

Kenney Co m 476 

Kenney, S. H. & Son. . . . 

C, 39, .59 ; 214, 2g6 

Kentucky Bluestqne Co. . 63 .345 

Kentucky Construct'n Co. 63 .345 

Kentucky Fluor Spar Co. 63 345 

Keppler & Schwarzmann. 13 98 

Kerr, Clarence E 17 ii5 

Kerr, G. G 39 214 

Kessler Brothers 63 345 

Kcster Electric Mfg. Co. . 23 140 

Keyes, W. S 60 aw 

Keyless Lock Co 6q 398 

Keystone Engineering & 

Mfg. Co 19 120 

Keystone Gold Mining Co. 63 .345 

Keystone Marble Co. ... 63 .345 

Keystone Quarries 63 .345 

Kicking. Horse Mining Co. 63 .145 

Kieley & Muler 74 410 

Kiger, R. C 39 214 

Kilborne, F. L. 39 214 

Kilen, A. R .39 214 

Killer, J. S .39 214 

Kilmer. H. E. 13 q8 

Kimball & Thompson 10 76 

Kimball, George A 32 172 

Kimball 10 76 

Kimble Estate 58 202 

Kindergarten Literature 

Co 13 q8 

King Bridge Co 2Q 163 

King, Columbus 45 268 

King. F. S 8 68 

King, J. B 41 246 

King, J. C. E 63 .345 

King, J. M 41 246 

King, Julius, Optical Co. 

c. 15,73; 110, 409 

King Mining Co 6^ 345 

Kingsley, Elbridge 8 68 



INDEX. 



527 



OUai. Page. 

Kinsman, F. E 25 147 

Kipp, B. A., & Co 50 279 

Kirk, H. B., &Co 61 .102 

Kirk, W. H 63 345 

Kirk-Christy Co 50 279 

Kirsch, P. H 53 284 

Kirtley Tunnel Co 63 345 

Kitson, Arthur..C. 66, 75 ; 3Q6, 412 

Kitson, Henry Hudson. . . 72 

Kitterman, Enos 45 268 

Klapp, Mrs. William Q.s 4.37 

Klee, John. 66 .306 

Klein, M., & Sons 

C. 23, 26; 140, 151 

Kleist, Eugene de 17 115 

Kline, J 63 .345 

Klondike Mininfi: Co. ... 63 .345 

Knapp, S. A 63 345 

Knauer, Erhard 13 08 

Knickerbocker, Willis. ... 83 183 

Knight Jesse 63 .346 

Knight, John W 63 .346 

Knight, Louis Aston 7 55 

Knight, Ridgway 7 55 

Knight, Wilbur C 63 .346 

Knights of the Golden 

Eagle 100 466 

Knights of Malta 100 466 

Knights of the Maccabees 100 466 

Knipp, John C. & Bro 6q 308 

Knoop, Frerichs & Co. . . 41 246 

Knopf, S. A 16 112 

Knox, Charles B 58 2Q2 

Knox, Frank H 13 q8 

Kny, Richard 16 112 

Kny-Scheerer Co 

C. 16 35; iir 190 

Koch, G. W., & Son 60 3q6 

Kochs, Theodore A., Co. 00 420 

Koenig, Adolph 13 98 

Kofoid, C. A 53 284 

Kohler, John 30 214 

Kohler, W. A 3Q 214 

Kohlmann, Louis 41 246 

Koiner. W. F 3q 214 

Kokomo Telephone & 

Elec. Co 26 151 

Koopman, AuRust 66 306 

Koopman, Augustus 7 55 

Koser, D. C 39 214 

Koshland, M. S 41 246 



OUn. Page. 

Kosminsky & McFaddin. 41 246 

Kost, Frederick W 7 55 

Kostcr, John L 60 .300 

Kraft, Herbert, Co 45 268 

Krahenbuhl, Ernest 96 438 

Kramer, G .39 214 

Kronberg, Louis 7 5.5 

Kruell, Gustav 8 69 

Kudo, M .33 183 

Kuichling, Emil 29 163 

Kunz, George F 

C. 63. 95 ; 346, 437 
Kusel Telephone & Elec. 

Co 26 151 

Labor & Industrial Statis- 
tics & Factory Inspec- 
tion 105 461 

Labor, Conn. State Bu. of 105 460 

Labor, Ills. State Bu. of. .105 460 

Labor, Ind. State Bu. of.. 105 460 

Labor, Mass. State Bu. of. 105 460 

Labor, Minn. State Bu. of. 105 460 

Labor, Neb. State Bu. of. 105 460 
Labor, New H. State Bu. 

of 105 460 

Labor, N. Y. State Bu. of. 

C. 102, 105 ; 444, 460 
Labor Statis., Mass. State 

Bu. of C. loi, 105 ; 443, 461 

Labor, Wis. State Bu. of. 105 460 
Lackawanna Iron & Steel 

Co 63 .^6 

Lackawana Lubricator & 

MTg Co 19 120 

LaClanche Battery Co. ... 24 I44 

Ladd, E. F in 476 

Ladd & Clement 63 .346 

La Farge, John 7 55 

Lafayette 3 38 

Lafayette College 3 38 

Lagai, George 16 113 

Laird, Schober & Co 86 423 

Lake, H. W 63 .340 

Lake Keuka Wine Co 60 .300 

Lake, Levin ,33 183 

Lake Shore & Mich. So. 

Ry. Co .39 214 

Lake Superior Consoli- 
dated Iron Mines 63 .346 

Lakon Transformer Co. .. 23 140 



528 



INDEX. 



Glass. Page. 

Lamartine Mining G) 63 346 

Lamb, A. H .39 214 

Lamb Factory 30 167 

Lamb, J. & R. 67 396 

Lambert Pharmacal Co. . 87 426 

Lambert Typewriter Co.. 11 83 

Lambie, W. .. . * 39 214 

Lamont, Fred G 40 232 

Lampton, A. P 39 214 

Lampton, K. F 39 214 

Lancaster School. 112 483 

Landis, J. M 39 215 

Landis Tool Co 22 131 

Lang, Jacob 39 215 

Langdon, Palmer H 13 98 

Lankford, C. E 39 215 

Lanston Monotype Ma- 
chine Co II 83 

Laplace, Ernest 16 113 

Larapedie, Christian 17 ii5 

La Rash. S. D 4S 268 

Large Distilling Co 61 302 

La Roche & Co 23 140 

Larson, A 63 346 

La Sal Copper Mining Co. 63 346 

La Sal Mining Co 63 .346 

Lasher & Osborne 13 98 

Last Dollar Mining Co. . . 63 .346 

Laswell, J. W 63 346 

Later, P 39 215 

Latham Machinery Co.. . . 

C. II. 13; 83. 98 

Lathbury & Spaclcman 28 159 

Lathrop, F. H 50 279 

Lathrop, Francis 7 US 

Lathrop, Frank 67 .397 

Lathrop, W. L 7 55 

La Tosca Mining Co 63 .346 

Latrobe Steel Works 32 172 

Laurence. Sturgis 72 404 

Lavalle, John 72 404 

Lawler & Wills 63 .346 

Lawrence, D. G .39 215 

Lawrence, George R 12^ 86 

Lawrence, Stephen B 71 399 

Lawrence, W. J 63 .346 

Lawrence, W. W., & Co.. 87 426 

Lawrence Sewerage Bd.. 29 163 

Lawson, Adele V 72 404 

Lawyer, Rufus 45 269 

Lea Brothers & Co 13 98 



OUm* Pace. 

Lea, F. H 41 246 

Lea MTg Co 25 I47 

Leach, Henry L. .32 172 

League for Social Econ- 
omy 108 464 

Leas & McVitty 89 428 

Leavitt, Charles W 29 163 

LeBlond, The R. K.. Ma- 
chine Tool Co 22 1.32 

Leckenby, A. B .39 215 

Le Count. William G 22 132 

LeClanche Battery Co... 24 I44 



Lee, Bishop B. F no 469 

Lee, Homer 7 55 

Lee-Robins, Lucy 7 .50 

Lee, Samuel & Co 41 246 

i^ee, X. ,...........•.••• ",j %Ai 

Lee Injector MTg Co — 19 120 

Lee. Robert E 41 246 

Leffingwell. Charles W... 13 98 

Le Grand Quarry Co — 63 .347 

Lehigh Coal Mining Co.. 63 .347 

Lehigh University 3 .38 

Lehigh Valley R.R. Co.. .103 45 1 

Lehnert, G. A.> 39 215 

Leisenring, John, M'f'g 

Co 22 1.32 

Leister, W. Hammond... 33 183 
Leland & Falconer M'f'g 

Co 22 132 

Leland, G. Banning .50 279 

Le Maitre Optical Co — 

C. 15. l?i\ no. 409 
Lembeck & Betz. Eagle 

Brewing Co 62 304 

Lemmon, H. A. 63 .347 

Lemoine, William 63 .347 

Lenz, Henry 41 246 

Lenz, Henry .39 215 

Leonard, Anna B 72 404 

Leonard, C. N 45 269 

Leonard, Daniel 4i 246 

Leonard, Genevieve 72 404 



Leonard, Harriet N. 



72 404 
.347 



Leonard, P. H 63 

Leonard & Ellis C. 19. 87 ; 120. 426 
Leonhardt Wagon M'f'g 

Co .32 172 

Leopold, Nathan F 63 .347 

Lepper, G 63 .347 

Leschbrandt, E .33 183 



INDEX. 



529 




OUat. Page. 

Leschinske, Robert 63 347 

Leslie, P. C 41 

Letterman, D. A 45 

Levi, M. P 41 247 

Levy, H. M 63 .347 

Levy, Louis Edward 11 83 

Levy, Max 11 83 

Lewis, Arthur 7 56 

Lewis, D. W «»8 2Q2 

Lewis, J. N 30 21S 

Lewis, O. K. 30 215 

Lewis, S. B .SO 206 

Lewis, W. L S8 202 

Lexington Coal Mining 

Co 63 .347 

Libby, McNeil & Libby. . 

C. 55. .58; 287. 202 

Liberty Silk Co 83 418 

Lidell & Williams 22 132 

Liebmann's Sons. Brew- 
ing Co 62 304 

Life Publishing Co 13 08 

Light of Truth Pub. Co. 13 08 

Lilienthal, A 63 347 

Lill, Samuel, & Co 41 247 

Lincoln Granite Co 63 .347 

Lincoln Springs 62 304 

Lindeman, Clara C 72 404 

Linder, H 07 4.39 

Lindsay, W. E 63 .347 

Link Belt Engineering Co. 

C. 28, 103; 150. 451 

Linton, Edwin 53 284 

Linton, Harvey 28 150 

Linton, W. D 45 260 

Linton, W. D 63 .347 

Lippencott Steam Spe- 
cialty Co 21 125 

Lippincott, J. B., Co.... 

• • v^. 1 3f ^.3 * Oo» 347 

Lipscomb, A. S 41. 247 

Lipscomb, B. S 41 247 

Lipscomb, J. M 41 247 

Liquid Air Refrigeration 

& Power Co 55 287 

Listie Mining Co 63 .347 

Little, Joseph H 33 183 

Little, W. P 63 .348 

Little, Brown & Co 13. 08 

Little, John. Mining Co.. 63 .348 

Littleford, Frank & Bros. 50 270 



GUaa. Page. 

Littman, Felix 01 43i 

Living Age Co 13 09 

Livingston Gold Mining 

Livingstone, A. H 45 260 

Llewellyn, Frank J 20 164 

Llewellyn. H. H 63 .348 

Logan, H. R. 63 .348 

Lloyd Fresco Cleaning & 

Decorating Co 66 306 

Locke, Caroline T 7 .56 

Locke, Fred M 23 140 

Locke Regulator Co 

C. 10. 21; 120. I2S 

Lockwood, Wilton 7 .56 

Locomobile Co. of Amer- 
ica .30 167 

Locomotive Engineering.. 103 45 1 
Locomotive Engineers, 

Brotherhood 103 4Si 

Locomo. Fireman's Mag.. 103 45i 
Locomotive Engineers 

Mutual Life & Accident 

Ins. Asso 100 466 

Loeser's, Charles McK., 

Sons 13 00 

Logan, J. A 41 247 

Lone Pine Mining Co 63 348 

Long, Adelaide H 73 400 

Long, J 63 .348 

Long, Marion W 72 404 

"Long Arm" System Co.. 33 184 

Long Dale Mining Co 63 .348 

Long Island Brewing Co. 62 304 

Long Island R.R. Co 20 164 

Long Valley Coal Co 63 .348 

Lopez, Charles 07 4.10 

Lorain Steel Co 23 140 

Lord, Julia P 41 247 

I^rd & Thomas C. 13. I4 ; 00, 100 

Lord, Hewlett & Hull 10 76 

Lorenz, George 00 420 

Lorraine M'f 'g Co 

C. 80. 82; 41.5, 417 

Los Alamitos Beet Sugar 

Co 50 206 

Los Angeles Art Leather 

Co 08 440 

Los Angeles Cham, of 

Com 

C. 42, 45. 58; 258. 260, 202 



530 



JINDEX. 



OUat. Pace. 

Los Angeles Granite & 

Brownstone G> 63 348 

Loseke, G 30 215 

Lost Lillie Mining Co 63 348 

Lotbrop & Higflrins 46 273 

Lothrop Pub. Co 13 99 

Lott, C. T 63 348 

Loud & Gerling 58 292 

Louden, William 39 215 

Louisiana Planter and 

Sugar Manuf er 103 45 1 

Louisiana Sugar Planters' 

Association 59 296 

Louisville Leaf Tob. Exc. 91 43 1 

Love, Boyd & Co 50 279 

Lovelocks, G 63 .348 

Low, George P 13 99 

Low, Will H 7 56 

Low Moor Iron Co 63 348 

Lowe, Henry P 63 348 

Lowe, T. H 63 .348 

Lowell Textile School . . . loi 443 
Lower Mammoth Mining 

Loweth, Charles F 20 164 

Lowman, W. M 39 215 

Lowry Institute 6 43 

Lowry, J. G 39 215 

Lozier M'f 'g Co 33 184 

Lubin, Siegmund 

, C. 12, 15, 73; 86, no, 409 

Lucas, Albert P 9 72 

Lucas, J. L 22 132 

Lucas, John, & Co 106 462 

Luce & Manning 41 247 

Luce, W. D 63 349 

Lucky Guss Mining Co. . 63 .349 

Ludlow M'f 'g Co 108 464 

Ludlow Valve M'f'g Co.. 21 125 

Ludwig, B. T. J 41 247 

Ludwig & Co 17 115 

Lukens, T. P 63 .349 

Lumber Trade Journal . . . 103 452 

Lumbermen's Club of 

Cincinnati 50 279 

Lunacy Com., Maryland. . 1 12 483 

Lunacy Com., New York. 112 483 

Lund, Waldemar 33 184 

Lunkenheimer Co 19 120 

Lutheran Ministerium of 

New York 13 99 



CBftM. Page. 

Lyale, Addison 43 262 

Lyden, M. J .13 184 

Lyford, J. 109 466 

Lyman School 112 483 

Lynch, B. McN 41 247 

Lynn, George W 41 247 

Lynn Incandescent Lamp 

Co 25 147 

Lyon, Leonidas S., Jr — 33 184 

Lyon, Robert P 103 4.S2 

Lyon, T. Littleton 5 42 

Lyons, J 4i 247 

Lyons, S. C, & Bros 63 349 

Lytton Springs Sanitarium 

Company in 476 

Mabee, George W 63 349 

Macarty, W. W 4i. 247 

MacCarter, Henry 7 .56 

MacChesney, Clara. 7 .S6 

MacDonald, Pirie, 12 87 

MacEwen, Walter 7 56 

MacFarlane, Alexander. . 3 .38 

Macllhenny, CM 7 .S6 

MacKane, Mrs. H. W. . . . 84 420 

MacKim. Mead & White. . 10 76 
Mackintosh, Hemphill & 

Company 64 388 

MacKubin, Florence 7 .S6 

Macmillan Co I3 99 

MacMonnies, Frederick... 9 72 

MacMonnies, Mary F — 7 .57 

MacNeil, H. A 9 73 

Macullar Parker Co 103 4.52 

Macy, John W I7 IIS 

Magee Furnace Co 74 410 

Magic Food Co .39 216 

Magnerson, J. F 33 184 

Magoun, F. P .13 184 

Mahan, W. H 41 248 

Mahoney M'f'g Co 74 4io 

Mahoning Iron & Steel 

Company 63 349 

Maine Condensed Milk 

Company 4P 232 

Maine Red Granite Co. . . 63 350 
Maine State Pomological 

Society 45 269 

Maine & N. H. Granite 

Company 63 3.50 

Makeig, S. 1 4i 248 



INDEX. 



531 



GUfft. Page. 

Malaga G)-operative Co.. 58 2Q3 

Malcolmson, Charles T... 25 147 
Maley, Thompson & Mof- 

fett «>o 279 

Mallett, D. F 13 09 

Malone & Smith 58 293 

Malones MininR Co 6.'^ 350 

Maloney, W. A 41 248 

Malta, Georffe H 60 300 

Mammoth Mining & Mill- 
ing Co 63 3^0 

Manchester, Elbert 45 269 

Mandle, 1 63 350 

Manget, John A 39 216 

Manhattan Brass Co 

C. 65. 91; .391.4.31 

Manhattan Elec. Supply 

Co C. 23. 24; 141. 144 

Manhattan Mining Co... 63 .350 

Manhattan Optical Co... 73 409 
Manhattan Storage and 

Warehouse Company.-. . 103 452 

Mann, C. M 60 300 

Mann, F. W.. Co .37 I93 

Mann, T. R 63 350 

Mannello, Angelo 17 116 

Mansfield, M. J 95 4.37 

Manufacturers' Record... 103 452 

Manufacturing Jeweler.. 103 452 

Manzel Brothers 19 120 

Marcariar & Co 58 293 

March, John A 39 216 

Marclcs, A 39 216 

Marine Record Pub. Co.. 13 99 

Marine Review Pub. Co. . 13 99 

Mariner, F. C 39 216 

Marion Improvement Co. 63 3.S0 

Marion Mining Co 63 350 

Marion Steam Shovel Co. 28 159 

Markel, E 39 216 

Markert, J 39 216 

Markham, R 39 216 

Marks, A. A 16 113 

Marks, George E 16 113 

Marks, William L 16 113 

Markt & Co 22 132 

Marquardt, Francis X 72 

Marsh, Bessie 59 

Marsh, F. D 7 .57 

Marsh, John N 33 184 

Marshall Brothers 45 269 




OlUM. Plfftl 

Marshall, William 

c. 23, 27; 141, 155 

Martha Washington Min- 
ing Co 63 3.50 

Martin, E. J 39 216 

Martin, F. M 41 248 

Martin, H. M .39 216 

Martin, Homer 7 57 

Martin, T. B 39 216 

Martine, C. H 63 3S0 

Mary McKinney Mining 

Maryland Agri. Exp. Sta. 43 262 

Maryland Coal Co 63 .350 

Maryland Distilling Co. . 61 302 

Maske, LB 41 248 

Mason, E. J 39 216 

Mason, Elizabeth 72 404 

Mason, Miss M. M 72 404 

Mason, Perry & Co 13 99 

Mason, Thomas 13 100 

Mason, Walter 45 269 

Mass. Bd. of Paris Exp. 

Managers 53 284 

Chief of Dist. Po- 
lice 105 461 

Com., Paris Exp.. 3 38 

Commowealth of.. 29 164 

Institute of Tech.. 

C. 3, 13. 63 ; 38, 100, 350 

New Church Union 13 100 

Sav. Bank Com's. . 109 466 

State Board Agri.. 42 259 

State of C. 33 ; 25 184 

Insurance ComV. . 

C. 105. 109; 461. 466 



Massenge, August .33 185 

Massey, B. F 41 248 

Masson, Paul 60 300 

Master Builders' Asso...i03 4.52 

Mather, Fred . .C. 52, 53 : 282, 284 
Matheson, William J., & 

Co 87 426 

Mathews, H. H 63 .3.50 

Matson, W. H 39 217 

Matthews, Owen 39 217 

Matthews, W. R. H 39 217 

Mauger & Avery 41 248 

Mauney, W. A 41 248 

Maurer, A. H 7 .57 

Maxey, S. C 41 248 



534 



INDEX. 



Olmn. Page. 

Mine la Motte Mining G>. 6.3 352 

Miner, E. N 13 100 

Mingc, C. H., & Co 41 249 

Mining & Eng. Rev 103 4S2 

Minnesota Iron Co 

C. 6r 103; 352, 452 

Minnesota Mining Co 63 352 

Minnesota Sandstone Co. 63 352 
Minnewawa Vineyard ... 58 2Q3 

Minor, Robert C 7 .58 

Mirabel Standard Mining? 

Co 63 .352 

Mississippi River Com. . 

C. 28. 29, 33 ; 159. 164. 185 

Valley Lumbermani03 452 

Valley Trans Co.. Xi 185 

Missouri Granite Co 63 .352 

Lumber & Mininsr 

Co 103 452 

Pacific Ry. Co 80 415 

Horticultural Soc. 

C. 43. 45 ; 262, 270 

Valley Bridge & 



Iron Works 20 164 

Mitchell, A. E 39 217 

Mitchell, Charles 63 352 

Mitchell. E. B 41 249 

Mitchell, Joseph D 41 249 

Mitchell, L. M 41 249 

Mitchell Co., John J 

C. II, 13. 85 ; 83. 100, 422 

Mittag & Voider 11 83 

Mittallbury Coal & Coke 

Co 63 .352 

Mobile Cotton Exchange. 41 249 

Model Heating Co 74 4ii 

Modern Miller Co 

.C. 13, 103 ; 101, 452 

Modesti & Avila 63 .152 

Modjeski, Ralph 29 164 

Moeller, Louis 7 58 

Moffat, F. L 39 217 

Mollie Gibson Con's Min- 
ing Co 63 .352 

Monarch Factory 30 167 

Monarch Fire Appliance 

Co 21 125 

Monarch Governor & Ma- 
chine Co 21 125 

Monarch Mfg. Co 21 125 



OUaa. Page. 

Monongahela River Cons. 

Coal & Coke Co 63 .3.52 

Monson Maine Slate Co. . 63 352 
Montana Coal & Coke Co. 63 352 
Montauk Multiphase Ca- 
ble Co 27 1.55 

Monte Cristo Mining Co. 63 352 

Montfort, Helen E 72 405 

Montfort & Co 13 loi 

Montgomery, A 45 270 

Montgomery. George W.. 41 249 

Monticello Wine Co 60 .300 

Moonshine Mining Co... 63 .3.52 

Moore, Aaron 41 249 

Moore, Matt 41 249 

Moore, Oliver 86 424 

Moore, T. B 41 249 

Moore, W. E 41 249 

Mooreland. Mrs. W. C. 

Jr 72 40s 

Moran Brothers Co . . no 469 

Moran, Horace I7 116 

Moretti, G 97 4.39 

Morgan, Ada White 72 405 

Morgan, D. W. C 63 352 

Morgan, E. D 33 185 

Morgan, J. Pierpont .13 i8s 

Morgan, W. J., & Co 11 83 

Morgan Machine Co 22 132 

Morgan Milling Co 63 .3.53 

Momingstar, P. H .39 217 

Morning Star Mining Co. 63 .3.53 

Morrell, J. A 63 3.53 

Morrin, J. & L 39 217 

Morris 10 76 

Morris Arc Lamp Co 25 I47 

Morris, E. E., & Co 64 .388 

Morris, E. K.. & Co 91 43i 

Morris, J. B.. Foundry 

Co C. 65. 91 : .391. 431 

Morris, J. F 39 217 

Morris, Thomas 41 249 

Morris, Nelson. & Co 58 293 

Morris Run Coal Co 63 .353 

Morrisdale Coal Co 63 .353 

Morrison, E. A 63 .3.53 

Morrison. Gilbert B 

C. I, 2; 31, 35 

Morse, Charles 45 270 

Morse, H 63 3.53 

Morse, T. Vemette 13 loi 



INDEX. 



535 



1.32 

249 

IQ3 

185 
353 

132 
185 



CBftM. Page. 

Morse Twist Drill & Ma- 
chine Co 22 

Morton Mfe. Co 22 

Moseley, Albert R 41 

Moseley & Stoddard Mfff. 
Co 37 

Mosher, Charles D 

C. 19. 33; 120. 

Moss, Jerome 6.3 

Mossberff & Granville 
Mfg. Co 22 

Motley. Thornton N 33 

Mott, J. L., Iron Works. . 

C. 74, III; 4", 476 

Mott, John M I 31 

Mountain Copper Co 63 .353 

Mountaineer Mining Co.. 63 .3.53 
Mt. Airy Granite* Quar- 
ries 6.3 353 

Mount Carbon Coal Co. . . 6.3 353 

Mount Copper Co 6.3 353 

Mount Diablo Mininir Co. 63 .353 

Mount Hope Mine 6.3 353 

Mountford. Elijah 6.3 

Mouse River Li^rnite Coal 

Co 63 

Mowry, F. J 13 

Moyer, J. S.. & Co 6.3 

Mt. Holyoke Collesre 3 

Mudges, RE 30 

Muhlhauser, The P.. Co. . 82 

Muhrman, Henry H 7 

Mulford. H. K., & Co. . . .111 476 

Muller, L., Jr 13 loi 

Mumford, A. W 13 

Mumma, A. L 39 

Mundy. A. J 27 

Munger, E. E 16 

Muncipal KngincerinK Co. 13 

Munn & Co 13 

Munsell, Eugene, & Co. . . 2.3 

Munster, A 20 

Muralo Co 87 

Murdock, William A 6.3 

Murphy, Arthur 63 

Murphy, F. M 63 

Murphy, James Shields.. 13 

Murphy, J. Francis 7 

Murphy. S. H 30 

Murray, Daniel no 

Murray, Samuel 



3.53 
3.54 

lOI 

354 

.39 

217 

417 

.58 



lOI 

218 

1.54 

"3 
lOI 

lOI 

141 
164 
426 
3.54 
354 
354 
lOI 

58 
218 
469 

73 



OUat. Pafe. 

Muscovite Mica Co 63 3.54 

Mutual l^ife Ins Co. of 

N. Y lOQ 466 

Muzzy Brothers 87 427 

Myers, B. L 41 240 

Myers, Calvin 45 270 

Myers, E. L 41 249 

Myles Salt Co 63 354 

Myrick, Herbert 103 452 



Nashville Hardw'd Lum- 
ber Manuf rs '. 

Nasmyth, Mrs. Percy 

Nathan Mfg. Co 

C. 19, .32; 

National Assn. of Photo- 
Engravers 

Wool Manufactur- 



ers 



Aut. Tel«f hone Co. 
Bank of Commerce 

Biscuit Co 

Carbon Co 

Cash Register Co. 
C. IS. 43, 108; no. 
Conduit & Cable 



v^O. ......... \^t 2.i« 20 , 

Ger. Am. Teach- 

Sem 

Hollow Brake 



ers 



Beam Co. 

India Rubber Co . . 

Injector Co 

Inst. Dental Peda- 



gogy, Am. 

Iron & Steel- Pub. 



Co. 



^ — Iron Co 

■^^■^"^ j.^eaQ vxO. ......... 

— J- League of Mineral 

Painters 

Machine Co 

Nickel Co 

Nurseryman Pub. 



Co. 



Printing Co 

Ry. Publication Co. 

Rice Milling Co. . . 
Specialty Co 



SO 279 

72 40s 

120. 173 

n 84 

82 417 

26 151 

63 354 

.57 289 

25 147 

262, 464 

141. 151 

I 31 

.32 173 

26 151 
19 120 

16 n3 

13 lOI 

105 461 

63 3.54 

72 405 

II 84 

63 3.54 

103 452 

13 loi 

loi, 173 

.39 218 

37 193 



^ 



536 



INDEX. 



National Starch Mfg. Co. 

C. .39. .S6; 218. 288 

Steel Co 63 .rw 

Tube Works .32 I73 

Natural Mineral Water 

Co Ill 476 

NaumkeaR BuflFinR Ma- 
chine Assn 70 414 

Naylor, J. L .30 218 

Neal, Fanny 72 405 

Neal, John R.. & Co 58 2Q3 

Neal, Mary Alley. 72 405 

Neal, U. W ^Q 218 

Nebraska State Hort. Soc. 45 270 

Needham, Charles Austin 7 58 

Neeley, A. L 41 250 

Neely, F. L .39 218 

Ncff, A. C .39 218 

Neff , J. H 03 .354 

Neff, John .39 218 

Negus, T. S. & J. D 119 489 

Neidy, J 63 3.S4 

Nelson .39 218 

Nelson. B. F SO 27O 

Nelson, C. C .39 218 

Nelson, E. W 52 282 

Nelson, M 7 .58 

Nelson, N 39 218 

Nelson, R. C 39 218 

Nelson, A.. & Co 45 270 

Nelson, Hall & Co .37 ia3 

Nelson Mfg. Co 

C. 107, 108; 462, 464 

Neodesha Mining Co 63 .354 

Neostyle Envelope Co — 92 4.34 

Neostyle Mfg. Co n 84 

Nepera Chemical Co 12 87 

Neptune Meter Co 21 125 

Nesbit, J. S 63 .3.54 

Netter, David, & Co 61 303 

Nettie Mining Co 63 .354 

Nettleton, Walter 7 58 

Neufield, Emil M 73 409 

Nevada & Boston Co 63 .354 

Nevada Com. to Paris 

Expo. 63 355 

Nevada. State of 03 .355 

New Almaden Quicksilver 

Mining Co 63 355 

New Bedford Boiler & 

Machine Co 19 120 



New Bedford Oil Co 53 

New Bedford Textile 

School loi 

Newby, Thomas T 

C 43. 4S;262. 

Newcomb, B. M 63 

Newcombcr, J. L 41 

New Departure Trunk Co. 99 
New Dunderbcrg Mining 

New England Co 82 

Brown Stone Co. . fe 

Cotton Mfrs.Assn. 80 

Crutch Co 16 

Gas & Coke Co.. . . 63 

Pub. Co 13 

Shoe & Leather 

Mfrs. Assn. .C. 86, 103; 424, 
New Excelsior Dry Bat- 
tery Co 24 

New Hamm'ndsp'rt Wine 

Co 60 

New Haven Mfg. Co 22 

New Home Sewing Ma- 
chine Co C. 79, 84 ; 414, 

Newhouse & Weir 63 

New Idria Quicksilver 

Mining Co 63 

New Jersey Car Spring 

& Rubber Co I9 

New Jersey Zinc Co 

Newland, W. T .39 

Newman, Mrs. W. B 7 

Newman. R. L 7 

New Mexico Agfri. Col- 
lege 45 

New Process Rawhide Co. 

C. 21. 23; 125. 

New Process Twist Drill 

Co 22 

New Salt & Borax Co 63 

New Sapphire Syndicate. 63 

Newsboy Mining Co "63 

Newton, G. G .39 

Newton, H. A 63 

New York Air Brake Co. .32 

Belting & Packing 

Co 99 

Blower Co 74 

Boat Oar Co .\3 



284 
443 

270 

.^55 
250 

441 

.355 
417 
355 
415 
113 
355 

lOI 

453 

144 

.300 
1.32 

420 

.355 

.355 

120 

.388 

218 

.58 

.58 

270 

141 
1.32 

355 



218 
.356 
173 



411 
185 



INDEX. 



637 



Olaat. Page. 

New York Car Wheel 

Works 32 173 

Central R.R 108 464 

City of 20 i54 

Daily Times 13 loi 

Education. C. i. 2; 31, 35 

Insulated Wire Co. 

C. 23. 26; 141. i.«»i 

Lumber Trade 

Journal I3 loi 

Musical Courier Co 13 10 1 

Novelty Co 

C. 73. QS'f 409. 437 

Orphan Asylum ..112 483 

State Banking De- 
partment 100 466 

State Com. Paris 

Expo C.40, iii;232,477 

State Ins. Dept 109 407 

State Museum ... 63 356 

— '■ — State Paris Com... 45 270 

Trade School 6 43 

University School 

of Pedagogy 3 .39 

Yacht Qub .13 185 

& Ohio Co 

C. 23. 25 ; 141, 148 

& Rosendale Ce- 
ment Co 63 356 

Niagara Mining Co 63 3.56 

Nichols, E. B., Miss 84 420 

Nichols, H. W 63 .356 

Nicholls, Rhoda Holmes. 7 58 

Nicholson, W. H., & Co, 22 132 

Nicodemus, C. A 39 218 

Niell, James P no 469 

Niemolier, A. F 39 218 

Niles Tool Works 22 133 

Nisi Prius Mining Co 63 356 

Nix, C. H 63 .356 

Nix, F. M 41 250 

Nixon, G 63 356 

Noble Brothers 58 293 

Noble, William 63 356 

Nolan, H. Jennings 84 420 

Nolan Pub. Co 13 102 

Noland, B. R 41 250 

Non- Polarizing Dry Bat- 
tery Co 24 144 

Noon, A. A 63 .356 

Norcross Brothers 63 356 



(Saat. Page. 

Norfleet, F. S 41 250 

Normal Art School 4 4i 

Normal Instructor i 31 

North Bloomfield Gravel 

Co. 63 356 

Branch LumbV Co. 50 279 

Buffalo Factory... 30 167 

Empire Mining Co. 6.^ 360 

Monson Main€ 

Slate Co 63 360 

Pacific Coal Co... 63 .360 

Star Mills 56 289 

Star Mining Co. . . 63 .360 

Star Mining Co . . . 63 .360 

North Electric Co 26 151 

North Brothers Mfg. Co. 

C. 5.5, 65; 287. .391 

North Carolina Dept. of 

Agri C. 45. 46; 270. 274 

Pine Assn. 50 279 

Paris Com. . 63 357 

State Bd. of 

C. 50, 52, 54. 63 

P. 279. 282, 285. .3.56 

State Mu- 
seum 63 .360 

Northcote. Stafford M . . . '8 69 

Northern Coal Co 63 .360 

Northern Mich. Marble 

Northrup, Henry S 66 396 

Northw'st'rn Grass Twine 

Co C. 70, 81 ; 399. 416 

Northwestern Miller 103 453 

Norton, C. S.. Blue Stone 

Co 63 .360 

Norton, William E 7 58 

Norton Electric Inst. Co. 27 I55 

Norton Emery Wheel Co. 22 133 
Norwich Nickel & Brass 

Co 79 414 

Notla Cons. Marble, Iron 

& Talc Co 63 360 

Nourse, Elizabeth 7 58 

Nourse, Mary 72 405 

Noyes. G. R 39 219 

Noyes. Read & Co 86 424 

Nuque, Gustave .33 185 

Nyack Factory .30 167 



538 



INDEX. 



dan. Page. 

Oak Hill MinitiR Co 6^ 360 

Oakes Mininjf Co 63 .160 

Obcrlin College .3 39 

Oberv, Mrs Christine M. 84 420 

O'Brien, H. J 33 185 

O'Brien, James F 41 250 

Ochtman, Leonard 7 59 

Ockerson, J. A 29 164 

O'Connor, Con 6^ 360 

Oelrich, Herman 39 219 

Oelrich, Herman, & Bro.. 39 219 

Oestcrlein Machine Co. .. 22 133 

Ogilvie, Theodore 41 250 

Ohio Elec'l Specialty Co. 23 141 

Ohio Fire Brick Co 

C. 63. 64 ; 360, 388 

Ohio Tool Co 65 301 

Ohmann-Dumesnil, A. H. 13 102 

Ohmer, Will 1 32 173 

Ohr, George E 72 405 

Oil Vapor Incan. Lt. Co. . 75 412 

Oil Well Supply Co 

C. 19, 21, 63; 120, 125, .361 

O'Kane, J 31 169 

Oklahoma Cotton Com- 
press Co 41 2.';o 

Okonite Co. ...C. 23, 26: 141, i.^i 

Olcan, Felix 72 405 

Old Dominion Copper Co. 63 .361 
Old Dominion Mining Co. 63 361 
Old Jordan & Galena Min- 
ing Co 63 .361 

Old Nick Williams Co... 61 303 

Oleta Marble Co 63 .361 

Oliphint, T. W 41 2i>o 

Oliver, Dave 63 .361 

Oliver, Greenwood K 64 388 

Oliver, J. C 30 219 

Oliver, John L 41 250 

Oliver Typewriter Co 11 84 

Oliver Iron Mining Co. . . 63 .361 

Olsen, Tinius & Co 21 125 

Olszewski, Anton 13 102 

Omaha & Grant Smeltins: 

Co 63 .361 

Omeyer, Emile 33 185 

Oneida Community si 281 

Oneida Community 6.S 391 

Oneida National Chuck 

Co 22 133 

O'Neill, William E 33 185 



OUat. Pace. 

Onondaga Dynamo Co... 23 141 
Onota Mfg. Co. .C. 25, 27; 1$, 155 
Ontario & Western Rv. 

Co 63 361 

Ontario Silver Mining Co. 63 .361 

Ophir Mining Co 63 .361 

Orange Judd Co 13 102 

Orbra, Charles 39 219 

Order of Scottish Clans, .ioq 467 

Orenbek, Frederick 41 250 

Oregon Coal & Navigation 

Co 63 .361 

Improvement Co.. 63 .361 

R. R. & Nav. Co.. . 3Q 219 

Short Line R. R. . 103 453 

Ore Knob Mining Co 63 .301 

Ores & Metals 103 4.';3 

Orient Electric Co 2.5 148 

Ormsby, F. E 13 102 

Oro Bella Mining Co 63 .361 

Orr, J. W 41 250 

Orton, Edward. Jr 

C. 63, 108; 361, 464 

Orvis & Hawkes 10 120 

Osbon, Mrs. E. A 72 405 

Osborne. D. M., & Co 35 I9i 

Osborne, Seager & Co... 63 .361 

Osgood Art Colortype Co. 11 84 

Osgood, Mrs. Worth 72 405 

Oskaloosa Coal Co 63 .3fe 

Oster Mfg. Co 22 133 

Ostermeyer, William. . . . 33 i8«5 

Ostrander, W. R., & Co. . 26 151 

Ostrom, John N 29 164 

Oswego Normal School. . 3 .39 
Otis Elevator Co.. 23, 105; 141, 461 

Otto, John B 41 250 

Outing Pub Co 13 102 

Outlook Co 13 102 

Overland Mining & Mill 

Overland Monthly Pub. 

Co 13 102 

Overly. Laura S 72 405 

Overman Wheel Co .30 168 

Overstreet, J. R 39 219 

Owen Machine Tool Co.. 22 133 

Owl Commercial Co 91 43i 

Oxley & Enos 25 148 

Ozark Mining Co 63 .36a 



INDEX. 



539 



Olaas. Pasre. 

Pacific G>ast Borax Co. . 6.*^ 362 

Condensed 

Milk Co 40 233 

Elevator Co 59 219 

Pacific Copper Co 63 ^62 

Creameries 40 233 

Electric Co 

C. 25, 26 ; 148, 152 

Press Pub. Co 13 102 

Steam Whalinj? Co, !yS 293 

Packard, A. S 43 263 

Packard's Business Col- 
lege 6 43 

Page Brothers & Co 1 18 487 

Page, Newell & Co 32 I73 

Pahannes, Isaac 63 3^ 

Paine, Cassius M 13 1Q2 

Pajne, A. J 33 186 

Pain's Fireworks Co. ...118 487 

Paist, Mrs. H. B 72 40«; 

Paiste, H. T., Co 2s 148 

Palmer, Mrs. Lucia A 13 102 

Palmer, Walter L 7. 59 

Palmeri, L. J 9«> 437 

Palmersberg. J. R., & 

Sons 69 .198 

Palmtag, William 60 300 

Pan Confection Co 59 296 

Pape, Eric 7 .S9 

Parf et G. W 63 3O2 

Parke County Coal Co. . . 63 .162 

Parke, Davis & Co 11 1 477 

Parker, J. A 4.«; 270 

Parker, t. R 41 250 

Parker, John M 41 250 

Parker, W. N 30 219 

Parker, W. U 30 219 

Parkhurst, H. W 32 173 

Parkinson, W. W 30 219 

Parkinson & Kengla 13 102 

Parks, J. S 39 219 

Parks, S. F 63 362 

Parrett, J 63 .^ 

Parrish, Gara W 7 .i;9 

Parrish, Maxfiefd 7 tjg 

Parrot Silver & Copper 

Co C. 63, 64; 362, 389 

Parry, E. L., & Sons 63 .162 

Parry, R. 63 .362 

Parsons, James Russell.. 3 .19 



dan. Page. 

Partridge, A. E 13 102 

Partridge Carbon Works. 23 141 

Pasadena Exhibition Asso 13 102 

Pasadena Ostrich Farm. . S6 424 

Pass & Seymour 2.S 148 

Patchett, Joseph 4.'> 270 

Patent Oflice no 469 

Paterspn Ribbon Co 83 4i8 

Pathfinder Pub. Co 13 102 

Patrick, Carter & Wilkins. 

C. 23, 26; 141, 152 

Patterson, C. W 63 .'^02 

Patterson, R. A 41 250 

Pattison, A. S 39 219 

Patton, Lena B 72 405 

Patton, R. H 30 219 

Patton Coal Co 6^ 362 

Paugh, E 39 219 

Paul & Elliston 4.'> 270 

Pauper Institutions Dept.112 484 

Pawlich, J 39 219 

Pajrne, J. C 39 2?o 

Payne, William R., & Co. 41 250 

Peabody & Stearns 10 76 

Peace Dale Mfg. Co 82 417 

Peacock, A. L 39 220 

Pearce, Charles Sprague. 7 .'59 
Pearce, Richard, Manager 

p .......C. 63, 64; 362,389 

Pearce, T. M 39 220 

Pearl, James 41 2.S1 

Pearson Machine Co 22 133 

Pearson, N. M 45 270 

Peck. Grace H 72 405 

Peck & Snyder 

. . . .C. 65, 03, 100; 391, 435, 442 

Pedagogical Semmary. . . 3 39 

Peddicord, John 30 220 

Peddle, Caroline C 73 

Pederson, Peder 45 270 

Peele, John B 41 251 

Peeler, 1 39 220 

Pel gram & Meyer 83 418 

Pelicon Dives Mining Co. 63 363 

Pel ton Water Wheel Co.. 20 122 

Pelzer Mills 80 4i<; 

Peerless Rubb^pr Mfg. Co. 10 121 

Penberthy Injector Co. . . 19 121 
Pencoyd Iron Works .... 

„ C. 28, 64 ; 160, 389 

Pendleton, Andrew F 33 186 



540 



INDEX. 



(Saat. Page. 

Penii Mining Co 63 363 

Pcnnell, Joseph C. 7, 8; 59, 69 

Pennsylvania Coal Co... 63 .363 

Elec. Co 26 i«»2 

Railroad Co 

C. 43, 63. 103, 109 
P. 263. 363, 453, 467 

R. R. Employes 

Savings Fund 103 453 

School Journal. . . 

C. I. 2; 31. 35 

Pennsylvanian, The 3 39 

Penrod, E 63 363 

Penrose, R. A. F 63 .363 

Penrose Home Minini; Co 63 .'^63 

Perfumo, P. B 63 .*?63 

Perkins Co 63 363 

Perkins Machine Co 22 133 

Perkins, Linscott & Co. . . 86 424 

Perkins Switch MfK. Co. 2?; 148 

Perley, C. B 33 186 

Perley, Mrs. M. E 72 406 

Perrine, I. B 45 270 

Perrine, Van Dearinff . ... 7 59 

Perry, Edward Delavan. . 3 .39 
Perry, Mathews & Bus- 

ivirfv. ................. v^.f .f^.f 

Perry Pictures Co. . .C. i, 2; 31, 35 

Perry Phosphate Co 35 191 

Perry, William 39. 220 

Perth Amboy Terra Cotta 

Peru Elec Mfe. Co 2(5 152 

Peteet, C 41 2Si 

Peterson, I. C 41 251 

Peterson. W. C 39 220 

Pettinpll & Co 13 102 

Pettingill Andrews Co. . . 2(5 ii>2 

Pettinos Brothers 63 .363 

Pewabic Mining Co 63 .363 

Peyton. Gill S 63 .363 

Phal, Richard 63 363 

Pharmacist Mininjr Co... 63 .363 

Phelps, Pearl Waneta. . . 72 40(5 

Phelps, W. T 25; 148 

Phelps Pub. Co 13 102 

Philadelphia & Readinfi: 

R. R. Co 103 453 

Business Collefire. . 6 43 

Collejre of Phar- 
macy 13 103 



OUat. Page. 

Commercial Mu- 
seum 103 453 

Elec'l & Mfff. Co. . 23 142 

Hardware & Mal- 
leable Iron Works 74 411 

School of Indus- 
trial Art 108 464 

Textile Co 80 416 

Textile School. . . . loi 443 

Times 103 4.53 

Philleo, W. W 39 220 

Phillip Insulated Wir^ 

Co. 26 152 

Phillips, Charles C 41 251 

Phillips, J. M., & Son 30 220 

Phillips, Mary A. 72 406 

Phillips, L. Vance, Mrs.. 72 406 

Phillips, P. R .39 220 

Phillips, W. R. 39 i20 

Phillips & Qark Stove Co. 74 4ii 

Phinney, C. S 45 270 

Phoenix, F. S 45 271 

Phoenix, Lloyd .13 186 

Phoenix Battery Mfg. Co. 23 141 

Phoenix Bridge Co 29 164 

Phoenix Horseshoe Co 6«> 392 

Phoenix Metallic Packing 

Co 19 121 

Phoenix Packing Co s8 293 

Phoenix Steam Packing 

Co 19 121 

Phosphoria Phosphate Co. 28 160 
Pliotographic Times Pub. 

Assn 13 103 

Photo-Materials Co 12 87 

Physical Education Soc. . 2 35 
Piano & Organ Supply 

Co 17 116 

Piano Mfrs. Assn 103 453 

Pickett, H. A 41 2SI 

Picknell, W. L 7 59 

Pierce, E. M., Miss 72 406 

Pierce, John 63 .363 

Pierce, J. V 63 .364 

Pierce. W. E., & Co so 279 

Pigeon Roost Belt 63 .364 

Pike Mfg. Co. . .C. 63. 65 ; 364, .392 

Pilgrim Mining Co 63 .364 

Pillsbury Mills 107 462 

Pillsbury- Washburn Flour 

Mills Co C. 39. .56; 220, 289 



INDEX. 



541 



dtsa. Page. 

Pinnacle Gold Mining Co. 63 .364 

Pioneer Salt Works SO 2q6 

Pitt & Scott 2Q 165 

Pittman, D. W 30 220 

Pitts, B. B., & Son 41 251 

Pittsburg & Lake Anjfe- 

line Mining: Co 63 .364 

Pitts. & W. Ry. Relief 

Dept 10.3 4.S.3 

Pittsbun^ & Wheelinir 

Coal Co 6.^ 364 

Pittsbura Coal Co 63 364 

Coal Mining Co, . . 63 ."^64 

Crushed Steel Co. . 63 .364 

Junction R. R. Re- 
lief Dept 100 467 

Plate Glass Co — 73 4O0 

Reduction Co 

C. 26, 64 1 I5>2. 389 

Steam Jacket Lub- 
ricating Co 10 121 

Transformer Co. . 23 142 

Writing Machine 

Co II 84 

Place, O. F 63 .364 

Placerville Gold Mining 

Piano Mfg. Co 3«; lOi 

Plasterer, J. B 30 220 

Plastic Kaolin Co 63 .364 

Piatt, Charles A 7 SO 

Piatt, E. B 4S 271 

Piatt, George F., & Son. . 4S 271 

Piatt. N. D 4S 271 

Piatt Pressed Brick Co. . 63 .164 

Plattner, Joseph 30 220 

Pleasant River Granite Co 63 364 

Valley Coal Co 63 .364 

Valley Wine Co. . . 

C. 60, 104; .^00, 458 

Pleacher. Andrew 33 186 

Plumb, Charles S 41 251 

Plumb, Fayette R 65 392 

Plymouth Con's Mining 

Co 63 .365 

Plymouth Factory 30 168 

Pocono Laboratories iii 477 

Poet-Lore Co 13 103 

Polar Star Mining Co 63 .365 

Political Science Quar'ly.iio 470 

Pollock, W. A 41 2.SI 



GUfft. Page. 

Pomeroy Brothers 02 4.34 

Pomona Terra Cotta Co.. 63 .365 

Pond Machine Tool Co. . 22 133 

Ponemah Mills 80 416 

Poole Brothers Pub. Co.. 

C, II, 63; 84. .365 

Poole's Granite & Marble 

Poor, Overseers of the. 

Boston 112 484 

Brockton 112 484 

Fafrhaven 112 484 

Natick 112 484 

Worcester 112 484 

Poore, H. R. 7 .SO 

Pope Mfg. Co 108 464 

Popular Photograph Co.. 12 87 

Popular Science 103 453 

Porcher, Phillip G 41 251 

Porcher, W. D 30 220 

Pordur, Phillip G 41 2S1 

Porter, Benjamin C 7 60 

Porter, Charles M 63 .365 

Porter, E. A 30 220 

Porter, H. K., Co 32 173 

Porter, Taylor & Co 13 103 

Portland Cement Co. ... 63 .365 

The 103 453 

Mining Co , . . 63 .365 

Tradesman 103 453 

Post, Cornelia S 72 406 

Post, George B 10 76 

Post, Herbert. . .C. 43. 45 ; 263. 271 

Post, L. D 103 453 

Postal Telegraph Cable 

Co 103 453 

Postlewaite, Harry 43 263 

Postley, Clarence A 33 186 

Poston, C. L., & Co 63 36s 

Postum Cereal Co .so 280 

Potomske Mills 80 416 

Potter, W. W., Co 13 103 

Potter & Johnston Co 22 133 

Potter-Kendall Co 13 103 

Poulson, P 30 221 

Powell, Caroline A 8 60 

Powell, Edwin C 13 103 

Powell, George T 45 271 

Powell, William. Co 10 120 

Power 103 453 

Powers. E. L., Co 103 454 



542 



INDEX. 



133 
Ii6 

133 

133 
2.SI 
36s 
173 
36s 



OUaa. Pags. 

Powers, Joseph A. 32 I73 

Powers RcRulator Co. ... 74 41 1 

Prairie Creek Coal Co. ... 63 .365 
Prang Educational Co. . . 

c. 1, 2, 3, 4; 31. 35.39,41 

Pratt, A. C 63 .365 

Pratt & Whitney Co 22 133 

Pratt Chuck Co 22 

Pratt, Reed & Co 17 

Prentice Bros. Co 22 

Prentiss Vise Co 22 

Prescott, E 41 

Prescott Mining Exch. ... 63 
Pressed Steel Car Co. ... 32 

Preston, E. B 63 

Prevention of Cruelty to 

Children. Ills. Soc 112 484 

Price, Bruce 10 76 

Price, Charles W 13 103 

Price, H. J 3Q 221 

Price, W. J 41 2.S1 

x rice, w • o. ............ ^o 

Pridgeon, D. E 63 

Primary Instructor i 

Prince, Mrs. M. F 72 

Princeton University. ... 63 

Princetonian 3 

Prison Com., Georgia. ... 112 
Proctor, A. Phimister. ... 

Proctor, P. A 7 

Proctor & Gamble Co. . . 

C. 107, 109 ; 462, 467 

Professional Photogra- 
pher Pub. Co 13 

Profitable Advertising. . . 103 

Proffit, D. R 4.*? 

Progressive Age 103 

Providence Gold Mining 

Prudential Life Ins. Co. ioq 
Public Instruction. Colo- 
rado Dept C. I. 2 ; 32, 35 

Illinois Dept i 32 

Indiana Dept i 32 

Iowa Dept i 32 

Kansas Dept i 32 

Maryland Dept. ... i 32 

Montana Dept. ... i 32 

Nebraska Dept. . . 'i 32 

New York Dept. . . 

C. i, 2, 3; .32.35, 39 



279 
.365 

.32 
406 
.365 

.39 
484 

73 

60 



103 

454 
271 

454 

.365 
467 



dasa. Pact. 

North Carolina 

Dept I 32 

North Dakota Dept i 32 

South Dakota Dept i 32 

Wisconsin Dept. . . i 32 

Public Lands & Buildings. 

Nebraska Board of. ...112 484 

Publishers* Weekly 13 103 

Puerto Rico. Island of. ..iii 477 

Pulaski Iron Co 63 .366 

Pullman Co .32 I73 

Pungo Lumber Co 50 280 

Purington Paving Brick 

Putnam, Eben 13 103 

Putnam, G. P., Sons 

C. 13, 63; i^, 366 

Putnam. S. G 8 00 

Pyle, D. M 63 .366 

Pyle, Howard 7 60 

Pyramid Mining Co 63 .366 

Quaboag Mineral Springs. 62 304 
Quartermaster's Dept.. U. 

S. Marine Corps 120 480 

Q. & C. Co C. 22, 32; 133, 173 

Queen & Co 27 I55 

Queen County Stoneware 

Co 63 .366 

Quicksilver Mining Co... 63 .366 

Quigley Furniture Co. ..11 84 

Quincy Mining Co 63 .366 

Quinnipiac Brewing Co. . . 62 304 

Quint, A. D 22 133 

Radovich, Bozo 60 300 

Raffensparger, Lizzie J... 45 271 
Railroad & Warehouse 

Com.. Illinois 32 I73 

Minnesota 32 I73 

Missouri 32 174 

Railroad Assn., The 

Western 32 174 

Chattanooga & 

Lookout Mountain. .... 32 174 

Chi., Mil. & St. P. . 32 174 

Commission, Ala- 
bama .32 174 

Arkansas 32 174 

Florida 32 174 

Georgia 32 174 

• 



^ 



INDEX. 



543 



Qaa^ Page. 

Railroad Commission, 

Kentucky 32 174 

Massachusetts. ... 32. 174 

Mississippi .12 174 

New Hampshire. .. 32 I74 

Texas .12 174 

Vermont .32 174 

Virginia .12 174 

Commissioner, 

Rhode Island 32 I74 

Commissioners, « 

California Board 32 174 

Connecticut 32 175 

Iowa 32 175 

Kansas 32 i7S 

Maine .32 17.S 

New York. 32 I75 

South Carolina. . . 32 i75 

South Dakota 32 I75 

Wisconsin 32 I75 

Company. Lehigh 

Valley .^ I75 

Mich. Cent .32 I7.«5 

Phil. & Reading. . . 32 I75 

Employe 103 4.S4 

Gazette. The 

v^. 13? 32 t 103, 1/5 

N. Y. Central & 

H. Riv ^2 175 

Northern Pac 32 I7S 

Telegraphers 103 4.S4 

Railroads & Telegraphs, 

Ohio Commr 32 I75 

Railroad Com'r, Michigan 32 175 

North Dakota. ... 32 I75 

Railway Accbunting Offi- 
cers, Am. Assn 32 176 

Age. . .C. 32. 103 ; 176. 454 

& Engineering Re- 
view C. 32, 103 ; 176. 454 

Assn, The Am. ... 32 176 

Boston & Maine. . . 32 176 

Car Accountants. 

International Assn. ... 32 176 

Chicago & West 

Mich 32 176 

Club, Central, Buf- 
falo 32 176 

New England .12 176 

New York ^2 176 

Northwest 32 176 



(Saat. Page. 

St Louis 32 176 

Western 32 176 

Company, Colo. 

Mid A . . . 32 176 

Gulf, Colo. & S. F. 32 176 

Metropolitan of 



Chicago 32 176 

Missouri Pac .32 176 

Peoria & Eastern. . 32 177 

Genl. Pass. & Tkt. 



Agts., Am. Assn 32 I77 

Master Car Build- 



ers' Assn .32 177 

■Master Car & Loco- 



motive Painters' Assn . . 32 177 
Master Mechanics. 



C. 32, 103 ; 177, 454 

Review, The 13 103 

Road Masters* 



Assn. New England 32 I77 

Signalling Club... 32 I77 

Super'dts of Bridges 



& Bldgs. Assn 32 177 

Telegraph Super- 



in'dts Assn 32 177 

Railways, Penn. Bureau.. 32 177 

Rainbow Mining Co 63 .366 

Rambler Factory 30 168 

Ramos, Joaquin D 62 30S 

Rand Drill Co 

C. 21, 28. 63 ; 125. 160, 366 

Rand, McNally & Co 

C. 1.3. 14 ; 103. 109 

Randall, T. A.. & Co.... 

C. 13. I03;i03,454 

Randolph, B. S 63 .306 

Rangel, Robert 63 .366 

Ranger, Henry W 7 60 

Rankin, J as 271 

Ranlett, Captain 03 .306 

Ranous, Mrs. L. P 3Q 221 

Ransom, John B.. & Co.. . 50 280 

Ransom, Perry 22 133 

Rantoul 10 76 

Ratcliff. J. T 30 221 

Ratcliflf , W. S 30 221 

Raton Coal & Coke Co. . . 63 .366 

Rawson Electric Co 2(5 152 

Ray, CD 45 271 

Ray, Andrews & Co 30 221 



544 



INDEX 



Olaas. Page. 

Raycraft, E 63 366 

Raymond Granite Co. ... 6.3 .366 

Raymond, H. R 4.S 271 

Raymond, M 63 .367 

Raymond & Ely 63 367 

Reading Factory 30 168 

Reading Iron Co .32 177 

Reardon, George W 63 .367 

Record, J. H 30 221 

Redding, W. E 13 104 

Redfield, Edward W. . . . 7 60 

Rcdiger, C .30 221 

Redmond, Edmond 33 186 

Redondo Salt Works .SQ 2g6 

Red Umbrella Mining Co. 63 .367 

Redway, J. W 63 .167 

Reece, E. F. & Co 22 134 

Reed, A. J 63 367 

^vceu, v^. ................ ^J,' ,^V/ 

Reed, C. F 63 .367 

Reed, D. A 28 160 

Reed, F. E., Co 22 134 

Reed, Geneva 72 406 

Reed, H. W 63 367 

Rceder, E 39 221 

Reeves, C. P 63 :fy7 

Reeves Pulley Co 21 125 

Regensburg, O. H 

C. 94. 98 ; 4.I.S, 440 

Registration in Medicine, 

Mass. Bd Ill 477 

Registrar of Titles Cook 

Co., Ill 104 458 

Rehn, F. K. M 7 60 

Reichard, R 39 221 

Reid, A. H 37 I93 

Reid, I. H 63 .367 

Reid, Robert C. 7, 66 ; 6o» 396 

Reid Brothers 10 76 

Reid Mfg. Co 19 121 

Reidy, Sara 98 441 

Reiger, Paul, & Co 90 429 

Reims, Thomas C, & Co. 63 .367 

Reindahl, Knute 17 116 

Reinert Pub. Co 13 104 

Reinhart, C. S 7 60 

Reinhold. H. & Co 63 367 

Reinnagel, G. H 13 104 

Reith, Jf., Jr 39 221 

Reliable Incubator & 

Brooder Co 37 I93 



Reliance Gauge Column 

Co 19 121 

Reliance Lamp Elec. Co. . . 24 I44 

Remington, F. . , 97 4.39 

Remington- Sholes Co. . . 

C. 2, 11; 24, 84 

Remington Standard 

Typewriter 103 454 

Rend, W. P., & Co 63 .367 

Rene, W. T .39 221 

Renk^W. F .39 221 

Reporter, The 108 464 

Repsold, A., & Co 60 .300 

Republic Iron & Steel Co. 63 .167 
Republic Mining & Mfg. 

Co 63 367 

Republic Mining Co 63 .367 

Resh, S .39 221 

Restein, Clement, h Co. . . 19 121 
Retail Druggist, Universal 

Trade Assn 103 4.S4 

Revell, Alexander H.. & 

Co 69 .398 

Review & Herald Pub. Co. 

C. 13, 103; 104,454 

Review of Reviews Co. . . 13 104 
Review Pub. & Printing 

Co 13 104 

Revillon Frcres 85 422 

Reynolds, E .39 221 

Reynolds, Virginia 7 60 

Rheinstrom, Bettman. 

Johnson & Co 61 303 

Rhode Island Granite 

Works 63 368 

Rhode Island Graphite Co 63 368 

Rhodes, A. S 41 251 

Rhodes, E. & D 63 .368 

Rhodes, M. G 63 .368 

Rhodes, Bradford & Co.. 13 104 

Rhopeter, George 63 .368 

Rice, C. S. 41 251 

Rice Gear Co C. 21, 22 ; 125, 134 

Richards, F. T 7 60 

Richards, John T 41 251 

Richards, T 63 .368 

Richardson, C. F., & Son. 22 134 

Richardson, J. C 41 251 

Richardson, J. M 63 .368 

Richardson Silk Co 83 4I9 

Richardson, Thomas V.., .39 221 



INDEX. 



545 



Class. Page. 

Richardson, T. M., Co... 103 454 

Richardson, WashinRton,. 41 252 

Richardson, William D. . 59 296 

Richardson & Co 30 221 

Richardson & Robbins ... 58 2Q.3 

Richens, John M 3.3 186 

Rich Hill Coal cc Mininf? 

Rich, H. S.. & Co 13 104 

Richmond, John F 3Q 222 

Richmond, O 3Q 222 

Richmond Con's Minins: 

Co 63 .368 

Richmond Gold & Silver 

Cigarette Co Qi 431 

Richmond Horticultural 

Soc 45 271 

Richmond Locomotive 

Works 32 177 

Richmond Mining Co. ... 63 .^68 
Richmond Minin^jr & Mill 

Co 63 .368 

Richter Mfg. Co.C. 70, 81 ; 30Q, 416 

Rickard, E. T 39 222 

Rickard, Forbes 63 368 

Ricker, George A 32 I77 

Ricketts, C. Lindsay 11 84 

Ridduck, N. E 41 252 

Ridenor & Jenks 13 104 

Rider-Ericsson Engine 

Co 20 123 

Rider, Frank 45 271 

Rider, P. S 63 .'^68 

Rider, S. A., Jewelry Co.. 95 4.37 

Ridgway Burton Co 63 368 

Ridgway Mining Co 63 368 

Ridley, Chris 33 186 

Riegle, Phillip A 41 252 

Right, L. W 41 252 

Rigsbee, Atlas M 41 252 

Riker Elec. Vehicle Co. . . 30 168 

Riley Brothers 103 454 

Rine, J. M 39 222 

Ritchie, E. S., & Sons 

C. 27, 119; 155^489 

Rittenhouse, N. M 63 .368 

Rittenhouse & Embree Co. 50 280 

Ritter, W. M 50 280 

Ritter Dental Mfg. Co 16 113 

Riverside Iron Works. ... 63 369 



Glass. Page. 

Rivett-Dock Co 22 1.14 

Roach, James 63 369 

Roach, Thomas 63 369 

Roach, William, Mfg. Co. 24 144 

Road Masters* Assn. Am. 32 I77 
Roanoke, R. R.. & Lumber 

Co 5Q 280 

Roatcap, Mrs. B. A 39 222 

Robarts, M. M 45 271 

Robbins & Meyers Co. . . 

C. 23. 25; 142, 148 

Robe, J. W 41 252 

Roberts, A. V 41 252 

Roberts, J 39 222 

Roberts, J. W 41 252 

Roberts, I. P 39 222 

Roberts, P. Z 63 .369 

Robertson, J. T 39 222 

Robertson, T. J., & Son. . 41 252 

Robineau, A. A 72 406 

Robins Conveying Belt Co. 

C. 19, 21, 63 ; 121, 125, 369 

Robinson, A 41 252 

Robinson. Alexander 

McK 39 222 

Robinson, A. S 39 222 

Robinson, C. A 41 252 

Robinson, J 39 222 

Robinson, Theodore 7 60 

Robinson, Will S 7 61 

Robinson Mining Co 63 .369 

Robison. Thomas R., Mrs. 45 271 

Roby, C. C 41 252 

Rochester & Pittsburg 

Coal & Iron Co 63 .369 

Com'cl College. ... 6 44 

Radiator Co 74 411 

Rockhill Iron & Coal Co. 63 .369 

Rocklind Quarry Co 63 .369 

Rockport Granite Co. ... 63 .369 
Rock River Brownstone 

Rocky Ford Coal Co 63 .369 

Rocky Point Granite 

Works 63 .369 

Rodd, Thomas .32 I77 

Rodenburg, Charles 45 271 

Rodenick, G 39 222 

Rodkinson, Michael L. . . 13 104 



546 



INDEX. 



Glass. Page. 

Roebling's, John A., Sons 
Co 

C. 26. 2Q, 64. 65 

p. 152, 165,389,393 

Roeder, Henry 63 309 

Roeding, George C 43 263 

Roelker, H. B 118 487 

Roelofs, Henry H., & Co. 86 424 

Roger Williams Univ 

C. 6, no; 44. 470 

Rogers, Brown & Co. . . . 

C. 63. 64 ; .^6q, 389 

Rogers, E 4.S 272 

Rogers, G. W .^9 222 

Rogers, T. M 22 134 

Rogers, Mrs. L. S 63 .369 

Rogers, O. T 63 370 

Rogers, W. A 7 61 

Rogers, W. H .S3 284 

Rogers & Mason 13 104 

Rogers Mining Co 63 369 

Rohilly, P. H .39 222 

Rohwer, George 63 .370 

Rolf, A. A .33 186 

Rollins, C. E I3 104 

Rolshoven, Julius 7 61 

Rolty Company 41 252 

Romer Mining Co 63 370 

Romona Oolitic Stone Co. 63 370 

Rondebust, J. H Q 73 

Rooke Register Co 32 I77 

Rookwood Pottery Co. . . 

C 72, 103; 406, 454 

Root, A. I., Co. .C. 13, 42; 104, 259 

Root & Cain 30 222 

Roots, P. H. & F. M.. Co. 21 126 

Roper, John L 50 280 

Rorick Air Cushion Truss 

Co 16 113 

Rosback, Fred P 13 104 

Rosenberg Brothers 41 252 

Rosenheimer, John 63 370 

Rosenthal, J 63 .370 

Rosiclaire Mining Co.... 63 .370 

Ross Brothers 30 222 

Ross, J. A 45 272 

Ross, J. R ^Q 222 

Rothenbusch, F 72 406 

Rough Notes Co 13 104 

Rouse, Harry B 11 84 

Rowe, Frank .'^0 223 



OUas. Page*. 

Rowell, George P., & Co. 13 104 

Rowell, Mrs. Fanny 72 406 

Rowland Multiplex Print- 
ing Tel. Co 26 152 

Rowland, Henry A i5 m 

Royal Arcanum 100 467 

Royal Electric Co *. . 23 142 

Rubber Tire Wheel Co. of 

America. .30 168 

Rubens, Leon F 70 4i4 

Ruckel, A. D., & Son. . . . 63 .370 

Runyon, E. W .58 203 

Ruppe, A .30 223 

Russell Cream Co 40 233 

Russell. D. B 41 252 

Russell, D. B 30 223 

Russell, E. T., & Co 58 203 

Russell, Elmira 45 272 

Russell, G 63 370 

Russell Mining Co 63 .370 

Russia Cement Co 87 427 

Rutgers College 3 .39 

Rutland Railroad Co 103 4.54 

Ryan, P. J., D.D 13 104 

St. Anthony Mining & 

Mill Co 63 .370 

St. Bernard Coal Co 

C. 28. 63; 160, 370 

St. Charles Condensing 

Company 40 233 

St. Francis Xavier, Col- 
lege of 3 39 

St. Gaudens, Augustus... 73 

St. German, N. C .30 223 

St. Hubert Wine Co 60 300 

St. Joe Lead Co 63 .370 

St. Lawrence Marble Co. 63 376 

St. Louis Dairy Co 

C. 37. 40; 19.3. 233 

St. Louis Machine Tool 

Grinder Co 22 134 

St. Louis Well Machine & 

Tool Co 63 370 

St. Paul Bd. of Park 

Com'rs 43 263 

Sackman. F. A 22 134 

Sacramento River Pack- 
ing Co .58 203 

Saegertown Mineral Spgs 

Company 62 305 






INDEX. 



547 



Class. Pnge. 

Safety Car Heating & 

Lighting Co .^2 178 

Safety Emery WHeel Co. 22 134 
Safety Insulated Wire & 

Cable Co 26 1^2 

Sagamore Coal Co 63 .370 

Salem Tanning Co 8q 428 

Salisbury^ Mining & Mill 

Company 63 .370 

Salisbury, Lydia A .39 223 

Salmon River Mining Co. 63 37i 

Salt Lake City Onyx Co.. 63 .371 

Salt Lake Coal Co 63 .371 

Salzer, J. A., Seed Co 3Q 223 

Sample Lumber Co 103 454 

Sampolo-Brasseur Co — 12 87 

San Benito Mining Co... 63 .371 

San Diego Marble Co 63 37i 

San Fernando Co 63 .371 

San Francisco Breweries. 62 305 

City of 2g 165 

Packing Co 59 296 

Slate Co 63 371 

Street Improve- 
ment Co 63 371 

Trade Journal 103 4.55 

& ^ San Joaquin 

Coal Co 63 .371 

San Gabriel Fruit Co 58 293 

San Juan Star Mining Co. 63 37i 

San Luis Vineyard 60 300 

Sandberg, F. W 

C. 94, 95, 97 ; 435, 4.37. 439 

Sanders, D. H 41 252 

Sanders, L 41 252 

Sanders, T. H.. Pub. Co.. 13 105 

Sanders, Orr & Co 41 253 

Sanderson. F 63 .371 

Sanford, Albert B 63 .371 

Sanitarium, Colorado. ...iii 477 

Gabriels in 477 

Loomis Ill 477 

Sharon in 477 

Sanitary Plumber. Light- 
ing & Ventilating Eng- 
ineer Ill 477 

Sanitas Nut Food Co ... . 56 289 
Santa Ana Chamb. of 

Com 58 204 

Santa Barbara Mineral 

Water Co in 477 



Class. 

Santa Cruz Island Co 41 

Sargent, John S 7 

Saunders, D., Sons 

C. 21, 22; 126, 

Saunders, W. L 13 

Sauser, Andre 63 

Savage Arms Co 51 

Savage, J. M .33 

Saw Company. 22 

Sawyer, J. J 39 

Sawyer Tool Co 22 

Sax, Sara 72 

Saxon, John G 7 

Scaife, William B., & 

Sons 74 

Scarborough, J. K 39 

Scatcherd, John N 50 

Scientific Pub. Co 63 

Scotch Oats Mill 56 

Scott Brothers 63 

Scott, Charles 41 

Scott, Charles. Spring Co. 32 

Scott, E. H., Mrs 7 

Scott, J .39 

Scott, J. W 41 

Scott, Lee R 41 

Scott, Richard 41 

Scott & Magner 39 

Scranton, Jewett 63 

Scripture, Edward W 

Scudder, Janet 9 

Schaffer & Budenbers: 

C. 19, 21: 121, 

Schaffner 39 

Scheer. Frank 39 

Scherer, Oscar, & Brother 89 
Schieren, Charles A., & 

C0...C 21, 89, 103; 126, 428, 

Schiermier. W 39 

Schiff, Jordon & Co 25 

Schilling, C, & Co 60 

Schindel, S. M 39 

Schladitz, E 8 

Schlesinger, Ferdinand, . . 63 

Schmidt, Charles 72 

Schmidt, Gustav 79 

Schmidt, W 63 

Schnabel, D. M 63 

Schneider Granite Co. . . . 63 

Schneider. Louis 63 



Page. 

253 
61 

1.34 
105 

371 
281 
186 

1.34 
223 

406 
61 



411 
223 
280 
372 
289 
372 

253 
178 
61 
223 
253 
253 
253 
223 
372 

178 
73 

126 
224 
223 
428 

455 
223 

134 
.301 

223 
69 
372 
406 
414 
371 
371 
.371 
.371 



548 



INDEX. 



Class. Pftge. 

Schoenhofen Brewing Co. 62 30S 

Schoff, W. A 10.^ 455 

Schofield, J. Elmer 7 61 

School Bulletin C. i. 2; 32. 35 

Journal C. i, 2; 32, 35 

of Mines 63 .372 

Review 2 35 

Schram, Jacob 60 301 

Schreiber, W. A. H 63 372 

Schreyvogel, Charles. ... 7 61 

Schriber, H. F .30 223 

Schumacher, F. G 12 87 

Schuritzer & Boyer 63 372 

Schuttler & Hotz .39 223 

Schwab & Wolf 80 416 

SchwartzburRer, C 8 70 

Schweinfurt, A. C 10 76 

Schweyer & Liess 63 .372 

Sea Beach Pickl'j? Works 58 294 

Seabury & Johnson 

C. 16, 87; H.3. 427 

Seafert, William I3 lOS 

Seager, A. L 63 372 

Sears, Sarah C 7 61 

Seaton Mining & Mill Co. 63 372 
Seattle Brewing & Malt. 

Co .62 305 

Seaver Brothers .39 223 

Seawanhaka Corinthian 

Yacht Club .33 186 

Sebastian. W. W 41 253 

Sebewaing Coal Co 63 372 

Sedgwick, Richard 45 272 

Sehon, A. D 12 406 

Seitz, J .39 223 

Sellers, William, & Co. .. 

....C. 19, 32, 118; 121, 178, 487 

'Sellwood, Joseph 63 .372 

Semon, Adolph 63 372 

Sempire Clock Co 27 I55 

Sessions. Mrs. F. M 72 406 

Seville Packing Co 39 224 

Sharadui, H. W 72 406 

Sharp, J. H 7 61 

Sharpless, P. M .37 I93 

Sharwood, W 63 372 

Shasta Mining Co 63 .372 

Shaw, C. C, & Son 41 253 

Shaw Elec. Crane Co 23 142 

Shaw, Fred 45 272 

Shaw, J. F .39 224 



Glaat. Page. 

Shaw University no 470 

Shawmut Coal Co 63 M^ 

Sheague, G. A 13 105 

Shearer, F. E 63 372 

Sheffield Car Co 103 4.55 

Shelby Factory 30 168 

Sheldon, C. H 39 224 

Sheldon, J. D 41 253 

Shelley, G. E .39 224 

Shelton Co 65 .392 

Shelton, D. A .39 224 

Shepard 10 76 

Shepard, James H 39 224 

Shepherd, Harry no 470 

Shepherd Photo Co 12 87 

Shepley, Rutan & Cool- 

idge 10 76 

Shepperson, Daniel W... 39 224 

Sherb, Ignace 60 301 

Sherfy, C. W .39 224 

Sheriff Mining Co 63 .373 

Sherman, W. A 63 .373 

Sherron, Charles B 13 105 

Sherwin-Williams Co 108 464 

Sherwood M'f'g Co 19 121 

Sherwood, Rosina Emmet 7 61 

Shields, Emily 

C. 42, 45. 59; 259. 272. 296 

Shine, John W 41 253 

Shipman, W. A 41 253 

Shiras, George. 3rd 52 282 

Shirayamadani, Kataro. . 72 407 

Shockley, W. H 63 373 

Shoe & Leather Reporter 

C. 13, 103 ; 105. 455 

Shoe Trade Journal 13 105 

Shoemaker. P. H .39 224 

Shofner, L. M 39 224 

Shortstory Pub. Co 13 105 

Shouse, S. H 39 224 

Showalter, S. J .39 224 

Shriver, T., & Co 17 116 

Shutts, W 39 224 

Sibley, Gideon 16 113 

Sibley, R. C 41 253 

Sibley Journal of Eng- 
ineering 13 105 

Siegel, Cooper & Co 108 464 

Sierra Buttes Gold Milt- 
ing Co 63 .37.3 

Sierra Madre Vintage Co. 60 301 



INDEX. 



549 



Class. Page. 

Signal Oil Co %2 178 

Silex Insulation Co 23 142 

Siljan, C. H 39 224 

Silk Assn. of Am 83 4^9 

Sills, W. H., Mica Co 

C. 23, 63 ; 142, 373 

Silver Bow Mining Co. . . 63 373 

Silver, Burdett & Co 

C. I, 2, 3, 4. 6; Z2. 36, .39. 4i, 44 

Silver Dick Mining Co. . . 63 373 

King Mining Co. . 63 .373 

Lowry 63 373 

Silverman, Lazarus 21 126 

Silverthorn, G. W 63 373 

Simmes, S. S 41 253 

Simmons, Harry E 72 407 

Simmons, John, Co 

C. 15. 73; III, 409 

Simmons, William E 41 253 

Simonds M'f g Co 22 134 

Simons, Amory C Q 73 

Simplex Electric Co 26 152 

Simplex Interior Teleph. 

Co 26 152 

Simpson, Edward 63 THZ 

Simpson, J. B 30 224 

Simpson, J. B., & Gibbs.B. .39 224 

. Simpson, J. E 39 225 

Simpson, Mclntyre & Co. 40 233 

Sims Coal Co 63 .373 

Sinclair, W. A 3.3 186 

Singer M'fg Co 

C. 13, 71. 79,84, 103 

P. 105. 400. 414, 420, 4.^5 

Singleton, W. L 41 253 

Sinnamahoning Gold & 

Copper Co 63 .373 

Skinner Chuck Co 22 134 

Skinner, Frank W 103 4.'55 

Slade, C. C 30 22.'; 

Slater, W. A 41 253 

Slater Woolen Co 82 417 

Slatington Slate Co 63 .373 

Slaton, J. P., & J. C 41 253 

Sloan, George P., & Bro. ^o 280 

Sloan, J. B., & Co 41 25;4 

SToan, R. E 63 37.3 

Sloan, William D 70 309 

Slocomb, F. R, & Co. ... 80 428 

Slocomb, J. T., & Co 22 134 

Sloss Furnace 63 373 



Class. Page. 

Sloss Iron & Steel Co 63 373 

Small, Maynard & Co... 

C. 13. Ill ; 105. 477 

Smalley, E. V 13 lOS 

Smedlcy, William S 7 62 

Smoothon M*f*g Co 10 121 

Smuggler Union Mining 

Co 63 374 

Smurthwaite, A. A., 

Produce Co .30 225 



Smith 
Smith 
Smitn 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 



254 



186 

254 

374 

39 



, Alfred 41 

, A., i-« ....••.. 03 3/4 

, A. T .30 22s 

, B. &W. B 60 308 

, Chandler 63 374 

, Charles D 41 254 

, Eugene .S3 285 

, F .30 225 

, George A 39 225 

, George B 33 

, George T 41 

Granite Co 63 

, Harlan J 3 

, H. B., Machine Co. 22 134 

, H. C .30 225 

, Hugh M 53 284 

, J. D 30 225 

, Jay C 53 285 

, Jatob E 45 272 

, John E 41 254 

, Julius P .30 225 

, Julius Paul 60 301 

, L. W .30 225 

, 39 225 

Smith Parts Factory 30 168 

Smith - Premier Type- 
writer Co II 

Smith, R. H.. MTgCo.. 

C. II, 02; 84, 4.34 

Smith, S. A .30 225 

Smith, S. Morgan, Co 20 123 

Smith, Willard A..C. 20, .32: 25, 25 

Smith, W. D .30 225 

Smith, W. T 63 .374 

Smith & Anthony 74 411 

Smith & Fullerton 41 254 

Smith & Kaufman 83 41O 

Smith & McNicol 63 .374 

Smith & Wesson 

C. 20, 51; 165, 281 

Snell, Henry B 7 62 



84 



550 



INDEX. 



Olaat. Page. 

Snow, Clark 41 254 

Snowden, F 39 225 

Society, Beck Literary. . . 2 36 

Solar Carbon & M'f'j? Co 2s 148 

Solar Refining Co 87 427 

Sommerkamp. R. P 

C 39, 41; 225. 254 

Soniat, L. M M 296 

Sonne, Otto 2Q 165 

Sorenson, Andrew J 17 116 

Sormano, G 60 301 

Soule Com'cl College & 

Literary Inst 6 44 

South Eureka Mining Co. 63 374 

Side Lumber Co. . . «;o 280 

Side Mininpr & 

M'f 'g Co 63 374 

Spring Mining Co. 63 374 

Swansea Min'g Co. 63 .374 



Southern Calif. Salt Co.. 59 296 

Calif. Wine Co... 60 301 

Cdfton Oil Co 39 22.S ! 

Lumberman 103 4.^5 

Mining Co 63 374 

Pacific R R 108 464 

Planter 103 4.S5 

Railway Co r 

C. 39. 41, 43» 49, 50, 63, 103, 104 

P. 225, 254, 263. 275; 280, 374, 

4.';5. 4.';8 

Southwest Va. Improve- 
ment Co 63 .374 

Southwestern Coal & Im- 
provement Co 63 374 

Soverhill, S. G 39 226 

Spalding, A. G., & Bros. 100 442 

Spalding M'f'g Co 100 442 

Spalding St. Law. Boat 

Co 33 186 

Sparkman, John H 41 254 

Specie Payment Mining 

Co 63 .374 

Speckels, J. C 41 254 

Speer Carbon Co 

i^. 23. 25 f 142. 14^ 

Speirs, Frederick W no 470 

Spencer, E. E 30 226 

Spencer, George W 41 254 

Spencer Optical Co 

y—, 1 5 4 7.3 I 1 1 1 « 409 

Spencer, T. C 41 254 



CUss. Page. 

Spcncerian Com'cl School 6 44 

Spengler, F 94 435 

Spenker, James F 39 226 

Sperry Flour Co 56 289 

Spicer-Simson. Margaret. 7 62 

Spicer, W. E..... 41 254 

Spiller & Robinson 91 43i 

Splitdorf , C. F 25 148 

Sprague, Amelia B 72 407 

Sprague Electric Co 

C, 23. 20 1 142, 152 

Sprague Elevator Co 108 465 

Sprague, H .39 226 

Spratt, Charles E 

C. 95, 96, 97; 437, 4.38. 439 

Spratt's Patent 39 226 

Sprawls, W. L 39 226 

Spreckels Sugar Co 59 297 

Spring Valley Hydraulic 

Co 63 .374 

Springheld Machine Tool 

Co C. 22, 103; 1.34. 455 

Springfield M'f'g Co 22 135 

Springville M'f'g Co 82 417 

Sprunt, Alexander, & Son 41 254 

Squier, E. E., & Co 63 374 

Staddon, Samuel 63 .375 

Stager, Henry J 13 105 

Staib-Abendscliein Co. ... 17 116 

Stallings. J. R 41 254 

Standard Asphalt Co 63 .375 

Caster & Wheel Co. 65 .392 

Coal & Coke Co. . . 63 375 

Electric Co 20 165 

Furniture Co 69 .398 

M'f'g Co 

C 69, in: .398, 477 

Oil Co 

C. 37, 63, 87 ; 19.3. .375. 427 

Paint Co 

i_/. 23« 2o t I42« 100 

Pneumatic Tool 



Co .' 22 135 

Steel Works 32 178 

Teleph. & Elec. Co. 26 152 

Tool Co 22 135 

Varnish Works.. . . 103 455 

Worsted Co 82 417 



Stanley Cons'td Mining 
Co 63 .375 



INDEX. 



551 



i86 
392 

375 
226 



Class. Page. 

Stanley Instrument Co. . . 

C 25, 27; 148. 155 

Stanley Rule & Level Co. 6.S 3Q2 

Stanley, William E ^^ 

Stanley Works 65 

Stanstead Granite Uuar- 

Staples, L. O ^Q 

Starchroom Pub. Co 

C. 13. 10.3 ; 105. 455 

Star Cons'td Mining Co. 63 375 

Star Milk Cooler Co 37 IQ3 

Stark & Rolston 63 375 

Starrett, The L. S., Co. . 22 
State Board of Health, 

Mass 29 

State, Charles 8 

State Normal College. 

Mich 3 39 

College of Penn. . . 3 .39 



135 

165 
70 



Ore Sampling Co.. .63 375 

Stearns, John N., & Co.. 83 419 

Stebbins, Charles M .13 186 

Steckel, George 12 87 

Steel Cable EngineeringCo 28 160 

Steel, T 63 375 

Steele, Theodore C 7 62 

Steele, W. F 116 485 

SteflFen, A 30 226 

Stein, William 41 254 

Stein & Boericke 

C. 63. 65 ; 375, .392 

Steinhart. Bros. & Co 61 303 

Steinie, Carrie. 72 407 

Steinmeyer, W., & Co 103 455 

Stejneger. Leonhard 53 285 

Stephen, W. F 3Q 226 

Stephens, Alice Barber, . 7 62 

Stephens, Henry, & Co. . . 50 280 

Stephens, T 30 226 

Stephenson, Miss C. J... 84 420 

Sterling Arc Lamp Co. . . 25 148 

Sterling Coal & Coke Co. 63 375 

Sterling Factory 30 168 

Stern, Daniel 13 105 

Sterner. Albert E 7 62 

Stern's School of Lan- 
guages I 33 

Stetson, John B., Co 

C. 83, 86. 108. 109 

P. 419. 424, 465. 467 



Clara. Page. 

Steubenville Coal & Min- 
ing Co 03 375 

Stevens, B. H 63 375 

Stevens, C. C 4i 2.S5 

Stevens Coal Co 63 375 

Stevens, H 63 375 

Stevens Inst, of Tech — 

C. 3, .33; .3.3. 187 

Stevens, Mrs. Kinton 43 263 

Stevenson, C. H 53 285 

Stevenson, T. R., & Co.. . 74 4ii 

Steward, D. M., M'f g Co. 23 142 

Stewart, Frank H., & Co 25 148 

Stewart Hartshorn Co... 71 400 

Stewart, Jules 7 62 

Stewart, Henry P., Mrs. 72 407 

Stewart, L. F., Mrs 72 407 

Stewart, P. M .39 226 

Stewart, S. N .33 187 

Stiele, Fred M 72 407 

Stiggers, E. G I3 105 

Stiles & Parker Press Co. 22 I35 
Stillwell-Bierce & Smith- 

Vaile Co 21 126 

Stine, Fred .39 226 

Stinson, R 39 226 

Stirling-Firth Co 64 .389 

Stitzel Brothers 61 303 

Stockbridge Soapstone 

Works 63 .376 

Stockwell. H. E 63 .376 

Stogner, John 41 255 

Stoiber, Edward G., & 

Co 63 ,376 

Stoiber, G. H 63 .376 

Stokes, W. H .30 226 

Stone 103 455 

Stone, George A 45 272 

Stone, Herbert S.. & Co.. 13 105 

Stone, James A., & Son. . 41 255 

Stone Mill 56 289 

Stone. Nota B 41 255 

Stone, R. J 41 255 

Stone, T. B., Lumber Co. 50 280 

Stone, W. B 63 .376 

Stony Creek Red Granite 

Co 63 376 

Storck, George H 97 4.39 

Storer, Mrs. Marie L. . . . 

C. 72, 97; 407, 439 



552 



INDEX. 



Class. Page, 

Storms, W. H 63 376 

Story, Julian 7 62 

Stouffer. J 39 226 

Stover M f 'g Co 

C. 35. 65; 191, 392 

Stow, H. P 63 376 

Stow M'f 'g C0...C. 21, 23 ; 126, 142 

Stowe, H 63 ^7(i 

Straf er, Harriette R 7 62 

Straker, Joseph E 95 437 

Strauch Brothers 17 116 

Strauss, L. L 91 43i 

Street & Smith 13 106 

Cleaning Depart- 
ment, N. Y.. Ill 477 

Dept., Boston iii 477 

Dept., New York..iii 477 

Ry. Pub. Co. 



C. 13, 32 ; 106. 178 

Rail. Assn., Am... 32 178 



Strom, H. H.. .39 226 

St romberg- Carlson Tele- 
phone M'f'g Co 26 152 

Strong, Henry R 13 106 

Strong, Josiah no 470 

Strong, H. W. R., Mrs.. . 45 272 

Stuart, J. A 39 227 

Stuart Pecan Co 45 272 

Stuarts Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works 21 126 

Stuckey, J. L 39 227 

Studebaker Bros. M'f'jf 

Co 103 4.';5 

Studer, Jacob H 13 106 

Studer, Nicholas 

C. 43. 47 ; 263, 274 

Stump, S. C 62 376 

Sturtevant. B. F., & Co. . 21 126 

Stuyvesant, Rutherford... 41 255 

Sublette, William 63 .376 

Suffolk Saw Mill Co. . . . .' ^o 280 I 

Sugar Beet 103 455 

Sugar City Cereal Mills. . 56 289 

Sullivan, J. E 41 255 

Sullivan, Joseph W 41 255 

Sullivan, William 63 .376 

Sultemeyer. C. F 33 187 

Summit Mining Co 63 376 

Sun Dance Mining Co... 63 376 

Sunset 103 4.s6 

Sunset Mining Co 63 376 



Clan. Page. 

Sunshine Mining Co 6^ ^77 

Superior China Clay Co. . 63 ^77 

Surry Lumber Co 50 280 

Surveyors & Civil Eng- 
ineers, Ohio Soc 32 178 

Sussfeld, Lorsch & Co... 22 13S 

Sutherland, W. J 63 377 

Sutter Brothers. 91 431 

Sutton, George 39 209 

Swain Brothers 50 280 

Swain, >N 63 ^77 

Swamby, G 94 435 

Swanders, E. H .39 227 

Swedish Methodist Episc. 

Book Concern 13 106 

Sweet, W. H 63 ^77 

Sweetwater Coal Co 63 .377 

Swift, Caroline L.. .' 72 407 

Swift & Co 

C. 40.5.5. .58,87, 103 

P. 233, 287, 294, 427. 456 

OyKvS, v^. X^. ............. U.5 .1/ / 

Sylvester, H 63 .377 

Syracuse Chilled Plow Co. 35 191 

Syracuse Elec. Instru. Co. 25 I49 

Syracuse Factory 30 168 

T. & B. Tool Co 22 135 

Taber, E. M 7 63 

Tabor M'f g Co 21 126 

Tabor Photographic Co. . 12 87 

Tabor, R. H 45 272 

Taft, Austin S .39 227 

Taft, Joseph H 

C. 66, 69, 70, 71. 84 

P. 396, 398. 399. 400. 420 

Taft & Dunn 63 .377 

Taggart & Hall 63 377 

Talant, A. W .39 227 

Talant, F. H .39 227 

Tallman. H. B 39 227 

Taltavall, John B ". . 13 106 

Tamale I. X. L. Co 58 294 

Tamarack Mining Co. .. . 64 .389 

Tarns, Lemoine & Crane. 33 187 

Tanner, H. 7 63 

Tanner. Z. L 53 285 

Tarbell, Edmund C 7 63 

Tarkington, S. G 41 255 

Taskinas Mineral Sp'gs 

Co Ill 477 



INDEX. 



553 



GUss. Page. 

Taunton Locomotive Mfsr. 

Co C. 19. 32; 121. 178 

Tax ComV, Maryland 32 178 

Tax Com'rs, Indiana Bd.. 32 178 

Taylor, B. L. L 41 255 

Taylor, C. J 7 63 

Taylor. E. Coxhead. Mrs. 84 420 

Taylor. Emily D 7 63 

Taylor Iron & Steel Co.. 64 .389 
Taylor Iron & Steel Co. . . 

C. 64. 65; .389, .392 

Taylor. Hughey 45 272 

Taylor- Jorgenson Co. ...iii 478 

Taylor, Mary A 12 a,vj 

Taylor, N. H .39 227 

Taylor, P. H .39 227 

Taylor, R. B 63 377 

Taylor, Robert 4.'» 272 

Taylor, S. S 94 4.35 

Taylor, W. H 33 187 

Teachers* College 3 40 

Teasdel, Mary 7 63 

Teel, A. E 59 297 

Tegt, E 39 227 

Tehachapi B'ld'g & Stone 

Teich, Frank 63 377 

Telephone Magazine 103 4.56 

Telephone M'f'g Co 26 153 

Temescal Mining Co 63 377 

Temple, E. S 63 377 

Templeton, W. E 39 227 

Tenement . House Com- 
mittee, Asso. Charities.. 106 462 
Tennessee Coal & Iron R. 

R. Co 63 377 

Tennessee Producers 

Marble Co 63 378 

Tenney, J. F.. Co 11 84 

Tenney. S. A 39 227 

Tenny, Delos 45 272 

Terhune, W. L 13 106 

Terre Haute Brick Pipe 

Co 103 456 

Texas Briquette & Coal 

Co 63 .378 

Cons'td Mining Co. 63 378 

Farm & Ranch .... 103 456 

Mining Co 63 .378 

Tobacco Growers* 

Assn 91 431 



CUss. Pace. 

& Pac. Coal Co. . . 63 378 

Textile Pub. Co 

C. 13. 103; 106, 456 

Thacher, Edwin 29 165 

Thacker Coal & Coke Co. 63 378 

Thackray, George E 28 160 

Thatcher, H. L 33 187 

Thayer, Abbott 7 63 

Thayer, Theodora W.... 7 63 

Theriat, Charles J 7 63 

Thibodran, Emlyde .33 187 

Thies, J 63 ^ro 

Thirlkeld, Rev. L. A 13 106 

Thiry, J. H 2 .36 

Thoma, J. S 94 4.36 

Thomas, John P. & Co. .. .30 168 

Thomas, M. Carey 3 40 

Thomas, R., & Sons Co. . 23 142 

Thomas, Samuel. .> .39 227 

Thomas, S. Seymour. ... 7 63 

Thomas, William C 41 255 

Thompson 10 76 

Thompson, Edward D. .. 33 187 
Thompson, Henry B., & 

Son Co 22 135 

Thompson Mining Co. . . 63 378 

Thompson Parts Factory. 30 168 

Thompson. Pub. Co i3 106 

Thompson Reporting Co. 103 456 

Thompson Run Coal Co. . 63 .378 

Thompson, S. M 41 255 

Thompson, Z. T 41 255 

Thomsen Chemical Co... 87 427 

Thomson, John, Press Co. 11 84 

Thomson Meter Co 21 126 

Thorbum, John M., & Co. 39 227 

Thorp, H. T 63 378 

Thorp & Son. 63 .378 

Thorpe, Pratt & Co 20 122 

Thresher Electric Co 23 142 

Tiffany & Co 

C. II, 51. 53, 63, 92, 93, 94, 95. 

97, 98; P. 84. 281, 285, .378. 4.34 

435, 436, 437, 4.39, 441 

Tiffany Glass & Decorat- 
ing Co 

C. 25. 67, 69, 71, IZy 75. 97 
P. 149, 397, 398, 400, 409, 412, 439 

Tiffany, Louis 67 .397 

Tiger Mining & Milling 

Co 63 .378 



554 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

Tight Joint Co 21 126 

Tilden, Douglas 9 73 

Tillman, E. D 41 255 

Timber Line Mining Co.. 63 ^7^ 
Tin & Terne & Metal 

World 103 4.S6 

Tinkey, John 8 70 

Tinsley. C. D 63 .378 

Titcomb, John W .S3 285 

Tobacco Leaf Pub. Co... 103 4.S6 

Toberentz, R 97 440 

Todd, Albert M 41 255 

Todd, W. E .33 187 

Toerring, C. J., Co 25 149 

To-Kalon Wine Co 60 301 

Toledo, Ann Arbor & N. 

Mich. R.R. Co 107 462 

Toledo Factory 30 168 

Tolman. W. H 

C. 108, no; 465, 470 

Tomboy Gold Mines Co.. 63 378 

Tompkins, D. A 41 255 

Tompkins, Josiah. & Son! 41 255 

Toohey, Sallie 72 407 

Topping, Helen M 72 407 

Torrey, H. S 21 126 

Torrey, Curtis & Tyrrell. 86 424 

Towle Syrup Co .S9 297 

Town Topics Pub. Co 13 106 

Towson, W. P .39 227 

Track Elevation & De- 
pression Com .32 178 

Trade Dollar Mining & 

Milling Co 63 378 

Trade Journal 103 4.'56 

Trades Weekly Co 13 106 

Transportation, Neb. Bd. 32 178 

Trautvetter Bros 21 126 

Traupell, Eugene 63 .379 

Traylor, T. W 41 2S6 

Treasury Dept 104 4.S8 

Treedley. J. K.. & Sons. . 6.^ 379 

Tregarden Bros 6."^ 379 

Trenton Iron Co 28 160 

Trenton Potteries Co. . . . 

C. 72, in; 407, 478 

Trent Tile Co 72 407 

Tribune Factory. ."^o 168 

Trigg, William R., & Co. 103 456 

Trimble, MaGill & Co 45 272 

Trimont M'fg Co 22 l^S 



Class Page. 

Tripler Liquid Air Power 

Co 21 126 

Tripp, Louis F 41 256 

Tripp, William P.. 4i 256 

Triumph Ice Macfiine Co. 103 456 

Troop, William 63 . 379 

Troutman, John H 4% 272 

Trowbridge, D. S .S8 294 

Troy Laundry Machinery 

Co 78 413 

Troy Nickel Works 74 4i i 

True Blue Marble Co 63 .379 

True. F. W .S3 285 

Trumbull & Beebe 

C. 39, 48; 227, 274 

Trump Bros. Machine Co. 22 13.S 

Trump, W .39 227 

Tuck, J. H. L 63 379 

Tucker, E. F .39 228 

Tucker, F. de L no 470 

TuUis, John W., & Co. . . 41 2.SS 

Tungsten Mining Co 6^ 379 

Tunis Lumber Co so • 280 

Tunison. Mary L : . 33 187 

Turner Brick Co 63 .379 

Turner Coal, Coke & Min- 
ing Co 03 .379 

Turner, G. W .39 228 

Turner, William S 41 255 

Tuskegee Normal & In- 
dustrial Institute 

C. 6, no; 44, 470 

Tuttle, L. C 41 2.S5 

Tuttle & Bailey Mfg. Co. . 74 4" 

Tyler, Charles M 63 379 

Tyler, The W. S.. Co.... 

C. 21. 6.S ; 127, .392 

Tyndall, E. T 103 4.S6 

Tyro Mining Co 63 .379 

Tyson Mining Co 63 .379 

Ulster Bluestone Co 6.^ 379 

Uncle Sam Mining Co... 63 .379 

Underwood, John. & Co. n 85 

Underwood, S. G 39 228 

Union Bag & Paper Co. . 92 434 

Union Copper Co 63 379 

Union Glee Gub, San 

Francisco 63 379 

Union Gold Mining Co. . . 63 .379 

l^nion Iron Works 63 .380 



INDEX. 



555 



GUaa. Page. 

Union Lead Co 63 .380 

Union Mfg. Co 22 135 

Union Oil Co, New Or- 
leans .39 228 

Union Oil Co., New York 41 256 
Union Oil Co., San Fran- 

Union Pacific Co 63 .380 

Union Pacific Salt Works. SO 2Q7 

Union Porcelain Works.. 23 142 

Union Sand Paper Co 63 .380 

Union Soapstone Co 6.3 .380 

Union Stock Yards Co . . . SS 287 

Union Sulphur Co 6.3 .380 

Union Twin Edf^e Setter 

Co 70 414 

United Am. Mechanics . . . 100 467 

Ancient Order of 

Druids lOO 467 

Elec. Heating Co. . 27 i.S.S 

Globe Mintnjf Co. 

C. 6.3, 64 ; .380, .389 

Shoe Machinery 

Co 70 414 

United States Battery Co. 24 144 

Bunting: Co 82 417 

Carbon Co .•25? 140 

Com. Fish & Fish- 
eries S3 285 

Express Co 29 165 

Frumentum Co. . . so 289 

Gov. Printinjf Of- 
fice II 8s 

Industrial Pub. Co. 13 106 

Marble Co 63 .380 

Metallic Packins: 

Co C. 19, .32 ; 122, 178 

Mining Co 6.3 .380 

Playing Card Co. . 

C. 92, 100; 4.34, 442 

Tobacco Co 01 4.3i 

Trade Mark Assn. 13 106 

Unitype Co 11 85 

Universal Calculator Co . . is in 

Company 63 380 

Expo. Com., State 

N. Y. 33 187 

Machine Co 22 1.3.S 

Peace Union 13 106 

University of Atlanta 6 44 

California 3 40 



44 
263 
40 
40 
40 
44 



Olaaa. Page. 

Chicago 

C. 3, 63, no; 40, 380. 470 

Colorado 3 40 

Fisk 6 

Idaho 43 

Iowa 3 

Minnesota 3 

Missouri 3 

Nebraska 6 

Pennsylvania 

C. .3, no; 40. 470 

Princeton 3 40 

State of New York 

C. .3, 108; 40, 465 

State of N. Y.. 

Museum Dept 3 40 

Wisconsin 

C. 3. 13, no; 40. 106, 470 

Wyoming 



.............. v^» ,1, ".» • ^", .»ow 

Updike, N. B 63 .380 

Urbana Wine Co 60 .301 

Utah Mining Co 63 .380 

Utica Mining co 63 .380 



Vacuum Oil Co 

C. 19, 21, 89; 122, 

Vaden, J. H 

Vail, Eugene 

Valentien, Anna M 

Valentien, A. R 

Valentine & Co 

Valentine, M. D.. & Son 

Co 

Van Briggle, Artus 

Van Camp Packing Co. . . 
Van Cauenberg, Frank. . . 
Van Cley, Mrs. J. Charles 
Vanderbeck Tool Works. 

Van Houten, J 

Van Nostrand, D.. & Co. . 

Van Oost, John W 

Van Slyke, A 

Van Valkenburg, J. D . . . 
Van Wagoner & Williams 

Hardware Co 

Van Wye, G. P 

Varley Duplex Magnet 

Co 

Vartray Water Co 

Vassar College 



127, 


.428 


.30 


228 


7 


64 


72 


407 


72 


407 


87 


427 


64 


.389 


72 


407 


S8 


204 


33 


187 


84 


420 


22 


135 


63 


380 


6^ 


.381 


13 


106 


.30 


228 


41 


2.s6 


23 


142 


33 


187 


26 


153 


62 


.305 


3 


40 



556 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

Vaughan. J. C 4.^ 263 

Vaughn, Henry 10 76 

Vedder, Simon H 7 64 

Veeder Mfg. Co .^o 168 

Vegetarian Co i.^ 107 

Veiller, Laurence 106 462 

Veitor, E. K., & Co 91 431 

Velasco School of Lan- 
guages 2 36 

Venable, A. R 3Q 228' 

Verbeck, George J 11 85 

Verd- Antique Marble Co. 63 .381 

Verdenal, D. F 63 .381 

Vermont Condensed Milk 

Co 40 233 

Vermont Farm Machine 

Co .37 193 

Vermont Improvement 

Assn 103 4.'i6 

Vermont Marble Co 

C. 63, 103 ; .381, 4.S6 

Viaduct Mfg. Co 26 153 

Viau, Lewis 5;8 294 

Vickers, Thomas McE. . . 29 165 

Victor Coal Co 63 .381 

Victor Malt Whiskey Co. 61 303 

Victor Marble Co 63 .381 

Vilas Mining Co 63 381 

Vina Vineyard & Distill'g 

Co 60 301 

Vine, Emory 39 228 

Vinton, Frederick P 7 64 

Virginia Coal & Coke Co. 63 .381 
Iron. Coal & Coke 

Co C. 63. 64 : .381, 389 

Horticultural Soc. 4.S 272 

Vital Statistics, Div. of, 

Mich. State Dept 11 1 478 

Vitrified Wheel Co 22 135 

Voice Brothers 58 294 

Voigt, Henry E 13 107 

Volkmar, Charles 72 408 

Voltamp Elec. Mfg. Co... 24 I44 

Von HerflF, B 43 263 

Von Klenner, Mme. K. E. 13 107 

Vonnoh, Bessie Potter... 9 74 

Vonnoh, Robert W 7 64 

Von Ruck, C iii 478 

Voorhees, E. B 39 228 

Vorce. H 39 228 

Vosbrink, George P 39 228 



Glass. Page. 

Vos, Hubert no 470 

Vought, M. 1 2.S 149 

Voy, C. D 63 .381 

Vulcanized Fiber Co 63 .381 

Vulcanized Fibre Co 23 142 



Wade, Rufus R 

Wadley, William O 

Waggoner, S. S 

Wagoner, C. M 

Wagner Elec. Mfg. Co. . . 

Wagner Leather Co 

Wagner Mfg. Co 

Wagner, Martin, Co 

Wagner, Mrs. M. L 

Wagner Typewriter Co.. 

Wagner, W. F 

Wagner, W 

Waite, W. S 

Wake,C. S 

Walcott, George D. & Son 

Walden, Lionel 

Walden, W. A 

Waldron, C. A 

Walker-Gordon Lab. Co.. 

WalkerrHoratio 

Walker, O. S., & Co 

Walker, W. P 

Walker, W. S 

Walker & Kimball 

Walker & Morris 

Walker & Pratt Mfg. Co. 

Wall, A. Bryan 

Wallihan, A. G 

Wallis, Frank E 

Walls, Sam 

Walsh, Thomas F 

Walter, Mrs. W. C 

Walters, J 

Walters, Moses 

Waltham Watch Tool Co. 

Walton, L N 

Walworth Mfg. Co 

C. 19, 21; 

Wamsutta Mills 

Wampum Run Coal Co.. 
Wanamaker, John 



74 411 

41 256 

41 256 

63 .381 

14.3. 155 

89 428 

95 437 

.S8 294 

72 408 

II 85 

33 187 

.39 228 

39 228 
3 41 

22 135 

7 64 

.39 228 

.39 228 

40 233 
7 64 

22 I3& 

.39 228 

41 256 

10 76 

10 n 

106 462 

7 64 

^2 282 

66 396 

41 2.s6 

63 .381 

72 408 

.39 229 

39 229 

22 136 

.39 229 

122, 127 

80 416 

63 .381 

108 465 



Ward, E. B 63 .381 

97 440 
23 143 



Ward, J. A, 

Ward Leonard Elec. Co.. 



INDEX. 



557 



Class. Page. 

Ward Pyritic Smelting Co 64 389 

Ward, W. S 6.3 .381 

Ward & Capito 6.3 381 

Warder, Biishnell & 

Glessner Co 35 191 

Ware Brothers 

C. 13. 103 ; 107, 456 

Wareham, J. D 72 408 

Waring, Mrs. C. E. Scott. 84 420 

Warner Brothers 108 46.S 

Warner. E. C 4.S 273 

Warner, G. E .3Q 229 

Warner, H. C .30 229 

Warner. WiUiam R.. & 

Co 87 427 

Warner & Swasey 

• V/. I .T» 22 , 111, 1 ,yyJ 

Warnock Uniform Co 8$ 422 

Warren City Boiler Wks. 2g 165 

Warren, E. B .33 187 

Warren Elec. & Specialty 

Co 23 143 

Warren, Nathan 100 467 

Warsaw Blue Stone Co . . 63 .382 

Warwick, J. M 41 2«;6 

Washburn-Crosby Co. ... 5>6 28Q 

Washington, Booker T . . . 6 44 

^ — Carbon Co 2S I49 

Junction Stone Co. 63 .382 

Public Schools ... 1 10 470 

University 2 36 

Wasson, B. S.. & Co 13 107 

Watchman Pub. Co 13 107 

Waterbury Tool Co 22 136 

Waterman, L. E., Co 92 4.34 

Waterman, Richard, Jr. . . 1 10 47i 

Waterman, W. S 63 .382 

Watertown Brick Co 63 382 

Waters, Sadie 7 64 

Watkins. W. W 41 256 

Watkins, J. F 41 256 

Watson, D. A 39 229 

Watson, N. A 19 122 

Watson- Stillman Co 

C. 21, 22; 127, 136 

Watts, C. J 41 2«;6 

Watts, John M., Sons 10 122 

Watts & Heikes 63 .382 

Watts & Melton 63 382 

Weaner, J. W 41 256 

Weavers Herald 103 456 




Olaat. Page. 

Webb Granite & Con- 
struction Co 63 .382 

Webb, I. A 63 .382 

Webb, L. T., Mrs 90 429 

Webb, W. T 41 257 

Weber Ry. Joint Mfg. Co. 32 I79 

Webber, F 63 .382 

Webster, Alice, & Pratt, 

Candace R 13 107 

Webster County Horti- 
cultural Soc 45 273 

Webster, Warren & Co. . . 74 411 

Wedge Mining Co 63 .382 

Weeks, E. Lord 7 64 

Wehner, William 60 301 

Weidner, Aaron J 4.S 273 

Weidner, Carl A 7 64 

Weir, J. Alden 7 65 

Weir, John F 7 65 

Weir, John, Lead & Zinc 

Co 63 .382 

Weirick, G. S 39 229 

Welch Maple Sugar Co. . 59 297 
Welch Grape Juice Co. . . 58 

Welford, Walker L 50 

Wellesley College 3 41 

Wellington, Frank H 8 70 

Wellman Seaver Engin- 
eering Co 64 .389 

Wells, A. J., Mfg. Co. ... 69 398 

Wells Brothers & Co 22 136 

Wells, George A 63 382 

Wells, Heber C 63 382 

Welsbach Light Co 63 382 

Welsh Packing Co 20 122 

Werner, Edgar S 13 107 

Wesel, F.. Mfg. Co 11 85 

Wessinger. P. J 41 257 

West, Andrew Fleming. . 3 41 

West Gallatin Irriga'n Co. 29 165 

West, George, & Son 60 .301 

West, H. S 25 149 

West, Bina M 13 107 

West Point Mill Co 39 229 

West Va. Cent. ^ Pitts. 

Ry. Co 63 383 

West & Simons 108 465 

Westcott Chuck Co 22 13(5 

Western Bank Note & 

Engraving Co 11 85 



558 



INDEX. 



CUm. Page. 

Western Coal & Mining Co. 63 382 

Electric Co 

C. 23, 25, 26 ; 143. 149. 153 

MfR. Co 22 136 

School Journal ... 

C. I, 2; 3.^ 36 

Teleph. Construc- 
tion Co 26 153 

Union Telegraph 



Co 103 4.'57 

Westfield Factory 30 168 

Westfield Marble & Sand- 
stone Co 63 .382 

Westinghouse Air Brake 

Co C. 32, 108 : 179. 465 

Westinghouse Electric & 

Mfg. C0....C. 23, 103; 14.3, 457 

Westmoreland Coal Co. . . 63 382 
Weston Elec'l Instrument 

Co ; 27 I.S5 

Weston Paper Mite. Co.. 

C. 69, 92, 99; 399. 4.34, 441 

Weston, Thomas A 22 136 

Weston. S. G 63 .383 

Wetherby, A. G 63 .383 

Wetmore-Bowen Co 60 301 

Wetter, Joseph, & Co 13 107 

Weyden, Harry Van der. 7 65 

Whately, Walter 45 273 

Whatley, S. J 39 229 

Wheatley, E. A 12 87 

Wheatley, Elizabeth S... 12 87 
Wheeler Condenser & En- 
gineering Co IQ 122 

Wheeler, Candace 

C 70, 84 ; 399, 420 

Wheeler, T. C .39 229 

Wheeler & Hurlbert 63 .383 

Wheeler & Wilson Mfg. 

Company. . . . C. 70, 84 ; 399, 420 

Wheelwright & Haven... 10 77 

Whipsaw Mining Co 63 .383 

Whistler, J. MaclSJ'eil 7 65 

Whitaker, Georg* F 13 107 

White Breast Fuel Co. . . . 63 .383 

White City Art Co 13 107 

White, E. M 39 22Q 

White, Frank B., Co 13 107 

White. H. C. Co 12 87 

White, J. A 39 229 

White, James. & Co 11 8.S 



Class. Page. 

White, O. C. Co 25 14Q 

White, Peter 63 .383 

White Rock Mineral 

Springs Co 62 305 

White Sewing Machine 

Company C. 70, 84 ; 399, 420 

Whitehouse, F. W 97 440 

Whitehouse, James H 9.*) 437 

Whiteley, John .39 229 

Whitesell. J. C .39 229 

Whitfield Co I9 122 

Whiting Paper Co 92 434 

Whitman Agri. Co 3.') 191 

Whitman, Clarence, & 

Co 80 416 

Whitman & Barnes Co. . . 3.S 191 

Whitney, Charles .39 229 

Whitney-Noyes Seed Co. 39 229 

Whitney Warren 10 77 

Whiton, D. E., Machine 

Co 22 136 

Whittaker, F. A 41 257 

Whittemore, William J. . 7 65 

Whitten, Robert W no 471 

Wholesale Grocers* & 

Canners' Directory 103 457 

Wichert & Gardiner 8d 424 

Wick, H. K.. & Co 63 .383 

Wickford & Snapp 63 .383 

Wickham, Chapman & Co. 17 116 

Wickson, G. C. & Co 37 I93 

Widdicomb, John, Co 69 309 

Wilborg, Hanna & Co so 201 

Wilce, T., Co 50 281 

Wilcox, Harriet E 72 408 

Wilcox, Olive 72 408 

Wilcox, S 41 257 

Wilcox, W. A 53 285 

Wiles, Irving R 7 65 

Wild, Edwin 13 107 

Wilder Mfg. Co 37 193 

Wiley, J., & Son 

C. 13. 63 ; 107, .383 

Wilgus, William J 32 179 

Wilkins, George S 

C. 28. 29 : 160, 165 

Wilkins, W. A 91 4.3*1 

Wilkins, William E 13 107 

Wilkinson & Co 19 122 

Wilkinson Coal & Coke 

Co 63 .383 



INDEX. 



559 



Class. Vfkie. 

Williamson Bros. C0....118 488 

Williamson, J. A 41 257 

Williamson, J. J 41 257 

Williamson, T. S., & Co. . Qi 431 

Willingham, B. H 41 2«;7 

Willis, G. F 63 .384 

Willoughby, W. F 

C. 102, 103. 105. 109 

P. 444, 457. 461. 467 

Willy, John I3 108 

Wilmington Star Mining 

Co 63 384 

Wilson, F. J 6.^ 384 

Wilson, W 63 .384 

Williams- Abbott Elec, Co. 26 i§3 

Williams & Co 63 383 

Williams, C. K., '& Co... 

C. 63, 65 ; .383, .302 

Williams, Daniel H 1 1 1 478 

Williams, David. Co 

C. 22, 63; 1.36. 383 

Williams, Edwin 13 107 

Williams Electric Co 26 153 

Williams, E. W 63 .^83 

Williams, George 59 297 

Williams, Henry 3Q 230 

Williams, J. A 63 .383 

Williams, J. B., Co go 429 

Williams, J. H., & Co 

C. 65, 105; 392, 461 

Williams. J. M 41 257 

Williams, John R 6.^ .^83 

Williams, P. N .39 230 

Williams, Prescott 45 273 

Williams, T. H., & Co. . . 108 465 

Williams, Thomas 37 I03 

Williams, Thomas A 13 107 

Williams Typewriter Co.. 12 85 

Williams, W. . , 63 .384 

Williams, W. B 41 257 

Williams. W. W 45 273 

Wilson, C. C 41 257 

Wilson, D. J 41 257 

Wilson, F. J 63 .384 

Wilson, J. F. ..C. 4.3. 45; 263, 273 

Wilson, J. H 30 230 

Wilson, James 30 230 

Wilson, John A 30 230 

Wilson, L. L. W., Mrs. . 3 4i 

Wilson, Lilian B 84 420 

Wilson, W 6.'^ 384 



Clus. Page. 

Winans, Walter 07 440 

Windsor Lead & Zinc Co. 63 384 

Wing, J. & W. R 53 285 

Wing, Joseph E 

C. 39. 41; 230. 257 

Wingo, B. A 41 257 

Wingo, J. W .30 230 

Winkle, G. W 58 294 

Winkley, F. D ;.. 10 122 

Winn. Charles C 45 273 

Winslow Bros. Co 

C. 65, 103; 393,457 

Winslow, J. H 63 .384 

Winsor, Mulford 63 384 

Wirt, Charles, & Co 23 I43 

Wirth & Hillings 63 384 

Wisconsin Land & Lum- 
ber Co 50 281 

Wise, A 63 .384 

Wise, Leo, & Co 13 108 

Wisser, John P 13 108 

Withers, J. B 41 257 

Withershers, Sherman & 

Co 63 384 

Withington & Cooley 

Mfg Co 35 191 

Wohler, C 63 .384 

Woldert Grocery Co 45 273 

Wolf, Henry 8 70 

Wolfrum, J. G 30 230 

Womack, T. A 41 257 

Woman's Bd. Home Mis- 
sions 13 108 

Foreign Missions.. 13 108 

Women's Christian Assn. 

Philadel 13 108 

Woman's Medical Journal 13 108 

Wonderly, Mrs. A 13 108 

Wonson, William H., & 

Son 58 294 

Wood, H., & Bros 63 .384 

Wood,H. E 63 .384 

Wood, Henry E 6.3 .384 

Wood, Lovett M 13 108 

Wood. R. D., & Co 28 160 

Wood, T. S 63 .385 

Wood, T. W., & Sons 30 230 

Wood, Walter A.. Mow- 
ing & Reaping Machine 

Co C. 35. 103 ; lOi. 457 

Wood, William & Co 13 108 



560 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

Woodbury, Charles H 7 65 

Woodbury, Marcia O 7 65 

Woodhull, S. D 63 384 

Woodmen of the World. . lOQ 467 

Woods Investment Co... 63 .384 
Woodside Patent Calf 

Mfg. Co 80 428 

Woodward Iron Co 6.^ .385 

Woodward, T. R 1.3 108 

Woody, William 63 .385 

Woollacott, H.J 60 301 

Woolman, A. J 5>3 285 

Worcester Corset Co 108 465 

Work Mining & Milling 

Co 63 385 

World's Maritime News 

Co 13 108 

Wormser Filter Plate Co. 63 .385 

Worth Brothers & Co 32 I7Q 

Worthington, C. T 41 257 

Worthington Pumping 

Engine Co 21 127 

Wrey, W. B 4.S 273 

Wright, E. H 30 230 

Wright, Harrison 41 257 

Wright, Henry L 33 187 

Wright, J. D 63 385 

Wright, Robert 39 230 

Wright, Simeon 41 2«>8 

Wright, Thomas K 45> 273 

Wright, T. H 95 4.37 

Wright, W. H 41 2S8 

Wright & Ditson 100 442 

Wrought Iron Bridge Co. 20 105 

Wuerpel, Edmund H 7 65 

Wuertz, E Q7 440 

Wyant, A. H 7 65 

Wyatt, J. T 63 .385 

WyckofF, Seamans & Ben- 
edict C. 2, 11; 24. 8s 

Wyoming Engineering 

Dept 63 385 

Wythe Zinc & Lead Co. . . 63 .385 

Xander, Christian 

C. 60, 61; 301, 303 

X-Ray Mining Co 63 .^85 



Class. Page. 

Yale Medical School 13 108 

Yale University 3 41 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Co... 65; 393 

Yandell, Enid 9 74 

Yankee Girl Mining Co.. 63 .385 

Yard, E. J .32 179 

Yates, C. L 13 108 

Yates, J 39 230 

Yellow Jacket Mining Co. 63 .385 

Yerington, J. A 63 .^5 

Yesbera Mfg. Co 11 8$ 

Yohn, F. C 7 66 

Yost, John 63 385 

Yost Writing Machine 

Co II 85 

Young, A. P 39 230 

Young, B. H 63 385 

Young, B. M 4.'? 273 

Young, C. W 63 385 

Young, Grace 72 408 

Young, Mrs. J 63 .38.S 

Young, Rufus 3Q 230 

Young, William A 45 273 

Young, W. D so 281 

Young & Robinson 98 441 

Young Churchman Co... 13 108 
Young Men's Christian 

Assn no 470 

Young Woman's Chris- 
tian Assn 1 10 470 

Youngstown Bridge Co.. 29 i6s 

Yowell, P. J 3Q 23b 

Yreka Journal Pub. Co. . . 63 .386 

Yunker, P. N 39 230 

Zadig, S. F., & Co 63 386 

Zallee, John 60 396 

Zanesville Stoneware Co. 63 .386 

Zeller, W. N 39 230 

Zenobia Mining 60 63 .386 

Zeublin, Henrietta C 72 408 

Zettle, Josephine E 72 408 

Zeigler, Jacob 41 258 

Zimmerman Bros s8 294 

Zimmerman, Dr (53 386 

Zindars & Hunt 23 143 

Zogbaum, Rufus F 7 00 

Zuni Mining Co 63 386 



«. t. OOHNfLLtV 4 tONt CO., rRINTtRt. 



5 
5 

5 
6 

S; 

.«? 
(5; 

273 

470 
470 

k^ 



o8 



16 



1 



^ 



1 



THE EXHIBIT 



OF THE 



Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. 

of New York 



The Largest Life 

Insurance Company 

in the World 



Will be found in the Publisher's Build- 
ing United States Section 



VOLUME ANNEXE 



Official Catalogue 

United States 



EXHIBITORS 



1 



< 



1 



I 



i 



THE mTERNITIOHIL UmVERSIL EXHIBITIOK OF 1900 

CHBONICLES OF THE WORLD'S GREAT PRODUCTS 



VOLUME ANNEXE 

Official Catalogue 

United States 

EXHIBITORS 



i 



IMPRIMERIES LEMERCIER — PARIS 
L. DANEL - LILLE 



4 



M. E. LOUBET. 

President oE the Bepublie. 



4 

Ts8 Pesbidiiitiu. FaoosasioH at thb Officui. Ofratiifa. Apbiii 14, 1900. 



Ta» Mnoftiu, EMTBiNnt. 



PREFACE. 



"Aiins-i> the many diflhulties to be overcome, the most formidable, 
perhaps, is dm to the fact that the dififerent branches of artistic pro- 
duction, agricultural or industrial, have innumerable points of 
contact overlapping each other, intermingling almost to the point of 
confusion. 

" Neither classification or even groups can be given an absolutely 
defined ground. Their limits are possibly difificult to define. 



( 

The Oreit Hall. ) 

" In many instances eshibita arc of such a mixed cbaracter that a 
natural hesitation arises as to which category they should really be ' 

placed ODdec. They may be appreciated for their intrinsic qualities of i; 

for the uses to which they may be put. A large number change their d 

classification, of even group, by their successive developments. I 

Wool, to cite only one example, a product derived from sbeep- || 

farming, becomes the principal material in the weaving of stuffs for I 

clothing, for curtains and for furniture. Doth the public and the rl 

jury, therefore, feel a great difficulty in giving a decisive verdict 4 

unless the varied elementary principles are before them. Duplication I 

is necessary to overcome this difficulty, and the varied classes bo i 

closely allied are placed together, the juries being authorised to render | 

each other every assistance. ^ 

"We have taken as a basis for our actual classification that of ^ ' 
1889, and, aided by the legitimate criticisms it evoked, and by the 
experience of foreign exhibitions, we have entirely reconstructed it." 

Thus tuns the remarkable report of Mr. Alfred Ficard, Chief 
Commissioner of the 1900 Exhibition. We could not do better than 



U. Alfbed Picabd. 



12 PREFACE. 

quote these clear aod precise phrases, tvhich demonstrate so plainly 
the aim of the Eshibitioa and the difficulties to be overcome to bring 
about a successful issue. 

Happily, France is a country where one is never daunted, where 
difficulties are but an incentive, where courage and invention are 
invincible qualities. 



M. Dz LA UN AX -Belleville. 
Chiet Director o( the Working Department. 

f bis is the reason that, notwith^^tanding so many excellent foreign 
exhibitions in the various capitals of the world, so many successful 
efforts, the Paris Exhiljicions, as a rule, and this one in particular, 
remain tJlOSe to which tho eyes of the whole world are attracted, to 
which the world flocks in its tnas<ics, exhibitors and visitors, a crowd 
covetous of this supremo renown, this unequalled splendour, or of 
this remarkable marth of intellect. 



PREFACE. 18 

It ia at these moments, which return periodically after long 
anticipation, that our couatrj- finds, indubitably, onco moro all its 
artistic and industrial glory, and it ia for that reason that the restless 
energy we have all displayed in this Exhibition is fully justiUcd by the 
importance of the end attained. 

We mu9t each time build larger and more perfect, each time risa 



M. Stepuem Deiiviu.^. 
AesiBtanC General Director ol the Working Department. 

to a higher level, and notwithstanding the apparent impossibility of 
Buccess, the result ia there to prove beyond a doubt that we have 
reached the unattainable. 

What we have attempted to-day, and succeeded in doing to a 
great extent, is the absolute classification of the exhibits. The groups 
and classes have been so divided as not to be entirely isolated from the 
general attractions, nor relegated to some unfrequented spot. Each 



14 PREFACE. 

hour of stndy is rewarded by one minuto of repose ; in place of an 
arid exhibition will be found one full of variety. 

Over the entire extent of the Exhibition the useful is blended with 
the ornamental. 

In 1889 we bad but one special attraction — the Eiffel Tower; in 1900 
we have several special attractions, but they ate cleverly set all o«r 



M. BOUVAIID. 

Diiector of tbo ArchitacluTiil Department. 

the grounds, distributed harmoniously and symmetrically, so arranc;ed 
that they form pare of the general scheme, instead of there being but 
one attraction, and that all powerful. 

The Exhibition called into being nearly all the buildings which 
shelter its products ; it has also created a new railway, a new bridge, 
and has possibly changed one of Paris' most ancient customs, the 
classic promenade on the Champs -Ely sees. 



PREFACE. 15 

The two quadrilfltemh which form the Exhibition, the one con- 
tajning the two Palacos, the Ale^aadr^i Bridge, ths Esplanade of the: 
Invalidos, the other the TrocadtTo, followed by a series of pavilions 
from the Great Hall to the Military School, arc joined by the twO' 
banks of the Seine, which are also lined with palaces and paviliona. 
Thus was resolved the arduous problem : find the necessary space. 



allowing all the buildings to appear as one homogeneous whole, 
although necessarily scattered and divided by the esisting monumeots, 
streets, and houses. 

Among the many things impossible to enumerate in the restricted 
limits of these introductory words, it is permisalble to draw special 
attention to the two Palaces which have been the cynosure of all eyes 
since their construction was finally decided upon, the famous bridge 



16 PREFACE. 

of which tha Tsar laid the foundation stone on his memorable visit to 
Paris, and the Memorial Entrance destined to admit those Tast hordes 
of visitors whose arrival we, with every jastification, fully expect. 

The two Palaces are designated by two adjectives, by which they 
will doubtless continue to be known, sanctioned, as it wore, by custom. 

The "Grand" Palace's principal front, like the "Petit" one, faces 



M. Ukmbi Chakdon. 
Oeneral SacrebLr;. 

the Avenue Nicolas II., the latter forming a continuation of the 
Alexander III. Bridge. 

This front is in the Boman style, the other portions of the 
building being seemingly suggested by the Chateau of VeraailleB. 

Tha architects, Msasra. Daglane, Thomas and Louvet, designed 
the building in the form of a T, as being the most appropriate for 
the different purposes for which it has been erected — firstly, the 



18 PREFACE. 

Exhibition, afterwards the annual *^Salony* horse shows and special 
exhibitions, similar, in fekct, to those fetes and functions which 
formerly took place at the '^ Palais d 'Industrie,*' recently pulled down. 

From the ornamental point of view, the Grand Palace has a most 
noble colonnade in the purest style, with bas-reliefs in stone, and, on 
the Avenue d'Antin side, the bas-reliefs in poly-chromatic sandstone, 
by Messrs. Barrias and Blanc, form a pleasant variation. 

Female statues allegorize the Grecian, Roman, Egyptian and 
Byzantine arts and the four classic arts — Painting, Engraving, 
Architecture and Sculpture. 

Smaller, and possibly more to the general taste, the ''Petit** 
Palace, to the right on entering by the Memorial Hall, is due to 
M. Girault, the architect. Its essential feature on the Avenue 
Nicolas n. is a semi-circular porch, surmounted by a dome, and 
flanked by two pavilions with triangular pediments. These two 
pavilions are set off by columns surrounding the three bays, and on 
the flank fronts statues alternate with the columns between the 
arched bays. A light balustrade overlooking the walls gives them a 
most graceful elegance. 

This Palace is devoted to a retrospective exhibition of French 
arts. Needless to say, therefore, that its elegant roof will shelter all 
that is purest and best of all styles. The Alexander Bridge completes 
the picture. It was said to be indisj^nsable. There is no doubt 
that, in any case, it is perfect, at once striking a most picturesque 
and practical note. 

It consists of a single span of not less than 108 metres opening, 
in addition to which the important problem has been solved of while 
making it sufficiently high to offer no inconvenience to the navigation of 
the river, it in no way obstructs the perspective of the Champs-Elys^ 
and the Esplanade of the Invalides, truly a chef d'oeuvre in its way. 

Without pausing at the Palace of the Esplanade, just one word as to 
the Memorial Entrance. The principal idea of the architect (M. Reni 
Binet) was to facilitate the admission of the crowd without stoppage or 
confusion. The central dome is supported by three large arches, each 
20 metres wide, arranged in a triangle. Under the semi-circle so 
formed are placed 86 turnstiles enabling 40,000 persons to enter the 
Exhibition per hour. 



T 



20 PREFACE. 

The decorative effects in the open space where these lordly palaces 
stand will be largely due to Electricity, the statue of which will cause 
as much discussion as that of the '< Parisienne ** which overlooks the 
entrance. 

No apology is needed for inserting here a few details of the career 
of the man who has been the life and soul of this glorious creation, 
M. Alfred Picard, Chief Commissioner of the Exhibition of 1900. 

M. Alfred Picard was born in Strasburg on December 21, 1844. 

After deep literary study, he eventually drifted towards the 
Polytechnic School, where he was admitted in 1862. 

Engineering-pupil of the^i Boads and Bridges Department in 1864, 
M. Picard was three years later entrusted with a mission to the East 
and the Suez Canal, the works in connection with the latter being 
then in full swing. 

In 1870, being in Metz, where he was in charge of the Sarre Coal 
Mine, and the Dieuze Salt Mine Canals, he remained during the siege 
and took part in the defensive works. After the surrender M. Picard 
effected his escape and served in the Army of the Loire. 

Upon peace being signed, he was dispatched by the Government 
to Nancy, where he united to his civil duties those of Commander of 
the Engineers' Corps of the region of Verdun during the German 
occupation. 

In this latter capacity he organised temporary barracks in the 
towns of Verdun, fitain, and Clermont-en-Argonne. The works 
costing forty thousand pounds were, notwithstanding innumerable 
difficulties, finished on the very day they were promised. M. Thiers 
recognised this success by conferring on M. Picard the Cross of 
Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur ; the Verdun Municipal Council 
also signalling the event by an address of thanks and congratulation. 

From 1872 to 1879 M. Picard had in his department charge 
of the State Railways, a portion of the Canal from the Maine to the 
Rhine, the Canal de I'Est, and the preliminary works of the canal from 
Dombasie to Saint Di^. He also assisted the military authorities in 
the waterworks for the new frontier forts. 

Among the many notable works for which he has been responsible 
may be cited the Paroy reservoir, the elevating machinery at Valoourt, 
Pierre la Treiche, and Vacoir, a stonework bridge having a skew of 



Th> PlLACI or EliICTBiaTT AXS TBI CoiTEin s'Euj. 

45 de^r^^es e,i the Esurs Pass and a sloping roof tunnel, with novel 
gear, as interesting from the scientific as from the practical point of 

Two operations fully equal to any of those of American daring also 
redound to his credit, the underpinning of the piles of a bridge oa the 
Meurthe and the raising in one solid block of a stonework arch. 

Called to the Central Administration of Public Works in 1880, 
M. Picard was successively appointed Director of the Cabinet and 
Staff, Director of the Boads, Navigation and Mines, Director of the 
Railway, Chief Director of the Boads and Bridges, Mines and Rail- 
ways. Councillor of the State on special occasions in 1881, a year 
later CoimcilloT of the State, he has been, since January, 1886, 




The PAI.1CE OF the Esfukidb. 

View taken trom the Invalides. 



President in the Departmantal SUte Council of the Puhlic Works, 
Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Post and Telegraph sections. 

He also presides at the Consulting Committee of Bailwaiys, the 
mixed Commission of Public Works, the Commission for the Verifi- 
cation of Bailway Accounts, the Permanent Commission on the 
Customs Imports, the Commission controlling the monetary circula- 
tion, and is a membsr of several other committees and councils. 

At the Universal Exhibition of 1889 M. Ficard was elected President 
of the committees and juries in the Railway class and Mechanical 
group, as well as that of the Exhibition Betrospective Committee on 
the means of transport. 

M. Tirard, the then President of the Council, Minister of Com- 



PREFACE. 27 

merc«, Industry and the GolonieB, appointed bim Chief Becorder of 
the Exhibition. 

At the same time the International Railway Congress selected him 
03 President for the F^rie session. Sis years ago be visited St. 
Petersburg as chief French delegate to the Congress sitting there. 

Chief Engineer of the Roads and Bridges on June 1st, 1880, M. 
Picard -was promoted to Chief Inspector of the second class on 



FilACK OF MVBBS iHDnSTBIIS. 

Esplanade des lavalidw. 

April 1st, 1887, and Chief Inspector of the first class on October 1st, 
1891. 

He was nominated Chief Commissioner of the Universal Exhibition 
of 1900 by a decree dated September 9tb, 1898. 

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur in 1881, Commander in 188fi, 
Grand Officer in 1889, M. Picard was, amidst the acclamations of his 
colleagues, awarded the Grand Cross of tha Legion d'Honneur at the 
inauguration of the Exhibition of 1900. 



i" 

H 

is 
I 



The Frencb Colokies xt tbe TsociDtso. 
Dahomey. 



We muat UDfortunately, owing to want of space, rest content with 
M. Alfred Picard'a biography, for as H. Millerand stated io his most 
eloquent speech at the opening of the Exhibition : " It would be 
impossible, without committing a grave injustice, to select an; name 
01 names from among the brilliant cluster of artists, engineers, con- 
tractors, and manufacturers who have been the artisans of these 
wonders. I would thank them and that innumerable legion of 
anonymoua workers whose hands have erected these palaces in pre- 
senting the public's respectful gratitude to their chief, the great 



PREFACE. 31 

engineer, the anequalled administrator, that man of modesty, of work 
and courage who has brought them through all their difficulties to 
encli a glorious conclasion." 

It tcmains only for us to associate ourselves with the wishes of the 
President of the Republic : " May this work be a work of Harmony, 
Peace, and Progress, and ephemeral aa its decorations may be, still 
not a work in vain." Let us be convinced, with him, that the pacific 
meeting of the various Governments of the world will not remain 
without fruit, and that thanks to the constant reiteration of certain 
generous thoughts which have re-echoed through the last moments of 
the dying centnry, the twentieth century will see more fraternity 
shine on less misery of ever; kind, and that possibly we shall have 
shortly passed an important period in the belated evolution of labour 
towards happiness and of man towards humanity. 



XhC ALaZBUH Pavilioh. 



.^AT3-U?i5. 



THE EXHIBITS 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The Republic of France issued to her sister republic over the seo 
an invitation to unite in the International Universal Exposition to bo 
held in Paris in the year 1900, and this invitation the people of the 
United Btatea accepted with the most cordial gratification. The time 
of this celebration is the latest landmark of history, marking the 
division between the expiring century, luminous in its events, and the 
century to come, yet more alluring with its expectations. The nation 
which has undertaken the enterprise is of all nations the best fitted in 
genius, in versatility, in le saioir fairf, to carry it to a successful issue. 
The place is the omphalos of the world. 

To the people of the United States the invitation was a challenge. 
Only a few years before, upon the farther shore of a remote inland 
sea, from whose sands the track of the deer and the print of the 
moccasin were hardly effaced, whose breezes were yet fragrant with 
the aromatic odors of fir and cedar pine, that people had evoked an 
exposition magnificent in outline and perfect in detail, springing up 
like an exhalation, revealing a strength as of the hills, a breadth as of 
a western sky, the repose of true grandeur, tinged with the radiance of 
the aurora of the dawn. To the success of the exposition at the 
^Vhite City the contributions of the French people, acting as individuals 
and as a nation, were worthy and abundant. Their generous assistance 
was cordially received and kindly remembered. When, therefore, that 
nation, with a spirit ot courteous rivalry not less debonair than that 
displayed by their fathers to our fathers upon the Field of the Cloth of 
Gold, said to the people ot the United Slates, "Come over the sea, and 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 



let US show you how we make an exposition," the people of the United 
States could not fail to respond. 

Nor is this all. Passing by the belief prevalent in every American 
of youth and culture that Paris and paradise differ in spelling only, 
one may not fail to note the strong undercurrent of friendship for the 
French people everywhere prevalent among the people of the United 
States. It is involved in all the traditions of the nation, and is 
perpetuated by the instruction given even in its elementary schools. 
Every schoolboy knows about the material aid given by the French 
king at the crisis of our revolutionary struggle. He knows of 
Lafayette and De Grasse and Bochambeau, and of the victory at 
Yorktown. He knows, too, that fully half of the great continental 
domain of the United States was once French, under the name of 
Louisiana. He finds the names of French explorers and missionaries, 
like Champlain and La Salle, Marquette and Hennepin, with Detroit 
and Illinois, Saint Louis and New Orleans, written all over the maps 
of the States. The children of the United States will erect in the 
heart of Paris, in the park of the Louvre, a memento of their affection 
for France in the statue which will perpetuate the beloved name of 
Lafayette. 

Beyond all considerations such as we have suggested, it was 
recognised by every intelligent man of affairs that the time had fully 
come when the United States of North America should assume its 
proper place in all the international assemblings of the nations of the 
world. Whether the subjects to be discussed at such conferences are 
the methods of conducting war or the means of preserving peace, 
whether they are scientific, social, educational or commercial, the 
condition of the United States as to area of country, number of 
inhabitants, wealth accumulated and power of accumulation, the 
intelligence of her people, their skill, energy, and aggressiveness, their 
productive and commercial ability and attainment — all the elements 
of national greatness are present in such degree as to make it 
incumbent upon her to assert her position among the nations, to take 
a seat in international councils, and to have a voice in deliberations 
which concern the welfare of the world. For more than a century the 
United States has attended strictly to her own affairs, and while she 
will retain that attitude, she may not forget that her affairs are 



William Mc Kinley, 
Presidenl of the Uniled States. 



SECTIONS OF TIIE UNITED STATES. 

inextricably involved in the affairs that concern one common 
humanity. 

But responsibilities and duties are inseparable. It was not 
merely a privilege to accept the invitation of the French nation to 
join in the exposition of 1900 ; it was not simply to meet the honorable 
challenge of a worthy competitor ; it was not alone in obedience to a 
sentiment living in the hearts of her people ; it was in response to a 
well-known and fully appreciated international obligation that the 
people of the United States, speaking through their representatives in 
Congress, determined to assume their proper position at the exposition 
of 1900. 

To the invitation the response was, " We come, with full hearts 
and full hands." 

A preliminary investigation and report was made by Moses P. 
Handy, a special commissioner, whose death, occurring soon after his 
report was made, all deeply deplored. His mission, both difficult and 
delicate, was to convey to the French the response of the United 
States to the proffered invitation, and to report upon the conditions 
requisite for proper action. On July 1, 1898, Congress passed enact- 
ments authorizing the national participation in the exposition, the 
appointment of a commissioner-general and other officials, and the 
appropriation of funds necessary to carry its enactments into effect. 
The appropriations made at that time, and increased by subsequent 
legislation, amount in the aggregate to $1,369,500. 

Pursuant to that authority, the President appointed Ferdinand 
W. Peck, of Chicago, Commissioner- General ; Benjamin D. Woodward, 
of Columbia University, New York, Assistant Commissioner- General ; 
and Frederick Brackett, of the Treasury Department, Washington, 
Secretary. In the organisation which was afterwards perfected two 
principal departments were created, one of exhibits and the other of 
business. Frederick J. V. Skiff, of the Field Columbian Museum of 
Chicago, was placed at the head of the first as Director-in-Chief of 
Exhibits^ and Paul Blackmar, also of GhtcagO) at the head of the 
second) aa Director ot Affairs. The classification determined by the 
French authorities provided for the arrangement of exhibits in eighteen 
groups, but for reasons of economy and of efficiency these groups were 
distributed by the United Stales Commissioner among ten chief officers. 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 



called directors. In some cases two, or even three, groups were 
assigned to a single director. The resulting departments are as 
follows : 



Departments. 

Education and Social Economy 

j^ inc aXuS ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 

Liberal Arts and Chemical Industrie:^ ... 

Machinery and Electricity 

Transportation, Military and Naval Exhibo. 
Agriculture, Horticulture, and Foods ... 

Forestry and Fisheries 

Mines and Metallurgy 

Textile Industries 

Furniture and varied Industries 



Directors. 

Howard J. Bogers. 
James H. Cauldwell. 
Alexander S. Capehart. 
Francis E. Drake. 
Willard A. Smith. 
Charles Richards Dodge. 
Tarleton H. fiean. 
Frederick J. V. Skiflf. 
John H. McOibbons. 
M. H. Hulbert. 



In February, 1900, the President appointed eighteen honorary 
commissioners, as follows : 



Bertha Honore Palmer 
James Allison 
Brutus J. Clay 
Charles A. Collier ... 
Michel H. de Young 
WiUiam L. Elkins 
Ogden H. Fethers 
Peter Jansen 
Calvin Manning 
Franklin Murphy 
Henry A. Parr 
Henry M. Putney 
Alvin H. Sanders 
Louis Stern 
William G. Thompson 
William M. Thornton 
Arthur E. Valois ... 
Thomas F. Walsh... 



Illinois. 

Kansas. 

Kentucky. 

Georgia. 

California. 

Pennsylvania. 

Wisconsin. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

New Jersey. 

Maryland. 

New Hampshire. 

Illinois. 

New York. 

Michigan. 

Virginia. 

New York. 

Colorado. 



Offices were opened at the Auditorium in Chicago, at the 
Equitable Building in New York, at the Agricultural Department at 
Washington, and at 20 Avenue Rapp in Paris. Negotiations for 
space were at once entered upon with the French. After some dis- 
cussion, in which the highest diplomatic talent of both countries was 
involved, the authorities responded with a d?gree of liberality, 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

perhaps as great as the limiting conditions would allow. The aggre- 
gate of space which has heen assigned to the United States sections is 
888,987 square feet gross — that is, inclusive of aisles and passages. 

A national pavilion, covering 9,985 square feet of area, and 
167*5 feet high, has been erected upon the Quai d'Orsay, in a style 
worthy of the dignity and position of the nation which it represents. 
Other buildings have been erected as they were found necessary, upon 
the Quai d'Orsay, the Esplanade des Invalides, the Avenue Su&en, 
and at Vincennes. Several buildings have been erected at Yincennes 
by exhibitors. 

The spaces provided for exhibits from the United States, either 
by assignment in the great palaces of the exposition or in the 
buildings erected for the purpose, have been filled with material 
selected with the care made imperatively necessary by the relatively 
restricted exhibition areas. The exhibits are thoroughly representative 
in their various classes. The total number of exhibitors presenting 
distinct exhibits appears from the catalogue herewith presented to be 
6,568. Were the contributors to collective exhibits included in the 
reckoning, the total number of exhibitors would be considerably more 
than 7,000. The number of distinct exhibits has not yet been 
ascertained, as it rests under the necessary uncertainty of the limita- 
tion of an exhibit. Conservative estimates will place the number of 
exhibits at from 25,000 to 80,000. 

It is believed that no citizen of the United States need go away 
disappointed after viewing the exhibits which his country makes at 
this exposition. It is expected that a reasonable proportion of the 
articles displayed will receive the commendations of those appointed 
to determine their comparative merits. The Commissioner-General 
feels assured that the sections of the United States will present their 
full share of exhibits notable for conspicuous merit, illustrative of the 
progress of science and the march of invention. It is nevertheless the 
fact that the best things of a nation's production — ^those which con- 
tribute most largely to its glory and assign to it a commanding place 
among its competitors — are such as will not submit to be encased in 
the* pavilions of an exposition, to be ticketed and numbered and 
inscribed in its catalogue. Some of these things are visible and 
tangible, like the trains and tracks and bridges of railways; steel 



Ferdinand \V. I'cck, 
Commissioner-General ol Ihc United Stales lo Ibe Paris Exposilion or 1900. 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

buildings that reach above the clouds ; the Chicago drainage canal ; 
the Yerkes telescope ; forests and plains ; wheat fields bounded by the 
horizon ; cotton fields, ivory white beneath the moon's cold radiance ; 
unbroken areas of rustling maize that a flying train may skirt for an 
hour ; the deep canons and resounding waterfalls, and the towering 
summits of snow-clad mountains. 

The chief exhibit which the nation of the United States of 
North America has to present before the world is herself, her people, 
her institutions, and the results which she has achieved. One 
hundred and twenty- four years have passed since thirteen British 
colonies in America declared their indepsndence ; one hundred and 
seventeen since their independence was recognised by the mother 
country. The years which passed between these events and the 
opening of the nineteenth century were full of effort and fertile of 
results not to be slightly esteemed; but it still remains true that 
the United States, as viewed at the close of the nineteenth century, 
has been, in the main, developed within the nineteenth century. 
Under the methods of the exposition of 1900, it may not be inappro- 
priate to present, with a brevity imposed by the conditions, 

A EETROSPECTIVE EXPOSITION OF THE UNITED 

STATES OF AMERICA. 

In 1801 the United States was a country but lately admitted to 
the family of nations and scarcely come to its majority. Its 
inheritance was rather in posse than in esse. Its capital, like many a 
young man's wealth, consisted chiefly of youth, vigor, hope and 
freedom. Its principal asset was a virgin forest, traversed here and 
there by a stream or a trail, and occupied only by savage and hostile 
men. A strip of territory, inhabited and cultivated, extended inland 
from the sea from ono hundred to three hundred miles, and along 
the coast about a thousand miles, having an area of about 280,000 
square miles. In this area dwelt about four millions of people, most 
of whom were farmers, wrestling hard to wring a scanty subsistence 
from a churlish soil. There were few manufactories, and most of the 
farmers served themselves in widely varied handicrafts. The wonder- 
ful foat was sometimes performed to shear a sheep in the early 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES, 

morning ; during the day to carry its wool through the various 
processes of spinning, weaving and dyeing, and from the cloth so 
made to cut out, make and finish a suit of clothing before the day 
should end. 

Cities were few; Philadelphia and New York in the centre, 
Boston in the north, and Charleston in the south. Philadelphia, the 
largest of these, numbered only 81,000 inhabitants. Distances were 
great and journeys were tedious. From Boston to New York the 
time in a carriage was from one to two weeks, according to the state 
of the roads and of the weather. The postmaster-general himself 
carried the mails in a chaise, and the time of service from Washington 
to New York was about a week. 

The titles to territory which the several colonies brought with 
them into the union of States were generally vague and often 
conflicting. In some cases the claims ran ostensibly to the Pacific 
Ocean. ^Vhen the conflict with the mother country was settled, the 
United States found itself in possession of an area bounded on the 
north partially by the great lakes and the St. Lawrence River, on the 
east by the ocean, on the south by the Spanish possessions of the 
Floridas, and on the west by the Mississippi River. The area of this 
territory was about 807,000 square miles. 

The first half of the century was especially an era of expan- 
sion. The Floridas were obtained from Spain. From France 
was purchased the Louisiana country, which occupied on the 
Gulf coast the land between the mouths of the Mississippi and 
the Sabine rivers, extending northwardly along the great river 
to Canada, and included all the land between Canada and Mexico 
as far as the western range then called the Rocky Mountains, 
but since more definitely known as the Sierra Nevada. West of 
this range, the Oregon country in the north was claimed by right 
of discovery. California, with the arid land of the great central 
plateau, and Texas in the east, came from Mexico, through a com- 
bination of influences, of which revolution, conquest, and purchase 
were the most conspicuous. Without attempting a strict enumeration 
of metes and bounds, it is enough to note that the United States of 
to-day occupies a broad belt of. land lying across the North American 
ontinent from ocean to ocean, from east to west about 8,000 miles, 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

and from north to south about 1,200 miles in extent. The area of its 
central continental mass is not far from 3,500,000 square miles, 
besides its outlying portions, Alaska and its dependencies, the islands 
of Hawaii and Porto Rico^ and the recent Philippine acquisitions. 
The territory acquired during the first half of the century is about 
double in area that owned at the beginning of that period. The value 
of the Alaskan country and ihe utilities of the recent acquisitions are 
subjects upon which opinions yet differ. 

But this acquisition of territory, although the necessary ante- 
cedent to subsequent development, is the least important item in the 
history of progress in the himdred years. Starting at about the 
beginning of the century and continuing with an ever-swelling tide 
that does not yet show evidence of diminution, a grand migration of 
peoples has distributed many millions of inhabitants over this broad 
land. The movement began in the eastern States of the seaboard, 
and presently the currents were found flowing from all European 
lands. Men came seeking free homes or fertile soils or wealth of 
precious metals. They came because their friends came. They came 
to escape exactions upon their persons in the shape of military service, 
upon their purses in the form of severe taxation. They came because 
by so doing they could shake off the trammels of oppressive institu- 
tions and place themselves where they could think and speak their 
own free thoughts. This tide of migration swept over the eastern 
mountains and across the wide interior plain until it surged against 
the great central mountain masses of the continent. The mountains 
did not arrest its onward movement, which continued until it covered 
the western slope even to the Pacific shore. Millions of acres of 
arable lands come into the possession of millions of men, either 
without price or at such prices as could be paid out of the profits of a 
single harvest. As might be expected, the choicest lands are now 
occupied, but yet there remain millions of acres more well worth the 
possession of those who would occupy and cultivate them. 

After the settler followed those who built railways, laid out towns, 
founded cities, erected mills, foundries and factories, and wrought in 
every form of handicraft and of artisan's skill. They built dwellings, 
they planted forests, they made highways, they erected churches. 
And near the centre of every village the largest, the costliest and the 



m^^^am^^m^jfr 



Unilcd Stales Building at Ibe Paris Exposition of 1900. 



SECTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

most elegant building, seen from everywhere, and known at once by 
every stranger, was the public school. Amid the farms, by every 
hillside, in every valley, in some bright spot planted with trees and 
decorated with flowers, was the house for the rural district school. 

In this movement of the people the railroads did not follow ; they 
led the way. The iron track was pushed across the wild prairie, 
where were no dwellers ; but scarcely were the rails laid before the 
coming trains brought the coming immigrants, with their families, 
their cattle, their household goods, and the wilderness, once inhabited 
by the timid deer, the lumbering bison, and the howling wolf, and 
swept by. the shadows ot the migrating fowl, became a magnificent 
mosaic of broad farms, everywhere beautified by happy homes, the 
dwellings of successful workers. At this close of the century the 
people of the United States number more than seventy-five millions 
of souls. 

The full significance of this great migration to the United 
States needs a moment's consideration to be fully understood. From 
the census of 1880 the fact was ascertained that at least two-fifths of 
those enumerated were inheritors of citizenship in other countries, 
chiefly European. Their parents were born elsewhere than in the 
United States. Later it was the boast of a mayor of Chicago that in 
his city there were more Irish than in Dublin, more Germans than in 
Berlin, more Swedes than in Stockholm, more Greeks than in 
Athens, and so on through a very considerable list. Those native in 
the United States were in a minority. 

In changing their nationalities, most of these immigrants had 
made great sacrifices, often not appreciated until later in their 
experience. No one knows how large a portion of his capital in life 
is really an inheritance from his ancestry until he has, for some 
reason, lost this inheritance and has gone to construct new environ- 
ments in a distant country. The intangible elements of home, family, 
social ties, habits and affections, as well as the visible things — 
churches, with God's acres adjacent ; the mountain summits, golden 
at sunrise, or purple at nightfall ; the fields lying silent under the 
midday sun, orchards and meadows, highways and hedges, and the 
homestead, however humble — have vanished utterly, and must be 
wholly reconstructed and adjusted to strange conditions. Old things 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

have passed away, and with new scenes and new relationships, new 
standards of life, duty, freedom, and even of faith, are found to have 
assumed control. 

The immigrant to the United States lost much, but he found 
much more. Fhrst of all, he found freedom m matters political, 
social and religious. The trammels of tradition were loosened, the 
shackles of caste were shaken off. Even the humblest man became a 
factor in social organization and in the forces which control local and 
general government. It does not follow that in the outset, or even at 
later periods, he always acted wisely, but it made a great enlargement 
of his whole spiritual nature that he was able to act at all. He soon 
learned that freedom meant restraint. Not restraint from without, 
from sources which would restrict and confine him, but from within, 
bom of the evidence that to be himself free he must respect and 
protect the liberties of others. 

With freedom, he found inteUigence, somewhat for himself, but 
mostly for his children ; the intelligence of a public school system 
everywhere in evidence, though often more notable for the generous 
diffusion of the opportunities of elementary training than for the 
extent or completeness of that training. The intelligence diffused by 
an active and untrammelled press broadened the scope of his vision 
and constantly rectified his judgments. 

Next came unity, a unity which is perhaps the most remarkable 
characteristic of the new life which these migrated elements presently 
took upon themselves. Nothing is so remarkable in the history of the 
increase of the population of tbe United States, by the gathering of 
peoples from every land and every clime, as the rapidity and the 
degree of completeness with which these apparently conflicting 
elements have become unified as Americans and united as the 
citizens of a common country. The parents of a family may, 
for example, be Germans or Poles, Swedes, Swiss or Irish, as 
the case may be. They naturally and necessarily retain much of 
that to which they were born, their habits of life, speech, manners, 
instincts. Little else could be expected. Ask a man of what 
nationality he is, and he will answer instinctively according to the 
fact of his births But a single generation finds a transformation. The 
children are Americans, more intense in their earnest sympathieSi 



BECnONS OF THE UNITED 8TATES. 

more proud of the name and the relationship, more anxious that nc 
mistake he made in the recognition, than are those whose inheritances 
of a like nature run through several generations of ancestry. The son 
of an Irishman, a Scandinavian, a German, a Bohemian, is always 
ready to acknowledge his parentage, but he is still more proud of being 
born under the stars and stripes, and he wants everybody to be 
cognizant of the fact. 

Whether from the mingling of so many types and the blending of 
all into one, whether as the result of newly active influences and the 
elimination of some thought to be effete or harmful, whether from 
breathing an atmosphere replete with ozone and surcharged with 
electric forces attractive and repellent, somehow the American has 
developed a type of character pacuUar to himself. Known and read 
of all men, admired by some, feared by some, but admitted to have a 
positive function among the forces now active in all mundane affiwrs, 
the American — for such the citizen of the United States of America 
usually styles himself — is decided in his views, nervous and vigorous 
in expressing them, prompt in action as he is quick in apprehension, 
respects the future far more than the past, is confident of himself, and 
has the strength of his convictions. He is cool, dear-headed, and 
deliberate, and he never recognises defeat. 

The American citizen is himself the most notable element in this 
retrospective exhibition. 

What has he accomplished ? 

As we have already seen, he has subdued the wilderness, whether 
forest or prairie, and has dotted it over with millions of farms and 
homes. The fiist work of the settler was to provide a shelter for his 
family, Tha next was to civilize the soil, which in nature was raw 
and savage. If his lands were covered with forest, the forest was to 
be removed ; if the land were prairie, the sod must be disintegrated ; 
fences must ba made, roads opened, swamps drained, dwellings and 
other buildings erected. When the farm was brought into proper 
subjugation, and was fiktad with the equipment and conveniences 
necessary to make life comfortable and labour remunerative, most of 
its value consisted in that which its owner had put into it out of his 
own pationt and parsevering effort. ' The land was little more than an 
opportunity, useful according as it was used. 



B.-D. Woodward, 

AssisUnt Commissioner-General of the UnilcdlSlalus 

to Ihe Parig ExpMition of 1900, 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

Assuming that the normal area of a farm is a quarter section of 
land — that is, a square half a mile long and wide — we find that about 
9,000,000 of lektms have been made in the United States during the 
century. In the earlier days the settler paid $100 for his quarter 
section ; in later days he received title to it free of money cost, after 
he had lived upon it and cultivated ifc for five years. An estimate of 
the present value will depend upon a value assumed for the unit, upon 
which opinions will vary greatly. At $20 per acre, which most 
valuers would consider low, the aggregate value of the farms of the 
United States would reach the sum of $115,200,000,000. 

An exhaustive estimate of the productive power of these lands 
wiU not be attempted. The great variety of soil, of temperature, and 
of moisture existing in the various parts of an area so extended 
provide for an equally great variety of possible products. Three items 
are especially notable, furnishing directly or indirectly the chief 
articles which the nation may offer in trade with other peoples. 
These are hay, grain, including principally wheat in the northern and 
maize in the central regions, and cotton. Wheat and cotton are 
exported chiefly in their natural, non -manufactured form; hay and 
maize are used in feeding of animals, and appear in the world's 
markets transformed into less bulky commodities in the form of 
animal food products. In respect to cotton the United States stands 
as the recognized source from which the world's supply is chiefly- 
drawn. As to grain and meats the United States furnishes the 
reserve from which other nations may draw when their own resources 
prove to be inadequate. 

A few quotations will indicate the capacity of the United States 
in these respects. 

In 1896 the United States produced of the articles named : 

Wheat 430,000,000 bushels, valued at ^429,000,000 

Maize 1,903,000,000 bushels, valued at 3501,000,000 

All forms of grain ... 3,227,000,000 bushels, valued at $1,114,000,000 

Hay 60,000,000 tons, valued at $401,000,000 

Cotton 5,677,000,000 pounds, valued at 1304,000,000 

The throe vegefcable products, hay, grain, and cotton, produced in 
a single year, aggregate a value of $1,809,000,000. 

If to this sum be added the values of other products of the soil, 



SECTIOKS OF THE VMTED STATEb. 

less important relatively, but yet of large real moment, such as 
lumber, vegetables, fruits, tobacco, with the increased value of animal 
products above that of the food consumed in producing them, the 
aggregate annual returns from the agricultural resources of the United 
States do not fall short of $2,500,000,000. 

Nor does this express the enormous productive power of this 
country. In 1897 the mines of the United States yielded quantities 
and values stated in roimd numbers as follows : 



Iron Ore, 18,000,000 tons. 
Pig Iron, 10,000,000 tons 

Coal, 179,000,000 tons 

Petroleom, 60,000,000 barrels ... 

Gk)ld and Silver 

Copper, Lead and Zinc 

Mineral products, metallic 
Mineral products, non-metallic ... 



$ 95,000,000 

199,000,000 

41,000,000 

90,000,000 

73,000,000 

302,000,000 

329,000,000 



Thus do we present in a few of the more important items the 
power of the United States of 1900 in the production of material 
wealth out of its own resources. 

Mention has already been made of the railroads as factors aiding 
the settlement of the country and subjugation of the soil. The 
history of the growth of railways in the United States is brief, as it is 
elsewhere in the world. Seventy years only have passed since the 
beginning of this great industry in this land. In the earlier days the 
railroads extended themselves slowly; they joined places already 
established, they accepted routes imder the pressure of conditions 
imposed upon them, they were the servants of the public. In later 
periods their progress was rapid and irresistible ; they pushed beyond 
the outposts of civilisation, moving as an advanced guard into the 
wilderness, and leaving a finished map behind. The builders swept 
across the prairies, laying ties upon the ungraded earth, dropping 
rails from flat-cars, which rolled on over the irons thcmGclvcs had 
brought ; they spanned the streams and the arroyos ; they threaded 
the canons ; some mountains they climbed, others they pierced. No 
difficulty was so formidable that it could not be passed by a route that 
went over or around or through it. The first requisition was to " get 
there*! — from terminus to terminus — by structures no matter how 



** 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

temporary in appearance if only they could endure the tramp of the 
iron steed. Once the track was laid, it was used as a factor in its own 
perfection. It was aligned, graded, ballasted, provided with sidings, 
turnouts, stations, passenger and freight cars, and locomotives. A wide 
river was crossed by boats ; the permanent bridge of steel came later. 
The mountain was flanked by a switch-back, anticipating the 
tunnel which afterwards pierced it through and through. Thus 
it happened that the road was in active and profitable use long 
before it was finished — if, indeed, an American railroad is ever 
finished. To-day the trunk lines of the United States, the great 
arteries of traffic, challenge comparison with any railroads of the 
world upon the following items: Solidity and durability of permanent 
way in every minutia detail ; strength and swiftness of motive power ; 
comfort and convenience of its passenger equipment ; the accuracy of 
connections, making all the roads of one great area to act as if they 
were under the control of a single management ; the care with which 
baggage is handled and the certainty with which it is made to arrive 
at its destination and be restored to its rightful ownor. Sleeping-cars, 
dining-cars, vestibuled trains, automatic braking systems, self-acting 
car-couplers, all have their origin and their acme upon the railroads of 
the United States. 

Of these roads, 184,608 miles are in operation. Their service 
requires 33,000 lo3omotives, 26,000 passenger cars, 8,000 baggage and 
mail cars, and more than 1,250.000 freight cars. They represent a 
capitalization of eleven and a quarter billions of dollars 
($11,233,529,588), and their annual earnings are $338,000,000. 

The railroad recognises but one messenger, the telegraph, as 
fleeter than himself, and this messenger he has taken into his own 
service. The telegraphs are as ubiquitous as the railroads, having in 
operation 875,000 miles of wire. 

In every form the applications of electricity are constant and 
efifective. Every village has its electric street-car service, its system 
of electric lighting, and its telephone service. The statistics thereof 
vary too rapidly to bo quoted. One would as soon think of asking if 
the sun shines in Oshkosh or in Kankakee as of enquiring if electric 
lights and tramways and telephones could be found there. 

Several causes have aided in developing in the United Stotas a 



ftECTtONS OF THE UNITED STATE^. 

• 

manufacturing system scarcely less important than the agricultural 
system which has been described. The first is the possession in 
unlimited amounts, by the gift of nature, of the materials for 
manufactures. The forests abound in woods, each variety having a 
peculiar merit. In the making of a heavy farm-wagon more than 
twenty kinds of wood are used, and each is found in some region 
which produces it of the quality which best fits it for its peculiar use. 
Immense fields of anthracite and bituminous coals, scattered all over 
the country furnish fuel for the production of motive power. The 
mountains furnish ores of all the useful metals and of the most 
excellent quality. 

The second cause is the imperative demand for the aid of nature's 
forces, working through machinery and accentuated by the relative 
scarcity of manual labor. Men's hands were too few to perform the 
labor which their heads devised, and the powers of the wandering 
winds or of running streams or of throbbing steam were made to 
delve and pound, grind and spin. Four hundred millions of bushels 
of wheat grown in a single season would fall in the field before such a 
mass of grain could be reaped with the sickle, or would rot in the 
stock before it could be thrashed by the flail. Out of such needs came 
the invention of machinery for doing almost every kind of agricultural 
labor. Similar causes stimulated invention in other directions, 
producing machines of which those for sewing, for writing, for setting 
type are examples. 

The third element, and one which produced the greatest effect in 
the advancement of American manufacturers, is the skill which has 
invented and applied machinery for making machines, after what 
has been distinctively called the American system. To illustrate what 
is meant by this term, and its application as well, let us suppose 
that a complex object, say a revolver, is to be produced in 
considerable quantities. Doubtless a thoroughly skilful work- 
man can produce the 'implement by working out piece after 
piece, fitting, adjusting, failing, and trying again, and in time 
evolve one revolver and after that another. But the successful 
manufacture of revolveis cannot be conducted in that way. The first 
step will require the careful and complete analysis of the weapon, 
separating it into its minutest elements, and determining'^ the 



THE EXHIBITS IN THE 

mechanical processes by which each separate element may be produced 
in the best and most economical manner. For each process a machine 
is devised, and this machine is made to do that particular piece of 
work with the utmost accuracy. So small a thing as a screw may 
require a separate machine for each of such processes as turning and 
threading, or slotting the head ; each screw produced must be 
absolutely perfect, answering the strictest tests for length or for 
diameter. If at any time the screws are found not to answer to the 
tests, the fault must be sought in the machines which make the 
screws, and these machines must be readjusted to their special 
function. A thousand revolvers require one thousand pieces of each 
different kind, and these pieces, being made each by the same 
processes, in the action of the same machines, are not acceptable 
unless each is absolutely perfect, and therefore all of the same kind 
are absolutely alike. The parts being assembled, the thousand 
resulting weapons are perfect specimens of their kind. Any piece fits 
equally well in any revolver. 

The method requires high inventive genius in devising and 
keeping at its best service the varied and intricate machinery which 
constructs the parts ; it requires capital adequate to the outlay ; it 
must be sure of a market which will regularly absorb the product. It 
requires workmen educated to keep the machinery up to its ideal 
standard. 

This method has been applied to the production of firearms, of 
sewing-machines, writing-machines, watches, bicycles, printinjj 
presses, steam engines, pianofortes and other things without number, 
abundantly displayed at this exposition. 

The limits of space permit the presentation of only a few items 
illustrating the retrospective view of what the United States has 
accomplished in the nineteenth century. Busy in solving the 
material problems which nature and necessity have compelled them 
to consider, her people have neither forgotten nor neglected others of a 
more strictly scientific, intellectual, or aasthetic character. America 
with her century of retrospection may not be expected to parallel all 
the results which Europe may proudly present as the record of a 
thousand years. But in the living to-day, in proportion to tho 
pumber of her citizens, she presents in every field of intellectual 



SECTIONS OP THE UNITED STATES. 

attainment her sons and daughters, who represent her with dis- 
tinguished honour. Statesmen, legislators, jurists, soldiers, sailors, 
historians, discoverers, inventors, authors, poets, painters, sculptors, 
musicians, educators, — upon the roll of living men in any of these 
groups of names of Americans will appear, frequent in number and 
conspicuous in position. ' 

Of two results in education is she particularly proud. The first 
is the provision generously and imiversally made for the free instruc- 
tion of every child within her borders. Every state makes the 
primary education of its children its especial care, an education 
sufficient for their guidance in all the ordinary avocations of life. 
Fourteen millions of children are enrolled in the common schools of 
the United States. The annual expenditure for their instruction is 
more than $183,000,000. 

The second is the rapid and vigorous development within the 
last thirty years of technical schools and universities. Among the 
technical schools, those established by the aid of the general govern- 
ment are worthy of special commendation, as upon the foundations so 
laid have been erected some of the most advanced schools. The last 
ten years have been especially notable for generous endowments of 
important universities. Some of the elders, like Harvard, Yale, 
Columbia, and Princeton, have acquired large sums, surpassed only 
by the yet more magnificent endowments which have fallen to the 
University of California, the Leland Stanford, Jr., University, and 
the University of Chicago. Endowments are significant of possible 
opportunities ; but much more significant of actual advancement has 
been the forward steps taken by these institutions, and others as well, 
by providing instruction in the class of subjects known by common 
consent as university courses. It is now possible to obtain doctorate 
standing from American universities equal in actual significance, if 
not in reputation, to those acquired in European institutions. The 
day has already arrived when students from other countries are 
attracted to schools in the United States by the special advantages 
offered in special lines of study. 

The attitude of the United States of America before the other 
great nations of the world is interesting and peculiar. She is the first 
great republic of modern times founded upon the freedom, integrity. 



ThE E:;HimTs m the sections of the united states. 

and intelligence of the citizen. She is free from the traditional 
inheritances which haniper n&tions of a longer life. She is isolated 
in her position, which baa been to her a better protection than costly 
armaments, ^he has freed herself from the evil inSuences of buman 
bondage. Her people are intelligent, industrious, and prosperous. 
She presents in the retrospective exposition of the nations, herself, 
her people, and her history. 



Fred. Bracket!, 

Secretary and Disbursing Agenl of Ihe United Slates 

to the Paris Exposition of 1900. 



THB PRATT & >VMITrNfEY CO., 

HARTFORD, CONIN., U. S. A. 

¥¥¥¥¥* 



Precigiow Bench Lathes j 

pRBssEs AKD Dies. 
600-MH. Standabd Meamirinq Machine; Standard Ctundrical Size- 

Oauobs and Tkmpi^tbs; Standard DROP-FoRaini St»bi, Caliper 

GAUOEa. 
International Stakdaiid Screw Thread Gauges. 6 mm. to 5S Dim. diam. 
^TANDARn Kbasebs. for Huchino Shop and Locomotive Work; Standard 

Taper Pins, 
MiLLiMO Cutters. Formed and Inserted Blade; Hetal Sltitino Sawb. 
Internationai. Standard Taps and Dies; Ratchet DRtLt.s; Lathe Tuoia 
Combination Lathe Cbi-ckh 



Bols tie Vlnwenn«B United Statws Machltieo' BulldinB, 

Space 11 Block IV. 

EXHIBIT— In addition la Uacblnes and Tnole eniimented for the Ctiamps dc Uan: 

10-INCH Toolhakerb' Lathe; 14-iHcn Engine Lathe; 43-inch Qap Latbe. 

Centebino Machine; Ccttino-ow Machine, with InoreaBe Speed Menha- 
aiam; Dib-Sinkino Machine; Adjustable Mtri.Ti- Spindle Drill; Cup 
AND Cone and Cutter Urindino Machines ; Double and Single Bead 
MiLUNo Machines, with Horizootal or Tertkal SpinJleB; 18. i». X 4-rr. 
TooLRooH Planer: 14 incu Toolroom Shaper. 

Gun Barrel Drilling Machine; Oun-Babbel Bitlino Machine. 

Hand Ti;rret-Head Screw Machi-ves; 14-i.\ch TuRRcr-IlEAD Chucking 
Machine, with Brass -Work iim Tools; 16-inch Turket-Hkad Facing 
AND Chockino Machine; IA-inch Turret-Head Chasing Lathe. 

Automatic Turret-Head Screw Machine with Magazine Attachke.vt; 
t-Head Screw Machine, with Tools for Rod Work. 

¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

>e seon In operation at our VIncennes 
Inspection cordially Invited, 

TME PRATT & WMITINEY CO. 



Bethlehem Steel 

Company 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM, 
PENNSYLVANIA, U.S.A. 



Manufacturers of Special Grades of Steel 

Forgings and Castings of High 

Carbon Steel, Nickel 

Steel, Etc. 



Armor Plate, Vault Plate, 

Guns of all Calibers, Gun Carriages and 

Ordnance Material of all kinds. 



Special facilities for Fluid Compressing the Ingot, for 
Forging under Heavy Hydraulic Presses, for Hollow Forg- 
ing on a Mandrel, and for Annealing and Oil-tempering and 
giving the necessary Heat Treatment to Forgings and 
Castings of all descriptions. 

The largest Power Plants in the World are equipped 
with Stationary Engines to which **Bethlehem" Steel Forg- 
ings have been supplied. 

Marine Engine Shafting and Miscellaneous Forgings 
have been supplied to Ocean Steamers, Lake and River 
Vessels and to the Navies of the United States of America 
and Foreign Governments. The shafting of the U. S. S. 
'* OREGON" was manufactured by ** Bethlehem." 




The Walworth Mfg. Co., of Boston, Mass.. 
U. S. A., established in 1842, are the oldest 
manufacturers in the country of all goods 
and materials used for the erection of steam 
plants. Their works at City Point, South 
Boston, are very extensive, employing a 
force of 1,000 skilled mechanics. 

There are many departments of their 
business, each under charge of competent 
foremen. These departments include Iron 
Foundries, Brass Foundries, Forging Shops, 
Brass Finishing Shops, Iron Finishing Shops, Tool Making Shops, etc. ; 
every department equipped with the most modern machinery to facilitate 
the prompt and careful execution of orders. 

They manufacture many tools for the use of steam fitters and engi- 
neers, a number of which they own and control exclusively. Among these 
is the Stillson Pipe Wrench, well known throughout all the world, also the 
Miller's Ratchet Die Stock for threading pipe in trenches, corners, etc.. 
Walworth Die Stock for threading pipe with one going over, Walworth 
Pipe Vise, Hall's Patent Cast Iron Pipe Cutter, Stanwood and Walworth 
Pipe Cutters, and Walworth Taps and Reamers. All these tools are used 
wherever piping work is done. 

Another department of the business is the manufacture of Brass and 
Iron Valves and Cocks for all purposes, with both English and American 
threads. A department is devoted to making Cast Iron, Brass, and 
Malleable Fittings for steam, gas and water work. They also have a sep- 
arate building and department for manufacturing large valves, and make a 
specialty of fittings and pipe for power plants using high pressure stear^. 
In this department they make Walworth Gate Valves in all sizes from ^ 
to 42 inches, having bronze seats and discs which are renewable, as well 
as all kinds and sizes of Flanged Fittings. 

A specialty of their manufacture is the Van Stone Pipe Joint and Pipe 
Bend. The Van Stone Pipe Joint is made by flanging over a special soft 
steel pipe onto the face of a cast iron or gun iron steel flange, so that 
the Steam Joint is effected between the ends of the pipe by the introduction 
of a gasket. There are no threads through which steam can escape, 
and as the flanges swivel around the pipe, the erection of work is greatly 
facilitated. By their method of bending pipe many Jointsi are saved and 
friction is reduced, while expansion and contraction is amply provided for. 
Their work is found in nearly every large power plant in the United 
States. 

A large department is devoted to the manufacture of the Walworth 
Automatic Link Sprinkler, a device for automatically extinguishing fires 
in mills, factories and public buildings. Many hundred thousand of these 
tprinklers are annually sold. 

They will have samples for inspection in their display at the Exposi- 
tion, and a competent representative in charge to make all explanations. 
They arc represented in Europe by Mr. H. Munzing, 199 Upper Thames 
St., London, and by Mr. Aug. Eggers, Bremen, Germany. Their home 
ofices are 132 Federal St., Boston. Cable address *• Walmanco." 



r 

The American Steel & Wire Co. 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. 
SAN FRANCISCO, LONDON 

Miners of Iron, Coal and Zinc. Makers of Pij Iron. Open Hearth. 

Beuemer and Cnicible Steel. Charcoal Iron, Copper, Wire and 

Wirt Prodacfj of Every Description. Makers of 

Hates, Hone Shoes and Structural 

Material. 



Annual Product— 7,670,00a Tons (aa^o Lbs. each) Raw Material. 

" 1,500,000 " " " Pinisbed Material. 

Total Number of Employees, 36,000. 



Meda[s> 

Owners of Stcuiuhip 
London, 1851 , "^ 

PhiUddphi., 1876 """ "" "" *^'"' 

Clilugo, 1893 ^''" ""'' Ohio River 



Raw Material— Coking Coal, Steam Coal, Coke. Lime Stone, Zinc Ore. 
Zinc, Iran Ore, PJR Iron, Bessemer Steei. Open Heartii Basic 
and Acid Steel, Cruciblf; Steel, Charcoal Iron, Copper Ingots 
and Bars. 



Wire — Market, Fence, Weaving, Spring, Cast Steel, Straightened and 
Cut, Odd Shaped, Screw, Cotter. Linch Pin or Spring Key, 
Horse Nail, Rope Wire, Needle. Bottling, Florist. Mattress. 
Broom. Netting:. Neck for beer bottles, Signal, Bridge Cable, 
Pin, Bonnet, Card, Ileddle. Bookbinder. Stone, Spooled Wire. 
Drill Rod. Music, Covering, Telegraph (Galod), Telegraph (Cop- 
per), Trolley, Copper Wire, Brass Wire, Aluminum Wire, Alum- 
inum Bronze Wire. Resistance Wire (Nickel Steel). 

Flat Wire — Bessemer Steel, Cast Steel, Band Saw. Curtain Spring, 
Tape Line. Rule Steel. Steel Spring, Shoe Nail. Sash Ribbon. 
Corset, Dress Stays, Knife Blades. Clock Springs, Watch Springs. 
Motor Springs, Lamp Springs, Advertising Springs. Sash 
Balance Springs, Typewriter Springs. 



Structural Material — Steel Beams, Steel Angles, Steel Squares, Steel 
Hexagons and Special Shapes, Channel Stock, Knife Bar Angle 
Stock, Wagon Box Steel, Tire Stock, Splice Bars, Frog Filling. 

Shafting — Hot Finished. Cold Finished. ' 

Boiler and Tank Steel— Steel Plates, Boiler Plates. Throot Sheets for 
fire boxes, Door Sheets, Tank Steel, Flange Steel, Steel for 
Wagon Skeins, Bessemer Skelp. 

Chain — Butt Chains, Breast Chains, Stay Chains, Halter Chains, Lock 
Chains, Cart Back Chains, Stretcher Chains, Trace Chains, Cow 
Ties, Jack Chains, Pump Chains. 

Horse Shoes — Horse Shoes, Toe Calks. 

Nails, Staples, etc. — Nails, Brads, Escutcheon Pins, Wire Spikes, 
Common Spikes, Railway Spikes, Ship Spikes, Boat Spikes, 
Telegp-aph role Steps, Sash or Dowel Pins, Headless and Point- 
less Nails, Tacks, Double Pointed Tacks, Staples, Awning Hooks, 
Boot Calks, Special Hooks, Pail Ears, Bed Links, Basket Hooks. 

Tics — Bale Ties, Cotton Ties. 

Fencing— Glidden Barbed Fencing— Galv'd and Pt'd) Waukegan 
Barbed Fencing — Galv'd and Pt'd), Iowa Barbed Fencing — 
Galv'd and Pt'd), Flat Twisted Barbless Fencing, Two Ply 
Twisted Barbless Fencing, Barbed Netting, Poultry and Rabbit 
Fencing, Lawn Fencing, Horse Fencing, Field Fencing, Field 
Fencing Gates. 

Wire Ropes and Cables— Flat Ropes, Round Ropes. Sash Cord, 
Clothes Lines, Guy Ropes, Signal Strand, Hoisting and Trans- 
mission Rope, Hawsers, Ship Rigging, Street Railway Cables, 
Towing Cables, Switching Ropes, Wire Rope Fittings — Hooks, 
Thimbles, Swivels, etc. 

Spokes— Bicycle Spokes, Sulky Spokes. 

Insulated Wire and Cables — Magnet Wire, Office Wire, Underwriters 
Wire, Annunciator Wire, Lamp Cord, Feeder Wire, Ground 
Wire, Weatherproof Line Wire, Weatherproof Iron Line Wire, 
Submarine Power Cables, Submarine Teleg^raph Cables, Elec- 
trical Cables, Torpedo Cables, Office Cables, Telephone and 
Telegraph Cables, Lead Encased Wire and Cables, Flexible 
Cables, Rheostat Cables, Stranded Conductors, Fireproof Insu- 
lated Wire, Paper Insulated Wire, Asbestos Insulated Wire, 
Rubber Insulated Wire. 

Rail Bonds — Solid Bonds, Leaf Bonds, Stranded Bonds, Bonds of 
Special Lengths, etc., Terminals, Drift or Bond Pins. 

Springs, Etc, — Spiral Springs, Furniture Springs. Car Springs, Trolley 
Springs, Compression Springs, Helical Bed Springs, Gun Springs, 
Saddle Springs, Wringer Springs, Tedder Forks, Agricultural 
Implement Springs, Heel Protectors, Knife Backs. 

Dies — Iron Dies for Wire Drawing, Steel Dies for Wire Drawing, 
Diamond Dies for Wire Draw*ing. 

Bi-Products— Venetian Bed, Green Copperas, Rusty Copperas. 



THE AMERICAN STEEL & WIRE CO 

New York Chicago San Francisco London 



ATLAS TACK 
COMPANY 

TAUNTON, MASS., U. S. A. 

Group ii. Class 65. 



We are the Largest Manufacturers 

of Tacks and Small Nails 

in the V^orld. 



Our regular line comprises over twenty 
thousand kinds, styles and sizes. We make 
every kind of Tack and Nail known to the Shoe Finders and Hardware 
Trades, including many items which are made only by us. 

Field's Cub Nail : 

This is a long, sharp pointed, heavily corrugated Shoe Nail that 
"hugs like a bear." 

Soule's Patent Dowel Brads : 

For putting on rosettes, small Carvings and overlaying Panels 
without marring the face of the material. Does away with the 
trouble often caused by the weather where glue is used. 

Roth's Patent Top-Lift Heel Nail : 

Is used for fastening the top lift to heels. It can be used in any 
Heeling Machine. 

Our products include Steel Shoo Shanks, Heel and Toe Plates, 
Shoe anci Corset Eyelets, Wire Nails, Flange Head Hoop or Barrel 
Nails, Brass and Iron Escutcheon Pins, Rivets and Burrs, Double 
Pointed Tacks and Staples, Cast Head Coffin Tacks, Lining and Saddle 
Nails, Papier SL-iche Nails, Metal Tufting Buttons, Glaziers' Points. 
Leathered Head Carpet Tacks and hundreds of other kindred articles. 

We are prepared to make to sample any kind of Tack or Nail that 
ever has been, or can be made. 

We have been in the tack business since iSio, 

We employ six hundred workmen and endeavor to keep none but 
those who are most highly skilled in their various branches of trade. 

We are continually introducing improvements and endeavor to 
keep abreast of the times in every respect. 

Wo wish to call particular attention to our Exhibit 

We feel that our goods speak more loudly for us than we can tor 
them. 



THE 

L S- Starreh Co. 

ATHOL, MASSACHUSEHS. 

U.S. A. 

EsUblUhed 1880 
Incorporated 19OO 



Manufacturers of Fine Tools for all Workers in Metal or Wood 




WE MARE Steel Rules from t inch to 48 Inches and from 5 cm. to x M. in 
length, of various thicknesses and in a larsre variety of English and Metric gradua- 
tions; Steel straight Edges; Center Gauges; Squares of various designs and sizes 
from the x inch solid steel Square to the 34 inch or 60 cm. Standard Square. In our 
Squares as well as our Steel Rules special attention is given to accurate gradua- 
tion, and all of our products which require graduation are marked in either the 
English or Metric measure as the customer may order. We also make Protractors 
ana Inclinometers, Pocket Slide Caliper Squares and Bevel Protractors. Our 
line of Micrometer Gauges is extensive, both for outside and inside measure, in 
English or Metric. These tools embody a number of valuable and unique features 
ana will repay careful study on the part of anyone who is a user of instruments of 
precision. 

Other tools of our manufacture are Bevels, Cut Nippers. Scratch Gauges, 
Depth Gauges, Jack Screws, Steel Clamps, Scribers, Speed Indicators, Nail Sets, 
Center Punches, Surface Gauges, Trammel Points, Levels, T Squares, and other 
ingenious Draughting Instruments, Stair Gauges, Screw Drivers, Thickness 
Gauges, Locomotive Guide Liners, etc. In Screw Pitch Gauges we make a variety 
of styles, ranging from 3j< to 83 pitches, and for V, Whit worth or U. S. Standard 
threads; as well as Metric Gauges, and Gauges after the Systdme Fransais and 
the Syst^me International. Our line of Calipers and Dividers is most complete, 
including 29 different styles and 170 sizes. We also make Hack Saw Frames and 
saws for power or hand frames. 

WE ISSUE a carefully prepared and illustrated catalogue of xia pages which 
mav be obtained for the asking, either of us, or any of our agents. Our main office 
and works are at Athol, Massachusetts, five hours by railroad from New York. 
We have a branch office and store at No. 136 Liberty Street, New York City. 

OUR AGENTS ARE 

Prance^ Paris, Adphe. Janssens, x6 Place de la Republique. 

England^ London, Chas. Churchill & Co.. Ltd., 15 Leonard St., Finshury, E.C. 

Birmingham, Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd., 2-10 Albert Street. 

Manchester, Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd., 3 Charlotte Street. Mosley St. 
Scotland— Glasgow, Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd.. 52 Bothwell Street, 
Germany— Berlin. Schuchardt & Schdtte, 59 Spandauer Strasse. 

Cologne, Schuchardt & Schtitte. 
Belgium— Brussels, Schuchardt & Schtitte, Vieux March^-aux-G rains, 3. 

Brussels, Adphe. Janssens, loa Brd. Barth^leme. 
Italy— Milan, Adler & Bisenschitz. 38 Via Principe Umberto. 
Switzerland— La Chaux de Fonds, W. Hummel Fils, 30 Rue Leopold-Robert. 
Sweden— MalmO, Wilh. Sonesson & Co. 

Stockholm, Schuchardt & Schiitte, Fersenske Terassen Blasieholmsham 

Stockholm, Aktiebolaget B. A. Hjorth & Co., 5 Klafa Norra Kyrkogata. 
Denmark— Copenhagen K, Aktiebolaget V. L^Jwener. 

Copenhagen O, Wilh. Sonesson & Co. 
Austria— Vienna VII., Schuchardt & Schtitte, Breitegasse 17. 

Budapest, Igndcz Si^kely, 9-11 Erszebet-K^rut. 
Russia— St. Petersburg, Schuchardt & Schtitte. xi Newsky Prospect. 
Argentine Republic— Buenos Ayres, Thos. Drydale & Co., 436 Call** Moreno. 
Australia- Sidney, Edge & Edge, 250 Pitt Street. 

Melbourne, Edge & Edge. 
Japan— Yokohama, F. W. Home, Box X74. 



Jones & Lamson Machine Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT, U. 5. A. 

Manufacturers of Turret Machinery 



WE MANUFACTURE but one style of Turret Machinery, i.e., 
what is known in the maiket as the Hartness Flat Turret Lathe. This 
machine in its popular size handles stock from the rod or bar up to 2 
inches in diameter and 24 inches long, and has become an indispens- 
able tool in the equipment of modern machine shops throughout the 
civilized world. It is designed especially for the Rapid and Accurate 
production ot Lathe Workivoxti the continuous bar with but one hand- 
ling, thus making a saving in the cost of producing this class of work 
over the old method of from 50 to 75 per cent. ; the machine in some 
cases actually saving the amount of its purchase price during the yeax 
of its installation. Our catalogue entitled, **Rapid Lathe Work," illus- 
trates and describes our machine and its equipment and is mailed on 
request. 

OUR FACILITIES.-— Our plant for the manufacture of this ma- 
chine is unique, in that the entire works are designed and equipped for 
the most rapid and accurate construction of but one class of machine 
tools, and at present it is exclusively devoted to the production of the 
Hartness 2 x 24 Flat Turret Lathe. Only by thus concentrating our 
entire plant do we believe the best results in design, construction, and 
efficiency can be obtained. 

OUR EXHIBIT.— At the Champ de Mars we will have on exhibi- 
tion one of the Hartness 2 x 24 Flat Turret Lathes which will be sup- 
plied with power so as to demonstrate the various speeds and feeds of 
the machine; while at Vincennes, we will have these machines in oper- 
ation, producing actual work. Inspection of machines and their product 
is cordially invited. 

OUR MACHINES at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893 
were considered, quoting the words of our Diploma, •* As a new design 
of Turret Lathe, and one of the finest machines of its class ever shown. 
The details of construction and operation are arranged in a most prac- 
tical and careful manner. The tools are so arranged that they do the 
work in the shortest time. The whole machine is massively built, so 
that in operation there is neither trembling nor vibration. The work 
is done in a rapid, accurate, and efficient manner, and is thus effected 
because the arrangement of the tools and their form of speed is exactly 
adapted to their purposes and because the variation of speed can be 
secured by the most simple means. This Turret Lathe shows advanced 
and progressive development in design, construction, and arrangement 
of detail, both the. relative laws of motion, strength, and dimension, 
and superior workmanship." This standard of excellence it has been 
our aim to maintain in both our home plant and the works at Mulhausen, 
Germany. 

OUR SELLING. — Jones & Lamson Machine Company, of Spring- 
field, Vermont, U.S.A., and Exchange Building, Stephenson's Flace, 
Birmingham, England, have the entire charge of our product for the 
United States and England. Germany, Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, 
Austria-Hungary — M. Koyemann, Charlottenstrasse 112, Dusseldorf, 
Germany. France and Spain — Ph. Bonvillain, 6 Rue Blanche, Paris, 
France. Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland — Aktiebolaget 
Verktygsmaskiner, Centralpalatset, Stockholm, Sweden. 



The Hendey Machine Company 

Torrington, Connecticut 
U. S. A. 



rton Lathes and the Heoiley PilWr 
1 19 to 31 inches in various lengths o( 

their especial merits are the Norton Sysiem of Change Gear ing for Threads" and 
Feeds, Automatic Stop for duplicate work and internal thread culling, Reverse 
Motion in apron, and improved self-oiling bearings. 

The lihapers are made with 15 to M inch stroke, our Patent AdjnsUble Table, 

We quote from Judgment pBBsed upon our machines at Chicago Fair: " The 
convenience with Which this lathe can be operated is simpl)' a revelation to an 
ordinary lathe hand. They are marked far beyond the ordmary ia the amoont of 

machines is, the deliuaie stop on the shaping machine, and ESPECIALLY the 
varlouslmpTovemenlsin the Hendey-Nortou Lathe," Signed by John E. Sweet. 

1 Lathe, at Vincenne* 
3 Headey Shap- 



ed, and viailora are cordially invited to iospei 
)S established in 1870, 



Hlled with Rre sprinklers, modern 
t work, all ofwhich is caichilly 
Place de la Republique. Parle. 



la Republique, Parli 
land. Belgium, Schu 



! 

s 

SI 



81 



t$i ^6it of f^ tiffdng JStubtos, QletP 'Borft, ie 
sttuateb in t$e center of t^ l^merican Section in t^ 
(gotunfea in iSfi QSuifbing of t^e (pflrieb ^tta anb 
^nbustriee. 



■' The KivER of the Water of L 

A Memorial Wixdow of Tiffany Favri 

Designed bv Mb. Louis C. Tiffai 



The exhibit includes artistic glass and metal work, and 
a full collection of Tiffany Pavrile Glass, Electric and Oil 
Table and Reading Lamps, Stained Glass Windows, 
Enamels, Ecclesiastical Embroideries, and various other 
objects made of combinations of metal and glass. 

The articles exhibited are chiefly from the designs of 
Mr. Iiouis C. Tiffany, the artist. 



Tiffany & Co 



UNION SQUARE 

NEW YORK QT Y USA 



Diamond and Gem merchants^ cut- 
ters of Diamonds and Precious Stones 
and general lapidaries* 

Gold and Silversmiths and artistic 
workers in other metals« 

Jewelers and Silversmiths by special 
appointment to Her Majesty Queen of 
England^ the Emperor of Russia and 
the principal Courts of Europe. 

Grand Prix and the Legion of Honor, 
Paris Expositions, J 878 and t889. 



BRANCH HOUSES IN EUROPE: 

PARIS: AVENUE DE L'OPfiRA, 36 BIS. 
LONDON: 221 AND 221 A REGENT ST., WEST 

Tiffany Pavilion at the Entrance to the United States Ezhibite 

Palace of Varied Industries 




1% dLe/ov JUa^. ])<m(UAy<yllok: 

thA/e/ote/nAAvc^ to d/va^pe/n^^ eti/tvi/C/ty. lAK/tli 
oii/i/ ^^e^cyue/Uvvte^, Reo/t^, ifou ^^Aoi^tcL (jet 
a moc/fva/ae. 

3i/(yi/enee 

of. 6a<yt R4/i^e/i/,-ttki/tFi y^Hc/u (?) i^oM^ i/n tfve 
f<vi/egA/<Hind , -lAK/t^fv tlie B^oo^ti^ BvLcLge a/rvcl 
(]o<iA/e/t^ <y^ CAJlyeAAA^ in the dUu>/ta/noe, -t^f 

bqtK to notf i^t^ueet^^, 8a^ R4>ue^, Ue^un 
y<>VR. ©etteA/ qJU^o q^ -MDum/j^te^v o^ mcwvl- 

yo^yOAAK^ and iMMeo<yio^ vyyik i/n >ikj/Ux>u^ 
<M^te^ oj. tif^JDe c3/rvd dA^yPe/i^/nt ootoo^. 

3. 

(photo. FAC-SIMILE of HAMMOND TYPEWRITER WORK) 





Williams' 




American Shaving 


^_^.,,.u.»..^^ 


and Toilet Soaps 


^ 


For WillUms' Shaving Soaps we 
Claim the following points of 
superiority : 


^IP 


1st 'I'he exceedingly— Rich—Thick— Creain- 
like Copious Lather produced by them. 




2ad The remarkably lasting quality of this 
lather, as shown by the length of time 
it retains its moisture after being applied 

to the face. 


'<p 


$ni The peculiarly softening action of the 
lather upon the beard, and the soothed, 
refreshed condition in which it always 
leaves the face, after shaving. 


■'VANRCE- 


4th Conrenience and attractiveness of style 

of soaps and containers. 


y^^t 


For Williams' Toilet Soaps we claim : 


WILUftMS' 


1st High quality of the Soap, due to char- 
acter and purity of materials used, and 
to the care used in the manufacture. 


""""•'""'"° 


2nd Creaminess and softness of the Uther 
produced. 


-•-^^ . 


3rd Attractiveness of packages. 


^^ 


THE J. B. WILLIAMS CO. 


HomeOKlct: ■•>»*» 


JERSEV CREAM 
TOILET SOAP 


QlnBtonbury. Conn. H!^ 



GoRHAM Mfg. Co. 

GOLD AND SILVER SMITHS 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



New York 

BROADWAY & iqth ST. 
23 MAIDEN LANE 

Chicago 

131 TO 137 WABASH AVE. 

San Francisco 

118 TO 120 SUTTER ST. 

Works 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
AND NEW YORK 



Paris Office 

36 AVE. DE L'OPERA 



i 



LARGEST IN THE WORLD 

SUGAR COATERS OF 

Hig^h Grade 

Confections and Sweetmeats 



We have in a few years established an enviable reputa- 
tion for the edible qualities and appearances of our confec- 
tions and sweetmeats. 

With due realization of the necessity of the best ingre- 
dients for the best results, we have never varied from the 
established principle. 

Our workman are the most skilled, intelligent and 
clever in conception of the consumers wants. 

In size, system and equipments, there is no factory so 
well adapted to its specialty as our own. 

Officered by men of high attainments and standing in 
the commercial world, we feel sufficiently capable of properly 
catering to the consumption of sweetmeats and confections. 

Our daily out-put of 60,000 pounds, is distributed 
throughout the world. 

A marked increase in our exportations is due to the 
salability and keeping qualities of our confections in warm 
climates. Our candies do not get stale, and unpalatable 
with age. 

The most attractive and practical ways of packing have 
been conceived by us. 

We have established agencies throughout the world. 

We solicit requests for our descriptive and illustrated 
catalogue. 

Sample shipments, costing $7.50 per case, delivered to 
New York, of fifty (50) one pound attractive tins, each filled 
with a different confection or sweetmeat, can be ordered 
direct, or through any reliable New York commission house. 

Sincerely hoping our exhibit may prove attractive 
enough to warrant your further interest and correspondence 
with us, we remain. 

Very obediently yours, 

PAN CONFECTION CO., 

248-250 E. ILLINOIS STREET. CHICAGO, ILL., U. 5. A. 



HENRY H. ROELOFS & CO. 



Brown and Twelfth Streets 
PHILADELPHIA, V. S. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Fur Fe lt Stiff a nd Soft Hats 

SOLC MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

American Improved Pressed Hats 




(TRADE MARK AS BELOW) 

Tliex\aier!eanlmproved ^ 

PRESSED 
FINISHED A^'D CURLED 

HAT 

UENRVH.ROELOFS&GO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

FINE FUR FELT SOFT HATS 



(TRAI>R MARKS AS BELOW) 



CaUiogue of Styles Sent Free on Application 

Our HaU received the Highest Award at the National Export 
Exposition, held In Philadelphia, V. S. A., Septem- 
ber 14th to November 30th, 1899 



iMilcvardHaiiiin 



Paris Agents, A. BEKTEIL & CO. 




A SHORT HISTORY OF 

The Peace Dale Mfg, Co* 

of Peace Dale^ Rhode Island, U.S.A* 



Business begun by Rowland Hazard, 1801. 

First powerloom in America, if not in the world, started in 18 15. 

The first manufacture was of coarse woolen cloth, followed by finer 
grades, and then by rugs and sharwls, the principal business of the 
company for many years. Peace Dale Shawls were, and are, noted for 
sound fabric and lasting fine colors. 

The incorporation of the company, 1848. 

The first complete plant in America for the manufacture of worsteds, 
in all the processes from the raw material to the finished cloth, 1S72. 

A steady increase and improvement in methods and plant from 
1801 to 1900. 

The product is today: 

First, Woolens : 

Friezes in 28, 34, and 40 ounces, in piece-dyes and mixtures. 

Cassimeres and Cheviots for men's wear. 

Homespun and Fancy Suitings for women's wear. 

Golf and Outing Cloths. 

Rugs in three grades and many styles. 

Overcoatings, Carriage Rug Linings, etc. 

Second, Worsteds: 

Serges, both piece-dyes and mixtures, in three grades and in 
weights from S)4 to 24 ounces, the most important product of the com- 
pany. 

Overcoatings, etc. 

The output is strictly all wool and very largely made from domestic 
fleeces. No admixture of cotton is used in any fabric. 

The coarsest grade of the worsted is made from long staple Amer- 
ican wool, with a percentage of quarter blood Australian cross-bred 
combing. It is intended to be serviceable and stylish. 

The medium grade is of domestic and Australian combing stock. 
This American wool is long, strong, and of most lasting quality, while 
the Australian gives softness and finish. The combination is the cor- 
rect blend for worsted serges. 

The finest grade is made of Australian wool. 

Peace Dale is in Rhode Island, near the sea, and has the benefit 
of uniform humidity and equable climate. The village is attractive. 
The houses of the operatives are well built and kept in good repair. 
A system of profit-sharing was in force for a number of years, and in 
the improved condition of business, has been revived. Many thinp^ are 
done in Peace Dale for the benefit of the employees of the mill m the 
way of the library, reading rooms, gymnasium, baths, lectures, concerts, 
singing societies, etc. All of these are believed to contribute to the 
welfare of the operatives, and so to the good quality of the product. 

The business has been conducted by four generations of the Hazard 
family. 

The selling agents have been always the same ; one house and its 
business successors for a long series of years. The firm is at present 
Lawrie, Mann & Drowne, 61 Leonard Street, New York. 




Arlington Mills, Lawrence, Mass., U.S.A. 

The Arlington Mills are situated in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, U.S.A. 

The Corporation was formed in 1865, and its 

capital stock has been increased at different times 

until it has reached the present amount, $2,500,000. 

_ The business is divided into four departments — 

Wink f K^^ * Worsted Top Mill, a Worsted Yarn Mill, a Cotton 

Yam Mill, and a Worsted Dress Goods Mill. 

Firs/. — The manufacture of worsted tops, made from nearly all the 
varieties of combed wools g^own in the world, is a large and growing 
feature of the business, The tops made of all these varieties of fibres 
are offered to worsted spinners. A commission combing business is 
also done, and this part of the work has grown to large proportions. 

The Top Mill has a capacity which will enable it to produce 300,000 
pounds of top a week, requiring for its production between 600.000 and 
800,000 pounds of greasy wool per week ; in other words, the fleeces of 
20,000 sheep will pass through its machinery every day that it is in full 
operation. 

Second. — In the Worsted Yarn Department yarns are made, on 
both the English and French systems of spinning, from the tops manu- 
factured at the Top Department While there is a great variety of 
uses to which these yams are put, the principal sales are to the weav- 
ers of men's wear goods and the knitters of underwear and hosiery. 
These yams are made in all degress of fineness — in the grey, solid 
colors, fancy mixes, Jasper effects, and in double and twists. 

Third. — The Arlington Mills also manufacture, in addition to its 
own requirements, fine combed cotton yarns for sale to manufacturers 
and knitters. These yarns are manufactured from the longest staple 
Egyptian, American, and Sea Island cottons, and are spun in all num- 
bers and delivered in all varieties of forms required by the purchaser. 

A recent development of the cotton-yam trade is the process of 
mercerizing, in which line the Arlington Mills are very large manufac- 
turers. By this process yarns are given a very brilliant lustre, almost 
equal to that of silk, and the uses for this proauct are very extensive. 

fourth. — In its dress goods business it has always been the aim 
of the management to provide for the people at large, and this has 
greatly broadened the scope of the work in this department, so that at 
present the Mills have facilities for the manufacture of nearly every 
kind of worsted fabric for women's and children's wear, whether the 
weave be plain or fancy, the colors solid or combined in plaids, figures, 
or stripes ; whether the fabric be made of white yarns for subsequent 
piece-dyeing, or of yams dyed in the wool or top. 

The Arlington Mills' dress goods in the cheaper varieties and the 
finer fabrics are recognized by the trade at large as equal to the best 
products of the looms of Europe. 

Perhaps the most characteristic feature of this branch of the 
Arlington Mills business is the manufacture of specialties for the trade 
on orders which have heretofore been made solely in Europe. This 
business lately has grown into large proportions. 

From the above it will be seen that all the processes of manufac- 
ture, from the raw cotton and raw wool to the various finished products 
are carried on under one management and one corporation. 

The total number of employees of the corporation, in all its depart- 
ments, is 4,350. 

The Executive Offices of the Corporation are located at 78 Chauncy 
street, Boston, Massachusetts. U.S.A. 



^;B^^^mm 


-. 


PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A. 


RADES OF 


MANUFACTURERS OF THE FINEST G 


SOFT AND STIFF 




FELT HAl 


awardoJ the 


The Miken of STETSON HATS were 


Tb. S«o. *?^-^A«is'-'«W% 
Exhibit is 
located in 
Textile 


mintnlcd 

win be 

nulled on 

rcqueit to 

any >«IUlile 

tnttcr 



COLUMBUS BUGGY CO. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO, U.S.A. 

BUILDERS OF 

FINE VEHICLES 



SUITABLE FOR 

ALL COUNTRIES AND ALL CLIMES. 

200,000 NOW IN USE. 



UNEXCELLED 

IN STYLE 

FINISH AND 

WORKMANSHIP. 



AMERICAN TIMBER 

IS THE BEST 

IN THE WORLD 

FOR 

VEHICLE BUILDING 



IT MAKES THEM 

STRONG, LIGHT, DURABLE. 

THEY STAND THE SEVEREST TEST AND 
HARDEST USAGE. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE OF 100 STYLES 



STANDARD THE WORLD OVER 



F. E. REED COMPANY, STs^^Ts^i 

MANUFACTURERS OF MACHINE TOOLS. 
ENGINE LATHES A SPECIALTY. 

WE MANUFACTURE a standard line of Engine Lathes of 12. 
14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 27 and 30 inches swing; Special Turning Lathes, 
having two Patented Elevating Tool Posts, 16 and 20 inches swing ; 
Turret-Head Chuck Lathes, 16, 20 and 30 inches swing ; Stud and Bolt 
Lathes, 16 inches swing ; Screw Cutting Lathes, 10 and 12 inches swing, 
for use of amateurs, operated by foot power or other power ; Hand 
Lathes, 9, 11. 12, 14, 16 and 26 inches swing, and Slide Rests for same; 
a special 10 inches swing Wood Turning Lathe for use of educational 
institutions (lathes of our manufacture, of various sizes and styles, are 
in use in more than 150 educational institutions, in all civilized coun- 
tries). All of the foregoing are fully illustrated and described in our 
illustrated catalogue which we shall mail, free to all who make appli- 
cation for it. 

OUR EXHIBIT. At Champ de Mars we have on exhibit one com- 
plete 12-inch swing Engine Lathe; and at Vincennes one each of the 
following complete lathes: 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22 and 24 inches swing 
Engine Lathes, 20 inches swing Special Turning Lathe, 10 inches swing 
Screw Cutting Foot Power Lathe, 10 inches swing Special Wood Turn- 
ing Lathe for manual training use. These lathes represent and embody 
the latest and most approved designs in points of design, power, 
strength, workmanship and convenience in handling, in use in the 
United States, up to date. 

OUR PLANT was established in 1875, employing at first 6 work- 
men, and now giving employment to over 300 skilled mechanics. Our 
buildings contain 2.2 acres of floor space, and are thoroughly well con- 
structed by us with special reference to the manufacture of lathes. 
They are well lighted and heated, and are provided with every machine 
and special tool avhich experience can supply, for the manufacture of 
lathes to the best possible advantage. 

OUR PRODUCT. We quote the words of our diploma, received at 
the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, in 1893, which we believe is 
applicable to our product now, as well: * 'Award for collection of Stand- 
ard Engine Lathes, ranging from 10 to 30 inches swing, especially de- 
signed for the average run of work and to furnish the purchaser with a 
thoroughly good machine at a reasonable price — a difficult problem suc- 
cessfully solved. To meet this requirement these machines are simple 
in construction and operation and arranged to prevent breakage b^r negli- 
gence on the part of the operator. The design of the lathes is in con- 
formity with standard practice, and the workmanship is of a high char- 
acter. The utmost care is used in the construction of each lathe. Each 
machine has its own individual number stamped upon it and undergoes 
a thorough inspection at the hands of a competent, experienced inspec- 
tor before leaving our works, and a written report of the inspection 
handed into our office for reference ; thus each lathe leaves our hands 
as nearly perfect, practically, as it is possible for us to have it. 

OUR AGENTS are : for France, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy and 
Spain, Fenwick Freres & Co., main office, 21 Rue Martel, Paris; for 
Germany and Austria, Gustav Diechmann & Sohu, main office, Neue 
Promenade 4, Berlin C 22; for Russia, G. Koeppen & Co., Moscow; 
for Holland, van Rietschoten & Houwens, Rotterdam; for Great 
Britain, Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd., 9 Leonard St., London. 



THE \ f 1. " 

Celebrated "ViCtOr Turbine 

Now in use in all parts of the worid 



We are the most extensive manufacturers 
of Turbine Water Wheels in the world. 
Our ST'^* variety of designs and sizes 
enable us to meet almost any requirement. 
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF COM- 
PLETE WATER POWER PLANTS. 



The Stilwcll-Bicrcc & Smith-Vaile Co. 

CapIU] $1,100,000.00 

Factories and Head Office, DAYTON, OHIO. U. S. A. 



Salu Agency tor Grut BriUin and Europe 
FRED NEU, 97 QUEEN VICTORIA ST.. LONDON. E. C 



I rurnnatiu Lonoo 



TRIPLEX PUMP 

DRIVEN BY 

ELECTRIC MOTOR 



PUMPING MACHINERY 

of all kinds anil adapted for all purposes; Air 
Compressors, Straig^ht Line, Duplex and Cross- 
Compound, both Steam and Belt Actuated ; 
Oil Mill Machinery ; Hydraulic Madiinery ; 
Ice and Refrigerating Machinery. Manu- 
factured by 

The Stilwell-Bierce & Smith-Vaile Co. 

Capital $1,100,000.00 

Factories and Head Office, DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A. 

Sale* Agency for Great Britain and Europe. 
FRED NELU 97 QUEEN VlCTOKiA ST.. LONDON. E. C. 




THE ROBINS PATENT BELT CONVEYORS are in use all over the world. 
handling coal, ore, sand, gravel, dredgings, cement and other materials. 
The FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE of thcse conveyors is the perfect 
SEPARATION of the CONVEYING parts from the running parts. The power re- 
quirements are therefore MUCH lower than those of any other conveying 
SYSTEM. The material is carried at a MINIMUM OF FRICTION on the troughed 
belt and is delivered at any point or points along its length. 

The DURABILITY OF THE BELT Js rendered very great by the rein- 



•U4 



::^^^^^^ 



forcement of rubber at its centre, as shown in this cut of a cross section. 
Any ordinary belt used for carrying heavy material lasts but a short time. 

These conveyors have a capacity as high as 1500 TONS per hour. They 
can ELEVATE at a 50 per cent grade. They DO not break the material car- 
ried. Their bearings arc dust-proof. Their simpucity minimizes the cost 
OF repairs and insures absolute freedom from shutdowns. 

A BRIEF examination of any of our exhibits will demonstrate the 
truth of these statements. 



OUR EXHIBITS ARE LOCATED AS FOLLOWS : 

Machinery and Electricity Building : 

Space 5, Block 16, U. S. Section. Two 20 inch Belt Conveyors 
in operation. Our main office is with this exhibit. 

Palace of Mines and Metallurgy : 

United States Section. Two Model Belt Conveyors, with 
Movable Tripper in operation. 

ViNCE?fNns : 

U. S. Triangle, near Machinery Building. Two ao inch Belt 
Conveyors and Movable Tripper in operation. 



ROBINS CONVEYING BELT COMPANY 

PARK ROW BUILDING, NEW YORK» U.S.A. 

Cable Address, DURABELT, NEW YORK. A.B.C., Liebcrs* a Western Union Codes U&ed 



The J. A. Fay & Egan Company 

OP ClNCINNATr, OHIO. U.S.A., 

X*/ one of the largest exhibitors at the American Section, 
Cl^flf^jJ'' grew io fifty years from a capacity of one machine 
"'~™"- per month to Its present output of over fifty machines 

per day. This Company owns the large works of J. A. Fay & Com- 
pany and of The Egan Company, both at Cincinnati, which were 
absorbed into one Company in 1893 under the name of J. A. Fay & 
Egan Company, 

The Company has an exhibit at Champ de Mars, where it shows 
in operation a number of the simpler machines, such as are used in 
furniture and other light manufacturing; while at Vincennes it shows 
a complete line of wood-working machinery of every kind, including 
all the heavy car and ship building tools in operation. 

The most conclusive and convincing proof of the excellence of its 
products lies in the fact that it supplies the best trade in the world, and 



WORKa OF J. A. FAV & EOAM COUPAHV, CtNCWNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 

its export trade is larger than that of all similar Americas 
combined. Its machines are in use in every civilized country on the 
globe, and the Company has never failed to receive the highest prize 
wherever its machines were exhibited. It has received no less a recog- 
nition than the Decoration of the Legion of Honor, conferred by the 
French Government on the occasion of the 1E89 Exposition. It ranks 
as the great designer and inventor of automatic labor-saving wood- 
working machinery, and stands in the relation of advisor to many of 
the World's most famous railway-car and ship building works. 

Engineers should visit the Company's wonderful Exhibit at Vin- 
cennes and examine its machines at Champ de Mars, where Mr. G. P. 
Attenberg, the Company's Foreign Manager, who is well known to 
many of the European Eng^ineers, will be pleased to show to the 
Engineers and their Principals plans illustrating the American method 
of building and designing modem factories where wood-workinjz 
machinery is used. 



Western Electric Company 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 

Exhibit Electrical Appliances Group 5, Class 23, 25, 26 



MEDALS RECEIVED AT THE FOLLOWING: 

International Exhibition Exposition Internationale 

" Centennial •' Dc rElectricitc, 

Philadelphia, U.S.A., 1876 Paris, xE3i 

Centennial International Exhibition 
Melbourne, Australia, x888 

Exposition Universelle World's Columbian Expositioa 

Paris, Z889 Chicago, 1893 



Detailed Description of Exhibits 

Exhibits of Telephone, Telegraph, Fire Alarm, Electric Lighting and 
Power Transmission Machinery, as follows : 

Telephone 

A complete Telephone Exchange Equipment illustrating the latest 
American practice, showing various forms of subscribers, instruments 
and other appliances, all in practical operation ; lines are extended and 
instruments located at different points about the Exposition. 

Telegraph 

Complete set of Telegraph Instruments in operative condition, 
illustrating latest devices. 

Fire Alarm 

Complete Fire Alarm and Police Call Instruments with different 
styles of call boxes, complete apparatus in operative condition. 

Electric Lighting 

Dynamo driven by Motor, direct connected on one sub-base, oper- 
ated and controlled by Switchboard, complete in all details. Arc 
Lamps of constant current series tj^pe and of the constant potential 
enclosed type and also Incandescent Lamps and Fan Motors. 

Power Transmissions 

Motors driven by above generator of open, semi-encased or com- 
pletely encased types. 

The company has always a representative in attendance for pur- 
poses of explaining exhibits to visitors, in addition to attendants em- 
ployed in operating the exhibit. 

Western Electric Company 

CHICAGO, NEW YORK. PARIS, LONDON, ANTWERP, BERLIN 



Wagner Electric 

Mfg. Go. 

BUILDERS OF 

Self Starting Single Phase A. C. Motors. 
Transformers for all Kinds of Service. 
Direct Current Motors and Generators. 
All Kinds of Switch Boards. 
High Grade Knife Switches. 
Indicating Switch Board Instruments. 
Ventilating Fans for Direct and 
Alternating Currents. 
Automobile Charging Outfits. 
High Tension Fuse Cut-outs. 
Wrought Copper Terminals. 



General Offices and Works : 

St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A 

Foreign Department : 
222 Havemeyer BuiLr*NG, New York City, U. S. A. 



OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 

PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, UJSJL 



The Oil W«ll Suppfy C». Manufaoture svsry us*ntial appll*n«" 

for drilirng or sinking deep Artesian Wetls. Bttilers, 

Engines, Drilling Tools, Driva Pipe, Casing, 

Tubing, Line Pipa, Brass and Iron Fittings. 



^^ *" SPRINQFIELD, MASS., /I/ 

•^ U.S.A. ' 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

MILITARY, POLICE, POCKET AND TARGET 

REVOLVERS 



You are cordially invited to inspect our display in the Palace 
of Forestry, Fisheries and the Chase 

SPACE No. 30. 

UNITED STATES SECTION. 

Do not fail to visit our gallery at the Bois de Vincennes 

where z practical demonstration of the operation 

of our arms may be seen. 



Johnston Harvester Co. 



BATAVIA. Sonptu Oflee i 

NEW YORK, ISIludll'iqndlE 

U.S.A. fnij rnnn 



BVRON E. HUNTLEY, President. 



Mowing Machines Reaping Machines 

Combined l(eapers and Mowers 
Harvesters and Binders for Grain 
Harvesters and Binders for Com (Maize) 
Headers ' Header-Binders 

Disk Harrows, or Pulverizers 
Disk Com Cultivators 
Hay Rakes Hay Teddere 



Paris ExposlUon, 1900 
United States Annex, Pavilion of Agriculture 



THE BABCOCK PRINTING PRESS 

MANUFACTURINQ COMPANY 

da«  lirye buslnas, building many alze* will Btyln ol 
piintlnz pnntet. Oncol Iheir ben machlnn. the "00(1- 
mii«,"7*an cublbltlon In the Qulnceconcc Annexe, Qroup 3. 



This press is properly 

strength, and espt^cially to 
resist tlio strain of impres- 
sion. The side frames and 
center cross girt, which 
rests on these frames arc 
very heavy; and the beJ, 
with its six steel -shod 
tracks, is supported by this 
girt in a way that entirely 
prevents springing. The 
cylinder is lifted by eccen- 
trics, without J j.iit butwct;! the lift.ng device and the cyhnder. 

This press runs smoothly at high speed. The ball and socket uni- 
versal ^'oint permits the use of a large driving gear, which consumes 
one-third of its time in reversing the bed ; this slow, easy rounding of 
the centers, in connection with the very efficient air spring, avoids all 
jar and produces the smooth, even tnutjon of tha Optimus. A study 
of the ball and socket joint, referred to above, will show that it is me- 
chanically correct and gives a perfectly regular motion to the bed 
while printing. 

By the gearing of the " angle" or distributing rollers, they are 
po-iitively driven, the distribution of the ink is improved and the com- 
position will last much longer. The form and distributing rollers are 
interchangeable, enabling the printer to use all new rollers, first on 
the form and when partly worn, as distributers. The roller bearings 
are so arranged that any of the rollers may be removed without 
altering the " set " ; and the composition rollers may be released from 
contact without removing them from tlieir bearings. 

The " Optimus " delivers the sheets without touching the printed 
surface, piling them printed side up, in plain view of the pressman, 
and directly over the fountain. There are many other advantages of 
this delivery that are especially worthy of careful cunstderatiou. 

Among the many other 
excellent features of the " Op- 
timus "press, are the Safety 
G ripper Mechanism, wliiefi 
register perfectly; the Impres- 
sion Tnp, the Reversing 
Mechanism, the Positive Slid- 
er Controlling Mechanism, the 
Piston Head and Air Spring 
(which are remarkably easy <i'. 
adjustment), and the Valve foi 
removing the spring when 
desired. 

THE BABCOCK PRINTING PRESS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, NEW YORK,U.S.A. 

JOHN HADDON ft COMPANY, 
Areata fet Great BiitaiD, Bouvarle Houae, Saliabury Sq., Fl:;et C:., E.C.,t.ondao, Edc, 



McCORMICK 

Harvesting Machine Company, 

CHICAGO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



Manufactuiers of Self-Binding Harvesters, Reapers, Mowers, Headeis, 
Hay Rakes, Com (Maize) Bindeis, Corn (Maize) Shredders, Etc., 

and Binding Twine. 



FOUR EXHIBITS, LOCATED AS FOLLOWS; 

/. FInt Floor of Aplcaltaral Aaaex. Flnelf ftoiabed Bpedmena of (elt-bliuliiif 
hureetcr, [caper uid mower, and modclB of other HcCormlck nuchina, 

2. ninl Floor otAgrtaiHural Aaao*. Bjantborllraf tbeCslMd Stalea OoTcnitsest, 
a Rcirospeetlve Kxblblt of modela Id motion, vrltb borse* atlached, representlne ihe danlop- 
ment of the art oC bineallDK gnln. na ebown by McCormlck MBcblaee, from tbe Hist prurkal 
reaper. Inventei] by Cyrns U. HcCarmlckio 1S3I, to IhelateaCUcConnlclc UacblDes, the btgbeei 
csaniplcBOftliccrt. 

3. Balconjr otAgrleaKaimt BmlU- 
lag. Eibiblt of blndlDR Inine, ■iili 
repreflcatatJonB of flgarefl of iuIlt^ 
withering and preparing Yncotan 
gisal and UaoLMa hemp; and pboto- 
gnpha of Ibo procenea of mumfaetDT- 

4. At Vlaaaatt. EibiUt o( fall- 
■!zed ■pcdmeni. In operation, of all 
HcCormlck Uachlnea. tn > apeclal 
banding erected bj tbe McCormick 
Company; alto historical models, 
pbolosrapba of harrcftlnz acaiica 

Tn.,MoCoBa[CKBBiLn.so*TV.sc«s«a. th^-ebout Ibe world. «,d a tcenc 

repreaeDtillon of Iha great McCormick 
• Worke. 

The MeCormlck narvcBtlng Mncbino Compony Is (be oldeit orKinlntJoa la tbe 
world engaged la the laantifacture of hnneetlng machinery. The bnalncM was roandcd 
In ISai by Cyriig H. HcCormlck, uho then lavented aad bnllt the lint reaper. In IMT 
C. II. McCormick and brother located In Chicago, forcneelnj; that this city was destined to 
become the ercot Rrain center of Americn, Here tbe bagioeea grew year after yew, nnill 
to-day It la the largest ctlabllabnieDt of Ita kind on eorih, wlita an ontpul of l.MO eompleli 
mschlnM each day of ten baara, equal lo nearly onchalf the Korld'e oulpat of 
harvesting machinery. The blackamith ahop In which the first reaper* were bnilt baa 
grown Inio vhat la imitonbiediy the moat remaikable organlutlon In tbe world of l*hor- 
■arlng " macbinea that make macblnea." 



The dominant featare of McCormick machines Is their high standard of qaality. All the 
resoorcea of the McCormick Company, the largest of its kind in the world, are concentrated to 
secure perfection in materials, workmanship, meclianlcal design, darabllity and efficiency. 
That McCormick machines are nnlversally recognized as the world's best, Is shown by the 
record of more than 800 World^s Exposition and Field Trials, in which the McCormick, 
almost wlthoat exception, has received the highest awards. /L few of the most notable honors 
awarded to the McCormick arc the following : 

GRAND COUNaL MEDAL. World's Fair, London, 1851. 

{Extract from the Report of the Council qf Juries,) 

**The McCormick Reaper is the most vulaable article contribntcd to the exposition, and 
for its originality and value and its perfect work In the field, it is awarded the Council 
Medal." 

GRAND GOLD MEDAL. Universal Exposition, Paris, 1855. 
{Extract from the Report of the Judge*.) 

*'' On the McCormick invention all grain cutting machines are based 

and it (the machine), as well, is the one which worked the best in all its trials.'^ 

GRAND GOLD MEDAL. National Field Trial of Ilarvcsterg, U. S. A., 1857. 
** For the best reaping machine.** 

GRAND PRIZE. International Exhibition, London, 18C3. 

GRAND GOLD MEDAL. International Exposition, Hamburg, 1863. 
{Extract from the Official l*rize List.) 

" Cyrus Hall McCormick, Chicago, Illinois, the Gold Medal for the practical introduction and 
Improvement of the reaping machine." 

GRAND GOLD MEDAL. UniTcrsal Exposition, Paris, 18C7. 
{Extract from Report of Eugene THsseraud^ Director- General of tlie Imperial Domains.) 
The man who has labored most in the general distribution, perfection and discovery of the 

first practical reaper is assuredly Mr. McCormick, of Illinois. 
*' In all the universal Expositions the flivt prize has been awarded to this admirable 

machine, and at this time at Vincennes, as at Fouillcuse, under the most difficult conditions, 

its triumph has been complete. Mr. McCormick has been judged worthy of the highest 

distinction of the exposition.'* 

DECORATION CROSS OF THE LEGION OP HONOR. Awarded by Emperor 

Napoleon III on the field trial at tho Universal Exposition, Paris, 18G7. 
TWO GRAND G^>LD MEDALS. The Universal Exposition, Vienna, 1873. 
TWO BRONZE MEDALS. Centennial ExposiUon, U. S. A., 1876. 
GRAND GOLD MEDAL. Universal Exposition, Paris, 1678. 
DECORATION OFFICER OF THE LEGION OP HONOR. Awarded by the French 

Minister of Agriculture, Universal Exposition, Paris, 1878. 
SPECIAL GOLD MEDAL. Awarded by the Society of Agriculture of France and the 

French Minister of Agriculture, Universal Exposition, Paris, 1878. 
OBJECT OF ART. Awarded by tho Society of Agriculture of France, International 

Exposition, Paris, 1878. 
BRONZE MEDAL. International Exposition, Sydney, Australia, 1879. 
GOLD MEDAL. International Exposition, Melbourne, Australia, 1880. 
GRAND GOLD MEDAL. Cotton Exposition, msi, Atlanta, U. S. A. 
TWO SILVER MEDALS. International Mining and Industrial Expos'tion, Denver, 

U. S. A., 1884. 
BRONZE MEDAL. Jubilee International Exposition, Adelaide, Australia, 1887. 
GOLD MEDAU International Exposition, Melbourne, Australia, 1883. 
GRAND PRIZE. International Exposition, Paris, 1889. 
BRONZE MEDAL. World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1833. 

That McCormick machines are maintaining their high position U shown by tho report of the 
Judges of the World*s Columbian Exposition, after exhaustive field trials : 

**The machines are splendid examples of the hljjhest contemporary state of the art In 
design, construotlon, operation, and economical performance.^* 



The Miller, DuBrul & Peters Mfg. Co. 

ESTABUSHED I87O 1 : 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CIGAR AND 
CIGAREHE 
MACHINERY 



Plodura Tobacco Cultcr. 

Suction Cigar Railing Madilne, 

All tobacco ClEartttc fltadilacs, 

ClEar BrandlnE Madilocf. 

Cienr Making Toote. 

CIGAR MOLDS-4,000 SHAPES 

I 



ClCAKi^i IE Machine. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, NEW VOeK 

507-519 Eail PuH Strut 404'40S East 32iid Slml 




The object of this exhibit is to show the 
advance in the methods of wrapping up 
articles going to consumers. 

Formerly it was leaves, then news- 
'^ papers, then in crrder **Flat," ** Square" 
and ** Satchel Bottom" bags, and now 

THE SELF OPENING BAG 

In all other forms of bags, the grocer has to insert his 
hand to shape it to his purpose. 

THIS TAKES TIME AND TIME IS MONEY 

With this bag a gentle flip makes a square shaped paper 
box, ready to receive its contents without manipulation. 
SEVENTY PER CENT, of bags used in the United 
States are SELF OPENING. 

The Union Bag & Paper Co^ 

CAPITAL $27,000,000 

is a combination of all the companies in the United States 
making this shaped bag, and it controls over 



TWO HUNDRED PATENTS 

This Company owns its own timber lands, water powers, 
wood pulp, chemical mills and jute mills, and has eighteen 
paper mills and seven bag factories. 

Present CAPACITY 30,000,000 bags per day. 

Can deliver bags in any European seaport to compete 
with any home manufacturer. 

Makes any style of bag of any grade of paper at prices 
beyond competition ; quality considered. 

The goods of this Company have easily taken the high- 
est prizes in every competitive exhibition in which they have 
been entered, as follows : 

World's Industrial Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, May, 1885 

The World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893 

Exposition Universelle D'Anvers, August, 1894 

Pood Exposition, Cincinnati, U. S. A., 1898 



THE PIKE MFQ. CO 

PIKE STATION. N. H., U. S. A. 

Worlds 

Headquarten 

lor 

Scythe Stones 
Oil Stones 
Razor Hones 



^ 



E 



Pike's 
Uly White 
Washita Oil Sto« 



Piice's 

Hard Arlcansas 

Oil Stone , 

for Eagravtn.1 
Jtwdext,W*tdf\ 
^uJun, inrf aDi 
finwdge Took] 

- I 

Razor Horns, atl kindt 
Bdjiui Hon II. German 
Water Honet. Swaty and 
Japancit Hontt. Indiw 
Pond, Black Diamond and 
White Mountain Scythe 



S-^tS' INDIA OIL STONES 

The Mining Buiiding, Chtmp dc Man, Croup IX. Clasi 65, 

FOU SAMPI.F.S, CATAl-OGIR ASTl PRICES, APPLV TO 

Markt & Co., 76 Rue de Ti'rrenne, 



VICTOR 
INCUBATORS 

...AND... 

BROODERS 



are intended to, and witl batch 
chicks from any kind of eggs 
and in any part of the world. 
They are made of first-class 
material throughout, the con- 
struction of the case being 
the very beat quality of ma- 
terial; made double, with a nar- 
row space between the walls, 
which is packed with mineral 

The trays are arranged so the 
eggs can tie turned without open- 
ing the inner doors of the 
machine. The thermometer is 
absolutely accurate and tested 



one, and the machines contain 
all the principles that are essen- 
tial to bring about the results 
for which they are intended. 

The purpose of the Brooder is 
to take care of the chicks after 
they are hatched. It is also con 
structed of Grat-class material, 
and so finished as to make it 
tit to withstand all kinds of 
weather; it is undoubtedly un- 
surpassed by anything ctf the 
kind made for the purpose. 
Every machine is guaranteed. 

We invite you to examine our 
exhibit with the United Slatei. 
Collective Exhibit in the Palart 
of Agriculture. 



George Ertel Company 

Quincy, Illinob, 

U. S.A- 



ro;f»^iiii;!|BSfliis 



No Cords or Bolanevs 



Every Geoubie RoOcr bu 
the lume of Stewut Hut- 
thotu, in script, on hbd 



Wood RDllen. Tlo Roller*. Made oil lengtlu and In diameters from ^ locb to t 

Inche*. Suitable for DwelllBE Hoiuca, Sbopc, Tran Cars. 

Steam Care, Map*, Awolnss. Etc. 

MEDALS FROM 10 WORLD'S FAIRS 

SOLD ALL OVER THE WORLD 

Stewart Hartshorn & Co., ■"" ="""!,";'■.''•'' ""»■ 



CAMPBELL'S C(\\ inc 

CONDENSED tJ\J KJ M *3 

 Jiut add Hot Water and Serve." 

The Addition of i>j Piot* of Bollioe Water Haksi S PnU 
Portlone of DcKcJoui Soup. RETAILS AT ;i COST OF 
LIQUID SOUPS, n Xindi. Peeked la i Pound Caaa. 

Originaton o[ Condcwd Soupt. CAMDEN. H.J., VSJi. 



Ttie Incubator and 
Tcferredto. With the 
on thointubatoriauti 


THE mm iHcusM m imm co. 

QUINCY, ILL., U.S.A. 

Tliifi Incubator i» so constructed that it win hatch 
aff as nMf '" wi'hjhe least trouble available 

.1 .■!1,"'""J''.''"'*™""?'''> '""■Thermo Regulator, ven. 

blalion and turniQg device. 
Broodercombined, orlncQbator part, islhesame as above 
iS ^Sheat^"^!''' """* ""T'"' ?•*' escapes from the lamp 



caloloBUe. THE KELIABLK IVCUBATOR & DKOODEli CO.. yuincy. Ill 

VALVES of all sizes— in great variety, for any 
service to which a valve may be put. Hydrants 
and Water Gates for water works purposes, 
bare manufactured by 

/THE KENNEDY 
VALVE IMFC. 
CO. 

NEW YOI<K 



:Sfi." 



nd for a 
, U.S.A. 




OTIS 
ELEVATOR 



CO 




PANY 



71 BBOADWAY, HEW YORK , U. S. A. 



OTIS ELEVATOR CO, 

UNITED 

4 Queen Vtctoria St., E. C. 
LONDON. 

25 Rue de la Palx. 
PARIS. 

DEUTSCHE OTIS- 

QESELLSCHAFT. 
W. Leipziger Stp., 124 
BERLIN. 

LIFTS 

for 
Paseengere and Freight. 

Hydraullo, Steam. Belt, 

ELECTRIC 

FOR 

Office Buildings, Hotel*, Apart- 
ment Houeee, Reslden- 
oee. Shops, Faotories, Mines, 
Blast Fumaoes, Etc. 

Builders of 
INCLINED RAILWAYS 







SEE OUR EXHIBITS 

Two Electric Passenger Lifts, 
The United States Pavilion, 
Qual D>Orsay| and THE ESCA- 
LATOR, the Palace of Textiles, 
Champ de Mars. 



WE HAVE FIVEFACTO- 
RIES RUNNING TO THEIR 
FULL CAPACITY. 



OUR APPARATUS IS IN 
USE IN EVERY CIVILIZED 
COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. 



SAFE 

DURABLE 
EFFICIENT 

HIGHLY 

ECONOMICAL IN 

MAINTENANCEAND 

OPERATION 



THE ESCALATOR 



I ( 



OTIS ELEVATORS 

THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD 



» • 



Established i836. 




^^cSat 



is a name that has been before the American public in connection 
with household commodities for sixty years. A synonym for 
reliability in American households. With this recommendation, 
B. T. Babbitt ventures to bring to the attention of the people of 
France a group of household commodities that have stood the test 
of time. 



M&s^ Best som 

noted for its purity and quality. Millions of families— as well as 
mechanics, railroad engineers, and railroad men— attest the re- 
markable efficiency of Best Soap. 

(^dfyk m Soap Powder. 

Made from pure materials. It acts quickly, easily and cheaply. 
It saves time, labor and money. In washing clothes no lady or 
servant need fear to have 1776 Soap Powder in contact with her 
hands, as it cannot injure the skin. 

lest Wm PowKer. 

Originated in 1849 by B. T. Babbitt. Best Baking Powder will 
be found a practical substitute for yeast, especially useful to bak- 
ers in hastening certain processes. As the ingredients are mixed 
and react in perfect chemical proportion, the powder is completely 
consumed, and leaves, even when used in unneccessarily exces- 
sive quantities, absolutely no trace of foreign odor or flavor — only 
the natural fresh odor or desired flavor of the cake or bread. 

B. T. Babliitt's Bi-Carb. Soda, Pure Potash, Best Dynamite Blycerine. 




PARIS. 



NEW YORK. 



LONOOM 



D.n.BALDWlti<s @. CIMaNMATI.0..U.5.A. 

M°btL 'F BAUWn PIAtIo fACToRlEi "M- 

CIMCinnATI DISPLAYED IM DtPARTMEnT OF 

CNIL EH6intERIt16 ->- TRAN5PoRTATI°M 



Established i86a, 

D. H. Baldwin & Co. 

Manufacturers, Distributors and Exporters 

Grand and Upright Pianos, 

Reed Organs. 

Factories in Cincinnati and Chicago. 

The Baldwin Piano Co. 

Grand and Upright Pianos of the highest artistic 

quality. 

The Ellington Piano Co. 

upright Pianos of standard make. 

The Hamilton Organ Co. 

Cabinet Organs and Upright Pianos. High standard of 

excellence. 

. J ^ .. 8000 Pianos. 

Annual Capacity ^ 

5000 Organs. 

Guaranteed to stand in any climate. 

Our facilities enable us to meet, in the most 
comprehensive manner, any requirement of 
the retail buyer as well as that of the trade. 

Address 

D. H. Baldwin & Co. Cincinnati, O., U. S. A. 



MACULLAR PARKER 
COMPANY 



Maciillar Parker Company, of Boston, 
Massachusetts. These photographs were 
furnished by special request to show the 
actual e very-day appearance of probably 
theonly clothing workshops in the United 
States or in Europe maintained on their 
own premises by retail clothing mer- 
chants. 

Over forty years ago this house recog- 
nized the importance of manufacturing 
their clothing under proper sanitary con- 
ditions, and when their present warehouse 
was erected ample provision was niade for the manufacturing depart- 
ments, where garments could be made under personal supervision 
with absolutely clean surroundings. 

They employ in these workrooms three to four hundred hands, men 
and women, the year round and always take pleasure in having anyone 
interested in the matter make an inspection of the workshops and their 
sanitary conditions. 

396 & 400 Washineton St., Boston, Massachusetts, IJ.S.A. 



REVILLON FRERES SJRRIers 

13-15 West 28th St.. fet. Broxiwy .nd Sth Ave.. fJEW YORK 



SPcoaiT* or Russian sables 

■HD ILL FtNE FURS 

SEAL AND FASHIONABLE 

FUR GARMENTS 

WEDDING GIFTS 



ALL LATEST NOVELTIES 

opera wraps 

gents' overcoats 

Rugs, Robes, Scarfs, etc. 

driving «nd automobile 

cloth coats, fur lined 



:^Kual Cold Storage (the only one of its kind) for Fun and Ganncnts 

LUDWIG & CO. ^iNur/u^BRS 

NEW YORK. 1J.S.A. Annual Output 3500 Pianos. 
MANUFACTURE TnC ClaVioIa piano player. 



NEW YORK CITY 

ihibit in Liberal Art Building 



S. T. Bailer, PK^deat J. W. BUkr, Secretary 

E, L. Fan, Vice-Preddent and Treasurer 

Farr & Bailey Mfg. Co. 



FLOOR on. (XOTH 
LINOLEUM AND DECORATIVE BURLAPS 

FastorUii CAMDEN, N. J., U. S A. 



83 What Street, New York 1S5 Fifth Aveau*, Chicago 



For dr 


£f.'," SiruSr ""• ^^ WiUimi IjiiBul IjltW M, Sd, 5 


fn^"*!!! 












H 




M 




^ 


I^B^ holes. wilhehipa.-3=mehthick. Sold toSNavy YiirOsm the 


 




 




V 




1 


^ shops, etc. These Jrtlls are shown <a tho Collective Exhibit of the 


 


1 United SUtes Section ; I'nlace of Machinery and Electrk-ity : also in 


f 









M. HALLANAN 

186 W. 4th St., New York City 



Receivod highest awards American In- 
stitute Fair, 1897-^8; also Franklin In- 
stitute, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Over 150,000 horses wore the Hallanaji 
Star Pad during the year 1899. 



Pure Milk for Land and Sea 

H' 



IIGHLAND 
BRAND 



Evaporated Cream 



Cormpondencc Solldtcd by 

Helvetia Milk Condensing Co., Highland, III.. U.S.A. 



ESTA BUSHED 11 



CtVatAiti^ I Numbers 318, 320, 323, 324, 326, and 328 
9lflllvt|IV I East Twenty-Third Street, New York City 
n>^Mf^^^ I are the strategic points. That fact is familiar to 
rWlllW™^ I thousands, hut thousands nlore should learn it. 
Points are valueless without power: three elements make power. First, 
good goods; second, prices :tbird, publicity. The Goods: Standard Ball- 
Bearing Casters. The Prices: Our business life is vitalized by fumiEh- 
ingasuperior article at a figure that does not prohibit its universal use. 
The Publicity: True news of Standard Bail-Bearing Casters at right 
prices makes good reading at all times. Falsehood and stupidity are 
high explosives ia business prosperity — dangerous to fool with; we 
leave their use to others. GrLitis samples and illustrated catalogue. 

STANDARD CASTER AND WHEEL CO. 

SAVAGE MAGAZINE RIFLE 



I 



MANUFACTURERS 

WELL MACHINERY 
WELL TOOLS 

WELL SUPPLIES 

Fop Sinking Artesian Weill, Oil and Gas Wells, 
Prospecting for IVIinerals, Etc., Etc. 

St. Louis Well "i'rSSl' Co. 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. U.S.A. 



THE S|«ITH PHEIBIEH TYPEWHITEH 



t Publifhsra' Building, Space D. 



ADAPTS ITSELF TO THE USE OF ALL LANGUAGES 



IHeehsnlcBlly eoFfeet in its eonatFUCtlon. 

Contains more imppovements than any other 

typevi/plteti. 

Does perfect mofk and does It eontlnualy. 



Factory Branches 



Head office AGENCIES 

SYRACUSE AllthepriMipil 

N. Y. CITIES 



The SMITH Premier N" 4 has 84 characters. 



The most durable machine, 
whose construction has given to this day the most 

satisfaction- 

ASK FOR THE CATALOGUE 



9, Boulevard des Italiens, Paris. 
14, CpaeeehupGh St., Uondofi. 



ESTATE OF 

WILLIAM S.DOIG 

54Frar" " 

BROOKL 

Manufacturer of 

STANDARI 

NAILING 

MACHINE 



Oochda, Pork, or ( 
packing caa«a, up t 
inches square. 



Nailing Mat 

fOR ANY SPEi 

PUiy>OSE. 

Cleating, Lock' 

Lining, Box-1 

Sand Paper Mai 

Also 

Box-Hingeing Mi 



In ths United ' 
Slat SI Machloety 
Building at Vio- 
ceacH. Qroua IV. 
Space VI, Block 
IX.Machinary and 
Blectricltr Bull d- 
ini, Oroup IV and 
V^bampSaMari. 

EUROPEAN AGENTS: 



The Raior put Dp comi 



— Ii — t — drop ud itrer^ai 

raxtn* ID. vllt(U*d» SIrop Slnip^« Hm- 
cUne, ShirtiiE Bruib, Soip, Ca«»li<|uc, iBd