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Full text of "Catalogue number [of the Bulletin]"

1976-1977 
Bulletin of 



Wellesley 
College 



Catalogue Issue 
October 1976 




1976-1977 Wellesley Catalogue Issue 

Bulletin of College October 1976 



Volume 66, Number 2 
Catalogue Issue 



The College reserves the right in its discretion to make fronn 
time to time changes affecting policies, fees, curricula, or 
other matters announced in this Bulletin. 



Bulletin published eight times a year by Wellesley College, 
Green Hall, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181. September, one; 
October, one; November, \\no; January, one; March, one; April, 
one; May, one. 



Contents 

Academic Calendar 1 976-77 3 

The College 9 

Admission 13 

Financial Information 17 

Student Life 25 

The Campus 31 

Academic Program 35 

Courses of Instruction 43 

Officers of Instruction 157 

Administration 173 

Alumnae Organization 179 

Index 182 



Credits: 

Photographs by: Foster-Bush Studio, 
Bradford Herzog, Lillian Kemp, Elaine 
Lampert, and Julie O'Neil. 

Printer: Rapid Service Press, Boston 
September 1976 30M 



Academic Calendar 
1976-1977 



First Semester 




Second Semester 




New students 
arrive 


Sunday 
Septembers 


Classes begin 


Monday 
January 31 


Returning students 
arrive 


Tuesday 
September? 


Spring vacation 
begins 


Friday 
March 25 


Convocation 


Wednesday 
Septembers 


Spring vacation 
ends 


Sunday 
Aprils 


Classes begin 


Thursday 
September 9 


Classes end 


Friday 
May 6 


Fall recess begins 


Friday 
Octobers 


Reading period 
begins 


Saturday 
May 7 


Fall recess ends 


Monday 
October 11 


Reading period 
ends 


Wednesday 
May 11 


Thanksgiving 
recess begins 


Wednesday 
November 24 


Examinations begin 


Thursday 
May 12 


Thanksgiving 
recess ends 


Sunday 
November 28 


Examinations end 


Wednesday 
May IS 


Classes end 


Monday 
December 13 


Commencement 


Friday 
May 27 


Reading period 
begins 


Tuesday 
December 14 






Reading period 
ends 


Friday 
December 17 






Examinations begin 


Saturday 
December 18 






Examinations end 


Thursday 
December 23 






Christmas vacation 
begins 


Thursday 
December 23 






Christmas vacation 
ends 


Saturday 
Januarys 






Winter break begins 


Sunday 
January 9 






Winter break ends 


Sunday 
January 30 







4 CORRESPONDENCE/VISITORS 



Correspondence 

President 

General interests of the College 

Dean of the College 

Academic policies and programs 

Class Deans 

Individual students 

Study abroad; students from abroad 

Director of Admission 

Admission of students 

Financial Aid Officer 

Financial aid; student employment; 
fellowships 

Student Services 

Residence; health services; counseling 

Bursar 

College fees 

Registrar 

Transcripts of records 

Director of Continuing Education 

Continuing education 

Dean of Academic Programs 

MIT cross-registration 
Exchange programs 

Director of Career Services 

Employment of graduating seniors and 
alumnae 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

Business matters 

Vice President for College Relations 

Internal and external publics 

Vice President for Resources 

Gifts and bequests 

Executive Director, Alumnae Association 

Alumnae interests 



Visitors 

Wellesley welcomes visitors to the College. 
The administrative offices in Green Hall are 
open Monday through Friday, 8: 30 a.m. to 
4: 30 p.m., and by appointment on Saturday 
mornings during term time. Special arrange- 
ments for greeting prospective students can 
also be made during vacation periods. Rooms 
for alumnae and for parents of students or 
prospective students are available on the 
campus in the Wellesley College Club and 
may be reserved by writing to the club 
manager. 

A prospective student who wishes to arrange 
an interview with a member of the profession- 
al staff of the Board of Admission should 
make an appointment well in advance. 

Student guides provide tours for visitors with- 
out previous appointment. Visitors to the 
College may call the Board of Admission prior 
to their visit to arrange a mutually convenient 
time for the tour. 



Address 

Wellesley College 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

(617)235-0320 



Board of Trustees 




6 BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr., LL.B. 
Chairman of the Board 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Betty Freyhof Johnson, MA. 

Vice Chairman 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

John Kenneth Spring, MBA. 

Treasurer 

Concord, Massachusetts 

Betsy Ancker-Johnson, Ph.D. 
Washington, D.C. 

Florence Van Dyke Anderson, B.A. 
Golden, Colorado 

William M. Boyd II, Ph.D. 
Concord, Massachusetts 

Frances Clausen Chapman, B.A. 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Harriet Segal Cohn, B.A. 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

Dorothy Dann Collins, B.A. 
Dallas, Texas 

Ann Rockefeller Coste, B.A. 
New York, New York 

Camilla Chandler Frost, B.A. 
Pasadena, California 

Harvey H. Guthrie, Jr., Th.D. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

William E. Hartmann, B.Arch. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Barbara Barnes Hauptfuhrer, B.A. 
Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania 

Anne Cohen Heller, M.D. 
New York, New York 

James T. Hill, Jr., LL.B. 

New York, New York 

Walter Hunnewell, MBA. 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 

David O. Ives, MB. A. 

Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Barbara Loomis Jackson, Ed.D. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Carol G. Johnson Johns, M.D. 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Howard Wesley Johnson, MA. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Mary Gardiner Jones, LL.B. 
Washington, D.C. 

Hilda Rosenbaum Kahne, Ph.D. 
Lexington, Massachusetts 

Mildred Lane Kemper, B.A. 
Kansas City, Missouri 

George Howell Kidder, LL.B. 
Concord, Massachusetts 

Robert Lawrence, B.A. 
Westwood, Massachusetts 

Suzanne Carreau Mueller, B.A. 
New York, New York 

Samuel H. Proger, M.D. 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

George Putnam, MBA. 
Manchester, Massachusetts 

Rose Clymer Rumford, B.A. 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Mary Ann Dilley Staub, B.A. 
Winnetka, Illinois 

Nancy Angell Streeter, B.A. 
New York, New York 

Leah Rose Werthan, B.A. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Kathie Ann Whipple, B.A. 
Brooklyn, New York 

Barbara W. Newell, Ph.D., ex officio 
President of Wellesley College 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Nardi Reeder Campion, B.A., ex officio 
President of the Wellesley College 
Alumnae Association 
Amherst, Massachusetts 



Clerk of the Board of Trustees 

Doris E. Drescher, B.S. 
Needham, Massachusetts 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 7 



Trustees Emeriti 



Eleanor Wallace Allen '25 

Boston. Massachusetts 

O. Kelley Anderson 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Charles C. Cabot 

Dover, Massachusetts 

Sirarpie Der Nersessian 

Paris. France 

Byron Kauffman Elliott 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Alexander Cochrane Forbes 

South Dartnnouth, Massachusetts 

Mary Cooper Gaiser '23 

Spokane, Washington 

Elisabeth Luce Moore '24 

New York, New York 

Elizabeth King Morey '19 

Tucson, Arizona 

John R. Quarles 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Robert Gregg Stone 

Dedham, Massachusetts 

Edward A. Weeks, Jr. 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Mary Sime West '26 

Katonah, New York 

Henry Austin Wood 

Newport. Rhode Island 

Katharine Timberman Wright '18 

Columbus, Ohio 




8 PRESIDENTS 




Presidents 



Ada Howard 
1875-1881 

Alice Freeman Palmer 
1881-1887 

Helen Shafer 
1887-1894 

Julia Irvine 
1894-1899 

Caroline Hazard 
1899-1910 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton 
1911-1936 

Mildred McAfee Horton 
1936-1949 

Margaret Clapp 
1 949-1 966 

Ruth M. Adams 
1966-1972 

Barbara W. Newell 
1972- 



The College 




J ,ii>'-w«^W"' 



10 THE COLLEGE 



A student's years at Wellesley College are the 
beginning — not the end— of an education. It 
is an education characterized by sensitivity 
and knowledge, and by the mastery of intel- 
lectual skills and the growth of a discerning 
nnind. Above all, its aim is the wisdom to use 
knowledge to enhance one's own life and to 
participate more effectively in the larger 
community. 

Wellesley offers this education in an environ- 
ment which takes women seriously as indi- 
viduals, as scholars, and as leaders. 

Although education at Wellesley was 100 
years old in 1 975, it continues to reflect the 
goals of its founder, Henry Fowie Durant. He 
was an impassioned believer in equality for 
women, who saw education as the way wom- 
en could prepare themselves for "great con- 
flicts" and "vast reforms in social life." 
Wellesley College reaffirmed these early vi- 
sions in 1971 when, after seriously consider- 
ing coeducation, it elected to remain a college 
for women only. 

Throughout the years, Wellesley has encour- 
aged women to make unconventional choic- 
es, and it continues to encourage students to 
seek for themselves a range of options. As a 
result, many Wellesley women choose to 
major in such areas as economics, mathe- 
matics, and the sciences and subsequently 
enter careers in business, law, and medicine 
—all fields which have been long dominated 
by men. 

This conscious effort to provide women with a 
full range of career and life choices is an inte- 
gral part of Wellesley's rigorous and demand- 
ing academic experience. 

High academic standards at Wellesley are 
combined with considerable flexibility of 
choice for the individual student. There are 
opportunities for independent study, indi- 
vidually designed majors, and research. 

A primary concern in the Wellesley classroom 
is the development of analytical skills and 
clarity of expression; to this end, most in- 
structors emphasize writing papers and re- 
ports. Classes are small, with the average size 
ranging from 22 to 25 students. Popular intro- 
ductory courses which enroll more than 100 
students include small discussion or confer- 
ence sections. Upper level classes and semi- 
nars bring together 1 2 to 1 5 students and an 
instructor to pursue a common problem. The 
student-faculty ratio of 10 to 1 offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for students to undertake 
individual work with faculty on honors proj- 
ects and research. 



Wellesley's faculty— of whom 58 percent are 
women — bring to the College diverse aca- 
demic and professional interests. They are 
scholars as well as poets, novelists, artists, 
musicians, scientists, political and economic 
analysts. A number live on or near the cam- 
pus, and they take part in many aspects of 
College life. 

Intellectual development at Wellesley is but- 
tressed by outstanding resources and facili- 
ties. The Margaret Clapp Library has an exten- 
sive general collection containing original 
source material from special collections. In 
addition to the facilities of the main library, 
many departments have their own libraries. In 
the sciences, facilities include laboratories, 
greenhouses, an observatory, and special 
equipment such as controlled environment 
chambers, an electron microscope, and a 
laser beam spectrophotometer. Wellesley's 
physics laboratory was the second such 
laboratory in the country (the first was at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology). A 
new Science Center, completed in 1976, will 
bring together all of the science departments, 
including mathematics and computer sci- 
ence, in a contemporary setting where inter- 
disciplinary studies can be fostered. 

Students in the arts find excellent facilities in 
the Jewett Arts Center which has a teaching 
museum, libraries, practice rooms, studios, 
and an auditorium. Each year the Museum 
has several exhibitions of students' work, and 
Jewett is also used for students' concerts and 
recitals. 

The Wellesley curriculum is extended through 
opportunities for cross-registration with the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, ex- 
change programs, and study abroad. 

MIT men and women come to Wellesley for 
such courses as psychology, economics, and 
art history. Wellesley women travel to MIT for 
such classes as urban planning, political sci- 
ence, and photography. Buses shuttle hourly 
along the 1 2 mile route between the two 
campuses. 

The Twelve College Exchange Program each 
year brings men and women from other New 
England colleges to Wellesley for a semester 
or a year, and enables Wellesley students to 
live and study on another campus. An experi- 
mental exchange between Wellesley and 
Spelman College, a distinguished Black liber- 
al arts college for women in Atlanta, Georgia, 
was inaugurated in 1974-75. 



THE COLLEGE 11 



Wellesley also offers opportunities for study 
abroad through the Slater, Waddell, and 
Stecher scholarship progranns. The Slater 
program underwrites the cost of attending 
European institutions for a sunnnner or aca- 
demic year, and it brings Slater Fellows from 
abroad to the Wellesley campus. The Waddell 
program provides funds for study in Carib- 
bean countries or in Africa. The Stecher pro- 
gram enables students to study art in Europe 
either during the academic year or in the sum- 
mer. Wellesley does not have its own junior 
year abroad program, but it does help stu- 
dents make arrangements for such study by 
direct enrollment in foreign universities or 
through application to such programs admin- 
istered by other colleges. 

One advantage of women's colleges is the 
opportunity for women to assume leadership 
in college organizations and activities. These 
options frequently are closed to women in 
coeducational institutions where extracurric- 
ular activities are dominated by male 
students. 

Wellesley students serve, often as voting 
members, on almost all major committees of 
the Board of Trustees, including the Invest- 
ment Committee; of the Academic Council, 
including the Board of Admission and the 
Committee on Curriculum and Instruction; 
and of ad hoc committees, including the 
Commission on Community Life. In academic 
departments, they are voting members of 
curriculum and faculty search committees, 
and they also serve on committees which set 
policy for residential life and which govern 
Schneider College Center, the focus for much 
student and community activity on campus. 

In 1918 students and faculty concluded a 
historic Agreement creating the College Gov- 
ernment which allows for student control over 
most nonacademic aspects of their lives and 
for faculty supervision of academic matters. 
College Government officers are elected each 
spring by the students, and the president of 
College Government heads the student Sen- 
ate which consists of students, faculty, and 
administrators but in which only student 
members have voting privileges. 

Students are members of the Commission on 
Community Life, which has representatives 
from all College groups and reports to the 
president. The commission is concerned with 
relations and communications among the 
many segments of the campus community, 
and has also developed an affirmative action 
program which will insure diversity among 
employees. 

Students also have numerous outlets for self- 
expression through involvement in such activ- 
ities as theatre and musical groups, student 
publications, and sports. 




12 THE COLLEGE 



Each week brings lectures, poetry readings, 
filnns, exhibitions, and performances in 
dance, theatre, and music. Visiting artists 
and lecturers frequently offer master classes 
for interested students; receptions and infor- 
mal dinners provide further occasions for 
students to talk with distinguished men and 
women. 

While Wellesley encourages the participation 
of its students in events and activities de- 
signed to heighten their awareness of the 
world around them, a student's inner develop- 
ment and her search for personal and spiritual 
values is also an important process. Over the 
past few years, there has been an increasing 
interest in ethical and religious issues and 
activities. The Office of the Chaplain spon- 




sors special seminars and programs in which 
students can explore these issues as well as 
share with one another the celebration of reli- 
gious holidays. The chaplaincy provides a 
religious program embracing many faiths, but 
also offers denominational programs for 
those who wish to participate. 

The development of social responsibility and 
social responsiveness is an integral part of 
Wellesley's heritage that continues to this 
day. Students are encouraged to participate in 
the communities of Boston as well as in the 
Wellesley College community. Their activities 
range from tutoring with the MIT-Wellesley 
Upward Bound Program to internships in 
urban legal studies. 

As an individual learns and grows, so, too, 
does a community. It explores and seeks al- 
ternatives, makes mistakes and begins anew. 
The past five years at Wellesley have wit- 
nessed marked changes in the curriculum and 
academic policies as well as in policies gov- 
erning students' lives on campus. This 
change— and it is a continuing process- 
comes about through the efforts of individ- 
uals who influence and shape the College 
environment. The College, in turn, influences 
the lives of each member of its community. 

In its desire to create the best possible edu- 
cation for women, Wellesley continues to 
seek solutions to problems faced by both men 
and women in a changing society. It is 
looking, too, at its own community, and is 
trying to make it a better place in which to 
work and to study and to grow. It is exploring 
new patterns of work, new ways for campus 
groups to communicate more effectively with 
one another, and new styles of residential 
life. 

Each student who comes to Wellesley College 
joins a continuing community, for the support 
and involvement of the alumnae add an impor- 
tant dimension to the College's life. 

One reason for Wellesley's leadership among 
colleges and universities in this country is the 
success of its many alumnae who have pio- 
neered in all areas of life. Some have been 
outstanding scholars and researchers; others 
have been leaders in science, politics and 
women's rights; still others have made 
important contributions to their communities 
through volunteer work. 

Whatever one's life choice and goal, a 
Wellesley education provides women with 
intellectual and personal growth which con- 
tinues long after the college years. 



Admission 




14 ADMISSION 



Criteria for Admission 



The Board of Admission at Wellesley is com- 
posed of representatives of the faculty, the 
administration, and the students. In selecting 
the candidates who will comprise the student 
body, the Board of Admission considers a 
number of factors: high school records, rank 
in class, scholastic aptitude and achievement 
test scores, letters of recommendation from 
teachers and principals, the student's own 
statements about herself and her activities, 
and the interview reports of the staff or alum- 
nae. The Board of Admission values evidence 
of unusual talent and involvement in all areas 
of academic and social concern. 

Each application is evaluated with care. The 
admission decision is never made on the 
basis of a single factor. For instance, the 
Board recognizes that tests do not measure 
motivation or creativity and that scores may 
be influenced by the student's experience 
with timed examinations. 

The Board of Admission chooses students 
who will benefit from and contribute to the 
type of education offered at Wellesley and be 
able to meet the standards for graduation 
from the College. Consideration is given to 
creativity and high motivation as well as 
strong academic potential. 

The Board of Admission considers each appli- 
cation on its merits and does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, religion, color, creed, or 
national origin. In accordance with its desire 
to maintain diversity in its student body, 
Wellesley College encourages applications 
from qualified students who come from a 
wide variety of cultural, economic, and ethnic 
backgrounds. 

General Requirements for Freshman 
Applicants 

Wellesley College does not require a fixed 
plan of secondary school courses as prepara- 
tion for its program of studies. Entering stu- 
dents normally have completed four years of 
strong college preparatory studies in secon- 
dary school. Adequate preparation includes 
training in clear and coherent writing and in 
interpreting literature, training in the princi- 
ples of mathematics (usually a minimum of 
three years), competence in at least one for- 
eign language, ancient or modern (usually 
achieved through three or four years of study), 
and experience in at least one laboratory 
science and in history. 



Students planning to concentrate in mathe- 
matics, in premedical studies, or in the natur- 
al sciences are urged to elect additional 
courses in mathematics and science in secon- 
dary school. Students planning to concen- 
trate in language or literature are urged to 
study a modern foreign language and Latin or 
Greek before they enter college. 

There are always exceptions to the prepara- 
tion suggested here, and the Board will con- 
sider an applicant whose educational back- 
ground varies from this general description. 

The Application 

Application forms may be obtained from the 
Board of Admission. A nonrefundable fee of 
$20 must accompany the formal application. 
If the application fee imposes a burden on the 
family's finances, a letter from the applicant's 
guidance counselor requesting a fee waiver 
should be sent to the College with the appli- 
cation for admission. 

The Interview 

A personal interview is required of each appli- 
cant. If it is not possible for a candidate to 
come to the College for an interview, she 
should write to the Board of Admission for 
the name of a local alumna interviewer. The 
Board of Admission is closed for interviews 
from February 1 5 to March 1 5; however, tours 
will still be given by student guides at this 
time. 

Campus Visit 

Students who are seriously considering 
Wellesley will have a fuller understanding of 
student life at Wellesley if they can arrange to 
spend a day on campus. Candidates are wel- 
come to attend classes, eat in the residence 
halls, and talk informally with Wellesley stu- 
dents. Prospective students who plan to 
spend some time exploring the College are 
urged to notify the Board of Admission in 
advance so that tours, interviews, meals, and 
attendance at classes can be arranged before 
arrival on campus. 



ADMISSION 15 



College Entrance Examination Board Tests 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test and three 
Achievement Tests of the College Entrance 
Examination Board (CEEB) are required of all 
applicants for admission. One Achievement 
Test must be the English Composition Test. 

Each applicant is responsible for arranging to 
take the tests and for requesting CEEB to 
send to Weilesley College the results of all 
tests taken. CEEB sends its publications and 
the registration forms necessary to apply for 
the tests to all American secondary schools 
and many centers abroad. The applicant may 
obtain the registration form at school, or may 
obtain it by writing directly to CEEB, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540; or in western 
United States, western Canada, Australia, 
Mexico, orthe Pacific Islands, to CEEB, Box 
1 025, Berkeley, California 94701 . 

It is necessary to register with CEEB approxi- 
mately six weeks before the test dates; how- 
ever, limited walk-in registration may be avail- 
able at some test centers. 

Either the SAT or three Achievement Tests 
may be taken on any of the following dates, 
but it is not possible to take both the SAT and 
the Achievement Tests on the same day, so 
students must select and register for two dif- 
ferent test dates. The latest test date from 
which scores can be used for admission in 
September 1977 is January 22, 1977. 

The CEEB Code Numberfor Weilesley 
College is 3957. 

Dates of CEEB Tests 

April 3, 1976 
June5, 1976 
Novembers, 1976 
December 4, 1976 
January 22, 1977 
March 26, 1977 
May 7, 1977 
June4, 1977 

In addition, on October 16, 1976 the SAT only 
is offered in California and Texas. 

Admission Plans 

1 

April Decision 

A candidate who uses the regular plan of ad- 
mission must file an application by January 
15 of the year for which she is applying. Ap- 
plicants will be notified of the Board of Ad- 
mission's decisions in April. Applicants for 
regular admission may take Scholastic Apti- 
tude Tests and Achievement Tests any time 
through January of the senior year. Results of 
tests taken after January arrive too late for 
consideration by the Board of Admission. 



Early Evaluation 

Candidates whose credentials are complete 
by January 1 , and who request it, will receive 
an Early Evaluation of their chances of admis- 
sion. These evaluations will be sent by the 
end of February. Candidates will receive the 
final decision from the Board of Admission in 
April. 



Early Decision 

This plan is intended for those students with 
strong high school records who have selected 
Weilesley as their first choice college by the 
fall of the senior year. To provide greater flexi- 
bility for these students, Wellesley's Early 
Decision Program will become a first choice 
plan rather than a single choice plan begin- 
ning with the class entering in September 
1977. Candidates under this plan may initiate 
applications at other colleges, but they agree 
to make only one Early Decision application, 
and if admitted under Early Decision, they 
must then withdraw all other applications. 

Candidates who wish Early Decision must 
apply by November 1 and indicate that they 
want to be considered under the Early Deci- 
sion Plan. The appropriate CEEB tests should 
have been taken by the end of the junior year. 
All supporting credentials and an interview 
must be completed by November 15. Deci- 
sions on admission and financial aid will be 
mailed no later than December 15. 



Early Admission 

The College considers applications from can- 
didates who plan to complete only three years 
of high school and who have demonstrated 
academic strength and personal and social 
maturity. These candidates are considered for 
admission along with other applicants for the 
April Decision Plan. They are requested to 
identify themselves as Early Admission appli- 
cants in their correspondence with the Board 
of Admission. It is preferable that these can- 
didates have their interviews at the College if 
distance permits. In all other respects they 
follow the regular procedures for the April 
Decision Plan. 

Deferred Entrance 

An admitted applicant who has notified the 
Board of Admission by May 1 of her intention 
to attend Weilesley may defer entrance to the 
freshman class for one year if she makes this 
request in writing to the Director of Admis- 
sion by May 15. 



16 ADMISSION 



United States Citizens Living Abroad 

For U.S. citizens living in other countries the 
entrance requirements and procedures for 
making application are the same as for appli- 
cants within the United States. 

Foreign Students 

The College welcomes applications from citi- 
zens of other countries who have excellent 
secondary school records and have complet- 
ed the university entrance requirements of 
their own countries. It is possible to receive 
advance credit toward the Wellesley degree 
through successful results in national matric- 
ulation examinations. Foreign students must 
apply by January 15 of the year in which the 
student plans to enter the College. Admission 
is for September entrance only. There is no 
application fee for foreign students. Specific 
instructions for foreign students wishing to 
apply to Wellesley are contained in the bro- 
chure, Information for Foreign Students, 
which may be obtained by writing to the 
Board of Admission. Letters of inquiry should 
include the student's age, country of citizen- 
ship, present school, and academic level. 

The Slater One-Year Fellowship Program is 
open to qualified foreign students currently 
enrolled in foreign universities who wish to 
increase their understanding of life in the 
United States while preparing fora degree in 
their home universities. Preference is given to 
students from western Europe. Stater Fellows 
receive the full cost of tuition, room and 
board from the College. Application forms 
may be obtained by writing to the Office of 
Foreign Study. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

Wellesley College accepts transfer students 
from accredited four and two year colleges. 
They must offer excellent academic records at 
both the high school and college levels and 
strong recommendations from theirdeans 
and instructors. Incoming sophomores and 
juniors are eligible to apply for entrance in 
either the first or second semester; transfers 
in the middle of the freshman year are dis- 
couraged. Students wishing to transfer into 
Wellesley should make application before 
February 1 for entrance in the fall semester, 
and before November 1 5 for entrance in the 
spring semester, on forms which may be 
obtained from the Board of Admission. Notifi- 
cation is in early April and late December, 
respectively. The preliminary application 
forms should be returned with a nonrefund- 
able registration fee of $20, or a fee waiver 



request authorized by a financial aid officer or 
college dean; the rest of the application 
forms will be sent upon receipt of these 
items. 

The College will evaluate the transcripts of 
transfer applicants who have been offered 
admission, and will accept for credit only 
those courses which are comparable to cours- 
es offered in the liberal arts curriculum at 
Wellesley. Transfer credit for studies com- 
pleted in foreign countries will be granted 
only when the College registrar has given 
specific approval of the courses elected and 
the institutions granting the credit. 

To receive a Wellesley degree, a transfer stu- 
dent must complete a minimum of 16 units of 
work and two academic years at the College. 
A Wellesley unit is equivalent to four semes- 
ter hours and some transfer students may 
need to carry more than the usual four cours- 
es per semester in order to complete their 
degree requirements within four years. 
Wellesley College has no summer school and 
courses done independently during the sum- 
mer may not be counted toward the 16 units 
required. Incoming juniors, in particular, 
should be aware that Wellesley requires evi- 
dence of proficiency in one foreign language 
before the beginning of the senior year. In 
addition, all transfer students should note 
Wellesley's course distribution requirements 
which must be fulfilled for graduation. These 
requirements are described on p. 36 of this 
catalogue. 

Incoming junior transfer students may not 
take part in the Twelve College Exchange Pro- 
gram or Junior Year Abroad. All transfer stu- 
dents may elect to take courses through the 
cross-registration program with MIT after they 
have completed one semester of study at 
Wellesley. Candidates who have interrupted 
their education for more than five years and/ 
or who are older than 25 years of age may 
wish to consult the Office of Continuing 
Education. 



Financial Information 




18 FEES 





Fees and Expenses 



At Wellesley the fee represents approximately 
one-half of the educational cost to the Col- 
lege for each student. In past years the differ- 
ence has been made up from gifts and income 
earned on endowment funds. 

Annual Fee 

The fee for the academic year 1976-77 is 
$5500. in addition, there is a student activity 
fee of $60 and a Mass. State Meals Tax of 8% . 
The breakdown is as follows: 









Resident 


Nonresident 


Tuition 


1 




$3600 


$3600 


Room 






800 




Board 






1100 




Student activi 


ity 






fee 






60 


60 


Mass. ; 


State 








Meal 


s Tax 




88 





$5648 



$3660 



The College offers three plans of payment 
described on pp. 20-21 . 

Student Activity Fee 

The purpose of the student activity fee of $60 
is to provide resources from which the stu- 
dent government organization can plan and 
implement the programs of student activities 
sponsored by various clubs and organizations 
on campus. 

Reservation Fee 

A fee of $200 reserves a place in the College 
for the student. It is due February 1 for Early 
Decision students and May 1 for all other en- 
tering students, and annually on July 1 for 
returning students. It is included in the an- 
nual fee of $5500. 



General Deposit 

A general deposit of $50 is paid by each enter- 
ing student. The deposit is refunded after 
graduation or withdrawal and after deducting 
any unpaid special charges. 

Room Retainer Fee 

Returning resident students must submit 
$1 00 to the bursar by March 8 to reserve a 
room for the following year. This $1 00 fee is 
applied against room and board charges for 
the following year. 



FEES 19 



Special Fees and Expenses 

These include, but are not limited to, the 
following: 

Certain special fees and expenses listed in 
departmental descriptions, e.g., the cost of 
instrumental and vocal lessons given on 
p. 107. 

A fee for each unit of work taken for credit in 
excess of five in any semester: $450. 

A fee for each unit of work done independent- 
ly during the summer: $50. 

A fee for each examination for credit: $50. 

An automobile parking fee per semester: $40. 

Fees for breakage of laboratory equipment 
and any other damage incurred by a student. 

A fee for room key in residence hall, if not 
returned: $5. 

Plans of Payment 

It is necessary that all fees be paid in accor- 
dance with the specified plans before the stu- 
dent can begin or continue attendance, and 
all financial obligations to the College must 
be discharged before the degree is awarded. 

Detailed descriptions of plans are sent by the 
bursar to the parents of entering students and 
to others upon request. Although there are 
minor variations in the payment plans for 
April Decision and Early Decision students, 
the final due dates for each group are the 
same. The eight-payment plan is available 
only for a complete academic year. 

Payment for Students on Financial Aid 

Except for the reservation fee, grants and 
loans are usually applied equally by semester 
against all tuition, and room and board pay- 
ments for the year. The remaining financial 
obligation must be paid in accordance with 
one of the approved plans. Students on finan- 
cial aid who have difficulty meeting the 
scheduled payments outlined above should 
consult the financial aid officer. 

Medical Insurance 

Information concerning student medical in- 
surance is sent to all parents by the bursar. 
Because of the high cost of medical care, 
parents are required to subscribe to the 
Wellesley College Student Insurance Plan 
(Blue Cross-Blue Shield), or to provide equiv- 
alent coverage, especially since among the 
accidents or injuries for which Wellesley Col- 
lege does not assume financial responsibility 
are those incurred in instructional, intercol- 
legiate, intramural, or recreational programs 
under the auspices of the Department of 



Physical Education. Full-time continuing 
education students are also required to have 
coverage if they plan to use the College 
Health Services. Continuing Education stu- 
dents carrying less than three courses are not 
eligible for Infirmary care. 

Refund Policy 

Effective August 1 , 1976, refunds of prepaid 
tuition, reservation, and other fees, and room 
and board charges will be allowed for with- 
drawal prior to the mid-point of the semester. 
In computing refunds, such prepayment will 
be prorated on a weekly basis, except that 
$100 will be withheld to cover administrative 
costs in any case. No refunds will be made for 
withdrawal after the semester mid-point. The 
date of withdrawal shall be the date on which 
the student notifies the registrar of with- 
drawal in writing, or the date on which the 
College determines that the student has with- 
drawn, whichever is earlier. Admissions can- 
didates must notify the Director of Admission 
of withdrawal. Refunds will be made within 40 
days after withdrawal and will be prorated 
among the sources of original prepayment. 
Wellesley College scholarships are not 
subject to refund to the student. 

General Expenses 

It is estimated that $600 for the year will cover 
a student's general expenses including books 
and supplies, incidental fees, clothing, recre- 
ation and entertainment, laundry and dry 
cleaning, and local transportation, excluding 
trips to and from home for the year. For the 
foreign student coming from abroad this fig- 
ure is estimated at $800. 

Continuing Education Fees 

The basic fee for a continuing education stu- 
dent is $450 per semester course, payable by 
August 15 for the fall semester and by Jan- 
uary 15 for the spring semester. Continuing 
education applicants pay the same $20 fee as 
all other students. There is also a registration 
fee of $25, payable when the student is ac- 
cepted. 

In case of withdrawal, see section Refund 
Policy above. 



20 PLANS OF PAYMENT 



Standard 
Semester Plan* 



Resident 

Annount 



Second 
semester fee 



2824 



Nonresident 

Amount 



Early 
Decision 

Due 



1830 



Jan. 15 



April 
Decision 

Due 



Jan. 15 



Returning 
Students 

Due 



Reservation fee 


$ 200 


$ 200 


Feb.1 


May 1 


Julyl 


General deposit 
for entering 
students 


50 


50 


Feb.1 


Mayl 




Room retainer 
fee for returning 
students 


100 








March 8 


First semester 
fee for entering 
students 


2624 


1630 


Aug. 15 


Aug. 15 




First semester 
fee for returning 
students 


2524 


1630 






Aug. 15 



Jan. 15 



*Tfie College will accept payments made through any bank or trust company or recognized 
financing agency which will forward payments in accordance with the Standard Plan. 



Annual 
Payment Plan 



Resident 

Amount 



Balance for 

returning 

students 



5348 



Nonresident 

Amount 



Early 
Decision 

Due 



3460 



April 
Decision 

Due 



Returning 
Students 

Due 



Reservation fee 


$ 200 


$ 200 


Feb. 1 


Mayl 


Julyl 


General deposit 
for entering 
students 


50 


50 


Feb. 1 


Mayl 




Room retainer 
fee for returning 
students 


100 








March 8 


Balance for 

entering 

students 


5448 


3460 


Aug. 15 


Aug. 15 





Aug. 15 



PLANS OF PAYMENT 21 



Eight-Payment 
Plan* 


Resident 

Amount 


Nonresident 

Amount 


Early 
Decision 

Due 


April 
Decision 

Due 


Returning 
Students 

Due 


Reservation fee 


$ 200 


$ 200 


Feb.1 


Mayl 


Julyl 


General deposit 
for entering 
students 


50 


50 


Feb.1 


IVIay 1 




Room retainer 
fee for returning 
students 


100 








March 1 


Eight equal pay- 
ments on the 
first day of each 
month for enter- 
ing students 


5468 


3480 


Julyl 

through 

Feb. 1 


Julyl 

through 

Feb.1 




Eight equal pay- 
ments on the 
first day of each 
month for re- 
turning students 


5368 


3480 






Julyl 

through 

Feb. 1 



*This plan includes a 
$20 service charge. 



iW 'y f^ir. 




22 FINANCIAL AID 



The Wellesley College program of financial 
aid for students is intended to open educa- 
tional opportunity to able students of diverse 
backgrounds regardless of tfieir financial cir- 
cunnstances. No student should be discour- 
aged from applying to Wellesley because of 
the need for financial aid. At Wellesley, ad- 
mission decisions are made without regard 
for financial need, and only after a student is 
admitted does the Committee on Financial 
Aid consider applications for aid. 42 percent 
of Wellesley students receive financial aid; 
37 percent receive aid directly from Wellesley. 

The Wellesley College Students' Aid Society, 
which sponsors loans, also offers personal 
assistance through loans of books and other 
items, gifts of clothing, and loans of small 
amounts of money for incidental expenses 
and special emergencies. 

Financial aid is given only to students who 
require assistance in order to attend. Awards 
vary in size according to individual need and 
may equal or exceed the comprehensive Col- 
lege fee. Although awards are generally grant- 
ed for one year at a time, the College expects 
to continue aid as needed throughout the four 
years for all financial aid students who con- 
tinue to have need. Most awards consist of a 
package of work, loan, and grant. 

In addition to College funds, federal monies 
are available for grants, loans, and work- 
study programs. 

The need for financial help sometimes ex- 
ceeds the amount of resources Wellesley has 
available in any given year. Therefore, stu- 
dents should, whenever possible, seek grants 
and/or loans through local, state, or federal 
programs, from educational foundations, and 
other private sources. 

Wellesley College offers ten Town Scholar- 
ships to residents of the Town of Wellesley 
who qualify for admission and whose parents 
or guardian live in Wellesley. If these students 
live at home the scholarship is in the form of a 
full tuition grant. If these students choose to 
live on campus the amount of financial aid is 
based on financial need and is determined by 
the same need criteria which apply to all other 
financial aid applicants. 

The College expects students to contribute as 
much as possible to their own expenses 
through summer and term-time earnings. 
Academic-year campus jobs ordinarily involve 
five hours of work per week and enable stu- 
dents to earn approximately $350 a year. 



Further information on financial aid at 
Wellesley is contained in the publication 
Information for the Prospective Student which 
may be obtained by writing to the Financial 
Aid Officer, Wellesley College, Wellesley, 
Massachusetts 021 81 . 

Application for Financial Aid 

Each registered applicant for admission who 
is applying forfinancial aid must file three 
forms: the Wellesley College Application for 
Financial Aid, the Parents' Confidential State- 
ment of the College Scholarship Service, and 
a certified copy of the latest federal income 
tax return. 

Application 

The Wellesley College Application for Finan- 
cial Aid should be returned to the financial aid 
officer, Wellesley College, by October15 from 
Early Decision applicants and by February 1 
from alt other applicants. 

Parents' Confidential Statement 

This form is available in the secondary 
schools, or may be obtained by writing to the 
College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey 08540; Box 881 , Evanston, 
Illinois 60204; or Box 1025, Berkeley, Califor- 
nia 94701 . A copy can also be provided by the 
financial aid officer if specifically requested 
by an applicant. The Parents' Confidential ■ 
Statement should be filed with the College 
Scholarship Service which will then forward a 
copy for confidential use to the college or 
colleges indicated on the form. 

The Parents' Confidential Statement must be 
filed with the Wellesley College financial aid 
officer by October 1 5 from Early Decision 
applicants; February 1 from April Decision 
applicants; February 15 from fall semester 
transfer applicants; and November 30 from 
spring semester transfer applicants. 

Federal Income Tax Return 

If a student is admitted and enrolls at 
Wellesley College, parents are required to 
submit a certified copy of their latest federal 
income tax return by July 1 . The certified copy 
is forwarded directly to the College by the 
District IRS Office at the request of the par- 
ent. Financial aid awards are not final until 
the IRS form is submitted. 

Financial Aid for Transfers 

Financial aid funds are available to assist a 
limited number of transfer students. If a 
transfer student continues to show need, she 
will be eligible to receive aid for the number of 
semesters which the registrar determines will 
be necessary for degree completion. 



FELLOWSHIPS 23 



Graduate Fellowships 



A number of fellowships for graduate study 
are open to graduating seniors, and alumnae 
of Wellesley College, while others adminis- 
tered by Wellesley are open to women gradu- 
ates of any American institution. Awards are 
usually made to applicants who plan full-time 
graduate study for the coming year. 

Information and application forms may be 
obtained from the Secretary to the Committee 
on Graduate Fellowships, Office of Financial 
Aid, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massa- 
chusetts 02181 . 

Applications and supporting credentials for 
fellowships are due by January 2, except 
where noted. 



For Graduates and Undergraduates of 
Wellesley College 

Fellowships open to Wellesley College alum- 
nae, graduating seniors, and undergraduates 
are listed below. 

Anne Louise Barrett Fellowship, preferably in 
music and primarily for study or research in 
musical theory, composition, or in the history 
of music; abroad or in the United States. 
Stipend: $3000 

Professor Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship for 
research or further study in geology or geog- 
raphy, including urban, environmental or eco- 
logical studies. Preference given to geology 
and geography. 
Stipend: $1000 

Horton-Hallowell Fellowship for graduate 
study in any field, preferably in the last two 
years of candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, or its 
equivalent, or for private research of equiva- 
lent standard. 
Stipend: $4000 

Edna V. Moffett Fellowship for a young alum- 
na, preferably for a first year of graduate 
study in history. 
Stipend: $2500 

Vida Dutton Scudder Fellowship for graduate 
study in the field of social science, political 
science, or literature. 
Stipend: $3000 

Sarah Perry Wood Medical Fellowship for the 
study of medicine. 
Stipend: $4000 

Trustee Scholarships are awarded on a com- 
petitive basis to seniors who intend to pursue 
graduate studies. These scholarships are 
unrestricted as to field of study. The title 



Trustee Scholar is honorary and in cases of 
financial need stipends may be awarded to 
the scholars or, if not needed by them, to 
alternates who need financial assistance. All 
applications and credentials are due by Janu- 
ary 15. Recipients share the total annual 
stipend. 
Stipend: $6000 

Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship for 
graduate study in any field. 
Stipend: $3000 

Mary Elvira Stevens Traveling Fellowship for 
travel or study outside the United States. Any 
scholarly, artistic, or cultural purpose may be 
considered. Candidates must be at least 25 
years of age on September 1 of the year in 
which the fellowship is first held. Applica- 
tions must be filed with the Secretary to the 
Stevens Fellowship Committee, Office of 
Financial Aid, before December15. 
Stipend: $8000 

Peggy Howard Grants in Economics for study 
by women who intend to become professional 
economists. Available to both especially 
qualified Wellesley College undergraduates or 
alumnae for post-graduate study or for spe- 
cial projects in economics. Funds vary in 
amount; applications and awards are made 
through the Department of Economics. 



For Graduates of Otfier Institutions and 
Wellesley College 

Some graduate fellowships for study at the 
institution of the candidate's choice are ad- 
ministered by Wellesley College and are open 
to alumnae of any American institution, in- 
cluding Wellesley. 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship for study or 
research abroad or in the United States. The 
holder must be no more than 26 years of age 
at the time of her appointment, and unmarried 
throughout the whole of her tenure. Non- 
Wellesley candidates should file through their 
institutions. Wellesley will accept no more 
than five applications from another institu- 
tion. 
Stipend: $4000 

M. A. Cartland Shackford Medical Scholar- 
ship for the study of medicine with a view to 
general practice, not psychiatry. 
Stipend: $3500 

Harriet A. Shaw Scholarship for study or re- 
search in music and allied arts, abroad or in 
the United States. The candidate must be no 
more than 26 years of age at the time of her 
appointment. Preference given to music can- 
didates; undergraduate work in history of art 
required of other candidates. 
Stipend: $3000 



24 POLICIES 



Confidentiality of Student Records 

Maintenance of the confidentiality of individ- 
ual student educational records has been and 
continues to be innportant at Wellesley, as is a 
concern for the accuracy of each record. 
Under the provisions of the federal Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, 
every Wellesley student is assured the right to 
inspect and review all college records, files, 
and data directly related to her, with certain 
exceptions such as medical and psychiatric 
records, confidential recommendations sub- 
mitted before January 1, 1975, records to 
which the student has waived her right of ac- 
cess, and financial records of the student's 
parents. The student may also seek a correc- 
tion or deletion where a record is felt to be in- 
accurate, misleading, or otherwise in viola- 
tion of the privacy or other rights of the stu- 
dent. The Privacy Act also protects the 
privacy of personally identifiable information 
maintained in student records by prohibiting 
the release of such information (other than 
those facts defined below as "Directory Infor- 
mation") without the written consent of the 
student, except to persons such as officials 
or teachers within the College who have a 
legitimate educational interest in seeing the 
information, officials of other institutions in 
which the student seeks to enroll, the stu- 
dent's parents if the student is a dependent 
for tax purposes, and certain other persons 
and organizations. 

The parents of Wellesley students have not 
automatically been sent copies of warning 
letters and grade reports of students in aca- 
demic difficulty in recent years because of 
conflicting interpretations of the Privacy Act. 
The final regulations for the Act make clear 
that, in the case of students who are depen- 
dents of their parents for Internal Revenue 
Service purposes, information from the edu- 
cation records of the student may be dis- 
closed to the parents without the student's 
prior consent. Therefore the College intends 
once again to notify both the student and her 
parents in writing of academic warnings, 
probationary status and dismissal. It will be 
assumed that every student is a dependent of 
her parents, as defined by the Internal 
Revenue Code, unless notification to the con- 
trary with supporting evidence satisfactory to 
the College is filed in writing with the regis- 
trar by October 1 of each academic year. In 
communications with parents concerning 
other matters, it is normally College policy to 
respect the privacy of the student and not to 
disclose information from student education 
records without the prior consent of the 
student. 



Copies of the Privacy Act, the regulations 
thereunder and the "Wellesley College Guide- 
lines on Student Records" are available on 
request from the Office of the Dean of 
Academic Programs. Students wishing to 
inspect a record should apply directly to the 
office involved. Questions should be directed 
to the Dean of Academic Programs. Com- 
plaints concerning alleged noncompliance by 
the College with the Privacy Act which are not 
satisfactorily resolved by the College itself 
may be addressed in writing to the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office, 
Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare, 330 Independence Avenue, S.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20201. 

Directory Information 

The Privacy Act gives to Wellesley the right to 
make public at its discretion, without prior 
authorization from the individual student, the 
following personally identifiable information: 
name; class year; home address and tele- 
phone number; college address and tele- 
phone number; major field; date and place of 
birth; dates of attendance at Wellesley Col- 
lege; degrees, honors and awards received; 
weight and height of student athletes; partici- 
pation in officially recognized sports and 
activities; previous educational institution 
most recently attended. 

The Privacy Act also allows individual stu- 
dents to place limitations on the release of 
any of the above information. A student who 
wishes to do this must file a special form with 
the registrar. Green Hall, each year by July 1 
for the following academic year. 

In practice, College policies discourage the 
indiscriminate release of any information 
about individual students. College directories 
and lists are for use within the College com- 
munity itself. 

Nondiscriminatory Policy 

Wellesley College is a private, undergraduate 
educational institution for women. In com- 
pliance with the regulations of Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972, the College 
does not discriminate on the basis of sex in 
the educational programs or activities which 
it operates for its students or in its employ- 
ment policies. 

Wellesley College admits the students of any 
race to all the rights, privileges, programs, 
and activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the College. The Col- 
lege does not discriminate on the basis of 
race in administration of its educational 
policies, admission policies, scholarship and 
loan programs, and athletic and other college- 
administered programs. 



student Life 




26 STUDENT LIFE 



Intellectual growth is only part of the journey 
toward the full realization of one's talents and 
abilities. Wellesley College offers many op- 
portunities fora student to develop self-confi- 
dence, sensitivity, and leadership abilities 
through participation in student organizations 
and college governance. 

Many student groups reflect ethnic as well as 
social, political, and religious interests. 
Some of these organizations are Mezcia, an 
association of Chicana, American Indian, and 
Puerto Rican students; Ethos, an organiza- 
tion of Black students; the Wellesley Wom- 
en's Committee, a group of students, faculty, 
and staff interested in feminist issues; the 
Married Students Union, a new group which is 
seeking programs serving their special 
needs; and the Nonresident Council. A 
number of religious groups such as the 
Newman Club, the Wellesley Christian 
Fellowship, and the Wellesley Jewish 
Students offer many programs throughout the 
year. Other groups such as Archaeologists 
Anonymous and Club Frangais plan activities 
around academic interests. 

Students are also responsible for a number of 
publications, among them Wellesley News, 
the weekly student newspaper; Legenda, the 
College yearbook; We, a literary publication; 
and Muse, a newsletter of the Wellesley 
Women's Committee. WZLY-AM and FM, the 
campus radio station, is operated by an all- 
student staff. 

Sports are a significant part of life at 
Wellesley. Some students compete on crew 
and tennis teams as well as in field hockey, 
basketball, squash, sailing, swimming, and 
water polo. Other students pursue physical 
education just for fun, or to stay in shape. 
Interests range from yoga and fencing to 
dance and scuba diving. The recreation build- 
ing, which has a heated swimming pool, also 
has facilities for badminton, volleytDall, 
squash, gymnastics, exercise, and dance. 
Lake Waban, on the campus, is used for water 
sports and ice skating. 

The arts have always been a highly visible part 
of the Wellesley experience, and many musi- 
cal and theatrical groups have been formed. 
The College Choir, the Madrigals, the Tupe- 
los, the Collegium Musicum, the Chamber 
Music Society, the Chapel Choir, the Ethos 
Choir, the Carillonneurs Guild, and the MIT 
Orchestra all offer experiences for students 
with interests in music. Those inclined to- 
ward the theatre can choose among the 



Wellesley College Theatre, the Experimental 
Theatre, the Shakespeare Society, and the 
Wellesley College Black Repertory Total The- 
atrical Experience. In addition to the produc- 
tions of these groups, the Departments of 
Greek and Latin offer plays in the original 
text. 

Life at Wellesley also includes a number of 
traditional social events. Winter Weekend, 
Sophomore Parents Weekend, and Spring 
Weekend are supplemented by frequent infor- 
mal parties. A weekly celebration, TSIF 
(Thank Schneider It's Friday), has a growing 
number of enthusiasts among faculty mem- 
bers and employees as well as students who 
come to Schneider College Center late Friday 
afternoons for beer, wine, ragtime piano, 
talent shows, and other informal entertain- 
ment. 

Schneider Center, which also has a coffee 
house and conference rooms, is the location 
for much community activity. Supplementing 
the facilities and resources of Schneider are 
Slater International Center, which is the fre- 
quent setting for international events and 
celebrations, and Harambee House, the so- 
cial and cultural center of the Black communi- 
ty at Wellesley. Throughout the year, Haram- 
bee sponsors such events as lectures and 
dance performances, many in conjunction 
with the Black studies department. Beit Sha- 
lom /La Casa is the center for the Wellesley 
Jewish students and Mezcia students. 

On weekends, many students move back and 
forth between the campus and activities in 
Cambridge and Boston. The student Senate 
provides buses on weekends to and from Har- 
vard Square, opening up many opportunities 
for exploring urban life. 

Honor Basis 

Inherent in Wellesley's system of democratic 
government, and its accompanying law, is the 
honor basis. As the vital foundation of 
government, the honor basis rests on the 
assumption that individual integrity is of 
fundamental value to each member of the 
community. Within the philosophy of self- 
government, the personal honor and respon- 
sibility of each individual as she approaches 
both the regulated and nonregulated areas of 
academic, social, and residence hall life in 
the Wellesley community are of central 
importance. 



STUDENT LIFE 27 



The honor system covers all duly adopted 
rules of the College for the government of 
academic work, for the use of college resourc- 
es and for the special conduct of its mem- 
bers. Each student— degree candidate, ex- 
change student, and special student— is 
bound by all the rules. 

Each student is expected to live up to the 
honor system, as a member of the student 
body of Wellesley College, both on and off 
the campus. She should also remember that 
she is subject to federal, state, and local laws 
which are beyond the jurisdiction of Wellesley 
College. 

The honor system can work only with full sup- 
port among all members of the College com- 
munity. In addition to upholding the regula- 
tions and spirit of the honor system personal- 
ly, each student is responsible for the survival 
and success of the system as a whole. This 
includes guarding against and, if necessary, 
reporting any inadvertent or intentional abus- 
es of the honor system by any member of the 
community. 

Residence Halls 

Although some students live off campus, 
most live in one of Wellesley's 13 residence 
halls which are the focus of much campus 
life. Each is a community within a larger 
Wellesley community, and each has a charac- 
ter of its own. Much of the informal learning 
at Wellesley takes place in spontaneous dis- 
cussions and debates at meals and in stu- 
dents' rooms. The diversity of Wellesley's 
students, who bring to the College differing 
lifestyles and cultural backgrounds, con- 
tributes much to this process. 

The residence experience is also likely to 
include lectures, faculty and staff guests-in- 
residence, group discussions, dinners with 
faculty members, and parties. One tradition, 
initiated in the early years of the College, is 
Wednesday afternoon tea— an informal occa- 
sion which continues to attract many stu- 
dents. 

Members of all four classes live in each hall. 
Each residence hall also has a professional 
head of house, with the exception of Stone- 
Davis, which is staffed entirely by students. 
The head of house serves as an advisor and 
counselor to individuals and groups in the 
residence halls and as a liaison to the College 
community. 

Students in each residence hall elect a House 
Council which administers the day-to-day 
details of living. The programming committee 
in each hall plans parties and other events 
throughout the year. Each residence also 



elects representatives to the Senate, and 

these students consult with members of the 
residence hall on campus-wide issues and 
convey the feelings of the hall to the student 
government. 

A residential policy committee reviews many 
aspects of residential life and is developing 
ways to involve students in all areas of resi- 
dential policy making. The Residence Office 
has been working to expand the guest-in-resi- 
dence program, and to increase the number of 
academic, cultural, and social events in the 
residence halls. 

Each of the residence halls contains single 
rooms, double rooms, and some suites. The 
cost of all rooms is the same, regardless of 
whether they are shared, and students are 
required to sign a residence contract. Each 
hall has spacious living rooms, smaller com- 
mon rooms, and a study room. All but two 
have dining facilities, and in the remaining 
halls, facilities are open on a five-day or 
seven-day basis. There are limited kitchenette 
facilities in the halls for preparing snacks or 
for use when entertaining. Each building is 
equipped with coin-operated washers and 
dryers. 

The College supplies a bed, desk, chair, 
lamp, bookcase, and bureau for each resident 
student. Students may rent linen or supply 
their own. Students supply blankets, quilts, 
and their own curtains, pictures, rugs, and 
posters. They clean their own rooms and con- 
tribute two or three hours a week answering 
the telephones and doing other miscellane- 
ous jobs which are scheduled by the student 
heads of work. 

Counseling Resources 

The College has a number of professionally 
trained staff members who are available for 
consultation on academic or personal mat- 
ters. The class deans, who generally follow a 
class throughout the four years, have major 
responsibility for advising students on aca- 
demic matters. Questions about choosing a 
major, or difficulties in adjusting to a pro- 
gram, are discussed with the class deans. 
Special tutoring and programs in study skills 
are arranged through the academic depart- 
ments and the dean of academic programs. 

It is most unusual for a student not to feel the 
need, some time during her college years, to 
talk over personal concerns with people other 
than friends and roommates. The counseling 
staff is always available, and complete confi- 
dentiality is maintained at all times. 



28 STUDENT LIFE 



The staff of the College Health Services in- 
cludes psychiatrists and other specialists 
available for crisis counseling and special 
help. Long-term psychotherapy is not pro- 
vided at the College, but the resources for 
such treatment are available in the surround- 
ing area. 

Other Student Services resource people in- 
clude the professional staff in the residence 
halls, the student activities staff in Schneider 
Center, Harambee House and Slater Inter- 
national Center, and the chaplain and his 
assistants. Faculty members are also avail- 
able to talk with students. 

Religious Resources 

Wellesley seeks to respond sensitively to a 
variety of religious traditions. The College 
encourages independent religious involve- 
ment on the part of its students. 

The College Chaplaincy offers a wide variety 
of religious, personal growth, and social 
action programs and voluntary service oppor- 
tunities. The chaplain and other members of 
the chaplaincy staff are regularly available for 
religious and personal counseling. 

The chaplain also officiates at regular Sunday 
morning worship, an ecumenically oriented 
Protestant service in Houghton Memorial 
Chapel with many guest preachers invited 
during the year. Attendance at all worship 
services is voluntary. 

Students may also major in religion and bibli- 
cal studies, or take elective courses in these 
fields. 

College Health Services 

The services of the College physicians, psy- 
chiatrists, and nurses are available at Simp- 
son Infirmary which includes a 29-bed hospi- 
tal and an outpatient clinic. Regular full-time 
students and part-time continuing education 
students who carry three or more courses are 
eligible for care. There is no health fee. Ap- 
propriate charges are made for inpatient care; 
medical, psychiatric, and surgical services 
which are usually covered by insurance, lab- 
oratory studies, elective examinations or pro- 
cedures, immunizations, and treatment for 
pre-existing or ongoing conditions. A College 
sponsored Blue Cross-Blue Shield group 
insurance plan is available. Boston has long 
been one of the major medical centers in the 
country, and consultation with specialists in 
all medical fields is easily available. 



Besides the usual care given by College 
Health Services, members of the Wellesley 
medical staff serve on a student-staff health 
committee. This committee works on ways to 
expand the use of the health services and 
arranges special programs in response to 
student interests. 

The confidentiality of the doctor-patient rela- 
tionship is the foundation upon which the 
success of the health services is based. 
College medical personnel will not share any 
medical information concerning a student 
with any College authorities, or with the par- 
ents of students, without the consent of the 
student. Parents are requested to sign a state- 
ment authorizing the College to proceed vi/ith 
appropriate treatment in the case of serious 
illness or emergency in the event they cannot 
be reached by telephone. 

There are charges for inpatient care and for 
certain outpatient services which are usually 
covered by health insurance. It may be neces- 
sary to disclose minimal information to insur- 
ance companies for verification of medical 
claims. Students are required to enroll in the 
College Health Insurance plan unless they 
have equivalent coverage. 

Jobs on and off Campus 

A student interested in employment may reg- 
ister at the Office of Student Employment. 
This office assists students in obtaining sum- 
mer employment as well as part-time work 
during the academic year. There are many 
opportunities for students to find part-time 
employment at the College and in the Town of 
Wellesley. The Office of Financial Aid and 
Student Employment Office is the clearing- 
house for employment of students. Opportu- 
nities on campus include office work in aca- 
demic and administrative departments, where 
financial aid students receive priority through 
the Financial Aid Office, in Schneider College 
Center, and work in small businesses run by 
students. Off campus, students have worked 
in offices, stores, and restaurants. A large 
number of local families employ students for 
child care and for other varieties of household 
work. 



STUDENT LIFE 29 



In the Career Services Office, students are 
assisted in making plans for thie future, either 
for ennployment or further study. Students 
may consult with the career services coun- 
selors about their interests and plans. Assis- 
tance is provided in many ways. The office 
maintains a library of vocational literature on 
current positions and future career possibili- 
ties; holds lectures and discussions for stu- 
dents on various occupations; supplies infor- 
mation about graduate courses, apprentice- 
ships, graduate scholarships and assistant- 
ships, as well as job opportunities; and 
schedules interviews for seniors with employ- 
er and graduate school representatives who 
recruit at the College. 

All alumnae may continue to use the services 
of this office for information and help to find 
employment or in planning further study. 



Summers 

The long summer vacation gives students 
ample time for work, travel, or study. 

The Career Services Office has information on 
summer opportunities. Counseling and ad- 
vice are offered to students on the various 
possibilities available to match their interests 
and abilities. 

Summer internships and other opportunities 
sponsored by the College are described on 
pp. 39-40. 



Academic Summary 



Non- 
Resident resident 



Class 
Totals 



Totals 



Candidates for the B.A. Degree 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Candidates for the M.A. Degree 

Continuing Education Students 

Nondegree Candidates 



1,866 



484 


49 


533 




351 


22 


373 




485 


13 


498 




448 


14 


462 






17 




17 




111 




111 


46 


5 




51 



Total Registration 



September 1975 



2,045 



30 STUDENT LIFE 



Geographic Distribution of 
Students in 1974-75 



Students from the United States 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 



Students from Other Countries 



Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 



Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 



Nebraska 
Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 



Arkansas 


4 


California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 


83 

16 

123 


Delaware 

District of Columbia 


14 
20 


Florida 


33 


Georgia 


19 


Hawaii 


13 



4 
63 
14 



Iowa 


10 


Kansas 
Kentucky 


12 
11 


Louisiana 


8 



27 
45 
509 
29 
15 

5 
16 

4 



5 

1 

28 

118 

4 

288 

11 

1 



Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 


84 
7 
8 


Pennsylvania 


74 


Rhode Island 


16 


South Dakota 


4 


Tennessee 
Texas 


7 
40 


Utah 


2 


Vermont 
Virginia 


13 
55 


Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 


15 

2 

20 



Foreign 
Citizens 



Argentina 
Austria 



Belgium 

Brazil 

Burma 



Canada 
Ceylon 

China, Rep. of 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cyprus 



Pakistan 
Panama 
Peru 

Philippines 
Puerto Rico 



Scotland 
Somalia 
Sweden 
Switzerland 



U.S. 

Citizens 

Living 

Abroad 



Egypt 

England 
Ethiopia 


1 
8 

1 


1 


France 


2 


2 


Germany 
Greece 


3 
1 


1 


Haiti 

Honduras 
Hong Kong 


1 
1 
3 


1 


India 

Iran 

Italy 


7 
5 
2 


1 
1 


Jamaica 
Japan 


2 
1 


3 


Kenya 
Korea 


1 
9 




Malaysia 
Mexico 


6 


2 


Nepal 

Netherlands/Antilles 

Nigeria 


1 
4 
3 





Thailand 
Trinidad 
Turkey 


2 


1 

1 


Venezuela 
Vietnam 
Virgin Islands 


3 
2 


1 
1 


West Indies 


1 





Total 



1,912 Total 



101 



32 



The Campus 




32 THE CAMPUS 



Wellesley College has a campus of more than 
500 acres bordering on Lake Waban. There are 
woodlands, hills and meadows, an arbore- 
tum, ponds, and miles of footpaths. In this 
setting are 64 buildings, with architectural 
styles ranging from Gothic to contemporary. 

The focal point of the campus is the Galen 
Stone Tower, named for its donor. The tower 
rises 182 feet from Green Hall, the adminis- 
tration building, and contains a 30-bell caril- 
lon. It is an excellent vantage point from 
which to view Wellesley's campus and be- 
yond. 



Academic Facilities 



Classrooms 

The two primary classroom buildings, Found- 
ers Hall and Pendleton Hall, are located in the 
academic quadrangle. The humanities, social 
sciences, and mathematics are taught in 
Founders. Pendleton contains the laborator- 
ies, lecture rooms, libraries, and offices of 
the departments of chemistry, physics, and 
psychology. Extensive equipment and facili- 
ties provide opportunities for advanced work 
in these areas. 

Sage Hall 

Located on the northeast side of the campus 
is Sage Hall, which will house the class- 
rooms, offices, and some of the special lab- 
oratories of the science departments. The 
building, which is currently being renovated, 
will be completed during 1977. The College's 
electron microscopes, x-ray generator, and 
camera and autoradiography facilities will be 
located in Sage. Two large lecture halls, 
equipped for closed-circuit television, have 
been completed and are in use. 

Greenhouses 

Classrooms in the biological sciences depart- 
ment open directly into the Margaret C. Fer- 
guson Greenhouses, named after a former 
Wellesley professor of botany. The climate in 
the greenhouses ranges from temperate to 
tropic with many excellent examples of trees 
and flowers which flourish in the respective 
temperatures. There is considerable space for 
experiments by faculty and students. The 
greenhouses are open to the public through- 
out the year. 



Observatory 

The Whitin Observatory contains laboratories, 
classrooms, darkrooms, and the library of the 
astronomy department. Its research equip- 
ment includes a 6-inch, a 12-inch, and a 24- 
inch telescope. The observatory was a gift of 
Mrs. John C. Whitin, a former trustee of the 
College. It was built in 1900, enlarged in 1962 
and 1966, and is considered to be an unusual- 
ly fine facility for undergraduate training in 
astronomy. 

Science Center 

A new building has been completed which, 
together with renovated Sage Hall, forms the 
Wellesley College Science Center. This com- 
plex houses the departments of astronomy, 
biological sciences, chemistry, computer 
science, geology, mathematics, physics, 
psychology, and the laboratories of electron 
microscopy and human performance. It in- 
cludes the teaching and research laboratories 
of the science departments and the Science 
Library. The Science Center is equipped with 
modern, sophisticated equipment used by 
students in their course work and indepen- 
dent projects. The museum collection is on 
display along the corridors of the Center. 

Computing Facilities 

Many courses and research projects at Welles- 
ley involve the use of a computer. Compu- 
ter terminals are located in the Public Termin- 
al Room of the Margaret Clapp Library, in the 
Science Center, and in the Psychology 
Library. Computing power is obtained on a 
time-shared basis from other colleges in New 
England. In the next academic year, the 
College will acquire its own computer to be 
located in the Science Center. 

Arts Center 

The Jewett Arts Center, completed in 1958, 
consists of the Mary Cooper Jewett art wing 
and the Margaret Weyerhauser Jewett music 
and drama wing. Linking the two buildings is 
the Wellesley College Museum. 

The Museum is open to the general public. It 
includes a fine collection of classical, medi- 
eval and Renaissance sculpture, old master 
paintings, prints and drawings, and contem- 
porary painting. In addition to the permanent 
collection, exhibitions are arranged through- 
out the academic year. 

The art wing contains studios, classrooms, 
an extensive library, and offices of the art 
department and museum. The music and 
drama wing contains the music library, listen- 



THE CAMPUS 33 



ing rooms, practice studios, and classrooms 
and offices of the music department. A col- 
lection of musical instruments of various 
periods is available to students. 

The Jewett Auditorium, a theatre seating 320 
persons, was designed for chamber music 
performances, and is also used for special 
events. In addition, there are rehearsal rooms 
and other theatre facilities. 

Margaret Clapp Library 

The third enlargement and complete remodel- 
ing of the Margaret Clapp Library was finished 
in 1 975. At the center of the modern and func- 
tional building is the reference room which 
distinguished the original building erected in 
1910. 

The library's holdings exceed 500,000 vol- 
umes and contain in addition an important 
collection of public documents. Subscrip- 
tions to periodicals number over 2,000. The 
Special Collections include letters, manu- 
scripts, and rare books of distinction. 

The language laboratory and a new listening 
room for the collection of spoken and dramat- 
ic recordings are part of the library. A lecture 
room is available for meetings. 

Child Study Center 

Wellesley College opened the Child Study 
Center in the fall of 1969 under the direction 
of the psychology department. It is located in 
the Anne L. Page Memorial Building, used for 
many years to house the College nursery 
school. The center serves as a laboratory in 
which Wellesley undergraduates can study 
the development of children ages two through 
five. Students also have the opportunity to 
work as assistant teachers in the classroom. 

Residence Halls 

Each residence, its student capacity and 
location, is listed below: 



Munger 


144 students 


Northwest 


Beebe 


125 students 




Cazenove 


135 students 




Pomeroy 


135 students 




Shafer 


130 students 




Tower Court 


250 students 


West 


Claflin 


130 students 




Severance 


154 students 




Stone 


115 students 


Southeast 


Davis 


117 students 




Bates 


130 students 


Northeast 


Freeman 


130 students 




McAfee 


135 students 





Physical Education Facilities 

Classes for all indoor sports and for modern 
dance are conducted in Mary Hemenway Hall, 
which houses the offices of the physical edu- 
cation department, and in the nearby Recrea- 
tion Building. The latter has game rooms, 
badminton and squash courts, and a swim- 
ming pool. Outdoor water sports center 
around the boathouse where the canoes, sail- 
boats, and crew shells are kept. Wellesley 
also maintains a 9-hole golf course, 16 tennis 
courts, hockey and lacrosse fields, and a ski 
slope. 



Extracurricular Facilities 



Alumnae Hall 

The largest auditorium on the campus, seat- 
ing 1500 people, is in Alumnae Hall. It also 
has a large ballroom and houses the 
Wellesley College Theatre and the College 
radio station, WZLY. Visiting lecturers, con- 
cert artists, and professional theatre groups 
often appear there. The building was erected 
in 1923 and is the gift of Wellesley alumnae. 

Chapel 

The Houghton Memorial Chapel was present- 
ed to Wellesley in 1897 by the son and daugh- 
ter of William S. Houghton, a former trustee 
of the College. The chapel's stained glass 
windows commemorate the founders and 
others, while a tablet by Daniel Chester 
French honors Alice Freeman Palmer, 
Wellesley's second president. The chapel, 
which seats 1 200 people, is a setting for 
lectures and community meetings as well as 
religious services. 

Schneider College Center 

The center for extracurricular life at the Col- 
lege is Schneider College Center. Its newly 
remodeled facilities provide lounge areas, a 
snack bar, meeting rooms, offices for student 
organizations, and a coffee house. It also 
contains the offices of the coordinator of 
student services, the director of residence, 
and the chaplain. 

Harambee House and Slater International 
Center are complementary adjuncts to 
Schneider. 



34 THE CAMPUS 



Harambee House 

Harambee House is the cultural and social 
center for the Black connnnunity at Wellesley. 
It contains rooms for seminars, meetings, 
and social gatherings as well as facilities for 
cooking and entertaining. 

Slater International Center 

Slater International Center is an informal 
meeting place for foreign and American stu- 
dents and faculty. The Center serves campus 
organizations which have an interest in inter- 
national affairs and helps to sponsor semi- 
nars and speakers on international topics. 
Located in the Center is the Foreign Student 
Office, which handles immigration and all 
nonacademic counseling for students from 
abroad. Slater is the headquarters for the 
Foreign Students Association, providing a 
place where foreign students may study, 
cook, entertain, and get to know each other 
better. 

Beit Shalom 

Beit Shalom, the religious, cultural, and 
social center for the Wellesley Jewish Com- 
munity, houses study rooms and kosher 
kitchen facilities as well as a dining room for 
Sabbath dinners. 

Society Houses 

There are three society houses for special 
interest groups. Each house has kitchen and 
dining facilities, a living room, and other 
gathering rooms. Members are drawn from all 
four classes, beginning with second semester 
freshmen. Shakespeare House is a center for 
students interested in Shakespearean drama; 
Tau Zeta Epsilon House is oriented around art 
and music; and Zeta Alpha House provides a 
setting for students with an interest in mod- 
ern drama. 



Other Campus Facilities 



Green Hall 

The offices of the president, the Board of 
Admission, the deans, and all administrative 
offices directly affecting the academic and 
business management of the College are lo- 
cated in Green Hall. The building has large 
rooms for Academic Council and trustee 
meetings, class and seminar rooms, and 
some faculty offices. Named for Hetty R. 
Green, the building was erected in 1931 . 

Infirmary 

Simpson Infirmary is a 29-bed licensed hospi- 
tal, approved by the American Hospital Asso- 
ciation, with an outpatient clinic built in 1942. 
It is connected to the original infirmary which 
was built in 1 881 and is now used for psychi- 
atric services and staff housing. 

President's House 

The President's House, formerly the country 
estate of Wellesley's founders, the Durants, is 
located on a hill just south of the main cam- 
pus. The spacious lawns border Lake Waban. 
Remodeled and renovated in 1968, it is fre- 
quently the scene of alumnae and trustee 
gatherings as well as receptions for distin- 
guished visitors, for entering students, and 
for graduating seniors and their parents. 

Wellesley College Club 

The Wellesley College Club is a center for 
faculty, staff, and alumnae. Its reception and 
dining rooms are open to members, their 
guests, and parents of students for lunch and 
dinner and are also used for many special 
occasions. Overnight accommodations are 
also available for alumnae and for parents of 
students and prospective students. 



Center for Research on Women 

in Higher Education and the Professions 

The Center for Research on Women in Higher 
Education and the Professions, funded by a 
grant from the Carnegie Corporation, was 
established in the summer of 1974 and is 
sponsored jointly by Wellesley College and 
the Federation of Organizations for Profes- 
sional Women. The Center conducts policy- 
oriented studies of women's educational 
needs and examines paid and unpaid work in 
the context of increasing life choices for both 
men and women. 



Academic Program 




36 THE CURRICULUM 



The curriculum provides a framework within 
which students are invited to explore various 
fields in the arts and sciences. In developing 
the curriculum, the faculty presents diverse 
offerings among which students will gradual- 
ly discover interrelationships. Through study 
of different disciplines and bodies of knowl- 
edge, students perceive the coherent unity 
among diversity which is traditionally termed 
a liberal arts education. When students 
decide on an area of concentration they then 
elect courses in other fields to provide com- 
plementary or contrasting experiences. 
These, together with the major, enable stu- 
dents to achieve a broad liberal arts educa- 
tion. 

By the time the Bachelor of Arts degree is 
earned, the student should be acquainted 
with the main fields of human interest, capa- 
ble of integrating knowledge from various 
fields, and prepared for continuous scholarly 
growth and responsible participation in soci- 
ety. In the major field, the student is expected 
to demonstrate maturity of thought, acquain- 
tance with recognized authorities in the field, 
and general competence in dealing with 
sources of research or analysis. 

Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

Each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts is required to complete 32 units of aca- 
demic work at a C average or better. Each 
semester course is assigned one unit of cred- 
it. The normal period of time in which to earn 
the degree is four years and a normal program 
of study includes from three to five courses a 
semester. Freshmen are encouraged to carry 
a maximum of four courses each semester, 
but upperclass students may take five. 

Courses are classified in Grades I, II, and III. 
Introductory courses are numbered 100-199 
(Grade I); intermediate courses, 200-299 
(Grade 11); advanced courses, 300-380 (Grade 
III). Each student must include at least four 
units of Grade III work, at least two of which 
shall be in the major. The program in the se- 
nior year may not include more units of Grade 
I than of Grade III work, and at least two must 
be Grade 111. 

Distribution Requirements 

In order to provide students with as much 
flexibility as possible, Wellesley requires no 
specific courses. To insure, however, that 
students gain insight and awareness in areas 
outside their own major fields, the College 
does require that they choose three semester 
courses in each of three general areas during 
the four year period. (Courses numbered 350 
— Research or Individual Study— do not satis- 
fy this requirement.) 



The three groups of academic disciplines are: 

Group A 

Literature, Foreign Languages, Art, and 
Music 

Three units chosen from courses in the De- 
partments of Art, Chinese, English, French, 
German, Greek and Latin, Italian, Music, Reli- 
gion and Biblical Studies (Greek and He- 
brew), Russian, Spanish; or from those 
courses offered by the Department of Black 
Studies and from those extradepartmental 
literature courses which are designated as 
fulfilling the requirement in Group A. 

Group B 

Social Science, Religion and Biblical Studies, 
and Philosophy 

One or two units chosen from courses in the 

Departments of History, Philosophy, Religion 

and Biblical Studies, and courses offered by 

the Department of Black Studies in these 

fields 

and 

One or two units chosen from courses in the 

Departments of Economics, Political Science, 

Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology, 

and courses offered by the Department of 

Black Studies in these fields. 

Group C 

Science and Mathematics 

Three units, at least one of which shall be a 
course with laboratory, chosen from offerings 
in the Departments of Astronomy, Biological 
Sciences, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, 
and Physics. 

Foreign Language Requirements 

Before the beginning of the senior year stu- 
dents must exhibit a degree of proficiency in 
the use of one foreign language, either an- 
cient or modern. Many students fulfill the 
requirement by passing one of the language 
tests offered by the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board (CEEB). Wellesley requires a 
score of 61 or better on the CEEB Achieve- 
ment Test, or a score of at least 3 on the Ad- 
vanced Placement Examination (AP). This 
requirement can also be met by the comple- 
tion of 2 units of language study at the sec- 
ond year college level orl unit of language 
study above the second year college level. 

Students may take introductory courses in 
only two modern foreign languages. 



THE CURRICULUM 37 



Fulfillment of the foreign language require- 
ment thirougfi work done at another institution 
must be approved by the appropriate depart- 
ment. A student whose native language is not 
English will be exempted from this require- 
ment, subject to approval of the class dean 
and the Academic Review Board. 

Other Requirements 

Students are expected to use acceptable stan- 
dards of spoken and written English in their 
college work. Special assistance in English, 
mathematics, and other basic and special 
skills is offered at the College. 

In addition, all students must complete the 
physical education requirement described on 
p. 112 for which no academic credit is given. 

The Major 

Students may choose from among 25 depart- 
mental majors, five interdepartmental majors 
—classical civilization, classical and Near 
Eastern archaeology, East Asian studies, 
medieval /renaissance studies, and molecular 
biology— or they may design an individual 
major. Of the 32 units required for graduation, 
at least 8 are to be elected in the major, and 
no more than 1 4 in any one department. 

Students who are interested in an individual 
major submit a plan of study to two faculty 
members from different departments. This 
plan should include four units in one depart- 
ment above the introductory level. The pro- 
gram for the individual major is subject to the 
approval of the Committee on Curriculum and 
Instruction. Some students wish to center 
their study upon an area, a period, ora sub- 
ject which crosses conventional departmental 
lines. Examples of possible area studies are 
American studies, Latin American studies, 
Russian studies; of periods, the Middle 
Ages, the Renaissance; of subjects, com- 
parative literature, international relations, 
theatre studies, urban studies. 

In the second semester of the sophomore year 
each student elects a major field and prepares 
for the registrar a statement of the courses to 
be included in the major. Later revisions may 
be made with the approval of the chairman of 
the major department, or in the case of the 
individual major, with the student's advisors, 
and be presented to the registrar not later 
than the second semester of the junior year. 



Academic Standards 

Academic standards at Wellesley are high, 
and students take full responsibility for at- 
tending classes, submitting required work on 
time, and appearing for examinations. If stu- 
dents have difficulties with course work, be- 
come ill, or have other problems which inter- 
fere with their academic work, they should 
consult with theirclass dean for assistance in 
making special arrangements for their 
studies. 

Students are expected to maintain at least a 
C average throughout the college career. At 
the end of each semester each student's rec- 
ord is reviewed, and appointments with the 
class dean are arranged if needed. The Col- 
lege tries to provide the appropriate support 
services to students in difficulty. Students 
who show consistent effort are rarely exclud- 
ed from the College. 

Grading System 

Students have the option of electing courses 
on a letter or nonletter grading system. At the 
beginning of the eighth week of a semester, 
students notify the registrar and their instruc- 
tor whether they plan to take a course for a 
letter grade or on the credit/ noncredit basis. 
Credit is given to students who have attained 
a satisfactory familiarity with the content of a 
course and have demonstrated ability to use 
this knowledge in a competent manner. If 
credit is not earned the course does not ap- 
pear on the student's permanent record. 

Examinations 

An examination period occurs at the end of 
each semester. Within this period students 
may devise their own examination schedules 
for the majority of courses. Examinations are 
scheduled for some art, music, and foreign 
language courses which require audiovisual 
equipment. Special examinations are offered in 
September to qualified students to earn credit 
for work done independently, for admission 
to advanced courses without the stated pre- 
requisites, and for exemption from required 
studies. 

Students who wish credit towards the degree 
for work done independently in the summer 
should consult the appropriate department 
and the class dean, and should apply to the 
registrar at least a month in advance for a 
special examination to be given at the begin- 
ning of the college year. 



38 THE CURRICULUM 



Examinations may be taken for credit, for 
admission to a more advanced course, or for 
exemption from the required studies in 
Groups A, B, and C. Examinations for credit 
passed at a satisfactory level also count for 
advanced placement and/or exemption; 
examinations for advanced placement also 
count for exemption. Examinations passed at 
a satisfactory level for exemption do not 
count for credit. 

Credit for Advanced Placement Examinations 

Students entering under the Advanced Place- 
ment Program of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, and who make the scores speci- 
fied by Wellesley College, will receive credit 
toward the B.A. degree, provided they do not 
register in college for courses which cover 
substantially the same material as those for 
which they have received Advanced Place- 
ment credit. Two units of credit will be given 
for each AP examination in which a student 
received a grade of 4 or 5 with the following 
exceptions: 1 unit of credit will be given for 
the Latin 4 examination; 1 unit of credit will 
be given in the Mathematics AB examination; 
1 unit of credit for a score of 3 in the Mathe- 
matics BC examination. Not more than 2 
units are credited in any one department. 

Credit for Other Academic Work 

Of the 32 units required for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, a student may earn a maxi- 
mum of 16 units through a combination of the 
following: AP examinations (no more than 8); 
courses taken at another institution during 
the summer or the academic year; or study 
independent of Wellesley courses which is 
then evaluated by examination by a Wellesley 
department. (See Examinations.) Four units 
may be earned in summer school, or by a 
combination of summer school and summer 
independent study. No more than 2 units may 
be earned for summer. independent study. 
Eight units, in addition to summer school, 
may be earned through courses taken at 
another institution. Students, including 
transfer students, must complete 16 units at 
Wellesley. Candidates for the B.A. degree in 
the program for Continuing Education must 
complete a minimum of 8 units of work at the 
College. 

Exemption from Required Studies 

Students may be exempted from any of the 
studies required for the degree, provided they 
can demonstrate to the department concerned 
a reasonable competence in the elements of 
the course. Exemption from any of the stud- 
ies required does not affect the general re- 
quirement for completion of 32 units for grad- 



uation. It does, however, make it possible for 
some students to select more advanced 
courses earlier in their college careers. 

Such exemption may be achieved in one of 
two ways: a score of 4 (Honors) or 5 (High 
Honors) on the CEEB AP tests, or passing a 
special exemption examination. Permission 
for the exemption examination must be ob- 
tained from the class dean and the chairman 
of the department concerned. (See Examina- 
tions.) In addition to the evidence offered by 
the examination, some departments may re- 
quire the student to present a paper or an 
acceptable laboratory notebook. 

Acceleration 

A few students complete all the requirements 
for the degree in less than the usual eight 
semesters. After two semesters at Wellesley, 
students who wish to accelerate should con- 
sult their deans and then write a letter to the 
Academic Review Board, petitioning to fulfill 
the requirements earlier. 

The petition should include the month and 
year in which the degree requirements will be 
fulfilled, and all units that will be counted 
toward the degree. 

Normally, a plan to accelerate must include 
8 units at Wellesley in two consecutive se- 
mesters during the junior and senior years. 
In accumulating units in addition to courses 
taken at Wellesley, an accelerating student 
may count: 
1 

Advanced Placement credit (no more than 8 
units); 
2 

A maximum of 4 units earned either in sum- 
mer school or by a combination of summer 
school and independent study during the 
summer, validated at Wellesley. No more than 
2 units may be earned for summer inde- 
pendent study; and 
3 

A maximum of 2 units of college or university 
credit earned prior to graduation from secon- 
dary school, which is not included in the units 
of secondary school work required for admis- 
sion. 

An accelerating student must maintain a C 
average at all times. 

Researcfi or Individual Study 

Each academic department provides the op- 
portunity for qualified students to undertake a 
program of individual study directed by a 
member of the faculty. Under this program an 
eligible student may undertake a research 



THE CURRICULUM 39 



project or a program of reading in a particular 
field. The results of this work normally are 
presented in a final report or in a series of 
short essays. The conditions for such work 
are described under the course numbered 350 
in each department. Wellesley offers further 
opportunities for research and individual 
study. (See Honors in the Major Field.) 

Freshman-Sophomore Colloquia 

These colloquia give students the chance to 
work closely in small groups with individual 
faculty members. They are designed to pro- 
vide the sort of educational experience which 
previously was enjoyed only by advanced 
students. They are similar to the seminars in 
that they stress independent work, discus- 
sion, and oral and written presentations. 

Cross-Registration Program with the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

A program of cross-registration of students at 
Wellesley and the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology was officially inaugurated in 
1968-69. The program allows students to elect 
courses at the other institution, and extends 
the diversity of educational experiences avail- 
able in the curricula and in the environments 
of both. The two schools combine theiraca- 
demic, extracurricular, and operational re- 
sources while maintaining the separate 
strengths, independence, and integrity of 
each institution. 

A Wellesley student interested in exploring 
the possibilities of electing a specific course 
at MIT should consult the exchange coordi- 
nator, the department advisor, or the appro- 
priate exchange program faculty advisor. 
Registration in MIT courses takes place each 
semester, and application must be made in 
the Exchange Office during the preceding 
semester. Since the number of participants in 
the exchange is limited, upperclass students 
are given preference. 

The Twelve College Exchange Program 

Wellesley belongs to a consortium which 
includes Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut 
College, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Smith, 
Trinity, Vassar, Wesleyan, Wheaton, and 
Williams. Students in good standing may 
apply through the exchange coordinator for a 
semester or full academic year in residence at 
any of the member institutions. The number 
of places is limited and admission is competi- 
tive. Preference is given to students planning 
to participate in their junior year. 



The Junior Year Abroad 

Qualified students may apply for admission 
to various groups spending the junior year in 
Europe and in other foreign countries. A few 
Wellesley Slater Junior Year Abroad scholar- 
ships are available to juniors, eligible for 
financial aid, who have been accepted for 
programs approved by the Foreign Study 
Committee. Stecher Scholarships for the 
study of art abroad are awarded to qualified 
students who are eligible for financial aid. 
Candidates are selected by the Art Depart- 
ment Stecher Scholarship Committee and the 
Foreign Study Committee. Limited financial 
support for students wishing to spend the 
junior year in Africa or the Caribbean is pro- 
vided by the Waddell Fund. The selection of 
recipients for awards from the three funds is 
made early in the second semester of the 
sophomore year on the basis of academic 
qualifications and faculty recommendations. 
The amount of each individual award is deter- 
mined according to need. Information about 
these awards may be obtained from the Office 
of Foreign Study. 

The Office of Foreign Study helps students 
with individual plans for study abroad, for 
example, applications for direct enrollment as 
visiting students in British universities. 

The Spelman-Wellesley Experimental 
Exchange Program 

The academic year 1 975-76 was the second 
year of an experimental student exchange 
between Wellesley and Spelman College in 
Atlanta, Georgia, a distinguished Black liber- 
al arts college for women. The experimental 
exchange is expected to continue in 1976-77, 
with a maximum of two full year students 
from each institution participating. 

The program is open only to students in their 
junior year. 

Summer Internships 

The College sponsors a Washington Summer 
Internship Program which provides a unique 
opportunity for students to learn about the 
national government through direct participa- 
tion in political activity. Interested juniors 
may apply for 1 5 available summer intern- 
ships, in governmental and nongovernmental 
offices. Interns hold full-time jobs forten 
weeks and also participate in evening semi- 
nars with guest speakers on governmental or 
political problems. Job assignments are 
made according to the interest of the student 
and the potential for learning. Recent assign- 
ments have included positions in congres- 
sional offices, in the Department of Justice, 



40 THE CURRICULUM 



in the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare, with the Federal Trade Commission, 
in the Office of the President, and with a ma- 
jor broadcasting system. Salaries are offered 
in some of these positions; the College pro- 
vides stipends for students who hold non- 
salaried positions. 

In addition, the Wellesley Urban Politics Sum- 
mer Internship Program offers juniors the 
opportunity to focus on some of the dilem- 
mas of contemporary urban life. Students 
participating in this program spend ten weeks 
working for government agencies or private 
organizations in Boston or Los Angeles. In- 
terns attend seminars and other meetings 
designed to stimulate analytical thinking 
about politics, government institutions, and 
public policy-making. Interns receive a sti- 
pend from the College. 

The Internship Program in Economics, found- 
ed at Wellesley by the National Association of 
Business Economists, places qualified eco- 
nomics majors in salaried positions in private 
or public agencies in all parts of the country 
during the summer following the junior year. 
Students in this program carry out applied 
economic research under the direction of 
senior economists. 

Community Involvement 

Wellesley students can become involved in 
the Greater Boston community in a variety of 
ways. Some students choose to work in com- 
munities where they can participate in legal 
aid, tutoring, and health services, or church 
work. Others work with the City of Boston or 
the Town of Wellesley in various depart- 
ments. 

Credit may be given for supervised field work 
as a research component of some courses or 
independent study; in other instances, ex- 
perience in the community forms part of the 
required work of courses dealing with social, 
political, or economic issues. Generally, stu- 
dents become involved in community work for 
many reasons besides the possibility of earn- 
ing academic credit. 

Credit for Summer School and Summer 
Independent Study 

Some students undertake planned programs 
of summer independent study which they 
have designed with members of the faculty 
and their class dean. Two units of credit may 
be earned in this way. Four units may be 
earned by a combination of summer school 
and independent study. Other students attend 
summer school. The amount of summer 
school credit allowed toward the degree is 
limited to 4 units, and is not automatic. Stu- 
dents should consult their class deans and 



appropriate departments before enrolling in 
summer school courses for which they expect 
credit toward the Wellesley degree. 

Summer Study Abroad 

Students planning summer study in foreign 
countries should consult the Office of For- 
eign Study. Wellesley awards Slater and 
Stecher Summer Scholarships to students 
who need to have access to materials avail- 
able only in foreign countries. First consider- 
ation is given to applicants whose summer 
studies are related to honors projects ap- 
proved for the senior year. Waddell Summer 
Scholarships provide opportunities for stu- 
dents wishing to study in Africa or the Carib- 
bean. An application for a Slater, Stecher, ora 
Waddell Scholarship requires the support of 
the student's major department and a state- 
ment from the financial aid officer showing 
what funds are needed to supplement the 
student's financial resources. 



Academic Distinctions 

Honors in the Major Field 

Students who have shown marked excellence 
and an unusual degree of independence in 
their work may be invited to participate in the 
Honors Program, based on their record in the 
major field. Under this program an eligible 
student may be invited to undertake indepen- 
dent research or special study which will be 
supervised by a member of the faculty. In 
several departments, options for general 
examinations, special honors seminars, and 
opportunities to assist faculty in teaching 
introductory and intermediate level courses 
are available to honors candidates. The suc- 
cessful completion of the work and of an oral 
honors examination leads to the award of 
Honors in the t\/lajor Field. i 

Other Academic Distinctions 

The College names to Freshman Honors 
those students who maintain high academic 
standing during the freshman year. Wellesley 
College Scholars and Durant Scholars are 
named at Commencement, based on academ- 
ic records after the freshman year. Wellesley 
College Scholars have achieved high aca- 
demic standing and Durant Scholars highest 
academic standing. 

Juniors and seniors are elected to member- \ 
ship in the Eta of Massachusetts chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa on the basis of their total aca- 
demic ahievement in college. Seniors who are 
majoring in the sciences may be elected to 
associate membership in the Wellesley chap- 
ter of Sigma Xi. 



THE CURRICULUM 41 



On recommendation of the faculty, the trus- 
tees award the title of Trustee Scholar to four 
seniors who intend to pursue graduate stud- 
ies. The awards are made on a competitive 
basis; the title is honorary. In cases of finan- 
cial need stipends are awarded to the Schol- 
ars or, if not required by them, to alternates 
who need financial assistance. Applications 
and supporting credentials should be sent to 
the Secretary to the Committee on Graduate 
Fellowships by January 2. 

Certain prizes have been established at the 
College for the recognition of excellence in a 
particular field. Each carries a small stipend 
or gift and usually bears the name of the do- 
nor or the person honored, and is awarded by 
the departments. 

Leave of Absence 

Recognizing that many students benefit edu- 
cationally if they interrupt the normal se- 
quence of four continuous years at Wellesley, 
the College has established a policy for tem- 
porary leaves of absence. Leaves may be tak- 
en for as short a period as one semester or as 
long as two years, and for a variety of reasons 
which may include study at another institu- 
tion, work, travel, or other activities which 
meet personal needs. Application for leave of 
absence may be made to the class dean at any 
time after a student has completed at least 
one year at Wellesley. 

To obtain permission to spend the year at 
another institution as nonmatriculated stu- 
dents or guests, students submit a detailed 
plan to the class dean or advisor and, if a ma- 
jor has been chosen, to that department. The 
plan should list the course of study for the 
year and justify its relationship to the four 
year program. Students must also submit a 
statement signed by the dean or registrar of 
the other institution recognizing their status 
as nonmatriculated students who will return 
to Wellesley to complete their work for the 
degree. 

Withdrawal 

Students who plan to withdraw must inform 
the class dean. A withdrawal form will then be 
sent to the parents or guardian for their signa- 
ture. The official date of the withdrawal is 
considered to be the date upon which the 
student and the class dean agree and on 
which the withdrawal card is signed by the 
class dean. The withdrawal date is important 
in order to compute costs and refunds. (See 
Refund Policy p. 19.) Students who have offi- 
cially withdrawn from the College or have 
taken an official leave of absence for the cur- 
rent semester cannot remain in residence on 
campus. 



The College reserves the right to require the 
withdrawal of any student whose academic 
work falls below its standards, or for whom 
Wellesley may not have been the best choice. 
In such cases of involuntary withdrawal, 
which are rare, the official date of withdrawal 
is determined by the College. 

Readmission 

A student who has withdrawn from the Col- 
lege and wishes to return should apply to the 
Office of the Dean of Academic Programs for 
the appropriate forms. Readmission will be 
considered in the light of the reasons for with- 
drawal and reapplication, and in the case of 
resident students, available residence hall 
space. A nonrefundable fee of $20 must 
accompany the application form for readmis- 
sion. 

Career Preparation 

Although a liberal arts education does not 
prepare a student directly for a specific ca- 
reer, it provides the broad background upon 
which a student depends in innumerable 
ways throughout a lifetime. Qualities and 
skills such as resourcefulness, initiative, in- 
dependence, and research ability are all prod- 
ucts of a liberal arts education, as well as im- 
portant career requisites. The quality and 
rigor of the academic program at Wellesley 
prepare a student to pursue specialized pro- 
fessional training in graduate school, or to 
perform well on a job. Wellesley graduates do 
further study and find employment in a wide 
variety of interesting and challenging fields, 
including the arts and sciences, architecture, 
business, education, health services, law, 
and social service. 

Students are encouraged to develop an on- 
going relationship with the Career Services 
Office throughout their four years at Welles- 
ley. The Career Services Office staff is pre- 
pared to assist students in planning their pro- 
gram at Wellesley within the framework of ex- 
panding, long-range career and life-planning 
options. Through workshops, group meet- 
ings, panels, individual appointments, and 
research in the resource center, a student can 
identify the career-related skills provided 
through a liberal arts curriculum. 

Workshops are offered on graduate school 
applications, job search, resume writing, 
interview techniques, and the office sponsors 
or cosponsors panels where graduates and 
others share their experiences from a wide 
variety of career fields. To assist students in 
examining and evaluating various possible 
career options on a first-hand basis, up-to- 
date files on career-related internships and 
field experiences are maintained. 



42 THE CURRICULUM 



The career resource center houses informa- 
tion on specific professions and career op- 
tions, graduate and professional study, en- 
trance examination requirements, and oppor- 
tunities for work and study abroad. Alumnae 
provide one of the most valuable resources, 
and the resource center maintains a file of 
alumnae who are willing to talk with students 
about their graduate training and/or about 
their career fields. To help seniors and gradu- 
ates seeking employment, the Career Services 
Office sends specific job referral notices and 
provides a credential service. For seniors, re- 
cruiter interviews are available both at Welles- 
ley and MIT. 

Specific requirements for various professions 
and career options vary widely. Law and busi- 
ness schools, for example, do not have spe- 
cific undergraduate course requirements. In 
general, they require a broad liberal arts edu- 
cation which prepares a student to think and 
write analytically. 

A student who intends to enter college teach- 
ing and research should plan to earn a Ph.D. 
in the academic discipline in which she 
wishes to teach. She should consult as early 
as possible with the departmental chairman in 
the field of interest for advice on which 
courses and which foreign languages are 
needed to pursue graduate study. No specific 
background in the theory of education is re- 
quired. 

The field of secondary school teaching, how- 
ever, requires specific undergraduate prepara- 
tion. Students intending to teach on the sec- 
ondary level should consult the chairman of 
the education department in the freshman 
year if possible about requirements for cer- 
tification and ways of preparing to meet them. 
It should be noted that Wellesley does not of- 
fer a major in education, nor the opportunity 
for practice teaching on the elementary level. 

Medical and dental schools also require spe- 
cific undergraduate preparation. Students 
should consult as early as possible with the 
premedical advisory committee to plan their 
sequence of courses. Trends in medicine in- 
dicate that public health, health policy plan- 
ning and administration, and other new pro- 
fessional categories are among the many al- 
ternatives available to women in the health 
professions. A detailed booklet. Information 
for Wellesley Students Interested in the 
Health Sciences, may be obtained from the 
Career Services Office. Students interested in 
new careers in the health professions should 
also consult with the premedical advisory 
committee. 



Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Program is normal- 
ly for women 25 years of age or older or whose 
education has been interrupted for five or 
more years prior to the date of application. 

This nonresidential program enables students 
to enroll either part-time or full-time. They 
attend classes with Wellesley undergraduates 
and take the same courses. 

The majority of Continuing Education stu- 
dents resume study toward the Bachelor of 
Arts degree; others who have undergraduate 
degrees may need further training or reeduca- 
tion in preparation for a career or graduate 
study; others may simply wish to explore a 
new field. Continuing Education students 
who are candidates for the B.A. degree must 
complete a minimum of 8 units of work at the 
College. 

For further information about the program 
contact the Office of Continuing Education, 
Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
02181. 




Courses of Instruction 




In H 




Wsik 


^^ 


^^*^^9^ '^i^lH 





44 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



A semester course which carries one unit of 
credit requires approximately eleven hours of 
work each week spent partly in class and part- 
ly in preparation. The amount of time sched- 
uled for classes varies with the subject from 
two periods each week in many courses in the 
humanities and social sciences to three, four, 
or five scheduled periods in certain courses in 
foreign languages, in art and music, and in 
the sciences. Classes are scheduled from 
Monday morning through late Friday after- 
noon; examinations may be scheduled from 
Monday morning through late Saturday after- 
noon. 

Prerequisites are given in terms of Wellesley 
courses, exemption examinations, AP scores, 
and "admission units." Admission units refer 
to the secondary school credits acquired in 
various precollege courses. 



Freshman-Sophomore Coiloquia 
Directions for Election 



The coiloquia (1 50 courses) are designed for 
freshmen and sophomores who are interested 
in concentrated study of a significant well- 
defined topic. They offer students the oppor- 
tunity to work in small groups in close associ- 
ation with faculty members. Most are open 
without prerequisite although a few presup- 
pose some earlier study of the field either in 
secondary school or in a college course. They 
are similar to seminars in method and ap- 
proach in that they stress independent work, 
discussion, and student reports. 

Each colloquium counts as one unit. Each 
may be elected to satisfy in part one of the 
distribution requirements. Since enrollments 
are limited, students ordinarily may not enroll 
in more than one colloquium. They may, how- 
ever, apply for more than one, indicating their 
preference. If a colloquium is oversubscribed 
the chairman or instructor, in consultation 
with the class dean, will decide which appli- 
cants will be accepted. 

In 1976-77 coiloquia are offered by the follow- 
ing departments: Art, Black Studies, English, 
History, and Philosophy. 



Legend 



Courses numbered: 

100-199 

Grade I courses 

200-299 

Grade II courses 

300-380 

Grade III courses 



1 or 2 

Units of credit 



(1) 

Offered in first 
semester 

(2) 

Offered in second 
semester 

(1){2) 

Offered in both 
semesters 



(1-2) 

Continued 
throughout the 
academic year. 
Unless specifically 
stated, no credit 
is awarded unless 
both semesters are 
completed 
satisfactorily. 



Numbers in 
brackets designate 
courses listed only 
in earlier 
catalogues. 



Offered in alternate 
years. Note: Unless 
specifically stated 
such courses will be 
offered in 1976-77. 



Part-time instructor 



Absent on leave 

•1 

Absent on leave 

during the first 

semester 

• 2 

Absent on leave 

during the second 

semester 



ART 45 



Art 



Professor: 
O'Gorman 

Associate Professor: 

Moffett, Wallace*, Anderson, Rayen*, 

Fergusson (Chairnnan), Janis 

Assistant Professor: 

Clapp, Marvin, Lyndon, MacNeil , Sandman, 

Waltermire, Harvey, Wentworth 

Instructor: 

Solomon3, Carroll, Leff 

Lecturer: 
Gabhart, Gaither3 

Visiting Professor: 
Seznec'^ 

The Departnnent of Art offers courses in the 
history of art and in studio art. Some of the 
courses in art history include laboratory work 
in one or more media with which the course is 
concerned. One of the studio courses, 204, is 
a survey of the techniques of painting from 
the Middle Ages to the present, and is re- 
quired of all art majors. The department be- 
lieves that laboratory training has great value 
in developing observation and understanding 
of artistic problems. For students majoring in 
history of art, however, no particularly artistic 
aptitude is required, and the laboratory work 
is adjusted to the student's ability. 

An art major may either concentrate in history 
of art or in studio art. 



History of Art 



100(1-2) Introductory Course 
1 or 2 

A foundation for further study in the history of 
art. The major styles in western architecture, 
sculpture, and painting from ancient Greece 
through the 19th century are presented in 
lectures and in conference sections. Simple 
laboratory work requiring no previous training 
or artistic skill planned to give the student a 
greater understanding of artistic problems. 
One unit of credit may be given for the first 
semester. 
Open only to freshmen and sophomores. 

The Staff 



150 (2) Colloquium 
1 

The eloquent object 

For directions for applying see p. 44. Open by 
permission to a limited number of freshman 
and sophomore applicants. 
An orientation to art using originals. The 
course will concentrate on an examination of 
the material properties of objects and the 
manner in which they may incorporate and 
express social, political, historical, literary, 
aesthetic and/or formal ideas. 
Prerequisite: 100 (1 ). The colloquium can be 
substituted for 100 (2) to fulfill the require- 
ment for majors, although a student is free to 
elect 100 (2) at the same time or in the sopho- 
more year. 

Ms. Janis 

200 (1)* Classical Art 
1 

Topic for 1977-78: Greek painting, sculpture, 
and architecture from the Geometric Period to 
the death of Cleopatra. Greek sculpture will 
be emphasized and some attention will be 
paid to the impact of Greek forms on later 
western art. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
who have taken 100 (1) or 21 5, or by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Miss Marvin 

201 (2)* Near Eastern and Bronze Age Art 
1 

The art and archaeology of the eastern Medi- 
terranean from 3000 B.C. to 1200 B.C. with 
particular emphasis on Egypt. The interrela- 
tions of the culture of Egypt with Mesopo- 
tamia, Minoan Crete, Mycenaean Greece, and 
their neighbors will be studied. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite and to freshmen by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Miss Marvin 

202 (2) Medieval Sculpture and Painting 
1 

A survey of the major monuments of sculp- 
ture, manuscript and fresco painting in 
France and England during the Romanesque 
and Gothic periods with particular emphasis 
on the context of use, the formation of work- 
shops, and the development of programs. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores who have 
taken 1 00 (1 ), and to juniors and seniors with- 
out prerequisite. 

Mrs. Leff 



46 ART 



203 (1) Cathedrals and Castles of the High 

Middle Ages 

1 

A study of the major religious and secular 
buildings of the Romanesque and Gothic 
periods with emphasis on France and Eng- 
land. Attention will be given to the interpreta- 
tion and context of buildings and to their rela- 
tionship to cult, political and urban factors. 
Occasional conferences. 
Open to sophomores who have taken 1 00 (1 ), 
and to juniors and seniors without prerequi- 
site. 

Mr. Fergusson 

215 (1) European Art to the Renaissance 
1 

The major movements in architecture, sculp- 
ture, and painting from classical antiquity to 
c. 1 400. Students attend course 1 00 lectures 
and have the option of attending course 100 
conferences. Reading and paper assignments 
differ from those of 100. Students will be 
assigned staff advisors. 
Open only to juniors and seniors who have 
not taken 100. 

The Staff 

216 (2) European Art from the Renaissance 
through the Nineteenth Century 

1 

Western art from the Renaissance through the 
19th century with emphasis on painting, 
sculpture, and architecture. Students attend 
course 100 lectures and have the option of 
attending course 100 conferences. Reading 
and paper assignments differ from those of 
100. 
Prerequisite: same as for 215. 

The Staff 

219 (1) Painting and Sculpture of the 

Nineteenth Century 

1 

A study of the painting and sculpture of the 
19th century in Europe with an emphasis on 
France. Special emphasis on the relationship 
of academic ideals to emerging individualism 
and to the social context of style. 
Open to sophomores who have taken 1 00 (1 ) 
and (2), by permission of the instructor to 
freshmen who are taking 100, and to juniors 
and seniors without prerequisite. 

Ms. Janis 



220 (1 )* Painting and Sculpture of the Later 
Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries in 
Southern Europe 

1 

A study of Italian and Spanish painting and 
sculpture from early Mannerism through the 
late Baroque. Among the principal artists 
studied are Michelangelo, II Rosso Fiorentino, 
Pontormo, Parmigianino, Tintoretto, El 
Greco, theCarracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, 
PietrodaCortona, Ribera, Velasquez, Tiepolo. 
Open to sophomores who have taken 1 00 (1 ) 
and (2), and to juniors and seniors without 
prerequisite. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Wallace 

221 (2) Seventeenth Century Art in Northern 
Europe 

1 

Dutch and Flemish painting, drawing and 
printmaking of the 17th century with empha- 
sis on Rubens, Van Dyck, Hals, Rembrandt, 
and Vermeer. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Mrs. Carroll 

224 (1-2) Modern Art 
1 or 2 

The major developments in painting and 
sculpture from the mid-19th century to the 
present in Europe and the United States. Spe- 
cial attention is paid to the problematic of 
modernism in the arts— what it means to be 
modern; what makes modern art unique; and 
in what sense is it an expression of ourselves. 
Aso there is an emphasis on abstract art and 
on the question of judgment of quality. Con- 
ference sections in second semester. One 
unit of credit may be given for either semes- 
ter. Background reading is required if elected 
in second semester only. 
Prerequisite: 1 00 (1 ) and (2), or 21 6, or 21 9, or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Moffett 

226 (1) History of Afro-American Art 
1 

A survey of Afro-American art from colonial 
times to the present. Special attention will be 
given to the relationship between Afro-Ameri- 
can art and social and cultural conditions in 
America. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Gaither 



ART 47 



228 (2) Nineteenth and Twentieth Century 

Architecture 

1 

A survey of the major movements in architec- 
ture in Europe and the United States from 
Neo-Ciassicism to the present. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Mrs. Left 

231 (1) American Art from Colonial Times to 
the Civil War 

1 

A survey of American painting, sculpture, and 
architecture from the colonial period to the 
Civil War. Attention given to the relationship 
between art and the social history and litera- 
ture of the time. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Mr. O'Gorman 

232 (2) American Art from the Civil War to 
the Foundation of the New York School 

1 

American painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture from the Civil War to the foundation of 
the New York School. Attention given to the 
relationship between art and the social 
history and literature of the time. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Mr. O'Gorman 

240 (1) Literary and Scholarly Contexts cf 

Nineteenth Century French Painting 

1 

The course will embrace the mutual relation- 
ship between art and literature with particular 
attention given to the role of mythology and 
fable. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Seznec 

248 (2) Chinese Art 
1 

Survey of the major artistic traditions of China 
through monuments of the Bronze Age, Bud- 
dhist sculpture and painting from the Han to 
the Ch'ing Dynasty. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
who have taken one unit in the history of art; 
or History 271 or 275 or 276 or 338 or 339 or 
346; or Religion 253; or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Clapp 



249 (1) Far Eastern Art 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Indian art. A survey of the 
architecture and sculpture of Buddhism and 
the Hindu dynasties in India, Southeast Asia, 
Tibet, and Nepal. Topic for 1977-78: Japanese 
art. An introduction to the sculpture and pic- 
torial arts of Japan from the early Buddhist 
period through the 18th century woodblock 
print. 
Prerequisite: same as for 248. 

Mrs. Clapp 

251 (2) Italian Renaissance Art 
1 

Painting and sculpture in Italy in the 15th and 
16th centuries. Special attention given to 
major masters and monuments, with empha- 
sis on the general artistic principles of Early 
and High Renaissance in Florence, Rome, 
and northern Italy. Analysis of patronage and 
changing cultural and aesthetic ideals in the 
Renaissance period. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Mrs. Anderson 

254(2)* Art of the City: Medieval, 

Renaissance, and Baroque 

1 

Aspects of the history of urban form, and of 
art in public areas of the city in the medieval. 
Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Analysis 
of various urban types such as medieval mar- 
ket towns, ideal city plans in the Renais- 
sance, and innovations in city planning in the 
17th century. Attention will be given to sculp- 
tural programs designed to enhance public 
spaces and buildings. 

Open to sophomores who have taken 202, or 
203, or 220, or 251 , and to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Anderson 

302 (1)* Italian Painting: The Fourteenth 

and Fifteenth Centuries 

1 

A study of selected artists whose work sig- 
nificantly illustrates the character of the late 
medieval and the early Renaissance styles. 
Open to sophomores who have taken 251 , to 
juniors and seniors who have taken or are 
taking one Grade II unit in the department, or 
by permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Anderson 



48 ART 



304 (1)* Late Medieval and Renaissance 
Sculpture 

1 

A study of major sculptors from the 1 4th cen- 
tury to the end of the 16th century with em- 
phasis on Italy and the work of Giovanni 
Pisano, Donatello, Ghiberti, and Michelan- 
gelo. 
Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Mrs. Anderson 

305 (2) The Graphic Arts 
1 

The graphic arts from the Renaissance to the 
present. Emphasis on the styles of Dijrer, 
Rembrandt, and Goya. Special attention given 
to the influence of technique upon style. 
Laboratory instruction in the processes of 
woodcut, engraving, etching, lithography. 
Visits to collections. 
Open only to seniors. 

306 (1) History of Photography 
1 

A survey of photography in France, England, 
and the United States in the 1 9th and 20th 
centuries. Topics will include styles of indi- 
vidual photographers and movements, the 
problem of style in photography, and the re- 
ciprocal relationship between photography 
and the graphic arts. 

Open only to juniors and seniors who have 
taken 21 9 or 305 or [306(1)]. 

Ms. Janis 

308(2)* Renaissance and Baroque 

Architecture 

1 

The Early and High Renaissance, Mannerist, 

and Baroque styles of the 15th through the 

18th centuries, with particular emphasis on 

Italy. 

Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

311 (2)* Painting of Northern Europe 
1 

Painting in the period from the late 14th cen- 
tury through the early 1 6th century in France, 
Germany, and the Low Countries. Emphasis 
on aspects of International Gothic style paint- 
ing and miniatures; on the Flemish painters 
Campin, van Eyck, van der Weyden, and van 
derGoes; and on DiJrer. 
Open to sophomores who have taken 202 or 
251 ; to juniors and seniors who have taken or 
are taking one Grade II unit in the department, 
or by permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Carroll 



312 (2)* Problems in Nineteenth and Early 

Twentieth Century Art 

1 

A study of special problems of interpretation 
in 1 9th and early 20th century art. Romantic 
imagery, interpretations of Manet, photog- 
raphy and painting, historicism, origins of 
abstraction. Emphasis on extensive reading 
and class discussion. 
Prerequisite: 219 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Janis 

320 (1) Art, Science and Invention in 

Nineteenth Century America 

1 

A study of the careers and works of painters 
such as Peale, Fulton, Morse, Mount, 
Church, Eakins and others in the light of the 
history of scientific thought from Linnaeus to 
Humboldt'to Darwin, the evolution of the na- 
tural sciences and the development of post- 
Industrial Revolution technology. 
Prerequisite: 231 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. O'Gorman 

325 (1) British Art of the Late Eighteenth 

and Early Nineteenth Centuries 

1 

A study of the relationship of art and aesthet- 
ic theory, contemporary developments on the 
Continent, and the genesis of Romanticism 
and Neo-Classicism. 
Prerequisite: same as for 220. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

330 (2)* Seminar. Italian Art 
1 

Topic for 1977-78: To be announced. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

331 (1)* Seminar. Renaissance and Rena- 
scences in the Art of the Middle Ages 

1 

The revival and survival of the antique in 

medieval art, focusing on painting, sculpture, 

and architecture in both the Byzantine and 

West European Empires. 

Prerequisite: 100 (1 ) or permission of the 

instructor. 

Mrs. Left 



ART 49 



332 (2)* Seminar. The Arts in England in the 
Thirteenth Century 

1 

A study of painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture during the reigns of Henry III and 
Edward I with particular attention to the nnajor 
architectural monunnents of the period such 
as Lincoln, Salisbury, Wells, and Westmin- 
ster, to tomb sculpture, and to the paintings 
of William de Brailes and Matthew Paris and 
his school. 

Prerequisite: 202 or 203, or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Fergusson 

333 (1) Seminar. Northern Baroque Art 
1 

Intensive study of a single artist (Rembrandt 
or Rubens) considering problems of style and 
imagery, with particular attention to the art- 
ist's stance toward tradition as well as his 
social, political, and cultural milieu. 
Open by permission to juniors and seniors 
who have taken 220 or 221 . 

Mrs. Carroll 

334 (2)* Seminar. Problems in 
Archaeological Method and Theory 
1 

An examination of the theoretical premises 
underlying the study of ancient art and ar- 
chaeology. The problems dealt with will in- 
clude the models from which ancient socie- 
ties are reconstructed, methods of excavation 
and analysis of materials, the design of re- 
search projects, and the special problems of 
the historian of ancient art. Required of ar- 
chaeology majors. Meets jointly with MIT 
21.682. 

Prerequisite: at least one Grade II unit of 
ancient art, ancient history, or archaeology. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Marvin, Mr. Steinberg (MIT) 

335 (2) Seminar. Modern Art 
1 

Intensive examination of the history, theory, 
and practice of art criticism in the modern 
period. Major critics such as Baudelaire, Rus- 
kin. Fry, and Greenberg will be studied. Stu- 
dents will do a series of short reviews of art 
exhibitions in the area as well as criticize 
reviews by local critics. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Moffett 



336 (2) Seminar. Museum Problems 
1 

An investigation of the history and structure 
of the museum, the philosophy of exhibitions 
and acquisitions, and the role of the museum 
in modern society, combining the theory and 
practice of all aspects of museum work. Prob- 
lems of conservation, exhibition, acquisition, 
publication, and education will be discussed. 
If the museum schedule permits, students 
will be involved in the planning and mounting 
of an exhibition. Visits to museums and pri- 
vate collections in the area will be arranged. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors. 

Ms. Gabhart 

337 (2)* Seminar. Chinese Art 
1 

Topic for 1977-78: To be announced. 
Open by permission of the instructor to 
juniors and seniors who have taken 248. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Clapp 

340 (2) Seminar. Images of the American 
City from the Civil War to the Depression 
1 

A study of the evolving American metropolis 
of the late 19th and 20th centuries and its 
effect on the visual arts. 
Prerequisite: 232 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. O'Gorman 

345 (1)(2) Seminar. Historical Approaches 

to Art for the Major 

1 

Comparative study of the major art historical 
approaches and their philosophical bases: 
connoisseurship, iconography, theories of 
the evolution of art, theories of style, psycho- 
analysis and art, psychology of perception, 
and theories of art criticism. Strongly recom- 
mended to all art majors. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken or 
are taking one Grade II unit in the department. 

Mr. Moffett, Mrs. Clapp 

350 (1 ) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to qualified students by permission of 
the instructor and the chairman of the depart- 
ment. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



50 ART 



380 (2) Mini Courses 

Vt 

Intensive six-week study of a specialized 
topic in medieval or classical art. One unit of 
credit will be given for two mini courses ; no 
credit will be given for one mini course. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



Directions for Election 



History of Art 

An art major concentrating in history of art 
must elect both semesters of 100 (unless an 
exemption examination is passed) orlOO (1 ) 
and 150 (2), 204, and at least five further units 
in history of art. For distribution, students 
must elect at least one unit each in three of 
the following six areas of specialization: 
ancient, medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and 
18th century, 19th and 20th centuries, non- 
western art. Art 345 and 305 may not be used 
to meet this distribution requirement. If ap- 
proved by the chairman, courses elected at 
other institutions may be used to meet the 
distribution requirement. Although the de- 
partment does not encourage overspecializa- 
tion in any one area, by careful choice of re- 
lated courses a student may plan a field of 
concentration emphasizing one period or 
area, for example, medieval art or oriental art. 
Students interested in such a plan should 
consult the chairman of the department as 
early in the freshman or sophomore year as 
possible. 

Students planning to major in history of art 
should plan to take 204 in the second semes- 
ter of the sophomore year or in the first se- 
mester of the junior year. 

Art 345 is strongly recommended for all ma- 
jors, especially those who are considering 
graduate study in history of art. 

A reading knowledge of German and French, 
or Italian, is strongly recommended for 
majors. 

Knowledge of literature, history, philosophy, 
and religion is of great value to the student of 
art. See, for example, English 21 7, 220, 221 , 
223,310,314; Greek and Latin 104, 203; Phil- 
osophy 203; History 230, 231 , 232, 233, 235, 
242, 248, 250, 271 , 275; Religion and Biblical 
Studies 108, 204, 216, 218, 251 , 253, 254. 



A limited number of qualified students may 
elect for credit seminars offered by the cura- 
tors of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 
These are held in the museum and use objects 
from the collection for study. Seminars to be 
offered in 1976-77 include: The Application of 
Science in the Examination of Works of Art 
(1); Greeks, Romans and Barbarians (1); 
Coptic Textiles (1 ); Buddhist Mandala 
Symbols (2); Egyptian Sculpture (2). 

Students interested in graduate study in the 
field of conservation of works of art should 
consult with the chairman of the department 
regarding chemistry requirements for en- 
trance into conservation programs. Ordinarily 
at least two semesters of chemistry at the 
college level should be elected. 

The attention of students is called to the 
interdepartmental major in classical and Near 
Eastern archaeology, and in medieval /renais- 
sance studies. 



ART 51 



Studio Courses 



In order to receive full credit for studio cours- 
es, except 1 08 and 208, at least two units in 
the history of art must also be elected. The 
department recommends that the units in the 
history of art precede or be elected concur- 
rently with the studio courses. 



105 (1) (2) Introductory Drawing 

1 

Introductory drawing with emphasis on basic 
forms in spatial relationships. Stress on the 
essential control of line in a variety of media. 
Four periods of class instruction and four of 
studio practice. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, 
and by permission to freshmen who have 
studied art before entering college. 

The Staff 

108 (1) (2) Introductory Photography 
1 

Photography as a means of visual communi- 
cation. Problems dealing with light, tonal 
values, two- and three-dimensional space, 
documentary and aesthetic approaches to the 
medium. Emphasis on printing and critical 
analysis of photographs. Four periods of 
class instruction. Limited enrollment. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Mrs. MacNeil 

204 (1) (2) General Techniques Course 
1 

A survey of significant technical material 
related to the history of western painting from 
the Middle Ages to the modern period. Includ- 
ed are laboratory problems of purely technical 
nature requiring no artistic skill. 
Open to other students who are taking Grade 
II or Grade III art history courses. Required of 
all art majors. 

The Staff 

205 (1) (2) Introductory Painting 
1 

A study of basic forms in plastic relationships 

in a variety of media. Four periods of class 

instruction. 

Prerequisite; same as for 105. 

Mr. Waltermire, Mrs. Harvey 



207(1) Introductory Sculpture 
1 

Analysis of forms using clay, direct plaster, 
and facilities permitting, elementary welding, 
to study closely the distribution of weight and 
volume in space and light. Additional weekly 
assignments involving three-dimensional 
analyses and constructions in paper. Four 
periods of class instruction. Studio fee for 
materials: $20. 
Prerequisite: same as for 1 05. 

Mrs. Lyndon 

208 (2) Advanced Photography 
1 

The development of one's personal photo- 
graphic vision through intensive technical and 
aesthetic studies in photography. Indepen- 
dent projects in which students are encour- 
aged to combine studies in photography with 
work in related disciplines such as history, 
philosophy, creative writing, psychology. 
Study of the work of master photographers, 
writings on photography, and discussions 
with lecturers from various disciplines. Four 
periods of class instruction. Limited enroll- 
ment. 

Prerequisite: 108 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. MacNeil 

209 (2) Design I 

1 

Basic problems in two and three dimensions 
stressing texture and composition. Four 
periods of class instruction. 
Prerequisite: 105 or 205 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Sandman 

210 (1) Design II: Color 
1 

Basic problems in the interaction of color. 
Four periods of class instruction. 
Prerequisite: same as for 209. 

Mr. Wentworth 

212 (1) Printmaking 
1 

A study of raised image and intaglio print- 
making including woodcut, etching, aquatint, 
and engraving. Four periods of class instruc- 
tion. Studio fee for materials: $20. 
Prerequisite: 105. 

Mrs. Lyndon 



52 ART 



307 (2) Advanced Sculpture 
1 

Problems in sculptural composition, both 
representational and abstract. Exploration of 
various media including plaster, wood, and 
metals. Technical considerations include 
basic shop procedures and use of power 
tools. Four periods of class instruction. 
Limited enrollment. Studio fee for materials: 
$20. 

Prerequisite: 207 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Lyndon 

314 (1)* Advanced Drawing 
1 

Problems dealing with the realization through 
graphic media of form, light, and volume. 
Students will be required to establish and 
work out an individual project during the sec- 
ond part of the course. Four periods of class 
instruction. 
Prerequisite: 105. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

315 (1) Advanced Painting 
1 

Continuing problems in the formal elements 
of pictorial space, including both representa- 
tional and abstract considerations in a variety 
of media. Four periods of class instruction. 
Prerequisite: 105 and 205. 

Mrs. Sandman 

316 (2) Life Drawing 
1 

Intensive analysis of anatomy, perspective, 
composition, chiaroscuro, with direct visual 
observation of the model. Four periods of 
class instruction. 
Prerequisite: 105. 

Mr. Waltermire 



350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to qualified students by permission of 
the instructor and the chairman of the depart- 
ment. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Studio Art 

An art major concentrating in studio art must 
elect 100, 105, 204, and at least fouraddition- 
al Grade II or Grade III units in studio art. 



317 (2) Seminar. Problems in the Visual Arts 
1 

A concentrated study of individual problems 
in the visual arts in a variety of media. Stu- 
dents will be required to formulate a specific 
project to pursue throughout the semester. 
Emphasis is given to class discussions and 
criticisms on a regular weekly basis. 
Prerequisite: 307 or 31 4 or 315. 

Mrs. Harvey 



ASTRONOMY 53 



Astronomy 



Professor: 
Birney 

Assistant Professor: 
Dinger, Little 



103 (1) (2) Introduction to Astronomy 
1 

Relationships of earth and sky; the solar sys- 
tem, stars, and galaxies. Two periods of lec- 
ture and discussion weekly with a third period 
every other week; laboratory in alternate 
weeks, and unscheduled evening work at the 
Observatory for observation and use of the 
telescopes. 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 

112(2) Evolution: Change through Time 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 112. 

200 (2) Modern Physics 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Physics 
200. 

201 (1) Techniques of Intermediate Calculus 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Mathe- 
matics 201 . 

202 (1) Optical Physics 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Physics 
202. 

203 (2) Recent Developments in Astronomy 
1 

Contemporary problems in optical, radio, and 
space astronomy. Astronomical observations 
from outside the earth's atmosphere. Radio 
galaxies and quasars. 
Prerequisite: 103. 

Miss Dinger 



204 (1) Introduction to Astrophysics 
1 

The physical principles behind the analyses 
of stars, interstellar matter and galaxies. 
Open to students who have taken 103 and are 
familiar with basic calculus and elementary 
physics (high school or college), or by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Miss Dinger 

206 (1) Basic Astronomical Techniques I 
1 

Visual and photographic use of the tele- 
scopes. Optics applied to astronomical in- 
struments. Astronomical coordinate systems. 
Spherical trigonometry. Conversion of time 
and use of Ephemeris. Star catalogs. Quanti- 
tative classification of stellar spectra. 
Prerequisite: 103 and a familiarity with trigo- 
nometric functions. 

Mr. Birney 

207 (2) Basic Astronomical Techniques II 
1 

Measurement of stellar radial velocities. 
Photoelectric and photographic photometry. 
Applications of the Method of Least Squares 
and statistical methods. The semester's work 
includes an independent project at the tele- 
scope. 

Prerequisite: 206 and Mathematics [111] or 
116. Prerequisite or corequisite: 204. 

Mr. Birney 

216 (2) Mathematics for the Physical 

Sciences 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 216. 

302 (2) Galactic Structure 
1 

Distribution and kinematics of the stellar and 
nonstellar components of the galaxy. Galactic 
rotation, problems of spiral structure, the 
galactic nucleus, the halo. 
Prerequisite: 204, and 201 or 21 6 or 
Mathematics 208. 

Mr. Little 

304 (1)* Astrophysics— Stellar 

Atmospheres 

1 

The physical nature of the sun and stars 
derived from analysis of their spectra. 
Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 



54 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



349(1)* Selected Topics 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: The solar system. Topic for 
1977-78: To be announced. 
Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Mr. Little 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
lor 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



The following courses form the minimum 
major: 204,207,216,302; Physics 200, 202; 
and two additional Grade III units in astron- 
omy or physics. Extradepartmental 110 is 
strongly recommended. In planning a major 
program students should note that some of 
these courses have prerequisites in mathe- 
matics and/or physics. Additional courses for 
the major may be elected in the departments 
of physics, mathematics, and astronomy. 

A substantial background in physics is re- 
quired for graduate study in astronomy. 

A student planning to enter graduate school 
in astronomy should supplement the mini- 
mum major with courses in physics, includ- 
ing Physics 306 and, if possible, other Grade 
III work. The student is also urged to acquire a 
reading knowledge of French, Russian, or 
German. 

See p. 32 for a description of Whitin Obser- 
vatory and its equipment. 



Biological 
Sciences 



Professor: 
Widmayer 

Associate Professor: 
Coyne (Chairman), Allen 

Assistant Professor: 

Dobbins, Machtiger, Sanford, Busch, Webb, 

Gross, Williams 

Instructor: 
Harris 

Laboratory Instructor: 
Muise, Dermody 

Laboratory of Electron Microscopy 

Professor: 

Padykula, Gauthier 

Unless otherwise noted all courses meet for 
five periods of lecture, discussion, and lab- 
oratory weekly, except for seminars that meet 
for two periods. 



100 (1) Multicellular Plants and Animals 
1 

Major biological concepts emphasizing rela- 
tionships between structure and function 
through examination of selected plant and 
animal systems. 

Open to all students except those who have 
taken [103] or [105]. 

The Staff 

101 (2) Cell Biology and Microbial Life 
1 

Plant, animal and microbial cell structure, 
chemistry and function. Growth and repro- 
duction of cells, energy relationships and 
genetics. Activities of microorganisms in 
their natural habitats. 

Open to all students except those who have 
taken [104] or [106] or [107]. 

The Staff 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 55 



108 (2) Horticultural Science 
1 

Fundamentals of cultivation and propagation 
of plants, the effects of chemical and environ- 
mental factors on their growth, and methods 
of control of pests and diseases. Laboratory 
includes work in the field and in the green- 
houses. Not to be counted toward the mini- 
mum major in biological sciences. 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken [208]. 

Mr. Sanford, Mr. Harris 

109 (1) Human Biology 
1 

Study of anatomy and physiology of man. 
Some work on human genetics, nutrition, and 
immunology. Two lectures weekly with a 
double period every other week for demon- 
stration-discussions. Does not meet the 
laboratory science distribution requirement. 
Will not count toward the minimum major in 
biological sciences. 

Open to all students except those who have 
taken 100 or [105]. 

Mrs. Coyne 

112(2) Evolution: Change through Time 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 112. 

200 (2) Cellular Physiology 
1 

Intensive study of cell function, physical 
characteristics of cells, energy metabolism 
and metabolic pathways, irritability of cells, 
membranes and membrane transport, evolu- 
tion of enzyme systems, control mechan- 
isms. Students intending to major should 
elect this course as soon as possible. 
Prerequisite: 100 and 101 and one unit of 
college chemistry. 

Mrs. Allen, Mr. Harris 

201 (1) Introductory Ecology 

1 

An introduction to ecosystem structure and 
development, including population and com- 
munity ecology, intraspecific and interspe- 
cific relationships among organisms, and 
biogeography. Emphasis on evolutionary 
aspects of ecology. Laboratory emphasis on 
field work and reduction and presentation of 
quantitative data. 

Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Sanford, Mr. Williams 



202(1) Comparative Anatomy 
1 

Comparative anatomy of the chordates with 
emphasis on evolutionary trends within the 
vertebrate group. Dissection of representative 
forms including the dogfish and the cat. 
Open to students who have taken 1 00 or [1 05] 
and to juniors and seniors without prerequi- 
site. 

Mr. Webb 

205 (1) Genetics 
1 

Principles of inheritance, structure and func- 
tion of hereditary informational molecules, 
application of genetic principles to biological 
problems. Laboratory and lecture material 
selected from plant, animal, microbial, and 
human studies. Students intending to major 
should elect this course before entering 
Grade III work. 

Open to students who have taken 101 or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Miss Widmayer, Mrs. Dermody 

206(1) Histology-Cytology I: Cell and 

Tissue Structure 

1 

The microscopic organization of animal cells 
and tissues. Ultrastructural and cytochemical 
features considered, especially in relation to 
functional activity. Laboratory study includes 
direct experience with selected histological 
and histochemical techniques. 
Prerequisite: 101 or [106] or [107]. 

Ms. Padykula, Ms. Gauthier 

207 (2) Nonvascular Plants 
1 

Morphology, taxonomy, and evolutionary 
relationships of representative fungi, algae, 
lichens, liverworts, and mosses. A field col- 
lection with concomitant identifications re- 
quired. Laboratory includes microscopic 
observations of a diversity of genera and 
culturing of selected specimens. 
Prerequisite: 100 or the equivalent or [103] or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Sanford 

209 (1) Microbiology 
1 

Introduction to bacteriology, virology, and 
immunology. A detailed consideration of 
biological principles which characterize the 
microbial world. The microbiology of infec- 
tious disease and unique features of micro- 
organisms will also be considered. 
Prerequisite: 1 00 and 1 01 . 200 or 205 strongly 
recommended. 

Mr. Machtiger 



56 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



210(2) Invertebrate Zoology 
1 

Comparative study of the major invertebrate 
groups emphasizing evolutionary trends and 
adaptations to the environment. 
Prerequisite: 100 or [105]. 

Mr. Williams 

211 (1)* Developmental Plant Anatomy 
1 

Structure and function of cells, tissues, and 
organs comprising the plant body. Develop- 
mental aspects are utilized to enhance the 
understanding of plant structure and its vari- 
ability. Investigations of plants in the labora- 
tory, greenhouses, and growth chambers. 
Laboratory includes basic microtechnique, 
light microscopy, and photomicrography. Not 
open to students who have taken [203]. 
Prerequisite: same as for 207. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Dobbins 

212(1)* Vascular Plants 
1 

Basic morphological and phylogenetic rela- 
tionships including aspects of reproduction, 
embryology, and modification of vegetative 
parts between psilopsids, lycopsids, ferns, 
and seed plants. Laboratory includes obser- 
vation of living and prepared plant specimens 
in the field and in the greenhouses. Not open 
to students who have taken [203]. 
Prerequisite: same as for 207. 

Mr. Dobbins 

213 (2) Neurobiology. The Biological Bases 

of Behavior 

1 

An approach to the study of animal behavior 
emphasizing functions of the vertebrate brain. 
Topics will include functional and correlative 
neuroanatomy, behavioral observation tech- 
niques, and experimental procedures for the 
study of brain function and behavior. 
Prerequisite: Minimum of two courses in 
Biological Sciences, including 100 or109. 

Mr. Busch 

216 (2) Concepts in Growth and 

Development 

1 

Introduction to principles governing the 
growth and development of organisms. Lec- 
tures and laboratory integrate the use of 
plant, animal and microbial systems to illus- 
trate concepts of development from the mo- 
lecular to the gross morphological level. 
Prerequisite: 100 and 101 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Dobbins, Mr. Webb 



221 (1) (2) Biochemistry I 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Chem- 
istry 221 . 

302 (2) Animal Physiology 
1 

A study of organ systems in vertebrates. Ba- 
sic cardiovascular, neural, respiratory, excre- 
tory, sensory, muscle and endocrine physi- 
ology covered each year. Special topics vary 
from year to year and have included digestion, 
nutrition, exercise physiology, high altitude 
or hyperbaric physiology, countercurrent 
systems and temperature regulation. Stu- 
dents gain experience in the use of kymo- 
graphs, polygraphs, strain gauges, pressure 
transducers, stimulators, oscilloscopes, and 
other physiological measuring devices. 
Prerequisite: 200 and two units of college 
chemistry, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Busch, Mr. Gross 

303 (1) Plant Physiology 
1 

Physiology of plant growth considering hor- 
mones, reproduction, mineral nutrition, water 
relations, photosynthesis, and other selected 
topics. Experimentation in the laboratory, 
greenhouses, and controlled environment 
chambers. 
Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Mr. Harris 

304 (2) Histology-Cytology II : Structure of 
Organ Systems 

1 

Analysis of the microscopic organization of 
organ systems, particularly those of the mam- 
mal. Detailed examination of selected spe- 
cialized cells; the relationship of ultrastruc- 
tural and cytochemical features to character- 
istic physiological processes. 
Prerequisite: 206. 

Ms. Padykula, Ms. Gauthier 

305 (2) Seminar. Genetics 
1 

Cytological and biochemical aspects of gene 
structure and function, mutational and re- 
combinational processes, problems of cellu- 
lar differentiation. 

Prerequisite: 205, and either 200 or Chemistry 
[201] or 211, or permission of the instructor. 

Miss Widmayer 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 57 



306 (2) Embryology 
1 

Ontogenetic development of animals includ- 
ing human. Discussion of current cellular and 
molecular theories of developmental biology. 
Laboratory emphasis on experimental analy- 
sis of mechanisms underlying development. 
Prerequisite: 200 or 205 or permission of the 
instructor. 202 recommended. Starting in 
1977-78 only 216 will be required. 

Mr. Webb 

307 (1) Topics in Ecology 
1 

Topic for 1976-77 : Plant ecology. Investiga- 
tion of individual plant species and vegetation 
in relation to environmental factors. Princi- 
ples of vegetational structure, composition, 
and classification, utilizing the local flora, 
and vegetation types. Laboratories include 
field work, plant collections, and aspects of 
physiological ecology. Topic for 1977-78: 
Community-population ecology. In-depth 
study of population dynamics, speciation, 
competition, and pollution. Extensive read- 
ings in primary source material. Laboratory 
and field studies. 

Prerequisite: 201 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Sanford 

308 (2) Plant Morphogenesis 
1 

Experimental study of internal and external 
factors affecting the development of form. 
Emphasis is placed on cellular differentiation 
and organogenesis. Tissue culture and prepa- 
ration of tissues for cytochemical and micro- 
scopic study. 

Prerequisite : 200, and either [203] or 207 or 
211 or 212. For1977-78, 216 or a combination 
of 200 and 211. 

Mr. Dobbins 

312 (2) Seminar. Endocrinology 
1 

Selected topics on the regulation and action 
of hormones and neurohormones in verte- 
brates. Emphasis on the study of current 
literature. 

Prerequisite: 205 and 200 or permission of the 
instructor. 302 is strongly recommended. 

Mrs. Coyne 



313 (1) Microbial Physiology and Cytology 
1 

Microorganisms used as model systems for 
the study of cellular growth and its physio- 
logical basis, metabolic patterns, biochem- 
ical genetics, and relation of structure to 
function. 

Prerequisite: same as for 305. 209 is strongly 
recommended. 

Mrs. Allen 

314 (2) Seminar. Topics in Microbiology 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Virology. Nature of 
viruses, the biology of their replication and 
the interactions between virus and host cell. 
Topic for 1977-78: Pathogenic microbiology 
and immunology. The biology of microbial 
pathogens and the diseases which they 
cause. Nature and function of the immune 
system. Interactions between pathogen and 
host defenses leading to development of 
infection and recovery from disease. 
Prerequisite: 200, 205, 209 and Chemistry 
21 1 . It is strongly recommended that Chemis- 
try 221 be taken as a prerequisite or corequi- 
site. 

Mr. Machtiger 

319 (1) Advanced Cytology: Biological 

Ultrastructure 

1 

Introduction to the principles and major pro- 
cedures of electron microscopy. Emphasis on 
interpretation of ultrastructural and cyto- 
chemical features of cellular components, 
particularly as related to functional activity. A 
knowledge of the basic principles of 
biochemistry strongly recommended. 
Prerequisite: 304 and either Chemistry [201] 
or 21 1 , and permission of the instructor. 

Ms. Padykula, Ms. Gauthier 

326 (2) Biochemistry II 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Chemistry 326. 

330(1) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Aquatic biology. Discus- 
sion and comparison of life in fresh water and 
in the oceans. Emphasis on ecology. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 201 is 
strongly recommended. 

Mr. Williams 



58 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



331 (1) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Animal belnavior. Selected 
topics, such as aggression, courtship, com- 
munication and orientation will be considered 
in the context of a general theory of animal 
behavior. Emphasis on neurophysiological 
and endocrinological control, including read- 
ings on experimental work involving brain 
stimulation and ablation, manipulation of 
hormones and extirpation of sense organs. 
Examples to be drawn from invertebrates and 
vertebrates. Discussion and reports on the 
literature. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mr. Busch 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



A major in biological sciences must include 
two Grade I units or their equivalent, 200 and 
205, which should be taken before declaring 
the major or before electing Grade III work, 
and at least two Grade III units in biology 
taken at Wellesley College. One of these 
Grade III units, exclusive of 350 or 370 work, 
must require laboratory experience. Two units 
of chemistry are also required. Additional 
chemistry is strongly recommended or re- 
quired for certain Grade III courses. 

Courses 108 and 109 do not ordinarily count 
toward the minimum major in biological sci- 
ences, but they do fulfill the College distribu- 
tion requirements for the degree; 108 as a 
laboratory science; 109 as a nonlaboratory 
science course. Independent summer study 
and courses in biochemistry will not count 
toward the minimum major. 

Within the major, students may design a pro- 
gram in general biology or one which empha- 
sizes subjects dealing with animals, plants, 
or microorganisms. A broad training in the 
various aspects of biology is recommended. 

Students interested in an interdepartmental 
major in molecular biology are referred to the 
section of the Catalogue where the program is 
described. They should consult with the 
director of the molecular biology program. 

Students interested in an individual major in 
psycho-biology should contact the depart- 
ment chairman as early as possible. 

Students planning graduate work are advised 
to take calculus, statistics, organic chemis- 
try, two units of physics, and to acquire a 
working knowledge of computers and a read- 
ing knowledge of a second language. They 
should consult the catalogues of the schools 
of their choice for specific requirements. 

Premedical students are referred to the 
requirements given on p. 42. 



BLACK STUDIES 59 



Black Studies 



Associate Professor: 
Martin (Chairman), Scott 

Assistant Professor: 
Spiiiers, Scarborough 



Course nnay be elected to fulfill in part the 
distribution requirement in Group A 

Course may be elected to fulfill in part the 
distribution requirement in Group B 

The following courses form the core of offer- 
ings in Black studies. 



150(1) (2)*** Colloquia 
1 

For directions for applying see p. 44. Open by 
permission to a limited number of freshman 
and sophomore applicants. 

(1) 

a. The internationalization of Black Power 

The Black Power movement of the 1960's and 
1970's represents one of the most militant 
periods in Afro-American history, similar in 
many respects to the "New Negro" period 
after World War I. As was the case with the 
New Negro movement, the Black Power idea 
quickly spread to Black populations in many 
countries. This colloquium will discuss some 
of the highlights of the Black Power era in the 
United States, Canada, Britain, and the West 
Indies. 

Mr. Martin 



105 (2)*** Introduction to the Black 
Experience 

1 

The course serves as the introductory offering 
in Black studies and explores in an interdis- 
ciplinary fashion salient aspects of Black 
history, culture, and life in Africa, the Carib- 
bean, and the Americas. Its aim is to provide 
students with a fundamental intellectual 
understanding of the world Black experience 
as it is reflected in history, the humanities, 
and social sciences. Not open to students 
who have taken Black Studies 106 or [107] or 
[205]. Open to freshmen and sophomores 
without prerequisite, and to juniors and 
seniors by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Scott 

106 (2) Afro-American Music 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Music 
106. 



b. African Diaspora 

An attempt to examine the assumptions- 
historical, logical, rhetorical, and cultural— 
which underlie the poetry of certain New 
World writers in the 20th century; e.g., Lang- 
ston Hughes, Nicolas Guillen, Aime Cesaire, 
Edward K. Brathwaite, and the poetry of Black 
resurgence in the United States, the new 
poets of the 1960's. The colloquium will look 
at this poetry against its changing historical 
background. 

Ms. Spiiiers 

(2) 

a. The internationalization of Black Power 

For description see Black Studies 150 (1) a. 

202 (2)* *** Introduction to African 

Philosophy 

1 

Initiation into basic African philosophical 
concepts and principles. The first part of the 
course deals with a systematic interpretation 
of such questions as the Bantu African philo- 
sophical concept of Muntu and related be- 
liefs, as well as Bantu ontology, metaphysics, 
and ethics. The second part centers on the 
relationship between philosophy and ideol- 
ogies and its implications in Black African 
social, political, religious, and economic in- 
stitutions. The approach will be comparative. 
Offered in alternation with 21 1 . 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken [302]. 

Mr. Menkiti 

Not offered in 1977-78. 



60 BLACK STUDIES 



206(1-2)*** Afro-American History 
1 or 2 

First semester: Afro-American history to 
1865. Study of tine political, economic, and 
social development of American Blacks from 
their African origins to the end of the Civil 
War. Second semester: Afro-American 
history since 1865. An analysis of the social, 
economic, and political developments within 
the Black community from the Recon- 
struction era to the emergence of Black 
Power. One unit of credit may be given for 
either semester. 

Open to all students except those who have 
taken [204]. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Scott 

Offered in 1977-78. 

207 (1)** Revolution and Insurrection: The 
Neglected Literature of Nineteenth Century 
Black Americans 

1 

The study of neglected Black fiction of the 
19th century. Special attention is given to the 
efforts of Black authors of this period, despite 
their use of so-called "dialect," to project 
positive images of Black life and to promote 
Black political advancement. Pan-African and 
Third World themes in these writings are also 
explored. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Scarborough 

208 (2)** Revolution and Insurrection : The 
Neglected Literature of Twentieth Century 
Black Americans 

1 

Examination of neglected works of fiction by 
20th century Black writers. Some compari- 
sons will be made with earlier works to illumi- 
nate the various styles, themes, concepts, 
artistic merit, and orientation of Black fiction. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Scarborough 



21 (1 -2)* * Black Drama in the Twentieth 

Century 

1 or 2 

Basic concepts, subtleties, and complexities 
of the Black playwright and his interpretation 
of the various Black experiences that are an 
integral part of the Black man's existence in a 
racist society. Lonne Elder III, Ron Milner, 
Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Joseph 
Walker, James Baldwin, Imamu Baraka, Lor- 
raine Hansberry, Ted Shine, William Branch, 
and Douglas Turner Ward are among the play- 
wrights to be considered. Special emphasis 
on the aesthetics of Black drama and theatre 
in general. Students will also be given the 
opportunity to explore how Black drama has 
helped to save Broadway from its own artistic 
and economic decadence. One unit of credit 
may be given for either semester. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Scarborough 

211(1)*** Introduction to African 

Literature 

1 

The development of African literature in Eng- 
lish and in translation. Although special at- 
tention will be paid to the novels of Chinua 
Achebe, writers such as James Ngugi, Cam- 
ara Laye, Wole Soyinka, Ezekiel Mphahlele, 
and Christopher Okigbo will also be consid- 
ered. The influence of oral tradition on these 
writers' styles as well as the thematic links 
between them and writers of the Black awak- 
ening in America and the West Indies will be 
discussed as time allows. Offered in alterna- 
tion with 202. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Menkiti 

Offered in 1977-78. 

215 (1)*** Nationalism and Political 

Integration in Tropical Africa 

1 

An examination of concepts and patterns of 
African nationalism, the independence move- 
ment, nation building, and political systems 
development. Special attention will focus on 
the role of political parties in the functioning 
and development of modern African societies. 
Prerequisite: Political Science [100] or 101 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 



BLACK STUDIES 61 



21 7 (2)* * * Africa in World Politics 
1 

A study of concepts of supranationalism, ex- 
amination of emergent patterns of regional- 
ism, Pan-Africanism and continental unity, 
Africa and the major powers, and African rela- 
tions with the Third World. 
Prerequisite: same as for 215. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 

220 (1)* *** The Black Religious Experience 

in America 

1 

A historical and theological analysis of the 
religious experience in Afro-American com- 
munities, with emphasis on the origins, var- 
ied nature, and function of Black religion. 
Special attention is given to the works and 
thinking of major Black clergy and theolo- 
gians as an aid to : 1 ) a systematic approach 
to the study of religion ; and 2) an informed 
understanding of the limits and possibilities 
for religious involvement in a racially oppres- 
sive society. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

226 (1)** History of Afro-American Art 
1 

A survey of Afro-American art from colonial 
times to the present. Special attention will be 
given to the relationship between Afro- 
American art and social and cultural condi- 
tions in America. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Gaither 

228 (2)** Black Literature in America 
1 

Poetry and prose from slave narratives to the 
present day with emphasis upon modern 
major figures. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Spillers 



230 (1 -2)* • * The Black Woman in American 

Society 

1 or 2 

First semester: An analysis of the economic, 
social and political role of Black women in 
American society from a historical perspec- 
tive, beginning with the African background 
through the era of slavery, Reconstruction, 
urban migration, two world wars, to the pres- 
ent. Special emphasis on the Black woman 
within the context of major Black social insti- 
tutions such as family and church. Second 
semester: An examination of the problems of 
the contemporary Black woman in the United 
States. Topics include: the relationships 
between Black men and women; Black 
women and white men ; Black women and 
white women; Black Sisterhood; the Black 
woman as wife and mother; the Black profes- 
sional woman ; and the role of Black women 
in both the struggle for Black and women's 
liberation. One unit of credit will be given for 
either semester. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite, and to freshmen by 
permission of the instructor. 

240(1-2)*** Inner-City Community 

Development 

1 or 2 

This course will acquaint students with the 
practice and theory of community develop- 
ment from both the planning and implemen- 
tational perspective. Five hours per week will 
be spent working at the Roxbury Action Pro- 
gram, a community development organization 
located in the Highland Park section of Rox- 
bury. In addition to supervised site work, a 
biweekly seminar will be conducted to ana- 
lyze the experience in light of community 
theory as well as long-range planning in Rox- 
bury. Activities will be centered around as- 
pects of physical and social planning and will 
include housing development, tenant rela- 
tions, a health survey, youth work, a monthly 
newsletter, and manual labor (land clearing). 
Prerequisite: schedule of classes that leaves a 
half day free on Monday, either morning or 
afternoon ; evidence of serious commitment 
to cons/sfenf community work; permission of 
the instructor. 



62 BLACK STUDIES 



310 (1-2)** Seminar. Black Literature 
1 or 2 

Topic for 1 'dl^-ll: Authentic and nonauthen- 
tic slave narratives. Part I of the seminar ex- 
amines authentic slave narratives, those writ- 
ten by the slaves themselves. Part II concerns 
itself with the nonauthentic slave narratives, 
those involving a second party. Hopefully, a 
detailed look at the two categories of slave 
narratives will give students a total awareness 
of Black religion, folklore, history, autobiog- 
raphy, biography, drama, spirituals, and sec- 
ular songs of the slaves. Also, close study of 
the authentic and nonauthentic slave narra- 
tives will give students the opportunity to see 
how the slaves successfully incorporated and 
made an art of dissembling in order to survive 
an oppressive society. One unit of credit may 
be given for either semester. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit in literature or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Scarborough 

312 (2)*** Seminar. Black Sociology 
1 

Topic for 1976-77 : Race and sex— the making 
and breaking of the marginal person. An in- 
vestigation of race and sex as the most impor- 
tant and rigid determinants of status and ac- 
cess to power for individuals in American 
society. Special attention to race and sex as 
categories clarifying the concept of marginal- 
ity— the contradiction involved in being cate- 
gorized as both dominant and subordinate at 
the same time as in the cases of the Black 
male and white female. Readings and student 
research will focus both on the theory and its 
application, using literature, personal experi- 
ence, and hypothetical situations. 
Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 
the instructor. 

316(1)*** History of the West Indies 
1 

Survey of political, economic, and sociologi- 
cal factors shaping West Indian society from 
Columbus to the present. 
Open to sophomores by permission of the 
instructor and to juniors and seniors without 
prerequisite. 

Mr. Martin 



319 (2)*** Pan-Africanism 
1 

The historical efforts of Black people all over 
the world to unite for their mutual advance- 
ment will be examined. Such topics as 19th 
century emigrationist movements, the role of 
Afro-American churches in African national- 
ism, the Pan-African congresses of W. E. B. 
DuBois, the Garvey movement, the Pan-Afri- 
can ideas of Malcolm X, the Pan-African as- 
pects of Southern African liberation move- 
ments and others will be discussed. The 
emphasis will be on the 20th century. 
Prerequisite: 105 or Black Studies [106] or 
[107] or [205] or one unit in Black history or 
permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Martin 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

340 (2)*** Seminar. Afro-American History 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Marcus Garvey. Marcus 
Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Asso- 
ciation dominated the Afro-American scene in 
the decade after World War I and was a major 
influence in the lives of Black people in the 
West Indies, Central America, Africa and else- 
where. Garvey's program of race first, self- 
reliance, and Black nationalism was still very 
much alive in the Black Power era of the 
1960's and 1970's. Elijah Muhammad, Mal- 
colm X, and Shirley Chisholm are among the 
many politically active Black people who were 
associated with Garvey's movement in their 
formative years. This seminar will examine 
Garvey's ideas, impact, and struggles. Topic 
for 1977-78: Blacks and communists. 
Open to qualified juniors and seniors and by 
permission to sophomores with a strong 
background in Black studies courses. 

Mr. Martin 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



CHEMISTRY 63 



The following courses are offered as related 
work by other departments where they are 
described and may be counted toward the 
major in Black studies. 



210 (2) Racial and Ethnic Minorities 

See Sociology and Anthropology 210. 

212(1) Urban Politics 

See Political Science 212. 

244 (1 ) Societies and Cultures of Africa 

See Sociology and Anthropology 244. 

254 (1) United States Urban History 

See History 254. 

267 (1) History of Africa. West Africa 

See History 267. 

268 (2) History of Africa. East, Central, and 
Southern Africa 

See History 268. 

318 (1) Race and Conflict in Southern Africa 

See History 318. 



Directions for Election 



The requirements for the major are consistent 
with the concept of Black studies as a multi- 
disciplinary field of study. The requirements 
are designed to provide a wide range of 
knowledge and analytical ability as well as a 
firm foundation in an area of specialization, 
such as history, economics, or political 
science. 

It is recommended that two units be elected in 
each of the three general areas of Black his- 
tory, humanities, and the social sciences as 
multi-disciplinary training. As the basic intro- 
duction to the discipline of Black studies, 105 
is required for the major. At least four units 
must be taken in a single discipline as a field 
of specialization. 

In addition to formal course work, the pro- 
gram offered in Black studies is comprised of 
special events— lectures, concerts, confer- 
ences, festivals— and of a field studies pro- 
gram that provides students with work experi- 
ence in neighboring Black communities. 



Chemistry 

Professor: 

Crawford, Webster, Rock 

Associate Professor: 
Loehlin*, Hicks (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: 

Kolodny, Levy, Kahl, Lieberman, Bowie, 

Blum»1 

Laboratory Instructor: 

Darlington, Mann, Smith^, Lieberman^ 

Unless otherwise noted, all courses meet for 
two periods of lecture and one three-and- 
one-half hour laboratory appointment weekly. 
The Selected Topics courses will generally be 
taught without laboratory, but may include 
laboratory for some topics. 



1 00 (1 ) Fundamentals of Chemistry 
1 

The periodic table, atomic structure, chemical 
formulas and equations ; states of matter, 
properties of solutions, equilibria in solution, 
electrochemistry ; introduction to chemical 
energetics and kinetics. Three periods of lec- 
ture and one three-and-one-half hour labora- 
tory appointment weekly. Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken 1 03 or [1 06] or [1 07]. 
Open to students who offer little or no chem- 
istry for admission (see Directions for Elec- 
tion). 

Ms. Kolodny 

101(1) Contemporary Problems in 

Chemistry I 

1 

Consideration of selected aspects of chem- 
istry and related chemical concepts. Topic for 
1976-77: Chemical perspectives on the energy 
crisis. A consideration of heat, temperature 
and energy by solar and nuclear processes 
and environmental problems associated with 
such processes. Not to be counted toward the 
minimum major. Students wishing credit for 
more than one unit of 101-102 should consult 
the department. 

Open to all students except to those who have 
taken 100, 103, 104 or their equivalents. 

Mr. Kahl 



64 CHEMISTRY 



102 (2) Contemporary Problems in 

Chemistry II 

1 

Consideration of selected aspects of chenn- 
istry and related chennical concepts. Topic for 
1976-77: Chennistry in the service of art. Not 
to be counted toward the nninimum major. 
Students wishing credit for nnore than one 
unit of 101-102 should consult the depart- 
nnent. 

Open to all students except to those who have 
taken 1 00, 1 03, 1 04 or their equivalents. 

Ms. Rock 

103(1) (2) Introductory Chemistry I 
1 

States of nnatter, properties of solutions, 
equilibria in solution, electrochennistry; intro- 
duction to chennical energetics and kinetics. 
Reconnmended for students who have taken 
[106] and wish to elect advanced work in 
chemistry. 

Open to all students who present chemistry 
for admission except those who have taken 
100 or [107]. 

The Staff 

104 (1) (2) Introductory Chemistry II 
1 

Quantum theory of atomic and molecular 
structure, chemical bonding, chemistry of 
elements. Not open to students who have 
taken [106]. 
Prerequisite: 100 or 103. 

The Staff 

112 (2) Evolution : Change through Time 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 112. 

211 (1) (2) Organic Chemistry I 
1 

A study of the synthesis and reactions of typ- 
ical organic compounds with emphasis on the 
chemistry of aliphatic molecules. There may 
be an additional meeting each week for stu- 
dents who exempted 103 or 104. Not open to 
students who have taken [201]. 
Prerequisite: 104 or [107]. 

Ms. Crawford, Ms. Webster 



221 (1) (2) Biochemistry I 
1 

A study of the chemistry of proteins and nu- 
cleic acids, with emphasis on structure-func- 
tion relationships. Particular emphasis on the 
mechanism of enzyme action. Not open to 
students who have taken [324]. 
Prerequisite: [201] or 211 . Biology 205 is 
recommended. 

Ms. Hicks 

231 (1) (2) Physical Chemistry I 
1 

Properties of gases, chemical thermodynam- 
ics, properties of solutions and chemical kin- 
etics. Not open to students who have taken 
[203]. 

Prerequisite: 104 or [107], Mathematics [111] 
or 1 1 6, and Physics [1 00] or [1 03] or 1 04 or 1 05 
or 106 or 110. 

241(1) Inorganic Chemistry 
1 

Chemical periodicity, structure and reactivi- 
ties in inorganic systems. Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken [304]. 
Prerequisite: [201] or 211. 

Mr. Kahl 

261 (2) Analytical Chemistry 
1 

Classical and instrumental methods of sepa- 
ration and analysis, structure determination, 
quantitative manipulations, statistical treat- 
ment of data. One lecture and two laboratory 
meetings each week. Not open to students 
who have taken [300]. 
Prerequisite: [201] or [203] or 211 or 231. 

Mr. Lieberman 

306 (1) Seminar 
1 

Each year an important topic will be studied 
from a variety of chemical perspectives. Topic 
for 1976-77: Chemistry and the Nobel prizes. 
One two-period meeting per week. No 
laboratory. 

Open to all students regardless of major who 
have completed two units of chemistry be- 
yond the Grade I level and who have permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Ms. Webster 



CHEMISTRY 65 



309 (1) Foundations of Chemical Research 
1 

Advanced study of research design and nneth- 
ods through the literature and the laboratory. 
Two three-and-one-half hour periods of lec- 
ture and/or laboratory each week. 
Prerequisite; 211, 231 and 261. 

Mr. Liebernnan 

313(1) (2) Organic Chemistry II 
1 

A continuation of 211 , with emphasis on the 
chemistry of aromatic molecules. Not open to 
students who have taken [210] or [303]. 
Prerequisite; [201] or 211. 

319 (1)* Selected Topics in Organic 

Chemistry 

1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite; [210] or [303] or 313. and 
permission of the department. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 

326 (2) Biochemistry II 
1 

A study of biochemical energetics, intermedi- 
ary metabolism, with emphasis on the mech- 
anism of individual enzymatic reactions, 
functions of coenzymes, problems of physio- 
logical regulation. Not open to students who 
have taken [325] 

Prerequisite; 221 or [324]. and [203] or 231 . 
31 3 and Biology 200 are recommended. 

329 (1)* Selected Topics in Biochemistry 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: To be announced. 
Prerequisite: 221 or [324]. and permission of 
the department. 

333 (2) Physical Chemistry II 
1 

The structure of solids and liquids, introduc- 
tion to quantum chemistry, bonding and 
spectroscopy. Not open to students who have 
taken [305]. 

Prerequisite; [203] or 231, Physics 106 or 110 
and Mathematics 201, 207 or 215. 

Ms. Kolodny 

339 (2)* Selected Topics in Physical 

Chemistry 

1 

Topic for 1 976-77 : Magnetic resonance 
! spectroscopy of biological molecules. 
\ Prerequisite: [203] or 231 , and permission of 
I the department. 

I Ms. Kolodny 



349 (2)* Selected Topics in Inorganic 
Chemistry 

1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite : 241 or [304], and permission of 
the department. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to students who have 
taken at least two units in chemistry above 
the Grade I level. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Students who present little or no chemistry 
for admission should elect Chemistry 100. All 
students electing Chemistry 100 or 103 
should complete the placement questionnaire 
available from the department. 

A major in chemistry must include 100 or 103 
or [107] and 104 or [106] or their equivalent, 
[201 ] or 21 1 , [303] or 31 3. [203] or 231 , and 
[305] or 333, plus two additional units exclu- 
sive of 350 and 370. In addition. Mathematics 
201, 207 or 215 and a Grade II unit of physics 
are required. 

Students planning graduate work in chemistry 
or closely allied fields should plan to elect 241 
and 261 , and should also strongly consider 
additional mathematics and physics courses. 
A reading knowledge of German and either 
French or Russian is required in many grad- 
uate programs. 

Students planning to elect Organic Chemistry 
I and II and/or Physical Chemistry I and II are 
urged to elect both units I and II in the same 
academic year whenever possible. 

Students interested in biochemistry or molec- 
ular biology are referred to the section of the 
Catalogue where the interdepartmental major 



66 CHINESE 



in molecular biology is described. They 
should consult with the director of the 
nnolecular biology program. 

Premedical students are referred to the re- 
quirements given on p. 42. Note that either 
[203] 231 or [21 0] 31 3 is acceptable to most 
medical schools as the fourth chemistry unit. 

The American Chemical Society has estab- 
lished a set of requirements which it consid- 
ers essential for the training of chemists. 
Students wishing to meet the standard of an 
accredited chemist as defined by this society 
should consult the chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry. 



Placement and Exemption Examinations 



Students who have had Advanced Placement 
courses, or two years of secondary school 
chemistry, or other unusually good prepara- 
tion should consider the possibility of ex- 
empting [106] 104 and/or [107] 103 by exam- 
ination. For exemption with credit students 
will be expected to submit laboratory note- 
books or reports. 



Chinese 

Associate Professor: 
Lin (Chairman), Tai 

Lecturer: 
Yu, Yao 

Attention is called to the opportunity for resi 
dence in the Chinese Corridor in Shafer Hall. 



101(1-2) Elementat7 Spoken Chinese 
2 

Introduction to vernacular Mandarin Chinese. 
Pronunciation, sentence structure, conver- 
sation and reading. Three periods. 101 and 
102 combined form the first-year Chinese 
course. 
Open to all students. Corequisite: 102. 

Mrs. Lin 

102 (1-2) Basic Chinese Reading and 

Writing 

1 

Development of reading skills of simple texts 
and in character writing in both regular and 
simplified forms. One period with an addi- 
tional hour for smaller group discussions or 
individual assignments. 101 and 102 com- 
bined form the first-year Chinese course. 
Open to all students. Corequisite: 101. 

Mrs. Yao 



151 (1-2) Advanced Elementary Chinese 
2 

A further study with emphasis on speak- 
ing, reading, writing, and analyzing in 
vernacular Mandarin. Conversational practice 
stressing the building of verbal skills in daily 
life and intellectual topics. Three periods. 
Open to students with 200 characters as ac- 
tive knowledge or who can speak some Man- 
darin and/or any kind of dialect fluently, and 
by permission of the instructor. 

Mrs. Yao 



CHINESE 67 



201 (1-2) Intermediate Chinese Reading 
2 

Reading with emphasis on vocabulary build- 
ing ; review and further development of sen- 
tence structure, composition, and oral ex- 
pression. Newspaper reading. Three periods. 

201 and 202 combined form the second-year 
Chinese course. 

Prerequisite: 101 and 102 taken concurrently, 
or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: 
202. 

Mr. Tai, Mrs. Yu 

202 (1-2) Intermediate Conversational 
Chinese 

1 

Discussion of current events and cultural 
topics. One period with an additional hour for 
smallergroup discussions or individual as- 
signment. 201 and 202 combined form the 
second-year Chinese course. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . Corequisite: 
201. 

Mr. Tai, Mrs. Yao 

231(1) Chinese for the Bilingual 
1 

Readings from selected short stories, plays, 
newspapers and current periodicals for dis- 
cussion and imitation. Emphasis on the be- 
havior of parts of speech as they relate to 
English. Conversational practice stressing 
the building of verbal skills for discussion of 
intellectual topics and current events. Three 
periods. 

Prerequisite: 151 or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Tai 

241 (1)* Chinese Literature in Translation I 
1 

A survey of Chinese literature in the classical 
language. The course begins by contrasting 
the simple language and imagery of the north- 
ern Book of Songs with the complex, shaman- 
istic Songs of ttie Soutfi. The evolution of 
narrative is then traced from its origins in 
early historical writings such as the Tso 
Chuan, through Ssu-ma Cti'ien, to the emer- 
gence of fiction in the T'ang. The course con- 
cludes with a study of major lyrical poets 
from T'ao Ch'ien to Su Tung-p'o. Conducted 
in English. Offered in alternation with 242. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite, and to freshmen by 
permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Tai 



242 (1)* Chinese Literature in Translation II 
1 

A survey of Chinese literature from T'ang tales 
(618-905 A.D.) to contemporary literature, 
dealing with the emergence of vernacular 
fiction. The focus will be on T'ang and Sung 
short stories, Yuan drama, Ming and Ching 
novel and the literary works from the May 4th 
movement through the post-Liberation era. 
Offered in alternation with 241 . 
Prerequisite : same as for 241 . Open to sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors, or by permission 
of the instructor. 

Mr. Tai 

252 (1) Readings in l\flodern Style Writings 
1 

Reading and discussion in Chinese of selec- 
tions from contemporary Chinese writings, 
including plays, poetry and essays on various 
topics such as economics, history, philoso- 
phy, political theory, and sociology. Three 
periods. 

Prerequisite: 201 and 202 taken concurrently, 
or permission of the instructor. 

Mrs. Lin 

300 (2) Readings in Contemporary Chinese 
Literature 

1 

Reading and discussion in Chinese of selec- 
tions from short stories, novels, and essays. 
Three periods. 

Prerequisite: 231 or 252 or by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mrs. Yu 

301 (2) Readings in Expository Writings of 
Revolutionary China, before and after 1949 

1 

Readings and discussions in Chinese of se- 
lections from revolutionary China pre- and 
post-1949, including the works of Mao Tse- 
Tung and important issues of various revolu- 
tionary cultural movements in China, with 
strong focus on political and social aspects. 
Three periods. 

Prerequisite : 252 or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Lin 

310 (1) (2) Introduction to Literary Chinese 
1 

Wen-yen grammar, reading, and discussion in 
Chinese of selections of simple texts in clas- 
sical Chinese. Two periods. 
Prerequisite: 231 or 252 or by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mrs. Yu 



68 CHINESE 



311 (2) Readings in Elementary Classical 

Chinese 

1 

Reading and discussion in Chinese of selec- 
tions of poetry, prose, traditional short stor- 
ies, and novels. Two periods. 
Prerequisite; 310 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Yu 

316 (1) Seminar. Chinese Literature in the 

Twentieth Century 

1 

Study of works and authors In Chinese thea- 
tre, poetry, novels, etc. 
Topic for 1976-77 Development of contem- 
porary Chinese theatre from the May 4th 
movement to the present. 
Prerequisite ; 300 or 301 , or by permission of 
the instructor. 

iVIr. Tai 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1 or 2 

Open by permission to qualified students. 



Directions for Election 



Although the College does not offer a major in 
Chinese language and literature, students 
who major in East Asian studies or Chinese 
studies that relate to China should consult 
the chairman of the department and the ad- 
visor early in the college career. 

For students majoring in East Asian studies 
who do not intend to do graduate work, at 
least one year of Chinese is encouraged, but 
not required. Students who wish to do gradu- 
ate work in East Asian studies are advised to 
complete at least two years of Chinese lan- 
guage training. 

For students majoring in East Asian studies, 
with a concentration of Chinese studies, the 
minimum requirement is three years of Chi- 
nese language and literature in the original 
Chinese. Extradepartmental 106: History 275, 
276. 345. 346; Political Science 300. 305; Art 
248. 337; and Religion 250, 253. 254, and 305 
are strongly recommended as related 
courses. Students who wish to take Chinese 
252 or other courses in Chinese literature are 
advised to have a knowledge of Chinese cul- 
ture or history. For this. History 275 and 276 
are recommended. 

Course 350 is an opportunity for properly 
qualified students to work independently in 
fields not covered in other courses in the de- 
partment. It can also provide continuing study 
in classical Chinese literature. 



ECONOMICS 69 



Economics 

Professor; 

Bell, Goldman (Chairman), 

Newell. Ilchman. Morrison 

Assistant Professor: 
Painter. Ladd«2 

Instructor: 

Horner. Ratner, Robinson, Case 

Visiting Professor: 
Calderwood3 



101 (1) (2) Survey of Modern Ecoriomics— 
Microeconomics 

102 (1) (2) Survey of Modern Economics- 
Macroeconomics 

1 each 

Each course may be taken independently and 
in any order; each contains an overview of the 
nature of economics and economic systems. 
Microeconomics, in 101 , analyzes the choices 
of individual firms and households in the mar- 
kets where they buy and sell. Equity and effi- 
ciency considerations of income distribution, 
health, education, the environment, and other 
policy problems of social welfare. Macro- 
economics, in 102, analyzes current problems 
and policies of national income and GNP; 
supply and demand; labor and management; 
some accounting and stock market analysis, 
the role of government ; money and banking, 
inflation and employment; prosperity and 
depression; and international payments and 
balance of trade. Freshmen in special sec- 
tions with weekly tutorial (See Economics 
355.) 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 

201(1) (2) Microeconomic Analysis 
1 

Microeconomic theory; analysis of the indi- 
vidual household, firm, and industry. 
Prerequisite: 101 and [100] or 102. 

Mrs. Painter, Mr. Morrison 

202 (1) (2) Macroeconomic Analysis 
1 

Macroeconomic theory; analysis of aggregate 
income, output, and employment. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Ratner, Mrs. Robinson 



203 (2)* Economic History 
1 

An economic analysis of European develop- 
ment in the 18th and 19th centuries. A selec- 
tive application of classical and neoclassical 
growth models. The development of the mar- 
ket system and modern economic society. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: 101 and [100] or 
102. 
Not Offered I n1 976-77. 

204(1)* American Economic History 
1 

The "new" economic history. A sectoral and 

factoral analysis of the development of the 

American economy from colonial times to the 

20th century. The economics of slavery and 

the Civil War. The emergence of an industrial 

state. 

Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Morrison 

205(1) The Corporation 
1 

The development of the modern corporation 
and its place in the economy. Corporation 
organization and financial management. Fi- 
nancial markets; the technical and fundamen- 
tal aspects of the stock market. Government 
regulation of corporations and markets. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Calderwood 

210 (2) Money and Banking 
1 

The structure and operation of the monetary 
system. Commercial banking and other finan- 
cial institutions. The Federal Reserve System. 
Monetary theory and policy. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Ratner 

211(1) (2) Elementary Statistics 
1 

Descriptive statistics and an introduction to 
statistical inference. Expected values, proba- 
bility distributions, and tests of significance. 
Classical models of bivariate and multiple 
regression. Problem solving by means of the 
time-sharing computer. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mrs. Ladd, Mr. Case 



70 ECONOMICS 



225 (1) Urban Economics 
1 

Analyses of the urban and suburban econo- 
mies with particular reference to urban renew- 
al, income distribution, transportation, hous- 
ing markets, employment, and the economic 
development of the inner city. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Case 

230(1)* Labor Economics 
1 

Activities and policies relating to American 
Labor. Growth and composition of a labor 
force. Labor unions and collective bargaining. 
Public policy; social legislation. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mrs. Painter 

240 (1)* The Economics of Controversy 
1 

Income distribution data and how to analyze 
them : who gets what in this country and else- 
where. Programs and policies for welfare and 
income maintenance: the economics of 
sharing. 

Prerequisite: same as for 201 ; students with 
further work in economics admitted only if 
enrollment permits. Offered in alternation 
with 307. 

Mrs. Bell 

245 (1)* Law and Economics 
1 

The interplay and sometimes conflict between 
economics and law. Among the topics con- 
sidered are the role of anti-trust law, tax law, 
commercial arbitration, regulatory agencies, 
securities regulation, and public choice. 
Prerequisite: 101 and 102. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

249 (2) Seminar. The Economics of 

Environmental Disruption 

1 

Is economic growth without environmental 
deterioration possible? The economic forces 
(externalities) which cause pollution; the 
costs and who bears the costs; the energy 
crisis; the implications of zero economic 
growth ; the extent of the problem and possi- 
ble solutions both here and abroad. 
Prerequisite; same as for 201 . 

Mr. Goldman 

301 (2) Comparative Economic Systems 
1 

The economics of capitalism, socialism, 
fascism, and communism. 
Prerequisite: 201 or 202. 

Mr. Goldman 



302 (2) Economic Development 
1 

The problems and possibilities of the less 
developed countries. 
Prerequisite : same as for 301 . 

Mrs. Painter 

305 (2)* Industrial Organization 
1 

Analysis of the structure, conduct, and per- 
formance of particular industries in the 
economy. 
Prerequisite: 201. 

Mr. Horner 

307 (1)* Consumption and Marketing 
1 

Analysis of the theory of consumer choice 
and of market models applied to patterns of 
income, spending, and saving. Offered in 
alternation with 240. 
Prerequisite : 201 , 202, and 21 1 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Bell 

310(1) Public Finance 
1 

Principles, practices, and economic effects of 
the public sector. The goals of public finance. 
A seminar treatment of current issues of fis- 
cal policy. 
Prerequisite: 201 . 

Mrs. Ladd 

312(2) Economics of Accounting 
1 

How economists use accounting data in fi- 
nancial analysis and cost accounting in deter- 
mining price policy and capital spending. 
Social accounting and the economy : aggre- 
gate data and their analysis. 
Prerequisite: 201. 

Mrs. Bell 

314 (1) International Economics 
1 

Theory of international trade. Methods of 
adjustment to disequilibrium in balance of 
payments. The impact of international move- 
ments of commodities and capital on eco- 
nomic activity in the past and since World 
War II. Current problems: international liquid- 
ity, economic integration, the United States 
balance of payments. 
Prerequisite: 201 and 202. 

Mrs. Robinson 



ECONOMICS 71 



315 (2)* History of Economic Thought 
1 

The development of economic thought from 
ancient to modern times. A brief survey of 
early economic ideas followed by a more de- 
tailed examination of the history of econom- 
ics since 1776. The systems of the leading 
economists in the light of their own times and 
of the present day. 
Prerequisite: 201. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

316 (1)* Recent Economic History 
1 

Economic history from the depression to the 
"new" economics. Stagnation, growth, and 
inflation : an analysis of the major economic 
events of the 1950's and the 1960's. 
Prerequisite: 202. 

Mr. Morrison 



355 (1-2) Honors Tutorial Seminar 
2 

Open to senior majors nominated by the de- 
partment. Topics in economic theory and 
policy analyzed by independent and/or team 
research; oral presentation and critique in 
weekly seminar. Responsible for weekly tu- 
torials for freshmen electing Economics 101- 
102. Where appropriate tutorial work may be 
developed into an honors program which will 
require a public lecture and defense of a re- 
search topic. 

Mrs. Bell, Mr. Morrison 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



317 (1) Seminar. Mathematical Economics 
1 

Applications of elementary calculus to select- 
ed topics in economic theory. Use of basic 
econometric techniques to estimate con- 
sumption, investment, and price relation- 
ships. Problems and use of computation 
facilities. 
Prerequisite: same as for 307. 

Mr. Horner 

330 (1)* Seminar. The Distribution of 

Income 

1 

A theoretical and empirical study of the distri- 
bution of income. Who gets what in the Amer- 
ican economy? Problems of equity and effi- 
ciency. Social policy, including measures to 
equalize income, to redistribute income, or to 
influence its receipt and expenditure. 
Prerequisite: 201 and 202, one of which may 
be taken concurrently. 

335 (2) The Economics of Higher Education 
1 

The financing of public and private higher 
education ; rising costs and increased 
productivity in a service industry, equity of 
access and redistributional effects of educa- 
tional spending. The economic implications 
of the Carnegie Commission Report ; Welles- 
ley College used as one case study. 
Prerequisite: same as for 31 4. 

Mrs. Ilchman 

350 (1 ) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors 
who have taken 201 and 202. 



Directions for Election 



The complete survey course consists of both 
100 level courses. Neither 101 nor 102 is a pre- 
requisite for the other and either may be 
elected separately for one unit of credit. 

A student who plans to take any course after 
[100], 101 and 102, should consult either the 
instructor or the department chairman. 

Courses 201 , 202, and 211 are required for the 
major and should be taken at Wellesley. If a 
student proposes to take these courses at 
another institution, these plans must be ap- 
proved in advance by the department chair- 
man. Either Economics 203 or 204 is recom- 
mended for the major. At least half of the 
Grade III units in the major should be taken at 
Wellesley. Plans to elect more than half of the 
advanced level work at another institution 
must receive prior approval from the chair- 
man. 

Students planning careers in business or law 
should also give special consideration to 205, 
210, 305, 307, 310, 312, and 314. Those who 
plan to study economics in graduate school 
should take 317. 

All students are strongly urged to take mathe- 
matics as a related subject. For those going 
into graduate work in economics, calculus 
and linear algebra have proven to be particu- 
larly helpful. 



72 EDUCATION 



Education 



Professor: 
llchman 

Assistant Professor: 

Sleeper (Chairman). Foster, Bane3 

Associate in Education: 
Rokicki 



208 (2) Growing Up Female: Varieties of 
Educative Eperiences of Women in American 
History 
1 

Examination of tfie role of education in shap- 
ing tfie lives of women in American fiistory. 
Exploration in biographies and autobiog- 
raphies of women's efforts to educate them- 
selves and of individual and/or group self- 
consciousness in processes of education. 
Open to all students who have taken one unit 
in Group B. 

Ms. Foster 



101 (1) Education in l-listorical Perspective 
1 

Study of education as the active and deliber- 
ate pursuit of standards and principles for 
individual and community life in western his- 
tory. Investigation of various institutions 
which intentionally transmit a culture's values 
and knowledge. Changing educational pro- 
cesses and patterns as related to economic 
developments and to changing assumptions 
about human nature, the nature of society and 
ways of knowing and valuing. Emphasis on 
historical materials and their analysis. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Foster 

200 (2) IVIodern Pfiilosopfiies of Education 
1 

Analysis of the components of an educational 
philosophy and their implications for peda- 
gogy. Studies of essentialism, experimental- 
ism, and existentialism as ideologies of edu- 
cation. 

Prerequisite: 101 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Sleeper 

206 (1) Women, Education and Work 
1 

Examination of ways in which the educational 
system and the structure of work affect the 
lives of women, from a sociological and pub- 
lic policy point of view. Relationships be- 
tween educational and economic institutions. 
Intersections between the family lives and 
work lives of women. Comparison with the 
lives of men. Institutional bases of discrimi- 
nation. Public policy alternatives. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Bane 

Offered in 1977-78. 



212 (1) History of American Education 
1 

Patterns and processes of education, includ- 
ing schooling, in American history. Evalua- 
tion of the nature and uses of education in 
shaping American culture. Educational 
changes related to broader political and eco- 
nomic developments in American history. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Foster 

216 (2) Education, Society, and Social 

Policy 

1 

Investigation of the ways in which the educa- 
tional system creates, maintains, and reflects 
social structures; the constraints which the 
social structure places on education as an 
instrument of social policy. The concepts and 
methods for arriving at a sociological under- 
standing of the educational system. Cases 
illustrating the relations among education 
and social policy; e.g., the extension of com- 
pulsory schooling ; the development of equal 
opportunity; the rights of students in educa- 
tional institutions. 
Prerequisite: 101 or Sociology 102. 

Ms. Bane 

228 (1)* Population and Society 
1 

An introduction to population studies. Topics 
will include: the dynamics of population 
growth and change; the demographic transi- 
tion ; fertility control and the status of 
women ; effects of population change on 
households and social institutions; 
population and natural resources. Cases of 
population change will be examined in both 
developed and less developed countries, 
followed by a survey of current population 
problems and possible solutions. Not open to 
students who have taken Sociology 208. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 102. 

Ms. Bane 

Not offered in 1977-78. 



EDUCATION 73 



300 (1) The Secondary School 
1 

Aims, organization and administration of 
United States secondary schools, including 
"free" schools. Topics include history of the 
secondary school, secondary school educa- 
tion in relation to adolescent development 
and the role of the secondary school in the 
community. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Sleeper 

302 (2) Methods and Materials of Teaching 
1 

Study and observation of teaching objectives 
and classroom procedures in secondary 
schools. Review of learning theories. Exam- 
ination of curriculum materials in major 
teaching fields and of curriculum planning in 
general. Open only to seniors doing student 
teaching. Students electing 302 and 303 may 
include in addition one unit of independent 
study in the same semester. 
Prerequisite: 300 or permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: 303. 

Mr. Sleeper 

303 (2) Curriculum and Supervised Teaching 
1 

Observation, supervised teaching, and curric- 
ulum development in student's teaching 
fields throughout the semester. Attendance at 
secondary school placement required five 
days a week. Students electing 302 and 303 
may include in addition one unit of indepen- 
dent study in the same semester. 
Corequisite: 302. 

Mr. Sleeper 

305 (1) Seminar. Developmental Theory and 

Curriculum 

1 

Examination of the philosophical and psycho- 
logical components of developmental theory 
as an ideology of education. Emphasis on the 
application of the theory to the design of cur- 
riculum. Analysis of ways in which academic 
subjects may be defined for pedagogic pur- 
poses within a developmental framework. 
Prerequisite: 101 or Psychology 101 . 

Mr. Sleeper 



307 (2) Mass Media as Educators 
1 

How radical changes in the technology of 
communication have altered modes of learn- 
ing and the acquisition of values. Learning 
about the world through books vs. learning 
from mass-circulation newspapers; learning 
verbally vs. learning from television pictures. 
An examination of the role of formal teachers 
and of those in charge of television program- 
ming with emphasis on the responsibility 
accruing to the latter in view of their power to 
influence what society comes to know and 
how it comes to know it. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 215 or by permission 
of the instructor. 

Ms. Foster 

350 (1 ) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1 or 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 



Directions for Election 



The department offerings are intended to 
acquaint students systematically with the 
history of compulsory free education as de- 
veloped in the United States and now prac- 
ticed in many countries under different forms, 
the philosophies which underlie these efforts, 
the problems to be solved, and, as an adjunct, 
to aid students who wish to enter teaching 
immediately after graduation. 

Students who intend to teach should (in their 
freshman year if possible) consult the depart- 
ment concerning the various city and state 
requirements for the certificate to teach and 
the appropriate undergraduate preparation for 
fifth year and paid intern programs which 
combine professional study with further 
study in teaching fields and lead to advanced 
(M.A.T., Ed. D., Ph.D.) degrees. 

For those interested in secondary school 
teaching upon graduation, the following pro- 
gram is recommended : 



Freshman year: 

Sophomore and/or 
Junior year: 



Senior year: 



Education 101 and 
Psychology 101 

Education 200, and 
212or216 
Psychology 212 or 
217or219 

Education 300 (may 

also betaken junior 

year) 

Education 302 and 303 



74 ENGLISH 



Preparation to teach in elennentary schools 
should include: 



Freshman year: 

Sophomore and /or 
Junior year: 



Education 101 and 
Psychology 101 

Education 200, and 
212 or 216, and 
Psychology 207 



A summer program, preferably preceding the 
senior year, at another accredited institution 
should include Methods and Supervised 
Teaching for the Elementary School. With 
careful planning the same courses can be 
taken under the Twelve College Exchange 
Program. 



English 



Professor: 

Corsa, Lever, Quinn, Layman (Chairman), 

Ferry», Garis, Spacks*, Craig 

Associate Professor: 

Gold, Pinsky, Gertmenian, Sabin 

Assistant Professor: 

Cole«2, Faville, Spillers, Killoh, 

Saunders, Beaton 

Lecturer: 

Eyges, Stubbs, Moss3, Bidart^, Wilson3 



100 (2) Tutorial In Expository Writing 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 100. 

108 (2) Interpretations of Man in Western 
Literature 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 108. 

1 09 (1 ) (2) Expository Writing I 
1 

Instruction in the fundamentals of writing 
expository essays. 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 

110(2) Expository Writing II 
1 

A continuation of 109. Weekly assignments 
designed to meet the student's particular in- 
terests and needs. Frequent conferences. 
Open to students who have taken 109 and 
have the consent of their advisor or class 
dean. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Stubbs 






^ 



ENGLISH 75 



150(1) (2) Colloquia 
1 

For directions for applying see p. 44. 
Open by permission to a linnited nunnber of 
freshiman and sophomore applicants. 

(1) 

a. Literary Boston 

Nineteenth century Boston writers : their rela- 
tionships to each other and to the city. Writ- 
ings of John and Henry Adams, Emerson, 
Hawthorne. James; trips to exhibits and his- 
torical places in the city. 

Mrs. Cole 

b. African Diaspora 

For description see Black Studies 150(1) b. 
Ms. Spillers 

(2) 

c. Women writers 

Southern and midwestern writers: an explora- 
tion of the effect of place on the styles and 
ideas of writers such as Eudora Welty, Kath- 
arine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Ellen 
Glasgow, Carson McCullers, Willa Gather, 
Toni Morrison, and Kate Chopin. 

Ms. Killoh, Ms. Saunders 

200(1) (2) Short Narrative 
1 

The writing of sketches and the short story. 

For interested students, experience in the 

writing of one-act plays. 

Open to all students by permission of the 

instructor. 

Miss Lever, Mr. Pinsky, Ms. Killoh, 
Mrs. Moss 

201(2) The Critical Essay 
1 

The writing and revising of critical essays in 
conjunction with readings in important con- 
temporary criticism. Usually organized 
around the work of a single author. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Craig, Mr. Beaton, Mrs. Eyges 

202(1) (2) Poetry 
1 

The writing of short lyrics and the study of the 
art and craft of poetry. 
Prerequisite: same as for 200. 

Mr. Pinsky, Mr. Bidart 



209 (1) (2) Critical Interpretation 
1 

A course designed to increase power and skill 
in the critical interpretation of literature, by 
the detailed reading of poems, mostly short, 
as individual works of art and in historical 
context. A sequence of poems drawn from the 
Renaissance to the Modernist period. Sec- 
tions of the course to meet twice a week, with 
scheduled lectures about once every two 
weeks, historical in perspective. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Quinn, Mr. Garis, Miss Craig, Mr. Gold, 
Mr. Pinsky, Mrs. Gertmenian, Mrs. Sabin, 
Mr. Beaton 

210(1) (2) Modern Poetry 
1 

British and American poetry and poets, recent 
and contemporary. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Sabin, Mr. Bidart 

212(1) (2) Modern Drama 
1 

The study of British, American, and European 
drama from Ibsen to the present. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Garis, Mrs. Gertmenian, Ms. Saunders, 
Mr. Beaton 

215(1) (2) Shakespeare 
1 

The study of a number of representative plays 

with emphasis on their dramatic and poetic 

aspects. 

Open to all students. 

Mr. Layman, Miss Craig, Mr. Pinsky, 
Mrs. Sabin 

217 (2) Milton 
1 

A study of Milton's lyric, epic, and dramatic 
poetry and some prose, with emphasis upon 
their significance for 20th century readers. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Lever 

218 (1) The History of the English Novel I 
1 

The beginnings of the English novel in the 
18th century: Defoe through Jane Austen. 
Open to all students. 

MissCorsa, Mr. Faville 



76 ENGLISH 



219 (2) The History of the English Novel II 
1 

The 19th century English novel from the 
Brontes to the beginnings of Modernism. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Corsa, Mr. Quinn, Mr. Faville, 
Ms. Killoh 

220(1) Chaucer I 
1 

Intensive study of The Canterbury Tales, sup- 
plemented by the short later poems as they 
reveal Chaucer's comic artistry, his relation to 
history and society of the late 14th century in 
England. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Corsa 

221 (2) Chaucer II 

1 

A reading of the early poems, "The Book of 
the Duchess," "The House of Fame," "The 
Parliament of Fowls," "Anelida and Arcite," 
"The Legend of Good Women," as they lead 
to an intensive study of Chaucer's one trage- 
dy, Troilus and Criseyde. Supplemented by 
shorter, minor poems that reveal his interest 
in the history and society of the late 14th 
century. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Corsa 

223 (1) American Literature I 
1 

A survey of American literature from its Puri- 
tan beginnings to Moby-Dick. Emphasis upon 
major figures. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Quinn, Mrs. Cole 

224 (2) American Literature 11 
1 

American writers from Whitman to World 
War I. Emphasis upon major figures. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Spillers, Ms. Saunders 

225 (1) (2) American Literature III 
1 

American writers from World War I to the 
present: prose and poetry. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Ouinn, Ms. Saunders, Ms. Killoh, 
Mrs. Moss 



226 (1) (2) Studies in Fiction 
1 

Studies of the nature of prose fiction. Read- 
ings drawn principally from British, Ameri- 
can, and European writers of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Usually organized around a 
central topic or theme. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Lever, Ms. Spillers, Mr. Faville 

228 (2) Black Literature in America 
1 

Poetry and prose from slave narratives to the 
present day with emphasis upon modern 
major figures. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Spillers 

230(1) Romantic Poets I 
1 

Poems and critical writings of Wordsworth 
and Coleridge. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Gold 

231 (2) Romantic Poets II 
1 

Poems and critical writings of Byron, Shelley, 

and Keats. 

Open to all students. 

Mr. Gold 

232 (2)* English Comedy in Various Genres 
1 

The development, variety, and continuity of 
English comic writing. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

233 (2)* English Renaissance Tragedy in 
Perspective 

1 

Tragic drama in the age of Shakespeare— its 
diversity and relation to other traditions. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Layman 

301 (1) The Short Story 
1 

Techniques of short story writing together 
with practice in critical evaluation of student 
work. 

Open by permission of the instructor to stu- 
dents who have taken one Grade II writing 
course. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



Mrs. Moss 



ENGLISH 77 



302(2) Fiction 
1 

Intensive practice in the writing of prose fic- 
tion, the short story, or novella, according to 
the interest of the individual student. 
Prerequisite; same as for 301 . 

Mr. Bidart 

305 (1) Advanced Studies in Shakespeare I 
1 

Plays written between 1591 and 1604, such as 
Richard II. Henry IV. Much Ado about Noth- 
ing. Troilus and Cressida. Hamlet. Measure 
for Measure. Othello. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken or 
are taking two Grade II literature courses in 
the department, and by permission of the 
instructor to other qualified students. 

Miss Craig, Mrs. Gertmenian 

306 (2) Advanced Studies in Shakespeare II 
1 

Plays written between 1605 and 1611 , such as 
King Lear. Macbeth. Antony and Cleopatra, 
Coriolanus. Cymbeline. The Winter's Tale, 
The Tempest. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Gold, Mrs. Gertmenian 

307(2) Criticism 
1 

Problems and principles of critical theory, 
with emphasis upon modern critical trends. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Miss Craig 

308 (2)* The Middle Ages and Renaissance 

in England 

1 

The medieval world reflected in narrative 
poems by Chaucer's contemporaries; the rise 
of the Renaissance traced through the chang- 
es in lyric poetry and the drama and through 
the culture of Henry Vlll's England; and the 
High Renaissance exemplified by works of 
Sidney, Spenser, and Marlowe. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Miss Lever 

310(1) The Age of Satire 

1 

A study of satire as social response and as 
literary phenomenon, exemplified in the work 
of such writers as Dryden, Congreve, Gay, 
Swift, and Pope. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Mrs. Gertmenian 



311(2) From Neoclassic to Romantic 
1 

The shift of sensibility from the 18th to the 
19th century studied with emphasis on such 
authors as Johnson. Burke, and Blake. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Mrs. Sabin 

312(1) The English Language 
1 

Historical linguistics; major characteristics of 
the English language today studied as the 
products of their origin and history. Emphasis 
on speech, dictionaries, semantics and ety- 
mology, and translation. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken or 
are taking two Grade II literature courses in 
the department, or a course in linguistics, or 
by permission of the instructor to other quali- 
fied students. 

Miss Lever 

313 (1) The Poet-Critic 
1 

Such authors as Sidney, Dryden, Johnson, 
Coleridge, Arnold, and Eliot, studied as 
makers of English criticism and as examples 
of interaction between the practice and theory 
of poetry. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

314(1) The Victorian Crisis 
1 

Contributions by major poets and essayists to 
an ongoing discussion of social issues; the 
role of science and religion; the value of work; 
the idea of culture. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Beaton 

315 (2) Victorian Poetry 
1 

Study of some characteristic poetic themes 
and procedures of the period between Landor 
and Yeats, including such poets as Tennyson, 
Arnold, Hopkins, and Hardy, with some em- 
phasis on the roots and emergence of mod- 
ernism. 
Prerequisite; same as for 305. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Beaton 



78 ENGLISH 



316 (2) Seventeenth Century Poetry 
1 

Close study of themes and techniques as they 
develop in nnajor poenns of the period between 
Sidney and Marvell, concentrating on Jonson, 
Donne, Herbert, and Marvell. Particular atten- 
tion to love and devotional poetry. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Garis 

317 (1) American Literature IV 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Melville and Faulkner. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Quinn 

318 (1) Major Twentieth Century Novels in 
English 

1 

Advanced studies in the development of the 

modern novel. 

Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Faville 

319 (2) Advanced Studies in Modern Poetry 
1 

Contemporary poetry and the modernist back- 
ground. Recent poetry considered in the light 
of the achievements of such modernist prede- 
cessors as Stevens, Frost, and Williams. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Pinsky 

320(1) (2) Literary Crosscurrents 
1 or2 

First semester: Blake and Religion. Blake's 
more accessible writings, studied in the con- 
text of radical Christian and Jewish traditions 
(The Gospel according to St. John, the Zohar, 
Dostoevsky). 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Mr. Gold 

Second semester: Normally a different topic 

each year. 

Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



322 (2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for1976-77: Jane Austen. Jane Austen 
as human being and as artist. Life and letters 
as well as novels and fragments of novels as 
they reveal historical, social, and cultural 
changes from 1775-1817 in England. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Miss Corsa 

330 (1) Seminar. Comparative Literature 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Extradepartmental 330. 

Mr. Layman 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors 
who have taken or are taking two Grade II 
literature courses in the department. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates who 
choose to do honors research or an honors 
project in creative writing. For alternate hon- 
ors programs see Directions for Election. 



321 (1) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Arthurian Legends. Select- 
ed legends of King Arthur, Merlin, and 
Knights of the Round Table mainly as pre- 
served in medieval literature with some con- 
sideration of sources, cultural milieu, and 
modern treatments. Special lectures by mem- 
bers of the Art, French, and History depart- 
ments. 
Prerequisite: same as for 305. 

Miss Lever 



ENGLISH 79 



Directions for Election 



Course 109 is open to all students, regardless 
of year or major, who want to improve their 
skills in writing expository essays. Frequent 
writing assignments emphasize clear exposi- 
tion of ideas and coherent argument. Class 
meetings are supplemented by individual 
conferences. In addition, 110 and Extra- 
departmental 100 are open, with permission 
of an advisor or class dean, to students who 
would benefit from a continuation of 109, or 
from an individual tutorial in expository writ- 
ing. 201 , primarily for English majors, offers 
intensive instruction in the writing of critical 
essays about literature. 

Grade II literature courses are open to all stu- 
dents. Special attention is called to 209, 
which offers fundamental and rigorous prac- 
tice in methods of interpretation of a literary 
text. Beginning with the Class of 1979, stu- 
dents planning to major in English must take 
209, ordinarily in the freshman year. Other 
courses isolate certain major figures or peri- 
ods for concentrated study, or address them- 
selves to continuing themes and issues. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to consult with the 
instructors of courses they are interested in, 
and with members of the department general- 
ly. More complete descriptions of all courses, 
composed by their instructors, are posted 
every fall and spring on bulletin boards in 
Founders Hall, and are available from the 
department secretary. 

English majors must take at least one unit in 
Shakespeare, ordinarily 305 and/or 306. In 
addition, majors should work closely with 
their advisors in arranging a program of study 
with these objectives: (a) ability to interpret a 
text (b) an understanding of some of the ma- 
jor works, authors, and periods that comprise 
the history of English and American literature 
(c) a developing interest in some special field 
of study, such as the English Renaissance, 
drama, criticism, modernism. 

Students of at least B standing in the work of 
the department will have first consideration 
when applying for admission to seminars and 
for independent work (350). 

The department offers a choice of three pro- 
grams for Honors. Under Program I (English 
370, carrying two to four units of credit) the 
honors candidate does independent research 
or a project in creative writing. Programs II 
and III offer an opportunity to receive Honors 
on the basis of work done for regular courses; 
these programs carry no additional course 
credit. The candidate who elects Program II 



takes a written examination in a field defined 
by several related courses she has taken (e.g., 
the Renaissance, drama, criticism). The can- 
didate who elects Program III presents a dos- 
sier of essays written for several courses, 
with a statement of connections between 
them and critical questions raised by them. 
An oral examination is required in all Honors 
Programs. 

Courses 200, 201 , and 202 are planned as 
workshops in writing with informal group 
meetings and frequent individual confer- 
ences. While the emphasis is on constant 
practice in writing, each course requires a 
critical reading of pertinent examples of the 
type of writing being studied. Courses 301 
and 302 continue the same plan at an ad- 
vanced level. In addition, qualified students 
may apply for one or two units of 350 in writ- 
ing. All courses in writing, and all 350 writing 
projects as well, must be taken credit/non- 
credit. It is strongly recommended that ma- 
jors electing several writing courses should 
also elect a strong program in literature 
courses in consultation with their advisors. 
In general, enrollment in writing courses is 
limited to 15. 

Knowledge of English and American history, 
of the course of European thought, of theatre 
studies, and of at least one foreign literature 
at an advanced level is of great value to the 
student of English. See, for example. History 
233, 235, 236, 238, 239, 240, 301 ; Philosophy 
203, 204; Grade II and Grade III courses in 
foreign literatures; Extradepartmental 104, 
108, 201 , 202, 220, 228, 229, 231 , 330, 331 ; 
and courses in theatre studies. 

A reading knowledge of at least one ancient or 
modern foreign language is desirable for all 
majors. Students expecting to do graduate 
work in English should ordinarily plan to ac- 
quire a reading knowledge of two foreign 
languages. 

For students interested in American litera- 
ture, in American studies, in modern drama, 
and in modern poetry, attention is called to 
relevant courses in the Department of Black 
Studies, especially 105, 206, 210, 211 , and 
310. 



80 FRENCH 



French 



Professor; 
Galand, Frangois. 
McCulloch 

Associate Professor; 
Stambolian (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: 

Mistacco. Lydgate. Gillain-Robbins, 

Gill, de Courtivron, Hules, Grimaud 

Instructor; 
Simon 

Visiting Professor; 
Seznec3 

All courses are conducted in Frenchi. Oral 
expression, composition, and, in certain 
courses, creative writing are stressed. 

The department reserves the right to place 
new students in the courses for which they 
seem best prepared regardless of the number 
of units they have offered for admission. 

Attention is called to the opportunity for resi- 
dence in the French Center. 

Qualified students are encouraged to spend 
the junior year in France. See p. 39. 

The department offers to students who do not 
have a knowledge of French the following 
courses in French literature in translation: 
Extradepartmental 220, 331 . 



100(1-2) Beginning French 
2 

Intensive oral training and practice in reading 
and writing, supplemented by regular use of 
the language laboratory, and in the second 
semester, by selected literary texts; explora- 
tion of fundamental relationships of the lan- 
guage to French culture. Three periods. 
Open only to students who do not present 
French for admission. 

The Staff 



102 (1-2) Intermediate French 
2 

Short stories, novels, plays, and films illus- 
trating aspects of French culture. Stress on 
grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. 
Oral and written work. Three periods. 
Prerequisite; 100 or two admission units in 
French. 

The Staff 

104 (1-2) The Literature and Language of 

IVIodern France 

2 

Analysis of selected modern texts; fiction, 
drama, poetry. Grammar review. Study of 
vocabulary and pronunciation. Frequent writ- 
ten work and oral practice. Three periods. 
Prerequisite; 102 or three admission units in 
French. 

The Staff 

201 (1-2) French Literature through the 

Centuries 

1 or2 

First semester; Middle Ages through the 17th 
century. Second semester; The 18th century 
to the present. Class discussion of selected 
masterpieces, short papers, outside reading. 
Each semester may be taken independently. 
Prerequisite; 104 or four admission units in 
French; by permission of the instructor, 102. 

The Staff 

203 (1-2) Introduction to Literary Analysis 
by Genres 
1 or2 

First semester: Short story and novel. Second 
semester; Theatre and poetry. Class discus- 
sion, oral reports, short papers. Each semes- 
ter may be taken independently. 
Prerequisite; same as for 201 . 

The Staff 

205 (1) (2) French Society Today 
1 

Contemporary problems and attitudes. Class 
discussion of representative texts, periodi- 
cals, and newspapers. Oral reports, short 
papers, outside reading. 
Prerequisite; same as for 201 . 

Ms. Simon 

206 (1) (2) Intermediate Spoken French 
1 

Practice in conversation, using a variety of 
materials including films, video tapes, period- 
icals, songs, radio sketches, and interviews. 
Regular use of language laboratory. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. 
Prerequisite; same as for 201 . 

Ms. Gillain-Robbins 



FRENCH 81 



212(1) Medieval French Literature I 
1 

French literature from the Chanson de Roland 
through Villon. Medieval texts read in modern 
French. 

Prerequisite: 201 or 203 or 205. Open to fresh- 
men with four or more admission units. 

Miss McCulioch 



French Drama in the Twentieth 



213 {1)(2) 
Century 
1 

Trends in contemporary drama: symbolism, 
the use of myths, the influence of existential- 
ism, the theatre of the absurd. 
Prerequisite: same as for 21 2. 

Mr. Stambolian, Mrs. Hules, 
Ms. de Courtivron 

214(1) (2) The French Novelin the 

Nineteenth Century 

1 

Intensive study of narrative techniques and 
the representation of reality in major works by 
Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola. 
Prerequisite: same as for 21 2. 

Ms. Gillain-Robbins, Mrs. Gill 

215 (2) Baudelaire and Symbolist Poets 

1 

The nature of the poetic experience studied in 
the works of Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, 
and Mallarme. 
Prerequisite: same as for 21 2. 

Mr. Galand 

216 (2) The French "New Novel" 
1 

Recent experiments in fiction, with discus- 
sion of drama and film. Emphasis on the 
works and theoretical writings of Robbe- 
Grillet, Sarraute, Butor, and Beckett. 
Prerequisite: same as for 21 2. 

Ms. Mistacco 

220 (1) The Modern French Novel in 
Translation 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 220. 



222(1) (2) Studies in Language I 
1 

A review of selected problems in French 
grammar, enrichment of vocabulary, and an 
introduction to specifically French tech- 
niques of composition and the organization of 
ideas, especially the dissertation and the 
explication de texte. Not open to freshmen in 
the first semester. 

Prerequisite: 104, or 102 by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Gill, Mr. Lydgate, Mr. Grimaud 

226 (2) Advanced Spoken French 
1 

Practice in oral expression to improve fluency 
and pronunciation with special attention to 
idiomatic vocabulary and phonetics. In addi- 
tion to recordings, video tapes, and periodi- 
cals, several classics of the French cinema 
will be studied for their linguistic interest. 
Regular use of language laboratory. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit or by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Ms. Gillain-Robbins 

249 (1 ) (2) Selected Topics 
1 or2 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

300 (2) French Literature in the Sixteenth 
Century 

1 

Studies in the Renaissance. Authors include 
Rabelais, Ronsard, and Montaigne. 
Prerequisite: two Grade II units of French 
literature. 

Miss McCulioch 

301 (1) French Literature in the Seventeenth 
Century I 

1 

Baroque and Precieux poets. L'Astree. The 
birth of the classical theatre: Corneille. Des- 
cartes, Pascal. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Frangois 

302 (2) French Literature in the Seventeenth 
Century II 

1 

The classical theatre: Moliere, Racine, Lafay- 
ette, La Fontaine, La Bruyere. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Fran9ois 



82 FRENCH 



304 (1) The French Novel in the Eighteenth 
Century 

1 

The affirmation of self and the development of 
narrative forms. Authors studied: Prevost, 
Marivaux, Rousseau, Diderot, Laclos, Sade. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Ms. Mistacco 

305 (2) Studies in Romanticism 
1 

The Romantic Imagination and the Occult in 
selected works from Nodier and Balzac to 
Nerval, Lautreamont, and Maupassant. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Ms. Simon 

306 (1) French Literature In the Twentieth 
Century I 

1 

From Symbolism to Surrealism: the literary 
experience in works of Valery, Proust, Gide, 
Apollinaire, Saint-John Perse, Breton. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Galand 

307 (2) French Literature in the Twentieth 
Century II 

1 

Existentialism and after: the function of liter- 
ature in works of Malraux, Sartre, Camus, 
Char, Ponge, Robbe-Grillet. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Galand 

308(1) Studies in Language lla 
1 

Comparative stylistics: a normative approach 
to the problems of translation. 
Prerequisite: one Grade III unit of French liter- 
ature and 222, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Frangois 

309(2) Studies in Language lib 
1 

Translation into French from novels, essays, 
and poetry. Study of French style through 
analysis of selected texts. 
Prerequisite: same as for 308. 

Ms. Giltain-Robbins 



312 (1) Medieval French Literature II 
1 

See 212. Joint class meetings for 212 and 312. 
Supplementary assignments and readings in 
Old French for students at Grade III level. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Miss McCulloch 

319(1) Women and Literary Expression 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Twentieth century women 
novelists in France: Colette, Beauvoir, Leduc, 
Duras, Wittig, and others, with emphasis on 
the woman's role in contemporary French 
society and her rebellion against it. 
Prerequisite: one Grade III unit of French 
literature. 

Ms. de Courtivron 

321 (2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: The reader in modern 
French fiction. A new critical approach to the 
study of modes of communication and the 
evolution of the implied reader's expectations 
in selected novels from Gide's L'lmmoraliste 
to the Nouveau Roman, with emphasis on 
recent experimental narratives. 
Prerequisite: same as for 319. 

Ms. Mistacco 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or2 

Prerequisite: same as for 319. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



GEOLOGY 83 



Directions for Election 



Course 1 00 is counted toward the degree but 
not toward the major. Students who begin 
with 100 in college and who plan to major in 
French should consult the chairman of the 
department during the second semester of 
their freshman year. A student may not count 
toward the major both 102 and 104. Course 
104 may not be elected by students who have 
taken both 100 and 102. 

Majors are required to take two of the follow- 
ing courses: 222. 308, 309. In some cases 226 
may also be required. 

Courses in other foreign language and liter- 
ature departments, in art, history (especially 
242 and 243), philosophy, English, Extra- 
departmental 330 and 331 , and Religion and 
Biblical Studies 104 and 105 are recommend- 
ed for majors. 

Students who plan to do graduate work in 
French are advised to begin or to pursue the 
study of a second modern language and the 
study of Latin; those who plan to do graduate 
work in comparative literature are advised to 
continue the study of one or more other mod- 
ern literatures and to acquire proficiency in at 
least one classical language. 



Geology 



Assistant Professor: 

Andrews (Chairman), Besancon 

Instructor: 
Lundeen 



102 (1) (2) Introduction to Geology 
1 

An introduction to the basic features of the 
solid earth and the processes that continue to 
modify it. Emphasis on the development and 
impact of the continental drift and plate tec- 
tonics theories. Laboratory and field trips 
include study of minerals, rocks, fossils, 
topographic and geologic maps. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Andrews, Mr. Besancon, Mrs. Lundeen 

112 (2) Evolution: Change through Time 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 112. 

200 (2) Historical Geology 
1 

The geologic history of North America and the 
evolution of life as revealed in the fossil rec- 
ord. Interpretation of paleogeography and 
ancient sedimentary and tectonic environ- 
ments. Laboratory and field trips. 
Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Andrews 

202(1) Mineralogy 
1 

Introduction to crystallography; systematic 
study of the rock-forming minerals. Emphasis 
on geochemical relationships including bond- 
ing, solid solution series, and mineral struc- 
tures. Laboratory. 

Prerequisite: 102 and another unit of physical 
science, preferably chemistry, or permission 
of the instructor. 



Mr. Besancon 



84 GEOLOGY 



205 (2)* Invertebrate Paleontology 
1 

The morphology and evolution of the major 
fossil invertebrate phyla with discussion of 
such general topics as functional morphol- 
ogy, origin of species and higher taxa, ontog- 
eny and phylogeny, and animal size and 
shape relationships. Laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 102 and 200, or one unit in biol- 
ogy, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Andrews 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

206 (1)* Structural Geology 
1 

The recognition, description, and causes of 
deformation of the earth's crust. Topics in- 
clude the tectonic history of mountain 
ranges, scale models of geologic structures, 
mechanics of folding and faulting, and plate 
tectonics. Laboratory and field trips. 
Prerequisite: 102 and 200, or permission of 
the instructor. 

IVIrs. Lundeen 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

208(1)* Marine Geology 
1 

Geology of the ocean floor with emphasis on 
ocean basin tectonics and submarine pro- 
cesses. Topics include ocean currents and 
sediments, evolution of continental margins, 
submarine canyons, coral reefs, and deep sea 
life. No laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 102. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Lundeen 

Offered in 1977-78. 

304 (2)* Stratigraphy and Sedimentation 
1 

Study of the formation, composition, and 
correlation of stratified rocks. Emphasis on 
sedimentary environments, transportation of 
sedimentary particles, sediment diagenesis, 
and sedimentary petrography. Laboratory and 
field trips. 

Prerequisite: 102 and 200, or permission of 
the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Lundeen 

Offered in 1977-78. 



307(1)* Optical Mineralogy 
1 

Basics of optical crystallography. Application 
of modern methods to the identification of 
silicates in grains and thin section. Labora- 
tory. 
Prerequisite: 202 or Physics 202. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Besancon 

Offered in 1977-78. 

309 (2) Petrology 
1 

Study of the origin and occurrence of igneous 
and metamorphic rocks with particular refer- 
ence to modern geochemical investigations. 
Examination and description of hand speci- 
mens and thin sections using the petrograph- 
ic microscope. Laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 202. 

Mr. Besancon 

310(1)* Geometries 
1 

Statistical analysis of geologic data utilizing 
univariate, bivariate, and multivariate tech- 
niques. Development and application of FOR- 
TRAN computer programs for the solution of 
geologic problems. Laboratory includes field 
mapping and scientific photography. 
Prerequisite: 102 and one Grade I! unit, or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Andrews 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

349(2) Seminar 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II course in geology 
and permission of the instructor. 

Mrs. Lundeen 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



GERMAN 85 



Directions for Election 



German 



In addition to eight units in geology, normally 
.o include 205, 206. 304, and 309, the mini- 
nnum major requires four units from other 
laboratory sciences, mathematics, or compu- 
ter science. All four units may not be taken in 
the same department. A student planning 
graduate work should note that most graduate 
geology departments normally require two 
units each of chemistry, physics, and mathe- 
matics. Biology often may be substituted if 
the student is interested in paleontology. 

The department recommends that students 
majoring in geology attend one of the Rocky 
Mountain geology field courses given by 
other colleges. Credit may be given for such 
courses provided the student's plans are ap- 
proved in advance by the department. 



Professor: 
Goth (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: 
Ward*, Prather 

Lecturer: 
Deutsch, Ingersoll 

The language of the classroom in all courses 
is almost exclusively German. The student 
thus has constant practice in hearing, speak- 
ing, and writing German. 

The department reserves the right to place a 
new student in the course for which the stu- 
dent seems best prepared regardless of the 
number of units the student has offered for 
admission. 

By doing special reading during the summer 
and upon approval of the chairman, capable 
students in 100 have the opportunity to omit 
102 and proceed with 202. 

Qualified students may be recommended to 
spend the junior year in Germany. See p. 39. 



100(1-2) Elementary German 
2 

Study of grammar and vocabulary; frequent 

written exercises; reading of short stories; 

special emphasis on oral expression. Three 

periods. 

Open to students who do not present German 

for admission. 

The Staff 



102(1-2) Intermediate German 
2 

Intensive language study: emphasis on idio- 
matic usage and on syntax. Introduction to 
the critical study of literary texts, mainly 19th 
and 20th centuries. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 100 or two admission units in 
German. 

The Staff 



86 GERMAN 



104 (1-2) Studies in Language and Literature 
2 

Training in analysis of fiction and drama. 
Grammar review. Vocabulary building. Writ- 
ten and oral practice. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: two admission units in German 
and placement test or, by permission of the 
department, 100. Permission will be based on 
a high grade in 100. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

202 (1) (2) Introduction to German Literature 
lor 2 

Close study of representative works of the 
18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. First semes- 
ter: Drama— Schiller, Hebbel, Brecht, Durren- 
matt. Second semester: Prose— Kant, Less- 
ing, Kleist, Keller, Kafka. Frequent exercises 
in expository writing and stylistics. One unit 
of credit may be given for the first semester. 
Prerequisite: three or more admission units in 
German, or 102, or 104, or, by permission of 
the department, 100. Permission will be 
based on a high grade in 100 and summer 
work. 

Ms. Goth, Mrs. Deutsch 

204(1) Goethe I 
1 

Lyric, prose, and drama before Goethe's 

return from Italy. 

Prerequisite: 202 (1 ) and (2), or [201 ] and 

202(2). 

Ms. Goth 

205(1) Studies in Romanticism 
1 

Romantic thought, discovery of the uncon- 
scious: Friedrich Schlegel, Brentano, No- 
valis, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Eichendorff, and 
others. 
Prerequisite: same as for 204. 

Mrs. Prather 

206 (2)* Nineteenth Century Literature 
1 

Late Romanticism and Realism with special 
emphasis on the development of the Novelle 
as a genre. Morike, Stifter, Keller, C. F. 
Meyer, Droste-Hulshoff, Storm, and Fontane. 
Prerequisite: same as for 204. 

Mrs. Prather 



210(1)* German Drama 
1 

Theory and practice between the age of 
Gottsched and Brecht. The theories of 
Gottsched, Lessing, Schiller, Hebbel. and 
Brecht will be included as well as the drama 
of Schiller, Buchner, Kaiser, and others. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

220 (2) Contemporary Literary Trends in the 
Two Germanys 

1 

Discussion of literature in the Federal Repub- 
lic of Germany and the Democratic Republic 
of Germany. An analysis of contrasts, taking 
works from each genre by representative writ- 
ers (Grass, Boll, Christa Wolf, Biermann, and 
others), and considering them within a politi- 
cal/historical context. Attention will also be 
given to recent trends in literary criticism. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

221 (2) Politics and Literature in Post-War 
Germany 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 221 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

304(2) Goethe II 
1 

Goethe, the poet and the thinker, with em- 
phasis on Faust, and his writings after 1788. 
Prerequisite: 204. 

Ms. Goth 

308 (1)* Literature of the Late Nineteenth 

and Early Twentieth Centuries 

1 

Intellectual and aesthetic trends of the period. 
Varied texts: drama, poetry, and prose of rep- 
resentative authors such as Nietzsche, Hof- 
mannsthal, Rilke, Thomas Mann, Hesse, and 
others. 
Prerequisite: two Grade II units. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

310(1)* Studies in Poetry 
1 

Study of techniques and historical back- 
ground. The development of German poetry 
from the Baroque to the modern times. With 
emphasis on poets such as Gryphius, 
Goethe, the Romantics, Rilke, Hofmannsthal, 
Benn, and some contemporaries. 
Prerequisite: two Grade II units. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



GREEK 87 



312 (2) German Literature in the Twentieth 
Century: Expressionism and Its 
Consequences 
1 

The rise of the Expressionist movement as an 
outcry against the near fatal crisis of modern 
culture around World War I; the search for a 
new language, imagery and content for lyrics, 
drama and prose in the works of TrakI, Heym, 
Barlach, Toller, Doblin; the bitter humorof 
the Dadaists, the early works of Brecht and 
Werfel, and the impact of Expressionism on 
German literature to the present day. 
Prerequisite: three Grade II units or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Mrs. Deutsch 

349 (1) Seminar. The Writer and His Age 
1 

Intensive study of the works of one or two 
writers in relation to philosophical, historical, 
and literary trends of their periods. Topic for 
1976-77: Thomas Mann. 
Prerequisite: one Grade III unit or permission 
of the instructor. 

Ms. Goth 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370 (1) (2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Course 1 00 is counted toward the degree but 
not toward the major. 

Students who begin with 100 and who wish to 
major in German should consult the depart- 
ment in order to obtain permission to omit 
102 and take 202. 

Students intending to major in the depart- 
ment are requested to take 202, or 201 and 
202 (2), 204, 304, and at least two further 
Grade III units. 

Courses 205, 210. 31 2, and one seminar are 
strongly recommended for the major. 

Courses in art, history, philosophy, English, 
literature courses in other foreign language 
departments, and Extradepartmental 221 , 
330, and 331 are recommended. 



Greek and 
Latin 



Professor: 

Lefkowitz (Chairman), Geffcken* 

Assistant Professor: 

Brown, Marvin, Franklin, Raschke 

Instructor: 
Fant 



Greek 



102(1)(2) Beginning Greek 
1 

Fundamentals of the Greek language. Read- 
ing from classical authors and from the New 
Testament. Four periods. 
Open to students who do not present Greek 
for admission. 

Mrs. Lefkowitz, Mr. Franklin 

103 (1) (2) Introduction to Greek Literature 
1 

Reading from classical authors and from the 
New Testament. Intensive review of grammar 
and syntax. 
Prerequisite: [100 (1)] or102. 

Miss Marvin, Ms. Brown 

104(1) Classical Mythology 
1 

The more important classical myths read in 

English translations of Greek and Latin 

authors; their religious origins; theirexpres- 

sion in ancient literature and art; their later 

influence. 

Open to all students. 

Mrs. Lefkowitz 

150(2) Colloquium 
1 

For title and description see History 150 (2)c. 



88 GREEK 



201 (1) Plato 
1 

Apology. Crito, and selections from the Phae- 
do. The character of Socrates and his position 
in development of Greek thought. Three 
periods. 

Prerequisite: [100] or 102 and 103, or two ad- 
mission units in Greek or exemption examina- 
tion. 

Ms. Brown 

203 (2)* The Psychology of Greek Drama 
1 

Intensive study of tragedies of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, and Euripides, in English transla- 
tion. The survival in literary form of primitive 
ritual; the development of new mythic 
patterns on ancient models. The role of con- 
temporary psychoanalytic theory in 
evaluating the social function and structure of 
drama. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Lefkowitz 

205 (2) Homer's Iliad 
1 

Study of selected books in Greek with empha- 
sis on the oral style of early epic; reading of 
the rest of the poem in translation; the ar- 
chaeological background of the period. Three 
periods. 
Prerequisite: 103 or 201. 

Miss Marvin 

207 (2) New Testament Greek 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Religion 
207. 

230 (1)* History of Greece 
1 

For description and prerequisite see History 
230. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

249 (2)* Selected Topics 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite: 104. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



302(2)* Aeschylus and Sophocles 
1 

Drama as expression of mans conflict with 
forces beyond his control; the use of mythol- 
ogy to describe the conflict between human 
institutions and the natural world; innova- 
tions in language, metaphor, and metre. 
Reading of one drama by each author in 
Greek, others in English. 
Prerequisite: 205. 

Ms. Brown 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

303 (1)* Myth and History in the Archaic 
Age 

1 

Investigation of the narrative methods of re- 
cording significant past experience; the eval- 
uation of the relationship of the past to events 
of the first half of the 5th century; the restric- 
tions on perception imposed by style and 
structure in both prose and poetry. Reading in 
Greek from Herodotus and the lyric poets. 
Prerequisite: 205. 

Ms. Brown 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

304 (2)* Euripides 
1 

Euripides' exposition of current problems in 
traditional narrative framework; his develop- 
ment of dramatic form; his exploration of 
human and political motivation. Reading of 
two or three plays in Greek, others in English. 
Prerequisite: 205. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Brown 

Offered in 1977-78. 

305(1)* Thucydides 
1 

Contemporary impressions of the political 
conflicts confronting the state in the late 5th 
century B.C. Imperialism and the causes of 
the Peloponnesian War; the flaws in Athenian 
democracy and the influence of Sophistic 
argumentation. The attempt to formulate a 
scientific approach to history and the rejec- 
tion of earlier models; the creation of a new 
prose style. Reading in Greek of selections 
from Thucydides. 
Prerequisite: 205. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Fant 

Offered in 1977-78. 



LATIN 89 



328 (2) Problems in Ancient History and 

Historiography 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Latin 
328. Topic for 1977-78 will be a problem in 
Greek history. 

349(1) (2) Seminar 
1 or 2 

First semester: The portrayal of insanity in 
Greek drama. Study of the symptoms and 
results of madness in selected dramas, with 
close attention to language. The social func- 
tion of public performance of such actions. 
Consideration of the applicability of modern 
psychoanalytic theory to the interpretation of 
ancient texts. Second semester; The fictions 
of Greek history. The role of ancient mythic 
patterns in shaping the interpretation of his- 
torical events and in the creation of fictional 
biographies. Special consideration of Thu- 
cydides' account of the Athenian expedition 
to Sicily and of the development of special 
narrative techniques to describe the creative 
process. 
Prerequisite: 205. 

Ms. Brown, Mrs. Lefkowitz 

350 (1 ) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or2 

Open to seniors by permission. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates who 
choose to do honors research. For alternate 
honors program see Directions for Election. 



Latin 



100(1) Beginning Latin 
1 

Fundamentals of the Latin language. Read- 
ings from classical and medieval texts. Three 
periods. 

Open to students who do not present Latin for 
admission, or by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Fant, Ms. Raschke 

101 (2) Intermediate Latin 
1 

Development of reading skills through inten- 
sive study of classical authors. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 100. 

Ms. Raschke 



102 (2) Introduction to Latin Literature 
1 

Intensive review of grammar and syntax; 
reading from classical Latin authors. 
Prerequisite: two admission units in Latin or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Fant 

103 (1) Introduction to Vergil's Aeneid 
1 

Study of the poem with selections from 
Books l-VI in Latin. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 101 , 102, or three admission 
units in Latin not including Vergil, or exemp- 
tion examination. 

Mr. Franklin 

104(1) Classical Mythology 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Greek 
104. 

150(2) Colloquium 
1 

For title and description see History 150 (2)c. 

202(1) Catullus and Cicero 
1 

Love, politics, morality, and humor in the last 
years of the Republic. Study of the evolution 
of Latin poetic style and of the technique of 
destructive oratory. 

Prerequisite: four admission units in Latin or 
three including Vergil or 103. 

Ms. Raschke 

203 (2) Horace 
1 

The development of Horace's poetic style and 

social commentary Reading from Satires and 

Odes. 

Prerequisite: same as for 202. 

Mr. Franklin 

206(2)* Latin Prose Style 
1 

A study of the development of Latin style with 
reading and analysis of selected texts: prac- 
tice in writing Latin prose. 
Prerequisite: 202 or 203. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



90 LATIN 



207(2) Medieval Latin 
1 

The interaction of Christian values and classi- 
cal modes of thought in literature from 374 to 
1374 A.D. Selected readings from prose and 
poetry. 

Prerequisite: 1 03 or the equivalent or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Ms. Raschke 

231(1)* History of Rome 
1 

For description and prerequisite see History 
231. 

249(1) Selected Topics 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Latin love elegy. Tradition- 
al expressions of subjectivity and their devel- 
opment in the elegiac poetry of Catullus, 
Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. Topic for 
1977-78: Latin comedy. 
Prerequisite: 202 or 203 or an AP Latin score 
of 5. 

Mr. Franklin 

300 (1)* The Decline of \he Heroic and tfie 
Epicurean Response 

1 

Anti-heroic treatment of myth in Catullus 64; 
Lucretius' re-creation in poetic form of the 
Epicurean view of the human experience. 
Prerequisite: 249. 

Mr. Franklin 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

301 (1)* Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics and 
Ovid's Ars Amatoria 

1 

Vergil's re-creation of the Greek pastoral and 
his use of didactic and descriptive poetry as a 
means of examining man's relationship to 
nature and as political and social commen- 
tary. Ovid's parody of Vergilian didactic. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Geffcken 

Offered in 1977-78. 

302 (2) Vergil's Aeneid 
1 

The artistic achievement of Vergil in the light 
of earlier literature, especially Homer and 
Ennius; Vergil's view of man and the destiny 
of Rome. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Franklin 



308 (1)* The Struggle for Power in the Late 
Republic 

1 

The events, life, and thought of the late Re- 
public in the letters of Cicero and in the his- 
torical writings of Caesar and Sallust. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78. 

309 (2)* Historical Tradition, Morality, and 
Immorality 

1 

Livy's portrayal of early Roman heroes as 
models of behavior and Ovid's and Propertius' 
rejection of this moral point of view. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Fant 

Offered in 1977-78. 

316 (1)* The Effects of Power and Authority 

in the Empire 

1 

The literature of disillusion both historical 

and satirical with emphasis on Tacitus and 

Juvenal. 

Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Ms. Raschke 

Not offered in 1977-78. 

317(2) Imperial Rome: The Novel 
1 

The development of the ancient novel with 

emphasis on satirical techniques in Petronius 

and on religious and mythological themes in 

Apuleius. 

Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Ms. Raschke 

Not offered in 1977-78. 



LATIN 91 



328 (2) Problems in Ancient History and 

Historiography 

1 

Topic for1976-77: The Julio-Claudians; leg- 
end and reality. The historical and archaeo- 
logical evidence about the first innperial fam- 
ily; the nature of senatorial propaganda 
against them. Special consideration of spe- 
cific problems: were imperial women (Livia, 
Agrippina the Younger) real movers of im- 
perial policy? Can we rehabilitate Tiberius and 
Nero? Some attention to the particular in- 
sights of modern historical novelists into the 
period. Topics alternate between Greek and 
Roman history. 

Prerequisite: History 231 , or two Grade II 
units of Greek or Latin or History, or a unit of 
Roman Art. or by permission of the in- 
structor 

Mr. Fant 

350 (1) (2) Research or individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to seniors by permission. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates who 
choose to do honors research. For alternate 
honors program see Directions for Election. 



Directions for Election 



To fulfill the distribution requirement in 
Group A, students may elect any courses in 
Greek or Latin except 150, 230, 231 , and 328. 
The following may not be counted toward the 
major in Greek or Latin: Greek [101], 203, 
[204], 230; Greek/ Latin 104, 150, [208], 328; 
Greek 203, [204], 230, 249; Latin 231 . 

All students majoring in Greek must complete 
four units of Grade III work. 

All students majoring in Latin are required to 
complete 300 or 301 , 302, and at least two 
units of the following: 308, 309, 316, 317. 
Students planning to teach are advised to 
elect 206. 

Latin students who offer an AP Latin score of 
5 should elect 249; an AP score of 4 normally 
leads to 202, but under special circumstances 
permission may be given to elect 249. 

Students majoring in Greek or Latin are ad- 
vised to elect some work in the other lan- 
guage. It should be noted that work in both 
Greek and Latin is essential for graduate 
studies in the classics. 

Courses in ancient history, ancient art, an- 
cient philosophy, and classical mythology are 
recommended as valuable related work. Stu- 
dents interested in a major in classical and 
Near Eastern archaeology are referred to 
p. 149 where the program is described. 

Students who wish to focus a classical major 
on ancient civilization can plan with the de- 
partment an appropriate sequence of courses, 
which should include work in art, history, 
philosophy, and literature. Such a program 
should always contain at least four units of 
work in the original language. Basic knowl- 
edge of French or German is recommended. 

The departments offera choice of two plans 
for the Honors Program. Plan A (Honors Re- 
search, see 370 above, carrying two to four 
units of credit) provides the candidate with 
opportunity for research on a special topic 
and the writing of a long paper or several 
shorter papers. Plan B provides an opportu- 
nity for the candidate to show through exam- 
inations at the end of her senior year that she 
has acquired a superior grasp, not only of a 
basic core of texts, but also of additional 
reading beyond course requirements. Plan B 
carries no course credit, but where appropri- 
ate, students may elect a unit of 350 to pre- 
pare a special author or project which would 
be included in the Honors examinations. 
Honors candidates who are classical civiliza- 
tion majors should elect Plan B. 



92 HISTORY 



History 



Professor: 

Gulick. Robinson. Preyer. 

Cohen». Cox (Chairman) 

Associate Professor: 
Auerbach. Martin 

Assistant Professor: 

Hay. Chaplin. Edwards. Tumarkln-Fosburg. 

Jones. Ocko 

Instructor: 
Knudsen 



103(1) The World and the West 
1 

An introduction to comparative history, fo- 
cusing on the changing relations between 
western Europe and other civilizations over 
the past five centuries. Discussion of such 
topics as technological change and the bal- 
ance of power, the missionary impulse in 
Christianity and Islam, trading-post empires 
and full colonial rule, with case studies from 
Southeast Asia. Latin America, Africa, India, 
and the Middle East. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Hay 

150(1)(2) Colloquia 
1 

For directions for applying see p. 44. 
Open by permission to a limited number of 
freshman and sophomore applicants. 



100(1) (2) Medieval and Early Modern 

European History 

1 

A study of the major ideas and institutions 
that have shaped western civilizations from 
the "grandeur that was Rome" to the Age of 
the Renaissance and Reformation. Emphasis 
upon the different lifestyles" of successive 
western societies and upon the processes of 
social change in the history of western 
Europe. Introduction to the techniques of 
historical analysis and to problems in the 
interpretation of historical evidence through 
extensive use of original sources. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Cox. Mr. Edwards 

101(1) (2) Modern European History 
1 

An introduction to European history from 
1600 to the present, designed to aid the stu- 
dent in formulating historical judgments 
about the significance of representative insti- 
tutions, the scientific revolution, the Enlight- 
enment, the French Revolution, industrializa- 
tion, imperialism, world wars, totalitarianism. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Gulick. Mr. Knudsen. 
Mrs. Tumarkin-Fosburg 

102(2)* Approaches to the History of 
American Society 



(1) 

a. The internationalization of Black Power 

The Black Power movement of the 1960's and 
1970's represents one of the most militant 
periods in Afro-American history, similar in 
many respects to the "New Negro" period 
after World War I. As was the case with the 
New Negro movement, the Black Power idea 
quickly spread to Black populations in many 
countries. This colloquium will discuss some 
of the highlights of the Black Power era in the 
United States. Canada. Britain, and the West 
Indies. 

Mr. Martin 

(2) 

a. The internationalization of Black Power 

Same as 1 50 (1 ) a. 

b. 1776and all that 

An analysis of the group of American revolu- 
tionaries who rose to power and led the move- 
ment for independence from Great Britain. 
Materials will be drawn from primary sources 
of the period: letters, documents, pamphlets, 
and newspapers. 

Mrs. Preyer 



Not offered in 1976-77. 



HISTORY 93 



c. Ruler as God in antiquity 

What led nnen in the ancient world to consider 
their rulers living gods? How prevalent was 
the practice? An exannmation of the divine 
king from religious, historical, and political 
perspectives: particular ennphasis on 
Mycenaean kingship. Alexander the Great. 
Ptolennies in Egypt. Caesar and Augustus, 
and the growth of emperor worship in the 
Roman Empire 

Mr Fant 

d. Asian radicals 

A comparative study of radical leaders such 
as Mao. Ho. Gandhi. Sukarno, and Japanese 
militarists. Through the use of biographies 
and political writings, the course will focus 
on motivation, intellectual and ideological 
underpinnings, and technics of mobilization. 
In order to assess the efficacy of cross- 
cultural comparisons, writings of European 
radicals will also be studied. 

Mr Ocko 

206(1-2) Afro-American History 
1or2 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 206. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Offered in 1977-78 

230(1)* History of Greece 
1 

The failure of democracy in Greece: a study of 
the historical evidence for the development of 
democracy in Athens: the effects of the acqui- 
sition of an empire and the results of the con- 
frontation with Sparta. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

231(1)* History of Rome 
1 

Rome of the Caesars: political, economic, 
social life of the empire: attitudes toward 
autocratic government Particular attention 
will be given to the period 27 B.C.- 1 38 A. D. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Fant 



232 (2) Medieval Civilization, 1000 to 1300 
1 

European society during the High Middle 
Ages. Kingship and a comparison of medieval 
states, warfare and the birth of chivalry, peas- 
ants and townsmen in an era of economic and 
technological change, students and church- 
men in a period of intellectual ferment. An 
exploration of political and social ideas as 
expressed in contemporary sources, includ- 
ing art and literature. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores who have 
had a course in medieval history, art. or liter- 
ature, and to juniors and seniors without pre- 
requisite. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Cox 

233 (1) The Renaissance and Reformation 
Movements, 1300 to 1600 

1 

A survey of Italian Renaissance civilization. 
Its republics and despotisms, cultural life and 
patronage. Petrarch, the Medici, Machiavelli, 
and the Renaissance and Reformation papa- 
cy: the Renaissance in the North: and the 
Lutheran. Calvinist. Radical, and Catholic 
Reformations. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores who have 
taken 100 or related work in art, literature, or 
philosophy, and to juniors and seniors with- 
out prerequisite 

Mr. Edwards 

235 (2) Medieval and Early Modern 

Intellectual History 

1 

A history of western thought from St. Augus- 
tine to the 16th century reformations, empha- 
sizing the relations between intellectual de- 
velopments and political, social, and eco- 
nomic context. Topics will include the 12th 
century Renaissance, scholasticism and the 
medieval universities. Italian Renaissance 
thought, and Reformation theology and polit- 
ical theory. 
Prerequisite: same as for 233. 

Mr. Edwards 

236(1) Modern European Intellectual 

History 

1 

A study of western thought from Montaigne 
and Descartes to Nietzsche. Freud, and Rilke. 
The general theme will be the problem of self- 
identity, its emergence, crisis, and loss. 
Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 
(see Directions for Election), and to juniors 
and seniors without prerequisite. 

Mr. Knudsen 



94 HISTORY 



238 (1) History of England to 1 500 
1 

A survey of English history from the coming 
of the Anglo-Saxons through the Wars of the 
Roses. Some attention will be given to prob- 
lems of historical interpretation. 
Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 
(see Directions for Election), to sophomores 
who have taken 1 00 or are concentrating in 
English literature, and to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Robinson 

239 (2) History of England, 1500 to 1700 
1 

English history under the Tudors and Stuarts. 
The English Reformation, Elizabethan Re- 
naissance, and 17th century revolutions will 
be the major themes. 
Prerequisite: same as for 238. 

Mrs. Robinson 

240(2) Modern England 
1 

English history from the late 18th century to 
the mid-20th century. The transformation of a 
basically agrarian, hierarchical, traditional 
society into an industrial, democratic welfare 
state. 

Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 
(see Directions for Election), to students who 
have taken 1 01 or 239, to sophomores concen- 
trating in English literature, and to juniors 
and seniors without prerequisite. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Robinson 

242 (1) The Age of Louis XIV in France 
1 

Society and government in 17th century 
France. The political and cultural background 
under Richelieu and Mazarin; social, political, 
and intellectual life during the Golden Age of 
Absolutism under Louis XIV. 
Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 
(see Directions for Election), to sophomores 
who have taken one unit in history, art his- 
tory, or French, and to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mr. Cox 



243 (1) The Enlightenment, the French 
Revolution, and Napoleon 

1 

French civilization in the 18th century; anal- 
ysis of the causes, events, and results of the 
Revolution. The era of the Revolution and the 
Napoleonic Empire with emphasis upon polit- 
ical, social, and cultural developments, and 
their impact upon the rest of Europe. 
Prerequisite: same as for 242. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Cox 

244 (2) Modern Germany 
1 

Beginning with the revolution of 1848, an 
examination of German politics, society, and 
culture to the post-World War II period. Spe- 
cial emphasis on Bismarck and the founding 
of the German Empire; the Empire's crisis and 
collapse in World War I; the formation of the 
Weimar Republic; and the emergence of Naz- 
ism and the Third Reich. The task will be to 
explore the German response to problems 
shared throughout western Europe. 
Prerequisite: same as for 236. 

Mr. Knudsen 

246(1) Medieval and Imperial Russia 
1 

Russia from the 9th to the 19th century. 
Medieval Russia, the development of an ab- 
solutist state and the creation of the Russian 
Empire. Particular consideration is given to 
the political, social, and cultural impact upon 
Russia of other societies— Byzantium, the 
Mongol Empire, and the West. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Tumarkin-Fosburg 

247 (2) Modern Russia and the Soviet Union 
1 

One hundred years of reform, revolution, and 
reaction. Late Imperial Russia and the crea- 
tion of a Soviet state under Lenin and Stalin. 
Special emphasis is placed on the Russian 
Revolution and on social change under Soviet 
rule. 
Prerequisite: same as for 246. 

Mrs. Tumarkin-Fosburg 



HISTORY 95 



248 (1) Europe in the Twentieth Century 
1 

An interpretative study of nnodern Europe, 
emphasizing social change and the develop- 
ment of new modes of thought and expres- 
sion. Topics include: communism, fascism, 
nationalism: Freud; changing artistic and 
intellectual perceptions; the mass media. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Tumarkin-Fosburg 

250(1) The First Frontier 
1 

The adaptation of the English, Europeans, 
and Africans to the alien environment of 
North America in the 17th century. Analysis 
of the formation of colonial settlements, 
problems of survival and leadership, relations 
with Indian cultures, the creation of new soci- 
eties in the New World. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Preyer 

251 (2) The United States in the Eighteenth 
Century 

1 

Society, culture, and politics in colonial 
America, in the era of the American Revolu- 
tion and in the early national period to 1815. 
Prerequisite: same as for 250. 

Mrs. Preyer 

252 (1) The United States in the Nineteenth 
Century 

1 

An introduction to the major political, eco- 
nomic, and social forces which shaped 19th 
century American history. 
Prerequisite: same as for 250. 

Ms. Jones 

253 (2) The United States in the Twentieth 
Century 

1 

Selected 20th century issues and problems, 
with emphasis on the responses of Americans 
and their institutions to social change. 
Prerequisite: same as for 250. 

Mr. Auerbach 



254 (1) United States Urban History 
1 

Origins and development of the American 
urban system from the colonial period to the 
present, with emphasis upon changing city 
functions, urban physical and spatial struc- 
ture and growth, group accommodation to 
city living, historical trends in urban politics, 
and problem solving. 

Open to sophomores by permission of the 
instructor, and to juniors and seniors without 
prerequisite. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

255 (2) Women in American History 
1 

A survey of women in American history, from 

the colonial period to the present, focusing 

on the family, marriage and divorce, women's 

role in the labor force, images of women in 

the popular media, women's rights, and 

feminism. 

Prerequisite: same as for 250. 

Ms. Jones 

260(1)* The Hispanic World 
1 

The political, social, economic, and cultural 
evolution of the Latin American world from 
colonial days to the present. Emphasis on 
colonial institutions and their relations to 
historical developments in the Iberian penin- 
sula, and on the fundamental problems, espe- 
cially in certain key countries, of modern and 
contemporary Latin America. 
Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 
(see Directions for Election), to sophomores 
who have had a course in history or art his- 
tory, and to juniors and seniors without pre- 
requisite. 

Mr. Lovett 

261(1)* History of Spain 
1 

The period of Spain's hegemony and modern 

developments culminating in the Civil War of 

1936-39. 

Prerequisite: same as for 260. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Lovett 



96 HISTORY 



265(2) History of the Middle East 
1 

The social and cultural institutions of the 
Islannic world before 1800; the innpact of the 
West; the rise and development of nationalist 
nnovements in the 19th and 20th centuries. 
Some attention will be given to Islamic influ- 
ence in India, Africa, and Southeast Asia. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Hay 

267 (1) History of Africa. West Africa 
1 

An introduction to the history of West Africa 
from around 1500 A.D. to the present. The 
major topics will include the pre-colonial 
kingdoms, the expansion of Islam, the Atlan- 
tic slave trade, social and economic change 
during the colonial period, and nationalistic 
movements. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Hay 

268 (2) History of Africa. East, Central, and 
Southern Africa 

1 

An introduction to the history of East, Cen- 
tral, and southern Africa from ancient times 
to the present. Topics of major interest will 
include migration and state formation in early 
times, Swahili civilization, the slave trade, 
colonialism and nationalism, and the con- 
tinuing conflicts in southern Africa. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Hay 

271 (1) Japanese History 
1 

Japanese history from earliest times to pres- 
ent, focusing on modern period (since 1600). 
Special consideration given to cross-cultural 
comparison (Japanese and European feudal- 
ism, Japanese and Chinese responses to 
encounters with the modern West), factors 
contributing to Japan's astonishingly rapid 
modernization in the 19th and 20th centuries, 
and problems faced by Japan in the future. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



275 (1) Premodern Chinese History 
1 

Chinese civilization from earliest times to the 
period of the modern western intrusion. Em- 
phasis on dominant historical and cultural 
patterns; the evolution of Confucianism. Tao- 
ism, and Chinese Buddhism; and the develop- 
ment of major political institutions (emperor, 
bureaucracy, examination system, and 
others). Extensive readings in Chinese litera- 
ture. Two simulation games will be played. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Ocko 

276 (2) Modern Chinese History 
1 

The history of China from the Opium War to 
the present. Analysis of political, economic, 
social, and intellectual changes stimulated by 
the intrusion of the modern West Special 
attention paid to ways in which Chinas quest 
for modernity has been shaped by the Chi- 
nese past. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Ocko 

280 (2) Imperialism, Nationalism, and 

Modernization 

1 

Varieties of European imperialism in the 19th 
and 20th centuries, particularly colonial rule 
and informal empire, and the different ways in 
which people of other world civilizations 
responded to the threat of industrial Europe. 
The colonial experience, the growth of nation- 
alist movements, and forms of modernization 
will be compared on the basis of examples 
drawn from Africa, the Middle East. Japan, 
and Southeast Asia. 
Prerequisite; same as for 200. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Hay 

300 (1) Historical Thinking and Its Problems 
1 

A study of the variety of approaches to history 
used by historians in the past and present. 
The relationship between the historical disci- 
pline and disciplines such as the social sci- 
ences and literature. Problems confronting 
the historian today: evidence, causation, 
generalization, value judgment, objectivity. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
who have taken two Grade II units of history, 
or by permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



Mrs. Robinson 



HISTORY 97 



301 (1) The Art of Biography 
1 

Exploration of the diverse ways of presenting 
biographical narrative and insights in prose, 
film, and other media; the utilization of 
sources on the individual and their integration 
with historical materials; the historiographi- 
cal problems of biography. 
Prerequisite: same as for 254. 

Mr. Gulick 

302 (2) Biography Workshop 
1 

Student biographical projects in prose, film, 
and other media, normally a continuation of 
projects begun in 301 . Group discussion. 
Prerequisite: 301 . 

Mr. Gulick 

305 (1) Europe's Traditional System of 
International Relations, 1780 to 1914 

1 

The nature of Europe's classical balance of 
power system and its subsequent modifica- 
tion through the French and industrial revolu- 
tions; the diplomacy of national unification 
and of imperialist expansion. Attention to 
Ottoman, Chinese, and African relations with 
Europe. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Gulick 

306 (2) Global International Relations 
1 

The emergence of untraditional, cataclysmic 
problems of weaponry, population, and envi- 
ronment superimposed on traditional, on- 
going problems of international relations. 
Attention equally divided among Europe, East 
Asia, the United States, and the Soviet Union. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Gulick 

309 (1) Intellectual History of Russia and 

the Soviet Union 

1 

Social and political thought in the 19th and 
20th centuries. A consideration of political 
and literary figures, both radical and conser- 
vative, including Dostoevsky, Lenin, and Sol- 
zhenitsyn. Emphasis is placed on the role of 
historical myths— such as Holy Russia and 
the chosen leader— in Russian and Soviet 
political ideology. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mrs. Tumarkin-Fosburg 



310 (1-2) Social History of the United States 
lor 2 

The development of American society in 
terms of changing family organizations, 
socioeconomic class structure, patterns of 
work and leisure time activities, industrializa- 
tion, urbanization, ethnic groups, and social 
and geographical mobility. First semester: 
Colonial period to 1850. Second semester: 
1 850 to 1 960. Either semester may be elected 
independently. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
two units of history or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Ms. Jones 

312 (2) Civil Liberties in the United States 
1 

The historical development of selected First 
Amendment freedoms with emphasis on the 
relationship between civil liberties and polit- 
ical and social movements. The historical 
context of contemporary issues such as polit- 
ical justice, civil disobedience in wartime, 
and student rights. 
Prerequisite: same as for 254. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Auerbach 

316(1) Historyof the West Indies 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 316. 

318 (1) Race and Conflict in Southern Africa 
1 

An exploration of the historical relationships 
between the European, African, and the Asian 
communities in South Africa in an attempt to 
shed light on the current situation. 
Prerequisite: one unit in African studies or 
permission of the instructor. 

Ms. Hay 

319(2) Pan-Africanism 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 319. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



98 HISTORY 



320 (1) Social History of American Law: The 
Formative Era 

1 

The modification of English law in the Anneri- 
can colonies, the impact of legal changes 
during the post-revolutionary period; the 
development of American law in the federal 
system, the growth of the legal profession, 
the role of the judiciary, the relationship of 
law and legal institutions to social and eco- 
nomic change before the Civil War. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

Mrs. Preyer 

321 (2) Social History of American Law: The 
l\/lodern Era 

1 

An examination of selected problems in 
American legal development since the Recon- 
struction era. Law will be viewed as a social 
institution, not as a transcendent abstraction. 
It will be considered as an instrument of, and 
deterrent to, social change, with special at- 
tention to the relation of law to liberty, the 
role of the legal profession, and modes of 
legal thought. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

Mr. Auerbach 

328 (2) Problems In Ancient History and 

Historiography 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Latin 
328. 

330(2) Seminar. Medieval/Early Modern 

Europe 

1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Kings, knaves, and jokers: 
studies in feudalism, kingship, and tyranny 
during the High Middle Ages, with special 
attention given to early western notions of 
political, religious, and personal freedom as 
reflected in medieval chronicles, biographies, 
correspondence, political treatises, and liter- 
ature. Examples will be drawn primarily from 
the history of England and France from the 
11th through the 14th centuries, but some 
material on medieval Germany, Italy, and 
Aragon will also be included. 
Open to qualified juniors and seniors by per- 
mission of the instructor (see Directions for 
Election). 

Mr. Cox 

331 (1) Seminar. European History 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



332(1) Seminar. English History 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: The "woman question" in 
Victorian England. A study of the literature 
about, and the struggles for, the emancipa- 
tion of women: personal, legal, educational, 
professional, political. The major source will 
be the periodical literature from the 1850's 
onward, with special attention to the many 
articles written, often anonymously, by 
women. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mrs. Robinson 

333(1) Seminar. European Intellectual 

History 

1 

Topic for 1 976-77: The Machiavellian Moment: 
historians and historical thought in 16th cen- 
tury Italy. Using readings primarily from 
Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and their critics, 
the course will examine the nature of histori- 
cal explanation, objectivity in history, the rela- 
tions of the historian to his sources and the 
legitimacy of generalization from historical 
data to political theory, both as they arose in 
16th century Italy and as contemporary prob- 
lems for the historian, social scientist, and 
philosopher. Same course as Philosophy 334. 
Prerequisite: at least one course in Philoso- 
phy and one in History. 

Mrs. Janik, Mr. Edwards 

335 (1) Seminar. American Studies 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: America as the promised 
land. An examination of selected texts drawn 
from various disciplines and historical eras 
which attempts to define the promise of the 
American experience and analyze the fulfill- 
ment or failure of that promise. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Auerbach 

336 (2) Seminar. American Urban History 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

337 (2) Seminar. American History I 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Reform in American his- 
tory. A comparison of the assumptions, 
goals, and methods of major American "re- 
formers," including common school reform- 
ers, abolitionists, temperance crusaders, 
"good government" advocates and muck- 
rakers, social settlement workers, and New 
Dealers. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Ms. Jones 



HISTORY 99 



338 (2) Seminar. American History II 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: The silent generation. The 
impact of the Cold War and McCarthyism on 
the values and lifestyles of young (and not so 
young) Americans. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mr. Auerbach 

339 (1) Seminar. American Jewish History 
1 

Ethnicity, assimilation and identity: American 
Jews as a case study. The development of 
American Jewish life and institutions since 
the era of mass immigration. Historical and 
literary evidence will guide explorations into 
the relationship between minority and major- 
ity cultures and the implications for group 
identity. Theories of assimilation and plural- 
ism will be considered within their social 
contexts. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Auerbach 

340 (2) Seminar. Afro-American History 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 340. 

342(2) Seminar. African History 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: African women and social 
change. European colonial rule brought about 
far-reaching changes in the lives of African 
women, changes which in many cases have 
been consciously accelerated under indepen- 
dent African governments. Readings and 
student papers will focus on the contrasts 
between the ways in which policy-makers 
(both European and African) have tried to 
change women's roles. Special attention will 
be given to the situation of women in the 
revolutionary societies of Tanzania and 
Mozambique. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Ms. Hay 

345(1) Seminar. Cfiinese History I 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Law and society in China- 
past and present. This seminar will examine 
the structure and functioning of China's legal 
system and the way in which the law mani- 
fests the values of both traditional and con- 
temporary China. Works to be read include 
early philosophical writings, legal cbdes, 
substantive cases, magistrates' handbooks, 
and detective stories. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mr. Ocko 



346(2) Seminar. Cfiinese History II 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: China in revolution. Fol- 
lowing an analysis of the major themes and 
historical controversy in 20th century Chinese 
history, the course will focus on such topics 
as intellectual origins, ideology, militariza- 
tion and national integration, countryside 
versus city, and cultural and social change. 
Throughout the course particular attention 
will be paid to the issue of external influ- 
ences. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mr. Ocko 

347 (2) Seminar. Comparative History 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Conservative political and 
social theory in England, France, and Ger- 
many, 1 789-1 91 4. Comparative analysis of 
historically significant patterns of conserva- 
tive and counter-revolutionary thought based 
on the study of a variety of primary sources. 
An attempt will be made to construct ideal- 
typical models of conservatism from counter- 
revolutionary traditionalists (Burke, Metter- 
nich), to counter-revolutionary modernists 
(Bismarck), to proto-fascist revolutionary 
conservatives (Moellervan den Bruck), linking 
these types to major intellectual currents 
surrounding the French Revolution, romanti- 
cism, the industrial revolution, Marxism, and 
anti-semitism. 
Prerequisite: same as for 330. 

Mr. Knudsen 

350 (1) (2) Researcfi or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



100 ITALIAN 



Directions for Election 



Italian 



A wide variety of programs may provide in- 
sight into ttie nature and scope of history as a 
discipline. Accordingly, the student majoring 
in history is given great latitude in designing a 
program of study. The student may elect 
courses freely, but should focus eventual'y 
upon a special field of interest, such as: (1 ) a 
particular geographic area, nation, or culture 
(2) a limited time period (3) a special aspect of 
history, e.g., social, diplomatic, intellectual 
(4) a significant historical problem or theme, 
e.g., revolution, urbanization, racism. In de- 
signing a program students are encouraged to 
consider courses given at MIT and in other 
departments at Wellesley. The concept of the 
major should be discussed with the major 
advisor, and students should consult with 
their advisors about changes they may wish 
to make in the course of the junior and senior 
years. 

The colloquia are available to freshmen and 
sophomores without prerequisite. Since col- 
loquia enrollments are limited, special appli- 
cation must be made. Incoming freshmen 
may obtain application forms from the class 
dean, sophomores from the Registrar's Of- 
fice, Green Hall. If a colloquium is oversub- 
scribed the instructor will decide which appli- 
cants are to be accepted. Students are ad- 
vised to apply for more than one, indicating 
first, second, and third choices if they wish. 

Seminars, unless otherwise indicated, are 
open by permission of the instructor to quali- 
fied juniors and seniors. Since enrollments 
are limited, a student wishing to apply for 
admission to one or more seminars must fill 
out an application blank, available in the de- 
partment office. Founders Hall 120. Notifica- 
tion of which applicants are to be accepted 
will be made no later than the announced date 
for course changes without fee in each 
semester. 

The general survey courses (1 00, 1 01 , 1 02, 
1 03) and Grade II survey courses in classical 
(230, 231 ), Asian (271 , 275, 276), African (267, 
268), and Middle Eastern (265) history are 
open to all students without prerequisite. In 
addition, freshmen and sophomores with a 
strong secondary school background in Euro- 
pean history (modern, and ancient, or medi- 
eval) may elect as a beginning course 232, 
233, 235, 236, 238, 239, 240, 242, 243. Cours- 
es at the Grade I level, however, are strongly 
recommended for students planning to major 
in history. 



Professor: 
Avitabile 

Assistant Professor: 
Ellerman (Chairman) 

Instructor: 
Mattii3 

All courses are conducted in Italian. In all 
courses except seminars some work may be 
required in the laboratory. 

Qualified students may be recommended to 
spend the junior year in Italy. See p. 39. 



100(1-2) Elementary Italian 
2 

Development of basic language skills for the 
purpose of acquiring contemporary spoken 
Italian and a reading knowledge useful in the 
study of other disciplines. A general view of 
Italian civilization. Three periods. 

The Staff 

202(1) Intermediate Italian 
1 

Readings from newspapers and periodicals 
on topics of contemporary interest such as 
the changing status of the Italian woman. 
Study of a contemporary novel in its historical 
context. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 100 or the equivalent. 

The Staff 

207 (2) Significant Moments of the Italian 
Literature of the Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance 
1 

An introduction to the Golden Age of Italian 
literature. Study and analysis of selected 
texts by authors such as Saint Francis of 
Assisi, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machia- 
velli, Castiglione, and Guicciardini. 
Prerequisite: 202. 

Mrs. Mattii 

208(1) Italian Romanticism 
1 

An introductory study of the poetry and prose 
of Foscolo, Leopardi, and Manzoni. 
Prerequisite: 207 or permission of the 
instructor. 



Ms. Avitabile 



ITALIAN 101 



245(2) Films and the Novel in Italy 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 245. 

301 (1-2) Dante 
2 

A study of Dante's Divina Commedia and 

minor works. 

Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Ms. Avitabile 

302(1)* The Theatre in Italy 
1 

The development of the theatre from its ori- 
gins to the present time. An introduction to 
the classical theatre, the Commedia dell'Arte, 
the Pastoral drama; special emphasis on the 
modern theatre. Study of plays by authors 
such as Poliziano, Machiavelli, Tasso, Goldo- 
ni, and Pirandello. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Mrs. Ellerman 

303 (1)* The Short Story in Italy through the 

Ages 

1 

A study of short stories by authors such as 
Boccaccio, Sacchetti, Bandello, Gozzi, 
Verga, Calvino, Ginzburg. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

308 (2) The Contemporary Novel 
1 

The study of Italian fiction since 1930 as seen 
in the works by authors such as Moravia, Vit- 
torini, Pavese, Calvino, Pratolini, and Scias- 
cia. Special emphasis on themes related to 
the literary, social, and cultural problems of 
the postwar era. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Mrs. Ellerman 

349 (2) Seminar. Literature and Society 
1 

The works of one or two writers studied in 
relation to their historical context. The au- 
thor(s) will be chosen according to the inter- 
ests of the participants in the course. 
Open by permission of the chairman. 

The Staff 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1or2 

Open by permission to students who have 
completed two units in literature in the de- 
partment. 



370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Course 1 00 is counted toward the degree but 
not toward the major. Course 245 may count 
toward the major as specified in the course 
description. 

Students majoring in Italian are advised to 
take 301 and 308. Courses in one or more 
other languages, ancient or modern, art, his- 
tory, and philosophy, are recommended as 
valuable related work. 

Majors planning to do graduate work in Italian 
are advised to take at least one unit in French 
or Spanish literature and to have a reading 
knowledge of Latin or of a third Romance 
language. 



102 MATHEMATICS 



Mathematics 



Professor: 

Schafer, Norvig (Chairman) 

Associate Professor: 
Wilcox* 

Assistant Professor: 

Sfehney, Shultz, Wason*, Shuchat, 

Roitman, Sontag, Wang 

Most courses meet for two periods weekly 
with a third period every other week. 



100 (1) (2) Introduction to Mathematical 
Thought 

1 

Topics chosen from areas such as strategies, 

computers, infinite sets, knots, coloring 

problems, number theory, geometry, group 

theory. 

Courses 1 00 and 1 02 are intended primarily as 

terminal courses; both may be elected. 

Open to all students. 

The Staff 

101 (1) Discovery Course in Elementary 
Mathematics and Its Applications 

1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 101 . 

102 (1)(2) Applications of Mathematics 
without Calculus 

1 

Introduction to topics such as probability and 
statistics, matrices and vectors, linear pro- 
gramming, graph theory; applications in the 
biological and social sciences. May involve 
use of the computer. Courses 100 and 102 are 
intended primarily as terminal courses; both 
may be elected. 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 

103 (1)(2) Techniques of Mathematics: 
Precalculus 

1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Experimental 103. 



115(1)(2) Calculus! 
1 

Introduction to differential and integral calcu- 
lus for functions of one variable. Differentia- 
tion and integration of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions with applications to 
curve sketching, extremal problems, veloci- 
ties, related rates, areas, and volumes. 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken [108] or [110]. 

The Staff 

116(1)(2) Calculus II 
1 

Theoretical basis of differentiation and inte- 
gration: limits, continuity, differentiability, 
Mean Value Theorem, linear approximation, 
integrability. Transcendental functions and 
theirapplications in greater depth than in 115. 
Further integration techniques. Sequences 
and series. 
Prerequisite: 115 or the equivalent. 

The Staff 

201 (1) Techniques of Intermediate Calculus 
1 

A nontheoretical development of topics of 
particular importance to students interested 
in applications of mathematics. Topics in- 
clude: functions of several variables, partial 
differentiation and multiple integration. Lin- 
ear algebra, matrices, linear equations, deter- 
minants. Ordinary differential equations, 
homogeneous and simple nonhomogeneous 
equations, numerical and power series solu- 
tions. Vector valued functions. Not to be 
counted toward the major in mathematics. 
Extradepartmental 216 is recommended as a 
sequel, particularly for majors in the physical 
sciences. 

Open to students who have taken [1 1 1 ] or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Shultz 

203 (2) Probability and Elementary 

Statistics 

1 

Topics selected from the theory of sets, dis- 
crete probability for both single and multi- 
variate random variables, probability density 
for a single continuous random variable, ex- 
pectations, mean, standard deviation, and 
sampling from a normal population. 
Prerequisite: [111] or 116 or the equivalent. 

Mr. Shuchat 



MATHEMATICS 103 



206(1) (2) Linear Algebra 
1 

Systems of linear equations, vector spaces 
over the real and complex fields, linear trans- 
formations, matrices, determinants. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Ms. Sontag 

207(1) Calculus III 
1 

Indeterminate forms, improper integrals and 

infinite series. Differentiation and integration 

of power series. Introduction to differential 

equations. 

Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Norvig 

208 (2) Calculus IV 
1 

Functions of several real variables. Partial 
differentiation. Multiple and iterated integra- 
tion. Line integration and Green's Theorem. 
Prerequisite: 207 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Norvig 

210(2) Differential Equations 
1 

An introductory course in ordinary differential 

equations. 

Prerequisite: 207 or 21 5. 

Ms. Wang 

215 (1) (2) Linear Algebra and Multivariable 
Calculus I 

1 

Vectors, matrices, determinants, curves, 
functions of several variables, partial deriva- 
tives, gradients, multiple integrals, first-order 
differential equations. Applications of differ- 
ential equations and functions of several vari- 
ables. 
Prerequisite: 116 or the equivalent. 

The Staff 

216 (2) Linear Algebra and Multivariable 
Calculus II 

1 

Vector spaces, including subspaces, inde- 
pendence, bases, dimension. Linear trans- 
formations, including range, null space, in- 
verses, representing matrices, eigenvalues. 
Vector-valued functions of a vector variable. 
Line integrals and Green's Theorem. 
Prerequisite: 215 or the equivalent. 

The Staff 



249 (1) Selected Topics 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Number theory. Introduc- 
tion to the theory of numbers and its history, 
including study of prime numbers, congru- 
ences, Diophantine equations, and geometric 
construction problems. Some elementary 
problems will be carried out on the computer. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Ms. Wang 

302 (1 -2) Elements of Analysis 
lor 2 

Point set theory; study of convergence, con- 
tinuity, differentiation and integration in finite 
dimensional Cartesian spaces. Topics chosen 
from Lebesque integration. Fourier series. 
One unit of credit may be given for the first 
semester. 
Prerequisite: 21 6 or both 207 and 208. 

Mr. Shuchat, Mr. Shultz 

305 (1-2) Modern Algebraic Theory 
lor 2 

Introduction to algebraic systems including 
groups, rings, integral domains, fields, ab- 
stract vector spaces. One unit of credit may 
be given for the first semester. 
Prerequisite: same as for 302. 

Ms. Schafer 

307 (2) Topology 
1 

An introduction to abstract point-set and 
algebraic topology. Topological spaces, com- 
pactness, connectedness, continuity. Topics 
taken from metric spaces, product spaces, 
separation axioms, convergence, homotopy 
theory, manifolds, and simplicial homology. 
Prerequisite: 302(1). 

Ms. Roitman 

309 (1)* Foundations of Mathematics 
1 

The set-theoretic foundations of modern 
mathematics. Cardinal and ordinal arithmetic. 
The axiom of choice and the continuum hy- 
pothesis. 

Prerequisite: 302 (1 ) or 305 (1 ) or permission 
of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



104 MATHEMATICS 



310 (2) Functions of a Complex Variable 
1 

Elementary functions and their mapping prop- 
erties; integration theory; series expansions 
of analytic functions. 
Prerequisite: 302(1). 

Ms. Sontag 

349 (2) Selected Topics 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
lor 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 

Required of honors candidates who choose to 
do honors research. 



Placement in Courses and Exemption 
Examination 



Students entering with AP scores of 4 or 5 on 
the AB Examination, or 3 on the BC Examina- 
tion of the GEEB are eligible for 11 6; those 
entering with AP scores of 4 or 5 on the BC 
Examination of the CEEB are eligible for 215. 

Examinations for exemption from one or two 
courses in mathematics to satisfy partially 
the college requirement in science and mathe- 
matics will be offered to students who have 
been well prepared in the subject matter of 

1 1 5 and 116. If students pass both 1 1 5 and 

116 examinations, they will receive exemption 
from two units in mathematics; if they should 
pass the 115 examination only, they will re- 
ceive exemption from one unit in mathemat- 
ics. Exemption examinations are not offered 
for 100 and 102. 



Directions for Election 



A major in mathematics must include the first 
semester of 302 and of 305, and either the 
second semester of 302 or 31 0. Units of AP 
credits will not be counted toward the mini- 
mum of eight units required of majors. Stu- 
dents planning to elect both units of either 
302 or 305 should take both units in the same 
year. 

Courses 1 00 and 1 02 may not be counted to- 
ward the major. The department also offers 
Introduction to the Uses of Mathematics, 
Experimental 1 01 , and Techniques of Mathe- 
matics, Experimental 103, which is described 
on p. 143. 

Students expecting to do graduate work in 
mathematics should elect the second semes- 
ter of 302 and of 305, 31 0, and 349. They are 
also advised to acquire a reading knowledge 
of one or more of the following languages: 
French, German, or Russian. 

Students who expect to teach at the secon- 
dary school level are advised to elect the sec- 
ond semester of 302 or a course in geometry, 
and 310. 

Majors who may be practice teaching in their 
senior year should elect 302 (1-2) or 302 (1 ) 
and 310 (2) not later than their junior year. 
Students are encouraged to elect MIT courses 
which are not offered by the Wellesley Col- 
lege mathematics department. 



MUSIC 105 



Music 



Professor: 

Herrmann (Chairnnan), Jander 

Associate Professor: 
Barry 

Assistant Professor: 
Kelly*, Shapiro, Proctor 

Lecturer: 

Cooke3. Fisk3, AarsefS, Carroll^, 

Tolkoff^ 

Instructor in Performing Music: 
Goetze (piano), Taylor (organ), Pappoutsakis 
(hiarp), Preble (flute), O'Donnell (voice), Odi- 
aga (hiarpsichord), Plaster (bassoon and As- 
sistant in Chamber Music), Hartzell (viola da 
gamba and Assistant in the Collegium Musi- 
cum), Linfield (recorder, krummhorn, and 
Assistant in the Collegium Musicum), 
R. Cook (trumpet and cornetto), K. Roth 
(oboe and baroque oboe), Cirillo (violin and 
Director of Chamber Music), Arnold (guitar), 
Fisk (piano), N. Roth (baroque flute), Zaret- 
sky (viola), Hadcock (clarinet), Moerschel 
(cello) 



100(1) (2) Style in Music 
1 

Representative works from eight periods of 
unusual interest in the history of western 
music (e.g., Paris at the time of Debussy and 
Stravinsky; J. S. Bach; the European discov- 
ery of ragtime, blues and jazz in the 1920's; 
the variety of uses of electronic techniques in 
our time; Vienna in the age of Mozart, Schu- 
bert, and Beethoven), chosen to teach the ear 
the essential characteristics of musical style. 
Not to be counted toward the major. Two 
lectures and one section meeting. Open to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have 
not taken more than one unit in music, and to 
freshmen with the permission of the chair- 
man. 

Mr. Jander, Mrs. Shapiro 



101(1-2) Introductory Course 
1 or 2 

The fundamentals of musicianship. Develop- 
ment of reading and listening skills. Introduc- 
tion to traditional harmony. One unit of credit 
may be given for the first semester. Three 
periods: one lecture and two section meet- 
ings. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Barry, Mr. Fisk 

106(2) Afro-American Music 
1 

A survey of Black music in America, its 
origins, its development, and its relation to 
cultural and social conditions. Not to be 
counted toward the major in music. 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken [107]. 

Mr. Carroll 

151 (1) Freshman Seminar. Music In 

Performance 

1 

A course for freshmen with a strong back- 
ground in theory and performance, designed 
to increase their awareness of interpretive and 
stylistic problems through a study of selected 
works observed in live performance. Works 
studied will be chosen to take advantage of 
the rich cultural offerings of the Boston- 
Cambridge area. 

Open only to freshmen who have exempted 
the first semester of 1 01 . 

Mr. Jander 

200 (1)(2) Design in Music 
2 

A survey beginning with Gregorian chant and 
concluding with electronic music, with em- 
phasis on live performance and on the incisive 
analysis of scores. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mrs. Shapiro 

203(1-2) Counterpoint 
2 

Two- and three-part writing. Analysis. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Cooke 

208 (1)* The Baroque Era 
1 

Studies in the music of the 17th and early 18th 
centuries with emphasis on the works of Bach 
and Handel. Not to be counted toward the 
major in music. 
Prerequisite: 100, 101 (1), or[103]. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



106 MUSIC 



209(1)* The Classical Era 
1 

The development of the principal instrumental 
forms of the period: concerto, sonata, string 
quartet, and symphony, with emphasis on 
works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Not 
to be counted toward the major in music. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Miss Barry 

210 (2)* The Romantic Era 
1 

Main currents in 19th century music: the in- 
fluence of Beethoven; short lyric forms; the 
music drama. Not to be counted toward the 
major in music. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Mr. Jander 

214 (2)* The Twentieth Century 
1 

An introduction to contemporary music. Not 
to be counted toward the major in music. 
Prerequisite: same as for 208. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

240(2) Proseminar in Performance 
1 

Studies in performance and interpretation. 
Exploration of available repertory, editorial 
problems, and questions of performance 
practice in several historical periods through 
the performance and analysis of a few repre- 
sentative works. The study of a common rep- 
ertory, shared by the entire class, will be sup- 
plemented by individual projects relating 
directly to the student's own performance 
interests and needs. Limited enrollment. 
Open by consultation and informal audition 
with the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Music 101 . 

Mr. Fisk 

303 (2) The Middle Ages and the 

Renaissance 

1 

Topic for 1 976-77. To be announced. 
Prerequisite: 200. 

307 (2) The Opera 
1 

A study of operatic forms, styles, and tradi- 
tions from the time of Mozart to the present. 
Prerequisite: two Grade II units in the liter- 
ature of music. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



312(1-2) Harmony 
2 

The figured bass. Harmonization of melodies. 
Analysis. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 203. 

Mrs. Proctor 

316 (1-2) Introduction to Composition 
2 

Advanced studies in theory. The principles of 
instrumentation. Composition for small en- 
sembles. 
Prerequisite: 312 and 320. 

Mrs. Proctor 

319 (1)* Seminar. The Nineteenth Century 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: The many facets of Roman- 
ticism as found in the music of Beethoven, 
Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz, Brahms, and 
Mahler. 

Open to students who have taken 200 and who 
have taken or are taking 31 2. 

Miss Barry 

320 (1) Seminar. The Twentieth Century 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Studies in forms and tech- 
niques in the music of Stravinsky, Hindemith, 
Bartdk, and Carter. 
Prerequisite: same as for 303. 

Mr. Cooke 

321(1) Seminar. The Age of Bach and 

Handel 

1 

Normally a different topic each year. 
Prerequisite: same as for 319. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

322 (2) Seminar. The Classical Era 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Haydn's last period, with 
special emphasis on the London Symphon- 
ies, the late Masses, and The Creation. 
Prerequisite: same as for 319. 

Mr. Herrmann 

344(1) (2) Performing Music 
lor 2 

Intensive study of interpretation and of ad- 
vanced technical performance problems in the; 
literature. One hour lesson per week. 
Open to qualified juniors and seniors who 
have taken 200 and who meet the qualifica- 
tions described in the Directions for Election. > 

The Staff 



MUSIC 107 



350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1or2 

Directed study in theory, orchestration, com- 
position, or the history of music. 
Open to qualified juniors and seniors by 
permission. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



A major in music includes 101 , 200, 203, and 
31 2. At least two units of additional study at 
the Grade III level are strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to undertake graduate 
study in music should be aware that a knowl- 
edge of both German and French is essential 
for work at that level, and a proficiency in Ital- 
ian is highly desirable. Also of value are stud- 
ies in European history, literature, and art. 

Music majors are especially urged to develop 
their musicianship through the acquisition of 
basic keyboard skills, through private instruc- 
tion in practical music, and through involve- 
ment in the music department's various per- 
forming organizations. 

Training in sight reading, keyboard harmony, 
and score reduction is provided without 
charge to all students enrolled in Music 203 
and 31 2. 



Performing Music 



Private Instruction 

The music department makes arrangements 
for private instruction in voice, piano, organ, 
harpsichord, harp, violin (baroque and mod- 
ern), viola, cello, viola da gamba, flute (ba- 
roque and modern), oboe (baroque and mod- 
ern), clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, French horn, 
recorder, cornetto, lute, and guitar (classical 
and modern). 

Students who contract for performing music 
instruction are charged at the rate of $224 for 
a half-hour private lesson per week through- 
out the year. An additional fee of $25 per year 



is charged to all performing music students 
for the use of a practice studio for one period 
daily. The fee for the use of a practice studio 
for harpsichord and organ is $35. Performing 
music fees are payable in advance and can be 
returned or reduced only under limited con- 
ditions and upon the approval of the chairman 
of the Department of Music. 

All students at Wellesley who take lessons in 
performing music are required to take the first 
semester of Music 1 01 (basic theory) or gain 
exemption. 

Arrangements for lessons in performing mu- 
sic are made at the department office during 
the first week of the semester. 

Academic Credit 

One to four units of 344 may be counted to- 
ward the degree provided at least two units of 
Grade III work in the literature of music are 
completed. Music 344 should ordinarily fol- 
low or be concurrent with such courses in the 
literature of music; not more than one unit 
may be elected in advance of election of 
Grade ill work in the literature. Only one unit 
of 344 may be elected per term. 

Permission to elect the first unit of 344 is 
granted only after the student has success- 
fully auditioned for the department faculty 
upon the written recommendation of the in- 
structor in performing music. This audition 
ordinarily takes place early in the second 
semester of the sophomore or junior year. 
Permission to elect subsequent units is 
granted only to a student whose progress in 
344 is judged excellent. 

Performing Organizations 

The following five organizations are a vital 
extension of the academic program of the 
Wellesley music department: 

The Wellesley College Choir 

The Wellesley College Choir, with approxi- 
mately 80 members, gives concerts on and off 
campus during the academic year, many of 
them with men's choirs. Endowed funds pro- 
vide for at least one joint concert each year 
accompanied by a professional orchestra. 

The Wellesley Madrigal Singers 

The Madrigal Singers are a chamber chorus of 
about twenty-five mixed voices. The organiza- 
tion elects its own student director. 

The Chamber Music Society 

The Chamber Music Society, supervised by a 
faculty member and assistants, presents 
three concerts each year, plus a number of 
diverse, informal programs. 



108 PHILOSOPHY 



The Collegium Musicum 

The Collegium Musicum, directed by a faculty 
member and several assistants, specializes in 
the performance of early music. Members of 
the Collegium enjoy the use of an unusually 
fine collection of historical instruments: harp- 
sichords, recorders, krummhorns, violas da 
gamba, baroque violins, baroque and renais- 
sance flutes, baroque oboe, cornetto, sack- 
but, and lute. 

Separate consort instruction is available in 
viola da gamba and recorder for both begin- 
ning and advanced players. Members of such 
groups are encouraged to take private instruc- 
tions as well. 

The MIT Orchestra 

Through the Wellesley-MIT cross-registration 
program students on the Wellesley campus 
are eligible to audition for membership in the 
MIT Symphony Orchestra. Wellesley mem- 
bers of the orchestra have often held solo 
positions. 



Philosophy 



Professor: 
Stadler (Chairman) 

Associate Professor: 
Putnam, Congleton* 

Assistant Professor: 
Menkiti, Janik 

Instructor: 
FosterS 

Visiting Professor: 
Stavrides 



101 (1) (2) Plato's Dialogues as an 

Introduction to Philosophy 

1 

An introduction to philosophy through a 
study of Plato's views of the nature of man 
and society, and of the nature of philosophi- 
cal inquiry as found in the early and middle 
dialogues taking Socrates as their central 
concern. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Stavrides 



106 (1) (2) Introduction to Moral Philosophy 
1 

An examination of the methods by which 
intelligent moral decisions are made through 
an examination of the views of several major 
figures in the history of moral philosophy. An 
attempt to develop the capacity to recognize 
and critically analyze philosophical argu- 
ments pertinent to the resolution of concrete 
contemporary issues. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Foster 



PHILOSOPHY 109 



150(1) Colloquium 
1 

For directions for applying see p. 44. 
Open by permission to a limited number of 
freshman and sophiomore applicants. 

(1) 

Fact, fiction, and philosophy 

Scientists, story tellers, and philosophers 
view the world from different perspectives. 
They seem to see different worlds and use 
different modes of expression to communi- 
cate what they see. In this colloquium stu- 
dents will explore these different approaches. 
Appreciation of the value of these diverse 
points of view and modes of expression will 
be encouraged. 

Mrs. Putnam 

200 (1) (2) Modern Sources of 
Contemporary Philosophy 
1 

A study of the work of Descartes, Hume, and 
Kant. The course is intended to introduce 
students to the most influential philosophers 
of modern times. Key concepts, terms, and 
arguments used by philosophers from the 
1 7th century to the present day will be dis- 
cussed. The course also provides preparation 
for more advanced work both in contemporary 
philosophy and in the history of modern phi- 
losophy. 

Open to all students except freshmen in the 
first semester. 

Mrs. Janik 

202(2)**** Introduction to African 

Philosophy 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 202. Course alternates with Black 
Studies 211. 

Mr. Menkiti 

203(1) (2) Philosophy of Art 
1 

An examination of some major theories of art 
and art criticism. Emphasis on the clarifica- 
tion of such key concepts as style, meaning, 
and truth, and on the nature of judgments and 
arguments about artistic beauty and excel- 
lence. 

Open to freshmen who have taken one unit in 
philosophy, and to sophomores, juniors, and 
seniors without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Stadler 



204 (2) Philosophy of Language 
1 

An investigation of man as the unique user of 
language. The relationship of language ca- 
pacity to rationality and morality will also be 
considered. Readings for the first half of the 
course will include Whorf , Skinner, Chomsky, 
Piaget, and Vygotsky; for the second half, 
Wittgenstein. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Stadler 

206 (1) Selected Problems in Moral 

Philosophy 

1 

Focus on a clarification of the nature of jus- 
tice and of moral responsibility as discussed 
by major modern and contemporary philoso- 
phers. Application to current problems. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Menkiti 

211 (2)* Philosophy of Religion 
1 

An examination of basic problems regarding 
the nature of religion, the grounds of religious 
belief, and the character of ritual, with atten- 
tion to both traditional and contemporary 
positions. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Menkiti 

215 (1)* Consciousness, Ideology and 
Knowledge 

1 

What factors influence the formation of an 
individual's beliefs? Theses in the sociology 
of knowledge. Readings in Marx, Weber, 
Mannheim, and others. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Putnam 

216 (1) Logic 
1 

An introduction to the methods of symbolic 
logic and their application to arguments in 
ordinary English. Discussion of validity, im- 
plication, consistency, proof, and of such 
topics as the thesis of extensionality and the 
nature of mathematical truth. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, 
and to freshmen by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Mrs. Putnam 



110 PHILOSOPHY 



21 7 (2) Philosophy of Science 
1 

A course for both science and nonscience 
nnajors to increase understanding and appre- 
ciation of scientific knowledge and the meth- 
ods of scientists. An examination of concepts 
which philosophers of science have found to 
be particularly interesting, e.g., explanation, 
law, theory construction, experiment and 
observation, truth. Examples from the history 
of science and contemporary science, drawn 
from both the "hard" and the "soft" sciences. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Putnam 

218(1) History of Science! 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 218. 

219(2) History of Science 11 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 219. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

220 (1) History of Modern Philosophy from 
the Renaissance to Kant 

1 

Examination of the origins and development 
of modern philosophy, with emphasis on the 
Renaissance rediscovery of the Classics, the 
rise of skepticism, the influence of scientific 
thought on philosophy, and the thought of 
the French Enlightenment. The social and 
cultural context of philosophical change will 
be used to illuminate a series of specific 
texts. Writers to be discussed will include 
Montaigne, Bacon, Pascal, Locke, Leibniz, 
and Diderot. 

Prerequisite: 200 or other previous study of 
Descartes, Hume, and Kant accepted by the 
instructor as equivalent. 

Mrs. Janik 

221 (2) History of Modern Philosophy from 
Kant to the Early Twentieth Century 

1 

A continuation of Philosophy 220 through the 
study of Mill, Comte, Hegel, Marx, Schopen- 
hauer, and Nietzsche. 
Prerequisite: 220. 

Mrs. Janik 



249(1) Medical Ethics 
1 

A philosophical examination of some central 
problems at the interface between medicine 
and ethics. Exploration of the social and ethi- 
cal implications of current advances in bio- 
medical research and technology. Topics 
discussed will include psycho-surgery, gen- 
der-surgery, genetic screening, amniocen- 
tesis, euthanasia. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Menkiti 

311(2) Aristotle 
1 

Intensive study of the thought of Aristotle 
through detailed reading of selected works. 
Aristotle's Metaphysics, Physics, DeAnima, 
and Posterior Analytics are the texts to which 
most attention will be devoted. 
Prerequisite: 101 or other study of Plato ac- 
cepted as equivalent by instructor. 

Mrs. Janik 

326 (2) Philosophy of Law 
1 

A systematic consideration of fundamental 
issues in the conception and practice of law. 
Such recurrent themes in legal theory as the 
nature and function of law, the relation of law 
to morality, the function of rules in legal rea- 
soning, and the connection between law and 
social policy. Clarification of such notions as 
obligation, power, contract, liability, and 
sovereignty. Readings will cover the natural 
law tradition and the tradition of legal posi- 
tivism, as well as such contemporary writers 
as Hart and Fuller. 

Open to qualified juniors and seniors, or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Menkiti 

327 (2) Seminar. Ideas of Progress 
1 

The aim is to discover what exactly is at issue 
in discussions of the debts which the arts, 
sciences, and philosophies of the 20th cen- 
tury owe to their respective historical ante- 
cedents. The seminar will examine texts in 
the history of art, science, and philosophy 
with a view to clarifying the measure of agree- 
ment between different answers to the ques- 
tions of what progress is and how it is to be 
assessed. Readings will include Gombrich, 
Lakatos, and Collingwood. Offered jointly 
with MIT 21. 751. 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mrs. Stadler, Mr. Kibel (MIT) 



PHILOSOPHY 111 



328 (1) Problems in Twentieth Century Art 

and Philosophy 

1 

Twelve major painters of the last 1 00 years, 
from Manet to Olitski, will be studied. Equal 
emphasis will be given to their stylistic devel- 
opment through a close study of individual 
paintings and to the critical issues raised by 
their work especially as these issues relate to 
the history of Modernist thought. Readings 
will include writings of the artists themselves, 
as well as relevant critical and philosophical 
texts. Offered jointly with MIT 21 .753. 
Open by permission of the instructors. 

Mrs. Stadler, Mr. Ablow (MIT) 

333(1) Existential Philosophy and 

Phenomenology 

1 

Central themes in contemporary European 
philosophy with special emphasis on the 
contributions of Soren Kierkegaard, Edmund 
Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and Jean-Paul 
Sartre. 
Prerequisite: 200. 

Mrs. Stavrides 

334 (1) The Machiavellian Moment: 
Historians and Historical Thought in 
Sixteenth Century Italy 
1 

Using readings primarily from Machiavelli, 
Guicciardini and their critics, the course will 
examine the nature of historical explanation, 
objectivity in history, the relations of the his- 
torian to his sources and the legitimacy of 
generalization from historical data to political 
theory, both as they arose in 16th century 
Italy and as contemporary problems for the 
historian, social scientist, and philosopher. 
Same course as History 333. 
Prerequisite: at least one course in Philoso- 
phy and one in History. 

Mrs. Janik, Mr. Edwards 

338(2) Equality 
1 

A systematic philosophical examination of an 
ambiguous social ideal. Critique of traditional 
attempts to distinguish legal, political and 
economic equality. Clarification of new ques- 
tions raised by current controversies regard- 
ing racial and sexual equality as well as by the 
notion of equality of opportunity. The seminar 
is intended to elucidate the concept(s) of 
equality; to subject arguments for and 
against it to critical scrutiny, and to reveal 
how equality relates to other moral and social 
ideals. Prerequisite: at least one course in 
moral or social philosophy or in political 
theory, or consent of the instructor. 

Mrs. Putnam 



350(1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 

370 (1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Philosophy majors are expected to elect 
courses in at least two of the following fields: 

(1 ) logic or the philosophy of science (2) his- 
tory of philosophy, ancient or modern (3) val- 
ue theory, i.e., moral or political philosophy, 
or the philosophy of art. Students planning 
graduate work in philosophy are strongly ad- 
vised to elect courses in all three fields, and, 
in particular, in logic. 

In addition, students majoring in philosophy 
should develop a special competence either in 
the work of one major philosopher or in one 
problem of contemporary concern. Such com- 
petence may be demonstrated by passing a 
course on the Grade 111 level with an honors 
grade, by 350 work, or by submitting a sub- 
stantial paper. Special arrangements can be 
made for students with strong interdepart- 
mental interests. 

A knowledge of Greek, French, or German is 
desirable. Students planning graduate work in 
philosophy should acquire a reading knowl- 
edge of two of these languages. 

The department offers the following options 
for earning honors in the major field: (1 ) writ- 
ing a thesis or a set of related essays (2) a 
two-semester project which replaces the the- 
sis with some of the activities of a teaching 
assistant (3) a program designed particularly 
for students who have a general competence 
and who wish to improve their grasp of their 
major field by independent study in various 
sectors of the field. A student electing option 

(2) will decide, in consultation with the de- 
partment, in which course she will eventually 
assist and, in the term preceding her teach- 
ing, will meet with the instructor to discuss 
materials pertinent to the course. Option (3) 
involves selecting at least two related areas 
and one special topic for independent study. 
When the student is ready, she will take writ- 
ten examinations in her two areas and, at the 
end of the second term, an oral examination 
focusing on her special topic. 



1 1 2 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Physical 
Education 



Associate Professor: 
Vaughan (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: 

Cocinran, Trexler, Burling, Batchelder, 

Wiencke 

Instructor: 

Brown, Earle, Robinson, Allen^, 

LaPeer3 



121 (1-2) Physical Education Activities 

The instructional program in physical educa- 
tion is divided into four seasons, two each 
semester. To complete the College work in 
physical education a student must earn 8 
credit points by the end of the junior year. 
These credit points do not count as academic 
units toward the degree, but are required for 
graduation. Most activities give 2 credit 
points each season, but certain activities give 
3 or more credit points. Each activity is divid- 
ed into skill levels to provide instruction in 
homogeneous groups. Special fees are 
charged for a few courses and are listed in the 
course descriptions. More detailed informa- 
tion on specific course offerings, skill levels, 
prerequisites, and numbers of points may be 
found in the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion curriculum handbook which is sent to 
entering students and is distributed to each 
student prior to registration. The total pro- 
gram of activities offered in 1976-77 in very 
general terms follows below. 



235 (2) Contemporary Approaches to Dance 

Composition: Practice and Theory 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 235. 

(1) 

Scheduled throughout the first semester 

Advanced Life Saving and 

Aquatic Safety 
Dance 
First Aid 
Gymnastics 
Self Defense 
Swimming 

Season 1 . Scheduled in first half of first 
semester 

Archery 

Canoeing 

Crew 

Dance 

Golf 

Hiking and Outdoor Study 

Horseback Riding 

Individual Exercise Activities 

Mask, Fin and Snorkel 

Sailing 

Swimming 

Tennis 

Volleyball 

Water Safety Instructor Review 

Season 2. Scheduled in second half of first 
semester 

Badminton 

Dance 

Diving 

Fencing 

First Aid 

Gymnastics 

Horseback Riding 

Human Performance: Physio- 
logical Perspectives and 
Psychological Perspectives 

Individual Exercise Activities 

Scuba Diving 

Seminar. Sport in Society 

Squash 

Swimming 

Trampoline 

Volleyball 

Yoga 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 113 



(2) 

Scheduled throughout the second semester 

Dance 

Gymnastics 

Self Defense 

Swimming 

Water Safety Instructor 

Yoga 

Season 3. Scheduled in first half of second 
semester 

Badminton 

Cross Country Skiing 

Dance 

Downhill Skiing 

Fencing 

Gymnastics 

Individual Exercise Activities 

Mask, Fin and Snorkel 

Squash 

Trampoline 

Volleyball 

Season 4. Scheduled in second half of second 
semester 

Archery 
Canoeing 
Crew 
Dance 
First Aid 
Golf 

Hiking and Outdoor Study 
Horseback Riding 
Human Performance: Physio- 
logical Perspective 
Individual Exercise Activities 
Sailing 
Scuba Diving 
Seminar. Sport in Society 
Swimming 
Tennis 
Volleyball 
Water Safety Instructor 

Intercollegiate Program 

There are opportunities for those who enjoy 
competition to participate on one of the inter- 
collegiate teams presently sponsored by the 
department and the Sports Association. 

These teams include: 

Basketball 

Crew 

Fencing 

Field Hockey 

Lacrosse 

Sailing 

Squash 

Swimming and Diving 

Tennis 

Volleyball 

Water Polo 



Directions for Election 



Each student is expected to complete a mini- 
mum of two seasons a year until Physical 
Education 121 is completed. A student may 
elect a course which is scheduled throughout 
a semester, two courses concurrently, or may 
choose not to elect a course during some 
seasons. 

Students should select courses which meet 
their present and projected interests in physi- 
cal activities. It is hoped that students will 
gain knowledge of the relation of physical 
activity to the maintenance of general well- 
being; that they will achieve a level of ability, 
understanding, and participation in sports, 
dance, and/or exercise so that they may ex- 
perience satisfaction and enjoyment; and that 
they will be able to swim with sufficient skill 
to participate safely in recreational swimming 
and boating. 

A student's choice of activity is subject to the 
approval of the department and the College 
Health Services. Upon recommendation of a 
College physician and permission of the de- 
partment, a student may enroll in a modified 
program. 

Students may continue to enroll in physical 
education after Physical Education 121 is 
completed. Members of the faculty may elect 
activities with the permission of the depart- 
ment. 



114 PHYSICS 



Physics 



Professor: 

Guernsey (Chairman), Fleming 

Associate Professor: 
Brown 

Assistant Professor: 

von Foerster, Papaefthymiou3 

Laboratory Instructor: 
Benson3, Byleckie^ 

Unless otherwise noted all courses meet for 
two periods of lecture and discussion weekly 
and all Grade I and Grade II courses have one 
three-hour laboratory appointment weekly. 



101 (2) Physics in Perspective 
1 

Qualitative discussion of the evolution of 
physics from classical to modern concepts 
with emphasis on 20th century physics. Lab- 
oratory in alternate weeks. Not to be counted 
toward the minimum major, orto fulfill en- 
trance requirement for medical school. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Fleming 

102 (2)* Physics of Perception and 
Aesthetics 

1 

Qualitative discussion of some of the physi- 
cal problems arising in psychology, art, and 
music. Each student will write a final paper 
applying physical principles to a particular 
field of interest. Laboratory in alternate 
weeks. Not to be counted toward the mini- 
mum major, or to fulfill entrance requirement 
for medical school. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. von Foerster 



103(2)* Energy 
1 

Qualitative and, at times, quantitative discus- 
sion of the role of energy in physical systems: 
discussion of the various forms of energy, of 
their relationships, and of the transformation 
of one form into another; general physical 
principles and applications to technology, as 
well as to other sciences. Each student will 
write a final paper applying the physical prin- 
ciples to a particular field of interest. Labora- 
tory in alternate weeks. Not to be counted 
toward the minimum major, orto fulfill en- 
trance requirement for medical school. 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken Chemistry 102, spring 1975. A knowl- 
edge of high school algebra and trigonometry 
is assumed. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. von Foerster 

104(1) Basic Concepts in Physics 
1 

Forces, fields, conservation laws, waves, 
duality of nature. Two periods weekly with a 
third period every other week. Three and one- 
half hour laboratory appointments in alternate 
weeks. Not open to students who have taken 
[100]. 

Open to all students who do not offer physics 
for admission and by permission of the in- 
structor to juniors and seniors who offer 
physics for admission. 

Miss Fleming 

105 (1) General Physics I 
1 

Elementary mechanics; introduction to wave 
phenomena. Not open to students who have 
taken [103]. 

Open to students who offer physics for ad- 
mission and who are not eligible for 110. 

Mr. von Foerster 

106(1) (2) General Physics II 
1 

Electricity and magnetism; wave phenomena 
and optics. Biological examples. Two periods 
weekly with a third period every other week. 
Prerequisite: [1 00] or [1 03] or 1 04 or 1 05 and 
Mathematics 115 or [108] or [110], or open by 
permission to juniors and seniors who offer 
physics for admission. 

Ms. Papaefthymiou, Ms. Brown 



PHYSICS 115 



110 (1) Advanced General Physics 
1 

Mechanics, wave motion, optics. Two periods 
weekly with a third period every other week. 
Open to students who offer physics for ad- 
mission and have completed Mathematics 
115; or by permission of the instructor to 
students who offer no physics and who have 
completed Mathematics 11 6 or [111]. 

Mrs. Guernsey 

200(2) Modern Physics 
1 

Basic principles of relativity and quantum 
theory, and of atomic and nuclear structure. 
Prerequisite: 106 or 110 and Mathematics 115 
or[111]. 

Miss Fleming 

201 (2) Electricity and Magnetism 

1 

Fundamental laws of electric and magnetic 
fields; electric circuits; electric and magnetic 
properties of matter. Laboratory includes 
practice in the use of the oscilloscope and 
other measuring instruments. 
Prerequisite: 106 or 110, and Mathematics 116 
or[111]. 

Mrs. Guernsey 

202(1) Optical Physics 
1 

Wave theory as applied to optical phenomena. 
Interference, diffraction, coherence, polariza- 
tion, dispersion, resolution. Introduction to 
modern optics including lasers and holog- 
raphy. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Ms. Brown 

206(2)* Electronics 
1 

Fundamental principles of electron tubes and 
transistors; application to power supplies, 
amplifiers, oscillators, modulators. Intro- 
duction to integrated circuits. 
Prerequisite: 201 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Guernsey, Ms. Brown 

216(2) Mathematics for the Physical 

Sciences 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 216. 



249 (1)* Selected Topics 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. Students 
will present papers on topics of interest to 
them. 

Prerequisite: 200 and 216 or Mathematics 206 
or the equivalent, or permission of the in- 
structor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. von Foerster 

305 (2)* Thermodynamics 
1 

The laws of thermodynamics; kinetic theory 
of gases; statistical mechanics. 
Prerequisite: 106 or 110, and one Grade II 
course; 216 or Mathematics 201 or 215 or 208. 

Ms. Brown 

306(1) Mechanics 
1 

A vector analytical presentation of Newtonian 
mechanics. Two periods weekly with a third 
period every other week. 
Prerequisite: 201 or 202; 216; or permission of 
the instructor. 

Mr. von Foerster 

31 4 (2) Electromagnetic Theory 
1 

Maxwell's equations, boundary value prob- 
lems, special relativity, electromagnetic 
waves, and radiation. 

Prerequisite: 201 and 306 and 216 or Mathe- 
matics 215 or 208. 

Ms. Papaefthymiou 

321 (1) Quantum Mechanics 
1 

Interpretative postulates of quantum mechan- 
ics; solutions to the Schroedinger equation; 
operator theory; perturbation theory; scatter- 
ing; matrices. 

Prerequisite: 216 or Mathematics 210. 
In addition, one unit of Grade II physics, or 
permission of the instructor. 306 is recom- 
mended. 

Ms. Brown 

349 (1) Selected Topics 
1 

Topics from Mathematical Physics; in 1976-77 
these will include General Relativity, nonrela- 
tivistic Quantum Field Theory, as well as 
other topics from Quantum Theory. 
Prerequisite: 321 or permission of the 
instructor. 



Mr. von Foerster 



116 POUTICAL SCIENCE 



350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
lor 2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
depart nnent. 



Directions for Election 



Credit will be given for only one of the follow- 
ing courses: [100], [103], 104, 105, 110. 

A major in physics should ordinarily include 
201 , 202, 306, 314, and 321 . Extradepartmen- 
tal 216 or Mathematics 216 or 208 is an addi- 
tional requirement. One unit of another lab- 
oratory science is recommended. 

A reading knowledge of two of the following 
languages is desirable for students planning 
to attend graduate school: French, German, 
Russian. 



Political 
Science 



Exemption Examination 



An examination for exemption from Physics 
1 1 is offered to students who present one 
admission unit in physics. Students who pass 
this examination will be eligible for Grade II 
work in physics. No unit of credit will be given 
for passing this examination. 



Professor: 

Evans, Miller*, Schechter 

Associate Professor: 
Stettner (Chairman), Just 

Assistant Professor: 
Sullivan, Grindle, Paarlberg 

Instructor: 
AbramsonS, McGeary3 

Visiting Professor: 
Crespi-Reghizzi3 



101 (1)(2) Introduction to Politics 
1 

Study of political conflict and consensus, or 
"who gets what, when, and how." Topics 
include ways in which political systems deal 
with problems of leadership, economic devel- 
opment, social and racial inequality. Compar- 
ison of democratic and authoritarian systems, 
including the United States, Great Britain, 
Nazi Germany, and the People's Republic of 
China. Emphasis on the relationship between 
political thought, institutions, and policy 
problems. Readings from Rousseau, Madi- 
son, Mill, Hitler, Marx, Lenin, and Mao as 
well as contemporary political analysts. 
Strongly recommended for all further work in 
political science. 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 117 



Comparative Politics 

204 (1) Comparative Politics of the 
Developing Areas 

1 

Study of selected aspects of African, Asian, 
and Latin American political systems, with 
emphasis upon use and evaluation of analyti- 
cal concepts in recent literature; political 
change, national integration, and legitimiza- 
tion among problems considered. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science or 
European history; open to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mr. Sullivan 

205 (1) Politics of Western Europe 
1 

A comparative study of democratic politics in 
western Europe. The course will focus on 
political development in Great Britain, 
France, and Germany and will examine the 
role of political culture, parties, interest 
groups, and leaders in the political process. 
Contemporary problems in civil rights, eco- 
nomics, and European integration will be 
explored. 

Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science or 
European history; open to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Mrs. Just 

207 (2) Politics of Latin America 
1 

An analysis of political and economic prob- 
lems of Latin America, including alternative 
explanations of development and under- 
development in the region. The course will 
focus on major national problems such as 
urbanization, rural development and agrarian 
reform, economic dependency, industrializa- 
tion and redistribution and explore the politi- 
cal consequences of public policies formu- 
lated to deal with these issues. Special con- 
sideration given to the political systems of 
Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, and Chile. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science; by 
permission to other qualified students. 

Ms. Grindle 

209 (2) Politics of Subsaharan Africa 
1 

An examination of the problems of decoloni- 
zation, national integration, and mobilization 
in selected African states, including Ghana, 
Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, and ZaTre. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science; by 
permission to other qualified students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



300(2) Politics of East Asia 
1 

National and international politics of China 
and Japan. The People's Republic of China 
will be considered as an experiment in a radi- 
cal political ideology and a response to the 
problems of economic development. Study of 
Japan will emphasize contemporary voting 
behavior and bureaucratic politics. 
Prerequisite: two units in Political Science or 
East Asian Studies. 

Mr. Sullivan 

301 (1) Politics of the Soviet Union and 

Eastern Europe 

1 

Study of politics and government in the Soviet 
Union and eastern Europe; the interrelation- 
ship of ideology and power, leadership, politi- 
cal institutions, and policy formation. 
Prerequisite: two units in Political Science or 
Russian language and/or history. 

Mr. Sullivan 

304 (2) Studies in Political Leadership 
1 

The interaction of psychology and politics 
will be emphasized in conceptual approaches 
and case studies. Special attention will be 
given to U.S. presidents as political leaders 
and women as political leaders. Individual 
research and student reports. 
Open to students who have taken one Grade II 
unit in international relations, American or 
comparative politics, or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Miller 

Offered in 1977-78. 

305(1) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Comparative perspectives 
on social welfare policies. An examination of 
the government's role in the provision of 
social welfare benefits in selected countries, 
including consideration of the contribution of 
the political process to the definition of 
issues such as health care, income main- 
tenance, and education. The seminar will 
analyze the development of governmental 
responsibility in the social welfare area, alter- 
natives available to policy makers, con- 
straints on their decisions, and the impact of 
policy choices on various groups and classes 
in the society. Case material drawn from the 
experience of the United States, western 
European and Third World nations. 
Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 
the instructor. 



Ms. Grindle 



118 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



306(2) Seminar 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 

the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



American Politics 



200(1) (2) American Politics 
1 

The dynamics of the American political pro- 
cess: constitutional developments, erosion of 
congressional power and the rise of the presi- 
dency, impact of the Supreme Court, evolu- 
tion of federalism, the role of political parties, 
elections and interest groups. Emphasis on 
political values and their influence on both 
institutions and policies. Analysis of contem- 
porary problems, including political corrup- 
tion, racial conflict, individual liberties, ur- 
banization, environmental disruption, infla- 
tion, and unemployment. Recommended for 
further work in American law and politics. Not 
open to students who have taken [211]. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science, 
Economics, or American Studies, or by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Mr. Schechter, Ms. Grindle 

210 (1) (2) Voters, Parties and Elections 
1 

Analysis of political behavior in America. 
How do people learn about politics? What is 
the role of public opinion in contemporary 
issues? Study of voting decisions, political 
campaigns, party organization and the mean- 
ing of elections. Special topics include the 
use of media and technology in campaigns, 
political alienation, and structural reform. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 200, or [211], 
or the equivalent, or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mrs. Just 



212(2) Urban Politics 
1 

Introduction to contemporary urban prob- 
lems. Analysis of the various perspectives on 
the nature of urban and suburban problems 
and policies. Evaluation of the formation, 
implementation, and impact of selected urban 
policies concerning housing, education, race, 
criminal justice, welfare, finances, transpor- 
tation. Examination of trends in national ur- 
ban policy, intergovernmental relations, and 
patterns of political involvement and conflict. 
Opportunities for group and individual field 
work in the metropolitan Boston area. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit in American 
politics, two units in American history or 
Sociology, or by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. McGeary 

310 (2) Political Decision-Making in the 
United States 

1 

Analysis of the policy-making process based 
on simulation of decision-making in execu- 
tive, legislative, and/or judicial units at differ- 
ent levels of government in the United States. 
Four or five nationally important questions 
considered with all class members playing 
roles as advocates, witnesses, decision- 
makers, or analysts; evaluation of role-play- 
ing and extent to which relevant considera- 
tions are taken into account in reaching 
decisions. 

Prerequisite: one Grade II unit in American 
politics or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Schechter 

311 (1) Seminar 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 

the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

312(1) Seminar 
1 

Normally a different topic each year. 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 

the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 119 



315 (2) Bureaucratic Behavior and Policy 

Analysis 

1 

Introduction to the foundations and recurrent 
themes in the study of nnodern bureaucracies. 
The course will focus on bureaucratic policy- 
nnaking in a technologically changing environ- 
ment and will evaluate the role of the new 
technological bureaucracies including the 
FEA, EPA, and AEG. Issues to be examined 
include the controversy of politics versus 
administration, modern bureaucracies and 
democratic theories, the effect of individual 
behavior and other social-psychological as- 
pects of bureaucracies on policy and the im- 
pact of values, expertise, and communication 
in bureaucratic decision-making. 
Prerequisite: one Grade II unit in American 
politics or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. McGeary 



International Relations 



321 (1) The United States in World Politics 
1 

An examination of American foreign policy 
since 1945. Readings will include general 
critiques and case studies designed to illumi- 
nate both the processes of policy formulation 
and the substance of policies pursued. Con- 
sideration of future prospects and current 
research strategies. 

Prerequisite: one unit in international rela- 
tions or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Paarlberg 

323 (2) Seminar. The Politics of Global 

Welfare 

1 

Topic for 1976-77: Origins and consequences 
of international inequality. Selected issues in 
contemporary relations among rich and poor 
nations, including food, population, energy, 
resource depletion, ecology, aid, trade, and 
multinational investment. Prospects for a new 
international economic order. 
Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mr. Paarlberg 



221(1) (2) World Politics 
1 

An introduction to the international system 
with emphasis on contemporary theory and 
practice. Analysis of the bases of power and 
influence, the policy perspectives of principal 
states, and the modes of accommodation and 
conflict resolution. 

Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Paarlberg 

222 (2) Comparative Foreign Policies 

1 

An examination of factors influencing the 
formulation and execution of national foreign 
policies in the contemporary international 
system. Comparisons and contrasts between 
"advanced" and "developing" countries will 
be stressed, especially the varying signifi- 
cance of domestic sources of foreign policy in 
western and nonwestern settings. 
Prerequisite: one unit in international rela- 
tions or comparative politics. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



Legal Studies 



330 (1) (2) Law and the Administration of 

Justice 

1 

Fundamentals of the American legal process, 
including development of common law, 
courts and judges, civil and criminal proceed- 
ings, consumer rights and duties, criminal 
liability, interaction of law and politics, limits 
of a legal system, some comparison with Civil 
Law System. Legal research and moot court 
practice. Recommended for further work in 
legal studies. 

Prerequisite: two Grade II units in one of the 
following fields— Political Science, Econom- 
ics, History, Psychology, or Sociology; and 
by permission of the instructor to sopho- 
mores. 

Miss Evans 



120 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



331 (2) International Law 
1 

The law applicable to the relations of States, 
international organizations, and individuals in 
the international community, considering 
law-making processes, settlement of public 
and private disputes, national claims to ma- 
rine areas, control of international terrorism, 
nationality and alienage, regulation and pro- 
tection of foreign trade and investments, revi- 
sion of laws of war. Legal research and moot 
court practice. 

Open to students who have taken 330 or two 
units in international relations, or by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Miss Evans 



334(2) The CriminalJustice System 
1 

An examination of how the criminal justice 
system works, considering the functions of 
police, prosecutor, defense counsel, and 
court in the processing of criminal cases; 
uses of discretionary power in regard to inter- 
national and national rendition of fugitive 
offenders, arrest, bail, plea bargaining, and 
sentencing; scope and limits of the legal 
rights of the offender; current problems in the 
penumbra of criminal law. Legal research and 
moot court practice. 
Prerequisite: 330 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Miss Evans 



332(1) The Supreme Court In American 

Politics 

1 

Analysis of major developments in constitu- 
tional interpretation, the conflict over judicial 
activism, and current problems facing the 
Supreme Court. Emphasis will be placed on 
judicial review, the powers of the President 
and of Congress, federal-state relations, and 
individual rights and liberties. Each student 
will take part in a moot court argument of a 
major constitutional issue. 
Prerequisite: two Grade II units in Political 
Science, including one in American politics; 
or 330; or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Schechter 

333(2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Law and social change- 
emerging constitutional rights of women, 
racial minorities, and the poor. Analysis of 
contemporary legal, political, and adminis- 
trative issues. Focus on the equal protection 
clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, the 
proposed Equal Rights Amendment, and 
statutes such as Title VII of the 1964 Civil 
Rights Act. The seminar will examine the role 
of interest groups, political leaders, bureau- 
crats, and judges in conflicts such as employ- 
ment discrimination, affirmative action pro- 
grams, school segregation, housing for the 
poor and racial minorities, welfare rights. 
Prerequisite: 332 and permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Schechter 



335 (2) Law and Legal Institutions in 

Developing Countries 

1 

Description to be announced. 
Prerequisite: previous work in comparative 
politics or law, or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Crespi-Reghizzi 

336(2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: The role of law in socialist 
and communist nations. 
Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mr. Crespi-Reghizzi 



Political Theory and Methods 



240 (1)* Classical and Medieval Political 

Theory 

1 

Study of selected classical, medieval, and 
early modern writers such as Plato, Aristotle, 
Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, 
Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, and Hooker. 
Views on such questions as nature of political 
man; interpretations of such concepts as free- 
dom, justice, and equality; legitimate powers 
of government; best political institutions. 
Some attention to historical context and to 
importance for modern political analysis. 
Offered in alternation with 340. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science, 
Philosophy, or European history. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Stettner 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 121 



241 (2) Modem and Contemporary Political 

Theory 

1 

Study of political theory from the 1 7th century 
to the present. Among the theorists studied 
are Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Burke, 
Mill, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Views on 
such questions as the nature of political man; 
interpretations of such concepts as freedom, 
justice, and equality; legitimate powers of 
government; best political institutions. Some 
attention to historical context and to impor- 
tance for modern political analysis. 
Prerequisite: one unit in Political Science, 
Philosophy, or European history. 

Mr. Stettner 



341 (2) Issues and Concepts in Political 

Theory 

1 

Study of such political concepts as freedom, 
justice, equality, democracy, power, revolu- 
tion, civil disobedience, and political obliga- 
tion. Discussion of related issues, including 
implications for political systems of adopting 
these concepts and problems which result 
when these values conflict with one another. 
Emphasis on contemporary political prob- 
lems and sources. 

Prerequisite: two Grade II units in Political 
Science, Philosophy, or intellectual history, 
or by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Abramson 



249 (2) Political Science Laboratory 
1 

The role of empirical data and the use of the 
computer in the study of comparative politics, 
public opinion, and political behavior. Fre- 
quent exercises introduce students to topics 
in descriptive statistics, probability and 
sampling, questionnaire design, cross tabula- 
tion; tests of significance, regression, corre- 
lation and modeling. Emphasis is on con- 
cepts in data analysis. No previous knowl- 
edge of mathematics, statistics, or comput- 
ing is required. 

Prerequisite: one Grade II unit in political 
science or permission of the instructor. 

Mrs. Just 

340 (1)* American Political Thought 

1 

Examination of American political writing, 
with emphasis given to the Constitutional 
period. Progressive Era, and to contemporary 
sources. Questions raised include: origins of 
American institutions, including rationale for 
federalism and separation of powers, role of 
president and congress, judicial review, etc.; 
American interpretations of democracy, 
equality, freedom and justice; legitimate 
powers of central and local governments. 
Attention paid to historical context and to 
importance for modern political analysis. 
Offered in alternation with 240. 
Prerequisite: Grade 11 work in political theory, 
American politics, or American history, or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Stettner 



349 (2) Seminar 

1 

Topic for 1976-77: To be announced. 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission of 

the instructor. 

Mr. Abramson 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Individual or group research of an exploratory 
or specialized nature. Students interested in 
independent research should request the as- 
sistance of a faculty sponsor, and plan the 
project, readings, conferences, and method 
of examination with the faculty sponsor. 
Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



122 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Wellesley-MIT Experimental Course 
Exchange 



One MIT course has been selected for the 
experiment, and deliberate efforts will be 
made to enroll approximately an equal 
number of MIT and Wellesley students in the 
course. The course will meet once a week, on 
a rotating basis between the two campuses. 
Students will receive academic credit from the 
institution sponsoring the course. However, 
the MIT course will not count as an exchange 
unit for purposes of determining whether 
Wellesley students can take additional units 
at MIT. 



17.20 (2) The Evolution of American Politics 

Designed to provide students with historical 
background for understanding growth and 
change in American national political struc- 
tures and processes to their present state. 
The approach, however, will be at least as 
much oriented to social-science perspectives 
as to those of more conventional history. Top- 
ics to be examined include the evolution of 
Congress, the Presidency and electoral poli- 
tics, with attention to changes in behavior, 
structure, and performance. Primary empha- 
sis placed on developments in the 20th cen- 
tury, and some collateral attention paid to 
changes in the role of the Supreme Court in 
the national policy process. 
Previous work in American politics strongly 
recommended. 

Mr. Burnham (MIT) 



Directions for Election 



A major in political science may be broad in 
scope, or it may have a special focus, e.g., 
metropolitan regional problems, environmen- 
tal politics, area studies, international poli- 
tics, legal problems of minorities, political 
ethics. Political Science 100, which provides 
an introduction to the discipline of political 
science, is strongly recommended for stu- 
dents planning to major. The department of- 
fers courses, seminars, and research or inde- 
pendent study in five fields: American govern- 
ment, comparative government, international 
relations, legal studies, political theory and 
methods. Of the eight units comprising a 
minimum major, two units must be taken in 
each of three of these five fields. At least 
three of these six distribution units must be 
taken in the Department of Political Science 
at Wellesley. Units taken at another institu- 
tion in order to fulfill the field requirement 
must be approved by the department. 

Graduate work in political science leading to 
the Ph.D. usually requires a reading knowl- 
edge of two foreign languages and, for many 
specialties, a knowledge of statistical tech- 
niques or an introduction to the calculus. 

Students participating in the Wellesley Wash- 
ington Summer Internship Program or the 
Wellesley Urban Politics Summer Internship 
Program may arrange with the respective di- 
rectors to earn credit for independent study. 

The experimental exchange of faculty and 
courses between the political science depart- 
ments of Wellesley and MIT is described 
on this page. 



PSYCHOLOGY 123 



Psychology 



Professor; 
Zimmerman* 

Associate Professor: 

Dickstein, Furumoto (Chairman), Schiavo 

Assistant Professor: 

Clinchy*, Finison*, Koff, Mokros, Riederer, 

Rierdan, Weingarten, Sheingoid 

Instructor: 

Levine3, Burke^, Thomas, Williamson, 

Littenberg3, Frey3, Masur3 

Lecturer: 
Stiver3 

Research Assistant: 
Eister 



101 (1)(2) Introduction to Psychology 
1 

Study of selected research problems from 
areas such as personality development, learn- 
ing, cognition, and social psychology to 
demonstrate ways in which psychologists 
study behavior. 
Open to all students. 

Mr, Schiavo, Ms. Burke 

201(1) (2) Statistics 
1 

The application of statistical techniques to 
the analysis of psychological data. Major 
emphasis on the understanding of statistics 
found in published research and as prepara- 
tion for the student's own research in more 
advanced courses. A considerable part of the 
course will be devoted to laboratory exercises 
in and out of class. Three periods of com- 
bined lecture-laboratory. Additional optional 
periods may be arranged for review and dis- 
cussion. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Riederer, Mr. Thomas 



207(1) (2) Child Development 
1 

A survey of child behavior and psychological 
development, with emphasis on infancy and 
early childhood. Theory and research pertain- 
ing to personality, social and cognitive devel- 
opment are examined. Two periods of lecture 
and one of discussion or observation of chil- 
dren. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Ms. Mokros, Ms. Sheingoid, Ms. Masur 

207R (1) (2) Research Methods in 

Developmental Psychology 

1 

An introduction to research methods appro- 
priate to the study of human development. 
Individual and group projects. Laboratory. 
Each section typically limited to ten students. 
Not open to students who have taken or are 
taking 210R, or212R. 
Prerequisite: 201 and 207. 

Mrs. Koff, Ms. Mokros, Ms. Sheingoid 

210(1) (2) Social Psychology 
1 

The individual's behavior as it is influenced by 
other people and the social situation. Study 
of social influence, interpersonal perception, 
social evaluation, and various forms of social 
interaction. Three periods of lecture, discus- 
sion, and demonstration. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Thomas, Mr. Williamson 

210R (2) Research Methods in Social 

Psychology 

1 

An introduction to research methods appro- 
priate to the study of social psychology. Indi- 
vidual and group projects on selected topics. 
Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 
ten students. Not open to students who have 
taken or are taking 207R, or 21 2R. 
Prerequisite: 201 and 210. 

Mr. Williamson 

212(1) (2) Personality 
1 

Selected theories of personality as applied to 
the normal individual. Some emphasis on 
relation of theories to selected topics and/or 
case studies. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Dickstein, Ms. Rierdan, Ms. Weingarten, 
Ms. Littenberg 



124 PSYCHOLOGY 



212R (1) (2) Research Methods in 

Personality 

1 

An introduction to research methods appro- 
priate to the study of personality. Individual 
and group projects. Laboratory. Each section 
typically linnited to ten students. Not open to 
students who have taken or are taking 207R, 
or210R. 
Prerequisite: 201 and 212. 

Mr. Dickstein, Ms. Rierdan 

216(1) Psycholinguistics 
1 

Consideration of psychological theories of 
language, including such topics as an intro- 
duction to linguistics, language acquisition, 
speech perception, meaning, and the relation 
between language and thought. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mrs. Koff 

217 (2) Cognitive Processes 
1 

An examination of basic issues and empirical 
research in human information processing, 
including topics from pattern recognition, 
memory processes, concept learning, prob- 
lem solving, judgment and reasoning. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Riederer 

218(2) Perception 
1 

Experimental and theoretical approaches to 
selected topics in perception including visual 
space, form, and motion; speech perception; 
perceptual learning and development; and the 
role of personality variables in perception. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

219 (2) Learning 
1 

Basic problems and research findings at the 
human and animal levels. Among topics stud- 
ied: schedules and parameters of reinforce- 
ment, discrimination, generalization, con- 
ditioned reinforcement, and behavior corre- 
lated with negative reinforcement. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mr. Riederer 



220R (1) Research IVIethods in Experimental 

Psychology 

1 

An introduction to research methods em- 
ployed in experimental psychology including 
the fields of learning, information processing, 
animal behavior, and cognition. Group and 
individual projects. Opportunity for student 
selection of an appropriate independent proj- 
ect. Laboratory. 

Prerequisite: 101 and 201 (201 may betaken 
concurrently); and 216 or 217 or 218 or 219 or 
245. 

Mr. Riederer 

245 (1) Neuropsychology 
1 

Study of the structure and function of the 
nervous system with particular emphasis on 
the brain. Normal and pathological relation- 
ships between brain processes and such as- 
pects of human behavior as emotion, atten- 
tion, memory, learning, and language will be 
considered. Readings will include human 
experimental and clinical studies and relevant 
animal studies. 
Prerequisite: 101 . 

Mrs. Koff 

300(1) (2) Seminar 
1 

Study of the Keller Plan method of learning 
and teaching, which permits a student to 
move through course material at her own 
pace. Seminar members construct materials 
for the Keller Plan portion of 101 , act as Keller 
advisors to 1 01 students for five weeks, and 
later evaluate the Keller Plan work. Advan- 
tages and disadvantages of Keller Plan learn- 
ing; some comparison of Keller Plan and 
other innovative teaching programs in 
colleges. 

Open by permission of the instructor to stu- 
dents who have taken 101 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Zimmerman 

301 (2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: The role of sex-typing in 
childhood socialization. The development of 
sex-role behaviors, standards, and identifica- 
tions will be considered, with emphasis upon 
the processes through which sex-typed be- 
haviors are socialized. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and two 
Grade II units, including 207. 

Ms. Mokros 



PSYCHOLOGY 125 



303 (1) (2) The Psychological Implications 

of Being Female 

1 

Consideration of some of {he changing pat- 
terns in Xhe behavior of women, including 
literature in the area of sex differences. Some 
of the following topics will be examined: the- 
oretical formulations of the psychology of 
women; female sexuality; men's liberation; 
results of research on sex differences in hu- 
mans and animals; social determinants of 
sex-stereotyped behavior. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
101 and two Grade II units. 

Ms. Weingarten 

306 (1) Seminar in Personality 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Behavior problems in chil- 
dren. This seminar will be concerned with 
personality development, especially the con- 
cept of "self" and the individual's develop- 
ment of a self definition. Special attention 
will be given to recent research with infants. 
Prerequisite: same as for 303. 

Mr. Frey 

307 (2) Adolescence 

1 

Consideration of physical, cognitive, social, 
and personality development during adoles- 
cence. Emphasis will be on recent research. 
Prerequisite: same as for 303. 

Ms. Masur 

309 (1) (2) Abnormal Psychology 
1 

Consideration of major theories of neurosis 
and psychosis. Illustrative case materials. 
Selected issues in prevention and treatment 
of emotional problems. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
101 and two Grade II units, including 212. 

Ms. Rierdan, Mrs. Stiver 

310 (1) Special Topics in Social Psychology 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Playing and working. An 
eclectic, interdisciplinary examination of the 
polar concepts of play and work as qualities 
of a variety of settings. A quest for a general 
model of situational involvement through 
such topics as theories of children's play, 
play therapy, sports involvement, competi- 
tion, games across cultures, adult leisure, 
organizational theory, job satisfaction stud- 
ies. Includes emphasis on the application of 
knowledge to action. 
Prerequisite: 101 and two Grade II units. 

Mr. Williamson 



311(1) Seminar. Social Psychology 
1 

Psychological study of family interaction. 
Application of social psychological variables 
and small group theories to the study of the 
internal processes of family interaction. 
Topics will include mate selection, family 
structure, power, decision-making, coalition 
formation, and conflict resolution. The 
approach will consider marital interaction, 
parent-child interaction, and the family as a 
unit. Some consideration given to the 
research methods used to study family 
interaction. 

Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and two 
Grade II units, including 210. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Schiavo 

312(2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: The acquisition of schizo- 
phrenic behavior. A definition of "schizo- 
phrenia" will be attempted through considera- 
tion of theoretical models, case studies, and 
autobiographical reports. Different approach- 
es to explaining the acquisition of schizo- 
phrenia, as well as strategies for the change 
of schizophrenic behavior, will be considered. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and two 
Grade II units, including 212. 

Ms. Rierdan 

313(2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Group psychology. Studies 
everyday interaction of individuals in groups. 
Experientially-based introduction to practical- 
theoretical problems of leadership, group 
formation and organization, participation and 
intervention. Each student becomes a mem- 
ber of a self-analytic group. Readings, dem- 
onstrations and instruction in systematic 
observation of behavior, interpretation of 
motivation, and conceptualization of individ- 
ual personalities and group dynamics. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and 
two Grade II units, including 210. 

Mr. Williamson 



126 PSYCHOLOGY 



317 (1) Seminar. Cognitive Development in 

College 

1 

An examination of significant changes in 
thinking during the college years. Major focus 
on the theories of Perry and Kohlberg and on 
research based on these theories concerning 
college students' changing views on issues 
such as authority, truth, justice, and comnnit- 
ment. Consideration of ways in which col- 
leges nnay facilitate or retard students' devel- 
opment. 

Prerequisite: 101 and two Grade 11 units, 
including 207. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Clinchy 

318(2) Seminar. The Psychology of 

Language 

1 

The study of normal language acquisition, the 
biological substrate of language (cerebral 
dominance and lateralization of speech and 
language function), language pathology 
(developmental disorders, aphasia), and 
language learning in nonhuman primates. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
101 and at least two Grade II units, including 
216. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Koff 

325 (2) History of Psychology 
1 

The history of selected topics and issues in 
psychology with an emphasis on the analysis 
of primary sources. The field of psychology 
will be analyzed as a developing science. 
There will also be discussion of current is- 
sues in the historiography of psychology. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
101. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Finison 

327 (1) Seminar. Child Development 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Cognitive development in 
children. Theoretical and empirical approach- 
es to the child's developing cognitive abilities 
of thinking, perceiving, and remembering. 
Both the skills which characterize intellectual 
development and the processes which con- 
tribute to theiracquisition will be discussed. 
Grosscultural perspectives will be included. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and 
two Grade II units, including either 207 or 217. 

Ms. Sheingold 



328(1) (2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: The child, the family, and 
family treatment. The study of children in the 
context of their families and society. Factors 
that contribute to optimal growth or serious 
disturbance within the family will be ex- 
plored, and individual pathology will be relat- 
ed to family dysfunction. A variety of treat- 
ment modalities that attempt to promote 
change in families and their members will be 
studied. 

Open by permission of the instructor to 
juniors and seniors who have taken 101 and 
two Grade II units, including 207 and 212. 

Ms. Weingarten 

330(1) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Behavior therapy, juvenile 
delinquency, and individual rights. Purposes 
include developing an understanding of be- 
havior therapy (including "behavior modifica- 
tion" techniques) and an increased apprecia- 
tion of important ethical issues that relate to 
individual rights. Consideration of history, 
nature, and scope of behavior therapy: and 
such ethical issues as informed consent to 
treatment; punishment and aversive tech- 
niques; and dangers to individual freedom. 
Particular attention to applications of behav- 
ior therapy to juvenile delinquency. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and 
two Grade II units. 

Mr. Thomas 

335 (2) Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Memory and attention. 
Consideration of major empirical and theoret- 
ical issues in contemporary research on hu- 
man memory and attention. Emphasis will be 
on conceptions of memory processes in 
relation to mental operations. 
Open by permission of the instructor to ju- 
niors and seniors who have taken 101 and two 
Grade II units, including 217. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Riederer 



PSYCHOLOGY 127 



340 (2) Social Psychology and Industrial 

Society 

1 

Examination of the psychology of work and 
the psychological consequences of the 
growth of industry. Investigation of the nature 
of work as it relates to such psychological 
variables as satisfaction and feelings of self- 
worth. Consideration of recent experiments in 
industry as they relate to these concepts. 
Prerequisite: 101 and two Grade II units. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Finison 

345 (1) Seminar. The Psychology of 

Thinking 

1 

An inquiry into the processes of human think- 
ing with major emphasis on empirical stud- 
ies. Topics to be covered will include induc- 
tive and deductive reasoning, problem solv- 
ing, creative thinking, sex differences, and 
the role of personality variables in intellectual 
functioning. 

Prerequisite: 101 and two Grade II units in 
psychology. 

Mr. Dickstein 

349 (2) Child Development and Social Policy 
1 

This course will examine the relationships 
between research in child development and 
the formulation of social policy. Topics will 
include psychological rationales for: early 
childhood education, day care, custody deter- 
mination, and adoptive placement. 
Prerequisite: same as for 301 . 

Mr. Levine 



Directions for Election 



A major in psychology must include 101 ; one 
of the following; 207,210,212; one of the 
following: 216,217,218,219,245; and 201 . 

The department offers four research courses: 
207R, 210R, 212R, 220R. A major in psychol- 
ogy must include at least one of these. How- 
ever, no more than one of 207R, 210R, 212R 
may be elected. It is possible to elect 220R in 
addition to one of the other R courses. 

The department recommends that students 
plan a program in which 201 , the research 
course, and preferably all Grade II require- 
ments are completed as early in the program 
as possible and no later than the end of the 
junior year. 



350 (1 ) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 

department. 

Prerequisite: any one of the following: 207R, 

210R, 212R, 220R. 



128 RELIGION AND BIBLICAL STUDIES 



Religion and 
Biblical Studies 



Professor: 

Denbeaux, Mowry, Johnson*2 (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: 
Levenson, Kodera, Marini3 

Instructor: 
Elkins3 

Lecturer: 
Santmire 

Visiting Professor: 
Welch^^ 



104 (1) (2) The Hebrew Scriptures 
1 

A study of the historical, prophetic, wisdom, 
and apocalyptic literature of the Old Testa- 
ment. An introduction of the methods of liter- 
ary and historical criticism with a considera- 
tion of the impact of the biblical tradition on 
the individual and society. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Denbeaux, Mr. Levenson 

105 (1) (2) The Person and Message of Jesus 
1 

The life and message of Jesus of Nazareth, 
based on recent historical critical research of 
the Gospel record. A consideration of the 
relation between historical knowledge about 
Jesus and the faith of the early church in him 
with particular attention to the synoptic 
Gospels. 
Open to all students. 

Miss Mowry 

107(1) (2) Crises of Belief in Modern 

Religion 

1 

Religious and antireligious thinkers from the 
Enlightenment to the present. An examina- 
tion of the impact of the natural sciences, 
social theory, psychology, and historical 
method on traditional religion. Readings in 
Hume, Darwin, Teilhard de Chardin, Marx, 
Reinhold Niebuhr, Freud, Tillich, and others. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Johnson, Mr. Santmire 



108(1) Sacred Writings of the East 
1 

An examination of Asian religions based on 
texts regarded as having scriptural authority. 
For India the texts of Hinduism the Vedas, the 
Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita; and of Bud- 
dhism the Dhammapada, the Lotus Sutra, the 
Prajnaparamita Sutra; for China, the Tao Te 
Ching (Taoism), the Ana/ecfs (Confucius); 
and for Japan Nihongi (Shinto). The texts to 
be studied in the context of their historical 
setting and for their importance in their tradi- 
tions. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Kodera 

109(1-2) Biblical Hebrew 
2 

The elements of biblical grammar, syntax, 
and vocabulary, and later in the course, read- 
ings in simple prose and poetic passages 
from the Hebrew Scriptures. No knowledge of 
Hebrew assumed. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Levenson 

204(1)* Christian Beginnings in the 

Hellenistic World 

1 

A study of the emergence of the Christian 
movement with special emphasis upon those 
experiences and convictions which deter- 
mined its distinctive character. Intensive anal- 
ysis of Paul's thought and the significance of 
his work in making the transition of Christian- 
ity from a Jewish to a Gentile environment. 
Prerequisite: 105. 

Miss Mowry 

205 (2)* The Prophetic Institution in Biblical 

Israel 

1 

A study of the institution of prophecy in its 
literary, historical, sociological, and theo- 
logical settings. A careful reading of all the 
prophetic anthologies in the Hebrew Scrip- 
tures in an effort to understand the forms of 
prophetic speech, the emergence of classical 
prophecy, and the transformation of prophecy 
into apocalyptic. Offered in alternation with 
306. 
Prerequisite: 104. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Levenson 



RELIGION AND BIBLICAL STUDIES 129 



207(2) New Testament Greek 

1 

Special features of Koine Greek. Readings 
from New Testament authors. 
Prerequisite: Greek 102(1). 

Miss Mowry 

208(1) Ethics 
1 

An examination of selected social ethical 
issues, including violence and revolution, 
poverty and equality, racial and sexual op- 
pression. Readings in recent religious think- 
ers, such as Thomas Merton, Simone Weil, 
Martin Buber, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther 
King, Paul Ramsey, the Niebuhrs, and Latin- 
American Catholic theologians. Attention to 
the implications of these issues for personal 
morality and social justice. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

Mr. Marini 

209 (1-2) Intermediate Hebrew 
2 

A systematic review of Hebrew grammar. 
Readings in biblical materials and, if desired, 
in rabbinic and modern literature as well. 
Prerequisite: 109 or successful completion of 
equivalency examination. 

Mr. Levenson 

210 (1) Psychology of Religion 
1 

An examination of psychological theories of 
religion from William James through Sig- 
mund Freud and Erik Erikson. Exercises in 
the psychological interpretation of religious 
source materials. 

Prerequisite: one unit in the department and 
one unit in psychology, or two units in either 
department. 

Mr. Johnson 

213(1)* The Jewish Liturgy 
1 

A study of the classical Jewish liturgy in its 
historical development. The use of the He- 
brew Scriptures in the liturgy, the transition 
from sacrifice to prayer, introduction to the 
laws (halakhot) of prayer, the Jewish liturgical 
calendar, comparison of Jewish and Christian 
liturgy. Readings are in the weekday, sab- 
bath, and festival prayer books, the Hagga- 
dah, and in the Mishnah, and serve as an in- 
troduction to classical Jewish theology. 
Offered in alternation with 214. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Levenson 



214(2)* Modern Jewish Theology 
1 

An examination of the varying approaches to 
Jewish tradition among major post-enlighten- 
ment thinkers to be chosen from the follow- 
ing: Mendelsohn, Zunz, Hirsch, H. Cohen, 
Baeck, Buber, Rozenzweig, Heschei, Solo- 
veitchik, Herberg, Fackenheim, Borowitz. 
Offered in alternation with 213. 
Prerequisite: 104 or 213 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

215 (1) Pilgrimage. The Search for Meaning 
1 

A study of various journeys, mostly autobio- 
graphical, as portrayed in Wiesel's Night, 
Hesse's Siddhartha, Kosinski's The Painted 
Bird, Castenada's Journey to Ixtlan, Bellow's 
l-lenderson the Rain King, The Autobiography 
of Malcolm X, Lagerkvist's Barabbas, and 
Ellison's The Invisible Man. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Denbeaux 

216(1)* Classical Theology 
1 

The interaction of the biblical world view with 
classical culture and the consequent emer- 
gence of specifically Christian thought. A 
careful study of major theologies such as 
Irenaeus, Origen, Athanasius, Augustine, and 
Thomas Aquinas. Offered in alternation with 
225. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Elkins 

218(1) Religion in America 
1 

A history of religious movements in America 
and an analysis of their implications for 
American cultural and social life from the 
colonial period to 1920. Attention to develop- 
ments within and among the Protestant, 
Catholic, and Jewish traditions in America 
and to the religious aspects of various social 
movements, public values, and interpreta- 
tions of the American enterprise. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Marini 

220 (1)* The Black Religious Experience in 

America 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Black 
Studies 220. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



130 RELIGION AND BIBLICAL STUDIES 



221 (2) American Catholic Studies 
1 

Selected issues from the development and 
present life of the Roman Catholic Church in 
America examined from historical, social, and 
theological perspectives. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Elkins 

222 (1) The Protestant Heritage: Its Origin, 
Diversity, and Contemporaneity 

1 

Emphasis will be upon theological problems 
rather than upon matters historical and socio- 
logical. From Luther through Kierkegaard, 
Barth and Bonhoeffer. The unity of the Prot- 
estant understanding expressed through such 
varied figures and movements as Calvin, the 
Anabaptist Left Wing, Pacifist and Marxist 
traditions, the Anglican Middle Way, Existen- 
tialism, Liberalism, Theology of Crisis, Mod- 
ern Relevancy Theologies, and Evangelical 
Christianity. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Denbeaux 

225 (1) Nature in Hebraic and 

Christian Religion 

1 

An investigation of religious attitudes toward 
nature in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testa- 
ment and classical Christianity. Study of fig- 
ures such as the Jahwist and the Priestly writ- 
er; Jesus and Paul; St. Augustine and St. 
Francis; Luther and Calvin. Special attention 
to the influence of mythological imagery on 
this tradition. Offered in alternation with 216. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Santmire 

250(1) The Confucian Tradition 
1 

An examination of the fundamental principles 
of Confucianism, from its beginning to the 
present, with special attention to the rele- 
vance of Confucianism for the context of 
modern religious and philosophical thought. 
Readings in early Confucian sources: the 
Classics, the Analects, Mencius, and Hsun- 
Tsu; Neo-Confucian responses to Buddhism; 
and modern responses to the western impact 
on China: K'ang Yu-Wei, Sun Yat Sen and 
Mao Tse Tung. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



251 (1) Indian Religions 
1 

An examination of Indian religions especially 
Hinduism and the origin and early develop- 
ments of Buddhism in India. A study of two 
aspects of these religions: (1 ) the multiple 
suggestions (devotional, popular, legal, mys- 
tical, and philosophical) offered to questions 
about ultimate reality, the world, and man in 
their most influential periods; (2) their rela- 
tion to other religious groups in India (Jaina, 
Moslem, Zoroastrian or Parsi, Nestorian 
Christian, Sikh, and Jewish) in a pluralistic 
religious society. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Kodera 

253(2) Buddhism in China and Japan 
1 

A historical survey of the development of the 
Zen, T'ien-t'ai, Pure Land and Nichiren School 
of Buddhism in the context of East Asian 
society. The study of their major doctrines 
and scriptures will receive primary attention, 
complemented by some attention to their 
religious practices and contemporary rele- 
vance. 
Prerequisite: same as for 251 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

254(1) Chinese Religions 
1 

The history of religion in China from archaic 
times to the Cultural Revolution including the 
great traditions of Confucianism, Buddhism, 
and Taoism as well as the various aspects of 
popular religion. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Welch 

256(2) Primitive Religion 
1 

A study of religious myths and rituals within 
the context of the socioeconomic back- 
grounds of selected North American Indian 
tribes. Some consideration of the variety of 
methods by which this material can be 
analyzed — examples from Shamanism. 
Prerequisite: 108 or Anthropology 104 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

305 (2) Seminar. History of Religions 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Zen Buddhism in China 
and Japan. 

Mr, Kodera 



RELIGION AND BIBLICAL STUDIES 131 



306(2)* Seminar in Biblical Hebrew 
Literature 

1 

A concentrated investigation of a limited 
corpus of biblical literature fronn form-critical, 
tradition-historical, and tfieological perspec- 
tives. Some examples of possible topics: 
How Deuteronomic is the "Deuteronomistic" 
history?; models of Israelite society; the 
concepts of revelation in Wisdom Literature; 
evidence for an Enthronement Festival at the 
New Year. Offered in alternation with 205. 
Prerequisite; 104. 

Mr. Levenson 

307(2)* Seminar. The New Testament 
1 

A study of the Christian movement, its life 
and problems, in the post-Pauline period with 
special emphasis on the Gospel according to 
John and its interpretive insights for an un- 
derstanding of the person and work of Jesus 
and of the Christian tradition. 
Prerequisite; 204. 

Miss Mowry 

311 (2)* Theology and Its Expression in 

Literature 

1 

The relation of theology and imagination. A 
study of selected theological images and the 
ways in which they have been reshaped by 
such interpreters as Dostoevsky, Faulkner, 
Kafka, and Pasolini. Offered in alternation 
with 314. 

Open to students who have taken one unit in 
the department and a Grade II course in liter- 
ature. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Denbeaux 

314 (2)* Theology Seminar. Mortality, 

Immortality, and Resurrection 

1 

A critical study of three classical descriptions 
of the end of man: (1 ) the case that views 
death as both absolute and natural; (2) the 
case that views death as the enabling instru- 
ment to free the soul from the body/prison; 
and (3) the Christian view of a new heaven and 
a new earth. Offered in alternation with 311 . 
Prerequisite; one Grade II course in the 
department. 

Mr. Denbeaux 



316 (2)* Ethics 
1 

An intensive study of an ethical issue or a set 
of related issues with readings in relevant 
source materials. Normally offered in alterna- 
tion with 317. 
Prerequisite: 208. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Johnson 

317 (2)* Seminar. Psychology of Religion 
1 

An intensive study of particular religious 
personalities, texts, or communities from a 
psychological perspective. Normally offered 
in alternation with 316. 
Prerequisite: 210. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Johnson 

318(2) Seminar in American Religion 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Religion and politics in 
Boston — the 19th century. Critical analysis of 
the role of religious thought in movements for 
social change. Boston area resources will be 
used for investigations of the religious moti- 
vations and consequences of major political 
events and of various reform movements. 
Emphasis on abolitionism and the Civil War, 
public schooling, immigration and nativism. 
Prerequisite: 218 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Marini 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open to juniors and seniors by permission. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



132 RUSSIAN 



Directions for Election 



Russian 



The total program of the major shall be pre- 
pared in consultation with the advisor so as to 
provide for an appropriate balance between 
specialization and diversity. 

Specialization shall include a sequence of 
courses in at least one particular field of 
study. Diversity is fulfilled by electing some 
work within the department outside the field 
of specialization. 

Freshmen and sophomores considering a 
major are encouraged to elect introductory 
courses appropriate to their special field of 
interest; information is available in the de- 
partment office. Students planning to pursue 
studies in the Twelve College Exchange Pro- 
gram as part of their major should consult 
with their department advisor. Several of the 
Twelve College religion departments offer 
courses which could supplement and enrich a 
Wellesley major in religion and biblical 
studies. 

Studies in the original language are particu- 
larly valuable for students specializing in Old 
Testament or New Testament; see Religion 
109 and 209 (Biblical Hebrew) and Greek 102 
(1 ) (Beginning Greek) and Religion 207 (New 
Testament Greek). 



Professor: 

Lynch, Bones (Chairman) 

Instructor: 
Hoffman 



100(1-2) Elementary Russian 
2 

Grammar, oral and written exercises, reading 
of short stories. Three periods. 

The Staff 

200(1-2) Intermediate Russian 
2 

Conversation, composition, reading, review 
of grammar. Three periods. 
Prerequisite: 100 or the equivalent. 

The Staff 

201 (1) Russian Literature in Translation I 
1 

Russian literature from its beginnings to the 
middle of the 19th century. The focus of the 
course is on the major prose of the first half of 
the 19th century. The authors to be consid- 
ered include Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol', 
Goncharov, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Bones 

202 (2) Russian Literature in Translation II 
1 

Russian literature from the second part of the 
19th century to the present with emphasis on 
the works of Tolstoy, Chekhov, Sologub, and 
such Soviet writers as Babel, Olesha, Paster- 
nak, and Bulgakov. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Bones 

249 (2)* Language 
1 

General laws of phonology, syntax, and gram- 
matical categories. History, theory and logic 
of language and their application to Russian 
and the problems of English-Russian trans- 
lation. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 200 or permission 
of the instructor. 



Miss Hoffman 



RUSSIAN 133 



250(2)* The Writer and His Age 
1 

Intensive study of a 19th century Russian 
writer in the social, literary, and philosophical 
framework of that century. Topic for 1975-76: 
The works of Nikolai Gogol'. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: same as for 249. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Bones 

300(1-2) Advanced Russian 
2 

The structure of modern Russian. Reading of 
literary and historical works. Written and oral 
reports on selected topics. 
Prerequisite: 200. 

Mrs. Lynch 

31 1 (1)* Russian Literature from Its 
Beginnings to Pushkin 

1 

Byzantine, western, and folk influences in the 
chronicles and epics of the Kievan and Mos- 
covite periods. Reading of the Igor Tale, se- 
lections from Primary Chronicle, Zadonsh- 
china; and works of Ivan IV, Avvacum, Lomo- 
nosov, Derzhavin, Radishchev, and Pushkin. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Lynch 

317(1)* Russian Writers Today: Emigre and 

Soviet 

1 

Prose and poetry of Aldanov, Nabokov, 
G. Ivanov, Morshen, and Bulgakov, Solzhenit- 
syn, Voznesensky, Okudzhava. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: 300. 

Mrs. Lynch 

320(2)* Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1976-77: Two Russian poets- 
Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhmatova. In- 
tensive study of selected works by two major 
20th century writers in the light of their philo- 
sophical, social, and literary context. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: 300. 

Mrs. Bones 



350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 

1 or 2 

Open by permission to qualified students. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 

2 to 4 

Required of honors candidates who choose to 
do honors research. 



Directions for Election 



Course 100 is counted toward the degree but 
not toward the major. Courses 201 and 202 are 
counted toward the distribution requirements 
in Group A but not toward the major. How- 
ever, 201 and 202 are strongly recommended 
to students who intend to major in Russian. A 
major in Russian is expected to elect 249 or 
250 in conjunction with 200. 

Students majoring in Russian should consult 
the chairman of the department early in the 
college career, as should students interested 
in an individual major which includes Rus- 
sian. 

History 246 and 247 and 309 are recom- 
mended as related work. 

The study of at least one other modern and/or 
classical language is strongly recommended 
for those wishing to do graduate work in Slav- 
ic languages and literatures. 



349 (2)* The Writer in a Censored Society: 

His Literary and Nonliterary Roles 

1 

From Pushkin and Lermontov through Tol- 
stoy, Dostoevsky, Majakovsky, Esenin, 
Zam'atin, and to Evtushenko, Sin'avsky, 
Daniel. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Lynch 



134 SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



Sociology and 
Anthropology 



Professor: 

Eister, Shimony (Chairman) 

Associate Professor: 
Markson3 

Assistant Professor: 

Mueller, Kohl, Dimieri, Sheingold^ 

Instructor: 

Merry, Anderson-Khleif, Silbey 



102 (1) (2) Introduction to Sociology 
1 

Analysis of basic social structures and pro- 
cesses. Relationship of social norms, values 
and beliefs to stratification, power, bureau- 
cracy and community. Influence of social 
movements and ecological adaptation on 
social change. Brief introduction to quanti- 
tative analysis of data. 
Open to all students. 

The Staff 

103 (1) American Society 
1 

Distinctive organizational and structural char- 
acteristics of society in the United States 
including representative local communities. 
Population change and institutional develop- 
ments. Review and critical assessment of the 
work of deTocqueville, T. Veblen, C. W. Mills, 
D. Riesman, V. Packard, and others. Does not 
substitute for 102 as a prerequisite for ad- 
vanced work in the department. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Eister 

104 (1) (2) Introduction to Anthropology 
1 

Consideration of man's place in nature, his 
physical history, and physical varieties. Brief 
survey of archaeology and linguistics. The 
nature of culture with examples primarily 
from nonwestern societies. 
Open to all students. 

Mrs. Shimony, Mrs. Merry 



106(1) (2) Archaeology 
1 

A survey of the development of archaeology 
and an overview of its methods and themes. 
Introduction to Old World and New World 
archaeological sites and sequences. 
Prerequisite: 104, but open to qualified ju- 
niors and seniors by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Mr. Kohl 

201 (1) Social Research I 
1 

Nature of social research, problem specifica- 
tion, research design, techniques of data col- 
lection including field work, survey research, 
interviews and content analysis. Significance 
of values, ethics, and politics for research 
enterprise. One laboratory period required. 
Normally followed by 202. 
Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Dimieri 

202 (2) Social Research II 
1 

Techniques for the analysis of quantitative 
data; creation and access of computer data 
files; descriptive and inductive statistics in- 
cluding measures of distribution, tests for 
significance, and measures for association. 
One laboratory period required. 
Prerequisite: 201 . 

Mr. Dimieri 

203(1) Deviance 
1 

The process of labeling and defining non- 
normative conduct. Focus on juvenile delin- 
quency and mental illness in cross-cultural 
and historical perspectives. 
Prerequisite: 102 or 104. 

Mrs. Markson 

204(1) Physical Anthropology 
1 

Theories regarding the origin and evolution of 
man. Primate behavior and adaptation. Analy- 
sis of human fossil evidence. Implications for 
the question of race. 
Prerequisite: 104. 

Mr. Kohl 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 135 



205(1) Social Anthropology 
1 

Comparative study of social, political, and 
economic organization of primitive societies. 
Stability and change of primitive groups in 
contact with) western culture. Application of 
anthropology to the problems of underdevel- 
oped countries. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Merry 

206 (1) Women, Education and Work 
1 

For description and prerequisite see 
Education 206. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Bane 

207 (2) Comparative Institutions 
1 

The study of socialization institutions (in- 
cluding the family, child care centers, and 
schools) in cross-cultural perspective. Focus 
on variations inculcating motivational pat- 
terns. Special emphasis on Russia, China, 
and Israel. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Markson 

208 (1) Demography 
1 

An approach to the analysis of social phe- 
nomena in terms of populations rather than 
individuals. Historical and comparative treat- 
ment of the nature, causes, and demographic 
consequences of the "population explosion." 
Particular attention will be given to demo- 
graphic processes defined as social prob- 
lems, such as social differences in the risk of 
illness and death, immigration, and fertility 
control. Consideraton will be given to alter- 
native policy strategies which are aimed at 
these "social problems." Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken Education 228. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203 or permission 
of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Dimieri 

Offered in 1977-78. 

209 (1) Social Stratification and Power 
1 

Critical analysis of inequality, social stratifi- 
cation and social class in the U.S. and in 
other societies. Relationship between stratifi- 
cation and power. Attention to current issues 
of lifestyles, liberation movements and class 
as the basis of social change. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Sheingold 



210(2) Racial and Ethnic Minorities 
1 

An analysis of the problems of racial and eth- 
nic groups in American and other societies. 
Systematic study of adjustment mechanisms 
of selected racial, religious, and immigrant 
minorities. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Merry 

211(2) Family and Society 
1 

The structure and functions of the family. 
Analysis of the relationship of the family to 
social class, society and community in com- 
parative and historical terms. Emphasis on 
sex roles, traditional and emergent, and on 
alternative family structures. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Anderson-Khleif 

212(2) Religion and Society 
1 

Sociological and anthropological views of 
religion. Differences in organization and func- 
tions of religion in primitive, traditional, and 
advanced contemporary societies. Problems 
of organized religion in secular, pluralistic, 
and urban-industrial society. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Eister 

213(1) Sociology of Law 
1 

Analysis of sociological jurisprudence; 
examination of the empirical studies of 
various components of the justice 
system — legal profession, jury system, 
courts, police and prisons; special attention 
to topics of social change, social class, and 
the law. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Silbey 

214(1) Medical Sociology 
1 

Social factors associated with the incidence 
and treatment of health disorders. Differential 
availability of health care services. Social 
organization of hospitals; role behavior of 
patients, professional staff and others; atti- 
tudes in hospital setting toward terminal pa- 
tients and death. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Markson 



136 SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



215(2) Sociology of Communication 
1 

Sociological forms and consequences of 
communication with special attention to thie 
press, motion pictures, television, and other 
mass media. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Eister 

216 (2) Sociology of Higher Education 
1 

Contemporary functions and types of higher 
educational institutions in the United States. 
Social organization of the campus as a local 
community. Professional and nonprofession- 
al role relationships and the coordination of 
standards and of objectives. Field research 
required. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

219(2) Modern Organizations 
1 

Various perspectives and methodologies used 
in the investigation of organizations. Exami- 
nation of the nature of work. Emphasis on 
size, complexity, and formalization of struc- 
ture and on power, communication, and deci- 
sion-making processes. Roles and adaptation 
of individuals in organizations; the signifi- 
cance of social and cultural environments. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mr. Dimieri 

220 (2) The Metropolitan Community 
1 

Ecological basis of community development 
from the village to the megalopolis. Changes 
in social control, deviance, conflict and inte- 
gration of neighborhood and community in 
relation to social class, ethnicity, and city 
size. Types of political behavior emerging 
from different community structure. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Mueller 

224 (1)* Social Movements and Collective 

Behavior 

1 

Theories of conflict and collective behavior 
applied to emergent social processes such as 
demonstrations, riots and rebellions; rela- 
tionship to movements seeking alterations in 
the social order. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Mueller 



231 (2) Society and Self 
1 

Social structure and process with relation to 
the self. Social contributions and impedi- 
ments to individual experience. Institutional- 
ization of, and group innovation in, goals, 
attitudes, and ideas. Group formation as re- 
lated to self-identity and social purpose. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Mrs. Markson 

242 (2)* The Emergence of Early Urban 
Societies 

1 

Review of current research on the beginnings 
of civilization in Southwest Asia, the eastern 
Mediterranean, and Mesoamerica. The course 
will emphasize qualitative differences be- 
tween ranked and class stratified societies. 
Prerequisite: 104 and 106, or permission of 
the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Kohl 

Offered in 1977-78. 

243 (2) The Beginnings of Food Production 
1 

A survey of the beginnings of agriculture and 
domestication of animals in Southwest Asia 
and Mesoamerica. Examination of primary 
reports detailing the transition to a new sub- 
sistence economy. Discussion of causes and 
effects of the "neolithic revolution." 
Prerequisite: 104 and 106, or permission of 
the instructor. 

Mr. Kohl 

244 (1) Societies and Cultures of Africa 
1 

Comparative study of distinctive kinship, 
political, economic, and other social institu- 
tions of several major cultures of Africa for 
which there are anthropological reports. Con- 
sequences of culture contact among selected 
tribes and between indigenous and Asian or 
European cultures. 
Prerequisite: same as for 203. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mrs. Merry 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 137 



269 (2) Sex Roles in CrossCultural 

Perspective 

1 

An examination of male-female dominance 
and sex roles in selected cultures. 
Prerequisite; same as for 203, or permission 
of the instructor. 

Mrs. Merry 

300 (1) Classical Sociological Thought 
1 

Development of major sociological themes 
and theoretical positions from Montesquieu 
to the present. 

Prerequisite: 102 or 104, and two Grade II 
units, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Eister 

301 (2) Anthropological Theory 
1 

History of ethnological theory. Examination 
of current evolutionary and functional the- 
ories of culture. Discussion of the relation- 
ship between personality and culture. Prob- 
lems of method in anthropology. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mrs. Shimony 

308 (1 -2) Food Production in Ancient 

Societies 

1 or 2 

Analysis of the development of food produc- 
tion technologies in the earliest civilizations 
of the Near East, China, and Mediterranean 
areas, and in the New World. Topics to be 
discussed will include the domestication of 
plants and animals, technologies of different 
agricultural systems, and the interaction of 
pastoralists and sedentary agriculturalists. 
The second semester will consist of labora- 
tory work, emphasizing the identification and 
analysis of floral and faunal remains. Visiting 
professors from Boston University, Brandeis, 
Harvard, MIT, Museum of Fine Arts, Tufts, 
U. of Mass. (Boston). Limited enrollment. 
One unit of credit may be given for the first 
semester. 

Open only to juniors and seniors by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Mr. Kohl, Mr. Meadow (Harvard), 
Ms. Wetterstrom (MIT) 



311(2) Seminar in Anthropology 
1 

Topic for 1975-76: Economic anthropology. 
Analysis of economic structures of nonwest- 
ern societies in relation to our industrial capi- 
talistic system. Concentration on substantive 
issues in economic anthropology, such as the 
debate on the applicability of formal econom- 
ic theory to simpler societies, the nature and 
importance of the economic surplus, and 
problems of scarcity and development. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Kohl 

Offered in 1977-78. 

320 (2) Urban Poverty 
1 

A comparative social systems analysis of 
urban poverty in the U.S. and the Third World. 
Focus on cultural and structural interpreta- 
tions of poverty, on the strategies of the poor 
for coping with poverty, and on poverty poli- 
cies and their implementation. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mrs. Anderson-Khleif 

323(1) Seminar. Deviance 
1 

Social factors associated with the incidence 
and treatment of crime. Focus on the relation- 
ship between the criminal justice institutions 
(police, courts, and prisons) and the inci- 
dence of crime. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mr. Dimieri 

329 (1) (2) Seminar. Human Service 

Organizations 

1 

Health, housing, correctional and related 
institutions in contemporary society. Re- 
quired internship assignment. Limited to 12 
students. This course can only be elected for 
credit/noncredit. 

Prerequisite: same as for 300, and 219 is rec- 
ommended but not required, and by permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Mr. Eister, Mrs. Anderson-Khleif 



341 (2)* 
Theory 



Development of Archaeological 



An evaluation of current trends in archaeo- 
logical theory. Examines anthropological 
archaeology by surveying the origin and 
growth of the concept of prehistory and relat- 
ing it to cultural evolutionary theory. 
Prerequisite: 104 and 106 and one Grade II 
unit, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Kohl 



138 SPANISH 



342 (1) Seminar. Native American Literature 

and Biography 

1 

Native American history and contemporary 
cultures as seen through their novels, mem- 
oirs, and autobiographies. Comparison with 
reports by European observers and considera- 
tion of ethnographic accuracy. Contemporary 
literature of protest and revival. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300. 

Mrs. Shimony 

349 (2) Seminar. Strategies of Social 
Change in Contemporary America 

1 

Examination of strategies of change available 
to "relatively powerless" groups. Relationship 
of protest strategies to electoral politics. 
Recent examples include strategies by stu- 
dents, women, and ethnic minorities. 
Prerequisite: same as for 300, and 224 is 
recommended but not required. 

Mrs. Mueller 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
1or2 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



Directions for Election 



Majors in sociology are required to include in 
their program 102, 201 , and 300. Students 
planning graduate work in the field are ad- 
vised to include 202. 

Majors in anthropology are required to in- 
clude in their program 104, 301 , and at least 
two appropriate intermediate level anthropol- 
ogy courses. 

Students wishing a combined sociology- 
anthropology major or some other individual- 
ly designed program of study should consult 
the chairman of the department. 



Spanish 



Professor: 
Lovett 

Assistant Professor: 

Gostautas (Chairman), Gascon-Vera* 

Instructor: 
Lusky3, Viilanueva3 

Visiting Professor: 
Gutierrez 

Courses of the department are normally 
conducted in Spanish; oral expression is 
stressed. 

The department reserves the right to place 
new students in the courses for which they 
seem best prepared regardless of the number 
of units they have offered for admission. 

Qualified students may be recommended to 
spend the junior year in a Spanish-speaking 
country. See p. 39. 



100(1-2) Elementary Spanish 
2 

Introduction to grammar through directed 
conversation; stress on audio-lingual ap- 
proach. Intensive language laboratory and 
computer exercises. Three periods. 
Open to students who do not present Spanish 
for admission. 

The Staff 

102(1-2) Intermediate Spanish 
2 

Intensive review of grammar and language 
skills through practice in the classroom and 
with language laboratory and computer exer- 
cises. Readings by contemporary Hispano- 
American writers. Emphasis on vocabulary 
building and oral and written expression. 
Three periods. 

Prerequisite: two admission units in Spanish 
or 100. 



The Staff 



SPANISH 139 



104 (1) Representative Modern Authors 
1 

Analysis of selected prose works from La 
Generacion del '98 on. Authors studied in- 
clude Unamuno, Valle-lnclan, Benavente, 
Baroja, and Ortega. Constant practice in writ- 
ing and speaking. Thiree periods. 
Prerequisite: thiree admission units or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Lovett 

201 (1) (2) Oral and Written Communication 
1 

Practice in conversation and writing to in- 
crease fluency and accuracy in the use of idio- 
matic Spanish. Not open to students who 
have taken 230. 

Prerequisite: 102 or 104 or four admission 
units. 

Mr. Villanueva 

202 (2)* Hispano-American Literature I 
1 

Critical and aesthetic problems in the field of 
fiction as seen through the works of Isaacs, 
Sarmiento, Quiroga, Guiraldes, Azuela, Gar- 
cia Marquez, et al. Offered in alternation with 
205. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Gostautas 

203 (1)* Modern Spanish Literature 
1 

From La Generacion del '98 to the Spanish 
Civil War. Dominant themes and innovations 
in such authors as Unamuno, A. Machado, 
Garcia Lorca, Guillen and Salinas. Offered in 
alternation with 204. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Gutierrez 

204 (1)* Post-Civil War Spanish Literature 

1 

From post-civil war literature to today. Auth- 
ors studied include Cela, Goytisolo, Miguel 
Hernandez, and Bias de Otero. Offered in al- 
ternation with 203. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Gascon-Vera 



205 (2)* Hispano-American Literature II 
1 

A selection of such outstanding Latin Ameri- 
can essayists, poets, and playwrights as El 
Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 
Neruda, Lugones, Ruben Dario, et al. Offered 
in alternation with 202. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Gostautas 

206 (1) Landmarks of Spanish Literature I 
1 

Intensive study of masterpieces and authors 
chosen from the Middle Ages to the Baroque: 
Poema del Cid, La Celestina, Lazarillo de 
Tormes; Garcilaso, Fray Luis de Leon, Cer- 
vantes, Lope de Vega, Calderon. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Miss Lusky 

207 (2) Landmarks of Spanish Literature II 
1 

From the Enlightenment to 19th century Real- 
ism. The evolution from neoclassicism to the 
realistic novel: Moratin. Larra, Espronceda, 
Becquer and Perez Gaidos. 
Prerequisite: same as for 201 . 

Mr. Lovett 

228 (2)* Latin American Literature: Fantasy 
and Revolution 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 228. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

229 (2)* Spanish Literature in Translation 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Extra- 
departmental 229. 

Miss Lusky 

230 (1) Spanish for the Bilingual 
1 

This course is comparable to freshman com- 
position in English in that it provides a basis 
for oral and written competence for the bilin- 
gual American of Hispanic background. Em- 
phasis on the behavior of parts of speech as 
they relate to English. Conversational prac- 
tice stressing the building of verbal skills for 
discussion of academic and intellectual top- 
ics. Readings from selected short stories, 
newspapers, and magazines for discussion 
and imitation. Not open to students who have 
taken 201 . 

Prerequisite: a bilingual background and 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Villanueva 



140 SPANISH 



260(1)* The Hispanic World 
1 

For description and prerequisite see History 
260. 

Mr. Lovett 

261 (1)* History of Spain 
1 

For description and prerequisite see History 
261. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Lovett 

301 (2)* Drama of the Seventeenth Century 
1 

The characteristics of the Spanish drama of 
the Golden Age. Analysis of ideals of this 
period as revealed in the drama. Representa- 
tive masterpieces of Lope de Vega, Guillen de 
Castro and Ruiz de Alarcon, Tirso de Molina, 
Calderon. Offered in alternation with 302. 
Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 
two Grade II units including one unit in 
literature. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Lovett 

302 (2)* Cervantes 
1 

A close reading of the Quijote with particular 
emphasis on its significance in modern litera- 
ture: the hero versus the anti-hero; the devel- 
opment of plot; levels of reality and fantasy in 
the novel; history versus fiction. Offered in 
alternation with 301 . 
Prerequisite: same as for 301. 

Mr. Gutierrez 

306 (1)* Modern Hispano-American 

Literature I 

1 

Study of the main literary currents in Mexico; 
analysis of present-day trends in prose and 
poetry: Rulfo, Fuentes, Reyes, Vasconcelos, 
Octavio Paz. Offered in alternation with 307. 
Prerequisite: same as for 301 . 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Gostautas 



310(1)* Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: El Duque de Rivas (1 791 - 
1865). In the work of this outstanding Roman- 
tic poet, Duke of Rivas, some of the most 
representative features of Spanish Romanti- 
cism can be found. The seminar will study 
Rivas' narrative poems, especially his histori- 
cal ballads, and the drama Don Alvaro o la 
fuerza del sino. Discussions of controversies 
concerning the nature of Spanish Romanti- 
cism will be emphasized. Offered in alterna- 
tion with 311. 

Prerequisite: two Grade II units in literature or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Lovett 

311(1)* Seminar 
1 

Topic for 1 977-78: The literature of Spain in 
the 15th century. A study of the literary and 
cultural life of Spain in the century preceding 
the Golden Age, with emphasis on the poets 
of the Court of Juan II, the writings of the 
Castilian humanists, the achievement of Fer- 
nando de Rojas, and the flowering of the Isa- 
belline Renaissance. Offered in alternation 
with 310. 
Prerequisite: same as for 310. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Gascon-Vera 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
lor 2 

Open by permission, or to seniors who have 
taken two Grade III units in the department. 

370(1-2) Honors Program 
2 to 4 

Required of all honors candidates in the 
department. 



307(1)* Modern Hispano-American 

Literature II 

1 

Analysis of present-day trends in prose and 
poetry: Borges, Mallea, Gabriela Mistral, Val- 
lejo, Carpentier, Cortazar, Donoso, Garcia 
Marquez. Offered in alternation with 306. 
Prerequisite: same as for 301 . 

Mr. Gostautas 



THEATRE STUDIES 141 



Directions for Election 



Course 1 00 is counted toward the degree but 
not toward the major. 

Students who begin with 100 in college and 
who wish to major should consult the chair- 
man in the second semester of their freshman 
year. 

Students may choose to major either in Pen- 
insular or Latin American literature. The Pen- 
insular major should ordinarily include 201 , 
206, 207, 301 , 302, and two additional units of 
Grade III literature in Spanish; the Latin 
American major should include 201 , 202, 205, 
306, 307, and two additional units of Grade III 
literature in Spanish. History 260 is recom- 
mended for the Latin American major; History 
261 is recommended for the Peninsular major. 
Extradepartmental 330 and 331 are recom- 
mended for both majors. 



Theatre 
Studies 



Lecturer: 

Barstow (Chairman), Levenson^ 



203 (2) Plays, Production, and Performance 
1 

The produced play considered as originally 
the creation of the dramatist but brought to 
completion in performance through the crea- 
tive collaboration of producers, directors, 
designers, and actors. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Barstow 

205 (1)* Scene Study 
1 

Study of the performed scene as the basic 
building-block of playwright, director, and 
actor. Scenes from significant plays and 
scenes written for the course regularly re- 
hearsed and performed for class criticism. 
Prerequisite: 203 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Barstow 

206(1)* Design for ttie Ttieatre 
1 

Study of changing concepts of theatrical en- 
vironment; the designer's function in the pro- 
duction process, with emphasis on perfor- 
mance as a realization of the analytical inter- 
pretation of specific plays. Offered in alterna- 
tion with 209. 
Prerequisite: same as for 205. 

Mr. Levenson 

208(1)* Contemporary Ttieatre 
1 

Mid-20th century dramatists and production 
styles; plays, producers, designers, and ac- 
tors significant in the development of con- 
temporary theatre. 

Prerequisite: 203 or permission of the 
instructor. Open to juniors and seniors 
without prerequisite. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 



Mr. Barstow 



142 EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



209 (1)* Seminar. The Design of Lighting for 
Theatrical Production 

1 

Theory and technique of the lighting of per- 
fornnance as a nnajor artistic component of 
theatrical production. Offered in alternation 
with 206. 
Prerequisite; same as for 205. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Levenson 

21 (1 -2)* H istory of the Theatre 
1 or2 

Study of theatre structures, crafts, and prac- 
tices with emphasis on acting and production 
styles as these relate to major developments 
in dramatic literature. One unit of credit may 
be given for either semester by permission of 
the instructor. 
Prerequisite: same as for 205. 

Mr. Barstow 

215(1)* Shakespeare in the Theatre 
1 

Study of production of Shakespeare's plays in 
the theatre; particular attention to 
Elizabethan stagecraft and to contemporary 
production styles; emphasis on acting and 
directing. Reports, and scenes performed for 
class criticism. 

Prerequisite: 203, and English 215 or 305 or 
306, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Barstow 

350 (1) (2) Research or Individual Study 
lor 2 

Open by permission to qualified students. 



Extradepartmental 
Majors 



The following section includes several sepa- 
rate courses of interest to students in various 
disciplines. 



Course may be elected to fulfill in part the 
distribution requirement in Group A 



Course may be elected to fulfill in part the 
distribution requirement in Group B 



Course may be elected to fulfill in part the 
distribution requirement in Group C 



Directions for Election 



A student who wishes to pursue an interest in 
theatre should consult the chairman of thea- 
tre studies about course selection which will 
emphasize dramatic literature in English and 
foreign languages together with the history 
and philosophy of art and music. 

A student who is interested in an individual 
major in theatre studies should see Interde- 
partmental Majors. 



EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 143 



Experimental Courses 



According to College legislation, the student- 
faculty Committee on Educational Research 
and Development has the authority to recom- 
mend experimental courses and programs to 
the dean of the college. Faculty members and 
students are invited to submit their ideas to 
the Committee. There are three criteria for an 
experimental course or program: (a) it should 
address a defined problem in education at 
Weliesley; (b) it should test a set of con- 
scious assumptions about learning (and the 
results of the test should be communicated 
openly); (c) it should not fit easily into con- 
ventional departmental contexts. The follow- 
ing are the experimental courses which have 
been approved for 1 976-77: 

101 (1)**** Discovery Course in Elementary 

Mathematics and Its Applications 

1 

Mathematical reasoning and its applications. 
The course requires little background and is 
conducted as a discussion group in which 
students discover mathematical structure in 
several fields, including some not often rec- 
ognized as mathematical in nature. Topics 
chosen from: network analysis, mathematics 
in music and art, graphing and interpretation 
of data, game theory, computer program- 
ming, recursion theory. Two 70-minute meet- 
ings and one two-hour meeting weekly. May 
not be counted toward the major in mathe- 
matics. Mandatory credit/noncredit. 
Open by permission of the Department of 
Mathematics with preference given in the first 
semester to freshmen. 

Ms. Sontag 

102(2)*** Science and Reality 
1 

A study leading to a better understanding of 
science as a human institution. A historical 
rather than philosophical approach, attempt- 
ing to show what science has consisted of in 
different epochs, assumptions under which 
scientists have operated, and the changes 
they have wrought in our perception of reality. 
As an experiment in education, the course 
will try to find out if a study of epochs in the 
history of science can actually affect one's 
attitude to science itself, and to the world that 
scientific work has disclosed. Especially rec- 
ommended for freshmen and sophomores. 

Mrs. Chaplin 



103 (1) (2) Techniques of Mathematics: 

Precalculus 

1 

Methods of problem-solving; an emphasis on 
development of analytic and algebraic skills 
necessary for success in studying calculus. 
The course is designed to maximize substan- 
tive success in mathematics: interaction and 
close personal attention are the rule in class; 
quizzes are given frequently with virtually 
unlimited opportunities to retake them. Three 
50-minute class meetings, two optional 
tutorial sessions weekly. Does not count 
toward the Group C distribution requirement 
or a major in mathematics. Mandatory credit/ 
noncredit. 

Open by permission of the Department of 
Mathematics. 

Ms. Roitman 

1 1 2 (2)* * * * Evolution: Change Through 

Time 

1 

Study of the concepts of evolution in the 
physical and biological world and their impact 
on man's view of himself, his place in nature, 
and his expectations for future change. 
Evidence for origins and change in the 
universe, the earth and life forms will come 
from the various scientific disciplines. 
Consideration of the historical development 
of evolutionary concepts will provide the 
opportunity to examine carefully the manner 
in which scientific concepts are formulated, 
revised, and restated; what it means to be 
"objective" in science; and the degree to 
which preconceived ideas affect what we 
observe, record, and accept in science. Two 
periods for lecture and a 3-period demonstra- 
tion section weekly. Meets the Group C distri- 
bution requirement as a nonlaboratory unit 
but does not count toward the minimum 
major in any Group C department. 
Open only to freshmen and sophomores. 

Miss Widmayer, Mr. Andrews, Miss Webster 



144 EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



120 (2) Problem Setting and the Visual 

Intellect 

1 

The course has two objectives. The first is to 
help students make the transition from rely- 
ing on the definition of problems by others to 
being able to define problems for themselves. 
Through a limited set of studio exercises, 
students will be encouraged to initiate prob- 
lems and to remain open to shifts of direction 
that subsequent work on a problem may itself 
suggest. The second objective of the course 
is to investigate the nature of visual as con- 
trasted to verbal intellect, and to understand 
some ways in which visual artists transform 
information. No previous experience in art is 
presupposed. May not be counted toward the 
major in any department. f\/iandatory credit/ 
noncredit. 

Open by permission of the instructor to fresh- 
men and sophomores. 

Mrs. Lyndon 

210 (2) Bath In 1775 and Sheridan's The 

Rivals 

1 

Through seminar meetings, attendance at 
rehearsals and observation/participation in a 
production of The Rivals, the ambience and 
cultural history of a time and place will be 
explored with special attention to civic life, 
modes and manners, decorative arts, cos- 
tume, theatre practice, etc. , in order to con- 
sider the relationship between a specific cul- 
ture and its theatre. Other faculty and guests 
will serve as resource people. No specific 
theatrical skills are required. 
Open by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Barstow 

223(1) Seminar. Cultural Change in 
American Art, Music, and Literature 
1 

Focusing on Boston and environs from the 
Federalist period through about 1840, this 
seminar will study the backgrounds, works, 
and interconnections of a small number of 
authors, architects, artists, musicians, and 
critics. The seminar will examine values of the 
period as developed and articulated in build- 
ings, art, literature, music, and cultural insti- 
tutions. Some of the problems of the period — 
e.g., nativism vs. foreign influence and the 
role of arts in a democratic society— continue 
to be crucial issues today. The seminar will be 
taught by faculty members from the depart- 
ments of art, music, and literature. An addi- 
tional task of the seminar will be to examine 
the problems of interdisciplinary studies. 
Limited enrollment. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

Mrs. Cole, Mr. O'Gorman, Mrs. Shapiro 



Extradepartmental Courses 



100 (2) Tutorial in Expository Writing 
1 

An individualized tutorial in writing, taught by 
juniors and seniors from a variety of academic 
departments. Requirements for the course 
include completion of weekly assignments in 
writing and revising and occasional reading 
assignments; weekly conferences with a stu- 
dent tutor; participation in a six-hour course 
in reading and study skills; occasional con- 
ferences with faculty advisor. Mandatory 
credit/noncredit. 
Open by permission of the class dean. 



104(1)** Classical Mythology 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Greek 
104. 

106 (1) Introduction to Chinese Culture 
1 

An examination of the philosophy, religion, 
literature, art, and music of China. Attention 
to common patterns of thought and percep- 
tion underlying these facets of Chinese cul- 
ture. 
Open to all students. 



108 (2)** Interpretations of Man in Western 

Literature 

1 

Representative views of the nature of man 
reflected in a selection of major works of 
European literature. The readings, chosen to 
emphasize the classical heritage, will include 
works of Vergil, Augustine, Dante, Machia- 
velli, Montaigne, Milton, Goethe, and Eliot. 
Open to all students. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Mr. Layman 

110(1) (2) Introduction to Automatic 

Computation 

1 

Modeling of computational processes as 
sequential algorithms. Formal and informal 
techniques for the representation of these 
algorithms and their implementation on digi- 
tal computers. Experience in programming 
and running of elementary problems, numeric 
and nonnumeric, on adigital computer. 
Open to all students. 

Mr. Ott 



EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 145 



114(1) Introduction to Linguistics 
1 

Designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the essential concepts of language descrip- 
tion. Suitable problem sets in English and in 
other languages will provide opportunities to 
study the basic systems of language organi- 
zation. Changes in linguistic methodology 
over the last century will also be discussed. 
Open to all students. 

Ms. Levitt 

201 (1)** Russian Literature in Translation I 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Russian 
201. 

202 (2)** Russian Literature in Translation II 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Russian 
202. 

203 (2)* ** The Psychology of Greek Drama 
1 

For description and prerequisite see Greei< 
203. 



21 (2) Contemporary Women: An 
Interdisciplinary Perspective 
1 

The course will draw on several disciplines to 
aid students in orienting their thinking about 
the nature of women and their actual and pos- 
sible positions in modern society. Lectures 
by Wellesley faculty members with special 
expertise in biology, economics, history, 
philosophy, political science, psychology, 
and sociology will contribute insights toward 
a better understanding of contemporary 
women. In addition to weel<ly lectures, the 
course will include weekly discussion groups. 
Open to all students with preference given to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 



216(2) Mathematics for the Physical 
Sciences 

1 

Vector calculus and introduction to tensor 
calculus, partial differential equations, boun- 
dary value problems; complex analysis; ab- 
stract vector spaces, Hilbert spaces; numeri- 
cal methods and analysis of data. Two weekly 
meetings with a third meeting every other 
week. Not open to students who have taken 
Mathematics 302, 305, or 310. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or215. Aprior 
course in physical science is recommended. 

Mr. von Foerster 



218(1) History of Science I 
1 

A topical introduction to history of science 
through examination of changing patterns of 
scientific explanation and scientific activity, 
with particular emphasis on the sources, sig- 
nificance and impact of the 17th century 
scientific revolution. Two periods weekly with 
a double period every other week for labora- 
tory-discussion. 

Open only to juniors and seniors who have 
completed the Group requirements and 
have taken a unit of either history or philos- 
ophy or Experimental 102. 

Miss Webster 

219(2) History of Science II 
1 

A historical study of the nature, structure and 
organization of science and scientific thought 
with particular emphasis on episodes from 
physical and biological science in the 19th 
and 20th centuries. Two periods weekly with a 
double period every other week for laboratory- 
discussion. 
Prerequisite: Extradepartmental 218. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Webster 

Offered in 1977-78. 

220(1)** The Modern French Novelin 

Translation 

1 

Psychology and aesthetics in works by Flau- 
bert, Gide, Sartre, Beckett, and Robbe- 
Grillet, with emphasis on Proust's Remem- 
brance of Things Past. 
Open to students who have not fulfilled the 
language requirement in French (through 
examinations or courses) or by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mr. Stambolian 

221 (2)** Politics and Literature in Post-War 
Germany 

1 

Political and social influences on the litera- 
ture of East and West Germany since 1945. 
Studies of works by Biermann, Weiss, Hoch- 
huth, Grass, and others. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Ward 



146 EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



228(2)* ** Latin America Literature: 

Fantasy and Revolution 

1 

Aesthetic and sociopolitical problems in the 
works of contennporary Latin American writ- 
ers, as seen by Garcia Marquez, Cortazar, 
Paz, Donoso and Neruda. Special attention 
will be given to the imaginative vision of Jorge 
Luis Borges. 

Open to all students except those who have 
taken Spanish 306 and 307. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Miss Lusky 

229(2)* ** Spanish Literature in 
Translation 

1 

Through the writings of Cervantes, Tirso de 
Molina, Calderdn, and the author of the Laza- 
rillo, four universal themes will be analyzed: 
idealism and reality in the figures of Don Qui- 
jote and Sancho; the myth of Don Juan in El 
burlador de Sevilla; the picaresque in El Laza- 
rillo de Tormes, and free will and predestina- 
tion in La vida es sueho. Additional readings 
of modern authors such as Perez Galdds and 
Unamuno will provide further insight into 
these recurring themes. 
Open to all students except those who have 
taken Spanish 206, 301 and 302. 

Miss Lusky 

230 (2) Seminar. Introduction to Computer 
Science 

1 

Selected topics: Advanced programming 
techniques, elements of formal languages, 
automata and computability theory. 
Prerequisite: Extradepartmental 110 and 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Ott 

231 (2) Interpretation and Judgment of 
Films 

1 

Close analysis of masterpieces of film art, 
drawn from the work of such directors as 
Eisenstein, Chaplin, Keaton, Dreyer, Ophuls, 
Welles, Bergman, Fellini, Godard, and Anto- 
nioni. Many short written assignments. Fre- 
quent screenings in the early part of the week 
of the film under discussion; students are 
required to see each film at least twice. 
Open to ail students. 

Mr. Garis 



235 (2) Contemporary Approaches to Dance 

Composition: Practice and Theory 

1 

Mid-20th century developments in dance. 
Practice in composition and experience in 
critical evaluation of student work. Emphasis 
on aesthetic problems related to chance and 
indeterminism in dance. Reading by Arnheim, 
Cage, McLuhan, and Peckham among others. 
Open to all students. Performance skills in or 
previous study of any art form is recommend- 
ed but not required. 

Ms. Trexler 

237(2)* History and Structure of the 

Romance Languages 

1 

Open to students of French, Italian. Spanish, 
and Latin, this course deals with the develop- 
ment of the modern Romance languages from 
Vulgar Latin. Primary emphasis will be placed 
on examining this development from a lin- 
guistic point of view, stressing general prin- 
ciples of historical change. Some reading and 
comparison of early texts in each of the lan- 
guages will also be included. Offered in alter- 
nation with 238. 

Prerequisite: Extradepartmental 1 14 or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Ms. Levitt 

238 (2)* Linguistic Analysis of Social and 
Literary Expression 

1 

An interdisciplinary course designed for stu- 
dents in the humanities and social sciences 
based on the application of linguistics to the 
analysis of language in its written and spoken 
forms. Emphasis on the ways literary styles 
are created, and levels of social expression 
are conveyed, by variations in the structural 
and semantic organization of language. Of- 
fered in alternation with 237. 
Prerequisite: Extradepartmental 1 1 4 or by 
permission of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

Ms. Levitt 

241(1)* ** Chinese Literature in 
Translation I 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Chinese 
241. 

Not offered in 1976-77. 

242(1)* ** Chinese Literature in 

Translation II 

1 

For description and prerequisite see Chinese 
242. 



EXTRADEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 147 



245 (2) Films and the Novel in Italy 
1 

An exploration of the close interrelationship 
between Italian cinema and fiction in the 
development of both social realism and ex- 
perimental modes of poetic expression. Spe- 
cial emphasis on novels by authors such as 
Moravia, Pavese, Bassani, Pasolini, and 
analysis of films directed by De Sica, Rossel- 
lini, Fellini, Visconti, Bertolucci, Pasolini, 
and Cavani. Given in English. Students doing 
the reading and paper vi/riting in Italian may 
count this course toward the major in Italian. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

Mrs. Ellerman 

250(1) Women and Development 
1 

Women's participation in development and its 
impact on their status in society in Africa, 
Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. 
Emphasis on comparative analysis. General 
theories about modernization will be exam- 
ined against evidence from studies of differ- 
ent regions, income levels, rural-urban con- 
texts, etc. Topics will include labor force par- 
ticipation, social networks, political partici- 
pation, and familial roles. Historical and 
contemporary materials to be used. 
Prerequisite: One unit of relevant work in 
economics, history, political science or so- 
ciology/anthropology or permission of the 
instructor. 

Ms. Elliott 

330 (1) Seminar. Comparative Literature 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: Romance-epics of the 
Renaissance. Study and comparison of three 
masterpieces— Ariosto's Orlando Furioso 
(1516-1532), Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered 
(1575), Spenser's The Faerie Queene (1590- 
1596)— and of their cultural milieux (High 
Renaissance, Counter-Reformation, Eliza- 
bethan). Topics for discussion may include, 
for students interested in the visual arts, epi- 
sodes from Ariosto and Tasso as interpreted 
by a long line of eminent painters. 
Open to students who have taken or are taking 
at least one unit of foreign language beyond 
the college requirement and who have taken 
at least two units of Grade III literature. Also 
open by permission of the instructor to other 
students conversant with the art and culture 
of the periods represented. 

Mr. Layman 



331 (2) Seminar. The Theatre Since 1945 
1 

Comparative study of the major innovative 
forms of contemporary drama from the works 
of Beckett. Brecht, and Artaud to the most 
recent theatrical experiments in Europe and 
America. New critical approaches and play- 
writing encouraged. 
Open by permission of the instructor to 
juniors and seniors. 

Mr. Stambolian 

335 (1) Seminar. American Studies 
1 

Topic for 1 976-77: America as the promised 
land. An examination of selected texts drawn 
from various disciplines and historical eras 
which attempts to define the promise of the 
American experience and analyze the fulfill- 
ment or failure of that promise. 
Open by permission of the instructor to Amer- 
ican studies majors, and to other qualified 
students if space permits. 

Mr. Auerbach 



Courses in Natural Philosophy 



Throughout the past and into our own times 
human curiosity and human imagination have 
been joined in a struggle to understand some- 
thing of the structure of the universe, the 
structure of matter, and the nature of living 
systems. The beliefs which have emerged 
from the struggle express the themes of 
Western civilization: its philosophy, its art, 
its literature, its values. 

Because this quest for knowledge and under- 
standing is not the province of any single dis- 
cipline, nor simply of science, the phrase 
Natural Philosophy is more truly descriptive 
than History of Science. History of Science 
provides an orientation for examining the 
specific activities of practitioners of science 
and seeing the ways in which scientific ideas, 
methods, and theories both reflect and in- 
fluence man's thought in other areas. The ac- 
tivities of scientists are imaginative and con- 
ceptual as well as observational and experi- 
mental, and a fuller understanding of these 
activities and the scientific beliefs they 
produce comes from examining them in the 
context of the social, political, economic, and 
intellectual milieu of their times. 

Although Wellesley does not have a depart- 
ment or major in History of Science, there are 
many courses in Wellesley's curriculum, de- 



148 INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



partmental and extradepartmental, which 
could be designated Natural Philosophy. 
Whether they plan majors in mathematics, the 
social sciences, laboratory sciences, or the 
humanities, many students will find in a 
selection from these courses a congenial and 
satisfying framework for integrating many 
facets of their undergraduate education. 



Chemistry 102 (2) 

Contemporary Problems in Chemistry I! 

Chemistry 306(1) 

Seminar. Chemistry and the Nobel Prizes 

Experimental102(2) 

Science and Reality 

Experimental 112(2) 

Evolution: Change Through Time 

Extradepartmental 218 (1) 

History of Science I 

Extradepartmental 219 (2) 

History of Science II 

History 235 (2) 

Medieval and Early Modern Intellectual 
History 

History 236(1) 

Modern European Intellectual History 

Philosophy 200(1) (2) 

Modern Sources of Contemporary Philosophy 

Philosophy 21 7 (2) 

Philosophy of Science 

Philosophy 220(1) 

History of Modern Philosophy from the 
Renaissance to Kant 

Philosophy 221 (2) 

History of Modern Philosophy from Kant to 
the Early Twentieth Century 

Philosophy 327 (2) 

Seminar. Ideas of Progress 

Physics 101 (2) 

Physics in Perspective 

Physics 102 (2)* 

Physics of Perception and Aesthetics 

Physics 103(2)* 

Energy 

Physics 249(1)* 

Selected Topics 

Psychology 325 (2) 

History of Psychology 

Religion 107(1) (2) 

Crises of Belief in Modern Religion 



Interdepartmental 
Majors 



The College offers five established interde- 
partmental major programs: classical civiliza- 
tion, classical and Near Eastern archaeology. 
East Asian studies, medieval /renaissance 
studies, and molecular biology. In addition, a 
student may design an individual major. All 
interdepartmental and individual majors must 
include at least four units of work in one de- 
partment above the Grade I level, and at least 
two Grade III units. Some representative in- 
dividual majors and courses available for 
them are included in this section. 



Classical Civilization 

Director: Lefkowitz 



Students who wish a classical civilization 
major can plan with the Departments of Greek 
and Latin an appropriate sequence of 
courses, which should include work in art, 
history, philosophy, and literature. Such a 
program should always contain at least four 
units in the original language. Basic knowl- 
edge of French or German is recommended. 

The selections listed below are available for 
majors in classical civilization. 

Greek: All courses in the original. Latin: All 
courses in the original. 

Art 100 (1-2) 

Introductory Course 

Art 200(1)* 

Classical Art 

Art 334 (2)* 

Seminar. Problems in Archaeological Method 
and Theory 

Greek 104(1) 

Classical Mythology 

Greek 203 (2)* 

The Psychology of Greek Drama 

Greek 249 (2)* 
Selected Topics 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 149 



History 150 (2) c 

Ruler as God in Antiquity 

History 230(1)* 

History of Greece 

Latin 328 (2) 

Problenns in Ancient History and 
Historiography 

Philosophy 101(1) (2) 

Plato's Dialogues as an Introduction to 
Philosophy 

Philosophy 311 (2) 

Aristotle 

Religion and Biblical Studies 104 (1) (2) 

The Hebrew Scriptures 

Religion and Biblical Studies 105 (1) (2) 

The Person and Message of Jesus 

Religion and Biblical Studies 204 (1)* 

Christian Beginnings in the Hellenistic World 

Religion and Biblical Studies 207 (2) 

New Testannent Greek 

Religion and Biblical Studies 307(2)* 

Seminar. The New Testament 



Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology 

Director: Marvin 



anthropology, as well as from the architecture 
and anthropology programs at MIT. Certain 
courses in statistical methods and geology 
are also very useful. The introductory course 
in archaeology (Sociology 106) or equivalent 
and the course on the development of archae- 
ological theory (Sociology 341 ) are required 
for all archaeology majors, regardless of area 
specialty. 

Students should plan for at least one summer 
of excavation and travel, and are expected to 
complete units of independent study as well 
as regular course offerings. 

Because the requirements for this major are 
somewhat complex, students are urged to 
declare an interest early so that a comfortable 
program can be devised for each student. 



East Asian Studies 

Directors; Clapp, Lin 



Students interested in graduate work and a 
career in Chinese studies should take exten- 
sive Chinese language work; students inter- 
ested in a broader range of courses on Asia 
may take a minimum of Chinese language 
work or none. 

The following courses are available for majors 
in East Asian studies: 

Art 248 (2) 

Chinese Art 



The purpose of a major in classical and Near 
Eastern archaeology is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the complex societies of the Old 
World in antiquity. 

Students who major in archaeology may 
choose Greece, Rome, or the ancient Near 
East as a principal area of interest. Students 
who concentrate in classical archaeology 
must normally have at least an elementary 
knowledge of both Greek and Latin, and an 
advanced knowledge of the literature of that 
country (Greece or Rome) which is their spe- 
cial area of concern. Students who concen- 
trate on the ancient Near East must have 
knowledge of one ancient Near Eastern lan- 
guage and have taken Sociology 242 which 
details the emergence of early urban soci- 
eties. 

The program for each student will be planned 
individually from courses in the departments 
of art, Greek, history, Latin, philosophy, reli- 
gion and biblical studies, and sociology and 



Art 249(1) 

Far Eastern Art 

Art 337 (2)* 

Seminar. Chinese Art 

Chinese 101 (1-2) 

Elementary Spoken Chinese 

Chinese 102 (1-2) 

Basic Chinese Reading and Writing 

Chinese 201 (1-2) 

Intermediate Chinese Reading 

Chinese 202 (1-2) 

Intermediate Conversational Chinese 

Chinese 241 (1)* 

Chinese Literature in Translation I 

Chinese 242(1)* 

Chinese Literature in Translation II 



150 INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



Chinese 252(1) 

Readings in Modern Style Writings 

Chinese 300 (2) 

Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature 

Chinese 301 (2) 

Readings in Expository Writings of Revolu- 
tionary China, before and after 1949 

Chinese 310(1) (2) 

Introduction to Literary Chinese 

Chinese 311 (2) 

Readings in Elementary Classical Chinese 

Chinese 316(1) 

Chinese Literature in the Twentieth Century 

Extradepartmental 106 (1) 

Introduction to Chinese Culture 

History 271 (1) 

Japanese History 

History 275(1) 

Premodern Chinese History 

History 276 (2) 

Modern Chinese History 

History 345(1) 

Seminar. Chinese History I 

History 346 (2) 

Seminar. Chinese History II 

Political Science 300 (2) 

Politics of East Asia 

Religion and Biblical Studies 108 (1) 

Sacred Writings of the East 

Religion and Biblical Studies 253 (2) 

Buddhism in China and Japan 

Religion and Biblical Studies 254 (1) 

Chinese Religions 



Numerous opportunities for study abroad 
exist for those who wish to broaden their 
experience and supplement research skills 
through direct contact with European and 
Mediterranean culture. Majors who are con- 
templating postgraduate academic or pro- 
fessional careers should consult faculty advi- 
sors, who will assist them in planning a se- 
quence of courses that will provide them with 
a sound background in the linguistic and criti- 
cal techniques essential to further work in 
their chosen fields. Individual interests and 
needs can be accommodated through inde- 
pendent study projects carried out under the 
supervision of one or more faculty members 
and designed to supplement, or substitute 
for, advanced seminar-level work. English 321 
is the seminar recommended for majors in 
medieval /renaissance studies in 1976-77. 
Among the courses available for majors and 
prospective majors are: 

Art 202 (2) 

Medieval Sculpture and Painting 

Art 203(1) 

Cathedrals and Castles of the High Middle 
Ages 

Art 215(1) 

European Art to the Renaissance 

Art 251 (2) 

Italian Renaissance Art 

Art 254 (2)* 

Art of the City: Medieval, Renaissance and 
Baroque 

Art 302(1)* 

Italian Painting: The Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Centuries 

Art 304 (1)* 

Late Medieval and Renaissance Sculpture 

Art 308 (2)* 

Renaissance and Baroque Architecture 

Art 311 (2)* 

Painting of Northern Europe 



Medieval/Renaissance Studies 

Directors: Cox, Fergusson 



The major in medieval /renaissance studies 
enables students to explore the infinite rich- 
ness and variety of western civilization from 
later Greco-Roman times to the Age of the 
Renaissance and Reformation, as reflected in 
art, history, music, literature, and language. 



Art 330 (2)* 

Seminar. Italian Art 

Art 332 (2)* 

Seminar. The Arts in England in the 
Thirteenth Century 

English 215(1) (2) 

Shakespeare 

English 220(1) 

Chaucer I 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 151 



English 221 (2) 

Chaucer II 

English 233 (2)* 

English Renaissance Tragedy in Perspective 

English 305(1) 

Advanced Studies in Shakespeare I 

English 306 (2) 

Advanced Studies in Shakespeare II 

English 308 (2)* 

The Middle Ages and Renaissance in England 

English 312(1) 

The English Language 

English 321 (1) 

Seminar. The Arthurian Legends 

Extradepartmental 108 (2) 

Interpretations of Man in Western Literature 

Extradepartmental 229 (2)* 

Spanish Literature in Translation 

Extradepartmental 330 (1) 

Seminar. Comparative Literature 

French 212(1) 

Medieval French Literature I 

French 300 (2) 

French Literature in the Sixteenth Century 

French 312(1) 

Medieval French Literature II 

History 100(1) (2) 

Medieval and Early Modern European History 

History 150 (2) c 

Ruler as God in Antiquity 

History 230(1)* 

History of Greece 

History 231 (1)* 
History of Rome 

History 232 (2) 

Medieval Civilization, 1000 to 1300 

History 233(1) 

The Renaissance and Reformation 
Movements, 1300 to 1600 

History 235 (2) 

Medieval and Early Modern Intellectual 
History 



History 238(1) 

History of England to 1500 

History 239 (2) 

History of England, 1500 to 1700 

History 330 (2) 

Seminar. Medieval/Early Modern Europe 

History 333(1) 

Seminar. European Intellectual History 

Italian 207 (2) 

Significant Moments of the Italian Literature 
of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 

Italian 301 (1-2) 

Dante 

Latin 207 (2) 

Medieval Latin 

Latin 328 (2) 

Problems in Ancient History and 
Historiography 

Music 303 (2) 

The Middle Ages and the Renaissance 

Political Science 240 (1)* 

Classical and Medieval Political Theory 

Religion and Biblical Studies 216 (1)* 

Classical Theology 

Spanish 206(1) 

Landmarks of Spanish Literature I 

Spanish 302 (2)* 

Cervantes 



Molecular Biology 

Director: Levy 



The departments of biological sciences and 
chemistry offer an interdepartmental major in 
molecular biology which gives opportunity for 
advanced study of the chemistry of biological 
systems. 

In addition to two units of biochemistry (221 
or [324] and 326 or [325]), the area of concen- 
tration consists of four units of chemistry 
(1 00 or 1 03 or [1 07], 1 04 or [1 06], [201 ] or 21 1 , 
and [203] or 231); five units of biology (100, 
101 , 200 or 206, 205, and one Grade III unit 
with a scheduled laboratory, excluding 350 or 
370); Physics 104, 105, orllO; and Mathe- 
matics [111], 116, or the equivalent. 



152 INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



Individual Majors 



Students who are interested in interdisciplin- 
ary work may design an individual nnajor, in 
consultation with two faculty advisors. The 
program for the individual major is subject to 
the approval of the Committee on Curriculum 
and Instruction. In setting up guidelines for 
the individual major, the committee hopes to 
extend the possibility for a major which 
crosses traditional departmental lines to 
those students who could most benefit from 
such a major and to assure suitable guidance 
to the student in selecting appropriate 
courses for the major. The program for the 
individual major should include four units in 
one department above the Grade I level, and 
two Grade III units. 

The majors and suggested courses listed 
below are representative of the more estab- 
lished programs: 



American Studies 

Director: Auerbach 



American studies is a highly flexible, inter- 
disciplinary program designed to illuminate 
varieties of the American experience. A wide 
selection of courses in different departments 
within the College may be taken for credit in 
the major. This flexibility enables students to 
develop individual programs of study. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to integrate diverse 
elements of American experience by working 
closely with their advisors and by taking 
courses which focus on what is enduring and 
characteristic in American culture. 

There are no required courses. Among the 
courses which have been designed to assist 
students in developing their own ideas about 
characteristic themes in American culture is 
Extradepartmental 335, America as the Prom- 
ised Land. 

The following is a partial list of other courses 
available that may be included in an American 
studies major: 

Art 226(1) 

History of Afro-American Art 

Art 231 (1) 

American Art from Colonial Times to the Civil 
War 

Art 232 (2) 

American Art from the Civil War to the 
Foundation of the New York School 



Black Studies 206 (1-2) 

Afro-American History 

Black Studies 220(1)* 

The Black Religious Experience in America 

Black Studies 230 (1-2) 

The Black Woman in American Society 

Economics 204(1)* 

American Economic History 

Economics 230 (1)* 

Labor Economics 

Economics 305 (2)* 

Industrial Organization 

English 150 (1)3 

Literary Boston 

English 223(1) 

American Literature I 

English 224 (2) 

American Literature II 

English 225(1) (2) 

American Literature III 

English 228 (2) 

Black Literature in America 

History 250(1) 

The First Frontier 

History 251 (2) 

The United States in the Eighteenth Century 

History 252(1) 

The United States in the Nineteenth Century 

History 253 (2) 

The United States in the Twentieth Century 

Political Science 210 (1) (2) 

Voters, Parties and Elections 

Political Science 310 (2) 

Political Decision-Making in the United States 

Political Science 332(1) 

The Supreme Court in American Politics 

Political Science 340 (1)* 

American Political Thought 

Religion 218(1) 

Religion in America 

Sociology 103(1) 

American Society 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 153 



Sociology 210 (2) 

Racial and Ethnic Minorities 

Sociology 349 (2) 

Seminar. Strategies of Social Change in 
Contemporary America 



Language Studies 

The following courses are available in 
language studies: 

English 312(1) 

The English Language 

Extradepartmental 114(1) 

Introduction to Linguistics 

Extradepartmental 237 (2)* 

History and Structure of the Romance 
Languages 

Extradepartmental 238 (2)* 

Linguistic Analysis of Social and Literary 
Expression 

French 308(1) 

Studies in Language lla 

French 309 (2) 

Studies in Language Mb 

Philosophy 204 (2) 

Philosophy of Language 

Psychology 216(1) 

Psycholinguistics 

Psychology 318(2) 

Seminar. The Psychology of Language 

Russian 249 (2)* 

Language 



Theatre Studies 

Director: Barstow 



The individual major in theatre studies offers 
opportunity for study of the theatre through 
its history, literature, criticism, and related 
arts and through the disciplines of its practi- 
tioners: playwrights, directors, designers, 
actors, and producers. 

The student's program in the major may be 
adapted to individual interests. Focus may be 
on the theatre and a national dramatic litera- 
ture, on the theatre and related arts, or, within 



the general demands of the curriculum, a vari- 
ety of emphases may be evolved, including 
work in such areas as philosophy, history, 
psychology, sociology, and religion. 

At least four units above Grade I normally 
should be elected in a literature department 
(English, French, German, Greek and Latin, 
Italian, Russian, or Spanish), with emphasis 
on dramatic literature. At least two units 
above Grade I normally should be elected in 
art or music. Two of the six units thus speci- 
fied (or their equivalents) must be Grade III. 

Students electing to design a major in theatre 
studies normally will take at least one resi- 
dent semester of concentrated work in the 
discipline either with the National Theatre 
Institute at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center 
in Waterford, Connecticut, or at another insti- 
tution in the Twelve College Exchange Pro- 
gram, to supplement and enrich their work at 
Wellesley. 

Since developments in the theatre arts are the 
results of stage experiments and because the 
theatre performance is an expression of thea- 
tre scholarship, it is expected that theatre 
studies majors will elect to complement for- 
mal study of theatre history and theory with 
practical experience in the extracurricular 
production program of the Wellesley College 
Theatre. 

In addition to the offerings of the theatre 
studies department, the following courses are 
specifically relevant to the individual major in 
theatre studies: 

English 212(1) (2) 

Modern Drama 

English 215(1) (2) 

Shakespeare 

English 233 (2)* 

English Renaissance Tragedy in Perspective 

English 305 (1) 

Advanced Studies in Shakespeare I 

English 306 (2) 

Advanced Studies in Shakespeare II 

Extradepartmental 235 (2) 

Contemporary Approaches to Dance 
Composition: Practice and Theory 

Extradepartmental 331 (2) 

Seminar. The Theatre Since 1 945 

French 213(1) (2) 

French Drama in the Twentieth Century 



154 INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 



Greek 302 (2)* 

Aeschylus and Sophocles 

Greek 304 (2)* 

Euripides 

History 236(1) 

Modern European Intellectual History 

Italian 302 (1)* 

The Theatre in Italy 

Music 200(1) (2) 

Design in Music 

Music 307 (2) 

The Opera 

Philosophy 203(1) (2) 

Philosophy of Art 

The following courses are specifically 
relevant to the individual design major in 
theatre studies: 

Art 100 (1-2) 

Introductory Courses 

Art 105(1) (2) 

Introductory Drawing 

Art 108(1) (2) 

Introductory Photography 

Art 209 (2) 

Design I 

Art 210(1) 

Design II: Color 

Majors taking Design for the Theatre (206) are 
encouraged to take Art 100 and one or more of 
the following, before taking 206: Art 105, 108, 
209, 210. 



Urban Studies 



An individual major in urban studies may be 
designed by students in consultation with 
two faculty advisors, each representing differ- 
ent departments. These programs are subject 
to the approval of the Committee on Curricu- 
lum and Instruction. Normally, a program 
should include 4 units in one department 
above the Grade I level. Moreover, at least 2 
units must be at the advanced (Grade III) 
level. This concentration is to provide majors 
with a sound disciplinary background and to 
equip them for further academic or profes- 
sional work. Such concentration usually 
occurs within the Departments of Art, Black 
Studies, Economics, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, or Sociology. The inter- 
disciplinary approach based on particular 
student interests may emphasize urban 
problem-solving and public administration, 
urban design, urban education, or the urban 
environment. An understanding of the 
processes which create and sustain urban 
systems should be at the core of an urban 
studies major. 

Students should note carefully the course 
prerequisites set by each department. It is 
also strongly recommended that majors elect 
basic methodology courses in their field of 
concentration (e.g.. Sociology 201 , 202 se- 
quence; Political Science 249, etc.). This 
focus will provide techniques and tools of 
analysis pertinent to a disciplined perspective 
on urban processes and/or policy. Students 
are also encouraged to apply for experientially 
based programs such as the Urban Politics 
Summer Internship, the Sociology Internship 
Seminar on Organizations, or programs spon- 
sored by the Career Services Office and Office 
of the Dean of Academic Programs. Addi- 
tional opportunities for courses and field 
work are available through MIT cross- 
registration. 

These and other elements majors may draw 
upon and contribute to are described in great- 
er detail in the Urban Studies Handbook. 

The following courses are available for majors 
in urban studies: 

Art 254 (2)* 

Art of the City: Medieval, Renaissance, and 
Baroque 

Biological Sciences 307 (1) 

Topics in Ecology 



Black Studies 105 (2) 

Introduction to the Black Experience 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 155 



Black Studies 150 (1) a (2) a 

The Internationalization of Black Power 



Women's Studies 



Black Studies 206 (2) 

Afro-Annerican History Since 1865 

Black Studies 240 (1-2) 

Inner-City Community Development 

Economics 225(1) 

Urban Economics 

Economics 249 (2) 

Seminar. The Economics of Environmental 
Disruption 

Education 216 (2) 

Education, Society and Social Policy 

History 252(1) 

The United States in the Nineteenth Century 

History 253 (2) 

The United States in the Twentieth Century 

History 254(1) 

United States Urban History 

History 336 (2) 

Seminar. American Urban History 

Political Science 212 (2) 

Urban Politics 

Political Science 315 (2) 

Bureaucratic Behavior and Policy Analysis 

Political Science 333 (2) 

Seminar. Law and Social Change 

Psychology 313(2) 

Seminar. Group Psychology 

Psychology 340 (2) 

Social Psychology and Industrial Society 

Sociology 209(1) 

Social Stratification and Power 

Sociology 210 (2) 

Racial and Ethnic Minorities 

Sociology 220 (2) 

The Metropolitan Community 

Sociology 242 (2)* 

The Emergence of Early Urban Societies 

Sociology 320 (2) 

Urban Poverty 

Sociology 329(1) (2) 

Seminar. Human Service Organizations 



The following courses are available in 
women's studies. Other courses are available 
each semester through cross-registration 
with MIT. 

Black Studies 230 (1-2) 

The Black Woman in American Society 

Black Studies 312 (2) 

Seminar. Black Sociology 

Education 208 (2) 

Growing Up Female 

English 150 (2) c 

Women Writers 

Extradepartmental 210 (2) 

Contemporary Women: An Interdisciplinary 
Perspective 

French 319(1) 

Women and Literary Expression 

History 255 (2) 

Women in American History 

History 342 (2) 

Seminar. African History 

Psychology 301 (2) 

Seminar. Sex-typing in Childhood 
Socialization 

Psychology 303(1) (2) 

The Psychological Implications of Being 
Female 

Psychology 328(1) (2) 

Seminar. The Child, the Family, and Family 
Treatment 

Psychology 349 (2) 

Child Development and Social Policy 

Religion and Biblical Studies 208 (1) 

Ethics 

Russian 320 (2)* 

Seminar. Two Russian Poets 

Sociology 21 1 (2) 

Family and Society 




.*- 






.»'*i:» 






*a^:^4%-^j 



•^■■i 



Officers of Instruction 




158 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Tim AarsetS 

B.A., University of California (Santa Barbara); 
M.A., D.M.A., Stanford University 

Lecturer in Music 

Jeffrey Abramson3 

B.A., Amherst College 

Instructor in Political Science 

Barry Allen^ 

B.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Mary Mennes Allen 

B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

Lilian Armstrong Anderson 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D., Colunnbia University 

Associate Professor of Art 

Susan Anderson-Khleif 

B.A., University of Minnesota; 
A.M., Harvard University 

Instructor in Sociology and Anthropology 

Harold E. Andrews III 

B.A., College of Wooster; 
M.A., University of Missouri; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Louis W. Arnold 

Instructor in Guitar 

Jerold S. Auerbacfi 

B.A., Oberlin College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Colunnbia University 

Associate Professor of History 

Grazia Avitabile 

B.A., M.A., Smith College; 
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Professor of Italian 

Mary Jo Bane^ 

B.S., Georgetown University; 
M.A.T., Ed.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Education and 
Associate Director, Center for Research on 
Women 

Evelyn Claire Barry 

A.B., A.M., Radcliffe College 

Associate Professor of Music 



Paul Rogers Barstow 

B.A., Williams College; 
M.F.A., Yale University 

Lecturer in Theatre Studies 
Director, Wellesley College Theatre 

Ann Streeter Batchelder 

B.A., Wheaton College; 

M.Ed., Framingham State College; 

Ed.D., Boston University 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

James F. Beaton 

B.A., Boston College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Assistant Professor of English 

Robert Andrew Bekes 

B.S., University of California (Berkeley); 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Lecturer in Mathematics 

Carolyn Shaw Bell 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; 
Ph.D., London University 

Katharine Coman Professor of Economics 

Priscilla Benson^ 

B.A., Smith College 

Laboratory Instructor in Physics 

James R. Besancon 

B.S., Yale University; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Frank Bidart3 

B.A., University of California (Riverside); 
A.M., Harvard University 

Lecturer in English 

D. Scoft Birney 

B.S., Yale College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Professor of Astronomy 

Arlene Blum*'' 

B.A., Reed College; 

Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Ella P. Bones 

B.A., Cornell University; 
A.M., Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of Russian 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 159 



William T. Bowie 

B.S., Trinity College; 
Ph.D., Howard University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Ingrid G. Brainard^ 

Ph.D., Georg August University, Gottingen, 
Germany 

Lecturer in Music 

Maxine Bridger^ 

B.S., Queens College; 
M.A., Brandeis University 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Judith Claire Brown 

B.A., Rice University; 

Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Sheila Brown 

B.A., St. Olaf College; 
M.S., University of Colorado 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Sylvia G. Brown 

B.A., Vassar College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin 

Barbara W. Burke3 

B.A., Wellesley College 

Instructor in Psychology 

Judith W. Burling 

B.A., University of Iowa; 
M.S., Smith College 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Douglas E. Busch 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; 
Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

James Joseph Byleckie^ 

B.S., Stevens Institute of Technology; 
A.M., Harvard University 

Laboratory Instructor in Physics 

Stanford Calderwood^ 

B.A., University of Colorado 

Visiting Professor of Economics 

Lemuel Martinez Carroll^ 

B.S., Arkansas State College 

Lecturer in Music 



Margaret Deutsch Carroll 

B.A., Barnard College; 
M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in Art 

Karl E. Case 

A.B., Miami University; 
M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in Economics 

Maud H. Chaplin 

B.A., Wellesley College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Assistant Professor of History 
Associate Dean of the College 
Assistant to the President 

Nancy Cirillo 

Instructor in Violin 
Director of Chamber Music 

Anne de Coursey Clapp 

B.A., Smith College; 

M.F.A., Yale University; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Art 

BIythe McVickerClinchy* 

B.A., Smith College; 

M.A., New School for Social Research; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Barbara J. Cochran 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 
Ed.D., Boston University 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Paul A. Cohen* 

B.A., University of Chicago; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian 
Studies 

Phyllis B.Cole*2 

B.A., Oberlin College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of English 

Ann Congleton* 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Richard M. Cook 

B.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music 

Instructor in Trumpet and Cornetto 



160 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Francis Judd Cooke^ 

B.A., Yale University; 

Mus.B., University of Edinburgh 

Lecturer in Music 

Robert K. Cording3 

B.A., Montclair State College 

Instructor in English 

Helen Storm Corsa 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Martha Hale Shackford Professor of English 

Eugene Lionel Cox 

B.A., College of Wooster; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Professor of History 

Mary D. Coyne 

A.B., Emmanuel College; 
M.A., Wellesley College; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

Martha Alden Craig 

B.A., Oberlin College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Professor of English 

Jean V. Crawford 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; 
M.A., Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Charlotte Fitch Roberts Professor of 
Chemistry 

Gabriele Crespi-Reghizzi^ 

LL.B., LL.D., University of Milan; 
LL.M., Harvard University 

Visiting Professor of Political Science 

Jeanne A. Darlington 

B.A., Knox College; 
M.A., Wellesley College 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Isabelle de Courtivron 

B.A., Colby College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Brown University 

Assistant Professor of French 

Fred Denbeaux 

B.A., Elmhurst College; 

B.D., S.T.M., Union Theological Seminary 

Professor of Religion and Biblical Studies 



Margaret A. Dermody 

A.B., Emmanuel College; 
M.A., Wellesley College 

Laboratory Instructor in Biological Sciences 

Ruth Deutsch 

A.M., Radcliffe College; 
M.A., Stanford University; 
M.A., Yale University 

Lecturer in German 

Louis S. Dickstein 

B.A., Brooklyn College; 
M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Thomas J. Dimieri 

A.B., Fordham University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Brown University 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Anthropology 

Ann St. Clair Dinger 

B.A., Vassar College; 

M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

David R. Dobbins 

A.B., Franklin College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

(Amherst) 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

Mayrene Earle 

B.S., Northeastern University 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Mark U. Edwards, Jr. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Assistant Professor of History 

Allan Warden Eister 

B.A., DePauw University; 
M.A., American University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor of Sociology 

Dorothy Z. Eister 

B.A., Hood College; 

M.A., Mount Holyoke College 

Research Assistant in Psychology 

Sharon K. Elkins^ 

B.A., Stetson University; 
M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School 

Instructor in Religion and Biblical Studies 



i 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 161 



Mei-Mei Akwai Ellerman 

Lie, University of Geneva; 
M.A., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Italian 

Alona E. Evans 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Elizabeth Kimball Kendall Professor of 
Political Science 

Doris Holmes Eyges 

B.A., University of fVlichigan; 
A.M., Radcliffe College 

Lecturer in English 
Class Dean 

J. Clayton Fant 

B.A., Williams College 

Instructor in Greek and Latin 

John Nye Faville 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California 
(Berkeley) 

Assistant Professor of English 

Peter Fergusson 

B.A., Michigan State University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of Art 

David Ferry* 

B.A., Amherst College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Sophie Chantal Hart Professor of English 

Lorenz J. Finison* 

A.B., Wesleyan University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Charles Fisk3 

A.B., Harvard College; 
M.M.A., Yale School of Music 

Lecturer in Music 
Instructor in Piano 

Phyllis J. Fleming 

B.A., Hanover College; 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Sarah Frances Whiting Professor of Physics 

Claudia Foster 

B.A., M.A., University of Denver; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Education 



Susan J. Foster^ 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Tufts University 

Instructor in Philosophy 

Carlo Roger Fran9ois 

Lie. en Philosophie et Lettres, Agr^g6, 

University of Liege; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of French 

James Lee Franklin, Jr. 

B.A., Denison University; 

M.A., Queen's University at Kingston, 

Ontario; Ph.D., Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin 

Laurence Frey3 

B.A., Brandeis University; 
M.A., Clark University 

Instructor in Psychology 

Laurel Furumoto 

B.A., University of Illinois; 
M.A., Ohio State University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Director, Child Study Center 

Ann Gabhart 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Harvard University 

Lecturer in Art 

Director, Wellesley College Museum 

Edmund B. GaitherS 

B.A., Morehouse College; 
M.A., Brown University 

Lecturer in Art 

Ren^ Galand 

Lic.-es-Lettres, University of Rennes; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Professor of French 

Robert Garis 

B.A., Muhlenberg College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Katharine Lee Bates Professor of English 

Jeanne Garrison^ 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.F.A., Boston University 

Assistant Professor of Art 



162 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Elena Gasc6n-Vera» 

Lie, University of Madrid; 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Geraldine F. Gauthier 

B.S., M.S., Massachusetts College of 

Pharmacy; 

A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor in the Laboratory of Electron 
Microscopy 

Katherine Allston Geffcken* 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Professor of Greek and Latin 

Meg Gertmenian 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of English 

G.C.Gill 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Cannbridge University 

Assistant Professor of French 

Annie Gillain-Robbins 

Lie, Sorbonne; M.A., Tufts University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of French 

Klaus Goetze 

Instructor in Piano 

Arthur Ralph Gold 

B.A., Princeton University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of English 

Marshall Irwin Goldman 

B.S., Wharton School, University of 

Pennsylvania; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Class of 1919 Professor of Economics 

Stasys Gostautas 

B.A., Fordham University; 
M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 



Maja J. Goth 

Mittellehrerdipl., Oberlehrerdipl., Ph.D., 
University of Basel 

Professor of German 

Michel Grimaud 

B.A., M.A., University of Aix-en-Provence; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor of French 

Merilee Serrill Grindle 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Brown University; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Kenneth B. Gross 

B.S., Saint Peter's College; 
Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

Janet Brown Guernsey 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Louise S. McDowell Professor of Physics 

Edward Vose Gulick 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Elisabeth Hodder Professor of History 

Jesus Gutierrez 

Diplome De L'Enseignement Superieur Libre, 
Institut Catholique, Paris; 
M.A., Hunter College, C.U.N.Y.; 
M.A., Fordham University; 
Ph.D., City University of New York 

Visiting Professor of Spanish 

Gary 0. Harris 

B.S., Bates College; 

M.S., University of Massachusetts 

Instructor in Biological Sciences 

Adrienne Hartzell 

B.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music 

Instructor in Viola da Gamba 
Assistant in The Collegium Musicum 

Barbara Harvey 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Rhode Island School of 
Design 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Margaret Jean Hay 

B.A., Stanford University; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor of History 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 163 



William A. Herrmann 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of Ivlusic 
Director of the Choir 

Sonja E. Hicks 

B.S., University of fvlaine; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Janet Hoffman 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., New York University 

Instructor in Russian 
Class Dean 

Stephen Horner 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; 
IvI.P.P., University of Michigan 

Instructor in Economics 

Virginia Thorndike Hules 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of French 

Alice Stone llchman 

B.A., rviount Holyoke College; 

M.P.A., Maxw/ell School of Citizenship and 

Public Affairs; Ph.D., London School of 

Economics 

Professor of Economics and of Education 
Dean of the College 

Vivian Rippy Ingersoll 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; 
M.A., Johannes Gutenberg University 

Lecturer in German 
Class Dean 

Owen Hughes Jander 

B.A., University of Virginia; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of Music 

Linda Gardiner Janik 

B.A., University of Sussex; 
M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Eugenia Parry Janis 

B.A., University of Michigan; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of Art 



Nancy M. Jannarone 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Instructor in Physical Education 



Roger A. Johnson»2 

B.A., Northwestern University; 
B.D., Yale University; 
Th.D., Harvard University 

Professor of Religion and Biblical Studies 

Jacqueline Jones 

B.A., University of Delaware; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor of History 

Marion R. Just 

B.A., Barnard College; 

M.A., Johns Hopkins University; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Stephen B. Kahl 

B.S., Duke University; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Thomas Forrest Kelly* 

A.B., University of North Carolina; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Ellen Peck Killoh 

B.A., Allegheny College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Assistant Professor of English 

Jonathan B. Knudsen 

B.A., Michigan State University 

Instructor in History 

T. James Kodera 

B.A., Carleton College; 

M. A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Studies 

Elissa Koff 

B.S., Queens College, C.U.N.Y.; 
M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Philip L. Kohl 

B.A., Columbia University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Anthropology 

Nancy Harrison Kolodny 

B.A., Wellesley College; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



164 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Helen F. Ladd»2 

B.A., Wellesley College; 

M.S., London School of Economics; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Jyoti LaPeer3 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Beverly Joseph Layman 

B.A., Roanoke College; 
M.A., University of Virginia; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of English 

Susan Winston Leff 

A.B., University of Chicago; 
M.F.A., Princeton University 

Instructor in Art 

Mary Rosenthal Lefkowitz 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of Greek and Latin 

Eric Levenson3 

A.B., Harvard College; 
M.F.A., Brandeis University 

Lecturer in Theatre Studies 

Design Director, Wellesley College Theatre 

Jon D. Levenson 

A.B., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Religion and Biblical 

Studies 

Katherine Lever 

B.A., Swarthmore College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Professor of English 

James A. Levine3 

B.A., Amherst College; 

C.Phil., M.A., University of California 

(Berkeley) 

Instructor in Psychology 

Andrea Gayle Levitt^ 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., M.Phil., Yale University 

Instructor in Linguistics 

Judith T. Levy 

A.B., Goucher College; 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Elizabeth C. Lieberman3 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Brandeis University 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Peter Lieberman 

B.A., Oberlin College; 

Ph.D., City University of New York 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Helen T. Lin 

B.S., National Taiwan University 

Associate Professor of Chinese on the 
Edith Stix Wasserman Foundation 

Eva LInfield 

Instructor in Recorder and Krummhorn 
Assistant in The Collegium Musicum 

Ronnie Ann Littenberg3 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Psychology 

Stephen J. Little 

B.A., M.A., University of Kansas (Lawrence); 
Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles) 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

James Herbert Loehlin* 

B.A., College of Wooster; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Elizabeth Long 

B.A., Stanford University; 
M.A., Brandeis University 

Instructor in Women's Studies 
Class Dean 

Gabriel H. Lovett 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Professor of Spanish 

Margaret Thompson Lundeen 

A.B., Smith College; 
M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in Geology 

Mary H. Lusky3 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Columbia University 

Instructor in Spanish 

Barry Lydgate 

B.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of French 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 165 



Irina Borisova-Morosova Lynch 

A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of Russian 

Alice A. Lyndon 

A.B., Indiana University; 
fVl.A., University of California 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Arthur L. Lyons, Jr. 3 

B.S., Lov\/ell Tecfinological Institute; 
fvl.Phiil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Neal A. Machtiger 

B.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

Wendy Snyder MacNeil^ 

A.B., Smith College; 
fVI.A.T., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Helen C. Mann 

A.B., Fresno State College; 
M.A., Wellesley College 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Stephen Anthony Marini^ 

A.B., Dickinson College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Studies 

Tony Martin 

Barrister-at-Law, Gray's Inn; 

B.Sc, University of Hull; 

M.A., Ph.D., N/lichigan State University 

Associate Professor of History and of 
Black Studies 

Miranda Constant Marvin 

B.A., Bryn MawrCollege; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Art and of 
Greek and Latin 

Elise Frank Masur^ 

B.A., University of Chicago 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Cecilia Mattii3 

Dott. in Lett., University of Florence 

Instructor in Italian 



Florence McCulloch 

B.A., Vassar College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of French 

Michael McGeary3 

A.B., Harvard University 

Instructor in Political Science 

Ifeanyi A. Menkiti 

B.A., Pomona College; 
M.S., Columbia University; 
M.A., New York University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Sally Engle Merry 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Yale University 

Instructor in Sociology and Anthropology 

Linda B. Miller* 

A.B., Radcliffe College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of Political Science 

Vicki E. Mistacco 

B.A., New/ York University; 
M. A. , Middlebury College; 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of French 

Joel Moerschel3 

Instructor in Cello 

Kenworth W. Moffett 

B.A., Columbia College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of Art 

Janice Mokros 

B.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Bernard G. Moran^ 

Instructor in French Horn 

Rodney Morrison 

B.S., M.A., Boston College; 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor of Economics 

Rose Moss3 

B.A., English Honors Degree, University 
of Natal 

Lecturer in English 



166 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



M. Lucetta Mowry 

B.A., Wilson College; 
M.A., Presbyterian College of Christian 
Education; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Honorary Degree: L.H.D., Wilson College 

Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the 
Hunnanities 

Carol Mueller 

B.A., University of California (Berkeley); 
M.A., Rutgers University; 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Anthropology 

Barbara F. Mulse 

A.B., Bates College; M.A., Snnith College 

Laboratory Instructor in Biological Sciences 

Barbara W. Newell 

B.A., Vassar College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; 
Honorary Degrees: L.H.D., Trinity College; 
LL.D., Central Michigan University, Williams 
College; D.Lit., Northeastern University 

Professor of Economics 
President of Wellesley College 

Torsten Norvig 

B.S., University of Copenhagen; 
M.Sc, Ph.D., Brov\/n University 

Professor of Mathematics 

Jonathan K. Ocko 

B.A., Trinity College; 

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of History 

Lola Odiaga 

B.S., M.S., Juilliard School of Music; 
M.Mus., Yale School of Music 

Instructor in Harpsichord 

Hazel F. O'Donnell 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Boston University 

Instructor in Voice 

James F. O'Gorman 

B.Arch., Washington University; 
M.Arch., University of Illinois (Urbana); 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Grace Slack McNeil Professor of American Art 



Gene Ott3 

B.S., M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; 

M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
Director, Academic Computer Science 
Program 

Robert L. Paarlberg 

B.A., Carleton College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Helen Ann Padykula 

B.S., University of Massachusetts; 
M.A., Mount Holyoke College; 
Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor in the Laboratory of Electron 
Microscopy 

Diann Painter 

A.B., Antioch College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Georgia Papaefthymiou^ 

B.A., Barnard College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Louise Came Pappoutsakis 

Instructor in Harp 

Robert Pinsky 

B.A., Rutgers University; 

M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Associate Professor of English 

Isabelle C. Plaster 

B.A., Wellesley College; 

M.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music 

Instructor in Bassoon 
Assistant in Chamber Music 

Charlotte Carroll Prather 

B.A., Barnard College; 

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of German 

Elinor Preble 

B.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music 

Instructor in Flute 



Kathryn Conway Preyer 

B.A., Goucher College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor of History 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 167 



Arlene Zailman Proctor 

Diploma, Juilliard School of Music; 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Ruth Anna Putnam 

B.S.. Ph.D., University of California (Los 
Angeles) 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Patrick F. Quinn 

B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of English 

Wendy J. Raschke 

B.A., University of London; 

M.A.. Ph.D., State University of New York 

(Buffalo) 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin 

Jonathan B. Ratner 

A.B., Harvard University; 
M.A.. M.Phil., Yale University 

Instructor in Economics 

James Wilson Rayen* 

B.A., B.F.A., M.F.A., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Art 

Stephen A. Riederer 

B.A., M.A., University of Missouri (Kansas 
City); Ph.D., University of Texas (Austin) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Jill Rierdan 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Clark University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Alice Birmingham Robinson 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of History 

Joanna H. F. Robinson 

B.A., Bryn Mawr College; 
M.A., University of Chicago 

Instructor in Economics 

Patricia A. Robinson 

B.S., Skidmore College 

Instructor in Physical Education 



Elizabeth Jane Rock 

B.S., College of Mount St. Vincent; 

M.A., Smith College; 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Arthur J. and NellieZ. Cohen Professor 

of Chemistry 

Director, Science Center 

Judith Roitman 

B.A., Sarah Lav^/rence College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of California 
(Berkeley) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Kenneth W. Roth 

B.Mus., Nevi/ England Conservatory; 
M.A., Stanford University 

Instructor in Oboe and Baroque Oboe 

Nancy Joyce Roth 

B.Mus., M.Mus., New England Conservatory 
of Music 

Instructor in Baroque Flute 

Margery Sabin 

A.B., Radcliffe College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor of English 

Jo Sandman 

B.A., Brandeis University; 

M.F.A., University of California (Berkeley); 

M.A.T., Radcliffe College 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Gary R. Sanford 

B.A., University of California (Berkeley); 

M.A., Chico State College; 

Ph.D., University of California (Davis) 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

H. Paul Santmire 

A.B., Harvard College; 

B.D., The Lutheran Theological Seminary; 

Th.D., Harvard University 

Lecturer in Religion and Biblical Studies 
Chaplain 

Judith Saunders 

B.A., M.A., University of California 
(Berkeley); C.Phil., Ph.D.. University of 
California (San Diego) 

Assistant Professor of English 



168 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Danny L. Scarborough 

B.A., St. Augustine's College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor of Black Studies 



Alice T. Schafer 

B.A., University of Richmond; 
S.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Honorary Degree: D.Sc, University of 
Richmond 

Helen Day Gould Professor of Mathematics 

Alan Henry Schechter 

B.A., Amherst College; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of Political Science 

R. Steven Schiavo 

B.A., Lehigh University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

William R. Scott 

B.A., Lincoln University; 
M.A., Howard University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Associate Professor of Black Studies 
Associate Dean of the College 

Jean Seznec3 

Agreg6 des Lettres, Docteurtes Lettres, Ecole 

Normale Superieure; 

Honorary Degree: D.Litt., Harvard University 

Visiting Professor of French and Art 

Anne Dhu Shapiro 

B.A., University of Colorado; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Karen Sheingold 

B.A., Antioch College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Annemarie A. Shimony 

B.A., Northwestern University; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Alan Shuchat 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Frederic W. Shultz 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



Susan S. Silbey3 

B.A., Brooklyn College; 
M.A., University of Chicago 

Instructor in Sociology and Anthropology 

Frangoise Simon 

Maitrise d'Anglais, University of Nantes; 
M.Phil., Yale University 

Instructor in French 

Martin E. Sleeper 

B.A., Williams College; 

M.A.T., Ed.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Elaine L. Smith3 

B.A., M.A., Wellesley College 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Mariot A. F. Solomon3 

A.B., Radcliffe College 

Instructor in Art 

Alexia Henderson Sontag 

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Patricia Meyer Spacks* 

B.A., Rollins College; M.A., Yale University; 
Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley); 
Honorary Degree: L.H.D., Rollins College 

Professor of English 

Hortense J. Spillers 

B.A., M.A., Memphis State University; 
Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Assistant Professor of English and of 
Black Studies 

Ingrid Stadler 

B.A., Vassar College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of Philosophy 

George Stambolian 

B.A., Dartmouth College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of French 

Ria Stavrides 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Visiting Professor of Philosophy 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 169 



Ann Kathryn Stehney 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College; 

M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York 

(Stony Brook) 

Assistant Professor of f^athematics 
Director of Educational Research 

Edward A. Stettner 

B.A., Brown University; 

M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Irene Pierce Stiver^ 

B.A., Brooklyn College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Lecturer in Psychology 

Marcia Stubbs 

B.A., M.A., University of Michigan 

Lecturer in English 

Lawrence Sullivan 

B.S., University of Missouri; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Yih-jian Tai 

B.A., National Taiwan University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Associate Professor of Chinese 

Frank Cochran Taylor II 

B.A., Yale University 

Instructor in Organ 

Charles B. Thomas 

B.A., Cornell University; 
M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in Psychology 

LynTolkoff3 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Lecturer in Music 

Alice E. Trexler 

B.S., New York University; 
M.A., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Jeanne Trubek 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College; 
M.S., Northeastern University 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Nina Tumarkin-Fosburg 

B.A., University of Rochester; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of History 



Linda Kent Vaughan 

B.S., M.A., Russell Sage College; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Tino Villanueva^ 

B.A., Southwest Texas State University; 
M.A., State University of New York (Buffalo) 

Instructor in Spanish 

Thomas von Foerster 

B.S., University of Illinois (Urbana); 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Richard William Wallace* 

B.A., Williams College; 

M.F.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Associate Professor of Art 

K. Fiagg Waltermire 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; 

B.F.A., Maryland Institute, College of Art; 

M.F.A., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Helen Wang 

B.A., University of Wisconsin; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Margaret Ellen Ward* 

B.A., Wilson College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor of German 

Judith Callaghan Wason* 

A.B., Goucher College; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Andrew C. Webb 

B.Sc, Ph.D., University of Southampton 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

Eleanor Rudd Webster 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
M.A., Mount Holyoke College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of Chemistry 

Kathy Weingarten 

B.A., Smith College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



170 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Holmes H.Welch^ 

A.B., M.A., Harvard University 

Visiting Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Studies 

Michael Wentworth 

B.S.D., M.F.A., University of Michigan; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Dorothea J. Widmayer 

B.A., M.A., Wellesley College; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

William R. Kenan Professor of Biological 
Sciences 

Bonnie E. Wiencke 

B.S., Springfield College; 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Howard J. Wilcox* 

B.A., Hamilton College; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Ernest H. Williams 

B.S., Trinity College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 



Stephen Williamson 

A.B., Brown University 

Instructor in Psychology 

Thomas F. Wilson3 

A.B., Brown University; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Lecturer in English 

Theresa C-H Yao 

B.A., Taiwan Normal University 

Lecturer in Chinese 

Monica Yu 

B.A., National Taiwan University; 
M.A., Indiana University 

Lecturer in Chinese 

Michael Zaretsky 

Instructor in Viola 

Claire Zimmerman* 

B.A., Wellesley College; 
Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Professor of Psychology 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 171 



Professors Emeriti 



Katy Boyd George, MA 

Associate Professor of Biblical History 

Ola Elizabeth Winslow, Ph.D. 
Professor English 

Ruth Elvira Clark, Lift D. 

Professor of French 

Thomas Hayes Procter, Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

Mary Bosworth Treudley, Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

Grace Elizabeth Howard, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Botany 

Louise Pettibone Smith, Ph.D. 
Professor of Biblical History 

Marianne Thalmann, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 

Jeannette Barry Lane, Ph.B. 
Associate Professor of Speech 

Lucy Wilson, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics and Dean of Students 

Edna Heidbreder, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

Ada May Coe, MA. 

Professor of Spanish 

Evelyn Kendrick Wells, MA. 

Professor of English 

Leiand Hamilton Jenks, Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

Louise Overacker, Ph.D. 
Professor of Political Science 

Jorge Guillen, Catedratico de Universidad 
Professor of Spanish 

Waclaw Jedrzejewicz 

Associate Professor Russian 

Katharine Canby Balderston, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Marion Elizabeth Stark, Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 



Helen Thayer Jones, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Harriet Cutler Waterman, Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 

Ella Keats Whiting, Ph.D. 
Professor of English and Dean 

Mary Leilah Austin, Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 

Grace Ethel Hawk, B.Litt. (Oxon.) 
Professor of English 

Elizabeth Beall, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Lucy Winsor Killough, Ph.D. 
Professor of Economics 

Magdalene Schindelin, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of German 

Howard Hinners, B.A. 
Professor of Music 

Gladys Kathryn McCosh, Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 

Dorothy Mae Robathan, Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin 

Agnes Anne Abbot 

Professor Art 

Eva Elizabeth Jones, Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 

Edith Brandt Mallory, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

Evelyn Faye Wilson, Ph.D. 
Professor History 

Teresa Grace Frisch, Ph.D. 
Professor of Art and Dean of Students 

Dorothy Heyworth, Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics 

Margaret Elizabeth Taylor, Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin 

Concha Breton, Doctora en Letras 
Associate Professor of Spanish 

John McAndrew, M.Arch. 
Professor of Art 

Barbara Salditt, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of German 



172 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Louise Wilson Roquemore, Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

Eleanor Milton Tenney, B.A. 
Director of Residence 

Walter Edwards Houghton, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Barbara Philippa McCarthy, Ph.D. 
Professor of Greek 

Mary Ruth Michael, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Ernest Rene Lacheman, Ph.D. 

Professor of Religion and Biblical Studies 

Sylvia Leah Berkman, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Herbert Morrison Gale, Ph.D. 
Professor of Religion and Biblical Studies 

Delaphine Grace Rosa Wyckoff, Ph.D. 
Professor of Bacteriology 

Hannah Dustin French, M.S. 

Research Librarian, Special Collections 

Virginia Onderdonk, B.A. 
Professor of Philosophy 

Bartlett Hicks Stoodley, Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

Virginia Fleming Prettyman, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Thelma Gorflnkle Alper, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

Hubert Weldon Lamb, A.B. 
Professor of f\/lusic 

Harriet B. Creighton, Ph.D. 
Professor Botany 

Sarah J. Hill, Ph.D. 

Professor of Astrononny 



Germaine Lafeuille, Ph.D. 
Professor of French 

Justina Ruiz-de-Conde, Ph.D. 
Professor of Spanish 

Elizabeth Frisch 

Associate Professor of Art 

Richard Vernon Clemence, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics 

Virginia M. Fiske, Ph.D. 
Professor of Biological Sciences 

Owen S. Stratton, Ph.D. 
Professor of Political Science 

Mary E. Bradley, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor of Education 



Administration 




174 ADMINISTRATION 



Office of the President 



Office of Career Services 



Barbara W. Newell Ph.D. 

President 

Professor of Economics 

Doris E. Drescher B.S. 

Executive Secretary to the President 

Clerk of the Board of Trustees 

Maud H. Chaplin Ph.D. 
Assistant to the President 
Associate Dean of the College 
Assistant Professor of History 

Elizabeth K. Bark B.A. 
Budget Officer 



Barbara Lazarus Wilson Ed.D. 
Director 

Sandra L. Crump M.Ed. 
Career Counselor 

Patricia L. Meaney B.A. 
Career Counselor 

Diane L. Redonnet B.A. 
Career Counselor 

Catherine E. Solmssen M.Ed. 
Career Counselor 

Nancy Tobin B.A. 

Resource Center Coordinator 



Office of Admission 

Mary Ellen Ames B.A. 
Director of Admission 

Elizabeth M. Chandler B.A. 
Associate Director 

Marilyn Kimball M.A. 
Associate Director 

Margaret O. Rose B.A. 
Associate Director 

Elena M. McCall B.A. 
Assistant Director 

Alice M. Palubinskas M.Ed. 
Admission Counselor 

Joan N. Marshall B.A. 
Field Representative 

Florence L. Washington 

Assistant to the Director 



Office of College Relations 

Alia O'Brien B.A. 
Vice President 

Rosemarie Matthees Cummings 

Director of Publications 

Shirley H. Goldwyn B.A. 
Manager, Press Relations 

Margaret Galloway Lafferty B.A. 
Coordinator of Special Events 

Carolyn Harmon Scott 

Administrator, Information Bureau 

Susan Hennemuth Trayers B.A. 
Press Officer 



Office of Financial Aid 

Amelia Botsaris Nychis M.A. 
Financial Aid Officer 

Phyllis Kelley M.S. 
Administrative Assistant 

Carol Marsh 

Administrative Assistant 



Kathryn Osmond M.A. 

Assistant to the Financial Aid Officer 



ADMINISTRATION 175 



Office of the Dean of the College 

Alice Stone llchman Ph.D. 

Dean of the College 

Professor of Economics and of Education 

Maud H. Chaplin Ph.D. 
Associate Dean of the College 
Assistant to the President 
Assistant Professor of History 

William R. Scott Ph.D. 
Associate Dean of the College 
Associate Professor of Black Studies 

Karen Whitmore Maxwell B.A. 
Assistant to the Dean of the College 

Dorothy L. Connolly 

Administrative Secretary to the 
Dean of the College 

Norma B. Heyman 

Assistant to the Dean of the College 
for Faculty Appointments 

Florence Carlson 

Audiovisual Coordinator 

Supervisor of the Language Laboratory 



Office of the Dean of Academic Programs 

Elizabeth S. Blake Ph.D. 
Dean of Academic Programs 

Doris Holmes Eyges MA. 

Class Dean 
Lecturer in English 

Vivian R. Ingersoll MA. 

Class Dean 
Lecturer in German 

Janet Hoffman MA. 

Class Dean 
Instructor in Russian 

Elizabeth Long MA. 

Class Dean 

Instructor in Women's Studies 

Shirley Quinn B.A. 

Class Dean 

Director of Academic Assistance Programs 

Dorothy B. Moeller B.A. 
Exchange Coordinator 

Ruth G. Rose MA. 

Assistant for Foreign Study 



Office of Continuing Education 

Betty Lou Nitchie Marple Ph.D. 
Director 

Rosemary D. Hutcheson B.A. 
Assistant Director 

Mary Ann Bukovich 

Administrative Assistant 



Office of the Registrar 

Eleanore R. Silverman M.Ed. 
Registrar 

Eleanor Witten 

Administrative Assistant 

Office of Educational Research 

Ann Stehney Ph.D. 

Director of Educational Research 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Office of the Science Center 

Elizabeth Jane Rock Ph.D. 
Director of the Science Center 
Arthur J. and Nellie Z. Cohen Professor 
of Chemistry 

Rosamond V.White B.S. 

Assistant to the Director 



Margaret Clapp Library 

Helen Margaret Brown B.A., B.S., M.S. 
Librarian 

Edith Shapero Alpers B.A., M.S. 
Senior Cataloger 

Tomira Witkowska Buxell B.A., LL.M., M.S. 
Senior Cataloger in Reclassification 

Lynn Christopher Carney B.A., M.S. 
Technical Services Librarian 

Elizabeth Simmons Cookson B.A., M.S. 

Acquisitions Librarian 

Mary Wallace Davidson B.A., M.S. 
Music Librarian 

Ann Davis Greene B.S. in Ed., M.S. 
Serials Librarian 

Eleanor Adams Gustafson B.S., M.S. 
Associate Librarian, Technical Services 

Irene Shulman Laursen B.A., M.S. 
Science Librarian 



176 ADMINISTRATION 



Sally Blumberg Linden B.A., M.S. 
Readers Services Librarian 

Claire Tucker Loranz B.A., M.S. 
Documents Librarian 

Frances McNamara B.A., M.S. 
Cataloger 

Eleanor Louise NicholesB. A., M.S., Ph.D. 
Special Collections Librarian 

Wilma Ruth Slaight B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Archivist 

Joan Spillsburg Stockard B.A., M.S. 
Readers Services Librarian 



Office of Student Services 

Susan R. Fedo MA. 

Coordinator, Student Services 
Director, Schneider College Center 

ArlineS. Tyler MA. 

Director, Harambee House 

Helen Pickett B. A. 

Secretary, Slater International Center 

Stephen J. Nelson MAR. 

Assistant Director, Schneider College Center 

Alice M. Roodkowsky 

Administrative Assistant, Student Services 



Ann Stewart-Burton M.D. 
Consulting Gynecologist 

Harold Dixon Stalvey M.D. 
Consulting Psychiatrist and 
Psychoanalyst 

Jeannette Hatfield Corwin M.D. 
Associate Consulting Psychiatrist 

Lionel Abbott Schwartz M.D. 
Associate Consulting Psychiatrist and 
Psychoanalyst 



Counseling Services 

Donald L. Polk M.S. W. 

Human Relations Consultant 

Coordinator, Commission on Community Life 

Office of the Chaplaincy 

The Rev. H. Paul Santmire Th.D. 

Chaplain 

Lecturer in Religion and Biblical Studies 



Office of Residence 

Joyce S. Wadlington Ed.M. 
Director 

Dorothy Duquet 

Administrative Assistant 



College Health Services 

Thomas J. Keighley M.D. 
Director of Health Services 



Elizabeth Veeder M.D. 
Associate Physician 

Gertrude E. Murray M.D. 

Associate Physician 

Asha Wallace M.D. 
Associate Physician 



ADMINISTRATION 177 



Office for Financial and Business Affairs 



Office for Resources 



John W. Hartley MBA. 

Vice President for Financial and 

Business Affairs 

William L. Biggart, Jr. 

Manager of the Duplicating Services 

Carolyn A. Bruns 

Manager of thie Wellesley College Club 

Albert M. Coffey, Jr. B.S. 
Director of Physical Plant 

Richard P. Companion MBA. 

Director of Systems and Data Processing 

Elizabeth Cornwall B.S. 
Director of Food Services 

Harry Bertram Jones 

Controller 

Lucille M. Knight 

Assistant to the Vice President 



Albert E. Holland M.A., LL.D. (Hon.) 
Vice President for Resources 

Phyllis Shapiro Ranger M.Ed. 
Administrative Director for Resources 

Joseph M. Hobbs B.S. 
Associate Director 

Faith Clough Degenhart M.R.E. 
Assistant Director 

Ghislaine deGive B.A. 
Assistant Director 

Constance Whitman Baher B.A. 
Special Assistant to the Vice President 

Catharine B. Butchman B.A. 
Coordinator of Research 

Ann Wadsworth 

Office Manager and Assistant Director 



John Louis Leiievre 

Director of Purchasing 

Richard L. Lewis B.S./B.E. 
Bursar 

John C. McManus 

Manager of the College Post Office 

Barry F. Monahan MA. 

Chief of Campus Police 

Anthony R. Oteri 

Assistant Director of Physical Plant 

Annettes. Potenza 

Assistant Controller 



Center for Research on Women 

in Higher Education and the Professions 

Carolyn Elliott Ph.D. 

Director 

Mary Jo Bane Ph.D. 
Associate Director 

Ann Seidman Ph.D. 
Research Associate 

Bronwen Haddad A.B. 

Administrative Assistant and 
Conference Coordinator 



178 GIFTS TO WELLESLEY 



Wellesley has deep gratitude for the gifts of 
alumnae, friends, and parents without whose 
support it could not maintain its standards of 
excellence. The College welcomes outright 
gifts of cash, gifts of securities, and gifts of 
other property. The College provides income 
for life to donors who invest in either an 
Annuity ora Life Income Plan. 

Forms of Bequests 

An unrestricted bequest to Wellesley may be 
worded: 

"I give to Wellesley College, Wellesley, 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars." 

In the case of a bequest for a specific pur- 
pose, it is wise to allow considerable latitude 
in the use of any fund, so that changing con- 
ditions will not impair the usefulness of the 
gift. Thus, such a bequest may be expressed: 

"I give to Wellesley College, Wellesley, 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, the 

income only to be used for " (Here de- 
scribe the purpose in as broad and simple 
terms as possible, as for example, faculty 
salaries or scholarships.) The more limited 
the use, the more important it is to add a pro- 
vision such as, "If, in the future, the Trustees 
of the College determine that the Bequest is 
no longer needed for the purpose for which it 
was bequeathed, they may use it to meet 
other needs of the College, but the name of 
the Fund will always remain in Wellesley's 
records." 

A residuary bequest to Wellesley may read as 
follows: 

"All the rest, residue and remainder of my real 
and personal estate, I give to Wellesley Col- 
lege, Wellesley, Massachusetts." 



Alumnae Organization 




180 ALUMNAE ORGANIZATION 



Alumnae Office 

Anne Mitchell Morgan B.A. 
Executive Director 

Marion Saunders Chapman B.A. 
Assistant Director for Alumnae Council 
Financial Secretary 

Joan Gardner 

Administrative Assistant 

Caroline Canterbury Riem B.A. 

Assistant Director for Classes and Reunions 

Elizabeth Darlington Havens B.A. 
Assistant Director for Clubs 



Alumnae Magazine 

Mary C. Lyons B.A. 
Editor 



Alumnae Association 
Board of Directors 

President 

Mrs. Thomas B. Campion 

Iduna, R.F.D.#1 

Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 

First Vice President 

Mrs. Sam R. Watkins 
80 Clapboard Ridge Road 
Greenw/ich, Connecticut 06830 

Second Vice President 

Mrs. James A. Churchill 

461 Pine Street 

New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 

Secretary 

Mrs. Leslie Arthur Lewis 
84-54 Avon Street 
Jamaica, New York 1 1432 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Hiroshi Nishino 

281 Country Drive 

Weston, Massachusetts 02193 



Chairman, Class Officers 

Mrs. Frank P. Wilcox 

125 Winch Street 

Framingham Centre, Massachusetts 01701 

Chairman, Class Fund Programs 

Mrs. Douglas V. Rigler 
5008 River Hill Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20016 

Chairman, Clubs 

Mrs. Stanley M. Goldberg 
7019 Tupa Drive 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 

Chairman, Communications 

Mrs. Rhoda D. Wechsler 
1 01 5 Old Boston Post Road 
Mamaroneck, New York 10543 

Chairman, Academic Programs 

Mrs. William M. Crozier, Jr. 
41 Ridge Hill Farm Road 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

Ex Officiis 

Mrs. Vance N. Morgan 
Executive Director 

Miss Mary C. Lyons 

Editor, Wellesley Alumnae Magazine 

Alumnae Trustees 

Betsy Ancker-Johnson (1971-1977) 
(Mrs. Harold Hunt Johnson) 
Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. John D. Anderson (1972-1978) 
Golden, Colorado 

Mrs. F. Daniel Frost (1974-1980) 
Pasadena, California 

Mrs. William J. Chapman (1976-1982) 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Miss Kathie Ann Whipple (1974-1977) 
Brooklyn, New York 



Chairman, Campus 

Mrs. Willard S. Levings 

20 Nantucket Road 

Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 02181 



ALUMNAE ORGANIZATION 181 



National Development Fund Committee 

Chairman 

Dr. Carol J. Johns 
203 E. Highfield Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21218 

Assistant to the Chairman for Key Gifts 

Mrs. John W. Braitnnayer 
37 Knollwood Lane 
Darien, Connecticut 06820 

Secretary 

Ms. Betsy Geist 
3705 Hamilton Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 

Chairman, Clubs 

Mrs. Stanley M. Goldberg 
7019 Tupa Drive 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 

Trustee Member 

James T. Hill, Jr. 
201 East 62nd Street 
New York, New York 10021 

Vice Chairman, Bequests and Deferred Gifts 

Mrs. Francis G. Jenkins 

P.O. Box 684 

Williamstown, Massachusetts 01267 

Trustee Member 

Mrs. James M. Kemper, Jr. 
1231 West 57th Street 
Kansas City, Missouri 64113 

Chairman, Incentive Giving Programs 

Mrs. Robert D. Kestnbaum 
442 West Wellington Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60657 

Trustee Member 
Chairman, Key Gifts 

Mrs. Carl M. Mueller 
435 East 52nd Street 
New York, New York 10022 

Chairman, Foundations 

Miss Elizabeth Paschal 

569 Patricia Lane 

Palo Alto, California 94303 



Chairman, Class Fund Programs 

Mrs. Douglas V. Rigler 
5008 River Hill Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20016 

Chairman, Geographic Representatives 

Mrs. Frederick R. Selch 

129 East 71st Street 

New York, New York 10021 

Assistant to the Chairman for Key Gifts 

Mrs. Raymond S. Troubh 

770 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 



182 INDEX 



Index 



Academic 

calendar, 3 

distinctions, 40 

honors in the major field, 40 

standards, 37 

summary, 29 
Acceleration, 38 
Administration, 173-177 
Admission, 13-16 

application for, 14 

campus visit, 14 

College Entrance Examination Board tests, 15 

criteria for, 14 

deferred entrance, 15 

early evaluation, 15 

foreign students, 16 

general requirements for freshman applicants, 14 

intervievi/, 14 

plans, 15 

transfer students, 16 

U.S. citizens living abroad, 16 
Advanced placement, credit for, 38 
Alumnae, 179-181 

Association, board of directors, 180 

National Development Fund Committee, 181 

trustees, 180 
Alumnae Hall, 33 

American studies, individual major, 152 
Anthropology courses, 134-138 
Archaeology, classical and Near Eastern, inter- 
departmental major, 149 
Art courses, 45-52 
Arts center, 32 
Astronomy courses, 53-54 



Bachelor of Arts degree, requirements for, 36 

Beit Shalom, 34 

Biblical studies courses, 128-132 

Biological sciences courses, 54-58 

Black studies courses, 59-63 

Buildings, see Campus 



Calendar, 3 

Campus, description of, 31-34 
map of, 184 

Career, preparation for, 41-42 

Career Services Office, 29 

Chapel, 33 

Chemistry courses, 63-66 

Child Study Center, 33 

Chinese courses, 66-68 

Classical civilization, interdepartmental 
major, 148-149 

Classical and Near Eastern archaeology, inter- 
departmental major, 149 

College, history of, 9-12 

College Entrance Examination Board tests, 15 

College Government, 1 1 

Colloquia, freshman-sophomore, 39, 44 

Community involvement, 40 

Computing facilities, 32 

Confidentiality of student records, 24 

Continuing education, 19, 42 



Correspondence, 4 
Counseling resources, 27-28 
Courses of instruction, 45-155 
Credit 

for advanced placement examination, 38 

for community involvement, 40 

for other academic w/ork, 38 

for summer school and independent study, 40 
Cross-registration, Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 39 
Curriculum, 35-42 



Degree 

B.A., requirements for, 36 
Dental school, 42 

Development, national committee, 181 
Dormitories, 27, 33 



Early evaluation, 15 

East Asian studies, interdepartmental major, 149 

Economic internship program, 40 

Economics courses, 69-71 

Education courses, 72-74 

Emeriti professors, 171-172 

Employment, student, 28-29 

English courses, 74-79 

Enrollment, 29-30 

Examinations, 37-38 

advanced placement, 38 

exemption, 38 
Exchange Program, Twelve College, 39 
Expenses, general, 19 
Experimental courses, 143-144 
Experimental exchange, Spelman-Wellesley, 39 
Extradepartmental courses, 142-147 

Faculty, see Officers of Instruction 
Federal Income Tax Return, 22 
Fees and expenses, 18-19 

annual fee, 18 

continuing education, 19 

general deposit, 18 

plans of payment, 19, 20-21 

reservation fee, 18 

room retainer fee, 18 

special fees and expenses, 19 

student activity fee, 18 
Fellow/ships, see also Scholarships 

undergraduate and graduate, 23 
Financial aid, 22 

application for, 22 

Federal Income Tax Return, 22 

Parents' Confidential Statement, 22 

payments, 19 

transfer students, 22 
Foreign language requirements, 36-37 
Foreign students 

admission of, 16 

countries, 30 
French courses, 80-83 
Freshman 

admission requirements, 14 
Freshman-sophomore colloquia, 39, 44 



Geology courses, 83-85 
German courses, 85-87 
Gifts and bequests, 178 



INDEX 183 



Grading system, 37 
Graduate fellowships, 23 
Greek and Latin courses, 87-91 
Greek course^, 87-89 
Green Hall, 34 
Greenhouses, 32 



Harambee House, 34 
Health professions, 42 
Health services, 28 

infirmary, 34 

medical insurance, 19 
History courses, 92-100 
History of science courses, 145 
Honor Basis, 26-27 
Honors in the major field, 40 

Individual majors, 152-155 
Individual study, 38-39 
Infirmary, 34 
Insurance, medical, 19 
Interdepartmental majors, 148-155 
Internships, summer, 39-40 
Interview/, 14 
Italian courses, 100-101 



Jewett Arts Center, 32-33 

Jobs, 28-29 

Junior Year Abroad, 39 



Latin courses, 89-91 

Leave of absence, 41 
Library, 33 
Loans, 22 



Major, 37 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

cross-registration, 39 
Mathematics courses, 102-104 
Medical insurance, 19 
Medical school, 42 
Medieval/Renaissance studies, interdepartmental 

major, 150-151 
Molecular biology, interdepartmental major, 151 
Music courses, 105-108 



National Development Fund Committee, 181 
Natural philosophy courses, 147-148 
Nondiscriminatory policy, 24 



Readmission, 41 

Refunds, 19 

Religion and biblical studies courses, 128-132 

Religious resources, 28 

Required studies 

exemption from, 38 
Requirements 

distribution, 36 

foreign language, 36-37 

other, 37 
Research, student, 38-39 
Residence halls, 27, 33 
Russian courses, 132-133 



Sage, 32 

Schneider College Center, 33 

Scholarships, see also Fellow/ships 

trustee, 23, 41 
Scholastic aptitude and achievement tests, 15 
Science Center, 32 
Secondary school teaching, 42 
Sigma Xi, 40 

Slater International Center, 34 
Slater scholarship, 39, 40 
Society houses, 34 

Sociology and anthropology courses, 134-138 
Spanish courses, 138-141 
Spelman-Wellesley Experimental Exchange 

Program, 39 
Sports facilities, 33 
Stecher scholarship, 39, 40 
Student life, 26 

Student records, confidentiality of, 24 
Students 

academic summary, 29 

from other countries, 16 

geographic distribution, 30 
Students' Aid Society, 22 
Study abroad 

junior year, 39 

summer, 40 
Summers, 29 

interships, 39-40 

Teaching, student preparation for, 42 
Theatre studies courses, 141-142 
Theatre studies, individual major, 153-154 
Transfer students 

admission, 16 

financial aid, 22 
Trustees, board of, 5-7 
Tuition 

payments, 18,20-21 
Twelve College Exchange Program, 39 



Observatory, 32 

Officers of instruction, 157-172 



Urban internship program, 40 

Urban studies, individual major, 154-155 



Parents' Confidential Statement, 22 
Phi Beta Kappa, 40 
Philosophy courses, 108-111 
Physical education courses, 112-113 
Physical education facilities, 33 
Physics courses, 114-116 
Plans of payment, 19, 20-21 
Political science courses, 1 16-122 
Presidents, 8 
President's House, 34 
Psychology courses, 123-127 



Visitors, 4 



Waddell scholarships, 39, 40 
Washington internship program, 39-40 
Wellesley College Club, 34 
Withdrawal, 41 
Women's research center, 34 
Women's studies, individual major, 155