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Full text of "Catalogue of Cary High School [serial]"

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CATALOGUE 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 



FARM LIFE SCHOOL 

Cary, North Carolina 

1915-1916 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FOB 



1916-1917 



Raleigh 

M. J. Carroll, Printing 

1916 



School Committee 



Charles J. Parker, Chairman 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Secretary 

F. R. Gray 



Calendar 1916-1917 



Fall Term opens September 4, 1916 
Fall Term closes December 22, 1916 
Spring Term opens January 1, 1917 
.Spring Term closes April 27, 1917 



Officers and Instructors 



M. B. Dby, Principal. 

J. S. Howabd, Principal Farm Life School. 

Miss Lillian Killingswobth, Lady Principal. 

High School 

M. B. Dby, A.M. (Wake Forest College, 1896), Mathematics, Latin, 

French. 
Miss Lillian Killingswobth, A.B. (Erskine College), History, 

English. 
J. S. Howabd, B.S. (A. and M. College), Agriculture, Science. 
Miss Elizabeth Pbyob, B.S. (Ames College, Iowa), Home Economics. 
Miss Chablotte White (Southern Conservatory of Music), Piano 

and Voice. 

Elementaby School 

Miss Edna Tyeb (Southern Female College), Sixth and Seventh 

Grades. 
Miss Myetha Fleming, A.B. (Meredith College), Fourth and Fifth 

Grades. 
Miss Cabbie Beame (Littleton Female College), Second and Third 

Grades. 
Miss Ibma Ellis (Normal and Industrial School), First Grade. 



Mbs. J. A. Smith, Matron Boys' Dormitory. 

Mbs. Betsy R. Htjnteb, Matron Girls' Dormitory. 



o 
V) 



Graduating Class 1916 



Bryce Little, President Raleigh, N. C. 

William David Turner, Vice-President Garner, N. C. 

Alma Pearl Barbee, Secretary r Apex, N. C. 

Annie Grace Holleman, Treasurer Cary, N. C. 

Mabel Adams Cary, N. C. 

Thomas William Atkins R. 2, Cary, N. C. 

Maylon Calvin Atkins R. 4, Raleigh, N. C. 

Whitson Legrande Benton Cary, N. C. 

Burtis Benton Cary, N. C. 

Samuel Lester Bobbitt R. 2, Henderson, N. C. 

Annie Lillian Dudley..... Cary, N. C. 

Mattie Ruby Garner R. 3, Raleigh, N. C. 

Omer Korb Goodwin R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Fannie Heater Cary, N. C. 

Henry Sanford Howie Abbeville, S. C. 

Thelma Madeline Jewell Garner, N. C. 

Mary Pearl Jones R. 3, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Buna Lawrence R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Kiddie Louise Maynard R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Mary Lukie Nichols R. 1, Gorman, N. C. 

James Gordon Olive ...R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Nellie Irene Olive R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Lillian Rebecca Peebles R. 1, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hubert McDonald Rhodes .R. 2, Apex, N. C. 

Mazie Roselle Sears R. 1, Morrisville, N. C. 

Annie Rebecca Seymour R. 1, Cary, N. C. 

Rodney Orin Stephens... . Abbeville, S. C. 

Margaret Ruth Strayhorn Cary, N. C 

Elva Muriel Templeton Cary, N. C. 

Lavine Waldo Cary, N. C. 

Gladys Ione Williams R. 3, Apex, N. C 

Elsie Bryan Yarborough Cary, N. C. 



Winners of Medals 



Scholarship Elsie Yarborough 

Debate H. M. Rhodes 

Oration R. 0. Stephen 1 ? 

Declamation C. L. Bedding field 

Recitation Alma Barbee 

Clay Improvement Burtis Benton 

Calhoun Improvement T. W. Atkins 

Irving Improvement Elva Templeton 

Lowell Improvement Evelyn Waldo 




H 



THE CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

AjSTD 

FARM LIFE SCHOOL 



History 



The Cary Public High School and Fa'rrh Life School is an outgrowth 
of the old Cary High School which had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. In 
1907, the owners of the property sold their stock to the county, and 
the school was converted into a State high school, the first to be 
established under the high school law of 1007. The official name was 
changed from the Cary High School to the Cary Public High School. 
In 1913, by special act of the Legislature, providing for' farm life 
instruction in Wake County, there were added to the school the 
departments of agriculture and domestic science, the name of the 
school being changed from the Gary Public High School to the Cary 
Public High School and the E. L. Middleton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading high schools 
of the State in its day. With a large and well equipped two-story 
wooden building, with ample boarding facilities in dormitories and 
in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew partonage from 
a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, Rev. 
Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and the Misses Jones. 
For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the school was under the wise 
management of E. L. Middleton. In 1908, Mr. Middleton resigned 
to enter a different field of work, and M. B. Dry was elected as his 
successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, for 
with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with dormitories 
both for boys and girls, with new departments constantly being 
added, and with a corps of specially trained and experienced teachers, 
the school still draws patronage from a large and growing territory 
in this State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had outgrown 
was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly modern brick structure 
with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,000.00. The old dormitory build- 
ing for boys which was burned in the spring of 1916 is now being 
replaced by a $10,000.00 brick structure which will be completed by 
the opening of the fall term. This building will be equipped with 
steam heat, baths, lavatories and toilets. It is located near the main 
school building and will be occupied by the girls. 

The present girls' dormitory, located a few hundred yards from 
the campus, will, in the future, be occupied by the boys. Sufficient 
boarding accommodations can be provided for as many students, 
either boys or girls, as may desire to attend. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School * 9 

Courses of Study 



Instruction iii the High School is offered in the following subjects : 
English, Mathematics, History, Science, Latin, French, Agriculture, 
Home Economics, Music. To receive a certificate of graduation, a 
pupil must have completed one of the following courses : 

ACADEMIC COURSE 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 




Spring Term 


English 




English 


Arithmetic 




Algebra 


Latin 




Latin 


History 




History 


General Science 




General Science 




SECOND 


YEAR 


English 




English 


Algebra 




Algebra 


Latin 




Latin 


History 




History 


Botany 




Botany 


Physiology 




Physiology 




THIRD 


YEAR 


English 




English 


History 




History 


Physics 




Physics 


Algebra 




Algebra 


Latin 




Latin 


Elect 1 : 




Elect 1 : 


Geometry 




Geometry 


Music 




Music 




FOURTH 


: YEAR 


English 




English 


History 




History 


Chemistry 




Chemistry 


Elect 2 : 




Elect 2 : 


Latin 




Latin 


Geometry 




Geometry 


French 




French 


Music 




Music 


AGRICULTURAL COURSE 




FIRST 


YEAR 


Fall Term 


> 


Spring Term 


English 




English 


Arithmetic 




Algebra 


General Agriculture 


General Agriculturi 


Carpentry 




Carpentry 


Botany 




Botany 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 11 

SECOND YEAR 

English English 

Algebra Algebra 

History History 

Farm Crops Farm Animals 

- Physiology Physiology 

Chemistry . Chemistry 

THIRD YEAR 

English English 

Algebra (Optional) Algebra (Optional) 

History History 

Physics Physics 

Poultry Poultry 

Horticulture Vegetable Gardening 

Farm Management Dairying 

FOURTH YEAR 

English English 

Soils and Fertilizers Soils and Fertilizers 

Feeds and Feeding Feeds and Feeding 

Farm Equipment Rural E?onomics - 

Elect 1: Elect 1: 

History History 

Agricultural Chemistry Agricultural Chemistry 

Mathematics Mathematics 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 


Spring Term 


English 


English 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Botany 


Botany 


Home Economics 


Home Economics 


SECOND 


YEAR 


English 


Englisli 


Algebra 


Algebra 1 


History 


History 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Home Economics 


Home Economics 


THIRD 


YEAR 


English 


English 


Algebra (Optional) 


Algebra { optional ) 


History 


History 


Physics 


Physics 



Home Economics Home Economics 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 13 

FOURTH YEAR 

English English 

Home Economics Home Economics 

Elect 1 : Elect 1 : 

History History 

Mathematics Mathematics 

Music Music 

Each of these courses requires the completion of Arithmetic. 



OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY WITH TEXTS USED 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English — Writing; Spelling (Branson); English Composition 
(Sykes); Grammar, Part II (Buehler); Beading on class Sketch 
Book, Enoch Arden and Deserted Village, and as parallel Arabian 
Nights, Evangeline, Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne) completed; 
Algebra — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Factoring (Wells). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — First Year Latin to Part III (Bennett) ; Exercises in Com- 
position. 

Science — General Science (Snyder). 

Agriculture — Elements of Agriculture (Warren). 

Domestic Science — Foods and Household Management (Kinne and 
Cooley) ; Shelter and Clothing (Kinne and Cooley). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English — Spelling (Payne) ; English Composition (Sykes) ; Gram- 
mar continued (Buehler) ; Reading on Class Snowbound, Merchant 
of Venice and Poc's Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, 
Cotter's Saturday Night and Treasure Island. 

Mathematics — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Theory of Ex- 
ponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 

Latin — Grammar Completed (Bennett) ; Caesar, Book I (Bennett) ; 
New Latin Composition, Tart I to page 4S (Bennett). 

Science — Introduction to Botany (Bergen and Caldwell) ; Physi- 
ology (Ritchie). 

Agriculture — Field Crops (Wilson and Warburton) ; Vegetable 
Gardening (Green) ; Popular Fruit Growing (Green). 

Domestic Science — 

JUNIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book to page 73 (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and Emerson) ; Gram- 
mar — Knowledge of clauses of all kinds and their relationship ; Read- 
ing on Class Julius Caesar, Vision of Sir Launfal, DcQuincey's Joan 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 15 

of Arc, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, Silas Marner and Tale of 
Two Cities. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells), New Plane Geometry 
(Wells). r 

History — Essentials of English History (Walker). 

Latin — Caesar, Books I, III and IV (Bennett) ; Cicero's Orations 
against Catiline (Bennett) ; New Latin Composition to Part III 
(Bennett) ; Sight Reader (Howe). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Millikan & Gale). 

Agriculture — Beginnings in Animal Husbandry (Plumb). 

Home Economics — 

SENIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Rapid analysis of English sentences taken from newspapers, 
magazines and text books; Handbook of Composition (Woolley) ; 
English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class Sir Roger de C ov- 
erly, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Milton's Minor Poems, and as parallel 
Ivanhoe, Pilgrim's Progress, House of Seven Gables. 

Mathematics — New Solid Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States (Adams and 
Trent) ; Government in the U. S. (Garner). 

Latin — Virgil's Aeneid, six books (Bennett) ; New Latin Compo- 
sition, Part III (Bennett) ; Sight Reader (Howe). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and others). 

Agriculture — 

Home Economics — 

The course of study for the Elementary School is not outlined 
here since it is identical with that outlined by the State Department 
of Education. 

Music is one of the culture subjects and ought to be in every home. 
It adds charm to the home life, turning many a dull hour into one 
of real enjoyment. 

It is elective in all the courses. We endeavor to give a course in 
Music that is thorough. Only teachers of recognized musical ability 
and skill are employed. The school owns four pianos and a grafa- 
nola. 

For session 1016-1917, both instrumental and vocal music will be 
offered. 

WHAT WE ARE DOING FOR OUR BOYS AND GIRLS 

The school is endeavoring to put itself in line with the demands 
of the times for practical education. The demand for vocational 
training, especially the training needed by the boys and girls who 
are to live in the country, is becoming more and more insistent. The 
whole course of study at Cary has been planned with this in view. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 17 

The so-callecl cultural subjects have uot been discarded, but emphasis 
is placed ou shop work aud field work for the boys, aud cooking and 
sewiug for the girls. 

OUR EQUIPMENT FOR VOCATIONAL TRAIXIXG 

In the school basement are two large, well-lighted rooms one of 
which serves as a kitchen and the other as a dining and sewing 
room. The kitchen is provided with running water, hot and cold, 
sinks, laundry tub. domestic science desks, oil and wood ranges, cup- 
boards, refrigerator, bins, oil stoves, and the most approved cooking 
utensils. The sewing and dining room contains dining tables and 
sewing tables with chairs, sewing machines, sewing lockers, china 
and linen closets, dressing mirror, and a substantial and attractive 
set of china and silver ware. The equipment of this department has 
been pronounced by experts to be as good as can be found in any 
school of the same grade in the State at present. 

For the boys a room in the basement has been fitted up with work 
benches, tools, etc.. and here all sorts of useful articles about the 
home and farm are made under the direction of the teacher of the 
farm life department. Another room in the basement serves as a 
dairy laboratory. The ecpiipment consists of two cream separators, 
the De Laval and the Sharpies, a Babcock milk tester, a sterilizer. 
a canning outfit and running water. The milk will be brought from 
the school farm to the dairy room where the milk and cream will be 
separated by the students and delivered to the dormitories. 

There are also laboratories where systematic work is done in 
illustrating the principles of Physics. Chemistry, Botany and Agri- 
culture. Recently a canning outfit was donated to the school and 
will be in active operation during the summer and fall months, the 
fruit and vegetables being canned on the school farm for use in the 
boarding department. 

The school owns a farm of sixteen acres on which a model barn 
and farm cottage have been built. The school also owns two fine 
Jersey cows and a Percheron mare, besides a lot of farm machinery. 
On this farm, as well as on the other farms in the neighborhood, the 
pupils learn how to set and to prune and spray fruit trees, to terrace 
hill sides, to select and test seed, to grow vegetables for market and 
for home use. and to experiment with cover crops, fertilizers, etc. 
It will be the earnest effort of the school to make the farm a practical 
demonstration of the best methods of farming, dairying, and pig 
and poultry raising. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Cary is fortunate in having four well organized, wide awake, ami 
enthusiastic literary societies, two for boys and two for girls. The 
girls meet Thursday afternoon and the boys on Thursday nights. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 19 

Each society gives a medal at Commencement for most improvement 
during the year. The boys' societies give jointly a medai f >r the 
best declamation and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. 
Mr. H. P. Smith, a former graduate of the school, gives annually a 
medal to the member of the boys' societies delivering the best oration 
on the occasion of Commencement. 

The literary societies are the school's strong right arm. Here the 
pupils of the high school meet once a week and declaim or recite, 
report on current events, and discuss the great questions that agitate 
the country. In the debates, not only do the members acquire skill 
in handling an opponent, but the knowledge of parliamentary practice 
which is so essential to success in handling large groups of men, is 
acquired in these societies. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical powers 
of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, the school has 
made ample provision for healthful sports for every sort of child 
from the little tot up to those who have already passed out of their 
teens. A baseball diamond, two basketball courts, one for boys and 
one for girls, three tennis courts, two groups of playground apparatus, 
one for the larger boys and another for the children and girls are 
located on the school campus and are amply sufficient to keep all 
the pupils occupied with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation 
periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and assistance 
to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams with uniforms 
and other equipment, these being the property of the school. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS . 

Pupifs must bring certificates from former teacher showing that 
the work of the Seventh Grade has been satisfactorily completed. 
Pupils unprepared for high school work are assigned to work in the 
grades. Credit is given for work done in other schools of the same 
standing. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given on all 
work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholarship, deport- 
ment, etc.. are mailed to parents or guardians. The pass mark is 75. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION PER TERM 

Primary Grades - - $ $.00 

Grammar Grades 12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 10.00 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 

Junior and Senior Years 18.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 12.00. 

Music Practice — an hour daily 2.40 

Voice t 12.00 

r 
BOARD PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 9.50 

Girls' Dormitory 9.50 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 2.00 

Girls' Dormitory — Single Beds 2.50 

Girls' Dormitory — Double Beds... 2.00 

TERMS 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduction is made 
for absence except in cases of protracted illness of one week or more. 

Board is payable at the end of each school month of 2S days with 
no deduction for less than nine meals missed in succession. 

Pupils from Wake County, ministerial students, and teachers in 
the public schools are allowed free tuition in the high school depart- 
ment. 

Pupils rooming in the dormitory must furnish the following : A 
pair of sheets, a pair of blankets or quilts, a pillow and pillow cases, 
towels, and toilet articles such as comb, brush, soap, and matches. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Table board from Monday to Friday is $6.50 per month, or from 
Sunday afternoon to Friday $7.00. There is no deduction in room 
rent. 

Board and room can be secured in private families for $12.00 a 
month for full time, or $8.50 a month from Monday to Friday. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on the 
opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discouragement 
and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the per- 
mission of the Principal. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at Cary than 
is necessary should notify the Principal. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls and 
the boys of the school or the town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage to 
school property in their rooms. 




o 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 23 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 148 high school pupils were enrolled. There were 106 
boarders from 14 counties. The graduating class numbered 32. the 
largest class in the history of the^school. 

An experiment in students' government was tried in the boys' 
dormitory last session with most gratifying results. Under this 
plan, the students elect their own officers and formulate the rules by 
which they are governed under the Principal's direction. 

During the vacation shower baths for the boys will be installed in 
the basement of the main building. Dressing rooms and lockers 
will also be provided for their use. 

The new dormitory for girls will be furnished with neat and 
attractive furniture, each room being provided with a closet and 
containing an oak dresser, a white enameled wash stand with fixtures, 
two single beds with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, 
and two chairs. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the school, 
several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue: (1) One of 
the most substantial high school buildings in the State. (2) An 
admirable heating and ventilating system. (3) Running water in 
the buildings. (4) Bored well on the campus. (5) Spacious class 
rooms lighted on one side and provided with cabinets built into the 
walls. (6) Tablet arm chairs for the high school and individual 
lockers for books, tablets, etc. (7) An auditorium that will seat 
eight hundred or more, with a gallery and a splendid stage.. (8) A 
gymnasium room, society halls, laboratories, etc. (9) Dormitories 
both for boys and girls^-one of these a handsome brick structure 
just built, with steam heat, baths, etc. (10) A school farm with 
buildings and equipment for demonstrating the principles of agri- 
culture, dairying, stock raising, etc. (11) A complete playground 
equipment for the whole school. (12) An unsurpassed domestic 
science equipment for high school students. 

DONATIONS TO THE SCHOOL 

The following have made donations to the school during the past 
j session : 

The De Laval Cream Separator Co.. 165 Broadway, New York 
City, one cream separator valued at $75.00. 

The Ringen Stove Co., St. Louis. Mo., one oil range valued at $18.00. 

The Sharpies Separator Company. West Chester, Pa., one cream 
separator valued at $70.00. 

The Southern Canner and Evaporator Co., Chattanooga. Tenn., 
one canning outfit valued at $10.00. 

The Junior Order, Cary, N. C, one flag pole valued at $10.00. 

The Junior Order and Patrotic Sons of Cary jointly, six brick 
piers and a brick wall in front of school building valued at $80.00. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 25 



The Woman's Betterment Association of Gary, a concrete walk 
and gravel driveway in front of the main building valued at $150.00. 

ENROLLMENT HIGH SCHOOL 

Session 1915-1916 



Adams, Mabel 
Atkins. M. C. 
Atkins. T. W. 
Bagwell. Texie 
Bailey, J. T. 
Ball, J. G. 
Banks. K. M, 
Banks, E. C. 
Banks, P. K. 
Barbee, Alma 
Barbee. Lyda 
Barker. Estelle 
Beddingfield. C. L. 
Benton. Whitson 
Benton, Burtis 
Bobbitt, S. L. 
Breeze. Sallie 
Broughton, J. T. 
Bullock, Lucy 
Campbell, Ida 
Carpenter, O. L. 
Carpenter, C. C. 
Carroll, M. E. 
Clements. E. S. 
Clements, R. D. 
Clifton. Jessie 
Coley, Alice 
Coley, Mildred 
Cooper, Evelyn 
Cooper, Elaine 
Daniel, T. P. 
Dudley, Lillian 
Eatman, Clive 
Edwards, Otho 
Foushee, Ina 
Garner, Ruby 
Goodwin, O. K. 
Gi'ay, Eugenia 
Green, Estelle 
Hall, Annie 
Hargis, Richard 
Heater, Fannie 
Heater, Retha 
Heater, Ernest 
Herndon, E. G. 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Dare 
Hood, F. L. 
House, Alpha 
Howie. H. S. 
Hunt. Reva 
Ivey, Hannah 



Jacobs, M. L. 
Jacobs, W. S. 
Jewell, Thelma 
Johnson, Joe 
Johnson, Lillian 
Jones, Eugene 
Jones, Pearl 
Jones, J. R. 
Jones, Eva 
Jones, Bessie 
Jones. Nellie 
Kelley. W. O. 
Kelley, Zoie 
Knight, Rachel 
Lawrence. Bunah 
Little, Bryce 
Lynn, Mary 
Mangum, C. R. 
Marconi, F. D. 
Matthews, J. L. 
Matthews, Grace 
Maynard, J. T. 
Maynard, Louise 
McKimmon, Hugh 
Mitcli ell. Neva May 
Moore. W. J. 
Morgan, Y. H. 
Newcombe, C. E. 
Nichols, Lukie 
Oldham, A. S. 
Olive, J. G. 
Olive, Nellie 
Page. William 
Page, Kittie 
Parker, Herman 
Parker, Alan 
Parker, Charles 
Peebles, Lillian 
Penny, M. A. 
Phelps, R. P. 
Pleasants. Mae 
Pool, Ruth 
Pritchett, W. B. 
Rand, O. C. 
Ranes, I. N. 
Bedford, W. W. 
Rhodes, H. M. 
Pigsbee. Jeppie 
Satterwhite, W. M. 
Rpuls. W. P. 
S^hweikert, F. E. 
Senrs, Roselle 



26 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Senter, O. R. 
Seymour, Bessie 
Seymour, Hubert 
Seymour, Annie 
Shaw, W. T. 
Simmons. Fannie 
Smith, Clarence 
Smith, Minda 
Smith, Pauline 
Stephens, Rodney 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stone. Ralph 
Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strother, Frank 
Strother, Dawson 
Templeton, Elva 
Thompson, R. L. 
Tillotson. Marie 
Turner. W. D. 
Upchureh, W. G. 
Upchureh, Alice 
Upchureh, Essie 



Upchureh, Frank 
Upchureh, John Lee 
Vernon, Willie 
Waldo, Lavine 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Ghita 
Waldo, Owen 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilkinson, Fred 
Williams, J. F. 
Williams, Gladys 
Womble, W. B. 
Womble, David 
Wood, Lovie 
Woodall, M. T. 
Woodward, Burnell 
Woodward, Augusta 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yarborough, Ada 
Yates, Ha 
Yates, Cuma 
Yates, Annie Lee 



Enrollment High School 14S 

Enrollment Elementary School 203 

Total Enrollment 351 



if 



=& 



GATTIS &WARD 

Shoes and Hosiery 

In Men's Fine Dress Shos we carry 
Steadfast, Biltrite, and other 
splendid lines that are ex- 
celled by none. 

For Women we have the celebrated LaFrance 
line that is unsurpassed for beauty, style and 
durability. 

For children we carry the very best that 
skilled labor can produce. 

We carry the strongest and dryest line of 
Men's Work Shoes made in America. 

TRY A PAIR AND BE CONVINCED 

GATTIS & WARD 

15 East Martin Street : Raleigh, N. C. 
Opposite Commercial National Bank 



*= 



SK 



EVERY FAMILY SHOULD OWN A 
"SOUTHERN" CANNER 

Farmers ! don't let your 'fruit and vegetables waste. 
You can make big money canning them with the 
"Southern" Canner. Big demand for home canned 
goods and quick sales at big profit. 

One little school girl made more than $200 in a 
season with her canner. J. C. Berryhill, of Los 
Angeles, California, made $2,000 the first year with 
his "Southern" Canner. You can make big money 
too, but you must have the "Southern" Canner for 
best results. It is the superior of all others. 




SPECIAL $10 OUTFIT for canning club girls 
and for ordinary family canning. Ladies get one of 
these canners, and learn this easy way of canning. 
Book of recipes and directions for canning with each 
outfit. 

Write today for our big catalogue. It tells all 
about cannindg. Address, 

Southern Canner and Evaporator Company 

CHATTANOOGA, TENK 

For Sale by Hardware Dealers 



PRIZES AND LOVING CUPS 

HUNDREDS OF NEW AND 

APPROPRIATE ARTICLES, 

INCLUDING LOVING CUPS, VASES, 

EWERS, BOWLS, ETC. 

H. MAHLERS' SONS 
JEWELERS OF RALEIGH 



WHILE IN RALEIGH 

make our store your headquarters. Wa carry a full and 
up-to-date line of LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR, DRY 
GOODS, SHOES, HATS, MILLINERY AND GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS. 

KLINE & LAZARUS DEPARTMENT STORE 

16 E. Haegett St., 206-210 S. Wilmington St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

i "WHERE YOUR DOLLARS COUNT MOST" 



OXFORD COLLEGE 

FOUNDED IN 1850 

Courses in Literature, Music, Art, Home Economics, (Do- 

r 

mestic Science and Domestic Art) Business, Pedagogy 

and Expression. 
Ten standard units required for admission to the Freshman 

Class. 
Two Literary Degrees conferred, Bachelor of Science and 

Bachelor of Arts. 
Diplomas and Certificates awarded in special courses. 
Two Preparatory courses offered. 
Specialists in all Departments. 
Charges moderate. 

Apply for Catalogue 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President 

When you visit Raleigh, be sure to see our large line 

of 

Home Furniture 



We carry the Largest Stock in Raleigh 



See Us Foe Easy Payments 

We can suit the poor as well as the rich. We deliver it to 
your home without cost. 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE COMPANY 

127 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 




Good eye sight is nature's greatest gift to mankind. 

Do not allow it to become impaired, either 

through misuse or neglect. 

Specialist and have your eyes examined. 
Go to Dr. A. G. Springier, the Eye Sight 

SPINGLER OPTICAL COMPANY 

132 Fayetteville St. (Up Stairs) EALEIGH, N. C. 



A. S.JOHNSON 

Cary, North Carolina 

GARAGE 

Repairs of All Kinds Storage 




ALUMINUM, CAST IRON AND STEEL WELDING 
AUD VULCANIZING A SPECIALTY 

All kinds of new and second hand gas 
and gasoline engines sold and repaired. 

A.S.JOHNSON, - - - Cary, North Carolina 



G. S.Tucker & Company 

FURNITURE DEALERS 

r 

A Complete Stock of Furniture and 
House Furnishings 

PRICES WITHIN REACH OF ALL 

Come and look over our stock and see if there isn't something 

that will add comfort as well as looks 

to your home. 

G. S. TUCKER & COMPANY, - Raleigh, N. C. 

114-116 East Haegett Street 

C. R. Scott & Son 

CARY, N. C. 

The Only Exclusive Dry Goods, Notions, Millinery 
and Shoe Store in Town. 

We carry a nice line of Ladies' and Children's Wraps, 
Matting, Rugs, Trunks and Suit Cases. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well-known 
Crossett for men, and Shelby's Fine Shoes for ladies. 

Give us a chance and let us prove to you that we can save 
you money. 

Make our store your headquarters while in town. 

School Books Tablets and Pencils 



Mrs. Frank Redf ord 

EXCLUSIVE 
MILLINERY 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



10 Per Cent Discount to Gary High 
School Students 



"The Place Where Quality Counts" 



Waldo Drug Company 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and Druggists' 

Sundries ; Perfumery, All Popular Odors ; Toilet 

and Fancy Articles, Combs, Brushes, Etc. 



TABLETS AND STATIONERY 
OF ALL KINDS 



Prescriptions Carefully Compounded Day or Night 



CROSS & LINEHAN COMPANY 

234-236 Fayettevilxe St., Raleigh, N. C. 
(Tucker Building) 
r 

Clothing, Men's Furnishings and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during your 
visit to our city. We will endeavor to make your stay pleasant. 



DR. J. C. MANN 

EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Office over Merchants and Farmers Bank with R. W. Johnson, M.D. 

Hours 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. Phone connections. Students of 

Cary High School Eyes Examined Free. 

APEX, N. C. 

CLOTHIERS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city, 



J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY 
GROCERS 

No. 9 East Martin Street 

EVERYTHING IN 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 



Phone 88 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



HAYES' PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO 
High Grade Portraiture 

VIEW AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

Kodak Finishing, Supplies, Bromide Enlargements, Copying 

HSMi Fatetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Hardware, Heavy and 
Fancy Groceries 

GARY, N. C. 

Tablets, Pencils and All Kinds of Stationery 

TEMPLETON & TEMPLETON 

Attorneys at Law 

Gary, N. G 

and Citizens National Bank Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

"WHERE YOUR DOLLARS COUNT MOST" 



RALEIGH DEPARTMENT STORE 

126 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Thos. H. Briggs & Sons 

RALEIGH, X <3. 
THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

Base Ball, Tennis and Sporting Goods • 
Majestic Ranges 

Builders' Supplies 

Farmers' Supplies 

BEST GOODS LOWEST PRICES 

SQUARE DEALING 

ALFRED WILLAMS & COMPANY 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina for All Kinds 
of 

BOOKS 

We carry all the Teachers' Books. 
We sell new books at publishers' prices. 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 

:. Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. ■. ','> 

Write for price list 'of 50 cent' fiction.' 

Our $1 Fountain Pens 

.'" AcfEMS roit. 'Eastman KodaivS and Supplies ' ; 



W. H. ATKINS 

Blacksmith and General Repairs 
Fancy Groceries 

All Kinds of Wagons Made to Order. Agent for Machinery of Inter- 
national Horvester Co. : Mowers, Rakes, Disc 
and Peg Tooth Harrows. 

Grist Mill for Manufacture of Best Qaulity Com Meal. 

Opposite Baptist Church CARY, N. C. 



THE BANK OF CARY, CARY, N. C. 

WHILE IN CARY, DEPOSIT YOUR MONEY IN 

THE BANK OF CARY 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 

M. ROSENTHAL & CO. 

FANCY GROCERIES OF EVERY 
DISCRIPTION 

Prompt Service and Best Goods Only 
JONES-BENTON COMPANY 

CARY, N. C. 

Here is where you find the highest quality atthelowest prices. 

Our line includes Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, 

Furnishing Goods and Farming Implements. 

FRESH MEAT MARKET 
See our line of the famous "SELv ROYAL BLUE SHOES" 



C. R. BOONE 

DE LUXE CLOTHIER 

r 

Guaranteed ^«9 \jAU/> 4HK Furnishings 

Eight Next to 10c Store All Phones 28 

226 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"Come and See" Is All We Ask. 

Your railroad fare paid for when you buy your suit from us. 

A LADIES' STORE OF 

READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS 

NOVELTIES, DRY GOODS AND TRUNKS 



AGENTS FOR THE "GOSSARD' 
AND "C. B." CORSETS 



Let our corsetier give you a comfortable fitting. 

THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

(Next to New Masonic Temple.) 
131 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH, N. C. 



We Welcome All Feel At Home When You Come 

HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 

East Martin St. Raleigh, N. C. 

Where you pay cash but pay less for your most up-to-date 

Shoes, Dry Goods, Notions, Millinery, Hats, Caps 
Gents' Furnishings 

AND LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR 

HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 

13 Stores in the Carolinas 



'IT'S WORTH THE DIFFERENCE' 

The TYREE Studio 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



DR. R. W. STEPHENS 
Dentist 

APEX, NORTH CAROLINA 



M. T. JONES 
Undertaker 

Coffins, Caskets and Burial Robes 
Cary, if. C. 



£.10=1.1 71 



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Announcement for I9lf-191B 



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School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Secretary 

F. R. Gray 



Calendar 1917-1918 

Fall Term opens. . . .September 3, 1917 

Fall Term closes December 21, 1917 

Spring Term opens. .December 31, 1917 
Spring Term closes April 19, 1918 



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Officers and Instructors 



M. B. Dry, Principal. 

J. S. Howard, Principal Farm Life School. 

Miss Lillian Killingsworth, Lady Principal. 

High School 

M. B. Dry, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College, 1S96) 

Mathematics, Latin, French. 

Miss Lillian Killingsworth, A.B. 
(Erskine College) 

History, English. 

J. S. Howard, B. S. 
(A. and E. College) 

Agriculture, Science. 

Miss Jane Temple, B.S. 
(Teachers' College. N. Y.) 

Home Economics. 

Miss Charlotte "White 
(Southern Conservatory of Music) 

Piano and Voice. 
Elementary School 

Miss Edna Tyer 
(Southern Female College) 

Sixth and Seventh Grades. 



Fourth and Fifth Grades. 

Miss Carrie Brame 
(Littleton Female College) 

Second and Third Grades. 

Miss Irma Ellis 
(Normal and Industrial College) 

First Grade. 



Matron Boys' Dormitory. 
Mrs. Betsy K. Hunter 
Matron Girls' Dormitory. 

*To be supplied. 



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Graduating Class 1917 



Allen, Bertha Cary 

Beddingfield, C. L Raleigh, R. 1 

Bryan, Bertie r Garner 

Buffaloe, J. M Raleigh), R. 1 

Carpenter, O. L Morrisville, R. 1 

Coley, Alice Raleigh, R. 5 

Daniel, T. P Youngsville, R. 1 

Edwards, 0. C INTeuse 

Goodwin, Bernice Apex, R. 3 

Hargis, R. R Hamlet 

Howard, C. B Cary 

Howie, Ruth Abbeville, S. C. 

Jacobs, M. L Morrisville 

Johnson, J. L Apex, R. 1 

Kelley, W. 0. . Clayton, R. 3 

Lawrence, Alva . .Apex, R. 3 

Parker, Chas. J., Jr Raleigh 

Redford, W. W Wake Forest, R. 3 

Riggsbee, Jeppie Morrisville 

Satterwhite, W. M Youngsville, R. 1 

Shaw, W. T Raleigh, R. 4 

Smith, Minda McCullers, R. 1 

TJpchurch, W. G Apex, R. 1 

Vernon, Willie West Raleigh 

Wilkinson, Bred Cary 

Womble, W. B Cary 

Woodward, Burnell Raleigh, R. 4 



Winners of Medals 



Scholarship C. B. Howard 

Debate C. L. Beddingfield 

Oration R. R. Eatman 

Declamation C. B. Howard 

Recitation Ruth Howie 

Clay Improvement C. B. Howard 

Calhoun Improvement T. P. Daniel 

Irving Improvement Willie Vernon 

Lowell Improvement Burnell Woodward 



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The Cary Public High School 

and Farm Life School 



History 

The Cary Public High School and Farm Life School is an 
outgrowth of the old Cary High School which had its origin 
back in the last century and was owned and controlled by a 
stock company. In 1907, the owners of the property sold their 
stock to the county, and the school was converted into a State 
high school, the first to be established under the high school law 
of 1907. The official name Avas changed from the Cary High 
School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, by special 
act of the Legislature, providing for farm life instruction in 
Wake County, there were added to the school the departments 
of agriculture and domestic science, the name of the school be- 
ing changed from the Cary Public High School to the . Cary 
Public High School and the E. L. Middleton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading high 
schools of the State in its day. With a large and well equipped 
two-story wooden building, with ample boarding facilities in 
dormitories and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school 
drew patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Eev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and the 
Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the school 
was under the wise management of E. L. Middleton. In 1908, 
Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, and 
M. B. Dry was elected as his successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con- 
stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory in this State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had out- 
grown was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly modern 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



9 



brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,000.00. 
The old dormitory building for boys which was burned in the 
spring of 1916 has been replaced by a $10,000.00 brick structure. 
This building is equipped with steam heat, baths, lavatories and 
toilets. It is located near the main school building and is 
occupied by the girls and the lady teachers. 

The old dormitory for girls, located a few hundred yards 
from the campus, will be occupied by the boys until a new 
dormitory can be built. Sufficient boarding accommodations 
can be provided for as many students, either boys or girls, as 
may desire to attend. 



Courses of Study 



Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Science, Latin, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music. To receive a 
certificate of graduation, a pupil must have completed one of 
the following courses : 



Academic Course 



\ 



FIRST 


YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 


English 




English 


Arithmetic 




Algebra 


Algebra 




Latin 


Latin 




, History 


History 




Botany 


General Ag] 


•iculture 


Zoology 


THIRD 


YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


English 




English 


History 




History 


Chemistry 




Physics 


Algebra 




Elect 2 : 


Latin 




Latin 


Geometry 




French 
Music 




Agricultural Course 


FIRST 


YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 


English 




English 


Arithmetic 




Algebra 


Algebra 




Botany 


General Agriculture 


• Zoology 


Horticulture 




Soils and Crops 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 11 

THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR 

English English 

Plane Geometry Physics 

History r History 

Chemistry Rural Economics 

Animal Husbandry Soils 

Home Economics Course 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 



English 


English 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Botany 


Home Economics 


Zoology 


General Agriculture 


Home Economics 


THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


English 


English 


History 


History 


Chemistry 


Physics 


Home Economics 


Elect 1 : 




Mathematics 




French 




Music 



Each of these courses requires the completion of Arithmetic, 



Outline Course of Study With Texts Used 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English — Writing; Spelling (Branson); English Composi- 
tion (Sykes) ; Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; Reading on class 
Sketch Bool', Enoch Arden and Deserted Village, and as a 
parallel Arabian Nights, Evangeline, Courtship of Miles Stan- 
dish. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne) com- 
pleted; Algebra — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Factoring 
(Wells). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — First Year Latin to Part III (Bennett) ; Exercises 
in Composition. 

Sscience — General Science (Snyder). 

Agriculture — Elements of Agriculture (Warren). 

Domestic Science — See page 15. 

GOPHOMORE YEAR 

English — Spelling (Payne) ; English Composition (Sykes) ; 
Grammar continued (Buehler) ; Reading on Class Snowbound, 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 13 

Merchant of Venice and Foe's Poems, and as parallel Last of 
the Mohicans, Cotter's Saturday, Night and Treasure Island. 

Mathematics — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Theory of 
Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 

Latin — Grammar completed (Bennett) ; Caesar, Book I 
(Bennett) ; New Latin Composition, Part I to page 48 (Ben- 
nett). 

Science — Introduction to Botany (Bergen and Caldwell) ; 
Physiology (Ritchie). 

Agriculture — (Text to be selected). 

Domestic Science — See page 15. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book to page 73 (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and Emerson) ; 
Grammar — Knowledge of clauses of all kinds and their relation- 
ship; Reading on Class Julius Caesar, Vision of Sir Launfal, 
DeQuincey's Joan of Arc, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, 
Silas Marner and Tale of Two Cities. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells) ; JSTew Plane 
Geometry (Wells). ; 

History — Essentials of English History (Walker). 

Latin — Caesar, Books I, III and IV (Bennett) ; Cicero's 
Orations against Catiline (Bennett) ; New Latin Composition to 
Part III (Bennett); Sight Reader (Howe). 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownleej and 
others). 

Agriculture — See page 15. 

SENIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Rapid analysis of English sentences taken from news- 
papers, magazines and text books; Handbook of Composition 
(Woolley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de Coverly, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Milton's Minor 
Poems, and as parallel Ivanhoe, Pilgrim's Progress, House of 
Seven Gables. 

History — High School History of United States (Adams and 
Trent) ; Government in the U. S. (Garner). 

Latin — Virgil's Aeneid, four books (Bennett) ; New Latin 
Composition, Part III (Bennett); Sight Reading (Howe). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 15 

Science — First Course in Physics (Milliken and Gale). 
Agriculture — See page 15. 

Outline of Course of Study in Home Economics 
Department 

The school offers a three-year course in Domestic Art and 
Science, for which high school credit is given. A special Home 
Economics diploma is granted students "who complete the course. 

We correlate the work of the course with other educational 
subjects. In general, our aim is to help to prepare the student 
for more efficient living. 

TIME GIVEN TO WORK 

Domestic Art — One forty-five minute period to recitation and 
two double periods to laboratory practice each week. 

Domestic Science — Same as Domestic Art. 

Text Books — First and second years : Shelter and Clothing 
(Kinne and Cooley) ; Foods and Household Management 
(Kinne and Cooley). Third year: Clothing for Women (Laura . 
Boldt) ; Laboratory Manual of Dietetics (D. M. Rose). Text 
supplemented by lectures and reference reading. Note books 
required. 

DOMESTIC ART COURSE 

First Year — (a) Elementary Sewing. Course involves the 
use and care of sewing machines, the making of a cookery apron, 
a set of underwear and a ginghams dress, (b) Textiles. (With 
excursion lessons). 

Second Year — (a) Intermediate Sewing. Course involves 
the making of a regulation middy blouse, a wollen skirt and a 
lingerie dress, (b) Drawing, (c) Textile study continued 
during first and second quarters. History of Costumes sub- 
stituted in third quarter. Costume Design in the fourth. 

Third Year — (a) Dressmaking. Course includes the making 
of a wollen or silk dress, (b) Drawing and color work, (c) 
Millinery. Involves the making of wire frames, stretching the 
foundation and completing a silk hat and straw hat. (d) In- 
terior Decoration. Study of problems involving practical ap- 
plications. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE COURSE 

First Year — (a) Technology of Cookery. Course includes a 
study of the food principles, with practical applications. It 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 17 

also includes the care of the laboratory; use of utensils; weights 
and measures; sanitation; care and use of milk, meat, etc. 
Excursion lessons and candy factory. 

Second Year — (a) General Pookery, involving canning; pre- 
serving; making of breads, cakes, soups, salads, etc. (&) 1. 
Infant feeding. Study of dairies. Emphasis placed on the 
economical, sociological and ethical aspects of the subject. 2. 
Invalid cookery and service. 3. Budget and menu making. 

Third Year — (a) Home Cookery and Table Service. The 
course aims to give theory and practice in preparation and 
service of the different "ways of serving formal and informal 
meals. Fancy cookery, (b) Nutrition, (c) Home Sanita- 
tion. Discussion of social and economical problems which con- 
front the housewives. 

The course of study for the Elementary School is not out- 
lined here since it is identical with that outlined by the State 
Department of Education. 

Music is one of the culture subjects and ought to be in every 
home. It adds charm to the home life, turning many a dull 
hour into one of real enjoyment. 

It is elective in all the courses. We endeavor to give a course 
in Music that is thorough. Only teachers of recognized musical 
ability and skill are employed. The school owns four pianos 
and a graf anola. 

For session 1917-1918, both instrumental and vocal music 
will be offered. 

What We Are Doing For Our Boys and Girls 

The school is endeavoring to put itself in line with the de- 
mands of the times for practical education. The demand for 
vocational training, especially the training needed by the boys 
and girls who are to live in the country, is becoming more and 
more insistent. The whole course of study at Cary has been 
planned with this in view. The so-called cultural subjects have 
not been discarded, but emphasis is placed on shop work and 
field work for the boys, and cooking and sewing for the girls. 

Our Equipment For Vocational Training 

In the school basement are two large, well-lighted rooms, one 
of which serves as a kitchen and the other as a dining and sew- 
ing room. The kitchen is provided with running water, hot 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 19 

and cold, sinks, laundry tub, domestic science desks, oil and 
wood ranges, cupboards, refrigerator, bins, oil stoves, and the 
most approved cooking utensils. The sewing and dining room 
contains dining tables and sewing tables with chairs, sewing 
machines, sewing lockers, china'and linen closets, dressing mir- 
ror, and a substantial and attractive set of china and silver 
ware. The equipment of this department has been pronounced 
by experts to be as good as can be found in any school of the. 
same grade in the State at. present. 

For the boys a room in the basement has been fitted up with 
work benches, tools, etc., and here all sorts of useful articles 
about the home and farm are made under the direction of the 
teacher of the farm life department. Another room in the 
basement serves as a dairy laboratory. The equipment consists 
of two cream separators, the De Laval and the Sharpies, a 
Babcock milk tester, a sterilizer, a canning outfit and running; 
water. 

There are also laboratories where systematic work is done in 
illustrating the principles of Physics, Chemistry, Botany x and 
Agriculture. Recently a large cannery was built by the school 
and the Cary Junior Order jointly, which will be in active 
operation during the summer and fall months, canning the 
fruits and vegetables on the school farm for use in the boarding 
department as well as the fruits and vegetables grown in the 
community. 

The school owns a farm of sixteen acres on which a model 
barn and farm cottage have been built. The school also owns 
two fine Jersey cows besides a lot of farm machinery. On this 
farm, as well as on the other farms in the neighborhood, the 
pupils learn how to set and prune and spray fruit trees, to 
terrace hill sides, to select and test seed, to grow vegetables for 
market and for home use, and to experiment with cover crops, 
fertilizers, etc. It will be the earnest effort of the school to 
make the farm a practical demonstration of the best methods 
of farming, dairying, and pig and poultry raising. 

Literary Societies 

Cary is fortunate in having four well organized, wide awake, 
and enthusiastic literary societies, two for boys and two for girls. 
The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the boys on Thursday 
nights. Each society gives a medal at Commencement for most 
improvement during the year. The boys' societies give jointly 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 

a medal for the best declamation and the girls' societies one for 
the best recitation. Mr. H. P. Smith, a former graduate of the 
school, gives annually a medal to the member of the boys' 
societies delivering the best oration on the occasion of Com- 
mencement. 

The literary socities are the school's strong right arm. Here 
the pupils of the high school meet once a week and declaim or 
recite, report on current events, and discuss the great questions 
that agitate the country. In the debates, not only do the mem- 
bers acquire skill in handling an opponent, but the knowledge 
of parliamentary practice which is so essential to success in 
handling large groups of men, is acquired in these societies. 

Athletics 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, the 
school has made ample provision for healthful sports for every 
sort of child from the little tot up to those who have already 
passed out of their teens. A baseball diamond, two basketball 
courts, one for boys and one for girls, three tennis courts, two 
groups of playground apparatus, one for the larger boys and 
another for the children and girls are located on the school 
campus and are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied 
with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and assist- 
ance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams with 
uniforms and other equipment, these being the property of the 
school. 

Entrance Requirements 

Pupils must bring certificates from former teacher showing 
that the work of the Seventh Grade has been satisfactorily com- 
pleted. Pupils unprepared for high school work are assigned 
to work in the grades. Credit is given for work done in other 
schools of the same standing. 

Examinations and Reports 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given on 
all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 




£ 



a 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 23 

Expenses 

TUITION PER TERM 

Primary Grades $ 8.00 

Grammar Grades 12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 16.00 

Junior and Senior Years 18.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 12.00 

Music Practice — an hour daily 2.40 

Voice 12.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 10.50 

Girls' Dormitory 10.50 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 2.00 

Girls' Dormitory — Single Beds 2.50 

Girls' Dormitory— Double Beds 2.00 

Terms 

Tuition is payable quaterly in advance. ~Ko deduction is 
made for absence except in cases of protracted illness of one 
week or more. 

Board is payable at the end of each school month of 28 days 
with no deduction for less than twelve meals missed in succession. 

Pupils from Wake County, ministerial students, and teachers 
in the public schools are allowed free tuition in the high school 
department. 

Pupils rooming in the dormitory must furnish the following : 
A pair of sheets, a pair of blankets or quilts, pillow cases, towels, 
and toilet articles such as comb, brush, soap, and matches. Boys 
furnish pillows also. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
with the Principal $1.00 to show good faith. This amount will 
be deducted from the first month's rent. Eooms, however, will 
not be held longer than September 5. 

Table board from Monday to Friday is $7.50 per month, or 
from Sunday afternoon to Friday $7.00. There is no deduc- 
tion in room rent. 

Board and room can be secured in private families for $13.00 
a month for full time, or $9.50 a month from Monday to Friday. 



ifi- 




Ifi 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School ' 25 

All bills unpaid by June 1, following the close of school, will 
be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

Miscellaneous 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on the 
opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discourage- 
ment and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at Cary 
than is necessary should notify the Principal. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

JSTo unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or the town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. 

Special Notes 

Last session 164 high school pupils were enrolled. There 
were 115 boarders from 15 counties. The graduating class 
numbered 27. 

The new dormitory for girls is furnished with neat and at- 
tractive furniture, each room being provided with a closet and 
containing and oak dresser, an oak wash stand with fixtures, 
two single beds with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, 
and two chairs. One of the rooms is used as an infirmary. 
• Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the 
school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue : 
(1) One of the most substantial high school buildings in the 
State. (2) An admirable heating and ventilating system. (3) 
Running water in the buildings. (4) Bored well on the campus. 
(5) Spacious class rooms lighted on one side and provided with 
cabinets built into the walls. (6) Tablet arm chairs for the 
high school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (7) 
An auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a 
gallery and a splendid stage. (8) A gymnasium room, labora- 
tories, etc. (9) Dormitories both for boys and girls — one of 
these a handsome brick structure with steam heat, baths, etc. 
(10) A school farm with buildings and equipment for demon- 
strating the principles of agriculture, dairying, stock raising, 
etc. (11) A complete playground equipment for the whole 
school. (12) An unsurpassed domestic science equipment for 
high school students. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 27 



Enrollment High School 

Session 1916-1917 



Adams, W B. 

Adams, Henry 

Allen, Lucile 

Allen, G. L. 

Allen, Bertha 

Atkins, Thelma 

Atkins, Elsie 

Bagwell, Texie 

Bailey, D. T. 

Bailey. J. D. 

Barbee, Daisy 

Barker, Estelle 

Bartholomew. Martha 

Beddingfield. C. L. 

Benton, Burtis 

Biddle. S. S. 

Blaloek, Mimmie 

Blowers, Florence 

Booker, E. B. 

Breeze, Sallie 

Breeze, Ruth 

Bryan, Bertie 

Bryan, Beulah 

Buffaloe, J. M. 
Buffaloe, N. B. 
Byrd, Zella 
Campbell, Ida 
Campbell, Lilla Mae 
Cannady, Hilda 
Carpenter, O. L. 
Carpenter, C. C. 
Clements, Helen 
Clifton, Jessie 
Coley, Alice 
Coley, Mozelle 
Cooper, Foy 
Cooper, Evelyn 
Cooper, Elaine 
Crocker, Eunice 
Daniel. T. P. 
Davis. C. H. 
Dudley, Lillian 
Eatman, C. C. 
Eatinan. Mary- 
Edwards, Otlio 
Eldridge. H. A. 
Elliott. J. C. 
Elliott, Helen 
Foland, Mabel 
Foushee, Ina 
Gathings, James 
Goodwin, Bernice 
Gray, Eugenia 
Greene, Estelle 
Hall, Annie 



Hargis, R. R. 
Heater, Ernest 
Heater, Retha 
Heater, Opel 
Herndon, E. G. 

Holleman, Dare 

Hood, F. L. 
Howard, C. B. 

House. Alpha 

Howie, Ruth 

Honeycutt. C. B. 

Hughes, W. T. 

Hunter, Lucy 

Ivey, Hannah 

Jacobs, M. L. 

Johnson, E. H. 

Johnson, Ethel 

Johnson, J. T.- 
Johnson, Lilla Mae 

Johnson, Foy 

Jones, J. R. 

Jones, Pearl 

Jones, Eugene 

Jones, W. F. 

Jones, Eva 

Jones, Nellie 

Jones, Sudie 

Jordan, Lula Helen 

Kelley, W. O. 

Kelley, Zoie 

King, M. E. 

Knight, Rachel 

Lane, Margaret 

Lawrence, Alva 

Leeson, W. C. 

Lockamy, Corinna 

Lynn, Worth 

Lynn, Clabe 

Lynn. Mary 
Lynn, Inez 
Marconi, F. D. 
Matthews, J. L. 
Matthews, Grace 
Maynard, J. T. 
Maynard, Albertine 
Murray, S. R. 
Ogburn. Ruth 
Page, William 
Page, Kittie 
Parker, Alan 
Parker, Chas. J.. Jr. 
Parker. William 
Pennington. T. J 
Penny. TT. E. 
Penny. M. A. 



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Ready-Made Garments 

THE BESTSTYLES 
LOWEST PRICES 




The largest store in the State carrying exclusively Gar- 
ments and Furnishings for Ladies, Misses and 
Children. Gowns for social func- 
tions a specialty. 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. : RALEIGH, N. C. 

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WHEN YOU VISIT RALEIGH, BE SURE 

TO SEE OUR LARGE LINE 

OF 

HOME FURNITURE 

We Carry the Largest Stock in Raleigh 
See Us for Easy Payments 

We can suit the poor as well as the rich. 

We deliver it to your home without cost. 

V 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street : : : Raleigh, N". C. 

£ ffi 



Hi Hi 

WALDO DRUG CO. 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and 

Druggists' Sundries; Perfumery, All 

Popular Odors ; Toilet and Fancy 

Articles, Combs, Brushes, Etc. 



TABLETS AND STATIONERY 
OF ALL KINDS 



Prescriptions Carefully Compounded Day 
or Night 

Hi Hi 

Hi -Hi 

Thos. FL Brings & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 



THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

Base Ball, Tennis and Sporting Goods 

Majestic Ranges, Builders' Supplies 

Farmers' Supplies 

Best Goods : Lowest Prices : Square Dealing 

Hi- Hi 



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and 
MANUFACTURING OPTICIAN 

132 Fayetteville Street 
(Up Stairs) 
BROKEN LENSES DUPLICATED 
. ON SHORT NOTICE 



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A. S. JOHNSON 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 

GARAGE 
Repairs of All Kinds 



Storage 




ALUMINUM, CAST IRON AND STEEL WELDING AND 
VULCANIZING A SPECIALTY 

All kinds of new and second hand gas 
and gasoline engines sold and repaired. 



A. S. Johnson, 



Cary, N. C. 



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M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 



Fancy Groceries of Every 
Description 

Prompt Service and Best Goods Only 

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W. D. JONES & SONS 

GARY, N. C. 

Here is where you find the highest quality at the lowest 

prices. Our line includes Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods and 

Farming Implements. 

FRESH MEAT MARKET 

Phone No. 9 

See our line of the famous "SELZ ROYAL BLUE SHOES" 

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HAYES' PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO 
High Grade Portraiture 

VIEW AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

Kodak Finishing, Supplies, Bromide Enlargements, Copying 

113% Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Hi 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Hardware, Heavy and 
Fancy Groceries 

GARY, N. C. 

TABLETS, PENCILS AND ALL KINDS OF STATIONERY 

ffi Hi 



Hi : Hi 



PRIZES AND LOVING CUPS 



HUNDREDS OF NEW AND 

APPKOPEIATE AETICLES, 

INCLUDING LOVING CUPS, VASES, 

EWERS, BOWLS, ETC. 



H. MAHLERS' SONS 
Jewelers of Raleigh 



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Make our store your headquarters. We carry a full and 

up-to-date line of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear, Dry 

Goods, Shoes, Hats, Millinery and 

Gents' Furnishings 



KLINE & LAZARUS DEPT. STORE 

"Where Your Dollars Count Most" 

]6 E.Hargett St. 206-210 S. Wilmington St., Raleigh 

Hi ■■ "" — -; — y 



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THE BANK OF CARY, CARY, N. C. 

WHILE IN CARY, DEPOSIT YOUR MONEY IN 

THE BANK OF CARY 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and Conservatism Protect 
Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



CLOTHIERS and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Whiting-Horton Co. 

MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS 
WHEN IN THE CITY. 



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THE TYREE STUDIO 

A. H. Coble, Manager 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



W- 



We Welcome All 



Feel at Home When You Come 



HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 

East Martin St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Where you pay cash but pay less for your most up-to-date 

SHOES, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, MILLINERY, HATS, 

CAPS, GENTS' FURNISHINGS AND LADIES' 

READY-TO-WEAR 

HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 

17 Stores in the Carolinas ! 17 



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CROSS&LINEHANCOMPANY 

234-236 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 
(Tucker Building) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishings and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us dur- 
ing your visit to our city. We will endeavor to 
make your stay pleasant. 

ifi 

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WHILE IN RALEIGH CALL ON 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
The Shoe Fitter 

Hose for Ladies and Gentlemen who care. 
Traveling Bags and Suit Cases. 

129 Fayetteville Street : : : : RALEIGH. N. C- 

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M. T. JONES 
Undertaker 

COFFINS, CASKETS AND BURIAL ROBES 

Phone No. 9 

Gary, North Carolina 

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DR. J. C. MANN 
Eyesight Specialist 

Office over Merchants and Farmers Bank with R. W. Johnson 

M.D. Hours 9 A.M. to 1 P.M. Phone connections 

Students of Cary High School Eyes 

Examined Free 

APEX, :::::::: NORTH CAROLINA 
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Guaranteed 
Clothing 
Shoes 
Hats 



C. R. BOONE 

DE LUXE CLOTHIER 




Furnishings 
Tailoring 
For Men 
and Boys 



Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"Come and See" Is All We Ask 

"Good Quality Spells What Boone Sells" 
226 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Right Next to 10c Store 



All Phones 28 



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A LADIES 9 STORE OF 

READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS 

NOVELTIES, DRY GOODS and TRUNKS 



Agents for the "Gossard' 
and "C. B." Corsets 



Let our corsetier give you a comfortable fitting. 

THOMAS A. PARTINCOMPANY 

Fayetteville Street Raleigh, ~N. C. 



Hi 



C. R. SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 

r 

The most complete stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions and Millinery carried in town. 
We carry an up-to-date line of Mat- 
ting, Rugs and Druggets. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well 
known Endicott Johnson shoe for men and 
the Godman shoe for ladies, both noted for 
their durability. We know we can save you 
money. Give us a chance. :::::: 

Make our store your headquarters 
while in town 



School Books 



Tablets and Pencils 



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BOOKS 

BOOKS 

BOOKS 

Alfred Williams Go's Bookstore 

119 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters for Books of Every Kind in 
North Carolina 

We carry all the School Books 
Teachers' Books, Law Books 

LARGE AND VARIED STOCK OF BIBLES 

Eastman's Kodaks and Supplies, Fountain Pens, Novel- 
ties, Leather Goods. Mail Your Orders if You Cannot Call 



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GATTIS & WARD 

SHOES AND HOSIERY 

In Men's Fine Dress Shoes we carry Stead- 
fast, Biltrite, and other splendid lines 
that are excelled by none. 

For Women we have the celebrated La France line that is 
unsurpassed for beauty, style and durability. 

For Children we carry the very best that skilled labor can 
produce. 

We carry the strongest and dryest line of Men's Work 
Shoes made in America. 

TRY A PAIR AND BE CONVINCED 

GATTIS & WARD 

15 East Martin Street :::::: Raleigh, N. C. 
Opposite Commercial National Bank 



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E. D. BANGERT 
Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Southern Railway Watch Inspector 
Formerly with T. W. Blake 

109^ Wilmington St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



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M. J. CARROLL, Printing 

School and College 
Printing a Specialty 

W. Martin Street, Raleigh 



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M. J. Carroll 

Book and Job Printing 

Raleigh, N. C. 



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Qlaro, Nortlj Carolina 



Carp public 
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1918-'19 



AmtaittumatiB for 1919~'2fl 



2 Cary Public High School and Farm. Life, School. 



School Committee 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman 

J. M. Templeton, Jr., Secretary 

E,e^. Walter ~N. Johnson 

A. H. Pleasants 

D. A. Morgan 



Calendar 1919-1920 

Fall Term opens September 1, 1919 

Fall Term closes December 19, 1919 

Spring Term opens December 29, 1919 

Spring Term closes April 16, 1920 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. -3 



Officers and Instructors 

M. B. Dry, Principal. 

J. S. Howard, Principal Farm Life School 

Miss Lillian - Killingsworth, Lady Principal 

Miss Ikma Ellis, Principal Elementary School 

HIGH SCHOOL 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 
(Wake Forest College) 
Mathematics 

MISS LILLIAN KILLINGS WORTH, A.B. 

(Erskine College) 
English 

MISS ETHEL SMITH 

(Meredith College) 
Science 



Latin 

MISS LEONTINE ARMSTRONG, A.B. 

(State Normal College) 
History and French 

J. S. HOWARD. B.S. 
(A. and E. College) 
Agriculture 

MISS BERTIE LEE BAKER 

(State Sormal College) 
Home Economics . 



Assistant Home Economics 

MISS MYRTLE ASHCRAFT 

(Meredith College) 
Piano 

MISS ANNIE LAURIE WICKER 

(Elon College) 
Expression and Art 



To be supplied. 



4 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

MISS ADA EDWARDS 

(Mars Hill College) 
Sixth and Seventh Grades 

MISS BESS CHILD 

(Fassifem School) 
Fourth and Fifth Grades 

MISS LENA STEPHENS 

(Bell's College) 
Second and Third Grades 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(State Normal College) 

First Grade and Librarian. 

MRS. M. B. DRY 

Supervisor of Boarding Department 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 



Graduating Class, 1918 

C. H. Davis '. Raleigh, R. 4 

Annnie Hall Cary 

Retha Heater Cary 

Lucy Hunter Turkey, R. 2 

Hannah Ivey Cary 

S. G. Jones Apex, R. 2 

Margaret Lane Auburn 

J. W. Lynn Raleigh, R. 6 

C. W. Lynn Raleigh, R. 6 

S. R. Murray Apex, R. 2 

Kittle Page Morrisville, R. 2 

J. T. Pennington Cary, R. 1 

Mae Pleasants Cary 

J. W. Prince Fuquay Springs 

E. G. Rand Garner 

Winnie Womble Apex, R. 1 

Augusta Woodward Raleigh, R. 4 

Ada Yarborough Cary 



6 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 



Graduating Class, 1919 

Lillian Atkins Raleigh, R. 4 

Ida Campbell Raleigh, R. 4 

Roy Cole Pittsboro, R. 1 

Ina Foushee Cary 

James Gathings Wingate 

Eugenia Gray Cary 

Ernest Heater Cary 

Dare Holleman Cary 

Sallie Hunt Wake Forest, R. 2 

Pattie Hunter Apex, R. 3 

Eliot Johnson Kipling 

Myrtle Keith North Side 

Mary Lynn Raleigh, R. 6 

Inez Lynn Raleigh, R. 6 

Albertine Maynard Apex 

Effie Morgan Raleigh, R. 3 

Pearl Phelps Hurdle Mills 

Parker Pool Clayton, R. 3 

Alice Pope Raleigh, R. 4 

Holmes Rand Garner 

Pauline Smith Cary 

Blanche Tillman Gary, R. 2 

Lovie Wood Cary 

Bennie Wilson Cary, R. 2 

Mildred Wilson Calhoun Falls, S. C. 

Annie Lee Yates Cary 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 



Winners of Medals, 1918 

Scholarship Hazel Vaden 

Debate E. G. Rand 

Oration C. C. Eatman 

Declamation W. C. Smith 

Recitation Edith Clements 

Clay Improvement Ellis Keith 

Calhoun Improvement William Parker 

Irving Improvement Kittie Page 

Lowell Improvement Hannah Ivey 



Winners of Medals, 1919 

Scholarship Mildred Wilson 

Deeate Franlc Seymour 

Oration James Gathings 

Declamation Ernest Heater 

Recitation Lyda Smith 

Clay Improvement William Swain 

Calhoun Improvement Frank Seymour 

Irving Improvement Sallie Hunt 

Lowell Improvement Annie Lee Yates 



8 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




The Cary Public High School 



and 



Farm Life School 
History 

The Cary Public High School and Farm Life School is an 
outgrowth of the old Cary High School which had its origin 
back in the last century and was owned and controlled by a 
stock company. In 1907, the owners of the property sold their 
stock to the county, and the school was converted into a State 
high school, the first to be established under the high school law 
of 1907. Theofficial name was changed from the Cary High 
School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, by special 
act of the Legislature, providing for farm life instruction in 
Wake County, there were added to the school the departments 
of agriculture and domestic science, the name of the school be- 
ing changed from the Cary Public High School to the Cary 
Public High School and the E. L. Middleton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading high 
schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story wooden 
building, with ample boarding facilities in dormitories and in 
the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew patronage 
from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and the 
Misses Jones. For tweh T e years from 1896 to 1908, the school 
was under the wise management of E. L. Middleton. In 1908, 
Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, and 
M. B. Dry, the present Principal, was elected as his successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con- 
stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory in this State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had out- 



10 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 11 

grown was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly modern 
brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,000. The 
old dormitory building for boys which was burned in the spring 
of 1916, was replaced that year by a brick structure at a cost 
of about $11,000. The building is provided with steam heat, 
electric lights, baths, lavatories and toilets, and is now occupied 
by the girls under the care of the Lady Principal. The old 
privately owned girls' dormitory, which has been occupied by 
the boys since 1916, was burned in the fall of 1918. T he school 
is now erecting on the campus a modern brick dormitory for the 
boys, practically a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost 
of about $25,000. 

Courses of Study 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects: English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, French, 
Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression and Art. To 
receive a diploma of graduation one must have completed one of 
the following courses : 

Academic Course. 



'irst Year 


Second Year 


English 


English 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Latin 


Latin 


General History 


General History 


Botany 


General Science 


Zoology 


Physiology and Hygiene 




Third Year 


Fourth Year 


English 


English 


Algebra 


Geometry 


Latin 


American History 


English History 


Civics 


Chemistry 


French 




Latin or Music 



12 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 13 



Agricultural Course. 



First Yeak 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Physiology and Hygiene 
Crops and Soils 

Third Year 

English 
Algebra 

General History 
Chemistry 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 



Second Year 
English 
Algebra 
Botany 
Zoology 
Animal Husbandry 

Fourth Year 

English 

Plane Geometry 

American History 

Civics 

Farm Management 

Farm Engineering 



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Home Economics Course. 



First Year. 


Second Year. 




English 


English 


• ■*] 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


"•* 


Algebra 


Botany 


. ~ "*? 


General Science 


Zoology 


■ i "" 


Physiology and Hygiene 


Home Economics 




Home Economics 






Third Year. 


Fourth Year. 




English 


English 




Algebra 


American History 




General History 


Civics 




Chemistry 


Physics 




Home Economics 


Geometry 
French qv Music 


!* 
i 



14 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




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Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 15 

Outline Course of Study with Texts Used 

r 

Freshman Year. 

English — -Spelling (Branson). 

English Texts— -Lewis and Hosic's Practical English; Eng- 
lish Grammar, Part II (Buehler). Selections to be studied in 
class: Tales of a Wayside Inn (Longfellow) ; A Christmas Carol 
(Dickens) ;The Gold Bug (Poe) ; Treasure Island (Stevenson) ; 
a collection of short stories. 

Parrallel Reading — 10 credits required : The Lay of the Last 
Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott) ; Lays of Ancient Rome, 2 
(Macaulay) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson) ; Rebecca of Sunny- 
brook Farm, l(Wiggin) ; Midsummer Night's Dream, 2 (Shake- 
speare) ; Robinson Crusoe, 3 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 2 
(Harris) ; The Lives of the Hunted, 1 (Thonipson-Seton) ; 
The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens) ; Little Women, 2 (AlcoO ; 
The Story of the Other Wise Man, 1 (Van Dyke). 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne) com- 
pleted ; Algebra — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Factoring 
(Wells). 

History — General History (Myers). 

Latin — First Year Latin to Part III (Bennett). 

Science — General Science (Snyder; Physiology and Hygiene 
(Ritchie). 

Sophomore Year. 

English — Spelling (Payne). 

English Texts — English Grammar continued (Buehler) ; 
Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). Selections to be studied 
in class: Snowbound and other Poems (Whittier) ; The Mer- 
chant of Venice (Shakespeare) ; Ivanhoe (Scott) ; Southern 
Poets (M. P. C). 

Parallel Reading — 12 credits required : The Last of the Mo- 
hicans, 2 (Cooper) ; The House of Severn Gables, 2 (Haw- 
thorne). 

Narative Poems — Hevre Riel, 1 (Browning) ; The Courtin 

1 (Lowell) ; John Gilpin, 1 (Cowper) ; The Lady of the Lake, 

2 (Scott). 



16 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




o 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School. 17 

Short Stories — The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; The Man 
Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The Ambitious Guest, 1 (Haw- 
thorne) ; The Chaporal Prince, 1 (O'Henry) ; Ghallegher, 1 
(R. H. Davis) ; Tom Sawyer and Wuclcleherry Finn, 2 (Mark 
Twain) ; The Cloister and the Hearth, 3 (Charles Reade). 

Mathematics — Algebra for Secondary Schools to Theory of 
Exponents (Wells). 

History — General History (Myers). 

Latin — Grammar completed (Bennett) ; Caesar, Boole I 
(Bennett) ; New Latin Composition, Part I to page 48 (Ben- 
nett). 

Science — Introduction to Botany (Bergen and Caldwell) ; 
Economic Zoology (Kellogg and Doane). 

JrxiOR Year. 

English — Spelling, High School ^Yord Bool' (Sandwick and 
Bacon). 

English Texts — Effective English (Claxton and McGinniss) ; 
Selections to he studied in class: Julius Caesar (Shakespeare) ; 
■Joan of Arc (DeQuincey) ; The Ancient Mariner (Coleridge) ; 
Idylls of the King (Tennyson) ; Sohrab and Rustum (Arnold). 

Parallel Reading — 15 credits required. One Plav of Shake- 
speare not previously read, 2; Silas Marner, 3 (Eliot) ; Tale of 
Two Cities, 3 (Dickens); David Copperfield, 3 (Dickens); 
Essays of Elia (Lamb), Selections, 1 each; (Byron) Selections, 
1 each; (Schelleu) Selections, 1 each; Sesame and Lilies, 2 Rus- 
kin) ; One Essay of Macaulay, 2; Essay on Burns, 2 (Carlyle) ; 
Sketch Bool-. 3 (Irving). 

Mathematic — Algebra completed (Wells). 

History — Essentials of English History (Walker). 

Latin — Caesar, Books I , III and IV (Bennett) ; Cicero's 
Orations Against Catiline (Bennett) ; New Latin Composition 
to Part III (Bennett). 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 



18 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 19 

Senior Year. 

English — Texts: English Literature (Halleck) ; Handbook 
of Composition (Woolley) ; Review of Grammar. Selections to 
be studied in class: Poems and Tales (Poe) ; Macbeth (Shake- 
speare) ; Selections from, Golden Treasury (Palgrave) ; The 
Conciliation (Burke) ; The War Message (Wilson) ; Life of 
Johnson (Macaulay). 

Parallel Reading — 20 credits required. The Marble Faun, 3 
(Hawthorne) ; One Novel of Cooper 2; Colonial Literature, 
selections, 1 each; Pilgrim's Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Pride and 
Prejudice, 3 (Austen) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 3 
(Thackeray) ; The Sketch Book, 3 (Irving) ; {Longfellow) 
Selections, 1 each; (Thoreau) Selections, 1 each; (Whitman) 
Selections, 1 each; (Mrs Browning) Selections, 1 each; (Riley) 
Selections, 1 each ; Selections from Modern Drama, Poetry, and 
Essays. An Essay is required of each one finishing this course, 
and three credits will be given for it. 

Mathematics — New Plane Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States (Adams and 
Trent) ; dries (Magruder). 

Latin — Virgil's Aeneid, four books (Bennett) ; New Latin 
Composition, Part III (Bennett). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Milliken and Gale). 

The school offers a three-year course in Domestic Art and 
Science, for which high school credit is given. A special Home 
Economics diploma is granted students who complete the course. 

The course in Agriculture covers four years, and prepares the 
student to enter the A. and E. College. A special diploma in 
Agriculture is given to students completing this course. 

The outline of courses in Home Economics and Agriculture 
may be had on application. 

The course of study for the Elementary School is not out- 
lined here since it is identical with that outlined by the State 
Department of Education. 



20 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 21 

Music is one of the culture subjects and ought to be in every 
home. It adds charm to the home life, turning many a dull 
hour into one of real enjoyment. 

Elocution and Art, like Music, /-are special subjects mainly 
cultural, but may be made of much utilitarian value. It is 
hoped that many, both boys and girls, will avail themselves of 
the opportunities offered in these special departments. 

What We Are Doing for Our Boys and Girls. 

The school is endeavoring to put itself in line with the de- 
mands of the times for practical education. The demand for 
vocational training especially the training needed by the boys 
and girls who are to live in the country, is becoming more and 
more insistent. The whole course of study at Cary has been 
planned with this in view. The so-called cultural subjects have 
not been discarded, but emphasis is placed on shop work and 
field work for the boys, and cooking and sewing for the girls. 

Our Equipment for Vocational Training 

In the school basement are two large, well-lighted rooms, one 
of which serves as a kitchen and the other as a dining and serv- 
ing room. The kitchen is provided with running water, hot 
and cold, sinks, laundry tub, domestic science desks, oil and 
wood ranges, cupboards, refrigerator, bins, oil stoves, and the 
most; approved cooking utensils. The dining room contains din- 
ing tables with chairs, china and linen closets, and a substantial 
and attractive set of china and silver ware. The sewing room 
is on the first floor and is provided with sewing tab^s with 
chairs, sewing machines, sewing lockers, dressing mirror, etc. 
The equipment has been pronounced by experts to be as good as 
can be found in any school of the same grade in the State at 
present. 

For the boys, there is a room in the basement fitted up with 
work benches and tools for use of the Agricultural students, 
and another room contains a cream separator, Babcock milk 
tester and a sterilizer for use of classes in dairying. 



22 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 23 

There are also laboratories with individual desks, running 
water, etc., where systematic work is done in illustrating the 
principles of Physics, Chemistry, Botany and Agriculture. 
A large cannery is located on the school grounds and is operated 
during summer and fall months, canning the fruits and 
vegetables on the school farm for use in the boarding depart- 
ment as well as the fruits and vegetables grown in the com- 
munity. 

The school owns a farm of twenty-one acres on which a 
barn and farm cottage have been built. The school also owns 
a Percheron mare, two Jersey cows, some pigs and chickens, 
besides a lot of farm machinery. On this farm, as well as on 
the other farms in the neighborhood, the pupils learn how to 
set and prune and spray fruit trees, to terrace hill sides, to 
select and test seed, to grow vegetaVes for market and for home 
use, and to experiment with cover crops, fertilizers, etc. 

At present the school receives an appropriation from the Fed- 
eral Government under the Smith-Hughes Act of Congress, 
which requires that each pupil taking the Agricultural course 
shall have a "project" either on the school farm or preferably at 
his home, this "project" to be closely supervised by the Agricul- 
tural teacher. 

Literary Societies 

Cary is fortunate in having four well organized literary socie- 
ties, two for boys and two for girls. The girls meet Thursday 
afternoons and the boys on Monday nights. Each society gives 
a medal at Commencement for most improvement during the 
year. The boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best 
declamation and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. 
Mr. H. P. Smith, a former graduate of the school, gives annually 
a medal to the member of the boys' societies delivering the best 
oration on the occasion of Commencement. 

Athletics 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, the 
school has made ample provision for healthful sports for every 
sort of child from the little tot up to those who have already 



24 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Expression Class 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 25 

passed out of their teens. A baseball diamond, two basketball 
courts, one for boys and one for girls, three tennis courts, two 
groups of playground apparatus, one for the larger boys and 
another for the children and girls, are located on the school 
campus and are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied 
with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and assist- 
ance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams with 
uniforms and other equipment, these being the property of the 
school. 

Entrance Requirements 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certificate 
from former teacher showing work that has been done. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished on application. Entrance 
examinations will be held on at least two subjects, English and 
Mathematics, for ,those wishing to enter classes above the 
Freshman. 

Examinations and Reports 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given on 
all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 

Expenses 

TUITION PER TERM 

Primary Grades $10.00 

Grammar Grades 14.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years : . . . 20.00 

Junior and Senior Years 22.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 15.00 

Music Practice — an hour daily 3.60 

Elocution 16.00 

Art 16.00 

BOARD PER MONTH (CLUB PLAN) 

Dormitories, all time boarders (estimated) 14.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders (estimated) 12.00 



2G 



Cary Puhlic High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 27 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory $ 4.00 

Girls' Dormitory — -Single Beds . . . . 4.00 

Girls' Dormitory — Double Beds 3.50 

Terms 

Tuition is paya^e quarterly in advance. ~No deduction is 
made for absence except in cases of protracted illness or other 
providential hindrance. 

Board is payable at the beginning of each school month of 28 
days with no deduction for less than twelve meals missed in 
succession. 

Pupils from Wake County, ministerial students, and teachers 
in the public schools are allowed free tuition in the high school 
department. 

Pupils rooming in the dormitory must furnish the following : 
A pair of sheets, a pair of blankets or quilts, pillow cases, towels, 
and toilet articles such as comb, brush, soap, and matches. Boys 
furnish pillows also. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
with the Principal $1.00 to show good faith. This amount will 
be deducted from the first month's rent. Rooms, however, will 
not be held longer than September 3, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

All bills unpaid by June 1, following the close of school, will 
be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

Miscellaneous 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on the 
opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discourage- 
ment and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at Cary 
than is necessary should notify the Principal. 






28 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 29 

!N"o form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. 

Special Notes 

Last session 179 high school pupils were enrolled. There 
were 137 boarders from 14 counties. The graduating class 
numbered 26. 

The dormitory for girls is furnished with neat and attractive 
furniture, each room being provided with a closet and containing 
an oak dresser, an oak wash stand with fixtures, two single beds 
with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, and two chairs. 
One of the rooms is used as an infirmary. 

The new brick dormitory for boys will have the same conven- 
iences as the girls' dormitory. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the 
school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue : 
(1) One of the most substantial high school buildings in the 
State. (2) An admirable heating and ventilating system. (3) 
Running water in the buildings. (4) Bored well on the campus. 
(5) Spacious class rooms lighted on one side and provided with 
cabinets built into the walls. (6) Tablet arm chairs for the 
high school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (7) 
An auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a 
gallery and a splendid stage and scenery. (8) Laboratories with 
individual desks, running water, etc. (9) Dormitories both for 
boys and girls — both handsome brick structures, with steam heat, 
baths, etc. (10) A school farm with buildings and equipment 
for demonstrating the principles of agriculture, dairying, stock 
raising, etc. (11) A complete playground equipment for the 
whole school. (12) An unsurpassed domestic science equipment 
for high school students. (13) An ample force of trained teach- 
ers to do the work of the school. 



30 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School. 

The High School Annual 

Each year the Senior Class publishes a book, the title of 
which is the "C. H. Chsite," which contains the individual 
pictures of the class, group pictures of the lower classes, the 
faculty, the societies and various other organizations of the 
school. Besides these there are pictures of the buildings and 
grounds, various and sundry school activities, cartoons, etc. 
It also contains the class will, the class prophecy, history, poem 
and many original jokes, puns, etc. It is a publication usually 
well edited, and beautifully printed and bound, and is highly 
prized by the pupils, teachers and patrons. The 1919 Annual 
is especially attractive, being bound in black leather with 
title on cover in gold letters and the whole printed on the finest 
quality of paper. The price is $2.00. A few copies are still 
on hand and can be had at this price. 

The school owns a few copies of the 1918 Annual which it is 
loaning to those investigating the merits of the school, with the 
understanding that they be returned after they are examined. 

Since the names of the high school pupils by classes are printed 
in the Annual they are omitted from this catalogue. 

The graduating class and winners of medals for 1918 are 
printed in this catalogue, as no catalogue was issued least year 
owing to war conditions. 

Our patrons and friends are urged to patronize our adver- 
tisers, both those who advertise in the catalogue and those who 
advertise in the Annual. 



J. M. Pace Mule Company 

r 

Mules and Horses 

For Sale 
For Cash or Credit 

J. R. HOLDER, Manager 

111 East Martin Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

DeLuxe Clothing Satisfies 

The shape is made not ironed in, and they are made by Stein- 

Bloeh, the House of Knpenheimer, and other good makes. 

They always satisfy and whisper come again. 

"COME AND SEE IS ALL WE ASK'' 

CLOTHING, TAILORING, SHOES 

FURNISHINGS, SUIT CASES 

BAGS, HATS 

"GOOD QUALITY SPELLS WHAT BOONE SELLS" 

C. R. BOONE 

DELUXE CLOTHIER 

226 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



Geo. G. Maynard J. E. Lowe 

MAYNARD & LOWE 

(Successors to W. T. Lynn) 

Heavy and Fancy Groceries 
Feed Stuffs of All Kinds 

Our Motto : 

BEST QUALITY, RIGHT PRICES, POLITE SERVICE 

Telephone 23 



DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

Alumnus of Cary High School 
Masonic Temple Raleigh, N. C. 

Job P. Wyatt & Sons 
Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 

FIELD SEED, GARDEN SEED, 

FLOWER SEED, BULBS AND PLANTS 

GARDEN TOOLS 

POULTRY SUPPLIES 

Write for Prices Telephone 589 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

The Big Hardware 
Men 

Base Ball, Tennis and Sporting Goods 

Majestic Ranges, Builders' Supplies 

Farmers' Supplies 

Paints, Stains, Enamels 

Best Goods Lowest Prices Square Dealing 



WHEN YOU VISIT RALEIGH, BE SURE 
TO SEE OUR LARGE LINE OF 

Home Furniture 

We Carry the Largest Stock in Raleigh 
See Us for Easy Payments 

WE CAN SUIT THE TOOK AS WELL AS THE RICH. 
WE DELIVER IT TO YOUR HOME WITHOUT COST 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 EAYETTEVILLE STREET RALEIGH, N. C. 



v.. 



Whiting- Horton Company 

10 East Martin Street 
CLOTHING AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

IF IT'S RIGHT IN MEN'S WEAR "WE HAVE IT." 

Thirty-one Years in the Same Location. 



WE TAKE CARE OF THE EYES 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

OPTICIANS 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Hardware, Heavy and 
Fancy Groceries 

GARY, N. C. 
TABLETS, PENCILS AND ALL KINDS STATIONERY 



If Its to Eat or Drink 

FOUSHEE'S PLACE 

CAN SATISFY YOU 
"The Cottage Store" Cary, N. C. 



M. T. JONES 
Undertaker 

r 
COFFINS, CASKETS AND BURIAL ROBES 

Phone No. 9 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



C. W. SCOTT 

CARY, N. C. 

The Most Complete Stock of Dry Goods 

Notions and Millinery carried in town. 

I carry an up-to-date line of 

Matting, Rugs and Druggets 

In my SHOE DEPARTMENT you will find the 
well-known Endicott Johnson Shoe for Men and 
Godman Shoe for Ladies, both noted for their 
durability. I know I can save you money. Give 
me a chance. 

MAKE MY STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN TOWN 



School Books 



Tablets and Pencils 



J. C. BRANTLEY 
Druggist 

WHEN AT RALEIGH DON'T FAIL TO STOP AT 

BRANTLEY'S DRUG STORE 

WE CARRY THE BEST OF EVERYTHING IN 

DRUGS, TOILET GOODS, ETC. 

ICE-CREAM AND SODA OUR SPECIALTY 

AGENT FOR WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN 

PHONE 15 RALEIGH, N. C. 



E. D. BANGERT 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Don't Think of It- 

Sending your orders out of the State for 
School Books, School Supplies, and Stationery 
generally. Why? 

You have right at your door the largest con- 
cern in the country with all kinds of Books 
and School Supplies. 

Prices right, service prompt and fair and 
square dealing. 

Having done business here on Fayetteville 
Street for Fifty-two Years, we are known all 
over the State and the South. 

Your business is solicited. 

Alfred Williams & Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



W. D. JONES & SON 

CARY, N. 0. 

Here is where you find the highest quality at the lowest prices. 
Our line includes GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, 

BOOTS, SHOES. HATS, FURNISHING GOODS, and 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Phone No. 9 
See our line of the famous "SELZ ROYAL BLUE SHOES" 



M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

Fancy Groceries of Every. 
Description 

Prompt Service and Best Goods Only 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Waldo Drug Company 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and 

Druggists' Sundries; Perfumery, All 

Popular Odors; Toilet and Fancy 

Articles, Combs, Brushes, Etc. 



TABLETS AND STATIONERY 
OF ALL KINDS 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded Day 
or Night 




M. J. CARROLL, PRINTER 
RALEIGH, N, C. 



% f). % €cboe$ 




Vol. II CATALOGUE NUMBER No. 1 




Cary Public 
High School 

i 1 AND | | 

Farm Life School 


• 


1920 




CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 

M. J. CARROLL, PRINTER, RALEIGH, N. C. 





C. H. S. Echoes 



Vol. II CATALOGUE NUMBER No. 1 



Cary Public 
High School 

- - - - AND - - - - 

Farm Life School 



1920 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 






Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief, M. Lucille Johnson" 

Assistant Editors : 

Mary Watts, Gladys Johnson, Blanche Martin 

Business Manager, William Swain 



School Committee 

J. M. Templeton, Jr., Chairman 

M. T. Jones, Secretary 

Dr. J. M. Templeton 

A. H. Pleasants 

D. A. Morgan 



Calendar 1920-1921 

Fall Term opens August 30, 1920 

Fall Term closes December 24, 1920 

Spring Term opens January 3, 1921 

Spring Term closes April 15, 1921 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 3 

Officers and Instructors 

r 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 

N. Gr. "Woodlief, Principal 

Miss Carrie Crawford, Lady Principal 

J. K Coggik, Principal Farm-Life School 

Miss Irma Ellis, Principal Elementary School 

HIGH SCHOOL 



M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Mathematics 



English 

MISS CARRIE CRAWFORD, B.E. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

History 

N. G. WOODLIEF, A.B. 

(Trinity College) 

Latin 



Science 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A.B.) 

Assistant in Mathematics and Science 



French 
Assistant in English and History 

J. K. COGGIN, B. S. 

(A. & E. College) 
Agriculture 

E. N. MEEKINS, B.S. 

(A. & E. College) 
Assistant in Agriculture 

MISS BERTY LEE BAKER 

(N. C. College for Women) 
Head Teacher Home Economics 



4 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



MISS LUCILLE BRITTON 

(Chowan College) 
Assistant in Home Economics 



Music 

MISS MATTIE GADDY 

(Meredith College) 
Assistant in Music 



Art and Expression 



''To be supplied. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



MISS ADA EDWARDS 

(Mars Hill College) 

Seventh Grade 

MISS MAMIE AVENT 
(Greensboro College for Women) 
Sixth Grade 

MISS EFFIE ROUSE 

(Meredith College) 

Fifth Grade 

MISS GUSSIE TONES 

(Greensboro College for Women) 

Fourth Grade 

MISS EULA WILLIAMS 

Second and Third Grade 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(N. C. College for Women) 
First Grade 

MRS. M B. DRY 

Supervisor of Boarding Department 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 5 

Graduating Class, 1920 

Miss Nina Broadwell Morrisville, 1ST. C, R. 1 

Miss Ruth Buffaloe r Garner, N. C. 

Miss Reba Butts . , Morrisville- N. C, R. 1 

Miss Helen Clements Morrisville, N. C. 

Miss Mary Coats Clayton, 1ST. C, R. 3 

Mr. Clive Eatman Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Julian Elliott Nelson, Va., R. 1 

Miss Helen Elliott Nelson, Va., R. 1 

Miss Willie Burt Fuller Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Nina Hartsfield Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Louise Hartsfield Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Charles Honeycutt Raleigh, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Ruby Honeycutt Raleigh, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Thelma Jones Neuse, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Alma Jones Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Lethia Jones Raleigh, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Sudie Jones Gary, N. C. 

Miss Grace King Garner, N. C. 

Miss Lucy Lee Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Aileen Luther New Hill, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Leone Luther New Hill, N. C, R. 2 

Mr, Wyatt Nichols Neuse, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Nannie Reams Morrisville, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Susie Reams ' Morrisville, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Rosabel Riggsbee Morrisville, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Frank Seymour Apex, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Lyda Smith McCullers, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. George Upchurch, Jr Apex, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Alba Williams Apex, N. C. R. 1 

Miss Mable Wilson New Hill, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Emma Womble Apex, N. C.» R. 1 

Miss Mary Womble Cary, N. C. 

Miss Myrta Woodard Cary, N. C. R. 2 

Miss Maggie Wooten Macclesfield, N. C, R. 1 



6 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Winners of Medals, 1920 

Scholarship Susie Reams 

Boys' Debate Claude Crisp 

Oration W. D. Unchurch 

Declamation W. D. Upchurch 

Becitation M. Lucille Johnson 

Clay Improvement J. B. Walters 

Calhoun Improvement C. D. Wheeler 

Irving Improvement Grace Atwater 

Lowell Improvement Helen Clements 

Girls' Debate Lyda Smith 



Cary Public High School 

and 

Farm Life School 



History 

The Cary Public High School and Farm Life School is an 
outgrowth of the old Cary High School which had its origin 
back in the last century and was owned and controlled by a 
stock company. In 1907, the owners of the property sold their 
stock to the county, and the school was converted into a State 
high school, the first to be established under the high school law 
of 1907. The official name was changed from the Cary High 
School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, by special 
act of the Legislature, providing for farm life instruction in 
Wake County, there were added to the school the departments 
of agriculture and domestic science, the name of the school be- 
ing changed from the Cary Public High School to the Cary 
Public High School and the E. L. Middleton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading high 
schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story wooden 
building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories and in 
the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew patronage 
from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Eev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and the 
Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the school 
was under the wise management of E. L. Middleton. In 1980. 
Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, and 
the present Superintendent- was elected as his successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con-. 



8 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 9 

stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory in {his State and South Carolina. 
The old two-story wooden building which the school had out- 
grown was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly modern 
brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,000. The 
old dormitory building for boys which was burned in the spring 
of 1916, was replaced that year by a brick structure at a cost 
of about $11,000. The building is povided with steam heat, 
electric lights, baths, lavatories' etc.. and is now occupied by 
the girls under the care of the Lady Principal. The old 
privately owned girls' dormitory, which had been occupied by 
the boys since 1916, was burned in the fall of 1918. The school 
has just erected on the campus a modern brick dormitory for the 
boys, practically a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost 
of about $25,000. 

Entrance Requirements 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certificate 
from former teacher showing work that has been done. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished on application. Entrance 
examinations will be held on at least two subjects, English and 
Mathematics, fo rthose wishing to enter classes above the 
Freshman. 

Courses of Study 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics. History. Latin. Science. French, 
Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression and Art. To 
receive a diploma of graduation one must have completed one of 
the following courses : 



10 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




o 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 
Academic Course. 



11 



First Yeab 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
Civics 

General Science 
Physiology 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 



Third Year 
\English 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Chemistry 

Fourth Year 
English 
Geometry 
History 
Civics 
French or Latin 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Physiology 
Crops and Soils 

Second Year 
English 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



Agricultural Course. 

Third Year 
English 
History 
Chemistry 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 

Fourth Year 

English 

Economics 

Physics 

Civics 

Farm Management 

Farm Engineering 
Farm Accounting 



Home Economics Course. 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Physiology 
Home Economics 

Second Year 
English 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Home Economics 



Third Year 
English 
History 
Chemistry 
Home Economics 

Fourth Year 
English 
Civics 
Physics 
French or Latin 



12 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 13 

Outline Course of Study 

FiRstf Year. 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Ward's Sentence and Theme. Selections to be 
studied in class: As You Like It (Shakespeare) ; A Christmas 
Carol (Dickens) ; Treasure Island (Stevenson) ; Short Stories 
(Smith). 

Parallel Eeading — 10 credits required: The Lay of the Last 
Minstrel, 1; The Talisman* 2 (Scott); Lays of Ancient Rome* 
2 (MacAulay) ; Rebecca of Sunny Brook Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; 
The Call of the Wild 1, (London) ; Robinson Crusoe, 2 (De- 
Toe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 1 (Harris) ; Little Men or Little 
Women, 2 (Alcot) ; The Story of the Other Wise Man, 2 (Van 
Dyke) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson) ; The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 
(Dickens). 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) through chapter VI; Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes) through chapter XI. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through chap- 
ter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry) Pall 
Term; Human Physiology (Ritchie) Spring Term. 

Civics — Community Civics (Hughes). 

Second Year. 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts : Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). Selec- 
tions to be studied in class: The Merchant of Venice (Shake- 
speare); Ivanhoe, (Scott); Snowbound and other Poemsj 
(Whittier) ; Selected stories from magazines; Sohrab and Rus- 
tum (Arnold). 

Parallel Reading — 12 credits required: The Lady of the 
Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Hevre Reil and John Gilpin, 1 (Browning, 



14 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 15 

Cooper) ; The Last of Mohicans, 2 (Cooper) ; Tom Brown's 
School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Clois- 
ter and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) Tom Saivyer or Huckleberry 
Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man Without a Country, 1 (Hale) 
The DeCoverley Papers, 2 (Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined 
Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; One 
of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Neiv High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) completed. 

Complete Algebra, (Slaught and Lennes) Through chapter 
XXII. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) completed; 
Caesar> Book II, (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — History of Europe, Ancient and Mediatval (Rob- 
inson and Breasted). 

Science — Civic Biology (Hunter). 

Thikd Year. 

English — Spelling (Sandwick and Bacon). 

English Texts: Written and Spoken English (Clippinger) 
(For reference) ; American Literature (Long). Selections to be 
studied in class: Julius Caesar (Shakespeare); The Vision of 
Sir Launfal (Lowell) ; Idylls of the King (Tennyson) ; or Silas 
Marner (Eliot). Selections from Poe, Irving, Hawthorne, 
Emerson, and 'Henry. 

Parallel Reading: 15 credits required: The Marble Faun, 3 
(Hawthorne), one play of Shakespeare's not previously read, 2; 
A Tale of Two Cities, 3 (Dickens) ; The Sketch Book, 3 (Ir- 
ving) ^Washington's Farewell Address, 2; The Surry of Eagle's 
Nest, 2 (Cooke) ; Aenied, 2 (Harrison) ; The Four Million or 
the Voice of the City, 2 (O'Henry) ; Red Rock or In Ole Vir- 
ginia, 2 (Page) ; The Rise of Silas Laphan, 2 (Howells) ; The 
Lady or the Tiger, 1 (Stockton) ; Poems and Tales, 3 (Poe) 



16 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School IT 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes), 
Completed. 

Latin — Caesar in Gaul (D'Ooge and Eastman), Four Books. 
Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), Four orations against 
Catiline. 

History — Outlines of European History (Bobinson and 
Beard), Part II. 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

Fourth Year. 

English — Spelling (Sandwick and Bacon). 

English Texts : Handbook of Composition (Woolley) ; English 
Literautre (Long). Selections to be studied in class: Macbeth 
(Shakespeare) ; Essay on Burns (Carlyle) ; the Conciliation 
(Burke) ; Miltons' M'mor Poems and other selections from 
Golden Treasury (Palgrave) ; Review of Grammar. 

Parallel Beading — 20 credits required : Pilgrim's Progress, 
2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 3 (Thackeray) : 
Pride and Prejudice, 3 (Austen); Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Bus- 
kin); Essays of Elia, 2 (Lamb); A Play of Shakespeare nc! 
previously read, 2. Selections from Browning, Thomas, She- 
ley, Keats, and Whitman, 1 each. Selections from Modern 
Drama, Poetry, and Essays, 1 each. Term Essay, 3. 

1ST. B. Credit will be given for all reading over and above the 
minimum in each class. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry ("Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — Virgil (Bennett), Four books. 

History — American History (Muzzey). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The Nlew Chardenal French Course (Brooks). 

The school offers a three-year course in Domestic Art and 
Science, for which high school credit is given. A special Home 



18 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 19 • 

Economics diploma is granted students who complete the course. 

The course in Agriculture covers four years, and prepares the 
student to enter the A. and E. College. A special diploma in 
Agriculture is given to students completing this course. 

The outline of courses in Home Economics and Agriculture 
may be had on application. 

The course of study for the Elementary School is not out- 
lined here since it is identical with that outlined by the State 
Department of Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

Our Equipment for Vocational Training 

In the basement of the Girl's Dormitory are two rooms, a 
dinning room and kitchen used at present for the cooking de- 
partment of the school. This department is provided with 
running water, sinks, domestic science desks, oil and wood 
rages, oil stoves and the most approved cooking utensils. 

The sewing room is on the first floor of the main building 
and is provided with sewing tables, chairs, sewing machines, 
dressing mirror, etc. 

For the boys, rooms in the main building are equipped with 
individual desks of special design, cream separator. Babcock 
testers, incubators, etc. 

Besides these there are also laboratories with individual desks, 
running water, etc., where systematic work is done in illustrating 
the principles of Physics, Chemistry, Botany and Agriculture. 
A large cannery is located on the school grounds and is operated 
during summer and fall months, canning the fruits and 
vegetables on the school farm for use in the boarding depart- 
ment as well as the fruits and vegetables grown in the com- 
munity. 

At present the school receives an appropriation from the Fed- 
eral Government under the Smith-Hughes Act of Congress, 
which requires that each pupil taking the Agricultural course 



20 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




o 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 

shall have a "project" either on the school farm or preferably at 
his home, this "project" to he closely supervised by the Agricul- 
rural teachers. 

New Vocational Building 

Recently the Cary School District voted a bond issue for 
the erection of a building to be used chiefly by the departments 
of Agriculture and Home Economics. The building will be of 
brick and will contain a gymnasium, science laboratories, agri- 
cultural rooms, shop and forge, and rooms for cooking and 
sewing. 

Literary Societies 

Cary is fortunate in having four well organized literary socie- 
ties, two for boys and two for girls. The girls meet Thursday 
afternoons and the boys on Monday nights. Each society gives 
a medal at Commencement for most improvement during the 
year. The boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best 
declamation and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. 
Mr. H. P. Smith- a former graduate of the schooL gives an- 
nually a medal to the member of the boys' societies delivering 
the best oration on the occasion of Commencement. Miss Lil- 
lian Killingsworth, formerly Lady Principal of the schooL gives 
annually a medal for the best depater in the girls' societies 
on the occasion of Commencement. 

The boys' societies also give a debaters' medal for the best 
debater at Commencement. 

Medals and Prizes 

The following medals are offered annually: Best debater in 
Clay and Calhoun Societies, best debater in Irving and Lowell 
Societies, most improvement in each of the societies, highest 



22 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 23 

scholarship, best oration, best declamation, best recitation. The 
scholarship medal is given by the Superintendent the orator's 
medal by Mr. H. P. Smith* a former graduate of the school and 
the medal for best debater in Irving and Lowell Societies by Miss 
Lillian Killingsworth, former Lady Principal of the school. 
Miss Killingsworth will also give annually hereafter a prize in 
books for the library to the class doing best work in English. 
The conditions will be announced later. 

Athletics 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, the 
school has made ample provision for healthful sports for every 
sort of child from the little tot up to those who have already 
passed out of their teens. A baseball diamond, two basketball 
courts, one for boys and one for girls, three tennis courts, two 
groups of playground apparatus one for the larger boys and 
another for the children and girls, are located on the school 
campus and are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied 
with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and assist- 
ance to the various form of athletics, providing the teams with 
uniforms and other equipment, these being the property of the 
schol. 

Examinations and Reports 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given on 
all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 



24 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



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Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 25 

Expenses 

r 
TUITION PER MONTH 

Primary Grades $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 4.50 

Music Practice — an hour daily J. 00 

Elocution 4.50 

Art 4.50 

BOARD PER MONTH (CLUB PLAN) 

Dormitories, all time boarders (estimated) 15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders (estimated) 13.00 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 

Terms 

Tuition is payable monthly in advance. No deduction is 
made for absence except in cases of protracted illness or other 
providential hindrance. 

Board is payable at the beginning of each school month of 28 
days with no deduction for less than twelve meals missed in 
succession. 

Pupils from "Wake County, ministerial students, and teachers 
in the public schools are allowed free tuition in the high school 
department. 



26 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 27 

Pupils rooming in the dormitory must furnish, the following: 
A pair of sheets, a pair of blankets or quilts, pillow cases, towels 
and toilet articles such as comb, brush, soap, and matches. Boys 
furnish pillows also. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
with the Superintendent $1.00 to show good faith. This amount 
will be deducted from first month's rent. Rooms, however, will 
not be held longer than September 2, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

All bills unpaid by June 1, following the close of school, will 
be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

Miscellaneous 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on the 
opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discourage- 
ment and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principals in charge of the dormitories. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at Cary 
than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils with 
about $6.00 to cover cost of books. 

Special Notes 

Last session 230 high school pupils were enrolled. There 
were 185 boarders from 14 counties. The graduating class 
numbered 34. 



28 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 






Judging Team 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 29 

The dormitory for girls is furnished with neat and attractive 
furniture, each room being provided with a closet and containing 

r 

an oak dresser, an oak wash stand with fixtures, two single beds 
with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, and two chairs. 
One of the rooms is used as an infirmary. 

The new brick dormitory for boys will have the same conven- 
iences as the girls' dormitory. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the 
school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue : 
(1) One of the most substantial high school buildings in the 
State. (2) An admirable heating and ventilating system. (3) 
Running water in the buildings. (4) Bored well on the campus 
(5) Spacious class rooms lighted on one side and provided with 
cabinets built into the walls. (6) Tablet arm chairs for the 
high school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (7) 
An auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a 
gallery and a splendid stage and scenery. (8) Laboratories with 
individual desks, running water, etc. (9) Dormitories both for 
boys and girls — both handsome brick structures, with steam heat, 
baths, etc. (10) A school farm with buildings and equipment 
for demonstrating the principles of agriculture, dairying, stock 
raising, etc. (11) A complete playground equipment for the 
whole school. (12) An unsurpassed domestic science equipment 
for high school students. (13) An ample force of trained teach- 
ers to do the work of the school. 

Student Government 

The school took an advanced step last year, under the leader- 
ship of Miss Killingsworth, the Lady Principal, by organizing 
the students in the high school into a self-governing body with 
its four units corresponding to the states in our federal system, 
each electing a council quarterly with a member of the faculty 
as adviser, and all the officers of the four units together con- 



30 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 

stituting a general council with a president and other officers 
elected by the members of the general council. 

The school was also organized in a somewhat similar manner 
into a general athletic association, the units of division in this 
case being the four classes or grades in the high school, whereas 
in the organization for pupil self-government' the uniits were 
the local boys, local girls, boarding boys and boarding girls. 

These plans of organization were so effective last session in 
developing and maintaining school spirit and discipline that 
they will be continued for next session. 

Cary High School Creed or Code of Honor 

(Adopted from the laws of the Boy Scouts of America.) 

1. The Cary High School students are Trustworthy. Their 
honor is to be trusted. If they were to violate their honor by 
telling a lie, or by cheating, or not .doing exactly a task given, 
when trusted on their honor, they are not C. H. S. students. 

2. The Cary students are Loyal. They are loyal to all to 
whom loyalty is due — their teachers, their home, their parents, 
their country. 

3. The Cary students are Helpful. They are ready to help 
persons in need at any time; to share duties of home and 
school. Each one does good turn to somebody every day. 

4. The Cary students are Friendly. Each is a friend to all. 

5. The Cary students are Courteous and Eespectful. They 
are always polite to women, children, older people, and the 
weak. They are obedient to parents, teachers, and all other 
duly constituted authorities. 

6. The Cary students are cheerful. They smile whenever 
they can. They enjoy fun and play. Their obedience to orders 
is prompt and cheerful. The harder the task the gladder their 
hearts ! 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 31 

7. The Cary students are Thrifty. They do not destroy 
property. They work faithfully, waste nothing. They make 
the best use of opportunities. They do not spend their money 
foolishly. 

8. The Cary students are Brave. They have the courage 
to face danger in spite of fear. They stand up for what is 
right even if coaxed by friends or jeered at by opponents. De- 
feat does not down any student. 

9. The Cary students are Clean. Each keeps clean in body 
and thought, stands for clean speech, clean sport, clean habits, 
and goes with a clean crowd. 

Order of The Long-Leaf Pine 

The Order of the Long-Leaf Pine is the honor roll of the 
Cary High School in conduct. The order sets a high standard 
of excellence in posture* self-controL courtesy, order in the study 
halL quiet voices, personal cleanliness. One hundred and seven- 
ty-five points are required before one is qualified for the order. 
The record is taken by quarters. The following is the score 
card: 

Points 

1. Triangular debater 20 

2. Y. W. C. A. president 25 

3. Y. W. C. A. vice-pres., sec. or treasurer 10 

4. Y. M. C. A. president 25 

5. Y. M. C. A. vice-pres., sec. or treasurer 10 

6. Making one or more class teams 20 

7. Making one or more school teams 25 

8. Being elected proctor 50 

9. Being elected officer of literary society 15 

10. Being elected commencement debater 25 

11. Commencement declaimer or reciter 20 

12. Getting exempt from one examination 10 



32 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




13. Getting exempt from all examinations 50 

14. Composing a school song or cheer which is adopted by 

the school 20 

15. General good behavior 50 

16. An average grade of not less than 80 on the health 

score card 50 

17. Being prompt at all meals 15 

18. Offering the best suggestion which is adopted by the 

school 20 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 33 

The High School Annual 

Fach year the Senior Class publishes a book, the title of which 
is the "Chiste,'' which contains the individual pictures of 
the class, group pictures of the lower classes, the faculty, the 
societies and various other organizations of the school. Besides 
these there are pictures of the buildings and grounds, various 
and sundry school activities, cartoons, etc. It also contains the 
class will, the class prophecy, history, poem and many original 
jokes, puns, etc. It is a publication usually well edited, and 
beautifully printed and bound, and is highly prized by the pupils 
teachers and patrons. This publication costs $2.50 per copy. 

Since the names of the high school pupils by classes are 
printed in the Annual they are omitted from this catalogue. 

C. H. S. Echoes 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year a 
school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the patrons 
and friends of the school. The subscription price is 40c. a year 
or 10c. a copy. The title 6f the paper is "C. H. S. Echoes." 
The present catalogue is the free midsummer number of "C. H. 
S. Echoes.'' Hereafter the Apriil number will be a special edi- 
tion of "C. H. S. Echoes" in book form, and will sell for a 
reasonable price. 



(i. 

M. T. JONES 

UNDERTAKER 

COFFINS, CASKETS AND BUEIAL EOBES 

Phone No. 9 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 

OXFORD COLLEGE 

OXFOED, K C. 
Seventy-first Year 

PREPARATORY and COLLEGE CLASSES 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

MUSIC, ART, EXPRESSION, HOME ECONOMICS, 
PEDAGOGY and COMMERCIAL BRANCHES 

All in charge of University and Standard College Graduates. 
Early application for rooms is necessary this year. 

Apply for Catalogue. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President. 



F. R. GRAY & BROTHER 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Hardware, Heavy and 
Fancy Groceries 

CAEY, K C. 
TABLETS, PENCILS and All Kinds STATIONERY 



LEE BROTHERS GARAGE 

A Full Line AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
GUARANTEED TIRES and TUBES 



Special Attention Given to Repair Department 
Day and Night Service 



Call No. 20 



CARY, N. C. 



J. M. Pace Mule Company 

Mules and Horses 



For Sale 



For Cash or Credit 



J. R. HOLDER, Manager 

111 East Martin Street , RALEIGH, N. C. 



^= 



f t. = 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, K C. 

For Young Women 

Only graduates of an accredited High School accepted. 
Four years of general college work based upon fifteen units 
of entrance credits. A.B. and B.8. degrees. Diplomas in 
Art and Music. 

Delightful location. Charges reasonable. 

For catalogue or other information address: 

CHAS. E. BREWER, President. 

) SB 

Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

The Big Hardware Men 

BASE BALL, TENNIS AND SPORTING 

GOODS 

MAJESTIC RANGES, BUILDERS' 

SUPPLIES 

FARMERS' SUPPLIES 

PAINTS, STAINS, ENAMELS 

Best Goods Lowest Prices Square Dealing 



3/ 



(F- 



33\ 



C. W. SCOTT 

CARY,^. C. 

The Most Complete Stock of DRY GOODS, 
NOTIONS and MILLINERY carried in Town 

I carry an up-to-date line of 
Matting, Rugs and Druggets 

In my SHOE DEPARTMENT you will find the 
well-known Endicott Johnson Shoe for Men and 
Godman Shoe for Ladies, both noted for their 
durability. I know I can save you money. Give 
me a chance. 

Make My Store Your Headquarters While In Town 

Tablets and Pencils 



GARY DRUG CO. 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and Drug- 
gists' Sundries; Perfumery, All Popular 
Odors; Toilet and Fancy Articles, 
Combs, Brushes, Etc. 

TABLETS and STATIONERY of All Kinds 



PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COM- 
POUNDED DAY OR NIGHT 



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ft, ^ft 

W. D. JONES & SON 

CAKY, 1ST. C. 

Here is where you find the highest quality at the lowest prices. 

Our line includes : 

GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
HATS, FURNISHING GOODS, FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Phone No. 9 

See our line of the famous "SELZ ROYAL BLUE SHOES" 



LEE BROTHERS 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCERIES 
OF ALL KINDS 



DAYTON WELL PUMP SYSTEMS 
ROOFING AND SHINGLES 



Prices Attractive 

Phone No. 20 CARY, N. C. 

WE TAKE CARE OF THE EYES 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

OPTICIANS 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



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Broken Lenses 
Duplicated on 
Short Notice. 




132— Fayette- 
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( Up Stairs ) 



and MAMTFACTURIJSTG OPTICIAN" 



When you Visit RALEIGH Be Sure to Visit 
Our Music Parlors 



Victor 
Victrolas 



We carry in 
Stock Victrolas 
from $25 to $275 




Victor 
Records 



All the latest in 
MUSIC 



"Write for 
Catalogue 



Royal & Borden Music Dept. 

(Service First) 
127 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH, 3ST. C. 



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What's In a Name? — 

For one thing, the largest book business in 
the State has been built up by service and 
square dealing and our name stands for 
JUST THAT. 

Books of All Kinds 

Stationery of All Kinds 

Office Supplies of All Kinds 

These, Our Specialties 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & COMPANY 

kaleigh, sr; c. 

Service for 53 years — since 1867 



Patronize Our Advertisers 
They Will Protect You 



=£> 




fc ft & €cboe$ 

Vol, III CATALOGUE NUMBER No. I 

Gary Public 
High School 



AND 



Farm Life ScKool 



1921 



CARY. NORTH CAROLINA 




^ ^r # 




$ 



Vol, II CATALOGUE NUMBER No. II 



Cary Public 



cnoo 



J AND r 



Farm Life School 



-CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief, M. Lucille Johnson 

Assistant Editors : 
Blanche Martin, Mary Watts, Clifton Poole. 

Associated Editors: 
Helen Dry, Frances Smith, Carlyle Wheeler,. 

William Tiiiberlake. 
Business Manager : 

Business Manager, Judson Mangum 

Assistant Business Manager, Baxter Timberlake 

Falealty Committee 

Mr. Meekins, Miss Cranfcrd, Miss Siler, 
Miss Brinson. 

School Committee 

J. M. Templeton, Jr. .Chairman 
M. T. Jones, Secretary 
Br. J. M. Templston 
A. H. Pleasants 
, D. A. Morgan 

Calendar 1921-1922 

Fall Term opens August 29, 1921 

Fall Term closes — ■ December 23, 1921 

Spring Term opens -- January 2, 1922. 

Spring Term closec -April 14, 1922 1 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 

Officers and Instructors 

M. B. T)vj, Superintendent 

W. C. MerAtt,Principal 

Miss Mattie McArthur, Lady Principal 

J. K. Coggin, Principal Farm-life School 

Miss Irma Ellis, Principal Elementary School 

HIGH SCHOOL 

M. B. DRY. A. M. 

(Wake Forest College) 
Mathematics . 

MISS MATTIE McAUTHUR 
(N. C. State College for Women) .... 
History 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A. R. 

(Trinity College) 
Latin anl French 

W. C. Merritt, A. R. 

(Trinity College) 

English 

R. M. BLUNT. B. S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Science 

MISS GRACE McNINCH 

(Peace Institute) 

Assistant in Science and Mathmatics 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A. R. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A. R. ) 

Assistant in- Math unities anil History 

MISS OVERTON SEARS 

(Meredith College) 

Expression and Assistant in English 

.1. K. COGGIN, R. S. 

(N. C. State Ci liege o£ A. &E.) 

Agriculture 

E. N. MEEKINS. B. S. 

(N. C. State College of A. & E.) 

Assistant in Agriculture 

ARMSTRONG, B. S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Assistant in Agriculture 



Oary Public High School and Farm Life School 



MISS BERTY LEE BAKER 

(N. ('. College for Women) 

Head Teacher Home Economics 

MISS LUCILLE BRITTON 

( Chowan C< liege) 
Assistant in Home Economics 

MISS MABEL DAWSON 

{Greensboro College for Women) 

Music 

MISS NANCY WHITE 
Typewriting anil Stenography 



|: To he supplied 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

MISS DAISY OSBORNE 
(Chieogo Training School) 
Seventh Grande and Art 

MISS ELSIE RESPESS 

(A. C. College) 
Sixth Grade 

MBS. E. N. MEEKINS 

(Meredith College) 

Fifth Grade 



Fourth Grade 

MISS ELLA WILLIAMS 
Third Grade 

MISS ESTELLE YARBOROUGH 

< Littleti n College) 

Second Grade 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

( N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MBS. M. B. DBY 
Supervisor of Boarding Department 

W. B. WOMBLE. A. B. 

(University cf N. C) 

Business Manager 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Graduating Class of 1921 

Jessie Arnold, Raleigh, N. C, R. 5 
Ursula Atkins, Raleigh, N. C, R. -I 
Martha Bailey. Wake Forest, N. C. 
Xennie Brady. Garner, N. C, R. I 
Robert Brooks, Garner, N. C. 
Mattie Campbell, Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 
Ralph Clements, Morrisville, N. C. 
Jessie Clifton. Cary, N. C, R. 1 
Bessie Davis, Raleigh, X. C R. 4 
Hellen Dry, Cary. X. C. 
Schlesinger Foushee, Cary X. C. 
Hazel Hill. Cary X. C. 
Vann Holloway, Cary X. C. 
Lucille Johnson. Kipling, X. C. 
M. Lucille Johnson, Clayton. X. 0.. 
Melza Jones, Cary X. C. R. 2 
Ella Mangum, Wake Forest. X. C- 
Blanche Martin. Benson. X. C. 
Clina Norwood, Xeuse, X. C, R. 1 
Hettie Pittard, Nelson, Va., R. 1 
Bernard Pleasants. Clayton. X. C. 
oris Rogers, Wake Forest. X. C. R. 3 
Paul Shaw. Raleigh, X. ('., It. 4 
Sadie Shearon. Wake Forest, X. C, R. 2 
Frances Smith. Meddlers. X. C, R. 1 
Leroy Smith, Trumarislmrg, X. Y. 
Dawson Strother, Cary. X. C, R. 1 
Helen Strother. Gary, X. C, R. 1 
Amanda Tillman, Cary. X. C., R. 2 
Baxter Timberlake, Wake Forest. X. C. 
William Timberlake. Wake Forest X. C. 
Dennis Upchurch, Xew Hill, X. C, R. 2 
Leroy Upchurch, Morrisville, X. ('. 
J. B. Walters. Westville. S. C. 
Mary Watts. Auburn. X. C. 
Carlyle Wheeler, Holly Springs, X. C. 
Dorothy Wood, Cary, X. C. 
Genevieve Woodson, Cary. X. ('., R. 1 
Azzie Woodard, Raleigh, N. C R. i 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life. School 



Winners of Medals, 1921 

Scholarship .'. ' Ann Wilkinson 

Boy's Debate Carlyle Wheeler 

Oration Burnet/ Williams 

Declamation ..Vann Holloway 

Recitation : Mary Watts 

Clay Improvement Vann Holloway 

Calhoun Improvement Marvin Poole 

Irving Improvement Clina Norwood 

Lowell Improvement M. Lucille Johnson 

Gtrls' Debate Grace Atwater 

Prizes 

Cleanest Room Fall Term : 

Azeline Hatcher, Elizabeth Page, 

Barney Williams, Herbert Creech. 
Cleanest Room Spring Term : 

Frank Davis, Harold Wilson, Tom Reynolds, 

Ruby Myatt, Vena Upclrurch. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 

Cary Public High School 

and 

Farm Life School 



History 

The Cary Public High School and Farm Life School is an 
outgrowth of the old Cary High School which had its origin 
back in the last century and was owned and controlled by a 
stock company. In 1907, the owners of the property sold their 
stock to the county, and the school was converted into a State 
high school, the first to be established under the high school law 
of 1907. The official name was changed from the Cary High 
School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, by special 
act of the legislature, providing for farm life instruction in 
Wake County, there were added to the school the departments 
of agriculture and domestic science, the name of the school be- 
ing changed from the Cary Public High School to the Cary 
Public High School and the E. L. Middleton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading high 
schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story wooden 
building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories and in 
the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew patronage 
from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and the 
Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1S96 to 1908, the school 
was under the wise management of F. L. Middleton. In 1908, 
Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, and 
the present Superintendent, was elected ns his successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con- 



8 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 9 

stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
lexperienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory in thj.9 State and South Carolina. 
The old two-story wooden building which the school had out- 
grown was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly modern 
brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,000. The 
•old dormitory building for boys which was burned in the spring 
of 1916, was replaced that year by a brick structure at a cost 
of about $11,000. The building is provided with steam heat, 
electric lights, baths, lavatories, etc., and is now occupied by 
the girls under the care of the Lady Principal. The old 
privately owned girls' dormitory, which had been occupied by 
the boys since 1916, was burned in the fall of 1918. In 1919-20 
there was erected on the campus a mordern brick dormitory for 
the boys, practically a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost 
of about $28,000. This building is provided with steam heat, 
electric lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

Entrance Requirements 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certificate 
from former teacher showing work that has been clone. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished on application. Entrance 
examinations will be held on at least two subjects, English and 
Mathematics, for those wishing to enter classes above the 
Freshman. 

Courses of Study 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, French 
Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, Art, Type- 
writing and Stenography. To receive a diploma of graduation 
•one must have completed one of the following courses : 



10 Cary Public High School and Far"). Life School 




lary Public High School and Farm Life School 



II 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
Civics 
General Science 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 



Academic Course 

r 

Third -Year -- — 

English 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 

Chemistry 

Fourth Y'ear 
English 
Geometry 
History * 
Civics 
French or Latin 



Agricultural Course 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Crops and Soils 



Third Year 
English 
History 

Chemistry or Algebra 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 



Second Year 
English 

Arithmetic- 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



Fourth Year 
English 
Economics 

Physics or Geometry 
Civics 

Farm Management 
Farm Engineering 
Farm Accounting 



Home Economics Course 



First Yeah 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Home Economics 

Second Year 
English 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Home Econ< mics 



Third Year 
English 
History 
Chemistry 
Home Economics 

Fourth Y'ear 
English 
Civics 

Physics or Geometry 
French or Latin 



12 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Gary Public High School and Farm Life School lo- 



Outline Course of Study 

r 

First Year 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Ward's Sentence and Theme. Selections to be 
studied in class: As You Like It (Shakespeare); A Christmas 
Carol (Dickens) ; Treasure Tsland (Stevenson) ; Short Stories 
(Smith). 

Parallel Reading — 10 credits required: The Lag of the Last 
Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott); Lays of Ancient Rome, 
2(MacAulay) ; Rebecca of Sunny Brook Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; 
The Call of the Wild 1, (London) ; Robinson Crusoe, 2 (De- 
Foe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 1 (Harris); Little Men or Little 
Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The Story of the Other Wise Man. 2 (Van 
Dvke) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson) ; The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 
(Dickens). 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) Through chapter VI; Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes) Through chapter XI. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through chap- 
ter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 
Civics — Community Civics (Hughes). 

Second Year 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic).. Selec- 
tions to be studied in class: The Merchant of Venice (Shakes- 
peare) ; Ivanhoe, (Scott) ; Snowbound and other Poems,. 
(Whittier) ; Selected stories from, magazines; Sohrab and Rus- 
tum (Arnold). 

Parallel Reading — 12 credits required: The Lady of the 
Lake, 2 (Scott); Hevre Rett and John Gilpin, 1 (Browning, 



14 Carij Public High School ani Farm Life School 




Cdry Public High School and Farm Life School 15 

Cooper); The Last of Mohicans, 2 (Cooper); Tom Browns 
School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Clois- 
ter and the Hearth. 2 (Reade^ Tom Sawyer orHuckleberry 
Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man Without a Country, 1 (Hale) 
The DeCoverley Papers, 2 (Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined 
Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; One 
of Shakespeare's Plays not Previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Xew High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) Completed. 

Complete Algebra, (Slaught and Lennes) Through chapter 
XXII. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) Completed; 
Caesar, Pool- II, (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — History of Europe, Ancient and Mediaeval (Rob- 
inson and Breasted). 

Science — Civic Biology (Hunter). 

Third Year. 

English — Spelling (Sandwick and Bacon). 

English Texts Written and Spoken English (Clippinger) 
(For reference) ; American Literature (Long). Selections to be 
studied in class: Julius Caesar (Shakespeare); The Vision of 
Sir Launfal (Lowell) ; Idylls of the King (Tennyson) ; or Silas 
Marner (Eliot). Selections from Poe, Irving, Hawthorne, 
Emerson and 0. Henri/. 

Parallel Reading: 15 credits required: The Marble Faun, 3 
(Hawthone), one Play of Shakespeare's not previously read, 2; 
.1 Tale of Two Cities. 3 (Dickens); The Sketch Book, 3 (Ir- 
Ving) ^Washington's Farewell Address, 2; Surry of Eagle's 
Nest, 2 (Cooke); Aenied, 2 (Harrison); The Four Million Off 
the Voice of the City. 2(0. Henry) ; Red Rock or In Ole Vir- 
ginia, 2 (Page); The Rise of Silas Laphan, 2 (Howells) ; The 
Lady orthe Tiger, 1 (Stockton) ; Poems and Tales, 3 (Poe). 



16 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Gary Public High School and Farm Life School ' 17 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes),. 
Completed. 

Latin — Caesar in Gual (r/Ooge and Eastman), Four Books. 
Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and LTarley), Four orations against 
Catiline. 

History — Outlines of European History (Robinson" and 
Beard), Part II. 

Sri mce — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee- and 
others ) . 

Fourth Year 

English — Spelling (Sandwich and Bacon). 

English Texts Handbook of Composition (Woolly) -English 
Literature (Long). Selections to be studied in class: Macbeth 
(Shakespeare); Essay on Burns (Carlyle); the Conciliation 
(Burke); Milton's Minor Poems and other Selections from 
Golden Treasury (Palgrave) ; Revieiu of Grammar. 

Parallel Reading — 20 credits required : Pilgrim's Progress, 
2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 3 (Thackeray) : 
Pride and Prejudice, 3 (Austen) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Rus- 
kin) ; Essays of Elia, 2 (Lamb) ; A play of Shakespeare not 
preciously read, 2. Selections from Browning, Thomas, She- 
ley, Keats, and Whitman, 1 each. .Selections from Modern 
Drama. Poetry, and Essays, 1 each. Term Essay, 3. 

X. B. Credit will be given for all reading over and above the 
minimum in each class. 
Mathematics— Plain Geometry ( Wen f worth-Smith) . 

Latin—Virgil (Bennett), Four Books. 

History — American History (Muzzey). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks). 

The school offers a two year course in Domestic Art and 
Science, for which high school credit is given. A soecial Home 
Economics diploma is granted students who complete the course. 

The course in Agriculture covers four years, and prepas^ie the 



18 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Firm Life School 19 

student to enter the A. and E. College. A fpeeial diploma in 
Agriculture is given to students completing this course. 

The outline of courses in Home Economics and Agriculture 
may be had on application. 

The course of study for the Elementary School is not out- 
lined here since it is identical with that outlined by the State 
Department of Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

Our Equipment for Vocational Training 

In the basement of the Girl's Dormitory are two rooms, a 
dinning room and kitchen used at present as a laboratory for the 
cooking department ofthe school. This department is provided 
with running water, sinks, domestic science desks, oil and wood 
ranges, oil stoves and the most approved cooking utensils. 

The sewing room at present is on the first floor of the main 
building and is provided with sewing tables, chairs, sewing 
machines, dressing mirror, etc. * 

For the boys, rooms in the main building are equipped with 
individual desks of special design, cream separator, Babcock 
testers, incubators, etc. 

Besides these there are also laboratories with individual desks, 
running water, etc., where systematic work is done in illustrating 
the principals of Physics, Chemistry, Botany and Agriculture. 
A large cannery is located on the school grounds and is operated 
during the summer and fall months, canning the fruits and vege- 
tables grown in the community. 

At present the school receives an appropriation from the Fed- 
eral Government under the Smith-Hughes Act of Congress, 
which requires that each pupil taking the Agricultural course 
shall have a "project'' either on the school farm or preferably at 
his home, this "project" to be closely supervised by the Agricul- 
tural teachers. 

New Vocational Building 

Tn May, 1920, the Cary School District voted a boad issue for 
flic erection «f a bui'Ming to be used chiefly by t4e departments 



20 Carjj Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 

of Agriculture and Home Economics. The building will be of 
brick and will contain a gymnasium, science laboratories, agri- 
cultural rooms, and rooms for^cooking and sewing. A separate 
building will be erected for a wood shop and forge. These build- 
ings will probably be completed by the opening of the spring 
term. 

Literary Societies 

The school has four w T ell organized literary societies, two for 
boys and two for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons 
and the boys on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at 
Commencement for most improvement during the year. The 
boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best declamation and 
the girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. Smith, 
a former member of the school gives annually a medal to the 
member of the boy's societies delivering the best oration on the 
occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killingsworth, 
formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives annually a medal 
for the best debater in the girls' societies on the occasion of Com- 
mencement, 

The boy's societies also give a debater's medal for the best 
debater at Commencement. 

Medals and Prizes 

The following medals are offered annually: Best debater in 
Clay and Calhoun Societies, best debater in Irving and Lowell 
Societies, most improvement in each of the societies, highest 
scholarship, best oration, best declamation, best recitation. The 
scholarship medal is given by the Superintendent the orator's 
medal by Mr. H. P. Smith, a former graduate of the school, and 
the medal for best debater in Irving and Lowell Societies by Miss 
Lillian Tvillingsworth, former Lady Principal of the school. 

Atheletics 

Beleiving strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, the 



22 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 23 

school has made ample provision for heal hful sports for every 
sort of child from the little tot up to those who have already 
passed out of their teens. A baseball diamond, two basketball 
courts, one for boys and one for girls, three tennis courts, two 
groups of playground apparatus one for the larger boys and 
another for the children and girls, are located on the school 
campus and are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied 
with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and assist- 
ance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams with' 
uniforms and other equipment, these being the property of the 
school. 

Examinations and Reports 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given on 
all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The" 
pass mark is 75. 

Expenses 

Tuition per Month 

Primary Grades $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades .: 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 4.00 

Music Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Elocution 4.00 

Art 4.00 

Typewriting _ ;.... 4.00 

Stenography 4.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders 14.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 12.00 



24 Cary Public. High School and Farm Life School 




Car j Public High School and Farm Life School 25- 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

r 

Boys' Dormitory 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 

Terms 

Tuition is payable mom lily in advance. Xo deduction is 
made for absence except in cases of protracted illness or other 
providential hindrance. 

Board is payable at the beginning of each school month of 28 
days with no deduction for less than a week's absence. 

Pupils from Wake County outside of Raleigh township, minis- 
terial students, and teachers in the public schools are ailowed free 
tuition in the high school department. 

Society Fee Per Month 25c. 

Athletic Fee for Boys Per Month 25c. 

Athletic Fee fur Girls _.. Per Month 15c. 

Medicine Fee for Girls. Per Term 25c. 

Current Events Per Term 20c. 

Each pupil in the dormitory should bring the following : two 
white counterpanes, (4) sheets, (3) pillow cases, blankets or 
quilts, (1) glass, (1) knife, fork and spoon, covers for dresser, 
washstand and table, curtains for windows (if desired), towels, 
comb, brush, soap. Boys will bring pillows also. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
with the Superintendent $1.00 to show good faith. This amount 
will be deducted from the first month's rent. Rooms, however, 
will not be held longer than September 2, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

All bills unpaid by -Tune 1, following the close of school, will 
be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

Make all checks to Cary High School, or W. B. Womble, 
Treasurer. 



2fi 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 27 

Miscellaneous 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on the 
■opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discourage- 
ment and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children s^ Q ndinej more money at Cary 
than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

Xo form of hazing is allowed. 

Xo unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. 

Bo not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils with 
about $6.00 to cover cost of books. 

Special Notes 

Last session 302 high school pupils and 2 35 in the elemetary 
school making a total enrollment of 537. There were 212 
boarders from 19 comities. The graduating class immbered 39. 

The dormitory for girls is furnished with neat and attractive 
furniture, each room being provided with a closet and containing 
an oak dresser, an oak wash stand with fixtures, two single beds 
with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, and two chairs. 

The new brick dormitory for boys has practically the same 
conveniences as the girls' dormitory. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the 
school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue: 
(1) One of the most substantial high school buildings in the 
State. (2) An admirable heating and ventilating system. (3) 
Running water in the buildings. (4) Bored well on campus 
(5) Spacious class rooms lighted on one side and provided with 
cabinets built into the walls. (6) Tablet arm chairs for the 
high scbool and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (7) 
An fiuditorrrm thpt will seat eia;ht hundred or more, with a 



28 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 

gallery and a splendid stage and scenery. (8) Laboratories with 
individual desks, runnig water, etc. (9) Dormitories both for 
boys and girls — both handsome brick structures, with steam heat, 
baths, etc. (10) A school farm with buildings and equipment 
for demonstrating the priciples of Agriculture, dairying, stock 
raising, etc. (11) A complete playground equipment for the 
whole school. (12) An unsurpassed domestic science equipment 
for high school students. (13) An ample force of trained teach- 
ers to do the work of the school. 

C. H. S. Echoes 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year a 
school paper of enterest to the former pupils, and to the patrons 
and friends of the school. The subscription price is 40c. a year 
or 10c. a copy. The title of the paper is "C. H. S. Echoes.'' 
Thepresent catalogue is the free midsummer number of "0. H. 
S. Echoes." The April number is a special edition of "C. H. S. 
Echoes" in book form, and sells for $1.00. 



I 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated on 
short notice. 




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(Up Stairs) 



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Dealers in 

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Fruit, Cigars. Tobacco, Dry Goods, Shoes and Clothing 

Farming Implements a Specialty 

Coffins and Caskets 

PHONE NO. 9 CARY, N. C. 



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CATALOGUE 

— of— 

CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

— and — 

FARM LIFE SCHOOL 



1922 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



CATALOGUE 

— of— 
CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

— and — 

FARM LIFE SCHOOL 



1922 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Company 

1922 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. M. Templeton, Jr., Chairman 

D. A. Morgan, Secretary 

Mrs. P. D. Gray 

Dr. J. M. Templeton 

A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1922-1923 

Fall Term opens August 28, 1922 

Fall Term closes December 22, 1922 

Spring Term opens January 1, 1923 

Spring Term closes April 13, 1923 



(2) 



OFFICERS AJND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 

J. H. Roller, Principal 

Miss Kate Wofford, Lady Principal 

J. K. Coggin, Principal Farm Life School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Mathematics 

T. A. BANKS, A.B. 

(Trinity College) 

English and Athletics 

MISS ELIZABETH CALVERT, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

History 

J. H. ROLLER, B. S. 

(University of Tennessee) 

Science 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A. B. 
(Trinity College) 
Latin and French 

J. K. COGGIN, B.S. 

(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Agriculture 

MISS CLARA BUTTERY, B. S. 

(Teachers' College, Columbia University) 

Home Economics 

MISS ELIZABETH LINDSAY, B. M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Piano 

MISS JEANNETTE COX, B. M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Public School Music 



Mis a Ren a King, A. B. 
(N. a. College for Women) 
Seience 



(3) 



Catalogue 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A. B.) 

Mathematics 

MISS KATE WOFFORD, A. B. 

(Winthrop College) 

English and Commercial Subjects 

MISS THELMA THORNTON, B. S. 

(Columbia College, S. C.) 

Home Economics and History 

E. N. MEEKINS, B. S. 

(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Agriculture 

MRS. E. N. MEEKINS 

(Meredith College) 

Piano 

R. G. PRINCE 

Band Music and Violin 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 

MISS JULIA HOLT BLACK, B. P. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MISS ESTELLE YARBOROUGH 

(Littleton College) 

Second Grade 

MISS EULA WILLIAMS 

(University of Virginia) 

Third Grade 

MISS ETHEL BAUGH, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Fourth Grade 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Fifth Grade 

MISS KATHERINE BUTLER 

(Virginia Normal) 

Sixth Grade 

MISS ELSIE RESPESS 
(A. C. College) 
Seventh Grade 

MRS. M. B. DRY 
Supervisor Boarding Department 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1922 
f 

Grace Atwater, Chapel Hill, N. C, R. 1. 

Wallace Barbee, Morrisville, N. C, R. 1. 

Madeline Bashaw, Cary, N. C. 

Clarence Braswell, Cary, N. C, R. 1. 

Mary C. Broughton, Zebulon, N. C, R. 3. 

Mattie Banks, Raleigh, N. C, R. 3. 

Sophronia Bullock, Cary, N. C. 

Annie L. Carpenter, Morrisville, N. C, R. 1. 

Ethel Copeland, Cary, N. C. 

Charles R. Crocker, Raleigh, N. C. 

Frank Davis, Raleigh, N. C, R. 4. 

Pearl Garner, Raleigh, N. C, R. 3. 

Joe A. Gill, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Carl Goodwin, Apex, N. C, R. 3. 

Clarence Goodwin, Apex, N. C, R. 3. 

Mary Alice Gray, Cary, N. C. 

Mozelle Griffin, Neuse, N. C, R. 2. 

Alma Harris, Virgilina, Va. 

Susie Hartsfield, Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2. 

Edwin Hatcher, Carpenter, N. C. 

Ethel Hord, Cary, N. C. 

Willie Horton, Knightdale, N. C. 

Fred Hunt, Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2. 

Leona Hunt, Willow Spring, N. C, R. 1. 

Alsey Hunter, Cary, N. C. 

Elsie Jackson, Cary, N. C. 

Sam Johnson, Apex, N. C, R. 1. 

Elizabeth Jones, Cary N. C. 

Grace Jordan, Cary, N. C. 

Clair Lynn, Durham, N. C, R. 6. 

Troy Lynn, Raleigh, N. C, R. 6. 

Luna Mangum, Wake Forest, N. C. 

J. Andrew Morgan, Cary, N. C, R. 1. 

William Lee Page, Morrisville, N. C. 

Marvin B. Poole, Raleigh, N. C, R. 2. 

Hunter Satterwhite, Ytungsville, N. C, R. 1 

Macy Siler, Morrisville, N. C, R. 1 

Mary Elizabeth Smith, Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Ella Smith, McCullers, N. C, R. 1 

Mabel Stone, Apex, N. C, R. 1 

Meroe N. Stone, Cary, N. C. 

Amanda Tillman, Cary, N. C, R. 2 

H. Eugene Townsend, McDonald, N. C. 

John C. Tucker, Harrisburg, N. C. 

Ewell L. Umstead, Stem, N. C. 

Frank Unchurch. New Hill, N. C, R. 2 

Baxter Upchurch, Apex, N. C, R. 1 

Vena L. Upchurch, New Hill, N. C, R. 2 

Barney E. Williams, Charlotte, N. C. 

Kathleen Yates, Apex, N. C, R. 1 



(5) 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 1922 

Scholarship ' Glenn Yaroorough 

Boys' Debate Marvin Poole 

Oration ^Andrew Morgan 

Declamation Barney Williams 

Recitation Ina Atkins 

Girls' Debate Grace Jordan 

Clay Improvement Harold Ranes 

Calhoun Improvement Frank Up church 

Irving Improvement Mattie Banks 

Lowell Improvement Elsie Jackson 



(6) 



Cary Public High School 

— and — 

Farm Life School 



HISTORY 

The Cary Public High School and Farm Life School is an 
outgrowth of the old Cary High School which had its origin 
back in the last century and was owned and controlled by a 
stock company. In 1907, the owners of the property sold 
their stock to the county, and the school was converted into a 
State high school, the first to be established under the high 
school law of 1907. The official name was changed from the 
Cary High School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, 
by special act of the legislature, providing for farm life in- 
struction in Wake County, there were added to the school 
the departments of agriculture and domestic science, the 
name of the school being changed from the Cary Public High 
School to the Cary Public High School and the E. L. Middle- 
ton Farm Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading- 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker,. Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 
1908, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of 
work, and the present Superintendent, was elected as his 
successor. 

(7) 



Catalogue 




Cary Public High School mid Farm Life School 9 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding 
school, for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equip- 
ment, with dormitories both for boys and girls, with new 
departments constantly being added, and with a corps of 
specially trained and experienced teachers, the school still 
draws patronage from a large and growing territory in this 
State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing 
$33,000. The old dormitory building for boys which was 
burned in the spring of 1916, was replaced that year by a 
brick structure at a cost of about $11,000. The building- 
is provided with steam heat, electric lights, baths, lavatories, 
etc., and is now occupied by the girls under the care of the 
Lady Principal. The old privately owned girls 1 dormitory, 
which had been occupied by the boys since 1916, was burned 
in the fall of 1918. In 1919-20 there was erected on the 
campus a modern brick dormitory for the boys, practically 
a duplicate of the girls 1 dormitory, at a cost of about $2§,000. 
This building is provided with steam heat, electric lights, 
single beds, shower baths, etc. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 
Blanks for this purpose will be furnished upon application. 
Entrance examinations will be held on at least two subjects, 
English and Mathematics, for those wishing to enter classes 
above the Freshman. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Instruction in the High School) is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, 
Art, Typewriting and Stenography. 



10 



Catalogue 








A jf 




Gary Public Higli School and Farm Life School 11 

DIPLOMAS pF GRADUATION 

To receive a diploma of graduation in the academic de- 
partment, a pupil must have completed the following work': 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
Civics 
General Science 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 



Academic Course 
(15y 2 units) 

Third Year 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
French 
History 
Chemistry 



Fourth Year 
English 
Geometry 
History 
Physics 
Civics 
French or Latin 



To receive a diploma in Agriculture, a pupil must have 
completed the following : 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Civics 
Crops and Soils 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



Agricultural Course 
(15 units) 

Third Year 
English 
History 
Chemistry 
Algebra 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 

Fourth Year 
English 
Economics 
Physics 
Geometry 
Civics 

Farm Management 
Farm Engineering- 
Farm Accounting 



12 



Catalogue 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 13 



To receive a diploma in Home Economics, one must have 
completed the following : 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Civics 
Home Economics 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Biology 
History- 
Home Economics 



Home Economics Course 
(15 units) 

Third Year 
English 
History 
Chemistry 
Algebra 
Latin 
French 

Fourth Year 

English 

Civics 

Physics 

French 

Geometry 

Latin 



14 



Catalogue 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 15 



CERTIFICATES OF GRADUATION 

To receive a certificate of graduation in the agricultural 
department a pupil may make the following eliminations 
from the agricultural course outlined above : Geometry, 
third year algebra, and one year of history. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in home economics, 
one may eliminate the following from the home economics 
course: Latin, Trench, Geometry, third year algebra. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in the academic 
department, a pupil may substitute a year in music or type- 
writing and stenography, or expression for a year in Latin, 
mathematics, History or Science. 

As all standard colleges now require fifteen units of high 
school work for entrance, only pupils who do not expect to 
go to college or who contemplate entering non-standard in- 
stitutions should take courses leading to certificates of 
graduation. All are urged to take one of the complete 
courses leading to diplomas. 



16 



Catalogue 




OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

First Year 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Ward's Sentence and Theme. Selections 
to be studied in class: As You Like It (Shakespeare); A 
Christmas Carol (Dickens); Treasure Island (Stevenson); 
Short Stories (Smith). 

Parallel Reading — 10 credits required: The Lay of the 
Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott) ; Lays of Ancient 
Rome, 2 (Macaulay) ; Rebecca of Sunnybrooh Farm, 1 
(Wiggin); The Call of the Wild 1, (London); Robinson 
Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 1 (Harris) ; 
Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The Story of the 
Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Steven- 
son ) ; The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — Neiv- High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) Through chapter VI; Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes) Through chapter XL 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through 
chapter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Community Civics (Hughes). 

Second Year 

English — Spelling (Williams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). 
Selections to be studied in class: The Merchant of Venice 
(Shakespeare) ; Ivanhoe, (Scott) ; Snowbound and other 
Poems, (Whittier) ; Selected stories from magazines ; Soh- 
rab and Rustum (Arnold). 

Parallel Reading — 12 credits required: The Lady of the 
Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Reil and John Gilpin, 1 (Browning, 

( 17) 



18 



Catalogue 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 19 

Cowper) ; The Last of Mohicans, 2 (Cooper) ; Tom Brown's 
School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The 
Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Re&de) Tom Sawyer or Huckle- 
berry Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man Without a Country, 
1 (Hale) The DeCoverley Papers, 2 (Addison and Steele) ; 
The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old Testament Narratives, 2 
(Rhodes) ; One of Shakespeare's Plays not Previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) Completed. 

Complete Algebra, (Slaught and Lennes) Through chap- 
ter XXII. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) Completed; 
Caesar, Book II, (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — History of Europe, Ancient and Mediaeval 
(Robinson and Breasted). 

Science — Civic Biology (Hunter). 

Third Year 

English — Spelling (Sandwick and Bacon). 

English Texts — Written, and Spoken English (Clip- 
pinger) ; American Literature (Long). Selections to 
be studied in class: Julius Caesar (Shakespeare); The 
Vision of Sir Launfal (Lowell) ; Idylls of the King (Tenny- 
son) ; or Silas Marner (Eliot). Selections from Poe, Irving, 
Haivthorne, Emerson and 0. Henry. 

Parallel Reading: 15 credits required: The Marble Faun, 
3 (Hawthorne), one Play of Shakespeare's not previously 
read, 2 ; A Tale of Two Cities, 3 (Dickens) ; The Sketch 
Book, 3 (Irving)"; Washington 's Farewell Address, 2 Surry 
of Eagle's Nest, 2 (Cooke) ; Aeneid, 2 (Harrison) ; The 
Four Million or The Voice of the City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Bed 
Bock or In Ole Virginia, 2 (Page) ; The Rise of Silas Lap- 
han, 2 (Howells) ; The Lady or the Tiger, 1 (Stockton) ; 
Poems and Tales, 3 (Poe). 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes), 
Completed. 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 

Latin — Caesar in Gaul (D'Ooge and Eastman), Four 
Books. Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), Four 
orations against Catiline. 

History — Outlines of European History (Robinson and 
Beard), Part II. 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

Fourth Year 

English — Spelling (Sandwick and Bacon). 

English Texts — Handbook of Composition (Wool ley) ; 
English Literature (Long). Selections to be studied in class: 
Macbeth (Shakespeare) ; Essay on Burns (Carlyle) ; the 
Conciliation (Burke) ; Milton's Minor Poems and other Se- 
lections front Golden Treasury (Palgrave) ; Review of 
Grammar. 

Parallel Reading — 20 credits required: Pilgrim's Prog- 
ress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 3 (Thack- 
eray) ; Pride and Prejudice, 3 (Austen) ; Sesame and Lilies, 
3 (Buskin) ; Essays of Elia, 2 (Lamb) ; A play of Shakes- 
peare not previously read, 2. Selections from Browning, 
Thomas, Shelley, Keats, and Whitman, 1 each. Selections 
from Modern Drama, Poetry, and Essays, 1 each. Term 
Essay, 3. 

X. B. Credit will be given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Went worth-Smith) . 

Latin — Virgil (Bennett), Four Books. 

History — American History (Muzzey). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks). 

The courses of study for the Elementary School and Farm 
Life School are not outlined here since they are issued by 
the State Department of Education and can be had in 
bulletin form. 



OUR EQUIPMENT FOR VOCATIONAL TRAINING 

In the basement of the Girls' Dormitory are two rooms, a 
dining room and kitchen used at present as a laboratory for 
the cooking department of the school This department is 
provided with running water, sinks, domestic science desks, 
oil and wood ranges, oil stoves and the most approved cook- 
ing utensils. 

The sewing room at present is on the first floor of the main 
building and is provided with sewing tables, chairs, sewing 
machines, dressing mirror, etc. 

Tor the boys, rooms in the main building are equipped with 
individual desks of special design, cream separator, Babcock 
testers, incubators, etc. 

Besides these there are also laboratories with individual 
desks, running water, etc., where systematic work is done in 
illustrating the principles of Physics, Chemistry, Botany and 
Agriculture. 

At present the school receives an appropriation from the 
Pederal Government under the Smith-Hughes Act of Con- 
gress, which requires that each pupil taking the Agricultural 
course shall have a "project" either on the school farm or 
preferably at his home, this "project" to be closely super- 
vised by the Agricultural teachers. 

NEW VOCATIONAL BUILDING 

In May, 1920, the Cary School District voted a bond issue 
for the erection of a building to be used chiefly by the de- 
partments of Agriculture and Home Economics, but owing 
to unavoidable circumstances the work has been delayed. It 
is hoped that the building will be under way before the 
session opens. The building will be of brick and will contain 
a gymnasium, science laboratories, agricultural rooms and 
rooms for cooking and sowing. A separate building has 
been erected for a wood shop and forge. 

(23) 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 25 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The school has foui literary societies, two for boys and 
two for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the 
boys on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at 
Commencement for most improvement during the year. The 
boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best declamation 
and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. 
Smith, a former member of the school gives annually a medal 
to the member of the boys' societies delivering the best oration 
on the occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killings- 
worth, formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives annually 
a medal for the best debater in the girls' societies on the 
occasion of Commencement. The boys' societies also give a 
debater's medal to the best debater at Commencement. 

SCHOLARSHIP MEDAL 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually 
by the Superintendent for the highest average grade in 
scholarship for the year. Any pupil in the high school is 
eligible to .compete for this medal. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the phys- 
ical powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and 
moral, the school has made ample provision for healthful 
sports for every sort of child from the little tot up to those 
who have already passed out of their teens. A baseball 
diamond, two basketball courts, one for boys and one for 
girls, three tennis courts, two groups of playground apparatus, 
one for the larger boys and another for the children and girls, 
are located on the school campus and are amply sufficient to 
keep all the pupils occupied with some sort of healthful ex- 
ercise at recreation periods. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and 
assistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the 
teams with uniforms and other equipment, these being the 
property of the school. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 27 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of 
scholarship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guar- 
dians. The pass mark is 75. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION PER MONTH 

Primary Grades $ 3,00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Piano — half-hour lessons alternate days 4.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily . .- 1.00 

Violin — half -hour lessons alternate days 5.00 

Elocution 4.00 

Art 4.00 

Typewriting 4.00 

Stenography and Typewriting 6.00 

Band Music 3.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders 15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 13.00 

ROOM RENT PER MOXTH 

Bovs' Dormitorv 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 

TERMS 

Tuition is payable monthly in advance. ISTo deduction is 
made for absence except in cases, of protracted illness or 
other providential hindrance. 



28 Catalogue 

Board is payable at the beginning of each school month of 
28 days with no deduction for less than a week's absence. 

Pupils from Wake County outside of Raleigh township, 
ministerial students, and teachers in the public schools are 
allowed free tuition in the high school department 

Society Fee Per Month 25c. 

Athletic Pee for Boys Per Month 25c. 

Athletic Fee for Girls Per Month 15c. 

Medicine Fee for Girls Per Term 25c. 

Current Events Per Term 15c. 

Each pupil in the dormitory should bring the following: 
two white counterpanes, (4) sheets, (3) pillow cases, blankets 
or quilts, (1) glass, (1) knife, fork and spoon, covers for 
dresser, washstand and table, curtains for windows (if de- 
sired), towels, comb, brush, soap. Boys will bring pillows 
also. 

The rates for room include fuel and lights. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must 
deposit with the Business Manager $1.00 to show good faith. 
This amount will be deducted from the first month's rent. 
Rooms, however, will not be held longer than September 2, 
except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

All bills unpaid by June 1, following the close of school, 
tvill be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school is fortunate in having ample boarding facilities 
for all the boarding pupils and teachers. In the basement of 
the main building is a large dining hall capable of seating 
over two hundred people. Here the pupils are seated in 
groups of ten at each table with a hostess in charge who sees 
to it that the rules of table etiquette are observed. From 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 29 

time to time the teacher of domestic science gives a demon- 
stration on table manners. The management of the school 
believes this to be an important part of an education. Table 
board is given at actual cost. By buying groceries in large 
quantities, the price of board has been kept at a very low 
rate, usually about $15.00 a month. 

TEACHER TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

Plans are under way for the establishment of a department 
of teacher training in the school whereby a pupil can get the 
equivalent of a year of college work toward securing a cer- 
tificate to teach. According to this plan a pupil who has 
completed the Junior year of high school work can by taking 
this course secure an elementary certificate class B without 
attending summer school or college. A high school graduate 
by taking the same course can secure an elementary certifi- 
cate class A. Teachers holding elementary certificates class 
B can raise them to class A. An outstanding teacher of ex- 
perience will have charge of this department. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Last year violin was offered in the school for the first time 
and about a dozen pupils were enrolled. We are glad to 
announce that this department will be continued. 

The piano department will be under the direction of Miss 
Elizabeth Lindsay, a graduate in Music of N". C. College for 
Women and is highly endorsed by Professor Wade R- Brown, 
Director of Music in that institution. She will be assisted 
by Mrs. E. !N". Meekins, an experienced teacher of piano. 

The Cary Band which was organized last year by Mr. 
R. G. Prince, will be continued this year and Mr. Prince 
will remain in charge. 

Arrangements have been made to have public school music, 
or sight singing, taught to all the school. Miss Jeannette 



30 



Catalogue 




Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 31 

Cox, a graduate of 1ST. C. College for Women, has been 
employed for this work and she will give her whole time to 
it. It will be free to all the pupils. 

The school last year bought six new Remington type- 
writers and arrangements will be made whereby pupils can 
take typewriting and stenography and get credit for these 
subjects in at least one course offered in the school. Pro- 
vision will also be made for giving instruction in art and 
expression, credit for which will also be allowed. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition 
to his regular course, to take at least one of the special sub- 
jects outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take 
more than one. To be able to use a typewriter or to play 
in a band is frequently the means of a student's paying his 
way through college. Every girl ought to learn to play the 
piano and to sing, and every boy ought to learn to play some 
kind of musical instrument as well as to sing. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much dis- 
couragement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

jSTo unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all 
damage to school property in their rooms. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $G.OO to cover cost of books. 



32 Catalogue 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 237 high school pupils were enrolled and 296 
in the elementary school making a total enrollment of 533. 
There were 186 boarders from 14 counties. The graduating 
class numbered 50. Twenty-four teachers were employed to 
do the work of the school, of whom seven were men. 

The dormitory for girls is furnished with neat and attrac- 
tive furniture, each room being provided with a closet and 
containing an oak dresser, an oak wash stand with fixtures, 
two single beds with felt mattresses, a table with double 
drawers, and two chairs. 

The new brick dormitory for boys has practically the same 
conveniences as the girls' dormitory. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of 
the school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this 
catalogue: (1) One of the most substantial high school 
buildings in the State. (2) An admirable heating and ven- 
tilating system. (3) Running water in the buildings. (4) 
Bored well on campus. (5) Spacious class rooms lighted on 
one side and provided with cabinets built into the walls. (6) 
Tablet arm chairs for the high school and individual lockers 
for books, tablets, etc. (7) An auditorium that will seat 
eight hundred or more, with a gallery and a splendid stage 
and scenery. (8) Laboratories with individual desks, gas, 
running water, etc. (9) Dormitories both for boys and 
girls — both handsome brick structures, with steam heat, 
baths, etc. (10) A complete playground equipment for the 
whole school. (11) An unsurpassed domestic science equip- 
ment for high school students. (12) An ample force of 
trained teachers to do the work of the school. 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 
40c. a year or 10c. a copy. The title of the paper is 
"C. H. S. Echoes." 



Cary High School 

NINETEEN TWENTY -THREE 
CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 





-Mi 



New Vocational Building 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 

1923 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



lb 



RALEIGH, N. V. 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Oompan? 

1923 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J, M. Templeton, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. P. D. Gray, Secretary 

D. A. Morgan 

Dr. J. M. Templeton 

A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1923-1924 

Pall Term opens August 27, 1923 

Fall Term closes December 21, 1923 

Spring Term opens December 31, 1923 

Spring Term closes April 11, 3 924 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 

J. H. Roller, Principal 

Miss Elizabeth Calvert, Lady Principal 

E. N. Meekins, Principal, Farm-Life School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Mathematics 



Assistant English and Athletics 

MISS ELIZABETH CALVERT, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

History 

J. H. ROLLER 

(University of Tennessee) 
Science 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A. B. 
(Trinity College) 
Latin and French 

E. N. MEEKINS, B. S. 

(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Agriculture 

MISS CLARA BUTTERY, B. S. 

(Teachers' College, Columbia University) 

Home Economics 

MRS. C. P. BLALOCK 

(Chowan College; Johns Hopkins; Teachers College) 
Teacher Training 

MISS ELIZABETH LINDSAY, B. M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Piano 

MISS MOLLIE MATHESON, B. M. 
(N. C. College for Women) 
Public School Music 
Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



Catalogue 



MISS RENA KING, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 
Assistant Science 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A. B.) 

Assistant Mathematics 



English 

MISS THELMA THORNTON, B. S. 

(Columbia College, S. C.) 

Assistant Home Economics and History 

L. E. RAPER, B. S. 
(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Assistant Agriculture 



Assistant Piano 



Band Music and Violin 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 



First Grade 

MISS ELOISE WHITLEY 

(Louisburg College) 

Assistant First Grade 

MISS ESTELLE YARBOROUGH 

(Littleton College) 

Second Grade 

MISS EULA WILLIAMS 

(University of Virginia) 

Third Grade 



Fourth Grade 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Fifth Grade 

* Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



Gary High School 

MISS HESTER FARRIOR 

(Meredith College) 

Sixth Grade 
r 

MISS ELSIE RESPESS 

(A. C. College) 

Seventh Grade 

* 
Supervisor Boarding Department 
* 

Business Manager 
Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1923 

Clelon Allen, Cary, N. C. 

Eula Mae Baskin, Heath Springs, S. C, R. 1 

David Bobbitt, Tillery, N. C. 

Sibyl Brady, Garner, N. C. 

Mariah Broughton, Garner, N. C. 

Mae Buffaloe, McCullers, N. C. 

Virginia Cathell, Moncure, N. C. 

Cephas Christian, Mocksville, N. C. 

Mildred Clifton, Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Irma Cox, Cary, N. C. 

Ruth Daniel, Youngsville, N. C, R. 1 

Mossa Eaton, Cana, N. C, R. 1 

Mary Ford, Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Henry Franks, Apex, N. C, R. 2 

Roy Gay, Raleigh, N. C. 

Pat Gray, Cary, N. C. 

Paul Hardy, Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Azelene Hatcher, Carpenter, N. C. 

Annie Lasater, Moncure, N. C, R. 1 

Pansie Little, Wake Forest, N. C, R. 5 

Lula Little, Ansonville, N. C. 

Cleo Matthews, Cary, N. C. 

Calvin Meconnahey, Cary, N. C. 

Robert Moore, Cary, N. C. 

Edmond Nichols, Durham, N. C, R. 8 

Elizabeth Page, Morrisville, N. C. 

Claude Pipkin, Cary N. C, R. 1 

David Pleasants, Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Fat Pleasants, Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Ernest Pope, Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Tom Reynolds, Merry Oaks, N. C. 

Helen Rhodes, Apex, N. C, R. 2 

Dorothy Smith, McCullers, N. C. 

Margaret L. Smith, McCullers, N. C. 

Novvie Smith, Cary, N. C. 

Vallie Smith, Apex, N. C, R. 2 

Lewis Sorrell, Raleigh, N. C, R. 6 

Victor Sorrell, Morrisville, N. C, R. 2 

Mary Lee Starling, Garner, N. C. 

Dacosta Stephenson, McCullers, N. C. 

Thelma Stone, Kittrell, N. C, R. 1 

Meredith Swain, Raleigh, N. C. 

Ennis Thorne, Youngsville, N. C. 

Bernard Tillman, Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miriam Walton, Raleigh, N. C, R. 1 

Glenn Yarborough, Cary, N. C. 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 

Scholarship Mary Rodwell Hunter 

Boys' Debate Ennis Thorne 

Oration Robert Moore 

Declamation Curtis Muse 

Recitation Rachel Eaton 

Clay Improvement Victor Sorrell 

Calhoun Improvement Ennis Thorne 

Irving Improvement Azelene Hatcher 

Lowell Improvement Mossa Eaton 



171 



Catalogue 




$ o 



Cary High School 



FOREWORD 

For the twenty-eighth time the Cary High School comes 
before the public in its annual printed message bidding for 
a continuance of the patronage which has been so abundantly 
bestowed upon it in the past. 

In all its history the prospects of the school have never 
been quite so encouraging as now. With another handsome 
new brick building, costing $15,000, nearing completion; 
with two large brick dormitories in use, equipped with every 
modern convenience; with the thirty-three room administra- 
tion building, also of brick, completed in 1914 and improved 
from time to time; with a strong faculty of men and women, 
numbering twenty-five, and each highly trained for his par- 
ticular work ; with new departments added, bringing the 
school abreast with the best equipped institutions of the 
country, there is every reason to believe that the coming 
year will be the best in the school's history. 

This catalogue sets forth, as briefly as possible, the 
entrance requirements, the course of study, the expenses, 
the special departments, the general features, some miscel- 
laneous matters, and at the back a brief history of the growth 
and development of the school. Scattered through the book 
are pictures of the buildings, departments, etc., which speak 
for themselves. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 
Blanks for this purpose will be furnished upon application. 

[9] 



10 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 



11 



COURSES OF STUDY 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects: English, Mathematics^ History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, 
Art, Typewriting, Stenography, Bookkeeping, Teacher- 
training. 

To receive a diploma of graduation in the academic de- 
partment, a pupil must have completed the following work: 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
Civics 
General Science 



ACADEMIC COURSE 
Third Year 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
French 
History 
Chemistry 



Fourth Year 
English 
Geometry 
History 
Physics 
Civics 
French or Latin 



Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 

To receive a diploma in Agriculture, a pupil must have 
completed the following: 

AGRICULTURAL COURSE 
Third Year 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Civics 
Crops and Soils 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



English 

History 

Chemistry 

Algebra 

Horticulture 

Farm Mechanics 

Fourth Year 
English 
Physics 
Geometry 
Civics 

Farm Management 
Farm Engineering 



12 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 13 

To receive a diploma in Home Economics, one must have 
completed the following: 

HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

First Year Third Year 
English English 

Arithmetic History 

Algebra Chemistry- 

General Science Algebra 

Civics Latin 

Home Economics French 

Second Year Fourth Year 

English English 

Arithmetic Civics 

Algebra Physics 

Biology French 

History Geometry 

Home Economics Latin 

To receive a certificate of graduation in the agricultural 
department a pupil may make the following eliminations 
from the agricultural course outlined above: Geometry, 
third year algebra, and one year of history. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in home economics, 
one may eliminate the following from the home economics 
course : Latin, French, geometry, third year algebra. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in the academic 
department, a pupil may substitute a year in music, type- 
writing, stenography, bookkeeping, or expression, for a year 
in Latin, mathematics, history, or science. 

As all standard colleges now require fifteen units of high 
school work for entrance, only pupils who do not expect to 
go to college or who contemplate entering non-standard in- 
stitutions should take courses leading to certificates of 
graduation. All are urged to take one of the complete 
courses leading to diplomas. 



14 



Catalogue 




OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

FIKST YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Sentence and Theme (Ward). 

English Classics for Study — As You Like It (Shakes 
peare) ; A Christmas Carol (Dickens) ; Treasure Island 
(Stevenson). 

English Classics for Beading — (10 credits required) : 
The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott) ; 
Lays of Ancient Borne, 2 (Macaulay) ; Bebecca of Sunny- 
brook Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; The Call of the Wild, 1 (Lon- 
don) ; Bobinson Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Bemus Stories, 
1 (Harris) ; Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The 
Story of the Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke) ; Kidnapped, 2 
(Stevenson) ; The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) through chapter VI; Complete Algebra (Slanght and 
Lennes) through chapter XL 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniel!) through 
chapter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Community Civics (Hughes). 

Agriculture — Productive Farm Crops (Montgomery) ; 
Soils and Fertilizers (Lyon). 

Home Economics — School and Home Cooking (Greer) ; 
Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

SECOXD YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase). 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). 

English Classics for Study — The Merchant of Venice 
(Shakespeare) ; IvanJioe (Scott) ; Snowbound and Other 
Poems (Whittier). 



16 



Catalogue 



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Cary High School 17 

English Classics for Reading — (12 credits required) : 
The Lady of the Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Reil, 1 (Browning) ; 
Franklin's Autobiography , 2 ; The Last of the Mohicans, 2 
(Cooper) ; Tom Brown s School r Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of 
Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) ; 
Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The 
Man Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The DeCoverley Papers, 
2 (Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; 
Old Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; The Virginian, 2 
(Wister) ; Wild Animals I Have Known, 2 (Seton-Thomp- 
son) ; One of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) completed; Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
through chapter XXII. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) completed; 
Ccesar, Book II (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — History of Europe, Ancient and Medkeval 
(Robinson and Breasted). 

Science — Civic Biology (Hunter). 

Agriculture — A Study of Farm Animals (Plumb) ; Dairy 
Farming (Eckles and Warren). 

Home Economics — Dietetics for High School (Willard 
and Gillett) ; Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

THIRD YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon). 

English Texts — Written and Spoken English (Clip- 
pinger) ; American Literature (Long). 

English Classics for Study — Julius Ccesar (Shakespeare) ; 
The Vision of Sir Launfal (Lowell) ; Idylls of the King 
(Tennyson). Selections from Poe, Irving, Hawthorne, 
Emerson, and O. Henry. 

English Classics for Beading — (15 credits required) : The 
Marble Faun, 3 (Hawthorne) ; A Tale of Two Cities, 3 
(Dickens) ; The Sketch Book, 3 (Irving) ; Washington's 
Farewell Address, 2; zEneid, 2 (Harrison) ; Captains Gour- 



18 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 19 

ageous, 2 (Kipling) • Sohrab and Rustum, 2 (Arnold) ; The 
Oregon Trail, 2 (Parkman) ; The Four Million or The 
Voice of the City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Red Booh or In Ole Vir- 
ginia, 2 (Page) ; The Rise- of Silas Lapham, 2 (Howells) ; 
Poems and Tales, 3 (Poe) ; one Play of Shakespeare not 
previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
completed. 

Latin — Ccesar in Gaul (D'Ooge and Eastman), Four 
Books. Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), Four 
orations against Catiline. 

History — Outlines of European History (Robinson and 
Beard), Part II. 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; 
Lectures Faciles (Bruce) ; La Belle France (Monvert). 

Agriculture — Horticulture (Davis) ; Farm Mechanics. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon). 

English Texts — Handbook of Composition (Woolley) ; 
English Literature (Long). 

English Classics for Study — Macbeth (Shakespeare) ; Es- 
say on Burns (Carlyle) ; Speech on Conciliation (Burke) ; 
Milton's Minor Poems. 

English Classics for Reading — (20 credits required) : Pil- 
grims Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry 
Esmond, 3 (Thackeray) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Ruskin) ; 
The Ancient Mariner, 2 (Coleridge) ; Bunker Hill Oration, 
2 (Webster) ; Education and Citizenship, 2 (Graham) ; 
Lorna Doone, 2 (Blackmore) ; Heart of the West, 2 (0. 
Henry) ; The Vicar of Wakefield, 3 (Goldsmith) ; one Play 
of Shakespeare not previously read, 2. Selections from 
Browning, Shelley, Keats, and Whitman, 1 each. Selections 



20 



Catalogue 




Gary High School 21 

from modern drama, poetry, and essays, 1 each. Term 
essay, 3. 

N". B. — Credit will be given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class. f 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — Virgil (Bennett), Four Books. 

History — American History (Muzzey). 

Civics— American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; 
La France Heroique (Osgood) ; A French Reader (Aldrich 
and Foster) ; Colomba. 

Agriculture— ^F arm Management (Warren) ; Farm Engi- 
neering. Farm shop work is given throughout the four years 
to all students taking agriculture. The Farmer s Shop Book 
(Roehl) is used as the basal text. 

JST. B. — The course of study for the Elementary School 
is not outlined here, since it is issued by the State Depart- 
ment of Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

EXPENSES 
TUITION PER MONTH 

Primary Grades $ 3,00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Piano 4.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Violin 5.00 

Elocution 4.00 

Art 4.00 

Typewriting 4.00 

Stenography and Typewriting 6.00 

Bookkeeping 4.00 

Band Music 3.00 



22 



Catalogue 




o 



Cary High School 23 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders 15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 13.00 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 

MINOR DUES PER MONTH 

Societies (all) 25c 

Athletics (boys) 25c 

Athletics (girls) 15c 

Medicine Fee (girls in dormitory) 10c 

Current Events (all) 5c 

All dues are payable monthly in advance. Eor absence on 
account of sickness or other providential cause, deduction 
is made in tuition and board for a full week of continuous 
absence. A school month is four weeks or twenty-eight 
days. 

Tuition in the High School Department is free to all 
pupils living in Wake County, except in special charter 
districts, for the first six months. Eor the remainder of the 
term there will be a charge for tuition determined by the 
actual cost of instruction per pupil after deducting the 
county apportionment for six months. This charge, which 
was made by order of the County Board, applies to all 
High Schools in the county. 

Each pupil in the dormitories should bring the following : 
Two white counterpanes, four sheets, three pillow cases, 
two blankets or quilts, one glass, covers for dresser, wash- 
stand and table, curtains for window (if desired), towels, 
comb, brush, soap. Boys will bring pillows also. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must 
deposit with the Business Manager $1.00 to show good faith. 



24 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 25 

This amount will be deducted from the first month's rent. 
Rooms, however, will not be held longer than September 1, 
except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

All bills unpaid by June 1, following the close of school, 
will be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection. 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school is fortunate in having ample boarding facilities 
for all the boarding pupils and teachers. In the basement of 
the main building is a large dining hall capable of seating 
over two hundred people. Here the pupils are seated in 
groups of eight to a table with a hostess in charge, usually 
a senior, who sees to it that the rules of table etiquette are 
observed. From time to time the teachers of domestic sci- 
ence give talks and demonstrations on table manners. The 
management of the school believes this to be an important 
part of an education. Table board is given at actual cost. 
By buying groceries in large quantities, the price of board 
has been kept at a very low rate, usually about $15.00 a 
month. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

TEACHER-TRAINING 

This department was new last year, having been tried out 
at Cary and three other places in the State by the Teacher- 
training Department at Raleigh. The work at Cary was 
in charge of an outstanding teacher, and so pronounced 
was its success that it will be continued, occupying comfort- 
able quarters in the new vocational building. 

By taking this course, a pupil will get the equivalent of 
a year of college work toward securing a certificate to teach. 
A junior who has completed twelve units of academic work 
in an accredited high school will, upon the completion of 
the course, secure an elementary certificate Class B. A grad- 
uate of an accredited high school, upon completion of the 



26 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 27 

course, is granted an elementary certificate Class A. The 
course covers a period of one school session. Graduates 
from this department are granted diplomas from the high 
school as well as the certificate from the State Department 
at Raleigh and will be admitted to the North Carolina Col- 
lege for Women or the East Carolina Teachers College, if 
they decide to go to college. 

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

These departments, next session, will occupy spacious 
quarters in the new vocational building. The entire first 
floor and one large room in the basement, making in all 
nine rooms, will be devoted to the work of these departments. 
These rooms will be furnished with the most modern equip- 
ment for teaching agriculture and home economics and will 
place the school in the forefront of high schools in the South 
doing this class of work. 

For agriculture, there are two large classrooms provided 
with individual desks, cabinets, lantern, running water, etc. 
Between these two is a room which will be used as a combina- 
tion library, reading room and office. In the basement a large 
room has been provided for the animal husbandry work and 
will be equipped with cream separators, testers, incuba- 
tors, etc. Five rooms will be used by the Home Economics 
Department as follows : Cooking laboratory, dining room, 
sewing room, fitting room, and library. The rooms are 
provided with running water, cabinets, tables, desks, book- 
cases, cooking stoves and cooking utensils, china, sewing 
machines, ironing boards, mirrors, etc. 

Science being the basic subject for both agriculture and 
home economics, ample provision has been made in the new 
building for teaching it by the laboratory method. In addi- 
tion to the laboratory and lecture room already in use in 
the main building, four other rooms on the second floor of 
the new building will be devoted exclusively to science, and 
an elaborate equipment in desks, cabinets, physical, chem- 
ical and biological apparatus, etc., with suitable plumbing, 
has been provided. 



28 



Catalogue 




o 



Gary High School 29 

Three other large rooms on the second floor of this build- 
ing will be occupied by the teacher-training department, the 
commercial department, and one of the other special depart- 
ments of the school. t 

MUSIC 

The Piano Department has long been one of the promi- 
nent features of the school. Onlv teachers of recognized 
musical attainments are employed for this work. A music 
studio, six practice rooms and seven pianos constitute the 
equipment. 

Violin and band music will be provided for again. The 
school is fortunate in having a well-organized band with 
regular instruction given by a recognized band leader. 

Teachers have been employed who will give lessons in 
art and expression to those who desire this sort of instruction. 

Public school music has now become an established feature 
of the school and a trained teacher is employed to give her 
whole time to it. It is required of all pupils and there is 
no charge for it. 

COMMEECIAL 

The work of the Commercial Department has been enlarged 
so as to include bookkeeping along with typewriting and 
stenography. A large room in the new building, six Reming- 
ton typewriters, suitable tables and chairs make up the 
equipment for this department. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition 
to his regular course, to take at least one of the special sub- 
jects outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take 
more than one. To be able to use a typewriter or to play 
in a band is frequently the means of a student's paying his 
way through college. Every girl ought to learn to play the 
piano and to sing, and every boy ought to learn to play some 
kind of musical instrument as well as to sing. 

Credit is given toward graduation for work done in these 
special departments. 



30 



Catalogue 




Gary High School 31 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

LITEBABY SOCIETIES 
The school has four literary societies, two for boys and 
two for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the 
boys on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at 
Commencement for most improvement during the year. The 
boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best declamation 
and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. 
Smith, a former member of the school, gives annually a medal 
to the member of the boys' societies delivering the best oration 
on the occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killings- 
worth, formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives annually 
a medal for the best debater in the girls' societies on the 
occasion of Commencement. The boys' societies also give a 
debaters' medal to the best debater at Commencement. All 
high school pupils, unless excused by the Superintendent, 
are required to join one of the societies. 

SCHOLABSHIP MEDAL 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually 
by the Superintendent for the highest average grade in 
scholarship for the year. Any pupil in the high school is 
eligible to compete for this medal. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the phys- 
ical powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and 
moral, the school has made ample provision for healthful 
sports of every kind. A baseball diamond, basketball courts, 
for both boys and girls, tennis courts, and playground appa- 
ratus, are located on the school campus and are amply 
sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied with some sort of 
healthful exercise at recreation periods. A new athletic 
field on a neighboring hill has been secured which will be 
put in shape for football, baseball, basketball and track ath- 
letics and will be used exclusively by the high school 
department. 



32 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 3*3 

The school committee gives every encouragement and 
assistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the 
teams with uniforms and other equipment, these being the 
property of the school. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of 
scholarship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guar- 
dians. The pass mark is 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much dis- 
couragement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all 
damage to school property in their rooms. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $6.00 to cover cost of books. 

Unless there is objection from parents, boarding pupils 
must attend Sunday School and church. 

Smoking in any of the school buildings or on the school 
grounds is prohibited. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 263 high school pupils were enrolled and 342 
in the elementary school, making a total enrollment of 605. 
There were 179 boarders from 18 counties. The graduating 



34 Catalogue 

class numbered 46. Twenty-five teachers were employed to 
do the work of the school. 

The dormitory for girls is of brick and is furnished with 
neat and attractive furniture, each room being provided 
with a closet and containing an oak dresser, an oak wash- 
stand with fixtures, two single beds with felt mattresses, a 
table with double drawers, and two chairs. 

The brick dormitory for boys has practically the same 
conveniences as the girls' dormitory. Both dormitories are 
provided with steam heat, electric lights, running water 
(hot and cold), baths, etc. The boys' dormitory has shower 
baths. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of 
the school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this 
catalogue: (1) A large and substantial main building with 
33 rooms. (2) A new vocational building with 18 rooms. 
(3) All buildings heated by steam. (4) Running water in 
all the buildings. (5) Bored well on campus. (6) Spacious 
classrooms lighted on one side and provided with cabinets 
built into the walls. (7) Tablet arm chairs for the high 
school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (8) An 
auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a 
gallery and splendid stage and scenery. (9) Laboratories 
with individual desks, gas, running water, etc. (10) Dormi- 
tories both for boys and girls — both handsome brick struc- 
tures, with steam heat, baths, etc. (11) A complete 
playground equipment for the whole school. (12) An 
unsurpassed domestic science equipment for high school 
students. (13) An ample force of trained teachers to do 
the work of the school. 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 
40c a year or 10c a copy. The title of the paper is 
C. H. S. Echoes. The class also publishes an annual, in 
book form, which is highly prized by the members. 



Cary High School 3'5 

HISTORY 

The Cary High School had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. 
In 1007, the owners of the property sold their stocl\ to 
the comity, and the school was converted into a State high 
school, the first to be established under the high school 
law of 1907, The official name was changed from the Cary 
High School to the Cary Public High School. In 101-'], 
by special act of the legislature, providing for farm-life in- 
struction in "Wake County, there were added to the school 
the departments of agriculture and domestic science, the 
name of the school being changed from the Cary Public High 
School to the Cary Public High School and the E. L. Middle- 
ton Farm-Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading- 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1806 to 1008, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 
1008, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of 
work, and the present Superintendent was elected as his 
successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding 
school, for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equip- 
ment', with dormitories both for boys and girls, with new 
departments constantly being added, and with a corps ot 
specially trained and experienced teachers, the school still 
draws patronage from a large and growing territory in this 
State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913-14 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing 
$33,000. The old dormitory building for boys which was 
burned in the spring of 1016, was replaced that year by a 



36 Catalogue 

brick structure at a cost of about $13,000. The building 
contains 31 rooms, being provided with steam heat, electric 
lights, baths, lavatories, etc., and is now occupied by the 
girls under the care of the Lady Principal. The old pri- 
vately owned girls' dormitory, which had been occupied 
by the boys since 1916, was burned in the fall of 1918. 
In 1919-20 there was erected on the campus a modern brick 
dormitory for the boys, practically a duplicate of the girls' 
dormitory, at a cost of about $28,000. This building con- 
tains 33 rooms and is provided with steam heat, electric 
lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

In the summer of 1923, another two-story brick building 
was erected to provide rooms for the departments of . agri- 
culture, home economics, teacher-training and the commercial 
subjects. It contains 18 rooms and cost $45,000. This 
building has been named in honor of Gary's most illus- 
trious citizen, the late Walter Hines Page, and will be 
known officially as the Walter Hines Page Building for 
Vocational Training. 

This building, with the three other brick buildings on 
the campus, conrpletes the quadrangle as planned for the 
school by Professor J. P. Pillsbury, of the K C. State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Engineering, in 1916. 

Other buildings on the campus are the teacherage, the 
janitor's home, and the shop. The janitor's home is all that 
is left of the old high school building that stood on the 
site of the present main building up to 1913. The teacher- 
age has been twice moved and has traveled half way around 
the campus. The shop was built by the students of the 
agricultural department in 1921 and is equipped with a 
forge, work benches and a complete set of tools. 

Connected with the school, but not on the campus, are 
a cottage and a barn on a twenty-one acre farm, which the 
school owns, a quarter of a mile away. 

The school campus contains four acres and, according to 
the last geological survey, is the highest ground in Wake 
County. 

The entire school plant at the present time is estimated 
to be worth $200,000. 



Application for Admission 
CARY HIGH SCHOOL 



Date. 



Name 



Postoffice 

Age County. 

Name of Parent or Guardian 

Last School Attended 



.192. 



Indicate by X which course you expect to take. 

1. Academic 

2. Agricultural 

3. Home Economics 

Indicate by X, if $1.00 is enclosed to have room reserved in Dormi- 
tory 

Do you expect to go home week-ends? 

Mail to M. B. Dry, Cary, N. C. 




I 



Waiter Hikes Page Vocational Building 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 

1924 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH, N. U. 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 'Jompant 

1924 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. M. Templeton, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. P. D. Gray, Secretary 

D. A. Morgan 

Dr. J. M. Templeton 

A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1924-1925 

Fall Term opens September 1, 1924 

Fall Term closes December 19, 1924 

Spring Term opens December 29, 1924 

Spring Term closes April 24, 1925 



HOLIDAYS 



Thursday and Friday, October 16 and 17, 1924, of State Fair Week 
Thursday and Friday, November 27 and 28, 1924, Thanksgiving 
Easter Monday, April 13, 1925 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 
J. H. Roller, Principal 

* ...Lady Principal 

E. N. Meekins, Principal, Farm-Life School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 
Geometry 

B. B. DALTON, A.B. 

(State University) 
Assistant English and Athletics 

MRS. J. W. DANIEL, A.B. 

(LaGrange College) 

History and Commercial Subjects 

J. H. ROLLER 

(University of Tennessee) 
Science 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A. B. 

(Trinity College) 

French and Civics 

MISS RUTH LIVERMON, A.B., A.M. 

(Meredith College, Columbia University) 

Latin 

E. N. MEEKINS, B. S. 

(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Agriculture 

MISS MARY E. YORK, B.S. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Home Economics 

MISS LOUISE M. GILL, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Teacher Training 

MISS ELIZABETH LINDSAY, B. M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Piano 

MISS MOLLIE MATHESON, B. M. 
(N. C. College for Women) 
Public School Music 
Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



13 



Catalogue 



Physical Training and Assistant Science 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A. B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A. B.) 

Assistant Mathematics 



English 



Assistant Home Economics and Science 

L. E. RAPER, B. S. 

(N. C. College of Agriculture and Engineering) 

Assistant Agriculture 



Assistant Piano and Violin 

LIEUTENANT BRAXTON 

Band Music 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MISS MINNIE MORRIS 

(Columbia College) 

Assista7it First Grade 

MISS ESTELLE YARBOROUGH 

(Littleton College) 

Second Grade 

MISS EULA WILLIAMS 

(University of Virginia) 

Third Grade 

MISS MAY BELLE FRANKLIN 

(Littleton College) 

Fourth Grade 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Fifth Grade 

* Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



Cary High School 

MISS HESTER FARRIOR 

(Meredith College) 

Sixth Grade 

MRS. ELSIE RESPESS McLEAN 
(A. C. College) 
Seventh Grade 



Supervisor Boarding Department 



* Not employed when catalogue went to press. 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1924 

ACADEMIC DIPLOMA 

Miss Allena Bunch Clayton, N. C. 

Mr. Judson Coats Clayton, N. C. 

Mr. Wahab Edwards Belhaven, N. C. 

Mr. Phares Green Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Doris Honeycltt Raleigh, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. James Hunter Turkey, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mary R. Hunter Cary, N. C. 

Miss Thelma Johnson Goldsboro, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Otis King Areola, N. C. 

Miss Martha Medlin Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Felix Wheeler Holly Springs, N. C, R. 1 

Miss A,nn Wilkinson Cary, N. C. 

Miss Martha Wright Cary, N. C. 

Miss Geneva Yeargan Garner, N. C. 

Mr. Ralph Johnson Clayton, N. C, R. 3 

AGRICULTURAL DIPLOMA 

Mr. Glenn Johnson Kipling, N. C. 

Mr. Kenneth Smith Raleigh, N. C. 

Mr. Harold Wilson Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

HOME ECONOMICS DIPLOMA 

Miss Nell Johnson Kipling, N. C. 

Miss Margaret Smith Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Martha Medlin Cary, N. C., R. 1 

Miss Geneva Yeargan Garner, N. C. 

TEACHER TRAINING DIPLOMA 

Miss Katie Buff aloe Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Myrtle Cooper Cary, N. C, R 1 

Miss Ethel Copeland Cary, N. C. 

Miss Rachel Eaton Cana, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Ruby Franklin Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Julia Griffin Neuse, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mary Belle Hodge Knightdale, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Mary Louise Johnson Holly Springs, N. C. 

Miss Dora Moore Cary, N. C. 

Miss Lillian Pearce Youngsville, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Meroe Stone Cary, N. C. 

Miss Mildred Wood Apex, N. C, R. 2 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE 

Mr. Herman Armstrong Columbia, N. C. 

Mr. John Baucom Raleigh, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Gamaliel Coats Coats, N. C. 

Miss Madeline Hodge Knightdale, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Irwin Jackson Neuse, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Sam Matthews Cary, N. C. 

Miss Allene Pittard Nelson, Va. 

Miss Irene Pittard Nelson, Va. 

Mr. Waldron Shearon Wake Forest, N. C. 

Mr. Lewis Williams Pink Hill, N. C. 

AGRICULTURAL CERTIFICATE 

Mr. Oral Allen Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Rocher Allen Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Richard Ferguson Neuse, N. C. 

Mr. Robert Atkins Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Edwin Dowell Auburn, Ala. 

: G i 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 

Scholarship Martha Wright 

Boys' Debate Harold Wilson 

Declamation Melzar Morgan 

Recitation Rebecca Clements 

Clay Improvement Vallin Estes 

Calhoun Improvement John Lee Hester 

Ir\tng Improvement Ethel Copeland 

Lowell Improvement Rachel Eaton 

Piano Geneva Yeargan 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 



FOREWORD 

The Cary High School is first and foremost a boarding- 
school. Two-thirds of its high school pupils come from out- 
side the local district, many of them from other comities. 
A boarding school affords numerous advantages over a school 
purely local. The students generally are the picked repre- 
sentatives of their communities ; the dormitory life and the 
mingling of pupils and teachers in the dining hall afford a 
training even more valuable than that obtained from text- 
books, while the organized life of the students in the literary 
societies, Y. M. 0. A., Y. W. C. A., Athletic Clubs, Music- 
Clubs, Science Clubs, etc., means vastly more to the pupils 
than in a purely local school. Then, too, pupils fi\ed from 
home duties and home distractions have far better oppor- 
tunities for study; and when they have finished the high 
school, the transition to college life is less abrupt. Many 
boys and girls need the discipline of dormitory life, to say 
nothing of correct table and social etiquette. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 
Blanks for this purpose will be furnished upon application. 



9] 



10 



Catalogue 




Gary High School 



11 



COURSES OF STUDY 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, 
Art, Teacher-training. 

To receive a diploma of graduation in the academic de- 
partment, a pupil must have completed the following work: 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
Civics 
General Science 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 



ACADEMIC COURSE 
Third Year 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
French 
Chemistry 

Fovrth Year 
English 
Geometry 
History 
Physics 
Civics 
French or Latin 



To receive a diploma in Agriculture, a pupil must have 
completed the following: 



First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 

General Science 
Civics 
Crops and Soils 

Second Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



AGRICULTURAL COURSE 
Third Year 



English 
Chemistry 
Algebra 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 

Fovrth Year 
English 
Physics 
Geometry 
History 
Civics 

Farm Management 
Farm Engineering 



12 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 13 

To receive a diploma in Home Economics, one must have 
completed the following : 



HOME 


ECONOMICS COURSE 


First Year 


Third Year 


English 


English 


Arithmetic 


Chemistry 


Algebra 


Algebra 


General Science 


Latin 


Civics 


French 


Home Economics 




Second Year 


Fourth Year 


English 


English 


Arithmetic 


Civics 


Algebra 


Physics 


Biology 


French 


History 


History 


Home Economics 


Geometry 




Latin 



To receive a certificate of graduation in the agricultural 
department a pupil may make the following eliminations 
from the agricultural course outlined above : Geometry, 
and third year algebra. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in home economics, 
one may eliminate the following from the home economics 
course: Latin, French, geometry, third year algebra. 

Credit, will be allowed, in the academic department, for 
music, typewriting, stenography, bookkeeping, or expression, 
only when this work is done at Cary. 

As all standard colleges now require fifteen units of high 
school work for entrance, only pupils who do not expect to 
go to college or who contemplate entering non-standard in- 
stitutions should take courses leading to certificates of 
graduation. All are urged to take one of the complete 
courses leading to diplomas. 



14 



Catalogue 







OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

FIRST YEAE 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), through page 36. 

English Texts — Sentence and Theme (Ward). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book I 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Beading — (10 credits required) : 
The Lag of the Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott) ; 
Lags of Ancient Borne, 2 (Macaulay) ; Bebecca of Sunng- 
brook Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; The Call of the Wild, 1 (Lon- 
don) ; Bobinson Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Bonus Stories, 

I (Harris); Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The 
Story of the Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke ) ; Kidnapped, 2 
(Stevenson); The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — Xew High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) through chapter VI; Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes ) through chapter IX. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through 
chapter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Text-book in Citizenship (Hughes). 

Agriculture — Productive Farm Crops (Montgomery) ; 
Soils and Fertilizers (Lyon). 

Home Economics — School and Home Cooking (Greer) ; 
Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

SECOND YEAE 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), completed. 

English Texts — Practiced English (Lewis and Hosic). 
English Classics for Study- — Literature and Life, Book 

II ("Greenlaw & Stratton ). 



16 



Catalogue 




I o 



Cary High School 17 

English Classics for Reading — (12 credits required) : 
The Lady of the Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Reil, 1 (Browning) ; 
Franklin's Autobiography, 2; The Last of the Mohicans, 2 
(Cooper) ; Tom Brown's School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of 
Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) ; 
Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The 
Man Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The DeCoverley Papers, 
2 (Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; 
Old Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; The Virginian, 2 
(Wister) ; Wild Animals I Have Known, 2 (Seton-Thomp- 
son) ; One of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart) completed; Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
through chapter XVI. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) completed; 
Ccesar, Books I and II (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — World History (Webster).- 

Science — Biology for High Schools (Smallwood and 
others). 

Agriculture — A Study of Farm Animals (Plumb) ; Dairy 
Farming (Eckles and Warren). 

Home Economics — Dietetics for High School (Willard 
and Gillett) ; Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

THIRD YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon), Part I. 

English Texts — Written and Spoken English (Clip- 
pinger). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book 
III (Greenlaw & Miles). 

English Classics for Reading — (15 credits required) : The 
Marble Faun, 3 (Hawthorne) ; A Tale of Two Cities, 3 
(Dickens) ; The Sketch Bool-, 3 (Irving) ; Washington's 
Farewell Address, 2; JEneid, 2 (Harrison) ; Captains Cour- 



18 



Catalogue 




o 



Cary High School 19 

ageous, 2 (Kipling) ; Sohrab and Rustum, 2 (Arnold) ; The 
Oregon Trail, 2 (Parkman) ; The Four Million or The 
Voice of the City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Red Book or In Ole Vir- 
ginia, 2 (Page) ; The Rise of Silas Lapham, 2 (Ho wells) ; 
Poems and Tales, 3 (Poe) ; one Play of Shakespeare not 
previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
completed. 

Latin — Ccesar in Gaul (D'Ooge and Eastman), Four 
Books. Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), Four 
orations against Catiline ; The Maniiian Lair; The Citizen- 
ship of Archias. 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

French — The Phonetic Chardenal French Course 
(Brooks) ; La Belle France (Monvert). 

Agriculture — Horticulture (Davis) ; Farm Mechanics. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Booh (Sandwich and 
Bacon), Part II. 

English Texts — Century Handbook of Writing (Crever & 
Jones). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book 
IV (Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (20 credits required) : Pil- 
grims Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry 
Esmond, 3 (Thackeray) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Ruskin) ; 
The Ancient Mariner, 2 (Coleridge) ; Bunker Hill Oration, 
2 (Webster) ; Education and Citizenship, 2 (Graham) ; 
Lorna Doone, 2 (Blackmore) ; Heart of the West, 2 (O. 
Henry) ; The Vicar of Wakefield, 3 (Goldsmith) ; one Play 
of Shakespeare not previously read, 2. Selections from 
Browning, Shelley, Keats, and Whitman, 1 each. Selections 



20 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 21 

from modern drama, poetry, and essays, 1 each. Term 
essay, 3. 

]ST. B. — Credit will be given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — Virgil (Bennett), Six Books. 

History — History of U. S. (Beard & Beard). 

Civics— American Government (Magrnder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; 
Fifteen French Plays (Francois); Le Voyage de M. Per- 
richon (Labiche it Martin) ; Eight French Stories (Manley). 

Agriculture — Farm Management (Warren) ; Farm Engi- 
neering. Farm shop work is given throughout the four years 
to all students taking agriculture. The Farmer s Shop Book 
(Eoehl) is used as the basal text. 

JN". B. — The course of study for the Elementary School 
is not outlined here, since it is issued by the State Depart- 
ment of Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION PER MONTH 

Primary Grades $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Piano 4.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Violin 5.00 

Elocution 4.00 

Art 4.00 

Typewriting 4.00 

Stenography and Typewriting 0.00 

Bookkeeping 4.00 

Band Music 3.00 



22 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 23 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders.. 15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 13.00 

BOOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 

MINOR DUES PER MONTH 

Societies (all) 25e 

Athletics (boys) 25c 

Athletics (girls) 15c 

Medicine Fee (girls in dormitory) 10c 

Current Events (all) 5c 

All dues are payable monthly in advance. For absence on 
account of sickness or other providential cause, deduction 
is made in tuition and board for a full week of continuous 
absence. A school month is four weeks or twenty-eight 
days. 

Tuition in the High School Department is free to all 
pupils living in Wake County, except in special charter 
districts, for the first six months. For the remainder of the 
term there will be a charge for tuition of $5.00 per month 
in the high school and $3.00 in the elementary school. This 
charge, which is made by order of the County Board, applies 
to all High Schools in the county. 

Each pupil in the dormitories should bring the following : 
Two white counterpanes, four sheets, three pillow cases, 
two blankets or quilts, one glass, covers for dresser, wash- 
stand and table, curtains for window (if desired), towels, 
comb, brush, soap. Boys will bring pillows also. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must 
deposit $1.00 to show good faith. This amount will lie de 



24 



Catalogue 





■ 








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Gary High School 25 

ducted from the first month's rent. Rooms, however, will 
not be held longer than September 3, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 



THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school has ample boarding facilities for all the board- 
ing pupils and teachers. In the basement of the main build- 
ing is a large dining hall capable of seating over two hun- 
dred people. Here the pupils are seated in groups of eight 
to a table with a hostess in charge, usually a senior. From 
time to time the teachers of domestic science give talks and 
demonstrations on table manners. The management of the 
school believes this to be an important part of an education. 
By buying groceries by wholesale and by economic manage- 
ment, the school has been able to give very substantial board 
at $15.00 a month. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

TEACHER-TRAINING 

This department in our school has fully met the expecta- 
tions of the State Department of Education at Raleigh, which 
established it two years ago, and will be continued next year. 
The graduates of this department have been very successful 
in securing good positions to teach. Wake County has pro- 
vided a very elaborate equipment for the department in our 
new Vocational Building, and the State requires an outstand- 
ing teacher for the position. 

By taking this course, a pupil gets the equivalent of 
a year of college work toward securing a certificate to teach. 
A junior who has completed twelve units of academic work 
in an accredited high school or a graduate of a non-standard 
high school will, upon the completion of the course, secure 
an elementary certificate Class B. A graduate of an ac- 



26 



Catalogue 




.1 



Cary High School 27 

credited high school, upon completion of the course, is granted 
an elementary certificate Class A. The course covers a period 
of nine school months. Graduates from this department are 
granted diplomas from the high school as well as the cer- 
tificate from the State Department at Kaleigh and will be 
admitted to the North Carolina College for Women or the 
East Carolina Teachers College, if they decide to go to 
college. 

AGBICULTUBE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

These departments occupy spacious quarters in the new 
vocational building. The entire first floor and one large 
room in the basement, making in all nine rooms, are devoteel 
to the work of these departments. These rooms are fur- 
nished with the most modern equipment for teaching agri- 
culture anel home economics and place the school in the 
forefront of high schools in the South doing this class of 
work. 

For agriculture, there are two large classrooms provided 
with individual desks, cabinets, lantern, running water, etc. 
Between these two is a room which is used as a combina- 
tion library, reading room and office. In the basement a large 
room has been provided for the animal husbandry work and 
is equipped with cream separators, testers, incubators, etc. 
Five rooms will be used by the Home Economics Depart- 
ment as follows : Cooking laboratory, dining room, sew- 
ing room, fitting room and library. The rooms arc provided 
with running water, cabinets, tables, desks, bookcases, cook- 
ing stoves and cooking utensils, china, sewing machines, 
ironing boards, mirrors, etc. 

Science being the basic subject for both agriculture and 
home economics, ample provision was made in the new 
building for teaching it by the laboratory method. In addi- 
tion to the laboratory and lecture room already in use in 
the main building, four other rooms on the second floor of 
the new building are devoted exclusively to science, and 
an elaborate equipment in desks, cabinets, physical, chem- 
ical and biological apparatus, etc., with suitable plumbing, 
has been provided. 



28 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 29 

Three other large rooms on the second floor of this build- 
ing are occupied by the teacher-training department and the 
Seventh Grade. 

MUSIC 

The Piano Department has long been one of the promi- 
nent features of the school. Only teachers of recognized 
musical attainments are employed for this work. A music 
studio, six practice rooms and seven pianos constitute the 
equipment. 

Band music has been provided for. The school is fortun- 
ate in having a well-organized band with regular instruc- 
tion given by a recognized band leader. Provision will be 
made for instruction in violin if pupils desire it. 

Teachers have been employed who will give lessons in 
art and expression to those who desire this sort of instruction. 

Public school music has now become an established feature 
of the school and a trained teacher is employed to give her 
whole time to it. It is required of all pupils and there is 
no charge for it. 

A gold medal is given annually by Rev. C. H. Xorris to 
the pupil doing best work in piano for the year. 

COMMERCIAL 

The work of the Commercial Department includes book- 
keeping, typewriting and stenography. A large room in the 
new building, six Remington typewriters, suitable tables and 
chairs make up the equipment for this department. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition 
to his regular course, to take at least one of the special sub- 
jects outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take 
more than one. To be able to use a typewriter or to play 
in a band is frequently the means of a student's paying his 
way through college. Every girl ought to learn to play the 
piano and to sing, and every boy ought to learn to play some 
kind of musical instrument as well as to sing. 

Credit is given toward graduation for work done in these 
special departments. 



30 



Catalogue 







Gary High School 31 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The school has foui' literary societies, two for boys and 
two for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the 
boys on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at 
Commencement for most improvement during the year. The 
boys' societies give jointly a medal for the best declamation 
and the girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. 
Smith, a former member of the school, gives annually a medal 
to the member of the boys' societies delivering the best oration 
on the occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killings- 
worth, formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives annually 
a medal for the best debater in the girls' societies on the 
occasion of Commencement. The boys' societies also give a 
debaters' medal to the best debater at Commencement. The 
school enters each year the State Triangular Debate, the 
speakers being chosen in a preliminary debate open to all 
members of the four societies. All high school pupils, unless 
excused by the Superintendent, are required to join one of 
the societies. The membership is determined by lot to avoid 
overcrowding in any one society. 

SCHOLARSHIP MEDAL 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually 
by the Superintendent for the highest average grade in 
scholarship for the year. Any pupil in the high school is 
eligible to compete for this medal. 

SOCIETY TROPHY 

The Faculty during the fall of 1923 provided a beautiful 
trophy cup to be awarded annually in Xovember to the Clay 
or Calhoun Society winning in a public debate, with the 
proviso that the cup shall become the permanent possession 
of the society winning three out of five debates. The Cal- 
houns won the first debate. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the phys- 
ical powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and 
moral, the school has made ample provision for healthful 



32 



Catalogue 




Cary High School 2fd 

sports of every kind. A baseball diamond on a neighboring 
bill besides basketball courts, for both boys and girls, tennis 
courts, and playground apparatus on the school campus are 
amply sufficient to keep all the pupils occupied with some 
sort of healthful exercise at recreation periods. 

The new athletic field has been provided with a fence and 
a grand stand and is used exclusively by the high school for 
football, baseball, and track. 

Letters are awarded by the Athletic Association to the 
players meeting certain requirements in football, basketball, 
baseball, tennis, and track. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and 
assistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the 
teams with uniforms and other equipment, these being the 
property of the school. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of 
scholarship, eleportn:ent, etc., are mailed to parents or guar- 
dians. The pass mark is 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much dis- 
couragement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

Wo unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all 
damage to school property in their rooms. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $6.00 to cover cost of books. 

Unless there is objection from parents, boarding pupils 
are expected to attend Sunday School and church. 

Smoking in any of the school buildings or on the school 
grounds is prohibited. 



34 Catalogue 

The school operates a moving picture machine. The films 
are furnished by the State Department of Education and 
are shown each Thursday night. There are no other movies 
in Gary. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 268 high school pupils were enrolled and 358 
in the elementary school, making a total enrollment of 626. 
There were 175 boarders from 20 comities. The graduating 
class numbered 47. Twenty-fonr teachers were employed to 
do the work of the school. 

The dormitory for girls is of brick and is furnished with 
neat and attractive furniture, each room being provided 
with a closet and containing an oak dresser, an oak wash- 
stand with fixtures, two single beds with felt mattresses, a 
table with double drawers, and two chairs. 

The brick dormitory for boys has practically the same 
conveniences as the girls' dormitory. Both dormitories are 
provided with steam heat, electric lights, running water 
(hot and cold), baths, etc. The boys' dormitory has shower 
baths. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of 
the school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this 
catalogue: (1) A large and substantial main building with 
33 rooms. (2) A new vocational building with 18 rooms. 
(3) All buildings heated by steam. (4) Running water in 
all the buildings. (5) Bored well on campus. (6) Spacious 
classrooms lighted on one side. (7) Tablet arm chairs for 
the high school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. 
(8) An auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with 
a gallery and splendid stage and scenery. (9) Laboratories 
with individual desks, gas, running water, etc. (10) Dormi- 
tories both for boys and girls — both large brick structures, 
with steam heat, baths, etc. (11) A complete playground 
equipment for the whole school. (12) Splendid domestic 
science equipment. (13) An ample force of trained teachers 
to do the work of the school. 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 



Cary High School So 

40c a vear or 10c a copy. The title of the paper is 
C. H. S. Echoes. The class also publishes an annual, in 
book form, which is highly prized by the members. 

HISTORY 

The Cary High School had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. 
In ]907, the owners of the property sold their stock to 
the county, and the school was converted into a State high 
school, the first to be established under the high school 
law of 1907. The official name was changed from the Cary 
High School to the Cary Public High School. In 1913, 
by special act of the legislature, providing for farm-life in- 
struction in Wake County, there were added to the school 
the departments of agriculture and domestic science, the 
name of the school being changed from the Cary Public High 
School to the Cary Public High School and the E. L. Middle- 
ton Farm-Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building;, with s;ood boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 
1908, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of 
work, and the present Superintendent was elected as his 
successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding 
school, for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equip- 
ment, with dormitories both for boys and girls, with new 
departments constantly being added, and with a corps ol 
specially trained and experienced teachers, the school still 
draws patronage from a large and growing territory in this 
State and South Carolina. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913-14 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing 



36 Catalogue 

$33,000. The old dormitory building for boys which was 
burned in the spring of 1916, was replaced that year by a 
brick structure at a cost of about $13,000. The building 
contains 34 rooms, being provided with steam heat, electric 
lights, baths, lavatories, etc., and is now occupied by the 
girls under the care of the Lady Principal. The old pri- 
vately owned girls' dormitory, which had been occupied 
by the boys since 1916, was burned in the fall of 1918. 
In 1919-20 there was erected on the campus a modern brick 
dormitory for the boys, practically a duplicate of the girls' 
dormitory, at a cost of about $28,000. This building con- 
tains 33 rooms and is provided with steam heat, electric 
lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

In the summer of 1923, another two-story brick building 
was erected to provide rooms for the departments of agri- 
culture, home economics, teacher-training and the commercial 
subjects. It contains 18 rooms and cost $45,000. This 
building has been named in honor of Gary's most illus- 
trious citizen, the late Walter Hines Page, and will be 
known officially as the Walter Hines Page Building for 
Vocational Training. 

This building, with the three other brick buildings on 
the campus, completes the quadrangle as planned for the 
school by Professor J. P. Pillsbury, of the 1ST. C. State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Engineering, in 1916. 

Other buildings on the campus are the teacherage, the 
janitor's home, and the shop. The janitor's home is all that 
is left of the old high school building that stood on the 
site of the present main building up to 1913. The teacher- 
age has been twice moved and has traveled half way around 
the campus. The shop was built by the students, of the 
agricultural department in 1921 and is equipped with a 
forge, work benches and a complete set of tools. 

The school campus contains four acres and, according to 
the last geological survey, is the highest ground in Wake 
County. 

The entire school plant at the present time is estimated 
to be worth $225,000. 



Application for Admission 
CARY HIGH SCHOOL 



Date. 



.192. 



Name 



Postoffice 

Age County. 

Name of Parent or Guardian 

Last School Attended 



Indicate by X which course you expect to take. 

1. Academic 

2. Agricultural 

3. Home Economics 

Jf. Teacher-Training 

Indicate by X if $1.00 is enclosed to have room reserved in Dormitory 



Do you expect to go home week-ends? 

Mail to M. B. Dry, Cary, N". C. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 

1925 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & BRorfiHTON Printing Compant 

1925 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman 
M. T. Jones, Secretary 

D. A. Morgan 

E. J. Byrum 
A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1925-1926 

Fall Term opens August 31. 1925 

Fall Term closes December 23, 1925 

Spring Term opens January 4, 1926 

Spring Term closes April 23, 192*5 



HOLIDAYS 

Fair Week — Thursday, October 15. 

Thanksgiving — Thursday and Friday, November 26 and 27. 

DEBATES 
Clay-Calhoun for Faculty Cup — December 7. 
Lowell-Irving — January 21. 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 
J. H. Roller, Principal Academic Department 

Miss Rena Ki^g, Lady Principal 
E. X. Meekins, Principal Farm Life Department 
Miss Irma Ellis, Principal Elementary School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Geometry 

J. H. ROLLER 

(University of Tennessee) 
Science 

B. B. DALTON, A.B. 

(State University) 
English and Athletics 

MRS. J. W. DANIEL, A.B. 

(LaGrange College) 
History and Typeicriting 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A.B. 
(Duke University) 
Frencli and Latin 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A.B.) 

Mathematics and Latin 

E. N. MEEKINS, B.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

L. E. RAPER, B.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

MISS MARY E. YORK, B.S. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Home Economics 



Catalogue 

MISS LOUISE N. GILL, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Teacher Training 

MISS EUGENIA GRAY, B.M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Piano 

MISS LOIS BURT, B.M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Public School Music 



Physical Training 

Miss Rena King, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Science 



English 



Assistant Piano 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MISS MINNIE MORRIS 

(Columbia College) 

First Grade 



Second Grade 

MISS MARY FARRIOR 

(Meredith College) 
Second Grade 



Third Grade 

MISS RUTH SHAW BRITTON, A.B. 

(Meredith College) 

Fourth Grade 



'Not employed when catalog went to press. 



Cary High School 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 
Fifth Grade 

MISS HESTER FARRIOR 

(Meredith College) 

Sixth Grade 

MRS C. A. McLEAN 
(A. C. College) 
Seventh Grade 

MRS. M. B. DRY 
Supervisor Boarding Department 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1925 

ACADEMIC DIPLOMAS _ _ 

Miss Elizabeth Batts Cary, N. C. 

Miss Florence Batts Gary, N. C. 

Miss Famie Bowers Kershaw, S. C. 

Miss Violet Cornell Cary, N. C. 

Miss Beulaii Davis Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Matie Belle Finch Zebulon, N. C, R. 3 

Mr. Gilbert Fonville Neuse, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Green Morrisville, N. C. 

Miss Jane Green Raleigh, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Immogene Holleman Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Cameron Howard Deep Run, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Grace Hunt Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mabel Hunt Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Newman Knott Knightdale, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Fay Morgan Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Rosa Pleasants Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Paul Poole Raleigh, N. C, 325 W. Edenton St. 

Miss Iris Robinson Cary, N. C. 

Mr, James Satterwhite Youngsville, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Marguerite ThOmas Spencer, N. C. 

Miss Evelyn Tillman Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Ray Wood-all Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Luna Yates Cary. N. C, R. 1 

AGRICULTURAL DIPLOMAS 

Mr. James Batts Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Vallin Estes Youngsville. N. C, R. 2 

HOME ECONOMICS DIPLOMAS 

Miss Elizabeth Batts Cary, N. C. 

Miss Florence Batts Cary, N. C. 

Miss Beulah Davis Raleigh. N. C, R. 4 

Miss Mabel Hunt Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Rosa Pleasants Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Elizabeth Sorrell Raleigh, N. C, 103 N. Boylan Ave. 

Miss Marguerite Thomas 'Spencer, N. C. 

Miss Evelyn Tillman Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Luna Yates Cary, N. C, R. 1 

TEACHER TRAINING DIPLOMAS 

Miss Naomi Blalock Roxboro. N. C, R. 1 

Miss Athleene Dickerson Ayden, N. C. 

Miss Catherine Jones Zebulon, N. C. 

Miss Thelma Jones Neuse. N. C, R. 2 

Miss Vera Jones Neuse, N. C. R. 2 

Miss Sallie Lyon Neuse, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Nettie Myrick Vaughan, N. C. 

Miss Myrtie Prince Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Mary Smith Morrisville, N. C. 

Miss Viola Tingen Apex, N. C, R. 5 

AGRICULTURAL CERTIFICATES 

Mk. Raymond Morgan Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. David Jones Elizabethtown, N. C. 

HOME ECONOMICS CERTIFICATES 

Miss Ina Atkins Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Watie Jones Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mabel Wood Apex, N. C, R. 2 



■ 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 

Scholarship Hazel Reams 

Boys' Debate William Harris 

Girls' Debate Grace Hunt 

Declamation Belvin Blalock 

Recitation Clellie Jones 

Clay Improvement James Bashaw 

Calhoun Improvement Wallace Shearon 

Irving Improvement Mabel Hunt 

Lowell Improvement Rosa Pleasants 

Piano Elizabeth Batts 

OTHER HONORS 

Special mention for excellence in Typewriting, James Batts. 

Clay Society wins Faculty Cup, December S. 

Clay Society wins Commencement Debate, April 22. 

Irving Society wins Mid-term Debate, March 3. 

Irving Society wins Commencement Debate, April 22. 

Cary High School wins first place in County Commencement, 
April 11. 

James Bashaw' and Clyde E Franklin win in Triangular Debate, 
April 3. 



Cary High School 



FOREWORD 

For the twenty-ninth time the Cary High School presents 
to the friends of education in general and to its patrons in 
particular this its annual catalogue in the firm belief that the 
high standard of excellence reached by the school in the past 
will be maintained during the session of 1925-1926. 

Contrary to the expectation of some people, the school has 
maintained its place as a boarding school. Large numbers of 
pupils still come from outside the local district and many from 
other counties and other states. The school is unusually well 
equipped for earing for nonresident pupils. With two large 
brick dormitories, a common boarding hall for both teachers 
and pupils, with an ample teaching force and adequate physi- 
cal equipment, the school is abundantly able to care for a large 
boarding patronage. 

A boarding school affords numerous advantages over a school 
purely local. The students generally are the picked represen- 
tatives of their communities; the dormitory life and the ming- 
ling of pupils and teachers in the dining hall afford a training 
even more valuable than that obtained from textbooks, while 
the organized life of the students in the literary societies, 
Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., athletic clubs, music clubs, science 
clubs, etc., means vastly more to the pupils than in a purely 
local school. Then, too, pupils freed from home duties and 
home distractions have better opportunities for study ; and 
when they have finished the high school, the transition to col- 
lege life is less abrupt. Many boys and girls need the discipline 
of dormitory life, to say nothing of correct table manners and 
social etiquette. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 
Blanks for this purpose will be furnished upon application. 



COURSES OF STUDY 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, 
Voice, Art, Teacher-training, Typewriting. 

To receive a diploma of graduation in the academic de- 
partment, a pupil must have completed the following work: 

ACADEMIC COURSE 

Fibst Year Third Year 

English English 

Arithmetic Algebra 

Latin Latin 

Civics' French 

General Science Chemistry 



Secoxd Year 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
Biology 



Fourth Year 
English 
Geometry 

History and Civics 
Physics 
French or Latin 



To receive a diploma in Agriculture, a pupil must have 
completed the following : 



AGRICULTURAL 

First Year 
English 
Arithmetic 
General Science 
Civics 
Crops and Soils 

Second Year 
English 
Algebra 
Biology 
History 
Animal Husbandry 



COURSE 

Third Year 
English 
Chemistry 
Algebra 
Horticulture 
Farm Mechanics 

Fourth Year 
English 
Physics 
Geometry 

History and Civics 
Farm Management 
Farm Engineering 



Cary High School 13 

To receive a diploma in Home Economies, one must have 
completed the following : 

HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

First Year Third Year 
English English 

Arithmetic Chemistry 

General Science Algebra 

Civics Latin 

Home Economics Lrench 

Second Year Fourth Year 
English English 

Algebra Physics 

Biology French 

History History and Civics 

Home Economics Geometry 

Latin 

One unit's credit is allowed for a year's work in each subject 
listed above with the following exceptions : Each year of agri- 
culture counts for one and a half units, while general science 
and first year civics are valued at one half unit each. American 
history and civics in the fourth year together make one unit. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in the agricultural 
department a pupil may eliminate geometry and third year 
mathematics from the agricultural course outlined above. 

To receive a certificate of graduation in home economics, 
one may eliminate the following from the home economics 
course : Latin, French, geometry, physics and third year mathe- 
matics. 

A half unit of credit is allowed for a year in music, type- 
writing, expression, or physical training, when this work is 
done at Cary. 

As all standard colleges now require sixteen units of high 
school Avork for entrance, only pupils who do not expect to 
go to college or who contemplate entering non-standard in- 
stitutions should take courses leading to certificates of gradu- 
ation. All are urged to take one of the complete courses leading 
to diplomas. 



OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

FIRST YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), through page 36. 

English Texts — Sentence and Theme (Ward). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book I 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Beading — (10 credits required) : The 
Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott); Lays 
of Ancient Rome, 2 (Macaulay) ; Rebecca of Sunnybrook 
Farm. 1 (Wiggin) ; The Call of the Wild, 1 (London) ; Robin- 
son Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 1 (Harris) ; 
Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The Story of the 
Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson) ; 
The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — Xew High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart). 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through chap- 
ter XLIX. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Text-booh in Citizenship (Hughes). 

Agriculture — Productive Farm Crops (Montgomery) ; Soils 
and Fertilizers (Lyon). 

Home Economics — School and Home Cooking (Greer) ; Tex- 
tiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

SECOND YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), completed. 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book II 
(Greenlaw & Stratton). 

English Classics for Reading — (12 credits required) : The 
Lady of the Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Reil, 1 (Browning) ; 
Franklin's Autobiography, 2; The Last of the Mohicans, 2 
(Cooper) ; Tom Browns School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of 



Gary High School 17 

Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) ; 
Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Fpin, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man 
Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The DeCoverley Papers, 2 
(Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old 
Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; The Virginian, 2 (Wis- 
ter) ; Wild Animals I Have Known, 2 (Seton-Thompson) ; 
One of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
through chapter XIII. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) completed; 
Ccesar, Books I and II (D'Ooge and Eastman). 

History — World History (Webster). 

Science — Biology for High Schools (Smallwood and others). 

Agriculture — A Study of Farm, Animals (Plumb) ; Dairy 
Farming (Eckles and Warren). 

Home Economics — Dietetics for High School (Willard and 
Gillett) ; Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

THIRD YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Booh (Sandwich and Bacon), 
Part I. 

English Texts — Written and Spoken English (Clippinger). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book III 
(Greenlaw & Miles). 

English Classics for Reading — (15 credits required) : The 
Marble Faun, 3 (Hawthorne) ; A Tale of Two Cities, 3 (Dick- 
ens) ; The Sketch Bool', 3 (Irving) ; Washington's Farewell 
Address, 2; Mneid, 2 (Harrison); Captains Courageous, 2 
(Kipling) ; Sohrab and Rustum, 2 (Arnold) ; The Oregon 
Trail, 2 (Parkman) ; The Four Million or The Voice of the 
City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Red Booh or In Old Virginia, 2 (Page) ; 
The Rise of Silas Lapham, 2 (Howells) ; Poems and Tales, 3 
(Poe) ; one Play of Shakespeare not perviously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
completed. 




o 




o 




o 



Cary High School 27 

Latin — Caesar in Gaul (D'Ooge and Eastman), Books III 
and IV. Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), Four ora- 
tions against Catiline; The Manilian Law; The Citizenship of 
Archias. 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

French — The Phonetic Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; 
La Belle France (Monvert). 

Agriculture — Horticulture (Davis) ; Farm Mechanics. 

FOURTH YEAB 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwiek and Bacon). 
Part II. 

English Texts — Century Handbook of Writing (Crever & 
Jones). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book IV 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (20 credits required) : Pil- 
grim's Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 
3 (Thackeray) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Ruskin) ; The Ancient 
Mariner, 2 (Coleridge) ; Bunker Hill Oration, 2 (Webster) ; 
Education and Citizenship, 2 (Graham) ; Lorna Doone, 2 
(Blackmore); Heart of the West, 2 (O. Henry); The Vicar 
of Wakefield, 3 (Goldsmith) ; one Play of Shakespeare not pre- 
viously read, 2. Selections from Browning, Shelley, Keats, and 
Whitman, 1 each. Selections from modern drama, poetry, and 
essays, 1 each. Term essay, 3. 

N". B. — Credit will he given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — Virgil (Bennett), Six Books. 

History — History of U. S. (Beard & Beard). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 




o 



Cary High School 29 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; Fif- 
teen French Plays (Francois) ; Le Voyage de M. Perrichon 
(Labiche & Martin) ; Eight French Stories (Manley). 

Agriculture — Farm Management (Warren) ; Farm Engi- 
neering. Farm shop work is given throughout the four years 
to all students taking agriculture. The Farmer's Shop Book 
(Roekl) is used as the basal text. 

N. B. — The course of study for the Elementary School is 
not outlined here, since it is issued by the State Department of 
Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION PEE MONTH 

Primary Grades $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Piano 4.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Violin 5.00 

Elocution 5.00 

Art 5.00 

Typewriting 4.00 

Typewriter Practice 1.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders $15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 13.00 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds 4.50 



Cary High School 31 

MINOR DUES PEE MONTH 

Societies (all) ''. 25c 

Athletics (boys) 25c 

Athletics (girls) 15c 

Medicine Fee (girls in dormitory) 10c 

Current Events (all) 5c 

All dues are payable monthly in advance. Eor absence on 
account of sickness or other providential cause, deduction 
is made in tuition and board for a full week of continuous 
absence. A school month is four weeks or twenty-eight days. 

Tuition in the High School Department is free to all pupils 
living in Wake County, except in special charter districts, for 
the first six months. Eor the remainder of the term there will 
be a charge for tuition of $5.00 per month in the high school 
and $3.00 in the elementary school. This charge, which is made 
by order of the County Board, applies to all High Schools in 
the county. Pupils in the Teacher-training Department, 
whether inside or outside the county, are not subject to tuition. 

Each pupil in the dormitories should bring the following : 
Two white counterpanes, four sheets, three pillow cases, two 
blankets or quilts, one glass, covers for dresser, washstand and 
table, curtains for window (if desired), towels, comb, brush, 
soap. Boys will bring pillows also. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
$1.00 to show good faith. This amount will be deducted from 
the first month's rent. Rooms, however, will not be held longer 
than September 3, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school has ample boarding facilities for all the board- 
ing pupils and teachers. In the basement of the main build- 
ing is a large dining hall capable of seating over two hun- 
dred people. Here the pupils are seated in groups of eight 




u 



Gary High School 33 

to a table with a hostess in charge, usually a senior. From 
time to time the teachers of domestic science give talks and 
demonstrations on table manners. The management of the 
school believes this to be an important part of an education. 
By buying groceries by wholesale and by economic management, 
the school has been able to give very substantial board at $15 
a month. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

TEACHER-TRAINING 

This department in our school has fully met the expecta- 
tions of the State Department of Education at Raleigh, which 
established it three years ago, and will be continued next year. 
The graduates of this department have been very successful 
in securing good positions to teach. Wake County has pro- 
vided a very elaborate equipment for the department in our 
new Vocational Building, and the State requires an outstand- 
ing teacher for the position. 

. By taking this course, a pupil gets the equivalent of a year 
of college work toward securing a certificate to teach. A grad- 
uate of an accredited high school, upon completion of the 
course, is granted an elementary certificate Class A. A gradu- 
ate of a non-standard high school is granted an elementary B 
certificate. The course covers a period of nine school months. 
Graduates from this department are granted diplomas from the 
high school as well as the certificate from the State Department 
at Raleigh ; and if they wish to continue their education in col- 
lege, credit is given for the work done in this department. 

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

These departments occupy spacious quarters in the new 
vocational building. The entire first floor and one large room 
in the basement, making in all nine rooms, are devoted to the 
work of these departments. These rooms are furnished with 
the most modern equipment for teaching agriculture and home 
economics and place the school in the forefront of high schools 
in the South doing this class of work. 



Cary High School 35 

For agriculture, there are two large classrooms provided 
with individual desks, eabii>ets, lantern, running water, etc. 
Between these two is a room which is used as a combination 
library, reading room and office. In the basement a large room 
has been provided for the animal husbandry work and is 
equipped with cream separators, testers, incubators, etc. Five 
rooms are used by the Home Economics Department as fol- 
lows : Cooking laboratory, dining room, sewing room, fitting 
room and library. The rooms are provided with running water, 
cabinets, tables, desks, bookcases, cooking stoves and cooking- 
utensils, china, sewing machines, ironing boards, mirrors, etc. 

Science being the basic subject for both agriculture and 
home economics, ample provision was made in the new building 
for teaching it by the laboratory method. In addition to the 
laboratory and lecture room already in use in the main build- 
ing, four other rooms on the second floor of the new building 
are devoted exclusively to science, and an elaborate equipment 
in desks, cabinets, physical, chemical and biological apparatus, 
etc., with suitable plumbing has been provided. 

Three other large rooms on the second floor of this building 
are occupied by the teacher-training department and two grades 
of the elementary school. 

MUSIC 

The Piano Department has long been one of the prominent 
features of the school. Only teachers of recognized musical 
attainments are employed for this work. A music studio, six 
practice rooms and seven pianos constitute the equipment. 

Band music is available to the pupils in the school at small 
cost. The town of Cary is fortunate in having a well organized 
band with regular instruction given by a recognized band leader. 
Provision will be made for instruction in violin if pupils 
desire it. 

Teachers have been employed who will give lessons in art 
and expression to those who desire instruction in these subjects. 

Public school music has now become an established feature 
of the school and a trained teacher is employed to give her 
wdiole time to it. It is required of all pupils and there is no 
charge for it. 



! i ' 



I I^BHIHM9HB9HHI 




.fit ' J1ML;J| 



Gary High School 37 

A gold medal is given annually by Key. C. H. Norris to the 
pupil doing best work in piano for the year. 

COMMERCIAL 

The work of the Commercial Department at present includes 
only typewriting. Six Remington typewriters and suitable 
tables and chairs make up the equipment for this department. 
The touch system, now universally recognized as the most 
efficient method of operating the keyboard, is used exclusively 
as a basis of work, and the high standards set in the text, "New 
Rational Typewriting," are carefully observed. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition to 
his regular course, to take at least one of the special subjects 
outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take more than 
one. To be able to use a typewriter or to play in a band is 
frequently the means of a student's being able to pay his way 
through college. Every girl ought to learn to play the piano 
and to sing, and every boy ought to learn to play some kind of 
musical instrument as well as to sing. 

Credit is given toward graduation for work done in these 
special departments. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The school has four literary societies, two for boys and two 
for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the boys 
on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at Commence- 
ment for most improvement during the year. The boys' socie- 
ties give jointly a medal for the best declamation and the 
girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. Smith, 
a former member of the school, gives annually a medal to the 
member of the boys' societies delivering the best oration on 
the occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killingsworth, 
formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives annually a medal 
for the best debater in the girls' societies on the occasion of 
Commencement. The boys' societies also give a debaters' medal 
to the best debater at Commencement. The school enters each 
year the State Triangular Debate, the speakers being chosen 



Gary High School 39 

in a preliminary debate open to all members of the four socie- 
ties. All high school pupils, unless excused by the Superinten- 
dent, are required to join one of the societies. The membership 
is determined by lot to avoid overcrowding in any one society. 

SCHOLAESHIP MEDAL 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually 
by the Superintendent for the highest average grade in scholar- 
ship for the year. Any pupil in the high school is eligible to 
compete for this medal. 

SOCIETY TEOPHY 

The Faculty during the fall of 1923 provided a beautiful 
trophy cup to be awarded annually in November to the Clay 
or Calhoun Society winning in a public debate, with the proviso 
that the cup shall become the permanent possession of the 
society winning three out of five debates. The Calhouns won 
the debate in 1923 ; the Clays won in 1924. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, 
the school has made ample provision for healthful sports of 
every kind. A baseball diamond on a neighboring hill besides 
tennis courts for both boys and girls, and playground apparatus 
on the school campus are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils 
occupied with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation 
periods. 

The new athletic field has been provided with a fence and 
a grandstand and is used exclusively by the high school for 
football, baseball, and track. 

Letters are awarded by the Athletic Association to the play- 
ers meeting certain requirements in football, basketball, base- 
ball, tennis, and track. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and as- 
sistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams 
with uniforms and other equipment. 




I 



Cary High School 41 

NEW GYMNASIUM 

During the spring of 1925, a gymnasium was erected on the 
southwest corner of the campus at a cost of about $12,000. The 
building is of brick veneer and has ample floor space for basket- 
ball and the physical training work of the school. The build- 
ing is provided with dressing rooms, shower baths, spectators' 
seats, and a shop 25 by 50 feet in the basement for the agricul- 
tural department of the school. The building has been named 
in honor of Gary's most distinguished and beloved citizen, Dr. 
J. M. Templeton, and will be officially known as the Dr. J. M. 
Templeton Building for Physical Training. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discour- 
agement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. A deposit of $5 is required 
to cover damage to rooms in the dormitories. This amount is 
returned to the occupant at the close of the session if the room 
is left in satisfactory condition. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $8 to cover cost of books. 

Unless there is objection from parents, boarding pupils are 
expected to attend Sunday school and church. 



42 Catalogue 

Smoking in any of the school buildings or on the school 
grounds is prohibited. 

The shool operates a moving picture machine. The films 
are furnished by the State Department of Education and are 
shown each Thursday night. There are no other movies in 
Gary. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 236 high school pupils were enrolled and 402 
in the elementary school, making a total enrollment of 638. 
There were 159 boarders from 26 counties and five states. The 
graduating class numbered 41. Twenty-seven teachers were 
employed to do the work of the school. 

The dormitory for girls is of brick and is furnished with 
neat and attractive furniture, each room being provided with 
a closet and containing an oak dresser, an oak washstand, two 
single beds with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, 
and two chairs. 

The brick dormitory for boys has practically the same con- 
veniences as the girls' dormitory. Both dormitories are pro- 
vided with steam heat, electric lights, running water (hot and 
cold), baths, etc. The boys' dormitory has shower baths. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of 
the school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this cata- 
logue : (1) A large and substantial main building with 33 
rooms. (2) A handsome vocational building with 18 rooms and 
splendid equipment. (3) Two brick dormitories, one for girls 
and one for boys. (4) New gymnasium building. (5) All 
buildings heated by steam. (6) Running water in all the 
buildings. (7) Bored well on campus. (8) Spacious class- 
rooms lighted on one side. (9) Tablet arm chairs for the high 
school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (10) An 
auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a gallery 
and splendid stage and scenery. (11) Laboratories with indi- 
vidual desks, gas, running water, etc. (12) A complete play- 
ground equipment for the whole school. (13) Splendid domes- 
tic science equipment. (14) An ample force of trained teachers 
to do the work of the school. (15) All the special departments 
to be found in the large city schools. 



Cary High School 13 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 
50c a year or 10c a copy. The title of the paper is C. H. S. 
Echoes. The class also publishes an annual, in book form, 
which is highly prized by the meimbers. 

HISTORY 

The Cary High School had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. 
In 1907, the owners of the property sold their stock to the 
county, and the school was converted into a State high school, 
the first to be established under the high school law of 1907. 
The official name was changed from the Cary High School to 
the Cary Public High School. In 1913 by special act of the 
legislature, providing for farm-life instruction in Wake County, 
there were added to the school the departments of agriculture 
and domestic science, the name of the school being changed 
from the Cary Public High School to the Cary Public High 
School and the E. L. Middleton Earm-Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 
1908, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, 
and the present Superintendent was elected as his successor. 

The school has lost none of its pestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with neAV departments con- 
stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory. 



44 Catalogue 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913-14 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,- 
000. The old dormitory building for boys which was burned 
in the spring of 1910, was replaced that year by a brick struc- 
ture at a cost of about $13,000. The building contains 34 
rooms, being provided with steam heat, electric lights, baths, 
lavatories, etc., and is now occupied by the girls under the c»re 
of the Lady Principal. The old privately owned girls' dormi- 
tory, which had been occupied by the boys since 1916, was 
burned in the fall of 1918. In 1919-20 there was erected on 
the campus a modern brick dormitory for the boys, practically 
a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost of about $28,000. 
This building contains 33 rooms and is provided with steam 
heat, electric lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

In the summer of 1923, another two-story brick building 
was erected to provide rooms for the departments of agri- 
culture, home economics, teacher-training and science. It con- 
tains 18 rooms and cost $45,000. This building has been named 
in honor of Gary's most illustrious citizen, the late Walter 
Hines Page, and is known officially as the Walter Hines Page 
Building for Vocational Training. 

The most recent building erected on the campus is the gym- 
nasium, which was completed during the spring of 1925 at a 
cost of about $12,000. For description of this building, see 
page 41. 

The school campus contains four acres and, according to the 
last geological survey, is the highest ground in Wake County. 

The entire school plant at the present time is estimated to 
be worth $240,000. 



Application for Admission 
CARY HIGH SCHOOL 



Date 192 

Name 

Postoffice 

Age County 

Name of Parent or Guardian 

Last School Attended 

Indicate by X which course you expect to take. 

1. Academic 

2. Agricultural 

3. Home Economics 

4. Teacher-Training 

Indicate by X if $1.00 is enclosed to have room reserved in 
Dormitory. 

Do you expect to go home week-ends? 

Mail to M. B. Dry, Caby, N. C. 



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CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 

1926 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Broughton Company 
1926 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. M. Tejipleton, Chairman 

M. T. Jones, Secretary 

D. A. Morgan 

E. J. Byrum 

A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1926-1927 

Fall Term opens August 30, 1926 

Fall Term closes December 21, 1926 

Spring Term opens January 3, 1927 

Spring Term closes April 22, 1927 



HOLIDAY 

Thanksgiving — Thursday and Friday, November 25 and 26. 

DEBATES 

Clay-Calhoun for Faculty Cup — December 6. 
Lowell-Irving for Parent-Teacher Cup — February 3. 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 

J. H. Roller, Principal Academic Department 

Miss Rena King, Lady Principal 

E. N. Meekins, Principal Farm Life Department 

Miss Irma Ellis, Principal Elementary School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Geometry 

J. H. ROLLER 

(University of Tennessee) 

Science 



English and Athletics 

MRS. J. W. DANIEL, A.B. 

(LaGrange College) 
History and Typewriting 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A.B. 
(Duke University) 
French and Latin 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A.B.) 

Mathematics and Latin 

E. N. MEEKINS, M.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

L. E. RAPER, M.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

MISS MARY E. YORK, B.S. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Home Economics 



Not employed when this catalogue went to press. 



Cary High School 

MISS LOUISE N. GILL, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Teacher framing 

MISS EUGENIA GRAY, B.M. 
Piano 



Public School Music 



Physical Training 

MISS RENA KING, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Science 

MISS NELLIE K. BURGESS, A.B. 

(State University) 

English 



Assistant Piano 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MISS MINNIE MORRIS 
First Grade 

MISS RACHEL WILKINSON, A.B. 

(Meredith College) 
Second Grade 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Third Grade 

MISS RUTH SHAW BRITTON, A.B. 

(Meredith College) 

Fourth Grade 



Not employed when this catalogue went to press. 



Catalogue 

MISS MARY GADDY 

(Meredith College) 

Fifth Grade 

MISS HESTER FARRIOR 

(Meredith College) 

Sixth Grade 

MRS. C. A. McLEAN 
(A. C. College) 
Seventh Grade 

MISS MYRTLE KEITH 

(State University) 

Special Fourth and Fifth Grade 

MRS. ETHEL ADAMS 

(Gary T. Tr. Department) 

Special Sixth Grade 

MRS. A. M. RAY 

(Columbia College, Chicago) 

Expression 

MRS. M. B. DRY 
Supervisor Boarding Department 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1926 

ACADEMIC DIPLOMAS 

Miss Beulah Allen Cary, N. C. 

Mr. James Bashaw.. Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Lonnie Batts Cary, N. C. 

Miss Gladys Blaylock... Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Radcliffe Caviness.. Cary, N. C. 

Miss Lucy Clifton ...Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Helen Davis New Bern, N. C, 47 Broad St. 

Mr. William Dry Cary, N. C. 

Miss Ruby Duke Raleigh, N. C, Box 45 

Miss Rachel Eaton... Cana, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Royce Ellington Cary, N. C. 

Miss Lucy Clyde Gray Cary, N. C. 

Miss Nancy Harden Raleigh, N. C, 1615 Hillsboro St. 

Mr. John Harris.. Fairfield, N. C. 

Mr. William Harris Pantego, N. C. 

Miss Elaine Holleman ...Cary, N. C. 

Miss Bessie Jackson Neuse, N. C. 

Miss Louise Johnson ....Cary, N. C. 

Mr. Thomas Lawrence Apex, N. C, R. 3 

Miss Marta Selma Morgan Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Olga Poplin Cary, N. C. 

Miss Margaret Ray Raleigh, N. C, R. 7 

Miss Evelyn Sherwin Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Gertrude Straughan .....Raleigh, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Nell Waldo Cary, N. C. 

Miss Martha Washburxe Dunn, N. C, 503 W. Broad St. 

Miss Louise Whitlock Milton, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Wilkinson Cary, N. C. 

HOME ECONOMICS DIPLOMAS 

Miss Beulah Allen Cary, N. C. 

Miss Lucy Clifton Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Bessie Jackson Neuse, N. C. 

Miss Marta Selma Morgan Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Lola Northcutt Cary, N. C. 

Miss Carmel Ross Cary, N. C. 

Miss Lucy Stephens Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Gertrude Straughan Raleigh, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Reba Womble Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 



8 Catalogue 

AGRICULTURAL DIPLOMAS 

Mr. Dwight Bennett Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Melzer Morgan Cary, N. C, R. 1 

Mr. Wallace Shearon Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE 

Mr. Robert Baum Fairfield, N. C. 

Mr. Robert Curtis Cary, N. C. 

Mr, Judd Daniel Wake Forest, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Alton Fetner Raleigh, N. C, 1214 Glenwood Ave. 

Miss Cora Alice Gillespie Cary, N. C. 

HOME ECONOMICS CERTIFICATE 

Miss Lorena Braswell Cary, N. C. 

Miss Mamie Campbell...... Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mary Craddock .....Cary, N. C. 

Miss Juanita Franklin Raleigh, N. C, R. 4 

Miss Mary Nipper Neuse, N. C. 

GRADUATES TEACHER TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

Miss Famie Bowers ...Kershaw, S. C. 

Miss Mary Harris Vaughan, N. C. 

Miss Arleene Holloway Cary, N. C. 

Miss Ollie Mae Hunnicutt Neuse, N. C. 

Miss Myrtle Lassiter Neuse, N. C. 

Miss Rosa Pleasants Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Elizabeth Sorrell Burlington, N. C. 

Miss Mildred Stancil Garner, N. C, R. 2 

Miss Mary Gladys Stephenson. Varina, N. C. 

Miss Lena Mae Valentine Kenly, N. C, R. 1 

Miss Maggie Williams Apex, N. C, R. 1 

Note. The following students, by removing certain conditions 
during the summer in a summer school, are entitled to diplomas: 

Miss Mildred Bennett Cary, N. C, R. 2 

Mr. Alton Fetner Raleigh, N. C, 1214 Glenwood Ave. 

Miss Cora Alice Gillespie Cary, N. C. 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 

Scholarship — High School Katie Blanchard 

Scholarship — Seventh Grade Boyd Moore 

Boys' Debate Carl Bowden 

Girls' Debate Helen Davis 

Declamation Liston Freeman 

Recitation Louise Johnson 

Clay Improvement Judd Daniel 

Calhoun Improvement Carl Bowden 

Lowell Improvement Marta Selma Morgan 

Irving Improvement Martha Washburne 

Music Medal Marta Selma Morgan 

Latin Medal..... Hazel Reams 

OTHER HONORS 
Calhoun Society wins Faculty Cup. 
Irving Society wins Parent-Teacher Cup. 
Calhoun Society wins Commencement Debate. 
Lowell Society wins Commencement Debate. 
James Bashaw and Belvin Blalock win in Triangular Debate. 
Cary High School wins first place in County Commencement. 



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GYMNASIUM 



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Cary High School 



FOREWORD 

The Cary High School presents to the public this its thirtieth 
annual catalogue in the belief that the high standard of ex- 
cellence reached in the past will be fully maintained during 
the session of 1926-1927. So far the school has lost none of its 
prestige as a boarding school, large numbers still coining from 
outside the local district and many from other counties and 
states. The school is unusually well equipped for caring for 
nonresident pupils. With two large brick dormitories, a com- 
mon boarding hall for both teachers and pupils, with an ample 
teaching force and adequate physical equipment, the school 
is abundantly able to care for a large boarding patronage. 

A boarding school affords numerous advantages over a school 
purely local. The boarding students generally are the picked rep- 
resentatives of their communities ; the dormitory life and the 
mingling of pupils and teachers in the dining hall afford a 
training even more valuable than that obtained from textbooks, 
while the organized life of the students in the literary societies, 
Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A, athletic clubs, music clubs, science 
clubs, etc., means vastly more to the pupils than in a purely 
local school. Then, too, pupils freed from home duties and 
home distractions have better opportunities for study; and 
when they have finished the high school, the transition to col- 
lege life is less abrupt. Many boys and girls need the discipline 
of dormitory life, to say nothing of correct table manners and 
social etiquette. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 




o 



COURSES OF STUDY 

r 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Music, Expression, 
Voice, Art, Teacher-training, Typewriting, Physical Training. 

To receive a diploma of graduation a pupil must have com- 
pleted sixteen units of work as outlined below : 

First Year Third Year 

English English 

Arithmetic (First Semester) Elect two 

Algebra (Second semester) Plane Geometry- 

Civics Chemistry 

Elect one History 

General Science Elect one 

Agriculture Latin 

Home Economics French 

Agriculture 

Second Year Fourth Year 

English English 

Algebra American History 

Biology and 

Elect one American Government 

World History Physics 

Agriculture Elect one 

Home Economics Latin 

French 

Agriculture 

In the above all subjects are given five times a week. All 
sciences have three class periods and two laboratory periods, 
while agriculture and home economics classes have five labora- 
tory periods per week. All class periods are 45 minutes and 
all laboratory periods are 90 minutes each. A unit's credit is 
allowed for a year's work in each subject listed above except 
that a year in agriculture counts for a unit and a half. A half 
unit is allowed for a year in music, expression, art, typewriting 
or physical training. 

Cicero and Virgil are offered to those who wish them or need 
them for college entrance. 

Although plane geometry is elective, it must be taken by pupils 
who expect to enter college. Of the six units of foreign lan- 
guage offered, at least four are needed for college entrance. 



OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

FIEST YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), through page 36. 

English Texts — Sentence and Theme (Ward). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book I 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (10 credits required) : The 
Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott); Lays 
of Ancient Rome, 2 (Macaulay) ; Mtitecca of Sunnybrook 
Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; The Call of the W£d, 1 (London) ; Robin- 
son Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Remiss Stories, 1 (Harris) ; 
Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The Story of the 
Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke) ; Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson) ; 
The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart.) First Semester. Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes), through Chapter Y. Second Semester. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Text-booh in Citizenship (Hughes). 

Agriculture — Productive Farm Crops (Montgomery) ; Soils 
and Fertilizers (Lyon). 

Home Economics — School and Home Cooking (Greer) ; Tex- 
tiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

SECOND YEAR 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), completed. 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book II 
(Greenlaw & Stratton). 

English Classics for Reading — (12 credits required) : The 
Lady of the Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Reil, 1 (Browning) ; 
Franklin s Autobiography. 2; The Last of the Mohicans, 2 
(Cooper) ; Tom Brown's School Days, 3 (Hughes) ; Iliad of 




o 



o 



o 



Cary High School 17 

Homer, 3 (Pope); The Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) ; 
Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man 
Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The DeCoverley Papers, 2 
(Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old 
Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes) ; The Virginian, 2 (Wis- 
ter) ; Wild Animals I Have Known, 2 (Seton-Thompson) ; 
One of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
through chapter XXI. 

History — World History (Webster). 

Science — Biology for High Schools (Smallwood and others). 

Agriculture — A Study of Farm Animals (Plumb) ; Dairy 
Farming (Eckles and Warren). 

Home Economics — Dietetics for High School (Willard and 
Gillett) ; Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

THIRD YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwiek and Bacon), 
Part I. 

English Texts — Written and Spoken English (Clippinger). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book III 
(Greenlaw & Miles). 

English Classics for Reading — (15 credits required) : The 
Marble Faun, 3 (Hawthorne; ; A Taie of Two Cities, 3 (Dick- 
ens) ; The Sketch Book, 3 (Irving) ; Washington s Farewell 
Address, 2; lEneid, 2 (Harrison); Captains Courageous, 2 
(Kipling) ; Sohrab and Rustum, 2 (Arnold) ; The Oregon 
Trial, 2 (Parkman) ; The Four Million or The Voice of the 
City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Red Rock or In Old Virginia, 2 (Page) ; 
The Rise of Silas Lapham, 2 (Howells) ; Poems and Tales, 3 
(Poe) ; one Play of Shakespeare not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through 
Chapter XLIX, or Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), 
Four Orations against Catiline; The Manilian Law; The Citi- 
zenship of Archias. 




o 



Cary High School 19 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

French — The Phonetic Charclenal French Course (Brooks) ; 
La Belle France (Monvert). 

Agriculture — Horticulture (Davis) ; Farm Mechanics. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Booh (Sandwich and Bacon). 
Part II. 

English Texts — Century Handbook of Writing (Crever & 
Jones). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book IV 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (20 credits required) : Pil- 
grim's Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 
3 (Thackeray) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Ruskin) ; The Ancient 
Mariner, 2 (Coleridge) ; Bunker Hill Oration, 2 (Webster) ; 
Education and Citizenship, 2 (Graham) ; Lorna Boone, 2 
(Blackmore) ; Heart of the West, 2 (0. Henry) ; The Vicar 
of Wakefield, 3 (Goldsmith) ; one Play of Shakespeare not pre- 
viously read, 2. Selections from Browning, Shelley, Keats, and 
Whitman, 1 each. Selections from modern drama, poetry, and 
essays, 1 each. Term essay, 3. 

1ST. B. — Credit will be given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar & Daniell) Completed; Cae- 
sar, Books I-IV (D'Ooge & Eastman), or Virgil (Bennett), 
Six Books. 

History — History of U. S. (Beard & Beard). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — The New Chardenal French Course (Brooks) ; Fif- 
teen French Plays (Francois) ; Le Voyage de M. Perrichon 
(Labiche & Martin); Eight French Stories (Manley). 

Agriculture — Farm Management (Warren) ; Farm Engi- 
neering. Farm shop work is given throughout the four years 







p 

<y 



Cary High School 21 

to all students taking agriculture. The Farmer's Shoj) Booh 
(Roehl) is used as the basal text. 

]ST. B. — The course of study for the Elementary School is 
not outlined here, since it is issued by the State Department of 
Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION" PER MONTH 

Primary Grades .y?_ $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Ereshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years 6.00 

Piano - 4.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Violin 5.00 

Elocution 5.00 

Art 5.00 

Typewriting 4.00 

Typewriter Practice 1.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 

Dormitories, all time boarders... $15.00 

Dormitories, five-day boarders 13.00 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory $ 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, single beds. 5.00 

Girls' Dormitory, double beds.. 4.50 

MINOR DUES PER MONTH 

Societies 25c 

Athletics (boys) 25c 

Athletics (girls) 15c 

Medicine Fee (girls in dormitory).... 10c 

Current Events 5c 



Gary High School 23 

All dues are payable monthly in advance. For absence on 
account of sickness or other providential cause, deduction 
is made in tuition and board for a full week of continuous 
absence. A school month is four weeks or twenty-eight days. 

Tuition in the High School Department is free to all pupils 
living in Wake County, except in special charter districts, for 
the first six months. For the remainder of the term there will 
be a charge for tuition of $5.00 per month in the high school 
and $3.00 in the elementary school. This charge, which is made 
by order of the County Board of Education, applies to all High 
Schools in the county. Pupils in the Teacher-training De- 
partment, whether inside or outside the county, are not subject 
to tuition. 

Each pupil in the dormitories should bring the following : 
Two white counterpanes, four sheets, three pillow cases, two 
blankets or quilts, one glass, covers for dresser, washstand and 
table, curtains for window (if desired), towels, comb, brush, 
soap. Boys will bring pillows also. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories must deposit 
$1.00 to show good faith. This amount will be deducted from 
the first month's rent. Rooms, however, will not be held longer 
than September 3, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

Boarding teachers room in the dormitories and pay the same 
rates as pupils. 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school has ample boarding facilities for all the board- 
ing pupils and teachers. In the basement of the main build- 
ing is a large dining hall capable of seating over two hun- 
dred people. Here the pupils are seated in groups of eight 
to a table with a hostess in charge, usually a senior. From 
time to time the teachers of domestic science give talks and 
demonstrations on table manners. The management of the 
school believes these things to be an important part of an 
education. By buying groceries by wholesale and by economic 
management, the school has been able to give very substantial 
board at $15 a month. 



. I 




r- ■ 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

TEACHERS-TRAINING 

This department in our school has fully met the expecta- 
tions of the State Department of Education at Raleigh, which 
established it four years ago, and will be continued next year. 
The graduates of this department have been very successful 
in securing good positions to teach. Wake County has pro- 
vided a very elaborate equipment for the department in our 
new Vocational Building, and the State requires an outstand- 
ing teacher for the position. 

By taking this course, a pupil gets the equivalent of a year 
of college work toward securing a certificate to teach. A grad- 
uate of an accredited high school upon completion of the 
course, is granted an elementary certificate Class A by the 
State Department of Education. A graduate of a non-standard 
high school is granted an elementary B certificate. The course 
covers a period of nine school months. To graduates from this 
department, credit is given if they wish to continue their educa- 
tion in college. 

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

These departments occupy spacious quarters in the new 
vocational building. The entire first floor and one large room 
in the basement, making in all nine rooms, are devoted to the 
work of these departments. These rooms are furnished with 
the most modern equipment for teaching agriculture and home 
economics and place the school in the forefront of high schools 
in the South doing this class of work. 

Tor agriculture there are two large classrooms provided 
with individual desks, running water, lantern, etc., with a 
supply room adjoining each. Between these is a room which 
serves as a combination library, reading room and office. In 
the basement a large room has been provided for the animal 
husbandry work and is equipped with cream separators, testers, 
etc. Since the last catalogue was issued, a hatchery with a 
capacity of over 12,000 eggs has been installed in this room 



Cary High School 27 

and is owned by the Cary Poultry Association, an organization 
of farmers in the community, and operated by the teachers 
and students of agriculture in the school. 

Five rooms are used by the Home Economics Department 
as follows : Cooking laboratory, dining room, sewing room, 
fitting room and library. The rooms are provided with running 
water, cabinets, tables, desks, bookcases, cooking stoves and 
cooking utensils, china, sewing machines, ironing boards, mir- 
rors, etc. 

Science being the basic subject for both agriculture and 
home economics, ample provision was made in the new building 
for teaching it by the laboratory method. In addition to the 
laboratory and lecture room already in use in the main build- 
ing, four other rooms on the second floor of the new building 
are devoted exclusively to science, and an elaborate equipment 
in desks, cabinets, physical, chemical and biological apparatus, 
etc., with suitable plumbing, has been provided. 

Three other large rooms on the second floor of this building 
are occupied by the teacher-training department and two grades 
of the elementary school. 

MUSIC 

The Piano Department has long been one of the prominent 
features of the school. Only teachers of recognized musical 
attainments are employed for this work. A music studio, six 
practice rooms and seven pianos constitute the equipment. 

Teachers have been employed who will give lessons in art 
and expression to those who desire instruction in these subjects. 

Public school music has now become an established feature 
of the school for which a trained teacher is employed. There is 
no extra charge for it. 

A gold medal is given annually by Rev. C. H. Norris to the 
pupil doing best work in piano for the year. 

COMMERCIAL 

The work of the Commercial Department at present includes 
only typewriting. Six Remington typewriters and suitable 
tables and chairs make up the equipment for this department. 



Gary High School 29 

The touch system, now universally recognized as the most 
efficient method of operating 'the keyboard, is used exclusively 
as a basis of work, and the high standards set in the text, "New 
Rational Typewriting," are carefully observed. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition to 
his regular course, to take at least one of the special subjects 
outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take more than 
one. To be able to use a typewriter is frequently the means of 
a student's being able to pay his way through college. Every 
girl ought to learn to play the piano and to sing, and every 
boy ought to learn to play some kind of musical instrument 
as well as to sing. 

Credit is given for work done in these special departments. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The school has four literary societies, two for boys and two 
for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the boys 
on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at Commence- 
ment for most improvement during the year. The boys' socie- 
ties give jointly a medal for the best declamation and the 
girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. Smith, 
an alumnus of the school, gives annually a medal to the member 
of the boys' societies making the best speech in debate on the 
occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killingsworth, 
formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives a similar medal 
for the best debater in the girls' societies. The school enters each 
year the State Triangular Debate, the speakers being chosen 
in a preliminary debate open to all members of the four socie- 
ties. All high school pupils, unless excused by the Superintend- 
ent, are required to join one of the societies. The membership 
is determined by lot to avoid overcrowding in any one society. 

SCHOLARSHIP MEDALS 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually by 
the Superintendent for the highest average grade in scholarship 
for the year. Any pupil in the high school is eligible to com- 




o 



Cary High School 31 

pete for this medal. Mr. T. Ivey gives a gold medal for the 
best work in Latin. The Junior Order of Cary gives a medal 
for highest grade made during the year in the Seventh Grade. 

SOCIETY TROPHIES 

The Faculty during the fall of 1923 provided a beautiful 
trophy cup to be awarded annually in November or December 
to the Clay or Calhoun Society winning in a public debate, 
with the proviso that the cup shall become the permanent pos- 
session of the society winning three out of five debates. The 
Calhouns won the cup in 1923, the Clays in 1924, and the Cal- 
houns again in 1925. 

During the last session, the Parent-Teachers Association 
provided in similar cup for the girls of the Lowell and Irving 
Societies. In the first debate in February, 1926, the Irvings 
won. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, 
the school has made ample provision for healthful sports of 
every kind. A baseball diamond on a neighboring hill besides 
tennis courts for both boys and girls, and playground apparatus 
on the school campus are amply sufficient to keep all the pupils 
occupied with some sort of healthful exercise at recreation 
periods. 

The new athletic field has been provided with a fence and 
a grand stand and is used exclusively by the high school for 
football, baseball, and track. 

Letters are awarded by the Athletic Association to the play- 
ers meeting certain requirements in football, basketball, base- 
ball, tennis, and track. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and as- 
sistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams 
with uniforms and other equipment. 




o 



Cary High School 33 

THE GYMNASIUM 

r 

During the spring of 1925, a gymnasium was erected on the 
southwest corner of the campus at a cost of ahout $12,000. The 
building is of brick veneer and has ample floor space for basket- 
ball and the physical training work of the school. The build- 
ing is provided with dressing rooms, shower baths, spectators' 
seats, and a shop 25 by 50 feet in the basement for the agricul- 
tural department of the school. The building has been named 
in honor of Cary's most distinguished and beloved citizen, Dr. 
J. M. Templeton, and will be officially known as the Dr. J. M. 
Templeton Building for Physical Training. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discour- 
agement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

]NTo form of hazing is allowed. 

No unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. A deposit of $5 is required 
to cover damage to rooms in the dormitories. This amount is 
returned to the occupant at the close of the session if the room 
is left in satisfactory condition. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $8 to cover cost of books. 

Boarding pupils are expected to attend Sunday school and 
church. 



Cary High School 35 

Smoking in any of the school buildings or on the school 
grounds is prohibited. 

The school owns a moving picture machine, and occasionally 
films furnished by the State Department of Education and 
having an educational value are shown in the school auditorium. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

Last session 243 high school pupils were enrolled and 470 
in the elementary school, making a total of 713. There were 
162 boarders from 28 counties and three states. The graduating 
class numbered 57, including the 11 graduates from the Teacher- 
training Department. Twenty-nine teachers were employed to 
do the work of the school. 

The dormitory for girls is of brick and is furnished with neat 
and attractive furniture, each room being provided with a closet 
and containing an oak dresser, an oak washstand, two single beds 
with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, and two chairs. 

The brick dormitory for boys has practically the same con- 
veniences as the girls' dormitory. Both dormitories are pro- 
vided with steam heat, electric lights, running water (hot and 
cold), baths, etc. The boys' dormitory has shower baths. 

Summarizing, we wish to stress the following features of the 
school, several of which are illustrated by cuts in this catalogue : 

(1) A large and substantial main building with 33 rooms. 

(2) A handsome vocational building with 18 rooms and 
splendid equipment. (3) Two brick dormitories, one for girls 
and one for boys. (4) New gymnasium building. (5) All 
buildings heated by steam. (6) Running water in all the 
buildings. (7) Bored well on campus. (8) Spacious class- 
rooms lighted on one side. (9) Tablet arm chairs for the high 
school and individual lockers for books, tablets, etc. (10) An 
auditorium that will seat eight hundred or more, with a gallery 
and splendid stage and scenery. (11) Laboratories with indi- 
vidual desks, gas, running water, etc. (12) Splendid domes- 
tic science equipment. (13) An ample force of trained teachers 
to do the work of the school. (14) All the special departments 
to be found in the large city schools. 



Office 
Home Economics Library 




*iis(!j£ 



Vie Fitting Room 

Chdjeining Class Roam) 



A Lesson 
In 
CuWug a "^ Basting Woolen Dresses 




Cary High School 37 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes ■'monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 
50c a year or 10c a copy. The title of the paper is C. H. S. 
Echoes. The class also publishes an annual, in book form, 
which is highly prized by the members. 

HISTORY 

The Cary High School had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. 
In 1907, the owners of the property sold their stock to the 
county, and the school was converted into a State high school, 
the first to be established under the high school law of 1907. 
The official name was changed from the Cary High School to 
the Cary Public High School. In 1913 by special act of the 
legislature, providing for farm-life instruction in Wake County, 
there were added to the school the departments of agriculture 
and domestic science, the name of the school being changed 
from the Cary Public High School to the Cary Public High 
School and the E. L. Middleton Farm-Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 
1908, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, 
and the present Superintendent was elected as his successor. 

The school has lost none of its prestige as a boarding school, 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con- 
stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large and growing territory. 



Cary High School 39 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913-14 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,- 
000. The old dormitory building for boys which was burned 
in the spring of 1916, was replaced that year by a brick struc- 
ture at a cost of about $13,000. The building contains 34 
rooms, being provided with steam heat, electric lights, baths, 
laA'atories, etc., and is now occupied by the girls under the care 
of the Lady Principal. The old privately owned girls' dormi- 
tory, which had been occupied by the boys since 1916, was 
burned in the fall of 1918. In 1919-20 there was erected on 
the campus a modern brick dormitory for the boys, practically 
a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost of about $28,000. 
This building contains 33 rooms and is provided with steam 
heat, electric lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

In the summer of 1923, another two-story brick building 
was erected to provide rooms for the departments of agri- 
culture, home economics, teacher-training and science. It eon- 
tains IS rooms and cost $45,000. This building has been named 
in honor of Gary's most illustrious citizen, the late Walter 
Hines Page, and is known officially as the "Walter Hines Page 
Building for Vocational Training. 

The most recent building erected on the campus is the gym- 
nasium, which was completed in the spring of 1925 at a 
cost of about $12,000. For description of this building, see 
page 33. 

The school campus contains four acres and, according to the 
last geological survey, is the highest ground in Wake County. 

The entire school plant at the present time is estimated to 
be worth $240,000. 

The town of Cary has recently installed a water and sewerage 
system at a cost of $150,000, thus materially enhancing the de- 
sirability of the town as a place of residence. Electric lights, 
electric power and telephones have been in use for several years. 
Recently the Baptist and Methodist denominations of the town 
have provided themselves with new brick church houses with 
every modern convenience and fully in keeping with the school 
buildings described in this catalogue. 




o 




o 




o 



Application for Admission 

CARY HIGH SCHOOL 



Date 192. 

Name 

Postoffice 

Age County 

Name of Parent or Guardian 

Last School Attended 

Indicate by X which course you expect to take. 

1. Academic 

2. Agricultural 

3. Home Economics 

]+. Teacher-Training 



Indicate by X if $1.00 is enclosed to have room reserved in 
Dormitory. 



Do you expect to go home week-ends? 

Mail to M. B. Dry, Cary, N. C. 








'■■■-• ".■•!••: ; • 

;■■■'■ \. -v-^ ■:•■■••:■'■ ■ 




CATALOGUE 



01 



GARY '^WlW^m^i- 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 




n 




jSrrrr— ^as^s 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 

1927 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Brouohton Company 

1927 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. M. Templetox. Chairman 

M. T. Jones, Secretary 

D. A. Morgan 

E. J. ByruxM 

A. H. Pleasants 



CALENDAR 1927-1928 

Fall Term opens August 29, 1927 

Fall Term closes December 20, 1927 

Spring Term opens January 2, 192S 

Spring Term closes April 20, 1928 



HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving — Thursday and Friday- November 24 and 25 

DEBATES 

Clay-Calhoun Debate for Faculty Cup, December 5. 
Lowell-Irving Debate for Parent-Teacher Cup, February 2. 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

M. B. Dry, Superintendent 

J. H. Roller, Principal Academic Department 

Miss Rexa Kinc, Lady Principal 

E. N. Meekins, Principal Farm Life Department 

Miss Irma Ellis, Principal Primary Department 

Mrs. C. A. McLean, Principal Grammar Grade Department 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

M. B. DRY, A.M. 

(Wake Forest College) 

Geometry 

J. H. ROLLER 

(University of Tennessee) 

Science 

W. H. SMITH 

(Duke University) 

History and Athletics 

MISS CLAIRE NICHOLS, A.B. 
(Duke University) 
French and Latin 

MISS JULIA PASMORE, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

(State University, A.B.) 

Mathematics and Latin 

E. N. MEEKINS, B.S. and M.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

L. E. RAPER, B.S. and M.S. 

(N. C. State College) 

Agriculture 

MISS MARY E. YORK, B.S. 

(N. C. College for Women) 
Home Economics 



Cary High School 

MISS LOUISE N. GILL, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Teacher Training 

MISS EUGENIA GRAY, B.M. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Piano 

MISS EMILY SMITH, B.S. 
(Winthrop College) 
Public School Music 

MISS PEARL JONES, A.B. 

(Brenau College) 

Physical Education 

MISS RENA KING, A.B. 

(N. C. College for Women) 

Science 

MISS NELLIE K. BURGESS, A.B. 

(State University) 

English 

MISS SALLIE BREEZE 

(Cincinnati Conservatory) 

Assistant Piano 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 

MISS IRMA ELLIS 

(N. C. College for Women) 

First Grade 

MISS MINNIE MORRIS 
First Grade 

MISS RACHEL WILKINSON, A.B. 

(Meredith College) 

Second Grade 

MISS RACHEL EATON 

(Cullowhee Normal) 

Special First and Second Grades 

Unliraraity of Colorado! 



Catalogue 

MRS. C. L. BEDDINGFIELD 

(N. C. College for Women) 
Third Grade 

Mrs. W. H. Smith, A.B. 

(Meredith College) 

Fourth Grade 

MISS MARY GADDY 
(Meredith College) 

Fifth Grade 

MISS EULA WILLIAMS 

(University of Virginia) 

Sixth Grade 

MRS. CHAS. A. McLEAN 

(Atlantic Christian College) 

Seventh Grade 

MISS MYRTLE KEITH 

(State University) 

Special Fourth and Fifth Grade 

MRS. H. R. ADAMS 

(Cary High School T. Tr. Dept. ) 

Special Sixth Grade 

MISS WILLIE WRENN 
Elocution 

MISS MARY BROCKWELL 
(Meredith College) 
Violin 



Typewriting and Stenography 

MRS. M. B. DRY 
Supervisor Boarding Department 



Not employed when this catalogue went to press. 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1927 

ACADEMIC DIPLOMA 

Bessie Allex __Cary, N. C. 

Emcgexe Baucom Gary, N. C. 

W. R. Beach, Jr Gary, N. C. 

Bei.vix Blalock R. 1, McCullers, N. C. 

Katie Blaxchakd.. Cary, X. C. 

Uxa Mae Davis Varina, N. C. 

Hallie Dry Cary, N. C. 

Wilsox Farrell..... Cary, N. C. 

Annie Hayes..... Cary, N. C. 

Alex Houstox 1304 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Joyner Jackson ...Cary, N. C. 

Mildred Joxes ...Cary, N. C. 

Philip Joxes. R. 4, Raleigh, N. C. 

Addie Mae Kexdall Goldsboro, N. C. 

Pansy Moore Cary, X. C. 

William Pleasants R. 2, Cary, X. C. 

Hazel Reams R. 1, Morrisville, X. C. 

Elizabeth Smith .....R. 1, McCullers, X. C. 

William Smith.. Cary, X. C. 

Bessie Watsox Aurora, X. C. 

HOME' ECOXOMICS DIPLOMA 

Bessie Allex Cary, X. C. 

Hattie Mae Bagwell R. 4, Raleigh, X. C. 

Katie Blaxchard Cary, X. C. 

Mildred Joxes Cary, X. C. 

Wava Keith R. 1, Cary, X. C. 

Pansy Moore Cary, X. C. 

Clareexe Murray R. 2, Apex, X. C. 

Pansy Rogers Cary, X. C. 

AGRICULTURE DIPLOMA 

Raymond Bagwell R. 4, Raleigh, X. C. 

Frank Fetxer .....406 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, X. C. 

Walter Stevens R. 4, Raleigh, X. C. 

HOME ECOXOMICS CERTIFICATE 
Lois Ellixgtox Salisbury, X. C. 



8 Cary High School 

AGRICULTURE CERTIFICATE 
John Lee Hester R. 2, Neuse, N. C. 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE 
Laverne Ellington Cary, N. C. 

TEACHER TRAINING DIPLOMA 

Ina Beach.. Cary, N. C. 

Pauline .Z?eddingfield R. 1, Raleigh, N. C. 

Alma Brooks R. 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

Leonie Blalock Varina.., N. C. 

Jewell Hinnant R. 3, Clayton, N. C. 

Mildred Hinnant R. 3, Clayton, N. C. 

Alma Partin..... R. 5, Raleigh, N. C. 

Irene Segroves R. 2, New Hill, N. C. 

Gertrude Straughan R. 2, Raleigh, N. C. 

Leona Todd Wendell, N. C. 

Nell Waldo Cary, N. C. 

Reba Womble R. 4, Raleigh, N. C. 

Note. The following students, by removing certain conditions 
during the summer in a summer school, are entitled to diplomas: 

Carl Bowdex R. 2, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Foye Hodge R. 2, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Anton Phillips 630 E. Franklin St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Fletcher Turner Raleigh, N. C. 



WINNERS OF MEDALS 

Scholarship — High School ....Marie Murray 

Scholarship — Elementary School Ernest Northcutt 

Boys' Debate.. Belvin Blalock 

Glrls' Debate Martha Castlebury 

Declamation Carl Bowden 

Recitation Frances Sorrell 

Clay Improvement ...Wilson Fonville 

Calhoun Improvement Wilson Farrell 

Lowell Improvement..... Pansy Moore 

Irving Improvement .Bessie Watson 

Music Medal Frances Sorrell 

Latin Medal Katie Blanchard 

OTHER HONORS 

Excellence in Typewriting Mildred Jones 

Winner of Faculty Cup in Debate Clay Society 

Winner of Parent-Teacher Cup in Debate Irving Society 

Winner of Boys' Commencement Debate Calhoun Society 

Winner of Girls' Commencement Debate Irving Society 

Cary High School wins both debates in the State Triangular 

Debate. 
Cary Farm Life Department wins a radio set in a state-wide contest. 



rg g b v )-<• vi 1 g a a w h s 5 a J-* 1 S >- j >- ; J -- 5 S 3 5 53 5 S E 5 ^ 5 B S SB ^ " >-' ^ ">-' 5 3 v< H gg 




VOCATIONAL BUILDING 




BOyS DORMITORY 




girls' dormitory 




GYMNASIUM 

A-< HHVfK WWW M WJ-I >(> -( M W H VQ-P-CW )-( H )-(H J1KM WM )-< t-t V? J-f ggHHSBJ 



Cary High School 



FOREWORD 

The Cary High School presents to the public this its thirty- 
first annual catalogue in the belief that the high standard of ex- 
cellence reached in the past will be fully maintained during 
the session of 1927-1928. So far the school has maintained its 
prestige as a boarding school, large numbers still coming from 
outside the local district and many from other counties and 
states. The school is unusually well equipped for caring for 
nonresident pupils. With two large brick dormitories, a com- 
mon boarding hall for both teachers and pupils, with an ample 
teaching force and adequate physical equipment, the school 
is abundantly able to care for a large boarding patronage. 

A boarding school affords numerous advantages over a school 
purely local. The boarding students generally are the picked rep- 
resentatives of their communities ; the dormitory life and the 
mingling of pupils and teachers in the dining hall afford a 
training even more valuable than that obtained from textbooks, 
while the organized life of the students in the literary societies, 
athletic clubs, music clubs, science clubs, etc., is of inestima- 
ble value. Then, too, pupils freed from home duties and 
home distractions have better opportunities for study; and 
when they have finished the high school, the transition to col- 
lege life is less abrupt. Many boys and girls need the discipline 
of dormitory life, to say nothing of correct table manners and 
social etiquette. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

County seventh grade graduates are admitted to the high 
school without examinations. All others must bring certifi- 
cate from former teachers showing work that has been done. 




DEPARTMENT 





Public School Music 



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Alma Partin 
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Mildred Hirmant 
Leona Mae Todd 
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Irene SewDvca 
\\ Nell Waldo 
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PhyskaJ Education 




COURSES OF STUDY 

Instruction in the High School is offered in the following 
subjects : English, Mathematics, History, Latin, Science, 
French, Agriculture, Home Economics, Expression, Piano, 
Violin, Voice, Teacher-training, Typewriting and Stenography, 
Physical Education. 

To receive a diploma of graduation a pupil must have com- 
pleted sixteen units of work as outlined below : 
First Year Third Year 

English English 

Arithmetic (First Semester) Elect two 

Alegbra (Second Semester) Plane Geometry 

Civics Chemistry 

Elect one History 

General Science Elect one 

Agriculture Latin 

Home Economics French 

Latin Agriculture 

Second Year Fourth Year 

English English 

Algebra American History 

Biology and 

Elect one American Government 

World History Physics 

Agriculture Elect one 

Home Economics Latin 

Latin French 

Agriculture 

In the above all subjects are given five times a week. All 
sciences have three class periods and two laboratory periods, 
while agriculture and home economics classes have five labora- 
tory periods per week. All class periods are 45 minutes and 
all laboratory periods are 90 minutes each. A unit's credit is 
allowed for a year's work in each subject listed above except 
that a year in agriculture counts for a unit and a half. A half 
unit is allowed for a year in music, expression, typewriting, 
stenography, or physical education. 

Cicero and Virgil are offered to those who wish them or need 
them for college entrance. 

Although plane geometry is elective, it must be taken by pupils 
who expect to enter college. Of the six units of foreign lan- 
guage offered, at least four are needed for college entrance. 



Office 

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Hotne Economies Library 




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OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 

FIEST YEAE 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), through page 36. 

English Texts — Sentence and Theme (Ward). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book I 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (10 credits required) : The 
Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1; The Talisman, 2 (Scott); Lays 
of Ancient Rome, 2 (Macaulay) ; Rebecca of Sunnybrooh 
Farm, 1 (Wiggin) ; The Call of the Wild, 2 (London) ; Rodin- 
son Crusoe, 2 (DeFoe) ; Uncle Remus Stories, 1 (Harris) ; 
Little Men or Little Women, 2 (Alcott) ; The Story of the 
Other Wise Man, 2 (Van Dyke); Kidnapped, 2 (Stevenson); 
The Old Curiosity Shop, 3 (Dickens). 

Mathematics — New High School Arithmetic (Wells and 
Hart.) First Semester. Complete Algebra (Slaught and 
Lennes), through Chapter V. Second Semester. 

Science — General Science (Caldwell and Eikenberry). 

Civics — Text-booh in Citizenship (Hughes). 

Agriculture — Productive Farm Crops (Montgomery) ; Soils 
and Fertilizers (Lyon). 

Home Economics — School and Home Cooking (Greer) ; Tex- 
tiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

SECOND YEAE 

Spelling — Essentials in Spelling for High Schools (Wil- 
liams, Griffin and Chase), completed. 

English Texts — Practical English (Lewis and Hosic). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book II 
(Greenlaw & Stratton). 

English Classics for Reading — (12 credits required) : The 
Lady of the Lake, 2 (Scott) ; Herve Rett, 1 (Browning) ; 
Franklin's Autobiography, 2; The Last of the Mohicans, 2 
(Cooper); Tom Brown's School Days, 3 (Hughes); Iliad of 



Gary High School 17 

Homer, 3 (Pope) ; The Cloister and the Hearth, 2 (Reade) ; 
Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn, 2 (Mark Twain) ; The Man 
Without a Country, 1 (Hale) ; The DeCoverley Papers, 2 
(Addison and Steele) ; The Purloined Letter, 1 (Poe) ; Old 
Testament Narratives, 2 (Rhodes); The Virginian, 2 (Wis- 
ter) ; Wild Animals I Have Known, 2 (Seton-Thompson) ; 
One of Shakespeare's Plays not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Complete Algebra (Slaught and Lennes) 
through chapter XXI. 

History — World History (Webster). 

Science — Biology for High Schools (Smallwood and others). 

Agriculture — A Study of Farm Animals (Plumb) ; Dairy 
Farming (Eckles and Warren). 

Home Economics — Dietetics for High School (Willard and 
Gillett) ; Textiles and Clothing (McGowan and Waite). 

THIRD YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Boole (Sandwick and Bacon), 
Part I. 

English Texts — -Written and S pole en English (Clippinger). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book III 
(Greenlaw & Miles). 

English Classics for Reading — (15 credits required) : The 
Marble Faun, 3 (Hawthorne) ; A Tale of Two Cities, 3 (Dick- 
ens) ; The Sketch Book, 3 (Irving) ; Washington's Farewell 
Address, 2; 2Eneid, 2 (Harrison); Captains Courageous, 2 
(Kipling) ; Sohrab and Rustum, 2 (Arnold) ; The Oregon 
Trial, 2 (Parkman) ; The Four Million or The Voice of the 
City, 2 (O. Henry) ; Red Rock or In Old Virginia, 2 (Page) ; 
The Rise of Silas Lapham, 2 (Howells) ; Poems and Tales, 3 
(Poe) ; one Play of Shakespeare not previously read, 2. 

Mathematics — Plane Geometry (Wentworth-Smith). 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniell) through 
Chapter XLIX, or Cicero's Orations (Gunnison and Harley), 
Four Orations against Catiline; The Manilian Law ; The Citi- 
zenship of Archias. 



Gary High School 19 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee and 
others). 

French — Chardenal's Complete French Course, Phonetic 
Edition, (Brooks) ; La Belle France (Monvert). 

Agriculture — Horticulture (Davis) ; Farm Mechanics. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Spelling — High School Word Book (Sandwich and Bacon). 
Part II. 

English Texts — Century Handbook of Writing (Crever & 
Jones). 

English Classics for Study — Literature and Life, Book IV 
(Greenlaw and others). 

English Classics for Reading — (20 credits required) : Pil- 
grim's Progress, 2 (Bunyan) ; Vanity Fair or Henry Esmond, 
3 (Thackeray) ; Sesame and Lilies, 3 (Ruskin) ; The Ancient 
Mariner, 2 (Coleridge)-; Bunker Hill Oration, 2 (Webster) ; 
Education and Citizenship, 2 (Graham) ; Lorna Boone, 2 
(Blackmore) ; Heart of the West, 2 (O. Henry) ; The Vicar 
of Wakefield, 3 (Goldsmith) ; one Play of Shakespeare not pre- 
viously read, 2. Selections from Browning, Shelley, Keats, and 
Whitman, 1 each. Selections from modern drama, poetry, and 
essays, 1 each. Term essay, 3. 

^N". B. — Credit will be given for all reading over and above 
the minimum in each class; also for approved work in debate, 
declamation, recitation, C. H. S. Echoes, and the Senior annual. 

Latin — First Year Latin (Collar & Daniell) Completed; Cae- 
sar, Books I-IV (D'Ooge & Eastman), or Virgil (Bennett), 
Six Books. 

History — History of U. S. (Beard & Beard). 

Civics — American Government (Magruder). 

Science — Practical Physics (Millikan and Gale). 

French — Chardenal's Complete French Course, Phonetic 
Edition, (Brooks) ; Fifteen French Plays (Francois) ; Le 
Voyage de M. Perrichon (Labiche <& Martin) ; Eight French 
Stories (Manley). 



Gary High School 21 

Agriculture — Farm Management (Warren) ; Farm Engi- 
neering. Farm shop- work \s given throughout the four years 
to all students taking agriculture. The Farmer s Shop Boole 
(Roehl) is used as the basal text. 

N". B. — The course of study for the Elementary School is 
not outlined here, since it is issued by the State Department of 
Education and can be had in bulletin form. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION PEE MONTH 

Primary Grades ..,.. $ 3.00 

Grammar Grades 4.00 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 5.00 

Junior and Senior Years.. 6.00 

Piano 5.00 

Piano Practice — an hour daily 1.00 

Violin - 5.00 

Elocution 5.00 

Art 5.00 

Typewriting 5.00 

BOARD PER MONTH 
Dormitories ..$18.00 

ROOM RENT PER MONTH 

Boys' Dormitory ....$4.00 

Girls' Dormitory 4.00 

MINOR DUES PER MONTH 

Societies - —• --.- ...25c 

Athletics (boys) 25c 

Athletics (girls) - - 15c 

Medicine Fee (girls in dormitory) 10c 

Current Events 5c 



Gary High School 23 

All clues are payable monthly in advance. For absence on 
account of sickness or other providential cause, deduction 
is made in tuition and board for a full week of continuous 
absence. A school month is four weeks or twenty-eight days. 

Tuition in the High School Department is free to all pupils 
living in Wake County, except in special charter districts, for 
the first six months. For the remainder of the term there will 
be a charge for tuition of $5.00 per month in the high school 
and $3.00 in the elementary school. This charge is made by 
order of the County Board of Education and applies to all High 
Schools in the county. Students in the Teacher-training De- 
partment, whether inside or outside the county, are not subject 
to tuition. 

Each pupil in the dormitories should bring the following : 
Two white counterpanes, four sheets, three pillow cases, two 
blankets or quilts, covers for dresser, washstand and table, cur- 
tains for window (if desired), towels, comb, brush, soap. Boys 
will bring pillows also. 

Those desiring rooms reserved in the dormitories should 
notify the superintendent as early as possible. Rooms will not 
be held longer than September 2, except by request. 

All boarding pupils must room in the dormitories unless 
other arrangements are made satisfactory to the committee. 

Boarding teachers room in the dormitories and pay the same 
rates as pupils. 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT 

The school has ample boarding facilities for all the board- 
ing pupils and teachers. The dining hall is in the basement 
of the main building and is capable of seating about two hun- 
dred people. Here the pupils are seated in groups of eight 
to a table with a hostess in charge, usually a senior. From 
time to time the teachers of domestic science give talks and 
demonstrations on table manners. The management of the 
school believes these things to be an important part of an 
education. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

TEACHER-TRAINING 

This department in our school has fully met the expecta- 
tions of the State Department of Education at Raleigh, which 
established it five years ago, and will be continued next year. 
The graduates of this department have been very successful 
in securing good positions to teach. "Wake County has pro- 
vided a very elaborate equipment for the department in our 
Vocational Building, and the State requires an oustand- 
ing teacher for the position. 

By taking this course, a student gets the equivalent of a year 
of college work toward securing a certificate to teach. A grad- 
uate of an accredited high school upon completion of the 
course, is granted an elementary certificate Class A by the 
State Department of Education. A graduate of a non-standard 
high school is granted an elementary B certificate. The course 
covers a period of nine school months. To graduates from this 
department, credit is given if they wish to continue their educa- 
tion in college. 

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

These departments occupy spacious quarters in the Voca- 
tional Building. The entire first floor and one large room 
in the basement, making in all nine rooms, are devoted to the 
work of these departments. These rooms are furnished with 
the most modern equipment for teaching agriculture and home 
economics and place the school in the forefront of high schools 
in the South doing this class of work. 

Eor agriculture there are two classrooms provided with in- 
dividual desks, running water, lantern, etc., with a supply room 
adjoining each. Between these is a room which serves as a 
combination library, reading room and office. In the basement 
a large room has been provided for the animal husbandry work 
and is equipped with cream separators, testers, etc. A hatchery 
with a capacity of over 12,000 eggs has been installed in this 
room and is owned by the Gary Poultry Association, an organ- 



Cary High School 27 

ization of farmers in the community, and operated by the 
teachers and students of agriculture in the school. Another 
hatchery of 9,000 capacity will be installed for next season. 

Five rooms are used by the Home Economics Department 
as follows : Cooking laboratory, dining room, sewing room, 
fitting room and library. The rooms are provided with running 
water, cabinets, tables, desks, bookcases, cooking stoves and 
cooking utensils, china, sewing machines, ironing boards, mir- 
rors, etc. 

Science being the basic subject for both agriculture and 
home economics, ample provision was made in the Vocational 
Building for teaching it by the laboratory method. In addition 
to the laboratory and lecture room already in use in the main 
building, four other rooms on the second floor of this building 
are devoted exclusively to science, and an elaborate equipment 
in desks, cabinets, physical, chemical and biological apparatus, 
etc., with suitable plumbing, has been provided. 

The teacher training department is housed in this building 
on the second floor. 

MUSIC 

The Piano Department has long been one of the prominent 
features of the school. Only teachers of recognized musical 
attainments are employed for this work. A music studio, six 
practice rooms and seven pianos constitute the equipment. 

A teacher has been employed who will give lessons in expres- 
sion to those who desire instruction in this subject. Also ar- 
rangements have been made to have violin taught again next 
session. 

Public school music has now become an established feature 
of the school for which a trained teacher is employed. There is 
no extra charge for it. 

A gold medal is given annually by Rev. C. H. !N"orris to the 
pupil doing best work in piano for the year. 

COMMERCIAL 

The work of the Commercial Department last year included 
only typewriting. The school is planning to add stenography 
and probably bookkeeping next session. Six Remington type- 




o 



Cary High School 29 

writers and suitable tables and chairs make up the equipment 
for this department. 

The average high school pupil can find time, in addition to 
his regular course, to take at least one of the special subjects 
outlined above, and a very bright pupil might take more than 
one. Ability to use a typewriter has frequently been the means 
by which a student has paid his way through college. Every 
girl ought to learn to play the piano and to sing, and every 
boy ought to learn to play some kind of musical instrument 
as well as to sing. 

Credit is given for work done in these special departments. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

LITERAEY SOCIETIES 

The school has four literary societies, two for boys and two 
for girls. The girls meet Thursday afternoons and the boys 
on Monday nights. Each society gives a medal at Commence- 
ment for most improvement during the year. The boys' socie- 
ties give jointly a medal for the best declamation and the 
girls' societies one for the best recitation. Mr. H. P. Smith, 
an alumnus of the school, gives annually a medal to the member 
of the boys' societies making the best speech in debate on the 
occasion of Commencement. Miss Lillian Killingsworth, 
formerly Lady Principal of the school, gives a similar medal 
for the best debater in the girls' societies. The school enters each 
year the State Triangular Debate, the speakers being chosen 
in a preliminary debate open to all members of the four socie- 
ties. All high school pupils, unless excused by the Superintend- 
ent, are required to join one of the societies. The membership 
is determined by lot to avoid overcrowding in any one society. 

SCHOLAESHIP MEDALS 

Besides those mentioned above, a medal is given annually by 
the Superintendent for the highest average grade in scholarship 
for the year. Any pupil in the high school is eligible to com- 
pete for this medal. Mr. T. Ivey gives a gold medal for the 
best work in Latin. The Junior Order of Cary gives a medal 
for highest grade made during the year in the Seventh Grade. 



Cary High School 31 

SOCIETY TROPHIES 

The Faculty during the fall of 1923 provided a beautiful 
trophy cup to be awarded annually in November or December 
to the Clay or Calhoun Society winning in a public debate, 
with the proviso that the cup shall become the permanent pos- 
session of the society winning three out of five debates. The 
Calhouns Avon the cup in 1923, the Clays in 1924, the Cal- 
houns in 1925, and the Clays in 1926. 

In 1925, the Parent-Teacher Association provided a similar 
cup for the girls of the Lowell and Irving Societies. In the 
first debate in February, 1926, the Irvings won. They also won 
again in 1927. 

ATHLETICS 

Believing strongly in the proper development of the physical 
powers of the boy or girl along with the mental and moral, 
the school has made ample provision for healthful sports of 
every kind. A baseball diamond, tennis courts and basketball 
courts for both boys and girls, and playground apparatus on 
the school campus and in the gymnasium are amply sufficient 
to keep all the pupils occupied with some sort of healthful 
exercise at recreation periods. 

Letters are awarded by the Athletic Association to the play- 
ers meeting certain requirements in football, basketball, base- 
ball, tennis, and track. 

The school committee gives every encouragement and as- 
sistance to the various forms of athletics, providing the teams 
with uniforms and other equipment. 

THE GYMNASIUM 

During the spring of 1925, a gymnasium was erected on the 
southwest corner of the campus at a cost of about $12,000. The 
building is of brick veneer and has ample floor space for basket- 
ball and the physical training work of the school. The build- 
ing is provided with dressing rooms, shower baths, spectators' 
seats, and a shop 25 by 50 feet in the basement for the de- 
partment of agriculture. The building has been named 
in honor of Cary's most distinguished and beloved citizen, Dr. 
J. M. Templeton, and is officially known as the Dr. J. M. 
Templeton Building for Physical Education. 




o 



Cary High School 33 



EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

At the end of each quarter, written examinations are given 
on all work gone over during the quarter and reports of scholar- 
ship, deportment, etc., are mailed to parents or guardians. The 
pass mark is 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Parents should see to it that their children are present on 
the opening day. Late entrance is the cause of much discour- 
agement and many failures. 

Boarding pupils are not allowed to leave Cary without the 
permission of the Principal in charge. 

Parents who find their children spending more money at 
Cary than is necessary should notify the Superintendent. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

jSTo unnecessary communication between the boarding girls 
and the boys of the school or town is permitted. 

Pupils in the dormitories are held responsible for all damage 
to school property in their rooms. A deposit of $5 is required 
to cover damage to rooms in the dormitories. This amount is 
returned to the occupant at the close of the session if the room 
is left in satisfactory condition. 

Do not request that books be charged, but furnish pupils 
with about $8 to cover cost of books. 

Boarding pupils are expected to attend Sunday school and 
church. 

Smoking in any of the school buildings or on the school 
grounds is prohibited. 

The school owns a moving picture machine, and occasionally 
films furnished by the State Department of Education and 
having an educational value are shown in the school auditorium. 

THE DOEMITOEIES 

The dormitory for girls is of brick and is furnished with neat 
and attractive furniture, each room being provided with a closet 
and containing an oak dresser, an oak washstand, two single beds 
with felt mattresses, a table with double drawers, and two chairs. 



Gary High School 35 

The brick dormitory for boys has practically the same con- 
veniences as the girls' dormitory. Both dormitories are pro- 
vided with steam heat, electric lights, running water (hot and 
cold), baths, etc. The boys' dormitory has shower baths. 

C. H. S. ECHOES 

The Senior Class publishes monthly during the school year 
a school paper of interest to the former pupils, and to the 
patrons and friends of the school. The subscription price is 
50c a year or 10c a copy. The title of the paper is C. H. 8. 
Echoes. The class also publishes an annual, in book form, 
which is highly prized by the members. 

A few copies of the 1927 Annual are still on hand and can be 
had at the regular subscription price of $3.25. 

HISTORY 

The Gary High School had its origin back in the last 
century and was owned and controlled by a stock company. 
In 1907, the owners of the property sold their stock to the 
county, and the school was converted into a State high school, 
the first to be established under the high school law of 1907. 
The official name was changed from the Gary High School to 
the Gary Public High School. In 1913 by special act of the 
legislature, providing for farm-life instruction in Wake County, 
there were added to the school the departments of agriculture 
and domestic science, the name of the school being changed 
from the Cary Public High School to the Cary Public High 
School and the E. L. Middleton Farm-Life School. 

The old Cary High School ranked as one of the leading 
high schools of the State in its day. With a large two-story 
wooden building, with good boarding facilities in dormitories 
and in the homes of the citizens of Cary, the school drew 
patronage from a large section of the State. 

Among the first teachers of the school were A. H. Merritt, 
Rev. Solomon Pool, W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page, and 
the Misses Jones. For twelve years from 1896 to 1908, the 
school was under the management of E. L. Middleton. In 



Gary High School 37 

1908, Mr. Middleton resigned to enter a different field of work, 
and the present Superintendent was elected as his successor. 

The school has maintained its prestige as a hoarding school 
for with new buildings, new and up-to-date equipment, with 
dormitories both for boys and girls, with new departments con- 
stantly being added, and with a corps of specially trained and 
experienced teachers, the school still draws patronage from a 
large territory. 

The old two-story wooden building which the school had 
outgrown was replaced in 1913-14 by a new and thoroughly 
modern brick structure with thirty-three rooms, costing $33,- 
000. The old dormitory building for boys which was burned 
in the spring of 1916, was replaced that year by a brick struc- 
ture at a cost of about $13,000. The building contains 31 
rooms, being provided with steam heat, electric lights, baths, 
lavatories, etc., and is now occupied by the girls under the care 
of the Lady Principal. The old privately owned girls' dormi- 
tory, which had been occupied by the boys since 1916, was 
burned in the fall of 1918. In 1919-20 there was erected on 
the campus a brick dormitory for the boys, practically 
a duplicate of the girls' dormitory, at a cost of about $28,000. 
This building contains 33 rooms and is provided with steam 
heat, electric lights, single beds, shower baths, etc. 

In the summer of 1923, another two-story brick building 
was erected to provide rooms for the departments of agri- 
culture, home economics, teacher-training and science. It con- 
tains 18 rooms and cost $45,000. This building has been named 
in honor of Cary's most illustrious citizen, the late Walter 
Hines Page, and is known officially as the Walter Hines Page 
Building for Vocational Training. 

In the spring of 1925 a gymnasium was erected on the campus 
at a cost of about $12,000. For description of ibis building, see 
page 31. 

In March, 1927, the school took another forward step by 
voting consolidation with several districts lying along the Sea- 
board Air Line and Southern Railway and extending from 
Raleigh to the Durham County line. Another brick building, 
the sixth since 1913, is now under construction and will be 



Cary High School 39 

ready for use in the fall of this year. This building will con- 
tain twelve rooms and will be used exclusively by the elementary 
school. The building will cost something over $31,000. 

The school campus contains four acres and, according to the 
last geological survey, is the highest ground in Wake County. 

The entire school plant at the present time is estimated to 
be worth $275,000. 

The town of Cary in 1926 installed a water and sewerage 
system at a cost of $150,000, thus materially enhancing the de- 
sirability of the town as a place of residence. Electric lights, 
electric power and telephones have been in use for several years. 
Recently the Baptist and Methodist denominations of the town 
have provided themselves with new brick church houses with 
every modern convenience and fully in keeping with the school 

buildings described in this catalogue. 

Note. Cary High School is accredited by the State De- 
partment of Education, and the elementary department has 
been standardized in accordance with the requirements ol the 
State Department of Elementary Supervision. 



Application for Admission 

CAEY HIGH SCHOOL 



Date 192. 

Name 

Postoffice 

Age County 

Name of Parent or Guardian 

Last School Attended 

Indicate by X which course you expect to take. 

1. Academic 

2. Agricultural 

3. Home Economics 

4. Teacher-Training 



Indicate by X if you wish room reserved in one of the 

Dormitories. ( ) 

Mail to M. B. Dry, Cary, N. C. 






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