(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue of Cary High School [serial]"

Cbe Hifcrarp 

of tl?r 

Ontersitp of Jftorti) Carolina 




Collection of Boxty Caroliniana 

jFtom tge Eibrarp of 

Natnan Wilson Walker 

C373.5 

C33 
vatt4JDFT-.\aiA-/ig 



CSV 9. 5 Cary^ 
"~ sonoo 



1904/ 



. G. Cary ^ife£i 



DATE 





This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



LUNC-15M N.36 
OP-13370 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueof190405191415 



AA-jJjy 



Cars IHigb School 
1905 



':' 




B. L. Middleton, Phixcipal. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Cary High School, 



CARY, N. C. 



1904-1905. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 1905-1906. 



*$* 




PRESSES OF 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



1. Directors and Stockholders. 

Board of Directors. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman. 
Rev. A. D. Hunter, Secretary. 
B. S. Franklin. F. R. Gray. C. W. Scott. 



Stockholders. 



C. W. Blanch ard. 

J. C. Angier. 

J. E. White. 

A. D. Hunter. 

J. W. Bailey. 

J. R. Walker. 

C. W. Scott. 

F. R. Gray. 

W. D. Jones. 

C. R. Scott. 

Miss Sallie Bonner. 



Mrs. J. K. Mason. 
P. D. Gray. 

B. S. Franklin. 
T. Ivey. 

J. W. Creel. 
Z. V. Johnson. 

C. B. Pasmore. 
R. R. Yates. 
Levi Cole. 

Dr. J. M. Templeton. 
E. L. Middleton. 



A. F. Sams. 



II. Calendar 1905-1906. 

Fall Term opens August 22, 1905. 
Thanksgiving Day, November 30, 1905. 
Fall Term closes December 22, 1905. 
Spring Term opens January 2, 1906. 
Easter Monday, Holiday, 1906. 
Spring Term closes May 17, 1906. 



III. Officers and Instructors. 

Session 1905-1906. 
I. E. L. Middleton, Principal, 
II. Dk. J. M. Templeton, Chm'n Board Directors. 

III. Mes. C. A. Wood, Matron. 

IV. E. L. Middleton, A.B. (Wake Forest, 1889), 

Mathematics, Science, Latin. 

V. 0. J. Jones, A.B. (Trinity College, 1904) , 
English, French, Greek. 

VI. Stella Pasmoee (Peabody Nor. College, 1895) , 
Primary. 

VII. Etta F. Peace, (Peace Institute, 1903) , 
History, Grammar Grades. 

VIII. Alice F. Best (Littleton Female College, 1901), 
Music, Elocution. 



IV. Index. 

Page. 

1 — Admission 6 

2— Athletics 12 

3 — Building and equipment 14 

4 — Bookkeeping 18 

5— Board 25 

6 — Christian influences 12 

7 — Commencement, 1905 32 

8 — Course of study 20 

9— Elocution > 18 

10 — Expenses 24 

11 — Examinations 16 

12 — Faculty — who we are 8 

13 — Graduation 17 

14— Honors 17 

15 — Library 15 

16 — Literary societies 14 

17 — Location 13 

18— Matriculation 6-7 

19 — Mental training 12 

20— Music 17 

21 — Miscellaneous 26 

22— Payments 7-24 

23 — Patron's wanted 11 

24 — Pupils wanted and not wanted 11 

25 — Reading-room 15 

26— Reports 16 

27— Roll, 1904-1905 29 

28— Summary 27-31 

29— Terms 24 

30 — Teacher's course 19 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



V. forewords. 

All enterprises of great success and use- 

1. A Look f u i ne g S are f slow growth. For eight 
Backward. 

years a few faithful men and women 

have worked and prayed and planned to have a 
strong, useful educational institution in Cary. Their 
efforts have not been in vain. The liberal patron- 
age, the excellent record of former pupils in our col- 
leges and in active life, and the unusually kind 
words of patrons, friends and the press all give evi- 
dence of the success of the enterprise. The building, 
grounds and equipment have been improved from 
year to year, until we now have a large and conve- 
nient building in one of the most desirable locations 
in the State. 

As we begin preparations for another 

2. A look y ear we are g rea tiy encouraged. The 

community has maintained its reputa- 
tion for loyalty to the school. Its patronage was full 
and regular. The great growth was in the number 
of non-resident pupils. There was an increase 
of 32 per cent, in this patronage. "We wish to thank 
our pupils and friends for their aid in enlarging the 
non-resident patronage. "We ask for continued sup- 
port and cooperation and promise our best efforts 
in maintaining our high standard of scholarship, and 
that vigilance which is necessary in guarding the 
moral and spiritual welfare of our pupils. 

2 



6 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Not an Ex- To prospective students we wish to say 
periment in all candor, that if you have not de- 
Station. cided to enter school in good faith, 

under the requirements of our catalogue, we much 
prefer that you do not enter at all — at least until 
you may have reached such a decision. Constant shift- 
ing in a student-body means endless confusion to 
teachers and little or no profit to pupils. All pupils 
are expected to enter for a full term of five months, 
or for the balance of the term. Since this Catalogue 
is our only means of communication, we shall con- 
sider that all pupils matriculating thereby agree to 
the above terms, unless satisfactory arrangements 
have been previously made. 

However much we may be interested in 

4. Not a Re- ^e re f orma tion of bad boys, we could not 

take the risk of endangering the charac- 
ter of many others for the hope of benefiting one. 
Because of the excellent moral atmosphere of Cary, 
and its numerous incentives to noble living, many 
boys have been strengthened morally while under 
our tuition, but we are too busily engaged otherwise, 
to devote our time to the subordination of pupils who 
have never been taught to respect just authority, or 
to tolerate for any considerable time such as persist 
in the practice of evil habits. We reserve the right 
to suspend any pupils whose influence is known to 
be injurious or demoralizing to the student body. 

Many farmers who think it almost a dis- 

5. When to g race ^ h. aV e farm work a few weeks 

behind that of their neighbors, think it 
all right to enter their children from one to eight 
weeks behind their classes. With late planting they 
expect poor crops, but ask for good results in school 
with late entrance. The first is as possible and prob- 
able as the last. Going to school is a business, and 
no one ever engages in any business more important. 



CABY HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

If one fail in business he may start again, but if edu- 
cation is neglected, lost opportunities can never be 
regained. We urge all to be present as early in the 
session as possible, and be sure to plan for the whole 
term. 

6 When and A ^ well-regulated schools incur expenses 
How to before the school opens, and many inci- 
Pay. dental expenses are due from the begin- 

ning, besides the salaries of teachers. Usually it 
causes no inconvenience for patrons to pay in ad- 
vance. "We are trying to run our school on business 
principles, and to do this we must have our patrons 
deal with us in the same way. In order to show 
good faith, we request each patron to make some 
payment on entrance, and pay balance of first quarter 
on presentation of statement after assignment to 
grades and classes. If this can not be done, let in- 
dulgence be asked for, so there can be no misunder- 
standing. 

Pupils frequently discontinue their work in the 
midst of a term without previous arrangement and 
ask for a pro rata discount in tuition. In the future 
patrons or pupils wishing indulgence on tuition or ex- 
pecting to discontinue before end of term must make 
such statement in writing within ten days after ad- 
mission. This is done to prevent misunderstanding. 
In no case will discounts be made for such absence 
during the last three weeks of a term. 

All pupils on entering, are required to 
7. Matncu- gjj blanks on registration card, giving 
lation. , ill.! 

name, age, parent, county, church rela- 
tion, date of registration, etc. On the reverse side 
they sign the following: "In entering Cary High 
School, I agree to obey all rules necessary to good 
order and efficient work. I shall consider and re- 
spect the rights of landlords, teachers and fellow-stu- 
dents." 



8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

VI. Who We Are. 

1. E. L. Middleton. — The Principal has heen in the 
school work for sixteen years. His nine years' labor 
in Cary bear testimony to his zeal and fitness for his 
position. He has a large number of endorsements 
from prominent men and former patrons. Such men 
can not afford to endorse a school which is not of 
high grade. Among these men are: 

(1) Dr. F. P. Venable, President University of 
North Carolina. 

(2) Dr. Chas. E. Taylor, President Wake Forest 
College. 

(3) Dr. John C. Kilgo, President Trinity College. 

(4) Prof. F. P. Hobgood, President Oxford Semi- 
nary. 

(5) Dr. B. F. Dixon, State Auditor of North Caro- 
lina. 

(6) Rev. L. Johnson, Corresponding Secretary Bap- 
tist Mission Board of North Carolina. 

(7) Dr. W. C. Tyree, Pastor First Baptist Church, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

(8) Dr. E. A. Yates, Professor Biblical Literature, 
Trinity College. 

(9) Dr. J. M. Covington, Wadesboro, N. C. 

The school is well known by many men who have 
not patronized it. By permission, the Principal re- 
fers you to the following: 

(1) Hon. J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent Public In- 
struction for North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C. 

(2) Dr. R. T. Vann, President Baptist University 
for Women, Raleigh, N. C. 

(3) Dr. E. W. Sikes, Professor History Wake For- 
est College, Wake Forest, N. C. 

(4) Dr. T. N. Ivey, editor Christian Advocate, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

(5) J. W. Bailey, editor Biblical Recorder, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

(6) Josephus Daniels, editor News and Observer, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

(7) John A. Oates, editor North Carolina Baptist, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

(8) Clarence H. Poe, editor Progressive Farmer, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

(9) N. B. Broughton, Publisher, Raleigh, N. C. 
(10) Hon. E. W. Pou, Member Congress from North 

Carolina, Smithfield, N. C. 

(11) Rev. G. T. Adams, pastor Centenary M. E. 
Church, South, New Bern, N. C. 

2. O. J. Jones. — From many applicants Mr. Jones 
was elected one year ago. His work has fully justi- 
fied the wisdom of the choice. He has been faithful, 
energetic and successful. He has in every way proven 
that the following endorsements are true: 

Dr. Kilgo writes: "You will be very fortunate to 
secure his services. He is a young man of unques- 
tioned integrity and will render you a very high or- 
der of service." Prof. S. A. Stewart, his former em- 
ployer, says: "I consider him an excellent teacher. 
He is scholarly and thorough. He commands the re- 
spect of his students and has a deep hold upon 
them." Rev. J. H. West, P. E. Morganton District, 
writes: "He was regarded as a fine teacher at Stan- 
ley Creek, giving universal satisfaction. I believe he 
will prove to be a valuable acquisition to your 
School." A former patron says: "He gave great sat- 
isfaction here, having the respect of patrons and pu- 
pils alike. He is a fine young man in every way, as 
true as steel and as solid as a rock." Others say the 
same good things of him. The public may expect 
former high standards in his departments to be 
maintained. 

3. Miss Stella Pasmore. — The standards of this 
department have always been very high. These have 



10 CARY HIGH SCHOOL, 

been maintained with Miss Pasmore in charge. She 
has taught with great success in private and public 
schools in Wake, Johnston and Robeson counties. She 
has made primary work her special study for nine 
years. With this broad experience, her tact and pa- 
tience, she has done much for the School. She is emi- 
nently competent to teach any advanced classes as- 
signed to her. Her methods are modern, practical 
and interesting. Her pupils become intensely inter- 
ested in their work. 

4. Alice F. Best. — The music and elocution de- 
partments have been kept to the high standards of 
the past. The departments were never so well filled 
with pupils. The pupils under her care showed the 
thoroughness of their training in our last commence- 
ment. A few opinions of her and her work are given 
below: "She is a refined, cultured, conscientious 
Christian woman. I believe she will do your work in 
music and elocution satisfactorily." "She is thor- 
oughly alive to her work and profession, and was con- 
sidered a first-class teacher. As a boarder in our 
home, she impressed us as a splendid Christian wo- 
man." "I can highly recommend Miss Best as an elo- 
cutionist. She has a natural aptitude for that work." 

5. Etta F. Peace. — During last year the growth of 
patronage was such as to enable the principal to put 
in a teacher to aid in grammar grades. Miss Peace 
has taught for two years with success. Her last em- 
ployer says of her: "She is an efficient and success- 
ful teacher, beloved by patrons and pupils, who join 
me in recommending her for any place for which she 
may wish to apply." Dr. Jas. Dinwiddie, President 
Peace Institute, says: "She is a young woman of 
highest qualities and of the finest character in every 
way. I can commend her without reserve for any 
position for which she applies. She is a young wo- 
man of marked ability and sterling worth." 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

VII. What We Want. 
Who are willing to co-operate with, us in 
our work. Those who have the courage 
to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatis- 
faction, rather than break a contract or backbite and 
malign a worthy institution. Those who honor a 
contract with a school teacher as much as one with 
a grocer. 

Who realize that mental force is superior 
2. Boys 

to physical force. Boys of good habits 

who want an education and are willing to work for 
it. Boys who see the great possibilities lying before 
men of the rising generation. 

Who realize the true nobility of woman- 
hood. Girls who are willing to live in 
woman's sphere and work faithfully to prepare them- 
selves for the noble callings now open to women. 
Girls who prefer well-stored brains and counten- 
ances beaming with intelligence to servile obedience 
to the whims of fashion. 

Pupils Not Wanted. 
Who do not want an education. Boys 
who curse, swear, play cards, and use 
intoxicants in any way or degree. Boys who are 
boisterous and indifferent to the rights of fellow-stu- 
dents, teachers and landlords. Boys who are habit- 
ual grumblers and malcontents. Boys who wilfully 
disobey necessary rules. Boys who, concerning their 
course of study, know more of their needs than the 
principal. Boys who enter on trial and stay only a 
short time. 

Who are unwilling to work for an edu- 
cation. Girls who will risk personal 
character and that of a school to carry their point. 
Girls who are unwilling to obey rules made for their 
welfare and protection. 



12 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

V1I1. What We Do. 

1. For the The School is not under the control of 
Heart. any religious denomination, but is thor- 
oughly permeated with the spirit of Christianity. 
Only teachers of recognized Christian character are 
employed, and students of every denomination, or of 
no church affiliations, are received on equal grounds 
in all respects. It is our policy to divide the teach- 
ers as equally as possible among the denominations 
represented by the patrons of the school. In no case 
will any influence be allowed which might draw a 
pupil away from his church moorings. As far as pos- 
sible, the wholesome influence of a Christian home is 
thrown around our students. While character is be- 
ing formed, and impressions for life are being made, 
the Christian teacher has open to him a most won- 
derful field of usefulness. 

The School is opened every morning with devo- 
tional exercises. Cary has a Methodist and Baptist 
church, and a mission of the Episcopal church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to at- 
tend the services of these churches and Sunday 
School regularly. 

It is our plan to cultivate our students 

2. For the physically as well as mentally and mor- 

ally. Otherwise the best results in the 
class-room and in after life can not be realized. To 
this end, we have foot-ball and baseball grounds, 
and students are encouraged to take sufficient out- 
door exercise. 

In all our work we have three ends in 

3. For the v j ew — i teach pupils to be observant of 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 
cate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him, draw 
out his mental powers rather than pour in a hetero- 
geneous mass of information. Pupils are encouraged 
to do as much original thinking as possible. In addi- 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

tion to mere mental discipline, we try to use those 
essentials in education tending to culture and refine- 
ment, and those which will prepare young men and 
women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for fu- 
ture work, whether in business, high school or col- 
lege. Frequent and thorough drills are given in 
spelling, reading and writing. In English Grammar, 
pupils are trained in the correct use of the language 
by frequent exercises in written work. "When the 
pupil has acquired a thorough knowledge of the tech- 
nical principles of grammar the critical study of Eng- 
lish Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as 
broad culture as possible and yet magnify the practi- 
cal parts. The student should be taught to reason 
from cause to effect, and, as far as possible, make 
practical application of every lesson imparted. Our 
methods of instruction are varied with a view to 
arousing and holding a live interest in the work. 

IX. Where We Are and What We Have. 

Too much could not be said of the desi- 
rability of the location. It is both health- 
ful and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the 
town of Cary could not be excelled in the State. The 
society in the town will be elevating and stimulating 
to the youth that will attend the institution. No bet- 
er railroad facilities could be furnished in the State 
— just at the junction of the Seaboard and Southern 
Railways, eight miles west of Raleigh. The town 
was chartered dry, and is fortified against the possi- 
bilty of alcoholic drinks ever being sold in or near it. 
Cary is far removed from malarial re- 
gions and has excellent water. Few 
towns can show a better health record. Lest there be 
misapprehensions, we explain the illness of last year. 

3 



14 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

During the spring term there were epidemics of grip, 
measles and some whooping-cough. There was not a 
single case of illness in the student body caused by 
any local conditions. The young man who died con- 
tracted pneumonia while at home and was never able 
to return to Cary. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
and surrounded by a beautiful campus 
of oaks, is our school building. On the first floor 
there are four large and well-lighted class-rooms — 
which may be easily converted into an auditorium — 
dining-hall, reading-room, library, and four music- 
rooms. On the second floor are rooms for the matron 
and dormitories for thirty boys. 

The entire building is furnished with 

4. Equip- suitable furniture and equipment. The 
ineiit. 

class-rooms have folding desks, charts 
and maps. The Society hall has chairs, tables and 
tracking. The music-rooms are furnished with four 
pianos, and the dormitory rooms with neat and com- 
fortable furniture. 

X. General Culture. 

1. Literary The Clay Society for young men and the 
Societies. Browning Society for girls meet once a 
week for exercises in debate, composition and elocu- 
tion. All members are required to take part in 
the exercises. Most excellent results have been ob- 
tained during the past year. The good to be derived 
from this work can not be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a 
fondness for reading. It gives the power of express- 
ing in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed 
by many people. It gives a broader view of men and 
things, and as an educator it has no superior. We 
want original thought, and there is no field broader 
and more capable of yielding rich harvest. We be- 




w 

M 



H 



CART HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

lieve the boys and girls need the supervision of teach- 
ers as much in their society work as in the class- 
room. And while the management of each society is 
left largely to its members, who perform all official 
duties, the Principals do not hesitate to make or un- 
make regulations when in their judgment the best 
interests of the societies demand it. All boarding 
pupils over fifteen years old will be required to be 
members of these societies. 

A library of 400 volumes has been col- 
y. ig^ed, to which additions are constantly 
being made. Every volume is carefully examined, 
and nothing except literature of high order is allowed 
on our shelves. We have many volumes of biogra- 
phy, history, addresses, together with the prose and 
poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, 
Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and 
others. 

No other preparatory school in North 
3. Reading:- Carolina has a better reading-room. On 

our files are Review of Reviews, World's 
Work, Outlook, McClure's, Cosmopolitan, Munsey, 
Frank Leslie, Youth's Companion, Success, with a 
large number of State and National periodicals and 
two excellent educational monthlies. All pupils have 
access to the reading-room every day, and during the 
past year it was largely used. 

XI. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine it- 
self to one specific line of work. We have two gen- 
eral ends in view — one to prepare boys and girls for 
college, the other to fit the great mass of our students 
for the active duties of life. In the latter class we 
can point with pride to young men and women who 
are becoming strong factors in the social, industrial 
and church life of their several communities. In the 



16 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

former class our pupils are doing us honor while 
honoring themselves. 

During last year our pupils led their classes in 
three colleges and stood high in several other institu- 
tions. Very few secondary schools send a larger per 
cent, of their senior classes to college. 

During last year we had a large number of former 
pupils in the following institutions: University of 
North Carolina, Trinity College, "Wake Forest Col- 
lege, A. and M. College, Elon College, Baptist Univer- 
sity for Women, N. C. Normal and Industrial College, 
Oxford Seminary, and Littleton Female College. This 
does not include several of our students who went 
directly from our school to professional schools. Sev- 
eral of our students at these colleges have graduated 
magna cum laude. 

XII. Record of Work,. 
1. Examina- Educators are not agreed as to how often 
tions. or k 0W difficult examinations should be. 

We require written examinations of all pupils on all 
studies during each quarter, but these examinations 
are short and at such times as will give the pupils 
an opportunity of telling what they know, and not 
what has been "crammed" in their heads for a special 
occasion. A record is kept of work on recitations, 
and an average mark is secured from these two 
sources. 

We send reports at the end of each ten 
epo s. -^gejjg^ ^- e keep, a n parents informed 

regarding the scholarship, deportment and attend- 
ance of their children. 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks on 
scholarship are not necessarily a sign of poor work. 
A poor mark on deportment needs immediate atten- 
tion. 



CART HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 
is posted. To be entitled to a place on 
this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on schol- 
arship, 95 on attendance, and excellent deportment. 
To be on the annual Honor Roll, a pupil must have 
been on all the quarterly Rolls of Honor. 

A handsome gold medal will be awarded to the 
pupil in the High School making the highest scholar- 
ship during next year. To compete for this, a pupil 
must be present to receive all the reports of the year. 

Prizes will be given on same conditions for highest 
mark in Grammar Grades and Primary Department. 

Medals will also be awarded for excellence in de- 
bate, essay writing, declamation and recitation. 
4. Gradua- I n the course of study there are seven de- 

tion. partments — Latin, English, Mathemat- 

ics, History, Greek, French, and Elementary Science. 

The first five of these are considered Majors and 
the last two Minors. To receive a certificate of profi- 
ciency a pupil must have completed the work in three 
Majors or two Majors and the two Minors. General 
History may be counted a Minor. All candidates for 
certificates must take one year in all Major except 
Greek. Pupils must average eighty-five per cent, on 
each year's work in each course. Deficits on work of 
the Junior year must be made up during the first 
quarter of the Senior year, and deficits during Senior 
year must be made up promptly. 

XIII. Special Departments. 

Music has long since come to be a neces- 
1. Music. 

sity to a civilized people. It is the most 

extensively cultivated and the most generally appre- 
ciated of all the fine arts. A thorough and conscien- 
tious course in music will certainly carry with its 
manual training, mental and heart training also. 
Many now study music who never expect to teach or 



18 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

become performers, because of the enlarged capacity 
to enjoy good music that comes from such a course of 
study, and because tbey realize that all cultivation of 
the fine arts is an upward and forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such 
a course of study as tends to give a thorough knowl- 
edge of music and to make the best performers. 

_ __ Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

2. Elocution. , . , , 

pastime study. The eyes of the people, 
even in our conservative South, have been opened to 
see not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practi- 
cal importance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inele- 
gant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the 
field to make room for the man who cultivates both 
brain and body. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feel- 
ings, we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, 
Force, Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Ca- 
dence to the various qualities of tone, selected with 
proper reference to the meaning to be conveyed." Ex- 
pression also teaches Self Control, Ease, Polish, Ad- 
dress, Fluency, etc. 

The policy of the School is to make no 

3. Book- promises that are not kept. We have 
keeping'. 

no separate departments for this study. 

Too many boys and girls are being misled by induc- 
ing them to take a business course before their men- 
tal development or experience in life warrants it. 
This study is pursued as a part of our work in Arith- 
metic, and is intended to prepare pupils for a more 
advanced study of the subject, or fit them for man- 
aging their own business as farmers, merchants, arti- 
sans, etc. The work is elementary, and we make no 
extra charge for it. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

Many teachers begin work before the 

4. Teachers' ^jg^ SC h 00 i course has been completed. 
Course. 

They often wish to prosecute their stud- 
ies further. We wish to aid them. During the first 
two months of the fall term we offer free literary tui- 
tion to all bona fide public school teachers and half 
rates through the remainder of the year. Persons 
securing these terms must have taught at least one 
term in the public schools. We can not form special 
classes for such pupils. The cooperation of County 
Superintendents is asked. 

5. Primary This is taught in a large, airy room 25 x 
Depart- 30 feet. Every effort has been put forth 
ment * to make the room attractive to the child- 
ren. Pictures have been put upon the walls and a 
small library has been collected, consisting of thirty- 
five volumes of historical, mythological and fairy 
stories. Any addition to this library by friends of 
the School will be appreciated. 

The word and phonic methods are used. In addi- 
tion to the regular course of study there are given 
throughout the year general exercises in physical cul- 
ture (the Swedish System), Manual Training and Na- 
ture Study. A Meteorological Record is kept daily 
by the pupils. Frequent walks are taken through 
fields and woods to study nature. In order to arouse 
interest in Nature Study, there is offered a prize to 
the pupil who does the best nature work in the Prim- 
ary Department. Some work in Primary Manual 
Training, consisting of drawing, sewing, etc., is given 
the children twice a week. 



20 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



XIV. Course of Study. 
(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Primer (Carnefix). 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader (Holmes). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Life of Washington. 

6. Number of Work. 

7. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader (Holmes). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. Number Work. 

5. Life of Franklin. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader (Holmes). 

3. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Harrington). 

5. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

6. Language Work. 

7. Physical Culture (Johnson). 

8. Writing. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 21 



(2.) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GKADE. 

1. Fourth Reader (Holmes). 

2. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. English Grammar (Hyde). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Life of Stonewall Jackson (Williamson). 

2. Primary History of United States (Chambers). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; Ad- 
vanced Arithmetic to Fractions (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Physiology (Steele). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Makers of American History (Chandler & Chit- 
wood). 

2. Spelling, Part II (Branson). 

3. Advanced Arithmetic to Percentage (Colaw and 
Ellwood). 

4. Mental Arithmetic (Milne's). 

5. Manual of Geography (Maury). 

6. English Grammar, Book II (Hyde). 

7. Writing. 



22 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



(3.) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — "Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctua- 
tion and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arclen, and Ara- 
bian Nights and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill from Percentage, including Mental 
Arithmetic (Milne's). 

History. — History of United States (Lee's New 
School); Civil Government (Peterman). 

Latin. — Beginner's Latin Book (Collar and Dan- 
iel) ; Exercises in Composition. 

Science. — Physiology (Martin's Human Body). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Grammar reviewed (Buehler), and a 
Study of English Composition; Study of American 
Literature on class, and as parallel reading using 
Evangeline, Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, etc. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic completed; Supplemen- 
tary Exercises and Appendix (Colaw and Ellwood); 
Mental Arithmetic (Milne's); First Steps in Algebra 
(Wentworth). 

History. — Eastern Nations, Greece, Rome (Myer's). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Gate to Caesar; Caesar's 
Gallic Wars, Book I (Allen and Greenough) ; Prose 
Composition (Pearson's). 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 23 



JXJNIOE YEAR. 



English. — Normal Grammar (Maris) ; Practical 
Rhetoric (Raub) ; Study of English Literature on 
class and as parallel reading, using Ancient Mari- 
ner, Julius Caesar, DeCoverly Papers, Silas Warner, 
etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra through Quadratics (Went- 
worth). 

History. — Mediaeval and Modern History (Myers). 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Book III (Allen and 
Greenough) ; Cicero's Orations Against Catiline (Al- 
len and Greenough); Prose Composition (Pearson's). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr) Pall Term — • 
Physics (Higgins). Spring Term. 

Greek. — First Greek Book (White). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — Rhetoric completed (Raub); English 
and American Literature (Swinton); Study of Eng- 
lish and American Literature, on class and as paral- 
lel reading, using Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
The Princess, Merchant of Venice, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra, completed; Plane Geome- 
try, Three Books (Wentworth). 

Latin. — Virgil's Aeneid, Books I and II; Prose Com- 
position, (Pearson's) ; Critical Study of Syntax and 
Prosody. 

French. — G r a m m a r ( Macmillan's) ; Readers 
(Conte's De Fees and Supers). 

History. — English History (Coman & Kendall). 

Greek. — Grammar reviewed. Xenophon's Anabasis. 
Books I and II. 



24 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

XV. Expenses. 

FALL SPEING 
TEEM. TEEM. 

First Grade $4.50 $5.00 

Second and Third Grades 6.75 7.50 

Fourth and Fifth Grades 9.00 10.00 

Sixth Grade 11.25 12.50 

Freshman Year 13 . 50 15 . 00 

Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years. 15.75 17.50 

Music 11.25 12.50 

Music, with instrument for practice. 13.50 15.00 

™ x. f 6.75 7.50 

Elocut1011 jll.25 12.50 

Incidental Fee 50 .50 

Library and Reading-Room Fee (for 

all above Fourth Grade) 25 .25 

XVI. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but month- 
ly payments may be arranged when necessary. No 
deduction will be made for absence except in cases of 
protracted illness of one week or more. All pupils 
must enter for a whole term or the remainder of a 
term, unless previous arrangements are made to the 
contrary. The entrance of a pupil will be considered 
as an acceptance of these terms. 

Ministerial students properly endorsed by their 
churches will receive a discount of 50 per cent, and 
the sons and daughters of ministers 25 per cent dis- 
count from the regular rates of literary tuition. 

A discount of 10 per cent is given to all parents 
sending three or more pupils, or to those whose quar- 
terly bills aggregate $20.00 or more. 

Any special arrangements desired must be made on 
or before the entrance of the pupils. The grading 
will be based on the course of study. In the Primary 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 25 

and Grammar School the rates will be in the grade 
in which the pupils have the most studies. Pupils 
having two or more of the following studies will be 
charged $17.50 per term: Latin, Algebra, General 
History, and Junior English. 

XVII. Board. 

During the past year satisfactory ar- 

1. Private rangements have been made for all pu- 
Families. , . . , , __ „ ._ 

pils desiring board. Many of the best 

Christian homes in Gary have been open for the boys 
and girls of the School. During the past year boys 
and girls have had different boarding places, and the 
same plans will be arranged for next year. Our 
charges are as low as can be arranged with present 
prices for groceries. These charges cover all ex- 
penses except washing, but each pupil will be re- 
quired to furnish a pair of blankets or two quilts, a 
pair of sheets and pillow-cases. Arrangements can 
be made to board from Monday till Friday of each 
week. The Principal will gladly arrange board when 
notified by parents. Charges for board are payable 
monthly. 

Board in private families $8.00 

Board from Monday until Friday 5 . 00 

Mrs. C. A. Wood, as Matron, will preside 

rmi- over the students' home in the school 
tory. 

building. 

These dormitories are furnished with bedstead, 

mattress with springs, chairs, table, lamp, etc. All 

boys rooming in dormitory must furnish sheets, 

towels, bedding, pillow, and toilet articles, such as 

comb and brush, soap, matches, etc. They get their 

board at actual cost, which varies with the price and 

quality of groceries. The estimated cost, based on 

the last two years, is $7.00 to $7.25 per month. There 



26 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

is no more desirable place connected with the School 
than this. 

During the past year pupils in these dormitories 
were allowed to remain in their rooms for study. The 
Principal found the charges were not sufficient to cover 
the increased expense for fuel. Those who remain in 
their rooms during school hours will be charged $1.25 
each per school month. The Principal reserves the 
right to remove any boy from the dormitory to the 
school rooms for indolence or disorder. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous. 

1. The Principal has selected text-books by stand- 
ard authors, and all pupils will be required to use 
books mentioned in the course of study, except when 
it is to the interest of the pupil for the teacher in 
charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term of five months, and pupils entering late must 
join classes already formed. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Going to school is as much 
a business as farming, merchandising, etc., and boys 
and girls should be taught to be prompt in meeting 
all business engagements. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation, they must seek it in 
other ways. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principal 
when a favor is to be asked for their children, or 
when any complaint is made. 

6. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must 
get permission from the Principal or Prof. Jones. 
Permission will not be given to boarding girls to 
leave Cary, except for their homes, unless by written 
request from their parents to the Principal. If pa- 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 27 

rents of boys wish special restrictions for their sons 
they should notify the Principal. 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principal for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

For further information, address 

E. L. MIDDLETON, Principal, 

Gary, North Carolina. 

XIX. Summary. 
A Few Reasons for Patronizing Cary High School. 

1. No other school "from the mountains to the sea" 
is so fortunately located. Situated in a high, well- 
drained town, supplied with abundance of good, cool 
well-water, it is free from malaria and has a general 
health record equal to any town in the entire State. 
It is located at the junction of S. A. L. and Southern 
railroads, eight miles west of Raleigh; has fourteen 
passenger trains daily, six of which are regular mail 
trains. No town can offer better facilities for travel, 
communication, etc. 

2. The moral atmosphere which pervades the town 
of Cary is very excellent. It was chartered dry, and 
is securely fortified against any alcoholic drinks ever 
being sold in or near it. All influences, socially and 
otherwise, are such as will prove refining and profit- 
able to students of the School. 

3. It is permeated with the spirit of Christianity. 
Only teachers of recognized Christian character are 
employed, and students of every denomination, or of 
no church affiliation, are received on equal grounds in 
all respects whatever. 

4. The course of study is comprehensive and prac- 
tical. 

5. The teachers are well prepared by learning and 
experience, and are enthusiastic and faithful in their 
work. 



28 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

6. The work done is not for show, but for thorough 
mental drill and a broad and practical knowledge of 
men and things. 

7. The school building is convenient in arrange- 
ment, well equipped in all departments, and neat in 
appearance. 

8. The Clay Society for boys and the Browning So- 
ciety for girls are a great aid in fitting pupils for the 
highest duties of life. 

9. The course in English is not surpassed by any 
school in the State. Our motto in this department is 
— "Read much, write much." 

10. In addition to a tborough literary course, it of- 
fers excellent advantages in Music and Elocution. 

11. A well-selected library of standard fiction, poet- 
ry, history, biography, etc., furnishes ample reading 
matter. No other preparatory school in North Caro- 
lina has a better reading-room. On our files are Re- 
view of Revieivs, World's Worlc, McOlure's, Youths' 
Companion, Outlook, etc. — over twenty standard pe- 
riodicals. 

12. It offers special terms to ministerial students 
and to the sons and daughters of ministers of all 
orthodox religious denominations. 

13. It affords separate boarding places and sepa- 
rate departments at school for the boys and girls. All 
boarding students are responsible to the Principal for 
their conduct out of school as well as while they are 
at the school building. 

14. Our charges for tuition and board are the low- 
est to be found, considering the advantages offered. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



29 



XX. Studen 



Adams, Ada. 
Adams, Clio. 
Adams, Gussie. 
Adams, Mabel. 
Adams, James M. 
AtMns, Harold. 
Atkins, Lillie. 
Baker, Roxana. 
Barwick, Dempsey. 
Bennett, Chester. 
Bennett, Laura. 
Blue, Cornelia. 
Blue, Daniel. 
Blue, Gertrude. 
Bonner, Blanchard. 
Bonner, Fannie. 
Bright, Ada. 
Broughton, Maude. 
Buffaloe, Myrtle. 
Buffaloe, Paul. 
Burt, Emma. 
Butt, Ethel. 
Butt, James. 
Capps, Loy B. 
Cooke, Duncan. 
Crews, Wilmot H. 
Darden, Maynard. 
Darden, Simeon I. 
Davis, Eunice. 
Davis, Walker. 
Edwards, Allie C. 
Edwards, Blannie. 
Edwards, Clenon C. 
Edwards, Lovie. 



ts, 1904-1905. 

Ferrell, Maggie. 
Finch, Ollie E. 
Finch, Sanford M. 
Franklin, Joseph L. 
Franklin, May Belle. 
Franks, Iola. 
Freeman, Vernon. 
Gattis, Eckie H. 
Gattis, Edna. 
Glenn, Willie B. 
Goodwin, Sidney. 
Gurley, Clem C. 
Harrington, Thomas J., Jr. 
Harrison, Arthur B. 
Harward, Floyd. 
Herndon, Claud. 
Hilliard, Cecil. 
Holding, Sidney C. 
Holland, Bertha. 
Holleman, Ethel. 
House, Eva. 
Howell, Maggie. 
Hunter, Isaac. 
Hunter, John. 
Hunter, LaRue. 
Hunter, Reid. 
Ivey, Esther. 
Ivey, Rachel. 
Ivey, Thaddeus. 
Johnson, Cyrus. 
Johnson, Charlie N. 
Johnson, Frances. 
Johnson, Mary Lynch. 
Jones, Craige. 



30 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



Jones, Ezra G. 
Jones, Shell. 
Jones, Hervey. 
Jones, Lillian. 
Jones, Marvin. 
Jones, Troy. 
Jordan, Alma. 
Keller, Raymond. 
King, Robert. 
King, Surveiter. 
Kivett, Edwin. 
Lawrence, Clyde. 
Lawrence, John H. 
Lowe, Arthur. 
Lowe, William Howard. 
Lynn, Norma. 
Maynard, Alfred. 
Maynard, Charlie C. 
Maynard, Kate. 
Maynard, Marvin. 
Matthews, Blanche. 
Matthews, Joseph. 
Matthews, Raymond. 
McGhee, Ezra. 
Mcintosh, Clem C. 
McKinnie, Mack B. 
Middleton, Ada. 
Middleton, Lucy. 
Middleton, Robert Lee. 
Mills, Junius. 
Mims, Avery. 
Mitchell, Jutson. 
Mitchell, Magruder. 
Montgomery, Amie Allen. 
Montgomery, Bays. 



Montgomery, Julia Lillie. 
Norris, Cadvin H. 
Norris, Clevy. 
Norris, Mary. 
Norwood, W. D. 
Nunn, Clifford. 
Nunn, Henry. 
O'Briant, Leland R. 
Ormond, "Wilbur. 
Page, Norma. 
Partin, Minda. 
Pepper, Bessie. 
Pepper, Worth. 
Perry, Clyde. 
Perry, Nonie. 
Pickett, Hubert W. 
Pipkins, Sammie. 
Pleasants, Clarence. 
Pleasants, Earl Barron. 
Pleasants, May. 
Pleasants, Milton. 
Preddy, Henry. 
Preddy, Willie S. 
Ray, Hickman. 
Rogers, Eva. 
* Scott, Arthur N. 
Scott, Elsie. 
Smith, Edwin. 
Smith, Herbert. 
Sorrell, Lloyd. 
Sorrell, Norman. 
Sorrell, Vara. 
Stephens, Myrtie. 
Stephens, Tommie A. 
Stephenson, Adelaide. 



♦Deceased. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 31 

Stephenson, Joseph H. Upchurch, Duby. 
Stephenson, Etta. Upchurch, Lizzie. 

Stephenson, Lina. Vaughan, Lillian. 

Stone, Lila. Trailer, Thomas S. 

Sutton, Hugh. Weathers, Ben A. 

Taylor, Mamie. Wilburn, M. T. 

Templeton, Alfred J. "Wilder, Milton. 

Templeton, Hugh. Williams, Nora. 

Thompson, Pearl. Williams, Pink. 

Thompson, Romie. Williams, Thomas. 

Thompson, Sanford. Winston, Lem E. 

Thompson, William P. Womble, Jodie B. 
Tilley, Ira. Woodall, Neta. 

Tilley, Mary. Woodard, Sadie. 

Tilley, Nannie. Woodward, Mary. 

Tilley, Laddin L. Wyatt, Thomas P. 

Tilley, Posie. Yates, Lydia. 

Turner, Leslie C. Yates, Otho. 

Umstead, Bertha. Young, Daniel C. 

Young, Will. 

Summary of Roll. 

Wake County — Resident Students 71 

Wake County — Non-resident Students 54 

Durham County 7 

Chatham County 10 

Franklin County 9 

Lenoir County 7 

Harnett County 5 

Moore County 3 

Richmond County 3 

Vance County 3 

Granville County 2 

Alamance County 1 

Wilson County 1 

Duplin County 1 

Total 177 



32 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



XXI. Commencement Exercises,- 1905. 

May 16. 8 p. m. Declamation and Recitation Contest by Represen- 
tatives of the Clay and Browning Literary Societies. 

May 17. 2.30 p.m. Exercises by Primary and Intermediate Depart- 
ments. 

8 p. m. Annual Debate by Representatives of the Clay 
Literary Society. 

May 18. 11 a. m. Annual Literary Address, by 

Rev. A. H. Moment, D.D., Raleigh, N. C. 

12 m. Graduating Exercises. 
8 p. m. Annual Concert by 

Music and Elocution Classes. 

Senior Class. 

L. L. Tilley, President. 

Maude Broughton, Secretary. 
Laurie Adams. J. R. King. 

S. I. Darden. Norma Lynn 

J. L. Franklin. Posie Tilley. 

Floyd Harward. A. J. Templeton. 

Esther Ivey. L. E. Winston. 

J.£C. Jones. T. S. Waller. 

Mary Woodward. 

Honors and Prizes. 

Scholarship Medal D. C. Young, Cary, N. C. 

Debater's Medal A. J. Templeton, Cary, N. C. 

Medal; for Improvement in Debate and Oratory, 

A. J. Templeton, Cary, N. C. 

Declaimer's Medal L. L. Tilley, Bahama, N. C. 

Recitation Medal Adelaide Stephenson, Raleigh, N. C. 

Essay Medal Esther Ivey, Cary, N. C. 

Grammar Grade Prize Gussie Adams, Cary, N. C. 

Primary Prize Ethel Butt, Cary, N. C. 



DON'T BUY & UT jT\ IT* ^ TILL YOU 



See the Largest and Latest Fashions 

and at less prices than any house in the City 

Every pair warranted 

S. C. POOL N£ RALEIGH, N. C. 

Dobbin &> Ferrall 

AT TUCKER'S STORE 

Raleigrh, ST. C. ' 

Dry Goods of All Kinds 

Ready-to- Wear Garments, Shoes, etc. 
Carpets, Curtains and Draperies 



WE GIVE 

DOBBIN & FERRALL'S 
Gold Trading Stamps 

( Registered ) 
with every cash purchase 
One stamp for every 10c. 



We sell better goods at lower 
prices than any other store 



We always have what you 
can not find elsewhere :: :: 



"LEST YOU FORGET, WE SAY IT YET" 

EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOLS 
EXCEPT BOOKS 

Charles J. Parker, Raleigh, N. C. 

The School Furniture and Supply Man, General Dealer and 

Manufacturers' Agent Virginia, North Carolina, 

South Carolina 

The Southern Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Secures positions for teachers. Write for particulars. 




Dress Suits Made to Order 

A SPECIALTY 

We have a line of samples of the best cloths for 

Dress Suits and guarantee a perfect fit 

and low prices. We also have 

a full line of 

Clothing, Underwear, Hats, 
Shoes, etc. 



Lowest 

Prices 

Guaranteed 



THE COMMERCIAL AND FARMERS BANK 

OF EALEIGH, 1ST. C. 
Resources . . $900,000.00. 

OFFICERS 

J. J. Thomas, President. B. S. Jebman, Cashier. 

A. A. Thompson, Vice-Pres. H. W. Jackson, Asst. Cashier. 
Jambs E. Shepherd, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS. 

J. J. Thomas, President. 

Ale. A. Thompson, President Raleigh Cotton Mills. 

Carey J. Hunter, Supt. Union Central Life Insurance Co. 

R. B. Raney, Gen. Agent Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Thos. H. Briggs, of Thomas H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

Joshua B. Hill, of J. R. Ferrall & Co., Grocers. 

Jas. E. Shepherd, of Shepherd & Shepherd, Attorneys at Law 

Henry A. London, Attorney at Law, Pittsboro, N. C. 

John W. Scott, Capitalist, Sanford, N. C. 

Geo. W. Watts, Director American Tobacco Co., Durham, N. C 

Ashley Horne, Pres. Clayton Banking Co., Clayton, N. C. 

Fred Phillips, Capitalist, Tarboro, N. C. 

D. Y. Cooper, Capitalist, Henderson, N. C. 

Ashby L. Baker, President Virginia Cotton Mills. 

Designated depositary of the State of North Carolina, the 
County of Wake and the North Carolina Railroad. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Burglar-proof Vault. New business 
wanted. Out of town deposits sent by mail and express receive 
prompt attention. 



CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

234 and 236 Fayetteville Street, 
New Tucker Building'. 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers and 
Outfitters, 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during 

your visit to our city. We will endeavor to make 

your stay pleasant. Respectfully, 

CROSS & LINEHAN CO., ^^igh, g. c. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina 
for 

ALL KINDS OF BOOKS 

~\§)©/^ 

A full line of Second-hand Books always on hand at 

One-Half Regular Price. We sell at 

Publishers' Prices. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention. 
Give Us Your Orders. 

Agents for Public School Books in North 
Carolina. 



Wfiarti 



EOPLE'S 
OPULAR 

aPLOn -Pushing 




ROGRESSIVE 
RALEIGH, N. C. J&ZZ^KOTOGRAPHER 

Always 

"NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD" 

and up-to-date. 

CHILDREN'S PICTURES A SPECIALTY. 




Raleigh Marble Works 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

COOPER BROS., Proprietors. 

HEADSTONES, MONUMENTS, 

IRON FENCES. 

Best Material. We pay the Freight. 

Best Work. Write for Catalogue. 

Low Prices. 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 

WITH 

BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO. 

206 Fayetteville St. and 208 Salisbury 
St., Raleigh, N. C. 

The Largest and Best Selected Stock of Dry 
Goods, Notions, Carpets, 

Millinery, Tailor- Made Suits, Cloaks and Capei 
shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the City. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLAN, PEARCE & COMPANY 

Established 1875. 

WYATT HARNESS COMPANY 

109 East Martin St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Manufacturers of Harness and Saddlery 

Jobbers of Saddlery Hardware, Robes, Oils, Soaps, Whips 
and all kinds of Horse-Furnishings. 

C. B. RAY, Proprietor. 



Patterns' Sun Proof Paint 

BEST OX EARTH, COVERS MORE 
THAN ANY PALNT MADE 



BUG DEATH 



Sure Death for Potato Bug-s; Non -Poisonous and 
is a Plant Eood. 

All Right Cook Stoves and Ranges 



Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best 

Goods. Lowest prices. Your money back 

if not satisfied. Call and see us. 

HART = WARD HARDWARE CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



R. J. HARRISON, Pres. F. R. GRAY, Vice-Pres. 

F. T. WARD, Sec'y and Treas., 

Raleigh, N. C. 

TRe Harrison Wagon (o. 




(Uagon manufacturers* 

OMice, RALEIGH, H. C. Works, CARY, H. C. 



Watson & Go's Gallery 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 

W. H. RIGGSBEE, Operator 

Thomas H. Griggs 
SJ!™i UTardware 



Raleigh, N. C. 




STOVES, TINWARE 
NAILS, IRON, STEEL 



Paints, Oils, Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime 
Plaster, Cement, Clay Chimney Pipe 



BEST GOODS 
LOWEST PRICES 
SQUARE DEALINGS 



BUCK'S STOVES 
AND RANGES 



J. H. STONE 

<fe OO. Dealers in Dry Goods 

^AtA7& Notions, Shoes and 

<S\Wy GENERAL 
GROCERIES 

The cheap cash store of the town. Come 
once and you will want to come again 

RAILROAD ST. CARY, N. C 




F. R. GRAY & BRO. 



CARY, N. C. 



We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, Pants* 
Gents' Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, Glass- 
ware, Hardware, Plow Castings and farming 
utensils. From our warehouse we can 
furnish you with cotton seed 
meal and hulls, corn, oats, 
hay, fertilizers, etc. 

COLD DRINKS DISPENSED AT AN UP-TO-DATE 

FOUNTAIN. 



COME TO SEE US 
We are Headquarters for Dry Goods 

Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing 
Goods, Groceries and Queensware. We sell as 
cheap as the cheapest We thank you for your 
past patronage and solicit your future Trade. 

W. D. JONES A A A CARY, N. C. 



Z. V. JOHNSON & SON 
UNDERTAKERS 



We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes, and General 

Burial Supplies. 

Wagons and Buggies Made and Repaired. 

General Repair Shop in Wood and Iron, 

Bicycles, Guns, Etc. 



CARY, N. C. 



Millinery Store. 

We carry a full line of Millinery in latest styles and can 

furnish goods 25 per cent to 50 per cent cheaper 

than city prices. In the general store you 

can get the best selection of dry 

goods and notions in 

the village. 

MRS. C. W. SCOTT, with C, R. SCOTT & SON. 

CARY, N. C. , 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

The Seventy-second Session will begin August 30, 1905. 
Fifteen independent "Schools," embracing 
Science, Language, Mathematics, 
Philosophy, Bible, Law, Peda- 
gogy, Medicine, Etc. 

Expenses flDofcerate* 

For Catalogues or Special Information, address 

CHAS. E. BREWER, 

Chairman of Faculty, 
WAK FORETSE, NORTH CAROLINA 

UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

RICHMOND, VA. 
MEDICINE-DENTISTRY-PHARMACY 

The facilities for instruction include a modern College 
building completely equipped, a large Hospital ad- 
joining, owned and controlled by the Faculty, two 
thoroughly established confinement dispensaries, 
and the privilege of teaching in other hospitals and 
public institutions in Richmond. 

JTor outline of courses offered and degrees conferred 
apply to 

William R. Miller, proctor 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Gary High School 



CARY, N. C. 



1905-1906. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 1906-1907. 




PRESSES OF 
EDWARDS & BROUGHTON, 
1906. 



1, Directors and Stockholders. 

Board or Directors. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman. 
.Rev. A. D. Hunter, Secretary. 
B. S. Franklin. F. R. Gray. C. W. Scott. 



C. W. Blanchard. 
J. C. Angier. 
J. E. White. 
A. D. Hunter. 
J. W. Bailey. 
J. R. Walker. 
0. W. Scott. 
F. R. Gray. 
W. D. Jones. 
C. R. Scott. 
Mrs. 0. J. Jones. 
S. W. Stone. 
Mrs. J. K. Mason. 



Stockholders, 

P. D. Gray. 

B. S. Franklin. 
T. Ivey. 

J. W. Creel. 
Z. V. Johnson. 

C. B. Pasmore. 
R. R. Yates. 
Levi Cole. 

Dr. J. M. Templeton. 
E. L. Middleton. 
A. F. Sams. 
L. B. Woodall. 
A. H. Pleasants. 



II. Calendar 1906-1907. 

Fall Term opens August 21, 1906. 
Thanksgiving Day, November 29, 1906. 
Fall Term closes December 20, 1906. 
Spring Term opens January 1, 1907. 
Easter Monday, Holiday, 1907. 
Spring Term closes May 16, 1907. 



III. Officers and Instructors. 

Session 1906-1907. 

I. E. L. Middleton, Principal. 

II. Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chm'n Board Directors. 

III. Mes. C. A. Wood, Matron. 

IV. E. L. Middleton, A.B. (Wake Forest, 1889), 
History, Mathematics, Science. 

V. Hoy Taylor, A.B. (Trinity College, 1906), 
English, Mathematics. 

VI. Ella Mundy, B.L. .(Rawlings Institute, 1901), 
Latin, French, Art. 

VII. Stella Pasmore (Peabody Nor. College, 1895), 
Primary. 

VIII. Sara Parham, A.B. (Oxford Seminary, 1897), 
Music, Elocution. 



IV. Index. 

Page. 

1 — Admission 6 

2— Art 18 

3 — Athletics 13 

4 — Building and equipment 14 

5 — Bookkeeping 19 

6 — Board 25 

7 — Christian influences 12 

8 — Course of study 20 

9 — Elocution 18 

10 — Expenses 24 

11 — Examinations 16 

12 — Faculty — who we are 8 

13 — Graduation i 17 

14 — Honors 17 

15 — Library 15 

16 — Literary societies 15 

17 — Location 14 

18 — Matriculation 7 

19 — Mental training 13 

20— Music 17 

21 — Miscellaneous 26 

22 — Payments 7-24 

23 — Patron's wanted 11 

24 — Pupils wanted and not wanted 11-12 

25 — Reading-room 15 

26— Reports 16 

27— Roll, 1904-1905 29 

28— Summary 27-31 

29 — Terms 24 



CATALOGUE 

OF 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



V. forewords. 

All enterprises of great success and use- 

1. A Lookf u i ness are f slow growth. For ten years 

'a few faithful men and women have worked 
and prayed and planned to have a strong, useful edu- 
cational institution in Cary. Their efforts have not 
been in vain. The liberal patronage, the excellent rec- 
ord of former pupils in our colleges and in active life, 
and the unusually kind words of patrons, friends and 
the press all give evidence of the success of the enter- 
prise. The building, grounds and equipment have been 
improved from year to year, until we now have a large 
and convenient building in one of the most desirable 
locations in the State. 

As we begin preparations for another year 

2. A Look we are greatly encouraged. The commu- 
Forward. , & . . . , 7? 

nity has maintained its reputation for 

loyalty to the school. Its patronage was full and regu- 
lar. The growth was in the number of non-resident 
pupils. We wish to thank our pupils and friends for 
their aid in enlarging the non-resident patronage. We 
ask for continued support and co-operation and promise 
our best efforts in maintaining our high standard of 
scholarship, and that vigilance which is necessary in 
guarding the moral and spiritual welfare of our pupils. 

2 



6 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Not an Ex- To prospective students we wish to say in 
periment all candor, that if you have not decided to 

on ' enter school in good faith, under the re- 
quirements of our catalogue, we much prefer that you 
do not enter at all — at least until you may have; 
reached such a decision. Constant shifting in a student- 
body means endless confusion to teachers and 'little or 
no profit to pupils. All pupils are expected to enter 
for a full term of five months, or for the balance of the 
term. Since this Catalogue is our only means of com- 
munication, we shall consider that all pupils matricu- 
lating thereby agree to the above terms, unless sat- 
isfactory arrangements have been 'previously made. 

However much we may be interested in 

4. Not a Re- ^g reformation of bad hoys, we could not 

" take the risk of endangering the character 
of many others for the hope of benefiting one. Because 
of the excellent moral atmosphere of Cary, and its 
numerous incentives to noble living, many boys have 
been strengthened morally while under our tuition, but 
we are too busily engaged otherwise, to devote our time 
to the subordination of pupils who have never been 
taught to respect just authority, or to tolerate for any 
considerable time such as persist in the practice of evil 
habits. We reserve the right to suspend any pupil 
whose influence is known to oe injurious or demorali- 
zing to the student body. 

Many farmers who think it almost a dis- 

5. When to g raee fa have farm work a few weeks be- 

hind that of their neighbors, think it all 
right to enter their children from one to eight weeks 
behind their classes. With late planting they expect 
poor crops, but ask for good results in school with late 
entrance. The first is as possible and probable as the 
last. Going to school is a business, and no one ever 



OARY HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

engages in any business more important. If one fail 
in business he may start again, but if education is 
neglected, lost opportunities can never be regained. We 
urge all to be present as early in the session as possible, 
and be sure to plan for the whole term. 
6 "When and ^^ well-regulated schools incur expenses 
How to before the school opens, and many inciden- 
Fay, tal expenses are due from the beginning, 

besides the salaries of teachers. Usually it causes no 
inconvenience for patrons to pay in advance. We are 
trying to run our school on business principles, and to 
do this we must have our patrons deal with us in the 
same way. * 

If payments cannot be made at times named in the 
catalogue, let indulgence be asked for, so there can be 
no misunderstanding. 

Pupils frequently discontinue their work in the midst 
of a term without previous arrangement and ask for a 
pro rata discount in tuition. In the future patrons or 
pupils wishing indulgence on tuition or expecting to 
discontinue before end of term must make such state- 
ment in writing within ten days after admission. This 
is done to prevent misunderstanding. In no case will 
discounts be made for such absence during the last three 
weeks of a term. 

All pupils, on entering, are required to fill 
Matncu- bia^g on registration card, giving name, 
age, parent, county, church relation, date 
of registration, etc. On the reverse side they sign the 
following: "In entering Cary High School, I agree to 
obey all rules necessary to good order and efficient work. 
I shall consider and respect the rights of landlords, 
teachers and fellow-students." 



8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

VI. Who We Are. 

1. E. L. Middleton. — The Principal has been in the 
school work for seventeen years. His ten years' labor 
in Cary bear testimony to his zeal and fitness for his 
position. He has a large number of endorsements from 
prominent men and former patrons. Such men cannot 
afford to endorse a school which is not of high grade. 
Among these men are: 

( 1 ) Dr. F. P. Venable, President University of North 
Carolina. 

(2) Dr. W. L. Poteat, President Wake Forest College. 

(3) Dr. John C. Kilgo, President Trinity College. 

(4) Prof. F. P. Hobgood, President Oxford Seminary. 

( 5 ) Rev. L. Johnson, Corresponding Secretary Bap- 
tist Mission Board of North Carolina. 

(G) Dr. W. C. Tyree, Pastor First Baptist Church, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

(7) Dr. E. A. Yates, Professor Biblical Literature, 
Trinity College. 

(8) M. W. Page, Sheriff Wake County. 

(9) Maj. J. J. Bernard, Register of Deeds Wake 
County. 

(10) Dr. John E. White, Atlanta, Ga. . 

(11) Rev. W. H. Rich, Macon, Ga. 

The school is well known by many men who have 
not patronized it. By permission, the Principal refers 
you to the following: 

( 1 ) Hon. J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent Public In- 
struction for North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C. 

(2) Dr. R. T. Vann, President Baptist University for 
Women, Raleigh, N. C. 

(3) Dr. E. W. Sikes, Professor History Wake Forest 
College, Wake Forest, N. C. 

(4) Dr. T. N. Ivey, editor Christian Advocate, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

(5) J. W. Bailey, editor Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

( 6 ) Josephus Daniels, editor Neiis and Observer, Ral- 
eigh. N. Q. 

(7) John A. Oates, editor North Carolina Baptist, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

( 8 ) Clarence H. Poe, editor Progressive Farmer, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

(9) N. B. Bronghton, Publisher, Raleigh, N. C. 

(10) Hon. E. W. Pou. Member Congress from North 
Carolina, Smithfield, N. C. 

2. Hoy Taylor. — Mr. Taylor was chosen from a large 
number of applicants, and we feel we have been exceed- 
ingly fortunate in securing him. He has had valuable 
experience in teaching. His record at Trinity has been 
very fine. He is heartily endorsed by the faculty of 
that college. Dr. John C. Kilgo says: "He is a young 
man of excellent talents, blameless character, and in 
every way worthy of the confidence of good men. I 
feel he will be a most valuable addition to your teach- 
ing force. 

B. B. Dougherty, Principal Appalachian Training 
School, says: "As a scholar, none better; as a teacher, 
successful : as a man he is almost ideal." 

Leading business men of his county say of him: "I 
have never known a young man whose moral character 
in every respect is superior to his, and I am satisfied 
his literary qualifications will be eminently satisfac- 
tory." "I have known him from childhood. His char- 
acter is excellent. You need have no fears as to his 
morals and push." 

3. Miss Ella Mundy. — Miss Mundy has been with us 
for five months and has shown herself to be in every 
way a first-class teacher. S^e is full of energy, requires 



10 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

thorough work by her pupils, and is an excellent discip- 
linarian. She has made a specialty of Latin, French 
and Art, She will do some work in the grammar grades. 
Former employers and teachers speak of her in the 
highest terms. 

Dr. H. W. Tribble, President Rawlings Institute, 
says of her: "It gives me pleasure to testify to her 
faithful and successful work. She has taken our liter- 
ary degree and art diploma. I feel she will be as 
faithful as a teacher as she has been as a pupil. Dr. 
C. A. Long, Professor of Latin, says: "Miss Mundy was 
under me in Latin and led a class of sixteen pupils. 
Her work in French was of a very high order. She is 
a full graduate of the art department, which requires 
four years of hard work for graduation." 

4. Miss Stella Pasmore. — The standards of this 
department haA'e always been very high. These have 
been maintained with Miss Pasmore in charge. She 
has taught with great success in private and public 
schools in Wake, Johnston and Robeson counties. She 
has made primary work her special study for nine years. 
With this broad experience, her tact and patience, she 
has done much for the School. She is eminently com- 
petent to teach any advanced classes assigned to her. 
Her methods are modern, practical and interesting. Her 
pupils become intensely interested in their work. 

5. Miss Sara Parham. — She comes to us for the first 
time, but has made an enviable reputation as a woman 
and teacher. She will in every way uphold the high 
standard in her departments. 

Prof. F. P. Hobgood says: "I can unqualifiedly recom- 
mend Miss Parham as an accomplished musician and 
successful teacher. She will do her work satisfactory 
to you and your patrons." John J. Wootten, New York 



CART HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

Conservatory of Music, says: "In Harmony she ranked 
with the first of her class. Her piano playing is bril- 
liant." A. F. Sams, Esq., of Board of Trustees employ- 
ing her last year, says: "She is a most attractive young 
woman and a positive force in any community. Were 
I in your place I would at once employ her." Editor 
Archibald Johnson, of same Board of Trustees, says: 
"She is a born teacher and can control your whole 
school. Her powers of command are truly wonderful. 
I advise you to secure her by all means." 

In our possession there are many other endorsements 
equally strong. 

VII. What We Want. 

Who are willing to co-operate with us in 

1. Patrons , m & , , 

our work. Those who have the courage to 

see and write to teachers regarding any dissatisfaction, 
rather than break a contract or backbite and malign 
a worthy institution. Those who honor a contract with 
a school teacher as much as one with a grocer. 

Who realize that mental force is superior 

2. Boys r 

to physical force. Boys of good habits 

who want an education and are willing to work for it. 
Boys who see the great possibilities lying before men 
of the rising generation. 

Who realize the true nobility of woman- 
hood. Girls who are willing to live in 
woman's sphere and work faithfully to prepare them- 
selves for the noble callings now open to women. Girls 
who prefer well-stored brains and countenances beaming 
with intelligence to servile obedience to the whims of 
fashion. 



12 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



1. Boys 



Pupils Not Wanted. 

Who do not want an education. Boys 
Who curse, swear, play cards, and use in- 
toxicants in any way or degree. Boys who are boister- 
ous and indifferent to the rights of fellow-students, 
teachers and landlords. Boys who are habitual "grumb- 
lers ana malcontents. Boys who wilfully disobey neces- 
sary rules. Boys who, concerning their course of study, 
know more of their needs than the principal. Boys 
who enter on trial and stay only a short time. 

Who are unwilling to work for an educa- 
2. Girls . 

tion. Girls who will risk personal charac- 
ter and that of a school to carry their point. Girls who 
are unwilling to obey rules made for their welfare and 
protection. 

VIII. What Wc Do. 

1. For the ^ ie School is not under the control of any 
Heart, religious denomination, but is thoroughly 
permeated with the spirit of Christianity. Only teach- 
ers of recognized Christian character are employed, and 
students of every denomination, or of no church affilia- 
tions, are received on equal grounds in all respects. It 
is our policy to divide the teachers as equally as pos- 
sible among the denominations represented by the pat- 
rons of the school. In no case will any influence be 
allowed which might draw a pupil away from his church 
moorings. As far as possible, the wholesome influence 
of a Christian home is thrown around our students. 
While character is being formed, and impressions for 
life are being made, the Christian teacher has open to 
him a most wonderful field of usefulness. 

The School is opened every morning with devotional 
exercises. Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, 
and a mission of the Episcopal church, with regular 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

services at each. Pupils are expected to attend the ser- 
vices of these churches and Sunday School regularly. 

It is our plan to cultivate our students 

' ° r e physically as well as mentally and morally. 
Otherwise the best results in the class- 
room and in after life cannot be realized. To this end, 
we have football and baseball grounds, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient outdoor exercise. 

In all our work we have three ends in 
3. For the view — to teach pupils to be observant of 
what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 
cate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him, draw out 
his mental powers rather than pour in a heterogenous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do as 
much original thinking as possible. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials in 
education tending to culture and refinement, and those 
which will prepare young men and women for -ae active 
duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments we 
take all. pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. Fre- 
quent and thorough drills are given in spelling, reading 
and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are trained 
in the correct use of the language by frequent exercises 
in written work. When the pupil has acquired a thor- 
ough knowledge of the technical principles of grammar 
the critical study of English Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as broad 
culture as possible and yet magnify the practical parts. 
The student should be taught to reason from cause to 
effect, and, as far as possible, make practical applica- 



14 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

tion of every lesson imparted. Our methods of instruc- 
tion are varied with a view to arousing and holding a 
live interest- in the work. 

IX Where We Are and What We have. 

„ T . Too much could not be said of the desira- 
1. Location. . . . 

bility of the location. It is both healthful 

and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the town of 

Cary could not be excelled in the State. The society in 

the town will be elevating and stimulating to the youth 

that will attend the institution. Xo better railroad 

facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 

junction of the Seaboard and Southern Railways, eight 

miles west of Raleigh. The town was chartered dry, 

and is fortified against the possibility of alcoholic 

drinks ever being sold in or near it. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 
2. Health. ' s 

and has excellent water, lew towns can 

show a better health record. During last year there 
was not a single case of illness in the student body 
caused by any local conditions. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
and surrounded by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are four large and well-lighted class-rooms — which may 
be easily converted into an auditorium — dining-hall, 
reading-room, library, and four music-rooms. On the 
second floor are rooms for the matron and dormitories 
for thirty boys. 

The entire building is furnished with suit- 
, able furniture and equipment. The class- 

rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. 
The Society hall has chairs, tables and tracking. The 
music-rooms are furnished with four pianos, and the 
dormitory rooms with neat and comfortable furniture. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

X. General Culture. 

1. Literary The Clay and Calhoun Societies for young 
Societies, men and the Browning Society for girls 
meet once a week for exercises in debate, composition 
and elocution. All members are required to take part 
in the exercises. Most excellent results have been ob- 
tained during the past year. The good to be derived 
from this work cannot be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a fond- 
ness for reading. It gives the power of expressing in 
public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by many 
people. It gives a broader view of men and things, and 
as an educator it has no superior. We want original 
thought, and there is no field broader and more capable 
of yielding rich harvest. All boarding pupils over fif- 
teen years old will be required to be members of these 
societies, or to do the equivalent work under the super- 
vision of a teacher on Friday afternoons. 

A library of 400 volumes has been col- 
lected, to which additions are constantly 
being made. Every volume is carefully examined, and 
nothing except literature of high order is allowed on 
our shelves. We have many volumes of biography, his- 
tory, addresses, together with the prose and poetical 
works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, 
Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and others. • 

No other preparatory school in North 

„ Carolina has a better reading-rocm. On 

Room. & 

our files are Review of Reviews, World's 
^York, Outlook, HcClure's, Cosmopolitan, Literary Di- 
gest, Collier's, Youth's Com-panion, Success, with a large 
number of State and National periodicals and two excel- 
lent educational monthlies. All pupils have access to 
the " reading-room every day, and during the past year 
it was largely used. 



16 VARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

XI. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general ends 
in view — one to prepare boys and girls for college, the 
other to fit the great mass of our students for the ac- 
tive duties of life. In the latter class we can point 
with pride to young men and women who are becoming 
strong factors in the social, industrial and church life 
of their several communities. In the former class our 
pupils are doing us honor while honoring themselves. 

Very few secondary schools send a larger per cent, of 
their senior classes to college. 

» During last year we had a large number of former 
pupils in the following institutions: University of 
North Carolina, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, 
A. and M. College, Elon College, Baptist University for 
Women, N. C. Normal and Industrial College. This 
does not include several of our students who went di- 
rectly from our school to professional schools. Several 
of our students at these colleges have graduated magna 
cum laude. 

XII. Record of Work.. 

1. Examina- Educators are not agreed as to how often 
tions. or h ow difficult examinations should be. 
We require written examinations of all pupils on all 
studies during each quarter, but these examinations are 
short and at such times as will give the pupils an oppor- 
tunity of telling what they know, and not what has 
been "crammed" in their heads for a special occasion. 
A record is kept of work on recitations, and an average 
mark is secured from these two sources. 

We send reports at the end of each ten 
weeks. We keep all parents informed re- 
garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance of 
their children. 




BALL TEAM. 




TENNIS COURT. 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks on schol- 
arship are not necessarily a sign of poor work. A poor 
mark on deportment needs immediate attention. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 

3. Honors. 

is posted. To be entitled to a place on 

this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on scholar- 
ship, 95 on attendance, and excellent deportment. To 
be on the annual Honor Roll, a pupil must have been 
on all the quarterly Rolls of Honor. 

A handsome gold medal will be awarded to the pupil 
in the High School making the highest scholarship dur- 
ing next year. To compete for this, a pupil must be 
present to receive all the reports of the year, — and must 
carry at least four studies each quarter. 

Prizes will be given on same conditions for highest 
mark in Grammar Grades and Primary Department. 

Medals will also be awarded for excellence in debate, 
essay writing, declamation and recitation. 

4. Gradua- In the course of study there are six de- 
tion. partments — Latin, English, Mathematics, 

History, French, and Elementary Science. 

The first three of these are considered Majors and 
the last three Minors. To receive a certificate of profi- 
ciency a pupil must have completed the work in three 
Majors or two Majors and two Minors. Pupils must 
average eighty-five per cent, on each year's work in each 
course. Deficits on work of the Junior year must be 
made up during the first quarter of the Senior year, and 
deficits during Senior year must be made up promptly. 

XIII. Special Departments. 

Music has long since come to be a neces- 
1. Music. . . . ° T . 

sity to a civilized people. It is the most 

extensively -cultivated and the most generally appre- 
ciated of all the fine arts. A thorough and conscien- 



18 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

tious course in music will certainly carry with its man- 
ual training, mental and heart training also. Many 
now study music who never expect to teach or become 
performers, because of the enlarged capacity to enjoy 
good music that comes from such a course of study, and 
because they realize that all cultivation of the fine arts 
is an upward and forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such a 
course of study as tends to give a thorough knowledge 
of music and to make the best performers. 

Elocution is no longer considered a mere 
2. Elocution. .. , , ^ n to , ,, 

pastime study. Ihe eyes of the people, 

even in our conservative South, have been opened to 

see not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practical 

importance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inelegant 
speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the field 
to make room for the man who cultivates both brain 
and body. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to the 
various qualities of tone, selected with proper reference 
to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression also teaches 
Self Control, Ease, Polish, Address, Fluency, etc. 

A knowledge of Art is not purely a matter 
of ornamental education. In most branches 
of trade, and in many branches of manufacture, an ar- 
tistic taste is a matter of practical importance -in the 
gaining of one's livelihood. There are few kinds of 
handiwork in which the element of design does not 
enter, and wherever the arts of design are in question, 
taste has to be exercised. There is a general tendency 
to introduce the practice of drawing into elementary 



GARY HIGH iiGHOOL. 19 

school instruction, resulting from a public recognition 
of these practical uses of Art instruction. 

We have provided instruction for courses in Draw- 
ing, Crayon and Pastel Work, Water Color and Oil 
Painting. 

The policy of the School is to make no 

4. Book- r J 

keeping-, promises that are not kept. We have no 

separate departments for this study. Too 
many boys and girls are being misled by inducing them 
to take a business course before their mental develop- 
ment or experience in life warrants it. This study is 
pursued as a part of our work in Arithmetic, and is in- 
tended to prepare pupils for a more advanced study of 
the subject, or fit them for managing their own business 
as farmers, merchants, artisans, etc. The Avork is ele- 
mentary, and we make no extra charge for it. 

5. Primary This is taught in a large, airy room 25 by 
Depart- 30 feet Every effort has been put forth 

to make the room attractive to the child- 
ren. Pictures have been put upon the walls and a small 
library has been collected, consisting of thirty-five vol- 
umes of historical, mythological and .fairy stories. Any 
addition to this library by friends of the School will be 
appreciated. 

The word and phonic methods are used. In addition 
to the regular course of study there are given through- 
out the year general exercises in physical culture (the 
Swedish System), Manual Training and Nature Study. 
A Meteorological Record is kept daily by the pupils. 
Frequent walks are taken through fields and woods to 
study nature. In order to arouse interest in Nature 
Study, there is offered a prize to the pupil who does 
the best nature work in the Primary Department. Some 
work in Primary Manual Training, consisting of draw- 
ing, sewing, etc., is given the children twice a week. 



20 CAh'Y HIGH SCHOOL. 



XIV. Course of Study. 

( 1 ) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Primer (Carnefix). 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader ( Holmes ) . 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Life of Washington. 

6. Number of Work. 

7. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader (Holmes). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. Number Work. 

5. Life of Franklin. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader (Holmes). 

3. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

4. Spelling, Part I ( Harrington ) . 

5. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

6. Language Work. 

7. Physical Culture (Johnson). 
S. Writing. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 21 



(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader (Holmes). 

2. North Carolina History Stories ( Allen ) . 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. English Grammar (Hyde). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Writing. 

FIFTH GEADE. 

1. Life of Stonewall Jackson (Williamson). 

2. Primary History of United States ( Chambers ) . 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Geography (Tarr & MeMurry). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; Ad- 
vanced Arithmetic to Fractions ( Colaw and Ellwood ) . 

7. Physiology (Culler). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Makers of American History (Chandler & Chit- 
wood ) . 

2. Spelling, Part II (Branson). 

3. Advanced Arithmetic to Percentage (Colaw and 
Ellwood ) . 

4. Mental Arithmetic (Milne). 

5. Manual of Geography (Maury). 

6. English Grammar, Book II (Hyde). 

7. Writing. 



22 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctuation 
and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and Arabian 
Nights and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill from Percentage, including Mental Arith- 
metic ( Milne ) . 

History. — History of United States (Lee's New 
School ) . * 

Latin. — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science. — Physiology (Culler). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Grammar reviewed (Buehler), and a Study 
of English Composition; Study of American Literature 
on class, and as parallel reading using Evangeline, Last 
of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, etc. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic completed; Supplementary 
Exercises and Appendix (Colaw and Ellwood) ; Mental 
Arithmetic, (Milne) ; First Steps in Algebra (Went- 
worth ) . 

History. — Famous Men Series; Civil Government 
( Schwinn & Stevenson ) . 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Introduction to Caesar 
(Brittain) ; Caesar's Gallic Wars, Book I (Allen and 
Greenough ) ; Prose Composition ( Pearson ) . 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 23 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English. — Normal Grammar (Maris) ; Practical Rhet- 
oric (Raub) ; Study of English Literature on class and 
as parallel reading, using Ancient Mariner, Julius Coz- 
sar, DeCoverly Papers, Silas Marner, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra to Quadratics (Wentworth's 
Elements ) . 

History. — General History (Myers). 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Book III (Allen and 
Greenough) ; Cicero's Orations Against Catiline (Allen 
and Greenough) ; Prose Composition (Pearson). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr) Fall Term — 
Physics ( Higgins ) . Spring Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — Rhetoric completed (Raub) ; Study of Eng- 
lish and American Literature, on class and as parallel 
reading, using Burke's Speech on Conciliation, The 
Princess, Merchant of Venice, etc. 

Mathematics.— Algebra., through Quadratics; Plane 
Geometry, Three Books ( Wentworth ) . 

Latin. — Virgil's Aeneid, Books I and II; Prose Com- 
position (Pearson's) ; Critical Study of Syntax and 
Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair) ; Readers 
( Conte's De Fees and Supers ) . 



24 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

XV. Expenses. 

FALL SPRING 
TERM. TERM. 

First, Second and Third Grades $6.75 $7.50 

Fourth and Fifth Grades 9 . 00 10 . 00 

Sixth Grade 11.25 12.50 

Freshman Year 13 . 50 • 15 . 00 

Sophomore and Junior Years 15.75 17.50 

Senior Year 18.00 20.00 

Music 11.25 12.50 

Use of piano for practice 2.25 2.50 

tj,, ,. f 6.75 7.50 

Elocution J 

\ 11.25 12.50 

Art J 675 75 ° 

1 11.25 12.50 

Incidental Fee 50 .50 

Library and Reading-Room Fee (for all 

above Fourth Grade) 25 .25 

XVI. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but monthly 
payments may be arranged when necessary. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, 
unless previous arrangements are made to the contrary. 
The entrance of a pupil will be considered as an accept- 
ance of these terms. 

Ministerial students properly endorsed by their 
churches will receive a discount of 50 per cent, and 
the sons and daughters of ministers 25 per cent discount 
from the regular rates of literary tuition. 

A discount of 10 per cent is given to all parents send- 
ing three or more pupils, or to those whose quarterly 
bills aggregate $20.00 or more. 




■•9T -* 'KT^.'i. 



RESIDENCE OF THE PRINCIPAL. 




BUILDING— FRONT VIEW. 



VARY RICH SCHOOL. 25 

Any special arrangements desired must be made on 
or before the entrance of the pupils. The grading will 
be based ©n the course of study." 

XVII. Board. 

During the past year satisfactory arrange- 
" Families. men ts have been made for all pupils desir- 
ing board. Many of the best Christian 
homes in Cary have been open for the boys and girls of 
the School. During the past year boys and girls have 
had different boarding places, and the same plans will 
be arranged for next year. Our charges are as low as 
can be arranged with present prices for groceries. These 
charges cover all expenses except washing, but each 
pupil will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or 
two quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow-cases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday of 
each week. The Principal will gladly arrange board 
when notified by parents. Charges for board are pay- 
able at end of each school month of four weeks. 

Board in private families $8 . 50 to $9 . 00 

Board from Monday until Friday $6 . 00 

Mrs. C. A. Wood, as Matron, will preside 
torv over the students' home in the school build- 

ing. 
These dormitories are furnished with bedstead, mat- 
tress with springs, chairs, table, lamp, etc. All boys 
rooming in dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bed- 
ding, pillow, and toilet articles, such as comb and 
brush, soap, matches, etc. They get their board at ac- 
tual cost, which varies with the price and quality of 
groceries. The estimated cost, based on the last two 
years, is $7.00 to $7.25 per month. There is no more 
desirable place connected with the School than this. 



26 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

During the pastyear pupils in these dormitories were 
allowed to remain in their rooms for study. The Prin- 
cipal reserves the right to remove any boy froA the dor- 
mitory to the school rooms for indolence or disorder - . 

XVIII. Miscellaneous. 

1. The Principal has selected text-books by standard 
authors, and all pupils will be required to use books 
mentioned in the course of study, except when it is to 
the interest of the pupil for the teacher in charge to 
order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term of five months, and pupils entering late must join 
classes already formed. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation, they must seek it in other 
ways. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 

6. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal or Prof. Taylor. Per- 
mission will not be given to boarding girls to leave 
Cary, except for their homes, unless by written request 
from their parents to the Principal. If parents of boys 
wish special restrictions for their sons they should no- 
tify the Principal. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 27 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the Prin- 
cipal for their conduct out of school, as well as while 
at the school building. 

For further information, address 

E. L. MIDDLETON, Principal, 

Gary, North Carolina. 

XIX. Summary. 

A pew Reasons for Patronizing Cary High School 

1. Xo other school "from the mountains to the sea" 
is so fortunately located. Situated in a high, well- 
drained town, supplied with abundance of good, cool 
well-water, it is free from malaria and has a general 
health record equal to any town in the entire State. 
It is located at the junction of S. A. L. and Southern 
railroads, eight miles west of Raleigh; has fourteen 
passenger trains daily, six of which are regular mail 
trains. No town can offer better facilities for travel, 
communication, etc. 

2. The moral atmosphere which pervades the town of 
Cary is very excellent. It was chartered dry, and is se- 
curely fortified against any alcoholic drinks ever being 
sold in or near it. All influences, socially and other- 
wise, are such as will prove refining and profitable to 
students of the School. 

3. It is permeated with the spirit of Christianity. 
Only teachers of recognized Christian character are em- 
ployed, and students of every denomination, or of no 
church affiliation, are received on equal grounds in all 
respects whatever. 

4. The course of study is comprehensive and prac- 
tical. 

5. The teachers are well prepared by learning and ex- 
perience, and are enthusiastic and faithful in their 
work. 



28 VARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

6. The work done is not for show, but for thorough 
mental drill and a broad and practical knowledge of 
men and things. 

7. The school building is convenient in arrangement, 
well equipped in all departments, and neat in appear- 
ance. 

8. The Clay and Calhoun Societies for boys and the 
Browning Society for girls are a great aid in fitting 
pupils for the highest duties of life. 

9. The course in English is as good as the best in the 
State. Our motto in this department is — "Read much, 
write much." 

10. In addition to a thorough literary course, it offers 
excellent advantages in Music and Elocution. 

11. A well-selected library of standard fiction, poetry, 
history, biography, etc., furnishes ample reading mat- 
ter. No other preparatory school in North Carolina 
has a better reading-room. On our files are Review of 
Revieios, World's Work, McClure's, Youths' Companion, 
Literary Digest, etc. — over twenty standard periodicals. 

12. It offers special terms to ministerial students 
and to the sons" and daughters of ministers of all ortho- 
dox religious denominations. 

13. It affords separate boarding places and separate 
departments at school for the boys and girls. All board- 
ing students are responsible to the Principal for their 
conduct out of school as well as while they are at the 
school building. 

14. Our charges for tuition and board are the lowest 
to be found, considering the advantages offered. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



29 



XX. Students, 1905-1906. 



Adams, Ada. 
Adams, Clio. 
Adams, Gussie. 
Adams, Mabel. 
Adams, Henry. 
Arie, Edna. 
Atkins, Harold. 
Atkins, Lily. 
Atkins, Ray. 
Avent, E. H. 
Bagwell, Marvin. 
Baker, Roxie. 
Baucom, Estus. 
Blue, Daniel. 
Blue, Cornelia. 
Blue, Gertrude. 
Booker, Carr. 
Bonner, Blanchard. 
Bonner, Fannie. 
Broughton, Irene. 
Broughton, J. R. 
Breeze, Pearl. 
Buffaloe, Paul. 
Buffaloe, Myrtle. 
Capps, L. B. 
Cash, Robert. 
Cheek, John M. 
Clevinger, Edna. 
Campbell, Ben. 
Coleman, H. G., Jr. 
Currin, Johnnie. 
Daniel, W. B., Jr. 



Davis, Eunice. 
Davis, Ora. 
Duke, Vann. 
Edwards, Blannie. 
Edwards, Lovie. 
Edwards, Ruth. 
Edwards, C. C. 
Edwards, Donnie. 
Eatman, Bessie. 
Eatman, Dulcie. 
Farrar, Geo. W. 
Finch, Saniord. 
Flemming, John. 
Freeman, E. V. 
Franklin, May. 
Griffith, Leslie. 
Goodwin, Arthur. 
Goodwin, Earl. 
Gower, C. E. 
Gurley, C. C. 
Harrison, A. B. 
Harward, Frank. 
Herndon, Alma. 
Herndon, Frank. 
Herndon, C. N. 
Hilliard, S. C. 
Hooker, Ella. 
Holloway, Bessie. 
Holloway. Clyde. 
Holleman, Ethel. 
House, H. H. 
House, Eva. 



30 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



Hunter, H. R. 
Hunter, LaRue. 
Hunter, Isaac. 
Hunter, John. 
Hurst, Vernon. 
Ivey, Thaddeus, Jr. 
Ivey, Esther. 
Ivey, Geo. E. 
Ivey, Rachel. 
Ivey, Hannah. 
Jones, Hervey. 
Jones, Troy. 
Jones, Percy. 
Jones, Lattie. 
Jones, Joe P. 
Jones, Marvin. 
Jones, Lillian. 
Johnson, W. R. 
Johnson, W. L. 
Jordan, Jas. A. 
King, H. N. 
Lawrence W. E. 
Lawrence, G. C. 
Lyon, C. D. 
McDonald, John. 
Middleton, Ada, 
Middleton, Robert Lee. 
Middleton, Lucy. 
Middleton, Rachel. 
Mangum, Graham. 
Maynard, Viola. 
Maynard, L. A. 
Maynard, C. D. 
Mavnard, C. C. 



Maynard, Katharine. 
Maynard, John. 
Matthews, J. R. 
Markham, Olive. 
Murdoch, Emerson. 
Mims, A. H. 
Newsom, Allie. 
Norris, C. H. 
Norris, D. C. 
Norris, A. D. 
Norris, Lonnie. 
Norris, Mary. 
Nunn, J. C. 
Nunn, J: H. 
Page, Lillian. 
Page, Bertie. 
Page, Maude. 
Page, Norma. 
Page, 0. C. 
Partin, Aldridge. 
Partin, Charity. 
Patrick, Alvis. 
Plesants, Milton. 
Plesants, Clarence. 
Plesants, May. 
Peacock, Vernon. 
Peed, V. O. 
Pickett, H. W. 
Powers, Nona. 
Ranes, Robt. B. S. 
Reynolds, Beulah. 
Rich, John. 
Roycroft, Nannie. 
Saintsing, Geo. W. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



31 



Stainback, Helen. 
Stainback, Annie Burt. 
Sears, J. L. 
Sears, Jimmie. 
Sears, Ruth. 
Scott, F. Y. 
Shepherd, Genie. 
Smith, Benton. 
Smith, D. R. 
Sorrell, L. V. 
Sorrell, C. R. 
Sorrell, Maude. 
Starling, Braxton. 
Stalling, L>. I. 
Stephenson, Adelaide. 
Stephenson, Lina. 
Stone, Lila. 
Stone, Lola. 
Stone, Loulie. 
Templeton, Hugh. 
Templeton, Elva. 
Tilley, Bertha. 
Tilley, I. E. 
Tilley, Mary. 
Tilley, Nannie. 



Thomas, Nannie. 
Thompson, Pearl. 
Thompson, Elsie. 
Upchurch, J. B. 
Upchurch, Lizzie. 
Upchurch, Dubie. 
Veazey, S. B. 
Veazey, Archie. 
Vernon, C. T. 
Warren, Edgar. 
Waller, J. A. 
Weathers, B. A. 
Weathers, Bahnson. 
White, J. E., Jr. 
Wilder, J. E. 
Wilder, M. A. 
Winston, V. H. 
Womble, J. B. 
Woodard, Sadie. 
Woodlief, Amos. 
Woodlief, Needham. 
Yates, Lydia. 
Young, J. M. 
Young, D. C. 
Young, Herbert. 



Summary of Roll. 



Wake, local 73 

Wake, boarders 58 

Durham 13 

Granville 10 

Chatham 5 

Richmond 3 

Vance 3 

Harnett 2 

Onslow 2 

Wayne 2 



Person 2 

Wilson 

Beaufort 

Duplin 

Haywood 

Davidson 

Stanly 

Chesterfield, S. C 2 

Fulton, Ga 1—182 



32 



VARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



XXI. Commencement Exercises, 1906. 

May 15. 8 p. m. Declamation and Recitation Contest by Represent- 
atives of the Clay, Calhoun and Browning Literary 
Societies. 
May 17. 2. 30 p. m. Exercises by Primary and Grammar Grades. 
8 p. m. Annual Debate by Clay and Calhoun Societies. 
May 18. 11 a m. Annual Literary Address by Dr. E. W. Sikes, Wake 
Forest, N. C. 
12 m. Graduating Exercises. 
8 p. m. Annual Concert by Music and Elocution Classes. 

Honors and Prizes. 

Scholarship Medal Lydia Yates. 

Debater's Medal C. R. Soreell. 

Medal for Improvement in Debate C. R. Soerell. 

Declaimer's Medal John M. Cheek. 

Recitation Medal Kate Maynard. 

Essay Medal Lydia Yates. 

Grammar Grade Prize Robert Lee Middi.eton. 

Primary Prize Ethel Butt. 

Senior Class. 

E. V. Freeman, President. 
Ada Middleton, Secretary. 

W. B. Daniel. May Franklin. 

C N. Heendon. Ethel Holleman. 

H. R. Hunter. Kate Maynard. 

H. N. King. Norma Page. 

C. C. Maynard. Maude Soeeell. 

B. A. Weathers. Adelaide Stephenson. 

D. C. Young. Lydia Yates. 



DON'T BUY SHOES TILL YOU 



See the Largest and Latest Fashions 
and at less prices than any house in the City 

EVERY PAIR WARRANTED 

S. C. POOL RALEIGH, N.C. 

Dobbin-Ferrall Co. 

AT TUCKER'S STORE 
Raleigrh, X. C. 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 

Ready-to-Wear Garments, Shozs, etc 
Carpets, Curtains and Draperies 



.WE GIVE 

DOBBIN-FERRALL GO'S 
Gold Trading Stamps 

(REGISTERED) 

with every cash purchase 
One stamp for every 10c. 



We sell better goods 
at lower prices than 
any other store jfe j& 
We always have what 
you cannot find else= 
where j& .& jfe j& 



"EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOLS EXCEPT BOOKS" 

CHAS. J. PARKER, RALEIGH, N. C. 

The School Furniture and Supply Man, General Dealer 

and Manufacturers' Agrent Virginia, North 

Carolina, South Carolina 



The Southern Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Secures positions for teachers. Recommends teachers to 
Employers. Confidential correspondence invited 



D.ress Suits Made to Order 

A SPECIALTY 

We have a line of samples of the best 
cloths for Dress Suits and guarantee a 
perfect fit and low prices. We also 
^== have a full line of ~ 

p Clothing, Underwear, $4 
iS A Hats, Shoes, etc. A S 



Lowest 

Prices 

Guaranteed 




THE COMMERCIAL AND FARMERS BANK 

OF RALEIGH, X. C. 



Resources 



$900,000.00 



OFFICERS 

J. J. Thomas, President. B. S. Jerman, Cashier. 

A. A. Thompson, Vice-Pres. H. W. Jackson, Asst. Cashier. 

James E. Shepherd, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS. 

J. J. Thomas, President. 

Alf. A. Thompson, President Raleigh Cotton Mills. 

Carey J. Hunter, Supt. Union Central Life Insurance Co. 

R. B. Raney, Gen. Agent Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Thos. H. Briggs, of Thomas H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

Joshua B. Hill, of J. R. Ferrall & Co., Grocers. 

Jas. E. Shepherd, of Shepherd & Shepherd, Attorneys at Law. 

Henry A. London, Attorney at law, Pittsboro, N. C. 

John W. Scott, Capitalist, Sanford, N. C. 

Geo. W. Watts, Director American Tobacco Co., Durham N. C. 

Ashley Horne, Pres. Clayton Banking Co., Clayton, N. C. 

Fred Phillips, Capitalist, Tarboro, N. C. 

D. Y. Cooper, Capitalist, Henderson, N. C. 

Ashby L. Baker, President Virginia Cotton Mills. 

Designated depositary of the State of North Carolina, the 
County of Wake and the North Carolina Railroad. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Burglar-proof Vault. New business 
wanted. Out of town deposits sent by mail and express receive 
prompt attention. 



CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

234 and 236 Fayetteville Street, 

New Tucker Building, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

CLOTHING, MEN'S FURNISHERS AND 
OUTFITTERS. 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during 

your visit to our city. We will endeavor to 

make your stay pleasant. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS 6 CO. 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina 
____________ for — 

ALL KINDS OF BOOKS 

A full line of Second-hand Books always on hand a^ 

One-Half Regular Price. We sell at 

Publishers' Prices. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention, 
Give Us Your Orders. 

_____________ Agents for . 



Public School Books in North Carolina. 






EOPLES' 

'</%(//?7®Y&Z?££- I Popular 
__ i_ p— Pushing 



RALEIGH, N. C. 




ROGRESSIVE 
HOTOGRAPHERS 



Always 

"NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD" 

and up-to-date. 

CHILDRENS' PICTURES A SPECIALTY. 



RALEIGH MARBLE WORKS 

RALEIGH, 1ST €.. 
/> ' "4 - COOPER BROS., Proprietors. 




HEADSTONES, TABLETS, IRON FENCES. 

Best Material. We pay the Freight. 

Best Work. Write for Catalogue. 

Low Prices. 

CHARLES B. PASMORE 

WITH 

BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

206 Fayetteville St. and 208 Salisbury 
St., Raleigh, N. G. 

The Largest and Best Selected Stock of Dry 
Goods, Notions, Carpets, 

Millinery, Tailor- Made Suits, Cloaks and Capes 
shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the City. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 



Established 1875. 

Wyatt Harness Company 

109 East Martin St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Manufacturers of Harness and Saddlery 

Jobber* of Saddlery Hardware, Robes, Oiis, Soaps, Whips 
and ail kinds of Horse-Furnishings. 

C. K. RAY, Proprietor. 



Patterns' Sun Proof Paint 

BEST OX EARTH, COVERS MORE 
THAN ANY PAINT MADE 

BUG DEATH 

Sure Death for Potato Bugs; Non-Poisonous and 
is a Plant Pood. 

AH Right Cook Stoves and Ranges 



Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best 
Goods. Lowest prices. Your money back if not 
satisfied. Call and see us ::::::::: : 

HART=WARD HARDWARE CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



R. J. HARRISON, Pees. F. R. GRAY, Vice-Pees. 

F. T. WARD, Sec'y and Teeas., 

Raleigh, N. C. 

The Harrison WaAon Co. 







WAGON MANUFACTURERS. 

Office, RALEIGH, N. C. Works, CARY, N. C- 



JNO. P. HAYES 

photographer 

Money Saved You on Every Sitting Made at My Gallery 
WORK AS GOOD AS THE BEST, GUARANTEED 
Agent for Edison and Victor Machine Records and Supplies 

124% FAYETTE VILLE ST. RALEIGH, 3SF. C. 

Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 




E 



STOVES, TINWARE, NAILS, IRON, STEEL. 

Paints, Oils, Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime 
Plaster, Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe 

BEST GOODS 
LOWEST PRICES 
SQUARE DEALINGS 

Buck Stoves ant) IRanges 



J. BL STONE & CO. 

Dealers in Dry Goods 
Notions, Shoes and GENERAL 

GROCERIES 

The cheap cash store of the town. Come 
once and you -will want to come agrain 

RAILROAD ST. CARY, N. C. 



F. R. GRAY & BRO. 

CARY, N. C. 

We cary a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, Pants. 
Gents' Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, Glass- 
ware, Hardware, Plow Castings and farming uten- 
sils. From our warehouse we can furnish 
you with cotton seed meal and hulls, 
corn, oats, hay, fertilizers, etc. 

COLD DRINKS DISPENSED AT AN UP-TO-DATE 
FOUNTAIN. 



COME TO SEE US, WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR 

DRY GOODS 



Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing 
Goods, Groceries and Queensware. We sell as 
cheap as the cheapest. We thank you for your 
past patronage and solicit your future Trade. 

W. D. JONES CARY, N. C. 

Z. \. JOHNSON & SON 

^UNDERTAKERS IS 



We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and General 

Burial Supplies. •! Wagons and Buggies Made 

and Repaired, fl General Repair Shop 

in Wood and Iron, Bicycles, 

Guns, etc. :: :: :: 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA. 

MILLINERY STORE 

We carry a full line of Millinery in latest styles and 
can furnish goods 25 per cent to 50 per cent 

cheaper than city prices. In the general 
store you can get the best selection of dry goods 

and notions in the village. :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 

MRS. C. W. SCOTT, with C. R. SCOTT & SON 
CARY, N. C. 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

The seventy-third Session will begin August 
29, 1906, Sixteen independent ''Schools," 
embracing the Sciences, Languages, Mathe- 
matics, Philosophy, Bible, Law, Education, 
Medicine (first two years) Etc 

jSipenses flftofretate 

For Catalogues or Special Information, address 

President 

W. L. POTEAT, 

WAKE FOREST, North Carolina 



PIANOS AND ORGANS 



of the very best makes sold on easy terms at prices that 
can not be beaten, quality considered. 



=We also Handle a Full Line of= 



Guitars Banjos, Violins,, all Kinds of Strings 
for String Instruments. 

ALL THE LATEST POPULAR SHEET 
MUSIC AT HALF PRICE 

The famous Shoninger Pianos are sold by us at prices 
and terms that will surprise you. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
RALEIGH, North Carolina 



Cat£ public MiQb Scbool 
1907 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Cary High School, 

CARY, N. C. 



1906-1907. 



Announcements of Cary Public 
High School, 1907-1908. 






presses of 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Go. 

1907 



I. School Committee. 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
Sion Holleman, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



II. Calendar, 1907-1908. 

On account of delay in getting lumber for new building the 
opening has been delayed two weeks. Here is the amended 
Calendar : 

Fall Term opens (Primary Department) September 2, 1907 ; 
(Grammar Grades and High School) September 3, 1907. 
Thanksgiving Day, November 28, 1907. 
Christmas Holidays, December 21 to December 30. 
Fall Term closes January 10, 1908. 
Spring Term opens January 13, 1908. 
Examinations close May 13, 1908. 
Commencement Exercises May 1-1 and 15, 1908. 



111. Officers and Instructors. 

Session, 1907—1908. 
I. E. L. Middleton, Principal. 
II. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 

III. Mrs. C. A. Wood, Manager Boys' Club. 

IV. Mbs. W. T. Lynn, Manager Browning Hall for 

Girls. 

V. E. L. Middleton, B.A. (Wake Forest College 
1889), 

History, Mathematics, Science. 

VI. J. M. Templeton, Jr., B.A. (Trinity College, 
1907), 

English, Mathematics. 

VII. Ella Mtjndy, B.L. (Rawlings Institute, 1901), 
Latin, French, Art. 

VIII. Julia Pasmore (N. C. Normal and Industrial 
College, 1902), 

Grammar Grades. 

IX. Lillian E. Fields (Peace Institute, 1907), 
Elocution, Primary Grades. 

X. Irma Ellis (N. C. Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege) ; Primary Grades, 
XL Nettie Rodwell (Baptist University for Women, 
1907), 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 



IV. Commencement 1907. 

May 14, 8 p. m. Contest in Declamation and Recitation. 

May 15, 3 p. m. Exercises of Primary Department. 

May 15, 8 p. m. Annual Debate. 

May 16, 11 a. m. Annual Address by Hon. R. N. Page, Biscoe, N. C. 

May 16, 12 m. Graduating Exercises. 

May 16, 8 p. m. Annual Concert. 

Winners of Prizes and Medals. 

High School Scholarship Medal Inona Powers. 

Grammer Grade Scholarship Prize— Robert L. Middleton. 

Primary Grade Scholarship Prize .Ethel Butt. 

Essay Medal Sadie Woodard. 

Writing Prize Jno. P. Hunter. 

Debaters' Medal S. C. Hilliard. 

Declaimers' Medal J. C. Kich. 

Recitation Medal Cleo Adams. 

Clay Improvement Medal H. E. Britt. 

Calhoun Improvement Medal A. T. Knott. 

Senior Class 1907. 

J. M. CHEEK, President. 

SADIE WOODARD, Secretary. 

Ada Adams. L. R. O'Brian. 

D. T. Blue. O. C. Page 

Dulcia Eatman. H. W. Pickett. 

A. B. Harrison. J. C. Rich. 

S. C. Hilliard. P. Y. Scott. 

G. D. Mangum Lila Stone. 

E. P. Warren. 

Certificate in Elocution Cleo Adams. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 



Gary Public High School 



V. Forewords. 



All enterprises of great success and useful- 
Backward. 



* * ■ ' C " J * ness are of slow growth. For eleven years 



a few faithful men and women have worked 
and prayed and planned to have a strong, useful edu- 
cational institution in Cary. They have given of their 
time and money for the success of the school. The build- 
ings have been enlarged from year to year. The patron- 
age has grown in numbers and territory. Following 
these labors will be a school under new management. 

The General Assembly of 1907 enacted a 
2, A Look j aw providing f or a system of public high 

schools for North Carolina. This policy is 
new in our State but not an experiment. Nearly all 
States that are advancing in education have adopted 
this plan for their secondary schools. It remains to be 
seen if our people will co-operate in this plan and make 
the law effective. Anyone can secure a copy of the law 
and rules of the State Department of Education under 
the law by applying to Hon. J. Y. Joyner, Raleigh, N. C. 

The rules of Superintendent Joyner admits 
' w "° can those who have completed the course of 

study for public schools issued from his 
office. The first six grades in this catalogue cover this 
course. Applicants must stand examination on entering 
or bring certificate from last teacher saying the course 



6 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

has been satisfactorily completed, and this must be 
signed by the County Superintendent. 

All public school teachers of whatever age, and stu- 
dents over twenty-one years of age, who pledge to teach, 
will be entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one years 
of age must pay tuition. The law allows four schools 
to a county. At this writing only one has been estab- 
lished in Wake County. As soon as others are estab- 
lished the territory and grades of these schools will be 
established by the County Board of Education. 

^ . .j The County Board of Education has al- 
4. Outside J . .. 

Patron- lowed the school committee to receive pupils 

agre. from territory outside of Wake County. 

This is allowed in all public high schools. These pupils 

will receive every advantage formerly given by the school 

under private management. There will be room for 

these in boarding houses and school rooms, and no 

undue crowding will be allowed. We earnestly solicit 

the co-operation of our old pupils outside of Wake 

County. 

Many farmers who think it almost a dis- 
5. When to grace to have farm work a few weeks be- 
Bnter. hi ^ ^^ of their -neighbors, think it all 
right to enter their children from one to eight weeks 
behind their classes. With late planting they expect 
poor crops, but ask for good results in school with late 
entrance. The first is as possible and probable as the 
last. Going to school is a business, and no one ever 
engages in any business more important. If one fail in 
business he may start again, but if education is neg- 
lected, lost opportunities can never be regained. We 
urge all to be present as early in the session as possible, 
and be sure to plan for the whole term. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 1 

VI. The Faculty. 

The School Committee has exercised the greatest 
painstaking in electing teachers for next year. Full 
investigation was made regarding the ability, fitness 
and attainments of each one. 

From a very large number of applicants the teachers 
named on another page were chosen. It is believed their 
work will prove the wisdom of their election. 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want. 

Under the new management we wish to have a most 
cordial relationship existing between parents and pupils 
and teachers. There must be between parents and 
teachers, harmony, sympathy, co-operation and mutual 
good will, if good results. Let the parents openly come 
to us and name their ideals, and if right and possible 
we will reach them. Here are some of our ideals: 

Who are willing to co-operate with us in 
our work. Those who have the courage to 
see and write to teachers regarding any dissatisfaction, 
rather than backbite and malign a worthy institution. 

Who realize that mental force is superior 

to physical force. Boys of good habits 

who want an education and are willing to work for it. 

Boys who see the great possibilities lying before men 

of the rising generation. 

Who realize the true nobility of woman- 
hood. Girls who are willing to live in 
woman's sphere and work faithfully to prepare them- 
selves for the noble callings now open to women. Girls 
who prefer well-stored brains and countenances beaming 
with intelligence to servile obedience to the whims of 
fashion. 



8 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

VIM. What Wc Do. 

The school is thoroughly permeated with 
1. For the the spirit of Christianity. Only teachers of 

recognized Christian character have been 
employed. In no case will any influence be allowed 
which might draw a pupil away from his church moor- 
ings. As far as possible, the wholesome influence of a 
Christian home is thrown around our students. While 
character is being formed, and impressions for life are 
being made, the Christian teacher has open to him a 
most wonderful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer-meeting. It 
is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 
been developed. Nearly all students attend the regular 
church prayer-meetings at the churches. The school is 
opened every morning with devotional exercises. 

Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, and a 
mission of the Episcopal church, with regular services 
at each. Pupils are expected to attend the services of 
these churches and Sunday school regularly. 

It is our plan to cultivate our students 
r physically as well as mentally and morally. 

Otherwise the best results in the class- 
room and in after life cannot be realized. To this end, 
we have foot-ball and base-ball grounds, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient out-door exercise. A few 
match games are allowed, but our team has never been 
allowed to be away except to return the same day. An 
excellent tennis court is available to teachers and pupils. 
Basket-ball will be encouraged next year. 

In all our work we have three ends in 
8. For the v j ew — to tea«h pupils to be observant of 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 



CART PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

cate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him, draw out 
his mental powers rather than pour in a heterogenous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do as 
much original thinking as possible. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials in 
education tending to culture and refinement, and those 
which will prepare young men and women for the active 
duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments we 
take all pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. Fre- 
quent and thorough drills are given in spelling, reading 
and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are trained 
in the correct use of the language by frequent exercises 
in written work. When the pupil has acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the technical principles of gram- 
mar the critical study of English Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as broad 
culture as possible and yet magnify the practical parts. 
The student should be taught to reason from cause to 
effect, and, as far as possible, make practical applica- 
tion of every lesson imparted. Our methods of instruc- 
tion are varied with a view to arousing and holding a 
live interest in the work. 

IX. Where We Are and What We Have. 

Too much could not be said of the desira- 
1. Location, Mlity of the location It ia both healthful 

and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the town of 
Cary could not be excelled in the State. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the youth 
that will attend the institution. No better railroad 
facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 
junction of the Seaboard and Southern Railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. The town was chartered dry, 



10 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

and is fortified against the possibility of alcoholic drinks 

ever being sold in or near it. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 
2. Health. /, „ ™ . 

and has excellent water, lew towns can 

show a better health record. During last year there 
was not a single case of illness in the student body 
caused by any local conditions. The young man who 
died during the year contracted pneumonia during one 
of the sudden changes of weather. 

Many pupils are exceedingly careless in the preserva- 
tion of health in unnecessary exposure without wraps, 
over-shoes and hats. A very large per cent of all sick- 
ness here is traceable to such thoughtlessness. Parents 
are urged to co-operate with teachers in this matter. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
' and surrounded by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are four large and well-lighted class-rooms — which may 
be easily converted into an auditorium — dining-hall, 
reading-room, library, and four music-rooms. On the 
second floor are rooms for the matron and dormitories 
for thirty boys. To this old building will be added dur- 
ing vacation a splendid building with two more school- 
rooms and two literary society halls. The present build- 
ing will be improved by painting and white-washing. 

The entire building is furnished with suit- 
quip- a jjj e f urn iture and equipment. The class- 
ment. . ^ r 

rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. 

Sufficient new furniture will be added to meet the needs 
of an enlarged patronage. The music-rooms are fur- 
nished with four pianos, and the dormitory rooms with 
neat and comfortable furniture. The literary societies 
will, at an early day, equip their halls with all needed 
furniture — chairs, pictures, tables, carpets, statuary, 
etc. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

X. General Culture. 

The Clay and Calhoun Societies for young 
1. Literary men an( j ^e Browning Society for girls 
' meet once a week for exercises in debate, 
composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. Most excellent results 
have been obtained during the past year. The good to 
be derived from this work can not be overestimated. It 
gives a knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates 
a fondness for reading. It gives the power of expressing 
in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by many 
people. It gives a broader view of men and things, and 
as an educator it has no superior. We want original 
thought, and there is no field broader and more capable 
of yielding rich harvest. 

Besides the above societies there is the Juvenile 
Society for boys and girls of the grammar grades. The 
pupils of the primary grades are required to do the 
same work. Every pupil in school will be required to 
do this work in declamation, recitation, essay writing 
and debate in one of the school organizations or on 
English classics once in two weeks. 

A library of over 500 volumes has been col- 
lected, to which additions are constantly 
being made. Every volume is carefully examined, and 
nothing except literature of high order is allowed on 
our shelves. We have many volumes of biography, his- 
tory, addresses, together with the prose and poetical 
works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, 
Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and others. 

During the past year Mrs. Mary E. Akins, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., gave the school nearly 100 volumes. Some of 
these are rare and costly. The school greatly appre- 
ciates this gift. During next year we wish to add at 
least 100 volumes. 



12 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Under new conditions it will not be expedient or pos- 
sible to conduct a reading-room, as in the past, but 
pupils will be encouraged to form reading circles and if 
possible a class in Current History will be formed. 

XI. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general ends 
in view — one to prepare boys and girls for college, the 
other to fit the great mass of our students for the active 
duties of life. In the latter class we can point with 
pride to young men and women who are becoming strong 
factors in the social, industrial and church life of their 
several communities. In the former class our pupils 
are doing us honor while honoring themselves. 

Very few secondary schools send a larger per cent of 
their senior classes to college. 

During last year we had a large number of former 
pupils in the following institutions: University of 
North Carolina, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, 
A. and M. College, Elon College, Baptist University for 
Women, N. C. Normal and Industrial College and Ox- 
ford Seminary. This does not include several of our 
students who went directly from our school to profes- 
sional schools. 

Many of our pupils find themselves in the front in 
their classes. They make high marks and are frequent 
winners of medals and college honors. 

XII. Record of Work.. 

Educators are not agreed as to how often 
1. Examin- or ^ ow a ifg cu it examinations should be. 
at ions. . . 

We require one or more written examina- 
tions of all pupils on all studies during each quarter, 
but these examinations are short and at such times as 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

will give the pupils an opportunity of telling what they 
know, and not what has been "crammed" in their heads 
for a special occasion. A record is kept of work on reci- 
tations, and an average mark is secured from these two 
sources. 

These examinations must be stood or the pupil take 
zero in making our averages. It is manifestly unfair to 
require a part and not all pupils to pass examinations. 
There are too low ideals regarding examinations. 
Pupils are not allowed to give or receive aid from any 
source. To appropriate the ideas of others unlawfully 
is as sinful as to steal material things, and to give these 
makes the giver a party to the sin. 

Zero is given on such examinations, with enough de- 
merits to make deportment "bad." Pupils guilty of this 
can not receive a school certificate until the work has 
been passed during a subsequent year. 

We send reports at the end of each nine 
weeks. We keep all parents informed re- 
garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance of 
their children. 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks on scholar- 
ship are not necessarily a sign of poor work. A poor 
mark on deportment needs immediate attention. 
3. Promo- Our standards will be kept high. Pupils 
tlon * to pass from one year or grade to the next 

must average eighty per cent on their respective studies, 
and all examinations must be passed. Pupils stopping 
before end of term and failing to stand examinations 
have no right to expect promotion until the omitted 
pages have been learned and examinations stood. All 
reputable institutions of learning require this. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 
'is posted. To be entitled to a place on 
this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on scholar- 
ship, 95 on attendance^ and excellent on deportment. 



14 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

To be entitled to honorable mention a pupil must 
make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A handsome gold medal will be given by the Principal 
to the pupil in the High School making the highest 
scholarship during next year. To compete for this, a 
pupil must be present to receive all the reports of the 
year — and must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

The literary societies will give medals for excellence 
in debate, declamation and recitation. 

Other prizes may be announced after the session is 
opened. 

In the course of study there are six de- 

. ra ua- partments — Latin, English, Mathematics, 

History, French, and Elementary Science. 

The first four of these are considered Majors and the 
last two Minors. To receive a certificate of proficiency 
a pupil must have completed the work in three Majors 
or two Majors and two Minors. Work through the 
Junior Year of Latin or Mathematics may be counted as 
a Minor. Deficits on work of the Junior year must be 
made up during the first quarter of the Senior year, and 
deficits during Senior year must be made up promptly. 

XIII. Special Departments. 

Music has long since come to be a necessity 
to a civilized people. It is the most exten- 
sively cultivated and the most generally appreciated of 
all the fine arts. A thorough and conscientious course 
in music will certainly carry with its manual training 
mental and heart training also. Many now study music 
who never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that comes 
from such a course of study, and because they realize 
that all cultivation of the fine arts is an upward and 
forward step. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such a 
course of study as tends to give a thorough knowledge 
of music and to make the best performers. 

Miss Rodvvell has made an extensive study of vocal 
music. We hope many will avail themselves of training 
in this department. Arrangements will be made to teach 
quartets and chorus classes at nominal cost. 
2. Elocu- Elocution is no longer considered a mere 
tion. pastime study. The eyes of the people, 

even in our conservative South, have been opened to see 
not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practical im- 
portance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inelegant 
speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the field 
to make room for the man who cultivates both brain and 
body. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to the 
various qualities of tone, selected with proper reference 
to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression also teaches 
Self-Control, Ease, Polish, Address, Fluency, etc. 

A knowledge of Art is not purely a matter 
of ornamental education. In most branches 
of trade^ and in many branches of manufacture, an ar- 
tistic taste is a matter of practical importance in the 
gaining of one's livelihood. There are few kinds of 
handiwork in which the element of design does not 
enter, and wherever the arts of design are in question, 
taste has to be exercised. There is a general tendency 
to introduce the practice of drawing into elementary 
school instruction, resulting from a public recognition 
of these practical uses of Art instruction. 

We have provided instruction for courses in Drawing, 
Crayon and Pastel Work, Water Color and Oil Painting. 

The teaching of the above work is conditioned on there 



16 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

being enough pupils to justify the management in form- 
ing the class. 

The law creating public schools admits all 
4. Teachers' pub u c school teachers. Many pupils of the 
Course. f . . * * f 

nigh schools are preparing to teach. In 

addition to the regular literary course and special 
courses named above we desire to form classes for special 
preparation for the great work of teaching. An effort 
is being made to provide the best advantages for such a 
course — an opportunity of taking a regular normal 
course with practical work in observation and teaching 




CART PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

XIV. Course of Study. 

( 1 ) Primary. 

FIKST GRADE. 

1. First Steps in Phonies. 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

4. Spelling, Part I (Griffith and Foust). 

5. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

6. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 
Numbers. 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware I). 

8. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

3. Spelling, Part II (Griffith and Foust). 

4. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

5. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware II). 

8. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

3. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Primary Arithmetic, pages 109-203 (Colaw and 
Ellwood ) . 

6. Language Work — Same as Second Grade. 

7. Physiology — Oral Instruction. 

8. Geography — Tarr and McMurray. 

9. Drawing (Webb and Ware III). 

10. Writing. 



18 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

2. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. English Grammar, pages 1-70 (Hyde). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic completed (Colaw and Ell- 
wood ) . 

7. Physiology, Book I (Culler). 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware IV). 

9. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. The Story of the Old North State (Connor). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Spelling, Parts III and IV (Griffith and Foust). 

4. Geography (Tarr & McCurry). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Intermediate Arithmetic (Colaw and Duke). 

7. Agriculture for Beginners. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware V). 

9. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling, Parts V and VI (Griffith and Foust). 

2. English Grammar — Our Language II (Smith). 

3. Higher History of U. S. (Chambers'). 

4. Complete Geography (Maury). 

5. Advanced Arithmetic to Percentage (Colaw and 
Ell wood ) . 

6. Physiology, Book II (Culler). 

7. Civil Government (Peele). 

8. Writing. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 



(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctuation 
and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and Arabian 
Nights and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood); a 
thorough drill from Percentage, with all reviews and 
supplementary exercises. 

History. — History of U. S. reviewed (Chambers) ; 
History of N. C. (Hill). 

Latin. — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Grammar reviewed ( Buehler ) , Fall term 
and Normal Grammar (Maris), Spring term, Study of 
American Literature on class, and as parallel reading 
using Evangeline, Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, 
etc. 

Mathematics.— Arithmetic completed; First Steps in 
Algebra (Wentworth) ; High School Algebra to Factor- 
ing ( Wentworth's Elements ) . 

History. — Civil Government (Schwinn & Stevenson). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Introduction to Caesar 
(Brittain). 

Science. — Physiology, Book III ( Culler ) . 



20 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School English (Keeler and Adams); 
Study of English Literature on class and as parallel 
reading, using Ancient Mariner, Julius Caesar, DeCov- 
erly Papers, Silas Marner, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra through Quadratics (Went- 
worth's Elements). 

History. — General History (Myers). 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough) ; Cicero's Orations Against 
Catiline (Allen and Greenough) ; Prose Composition 
( Pearson ) . 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr) ; Fall Term — 
Physics ( Higgins ) . Spring Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School English completed; Study of 
English and American Literature, on class and as 
parallel reading, using Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
The Princess, Merchant of Venice, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra, from Quadratics; Plane Geom- 
etry, Five Books ( Wentworth ) . 

History. — High School History of U. S. (Text to be 
selected. ) 

Latin. — Virgil's Aeneid; Prose Composition (Pear- 
son's) ; Critical Study of Syntax and Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair) ; Readers 
( Conte's De Fees and Supers ) . 

The above High School course is subject to the revision 
of the State Board of Education. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

XV. Expenses Per Term. 

Grammar Grades $12 . 00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 

Junior and Senior years 16 . 00 

Music — Half-hour lessons alternate days 11.25 

Use of piano for practice one hour daily 2.25 

Elocution — Private lessons 11 . 25 

Elocution — Classes of two 6.75 

( 6.75 

Art | 11.25 

XVI. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but monthly 
payments may be arranged when necessary. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, unless 
previous arrangements are made to the contrary. The 
entrance of a pupil will be considered as an acceptance 
of these terms. 

The school is no longer a private enterprise. All 
accounts must be settled in full on or before January 1 
and July 1, as the Committee must settle with County 
Board of Education on these dates, and report oftener 
if they require it. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition if from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board. 

Mrs. C. A. Wood, as Manager, will preside 
mi " over the students' home in the school build- 
ing. She is assisted by one of the young 
men as purchasing agent. 

These dormitories are furnished with bedstead, mat- 



22 VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

tress with springs, chairs, table, lamp, etc. All boys 
rooming in dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bed- 
ding, pillow, and toilet articles, such as comb and brush, 
soap, matches, etc. They get their board at actual cost, 
which varies with the price and quality of groceries. 

The room rent for next year will be $1.50 a month. 
The old price was fixed when fuel was much cheaper than 
now. The estimated cost, based on the last two years, 
is $7.25 to $7.75 per month. 

As an evidence of good faith all applicants for these 
rooms will deposit one month's room rent with the 
Principal between July 15 and August 5. After the lat- 
ter date the first ones paying will get the vacant rooms, 
if any. 

During the past year pupils in these dormitories were 
allowed to remain in their rooms for study. The Prin- 
cipal reserves the right to remove any boy from the dor- 
mitory to the school rooms for indolence or disorder. 

Another club for boys is being planned, and we think 

will be ready by opening of session. 

During the past year this home for girls 
2. Browning- wag built There ig nQW r00m j n j t {qt 

three teachers and twenty-six girls. This 
is presided over by Mrs. Lynn, who for five years has 
successfully managed private boarding houses for girls. 
The building is neatly and comfortably furnished. For 
convenience, though at extra cost, coal is used for fuel. 
The girls must keep their rooms neat and be quiet and 
studious in their own rooms during study hours. The 
girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow, and 
necessary toilet articles, such as soap, matches, comb and 
brush, etc. 

The cost of board here will be $9.25 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday will be $6 per month. 
Such pupils will be grouped, as far as possible in the 
same rooms, to stop cost of fires and lights during their 
absence. 



1. Private 

Families. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

During the past year satisfactory arrange- 
ments have been made for all pupils desir- 
ing board. Many of the best Christian 
homes in Cary have been open for the boys and girls of 
the school. During the past year boys and girls have 
had different boarding places, and .the same plans will 
be arranged for next year. Our charges are as low as 
can be arranged with present prices for groceries. These 
charges cover all expenses except washing, but each 
pupil will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or 
two quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow-cases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday of 
each week. The Principal will gladly arrange board 
when notified by parents. 

Board in private families $9 . 00 

Board from Monday until Friday $6 . 00 

In the boys' club each member must deposit $5 at be- 
ginning of each month, and pay balance at end of month. 
At Browning Hall and in private families board is 
payable at end of each month, with no deductions for 
less than one week. At end of terms the same time will 
be charged for as is made in school. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous. 

1. In the common school branches all books adopted 
by the State Board of Education will be used. The law 
allows the use of other books as supplementary. Our 
term being longer than the regular public school will 
allow the use of many of these. In the High School the 
Principal has selected text-books by standard authors, 
and all pupils will be required to use books mentioned 
in the course of study, except when it is to the interest 
of the pupil for the teacher in charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 



24 CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation, they must seek it in other 
ways. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 

6. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
homes, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons they should notify the Principal. 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the Prin- 
cipal for their conduct out of school, as well as while at 
the school building. 

For further information, address 

E. L. MIDDLETON, Principal, 

Cary, North Carolina. 

XIX Rules. 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. We 
add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly and girls lady-like in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retiring, 
except for public worship and other approved public 
meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls, and boys 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 25 

under eighteen years, must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb anyone in boarding houses. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offence 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores, or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
chaperonage. 

9. There must be no written communications between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for heavy demeriting or suspension. 



26 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



XX. Students, 1906-1907. 



Adams, Ada 
Adams, Cleo 
Adams, Gussie 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, Mabel 
Adams, Cleveland 
Ashworth, Junie 
Baker, Roxie 
Bennett, Chester 
Bennett, Laurier 
Bennett, Hula 
Blue, Daniel 
Blue, Cornelia 
Blue, Gertie 
Bonner, Fannie 
Bonner, Blanchard 
Breeze, Pearle 
Broughton, Irene 
Brett, Claxton 
Britt, Hardie 
Britt, W. R. 
Britt, Daisy 
Bright, John 
Butt, James 
Butt, Ethel 
Bullock, Ethel 
Bullock, Bertha 
Buslinger, E. T. 
Buslinger, Ben 
Byrum, Zetha 
Carter, H. W. 
Cheek, J. M. 
Critcher, C. E. 



Crutehfield, W. E. 
Currin, Elam 
Clevenger, Edna 
Daniel, Ada 
Daniel, Fred 
Davis, Eunice 
Davis, Ora 
Davis, Pearl 
Davis, H. E. 
Edwards, Lovie 
Edwards, C. C. 
Edwards, C. J. 
Eatman, Bessie 
Eatman, Dulcia 
Finch, Clarence 
Glover, Peyton 
Green, A. C, Jr. 
Garner, R. C. 
Gower, S. E. 
Hackney, Floyd 
Harrington, Henry 
Harrison, A. B. 
Hester, Hiram 
Hilliard, S. C. 
House, W. N.* 
Holleman, Carson 
Holleman, Terrine 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holloway, Bessie 
Holloway, Clyde 
Horton, Mary 
Hurst, Vernon 
* Deceased. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Hunter, LaRue 
Hunter, Isaac 
Hunter, John P. 
Hunter, Lizzie 
Hughes, Julian 
Haithcock, Beulah 
Ivey, Thaddeus 
Ivey, Rachel 
Ivey, Hannah 
Jones, Joe P 
Jones, J. Percy 
Jones, Lattie 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Garland 
Johnson, Lee 
Johns, Lucile 
Knott, A. T. 
Knott, L. D. 
Knott, E. J. 
Lawrence, Claire 
Lee, Robert E. 
Liles, W. B. 
Lowe, Edward 
Lyon, E. F. 
Maynard, Annie 
Maynard, John 
Marks, W. R. 
Markham, J. 0. 
Mangum, G. D. 
Minis, Uva 
Minis, B. V. 
Middleton, R. L. 
Middleton, Lucy 



Middleton, Rachel 
Massey, D. R. 
Morgan, Jeff 
Minor, R. L. 
McKinnie, I. C. 
Nicholson, Hazel 
Norris, D. C. 
Norris, A. D. 
Norris, Mary 
Norwood, J. T. 
Nurm, J. C. 
O'Brian, L. R. 
Page, 0. C. 
Page, Bertie 
Page, Lillian 
Page, F. H. 
Partin, D. L. 
Partin, A. S. 
Partin, Charity 
Pegram, J. D., Jr. 
Pegram, Worthy 
Pettiway, Roger 
Pickett, Claire 
Pickett, H. W. 
Pleasants, Milton 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, May 
Pleasants, Fidelia 
Powers, Inona 
Ranes, Minnie 
Ray, Macie 
Ray, Mattie 
Reynolds, Beulah 
Rich, J. C. 
Roycroft, Nannie 



28 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Sawyer, J. H. 
Scott, F. Y. 
Sears, Ruth 
Sears, J. L. 
Smith, Anna 
Smith, T. B. 
Smith, Beulah 
Smith, D. R. 
Smith, Orus 
Spenee, Rosa 
Stephenson, Etta 
Stephenson, Lina 
Stephenson, Eva 
Stone, Lila 
Stone, Lola 
Saintsing, G. W. 
Sorrell, L. V. 
Sorrell, C. R. 
Starling, Braxton 
Taylor, H. B. 
Templeton, Hugh 
Templeton, Elva 
Tilley, Nannie 
Tilley, Mary 



Tilley, Bertha 
Thomas, Nannie 
Thompson, Elsie 
Upchurch, E. E. 
Upchurch, Eunice 
Upchurch, Lizzie 
Upchurch, Lenora 
Upchurch, Dubie 
Upchurch, Pauline 
Veazey, S. B. 
Vernon, J. B. 
Warren, E. P. 
Warren, A. J. 
Weathers, Bahnson 
Wilder, M. A. 
Winston, J. V. 
Womble, J. B. 
Woodard, Sadie 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Williams, Addie 
Yates, Cleron 
Yates, Otis 



Wake, local 74 

Wake, boarders 44 

Durham 12 

Granville 12 

Chatham 10 

Harnett 10 

Richmond 3 

Person 3 

Onslow 2 

Sampson 2 

Mecklenburg, Va 2 



Summary of Roll. 

Halifax 2 

Vance 2 

Haywood 

Davidson . 

Hortford , 

Johnston 

Green 

Pamlico 



Total 184 



FURNITURE 

COME TO SEE US. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE COMPANY 



127 Fayetteville Street 



RALEIGH, N.C. 



D 



OBBIN-FERRALL COMPANY, 

AT TUCKER'S STORE, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 

Ready-to- Wear Garments, Shoes, etc. 
Carpets, Curtains ahd Draperies. 

We Sell Better Goods at 

Lower Prices than any 

other store. 



WE GIVE 

DOBBIN-FERRALL GO'S 
Gold Trading Stamps 

J (REGISTERED ) 

with every cash purchase 
One stamp for every 10c. 



We always have what you 
cannot find elsewhere. 



Artistic WBLovktvsi in ^fjotograpf)j>. 



Dress Suits Wade to Order 



A SPECIALTY. 

We have a line of samples of the best cloths 
for Dress Suits and guarantee a perfect fit 
and low prices. "We also have a full line of 



\» 



Clothing, Underwear, 
jfc Hats, Shoes, etc. %- 



Lowest 
Prices 
Guaranteed 




THE COMMERCIAL AND FARMERS BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 
RESOURCES - - - - $1,000,000.00 

OFFICERS 

J. J. Thomas, President. B. S. Jbrman, Cashier. 

A. A. Thompson, Vice-Pres. H. W. Jackson, Ass't Cashier. 
James E. Shepherd, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS 

J. J. Thomas, President. 

Alf. A. Thompson, President Raleigh Cotton Mills. 

Cary J. Hunter, Supt. Union Central Life Insurance Company. 

R. B. Raney, Gen. Agent Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Thomas H. Briggs,of Thomas H Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

Joshua B. Hill, of J. R Ferrall & Co , Grocers. 

James E. Shepherd, of Shepherd & Shepherd, Attorneys at Law. 

Henrv A. London, Attorney at Law Pittsboro, N. C. 

John W. Scott, Capitalist, Sanford, N. C. 

Geo. W. Watts, Director American Tobacco Co., Durham, N.C. 

Ashlev Home President Clayton Banking Co., Clayton, N. C. 

Fred Phillips, Capitalist, Tarboro, N. C. 

D. Y. Cooper, Capitalist, Henderson, N. C. 

Ashby L. Baker, President Virginia Cotton Mills. 

Desig-nated depository of the State of North Carolina, the 
County of Wake and the North Carolina Railroad. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Burgrlar-Proof Vault. New business 
wanted. Out-of-town deposits sent by mail and express receive 
prompt attention. 



CROSS &LINEHAN CO. 

234 and 236 Fayetteville Street, 
NEW TUCKER BUILDING : : RALEIGH, ST. C. 

CLOTHING, MEN'S FURNISHERS AND OUTFITTERS. 

"We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see u B 
during- your visit to our city. We \» ill endeavor to make 
your stay pleasant. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS 6 CO. 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 



HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH 
CAROLINA FOR ALL KINDS 
OF BOOKS. * * $- 



A Full Line of Second-Hand Books always on hand 

at One-Half Regular Price. We Sell 

at Publishers' Prices, 



MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION. GIVE US YOUR ORDERS. 



AGENTS FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL 
BOOKS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 



C. R. SCOTT & SON 

CARY, IM. C. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

SCHOOL BOOKS, TABLETS. PENCILS 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY. 



RALEIGH MARBLE WORKS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

COOPER. BROS.. Proprietors. 

iQW\EATS 

HEADSTONES, TABLETS. IRON FENCES 

Best Material. Best Work. Low Prices. 

WE PAY THE FREIGHT « « « WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 




CHARLES B. PASMGRE 

WITH 



Boylan-Pearce Go. 



206 Eayetteville St. 
208 Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, M". C. 

THE LARGEST AND BEST SELECTED STOCK OF DRY 
GOODS, NOTIONS, CARPETS, MILLINERY, TAILOR- 
MADE SUITS, CLOAKS AND CAPES SHOWN IN THE 
CITY OF RALEIGH. : : : : : : : : 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the 

City. Samples gladly furnished upon 

request (or same. Mail orders 

£lled same day received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY. 

ESTABLISHED 1875. 

WYATT HARNESS COMPANY, 

109 East Martin Street, RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Manufacturers of Harhess and Saddlery 

Jobbers of Saddlery Hardware, Robes, Oils, Soaps, 
"Whips and all kinds of Horse Furnishings, 

C. B. RAY, Proprietor. 



PATTONS' SUN PROOF PAINT 



BEST ON EARTH, 
COVERS MORE THAN 
ANY PAINT MADE. 



Bug Death 



Sure Death for Potato Bugs. Nc 
Poisonous and is a Plant Food. 



Headquarters (or Hardware of every kind. 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Your money 

back if not satisfied. Call and see us. 

HART- WARD HARDWARE COMPANY 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 



R. J. HARRISON 
E. R. GRAY - 
E. T. WARD - 



- President 

- Vice-President 
Sec. and Treas., Raleigrh, N. C 



THE HARRISON WAGON COMPANY. 




6-t<.IM u ,7i' ; -'-^X . 



WAGON MANUFACTURERS 



Office I 
RALEIGH, IM. C. 



Works: 
CARY, N. C. 



JOHN P. HAYES, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 

Money saved you on every Sitting made at my Gallery. 
Work as GOOD as the best. Guaranteed." 
Agent for Edison and Victor Machine Records and Supplies. 

124% FAYETTEVILLE STREET, RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS H. BRIGGS S SONS 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 

HARDWARE 

STOVES. TINWARE. NAILS. IRQN, 
STEEL. PAINTS. OILS. GLASS, 
SASH. DOORS. BLINDS, LIME, 
PLASTER, CEMENT, CLAY, CHIM- 
NEY PIPE, ==z^ = 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Square Dealings, 

BUCK STOVES AND RANGES. 

J. H. STONE & CO. 

Dealers in Dry Goods 

Notions, Shoes and GENERAL 

GROCERIES. 

The Cheap Cash Store of the Town. Come 

once and you will want to come again. 

RAILROAD STREET • «. « CARY, N. C. 



F. R. Gray & Bro. cary, n c 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, 

Pants, Gents' Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, 

Crockery, Glassware, Hardware. Plow 

Casting's and Farming- Utensils. 

From our warehouse we can furnish you 
with Cotton Seed Meal and Hulls, Corn. 
Oats, Hay, Fertilizers, etc. : : ; : : : 

Cold Drinks Dispensed at our Up-to-Date Fountain 

OME TO SEE US, WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR 

DRY GOODS, 

Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing 
Goods, Groceries and Queensware. We sell as 
cheap as the cheapest. We thank you for your 
past patronage and solicit your future trade. 

W. D JONES, Cary, N. C. 

Z. V.JOHNSON & SON. 



c 



M UNDERTAKERS 



"We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and General 

Burial Supplies. Wagrons and Bugrgries made and 

Repaired. General Repair Shop in Wood 

and Iron, Bicycles, Guns, etc., etc. 

CARY, North Carolina 

"We carry a full line of MILLIN- 
ERY in latest style, and can furnish 
goods 25 per cent to 50 per cent 
cheaper than city prices. In the 
General Store you can gret the best selection of DRY 
GOODS, SHOES, and NOTIONS in the village. 

Mrs. 0. W. Scott, ™ i,hC i fl R Rv sc S T 5. iS0N ' 




WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

The Seventy-Fourth Session will begin 
September 3, 1907. Sixteen independent 
"Schools," embracing the Sciences, Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Philosophy, Bible, 
Law, Education, Medicine, (2 years) etc. 

EXPEN8ESMODERATE 

For Catalogue or Special Information, address 

President W. L. POTEAT, 

WAKE FOREST, North Carolina. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS #£#3 

■ sold on easy terms at prices 
that cannot be beaten, quality 
considered. 

WE ALSO HANDLE A FULL LINE OF 

Guitars, Banjos, Violins, all kinds 
of Strings and Stringed Instruments 




The Famous Shoninger Pianos 
sold by us at prices and terms 
that will surprise you. J> J> 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 

RALEIGH j* £> J North Carolina 



Can? public Ibigb School 



1908 



r 

CATALOGUE 



OF 



GARY 

Public High School 

GARY, N. C. 



Announcements of Gary Public High 
School, 1908-1909. 



Q 



presses of 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 

1908. 



I. School Committee. 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
Sion Holleman, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



II. Calendar. 1908—1909. 

Fall Term opens August 17, 1908. 
Fall Term closes December 18, 1908. 
Spring Term opens December 28, 1908. 
Spring Term closes April 16, 1909. 



III. Officers and Instructors. 

Session 1908-1909. 
I. M. B. Dry, Principal. 

II. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 

III. M. B. Dry, M.A. (Wake Forest College, 1896), 

Latin, Mathematics, French. 

IV. L. A. Brothers, B.A. (Trinity College, 1908), 

Science, English, Mathematics. 

V. Alice F. Best, (Littleton Female College, 1901), 
History, English, Elocution. 

VI. Jtjlia Pasmore, (N. C. Normal and Industrial 
College, 1902), 

Grammar Grades. 

VII. Emma Pegram, B.L. (Oxford Seminary, 1903), 
Primary Grades. 

VIII. Irma Ellis, (N. C. Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege), 

Primary Grades. 

IX. Nettie Rodwell, (Baptist University for Wo- 
men, 1907), 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 



IV. Commencement, 1908. 

May 14, 3 p. m. Exercises by Primary Department. 

May 14, 8 p. m. Annual Debate. 

May 15, 11 a. m. Annual Address, by Dr. Edwin Mims. 

May 15, 12 m. Graduating Exercises. 

May 15, 3 p. m. Contest in Declamation and Recitation. 

May 15, 8 p. m. Annual Concert. 

Winners of Prizes and Medals. 

Scholarship Medal L. L. Carpenter. 

Essay Medal LaRue Hunter. 

Writing Prize Rachel Ivey. 

Music Prize Amelia Sturgeon. 

Clay Improvement Medal A. W. Wheeler. 

Calhoun Improvement Medal E. J. Knott. 

Debater's Medal L. L. Carpenter. 

Declaimer's Medal C. R. Sorrell. 

Reciter's Medal Clara Burt. 

Senior Class, 1908. 

C. E. Crichter, President. 

Inona Powers, Secretary. 

Cleo Adams. A. D. Norris. 

J. R. Broughton. Ethel Roane. 

Ralph Baynes. C. R. Sorrell. 

W. M. Gardner. A. J. Warren. 

W. L. Johnson. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

Cary Public High School 



V. Forewords. 

All enterprises of great success and useful- 
ly A Look ness are f s i ow growth. For twelve years 
' a few faithful men and women have worked 
and prayed and planned to have a strong, useful edu- 
cational institution in Cary. They have given of their 
time and money for the success of the school. The 
patronage has grown in numbers and territory. During 
the past year the patronage has come from 17 counties, 
while the local patronage has been greatly enlarged 
under the new regime. The building has been very much 
enlarged and improved at a cost of $2,250. The County 
Board of Education has furnished all needed desks and 
other equipment. 

The new law enacted by the General As- 

2. A Look sembly of 1907, providing for a system of 

1 public high schools for North Carolina, has 
now been in operation for a year. The Cary Public High 
School was the first established under this law, and 
since its establishment about one hundred and fifty 
others have been established in the State. In point of 
patronage and efficiency the school has come to occupy 
a position among the leading schools of the State. 

The rules of Superintendent Joyner admit 

3. "Who Can t,h ose w h nave completed the course of 

study for public schools issued from his 
office. The first seven grades in this catalogue cover 



6 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

this course. Applicants must stand examination on 
entering or bring certificate from last teacher saying the 
course has been satisfactorily completed, and this must 
be signed by the County Superintendent. 

All public school teachers of whatever age, and stu- 
dents over twenty-one years of age who pledge to teach, 
will be entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one years 
of age must pay tuition. 

4 O t id ^^ e bounty Board of Education has al- 
Patron- lowed the school committee to receive pu- 
agre. pils from territory outside of Wake County. 

This is allowed in all public high schools. These pupils 
will receive every advantage formerly given by the school 
under private management. There will be room for 
these in boarding houses and school rooms, and no 
undue crowding will be allowed. We earnestly solicit 
the co-operation of our old pupils outside of Wake 
County. 

Many farmers who think it almost a dis- 
5. When to g race to have farm work a few weeks be- 
hind that of their neighbors, think it all 
right to enter their children from one to eight weeks 
behind their classes. With late planting they expect 
poor crops, but ask for good results in school with late 
entrance. The first is as possible and probable as the 
last. Going to school is a business, and no one ever 
engages in any business more important. If one fail in 
business he may start again, but if education is neg- 
lected, lost opportunities can never be regained. We 
urge all to be present as early in the session as possible, 
and be sure to plan for the whole term. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

VI. The Faculty. 

The School Committee has exercised the greatest 
painstaking in electing teachers for next year. Full 
investigation was made regarding the ability, fitness 
and attainments of each one. 

From a very large number of applicants the teachers 
named on another page were chosen. It is believed their 
work will prove the wisdom of their election. 

Mr. E. L. Middleton, the former Principal, has this to 
say to his former patrons: "In leaving a work where 
I have put twelve years of the prime of life I was 
greatly interested in the faculty for next year. Four 
of the new faculty were co-laborers in my work. Every 
one has proven herself to be one of the best teachers in 
my knowledge. I have known Principal Dry for seven 
years. I have been in his school and seen his splendid 
work. Many prominent men commend him unreservedly. 
The committee has made no mistake. Mr. Brothers has 
had a full year's experience and comes with the highest 
endorsement. Miss Pegram is no stranger. She is 
known and loved by all our people. She is a college 
graduate with five years successful experience. In all 
candor, I believe the school nas the strongest faculty in 
its history." 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want. 

For the next year we wish to have a most cordial 
relationship existing between parents and pupils and 
teachers. There must be between parents and teachers, 
harmony, sympathy, co-operation and mutual good will, 
if good results. Let the parents openly come to us and 
name their ideals, and if right and possible we will 
reach them. Here are some of our ideals: 



8 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Who are willing to co-operate with us in 
our work. Those who have the courage to 
see and write to teachers regarding any dissatisfaction, 
rather than backbite and malign a worthy institution. 

Who realize that mental force is superior 

to physical force. Boys of good habits 

who want an education and are willing to work for it. 

Boys who see the great possiuiiities lying before men 

of the rising generation. 

Wiio realize the true nobility of woman- 
hood. Girls who are willing to live in 
woman's sphere and work faithfully to prepare them- 
selves for the noble callings now open to women. Girls 
who prefer well-stored brains and countenances beaming 
with intelligence to servile obedience to the whims of 
fashion. 

VIII. What We Do. 

The school is thoroughly permeated with 
1. For the the spirit of Christianity. Only teachers of 
ear " recognized Christian cnaracter have been 
employed. In no case win any influence be allowed 
which might draw a pupil away from his church moor- 
ings. As far as possible, xne wholesome influence of a 
Christian home is thrown around our students. While 
character is being formed, anu impressions for life are 
being made, the Christian teacher has open to him a 
most wonderful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer-meeting. It 
is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 
been developed. Nearly all students attend the regular 
church prayer-meetings at the churches. The school is 
opened every morning with devotional exercises. 

Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to attend 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

the services of these churches and Sunday School regu- 
larly. 

It is our plan to cultivate our students 

2. For the physically as well as mentally and morally. 

Otherwise the best results in the class- 
room and in after life can not be realized. To this end, 
we have football and baseball grounds, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient out-door exercise. A few 
match games are allowed, but our team has never been 
allowed to be away except to return the same day. An 
excellent tennis court is available to teachers and pupils. 
Basketball will be encouraged next year. 

In all our work we have three ends in 

3. For the view — to teach pupils to be observant of 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 
cate a pupil he must lead him, noi drive him, draw out 
his mental powers rather nian pour in a heterogenous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do as 
much original thinking as possible. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials in 
education tending to culture and refinement, and those 
which will prepare young men and women for the active 
duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments we 
take an pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. Fre- 
quent and thorough drills are given in spelling, reading 
and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are trained 
in the correct use of the language by frequent exercises 
in written work. When the pupil has acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the technical principles of gram- 
mar the critical study of English Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as broad 
culture as possible and yet magnify the practical parts. 



10 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

The student should be taught to reason from cause to 
effect, and, as far as possible, make practical applica- 
tion of every lesson imparted. Our methods of instruc- 
tion are varied with a view to arousing and holding a 
live interest in the work. 

IX. What We Are and What We Have. 

Too much could not be saiu. of the desira- 
bility of the location. It is both healthful 
and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the town of 
Cary could not be excelled in the State. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the youth 
that will attend the institution. No better railroad 
facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 
junction of the Seaboard and Southern railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 

and has excellent water. Few towns can 

show a better health record. During last year there 

was not a single case of illness in the student body 

caused by any local conditions. 

Many pupils are exceedingly careless in the preserva- 
tion of health in unnecessary exposure without wraps, 
over-shoes and hats. A very large per cent of all sick- 
ness here is traceable to such thoughtlessness. Parents 
are urged to co-operate with teachers in this matter. 
3 B ild- ^ n ^e mos t attractive part of the town, 
ing-s. and surrounded by a beautiful campus of 

oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are six large and well-lighted class-rooms — which may 
be easily converted into an auditorium — dining-hall, 
reading-room, library, office, and four music-rooms. On 
the second floor are rooms for the matron and dormito- 
ries for thirty boys. To this old building has been 



VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

added a splendid building with two more school-rooms 
and two literary society halls. 

The entire building is furnished with suit- 
4. Equip- a | 3 j e f urn iture and equipment. The class- 
rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. 
Sufficient new furniture has been added to meet the 
needs of an enlarged patronage. The music-rooms are 
furnished with four pianos, and the dormitory rooms 
with neat and comfortable furniture. The literary so- 
cieties have added new furniture at a cost of $250, and 
now have two of the most beautiful halls of any high 
school in North Carolina. 

X. General Culture. 

The Clay and Calhoun Societies for young 
1. Literary men an( j ^ e Browning Society for girls 
Sodietiea. , , . . . , 

meet once a week for exercises in debate, 

composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. Most excellent results 
have been obtained during the past year. The good to 
be derived from this work can not be overestimated. It 
gives a knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates 
a fondness for reading. It gives the power of expressing 
in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by many 
people. It gives a broader view of men and things, and 
as an educator it has no superior. We want original 
thought, and there is no field broader and more capable 
of yielding rich harvest. 

Besides the above societies, there is the Juvenile 
Society for boys and girls of the grammar grades. The 
pupils of the pirmary grades are required to do the 
same work. Every pupil in school will be required to 
do this work in declamation, recitation, essay writing 
and debate in one of the school organizations or on 
English classes once in two weeks. 



12 GABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

A library of over 500 volumes has been col- 
lected, to which additions are constantly 
being made. Every volume is carefully examined, and 
nothing except literature of high order is allowed on 
our shelves. We have many volumes of biography, his- 
tory, addresses, together with the prose and poetical 
work of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, 
Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and others. 

Under new conditions it will not be expedient or pos- 
sible to conduct a reading-room, as in the past, but 
pupils will be encouraged to form reading circles and if 
possible a class in Current History will be formed. 

XI. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general ends 
in view — one to prepare boys and girls for college, the 
other to fit the great mass of our students for the active 
duties of life. In the latter class we can point with 
pride to young men and women who are becoming strong 
factors in the social, industrial and church life of their 
several communities. In the former class our pupils 
are doing us honor while honoring themselves. 

Very few secondary schools send a larger per cent of 
their senior classes to college. 

During last year we had a large number of former 
pupils in the following institutions: University of 
North Carolina, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, 
A. and M. College, Elon College, Baptist University for 
Women, and Oxford Seminary. This does not include 
several of our students who went directly from our 
school to professional schools. 

Many of our pupils find themselves in the front in 
their classes. They make high marks and are frequent 
winners of medals and college honors. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 



XII. Record of Work. 

Educators are not agreed as to how often 

1. Examin- or ^ ow difficult examinations should be. 
at ions. ,,, ... 

We require one or more written examina- 
tions of all pupils on all studies during each quarter, 
but these examinations are short and at such times as 
will give the pupils an oppotunity of telling what they 
know, and not what has been "crammed'' in their heads 
for a special occasion. A record is kept of work on reci- 
tations, and an average mark is secured from these two 
sources. 

These examinations must be stood or the pupil take 
zero in making our averages. It is manifestly unfair to 
require a part and not all pupils to pass examinations. 

There are too low ideals regarding examinations. 
Pupils are not allowed to give or receive aid from any 
source. To appropriate the ideas of others unlawfully 
is as sinful as to steal material things, and to give these 
makes the giver a party to the sin. 

Zero is given on such examinations, with enough de- 
merits to make deportment "'bad." Pupils guilty of this 
can not receive a school certificate until the work has 
been passed during a subsequent year. 

We send reports at the end of each quarter. 
. Keports. -^ e jjggp a n parents informed regarding 
the scholarship, deportment and attendance of their 
children. 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks on scholar- 
ship are not necessarily a sign of poor work. A poor 
mark on deportment needs immediate attention. 
3. Promo- O ur standards will be kept high. Pupils 
tions. to pass from one year or grade to the next 

must average eighty per cent on their respective studies, 



14 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

and all examinations must be passed. Pupils stopping 
before end of term and failing to stand examinations 
have no right to expect promotion until the omitted 
pages have been learned and examinations stood. All 
reputable institutions of learning require this. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 

is posted. To be entitled to a place on 
this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on scholar- 
ship, 95 on attendance, and excellent on deportment. 
To be entitled to honorable mention a pupil must 
make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A handsome gold medal will be given by the Principal 
to the pupil in the High School making the highest 
scholarship during next year. To compete for this, a 
pupil must be present to receive all the reports of the 
year — and must carry at least four studies each quarter. 
The literary societies will give medals for excellence 
in debate, declamation and recitation. 

Other prizes may be announced after the session is 
opened. 

In the course of study there are six de- 
5. Gradua- partments — Latin, English, Mathematics, 

History, Science, and French. To receive 
a certificate of proficiency a pupil must have completed 
the work in at least three of the first five courses, and 
due credit will be given to all pupils who have com- 
pleted Latin and Mathematics through the Junior year. 
Deficits on work of the Junior year must be made up 
during the first quarter of the Senior year, and deficits 
during Senior year must be made up promptly. All 
deficits below 75 must be made up by special examina- 
tion and can not be redeemed by good marks in another 
quarter. Deportment must average 85, and any pupil 
receiving below 75 during any quarter will be barred 
from Senior class. No pupil will be given a certificate 
unless he has passed two years of Latin. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

XIII. Special Departments. 

Music has long since come to be a necessity 
to a civilized people. It is the most exten- 
sively cultivated and the most generally appreciated of 
all the fine arts. A thoroufh and conscientious course 
in music will certainly carry with its manual training 
mental and heart training also. Many now study music 
who never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that comes 
from such a course of study, and because they realize 
that all cultivation of the fine arts is an upward and 
forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such a 
course of study as tends to give a thorough knowledge 
of music and to make the best performers. 

Miss Rodwell has made an extensive study of vocal 
music. We hope many will avail themselves of training 
in this department. Arrangements will be made to teach 
quartets and chorus classes at nominal cost. 

„ ™ Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

2. Elocu- _ ° 

tion. pastime study. The eyes of the people, 

even in our conservative South, have been opened to see 
not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practical im- 
portance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inelegant 
speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the field 
to make room for the man who cultivates both brain and 
body. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to the 
various qualities of tone, selected with proper reference 
to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression also teaches 
Self-Control, Ease, Polish, Address, Fluency, etc. 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

XIV. Course of Study. 

( 1 ) Primary. 

FIBST GRADE. 

1. First Steps in Phonics. 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

4. Spelling, Part I (Griffin and Foust). 

5. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

6. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 
Numbers. 

7. Drawing ( Webb and Ware I ) . 

8. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

3. Spelling, Part II ( Griffin and Foust ) . 

4. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

5. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware II). 

8. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

3. Life of R. E. Lee ( Williamson ) . 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Primary Arithmetic, pages 109-203 (Colaw and 
Ellwood). 

6. Language Work — Same as Second Grade. 

7. Physiology — Oral Instruction. 

8. Geography — Tarr and McMurray. 

9. Drawing (Webb and Ware III). 
10. Writing. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

2. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. English Grammar, pages 1-70 (Hyde). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic completed (Colaw and Ell- 
wood) . 

7. Physiology, Book I (Culler). 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware IV). 

9. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. The Story of the Old North State (Connor). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Spelling, Parts III and IV (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Intermediate Arithmetic (Colaw and Duke). 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware V). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling, Parts V and VI (Griffin and Foust). 

2. English Grammar — Our Language II (Smith). 

3. Makers of American History (Fall Term); Higher 
History U. S., Chambers (Spring Term). 

4. Complete. Geography (Maury). 

5. Advanced Arithmetic to Compound Quantities (Co- 
law and Ellwood). 

6. Physiology, Book II ( Culler ) . 

7. Writing. 

SEVEXTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling — Reviewed and Completed (Griffin and 
Foust ) . 



18 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

2. English Grammar, Part I (Buehler). 

3. Higher History U. S., completed; History N. C. 
(Hill). 

4. Arithmetic to Square Root ( Colaw and Ellwood ) . 

5. Complete Geography reviewed (Maury). 

6. Writing. 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling ( Branson ) , Punctuation 
and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and Arabian Nights 
and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill of all reviews and supplementary exer- 
cises ; Algebra — First Steps ( Wentworth ) . 

History. — History of U. S. (Comman and Gerson), 
Fall Term; Civil Government (Peele), Spring Term. 

Latin. — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Sciences — Agriculture ( Burkett, Stevens and Hill ) . 

SOPHOMORE TEAR. 

English. — Normal Grammar (Maris), Spring Term; 
Composition; Study of American Literature on class, 
and as parallel reading using Evangeline, Last of the 
Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, etc. 

Mathematics. — High School Algebra to Simultaneous 
Equations (Wentworth's Elements). 

History. — General History, to 800 A. D. ( Myers ) . 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Introduction to Csesar 
(Brittain). 

Science. — Physiology, Book III ( Culler ) . 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

English. — High School English (Keeler and Adams) ; 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

Study of English Literature on class and as parallel 
reading using Ancient Mariner, Julius Cccsar, De Cov- 
erly Papers, Silas Marner, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra completed ( Wentworth's Ele- 
ments ) . 

History. — General History completed ( Myers ) . 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough) ; Cicero's Orations Against Cati- 
line (Allen and Greenough) ; Prose Composition (Pear- 
son). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr), Fall Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School English completed; Study of 
English and American Literature on class, and as 
parallel reading using Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
The Princess, Merchant of Venice, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra reviewed; Plane Geometry, 
Eive Books ( Wentworth ) . 

History. — High School History of U. S. (Adams and 
Trent). 

Latin. — Virgil's ^5neid; Prose Composition (Pear- 
son's) ; Critical Study of Syntax and Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair) ; Readers 
( Conte"s De Fees and Supers ) . 

Science. — Physics ( Higgins ) . 

XV. Expenses. 

FALL SPRING 

TERM. TERM. 

Grammar Grades $12.00 $11.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 12.75 

Junior and Senior years 16.00 14.50 

Music — Half-hour lessons alternate days, 11.25 10.00 

Use of piano for practice one hour daily, 2.25 2.00 

Elocution — Private lessons 11.25 10.00 

Elocution— Classes of two 6.75 6.00 



20 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



XVI. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, unless 
previous arrangements are made to the contrary. The 
entrance of a pupil will be considered as an acceptance 
of these terms. 

The school is no longer a private enterprise. All 
accounts must be settled in full on or before January 1 
and June 1. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition if from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board. 

The dormitories are furnished with bed- 

1. Dormi- stead, mattress with springs, chairs, table, 

lamp, etc. All boys rooming in dormitory 
must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow, and toilet 
articles, such as comb and brush, soap, matches, etc. 
They get their board at actual cost, which varies with 
the price and quality of groceries. 

The room rent for next year will be $1.50 a month. 
The estimated cost, based on the last two years, is $7.00 
to $8.00 per month. 

During the past year pupils in these dormitories were 
allowed to remain in their rooms for study. The Prin- 
cipal reserves the right to remove any boy from the dor- 
mitory to the school rooms for indolence or disorder. 

This home for girls is presided over by Mrs. 

2. Brown- Lynn, who for five years has successfully 

managed private boarding houses for girls. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

The building is neatly and comfortably furnished. For 
convenience, though at extra cost, coal is used for fuel. 
The girls must keep their rooms neat and be quiet and 
studious in their own rooms during study hours. The 
girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow, and 
necessary toilet articles, such as soap, matches, comb and 
brush, etc. 

The cost of board here will be $9.25 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday will be $6.50 per month. 
Such pupils will be grouped, as far as possible, in the 
same rooms, to stop cost of fires and lights during their 
absence. 

During next year the Principal and family will have 
a suite of rooms in this building. All parents may rest 
assured that their daughters' every interest will be care- 
fully looked after. 

During the past year satisfactory arrange- 
1. Private men ts have been made for all pupils desir- 
' ing board. Many of the best Christian 
homes in Cary have been open for the boys and girls of 
the school. During the past year boys and girls have 
had different boarding places, and the same plans will 
be arranged for next year. Our charges are as low as 
can be arranged with present prices for groceries. These 
charges cover all expenses except washing, but each 
pupil will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or 
two quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow-cases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday of 
each week. The Principal will gladly arrange board 
when notified by parents. 

Board in private families $9.25 

Board from Monday until Friday 6.50 

In the boys' club each member must deposit $5 at be- 
ginning of each month, and pay balance at end of month. 



22 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

At Browning Hall and in private families board is 
payable at end of each month, with no deductions for 
less than one week. At end of terms the same time will 
be charged for as is made in school. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous. 

1. In the common school branches all books adopted 
by the State Board of Education will be used. The law 
allows the use of other books as supplementary. Our 
term being longer than the regular public school will 
allow the use of many of these. In the High School the 
Principal has selected text-booivs by standard authors, 
and all pupils will be required to use books mentioned 
in the course of study, except when it is to the interest 
of the pupil for the teacher in charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal, except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation they must seek it in other 
ways. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 

G. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
homes, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons they should notify the Principal. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the Prin- 
cipal for their conduct out of school, as well as while at 
the school building. 

8. All pupils in High School from Wake County must 
conform to course of study prescribed by Superintendent 
Joyner. Each one must have at least one foreign lan- 
guage and carry all other studies as nearly in order of 
course of study as circumstances will allow. 

9. No pupil will be allowed time out of school for 
practice in music unless she is a bona fide pupil under 
some teacher of music. 

For further information address 

M. B. DRY, Principal, 

Caey, N. C. 

XIX. Rules. 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. We 
add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly and girls ladylike in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retiring, 
except for public worship and other approved public 
meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls, and boys 
under eighteen years, must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 



24 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores, or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
chaperonage. 

9. There must be no written communications between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for heavy demeriting or suspension. 




GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



XX. Students, 

Adams, Anna 
Adams, Cleo 
Adams, Gussie 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, Herman 
Adams, Lucile 
Adams, Mabel 
Atkins, Fred. 
Atkins, Harold 
Atkins, Lily 
Atkins, Ray 
Ayeseue, Lessie 
Bailey, Birter 
Bailey, H. J. 
Baker, Pearl 
Baker, Thelma 
Baker, Thurly 
Bagwell, Sadie 
Baueom, E. L. 
Baynes, Ralph 
Bennett, Chester 
Bennett, Hula 
Bennett, Laurier 
Beckwith, Grace 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Rubie 
Blalock, Smith 
Blue, Cornelia 
Blue, Gertie 
Bonner, Fannie 
Breeze, Mary 
Breeze, Pearl 
Breeze, Sallie 



1907-1908. 

Breeze, Ruth 
Rodwell, Alt. 
Broughton, Irene 
Broughton, Mavis 
Broughton, Lowell 
Broughton, Russell 
Bright, John 
Brown. J. C. 
Brown, Vester 
Britt, H. E. 
Butt, James 
Butt, Ethel 
Butt, Willie 
Burnett, John 
Burt, Zula 
Burt, Clara 
Buslinger, Ed. 
Buslinger, Ben. 
Byrd, Enna 
Byrd, H. U. 
Carter, 0. D. 
Carter, H. W. 
Campbell, Commie 
Carpenter, Levi 
Carpenter, Colon 
Carpenter, Commie 
Clevinger, Edna 
Chappell, Albert 
Chappell, Joseph 
Cnappell, Laura 
Cooke, Ernest 
Cooke, Alma 
Cooper, Allan 



26 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH aGHOOL. 



Cooper, George 
Cooper, Rosa 
Cooper, Frank 
Cooper, Fred, 
ditcher, C. E. 
ditcher, Lily 
Crutchfield, W. E. 
Currin, John 
Daniel, Ada 
Davis, Or a 
Davis, Walker 
Davis, Eunice 
Davis, Claud 
Dunn, Andrew 
Eatman, Mary 
Eatman, Tempie 
Eatman, Glenn 
Eatman, John 
Edwards, C. J. 
Edwards, C. C. 
Edwards, Lovie 
EdAvards, Paul 
Fleming, Kuben 
Fleming, Mildred 
Fleming, Alden 
Fleming, Myrtha 
Fleming, Ruth 
Fields, Bernice 
Finch, Clarence 
Gardner, Walter 
Glover, Maude 
Glover, Luna 
Glover, Richard 
Glover, Everett 
Glover, Early 
Green, A. Carl 



Green, Gary J. 
Gupton, Nolie Mag 
Gupton, Fiances 
Gupton, Mark 
Hall, Bonner 
Hall, Annie 
Hamilton, Rinda 
Harris, Ed. 
Harris, Clyde 
Harris, Clarence 
Harrington, H. A. 
Harrison, E. B. 
Billiard, James 
Holleman, Carson 
Holleman, Carter 
Holleman, Leonard 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Turrine 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Norman 
Holland, Otho 
Holland, Odessa 
Holloway, Bessie 
Holloway, Clyde 
Horton, Rera 
Howell, Maggie 
Hackney, Floyd 
Harward, Geo. N. 
House, N. B. 
Hunter, Bessie 
Hunter, Lizzie 
Hunter, LaRue 
Hunter, Lena 
Hunter, Isaac 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Hunter, John 
Hurst, Frank 
Hurst, Fred. 
Hurst, Lena 
Ivey, Thaddeus 
Ivey, Rachel 
Ivey, Hannah 
Johnson, J. C. 
Johnson, Raymond 
Johnson, Lee 
Jones, Leah 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Elsie 
Jones, Llric 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Martell 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, John 
Jones, Hervy 
Jones, Troy 
Jordan, Alma 
Jordan, Lily 
Jordan, Carlos 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Kidd, W. W. 
King, Walter 
King, Elby 
Knight, Mary 
Knight, Louis 
Knight, Henry 
Knight, Cassie 
Knight, Hugh 
Knight, Rachel 
Knott, A. T. 



Knott, Alex. 
Knott, E. J. 
Knott, May 
Lockamy, Orus 
Luther, John H. 
Luther, Alsey 
Luther, Millard 
Markham, J. 0. 
Markham, Ormond 
3Jayes, John B. 
Marks, C. H. 
Maynardj Cyrus 
Maynard, Annie 
Maynard, Hattie 
Maynard, George 
Maynard, John 
Maynard, Graham 
Maynard, Luther 
Maynard, Mina 
Mangum, A. E. 
Middleton, R. Lee 
Middleton, Lucy 
Middleton, Rachel 
Murdock, Emerson 
Murdock, Estes 
Morgan, Ma Hie 
MeGhee, Charlie 
McGhee, Goldie 
MeGhee, Lettie 
Moore, Elsie 
Moore, Percie 
Norris, A. D. 
Page, Bertie 
Page, Lillian 
Pendergraft, Allen 
Pendergraft, Walter 



28 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Pendergraft, Claude 
Pendergraft, Levi 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Mary 
Pendergraft, Leon 
Partin, Aldridge 
Partin, D. L. 
Partin, Charity 
Pegram, John D. 
Pegram, Worthy 
Pearson, B. P. 
Penny, Olga 
Penny, Mamie 
Penny, Novella 
Penny, Hattie 
Penny, Larrie 
Penny, E. E. 
Patrick, Alvis 
Pickett, J. W. 
Pleasants, Milton 
Pleasants, May 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Powell, Robert 
Powell, Willie 
Pettiway, Roger 
Powers, Inona 
Prince, Frank 
Prince, Florence 
Proctor, Dan. 
Puckett, Virginia 
Puckett, Sadie 
Ranes, Minnie 
Ranes, Lelon 
Ranes, Carlessie 
Ranes, Troy 



Ranes, Haley 
Ray, Macie 
Riggs, Ollie 
Roane, Ethel 
Rogers, Mary 
Saintsing, J. B. 
Saintsing, G. W. 
Scott, Azzie 
Scott, J. C. 
Sears, John 
Sears, Ruth 
Small, Wilburn 
Small, Clara 
Small, Cleo 
Spence, Herbert 
Stone, Ralph 
Smith, Orus 
Smith, Mabel 
Smith, Beulah 
Smith, Novella 
Smith, Myrtle 
Smith, Mavis 
Smith, Paul 
Sorrell, C. R. 
Sorrell, Norman 
Stephenson, Lina 
Stephenson, Eva 
Stephenson, Charlie 
Stephenson, Irene 
Sturgeon, Elizabeth 
Sturgeon, Amelia 
Seagroves, Clennie 
Stanley, George 
Taylor, Lizzie 
Taylor, T. B. 
Tcmpleton, Hugh 



CART PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



29 



Templeton, Elva 
Tilley, Otis 
Til ley, Mary 
Tilley, Nannie 
Tilley, Bertha 
Thomasson, Thad. 
Tolley, Douglass 
Tolley, Walter 
Upchurch, Estus 
Upchurch, Eunice 
Upchurch, Lizzie 
Upchurch, Lenora 
Upchurch, Frank 
Upchurch, John Lee 
Walker, Willie 
Walker, Janie 
Warren, A. J. 
Weathers, Bahnson 
Wheeler, A. W. 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Lovine 
Waldo, Ghita 
Walters, Fred. 
Williams, Ietta 
Williams, B,uth 



Williams, Myrtle 
Williams, Sadie 
Williams, Allie 
Williams, Clara 
Williams, Carlton 
Williams, McKinley 
Williams, Addie 
Wellons, Lilly May 
Wilder, Avery 
Wilder, Xenie 
Wilder, Jamie 
Womble, Willine 
Wood, Georgia 
Wood, Lovie 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Woodall, Haywood 
Woodall, Hubert 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Carson 
Y'ates, Otis 
Yates, Raymond 
Young, Herbert 



a 



PIANOS AND ORGANS 

Of the very best makes sold on easy terms at prices that can 
not be beaten, quality considered. 

THE FAMOUS SHONINGER PIANOS 

Sold by us at prices and terms that will surprise you. 

DARNELL fif THOMAS kaleigh, n. c. 

DOBBIN-FERRALL 
COMPANY 

At Tucker Store. Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Dry Goods of all Kinds. Ready-to- Wear 

Garments, Shoes, etc. Carpets, 

Curtains and Draperies. 

We sell better goods at s~w We always have what 
lower prices than any I I you can not find 

other store. ^\ elsewhere. 

W*Gwe Dobbin & Ferrall Go's. 

Gold Trading Stamps 

(REGISTERED) 

With every cash purchase. One stamp for every 10 cts. 

E. O. WALDO 

CARY. N. C. 

Drugs Prescriptions 

NICE LINE OF STATIONERY. 
TOILET ARTICLES. Etc. 

Up-to-Date Soda Fountain 

30 




DRESS SUITS MADE TO 
ORDER 

A SPECIALTY 

We have a line of samples of the best cloths for Dress 

Suits and guarantee a perfect fit and low prices. 

We also have a full line of 

CLOTHING, UNDERWEAR 
HATS, SHOES, Etc. 

Lowest" 

Prices 

Guaranteed 

THE COMMERCIAL 
NATIONAL BANK 

Of RALEIGH, N. C. 

B. S. JERMAN, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Vice-President 

H. W. JACKSON Cashier 

E. B. CROW Assistant Cashier 

J. J. THOMAS Chairman of Board 

JAS. E. SHEPHERD Attorney 

ACCOUNTS FROM 

FARMERS , MERCHANTS , CORPORATIONS 

BANKS, AND INDIVIDUALS INVITED. 

31 



CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

234 and 236 Fayetteville St. New Tucker Building. 

CLOTHING, MEN'S 
FURNISHERS 
AND OUTFITTERS. 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during your 
visit to our city We will endeavor to make your stay pleasant. :: 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH 

CAROLINA FOR ALL 

KINDS OF BOOKS 

A Full Line of Second-Hand Books always on hand at 
One-Half Regular Price. We Sell at Publishers' Prices. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt 
Attention. Give Us Your Order 

AGENTS FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL BOOKS 
IN NORTH CAROLINA 



C.R.SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 

Headquarters for SCHOOL BOOKS, 

TABLETS, PENCILS 
AND ALL KINDS OF ST A TIONERY 

32 



B. P. S. PAINT 

BEST PAINT SOLD 
COVERS MORE THAN ANY PAINT MADE 

BUG DEATH 



Sure Death for Potato Bugs 
Non-Poisonous and is a Plant Food 



ALL RIGHT COOK STOVES 
AND RANGES 

Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best Goods. 

Lowest Prices. Your money back if not satisfied. 

Call and see us. 

HART-WARD HARDWARE CO. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



R. J. Harbison, President. F. R. Gray, Vice-President. 

F. T. Ward, Secy. & Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 




"*Wtt/Wjj-j5j=5= 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



WAGONS, CARTS AND PLOWS 



Office: 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



33 



Works: 
CARY, N. C. 



Char.es B. Pasmora BOYLAN"PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

206 Fayetteville Street. 208 Salisbury Street. 



The Largest and best selected 
stock of Dry Goods, Notions. 
Carpets, Millinery, Tailor-made 
Suits, Cloaks and Capes shown 
in the City of Raleigh. :: :: 
We cordially invite you to visit 
our store when in our City. 
Samples gladly furnished upon 
request for same. Mail orders 
filled same day received. :: :: 

BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

THOMAS H. BRIGGS 
& SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HARDWARE 

Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils, 
Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, 
Plaster, Cement, Clay 
Chimney Pipe. 

Best Goods Lowest Prices Square Dealings 

Buck Stoves and Ranges 

34 



F. R. GRAY & BRO. 

CARY, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Pants, Gents' Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, 
Glassware, Hardware, Plow Castings and Fanning 
Utensils. flFrom our warehouse we can furnish you Cotton 
Seed Meal and Hulls, Corn, Oats, Hay, Fertilizers, etc. 

COLD DRINKS DISPERSED AT OUR UP-TO-DATE SODA FOUNTAIN 
Come to see us, we are headquarters for 

DRY GOODS 

Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 
Furnishing Goods, Groceries and 
Queensware. We sell as cheap as 
the cheapest, We thank you for 
your past patronage and solicit your 
future trade. :: :: :: :: 

W.D.JONES, * Cary, N. C. 

Z.V.JOHNSON & SON 
UNDERTAKERS 

We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, 

Robes and General Burial Supplies. 

Wagons and Buggies made and 

Repaired. General Repair 

Shop in Wood and Iron 

Bicycles, Guns, etc. 

Gary, N. C. 
Ml LLINERY STORE 

We carry a lull line of Millinery in latest style, and 
can furnish goods 25 to 50 per cent cheaper than city 
prices. In the General Store you can get the best 
selection of Dry Goods, Shoes, and Notions in the 
village. 

MRS. C. W. SCOTT 

With C. R. Scott & Son Cary. N.C. 

35 



J. H. STONE & CO. 

Railroad St. Caey, N. C. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes 
and General Groceries 

The Cheap Cash Store of the town. Come once and 
you will come again. 



The Seventy-fourth Session will 
begin September i, 1908. Sixteen 
independent "Schools," embracing 
the Sciences, Languages, Mathe- 
matics, Philosophy, Bible, Law, Ed- 
ucation, Medicine (2 years.) :: :: 

EXPENSES MODERATE 

For Catalogue or Special 
Information, Address 

President W. L. POTEAT 

Wake Forest, N. C. 

JOHN P. HAYES 

124)4 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, North Carolina 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Money saved you every sitting 
made at my Gallery. Work 
as good as the best guaranteed 

Agent for EDISON and VICTOR MACHINE RECORDS and SUPPLIES 

36 



Cars public Ifoiob School 
1009 




a £ 

S « 

Q g-O 

_; P*o5 

5 '~ & 



OH 
3 3 " 

go 

03 S 






g o 



— 






o3 * 

Eh > 
■< o 



„o 

--r 

M 

o.2 

o -K 


















5 «S 
o e c 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY 

Public High School 

CARY, N. C. 
19084909 

Announcements of Cary High School, 1909' 1910 



q 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Company 
1909 



I. School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
Sion Hoixeman, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



II. Calendar, 190^1910 

Fall Term opens August 17, 1909. 
Fall Term closes December 21, 1909. 
Spring Term opens December 28, 1909. 
Spring Term closes April 29, 1910. 



III. Officers and Instructors 
Session 1909-1910 
I. M. B. Dry, Principal. 

II. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 

III. M. B. Dry, M.A. (Wake Forest College, 1898), 

Latin, Mathematics, French. 

IV. C. L. Bivexs, B.A. (Trinity College, 1909), 

Science, English, Mathematics. 

V. Julia Pasmore, (N. C. Normal and Industrial 
College, 1902), 

History, English, Latin. 

VI.* 

Grammar Grades, Elocution. 

VII. Emma Pegram, B.L. (Oxford Seminary, 1903), 
Primary Grades. 

VIII. Irma Ellis, (N. C. Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege), 

Primary Grades. 

IX. Clyde Harrison, (Durham Conservatory of Mu- 
sic and Baptist University), 
Instrumental Music. 



*To be supplied. 



IV. Commencement, 1909 

April 14, 8 p.m. Annual Music Concert. 

April 15, 3 p.m. Exercises by Primary Department. 

April 15, 8 p.m. Annual Debate. 

April 16, 11 a.m. Annual Address by Prof. J. B. Carlyle. 

April 16, 12 m. Graduating Exercises. 

April 16, 3 p.m. Contest in Declamation and Recita- 
tion. 

April 16, 8 p.m. Play by students. 

Winners of Prizes and Medals 

Scholarship Medal L. L. Carpenter. 

Debater's Medal W. T. Baucom. 

Declaimer's Medal J. C. Brown. 

Reciter's Medal Lenora Upchurch. 

Clay Improvement Medal F. K. Pool. 

Calhoun Improvement Medal C. E. Byrd. 

Music Prize Mary Belle Stephenson. 

Drawing Prize John Hunter. 

Senior Class, 1909 

W. T. Baucom President. 

Bernice Kelley Secretary. 

Gussie Adams. La Rue Hunter. 

Lillie Atkins. M. R. Pleasants. 

Randolph Benton. F. K. Pool. 

Pearl Breeze. D. C. Proctor. 

J. C. Brown. E. G. Sinclair. 

L. L. Carpenter. Beula Smith. 

C. J. Edwards. Nannie Tilley. 

G. N. Harwabd. Lenora Upchurch. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

Cary Public High School 



V. Foreword 

All enterprises of great success and useful- 
' , , ness are of slow growth. For thirteen 

years a few faithful men and women have 
worked and prayed and planned to have a strong, useful 
educational institution in Cary. They have given of 
their time and money for the success of the school. The 
patronage has grown in numbers and territory. During 
the past year the patronage has come from eighteen 
counties, while the local patronage has been greatly 
enlarged under the new regime. 

The new law enacted by the General As- 

2. A Look sembly of 1907, providing for a system of 

public high schools for North Carolina, has 
now been in operation for two years. The Cary Public 
High School was the first established under this law. 
In point of patronage and efficiency the school has come 
to occupy a position among the leading schools of the 
State. 

The rules of Superintendent Joyner admit 

3. Who Can those who have completed the course of 

study for public schools issued from his 
office. The first seven grades in this catalogue cover 
this course. Applicants must stand examinations on 
entering or bring certificate from last teacher saying the 
course has been satisfactorily completed. 



6 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

All public school teachers of whatever age, and stu- 
dents over twenty-one years of age who pledge to teach, 
are entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one years 
of age must pay tuition. 

4 Outs'de ^* ie County Board of Education has al- 
Patron- lowed the school committee to receive pu- 
ag-e pils from territory outside of Wake County. 

This is allowed in all public high schools. These pupils 
receive every advantage formerly given by the school 
under private management. We earnestly solicit the 
cooperation of our old pupils outside of Wake County. 

Many farmers who think it almost a dis- 

5. When to grace to have farm work a few weeks be- 
Enter 

hind that of their neighbors, think it all 

right to enter their children from one to eight weeks 
behind their classes. With late planting they expect 
poor crops, but ask for good results in school with late 
entrance. The first is as possible and probable as the 
last. Going to school is a business, and no one ever 
engages in any business more important. If one fail in 
business he may start again, but if education is neg- 
lected, lost opportunities can never be regained. We 
urge all to be present as early in the session as possible, 
and be sure to plan for the whole term. 

VI. The Faculty 

The school committee has exercised great care in the 
selection of teachers for next session. The Principal 
has had thirteen years' experience at the head of a 
boarding school, one year at Cary and twelve as princi- 
pal of the well-known Wingate School. Mr. Bivens has 
been known to the Principal from childhood. He is a 
young man of clean life, studious in disposition, pleas- 
ing in manners, and well equipped from the standpoint 
of scholarship for the position which he is to fill. He is 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

an honor graduate of Trinity College. Miss Harrison, 
the music teacher, has taught successfully in some of 
the best high schools of the State, among them Winter- 
ville, where she taught four years. Misses Pasmore, 
Pegram and Ellis are known to our people, and because 
of their experience and ability are reelected for another 
year. One teacher is yet to be employed, but no pains 
will be spared to secure the very best teacher that can 
be found before the opening of the Fall Term. 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want 

We wish to have a most cordial relationship existing 
between parents and pupils and teachers. There must 
be between parents and teachers, harmony, sympathy, 
cooperation and mutual good will, if good results. Let 
the parents openly come to us and name their ideals, 
and if right and possible we will reach them. Here are 
some of our ideals: 

Who are willing to cooperate with us in 
our work. Those who have the courage to 
see and write to teachers regarding any dissatisfaction, 
rather than backbite and malign a worthy institution. 

Who realize that mental force is superior 

to physical force. Boys of good habits 

who want an education and are willing to work for it. 

Boys who see the great possibilities lying before men 

of the rising generation. 

Who realize the true nobility of woman- 
hood. Girls who are willing to live in 
woman's sphere and work faithfully to prepare them- 
selves for the noble callings now open to women. Girls 
who prefer well-stored brains and countenances beaming 
with intelligence to servile obedience to the whims of 
fashion. 



1. For the 
Heart 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

VIII. What We Do 

The school is thoroughly permeated with 
the spirit of Christianity. Only teachers of 
recognized Christian character have been 
employed. In no case will any influence be allowed 
which might draw a pupil away from his church moor- 
ings. As far as possible the wholesome influence of a 
Christian home is thrown around our students. While 
character is being formed, and impressions for life are 
being made, the Christian teacher has open to him a 
most wonderful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer-meeting. It 
is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 
been developed. Nearly all students attend the regular 
church prayer-meetings at the churches. The school is 
opened every morning with devotional exercises. 

Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to attend 
the services of these churches and Sunday School regu- 
larly. 

It is our plan to cultivate our students 
2. For the physically as well as mentally and morally. 
Otherwise the best results in the class- 
room and in after life can not be realized. To this end, 
we have baseball grounds, and students are encouraged 
to take sufficient outdoor exercise. A few match games 
are allowed, but our team has never been allowed to be 
away except to return the same day, and unless accom- 
panied by one of the teachers or some other responsible 
person. An excellent tennis court is available to teach- 
ers and pupils. 

In all our work we have three ends in 

view — to teach pupils to be observant of 
Head r r 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 

and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 



CART PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

eate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him; draw out 
his mental powers rather than pour in a heterogeneous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do as 
much original thinking as possible. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials in 
education tending to culture and refinement, and those 
which will prepare young men and women for the active 
duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments we 
take all pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. Fre- 
quent and thorough drills are given in spelling, reading 
and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are trained 
in the correct use of the language by frequent exercises 
in written work. When the pupil has acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the technical principles of gram- 
mar, the critical study of English classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as broad 
culture as possible and yet magnify the practical parts. 
The student should be taught to reason from cause to 
effect, and, as far as possible, make practical applica- 
tion of every lesson imparted. Our methods of instruc- 
tion are varied with a view to arousing and holding a 
live interest in the work. 

IX. What We Are and What We Have 

Too much could not be said of the desira- 
bility of the location. It is both healthful 
and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the town of 
Cary could not be excelled in the State. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the youth 
that will attend the institution. No better railroad 
facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 
junction of the Seaboard and Southern railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. 



10 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 

and has excellent water. Few towns can 

show a better health record. During the last year there 

was not a single case of illness in the student body 

caused by any local conditions. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
and surrounded by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are six large and well-lighted classrooms — which may 
be easily converted into an auditorium — dining-hall, 
reading-room, library, office, and four music-rooms. On 
the second floor are rooms for the matron and dormito- 
ries for thirty boys. To this old building has been 
added a splendid building with two more schoolrooms 
and two literary society halls. 

The entire building is furnished with suit- 
, able furniture and equipment. The class- 

rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. 
Sufficient new furniture has been added to meet the 
needs of an enlarged patronage. The music-rooms are 
furnished with four pianos, and the dormitory rooms 
with neat and comfortable furniture. The literary so- 
cieties have two of the most beautiful halls of any high 
school in North Carolina. 

X. General Culture 

The Clay and Calhoun Societies for young 
men and the Browning Society for girls 
meet once a week for exercises in debate, 
composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. Most excellent results 
have been obtained during the past year. The good to 
be derived from this work can not be overestimated. It 
gives a knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates 
a fondness for reading. It gives the power of expressing 



Literary 
Societies 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by many 
people. It gives a broader view of men and things, and 
as an educator it has no superior. We want original 
thought, and there is no field broader and more capable 
of yielding rich harvest. 

Besides the above societies, there is the Juvenile 
Society for boys and girls of the grammar grades. The 
pupils of the primary grades are required to do the 
same work. Every pupil in school will be required to 
do this work in declamation, recitation, essay writing 
and debate in one of the school organizations or on 
English classes once in two weeks. 

A library of about six hundred volumes has 
rary k een collected, to which additions are con- 
stantly being made. Every volume is carefully exam- 
ined, and nothing except literature of high order is 
allowed on our shelves. We have many volumes of 
biography, history, addresses, together with the prose 
and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, 
Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and others. 

Students have access to the best papers and maga- 
zines, which are kept in the study halls. 

XI. What Our Pupils Do 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general ends 
in view — one to prepare boys and girls for college, the 
other to fit the great mass of our students for the active 
duties of life. In the latter class we can point with 
pride to young men and women who are becoming strong 
factors in the social, industrial and church life of their 
several communities. In the former class our pupils 
are doing us honor while honoring themselves. 

Very few secondary schools send a larger per cent of 
their senior classes to college. 



12 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

During last year we had a large number of former 
pupils in the following institutions: University of 
North Carolina, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, 
A. and M. College, Elon College, Baptist University for 
Women, and Oxford Seminary. This does not include 
several of our students who went directly from our 
school to professional schools. 

Many of our pupils find themselves in the front in 
their classes. They make high marks and are frequent 
winners of medals and college honors. 

XII. Record of Work 

Educators are not agreed as to how often 
1. Exami- or jj 0W difficult examinations should be. 
nations ,tt • ... 

We require one or more written examina- 
tions of all pupils on all studies during each quarter, 
but these examinations are short and at such times as 
will give the pupils an opportunity of telling what they 
know, and not what has been "crammed" in their heads 
for a special occasion. A record is kept of work on reci- 
tations, and an average mark is secured from these two 
sources. 

These examinations must be stood or the pupil take 
zero in making our averages. It is manifestly unfair to 
require a part and not all pupils to pass examinations. 

There are too low ideals regarding examinations. 
Pupils are not allowed to give or receive aid from any 
source. To appropriate the ideas of others unlawfully 
is as sinful as to steal material things, and to give these 
makes the giver a party to the sin. 

Zero is given on such examinations, with enough de- 
merits to make deportment "bad." Pupils guilty of this 
can not receive a school certificate until the work has 
been passed during a subsequent year. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

We send reports at the end of each quarter. 

We keep all parents informed regarding 
the scholarship, deportment and attendance of their 
children. 

We ask for their cooperation. Low marks on scholar- 
ship are not necessarily a sign of poor work. A poor 
mark on deportment needs immediate attention. 

Our standards will be kept high. Pupils 
" to pass from one year or grade to the next 

must average eighty per cent on their 
respective studies, and all examinations must be passed. 
Pupils stopping before end of term and failing to stand 
examinations have no right to expect promotion until the 
omitted pages have been learned and examinations stood. 
All reputable institutions of learning require this. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 

is posted. To be entitled to a place on 
this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on scholar- 
ship, 95 on attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

To be entitled to honorable mention a pupil must 
make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A handsome gold medal is given by the Principal 
to the pupil in the High School making the highest 
scholarship during the year. To compete for this, a 
pupil must be present to receive all the reports of the 
year — and must carry at least four studies each quarter. 
The literary societies give medals for excellence in 
debate, declamation and recitation. 

Other prizes may be announced after the session is 
opened. 

In the course of study there are six de- 
,. " partments — Latin, English, Mathematics, 

History, Science, and French. To receive 
a certificate of proficiency a pupil must have completed 
the work of at least three of the first five courses, and 
due credit will be given to all pupils who have com- 



Music 



14 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

pleted Latin and Mathematics through the Junior year. 
Deficits on work of the Junior year must be made up 
during the first quarter of the Senior year, and deficits 
during Senior year must be made up promptly. All 
deficits below 75 must be made up by special examina- 
tion and can not be redeemed by good marks in another 
quarter. Deportment must average 85, and any pupil 
receiving below 75 during any quarter will be barred 
from Senior class. No pupil will be given a certificate 
unless he has passed two years of Latin and completed 
the full English course. 

XIII. Special Departments 

Music has long since come to be a necessity 
to a civilized people. It is the most exten- 
sively cultivated and the most generally appreciated of 
all the fine arts. A thorough and conscientious course 
in music will certainly carry with its manual training 
mental and heart training also. Many now study music 
who never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that comes 
from such a course of study, and because they realize 
that all cultivation of the fine arts is an upward and 
forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such a 
course of study as tends to give a thorough knowledge 
of music and to make the best performers. 

„ ™ Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

2. Elocu- ° 

tion pastime study. The eyes of the people, 

even in our conservative South, have been opened to see 
not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practical im- 
portance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inelegant 
speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the field 
to make room for the man who cultivates both brain and 
body. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to the 
various qualities of tone, selected with proper reference 
to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression also teaches 
Self-control, Ease, Polish, Address, Fluency, etc. 

XIV. Course of Study 

( 1 ) Primary. 

FIBST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. Hiawatha Primer. 

4. Science Reader, Book I. 

5. Spelling, Part I (Griffin and Foust). 

6. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

7. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 
Numbers. 

8. Drawing. 

9. Handwork — Paper Cutting, Clay Modeling, etc. 
10. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

3. Science Reader, Book II. 

4. Robinson Crusoe. 

5. Spelling, Part II (Griffin and Foust). 

6. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

7. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware I). 

9. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

3. Spelling, Part III (Griffin and Foust). 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

4. Primary Arithmetic, pages 109-203 (Colaw and 
Ellwood). 

5. Language Work — Same as Second Grade. 

6. Physiology, Book I ( Culler ) . 

7. Geography — Oral Instruction. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware II). 

9. Writing. 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

2. Story of Ulysses. 

3. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

4. Spelling, Part IV (Griffin and Foust). 

5. English Grammar, pages 1-70 (Hyde). 

6. Geography (Tarr and McMurray). 

7. Primary Arithmetic completed (Colaw and Ell- 
wood ) . 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware III). 

9. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. The Story of the Old North State (Connor). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Spelling, Part V (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Intermediate Arithmetic (Colaw and Duke). 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware IV). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling, Part VI (Griffin and Foust). 

2. English Grammar — Our Language II (Smith). 

3. Makers of American History. 

4. Complete Geography (Maury). 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

5. Advanced Arithmetic to Compound Quantities (Co- 
law and Ellwood ) . 

6. Physiology, Book II (Culler), Spring Term. 

7. Writing. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling — Reviewed and Completed (Griffin and 
Foust). 

2. English Grammar, Part I (Buehler). 

3. Higher History U. S. (Chambers). 

4. Arithmetic to Square Root ( Colaw and Ellwood ) . 

5. Complete Geography reviewed (Maury). 

6. Science — Agriculture ( Burkett, Stevens, and Hill ) . 

7. Writing. 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN TEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctuation 
and Use of Capitals ; Grammar, Part II ( Buehler ) ; 
Reading on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and 
as parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill of all reviews and supplementary exer- 
cises ; Algebra — First Steps ( Wentworth ) . 

History. — English History (Montgomery) ; N. C. His- 
tory (Hill), Fall Term; Civil Government (Peele), 
Spring Term. 

Latin. — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Spelling (Branson) ; Normal Grammar 
(Maris), Spring Term; Composition; Reading on Class 
Snoicbound, Merchant of Venice, and Poe's Poems, and 
as parallel Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, and 
Courtship of Miles Standish. 



18 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Mathematics. — High School Algebra to Simultaneous 
Equations (Wentworth's Elements). 

History. — General History, to 800 A. D. (Myers). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Introduction to Caesar 
(Brittain) . 

Science. — Physiology, Book III (Culler), Fall Term. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and Em- 
erson) ; Reading on Class Julius Caesar and First Bun- 
ker Hill Oration, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, 
Silas Marner, and Twice Told Tales. 

Mathematics. — Algebra completed (Wentworth's Ele- 
ments ) . 

History. — General History completed (Myers). 

Latin.— Caesar's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough) ; Prose Composition (Pearson) ; 
Cicero, First, Second, Third and Fourth Orations 
Against Catiline (Allen and Greenough). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr), Fall Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School Word Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Woolley) ; 
English Literature (Moody and Lovett) ; Reading on 
Class Sir Roger de Coverley, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, 
Milton's Minor Poems, and as parallel Ivanhoe, Vicar 
of Waicefield, Pilgrim's Progress, Washington's Farewell 
Address. 

Mathematics. — Algebra reviewed; Plane Geometry, 
Five Books ( Wentworth ) . 

History. — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent). 

Latin. — Virgil's JEneid, Books I, II, III and IV (Ben- 
nett) ; Prose Composition (Pearson) ; Critical Study of 
Syntax and Prosody. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

French. — Grammar ( Fraser and Squair ) . 
Science. — Physics (Higgins), Spring Term. 

XV. Expenses 

Per Term. 

Grammar Grades $12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 

Junior and Senior years 16.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 11.25 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Elocution — Private lessons 11.25 

Elocution — Classes of two 6.75 

XVI. Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence fxcept in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one iveek or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, unless 
previous arrangements are made to the contrary. The 
entrance of a pupil will be considered as an acceptance 
of these terms. 

The school is no longer a private enterprise. All 
accounts must be settled in full on or before January 1 
and June 1. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition if from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board 

The dormitories are furnished with bed- 
1. Dormi- stead, mattress with springs, chairs, table, 

lamp, etc. All boys rooming in dormitory 
must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow and toilet 
articles, such as comb and brush, soap, matches, etc. 



20 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

They get their board at actual cost, which varies with 
the price and quality of groceries. 

The room rent is $1.50 a month, which includes fuel, 
lights, etc. The estimated cost, based on the last two 
years, is $7.00 to $8.00 per month. 

Night latches have been placed upon all the doors, 
and each pupil will be required to deposit 25 cents for 
his key, which sum will be returned when the key is 
delivered up. 

Pupils in these dormitories are allowed to remain 
in their rooms for study. The Principal reserves the 
right, however, to remove any boy from the dormitory 
to the schoolrooms for indolence or disorder. 

This home for girls is presided over by Mrs. 

2. Brown- Lynn, who for six years has successfully 

managed private boarding houses for girls. 
The building is neatly and comfortably furnished. The 
girls must keep their rooms neat and be quiet and 
studious in their own rooms during study hours. The 
girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow, and 
necessary toilet articles, such as soap, matches, comb 
and brush, etc. 

The cost of board here is $9.25 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday is $6.50 per month. 
Such pupils will be grouped, as far as possible, in the 
same rooms, to stop cost of fires and lights during their 
absence. 

The Principal and family have a suite of rooms in 

this building. All parents may rest assured that their 

daughters' every interest will be carefully looked after. 

When the dormitories are filled, satisfac- 

3. Private tory arrangements can be made for board 

with private families. Boys and girls 
must have different boarding places. Our charges are as 
low as can be arranged with present prices for groceries. 
These charges cover all expenses except washing, but 
each pupil will be required to furnish a pair of blankets 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

or two quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow-eases. Ar- 
rangements can be made to board from Monday till 
Friday of each week. The Principal will arrange board 
wben notified by parents. 

Board in private families $9.2o 

Board from Monday until Friday 6.50 

In the boys' club each member must deposit $5 at be- 
ginning of each month, and pay balance at end of month. 

At Browning Hall and in private families board is 
payable at end of each month, with no deductions for 
less than one week. At end of terms the same time will 
be charged for as is made in school. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous 

1. In the common school branches all books adopted 
by the State Board of Education will be used. The law 
allows the use of other books as supplementary. Our 
term being longer than the regular public school wfll 
allow the use of many of these. In the High School the 
Principal has selected text-books by standard authors, 
and all pupils will be required to use books mentioned 
in the course of study, except when it is to the interest 
of the pupil for the teacher in charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal, except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation they must seek it in other 
ways. 



22 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 

6. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
home, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons they should notify the Principal. 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the Princi- 
pal for their conduct out of school, as well as while at 
the school building. 

8. All pupils in High School from Wake County must 
conform to course of study prescribed by Superintendent 
Joyner. Each one must have at least one foreign lan- 
guage and carry all other studies as nearly in order of 
course of study as circumstances will allow. 

^or further information address 

M. B. DRY, Principal. 
Cary, N. C. 




CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 



XIX. Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. We 
add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly and girls ladylike in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retiring, 
except for public worship and other approved public 
meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years, must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores, or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
chaperonage. 

9. There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for heavy demeriting or suspension. 



114 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



XX. Students, 

Adams, Mabel 
Adams, Gussie 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, Lucile 
Adams, Herman 
Adams, Frances 
Atkins, Lillie 
Atkins, Ray 
Atkins, Fred. 
Atkins, Elsie 
Bagwell, C. B. 
Bagwell, Sadie 
Bailey, H. J. 
Bailey, Birter 
Baker, Thurley 
Baker, Thelma 
Baker, Pearl 
Baucom, E. L. 
Baucom, W. T. 
Baugh, R. L. 
Beach, Estelle 
Beach, Ben 
Beach, Susie 
Benton, Randolph 
Benton, Lenna 
Benton, Whitson 
Benton, Bertice 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Rubie 
Blake, Sarah 
Bonner, Fannie 



1908^1909 

Boone, Alberta 
Boone, Waldo 
Breeze, Pearl 
Breeze, Mary 
Breeze, Sallie 
Breeze, Ruth 
Broadwell, Alfred 
Brown, J. C. 
Butt, James 
Butt, Ethel 
Butt, Willie 
Byrd, C. E. 
Campbell, E. P. 
Campbell, B. B. 
Campbell, C. L. 
Carpenter, L. L. 
Carpenter, C. J. 
Carpenter, Gladys 
Chapell, Laura 
Chapell, Joseph 
Chapell, Albert 
Clevenger, Edna 
Cooke, Ernest 
Cooke, Alma 
Cooper, Fred. 
Cooper, Frank 
Cooper, Allie 
Cooper, George 
Cooper, Lovie 
Cooper, Susie 
Covington, W. B. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



Critcher, Lillie 
Crocker, Maud 
Dowdy, L. L. 
Eatman, J. W. 
Eatinan, Marvin 
Eatman, Glenn 
Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Mary 
Edwards, C. J. 
Edwards, P. I. 
Edwards, Lovie 
Ellington, Foster 
Ellington, Mozelt 
Ellington, Sherwood 
Ellington, Ralph 
Farrar, W. G. 
Finch, O. E. 
Fleming, Alden 
Fleming, Myrtha 
Fleming, Ruth 
Fleming, Ruben 
Fleming, Mildred 
Fleming, John 
Franklin, C. W. 
Franklin, A. C. 
Franklin, Bessie 
Franks, D. P. 
Glover, Mrs. B. C. 
Glover, Maud 
Glover, Everett 
Glover, Earlie 
Glover, Luna 
Glover, Richard 
Glover, Lonnie 



Glover, Rommie 
Goodman, Jinks 
Greene, C. J. 
Gulley, L. R. 
Gulley, W. R. 
Hall, Annie Montague 
Hall, William Bonner 
Harris, Edgar 
Harris, Clyde 
Harris, Clarence 
Harris, John 
Harrison, E. B. 
Harward, G. N. 
Hester, J. R. 
Hines, B. L. 
Holland, S. O. 
Holleman, Carter 
Holleman, Leonard 
Holleman, Norman 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Carson 
Holleman, Cleo. 
Holleman, Terrine 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Dare 
Holloway, Bessie 
Holloway, Clyde 
Horton, R. L. 
House, W. C. 
House, Ha 
House, Alpha 
Howell, Maggie 
Hunter, LaRue 
Hunter, Isaac 



26 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Hunter, John 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hurst, Fred. 
Hurst, Lena 
Hurst, Frank 
Ivey, Thaddeus, Jr. 
Ivey, Rachel 
Ivey, Hannah 
Johnson, Ethel 
Johnson, Howard 
Jones, C. R. 
Jones, Marvin 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, David 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, John 
Jones, Mautell 
Jones, Edwin 
Jordan, Alma 
Jordan, Carlos 
Jordan, Lily 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Kelley, Berniee 
King, Elbie 
Knight, Cassie 
Knight, Mary 
Knight, Rachel 
Knight, Henry 
Knight, Lucy 
Knight, Hugh 



Knight, Louis 
Knott, A. J. 
Knott, Jennie 
Lassiter, Ila 
Lassiter, Lovie 
Lassiter, Iva 
Lassiter, Nina 
Lockamy, Otis 
Luther, Millard 
Luther, Alsey 
Maynard, Katie 
Maynard, Mina 
Maynard, Graham 
Maynard, George 
Maynard, Hattie 
Maynard, Luther 
Maynard, John 
McGhee, Lettie 
McGhee, Charlie 
McGhee, Gholdie 
Middleton, Robert Lee 
Middleton, Lucy 
Middleton, Rachel 
Moore, Percy 
Moore, Elsie 
Morgan, Hattie May 
Morrison, J. D. 
Murdoch, Emerson 
Murdock, Estis 
Nbrris, Mary 
Olive, Bunnie 
Partin, Aldridge 
Partin, Charity 
Pearson, B. P. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Pegram, Worthy 
Pegram, John D. 
Pendergraft, W. R. 
Pendergraft, Mary 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Claude 
Pendergraft, Leon 
Pendergraft, Levy 
Penny, E. R. 
Pleasants, Milton 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, May 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pool, F. K. 
Powell, Robert 
Powell, Willie 
Powell, George 
Powers, Inona 
Prince, Frank 
Prince, Florence 
Proctor, D. C. 
Proctor, Mabel 
Prueitt, J. L. 
Prueitt, Ruth 
Ranes, Minnie 
Ranes, Corlessie 
Ranes, Leland 
Ranes, Troy 
Ranes, Halsie 
Roberts, G. T. 
Rogers, Mary 



Rowland, J. C. 
Satterwhite, J. F. 
Sears, J. L. 
Sears, Ruth 
Sears, Loomis 
Seymour, Lydia 
Sinclair, E. G. 
Small, Clara 
Small Clio 
Small, Dewey 
Small, Wilburn 
Smith, W. F. 
Smith, P. N. 
Smith, Lizzie 
Smith, Beulah 
Smith, Novella 
Smith, Myrtle 
Smith, Mavis 
Sorrell, Ollie 
Sorrell, N. S. 
Stanley, G. N. 
Stedman, George 
Stedman, Maurice 
Stephenson, Mary Belle 
Stephenson, Rebecca 
Stephenson, Eva 
Stephenson, Charlie 
Stephenson, Irene 
Stephenson, Catherine 
Stone, Ralph 
Taylor, J. H. 
Templeton, Hugh 



28 



GABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Templeton, Elva 
Templeton, Grace 
Thomas, Annie 
Tilley, Mary 
Tilley, N'tmie 
Tilley, Bertha 
Tolley, Douglas 
Tolley, Walsey 
Tolley, Jesse 
Turner, B. W. 
Upchurch, E. E. 
Upchurch, Eunice 
Upchurch, Lenora 
Upchurch, Frank 
Upchurch, John Lee 
Varner, Agnes 
Varner, Maggie 
Waldo, Lavine 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Ghita 
Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Owen' 
Walker, W. L. 
Warren, Ernest 



Warren, T. H. 
Weathers, Bahnson 
Weathers, H. H. 
Weaver, Donnie 
Weldon, 0. J. 
Weldon, T. H. 
Wellons, Dessie 
Wellons, Lillie May 
Wilder, A. B. 
Wilder, Xenia 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilkinson, Fred. 
Williams, T. W. 
Williams, Addie 
Williams, Sadie 
Williams, Myrtle 
Williams, McKinley 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Lovie 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Keedham 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Carson 
Yates, Annie Lee 



J. B. RICHARDSON 



CARY, N. C. 

DEALER IN 



Heavy and Fancy Groceries 
Fresh Meats, Fish, etc* 

Headquarters for everything good to eat. Prices right. 
Goods right. Prompt delivery and polite service. 



Pianos and Organs 

of the very best makes sold on easy terms 
at prices that can not be beaten, quality 
considered. The Famous SHONINGER 
Pianos sold by us at prices and terms that 
will surprise you. 

Darnell & Thomas 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dobbin-Ferrall Co. 

At Tucker Store 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dry Goods of all Kinds. Ready-to-wear 

Garments, Shoes, etc. Carpets, 

Curtains and Draperies 

We sell better goods at lower prices than 
any other store 

We always have what you can not find 
elsewhere 

We Give Dobbin & Ferrall Co/s 

Gold Trading Stamps 

(registered) 
With every cash purchase. One stamp for every 10 cts. 

E. O. Waldo Cary, N. C. 

Drugs, Prescriptions 

Nice Line of Stationery Up-to-date Soda 

Toilet Articles, etc. Fountain 



Dress Suits Made to Order 

A SPECIALTY 

We have a line of samples of the best cloths for Dress 

Suits and guarantee a perfect fit and low prices. 

We also have a full line of 

Clothing, Underwear, Hats 
Shoes, etc. 




LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED 

Charles E. Johnson, President F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier 

Raleigh Banking and Trust Company 

RALEIGH, N". C. 
Condition at Close of business, April 28, 1909 

RESOURCES 

Loans and investments 5560,367.63 

Banking house 25.000.00 

Due from banks and bankers 155,790.20 

Cash 57,994. 17 

Total 8799, 152.00 

LI A EI LI TIES 

Capital stock $100,000.00 

Undivided profits 16,893.37 

Deposits subject to check 667,630.91 

Due to banks and bankers 14,627.72 

Total 8799, 152.00 

Directors 

CHARLES E. JOHNSON C. M. BUSBEE ALFRED WILLIAMS 

JAME8 A. BRIGGS H. E. NORRIS THOMAS 8. KENAN 

\V. N. JONES J. R. CHAMBERLAIN JOHN W. HARDEN 

W. A. LINEHAN T. B. CROWDER F. O. MORING 

2 



CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

234 and 236 Fayetteville St., New Tucker Building 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during your 
visit to our city. We will endeavor to make your stay pleasant. 



Alfred Williams & Co. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Headquarters in North Carolina, 
for all Kinds of 



BOOKS 



A full line of second-hand books always on hand at 
one-half regular price. 

We sell at publishers' prices. 

Mail orders given prompt attention. 

Give us your order. 

Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina 



C. R. SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 

Headquarters for School Books, tablets 

Pencils and All Kinds of 

Stationery 



B. P. S. PAINT ^ST PAINT SOLD 

Covers more than any Paint made 

BUG DEATH 

Sure death to Potato Bugrs 
Non -poisonous and is a Plant Food 

"ALL RIGHT" COOK STOVES AND RANGES 
TOBACCO FLUES A SPECIALTY 

Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best Goods. 

Lowest Prices. Your money back if not satisfied. 

Call and see us. 

Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, NT. C. 



E. J. Harbison, President F. R. Gray, Vice President 

F. T. Ward, Secy. & Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 

The Harrison Wagon Company 



Manufacturers of 



WAGONS, CARTS AND PLOWS 

Office "Works 

RALEIGH, N. C. CARY, N. C. 

4 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 

WITH 

COoulan = jL earce s^ompanu 

206 Fayetteville St., 208 Salisbury St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best selected stock of Dry 
Goods, Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor- 
made Suits, Cloaks and Capes shown in the 
City of Raleigh. We cordially invite you 
to visit our store when in our city. Samples 
gladly furnished upon request for same. 
Mail orders filled same day received. 

i_Jjoulan = J, earce C ompanu 
Thomas H. Briggs 

& SonS RALEIGH, N. C. 

The Big 
Hardware Men 



Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime 

Plaster, Cement 

Clay Chimney Pipe 

Best Goods Lowest Prices Square Dealings 

Stoves and Ranges 

5 



F. R. GRAY & BRO. 

CARY, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions. Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Pants, Men's Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, 
Glassware, Hardware, Plow Castings and Farming Uten- 
sils. From our warehouse we can furnish you Cotton 
Seed Meal and Hulls, Corn, Oats, Hay, Fertilizers, etc. 

Cold Drinks Dispensed at Our Up-to-date Soda Fountain 

Come to see us. We are headquarters for 

DRY GOODS 

Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods 
Groceries and Queensware. We sell as cheap as the 
cheapest. We thank you for your past patronage and 
solicit your future trade. 

W. D. JONES, Cary. N. C. 

Z.V. JOHNSON & SON 

Undertakers 

CARY, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and General Burial 
Supplies. Wagons and Buggies made and Repaired. General Repair 
Shop in Wood and Iron, Bicycles, Guns, etc. 

MILLINERY STORE 

We carry a full line of Millinery in latest style, and can 
furnish goods 25 to 50 per cent cheaper than city prices. 
In the general store you can get the best selection of Dry 
Goods, Shoes, and Notions in the village. A nice line of 
ladies' coat suits for the fall trade. 

MRS. C. W. SCOTT 

With C. R. Scott & Son CARY, N. C. 



J. H, STONE & CO. 

Railroad Street. CARY, N. C. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes 
and General Groceries 

The Cheap Cash Store of the town. Come once and 
you will come again. 

WAKE FOREST 
COLLEGE 

The Seventy-fifth Session will begin Sep- 
tember 7, 1909. Sixteen independent 
"Schools," embracing the Sciences, Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Philosophy, Bible, 
Law, Education, Medicine (2 years.) 

EXPENSES MODERATE 

For catalogue or special information, 
Address 

President W. L. POTEAT 

WAKE FOREST, N. C. 



JOHN P. HAYES 

124% Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Photographer 

Money saved you on every sitting made at my Gallery. Work as 
good as the best guaranteed. Agent for Edison and Victor Machine 
Records and Supplies. Films and Cameras for sale. Kodak work 
a specialty. 




Graduating Class, 1910 

First row. from left to right — O. W. Yates. Novella Smith, (). 
R. Yates. 

Second row, from left to right — T. L. Williams. Ruth Sears, 
Prof. M. B. Dry. Willine Womble, C. J. Greene, 
bird row. from left to right— W. F. Smith. S. O. Holland. 
Myrtha Fleming. C. J. Carpenter, W. G. Farrar. 

Fourth row. from left to right — A. L. Fleming, W. F. Coving- 
ton, B. P. Pearson. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Car? public High School 

Cary, North Carolina 



1909-1910 



Announcements of Cary High School 1910-191 1 




RALEIGH 

Commercial Printing Company 

1910 



/. School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
F. R. Gray, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



//. Calendar, 1910-1911 

Fall Term opens August 15, 1910. 
Fall Term closes December 23, 1910. 
Spring Term opens January 2, 1911, 
Spring Term closes April 28, 1911. 



///. Officers and Instructors 
Session, 1910-1911 

I. M. B. Dry, Principal. 
II. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 

III. M. B. Dby, M.A. (Wake Forest College, 1896), 

Mathematics, Science. 

IV. C. L. Bivens, B.A. (Trinity College, 1909), 

English, History. 

V. Julia Pasmobe (N. C. Normal and Industrial 
College, 1902), 

Latin, Mathematics. 

VI. Lydia Yates (Oxford Seminary), 
Grammar Grades. 

VII. Estelle Yabborough (Littleton Female Col- 
lege), 

Primary Grades. 

VIII. Ibma Ellis (N. C. Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege), 

Primary Grades. 




&.CU**V¥»£| af ^O 



X. Mabgabet Bbight (Meredith College), 
Expression, History. 

XI. Josephine Evans, 

Domestic Science. 



•To be elected. 



April 27, 


8 p. m. 


April 28, 


3 p. m. 


April 28, 


8 p. m. 


April 29, 


11 a. m. 


April 29, 


12 m. 


April 29, 


3 p. m. 



IV. Commencement, 1910 

Expression Recital. 

Exercises by Primary Department. 

Annual Debate. 

Annual Address by Hon. T. W. 
Bickett. 

Graduating Exercises. 

Contest in Declamation and Reci- 
tation. 
April 29, 8 p. m. Musical Concert. 

Winners of Medals 

Scholarship Medal B. P. Pearson. 

Debater's Medal C. J. Carpenter. 

Declaimer's Medal W. F. Smith. 

Reciter's Medal Lena Stephenson. 

Clay Improvement Medal E. R. Penny. 

Calhoun Improvement Medal O. W. Yates. 

Senior Class, 1910 

S.jQ^vHoauA.ND^.^^.^ . . . Jsj. . Jp . . .^resident. 

^Novella Smith Secretary. 

C. J. Carpenter. A. L. Fleming, 

W. B. Covington, Myrtha Fleming, 

W. G. Farrar. C. J. Green. 

B. P. Pearson. Ruth Sears. 

W. F. Smith. Willine Womble. 

T. L. Williams. O. R. Yates. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 



Cary Public High School 



V. Foreword 
The Cary High School is not a new enter- 
s' b°° h P r * se ' DU ^ nas an honorable history ex- 
tending over more than a dozen years. 
Under the guiding hand of Prof. E. L. Middleton, its 
head for a decade or more, the school came to occupy 
a foremost place among the private preparatory schools 
of the State. When the General Assembly of 1907 
enacted a law providing for a system of public high 
schools for North Carolina, the Cary High School was 
converted into the Cary Public High School, which 
enjoys the distinction of being the first high school 
established under the new law. As such, it has now 
been in operation for three years and has steadily 
grown in patronage and efficiency. 

The rules of the State Superintendent ad- 
2. Who Can m j t those who have completed the course 
of study for public high schools issued 
from his office. The first seven grades in this cata- 
logue cover this course. Applicants must stand exam- 
inations on entering, or bring certificate from last 
teacher saying the course has been satisfactorily com- 
pleted. 

All public-school teachers of whatever age, and stu- 
dents over twenty-one years of age who pledge to 
teach, are entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one 
years of age must pay tuition. 



6 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

The County Board of Education allows 

3. Outside ^ e gchool committee to receive pupils 

from territory outside of Wake County. 
This is allowed in all public high schools. These pupils 
receive every advantage formerly given by the school 
under private management. 

It is important to begin at the opening, 

4. When to j ugt as important as to begin a crop on 

time. The pupil who starts a few weeks 
late is often handicapped in his work for the whole 
term. Begin at the first and plan for the entire school 
year. 

VI. The Faculty 

The school committee exercises great care in the 
selection of teachers. The Principal has had fourteen 
years' experience at the head of a boarding school, 
two years at Cary and twelve as principal of Wingate 
High School. Mr. Bivens has been known to the Prin- 
cipal from childhood. He is a young man of clean life, 
studious in disposition, pleasing in manners and well 
equipped from the standpoint of scholarship for the 
position which he fills. He is an honor graduate of 
Trinity College. He taught with us last session with 
great satisfaction to pupils and patrons. 

Misses Pasmore and Ellis are known to our people, 
and because of their experience and ability are re- 
elected for another year. 

We are fortunate in securing the services of Miss 
Margaret Bright as teacher of Expression. She is a 
full graduate of Meredith College, both in the Literary 
Department and in Expression. She taught last year 
at Meredith. 

Misses Yates and Yarborough are new additions to 
our teaching force, but they are well equipped for 
their work and have had successful experience in 
teaching. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 1 

Miss Josephine Evans is a successful teacher of 
Domestic Science, and her addition to our teaching 
force will greatly increase the efficiency of the school. 

The music teacher is yet to be employed, but no 
pains will be spared to secure the very best teacher 
that can be found before the opening of the Fall Term. 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want 

Who are willing to co-operate with us in 
1 Pstrons 

our work. Those who have the courage 

to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatisfac- 
tion, rather than backbite and malign a worthy insti- 
tution. 

°ys Qf g 00( j habits who want an education 

and are willing to work for it. Boys who see the 
great possibilities lying before men of the rising gen- 
eration. 

" s Who realize the true nobility of woman- 

hood. Girls who are willing to live in woman's sphere 
and work faithfully to prepare themselves for the 
noble callings now open to women. 

VIII. What We Do 

Only teachers of recognized Christian 
vj 1 " . e character are employed. In no case is 

any influence allowed which might draw 
a pupil away from his church moorings. As far as 
possible, the wholesome influence of a Christian home 
is thrown around our students. While character is 
being formed, and impressions for life are being made, 
the Christian teacher has open to him a most wonder- 
ful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer meeting. 
It is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 



8 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

been developed. Nearly all students attend the regu- 
lar church prayer meetings at the churches. The 
school is opened every morning with devotional exer- 
cises. 

Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to at- 
tend the services of these churches and Sunday-school 

regularly. 
u h ** * s our P* an *° cultivate our students 

physically as well as mentally and mor- 
ally. Otherwise the best results in the classroom and 
in after life cannot be realized. To this end, we have 
baseball grounds and tennis courts, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient outdoor exercise. A few 
match games are allowed, but our team has never been 
allowed to be away except to return the same day, 
and unless accompanied by one of the teachers or some 
other responsible person. 

In all our work we have three ends in 

3. For the v iew — to teach pupils to be observant of 
Head 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 

and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 
cate a pupil be must lead him, not drive him ; draw 
out his mental powers rather than pour in a hetero- 
geneous mass of information. Pupils are encouraged 
to do as much original thinking as possible. In addi- 
tion to mere mental discipline, we try to use those 
essentials in education tending to culture and refine- 
ment, and those which will prepare young men and 
women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. 
Frequent and thorough drills are given in spelling, 
reading and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

trained in the correct use of the language by frequent 
exercises in written work. When the pupil has ac- 
quired a thorough knowledge of the technical princi- 
ples of grammar, the critical study of English classics 
is emphasized. 

IX. What We Are and What We Have 

The location is both heathful and beauti- 
1. Location ful The moral atmosphere of the town 

of Gary is hardly excelled anywhere. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the youth 
that attend the institution. No better railroad facili- 
ties could be furnished in the State — just at the junc- 
tion of the Seaboard and Southern railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 
ea and has excellent water. Few towns cau 

show a better health record. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
. ui ings aQ( j sul . roun( j e( i by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are six large and well-lighted classrooms — which may 
be easily converted into an auditorium — dining-hall, 
library, office, and four music-rooms. On the second 
floor are dormitories for thirty-four boys, and two 

literary society halls. 
4. Equip- Tlie en ti re building is furnished with suit- 
ment 

able furniture and equipment. The class- 
rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. The 
music-rooms are furnished with four pianos, and the 
dormitory rooms with neat and comfortable furniture. 
The literary societies have beautifully furnished halls, 
and these are the pride of the school. 



10 GABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



X. General Culture 



The Clay and Calhoun societies for young 

}~ ■ r 5 r ^ men, and the Browning Society for girls 
Societies 

meet once a week for exercises in debate, 

composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. The good to be derived 
from this work cannot be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a 
fondness for reading. It gives the power of express- 
ing in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by 
many people. It gives a broader view of men and 
things, and as an educator it has no superior. 

A library of about six hundred volumes 
1 rary has been collected, to which additions are 
constantly being made. We have many volumes of 
biography, history, addresses, together with the prose 
and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tenny- 
son, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and 
others. 

Students have access to the daily papers and the 
magazines. 

XL What Our Pupils Do 

We have two general ends in view — one to prepare 
boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
page 12) pupils can choose those studies which bear 
most directly upon their life work. For those con- 
templating a profession, the Classical Course may be 
chosen ; for those who expect to lead an agricultural 
life, the Scientific Course doubtless is to be preferred ; 
while for those having in view a business career, the 
English Course is perhaps the best. 



CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

XII. Record of Work 

We require one or more written exaniin- 
1. Examma- a tions of all pupils on all studies during 

each quarter, but these examinations are 
short and at such times as will give the pupils an 
opportunity of telling what they know, and not what 
has been "crammed" in their heads for a special 
occasion. A record is kept of work on recitations, and 
an average mark is secured from these two sources. 

These examinations must be stood or the pupil take 
zero in making our averages. 

Pupils are not allowed to give or receive aid from 
any source. 

Zero is given on such examinations, with enough de- 
merits to make deportment "bad." Pupils guilty of 
this cannot receive a school certificate until the work 
has been passed during a subsequent year. 

We send reports at the end of each quar- 
epor s ter We keep all p arentg i n f orme( i re- 
garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance of 
their children, and we ask for their co-operation. 

Our standards will be kept high. Pupils 
3. Promo- to p ass from one year or grade to the 

next must average eighty per cent on 
their respective studies, and all examinations must be 

passed. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 
is posted. To be entitled to a place on this, a pupil 
must make an average of 92.5 on scholarship, 95 on 
attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

To be entitled to honorable mention a pupil must 

make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 

in the high school making the highest scholarship dur- 



12 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

ing the year. To compete for this, a pupil must be 

present to receive all the reports of the year — and 

must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

The literary societies give medals for excellence in 

debate, declamation and recitation. 

In the course of study there are six de- 

5. Gradua- partments — Latin, English, Mathematics, 
tion 

History, Science and French. To receive 

a certificate of graduation a pupil must have com- 
pleted one of the following courses : 

(1) Classical. — Required: Latin, English, Mathemat- 
ics. Elective: History or Science (through the Sopho- 
more year) or French. 

(2) Scientific. — Required: Science, Mathematics, 
English (through the Junior year). Elective: Latin 
(through the Sophomore year) or History (through 
the Junior year). 

(3) English. — Required: English, History, Science 
(through the Junior year). Elective: Mathematics 
(through the Junior year) or Latin (through the 
Sophomore year). 

Deficits on work of the Junior year must be made 
up during the first quarter of the Senior year, and 
deficits during Senior year must be made up promptly. 
All deficits below 75 must be made up by special ex- 
amination and cannot be redeemed by good marks in 
another quarter. Deportment must average 85, and 
any pupil receiving below 75 during any quarter will 
be barred from Senior Class. 

XIII. Special Departments 

Music has long since come to be a neces- 
1 IVI u s i c 

sity to a civilized people. It is the most 

extensively cultivated and the most generally appreci- 
ated of all the fine arts. A thorough course in music 



CART PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

will certainly carry with its manual training mental 
and heart training also. Many now study music who 
never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that 
comes from such a course of study. 

Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

2. Elocution pastime stu( jy. The eyes of the people 

have been opened to see not only the beauty and 
grandeur, but the practical importance of true ex- 
pression. And the time rapidly approaches when the 
inelegant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from 
the field to make room for the man who cultivates both 
brain and body. 

3. Domestic Domestic Science, or the science of cook- 

Science 

mg, has been taught in a few of our city 

high schools for several years, but so far has not been 
introduced in the rural village high schools because of 
limited income and the inability to secure adequately 
trained teachers. The subject just now is forcing 
itself upon the attention of our educational leaders 
and will soon receive the same emphasis as agriculture 
in our rural high schools. The services of a thor- 
oughly trained teacher have been secui"ed for this de- 
partment 'for next year, and the instruction will be 
open to all young ladies of the school without extra 
charge. 

XIV. Course of Study 

(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. Hiawatha Primer. 

4. Science Reader, Book I. 

5. Spelling, Part I (Griffin and Foust.) 

6. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 



14 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

7. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 

8. Drawing. 

9. Handwork — Paper Cutting, etc. 
10. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

3. Science Reader, Book II. 

4. Robinson Crusoe. 

5. Spelling, Part II (Griffin and Foust). 

6. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

7. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware I). 

9. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Tbird Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

3. Spelling, Part III (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Primary Arithmetic, pages 10D-203 (Colaw and 

Ellwood). 

5. Language Work — Same as Second Grade. 

6. Physiology, Book I (Culler). 

7. Geography — Oral Instruction. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware II). 

9. Writing. 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

2. Story of Ulysses. 

3. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

4. Spelling, Part IV (Griffin and Foust). 

5. English Grammar, pages 1-70 (Hyde). 



CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

6. Geography (Tarr and McMurray). 

7. Primary Arithmetic Completed (Colaw and 

Elhvood). 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware III). 

9. Writing. 

FIFTH GBADE. 

1. The Story of the Old North State (Connor). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Spelling, Part V (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Intermediate Arithmetic (Colaw and Duke). 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware IV). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling, Part VI (Griffin and Foust). 

2. English Grammar — Our Language II (Smith). 

3. Makers of American History. 

4. Complete Geography (Maury). 

5. Advanced Arithmetic to Compound Quantities 

(Colaw and Ellwood). 

6. Physiology, Book II (Culler), Spring Term. 

7. Writing. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling — Reviewed and completed (Griffin and 

Foust). 

2. English Grammar, Part I (Buehler). 

3. Higher History U. S. (Chambers). 

4. Arithmetic to Square Root (Colaw and Ellwood). 

5. Complete Geography reviewed (Maury). 

6. Science — Agriculture (Burkett, Stevens and 

Hill). 

7. Writing. 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling ( Branson ) , Punctuation 
and Use of Capitals; Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; 
Reading on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and 
as parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill of all reviews and supplementary exer- 
cises; Algebra — First Steps (Wentworth) ; Science of 
Accounts (Allen). 

History. — English History ( Montgomery ) ; N. C. 
History (Hill), Fall Term; Civil Government (Peele), 
Spring Term. 

Latin. — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science. — Physiology, Book III (Culler), Fall Term. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Spelling (Branson) ; English Composition; 
Reading on Class Snowbound, Merchant of Venice, and 
Poe's Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, 
Scarlet Letter, and Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics. — High School Algebra to Theory of 
Exponents (Wells). 

History. — General Hjstory, to 800 A. D. (Myers). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed ; Introduction to Caesar 
(Brittain). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Farr), Spring Term. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Caesar and First 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

Banker Hill Oration, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, 
Silas Maimer and Twice- Told Tales. 

Mathematics. — Algebra completed (Wells). 

History. — General History completed (Myers). 

Latin. — Causer's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough) ; Prose Composition (Pear- 
son) ; Cicero's Four Orations Against Catiline (Allen 
and Greenough). 

Science. — Botany (Bailey), Fall Term; Agriculture 
(Soule and Turpin), Spring Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — High School Word Book completed ( Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Moody and Lovett) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sir Roger cle Coverly, Macbeth, Life of 
Johnson, Milton's Minor Poems, and as parallel Ivan- 
hoe, Vicar of Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress, Washing- 
ton's Farewell Address. 

Mathematics. — Plane Geometry, Five Books (Wells). 

History. — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent). 

Latin. — Virgil's iEneid, Six Books (Bennett) ; Prose 
Composition (Pearson) ; Critical Study of Syntax and 
Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science. — Physics (Higgins), Fall Term; Chemistry 
(Ostwald and Morse), Spring Term. 

XV. Expenses 

Per Term. 

Grammar Grades $12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 

Junior and Senior years 16.00 



13 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days... 11.25 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily . . 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily. 4.50 

Elocution — Private lessons 11.25 

Elocution — Classes of two 6.75 

XVI. Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, 
unless previous arrangements are made to the con- 
trary. The entrance of a pupil will be considered as 
an acceptance of these terms. 

The school is not a private enterprise. All accounts 
must be settled in full ou or before January 1 and 
June 1. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition if from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board 

The dormitories are furnished with bed- 

1. Dormi- stead, mattress with springs, chairs, table, 
tory 

lamp, etc. All boys rooming in dormitory 

must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow and toilet 

articles, such as comb and brush, soap, matches, etc. 

The room rent is $1.50 a month, which includes fuel, 
lights, etc. The cost of table board is $8.50 per month, 
or $6.00 from Monday to Friday. 

Night latches have been placed upon all the doors, 
and each pupil is required to deposit 25 cents for his 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

key, which sum will be returned when the key is de- 
livered up. 

Pupils in these dormitories are allowed to remain 
in their rooms for study. The Principal reserves the 
right, however, to remove any boy from the dormitory 
to the schoolrooms for indolence or disorder. 

This home for girls is presided over by 
2. Browning ^ rs Ly nn w h f or several years has suc- 
cessfully managed private boarding houses 
for girls. The building is neatly and comfortably fur- 
nished. The girls must keep their rooms neat and be 
quiet and studious in their rooms during study hours. 
The girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow, 
and necessary toilet articles, such as soap, matches, 
comb and brush, etc. 

The cost of board here is $10.00 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday is $7.00 per month, or 
from Sunday evening to Friday, $7.50. Such pupils 
will be grouped, as far as possible, in the same rooms, 
to stop cost of fires and lights during their absence. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughters' 

every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 

the lady assistants, Miss Bright, will room in the 

dormitory and have charge of the girls. 

When the dormitories are filled, satisfac- 

Pr'vate ^ 0V y. arrangements can be made for board 
Families ..,, . * x _ , . . 

with private families. Boys and girls 

must have different boarding places. Our charges are 

as low as can be arranged with present prices for 

groceries. These charges cover all expenses except 

washing, but each pupil will be required to furnish a 

pair of blankets or two quilts, a pair of sheets and 

pillow cases. Arrangements can be made to board 

from Monday till Friday of each week. The Principal 

will arrange board when notified by parents. 



20 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Board in private families $10.00 

Board from Monday until Friday 7.00 

Board is payable at end of each month, with no de- 
ductions for less than one week. At end of terms the 
same time will be charged for as is made in school. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous 

1. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 

2. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal, except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

, 3. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation they must seek it in other 
ways. 

4. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 

5. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
home, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons they should notify the Principal. 

6. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principal for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

For further information address 

M. B. DRY, Principal. 

Caby, N. C. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 



XIX. Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly and girls ladylike in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retir- 
ing, except for public worship and other approved pub- 
lic meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Gary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amuse- 
ment sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
chaperonage. 

9 There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for heavy demeriting or suspension. 



22 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

XX. Special Notes 

The Science Course has been strengthened by the 
addition of Botany, Agriculture and Chemistry, and 
by the purchase of laboratory apparatus for teaching 
these subjects. 

The Science of Accounts, or Bookkeeping, will be 
taught in the first year of the high school in connec- 
tion with arithmetic and algebra. One period a week 
will be devoted to it. 

A course in Domestic Science has been introduced 
for next session (see page 13). The subject will be 
taught by Miss Josephine Evans, whose excellent work 
in the Raleigh High School last year attracted much 
attention. She retains her position in Raleigh, but 
will give Cary two lessons each week. 

Agriculture will be given more attention than for- 
merly. The text-books by Burkett, Stevens and Hill 
will be retained in the seventh grade, and Soule and 
Turpin's Fundamental Principles of Agriculture will 
be used in the Junior year of the High School along 
with Botany. 

The school will have a faculty of nine teachers next 
session with college training and successful experi- 
ences in teaching. With this strong teaching force, 
and with the added equipments noted elsewhere in this 
catalogue, the school, we think, offers exceptional ad- 
vantages to boarding pupils. 

During the summer a cottage will be built on the 
school campus for the matron of the boys' dormitory. 
The boys will take their meals there, retaining their 
rooms in the dormitory. The old dining-room and 
kitchen will be used for the Science Department and 
for the class in Domestic Science. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

The school sends out each year from fifteen to 
twenty graduates. These do not all come from Wake 
County. The school's patronage for the last two years 
has extended over more than a score of counties in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. 

Every pupil in school is required to take spelling. 
The neglect of spelling in the high school accounts, in 
a large measure, for the wail that every year goes up 
from the colleges over the woful condition of the 
spelling of college students. Every pupil in the high 
school is also required to join one of the three classes 
in Current Events. These classes take one of the 
spelling periods each week, and the time is devoted to 
the discussion of passing events. Current Events, 
a weekly non-partisan paper, published at Springfield, 
Mass., at 20 cents a year or 10 cents a half year in 
clubs, is used. This little paper has a larger circula- 
tion than any other school paper in the world and 
ought to be used by every teacher and read by every 
boy and girl in America. 

The situation of Cary High School — right in the 
educational as well as the geographical center of the 
State and almost in the suburbs of the State capital — 
is a greater advantage than is commonly supposed. 
Within a radius of thirty miles from Cary are located 
the A. and M. College, Wake Forest, Trinity, the State 
University, Meredith College, St. Mary's, Peace Insti- 
tute, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. These 
institutions have put us under obligation to them in 
many ways, as in sending us speakers from time to 
time and permitting us to consult their well-equipped 
libraries. The State capital affords an opportunity of 
seeing the State's public buildings, the State Fair, the 
Legislature in session, etc. 



24 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Students, 1 909-1 910 



Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Atkins, 
Atkins, 
Atkins, 



Anna 

Frances 

Herman 

Lucile 

Gussie 

Henry 

Mabel 

Elsie 

Fred. 

Ray 



Bailey, Odelia 
Barrett, J. D. 
Beach, Ben. 
Beach, Estelle 
Beach, Susie 
Beasley, Annie 
Benton, Burtis 
Benton, Howard 
Benton, Lenna 
Benton, Whitson 
Blackwell, J. B. 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Ruby 
Blake, Sarah 
Bonner, Fannie 
Booker, Baxter 
Branton, Raymond 
Breeze, Mary 
Breeze, Ruth 
Breeze, Sallie 
Bullock, Annie 
Bullock, Ruth 
Byrd, C. E. 

Campbell, J. B. 
Carpenter, C. J. 
Chappell, Albert 
Chappell, Joseph 
Chappell, Laura 
Clevenger, Edna 
Cook, Alma 
Cooper, Allie 



Cooper, Ernest 
Cooper, Frank 
Cooper, George 
Cooper, Lovie 
Cooper, Susie 
Covington, G. I*. 
Covington. W. B. 
Cox, P. L. 
Crocker, Maud 

Doub. L. A. 
Drake, W. M. 

Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Glenn 
Eatman, Marvin 
Eatman, Mary 
Edwards, J. R. 

Farrar. W. G. 
Fisher, Alma 
Fisher, Edgar 
Fisher, Henry 
Fisher, Ralph 
Fleming, A. L. 
Fleming, John 
Fleming, Mildred 
Fleming, Myrtha 
Fleming, Reuben 
Fleming, Ruth 
Franklin, Bessie 
Franklin, C. W. 
Franklin, Lessie 
Franklin, Zadie 

Glover, Lonnie 
Glover, Luna 
Glover, Maud 
Glover, Richard 
Glover, Rommie 
Gray, Eugenia 
Green, C. J. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



Hall, Annie 
Hall, Bonner 
Harris. Clarence 
Harris, Johnny 
Harrison, E. B. 
Harward, P. C. 
Herndon, J. M. 
Herndon. W. G. 
Hester, J. R. 
Hilliard. R. F. 
Hines, B. L. 
Holland, S. O. 
Holleman. Brogden 
Hollernan, Carson 
Holleman, Carter 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Leonard 
Holleman. Norman 
Holleman, Terrene 
Horton, R. L. 
House, Alpha 
House, Ha 
Howell, Maggie 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hunter, John 
Hunter, Isaac 
Hunter LaRue 
Hunter, Eva 
Hurst, Frank 
Hurst, Fred. 
Hurst, Lena 

Ivey, Hannah 

Ivey, Rachel 

Ivey. Thaddeus. Jr. 

Jackson, Klipstein 
Johnson, Ethel 
Johnson, Howard 
Johnson. Fannie 
Johnston, Malcus 
Jones, C. W. 



Jones, David 
Jones. Edwin 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, Johnny 
Jones, Katie 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Mautell 
Jones, Nora 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Tyree 
Jordan, Carlos 
Jordan, Ellie 
Jordan, Lillie 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Jordan, Mina 

King, M. E. 
Knight. Cassie 
Knight, Henry 
Knight, Lucy 
Knight, Mary 
Knight. Rachel 

Lassiter, Ila 
Lassiter, J. W. 
Lassiter, Iva 
Lassiter, Lovie 
Lassiter, Nina 
Luther, Alsey 
Luther, Millard 

Maynard, George 
Maynard, John 
Maynard, Hattie 
Maynard, Luther 
Maynard, Katie 
Middleton, Robt. Lee 
Middleton, Lucy 
Middleton, Rachel 
Mitchell, G. W. 
Mitchell, Noland 
Moore, Elsie 
Moore. Percy 



20 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Morgan, Hattie May 
Morrison, J. D. 
Murdock. Estis 
Muse, Blanche 
Muse, Hazel 

Norris, Mary 

Olive, Bunnie 
Olive, W. W. 

Partin, Aldridge 
Partin, Charity 
Pearson, B. P. 
Pearson, Ruth 
Pegrani, John D. 
Pegram, Worthy 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pendergraft, Claude 
Pendergraft, Leon 
Pendergraft, Levi 
Pendergraft, Mary 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, W. R. 
Penny, E. R. 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, May 
Pleasants, Milton 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pool, Carrinna 
Powell, George 
Powell, Robert 
Powell, Willie 
Prince, Florence 
Prince, Frank 
Prueitt, J. L. 
Prueitt, Ruth 

Ranes. Carlessie 
Ranes, Minnie 
Reddish. Mary 
Redfearn, J. D. 
Redfearn, W. T. 



Richardson, Norwood 
Rogers, Mary 

Scott, Azzie 
Sears, Ruth 
Seymour, Lydia 
Small, Clara 
Small, Cleo 
Small, Dewey 
Small, Wilburn 
Smith, Mavis 
Smith, Myrtle 
Smith, Novella 
Smith, W. F. 
Spence, Hubert 
Stanton, Mack 
Steadman, George 
Steadman, Maurice 
Steadman, Willie 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stephenson, Catherine 
Stephenson, Charles 
Stephenson, Eva 
Stephenson, Irene 
Stephenson, Lena 
Stephenson, Mary B. 
Stephenson, Rebecca 
Stone, Lola 
Stone, Ralph 

Tally, B. T. 
Templeton, Elva 
Templeton, Grace 
Templeton, Hugh 
Thornton, N. B. 
Tilly, Bertha 
Tolly, Douglas 
Tolly, Jesse 
Tolly, Walsey 

Upchurch, E. E. 
Upchurch, Eunice 
Upchurch, H. C. 
Upchurch, Frank 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Upchurch, John Lee 
Upchurch, Lenora 

Varner, Maggie 

Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Owen 
Weathers, Bahnson 
Weathers, H. H. 
Wellons, Lizzie May 
Wilder, A. B. 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilder, Xennie 
Wilkinson, Fred. 
Williams, Addie 
Williams, Margaret 
Williams, McKinley 
Williams, T. L. 



Wheeler, Mera 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Lovie 
Woodall, Eugenia 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Neeedham 
Womble, Willine 

Yarborough, Ada 
Yarborough, Bayard 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yarborough, Frank 
Yarborough, Mae 
Yates, Annie Lee 
Yates, Carson 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, O. R. 
Yates, O. W. 



PIANOS AND ORGANS 

of the very best makes sold on easy terms at 
prices that cannot be beaten, quality consid- 
ered. The Famous SHONINGER PIANOS 
sold by us at prices and terms that will sur- 
prise you. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Alfred Williams & Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina 
for all Kinds of 

BOOKS 

A full line of second-hand books always on hand at 
one half regular price. We sell at publishers' prices. 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 

Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. 

Agents for EASTMAN KODAKS. 

Waldo Drug Company 

CARY, N. C. 

DRUGS, PRESCRIPTIONS 

Nice Line of Stationery Up-to-date Soda 

Toilet Articles, etc. Fountain. 



AN INVITATION 

We cordially invite you to make our store your 
headquarters, where you will find a select stock of 
Millinery, Dry Goods, Notions, Carpets, Matting and 
Rugs. We also have exclusive sale of American 
Beauty Corsets, Godman and Crossett Shoes — on all of 
which we will give you the lowest possible price. 

We handle a full line of Softool Books, Pencils and 
Tablets. 

Give us a chance to show you our goods. 
Respectfully yours, 

C R- SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 

Z. V. JOHNSON & SON 

UNDERTAKERS 

CARY, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and 
General Burial Supplies. 

Wagons and Buggies made and repaired. General 
repair shop in wood and iron, bicycles, guns, etc. 

Come to see us. We are headquarters for 

DRV GOODS 

Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, 
Groceries and Queensware. We sell as cheap as the 
cheapest. We thank you for your past patronage and 
solicit your future trade. 

W. D. JONES, Cary, N. C. 



Thomas A. Partin Company 

A LADIES' STORE OF 

READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS 
Novelties and Dry Goods 



Agents for the "CB" and "PN" CORSETS 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

131 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 
(Next to new Masonic Temple.) 

Clothiers and Gent's Furnishers 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city. 



F. R. Gbay, 
President 



M. B. Dky, 
Vice-President. 



N. C. Hines, 

Cashier 



THE BANK OF CARY, CARY, N. c. 

While in Cary deposit your money in The Bank of 
Cary. 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and 
Conservatism Protect Our Patrons. 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



WaKe Forest College 

The Seventy-Sixth Session will begin 
September 6, 1910. Sixteen independent 
"Schools," embracing the Sciences, Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Philosophy, Bible, 
Law, Education, Medicine (two years). 

EXPENSES MODERATE 

For catalogue or special information 
Address 

President >W. L. POTEAT, Wake Forest, N. C. 



Dobbin-Fcrrall Company 

At Tucker Store 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Dry Goods of all Kinds, Ready-to- Wear 

Garments, Shoes, etc., Carpets 

Curtains and Draperies 

We sell better goods at lower prices than any other 
store. We always have what you cannot find else- 
where. 

We give Dobbin & Ferrall Co.'s Gold Trading Stamps 

(registered) with every cash purchase. 

One stamp for every 10c. 



COME TO SEE US 

We can furnish all your wants in Men's and Young Men's Wear. Complete 
line in all departments. 

If you want a suit made by special order, we have a splendid line of woolens. 
Look them over; prices are right. 

If you want the best attention, best clothes, best prices, best and most complete 
line to select from, come to 

J. Rosengarten Company 

214 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital City Phone 397. 

R. J. Harbison, President F. R. Gray, Vice-Pres. 

F. T. Ward, Sec. & Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 



The Harrison Wagon Company 




Manufacturers of 

WAGONS, CARTS AND PLOWS 

REPAIR WORK OF ALL KINDS 
AT REASONABLE RATES. 

Office: Raleigh, N. C. Works: Cary, N. C. 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER, Cary, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, 
Caps, Pants, Men's Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, 
Crockery, Glassware, Hardware, Plow Castings and 
Farming Utensils. From our warehouse we can fur- 
nish you Cotton-Seed Meal and Hulls, Corn, Oats, Hay, 
Fertilizers, etc. 

Cold Drinks Dispensed at Our Up-to-date Soda Fountain 

5 



J. H. Stone & Company 

Railroad Street, CARY, N. C. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes and General Groceries 

The cheap cash store of the town. Come 
once and you will come again. 

Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

The Big Hardware Men 



Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster 

Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe 

Best Goods Lowest Prices Square Dealings 

STOVES AND RANGES 

Cross & Linehan Company 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 
(New Tucker Building.) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and 
see us during your visit to our city. We will en- 
deavor to make your stay pleasant. 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 



Boylan-Pearce Company 

208 Fayetteville Street, 208 Salisbury Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best-selected stock of Dry 
Goods, Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor- 
Made Suits, Cloaks and Capes shown in the 
city of Raleigh. We cordially invite you to 
visit our store when in our city. Samples 
gladly furnished upon request for same. Mail 
orders filled same day received. 

Boylan-Pearce Company 
B. P. S. Paint Best Paint Sold 

Covers more than any Paint made. 

Rllf flFATH Sure deatn to P otato bugs. 
DUU LfLrll'S Non-poisonous and is a plant food. 

"ALL RIGHT" COOK STOVES AND RANGES 

TOBACCO FLUES A SPECIALTY 

Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best 
goods ; lowest prices. Your money back if not satis- 
fied. Call and see us. 

HART-WARD HARDWARE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

7 



CARY PUBLIC 

HIGH 

SCHOOL 



1911 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Cary Public High School 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



1910-1911 



Announcements of Cary Public High School 
19111912 




I. School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
F. R. Gray, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



II. Calendar 1911-1912 

Fall Term opens August 28, 1911. 
Fall Term closes December 22, 1911. 
Spring Term opens January 1, 1912. 
Spring Term closes April 26, 1912. 



Graduating Class 1911 

Tot) row, from reader's left to right — Ethel Britt, H. G. 

Benton, I. J. Hunter. 
Middle row, from left to right — P. C. Harward, Myrtle 

Smith, H. C. Upchurch, Katie Maynard, G. V. 

Stephens, Florence Burch. 
Bottom row, from left to right — Eva Hunter, Bahn- 

son Weathers, Fannie Bonner, J. R. Hester, Alma 

Fisher, C. E. Byrd, Mary Belle Stephenson, Mavis 

Smith, T, Ivey, Jr. (not present). 



III. Officers and Instructors 

Session, 1911-1912 

I. M. B. Dey, Principal. 

II. Mes. Sarah Lambert Blalock, Lady Principal. 

III. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 

IV. M. B. Dry, M.A. (Wake Forest College, 1896), 

Mathematics, Science. 
V. C. L. Bivens, B.A. (Trinity College, 1909), 
English, History. 
VI. Miss Julia Pasmore (N. C. Normal and Indus- 
trial College), 

Latin, Mathematics. 
VII. Miss Nora Carpentee (N. C. Normal and In- 
dustrial College), 

Science, Domestic Science. 
VIII. Miss Lydia Yates (Oxford Seminary), 
Grammar Grades. 
IX. Miss Estelle Yarborough (Littleton Female 
College), 

Primary Grades. 
X. Miss Irma Ellis (N. C. Normal and Industrial 
College), 

Primary Grades. 
XI. Mrs. Sarah Lambert Blalock (Meredith Col- 
College), 

Instrumental Music, Expression. 
XII. Miss Annie Whitmore (So. Conservatory of 
Music), 

Vocal Music. 

XIII. Mrs. W. T. Lynn, Matron Girls' Dormitory. 

XIV. Mrs. S. S. Wood, Matron Boys' Dormitory. 



IV. Commencement, 1911 



April 26, 


8 P. M. 


Annual Musical Concert. 


Apeil 27, 


3 P. M. 


Exercises by Primary Department. 


April 27, 


8 P. M. 


Annual Debate. 


April 28, 


11 A. M. 


Annual Address by Prof. M. C. S. 

Noble. 


April 28, 


12 M. 


Graduating Exercises. 


April 28, 


3 P. M. 


Contest in Declamation and Reci- 
tation. 


April 28, 


8 P. M. 


Play by Elocution Class. 



Winners of Medals 

Scholarship Medal Myrtle Smith 

Debater's Medal H. C. Upchurch 

Declaimer's Medal H. C. Benton 

Reciter's Medal Mary Reddish 

Clay Improvement Medal J. H. Wheeler 

Calhoun Improvement Medal Malcus Johnson 

Graduating Class, 1911 

EL C. Benton President 

Ethel Britt Secretary 

Fannie Bonner. Thaddetjs Ivey, Jr. 

Florence Btjrch. Katie Maynard. 

C. E. Byrd. Myrtle Smith. 

Alma Fisher. Mavis Smith. 

P. C. Harward. G. V. Stephens. 

J. R. Hester. Mary Belle Stephenson. 

Isaac Hunter. H. C. Upchurch. 

Eva Hunter. Bahnson Weathers. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 



V. Foreword 

1. A Look The Cary High School is not a new enter- 
Backward prise, but has an honorable history ex- 
tending over more than a dozen years. 
Under the guiding hand of Prof. E. L. Middleton, its 
head for a decade or more, the school came to occupy 
a foremost place among the private preparatory schools 
of the State. When the General Assembly of 1907 
enacted a law providing for a system of public high 
schools for North Carolina, the Cary High School was 
converted into the Cary Public High School, which 
enjoys the distinction of being the first high school 
established under the new law. As such, it has now 
been in operation for four years and has steadily 
grown in patronage and efficiency. 

The rules of the State Superintendent ad- 
^ an mit those who have completed the course 
hunter ^ s ^ u ^j f or public high schools issued 
from his office. The first seven grades in this cata- 
logue cover this course. Applicants must stand exam- 
inations on entering, or bring certificate from last 
teacher saying the course has been satisfactorily com- 
pleted. 

All public-school teachers of whatever age, and 
students over twenty-one years of age, who pledge to 
teach are entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one 
years of age must pay tuition. 



6 CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Outside The County Board of Education allows 
Patronage the school Committee to receive pupils 

from territory outside of Wake County. 
This is allowed in all public high schools. These 
pupils receive every advantage formerly given by the 
school under private management. 

It is important to begin at the opening, 
• Wnen to just as important as to begin a crop on 

time. The pupil who starts a few weeks 
late is often handicapped in his work for the whole 
term. Begin at the first and plan for the entire school 
year. 

VI. The Faculty 

The school committee exercises great care in the 
selection of teachers. The Principal has had fifteen 
years' experience at the head of a boarding school, 
three years at Cary, and twelve years as principal of 
Wingate High School. 

Mr. Bivens has been known to the Principal from 
childhood. He is a young man of clean life, studious 
in disposition, pleasing in manners and well equipped 
from the standpoint of scholarship for the position 
which he fills. He is an honor-graduate of Trinity 
College. He has taught with us the last two sessions 
with great satisfaction to pupils and patrons. 

Misses Pasmore and Ellis are known to our people, 
having taught in the school for several years, and be- 
cause of their experience and ability were re-elected 
for another year. 

Misses Yates and Yarborough did satisfactory work 
in their departments last year, and have been re- 
elected. 

Mrs. Blalock is a graduate from Meredith College 
in both music and elocution, and has had two years 
of successful experience in teaching music. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

Miss Carpenter, the Science teacher, is a graduate 
of the Normal and Industrial College and conies highly 
recommended. 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want 

Who are willing to co-operate with us in 
1. Patrons our w01 .^ Those who have the courage 
to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatis- 
faction rather than backbite and malign a worthy in- 
stitution. 
ys Of good habits who want an education 
and are willing to work for it. Boys who see the 
great possibilities lying before men of the rising gen- 
eration. 
s Who realize the true nobility of woman- 

hood. Girls who are willing to live in woman's sphere 
and work faithfully to prepare themselves for the 
noble callings now open to women. 

Vffl. What We Do 

1. For the Only teachers of recognized Christian 
Heart character are employed. In no case is 
any influence allowed which might draw 
a pupil away from his church moorings. As far as 
possible, the wholesome influence of a Christian home 
is thrown around our students. While character is 
being formed, and impressions for life are being made, 
the Christian teacher has open to him a most wonder- 
ful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer meeting. 
It is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 
been developed. Nearly all students attend the regu- 
lar church prayer meetings at the churches. The 
school is opened every morning with devotional exer- 
cises. 



8 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Cary has a Methodist and a Baptist church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to attend 
the services of these churches and Sunday-school regu- 
larly. 

2. tor the It ig our p lan to cu iti va te our students 

Hand physically as well as mentally and mor- 
ally. Otherwise the best results in the classroom and 
in after life cannot be realized. To this end, we have 
baseball grounds and tennis courts, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient outdoor exercise. A few 
match games are allowed, but our team has never been 
allowed to be away except to return the same day, 
and unless accompanied by one of the teachers or 
some other responsible person. 

In all our work we have three ends in 

3. *or the v iew : to teach pupils to be observant of 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to educate 
a pupil he must lead him, not drive him ; draw out 
his mental powers rather than pour in a heterogeneous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do as 
much original thinking as possible. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials 
in education tending to culture and refinement, and 
those which will prepare young men and women for 
the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. 
Frequent and thorough drills are given in spelling, 
reading and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are 
trained in the correct use of the language by frequent 
exercises in written work. When the pupil has ac- 
quired a thorough knowledge of the technical princi- 
ples of grammar, the critical study of English classics 
is emphasized. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

LX. What We Are and What We Have 

1. Location The location is both healthful and beauti- 
ful. The moral atmosphere of the town 
of Cary is hardly excelled anywhere. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the 
youth that attend the institution. No better railroad 
facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 
junction of the Seaboard and Southern railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. 

Cary is far removed from malarial regions 
and has excellent water. Few towns can 
show a better health record. 

In the most attractive part of the town, 
ngs and surrounded by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor, there 
are seven large and well-lighted classrooms, four of 
which may be easily converted into an auditorium. 
Besides these, there are rooms for library, office, 
kitchen, and four music-rooms. On the second floor 
are dormitories for thirty-four boys, and two literary 
society halls. On the northeast corner of the campus 
is the Matron's Home, where the boys get their meals. 
The entire building is furnished with suit- 
quip " able furniture and equipment. The class- 
ment rooms have folding desks, charts and 
maps. The music-rooms are furnished with four 
pianos, and the dormitory rooms with neat and com- 
fortable furniture. The kitchen is provided with a 
complete outfit of modern cooking utensils, and is the 
most attractive room in the building. The science- 
room is furnished with a complete outfit of laboratory 
apparatus for teaching physics, chemistry, botany, etc. 
The literary societies have beautifully furnished halls, 
and these are the pride of the school. 



10 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

X. General Culture 

1. Literary The Clay and Calhoun societies for young 
Societies men, and the Browning Society for girls, 

meet once a week for exercises in debate, 
composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. The good to be derived 
from this work cannot be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a 
fondness for reading. It gives the power of express- 
ing in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by 
many people. It gives a broader view of men and 
things, and as an educator it has no superior. 

A library of about six hundred volumes 
Library hag been collected, to which additions are 
constantly being made. We have many volumes of 
biography, history, addresses, together with the prose 
and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tenny- 
son, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and 
others. 

Students have access to the daily papers and the 
magazines. 

XL What Our Pupils Do 

We have two general ends in view : one to prepare 
boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
page 12) pupils can choose those studies which bear 
most directly upon their life work. For those con- 
templating a profession, the Classical Course may be 
chosen ; for those who expect to lead an agricultural 
life, the Scientific Course doubtless is to be preferred ; 
while for those having in view a business career, the 
English Course is perhaps the best. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

XII. Record of Work 

1. Examina- We require, at the end of each quarter, 

tions written examinations of all pupils on 
studies gone over during the quarter. 
These examinations are preceded by a thorough review 
of the quarter's work. A record is kept of work on 
recitations, and an average mark is secured from 
these two sources. These examinations must be stood 
or the pupil take zero in making our averages. 

We send reports at the end of each quar- 

2. Reports tei . yv T e keep all parents informed re- 
garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance of 
their children, and we ask for their co-operation. 

Our standards will be kept high. Pupils 

5. rromo- ^ Q p ass f rom one year or grade to the 

tions ne xt must average eighty per cent on 

their respective studies, and all examinations must be 

passed. 

4. Honors At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 

is posted. To be entitled to a place on this, a pupil 
must make an average of 92.5 on scholarship, 95 on 
attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

To be entitled to honorable mention a pupil must 
make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 
in the high school making the highest scholarship dur- 
ing the year. To compete for this, a pupil must be 
present to receive all the reports of the year, and 
must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

The literary societies give medals for excellence in 
debate, declamation and recitation. 

In the course of study there are six de- 

5. Gradua- pai . tments . Latin, English, Mathematics, 

tion History, Science, and French. To receive 
a certificate of graduation, a pupil must have com- 
pleted one of the following courses : 



12 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

(1) Classical. — Required: Latin, English, Mathe- 
matics. Elective: History or Science (through the 
Sophomore year) or French. 

(2) Scientific. — Required: Science. Mathematics, 
English (through the Junior year). Elective: Latin 
(through the Sophomore year) or History (through 
the Junior year). 

(3) English. — Required: English, History, Science 
(through the Junior year). Elective: Mathematics 
(through the Junior year) or Latin (through the 
Sophomore year). 

Deficits on work of the Junior year must be made 
up during the first quarter of the Senior year, and 
deficits during Senior year must be made up promptly. 
All deficits below 75 must be made up by special ex- 
amination and cannot be redeemed by good marks in 
another quarter. Deportment must average 85, and 
any pupil receiving below 75 during any quarter will 
be barred from Senior Class. 

XIII. Special Departments 

1. Music Music has long since come to be a neces- 
sity to a civilized people. It is the most 
extensively cultivated and the most generally appreci- 
ated of all the fine arts. A thorough course in music 
will certainly carry with its manual training mental 
and heart training also. Many now study music who 
never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that 
comes from such a course of study. 

. Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

pastime study. The eyes of the people 

have been opened to see not only the beauty and 

grandeur, but the practical importance of true ex- 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

pression. And the time rapidly approaches when the 
inelegant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from 
the held to make room for the man who cultivates both 

brain and body. 
5. Domestic j) omes tic Science, or the science of cook- 
Science j ug j^g j, een taught in a few of our city 
high schools for several years, but so far has not been 
taught in the rural village high schools to any ap- 
preciable extent because of the limited income and 
the inability to secure adequately trained teachers. 
The subject is now forcing itself upon the attention 
of our educational leaders and will soon receive the 
same emphasis as agriculture in our rural high 
schools. The services of a thoroughly trained teacher 
has been secured for this department next year. 

Heretofore these special departments have not 
counted toward graduation, but beginning with next 
session, pupils completing a prescribed course in Music 
may substitute it for any elective mentioned in this 
catalogue, while a year of satisfactory work in Elo- 
cution or Domestic Science may take the place of a 
year of any elective. 

XIV. Course of Study 

(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. Howell's Primer. 

3. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

4. Hiawatha Primer — Spring Term. 

5. Science Reader, Book I — Spring Term. 

6. Spelling, Part I (Griffin and Foust). 

7. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 



14 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

8. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 

9. Drawing. 

10. Handwork — Paper Cutting, etc. 

11. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

3. Science Reader, Book II. 

4. Robinson Crusoe. 

5. Fifty Famous Stories Retold. 

6. Spelling, Part II (Griffin and Foust). 

7. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

8. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

9. Drawing. 
10. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). Fall Term. 
Story of Ulysses. Spring Term. 

3. Spelling, Part III (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Primary Arithmetic, pages 109-203 (Colaw and 

Ellwood). 

5. Language Work — with Pencil and Pen. 

6. Physiology, Book I (Culler). Fall Term. 

7. Geography — Home Geography and Oral Instruc- 

tion. 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware II). 

9. Writing. 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader — Classics, Old and New. 

2. Beginners' U. S. History. Spring Term. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

3. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

4. Spelling, Part IV (Griffin and Foust). 

5. English Grammar, pages 1-70 (Hyde). 

6. Geography (Tarr and McMurray). 

7. Primary Arithmetic Completed (Colaw and Ell- 

wood) . 

8. Drawing (Webb and Ware III). 

9. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. The Story of the Old North State (Connor). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Spelling, Part V (Griffin and Foust). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Intermediate Arithmetic, to Percentage (Colaw 

and Duke). 

7. Drawing (Webb and Ware IV). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GEADE. 

1. Spelling, Part VI (Griffin and Foust). 

2. English Grammar — Our Language II (Smith). 

3. Makers of American History. 

4. Complete Geography, to Europe (Maury). 

5. Intermediate Arithmetic, Completed and Reviewed 

(Colaw and Duke). 

6. Physiology, Book II (Culler). Spring Term. 

7. Writing. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Spelling — Reviewed and Completed (Griffin and 

Foust). 

2. English Composition (Sykes). 

3. English Grammar, Part I (Buehler). 

4. Higher History U. S. (Chambers). 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

5. Arithmetic, through Compound Quantities (Colaw 

and Ellwood). 

6. Complete Geography — Completed and Reviewed 

(Maury). 

7. Science — Agriculture (Burkett, Stevens and Hill). 

Fall Term. 

8. Writing. 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English — Writing, Spelling (Branson), English Com- 
position (Sykes), Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and as 
parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) to 
Powers and Roots; Algebra — First Course (Wells); 
Science of Accounts (Allen). 

History — Ancient History (West) ; North Carolina 
History (Hill), Fall Term; Civil Government (Peele), 
Spring Term. 

Latin — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science — Physiology, Book III (Culler), Fall Term. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English — Spelling (Branson) ; English Composition; 
Reading on Class Snowbound, Merchant of Venice, and 
Poe's Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, 
Scarlet Letter, and Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) — 
Completed and Reviewed; High School Algebra to 
Theory of Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

Latin — Grammar, Completed and Reviewed, Fall 
Term; Introduction to Ccesar (Brittain) ; First Book 
of Ccesar. Spring Term. 

Science — Physical Geography (Tarr), Spring Term. 

JUNIOS YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Ccesar and First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, 
Silas Marner and Twice-Told Tales. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells). 

History — English History (Montgomery). 

Latin — Cwsar's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough), Fall Term; Prose Composi- 
tion (Pearson) ; Cicero's Four Orations Against Catil- 
ine (Allen and Greenough). Spring Term. 

Science — Botany (Bailey), Fall Term; Agriculture 
(Soule and Turpin), Spring Term. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word-Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de Coverly, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems, and as parallel Ivanhoe, Vicar of 
Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress, Washington's Farewell 
Address. 

Mathematics — Plane and Solid Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent). 

Latin — VirgiVs JEneid, Six Books (Bennett) ; Prose 
Composition (Pearson) ; Critical Study of Syntax and 
Prosody. 



18 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Sguair). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Millikan and 
Gale), Fall Term; Chemistry (Ostwald and Morse), 
Spring Term. 

XV. Expenses 

Per Term 

Grammar Grades $12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 

Junior and Senior years 16.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 11.25 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily 4.50 

Elocution — Private lessons 11.25 

Elocution — Classes of two 6.75 

XVI. Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, 
unless previous arrangements are made to the con- 
trary. The entrance of a pupil xcill be considered as 
an acceptance of these terms. 

The school is not a private enterprise. All accounts 
must be settled in full on or before January 1st and 
June 1st. 

No pupil whose bills for the previous session have 
not been paid will be allowed to take music, elocution, 
etc., till satisfactory arrangements have been made 
with the School Board. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board 

1. Boys' The dormitories are furnished with bed- 
Dormi- stead, mattress with springs, chairs, table, 
tory lamp, etc. All boys rooming in dormitory 

must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow and toilet 
articles, such as comb and brush, soap, matches, etc. 
The room rent is $1.50 a month, which includes fuel, 
lights, etc. The cost of table board is $9 per month, 
or $6 from Monday to Friday. Room rent from Mon- 
day to Friday is $1 per month. 

Night latches have been placed upon all the doors, 
and each pupil is required to deposit 25 cents for his 
key, which sum will be returned when the key is de- 
livered up. 

Pupils in these dormitories are allowed to remain 
in their rooms for study. The Principal reserves the 
right, however, to remove any boy from the dormitory 
to the schoolrooms for indolence or disorder. One of 
the teachers has a room in the dormitory and keeps 
order at night. 

This home for girls is presided over by 
owning Mrs. Lynn, who for several years has 
successfully managed private boarding 
houses for girls. The building is neatly and comfort- 
ably furnished. The girls must keep their rooms neat, 
and be quiet and studious in their rooms during study 
hours. The girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, 
pillow and necessary toilet articles, such as soap, 
matches, comb and brush, etc. 

The cost of board here is $10 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday is $7 per month, or 



20 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

from Sunday evening to Friday, $7.50. These rates 
include room, fuel, lights, etc. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughter's 
every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 
the lady assistants, Mrs. Blalock, will room in the 
dormitory and have charge of the girls. 

When the dormitories are filled, satisfac- 

"rivate ^ ory arran geiuents can be made for board 

famines w ^jj p r i V ate families. Boys and girls 
must have different boarding places. Our charges are 
as low as can be arranged with present prices for 
groceries. These charges cover all expenses except 
washing, but each pupil will be required to furnish a 
pair of blankets or two quilts, a pair of sheets and 
pillow cases. Arrangements can be made to board 
from Monday till Friday of each week. The Principal 
will arrange board when notified by parents. 

Board in private families $10.50 

Board from Monday until Friday 7.50 

Board is payable at end of each month, with no de- 
ductions for less than one week. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous 

1. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 

2. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 
school until regular time of dismissal, except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

3. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation they must seek it in other 
ways. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

4. Parents should always write to the Principal 
when a favor is to be asked, for their children, or when 
any complaint is made. 

5. All boarding pupils before leaving Cary must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
home, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons they should notify the Principal. 

6. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principal for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

For further information, address 

M. B. DRY, Principal 

Cart, N. C. 

XIX. Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly, and girls ladylike, in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retir- 
ing, except for public worship and other approved pub- 
lic meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amuse- 
ment sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 



22 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
ehaperonage. 

9. There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for heavy demeriting or suspension. 

XX. Special Notes 

The school is now offering three years in Science — 
a half year each in Physiology, Physical Geography, 
Botany, Agriculture, Physics, and Chemistry. 

Beginning with next session, the course in Mathe- 
matics will include Solid Geometry as well as Plane. 

The school now owns about $400 worth of apparatus 
for teaching Science, and Domestic Science. 

Arrangements have been made with Miss Annie 
Whitmore, of Durham, to teach Vocal Music. She is 
a graduate of the Durham Conservatory of Music in 
both voice and instrumental music. 

A teacher has been employed to give her whole time 
to Domestic Science and the -other high school sciences. 

Mrs. Sarah Blalock will have charge of the girls at 
Browning Hall, and the rules of the school will be 
strictly enforced. 

Next session, more attention will be given to track 
athletics than formerly. A good beginning was made 
last spring. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

Pupils in the dormitories will be held responsible 
for all damage to school property in their rooms. 

The following changes have been made in textbooks 
for next session : West's Ancient History, and West's 
Modern History in place of Myers' General History ; 
Millikan and Gale's First Course in Physics in place 
of Higgins' Lessons in Physics ; Halleck's History of 
English Literature instead of Moody and Lovett's 
First Review of English Literature ; Wells' Plane and 
Solid Geometry instead of Wells' Plane Geometry. 
The new books added are Sykes' Elementary English 
Composition, in the seventh and eighth grades ; How- 
ell's Primer, in the first grade ; With Pencil and Pen, 
in third grade ; Fifty Famous Stories Retold, in second 
grade. Montgomery's English History has been trans- 
ferred from the eighth grade to the tenth, while West's 
Ancient History has been put in the eighth, and West's 
Modern History in the ninth. Two years will be 
given to Colaw and Duke's Intermediate Arithmetic 
instead of one. Colaw and Ellwood's Advanced Arith- 
metic will be taken up in the seventh grade instead of 
the sixth, and completed in the ninth. 

The school is exceedingly fortunate in being able to 
retain the services of Mrs. W. T. Lynn and Mrs. S. S. 
Wood as matrons of the two dormitories for next 
session. They have given entire satisfaction. 

The school will have a faculty of nine teachers next 
session with college training and successful experi- 
ences in teaching. With this strong teaching force, 
and with the added equipments noted elsewhere in 
this catalogue, the school, we think, offers exceptional 
advantages to boarding pupils. 

Last session 118 high school pupils were enrolled. 
There were 90 boarders from fourteen counties in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. The Graduating 



24 CARY PUBLIC HIGH 8CH00L. 

Class numbered eighteen, of whom nine were boys and 
nine girls. Nearly all of these will enter college this 
fall. 

If our friends into whose hands this catalogue falls 
will send us the names and addresses of any boys and 
girls who contemplate entering a high school soon, or 
of parents who might be induced to patronize Cary 
High School, the kindness will be appreciated. 

Every pupil in school, of whatever grade, is re- 
quired to take spelling, and every pupil in the high 
school must join one of the four classes in Current 
Events. 

The situation of Cary High School — right in the 
educational as well as the geographical center of the 
State and almost in the suburbs of the State Capital — 
is a greater advantage than is commonly supposed. 
Within a radius of thirty miles from Cary are located 
the A. and M. College, Wake Forest, Trinity, the State 
University, Meredith College, St. Mary's, Peace Insti- 
tute, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. These 
institutions have put us under obligation to them in 
many ways, as in sending us speakers from time to 
time and permitting us to consult their well-equipped 
libraries. The State Capital affords an opportunity of 
seeing the State's public buildings, the State Fair, the 
Legislature in session, etc. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



Students, 

Abernethy, H. M. 
Adams, Lucile 
Adams, Herman 
Adams, Anna 
Adams, Frances 
Adams, Mabel 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, Annie 
Arnold, D. C. 
Atkins, Vita 
Atkins, Ray 
Atkins, Fred 
Atkins, Elsie 

Bagwell, Neta 
Bagwell, Maud 
Bailey, Odelia 
Banks, Alice 
Banks, Celestia 
Barbee, Lyda 
Barrett, J. D. 
Beach, Estelle 
Beach, Ben 
Beach, Susie 
Beach, Bertha 
Beasley, Annie 
Belk, R. A. 
Benton, H. C. 
Benton, Lenna 
Benton, "Whitsun 
Benton. Burtis 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Rubie 



1910-1911 

Blake, Sarah 
Blake, Coy 
Bonner, Fannie 
Booker, W. B. 
Branton, Raymond 
Branton, Ralph 
Breeze, Mary 
Breeze, Sallie 
Breeze, Ruth 
Breeze, Robert 
Britt, Ethel 
Bryant, Mac 
Burch, Florence 
Burnette, Myrtle 
Bumette, Thelma 
Burnette, Vera 
Burt, C. H. 
Butt, Ethel 
Butt, Willie 
Butt, Mary Louise 
Byrd, C. E. 

Carpenter, Eva 
Carpenter, Grace 
Chappell, Joseph 
Chappell, Laura 
Chappell, Albert 
Clevenger, Edna 
Cook, Alma 
Cook, Ernest 
Cook, Ira 
Cook, Agnes 
Cooper, Elaine 



26 



CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Cooper, Evelyn 
Cooper, Frank 
Cooper, Lovie 
Cooper, Susie 
Covington, G. P. 
Crews, R. F. 
Crocker, Maud 
Currie, E. D. 
Eatman, Glenn 
Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Mary 
Edwards, J. R. 
Edwards, Nell 

Farmer, S. F. 
Farrar, Elector 
Fisher, Alma 
Fisher, Ralph 
Fisher, Henry 
Fisher, Edgar 
Franklin, Bess 
Franklin, Zadie 
Franklin, Garland 
Franklin, Tessie 

Glover, Early 
Glover, Everett 
Glover, Maud 
Glover, Luna 
Glover, Lonnie 
Glover, Rommie 
Glover, Richard 
Glover, Ollie 
Goodwin, Irving 
Gray, Eugenia 
Gulley, W. R. 



Hall Annie 
Hall, Bonner 
Hamilton, Turner 
Hamilton, Lula Lee 
Harris, H. B. 
Harris, Clarence 
Harris, Johnny 
Harward, P. C. 
Herndon, W. G. 
Herndon, J. M. 
Herndon, M. D. 
Hester, J. R. 
Hilliard, R. F. 
Holleman, Carter 
Holleman, Leonard 
Holleman, Norman R. 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Carson 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Terrence 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Norman 
House, W. C. 
House, Ha 
House, Alpha 
House, Herbert 
Howard, W. A. 
Howell, Maggie 
Hunter, E. W. 
Hunter, Bessie 
Hunter, Eva 
Hunter, R. W. 
Hunter, I. J. 
Hunter, John 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Hunter, Alsey 
Hurst, Lena 
Hurst, Fred 
Hurst, Frank 

Ivey, Thaddeus, Jr. 
Ivey, Rachel 
Ivey, Hannah 

Jackson, Klipsteine 
Jackson, Dorris 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnson, R. M. 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Elizabeth 
Jones, Johnny 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones, Katie 
Jones, Mautelle 
Jones, Nora 
Jones, F. T. 
Jones, C. W. 
Jordan, Lily 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Jordan, Raymond 
Jordan, Mina 
Jordan, Ellie 

King, M. E. 

Lassiter, Lovie 
Lassiter, Iva 



Lassiter, Nina 
Luther, Millard 
Luther, Alsey 
Luther, Oscar 
Marks, W. C. 
Marks, P. M. 
Maynard, Katie 
Maynard, J. T. 
Maynard, George 
Maynard, Hattie 
Maynard, Luther 
Medlin, Mattie 
Medlin, Charlie 
Middleton, Robert Lee 
Middleton, Lucy 
Middleton. Rachel 
Mitchell, Ona 
Mitchell, G. W. 
Mitchell, Noland 
Morgan, Andrew 
Morgan, Lynda 
Morgan, Hattie May 
Moore, Percy 
Moore, Elsie 
Moore, Edith 
Morrison, J. D. 
Murdock, Estis 
Muse, Blanche 
Muse, Hazel 

Nichols, F. M. 
Nichols, Lida 

Olive, W. W. 
Olive, Bunnie 
Olive, Bessie 



28 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Partin, A. S. 
Partin, Charity 
Pearce, B. B. 
Pearson, Ruth 
Pendergraft, W. R. 
Pendergraft, Claud 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Levy 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pendergraft. Leon 
Penny, E. R. 
Penny, J. E. 
Perry, Fred 
Perry, Earl 
Perry, Ulus 
Pipkin, Lassie 
Pipkin, Anna 
Pipkin, Margaret 
Pipkin, Gladys 
Pipkin, Cora 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, May 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, "Virgie 
Pleasants, Pat 
Pleasants, Vernon 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pleasants, Philip 
Prince, Florence 
Prince, Frank 
Proctor, Mabel 
Puckett, William 
Reddish, Mary 
Richardson, Norwood 

Scott, Azzie 



Sears, J. L. 
Seymour, Lydia 
Seymour, Swannie 
Small, Clara 
Small, Dewey 
Small, Clio 
Small, Wilburn 
Small, Foy 
Smith, Myrtle 
Smith, Mavis 
Smith, Everette 
Smith, H. P. 
Sorrell, Ollie 
Sorrell, Ruby 
Spence, Herbert 
Spivey, W. B. 
Steadman, Willie 
Steadman, George 
Steadman, Maurice 
Stephens, G. V. 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stephenson, Mary Belle 
Stephenson, Lena 
Stone, Lola 
Stone, Lula 
Stone, Ralph 
Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strayhorn, Susie May 
Strother, Frank 
Strother, Dawson 
Strother, Helen 

Templeton. Hugh 
Templeton, Elva 
Templeton, Grace 
Thompson, R. E. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



29 



Thornton, N. B. 
Tolley, Douglas 
Tolley, Walter 
Tolley, Jesse 
Tolley, Ora 

Upchurch, H. C. 

Upchurch, H. K. 

Upchurch, Vivian 

Upchurch, Frank 

Upchurch, John Lee 

Varner, Agnes 
Varner, Maggie 

Waldo, Owen 
Waldo, Robert 
Waldo, Nannie 
Weathers, Bahnson 
Wellons, Lillie May 
Wheeler, J. H. 
Wilder, A. B. 
Wilder, Xennie 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilder, Blanche 

Total for the session, 



Wilkinson, Fred 
Williams, H. P. 
Williams, Irene 
Williams, Addie 
Williams, McKinley 
Winburn, M. C. 
Winfleld, Susie 
Wood, Lovie 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Dorothy 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Woodward, Pauline 

Yarborough, Lenna 
Yarborough, Mae 
Yarborough, N. B. 
Yarborough, Frank 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yarborough. Ada 
Yates, G. N. 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Carson 
Yates, Annie Lee 
Yates, Lottie 
316. 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry 
Company 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 



JEWELRY, CUT GLASS 
SILVERWARE 

We are agents for Howard and all other American 
Watches. 

128 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. O. 

C. R. SCOTT & SON 

THE ONLY EXCLUSIVE 

Dry Goods, Notions and Millinery 

STORE IN TOWN 

We are exclusive agents for American Beauty Cor- 
sets, Goodman, and Crosset Shoes. We also have an 
up-to-date line of Trunks, Suit Cases and Hand Bags. 

Give us a chance and we will save you money. 

We will always give you a cordial welcome. 

C. R. SCOTT & SON 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 

1 



Pianos, Player Pianos 
' Organs^ 



OF THE VERY BEST MAKE 
SOLD ON EASY TERMS AND 
AT PRICES THAT CANNOT 
BE EQUALED BY ANY 
OTHER FIRM. 

Same great bargains in slightly 
used and rebuilt pianos. 




Write for our Free Catalogue. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



B. P. S. Paint Best Paint Sold 

Covers more than any Paint made. 



Bug Death 



Sure death to potato bugs. 
Non-poisonous, and is a plant-food. 



"ALL RIGHT" COOK STOVES AND RANGES 

TOBACCO FLUES A SPECIALTY. 

Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best 
goods ; lowest pi'iees. Your money back if not satis- 
fied. Call and see us. 

Hart- Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

2 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 

WITH 



Boylan-Pearce Company 

206 Fayetteville Street, 208 Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best-selected stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor-Made Suits, Cloaks 
and Capes shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in 
our city. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 



THOMAS H. BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

"The Big Hardware Men" 

Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster 

Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe. 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Square Dealings. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 



** Come to See Us ** 



We can furnish all your wants in Men's and Young 
Men's Wear. Complete line in all departments. 

If you want a suit made by special order, we have 
a splendid line of woolens. Look them over ; prices 
are right. 

If you want the best attention, best clothes, best 
prices, best and most complete line to select from, 
come to 

J. Rosengarten Company 

214 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital City Phone 397. 



Wake Forest College 

The Seventy- Seventh Session 
Will Begin September 5, 1911 



Sixteen independent "schools," embracing the Sciences, 

Languages, Mathematics, Philosophy, Bible, 

Law, Education, Medicine (two years). 

EXPENSES MODERATE 

For catalogue or special information, address 

Secretary E. B. EARNSHAW, Wake Forest, N. C. 



INCORPORATED 

Capital Stock $30,000 No Vacation Enter Any Time 

It is a conceded fact, known everywhere in North Carolina by 
those who are informed, that KING'S is the SCHOOL— THE RIGHT 
SCHOOL, viewed from every standpoint of merit and worthiness. 
The best faculty, best equipment, the largest. More graduates in 
positions than all other schools in the State. So get the best. It is 
cheapest. Write to-day for our SPECIAL OFFERS, NEW CATA- 
LOGUE, and full information. Address 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C, or Charlotte, N. C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Penmanship, etc., by 
mail. Send for our Home Study circular. 

Cross & Linehan Company 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 
(New Tucker Building) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and 
see us during your visit to our city. We will en- 
deavor to make your stay pleasant. 

G. S. Tucker & Co. 

Furniture Dealers 

Our stock of Furniture and House Furnishings is 

complete, and our prices are within the reach of all. 

Come and look at our stock and see if there isn't 

something that will add comfort as well as looks to 

your home. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

5 



R. J. Harrison, President F. R. Gray, Vice-Pres. 

F. T. Ward, Sec. & Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 

Harrison Wagon Company 

Cary, North Carolina 



Harrison's Wagons are Known All Over the South 

We give the best material, workmanship and the 
most attractive finish that can be had in a wagon. 

Log Carts and Trucks of all sizes. 

Harrison's Cultivators and Harrows cannot be ex- 
celled. 



Meredith College 

One of the few colleges for women in the South that 
gives an A.B. degree representing four years of genu- 
ine college work according to the standard colleges. 

Diplomas awarded those who complete the course 
in the School of Elocution, Art, or Music. 

Library facilities excellent. 

Systematic training in physical education, under 
director ; courts for basketball and tennis. 

Boarding Club, where, by about half an hour of light 
domestic service daily, students save from. $52 to $60 
a year. 

Students not offering the necessary units may pre- 
pare in Meredith Academy. 

Believed to be the cheapest college for women of its 
grade in the South. 

For catalog, quarterly bulletin, or fuller informa- 
tion, address 

RICHARD TILMAN VANN, President, Raleigh, N. C. 






Clothiers and Gents' Furnishers 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city. 

COME TO SEE US 

We are headquarters for Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, Groceries and 
Queensware. 

Market with Fresh Meats, Oysters and Fish in 
Season. 

We sell as cheap as the cheapest. 

JONES & JONES, Cary, N C. 



A Ladies* Store of 

Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Novelties and Dry Goods 



Agents for the "CB" and "PN" Corsets. 
A guarantee goes with every purchase. 



Thomas A. Partin Company 

131 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 
(Next to new Masonic Temple) 



Z. V. JOHNSON & SON 

UNDERTAKERS 

CARY, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and. 
General Burial -Supplies. 

Wagons and Buggies made and repaired. General 
repair shop in wood and iron, bicycles, guns, etc. 

Welcome to Raleigh and our store, where you will 
find the largest stock of Shoes and Hosiery in the 
city to make your selection from. Latest Styles ; 
Lowest Prices. 

Hunter-Rand Company 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville Street 

CHINA, TOYS, DOLLS, STATIONERY, 

Pictures, Bric-a-brac, Glass and 

Cooking Utensils 

BEST LINE IN THE CITY 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

132 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN P. HA YES 

124% Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Photographer 

Money saved you every sitting made at my gallery. 
Work as good as the best guaranteed. 



F. R. Gray, President M. B. Dby, Vice-President 

THE BANK OF CARY, Cary, N. C. 

While in Cary, deposit your money in The Bank of 
Cary. 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and 
Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. INTEREST 
COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 

J. C. WALKER, The Cash G ™* f 

Will be glad to have you call. I propose to keep what 
you want, and to sell to you as low as the lowest. 
This is the place for Groceries, Notions and Shoes. 
Call to see me, and you will be convinced that the 
"Cash Grocer" is the place to trade. 
A full line of School Books, Pencils and Tablets. 

J. C. WALKER, THE CASH GROCER 

Railroad Street, CARY, N. C. 

F. R. GRAY AND BROTHER, Cary, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, 
Caps, Pants, Men's Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, 
Crockery, Glassware, Hardware, Plow Castings and 
Farming Utensils. From our warehouse, we can fur- 
nish you Cottonseed Meal and Hulls, Corn, Oats, Hay, 
Fertilizers, etc. 

A nice line of Tablets, Pencils and all kinds of 
Stationery. 

Cold Drinks dispensed at our up-to-date Soda Fountain. 

E. 0. WALDO DRUG CO. 

CARY, N. C. 
Drugs, Prescriptions 

Nice line of Stationery, Toilet Articles, etc. 
Up-to-date Soda Fountain. 

9 



OXFORD COLLEGE 

OXFORD, N. C. 

Founded in 1850. 

Literary, Music, Art, Business and Teaching Courses 

B.A. Course extended, by one full year's work. 

Bachelor of Science Course omits Latin after Caesar, 
Mathematics after Algebra, and French, after first 
year, but retains full English, Science, History and 
Moral Philosophy courses, and is made as practical 
as possible. 

Specialists at head of all departments, representing 
some of the great universities and standard colleges, 
such as Vassar College, New York ; Smith College, 
Massachusetts ; Institute of Applied Music, of New 
York ; the Cincinnati Conservatory, and the National 
Academy of Arts, and Students' Art League, of New 
York. 

Board and full literary tuition, per year, $166. 
Illustrated catalogues ready, apply for one. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina 
For All Kinds of 



BOOKS 



We carry a stock of second-hand books at one-half 
the regular price. 
We sell new books at publishers' prices. 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 

Jlgents for Public School $ool(3 in North Carolina. 

Write for price list of 50 cent fiction. 

Agents for Eastman Kodaks. 

10 



ELON COLLEGE 

(Co-educational) 

Delightfully situated in the hill country. 

Unsurpassed in healthfulness. Modern equipment; 
steam heat ; electric lights ; baths ; sewerage ; with 
all the advantages, and none of the disadvantages, 
of city life. 

An ideal institution for the education of young men 
and young women, with twenty-one years of success- 
ful history behind it. 

A high-grade college, whose graduates are admitted 
without examination to the graduate departments 
of the great universities. 

Maintains also Music, Art, Expression, Commercial, 
and Preparatory Departments. 

Four courses leading to degrees. 

Special normal courses for teachers, approved and en- 
dorsed by State Superintendent Joyner and your 
County Superintendent. 

Terms moderate — $132 to $187 per session of ten 
months. 

For catalogue or other information, address (men- 
tioning this catalog) 

W. A. HARPER, President 

ELON COLLEGE, N. C. 



11 



Carplhtttfic 




tgj) g>cl)ool 




CATALOGUE 



OF 



Cary Public High School 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 
1911-1912 



Announcements of Cary Public High School 
1912-1913 



Raxeigh 

Commercial Printing Co. 

1912 



I. School Committee 

G. W. Scott, Chairman. 
F. R. Gray, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



II. Calendar 1912-1913 

Fall Term opens September 2, 1912. 
Fall Term closes December 20, 1912. 
Spring Term opens December 30, 1912. 
Spring Term closes April 25, 1913. 



Graduating Class 1912 

Top row, from reader's left to right — N. B. Yarborough, 
Lenna Benton, J. H. Wheeler. 

Middle row, from left to right — Xennie Wilder, Ruth 
Pearson, Azzie Scott, F. M. Nichols, Maud Bagwell, 
Mary Reddish. 

Bottom row, from left to right — Ralph Fisher, Lydia 
Seymour, J. D. Barrett, Odelia Bailey, Malcus John- 
ston. 



III. Officers and Instructors 

Session, 1912-1913 

I. M. B. Dry, Principal. 
II. Mrs. Sarah Lambert Blalock, Lady Principal. 
III. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Committee. 
IV. M. B. Dey, M.A. (Wake Forest College, 1896), 
Mathematics, Science. 
V. C. L. Bivens, B.A. (Trinity College, 1909), 
English, History. 
VI. Miss Julia Pasmoee (N. C. Normal and Indus- 
• trial College), Latin, Mathematics. 
VIL Miss Lydia Yates (Oxford Seminary), Gram- 
mar Grades. 
VIII. Miss Estelle Yaebobough (Littleton Female 
College), Primary Grades. 
IX. Miss Ibma Ellis (N. C. Normal and Industrial 

College), Primary Grades. 
X. Mrs. Saeah Lambert Blalock (Meredith Col- 
lege), Instrumental Music, Elocution. 
XL Mrs. W. T. Lynn, Matron Girls' Dormitory. 
XII. Mrs. S. S. Wood, Matron Boys' Dormitory. 



IV. Commencement, 1912 



April 24, 


3 P. M. 


Elocution Recital. 


April 24, 


8 P. M. 


Annual Musical Concert. 


April 25, 


3 P. M. 


Exercises by Primary Department. 


April 25, 


8 P. M. 


Annual Debate. 


April 26, 


11 A. M. 


Annual Address, by Hon. J. Bryan 
Grimes. 


April 26, 


12 M. 


Graduating Exercises. 


April 26, 


3 P. M. 


Contest in Declamation and Reci- 
tation. 


April 26, 


8 P. M. 


Play by Elocution Class. 



Winners of Medals 

Scholarship Medal Annie Adams 

Debater's Medal M. G. Eatman 

Declaimer's Medal J. D. Barrett 

Reciter's Medal Azzie Scott 

Clay Improvement Medal M. G. Eatman 

Calhoun Improvement Medal W. G. Herndon 

Graduating Class, 1912 

J. D. Barrett President 

Ruth Pearson Secretary 

Maud Bagwell. Mary Reddish. 

Odelia Bailey. Azzie Scott. 

Lenna Benton. Lydia Seymour. 

R. L. Fisher. J. H. Wheeler. 

R. M. Johnston. Xennie Wilder. 

F. M. Nichols. N. B. Yarborough. 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 



V. Foreword 

1. A Look The Gary High School is not a new enter- 
Backward prise, but has an honorable history ex- 
tending over more than a dozen years. 
Under the guiding hand of Prof. E. L. Middleton, its 
head for a decade or more, the school came to occupy 
a foremost place among the pirvate preparatory schools 
of the State. When the General Assembly of 1907 
enacted a law providing for a system of public high 
schools for North Carolina, the Gary High School was 
converted into the Cary Public High School, which 
enjoys the distinction of being the first high school 
established under that law. As such, it has now been 
in operation for five years, and has steadily grown in 
patronage and efficiency. 

The rules of the State Superintendent 
admit free from tuition those who have 
completed the course of study for public 
high schools issued from his office. The first seven 
grades in this catalogue cover this course. Applicants 
must stand examinations on entering, or bring certifi- 
cate from last teacher saying the course has been sat- 
isfactorily completed. 

All public-school teachers of whatever age, and stu- 
dents over twenty-one years of age, who pledge to 
teach are entitled to tuition. Others over twenty-one 
years of age must pay tuition. 



6 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Outside The County Board of Education allows 
Patronage the School Committee to receive pupils 
from territory outside of Wake County. 
This is allowed in all public high schools. These 
pupils receive every advantage formerly given by the 
school under private management. 

It is important to begin at the opening, 

■ " nen to just as important as to begin a crop on 

r time. The pupil who starts a few weeks 

late is often handicapped in his work for the whole 

term. Begin at the first and plan for the entire school 

year. 

VI. The Faculty 

The School Committee exercises great care in the 
selection of teachers. The Principal has had sixteen 
years' experience at the head of a boarding school — 
four years at Cary and twelve years as principal of 
Wingate High School. 

Mr. Bivens has been known to the Principal from 
childhood. He is a young man of clean life, studious 
in disposition, pleasing in manners and well equipped 
from the standpoint of scholarship for the position 
which he fills. He is an honor-graduate of Trinity 
College. He has taught with us the last three sessions 
with great satisfaction to pupils and patrons. 

Misses Pasmore and Ellis are known to our people, 
having taught in the school for several years, and be- 
cause of their experience and ability are re-elected for 
another year. 

Misses Yates and Yarborough, having done satisfac- 
tory work in their departments the last two years, 
have been re-elected. 

Mrs. Blalock gave such general satisfaction last ses- 
sion, not only as a teacher of music and elocution, but 
as manager of the girls' dormitory, that she was re- 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

elected long before the close of the session, at the ear- 
nest request of patrons. She is a graduate from 
Meredith College in both music and elocution. 

VII. Some Ideals of What We Want 

1. Patrons Who are willing to co-operate with us in 
our work. Those who have the courage 
to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatis- 
faction rather than backbite and malign a worthy in- 
stitution. 
ys Of good habits who want an education 

and are willing to work for it. Boys who see the 
great possibilities lying before men of the rising gen- 
eration. 
s Who realize the true nobility of woman- 

hood. Girls who are willing to live in woman's sphere 
and work faithfully to prepare themselves for the 
noble callings now open to women. 

Vffl. What We Do 

Only teachers of recognized Christian 
or character are employed. In no case is 

Heart any influence allowed which might draw 

a pupil away from his church moorings. As far as 
possible, the wholesome influence of a Christian home 
is thrown around our students. While character is 
being formed, and impressions for life are being made, 
the Christian teacher has open to him a most wonder- 
ful field of usefulness. 

The young men hold every week a prayer meeting. 
It is well attended, and useful Christian workers have 
been developed. Nearly all students attend the regu- 
lar church prayer meetings at the churches. The 
school is opened every morning with devotional exer- 
cises. 



8 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Cary lias a Methodist and a Baptist church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are expected to attend 
the services of these churches and Sunday schools 

regularly. 
I. vox the jf. j g our p] an f cultivate our students 
Hand physically as well as mentally and mor- 
ally. Otherwise the best results in the classroom and 
in after life cannot be realized. To this end, we have 
baseball grounds and tennis courts, and students are 
encouraged to take sufficient outdoor exercise. A few 
match games are allowed, but our team is never 
allowed to be away except to return the same day, 
and unless accompanied by one of the teachers or 
some other responsible person. 

In all our work we have three ends in 
' r view: to teach pupils to be observant of 

what they see, judicious in what they do, 
and logical in what they say. For a teacher to edu- 
cate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him ; draw 
out his mental powers rather than pour in a heteroge- 
neous mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to 
do as much original thinking as possible. In addition 
to mere mental discipline, we try to use those essen- 
tials in education tending to culture and refinement, 
and those which will prepare young men and women 
for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. 
Frequent and thorough drills are given in spelling, 
reading and writing. In English Grammar, pupils are 
trained in the correct use of the language by frequent 
exercises in written work. When the pupil has ac- 
quired a thorough knowledge of the technical princi- 
ples of grammar, the critical study of English classics 
is emphasized. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

K. What We are and What We Have 

The location is both healthful and beauti- 
1. Location fuL r^ moral atmosphere of the town 
of Gary is hardly excelled anywhere. The society in 
the town will be elevating and stimulating to the 
youth that attend the institution. No better railroad 
facilities could be furnished in the State — just at the 
junction of the Seaboard and Southern railways, eight 
miles west of Raleigh. 

Cary is far removed from malarial re- 

gions and has excellent water. Few 
towns can show a better health record. 

In a most attractive part of the town, 
5. Buildings an( j s Urr0 u n cl e cl by a beautiful campus of 
oaks, is our school building. On the first floor there 
are seven large classrooms, four of which may be 
easily converted into an auditorium. Besides these, 
there are rooms for library, office, kitchen, and four 
music rooms. On the second floor are dormitories for 
thirty-four boys, and two literary society halls. On 
the northeast corner of the campus is the Matron's 
Home, where the boys get their meals. 

The entire building is furnished with 
J^quip- suitable furniture and equipment. The 
1116 classrooms have folding desks, charts 

and maps. The music rooms are furnished with four 
pianos, and the dormitory rooms with neat and com- 
fortable furniture. The kitchen is provided with a 
complete outfit of modern cooking utensils, and is the 
most attractive room in the building. The science 
room is furnished with a complete outfit of laboratory 
apparatus for teaching physics, chemistry, botany, etc. 
The literary societies have beautifully furnished halls, 
and these are the pride of the school. 



10 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

X. General Culture 

1. Literary The Clay and Calhoun societies for young 
Societies men, and the Browning Society for girls, 

meet once a week for exercises in debate, 
composition and elocution. All members are required 
to take part in the exercises. The good to be derived 
from this work cannot be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a 
fondness for reading. It gives the power of express- 
ing in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed by 
many people. It gives a broader view of men and 
things, and as an educator it has no superior. 

A library of about six hundred volumes 
library ^as been collected, to which additions are 
constantly being made. We have many volumes of 
biography, history, addresses, together with the prose 
and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Tenny- 
son, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and 
others. 

Students have access to the daily papers and the 
magazines. 

XL What Our Pupils Do 

We have two general ends in view : one to prepare 
boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
page 12) pupils can choose those studies which bear 
most directly upon their life work. For those con- 
templating a profession, the Classical Course may be 
chosen ; for those who expect to lead an agricultural 
life, the Scientific Course doubtless is to be preferred ; 
while for those having in view a business career the 
English Course is perhaps the best. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 



XII. Record of Work 

1. Examina- We require, at the end of each quarter, 
tions written examinations of all pupils on 
studies gone over during the quarter. 
These examinations are preceded by a thorough review 
of the quarter's work. Written tests are also given 
every two or three weeks, and pupils who average 90 
on these are excused from the regular examinations. 

We send reports at the end of each quar- 
po ter. We keep all parents informed re- 

garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance of 
their children, and we ask for their co-operation. 

Our standards will be kept high. Pupils 

"romo- tQ p agg f rom one y ear or grade to the 

tions next must average eighty per cent on 

their respective studies, and all examinations must be 

passed. 
4. Honors At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 

is posted. To be entitled to a place on this, a pupil 
must make an average of 92.5 on scholarship, 95 on 
attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

To be entitled to honorable mention, a pupil must 
make the above marks on scholarship and deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 
in the high school making the highest scholarship dur- 
ing the year. To compete for this, a pupil must be 
present to receive_ all the reports of the year, and 
must carry at least four studies each quarter. For 
next session a medal will be awarded to the best 
performer in music, and one will be given by the 
music teacher for the best work done in music during 
the year. 

The literary societies give medals for excellence in 
debate, declamation, and recitation. 



12 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

5. Gradua- In the course of study there are six de- 
tion partnients : Latin, English, Mathematics, 
History, Science, and French. To receive 
a certificate of graduation, a pupil must have com- 
pleted one of the following courses : 

(1) Classical. — Required: Latin, English, Mathe- 
matics. Elective: History or Science (through the 
Sophomore year) or French. 

(2) Scientific. — Required: Science, Mathematics, 
English (through the Junior year). Elective: Latin 
(through the Sophomore year) or History (through 
the Junior year). 

(3) English. — Required: English, History, Science 
(through the Sophomore year). Elective: Mathe- 
matics (through the Junior year) or Latin (through 
the Sophomore year). 

Each of these courses requires the completion of 
Arithmetic. 

Deficits on work of the Junior year must be made 
up during the first quarter of the Senior year, and 
deficits during Senior year must be made up promptly. 
All deficits below 75 must be made up by special ex- 
amination and cannot be redeemed by good marks in 
another quarter. Deportment must average 85, and 
any pupil receiving below 75 during any quarter will 
be barred from Senior Class. 

XIII. Special Departments 

1. Music Music has long since come to be a neces- 
sity to a civilized people. It is the most 
extensively cultivated and the most generally appreci- 
ated of all the fine arts. A thorough course in music 
will certainly carry with its manual training mental 
and heart training also. Many now study music who 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

never expect to teach or become performers, because 
of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good music that 
comes from such a course of study. 

Elocution is no longer considered a mere 
2. Elocution pastime s tudy. The eyes of the people 
have been opened to see not only the beauty and 
grandeur, but the practical importance of true ex- 
pression. And the time rapidly approaches when the 
inelegant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from 
the field to make room for the man who cultivates both 
brain and body. 

Heretofore these special departments have not 
counted toward graduation but, beginning with next 
session, pupils completing a prescribed course in Music 
may substitute it for any elective mentioned in this 
catalogue, while a year of satisfactory work in Elo- 
cution may take the place of a year of any elective. 

XIV. Course of Study 

(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. Writing. 

3. Howell's Primer. 

4. Howell's First Reader. X Jy 

5. Graded Classics, I. 

6. Reed's Primary Speller. " 

7. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

8. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 

9. Progressive Drawing, I. 

10. Handwork — Paper Cutting, etc. 

11. Hiawatha Primer (Holbrook). 

32. Language Reader, I (Baker-Carpenter). 
13. Grimm's Fairy Stories (Claxton). 



14 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Graded Classics, II. 

2. Robinson Crusoe (McMurry). )%~- 

3. Fifty Famous Stories Retold (Baldwin). 

4. Reed's Primary Speller. 

5. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

6. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

7. Progressive Drawing, I. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, I. 

9. Language Reader. II (Baker-Carpenter). 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Graded Classics, III. 

2. Reed's Primary Speller. 

3. Story of Ulysses (Cook). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic I (Milne). 

5. Language Work — With Pencil and Pen (Arnold). 

6. Physiology — Oral Instruction. 

7. Geography — Home Geography and Oral Instruc- 

tion. 

8. Progressive Drawing, II. 

9. Berry's Writing Books, II. 
10. Language Reader, III (Baker-Carpenter). 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, IV (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

4. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

5. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Drawing, III. 

7. Berry's Writing Books, III. 

8. Primary Hygiene (Caldwell-Ritchie). 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 



9. Heart of Oak Books, IV. 

10. Bible Stories of Old Testament (Moultou). 

11. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 



uuv^r 






FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, II (Baker-Carpenter). 
JL. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Reed's Word Lessons. 

4. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

5. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

6. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

7. Progressive Drawing. IV. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, IV. 

9. Primer of Hygiene (Ritchie-Caldwell). 

10. Heart of Oak Books, V. 

11. Makers of North Carolina History (Connor). 

12. Song of Hiawatha. 

13. Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 



SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English, II (Robbins & Row). 
"3. Young People's History of North Carolina (Hill). 

4. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

5. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). "• 

7. Writing — Berry's Writing Books, V and VI. 

8. Progressive Drawing, V. 

9. Elements of Agriculture (Stephens, Burkett and 

Hill). 

10. Language Reader, VI (Baker-Carpenter). 

11. Hawthorne's Great Stone Face. 

12. Brown's In the Days of the Giants. 

13. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. 



f l/V'" 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English, II (Robbins & Row). 

3. Our Republic (Riley & Cbandler). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

7. Berry's Writing Books, VII and VIII. 

8. Progressive Drawing, VI. 

9. Civil Government (Peele). 

10. Story of Cotton (Brooks). 

11. Irving's Rip Van Winkle. 

12. Stories from English History (Warren). 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English — Writing, Spelling (Branson), English Com- 
position (Sykes), Grammar, Part I (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Boole and Enoch Arden, and as 
parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne) 
to Powers and Roots; Algebra — First Course (Wells) ; 
Science of Accounts (Allen). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — Essentials of Latin (Pearson) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science — Human Physiology (Ritchie), Fall Term; 
Physical Geography (Tarr), Spring Term. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English — Spelling (Branson) ; English Composition 
(Sykes) ; Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Snowbound, Merchant of Venice, and Poe's 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL, 17 

Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet 
Letter, and Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne), 
completed and reviewed ; Algebra for Secondary 
Schools to Theory of Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 

Latin — Grammar, completed and reviewed, Fall 
Term; Introduction to Coesar (Brittain), First Book 
of Ccesar, Spring Term. 

Science — Botany (Bailey), Fall Term; Agriculture 
(Warren), Spring Term. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Ccesar and First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, 
Silas Maimer and Twice-Told Tales. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells). 

History — English History (Walker). 

Latin — Cossar's Gallic Wars, Books II, III and IV 
(Allen and Greenough), Fall Term; Prose Composi- 
tion (Pearson) ; Cicero's Four Orations Against Cati- 
line (Allen and Greenough), Spring Term. 

Science — Elements of Physics (Crew and Jones). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de C overly, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems, and as parallel Ivanhoe, Vicar of 
Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress, Washington's Farewell 
Address. 



IS GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Mathematics — Plane and Solid Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent) ; Civics or review of English 
Grammar. 

Latin — Virgil's Mneid, six books (Bennett) ; Prose 
Composition (Pearson) ; Critical Study of Syntax and 
Prosody. 

French, — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — Chemistry (Ostwald and Morse). 

XV. Expenses 

Per Term 

Grammar Grades $12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 14.00 

Junior and Senior years 16.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 11.25 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily 4.50 

Elocution — Private lessons ' 11.25 

Elocution — Classes of two 6.75 

XVI. Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, 
unless previous arrangements are made to the con- 
trary. The entrance of a pupil will be considered as 
an acceptance of these terms. 

The school is not a private enterprise. All accounts 
must be settled in full on or before January 1st and 
June 1st. 

No pupil whose bills for the previous session have 
not been paid will be allowed to take music, elocution, 



GABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

etc., till satisfactory arrangements have been made 
with the School Board. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition from outside of 
Wake County. 

XVII. Board 

1. Boys' The dormitories are furnished with bed- 

Dormi- stead, mattress with springs, chairs, 

tory table, lamp, etc. All boys rooming in 

dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow 

and toilet articles, such as comb and brush, soap, 

matches, etc. 

The room rent is $1.50 a month, which includes fuel, 
lights, etc. The cost of table board is $9 per month, 
or $6 from Monday to Friday. Room rent from Mon- 
day to Friday is $1 per month. 

Rooms are rented only to those who take their meals 
at the matron's home. 

Night latches have been placed upon all the doors, 
and each pupil is required to deposit 25 cents for his 
key, which sum will be returned when the key is de- 
livered up. 

Pupils in these dormitories are allowed to remain 
in their rooms for study. The Principal reserves the 
right, however, to remove any boy from the dormitory 
to the schoolroom for indolence or disorder. One of 
the teachers has a room in the dormitory and keeps 
order at night. 

This" home for girls is presided over by 

Browing -^j rs Lynn, who for several years has 
successfully managed private boarding 
houses for girls. The building is neatly and comfort- 
ably furnished. The girls must keep their rooms neat. 



20 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

and be quiet and studious in their rooms during study 
hours. The girls must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, 
pillow and necessary toilet articles, such as soap, 
matches, comb and brush, etc. 

The cost of board here is $10 per school month. 
Board from Monday to Friday is $7 per month, or 
from Sunday evening to Friday, $7.50. These rates 
include room, fuel, lights, etc. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughters' 
every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 
the lady assistants, Mrs. Blalock, rooms in the dormi- 
tory and keeps order. 

When the dormitories are filled, satisfac- 
., tory arrangements can be made for board 
ami ies w j^j 1 private families. Boys and girls 
must have different boarding places. Our charges are 
as low as can be arranged with present prices for 
groceries. These charges cover all expenses except 
washing, but each pupil Avill be required to furnish a 
pair of blankets or two quilts, a pair of sheets and 
pillow cases. Arrangements can be made to board 
from Monday till Friday of each week. The Principal 
will arrange board when notified by parents. 

Board in private families $10.50 

Board from Monday until Friday 7.50 

Board is payable at end of each month, with no de- 
ductions for less than one week. 

XVIII. Miscellaneous 

1. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term, and pupils entering late must join classes already 
formed. 

2. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Local pupils must remain in 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

school until regular time of dismissal, except for provi- 
dential reasons. 

3. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 

4. Parents should always write to the Principal 
when a favor is to be asked for their children, or when 
any complaint is made. 

5. All boarding pupils, before leaving Cary, must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for their 
home, unless by written request from their parents to 
the Principal. If parents of boys wish special restric- 
tions for their sons, they should notify the Principal. 

6. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principal for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

For further information, address 

M. B. DRY, Principal, 

Gary, N. C. 

XIX. Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for next term. 

1. Boys must be gentlemanly, and girls ladylike, in 
their relations with teachers, students and landlords. 

2. After time for study hour, all must go to their 
rooms and remain there in study until time for retir- 
ing, except for public worship and other approved pub- 
lic meetings. 

3. No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission from 
parents for any such absence, except to their homes. 

4. There must be no boisterous conduct or amuse- 
ment sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 



22 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

5. No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

6. No form of hazing is allowed. 

7. Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

8. Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under proper 
chaperonage. 

9. There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 

10. Girls are not allowed to have the company of 
young men in walks or at boarding places. 

11. All pupils must be studious and orderly in school- 
rooms. 

12. Giving or receiving aid on examinations will be 
ground for beavy demeriting or suspension. 

XX. Special Notes 

The school is now offering four years in Science — 
a balf year each in Physiology, Physical Geography, 
Botany, and Agriculture, and a year each in Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Tbe school owns about $400 worth of apparatus for 
teaching Science and Domestic Science. 

Owing to some changes in our plans, we are com- 
pelled to drop Domestic Science for session 1912-1913. 
The work will be taken up again session 1913-1914. 

Pupils in the dormitories will be held responsible 
for all damage to school property in their rooms. 

The school is exceedingly fortunate in being able to 
retain the services of Mrs. W. T. Lynn and Mrs. S. S. 
Wood as matrons of the two dormitories for next ses- 
sion. They have given entire satisfaction. 

Last session 119 high -school pupils were enrolled. 
There were 80 boarders from fourteen counties in 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

North Carolina and. South Carolina. The Graduating 
Class numbered fourteen. Nearly all of these will 
enter college this fall. 

If our friends into whose hands this catalogue falls 
will send us the names and addresses of any boys and 
girls who contemplate entering a high school soon, or 
of parents who ■ might be induced to patronize Cary 
High School, the kindness will be appreciated. 

Every pupil in school, of whatever grade, is re- 
quired to take spelling, and every pupil in the high 
school must join one of the four classes in Current 
Events. 

The situation of Cary High School — right in the 
educational as well as the geographical center of the 
State and almost in the suburbs of the State capital — 
is a greater advantage than is commonly supposed. 
Within a radius of thirty miles from Cary are located 
the A. and M. College, Wake Forest, Trinity, the State 
University, Meredith College, St. Mary's, Peace Insti- 
tute, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. These 
institutions have put us under obligation to them in 
many ways, as in sending us speakers from time to 
time, and permitting us to consult their well-equipped 
libraries. The State capital affords an oportunity of 
seeing the State's public buildings, the State Fair, the 
Legislature in session, etc. 

The following pupils did not miss a day from 
school the past session : Elementary School — Elsie 
Atkins, Ben Beach, Helen Dry, Edgar Fisher, Eugenia 
Gray, Mary Gray, Elsie Jackson, Katie Jones, Rachel 
Pleasants, Pat Pleasants, Foy Small, Elizabeth Wood, 
Lovie Wood, Ada Yarborough, Annie Lee Yates, Lottie 
Yates. High School — Ralph Fisher, Henry Fisher, Ila 
House, Maggie Howell, John Hunter, J. H. Wheeler, 
Xennie Wilder, N. B. Yarborough, Frank Yarborough, 
Lenna Yarborough. Carson Yates. 



24 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Students, 1911-1912 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 



Adams, Henry 


Branton, Ralph 


Adams, Tillie 


Breeze, Ruth 


Adams, Frances 


Breeze, Robert 


Adams, Lena 


Bryan, Mack 


Atkins, R. L. 


Butt, Willie 


Atkins, Ray 


Butt, Mary Louise 


Atkins, Fred. 




Atkins, Elsie 


Campbell, B. B. 


Atkins, Robert 


Cooke, Alma 




Cooke, Ira 


Baker, Susie 


Cooke, Agnes 


Barbee, Lyda 


Cooper, Evelyn 


Barnes, William 


Cooper, Elaine 


Barnes, Ralph 


Crocker, Maud 


Beach, Estelle 


Crews, R. F. 


Beach, Ben 
Beach, Susie 


Dry, Helen 


Beach, Bertha 
Benton, Whitson 
Benton, Burtis 


Eatman, Clive 
Eatinan, Mary 


Blake, Arthur 


Faulkner, Susie 


Blake, Ruby 


Fisher, Edgar 


Blake, Sarah 


Franklin, Zadie 


Blake, Coy 


Franklin, Tessie 


Booth, Guy 


Franklin, Garland 


Booth, Mabel 




Bradsher, J. R. 


Glover, Maude 


Bradsher, Arthur 


Glover, Early 


Bradsher, Dewey 


Glover, Everett 


Bragassa, Ralph 


Gray, Eugenia 


Branton, Raymond 


Gray, Mary 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



Hall, Annie 
Hall, Bonner 
Hamilton, Loula 
Hamilton, Turner 
Hargis, Tom 
Harris, Clarence 
Harris, Johnny 
Hill, Hazel 
Hines, Clyde 
Holleman, Carter 
Holleman, Leonard 
Holleman, Norman 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holeman, Norman 
House, Alpha 
House, Herbert 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hurst, Fred. 
Hurst, Lena 
Hurst, Frank 

Ivey, Hannah 

Jackson, Klipstein 
Jackson, Doris 
Jackson, Elsie 
Jones. Hervey 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Elizabeth 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, Johnny 
Jones, Katie 



Jones, Nora 
Jones, Sudie 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones, Mautell 
Jordan, Loula Helen 
Jordan, Raymond 

Lambert, Dandridge 
Lassiter, Iva 
Lassiter, Nina 
Luther, Millard 
Luther, Alsey 
Luther, Oscar 

Maynard, John 
Maynard, Luther 
Mitchell, Noland 
Morgan, Hattie May 
Morgan, Andrew 
Morgan, Lynda 
Morgan; William 

Olive, Bessie 
Olive, Bunnie 
Olive, Lottie 

Parish, Louise 
Partin, Charity 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Claud 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pendergraft, Hersie 
Pendergraft, Leonard 
Pendergraft, Levy 
Perry, Fred. 
Perry, Ulys 



26 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Perry, Earl 
Perry, Donnie 
Pipkin, Margaret 
Pipkin, Cora 
Pipkin, Gladys 
Pipkin, Paul 
Pipkin, Rosa 
Pleasants, Virgie 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, Helen 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pleasants, Pat 
Pleasants, Vernon 
Prince, Florence 
Prince, Frank 
Prince, Lonnie 

Reavis, Myrtle 
Richardson, Norwood 
Rogers, Artansie 

Sears, Gervis 
Small, Dewey 
Small, Clio 
Small, Wilbum 
Small, Foy 
Smith, Everette 
Smith. Erdine 
Sorrell, L. L. 
Stanton, Grady 
Steadman, George 
Steadman, Maurice 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stone, Ralph 



Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strayhorn, Susie May 
Strother, Frank 
Strother, Dawson 
Strother, Helen 

Templeton, Grace 
Thompson, Ira 
Thompson, Battle 
Tolley, Douglas 
Tolley, Walter 
Tolley, Jesse 
Tolley, Ora 

Upchurch, Ada 
Upchurch, Bennie 
Upchurch, John Lee 

Waldo, Lavine 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Ghita 
Waldo, Owen 
Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Robert 
Wellons, Lillie Mae 
Wilder, Jamie 
Williams, McKinley 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Lovie 
Wood, Dorothy 

Yarborough, Ada 
Yates, Annie Lee 
Yates, Lottie 
Young, Clarence 
Young, Clyde 
Young, Herbert 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Adams, Annie Mae 
Adams, Mabel 

Bagwell, G. O. 
Bagwell, Maud 
Bagwell, Lena 
Bailey, J. T. 
Bailey, Odelia 
Bailey, F. H. 
Barrett, J. D. 
Beasley, Annie 
Beddingfield, Louise 
Benton, Lenna 
Bivens, Pat 
Booth, Alma 
Breeze, Sallie 
Broughton, J. H. 
Butt, James 
Butt, Ethel 
Byrd, C. E. 

Carpenter, Bertha 
Carpenter, Eva 
Carpenter, Grace 
Clark, W. E. 
Clevenger, Edna 
Currie, E. D. 

Eatman, M. G. 
Edwards, J. R. 
Edwards, Nell 

Ferguson, T. A. 
Fisher, Ralph 
Fisher, Henry 



Goodwin, Irving 
Greene, W. V. 

Hargis, Harry 
Hargis, Richard 
Herndon, W. G. 
Hilliard, R. F. 
Holland, G. H. 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Terrene 
Honeycutt, Etta 
Horton, R. L. 
House, Ha 
Howell, Maggie 
Hunter, E. W. 
Hunter, John 

Ivey, Rachel 

Jones, C. C. 
Jones, F. T. 
Jones, Lillian 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnston, R. M. 
Jordan, Lily 

Kelley, W. H. 
King, M. E. 

Lassiter, Lovie 
Lewter, W. A. 

Maynard, George 
Marks, W. C. 
Middleton, W. R. 



28 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Muse, Blanche 
Muse, Hazel 

Nichols, F. M. 
Nichols, J. T. 
Nichols, Lyda 

Pearson, Ruth 
Pearson, J. A. 
Penny, J. E. 
Penny, Eunice 
Pleasants, Mae 
Pool, J. G. 
Pool, W. L. 
Proctor, Mabel 

Railings, Maye 
Reddish, Mary 

Scott, Azzie 
Seymour, Lydia 
Seymour, Swannie 
Small, Clara 
Sorrell, J. J. 
Stone, Lola 
Stone, Loula 

Taylor, Evelyn 
Templeton, Hugh 
Templeton, Elva 
Thomas, Lura 
Thompson, J. P. 



Thompson, Orion 
Tucker, Essie 
Tucker, Margaret 

Upchurch, Vivian 
Upchurch, Frank 

Yarner, Agnes 
Varner, Maggie 

Wheeler, J. H. 
Wilder, A. B. 
Wilder, Xennie 
Williams, Irene 
Williams, Addie 
Williams, R. H. 
Womble, W. B. 
Woodall, Eugenia 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Woodward, Pauline 
Yarborough, Lenna 
Yarborough, Mae 
Yarborough, N. B. 
Yarborough, Frank 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yates, G. N. 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Carson 
Yates, I. C. 
Yates, Cuma 



Enrolled in Elementary School 189 

Enrolled in High School 115 

Total enrollment 304 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry 
Company 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 



Jewelry, Cut Glass 
Silverware 

We are agents for Howard and all other American 
Watches. 

128 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 



B. P. S. PAINT 

Covers more than any Paint made. 



BEST PAINT 
SOLD 



Bug Death 



Sure death to potato bugs. 
Non-poisonous, and is a plant-food. 



"ALL RIGHT" COOK STOVES AND RANGES 

TOBACCO FLUES A SPECIALTY. 

Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best 
goods ; lowest prices. Your money back if not satis- 
fled. Call and see us. 

Hart- Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



C. R. BOONE 



DE LUXE CLOTHIER 



Guaranteed 

Clothing 

Shoes 

Hats 




Furnishings 
Tailoring 
for Men 
and Boys 



Opposite the Market. All Phones 28. 

226 Fatetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"COME AND SEE" 

IS ALL WE ASK. 

Your railroad fare paid for when you buy your suit 
from us. 



Clothiers and Gents' Furnishers 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city. 



THE BANK OF GARY, Cary, N. C. 

While in Cary, deposit your money in 
The Bank of Cary. 

Burglar]/ and Fire Insurance and 
Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



Wake Forest College 

Founded in 1834, Wake Forest College has grown to 
be one of the stronger colleges of the country. Endow- 
ment and equipment valued at more than half a mil- 
lion dollars. Faculty of twenty-two Professors, six 
Instructors, and twelve Assistants. Student body, 
four hundred and five. Solid work in a wholesome 
environment at moderate cost. Library of twenty 
thousand volumes, in charge of a skilled Librarian. 
Hospital in charge of a Trained Nurse, with the at- 
tendance of three college physicians. Gymnasium 
with compulsory attendance. Intercollegiate athletics. 
Intercollegiate debates. Literary Societies giving ex- 
ceptional training in public speaking. 

In addition to the usual college courses, three years 
in Law and two years in Medicine are offered. 

Session Begins Tuesday, September 3, 1912. 

President WILLIAM LOUIS POTEAT 

WAKE FOREST, NORTH CAROLINA 

Meredith College 

One of the few colleges for women in the South that confers an 
A. B. degree representing four years of genuine college work accord- 
ing to the standard of colleges belonging to the Association of Col- 
leges of the Southern States. 

Diplomas are awarded those who complete the course in the 
Schools of Elocution, Art and Music. 

Library facilities excellent. 

Systematic training in Physical Education, Courts for tennis and 
basket-ball. 

Board and furnished room in Main Building, heat, light, literary 
tuition, fees for physician and nurse, and all minor fees, $220.50; in 
the East Building and Cottages from $47 to $57 less. 

Meredith Academy 

Students not offering the necessary units for entrance may pre- 
pare in Meredith Academy, which is rated in the A Class of the 
accredited schools of the State University. 

Both the College and the Academy are located in the center of 
Raleigh, near the capitol and leading churches, so that students 
have many opportunities for general culture, in addition to their 
regular work. For Catalogue, Quarterly Bulletins, or fuller infor- 
mation, address 

jR. T. VANN, President, Raleigh, N. C. 



G.S. TUCKER & CO. 

FURNITURE I 

DEALERS 

A Complete Stock of Furniture 
and Housefurnishings 



«I Prices Within Reach of All 

Come and look over our stock and see if there isn't 
something that will add comfort as well as looks to 
your home. 

G. S. TUCKER & Co., Raleigh, N. C. 

McKimmon Dry Goods 
Company 

1 26 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH, N. C. 

This store is authority on Ladies' and Misses' Coat 
Suits, Dresses, Wraps, Separate Skirts, Waists, Under- 
muslins, Corsets, and all Ready-to- Wear Garments. 

Silks, Dress Goods and Trimmings, Wash Goods, 
Notions, and a full stock of all articles carried in a 
first-class Dry Goods Store. 

Write for samples. Mail orders given special atten- 
tion and filled the day order is received. 






A Ladies' Store of 

Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Novelties and Dry Goods 



Agents for the "Gossard", "CB" and "PN" Corsets. 
A gurantee goes with every purchase. 



Thomas A. Partin Company 

131 Fayetteville Street, - - RALEIGH, N. C. 

(Next to New Masonic Temple.) 



Welcome to Raleigh and our store, where you will 
find the . largest stock of Shoes and Hosiery In the 
city to make your selection from. Latest styles ; 
Lowest Prices. 

Hunter -Rand Company 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 
210 Fayetteville Street. 

Cross & Linehan Company 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 
(New Tucker Building.) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and 
see us during your visit to our city. We will en- 
deavor to make your stay pleasant. 



THOMAS H. BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



"The Big Hardware Men" 



Stoves. Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils, 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster 

Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe. 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Square Dealings. 

STOVES AND RANGES 



Alfred Williams & Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters in North Carolina 
For All Kinds of 



BOOKS 



We carry a stock of second-hand books at one-half 
the regular price. 

We sell new books at publishers' prices. 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 

Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. 

Write for price list of 50 cent fiction. 

Agents for Eastman Kodaks. 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 



Boylan-Pearce Company 

216 Fayetteville Street, 218 Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best-selected stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor-Made Suits, Cloaks, 
Curtains, etc., shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our new store when 
in our city. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLtN-PEARCE COMPANY 



"THE STORE OF QUALITY 



55 



This means that quality is always maintained. You 
can always feel assured, when buying from us, that 
you are getting the best. Our prices are right and 
always lower than other stores. We carry the largest 
stocks of Dry Goods of all kinds, Carpets, Rugs and 
Housefurnishings, Shoes, Millinery and Ready-to-Wear 
Garments for Ladies and Misses. 

Dobbin-Ferrall Co. 

123-125 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 

North Carolina's Largest and 
Leading Dry Goods Store 



COME TO SEE ME 

I am headquartei's for Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, Groceries and 
Queensware. 

A NICE LINE OF TABLETS AND PENCILS. 

I Sell as Cheap as the Cheapest. 

M. T. JONES, cary, N. c. 

J. C. WALKER, The Cash Grocer 

Will be glad to have you call. I propose to keep what 
you want, and to sell to you as low as the lowest. 
This is the place for Groceries, Notions and Shoes. 
Call to see me, and you will be convinced that the 
"Cash Grocer" is the place to trade. 
A full line of School Books, Pencils and Tablets. 

J. C. WALKER, THE CASH GROCER 

Railroad Street, CARY, N. C. 

C. R. Scott & Son 

GARY, N. C. 

The Only Exclusive Dry Goods, 

Notions, Millinery and Shoe 

Store in Town. 

We carry a nice line of Ladies' Coat Suits, Ladies' 
and Children's Wraps, Matting, Rugs, Trunks and 
Suit Cases. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well- 
known Crossett for men, and Selby's Fine Shoes for 
ladies. 

Give us a chance and let us prove to you that we 
can save you money. 

Make our store your headquarters while in town. 



F. R. GRAY & BROTHER, Cary, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, 
Caps, Pants, Men's Underwear, Tobacco, Groceries, 
Crockery, Glassware, Hardware, Plow Castings and 
Farming Utensils. From our warehouse, we can fur- 
nish you Cottonseed Meal and Hulls, Corn, Oats, Hay, 
Fertilizers, etc. 

A nice line of Tablets, Pencils and all kinds of 
Stationery. 
Cold, Drinks dispensed at our up-to-date Soda Fountain 

E. 0. WALDO DRUG COMPANY 

CARY, N. C. 

DEALEBS IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and Druggists' 

Sundries ; Perfumery, all popular odors ; 

Toilet and Fancy Articles, 

Combs, Brushes, etc. 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED, 

DAY OR NIGHT. 

R. J. Harbison, President. F. R. Gbay, Viee-Pres. 

F. T. Wabd, Sec. and Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 

Harrison Wagon Company 

Cary, North Carolina 




Harrison's Wagons are Known All Over the South 

We give the best material, workmanship and the 
most attractive finish that can be had in a wagon. 

Log Carts and Trucks of all sizes. 

Harrison Cultivators and Harrows cannot be ex- 
celled. 



Z. V. Johnson & Son 

UNDERTAKERS 

Cary, North Carolina 

We carry a full line of Caskets, Coffins, Robes and 
General Burial Supplies. 

Wagons and Buggies made and repaired. General 
repair shop, in wood and iron, bicycles, guns, etc. 



Oxford College 

oxford, n. c. 
Literary Art 

Music *M* Business 

Expression Teachers ' Course 

DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
GRADUATE IN ART 
GRADUATE IN MUSIC 
GRADUATE IN EXPRESSION 
CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS COURSE 
CERTIFICATE IN TEACHERS' COURSE 

Ten standard unites of preparation required for 
entrance to the Freshman Class, these being four units 
less (one year's work lower) than are required for 
entrance to the Freshman Class of the male colleges. 
Students graduating from the High Schools of the 
State of ten grades admitted to the Freshman Class 
on certificate; those from High Schools of eleven 
grades admitted to the Sophomore Class on certificate. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Arranged for those not prepared to enter our Col- 
lege classes, consists of three years of High School 
work. 

FACULTY. 

The teachers represent the great Universities of the 
land. Two members of the faculty are B. A. gradu- 
ates of Smith College, Massachusetts ; one a graduate 
of Hollins College ; one of the New York School of 
Expression. The Music teachers represent the Insti- 
tute of Applied Music, New York City, and the great 
Music Schools of Chicago. The Art teacher represents 
in her preparation two years in the Art Schools of New 
York City and one year in the Studio of Noell, of 
Rome, Italy. 

BOARD AND GENERAL EXPENSES for the 
school year is $167.00. Music, Art, Expression, etc., 
extra. Apply for Illustrated Catalogue. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President 



Carp $ut)ltc 





1913 



CATALOGUE 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Cary, North Carolina 
1912-1913 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF CARY PUBLIC 

HIGH SCHOOL 

1913-1914 



« t w A ri tWJ? 1'^ f j '-' o a k cTn. ^ 



Raleigh 

M. J. CARROLL 

Printing 



School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman. 
J. W. Benton, Secretary. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton. 



Calendar 1913-1914 

Fall Term opens September 1, 1913. 
Fall Term closes December 19, 1913. 
Spring Term opens December 29, 1913. 
Spring Term closes April 17, 1914. 



Graduating Class 1913 

Top row, from reader's left to right — J. G. Pool, 
Kemp Funderburk, M. G. Eatman. 

Middle row, from reader's left to right — Nell Edwards, 
Eva Carpenter, Pauline Woodward, Annie Adams. 

Bottom row, from reader's left to right — W. G. Hern- 
don, John Hunter, Hugh Templeton. 



Officers and Instructors 

SESSION 1913-1014 



1. M. B. Dry, Principal. 

2. Miss Roberta Osborne, Lady Principal. 

3. C. W. Scott, Chairman School Board. 

4. M. B. Dry, A.M. (Wake Forest College, 1896), 

Mathematics, Science. 

5. R. L. Towe, A.B. (Trinity College ,1913), English, 

History. 

6. Miss Julia Pasmore (Greensboro Normal and 

Industrial College), Latin, Arithmetic. 

7. Mrs. Betsy R. Hunter (Oxford Seminary)' 

Grammar Grades. 
S. Miss Floy Leach (Greensboro Female College), 

Grammar Grades. 
9. Miss Estelle Yarborough (Littleton Female 

College), Primary Grades. 

10. Miss Irma Ellis (Greensboro Normal and In- 

dustrial College), Primary Grades. 

11. Miss Roberta Osborne (Carson and Newman 

College, Asheville School of Music, Conserva- 
tory of Music, Ithaca, N. Y. ), Instrumental 
Music. 

12. Mrs. W. T. Lynn, Matron Girls' Dormitory- 

13. Mrs. S. S. Wood, Matron Boys' Dormitory. 



Commencement 1913 

April 11, 8; p. m. Annual Musical Concert. 

April 23, 8 p. M. Irving and Lowell Recital. 

April 24, 3 p. m. Primary Concert. 

April 24, 8 p. m. Annual Debate. 

April 25, 11 a. ii. Annual Address, by Gov. Locke 
Craig. 

April 25, 12 m. Graduating Exercises. 

April 25, 3 p. m. Declamation and Recitation Con- 
test. 

April 25, 8 p. m. Flay by Elocution Class. 

Winners of Medals 

Scholarship Allen Gardner 

Debate Kemp Funderburk 

Declamation J. M. Herndon 

Recitation Maye Railings 

Music Swannie Seymour 

Clay Improvement Carson Yates 

Calhoun Improvement J. M. Herndon 

Irving Improvement Rosalie Penny 

Lowell Improvement Allen Gardner 

Music Improvement Louise Beddingfield 

Graduating Class 1913 

W. G. Herndon, Pres., R. F. D. 1, Morrisville, N. C. 
Eva Carpenter, Sec, R. F. D. 1, Morrisville, N. C. 

Annie Adams, R. F. D. 1, Willow Springs, N. C. 

M. G. Eatman, Cary, N. C. 

Nell Edwards, Neuse, N. C. 

Kemp Funderburk, R. F. D. 4, Monroe, N. C. 

J. P. Hunter, " Cary, N. C. 

J. G. Pool, R. F. D. 2, Raleigh, N. C. 

H. B. Templeton, Cary, N. C. 

Pauline Woodward R. F. D. 4, Raleigh, N. C. 



I 




CATALOGUE 

OF 



Cary Public High School 



Foreword 

Past The Cary High School is not a new 

Record enterprise, but has an honorable his- 

tory. For nearly two decades it has 
occupied a foremost place among the secondary schools 
of the State. Even before 1896 when Prof. E. L. 
Middleton took charge, the school was doing a supe- 
rior class of work under the intelligent guidance of 
such teachers as A. H. Merritt, Rev. Solomon Pool, 
W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page and the Misses Jones. 
For twelve years, from 1896 to 1908, 

° the school was under the wise man- 

agement of Prof. Middleton. Under his leadership 
the school building grew from a one or two-room 
structure to a building of sixteen rooms, besides dor- 
mitory rooms, and from a teaching force of two or 
three and a small boarding patronage to eight teach- 
ers and more than a hundred boarding students. 

When the General Assembly of 1907 enacted a law 
providing for a system of public high schools for 
North Carolina, the Cary High School was converted 
into the Cary Public High School, which enjoys the 
distinction of being the first high school established 
under that law. As such, it has now been in opera- 
tion for six years, and has steadily grown in patron- 
age and efficiency. 



6 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

New The school has recently entered upon 

Building a career of larger usefulness by voting 

a bond issue to the amount of $25,000 
for a new building. The county will add to this 
$5,000, making the total amount available for build- 
ings $30,000. It is hoped to have the building under 
way by the middle of July and ready for occupancy 
some time during the fall term. (See page 8 for a 
fuller description.) 

The rules of the State Superintendent 

admit free from tuition in Wake county 
ter those who have completed the seven 

grades of the elementary school as outlined on pages 
12-15 in this catalogue. Applicants must bring cer- 
tificates from last teacher saying the course has been 
satisfactorily completed. 

All public school teachers of whatever age are en- 
titled to free tuition. All other pupils over twenty- 
one years of age must pay tuition. Pupils who are 
unprepared to do the work of the High School are re- 
quired to pay tuition .in the lower grades. (For rates 
of tuition see page 17.) 

The County Board of Education al- 
Outside lows the School Committee to receive 

Patronage pup ii s f rom outside Wake county. 
These pupils receive every advantage formerly given 
under private management. 

It is important to begin at the opening, 
When to j ug £ ag i m p or tant as it is for a farmer 

hunter to De gi n a cl . op on tj ma The pupil 

who starts a few weeks late is often handicapped in 
his work for the whole term. Begin at the first and 
plan for the entire school year. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 7 

What We Do 

For the The moral and religious welfare of 

Heart the students is not neglected. Young 

men's prayer meetings are held once a 
week in the school building and most of the pupils 
with the teachers attend the weekly prayer services 
at the churches. Most of the teachers teach in the 
Sunday schools of the town, and regular attendance 
on the part of the pupils is insisted upon and ex- 
pected ; yet no one's religious belief is questioned or 
interfered with in any way. 

The health record for the school is 

tne most gratifying. There has not been a 

y death nor a severe case of sickness, not 

even a case of typhoid fever, among the pupils in the 

last five years. 

The school management believes in athletics both 
for boys and girls and encourages all healthful sports 
among the pupils. Baseball and track athletics for 
boys and basketball and tennis for girls afford ex- 
cellent opportunities for physical development. All 
boarding girls are required to take a daily walk. 
Wide open windows and plenty of fresh air are in- 
sisted upon at all times. No pupil who fails to make 
the pass mark on at least four of his studies is allow- 
ed to take part in any match game of ball or other 
form of athletics. This regulation last session proved 
a powerful stimulus to study in the case of some 
students. 

In all our work we have three ends in 
or the view : to teach pupils to be observant 

of what they see, judicious in what 
they do, and logical in what they say. For a teacher 
to educate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him ; 
draw out his mental powers rather than pour in a 



8 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

heterogeneous mass of information. Pupils are en- 
couraged to do as much original thinking as possible. 
In addition to mere mental discipline, we try to use 
those essentials in education tending to culture and 
refinement, and those which will prepare j'oung men 
and women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains to lay good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. 
Frequent and thorough drills are given in spelling, 
reading and writing. 

What We Are and What We Have 

Location The school is only eight miles from the 

State's capital city. It is on both the 
Seaboard and Southern railways. It is on a principal 
watershed of Wake county, being high above the 
surrounding country and consequently free from 
local causes of sickness. It is in the educational as 
well as the geographical center of the State, being in 
close touch with the A. & M. College, Trinity College, 
the State University, Wake Forest College, Meredith 
College, Peace Institute, St. Mary's, none of which is 
more than thirty miles away. Representatives of the 
faculties of these institutions as well as the State 
officials at Raleigh, are frequently secured as speakers 
during the school session. The pupils also have easy 
access to the well-equipped libraries of these colleges 
as well as to the State Library at Raleigh. 

The new school building for which the 
Buildings contract has been let, will be erected 

on the site of the old building and will be a model 
of its kind containing all the advantages and con- 
veniences of the most up-to-date city high school. 
There will be rooms in the basement for heating 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

plant, toilets, society halls, domestic science, physical 
and chemical laboratories, manual training, gymna- 
sium, etc. On the first floor there will be six large 
class rooms, library, principal's office and teachers' 
room. The second floor will contain besides six reci- 
tation rooms and six music rooms, a large auditorium 
with study-hall combined. The auditorium, study- 
hall and gallery will seat about 800. A distinctive 
feature of tbe building will be the study-hall. It will 
be seated with tablet-arm chairs, lockers being provid- 
ed on the sides of the room for books, tablets, etc. It 
will be well lighted and ventilated and will accommo- 
date about 200 pupils. The primary grades will oc- 
cupy spacious and well-lighted rooms on the first 
floor. 

The boys' dormitory will be enlarged so as to ac- 
comodate about 60 boys. The building will be reno- 
vated throughout. The girls' dormitory will also be 
enlarged so as to provide for not less than 60 girls. 

General Culture 

Literary The Clay and Calhoun societies for 

Societies young men, and the Irving and Low- 

ell societies for girls, meet once a week 
for exercises in debate, composition and elocution. 
All members are required to take part in the exer- 
cises. The good to be derived from this work cannot 
be overestimated. It gives a knowledge of parliamen- 
tary law and stimulates a fondness for reading. It 
gives the power of expressing in public one's thoughts 
— a power not possessed by many people. It gives a 
broader view of men and things, and as an educator 
it has no superior. 



10 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Library A library of over seven hundred vol- 

umes has been collected, to which ad- 
ditions are constantly being made. We have many 
volumes of biography, history, addresses, together 
with the prose and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, 
Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Haw- 
thorne, Bacon, and others. 

Students have access to the daily papers and the 
magazines. 

What Our Pupils Do 

We have two general ends in view : one to prepare 
boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
page 11) pupils can choose those studies which bear 
most directly upon their life work. For those con- 
templating a profession, the Classical Course may be 
chosen; for those who expect to lead an agricultural 
life, the Scientific Course doubtless is to be preferred ; 
while for those having in view a business career the 
English Course is perhaps the best. 

Pupils who expect to enter college are urged to take 
the course leading to full graduation. (See page 12.) 

Record of Work 

Examina- We require, at the end of each quarter, 

tions written examinations on all studies 

gone over during the quarter. These 
examinations are preceded by a thorough review of 
the quarter's work. Written tests are also given 
every two or three weeks, and pupils who average 90 
on these are excused from the regular examinations. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 11 

Reports At the end of each quarter reports are 

mailed to all parents in order that 
they may be kept informed regarding the scholarship, 
deportment and attendance of their children, and we 
ask for their co-operation. 

Pupils to pass from one year or grade 
rromotions t0 t ^ e neX £ mus t average seventy-five 
per cent on their respective studies, and all examina- 
tions must be passed. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor 
Honors Roll ig posted To be entitled to a 

place on this, a pupil must make an average of 90 on 
scholarship, 90 on attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 
in the high school making the highest scholarship 
during the year. To compete for this, a pupil must 
be present to receive all the reports of the year, and 
must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

A medal is given for the best performer in music, 
one each to the best debater, best declaimer. and best 
reciter, and one for most improvement in each of the 
four literary societies. 

In the course of study there are six 

Gradua- departments: Latin, English, Mathe- 

on matics, History, Science, and French. 

To receive a certificate of graduation, a pupil must 

have completed one of the following courses : 

(1) Classical. — Required: Latin, English, Mathe- 
matics. Elective: History or Science (through the 
Sophomore year) or French. 

(2) Scientific. — Required: Science, Mathematics, 
English ( through the Junior year) . Elective : Latin 
(through the Sophomore year) or History (through 
the Junior year). 

(3) English. — Required: English, History, Science 
(through the Sophomore year). Elective: Mathe- 



12 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

matics (through the Junior year) or Latin (through 
the Sophomore year). 

To receive the full diploma of graduation one must 
have completed the full four years' course including 
French. 

Each of these courses requires the completion of 
Arithmetic. 

A deficit in any quarter's work, unless the work is 
below 70, may be made up in the succeeding quarter ; 
but in the Senior year, it must be made up immediate- 
ly by special examination. 

Course of Study 

(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. Writing. 

3. Howell's Primer. 

4. Howell's First Reader. 

5. Graded Classics, I. 

6. Reed's Primary Speller. 

7. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

8. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 

9. Progressive Drawing, I. 

10. Handwork— Paper Cutting, etc. 

11. Hiawatha Primer (Holbrook). 

"12. Language Reader, I (Baker-Carpenter). 
13. Grimm's Fairy Stories (Claxton). 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Graded Classics, II. 

2. Robinson Crusoe (McMurry). 

3. Fifty Famous Stories Retold (Baldwin). 



CABY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

4. Reed's Primary Speller. 

5. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

6. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

7. Progressive Drawing, I. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, I. 

9. Language Reader, II (Baker-Carpenter). 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Graded Classics, III. 

2. Reed's Primary Speller. 

3. Story of Ulysses (Cook). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic I (Milne). 

5. Language Work — With Pencil and Pen (Arnold). 

6. Physiology — Oral Instruction. 

7. Geography — Home Geography and Oral Instruc- 

tion. 
S. Progressive Drawing, II. 
9. Berry's Writing Books, II. 
10. Language Reader, III (Baker-Carpenter). 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, IV (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

4. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

5. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Drawing, III. 

7. Berry's Writing Books, III. 

8. Primary Hygiene (Caldwell-Ritchie). 

9. Heart of Oak Books, IV. 

10. Bible Stories of Old Testament (Moulton). 

11. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, II (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 



14 CARS' PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Reed's Word Lessons. 

4. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

5. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

6. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

7. Progressive Drawing, IV. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, IV. 

9. Primer of Hygiene (Ritchie-Caldwell). 

10. Heart of Oak Books, V. 

11. Makers of North Carolina History (Connor). 

12. Song of Hiawatha. 

13. Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English, II (Robbins & Row). 

3. Young People's History of North Carolina (Hill). 

4. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

5. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

7. Writing — Berry's Writing Books, V and VI. 

8. Progressive Drawing, V. 

9. Elements of Agriculture (Stephens, Burkett and 

Hill). 

10. Language Reader, VI (Baker-Carpenter). 

11. Hawthorne's G^eat Stone Face. 

12. Brown's In the Days of the Giants. 

13. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English, II (Robbins & Row). 

3. Our Republic (Riley & Chandler). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

7. Berry's Writing Books, VII and VIII. 

8. Progressive Drawing, VI. 

9. Civil Government (Peele). 

10. Story of Cotton (Brooks). 

11. Irving's Rip Van Winkle. 

12. Stories from English History (Warren). 

(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English — Writing, Spelling (Branson), English Com- 
position (Sykes), Grammar, Part I (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and as 
parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne) 
to Powers and Roots; Algebra — First Course (Wells) ; 
Science of Accounts (Allen). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — First Tear Latin (Bennett) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science — Human Physiology (Ritchie), Fall Term; 
Physical Geography (Tarr), Spring Term. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English — Spelling (Branson) ; English Composition 
(Sykes); Grammar, Part II (Buehler); Reading on 
Class Snowbound, Merchant of Venice and Poe's 
Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, Lady of 
the Lake, and Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne), 
completed and reviewed ; Algebra for Secondary 
Schools to Theory of Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 



16 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Latin — Grammar (Bennett) ; Caesar, Books I-IV 
(Bennett) ; New Latin Composition, Part I (Bennett). 

Science — Botany (Bailey), Fall Term; Agriculture 
(Warren), Spring Term. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Caesar, First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, Silas Marner 
and Tale of Two Cities. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells), Plane 
Geometry (Wells). 

History — English History (Walker). 

Latin — Cicero's Orations against Catiline, for Man- 
lian Law and for Archias (Bennett) ; New Latin 
Composition, Part II (Bennett) ; Sight Reader 
(Howe). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Millikan & Gale). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de Covcrley, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems, and as a parallel Ivanhoe, Vicar 
of Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress. 

Mathematics — Solid Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent) ; Government in the U. S. 
(Garner). 

Latin — Virgil's Mnceid, six books (Bennett) ; New 
Latin Composition, Part III (Bennett) ; Sight Reader 
(Howe). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — Chemistry (Ostwald and Morse). 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

Special Departments 

Music Music is a fine accomplishment for 

girls, adding charm to the home-life 
and turning many a dull hour into one of real en- 
joyment. It is equally as fine an accomplishment for 
a boy and in a home where there are only boys, it 
ought by no means to be neglected. All parents who 
can afford it should give their children the opportuni- 
ty of taking it. 

Expenses 

Per Term 

Primary Grades $ 8.00 

Grammar Grades 12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 16.00 

Junior and Senior years 18.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 12.00 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily 4.50 

Board and Room Boys' Dormitory, per month. . 10.50 
Board and Boom Girls' Dormitory, per month . . 10.00 
Board and Room Private Family, per month. . . . 12.00 

Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. 

The school is not a private enterprise. Ail accounts 
must be settled in full on or before January 1st and 
June 1st. 

No pupil whose bills for the previous session have 
not been paid will be allowed to take music, elocution, 
etc., till satisfactory arrangements have been made 
with the School Board. 



18 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition. 

Board 

Boys' The dormitories are furnished with 

Dormitory bedstead, mattress with springs, chairs, 
table, lamp, etc. All boys rooming in 
dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow 
and toilet articles, such as comb and brush, soap, 
matches, etc. The school furnishes fuel and lights. 
The cost of board with room from Monday to Friday 
is $7.00. 

Rooms are rented only to those who take their 
meals at the matron's home. 

Night latches have been placed upon all the doors, 
and each pupil is required to deposit 25 cents for his 
key, which sum will be returned when the key is de- 
livered up. 

Pupils in these dormitories are allowed to remain 
in their rooms for study. The Principal reserves the 
right, however, to remove any boy from the dormitory 
to the schoolroom for indolence or disorder. One of 
the teachers has a room in the dormitory and keeps 
order at night. 

After seventeen years' experience with boarding 
students, it is our honest conviction that there is no 
better place for a boy outside of his own home than 
a well regulated dormitory. 

This home for girls is presided over by 
Browing Mrg Lynn, who for several years has 

successfully managed private boarding 
houses for girls. The building is neatly and comfort- 
ably furnished. The girls must keep their rooms 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

neat, and be quiet and studious in their rooms during 
study hours. The girls must furnish sheets, towels, 
bedding, pillow and necessary toilet articles, such as 
soap, mathces, comb and brush, etc. 

Board from Monday to Friday is $7.00 per month, 
or from Sunday evening to Friday, $7.50. These 
rates include room, fuel, lights, etc. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughters' 
every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 
the lady assistants, rooms in the dormitory and keeps 
order. 

When the dormitories are filled, satis- 
t" rivate factory arrangements can be made for 

families board with private families. Boys and 

girls must have different boarding places. Each pupil 
will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or two 
quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow cases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday 
of each week at $S.50 a month. The Principal will 
arrange board when notified by parents. 

Board is payable at end of each month of four 
weeks with no deduction for less than one week. 

Miscellaneous 

Let parents see to it that their children are present 
on the opening day. Classes are formed then and 
pupils entering late must join classes already formed. 
Late entrance is the cause of many failures. 

Parents should always write to the Principal when 
any complaint is made. 

All boarding pupils, before leaving Cary, must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not 
be given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for 
their home, unless by written request from their 
parents to the Principal. 



20 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Pupils are encouraged by precept and by example 
to save their money. Parents who find their children 
spending more money than is necessary should notify 
the Principal. 

Parents who desire it may send all money for board, 
room-rent, tuition, and books to the Principal. He 
will not be a repository for spending money, however. 

For further information, address 

M. B. DRY, Principal, 

Cary, N. C. 

Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for boarding 
students. 

After time for study hour, all students must go to 
their rooms and remain there in study until time for 
retiring, except for public worship and other approved 
public meetings. 

No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission 
from parents for any such absence, except to their 
homes. 

There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient ground for expulsion. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under 
proper chaperonage. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 



Special Notes 



The school is now offering four years in Science — 
a half year each in Physiology, Physical Geography, 
Botany, and Agriculture, and a year each in Physics 
and Chemistry. 

The school owns about $400 worth of apparatus for 
teaching Science and Domestic Science. 

Owing to lack of room while the new building is 
going up we are compelled to omiit Domestic Science 
and Elocution for Session 1913-1914. 

Pupils in the dormitories will be held responsible 
for all damage to school property in their rooms. 

The school is exceedingly fortunate in being able to 
retain the services of Mrs. W. T. Lynn and Mrs. S. S. 
Wood as matrons of the two dormitories for next ses- 
sion. They are giving entire satisfaction. 

Last session 134 high-school pupils were enrolled. 
There were 109 boarders from thirteen counties in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. The graduating 
Class numbered ten. Nearly all of tftese will enter 
college this fall. 

If our friends into whose hands this catalogue falls 
will send us the names and addresses of any boys and 
girls who contemplate entering a high school soon, or 
of parents who might be induced to patronize Cary 
High School, the kindness will be appreciated. 

Every pupil in school, of whatever grade, is re- 
quired to take spelling, and every pupil in the high 
school must join one of the four classes in Current 
Events. 

Following are some of the advantages Cary High 
School will be able to offer when the new building is 



22 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

completed : one of the most substantial high school 
buildings in the State; sewerage and water in the 
building ; artesian well on the campus ; spacious class 
rooms lighted on one side and provided with cabinets 
built into the walls; well-lighted and ventilated 
study-hall seated with tablet-arm chairs and pro- 
vided with inidividual and family lockers for books, 
tablets, etc. ; an auditorium that will seat eight hun- 
dred or more with a gallery and a splendid stage; 
gymnasium, society halls, laboratories, etc. ; a boys' 
dormitory accommodating sixty boys ; the girls' dor- 
mitory enlarged to accommodate sixty or more. 

The school is widely known and extensively pat- 
ronized. The last report of the State Inspector of 
High Schools shows that Cary enrolled more high 
school pupils than any other one of the more than 
200 State High Schools now in operation. 

The school has standing with the colleges, its 
graduates being admitted on certificate. In one col- 
lege alone two years ago, there were enrolled 22 Cary 
High School graduates. This year in the graduating 
class of one of the leading colleges of the State, seven 
of the class were former pupils of Cary High School, 
most of whom graduated "with honor" and one or 
two "with great honor." 

Cary is an ideal place for a boarding school. It 
has most of the conveniences of larger towns and yet 
it is free from many of the evils incident to town and 
city life. The people are sober, honest, law-abiding, 
church-going. They are thoroughly devoted to the 
school and have sacrificed for it in many ways. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



23 



Students 1912-1913 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Adams, Annie Mae 
Adams, Mabel 
Adams, Lucile 
Atkins, T. W. 
Austin, J. E. 

Bagwell, G. O. 
Bailey, J. T. 
Baker, A. S. 
Banks, H. B. 
Barbee, Lyda 
Bashford, Kathleen 
Bashford, Irene 
Beddingfield, Louise 
Booth, Alma 
Booth, Guy 
Booth, Mabel 
Bowers, H. R. 
Bowers, W. C. 
Bowers, It. Y. 
Brady, E. C. 
Breeze, Sallie 
Britt, M. D. 
Burch, C. L. 
Butt, Ethel 

Carpenter, Eva 
Clark, W. E. 
Clements, E. S. 
Clements, R. D. 
Doub, Albert 
Dunn, Mary 
Eatman, M. G. 
Edwards, Nell 

Fisher, Henry 
Funderburk, Kemp 



Gardner, Allen 
Gardner, Rodwell 
Garner, Ruby 
Green, W. V. 

Hargis, Harry 
Hargis, Richard 
Harper, B. J. 
Harper, I. S. 
Hegler, J. L. 
Herndon, W. G. 
Herndon, J. M. 
Holland, Roy 
Holland, Lalon 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Terrene 
House, Ha 
Howard, Mabelle 
Howell, Maggie 
Howie, Sanford 
Hunter, J. P. 
Hunter, Daisy 

Ivey, Rachel 

Johnson, Almira 
Jordan, K. F. 
Jordan, Alia 
Jordan, Lily 

Lassiter, Lovie 
Matthews, Lenna 
Maynard, J. T. 
Medlin, Florrie 
Mitchell, V. F. 
Muse, Blanche 
Muse, Hazel 



24 



CARY PUBLIC HIOH SCHOOL. 



Nichols, J. T. 
Nichols, L. S. 
Nichols, Lida 
Nichols, Lukie 

Ogburn, Mamie 

Partin, Charity 
Pearson, J. A. 
Peebles, Ollie 
Penny, Eunice 
Penny, Rosalie 
Pleasants, May 
Pool, J. G. 
Pool, C. G. 
Pool, W. L. 
Prince, Omie 
Proctor, Mabel 

Railings, Maye 

Ray, Annie 
Ross, Floy 
Scarborough, Rosa 
Seagroves, C. J. 
Sears, Roselle 
Seymour, Swannie 
Seymour, Bessie 
Small, Clara 
Smith, H. P. 
Smith, Ethel 
Smith, Edna 
Smith, Elizabeth 
Sorrell, Ruby 
Stephenson, Rebecca 
Stoll, W. F. 
Stone, Lula 



Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strother, Constance 

Templeton, Hugh 
Templeton, Elva 
Thomas, C. H. 
Thomas, Lura 
Thomas, Eunice 
Thomas, Zona 
Thompson, R. L. 
Thompson, Orion 
Tingen, G. R. 
Tucker, Margaret 
Turner, W. D. 

Upchurch, Frank 
Utley, Nellie 

Waldo, Lavine 
Wheeler, Oma 
Wheeler, Bula 
Wilkins, R. L. 
Williams, C. R. 
Williams, Irene 
Womble, W. B. 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Woodward, Pauline 
Wrenn, W. L. 

Yarborough, F. R. 

Yarborough, Elsie 
Yates, G. N. 
Yates, I. C. 
Yates, Cuma 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Carson 



Special in Music 

Dughi, Margaret Smith, Mavis 

Jones, Lillian Yarborough, Mae 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Atkins, 
Atkins, 
Atkins, 
Atkins, 



Henry 

Herman 

Anna 

Frances 

Tillie 

Lena 

Charles 

Alexander 

Ray 

Fred 

Elsie 

Robert 



Bagwell, C. B. 
Baker, Sudie May 
Bashaw, Alexander 
Bashaw, Clarence 
Bashaw, Madeline 
Beach, Estelle 
Beach, Ben 
Beach, Susie 
Beach, Bertha 
Beach, Ina 

Beddingfleld, Charlotte 
Benton, Whitson 
Benton, Burtis 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Ruby 
Blake, Sarah 
Blake, Coy 
Blalock, J. W. 
Blalock, R. L. 
Bledsoe, Frank 
Bledsoe, Dora 
Bradsher, J. R. 
Bragassa, Ralph 
Branton, Raymond 
Branton, Mary 
Branton, Ralph 
Breeze, Ruth 
Breeze, Robert 



Bryan, Mack 
Butt, Willie 
Butt, Mary Louise 

Campbell, E. D. 
Chappell, Laura 
Chappell, Joseph 
Chappell, Mary 
Chappell, Mabel 
Chappell, Albert 
Cooper, Evelyn 
Cooper, Elaine 
Cooper, i'oy 
Crocker, Maud 



Dry, Helen 

Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Mary 

Fisher, Edgar 

Gower, Junie 
Gray, Eugenia 
Gray, Mary 
Gray. Pat 

Hall, Annie 
Hall, Bonner 
Hargis, Tom 
Harris, Clarence 
Harris, John 
Harris, Lonnie 
Harris, Mary 
Harris, Ina 
Harrison, Annie Alice 
Hill, Hazel 
Holland, G. H. 
Holleman, C. W. 



26 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Holleman, L. D. 
Holleman, Norman R. 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Norman 
Holleman, Immogene 
House, Alpha 
House, Herbert 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hurst, Frank 

Ivey, Hannah 

Jackson, Elsie 
Johnicum, McKinley 
Johnicum, Sandy 
Jones, James 
Jones, Lenora 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, Johnny 
Jones, Katie 
Jones, Douglas 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Elizabeth 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones, Sudie 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Jordan, Raymond 

Lambert, Dandridge 
Lassiter, Iva 
Lassiter, Nina 
Lassiter, Glenn 
Luther, Millard 
Luther, Alsey 

Matthews, J. L. 
Matthews, Lee 
Marcom, F. D. 
Matthews, Clarence 
Matthews, Cleo 



Matthews, Alene 
Maynard, Luther 
McGhee, Evie 
Mitchell, G. W. 
Mitchell, Noland 
Montague, W. P. 
Morgan, Hattie Mae 
Morgan, Andrew 
Morgan, Lynda 
Morgan, Raymond 
Morgan, Fay 
Morgan, William 

Olive, Bunnie 
Olive, Lottie 
Olive, Bessie 

Parish, Louise 
Parish, Betsy 
Pendergraft, Claud 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Leonard 
Pendergraft, Hersie 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pennington, Emma 
Penny, B. J. 
Perry, Fred 
Perry, Ulys 
Perry, Earl 
Perry, Donnie 
Pipkin, Cora 
Pipkin, Margaret 
Pipkin, Gladys 
Pipkin, Rosa 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, Pat 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pleasants, Rosa 
Prince, Frank 
Prince, Florence 
Prince, Lonnie 
Pruitt, Murphy 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Reavis, Myrtle 
Richardson, Norwood 
Richardson, Elmer 
Rowland, C. H. 

Small, Dewey 
Small, Wilburn 
Small, Cleo 
Small, Foy 
Smith, William 
Smith, Louise 
Smith, Erdine 
Smith, Annie 
Smith, Everette 
Sorrell, L. L. 
Steadman, George 
Steadman, Maurice 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stone, Ralph 
Strayhorn, Susie May 
Strother, Frank 
Strother, Dawson 
Strother, Helen 



Upchurch, John Lee 

Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Owen 
Waldo, Robert 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Ghita 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilder, L. G. 
Wilder, Gertrude 
Wilder, Milton 
Wilder, Marvin 
Wilkinson, Fred 
Williams, Addie 
Williams, McKinley 
Womack, Robert 
Womack, Laura 
Womble, David 
Womble, Mary 
Womble, Tom 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Lovie 
Wood, Dorothy 



Templeton, Grace Tarborough, Ada 

Thomas, V. R. Tarborough, Glenn 

Thomas, Flossie Yates, Annie Lee 

Thomas, Hubert Yates, Lottie 

Thomas, Marvin Young, Herbert 
Thompson, Ira 
Thompson, Battle 

Enrolled in High School 134 

Enrolled in Elementary School 208 

Special in Music 4 

Total Enrollment for Session 346 



Alfred Williams & Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquabtebs in Nobth Carolina 
Fob All Kinds of 

BOOKS 

We carry a stock of second-hand books at one-half 
the regular price. 

We sell new books at publishers' prices. 

Mail orders given prompt attention. 

Give us your order. 

Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. 

Write for price list of 50 cent fiction. 
AGENTS FOR EASTMAN KODAKS. 

G. S. TUCKER & CO. 

FURNITURE 
DEALERS 

A Complete Stock of Furniture and 
Housefurnishings 

PRICES WITHIN REACH OF ALL # 

Come and look over our stock and see if there isn't 
something that will add comfort as well as looks to 
your home. 

G. S. TUCKER & CO., Raleigh, N. C. 

9 and 11 East Maktin Street 



W. H. ATKINS 

Repaib Shop, Blacksmithlng and Plow Works. 

All kinds of Wagons Made to Order. 

Agent for machinery of International Harvester Com- 
pany : Mowers, Rakes, Disc and Pig 
Tooth Harrows. 

G-rist Mill for Manufacture of Best Quality Corn Meal 

Opposite Baptist Church : : CARY, N. C. 

COME TO SEE ME 

I am headquarters for Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, Groceries, Farm- 
ing Implements and Queensware. 

A NICE LINE OF TABLETS AND PENCILS. 

I Sell as Cheap as the Cheapest. 

M. T. JONES, Cary, N. C. 
J. C. WALKER, The Cash Grocer 

Will be glad to have you call. I promise to keep what 
you want, and to sell to you as low as the lowest. 
This is the place for Groceries, Notions and Shoes. 
Call to see me, and you will be convinced that the 
"Cash Grocer" is the place to trade. 
A full line of School Books, Pencils and Tablets. 
J. C, WALKER, The Cash Grocer 
Railroad Street, : : : : CARY, N. C 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER, Cary, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, 
Caps, Pants, Men's and Ladies' Underwear, Tobacco, 
Groceries, Crockery, Glassware, Hardware, Plow 
Castings and Farming Utensils. From our warehouse 
we can furnish you Cottonseed Meal and Hulls, Corn, 
Oats, Hay, Fertilizers, etc. 

A nice line of Tablets, Pencils and all kinds of 
Stationery. 

Cold Drinks dispensed at our up-to-date Soda Fountain 



A Ladies' Store of 

Ready - to - Wear Garments 

NOVELTIES AND DRY GOODS 



Agents for the "Gossard", "CB" and FW Corsets. 
A guarantee goes with every purchase. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

131 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 
(Next to New Masonic Temple.) 

CHARLES B. PASMORE 



216 Fayetteville Steeet, 21S Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best selected stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor-Made Suits, Cloaks, 
Curtains, etc., shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our new store when 
in our city. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 



THOS. R BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

"THE BIG HARDWARE MEN" 

Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils, 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster, 

Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe. 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Square Dealings. 

STOVES AND RANGES 

Wake Forest College 

Founded in 1834, Wake Forest College has grown to 
be one of the strongest colleges of the country. En- 
dowment and equipment valued at more than half a 
million dollars. Faculty of twenty-two Professors, 
six Instructors, and twelve Assistants. Student body, 
459. Solid icork in a wholesome environment at 
moderate cost. Library of twenty thousand volumes, 
in charge of a skilled Librarian. Hospital in charge 
of a Trained Nurse, with the attendance of three col- 
lege physicians. Gymnasium with compulsory atten- 
dance. Intercollegiate athletics. Intercollegiate de- 
bates. Literary Societies giving exceptional training 
in public speaking. 

In addition to tne usual college courses, three years 
in Law and two years in Medicine are offered. 
Session Begins Tuesday, September 2, 1913 

E. B. E ARNSHAW, Secretary 

WAKE FOREST, NORTH CAROLINA 



C. R. BOONE 

DE LUXE CLOTHIER 



Guaranteed 
Clothing 
Shoes 
Hats 




Furnishings 
Tailoring 
for Men 
and Boys 



Opposite the Market. All Phones 28. 

226 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"COME AND SEE" 

IS ALL WE ASK. 

Your railroad fare paid for when you buy your suit 
from us. 

Clothiers and Gents' Furnishings 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city. 

THE BANK OF GARY, CARY, N. C. 

While in Cary, deposit your money in 
The Bank of Cary. 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and 
Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



McKimmon Dry 
Goods Co. 

126 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

This store is authority on Ladies' and Misses' Coat 
Suits, Dresses, Wraps, Separate Skirts, Waists, Under- 
muslins, Corsets, and all Ready-to-Wear Garments. 

Silks, Dress Goods and Trimmings, Wash Goods, 
Notions, and a full stock of all articles carried in a 
first-class Dry Goods Store. 

Write for samples. Mail orders given special atten- 
tion and filled the day order is received. 

Welcome to Raleigh and our store, where you will 
find the largest stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, 
and Millinery in the city to make your selection from. 
Latest styles ; Lowest Prices. 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

210 Fayetteville Street. 

CROSS & LINEHAN COMPANY 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 
(Tucker Building.) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishings and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and 
see us during your visit to our city. We will en- 
deavor to make your stay pleasant. 



R. J. Harrison, President. F. R. Gray, Vice-Pres. 

F. T. Ward, Sec. and Treas., Raleigh, N. C. 

HARRISON WAGON COMPANY 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 




Harrison's Wagons are Known All Over the South 

We give the best material, workmanship and the 
most attractive finish that can be had in a wagon. 

Log Carts and Trucks of all sizes. 

Harrison Cultivators and Harrows cannot be ex- 
celled. 



J. C. & W. A. JONES 

Groceries, Fresh Meats, Etc. — Fruits and Veg- 
etables — Masonic Building, Chatham St. 
CARY, N. C. 
We caryy a choice line of these goods and seel as 
low as goods can be had anywhere. Give us a trial 
and be convinced. 

Yours to please, 

J. C. & W. A. JONES. 



W.T.LYNN 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

Canned Goods, Fruits, Confectioneries, Tobacco. 
Prices Reasonable. 



Chatham Street, 



CARY, N. C. 



Jolly & Wynne 
Jewelry Co. 

EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

JEWELRY, CUT GLASS 
SILVERWARE 

We are agents for Howard and all other 
American Watches. 

128 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHILE IN RALEIGH CALL ON 

H. ROSENTHAL, The Shoe-Fitter 

Hose for Ladies and Gentlemen who care. 
Traveling Bags and Suit Cases. 

129 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 

HAYES PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITURE 

View and Commercial Photography 

Kodak Finishing, Supplies, Bromide Enlargements 
Copying 

1131-2 Fayetteville Street : RALEIGH, N. C. 



E. O. WALDO DRUG COMPANY 

CARY, N. C. 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and Druggists' 

Sundries; Perfumery, all popular odors; 

Toilet and Fancy Articles, 

Combs, Brushes, etc. 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED 
DAY OR NIGHT. 

C. R. SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 

The Only Exclusive Dry Goods, 

Notions, Millinery and Shoe 

Store in Town. 

We carry a nice line of Ladies' Coat Suits, Ladies' 
and Children's Wraps, Matting, Rugs, Trunks and 
Suit Cases. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well- 
known Crossett for men, and Selby's Fine Shoes for 
ladies. 

Give us a chance and let us prove to you that we 
can save you money. 

Make our store your headquarters while in town. 

A. S. JOHNSON 

UNDERTAKER 

Gakage and Automobile Repair Shop 

A full line of Caskets, Robes, and General Burial Sup- 
plies. Wagons and Buggies made and repaired. 
General Repair Shop, in Wood and Iron, 
Bicycles, Guns, etc. 

Railroad Street, : : : : CARY,N. C. 



OXFORD COLLEGE 

OXFORD, N. 0. 

Literary Art 

Music Business 

Expression Teachers' Course 

Domestic Science 

DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
GRADUATE IN ART 
GRADUATE IN MUSIC 
GRADUATE IN EXPRESSION 
CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS COURSE 
CERTIFICATE IN TEACHERS' COURSE 

Ten standard units of preparation required for 
entrance to the Freshman Class, these being four units 
less (one year's work lower) than are required for 
entrance to the Freshman Class of the male colleges. 
Students graduating from the High Schools of the 
State of ten grades admitted to the Freshman Class 
on certificate ; those from High Schools of eleven 
grades admitted to the Sophmore Class on certificate. 

PREPARATOR Y DEPARTMENT. 
Arranged for those not prepared to enter College 
(■lasses, consists of three years of High School work. 

FACULTY. 

The teachers represent the great Universities of the 
land, Cornell and Columbia Universities, New York ; 
one a graduate of Hollins College ; one of the New 
York School of Expression. The Music teachers rep- 
resent the Institute of Applied Music, New York City, 
and the great Music Schools of Chicago and Paris. 
The Art teacher represents in her preparation four 
years in the Art Schools of New York City and one 
year in Paris. 

BOARD AND GENERAL EXPENSES for the 
school year is $179.50. Music, Art, Expression, etc.. 
extra. Apply for Illustrated Catalogue. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President. 



The Hardware Store 

SHOPPING BY MAIL 

The Parcel Post is a great convenience to those living 
out of town. You can send us your order TO- 
DAY and Uncle Sam will bring it 
tomorrow. 

OUR AGENT PACEL POST IS ALWAYS AT 
YOUR SERVICE. OUR HARDWARE 
STORE HAS MANY DEPARTMENTS. IF 
IT IS HARD TO FIND— TRY HART- WARD 

Your name and address on a postal card will put you 
on our mailing list, keeping you posted on our 
out-of-town specials. Mail today care Dept "B" 

HART- WARD HARDWARE CO. 

By Mail RALEIGH, N. C. By Mail 

direct to you. No. 125 East Martin St. direct to you. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Cary, North Carolina 
1913-1914 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF CARY PUBLIC 
HIGH SCHOOL 

1914-1915 



Raleigh 

M. J. CARROLL 

Printing 



School Committee 

C. W. Scott, Chairman 
J. W. Benton, Secretary. 
Dk. J. M. Templeton. 



Calendar 1914-1915 

Fall Term opens September 1, 1914. 
Fall Term closes December IS, 1914. 
Spring Term opens December 29, 1914. 
Spring Term closes April 16. 1915. 



Officers and Instructors 

HIGH SCHOOL 

1. M. B. Dry, Superintendent. 

'A. M. B. Andrews, Principal High School. 

3. To be Supplied, Lady Principal. 

4. To be Supplied. Principal Farm-life School. 

5. M. B. Dry. A.M. (Wake Forest College, 1896). 

Algebra, Geometry. 

6. M. B. Andrews, A.B. (Trinity College, 1914). 

English. History. 

7. To be Supplied. 

Agriculture, Science. 

8. Miss Julia Pasmore (Normal and Industrial 

College) . Latin, Arithmetic. 

9. To be Supplied. 

Science. Domestic Science. 
10 To be Supplied. 
Music. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

11. Mrs. Betsy R. Hunter (Oxford Seminary). 

Sixth and Seventh Grades. 
12 To be Supplied. 

Fourth and Fifth Grades. 

13. Miss Estelle Yarborough (Littleton Female 

College). Second and Third Grades. 

14. Miss Ibma Ellis (Normal and Industrial Col- 

lege). First Grade. 

15. Mrs. S. S. Wood, Matron of Boys' Dormitory. 

16. Mrs. J. A. Smith, Matron of Girls' Dormitory. 



Graduating Class 1914 

Top row, from reader's left to right — W. E. Clark, 

Maye Railings, G. O. Bagwell, Alia Jordan, Harry 

W. Hargis, Jr. 
Middle row from left to right — Rosalie Penny, H. P. 

Smith, Constance Strother, Swannie Seymour, J. M. 

Herndon, Louise Beddingfield. 
Bottom row from left to right — Lura Thomas, F. R. 

Yarborough, Lida Nichols, L. M. Upchurch, Terrene 

Holleman. 



Commencement 1914 

April 15. 3 p. m. Primary Concert. 

April 16, 11 a. m. Class Day Exercises 

April 16, 3 p. m. Declamation and Recitation Con- 
test. 

April 16, 8 p. u. Annual Debate. 

April 17, 10 a. m. Dedication of New School Build- 
ing. 

April 17, S p. m. Play by Music and Elocution 
Classes. 



Winners of Medals 

Scholarship F. R. Yarborough 

Debate J. M. Herndon 

Declamation F. R. Yai'borough 

Recitation Mabel Proctor 

Clay Improvement ...H. P. Smith 

Calhoun Improvement G. O. Bagwell 

Clay Orator I. C. Yates 

Irving Improvement Margaret Strayhorn 

Lowell Improvement Lyda Carbee 



Graduating Class 1914 

F. R. Yarborough, President Cary, N. C. 

Swannte Seymour, Secretary West Raleigh, N. G, 

G. O. Bagwell R.F.D. 2, Raleigh, N. 0. 

Louise Beddingfield R.F.D. 1, Raleigh, N. G. 

W. E. Clark R.F.D. 3, Apex, N. G. 

H. W. Hargis, Jr Cary, N. C. 

J. M. Herndon R.F.D. 1, Morrisville, N. C. 

Terrene Holleman Cary, N. C. 

Alla Jordan R.F.D. 1, McCullers, N. C. 

Lida Nichols R.F.D. 1, Gorman, N. G. 

Rosalie Penny R.F.D. 3, Raleigh, N. C. 

Maye Rallings Monroe, N. C. 

H. P. Smith McCullers, N. C. 

Constance Strother Raleigh, N. C. 

Lura Thomas R.F.D. 2, Jonesboro, N. C. 





w^S 










•.■ fiBgBKjk ' ^8 






i 


Ill 




. • 


3N| 




it 


%:5 


"f/f -■ 


i :,; *"'■ 


' 








'■ '1 
i 




^^^ < 








%w,. 










• ^* 











CATALOGUE 

OF 

Cary Public High School 



Foreword 

Past The Cary High School is not a new 

Record enterprise, but has an honorable his- 

tory. For nearly two decades it has 
occupied a foremost place among the secondary schools 
of the State. Even before 1896 when Prof. E. L. 
Middleton took charge, the school was doing a supe- 
rior class of work under the intelligent guidance o£ 
such teachers as A. H. Merritt, Rev. Solomon Pool, 
W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page and the Misses Jones. 
For twelve years, from 1896 to 1908, 
the school was under the wise man- 
agement of Professor Middleton. Under his leadership 
the school building grew from a one or two-room 
structure to a building of sixteen rooms, besides dor- 
mitory rooms, and from a teaching force of two or 
three and a small boarding patronage to eight teach- 
ers and more than a hundred boarding students. 

When the General Assembly of 1907 enacted a law 
providing for a system of public high schools for 
North Carolina, the Cary High School was converted 
into the Cary Public High School, which enjoys the 
distinction of being the first high school established 
under that law. As such, it has now been in opera- 
tion for seven years, and has steadily grown in patron- 
age and efficiency. 



CARy PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

New The school has recently entered upon 

Building a career of "larger usefulness by erect- 

ing a new main building, costing a little 
more than $30,000, with all the advantages and con- 
veniences of the most up-to-date city school. (See 
page 8 for a fuller description. ) 

Beginning with the session of 1914-1915, 

F arm-Lire t | le g^^ w m begin to do some real 

hool work in the teaching of Agriculture 

and Domestic Science, the school having been made 

one of the Farm-life Schools for Wake County. 

The rules of the State Superintendent 
Who Can admit free from tuition in Wake County 

those who have completed the seven 
grades of the elementary school as outlined on pages 
12-15 in . this catalogue. Applicants must bring cer- 
tificates from the last teacher saying the course has 
been satisfactorily completed. 

All public school teachers of whatever age are en- 
titled to free tuition. All other pupils over twenty- 
one years of age must pay tuition. Pupils who are 
unprepared to do the work of the High School are re- 
quired to pay tuition in the lower grades. (For rates 
of tuition see page 17.) 

The County Board of Education al- 
Outside lowg the g cm -> i Committee to receive 

Patronage pup u s f rom outside Wake County. 
These pupils receive every advantage formerly given 
under private management. 

It is important to begin at the opening, 
W^hcn to • 

just as important as it is for a farmer 

to begin a crop on time. The pupil 

who starts a few weeks late is often handicapped in 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

his work for the whole term. Begin at the first and 
plan for the entire school year. 

What We Do 

For the The moral and religions welfare of 

Heart the students is not neglected. Young 

men's prayer meetings are held once a 
week in the school building and most of the pupils 
with the teachers attend the weekly prayer services 
at the churches. Most of the teachers teach in the 
Sunday schools of the town, and regular attendance 
on the part of the pupils is insisted upon and ex- 
pected ; yet no one's religious belief is questioned or 
interfered with in any way. 

The health record for the school is 

or tae most gratifying. There has not been a 

° y death nor a severe case of sickness, not 

even a case of typhoid fever, among the pupils in the 

last five years. 

The school management believes in athletics both 
for boys and girls and encourages all healthful sports 
among the pupils. Baseball and track athletics for 
boys and basketball and tennis for girls afford ex- 
cellent opportunities for physical development. All 
boarding girls are required to take a daily walk. 
Wide open windows and plenty of fresh air are in- 
sisted upon at all times. No pupil who fails to make 
the pass mark on at least four of his studies is al- 
lowed to take part in any match game of ball or other 
form of athletics. This regulation has proved a pow- 
erful stimulus to study in some classes. 



16 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

For the In all our work we have three ends in 

Mind view : to teach pupils to he observant 

of what they see, judicious iu what 
they do, and logical in what they say. For a teacher 
to educate a pupil he must lead him, not drive him ; 
draw out his mental powers rather than pour iu a 
-heterogeneous mass of information. Pupils are en- 
couraged to do as much original thinking as possible. 
In addition to mere mental discipline, we try to use 
those essentials in education tending to culture and 
refinement, and those which will prepare young men 
and women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains to lay good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or college. 

What We Are and What We Have 

Location The school is only eight miles from the 

State's capital city. It is on both the 
Seaboard and Southern railways. It is on a principal 
watershed of Wake County, being high above the 
surrounding country and consequently free from local 
causes of sickness. It is in the educational as well 
as the geographical center of the State, being in 
close touch with the A. and M. College, Trinity Col- 
lege, the State University, Wake Forest College, Mere- 
dith College, Peace Institute, St. Mary's, none of which 
Is more than thirty miles away. Representatives of 
the faculties of these institutions as well as the State 
officials at Raleigh are frequently secured as speakers 
during the school session. The pupils also have easy 
.access to the well-equipped libraries of these colleges, 
.as well as to the State Library at Raleigh. 



IS CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Buildings The new school building which has been 

erected on the site of the old building 
is a model of its kind, containing all the advantages 
and conveniences of the most modern city high school. 
There are rooms in the basement for heating plant, 
toilets, society halls, domestic science, physical and 
chemical laboratories, manual training, gymnasium, 
etc. On the first floor there are four large class 
Tooms, an assembly room for the Elementary School, 
a library, principal's office and teachers' rest room. 
The second floor contains besides six recitation rooms 
for the High School and six music rooms a large audi- 
torium, with study hall combined, and a gallery. The 
auditorium, study hall and gallery will seat about 
850. A distinctive feature of the building is the study 
hall. It is seated with tablet-arm chairs, lockers be- 
ing provided on the sides of the room for books, tab- 
lets, etc. It is well lighted and ventilated and wiil 
accommodate about 200 pupils. The primary grades 
occupy spacious and well-lighted rooms on the first 
floor. 

The boys' dormitory is being enlarged so as to ac- 
commodate about SO boys. The building will be reno- 
vated throughout. The girls' dormitory will accom- 
modate about 30 girls. Arrangements are being made 
to care for several girls in a private house under the 
supervision of a teacher. 

General Culture 

Literary The Clay and Calhoun societies for 

Societies young men, and the Irving and Lowell 

societies for girls, meet once a week 

for exercises in debate, composition and elocution. 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

All members are required to take part in the exer- 
cises. The good to be derived from this work cannot 
be overestimated. It furnishes a knowledge of par- 
liamentary law and stimulates a fondness for reading. 
It gives the power of expressing in public one's 
thoughts — a power not possessed by many people. 
It gives a broader view of men and things, and as 
an educator it has no superior. 

A library of over seven hundred vol- 
.Literary umes has been collected, to which ad- 

ditions are constantly being made. We have many 
volumes of biography, history, addresses, together 
with the prose and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, 
Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Haw- 
thorne, Bacon and others. 

Students have access to the daily papers and the 
magazines. 

What Our Pupils Do 

We have two general end in view : one to prepare 
"boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
page 11) pupils can choose those studies which bear 
most directly upon their life work. For those con- 
templating a profession, the Classical Course may be 
chosen ; for those who expect to lead an agricultural 
life, the Agricultural Course, of course, is to be pre- 
ferred ; while for those having in view a business 
career, the English Course is perhaps the best. The 
Scientific Course might meet the needs of certain 
pupils, especially those preparing for the profession 
•of medicine or dentistry. 



VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

Pupils who expect to enter college are urged to take 
the course leading to full graduation. (See page 12.) 



Examina- 
tions 



Record of Work 

We require, at the end of each quarter, 
written examinations on all studies 



gone over during the quarter. These 
examinations are preceded by a thorough review of 
the quarter's work. Written tests are also given 
every two or three weeks, and pupils who average 90 
on these are excused from the regular examinations. 

At the end of each quarter reports are 



Reports 



mailed to all parents in order that 



they may be kept informed regarding the scholarship, 
deportment and attendance of their children, and we 
ask for their co-operation. 

Pupils to pass from one year or grade 
Promotions to tbe next mugt average se venty-nve 

per cent on their respective studies, and all examina- 
tions must be passed. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor 
Honors Roll . g posted To be entitle( a to a 

place on this, a pupil must make an average of 90 on 
scholarship, 90 on attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 
in the high school making the highest scholarship 
during the year. To compete for this, a pupil must 
be present to receive all the reports of the year, and 
must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

A medal is .given for the best performer in music, 
one each to the best debater, best declaimer, and best 
reciter, and one for most improvement in each of the 
four literary societies. 



22 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Gradua- In the course of study there are eight 

tion departments : Latin, English, Mathe- 

matics, History, Science, Agriculture, 
Domestic Science aud French. To receive a certificate 
of graduation, a pupil must have completed one of 
the following courses : 

(1) Classical. — Required: Latin. English, Mathe- 
matics. Elective: History or Science (through the 
Sophomore year). 

( 2 ) Scientific. — Required : Science. Mathematics, 
English (through the Junior year). Elective: Latin 
(through the Junior year or through Sophomore year 
and one year of any other elective), History 
(through Junior year) or Agriculture or Domestic 
Science. 

(3) English. — Required: English, History, Science 
(through Junior year). Elective: -Mathematics 
(through Junior year), Latin (through Junior year, 
or through Sophomore year and one year of any other 
elective), or Agriculture or Domestic Science. 

(4) Agricultural. — Required : Agriculture or Do- 
mestic Science, English (through Junior year), Science 
(through Junior year). Elective: The equivalent of 
five years' work in any subjects offered in this cata- 
logue. 

A year of satisfactory work in Music, French, Agri- 
culture or Domestic Science may be substituted for a 
year of any elective. 

To receive the full diploma of graduation, one must 
have completed the full four years' course, including 
French, but not including Agriculture or Domestic 
Science. 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 23: 

Each of these courses requires the completion of 
Arithmetic. 

It is to be noted that each of the four courses out- 
lined above requires fourteen units or years. 

The Agricultural Course is subject to change to con- 
form to the requirements of the State Department. 



Course of Study 



(1) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Phonics. 

2. Writing. 

3. Howell's Primer. 

4. Howell's First Reader. 

5. Graded Classics, I. 

6. Reed's Primary Speller. 

7. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

S. Number Work — Counting — Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 
9. Progressive Drawing. I. 

10. Handwork — Paper Cutting, etc. 

11. Hiawatha Primer (Holbrook). 

12. Language Reader, I (Baker-Carpenter). 

13. Grimm's Fairy Stories (Claxton). 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. Graded Classics. II. 

2. Robinson Crusoe (McMurry). 

3. Fifty Famous Stories Retold (Baldwin). 

4. Reed's Primary Speller. 

5. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction*, 



24 CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

6. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions! 

7. Progressive Drawing, I. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, I. 

9. Language Reader, II (Baker-Carpenter). 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Graded Classics, III. 

2. Reed's Primary Speller. 

3. Story of Ulysses (Cook). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

5. Language Work — With Pencil and Pen (Arnold). 

6. Physiology — Oral Instruction. 

7. Geography — Home Geography and Oral Instruc- 

tion. 

S. Progressive Drawing, II. 

9. Berry's Writing Books, II. 
10. Language Reader, III (Baker-Carpenter). 
(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, IV (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

4. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

5. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Drawing, III. 

7. Berry's Writing Books, III. 

S. Primer of Hygiene (Caldwell-Ritchie). 
9. Heart of Oak Books, IV. 

10. Bible Stories of Old Testament (Moulton). 

11. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 



CAR! 7 PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 25 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, V (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Reed's Word Lessons. 

4. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

5. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

6. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

7. Progressive Drawing, IV. 

8. Berry's Writing Books, IV. 

9. Primer of Hygiene (Ritchie-Caldwell). 

10. Heart of Oak Books, V. 

11. Makers of North Carolina History (Connor). 

12. Song of Hiawatha. 

13. Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. Language Reader, VI (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Essential Studies in English. II (Robbins & Row). 

4. Young People's History of North Carolina (Hill). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

7. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

S. Writing — Berry's Writing Books, V and VI. 
9. Progressive Drawing, V. 

10. Elements of Agriculture (Stephens, Burkett and 

Hill). 

11. Hawthorne's Great Stone Face. 

12. Brown's In the Days of the Giants. 

13. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. 



26 VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English. II (Robbins & Row). 

3. Our Republic (Riley & Chandler). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

7. Berry's Writing Books, VII and VIII. 

8. Progressive Drawing, VI. 

9. Civil Government (Peele). 

10. Story of Cotton (Brooks). 

11. Irving's Rip Van Winkle. 

12. Stories from English History (Warren). 
(3) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English — Writing, Spelling (Branson), English Com- 
position (Sykes), Grammar, Part I (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and as 
parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography r 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne) 
to Powers and Roots; Algebra — First Course (Wells). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — First Tear Latin (Bennett) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science — Human Physiology (Ritchie), Fall Term; 
Physical Geography (Tarr), Spring Term. 

Agriculture — Text to be selected. 

Domestic Science — 



• CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. IT 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English — Spelling (Branson) ; English Composition 
(Sykes) ; Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Snoiobound, Merchant of Venice and Poe's 
Poems, and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, Lady of 
the Lake, and Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Mathematics — Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne), 
completed and reviewed ; Algebra for Secondary 
Schools to Theory of Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 

Latin — Grammar (Bennett) ; Ccesar, Books I-IV 
(Bennett) ; New Latin Composition, Part I (Bennett). 

Science — Botany (Bailey) ; Zoology. 

Agriculture — Text to be selected. 

Domestic Science — ■ 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book , ( Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Caesar, First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, Silas Marner 
and Tale of Tivo Cities. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells), Plane 
Geometry (Wells). 

History — English History (Walker). 

Latin — Cicero's Orations against Catiline, for Man- 
lian Law and for Archias (Bennett) ; New Latin 
Composition, Part II (Bennett) ; Sight Reader - 
(Howe). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Millikan & Gale). 

Agriculture — Text to be selected. 

Domestic Science. 



28 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de Coverley, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems, and as a parellel Ivanhoe, Vicar 
of Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress. 

Mathematics — Solid Goemetry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent) ; Government in the U. S. 
(Garner). 

Latin — Virgil's jEneid, six books (Bennett) ; New 
Latin Composition, Part III (Bennett) ; Sight Reader 
(Howe). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — Chemistry (Ostwald and Morse). 

Special Departments 

Music Music is a fine accomplishment for 

girls, adding charm to the home-life 
and turning many a dull hour into one of real en- 
joyment. It is equally as fine an accomplishment for 
a boy, and in a home where there are only boys it 
ought by no means to be neglected. All parents who 
can afford it should give their children the opportunity 
of taking it. 

Expenses 

Per Term 

Primary Grades $ 8.00 

Grammar Grades 12.00 

Freshman and Sophomore years 16.00 



CAR? PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. -J) 

Junior and Senior years 18.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 12.00 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily 4.50 

Board and Room Boys' Dormitory, per month. . 10.50 

Board and Room Girl's Dormitory, per month. . 10.00 

Board and Room Private Family, per month. . . . 12.00 

Terms 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion is made for absence except in cases of protracted 
illness of one week or more. 

The school is not a private enterprise. All accounts 
must be settled in full on or before January 1st and 
June 1st. 

No pupil whose bills for the previous session have 
not been paid will be allowed to take music, elocutiou, 
etc., till satisfactory arrangements have been made 
with the School Board. 

The above rates are for all, and not subject to dis- 
counts. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition. 

Board 

Boys' The dormitories are furnished with 

Dormitory bedstead, mattress and springs, chairs, 
table, lamp, etc. All boys rooming in 
dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow 
and toilet articles, such as comb and brush, soap, 



30 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

matches, etc. The school furnishes fuel and lights. 
The cost of board with room from Monday to Friday 
is $7.00. 

Rooms are rented only to those who take their 
meals at the matron's home. 

One of the teachers has a room in the dormitory and 
keeps order at night. 

After eighteen years' experience with boarding 

pupils, it is our honest conviction that there is no 

better place for a boy outside of his' own home than 

a well-regulated dormitory. 

This home for girls will be presided 
Browning oyer by Mrs j A gmith) who for sev . 

" eral years has successfully managed 

boarding houses for school folks. The building is 
nearly and comfortably furnished. The girls must 
keep their rooms neat, and be quiet and studious in 
their rooms during study hours. The girls furnish 
sheets, towels, bedding, pillow and necessary toilet 
articles, such as soap, matches, comb and brush, etc. 

Board from Monday to Friday is $7.00 per month, 
or from Sunday evening to Friday, $7.50. These 
rates include room, fuel, lights, etc. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughters' 
every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 
the lady assistants rooms in the dormitory and keeps 
order. 

When the dormitories are filled, satis- 
fy factory arrangements can be made for 
Families board with private families. Boys and 
girls must have different boarding places. Each pupil 
will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or two 
quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow cases. Arrange- 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 31 

inents can be made to board from Monday till Friday 
of each week at $8.50 a month. The Principal will 
arrange board when notified by parents. 

Board is payable at end of each month of four 
weeks with no deduction for less than one week. 

Miscellaneous 

Let parents see to it that their children are present 
on the opening day. Classes are formed then and 
pupils entering late must join classes already formed. 
Late entrance is the cause of many failures. 

Parents should always write to the Principal when 
any complaint is made. 

All boarding pupils, before leaving Gary, must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not 
be given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for 
their home, unless by written request from their 
parents to the Principal. 

Pupils are encouraged by precept and by example 
to save their money. Parents who find their children 
spending more money than is necessary should notify 
the Principal. 

Parents who desire it may send all money for board, 
room rent, tuition and books to the Principal. He 
will not be a repository for spending money, however. 

For further information, address 

M. B. DRY. Principal, 

Gary, N. C. 



32 CANY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

Rules 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for boarding 
students. 

After time for study hour, all students must go to 
their rooms and remain there in study until time for 
retiring, except for public worship and other approved 
public meetings. 

No pupil must leaye Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission 
from parents for any such absence, excxept to their 
homes. 

There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient grounds for expulsion. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under 
proper chaperonage. 

Pupils in the dormitories will be held responsible 
for all damage to school property in their rooms. 

There must be no written communication between 
boarding girls and the boys of the school or village. 



Special Notes 



The school is now offering four years in Science — 
a half year each in Physiology and Physical Geog- 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 83 

raphy, a year in Botany and Zoology, a year each in 
Physics and Chemistry, and three years each in Agri- 
culture and Domestic Science. 

The school owns about $400 worth of apparatus for 
teaching Science, Agriculture and Domestic Science. 

Last session 131 high-school pupils were enrolled. 
There were 95 boarders from fourteen counties in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. The graduating 
class numbered fifteen. Nearly all of these will enter 
college this fall. 

Every pupil in school, of whatever grade, is re- 
quired to take spelling, and every pupil in the high 
school must join one of the four classes in Current 
Events. 

Following are some of the advantages Cary High 
School is now able to offer : one of the most sub- 
stantial high school buildings in the State; sewerage 
and water in the building; artesian well on the 
campus ; spacious class rooms lighted on one side and 
provided with cabinets built into the walls ; well- 
lighted and ventilated study hall seated with tablet- 
arm chairs and provided with individual and family 
lockers for books, tablets, etc. ; an auditorium that 
will seat eight hundred or more with a gallery and a 
splendid stage ; gymnasium, society halls, laboratories, 
etc. ; a boys' dormitory accommodating eighty boys ; 
a girls' dormitory to accommodate thirty or more. 

The school is widely known and extensively pat- 
ronized. The last report of the State Inspector of 
High Schools shows that Cary enrolled more high 
school pupils than any other one of the more than 
two hundred State High Schools now in operation. 



34 GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 

The school has standing with the colleges, its grad- 
uates beiug admitted on certificate. In one college 
alone, three years ago, there were enrolled 22 Cary 
High School graduates. Two years ago in the grad- 
uating class of one of the leading colleges of the State 
seven of the class were former pupils of Cary High 
School, most of whom graduated "with honor" and one 
.or two "with great honor." 

Cary is an ideal place for a boarding school. It 
has most of the conveniences of larger towns and yet 
it is free from many of the evils incident to town and 
city life. The people are sober, honest, law-abiding, 
church-going. They are thoroughly devoted to the 
school and have sacrificed for it in many ways. 

The Cary High School is putting itself in line with 
the best educational thought in the country today, 
namely, that of ministering to the needs of the people. 
North Carolina will doubtless remain an agricultural 
State. It is imperative, therefore, that agriculture be 
taught in the most approved and systematic way. To 
this end no pains or expense have been spared in 
equipping the school to teach the subjects of Agricul- 
ture and Domestic Science in a really effective way. 
The result is that these subjects will be taught, be- 
ginning with session 1914-1915, by specially trained 
teachers and under the most favorable conditions — 
one of these conditions being the school's proximity 
to the A. and M. College, which stands ever ready to 
lend a helping hand in promoting agricultural educa- 
tion among the people. 



VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



35 



Students 1913-1914 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Adams, Mabel 
Atkins, T. W. 

Bagwell, G. O. 
Banks, C. G. 
Barbee, Alma 
Barhee. Lyda 
Bashford, Kathleen 
Baskford, Irene 
Beach, Ben 
Beach, Estelle 
Beddingfield. Louise 
Benton, Whitson 
Benton. Burtis 
Blalock. R. L. 
Booth, Guy 
Bowers, H. R. 
Bowers, W. C. 
Brady, E. C. 
Breeze. Sallie 
Buchanan, Esther 

Carroll. B. H. 
Clark, W. E. 
Clements. E. S. 

Doub, Albert 
Dunn, Mary 

Edwards, Otho 

Fisher, Henry 

Garner, Ruby 
Gower, Junie 
Green, Estelle 



Hall, Annie 
Hargis, Harry 
Hargis, Richard 
Harper, I. S. 
Heater. Fannie 
Herndon, J. M. 
Holleman, L. D. 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Terrene 
House, Ha 
Howard. Mabelle 
Howie. Sanford 
Hunter, Daisy 

Ivey, Rachel 
Ivey, Hannah 

Johnson, J. L. 
Jones, H. M. 
Jones. Pearl 
Jones, Troy 
Jordan, Alia 

Keller, E. B. 
Kelley, C. D. 

Lassiter, Iva 

Ma gee. Edwin 
Marcum, Lester 
Matthews, J. L. 
Matthews. T. S. 
Maynard. J. T. 
Medlin. Mattie 
Medlin. Florrie 



36 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Montague, W. T. 
Morrison, E. P. 
Myatt, J. H. 

Nichols, L. S. 
Nichols, Lida 
Nichols, Lukie 
Norwood, J. T. 

Parker, J. W. 
Parker, Charles 
Peebles, Ollie 
Penny, B. J. 
Penny, Rosalie 
Penny, Ruth 
Pleasants, Mae 
Prince, Omie 
Prince, Florence 
Proctor, Mabel 

Railings, Maye 
Ranes, T. T. 
Ray, Annie 
Reams, Gertrude 
Bedford, W. W. 
Rosser, Faye 

Sears, Roselle 
Seymour, Swannie 
Seymour, Bessie 
Sistare, J. C. 
Small, Clara 
Smith, D. W. 
Smith, H. P. 
Steadman, George 
Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strother, Constance 

Taylor, Mary 
Tenipleton, Elva 



Thomas, Lura 
Thomas, Eunice 
Thompson, R. E. 
Thompson, R. L. 
Thompson, Orion 
Thompson, Elgetti 
Towe, W. T. 
Turner, W. D. 

Upchurch, L. M. 
Upchurch, W. G. 
Upchurch, W. D. 
Upchurch, Alice 
Upchurch, F. D. 
Upchurch, John Lee 

Waldo, Levine 
Waldo, Evelyn 
Wheeler, Oma 
Wheeler, Bula 
Wilder, H. B. 
Wilkinson, Fred 
Williams, E. C. 
Williams, Addie 
Womble, W. B. 
Woodlief, Amos 
Woodlief, Needham 
Woodward, Almira 
Woodward, Burnell 

Yarborough, F. R. 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yarborough, Ada 
Yarborough, Fannie 
Yates, I. C. 
Yates, Cuma 
Yates, E. C. 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Ila 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 



Adams, Henry 
Adams, Lena 
Adams, Eekie 
Atkins, Katherine 
Atkins, Robert 
Atkins, Elsie 
Atkins, Fred 

Baker, Thelma 
Baker, Pearl 
Baker, Josephine 
Bashaw, Alexander 
Bashaw, Madeline 
Bashaw, Clarence 
Beach, Bertha 
Beach, Ina 
Beach, Susie 
Beasley, Pearl 
Blake, Sarah 
Blake, Ruby 
Blake, Coy 
Blake, Arthur 
Bledsoe, Frank 
Bledsoe, Dora 
Bragassa, Ralph 
Branton, Mary 
Branton, Raymond 
Branton, Ralph 
Breeze, Ruth 
Breeze, Robert 
Bryan, Mack 
Butt, Mary Louise 

Castlebury, Luther 
Chappell, Laura 
Chappell, Joseph 
Chappell, Albert 
Chappell, Mary 
Chappell, Mabel 



Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Cooper, 
Crocker 



Elaine 

Evelyn 

George 

Susie 

Frank 

Allie 

Lovie 

, Maud 



Davis, Crystal 
Dry, Helen 

Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Mary 

Finch, Metabelle 
Fisher, Edgar 
Foushee, Ina 
Foushee, Vera 
Foushee, Schlesinger 

Glover, Richard 
Glover, Rommie 
Glover, Lonnie 
Glover, Ollie 
Glover, Jeff 
Glover, Arthur 
Gray, Eugenia 
Gray, Mary 
Gray, Pat 
Gulley, Furman 

Hall, Bonner 
Hamilton, Turner 
Hamilton, Clarence 
Hamilton, Loula 
Hamilton, Richard Lee 
Hargis, Tom 
Harris, John 
Harris, Evie 



dS 



VARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



Harris, Mary 
Harris, Raymond 
Heater, Retha 
Heater, Opel 
Heater, Langdou 
Hill, Hazel 
Hill, Abiier 
Holleiaan, Dare 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Norman 
Holleman, Immogene 
Holleman, Elaine 
Holleman, Norman R. 
House, Herbert 
House, Alpha 
Hunt, Reva 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hunter, Mary Rodwell 
Hurst, Frank 

Jackson, Elsie 
Jenkins, T. H. 
Jernigan, McKinley 
Jernigan, Calvin 
Jones, Lenora 
Jones, Tyree 
Jones, Johnnie 
Jones, Katie 
Jones, Douglas 
Jones, Garland 
Jones, Lee 
Jones, Elizabeth 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones, Sudie 
Jones, Thomas Edwin 
Jordan. Lula Helen 
Jordan, Raymond 

Lassiter, Nina 
Lassiter, Glenn 
Lowe, Ernest 
Luther, Millard 



Luther, Alsey 
Luther, Oscar 

Mann, Fannie 
Marconi, F. D. 
Matthews, Lee 
Matthews, Clarence 
Matthews, Alene 
Matthews, Cleo 
Matthews, Sam 
Mitchell, Noland 
Morgan, Hattie 
Morgan, Andrew 
Morgan, Raymond 
Morgan, Lynda 
Morgan, William 
Morgan, Fay 

Olive, Bessie 
Olive, Bunnie 
Olive, Lottie 

Parish, Louise 
Parish, Betsy 
Parker, William 
Parker, Henry 
Parker, James 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Pendergraft, Claud 
Pendergraft, Leonard 
Pendergraft, Levy 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pendergraft, Hersie 
Perry, Earl 
Perry, Donnie 
Pipkin, Gladys 
Pipkin, Rosa 
Pipkin, Claud 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, Rachel 
Pleasants. Pat 



GARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



39 



Pleasants, Rosa 
Prince, Frank 
Prince, Lonnie 
Prince, Pearl 
Pruitt, Murphy 

Reavis, Myrtle 
Richardson, Norwood 
Richardson, Elmer 
Richardson. French 
Robinson, Marvin 
Robinson, Frances 
Robinson, Nellie 
Rogers, Pansy 

Small, Wilburn 
Small, Cleo 
Small, Foy 
Small, Ethel 
Smith, Everett 
Smith, Erdine 
Smith, Annie 
Smith, Pauline 
Steadman, Maurice 
Steadman, Ben 
Steadman, Robert 
Stone, Ralph 
Strayhorn, Susie May 
Strother, Frank 
Strother, Dawson 
Strother, Helen 
Thomas, Yalton 
Thomas, Flossie 



Thomas, Hubert 
Thomas. Marvin 
Thompson, Ira 
Thompson, Battle 
Tillotson, Marie 

Waldo, Ghita 
Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Owen 
Waldo, Robert 
Wilder, Milton 
Wilder, Marvin 
Wilder, Allie 
Wilder. Kernie 
Wilder, Jamie 
Wilkinson, Annie 
Williams, McKinley 
Womack, Robert 
Womack, Laura 
Womble, David 
Womble, Mary 
Womble, Tom 
Womble, Arthur 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Wood, Lovie 
Wood, Dorothy 

Yarbo rough, Glenn 
Yates. Annie Lee 
Yates. Lottie 
Yates, Luna 
Young, Herbert 



Total Enrollment 344 



Alfred Williams & Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Headquarters in North Carolina for All Kinds of 

BOOKS 

We carry a stocK or second-hand books at one-half 
the regular price. 
We sell new books at publishers' prices. 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 
Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. 

Write for price list of 50 cent fiction. 

AGENTS FOR EASTMAN KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES. 



G. S. TUCKER & CO. 

FURNITURE 
DEALERS 

A Complete Stock of Furniture and 
Housefurnishings 

PRICES WITHIN REACH OF ALL 

Come and look over our stock and see if there isn't 
something that will add comfort as well as looks to 
your home. 

G. S. TUCKER & CO., Raleigh, N. C. 

9 and 11 East Martin Street 



A Ladies' Store of 

Ready-to- Wear Garments 

NOVELTIES AND DRY GOODS 



Agents for the "Gossard" and "C. B." Corsets. A 
guarantee goes with every purchase. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

131 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 
(Next to New Masonic Temple.) 

CHARLES B. PASMORE 



Boylan-Pearce Co. 

216 Fayetteville Street, 218 Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest and best selected stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor- Made Suits, Cloaks, 
Curtains, etc., shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our new store when 
in our city. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 

Mail orders filled same day received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

"THE BIG HARDWARE MEN" 

KEEN KUTTER KNIVES 

Stoves, Tinware. Nails. Iron. Steel, Paints, Oils, 

Glass, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster, 

Cement, Clay, Chimney Pipe. 

Best Goods. Lowest Prices. Square Dealings. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Clothiers and Gents' Furnishings 




Make our store your headquarters when in the citj 7 . 



F. R. GRAY & BROTHER, Cary, N. C. 

We carry a full line of Notions, Dry Goods, Hats, 
Caps, Pants, Men's and Ladies' Underwear, Tobacco, 
Groceries, Crockery, Glassware, Hardware, Plow 
Castings and Farming Utensils. From our warehouse 
we can furnish you Cotton-seed Meal and Hulls, Corn, 
Oats, Hay, Fertilizers, etc. 

A nice line of Tablets, Pencils and all kinds of 
Stationery. 
Cold Drinks dispensed at our up-to-date Soda Fountain 



Jolly & Wynne 
Jewelry Co. 

EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

JEWELRY, CUT GLASS 
SILVERWARE 

We are agents for Howard and all other 
American Watches. 



\ 



128 Fatetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 

■ WHILE IN RALEIGH CALL ON 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
The Shoe Fitter 

Hose for Ladies and Gentlemen who care. 
Traveling Bags and Suit Cases. 

129 Fatetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 

HAYES' PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITURE 

View and Commercial Photography 
Kodak Finishing. Supplies, Bromide Enlargements, . 

Copying 
113 1-2 Fatetteville Street : RALEIGH, N. C 



C. R. BOONE 

DE LUXE CLOTHIER 

Guaranteed ^ASSSif v \iri/ / 3&JPV "»' ? B °V S 



Opposite the Market. All Phones 28. 

226 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"COME AND SEE" 

IS ALL WE ASK. 

Your railroad fare paid for when you buy your suit 
froni us. 



CROSS & LINEHAN COMPANY 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 
(Tucker Building) 
Clothing, Men's Furnishings and Outfitters 
We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and 
see us during your visit to our city. We will en- 
deavor to make your stay pleasant. 



THE BANK OF CARY, CARY, N. C. 

While in Gary, deposit your money in 
THE BANK OF CARY. 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and 
Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



C. R. SCOTT & SON 

GABY, N. O. 

The Only Exclusive Dry Goods, 

Notions, Millinery and Shoe 

Store in Town. 

We carry a nice line of Ladies' Coat Suits, Ladies' 
and Children's Wraps, Matting, Rugs, Trunks and . 
Suit Cases. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well- 
known Crossett for men, and Selby's Fine Shoes for 
ladies. 

Give us a chance and let us prove to you that we 
can save you money. 

Make our store your headquarters while in town. 

The Hardware Store 

SHOPPING BY MAIL 

The Parcel Post is a great convenience to those living 
out of town. You can send us your order TO- 
DAY and Uncle Sam will bring it 
tomorrow. 
OUR AGENT, PARCEL POST, IS ALWAYS 
AT YOUR SERVICE. OUR HARDWARE 
STORE HAS MANY DEPARTMENTS. IF 
IT IS HARD TO FIND— TRY HART-WARD. 
Your name and address on a postal card will put you 
on our mailing list, keeping you posted on our 
out-of-town specials. Mail today care 
Dept. "B." 

HART- WARD HARDWARE CO. 

By Mail RALEIGH, N. C. By Mail ' 

direct to you. No. 125 East Martin St. direct to you. . 



Ready -Made Garments 

The Best Styles 
Lowest Prices 




The largest house in the State carrying exclusively 

Garments and Furnishings for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Gowns for social 

functions a specialty. 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. : : RALEIGH, N. C. 



Waldo Drug Company 

Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines and 

Druggists' Sundries; Perfumery, all 

popular odors; Toilet and Fancy 

Articles, Combs, Brushes, etc. 

SCHOOL BOOKS, TABLETS AND 
STATIONERY OF ALL KINDS. 



Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 
Day or Night. 



Hunter-Rand Company 

THE GROWING STORE 

Welcome to Raleigh and our store, where you will 
find a large stock of 

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, Coat Suits, 
Rain Coats, Coats and Millinery 

LATEST STYLES LOWEST PRICES 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES. 



'Where your dollars count most' 



.Raleigh Deparment Store 

126 Fayetteville Street, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



W. H. ATKINS 

Repair Shop, Blacksmithing and Plow Works. 

All Kinds of Wagons Made to Order. 

Agent for machinery of International Harvester Com- 
pany : Mowers. Rakes, Disc and Peg 
Tooth Harrows. 

Grist Mill for Manufacture of Best Quality Corn Meal. 

Opposite Baptist Church : : CARY, N. C. 

A. S. JOHNSON 

UNDERTAKER 
Garage and Automobile Repair Shop 

A full line of Caskets, Robes and General Burial Sup- 
plies. Wagons and Buggies made and repaired. 
General Repair Shop, in Wood and Iron, 
Bicycles, Guns, etc. 

Railroad Street : : • : : CARY, N. C. 



J. C. J O N E S 

Groceries, Fresh Meats, etc. — Fruits and Vegetables. 
Masonic Building, Chatham St. : CARY, N. C. 

We carry a choice line of these goods and sell as 
low as goods can be had anywhere. Give us a trial 
and be convinced. 

Yours to please, 

J. C. JONES. 



COME TO SEE US 

We are headquarters for Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, Groceries, Farm- 
ing Implements and Queensware. 

^ NICE LINE OF TABLETS AND PENCILS. 
We Sell as Cheap as the Cheapest. 

JONES-BENTON CO. 






llllllii! 



niiiiiiiiiii 



(Eanj f ahlu 

mh iff arm Kif t ^rljool 




1015 




JMHii i ii i ii i MBi i Bi i ma i i 

IfBlillfclli'wMlf^ 



CATALOGUE 



CARY PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

AND 

FARM LIFE SCHOOL 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 
1914-1915 

AND 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR 

1915-1916 



<TBADCSff K? ^COUHCIL> 



RALEIGH 

M. J. CARROLL 

PRINTING 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Charles J. Parker, Chairma, 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Secretary 

F. R. Gray 



c 



CALENDAR 1915-1916 



Fall Term opens August 30, 1915 
Fall Term closes December 17, 1915 
Spring Term opens January 3, 1916 

Spring Term closes April 21, 1916 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 



M. B. Dry, Principal. 

J. S. Howard, Principal Farm Life School. 

Miss Marion Williamson, Supervisor Elementary 

School. 
Miss Lillian Killingsworth, Lady Principal. 

high school 

M. B. Dry, A.M. (Wake Forest College, 1S96). 

Mathematics, Latin. 
Miss Lillian Killingsworth, A.B. (Erskine College, 

South Carolina). 

English, History. 
J. S. Howard, B.S. (A. & M. College). 

Agriculture, Science. 
Miss Elizabeth Pryor, B.S. (Ames College, Iowa). 

Home Economics, Science. 
Miss Bonnie Howard (Meredith College). 

Music. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Miss Marion Williamson (Randolph-Macon Insti- 
tute. 
Seventh Grade. Supervisor Elementary School. 

Miss Sally Royster (Oxford College). 

Fifth and Sixth Grades. 
Miss Estelle Yarborough (Littleton Female College). 

Third and Fourth Grades. 
Miss Irma Ellis (Normal and Industrial College). 

First and Second Grades. 
Mrs. S. S. Wood, Matron Boys' Dormitory. 
Mrs. J. A. Smith, Matron Girls' Dormitory. 




GRADUATING CLASS 



Top row from reader's left to right: C. L. Massey, 
E. C. Yates, H. B. Banks, H. W. Hargis, Jr. 

Second row from left to right: Almira Woodward, 
E. C. Brady, N. G. Woodlief, Daisy Hunter. 

Third row from left to right: Mary Dunn, Ila House, 
Rachel Ivey, Gaynelle Yates, Eunice Penny. 

Bottom row from, left to right: Terrene Holleman, 
Florrie Medlin, Cleo Holleman, Omie Prince. 



GRADUATING CLASS 1915 



1. Harry "Warren Hargis, Jr., President and Class 

Poet, Cary. 

2. Eunice Esther Penny, Secretary, Raleigh, R. 1. 

3. Ila Ethel House, Treasurer, Cary. 

4. Martha Rachel Ivey, Historian, Cary. 

5. Omie Delle Prince, Testatrix, Cary, R. 2. 

6. Mary Eleanor Dunn, Prophetess, Raleigh, R. 5. 

7. Clyde Gerard Banks, Raleigh, R. 3. 
S. Earl Cress well Brady, Garner. 

9. Cleo Yceda Holleman, Cary. 

10. Terrene Ianthe Holleman, Cary. 

11. Daisy Verta Hunter, Turkey, R. 2. 

12. Carvin Lester Massey, Cary, R. 2. 

13. Florrie Thelma Medlin, Raleigh, R. 4. 

14. Needham Gulley "Woodlief, Durham. 

15. Almira Eva Woodward, Raleigh, R. 4. 

16. Edward Carson Yates, Cary. 

17. Mary Gaynelle Yates, Cary. 

€L 

WINNERS OF MEDALS 



Scholarship Gaynelle Yates 

Deeate Z. B. Williams 

Orator C. G. Banks 

Declamation F. D. Upchurch 

Recitation Mabel Adams 

Clay Improvement IT'. B. Womble 

Calhoun Improvement C. G. Banks 

Irving Improvement..... Bessie Seymour 

Lowell Improvement Grave Holleman 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

Cary Public High School 

and Farm Life School 



FOREWORD 

Past The Cary High School is not a new 

Record enterprise, but has an honorable his- 

tory. For nearly two decades it has 
occupied a foremost place among the secondary schools 
of the State. Even before 1S96 when Prof. E. L. 
Middleton took charge, the school was doing a supe- 
rior class of work under the intelligent guidance of 
such teachers as A. H. Merritt, Rev. Solomon Pool, 
W. L. Crocker, Rev. Jesse Page and the Misses Jones. 
For twelve years, from 1S96 to 1908, 
the school was under the wise man- 
agement of Professor Middleton. Under his leadership 
the school building grew from a one or two-room 
structure to a building of sixteen rooms, and from a 
teaching force of two or three and a small boarding 
patronage to eight teachers and more than a hundred 
boarding students. 

When the General Assembly of 1907 enacted a law 
providing for a system of public high schools for the 
State, the Cary High School was converted into the 
Cary Public High School, which enjoys the distinction 
of being the first high school established under that 
law. As such, it has now been in operation for eight 
years, and has steadily grown in patronage and 
efficiency. 

A year ago the school entered upon a 
.New 

career of larger usefulness when it 

Features entered its new $30,000 building, a 

building with all the advantages and conveniences of 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 9 

the most up-to-date city school ; and began to do 
some real work in the teaching of Agriculture and 
Home Economics, the school having been made one of 
the Farm-life Schools for Wake County 

The rules of the State Superintendent 
admit free from tuition in Wake County 
Enter those who have completed the seven 

grades of the elementary school as outlined on pages 
24-26 in this catalogue. Applicants must bring cer- 
tificates from the last teacher saying the course has 
been satisfactorily completed. 

All public school teachers of whatever age are en- 
titled to free tuition. All other pupils over twenty- 
one years of age must pay tuition. Pupils who are 
unprepared to do the work of the High School are re- 
quired to pay tuition in the lower grades. (For rates 
of tuition see page 29.) 

The County Board of Education allows 

the School Committee to receive pupils 

Patronage fl . om ou t s ide Wake County. These 

pupils receive every advantage usually given in schools 

under private management. 

__ It is important to begin at the opening, 

When to ... , , ., . . „ 

just as important as it is for a farmer 

Enter t b e gi n a cr0 p 011 time. The pupil 

who starts a few weeks late is often handicapped in 
his work for the whole term. Begin at the first and 
plan for the entire school year. 

WHAT WE DO 

The moral and religious welfare of the 
students is not neglected. Most of 
Heart the teachers attend the weekly prayer 

services at the churches and teach in the Sunday 
schools of the town, and regular attendance on the. 
part of the pupils is insisted upon and expected ; yet 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 11 

no one's religious belief is questioned or interfered 
with in any way. 

The health record for the school is 
most gratifying. The school manage- 
Body ment believes in athletics both for boys 

and girls and encourages all healthful sports among 
the pupils. Baseball, track athletics, basketball, and 
tennis afford excellent opportunities for physical de- 
velopment. All boarding girls are required to take a 
daily walk. Wide open windows and plenty of fresh 
air are insisted upon at all times. No pupil who 
fails to make the pass mark on at least four of his 
studies is allowed to take part in any match game of 
ball or other form of athletics. 

" At considerable expense, we have pro- 

vided courses in Manual Training and 
Hand Farm Work for the boys and Cooking 

and Sewing for the girls, and these afford an excellent 
means of supplementing the work of the text book. 

In all our work we have three ends in 
view : to teach pupils to be observant 
Mmd of what they see, judicious in what 

they do, and logical in what they say. In addition to 
mere mental discipline, we try to use those essentials 
in education tending to culture and refinement, and 
those which will prepare young men and women for 
the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains to lay good foundations for future 
work, whether in business, high school or .college. 

WHAT WE ARE AND WHAT WE HAVE 

Location The school is only eight miles from the 

State's capital city. It is on both the 

Seaboard and Southern railways. It is on a principal 

watershed of Wake County, being high above the 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 13 

surrounding country and consequently free from local 
causes of sickness. It is in tlie educational as well 
as the . geographical center of the State, being in 
close touch with the A. and M. College, Trinity Col- 
lege, the State University, Wake Forest College, Mere- 
dith College, Peace Institute, St. Mary's, none of which 
is more than thirty miles away. Representatives of 
the faculties of these institutions as well as the State 
officials at Raleigh are frequently secured as speakers 
during the school session. The pupils also have easy 
access to the well-equipped libraries of these colleges, 
as well as to the State Library at Raleigh. 

The new main building is a model of 
Buildings itg kindi containing all tlle advantages 

and conveniences of the most modern city high school. 
There are rooms in the basement for heating plant, 
toilets, domestic science, physical and chemical labora- 
tories,, manual training, gymnasium, etc. On the first 
floor there are four large class rooms, an assembly 
room for the Elementary School, a library, principal's 
office and teachers' rest room. The second floor con- 
tains besides six recitation rooms for the High School 
and six music rooms ; a large auditorium, with study 
hall combined, and a gallery. The auditorium, study 
hall and gallery will seat about S50. The primary 
grades occupy spacious and well-lighted rooms on the 
first floor. 

The boys' dormitory will accommodate about 60 
boys. It has recently been provided with baths, 
toilets, etc. 

The girls' dormitory will accommodate 30 girls. 
Boarding places will be found in private homes for 
those who can not be provided for in the dormitories. 

Other buildings on the campus belonging to the 
school are the matron's home and a home for the 
janitor. 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 15 

On the school farm, the school has recently erected 
a model bam and a cottage for the farm hands. 

GENERAL CULTURE 

Literary The Clay and Calhoun societies for 

Societies young men, and the Irving and Lowell 

societies for girls, meet once a week 
for exercise in debate, composition and elocution. 
All members are required to take part in the exer- 
cises. The good to be derived from this work cannot 
be overestimated. It furnishes a knowledge of par- 
liamentary law and stimulates a fondness for reading. 
It gives the power of expressing in public one's 
thoughts and leads to a broader view of men and 
things. 

Library and ^ library of over seven hundred vol- 
Reading uines has been collected, to which ad- 
Room ditions are constantly being made. We 
have many volumes of biography, history, addresses, 
together with the prose and poetical works of Dickens, 
Scott, Cooper, Tennyson, Longfellow, Shakespeare, 
Hawthorne. Bacon and others. 

The reading room is supplied with magazines and 
papers, to which the pupils have access daily. 

WHAT OUR PUPILS DO 

We have two general ends in view : one to prepare 
boys and girls for college, the other to fit the great 
mass of our students for the active duties of life. 

By the elective system which we have adopted (see 
pages 17-23) pupils can choose those studies which 
bear most directly upon their life work. For those 
contemplating a profession, the Literary Course should 
be chosen ; for those who expect to lead an agricul- 
tural life, the Agricultural Course, of course, is to be 
preferred. 

All girls should take the course in Home Economics. 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 17 

RECORD OF WORK 

Examina- Written examinations are given at the 

t j ons end of each quarter. These examina- 

tions are preceded by a thorough re- 
view of the quarter's work. Written tests are also 
given every two or three weeks, and pupils who aver- 
age 90 on these are excused from the regular exami- 
nations. 

At the end of each quarter reports are 
Reports mailed to all parents in order that they 

may be kept informed regarding the scholarship, de- 
portment and attendance of their children. 

Pupils to pass from one year or grade 
Promotions ^ Q ^e nex ^ mus t average seventy-five 
per cent on their respective studies, and all examina- 
tions must be passed. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor 
Honors Roll ig posted To be entitled to a 

place on this, a pupil must make an average of 90 on 
scholarship, 90 on attendance, and 95 on deportment. 

A gold medal is given by the Principal to the pupil 
in the High School making the highest scholarship 
during the year. To compete for this, a pupil must 
be present to receive all the reports of the year, and 
must carry at least four studies each quarter. 

A medal is given for best debater, best declaimer, 
best reciter, best orator and one for most improvement 
in each of the four literary societies. 

The following colleges offer scholarships each year 
to Cary graduates of high standing: Wake Forest, 
Trinity, Davidson, Elon, Oxford. 

In the course of study, there are nine 
Graduation departments : Latin. English, Mathe- 
matics, History, .Science, Agriculture, Home Eco- 
nomics, Music. French. To receive a full diploma, a 
pupil must have completed all the above except Agri- 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 19 

i 

culture, Home Economics and Music. To receive a 

certificate of graduation he must have completed one 

of the following courses : 

LITERARY COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English 
Arithmetic 
Latin 
History 
General Science 



English 

Algebra 

Latin 

History 

Botany 

Physiology 



English 
History 
Physics 

Elect 2 : 

Algebra 

Latin 

Geometry 

Music 



English 
History 
Chemistry 

Elect 2 : . 
Latin 
Geomerty . 
French 
Music 



SECOND YEAS 



THIRD YEAR 



FOIRTII YEAR 



-fcd 



Spring Term 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
History 
General Science 



English 

Algebra 

Latin 

History 

Botany 

Physiology 



English 
History 
Physics 

Elect 2 : 

Algebra 

Latin 

Geomerty 

Music 



English 
History 
Chemistryj 

Elect 2: fl 
Latin 

^Geqme$^ .ISIS,] 
French 
Music 



Vary Public High School and Farm Life School 21 



AGRICULTURAL COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English 
Arithmetic 
General Agriculture 
Carpentry 
Botany 



Spring Term 
English 
Algebra 

General Agriculture 
Carpentry 
Botany 



SECOND YEAR 



English 

Algebra 

History 

Farm Crops 

Thysiology 

Chemistry 



English 

Algebra (Optional) 

History 

Physics 

Poultry 

Horticulture 

Farm Management 



English 

Algebra 

History 

Farm Animals 

Physiology 

Chemistry 



THIRD YEAR 



English 

Algebra (Optional) 

History 

Physics 

Poultry 

Vegetable Gardening 

Dairying 



FOURTH YEAR 



English 

Soils and Fertilizers 
Feeds and Feeding 
Farm Equipment 

Elect 1 : 

History 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Mathematics 



English 

Soils and Fertilizers 
Feeds and Feeding 
Rural Economics 



Elect 1 : 
History 
Agricultural 
Mathematics 



Chemistry 



IMS!' 




Gary Public B'ujh School and Farm Life School 23 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

FIEST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English 
Arithmetic 
Botany 
Home Economics 



English 

Algebra 

History 

Physiology 

Chemistry 

Home Economics 



English 

Algebra (Optional) 

History 

Physics 

Home Economics 



English 

Home Economics 

Elect 1 : 

History 

Mathematics 

Music 



Spring Term 

English 
Algebra 
Botany 

Home Economics 



SECOND YEAR 



THIRD YEAR 



English 

Algebra 

History 

Physiology 

Cnemistry 

Home Economics 



English 

Algebra (Optional) 

History 

Physics 

Home Economics 



FOURTH YEAR 



English 

Home Economics 

Elect 1 : 
History 
Mathematics 
Music 



Each of these courses requires the completion of 
Arithmetic. 



24 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 

COURSE OF STUDY 

(1) Primary. 

FIRST GEADE 

1. Phonics. 

2. Writing. 

3. Howell's Primer. 

4. Howell's First Reader. 

5. Graded Classics, I. 

6. Reed's Primary Speller. 

7. Language — Oral Reproduction of Stories. 

8. Number Work — Counting— Reading and Writing 

Numbers. 

9. Progressive Drawing, I. 

10. Handwork — Paper Cutting, etc. 

11. Hiawatha Primer (Holbrook). 

12. Language Reader, I (Baker-Carpenter). 

13. Grimm's Fairy Stories (Claxton). 

SECOND YEAR 

1. Graded Classics, II. 

2. Robinson Crusoe (McMurray). 

3. Fifty Famous Stories Retold (Baldwin). 

4. Reed's Primary Speller. 

5. Number Work — Simple Addition and Subtraction. 

6. Language — Oral and Written Reproductions. 

7. Progressive Drawing, I. 

S. Berry's Writing Books, I. 

9. Language Reader, II (Baker-Carpenter). 

THIRD GRADE 

1. Graded Classics, III. 
2 Reed's Primary Speller. 

3. Story of Ulysses (Cook). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

5. Language Work — With Pencil and Pen (Arnold). 

6. Phvsiologv — Oral Instruction. 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 25 

7. Geography — Home Geography and Oral Instruc- 
tion. 
S. Progressive Drawing, II. 
9. Berry's Writing Books, II. 
10. Language Reader, III (Baker-Carpenter)- 

(2) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE 

1. Language Reader, IV (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Progressive Arithmetic, I (Milne). 

4. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

5. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Drawing. III. 

7. Berry's Writing Books, III. 

8. Primer of Hygiene (Caldwell-Ritchie). 

0. Heart of Oak Books, IV. 

10. Bible Stories of Old Testament (Moulton). 

11. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

FIFTH YEAR 

1. Language Reader, V (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Primary History of United States (White). 

3. Reed's Word Lessons. 

4. Primary Geography (Dodge). 

5. Language Lessons, I (Hyde). 

C. Progressive Arithmetic. II (Milne). 
7. Progressive Drawing. IV. 
S. Berry's Writing Books, IV. 

9. Primer of Hygiene (Ritchie-Caldwell). 

10. Heart of Oak Books, V. 

11. Makers of North Carolina History (Connor). 

12. Song of Hiawatha. 

13. Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 



26 Corn PubUc High School and Farm Life School 

SIXTH GRADE 

1. Language Reader, VI (Baker-Carpenter). 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

3. Essential Studies in English. II (Bobbins & Row). 

4. Young People's History of North Carolina (Hill). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

6. Progressive Arithmetic, II (Milne). 

7. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

S. Writing— Berry's Writing Books, V and VI. 
9. Progressive Drawing, V. 

10. Elements of Agriculture (Stephens, Burkett and 

Hill ) . 

11. Hawthorne's Great Stone Face. 

12. Brown's In the Days of the Giants. 

13. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

1. Reed's Word Lessons. 

2. Essential Studies in English, II (Robbins & Row). 

3. Our Republic (Riley & Chandler). 

4. Progressive Arithmetic, III (Milne). 

5. Comparative Geography (Dodge). 

6. Primer of Sanitation (Ritchie). 

7. Berry's Writing Books, VII and VIII. 
S. Progressive Drawing, VI. 

9. Civil Government (Peele). 

10. Story of Cotton (Brooks). 

11. Irving's Rip Van Winkle. 

12. Stories from English History (Warren). 

13. Selections from the Riverside Literature Series. 

(3) High School, 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English — Writing. Spelling (Branson), English Com- 
position (Sykes), Grammar, Part I (Buehler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and as 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 27 

parallel Arabian Nights, Franklin's Autobiography, 
and Evangeline. 

Mathematics — Progressive Airtlmietic, III (Milne) 
completed ; Algebra — Algebra for Secondary Schools 
(Wells). 

History — Ancient World (West). 

Latin — First Year Latin (Bennett) ; Exercises in 
Composition. 

Science — General Science (Snyder). 

Agriculture — Elements of Agriculture (Warren) 

Domestic Science — Foods and Household Manage- 
ment (Kinne and Cooley; Shelter and Clothing (Kinne 
and Cooley). 

SOPHOMOEE YEAR 

English — Spelling (Payne) ; English Composition 
(Sykes) ; Grammar, Part II (Buehler) ; Reading on 
Class Snowbound, Merchant of Venice and Poe's 
Poems', and as parallel Last of the Mohicans, Lady of 
the Lake, and Courtship of Miles Stand ish. 

Mathematics — Algebra for Secondary Schools to 
Theory of Exponents (Wells). 

History — Modern History (West). 

Latin — Grammar Completed (Bennett) ; Ctfsar, 
Book I (Bennett) ; New Latin Composition, Part I 
(Bennett) . 

Science — Botany (Bailey) ; Physiology (Ritchie). 

Agriculture — Field Crops (Wilson and Worbnrton) ; 
Farm Animals (Hunt and Burnett). 

Domestic Science — 

JUNIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book (Sandwick and 
Bacon) ; Composition and Rhetoric (Lockwood and 
Emerson) ; Reading on Class Julius Cwsar, First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and Washington's Farewell Ad- 



2S Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 

dress, and as parallel Ancient Mariner, Silas Marner 
and Tale of Tivo Cities. 

Mathematics — Algebra completed (Wells), Plane 
Geometry (Wells). 

History — English History (Walker). 

Latin — Csesar, Books 11 and IV (Bennett) ; Cicero's 
Orations against Catiline (Bennett) ; New Latin Com- 
position (Bennett) ; Sight Reader (Howe). 

Science — First Course in Physics (Millikan & Gale). 

Agriculture — Text to he selected. 

Home Economics. 

SENIOR YEAR 

English — High School Word Book completed (Sand- 
wick and Bacon) ; Handbook of Composition (Wool- 
ley) ; English Literature (Halleck) ; Reading on Class 
Sir Roger de C overly, Macbeth, Life of Johnson, Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems, and as parallel Ivanhoe, Vicar 
of Wakefield, Pilgrim's Progress. 

Mathematics — Solid Geometry (Wells). 

History — High School History of United States 
(Adams and Trent) ; Government in the U. S. 
(Garner). 

Latin — Virgil's JEncid, six books (Bennett) ; New 
Latin Composition, Part III (Bennett) ; Sight Reader 
(Howe). 

French — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). 

Science — Chemistry of Common Things (Brownlee 
and Others). 

Agriculture- 
Home Economics — 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 29 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Music Music is a fine accomplishment for 

girls, adding charm to the home-life 
and turning many a dull hour into one of real enjoy- 
ment. It is equally as fine an accomplishment for a 
boy, and in a home where there are only boys it 
ought by no means to be neglected. All parents who 
can afford it should give their children the opportunity 
of taking it. 

EXPENSES 

Per Term 

Primary Grades $ S.00 

Grammar Grades 12/)0 

Freshman and Sophomore years 16.00 

Junior and Senior years 1S.00 

Music — half-hour lessons alternate days 12.00 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily 2.25 

Use of piano for practice, two hours daily 4.50 

Board and Room Boys' Dormitory, per month.... 11.00 
Board and Room Girl's Dormitory, per month.... 11.00 
Board and Room Private Family, per month 12.00 

TERMS 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance. No deduc- 
tion is made for absence except in cases of protracted 
illness of one week or more. 

The school is not a private enterprise. All accounts 
must be settled in full on or before January 1st and 
June 1st. 

No pupil whose bills for the previous session have 
not been paid will be allowed to take music until satis- 
factory arrangements have been made with the School 
Board. 

Ministerial students, properly endorsed by their 
churches, will receive free tuition. 



30 Corn Public High School and Farm Life School 

BOARD 

Boys' The dormitories are furnished with 

Dormitory bedstead, mattress and springs, chairs, 
table, lamp, etc. All boys rooming in 
dormitory must furnish sheets, towels, bedding, pillow 
and toilet articles, such as comb and brush, soap, 
matches, etc. The school furnishes fuel and lights. 
The cost of board with room from Monday to Friday 
is $7.50. 

Rooms are rented only to those who take their 
meals at the matron's home. 

One of the teachers has a room in the dormitory and 
keeps order at night. 

After eighteen years' experience with boarding 
pupils, it is our honest conviction that there is no 
better place for a boy outside of his own home than 
a well-regulated dormitory. 

This home for girls is presided over by 
Browning Mrg j A gmith) who for sev eral years 
Hall i ias successfully managed boarding 

houses for schools. The building is neatly and com- 
fortably furnished.The girls furnish sheets, towels, 
bedding, pillow and necessary toilet articles, such as 
soap, matches, comb and brush, etc. 

Board from Monday to Friday is $7.50 per month, 
or from Sunday evening to Friday, $S.OO. These 
rates include room, fuel, lights, etc. 

All parents may rest assured that their daughters' 
every interest will be carefully looked after. One of 
the lady assistants rooms in the dormitory and keeps 
order. 

When the dormitories are filled, satis- 

factory ararngements can be made for 

Families board with private families. Boys and 

girls must have diffei'ent boarding places. Each pupil 



Canj Public High School and Farm Life School 31 

will be required to furnish a pair of blankets or two 
quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow eases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday 
of each week at $S.50 a month. The Principal will 
arange board when notified by parents. 

Board is payable at end of each month of four 
weeks with no deduction for less than nine successive 
meals. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Let parents see to it that their children are present 
on the opening day. Classes are formed then and 
pupils entering late must join classes already formed. 
Late entrance is the cause of many failures. 

Parents should always write to the Principal when 
any complaint is made. 

All boarding pupils, before leaving Gary, must get 
permission from the Principal. Permission will not 
be given to boarding girls to leave Cary, except for 
their homes, unless by written request from their 
parents to the Principal. 

Pupils are encouraged by precept and by example 
to save their money. Parents who find their children 
spending more money than is necessary should notify 
the Principal. 

Parents who desire it may send all money for board, 
room rent, tuition and books to the Principal. He 
will not be a repository for spending money, however. 

For further information, address 

M. B. DRY, Principal, 

Cary, N. C. 



32 Gary PubUc High School and Farm Life School 

RULES 

No school can make all needed rules at one time. 
We add below a few general rules for boarding 
students. 

After time for study hour, all students must go to 
their rooms and remain there in study until time for 
retiring, except for public worship and other approved 
public meetings. 

No pupil must leave Cary without permission from 
the Principal or his representative. Girls and boys 
under eighteen years must get written permission 
from parents for any such absence, except to their 
homes. 

There must be no boisterous conduct or amusement 
sufficient to disturb any one in boarding houses. 

No form of immorality, such as drinking, cursing, 
playing cards, etc., will be tolerated. The first offense 
may be sufficient grounds for expulsion. 

No form of hazing is allowed. 

Boys must not loaf on streets, in stores or at rail- 
road depots. 

Girls must keep off streets, except for necessary 
exercise, and then in approved places and under 
proper chaperonage. 

Pupils in the dormitories will be held responsible 
for all damage to school property in their rooms. 

There must be no unnecessary communication be- 
tween boarding girls and the boys of the school or 
village. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

The school is now offering four years in Science — 
a year in General Science, a year in Botany, a year 
each in Physics and Chemistry, and four years each 
in Agriculture and Domestic Science. 



Canj Public High School and Farm Life School 33 

The school owns about $S00 worth of apparatus for 
teaching Science, Agriculture and Domestic Science. 

Last session 131 high-school pupils were enrolled. 
There were S2 boarders from sixteen counties in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. The graduating 
class numbered seventeen. Nearly all of these will 
enter college this fall. 

Every pupil in school, of whatever grade, is re- 
quired to take spelling, and every pupil in the high 
school must join one of the four classes in Current 
Events. 

Following are some of the advantages Gary High 
School is now able to offer : one of the most sub- 
stantial high school buildings in the State ; sewerage 
and water in the building ; bored well on the campus ; 
spacious class rooms lighted on one side and provided 
with cabinets built into the walls ; well-lighted and 
ventilated study hall seated with tablet-arm chairs 
and provided with individual lockers for books, tab- 
lets, etc. ; an auditorium that will seat eight hundred 
or more, with a gallery and a splendid stage ; gym- 
nasium, society halls, laboratories, etc. ; a boys' dormi- 
tory accommodating sixty boys, with water and baths ; 
a girls' dormitory to accommodate thirty or more. 
- The school is widely known and extensively pat- 
ronized. The last report of the State Inspector of 
High Schools shows that Cary enrolled more high 
school pupils than any other one of the more than 
two hundred State High Schools now in operation. 

The Farm Life School which was established last 
fall as a department of the High School is now well 
organized, and, in usefulness and efficiency, has al- 
ready surpassed the expectations of its promoters. 
There were over 30 girls enrolled in the classes in 
Cooking and Sewing and over 20 boys in the Shop 
Work and Agriculture. 



34 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 

A unique feature of the last commencement was the 
fact that the young ladies of the graduating class 
made their own commencement dresses, in the Home 
Economics Department and at a cost of only 95 cents. 

The school has standing with the colleges, its grad- 
uates being admitted on certificate. In one college 
alone, a few years ago, there were enrolld 22 Cary 
High School graduates. Three years ago in the grad- 
uating class of one of the leading colleges of the State 
seven of the class were former pupils of Cary High 
School, most of whom graduated "with honor" and one 
or two "with great honor." 

Cary is an ideal place for a boarding school. It 
has most of the conveniences of larger towns and yet 
it is free from many of the evils incident to town and 
city life. The people are sober, honest, law-abiding, 
church-going. They are thoroughly devoted to the 
school and have sacrificed for it in many ways. 

The Cary High School is putting itself in line with 
the best educational thought in the country today, 
namely, that of ministering to the needs of the people. 
North Carolina will doubtless remain an agricultural 
State. It is imperative, therefore, that agriculture be 
taught in the most approved and systematic way. To 
this end no pains or expense have been spared in 
equipping the school to teach the subjects of Agricul- 
ture and Domestic Science in a really effective way. 
The result is that these subjects are taught here by 
specially trained teachers and under the most favor- 
able conditions — one of these conditions being the 
school's proximity to the A. and M. College, which 
stands ever ready to lend a helping hand in promot- 
ing agricultural education among the people. 



Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 35 



STUDENTS 1914-1915 



HIGH SCHOOL 



Adarus, Herman 
Adams, J. Q. 
Adams, Mabel 
Atkins, T. W. 
Atkins, M. C. 
Austin, U. E. 

Bagwell, Texie 
Bailey, D. T. 
Bailev, J. T. 
Banks, C. G. 
Banks. K. M. 
Barbee, Alma 
Barbee, Lyda i 
Benton, Burtis 
Benton, Whitson 
Bobbitt, S. L. 
Brady, E. C. 
Breeze, Sallie 
Buchanan, Esther 

Carpenter, O. L. 
Clements. R. D. 
Coley, Alice 
Cooper, Elaine 
Cooper, Evelyn 

Dunn, Mary 

Eatman, Clive 
Eatman, Mary 
Edwaras, Otho 
Ewing, Ruth 

Fields, F. O. 
Freeman, W. M. 
Funderburk, W. B. 

Garner, J. P. 
Garner, Ruby 
Gordon, John 
Greene, Estelle 



Hall, Annie 
Hargis, H. W* Jr. 
Hargis, Richard 
Heater, Ernest 
Heater, Fannie 
Heater, Retha 
Holleman, Cleo 
Holleman, Grace 
Holleman, Terrene 
House, Alpha 
House, Ha 
Howie, H. S. 
Hunter, Daisy 

Ivey, Hannah 
Ivey, Rachel 

Jacobs, M. L. 
Jewell, Thelina 
Johnson, Joe 
Jones, H. M. 
Jones, J. T. 
Jones. Lenora 
Jordan, Lily 

Kelley, C. D. 
Knight, Rachel 
Knott, L. E. 
Little, Bryce 

Marconi, F. D. 
Massey, C. L. 
Matthews, J. L. 
Maynard, Albertine 
Maynard, J. T. 
Medlin, Florrie 
Moore, W. J. 
Morrison, E. P. 
Myatt, J. H. 

Nichols, L. S. ' 
Nichols, Lukie 
Norwood, J. T. 



36 Gary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Parker, Charles 
Parker, J. W. 
Penny, Eunice 
Penny, R. J. 
Phelps, R. P. 
Prince, Florence 
Prince, Omie 

Reams, Gertrude 
Rhodes, H. M, 
Riggsbee. Jeppie 
Russell, F. B. 

Sauls, W. P. 
Sears, Roselle 
Senter, H. C. 
Senter, M. E. 
Senter. O. R. 
Seymour, Bessie 
Seymour, Hubert 
Stoudt, Frederick 
Stedman, George 
Stephens, Ernest 
Stephens, H. J. 
Stephens, R. O. 
Stephenson, Katie 
Stephenson, N. J. 
Stone, Ralph 
Strayhorn, Margaret 
Strother, Frank 

Templeton, Elva 



Thomas, H. B. 
Thompson, Ira 
Towe, W. T. 
Turner, W. I). 

Upchurch, Alice 
Upchurch, F. D. 
Upchurch, J. L. 
Upchurch, T. B. 
Upchurch, W. D. 
Upchurch, W. G. 

Waldo, Evelyn 
Waldo, Lavine 
Wilkinson, Fred 
Williams, J. F. 
Williams, Z. B. 
Womble, David 
Womble, W. B. 
Wood, Elizabeth 
Woodlief. N. G. 
Woodward, Almira 

Yarborough, Ada 
Yarborough, Elsie 
Yates, Annie Lee 
Yates, Cuma 
Yates, E. C. 
Yates, Gaynelle 
Yates, Ila 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



Adams, 


Eckie 


Baker, Josephine 


Adams, 


Henry 


Baker, Pearl 


Adams, 


Lena 


Baker, Thelma 


Adams, 


Montrose 


Bashaw, Alexander 


Arnold, 


Martha 


Bashaw, Clarence 


Arnold, 


Rebecca 


Bashaw, Madeline 


Atkins, 


Catherine 


Baucom, Rudolph 


Atkins, 


.Elsie 


Blake, Coy 


Atkins, 


Fred 


Blake, Reuben 


Atkins, 


Robert 


Blake, Sarah 



Canj Public High School and Farm Life School 37 



Bledsoe, Dora 
Bledsoe, Frank 
Bragassa, Ralph 
Branton, Mary 
Branton, Ralph 
Branton, Raymond 
Branton, Worth 
Breeze, Robert 
Breeze. Ruth 
Bridges, Alda 

Chappell, Albert 
Chappell, Joseph 
Chappell. Laura 
Cooper, George 
Cooper, Lovie 
Cooper, Susie 
Crane, Marshall 
Crocker, Maude 

Davis, Grace 
Davis, Henry 
Davis, Jack 
Davis, Joe 
Dry, Helen 
Dry, Willie 

Batman, Mary 
Ellington, Laverne 
Ellington, Royce 

Foushee, Clarence 
Foushee, Ina 
Foushee, Schlesinger 
Foushee, Vera 
Franklin, Clyde 

Gordon, Eleanor 
Gray, Eugenia 
Gray, alary Alice 
Gray, Pat Dowd 
Gulley, Fnrman 

Hall, Bonner 
Hamilton, Clarence 



Hamilton, Loula 
Hamilton, Richard Lee 
Hamilton. Turner 
Hargis, Tom 
Harris, John 
Heater. Langdon 
Heater, Opel 
Hill/Abner 
Hill. Hazel 
Holleman, Brogden 
Holleman, Dare 
Holleman, Elaine 
Holleman, Immogene 
Holleman, Norman 
House, Herbert 
Hunt, Reva 
Hunter, Alsey 
Hunter, Mary Rodwell 

Jernigan, McKinley 
Johnson, Abbie, Jr. 
Johnson, Dora 
Johnson, Ha 
Johnson, Marvin 
Johnson, Mary 
Jones, Charlotte 
Jones, Douglas 
Jones, Edwin 
Jones. Elizabeth 
Jones, James 
Jones. Johnny 
Jones. Katie 
Jones, Sudie 
Jones, Thos. Edwin 
Jones, Tyree 
Jordan, Lula Helen 
Jordan, Raymond 

Lowe, Ernest 
Lowe. Esther 
Lowe, Ethel 
Lowe, Jessie 
Luther. Alsey 
Luther, Anna May 
Luther, Oscar 



38 Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 



Mann, Dura 
Mann, Fannie 
Matthews, Alene 
Matthews, Clarence 
Matthews, Cleo 
Matthews, Lee 
Matthews, Sam 
Maynard, Luther 
Meacham, Bertha Lee 
Meaeham, Fleva 
Meacham, Herman 
Mitchell, Naland 
Morgan, Andrew 
Morgan, Hattie Mae 
Morgan, Lynda 
Morgan, Marie 
Morgan, Mary 
Morgan, Raymond 
Morgan, William 

O'Daniel, Mamie 
Olive, Bessie 
Olive, Bunny 
Olive, Lottie 

Parish, Bessie 
Parish, Louise 
Parker, Henry 
Parker, Hubert 
Parker, James 
Parker, William 
Pendergraft, Bessie 
Pendergraft, Claud 
Pendergraft, Hersie 
Pendergraft. Leonard 
Pendergraft, Levy 
Pendergraft, Pearl 
Perry, Donnie 
Perry, Earl 
Pipkin, Claud 
Pipkin, Gladys 
Pipkin, Rosa 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, David 
Pleasants, Pat 



Pleasants, Rachel 
Pleasants, Rosa 
Prince, Lonnie 
Prince, Pearl 
Puckett, William 

Reavis, Myrtle 
Richardson, Elmer 
Richardson, French 
Richadson, Norwood 
Robinson, Frances 
Robinson, Marvin 
Robinson, Nellie 
Rogers, Pansy 

Smith, Annie 
Smith, Erdine 
Smith, Everett 
Smith, Pauline 
Stedman, Ben 
Stedman, Maurice 
Stedman, Robert 
Strayhorn, Susie Mae 
Strother, Dawson 
Sbrother, Helen 

Taylor, Evelyn 
Thompson, Battle 

Upchurch, Frederick 
Upchurch, Norman 

Waldo, Ghita 
Waldo, Nannie 
Waldo, Owen 
Waldo, Robert 
Wilkinson, Anne 
Williams, McKinley 
Williams, Worth 
Womack, Laura 
Womble, Arthur 
Womble, Mary 
Womble, Tom 
Wood, Dorothy 
Wood. Lovie 



Cary Public High School and Farm Life School 39 



Yarbo rough, Glenn 
Yates, Lottie 



Yates, Luna 
Young, Herbert 



Total Enrollment 319 




W. H. ATKINS 

BLACKSMITH AND GENERAL REPAIRS 
FANCY GROCERIES 

All Kinds of Wagons Made to Order 
Agent for Machinery of International Harvester Com- 
pany : Mowers, Rakes, Disc and Peg 
Tooth Harrows. 
Grist Mill for Manufacture of Best Quality Corn Meal. 
Opposite Baptist Chitrch : : CARY, N. C. 

THE BANK OF GARY, GARY, N. C. 

WHILE IN CARY, DEPOSIT YOUR MONEY IN 

THE BANK OF CARY 

Burglary and Fire Insurance and 

Conservatism Protect Our Patrons 

POUR PER CENT PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 

INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY. 



Clothiers and Men's Furnishings 




Make our store your headquarters when in the city. 



HAYES 9 PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO 
High Grade Portraiture 

VIEW AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

Kodak Finishing. Supplies, Bromide Enlargements, 
Copying. 

113 1-2 Fayetteville Street : RALEIGH, N. C. 



C.R.SCOTT & SON 

CARY, N. C. 
Tlie Only Exclusive Dry Goods, 

Notions, Millinery and Shoe 
Store in Town. 

We carry a nice Hue of Ladies' and Children's 
Wraps. Matting. Rugs, Trunks and Suit Cases. 

In our Shoe Department you will find the well- 
known Crossett for men, and Selby's Fine Shoes for 
ladies. 

Give us a chance and let us prove to you that we 
can save you money. 

Make our store your headquarters while in town. 
SCHOOL BOOKS, TABLETS AND PENCILS. 

G. S.TUCKER & CO. 

FURNITURE 

DEALERS. 

A Complete Stock of Furniture and 

House Furnishings 

PRICES WITHIN REACH OF ALL 

Come and look over our stock and see if there isn't 

something that will add comfort as well 

as looks to your home. 

G. S. TUCKER & CO., Raleigh, N. C. 

114-116 EAST HARGETT STREET 



CHARLES B. PASMORE 

WITH 

BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

21G Fayetteville Street, 218 Salisbury Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
The largest and best selected stock of Dry Goods, 
Notions, Carpets, Millinery, Tailor-Made Suits, Cloaks, 
Curtains, etc., shown in the city of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our new store when 
in our city. 

Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 
Mail Orders Filled Same Day Received. 

BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Headquarters in, North Carolina for All Kinds 

of 

BOOKS 

We carry a stock of second-hand books at one-half 
the regular price. 

We sell new books at publishers' prices 
Mail orders given prompt attention. 
Give us your order. 
Agents for Public School Books in North Carolina. 
Write for price list of 50 cent fiction. 

Our $1 Fountain Pens 

AGENTS FOR EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 



WALDO DRUG CO. 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, PATENT MEDICINES AND 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES; PERFUMERY, ALL 

POPULAR ODORS; TOILET AND FANCY 

ARTICLES, COMBS, BRUSHES, ETC. 



TABLETS AND STATIONERY 
OF ALL KINDS 



Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 
Day or Night. 

A LADIES' STORE OF 

Ready-to-Wear Garments 

NOVELTIES AND DRY GOODS 



AGENTS FOR THE 'GOSSARD" AND "C. B." 
CORSETS. 



Let our corsetier give you a comfortable fitting. 

THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

131 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 
(Next to New Masonic Temple.) 



OXFORD COLLEGE 

FOUNDED IN 1850 

Courses in Literature, Music, Art, Home Economics, 
(Domestic Science and Domestic Art) Business, 
Pedagogy and Expression. 

Ten standard units required for admission to the 
Freshman Class. 

Two Literary Degrees conferred, Bachelor of Science 
and Bachelor of Arts. 

Diplomas and Certificates awarded in special courses. 

Two Preparatory courses offered. 

Specialists in all Departments. 

Charges moderate. 

APPLY FOR CATALOGUE 

F. P. HOBGOOD : : : President 

Mrs. Frank Redford 

EXCLUSIVE 
MILLINERY 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



10 Per Cent Discount to Cary High 
School Students 



"The Place Where Quality Counts" 



J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY 
GROCERS 

No. 9 East Martin Street 

EVERYTHING IN 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Phone SS Raleigh, N. C. 



TEMPLETON & TEMPLETON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
CARY, N. C. 



DR. R. W. STEPHENS 

DENTIST 
APEX, NORTH CAROLINA 



DR. J. C. MANN 

EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Office over Merchants and Farmers Bank with R. W. 

Johnson, M.D. Hours 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. 

rhone connections. Students of Gary 

High School Eyes Examined Free. 

APEX, N. C. 



JOLLY & WYNNE 
JEWELRY CO. 

EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS 
IN 

JEWELRY 

CUT GLASS 

SILVERWARE 



We are agents for Howard and all other American 
and Fine Imported Watches. 



12S Fayetteville Street : : : RALEIGH, N. C. 

HUNTER -RAND COMPANY 

THE GROWING STORE 



Dry Goods, Notions, 

Shoes, Coat Suits, Rain Coats, 

Coats and Millinery 



LATES STYLES LOWEST PRICES 



Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES. 



JONES-BENTON COMPANY 

GARY, N. C. 

Here is where you find the highest quality at the 

lowest prices. 

Our line includes Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, 

Hats, Furnishing Goods and Farming Implements. 

See our line of the famous 

"SELZ ROYAL BLUE SHOES" 

F. R. GRAY & BROTHER 

Dry Goods, Hardware, Heavy and 

Fancy Groceries 

CARY, N. C. 
Tablets, Pencils and All Kinds of Stationery. 
COLD DRINKS AT OUR SODA FOUNTAIN. 



"IT'S WORTH THE DIFFERENCE" 

The TYREE Studio 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



WHILE IN RALEIGH CALL ON 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
The Shoe Fitter 

Hose for Ladies and Gentlemen who care. 

Traveling Bags and Suit Cases. 

120 Fayetteville Street : : RALEIGH, N. C. 



CROSS & LINEHAN COMPANY 

234-236 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

(Tucker Building) 

Clothing, Men's Furnishings and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see 

us during your visit to our city. We will 

endeavor to make your stay pleasant. 

A. S. JOHNSON 

Cary, North Carolina 

GARAGE 

Repairs of All Kinds Storage 




ALUMNIUM, CAST IRON AND STEEL WELDING 
AND VULCANIZING A SPECIALTY 

All kinds of new and second hand gas and 
gasoline engines sold and repaired. : : : 

A.S.JOHNSON - - - Cary, N. C. 



"WHERE YOUR DOLLARS COUNT MOST" 



RALEIGH DEPARTMENT STORE 

126 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Good eye sight is nature's greatest gift to mankind. 

Do not allow it to become impaired, either 

through misuse or neglect. 

Go to Dr. A. G. Spingler, the Eye Sight Specialist 

and have your eyes examined. : : : : : : 

SPINGLER OPTICAL CO. 

132 Fayetteville St., (Up Stairs) RALEIGH, N. C. 



DR. P. L. PEARSON 

DENTAL SURGEON 

Office over Merchants and Farmers Bank 
APEX, N. C. 



DR. CHAS. HUTCHISON 

DENTIST 

CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Over Drug Store 



C. R. HEATER 

CONTRACTOR FOR ARTESIAN WELLS 




BOX 41, CARY, N. C. 



C. R. BOONE, DE LUXE CLOTHIER 




for Men 

and Bogs 

Tailoring 

Furnishings 



Opposite the Old Market All Phones 28 

226 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Lowest prices and everything guaranteed. 

"COME AND SEE" Is All We Ask. 

Your railroad fare paid for when you buy your suit 

from us. 

Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 



Majestic Ranges 

Builders' Supplies 

Farmers' Supplies 



BEST GOODS LOWEST PRICES 

SQUARE DEALING 



THE SOUTHERN SCHOOL SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



We have in stock in Raleigh and Norfolk, 
Va. : School Desks, Teachers' Desks, Maps, 
Globes, Crayon, Erasers, and General Supplies. 

Our Croat an Sanitary Floor Dressing is the 
best ever offered, and at a reasonable price. 

We are furnishing practically all of the 
up-to-date buildings in the State. 



WRITE FOR SPECIAL CIRCULAR MATTER AND 
PRICES ON ANYTHING YOU MAY NEED. 



Ready -Made Garments 

THE BEST STYLES 
LOWEST PRICES 




The largest store in the State carrying exclusively 

Garments and Furnishings for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Gowns for social 

functions a specialty. 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. : : RALEIGH, N. C. 



Base-Ball and Tennis Goods 

SCISSORS AND RAZORS 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

The Best Quality 
at Lowest Prices 

Watkins - Seymour Company 
APEX, : : NORTH CAROLINA 

...For... 

Discriminating Ladies 

THE BON MARCHE 

: 113 Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 

"The Place of Revelation iff 
Ready-Made Attire" 

CLEAN, NEW STOCK 



Gattis & Ward 

Shoes and Hosiery 

In Men's Fine Dress Shoes we carry 
Steadfast, Biltrite, and other 
splendid lines that are ex- 
celled by none. 

For Women we have the celebrated 
LaFrance line that is unsurpassed for 
beauty, style and durability. 

For children we carry the very best 
that skilled labor can produce. 

We carry the strongest and dryest 
line of Men's Work Shoes made in 
America. 

TRY A PAIR AND BE CONVINCED 

Gattis & Ward 

15 East Martin Street : Raleigh, N. C. 
Opposite Commercial National Bank 




.. ... , , 

:•v•■^V..7v■.';■.;;^.>.^.^• T " , 

:',■■■'" 

. ■■■- -■ : '--/-ir-^ f r^f 
.,-, : .- ■■■■.■■■ ..V:^.-.-'^^M 




■ ;..■ : ■'.■•-' 
; " "■ : - ,; .v-;'.:-'.---'.'i>^-,r ; .; i ,.fl5 ; ,-r 

■•'■/•■■'■■. 



....SPiK 



... : , ; : 






■,'.-.