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Full text of "Catalogue of Cary High School [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C379.5 
C33 

1900/01 
1902/03 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofc1 90001 1 90203 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 




Catalogue of 1900-1901 
Announcements for 1901-1902 





Rev. A. D. HUNTER 



F. R. GRAY 




B. S. FRANKLIN 





E. L. MIDDLETON 



Dr. J. M. TEMPLETON 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CATALOGUE 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL 



CARY, NORTH CAROLINA 



CALENDAR J90J4902 

Fall Term opens August 6, 1901. 
Fall Term closes December 20, 1901. 
SpriDg Term opens December 30, 1901. 
Spring Term closes May 16, 1902. 




RALEIGH, N. C. 

Edwards & Broughton, Printers and Binders 

1 9 o 1 



INSTRUCTORS 



A. F. SAMS, A.B., Principal, 

(Wake Forest College, 1897), 
Latin, Science, Mathematics. 

J. R. CONLEY, Ph.B., 

'(University of North Carolina, 1901), 
English, History, Stenography and Typewriting. 

Miss LILY N. JONES, 

(Greensboro Female College, 1892), 
Primary, French, Penmanship. 

Miss LULA F. TISDALE, 

( Peace Institute and Southern Conservatory of Music), 
Music, Elocution and Voice Culture. 



; 



O r? ""' 



■ 



MANAGEMENT. 



Since the present school building was erected by the 
late A. F. Page, Gary has]ever striven to^ have a good 
school, but at no time in her history have the citizens 
been more loyal to her educational interest than during 
the last five years. 

The School is under the control of the best citizens of 
Cary. They showed their interest by investing enough 
money to buy^the property and equip the building. Any 
lack of success will be failure, not only to the instruc- 
tors but to stockholders and directors as well. We feel 
that with such concert of action our school will be emi- 
nently successful. 

BO0RD OF DIRECTORS. 

E. L. Middleton, Chairman. 
Rev. A. D. Hunter, Secretary. 
B. S. Frankly. F. R. Gray. Dr. J. M. Templeton. 

STOCKHOLDERS. 

0. W. Blanchard. Mrs. J. K. Mason. 

J. C. Angier. P. D. Gray. 

J. E. White. B. S. Franklin. 

A. D. Hunter. T. Ivey. 

J. W. Bailey. J. W. C&eel. 

J. R. Walker. Z. V. Johnson. 

C. W. Scott. C. B. Pasmore. 

F. R. Gray. R. R. Yates. 

W. D. Jones. Levi Cole. 

C. R. Scott. Dr. J. M. Templeton. 

Miss Sallie Bonner. E. L. Middleton. 
A. F. Sams. 



s 






To the Patrons and Friends of Cary High School: 

I take this means of thanking you for the liberal pat- 
ronage which you gave us during the four and a half 
years I was Priucipal of the school; also for your many 
expressions of satisfaction and appreciation. I write 
now to urge you to continue your support of the school 
under its present management. It is worthy of your 
patronage. I knew Professor Sams intimately as my 
associate for one year in Cary. He profited by extended 
experience as Principal of Marsh ville Academy. He is 
a strong man — competent, painstaking, earnest and en- 
thusiastic in his work. The school was never more suc- 
cessful than during the last term under his manage- 
ment. He has a strong corps of assistants. As Chair- 
man of the Board of Directors, I shall do all I can for the 
best interests of the school. 

E. L. MlDDLETON. 



flnnual Announcement and Greeting. 



Another year's work is finished, another era marked 
in the progress of Cary High School. During the last 
year we enrolled two hundred and forty-eight pupils, 
representing seventeen counties in North Carolina, and 
one in South Carolina. We take this opportunity of 
thanking our patrons, one and all, for their liberal pat- 
ronage, kind words, and expressions of satisfaction with 
our work. The people of our town and community have 
contributed in no small measure towards making the 
School what it is. Others, in adjoining counties and 
beyond, have hoard of the excellent work we are doing, 
and as a result of this seventy-seven of the pupils en- 
rolled last year were boarders. The usefulness of this 
institution is only begun, its resources are barely open- 
ing. To students and fellow-teachers we wish to extend 
hearty thanks for their excellent deportment, kind and 
respectful bearing, and faithful work. We wish for 
them all possible success and confidently hope that they 
may be staunch supporters of the School in their several 
communities. Progress along all lines, constant and 
permanent growth, are the very watchwords of this in- 
stitution. As teachers and pupils and friends of the 
School we look longingly and with great expectation to 
the opening of the next term. From a history of uni- 
form growth and permanent progress, we look to a 
future radiant with hope and rich in promises. 

Principal. 



Gary High School. 



PATRONS flND PUPILS. 

Many parents and a very large part of their chijdren 
do not realize the great responsibility they put upon 
school principals arid teachers when boys and girls are 
sent from home to attend a boarding school. There is 
no greater crisis in anyone's life, and we try to impress 
this fact upon all pupils on entering school. We appre- 
ciate the patronage given us, but we wish to be plain 
with all patrons for the future. These are the pupils 
we want: 

(1) Boys who realize that mental force is superior to 
physical force. Boys of good habits who want an edu- 
cation and are willing to work for it. Boys who see the 
great possibilities lying before men of the rising genera- 
tion. 

(2) Girls who realize the true nobility of womanhood. 
Girls who are willing to live in woman's sphere and 
work faithfully to prepare themselves for the noble call- 
ings now open to women. Girls who prefer well- stored 
brains and countenances beaming with intelligence to 
servile obedience to the whims of fashion. 

Here are some we do not w r ant : 

(1) Boys who do not want an education. Boys who 
curse, swear, play cards and use intoxicants in any way 
or degree. Boys who are boisterous and indifferent to 
the rights of fellow-students, teachers and landlords. 
Boys who are habitual grumblers and malcontents. 
Boys who wilfully disobey necessary rules. 

(2) Girls who are unwilling to work for an educa- 
tion. Girls who will risk personal character and that of 
a school to carry their point. Girls who are unwilling 
to obey rulesjnade for their welfare and protection. 
^With pupils of the first class enrolled and of the latter 



Gary High School. 7 

excluded, we will have reached our ideals regarding our 
pupils. We say these things in the interest of all who 
have the proper conceptions of an education. These are 
the patrons we want. Parents who are willing to co- 
operate with us in our work. Those who have the cour- 
age to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatis- 
faction rather than break a contract _' t or backbite and 
malign a worthy institution. Those who honor a con- 
tract with a school-teacher as much as one with a grocer. 

LOCATION. 

Too much could not be said of the desirability of the 
locatiou. It is both healthful and beautiful. The moral 
atmosphere of the town of Gary could not be excelled in 
the State. The society in the town will be elevating and 
stimulating to the youth that will attend the Institu- 
tion. No better railroad facilities could be furnished in 
the State — just at the junction of the Seaboard and 
Southern Railways, eight miles west of Raleigh. It is 
far removed from the malarial regions, with pure, cold 
well-water in abundance as the beverage of the people. 
The town was chartered dry, and is fortified against the 
possibility of alcoholic drinks ever being sold in or near it. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES.! £*— ■ . 

The School is not under the control of any religious 
denomination, but is essentially a Christian School. The 
Directors have always pursued the policy of having the 
teachers as equally divided as possible among the de- 
nominations represented by the patrons of the School. 
Nothing of a sectarian nature is tolerated in the School, 
but a broad and liberal Christian spirit is encouraged. 
Outside of the ministry there is no class of people in a 
position to do so much for the upbuilding of God's king- 



8 Gary High School. 

dom as teachers. They have pupils under their control 
when the character is being formed and impressions for 
life are being made on their hearts and minds. We be- 
lieve Christ can be taught in the school-room from, the 
Bible, from nature, and from history. 

We have devotional exercises in the School every 
morning. There are two churches in Gary — a Metho- 
dist and a Baptist — and a mission of the Episcopal 
church, with preaching each month. We have preach- 
ing every Sunday. All boarding pupils will be expected 
to attend the services of one or all of these churches. 

BUILDINGS fIND GROUNDS. 

In the most beautiful situation that could be found in 
the village are four acres of land that comprise the 
School grounds. These are well shaded by a grove of 
oaks. 

During the last two years four excellent music rooms 
have been built, and the main building extended fifty 
feet in the rear two stories high. We now have five 
excellent well lighted class-rooms on the first floor. All 
of these can be readily turned into an auditorium large 
enough to seat eight hundred people. 
^On the second floor are nice dormitories for twenty- 
four young men. Adjoining the School grounds is a 
suitable boarding-house where boys who room in the 
dormitories can get table fare at actual cost. These im- 
provements have given us far better boarding facilities, 
an.d also provided us with more convenient and commo- 
dious class-rooms. The entire buildiug is furnished with 
attractive and comfortable furniture. The class-rooms 
have excellent charts, maps and globe. The music 
rooms are furnished with three pianos and another will 
be purchased before the next term opens. The old pianos 
will be completely renovated during vacation. 




A. F. SAMS 



J. R. CONLEY 





Miss LILY N. JONES 



FACULTY 



Miss LULA F. TISDALE 



Cary High School. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Clay Society for young men and the Browning- 
Society for girls meet once a week for exercises in de- 
hate, composition and elocution. All members are re- 
quired to take part in the exercises Most excellent 
results have been obtained during the past year. The 
good to be derived from this work can not be overesti- 
mated. It gives a knowledge of parliamentary law and 
stimulates a fondness for reading. It gives the power 
of expressing in public one's thoughts — a power not 
possessed by many people. It gives a broader view of 
men and things, and as an educator it has no superior. 
We want original thought, and there is no field broader 
and more capable of yielding richer harvest. 

The exercises at our last commencement bear testi- 
mony to the fact that the work of these societies is 
second to no school of like grade in the State. We be- 
lieve the boys and girls need the supervision of teachers 
as much in their society work as in the class-room. And 
while the management of each society is left largely to 
its members who perform all official duties, the Princi- 
pal does not hesitate to make or unmake regulations 
when in his judgment the best interests of the societies 
demand it. Many well trained boys and girls have gone 
out from this school as living witnesses of excellent 
society work. In selecting a school the question of Lit- 
erary Societies should be a very weighty consideration. 

LIBRARY. 

When our School was organized under its present 
management we had no books, yet by the aid of the 
Directors, friends, and faithful effort on the part of the 
teachers about three hundred volumes have been col- 



10 Cary High School. 

lected. The students show a marked interest in read- 
ing. Every volume is carefully selected, and nothing 
save literature of the highest order will be allowed on 
our shelves. Reference to our course in English will give 
some idea of the work required of our advanced pupils 
We have many volumes of carefully selected biography, 
history, addresses, etc. We have a part of* the work of 
such novelists and poets as Dickens, Scott, Cooper, Ten- 
nyson, Longfellow, etc. Literature is provided for all 
pupils, and primary and intermediate pupils show a 
marked interest in reading. 

LECTURES. 

The management is always anxious to do all possible 
for the profit and pleasure of the School and community. 
We are peculiarly proud of our lecture course. The good 
done by this can not be estimated. The large audiences 
present showed the appreciation of our community. 

During the past sessions we have had practical and 
entertaining lectures from Hon. Ohas H. Mebane, Mr. 
Josephus Daniels, Dr. L. G. Broughton, Prof. W. L. 
Poteat, Prof. Edwin Minis, Rev. G. W. Greene, Prof. 
Jerome Dowd and other men of rare ability and promi- 
nence. This work will be a distinctive feature during the 
coming year. Several engagements for the ensuing ses- 
sion will be announced in due time. 

TEACHERS. 

From the organization of the School it has been the 
policy of the Directors to employ teachers of acknowl- 
edged ability and experience, and the best preparation 
the colleges of North Carolina can give. 

The Principal has taught four years consecutively, and 
has improved every opportunity for giving his pupils 



Cary High School. 11 

the benefit of advanced and progressive methods in edu- 
cation. He can produce endorsements from patrons and 
pupils in all his work, which bear testimony to his thor- 
oughness of instruction, faithfulness and enthusiasm in 
his work, and his judicious and successful management 
of school affairs. 

Mr. J. R. Conley comes uiost heartily recommended 
by the President and various Professors of our State 
University, and other men of distinction who have had 
long acquaintance with him. Having educated himself 
with a view to teaching he has completed a thorough 
course in pedagogy. Mr. Conley will room in the dor- 
mitory in order to insure correct conduct and studious 
habits among the boys. 

Miss Lily N. Jones has taught consecutively for nine 
years and has made a special study of primary work. 
Her tact, patience, knowledge of children and influence 
among the girls, together with her broad culture, ren- 
der her an indispensable factor in the management of our 
School. She is eminently competent to teach the ad- 
vanced classes assigned to her. 

Miss Lula F. Tisdale has the highest possible endorse- 
ments from her former instructors in music, elocution 
and voice culture. The Principal of the School in which 
she has been employed writes as follows : ' ' Miss Tisdale's 
work has given perfect satisfaction to all parties. As 
evidence of this she has been solicited to return. She 
is an accomplished elocutionist, a skillful pianist and a 
faithful instructor. She possesses an inherent love for 
music and inspires her pupils with this same devotion. 
She is a charming lady of most engaging manners. She 
makes friends of all whom she meets, and her pupils 
are devoted to her. She is a careful, patient and thor- 
oughly competent teacher." 

Additional teaching force will be employed whenever 



12 Gary High School. 

the patronage demands it. Another teacher was em- 
ployed for full time daring the larger part of last year. 
Arrangements are now being made for the employment 
of a teacher of Vocal Music, though definite announce- 
ments can not yet be made. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

By referring to our course of study, it can be seeu we 
have four distinct departments — Primary, Intermediate, 
Academic and High School. No pupil will be confined 
to auy one department, but will be advanced in his sev- 
eral studies wheuever they have been satisfactorily 
completed. 

All pupils in the Primary and Intermediate Depart- 
ments sit in the same room, but all above these depart- 
ments are under the supervision of the male teachers — 
the girls in one room and the boys in another Boys and 
girls also have separate playgrounds and boarding places. 

EXAMINATIONS ^ND REPORTS. 

Written examinations are required of all pupils on all 
studies during each quarter, but these examinations are 
short and at such times as will give the pupils an oppor- 
tunity of telling what they know, and not what has 
been u crararned , ' in their heads for a special occasion. 
A record is kept of work on recitations, and an average 
mark is secured from these two sources. 

The reports are sent at the end of each ten weeks 
We keep all parents informed regarding the scholarship, 
deportment and attendance of choir children. 

HONORS AND CERTIFICATES. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll is posted. 
To be entitled to a place on this a pupil must make an 



Gary High School. 13 

average of 92.5 on scholarship, 95 on attendance, and 
excellent deportment. To be on the annual Honor Eoll 
a pupil must have been on all the quarterly Rolls of 
Honor. 

A handsome gold medal has been offered to the pupil 
in the Academic or High School Department making the 
highest scholarship during next year. To compete for 
this a pupil mast be present to receive all the reports of 
the year. 

Prizes will also be awarded for excellence in debate, 
essay-writing, declamation and recitation. 

Certificates of proficiency will be given in English, 
Mathematics, Latin, French, History and Music, pro- 
vided the pupil completing either of these courses shall 
have made an average scholarship of 85. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Directors have secured scholarships from the fol- 
lowing institutions: Wake Forest College, University of 
North Carolina, Oxford Female Seminary, Eastern Nor- 
mal College, the Charlotte Presbyterian College for 
Women, and Claremont College. 

The above scholarships are worth from $40 to $60 
each. In order to be entitled to a scholarship the appli- 
cant must be prepared to enter college classes, and must 
have been a student of Gary High School for at least 
one year. Other conditions of award will be announced 
later. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

In all our work we have three ends in view — to teach 
pupils to be observant of what they see, judicious in 
what they do, and logical in what thev say. For a 
teacher to educate a pupil he must lead him and not 



li Cary High School. 

drive him, draw oat his mental powers rather than pour 
in a heterogeneous mass of information. Pupils are en- 
couraged to do as much original thinking as possible. 
In addition to mere mental discipline we try to use 
those essentials in education tending to culture and re- 
finement, and those which will prepare young men and 
women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary, Intermediate and Academic depart- 
ments all pains are taken in laying good foundations for 
all future work, whether in business, in High School or 
College. Constant and thorough drills are given in 
Spelling, Reading and Writing. In English Grammar 
all are trained in the correct use of the language by 
class drill and frequent exercises in written work. Oral 
work is emphasized in arithmetic, but all necessary at- 
tention is given to written work. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to magnify the 
practical part. The student should be taught to reason 
from cause to effect and as far as possible make practi- 
cal applications of every lesson imparted. The teacher 
in history and geography who merely requires his pupils 
to memorize dates and learn the location of cities and 
rivers, makes dull and unprofitable that which might as 
easily be made the most interesting and important studies 
in connection with the ordinary high school course. In 
all our work we are not sticklers for rules. We first 
teach pupils to reason: they can afterwards find or make 
rules. Our methods of instruction are varied in all 
branches of study with the purpose of arousing and 
holding a live interest in the work. Students must be 
interested. Any settled method of instruction will in 
time become more or less monotonous and fall short of 
the best results. 

In answer to considerable demands, we have arranged 
to give instruction in Shorthand and Typewriting. A 



Cary High School. 15 

study of this department will not only furnish excellent 
means for mental development, but also afford practical 
information that may prove very profitable. 

We teach the Pernin System of Shorthand. 

In connection with our course in Mental and Written 
Arithmetic, we also offer a short and very practical course 
in Bookkeeping. 

METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL. 

The same end is aimed at in this department as in the 
lower grades, but we make our plans more specific. 
Mathematics — Arithmetic is reviewed and completed. 
We give two years in Algebra and one year in Geometry. 
No work is more essential in developing minds of boys 
and girls than that of these studies. We try to make 
this work helpful and interesting by magnifying the 
practical features as far as possible. 

Languages. — No mental drill is superior to that de- 
rived from the study of the Languages. In addition to 
this, they give us a greater appreciation of our own 
language. It requires pupils three years to take our 
course in Latin. We require pupils to master the forms 
by constant drill in written and oral work. They have 
almost daily exercises in Latin composition at the black- 
board, and exercises to be handed to teacher to be cor- 
rected. We insist on pupils trying to get the spirit as 
well as the sense of all classics read. Daily exercises 
are required in parsing and analysis. Our course will 
prepare pupils to enter any of our colleges. We give 
one year in French. The course includes KeeteVs Ele- 
mentary Grammar, Conversation, Super's Reader, and 
Le Petit Chose (Daudet). Our purpose is to reach a 
thorough understanding of the grammar of the language. 

Written exercises and compositions are required 



16 Cary High School. 

throughout the course. Conversation is given so far as- 
practicable. 

Science. — We lose many of the real pleasures of life 
by not being able to see the God of nature in the field 
and forest. We try to get tne pupil interested in nature, 
and then let him tell and reason about what he sees. 
We can find in nature a great storehouse of knowledge, 
which is ever ready to give to us of its bounties. We 
use Paul Bert's "Science Primer ,, and his "First Steps 
in Scientific Knowledge." We give, in addition to 
this, lectures and field work in Botany, and a regular 
course in Physiology. We hope to have a demand for 
more extended work in General Biology, Astronomy, 
etc., during the coming year. 

English. — Realizing the absolute necessity of thor- 
ough training in English, we have given this branch a 
conspicuous place in our course of study. The course 
has been materially chauged for the coming year. A 
year and a half will be given to the study of English 
Grammar, the last five months of which Maris' Normal 
Grammar will be used The same length of time will 
be given to the study of Elementary Rhetoric, using 
Lockwood's Lessons in English and Raub's Rhetoric. 
There will be two recitations a week given to the study 
of English Classics and Composition work. 

The following list, or its equivalent, is prescribed for 
next year: 

First Year. — Sketch Book (selections) and Arabian 
Nights on class, and Voices of the Night and Tales of 
the White Hills as parallel reading. 

Second Year. — 1. The Deserted Village; u 2. The 
Ancient Mariner ; d. Addison's Sir Roger DeCoverly ; 
4. Macaulay's Essay on Addison, on class. 1. Enoch 
Ardeu ; ( 2. Cooper's Last of the Mohicans ; 3. Lady of 
the Lake; 4- Sohrab and Rustum ; 5. Irving' 's Alham- 
bra, as parallel reading. 



Cary High School. 17 

Third Year. — 1. Modern Painters; 2. Macbeth; 3. 
Milton's Comus, U Allegro* and II Penseroso ; 4- Mac- 
aulay's Essay on Milton; 5. Ancient Mariner, in class. 
1: Vicar of Wakefield; 2. Merchant of Venice ; 3. Silas 
Maimer ; 4- Ivanhoe, as parallel reading. 

All pupils in the second and third years will be re- 
quired to write two abstracts on the parallel reading. 

ELOCUTION. 

Elocution is no longer considered a mere pastime 
study. The eyes of the people, even in our conservative 
South, have been opened to see not only the beauty and 
grandeur, hut the practical importance of true expres- 
sion. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inelegant 
speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the field to 
make room for the man who cultivates both brain and 
body. 

To give due expression to] our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to the 
various qualities of tone, selected with proper reference 
to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression also teaches 
Self-Control, Ease, Polish, Address, Fluency, etc. 

Our teacher in this department is specially trained for 
the work and has demonstrated by results that she is 
fully capable of training others in this much needed art. 

MUSIC 

FIRST GRADE. 

Throughout the first grade students will be required 
to practice daily Technics, Finger Exercises, and Major 
and Minor Scales. 

2 



18 Cary High School. 

Easy pieces from best composers will be given as stu- 
dent advances. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Loeschorn; Easy and Progressive Studies, Opus 176; 
Books 1 aud 2 Duvernoy; Practice daily Major and Mi- 
nor Scales in thirds, sixths, and tenths. 

THIRD GRADE. 

Czerny's Velocite; Octave Studies; Selected Studies 
by Cramer, Books 1, 2, 3, 4, revised by Dr. Hans von 
Bulow; Bach's Inventions; Sonatas, Haydn, Mozart, 
Beethoven. 

p Continue technical work and daily practice of Scales, 
Chords, and Arpeggios. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

dementi's Gradus ad Parnassus, revised by Carl Tau- 
sig; Kullak's Octave Studies. Selections from Mos- 
cheles. 

Selections from best composers are used throughout 
the course. 

Continue daily practice of Major and Minor Scales in 
double-thirds and sixths, Chords and Arpeggios. 

Each student is required^to practice two hours a day. 

Our purpose is to train pupils in Technics and such a 
course of study as tends to give a thorough knowledge 
of music and to make the best performers. 

The most advanced pupils will be required to attend 
classes in Musical History. 



Gary High School. 19 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

PRIMARY FIRST. 

1. Primer (McGuffey). 

2. First Reader (Holmes). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson's). 

4. Number Work. 

5 Life of Washington. 
6. Writing. 

PRIMARY SECOND. 

1. Second and Third Readers (Holmes). 

2. Spelling, Part I (Branson's). 
8. Arithmetic Reader (Hall). 

4 Life of Franklin. 

5 Language Work. 
6. Writing. 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT. 

INTERMEDIATE FIRST. 

1. Fourth Reader (Holmes). 

2. Primary History of United States (Chambers). 

3. Spelling, Part 1 Harrington). 

4. Language Lessons (Swinton). 

5. Primary Geography (Long). 

6. I intermediate Arithmetic (Sanford). 

7. Mental Arithmetic, Parts I and II (Brooks). 

8. Writing. 

INTERMEDIATE SECOND. 

1. Fifth Reader (Holmes). 

2. History of North Carolina (Spencer). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. Elementary English Grammar (Harvey). 

6. Health Lessons (Brand). 

7. Common School Arithmetic to Percentage (Sanford). 

8. Mental Arithmetic, Parts III and IV (Brooks). 

9. Writing. 



20 Cary High School. 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 

ACADEMIC FIRST. 

1. History of North Carolina (Moore). 

2. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

3. Common School Arithmetic, completed (Sanford). 

4. Mental Arithmetic, Parts V and VI (Brooks). 

5. Elements of English Grammar (Lyte). 

6. Manual of Geography (Maury). 

7. Physiology (Steele). 

8. Writing. 

ACADEMIC SECOND. 

1. History of the United States (Chambers — Revised). 

2. Test Words (Raub). 

3. Arithmetic (Milne). 

4. Mental Arithmetic, Parts VII and VIII (Brooks). 

5. Physical Geography (Maury). 

6. Advanced English Grammar (Lyte). 

7. Civil Government (Peterman). 

8. First Steps in Science (Bert). 

9. Writing. 

HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

FIRST YEAR. 

1. Beginner's Latin Book (Collar & Daniel). 

2. First Steps in Algebra (Wentworth). 

3. Advanced English Grammar (Lyte). 

4. General History, Ancient (Myers). 

5. Botany (Gray). 

6. Unfinished Academic Work. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. Gate to Caesar (Collar). 

2. Caesar, Three Books (Allen & Greenough). 

3. Latin Grammar (Allen & Greenough). 

4. Algebra (Wentworth's Complete). 

5. Rhetoric (Raub or Lock wood). 

6. General History, Mediaeval and Modern (Myers). 

7. French Grammar (Keetel), Reader (Super's). 

THIRD YEAR. 

1. Cicero's Orations (Allen & Greenough). 

2. Virgil's ^Eneid (Four Books). 

3. Latin Prose Composition (Daniel). 

4. English Composition — Normal Grammar (Maris). 

5. Geometry (Wentworth). 



Caky High School. 21 



EXPENSES FOR TERM OF FIVE MONTHS. 

Primary — first - - - - - - $5.00 

Primary — second ------ 7.50 

Intermediate — first and second - - - 10.00 

Academic — first ------ 12.50 

Academic — second - - - - - - 15.00 

High School - - - - 17.50 

Music -------- 12.50 

Music, with instrument for practice - - 15.00 
Elocution (private lessons) - - - 5.00 to 10.00 

Elocution (in class) Free 

Stenography - - - - - - - 15.00 

Typewriting - - - - - - - 10.00 

Stenography and Typewriting - - - 20.00 

Incidental fee ------ .50 

TERMS. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but monthly 
payments may be arranged when necessary. No deduc- 
tion will be made for absence except in cases of pro- 
tracted illness of one week or more. All pupils must 
enter for a whole term or the remainder of a term, unless 
previous arrangements are made to the contrary. The 
entrance of a pupil will be considered as an acceptance 
of these terms. 

Ministerial students properly endorsed by their 
churches, and the sons and daughters of ministers, re- 
ceive 50 per cent discount from the regular rates of lit- 
erary tuition. 

A discount of 10 per cent is given to all parents send- 
ing three or more pupils or those whose quarterly bills 
aggregate $20.00 or more. 

Any special arrangements desired must be made on 



22 Cary High School. 

or before the entrance of the pupils. The grading will 
be based on the course of study. Pupils having two or 
more studies in the High School Department will be 
charged the rates of this department. In other cases 
the rates will be in the department in which the pupil 
has the most studies. 

BOARD. 

During the past year satisfactory arrangements have 
been made for all pupils desiring board. Many of the 
best Christian homes iu Cary have been open for the 
boys and girls of the school. During the past year boys 
and girls have had different boarding places, and the 
same plans will be arranged for next year. Our charges 
are as low as can be arranged with present prices of 
groceries. These charges cover all expenses except 
washing, but each pupil will be expected to furnish a 
pair of blankets or two quilts, a pair of sheets and pil- 
low-cases. Arrangements can be made to board from 
Monday till Friday of each week. The Principal will 
gladly arrange board when notified by parents. Charges 
for board are payable monthly. 

Mrs. C. A. Wood as Matron will preside over the stu- 
dents' home adjoining the school grounds, and good, 
substantial table fare will be furnished at actual cost. 
It is estimated that the cost will not exceed $5.00 or 
$6.00 per month, and perhaps less. Professor Conley 
will board with the boys and room in the Dormitory. 

Unfurnished rooms in the Dormitory are rented for 
50 cents a month; rooms furnished with bedstead, mat- 
tress, two chairs, table and lamp are rented for 75 cents 
a month. Other furniture may be had for little addi- 
tional cost. 

The following prices are for the school month of four 



Cary High School. 23 

weeks unless private arrangements have been made with 
the landlady: r 

Board in private families - $7.00 to $7.50 per month. 
Board from Monday till Friday - - 4.50 per month. 
Board at Walker Hotel - - 8.00 per month. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. The Principal has selected text-books by standard 
authors, and all pupils will be required to use books 
mentioned in the courses of study, except when it is to 
the interest of the pupil for the teacher in charge to or- 
der a change. Several changes will very likely be made 
during the ensuing year. In the Public School Course 
it is our purpose to use, as far as we can with consist- 
ency, the text-books adopted by our State Board of 
Education. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term of five months, and pupils entering late must join 
classes already formed. 

3. We urge all parents to enter pupils at the begin- 
ning of term. Late entrance is injurious to pupils and 
school. 

4. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial causes. Going to school is as much a 
business as farming, merchandising, etc., and boys and 
girls should be taught to be prompt in meeting all busi- 
ness engagements. 

5. Students are not allowed to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation they must seek it in other 
ways. 

6. Parents should always write to the Principal when 
a favor is to be asked for their children, or when any 
complaint is made. 



24 Cary High School. 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the Prin- 
cipal for their conduct out of school as well as while at 
the school building. 

8. All pupils on matriculating pledge themselves to 
obey and uphold the rules and regulations of the School. 
All who are not willing to do this are urged to stay at 
home. No regulations are made except for the moral, 
mental and religious welfare of the pupils and the 
school. 

9. For further information, address A. F. Sams, Prin- 
cipal, Cary, N. 0. 



COMMENCEMENT, 1901. 

Sunday, May 12. 

8 p. m. — Annual Sermon, by Dr. R. T. Vann, Raleigh, N. C. 

Wednesday, May 15. 

8 p. m. — Exercises by the Clay and Browning Literary Societies. 

Thursday, May 16. 

3 p. m. — Exercises by Primary and Intermediate Departments. 
8 p. m. — Debate by the Clay Literary Society. 

Friday, May 17. 

11 a. m. — Annual Address, by Dr. B. F. Dixon, Raleigh, N. C. 
8 p. m. — Concert by Music and Elocution Classes. 

Medals and Prizes Awarded as Follows : 

Scholarship Medal. — W. Herbert Holleman, Apex, N. C. 

Debater's Prize.— L. L. Caudle, Marshville, N. C. 

Declaimer's Prize. — H. H. Cheek, Durham, N. C. 

Essayist's Prize. — Bettie Goodwin, Elberon, N. C. 

., . t> ; i Elsie Hunter, Cary, N. C. 

Reciter s Prize.- -j Lena Parker ' Mor £ isville) N . c . 



Cary High School. 



25 



STUDENTS, 1900-1901. 



Ada Adams, 
Cleo Adams, 
Effie Adams. 
Gussie Adams, 
Laurie Adams, 
Royall Adams, 
Martha Allen . 
Mary Allen. 
Effie A vent, 
Ina Avent, 
Bessie Bagwell, 
C. R. Baucom, 
Chester Bennett, 
Laurence Blalock, 
Cornelia Blue. 
Daniel Blue, 
Blanchard Bonner, 
Fannie Bonner, 
Helen Bonner, 
Lexa Bonner, 
Margaret Bonner, 
Eddie Bough, 
Colon Boothe, 
Robert Branton, 
Hubert Breeze, 
Pearl Breeze, 
Maggie Bright, 
Jessie Broome, 
Lemuel Broome, 
Lillie Broome. 
Mary Broome, 
Nellie Broome, 
Sallie Broome, 
Beatrice Brown, 
Hallie Brown, 
E. H. Broughton, 
Ida Broughton, 
Irene Broughton, 
Lowell Broughton, 
J. H. Buffaloe, 
Ben. Campbell, 



C. Campbell, 

D. M. Campbell, 
Ernie Campbell. 
Eugene Campbell. 
Ned Campbell. 
Norma Campbell, 
L. L. Caudle, 

H. H. Cheek. 
Hubert Cox, 
Lena Crabtree, 
Carrie Crocker. 
Curtis Dunn, 
Eddie Dunn, 
Luther Dunn, 
Mamie Dunn, 
Joe Edwards, 
Lenna Edwards, 
Charley Ellington, 
Ethel Ellington, 
Foster Ellington. 
John Ellington. 
Lonnie Ellington, 
Irma Ellis, 
Craven Franklin, 
Earl Franklin, 
Bettie Goodwyn, 
Jimmie Goodwin, 
Malpheus Goodwin, 
Bernice Grady, 
Valeria Greene, 
Connie Hamilton, 
Dora Hamilton, 
L. Hamilton, 
Pascal Hamilton, 
Richmond Hamilton, 
G. D. Harrington, 
Ella Harris, 
Herbert Harris, 
Robt. Harrison. 

E. H. Hobbs. 
Carter Holleman, 



26 



Cary High School. 



Ethel Holleman, 
Herbert Holleman, 
Leonard Holleman, 
Maggie Howell, 
Roan Howell, 
Elsie Hunter, 
Isaac Hunter, 
LaRue Hunter, 
C. W. Huntley, 
Vernon Hurst, 
Maud Ingram, 
Albert Ivey, 
Downer Ivey. 
Esther Ivey, 
George Ivey, 
A. S. Johnson, 
Foy Johnson, 
Frances Johnson, 
A. P. P. Jones, 
Davie Jones. 
Do vie Jones, 
Henry Jones, 
Hervey Jones, 
Jessie Jones, 
*Leora Jones, 
Lillian Jones, 
Marvin Jones, 
Paul Jones, 
Willie Jones, 
Ulric Jones, 
Alma Jordan, 
Blanche Jordan, 
Carlos Jordan, 
George Jordan, 
Hubert Jordan, 
J. B. Jordan, 
Edgar King, 
Elbie King, • 
Emma King, 
Luther King, 
Rosa King, 
Sara King, 
Servita King, 
Walter King, 
Frank Knight, 



J. Kornegay, 
Alice Lashley, 
Vera Markham, 
Alfred Maynard, 
Atlas Maynard, 
Annie Maynard, 
Cyrus Maynard, 
George Maynard, 
Helen Maynard, 
Stella Maynard, 
Walter Maynard, 
Walter McDonald, 
W. E. McSwain, 
S. V. Morgan, 
Ida Moore, 
J. P. Moore, 
Pat. Moore, 
W. C. Moore, 
Edna Morris, 
Luther Morris, 
Maggie Morris, 
Vann Morris, 
Emerson Murdock, 
John Olive, 
Sylvester Olive, 
C. E. Page, 
Clare Page, 
Dollie Page, 
Donald Page, 
Ethel Page, 
Mamie Page, 
Walter Page, 
Wilbur Page, 
Lena Parker, 
Claudie Parks, 
Milton Pleasants, 
Allie Pendergraft, 
Walter Pendergraft, 
Ella Penny, 
Eva Penny, 
Olga Penny, 
R. J. Pickett, 
Sallie Pool, 
Peter Powers, 
Clennie Segraves, 



♦Deceased. 



Cary High School. 



27 



Herman Senter, 
Elsie Scott, 
Bessie Simons, 
Mark Simons, 
Nannie Sorrell, 
Newton Sorrell, 
Lloyd Sorrell, 
Sadie Sorrell, 
Elliot Smith, 
George Smith, 
J. Smith, 
Junius Smith, 
L. D. Smith, 
Willie Stedman, 
Rommie Stevens, 
T. A. Stevens, 
Charley Stevenson, 
Etta Stevenson, 
Eva Stevenson, 
G. D. Stevenson, 
Lina Stevenson, 
Sarah Stevenson, 
Eddie Stone, 
Lossie Stone, 
Alfred Templeton, 
Hoke Templeton, 
James Templeton, 
Lillian Templeton, 
Mary Templeton, 
Nannie Templeton, 
Clara Thompson, 
Elsie Thompson. 
John Thompson, 
Pearl Thompson, 
Rommie Thompson, 
Laddin Tilley, 
R. E. Truelove, 
C. A. Upchurch, 



Henry Upchurch, 
Jeff Upchurch, 
Zola Upchurch, 
Ruth Waldo, 
Frank Warren, 
Ernest Weathers, 
J. R. Weatherspoon, 
Jesse Weatherspoon, 
Dezzie Wellons, 
Emma Wellons. 
Ira Wellons, 
Dora Wilder, 
Myrtle Wilder, 
Allie Williams, 
Leander Williams, 
Jimmie Williams, 
Martha Williams, 
Mertie Williams, 
Nathaniel Williams, 
Ruth Williams, 
Sadie Williams, 
John White, 
J. F. Whitefield, 
*Clyde Wood, 
Daisy Yarbrough, 
Clarence Yates, 
Cleron Yates, 
Ernie Yates, 
Gaynell Yates, 
Lilla Yates, 
Seras Yates, 
Vara Yates, 
Waylon Yates, 
Alvah Young, 
Daniel Young, 
Geneva Young, 
Mamie Young, 
Willie Young. 



* Expelled. 



28 Cary High School, 

recapitulation. 

Wake County— local 171 

Wake County — boarders 44 

Durham County . 10 

Harnett County 4 

Lenoir County 3 

Richmond County 2 

Warren County 

Duplin County 

Cleveland County 

Beaufort County 

Wayne County 

Union County 

Anson County 

Vance County .. _ . . 

Caswell County _ 

Person County ..... 

Cumberland County 

Montgomery County . 

Chesterfield, South Carolina 

Canton, China 

Total .... .248 

For a part of the year the Public School was taught 
with, the High School, but an additional teacher was 
employed and the largest classes were divided, and no 
change was made in the length of recitation periods in 
classes above the Primary Department. Our attendance, 
when the Public School was not in session, was from 
eighty-five to one hundred and ten. 

Mantel Biien & Go-, 

Cbe Shoe Store 

of tbe State that caters 
to school trade 

IRaleigb, IRortb Carolina 



Advertisements. 



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A SPECIALTY. WE HAVE A LARGE LINE OF 
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Underwear, 
Hats, 
Shoes, etc* 



Lowest Prices Guaranteed. 




BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

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Ihe Property of the Baptists of North Carolina. 
Profits go to State Missions. =^== 

The Baptists of the State can trade with themselves — give the profits 
of their purchases to Missions and make a great name for their Store. 

LARGEST LINE OF BIBLES IN NORTH CAROLINA ; 
SCHOOL BOOKS, OFFICE SUPPLIES, GENERAL 
STATIONERY, and everything usually found in a 
FIRST-CLASS BOOK STORE ^^^^^ 



Baxter Durham, Manager. 



Agents for Edison's Phonograph. 



Advertisements. 



DON'T BUY 5MOE5 

TILL YOU SEE THE LARGEST 
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f ; j- Founded * 



<sg-^ 



STIEFF PIANOS 

SING THEIR OWN PRAISE. 

SOLD DIRECT FROM FACTORY. 
NO AGENTS. 

CHAS. M. STIEFF, 

Piano Manufacturer, 
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Local Representative, 
CARY, N. C. 



Advertisements. 




RALEIGH MARBLE WORKS 

COOPER BROS., Proprietors, 
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HEADSTONES 
MONUMENTS 
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LOW PRICES 

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Write for Catalogue. 



JOHN L. BORDEN, President. 
GEO. C. ROYALL, Vice-President. 



THE 



T. P. JERMAN. Jr., Sec. and Treas. 
MILES GOODWIN, Inst. Manager. 



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Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 
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THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK OF FURNITURE 
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,q PHOTOGRAPH 
O GALLERY 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Solicits your patronage 
for Photographs***** 



Up-to-date and the very best work 



Advertisements. 



I. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

JEWELER. 

09 FAYETTEVILLE STREET, EAST SIDE, NEAR CAPITOL. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 



/ft Rings, Seals and Badges W 

*& MADE TO ORDER. $ 






Alfred lUiiliams $ Co* 



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HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH 
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Mail orders given 
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BOOKS 
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A full line of 
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regular price.^^^ 6 



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c4rte>a.ys 

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Children's Pictures a Specialty*,* 



And 
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1 






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Stoves, 

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Iron, 

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Paints, 

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Bu ck's St ov es and Ran ges. 



UNIVERSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 



THE HEAD OF 
THE STATE'S 
EDUCATIONAL 
SYSTEM 



Academic Department, Law, Medicine, Pharmacy. 

EIGHTY-FIVE SCHOLARSHIPS. FREE TUITION 
TO TEACHERS AND MINISTERS' SONS. LOANS 
FOR THE NEEDY. 

527 STUDENTS.,*^ J>J>£43 INSTRUCTORS. 

NEW DORMITORIES, WATER WORKS, 
CENTRAL H EATING SYSTEM. 

$120,000 spent in improvements in 1900 and 1901. 

Fall Term begins September 9, 1901 . 

Address p. R VENABLE, President, 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. B. Pasmore, 



WITH 

BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO. 

206 FAYETTEVI LLE ST. AND 
208 SALISBURY ST. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE LARGEST AND BEST 
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We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the city. 
Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 
Mail orders filled same day received. 

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R. J. HARRISON, Pies. F. R. GRAY, Vice-Pics. G F GOODWYX Sec and Treas. 

THE 

Harrison Wagon Company 
Wagon Manufacturers 

CARY, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



-OUR STOCK OF- 



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NOTIONS, CLOTHING, HATS, TOBACCO GROCERIES, 
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Cold Drinks F. R. GRA Y & BRO., 

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Advertisements. 



OXFORD SEMINARY 



F. P. Hobgood President 

Mrs. S. D.Twitty Associate Principal 

Mrs. F. P. Hobgood Superintendent Domestic Department 

Miss Rell Robeson Assistant in Domestic Department 

Mrs. Kate Meadows Matron 



F. P. Hobgood, A.M Latin and Moral Science 

Mrs. M. A. Lacy... _ French and Mathematics 

Mrs S. D. Twitty . _ English 

Miss Lilly Egbert, A.B Natural Science 

Miss Lilly Grandy (Cornell Univ.) .English and History 

M s H allie E. Taurman Elocution 

Miss Edna Hudson Physical Culture 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 

Miss Hallie E. Taurman (four years a pupil of Mills and Parsons. 

of New York City) Piano and Voice 

Miss Ed^a Hudson (Music Graduate Oxford Seminary) Piano 

Miss Carrie Hobgood (Music Graduate Oxford Seminary) Piano 

SCHOOL OF ART. 
Miss Jessie Jenkens. 

Miss J anie Lacy _ Typewriting and Stenography 

Miss Lilly Egbert Pedagogy 



Health record unequalled. The school physician was called only 
twice to see sick girls during entire scholastic year. 

Many improvements made during past year — among them, the 
refurnishing of sleeping-rooms with handsome oak suits, and the sup- 
plying of Science Department with complete Physical and Chemical 
Apparatus. 

EXPENSES FOR ANNUAL SESSION. 

Board, fuel, lights, full Literary Course $125.00 

Music (extra) 40.00 

Apply for handsomely illustrated catalogue. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, Pres. 



Cars Ibigb School 
iW 1902 



catalogue 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL 



GARY, N. C. 



1901-1902. 



RALEIGH: 

Edwards & Broushton. 
1902 



Calendar, 1902-1903. 

Fail Term opens August 12, 1902. 
Field Day Exercises, November 14, 1902. 
Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 1902. 
Fall Term closes December 19, 1902. 
spring Term opens December 30, 1902. 
Easter Monday Holiday, 1903. 
Spring Term closes May 21, 1903. 



I. Officers and Instructors. 
Session 1902-1903. 

I. E. L. Middleton and A. F. Sams, Principals. 
II. Dr. J. M. Templeton, Ckm'n Board Directors 

III. Mrs. C. A. Wood, Matron. 

IV. E. L. Middleton, A.B. (Wake Forest, 1889), 

Mathematics, History, Greek. 

V. A. F. Sams, A.B. (Wake Forest, 1897), 
English, Latin, Science. 

VI. Lily N. Jones (Greensboro Female College, 1892), 
Primary, Penmanship, French. 

VII. Hazel Irene Waddell (Louisburg Female Col- 
lege, 1901), 
Music, Elocutun. 

VIII. Julia A. Alb ea (Greensboro Female College, 1891), 
Art. 

IX. Lucy D. Reavis, 

Stenography, Typewriting, 



II. .Directors and Stockholders. 

Board of Directors. 
Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman. 
Rev. A. D. Hunter, Secretary. 
B. S. Franklin. F. R. Gray. C. W. Scott. 



Stockholders. 



C. W. Blanchard. 

J. C. Angler. 

J. E. White. 

A. D. Hunter. 

J. W. Bailey. 

J. R. Walker. 

C. W. Scott. 

F. R. Gray. 

*\v . D. Jones. 

C. R. Scott. 

Miss Sallie Bonner. 



A. F. 



Mrs. J. K. mason. 
P. D. Gray. 

B. S. Franklin. 
T. Ivey. 

J. W. Creel. 
Z. V. Johnson. 

C. B. Pasmore. 
Jtt. R. Yates. 
Levi Cole. 

Dr. J. M- Templeton. 
S. L. Middleton. 
Sams. 



III. A Foreword. 

Six years ago this school was an experiment. This 
community has ever striven to have a good school, 
but no permanent management had ever been se- 
cured. The present Principals have been connected 
with the school during this period, and now unite 
their efforts in building up a larger and better school. 
The property has been leased for a term of years. 
Before the Fall Term, the building will be completely 
renovated and the furniture improved. The school 
has employed the most expensive and best-equipped 
faculty in its history. The experimental stage has 
passed. Directors, stockholders, principals and pa- 
trons expect a liberal increase in patronage, and the 
most excellent work ever done by the school. 

Our catalogue shows the smallest enrollment for 
six years. Last year the public school was taught in 
the public school building instead of being taught in 
connection with this school. Our pupils came from 
a larger territory than ever before, and the school 
was entirely successful. The usefulness of this insti* 
tution is only begun, its resource's are barely open- 
ing. To students and fellow-teachers we wish to ex- 
tend hearty thanks for their excellent deportment, 
kind and respectful bearing, and faithful work. We 
wish for them all possible success, and confidently 
hope that they may be staunch supporters of the 
school in their several communities. Progress along 
all lines is tne watchword of this institution. As 
teachers and pupils and friends of the school, we look 
longingly with great expectation to the opening of 
tne next term. From a history of uniform growth 
and permanent progress, we look to a future radiant 
with hope and rich in promises. 



8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

IV. Who We Are. 

1. E. L. Middleton. — For eleven and a half years he 
taught successfully in the public and private schools 
of this State. After a long service with this school, 
he was released by the Directors, but was unani- 
mously recalled to his old work. For a year and a 
half he has had a fine opportunity for studying meth- 
ods and plans in the best schools in the South. He 
knows more of the possibilities of his work and the 
means of attaining the most desirable ends in edu- 
cation. He returns with enlarged views, renewed 
zeal and greater enthusiasm for his work. 

2. A. F. Sams. — For five years he has taught in the 
schools at Marshville and Cary. No opportunity has 
been lost for giving his pupils the benefit of advanced 
and progressive methods in education. He can pro- 
duce endorsements from patrons and pupils in all 
his work, which bear testimony to his thoroughness 
of instruction, faithfulness and enthusiasm in his 
work, and his judicious and successful management 
of school affairs. 

3. Lily N. Jones. — The school is very fortunate in 
retaining the services of such a teacher. She has 
taught consecutively for ten years, and has made a 
special study of primary work. Her tact, patience, 
knowledge of children and influence among the girls, 
together with her broad culture, render her an indis- 
pensable factor in tne management of our school 
She is eminently competent to teach the advanced 
classes assigned to her. 

4. Hazel Irene Waddell. — We feel we have acted 
wisely in securing the services of Miss Waddell. She 
is a full graduate in literary departments and music, 
and has had a three years' course in elocution. Her 



CAKY HIGH SCHOOL. 9 

work in teaching music and elocution has heen pre- 
eminently successful. She is a woman of broad cul- 
ture and refinement. She performs elegantly, sings 
sweetly, and recites with ease and grace. She will 
add great strength to our faculty. 

5. Julia a. albea. — Miss Albea is a full graduate 
in two fine arts — Music and Art. She pursued these 
studies because she loved both. She has had exten- 
sive and valuable experience in teaching art. She 
is such a woman as will stimulate pupils to the 
highest endeavors in their school work and create 
within them a desire for the noblest living. She is 
an indefatiguable worker in whatever she undertakes. 

6. Lucy D. Reavis. — No one is more favorably 
known to the citizens of Gary and our former pupils 
than Miss Reavis. She took her business course un- 
der Miss Lizzie Lee, of St. Mary's College, Raleigh, 
N. C. Sne has taught private lessons for six years, 
and has been successful in her work. 

V. What We Want. 
Who are willing to co-operate with us 

1. Patrons in our work. Those who have the 

courage to see and write to teachers 
regarding any dissatisfaction rather than break a 
contract or backbite and malign a worthy institution. 
Those who honor a contract with a school teacher as 
much as one with a grocer. 

Who realize that mental force is supe- 

2. Boys rior to physical force. Boys of good 

habits who want an education and are 
willing to work for it. Boys who see the great possi- 
bilities lying before men of the rising generation. 



IO CARY HIGH SCHOOL,. 

Who realize the true nobility of wo- 
3. Girls manhood. Girls who are willing to 

live in woman's sphere and work 
faithfully to prepare themselves for the noble call- 
ings now open to women. Girls who prefer well- 
stored brains and countenances beaming with intelli- 
gence to servile obedience to the whims of fashoin. 

Pupils Not Waoted. 

Who do not want an education. Boys 
'• Boys who curse, swear, play cards and use 

intoxicants in any way or degree. 
Boys who are boisterous and indifferent to the rights 
of fellow-students, teachers and landlords. Boys who 
are habitual grumblers and malcontents. Boys who 
wilfully disobey necessary rules. 

Who are unwilling to work for an ed- 
2. Girls ucation. Girls who will risk personal 

character and that of a school to carry 
their point. Girls who are unwilling to obey rules 
made for their welfare and protection. 

VI. What We Do. 
The school is not under the control of 

I. For the any religious denomination, but is 

Heart. 

thoroughly permeated with the spirit 

of Christianity. Only teachers of recognized charac- 
ter are employed, and students of every denomination, 
or of no church affiliations are received on equal 
grounds in all respects.lt is our policy to divide the 
teachers as equally as possible among the denomina- 
tions represented by the patrons of the school. In 
no case will any influence be allowed which might 
draw a pupil away from his church moorings. As 
far as possible, the wholesome influence of a Chris- 
tian home is thrown around our students. While 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. II 

character is being formed, and impressions for life 
are being made, the Christian teacher has open to 
him a most wonderful field of usefulness. 

The school is opened every morning with devo- 
tional exercises. Gary has a Methodist and Baptist 
church, and a mission of the Episcopal Church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are required to at- 
tend the services of at least one of these churches, 
and are expected to attend Sunday School regularly. 

2. For the It is our plan to cultivate our students 
Maod. physically as well as mentally and mor- 
ally. Otherwise the best results in the class-room and 
in after life cannot be realized. To this end, we have 
a beautiful tennis court and baseball grounds, and stu- 
dents are encouraged to take sufficient outdoor exer- 
cise. The Principals take active part in training 
teams for their contests, and their presence on the 
play-grounds is a source of enthusiasm as well as 
moral influence among the boys. To further encour- 
age athletics, the 14th day of November is set apart 
for Field Day exercises. These exercises will be held 
on our athletic grounds and a handsome prize awarded 
to the best all-round athlete. 

_ _ In all our work we have three ends in 

3. For the 

i_, ead view — to teach pupils to be observant 

of what they see, judicious in what 
they do, and logical in what they say. For a teacher 
to educate a pupil he must lead him and not drive 
him, draw out his mental powers rather than pour in 
a heterogenous mass of information. Pupils are en- 
couraged to do as much original thinking as possible. 
In addition to mere mental discipline, we try to use 
those essentials in education tending to culture and 



12 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

refinement, and those which will prepare young 
men and women for the active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments, 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for fu- 
ture work, whether in business, high school or col- 
lege. Frequent and thorough drills are given in 
spelling, reading and writing. In English Grammar, 
pupils are trained in the correct use of the language 
by frequent exercises in written work. When the 
pupil has acquired a thorough knowledge of the 
technical principles of grammar, the critical study of 
English Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as 
broad culture as possible and yet magnify the practi- 
cal parts. The student should be taught to reason 
from cause to effect, and, as far as possible, make 
practical application of every lesson imparted. Our 
methods of instruction are varied with a view to 
arousing and holding a live interest in the work. 

VII. Where We flre arjd What We Have 

Too much could not be said of the desi- 
I. Location. rability of the location. It is both 

healthful and beautiful. The moral at- 
mosphere of the town of Cary could not be excelled 
in the State. The society in the town will be elevat- 
ing and stimulating to the youth that will attend tne 
institution. No better railroad facilities could be 
furnished in the State — just at the junction of the 
Seaboard ana Southern Railways, eight miles west of 
Raleigh. It is far removed from the malarial re- 
gions, with pure, cold well-water in abundance as the 
beverage of the people. The town was chartered dry, 
and is fortified against the possibility of alcoholic 
drinks ever being soid in or near it. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOI,. 13 

In the most attractive part of the 

2. Buildings. town and surrounded by a beautiful 

campus of oaks, is our school building. 
On the first floor there are four large and well-lighted 
class-rooms — which may be easily converted into an 
auditorium — a society hall, reading-room, library and 
four music-rooms. On the second floor are rooms for 
the matron, a dining-hall and dormitories for sixteen 
boys. During the present vacation, additional build- 
ing is to be done, and the entire plant embellished. 

The entire building is furnished with 

3. Equipment, suitable furniture and equipment. Tne 

class-rooms have folding desks, charts 
and maps. The Society hall has chairs, tables and 
tracking. The music-rooms are furnished with three 
pianos, and the dormitory rooms with neat and com- 
fortable furniture. 

VIII. Generol Culture. 

The Clay Society for young men and 
I. Literary 

Societies. * ne Browning Society for girls meet 
once a week for exercises in debate, 
composition and elocution. All members are re- 
quired to take part in the exercises. Most excellent 
results have been obtained during the past year. The 
good to be derived from this work can not be overesti- 
mated. It gives a knowledge of parliamentary law 
and stimulates a fondness for reading. It gives the 
power of expressing in public one's thoughts — a power 
not possessed by many people. It gives a broader 
view of men and things, and as an educator it has no 
superior. We want original thought, and there is no 
field broader and more capable of yielding rich har- 
vest. We believe the boys and girls need the super- 
vision of teachers as much in their society work as in 



14 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

the class-room. And while the management of each 
society is left largely to its members, who perform all 
official duties, the Principals do not hesitate to make 
or unmake regulations when in their judgment the 
best interests of the societies demand it. Many well- 
trained boys and girls have gone out from this school 
as living witnesses of excellent society work. 

A library of 400 volumes has been col- 

2. Library. le'cted, to which additions are constant- 

ly being made. Every volume is care- 
fully examined, and nothing except literature of high 
oraer is allowed on our shelves. We have many vol- 
umes of biography, history, addresses, together with 
the prose and poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Coop- 
er, Tennyson, Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, 
Bacon, and otners. 

A convenient reading-room has been 

3. Reading 

Room ~ provided, and will be open to students 

during certain hours each day. Pu- 
pils may have access to the best papers and maga- 
zines obtainable, and thereby not only keep posted 
upon current topics, but broaden their views and 
greatly extend their scope of knowledge. 

Lectures given at stated times by prom- 

4. Lectures. inent men have for years been a fea- 

ture of our work. Many distin- 
guished educators and leading men in other profes- 
sions have entertained and greatly benefitted us by 
timely ana practical addresses. Our student body 
looks forward to these occasions with much interest, 
and the large audiences from the town and commu- 
nity show that they are generally appreciated. We 
have already secured promises from many prominent 
lecturers for the coming session. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 1 5 

IX. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general 
ends in view — one to prepare boys and girls for col- 
lege, the other to fit the great mass of our students for 
the active duties of life. In the latter class we can 
point with pride to young men and women who are 
becoming strong factors in the social, industrial and 
church life' of their several communities. In the 
former class our pupils are doing us honor while hon- 
oring themselves. During last year we had thirty- 
one former pupils in the following institutions: Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, Trinity College, Wake For- 
est College, A. and M. College, Elon College, Asheville 
Normal College, N. C. Normal and Industrial College, 
Greensboro Female College, Oxford Female Seminary 
and Baptist Female University. This does not include 
several of our students who went directly from our 
school to professional schools. Several of our stu- 
dents at these colleges have graduated magna cum, 
laude. 

X. Scholarships. 

The Directors have secured scholarships from the 
following institutions: Wake Forest College, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, Oxford Female Seminary, 
Eastern Normal College, the Charlotte Presbyterian 
College for women, and Claremont College. 

The above scholarships are worth from ?40 to $60 
each. In order to be entitled to a scholarship, the 
applicant must be prepared to enter college classes, 
and must have been a student of Cary High School for 
at least one year. Other conditions of award will be 
announcea later. 



l6 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

XI. Record of Work.. 

Educators are not agreed as to how 
I Examioa- 

t i oos often or how difficult examinations 

shouid be. We require written exam- 
inations of all pupils on all studies during each 
quarter, but these examinations are short and at such 
times as will give the pupils an opportunity of telling 
wnat they know, and not what has been "crammed" 
in their heads for a special occasion. A record is 
kept of work on recitations, and an average mark is 
secured from these two sources. 

"We send reports at the end of each ten 

2. Reports. weeks. We keep all parents informed 

regarding the scholarship, deportment 
and attendance of their children. 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks are not 
necessarily a sign 01 poor work. A poor mark on 
deportment needs immediate attention. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor 

3. Honors. Roll is posted. To be entitled to a 

place on this, a pupil must make an 
average of 92.5 on scholarship, 95 on attendance, and 
excellent deportment. To be on the annual Honor 
Roll, a pupil must have been on all the quarterly 
Rolls of Honor. 

A handsome gold medal will be awarded to the 
pupil in the High School making the highest schol- 
arship during next year. To compete for this, a 
pupil must be present to receive ail the reports of the 
year. 

Prizes will also be awarded for excellence in de- 
bate, essay-writing, declamation and recitation. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 17 

XII. Special Departments, 

Music has long since come to be a 
Music necessity to a civilized people. It is 

the most extensively cultivated and 
the most generally appreciated of all the fine arts. 
A thorougn and conscientious course in music will 
certainly carry with its manual training mental 
and heart training also. Many now study music 
who never expect to teach or become performers, 
because of the enlarged capacity to enjoy good mu- 
sic that comes from such a course of study, and be- 
cause they realize that all cultivation of the fine arts 
is an upward and forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such 
a course of study as tends to give a thorough knowl- 
edge of music and to make the best performers. 

Elocution is no longer considered a 
Elocutioo- mere pastime study. The eyes of the 

people, even in our conservative South, 
have been opened to see not only the beauty and 
grandeur, but tne practical importance or true ex- 
pression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inele- 
gant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the 
field to make room for the man who cultivates both 
brain and uody. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feelings, 
we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, Force, 
Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Cadence to 
the various qualities of tone, selected with proper ref- 
erence to the meaning to be conveyed. Expression 
also teaches Self-Control, Ease, Polish, Address, Flu- 
ency, etc. 



l8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL- 

In this department the pupil is taught 
f rt - drawing from model and object; cray- 

on, including portraits, pastel and 
oil painting. It is much better to study drawing be- 
fore painting, as it enables the pupil to shade and 
sketch with much less trouble'. The study of art 
trains the eye and makes one a very close observer of 
nature, thereby training the mind. It also enables 
one to beautify the home at a very small cost. 

T , , ... In answer to considerable demands, we 

Typewriting 

and have arranged to give instruction in 

' en ° arap y - Shorthand and Typewriting. A study 
of these departments not only furnish excellent 
means for mental development, but also affords 
practical information which may prove very profit- 
able. By a knowledge of these arts, many ener- 
getic boys and girls are working their way through 
higher institutions of learning. We use the Isaac 
Pittman System of Shorthand. As texts we will use 
liis Twentieth Century Complete Phonographic In- 
structor, The Twentieth Century Dictation Book, and 
Nos. 1 and 2 Business Letter Book. 

For practice work in Typewriting, we will use a 
standard typewriter. 

The policy of the school is to make no 
BooKkeeping. promises that are not kept. We have 
no separate department for this study. 
Too many boys and girls are being misled by inducing 
them to take a business course before their mental de- 
velopment or experience in life warrant it. This 
study is pursued as a part of our work in Arithmetic, 
and is intended to prepare pupils for a more advanced 
study of the subject, or fit them for managing their 
own business as farmers, merchants, artisans, etc. 
The work is elementary, and we make no extra charge 
for it. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 19 



XIII. Course of Study. 
(1.) Primary. 

FIRST GRADE. 

1. Primer (Carnefix). 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader (Holmes). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Life of Washington. 

6. Number Work. 

7. Vv riting. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader (Holmes). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. Number Work. 

5. Life of Franklin. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader (Holmes). 

3. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Harrington). 

5. Primary arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

6. Language Work. 

7. Physical Culture (Johnson). 

8. Writing. 



20 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

(2.) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader (Holmes). 

2. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Language Lessons (Swinton). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Life of Stonewall Jackson (Williamson). 

2. Primary History of United States (Chambers). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood); Ad- 
vanced Arithmetic to Fractions (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Physiology (Steele). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. History of United States (Chambers). 

2. Spelling, Part II (Branson). 

3. Advanced Arithmetic to Percentage (Colaw and 
Ellwood). 

4. Mental Arithmetic, Parts IV and V (Brooks). 

5. Manual of Geography (Maury). 

6. English Grammar, Book II (Hyde). 

7. First Steps in Science (Bert). 

8. Writing. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

(3.) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctua- 
tion, and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Bueiiler) ; Read- 
ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and Ara- 
bian Nights and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill from Percentage, including Mental 
Arithmetic, Parts VI and VII (Brooks). 

History. — History of United States, reviewed and 
studied by topics (Lee's New School and White's 
Outlines); Civil Government (Peterman). 

Latin. — Beginner's Latin Book (Collar and Dan- 
iel) ; Exercises in Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English. — Grammar reviewed (Buehler) ; Lessons 
in English (Lockwood); Study of American Litera- 
ture on class and as parallel reading, using Evange- 
line, Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, etc. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic completed; Supplemen- 
tary Exercises and Appendix (Colaw and Ellwood) ; 
Mental Arithmetic;, Part VIII (Brooks); First Steps 
in Algebra (Wentworth). 

History. — Eastern Nations, Greece, Rome (Myers) ; 
Current History (Pathfinder). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Gate to Csesar; Caesar's 
Gallic Wars, Books I, III (Allen and Greenough) ; 
Prose Composition (Mellick). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr). 



22 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English. — Practical Rhetoric (Raub) ; Study of 
English Literature on class and as parallel reading, 
using The Deserted Tillage, Ancient Mariner, Julius 
Caesar, DeCoverly Papers, Silas Marner, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra through Quadratics (Went- 
worth). 

History. — Mediaeval and Modern History (Myers); 
Current History (Pathfinder). 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Book IV (Allen and 
Greenough) ; Cicero's Orations Against Catiline (Al- 
len and Greenough); Prose Composition (Daniell). 

Greek (elective). — Beginner's Greek Book (White) ; 
Thorough Drill upon Forms. 

Science. — Physics — Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Light, 
Electricity, Experiments. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — English and American Literature (Swine- 
ford) ; Basis of Lectures on English Literature (Pan- 
coast) ; Study of English and American Literature, 
on class and as parallel reading, using Burke's Speech 
on Conciliation, The Princess, Merchant of Venice, 
The Alhamora, Comus, L 'Allegro and II Penseroso. 
etc. 

Mathematics. — Three lessons per week; Algebra, 
completed; Plane Geometry (Wentworth). 

Latin. — Four times per week; Virgil's Aeneid, Books 
I — IV; Advanced Latin Grammar (Allen and Green- 
ough) ; Critical Study of Syntax and Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Keetel) ; Readers (Coutiers De 
Fees and Supers). 

History. — Two lessons per week; Leading Facts of 
English History (Montgomery). 

Greek (elective). — Three times per week; Grammar 
reviewed; Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I — III. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 23 

XIV. Experjses Per Term. 

First Grade $5.00 

Second and Third Grades 7.50 

Fourth and Fifth Grades 10.00 

Sixth Grade 12.50 

Freshman \ ear 15.00 

Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years 17.50 

Music 12.50 

Music, with instrument for practice' 15.00 

Elocution $6.25 to 12.50 

Art 10.00 to 15.00 

Stenography 15.00 

Typewriting 10.00 

Incidental Fee 50 

XV. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but month- 
ly payments may be arranged when necessary. No 
deduction will be made for absence except in cases of 
protracted illness of one week or more. All pupils 
must enter for a whole term or the remainder of a 
term, unless previous arrangements are made to the 
contrary. The entrance of a pupil will be considered 
as an acceptance of these terms. 

Ministerial students properly endorsed by their 
churches, and the sons and daughters of ministers, 
receive fiity per cent discount from' the regular rates 
of literary tuition. 

A aiscount of ten per cent is given to all parents 
sending three or more pupils, or to those whose quar- 
terly bills aggregate $20.00 or more. 

Any special arrangements desired must be made on 
or before the entrance of the pupils. The grading 
will be based on the course of study. In the Primary 



24 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

and Grammar School the rates will be in the grade 
in which the pupil has the most studies. Pupils hav- 
ing two or more of the following studies will be 
charged $17.50 per term: Latin, Algebra, General 
History, Lessons in English and Rhetoric. 

XVI. Board 

During the past year satisfactory arrangements 
have been made for all pupils desiring board. Many 
of the best Christian homes in Cary have been open 
for the boys and girls of the school. During the past 
year boys and girls have had different boarding 
places, and the same plans will be arranged for next 
year. Our charges are as low as can be arranged 
with present prices for groceries. These charges 
cover all expenses except washing, but each pupil will 
be expected to furnish a pair of blankets or two quilts, 
a pair of sheets and pillow-cases. Arrangements can 
be made to board from Monday till Friday of each 
week. The Principals will gladly arrange board 
when notified by parents. Charges for board are pay- 
able monthly. 

Mrs. C. A. "Wood, as Matron, will preside over the 
students' home in the school building. These dormi- 
tories are being painted, and will be neatly furnished. 
Good board will be furnished at actual cost, estimated 
at $6.00. to $7.00 per month. This includes cost of 
groceries, fuel, lights, lodging, dining-room and kitch- 
en service. 

The increase in the cost of living has necessarily 
raised the price of board, but we have not. raised it in 
proportion to this increase. The following prices are 
for the school month of four weeks: 

Board in private families $8.00 

Board from Monday until Friday 5.00 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 25 

XV11. Miscellaneous. 

1. The Principals have selected text-books by stand- 
ard authors, and all pupils will be required to use 
books mentioned in the courses of study, except wnen 
it is to the interest of the pupil for the teacher in 
charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term of five months, and pupils entering late must 
join classes already formed. 

3. We urge all parents to enter pupils at the begin- 
ning of term. Late entrance is injurious to pupils 
and school. 

4. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial causes. Going to school is as much 
a business as farming, merchandising, etc., and boys 
and girls should be taught to be prompt in meeting 
all business engagements. 

5. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation, they must seek it in 
other ways. 

6. Parents should always write to the Principals 
when a favor is to be asked for their children, or 
when any complaint is made. 

7. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principals for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

8. All pupils on matriculating pledge themselves to 
obey and uphold the rules and regulations of the 
school. All who are not willing to do this are urged 
to stay at home. No regulations are made except for 
the moral, mental and religious welfare of the pupils 
ana the school. 

For further information, address 

MIDDLETON & SAMS, Principals, 

Gary, 'North Carolina. 



26 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



Students 1901-1902. 



Adams, Ada 
Adams, Clio 
Adams, Erne 
Adams, Laurie 
Adams, Gussie 
Atkins, Harold 
Baucom, C. R. 
Bennett, Chester 
Blanchard, Arthur 
Blanchard, Dexter 
Blanchard, Edna 
Blanchard,, Mina 
Blue, Cornelia 
Blue, Daniel 
Bonner, Blanchard 
Bonner, Helen 
jaonner, Lexa 
Bright, Maggie 
Broughton, E. H. 
Broughton, Irene 
Broughton, Lowell 
Butt, James 
Cain, E. B. 
Campbell, D. M. 
Carroll, Annie 
Carroll, Ethel 
Cheek, H. H. 
Covington, P. W. 
Cox, Hubert 
Eatman, Joe 
Ellington, Charley- 
Ellington, Ethel. 



Franklin, Carey 
Ellis, Dicy 
Franklin, Craven 
Goodwyn, .bettie 
Goodwin, Malpheus 
Guess, Marvin 
Hamlin, L. D. 
Harrington, G. P. 
Hobbs, E. H. 
Holleman, Ethel 
Holleman, W. H. 
Hooker, Roscoe 
House, I. O. 
Huggins, Lessie 
Hunter, Isaac 
Hunter, La Rue 
Huntley, C. W. 
Hurst, Vernon 
Ivey Albert 
Ivey, D. R. 
Ivey, Esther 
Ivey, George 
Ivey, Thaddeus 
Johnson, Foy. 
Johnson, Frances 
Jones, E. C. 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Marvin 
Jones, Walter 
Jordan, Jas. a. 
King, Emma 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



27 



Lawrence, A. V. 
Livingston, M. J. 
Lougee, L. E. 
Lynn, .toy 
Lynn, Norma 
Matthews, M. C. 
Matthews, V. C. 
j^aynard, Atlas 
McKinney, D. T. 
Middleton, O. D. 
Middleton, Robert Lee 
Montgomery, Annie 
Montgomery, Bays 
Morris, Luther 
Murock, Emerson 
Norris, C. S. 
Norris, G. C. 
Norris, Nora 
Ormond, Willie 
Page, Donald 
Page, Clare 
Parks, Claudie 
Partin, Aldridge 
Partin, Pearl 
Pearson, E. C. 
Pickett, Bessie 
Pickett, Lillie 



Pleasants, Milton 
Pleasants, Rena 
Powers, Peter 
Ray, Hickman 
Scott, Elsie 
Segroves, Clennie 
Sorrell, A. N. 
btephenson, George 
Stephenson, Lina 
Stephenson, Sarah 
Stevens, Tommie 
Stone, Lossie 
Templeton, Alf. 
Templeton, Georgia 
Templeton, Hoke. 
Templeton, James 
Templeton, Lillian 
Thompson, Rommie 
Tilley, Amed 
Waldo, Ruth. 
Weathers, E. C. 
Weatherspoon, W. H. 
Wilder, Myrtle 
Williams, W. J. 
Woodlief, B. B. 
Wright, Mary. 
Yates, Ernie 
Yates, Silas 



Pickett, R. J. 
These pupils came from eighteen counties, and are 
representatives of many excellent homes. Heretofore 
the public school was taught with the High School, 
but during the past year the two were separated, 
hence a shorter roll of students. 



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Established 
1881 

BAPTIST BOOK 



RALEIGH 
North Carolina 



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The property of the 

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Largest line of Bibles in North Carolina ; Scbool Books, Office 

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We have the best dollar fountain pen on the market. 
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We pay the freight. Write for Catalogue. 



John L.Borden, Pres. T. P. Jerman, Sec. and Treas. 

Geo. C. Royal), V.-Pres. Miles Goodwin, Inst. Mg. 

Zhe J\oyaU & Borden 
Turniture Co. 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., Raleigh, N. C. 

The largest and most complete stock of Furniture and House- 
furnishings in the State. 

Prices and Quality 

WITH 

BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO., 

206 FAYETTEVILLE ST. AND 

208 SALISBURY ST. RALEIGH , N. C. 

The largest and best 
selected stock of 

Dry Goods, notions, Carpets, 

millinery, ZaiUr=ltlade Suits, Cloaks 

and Capes 

shown in the city of Ralegh 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the city. 
Samples gladly furnished upon request for same. 
Mail orders filled same day received. 

Boylan, Pearce (Si Company 



CROSS ®. LINEHAN CO. 

New Tucker Building. :: :: 234 and 236 Fayetteville St. 

Clothiers, Men's Furnishers 
and Outfitters 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during 
your visit to our city. We will endeavor to make your stay 
pleasant. Respectfully, 

CROSS <& LINEHAN COMPANY 

FLa-leigh ^» V ^» V . NortH Carolina 



*& 



Headquarters in 
North Carolina for 
all kinds of 



tfetaglr, & d. 



■L—nmm— ga^llM 




A full line of second-hand books always 
on hand at 

One-Half Regular Price 



We sell at publisher's prices. 

Mail orders given prompt attention. 

Send us your orders. 




Raleigh, N 



EOPLE'S 

OPULAR 

USHING 

ROGRESSIVE 

HOTOGRAPHER 



Always " Not How Che^p, but How Good " and vp- 

„_ to- Date 

Children's Pictures a Specialty 



R A L E I H NORTH CAROLINA 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils, Glass, Sash, 
Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster, Cement, Clay Chimney Pipe 

Best Goods Lowest Prices 
Square Dealing 



15he 

(Sbucattonal Bureau 

Chas. J. Parker, Manager, Raleigh, North Carolina 

Teachers' Agency Department Secures Positions for Teachers. 

Correspondence invited from Teachers and employers. 
School Furniture Department. Headquarters for Furniture and 

School Supplies of all kinds. 
Catalogue and circular upon application. 



{University College of Aedidne 

RICHMOND, VA. 
/medicine dentistry fltoarmacy 

Some Points of Excellence 

1. High Standard 5. Numerous Laboratories 

2. Broad Courses 6. Complete Equipment 

3. Thorough Methods 7. Varied Clinics 

4. New Buildings 8. Individual Instruction 

For outline of courses offered and degrees conferred apply to 

William R. Miller, 

Proctor 

Paint your houses 

and barns with 

Magnite A 

The Celebrated Cold-water Paints H 

Less than quarter the price of oil and lead and / V 

looks as well 

Bug Death 

Sure death for potato bugs ; non-poisonous, and is a 
plant food. 

Headquarters for hardware of every kind. Best goods. Lowest 
prices. Your money back if not satisfied. Call and see us_ 

Hardware Company 



IbartsOTard 



We carry the largest 
stock of 



Notions, Clothing, Hats, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, Hard- 
ware, Seeds, Plows, Castings, and such other goods as are 
kept in a first-class stock of general merchandise in Cary. 
We carry a select line of buggies and harness. 

Cold Drinks dispensed at 
an up-to-date fountain:::: 



T. /?. @rap & Bro. 



CARY, N. C. 




R. J. Harrison, Pres.H. C. Ormond F. R. Gray, V.-Pres. 

Sec. and Treas. 



'Bhe 



Troy, N. C. 

— , / ';■-■ ' & - t 




4SF- We keep on hand a full supply of 
public school books, and all books 
used in Cary High School. All 
kinds of Stationery on hand :: :: 



J. R. GUESS, 



Ca^ry, N. C. 



OXFORD j. j. SEMINARY 

OXFORD, N. C. 
Ceacbers and Officers, 1902=1903 

F. P. HOBGOOD, President 
Mrs. S. D. TWITTY, Mrs. F. P. HOBGOOD, 

Associate Principal Supt Domestic Department 

F. P. HOBGOOD, A. M., Latin and Moral Science. 
Mrs. M. A. LACY, French and Mathematics. 

Miss LILY EGBERT, A.B. (Randolph- Macon Woman's College, 
Richmond, Va. ), Natural Science. 

Miss LILY GRANDY( Cornell University), English and History. 

Miss JANIE LACY, A. B., Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

Miss HALLIE E. TAURMAN (pupil of Stebbins), Elocution. 

Miss EDNA HUDSON, A. B., Physical Culture. 



Conservatory of Itlusic 

Miss HALLIE E. TAURMAN (Medalist in Voice and Piano) 
Woman's College, Richmond, Va. Four years in Piauo under 
Mills and Parsons, of New York ; four years in Voice under 
Tamaro,Sufferen,and Lizzie Arbuckle Moses, of New York). 

Miss EDNA HUDSON (Music graduate, Oxford Seminary), 
Piano. 

Miss CARRIE HOBGOOD (Music graduate, Oxford Seminary), 
Piano. 



School of Jlrt 

Miss SUE W. HALL (Cooper Union Art School, and under New 
York masters six years. Teacher in Oxford Seminary twelve 
years. 

C 

Miss JANIE LACY, Typewriting and Stenography. 

Miss LILY EGBERT, A.B., Pedagogy. 

Session of 1902-1903 will open September 3, 1902. 

Extraordinary facilities offered in the Schools of Music, Art, 
Elocution. 

The continued prosperity of the school enables it to offer aid 
to meritorious students unable to pay their expenses. 

Our students whom we can recommend easily find places as 
teachers that pay good salaries. We have been unable so far to 
supply the demand for our graduates. 

CHARGES. — Board, fuel, lights, and full literary course for the 
annual session, $135. Music, including the use of the piano, $42 
to $45 for the annual session. 



CATALOGUE 



GARY, N. C. 

1902=1903, 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 1903=1904. 



RALEIGH: 

Edwards & Broughton. 
1903. 



I. Directors and Stockholders. 
Board of Directors. 

Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chairman. 
Rev. A. D. Hunter, Secretary. 
B. S. Franklin. F. R. Gray. C. W. Scott. 



Stockholders. 



C. W. Blanchard. 

J. C. Angier. 

J. E. White. 

A. D. Hunter. 

J. W. Bailey. 

J. R. Walker. 

C. W. Scott. 

F. R. Gray. 

W. D. Jones. 

C. R. Scott. 

Miss Sallie Bonner. 



Mrs. J. K. Mason. 
P. D. Gray. 

B. S. Franklin. 
T. Ivey. 

J. W. Creel. 
Z. V. Johnson. 

C. B. Pasmore. 
R. R Yates. 
Levi Cole. 

Dr J. M. Templeton. 
E. L. Middleton. 



A. F. Sams. 



II. Calendar, 1903-1904. 

Fall Term opens August 11, 1903. 
Thanksgiving Day, November 26, 1903. 
Fall Term closes December 23, 1903. 
Spring Term opens January 5, 1903. 
Easter Monday, Holiday, 1904. 
Spring Term closes May 20, 1904. 




III. Officers and Instructors. 

Session 1902-1903- 

I. E. L. Middleton and A. F. Sams, Principal. 
II. Dr. J. M. Templeton, Chm'n Board Directors. 

III. Mrs. C. A. Wood, Matron. 

IV. E. L. Middleton, A.B (Wake Forest, 1889), 

Mathematics, History, Science. 

V. A. F. Sams, A B. (Wake Forest, 1897), 
English, Latin, French. 

VI. Lily N. Jones (Greensboro Female College, 1892), 
Primary, Penmanship. 

VII. L. Kempie Carlton (Oxford Seminary) , 
Music, Elocution. 

VIII. Lucy D. Reavis, 

Stenography, Typewriting. 



CATALOGUE 



GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



IV. Forewords. 

The year just closed has brought to us 
1. Last Year. _ 

many encouragements. Our enrollment 

shows an increase of more than forty per cent over 
that of the preceding year. These students came 
from a larger territory than ever before and their 
work in every department has been more satisfac- 
tory. It is now believed that the permanent growth 
of this school is fully assured. To students and fel- 
low-teachers we wish to extend hearty thanks for 
their excellent deportment, kind and respectful bear- 
ing, and faithful work. We wish our former pupils 
all possible success, and hope that in their several 
communities they may be staunch supporters of their 
Alma Mater. 

To prospective students we wish to say 
perlment in a11 candor, that if you have not de- 
Station, cided to enter school in good faith, 
under the requirements of our catalogue, we much 
prefer that you do not enter at all — at least until 
you may have reached such a decision. Constant 
shifting in a student-body means endless confusion 
to teachers and little or no profit to pupils. All 
pupils are expected to enter for a full term of five 
months, or for the balance of the term. Since this 
Catalogue is our only means of communication, we 
shall consider that all pupils matriculating thereby 
agree to the above terms, unless satisfactory arrange- 
ments have been previously made. 



6 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

3. Not a Re- However much we may be interested 
formatory. in the reformation of had boys we could 

not take the risk of endangering the character of 
many others for the hope of benefitting one. Be- 
cause of the excellent moral atmosphere of Cary, and 
its numerous incentives to noble living, many boys 
have been strengthened morally while under our 
tuition, but we are too busily engaged otherwise to 
devote our time to the subordination of pupils who 
have never been taught to respect just authority, or 
to tolerate for any considerable time such as persist 
in the practice of evil habits. We reserve the right 
to suspend any pupil whose influence is known to be 
injurious or demoralizing to the student body. 

„ ,.,, Many farmers, who think it almost a dis- 

4. When " 

to Enter. grace to have farm work a few weeks be- 
hind that of their neighbors, think it all right to 
enter their children from one to eight weeks behind 
their classes. With late planting they expect poor 
crops, but ask for good results in school with late 
entrance. The first is as possible and probable as 
the last. Going to school is a business, and no one 
ever engages in any business more important. If 
one fail in business he may start again, but if edu- 
cation is neglected, lost opportunities can never be 
regained. We urge all to be present as early in the 
session as possible, and be sure to plan for the whole 
term. 

5. When and A11 well-regulated schools incur ex- 
Mow to Pay. penses before the school opens, and 

many incidental expenses are due from the begin- 
ning, besides the salaries of teachers. Usually it 
causes no inconvenience for patrons to pay in ad- 
vance. We are trying to run our school on business 
principles, and to do this we must have our patrons 
deal with us in the same way. In order to show 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL 7 

good faith, we request each patron to make some 
payment on entrance, and pay balance of first quarter 
on presentation of statement after assignment to 
grades and classes. If this cannot he done let in- 
dulgence be asked for, so there can be no misunder- 
standing. In the past a few pupils have stopped in 
the midst of the term without previous arrangement 
and asked to have tuition discounted. Of course we 
expect some to discontinue work with good reasons 
therefor, but we wish to know this so as to lay our 
plans with accuracy. Pupils, teachers and the school 
all suffer under such conditions. 

6. Registra- -^-11 pupils, on entering, are required 

tion - to fill blanks on registration card, 

giving name, age, parent, county, church relation, 
date of registration, etc. On the reverse side they 
sign the following: "In entering Cary High School 
I agree to obey all rules necessary to good order and 
efficient work. I shall consider and respect the 
rights of landlords, teachers and fellow-students." 

V. Who We Are. 

1. E. L. Middleton. — For twelve and a half years 
he has taught successfully in the public and private 
schools of this State. After a long service with this 
school, he was released by the Directors, but was 
unanimously recalled to his old work. For a year 
and a half he had a fine opportunity for studying 
methods and plans in the best schools in the South. 
He knows more of the possibilities of his work and 
the means of attaining the most desirable ends in 
education. He has enlarged views, renewed zeal and 
a greater enthusiasm for his work. 

2. A. F. Sam. — For six years he has taught in the 
schools at Marshville and Gary. No opportunity has 
been lost for giving his pupils the benefit of advanced 



8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

and progressive methods in education. He can pro- 
duce endorsements from patrons and pupils in all 
his work, which bear testimony to his thoroughness 
of instruction, faithfulness and enthusiasm in his 
work, and his judicious and successful management 
of school affairs. 

3. Lily N. Jones. — The school is very fortunate in 
retaining the services of such a teacher. She has 
taught consecutively for many years, and has made a 
special study of primary work. Her tact, patience, 
knowledge of children and influence among the girls, 
together with her broad culture, render her an indis- 
pensable factor in the management of our school. 
She is eminently competent to teach the advanced 
classes assigned to her. 

4. L. Kempie Carlton. — Miss Carlton is no stran- 
ger to us. She has taught with us two and a half 
years with preeminent success. She has few equals 
and no superiors in her work. Se is a woman of 
broad culture and refinement. She performs ele- 
gantly and recites with ease and grace. She adds 
great strength to our faculty. 

5. Lucy D. Reavis. — No one is more favorably 
known to the citizens of Gary and our former pupils 
than Miss Reavis. She took her business course 
under Miss Lizzie Lee, of St. Mary's College, Raleigh, 
N. C. She has taught private lessons for six years, 
and has been successful in her work. 

VI. What We Want. 

Who are willing to cooperate with us in 
our work. Those who have the courage 
to see and write to teachers regarding any dissatis- 
faction rather than break a contract or backbite and 
malign a worthy institution. Those who honor a 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. Q 

contract with a school teacher as much as one with 

a grocer. 

Who realize that mental force is superior to 

' oys physical force. Boys of good habits who 

want an education and are willing to work for it. 

Boys who see the great possibilities lying before 

men of the rising generation. 

— Who realize the true nobility of womanhood. 
3. Girls . 

Girls who are willing to live in woman s 

sphere and work faithfully to prepare themselves 

for the noble callings now open to women. Girls 

who prefer well-stored brains and countenances 

beaming with intelligence to servile obedience to the 

whims of fashion. 

Pupils Not Wanted. 

Who do not want an education. Boys who 
curse, swear, play cards and use intoxicants 
in any way or degree. Boys who are boisterous and 
indifferent to the rights of fellow-students, teachers 
and landlords. Boys who are habitual grumblers 
and malcontents. Boys who wilfully disobey neces- 
sary rules. Boys who, concerning their course of 
study, know more of their needs than the principals. 
Boys who enter on trial and stay only a short time. 

Who are unwilling to work for an education. 

2. G i ris 

Girls who will risk personal character and 
that of a school to carry their point. Girls who are 
unwilling to obey rules made for their welfare and 
protection. 

VII. What We Do. 

. _. .. The school is not under the control of any 
i. for the 

heart. religious denomination, but is thoroughly 
permeated with the spirit of Christianity. Only 
teachers of recognized character are employed, and 



10 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

students of every denomination, or of no church 
affiliations are received on equal grounds in all re- 
spects. It is our policy to divide the teachers as 
equally as possible among the denominations repre- 
sented by the patrons of the school. In no case "will 
any influence be allowed which might draw a pupil 
away from his church moorings. As far as possible, 
the wholesome influence of a Christian home is 
thrown around our students. While character is be- 
ing formed, and impressions for life are being made, 
the Christian teacher has open to him a most won- 
derful field of usefulness. 

The school is opened every morning with devo- 
tional exercises. Cary has a Methodist and Baptist 
church, and a mission of the Episcopal church, with 
regular services at each. Pupils are required to at- 
tend the services of at least one of these churches, 
and are expected to attend Sunday School regularly. 

2 For the Jt is our plan *° cultivate our students 
Hand. physically as well as mentally and mor- 
ally. Otherwise the best results in the class-room and 
in after life cannot be realized. To this end, we have 
a beautiful tennis court and baseball grounds, and 
students are encouraged to take sufficient outdoor 
exercise. The Principals take active part in training 
teams for their contests, and their presence on the 
play-grounds is a source of enthusiasm, as well as 
moral influence among the boys. To further encour- 
age athletics, a day will be set apart for Field Day 
exercises. These exercises will be held on our ath- 
letic grounds and a handsome prize awarded to the 
best all-round athlete. 

In all our work we have three ends in view 
3 -J r ° r , tne to teach pupils to be observant of what 

Head. 

they see, judicious in what they do, ana 
logical in what they say. For a teacher to educate 
a pupil he must lead him, not drive him, draw out 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. II 

his mental powers rather than pour in a heterogenous 
mass of information. Pupils are encouraged to do 
as much original thinking as possible. In addition 
to mere mental discipline, we try to use those essen- 
tials in education tending to culture and refinement, 
and those which will prepare young men and women 
for the, active duties of life. 

In the Primary and Grammar School Departments 
we take all pains in laying good foundations for fu- 
ture work, whether in business, high school or col- 
lege. Frequent and thorough drills are given in 
spelling, reading and writing. In English Grammar, 
pupils are trained in the correct use of the language 
by frequent exercises in written work. When the 
pupil has acquired a thorough knowledge of the 
technical principles of grammar the critical study of 
English Classics is emphasized. 

It is our aim in all branches of study to give as 
broad culture as possible and yet magnify the practi- 
cal parts. The student should be taught to reason 
from cause to effect, and, as far as possible, make 
practical application of every lesson imparted. Our 
methods of instruction are varied with a view to 
arousing and holding a live interest in the work. 

VIII. Where We Are And What We Have. 

Too much could not be said of the desi- 
rability of the location. It is both health- 
ful and beautiful. The moral atmosphere of the 
town of Cary could not be excelled in the State. The 
society in the town will be elevating and stimulating 
to the youth that will attend the institution. No bet- 
ter railroad facilities could be furnished in the State 
— just at the junction of the Seaboard and Southern 
Railways, eight miles west of Raleigh. It is far re- 



12 CARY HIGH SCHOOI,, 

moved from the malarial regions, with pure, cold 
well-water in abundance as the beverage of the peo- 
ple. The town was chartered dry, and is fortified 
against the possibility of alcoholic drinks ever being 
sold in or near it. 

In the most attractive part of the town 
ing . an( j surroun( j e( j by a beautiful campus 
of oaks, is our school building. On the first floor 
there are four large and well-lighted class-rooms — 
which may be easily converted into an auditorium — 
a society hall, reading-room, library and four music- 
rooms. On the second floor are rooms for the matron, 
a dining-hall and dormitories for sixteen boys. 
During the present vacation, additional building is to 
be done, and the entire plant embellished. 

The entire building is furnished with 
3. Equipment. guitable f urn jt U re and equipment. The 
class-rooms have folding desks, charts and maps. The 
Society hall has chairs, tables and tracking. The 
music-rooms are furnished with three pianos, and the 
dormitory rooms with neat and comfortable furni- 
ture. 

IX. General Culture. 

I Literary Tlie Clay Society for young men and 
Societies, the Browning Society for girls meet 
once a week for exercises in debate, composition and 
elocution. All members are required to take part in 
the exercises. Most excellent results have been ob- 
tained during the past year. The good to be derived 
from this work can not be overestimated. It gives a 
knowledge of parliamentary law and stimulates a 
fondness for reading. It gives the power of express- 
ing in public one's thoughts — a power not possessed 
by many people. It gives a broader view of men and 
things, and as an educator it has no superior. We 
want original thought, and there is no field broader 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 13 

and more capable of yielding rich harvest. We be- 
lieve the boys and girls need the supervision of teach- 
ers as much in their society work as in the class- 
room. And while the management of each society is 
left largely to its members, who perform all official 
duties, the Principals do not hesitate to make or un- 
make regulations when in their judgment the best 
interests of the societies demand it. All boarding 
pupils over fifteen years old will be required to be 
members of these societies. 
_ . .. A library of 400 volumes has been col- 

2. Library 

lected, to which additions are constantly 
being made. Every volume is carefully examined, 
and nothing except literature of high order is allowed 
on our shelves. We have many volumes of biogra- 
phy, history, addresses, together with the prose and 
poetical works of Dickens, Scott, Cooper. Tennyson, 
Longfellow, Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bacon, and 
others. 

No other preparatory school in North Car- 

3. Reading- olina has a better reading-room. On our 

Room 

files are Review of Reviews, World's Work, 
Outlook, McClure's, Cosmopolitan, Munsey, Frank 
Leslie, Youth's Companion, Success, with a large 
number of State and National periodicals and two 
excellent educational monthlies. All pupils have ac- 
cess to the reading-room every day, and during the 
past year it was largely used. 

Lectures given at stated times by promi- 
a Lectures 

' nent men have for years been a feature 

of our work. Many distinguished educators and 
leading men in other professions have entertained 
and greatly benefitted us by timely and practical ad- 
dresses. Our student body looks forward to these oc- 
casions with much interest, and the large audiences 
from the town and community show that they are 
generally appreciated. We have already secured prom- 



14 CriKY HIGH SCHOOL. 

ises from many prominent lecturers for the coming 

session. 

X. What Our Pupils Do. 

In the South, no secondary school can confine itself 
to one specific line of work. We have two general 
ends in view — one to prepare boys and girls for col- 
lege, the other to fit the great mass of our students 
for the active duties of life. In the latter class we 
can point with pride to young men and women who 
are becoming strong factors in the social industrial 
and church life of their several communities. In the 
former class our pupils are doing us honor while 
honoring themselves. During last year we had a 
large number of former pupils in the following insti- 
tutions: University of North Carolina, Trinity Col- 
lege, Wake Forest College, A. and M. College, N. C. 
Normal and Industrial College, and Oxford Female 
Seminary. This does not include several of our stu- 
dents who went directly from our school to profes- 
sional schools. Several of our students at these col- 
leges have graduated magna cum laude. 

XI. Record of Work.. 

I Examina- Educators are not agreed as to how often 
tions. or how difficult examinations should be. 

We require written examinations of all pupils on all 
studies during each quarter, but these examinations 
are short and at such times as will give the pupils 
an opportunity of telling what they know, and not 
what has been "crammed" in their heads for a special 
occasion. A record is kept of work on recitations, 
and an average mark is secured from these two 
sources. 

We send reports at the end of each ten 
• ° epor s - weeks. We keep all parents informed re- 
garding the scholarship, deportment and attendance 
of their children. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 15 

We ask for their co-operation. Low marks are not 
necessarily a sign of poor work. A poor mark on 
deportment needs immediate attention. 

At the end of each quarter an Honor Roll 
. s-jonors, . g p 0S ^ e( j rp be entitled to a place on 
this, a pupil must make an average of 92.5 on scholar- 
ship, 95 on attendance, and excellent deportment. 
To be on the annual Honor Roll, a pupil must have 
been on all the quarterly Rolls of Honor. 

A handsome gold medal will be awarded to the 
pupil in the High School making the highest scholar- 
ship during next year. To compete for this, a pupil 
must be present to receive all the reports of the year. 

Prizes will also be awarded for excellence in de- 
bate, essay-writing, declamation and recitation. 

XII. Special Departments. 

Music has long since come to be a necessity 
Music. 

to a civilized people. It is the most exten- 
sively cultivated and the most generally appreciated 
of all the fine arts. A thorough and conscientious 
course in music will certainly carry with its manual 
training mental and heart training also. Many now 
study music who never expect to teach or become per- 
formers, because of the enlarged capacity to enjoy 
good music that comes from such a course of study, 
and because they realize that all cultivation of the 
fine arts is an upward and forward step. 

Our purpose is to train pupils on technic and such 
a course of study as tends to give a thorough knowl- 
edge of music and to make the best performers. 

Elocution is no longer considered a mere 

ocution. pastime s tudy. The eyes of the people, 
even in our conservative South, have been opened to 
see not only the beauty and grandeur, but the practi- 
cal importance of true expression. 

And the time rapidly approaches when the inele- 



l6 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

gant speaker will be compelled to withdraw from the 
field to make room for the man who cultivates both 
brain and body. 

To give due expression to our thoughts and feel- 
ings, we must learn to apply the principles of Pitch, 
Force, Time, Stress, Emphasis, Modulation and Ca- 
dence to the various qualities of tone, selected with 
proper reference to the meaning to be conveyed. Ex- 
pression also teaches Self-Control, Ease, Polish, Ad- 
dress.. Fluency, etc. 

In answer to considerable demands we 

Typewriting n , , 

and have arranged to give instruction in 

Stenography. Shorthand and Typewriting. A study 
of these departments net only furnish excellent means 
for mental development, but also affords practical 
information which may prove very profitable. By a 
knowledge of these arts, many energetic boys and 
girls are working their way through higher institu- 
tions of learning. We use the Isaac Pittman System 
of Shorthand. As texts we will use his Twentieth 
Century Complete Phonographic Instructor, The 
Twentieth Century Dictation Book, and Nos. 1 and 2 
Business Letter Book. 

For practice work in Typewriting we will use a 
standard typewriter. 

The policy of the school is to make no 
00 promises that are not kept. We have 

no separate department for this study. Too many 
boys and girls are being misled by inducing them to 
take a business course before their mental develop- 
ment or experience in life warrant it. This study is 
pursued as a part of our work in Arithmetic, and is 
intended to prepare pupils for a more advanced study 
of the subject, or fit them for managing their own 
business as farmers, merchants, artisans, etc. The 
work is elementary, and we make no extra charge 
for it. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 1 7 

XIII. Course of Study. 

(1.) Primary. 

FIKST GRADE. 

1. Primer (Carneflx). 

2. First Reader — Graded Classics. 

3. First Reader (Holmes). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

5. Life of Washington. 

6. Number Work. 

7. Writing. 

SECOND GRADE. 

1. Second Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Second Reader (Holmes). 

3. Spelling, Part I (Branson). 

4. Number Work. 

5. Life of Franklin. 

6. Grimm's Fairy Stories. 

7. Writing. 

THIRD GRADE. 

1. Third Reader — Graded Classics. 

2. Third Reader (Holmes). 

3. Life of R. E. Lee (Williamson). 

4. Spelling, Part I (Harrington). 

5. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

6. Language Work. 

7. Physical Culture (Johnson). 

8. Writing. 



l8 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

(2.) Grammar School. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

1. Fourth Reader (Holmes). 

2. North Carolina History Stories (Allen). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Language Lessons (Swinton). 

5. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Writing. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

1. Life of Stonewall Jackson (Williamson). 

2. Primary History of United States (Chambers). 

3. Spelling, Part II (Harrington). 

4. Elementary Geography (Maury). 

5. English Grammar, Book I (Hyde). 

6. Primary Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; Ad- 
vanced Arithmetic to Fractions (Colaw and Ellwood). 

7. Physiology (Steele). 

8. Writing. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

1. History of United States (Lee's New School). 

2. Spelling, Part II (Branson). 

3. Advanced Arithmetic to Percentage (Colaw and 
Ellwood) . 

4. Mental Arithmetic (Milne's). 

5. Manual of Geography (Maury). 

6. English Grammar, Book II (Hyde). 

7. First Steps in Science (Bert). 

8. Writing. 

(3.) High School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

English. — Writing, Spelling (Branson), Punctua- 
tion, and Use of Capitals; Grammar (Buehler) ; Read- 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 19 

ing on Class Sketch Book and Enoch Arden, and Ara- 
bian Nights and Tales of the White Hills, as parallel. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Colaw and Ellwood) ; a 
thorough drill from Percentage, including Mental 
Arithmetic (Milne's). 

History. — History of United States, reviewed and 
studied by topics (Lee's New School); Civil Govern- 
ment (Peterman). 

Latin. — Beginnier's Latin Book (Collar and Dan- 
iel) Exercises in Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Engish.— Grammar reviewed (Buehler), and a 
Study of English Composition; Study of American 
Literature on class and as parallel reading, using 
Evangeline, Last of the Mohicans, Scarlet Letter, etc. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic completed; Supplemen- 
tary Exercises and Appendix (Colaw anl Ellwood); 
Mental Arithmetic (Milne's) ; First Steps in Algebra 
(Wentworth). 

History.- — Eastern Nations, Greece, Rome (Myers). 

Latin. — Grammar reviewed; Gate to Caesar; Caesar's 
Gallic Wars, Book I, (Allen and Greenough) ; Prose 
Composition (Mellick). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Tarr). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English. — Normal Grammar (Maris) ; Practical 
Rhetoric (Raub) ; Study of English Literature on 
class and as parallel reading, using The Deserted 
Village, Ancient Mariner, Julius Cwsar, DeCoverly 
Papers, Silas Marner, etc. 

Mathematics. — Algebra through Quadratics (Went- 
worth). 

History. — Mediaeval and Modern History (Myers). 

Latin. — Caesar's Gallic Wars, Book III (Allen and 



20 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

Greenough); Cicero's Orations Against Catiline (Al- 
len and Greenough); Prose Composition (Arnold). 

Science. — Physics — Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Light, 
Experiments (Mead's). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English. — Rhetoric completed (Raub); English 
and American Literature (Swinton); Study of Eng- 
lish and American Literature, on class and as paral- 
lel reading, using Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
The Princess, Merchant of Venice, The Alhamora, 
Comus, U Allegro and II Penseroso, etc. 

Mathematics. — Three lessons per week; Algebra, 
completed; Plane Geometry, Three Books (Went- 
worth). 

Latin. — Four times per week; Virgil's Aeneid, 
Books I — IV; Prose Composition (Arnold) ; Critical 
Study of Syntax and Prosody. 

French. — Grammar (Macmillan's) ; Readers 
Coute's De Fees and Supers). 

History. — Three lessons per week; Leading Facts 
of English History (Montgomery). 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 21 

XIV. Expenses Per Term. 

First Grade $5.00 

Second and Third Grades 7.50 

Fourth and Fifth Grades 10.00 

Sixth Grade 12.50 

Freshman Year 15.00 

Sophomore and Junior Years 17.50 

Music 12.50 

Music, with instrument for practice 15.00 

Elocution $6.25 to 12.50 

Stenography 15.00 

Typewriting 10.00 

Incidental Fee 50 

Library and Reading-Room Fee (for all above 
Fifth Grade) 25 

XV. Terms. 

Tuition is payable quarterly in advance, but month- 
ly payments may be arranged when necessary. No 
deduction will be made for absence except in cases of 
protracted illness of one week or more. All pupils 
must enter for a whole term or the remainder of a 
term, unless previous arrangements are made to the 
contrary. The entrance of a pupil will be considered 
as an acceptance of these terms. 

Ministerial students properly endorsed by their 
churches will receive a discount of 50 per cent, and 
the sons and daughters of ministers, 25 per cent dis- 
count from the regular rates of literary tuition. 

A discount of 10 per cent is given to all parents 
sending three or more pupils, or to those whose quar- 
terly bills aggregate $20.00 or more. 

Any special arrangements desired must be made on 
or before the entrance of the pupils. The grading 
will be based on the course of study. In the Primary 
and Grammar School the rates will be in the grade 



22 CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 

in which the pupils have the most studies. Pupils hav- 
ing two or more of the following studies will be 
charged $17.50 per term: Latin, Algebra, General 
History, and Junior Bngilsh. 

All accounts not settled within ten days after the 
close of each term must be closed by note. 

XVI. Board. 

During the past year satisfactory arrangements 
have been made for all pupils desiring board. Many 
of the best Christian homes in Gary have been open 
for the boys and girls of the school. During the past 
year boys and girls have had different boarding 
places, and the same plans will be arranged for next 
year. Our charges are as low as can be arranged 
with present prices for groceries. These charges 
cover all expenses except washing, but each pupil will 
be required to furnish a pair of blankets or two 
quilts, a pair of sheets and pillow cases. Arrange- 
ments can be made to board from Monday till Friday 
of each week. The Principals will gladly arrange 
board when notified by parents. Charges for board 
are payable monthly. 

Mrs. C. A. Wood, as Matron, will preside over the 
students' home in the school building. These dormi- 
tories are being painted, and will be neatly furnished. 
Good board will be furnished at actual cost, estimated 
at $7.00 per month. This includes cost of groceries- 
fuel, lights, lodging, dining-room and kitchen service. 

The increase in the cost of living has necessarily 
raised the price of board, but we have not raised it 
in proportion to this increase. The following prices 
are for the school month of four weeks 

Board in private families $8.00 

Board from Monday until Friday. 5.00 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 23 

XVII. Miscellaneous. 

1. The Principals have selected text-books by stand- 
ard authors, and all pupils will be required to use 
books mentioned in the courses of study, except when 
it is to the interest of the pupil for the teacher in 
charge to order a change. 

2. Classes will be formed at the beginning of each 
term of five months, and pupils entering late must 
join classes already formed. 

3. Parents should not allow their children to be at 
home for trivial cause. Going to school is as much 
a business as farming, merchandising, etc., and boys 
and girls should be taught to be prompt in meeting 
all business engagements. 

4. Students are not expected to idle away their time 
down town, around the depots and places of business. 
When they need recreation, they must seek it in 
other ways. 

5. Parents should always write to the Principals 
when a favor is to be asked for their children, or 
when any complaint is made. Permission will not be 
given to boarding girls to leave Gary, except for their 
homes, unless by written request from their parents 
to the Principals. 

6. All boarding pupils will be responsible to the 
Principals for their conduct out of school, as well as 
while at the school building. 

7. All pupils on matriculating pledge themselves to 
obey and uphold the rules and regulations of the 
school. All who are not willing to do this are urged 
to stay at home. No regulations are made except for 
the moral, mental and religious welfare of the pupils 
and the school. 

For further information, address 

MIDDLETON & SAMS, Principals, 

Gary, North Carolina. 



24 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



XVIII. Students 1902-1903. 



Adams, Efne 
Adams, Laurie 
Adams, Ada 
Adams, Clio 
Adams, Gussie 
Adams, John C. 
Adams, Robert B. 
Adams, C. B. 
Atkins, Harold 
Blanchard, Arthur 
Blan chard, Mina 
Blanchard, Edna 
Blanchard, Wingate 
Baker, Birdie 
Bonner, Alexander 
Bonner, Margaret 
Bonner, Helen 
Bonner, Blanchard 
Bonner, Fannie 
Blalock, Annie 
Blalock, Lula 
Benson, Nena 
Benson, Leo 
Bennett, Chester 
Bright, Ada 
Bright, Maggie 
Boothe, W. C. 
Butt, James 
Broughton, Arthur 
Barrett, Willie 
Currin, R. W. 
Covington, Piatt 
Covington, Walter 



Campbell, Coy 
Campbell, De Witt 
Cain, E. B. 
Cheek, H H. 
Coley, Ollie 
Crocker, Ruth 
Crocker, Julia 
Davis, Walker 
Davis, Eunice 
Davis, Lee Roy 
Darden, D. M. 
Darden, S. I. 
Eatman, Bessie 
Edwards, Levi 
Edwards, Allie 
Franks, Thomas H. 
Finch, Fred. 
Ferrell, T. H. 
Ferrell, G. Z. 
Freeman, Herman 
Franklin, May 
Franklin, Joe 
Gattis, W. A. 
Green, D. R. 
Green, J. E. 
Grady, Dora E. 
Goodwyn, Bettie 
Harrington, G. P. 
Hatch, James F. 
Haywood, E. M. 
Howard, Eugene 
Hooker, Roscoe A. 
Holleman, Ethel 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



25 



Huggins, Lessie 
Hunter, Isaac 
Hunter, La Rue 
Ivey, Albert H. 
Ivey, Esther 
Ivey. Thad., Jr., 
Jones, Ezra G. 
Jones, R. P. 
Jones, J. Craige 
Jones, Octavius 
Jones, Vernon 
Jones, Lillian 
Jones, Marvin 
Jones, Troy 
Jones, Hervey 
Jones, David 
Johnson, Foy 
Johnson, Gaynelle 
Johnson, Frances 
Jordan, Alma 
Jordan, Lily 
Judd. E Clarence 
King, Emma 
King, J. R. 
Lashly, Alice 
Lowe, Arthur 
Liles, Effie 
Lynn, Foy 
Lynn, Norma 
Markham, Lillian 
Middleton, Lucy 
Middleton, Robert Lee 
McGhee, Matthew 
McGhee, Claud 
McGhee, William 



Maynard, Atlas 
Maynard, Walter 
Montgomery, Amie A, 
Montgomery, Bays 
Matthews, V. C. 
Moore. K. C. 
Morris, Luther 
Norris, C. H. 
Norris, Nora A. 
Ormond, Will 
Patrick, Alvis 
Page Donald 
Page. Clare 
Page, Hunter 
Page, Dollie A. 
Page, Wilbur H. 
Page, Ethel 
Page, Mamie 
Pearson, Luna 
Pearson, E. C. 
Pleasants, Rena 
Pleasants, Clarence 
Pleasants, Milton 
Pendergraft, Walter 
Pope, David H. 
Powers, Peter 
Powell, Florence 
Powell, Ada 
Ray, Sam B. 
Ray, Hickman 
Stone. Lila 
Stone, Lossie 
Stone, Eugene 
Scott, Elsie 
Sorrell, Nannie A. 



26 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



Sorrell, Lloj r d 
Sams, Maude C. 
Stephenson, Lina 
Steppenson, Sarah 
Stephenson, George D. 
Smith, Effie 
Stephens, T. A 
Taylor, Ora A. 
Taylor, Carey B. 
Templeton, James M. 
Templeton, A. J. 
Tilley, Amed 
Tilley, Posie 
Turberville, Raleigh 
Thompson, Wm. P. 
Truelove, Annie 
Upchurch, Lena 
Upchurch, Lettie 



Upchurch, Willie E. 
Upchurch, Gettis 
Waldo, Lavine 
Waldo, Ruth 
* Weathers, Burke 
Warner, R, H. 
Wilborn, M. T. 
Willson, James D. 
Wood, Clyde 
Woodlief, Lona L 
Woodward, Mary J. 
fWoodard, T. M 
Williams, J. Q. 
Weather spoon, W. H. 
Yates, Bertha 
Yates, Lydia 
Young, W. R. 
Young, Daniel C. 



* Suspended for insubordination. 
t Expelled for immoral conduct. 



CARY HIGH SCHOOL. 27 



Summary of Roll. 

Wake County — Resident Students 85 

" " Non-resident Students 44 

Durham County 11 

Harnett County 7 

Franklin County 4 

Chatham County _ 3 

Scotland County 3 

Moore County 2 

Lenoir County 2 

PittCounty 2 

"Vance County _ 2 

Anson County 1 

Beaufort County 1 

Granville County 1 

Richmond County 1 

Warren County 1 

Wilson County 1 

Yancey County 1 

Total 172 



28 GARY HIGH SCHOOL. 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, 1903 

May 17. Annual Sermon by 

Dr. I. McK. Pittinger, Raleigh, N. C. 

May 19. Declamation Contest. 
May 20. Exercises by Primary Department. 
May 20, 8 p. m. Debate by Representatives of the Clay Literary 
Society. 

Query : Resolved, " That the results of the War of 1861 to 1865 
Justify the Sacrifice." 

AFFIRMATIVE. 

G. D. Stephenson, Cary, N. C. 

C. B. Taylor, Dunn, N. C. 

P. W. Covington, Wadesboro, N. C. 

NEGATIVE. 

J. M. Tbmpleton, Jr., Cary, N. C. 
K. C. Moore, Wilson, N. C. 
E. C. Jtjdd, Enno, N. C. 

May 21, 11 a. m. Annual Address by 

Hon. E. W. Pou, Smithfleld, N. C. 

May 21, 8. p. m. Annual Concert by 

Music and Elocution Classes. 

Senior Class, 

James M. Templeton, Jr. 
C. B. Taylor. Bettie M. Goodwyn. 

P. W. Covington. Rtjth Waldo. 

W. H. Weatherspoon. Foy Johnson. 

W. E. Upchurch. Maggie Bright. 

K. C. Moore. Foy Lynn. 



S. C. POOL. 



Don't 



DANIEL ALLEN, 

Late Daniel Allen & Co. 




Till you see the 

Largest and Latest 
FASHIONS and 
at LESS PRICES 

than any house in the city. 



Every Pair 
Warranted. 



POOL & ALLEN, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



at duchy's Store, 



We Sell Better Goods at Lower 
Prices than any other Store. 



We always have what you cannot find elsewhere. 
DRY GOODS of all kinds, 

READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS, 
SHOES, Etc., CARPETS, 

CURTAINS and DRAPERIES. 



Dress Suits SZZ.** 8 



J* 



We have a large line of samples of the BEST 
CLOTHS for dress suif,s, and guarantee a 
PERFECT FIT and LO W PRICES. We also 
have a full line of 



$♦ Shoes* etc* 




Lowest Prices Guaranteed. 



Paint your houses 
and barns with 



agn i te, 



The Celebrated Cold-water Paints. 
Less than quarter the price of oil and lead and looks as well. 




Bug Death, 

Sure death for potato bugs ; 
non-poisonous, and is a plant food. 



Headquarters for Hardware of every kind. Best Goods. Low- 
est prices. Your money back if not satisfied. Call and see us. 

HART-WARD figSuwu 



RALEIGH MARBLE WORKS, 

RALEIGH. N. C 
Cooper Bros., Proprietors 




HEADSTONES, MONUMENTS, IRON FENCES. 

BEST MATERIAL. BEST WORK. LOW PRICES. 

We Pay the Freight. Write for Catalogue. 

John L. Borden, President. T. P. Jerman, Sec.-Treas. 

Geo. C. Royal, Vice-President. Miles Goodwin, Inst. Mg. 

Tie ROYALL & BORDEN Furniture Company, 

Corner Wilmington and Hargett Streets, Raleigh, N. C. 

The Largest and Most Complete Stock of Furniture and House- 
Furnishings in the State. 

PRICES AND QUALITY. 

Charles B. Pasmore 

WITH 



BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO., 

206 Fayetteville Street, 

and 

208 Salisbury Street, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



The largest and best 
selected stock of 

Dry Goods, Notions, Carpets, 
Millinery, Tailor-Made Suits, 
Cloaks and Capes^SRP"* 1 "'" 1 " ~~ 

Shown in the City of Raleigh. 

We cordially invite you to visit our store when in the city. 
Samples gladly furnished upou request for same. 
Mailorders filled same day received. 

Boylan, Pearce & Company. 




W atson 's 

Photograph 

Qallery 

RALEIGH, N. C, 
Will Appreciate Your Patronage. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



E, 



Stoves, Tinware, Nails, Iron, Steel, Paints, Oils, Glass, 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Plaster, Cement, 

Clay Chimney Pipe. 



Best Goods, Lowest Prices, 
Square Dealing. 

Buck's Stoves and Ranges. 

THE 

Educational Bureau, 

Chas. J. Parker, Manager, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Teachers' Agency Department Secures Positions for Teachers. 

Correspondence invited from Teachers and employers. 

School Furniture Department — headquarters for 

Furniture and School Supplies of all kinds. 

Catalogue and Circular Upon Application. 




CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

New Tucker Building. :: 234 and 236 Fayetteville St. 

Clothing, Men's Furnishers 
and Outfitters. 

We extend to you a cordial invitation to call and see us during 

your visit to our city. "We will endeavor to make 

your stay pleasant. Respectfully, 

CROSS (EL LINEHAN COMPANY. 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Mrcd raiiams & Co., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Headquarters in 
North Carolina for 
all kinds of 



A full line of second-hand 

books always on hand at 

ssbalf ftegulai 

We sell at Publishers Prices. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention. 
Give Us Your Orders. 

AGENTS FOR 

Public School Bool^s in North Carolina. 

SoPULAR 

%%^g^~ I— Pushing 
^^^msmMzm?™*™^ i ^v REGRESSIVE 

Raleigh, N. C. JL >^ HOTOGRAPHER. 

Always " Not How Cheap, but How Good " and Up-to-Date. 





Children's Pictures a Specialty. 



We carry the largest 
stock of 



Dry Qoods and Shoes, 

Notions, Clothing, Hats, Tobacco, Groceries, Crockery, Hard- 
ware, Seeds, Plows, Castings, and such other goods as are kept 
in a nrst-class stock of general merchandise in Cary. We carry 
a select line„of 

BUGGIES AND HARNESS. 

F. R. Gray&Bro., 

CARY, N. C. 



Cold Drinks dispensed at an 
Up=to=Date fountain. 




R. J. Harrison, 

President. 

H. C. Ormand, 

Sec. and Treas. 

F. R. Gray. 

Vice-Pres ident . 



THE 

Harrison Wagon Co. 

WAGON MANUFACTURERS 

Cary, N. C, 



i 



E. F. UPCHURCH, 



CARY, N. C. 



UNIVERSITY 

COLIEQE OF MEDICINE. 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Medicine. Dentistry. Pharmacy. 

Some Points of Excellence: 



5. Numerous Laboratories. 

6. Complete Equipment. 

7. Varied Clinics. 

8. Individual Instruction . 



1. High Standard. 

2. Broad Courses 

3. Thorough Methods. 

4. New Buildings. 

For outline of courses offered and degrees conferred apply to 

William F^. Miller, 

PROCTOR. 




Mtt 



The Seventieth Session will begin August 26, 

1903. 
Fifteen independent " Schools," embracing 

Science, Language, Mathematics, Philoso- 




forest 




phy, Bible, Law, Pedagogy, Medicine, Etc. 

Expenses Moderate. 



College* 



For Catalogues or Special 
Information, address 



President Taylor, 

Wake Forest, N. C. 



Oxford Seminary, oxford, n. c. 

Teachers and Officers. 1903-1904. 

f. p. hobcood, president. 

Mrs. s. d. twitty, Associate principal. 

Mrs. f. p. hobgood, supt. domestic department. 

F. P. HOBGOOD, A.M., Latin and Moral Science. 

Mrs. M. A. LACY, French and Mathematics. 

Miss LILY EGBERT, A.B. (Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 

Lynchburg, Va.), Natural Science. 
*Miss LILLY GRANDY (Cornell University), English and 

History. 

Miss JANIE LACY, A.B., Assistant in Preparatory Department. 
Miss HALLIE E. TATJRMAN (Pupil of Stebbins), Elocution. 
Miss EDNA HUDSON, A.B., Physical Culture. 

Conservatory of Music. 

Miss HALLIE E. TAURMAN (Medalist in Voice and Piano) 
Woman's College, Richmond, Va. Four years in Piano 
under Mills and Parsons, of New York ; four years in 
Voice under Tamaro, Sufferen, and Lizzie Arbuckle Moses, 
of New York. 

Miss EDNA HUDSON (Music graduate, Oxford Seminary), 
Piano. 

Miss CARRIE HOBGOOD (Music graduate, Oxford Seminary), 
Piano. 

School of Art. 

Mrs. T. N. BURWELL, (Cooper Union Art School, and New 
York masters. Teacher in Oxford Seminary two years.) 



Miss JANIE LACY, Typewriting and Stenography. 
Miss LILY EGBERT, A.B., Pedagogy. 

Session of 1903-1904 will open September 2, 1903. 

Extraordinary facilities offered in the Schools of Music, Art, 
and Elocution. 

The continued prosperity of the school enables it to offer aid 
to meritorious students unable to pay their expenses. 

Improvement during session of 1902-1903 consist of building 
and equipping a handsome Studio, of finishing and furnishing 
dormitories for one dozen boarding students. 

A complete system of Water Works was installed. 

CHARGES.— Board, fuel, lights, and full literary course for 
the annual session, $135. Music, including the use of the piano, 
$42 to 847 for the annual session. 

* Resigned for one year, the vacancy to be filled.