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Full text of "Catalogue of early Dublin-printed books, 1601 to 1700"



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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




ENDOWED BY THE 
DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC 



D6lc 

v.l 

pt.1-3 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00024499106 




Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/catalogueofearly113dixe 



JSoohe 



PHWTED m DUBliIN in the 17tb GEnTORY. 

LIST COMPILED BY 

E. R. McC. DIX, 

WITH 
BY 

C. W. DUGAN. 



Part I.— 1601— 1635. 



PRICE 2/6. 



DUBLIN: 
T. Q. O'DONOQHUE, 3 Bedford Row, Aston's Quay 

LONDON : 
B. DOBELL, 77 CHARING CROSS ROAD, W.C. 



LIST OF NEW PUBLICATIONS. 

T. G. O'DONOGHUE, 3 Bedford l{ow, Aston's Quay, Dublin. 

MANQAN, JAMES CLARENCE, Life and 

Writings of, by D. J. O'Donoghue, large 

8vo., designed cover, el. gt.,gt. tops, with 

6 illus., including 2 portraits, noiu ready, 

(pub. 7/6), ^... 6/- 

Unpublislied letters, new poems, etc., etc. 



■itTLoiiinir Tianiiiuthan. . 



V-V 



Pall Mall Gazette. — The task, of preparing tlie biography 

could not have falle" *" 

those of Mr. O'Doi 

at this time of df 

O'Donoghue has giv 

a standard place on: 
Acadeiny — JMr. O'Donog 

completeness, and 

letters know well, 

gation, his instinct : 

and remembering fg 

genius. He tell h 

and at the same tinj 

it ia his industry wt 

without admiration 

Irish Times — A book a 
author has renderei 
position. 

O'DONOQHUE (D.i 

a Biographical 
graphical Parti 
of about 2,500 
1892-93, 8vo, (• 

ONLY A I 

Dublin Daily Express- 
arraed with uuflag 
horse, the end\u'an( 
health, and stimula 
ism, should have ex 



The sai 

as issued, three' 
only 50 copies } 




CARLETON (Will 

eluding his A 

tinuation by D O ^ETIiIj 

introduction by 

cl., with 2 p( 

(pub. 25/-), .. 

A (AunffiKm.— Delightful reading. 

Daily Chronicle. — To Mr. O'Donoghue are due our hearti est 

thanks for this most thorough, keen, and fascinating 

book. 

Daily News. — Mr. O'Donoghue has laid us all under a 
heavy obligation. 

COMYN. (DAVID). _ Irish Illustrations to 
Shakespeare, being Notes on his Eefer- 
ences to Ireland, wrapper, 4to, 6d. 



LALOR (JAMES PINTAN), Writings of, with 

Introduction by John O'Leary, and a 

Memoir by D. J. O'Donoghue, fancy 

wrapper, 1/- ; cloth, 2/- 

Sketch. — Of all the men of the '48 Movement, he was as a 
thinker, the ablest. His writings are very well worth ' 
study. 

Independent. — A man before his time, a keen thinker, a 
- - clear,.,forciblej andjogical writer. 

bne of the most original 

Jand, but of Europe. 

Is a very real and definite 



pnian Nights' Enter= 

knic Stories told at a 
Isigaed wrapper, I/- ; 

■:e his already high reputa- 
bme of the stories wUl take 
p of Irish humour. It is a 
;d re-read. 

^ racy. We obtain a pleaa- 
; view of the Irish Tireside 
bnoe ; a really kindly rural 

PANISH ARMADA.— 

'apt. CueUar in Con- 
.D., 1588, a picture 
pntemporary sources, 
I M.R.I. A., with trans-. 
[i documents by Mr. 
'ated, cL, bds., just 
Free. 

raluable document. Mr. 
lod service to the cause of 
a publication. 

j—The Eeliques of, 
gar and Dr. Crone, 
lue, post, wrapper, 

id collection of the writings 
|ter poet and eccentric. , 



IX UXVUXXL^M, XXX.\Ji\XI 



ax?a.tio]iL 

„. JIONARY OF IRISH 



ARTISTS, 

By D. J. O'DONOGHUE. 

Including about 2,000 Painters, Architects, Sculptors, 

Designers, Engravers, Gem and Seal Cutters, Medallists, 

Caricaturists, etc. 

PRICE to Subscribers, ... 7/6 

After Publication the Price will be IO/6. 



^dt alo0tte 



OF 



Early Dublin-Printed Books, 



1 60 1 to 1700. 



PART I. 

1601 to 1625. 



COMPILED BY 
E. R. McC. DIX, R.S.A.I., Nat. Lit. Society; 

WITH AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES, 
BY C. WINSTON DUGAN. 



Dublin, 1898. 



NOTE. 

Since the type of this Catalogue has been set up Sir John T. Gilbert has contributed a most valuable paper to 
the Royal Irish Academy upon " Irish Bibliography of the 17th Century," in which he gives much valuable 
information about Dublin Printers and Printing of that century, and I am availing myself of some of his 
references to Dublin-printed books of that period for this Catalogue, for its greater completeness and 
usefulness. 

I wish here to express my indebtedness to Dublin's pre-eminent historian, to whom I desire, with 
his permission, to dedicate this small effort. 

E. R. McC. DIX, 

17 Kildare Street, 

Dublin. 
15th June, 1897. 



[SECOND ISSUE, WITH ADDITIONS.] 



PREFACE. 



TNSPIRED by the excellent example of Mr. John Anderson's publication of a list 
of Belfast printed books (which is in so admirable a form that I have 
copied it closely), and prompted by the spirit of local rivalry to vindicate the 
superiority of my native city, both in time and excellence of its printing and 
literary cultivation, this preliminary step towards a similar list has been taken, and 
is at present only put forth in an imperfect and incomplete form for the purpose of 
inviting help to what must be a very slow and toilsome effort. Printing in Dublin 
began, it is generally believed, in 1551, but as our able and pre-eminent historian, 
Sir John T. Gilbert, has dealt with the earliest period of printing here, viz., during 
the 1 6th century, in a paper read before the Ro3'al Irish Academy, and will, I trust, 
publish his researches, I have entirely refrained from touching upon this 
period, and propose to deal with the 17th century only, still a virgin field in 
which even the feeble effort of the literary amateur may result in some fruit worth 
preserving. To enter upon the i8th century would be too great a task. Besides, 
lists of all books printed in Ireland during the greater part of that century have 
been published. 

At work for less than two years, I have collected, through the kind help of many 
book lovers and collectors (particularly should I here mention Messrs. R. R. Belshaw, 
C. W. Dugan, and D. J. O'Donoghue), a list of over 600 works or editions, and am 
gaining others, from time to time. To wait till the list becomes a large one, would 
mean a delay of years. To publish what has been gathered so far, would involve 
considerable expense, with very little resulting good. It has, however, occurred 
to me to divide the century into quarters, and as it is clear that there was little printing 
here in the first quarter of the 1 7th century, or less survival of it in any form, to 
print in a preliminary way the few works traced so far, between 1601 and 1625, ^^^ 
to circulate such list as widely as possible, soliciting additions to it, and more parti- 
cularly references to books printed in the rest of the century. This is my apology 
for this imperfect production of Part I. I hope it may achieve my desire. 



— 4 — 

It would be tedious here, and at present, to point out wliat advantage any sucli 
list of books can bring. Should Part II. ever appear, some reasons for it will be put 
forward sufficient to excuse the attempt in which I have been very kindly encouraged 
by Sir John T. Gilbert, and by the President of the National Literary Society, and 
many of its members. Meanwhile, any references to Dublin-printed works of the i yth 
century are urgently solicited, and will be very gratefully received and acknowledged. 

Of others who have kindly helped me, I gratefully acknowledge the aid of 
Count Plunkett, Mr. Hurley (Abbeylands,Waterford), Mr. James Collins, Mr. Patrick 
Traynor, Mr. N. Massey (Cork), Mr. T. G. O'Donoghue, Mr. R. A. Shrimpton (the 
Assistant Librarian of the King's Inns), Mr. A. De Burgh (T.C.D. Library), Miss 
Crofton, Mr. R. Longworth-Dames, Mr. Trevor (The National Library), Rev. Dr. 
Morgan (the Librarian of the Armagh Diocesan Library), Mr. Robbins (Law Library, 
Four Courts), Mr. J. LeFanu, Mr. John O'Leary, the Rev. John Dickenson 
(Librarian, "Worth Library," Dr. Steevens' Hospital), The Rev. Canon Rooke, 
(Librarian of St. Canice's Library, Kilkenny), the late Mr. Hugh Lyle, (Librarian of 
the Derry and Eaphoe Diocesan Library, Londonderry), Mr. John Anderson, Mr. 
Kershaw (Librarian, "Lambeth" Library), Rev. G. P. White (Librarian, Cashel 
Diocesan Librarjr), Mr. W. R. Browne, and Mr. F. Jenkinson (Librarian, University 
Library, Cambridge). 

For corrections in this Part I shall also be grateful. 

The list in this Part is not confined to books or pamphlets, but includes 

proclamations. 

E. R. McC. DIX. 



■"■■ 








ABBREVIATIONS. 




R. I. A. 


The Royal Irish Academy. 




T.C.D. 


The Trinity College, Dublin, Library. 




K. Inns 


The King's Inns (Dublin), Library. 




Pub. Rec. Office 


The Public Record Office, Four Courts. 




Marsh 


Marsh's Library, St. Patrick's. 




Nat. Lib. 


National Libraiy, Kildare Street. 




Lin. Hall 


The Linen Hall Library, Belfast. 




Lough Fea 


The *' Shirley " Library at Lough Fea, 


Can ickm across 


Malcomson 


The late R. Malcomson's Library. 




Brit. Mus. 


The British Museum Library. 




Lambeth 


The Lambeth Palace Library, London. 




Bodleian 


The Bodleian Library, Oxford. 




U. L. C. 


University Library, Cambridge. 




K. P. 


King's Printer. 





INTRODUCTION 



THE compilation of a List of Books, printed in Dublin during the seventeenth century, 
is a task attended with much difficulty and uncertainty. During this turbulent 
unhappy period of Irish history many books were either suppressed or destroyed, 
and their authors punished ; certainly the printing and publishing of many that contained 
matter savouring of disaffection to either the Church or State, then ascendant, was perilous 
to both writer and author. 

In our own peaceful times, when Protestant and Catholic, Saxon and Celt, men of 
any party whatever, all subjects of one Imperial crown, can agree to differ and to discuss 
and maintain their rights and privileges in a courteous and rational manner, we can hardly 
form a clear conception of the state of Ireland from 1600 to 1700. A candid inquirer will 
find it very difficult to follow out and unravel the convolutions of parties, the confusion 
of causes and motives, which led each party and its leader to action in those troublous days. 

Even the great Contemporary writers — such as Clarendon and Carte, Borlase, Davis, 
Temple, Clanricarde, Castlehaven, Ware, Ussher, Nalson, and a host of others — all give 
different accounts of the transactions and different complexions to the motives of the chief 
actors of this eventful century. During the immediately preceding centuries, Ireland, 
no doubt, had been torn by multiplied evils — despotic rule subverting national rights, and 
ferocious internecine wars of reprisal and revenge. The statutes of Kilkenny, in A.D. 1361, 
had bitterly accentuated the differentiation of race. Poynings' Law, A.D. 1495, had sealed 
the legislative degradation of the country; but to all such racial and political indignities 
was added, in the seventeenth century — religious oppression and hate, the most deadly of all — 
which indeed had been slowly creeping into Irish affairs from the times of Edward VI. 
and Elizabeth. In that long and bloody struggle under the despotic Tudors, and the vacillating 
corrupt Stuarts, we find an eclipse of mercy in the councils of the dominant power, and a 
crown of sorrow in the conquered race. 

This was the century ushered in by the bloody contests between the English forces, 
led on by Essex, Mountjoy and Carew, and the Native Irish under O'Neill, O'Donnell and 
O'Sullivan — which witnessed the plantations of James I., and the consequent feuds and 
heartburnings ; the promised graces of Charles I. never fulfilled, the cruel religious wars 
introduced by the new Puritan element, the terrible rebellion and massacres of 1641-42, the 
Confederation of Kilkenny, the struggles of the three great parties of Ormondists, Parliamen- 
tarians and Confederates ; the ruthless Cromwell, like a dark spirit of wrath over the devoted 
land, the sieges of Limerick and Derry, the Williamite and Jacobite campaigns, and lastly, 
the gloomy advent of the Penal Laws. The humanity taught by nature, and the charity 
which springs from Christianity, were all ignored in that terrible century of sectarian bigotry 
and hate. 

This is the story of Ireland from 1600 to 1700, and we find its spirit influencing nearly 
all the publications of the time. Well, indeed, would it be, were such a reign of terror 



— 6 — 

forgotten ; yet, although, we may not look over the record of such a period with unmoved 
hearts, we may at least walk with erect head and tranquil brow, for such gloomy days are 
gone for ever. 

We have noted thus much of the history of the seventeenth century, as it may, in a 
degree, account for the comparative dearth of authenticated Irish-printed books during 
this period. 

A large number of Irish writers, lay and clerical, availed themselves of the superior 
facilities for printing and publishing which then existed in London and Oxford, whilst nearly 
all those of the Roman Catholic party were deterred from printing or publishing any work 
in Dublin, under penalty of liberty, fortune, and perhaps life. Hence we find that during 
this century an immense number of books, political and religious, were published on the 
Continent, especially at Douay, Louvain, Paris, Lyons, Rome, and other Roman Catholic 
centres. 

Many of these works were surreptitiously brought into Ireland, and kept concealed 
amongst the few religious communities that contrived to exist. 

It is very probable, however, that many publications belonging to the prescribed 
parties were secretly printed in Dublin, and issued imder fictitious names and titles. We 
come to this conclusion partly from the internal evidences furnished by the works in 
themselves, partly from analogous action in other times and places, the evidence of which is 
undoubted. 

Other considerations of a more speculative character may be adduced to strengthen 
this opinion. 

We may notice, especially, a work by Henry FitzSimon, entitled : "A Catholike Confu- 
tation of Mr. foJiii Rider's Clayme of Antiquitie, etc.," in 2 vols., 4to, printed at " Roan," 1606. 
In this book the type, paper, and watermark are very similar to those used in known 
Dublin-printed books of the early part of the seventeenth century — for instance, in Ussher's 
" Vetenim Epistolarum Hibernicaruni Sylloge" Dublin, 1632. In both works the size of 
the paper is small 4to, and several of the woodcut initials are similar ; in Fitzsimon's treatise 
the names of the printer and printing office are omitted. At the end of Vol. I. the corrector, 
apologising to the reader, states, z>/to- alia — "I pray thee to pardon it (sc. erratum) because 
I never had in ttvo years' space that this worke was in printing the helpe of the Author to reade or 
peruse any one sheete of all this labour." If this book were printed in Rouen (spelled "Roan" 
in title page) it certainly could not have occupied two years' space in the printing. At that 
time Rouen, under the Latin title RotJiomagus, was famous for its printing establishments, so that, 
most likely, the great delay which occurred was owing to the difficulty of printing such a work 
in Dublin from the troubled state of the times and suspicion attached to all Roman Catholic 
publications. Henry FitzSimon had been in prison in Dublin Castle up to 1605, and was then 
banished to the Continent. He says, at the end of Vol. II., entitled : "A Replie to M. Rider's 
Rescript, etc." that he finished it 36th September, 1607. This second volume is also noted in 
title " At Roan, 1608." The printer of the first volume must therefore have had it on hands 
in Dublin, from 1605 to 1607. FitzSimon could not have been there during that time. We 
have commented at some length on this publication because it is probably the history of 
many others of a similar kind printed in Dublin during the seventeenth century. 



VVe have an analogous case from the followi:ig century. The work, " Hibernia 
Dominicana," by Thomas de Burgo, 4to, 17^2, is well known to have been printed at the private 
press of the Roman Catholic party in Kilkenny, yet, on the title page, it is stated to have 
been printed — Col. Agrip (Cologne). Of course this was done to avoid prosecution, as the 
book contained matter, notably the history of James II., the publication of which, in the 
author's days, would have involved serious penal consequences. 

It may be here interesting to note parallel instances of the suppressions of means to 
identify printed books which occurred before this period. It is well known to bibliographers 
that many of the works printed by Jenson, 1461-69, were dated 147 1, and many of the most 
celebrated printers of Upper Italy — the De Spiras, Valdarfer, John de Colonia, etc. — printed 
many works between these years without either name or date. This was simply because 
they were afraid. Our theory is that a similar fear prevailed in Ireland, though proceeding 
from a totally different cause. 

In Italy all the Universities had privileged guilds of copyists and illuminators attached, 
who produced all the transcripts necessary for the large body of students, and sanctioned by 
Authority. It is obvious that the introduction of the art of printing would have the effect 
of throwing these great bodies out of employment ; therefore, when it was brought in from 
Germany they petitioned the Government against it as an invasion of their privileges and means 
of living. Being very powerful and influential these guilds easily obtained a strong pro- 
hibition of the issue of printed work. As a consequence several printers left Italy — those 
that remained printed in secret, not daring to attach either name or date to their works. 
The prohibition was not relaxed until the issue of public decrees in Venice in 1470 ; in Genoa 
and other cities at a much later date. 

The printing trade seems to have been at a very low ebb in Dublin during the first 
quarter of the seventeenth century, and the defective type and material must have seriously 
limited the production of books. In the present day of steam-rollers and Linotypes we 
cannot but be amused at Dean Rider's quaint apology in the preface to his " Caveat" (Dublin, 
1602). The writer says: — "If the Irish Testament (a goodly laborious and profitable worke 
to God's Church) had not imbusied the Printers' Presse ; long before this time my Friendlie 
Caveat had presented itself I have onlie handled the first position and could goe no further 
till the Printers return from London with newe Letters." As to faults escaped (errata) he 
continues — " Impute them not to the skilful printer but to the stumpeworne letters, for as 
weapons unsteeled cut not, so letters overwoi'ne print not." We ought to bear in mind that 
at this period the Dean must have had command of the best privileged presses in Dublin. 
This brings us to a little digression as to the general state of printing in Ireland up to this 
period, and to considerations as to the probability that facilities for printing were in the hands 
of many of the religious bodies in Ireland, especially in Dublin, and that consequently many 
works may have been surreptitiously printed there, but which for reasons given above bore 
fictitious names and dates, or in which these were wholly suppressed. Such considerations 
are those of the speculative character above mentioned which may be adduced in favour of the 
opinion that many books were printed in Dublin during the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries, of whch we have no direct record. 

Ware enumerates sixteen Irish writers during the fifteenth, and forty-two during the 

c 



sixteenth centuries ; the latter having written altogether about one hundred and four works, not 
one of which is noted as being printed in Ireland, the greater number bearing the names 
of Doway, Antzverp, Venice and Tigunun (Zurich), yet many of these men resided during tKeir 
lives in Ireland, and suffered severely for the expression of their opinions — which was sufficient 
to deter the rest. We may mention John Traverse who published (? where) a book in defence 
of the Pope's supremacy ; for this he was indicted under the Act of Henry VIII. 28, cap 13, 
and punished. Some writers, Spondanus and Lynch, assert that his hands were cut off and 
burnt. This, however, is indignantly denied. He was, however, afterwards condemned for 
high treason and executed. Peter White was ejected from the Deanery of Waterford, and 
Nicholas Comerford from all his preferments, both for nonconformity, towards the close of 
Elizabeth's reign. Nicholas Creagh, Archbishop of Armagh, who wrote several works, was 
imprisoned in the Tower, and died therein, 1585. Under such circumstances it is certainly 
unlikely that any of the resident Irish writers would care to have their works identified by 
name or place of publication. 

It is generally stated that the first printing press established in Ireland was that of 
Humphrey Powell, in Dublin, 1550, and that the first book printed there of which we have 
authentic record, i.e., name of printer, place and date, is the " Boke of Common Prayer, etc" 
Humphrey Powell, Dublin, 155 1. The first book alleged to have been printed in England was 
The Game and the Playe of the Chesse, imprinted by Wm. Caxton, 1474; Bouchot gives the date 
1477. For a few years after Caxton no printers appear to have worked in London ; after 
1480, however, they became fairly numerous. At this stage the question may naturally 
occur — why was the art of printing of such late introduction to Ireland .' a period of seventy- 
seven years having elapsed between the date of first printing in England by Caxton, and the 
alleged dates of the first printing in Ireland, or nearly a century after the complete invention 
of the art by Gutenberg and Fust at Mentz. Admitting that the period of the first diffusion 
of printing in Europe was one of the darkest and most distressing in the history of Ireland, a 
period when the great racial conflicts were intensified and embittered by the imminent shadow 
of the greater and more lasting conflict of religion, still such a delay in its advent is open to 
very grave doubt. 

Irish Art, in the production of manuscript books, flourished over Europe from the sixth 
to the fourteenth century, and Irishmen were especially celebrated for copying and illuminating 
the Sacred Scriptures and other devotional works. Dr. Reeves, in his memoir of the Book of 
Armagh, states that the Irish were celebrated in very early times for the ample manner in 
which they were provided with copies of the Scriptures. Is it credible that the large number 
of Irish writers who flourished at the time of the diffusion of printing, and during the following 
century, most of whom were ecclesiastics and had spent much of their early years on the 
Continent, would have failed to bring back with them into Ireland the new art of book- 
producing .'' We know that many of these scholars were themselves practically acquainted with 
printing, a knowledge which they had acquired in the great early printing centres of Mentz, 
Strasburg, Venice, etc. A century before the printing of the first Bible at Mentz, Richard 
Fitzralph, Archbishop of Armagh, had written a translation of the New Testament. During 
centuries previous to the sixteenth, hosts of Irish writers appeared, a large number of whose 
works were extant in this latter century, and lying scattered through the great libraries of the 



Continent, and it may naturally be surmised that many of the learned men who came over to 
Ireland during this and the preceding century would have brought with them the materials 
for printing and diffusing a knowledge of these works in their own country. 

Such books, however, must have been comparatively few. The great body of the 
people spoke and understood their native language only, and certainly there was no induce- 
ment to print in that language. The Act 28, Henry VIII, almost proscribed the Irish 
language, and about half a century earlier, 14B3, we find an Irish bishop in Dublin petitioning 
to be allowed to choose natives to take charge of certain livings in his diocese. 

Of the many Irishmen on the Continent connected with the invention of printing we 

may notice one especially, Maurice Fihely, known also as Maurice Hibernicus and Maurice 

de Portu, an Irish Franciscan, and native of Baltimore, Co. Cork, hence the surname 

"de Portu." Towards the close of the fifteenth century he was engaged as principal corrector 

of the press to Octavian Schott, who set up as a printer at Venice — correctors of the press at 

this time were generally learned men of high position, and Venice was then celebrated as a 

printing centre, there being no less than 230 distinct presses in the city, previous to 1500, 

including the famous ones of the two de Spiras, Jenson, Valdarfer, and other well-known 

names. This Maurice Hibernicus was the author of several highly-esteemed works, one of 

which, " Encliiridion Fidci" 4to, 1500, is dedicated to the Earl of Kildare, then Lord Deputy, 

and from the title-page it appears that he was then Archbishop of Tuam ; he died in Galway 

in 1512. From the colophon of the Enchiridion it appears to have been printed by a certain 

Bon Locatelli ; and in Palmer's History of Printing it is stated that of the three printers under 

Archbishop Maurice, this Bon Locatelli was one. It appears, therefore, that Maurice, if not 

himself actually a working printer, must have thoroughly understood the art, and also as 

corrector of the press was acquainted with the whole art and mystery of the production and 

publication of literary matter. When he came to Galway in 15 12, more than half a century 

after the invention of printing, it is hardly likely that he found printers capable of publishing 

■ any of his works. Is it not, therefore, probable that this dignitary of the church would have 

brought printers and printing materials with him, and have endeavoured to introduce into the 

country that art with which he had been connected, and which had been brought to such 

perfection in Venice i" 

A well-known bibliographer. Prosper Marchand, in his Histoire de I'Origine de 
I' Imprimeric, 4to, 1 740, refers to a work — St. Jerome s Lives of the Saints, Printed by Faber, 1475, 
and states that this work was done in Cashel,* Ireland. But this opinion is combated by 
Mercier, another eminent bibliographer. Marchand's assertion, however, is not improbable. 
The Fabers were well-known Dutch printers, and at that period there was much intercourse 
between the south of Ireland and the Low Countries, while it is likely that the bishops of 
Cashel had already brought over printing materials from the Continent. We find a similar 
controversy involving the date of the first printing in England. 

A book entitled " Sancti feroniini Exposicio, etc." was found at Cambridge, the colophon 
of which states that it was printed at Oxford, MCCCCLXVIII, eight years before Caxton 
commenced to print in England. The Oxford date is said by some writers to be either a 
forgery or a mistake, while others stoutly uphold its authority. 

■'' Cassilia. tlie name on Faljer's book, is that given for Cas'iel in Tipp:rary, by Mowc;!!. 



lO 

Yet the generally received statement is that the first printing press established in 
Ireland was that of Humphrey Powell, in 1550, and that the first book printed and published 
in Ireland, entitled " The Boke of Common Prayer, etc." emanated from this press in the year 
following. If this be correct, we have thus a barren period of forty years elapsing between the 
advent to Ireland of the great printer, bishop, and illustrious scholar, Maurice de Portu— he 
himself closely connected with printing, and coming from a city the most celebrated in the 
world for its printers and presses, whether we consider the beauty of typography or the value 
of the issued works — and the publication of what was nothing more than a poor reprint of the 
Book of Common Prayer. We look upon this as highly improbable, and from all the above 
considerations, we venture to say that there must have been other printing presses actively 
employed in Ireland, and that several of the 104 works above referred to, the product of Irish 
genius, must have been actually, though surreptitiously, printed and published in Ireland during 
this century. 

A similar state of things, and for still stronger reasons, prevailed during the seventeenth 
century. All these considerations must convince us of the truth of our opening statement. 
The energetic and industrious compiler of this list has had a weary and uncertain task. 
Mr, Dix has identified over 600 works as being published in Dublin during this century. 
Could he have ascertained all, his list would perhaps be nearer to 1,000. The works of Irish 
writers of all kinds, between A.D. 1600 and 1700, number nearly fourteen hundred. 

Ware mentions 306 writers of Ireland born in the century, and enumerates about 900 
works. His list, however, included only the more important names. Our contention is, 
that many works printed in Dublin were issued under other names. Instead of " Dublin " we 
find on the titles such words as Bruxelks, Lovain, Gracii, Siyrorimi (Gratz), Nissa, and so on, 
likely those of the Institutions or Colleges to which the writers belonged. 

C. W. DUGAN. 



II 



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL NOTES. 



1602. This is the first Irish version of the New 
Testament and the second book recorded as being 
printed in Irisli type. The first was that entitled 
Alphahetum et Ratio Legendi Hiberniaim et Caicckis- 
mus,by John A. Kearnagh, 8fo, 1571. Both works 
were probably printed from the fount of Irish type 
and press provided by Queen Elizabeth at her own 
expense (see dedication to New Testament). We have 
no account of any publication in wliich these types 
were employed during the thirty-one intervening years. 
The Alphabetunij according to the Ussher Memoirs, 
by Wright, was published at the cost of Master John 
Ussher, Alderman, 20th June, 1571. This John 
Ussher was Mayor of Dublin in 1574. 

Archbishop O'Donnell undertook to complete the 
translation of the New Testament into Irish from the 
original, at the instance and urgent request of the Lord 
Deputy Chichester and the Irish Privy Council. He 
availed himself of the labours of his predecessors in the 
field of translation, John A. Kearnagh, treasui'er of St. 
Patrick's, Nicholas Walsh, Chancellor, afterwards 
Bishop of Ossory, and Nehemiah Donuellan, a native 
of Galway and Archbishop of Tuata. O'Donnell also 
went through Connaught looking for further aid, and 
secured the services of Mortogh O'Eionga (King), a 
well-known Irish scholar. Beliiig, in his Vindicia 
Hibernia, Parisus, 1650, gives the credit of the whole 
translation to King. 

The printing of this transla,tion, 1602, was executed 
in the house of Sir Wm. Ussher, Clerk of the Council, 
in 1593, son of the Alderman John Ussher, meutiouecl 
above. The Archbishop, in his address to James I., 
says : " Sir William Ussher willingly undertook the 
charges of the greater part of this impression, and did 
greatly kindle mine affection to foUowe the work with 
all earnestness." 

The following is the rendering of the Title-page of 
this Irish editio princeps. " The New Testament of 
Our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, translated from 
the Greek into Irish, by William O'Donnell. Printed 
at the town of the Ford of the Hurdles (Baile atha- 
Claith), in the house of Master Wm. Ussher, at the 
foot of the Bridge, by John Franke, 1602." It is a 
small folio of 214 pages, with double columns. O'Don- 
nell was one of the first three scholars of Trinity 
College, Dublin, and one of the first elected Fellows. 

1602. A Friendlie Caveat. This work is not men- 
tioned by Ware. It was written by Dean Eider, 
afterwards Bishop of Killaloe, in reply to the Eev. 
Henry Fitzsimon, a Jesuit, who being challenged, main- 
tained in a written tract, 20th January, 1601, that 
there was "no diversitie of beliefe, etc., betwixt the 
Catholicks of these tymes and the primitive Catholicks 
of the tymes of the Apostles." Fitzsimon was at this 
time a prisoner in Dublin Castle. He was the son of 
a Dublin Merchant, was educated in the Protestant 
religion, became a Jesuit, and was so eminent for his 
learning and as an able disputant that he began to be 
suspected as a dangerous person, and was committed to 
prison, 1599. In this year he had a dispute with the 
celebrated Ussher, then a very young man. The 



controversy with Eider was bitterly continued, and 
produced a number of tracts from each champion. 
FitzSimon, in the advertisements to his Catholicks 
Confutation gives a lively and quaint account of his 
personal disputations with him in the Castle before the 
Mayor, Chief Justice Palmer, etc. 

The Preface to Eider's Cavent contains the curious 
statements mentioned in the Introduction as affording 
an insight of the defective state of printing in Dublin 
at this period. 

Dean Eider was not a native of Ireland, and the 
Caveat was the only work of his noted as printed in 
Dublin. He was well known as the author of a Latin- 
English Dictionary.* 

1603. New Testament. Harris in Ware s.ays : "It 
appears by a Privy Seal dated 24th May, 1595, for his 
(Nehemiah Donnellan) advancement to the Archbishop- 
rick of Tuam, that one of his merits is mentioned — he 
had taken great pains in translating and putting to the 
Press the Communion Book and Xetv Testament in the 
Irish Language, which Queen Elizabeth greatly ap- 
proved of." This must refer to the part which he took 
in furthering the edition of 1602 — ut supra. 

The present one is, perhaps, a new edition of that 
published in 1603. Sir James Ware does not mention 
this latter, and seems to confound these editions. 
Referring to O'Donnell's work he says : "The New 
Testament was printed in 1603, quarto, and dedicated 
to King James," the charge of which was borne by the 
province of Connaught and Sir Wm. Ussher, then 
Clerk of the Council." Anderson in his Historical 
sketches follows the same error. 

1604. Instructions to his Children. This is the Sir 
Wra. Ussher mentioned above as taking such an active 
and substantial part in promoting the publication of the 
Irish New Testament. He spelled his name "Uscher" 
and was the sou of John Ussher, the Mayor who pub- 
lished the Alphabetum at his own cost, and who was the 
author of a curious treatise De Reformatione Hibernia. 
This work has not, as the title might imply, any reference 
to religious matters, but to a device for the reformation 
of the Staple, which device was strongly opposed by 
the Burgesses of the Staplejjortes The profits of this 
device to the Queen he estimates at seven or eight 
thousand a year ; his own portion, about three thousand , 
he purposes to devote to the erection of a College or 
University in Dublin. Vide Letter to Lord Burghley, 
Dublin, 15th July, I57r. 

In a letter to Lord Burghley from Lord Deputy 
Fitzwilliam, 7th July, 1572, we find — "The bearer. 
Alderman Ussher, has opened a device that seems very 
feasible for the coinage in base money of pence, etc." 
If this be the reformation intended it was rather silly 
and impolitic. But the debasing of money for Ireland 
was then a common practice, and was so during the 
three preceding reigns ; about this time the coinage 
struck for Ireland was only one-third fine, sometimes 
less. We can, therefore, hardly impute any dishonest 
intention to good old John Ussher, in his projected 
" reformation." 



* Dean Rider published another work entitled " A Kcscriiit, etc.," in answer to Fitz.simon's writing while a prisoner in the O.ibtle, This Rescript must 

hare been printed in Dublin, in March or April, 1604. 



— 12 



John Ussher and Sir William TJssIier, fatlier and 
son, who "were so active and zealous for the foundation 
of a University and support of Irish printing, were 
collateral branches of the same stock from which 
sprung the more celebrated Archbishop Ussher. Vide 
Ussher Memoirs hj Wright. 

1 60S. Book of Common Prayer, This boot, with 
the exception of the Psalms, was translated into Irish 
by Dr. O'Donnell, probably with the same help as 
in case of the New Testament, and published by him 
in the year before his appointment to the See of 
Tuara, at his own expense. The Psalms were trans- 
lated by John 0*Kearnagh. This was the fourth book 
printed from the Irish fount sent over by Elizabeth in 

1571- 

The Mortogh O'King whom O'Donnell found out in 
Connaught, and who assisted in his Irish trauslations, 
was one of the moat fiuished Irish scholars of the time. 
He was uncle to the celebrated Paul King, the Fran- 
ciscan, in answer to whose writings Belling wrote his 
^^Vindicia Catholicorum." Mortogh became a Protest- 
ant, obtained a church li ving,and on the recommendation 
of Archbishop Ussher was employed by Bedell on his 
Irish translation of the Scriptures. This celebrated 
Irish scholar was very unfortunate in after life. The 
opponents of Bedell, among whom were Laud and 
Strafford, were numerous. King was charged with 
incompetency, next accused of some slight delinquency, 
deprived of his living, and finally in his old age tried 
and imprisoned. 

This venerable man who had so usefully assisted in 
the translation of the Scriptures since 1601, died in 
poverty at the age of So. The place of his birth and of 
his interment are alike unknown. 

1 615. Le Primer Report, etc. Sir J. Davies, or 
Davis, was the son of a Wiltshire tanner. He studied 
at Oxford, was called to the bar, and subsequently 
became a favourite of James I. owing to a poem 
entitled ^^ Nosce teipsum," which he wrote during his 
student days. James made him his Solicitor, then his 
Attorney-General for Ireland, and he was subsequently 
elected Speaker of the Irish Commons. 

He was the author of several works, the most 
remarkable being "J. Discoverie of the True Causes why 
Ireland was Never Entireli/ Subdued, etc.^^ London, 161 2, 
quarto; an edition was published in Dublin, 1664, 
i2mo. For the times in which he lived and the position 
which he held, Davies in his woi-k displays impartial- 
ity and a politic tone; the closing paragraph contains 
the oft quoted statement referriug to the love of the 
Irish for *' equal and indifferent justice." 

The election of Davies as Speaker of the Irish House 
of Commons was the occasion of a most unseemly, if 
not amusing, tumult. For the first general parliament 
which was held in Dublin Castle, i6th May, 1613, 
James I. created forty new boroughs for the new 
counties which had been formed, in addition to the old 
thirteen shires which had fifty cities and boroughs. 
On assembling, the Eecusant (Catholic) party elected 
Sir J. Everard Speaker, and placed him in the chair. 
The government party, which was in the majority, 
selected Sir J. Davi-'S and conducted him to the chair. 
Everard refused to leave, whereupon, after some strug- 
gling, they placed Davies in his lap. Finally, Everard 
was pulled out with torn robes and injured leg; he and 
his party to the number of ninety-seven then left the 
house. Vide. Desiderata Curiosa Iliberniea, ed. J. 



Lodge, Dublin, 1772. Sir John subsequently made a 
very learned speech from the chair, but which was 
adulatory to the King and Lord Deputy in a fulsome 
degree. He was, however, a true and liberal friend to 
Ireland. He held the opinion that Ireland having a 
parliament of her own was not bound by Acts of the 
English parliament, thus forestalling the opinions of 
Molyneux in 1697, and of Charlemont and Grattan in 

1782. 

1619. Pathologia Hereditaria. The author of this 
work was bom in Tipperary and educated at Oxford ; 
he was esteemed one of the most eminent of his pro- 
fession in Ireland. He wrote other medical works, 
also some poems dedicated to the Earl of Ormond. 

1 62 1. The Statutes of Ireland, etc. Sir Richard 
Bolton was Lord Chief Baron, and afterwards Lord 
Chancellor of Ireland. In the Parliament of 1640, 
Captain Audley Mervin impeached Bolton, then Lord 
Chancellor, John Bi.shop of Derry, Sir G. Lowther, 
Chief Justice, and Sir G. Eatcliife for subverting 
the laws, for unjust decrees, and inflicting infamous 
punishments, etc. The charge against Sir E. Bolton, 
however, was dropped. He wrote several other legal 
works, two of which, to be noticed hereafter, were 
published in Dublin. 

1621. The Counlesse of Pembroke's Arcadia. This 
is the Arcadia of the celebrated Sir Philip Sidney, a 
heroic pastoral romance which was left uuiinished and 
in scattered manuscripts at the time of his death, after 
the battle of Zutphen in 1586. These were subse- 
quently carefully collected, revised and published liy his 
sister, the Countess of Pembroke, hence the title. 
This work went thi'ough several editions, and was 
translated into some foreign languages. There were no 
less than twelve editions published in London during the 
17th century. Lowndes (Bib. Manual) states that a 
" Supplement of a defect" in Part III. of the Arcadia by 
Sir Wm. Alexander was published in Dublin, 1621, 
folio, and that a sixth book to same work by E, B., 
Esq. {i.e. Eichard Belling), was published in Dublin, 
1624, 4to, the former being reprinted in the London 
edition of 1622, and the latter iu that of 1629, both 
appearing in subsequent editions. Ware, iu his ac- 
count of Belling, seems to have been imaware of the 
Dublin 1624 edition. He states that Belling, when a 
student at Lincoln's Inn, writ and added a t^lusth book 
to the Arcadia which was printed with that romance, 
London, 1633, folio. 

Sir William Temple, who had been secretary to Sir 
Philip Sidney up to the time of his death, and one of 
his most ardent admirers, was at this time Provost of 
Trinity College, an office which he accepted on the 
urgent solicitations of Archbishop Ussher in 1609, 
and in which he continued up to his death in 1626. 
Sir William was a man of much learning and taste, and 
probably it was under his auspices that these Dublin 
editions were brought out. It is certainly refreshing 
to find a work of belles lettres of this kind appearing 
midst the long wearisome list of controversial treatises, 
political and religious, sermons and tracts, which 
seemed to be the chief productions of the Dublin press 
during this century. 

1623 — 1625. A Friendly Advertisement, dec. — Reply 
to a Popish Adversary. — The author of these works 
may be styled a " religious lawyer." He was Chief 



— 13 — 



Justice during the reigns of James I. aud Charles I. 
He was a learned lawyer and found time to write 
several controversial works. Archbishop Ussher dedi- 
cated to him his discourse on the religion of the Ancient 
Trish, London 1631, 4to. These tracts were published 
in the closing years of James I — at a time when pro- 
ductions of the kind from both sides appeared ad 
nauseam. The lawyer might well have left such work 
to the Churchmen, who seemed to be "Christians in 
Compleat Armour " offensive and defensive for the 
purposes of this internecine paper war. 

1624, An Epistle, cic. — Answer" to a Challenge, &o. 
The celebrated James Ussher, whose learning and 
intellect has shed such lustre upon the Irish Church, 
was born iu Nicholas Street, Dublin, on the 4th of 
January, 15S0/1, and received his early education in 
School-house Lane. The school there was kept by two 
Scotchmen, James Hamilton, afterwards Lord Clande- 
boye, aud James FuUerton, both of whom became 
Professors and the first elected Fellows of Trinity 
College, which was opened iu 1593. The compiler of 
the Ussher Memoirs states that these two Scotchmen 
" under the guise of pedagogues were in reality agents 
for King James." To reach his school young Ussher 
had thus only to pass through High Street, Cornmarket, 
and by St. Audoen's. In his thirteenth year he entered 
Trinity College and was the second Scholar, aud eighth 
elected Fellow. From a very early age he turned his 
attention to antiquities and controversial subjects, and, 
at the age of 18, actually engaged in a polemical dispute 
through the controversies of Bellarmine, with the well- 
known Henry Fitzsimon, S.J. — who styled him 
" Acatholicorum Doctissimus." Ussher was related to 
Fitzsimon through his mother, Margaret Stanihur3t.§ 
In 1601 — immediately after taking his degree of M.A. 
— he preached a sermon in which it is said he foretold 
the rebellion of 1641, an event which proved such a 
disaster to hira, and which changed the whole course 
of his subsequent life. 

In 1603, after the battle of Kiusale, the royal army, 
to commemorate the defeat of the Spaniards, raised a 
sum of .£1,800, a goodly sum in those days, for the pur- 
chase of books to be presented to the new College of 
Trinity, and Dr. Challoner and young Ussher, then 
only 22, were intrusted with the charge of laying out of 
the money. 

In his 30th yeai' he was unanimously chosen Provost 
of Trinity in succession to his father-in-law, but declined 
the post lest it should interfere' with his studies and 
literary pursuits. Byhis urgent solicitations Sir William 
Temple was appointed Provost in 1610. Temple held 
the office till his death in 1626, when he was succeeded 
by the amiable Bedell. 

Dr. Ussher was nominated to the See of Meath, 
1619-20 and James I. is reported to have said on this 
occasion that " Ussher was a bishop of his own making," 
Sis days before the death of the king, he was promoted 
to the Primacy, 1625. During the interval he pub- 
lished some of his most celebrated works, and in 1621, 
when collecting MSS., he came upon the famous Book 
of Kells. Ussher states in a note therein, 4th August, 



1621, "I received the leaves of this Book, and found 
them to be iiL number 344." The Ussher collection of 
MSS. including the Book of Kells, came into possession 
of Trinity College in i66r. 

This marvellous book is traditionally said to have 
belonged to St. Columba, and that it was presented to 
the Monastery of Kells by that Saint in 550. In 
beauty, intricacy, and minuteness of design, this book 
stands unrivalled. Mr. Digby Wyatt says " I attemp- 
ted to copy some of the ox'naments, but broke down in 
despair." Another writer says : " The designs overiiow 
with beauty." Giraldus Cambrensis, writing iu the 
1 2th century, characterising the wonderful beauty of the 
work, says : " Ut veru haec omnia angelica potius quam 
humana diligenta jam asseveraveris esse composita." 
Indeed one may truly assert that all these things have 
been traced by angels rather than by human industry. 
Certainly, were it only for the preservation of this price- 
less treasure, Ireland is deeply indebted to Primate 
Ussher. 

The book mentioned in the list, as published in 1623, 
was written iu support of the Protestant cause, its 
scope being to prove that the ritual and discipline of 
the early Christians was in conformity with those of 
Protestantism. The second mentioned work, ** An 
Answer, etc." 1 624, was composed in reply to a challenge 
published in the same year from the Rev. Wm. Maloue, 
S. J., to disprove this uniformity of doctrine always pre- 
served by the Roman Church. In 1627 Maloue again 
published a reply to Ussher's "Answer." 

The published works of Primate Ussher number 
about 40, 13 of which were in Latin. Of these only 
three or four were published in Dublin during the 
seventeenth century — 24 in London — 7 in Oxford — 3 in 
Paris, aud 2 in Haguenau. 

Ireland's Jubilee or Joj/s lo-Paen. This fancifully 
named production was written by the Rev. Stephen 
Jerome, Rector of Taullagh on the occasion of the 
return of Prince Charles from Spain in 1624. The 
Prince, under the influence of the first Dukeof Bcuking- 
ham (Steenie), having made a quasi romantic journey 
into Spain in 1623 in order to pay Court incognito, and 
in person, to the Infanta between whom and Charles 
a marriage had been for some time negotiating. The 
folly and arrogance of Buckingham leil, however, to 
a quarrel with Olivarez, and the breaking off of the 
Spanish match. Buckingham had arranged with the 
Prince that they, under the names of John and Thomas 
Smith, should post through Fj-ance to Madrid, with 
only two attendants, and tliey arrived safely there, after 
16 days, in the end of March, 1623. »The difticulties in 
reference to the cession of the Palatinate, one of the 
stipulated articles, and the death of Pope Gregory, re- 
tarded the completion of the match. Howell, in his 
babbling Epistola Hoelianae, gives anarausiuggossiping 
account of the arrival and wooing of the Prince — his 
return to England and the subsequent disruption of 
relations between the two countries. 

C. W. DUGAN. 



§ The Primate was_ married in 1613 to Phoebe, daughter of Dr. Challouer, who was a cousiu to Pitzsimou. 



14 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer } Owner or Reference 



List of Books Printed in Dublin in the i7tli Century. 





PART I.— From 1601 TO 


1625 Inclusive. 




Date 


Author Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1601 




A Proclamation 




John Franckton 


Vide " State Papers, 
Ireland." (Carew) 


1602 


Most Revd. Wm. Daniell, 
(or Daniel, or O'Donnell), 
Archbishop of Tuam 


New Testament (in Irish), 
Tiomua Nuadh, etc. 
215 folios or leaves. 


4to 
9fx6^ 


S^on Francke . . . 
(John Francke) 


Bodleian (3 copies) 
Brit. Mus., Marsh, 
T.C.D.,K. Inns (Fol.) 
Lough Fea (sm. Fol.) 
U. L. C, Aberdeen 
University (2 copies). 
Faculty of Advocates. 


" 


John Rider (or Ryder,) 
Dean of St. Patrick's, after- 
wards Bishop of Killaloe. 


A Friendly Caveat to Ire- 
land's Catholickes, &c., 
&c. (No pagination.) 


4to 
7 X 5 


John Franckton 


Brit. Mus. (2 copies.) 
Middle Temple Library 
(8vo) 


» 




Three Proclamations 




do. 


Vide "State Papers, 
Ireland." (Carew) 


1603 


Most Rev. Wnu Daniell 


New Testament in Irish 
(second is me) 


— 


— 


— 


1604 


Sir WiUiam Ussher 


Instructions to his Children 


4to. 




vide " Harris's Ware." 


3J 


Johti Rider, Dean 


A Rescript, etc. 


— 




Quoted in Works of Rev. 
H. Fitzsimon, S.J. 


" 




Four Proclamations 


— 


John Franckton 
K.P. 


Vide "State Papers, 
Ireland 


1605 




Three do. (one in Latin) 


— 


do. 


do. 


1606 




Proclamation touching De- 
fective Titles, and two 
others. 


~ 


do. 


do. 


1607 




Two Proclamations 


— 


do. 


do 


ti6c8 


Most Revd. Wm. Daniell, 
(or Daniel, or O'Donnell), 
Archbishop of Tuam 


The Book of Common 
Prayer (in Irish) 
(No pagination.) 


Fol. 
9l- X 7i 


ShiSon Francke, 
alias Franckton 
(JohnFranckton) 


Brit. Mus., T.C.D.(4to) 
Lambeth, Bodleian. 
Marsh, R.I.A. 
U. L. C, Aberdeen 
University. 


J) 




Proclamation against Sir 

Cahir O'Dogherty and 

another, and other 

proclamations. 




John Franckton 
KP. 


Vide " State Papers 
Ireland," etc. 


1609 


Lord Deputy and Council 


"The second Proclamation 
touching Defective Titles 
and Surrenders." 


(s.sh.) 


do. 


do. 



t The '* Epistle Dedicatory *' is dated 20th October, 1609. 



— i6 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1611 



Lord Deputy and Council 



S. (E.) 



1615 



Sir Jolin Davies (or Davis), 
Knt., Attorney-General for 
Ireland 



LJames I.] 



Proclamation againstPries ts 
and Jesuists 



AConsideration upon Death 
through the decease of 
Robert late Earl of Sales- 
burie, &c. 
(18 pp. No pagination.) 



Le primer Report des Cases 

et matters en ley resolves 

at adjudges en les Courts 

del Roy en Ireland 

(chiefly black letter.) 

26 + 192 pp. 

Articles of religion agreed 
upon by tire Archbishops 
and Bishops and the rest 
of the Cleargie of Ireland 
in the Convocation holden 
at Dublin, 1615, &c., &c. 

An act for the Grauntofone 
entier subsidie by the 
Temporalitie 

(Chiefly black letter ; fine 
colophon) 



John Franckton, 
K.P. 



4to 



do. 



Viiie "State Papers 
(Ireland)" 



Middle Temple Library 



Fol. 



4to 
6f X 5^% 



4to 
(large) 



John Franckton, 
K.P. 



do. 



do. 



Lambeth, K. Inns, 
Brit. Mus., R. Long- 
worth-Dames, Lough 
Fea, Bodleian, R. LA. 
U. L. C, Middle 
Temple. 

T.C.D., Bodleian 
U. L. C. 



Brit. Mus. (Fol.) 



17 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



Date 



Autlior 



Short Title 



Size Printer 



Owner or Reference 



19 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1617 



John Merick (of the Society 
of the Inner Temple, Lon- 
don, "ac feodarium Provin- 
cise Conatii in Hibernia") 



Oliver St. John, Visct. 
Grandison, Lord Deputy, 
and the Council. 



A Compendious Collection 
and breefe Abstract of all 
the Auncient English Sta- 
tutes, etc. (in force in Ire- 
land). 8 + 440 pp.* 

Public Edict against the 
Catholicks of Ireland 



8vo 



1619 



Br. Dermod Meara (or 
O'Meara), M.D. 



Pathologia Haereditaria 
Generalis, &c., &c. (A 
Medical Treatise on Her- 
editary Disease) 
16 + 130 pp. 



i2mo 



John Franckton 
(Castle St.), K. P. 



John Franckton, 
K.P. 



K. Inns, R. R. Bel- 
shaw, Lough Fea, 
(i2mo.) 



Vide French Transla- 
tion in Brit. Mus. 



"Typis Deputa- 
torum, J.Franck- 
toni," K. P. 



Brit. Mus., T.C.D. 

(16 mo.) 
Bodleian (Svo.) 
U. L. C. 



• The Table at end has 10 pp. The date appears in final imprint ; chiefly in black letter. 



20 — 



Date 


Author. 


Short Title. 


Size. 


Printer. 


Owner or Reference 


*l62I 


Sir Richard Bolton 


The Statutes of Ireland, be- 


Fol. 


Societie of Station- ] 


faculty of Advocates, 






ginning the 3rd yere of 


"T^o 


ers, K. P's 


Edin., Bodleian, Brit> 






K. Edward the Second 


X 




Mus., T.C.D., Count 






to 13th, James J. 


7A 




Plunkett, Lin. Hall, 






30 + 446 pp. 






Lambeth (410), K. 
Inns, E. R. McC. Dix, 
R.I.A., U. L. C. 
Lincolns Inn. 


J) 


Sir Philip Sidney (or 


The Countesse of Pem- 


Fol. 


do. 


Nat. Lib., Brit. Mus. 




Sydney), Knight 


broke's Arcadia, etc. 
6 -H s8S pp. 


iotb- X 7 




(Fol.), U. L. C. 
(S copies) 


It 




fThe Booke of Common 


Large 


do. 


T.C.D., Brit. Mus. 






Prayer and administration 


8vo. 




Lough Fea. (Sm. 4to.) 






of the Sacraments, &c., 


^ X St'tt 




U. L. C 






of the Church of England 












(black letter chiefly; no 












pagination). 








It 




Proclamation concerning 


— 


Companie of Sta- 


Vide Sir J. Gilbert's 






the Customs, &c., for 




tioners, K. P's. 


Calendar of Ancient 






Dublin 






Records of Dublin, 
vol. iii., p. 546 


)) 


Wm. Alexander {Earl of 


A Supplement of a Defect in 


Fol 


_ 


Fide " Loiimdes " p. 




Stirling) 


the Third part of Sydney's 
Arcadia. 






2,396. 


1622 




(English) Statutes noiu in 
force in Ireland (black lettc?-) 


iSmo 


— 


Grant and Bolton's 
Catalogue, 1836,/. 459 


tt 


Christopher Hampton, D. D., 


An Inquisition of the True 


4to 


Societie of Sta- 


T.C.D. 




Archbishop of Armagh 


Church, etc. (A Sermon 
pronounced at the 2nd 
Session of Parliament) 


7tX5T"o 


tioners 




It 


Sir Christopher Sibthorp, 


A Friendly Advertisement 


8vo 


do. 


T.C.D. 




one of His Majestie's 


to the Pretended Catho- 






Brit. Mus. (4to) 




Justices of His Court of 


lickes of Ireland, etc. 






Bodleian, U. L. C. 




Chiefe Place in Ireland 


(41S pages, but no pagina- 






Middle Temple Lib- 






tion to the " Preface " or 






rary. 






" Table ") 












with 










§ James Usher, Bishop of 


An Epistle concerning the 


4to 


— 






Meath 


Religion of the Ancien". 
Irish, etc. (separate pagin- 
ation; 100 pages) 
[First Edition] 






Brit. Mus., Bodleian 
U. L. C. 



* The Imprint on the last page bears date " 1620." 

fThe Psalter has a separate title page, but the signatures are continuous ; no pagination. There is no sepaiate Title Page anu the 
sigiialures are continuous rrom p. 417, but the type is different. This " Epistle" is not in ths vulums in T.C.D, 



— 21 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



— 22 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size Printer 



Owner or Reference 



— 23 — 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



Rt. Revd. Henry Leslie 
(or Lesly), Bishop of Do wn 
and Connor, aftenvards of 
Meath 



Sir Christopher Sibthorp, 



James Usher, 



Henry Gary, ist Viscount 
Falldand, Lord Deputy 
and the Council. 



Most Revd. James Usher, 
(Jhen Bishop of Meath) 



R. B. (Richard Belling) 



Revd. Stephen Jerome, 
Domestick Chappleine to 
the Rt. Hon. Earle of 
Corke. 



R. (L.) 



A Treatise tending to unitie; 
in a Sermon preached at 
Droghedah (June 9, 1622), 
before the King's Majes- 
ties Comrs. for Ireland 
4 + 52 pp. 



A Friendly Advertisement 
&c. 48 + 418 pp. 

with 

An Epistle concerning the 

Religion professed by the 

Ancient Irish, etc. 

[2nd Edition or Issue] 

100 pp. 



Proclamation for banish- 
ment of Jesuits, &c. 



An Answer to a challenge 
made by a Jesuite in Irel- 
land, &c. 



A Sixth Book to the Comit- 
ess of Pembroke^ s Arcadia 



Ireland's Jubilee, or Joyes 
lo-Pjean, for Prince 
Charles, his welcome 
home, etc. 
(14 -1- 214 pp., cropped] 



An Antidote for Lazinesse 



4to 
7l X Sf 



8vo 

7rVx5w 



4to 



Fol. 
(s.sh.) 



4to 



4/1? 



4to 



4to 



Societie of Sta- 
tioners 



do. 



do. 



The Societie of 
Stationers 



do. 



* No place or printer's name, but adjudged as Dublin-printed by the types, etc 



Brit. Mus., T.C.D. 



K. Inns,, Lambeth, 
Chatsworth Library 
(4to), U.L.C. 



King's Inns, 
Chatsworth Library, 
U. L. C. 



Brit Mus. 



Bodleian 

Lough Fea (sm. 4to.) 
R, R. Belshaw, 
Brit. Mus., Lambeth, 
Aberdeen University. 



Vide "Lowndes^ 
p. 2,396. 



T.C.D., Brit. Mus. 
V. L. C. 



U. L. C. 



24 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1625 



Very Rev. Geo. Andrewe, 
A.M., Dean of Limerick 



Right Revd. Henry Leslie, 
Bishop of Down, one of 
His Majesty's chaplains in 
ordinary 



Sir Christopher Sibthorp 



John Richardson, D.D., 
Archdeacon of Derry, 
(afterwards Bishop of 
Ardagh) 



A quaternion of Sermons 
preached in Ireland in the 
Summer Season, 1624 
6 + 108 pp. 



A Warning for Israel, in a 
Sermon preached at Christ 
Church in Dublin, 30th 
October, 1625 (on Hosea, 
xiv. 2) 



Seven Proclamations and 
an Act of State 



AReplyto an Answeremade 
by a Popish Adversarie, 
&c. 

18 + 166 pp. 



A Sermon of the Doctrine 
of Justification, &c., 
preached 1624. 
4 + 38 pp. 



4to 
7i X 5t% 



4to 



Societie of Sta- 
tioners 



do. 



T.C.D., U. L. C. 



Brit. Mus., Malcomson. 
Bodleian 



Broad- 
sheets 



4to 
7T^xSi 



4to 
7 X 5i 



do. 



do. 



do. 



Pub. Rec. Office 



T.C.D., Bodleian. 
U. L. C. 



T.C.D. 



— 25 — 



Dale 



Short Title 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



26 — 



Dale 



Author 



Short Title 



Size Printer Owner or Reference 



NOTES. 



Dr. Meara's book shows that a work in Latin was printed in Dublin at a much 
earlier date than was authoritatively asserted in the " Nouveau Dictionaire Historique " 
quoted by Cotton in the second edition of his "Typographical Gazetteer." (1831, p. 84) 
This fact ought to have been known, as this work appears in the printed catalogue of 
T.C-D. Library, and is particularly referred to by Sir Charles Cameron, in his " History 
of the College of Surgeons." 

Owing to the different sizes given for the same book, apparently, in different catalogues, I 
have been often perplexed and in doubt whether there were not different editions of the same 
book published in the same year. Perhaps some light may be thrown on this question. I should 
like to give the actual measurements of each book, but this would be somewhat difficult. They 
are given in most cases, however, in inches and fractions of an inch. In some cases where I have 
examined a book personally, I have also counted the leaves from signature to signature, and 
given the size accordingly. 

Where there is some doubt whether a book was actually printed in Dublin the titles are 
given in italics. 

Most of the copies in the University Library at Cambridge form part of the collection 
of the late Henry Bradshaw. 

One reason why so few books can be traced to this period should be recollected. 
The great severity of the State laws against Roman Catholics prevented them from printing and 
publishing, wherever English law ran, any works on their side, or in defence or support of their 
church or religion. Such works had to be printed and published on the Continent, generally at 
Louvain or Douay ; there, however, is a good deal of reason to believe that some of the works of 
Roman Catholic authors were in fact printed in Dublin during the 17th century, although by the 
title page ascribed to some other place, or without any place being given. Of this latter class I 
would refer to a probable specimen — viz., a work by "Henry FitzSimon, Dublinian, of the Society 
of Jesus," printed in 161 1. It is a quarto volume comprising two books, written in defence of 
"The Masse." There is a copy ill the possession of Mr. P. Traynor, but it lacks the front 
title page and some leaves of the first preface, &c. The type is clear and good, and it 
resembles the Dublin printing of the time. It is said by some that this is the writer replied 
to by Archbishop Ussher, some years later, and not Malone. In the preface to the 
second book the author refers to the Rev. John Rider, then Dean of St. Patrick's. Jt is of 
course well known that at a later date, when the Confederate Catholic chiefs were in power, 
works were printed and published for them, or in their support, in Watetford and Kilkenny. 

As any specimen of printing, coming within the period covered by this Part, is rare, I 
have carefully noted Proclamations printed for the Government, but they may be unnecessary in 
the later Parts. They show, it seems to me, that an official State Printer was a necessity at the 
time, and, if a Printer and types were to be found here, it is natural that other printing should 
be also done here. I dwell on this point at some length, as many appear to think that the 
printing of books was in fact done in London. 



PRINTED BY SEALY, BRYERS & WALKER, 
94, 95 & 96 Middle Abbey Street. 

1898. 



JBooke, 



^racte, &c 



PRINTED IN DUBLIN in the 17th CENTURY. 



LIST COMPILED BY 



E. R. McC. DIX, 

WITH NOTES BY C. W. DUGAN, M.A. ; M.R.S.A.t. 



Part II. -1626 -1650. 



PRICE 2/6. 



DUBLIN: 

O'DONOQHUE & CO., 19 Lincoln Place. 

LONDON: 
B. DOBELL, 77 Charing Cross Road, W.C, 

CAMBRIDGE: 
W. HEFFER & SONS. 



All the undernoted Books are sent Post Free for Prices named. 

PU BLICATIO NS. 

Mangan (James Clarence), Life and Writings of. By D. J. O'Donoghue. 

Large 8vo., designed cover, Cloth gilt, gilt tops, witli six illustrations, including 
' two portraits (pub. 7s. 6d.) - - - - - 5s. 

Unpublished Letters, New Poems, etc. 

Pall Mall Gazette — The task of preparing the biography could not have fallen into more competent . 
hands than those of Mr. O'Donoghue. Probably no other man at this time of day could have produced it. 
Mr. O'Donoghue has given us a work which is sure to take a standard place on the shelves of Irish 
biography. 

Lalor (James Fintan), Writings of. With Introduction by John O'Leaey, and a 
Memoir. Fancy wi-apper. Is. ; Cloth. - - - - 2s. 

Sketch — Of all the men of the '48 movement he was as a tlnnker the ablest. His writings are very well 
worth study. Indepe^uleni — A man before his time, a keen thinker, a cleai-, forcible, and logical writer. 

A Bibliographical List of Dublin Printed Books of the Seventeenth Century. 

Parts I. and II., compUed by E. E. M'C. Dix, with IS'otes and Introduction by C. 
W. Dtjgan, price per Part - - - - - 2s. 6d. 

Irish Illustrations to Shakespeare. By Datid Comtn. Small 4to, wi'appers, 6d. 

Deals very interestingly and learnedly with Shakespeare's allusions to Ireland and the Irish. 

A Kish of Brogues : Stories and Poems of Eiu-al Ireland. By William Botle. 
Cloth gUt, 256 pp. - - - - - - 2s. 6d. 

Just published — overflowing,,with humour and knowledge of the people. 

Songs of Erinn. By P. J. M'Call. Cloth gilt - - - 2s. 6d. 

Just published — new volume by the well-known author of " Irish Noinins." 

Inishowen and Tyrconnell — An Account of the Antiquities and Writers of Cos. 
Deny, Donegal and Tyrone. By W. J. Doheety, C.E., M.E.I.A. Cloth, 1895, 
8vo, (over 600 pp.) - - - - - - 3s. 6d. 

Carleton (William) The Life of, iacluding his Autobiography, with continuation by 
D. J. O'Donoghue, and an Inti'oduction by Mrs. Cashel "Hoet. 2 vols.. Cloth, 
with 2 portraits, large 8vo, new (pub. 25s.) - - - 7s. 6d. 

Athenoium — Delightful reading. Daily Chronicle — To Mr. O'Donoghue are due our heartiest thanks 
for his most thorough, keen, and fascinating book. Daily. Neivs — JVIr. O'Donoghue has laid us all under a 
heavy obligation. Freeman's Journal — Mr. O'Donoghue deserves the thanks of all lovers of Irish literature. 

Siieaker — Mr. O'Donoghue has rendered a splendid service to Irish literature A Book which 

ought to live. 

Fenians and Fenianism, Recollections of. By John O'Leaey. Fine Portraits of 

the Leaders of the Movement. 2 vols.. Cloth, Lond. 1896, quite new 
(pub. 21s.) - - - ' - - - 7s. 6d. 

O'Leary (Ellen), Lays of Country, Home, and Friends. With Memoir' by 

T. W. EoLLESTON, and Introduction by Sir C. G. Duify. Wrapper, Is. ; cloth, 2s. 

An admirable little book of Poems. 

The Fenian Nights' Entertainments, being Ossiauic Stories told at a Wexford 
Fu'eside. By P. J. M'Call. Designed wi-apper, Is. ; Cloth - - 2s. 

An Irish Musical Genius, the Inventor of the Musical Glasses. By D. J. 

O'DoNOGHTiE. Wrapper - - - - - 6d. 

(Just Published). 

Catalogue of the Musical Loan Exhibition, held iu Dubliu, May, 1899, comj)iled 
by D. J. O'Donoghue for the FEIS CEOIL. Wrapper - - 6d. . 

An almost complete bibliography of collections of Irish music, etc. 

O'DONOGHUE & CO., 19 LINCOLN PLACE, DUBLIN. 



LIST OF 

:©ooh0, tDvacte, Sic. 



pvintcb in Dublin 



1 60 1 to 1700. 



PART II. 

1626 to 1650. 



COMPILED BY 
E. R. McC. DIX, R.S.A.I., Nat. Lit. Society: 

WITH BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES, BY C. WINSTON DUGAN, M.A., R.S.A.I. 



Dublin. 1899. 



PREFACE. 



IN presenting the Second Part of this work to the Public it gives me 
much pleasure to acknowledge the very favourable comments upon the 
work by the local Press. I trust that this Part will not be found to fall in 
any way below its predecessor. It will be seen at a glance that this 
Part is much larger than the former one in the number of books, etc., 
traced and listed. The more diverse character of the books should also 
render this Part more interesting to a larger number of readers. Mr. Dugan 
kindly continues his interesting Notes. As an Appendix to this Part will 
be found particulars of works coming within the period covered by Part I., but 
which have been only obtained since its publication. 

Under the advice of so eminent an authority as Mr. Francis Jenkinson, the 
Librarian of the University Library (to whom I am greatly indebted for very 
valuable aid), I have included Proclamations and Broadsides in this Part. They 
have a value historical as well as bibliographical. Only some of their titles 
however are given, as the year of issue, or date and place where to be found 
seemed sufficient. 

In the preparation of this Part, I have to particularly thank Mr. 
F. Madan (Bodley's Librarian) ; Mr. Etheridge (Librarian) and Mr. 
W. F. C. Suter (Asst. Librarian), Lincoln's Inn ; Mr. F. Jenkinson 
(Librarian) and Mr. O. Johnston (Asst, Librarian) of University Library, 
Cambridge ; The Librarians of Gray's Inns ; Inner Temple, and Middle 
Temple ; Mr. S. E. Sweatman, Librarian of Keble College, Oxford ; Mr. 
W. H. Grattan Flood, Mr. M. Dorey, Mr. R. E. Graves, Mr. J. E. 
Edmund (Haigh Hall), Mr. J. Ribton Garstin, Mr. R. A. Peddle, and 
Mr. F. Borlase (Librarian to the Incorporated Law Society, London), for 
special help afforded. 

E. R. McC. DIX. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



R. I. A. 

T.C.D. 

K. Inns 

Pub. Rec. Off. 

Marsh 

Nat. Lib. 

Worth 

Lin. Hall 

Lough Fea 

Brit. Mus. 

Lambeth 

Bodleian 

U. L. C. 

Lin. Inn 

Mid. Tern. 

Cashel 

Derry 

Aberdeen 

St. Canice 

Armagh 

Haigh Hall 

Lanhydrock 

Soc. Ant. Lon. 

Advocates 

Bristol 

I. L. S. (Lon.) 

Worcester 

K. P. 

1. 11. 

Shs. 

s. sh. 

p., pp. 

T.p. 

B. L. 

Sig., Sigs. 



The Royal Irish Academy. [Tracts = Halliday Collec- 
tion.] 
The Trinity College, Dublin, Libiary. 
The King's Inns (Dublin), Library 
The Public Record Office, Dublin. 
Marsh's Library, St. Patrick's, Dublin. 
National Libraiy, Dublin. 

The " Worth" Library, Dr. Steeven's Hospial, Dublin. 
The Linen Hall Library, Belfast. 

The ' ' Shirley " Library at Lough Fea, Carrickmacross. 
The British IMuseum Library. 
The Lambeth Palace Library, London. 
The Bodleian Library, Oxford. 
University Librarj', Cambridge. 
Lincoln's Inn Library, London. 
The Middle Temple Library, London. 
The Diocesan Library, Cashel. 
The Derry and Raphoe Diocesan Library, Derry. 
The Aberdeen University Library. 
St. Canice's Libraiy, Ivilkenny. 
The Public Library, Armagh 
The Earl of Crawford's Library, Wigan. 
Lord Robartes' Libraiy, Cornwall. 
The Society of Antiquaries, London. 
The Libraiy of the Faculty of Advocates, Edinburgh. 
The Public Library, Bristol. 
The Incorporated Law Society, London. 
Worcester College, Oxford. 
King's Printer, or Printers. 
Leaf, leaves. 
Sheets. 
Single sheet. 
Page, pages. 
Title Page. 
Black Letter. 
Signature, Signatures. 



33 



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL and HISTORICAL NOTES 



BY 



C. W. DUGAN. 



USSHER may be described as a Puritan Royalist, while his creed was distinctly Calvinistic. 
Though naturally averse to persecution he thought it his duty to be intolerant of any religion 
which he deemed to be false, and he had no liberality with regard to the rights of conscience for 
others. He strongly displayed this defect of an otherwise gentle character in his sermon before 
the Lord Deputy in 1622 and still more strongly in 1626 when he drew up the protest against the 
proposed measures of toleration for Roman Catholics, measures, indeed, not dictated by a feeling 
of pure justice or liberality, but from motives of expediency. At this time there was war with 
both France and Spain, and Charles wishing to strengthen the army in Ireland, asked through 
Falkland, at an assembly of the whole nation, that the Roman Catholics should consent to raise 
and support 500 horse and 500 foot, on conditiofi of a more enlarged toleration. The text of this 
protest, which in our days may seem to be an extraordinary production, will be found in Plowden's 
History. Ussher's sermon before Falkland was looked upon as a fanatical appeal for persecution, 
but the protest which no doubt was drawn up by him, was an expression of intolerance and 
illiberality which finds a parallel perhaps only in the worst acts of the Inquisition. 

In 161 5 a movement occurred amongst the Irish Protestant clergy, the aim of which, had it 
succeeded, would certainly have revolutionised the Church both in its theology and discipline. 
This was the assertion of total independence as a national church, and Ussher from his known 
proclivities was appointed to draw up the Articles. These, numbering 104, were strongly 
Calvinistic and asserted the doctrines of election and reprobation in the strictest terms, commonly 
termed the Lambeth Articles. He even held the opinion that Bishops were not a distinct order 
in the Church and were merely superior Presbyters. No doubt the spread of Arminianism and 
the bitter controversies on the subject that raged at this time, had much to do with the attitude 
of the Irish Protestant clergy. Archbishop Laud, who favoured Arminianism, perceived that the 
Irish Church was too Calvinistic and desirous also of establishing uniformity between the English 
and Irish Churches procured, through Bramhall, the abrogation of the greater part of the Ussher 
Articles and the subsequent use of the English : — He saved the Protestant Church in Ireland from 
becoming almost totally Genevan. History teaches the lesson that this imbecile domineering 
over human consciences has ever brought its retribution. Spain has fallen from its high estate 
and mother of colonies to be a third-rate power and a childless nation. The intolerance which 
raged in Calvin and led him to pursue his erstwhile friend, Servetus, to a terrible end, found an 
echo in the protest of the Irish bishops in 161 5 — an act which, no doubt, hastened and intensified. 



— 34 — 

on both sides, the horrors of 1641. Ussher is said to have predicted this rebellion — he must now 
be held responsible for hastening it. He must have had a prescience of the sorrow and suffering 
which that event brought upon his declining years. Ussher was in England at that time trying 
to patch up the burning differences between Charles and the Parliament in reference to Episcopacy 
and Presbytery. All his property, save his books, was pillaged and destroyed. He took up his 
abode at Oxford, and he received a small provision out of the revenues of the See of Carlisle which 
was then vacant, while his library was sent on to him from Drogheda by Chester. 

Dr. Bernard says that about this time Ussher was invited to France by Richelieu with the 
promise of an ample pension and religious freedom — he also sent him a gold medal — Ussher in 
return sending the Cardinal a present of Irish greyhounds, &c. This was shortly after the 
publication of his work Britanicarum Ecclesiarum Antiquitates, 4to., Dublin, 1639. Though 
truly Presbyterian at heart his strong loyalist sympathies forced him to refuse attendance at the 
Westminster Convention of 1643. This made him so obnoxious to Parliament that the confiscation 
of his library was decreed, but his friend, the learned Selden, who was then a member of the long 
Parliament, exerted his influence for its redemption by a fine. 

Primate Ussher, although a prodigy of learning and a pious conscientious man, seems to 
have wanted firmness of purpose and strength of will in affairs outside religion. Intolerant men 
are generally so. They cannot, to use the words of Lord Bacon, accustom themselves by the light 
of particulars to enlarge their minds to the amplitude of the world, and not reduce the world to 
the narrowness of their minds. Bishop Burnett said that Ussher was too gentle, while the weak- 
ness adverted to may have arisen from his natural human goodness of heart conflicting with a 
narrow spirit of religion, 

When the unfortunate Mortogh OTCionga (King) who ably assisted the amiable Bedell in 
the translation of the Scriptures into Irish, was persecuted by the Archbishop's Surrogates, Ussher 
stood aside without lifting voice or pen to shield the aged Irish scholar, although it was he who 
had in the first instance strongly recommended him to Bedell. Again in the case of the still 
more unfortunate Strafford whose fate was the initial blow struck against Royalty by the Long 
Parliament, Ussher here also stood aside and raised no voice against the Bill of Attainder. Charles I 
had given to Strafford his kingly word and the most solemn pledge of assurauce for his personal 
safety ; yet, when he was impeached, the king, the future author of Eikon Basilike, consulted five 
prelates, Ussher being one, as to whether his conscience might be made so elastic as to permit 
him to sign the Bill against the Earl. Juxon, Bishop of London, bluntly and honestly declared 
that the king could not do this thing. Ussher and the others temporised with casuistry and so 
stretched the king's conscience. It is stated, however, that Ussher was much affected by the 
passing of this bill. But it was too late. Had he been strong like Juxon, Charles might have 
been saved this dishonour. It is but fair to state, however, that after Strafford's condemnation, 
Ussher faithfully attended him to the last. 

The other works of Ussher mentioned in this list as being printed in Dublin are : — 

4to. — 1 63 1. Gotteschalci et PredestinaricB CoiitrovcrsicE, &c. — hitherto, but incorrectly, said* 
to be the first Latin work printed in Ireland. This work is an account of the life and writings of the 
Benedictine monk, Godeschalc, who, in the ninth century originated the controversy on predes- 

* The first Latin work printed in Ireland was the " Pathologia Hereditaria," by Dr. U. O'Meara, Dublinii, 1619. 
12mo. O'Meara was a native of Orniond, Co. Tipperary, vid. Part I., pp. 12 and 19. 



- 3S - 

tination and free grace— doctrines which he stoutly maintained to be derived from a close study 
of the writings of St. Augustine, and which in his time produced some schism in the Church. As 
already stated, Ussher had a strong leaning towards such doctrines, and in this way came into 
contact with another prelate, more powerful, who was inclined to Arminianism, Laud, at that 
time Bishop of London. 

4to. — 1632. Veteriim Epistolanun Hibernicarum Sylloge, &c. — This curious work 
consists of a selection of letters to and from Roman Pontiffs, Irish Bishops and monks, from the 
sixth to the twelfth century, on matters relating to the Irish Church. The judgment and learn- 
ing shewn in the selection of these letters from old MSS. in the Cottonian and other collections 
raised Ussher to a high rank among antiquarians. The copy in my possession, small 4to., bound 
in vellum, is inferior both in paper and type — certainly not a favourable example of Dublin 
typography of the seventeenth century. 

4to. — 1639. Britanicartim Ecclesiarum Antiquitates is said to contain a most exact 
account of the British Church both in Britain and Ireland from A.D. 20 to the end of the seventh 
century. His great works on chronology, which consist of four treatises, are those which have 
made this prelate's name most widely known. These were published at Leyden, London, Paris 
and Oxford. Of his numerous works, thirteen of which were in Latin, only four were printed in 
his native city. 

SIR J. WARE, justly styled by Bishop NichoLson "the Camden of Ireland," was born in 
Castle Street, Dublin, November, 1594, and was descended from an ancient Yorkshire family 
named de Warre or le Ware. His father. Sir James Ware, the first of the family who settled 
in Ireland, came over as Secretary to Lord Deputy Fitzwilliam in 1588, and subsequently 
became Auditor-General, a post of eminence and profit. James I. granted a reversionary patent 
of this office to his eldest son, the subject of the present note, who, after his father's death in 
1632, held the office till the period of the Restoration, save during the short interval that 
elapsed from the surrender of Dublin by the Marquis of Ormonde to the English Parliament in 
1647. On this occasion he was considered to be a man of such importance that the Parliament 
accepted him as one of the four hostages for the due performance of the treaty who, for this 
purpose, were to be sent over to England. Ware entered Trinity College, Dublin, as a Fellow- 
Commoner in 1610, Sir William Temple being then its fourth Provost, and studied there during 
six years, having taken out the degree of M.A. After leaving the College he made the 
acquaintance of Bishop Ussher, which ripened into a warm and lasting friendship. This 
learned prelate, noticing that young Ware had such a taste for antiquarian pursuits, and such a 
love for the study and collection of old IVISS., especially those relating to Irish history and affairs, 
strongly encouraged him in such pursuits, introduced him to several learned men, notably Daniel 
Molyneux, Ulster King at Arms and a noted antiquarian, whom Ware in one of his treatises* 
styles " Venerandae Antiquitatis Cultor." In his beloved pursuits he made a most industrious 
use of the large collections of these two friends, and spared neither time nor money in gleaning 
materials from the old Registries and Cartularies of the Irish Churches and Monasteries, still 
preserved with pious care. In furtherance of these pursuits he went to London in 1626 where he 
met his old friend Ussher, then Archbishop of Armagh, and by him was introduced to Sir Robert 

* De Prasul inter Fernensis, p. 133, Vid. Edition of Ware, by Harris. 



- 36 - 

Cotton, founder of the Cottonian Library, now forming an important portion of the British 
Museum. Sir Robert gave him every facility for research in his magnificent collection of MSS., 
from which source, as also from the Tower records and several private collections, he amassed a 
large quantity of materials for his works relating to Ireland. 

As a public man Ware held a conspicuous position during the troubled times in which he 
lived, but in a note like the present we can only briefly refer to his political career. This was 
truly, a period of sturm, und drang in Irish history — a period of bitter contests between the 
Royalists and Parliamentarians, between Protestant and Roman Catholic, Episcopal Church and 
Puritans, fierce struggles for life and possessions between the Anglo-Irish and native Irish, the 
time of the disastrous rebellion of 1641, the quarrels about subsidies to the unfortunate Charles I., 
and on cessation of hostilities with the Confederate Catholics in 1643, the impeachment of the 
Lord Deputy Wentworth, numerous remonstrances and counter remonstrances from the Irish 
Parliament, and, lastly, the episode of the Glamorgan Treaty — all of which formed a seething 
ferment of oppression, duplicity and blood. Throughout this period Ware discharged several 
important functions relative to affairs of state with zeal, ability and toleration. He was knighted by 
the Lords Justices Loftus and Boyle, called to the Privy Council by the Lord Deputy in 1633, 
was appointed one of a Commission for a settlement of certain claims between the Crown and the 
clergy, was returned member for the Dublin University in the Parliament of 1639, vigorously 
defended Lord Strafford in the debates for his impeachment, became one of the securities for the 
army loan required for the suppression of the rebellion in 1641, and was one of the Council of 
Seventeen appointed to assist the Marquis of Ormonde in his treaty with the Confederate Irish 
for a cessation of arms in 1643. In the following year he, with two other confidential delegates 
sent by the Marquis, went to Oxford to inform the king of the true state of affairs in Ireland. 
While at Oxford he had the advantage of constant intercourse with its learned men, devoted all 
his spare time to the examination of books and records for further materials for his works, and 
before leaving was complimented by the University with the degree of LL.D. On his return 
voyage he, with his companions, were captured by a Parliament warship and all were sent 
prisoners to the Tower of London, where they were detained for upwards of ten months and then 
released by exchange for prisoners in Dublin. In 1645 we find Ware on the Committee of the 
Privy Council appointed to inquire into the proceedings of the Earl of Glamorgan in his treaty 
with the Irish forces. In 1647 he was selected by Ormonde as one of the hostages in the Dublin, 
treaty as mentioned above. Some time after, when the conditions were fulfilled, he returned to 
his native city. He was not allowed, however, to remain there long. In 1649 Jones, the 
Parliamentarian Governor of Dublin, thinking it unsafe that an opponent of such importance 
should be allowed to reside in Ireland peremptorily ordered him to quit the British islands. He 
chose France as the place of his exile, where he remained for about two years, when, by licence 
from the Parliamentary Government he was allowed to return to England. He stayed two years 
in London, and in 1653 went back to his old home in Dublin. At the Restoration he was 
re-instated in his public office, and in 1661 was unanimously elected by the University of Dublin 
for a second time its representative. The Duke of Ormonde, then Viceroy, appointed him First 
Commissioner for Excise and New Tax Appeals, and, subsequently, to the high office of 
Commissioner for the execution of the provisions in the King's declaration for the settlement of 
the kingdom. He was offered a peerage by Charles II., which he declined, as also the dignity of 



— 37 — 

baronet, and in 1665 was instrumental, through his great influence, in obtaining a grant from the 
Crown of iTsoo a year for the support of the new dignity of the Lord Mayor of Dublin.' We 
must refrain here from minute comment on Ware's public actions in Church or State affairs. 
He was a devoted adherent to the Royal cause and a faithful friend and adviser of Strafford and 
Ormonde. During the times in which he lived there was but little or no toleration on either side, 
and we may safely say that throughout his long and eventful life he displayed neither controversial 
acrimony nor avaricious desire for property or place. He died in December, 1666, and was buried 
in the family vault, St. Werburgh's Church, Dublin, according to the extraordinary statement of 
Harris,t "without either stone or monumental inscription." This seems very strange, since Sir 
James left his family in good circumstances, and all, viz., four surviving, made wealthy and 
influential alliances. What a contrast to the honours paid to his contemporary Camden. This 
learned man, who is looked upon as the father of British antiquities, as Ware may be styled the 
father of Irish antiquities, died 1623, at about the same age as Ware, and was buried with great 
pomp in Westminster Abbey, a monument, with his effigy, holding in his hand the "Britannia," 
his great work, was afterwards erected near his grave. 

The intelligent tourist visiting Dublin will probably ask us : Where are the memorials erected 
by the people of Ireland or by the citizens of Dublin to this gifted, painstaking historian of their 
writers — their churches and monasteries — of their antiquities of all kinds ? Is there no 
place named in his honour — no statue, no monument of any kind ? I see frequently 
such memorials of worthless rulers and political agitators, but nothing save his works to 
" keep the memorj' green" of him — the " Clarissiinus Antiquitatis H ibeniicc Cnltor'' Alas, we must 
answer, there is nothing, not even a mural tablet, to mark the last resting place of Ware. How 
long will Irishmen or the citizens of Dublin permit such culpable neglect to exist ? Time alone 
can tell. 

The first treatise mentioned in the List — Archiepiscoporum Cassilitnsiiuu, &c., 4to, 1626 
— was published immediately after his return from his first visit to London in company with 
Primate Ussher, the second treatise — De Prcesulihus Lagenics, 4to— was published in 1628. Both 
treatises were afterwards formed into one under the title De Prcesulibiis Hibernice — folio. Dublin, 
1665. 

Ware published Spenser's " View of the State of Ireland" 1633, folio — with a dedicatory 
epistle to the Lord Deputy Wentworth. Subsequently, in same year, he published in a similar 
manner Campion's History and the Chronicles of Haniner and Marleburrough. 

From the list compiled by Mr. Dix, it would appear that several issues of these works, 
with minor variations, appeared in 1633. 

De Scriptoribus Hibernim — Lib I. and II. — 4to, Dublin, 1639. — The first book gives an 
account of writers, who were natives of Ireland, from the Christian era to the close of the sixteenth 
century. The second book includes writers who were not natives but held office or employment 
in Ireland, "qui in Hibcrnia Muncra aliqua obeirunt." To this work is also prefixed a dedication 
to Lord Wentworth. Harris says that Sir James intended to have published a new and enlarged 



* The titles of Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress were created by Charter of Charles I., l8 A.R., but the first assumption 
of the title appears in 1665, Sir Daniel Bellingham being first Lord Mayor. Vid., His., DiiUin. Ed. Walsh, 1817, pp. 
211 and 424. 

t Ware, Writers of Ireland, 1746, p. 156. 



- 38- 

edition of the De Scriptoribus, adding that he had in his custody the edition of 1639, interleaved 
and filled with numerous corrections and additions in Ware's own writing. Harris made full use 
of this for his edition of Ware, 3 vol., folio. Dublin, 1745. His other works, published in Dublin, 
will be noted in their proper place in the List by Mr. Dix. 

1626.— OvERBURY— " His Wife, &c." 
Sir Thomas Overbury, the story of whose tragic death forms one of the most scandalous 
episodes in English Court history, was descended from an old and respectable family in 
Gloucestershire. He was a distinguished scholar at Oxford, travelled much on the Continent, 
and returned home with the reputation of being an accomplished man of parts. In 1601 he 
went to Scotland, and there, unfortunately, became acquainted with Robert Carr, a young 
Scottish adventurer, belonging to a Border family, and who was then a favourite of the King. 
This Carr was of handsome exterior, but of mean education, and an unprincipled libertine. The 
two men, knowing that an acquaintance must be mutually advantageous, became closely con- 
nected by ties of confidence and self-interest. Carr could help Overbury in pushing his fortunes 
at Court, while the latter, owing to his learning, judgment and accomplishments, would be of 
infinite service to the former in giving counsel and advice, in fact in educating him as im homme 
de Cour for the delicate position of Royal favourite. Hume says that it was owing to Overbury 
that Carr temporarily enjoyed the highest favour of the King without being hated by the people. 
On the accession of James to the Throne of England he brought Carr over with him, and shortly, 
with scandalous rapidity, the weak and pedantic Prince advanced the sensual minion to the 
greatest offices of State, and finally created him Earl of Somerset. The favourite repaid the 
services of Overbury by procuring for him a Knighthood, and a Welsh judgeship for his father. 
We come now to the terrible story of illicit passion and crime which led to the barbarous murder 
of the unfortunate Overbury. The Countess of Essex, the young wife of the Earl of Essex, one 
of the most beautiful and fascinating women of her time, yet one of the most depraved attending 
a depraved Court, formed a guilty intercourse with Carr, then Earl of Rochester. Overbury, 
who is much to blame in the matter, showed himself to be an unprincipled man, since it is known 
that he advised, and even assisted, his patron in this amour. It is even said that he was instru- 
mental as the pander in bringing it about. When, however, the infamous Rochester broached to 
Overbury the plan he had formed to procure a divorce for the Countess from her husband, and 
then to marry her, the latter strongly opposed such a step, not indeed on grounds of morality, 
but from ulterior motives of self-interest, and referred in very plain language to the woman's 
depraved character. All this was conveyed to the Countess, who vowed revenge. First she 
bribed Sir D. Wood with .£'1,000 to slay Overbury in a pretended duel. This failing she pre- 
vailed upon Rochester to concert a plot for his ill-starred adviser's removal. The favourite 
denounced him to the King on a trumped-up charge of disobedience. He was committed to the 
Tower in April, 161 3, and kept closely confined under the charge of a new lieutenant, Sir R. 
Elwas, a creature of Rochester. As soon as Overbury realised the true position of 
affairs he threatened to publish certain damning secrets in his possession. This de- 
termined the guilty, pair to have the wretched prisoner removed by poison. This deed was 
effected through the agency of a Mrs. Turner, an abandoned confidant of the Countess ; ILlwas, the 
governor ; Weston, a warder ; Frankland, a druggist ; and Forman, a celebrated conjuror or wizard. 
Poison was gradually administered to Overbury in his food for about five months, but his strong 



— 39 — 

constitution enabling him to resist its power, liis murderers adopted another mode, so as to effect 
a sure tliough agonising death. He died after several liours of extreme torture on September 15th. 
It was reported that he died of an infectious disease and his body was hastily and secretly buried. 
Meanwhile, the Countess took proceedings for divorce before a servile commission* appointed by 
the King, a dissolution of marriage was pronounced, and on the i6th of December following, the 
marriage of Carr, created Earl of Somerset in the previous November, was solemnised with great 
pomp at Whitehall in the presence of the Queen and Prince Charles, t 

But the period of about a year and a half ensuing brought a just retribution. The fickle 
James had discarded Somerset and adopted a similar favourite in the person of the young 
George Villiers, afterwards the celebrated Duke of Buckingham. Somerset's friends became few, 
his enemies many ; dark rumours and suspicions were not only whispered but openly spoken of 
The people were indignant and clamoured for an inquiry which was ordered by Lord Chief 
Justice Coke, with the result that warrants were issued for the arrest of the Earl and Countess, 
together with their inferior accomplices already mentioned. Mrs. Turner, Weston, Frankland, and 
Elwas were tried in the autumn of 1615 + and found guilty ; it is remarkable that all four were 
executed a few days after sentence. Forman died before the trials and so escaped the last penalty 
of the law, while the complicity of a wizard in the nefarious business augmented the popular 
horror and indignation to a frenzied degree. It is even said that the last dose of poison so cruelly 
administered came from the hands of Dr. Mayerne, the King's physician. Mayerne was not 
examined at the trial, so that we have no clear account of his share in the act. 

In May, 1616, the Earl and Countess were tried by their peers in Westminster Hall, and 
returned again to the Tower § where they remained for some years. A scandalous pardon was 
then granted by the King, it is darkly hinted through fear, James dreading the revelation by 
Somerset of some disgraceful or criminal secret. The history of the Stuarts has many blots but 
this one is the foulest. Mrs. Turner, who must be looked upon as the prime evil spirit of the 
tragedy, was a very handsome woman, but of more than doubtful reputation in earlier days. She 
had been the companion and confidant of the Countess, who was daughter of the Earl of Suffolk, 
both before and after her marriage to the Earl of Essex, and it is strongly believed that the 
teaching she received, both as maid and wife, from this infamous woman contributed largely to 
make her what she was, a very Messalina. 

The grotesque circumstances which attended the execution of this woman added another 
element of interest to the gruesome sight. She had been well known as the inventor of a yellow 
starch, and had introduced its use some years before. Chief Justice Coke, who, to his credit, had 
been the main instrument in bringing all the prisoners to trial, in sentencing her, said that as she 
was the inventor of yellow starched ruffs and cuffs so he hoped she would be the last to wear such 
things. He, therefore, ordered that she should be hanged in what she had made so fashionable. 
The fair Mrs. Turner accordingly appeared on the scaffold in a dress a la mode with cobweb lawn 
ruff and cuffs stiffened with yellow starch. Howell says : " With her I believe that yellow starch 
which so much disfigured our nation and rendered it so ridiculous and fantastic, will receive its 
funeral."ll 

* This commission consisted of five Bishops and seven lawyers ; the case was tried before a jury of wonien. 

t Foi an account of this vid. Stow. Annales, London, 1631, folio, p. 1005. 

\ Vid. Stow. Annales, folio, London, 1631, p. 1024. 5 /Jem., p. 1024. 

II Epistolx Uo-Eliana — Letter II. — March, 161S. 



— 40 — 

Such was the sad fate of Sir Thomae Overbury, only in his 32ncl year, which, together with 
a certain amount of genius and literary accomplishments, although his character was somewhat 
unprincipled, made him the object of public regret and commiseration. He wrote both in poetry 
and prose. His poem — " The Wife " — delineating the character of a woman such as would 
render a married life happy, was much esteemed. It was, indeed, a curious subject for his pen, 
considering the circumstances of his own life. 

According to Lowndes the twelfth edition was printed in London in, 1627. If this be so 
the Dublin edition of 1626 given by Mr. Dix must be the eleventh. He mentions the eleventh 
edition as that of" London, 1622, sm. 8vo., A.-V. in eights — Dublin, 1626, i2mo." 

BEDELL.— The A.B.C. or the Institution of a Christian, Dublin, 1631 :— 
This most exemplary and upright man was born at Black Notley, Essex, in 1570 ■ ^^ 
graduated at Cambridge, and was elected Fellow of Emmanuel College in 1599. Shortly after 
ordination he got parochial charge of St. Edmundsbury, and officiated there with such zeal and 
success, that he was selected by Sir H. Wotton,* the newly appointed ambassador to Venice 
to accompany him as Chaplain, 1604. He remained in Venice during about eight years, and 
while there formed a close intimacy with the celebrated Fra Paolo (Paul Sarpi) a priest of the 
Servite order and the well-known historian of the Council of Trent. From him Bedell obtained a 
thorough knowledge of Italian into which he translated the English Liturgy shortly after, and 
in return instructed Father Paul in English and drew up a grammar for his use. 
Venice was at this period in a very critical state of unrest, political and religious. 
There was a bitter contest between the Republic and the Papal See — the excommunications 
and interdicts from Rome were openly defied — a complete schism resulted, and at 
one time a total separation from the Roman Catholic Communion was imminent. In fact 
this was the object of Sir H. Wotton's embassy from King James, and a high opinion of 
Bedell's theological abilities and judgment must have been entertained in selecting him as 
chaplain upon such a delicate mission. Izaac Walton observes f that "Father Paul wrote his 
celebrated history of the Council for King James, which history, as fast as it was written was 
sent in sheets to England, enclosed in letters by Mr. Bedell and others to King James and the 
Bishop of Canterbury " (Dr. Abbot). Wotton's Embassy totally failed, the Venetians having 
made up all their differences with Rome : a failure as Wellwood in his "Memoirs" J suggests, due 
to the blundering vanity of James. Shortly afterwards Bedell returned to England, and his 
renowned friend seeing that all his projects for the disruption of Venice^ with Rome had fallen 
through, and probably dreading further violence § from his clerical enemies, wished to go with him || 
but the Senate would not permit this. Bedell resumed his humble parochial work at Bury-St- 
Edmunds, and while there translated into Latin Father Paul's histories of the Inquisition, Venetian 



* On his way to Venice, Wotton wrote in a friend's album the following humorous definition of an ambassador — " Lcgattis 
est vir bonits peregre missus ad incntiendnm rcipublicae causa." This innocent sally brought Sir Henry under the displeasure of 
his pedantic master. 

\ Life of Wottmi, p. 150. Ed. Zouch. 

:t Page 30 London, 1736. This is a ridiculous suggestion. It is not at all likely that Venice would have severed her con- 
nection with Rome to please the English King, or be swayed by his " Premonition " which]was to have been presented by Wotton, 
she who had been ever previously the defender of the Popes and who had been first married to the Sea by a successor of St. 
Peter's, 300 years before. 

§ lid. Burnett's Life of Bedell, p. 15. 

II A few years before he had been attacked by five assassins with stilettoes, wounded in fifteen places and left for dead. 



— 41 — 

Interdict and Council of Trent. In i6i 5 he was presented with a living in the diocese of Norwich, 
but he was so scrupulous about paying induction fees, which he conceived rather savoured of 
simony, that there was much difficulty about his admission. At length the payment of those fees 
was waived, and he took charge of the parish and remained there in obscurity for about twelve 
years. While there he led such a retired unobtrusive life, preaching and ministering to his flock 
that he became almost unknown and forgotten, so much so that when Diodati, the celebrated 
Genevan divine, who had known and so much esteemed him at Venice, came to England he was 
surprised to find that he could not gain any intelligence of Bedell : it was by mere chance that 
they met in the streets of London, whither the quiet country clergyman had come to consult its 
libraries. But this lonely man was destined for a more stormy and troublous time and to spend 
his remaining days in the arena of bitter religious and political strife in Ireland. 

In 1626, Sir W. Temple, Provost of Trinity College died, and Ussher, who had been made 
Primate in the year before, anxiously looked round for a successor. No doubt the fame of 
Bedell as a scholar and theologian had reached the College and must have been well-known to 
the Primate, yet it is highly probable that his decided Calvinistic tendencies, .so similar to his own, 
decided Ussher in finally selecting him for that important office. He at first firmly refused, and 
in a characteristic letter to the Primate declining the offer unless forced upon him as a matter 
of duty, he writes " I have no want, thank God, of anything necessary for this life — I have a 
competent living of about ;^ioo a year in a good air and seat — and a little parish not exceeding 
the compass of my weak voice," etc. The entire letter, indeed, gives us a true insight of the 
humility and piety of this amiable man. The Primate and the College authorities urgently 
pressed his acceptance, and even petitioned the king, to whom Bedell must have been known 
since the time of Wotton's Embassy to Venice ; indeed, the latter told the King " that hardly a 
fitter man could have been propounded in his whole kingdom for singular erudition and piety." 
He accepted the office only at the positive royal command, and held it till 1629, when he was 
appointed to the united Sees of Kilmore and Ardagh. After he had joined the College for a 
short time he found himself face to face with many difficulties in his administration — he almost 
dreaded to carry out the reforms which he saw were absolutely necessary, and, returning to 
England, intended to resign. The Primate, however, sent him a strong letter of encouragement, 
he returned to his post, and resolutely set to work in rectifying abuses, restoring discipline and 
promoting the interests of religion amongst all classes in the College. On taking charge of his 
diocese he had still greater difficulties to overcome, he found it over-run with crying abuses and 
filled with intolerable disorders — cathedrals andparish churches dilapidated,* many in ruins — clergy 
without congregations, and congregations without clergy — revenues wasted or alienated, spiritual 
courts oppressive and extorting — pluralities and absenteeism amongst the clergy so frequent as to 
be scandalous Bedell was now fifty-nine years of age, and yet, nothing daunted,'_he commenced 
his task of reforming, of pulling down and of building up, with such amiability of manner, decision 
in action, and honesty of purpose, that even his enemies 'stood by and applauded, and those 
persons most affected by his reforms esteemed and respected him. In order to induce his clergy 
to give up pluralities, which was the crying evil of the time, he nobly set the example by 
resigning one of his Sees — that of Ardagh, in 1630. He thought it his duty to dispense with the 

* The Cathedral and Bishop's house in Ardagh were in ruins. In Kilmore there was neither spire nor bell, many of the 
parochial houses had no roofs. Indeed, non-residence prevailed so much, that houses for the clergy were hardly needed. 

a 



office of lay Chancellor, and taking upon himself the old episcopal jurisdiction, judicially decided 
in person the causes in his own court. About this time also the attention of this truly Christian 
Bishop was turned to the native Irish in his diocese. These unfortunate people, despised and 
neglected, were treated worse than cattle. The protestant clergy never attempted to mitigate 
their sorrows and sufferings, and, even if they willed it, were totally unable to influence them owing 
to their ignorance of Irish. This was merely a continuation of the old mischievous policy in 
Ireland as exemplified by the Statutes of Ed. III., Henry VIII. and Elizabeth.* Bedell, though 
a zealous propagandist, was neither an intolerant nor a persecutor, and it is morally certain that 
such a man could not have signed the protest of 1626, drawn up by Ussher,f and signed by twelve 
Protestant prelates. He sympathised strongly with his Irish fellow subjects, and believed that 
he could at the same time afford them some degree of culture and disseminate religious 
knowledge amongst them, by having the Scriptures and prayers read to them in their own 
beautiful and expressive tongue. It is recorded that Richard Fitzralph, Archbishop of Armagh, 
translated the New Testament into Irish so early as the middle of the fourteenth century. Fox, 
in 1573, refers to this ; | Ussher also speaks of some fragments of Irish translations of the Bible 
being in existence in his own time. But there is now no trace of these in existence. Kearney 
and Walsh had commenced an Irish translation of the New Testament in 1573. They were 
afterwards assisted by Archbishop Donnellan. § Harris I states that this was published in 1603, 
4to. 

As already mentioned, O'Domnhuill, or Daniel, Archbi.shop of Tuam, translated the New 
Testament from the Greek into Irish, published in Dublin, 4to, 1602. Bedell resolved, however, 
to have the Old Testament also translated, and for this purpose set to work in 1630, 
though now in his 60th year, to learn the language of the people around him, and to 
obtain such an accurate and critical knowledge of it as would enable him to get through the 
difficult task. He was fortunate in securing the services of the aged Irish scholar, O Kionga, 
or King, who had assisted Archbishop O'Donnell in his translation of the New Testament. 
Bedell, however, in the execution of his cherished designs, was destined to meet with many trials 
and disappointments, the outcome of the long continued fatal and misguided policy towards 
Ireland, which to this day has left its blackened mark upon the country. 

At a Convocation in Dublin, 1634, the question of an Irish version of the Scriptures was 
warmly discussed, Bramhall, Bishop of Derry, strongly opposed it as dangerous to the State, 
relying on the older penal Statutes, notably that of Hen. VIII. Bedell, however, seconded by 
Primate Ussher, succeeded in having Canons passed to the effect that where most of the people 
were Irish speaking, a Bible and two Prayer Books in the Irish language were to be provided, and 
that the parts of the Service to be read for the day as appointed were to be read in that tongue. 
In the previous year Bedell had drawn up and signed a remonstrance against certain grievances, 
known as the Cavan Remonstrance, which was forwarded to the Lord Deputy Wentworth. 
This gave great offence to the cruel and imperious governor, who sent to England a strong 

* Vid.^ Stat. Kilkenny, 40 Ed. III. and 28 Hen. VIII.; 2 Eliz. For the effects and futility of these and other Acts of 
English policy in Ireland, vid. passim, Sir J. Davies — " Discovery, etc.'' 

t Vid. supra, Ussher. For text of protest — Plowden, Vol. I., IS03. App , xviii. 

JActs and I\Ion., v. i., 473. 

§ This Nehemiah Donnellan was Chaplain to Thomas, 7th Earl of Ormond, who particularly recommended him in a letter 
to Queen Elizabeth, dated 24th JIarch, 1594, " as having bestowed all his time in the College of Dublin about translating the 
Bible into Irish." Sir J. Ware states that " he was bred at Cambridge." 

II Ware, " Writers of Ireland," p. 97. 



— 43 — 

complaint against the bishop. The difference, however, was amicably arranged some time 
after. 

The publication of the Irish version of the Old Testament met with the most violent 
opposition in high quarters ; Archbishop Laud, then Chancellor of Trin. Coll., Dublin ; Wentworth, 
the Lord Deputy, and several of the Irish bishops objected to it, the pretext being that King, 
the aged Irish scholar, whom Bedell had employed, was an incompetent and unworthy person. 
That this was a flimsy pretext will appear when we consider that this Irish translator had been 
actually recommended to Bedell by Primate Us.sher — then Bishop of Meath — Lord Dillon, Sir 
James Ware, and other eminent men. The unfortunate old man, now verging on his eightieth 
year, was deprived of his small living by the surrogates of the Archbishop, grossly maltreated on 
his way to prison in Dublin, and died shortly after : his birthplace, parentage and grave are now 
unknown. Bedell determined to have the work printed at his own e.xpense, and in his own 
house. But this was not to be ; before he could carry out his design a terrible cloud burst over 
Ireland ; the rebellion of 1641 with all its horrors broke out, and before some degree of quiet had 
been restored, the good old bishop was no more. 

It is most remarkable with what respect and admiration he was looked upon by the 
native Irish. Amidst all the scenes of blood, revenge and desolation that marked the time, he 
and all who took refuge with him were suffered to remain almost undisturbed ; he was the only 
Englishman in Co.Cavan whose house was not attacked. He and his family were removed, probably 
for safety sake, to the old castle of Cloughoughter, the Irish declaring that he would be the last 
Englishman they would drive out of Ireland. He was afterwards taken to the house of Dr. Denis 
Sheridan, who had helped in the translation of the Bible, where, worn out with fatigue, anxiety 
and sorrow, he was seized with an intermitting fever, and died in the midst of his family, 7th 
February, 1642. The R.C. bishop ordered that his remains be buried in consecrated ground, 
and the chiefs of the Irish forces paid unusual honours at his funeral. They assembled their forces 
and with much solemnity and decency accompanied the body to the grave, and at the interment 
fired a volley, shouting in Latin, '^ Hie requiescai icltimus* Anglorum!' They even desired the 
Rev. Mr. Clogy — a Protestant clergyman — to read the funeral offices of his church, and what is 
most remarkable of all, the Rev. Ed. Farrell}', a R.C. clergj-man, who was present, cried out in the 
warmth of his heart " O sit anima inea cum Bedello."^ 

The precious Irish manuscript came into the hands of the Rev. Mr. Sheridan, in whose 
house Dr. Bedell died ; after some years it was given to Dr. Jones, Bishop of Meath. After 
much delay, discouragement, ill-will, and even threats, it was published in London, 4to, 1686, 
under the care and auspices of the Hon. Mr. Boyle and Bishop Marsh. The little work 
mentioned in the List is a short catechism «'hich Dr. Bedell had printed in one sheet, containing 
the elements of Christianity, with some prayers and pas.sages from the Scriptures. Many copies 
were struck off and scattered throughout his diocese. The title, translated is " The Alphabet or 
Elements of Christian Doctrine." 

Burnet says that Bedell was a Calvinist both in decrees and grace, and so his prefer- 
ment was much retarded. If so, he was one of the most liberal minded Calvinists kno\Mi to 



* Qy- optimus. 

t This, together with many other instances, goes far to disprove the exaggerated accounts of the cruelty of the Irish durin" 
such a period of hate and revenge, given by such partial historians as Sir J. Temple, Borlase, Co.\, etc., and subsequently copied 
in glowing colours by Hume. 



— 44 — 

history. Borlase* says he was "one of the brightest lights of the Irish Church, both for learning 
and shining conversation ; and (in his constant diligence in the work of the ministry) a pattern 
to others." 

1627. CARPENTER, N. — a noted Mathematician and Geographer. His fame in this re- 
spect brought him under the notice of Primate Ussher, who invited him over to Ireland, made him 
one of his chaplains, and schoolmaster of the King's Wards in Dublin. Republished several works, 
only one of which " Achitophel " was printed in Dublin, as mentioned in the List by Mr. Dix. 
In the year following it was published in Oxford, 1628, 4to. f Prynne says there were divers 
passages in this book against Arminianism, averring it to be planted among us by Jesuits and 
Politicians to undermine our religion gradually, that as soon as it came abroad it was called in, 
and all passages against Arminianism expunged by Bishop Laud's agents — reprinted, London, 
1629, 4to, to the great injury both of the Truth and Author." The learned Hakewill J speaks of 
Carpenter as a renowned Cosmographer and Geographer, and quotes at length his witty arguments 
against those who maintained that America was discovered in the days of Augustus, because some 
coins of that Emperor had been found in the American mines. This is given by Marianus 
Siculas in his History of Spain. § He also says that Carpenter " clearly demonstrates that by 
Platoe's Atlantis America cannot be understood, and withall by the way gives us a touch of the 
Speciall Geographees of these latter times." 

Lowndes makes no mention of Carpenter. 

1630. AInsarutn Lachrynue. — Tliese tears are the production of twenty-four members of 
Trin. Coll., Dublin, the names of whom have been kindly furnished by Mr. Dix, as given in the 
Brit. Museum Library copy, amongst these appear two Wares — probably nephews of the cele- 
brated Sir J. Ware. 

The elegies are short, mostly in Latin and Greek, and even some in Hebrew, so that the 
gentle Muses must have been well-nigh tortured to tears. The " most illustrious " and " most 
religious heroine " for whom they were written was daughter of Sir G. Fenton and second wife 
of Richard Boyle, who, at the time of this second marriage, was knighted by the Lord Deputy, 
Sir G. Carew, shortly afterwards created Earl of Cork by James I., made one of the Lord Justices 
and hereditary Grand Treasurer of Ireland by Charles I. He has been styled the " great " Earl of 
Cork, but this epithet will be subjectively held to imply, perhaps, a qualification for totally 
different characters, according as the mind be that of a sympathiser with the Protestant English 
or with the Catholic Irish of the period. His public character from these antagonistic points of 
view may be gleaned from what Cromwell said of him. 

" If there had been an Earl of Cork in every province, it would have been impossible for 
the Irish to have raised a rebellion." 



* Irish Rebellion, fol. 1680, p. 32. 

t An Apologie, etc. London : 1630. Fol. — Advertisements at end. 
X Cant. Doom, 1646, p. 166. g.d. Harris's Ware — Writers, Dublin, 1745. Fob, p. 334. 

§ In tlie Treatise de Geograpliia Ijy Henry Glareanus,— 1529, Svo., p. 254,— we find an allusion to this far-fetclred notion 
" Sunt qui patent tempore Cresaris Augusti earn terram fuisse notam, alque Maronem. /En.lib. VI., de ea hsec prolulisse carminati 

" Jacet extra sidera tellus 
Extra anni solisq. ubi caelifer Atlas 
Axem humero torquet." 



— 45 — 

This "great" Earl of Cork was the man who in a letter* to the Speaker of the English 
House of Commons, dated from Youghal, 25th August, 1642, boasted that he had indicted and 
outlawed above eleven hundred persons, noblemen, baronets, knights, esquires and priests, in the 
counties of Cork and Waterford, whereby his Majesty may be intitled to their lands and 
possessions, not of so little yearly value as two hundred thousand pounds," " all their estates 
confiscated to the corruption of their blood and extirpation of them and their families." 
At the conclusion of his letters he styles these doings " this Work of Works." 
The subject of these numerous Trin. Coll. elegies had 16 children, the fifth of whom was 
the well-known Roger Boyle, Lord Broghill, afterwards Earl of Orrery, who played such a 
notoriously prominent part in Irish affairs under Charles I., Cromwell and Charles II. Her seventh 
son was the far more distinguished and famous Robert Boyle, so celebrated in the world of 
Science and Letters, and styled " The Father of Pneumatic Philosophy." 

1626. FAULKLAND was appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1622, and held that office 
for seven years. These were troublous times of subsidies and promised graces, of perfidy and intoler- 
ance, of proclamations and petitions, of kingly duplicity and broken faith, that crumbled the hopes 
of the Irish people. Faulkland had a difficult task in his administration. Leland f says that he 
' seems to have been more distinguished by his rectitude than abilities," " his temper directed him 
to moderation and indulgence in the affair of religious controversy." But rectitude in govern- 
ment and toleration in religion were fatal to a Lord Deputy in those days. The recusants — the 
Irish R.C. party — relying on the word of a king, thought that he was holding back what they 
were led to expect, while, on the other hand, the Protestant party, deeply tinged at the time with 
Puritanism, strongly remonstrated against any concessions, and maligned the embarrassed 
Governor at the English court. The result was that Faulkland was recalled, and the administra- 
tion of affairs temporarily handed over to the Lord Chancellor Loftus and to Richard Boyle, Earl 
of Cork. It is, perhaps, not too much to say that had Faulkland been retained and had the king 
been other than a Stuart, the course of history might have been totally changed : at all events, the 
seeds of distrust and discontent now sown brought Wentworth, Faulkland's successor, to the scaf- 
fold, and materially helped in bringing his master to a similar fate. 

1631. BISHOP DOWNHAM.— Was a native of Cheshire, succeeded to the See ofDerry 
in 1616 ; died, 1634. He was the fifth Protestant bishop. Dr. George Montgomery being the first. 
This prelate was decidedly Calvinistic in his views, zealous and intolerant to persecution in 
the cause of the Reformed Church within his diocese. He even obtained from the Lords 
Justices, Loftus and Boyle, a commission empowering him by immediate warrant from himself to 
arrest all within his jurisdiction who should refuse to appear upon citation or to obey the sen- 
tences given against them. This arbitrary commission was renewed by Lord Deputy Wentworth 
in 1633, and obtained upon the Bishop's information that his diocese abounded with delinquents who 
refused obedience to his spiritual processes.]: From the Visitation Book of the diocese it does 
not appear that he was very successful in this crusade. He says : — " For the removing of these 

* Orrery State Letters, vol. I. A copy of this letter is given in Hist. Mem. Irish RebelHon. Appx. Dubhn, 1770. 
t Hist. Ireland, Cork, 1776, vol. III., p. 3. 
:j; Vid, Harris's Ware. Bishops. 



-46- 

Popish priests, our lawes are weake and power lesse, neither can I get the assistance of the mili- 
tary men as I desire." He also laments that when convicted and imprisoned they have been 
again set at liberty by corruption, and that when he issued the writ de excommunicato 
capiendo, the Sheriffs could not be got to apprehend them. It was Downham who read 
before the State Council in Christ Church, Dublin, the fanatical protest of the Bishops in 1626, 
drawn up by Ussher, against accepting the offer of the Catholics to maintain an army, for the 
king's service, of 5,000 foot and 500 horse in return for some slight toleration. 

1631. WILLIAM CLERK. — "An Epitome of Certain late Aspersions, etc!' This is 
chiefly an answer to the Preface of Sir J. Davis's Reports, and to some parts of the cases of 
Praemunire reported by him.* The Reports referred to are those on cases adjudged in the King's 
courts in Ireland. This volume is prefaced by a learned and eloquent eulogy on the Common 
Law of England and a Vindication of its professors addressed to Lord Chancellor Ellesmere. 

1633. — SPENSER. — "A View of the State of Ireland" etc., etc. — In the year 1580, 
Spenser, then aged twenty -seven, arrived in Dublin in the train of Lord Gray de Wilton, the new 
Lord Deputy. This London youth, already famous as a poet, his Shepherd's Calendar having 
been published in the previous year, came over to Ireland in the capacity of Secretary to one 
of the most ruthless governors that ever disgraced the administration of that unhappy land. It 
is highly probable that he obtained this post on the recommendation of the celebrated Sir Philip 
Sydney, to whom the Shepherd's Calendar had been dedicated in 1579. In 1582 he returned 
to London with Lord Gray, who had been recalled after a short but unexampled sway of tyranny 
and bloodshed, During these two years the youthful poet, he who had sung of loveliness and 
truth, and had afterwards clothed in gorgeous diction, fwith "continued allegory or dark conceit," 
descriptions of all the abstract virtues, was destined to witness almost at first setting foot on the 
land of his adoption, the terrible butchery perpetrated at Smerwick b)' order of the Lord Deputy. 
Here he must have seen about 900 slaughtered Spaniards and Italians— victims of treachery 
who " yielded on mercy " \ to the ruthless Deputy, spread out on the yellow sands at the foot of 
Oilean-an-Oir. Spenser had thus served an apprenticeship and passed through his baptism of 
blood under the odious and unsparing Puritan Gray. This man was so inhuman that the 
Queen was assured that he tyrannized with such barbarity, "that little was left in Ireland for her 
Majesty to reign over but ashes and carcasses."§ Yet we find Spenser, his young Secretary, 
striving in his View of the State of Ireland, written in 1596, for the Government of Elizabeth, 
to palliate this terrible deed. He has even polluted that glorious poem. The Fcery Queene, in 
the representation of this man of blood and the events of his time, by the allegorical personage 
of Artegal, the Knight of Justice. Was ever a lie clothed in such magnificent diction, or veiled 
in such a golden web ? 

Sir Walter Raleigh, Spenser's friend, whom, with a quaint conceit, he styled The Sliephcrd 
of the Ocean, was also, we are pained to state, noted for his rapacity, treachery, Ij and cruelt)', 

* Harris's Ware — ^Writers, p. 119. 

t Campbell styles Spenser " the Rubens of English Poutiy." His harmony, imagery, and expression renders his 
description just. 

X Borlase — Rcdiidimt of Irdm^d, p, 136. Batier's Chronicle, fol. 356. Irish Annals, — trans, by O'Connor 

§ Leland's His. H., p. 2S7. 

II In a most treacherous manner he captured Lord Roche, who was hospitably entertaining him at the time at Castlctown- 
Roche. 



— 47 — 

and to him was committed the execution of the odious and barbarous massacre at Smerwick — 
a task which he carried out to the full. 

This " Gentle Spenser," after his return to England, though employed in some minor 
offices, appears, like many other of the needy and avaricious Court sycophants, to have been a 
chagrined and disappointed suitor for place or emolument. Through the influence of Sir Philip 
Sydney he obtained the patronage of the Earl of Leicester, but he failed to obtain that of 
Burleigh. The latter is said to have been offended at some of his allusions in The Shepherd's 
Calendar. In this poem Spenser makes his shepherds pipe of polemics as well as of love, and 
mingle amorous sighs with controversy on Protestantism and Popery. Through out all his works 
indeed there is a tinge of religion and morality which runs like veins of gold throughout a 
beautiful structure of Parian marble. He was, as already mentioned, for several years a suitor 
at Court, and no doubt he thought with longing heart of the rich vales and gentle streams of 
" deep-valleyed Desmond," which he had left behind ; he knew well of the design for the 
plantation of Munster and of the El Dorado that awaited the settler in Ireland, much more 
certain than that which his friend, Raleigh, so glowingly pictured as existing in Guiana. 

In " Mother Hubbard's Tale," written at or about this time, the poet describes the 
disappointments and reverses he met with in his quest of emolument and place, thus : — 

" Full little knowest thou that hast not tryed 
What hell it is in suing long to byde. 
To lose good days that might be better spent. 
To waste long nights in pensive discontent," &c., &c. 

In 1586 he was, however, rewarded with a grant of land, 3,028 acres, out of the forfeited 
estates of the ill-starred Earl of Desmond. These estates alone amounted to upwards of half a 
million acres of the finest country in Ireland, all of which was forfeited to the Crown. According 
to the plan of settlement this vast domain was to be divided into manors and seigniories, and 
granted to English gentlemen — Knights, Esquires, &c. — under certain conditions which they 
undertook to perform, hence the term, U?idertaker, applied to these grantees. What a field for 
grasping, impecunious courtiers — what a boon for younger sons and cadets of families ! Sir 
Walter Raleigh, for his services in carrying out the cruel orders of Lord Deputy Gray, received a 
grant of 42,000 acres in Cork and Waterford, including Youghall, Lismore, and a large tract of 
the valley of the Blackwater. These lands he afterwards disposed of to the avaricious and 
grasping Mr. Richard Boyle, better known by his subsequent title of the Earl of Cork, for the 
trifling sum of iJ^i,500. Much might be said about this interesting and extraordinary man, who 
may well be termed a land-grabber of the XVII. century, but this is not the place. 

Kilcoleman Castle, about three miles from Doneraile, situated on Spenser's tract, was the 
principal residence of the poet for about ten years, and here he wrote the chief portions of his 
immortal work, The Farie Queene. The Castle, situated on a small hill, is now an ivied ruin ; 
near it is a lake and a small calm flowing river, the Awbeg, fringed with alder trees. This is the 
"Mulla," m.entioned by the poet both in the poem Colin Clozct and in the Fcerie Queene: — 

" Under the foot of Mole, that mountain hore ; 
Keeping my sheep amongst the cooly shade, 
Of the green alders by the Mulla's shore." 
And again : — ■ Colin Clout. 

" And Mulla mine whose waves I whilom taught to weep." 

Fcerie Queene., c. xi., 41, 



The Baltyhoura mountains, lying towards the north of this beautiful land, are the " Mole." All 
this noble country with its variety of form and surface — mountains, vales, and many streams, 
bordered by the magnificent Galtees — the Oliver, Clydagh, and Ballyhoura mountains, once the 
patrimony of the Lords of Desmond, the Butlers, the MacCarties, and Barrys, with many Castles 
and Keeps, now dismantled and shattered, must be of surpassing interest to all students of 
English literature and history, and suggestive of sad reflections on the story of Ireland during 
the XVI. and XVII. centuries. Amidst such scenes our poet wrote his incomparable romantic 
poem in that stately English measure, since then named after him, and it is something for 
Ireland to be proud of that such a tissue of allegory, chivalrous devotion, and gorgeous description 
should have been woven on her soil, and no doubt derived its inspiration from the scenery 
around — its mountains, woods, and vales — its dark rivers and ruined Keeps. 

Spenser returned from England in 15S7 in order to take possession of his lands, and 
whilst residing in Kilcoleman Castle was visited in 1589 by Sir Walter Raleigh, who was at that 
time staying at Lismore. Spenser had then completed the first three books of the Fcerie 
Queene. Raleigh warmly approved of the poem, and persuaded Spenser to return with him to 
England and arrange for its publication. It appeared in 1590 with a dedication to the Queen, 
fulsome enough, as was then the fashion at the time. The poet was, of course, anxious to obtain 
the favour of Elizabeth, and in the poem itself we find the Queen Gloriana, and the huntress 
Belphoebe, are symbolical of her, whilst the personification of Envy is intended as a glance at 
the unfortunate Mary Queen of Scots. 

In 1591 Spenser returned to his home at Kilcoleman, having obtained a pension of £i,o 
a year from the parsimonious Queen, and in 1596 published three more books of his famous 
poem. In the same year he wrote the work, A View of the Siate of Ireland, which was 
intended for the Government of England. This piece lay in MS. in Archbishop Usher's Library, 
and was thence published by Sir J. Ware in 1633, folio — . Several editions are mentioned in 
the list given by Mr. Dix, those marked B, C, D and E having in addition the histories and 
chronicles of Campion, Hanmer, and Marleburrough : — 

" The scope and intention of the Book was to forward the Reformation of the Abuses and 
"evil Customs of Ireland; and some things in it are very well written, particularly as to the 
" Political main Design of reducing Ireland to the due Obedience of the Crown of England. 
" But in the History and Antiquities of the Country he is often miserably mistaken, and seems 
" rather to have indulged the Fancy and Licence of a Poet, than the Judgment and Fidelity 
" requisite for a Historian. Add to this his want of Moderation, in which, it must be confessed, 
" he was exceedingly defective."* 

This is a sweeping, but just, condemnation. Spenser ought not to have meddled in state- 
craft — his genius was born for the realms of imagination — his dwelling should be the Temple of 
the Muses. In truth, Spenser, like his own creation, Archimago, seems to have had a dual 
nature — that of the gentle poet and the persecuting Calvinist. 

Alas for human nature and for faith in man ! What shall we say when we find this 
" Gentle " Spenser, in his Vieiv of the State of Ireland, recommending the barbarous policy of 
creating a famine amongst the natives, that pestilence and death might follow, in order to ensure 
their total extirpation. We forbear quoting the words of this horrible counsel ; they can be 
found in the work referred tof 

'Harris, Ware, Writers of Ireland, II., p. 327., — fol., Dublin, 1745. t Vid, Spenser's View, &c., &c., p. 165. — fol., Dub., 1633. 



— 49 — 

The FcEvie Queene was never completed. We have seen that there was an interval 
of six years between the publications of the first three and second three books, but this was only 
half of the original design, and the world of literature was so much the poorer. There is a sort 
of traditionary story that the MS. of the remaining six books was lost by the " disorder and abuse 
of a servant " who was entrusted to carry it to England. Hallam states that " this is improbable," 
and adds, " the short interval before the death of this great poet was filled up by calamities 
sufficient to wither the fertility of any mind." He returned to Kilcoleman in 1597, and lived only 
two years afterwards. He was made Clerk of the Council of Munster, and in 1598 appointed 
Sheriff of Cork by the Queen. 

Spenser, as the sentiments in his work on Ireland will show, was an advocate for 
arbitrary power — for oppressive and harsh measures* towards the conquered nation, Tyrone's 
rebellion had broken out some few years before, and soon spread into IVIunster. Spenser, 
as one of the undertakers of the Crown lands, was, of course, disliked by the Irish, is even 
" accused, on the authority of existing legal documents, of having sought unjustly to add 
to his possessions," and therefore became a prominent object for attack in those days of revenge 
and bloodshed. Kilcolman was attacked, plundered, and burnt in 1 598. The poet and his wife 
with difficulty escaped ; their new-born child, in the confusion of such a calamity, was left 
behind and perished in the flames. 

Spenser, reduced to absolute penury, and broken-hearted, reached London, and died 
about three months after at an obscure inn in King Street, Westminster, on the 1 6th of 
January, 1599. Ben Jonson, in a letter to Drummond, says ^^ he died for lake of bread!' This 
may not be literally true ; yet, coming from such a likely and well-informed authority, it points 
to an inference, sad enough, that the great poet died in a state, at least, of misery and want.f 
Jonson also states that some time before his deaih "he refused twenty pieces, sent to him by 
my Lord of Essex, adding, ' he was sorrie he had no time to spend them.' " Spenser was buried 
in Westminster Abbey, at his own request, near the tomb of Chaucer, at the charge of the Earl 
of Essex. His grandson, Hugolin, obtained the estate at the Restoration, but being outlawed in 
the reign of James II., this estate reverted to the Crown. It is stated that a descendant of his 
obtained a re-grant in 1700. An interesting family tree of Edmund Spenser appears in the 
Anthologia Hiber?iica, Vol. I, 1793. This is copied by T. Crofton Croker in his Researches in 
the South of Ireland, 1824, 4 to. 

1638-1639.— SIR RICHARD BOLTON.—" A fustice of the Peace for Ireland."— Ses 
note for 1621. 

* Spenser suggested the barbarous policy above referred to for the wasting of Ulster and Connaught, and for the guidance 
of Essex in his war against Hugh O'Neill. This diabolical plan was afterwards carried out by Mountjoy, who succeeded 
Essex. 

t It is a remarkable fact, and one which persons of a speculative turn of thought would, no doubt, place under the 
category of retributive justice, that all who were concerned in the foul massacre at Smerwick met with untimely and unhonoured 
ends. At all events the irony of fate is strangely exemplified in the case of the poet's descendants and property. About 5S years 
after his death we find one of his grandsons, William Spenser, petitioning Cromwell to save his lands from confiscation and from 
division amongst his troopers, and himself from transplantation to Connaught. Cromwell wrote to the Commissioners for Affairs 
in Ireland in his favour, mentioning in his letter " that Edmund Spenser, who by his writings toucliing the reduction of ye Irish 
to civility, brought on him the odium of that nation, and for those works and his other good services Q. Elizabeth conferred on 
him yt. estate which the said Wm. Spenser now claims." We are iniormed that this intercession was in vain. Thus part of the 
c.ael treatment recommended by the poet for the unfortunate Irish, was shortly after meted out to his own descendants. 

n 



— so — 

1641.— CAPTAIN AUDLEY UY.'SNm .—"Speech deliveredin the Upper House, ^'c!'— 
Mervin was a gentleman from Tyrone, member of the Irish Parliament, of strong Puritan 
principles, a soldier and a lawyer, and signalised himself in both, seemingly incongruous, 
stations. He was deputed by the Commons to bring up to the House of Lords an impeachment 
for High Treason against Sir Richard Bolton, Lord Chancellor ; Dr. Bramhall, Bishop of 
Derry; and Sir Gerrard Lowther, Chief Justice. In his speech on this occasion, couched 
as was the fashion at the time, in vehement pompous language, he required that these persons 
be sequestered from the Council Board and places of Judicature, and their persons secured. The 
charges were — conspiring with Strafford to introduce arbitrary power — subverting of fundamental 
laws and rights, and inflicting infamous and cruel punishments. All three would, probably, 
have become witnesses on behalf of Strafford, and to prevent such an inconvenience to their 
measures against him, now being taken by their Committee before the Parliament of England, 
the Commons determined to have them removed.* la reference to these transactions a serious 
dispute arose on the question — Whether the House of Lords in Ireland had power of Judicature 
in Capital cases. " Whereupon, Captain Audley Mervin made a most excellent speech in the 
Lords House of Parliament, 24 May, 1641."! 

Mervin subsequently went to England and impeached Sir Geo. Ratcliffe, a trusted friend 
of Strafford, on a similar charge. 

We next hear of him as very active against the Irish forces during the Rebellion. 
He saved the lives of several thousands of women and children in Fermanagh, \ was made a 
Colonel in the army, and was one of the four officers § sent from Ireland to solicit the 
Parliament for succour. These went from London to Oxford, where the king then was, and 
presented a petition to the same effect. 

Although Mervin was one of those notoriously disaffected to the Royal Cause, he was 
knighted at the Restoration, made Prime Sergeant at Law, and Speaker of the Irish Commons 
in 1661. 

1639. — REVD. JOHN CORBET. — " Ungirding of the Scottish Arinotir" — Corbet was an 
Episcopal Minister in the "provostrie" of Dumbarton, who, refusing to take the Covenant, was turned 
out of his living and obliged to fly for his life to Ireland. He was a man of learning and abilities, 
and when he arrived in Dublin, published a book entitled "Epistle Covgratulatory of Lysimachus 
Nicanor" in which he draws a parallel and shows an agreement in principles and practices between 
the Covenanters and the Jesuits. It does not appear where this book was printed, but at the end 
of the Epistle is " From my study at Basileopolis, ist January, 1640." It is highly probable that 
it was printed and published in Dublin, and must therefore, come into the same category as those 
works published by the Revd. H. Fitzsimon, Paul Harris, and others. It is not mentioned 
by Lowndes. The vivacity and clearness displayed in this little work — the sufferings of the 
author and the spirit of the times, raised Corbet to such favour, that he was recommended by 
Strafford to a good living, then vacant, in the gift of the Bishop of KiUala. Now, this bishop 
was also a Scotsman named Adair, a strong Puritan at heart, but who had so far conformed and 
played the hypocrite as a suffering churchman, that he was appointed to the See of Killala. 

* Yid. Carte-Ormond, I. p. 127 t Sir R. Cox. — Hibernia AngKcana, II., p. 65. 

t Carles-Ormond, I., 178. §Sir J. Montgomery, Sir Hardress Waller Col. A. Hill, and Col. A. Mervyn. 



— 51 — 

He was angry with Corbet for his severe strictures on Puritanism, received him very sourly and 
reproached him witli some acrimony and bitterness. Corbet warmly retorted, when the bishop 
in the heat of dispute, defended and justified the acts of the Scotch Covenanters in their sedition 
and cruel intolerance. In the present juncture of affairs, when religious feuds and animosity ran 
so high, it was deemed very unsafe and improper to have a Scotch Covenanter in charge of an Irish 
See. Adair was brought before the High Commission Court and sentenced to be fined, imprisoned, 
and deprived. Bramhall, Bishop of Derry, also moved that he be censured in the House of Lords 
and adjudged unfit to be summoned to his place by writ. The sentence of deprivation was 
solemnly carried out in St. Patrick's Cathedral, l8 May, 1640, and Maxwell, Bishop of Rosse, 
in Scotland, appointed in succession to Adair. 

Corbet was subsequently well provided for. After the fall of Strafford Adair was restored 
to favour and appointed to the See of Waterford. 

C. W. DUGAN. 



— 53 — 



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1630 



Richd. Olmstead, Minister 
of God's Word and Master 
of Arts 



Sion's teares leading to joy 
or the Waters of Marah 
sweetened. First preached 
at Clonenagh * in the 
Queen's Co. in severall 
sermons and now pub- 
hshed for the benefite of 
the Church. 

[811. + 246 pp + Errata, &c. 
A in eights, B to L ir 
twelves, M in fours.] 



Musiirum Lachrymal ; sive 
elegia Collegii Sancta; et 
Individute Trinitatis Juxta 
Dubhn ; in obituni Illu,s- 
trissimse et ReHgio- 
sissimae Heroinaa 

Catharinse ComitissEe 
Corcagiee Vxoris Honora- 
tissimi Richardi, Comitis 
Corcagife unius ex 
Primariis lusticiariis totius 
Regni Hyberniae. 

(Unpaged ; 24 leaves = 2 + 
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Church College 
(Oxford) 



* Now Mountrath. 



58 



Date 



1631 



Author 



James Ussher (or Usher), 
Archbishop of Armagh and 
Primate of all Ireland 



(William Bedell, Bishop of 
Kilraore and Ardagh) 



Lords Justices and Council 



do. 



S. J. (M.A.) 



Wm. Clerk, Bachelor of the 
Civil Law 



George Downame (or 
Downham) S. T. P., Bishop 
of Derry 



Short Title 



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Gotteschalci et Praedestina- 
tianae Controversiae ab 
eo motae, Historia, Una 
cum diiplice, ejusdem con- 
fessione nunc prvimm in 
lucem ediia. 

(pp. 1-237 + errata; sig. 
Dd = subtitle, butpagination 
continuous.) 

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The SoulesCentinellringing 
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An Epitome of certaine late 
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1632 



James Ussher, Archbishop. 



do. 



George Synge (or Singe), 
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Roger Puttocke(orPuttock) 
Minister ... at Novan 



The Lords Justices and 
Councell 



Veterum Epistolarum 
Hibernicarura S y 1 1 o g e ; 
Quae partim ab Hibernis, 
partim ad Hibernos, partim 
de Hibernis, vel rebus 
Hibernicis sunt con- 
scriptae 

(pp. 1-165) 



Brittanicarum Eccksianim 
Antiquitates 



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published by the Jesuits 
under the name of 'Wm. 
Malone, &c. 

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1633 
"A" 



Edmund Spenser 



do. 
And Edmund Campion 
(Published by Sir James 
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Meredith Hanmer, D.D. 



Henry Marleburrough 



A View of the State of Ire- 
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The Title page is distinct 
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Same 

Whereunto is added The 
History of Ireland, by 
Edmund Campion, Some- 
time fellow of St. John's 
CoUedge in Oxford. 

(Onetitlepage, differingfrom 
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" Historie.") 

with 

The Chronicle of Ireland 
Collected by Meredeth 
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and 

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— 6i 



Date 



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1633 

"C" 



'D" 



Edmund Spenser 



Edmund Campion, Mere- 
dith Hanmer & H. Marle- 
burrough 



Edmund Campion, Mere- 
dith Hanmer, D.D., and 
Marleburrousih 



Edmund Spenser 



Short Title 



A View of the State of Ire- 
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With title page as " A " and 
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Two Histories of Ireland. 

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"Ireland by Edmund 
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1633 



Meredith Hanmer(&Henry 
Marleburrough) 



Edmund Campion 



Edmund Spenser 



1633 



Lords Justices and Council 



Viscount Wentworth, Lord 
Deputy and Councel 



The Historie of Ireland, 
collected by three learned 
authors, viz., Meredith 
Hanmer (and Henry Marle- 
burrough), Edmund Cam- 
pion and Edmud Spenser. 

[With title page all of plain 
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224 pp. " Finis " on page 
223] 

with 

A History of Ireland by 
Edmund Campion. 

[Separate and totally dif- 
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Viscount Wentworth, Lord 
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Viscount Wentworth, Lord 
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Lord Deputy and Councel 



Revd. Paul Harris 



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1634 



Christopher Syms 



John Wilkinson of Barnard's 
Inn, Gent. 



Lord Deputy (Wentworth) 
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do. 



Short Tille 



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— 66 



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1635 



(Thomas Randolph) 



The Statutes of Ireland (X 
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I4thday of Julyinthe loth 
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Charles and there contd. 
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1635- 
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Constitutions, and Canons 
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Henry Leslie (or Lesley) 
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Lord Deputy and Council 
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do. 



do. 



do. 



Sir Jas. Barry, J. (ist Baron 
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do. 



A Treatise of the Authority 
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April, 



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1637 



David Dickson, Preacher 
of God's Word, at Irwin 
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W. Laud, Archbishop. 



Short Title 



A Short Explanation of 
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Hebrewes (With the text 
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Speech deliveredintheStarre 
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1638 



viscount \Vent\vorth, Lord 
Deputy General 



Dr. James Ussher, Archbp. 



Charles I. 



Sir Richard Bolton, Chief 
Baron of the Exchequer 



Lord Deputy and Councel 



do. 



Lawes and Orders of Warre; 
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2 Proclamations. 



2 Proclamations. 



(4to) 

fill V c ^ 



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(4to) 
7ixsi 



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(Fol.) 



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1639 


Archbishop Jas. Ussher (or 


Britannicaruni Ecclesiarum 


(4to) 


Ex officina 


Bristol ; Aberdeen ; 




Usher) D.D., Primate 


Antiquitates, &c. 


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with 




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Appendi.x [havinga separate 






T.C.D. ; St. Canice 






title page and address to 






(Svo); Derry; Worth; 






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Marsh; E. R. McC. 






pp. 973—1196)]. 






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)j 


(Taken from Bolton's 


A Bridfe Roll of the Articles 


(4to) 


Society of 


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Justice of the Peace, r638) 


and matters to be given 
in charge and enquired of 
by the Grand Jury in the 
General or Quarter 
Sessions of the peace 
(Title page and 36 pp.) 


7Ax5iJ- 


Stationers. 




3) 


Sir Richard Bolton 


Justice of the Peace for 
Ireland. 
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(Fol.) 


do. 


r/(/e John O'Daly's Sale 
Catalogue, No. 45. 
1876, p. 10, No. 200. 


;t 


Sir James Ware 


De Scriptoribus Hiberniae, 


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The case of Tenures upon 


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paper) 
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Rev. John Corbet, Minister 


The Vngirding of the 


(4to) 


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of Bonyl in the Provostrie 


Scottish Armour, &c., &c., 


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72 



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1639 Revd. John Corbet, Minister 
of Bonyle, in the Pro- 
vostrie of Dumbarton. 



Henry LesUe (or Lesley) 
Bishop of Down and 
Connor (afterwards of 
Meath) 



Same. 



The Ungirding of the 
Scottish Armour, &c., &c. 

Another Edition or issue, 
with different title page. 



Vide BagfordCoUection 
of Title pages in Brit. 
Mus. 



Examen Conjurationis 
Scoticae sive oratio habita 
Lisnagarvae,* &c., &c. 



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7gX5l 



Ex officina 

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polarum. 



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of the Church, &c. To- 
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certaine objections . . 
against the Orders of our 
Church 

A Sermon : 2nd Edition 



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73 



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1640 



King Charles I. 



1 64 1 



Rodolph Hollingworth, 
S. Th. Bac. 



Lord Lieut. (Strafforde) and 
Councel 



Lord Deputy (Chr. Wandes- 
forde) and Councel 



The King 



Earl of Ormonde, Lt. Genl 



His Majestie's Declaration 
conceminghis proceedings 
with his subjects in Scot- 
land (since the Pacification 
in the camp neere Berwick) 

(pp. 1-44.) 



De justificatione Ex Sola 
Fide, Patrum et Protestan- 
tium Consensus ; Duobus 
opusculis Exhibitus : 'In 
Quibus Lutheri ac Pro- 
testantium hac in re 
Doctrina ab Heretica 
Novitate clare vindicatur, 
&c., &c., &c., &:c. 



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A Proclamation (28 March) 



A Proclamation (5 May) 



A Proclamation (18 Novr.) 



Lawes and Orders of Warre, 
&c. 



(4to) 



Society of Sta- 
tioners, K. P. 



R. R. Belshaw; 
T.C.D 



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tatis Bibliopol- 

arum. 



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(do.; 



do. 



(do.) 



(4to) 
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Reprinted by the 
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Pub. Rec. Off. Lib. 
f. 46. 



Pub. Rec Off. Lib. 
f. 47- 



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lA 



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1641 


Henry Burnell (or Burnel) 


Landgartha, A Tragie- 
Comedyas it was presented 
in the New Theater in 
Dublin with good applause 
being an ancient story, in 
verse, (5 acts). 
(Unpaged ; 37 leaves.) 


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6fx4f 




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" 


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Philosophia Naturalis Re- 
formata, \-c., I'vc. 

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Ex OfBcina Typo- 
graphica Socie- 
tatis Bibliopola- 

rum. 


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U.L.C.;Cashel; Aber- 
deen ; Brit. Mus. 


It 




T/ie Irish Petition to this 
ParliatnentinEngland,&c. 


— 




Vide London Reprint 
in U.L.C. 


ij 


Josua Hoyle, Doctor or 
Professor of Divinity in 
Ireland 


A Rejoynder to Master 
Malone's reply concerning 
the Real Presence, 
(pp. 662) 


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A True relation of the Plot 
Discovered in Ireland, &'e. 


— 




Vide Hazlitt's Biblio- 
graphical Collections 
and Notes, 1882, p. 302. 




Nicholas Barnard (or 
Bernard) D e a n e of 
Ardagh 


The Penitent death of a 
woeful Sinner (John 
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Burial of the said John 

Atherton, &c. in St. John's 

Church in DubHn, 

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The Lords Justices and 
Councel 


A Declaration Explanatory 
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not include any of the 
"old English" of the Pale. 

Order, &c., printed 12 Novr. 


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(s.sh.) 


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57- 


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Captain Audley Marvin (or 
Mervin or Mervyn) 


Speech delivered in the 
Upper House to the Lords 
inParliament, 24 May, 1 64 1 , 
concerning the Judicature 
of the High Court of Par- 
liament. 

(9 leaves.) 


(4to) 




Cashel ; Forster Col- 
lection {Vide Hazlitt 
(1882), p. 394. 


i) 


Same 


Speech made before tlie 
Lords . . . March 4th, 
1640, at Impeachment of 
Sir Rd. Bolton, (yc. 


{do.) 




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— 75 — 



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Houses of Parliament (Ire- 
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do. 



(do.) 



The King (Charles I.) 



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do. and Councel 



The Lords Justices and 
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do. 



do. 



Houses of Parliament (Ire- 
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An Order. 

A Protestation. 



A Hemonstrance from Ire- 
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Parliament in England 
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the Rebels, os'c, (ffc, &■<:., 
With 

A Proclajnation for pro- 
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next, d^c. 

Proclamation (28 Augt.) 



2 Proclamations (27 Oct. 
and 27 Deer.) 



4 Proclamations (May, 
Septr., Octr., and Novr.) 



A Proclamation (27th Octr.) 



A Proclamation 
1641.) 



Feb., 



9 Proclamations(Oct. to Jan, ^ 



Order to raise troops in the 
several counties 



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ofWarrepronouncedagamst 
Lord Mountnorris. 



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58. 

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at K. Inns ; Brit. 
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Pub. Rec. Off Lib. iff ' 
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76 — 



Date 


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Size 


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1642 


Charles I. 


Proclamation dated 9 Septr. 
(Roman letter or Plain type) 


(2 shs.) 


W. Bladen. 


Pub. Rec. Off. Lib. lA. 
f.93. 


» 


Lord Justices and Councell 


Declaration dated 10 Feb. 


(s.sh.) 


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Pub. Rec. Off. Lib. i. f. 
73- 


)) 


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June, 6 Mar. and 31 Deer. 


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69&74&Lib. lA.f 96. 


)j 


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The Lords Justices (W. 
Parsons and Jo. Borlase) 
and Councell 


An Act of State made by 
the Lords Justices and 
Council of Ireland for the 
observation of 23rd day of 
Oct. yearly to be a day of 
Thanksgiving for discovery 
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Dated 14 Oct. 

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)} 




A most damnable, &c. Plot, 
&c., against all Protestants 
in Ireland and England, 
&C., &C. 




Wm. Bladen. 


Vide London reprint in 
Bodleian; U.L.C. 


i} 


Jones 


Remonstrance (and other 
pieces). 


— 




Vide A. Cooper's Sale 
Catalogue, i833,p. 44. 


" 




The copy of a letter written 
from the Lord Visct. Gor- 
mansto^^^^ unto Sir P. 
O'Neal, &c. 


— 




Vide London reprint in 
Bodleian. 


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Lords Justices and Councell 


A Proclamation to annul, 
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in Ulster, &c. 


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Councill of Ireland. 


(Fol.) 




Cashel 


9) 


Launcelot (Bulkeley), Arch 
bishop of Dublin 


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Feb. 28th. 

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Sir Robt. Steward 


His letter giving an account 
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MSS. in T.C.D. 



I No place, but judged to be Dublin printed. 



77 



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1643 


The Lords Justices Borlase 
andTichbom and Councell 


A Proclamation — dated 1 9th 
Septr., 1643, igth Chas. 
I. — concerning a cessation 
of Armes agreed, &c., at 
Sigginstowne, Co. Kildare 
the 15th September, &c., 
&c. 

(Title page, verso blank 
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6|xs. 


Wm. Bladen, K.P. 


R.I. A. (Tracts); Brit. 
Mus.(7|xs-J); Bod- 
leian. 


>> 




A Collection of all the 
papers which passed upon 
the late Treaty touching 
the Cessation of Armes in 
Ireland, &c. 

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pp. blank.) 


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R. LA. (Tracts) 2 
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The Lords Justices and 
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A Proclamation of a rate 
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do 


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1644 


Lord Lieutenant (Ormonde) 
and Councel 


Proclamations dated 29 
Mar., 12 Apl., 20 May, z8 
Augt., 20 Sept., 18 Novr. 
3 Uecr., 4 Deer., 14 Deer. 
II Novr., 13 Jan., and 7 
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Richd. Bolton and M. 
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Visct. Muskerry and Others 


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— 79 — 



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1645 



1644.4S) 



1645 



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Declaration of an agreement 
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Lord Lieut, and Councel 



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Proclamation confirming 
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IV. Bladen. 



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Pub Rec. Off. 



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8o — 



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1646 




A Remonstrance from the 


(4to). 


Wm. Bladen K. P. 


R.I.A. (Tracts); Brit. 






Lords and Commons 


7X5i 




Mus. ; Nat. Lib. 






assembled in Parliament 






(Thorpe Collection) ; 






at Dublin concerning the 






T.C.D.; ChristChurch 






Estate of Ireland, &c., &c. 






(Oxford). 






(Unpaged ; 4 leaves) 








)» 




Articles of Peace made and 


(4to). 


do 


R.I. A. (Tracts); R. R. 






concluded (28 Mar., 1646) 


7x5 




Belshaw. 






between his Excellencie 












James Lord Marques of 












Ormond, &c., &c., and 












Donogh, Lord Viscount 












Muskerry and others ap- 












pointed, &c., by His 












Majesties said Roman 












Catholic Subjects, &c. 






_ 






(6 + 24 pp.) 












with 








)) 


The Marquess of Ormond, 
Lord Lieutenant General 
and Council 


Proclamation dated 30th 
July, 1646. 








»» 




Severall Papers of the 


(4to). 


Wm. Bladen, K.P. 


Nat. Lib. (Thorpe Col- 






Treatie between his Ex- 


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lection) ; R. I. A. 






cellencie Jas. Marques of 






(Tracts ; 3 copies) ; 






Ormond, &c., and Sir Thos. 






Bodleian; U.L.C. ; 






Warton, &c., With the 






Pickering & Chatto. 






Commrs. of Parliament's 












Instructions, ■' c, &c., <tc. 












(2 -1- 1-46 pp.) 








» 




A Collection of all the Papers 

which Passed upon the 

Late Treatie, &c., &c.. &c. 

(2 -n- 52 pp.) 


(4to). 


do 
do 


Corpus Christi (Oxford). 
Bodleian (Carte XVIII. 


}) 


Charles I. 


His Majesties Letter to the 


(Broad- 


p. 48.) 






Lord Marquess of Ormond 


side 










and the Council of Ireland 


s.sh.) 










informing them of his in- 












tention of trusting h i s 












person to the Scotts Army 












&c. (3rd Apl., 1646) 












And 












Order of Lord Lieutenant 












and Council to print 500 












copies. 









Date 



Author 



1647 



Commrs. from the Parlia- 
ment of England 



Short Title 



Articles of agreement made, 
&c. at Dublin the i8th day 
of June, 1647, &c., be- 
tween Lord Ormond and 
Commrs. from Parliament 
of England 

(8 pp.) 



An Ordnance of the 

Commons (of Ireland) &c., 

concerning qualifications 

of Knights, ifec. 

(8 pp.) 



A Mighty Victory over the 
Irish Rebels obtained by 
Colonell Jones at Lynceyes 
Knock neere Trim Aug. 
8 instant, &c., ifcc. 
(8 pp.) 



Size 



(4to) 
7x5i 



(4to). ^^ 
7tf X SfW 



A Declaration against 
taking free quarters 

(Black Letter.) 



(s.sh.) 



Printer 



Wm. Bladen, K.P 



C. A. 



Printed for 

Charles Ryley, & 

to be sold against 

the Castle-gate. 



W.Bladen, K.P. 



Owner or Reference 



Vide Reprints in Na- 
tional Library (Thorpe 
Collection) ; U.L.C. ; 
Bodleian ; Worcester; 
Corpus Christi (Ox- 
ford). 



T.C.D. ; Brit. 
Bodleian 



Mus. : 



Cashel; Bodleian ;Wor 
cester ; Christ Church 
(Oxford) 



Bodleian 



82 — 



■Oate 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1648 



Catalogus Librorum MSS., 
in Bibliotheca Jac. Waraei 

[7 pp+i p- blank + 1-23 
pp. + I p. blank ; some red 
ink printing on Title page.] 



(4to). 
7tV X 5^ 



Excudebat Ro- 
bertas Hughes. 



Bodleian ; Brit. Mus. 



83 



Date 



1649 

"A' 



(Mar. 
13th) 



1649 



Author 



Short Title 



Jas. Butler, ist Duke of 
Ormond and Colonel 
Michael Jones 



Jas. Butler, ist Duke of 
Ormond and Colonel 
Michael Jones 



do. 



(Oliver Cromwell) 



A True copy of several 
Letters first sent from the 
Lord of Ormonde to The 
Honorable Colonell 
Michaell lones, Com- 
mander in Chiefe of the 
Parliaments Forces in 
Leinster and Governor of 
the Citty of Dublin, With 
Colonell Jones his Answer 
to the Lord of Ormondes 
Saied Letters, &c., itc. 
[Title page + verso blank 
+ 1-18 pp.] 

(Sig. B. 2 on verso of p. no 
other sigs.) 

A True copy of two Letters, 
the first sent from the 
Earle of Ormonde to the 
Hon. Colonell Michael 
Jones (dated 9 March, 
164S at Carricke). With 
Colonell Jones his Answer 
(dated 14 March, 1648, 
from Dublin. 

(8 pp. but no signature). 

Same. 

[Another edition unpaged. 
Has same title page as "A." 
Title Page + verso blank 
+ 1-6 pp; Sig. A3 on 
verso of 2nd leaf]. 

A Declaration by The Lord 
Lieut, of Ireland, ifec. 

Ireland's Declaration, being 
a Remonstrance of the 
Generality of the Good 
People of Ireland (in be- 
half of Chas. II.) 

Ormonde's Breakfast, or a 
true relation of the Salley 
and Skirmish performed by 
CoUonell Michl. Jones and 
his Party, against the Mar- 
ques of Ormonde and his 
Forces encamped before 
Dublin, the 2nd of August, 
1649. In a Dialogue be- 
tween a Chevalier and a 
Roundhead. 

[In rhyme ; 8 pp.] 



Size 



Printer 



(4to). 



(4to). 
7^x5! 



(4to). 
7ix5i 



(s.sh.) 



(4to). 



Owner or Reference 



Wm. Bladen. 



Wm. Bladen. 



do. 



Wm. Bladen. 



T.C.D. ; Brit. Mus. (2 
copies) ; U.L.C. 



T.C.D. 



R. I. A. (Tracts). 



Fide London Reprint, 
in R.I. A. (Tracts) 

Brit. Mus. (2 copies) ; 
Bodleian. 



Worcester; Christ 
Church (Oxford) 



-84- 



Date 



1650 



Author 



Short Title 



Certaine Acts and Declara- 
tions made by the 
Ecclesiasticall Congrega- 
tion of the Archbishops, 
Bishops and other Prelates 
met at Clonmacnoise the 
4 day of Deer., 1649. To- 
gether with a Declaration 
of the Ld. Lieut, of Ire- 
land, &c., &c. 

(20 pp.) 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



(4to). 



K. Inns (Cork, printed 
25th Feby., 1649, 
Dublin Reprint). 



NOTES. 



In the Notes at the end of Part I. reference was made to the strong grounds 
there were for beHeving that some works of Roman Catholic writers were in fact printed 
in Dublin, although neither place nor printer is given on the title pages — or, even in 
some cases, where a foreign place is named — and as an instance a work by the Revd. 
H. Fitzsimons, S.J., was given. In the period covered by this Part another instance 
occurs even stronger than the last one mentioned. The Revd. Paul Harris, a secular 
Priest in Dublin, having come into conflict with his Diocesan, the Most Revd. Dr. 
Thomas Flemming, through his opposition to the Franciscan Order which the Archbishop 
strongly favoured, wrote four works, published between 1633 and 1635, having the following 
titles : — 

1. " The Excommunication published by the Archbishop of Dublin, Thomas Fleming, 

"alias Barnewell, friar of the Order of St. Francis, &c." ist Edition, 1632. 
2nd Edition, 1633. 

2. " Arktomastix, sive Edmundus Ursulanus propter usurpatum judicium de tribunali, 

"&c." 1633. 

3. "Fratres sobrii estote, i Pet. v. 8, &c." 1634. 

4. " Exile Exiled, Occasioned by a mandat from Rome, &c." 1635. 

Judging both by the form of these tracts, the type, initial letters, headpieces, etc. 
there is the strongest reason for judging that these works were printed here, and Harris, 
in his Edition of Ware, states his belief that they were so printed. 

* * * * * * 

Ambrose Usher, F.T.C.D., published " A Brief Catechism, very well Serving for the 
Instruction of Youth," which was printed in Dublin by the Company of Stationers, but 
without a date, vide Harris's Ware, edition of 1746, p. 128. 

* ***** 

The late Henry Bradshaw has put on record, as appears by his " Collected Papers " 
(1889), p. 338, that there was a 2nd Edition of Bishop Bedell's " A B C," of which no trace 
remains, but which must have been printed before 164 1. 

* ***** 

In 1640 was published a 4to. volume, entitled " The Epistle Congratulatorie of Lysimachus 
Nicanor (S.J.), etc." No place is given, but judging from the initial letter, tailpiece, etc., it was 
most probably printed in Dublin. The author was the Revd. John Corbet. 



APPENDIX A. 



ADDITIONS TO PART I. 



NOTE. 



1624. A copy of Beling's Sixth Book to the Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia, in its original vellum cover, is m the 
Britwell Library. It measures 7I x 5J, and contains Sigs. A to P in fours. The title page is without border or head 
piece. The Dedication to the Viscountess Falkland is followed by commendatory verses written by a kinsman of the 
author, by W. Martyn and by H. Delaune. Printed by the Societie of Stationers. 

I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. R. E. Graves for these particulars. 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



1606 



1620 



John Steere, Bishop of 
Kilfennora 



An Answere to Certaine 

Scandalous Papers. 
Scattered abroad under 

colour of a Catholicke 

Admonition. 

(No pagination) 

N.B. — This copy is im- 
perfect and contains only 
Sigs. A - B4. 



A Meditation upon the 
Bitter Passion and cruell 
Piercing the Heart of Our 
Lord Jesus Christ the 
Sauviour of the World. 

Beinga Sermonpreachedthe 
Weeke before Easter at St. 
Patrick's Church in Dublin, 
before the Lo : Deputie 
and Councell of Estate. 
An. Dom. 16 14. Now 
reviewed and published, 
with intent to prepare this 
forgetfuU world, to a more 
religious observation of 
that Holy Time. 



Register = A 4II B- 
in eights 



-E6 



[Dedicated to Sir Oliver St. 
John, Lord Deputy of 
Ireland.] 



4to 



8vo 



John Francton. 



Societie 

Stationers 



Owner or Reference 



E. E., McC. Dix 



Vide Hazlitt, Collec- 
tions and Notes (1876, 
p. 404). 



Dale. 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1622 


James L, 

- 


His Maiestie's Directions 
for the ordering and set- 
ling of the Courts and 
Course of Justice. With- 
in His Kingdome of 
Irelande. 

Published by Commande- 
ment of the Lords Justices 
and Councel. 

28 pp. 


4to 
7xsi 


Societie of 
Stationers, K.Ps. 


Lincoln's Inn, Inner 
Temple, U.L.C. 


1623 


T. C. 

[Signed to Dedication] 


A Short Discourse of the 
New-Found-Land con- 
taynig Diverse Reasons 
and Inducements for the 
planting of that Country. 

Published for the satisfac- 
tion of all such as shall 
be willing to be adven- 
turers in the said Plan- 
tation. 

45 pp. 


4to 
6fx5 


Societie of 
Stationers 


Brit. Mus. 

John Carter Brown 

Library, 
Lenox Library 
{vide Publications of the 
Prince Society.) 


1625 


Alexander Spicer 


An Elegy on the Much 
Lamented Death of The 
Right Honorable Sir 
Arthur Chichester Knight 
Lord Baron of Belfast, 
Lord High Treasurer of 
Ireland, one of the Lords 
of his Majestic Most 
Honourable privie Coun- 
sel!, and of the Counsell 
of Warre. 

The Second Impression. 




do. 


Vide, Reprint in His- 
tory of the Family of 
Chichester (1871). 


1625 


I. M. [John Merick.] 


A Briefe Abstract of all the 
English Statutes which 
are in force with in the 
Realme of Ireland, &c., Ac. 

N.B. — This is the original 
edition of 161 7, with a new 
and different Title page. 


8vo. 


do. 


St. Finbarre's Library 
(Cork). 



:Book6, 



XTracte, Sic, 



PRINTED IN DUBLIN in the 17th CENTURY. 



LIST COMPILED BY 



E. R. McC DIX, 

WITH NOTES BY a W. DUG AN, M.A.; M.B.S.A.I. 



Partlll. 1651 1675. 



PRICE 2/6. 



DUBLIN : 

O'DONOQHUE & CO., 31 South Anne Street. 

• LONDON: 

B. DOBELL, 77 Charing Cross Road, W. 

CAMBRIDGE: 

W. HEFFER & SONS. 



All the undernoted Books are sent Post Free for Prices named . 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Mangan (James Clarence), Life and Writings of. By D. J. G'Donoghue. 

Large 8vo., designed cover, Cloth gilt^ gilt tops, with six illustrations, including 
two portraits (pub. 7s. 6d.) - - - - - 7s. 6d. 

Unpublished Letters, New Poems, etc. 

Pall Mall Gazette — Tte task of preparing the biography could not have fallen into more competent 
liands than those of Mr. O'Donoghue. Probably no other man at this time of day could- have produced it. 
Mr. O'Donoghue has given us a work which is sure to take a standard place on the shelves of Irish 
biography. ' 

Lalor (James Fintan), Writings of. With Introduction by John O'Leary, and a 
Memoir., Fancy wrapper, Is. ; Cloth. - - - - 2s. 

Sketch — Of all the men of the '48 movement he was as a thinker the ablest. His writings are very well 
worth study. Independent — A man before his time, a keen thinker, a clear, forcible, and logical writer. 

A Bibliographical List of Dublin Printed Books of the Seventeenth Century. 

Parts I. and II., compiled by E. R. M'C. Dix, with Notes and Introduction by 

C. W. DuGAN, price per Part - - - - 2s. 6d. 

Irish Illustrations to Shakespeare- By David Com^n. Small 4to, wrappers, 6d. 

Deals very interestingly and learnedly with Shakespeare's allusions to Ireland and the Irish. 

A Kish of Brogues : Stories and Poems of Rural Ireland, By William Boyle. 
Cloth gilt, 256 pp. - - .- - - - 2s 6d. 

Just published — overflowing with humour and knowledge of the people. 

Songs of Erinn. By P. J. M'Call. Cloth gilt - - - 2s. 6d. 

Just published — new volume by the well-known autiior of " Irish Noinins." 

Inishowen and Tyrconnell — An Account oi the Antiquities and Writers of Cos. 
Derry, Donegal and Tyrone. By-W. J. Doheety, C.E.,' M.R.I.A. Cloth, 1895, 
8vo, (over 600 pp.) - - ' - - - - 3s. 6d. 

Carleton (William) The Life of, including his Autobiography, with continuation by 

D. J. O'Donoghue, and an Introduction by Mrs. Cashel Hoey, 2 vols., Cloth, 
with 2 portraits, large 8vo, new (pub. 25s,) - - - 7s. 6d, 

Athena^im — Delightful reading. Daily Chronicle — To Mr. O'Donoghue are due our heartiest thanks 
for his most thorough, keen, and fascinating book. Daily Neios — Mr. O'Donoghue Ijas laid us all under a 
heavy obligation. Freeman's Journal — Mr. O'Donoghue deserves the thanks of all lovers of Irish literatui-e. 
Speaker — Mr. O'Donoghue has rendered a splendid service to Irish literature. .... A Book which 
ought to live. 

Fenians and Fenianism, Recollections of. By John O'Leary. Fine Portraits 

of the Leaders of the Movement. 2 vols., Cloth, Lond. 1896, quite new 
(pub. 21s.) - - - ■ - - 7s. 6d. 

The Three Sorrows of Story-Telling, and Songs of St. Columba, translated. 
By Douglas Hyde. Wrapper (pub. Is.) - - - - 8d. 

The Fenian Nights' Entertainments, being Ossianic Stories told at ai Wexford 
Fireside. By P. J. M'Call. Designed wrapper, Is. ; Cloth - - 2s. 

An Irish Musical Genius, the Inventor of the Musical Glasses. By D. J. 

O'Donoghue. Wrapper - - - - - 6d. 

(Just Published), 

Catalogue of the Musical Loan Exhibition, held in Dublin, May, 1899, compiled 
by D. J, O'Donoghue for the FEIS CECIL. Wrapper - - 6d. 

An almost complete bibliography of collections of Irish music, etc. 

O'DONOGHUE & CO., 31 SOUTH ANNE STREET, DUBLIN. 



LIST OF 



3Boohg> tracts, 

Broa69i6eg> Sic, 

PRINTED IN DUBLIN 

FROM 

1601 to 1700. 



PART III. 

165 1 to 1675. 



COMPILED BY 

E. R. McC. DIX, 

WITH 

HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES 

BY 

C W. DUGAN, M.A., R.S.A.I. 



Dublin, 1902. 



PRINTED BY 

SEALT, BRYKRS AND WALKER, 

MIDDLE ABBEY STREET, 

DUBLIN. 



PREFACE. 



THE delay in issuing this Third Part has been unavoidable. Its size will 
be perhaps some excuse. To prevent the danger of further delay, it now 
appears, though lacking fuller particulars of several titles in the British Museum 
and Bodleian Libraries, to which a personal visit is impossible. 

Proclamations, though given down to 1661, are only very briefly referred 
to, but sufficiently, it is hoped, to guide those desirous of examining them. 
There are some volumes of Proclamations later than 1661, in the Public Record 
Office, Dublin. In the Appendices to the 23rd and 24th Reports of the Deputy 
Keeper, a chronological Catalogue of them will be found. A few Proclamations 
are given in this list, dated after 1661. 

Thanks are due to the Librarians and other friends who have kindly 
aided me in looking up titles and affording additional particulars of them, 
specially to Mr. James Buckley, Hon. Librarian of the Irish Literary Society, 
London, and Mr. R. R. Belshaw. 

Mr. Dugan kindly again affords his interesting Notes. 

As an Appendix to this Part, will be found particulars of Works coming 
within the periods covered by Parts I and II, but which have been only 
obtained since their publication. 

E. R. McC. DIX. 
o 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



R. I. A - ■ The Royal Irish Academy. [Tracts = HalIi(lay Collection ] 

T. C. D. - - The Trinity College, Dublin, Librnry. 

King's Inns - - The King's Inns (Dublin), Library. 

Pub. Rec. OlT. - - The Public Record Office, Dublin. 

iVIarsh's - - Marsh's Library, St. Patrick's, Dublin. 

Natl. Lib. - - National Library, Dublin. 

Worth - - 7-"he " Worth" Library, Dr Steeven's Hospital, Dublin. 

Lin. Hall - - The Linen Hall Library, Belfast. 

Derry etc.,Dio. - - The Derry and Raphoe Diocesan Library, Derry. 

Sir J.T. Gilbert- - The Library of the late Sir J. T. Gilbert, now the property of 

the Corporation of Dublin. 
Lough Fea - - The " Shirley " Library at Lough Fea, Carrickniacross. 

Brit. Mus. - - The British IMuseum Library. 

Lambeth ■ - The Lambeth Palace Library, London. 

Bodleian - - The Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

U. L. C. - - University Library, Cambridge. 

Lincoln's Inn - - Lincoln's Inn Library, London. 

Mid. Tern. - ■ The Middle Temple Library, London. 

Inner Tern. - - 'he Inner Temple Library, London. 

Lanhydrock - - Lord Robartes' Library, Cornwall. 

Advocates - - The Library of the Faculty of Advocates, Edinburgh. 

K._ p_ . - King's Printer, or Printers. 

1_ 11. . - Leaf, leaves. 

Shs. ■ - Sheets. 

s. sh. ■ - Single sheet. 

p. pp. - - Page, pages. 

T. p. ■ - Title Page. 

X. leaf - • Title Leaf. 

g L - - Black Letter. 

Sig. Sigs. - " Signature, Signatures. 

Private Collectors: — 

COUNT PLUNKETT, DUBLIN. 

E. R. McC. DIX, DUBLIN. 

M. DOREY, DUBLIN. 

R. R. BELSI-IAW, DUBLIN. 

J. COLLINS, DUBLIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL NOTES. 

BY 

C. W. DUG AN. 



i6^i . — Fitzgerald' s Letter, p. 89. 

The Irish forces being almost wholly subdued at 
this time by the English Parliamentary Army under 
Ludlow, the General Assembly of the Confederates, 
held in 165 1, in the Province of Leinster, sent the 
above letter to the Commissioners appointed to 
arrange affairs. This consisted chiefly in carrying 
out the scheme for the distribution of the confiscated 
lands amongst the adventurers — the officers and men 
of the Parliament Army, and all those living in 
Ireland who had shown themselves friendly to the 
English. These Commissioners were also to consider 
as to the treatment to be meted out to the Irish — 
the guilty to be punished and the innocent to be 
freed from apprehension and fear as to their ultimate 
fortunes. 

The Assembl)''s letter, signed G. Fitzgerald, 
desired a safe conduct for their deputies proposed to 
be sent to treat for articles of submission to the 
Commonwealth of England. This was refused : the 
Conqueror's Commissioners replied that the establish- 
ment of the nation belonged to the Parliament of 
England, but that all who laid down their arms and 
submitted to the Commonwealth would be dealt with 
according to their deserts. 

An explanation of the term " General Assembly " 
may be of interest. In 1642 the Confederates 
decided to create an order of Government and to 
give a form of authority for all their proceedings ; 
this was established somewhat on the plan of a 
National Parliament, though it was protested that it 
was not meant to be a Parliament in the constitutional 
sense of the term, since the right of calling a Parlia- 
ment is properly vested in the Crown. This plan of 
Government was as follows: — First: the General 
Assembly consisting of two bodies — viz., the one 
composed of temporal Peers and Prelates, the other 
of deputies from the counties and cities — both bodies 
sat in the same chamber — the clergy who were not 
qualified to sit with the Peers formed a separate House 
of Convocation. Second : The Supreme Council, an 
assembly consisting of twenty-four persons chosen 
by the General Assembly — viz., six from each 
province. Third: The Provincial Council, consisting 



of two DeputiES from each county, who were to meet 
four times a year. Fourth : The County Councils 
formed of twelve persons assigned for each county. 
This form of Government lasted from October, 
1642, till January, 1648, when peace was concluded 
with the Marquis of Ormond. A power of appeal 
from the decisions of each body lay to the next 
higher ; and each had its own sphere of function and 
limit of jurisdiction of which space does not permit 
a discussion here. 



Letter from the Earl of Clanricarde to Ludlozv. 

This letter does not appear in " The Memoirs and 
Letters of the Earl of Clanricarde," — folio, London, 
1757 — or in the " Memoirs, Letters, etc." — Dublin, 
1744. At this time the Confederate forces were in 
great straits and Galway being closel)' invested by 
Coote and Reynolds, the General Assembly convened 
there importuned Clanricarde for leave to send Com- 
missioners to treat with the English Parliamentary 
General. This, the Lord Deputy, though against 
his judgment, and unmindful of the Assembly's 
previous bad faith, consented to do. He accordingly 
wrote to General Ludlo«', who sent an answer some- 
what similar to that in reply to the letter from the 
Leinster Assembly, as above, signed, Gerald Fitz- 
gerald. However, Clanricarde having left the town 
in order to collect some forces which would enable 
him to raise the siege, the defenders, in his absence, 
probably swayed by the counsels of the ultra-party, 
which had been influenced b)- the Nuncio, Rinuccini, 
surrendered to Coote, and thus the Confederates 
lost their last stronghold. 

The Lord Deputy herein referred to, was Ulick, 
the 5th Earl of Clanricarde, born in 1604. This 
nobleman was a sincere Roman Catholic, possessing 
great power and interest in the kingdom, of un- 
blemished integrity, and most unshrinking loyalty to 
the cause of the King. During the terrible decade 
in Irish history, 1641 to 1651, the ICarl of Clanricarde 
and the Marquis of Ormonde \\'ere the two brighest 
and most prominent figures. Both men were earnest 
friends, both, as Viceroys, had to contend with the 



most fierce and factious opposition to their govern- 
ment, and eacli fated to struggle with a crisis involving 
the fate and fortunes of Ireland and its people. In 
fact the history of the country during this period is 
nothihg but a tangled web of barbarous cruelty, 
oppression, bigotry, hate and broken faith. It was 
not simply a war between English and Irish, nor 
wholly between Catholic and Protestant : the contend- 
ing parties weresplitupinto three camps — the Royalist 
(formed of Protestants and Catholics.botli English and 
I rish) — the Parliamentarians, chiefly English, with some 
Irish, Protestants, Presbyterians and Independents, and 
the Confederates, Irish and Anglo-Irish, all Catholics. 
Even this latter body was further split into two parties 
during the viceroyalty of Ormond, by the injudicious 
action of Rinuccini, the Nuncio, 1643 to 1649. — one 
may be styled the moderate party, mostly nobility 
and gentry of the old Anglo- Irish families who 
were inclined to treat with the Ormond and the 
Royalists — the other, or extreme party, com- 
posed chiefly of the Roman Catholic Bishops 
and clergy who bitterly opposed both Ormond 
and Clanricarde. This party frustrated all the 
endeavours of Ormond and the King for a cessation 
of hostilities and rejected the proposed treaty of peace 
in 1646. Subsequently also when a treaty was being 
entered into with the Duke of Lorraine for aid in 
support of the royal cause and the Irish army, this 
powerful section, led on by French the Bishop of 
Ferns, introduced such conditions as left no alterna- 
tive to the Lord Deputy, Clanricarde, as a loyal man to 
reject. This momentous treaty being thus totally 
broken off, and Galway having surrendered to the 
English Parliamentary forces, Clanricarde after 
making some futile attempts in favour of the royal 
cause, saw that it was now utterly lost in Ireland ; 
his resources were exhausted, his forces de- 
moralised, and even his life in danger. He, therefore, 
thought it best to treat with the republican army, 
and leaving his great possessions in Ireland at their 
mercy, he merely obtained passes for himself and 
followers to England in April, 1652, and retired to 
his estate at Somerhill, in Kent, where he died in 
1657. 

Agreement, etc., l%th June, 1647. — page go. 

A copy of this agreement will be found in Cox's 
" Hibernia Anglicana,'' Append, xxxviii. This is the 
celebrated agreement which has been the subject of 
so much comment on the fidelity and loyalty of 
Ormond. Writers on Irish history of the period 
express the most opposite opinions concerning this 
transaction. On the one hand we have Clarendon, ^ 
Hist. Rebellion and Civil Wars in Ireland. 



Borlase,^ Cox,' Leland,* Warner,' Gordon* in senses 
describing it as s. Just, politic, and necessary measure; 
on the other, Curry,' Plowden,' the author" of " His- 
torical Memoirs of the Irish Rebellion," etc., speak of 
it as shameful. So much for the effect of religious 
and political prejudices in biassing the judgments of 
our historians. 

The " others," Commissioners not named in this 
title as parties to this agreement, were Colonel John 
Moore and Colonel Michael Jones. 



An Act for the Settling of Ireland.— page 91. 

After the departure of Clanricarde, the Lord 
Deputy, and the almost total subjection of the Irish 
forces, the Republican Parliament proceeded to the 
settlement of the country. Two Acts were passed — 
one for the confiscation of all the lands of the Irish 
rebels ; the other for adjusting the claims of the 
English adventurers and the soldiers. The adven- 
turers received one moiety of the forfeited lands in 
'ten of the principal counties — the other moiety was 
reserved for the soldiers. These counties were Meath, 
Westmeath, King's Co., Queen's Co., Antrim, Down, 
Armagh, Waterford, Limerick, and Tipperary. Con- 
naught was reserved for the Irish and other disaffected 
Papists, who were to be transplanted thither after 
forfeiture of their lands. 

The term " adventurer" requires some explanation. 
In the earl}' years of the contest between Charles I. 
and his Parliament, the latter, wisely foreseeing that 
both men and money would be wanting for the struggle 
which now seemed inevitable, devised a scheme for 
obtaining both, which would have the effect of placing 
power directly in its own hands, embarrass the king 
by keeping his forces engaged in Ireland, suppress the 
Irish rebellion, and finally perfect the long-desired 
plantation of the country, which had been begun by 
Elizabeth and James I. According to this scheme, 
2,500,000 acres of lands in Ireland were declared to be 
forfeited, and these acres, amounting to about one- 
eighth of the total area of the island, were offered to 
all those of the English people who were willing to 
advance moneys on such security for the purpose of 
equipping and paying land and sea forces to be 
employed in subduing and extirpating the owners, 
viz., the Irish and Anglo-Irish now in rebellion. 

2 Hist. Rebellion in Ireland, 1641. 
^ Hibernia Anglicana. 
■* Hist. Irel.ind. 

^ Hist. Rebellion and Civil Wars in Ireland. 
^ Hist. Ireland. 

■^ Hist, and Crit. Review of Civil Wars in Ireland. 
^ Hist. Review. 

'' These Memoirs were written by Dr. Curry, vide Life of Author ol 
Hist, and Crit. Review. Stip-a. By C. O'Connor, 1786. 



This seems an amazingly high-handed proceeding, 
but the times were ripe for it. The most calumnious 
reports were industriously circulated of the barbarous 
cruelties and massacres on the part of the Irish and 
of their firm resolve to extirpate all the English Pro- 
testants in Ireland, and the people were even led to 
believe that the king and queen were fomenting the 
Irish rebellion. Many of the English, no doubt, 
inherited the desire to possess lands in Ireland, and 
to many it must have been the dream of their lives. 
Accordingly, we find that 1,360 persons adventured 
money to the Parliament of England to the amount 
of about ;£'28o,ooo. By subsequent subscriptions this 
sum was increased to ;£'36o,ooo. 



Ordinance on Destroying IFo/ves. — J'age 93. 

From an early date wolf-hunting seems to have 
been a pastime in Ireland. Prendergast' quoting 
from the Oblate and Fine Rolls mentions that in 
.^.n., 1200, Walter de Riddlesford applied to King 
John for license to hunt the wolf. Owing to the, 
desolation of the country by wars, famine and pesti- 
lence, these rapacious animals increased so much in 
number up to the 17th century as to become a source 
of public danger. They infested the bogs and 
mountains, finding shelter in the thick underwood 
whence they issued in numbers and desolated the 
neighbouring lands even close to towns and cities. 
On the 2oth December, 1652, a pubhc hunt was 
ordered by the State of the numerous wolves lying 
in the woods only six miles north of Dublin. Various 
measures were taken and Ordinances passed for their 
destruction. Lands lying only nine miles from 
Dublin were leased by Parliament to a Capt. Piers 
under condition of keeping a pack of wolf-hounds — 
part of the rent to be paid by wolves' heads at the 
rate allowed by the Ordinance of June, 1653 — viz., 
£6 for a she-wolf, ;^5 for a dog-wolf, and £2 for a 
cub. On these terms the State lands in the barony 
of Dunboyne, Meath, were leased to Piers for five 
years at a rent of ^£'543. In other parts of the coun- 
try wolves also abounded — by the Ordinance of June, 
1653, the various district governors were to appoint 
days and times for wolf-hunting, and all persons 
bringing in wolves' heads to the Revenue Commis- 
sioners were rewarded at the above-mentioned rates. 

Another strong evidence of the numbers of these 
animals that infested the island is to be found in the 
heavy assessments on counties for Treasury disburse- 
ments under the head of these rewards. In March 
1655, the charge due from the baronies about Galway 
amounted to ^^243 for rewards paid on wolves' heads. 
In spite of this war against wolves they appear to have 

Cromwellian Sett., p. iS. 



been numerous for many years after. From the 
Common's Journals ol 1662, it appears that Sir J. 
Ponsonby reports that a Bill should be brought in to 
encourage the killing of wolves. The last wolf killed 
in Ireland was in Kerry in 1710. 



Ordin 



Ton 



-P- 93- 



The eytmology of the term " Tory " is rather un- 
certain — some derive it from the Irish word tora 
meaning " give," — the Irish robbers of those days 
crying out tora ! tora ! equivalent, we may suppose, 
to the dramatic highwayman's, stand and deliver ! 
Others derive it from the e.xpression " ta righ," mean- 
ing " for the king" or "the royal cause," thereby 
assuming that Tories were those remnants of the 
Irish who had espoused the King's cause against the 
English Parliamentary and Cromwellian forces, who 
had not submitted to be transplanted into Connaught, 
and had taken refuge in the bogs mountains and 
woods. But we find the word to have been used in 
the time of Elizabeth, when such a meaning as the 
above could have no point. The word may be derived 
from the Irish coi|igen. pl.ro|iA — signifying a party in 
pursuit or chase, a persecution. According to Sir R. 
Cox,^ the word was made use of by Sir Henry 
Sidney, in a letter when he accepted the Lord Deputy- 
ship for the seventh time, in 1575, he says " that it 
was most difficult for a man to do any service there 
when he must struggle with famine and fastnesses, 
inaccessible bogs and light footed Tories." Mr. T. 
Crofton Croker- says, " In the civil wars under 
Elizabeth, the epithet " Tory " is supposed to have 
originated and ^^'a5 applied only to the peasantry." 
In after times it became the general name for all the 
Irish rebels and papists who refused to transplant- 
and were outlawed, or "out or protection,,' who be- 
took themselves to the most unfrequented and inac- 
cessible places, and thence raided the homes and 
lands of all those whom they naturally regarded as 
usurpers, the adventurers and disbanded soldiers of 
Cromwell. 

In one of Ormonde's proclamations, date 25th 
September, 1650, occurs the first public use of the 
term '■ Tory,"^ He orders that all those ill-disposed 
persons living upon the people of the country, and 
pillage the protected inhabitants, and that are termed 
"Toryes or Idle Boys," to enlist in His Majesty's 
service, or be deemed traitors. These bands of men 
" out of protection " were frequently led b)- dispos- 
sessed gentlemen who became beggars and wanderers 

,* Itibeniia An^Ucana, I., p, 342,, folio, London, 1689, 
" Researches in South of Ireland, 4to, Dublin, rS24, p, 52. 
" Carte Papers, p. 358. 



about their ancient inheritances. In the time of 
William III. these outlaws went generally by the 
name of Rapparees, and Acts and Ordinances against 
" Tories and Rapparees " appear on the Statute 
Books, from the reign of William III. to that of 
George III. The word Rapparee is derived from 
Jr. rapary, a kind of short or broken pike, a weapon 
with which these men were frequently armed. 

It would be interesting to trace how the word 
" Tory" came to be applied in after times to one of 
the great political parties in the State, but the limits 
of a note do not permit. 



The Interest of England, etc. — pp. 96 & 98. 

This work was written by Colonel Richard Lawrence 
as a strong defence of the policy of Transplantation, 
carried out by the Parliament, under the Act of 1642, 
and further Ordinances of 1652, and also as an answer 
to a work by Sir Vincent Gookin, published in 1654, 
entitled " The Great Case of Transplantation Dis- 
cussed." — 4to., London, 1655. 

In this work, Gookin puts forth considerations on 
the many great inconveniences that must attend the 
transplanting of the native Irish out of the three 
Provinces of Leinster, Ulster, and Munster, into 
Connaught. It was written with sound sense and 
political wisdom ; had the suggestions therein regard- 
ing the plantation been attended to, many subsequent 
evils and miseries might have been averted. 

This tract was first published anonymously — 410. 
London, 1655. — but on the appearance of Lawrence's 
answer, Mr. Gookin owned the authorship, and then 
published another work in reply to Lawrence, vindi- 
cating himself and his case " from the unjust asper- 
sions " of the latter. 

Mr. Gookin was Surveyor-General of Ireland, and 
son of Sir Vincent Gookin, a planter under the scheme 
of James I , and an old resident of Co. Cork. 

Richard Lawrence was a Colonel in the Parliament- 
ary and Cromwellian armies who came to Ireland in 
1649 ; was a member of the Committee of Trans- 
plantation, formed in November, 1653, and after the 
King's Restoration, became a member of the Council 
of Trade. 

Colonel Lawrence published some other tracts, " A 
treatise on Manufactures," " Directions for planting 
Hemp and Flax," "A treatise of Traffick," and "The 
Interest of Ireland in its Trade and Wealth Stated," 
etc.— 8vo., Dublin, 1682. 



educated at Trinity College, Dublin, of which he 
afterwards became Professor and Senior Fellow. He 
wrote several works, all of which were published in 
Dublin, and which will be found in their proper places 
in Mr. Dix's List. These treat of subjects connected 
with Divinity and Scholastics, rather than those of 
his own profession as a Physician. 



Suinine of Diverse Sermons, etc. — p. gS. 
The author of these was Dr. Samuel Winter, who 
was educated at Cambridge, and came to Ireland in 
1650. He was a very zealous Presbyerian, which was 
then the ruling party in Ireland, and was by this 
means advanced to the dignity of Provost of Trinity 
College, Dublin. 



Dr. Bernard's Life and Deatii of Archbishop Ussher. — 
p. 99. 

The Reverend Nicholas Bernard, a Cambridge man, 
came over to Ireland, and was ordained by Primate 
Ussher, became his Chaplain, and subsequently rose 
to the Deanery of Armagh Besides the above, he 
published eight other works, two of which were 
printed in Dublin. Having suffered much during the 
Irish Rebellion of 1 64 1, he took the earliest oppor- 
tunity to escape to England, and was made Rector of 
a parish in Shropshire, and subsequently became 
Chaplain and Almoner to Cromwell, and Preacher to 
the Society of Gray's Inn. He never returned to his 
Deanery, and died in 1661. 



Aphorismi, by fohn Stearne, M.D. — pp. 93 & 97. 

Dr. Stearne was nephew of Archbishop Ussher. 
He was born at Ardbraccan, in County Meath, and 



Dudley Loft us — Logica,etc. — p. lOO. 

Dudley Loftus was the second son of Sir Adam 
Loftus, who, in conjunction with Sir W. Parsons, Sir 
J. Temple and Sir R. Meredith was accused and tried 
in 1643 for traitorous practices against the King. 
He was born at Rathfarnham in the castle built by 
his grandfather, who was Archbishop of Dublin and 
Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Dudley Loftus graduated 
in Trinity College, Dublin, then went to Oxford, and 
having returned to Ireland in 1641 was placed in 
command of the garrison, and in this capacity did 
good service. He was made a Master in Chancery, 
Vicar-General of Ireland and Judge of the Preroga- 
tive Court. Loftus had an extensive knowledge of 
languages, especially Oriental ; his brain was 
crammed with a vast amount of book-learning, but 
was singularly weak in the moral qualities of the 
mind engendered by experience — refle.xion and 
judgment. A great Prelate who knew him well said : 
" He never knew so much learning in the keeping of 
a fool." Ware mentions twenty-eight of his works, 
thirteen of which were printed in Dublin — the earliest 



being dated 1657, the latest 1695, the year of his 
death. We have seen above that his father had been 
accused and imprisoned by order of the King for 
his partizanship to the English Parliament, so another 
Adam Loftus, a first cousin of his grandfather, and 
Lord Chancellor of Ireland, and one of the Lord 
Justices in 1630, was similarly treated by the despotic 
Strafford in 1636, and deprived of the Great Seal. 
This was one of the principal charges brought against 
this unfortunate Governor when he was impeached 
by Pym in the English Parliament. The details of 
this case as given by Clarendon^ vary somewhat from 
those in Leland- and Gordon'', but in any case are 
discreditable to Strafford. 



left Ireland, after his four years of office, poorer than 
when he came, and even had not sufficient money to 
pay the e.xpenses of his return journey to England. 

It is stated by Dr. Curry^ that the Duchess of 
Ormond begged the King, on her knees, that Henry 
Cromwell might enjoy the^ estate in Ireland given to 
him by his father, which was granted, because Oliver 
had given her possession of ;^3,ooo a }'ear out of her 
own estate as a jointure. 



Henry Cromwell — Proclamation. — p. loo 

Henry was the second son of Oliver Cromwell and 
a man in every sense superior to his elder brother 
Richard. He was sent to Ireland by his father in 
1654, partly to oversee the work of plantation and 
distribution of lands, and partly to smooth down the 
resentment shown by a large party, including Ludlow 
and the fanatic republicans, to his assumption of the 
title of Lord Protector. 

Henry was humane and just : he found enormous 
abuses existing in the machinery of both the executive 
and adminstrative bodies, and his kind heart was 
especially affected by the misery and desolation of 
the country caused by the terrible Republican's rule at 
this time. Henry returned to England and reported 
everything to his father, with the result that several 
indulgences were granted to the unfortunate inhabi- 
tants. 

In 1655, Henry Cromwell was again sent over to 
Ireland, and succeeded Fleetwood in the office of 
Lord Deputy ; he soon showed his wisdom and skill 
as a ruler, and " he established his authority so firmly 
in the hearts of a people who were ingenuous enough 
to acknowledge the merits of his administration, that 
they were entirely reconciled to his father's interests."* 
Happy would it have been for Ireland had she been 
governed by many such 'Viceroys ! 

Trinity College, Dublin, owes much to Henry 
Cromwell ; while Chancellor, he took special care of 
its interests, instituted professorships and literary 
competitions, encouraged the long neglected gradu- 
ations in arts, and presented to the College the noble 
library of Primate Ussher, which he had purchased 
out of his own private means. A true testimony to 
the integrity of this man will be found in the fact 
that in those days of corruption and self-seeking he 

' Hist. Reb. and Civil Wars, fol. ; Dublin, 1719 ; p. 127. 
" Hist, of Ireland, vol. 3, p. 40. 
^ Hist, of Ireland, vol. i , p. 350. 
* Leland Hist., vol. iii., p. 415. 



C Williamson, Panegyrics, etc., p. lOl. 
C. 'Williamson was an M.A. of Trin. Coll., Cam- 
bridge, who came into Ireland in 1646, was made a 
Fellow of Trin. Coll., Dublin, took the degree of D.D., 
and became Public Orator of the University. Henry 
Cromwell was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and 
Chancellor of Dublin University from 1655 till 1659. 
Dr. Williamson obtained a living near Drogheda, 
where he died shortly after the Restoration. 



Sir Charles Cooic, p. 106. 
This name holds a bad eminence amongst the many 
military leaders that harassed Ireland during the 
terrible period that elapsed between 1641 and the 
close of the Stuart reign. There were two, father and 
son of the same name and title, a case in which we 
have the truth of heredity strongly exemplified — both 
were wantonly cruel and relentless, and both bore 
ruthless hate to the unfortunate natives. Both men 
were brave soldiers, but it is certain that their conduct 
exasperated the Irish and provoked them to severe 
retaliation. As mere soldiers of fortune, the father 
and son unsheathed swords for the winning side — ■ 
the latter from an early period of his life fought 
stoutly for the Parliamentarians against the Con- 
federates and Clanricarde, and was made Lord Presi- 
dent of Connaught, but in the end when he and Lord 
Broghill clearly saw that there was a turn in the tide, 
he offered his services to General Monk, and became 
a staunch supporter of the Royal cause. Notwith- 
standing all the services that he rendered to the 
Regicides and the Parliamentary forces, and the 
losses he had inflicted upon the Royalist party in 
Ireland, Sir C. Coote, the younger, was confirmed in 
the estates he had acquired daring this troubled 
period and in the baronetcy which had been con- 
ferred upon his father by James I. in 1620, and was 
also elevated to the peerage in 1661 by the title of 
Earl of Mountrath. This earldom became extinct in 

•'' Hist. Memoirs, Svo. ; Dublin, iSlo, p. 401 ; quoting Unkhtd 
Deserter, p. 139, a book which Dibdin describes as one of the rarest 
and most important of this period : the author was N. Trench, Bishop 
of Ferns, 



l802, but the baronetcy remained ; the present holder 
of the title enjoys the distinction of Premier baronet 
of Ireland. 



invested it, and through some treachery on the part 
of the defenders. Sir Hardress Waller was made 
prisoner and sent to England. 



Declaration of Sir H. Waller, etc. — p. 105. 

Sir Hardress Waller was one of the most stuidy 
supporters of the Parliament and Republican party in 
Ireland. He was a cousin to Sir William Waller, who 
is frequently mentioned by Clarendon in his " History 
of the Rebellion in England, as commanding the 
Parliament forces in the west ; — he was also related 
to Edmund Waller, the well-known English poet, 
whose base political conduct during the time of the 
contest between the King and Parliament, has been 
so vigorously dealt with by Clarendon. Sir H. Waller 
was Major-General in the Parliamentary army in 
Ireland, and played a very prominent part in the 
contests from 1649 until the Restoration. We find 
him frequentl}' employed on Commissions from 1654 
for arranging the work of plantation. When the 
English Council of State suspecting Henry Cromwell 
sent over Commissioners to supersede him in the 
government of Ireland, Sir H. Waller was 
directed to surprise Dublin Castle. This being 
effected without trouble, Henry Cromwell immedi- 
ately left the Castle and retired to a house in the 
Phojnix Park. When all the measures for the restora- 
tion of the King had been nearly completed by Monk 
in England, Coote and BroghiU with others, became 
very zealous for the same cause in Ireland. They 
planned a design to seize the Castle and .secure the 
persons of Ludlow, Hardress Waller, and the republi- 
can commissioners. A Council of officers was 
assembled and assumed the control of affairs, a con- 
vention of estates was summoned, and a declaration 
for a free parliament published. It was at this 
Council that the Declaration dated February 
16, 1659, regarding the re-admission of the secluded 
members, was made, Vide Coote supra. The 
Convention now attempted to gain over Sir 
Hardress Waller, who had attended the Council. He 
was a steadfast enemy to the monarch}' and a deter- 
mined opponent of any attempt at restoration It is 
true tliat on principle he was a stern republican, but 
here his own personal safety and interest were at 
stake ; he had .sat as one of the late king's judges, and 
had signed the warrant for the e.xecution ; his name 
appears as the eleventh signature. Waller, therefore, 
justly dreaded the consequences of the restoration, 
he tried to cajole the Council to adjourn to the Castle 
for discussion of affairs, but, this failing, he, in con- 
junction with some partizans, contrived to seize the 
Castle. Coote, and Col, T. Jones shortly afterwards 



His Majesty's Declaration. — Sir Jolm Greenvil. — 
p. 109 

This Declaration, dated from Breda, 14th April 
(12 an. Car. 11), grants a free and general pardon to 
all subjects, excepting only such as may hereafter be 
excepted by Parliament. 

It contains some strong passages, which read in 
the light of subsequent action, especially in Ireland, 
form a strange comment on the Faith of Kings, e.g., 
" Let all our subjects, how faulty soever, rely upon 
the word of a king, solemnl}' given by this present 
Declaration, that no Crime whatsoever committed 
against Us or Our Roj'al Father, before the publica- 
tion of this, shall ever rise in judgment or be larought 
in question against any of them,'' — and so on — 
Further on the King declares full liberty for tender 
conscience and general religious toleration. 

The above mentioned exception by Parliament, 
gives a wide margin wherein the elasticity of a King's 
word may find pla)'. 

The King's letters to General Monk, to the Fleet, 
to the Corporation of the City of London, and to the 
two Houses of Parliament, all bearing the same date, 
14th April, 1660, were sent with the Declaration, and 
brought to England by Sir J. Greenvil. 

Sir J. Greenvil was a tried and trusty royalist^ 
his father was Sir Bevil Greenvil, who lost his life 
at the battle of Landsdown, fighting for the King in 
1643. Being shortly after appointed to attend at the 
Bar of the House in order to receive and convey the 
Parliament's answer to the King's letter, Sir John was 
ordered to be paid ii^soo to buy a jewel to wear as 
an honour for being the messenger of such a gracious 
Royal letter. 

His Majesty's Gracious Declaration for the Settlement 
of His Kingdome of Ireland. — p. 109. 

At the time of the Restoration, Ireland presented 
a pathetic and melancholy picture of miserj' and 
wretchedness. During the previous nineteen years 
the countrj' had been desolated by a cruel civil war — 
by pestilence and famine. Much havoc had been 
caused by the civil war, commonly called " the great 
Irish Rebellion," which lasted from 1641 to the 
Cessation in 1648, but all this was eclipsed by the 
ruthless barbarities of Cromwell and the Republican 
forces who ravaged the country from 1649 till 1651. 

The King's Declaration for the Settlement of 
Ireland was published 30th November, 1660 — and 
was intended to be the groundwork of the Act of 



XI 



Settlement. This declaration certainly showed good 
intentions towards the Roman Catholics on the part 
of the King, but these were rendered almost nugatory 
by the Act passed in the Irish Parliament in 1662. — 
(14 Carol. II). 

Jeremy Taylor, D.D. — p. no. 

This eminent divine was the son of a Cambridge 
barber. He graduated in the University there, 
entered into holy orders, was appointed by Laud one 
of his chaplains, and shortly after obtained the Rectory 
of Uppingham. He was created D.D. at Oxford, 
and was a favourite preacher to Charles I. His living 
being sequestered when the Parliament became 
victorious, he retired into Wales in 1645, and while 
there, under the protection of Lord Carberry, he kept 
a school in order to maintain himself and his family. 
After spending some years in this humble occupation, 
and bending under heavy domestic sorrow, he was 
invited by Lord Conway to Portmore, in the Co. of 
Antrim, and there remained until the Restoration in 
1660. It was during this enforced retreat of about 
fourteen years that Bishop Taylor composed the 
greater number of his brilliant works, so that, as a 
modern writer quaintly observes, we are almost 
grateful to those who enforced him into this strictly 
literary seclusion. 

Taylor has been styled the modern Chrysostom. 
His eloquence of expression, his melodious voice, and 
his fertilit}- of conception fully entitle him to this 
distinction. In addition to his eminent abilities and 
pre-eminence as an English writer, he possessed what 
in those days was most rare — a pure spirit of toleration 
and Christian charity towards the thoughts, principles, 
and beliefs of others. 



This document was sent by the Earlof Fingall to the 
Rev. P. Walsh, an Irish Franciscan, and an old con- 
fidant of the Duke of Ormond, by whom it was 
presented to the king, and most graciously received.'' 



The Faithful Protestations, &c. — p. 1 10. 

At this time, 1661, in order to render the Catholic 
party in Ireland as odious as possible and so give a 
colourable pretext for depriving them of any benefits 
of an Act of Indemnity, or that might be proposed 
in the projected Act of Settlement, reports of con- 
spiracies and treasonable practices were industriously 
circulated by the Commons House and its party. 
Leland, an unfriendly Protestant historian, writing of 
this period, says " their (R.C. Irish) enemies and com- 
petitors were indefatigable in endeavouring to load 
their whole party with new conspiracies ; and even 
manifest forgeries were received as solid proofs"^ In 
this conjuncture the Catholics of Ireland agreed upon 
a remonstrance^ and protestation of their loyalty 
couched in the strongest and most explicit terms. 

' Hist, of Ireland III. p. 441. 

2 A copy of thii Remonstrance appears in Appendix, supra. 



A Speech made by Sir Audley Mervyn, \yh Feb., 
1662. — p. III. 

A short notice of this personage has been already 
given — Part II. p. 50. The above speech, which he de- 
livered, as Speaker in the House of Commons, relates 
chiefly to the Act of Settlement. It appears that at 
this time the new Commissioners appointed for the 
executionoftheActofSettlementand to hear all claims 
according to its provisions, had adjudged as " inno- 
cent" a large proportion of the Catholic claimants 
who first came forward. The numerous Puritan and 
other sectarian parties in Ireland, nearly all of whom 
were Comwellian settlers, adventurers and soldiers, 
took alarm at this, and the House of Commons, 
entirely composed of these classes, waited in a body, 
with their Speaker, upon Ormond, and petitioned 
that he should give such further directions for the 
execution of the Act as would invalidate any further 
claims on the part of the Irish. Mervyn, the Speaker, 
made long comments on every article of their Address. 
Ormond received them very coldly, but the Commons 
appealed to the public, and printed Mervyn's speech. 
The king was much displeased at their action, and 
prosecutions were ordered against the printers of this 
speech both in London and Dublin. 



Answer of a person of Quality, etc.. — p. 116. 

The person of Quality was Roger Boyle, Earl of 
Orrery, better known in the Irish history of this 
period as Lord Broghill, and P.W. was the Rev. 
Peter Walsh, who took such a prominent part in 
forwarding the Irish Remonstrance of 1661. Walsh's 
letter was entitled ; — " A letter desiring a just and 
merciful regard for the Roman Catholics of Ireland." 

The descriptions of the character of this personage 
as given by different writers, are exceedingly contra- 
dictory. According to the life in Harris's Ware, and 
to accounts in Borlase and Cox, he was a brave loyal 
and learned man, according to others, such as Curry 
and most Roman Catholic writers, he is branded as 
cruel, treacherous, and disloyal. He was strongly 
attached to the Protestant interest, and a bitter 
enemy to the L'ish Roman Catholics, 

Broghill acted with Lorrl Inchiquin in the service 
of Charles I., but subsequently went over to the 
parliament, and was in high esteem with Cromwell 

^Curry's Hist. Review, Dublin, iSlo., p. 41,3. 



XII 



When affairs turned in favour of the Restoration, he, 
in conjunction with Coote, Earl of Mountrath, declared 
for the King, and was one of the commissioners sent 
to His Majesty with all professions of duty. In 1660 
he was created Earl of Orrery, and appointed one of 
the Lords Justices of Ireland. He drew up the 
famous Act of Settlement based on the King's Decla- 
ration, but is accused of having wilfully led the King 
astray as to the amount of land available for the 
satisfaction of the loyal Irish, and for reprizing the 
Cromwellian adventurers and soldiers. 

Lord Orrery is credited with being the author of 
the extraordinary scheme of marrying Cromwell's 
daughter to the exiled King, and also of advising the 
Protector to assume the title of King. 



An Act for the Explaining of some Duubta. — p. 127. 
This was the celebrated Act called " The Black Act," 
which fixed a final rule for the Settlement of lands 
and regulated the rights of the several interests of the 
occupants. The drawing up of this Explanatory Kill 
was committed chiefly to the Duke of Ormond, and 
was brought over by him to Ireland signed and 
sealed. 



A Brief Account of Mr. Valentine Greatrax, &c. — 
A 136. 

This gentleman, who pretended to the wonderful 
gift of healing the King's Evil, ulcers and pains, by 
merely stroking the affected parts with his hands, was 
born at Affane, Co. Waterford, in 1628. He was a 
man of estate, spent his income in charity, and obtained 
such a reputation for curing that hundreds of people 
waited at his house for the application of his touch. 
The Court and Royal Society even sent for him into 
England. He was many times successful, some times 
not at all, so that various persons wrote in his favour ; 
others ridiculed him. Members of the Royal Society, 
unable to dispute facts, tried to explain the strange 
effects produced as " A Sanative Contagion in his 
Body, which had an Antipathy to some particular 
Diseases, and not to others.'' This was certainly not 
a very scientific e.xplanation coming from phi-losophers. 

Greatrax wrote the above-mentioned " Brief 
Account" in reply to a book written against him by 
the Rev. David Lloyd entitled " ]Vonders no MiiacUs." 
London : 1666. In this " Brief Account" he gives 
testimonials from the celebrated Hon. Robert Boyle, 
Drs. Whiehcot, Cudworth, and Patrick, and several 
other eminent men, in his favour. He states, that on 
the breaking out of the rebellion in 1641, he was 
obliged to fly from Ireland, but, on arriving at man's 
estate returned, retired to Cappoquin Castle, and 
spent a year in contemplation there. On the restoration 



of the King he was made Clerk of the Peace and a 
magistrate for Co. Cork. When 34 years old he states 
that he felt the first impulses that the gift of curing the 
King s Evil was bestowed on him, and, subsequently, 
owing to successes in this direction, he received 
impulses that he had the gift of healing in a more 
extended way ; he explains his power by saying : 
" I have reason to believe that there is some 
extraordinary gift of God." 

We cannot by any means brand Greatrax as a 
deliberate impostor ; he was too charitable and 
unselfish for that. Like many other good persons he 
probably laboured under a mental delusion, fostered 
and strengthened by effects produced by two 
agencies — the pathological effect of mere mechanical 
rubbing, and the power of mind over matter produced 
by strong faith on the part of the patient. 

Newfoundland. — Appendix. 

Newfoundland, discovered by John Cabot or 
Cabota in 1497, is the oldest and one of the most 
valuable possessions of Great Britain — " a source of 
wealth in peace and a means of strength in vvfar." 
Rather more than half of the population is Irish. 

It is the nearest portion of British America to 
Ireland, being only about 1,550 miles from C. Clear. 

The remarkable Red or B^eothic Indian of New- 
foundland is now extinct, having been driven and 
hunted mercilessly by the hunters and farmers, who 
penetrated into their enclosures. Cabot saw them 
dressed in skins and painted \:ith red ochre. 

The author of the work in Mr. Dix's list was 
probably Captain Whitbourne, who described these 
Indians to James I. in 1622 in a book entitled — " A 
Discourse and Discoverie of Newfoundland, with 
many reasons to prove how worthy and beneficiall a 
plantation may there be made,'' etc., etc. Imprinted 
at London, 1622, sm. 4to., pp. 107. This work is 
very curious and scarce. 

The importance of this colony to the Mother 
Country may be inferred from the number of works 
referring to its trade and fisheries, which issued from 
the Press frorn 1497 up to our own times, of which 
we shall merel)' mention the earlier, e.g., " Purchas' 
Pilgrims''; many editions, folio 1497, '98-99, 1527." 
" Hakluyt," foHo, 1498, 1527, '36, '48, 53, '78, '83 ; 
and, again, four editions of Purchas' "Temp. James 
I.," 1609-10, '22, '26. And also several Acts and 
Ordinances for the better securing the Plantation and 
Trade of Newfoundland. 

The more complete discovery of the Coasts of 
Newfoundland was probably made by Sebastian 
Cabot, son of Sir J. Cabot, on voyages made after 
his father's death. 

C. W. DUGAN 



Author 



Short Title 



Printer 



t)wner or Reference 



A letter, or Paper signed j 4to 
by Garald Fitz-Gerald In (7^x5 
behalf of an Assembly of 
the Irish at Glanmaliroe 
in the Province of Lein- 
ster in Ireland to the 
Commissioners of Parlia- 
ment delivered the 11. of 
March 165 1 

also 



A Declaration thereupon, 
made by the said Com- 
missioners of Parliament, 
March 12. 1651. To- 
gether with a letter from 
the Earl of Clanrickard, 
to the Commander in 
Chief of the Parliaments 
Forces in Ireland: Feb- 
ruary 14, 1651. And 
Lieut - General Ludlowes 
Answer thereunto, Feb- 
ruary 20, 165 1. 



[Title leaf -I- 1 - lapp] 



W. Bladen 



Cashel Diocesan Lib- 
rary ; Kings Inns, N. 

1/27. 



90 



Date 


Aut":or 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 
1 


Owner or Reference 


1652 


An Act for the Speedie and 


(4to) 


W. Bladen 


Kings Inns (2 copies), 




effectual Reducing of the 


7i>=5i 




N. I, 27 and 268 




Rebels in His Majesties 






Pani. 




Kingdom of Ireland, to 










their due obedience to His 










Majestie and the Crown of 










England. (17 Car. i.) 












(9 leaves; unpaged.) 








II 


* 


Articles of agreement Made, 


(4to) 


W. Bladen 


Kings Inns (2 copies) 






Concluded, and Agreed on. 


i\^s\ 




N. I. 27 & Vol. 268 






at Dublin, the 18 day of 






Pamphlets. 






Tune, 1647, By, and be- 












tween the Most Honour- 












able James Lord Marquess 












of Ormond of the one 












part ; and Arthur Annesley, 






• 






Esquire, Sir Robert Mere- 












dith Knight (and others), 












Commissioners from the 












Parliament o/England, on 












the other part. 












[T. leaf -1- 1—8 pp.], 2nd 












Edition or Issue — Vide 












1647. 






•> 


ij 


[Claud Barthol. MorisotusJ 


Carolvs 1. Britanniarum 


(8vo) 


" Apud Liberum 


T. C. D. ; Fag. Q. 10, 
5 ; British Museum. 




" Morisot " 


Rex. a Securi et Calamo 


si X sA 


" Correctorem, 






Miltonii vindicatvs. 




" via Regia, sub 
" signo Solutae 








2 leaves -hi 18 pp. 2 blank 




•' fascis." 








leaves ; Sigs. A - H 5. 












Folds in eights]. 









Author 



Short Title 



I 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1652 Wm. Perkins, Fellow of 
Christ's College, Cam- 
bridge and Godfrey 
Daniel, M.A. (Translator) 



The Christian Doctrine, Or 
the Foundation of Christ- 
ian Religion, Gathered 
into Six Principles. 
Necessarie for every igno- 
rant Man to learn. Trans- 
lated into Irish by 
Godfrey Daniel, Master 
in the Arts. And also 
Brief and plain Rules for 
the reading of the Irish 
Tongue (in English and 
Irish in parallel columns) 

[Epistle by G. Daniel, 14 
April 1652] 

2 leaves -t- 80 pp. -v 4 leaves 



An Act for the Setling of 
Ireland. (12 Augt. 1652) 

[Title leaf + i - 2 2 pp. ] 



N.B. Large Type. Arms 
on T, page. 



Same 

Another Edition or Issue, 
totally different in type, 
etc., from above. 

[Title leaf (Arms on verso) 
-I- I - II pp. -(- I leaf 
blank] 



8vo 

I(6|x4l) 



\Vill. Bladen 



4to Will. Bladen 

(7ix5j) 



British Museum, C. 33, 

A. 24; Bodleian, 8°. 

B. 42, Line. (Folds 
in fours) ; U. L. C. 
(Bradshaw) 



T. CD., (P. CO. 4/25,— 
imperfect) ; M. Dorey. 



4to 

(7|x5j)l 



Will. Bladen 1 King s Inns, N 1.27. 



92 



Author 



1653 



The Commissioners for 
Settling and securing the 
Province of Ulster. 



The Commissioners of the 
Commonwealth of Eng- 
land for the affaires of 
Ireland. 



Shart Title 



Resolves of a General Coun- 
cil of Officers held at Dub- 
lin the 21. and 22. of Nov- 
ember 1653. 

[4 leaves = Title leaf + 6 
PP-] 



Regulations and Orders for 
the transplanting of dis- 
affected persons, &:c. 



Instructions to be duly ob- 
served by the Judges of 
every respective Court of 
Justice which is or shall 
be established to be kept 
and held weekely within 
any Citie, Towne or place 
in Ireland. And by all 
other officers and Minis- 
ters belonging to the said 
Courts respectively 



Size 



Fol. 
7A-) 



Printer 



Wm. Bladen 



Owner or Reference 



(s.sh.) 
(Fol.) 



Wm. Bladen 



Wm. Bladen 



R. I. A., (Halliday 
Tracts) Box 67/22 ; 



Brit. Mus., 816. M. 17. 
(74.) 



Vide MS. copy in Pub 
Record Ofifice(South- 
well Collection) Lot 
157, No. 3. 



— 93 — 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1654 



John Stearne (or Steam or 
Sterne) M.D. 



Oliver Cromwell 



Charles Fleetwood, Lord 
Deputy 



Ld. Deputy and Council. 



do. 



do. 



Aphorisimi de 
(First Edition) 



Felicitate 



His Highness's Speech to j 4'°- 
the Parliament in the!(7ix6 
Painted Chamber at their I 
Dissolution upon Mon- 
day, 22nd of Jany. 1654. 
[Title leaf + 1-20 pp.] 



Ordinance fixing a scale of 
rewards for destroyin" 
wolves. 

(Black Letter.) 



Ordnance for a return of 
real and personal Estates 
comprehended in the 
" Ordinance for Indemn- 
ity to the English Protest- 
ants of the Province of 
Munster, in Ireland." 



Ordinance for the trial of 
" 'I'ories and other Irish 
Rebels," by military 
Commissioners. 
(Black Letter.) 



Proclamation respecting 
the removal of Popish 
Recusants from Dublin. 



Fol. 



s.sh 
Fol 



(do.) 



(do.) 



Vide Harris's Ware, 
"Writers,"p.i59. Vide 
Sir Chas. Cameron's 
History of College of 
Surgeons, Ireland, p. 
8 ; also vide Watt's 
Biblio. Britannica. 



W-'liam Bladen 



Kings Inns, 
Pamph. ) 



(269/ 



Brit. Mus. 
(IS-) 



806, 



14 



Brit. Mus. (2 copies) 
806, i., 14 (5) & (6) 



Brit. Mus. 806, i, 14 
(10) 



,. (II) 



94 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Relerence 


1654 


Lord Deputy and Council 


Ordinance extending the 
time allowed for the re- 
moval of persons and 
their families into Con- 
naught. 

(Black Letter.) 


1 
s.sh. ' 




Brit. Mus. 806 i., 14 

(12). 


» 


do. 


A Declaration for making 
sale of the corn of such 
Irish proprietors and 
others as did not trans- 
plant themselves into the 
Province of Connaught 


do. 




do. (13). 


») 


do. 


A Declaration directing 
the Officers of Horse in 
Ireland to provide grass 
and hay for the horses 
under their charge, &c. 


do. 




do. (14). 


:j 




An Ordinance for Indemp- 
nitie to the English Pro- 
testants of the Province 
of Munster in Ireland 
(i Atigt. 1654.) 


Fol. 


William Bladen 


Brit. Mus. (England, 
Col. 202), 806, i, 14 
(3). 






Black Letter. 








■653 




Declaration, as to the Rates 
of the several Counties * * 
for satisfaction of Arrears 

[6 pp.] 


Sm. Fo'. 




Vt'iie Prendergast's 
Cromwellian Settle- 
ment, New Edition, 
p. 214. 



95 — 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1654 


Henry Osborne 


A more Exact way To De- 
lineate the Plot of any 
spacious parcel of Land, 
as Baronies, Parishes, and 
Town-Lands, as also of 
Rivers, Harbours and 
I^oughs, ifcc, than is as 
yet in practice. Also a 
IVIethod or Form of Keep- 
ing the Field-Book, and 
How to Cast up the Su- 
perficial Content of a 
Plot most exactly. 

[Title leaf H- ' Dedication,' 
I leaf -1-8 pp.] 


(4to) 

s;x6A 


William Bladen 


Marsh's, L, 4, 3, 18 
Brit. Mus. (Col. loi) 
558 b. 29. 


t» 


The Commissioners of the 
Commonwealth of Eng- 
land, for the Affairs of 
Ireland. 


A Declaration for the Pay- 
ment of Custom and Ex- 
cize. 

[T. leaf -F 6 pp.] 


Fol. 
10 X 6| 


do 


Marsh's, G, 4, 3, 38. 


)) 


Lord Deputy and Council, 


An Assesment for Ireland, 
For three Months; at Ten 
Thousand Pounds by the 
Month. Commencing the 
i6th day of October, 1654, 
and Determining the 7th 
o{ Jany. following. 

[T. leaf -t- 16 pp. -1- I leaf 
blank.] 


Fol. 
10 X 6J 


do. 


do. 
(2 copies). 


11 


Do. 


Proclamation for ringing 
swine. Dated 25th Nov. 


s.sh. 


do. 


T.C.D. (Press B. 6.21) 



96- 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



i55S 



Richard Lawrence 



Lord Deputy and Council 



do. 



A Declaration of his High- 
nesse by the Advice of his 
Council, shewing the 
Reasons of their Proceed- 
ings for securing the 
Peace of the Common- 
wealth upon occasion of 
the late Insurrection and 
Rebellion. 

[1-40 pp.] 



4to. 
(6f X 5« 



The Interest of England in 
the Irish Transplantation 
stated, &c. 

[T. leaf + 32 pp.] 



4to. 
(7i X 5l 



1 3 Ordnances, declarations, 
&c. 
(Some in Black Letter.) 



A Declaration * * for Re- 
moving and Preventing of 
some mistakes in Govern- 
ment in Ireland. 
[T. leaf + 10 pp.] 



General Form of Order upon 
the Treasury of Ireland. 



s.sh. or 
Fol. 



Fol. 
(10 X 6J) 



s.s. or 
Fol. 



Printer 



Wm. Bladen 



Wm. Bladen 



Wm. Bladen 



Owner or Reference 



T,C.D.,(S.ss. 71)— Im- 
perfect, 2 or 4 pp. 
wanting 



Advocates 



Brit. Mus. 806, i., 14 



Marsh's, G4.3.38 



Brit. Mus. 806, i., 14 
(7) 



— 97 



Date 


Author 


Short Title v 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1655 




Like of acknowledgment of 


s.sh. 




Brit. Mus. 806, i., 14 






money owing to the Re- 


or 




(8) 






ceiver, &c. 


Fol. 






II 


The Council for the Affairs 


A Declaration and Com- 


Fol. 


Wm. Bladen 


Marsh's, G4.3.38; Lon 




of Ireland 


mission for three months 
Assesment of Ten thou- 
sand Pounds by the 
Month ; Beginning the 
12th of Januayy, 1655, 
and ending the 12th of 
April following. 

[T. leaf -t- 6 pp.] 


(10 K 6i) 




don Institution (Cata- 
logue,Vol.III., p. 266, 


>J 


John Stearne, M.D. 


Aphorismi de Felicitate. 
(2nd Edition.) 


Svo. 




Vide Harris's Ware's 
"Writers, "p. 159; and 
Cameron's History of 
College of Surgeons, 
p. 8. 


- 


do. 


QavoTokoyia., &c. Sive De 
Morte Dissertatio. 
(First Edition.) 


(do.) 




Vide Harris's Ware's 
"Writers," p. 159 






The Humble Representa- 


4to 


William Bladen 


E. R. McC. Dix. 






tion And Address of 


(65x5l) 










severall Churches and 












Christians in South Wales, 












and Altinmouthshire, &c. 












[14 PP-] 









Date 



Author 



1656 



[>.] 



The Revd. Saml. Winter, 
D.D. Provost of T.C.D. 



R. L. ( Richd. Lawrence), A 
Member ot the Army in 
Ireland. 



The Lord Protector and 
Council 



do. 



do. 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



The Summe Of diverse 
Sermons Preached in 
Dublin before the L. 
Deputie Fleehvood, and 
the Commrs. of Parlia- 
ment for the Affairs of 
Ireland, Wherein the doc- 
trine of Infant Baptism is 
asserted &c. &c. 

[8 leaves + i - 182 pp.] 



England's great interest in 
the Well Planting of Ire- 
land with English people 
discussed. Wherein is 
briefly stated the benefits 
that will arise thereby, &c. 

[2 leaves -1-1-44 pp.] 

(2nd Edition, folds in fours.) 



Ordnance prescribing Oath 
of Abjuration to be taken 
by Irish conforming to 
Protestant Religion. 

(Black Letter.) 



Like prolonging Jurisdic- 
tion of Court of Claims at 
Athlcme. 

(Black Letter.) 



Declaration for discovery, 
&c., of Jesuits, &c. 

(Black Letter.) 



Svo. 
(5fx3i) 



Wm. Bladen 



(Svo.) 
6fx4j 



(Fol.) 



Wm. Bladen 



(s.sh.) 
(Fol.) 



(Fol.) 



T. C. D., CC n. 3S , 
R. R. Belshaw ; Sir 
J. T. Gilbert; Brit. 
Mus. (12 mo); E. R. 
McC. Dix. 



KingsInns(42oPamph., 
much cropped.) 



Brit. Mus. 806 i. 14 (31)- 



do. (29). 



do. 806 h. 14 (27). 



99 — 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1656 


The Lord Protector and 
Council 


Ordnance directing prose- 
cution of Tones, &c. 


(Fol.) 




Brit. Mus. 806 i. 14(28). 


>i 


do. 


Declaration offering rewards 
for destruction of wolves, 
&c. 

(Bhick Letter.) 


(s.sh.) 
(Fol.) 




do. do. (30). 




The Revd. Nicholas Ber- 


The Life and Death of x x x 


(i3mo.) 


VVm. Bladen 


Sir J. T. Gilbert ; E. R. 




nard, D.D., and Preacher 


Dr. James Usher, late 


5x2! 




McC. Dix. 




to the honourable Society 


Archbishop of Armagh, 










of Grays-Inn, London, 


and Primate of all Ireland. 

[5 leaves + i - 1 32 pp.] 

N.B.— Has list of Usher's 
Works on final leaf. 










The Council for the Affairs 


A Declaration and Commis- 


(Fol.) 


do. 


Marsh's, G4., 3, 38 (2 




of Ireland. 


sion for the Assessment of 
Twelve thousand pounds 
by the Month, For the Six 
ensuing Months, (viz. ) from 
the 24th of September 
1656, to the 24th day of 
March following. 

[T. leaf +12 pp.] 


10 X 6J 




copies) ; London In- 
stitution (Cat. Vol 3 
p. 267.) 



100 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1657 



Dudley Loftus 



Henry Cromwell, Lord 
Deputy, and Council 



The Council 



Logica seu Introductio in 
totam Aristotelis Phil- 
osophiam. Ab Armenico 
idiomate in Latinura versa 
opera Dudleii Loftusii. 
Adjicitur Oratio Domin- 
ica, qua a Christo prolata, 
apertierant creli, Luc. 3. 
21. e Syreaco versa &c. 

[4 leaves + 120 pp. + 6 
leaves,] 



Proclamation dated 2gth 
Jany. 1657 



An Assessment for Ireland 
For Six Months, at Thir- 
teen Thousand pounds 
per month, Commencing 
the 24th oijune 1657, and 
determining the 24th of 
December inclusive follow- 
ing. 

[T. leaf 4- 28 pp.J 



1 2mo 
(5 X 2|) 



^\'illiam Bladen 



(s.sh.) 
iif X9I) 



Fol. 
(10X6J) 



do. 



do. 



Brit. Mus. (cropped) 
Si9.a.27. 



Kings Inns, (N. 127.) 
N.B. Top of sheet 
with greater part of 
coatof arms cut away. 



Marsh's, 04-3.38. 
London Institution 
(Cat. Vol. 3. p. 267.) 



lOI — 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


165S 


John Stearne, M.D., and 
Prof. Pub. in Univ., Dub. 


Animi Medela, seu Da 
Beatitiidine & Miseria ; 
lUius essentia origine & 
ad ipsam methodo ; hujus 
natura, causis & remedis 
Tractatus. &c., &c. 

[12 leaves + i-5i6pp. + 
12 leaves, — Index.] 


4to. 

(7? X 5iy 


Wni. Bladen 


St. Canice's Library, 
Kilkenny; Kings 
Inns, An. 6.0.8; T. 
CD., LL. II, 7 ; 
Bodleian; Marsh's, E. 
3. 4. I ; R.I.A., 15, 
D. 17 RR.; Sir T- T. 
Gilbert. 


]} 


Caesar Williamsonus, S.T. 
P. et Orat Acad Dub. 


Panegyris in Excellentis- 
simum Dominium, Domi- 
num, Henricum Crom- 
wellum Deputatum Hiber- 
nise Cancellariumque 
Academisi Dubliniensis. 

[Epis. Ded. to Dudley 
Loftus, 12 pp. + 1-3 1 pp., 
&c. 


Svo. 
(6 X 3i) 


do. 


Bodleian, 80 C. 591 
Line. 


)) 


Lord. Lt. & Council 


An Assesment for Ireland 
for six Months, At nine 
thousand pounds by the 
month, commencing the 
24th day oi March, 1658, 
and determining the 24th 
of September, 1659. 

fT leaf + 10 pp. + I leaf 
blank.] 


Fol; 
(10 X 6i) 


do. 


Marsh's, G.4.3. 38 &c. 
(2 copies.) 


" 


Henry Cromwell, Lord 
Deputy, and Council 


Proclamation for certifying 
unauthorised preachers. 
20th January 1657. 


s.sh. 


do. 


T.C.D. (Press B. 6.21) 



— 102 — 



Ditc 



Author 



1659 



John Stearne, M.D. Pro- 
fessor in University of 
Dublin. 



Short Title 



QapaToXoyia 

sen 

De Morte Dissertatio In 

qua Mortis Natura Causae 

&c. &c. 

[8 leaves + i - 2S8 pp.] 

N.B. In Taylor's History 
of Trinity College, p. 379, 
there, is mentioned, appar- 
ently, an earlier edition of 
this work i.e. 1656. 



Some Animadversions upon 
the Declaration of, and 
the Plea for, the Army : 
Together with 16 Queries 
thence extracted. &c. &c. 

[T. leaf-H-34 pp.] 



Rules and Orders to be 
observed in the Proceed- 
ings of Causes in the 
High Court of Chancery 
in Ireland. By the spec- 
ial direction of the Lord 
Chancellor. 



[1-56 pp. 
table &c. 



+ 8 leaves & 
Sigs. A - E4] 



The Agreement and Reso- 
Ivtion of the Ministers of 
Christ Associated within 
the City of Dublin, and 
Province of Leinster ; for 
furthering of a real and 
thorough Reformation, 
According to the written 
word of God. 

[T. leaf-l-i-Hpp.] 



Printer 



Owner or Relerence 



Svo 
(6 X 3j) 



William Bladen 



Sir J. T, Gilbert ; Bod- 
leian ; Worth Liby. 
(Steevens Hospital) ; 
T. C. D., Iv. o. 19; 
Marsh's, E. 3. 5. 28 ; 
R.I.A., \6 A. 13RR. 



4to 
(7ixs|) 



Svo 
(5i X 3i) 



4to 
(6| X 5i) 



do. 



do. 



do. 



T. C. D., RR. pp. 6 (3) 



Law Library,'Dublin, 



R. R. Belshaw ; T. C. 
D. (P. gg. 32): E.R. 
McC. Di.t; R.I. A. 
H. T. (75/52). 



103 — 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1659 


Edward Worth, D D. 


The Servant doing and the 


4to 


William Bladen 


Cashel Diocesan Lib- 






Lord Blessing. A Sermon 


(Ta^xs-J) 




rary ; T. C. D., RR. 






preached at the Funeral 






pp. 6 (9) ; R. R. Bel 






of the Right honorable 






shaw ; Brit. Mus. 






Richard Pepys^ Lord 












Chief Justice of the 












Upper Bench in Ireland 












who deceased 2 January 












1658. 












[3 leaves + 1-34 pp.] 








a 


Geo. Monk (Duke of Albe- 


A Copie of a Letter from 


s.sh. 


do. 


F/i/«Hazlett 3rd Series 




marle) 


General Monck in answer 
to a Letter sent from 
hence by Colonel Jones 
& others. For the Com- 
mander in Chief of the 
Forces in Ireland to be 
communicated to the rest 
of the Officers of the 
Army there. 






p. 162 


t> 


Henry Cromwell, Lord 


A Proclamation, dated May 


s.sh. 




Vide London Reprint 




Lieutenant of Ireland 


the 9th 1659 Command- 
ing all Civil and Military 
Officers to put down all 
symptoms of disaffection 
to the Governmert. 


(Fol.) 




in Brit. Mus. 669 f. 
21(38), &c. 2 copies; 

and 
Bodleian 22857 d. 2 
(35) 


" 


General Geo. Monk &c. 


.i. Letter from General 
Monk in Scotland to the 
Commissioners of Parlia- 
ment in Ireland touching 
his present acting. 


— 





Vide London reprints 
in Brit. Mus. Col. 145 
669 f. 22 (38) &c. 
(2 copies). 



— 104 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1659 




An Account of the affairs 
in Ireland in reference to 
the late change in Eng- 
land ; with a declaration 
of several officers of the 
Army in Ireland * * * 
holding forthe their stead- 
fast resolution to adhere 
to the Parliament &c. 


s.sh. 
Fol. 




Vide London reprints 
in Brit. Mus., 669 i. 
22 (40) 

and 
Bodleian, Wood 510 
(24) 


}) 




The Newsletter (A News- 
paper. 

Query the same as first 
item on p. i8 


— 





Vide Hy. Bradshaw's 
address in the Dublin 
daily papers of 3rd 
Oct. 1884. 


" 




A New Declaration of the 
General Convention now 
Assembled at Dublin in 
Ireland ; Dated the 12 of 
this instant March 1659 


— 


\ 


Vide London reprints 
in R. I. A. /H. T. 

76/1. 



los — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Owner or lv"iorence 



1659 



The Declaration of Sir 
Hardresse Waller, Major 
General of the Parlia- 
ments Forces in Ireland, 
and the Council of Ofificers 
there. Dated at Dublin- 
Castle, the 28 of Decem- 
ber, 1659. 



An Act of Assesment. Fol 

(10x6^) 
[T. leaf -1-6 pp.] I 



William Bladen 



YirJt London reprint 
in Nat. Liby. (Thorpe; 
Vol. XI. /20) 

- • ' and 

. In_ Brit. Mus. (Col. 
229). 



Marsh's, G4. 3 38. (2 
crpies). 



— io6 — 



Date 



Author 



[1660] 



1660 



Sir Hardress Waller 



Short Title 



Owner or Reference 



An Account of the Chief 
Occurrences of Ireland. 
Together with some Par- 
ticulars from England 
From Monday the 13 of 
March, to Monday the 19, 
of March. 

[P'33-p-40- Bin fours] 

5th No. 



The Declaration of Sir 
Charles Coot Knight and 
Baronet, Lord President 
of the Province of Con- 
naught ; And the rest of 
the Council of Officers of 
the Army in Ireland 
Present at Dublin, Con- 
cerning the Re-admission 
of the Secluded Members. 
Dated Feb. 16. 



Declaration of Sir Hardress 
Waller Major Genl. of the 
Parliaments Forces in 
Ireland in reference to 
certain irregular proceed- 
ings by Lt. Genl. Ludlow 
at Duncannon fcc. Dated 
nth Jan. 1659. 

Printed on one side only. 



4to 



4to 



s.sh. 
(11X7I) 



William Bladen 



do. 



do. 



Worcester College 
(Oxford). 



Worcester College 
(Oxford); vide Re- 
prints in, Bodleian, 
Kings Inns and Natl. 
Liby. (Thorpe, Vol. 
V.) 



T.C.D. 2 copies, RRd. 

46/4 & s 



— 107 



Date 


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Short Title 


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1660 


John Stearne, M.D., &c. 


Clarissimi Viri Adriani 
Heereboordi Philosophiae 
Professoris Ordinarii Dis- 
putatonum de concursu 
Exam en 

[T. leaf +1-204 pp.] 


8vo. 
(5f X 3i) 


Wm. Bladen 


Bodleian, (80 K. 36 
Line). Marsh's, (E. 
3-5-28/3) 


)> 


Charles II. 


His Majesties Declaration 
To all His Loving Sub- 
jects of his Kingdom of 
England and Dominion of 
Wales concerning Ecclesi- 
astical Affairs 

(Oct. 25th 1660), 

[Title leaf -1-9 pp. -1- blank 
verso of last p.ige; Black 
Leiter]. 


Fo!. 
(nix7i) 


Wm. Bladen 


T.C.D., RRd46(No. 
6.) Folds in sixes ; 
King's Inns, 553 (Cut 
down, 10 X 5^) 


tt 




An Act of Free and 
General pardon Indemn- 
ity and Oblivion (XII., 
Car. II.) 

[6 leaves.] 

14 Proclamations 
21 Do 


do. 

(I'i X 
7i) 


do. 


T.C.D., RR. d. 46 (8) 
Pub. R>;c. Off. (Lib. i 

A. is;;-iw) 

Do. (Li ;>. I D) 



— io8 



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1660 Peter Walsh 



April 
24th 



1660 



Faithful Tate (or Teate) 
Ministei, &c. 



Letter to the Duke of 
Ormond 



A Declaration of the Ge- 
neral Convention of Ire- 
land expressing their de- 
testation of the unjust 
proceedings of the late 
King, in a pretended 
High Court of Justice in 
England * * * May i, 1660 



An Ordinance For the 
speedy raising of Moneys 
towards the Supply of 
the Army ; and for de- 
fraying of other Public 
charges 

[T. leaf -f 1-26 pp.] 



An Antheme sung at the 
C onsecration of the Arch- 
bishops and Bishops of 
Ii'eland on Sunday the 
27 of Jany., 1660, at St. 
Patrick's in Dublin 



[17 lines.] 



The Uncharitable Infoimer 
charitably informed that 
sycophanc) is a sin, &c. 



[82 pp.] 



4to. 



Fol. 
(ni X 7|) 



s sh. 
(13I X 8f) 



Svo. 
(5i X 3i) 



William Bladen 



Vide Catalogue of 
Dublin Library So- 
ciety (1810) p. 39. 



V/'de London reprint 
in Brit. Mus., 190 g. 
13 (265) 



icing's Inns, (N. i. 27), 
(folds in fours) ; 
Marsh's (G4 3.38) 



William Bladen 



Biit. Mus , 669 f 26 
61) 



Brit. Mus., E. 1921 (i) 



— 109 — 



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1660 



The General Convention 
of Ireland and others 



Charles II. 



Charles II. 



Charles II. 



[Sem. Coxe and Stephen 
CharnockJ 



March 
ist 



Proclamation declaring 
Charles II., to be lawful 
King of Great Britain and 
Ireland, May 14, 1660 



His Majesties Gracious 
letter and Declaration Sent 
to the House of Peers 
by Sir John Greenvil, 
Knight, from Breda ■ And 
read in the House the 
first of May, 1660 



4to. 
(7i X 5i) 



'PP'] 



Letter to General Monck, 
&c,, April, 1660 



His Majestie's Gracious 
Declaration for the Settle- 
ment of his Kingdome of 
Ireland and satisfaction 
of the severall interests 
of adventurers souldiers 
and other his subjects, 
there 



Two Sermons (on Prov. 
xi. 14& Jude 19) preached 
at Christ-Church in the 
City of Dublin before the 
General Conventioti of 
Ireland * * * March 2 & 
9 1659 (O.S.) 



[65 PP ] 



An Ordinance for the 
speedy raising of moneys 
for His Majesties Service 

[T. leaf -f 30] 



s.sh. 

(FoM 



s.sh. Ful 



Sm. Fol. 



4to. 
5f) 



(6 



Fol. 
(10 X 6i) 



William Bladen 



Brit. Mus., 1851 b. (4S) 



E. R. McC. Dix 



William Bladen 



William Bladen 



Brit. Mus., 807, g. 5(6) 



London Institution, 
Cat., Vol. 3, p. 267. 



R. R. Belshaw (wants 
title page); Brit. Mus., 
E. 1026 (2) 



Marsh's, (G4.3-38). 



no 



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1661 



Jeremy Taylor, D.D., Bishop 
of Downe & Connor. 



The Roman Catholic 
Nobility and Gentry of 
Ireland. 



H. M.'s Commrs. for putting 
in execution the Declara- 
tion for Settlement of 
Ireland. 



(Charles II.) 



A Sermon preached at the 
Consecration of the two 
Archbishops and ten 
Bishops, in the Cathedral 
Church of S. Patrick in 
Dublin, January 27, 1660. 

[3 leaves +1-48 pp.] 



The faithful protestations 
and humble remonstrance 
of the Roman Catholic 
Nobility and Gentry of 
Ireland. 



Proclamation for executing 
Declaration, 27th March, 
i66r. 

(Black Letter.) 



Proclamation (announcing 
the Accession and the 
vacancy of the Crown from 
death of Charles I.) 

[A Broadside.] 



9 Proclamations 



4to 
(7ix6) 



s.sh. 
(Fol.) 



s.sh. 
(Fol.) 



s.sh. 



\Vm. Bladen 



William Bladen 



Corpus Christi, Oxford ; 
T.C.D. (2 copies), P. 
dd. 31 and RK.., pp. 
6 (7); E. R. McC. 
Dix ; Lincoln's Inn ; 
Brit. Mus.; R. R. Bel- 
sliaw ; Lough Fea 
(sm. 4to) ; Marsh's. 



Brit. Mus., 
(4 



Vide London reprint in 
Brit. Mus. (2 copies), 
21 h. (141), &c. 



Vide Hazlett's Biblio. 
Coll. and Notes, 3rd 
Series, Supplements 
(1889), p. 126. 



Pub. Rec. Off. (Lib. i 
D and Lib. i F) 



Date 



Short Title 



Owner or Reference 



1661 



Sir Audley Mervyn, ?I. M.'s 
Prime Sergeant at Law in 
Ireland. 



[1661] 



[Date I 

not 

given.] I 



Dudley Loftus, J.U.D. 



Most Revd.John(Bramhall), 
Archbishop of Armagh, 
Primate, &c., ofall Ireland 



F. S. (Francis Synge or 
Singe) 



A Speech Made by Sir 
Audley Mervyn, his Ma- 
jesty's Prime Serjeant at 
Law in Ireland, the nth 
day of Afcij' in the House 
of Lords, when he was 
presented Speaker by the 
Com mens, before the Right 
Honourable, Sir Matin'ce 
Eustace, Knight ; Lord 
Chancellor of Ireland ; 
Roger, Earl of Orrery; and 
Charles, EarlofMountrath; 
His Majestie's Lords Jus- 
tices of his Kingdom of 
Ireland. 

[T. leaf+ I - 14 pp.] 



Liber Psalmorum Davidis, 
ex Armenico idiomate in 
Lntinum Traductus. 

[8 leaves + i - 24S pp.] 



A Sermon preachedat Dublin 
upon the 23 of Aprill, 
1 66 1, being the day ap- 
pointed for his Majestie's 
Coronation. With two 
Speeches made in the 
House of Peers the nth 
May, 1 66 1 when the House 
of Commons presented 
their Speaker. 

[T. leaf -H i - 48 pp.] 



A Panegyrick on the Most 
Auspicious and long- 
wished-for Return of the 
Great Example of the 
Greatest Virtue The 
Faithful Achates of our 
Royal Charles and the 
Tutelar Angel (as we justly 
hope) of our Church and 
State, The Most Illustri- 
ous James Duke, Marquess 
anil Earl of Ormond, &c.. 
Lord Lieutenant, &c. 

[T. Ieaf-l-i-i2 pp.] 



4to ! 



William Blade 



1 2 mo 
(slxSi) 



4to 
(5J'<5) 



Wm. Bladen 



M'm. Bladen 



4to. 

(7titX 

5t) 



T.C.D., P. gg. 41/7 & 
M.M.oo 3, (2 copies); 
Inner Temple, T.Y. 
I. 29/2, p. 138 ; R. 
R. Belshaw ; Kings 
Inns, (N.I, 27); Bod- 
leian ; Advocates. 



John Crook 



Brit. Mus.; Cashel Dio- 
cesan Library (8vo) ; 
Bodleian (8vo), Mar. 
399 (folds in eights). 



T.C.D., P. dd. 24, No. 
6, and R.R. p^ 6 
(10), 2 copies; R R. 
Belshav^ 



T.C.D.(Pgg29/,) 



Date 



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1661 



Thomas Sternhold, John 
Hopkins and others. 



[Jo. Jones, B.A., T.C.D.l 



Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of 
Down 



The whole Book of Psalms 
collected into English 
Metre, by Thomas Stern- 
hold, John Hopkins, and 
others, Conferred with the 
Hebrew. 



4to 
7tV X 5i 



[B.L. ; T. leaf + 
pp. + 2 leaves.] 



152 



Elegies * on the Much la- 
mented Death of the Right 
Honourable, the Earl of 
Mountrath (Chas. Coote.) 

[T. leaf +6 pp.] 



The Right Revd. John 
(Parker), Bishop of Elphin. 



4to 
(6f X 5i) 



John Crook, K.P. 



John Crook, K.P 



Rules and Advices to the 
Clergy of the Diocese of 
Down and Connor for 
their Deportment in their 
personal and Publick Ca- 
pacities. 

[T. Leaf + i - 46 pp.] 



4to 
(6-|x5|)l 



William Bladen 



jA Sermon (on II. Sam. xix. 
14), preached at Christ 
Church, Dublin, Before 
both Housesof Parliament, 
May, the 29th. 1661. Being 
the Anniversary of his 
Majesty King Charles the 
Second, his Most Memor- 
able and happy Restaura- 
tion, 

[2 leaves +1-50 pp. + i leaf 
blank.] 

• One English and Thret Latin, t Cotton gives date of publication as 1663, Vide Fasti Vol. iv., p. 127. Qy. was theie a 2nd Edition ? 



8vo 

6JX5]J 



Brit. Mus. ; R. R. 
Belshaw; E. R. McC. 
Dix ; Lanhydruck. 



T.C.D.,(P.nn. 53,No 
7) 



JohnCrooke,K.P. 



R.I. A., (H. T. Box, 

80/16); Lough Fea; 
Brit. Mus. (2 copies). 



T.C.D.,(P.gg.35);R. 
R. Belshaw; E. R 
McC. Dix. 



"3 — 



Autl or 



Short Title 



Size 



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t66i 



Lords Justices and Council. Proclamation respecting ar- ; s.sh. 
rears of pay due to Com- ! (Fol.) 
missioned Officers, dated 
April 17th, 1661. 



Conimrs. for Settlement of 
Ireland. 



Lords Justices and Council. 



W.L.,D.D.(W.Lightburn), 
Chanter of Christ's Church, 
Dublin. 



2 Proclamations. 

(Broadsides.) 
(Black Letter, chiefly.) 



Proclamation. 

(Broadside.) 
(Black Letter, chiefly.) 



s.sh. 



William Bladen 



do. 



A Declaration Of the Lords 
Spiritual, and Temporal, 
and the Commons in this 
present Parliament of 
Ireland assembled, con- 
cerning Ecclesiastical Go- 
vernment, and the Book 
of Common Prayer. 



do. 
15 X "I 



A Thanksgiving Sermon (on 
Ex. xviii., 10), preached at 
Christ Church — before the 
Lords Justices and Coun- 
cil, 

(24 PP-) 



do. 



do. 



Brit. Mus. 807, g. 5 (7). 



Kings Inns, (N, i, 27.) 



do. 



R-I.A., (H. T. 80/19.) 



4to I John Crook, K.P. 

(7l X Sl) 



Brit. Mu 



4105 



de 



114 — 



Date 



1662 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Sir James Ware 



[,.] 



His Majesty's Commrs. 



The Rt. Revd. Thomas 
Hacket, Bishop of Down 
and Connor 



Sir Audley Mervyn, Knt., 
H.M's. Prime Sergeant at 
Law and Speaker of the 
House of Commons in 
Ireland 



do. 



Rerum Hibernicarum I 8vo. 
Henrico Octavo Regnante ' (5-5-f x 
Annales. Nunc primum j 3*) 
editi. ' 

[3 leaves + i-i 38 pp. Sigs. 
A -Is] 



Owner or Reference 



Rules, Orders and Direc- 
tions Agreed upon by His 
Majestie's Commrs. ap- 
pointed for Execution of 
the Aci for Settlement of 
Ireland, for Regulating 
Proceedings in the Court 
for Adjudication of claims 
to be observed by Coun- 
sellors, Attorneys, Solrs., 
Agents, &c. Dated 22nd 
October, 1662 
[8 pp.] 



A sermon on I Cor. xiv. 16 
(Convocation) 



The Speech, &c., delivered 
to His Grace James Duke 
ofOrraond, Lord Lieuten- 
ant of Ireland, the 13 day 
of February 1662, in the 
Presence Chamber in the 
Castle of Dublin. 

[T. leaf -I- I - 40 pp. 4- I 
leaf] 
(First Edition or Issue) 



Same 

[42 pp. + I leaf] 
(Second Edition or Issue) 



Fol. 

(I.f X 

7i) 



John Crook, K.P. I T.C.D., (RR, nn. 6.) 
! (6^ X 4|). E. R. 
McC. Dix, (cropped); 
Lough Fea (i 2 mo) ; 
Natl. Liby. (Joly Col- 
lection) 



do 



Natl 



Liby. (Thorpe 
Collection) Vol. IX.; 
Sir J. T. Gilbert. 



4to. 



4to. 

(61-1 X 

Si) 



4to. 



W. B. 
(Wm. Bladen) 



Vide Harris's Ware's 
"Bishops," p. 213. 



do. 



T.C.D., (P. 
Worth. 



gg- 4i/6i) ; 



Natl. Liby. (Thorpe) 



115 — 



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1662 j James Butler, Duke of 
j Ormond, Lord Lieuten- 
ant of Ireland 



Charles II. 



John Stearne, M. & J.U.D. 



Sir Audley Mervyn, &c. 



John Crook, K,P. 



Speech to Both Houses of ' 410. 

Parliament on 27 Sept. (7] > 

'S62 StV) 

[14 pp. & blank leaf] 



An Act for the Better Fol. John Ciook, K.P, 
Execution of His IWajes- (11 x 6-1) 
tie's Gracious Declaration 
For The Settlement of 
His Kingdome of Ireland 
and Satisfaction of the 
several Interests of Ad- 
venturers, Souldiers and 
other His Majesties Sub- 
jects there 

(Black Letter ; T. leaf -I- 
I - 126 pp.) 



De Electione & Reproba- 
tione Dissertatio ejusdem 
Manuductio ad Vitem 
Probam 

[12 leaves + i - 158 pp.] 



4to. I John Crook, K.P. 
(7i X si) 



A Speech Delivered * * * * 
to his Grace James Duke 
Ormond Lord Lieutenant 
of Ireland, in the Presence 
Chamber * * * the 29. of 
July 1662 

[T. leaf -I- I - 1 2 pp. -I- I 
leaf blank] 



Pub. Rec. Off, (South- 
well Collection Lot. 
157. (2); Bodleian 
Carte Papers, C.L.I. 
Appendix J. 28. 



King's Inns, H. H. 11, 
(nx7i);R.IA, (33 
F. 2) ; Bodleian, (sm. 
fol.), Law Room ; 
Lambeth, Vol. 2, p. 
440. Marsh's, (E4.3. 
20.) 



4to. 
(6| X si) 



William Bladen 



Marsh's (R.3,4 13); T. 
CD., (LL. kk. 70); 
R. R. Belshaw ; Ad- 
vocates. 



T.C.D.,(P.gg. 4i'8)& 
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Il6 — 



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1662 



(Roger Boyle, ist Earl of The Answer of a Person of 4to. 



Orrery) 



James Harwood, D.D. 



Daniel Burston, B.D. and 
Preacher of God's Word 
in the City of Waterford 



Charles II. 



Charles II. 



Quality To a Scandalous (6| 
Letter lately printed and 
Subscribed by P. W. In- 
tituled : A Letter desiring 
ajust and merciful Regard I 
of the Roman Catholics 
of Ireland, given about | 
the end of October, 1660, j 
to the then Marquess,now 
Duke of Ormond, &c. 

[T. leaf + 1 - 94 pp.] 



5*) 



A Free-Wil Offering. (A 
number of Sermons) 

[4 leaves + 84 pp. + 1 leaf 
of other works] 



Euayy£\i(Tr»)c tV* EuayyeX- 
ifo/uecof, The Evangelist 
yet Evangelising ikc. &c. 

[2 leaves + i - 286 pp. + 
6 leaves (Index &c.)] 



His Majesties Declaration 
to all his loving subjects, 
Deer. 26 1662, 

[T. leaf + I - 8 pp. + 
I leaf blank] 



An Act for encouraging 
Protestants, Strangers and 
others to inhabit &c. in 
Ireland 



4to.(7f X 



4to. John Crook, K.P. 
(7| X si) 



J. C. 



J. C. 



T.C.D., (EE o. 85) ; 
AVorcester (Oxford) ; 
R.I.A., H.T. (Box 
81/3) 



R. R. Belshaw 



Fol. ! John Crook, K.P. 
(ni X 7i) 



T.C.D., (F. g. 60) : 
R. R. Belshaw. 



Fol. 



T.C.D., (RR d. 46 No. 
7); Kings Inns, ((553) 



Bodleian,(CartePapers), 
LXVI. f. 487 



117 — 



Date 



Author 



I 662 



Charles II. 



do. 



do. 



[„?] 



Abraham Cowley 



Short Title 



Owner or Reterencc 



Anthems to be sung at the 
Celebration of Divine 
Service in the Cathedral 
Church of the Holy and 
Undivided Trinity in 
Dublin 

[2 leaves + 1-34 pp.] 
N.B.— Words only 



i Fol. 
i(lof X 6| 



Proclamations, Speeches, 
&c. 



T.C.D., (R. f. 53.; 



Fol. 



Proclamation 
Oct. (1662) 



dated 2nd 



A Letter of the Kings Most 
Excellent Majesty to The 
Most Reverend Father in 
God William Lord Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury {14 
Oct.) To which are ad- 
joined His Majesties Di- 
rections concerning 
Preachers 

[T. leaf + 6 pp.] 



shs. 



N. B. — No place 
or printer given 
but judged to be 
Dublin printed 



John Crook 



Fol. 
5f) 



Poems 



Bodleian (Carte Papers) 
Vol. 71, 383 and 
many others 



King's Inns, (N. i. 27) 



(For S. Dancer) 



King's Inns, (553) 



Vide Lowndes p. 540 



ii8 



Date 



Author 



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Size 



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1663 



Sir Audley Mervyn, His 
Majesty's Prime Sergeant 
at Law and Speaker of 
the House of Commons 
in Ireland. 



Same 



Dudley Loftus, J.U.D., Vic. 
Gen. Arm. 



The Speech * * delivered 
to His Grace James, Duke 
of Ormond, Lord Lieut, 
of Ireland the 13th day of 
Feby. 1662, in the Pre- 
sence Chamber in^f the 
Castle of Dublin. » _ 

[Another issue'; 42 '.pp. + 1 
leaf at end.] 



Same ; containing the sum 
of affairs in Ireland ; but 
more especially, the In- 
terest of Adventurers and 
Soldiers. 

[Another issue ; 40 pp.] 



Oratio Funebris Habita post 
Exuvias nuperi Reveren- 
dissimi in Christo Patris 
Johannis Archiepiscopi 
Armachani, Totius Hiber- 
nicB Primatis & Metro- 
politani, terrse mandatas 
xvi. Die Julii 1663. In 
Ecclesia Cathedrali S.S. 
& individus Trinitatis 
Dubhn. 

[T. leaf+i-38 pp.] 



4to 



4to 



{Ikl 



m 



4to 

(7TffX 

5j) 



For William 
Bladen 



JohnCrooke. K.P. 



T.C.D. (2copies),R.R 
pp. 6 (6) and P. gg. 
29/2 ; Inner Temple, 
2 copies, (122 I. B/io 
p. 26 and 139.) 



Kings Inns, (/S05/2) ; 
R.LA., (H.T. 82/8); 
R. R. Belshaw. 



Marsh's, (T. 3 5, 61) ; 
Brit. Mus. (2 copies); 
T.C.D. (3 copies), P 
nn. 48 ; P. kk. 47 ; 
and R.R. pp. 3. 



— 119 



Date 



Author 



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Size 



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1663 



Jeremy (Taylor), Bishop of I XPi:SIS TEAEIiiTlKH. 



I 'own 



Duke of Ormond 



do. 



do. 



Mrs. Katherine Phillips 
" The Matchless Orinda " 
Translator, &c. 



A Discourse of Confirma- 
tion For the use of the 
Clergy and Instruction of 
the People of Irela?id. 

[6 leaves + i - 90 pp. + i leaf 
of the Bookseller's adver- 
tisement.] 



Proclamation dated 21st May 



4to 



Do. dated 27th May, 1663 3 sh: 



Do. Dated 5th Aug., 1663 



Pompey — A Tragedy (from 
the French of Corneille). 

[3 leaves + i - So pp. + Epi- 
logue (by Sir Ed. Dering) 
I leaf. 



2 shs 



4to 
(Sfxsl) 



John Crooke,K.P. R.I.A./H.T. Box 82/11 ; 
Cashel Diocesan Li- 
brary ; T. C. D. (3 
copies.; 



Christ Church College, 
(Oxford.) 



John Crooke Kings Inns, (N. i, 27.) 



John Crooke 



Kings Inns, (N. i, 27.) 



J. Crooke, K.P. 



Bodleian, (Malone, 14) 



Dale 



Author 



ShurtT.Lle 



Printer 



Owner ur Rt;[i;rtricc 



1663 



The Right Revd. Jeremy 
(Taylor), Bishop of Down 
and Connor. 



The Abstract of the Claims 
of all Persons claiming as 
Innocents in the City and 
County of Dublin. 

[T. leaf + 2 pp. + Preface 
+ 64 PP-] 



A Sermon preached in 
Christ Church Dublin at 
the Funeral of The Most 
Reverend Father in God, 
John (Bramhall), late Lord 
Archbishop of Armagh and 
Primate of all Ireland. 
With A succint Narrative 
of his whole Life. 

[T. leaf + I - 14 pp.] 



An Exact Account of the 
daily Proceedings of the 
Commissionersoi Oyer and 
Terminer at York, against 
the late horrid and bloody 
Conspirators, With the 
particulars of what hath 
lately occurred in England, 
York, Jan. S. 



Mcrcurius Hibernicus ; or, 
The Irish Intelligencer (A 
Weekly Journal), 1 5 Nos. 



Fol. 
1 1- X 7i 



John Crook. K. P. Brit. Mus, (6503 i.) 



4to John Crooke,K.P, 
711+ 1" 



4to 
(7x5) 



4to 



R.I. A., (H.T. 82/7); 
T.CD., (P, hh. 26; 
Cashel Diocesan Li- 
brary; Sir J. T. Gil- 
be-t; E, R. McC. 
Dix, 



Printed for Sam. 
Dancer 



do. 



Lincoln's Inn. 



Worcester College (Ox- 
ford.) 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Owner or Reference 



■ 663 



Jeremy Taylor, D.D. (Lord 
Bishop of Down & Connor) 



Dr. Lightburne 



3 Sermons at Christ Cliurch, 
Dubhn, viz., The Right- 
eous Evangelical described. 
The Christian's Conquest 
over the body ot Sin, and 
Faith working by Love. 



The humble representation 
and petition of the Lords 
and Commons Assembled 
in Parliament concerning 
Romish Priests & Jesuits, 
presented to His Majesty 
by both Houses, with 
his Majesties Speech at 
the reception thereof, and 
His Gracious Answer 
thereunto. Together with 
a Proclamation command- 
ing all Jesuits and Popish 
Priests to depart this King- 
dom. 

[8 pp. Partly Black Letter.] 



Sermon at C/insl CtiurcJi 
on 23rd of October. 



8vo 



Vide Lowndes p. 2587 
(i2mo), and Sam. 
Dancer's advertise- 
ment (1663.) 



Fol. 
(10 X 6) 



Kings Inns, 553. 



4to 



For S. Dancer. 



A perfect Collection of Acts Fol. 
of the late Parliament, 
to be sold together or 
severally. 



Vide S. Dancer's Ad- 
vertisement (1663) at 
end of Taylor's "Dis- 
course of Confirma- 
tion," ante. 



do. 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1663 



All sorts of Proclamations. 



Jacobi Warei Equitis An- 
nales Henrici Octavo. 



The Lord Lieutenant's 
Speech to the Parliament. 



The Church Catechisme at 
id. for Children. 



The Counter-scuffle. 



Poems by Several Persons 
of Quality and refined 
wits. 



The Seven Wise Masters 



8vo 



8vo 



8vo 



4to 



Svo 



Vide S. Dancer's Ad' 
vertisement (1663), at 
end of Taylor's " Dis- 
course of Confirma. 
tion," ante. 



do. 



do 



do 



do. 



do. 



do 



— 123 — 



Date 



1663 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Owner or Reference 



The Acts of Custom and 
Excise with the Book of 
Rates to each of them an. 
nexed, in a small Pocket 
Volume for the use of 
Merchants and others. 



A Letter to a Person of 
Quality concerning the 
Traytor Leckey. 



4to 



The Accidence- 



Vide S. Dancer's Ad- 
vertisement (1663.) 



do. 



Sententije Pueriles. 



8\o 



Acts of Parliamjnt made 
XV Carol'. i 



Fol. 



do. 



do. 



do. 



124 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1664 



John Stearne, M & J.U.D. ' Aphorismi de Fcelicitate 



[11 leaves + i - 206 pp.] 
(3rd Edition) 



Sir James Ware 



Sir James Ware 



Jno. Jones, Trin. Coll. Soc. 



Rerum Hibernicarum 
Annales, Regnantibus 
Henrico VII., Henrico 
VIII., Edwardo VI., et 
Maria, Ab anno scil. 
Domini MCCCCLXXXV, 
ad annum MDLVIII. 

[3 leaves + 1-228 pp.] 



Venerabilis Bedae Episto- 
lae Duae, necnon Vitae 
Abbatum Wiremuthen- 
sium et Girwiensium. Ac- 
cessit Egberti Archiepis- 
copi Eboracensis Bedae 
aequalis Dialogus, De 
Ecclesiastica Institutione 

[7 leaves + i - 136 pp.] 



Threnodia in Obitum Hon- 
oratissimi Wentworthii 
KildariaeComittis Baronis 
de Ophalia &c. 

(Fitzgerald Wentworth, 1 7th 
Earl of Kildare) 

[i 6 pp. ; I or 2 leaves want- 
ing] 



8vo. 
3*) 



Fol. 
(nix 

7rV) 



John Crook, K.P. 



do.. 



8vo. 
(si X 3i) 



do. 



4t0. 
(7i X 51) 



do. 



Bodleian ; Marsh's, E. 
3.5.28; T.C.D., EE 
n. 50; E. R. McC 
Dix; Cashel Diocesan 
Lib)'.; Sir J. T. 
Gilbert 



Sir J. T. Gilbert; 
Marsh's, N. 2. 4. 5. 
(11 1 X 7|); King's 
Inns; Worth Li by. ; 
Bodleian; Public 
Library, Armagh; 
T.C.D., P. b. 13; 
Merton College, Ox- 
ford ; Cashel Dioce- 
san Liby ; J. Collins; 
R.I.A., 30. II ; Natl. 
Liby. (Joly Collec- 
tion); E. R. McC. Dix 

T.C.D. (i2mo. cut 
down), RR. 0. 98 ; 
Faculty of Advocates 
Library ; Brit. Mus. 
(3 copies) ; Marsh's, 
D. 2. 6. 16. Bod- 
leian (2 copies) 80. 
A. 19 Th. B. S. and 
Wood 183 (4) 



T.C.D., P. hh. 26/No 
2 



125 — 



Date Author Short Title 


Size 


Printer Owner or Re:crence 


1664 


Jeremy (Taylor) Bishop of 
Down 


A Dissuasive from Popery 
to the People of Ireland 

[8 leaves + i - i 74 pp. + 
I leaf] 


4to. 
(7l X 6) 


JohnCrooke, K.P. 


R.I.A., RR (13 D. 

15) ; Lough Fea ; St. 
Canice's Liby., Kil- 
kenny ; T.C.D., RR 
00. 3S; E. R. McC. 
Dix; 




Dudley Loftus 

/ 


L'Oratione Del'Eccellentis- 
simo Signore Giacobo 
Duca i' Ormondia, Sig- 
nore Luogotenente Regio 
D'Irlanda. Fatta 27 di 
Settembre, 1662 &c., &c. 
(Speech of the Duke of 
Ormond translated into 
Italian) 

[4 leaves + i - 16 pp. Sig. 
B repeated twice] 


4to. 

(7i X 5t) 


John Crook, K.P. 


T.C.D., P.A. 4. I. No. 
8 ; Bodleian, Mar. 
129. 






Constitutions and Canons 
Ecclesiastical treated upon 
by the Archbishops and 
Bishops and the rest of 
the clergy of Ireland, ifec. 
(in 1634) 

[4 leaves + 1-94 pp ] 


4to. 
(7i X Sh) 


JohnCrooke, K.P. 


R. R. Belshaw; Brit 
Mus., 109. a. 40 ; 
R.LA.,/HT. Box 83/6 






A Memorial delivered to 
His Majestic from the 
Lord Vangogh, Ambassa- 
dorfromtheStates General 
of the United Provinces. 
With the answer which His 
Sacred Majestie Returned 
thereto 

[16 pp.] 


4to. 
(7i X 5i) 


Printed for Samuel 
Dancer 


T.C.D., Gall. 3 C. 
19. 19. 



— 126 



Date 


Author 


Sh^rt Title i Size 


1 

Printer 


Owner or Reference 


1664 


Sir John Davies 


Historical Relations ; Or 
a Discovery Of the true 
causes why Ireland Was 
never entirely subdued nor 
brought under obedience 
of the Crown of England 
until the beginning of the 
reign of King /antes of 
happy memory 

2nd Edition. 

[4 leaves + 256 pp.] 


Svo. 


Printed for S. 
Dancer 


Brit. Mus. (2 copies) 
C. 21. b. (2) &c. ; R. 
R. Belshaw; Queen's 
College, Oxford ; Ch. 
Ch. College, Oxford. 
(l2mo.) 


») 


Nathaniel Henshaw, M.D. 


Aero Chalinos, or a Regis- 
ter for the Air 

[6 leaves + 1-98 pp.] 


8vo. 




E. R. McC. Dix; 
T.C.D., K. m. 26 & 
K. nn. 13 (2 copies) 


)i 


George Rust, D.D., and 
Dean of Connor 


A Sermon Preached at New- 
town the 23 of Octob. 
1663, at the Funeral of the 
Rt. Hon. Hiigk Earl of 
Mount - Alexander, Lord 
Viscount iMountgomery of 
ArJs, late Master of the 
Ordnance, etc. etc. 

[40 pp.] 


4to. 
(7i X 6) 


John Crooke 


T.C.D., P. dd. 10/33 


ti 


— 


The Book of Common 
Prayer. 


— 




Vide Dr. Reeves's 
Pamphlets and Sale 
Catalogue of W. B. 
Kelly, p. 8 but 
query 


n 




The Psalter or Psalms of 
David after the Transla- 
tion of the Great Bible, 
pointed as they are to be 
said or sung 

[Title leaf -(- i - 178 pp.] 

N. B.— The date of this 
publication is given as 
1663 by Watt in his Biblio. 
Brit. Query 2 Editions ? 


4to. 

(7i X 

5i) 


John Crook, K.P. 


E. R. McC. Dix; 
T.C.D. ; Brit. Mus. 
(see 1668) 



— 12/ 



Date 


Author 


Short Title 


Size 


Printer 


Owner or I^:ference 


1665 


The Very Revd. Roger 


Inquisitio in fidem Chris- 


8vo 


John Crook 


T.C.D. (3 copies), F. 




Boyle, S.T.D. (Dean of 


tianorum hujus saeculi. 


(S|x3i) 




0. 6, &c. ; Bodleian ; 




Cork — afterwards Bishop 








E. R. McC. Dix 




of Clogher) 


[104 pp.] 






(folds in fours) 


)i 


Sir James Ware 


De Prsesuhbus Hibernije, 


Fol. 


John Crook, K.P. 


Sir J. T. Gilbert; 






Commentarius. A prima 


("J X 




Marsh's, G. 3, 2, 11 






Gentis Hibernicje ad Fi- 


7'V) 




("fx?!), 2 copies; 






dem Christianam Conver- 






Kings Inns, NN. 104 






sione ad Nostra usque 






a (4to); Public Li- 






Tempera. 






brary, Armagh ; 
Worth Liby. ; Bod. 






[6 leave.s + i - 284 pp.] 






leian; Derry, &c. Die. 
Liby. ; T.C.D., G, e. 
25, (fee. (4 copies); 
Merton College; J. 
Collins; Natl. Liby. 
(Joly Collection.) 




Ambrose White 


An Almanack and Prog- 


8vo 


N. T. (Nathaniel 


T.C.D., V. 00. 55 (in- 






nostication for the year of 


(six 30 


Thompson) 


terleaved copy.) 






our Lord, 1665, &c. 












[15 leaves ; unpaged. Ap. 












pendix of 8 leaves with 












separate title page.] 










Charles II. 


An Act for the Explaining 


Fol. 


John Crook, K.P. 


R.I.A.; Bodleian, Law 






of some Doubts Arising 


(lolx 




Room; T.C.D., V. 






upon An Act intituled. 


61) 




dd. 34/2; Kings Inns, 






An Act for the better exe- 




' 


H. H. II (iix6f); 






cution of His Majesties 






Marsh's, E4. 3, 20 






gracious Declaration for 






(wants T. leaf.) 






the Settlement of His 












Kingdome of Ireland, and 












Satisfaction of the several 












interests of Adventurers, 












Souldiers, and others, his 












subjects there. 












[Black Letter; 152 pp.] 









I2« — 



Date 



Author 



1665 I W. S. ; B. D. (William 
j Sheridan) Chaplain to Sir 
Maurice Eustace 



John Jones, A.M. 



Short Title 



A Sermon preach'd at the 
Funeral of the Right 
Honorable Sir Maurice 
Eustace ; Knt. ; Late Lord 
Chancelor of Ireland at 
St. Patrick's Dublin the 
fifth day of July 1665 
togr with a short account 
of his Life & Death 

[2 leaves + 40 pp.] 



Oratio Funebris H;ibita In 
Aula CoUegii S S & Invi- 
duae Trinitatis, Coram 
Academia, Judicibus, & 
clero inter celebrandas ex- 
equias Insignissimi viri 
Mauritii Eustace Equitis 
Aurati Hiberniae Cancel- 
larii Ejusdemque olim 
Regni Justitiarii, 5° Julii 
1665 



N.B.- 



[8 pp.] 
-Annexed to above. 



The Book of Common 
Prayer 

[No pagination ; Title leaf 
+ Sigs a e in fours + A 2 
in threes + (a) & (b) in 
fours + A — Fff in Fours] 



4 to. 
8x6|) 



Printer 



John Crook, K.P. 



Owner or Reference 



R. R. Belshaw ; Marsh's, 
A3- 5-8. 



4to. 
(8 X 6|) 



4to. 
(7l X si) 



R. R. Belshaw; Marsh's, 
A. 3- 5. 8 



John Crook, K.P. 



T.C.D., Press B. 4. 3 ; 
E. R. McC. Dix, 
(imperfect) ; 



129 



Date 



Aathor 



[ 665 I Sir Audley Mervyn 



Shjrt Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Rt-iL-rence 



A Speech delivered to the 
Duke of Ormond Lord 
Lieutenant &c. (No\-. 7th) 



Fol. 



Narrative of E d m o n d 
N angle of Cloandaran 

[16 pp., last blank] 



4to. 
H X 5-i) 



John Crook 



Rules, Orders & Directions 
by the Lord Lieutenant 
& Council for the regulat- 
ing of Cities & Walled 
Towns in Ireland 



8vo. 



N.B.— Title page 
wanting but 
judged to be 
Dublin printed 
Fide headpiece, 
&c. 



Bodleian, G. Pamp. 
12220/32; Corpus 
Christi, Oxford; 



Nat. Liby. (Thorpe 
Collection) lo^. V. 



Vide Sir Chas. Coote's) 
Sale Catalogue (p. 45) 
in Nat. Liby. 



— 130 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1666 



Francis Clarke (or Gierke), 
Edited by the Rev. Thos. 
Bladen, S.T.D., Dean of 
Ardfert 



4to. 
(7i X SiV 



John Crcok, K.P. 



4to. 
(7i X 5f) 



Nathaniel 
Thompson 



A Form of Consecration or 
Dedication of Churches & 
Chappels, Together with 
What may be used in the 
Restaurations of Ruined 
Churches & Expiation of 
Churches Desecrated or 
Profaned 

[T. leaf +1 — 40 pp.] 



Praxis Fr.mcisci Clarke 
Jam jus dicentibus quam 
alijs omnibus, qui in Foro 
Ecclesiastico versantur 
apprime utilis. 

[12 leaves + i — 428 pp.] 



La Liturgie. C'est a dire i2mo. John Crooke, K.P. 
le Formulaire des Prieres (si x 3j) 
Publiques de L'Eglise 
d'Ireland 

[140 pp.; first 3 leaves not 
numbered ; Sig. A.4, = 
paged 7 & 8 — Last page 
blank.] 



T.C.D., (2 copies) P. 
dd. 24 ; Magdalen 
College, Oxford; 
Marsh's , T3. 4. 9 



R.LA., 19. A. 12. RR 
Bodleian; E.R.McC. 
Dix; R. R. Belshaw; 
T.C.D., (4 h. 29) 
King's Inns E, 9. 
Marsh's, 02.5. 45 



Rules, Orders, and direc- 
tions, appointed by his 
Majesties Comrs. for Ex- 
ecuting the Act of Settle- 
ment And the Act of Ex- 
planation of the same, to 
be observed by all persons 
concerned before them. 
Dated 5 Jan., 1666. 

[12 pp.] 



Fol. 

(i of X 

6i) 



John Crook, K.P. 



Rev. J. P. Mahaffy, 
S.F., T.C.D. 



TC.D., V. dd. 34 



131— 



Date 



Aulhor 



Short Title 



Size • 



Printer 






Owner or Rei'erence 



1666 



[..] 



The Lord Lieutenant & Order in Council dated gth 



Council 



Charles H. 



Michael ^Harward, 
math 



Philo- 



Dr. Faithful Teat 



April, 1666 

[10 pp. + I leaf.] 



His Majesties Most Graci- 
ous Speech to both Houses 
of Parliament, On Friday 
the 8th ol February , 1666, 
At their Prorogation With 
the Speech of S : Edw. 
Tumor, Kt., Speaker of 
the Honourable House of 
Commons, To the King's 
most Excellent Majesty. 
Delivered on Friday the 
Eight Day of February, 
1666. Upon the Proro- 
gation of the Parliament. 



[8 pp.] 



A Prognostication for the 
Year of Our Lord God 
1666 together with an 
exact Accompt of the 
Principal Highways and 
Fairs in the Kingdom of 
Ireland 



A Discourse Grounded On 
Prov. 12. 5. The 
Thoughts of the Right- 
eous are Right, &c. 
In two parts. 



[478 pp.] 



Fol. 
6|) 



John Crook, K.P. 



Marsh's, E4. 3. 20/3 



4to. 

7ix5i) 



John Crooke , E. R. McC. Dix. 



John Crook, K.P. 



I 2mo. I Nath. 
(sl X 31) 



Thompson 



Vide Evans's "Histori- 
cal (fee. Account of 
Almanacks," &c.p. 16 
& Sir Wm. Wilde's 
" Closing years of 
Dean Swift's Life," 
(2nd Edn.), p. 126 



R. R. Belshaw 



133 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1666 



Francis Gierke (Published 
by Dr. Thos. Bladen) 



Sir John Davis, H.M. 
Attorney Genl. for Ireland 



John Ogilby 



Praxis Curiae Admiralita- 
tis Angliae 



A Compleat Index to the 
Act of Settlement And 
To the Explanatory Act 
of Settlement Whereby 
The Reader may at first 
sight know the several 
concerns and the differ- 
ences between the said 
Acts. As likewise by the 
marks Ex. & N. whatso- 
ever of the first Act is 
already Executed, or made 
Null by the Explanatory 
Act. 

[Title leaf -I- 1 — 18 leaves 
unpaged.] 



Historical Relations or A 
Discovery of the true 
causes why Ireland was 
never entirely subdued 
&c. &c. The 3rd Edition 
corrected and amended. 

[2 leaves -f i — 256 pp.] 



The Book of Common 
Prayer & Administration 
of the Sacraments & other 
rites & ceremonies of the 
Church according to the 
use of the Church of Ire- 
land, 

with 
ThePsalter(i664) 



Works of Virgil 



Fol. 
(ioix6i) 



John Crook, K.P. 



8vo. 
(5l ^ %\) 



4to. 



Vide Woods' Athen. 
Oxon. Vol. I. Col. 
657- 



R.I.A., 33 F.I. ; King's 
Inns /HH. 1 1. ( 1 1 x 
6J); Bodleian, Law 
Roorn. 



For S. Dancer 



John Crooke, K.P. 



T.C.D., R Ro. 93 & 
RRmm 85 (2 copies); 
Brit. Mus., 601. d. 6. 



Brit. Mus.,C. 36. e. i ; 
Lanhydrock. 



Vide Title page in 
Bagford Collection in 
Brit. Mus.- 



— 133 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1666 



Charles II. 



His Majestie's Most Graci- 
ous Speech to both 
Houses of Parliament the 
1 8th day of Jany. 1666 
With the Speech of Sir 
Edwd. Turner, Knt., 
Speaker of the Hon. 
House of Commons to 
the King's Most Excellent 
Majestie. Delivered on 
Friday the i8th day of 
Jan. I 666. 

[8 pp.] 



4to. ! 



John Crooke ! King's Inns /553. 



134 



Date 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1667 



The Right Revd. Henry 
(Jones) Bishop of Meath. 



A Sermon Preached at the 4to. 
Consecration of the Right j (7 J x 5I) 
Reverend Father in God [ 
Ambrose Lord Bishop of 
Kildarein Christ Church, 
Dublin, June 29, 1667. 

(24 leaves + i — 42 pp. + 
I leaf Errata, &c.) 



John Crook, K.P. 



Conly Cassin (Conlis Cas- Willisius Male Vindicatus [ 12 mo. I 
sinius Ossorieinsi Hiber- sive Medicus Oxoniensis (6 x 3t) 
nio, M.D.) Mendacitatis et inscitaie 

detectus. 

[3 leaves + 328 pp.] 



T.C.D., P. dd. 30, & 
P. ff. I. (2 copies); 
E. R. McC. Dix ; R. 
R. Belshaw 



John (Lesley) Bishop of 
Clogher. 



Revd. 
A.M. 



Lemuel Mathews, 



Articles to be enquired of 
by the Churchwardens & 
Questmen of every Parish 
in the next Visitation to 
be made &c, 

[12 pp.] 



A Pindarique (Elegie) upon 
the death of Jeremye 
(Taylor) late Bishop of 
Doune Connor and 
Dromore 

[14 pp.] 



4to. JohnCrooke,K.P. 
(H X 6) 



4to. 



Brit. Mus. 775. b. 22 : 
Bodleian (8vo.) 



T.C.D., P, ff, I. 



Brit. Mus., II, L26 bb. 
26 



— 135 



Author 



Short Title 



Owner or Reference 



1667 



Peter Butler, S.J.B. 



The Revd. George 
(Dean of Connor) 



Rust 



i.n 



The Ghost of Trenchard's 
Northern Revolutions. 



8vo. 



4to. 



4to. 



Oratio in inauguratione D 
Petri Butler Sacrae Theo- 
logiae Baccalaurei pro 
Admissione ad eundem 
gradum in Academia Dub- 
liniensi. 

[8 pp.] 



A Sennon at the Funeral 
of the Rt, Rev. Jeremy 
Taylor, Bishop of Down, 
Connor & Droniore. 



A Collection of Such of the 16 mo. 
Orders heretofore used in (5f x 3 J) 
Chancery. With such 
Alterations and Additions 
thereunto, as Michael, 
IvOrd Arch-bishop of 
Dublin, Lord Chancellour 
oi Ireland, Hath thought 
fit at present to ordain, 
&c. 



Vide Sale Catalogue of 
the Hon. Denis Daly's 
Library (1792) (p. 32, 
item 410) 



ex Typographia I 
Windsor. 



T.C.D. (P. 

n) 



gg. 29 No. 



[36 pp. X 6 leaves.] 



JohnCrooke, K.P. 



Vide Harris's \Vare's 
"Writers of Ireland,"; 
P- 348 



E. R, McC. Dix 



- 136 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1668 Valentine Greatrakes 



A Brief Account of Mr. 
Valentine Greatrak's And 
divers of the Strange Cures 
By him lately Performed. 
— Written by himself in a 
Letter to the Honourable 
Robert Boyle Esq. — 
Whereunto are annexed 
the Testimonials &c &c 

[96 pp.] 



The Book of Common 
prayer &c. &c. according 
to the use of the Church 
of England and Ireland. 

[Nearly all Black Letter ; 
not paged] 

with 
The Psalter &c. 



(See 1664,) 



A League of Union betwixt 
His Majestie, and the 
Estates General of the 
United Provinces of the 
Low-Countreys ; For an 
Effecatious Mediation of 
Peace between the Two 
Neighbouring Crowns now 
in War. 

[8 pp.] 



A Perpetual League of Mu- 
tual Defence and Allyance 
Between His Majesty, and 
the Estates General of 
the United Provinces of 
the Low-Countries : To- 
gether with a Confirma- 
tion of the Articles of 
Commerce, agreed upon 
by the Treaty of Breda. 



[8 pp.] 



4to 

61? X 

5f) 



(61 



{8ix6i) 



4to 
(7ix 
5x\) 



Printed for Saml 
Dancer 



John Crook, K.P. 



Brit. Mus. 14 1 6, h. 5; 
E. R. McC. Dix. 



Brit. Mus. 3408 e. 28. 



John Crooke, K.P. 



4to 
{7ixsi) 



John Crooke, K.P. 



T.C.D., P. gg.29/9J 
Kmgs Inns, 553. 



Kings Inns 553. 



— 137 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1669 



Dudley Loftus, J.U.D. 



Charles II, 



The Case of Ware and 
Sherley as it was set forth 
in matter of Fact And 
argued in several points 
of Law in the Consistory 
of Diihliii in Michaelmas 
Term 1668 

[34 PP-]. 
with 

The case of Mrs. Mary 
Ware and lames Shirly ; 
As it was argued, Relating 
to the several points of 
Law incident unto, and 
emergent thereout by 
Dudley Loftus.L. L.D. in 
the consistory Court be- 
fore Dr. William Buckley^ 
Chancellor to the Arch 
Bishop of Dublin, in 
Michaelmas tearm 1668 

[PP' 3S"94 + I leaf errata; 
Sigs. and pagination oi 
both continuous through- 
out, but separate title 
pages] 



Irish Statutes, XIII Car. II. 
to XVIII Car. II. (8 May 
1661— 8 Aug. 1666) 

[4 leaves + XV Car. II. 
(8 leaves) + 1-142 pp.] 



Do. Do. Ann XV. 
(Black Letter.) 



4to 
(7,', X Sf) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Brit. Mus, ; Bodleian ; 
Lough Tea; T.C.D, 
(P.kk. 47) ; Lanhyd- 
rock ; National Li- 
brary (Joly Pamphlets) 



Fol- Benjamin Tooke, 
(lof X K.P. 
7i) 



Fol. 



Count Plunkett; R.I.A. 
(37 F. 19) 



Count Plunkett ; Brit. 
Mus„ 1241, K. 2. 



- 138- 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



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1669 



Lt. Col. Wm. Mercer 



Dr. Edwd. AVoUey, Bishop 
of Clonfert 



Constitutions and Canons 
Ecclesiastical, treated 
upon by the Archbishops 
and Bishops and the rest 
of the Clergy of Ireland 
& agreed upon in the 
Synod begun at Dublin 
Anno Dom. 1634, &c. &c. 

[Title page and table 6 pp. 
+ 1-60 pp.] 



A "Welcome in a Poem to 
His Excellency John Lord 
Roberts, Baron of Truro, 
Ld. Lieut. Genl. & Genl. 
Governor of Ireland &c, 
&c. 



[20 leaves.] 



Address to the Noncon- 
formists 



O Tvirog or the Pattern of 
Grace and Glory in Our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ To be admired, 
adored and imitated. Col- 
lected out of the Holy 
Scripture, &c. &c. 

[i6 leaves, Sigs. A-E 2 -f 
184 pp. + 3 leaves.] 

Sigs. A — Ff2 in fours, save 
D in twos and E in twos 
(repeated). 



4to 
(7fx5i) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



R. R. Belshaw ; T.C.D,, 
RR. pp. 6/4; Worth 
Liby. ; Cashel Dioces- 
an Liby. ; E. R. McC. 
Dix. 



4to 
(Sixfif) 



Josiah Windsor 



4to 
(6f X 5) 



Josiah Windsor (in 
Castle St.) 



Brit. Mus., II, 632, d. f. 
9 ; Huth Liby. 



Fi de Sotheby's Sale 
Catalogue, 1898. 



Marsh's, (R. 3. 5. 11). 



139 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Prir.tcr 



O A ner or Reference 



1669 O'Gilby 



Translation of Homer, 2 
Vols. 

(Plates &c. by Faithorne.) 



Charles II, 



His Majesties Speech with 
the Lord Keepers to both 
Houses of Parliament Oct. 
19, 1669, &c. &c. 

[10 pp.J 



Large 
Paper 



Folio 
lojx 6) 



Benjamin Tooke 



Vide Sale Catalogue of 
Library of Wni. Elliot 
Hudson, 1853. 



King's Inns, 553. 



I40 — 



Date 



Autho 



Short Title 



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1670 



[The Vy. Rev. Arthur Stan- 
hope, L.L.D. Dean of 
Waterford] 



Thomas Jenner 



Dr. Edwd. Wolley, Bishop 
of Clonfert. 



[Dudley Loftus (?)] 



Joseph Teate, Dean of St. 
Canice's, Kilkenny 



The Bishop of Waterford's 
case with the Mayor and 
Sheriffs of Waterford 
stated & Vindicated. 

[2 leaves + 1- 132 pp.] 

Verso of p. 131 blank. 



4to 
(8i X 6|) 



Quakerism Anatomised and 
Confuted: S:c. &c, 

Folds in eights 

[20 leaves + 220 pp.] 



O Ti/TTOE or the Pattern of 
Grace and Glory &c. &c. 

[2nd Edition or Issue] 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K,P. 



1 2 mo. 
(6 X 3l) 



4to 
(6Jx4 



Noplaceorprinter 
but like Dublin 
printing 



Reductio Litium ad arbi- 4to 
trium boni viri, &c. (7J x 5J) 

[4 leaves, last blank] 



A Sermon Preached at the 
Cathedral Church of St. 
Canice Kilkenny, Feby. 
27, 1669. 

[3leaves+i-56pp.] 



4to 
(7ix5i) 



No place or printer 
but like Dublin 
printing 



T.C.D. (2 copies) HH, 
gg. 21, &c. ; King's 
Inns, (505); R.I.A. 
/H.T., 85/12, 



Brit. Mus. ; Natl. Liby. 



Vide Title page in Bag- 
ford's Collection Vol. 
5919 No. 315 in 
Brit. Mus. 



T.CD. (P. gg. 29) 



Benjamin Tooke 
K.P. 



R.I. A./H.T. 85/7; Cor- 
pus Christi College, 
Oxford ; Brit. Mus. 
447S K. I (i) 



141 — 



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I 



1670 



Charles II. 



Sir Edwd. Turner, Knt., 
Speaker of House of 
Commons. 



Speech to both Houses of 
Parliament with the Lord 
Keepers, On Monday 
February 14, 1669-70 

[8 pp.] 



Speech to the King on nth 
April, 1670 upon the ad- 
journment of Parliament 

[8 pp.] 



4to 
(7ix5i) 



4to 
{7jx6) 



Benjamin Tooke 



Do, 



Kings Inns, 553 



Kings Inns 553. 



— 142 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



1671 



Emmanuel Alvarus 



Prosodia ; sive Institutio- 
num linguae Latinae Li- 
ber quartus 

[i— 136 pp.] 



8vo 
(5ii X 3l) 



D.L., L.D., Vicar General 
(Dudley Loftus) 



Size 



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Speech delivered at a Visita- 
tion held in the Diocese 
of Clogher sede Vacante. 
Septr. 27. 16 7 1 &c. 

[3 leaves + 1 — 14 pp.] 



Fol. 
(7x5*) 



Robert Ware 



The Examinations of the 
faithful Cummin & Thomas 
Heath 



Ezekiel Hopkins, 
Bishop of Raphoe 



D.D. 



A Sermon preached at 
Christ Church in Dublin 
Jany, 31 1669 

[a leaves + 1 — 48 pp.] 



Samuel Mather 



' A Defence of the Protestant 
Religion in answer to 
i , " Fiat Lux " 



4to 

(7 X Si) 



4to 



" Typi'5 Regiis et 
impensis Mariae 
Crooke." 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



T.C.D., DD. h. 53. 



Lough Fea; T.C.D. 
P. nn. 48 (epitaph .in- 
serted between sigs 
A & A2 ;) (much cut 
down.) 



Vide Watts' Biblio, 
Brit., col. 949. 5. 



R. R. Belshaw; T.C.D., 
P. dd. 30 & P. nn 
48 (2 copies) ; Cor- 
pus Christi College, 
Oxford ; 



Vide Harris's Ware's 
Writers, Bk. I., p. 
346 ; vide Diet, of 
Natl. Biography and 
W o o d s' A t h e n. 
(Oxon.), Vol. 3, Coll. 
942. 



— 143 



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1671 



Lord Berkeley, Ld. Lt. & 
Council 



[„?J 



[Arthur Stanhope, L.L.D., 
Dean of Waterford] 



Charles II 



Proclamation dated 9th Oct. 

[Broadside, printed on one 
side only.] 



Episcopal Jurisdiction asser- 
ted, According to the right 
Constitution thereof by 
His I\'Iajesties Laws, &c. 
occasioned By the Stating 
and Vindicating of the 
Bishop of VVaterford's 
Case, With the Mayor 
and Sheriffs of Waterford. 

N.B. — This is the same as 
" The Bishop of Water- 
ford's case" (Stanhope), 
1670, save that the title 
page is different, and verso 
of p. 131 has errata, &c., 
and a single leaf (unpaged), 
with Imprimatur on recto, 
is inserted before p. 1. No 
date is given. 



Declaration against the 
States General of the 
United Provinces &c. 



[8 pp.] 



An Elegy and Funeral Ora- 
tion on the death of the 
Revd. R. Lingard, Dean 
of Lismore & Public Pro- 
fessor of Divinity 



3 shs. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



4to 



4to 
(7ix6) 



Pol. 



do. 



King's Inns, (N. i. 27.) 



Emmanuel College, 
Cambridge. (2. 4.61.); 
Lambeth ;E.R.McC. 
Dix (much cropped) ; 
R.I.A., H.T. S6/2 
(fragment only). 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



King's Inns, 553. 



Vide Cotton's Fasti 
V. 25. 



— 144 — 



Dak; 1 Author 


ShDrt Tide 


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1 
1672 


The Lord Lieutenant 


Orders, Rules & Instruc- 


4t0. 


Benjamin Tooke, 


Bodleian ; E.R. McC. 




General, and General 


tions To be observed 


(7* X St) 


K.P. 


Dix; 




Governour of Irelan d 


by the Muster-master 
General, and Cleark of the 
Checques, the Comp- 
troller of the Musters and 
Checques, and Commis- 
saries of the Musters of 
His Majesty's Forces in 
Ireland and all others 
whom the same doth or 
shall in any way concern, 
for the better preventing 
of any deceipts that may 
be practised in the Army, 
and to render the same 
full and effectual for His 
Majesties Service 

[24 PP-] 










H. D. signed to Epis. Ded. 


Two letters of Advice, I. 


Svo. 


do. 


Natl. Liby. ; D e r r y , 




[Henry Dodwell, M.A.] 


For the Susception of 
Holy Orders. II. For 


(6i X 3f) 




etc, Dio. Liby.; 
T.C.D.,(LL.mm. 32); 




Studies Theological, 






Bodleian; E. R. 






especially such as are 






McC. Dix. 






Rational. At the end of 












the former, is inserted, a 












catalogue of the Christian 












Writers and genuine works 












that are extant of the first 












three centuries 












[28 leaves (Title P, Epistle 












Ded., Preface to Readers, 












& Contents) -i- 1 — 300 pp.] 










The Earl of Essex, Lord 


Rules, Orders and Direc- 


Fol. 


Benjamin Tooke, 


Christ Church Library; 




Lieut. & Council 


tions made and estab- 
lished by the Lord Lieu- 
tenant & Council, for the 
better Regulating of all 


(" X 7l) 


K.P. 


Brit. Mus. 1243. I ; 
T.C. D. (2 copies) 
Press A. 1/4 & V g. 
3 ; Kings Inns (N.i. 
27); 






such Cities Walled-Towns 










and Corporations within 












this Kingdom of Ireland. 












And the Electing of 












Magistrates & OfBcers 












there, &c. 










1 


[12 pp.J 









145 — 



Date 



Short Title 



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1672 



The Earl of Essex, Lord 
Lieut. & Council 



Lord Lieut. (Essex) & 
Council 



John Stearne, M.D. 



Like "made & established 
* * * for the better Regu- 
lating the several Cities, 
Walled-Towns, and Cor- 
porations of Cork, Water- 
ford, Ki/igsa/e, } 'oHghall, 
Cashell, ClonmeU, Athlotie, 
Londonderry, Carrigfer- 
gus, Cokrain, Sirabane, 
Charkmont, Trym, Dtm- 
dalke, Kilkenny, Wexford 
& Ross in the Co. of 
Wexford, and the Elect- 
ing of Magistrates & Offi- 
cers there. 

[18 pp. Sigs A-C2 + I leaf,] 



(Proclamation or Order 
for) raising such a Sum 
of Money as may be Suffi- 
cient to Buy off Several 
Estates and Interests & 
how it was Proportioned 



De Obstinatione. Opus 
Postumus Pietatem Christ- 
iana stoicam, scholastico 
more, suadens. Prsfixa 
sunt Prolegomena Apolo- 
getica De usu dogmatum 
Philosophicorum praeci- 
pu^ Stoicorum, in Theo- 
logia, &c. [by Henry 
Dodwell] 

[The "Prolegomena" comes 
immediately after the ist 
(or joint) Title page. 

Collation = 6 leaves (un- 
numbered) -Hi — 282 pp. 
-f I leaf of Errata, with 
verso blank 

" De Obstinatione " has a 
separate Title page. 

Collation = 6 leaves + 1 — 
399 pp. (reverse of last 
page bluik) -I- 4 leaves 
(Index) 

The Signatures of each are 
are separate] 



Fol. 
(Ill- > 



Fol. 



4to. 

(Sm.) 

(sl X 3l) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Kings Inns N.1.27 ; 
Pub. Rec. Off. South- 
well MSS. 157/1. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



From J. Sullivan's Sale 
Catalogue of Rev. 
Jas. Graves' Liby. 
(1887), p. 22, item 371 



Bodleian; Marsh's 
(P. I. 7. 23);T.C.D. 
(F. o. 1; & CC. pp. 
32); Derry, etc., Dio. 
Liby. 



N.B. — The " Prolegomena" may have been also published separately. 



146 



Date 



1672 



Dr. Faithful Tate (or Teate) 



Richard Berry, M.A, 



[..?] 



Short Title 



Meditations 



A Sermon upon the Epiph- 
any preach't at Christ 
Church in Dublin, 1672 

[T.P. + 32 pp.] 



Size 



8vo. 



4to. 



Printer 



(7|x5|-) K.P. 



Benjamin Tooke, 



An Act for Settling the Sub- 
sidy of Poundage, And 
Granting a Subsidy of 
Tunnage. And other sums 
of money unto His Royal 
Majesty, His Heirs and 
Successors ; The same to 
be paid upon Merchan- 
dizes Imported and Ex- 
ported into or out of 
the Kingdom of Ireland 
according to a Boak of 
Rates hereunto annexed 

[395 PP- + '° leaves (index). 
Folds in fours.] 

N.B.— The date on Title 
page is not quite distinct, 
but 1677 seems the correct 
date, judging from internal 
evidence 



i6mo. 
{si X 3i) 



Owner or Reference 



Vide Harris's Ware's 
' Writers,' p. r62; and 
Watts' Biblio. Brit. 



T.C.D., P. hh. 2/9 &c. 
( 2 copies) ; R. R. 
Belshaw ; Bodleian, 
C. 7 15. Line. 



Benjamen Took 
and John Crook 
K.P's. 



Sir J. T. Gilbert 



— 147 — 



Shjrt Title 



1672 



Dionysius Syrus (Dudley 
Loftus, Translator) 



Sir Ellis Leighton, Knt. 



The Rev. Samuel Hinde, 
D.D. 



Charles II. 



Arthur Capel, ist Earl of 
Essex, Lord Lieutenant, 
General, & General 
Governor of Ireland 



The Exposition of Diony- 
sius Syrus. Written above 
900 years since on the 
Evangelist, St. Mark. 
Wherewith are bound 
several other Tracts of the 
same author, &, an An- 
cient Syriaclv Scholia on 
the Four Evangelists. As 
also some Persian, Ar- 
menian, and Greek an- 
tiquities. Translated as 
aforesaid, &c. 

[T. leaf -I- 1-224 PpO 



The Speech ■* * « * at the 
Tholsell of Dubhn, April 
the 4th, 1672. 



[8 pp.] 



A Sermon Preach't before 
the Rt. Honble. the Lord 
Mayor of the City of Dub- 
lin, And the Rest of the 
Society of the City & 
Co. Palatine of Chester 
And of the Co. Palatine 
of Chestershire. 

[3 leaves -1- 34 pp -h i leaf.] 



His IVIajestie's Declaration 
against the States General 
of the United Provinces 
of the Low-Countreys. 

(8 pp.) 



Laws <& Ordinances of 
War, established for the 
good conduct of His 
Majestie's Army in Ire- 
land. 

[30 PP-] 



Size 



Owner or Reference 



4tO. 

(7lfx 
Si) 



do. 
(7fx6) 



4to. 

(7iVx 

Sii) 



4to. 
(7jx6) 



4to. 
(7ix5|) 



(For Joseph 
Wilde) 



R.LA., 19 A. 7/RR, 
Halliday Books, (Sub 
title between pp. 194 
and 195) ; Bodleian; 
Brit. Mus. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



do 



do. 



do. 



Bodleian ; Christ Ch., 
Oxford ; Sir J. T. Gil- 
bert. 



Marsh's (S. 3. 3. 10/2. 



King's Inns (269 
Parap.) 



Advocates, p. 64. 



— I4-8 — 



Date Author 


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[1672] 


S. M. {Samuel Mather) 


A Defence of the Protest- 
ant Christian Rehgion 
against Popery : in an- 
swer to a discourse of a 
Roman CathoHc, (fee. 


4to. 




Brit. Mus., 3936 bbb 
16 (Col. 147). 


»; 





Two Letters one from the 
States General to his Most 
Christian Majestic. The 
other from His Most 
Christian Majestie to the 
States General. 

[8 pp.] 


4to. 
(7ix6) 


Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 


Kings Inns, (553.) 


- 


Charles II. 


His Majestie's Most Gra- 
cious Speech Together 
with the Lord Chancel- 
lor's, to Both Houses of 
Parliament. To which is 
added His Lordship's 
several Speeches ; as also 
those of Sir Job Charle- 
ton, At His Admission of 
Speaker to the Honour- 
able House of Commons, 
Delivered at the opening 
of the Parliament, (4 & 
S Feb., 1672). 

[88 pp.] 


4to. 
(7-1 X 6) 


do. 


do. 


») 


do. 


His Majestie's Most Gra- 
cious Speech to both 
Houses of Parliament, 
Saturday, March 8, 1672, 
In Answer to their 
Humble Petition and Ad- 
dress. Together with 
H.M. Proclamation. 

[2 leaves -1- 1 — 8 pp.] 


4to. 
(7ix6) 


do. 


do. 



149 — 



Date 1 Author 

i 


Short Title 


Size 


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1673 


Archbishop Boyle, Lord 


A Collection of Such of the 


i6mo. 


' Benjamin Tooke, 


Kings Inns, (E. 11.) 




Chancellor 


Orders heretofore used in 
Chancery, With such al 
terations and additions 
thereunto as Michael Lord 
Archbishop of Dublin, 
Lord Chancellor of Ire- 
land, Hath thought fit 
at present to Ordain and 
publish. For Reforming of 
several abuses in the said 
Court ; &c 

[36 pp. + 6 leaves 
Signs A — C in eights] 


(5I X 3h) 


K.P. 




1} 


St. Francis de Sales, Bishop 
of Geneva 


An Introduction to a de- 


24 mo. 


Printed and are 


E. R. McC. Dix. 




vout life : &c. With Pre- 


(5 X 2A) 


to be sold by Cashel Diocesan Liby 






face [by Henry Dodwell ?] 




Joseph Wilde. 








[T. leaf -1- Preface 3 7 leaves 












+ 1—434 PP- + 12 












leaves Collection of 












Maxims and Fables]. 








tt 


Earl of Essex 


Act of Explanation by the 


4to 


Benjamin Tooke, 


Count Phmkett. 






Lord Lieutenant and 




K.P. 






Council. 








» 


B. P., D.D. (The Right Rev. 


" More than Conqueror." 


4to 


Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 


R. B. Belshaw; Brit. 




Benjamin Parry, Bishop 


A Sermon Preach'd on 


(7l X 6) 


Mus., (4105, de 4/1.) 




of Ossory) 


the Martyrdom of King 
Charles the I., Jan. 30, 
at Christ Church, Dublin, 
before his Excellency 
Arthur Earl of Essex, 
Lord Lt. General & 
General Governor of the 
Kingdom of Ireland. 

[2 leaves + 38 pp.] 









— ISO — 



Date 



Author 



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1673 



' A Person of Honor ' 



Edward (WoUey), Bishop 
of Clonfert, &c. 



Charles II 



do 



Instructions for Collecting 
Customs in Ireland. 



A Narrative, and an Ac- 
compt Concerning the 
Hospital on OxmantoW7i- 
Green, Dublin, contain- 
ing the sums of money 
(and by whom given), &c. 

[7 leaves + i — 58 pp.] 



A Protestant Antidote 
against Popery ; With a 
Brief Discourse of the 
great Atheisticalness & 
vain Amours now in 
Fashion, &c. 

[i— 180 pp.] 



Altare evangelicum ; A Ser- 
mon preached at Christ 
Church, in Dublin, on the 
27th of April, &c., &c. 



[36 pp.] 



Proclamation for the Sup- 
pression of Popery. 



His Majestie's Gracious 
Speech, Together with 
the Lord Keepers, to both 
Houses of Parliament, 
Jan. 7, 1673/4 

[8 pp.] 



8vo. 



Fol. 
(7l X 51) 



4m o. 
(5i X =1) 



4to 

{r's X si) 



sh. 



4to. 
I X 6) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K,P. 



Printed, And are 
to be sold by 
Joseph Wilde. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Benjamin Tooke 
K.P. 



do 



Vide Austin Cooper's 
Sale Catalogue, No. 
679 (in Nat. Liby.) 



Sir J. T. Gilbert; R. I. A. 
/H.T.86/i5(8^x6i), 
8 leaves x i — 56 pp ; 
Kings Inns, (505) ; 
T.C.D., (V.KK. 39 & 
RR.pp.3);LoughFea 
(Sm. 4to) ; Bodleian 
(Gough London, 203); 
Brit. Mus. (4to) 8282 
b. 13. 



Bodleian (8vo); T.C.D. 
(V. 00. 67.) (Folds in 
si.xes) 



T.C.D., (R.R, nn. 21/5 



Kings Inns, (553.) 



Kings Inns (553.) 



— 151 



Date 



Autho 



[1673] 



1673 



Saml. Mather, M.A. 



Rhurl Titlt 



Size 



Owner or Reference 



Michael 
omath 



Harward, Phil- 



Charles II. 



An Essay upon the ad- \ 4to 
vancement of trade in 
Ireland. 



Brit. Mils., 1029 e. 1 1 (i) 



The Letter sent by the 
States General of the 
United Provinces of the 
Low Countries to His 
Majesty, By their Trum- 
peter ; Together with His 
Majesty's Answer to the 
said letter, translated out 
of French into English. 

[8 pp.] 



Fol. 
i&i X 6) 



Benjamin Tooke 
K.P. 



Kings Inns, (553.] 



I'he Figures or Types of 4to 
the Old Testament ex- 
plained and improved in 
sundry Sermons. 



The Herd's-man's Mate ; or ' 8vo. 
a guide for herdsmen, ;(5i ^ 3 
teaching them how to 
cure all diseases in bulls, 
oxen cows & calves, &c. 



I'uie Lowndes, p. 15 14 



Benjamin Tooke, j Brit. Mus. (779, b. 12.) 
K.P. 



[4 leaves x 122 pp.] 



His Majesties Most Graci- 
ous Speech Together with ( 
the Lord Chancellors to \ 
both Houses of Parlia- 
ment, on Monday, Octo- 
ber 27, 1673. 

[8 pp.] 



4to 



6) 



do 



Kings Inns, (553). 



— 152 



Date 



1673 



Charles II. 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



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Speech to both Houses 
of Parliament at their 
Prorogation November 
4. 1673. 

[4 PP-] 



Fol. 
(9 X 6) 



Benjamin Tooke, Kings Inns, (553). 
K.P. 



153 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



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1674 



Andrew Sail 



Edward Stillingfleet, D.D., 
Chaplain in Ordinary to 
His Majestie 



Charles II 



do. 



A Sermon preached at | Svo 
Christ Church in Dublin ' (5I x 3I) 
before the Lord Lieu- 
tenant & Council the 5th 
July 1674 I 

(Recantation Sermon) 

[20 leaves + i — 1 20 pp.] 



A Sermon preached Nov. V. 4to 
1673 at St. Margarets, (7^Sx 6^) 
Westminster. 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



[28 pp.] 



Proclamation 
(3rd Feby. 1674/5) 



s. sh. 



do. 



do 



His Majesty's Declaration 
for enforcing a late order 
made in Council 

[4 PP-] 



Fol. 
85x6) 



do. 



A Treaty Marine between Fol. 
the Most Serene and (&} x 6) 
Mighty Prince Chas. II 
* * * & the Jlig/i and 
Mighty Lords : the States 
General of the United 
Netherlands To be ob- 
served throughout all and 
every Countreys, &c., Con- 
cluded at London the 
First day of December 
1674 S.V. 

[8 pp.] 



do 



E. R. McC. Dix ; 
T.C.D., (EE. 00. 86); 
M. Dorey ; Marsh's, 
(T 3- S- IS-) 



T.C D., (P. dd. 9. &c.) 



Kings Inns, (553.) 



Kings Inns, (553 ) 



Cashel Diocesan Liby.; 
Kings Inns, (553.) 



154 — 



Date 



Author 



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Size 



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1674 



Stanley Starkey (or Starkie) " Upon the death of the 
" Hon. &c. Sir Edward 
" Massie &c " An Elegy 



[78 lines with Epitaph (2 
lines) in Black Letter.] 



The Lord Lieutenant 
(Essex) and Council 



A True and perfect account 
of the miraculous Sea 
Monster ; or wonderful 
Fish lately taken, &c. 

N.B. — This item is uncer- 
tain and only conjectured 
to be Dublin printed 



Anthologia Latina ; sive 
Epigrammatum Poema- 
tum que Latinorum Flori- 
legium. Ex Priori bus 
(praecipue) Veterum Mo- 
numentis * * in Usum 
Scholae inclytae Civitatis 
Dublinii. 
[A — M in fours & Errata.] 



Proclamation for raising 
money. Dated, 1 5 Feby. , 
1674 

[52 pp.] 



s. sh. 
(16 X 11) 



Brit. Mus. 807, g. 5.(8). 



4to 



sm. 8vo. 



Fol. 



Typis Regiis, et 
venum dantur 
apud Josephum 
Wilde. 



Brit, Mus. (1257, d. 15.) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Vide Hazlitt, Third 
Series, 2nd Supple- 
ment (1892) p. 28. 



T.C.D. (Press B. 6.21) 



155 — 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1675 



Andw. (Andrew) Sail, S.T.P.. 
D.D., Chaplain to Lord 
Lieut. 



Revd. Thomas Tonge., S.S. 
Theologiae Doctorem 



^ 



A Sermon Preached at 
Christ-Church in Dublin 
Before the Lord Lieu- 
tenant and Council The 
Fifth of July, 1674, with a 
Declaration made in St. 
John's Church in Cashel, 
before the Archbishop of 
that Province ; And a Pre- 
/aci^shewingtheReasonsfor 
deserting the Communion 
of the Ro7na7i C/iu?-ch, 
and embracing that of the 
Chmh of England. 

[16 leaves + i -120 pp.] 
(Folds in fours chiefly) 
N.B. — This is a second 
issue with a new title page 



Meditationes ETKTHPIAI 
<t EYXAPISTAI Quibus 
eEnPlAl Theologicae 
Reducuntur in Ilpafij' 



[12 leaves + i - 144 
Folds in sixes 



PP'l 



The Wish, being the Tenth 
Satyr of Juvenal peraphras- 
tically rendered in Pin- 
darick verse By a person 
Sometime fellow of Trinity 
College, Dublin 

[2 leaves + i - 38 pp.] 



Svo 
3iV) 



Benjamin Tooke, 
K.P. 



Incorporated Law So- 
ciety, London (Mind- 
ham Tracts) ; Lough 
Fea; E. R. McC. 
Dix; Bodleian (Svo); 
Lambeth ; Christ Ch. 
Coll., Oxford; Sir J. 
Gilbert; R. R. Bel- 
shaw. 



24mo 

(5 X 4) 



Fol. 
(7|x 



Et prostant vaen 
ales apud Jose- 
phum Wilde 



T.C.D., DD. h. 
(Folds in sixes) 



13 



Benjamin Tooke. 
K.P. 



T.C.D., (P. hh. 18) ; 
Sir J. T. Gilbert ; E. 
R. M'C. Dix. 



- 156- 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1675 Charles II. 



I 



His Majesties Gracious Fol. \ Benjamin Tooke, 
Speech together with the (8| x 6) K.P. 

Lord Keepers to Both 
Houses of Parliament Ap- 
ril 13, 1675. 

[8 pp.] 



King's Inns, (553). 



do 



Speech at Prorogation 9 Fol 



June, 1675 

[4 pp.] 



(9|x5l), 



do 



do. 



APPENDIX. 



ADDITIONS TO PARTS I & II 



Date 



Author 



Short Title 



Size 



Printer 



Owner or Reference 



1603 I The Lord Deputy & Council i A Proclamation regulating 

Standard of coin 



1612 Sir James Carroll, INIayor 



1613 



1633 



1634 ' Charles I. 



1640 



1416 



1642 



1648 

(or 

1647) 



Nicholas Bernard 



Proclamation 



Proclamation regulating 
wages 



Newfoundland. A Short 
Discourse containing 
Reasons and Inducements 
for planting that Country 



Decree (dated 4 Augt. , 1 5 2 7 , 
as to fees to be charged by 
King at Arms at Funerals 

Mr. Speaker. — His Speech 
to His Majestie. In * * 
Parliament, the ' fifth of 
November, 1640 



A Message from a Com- 
mittee of both Houses * * 
to the Spanish Ambassa- 
dor, whereunto is added 
the Spanish Ambassador's 
answer 

The Whole Proceedings of 
the Siege of Droghedah, in 
Ireland, &c., &c. 

(First Edition) 



The Humble Petition of us 
the Parliaments Poore 
Soldiers in the Army of 
Ireland whereof the many 
are starved already and 
many dead for want of 
Chirurgeons. 



s.sh 

(iSi X 
Hi) 

s.sh 
(29 X 

2 shs. 



4to 



i.sh 



4to 



4to 



4to 



John Franckton 
(St. Patrick Street) 



John Franckton, 
K.P. 



do. 



W. B. 



Brit. Mus. (Lansdowne 
MSB. 159) 



do. 



do. 



Vide Lowndes, p. 1666. 



Authority, Mr. N. 
Massey 



E. R. McC. Dix 



Brit. Mus., (8122 c.) 



J^ide Harris's Ware's 
' Writers,' p. 342. 



Authority, Mr. Grattan 
Flood. 



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES. 



As pointed out before there are works coming within the period of this Part that bear 
no imprint but which may have been printed in Dublin. Such are some of the works of the 
Revd. Peter Walsh, z'.^. — A Letter to the Marquis of Ormonde in 1660 "desiring a full and 
merciful regard of the Roman Catholics of Ireland," single sheet, folio. Also, " A Letter to 
the Catholics of England, Ireland, &c.," 1674. I might also mention in this connection a i2mo. 
work published in 1627 entitled " A Briefe Confutation of Certain . . Doctrines delivered by 
Mr. James Usher, etc., etc." The author given is " Paulus Veridicus.'' I have seen the copy 
in possession of Mr. R. R. Belshaw, who mentioned that, though the place of publication is 
given as " St. Oraers," yet so eminent an authority as the late Sir J. T. Gilbert was of opinion 
it was printed in Dublin. This seems so also judging from the type and headpieces. 



There are occasionally to be met with in sale catalogues brief titles of early works, or 
editions, ascribed to Dublin. These are generally very doubtful. The year, etc., may be 
merely a printer's error. I have not usually noted such, awaiting their confirmation from other 
sources, in case they should so prove accurate. In one catalogue, however, of J. C. Hotten, 
appearing in 1862, Part XXXVIII. , I lately noted (at No. 470) a Dublin edition of Temple's 
Irish Rebellion of the year 1643. It is given as the jirst edition, and is followed in the 
catalogue by the well-known London edition of 1646. I have never heard before of this Dublin 
edition, but as it is given more particularly than usual I mention it here to draw attention to 
it, and await some confirmation of it. 



In Taylor's " History of Trinity College, Dublin, there is mention made of editions of 
three of Usher's works (1627, 1629, and 1630), earlier than is recorded anywhere else or that I 
have hitherto traced. 



An original copy of the Dublin edition of " Articles of Agreement, &c.," printed in 1647, 
has lately been found by me in the still uncatalogued part of the Joly Collection in the 
National Library, Dublin. It is so far the only one known. 



In Lord Edmund Fitzmaurice's '' Life of Sir Wm. Petty " (1895) it is stated in a footnote 
at p. 90 that Petty 's " A Brief Account of the Most Material Passages relating to the Survey " 
^zs. published in Dublin in 1659 and his " Reflections on some Persons and Things in Ireland " 
in 1660, but I have not so far met these editions or any other reference to them. The 
" Reflections, etc." were published in London in 1660. 

E. R. McC. DIX. 



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