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Full text of "Catalogue of the eleventh annual session of Lincoln Normal University, Marion, Alabama : 1883-84"

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CATALOGUE 



-OF ti ie- 



KLEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF — 






MARION, ALABAMA, 



1883-84. 



MARION, ALA. : 

M AH ION STANDARD JOB PRINT. 

1884. 



c ■■ 

u C 



I % f 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



Capt. C. W. LOVELACE, President and Treasurer. 
Hon. J. T. HARRIS, Secretary. 
P. T. HURT, Esq., Auditor. 

Hon. PORTER KING, 

Rev. W. H. McALPINE, 

Hon. J. C, MARDIS. 



^f FACULTY!^ 



WILLIAM B. PATERSON, President, 
Mental Science, Mathematics, and Pedagogic*. 



ETHAN A. MILES, 
Ancient Languages, Natural Science, and Elocution. 



Miss JOIE STEWART, 
Vocal and Instrumental Music, and Penmanship. 



Miss CAN DACE BURROUGHS, 
Grammar, History, Composition and Rhetoric. 



Mrs. MARGARET B. PATERSON, 

Grammar, Composition and Arithmetic. 

(last two months.) 



Miss MYRA H. PRICE, 
Teacher Intermediate Department. 



Miss HESSIE SHERRILL, 
Teacher Primary Department. 



Miss CANDACE BURROUGHS. 
Superintendent of Girls' 1 Industrial Department. 



HANNIBAL DAYIS, 
Superintendent of Mechanical Department. 



-M 



^ALVXS^l 



UNIVERSITY COURSE. 

1881. 

Burwell, C'iias. A Felix, Perry Co., Ala. 

Wilson, John W Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

1882. 

Beverly, John W Greensboro, Hale Co., Ala. 

Moore, Marshall J Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

1 883. 

Hudson, Rufus R Uniontown. Perry Co., Ala. 

Parish, Hattie R Marion, Perry Co. , Ala. 

1884. 
Parish, P. J Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

NORMAL COURSE. 

1880. 

Baptist, Sarah H Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Curtis, Henrietta H Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

DeYampert, Emory A . . Perryville, Pern Co., Ala. 

Koyton, Abner C Summeifielcl, Dallas Co., Ala. 

Washington, Joshua F Selma, Dallas Co., Ala. 

Watson , Clara A . . , Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

1881. 

Crecy, Mary F Greensboro, Hale Co., Ala. 

Gooden. John J Livingston. Sumter Co., Ala. 

Howard, John H Autaugaville, Autauga Co., Ala. 

Gooden, Susie I. (Jordan) Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Moore, Agnes V. (McLean) Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Sullivan, Wilburt F Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

1882. 

Berry, Louisa M Uniontown, Perry Co., Ala. 

Freeman, Nannie W Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Jordan, Mary D Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Simmons, Junius S Greensboro, Hale Co., Ala. 

Webb, Ellen A Greensboro. Hale Co., Ala. 

Webb, Bettie H Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Williams, Alice H Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 



188.-J. 

Alexander, Philip C Summerfield , Dallas Co., A la. 

Bayloe, John A Macon Station, Hale Co., Ala. 

Dunlap, Eugenia C West Point, Miss. 

Frazter, Samuel F Pine Level, Montgomery Co., Ala. 

Gordon, Thomas R Camden, Wilcox Co., Ala. 

Jones, Edward M Stoneville, Miss. 

Lyons, John C Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Siminuton, Mary L Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Simmons, Israel L Laneville, Hale Co., Ala. 

1884. 

Beverly, Carter C Greensboro, Hale Co., Ala. 

Collins, Wilson H Gallion, Hale Co., Ala. 

(<>x way, Mary Lou Gallion, Hale Co., Ala. 

Gildersleeve, Sallte M Clay Hill, Marengo Co., Ala. 

Huckabee, Benjamin E Greensboro, Hale Co., Ala. 

Nelson, Lizzie E Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 

Philen, James W Lower Peach Tree, Wilcox Co., Ala. 

Tarrant, Lucy A Marion, Perry Co., Ala. 



SUMMARY OF GRADUATES. 



Class. 



Normal 





Males. 


Females 


URSE,— 1881, 


o 





— 1882, 


2 





—1883, 


1 


1 


—1884, 


1 





—1830, 


3 


3 


—1881, 


3 


3 


—1882, 


1 


6 


—1883, 


7 


2 


—1884, 


4 


4 



24 



10 



Total. 

2 
2 
2 
1 
G 


ry 
I 

9 

8 

43 



Classification of Students. 



A — UNIVERSITY. 

Name. Residence. 

Parish, Pleasant J Marion, Ala. 

]{ — UNIVERSITY. 
Hcjckabee, Benjamin E Greensboro, Ala. 

A — NORMAL. 

Bates, Gertrude Marion, Ala. 

Baldwin, Mary Marion, Ala. 

Beverly, Carter G Greensboro, Ala. 

BRAME, .1 DLIA Marion, Ala. 

Conway, Mary Lou Macon Station. Ala. 

COLLINS, Wilson H Macon Station, A'a. 

Dale, Mattie Marion. Ala. 

Gildersleeve. Sallie Choctaw < orner, A la. 

Hinton, Rebecca Marion, Ala. 

Holmes, Alfred S Marion, Ala. 

Jones, Cornelia Marion. Ala. 

Nelson, Lizzie Marion, Ala. 

Parish, Guilford L Marion, A la. 

Perky, Lie Marion. Ala. 

Philen, James W Lower Peach Tree, Ala. 

Steadman, John M Lower Peach Tie.-. Ala. 

Tarrant, Lucy Marion. A la. 

Reid, Julia Marion. Ala. 

Wyatt. Henry Marion. A la. 

i: — NORMAL. 

Bilbrue, Alice Marion, Ala. 

Brown, Nora Sumterville. Ala. 

Brown, Daniel W Sumterville, Ala. 

Brooks, Allie L Marion, A la. 

Callaway. Jcanita Montgomery , Ala. 

Frazier. Mattie Pine Level, Ala. 

ft - = =^ 



Frost, A Bednego Newberne, Ala. 

I In. i.. IIattie J Greensboro, Ala. 

Houser, Ei.i .1 Prattville, Ala. 

Holly, Columbus C Marion, Ala. 

Humble, B. J Mount Hope, Ala. 

Johnson. Horace K Greensboro, Ala. 

Jeffries, John B Maeon Station. Ala. 

Jones. Bettie Marion. Ala. 

King, Paroi.ee Marion. Ala. 

Lee, X. L Choctaw Corner, Ala. 

Lewis. B. L Marion, Ala. 

McGee, Charles W Marion, Ala. 

McCord, C. A Hayneville, Ala. 

Moore, Laura Marion. Ala. 

N ei. son . Osborne A Marion. Ala. 

Parker. Jared F Coffeeville, Ala. 

Parker. Joseph C Coffeeville, Ala. 

Plump, Allen Forkland. Ala. 

Peterson. Emma Marion. Ala. 

Pearson. Cato H Forkland, Ala. 

Rissell, George D Lower Peach Tree, Ala. 

Reid, Richard L . . .Marion, Ala. 

Sterrs, Willis E Montgomery, Ala. 

Snead, Bettie Forkland, Ala. 

Tutt, Florence Marion, Ala. 

Tate, John W Allenton, Ala. 

Walthall. Mittie Marion. Ala. 

W atkins, Carter Hillsboro, Ala. 

W atkins, Francis L Montgomery, Ala. 

Walthall. D. B Newberne, Ala. 

Watson. Jane Marion, Ala. 

Wilson, Maggie Marion, Ala. 

C NORMAL. 

Del Lay. Willa Forkland, Ala. 

Evans, Cally J Uniontown, Ala. 

Lewis. Wiley X Fniontown, Ala. 

Malloky Fannie ... .Epes, Ala. 

Norwood, Simon Peter Foi kland, Ala. 

Robertson, Lawreni e : Clinton, Ala. 

Sledge, M. F Pleasant Ridge, Ala. 

C^ -- - ' = =45 



Tiddle, W. A Marion, Ala. 

Underwood, Henderson J Marion, Ala. 

Whitman, J. E Marion, Ala. 

Willis, George E Gallion, Ala. 

P — NORMAL. 

Brown, Mary Brown's Station, Ala. 

Brow?;, Charles J Lower Peach Tree, Ala. 

Brown, Charles B Lowndesboro, Ala. 

Carson, Jennie Hayneville, Ala. 

( kawford, David Lower Peach Tree, Ala. 

Child, Nellie Marion, Ala. 

Dale, Ellis Marion, Ala. 

Davidson , A. R Wood's Bluff, Ala. 

Davis, Henry T Choctaw Corner, Ala. 

Fowlkes. Benjamin Marion, Ala. 

Goree, Isaiah Marion, Ala. 

Hargrow, Henry Brown's Station, Ala. 

Harrison, Sallie Marion, Ala. 

Harper, Alberta Choctaw Corner, Ala. 

Harris, Roxanna Marion, Ala. 

Hamilton, Annie Forkland, Ala. 

Jordan, Margaret Marion, Ala. 

James, Charles Boligee. Ala. 

Jackson, Vicy Forkland, Ala, 

Lipscomb, Matilda Marion, Ala. 

Lankster. Millie Thompson's Station, Ala. 

Lyons, Lewis A Montgomery, Ala. 

Lewis, E. A Montgomery, Ala. 

McCord, Juda Hayneville, Ala. 

McCord , Jennie Hayneville , Ala. 

Moore, Sterling Marion, Ala. 

Patton, Willie Ann Marion, Ala. 

Parker, James Marion, Ala. 

Parish, Arabelle Marion, Ala. 

Rivers, Bennett J Marion, Ala. 

Rivers, William S Marion, Ala. 

Simington, Alfred Marion, Ala. 

Stallworth, II. B Marion, Ala. 

Tarrant, John Marion, Ala. 



rev 



Walker, Grant Marion, Ala. 

Wvatt, Alfred Marion, Ala. 

Ward, Chloe 1? Newbern, Ala. 

A — INTERMEDIATE . 

Banks, E. L Uniontown, Ala. 

Brown, Sarah Eutaw, Ala. 

Davis. Willie Marion, Ala. 

Greenword, James Lauderdale, Miss. 

Goree, Susie Marion. Ala. 

Jones, Florence Mai ion , Ala. 

Jones, Charlie Marion, Ala. 

Jordan, Hattie Marion, Ala. 

Jordan, Creacy Marion, Ala. 

Lapsley, Alice Marion, Ala. 

Lapsley, Eliza Marion, Ala. 

Lewis, Alfred Marion, Ala. 

Murray, Joseph Hamburg, Ala, 

Martin, Hattie Marion. Ala. 

Moore, Claudie J Marion, Ala. 

Minor, John Burton Hill, Ala. 

Nelson, Mary Willis Marion, Ala. 

Plump, Nancy Forkland, Ala. 

Robertson, Eddie Scott's Station, Ala. 

Rutledge, William Radfordville, Ala. 

Speed, Alberta Marion, Ala. 

Tanzy, Mary Marion, Ala. 

White, Sherman Marion, Ala. 

Whitman, Andrew Marion, Ala. 

Webb, Henry Marion, Ala. 

B — INTERMEDIATE. 

Ames, James Marion, Ala, 

Bates, David Marion. Ala. 

Billingsley, Marttn Marion, Ala. 

Benjamin, Louvenia Marion, Ala. 

Benjamin, Mahala Marion, Ala. 

Child, Mattie Marion, Ala. 

Collins, David Laneville, Ala. 

Collins, Arabella Laneville, Ala. 

Curry, Carrie Marion, Ala. 



Curry, James Marion, Ala. 

Cole, Eli Marion, Ala. 

Fisher, Alfred C Clifton, Ala. 

(i \i:kott, Emma Marion, Ala. 

Hill, Etta ." Greensboro , Ala. 

Hendricks, Katie Cahaba, Ala. 

Hubbard, Missouri Marion, Ala. 

Jones, Mary Marion, Ala. 

Jones, John Indian Branch, Ala. 

Jones, Rosa Marion, Ala. 

Key, Leona China Grove, Ala. 

Levert, Phillis Marion, Ala. 

Lowky, Brutus Marion, Ala. 

Matthews, Rebecca Tinela, Ala. 

Mc Linney, Abram Marion, Ala. 

Oliver, Eliza Marion, Ala. 

Pearson, Henry Forkland, Ala. 

Parker, Annie Marion, Ala. 

Robinson, Archie, Lower Peach Tree, Ala. 

Reid, Emma Mar'on, Ala. 

Reid , Bettie Marion, Ala. 

Reid, Vennie Marion, Ala. 

Reid, James Marion, Ala. 

Rutledge, Ferdinand Radfordville, Ala. 

Smith, Willie Marion, Ala. 

Spencer Rhoda ... Hamburg, Ala. 

Tabb, Margaret Marion, Ala. 

Underwood, Henry Marion, Ala. 

Ware, Sallie Marion, Ala. 

Webb, Princess Marion, Ala. 

Whitehead, Willie - Scott's Station. Ala. 



A — PREPARATORY. 

Acres, William Scott's Station, Ala. 

Acres, Amanda Scott's Station, Ala. 

Benjamin, Marinda Marion, Ala. 

Bryant. Louisa Marion, Ala. 

Billingsley, Curley Marion, Ala. 

Baker, Parolee Marion, Ada. 



LINCOLN NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 11 



Brand. Martha Marion, Ala. 

Cheeks, Katie Marion, Ala. 

Carson, Rebecca Marion, Ala. 

Calvin, Eli Marion, Ala. 

Davis, Willie Marion, Ala. 

Foster, M.vttie Marion, Ala. 

Goree, James Marion, Ala. 

Goree, Lucius Marion, Ala. 

Givhan, Hattie '. . . Marion, Ala. 

Hubbard, Thomas Marion, Ala. 

Hubbard, Willie Marion, Ala. 

Hill, Margaret Marion, Ala. 

Jones, Emma Marion, Ala. 

Jemison, Eliza • Marion, Ala. 

Knight, Maria Marion, Ala. 

King, Ella Marion, Ala. 

Lee, Irving Marion, Ala. 

Lipscomb, Joseph Marion, Ala. 

Lowry, Robert Marion, Ala. 

Lawson, William Marion, Ala. 

Levert, Jackson Marion, Ala. 

McLinney, Mary Marion, Ala. 

Moore, Charnissa Marion, Ala. 

Moore, Walter Marion, Ala. 

Martin* Lizzie Marion, Ala. 

Nickerson, Mary Marion, Ala, 

Peyton, Katie Marion, Ala.. 

Phillips. William Marion, Ala. 

Smith, Ella Marion, Ala, 

Sutlers, Jane Marion, Ala. 

Thomas, John Marion, Ala. 

Tarrant, Carrie Marion, Ala. 

Tarrant, David Marion, Ala. 

Tarrant, Joseph Marion, Ala. 

Ware, Young Marion, Ala. 

Wilite, William Marion, Ala. 

B — PREPARATORY. 

Cheeks, Phenix Marion, Ala. 

Curry, Ruth Marion, Ala. 



«*-- 



Cole, Delia Marion, Ala. 

Gtvhan, Mamie Marion, Ala. 

Hi i J,, Thomas Marion, Ala. 

IItnley, Henry Marion, Ala. 

Jones, Lucinda Marion, Ala. 

Jones, Mattie Marion, Ala. 

Lewis, Mrs La Fayette, Ala. 

Lockett, Bessie Marion, Ala. 

Lockett, Nancy Marion, Ala. 

Moore. Maggie Marion, Ala. 

Moore. Esther Marion, Ala. 

Moore, Jimmie Marion, Ala. 

Napier, Mary Paunsdale, Ala. 

Napier, Ida Faunsdale, Ala. 

Peck, Sarah Fort Dodge, Kan. 

Revels, Gussie . .Marion, Ala. 

Speed, Hattie Marion, Ala. 

Speed, Josephine Marion, Ala. 

Smith, Grant Marion, Ala. 

Scott, Annie Marion, Ala. 

Tutt, Maggie Marion, Ala. 

Tarrant, Sudie Marion, Ala. 

Underwood, Bennie Marion, Ala. 

Underwood, Augusta Marion, Ala. 

White, Mary Ann Marion, Ala. 

White, Delia Forklanrl, Ala. 

Wilson, George Marion, Ala. 

Wilson, Alabama Marion, Ala. 

Wilson, Louisiana Marion. Ala. 

Wood, Mattie ' Marion, A la. 

Wood, Callie : Marion, Ala. 



Ik - ^ 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 



Class. 

A — University, 
B — University, 
A — Normal, 
r> — Normal, 
C — Normal,' 
D — Normal, 
A — Intermediate, 
B — Intermediate, 
A — Preparatory, 
B- -Preparatory, 



Males. 

1 

1 

7 
22 

8 
20 
12 
10 
18 

5 



Students in University Department, 
" " Normal 

- ' " Intermediate 

" " Preparatory 

" " Model School 

Total, 



Females. 




Total 







1 







1 


12 




19 


18 




40 


8 




16 


17 




37 


13 




25 


24 




40 


24 




42 


29 




34 


rMENT, 

i 

i 

i 
i 


2 

112 
65 

76 

48 





303 




=41 




Course of Study. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 



B CLASS. 

Third Reader, 

Arithmetic, (to Substraction.) 

Spelling, 

Language, 

Writing, 

Geography, 



A CLASS. 

Fourth Header. 

Arithmetic, (to Division.) 

Spelling, 

Language, 

Writing, 

Geography. 



INTERMEDIATE DEPA HTM EXT. 



B CLASS. 

Fifth Reader, 

Arithmetic, to (Fractions.) 

Spelling, 

Language, 

Writing, 

Geography, 



.V CLASS. 

Fifth Reader, 

Arithmetic, (to Denom. Numbers.) 

Spelling, 

Elementary Grammmar, 

Writing, 

Geography. 



XORMAL DEPARTMENT, 



D CLASS. 

Arithmetic, (to Ratio.) 
Elementary Science, 
History of United States, 
Grammar, 



c CLASS. 
Arithmetic, (completed. ) 
Physiology, (first term.) 
Civil Government, (second term. ) 
Grammar. 



Composition and Essays on U. S. Composition and Essays on English 



History. 



History. 




1! CLASS. A CLASS. 

Algebra, Geometry, 

Physical Geography, (first term.) Chemistry, (first term.) 

Natural Philosophy, (second term.) Botany, (second term.) 

Latin, (optional,) Reader and Latin, (optional,) Caesar. 

Grammar, Theory and Practice of Teaching, 

Elocution, Elocution and Literature, 

Rhetoric and Essays on Grecian Rhetoric and Essays on Roman His- 

Historv. tory. 

UNIVERSITY DEPA RTMENT. 



P. CI, ASS. 



A CLASS. 



Latin — Cicero's Orations and Vir- Greek — Anabasis, or German, 



-il. 
(ireek — Reader and Grammar, or 

French, 
Higher Arithmetic, (first term. » 
Higher Algebra, (second term,) 
Moral Philosophy, (first term,) 
Political Economy, (second term.) 



Geology, (first term,) 
Astronomy, (second term,) 
Mental Philosophy, (first term, 
Logic (second term,) 
English Literature. 



Classes in Penmanship are organized for all students of the Normal 
Department. 

Vocal Music is also taught to the above students during the entire 
session. 

Instruction is also given free to a limited number upon the Piano 
and Organ , but such students are required to pay five dollars in ad- 
vance for the use oi the instrument during the session. 

Better advantages for study and drill in Vocal and Instrumental 
Music are not to be found anywhere in the State. 



^ 



CALENDAR. 



1884-85. 

The year begins September 29th, 18S4, and ends June 17th, 1885. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written Examinations at close of First Term, February 3rd to 7th, 

1885. 

Written Examinations at close of the year, June 8th to 12th, 1885. 

ANNIVERSARIES. 

1885. 
Model School Exhibition, Friday, May 1st, 8 P. M. 
Preparatory Exhibition, Friday, May 15th, 8 P. M. 
Intermediate Exhibition, Friday May 29th, 8 P. M. 
Society Exhibition, Friday, June 12th, 8 P. M. 
Commencement Sermon, Sunday, June 14th, 11 A. M. 
Prize Declamations, Monday, June 15th, 8 P. M. 
Alumni Reunion, Tuesday, June 16th.. 10 A, M. 
Grand Concert, Tuesday, June 16th, 8 P. M. 
Graduating Exercises, Wednesday, June 17th, 10 A. M. 
Reception, Wednesday, June 17th, 8 P. M. 



m 

LINCOLN NORMAL UNIVERSITY. IV 



Q^FACULTY FOR 1884-85^50 



WILLIAM B. PATERSON, President, 
Mental Science, Mathematics, and Pedagogics. 

THOMAS DUNCAN, 
Ancient Languages and Natural Science, and Elocution. 

Miss JOIE STEWART, 
Grammar, History, Composition and Rhetoric. 

Miss HATTIE M. SILSBY, 
Piano, Organ, and Vocal Music. 

Mrss MYRA H. PRICE, 
Teacher of Intermediate Department. 

Miss FLORENCE JAOKMAX, 
Teacher of Preparatory Department. 

Miss MARY BOWEN, 
Methods, and Principal of Model School. 

Miss CANDACE BURROUGHS. 
Superintendent of Girls' Industrial Department. 

Z. T. SPENCER, 
Mechanical Drawing, and Superintendent of Boys'' Industrial 

Department. 



Si-; ( ,,,■< of Agriculture, and Warm Superintendent. 



m 



General Information. 



ORIGIN OF THE SCHOOL. 
This Institution was founded in 1873 by the State of Alabama A 
school had been in operation for four years previously in the same 
building. Since 1878, when it was reorganized under its present Prin- 
cipal, there has been a marked increase in the number of students. To 
accommodate these, additional buildings have just been erected, so that 
there are now eight large recitation rooms, a music room, office, and 
two- story carpenter shop. 

OBJECTS. 

1. A Normal School. It is a Normal School for the education 
of colored teachers for the schools of the State. As such, the aim is to 
o-ive thorough instruction in the elementary branches of studv. and so 
discipline the student as to tit him for the work of teaching. We aim 
also to give, in addition to instruction, opportunities of observation 
and practice, so that graduates will go out as practical teachers. The 
Model School is used as a training school, in which the senior class find 
ample opportunities for applying practically the instruction received in 
methods of teaching. 

2. A State University. The act of the General Assembly es- 
tablishing the school provides for a "University Department, in which 
such a course of instruction shall be established as shall meet the wants 
of the colored race and provide for their education in the higher de- 
partments of learning, it being the intent and purpose of this act to 
provide for the liberal education of the colored race in the same manner 
as is already provided for the white race in our University and 
colleges." 

The Hon. John M. McEiroy, in Report as State Superintendent in 
1875, says: "The Normal School at Marion is designed to become a 
University for the colored race in the State; and it is not doubted that 
its facilities for furnishing the higher education to this race will be am- 
plified as the demand therefor becomes apparent." 



--&. 



MEMBERSHIP. 

To gain admission to the Normal Course, pupils must have good 
health, good moral character, average abilities, and be not less than 14 
years of age. They must pass such examination as will show that they 
are prepared to take up and study profitably the studies of the Course. 
Pupils are admitted into other departments at any age. 

This Institution is open to both sexes. 

DIPLOMAS. 
Those completing the course of study, training and practice in the 
school, are granted a Diploma, which, by legislative enactment, enables 
the holder to teach in the Public Schools of the State, without further 
examination. 

LOCATION. 
Marion is a city of 3,000 inhabitants, healthful and beautiful, with 
a refined and cultured people. It is easy of access, and offers induce- 
ments for board and social advantages beyond most places. It has, 
perhaps, fewer temptations to idleness and dissipation, and combines 
religious and educational privileges in a greater degree than any other 
town or city in the State. The Cincinnati, Selma & Mobile Railroad 
affords convenient access from East or West. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition to pupils who will sign an agreement 
to teach two years in the Public Schools of the State after leaving the 
school. 

Board, including washing, lights, fuel, etc., may be obtained in 
private families at eight dollars per month. 

There is a Boarding Hall for young men, which is admirably man- 
aged bv a competent matron, and board is furnished at seven dollars 
per month. All young men will board here unless special arrangement 
is made otherwise, and approved by the President. 

Ladies will board in private families, under the following rules: 

1. They must board only at places endorsed by the President, and 
must consult him before selecting a place. 

2. They will not be allowed to board in the same house with young 
men, except in the case of brothers and sisters. 

3. Boarders will not absent themselves from their boarding places 
in the evening without permission from the President. Permission to 



attend suitable places at suitable times will always be granted to pupils 
who are doing well in their studies, but school and its requirements 
must be first. 

4. Pupils may receive calls only on Saturday evening from 5 to 8 
o'clock. 

5. All parties who keep boarders must exercise such supervision 
over the pupils as will secure a compliance with the spirit and inten- 
tion of the rules of the school. Pupils will not be allowed to continue 
to board where such supervision is not maintained, or where the re- 
quirements of the school are in any way disregarded. 

During the past five years our boarding arrangements have given 
the highest satisfaction. Pupils have all of the conveniences and com- 
forts of a home, and these at a cost much lower than in the majority of 
schools. 

It is proposed to erect a suitable Boarding Hall to accommodate all 
the students, and it may be done before the close of next session. 

TOTAL EXPENSES. 
The total cost to any student for board, washing, lights, fuel, 
books, etc., need not exceed seventy-five dollars per year, or less 
than nine dollars per month. When the high grade and thoroughness, 
and the social advantages of the school are considered, it will be seen 
that parents cannot find a cheaper school anywhere. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The instruction and discipline of the school aim at developing the 
moral principles, improving the manners, and forming the habits of the 
pupils. The principles of honor and truth are appealed to as the great 
regulators of conduct, and every one is trusted as long as he is found 
worthy. The important habits of punctuality, regularity and precision, 
are cultivated by the arrangements and requisitions of the school; and 
its graduates go forth not only with a careful training in the Arts and 
Sciences, but with things of still greater value; with minds sufficiently 
cultivated in various ways to enable them to comprehend easily the 
new duties upon which they enter; with good habits to gain the con- 
fidence of others, and with good manners to win the favor of those 
with whom they come in contact. 

In a Normal School there should be no need of referring to the 
matter of discipline. Only those should enter who are disposed to 
submit willingly and cheerfully to all the wholesome restraints found 
necessary for the good working and reputation of the school. 



&= 



We arc, in a measure, responsible to the State for the character 
ana acquirements of each student graduated from this school. We are 
therefore compelled to exercise the most rigid scrutiny in reference to 
both of these; and pupils will be dismissed whenever we become con- 
vinced that they are not suitable persons to enter the profession of 
teaching. 

NON-SECTARIAN. 

The School is without sectarian or other bias. Pour religious de- 
nominations, the Baptist, the Congregational, the Methodist and the 
Presbyterian, are represented in the Faculty. The Methodist denomi- 
nation is largely represented among the students. There are three 
churches, the Baptist, the Congregational, and the Methodist, which 
the students can attend. These churches have good pastors, who man- 
ifest a lively interest in the school, and welcome the students to church 
and Sabbath school. Students are required to attend church and Sab- 
bath school. 

APPARATUS. 

The School is furnished with musical instruments, a fine set of 
Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus, Cutter's Physiological Charts, 
Cornell's Maps, and Dr. Mason's Musical Charts. There is also a library 
of Dictionaries, Books of Reference, and Miscellaneous Books, to which 
additions are made from time to time. 

The School has recently purchased one ol Beck's Monocular Eco- 
nomic Microscopes, which is frequently used in illustrating points in 
Physiology, Zoology, etc. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Three Literary Societies, the Excelsior, Erosophic and Sumner, 
have been organized for the purpose of mutual improvement by means 
of Select Readings, Orations, Essays and Debates. They are managed 
by the students under the supervision of the Faculty, and meet every 
Friday afternoon. 

The Union Literary Society for the whole school, and the public, 
meets every Friday night. A course of Lectures by the Faculty and 
others will be given under the auspices of this Society during the 
coming session. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of study has been so arranged that the pupils will se- 
cure a thorough and scientific knowledge not only of the common 
branches, but of the higher subjects. The arrangement follows the 




natural order of development. The correct reading, writing and speak- 
ing of the English Language is continued through the entire course and 
supplemented by a critical study of the best authors. The object in 
this department is to impart to the student a practical knowledge of 
our language; to make him acquainted with the leading facts in its 
history and etymology, and practically familiar with the laws of com- 
position and style, and to introduce him by a course of critical reading 
to the treasures embodied in its literature. 

To cultivate accuracy, readiness, and elegance of expression, all 
the classes do work in composition. In the Preparatory classes, the 
writing is preceded by '•conversations" directed by the teacher, after 
which the pupils embody, in the best style possible, the material 
gained. 

Increased attention is now given to Reading and Elocution, The 
progress in the latter during the past two years has been rather phe- 
nomenal. To give control of a well cultivated voice, and to make in- 
telligent and forcible readers and speakers, are objects constantly kept 
in view. The various elements of expression are developed and pre- 
sented in their relation to the different kinds of thought. Special care 
is taken to develop graceful and expressive action, and prominence is 
given to public speaking. 

In Mathematics, special attention is given to such a complete analy- 
sis and clear presentation of the various topics, as will peculiarly pre- 
pare the student to present them to others. In Arithmetic, the atten- 
tion of the pupil is continually directed to the practical bearings, and 
applications of the different processes. In Geometry, care is exercised 
to have the pupil critical in definition, accurate in the statement of 
propositions, and strictly logical in demonstration. 

In the Latin and Greek- Languages the most approved methods of 
instruction are adopted. A thorough drilling in the accidence and 
syntax of the language is first given, accompanied by easy translation 
and written exercises. In translation, special pains are taken to insure 
fidelity to the original with a due regard to the idiom of the English. 
The aim here is to promote in the pupil the habit of accurate thought, 
and the elegant use of his mother tongue. 

In the department of Natural Science, the design of the instruction 
is to make the pupils acquainted with the leading physical truths, to 
cultivate the faculty of observation, and to practice them in the 
methods of inductive reasoning. In Physiology, a thorough grounding 
is given in all the important facts and principles of Anatomy, Physiology 



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LINCOLN NORMAL UNIVERSITY, 



23 



and Hygiene. In Botany, the fundamental principles of the science 
are taught largely by plant analysis, and the pupil is led to a practical 
acquaintance with the forms of plant life. 

The instruction in History is intended to make the student ac- 
quainted first, with the history of onr country; next, with the chief 
tacts of general history; thus giving an outline of the development of 
human civilization and culture in literature, science and art. 

Vocal Music is one of the greatest aids within the reach of the 
teacher. It is important in giving pleasing variety and aiding disci- 
pline; it is valuable in securing pure tones and articulation: and, 
therefore, it should be universally taught, and every teacher should 
understand music. Recognizing these facts, we have made provision 
for a thorough and systematic course of instruction in this subject. 
Theory and practice will be combined, and the work made as practical 
as possible. Attention will be given to voice culture, management of 
the breath, enunciation and articulation. 

The object of a Normal Scfiool is pre-eminently the education and 
training of teachers. To accomplish this object, thorough and system- 
atic culture is given to all the faculties ot the mind: accurate instruc- 
tion in the various branches of learning: a complete knowledge of the 
principles and methods of human culture and instruction, and of or- 
ganizing, managing, and governing a school; and an opportunity to 
make available for teaching purposes, under the supervision of well 
trained, experienced teachers, all the power developed, and knowledge 
acquired, in the class room. Considerable attention is given to the 
study of the school system of the State, with practical instruction in 
the duties of the teacher in making contracts, reports, &c. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

The progressive spirit of the times demands that, in the education 
of young men and women, the practical must be held above the theo- 
retical and the useful must supersede the ornamental. The training of 
the hands and muscles with a view to practical uses in the future is 
rapidly becoming an established feature in the education of the youth 
of the present day. 

The success of our Industrial Department during the past session, 
has carried us beyond mere experiment, and demonstrated not only the 
utility but the necessity of the work. 

Two departments of this work have been fully organized and 
placed under the control of special teachers. 




In the Girls' Department, are taught plain and fancy sewing, in- 
cluding machine work, cutting and fitting dresses in the latest and 
most approved style, hat-making, trimming, &c. 

In the Mechanical Department for young men the use of the vari- 
ous tools is taught, also the drawing of plans, and making estimates, 
specifications, «fcc. 

These departments are now supported by a donation from the 
John F. Slater Fund. 

We hope to be able to add a Department of Agriculture, with 
competent Farm Superintendent, in 1885. 

TO COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS: 

As our students are required to teach two years in the Public 
Schools of the State after graduating, County Superintendents will 
confer a favor if they notify the President where good teachers are 

wanted. 

Only such teachers will be recommended, as have shown them- 
selves worthy of confidence, and who will attend strictly to their 
duties as teacher. Superintendents are warned against any who claim 
to be graduates, or to have attended this Institution, but who have no 
Diploma or Certificate. 

A certificate or recommendation is given to every worthy student 

who asks for it. 

Superintendents are urgently requested to notify the President of 
any teacher who fails to fulfil his contract or to give satisfaction. 

This Institution is an important part of the school system of Ala- 
bama, and the aid of all school officers is desired to make it as effective 
as possible. 

ATTENTION 

Is called to the following statements: 

1. Tuition is free. 

2. Instruction is thorough. 

3. The discipline is such as to lead to self-government and the 
formation of a worthy character. 

4. The pleasantest relations exist between teachers and pupils. 

5. It is important that every student should be present on the 
first day of the session. 

6. All the studies represented in the course of study are taught 
in the school. 



fe= 



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7. No student is allowed to have in his possession, or to use, to- 
bacco, fire-arms, or liquor, of any kind. 

8. The school stands on its own merits. It has been built up, 
not by advertising or canvassing, but by the. work done within its 
walls. 

9. The Faculty consists of thoroughly trained teachers, of long 
experience, who have been chosen with special reference to their re- 
spective departments. 

10. In order to reduce the expenses to the lowest possible point, 
extravagance in dress is discouraged aud forbidden, and parents are 
requested to withhold the means that their daughters would use in 
gratifying their desires in this direction, A uniform dress to be worn 
on public occasions will be adopted at the opening of next session, and 
parents should wait till informed what it will be. 

11. Money for Board, or other expenses, should always be sent to 
the President by money order or registered letter. It will be judi- 
ciously and economically expended and an itemized account sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

12. Students who are qualified can generally find schools to help 
pay their own way through the Normal , and our graduates readily get 
good positions. 

13. While not sectarian, due attention is paid to the moral and re- 
ligious training of the students. Morality, industry, and temperance 
are taught by precept and example. A Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion has been organized, and a prayer meeting is sustained by the stu- 
dents. 

For further information desired, address the President, 

WILLIAM B. PATERSON, 

Makiojs. Alabama.